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Sample records for boundary element computation

  1. Computation of Sound Propagation by Boundary Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guo, Yueping

    2005-01-01

    This report documents the development of a Boundary Element Method (BEM) code for the computation of sound propagation in uniform mean flows. The basic formulation and implementation follow the standard BEM methodology; the convective wave equation and the boundary conditions on the surfaces of the bodies in the flow are formulated into an integral equation and the method of collocation is used to discretize this equation into a matrix equation to be solved numerically. New features discussed here include the formulation of the additional terms due to the effects of the mean flow and the treatment of the numerical singularities in the implementation by the method of collocation. The effects of mean flows introduce terms in the integral equation that contain the gradients of the unknown, which is undesirable if the gradients are treated as additional unknowns, greatly increasing the sizes of the matrix equation, or if numerical differentiation is used to approximate the gradients, introducing numerical error in the computation. It is shown that these terms can be reformulated in terms of the unknown itself, making the integral equation very similar to the case without mean flows and simple for numerical implementation. To avoid asymptotic analysis in the treatment of numerical singularities in the method of collocation, as is conventionally done, we perform the surface integrations in the integral equation by using sub-triangles so that the field point never coincide with the evaluation points on the surfaces. This simplifies the formulation and greatly facilitates the implementation. To validate the method and the code, three canonic problems are studied. They are respectively the sound scattering by a sphere, the sound reflection by a plate in uniform mean flows and the sound propagation over a hump of irregular shape in uniform flows. The first two have analytical solutions and the third is solved by the method of Computational Aeroacoustics (CAA), all of which

  2. Computation of dynamic stress intensity factors using the boundary element method based on Laplace transform and regularized boundary integral equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Masataka; Nakamura, Masayuki; Aoki, Kazuhiko; Matsumoto, Toshiro

    1993-07-01

    This paper presents a computational method of dynamic stress intensity factors (DSIF) in two-dimensional problems. In order to obtain accurate numerical results of DSIF, the boundary element method based on the Laplace transform and regularized boundary integral equations is applied to the computation of transient elastodynamic responses. A computer program is newly developed for two-dimensional elastodynamics. Numerical computation of DSIF is carried out for a rectangular plate with a center crack under impact tension. Accuracy of the results is investigated from the viewpoint of computational conditions such as the number of sampling points of the inverse Laplace transform and the number of boundary elements.

  3. Computation of consistent boundary quantities in finite element thermal-fluid solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, E. A.

    1982-01-01

    The consistent boundary quantity method for computing derived quantities from finite element nodal variable solutions is investigated. The method calculates consistent, continuous boundary surface quantities such as heat fluxes, flow velocities, and surface tractions from nodal variables such as temperatures, velocity potentials, and displacements. Consistent and lumped coefficient matrix solutions for such problems are compared. The consistent approach may produce more accurate boundary quantities, but spurious oscillations may be produced in the vicinity of discontinuities. The uncoupled computations of the lumped approach provide greater flexibility in dealing with discontinuities and provide increased computational efficiency. The consistent boundary quantity approach can be applied to solution boundaries other than those with Dirichlet boundary conditions, and provides more accurate results than the customary method of differentiation of interpolation polynomials.

  4. Interactive computer graphic surface modeling of three-dimensional solid domains for boundary element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perucchio, R.; Ingraffea, A. R.

    1984-01-01

    The establishment of the boundary element method (BEM) as a valid tool for solving problems in structural mechanics and in other fields of applied physics is discussed. The development of an integrated interactive computer graphic system for the application of the BEM to three dimensional problems in elastostatics is described. The integration of interactive computer graphic techniques and the BEM takes place at the preprocessing and postprocessing stages of the analysis process, when, respectively, the data base is generated and the results are interpreted. The interactive computer graphic modeling techniques used for generating and discretizing the boundary surfaces of a solid domain are outlined.

  5. Research related to improved computer aided design software package. [comparative efficiency of finite, boundary, and hybrid element methods in elastostatics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walston, W. H., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The comparative computational efficiencies of the finite element (FEM), boundary element (BEM), and hybrid boundary element-finite element (HVFEM) analysis techniques are evaluated for representative bounded domain interior and unbounded domain exterior problems in elastostatics. Computational efficiency is carefully defined in this study as the computer time required to attain a specified level of solution accuracy. The study found the FEM superior to the BEM for the interior problem, while the reverse was true for the exterior problem. The hybrid analysis technique was found to be comparable or superior to both the FEM and BEM for both the interior and exterior problems.

  6. A computer program for the 2-D magnetostatic problem based on integral equations for the field of the conductors and boundary elements

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, G.H. )

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on the iterative design of the 2-dimensional cross section of a beam transport magnet having infinitely permeable iron boundaries which requires a fast means of computing the field of the conductors. Solutions in the form of series expansions are used for rectangular iron boundaries, and programs based on the method of images are used to simulate circular iron boundaries. A single procedure or program for dealing with an arbitrary iron boundary would be useful. The present program has been tested with rectangular and circular iron boundaries and provision has been made for the use of other curves. It uses complex contour integral equations for the field of the constant-current density conductors and complex line integrals for the field of the piecewise-linear boundary elements.

  7. Introducing the Boundary Element Method with MATLAB

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ang, Keng-Cheng

    2008-01-01

    The boundary element method provides an excellent platform for learning and teaching a computational method for solving problems in physical and engineering science. However, it is often left out in many undergraduate courses as its implementation is deemed to be difficult. This is partly due to the perception that coding the method requires…

  8. Computation of airfoil buffet boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, L. L., Jr.; Bailey, H. E.

    1981-01-01

    The ILLIAC IV computer has been programmed with an implicit, finite-difference code for solving the thin layer compressible Navier-Stokes equation. Results presented for the case of the buffet boundaries of a conventional and a supercritical airfoil section at high Reynolds numbers are found to be in agreement with experimentally determined buffet boundaries, especially at the higher freestream Mach numbers and lower lift coefficients where the onset of unsteady flows is associated with shock wave-induced boundary layer separation.

  9. Design sensitivity analysis of boundary element substructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kane, James H.; Saigal, Sunil; Gallagher, Richard H.

    1989-01-01

    The ability to reduce or condense a three-dimensional model exactly, and then iterate on this reduced size model representing the parts of the design that are allowed to change in an optimization loop is discussed. The discussion presents the results obtained from an ongoing research effort to exploit the concept of substructuring within the structural shape optimization context using a Boundary Element Analysis (BEA) formulation. The first part contains a formulation for the exact condensation of portions of the overall boundary element model designated as substructures. The use of reduced boundary element models in shape optimization requires that structural sensitivity analysis can be performed. A reduced sensitivity analysis formulation is then presented that allows for the calculation of structural response sensitivities of both the substructured (reduced) and unsubstructured parts of the model. It is shown that this approach produces significant computational economy in the design sensitivity analysis and reanalysis process by facilitating the block triangular factorization and forward reduction and backward substitution of smaller matrices. The implementatior of this formulation is discussed and timings and accuracies of representative test cases presented.

  10. Periodic Boundary Conditions in the ALEGRA Finite Element Code

    SciTech Connect

    AIDUN,JOHN B.; ROBINSON,ALLEN C.; WEATHERBY,JOE R.

    1999-11-01

    This document describes the implementation of periodic boundary conditions in the ALEGRA finite element code. ALEGRA is an arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian multi-physics code with both explicit and implicit numerical algorithms. The periodic boundary implementation requires a consistent set of boundary input sets which are used to describe virtual periodic regions. The implementation is noninvasive to the majority of the ALEGRA coding and is based on the distributed memory parallel framework in ALEGRA. The technique involves extending the ghost element concept for interprocessor boundary communications in ALEGRA to additionally support on- and off-processor periodic boundary communications. The user interface, algorithmic details and sample computations are given.

  11. Object-oriented design and implementation of CFDLab: a computer-assisted learning tool for fluid dynamics using dual reciprocity boundary element methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, J.

    1999-08-01

    As lecturers, our main concern and goal is to develop more attractive and efficient ways of communicating up-to-date scientific knowledge to our students and facilitate an in-depth understanding of physical phenomena. Computer-based instruction is very promising to help both teachers and learners in their difficult task, which involves complex cognitive psychological processes. This complexity is reflected in high demands on the design and implementation methods used to create computer-assisted learning (CAL) programs. Due to their concepts, flexibility, maintainability and extended library resources, object-oriented modeling techniques are very suitable to produce this type of pedagogical tool. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) enjoys not only a growing importance in today's research, but is also very powerful for teaching and learning fluid dynamics. For this purpose, an educational PC program for university level called 'CFDLab 1.1' for Windows™ was developed with an interactive graphical user interface (GUI) for multitasking and point-and-click operations. It uses the dual reciprocity boundary element method as a versatile numerical scheme, allowing to handle a variety of relevant governing equations in two dimensions on personal computers due to its simple pre- and postprocessing including 2D Laplace, Poisson, diffusion, transient convection-diffusion.

  12. Symmetric Galerkin boundary formulations employing curved elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kane, J. H.; Balakrishna, C.

    1993-01-01

    Accounts of the symmetric Galerkin approach to boundary element analysis (BEA) have recently been published. This paper attempts to add to the understanding of this method by addressing a series of fundamental issues associated with its potential computational efficiency. A new symmetric Galerkin theoretical formulation for both the (harmonic) heat conduction and the (biharmonic) elasticity problem that employs regularized singular and hypersingular boundary integral equations (BIEs) is presented. The novel use of regularized BIEs in the Galerkin context is shown to allow straightforward incorporation of curved, isoparametric elements. A symmetric reusable intrinsic sample point (RISP) numerical integration algorithm is shown to produce a Galerkin (i.e., double) integration strategy that is competitive with its counterpart (i.e., singular) integration procedure in the collocation BEA approach when the time saved in the symmetric equation solution phase is also taken into account. This new formulation is shown to be capable of employing hypersingular BIEs while obviating the requirement of C 1 continuity, a fact that allows the employment of the popular continuous element technology. The behavior of the symmetric Galerkin BEA method with regard to both direct and iterative equation solution operations is also addressed. A series of example problems are presented to quantify the performance of this symmetric approach, relative to the more conventional unsymmetric BEA, in terms of both accuracy and efficiency. It is concluded that appropriate implementations of the symmetric Galerkin approach to BEA indeed have the potential to be competitive with, if not superior to, collocation-based BEA, for large-scale problems.

  13. (Environmental and geophysical modeling, fracture mechanics, and boundary element methods)

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, L.J.

    1990-11-09

    Technical discussions at the various sites visited centered on application of boundary integral methods for environmental modeling, seismic analysis, and computational fracture mechanics in composite and smart'' materials. The traveler also attended the International Association for Boundary Element Methods Conference at Rome, Italy. While many aspects of boundary element theory and applications were discussed in the papers, the dominant topic was the analysis and application of hypersingular equations. This has been the focus of recent work by the author, and thus the conference was highly relevant to research at ORNL.

  14. Boundary-element shape sensitivity analysis for thermal problems with nonlinear boundary conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kane, James H.; Wang, Hua

    1991-01-01

    Implicit differentiation of the discretized boundary integral equations governing the conduction of heat in solid objects subjected to nonlinear boundary conditions is shown to generate an accurate and economical approach for the computation of shape sensitivities for this class of problems. This approach involves the employment of analytical derivatives of boundary-element kernel functions with respect to shape design variables. A formulation is presented that can consistently account for both temperature-dependent convection and radiation boundary conditions. Several iterative strategies are presented for the solution of the resulting sets of nonlinear equations and the computational performances examined in detail. Multizone analysis and zone condensation strategies are demonstrated to provide substantive computational economies in this process for models with either localized nonlinear boundary conditions or regions of geometric insensitivity to design variables. A series of nonlinear example problems are presented that have closed-form solutions.

  15. An inverse problem by boundary element method

    SciTech Connect

    Tran-Cong, T.; Nguyen-Thien, T.; Graham, A.L.

    1996-02-01

    Boundary Element Methods (BEM) have been established as useful and powerful tools in a wide range of engineering applications, e.g. Brebbia et al. In this paper, we report a particular three dimensional implementation of a direct boundary integral equation (BIE) formulation and its application to numerical simulations of practical polymer processing operations. In particular, we will focus on the application of the present boundary element technology to simulate an inverse problem in plastics processing.by extrusion. The task is to design profile extrusion dies for plastics. The problem is highly non-linear due to material viscoelastic behaviours as well as unknown free surface conditions. As an example, the technique is shown to be effective in obtaining the die profiles corresponding to a square viscoelastic extrudate under different processing conditions. To further illustrate the capability of the method, examples of other non-trivial extrudate profiles and processing conditions are also given.

  16. A dual reciprocal boundary element formulation for viscous flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lafe, Olu

    1993-01-01

    The advantages inherent in the boundary element method (BEM) for potential flows are exploited to solve viscous flow problems. The trick is the introduction of a so-called dual reciprocal technique in which the convective terms are represented by a global function whose unknown coefficients are determined by collocation. The approach, which is necessarily iterative, converts the governing partial differential equations into integral equations via the distribution of fictitious sources or dipoles of unknown strength on the boundary. These integral equations consist of two parts. The first is a boundary integral term, whose kernel is the unknown strength of the fictitious sources and the fundamental solution of a convection-free flow problem. The second part is a domain integral term whose kernel is the convective portion of the governing PDEs. The domain integration can be transformed to the boundary by using the dual reciprocal (DR) concept. The resulting formulation is a pure boundary integral computational process.

  17. [Bone remodelling using the boundary element method].

    PubMed

    Martínez, Gabriela; Cerrolaza, Miguel

    2003-01-01

    An algorithm for the mathematical representation of external bone remodeling is proposed. The Boundary element method is used for the numerical analysis of trabecular bone, together with the remodeling algorithm presented by Fridez. The versatility and power of the algorithm discussed herein are shown by some numerical examples. As well, the method converges very fast to the solution, which is one of the main advantages of the proposed numerical scheme.

  18. Mean Flow Boundary Conditions for Computational Aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hixon, R.; Nallasamy, M.; Sawyer, S.; Dyson, R.

    2003-01-01

    In this work, a new type of boundary condition for time-accurate Computational Aeroacoustics solvers is described. This boundary condition is designed to complement the existing nonreflective boundary conditions while ensuring that the correct mean flow conditions are maintained throughout the flow calculation. Results are shown for a loaded 2D cascade, started with various initial conditions.

  19. A posteriori pointwise error estimates for the boundary element method

    SciTech Connect

    Paulino, G.H.; Gray, L.J.; Zarikian, V.

    1995-01-01

    This report presents a new approach for a posteriori pointwise error estimation in the boundary element method. The estimator relies upon the evaluation of hypersingular integral equations, and is therefore intrinsic to the boundary integral equation approach. This property allows some theoretical justification by mathematically correlating the exact and estimated errors. A methodology is developed for approximating the error on the boundary as well as in the interior of the domain. In the interior, error estimates for both the function and its derivatives (e.g. potential and interior gradients for potential problems, displacements and stresses for elasticity problems) are presented. Extensive computational experiments have been performed for the two dimensional Laplace equation on interior domains, employing Dirichlet and mixed boundary conditions. The results indicate that the error estimates successfully track the form of the exact error curve. Moreover, a reasonable estimate of the magnitude of the actual error is also obtained.

  20. A combined finite element-boundary element formulation for solution of axially symmetric bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Jeffrey D.; Volakis, John L.

    1991-01-01

    A new method is presented for the computation of electromagnetic scattering from axially symmetric bodies. To allow the simulation of inhomogeneous cross sections, the method combines the finite element and boundary element techniques. Interior to a fictitious surface enclosing the scattering body, the finite element method is used which results in a sparce submatrix, whereas along the enclosure the Stratton-Chu integral equation is enforced. By choosing the fictitious enclosure to be a right circular cylinder, most of the resulting boundary integrals are convolutional and may therefore be evaluated via the FFT with which the system is iteratively solved. In view of the sparce matrix associated with the interior fields, this reduces the storage requirement of the entire system to O(N) making the method attractive for large scale computations. The details of the corresponding formulation and its numerical implementation are described.

  1. Boundary element simulation of petroleum reservoirs with hydraulically fractured wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecher, Radek

    The boundary element method is applied to solve the linear pressure-diffusion equation of fluid-flow in porous media. The governing parabolic partial differential equation is transformed into the Laplace space to obtain the elliptic modified-Helmholtz equation including the homogeneous initial condition. The free- space Green's functions, satisfying this equation for anisotropic media in two and three dimensions, are combined with the generalized form of the Green's second identity. The resulting boundary integral equation is solved by following the collocation technique and applying the given time-dependent boundary conditions of the Dirichlet or Neumann type. The boundary integrals are approximated by the Gaussian quadrature along each element of the discretized domain boundary. Heterogeneous regions are represented by the sectionally-homogeneous zones of different rock and fluid properties. The final values of the interior pressure and velocity fields and of their time-derivatives are found by numerically inverting the solutions from the Laplace space by using the Stehfest's algorithm. The main extension of the mostly standard BEM-procedure is achieved in the modelling of the production and injection wells represented by internal sources and sinks. They are treated as part of the boundary by means of special single-node and both-sided elements, corresponding to the line and plane sources respectively. The wellbore skin and storage effects are considered for the line and cylindrical sources. Hydraulically fractured wells of infinite conductivity are handled directly according to the specified constraint type, out of the four alternatives. Fractures of finite conductivity are simulated by coupling the finite element model of their 1D-interior with the boundary element model of their 2D- exterior. Variable fracture width, fractures crossing zone boundaries, ``networking'' of fractures, fracture-tip singularity handling, or the 3D-description are additional advanced

  2. A locally refined rectangular grid finite element method - Application to computational fluid dynamics and computational physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, David P.; Melvin, Robin G.; Bieterman, Michael B.; Johnson, Forrester T.; Samant, Satish S.

    1991-01-01

    The present FEM technique addresses both linear and nonlinear boundary value problems encountered in computational physics by handling general three-dimensional regions, boundary conditions, and material properties. The box finite elements used are defined by a Cartesian grid independent of the boundary definition, and local refinements proceed by dividing a given box element into eight subelements. Discretization employs trilinear approximations on the box elements; special element stiffness matrices are included for boxes cut by any boundary surface. Illustrative results are presented for representative aerodynamics problems involving up to 400,000 elements.

  3. Comparison of boundary element and finite element methods in spur gear root stress analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, H.; Mavriplis, D.; Huston, R. L.; Oswald, F. B.

    1989-01-01

    The boundary element method (BEM) is used to compute fillet stress concentration in spur gear teeth. The results are shown to compare favorably with analogous results obtained using the finite element method (FEM). A partially supported thin rim gear is studied. The loading is applied at the pitch point. A three-dimensional analysis is conducted using both the BEM and FEM (NASTRAN). The results are also compared with those of a two-dimensional finite element model. An advantage of the BEM over the FEM is that fewer elements are needed with the BEM. Indeed, in the current study the BEM used 92 elements and 270 nodes whereas the FEM used 320 elements and 2037 nodes. Moreover, since the BEM is especially useful in problems with high stress gradients it is potentially a very useful tool for fillet stress analyses.

  4. Finite element computational fluid mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    Finite element analysis as applied to the broad spectrum of computational fluid mechanics is analyzed. The finite element solution methodology is derived, developed, and applied directly to the differential equation systems governing classes of problems in fluid mechanics. The heat conduction equation is used to reveal the essence and elegance of finite element theory, including higher order accuracy and convergence. The algorithm is extended to the pervasive nonlinearity of the Navier-Stokes equations. A specific fluid mechanics problem class is analyzed with an even mix of theory and applications, including turbulence closure and the solution of turbulent flows.

  5. A finite element-boundary element method for advection-diffusion problems with variable advective fields and infinite domains

    SciTech Connect

    Driessen, B.J.; Dohner, J.L.

    1998-08-01

    In this paper a hybrid, finite element--boundary element method which can be used to solve for particle advection-diffusion in infinite domains with variable advective fields is presented. In previous work either boundary element, finite element, or difference methods have been used to solve for particle motion in advective-diffusive domains. These methods have a number of limitations. Due to the complexity of computing spatially dependent Green`s functions, the boundary element method is limited to domains containing only constant advective fields, and due to their inherent formulation, finite element and finite difference methods are limited to only domains of finite spatial extent. Thus, finite element and finite difference methods are limited to finite space problems for which the boundary element method is not, and the boundary element method is limited to constant advection field problems for which finite element and finite difference methods are not. In this paper it is proposed to split a domain into two sub-domains, and for each of these sub domains, apply the appropriate solution method; thereby, producing a method for the total infinite space, variable advective field domain.

  6. High-order Finite Element Analysis of Boundary Layer Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Alvin; Sahni, Onkar

    2014-11-01

    Numerical analysis of boundary layer flows requires careful approximations, specifically the use of a mesh with layered and graded elements near the (viscous) walls. This is referred to as a boundary layer mesh, which for complex geometries is composed of triangular elements on the walls that are inflated or extruded into the volume along the wall-normal direction up to a desired height while the rest of the domain is filled with unstructured tetrahedral elements. Linear elements with C0 inter-element continuity are employed and in some situations higher order C0 elements are also used. However, these elements only enforce continuity whereas high-order smoothness is not attained as will be the case with C1 inter-element continuity and higher. As a result, C0 elements result in a poor approximation of the high-order boundary layer behavior. To achieve greater inter-element continuity in boundary layer region, we employ B-spline basis functions along the wall-normal direction (i.e., only in the layered portion of the mesh). In the rest of the fully unstructured mesh, linear or higher order C0 elements are used as appropriate. In this study we demonstrate the benefits of finite-element analysis based on such higher order and continuity basis functions for boundary layer flows.

  7. Advances in Numerical Boundary Conditions for Computational Aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, Christopher K. W.

    1997-01-01

    Advances in Computational Aeroacoustics (CAA) depend critically on the availability of accurate, nondispersive, least dissipative computation algorithm as well as high quality numerical boundary treatments. This paper focuses on the recent developments of numerical boundary conditions. In a typical CAA problem, one often encounters two types of boundaries. Because a finite computation domain is used, there are external boundaries. On the external boundaries, boundary conditions simulating the solution outside the computation domain are to be imposed. Inside the computation domain, there may be internal boundaries. On these internal boundaries, boundary conditions simulating the presence of an object or surface with specific acoustic characteristics are to be applied. Numerical boundary conditions, both external or internal, developed for simple model problems are reviewed and examined. Numerical boundary conditions for real aeroacoustic problems are also discussed through specific examples. The paper concludes with a description of some much needed research in numerical boundary conditions for CAA.

  8. Sound source reconstruction using inverse boundary element calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuhmacher, Andreas; Hald, Jørgen; Rasmussen, Karsten Bo; Hansen, Per Christian

    2003-01-01

    Whereas standard boundary element calculations focus on the forward problem of computing the radiated acoustic field from a vibrating structure, the aim in this work is to reverse the process, i.e., to determine vibration from acoustic field data. This inverse problem is brought on a form suited for solution by means of an inverse boundary element method. Since the numerical treatment of the inverse source reconstruction results in a discrete ill-posed problem, regularization is imposed to avoid unstable solutions dominated by errors. In the present work the emphasis is on Tikhonov regularization and parameter-choice methods not requiring an error-norm estimate for choosing the right amount of regularization. Several parameter-choice strategies have been presented lately, but it still remains to be seen how well these can handle industrial applications with real measurement data. In the present work it is demonstrated that the L-curve criterion is robust with respect to the errors in a real measurement situation. In particular, it is shown that the L-curve criterion is superior to the more conventional generalized cross-validation (GCV) approach for the present tire noise studies.

  9. Fluorescence photon migration by the boundary element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedele, Francesco; Eppstein, Margaret J.; Laible, Jeffrey P.; Godavarty, Anuradha; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    2005-11-01

    The use of the boundary element method (BEM) is explored as an alternative to the finite element method (FEM) solution methodology for the elliptic equations used to model the generation and transport of fluorescent light in highly scattering media, without the need for an internal volume mesh. The method is appropriate for domains where it is reasonable to assume the fluorescent properties are regionally homogeneous, such as when using highly specific molecularly targeted fluorescent contrast agents in biological tissues. In comparison to analytical results on a homogeneous sphere, BEM predictions of complex emission fluence are shown to be more accurate and stable than those of the FEM. Emission fluence predictions made with the BEM using a 708-node mesh, with roughly double the inter-node spacing of boundary nodes as in a 6956-node FEM mesh, match experimental frequency-domain fluorescence emission measurements acquired on a 1087 cm 3 breast-mimicking phantom at least as well as those of the FEM, but require only 1/8 to 1/2 the computation time.

  10. Fluorescence photon migration by the boundary element method

    SciTech Connect

    Fedele, Francesco; Eppstein, Margaret J. . E-mail: maggie.eppstein@uvm.edu; Laible, Jeffrey P.; Godavarty, Anuradha; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    2005-11-20

    The use of the boundary element method (BEM) is explored as an alternative to the finite element method (FEM) solution methodology for the elliptic equations used to model the generation and transport of fluorescent light in highly scattering media, without the need for an internal volume mesh. The method is appropriate for domains where it is reasonable to assume the fluorescent properties are regionally homogeneous, such as when using highly specific molecularly targeted fluorescent contrast agents in biological tissues. In comparison to analytical results on a homogeneous sphere, BEM predictions of complex emission fluence are shown to be more accurate and stable than those of the FEM. Emission fluence predictions made with the BEM using a 708-node mesh, with roughly double the inter-node spacing of boundary nodes as in a 6956-node FEM mesh, match experimental frequency-domain fluorescence emission measurements acquired on a 1087 cm{sup 3} breast-mimicking phantom at least as well as those of the FEM, but require only 1/8 to 1/2 the computation time.

  11. The complex variable boundary element method: Applications in determining approximative boundaries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hromadka, T.V.

    1984-01-01

    The complex variable boundary element method (CVBEM) is used to determine approximation functions for boundary value problems of the Laplace equation such as occurs in potential theory. By determining an approximative boundary upon which the CVBEM approximator matches the desired constant (level curves) boundary conditions, the CVBEM is found to provide the exact solution throughout the interior of the transformed problem domain. Thus, the acceptability of the CVBEM approximation is determined by the closeness-of-fit of the approximative boundary to the study problem boundary. ?? 1984.

  12. Equivariant preconditioners for boundary element methods

    SciTech Connect

    Tausch, J.

    1994-12-31

    In this paper the author proposes and discusses two preconditioners for boundary integral equations on domains which are nearly symmetric. The preconditioners under consideration are equivariant, that is, they commute with a group of permutation matrices. Numerical experiments demonstrate their efficiency for the GMRES method.

  13. Numerical Improvement of The Three-dimensional Boundary Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz-Aleman, C.; Gil-Zepeda, A.; Sánchez-Sesma, F. J.; Luzon-Martinez, F.

    2001-12-01

    Boundary element methods have been applied to calculate the seismic response of various types of geological structures. Dimensionality reduction and a relatively easy fulfillment of radiation conditions at infinity are recognized advantages over domain approaches. Indirect Boundary Element Method (IBEM) formulations give rise to large systems of equations, and the considerable amount of operations required for solving them suggest the possibility of getting some benefit from exploitation of sparsity patterns. In this article, a brief study on the structure of the linear systems derived from the IBEM method is carried out. Applicability of a matrix static condensation algorithm to the inversion of the IBEM coefficient matrix is explored, in order to optimize the numerical burden of such method. Seismic response of a 3-D alluvial valley of irregular shape, as originally proposed by Sánchez-Sesma and Luzon (1995), was computed and comparisons on time consumption and memory allocation are established. An alternative way to deal with those linear systems is the use of threshold criteria for the truncation of the coefficient matrix, which implies the solution of sparse approximations instead of the original full IBEM systems (Ortiz-Aleman et al., 1998). Performance of this optimized approach is evaluated on its application to the case of a three-dimensional alluvial basin with irregular shape. Transfer functions were calculated for the frequency range from 0 to 1.25 Hz. Inversion of linear systems by using this algorithm lead to significant saving on computer time and memory allocation relative to the original IBEM formulation. Results represent an extension in the range of application of the IBEM method.

  14. Increasing Accuracy in Computed Inviscid Boundary Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyson, Roger

    2004-01-01

    A technique has been devised to increase the accuracy of computational simulations of flows of inviscid fluids by increasing the accuracy with which surface boundary conditions are represented. This technique is expected to be especially beneficial for computational aeroacoustics, wherein it enables proper accounting, not only for acoustic waves, but also for vorticity and entropy waves, at surfaces. Heretofore, inviscid nonlinear surface boundary conditions have been limited to third-order accuracy in time for stationary surfaces and to first-order accuracy in time for moving surfaces. For steady-state calculations, it may be possible to achieve higher accuracy in space, but high accuracy in time is needed for efficient simulation of multiscale unsteady flow phenomena. The present technique is the first surface treatment that provides the needed high accuracy through proper accounting of higher-order time derivatives. The present technique is founded on a method known in art as the Hermitian modified solution approximation (MESA) scheme. This is because high time accuracy at a surface depends upon, among other things, correction of the spatial cross-derivatives of flow variables, and many of these cross-derivatives are included explicitly on the computational grid in the MESA scheme. (Alternatively, a related method other than the MESA scheme could be used, as long as the method involves consistent application of the effects of the cross-derivatives.) While the mathematical derivation of the present technique is too lengthy and complex to fit within the space available for this article, the technique itself can be characterized in relatively simple terms: The technique involves correction of surface-normal spatial pressure derivatives at a boundary surface to satisfy the governing equations and the boundary conditions and thereby achieve arbitrarily high orders of time accuracy in special cases. The boundary conditions can now include a potentially infinite number

  15. Element-topology-independent preconditioners for parallel finite element computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, K. C.; Alexander, Scott

    1992-01-01

    A family of preconditioners for the solution of finite element equations are presented, which are element-topology independent and thus can be applicable to element order-free parallel computations. A key feature of the present preconditioners is the repeated use of element connectivity matrices and their left and right inverses. The properties and performance of the present preconditioners are demonstrated via beam and two-dimensional finite element matrices for implicit time integration computations.

  16. Prediction of the acoustic field in a three-dimensional rectangular duct using the boundary element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pates, Carl S., III

    1991-01-01

    A boundary element formulation, along with detailed solution procedure for determining the acoustic field inside a three-dimensional, rectangular duct is presented in this paper. The results of classical and boundary element solutions are compared for a typical rectangular duct by restricting the input frequency in such a way that only plane wave propagation is possible. The effect of changing the type and number of discrete boundary elements on the computed sound pressure levels inside the duct is also presented.

  17. A Curved, Elastostatic Boundary Element for Plane Anisotropic Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smeltzer, Stanley S.; Klang, Eric C.

    2001-01-01

    The plane-stress equations of linear elasticity are used in conjunction with those of the boundary element method to develop a novel curved, quadratic boundary element applicable to structures composed of anisotropic materials in a state of plane stress or plane strain. The curved boundary element is developed to solve two-dimensional, elastostatic problems of arbitrary shape, connectivity, and material type. As a result of the anisotropy, complex variables are employed in the fundamental solution derivations for a concentrated unit-magnitude force in an infinite elastic anisotropic medium. Once known, the fundamental solutions are evaluated numerically by using the known displacement and traction boundary values in an integral formulation with Gaussian quadrature. All the integral equations of the boundary element method are evaluated using one of two methods: either regular Gaussian quadrature or a combination of regular and logarithmic Gaussian quadrature. The regular Gaussian quadrature is used to evaluate most of the integrals along the boundary, and the combined scheme is employed for integrals that are singular. Individual element contributions are assembled into the global matrices of the standard boundary element method, manipulated to form a system of linear equations, and the resulting system is solved. The interior displacements and stresses are found through a separate set of auxiliary equations that are derived using an Airy-type stress function in terms of complex variables. The capabilities and accuracy of this method are demonstrated for a laminated-composite plate with a central, elliptical cutout that is subjected to uniform tension along one of the straight edges of the plate. Comparison of the boundary element results for this problem with corresponding results from an analytical model show a difference of less than 1%.

  18. Electrodynamic boundary conditions for planar arrays of thin magnetic elements

    SciTech Connect

    Lisenkov, Ivan; Tyberkevych, Vasyl; Slavin, Andrei; Nikitov, Sergei

    2015-08-24

    Approximate electrodynamic boundary conditions are derived for an array of dipolarly coupled magnetic elements. It is assumed that the elements' thickness is small compared to the wavelength of an electromagnetic wave in a free space. The boundary conditions relate electric and magnetic fields existing at the top and bottom sides of the array through the averaged uniform dynamic magnetization of the array. This dynamic magnetization is determined by the collective dynamic eigen-excitations (spin wave modes) of the array and is found using the external magnetic susceptibility tensor. The problem of oblique scattering of a plane electromagnetic wave on the array is considered to illustrate the use of the derived boundary conditions.

  19. Three dimensional boundary element solutions for eddy current nondestructive evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ming; Song, Jiming; Nakagawa, Norio

    2014-02-01

    The boundary integral equations (BIE) method is a numerical computational method of solving linear partial differential equations which have been formulated as integral equations. It can be applied in many areas of engineering and science including fluid mechanics, acoustics, electromagnetics, and fracture mechanics. The eddy current problem is formulated by the BIE and discretized into matrix equations by the method of moments (MoM) or the boundary element method (BEM). The three dimensional arbitrarily shaped objects are described by a number of triangular patches. The Stratton-Chu formulation is specialized for the conductive medium. The equivalent electric and magnetic surface currents are expanded in terms of Rao-Wilton-Glisson (RWG) vector basis function while the normal component of magnetic field is expanded in terms of the pulse basis function. Also, a low frequency approximation is applied in the external medium. Additionally, we introduce Auld's impedance formulas to calculate impedance variation. There are very good agreements between numerical results and those from theory and/or experiments for a finite cross-section above a wedge.

  20. Numerical Computations of Hypersonic Boundary-Layer over Surface Irregularities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Chau-Lyan; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Li, Fei

    2010-01-01

    Surface irregularities such as protuberances inside a hypersonic boundary layer may lead to premature transition on the vehicle surface. Early transition in turn causes large localized surface heating that could damage the thermal protection system. Experimental measurements as well as numerical computations aimed at building a knowledge base for transition Reynolds numbers with respect to different protuberance sizes and locations have been actively pursued in recent years. This paper computationally investigates the unsteady wake development behind large isolated cylindrical roughness elements and the scaled wind-tunnel model of the trip used in a recent flight measurement during the reentry of space shuttle Discovery. An unstructured mesh, compressible flow solver based on the space-time conservation element, solution element (CESE) method is used to perform time-accurate Navier-Stokes calculations for the flow past a roughness element under several wind-tunnel conditions. For a cylindrical roughness element with a height to the boundary-layer thickness ratio from 0.8 to 2.5, the wake flow is characterized by a mushroom-shaped centerline streak and horse-shoe vortices. While time-accurate solutions converged to a steady-state for a ratio of 0.8, strong flow unsteadiness is present for a ratio of 1.3 and 2.5. Instability waves marked by distinct disturbance frequencies were found in the latter two cases. Both the centerline streak and the horse-shoe vortices become unstable downstream. The oscillatory vortices eventually reach an early breakdown stage for the largest roughness element. Spectral analyses in conjunction with the computed root mean square variations suggest that the source of the unsteadiness and instability waves in the wake region may be traced back to possible absolute instability in the front-side separation region.

  1. A novel boundary element method program for heat transfer analysis of composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, K. J.

    1982-01-01

    A boundary element method computer program developed for heat transfer analysis of two dimensional composite structures is described. The program runs on a time share mode and interacts with the user for multirun analysis. During a run, the geometry can be modified interactively by the user as many times as desired by using various options available and the new results printed or plotted. A concept of plotting the results for boundary element method is introduced. The advantage of such a program over the finite element method for simple design problems is demonstrated.

  2. Analysis of random structure-acoustic interaction problems using coupled boundary element and finite element methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mei, Chuh; Pates, Carl S., III

    1994-01-01

    A coupled boundary element (BEM)-finite element (FEM) approach is presented to accurately model structure-acoustic interaction systems. The boundary element method is first applied to interior, two and three-dimensional acoustic domains with complex geometry configurations. Boundary element results are very accurate when compared with limited exact solutions. Structure-interaction problems are then analyzed with the coupled FEM-BEM method, where the finite element method models the structure and the boundary element method models the interior acoustic domain. The coupled analysis is compared with exact and experimental results for a simplistic model. Composite panels are analyzed and compared with isotropic results. The coupled method is then extended for random excitation. Random excitation results are compared with uncoupled results for isotropic and composite panels.

  3. An interpolating boundary element-free method (IBEFM) for elasticity problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Hongping; Cheng, Yumin; Zhang, Wu

    2010-04-01

    The paper begins by discussing the interpolating moving least-squares (IMLS) method. Then the formulae of the IMLS method obtained by Lancaster are revised. On the basis of the boundary element-free method (BEFM), combining the boundary integral equation method with the IMLS method improved in this paper, the interpolating boundary element-free method (IBEFM) for two-dimensional elasticity problems is presented, and the corresponding formulae of the IBEFM for two-dimensional elasticity problems are obtained. In the IMLS method in this paper, the shape function satisfies the property of Kronecker δ function, and then in the IBEFM the boundary conditions can be applied directly and easily. The IBEFM is a direct meshless boundary integral equation method in which the basic unknown quantity is the real solution to the nodal variables. Thus it gives a greater computational precision. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the method.

  4. Boundary element methods in elastography: a first explorative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Hans-Uwe; Hann, Chris E.; Chase, J. Geoffrey; Broughton, Robert L.; Van Houten, Elijah

    2007-03-01

    Next to Magnet Resonance Elastography and Ultrasound Elastography, Digital Image Elasto-Tomography (DIET) is a new imaging-technique, using only motion data available on the boundary, to reconstruct mechanical material parameters, i.e. the interior sti.ness of a domain, in order to diagnose tissue related disease such as breast cancer. Where classically Finite Element Methods have been employed to solve this inverse problem, this paper explores a new approach to the reconstruction of mechanical material properties of tissue and tissue defects by the use of Boundary Element Methods (BEM). Using the Boundary Integral Equations for Linear Elasticity in two dimensions within a Conjugate Gradients based inverse solver, material properties of healthy and malicious tissue could be determined from displacement data on the boundary. First simulation results are presented.

  5. Laminar-Turbulent Transition Behind Discrete Roughness Elements in a High-Speed Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhari, Meelan M.; Li, Fei; Wu, Minwei; Chang, Chau-Lyan; Edwards, Jack R., Jr.; Kegerise, Michael; King, Rudolph

    2010-01-01

    Computations are performed to study the flow past an isolated roughness element in a Mach 3.5, laminar, flat plate boundary layer. To determine the effects of the roughness element on the location of laminar-turbulent transition inside the boundary layer, the instability characteristics of the stationary wake behind the roughness element are investigated over a range of roughness heights. The wake flow adjacent to the spanwise plane of symmetry is characterized by a narrow region of increased boundary layer thickness. Beyond the near wake region, the centerline streak is surrounded by a pair of high-speed streaks with reduced boundary layer thickness and a secondary, outer pair of lower-speed streaks. Similar to the spanwise periodic pattern of streaks behind an array of regularly spaced roughness elements, the above wake structure persists over large distances and can sustain strong enough convective instabilities to cause an earlier onset of transition when the roughness height is sufficiently large. Time accurate computations are performed to clarify additional issues such as the role of the nearfield of the roughness element during the generation of streak instabilities, as well as to reveal selected details of their nonlinear evolution. Effects of roughness element shape on the streak amplitudes and the interactions between multiple roughness elements aligned along the flow direction are also investigated.

  6. Preliminary Work for Modeling the Propellers of an Aircraft as a Noise Source in an Acoustic Boundary Element Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlahopoulos, Nickolas; Lyle, Karen H.; Burley, Casey L.

    1998-01-01

    An algorithm for generating appropriate velocity boundary conditions for an acoustic boundary element analysis from the kinematics of an operating propeller is presented. It constitutes the initial phase of Integrating sophisticated rotorcraft models into a conventional boundary element analysis. Currently, the pressure field is computed by a linear approximation. An initial validation of the developed process was performed by comparing numerical results to test data for the external acoustic pressure on the surface of a tilt-rotor aircraft for one flight condition.

  7. Experimental validation of boundary element methods for noise prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seybert, A. F.; Oswald, Fred B.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental validation of methods to predict radiated noise is presented. A combined finite element and boundary element model was used to predict the vibration and noise of a rectangular box excited by a mechanical shaker. The predicted noise was compared to sound power measured by the acoustic intensity method. Inaccuracies in the finite element model shifted the resonance frequencies by about 5 percent. The predicted and measured sound power levels agree within about 2.5 dB. In a second experiment, measured vibration data was used with a boundary element model to predict noise radiation from the top of an operating gearbox. The predicted and measured sound power for the gearbox agree within about 3 dB.

  8. Boundary Element Microhydrodynamics: Stagnation of flow in protein cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aragon, Sergio; Hahn, David

    2007-03-01

    A very precise boundary element solution of the exact Stokes flow surface integral equation has been implemented in our Fortan 90 program BEST. In our previous work (Aragon & Hahn, Biophys. J. 2006, 91: 1591-1603; J. Chem. Theory and Comput. 2006, 2: 1416-1428) we obtained very precise values of the tensorial transport properties (translation, rotation, and intrinsic viscosity) for a large set of proteins with a uniform water hydration thickness of 0.11 nm. In this work, we utilize the surface stress distribution thus obtained to evaluate the flow field as a function of distance away from the hydrodynamic surface for a variety of surface features in a dimpled sphere (test case) and for the proteins myoglobin, lysozyme, and human serum albumin. We demonstrate that solvent in small to large pockets on the hydrodynamic surface moves with the protein with distances up to 2 nm for deep pockets regardless of the direction of motion of the protein. On the other hand, the fluid flow pattern on protruding portions of the hydrodynamic surface decays much more rapidly with distance from the surface. The implications of these results with respect to the amount of water of associated with the surface and the rate of transport to active enzymatic sites in stirred solutions is discussed.

  9. Lubrication approximation in completed double layer boundary element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasseri, S.; Phan-Thien, N.; Fan, X.-J.

    This paper reports on the results of the numerical simulation of the motion of solid spherical particles in shear Stokes flows. Using the completed double layer boundary element method (CDLBEM) via distributed computing under Parallel Virtual Machine (PVM), the effective viscosity of suspension has been calculated for a finite number of spheres in a cubic array, or in a random configuration. In the simulation presented here, the short range interactions via lubrication forces are also taken into account, via the range completer in the formulation, whenever the gap between two neighbouring particles is closer than a critical gap. The results for particles in a simple cubic array agree with the results of Nunan and Keller (1984) and Stoksian Dynamics of Brady etal. (1988). To evaluate the lubrication forces between particles in a random configuration, a critical gap of 0.2 of particle's radius is suggested and the results are tested against the experimental data of Thomas (1965) and empirical equation of Krieger-Dougherty (Krieger, 1972). Finally, the quasi-steady trajectories are obtained for time-varying configuration of 125 particles.

  10. A finite element algorithm for high-lying eigenvalues with Neumann and Dirichlet boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Báez, G.; Méndez-Sánchez, R. A.; Leyvraz, F.; Seligman, T. H.

    2014-01-01

    We present a finite element algorithm that computes eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the Laplace operator for two-dimensional problems with homogeneous Neumann or Dirichlet boundary conditions, or combinations of either for different parts of the boundary. We use an inverse power plus Gauss-Seidel algorithm to solve the generalized eigenvalue problem. For Neumann boundary conditions the method is much more efficient than the equivalent finite difference algorithm. We checked the algorithm by comparing the cumulative level density of the spectrum obtained numerically with the theoretical prediction given by the Weyl formula. We found a systematic deviation due to the discretization, not to the algorithm itself.

  11. Computer Security: The Human Element.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guynes, Carl S.; Vanacek, Michael T.

    1981-01-01

    The security and effectiveness of a computer system are dependent on the personnel involved. Improved personnel and organizational procedures can significantly reduce the potential for computer fraud. (Author/MLF)

  12. Three-dimensional Stress Analysis Using the Boundary Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. B.; Banerjee, P. K.

    1984-01-01

    The boundary element method is to be extended (as part of the NASA Inelastic Analysis Methods program) to the three-dimensional stress analysis of gas turbine engine hot section components. The analytical basis of the method (as developed in elasticity) is outlined, its numerical implementation is summarized, and the approaches to be followed in extending the method to include inelastic material response indicated.

  13. Boundary control of parabolic systems - Finite-element approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lasiecka, I.

    1980-01-01

    The finite element approximation of a Dirichlet type boundary control problem for parabolic systems is considered. An approach based on the direct approximation of an input-output semigroup formula is applied. Error estimates are derived for optimal state and optimal control, and it is noted that these estimates are actually optimal with respect to the approximation theoretic properties.

  14. A new conformal absorbing boundary condition for finite element meshes and parallelization of FEMATS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatterjee, A.; Volakis, J. L.; Nguyen, J.; Nurnberger, M.; Ross, D.

    1993-01-01

    Some of the progress toward the development and parallelization of an improved version of the finite element code FEMATS is described. This is a finite element code for computing the scattering by arbitrarily shaped three dimensional surfaces composite scatterers. The following tasks were worked on during the report period: (1) new absorbing boundary conditions (ABC's) for truncating the finite element mesh; (2) mixed mesh termination schemes; (3) hierarchical elements and multigridding; (4) parallelization; and (5) various modeling enhancements (antenna feeds, anisotropy, and higher order GIBC).

  15. Calculation of compressible boundary layer flow about airfoils by a finite element/finite difference method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strong, Stuart L.; Meade, Andrew J., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Preliminary results are presented of a finite element/finite difference method (semidiscrete Galerkin method) used to calculate compressible boundary layer flow about airfoils, in which the group finite element scheme is applied to the Dorodnitsyn formulation of the boundary layer equations. The semidiscrete Galerkin (SDG) method promises to be fast, accurate and computationally efficient. The SDG method can also be applied to any smoothly connected airfoil shape without modification and possesses the potential capability of calculating boundary layer solutions beyond flow separation. Results are presented for low speed laminar flow past a circular cylinder and past a NACA 0012 airfoil at zero angle of attack at a Mach number of 0.5. Also shown are results for compressible flow past a flat plate for a Mach number range of 0 to 10 and results for incompressible turbulent flow past a flat plate. All numerical solutions assume an attached boundary layer.

  16. A finite element-boundary integral method for cavities in a circular cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempel, Leo C.; Volakis, John L.

    1992-01-01

    Conformal antenna arrays offer many cost and weight advantages over conventional antenna systems. However, due to a lack of rigorous mathematical models for conformal antenna arrays, antenna designers resort to measurement and planar antenna concepts for designing non-planar conformal antennas. Recently, we have found the finite element-boundary integral method to be very successful in modeling large planar arrays of arbitrary composition in a metallic plane. We extend this formulation to conformal arrays on large metallic cylinders. In this report, we develop the mathematical formulation. In particular, we discuss the shape functions, the resulting finite elements and the boundary integral equations, and the solution of the conformal finite element-boundary integral system. Some validation results are presented and we further show how this formulation can be applied with minimal computational and memory resources.

  17. Development of non-linear finite element computer code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, E. B.; Miller, T.

    1985-01-01

    Recent work has shown that the use of separable symmetric functions of the principal stretches can adequately describe the response of certain propellant materials and, further, that a data reduction scheme gives a convenient way of obtaining the values of the functions from experimental data. Based on representation of the energy, a computational scheme was developed that allows finite element analysis of boundary value problems of arbitrary shape and loading. The computational procedure was implemental in a three-dimensional finite element code, TEXLESP-S, which is documented herein.

  18. Evaluation of Boundary Conditions for Computational Aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hixon, R.; Shih, S.-H.; Mankbadi, Reda R.

    1995-01-01

    The performance of three boundary conditions for aeroacoustics were investigated, namely, (1) Giles-1990; (2) Tam and Webb-1993, and (3) Thompson-1987. For each boundary condition, various implementations were tested to study the sensitivity of their performance to the implementation procedure. Details of all implementations are given. Results are shown for the acoustic field of a monopole in a uniform freestream.

  19. Boundary element based multiresolution shape optimisation in electrostatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandara, Kosala; Cirak, Fehmi; Of, Günther; Steinbach, Olaf; Zapletal, Jan

    2015-09-01

    We consider the shape optimisation of high-voltage devices subject to electrostatic field equations by combining fast boundary elements with multiresolution subdivision surfaces. The geometry of the domain is described with subdivision surfaces and different resolutions of the same geometry are used for optimisation and analysis. The primal and adjoint problems are discretised with the boundary element method using a sufficiently fine control mesh. For shape optimisation the geometry is updated starting from the coarsest control mesh with increasingly finer control meshes. The multiresolution approach effectively prevents the appearance of non-physical geometry oscillations in the optimised shapes. Moreover, there is no need for mesh regeneration or smoothing during the optimisation due to the absence of a volume mesh. We present several numerical experiments and one industrial application to demonstrate the robustness and versatility of the developed approach.

  20. A finite element boundary integral formulation for radiation and scattering by cavity antennas using tetrahedral elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gong, J.; Volakis, J. L.; Chatterjee, A.; Jin, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    A hybrid finite element boundary integral formulation is developed using tetrahedral and/or triangular elements for discretizing the cavity and/or aperture of microstrip antenna arrays. The tetrahedral elements with edge based linear expansion functions are chosen for modeling the volume region and triangular elements are used for discretizing the aperture. The edge based expansion functions are divergenceless thus removing the requirement to introduce a penalty term and the tetrahedral elements permit greater geometrical adaptability than the rectangular bricks. The underlying theory and resulting expressions are discussed in detail together with some numerical scattering examples for comparison and demonstration.

  1. A non-local computational boundary condition for duct acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zorumski, William E.; Watson, Willie R.; Hodge, Steve L.

    1994-01-01

    A non-local boundary condition is formulated for acoustic waves in ducts without flow. The ducts are two dimensional with constant area, but with variable impedance wall lining. Extension of the formulation to three dimensional and variable area ducts is straightforward in principle, but requires significantly more computation. The boundary condition simulates a nonreflecting wave field in an infinite duct. It is implemented by a constant matrix operator which is applied at the boundary of the computational domain. An efficient computational solution scheme is developed which allows calculations for high frequencies and long duct lengths. This computational solution utilizes the boundary condition to limit the computational space while preserving the radiation boundary condition. The boundary condition is tested for several sources. It is demonstrated that the boundary condition can be applied close to the sound sources, rendering the computational domain small. Computational solutions with the new non-local boundary condition are shown to be consistent with the known solutions for nonreflecting wavefields in an infinite uniform duct.

  2. GENERAL: An improved boundary element-free method (IBEFM) for two-dimensional potential problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Hong-Ping; Cheng, Yu-Min; Zhang, Wu

    2009-10-01

    The interpolating moving least-squares (IMLS) method is discussed first in this paper. And the formulae of the IMLS method obtained by Lancaster are revised. Then on the basis of the boundary element-free method (BEFM), combining the boundary integral equation (BIE) method with the IMLS method, the improved boundary element-free method (IBEFM) for two-dimensional potential problems is presented, and the corresponding formulae of the IBEFM are obtained. In the BEFM, boundary conditions are applied directly, but the shape function in the MLS does not satisfy the property of the Kronecker δ function. This is a problem of the BEFM, and must be solved theoretically. In the IMLS method, when the shape function satisfies the property of the Kronecker δ function, then the boundary conditions, in the meshless method based on the IMLS method, can be applied directly. Then the IBEFM, based on the IMLS method, is a direct meshless boundary integral equation method in which the basic unknown quantity is the real solution of the nodal variables, and the boundary conditions can be applied directly and easily, thus it gives a greater computational precision. Some numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the method.

  3. Focusing performance of the closed-boundary cylindrical microlenses analyzed by the boundary element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jie; Ye, Jiasheng; Liu, Shutian

    2006-10-01

    In this paper, we investigate the focusing performance of closed-boundary cylindrical microlenses (CBCMs) based on rigorous electromagnetic theory and the boundary element method. The CBCMs with different incident angles, different quantization-level numbers, different microlens diameters, different f-numbers, and different polarizations of incidence are studied. Several focusing performance measures, such as the focal spot size, the diffraction efficiency, the real focal position, and the normalized transmitted power, are presented. It provides very useful information in designing the CBCMs in micro-optical systems.

  4. Wake Instabilities Behind Discrete Roughness Elements in High Speed Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhari, Meelan; Li, Fei; Chang, Chau-Lyan; Norris, Andrew; Edwards, Jack

    2013-01-01

    Computations are performed to study the flow past an isolated, spanwise symmetric roughness element in zero pressure gradient boundary layers at Mach 3.5 and 5.9, with an emphasis on roughness heights of less than 55 percent of the local boundary layer thickness. The Mach 5.9 cases include flow conditions that are relevant to both ground facility experiments and high altitude flight ("cold wall" case). Regardless of the Mach number, the mean flow distortion due to the roughness element is characterized by long-lived streamwise streaks in the roughness wake, which can support instability modes that did not exist in the absence of the roughness element. The higher Mach number cases reveal a variety of instability mode shapes with velocity fluctuations concentrated in different localized regions of high base flow shear. The high shear regions vary from the top of a mushroom shaped structure characterizing the centerline streak to regions that are concentrated on the sides of the mushroom. Unlike the Mach 3.5 case with nearly same values of scaled roughness height k/delta and roughness height Reynolds number Re(sub kk), the odd wake modes in both Mach 5.9 cases are significantly more unstable than the even modes of instability. Additional computations for a Mach 3.5 boundary layer indicate that the presence of a roughness element can also enhance the amplification of first mode instabilities incident from upstream. Interactions between multiple roughness elements aligned along the flow direction are also explored.

  5. Analytical finite element matrix elements and global matrix assembly for hierarchical 3-D vector basis functions within the hybrid finite element boundary integral method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Wang, K.; Li, H.; Eibert, T. F.

    2014-11-01

    A hybrid higher-order finite element boundary integral (FE-BI) technique is discussed where the higher-order FE matrix elements are computed by a fully analytical procedure and where the gobal matrix assembly is organized by a self-identifying procedure of the local to global transformation. This assembly procedure applys to both, the FE part as well as the BI part of the algorithm. The geometry is meshed into three-dimensional tetrahedra as finite elements and nearly orthogonal hierarchical basis functions are employed. The boundary conditions are implemented in a strong sense such that the boundary values of the volume basis functions are directly utilized within the BI, either for the tangential electric and magnetic fields or for the asssociated equivalent surface current densities by applying a cross product with the unit surface normals. The self-identified method for the global matrix assembly automatically discerns the global order of the basis functions for generating the matrix elements. Higher order basis functions do need more unknowns for each single FE, however, fewer FEs are needed to achieve the same satisfiable accuracy. This improvement provides a lot more flexibility for meshing and allows the mesh size to raise up to λ/3. The performance of the implemented system is evaluated in terms of computation time, accuracy and memory occupation, where excellent results with respect to precision and computation times of large scale simulations are found.

  6. Time-Domain Impedance Boundary Conditions for Computational Aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, Christopher K. W.; Auriault, Laurent

    1996-01-01

    It is an accepted practice in aeroacoustics to characterize the properties of an acoustically treated surface by a quantity known as impedance. Impedance is a complex quantity. As such, it is designed primarily for frequency-domain analysis. Time-domain boundary conditions that are the equivalent of the frequency-domain impedance boundary condition are proposed. Both single frequency and model broadband time-domain impedance boundary conditions are provided. It is shown that the proposed boundary conditions, together with the linearized Euler equations, form well-posed initial boundary value problems. Unlike ill-posed problems, they are free from spurious instabilities that would render time-marching computational solutions impossible.

  7. Application of the boundary element method to transient heat conduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dargush, G. F.; Banerjee, P. K.

    1991-01-01

    An advanced boundary element method (BEM) is presented for the transient heat conduction analysis of engineering components. The numerical implementation necessarily includes higher-order conforming elements, self-adaptive integration and a multiregion capability. Planar, three-dimensional and axisymmetric analyses are all addressed with a consistent time-domain convolution approach, which completely eliminates the need for volume discretization for most practical analyses. The resulting general purpose algorithm establishes BEM as an attractive alternative to the more familiar finite difference and finite element methods for this class of problems. Several detailed numerical examples are included to emphasize the accuracy, stability and generality of the present BEM. Furthermore, a new efficient treatment is introduced for bodies with embedded holes. This development provides a powerful analytical tool for transient solutions of components, such as casting moulds and turbine blades, which are cumbersome to model when employing the conventional domain-based methods.

  8. Boundary element analysis of cavity noise problems with complicated boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, S.; Maruyama, S.; Ido, H.

    1989-04-01

    The application of the boundary element method for the numerical solution of noise problems inside a complex-shaped cavity is considered. In particular, a new formulation for complicated boundary conditions to solve practical noise problems inside a vehicle cabin is proposed. This approach makes it possible to treat the acoustic effect of absorbent materials pasted on vibrating surfaces and the effect of leakage through an opening. Furthermore, boundary vibration velocities can be calculated with the structural-acoustic coupling effect. The sound pressure inside a linear duct is calculated to demonstrate the accuracy of the method in comparison with analytically determined solutions. Finally, the transmission of sound through a cavity-backed plate and the characteristics of sound absorption inside a sedan compartment model are discussed.

  9. A Matlab library for solving quasi-static volume conduction problems using the boundary element method.

    PubMed

    Stenroos, M; Mäntynen, V; Nenonen, J

    2007-12-01

    The boundary element method (BEM) is commonly used in the modeling of bioelectromagnetic phenomena. The Matlab language is increasingly popular among students and researchers, but there is no free, easy-to-use Matlab library for boundary element computations. We present a hands-on, freely available Matlab BEM source code for solving bioelectromagnetic volume conduction problems and any (quasi-)static potential problems that obey the Laplace equation. The basic principle of the BEM is presented and discretization of the surface integral equation for electric potential is worked through in detail. Contents and design of the library are described, and results of example computations in spherical volume conductors are validated against analytical solutions. Three application examples are also presented. Further information, source code for application examples, and information on obtaining the library are available in the WWW-page of the library: (http://biomed.tkk.fi/BEM).

  10. A finite element-boundary integral method for conformal antenna arrays on a circular cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempel, Leo C.; Volakis, John L.; Woo, Alex C.; Yu, C. Long

    1992-01-01

    Conformal antenna arrays offer many cost and weight advantages over conventional antenna systems. In the past, antenna designers have had to resort to expensive measurements in order to develop a conformal array design. This is due to the lack of rigorous mathematical models for conformal antenna arrays, and as a result the design of conformal arrays is primarily based on planar antenna design concepts. Recently, we have found the finite element-boundary integral method to be very successful in modeling large planar arrays of arbitrary composition in a metallic plane. Herewith we shall extend this formulation for conformal arrays on large metallic cylinders. In this we develop the mathematical formulation. In particular we discuss the finite element equations, the shape elements, and the boundary integral evaluation, and it is shown how this formulation can be applied with minimal computation and memory requirements. The implementation shall be discussed in a later report.

  11. A finite element-boundary integral method for conformal antenna arrays on a circular cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempel, Leo C.; Volakis, John L.

    1992-01-01

    Conformal antenna arrays offer many cost and weight advantages over conventional antenna systems. In the past, antenna designers have had to resort to expensive measurements in order to develop a conformal array design. This was due to the lack of rigorous mathematical models for conformal antenna arrays. As a result, the design of conformal arrays was primarily based on planar antenna design concepts. Recently, we have found the finite element-boundary integral method to be very successful in modeling large planar arrays of arbitrary composition in a metallic plane. We are extending this formulation to conformal arrays on large metallic cylinders. In doing so, we will develop a mathematical formulation. In particular, we discuss the finite element equations, the shape elements, and the boundary integral evaluation. It is shown how this formulation can be applied with minimal computation and memory requirements.

  12. Micromechanical modeling of laminated composites with interfaces and woven composites using the boundary element method

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, R.K.; Hopkins, D.A.

    1993-10-01

    The boundary element method is utilized to analyze the effects of fiber/matrix interfaces on the micromechanical behavior of laminated composites as well as the elastic behavior of woven composites. Effective composite properties are computed for laminated SiC/RBSN and SiC/Ti-15-3 composites, as well as a woven SiC/SiC composite. The properties calculated using the computerized tool BEST-CMS match the experimental results well.

  13. Micromechanical modeling of laminated composites with interfaces and woven composites using the boundary element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Hopkins, Dale A.

    1993-01-01

    The boundary element method is utilized to analyze the effects of fiber/matrix interfaces on the micromechanical behavior of laminated composites as well as the elastic behavior of woven composites. Effective composite properties are computed for laminated SiC/RBSN and SiC/Ti-15-3 composites, as well as a woven SiC/SiC composite. The properties calculated using the computerized tool BEST-CMS match the experimental results well.

  14. Steady-State and Transient Boundary Element Methods for Coupled Heat Conduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kontinos, Dean A.

    1997-01-01

    Boundary element algorithms for the solution of steady-state and transient heat conduction are presented. The algorithms are designed for efficient coupling with computational fluid dynamic discretizations and feature piecewise linear elements with offset nodal points. The steady-state algorithm employs the fundamental solution approach; the integration kernels are computed analytically based on linear shape functions, linear elements, and variably offset nodal points. The analytic expressions for both singular and nonsingular integrands are presented. The transient algorithm employs the transient fundamental solution; the temporal integration is performed analytically and the nonsingular spatial integration is performed numerically using Gaussian quadrature. A series solution to the integration is derived for the instance of a singular integrand. The boundary-only character of the algorithm is maintained by integrating the influence coefficients from initial time. Numerical results are compared to analytical solutions to verify the current boundary element algorithms. The steady-state and transient algorithms are numerically shown to be second-order accurate in space and time, respectively.

  15. High speed propeller acoustics and aerodynamics - A boundary element approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farassat, F.; Myers, M. K.; Dunn, M. H.

    1989-01-01

    The Boundary Element Method (BEM) is applied in this paper to the problems of acoustics and aerodynamics of high speed propellers. The underlying theory is described based on the linearized Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings equation. The surface pressure on the blade is assumed unknown in the aerodynamic problem. It is obtained by solving a singular integral equation. The acoustic problem is then solved by moving the field point inside the fluid medium and evaluating some surface and line integrals. Thus the BEM provides a powerful technique in calculation of high speed propeller aerodynamics and acoustics.

  16. Boundary conditions for direct computation of aerodynamic sound generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colonius, Tim; Lele, Sanjiva K.; Moin, Parviz

    1992-01-01

    A numerical scheme suitable for the computation of both the near field acoustic sources and the far field sound produced by turbulent free shear flows utilizing the Navier-Stokes equations is presented. To produce stable numerical schemes in the presence of shear, damping terms must be added to the boundary conditions. The numerical technique and boundary conditions are found to give stable results for computations of spatially evolving mixing layers.

  17. Telomerase RNA stem terminus element affects template boundary element function, telomere sequence, and shelterin binding.

    PubMed

    Webb, Christopher J; Zakian, Virginia A

    2015-09-01

    The stem terminus element (STE), which was discovered 13 y ago in human telomerase RNA, is required for telomerase activity, yet its mode of action is unknown. We report that the Schizosaccharomyces pombe telomerase RNA, TER1 (telomerase RNA 1), also contains a STE, which is essential for telomere maintenance. Cells expressing a partial loss-of-function TER1 STE allele maintained short stable telomeres by a recombination-independent mechanism. Remarkably, the mutant telomere sequence was different from that of wild-type cells. Generation of the altered sequence is explained by reverse transcription into the template boundary element, demonstrating that the STE helps maintain template boundary element function. The altered telomeres bound less Pot1 (protection of telomeres 1) and Taz1 (telomere-associated in Schizosaccharomyces pombe 1) in vivo. Thus, the S. pombe STE, although distant from the template, ensures proper telomere sequence, which in turn promotes proper assembly of the shelterin complex.

  18. Transpiration and film cooling boundary layer computer program. Volume 2: Computer program and user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gloss, R. J.

    1971-01-01

    A finite difference turbulent boundary layer computer program which allows for mass transfer wall cooling and equilibrium chemistry effects is presented. The program is capable of calculating laminar or turbulent boundary layer solutions for an arbitrary ideal gas or an equilibrium hydrogen oxygen system. Either two dimensional or axisymmetric geometric configurations may be considered. The equations are solved, in nondimension-alized physical coordinates, using the implicit Crank-Nicolson technique. The finite difference forms of the conservation of mass, momentum, total enthalpy and elements equations are linearized and uncoupled, thereby generating easily solvable tridiagonal sets of algebraic equations. A detailed description of the computer program, as well as a program user's manual is provided. Detailed descriptions of all boundary layer subroutines are included, as well as a section defining all program symbols of principal importance. Instructions are then given for preparing card input to the program and for interpreting the printed output. Finally, two sample cases are included to illustrate the use of the program.

  19. A shell element for computing 3D eddy currents -- Applications to transformers

    SciTech Connect

    Guerin, C.; Tanneau, G.; Meunier, G.; Labie, P.; Ngnegueu, T.; Sacotte, M.

    1995-05-01

    A skin depth-independent shell element to model thin conducting sheets is described in a finite element context. This element takes into account the field variation through depth due to skin effect. The finite element formulation is first described, then boundary conditions at the edge of conducting shells and the possibility of describing non conducting line gaps and holes are discussed. Finally, a computation of an earthing transformer model with an aluminium shield modelled with shell elements is presented.

  20. Arc Flash Boundary Calculations Using Computer Software Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, M.D.

    2005-01-07

    Arc Flash Protection boundary calculations have become easier to perform with the availability of personal computer software. These programs incorporate arc flash protection boundary formulas for different voltage and current levels, calculate the bolted fault current at each bus, and use built in time-current coordination curves to determine the clearing time of protective devices in the system. Results of the arc flash protection boundary calculations can be presented in several different forms--as an annotation to the one-line diagram, as a table of arc flash protection boundary distances, and as printed placards to be attached to the appropriate equipment. Basic arc flash protection boundary principles are presented in this paper along with several helpful suggestions for performing arc flash protection boundary calculations.

  1. Helical swimming in Stokes flow using a novel boundary-element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Breuer, Kenneth S.; Powers, Thomas R.

    2013-06-01

    We apply the boundary-element method to Stokes flows with helical symmetry, such as the flow driven by an immersed rotating helical flagellum. We show that the two-dimensional boundary integral method can be reduced to one dimension using the helical symmetry. The computational cost is thus much reduced while spatial resolution is maintained. We review the robustness of this method by comparing the simulation results with the experimental measurement of the motility of model helical flagella of various ratios of pitch to radius, along with predictions from resistive-force theory and slender-body theory. We also show that the modified boundary integral method provides reliable convergence if the singularities in the kernel of the integral are treated appropriately.

  2. Central control element expands computer capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Easton, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    Redundant processing and multiprocessing modes can be obtained from one computer by using logic configuration. Configuration serves as central control element which can automatically alternate between high-capacity multiprocessing mode and high-reliability redundant mode using dynamic mode switching in real time.

  3. Finite element computation with parallel VLSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgregor, J.; Salama, M.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes a parallel processing computer consisting of a 16-bit microcomputer as a master processor which controls and coordinates the activities of 8086/8087 VLSI chip set slave processors working in parallel. The hardware is inexpensive and can be flexibly configured and programmed to perform various functions. This makes it a useful research tool for the development of, and experimentation with parallel mathematical algorithms. Application of the hardware to computational tasks involved in the finite element analysis method is demonstrated by the generation and assembly of beam finite element stiffness matrices. A number of possible schemes for the implementation of N-elements on N- or n-processors (N is greater than n) are described, and the speedup factors of their time consumption are determined as a function of the number of available parallel processors.

  4. Solving finite element equations on concurrent computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nour-Omid, B.; Raefsky, A.; Lyzenga, G.

    1987-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of a concurrent algorithm for the solution of systems of equations arising in finite element applications. The approach is based on a hybrid of direct elimination method and preconditioned conjugate iteration. Two different preconditioners are used; diagonal scaling and a concurrent implementation of incomplete LU factorization. First, an automatic procedure is used to partition the finite element mesh into sub-structures. The particular mesh partition is chosen to minimize an estimate of the cost for evaluating the solution using this algorithm on a concurrent computer. These procedures are implemented in a finite element program on the JPL/CalTech MARK III hypercube computer. An overview of the structure of this program is presented. The performance of the solution method is demonstrated with the aid of a number of numerical test runs, and its advantages for concurrent implementations are discussed. Efficiency and speed-up factors over sequential machines for the numerical examples are highlighted.

  5. Aspects of implementing constant traction boundary conditions in computational homogenization via semi-Dirichlet boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javili, A.; Saeb, S.; Steinmann, P.

    2016-10-01

    In the past decades computational homogenization has proven to be a powerful strategy to compute the overall response of continua. Central to computational homogenization is the Hill-Mandel condition. The Hill-Mandel condition is fulfilled via imposing displacement boundary conditions (DBC), periodic boundary conditions (PBC) or traction boundary conditions (TBC) collectively referred to as canonical boundary conditions. While DBC and PBC are widely implemented, TBC remains poorly understood, with a few exceptions. The main issue with TBC is the singularity of the stiffness matrix due to rigid body motions. The objective of this manuscript is to propose a generic strategy to implement TBC in the context of computational homogenization at finite strains. To eliminate rigid body motions, we introduce the concept of semi-Dirichlet boundary conditions. Semi-Dirichlet boundary conditions are non-homogeneous Dirichlet-type constraints that simultaneously satisfy the Neumann-type conditions. A key feature of the proposed methodology is its applicability for both strain-driven as well as stress-driven homogenization. The performance of the proposed scheme is demonstrated via a series of numerical examples.

  6. Thermal analysis of a functionally graded material subject to a thermal gradient using the boundary element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Hopkins, Dale A.

    1994-01-01

    The boundary element method is utilized in this study to conduct thermal analysis of functionally graded composites, materials in which the internal microstructure or properties are explicitly tailored in order to obtain an optimal response, on the micromechanical (constituent) scale. A unique feature of the boundary element formulations used here is the use of circular shape functions to convert the two-dimensional integrations of the composite fibers to one dimensional integrations. Using the computer code BEST-CMS, the through the thickness temperature profiles are computed for a representative material with varying numbers of fibers and fiber spacing in the thickness direction. The computed temperature profiles are compared to those obtained using an alternate analytical theory which explicitly couples the heterogeneous microstructure to the global analysis. The boundary element results compared favorably to the analytical calculations, with discrepancies that are explainable based on the boundary element formulation. The results serve both to demonstrate the ability of the boundary element method to analyze these types of materials, and to verify the accuracy of the analytical theory.

  7. OPTIMIZATION OF 3-D IMAGE-GUIDED NEAR INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY USING BOUNDARY ELEMENT METHOD

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Subhadra; Carpenter, Colin; Pogue, Brian W.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2010-01-01

    Multimodality imaging systems combining optical techniques with MRI/CT provide high-resolution functional characterization of tissue by imaging molecular and vascular biomarkers. To optimize these hybrid systems for clinical use, faster and automatable algorithms are required for 3-D imaging. Towards this end, a boundary element model was used to incorporate tissue boundaries from MRI/CT into image formation process. This method uses surface rendering to describe light propagation in 3-D using diffusion equation. Parallel computing provided speedup of up to 54% in time of computation. Simulations showed that location of NIRS probe was crucial for quantitatively accurate estimation of tumor response. A change of up to 61% was seen between cycles 1 and 3 in monitoring tissue response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:20523751

  8. A rigid surface boundary element for soil-structure interaction analysis in the direct time domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizos, D. C.

    Many soil-structure interaction problems involve studies of single or multiple rigid bodies of arbitrary shape and soil media. The commonly used boundary element methods implement the equations of the rigid body in a form that depends on the particulars of the geometry and requires partitioning and condensation of the associated algebraic system of equations. The present work employs the direct time domain B-Spline BEM for 3D elastodynamic analysis and presents an efficient implementation of rigid bodies of arbitrary shape in contact with, or embedded in, elastic media. The formulation of a rigid surface boundary element introduced herein is suitable for direct superposition in the BEM system of algebraic equations. Consequently, solutions are computed in a single analysis step, eliminating, thus, the need for partitioning of the system of equations. Computational efficiency is also achieved due to the extremely sparse form of the associated coefficient matrices. The proposed element can be used for the modeling of single or multiple rigid bodies of arbitrary shape within the framework of the BEM method. The efficiency and general nature of the proposed element is demonstrated through applications related to the dynamic analysis of rigid surface and embedded foundations and their interaction with embedded rigid bodies of arbitrary shape.

  9. Boundary element analysis of sound scattered by a moving surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, M. K.; Hausmann, J. S.

    1990-10-01

    A solution for the acoustic field scattered from a uniformly moving rigid body in the presence of a harmonic incident source has been obtained using a boundary integral method. A derivation of the Kirchhoff formula given by Farassat and Myers (1988) for moving surfaces forms the basis for the analysis, and the development of a boundary integral method for the solution of scattering problems from moving rigid bodies is described. Finite elements are used in conjunction with the Galerkin method in order to solve the integral equation that results from the Kirchhoff formula when the observer point is placed on the moving body surface. Once appropriate surface field values are known they are inserted back into the formula in order to predict the field scattered off the body. Tests, including the so called superposition method, are carried out in order to validate the technique and to establish some confidence in its accuracy. Application of the superposition method to moving bodies is presented, and results of the two approaches are discussed. Sample calculations of scattering from a simple body are presented to illustrate the effects of variations in relevant parameters.

  10. A finite element-boundary integral method for scattering and radiation by two- and three-dimensional structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, Jian-Ming; Volakis, John L.; Collins, Jeffery D.

    1991-01-01

    A review of a hybrid finite element-boundary integral formulation for scattering and radiation by two- and three-dimensional composite structures is presented. In contrast to other hybrid techniques involving the finite element method, the proposed one is in principle exact and can be implemented using a low O(N) storage. This is of particular importance for large scale applications and is a characteristic of the boundary chosen to terminate the finite element mesh, usually as close to the structure as possible. A certain class of these boundaries lead to convolutional boundary integrals which can be evaluated via the fast Fourier transform (FFT) without a need to generate a matrix; thus, retaining the O(N) storage requirement. The paper begins with a general description of the method. A number of two- and three-dimensional applications are then given, including numerical computations which demonstrate the method's accuracy, efficiency, and capability.

  11. COMGEN-BEM: Boundary element model generation for composite materials micromechanical analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Robert K.

    1992-01-01

    Composite Model Generation-Boundary Element Method (COMGEN-BEM) is a program developed in PATRAN command language (PCL) which generates boundary element models of continuous fiber composites at the micromechanical (constituent) scale. Based on the entry of a few simple parameters such as fiber volume fraction and fiber diameter, the model geometry and boundary element model are generated. In addition, various mesh densities, material properties, fiber orientation angles, loads, and boundary conditions can be specified. The generated model can then be translated to a format consistent with a boundary element analysis code such as BEST-CMS.

  12. A new simple multidomain fast multipole boundary element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, S.; Liu, Y. J.

    2016-09-01

    A simple multidomain fast multipole boundary element method (BEM) for solving potential problems is presented in this paper, which can be applied to solve a true multidomain problem or a large-scale single domain problem using the domain decomposition technique. In this multidomain BEM, the coefficient matrix is formed simply by assembling the coefficient matrices of each subdomain and the interface conditions between subdomains without eliminating any unknown variables on the interfaces. Compared with other conventional multidomain BEM approaches, this new approach is more efficient with the fast multipole method, regardless how the subdomains are connected. Instead of solving the linear system of equations directly, the entire coefficient matrix is partitioned and decomposed using Schur complement in this new approach. Numerical results show that the new multidomain fast multipole BEM uses fewer iterations in most cases with the iterative equation solver and less CPU time than the traditional fast multipole BEM in solving large-scale BEM models. A large-scale fuel cell model with more than 6 million elements was solved successfully on a cluster within 3 h using the new multidomain fast multipole BEM.

  13. New developments in the CREAM Computing Element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreetto, Paolo; Bertocco, Sara; Capannini, Fabio; Cecchi, Marco; Dorigo, Alvise; Frizziero, Eric; Gianelle, Alessio; Mezzadri, Massimo; Monforte, Salvatore; Prelz, Francesco; Rebatto, David; Sgaravatto, Massimo; Zangrando, Luigi

    2012-12-01

    The EU-funded project EMI aims at providing a unified, standardized, easy to install software for distributed computing infrastructures. CREAM is one of the middleware products part of the EMI middleware distribution: it implements a Grid job management service which allows the submission, management and monitoring of computational jobs to local resource management systems. In this paper we discuss about some new features being implemented in the CREAM Computing Element. The implementation of the EMI Execution Service (EMI-ES) specification (an agreement in the EMI consortium on interfaces and protocols to be used in order to enable computational job submission and management required across technologies) is one of the new functions being implemented. New developments are also focusing in the High Availability (HA) area, to improve performance, scalability, availability and fault tolerance.

  14. Synchrotron Imaging Computations on the Grid without the Computing Element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curri, A.; Pugliese, R.; Borghes, R.; Kourousias, G.

    2011-12-01

    Besides the heavy use of the Grid in the Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SRF) Elettra, additional special requirements from the beamlines had to be satisfied through a novel solution that we present in this work. In the traditional Grid Computing paradigm the computations are performed on the Worker Nodes of the grid element known as the Computing Element. A Grid middleware extension that our team has been working on, is that of the Instrument Element. In general it is used to Grid-enable instrumentation; and it can be seen as a neighbouring concept to that of the traditional Control Systems. As a further extension we demonstrate the Instrument Element as the steering mechanism for a series of computations. In our deployment it interfaces a Control System that manages a series of computational demanding Scientific Imaging tasks in an online manner. The instrument control in Elettra is done through a suitable Distributed Control System, a common approach in the SRF community. The applications that we present are for a beamline working in medical imaging. The solution resulted to a substantial improvement of a Computed Tomography workflow. The near-real-time requirements could not have been easily satisfied from our Grid's middleware (gLite) due to the various latencies often occurred during the job submission and queuing phases. Moreover the required deployment of a set of TANGO devices could not have been done in a standard gLite WN. Besides the avoidance of certain core Grid components, the Grid Security infrastructure has been utilised in the final solution.

  15. Fast and Computationally Efficient Boundary Detection Technique for Medical Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Arpita; Goswami, Partha; Sen, Susanta

    2011-03-01

    Detection of edge is a fundamental procedure of image processing. Many edge detection algorithms have been developed based on computation of the intensity gradient. In medical images, boundaries of the objects are vague for gradual change of intensities. Therefore need exists to develop a computationally efficient and accurate edge detection approach. We have presented such algorithm using modified global threshold technique. In our work, the boundaries are highlighted from the background by selecting a threshold (T) that separates object and background. In the image, where object to background or vice-verse transition occurs, pixel intensity either rises greater or equal to T (background to object transition) or falls less than T (object to background). We have marked these transition regions as object boundary and enhanced the corresponding intensity. The value of T may be specified heuristically or by following specific algorithm. Conventional global threshold algorithm computes the value of T automatically. But this approach is not computationally efficient and required a large memory. In this study, we have proposed a parameter for which computation of T is very easy and fast. We have also proved that a fixed size memory [ 256 × 4 Byte] is enough to compute this algorithm.

  16. The case for biological quantum computer elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baer, Wolfgang; Pizzi, Rita

    2009-05-01

    An extension to vonNeumann's analysis of quantum theory suggests self-measurement is a fundamental process of Nature. By mapping the quantum computer to the brain architecture we will argue that the cognitive experience results from a measurement of a quantum memory maintained by biological entities. The insight provided by this mapping suggests quantum effects are not restricted to small atomic and nuclear phenomena but are an integral part of our own cognitive experience and further that the architecture of a quantum computer system parallels that of a conscious brain. We will then review the suggestions for biological quantum elements in basic neural structures and address the de-coherence objection by arguing for a self- measurement event model of Nature. We will argue that to first order approximation the universe is composed of isolated self-measurement events which guaranties coherence. Controlled de-coherence is treated as the input/output interactions between quantum elements of a quantum computer and the quantum memory maintained by biological entities cognizant of the quantum calculation results. Lastly we will present stem-cell based neuron experiments conducted by one of us with the aim of demonstrating the occurrence of quantum effects in living neural networks and discuss future research projects intended to reach this objective.

  17. High-Speed Boundary-Layer Transition Induced by an Isolated Roughness Element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kegerise, Michael A.; Owens, Lewis R.; King, Rudolph A.

    2010-01-01

    Progress on an experimental effort to quantify the instability mechanisms associated with roughness-induced transition in a high-speed boundary layer is reported in this paper. To simulate the low-disturbance environment encountered during high-altitude flight, the experimental study was performed in the NASA-Langley Mach 3.5 Supersonic Low-Disturbance Tunnel. A flat plate trip sizing study was performed first to identify the roughness height required to force transition. That study, which included transition onset measurements under both quiet and noisy freestream conditions, confirmed the sensitivity of roughness-induced transition to freestream disturbance levels. Surveys of the laminar boundary layer on a 7deg half-angle sharp-tipped cone were performed via hot-wire anemometry and pitot-pressure measurements. The measured mean mass-flux and Mach-number profiles agreed very well with computed mean-flow profiles. Finally, surveys of the boundary layer developing downstream of an isolated roughness element on the cone were performed. The measurements revealed an instability in the far wake of the roughness element that grows exponentially and has peak frequencies in the 150 to 250 kHz range.

  18. Artificial Boundary Conditions for Computation of Oscillating External Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsynkov, S. V.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new technique for the numerical treatment of external flow problems with oscillatory behavior of the solution in time. Specifically, we consider the case of unbounded compressible viscous plane flow past a finite body (airfoil). Oscillations of the flow in time may be caused by the time-periodic injection of fluid into the boundary layer, which in accordance with experimental data, may essentially increase the performance of the airfoil. To conduct the actual computations, we have to somehow restrict the original unbounded domain, that is, to introduce an artificial (external) boundary and to further consider only a finite computational domain. Consequently, we will need to formulate some artificial boundary conditions (ABC's) at the introduced external boundary. The ABC's we are aiming to obtain must meet a fundamental requirement. One should be able to uniquely complement the solution calculated inside the finite computational domain to its infinite exterior so that the original problem is solved within the desired accuracy. Our construction of such ABC's for oscillating flows is based on an essential assumption: the Navier-Stokes equations can be linearized in the far field against the free-stream back- ground. To actually compute the ABC's, we represent the far-field solution as a Fourier series in time and then apply the Difference Potentials Method (DPM) of V. S. Ryaben'kii. This paper contains a general theoretical description of the algorithm for setting the DPM-based ABC's for time-periodic external flows. Based on our experience in implementing analogous ABC's for steady-state problems (a simpler case), we expect that these boundary conditions will become an effective tool for constructing robust numerical methods to calculate oscillatory flows.

  19. Massively parallel computation of RCS with finite elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Jay

    1993-01-01

    One of the promising combinations of finite element approaches for scattering problems uses Whitney edge elements, spherical vector wave-absorbing boundary conditions, and bi-conjugate gradient solution for the frequency-domain near field. Each of these approaches may be criticized. Low-order elements require high mesh density, but also result in fast, reliable iterative convergence. Spherical wave-absorbing boundary conditions require additional space to be meshed beyond the most minimal near-space region, but result in fully sparse, symmetric matrices which keep storage and solution times low. Iterative solution is somewhat unpredictable and unfriendly to multiple right-hand sides, yet we find it to be uniformly fast on large problems to date, given the other two approaches. Implementation of these approaches on a distributed memory, message passing machine yields huge dividends, as full scalability to the largest machines appears assured and iterative solution times are well-behaved for large problems. We present times and solutions for computed RCS for a conducting cube and composite permeability/conducting sphere on the Intel ipsc860 with up to 16 processors solving over 200,000 unknowns. We estimate problems of approximately 10 million unknowns, encompassing 1000 cubic wavelengths, may be attempted on a currently available 512 processor machine, but would be exceedingly tedious to prepare. The most severe bottlenecks are due to the slow rate of mesh generation on non-parallel machines and the large transfer time from such a machine to the parallel processor. One solution, in progress, is to create and then distribute a coarse mesh among the processors, followed by systematic refinement within each processor. Elimination of redundant node definitions at the mesh-partition surfaces, snap-to-surface post processing of the resulting mesh for good modelling of curved surfaces, and load-balancing redistribution of new elements after the refinement are auxiliary

  20. Torsional vibration analysis of bars including secondary torsional shear deformation effect by the boundary element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapountzakis, E. J.; Tsipiras, V. J.; Argyridi, A. K.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper a boundary element method (BEM) is developed for the torsional vibration problem of bars of arbitrary doubly symmetric constant cross section, taking into account the nonuniform warping and secondary torsional shear deformation effects (STSDE). The bar is subjected to arbitrarily distributed or concentrated dynamic torsional loading along its length, while its edges are subjected to the most general torsional and warping boundary conditions. Apart from the angle of twist, the primary angle of twist per unit length is considered as an additional 1-D degree of freedom in order to account for the STSDE in the equations of motion of the bar. The warping shear stress distribution and the pertinent secondary torsional rigidity are computed by satisfying local equilibrium considerations under dynamic conditions without adhering to assumptions of Thin Tube Theory (TTT). By employing a distributed mass model system accounting for rotatory and warping inertia, an initial boundary value and two boundary value problems with respect to the variable along the bar time-dependent 1-D kinematical components, to the primary and secondary warping functions, respectively, are formulated. The latter are solved employing a pure BE method, requiring exclusively boundary discretization of the bar's cross section. The numerical solution of the aforementioned initial boundary value problem is performed through a BE method leading to a system of differential equations with displacement only unknowns, which is solved using an efficient direct time integration technique. Additionally, for the free vibrations case, a generalized eigenvalue problem is formulated through a similar BE technique. The accuracy and reliability of the results is assessed by FEM solutions employing solid or shell modelling. Both open- and closed-shaped cross section bars are examined and the necessity to include nonuniform torsional and STSD effects in the dynamic analysis of bars is demonstrated.

  1. Boundary element method applied to a gas-fired pin-fin-enhanced heat pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Andraka, C.E.; Knorovsky, G.A.; Drewien, C.A.

    1998-02-01

    The thermal conduction of a portion of an enhanced surface heat exchanger for a gas fired heat pipe solar receiver was modeled using the boundary element and finite element methods (BEM and FEM) to determine the effect of weld fillet size on performance of a stud welded pin fin. A process that could be utilized by others for designing the surface mesh on an object of interest, performing a conversion from the mesh into the input format utilized by the BEM code, obtaining output on the surface of the object, and displaying visual results was developed. It was determined that the weld fillet on the pin fin significantly enhanced the heat performance, improving the operating margin of the heat exchanger. The performance of the BEM program on the pin fin was measured (as computational time) and used as a performance comparison with the FEM model. Given similar surface element densities, the BEM method took longer to get a solution than the FEM method. The FEM method creates a sparse matrix that scales in storage and computation as the number of nodes (N), whereas the BEM method scales as N{sup 2} in storage and N{sup 3} in computation.

  2. Hybrid Finite Element-Fast Spectral Domain Multilayer Boundary Integral Modeling of Doubly Periodic Structures

    SciTech Connect

    T.F. Eibert; J.L. Volakis; Y.E. Erdemli

    2002-03-03

    Hybrid finite element (FE)--boundary integral (BI) analysis of infinite periodic arrays is extended to include planar multilayered Green's functions. In this manner, a portion of the volumetric dielectric region can be modeled via the finite element method whereas uniform multilayered regions can be modeled using a multilayered Green's function. As such, thick uniform substrates can be modeled without loss of efficiency and accuracy. The multilayered Green's function is analytically computed in the spectral domain and the resulting BI matrix-vector products are evaluated via the fast spectral domain algorithm (FSDA). As a result, the computational cost of the matrix-vector products is kept at O(N). Furthermore, the number of Floquet modes in the expansion are kept very few by placing the BI surfaces within the computational unit cell. Examples of frequency selective surface (FSS) arrays are analyzed with this method to demonstrate the accuracy and capability of the approach. One example involves complicated multilayered substrates above and below an inhomogeneous filter element and the other is an optical ring-slot array on a substrate several hundred wavelengths in thickness. Comparisons with measurements are included.

  3. Boundary integral spectral element method analyses of extreme ultraviolet multilayer defects.

    PubMed

    Niu, Jun; Luo, Ma; Fang, Yuan; Liu, Qing Huo

    2014-10-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography is an emerging technology for high-density semiconductor patterning. Multilayer distortion caused by mask defects is regarded as one of the critical challenges of EUV lithography. To simulate the influence of the defected nanoscale structures with high accuracy and efficiency, we have developed a boundary integral spectral element method (BI-SEM) that combines the SEM with a set of surface integral equations. The SEM is used to solve the interior computational domain, while the open boundaries are truncated by the surface integral equations. Both two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) EUV cases are simulated. Through comparing the performance of this method with the conventional finite element method (FEM), it is shown that the proposed BI-SEM can greatly decrease both the memory cost and the computation time. For typical 2D problems, we show that the BI-SEM is 11 and 1.25 times more efficient than the FEM in terms of memory and CPU time, respectively, while for 3D problems, these factors are over 14 and 2, respectively, for smaller problems; realistic 3D problems that cannot be solved by the conventional FEM can be accurately simulated by the BI-SEM. PMID:25401246

  4. Experimental validation of finite element and boundary element methods for predicting structural vibration and radiated noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seybert, A. F.; Wu, T. W.; Wu, X. F.

    1994-01-01

    This research report is presented in three parts. In the first part, acoustical analyses were performed on modes of vibration of the housing of a transmission of a gear test rig developed by NASA. The modes of vibration of the transmission housing were measured using experimental modal analysis. The boundary element method (BEM) was used to calculate the sound pressure and sound intensity on the surface of the housing and the radiation efficiency of each mode. The radiation efficiency of each of the transmission housing modes was then compared to theoretical results for a finite baffled plate. In the second part, analytical and experimental validation of methods to predict structural vibration and radiated noise are presented. A rectangular box excited by a mechanical shaker was used as a vibrating structure. Combined finite element method (FEM) and boundary element method (BEM) models of the apparatus were used to predict the noise level radiated from the box. The FEM was used to predict the vibration, while the BEM was used to predict the sound intensity and total radiated sound power using surface vibration as the input data. Vibration predicted by the FEM model was validated by experimental modal analysis; noise predicted by the BEM was validated by measurements of sound intensity. Three types of results are presented for the total radiated sound power: sound power predicted by the BEM model using vibration data measured on the surface of the box; sound power predicted by the FEM/BEM model; and sound power measured by an acoustic intensity scan. In the third part, the structure used in part two was modified. A rib was attached to the top plate of the structure. The FEM and BEM were then used to predict structural vibration and radiated noise respectively. The predicted vibration and radiated noise were then validated through experimentation.

  5. BEST3D user's manual: Boundary Element Solution Technology, 3-Dimensional Version 3.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The theoretical basis and programming strategy utilized in the construction of the computer program BEST3D (boundary element solution technology - three dimensional) and detailed input instructions are provided for the use of the program. An extensive set of test cases and sample problems is included in the manual and is also available for distribution with the program. The BEST3D program was developed under the 3-D Inelastic Analysis Methods for Hot Section Components contract (NAS3-23697). The overall objective of this program was the development of new computer programs allowing more accurate and efficient three-dimensional thermal and stress analysis of hot section components, i.e., combustor liners, turbine blades, and turbine vanes. The BEST3D program allows both linear and nonlinear analysis of static and quasi-static elastic problems and transient dynamic analysis for elastic problems. Calculation of elastic natural frequencies and mode shapes is also provided.

  6. Open Rotor Computational Aeroacoustic Analysis with an Immersed Boundary Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brehm, Christoph; Barad, Michael F.; Kiris, Cetin C.

    2016-01-01

    Reliable noise prediction capabilities are essential to enable novel fuel efficient open rotor designs that can meet the community and cabin noise standards. Toward this end, immersed boundary methods have reached a level of maturity so that they are being frequently employed for specific real world applications within NASA. This paper demonstrates that our higher-order immersed boundary method provides the ability for aeroacoustic analysis of wake-dominated flow fields generated by highly complex geometries. This is the first of a kind aeroacoustic simulation of an open rotor propulsion system employing an immersed boundary method. In addition to discussing the peculiarities of applying the immersed boundary method to this moving boundary problem, we will provide a detailed aeroacoustic analysis of the noise generation mechanisms encountered in the open rotor flow. The simulation data is compared to available experimental data and other computational results employing more conventional CFD methods. The noise generation mechanisms are analyzed employing spectral analysis, proper orthogonal decomposition and the causality method.

  7. Open Rotor Computational Aeroacoustic Analysis with an Immersed Boundary Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brehm, Christoph; Barad, Michael F.; Kiris, Cetin C.

    2016-01-01

    Reliable noise prediction capabilities are essential to enable novel fuel efficient open rotor designs that can meet the community and cabin noise standards. Toward this end, immersed boundary methods have reached a level of maturity where more and more complex flow problems can be tackled with this approach. This paper demonstrates that our higher-order immersed boundary method provides the ability for aeroacoustic analysis of wake-dominated flow fields generated by a contra-rotating open rotor. This is the first of a kind aeroacoustic simulation of an open rotor propulsion system employing an immersed boundary method. In addition to discussing the methodologies of how to apply the immersed boundary method to this moving boundary problem, we will provide a detailed validation of the aeroacoustic analysis approach employing the Launch Ascent and Vehicle Aerodynamics (LAVA) solver. Two free-stream Mach numbers with M=0.2 and M=0.78 are considered in this analysis that are based on the nominally take-off and cruise flow conditions. The simulation data is compared to available experimental data and other computational results employing more conventional CFD methods. Spectral analysis is used to determine the dominant wave propagation pattern in the acoustic near-field.

  8. Computer constructed imagery of distant plasma interaction boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenstadt, E. W.; Schurr, H. D.; Tsugawa, R. K.

    1982-01-01

    Computer constructed sketches of plasma boundaries arising from the interaction between the solar wind and the magnetosphere can serve as both didactic and research tools. In particular, the structure of the earth's bow shock can be represented as a nonuniform surfce according to the instantaneous orientation of the IMF, and temporal changes in structural distribution can be modeled as a sequence of sketches based on observed sequences of spacecraft-based measurements. Viewed rapidly, such a sequence of sketches can be the basis for representation of plasma processes by computer animation.

  9. Computational quantum-classical boundary of noisy commuting quantum circuits.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Keisuke; Tamate, Shuhei

    2016-01-01

    It is often said that the transition from quantum to classical worlds is caused by decoherence originated from an interaction between a system of interest and its surrounding environment. Here we establish a computational quantum-classical boundary from the viewpoint of classical simulatability of a quantum system under decoherence. Specifically, we consider commuting quantum circuits being subject to decoherence. Or equivalently, we can regard them as measurement-based quantum computation on decohered weighted graph states. To show intractability of classical simulation in the quantum side, we utilize the postselection argument and crucially strengthen it by taking noise effect into account. Classical simulatability in the classical side is also shown constructively by using both separable criteria in a projected-entangled-pair-state picture and the Gottesman-Knill theorem for mixed state Clifford circuits. We found that when each qubit is subject to a single-qubit complete-positive-trace-preserving noise, the computational quantum-classical boundary is sharply given by the noise rate required for the distillability of a magic state. The obtained quantum-classical boundary of noisy quantum dynamics reveals a complexity landscape of controlled quantum systems. This paves a way to an experimentally feasible verification of quantum mechanics in a high complexity limit beyond classically simulatable region. PMID:27189039

  10. Computational quantum-classical boundary of noisy commuting quantum circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Keisuke; Tamate, Shuhei

    2016-05-01

    It is often said that the transition from quantum to classical worlds is caused by decoherence originated from an interaction between a system of interest and its surrounding environment. Here we establish a computational quantum-classical boundary from the viewpoint of classical simulatability of a quantum system under decoherence. Specifically, we consider commuting quantum circuits being subject to decoherence. Or equivalently, we can regard them as measurement-based quantum computation on decohered weighted graph states. To show intractability of classical simulation in the quantum side, we utilize the postselection argument and crucially strengthen it by taking noise effect into account. Classical simulatability in the classical side is also shown constructively by using both separable criteria in a projected-entangled-pair-state picture and the Gottesman-Knill theorem for mixed state Clifford circuits. We found that when each qubit is subject to a single-qubit complete-positive-trace-preserving noise, the computational quantum-classical boundary is sharply given by the noise rate required for the distillability of a magic state. The obtained quantum-classical boundary of noisy quantum dynamics reveals a complexity landscape of controlled quantum systems. This paves a way to an experimentally feasible verification of quantum mechanics in a high complexity limit beyond classically simulatable region.

  11. Computational quantum-classical boundary of noisy commuting quantum circuits

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Keisuke; Tamate, Shuhei

    2016-01-01

    It is often said that the transition from quantum to classical worlds is caused by decoherence originated from an interaction between a system of interest and its surrounding environment. Here we establish a computational quantum-classical boundary from the viewpoint of classical simulatability of a quantum system under decoherence. Specifically, we consider commuting quantum circuits being subject to decoherence. Or equivalently, we can regard them as measurement-based quantum computation on decohered weighted graph states. To show intractability of classical simulation in the quantum side, we utilize the postselection argument and crucially strengthen it by taking noise effect into account. Classical simulatability in the classical side is also shown constructively by using both separable criteria in a projected-entangled-pair-state picture and the Gottesman-Knill theorem for mixed state Clifford circuits. We found that when each qubit is subject to a single-qubit complete-positive-trace-preserving noise, the computational quantum-classical boundary is sharply given by the noise rate required for the distillability of a magic state. The obtained quantum-classical boundary of noisy quantum dynamics reveals a complexity landscape of controlled quantum systems. This paves a way to an experimentally feasible verification of quantum mechanics in a high complexity limit beyond classically simulatable region. PMID:27189039

  12. Linear and nonlinear dynamic analysis by boundary element method. Ph.D. Thesis, 1986 Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, Shahid

    1991-01-01

    An advanced implementation of the direct boundary element method (BEM) applicable to free-vibration, periodic (steady-state) vibration and linear and nonlinear transient dynamic problems involving two and three-dimensional isotropic solids of arbitrary shape is presented. Interior, exterior, and half-space problems can all be solved by the present formulation. For the free-vibration analysis, a new real variable BEM formulation is presented which solves the free-vibration problem in the form of algebraic equations (formed from the static kernels) and needs only surface discretization. In the area of time-domain transient analysis, the BEM is well suited because it gives an implicit formulation. Although the integral formulations are elegant, because of the complexity of the formulation it has never been implemented in exact form. In the present work, linear and nonlinear time domain transient analysis for three-dimensional solids has been implemented in a general and complete manner. The formulation and implementation of the nonlinear, transient, dynamic analysis presented here is the first ever in the field of boundary element analysis. Almost all the existing formulation of BEM in dynamics use the constant variation of the variables in space and time which is very unrealistic for engineering problems and, in some cases, it leads to unacceptably inaccurate results. In the present work, linear and quadratic isoparametric boundary elements are used for discretization of geometry and functional variations in space. In addition, higher order variations in time are used. These methods of analysis are applicable to piecewise-homogeneous materials, such that not only problems of the layered media and the soil-structure interaction can be analyzed but also a large problem can be solved by the usual sub-structuring technique. The analyses have been incorporated in a versatile, general-purpose computer program. Some numerical problems are solved and, through comparisons

  13. CREAM Computing Element: a status update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreetto, Paolo; Bertocco, Sara; Capannini, Fabio; Cecchi, Marco; Dorigo, Alvise; Frizziero, Eric; Gianelle, Alessio; Mezzadri, Massimo; Monforte, Salvatore; Prelz, Francesco; Rebatto, David; Sgaravatto, Massimo; Zangrando, Luigi

    2012-12-01

    The European Middleware Initiative (EMI) project aims to deliver a consolidated set of middleware products based on the four major middleware providers in Europe -ARC, dCache, gLite and UNICORE. The CREAM (Computing Resource Execution And Management) Service, a service for job management operation at the Computing Element (CE) level, is a software product which is part of the EMI middleware distribution. In this paper we discuss about some new functionality in the CREAM CE introduced with the first EMI major release (EMI-1, codename Kebnekaise). The integration with the Argus authorization service is one of these implementations: the use of a unique authorization system, besides simplifying the overall management, allows also to avoid inconsistent authorization decisions. An improved support for complex deployment scenarios (e.g. for sites having multiple CE head nodes and/or having heterogeneous resources) is another new achievement. The improved support for resource allocation in a multi-core environment, and the initial support of version 2.0 of the Glue specification for resource publication are other new functionalities introduced with the first EMI release.

  14. Conserved boundary elements from the Hox complex of mosquito, Anopheles gambiae.

    PubMed

    Ahanger, Sajad H; Srinivasan, Arumugam; Vasanthi, Dasari; Shouche, Yogesh S; Mishra, Rakesh K

    2013-01-01

    The conservation of hox genes as well as their genomic organization across the phyla suggests that this system of anterior-posterior axis formation arose early during evolution and has come under strong selection pressure. Studies in the split Hox cluster of Drosophila have shown that proper expression of hox genes is dependent on chromatin domain boundaries that prevent inappropriate interactions among different types of cis-regulatory elements. To investigate whether boundary function and their role in regulation of hox genes is conserved in insects with intact Hox clusters, we used an algorithm to locate potential boundary elements in the Hox complex of mosquito, Anopheles gambiae. Several potential boundary elements were identified that could be tested for their functional conservation. Comparative analysis revealed that like Drosophila, the bithorax region in A. gambiae contains an extensive array of boundaries and enhancers organized into domains. We analysed a subset of candidate boundary elements and show that they function as enhancer blockers in Drosophila. The functional conservation of boundary elements from mosquito in fly suggests that regulation of hox genes involving chromatin domain boundaries is an evolutionary conserved mechanism and points to an important role of such elements in key developmentally regulated loci.

  15. Validation of finite element and boundary element methods for predicting structural vibration and radiated noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seybert, A. F.; Wu, X. F.; Oswald, Fred B.

    1992-01-01

    Analytical and experimental validation of methods to predict structural vibration and radiated noise are presented. A rectangular box excited by a mechanical shaker was used as a vibrating structure. Combined finite element method (FEM) and boundary element method (BEM) models of the apparatus were used to predict the noise radiated from the box. The FEM was used to predict the vibration, and the surface vibration was used as input to the BEM to predict the sound intensity and sound power. Vibration predicted by the FEM model was validated by experimental modal analysis. Noise predicted by the BEM was validated by sound intensity measurements. Three types of results are presented for the total radiated sound power: (1) sound power predicted by the BEM modeling using vibration data measured on the surface of the box; (2) sound power predicted by the FEM/BEM model; and (3) sound power measured by a sound intensity scan. The sound power predicted from the BEM model using measured vibration data yields an excellent prediction of radiated noise. The sound power predicted by the combined FEM/BEM model also gives a good prediction of radiated noise except for a shift of the natural frequencies that are due to limitations in the FEM model.

  16. On a 3-D singularity element for computation of combined mode stress intensities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atluri, S. N.; Kathiresan, K.

    1976-01-01

    A special three-dimensional singularity element is developed for the computation of combined modes 1, 2, and 3 stress intensity factors, which vary along an arbitrarily curved crack front in three dimensional linear elastic fracture problems. The finite element method is based on a displacement-hybrid finite element model, based on a modified variational principle of potential energy, with arbitrary element interior displacements, interelement boundary displacements, and element boundary tractions as variables. The special crack-front element used in this analysis contains the square root singularity in strains and stresses, where the stress-intensity factors K(1), K(2), and K(3) are quadratically variable along the crack front and are solved directly along with the unknown nodal displacements.

  17. A QR accelerated volume-to-surface boundary condition for finite element solution of eddy current problems

    SciTech Connect

    White, D; Fasenfest, B; Rieben, R; Stowell, M

    2006-09-08

    We are concerned with the solution of time-dependent electromagnetic eddy current problems using a finite element formulation on three-dimensional unstructured meshes. We allow for multiple conducting regions, and our goal is to develop an efficient computational method that does not require a computational mesh of the air/vacuum regions. This requires a sophisticated global boundary condition specifying the total fields on the conductor boundaries. We propose a Biot-Savart law based volume-to-surface boundary condition to meet this requirement. This Biot-Savart approach is demonstrated to be very accurate. In addition, this approach can be accelerated via a low-rank QR approximation of the discretized Biot-Savart law.

  18. A fast boundary element method for the scattering analysis of high-intensity focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    van 't Wout, Elwin; Gélat, Pierre; Betcke, Timo; Arridge, Simon

    2015-11-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) techniques are promising modalities for the non-invasive treatment of cancer. For HIFU therapies of, e.g., liver cancer, one of the main challenges is the accurate focusing of the acoustic field inside a ribcage. Computational methods can play an important role in the patient-specific planning of these transcostal HIFU treatments. This requires the accurate modeling of acoustic scattering at ribcages. The use of a boundary element method (BEM) is an effective approach for this purpose because only the boundaries of the ribs have to be discretized instead of the standard approach to model the entire volume around the ribcage. This paper combines fast algorithms that improve the efficiency of BEM specifically for the high-frequency range necessary for transcostal HIFU applications. That is, a Galerkin discretized Burton-Miller formulation is used in combination with preconditioning and matrix compression techniques. In particular, quick convergence is achieved with the operator preconditioner that has been designed with on-surface radiation conditions for the high-frequency approximation of the Neumann-to-Dirichlet map. Realistic computations of acoustic scattering at 1 MHz on a human ribcage model demonstrate the effectiveness of this dedicated BEM algorithm for HIFU scattering analysis. PMID:26627749

  19. Chromosome boundary elements and regulation of heterochromatin spreading

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiyong; Lawry, Stephanie T.; Cohen, Allison L.; Jia, Songtao

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin is generally classified as euchromatin or heterochromatin, each with distinct histone modifications, compaction levels, and gene expression patterns. Although the proper formation of heterochromatin is essential for maintaining genome integrity and regulating gene expression, heterochromatin can also spread into neighboring regions in a sequence-independent manner, leading to the inactivation of genes. Because the distance of heterochromatin spreading is stochastic, the formation of boundaries, which block the spreading of heterochromatin, is critical for maintaining stable gene expression patterns. Here we review the current understanding of the mechanisms underlying heterochromatin spreading and boundary formation. PMID:25192661

  20. Stress analysis of gas turbine engine structures using the boundary element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. B.; Snow, D. W.; Banerjee, P. K.

    1985-01-01

    The theory of the boundary element method is briefly reviewed with particular reference to the feasibility of elastic and inelastic three-dimensional stress analysis of complex structures characteristic of gas turbine engine components. Particular requirements of gas turbine analysis are defined, and examples of the use of a boundary element code designed for the three-dimensional stress analysis of turbine components are presented. It is shown that the general-purpose boundary element code can accurately and efficiently analyze many of the gas turbine engine structures.

  1. Power throttling of collections of computing elements

    DOEpatents

    Bellofatto, Ralph E.; Coteus, Paul W.; Crumley, Paul G.; Gara, Alan G.; Giampapa, Mark E.; Gooding; Thomas M.; Haring, Rudolf A.; Megerian, Mark G.; Ohmacht, Martin; Reed, Don D.; Swetz, Richard A.; Takken, Todd

    2011-08-16

    An apparatus and method for controlling power usage in a computer includes a plurality of computers communicating with a local control device, and a power source supplying power to the local control device and the computer. A plurality of sensors communicate with the computer for ascertaining power usage of the computer, and a system control device communicates with the computer for controlling power usage of the computer.

  2. A variational multiscale finite element method for monolithic ALE computations of shock hydrodynamics using nodal elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, X.; Scovazzi, G.

    2016-06-01

    We present a monolithic arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) finite element method for computing highly transient flows with strong shocks. We use a variational multiscale (VMS) approach to stabilize a piecewise-linear Galerkin formulation of the equations of compressible flows, and an entropy artificial viscosity to capture strong solution discontinuities. Our work demonstrates the feasibility of VMS methods for highly transient shock flows, an area of research for which the VMS literature is extremely scarce. In addition, the proposed monolithic ALE method is an alternative to the more commonly used Lagrangian+remap methods, in which, at each time step, a Lagrangian computation is followed by mesh smoothing and remap (conservative solution interpolation). Lagrangian+remap methods are the methods of choice in shock hydrodynamics computations because they provide nearly optimal mesh resolution in proximity of shock fronts. However, Lagrangian+remap methods are not well suited for imposing inflow and outflow boundary conditions. These issues offer an additional motivation for the proposed approach, in which we first perform the mesh motion, and then the flow computations using the monolithic ALE framework. The proposed method is second-order accurate and stable, as demonstrated by extensive numerical examples in two and three space dimensions.

  3. Prediction of metallic nano-optical trapping forces by finite element-boundary integral method.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiao-Min; Xu, Kai-Jiang; Yang, Ming-Lin; Sheng, Xin-Qing

    2015-03-01

    The hybrid of finite element and boundary integral (FE-BI) method is employed to predict nano-optical trapping forces of arbitrarily shaped metallic nanostructures. A preconditioning strategy is proposed to improve the convergence of the iterative solution. Skeletonization is employed to speed up the design and optimization where iteration has to be repeated for each beam configuration. The radiation pressure force (RPF) is computed by vector flux of the Maxwell's stress tensor. Numerical simulations are performed to validate the developed method in analyzing the plasmonic effects as well as the optical trapping forces. It is shown that the proposed method is capable of predicting the trapping forces of complex metallic nanostructures accurately and efficiently.

  4. Acoustic coupled fluid-structure interactions using a unified fast multipole boundary element method.

    PubMed

    Wilkes, Daniel R; Duncan, Alec J

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents a numerical model for the acoustic coupled fluid-structure interaction (FSI) of a submerged finite elastic body using the fast multipole boundary element method (FMBEM). The Helmholtz and elastodynamic boundary integral equations (BIEs) are, respectively, employed to model the exterior fluid and interior solid domains, and the pressure and displacement unknowns are coupled between conforming meshes at the shared boundary interface to achieve the acoustic FSI. The low frequency FMBEM is applied to both BIEs to reduce the algorithmic complexity of the iterative solution from O(N(2)) to O(N(1.5)) operations per matrix-vector product for N boundary unknowns. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the algorithmic and memory complexity of the method, which are shown to be in good agreement with the theoretical estimates, while the solution accuracy is comparable to that achieved by a conventional finite element-boundary element FSI model.

  5. Acoustic coupled fluid-structure interactions using a unified fast multipole boundary element method.

    PubMed

    Wilkes, Daniel R; Duncan, Alec J

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents a numerical model for the acoustic coupled fluid-structure interaction (FSI) of a submerged finite elastic body using the fast multipole boundary element method (FMBEM). The Helmholtz and elastodynamic boundary integral equations (BIEs) are, respectively, employed to model the exterior fluid and interior solid domains, and the pressure and displacement unknowns are coupled between conforming meshes at the shared boundary interface to achieve the acoustic FSI. The low frequency FMBEM is applied to both BIEs to reduce the algorithmic complexity of the iterative solution from O(N(2)) to O(N(1.5)) operations per matrix-vector product for N boundary unknowns. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the algorithmic and memory complexity of the method, which are shown to be in good agreement with the theoretical estimates, while the solution accuracy is comparable to that achieved by a conventional finite element-boundary element FSI model. PMID:25920865

  6. An axisymmetric boundary element formulation of sound wave propagation in fluids including viscous and thermal losses.

    PubMed

    Cutanda-Henríquez, Vicente; Juhl, Peter Møller

    2013-11-01

    The formulation presented in this paper is based on the boundary element method (BEM) and implements Kirchhoff's decomposition into viscous, thermal, and acoustic components, which can be treated independently everywhere in the domain except on the boundaries. The acoustic variables with losses are solved using extended boundary conditions that assume (i) negligible temperature fluctuations at the boundary and (ii) normal and tangential matching of the boundary's particle velocity. The proposed model does not require constructing a special mesh for the viscous and thermal boundary layers as is the case with the existing finite element method (FEM) implementations with losses. The suitability of this approach is demonstrated using an axisymmetrical BEM and two test cases where the numerical results are compared with analytical solutions.

  7. Evidence for a single impact at the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary from trace elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilmour, Iain; Anders, Edward

    1988-01-01

    Not only meteoritic elements (Ir, Ni, Au, Pt metals), but also some patently non-meteoritic elements (As, Sb) are enriched at the K-T boundary. Eight enriched elements at 7 K-T sites were compared and it was found that: All have fairly constant proportions to Ir and Kilauea (invoked as an example of a volcanic source of Ir by opponents of the impact theory) has too little of 7 of these 8 elements to account for the boundary enrichments. The distribution of trace elements at the K-T boundary was reexamined using data from 11 sites for which comprehensive are available. The meteoritic component can be assessed by first normalizing the data to Ir, the most obviously extraterrestrial element, and then to Cl chondrites. The double normalization reduces the concentration range from 11 decades to 5 and also facilitates the identification of meteoritic elements. At sites where trace elements were analyzed in sub-divided samples of boundary clay, namely, Caravaca (SP), Stevns Klint (DK), Flaxbourne River (NZ) and Woodside Creek (NZ), Sb, As and Zn are well correlated with Ir across the boundary implying a common deposition mechanism. Elemental carbon is also enriched by up to 10,000 x in boundary clay from 5 K-T sides and is correlated with Ir across the boundary at Woodside Creek. While biomass would appear to be the primary fuel source for this carbon a contribution from a fossil fuel source may be necessary in order to account for the observed C abundance.

  8. Grain boundaries as reservoirs of incompatible elements in the Earth's mantle.

    PubMed

    Hiraga, Takehiko; Anderson, Ian M; Kohlstedt, David L

    2004-02-19

    The concentrations and locations of elements that strongly partition into the fluid phase in rocks provide essential constraints on geochemical and geodynamical processes in Earth's interior. A fundamental question remains, however, as to where these incompatible elements reside before formation of the fluid phase. Here we show that partitioning of calcium between the grain interiors and grain boundaries of olivine in natural and synthetic olivine-rich aggregates follows a thermodynamic model for equilibrium grain-boundary segregation. The model predicts that grain boundaries can be the primary storage sites for elements with large ionic radius--that is, incompatible elements in the Earth's mantle. This observation provides a mechanism for the selective extraction of these elements and gives a framework for interpreting geochemical signatures in mantle rocks.

  9. Comparison of spherical and realistically shaped boundary element head models for transcranial magnetic stimulation navigation

    PubMed Central

    Nummenmaa, Aapo; Stenroos, Matti; Ilmoniemi, Risto J.; Okada, Yoshio C.; Hämäläinen, Matti S.; Raij, Tommi

    2013-01-01

    Objective MRI-guided real-time transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) navigators that apply electromagnetic modeling have improved the utility of TMS. However, their accuracy and speed depends on the assumed volume conductor geometry. Spherical models found in present navigators are computationally fast but may be inaccurate in some areas. Realistically-shaped boundary-element models (BEMs) could increase accuracy at a moderate computational cost, but it is unknown which model features have the largest influence on accuracy. Thus, we compared different types of spherical models and BEMs. Methods Globally and locally fitted spherical models and different BEMs with either one or three compartments and with different skull-to-brain conductivity ratios (1/1 – 1/80) were compared against a reference BEM. Results The one-compartment BEM at inner skull surface was almost as accurate as the reference BEM. Skull/brain conductivity ratio in the range 1/10 – 1/80 had only a minor influence. BEMs were superior to spherical models especially in frontal and temporal areas (up to 20 mm localization and 40% intensity improvement); in motor cortex all models provided similar results. Conclusions One-compartment BEMs offer a good balance between accuracy and computational cost. Significance Realistically-shaped BEMs may increase TMS navigation accuracy in several brain areas, such as in prefrontal regions often targeted in clinical applications. PMID:23890512

  10. An Adaptive Fast Multipole Boundary Element Method for Poisson-Boltzmann Electrostatics

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Benzhuo; Cheng, Xiaolin; Huang, Jingfang; McCammon, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    The numerical solution of the Poisson Boltzmann (PB) equation is a useful but a computationally demanding tool for studying electrostatic solvation effects in chemical and biomolecular systems. Recently, we have described a boundary integral equation-based PB solver accelerated by a new version of the fast multipole method (FMM). The overall algorithm shows an order N complexity in both the computational cost and memory usage. Here, we present an updated version of the solver by using an adaptive FMM for accelerating the convolution type matrix-vector multiplications. The adaptive algorithm, when compared to our previous nonadaptive one, not only significantly improves the performance of the overall memory usage but also remarkably speeds the calculation because of an improved load balancing between the local- and far-field calculations. We have also implemented a node-patch discretization scheme that leads to a reduction of unknowns by a factor of 2 relative to the constant element method without sacrificing accuracy. As a result of these improvements, the new solver makes the PB calculation truly feasible for large-scale biomolecular systems such as a 30S ribosome molecule even on a typical 2008 desktop computer.

  11. A coupled finite-element, boundary-integral method for simulating ultrasonic flowmeters.

    PubMed

    Bezdĕk, Michal; Landes, Hermann; Rieder, Alfred; Lerch, Reinhard

    2007-03-01

    Today's most popular technology of ultrasonic flow measurement is based on the transit-time principle. In this paper, a numerical simulation technique applicable to the analysis of transit-time flowmeters is presented. A flowmeter represents a large simulation problem that also requires computation of acoustic fields in moving media. For this purpose, a novel boundary integral method, the Helmholtz integral-ray tracing method (HIRM), is derived and validated. HIRM is applicable to acoustic radiation problems in arbitrary mean flows at low Mach numbers and significantly reduces the memory demands in comparison with the finite-element method (FEM). It relies on an approximate free-space Green's function which makes use of the ray tracing technique. For simulation of practical acoustic devices, a hybrid simulation scheme consisting of FEM and HIRM is proposed. The coupling of FEM and HIRM is facilitated by means of absorbing boundaries in combination with a new, reflection-free, acoustic-source formulation. Using the coupled FEM-HIRM scheme, a full three-dimensional (3-D) simulation of a complete transit-time flowmeter is performed for the first time. The obtained simulation results are in good agreement with measurements both at zero flow and under flow conditions. PMID:17375833

  12. Massively Parallel Boundary Integral Element Method Modeling of Particles in a Low Reynolds Number Mewtonian Fluid Flow

    SciTech Connect

    INGBER,M.S.; SUBIA,SAMUEL R.; MONDY,LISA ANN

    2000-01-18

    The analysis of many complex multiphase fluid flow systems is based on a scale decoupling procedure. At the macroscale continuum models are used to perform large-scale simulations. At the mesoscale statistical homogenization theory is used to derive continuum models based on representative volume elements (RVEs). At the microscale small-scale features, such as interfacial properties, are analyzed to be incorporated into mesoscale simulations. In this research mesoscopic simulations of hard particles suspended in a Newtonian fluid undergoing nonlinear shear flow are performed using a boundary element method. To obtain an RVE at higher concentrations, several hundred particles are included in the simulations, putting considerable demands on the computational resources both in terms of CPU and memory. Parallel computing provides a viable platform to study these large multiphase systems. The implementation of a portable, parallel computer code based on the boundary element method using a block-block data distribution is discussed in this paper. The code employs updated direct-solver technologies that make use of dual-processor compute nodes.

  13. Prediction of radiation ratio and sound transmission of complex extruded panel using wavenumber domain Unite element and boundary element methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H.; Ryue, J.; Thompson, D. J.; Müller, A. D.

    2016-09-01

    Recently, complex shaped aluminium panels have been adopted in many structures to make them lighter and stronger. The vibro-acoustic behaviour of these complex panels has been of interest for many years but conventional finite element and boundary element methods are not efficient to predict their performance at higher frequencies. Where the cross-sectional properties of the panels are constant in one direction, wavenumber domain numerical analysis can be applied and this becomes more suitable for panels with complex cross-sectional geometries. In this paper, a coupled wavenumber domain finite element and boundary element method is applied to predict the sound radiation from and sound transmission through a double-layered aluminium extruded panel, having a typical shape used in railway carriages. The predicted results are compared with measured ones carried out on a finite length panel and good agreement is found.

  14. Boundary element techniques - Applications in stress analysis and heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Brebbia, C.A.; Venturini, W.S.

    1987-01-01

    This volume includes contributions in the field of stress analysis, soil and rock mechanics, non-linear problems, dynamics and vibrations, plate bending and heat transfer. The companion volume includes contributions dealing with viscous and inviscid fluid flow, aerodynamics and hydrodynamics applications, elastostatics and computational and mathematical aspects.

  15. A combined finite element and boundary integral formulation for solution via CGFFT of 2-dimensional scattering problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Jeffery D.; Volakis, John L.

    1989-01-01

    A new technique is presented for computing the scattering by 2-D structures of arbitrary composition. The proposed solution approach combines the usual finite element method with the boundary integral equation to formulate a discrete system. This is subsequently solved via the conjugate gradient (CG) algorithm. A particular characteristic of the method is the use of rectangular boundaries to enclose the scatterer. Several of the resulting boundary integrals are therefore convolutions and may be evaluated via the fast Fourier transform (FFT) in the implementation of the CG algorithm. The solution approach offers the principle advantage of having O(N) memory demand and employs a 1-D FFT versus a 2-D FFT as required with a traditional implementation of the CGFFT algorithm. The speed of the proposed solution method is compared with that of the traditional CGFFT algorithm, and results for rectangular bodies are given and shown to be in excellent agreement with the moment method.

  16. System, Subsystem, Hive: Boundary Problems in Computational Theories of Consciousness

    PubMed Central

    Fekete, Tomer; van Leeuwen, Cees; Edelman, Shimon

    2016-01-01

    A computational theory of consciousness should include a quantitative measure of consciousness, or MoC, that (i) would reveal to what extent a given system is conscious, (ii) would make it possible to compare not only different systems, but also the same system at different times, and (iii) would be graded, because so is consciousness. However, unless its design is properly constrained, such an MoC gives rise to what we call the boundary problem: an MoC that labels a system as conscious will do so for some—perhaps most—of its subsystems, as well as for irrelevantly extended systems (e.g., the original system augmented with physical appendages that contribute nothing to the properties supposedly supporting consciousness), and for aggregates of individually conscious systems (e.g., groups of people). This problem suggests that the properties that are being measured are epiphenomenal to consciousness, or else it implies a bizarre proliferation of minds. We propose that a solution to the boundary problem can be found by identifying properties that are intrinsic or systemic: properties that clearly differentiate between systems whose existence is a matter of fact, as opposed to those whose existence is a matter of interpretation (in the eye of the beholder). We argue that if a putative MoC can be shown to be systemic, this ipso facto resolves any associated boundary issues. As test cases, we analyze two recent theories of consciousness in light of our definitions: the Integrated Information Theory and the Geometric Theory of consciousness. PMID:27512377

  17. System, Subsystem, Hive: Boundary Problems in Computational Theories of Consciousness.

    PubMed

    Fekete, Tomer; van Leeuwen, Cees; Edelman, Shimon

    2016-01-01

    A computational theory of consciousness should include a quantitative measure of consciousness, or MoC, that (i) would reveal to what extent a given system is conscious, (ii) would make it possible to compare not only different systems, but also the same system at different times, and (iii) would be graded, because so is consciousness. However, unless its design is properly constrained, such an MoC gives rise to what we call the boundary problem: an MoC that labels a system as conscious will do so for some-perhaps most-of its subsystems, as well as for irrelevantly extended systems (e.g., the original system augmented with physical appendages that contribute nothing to the properties supposedly supporting consciousness), and for aggregates of individually conscious systems (e.g., groups of people). This problem suggests that the properties that are being measured are epiphenomenal to consciousness, or else it implies a bizarre proliferation of minds. We propose that a solution to the boundary problem can be found by identifying properties that are intrinsic or systemic: properties that clearly differentiate between systems whose existence is a matter of fact, as opposed to those whose existence is a matter of interpretation (in the eye of the beholder). We argue that if a putative MoC can be shown to be systemic, this ipso facto resolves any associated boundary issues. As test cases, we analyze two recent theories of consciousness in light of our definitions: the Integrated Information Theory and the Geometric Theory of consciousness. PMID:27512377

  18. A Regularized Galerkin Boundary Element Method (RGBEM) for Simulating Potential Flow About Zero Thickness Bodies

    SciTech Connect

    GHARAKHANI,ADRIN; WOLFE,WALTER P.

    1999-10-01

    The prediction of potential flow about zero thickness membranes by the boundary element method constitutes an integral component of the Lagrangian vortex-boundary element simulation of flow about parachutes. To this end, the vortex loop (or the panel) method has been used, for some time now, in the aerospace industry with relative success [1, 2]. Vortex loops (with constant circulation) are equivalent to boundary elements with piecewise constant variation of the potential jump. In this case, extending the analysis in [3], the near field potential velocity evaluations can be shown to be {Omicron}(1). The accurate evaluation of the potential velocity field very near the parachute surface is particularly critical to the overall accuracy and stability of the vortex-boundary element simulations. As we will demonstrate in Section 3, the boundary integral singularities, which arise due to the application of low order boundary elements, may lead to severely spiked potential velocities at vortex element centers that are near the boundary. The spikes in turn cause the erratic motion of the vortex elements, and the eventual loss of smoothness of the vorticity field and possible numerical blow up. In light of the arguments above, the application of boundary elements with (at least) a linear variation of the potential jump--or, equivalently, piecewise constant vortex sheets--would appear to be more appropriate for vortex-boundary element simulations. For this case, two strategies are possible for obtaining the potential flow field. The first option is to solve the integral equations for the (unknown) strengths of the surface vortex sheets. As we will discuss in Section 2.1, the challenge in this case is to devise a consistent system of equations that imposes the solenoidality of the locally 2-D vortex sheets. The second approach is to solve for the unknown potential jump distribution. In this case, for commonly used C{sup o} shape functions, the boundary integral is singular at

  19. Exterior statistics based boundary conditions for representative volume elements of elastic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Somnath; Kubair, Dhirendra V.

    2016-10-01

    Statistically equivalent representative volume elements or SERVEs are representations of the microstructure that are used for micromechanical simulations to generate homogenized material constitutive responses and properties (Swaminathan et al., 2006a; Ghosh, 2011). Typically, a SERVE is generated from the parent microstructure as a statistically equivalent region, whose size is determined from the requirements of convergence of macroscopic properties. Standard boundary conditions, such as affine transformation-based displacement boundary conditions (ATDBCs), uniform traction boundary conditions (UTBCs) or periodic boundary conditions (PBCs) are conventionally applied on the SERVE boundary for micromechanical simulations. However, when the microstructure is characterized by arbitrary, nonuniform distributions of heterogeneities, these simple boundary conditions do not represent the effect of regions exterior to the SERVE. Improper boundary conditions can result in significantly larger than optimal SERVE domains, needed for converged properties. In an attempt to overcome the limitations of the conventional boundary conditions on the SERVE, this paper explores the effect of boundary conditions that incorporate the statistics of the exterior region on the SERVE of elastic composites. Using Green's function based interaction kernels, coupled with statistical functions of the microstructural characteristics like one-point and two-point correlation functions, a novel exterior statistics-based boundary condition or ESBC is derived for the SERVE. The advantages of the ESBC are established by comparing with results of simulations using conventional boundary conditions. Results of the SERVE simulations subjected to ESBCs are also compared with those from other popular methods like statistical volume element (SVE) and weighted statistical volume element (WSVE). The proposed ESBCs offer significant advantages over other methods in the SERVE-based analysis of heterogeneous

  20. Comparing Experiment and Computation of Hypersonic Laminar Boundary Layers with Isolated Roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bathel, Brett F.; Iyer, Prahladh S.; Mahesh, Krishnan; Danehy, Paul M.; Inman, Jennifer A.; Jones, Stephen B.; Johansen, Craig T.

    2014-01-01

    Streamwise velocity profile behavior in a hypersonic laminar boundary layer in the presence of an isolated roughness element is presented for an edge Mach number of 8.2. Two different roughness element types are considered: a 2-mm tall, 4-mm diameter cylinder, and a 2-mm radius hemisphere. Measurements of the streamwise velocity behavior using nitric oxide (NO) planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) molecular tagging velocimetry (MTV) have been performed on a 20-degree wedge model. The top surface of this model acts as a flat-plate and is oriented at 5 degrees with respect to the freestream flow. Computations using direct numerical simulation (DNS) of these flows have been performed and are compared to the measured velocity profiles. Particular attention is given to the characteristics of velocity profiles immediately upstream and downstream of the roughness elements. In these regions, the streamwise flow can experience strong deceleration or acceleration. An analysis in which experimentally measured MTV profile displacements are compared with DNS particle displacements is performed to determine if the assumption of constant velocity over the duration of the MTV measurement is valid. This assumption is typically made when reporting MTV-measured velocity profiles, and may result in significant errors when comparing MTV measurements to computations in regions with strong deceleration or acceleration. The DNS computations with the cylindrical roughness element presented in this paper were performed with and without air injection from a rectangular slot upstream of the cylinder. This was done to determine the extent to which gas seeding in the MTV measurements perturbs the boundary layer flowfield.

  1. Image-guided near infrared spectroscopy using boundary element method: phantom validation

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Subhadra; Carpenter, Colin; Pogue, Brian W.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2010-01-01

    Image-guided near infrared spectroscopy (IG-NIRS) can provide high-resolution vascular, metabolic and molecular characterization of localized tissue volumes in-vivo. The approach for IG-NIRS uses hybrid systems where the spatial anatomical structure of tissue obtained from standard imaging modalities (such as MRI) is combined with tissue information from diffuse optical imaging spectroscopy. There is need to optimize these hybrid systems for large-scale clinical trials anticipated in the near future in order to evaluate the feasibility of this technology across a larger population. However, existing computational methods such as the finite element method mesh arbitrary image volumes, which inhibit automation, especially with large numbers of datasets. Circumventing this issue, a boundary element method (BEM) for IG-NIRS systems in 3–D is presented here using only surface rendering and discretization. The process of surface creation and meshing is faster, more reliable, and is easily generated automatically as compared to full volume meshing. The proposed method has been implemented here for multi-spectral non-invasive characterization of tissue. In phantom experiments, 3–D spectral BEM-based spectroscopy recovered the oxygen dissociation curve with mean error of 6.6% and tracked variation in total hemoglobin linearly. PMID:20445830

  2. The Indirect Boundary Element Method (IBEM) for Seismic Response of Topographical Irregularities in Layered Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras Zazueta, M. A.; Perton, M.; Sanchez-Sesma, F. J.; Sánchez-Alvaro, E.

    2013-12-01

    The seismic hazard assessment of extended developments, such as a dam, a bridge or a pipeline, needs the strong ground motion simulation taking into account the effects of surface geology. In many cases the incoming wave field can be obtained from attenuation relations or simulations for layered media using Discrete Wave Number (DWN). Sometimes there is a need to include in simulations the seismic source as well. A number of methods to solve these problems have been developed. Among them the Finite Element and Finite Difference Methods (FEM and FDM) are generally preferred because of the facility of use. Nevertheless, the analysis of realistic dynamic loading induced by earthquakes requires a thinner mesh of the entire domain to consider high frequencies. Consequently this may imply a high computational cost. The Indirect Boundary Element Method (IBEM) can also be employed. Here it is used to study the response of a site to historical seismic activity. This method is particularly suited to model wave propagation through wide areas as it requires only the meshing of boundaries. Moreover, it is well suited to represent finely the diffraction that can occur on a fault. However, the IBEM has been applied mainly to simple geometrical configurations. In this communication significant refinements of the formulation are presented. Using IBEM we can simulate wave propagation in complex geometrical configurations such as a stratified medium crossed by thin faults or having a complex topography. Two main developments are here described; one integrates the DWN method inside the IBEM in order to represent the Green's functions of stratified media with relatively low computational cost but assuming unbounded parallel flat layers, and the other is the extension of IBEM to deal with multi-regions in contact which allows more versatility with a higher computational cost compared to the first one but still minor to an equivalent FEM formulation. The two approaches are fully

  3. Potential hydrodynamic effects on structures by the boundary element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouazar, D.; Benmansour, N.

    Problems based on a potential or streamfunction formulation of the BEM for the studying of hydrodynamic forces are addressed, with particular attention given to fluid applications of the constant conventional BEM (CBEM) and the regular BEM (RBEM). Comparison of the two methods for three numerical examples (the flow past a circular obstacle in an infinite medium, the flow past a circular obstacle in a channel, and the flow past a symmetric NACA 0018 airfoil) demonstrates the superiority of the RBEM over the CBEM in both accuracy and computational cost. It is noted that the optimal location of the singular points outside the domain remains unsolved on a rational basis.

  4. Numerical improvement of the three-dimensional indirect boundary element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz-Aleman, C.; Gil-Zepeda, S. A.; Luzon, F.; Sanchez-Sesma, F. J.

    2003-04-01

    In recent years, several numerical techniques for the estimation of the seismic response in complex geologic configurations have been developed. The flexibility and versatility of these techniques have increased along with the improvement of computational systems, and they altogether have allowed the study of 3D geometries to model several sedimentary basins around the world. In this article we study the structure of the linear systems derived from the Indirect Boundary Element Method (IBEM). We apply a LU-sparse decomposition solver to the inversion of the IBEM coefficient matrix in order to optimise the numerical burden of such method. As pointed out before, special emphasis is given to understanding the main features of ground motion in sedimentary basins. We compute the seismic response of a 3D alluvial valley of irregular shape, as originally proposed by Sánchez-Sesma and Luzón (1995), and we establish comparisons on time consumption and memory allocation. Inversion of linear systems by using this new algorithm lead us to a significant saving on CPU time and memory allocation relative to the original IBEM formulation. Results represent an extension in the range of application of the IBEM method.

  5. Computing forces on interface elements exerted by dislocations in an elastically anisotropic crystalline material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, B.; Arsenlis, A.; Aubry, S.

    2016-06-01

    Driven by the growing interest in numerical simulations of dislocation–interface interactions in general crystalline materials with elastic anisotropy, we develop algorithms for the integration of interface tractions needed to couple dislocation dynamics with a finite element or boundary element solver. The dislocation stress fields in elastically anisotropic media are made analytically accessible through the spherical harmonics expansion of the derivative of Green’s function, and analytical expressions for the forces on interface elements are derived by analytically integrating the spherical harmonics series recursively. Compared with numerical integration by Gaussian quadrature, the newly developed analytical algorithm for interface traction integration is highly beneficial in terms of both computation precision and speed.

  6. Experience with automatic, dynamic load balancing and adaptive finite element computation

    SciTech Connect

    Wheat, S.R.; Devine, K.D.; Maccabe, A.B.

    1993-10-01

    Distributed memory, Massively Parallel (MP), MIMD technology has enabled the development of applications requiring computational resources previously unobtainable. Structural mechanics and fluid dynamics applications, for example, are often solved by finite element methods (FEMs) requiring, millions of degrees of freedom to accurately simulate physical phenomenon. Adaptive methods, which automatically refine or coarsen meshes and vary the order of accuracy of the numerical solution, offer greater robustness and computational efficiency than traditional FEMs by reducing the amount of computation required away from physical structures such as shock waves and boundary layers. On MP computers, FEMs frequently result in distributed processor load imbalances. To overcome load imbalance, many MP FEMs use static load balancing as a preprocessor to the finite element calculation. Adaptive methods complicate the load imbalance problem since the work per element is not uniform across the solution domain and changes as the computation proceeds. Therefore, dynamic load balancing is required to maintain global load balance. We describe a dynamic, fine-grained, element-based data migration system that maintains global load balance and is effective in the presence of changing work loads. Global load balance is achieved by overlapping neighborhoods of processors, where each neighborhood performs local load balancing. The method utilizes an automatic element management system library to which a programmer integrates the application`s computational description. The library`s flexibility supports a large class of finite element and finite difference based applications.

  7. Extended displacement discontinuity boundary integral equation and boundary element method for cracks in thermo-magneto-electro-elastic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuan; Dang, HuaYang; Xu, GuangTao; Fan, CuiYing; Zhao, MingHao

    2016-08-01

    The extended displacement discontinuity boundary integral equation (EDDBIE) and boundary element method is developed for the analysis of planar cracks of arbitrary shape in the isotropic plane of three-dimensional (3D) transversely isotropic thermo-magneto-electro-elastic (TMEE) media. The extended displacement discontinuities (EDDs) include conventional displacement discontinuity, electric potential discontinuity, magnetic potential discontinuity, as well as temperature discontinuity across crack faces; correspondingly, the extended stresses represent conventional stress, electric displacement, magnetic induction and heat flux. Employing a Hankel transformation, the fundamental solutions for unit point EDDs in 3D transversely isotropic TMEE media are derived. The EDDBIEs for a planar crack of arbitrary shape in the isotropic plane of a 3D transversely isotropic TMEE medium are then established. Using the boundary integral equation method, the singularities of near-crack border fields are obtained and the extended stress field intensity factors are expressed in terms of the EDDs on crack faces. According to the analogy between the EDDBIEs for an isotropic thermoelastic material and TMEE medium, an analogical solution method for crack problems of a TMEE medium is proposed for coupled multi-field loadings. Employing constant triangular elements, the EDDBIEs are discretized and numerically solved. As an application, the problems of an elliptical crack subjected to combined mechanical-electric-magnetic-thermal loadings are investigated.

  8. E-coil: an inverse boundary element method for a quasi-static problem.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Clemente Cobos; Garcia, Salvador Gonzalez; Power, Henry

    2010-06-01

    Boundary element methods represent a valuable approach for designing gradient coils; these methods are based on meshing the current carrying surface into an array of boundary elements. The temporally varying magnetic fields produced by gradient coils induce electric currents in conducting tissues and so the exposure of human subjects to these magnetic fields has become a safety concern, especially with the increase in the strength of the field gradients used in magnetic resonance imaging. Here we present a boundary element method for the design of coils that minimize the electric field induced in prescribed conducting systems. This work also details some numerical examples of the application of this coil design method. The reduction of the electric field induced in a prescribed region inside the coils is also evaluated.

  9. A bibliography on finite element and related methods analysis in reactor physics computations (1971--1997)

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, D.C.

    1998-01-01

    This bibliography provides a list of references on finite element and related methods analysis in reactor physics computations. These references have been published in scientific journals, conference proceedings, technical reports, thesis/dissertations and as chapters in reference books from 1971 to the present. Both English and non-English references are included. All references contained in the bibliography are sorted alphabetically by the first author`s name and a subsort by date of publication. The majority of the references relate to reactor physics analysis using the finite element method. Related topics include the boundary element method, the boundary integral method, and the global element method. All aspects of reactor physics computations relating to these methods are included: diffusion theory, deterministic radiation and neutron transport theory, kinetics, fusion research, particle tracking in finite element grids, and applications. For user convenience, many of the listed references have been categorized. The list of references is not all inclusive. In general, nodal methods were purposely excluded, although a few references do demonstrate characteristics of finite element methodology using nodal methods (usually as a non-conforming element basis). This area could be expanded. The author is aware of several other references (conferences, thesis/dissertations, etc.) that were not able to be independently tracked using available resources and thus were not included in this listing.

  10. A boundary element-Random walk model of mass transport in groundwater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kemblowski, M.

    1986-01-01

    A boundary element solution to the convective mass transport in groundwater is presented. This solution produces a continuous velocity field and reduces the amount of data preparation time and bookkeeping. By combining this solution and the random walk procedure, a convective-dispersive mass transport model is obtained. This model may be easily used to simulate groundwater contamination problems. The accuracy of the boundary element model has been verified by reproducing the analytical solution to a two-dimensional convective mass transport problem. The method was also used to simulate a convective-dispersive problem. ?? 1986.

  11. iBem3D, a three-dimensional iterative boundary element method using angular dislocations for modeling geologic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maerten, F.; Maerten, L.; Pollard, D. D.

    2014-11-01

    Most analytical solutions to engineering or geological problems are limited to simple geometries. For example, analytical solutions have been found to solve for stresses around a circular hole in a plate. To solve more complex problems, mathematicians and engineers have developed powerful computer-aided numerical methods, which can be categorized into two main types: differential methods and integral methods. The finite element method (FEM) is a differential method that was developed in the 1950s and is one of the most commonly used numerical methods today. Since its development, other differential methods, including the boundary element method (BEM), have been developed to solve different types of problems. The purpose of this paper is to describe iBem3D, formally called Poly3D, a C++ and modular 3D boundary element computer program based on the theory of angular dislocations for modeling three-dimensional (3D) discontinuities in an elastic, heterogeneous, isotropic whole- or half-space. After 20 years and more than 150 scientific publications, we present in detail the formulation behind this method, its enhancements over the years as well as some important applications in several domains of the geosciences. The main advantage of using this formulation, for describing geological objects such as faults, resides in the possibility of modeling complex geometries without gaps and overlaps between adjacent triangular dislocation elements, which is a significant shortcoming for models using rectangular dislocation elements. Reliability, speed, simplicity, and accuracy are enhanced in the latest version of the computer code. Industrial applications include subseismic fault modeling, fractured reservoir modeling, interpretation and validation of fault connectivity and reservoir compartmentalization, depleted area and fault reactivation, and pressurized wellbore stability. Academic applications include earthquake and volcano monitoring, hazard mitigation, and slope

  12. Validation of High-Speed Turbulent Boundary Layer and Shock-Boundary Layer Interaction Computations with the OVERFLOW Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliver, A. B.; Lillard, R. P.; Blaisdell, G. A.; Lyrintizis, A. S.

    2006-01-01

    The capability of the OVERFLOW code to accurately compute high-speed turbulent boundary layers and turbulent shock-boundary layer interactions is being evaluated. Configurations being investigated include a Mach 2.87 flat plate to compare experimental velocity profiles and boundary layer growth, a Mach 6 flat plate to compare experimental surface heat transfer,a direct numerical simulation (DNS) at Mach 2.25 for turbulent quantities, and several Mach 3 compression ramps to compare computations of shock-boundary layer interactions to experimental laser doppler velocimetry (LDV) data and hot-wire data. The present paper describes outlines the study and presents preliminary results for two of the flat plate cases and two small-angle compression corner test cases.

  13. Final Report for Time Domain Boundary Element and Hybrid Finite Element Simulation for Maxwell's Equations

    SciTech Connect

    Pingenot, J; Jandhyala, V

    2007-03-01

    This report summarizes the work performed for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) at the University of Washington between September 2004 and May 2006. This project studied fast solvers and stability for time domain integral equations (TDIE), especially as applied to radiating boundary for a massively parallel FEM solver.

  14. ZZ-Type a posteriori error estimators for adaptive boundary element methods on a curve.

    PubMed

    Feischl, Michael; Führer, Thomas; Karkulik, Michael; Praetorius, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    In the context of the adaptive finite element method (FEM), ZZ-error estimators named after Zienkiewicz and Zhu (1987) [52] are mathematically well-established and widely used in practice. In this work, we propose and analyze ZZ-type error estimators for the adaptive boundary element method (BEM). We consider weakly singular and hyper-singular integral equations and prove, in particular, convergence of the related adaptive mesh-refining algorithms. Throughout, the theoretical findings are underlined by numerical experiments.

  15. Application of a boundary element method to the study of dynamical torsion of beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Czekajski, C.; Laroze, S.; Gay, D.

    1982-01-01

    During dynamic torsion of beam elements, consideration of nonuniform warping effects involves a more general technical formulation then that of Saint-Venant. Nonclassical torsion constants appear in addition to the well known torsional rigidity. The adaptation of the boundary integral element method to the calculation of these constants for general section shapes is described. The suitability of the formulation is investigated with some examples of thick as well as thin walled cross sections.

  16. Finite element analysis of MMIC structures and electronic packages using absorbing boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian-She; Mittra, Raj

    1994-03-01

    In this paper, a three-dimensional finite element method (FEM) is employed in conjunction with first and second-order absorbing boundary conditions (ABC's) to analyze waveguide discontinuities and to derive their scattering parameters. While the application of FEM for the analysis of MMIC structures is not new, to the best of the knowledge of the authors the technique for mesh truncation for microstrip lines using the first and higher-order ABC's, described in this paper, has not been reported elsewhere. The scattering parameters of a microstrip discontinuity are computed in two steps. As a first step, the field distribution of the fundamental mode in a uniform microstrip is obtained by exciting the uniform line with the quasi-static transverse electric field, letting it propagate, and then extracting the dominant mode pattern after the higher order modes have decayed. In step two, the discontinuity problem is solved by exciting the structure by using the fundamental mode obtained in step one. The scattering parameters based on the voltage definition are calculated by using the line integral of electric fields underneath the strip. Numerical solutions for several waveguide discontinuities and electronic packages are obtained and compared with the published data.

  17. A Boundary Element Model of Microbubble Sticking and Sliding in the Microcirculation

    PubMed Central

    Eshpuniyani, Brijesh; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Bull, Joseph L.

    2009-01-01

    A pressure driven 2-D channel flow at very low Reynolds numbers (Stokes flow) with a bubble sticking and sliding along one of the walls is studied computationally using the boundary element method (BEM). The moving three phase contact lines are modeled using a Tanner law wherein the contact line speed is linearly proportional to the deviation of the contact angle from its equilibrium value. Results are presented with and without the effect of contact angle hysteresis. Including contact angle hysteresis allows us to predict the stick-slide behavior of bubbles, which in turn affects the long term evolution and dynamics of the bubbles. It is shown that the initial rapid contraction or expansion of the bubbles to achieve local equilibrium with the surrounding pressure field results in cusps and bulges in the wall normal stress profiles. The wall shear stress also increases (with opposite signs upstream and downstream of the bubble) as the fluid rushes in or out of the channel inlet and outlet. In the long term, bubbles slowly expand as they slide along the channel wall. Contact lines are found to correspond to peaks in the wall normal and shear stress profiles at all times. The effectiveness of bubbles in occluding flow through the channel is also examined. PMID:19885367

  18. Development of a Transient Acoustic Boundary Element Method to Predict the Noise Signature of Swimming Fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagenhoffer, Nathan; Moored, Keith; Jaworski, Justin

    2015-11-01

    Animals have evolved flexible wings and fins to efficiently and quietly propel themselves through the air and water. The design of quiet and efficient bio-inspired propulsive concepts requires a rapid, unified computational framework that integrates three essential features: the fluid mechanics, the elastic structural response, and the noise generation. This study focuses on the development, validation, and demonstration of a transient, two-dimensional acoustic boundary element solver accelerated by a fast multipole algorithm. The resulting acoustic solver is used to characterize the acoustic signature produced by a vortex street advecting over a NACA 0012 airfoil, which is representative of vortex-body interactions that occur in schools of swimming fish. Both 2S and 2P canonical vortex streets generated by fish are investigated over the range of Strouhal number 0 . 2 < St < 0 . 4 , and the acoustic signature of the airfoil is quantified. This study provides the first estimate of the noise signature of a school of swimming fish. Lehigh University CORE Grant.

  19. Optically intraconnected computer employing dynamically reconfigurable holographic optical element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergman, Larry A. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An optically intraconnected computer and a reconfigurable holographic optical element employed therein. The basic computer comprises a memory for holding a sequence of instructions to be executed; logic for accessing the instructions in sequence; logic for determining for each the instruction the function to be performed and the effective address thereof; a plurality of individual elements on a common support substrate optimized to perform certain logical sequences employed in executing the instructions; and, element selection logic connected to the logic determining the function to be performed for each the instruction for determining the class of each function and for causing the instruction to be executed by those the elements which perform those associated the logical sequences affecting the instruction execution in an optimum manner. In the optically intraconnected version, the element selection logic is adapted for transmitting and switching signals to the elements optically.

  20. Solution-adaptive finite element method in computational fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, J. B.; Bass, J. M.; Spradley, L. W.

    1993-01-01

    Some recent results obtained using solution-adaptive finite element method in linear elastic two-dimensional fracture mechanics problems are presented. The focus is on the basic issue of adaptive finite element method for validating the applications of new methodology to fracture mechanics problems by computing demonstration problems and comparing the stress intensity factors to analytical results.

  1. A mathematical boundary integral equation for analysis of the heterogeneous media, using the functionally graded elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashrafi, H.; Shariyat, M.

    2015-09-01

    In the present research, a functionally graded (FG) boundary integral equation method capable of modeling quasistatic behavior of heterogeneous media fabricated from functionally graded materials (FGMs) whose distributions of the material properties obey either power or exponential laws is developed. Two heterogeneous material gradation models were employed to present the numerical formulations and solution algorithm. Somigliana's identity in 2D displacement fields of the isotropic heterogeneous domains is numerically implemented, employing FG elements. Based on the constitutive and governing equations and the weighted residual technique, the proposed boundary integral equation formulations are implemented for behavior analysis of the elastic heterogeneous isotropic solid structures. Results are verified and the proposed boundary element (BE) formulation is employed for behavior analysis of the plates and cylinders to demonstrate the proposed procedure more adequately.

  2. GASEOUS ELEMENTAL MERCURY IN THE MARINE BOUNDARY LAYER: EVIDENCE FOR RAPID REMOVAL IN ANTHROPOGENIC POLLUTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, gas-phase elemental mercury (Hg0) and related species (including inorganic reactive gaseous mercury (RGM) and particulate mercury (PHg)) were measured at Cheeka Peak Observatory (CPO), Washington State, in the marine boundary layer (MBL) during 2001-2002. Air of...

  3. A Advanced Boundary Element Formulation for Acoustic Radiation and Scattering in Three Dimensions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soenarko, Benjamin

    A computational method is presented for determining acoustic fields produced by arbitrary shaped three-dimensional bodies. The formulation includes both radiation and scattering problems. In particular an isoparametric element formulation is introduced in which both the surface geometry and the acoustic variables on the surface of the body are represented by second order shape functions within the local coordinate system. A general result for the surface velocity potential and the exterior field is derived. This result is applicable to non-smooth bodies, i.e. it includes the case where the surface may have a non-unique normal (e.g. at the edge of a cube). Test cases are shown involving spherical, cylindrical and cubical geometry for both radiation and scattering problems. The present formulation is also extended to include half-space problems in which the effect of the reflected wave from an infinite plane is taken into account. By selecting an appropriate Green's function, the surface integral over the plane is nullified; thus all the computational efforts can be performed only on the radiating or scattering body at issue and thereby greatly simplify the solution. A special formulation involving axisymmetric bodies and boundary conditions is also presented. For this special case, the surface integrals are reduced to line integrals and an integral over the angle of revolution. The integration over the angle is performed partly analytically in terms of elliptic integrals and partly numerically using simple Gaussian quadrature formula. Since the rest of the integrals involve only line integrals along the generator of the body, any discretization scheme can be easily obtained to achieve a desired degree of accuracy in evaluating these integrals.

  4. The Impact of Instructional Elements in Computer-Based Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Florence; Klein, James D.; Sullivan, Howard

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of several elements of instruction (objectives, information, practice, examples and review) when they were combined in a systematic manner. College students enrolled in a computer literacy course used one of six different versions of a computer-based lesson delivered on the web to learn about input, processing,…

  5. Computer simulation of grain boundary self-diffusion in aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Dragunov, Andrei S.; Weckman, A. V.; Demyanov, B. F.

    2014-10-06

    In the work study the process of self-diffusion in symmetric tilt grain boundaries (GB) with the axes misorientation [100], [110] and [111]. The research was carried out by the methods of computer simulation The objects of the research are the three GB of common and special type for each axis misorientation. The angles of misorientation of the common GB is amounted to 10°, 30° and 50°. The simulation was performed by the method of molecular dynamics in the temperature range from 600 to 1000 K, with an interval of 50 K. For research on the direction jumps atoms were built tracks the movement of atoms in the process of self-diffusion. The calculations have shown, that for all of GB is characterized by pronounced anisotropy of the jumps at low temperatures (< 700K). At temperatures near to the melting point directions of the jumps are isotropic only for three GB (Θ=30°[100], Θ=50=[100] and Σ5(013)[100]). For other GB such as [100] and [110] remains priority direction of diffusion along the nuclei GB dislocations. Arrenius curves have from one to three linear plots with different tilt. Change the tilt of Arrenius dependences testifies to the change in the mechanism of self-diffusion. The parameters of grainboundary self-diffusion were determined The activation energy of grainboundary diffusion in 4–5 times lower than the energy of activation of a volume self-diffusion of aluminum (about 200 KJ/mol). The minimum value of activation energy has GB 10° with the axis misorientation [100] (10,15 KJ/mol), maximum (104.12 Kj/mol) - a special GB Σ11(113)

  6. A robust finite element method for nonhomogeneous Dirichlet problems in domains with curved boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Bramble, J.H.; King, J.T.

    1994-07-01

    In this paper the authors consider a simple finite element method on an approximately polygonal domain using linear elements. The Dirichlet data are transferred in a natural way and the resulting linear system can be solved using multigrid techniques. Their analysis takes into account the change in domain and data transfer, and optimal-error estimates are obtained that are robust in the regularity of the boundary data provided they are at least square integrable. It is proved that the natural extension of this finite element approximation to the original domain is optimal-order accurate.

  7. COYOTE II - a finite element computer program for nonlinear heat conduction problems. Part I - theoretical background

    SciTech Connect

    Gartling, D.K.; Hogan, R.E.

    1994-10-01

    The theoretical and numerical background for the finite element computer program, COYOTE II, is presented in detail. COYOTE II is designed for the multi-dimensional analysis of nonlinear heat conduction problems and other types of diffusion problems. A general description of the boundary value problems treated by the program is presented. The finite element formulation and the associated numerical methods used in COYOTE II are also outlined. Instructions for use of the code are documented in SAND94-1179; examples of problems analyzed with the code are provided in SAND94-1180.

  8. Symmetric-Galerkin boundary element transient analysis of the DSIFs for the interaction of a crack with a circular inclusion

    SciTech Connect

    Phan, Anh-Vu; Gray, Leonard J; Salvadori, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    A dynamic analysis of crack-inclusion interaction is described in this paper. The analysis employs a two-dimensional symmetric-Galerkin boundary integral formulation for multi-domain elastodynamic fracture analysis in the frequency domain. The multi-domain technique is based on the assumption of perfectly bonded inclusions. The numerical implementation of this boundary integral formulation is carried out with standard quadratic elements, allowing the use of an improved quarter-point element for accurately determining frequency responses of the dynamic stress intensity factors (DSIFs). To deal with singular and hypersingular integrals, the formulation is decomposed into two parts: the rst part is identical to that for elastostatics while the second part contains at most logarithmic singularities. The treatment of the elastostatic singular and hypersingular singular integrals employs an exterior limit to the boundary, while the weakly singular integrals in the second part are handled by Gauss quadrature. Time histories (transient responses) of the DSIFs are obtained in a post-processing step by applying the fast Fourier transform (FFT) and inverse FFT to the frequency responses of these DSIFs. Two numerical examples are presented for the computation of the DSIFs due to crack-inclusion interaction under two types of impact loading: Heaviside step loading and blast loading. The numerical results are consistent and con rm the well known crack tip shielding mechanism observed during the interaction between a crack and a much stiffer inclusion.

  9. Application of the boundary element method to the micromechanical analysis of composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, R. K.; Hopkins, D. A.

    1995-01-01

    A new boundary element formulation for the micromechanical analysis of composite materials is presented in this study. A unique feature of the formulation is the use of circular shape functions to convert the two-dimensional integrations of the composite fibers to one-dimensional integrations. To demonstrate the applicability of the formulations, several example problems including elastic and thermal analysis of laminated composites and elastic analyses of woven composites are presented and the boundary element results compared to experimental observations and/or results obtained through alternate analytical procedures. While several issues remain to be addressed in order to make the methodology more robust, the formulations presented here show the potential in providing an alternative to traditional finite element methods, particularly for complex composite architectures.

  10. Acceleration of matrix element computations for precision measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, Oleg; Gutierrez, Gaston; Wang, M. H.L.S.; Ye, Zhenyu

    2014-11-25

    The matrix element technique provides a superior statistical sensitivity for precision measurements of important parameters at hadron colliders, such as the mass of the top quark or the cross-section for the production of Higgs bosons. The main practical limitation of the technique is its high computational demand. Using the example of the top quark mass, we present two approaches to reduce the computation time of the technique by a factor of 90. First, we utilize low-discrepancy sequences for numerical Monte Carlo integration in conjunction with a dedicated estimator of numerical uncertainty, a novelty in the context of the matrix element technique. We then utilize a new approach that factorizes the overall jet energy scale from the matrix element computation, a novelty in the context of top quark mass measurements. The utilization of low-discrepancy sequences is of particular general interest, as it is universally applicable to Monte Carlo integration, and independent of the computing environment.

  11. Coupling finite element and integral equation solutions using decoupled boundary meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cwik, Tom

    1992-01-01

    A method is outlined for calculating scattered fields from inhomogeneous penetrable objects using a coupled finite element-integral equation solution. The finite element equation can efficiently model fields in penetrable and inhomogeneous regions, while the integral equation exactly models fields on the finite element mesh boundary and in the exterior region. By decoupling the interior finite element and exterior integral equation meshes, considerable flexibility is found in both the number of field expansion points as well as their density. Only the nonmetal portions of the object need be modeled using a finite element expansion; exterior perfect conducting surfaces are modeled using an integral equation with a single unknown field since E(tan) is identically zero on these surfaces. Numerical convergence, accuracy, and stability at interior resonant frequencies are studied in detail.

  12. Finite Element Method for Thermal Analysis. [with computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heuser, J.

    1973-01-01

    A two- and three-dimensional, finite-element thermal-analysis program which handles conduction with internal heat generation, convection, radiation, specified flux, and specified temperature boundary conditions is presented. Elements used in the program are the triangle and tetrahedron for two- and three-dimensional analysis, respectively. The theory used in the program is developed, and several sample problems demonstrating the capability and reliability of the program are presented. A guide to using the program, description of the input cards, and program listing are included.

  13. On the roles of minimization and linearization in least-squares finite element models of nonlinear boundary-value problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payette, G. S.; Reddy, J. N.

    2011-05-01

    In this paper we examine the roles of minimization and linearization in the least-squares finite element formulations of nonlinear boundary-values problems. The least-squares principle is based upon the minimization of the least-squares functional constructed via the sum of the squares of appropriate norms of the residuals of the partial differential equations (in the present case we consider L2 norms). Since the least-squares method is independent of the discretization procedure and the solution scheme, the least-squares principle suggests that minimization should be performed prior to linearization, where linearization is employed in the context of either the Picard or Newton iterative solution procedures. However, in the least-squares finite element analysis of nonlinear boundary-value problems, it has become common practice in the literature to exchange the sequence of application of the minimization and linearization operations. The main purpose of this study is to provide a detailed assessment on how the finite element solution is affected when the order of application of these operators is interchanged. The assessment is performed mathematically, through an examination of the variational setting for the least-squares formulation of an abstract nonlinear boundary-value problem, and also computationally, through the numerical simulation of the least-squares finite element solutions of both a nonlinear form of the Poisson equation and also the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The assessment suggests that although the least-squares principle indicates that minimization should be performed prior to linearization, such an approach is often impractical and not necessary.

  14. Boundary element simulation of surface waves on a deformed half-space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvinchuk, S. Yu.; Belov, A. A.; Markov, I. P.; Ipatov, A. A.; Petrov, A. N.

    2015-11-01

    Homogeneous and two-layer half-spaces consisting of an anisotropic elastic, isotropic viscoelastic, or poroelastic material are considered. The Kelvin-Voigt model and the model with the Abel kernel are used as models of the viscoelastic material; the poroelastic material is studied within the framework of the model of the compressible Biot material. The case where the half-space contains a cavity is also considered. Propagation of surface waves is studied by the boundary element method. The numerical solution involves the method of collocations for a regularized boundary integral equation.

  15. An emulator for minimizing computer resources for finite element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melosh, R.; Utku, S.; Islam, M.; Salama, M.

    1984-01-01

    A computer code, SCOPE, has been developed for predicting the computer resources required for a given analysis code, computer hardware, and structural problem. The cost of running the code is a small fraction (about 3 percent) of the cost of performing the actual analysis. However, its accuracy in predicting the CPU and I/O resources depends intrinsically on the accuracy of calibration data that must be developed once for the computer hardware and the finite element analysis code of interest. Testing of the SCOPE code on the AMDAHL 470 V/8 computer and the ELAS finite element analysis program indicated small I/O errors (3.2 percent), larger CPU errors (17.8 percent), and negligible total errors (1.5 percent).

  16. Advanced development of the boundary element method for steady-state heat conduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dargush, G. F.; Banerjee, Prasanta K.

    1989-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made in recent years toward advancing the state-of-the-art in solid mechanics boundary element technology. In the present work, much of this new technology is applied in the development of a general-purpose boundary element method (BEM) for steady-state heat conduction. In particular, the BEM implementation involves the use of higher-order conforming elements, self-adaptive integration and multi-region capability. Two- and three-dimensional, as well as axisymmetric analysis, are incorporated within a unified framework. In addition, techniques are introduced for the calculation of boundary flux, and for the inclusion of thermal resistance across interfaces. As a final extension, an efficient formulation is developed for the analysis of solid three-dimensional bodies with embedded holes. For this last class of problems, the new BEM formulation is particularly attractive, since use of the alternatives (i.e. finite element or finite difference methods) is not practical. A number of detailed examples illustrate the suitability and robustness of the present approach for steady-state heat conduction.

  17. A fast multipole boundary element method for solving two-dimensional thermoelasticity problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y. J.; Li, Y. X.; Huang, S.

    2014-09-01

    A fast multipole boundary element method (BEM) for solving general uncoupled steady-state thermoelasticity problems in two dimensions is presented in this paper. The fast multipole BEM is developed to handle the thermal term in the thermoelasticity boundary integral equation involving temperature and heat flux distributions on the boundary of the problem domain. Fast multipole expansions, local expansions and related translations for the thermal term are derived using complex variables. Several numerical examples are presented to show the accuracy and effectiveness of the developed fast multipole BEM in calculating the displacement and stress fields for 2-D elastic bodies under various thermal loads, including thin structure domains that are difficult to mesh using the finite element method (FEM). The BEM results using constant elements are found to be accurate compared with the analytical solutions, and the accuracy of the BEM results is found to be comparable to that of the FEM with linear elements. In addition, the BEM offers the ease of use in generating the mesh for a thin structure domain or a domain with complicated geometry, such as a perforated plate with randomly distributed holes for which the FEM fails to provide an adequate mesh. These results clearly demonstrate the potential of the developed fast multipole BEM for solving 2-D thermoelasticity problems.

  18. Trace Elements in Cretaceous-Tertiary Boundary Clay at Gubbio, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebihara, M.; Miura, T.

    1992-07-01

    In 1980, Alvarez et al. reported high Ir concentrations for the Cretaceous-Tertiary (hereafter, K/T) boundary layer, suggesting an impact of extraterrestrial material as a possible cause of the sudden mass extinction at the end of the Cretaceous period. Since then, high Ir abundances have been reported for K/T layers all over the world. Iridium enrichments were alternatively explained in terms of volcanic eruptions (Officer and Drake, 1982) or sedimentation (Zoller et al, 1982). Thus, abundances of Ir only cannot be critical in explaining the cause of the mass extinctions at the K/T boundary. In contrast to the fairly large number of Ir data for K/T boundary geological materials, only limited data are available for other siderophile elements. Relative abundances of siderophiles must be more informative in considering the causes of extinction, and provide further data on the type of extraterrestrial material of the projectile if siderophile abundances are in favor of an impact as the cause of the mass extinction at the K/T boundary. Thus, we analyzed additional K/T boundary materials for trace elements, including some of the siderophiles. A total of 7 samples collected from the K/T boundary near Gubbio, Italy (three from Bottaccione, four from Contessa) were analyzed. For comparison, we analyzed three additional samples, one from a Cretaceous sediment layer and the remaining two from a Tertiary layer. Four siderophile elements (Ir, Pt, Au, and Pd) were measured by RNAA and more than 25 elements, including 9 lanthanoids, were measured by INAA. The siderophiles listed above and Ni were found to be present in all of the boundary clay samples. They have C1-normalized abundances of 0.02 for Ni, Ir, and Pt, 0.04 for Pd, and Au was exceptionally depleted at 0.005. Both Ni and Ir show fairly small variations in abundances among the clay samples, whereas the other three elements show quite large variations, exceeding error limits. We believe that similar enrichments for

  19. Structures of (001) twist boundaries in gold. II. Results obtained by x-ray diffraction and computer simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Majid, I.; Bristowe, P.D.; Balluffi, R.W. )

    1989-08-15

    Absolute grain-boundary structure factors, {vert bar}{ital F}{sub {ital b}}{vert bar}, were measured for a series of (001) twist boundaries in gold by the x-ray-diffraction method described in the preceding paper. The series included the {Sigma}113({theta}=7.6{degree}), {Sigma}25({theta}=16.3{degree}), {Sigma}13({theta}=22.6{degree}), {Sigma}17({theta}=28.1{degree}), and {Sigma}5({theta}=36.9{degree}) boundaries ({theta} being the twist angle). The atomistic structures and {vert bar}{ital F}{sub {ital b}}{vert bar}'s of these boundaries were also calculated by computer simulation using the embedded-atom model. The calculated atomic relaxations in the boundary cores consisted mainly of rotations around the {ital O} lattice elements, in agreement with previous work, and became monotonically weaker as {theta} increased. A considerable degree of consistency between measured and calculated {vert bar}{ital F}{sub {ital b}}{vert bar}'s was obtained for all five boundaries. The calculated results faithfully tracked large measured decreases in {vert bar}{ital F}{sub {ital b}}{vert bar} as {theta} increased. Considerable consistency was found between measured and calculated sets of {vert bar}{ital F}{sub {ital b}}{vert bar}'s for individual boundaries, particularly for {Sigma}113 and {Sigma}25, where the scattering was relatively strong. For the weakly scattering {Sigma}5 boundary, the observed {vert bar}{ital F}{sub {ital b}}{vert bar}'s led to a most probable structure with small displacements which closely resembled the calculated structure. For the intermediate {Sigma}13 and {Sigma}17 boundaries, the limited number of measured {vert bar}{ital F}{sub {ital b}}{vert bar}'s was reasonably consistent with calculated values. It was therefore concluded that the atomistic boundary structures calculated by the embedded-atom model were essentially correct.

  20. Finite Element Simulation Code for Computing Thermal Radiation from a Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, C. N.; Rappaport, H. L.

    2004-11-01

    A finite element code, ``THERMRAD,'' for computing thermal radiation from a plasma is under development. Radiation from plasma test particles is found in cylindrical geometry. Although the plasma equilibrium is assumed axisymmetric individual test particle excitation produces a non-axisymmetric electromagnetic response. Specially designed Whitney class basis functions are to be used to allow the solution to be solved on a two-dimensional grid. The basis functions enforce both a vanishing of the divergence of the electric field within grid elements where the complex index of refraction is assumed constant and continuity of tangential electric field across grid elements while allowing the normal component of the electric field to be discontinuous. An appropriate variational principle which incorporates the Sommerfeld radiation condition on the simulation boundary, as well as its discretization by the Rayleigh-Ritz technique is given. 1. ``Finte Element Method for Electromagnetics Problems,'' Volakis et al., Wiley, 1998.

  1. Finite element dynamic analysis on CDC STAR-100 computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, A. K.; Lambiotte, J. J., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Computational algorithms are presented for the finite element dynamic analysis of structures on the CDC STAR-100 computer. The spatial behavior is described using higher-order finite elements. The temporal behavior is approximated by using either the central difference explicit scheme or Newmark's implicit scheme. In each case the analysis is broken up into a number of basic macro-operations. Discussion is focused on the organization of the computation and the mode of storage of different arrays to take advantage of the STAR pipeline capability. The potential of the proposed algorithms is discussed and CPU times are given for performing the different macro-operations for a shell modeled by higher order composite shallow shell elements having 80 degrees of freedom.

  2. Investigations of Effects of Surface Temperature and Single Roughness Elements on Boundary-Layer Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liepmann, Hans W; Fila, Gertrude H

    1947-01-01

    The laminar boundary layer and the position of the transition point were investigated on a heated flat plate. It was found that the Reynolds number of transition decreased as the temperature of the plate is increased. It is shown from simple qualitative analytical considerations that the effect of variable viscosity in the boundary layer due to the temperature difference produces a velocity profile with an inflection point if the wall temperature is higher than the free-stream temperature. This profile is confirmed by measurements. The instability of inflection-point profiles is discussed. Studies of the flow in the wake of large, two-dimensional roughness elements are presented. It is shown that a boundary-layer can separate and reattach itself to the wall without having transition take place.

  3. Quantum corrected model for plasmonic nanoparticles: A boundary element method implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohenester, Ulrich

    2015-05-01

    We present a variant of the recently developed quantum corrected model (QCM) for plasmonic nanoparticles [Nat. Commun. 3, 825 (2012), 10.1038/ncomms1806] using nonlocal boundary conditions. The QCM accounts for electron tunneling in narrow gap regions of coupled metallic nanoparticles, leading to the appearance of new charge-transfer plasmons. Our approach has the advantages that it emphasizes the nonlocal nature of tunneling and introduces only contact resistance, but not ohmic losses through tunneling. Additionally, it can be implemented much more easily in boundary element method (BEM) approaches. We develop the methodology for the QCM using nonlocal boundary conditions and present simulation results of our BEM implementation, which are in good agreement with those of the original QCM.

  4. Immersed boundary-finite element model of fluid-structure interaction in the aortic root

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flamini, Vittoria; DeAnda, Abe; Griffith, Boyce E.

    2016-04-01

    It has long been recognized that aortic root elasticity helps to ensure efficient aortic valve closure, but our understanding of the functional importance of the elasticity and geometry of the aortic root continues to evolve as increasingly detailed in vivo imaging data become available. Herein, we describe a fluid-structure interaction model of the aortic root, including the aortic valve leaflets, the sinuses of Valsalva, the aortic annulus, and the sinotubular junction, that employs a version of Peskin's immersed boundary (IB) method with a finite element description of the structural elasticity. As in earlier work, we use a fiber-based model of the valve leaflets, but this study extends earlier IB models of the aortic root by employing an incompressible hyperelastic model of the mechanics of the sinuses and ascending aorta using a constitutive law fit to experimental data from human aortic root tissue. In vivo pressure loading is accounted for by a backward displacement method that determines the unloaded configuration of the root model. Our model yields realistic cardiac output at physiological pressures, with low transvalvular pressure differences during forward flow, minimal regurgitation during valve closure, and realistic pressure loads when the valve is closed during diastole. Further, results from high-resolution computations indicate that although the detailed leaflet and root kinematics show some grid sensitivity, our IB model of the aortic root nonetheless produces essentially grid-converged flow rates and pressures at practical grid spacings for the high Reynolds number flows of the aortic root. These results thereby clarify minimum grid resolutions required by such models when used as stand-alone models of the aortic valve as well as when used to provide models of the outflow valves in models of left-ventricular fluid dynamics.

  5. Finite and Boundary Element Modeling of the NASA Langley Aluminum Testbed Cylinder (ATC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosveld, Ferdinand W.

    2006-01-01

    The NASA Langley Aluminum Testbed Cylinder (ATC) was designed to serve as a universal structure for evaluating structural acoustic codes, modeling techniques and optimization methods used in the prediction of aircraft interior noise. Finite element models were developed for the components of the ATC based on the geometric, structural and material properties of the physical test structure. Numerically predicted modal frequencies for the longitudinal stringer, ring frame and dome component models, and six assembled ATC arrangements were in good agreement with experimental modal survey data. Finite element modal analyses were performed for 3 psi and 6 psi internal pressurization conditions. Acoustic cylinder modes for the interior of the ATC were calculated with an acoustic finite element model. Frequency transfer functions between a unit force on the structure and the acoustic response inside the ATC cylinder were measured and were compared with predictions based on a boundary element model. Comparisons between predicted and experimental results are presented and discussed.

  6. ZZ-Type a posteriori error estimators for adaptive boundary element methods on a curve☆

    PubMed Central

    Feischl, Michael; Führer, Thomas; Karkulik, Michael; Praetorius, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    In the context of the adaptive finite element method (FEM), ZZ-error estimators named after Zienkiewicz and Zhu (1987) [52] are mathematically well-established and widely used in practice. In this work, we propose and analyze ZZ-type error estimators for the adaptive boundary element method (BEM). We consider weakly singular and hyper-singular integral equations and prove, in particular, convergence of the related adaptive mesh-refining algorithms. Throughout, the theoretical findings are underlined by numerical experiments. PMID:24748725

  7. Coupling finite and boundary element methods for 2-D elasticity problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnamurthy, T.; Raju, I. S.; Sistla, R.

    1993-01-01

    A finite element-boundary element (FE-BE) coupling method for two-dimensional elasticity problems is developed based on a weighted residual variational method in which a portion of the domain of interest is modeled by FEs and the remainder of the region by BEs. The performance of the FE-BE coupling method is demonstrated via applications to a simple 'patch test' problem and three-crack problems. The method passed the patch tests for various modeling configurations and yielded accurate strain energy release rates for the crack problems studied.

  8. A wideband fast multipole boundary element method for half-space/plane-symmetric acoustic wave problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Chang-Jun; Chen, Hai-Bo; Chen, Lei-Lei

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents a novel wideband fast multipole boundary element approach to 3D half-space/plane-symmetric acoustic wave problems. The half-space fundamental solution is employed in the boundary integral equations so that the tree structure required in the fast multipole algorithm is constructed for the boundary elements in the real domain only. Moreover, a set of symmetric relations between the multipole expansion coefficients of the real and image domains are derived, and the half-space fundamental solution is modified for the purpose of applying such relations to avoid calculating, translating and saving the multipole/local expansion coefficients of the image domain. The wideband adaptive multilevel fast multipole algorithm associated with the iterative solver GMRES is employed so that the present method is accurate and efficient for both lowand high-frequency acoustic wave problems. As for exterior acoustic problems, the Burton-Miller method is adopted to tackle the fictitious eigenfrequency problem involved in the conventional boundary integral equation method. Details on the implementation of the present method are described, and numerical examples are given to demonstrate its accuracy and efficiency.

  9. Coupling finite and boundary element methods for two-dimensional potential problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnamurthy, T.; Raju, I. S.

    1992-01-01

    A finite element-boundary element (FE-BE) coupling method based on a weighted residual variational method is presented for potential problems, governed by either the Laplace or the Poisson equations. In this method, a portion of the domain of interest is modeled by finite elements (FE) and the remainder of the region by boundary elements (BE). Because the BE fundamental solutions are valid for infinite domains, a procedure that limits the effects of the BE fundamental solution to a small region adjacent to the FE region, called the transition region (TR), is developed. This procedure involves a judicious choice of functions called the transition (T) functions that have unit values on the BE-TR interface and zero values on the FE-TR interface. The present FE-BE coupling algorithm is shown to be independent of the extent of the transition region and the choice of the transition functions. Therefore, transition regions that extend to only one layer of elements between FE and BE regions and the use of simple linear transition functions work well.

  10. An enriched finite element model with q-refinement for radiative boundary layers in glass cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamed, M. Shadi; Seaid, Mohammed; Trevelyan, Jon; Laghrouche, Omar

    2014-02-01

    Radiative cooling in glass manufacturing is simulated using the partition of unity finite element method. The governing equations consist of a semi-linear transient heat equation for the temperature field and a stationary simplified P{sub 1} approximation for the radiation in non-grey semitransparent media. To integrate the coupled equations in time we consider a linearly implicit scheme in the finite element framework. A class of hyperbolic enrichment functions is proposed to resolve boundary layers near the enclosure walls. Using an industrial electromagnetic spectrum, the proposed method shows an immense reduction in the number of degrees of freedom required to achieve a certain accuracy compared to the conventional h-version finite element method. Furthermore the method shows a stable behaviour in treating the boundary layers which is shown by studying the solution close to the domain boundaries. The time integration choice is essential to implement a q-refinement procedure introduced in the current study. The enrichment is refined with respect to the steepness of the solution gradient near the domain boundary in the first few time steps and is shown to lead to a further significant reduction on top of what is already achieved with the enrichment. The performance of the proposed method is analysed for glass annealing in two enclosures where the simplified P{sub 1} approximation solution with the partition of unity method, the conventional finite element method and the finite difference method are compared to each other and to the full radiative heat transfer as well as the canonical Rosseland model.

  11. Comparison of the constant and linear boundary element method for EEG and MEG forward modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, J.C.; Chang, C.H.; Leahy, R.M.

    1996-07-01

    We present a comparison of boundary element methods for solving the forward problem in EEG and MEG. We use the method of weighted residuals and focus on the collocation and Galerkin forms for constant and linear basis functions. We also examine the effect of the isolated skull approach for reducing numerical errors due to the low conductivity of the skull. We demonstrate the improvement that a linear Galerkin approach may yield in solving the forward problem.

  12. Analytical and Experimental Studies of the Seismic Performance of Reinforced Concrete Structural Wall Boundary Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilson, Christopher William

    Following the February 27, 2010 Mw 8.8 Maule earthquake, an international effort was undertaken to better understand reasons for observed damage to concrete structural walls in buildings located in the affected region of Chile and to address potential design implications. The Chilean building code for concrete structures is based on the U.S. ACI 318 building code; however, based on the observed performance of over 400 buildings in the March 1985 earthquake-impacted Vina del Mar, Chilean Code NCh433.Of96 included an exception that special boundary elements (SBEs)---which are commonly required for walls in U.S. buildings---need not be provided. By taking exception to the special boundary element detailing provisions, the Chilean code allowed thin wall boundary zones with relatively large (typically 20 cm) spacing of transverse reinforcement (essentially unconfined) to be constructed. Given these differences, the 2010 earthquake is an excellent opportunity to assess the performance of reinforced concrete buildings designed using modern codes similar to those used in the United States. Data from damaged and undamaged buildings, as well as from parametric and experimental studies, are used to provide recommendations to improve the efficacy of U.S. provisions designed to inhibit structural damage at wall boundaries. Seven Chilean buildings were selected to investigate the performance of boundary elements during the 2010 earthquake. Several walls from each of the seven buildings were chosen to evaluate the ACI 318-11 Section 21.9.6.2 displacement-based trigger equation for determining if SBEs would have been required and if observed damage was consistent with the evaluation result (i.e., SBE required, no damage; SBE required, damage observed). The propensity of boundary longitudinal reinforcement to buckle was also investigated, taking into consideration the influence of boundary transverse reinforcement configuration and longitudinal reinforcement strain history. In

  13. Scattering of elastic waves by an arbitrary shaped 3-D planar crack using the Indirect Boundary Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viveros, U.; Sanchez-Sesma, F. J.; Luzon, F.

    2001-12-01

    The scattering of elastic waves by various types of cracks is an important engineering problem. From a physical point of view the question that arises is up to what degree will a local perturbation in a medium modifies the scattered wave field. For instance, in the seismic monitoring to enhance oil recovery (due to extensive presence of cracks and cavities) a crucial problem is to determine zones where there are physical property changes. Modelling such highly heterogeneous media is critical to increased production from oil and gas. In order to study scattering effects caused by arbitrary-shaped cracks a simplified indirect boundary element method (BEM) is used to compute the seismic response of a 3-D crack under incident elastic P and S waves. The method is based on the integral representation for scattered elastic waves using single layer boundary sources. This approach is called indirect BEM in the literature as the sources strengths should be obtained as an intermediate step. Scattered waves are constructed at the boundaries from which they radiate. Therefore, this method can be regarded as a numerical realization of Huygens' principle. Boundary conditions lead to a system of integral for boundary sources. A simplified discretization scheme is used. It is based on the approximate rectification of the surfaces involved using circles for the numerical and analytical integration of the exact Green's function for the unbounded elastic space. Radiation patterns for penny-shaped and croissant-shaped cracks are explored. The scattering effects of the elastic waves in a homogeneous isotropic infinite elastic medium with a 3-D crack are displayed in both frequency and time domains.

  14. Numerical algorithms for finite element computations on arrays of microprocessors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortega, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    The development of a multicolored successive over relaxation (SOR) program for the finite element machine is discussed. The multicolored SOR method uses a generalization of the classical Red/Black grid point ordering for the SOR method. These multicolored orderings have the advantage of allowing the SOR method to be implemented as a Jacobi method, which is ideal for arrays of processors, but still enjoy the greater rate of convergence of the SOR method. The program solves a general second order self adjoint elliptic problem on a square region with Dirichlet boundary conditions, discretized by quadratic elements on triangular regions. For this general problem and discretization, six colors are necessary for the multicolored method to operate efficiently. The specific problem that was solved using the six color program was Poisson's equation; for Poisson's equation, three colors are necessary but six may be used. In general, the number of colors needed is a function of the differential equation, the region and boundary conditions, and the particular finite element used for the discretization.

  15. Supplement to the ICRPG turbulent boundary layer nozzle analysis computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omori, S.; Gross, K. W.

    1972-01-01

    A supplement is presented for a turbulent boundary layer nozzle analysis computer program. It describes the program calculation sequence and presents a detailed documentation of each subroutine. Important equations are derived explicitly, and improvements to the program are discussed.

  16. Modeling of rolling element bearing mechanics. Computer program user's manual

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenhill, Lyn M.; Merchant, David H.

    1994-10-01

    This report provides the user's manual for the Rolling Element Bearing Analysis System (REBANS) analysis code which determines the quasistatic response to external loads or displacement of three types of high-speed rolling element bearings: angular contact ball bearings, duplex angular contact ball bearings, and cylindrical roller bearings. The model includes the defects of bearing ring and support structure flexibility. It is comprised of two main programs: the Preprocessor for Bearing Analysis (PREBAN) which creates the input files for the main analysis program, and Flexibility Enhanced Rolling Element Bearing Analysis (FEREBA), the main analysis program. This report addresses input instructions for and features of the computer codes. A companion report addresses the theoretical basis for the computer codes. REBANS extends the capabilities of the SHABERTH (Shaft and Bearing Thermal Analysis) code to include race and housing flexibility, including such effects as dead band and preload springs.

  17. Modeling of rolling element bearing mechanics. Computer program user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhill, Lyn M.; Merchant, David H.

    1994-01-01

    This report provides the user's manual for the Rolling Element Bearing Analysis System (REBANS) analysis code which determines the quasistatic response to external loads or displacement of three types of high-speed rolling element bearings: angular contact ball bearings, duplex angular contact ball bearings, and cylindrical roller bearings. The model includes the defects of bearing ring and support structure flexibility. It is comprised of two main programs: the Preprocessor for Bearing Analysis (PREBAN) which creates the input files for the main analysis program, and Flexibility Enhanced Rolling Element Bearing Analysis (FEREBA), the main analysis program. This report addresses input instructions for and features of the computer codes. A companion report addresses the theoretical basis for the computer codes. REBANS extends the capabilities of the SHABERTH (Shaft and Bearing Thermal Analysis) code to include race and housing flexibility, including such effects as dead band and preload springs.

  18. Automatic procedure for realistic 3D finite element modelling of human brain for bioelectromagnetic computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aristovich, K. Y.; Khan, S. H.

    2010-07-01

    Realistic computer modelling of biological objects requires building of very accurate and realistic computer models based on geometric and material data, type, and accuracy of numerical analyses. This paper presents some of the automatic tools and algorithms that were used to build accurate and realistic 3D finite element (FE) model of whole-brain. These models were used to solve the forward problem in magnetic field tomography (MFT) based on Magnetoencephalography (MEG). The forward problem involves modelling and computation of magnetic fields produced by human brain during cognitive processing. The geometric parameters of the model were obtained from accurate Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) data and the material properties - from those obtained from Diffusion Tensor MRI (DTMRI). The 3D FE models of the brain built using this approach has been shown to be very accurate in terms of both geometric and material properties. The model is stored on the computer in Computer-Aided Parametrical Design (CAD) format. This allows the model to be used in a wide a range of methods of analysis, such as finite element method (FEM), Boundary Element Method (BEM), Monte-Carlo Simulations, etc. The generic model building approach presented here could be used for accurate and realistic modelling of human brain and many other biological objects.

  19. Computation of three-dimensional mixed convective boundary layer flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gadepalli, Prashandt; Rahman, Muhammad M.

    1995-01-01

    The paper presents the numerical solution of heat and mass transfer during cross-flow (orthogonal) mixed convection. In this class of flow, a buoyancy-driven transport in the vertical direction and a forced convective flow in the horizontal direction results in a three-dimensional boundary layer structure adjacent to the plate. The rates of heat and mass transfer are determined by a combined influence of the two transport processes. The equations for the conservation of mass, momentum, energy, and species concentration were solved along with appropriate boundary conditions to determine the distributions of velocity components, temperature, and concentration across the thickness of the boundary layer at different locations on the plate. Results were expressed in dimensionless form using Reynolds number, Richardson number for heat transfer, Richardson number for mass transfer, Prandtl number, and Schmidt number as parameters. It was found that the transport is dominated by buoyancy at smaller vertical locations and at larger distances away from the forced convection leading edge. Effects of forced convection appeared to be very strong at smaller horizontal distances from the leading edge. The cross stream forced convection enhanced the rate of heat and mass transfer by a very significant amount.

  20. Stress analysis of 3D complex geometries using the scaled boundary polyhedral finite elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talebi, Hossein; Saputra, Albert; Song, Chongmin

    2016-08-01

    While dominating the numerical stress analysis of solids, the finite element method requires a mesh to conform to the surface of the geometry. Thus the mesh generation of three dimensional complex structures often require tedious human interventions. In this paper, we present a formulation for arbitrary polyhedral elements based on the scaled boundary finite element method, which reduces the difficulties in automatic mesh generation. We also propose a simple method to generate polyhedral meshes with local refinements. The mesh generation method is based on combining an octree mesh with surfaces defined using signed distance functions. Through several numerical examples, we verify the results, study the convergence behaviour and depict the many advantages and capabilities of the presented method. This contribution is intended to assist us to eventually frame a set of numerical methods and associated tools for the full automation of the engineering analysis where minimal human interaction is needed.

  1. Stress analysis of 3D complex geometries using the scaled boundary polyhedral finite elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talebi, Hossein; Saputra, Albert; Song, Chongmin

    2016-10-01

    While dominating the numerical stress analysis of solids, the finite element method requires a mesh to conform to the surface of the geometry. Thus the mesh generation of three dimensional complex structures often require tedious human interventions. In this paper, we present a formulation for arbitrary polyhedral elements based on the scaled boundary finite element method, which reduces the difficulties in automatic mesh generation. We also propose a simple method to generate polyhedral meshes with local refinements. The mesh generation method is based on combining an octree mesh with surfaces defined using signed distance functions. Through several numerical examples, we verify the results, study the convergence behaviour and depict the many advantages and capabilities of the presented method. This contribution is intended to assist us to eventually frame a set of numerical methods and associated tools for the full automation of the engineering analysis where minimal human interaction is needed.

  2. The role of prosodic boundaries in word discovery: Evidence from a computational model.

    PubMed

    Ludusan, Bogdan; Dupoux, Emmanuel

    2016-07-01

    This study aims to quantify the role of prosodic boundaries in early language acquisition using a computational modeling approach. A spoken term discovery system that models early word learning was used with and without a prosodic component on speech corpora of English, Spanish, and Japanese. The results showed that prosodic information induces a consistent improvement both in the alignment of the terms to actual word boundaries and in the phonemic homogeneity of the discovered clusters of terms. This benefit was found also when automatically discovered prosodic boundaries were used, boundaries which did not perfectly match the linguistically defined ones. PMID:27475196

  3. Optimisation methods for bathymetry and open boundary conditions in finite element model of ocean tides

    SciTech Connect

    Lyard, F.; Genco, M.L.

    1994-10-01

    A bidimensional, spectral in time, quasi-linearised hydrodynamic ocean tide model has been developed at the Institut de Mecanique de Grenoble. This model is derived from the classical shallow water equations by removing the velocity unknowns in the continuity equation, that leads to an elliptic, second-order differential equation where tide denivellation remains the only unknown quantity. The problem is solved in its variational formulation and the finite elements method is used to discretise the equations in the spatial domain with a Lagrange-P2 approximation. Bottom topography has to be known at the integration points of the elements. In the case of the large oceanic basins, a specific method, called the bathymetry optimisation method, is needed to correctly take into account the bottom topography inside the model. The accuracy of the model`s solutions is also strongly dependent on the quality of the open boundary conditions because of the elliptic characteristics of the problem. The optimisation method for open boundary conditions relies on the use of the in situ data available in the modelled domain. The aim of this paper is to present the basis of these optimisations of bathymetry and open boundary conditions. An illustration of the related improvements is presented on the North Atlantic Basin. 36 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs.

  4. Movement of a spherical cell in capillaries using a boundary element method.

    PubMed

    Wen, P H; Aliabadi, M H; Wang, W

    2007-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the translation and rotation of a spherical particle in capillaries and overcomes limitations in previous studies by using a boundary element method. The capillary, a straight cylindrical tube, is filled with a Newtonian viscous fluid. A spherical particle is arbitrarily positioned in the capillary either co-centrically or eccentrically and is free to translate and rotate. Flow in the capillary is first assumed to be caused solely by the movement of the sphere under the gravity. When a steady state is reached, the net force and torque on the sphere are zero. The translating velocity and rotation of the particle are calculated from equilibrium equations. For a co-centric sphere, our result agrees to Bohlin's analytical solution (Bohlin, 1960) and the difference is less than 1%. For an eccentrically positioned sphere in the tube, there are no analytical solutions unless the eccentricity is infinitesimal. Results by boundary element method (BEM) give an improved estimations on the velocity and rotation of the sphere than earlier results by a boundary singularity method (BSM), particularly when the clearance between the tube and the sphere becomes small. Movement of a spherical particle in a capillary driven by a pressure gradient is further investigated, which has closer relevance to movement of blood cells in capillaries. The current study using BEM enables investigation on cell movement in close proximities of the capillary wall. PMID:17027993

  5. Considerations of blood properties, outlet boundary conditions and energy loss approaches in computational fluid dynamics modeling.

    PubMed

    Moon, Ji Young; Suh, Dae Chul; Lee, Yong Sang; Kim, Young Woo; Lee, Joon Sang

    2014-02-01

    Despite recent development of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) research, analysis of computational fluid dynamics of cerebral vessels has several limitations. Although blood is a non-Newtonian fluid, velocity and pressure fields were computed under the assumptions of incompressible, laminar, steady-state flows and Newtonian fluid dynamics. The pulsatile nature of blood flow is not properly applied in inlet and outlet boundaries. Therefore, we present these technical limitations and discuss the possible solution by comparing the theoretical and computational studies. PMID:24642855

  6. ALGORITHM TO REDUCE APPROXIMATION ERROR FROM THE COMPLEX-VARIABLE BOUNDARY-ELEMENT METHOD APPLIED TO SOIL FREEZING.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hromadka, T.V.; Guymon, G.L.

    1985-01-01

    An algorithm is presented for the numerical solution of the Laplace equation boundary-value problem, which is assumed to apply to soil freezing or thawing. The Laplace equation is numerically approximated by the complex-variable boundary-element method. The algorithm aids in reducing integrated relative error by providing a true measure of modeling error along the solution domain boundary. This measure of error can be used to select locations for adding, removing, or relocating nodal points on the boundary or to provide bounds for the integrated relative error of unknown nodal variable values along the boundary.

  7. STARS: A general-purpose finite element computer program for analysis of engineering structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, K. K.

    1984-01-01

    STARS (Structural Analysis Routines) is primarily an interactive, graphics-oriented, finite-element computer program for analyzing the static, stability, free vibration, and dynamic responses of damped and undamped structures, including rotating systems. The element library consists of one-dimensional (1-D) line elements, two-dimensional (2-D) triangular and quadrilateral shell elements, and three-dimensional (3-D) tetrahedral and hexahedral solid elements. These elements enable the solution of structural problems that include truss, beam, space frame, plane, plate, shell, and solid structures, or any combination thereof. Zero, finite, and interdependent deflection boundary conditions can be implemented by the program. The associated dynamic response analysis capability provides for initial deformation and velocity inputs, whereas the transient excitation may be either forces or accelerations. An effective in-core or out-of-core solution strategy is automatically employed by the program, depending on the size of the problem. Data input may be at random within a data set, and the program offers certain automatic data-generation features. Input data are formatted as an optimal combination of free and fixed formats. Interactive graphics capabilities enable convenient display of nodal deformations, mode shapes, and element stresses.

  8. Computer simulation study of the structure of vacancies in grain boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Brokman, A.; Bristowe, P.D.; Balluffi, R.W.

    1981-01-01

    The structure of vacancies in grain boundaries has been investigated by computer molecular statics employing pairwise potentials. In order to gain an impression of the vacancy structures which may occur generally, a number of variables was investigated including: metal type, boundary type, degree of lattice coincidence and choice of boundary site. In all cases the vacancies remained as distinguishable point defects in the relatively irregular boundary structures. However, it was found that the vacancy often induced relatively large atomic displacements in the core of the boundary. These displacements often occurred only in the direct vicinity of the vacancy, but in certain cases they were widely distributed in the boundary, sometimes at surprisingly large distances.

  9. Nonreflecting Far-Field Boundary Conditions for Unsteady Transonic Flow Computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwak, D.

    1981-01-01

    The approximate nonreflecting far-field boundary condition, as proposed by Engquisi and Majda, is implemented In the computer code LTRAN2. This code solves the Implicit finite-difference representation of the small-disturbance equations for unsteady transonic flows about airfoils. The nonreflecting boundary condition and the description of the algorithm for Implementing these conditions In LTRAN2 tire discussed. Various cases re computed and compared with results from the older, more conventional procedures. One concludes that the nonreflecting far-field boundary approximation allows the far-field boundary to be located closer to the airfoil; this permits a decrease in the computer lime required to obtain the solution through the use of fewer mesh points.

  10. An Improved Treatment of External Boundary for Three-Dimensional Flow Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsynkov, Semyon V.; Vatsa, Veer N.

    1997-01-01

    We present an innovative numerical approach for setting highly accurate nonlocal boundary conditions at the external computational boundaries when calculating three-dimensional compressible viscous flows over finite bodies. The approach is based on application of the difference potentials method by V. S. Ryaben'kii and extends our previous technique developed for the two-dimensional case. The new boundary conditions methodology has been successfully combined with the NASA-developed code TLNS3D and used for the analysis of wing-shaped configurations in subsonic and transonic flow regimes. As demonstrated by the computational experiments, the improved external boundary conditions allow one to greatly reduce the size of the computational domain while still maintaining high accuracy of the numerical solution. Moreover, they may provide for a noticeable speedup of convergence of the multigrid iterations.

  11. A direct mixed-body boundary element method for packed silencers.

    PubMed

    Wu, T W; Cheng, C Y R; Zhang, P

    2002-06-01

    Bulk-reacting sound absorbing materials are often used in packed silencers to reduce broadband noise. A bulk-reacting material is characterized by a complex mean density and a complex speed of sound. These two material properties can be measured by the two-cavity method or calculated by empirical formulas. Modeling the entire silencer domain with a bulk-reacting lining will involve two different acoustic media, air and the bulk-reacting material. Traditionally, the interior silencer domain is divided into different zones and a multi-domain boundary element method (BEM) may be applied to solve the problem. However, defining different zones and matching the elements along each interface is tedious, especially when the zones are intricately connected. In this paper, a direct mixed-body boundary element method is used to model a packed silencer without subdividing it into different zones. This is achieved by summing up all the integral equations in different zones and then adding the hypersingular integral equations at interfaces. Several test cases, including a packed expansion chamber with and without an absorbing center bullet, and a parallel baffle silencer, are studied. Numerical results for the prediction of transmission loss (TL) are compared to experimental data.

  12. A direct mixed-body boundary element method for packed silencers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, T. W.; Cheng, C. Y. R.; Zhang, P.

    2002-06-01

    Bulk-reacting sound absorbing materials are often used in packed silencers to reduce broadband noise. A bulk-reacting material is characterized by a complex mean density and a complex speed of sound. These two material properties can be measured by the two-cavity method or calculated by empirical formulas. Modeling the entire silencer domain with a bulk-reacting lining will involve two different acoustic media, air and the bulk-reacting material. Traditionally, the interior silencer domain is divided into different zones and a multi-domain boundary element method (BEM) may be applied to solve the problem. However, defining different zones and matching the elements along each interface is tedious, especially when the zones are intricately connected. In this paper, a direct mixed-body boundary element method is used to model a packed silencer without subdividing it into different zones. This is achieved by summing up all the integral equations in different zones and then adding the hypersingular integral equations at interfaces. Several test cases, including a packed expansion chamber with and without an absorbing center bullet, and a parallel baffle silencer, are studied. Numerical results for the prediction of transmission loss (TL) are compared to experimental data. copyright 2002 Acoustical Society of America.

  13. Modelling of microstructured waveguides using a finite-element-based vectorial mode solver with transparent boundary conditions.

    PubMed

    Uranus, Henri; Hoekstra, H

    2004-06-14

    A finite-element-based vectorial optical mode solver is used to analyze microstructured optical waveguides. By employing 1st-order Bayliss-Gunzburger-Turkel-like transparent boundary conditions, both the real and imaginary part of the modal indices can be calculated in a relatively small computational domain. Results for waveguides with either circular or non-circular microstructured holes, solid- or air-core will be presented, including the silica-air Bragg fiber recently demonstrated by Vienne et al. (Post-deadline Paper PDP25, OFC 2004). The results of solid-core structures are in good agreement with the results of other methods while the results of air-core structure agree to the experimental results. PMID:19475122

  14. Modelling of microstructured waveguides using a finite-element-based vectorial mode solver with transparent boundary conditions.

    PubMed

    Uranus, Henri; Hoekstra, H

    2004-06-14

    A finite-element-based vectorial optical mode solver is used to analyze microstructured optical waveguides. By employing 1st-order Bayliss-Gunzburger-Turkel-like transparent boundary conditions, both the real and imaginary part of the modal indices can be calculated in a relatively small computational domain. Results for waveguides with either circular or non-circular microstructured holes, solid- or air-core will be presented, including the silica-air Bragg fiber recently demonstrated by Vienne et al. (Post-deadline Paper PDP25, OFC 2004). The results of solid-core structures are in good agreement with the results of other methods while the results of air-core structure agree to the experimental results.

  15. Chromatin boundary elements organize genomic architecture and developmental gene regulation in Drosophila Hox clusters.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhibo; Li, Mo; Roy, Sharmila; Liu, Kevin J; Romine, Matthew L; Lane, Derrick C; Patel, Sapna K; Cai, Haini N

    2016-08-26

    The three-dimensional (3D) organization of the eukaryotic genome is critical for its proper function. Evidence suggests that extensive chromatin loops form the building blocks of the genomic architecture, separating genes and gene clusters into distinct functional domains. These loops are anchored in part by a special type of DNA elements called chromatin boundary elements (CBEs). CBEs were originally found to insulate neighboring genes by blocking influences of transcriptional enhancers or the spread of silent chromatin. However, recent results show that chromatin loops can also play a positive role in gene regulation by looping out intervening DNA and "delivering" remote enhancers to gene promoters. In addition, studies from human and model organisms indicate that the configuration of chromatin loops, many of which are tethered by CBEs, is dynamically regulated during cell differentiation. In particular, a recent work by Li et al has shown that the SF1 boundary, located in the Drosophila Hox cluster, regulates local genes by tethering different subsets of chromatin loops: One subset enclose a neighboring gene ftz, limiting its access by the surrounding Scr enhancers and restrict the spread of repressive histones during early embryogenesis; and the other loops subdivide the Scr regulatory region into independent domains of enhancer accessibility. The enhancer-blocking activity of these CBE elements varies greatly in strength and tissue distribution. Further, tandem pairing of SF1 and SF2 facilitate the bypass of distal enhancers in transgenic flies, providing a mechanism for endogenous enhancers to circumvent genomic interruptions resulting from chromosomal rearrangement. This study demonstrates how a network of chromatin boundaries, centrally organized by SF1, can remodel the 3D genome to facilitate gene regulation during development. PMID:27621770

  16. Chromatin boundary elements organize genomic architecture and developmental gene regulation in Drosophila Hox clusters

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhibo; Li, Mo; Roy, Sharmila; Liu, Kevin J; Romine, Matthew L; Lane, Derrick C; Patel, Sapna K; Cai, Haini N

    2016-01-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) organization of the eukaryotic genome is critical for its proper function. Evidence suggests that extensive chromatin loops form the building blocks of the genomic architecture, separating genes and gene clusters into distinct functional domains. These loops are anchored in part by a special type of DNA elements called chromatin boundary elements (CBEs). CBEs were originally found to insulate neighboring genes by blocking influences of transcriptional enhancers or the spread of silent chromatin. However, recent results show that chromatin loops can also play a positive role in gene regulation by looping out intervening DNA and “delivering” remote enhancers to gene promoters. In addition, studies from human and model organisms indicate that the configuration of chromatin loops, many of which are tethered by CBEs, is dynamically regulated during cell differentiation. In particular, a recent work by Li et al has shown that the SF1 boundary, located in the Drosophila Hox cluster, regulates local genes by tethering different subsets of chromatin loops: One subset enclose a neighboring gene ftz, limiting its access by the surrounding Scr enhancers and restrict the spread of repressive histones during early embryogenesis; and the other loops subdivide the Scr regulatory region into independent domains of enhancer accessibility. The enhancer-blocking activity of these CBE elements varies greatly in strength and tissue distribution. Further, tandem pairing of SF1 and SF2 facilitate the bypass of distal enhancers in transgenic flies, providing a mechanism for endogenous enhancers to circumvent genomic interruptions resulting from chromosomal rearrangement. This study demonstrates how a network of chromatin boundaries, centrally organized by SF1, can remodel the 3D genome to facilitate gene regulation during development.

  17. Chromatin boundary elements organize genomic architecture and developmental gene regulation in Drosophila Hox clusters

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhibo; Li, Mo; Roy, Sharmila; Liu, Kevin J; Romine, Matthew L; Lane, Derrick C; Patel, Sapna K; Cai, Haini N

    2016-01-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) organization of the eukaryotic genome is critical for its proper function. Evidence suggests that extensive chromatin loops form the building blocks of the genomic architecture, separating genes and gene clusters into distinct functional domains. These loops are anchored in part by a special type of DNA elements called chromatin boundary elements (CBEs). CBEs were originally found to insulate neighboring genes by blocking influences of transcriptional enhancers or the spread of silent chromatin. However, recent results show that chromatin loops can also play a positive role in gene regulation by looping out intervening DNA and “delivering” remote enhancers to gene promoters. In addition, studies from human and model organisms indicate that the configuration of chromatin loops, many of which are tethered by CBEs, is dynamically regulated during cell differentiation. In particular, a recent work by Li et al has shown that the SF1 boundary, located in the Drosophila Hox cluster, regulates local genes by tethering different subsets of chromatin loops: One subset enclose a neighboring gene ftz, limiting its access by the surrounding Scr enhancers and restrict the spread of repressive histones during early embryogenesis; and the other loops subdivide the Scr regulatory region into independent domains of enhancer accessibility. The enhancer-blocking activity of these CBE elements varies greatly in strength and tissue distribution. Further, tandem pairing of SF1 and SF2 facilitate the bypass of distal enhancers in transgenic flies, providing a mechanism for endogenous enhancers to circumvent genomic interruptions resulting from chromosomal rearrangement. This study demonstrates how a network of chromatin boundaries, centrally organized by SF1, can remodel the 3D genome to facilitate gene regulation during development. PMID:27621770

  18. On buffer layers as non-reflecting computational boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayder, M. Ehtesham; Turkel, Eli L.

    1996-01-01

    We examine an absorbing buffer layer technique for use as a non-reflecting boundary condition in the numerical simulation of flows. One such formulation was by Ta'asan and Nark for the linearized Euler equations. They modified the flow inside the buffer zone to artificially make it supersonic in the layer. We examine how this approach can be extended to the nonlinear Euler equations. We consider both a conservative and a non-conservative form modifying the governing equations in the buffer layer. We compare this with the case that the governing equations in the layer are the same as in the interior domain. We test the effectiveness of these buffer layers by a simulation of an excited axisymmetric jet based on a nonlinear compressible Navier-Stokes equations.

  19. Nonlinear nonuniform torsional vibrations of bars by the boundary element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapountzakis, E. J.; Tsipiras, V. J.

    2010-05-01

    In this paper a boundary element method is developed for the nonuniform torsional vibration problem of bars of arbitrary doubly symmetric constant cross-section taking into account the effect of geometrical nonlinearity. The bar is subjected to arbitrarily distributed or concentrated conservative dynamic twisting and warping moments along its length, while its edges are supported by the most general torsional boundary conditions. The transverse displacement components are expressed so as to be valid for large twisting rotations (finite displacement-small strain theory), thus the arising governing differential equations and boundary conditions are in general nonlinear. The resulting coupling effect between twisting and axial displacement components is considered and torsional vibration analysis is performed in both the torsional pre- or post-buckled state. A distributed mass model system is employed, taking into account the warping, rotatory and axial inertia, leading to the formulation of a coupled nonlinear initial boundary value problem with respect to the variable along the bar angle of twist and to an "average" axial displacement of the cross-section of the bar. The numerical solution of the aforementioned initial boundary value problem is performed using the analog equation method, a BEM based method, leading to a system of nonlinear differential-algebraic equations (DAE), which is solved using an efficient time discretization scheme. Additionally, for the free vibrations case, a nonlinear generalized eigenvalue problem is formulated with respect to the fundamental mode shape at the points of reversal of motion after ignoring the axial inertia to verify the accuracy of the proposed method. The problem is solved using the direct iteration technique (DIT), with a geometrically linear fundamental mode shape as a starting vector. The validity of negligible axial inertia assumption is examined for the problem at hand.

  20. Salt-water-freshwater transient upconing - An implicit boundary-element solution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kemblowski, M.

    1985-01-01

    The boundary-element method is used to solve the set of partial differential equations describing the flow of salt water and fresh water separated by a sharp interface in the vertical plane. In order to improve the accuracy and stability of the numerical solution, a new implicit scheme was developed for calculating the motion of the interface. The performance of this scheme was tested by means of numerical simulation. The numerical results are compared to experimental results for a salt-water upconing under a drain problem. ?? 1985.

  1. The spectral-element method, Beowulf computing, and global seismology.

    PubMed

    Komatitsch, Dimitri; Ritsema, Jeroen; Tromp, Jeroen

    2002-11-29

    The propagation of seismic waves through Earth can now be modeled accurately with the recently developed spectral-element method. This method takes into account heterogeneity in Earth models, such as three-dimensional variations of seismic wave velocity, density, and crustal thickness. The method is implemented on relatively inexpensive clusters of personal computers, so-called Beowulf machines. This combination of hardware and software enables us to simulate broadband seismograms without intrinsic restrictions on the level of heterogeneity or the frequency content.

  2. A stochastic method for computing hadronic matrix elements

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandrou, Constantia; Constantinou, Martha; Dinter, Simon; Drach, Vincent; Jansen, Karl; Hadjiyiannakou, Kyriakos; Renner, Dru B.

    2014-01-24

    In this study, we present a stochastic method for the calculation of baryon 3-point functions which is an alternative to the typically used sequential method offering more versatility. We analyze the scaling of the error of the stochastically evaluated 3-point function with the lattice volume and find a favorable signal to noise ratio suggesting that the stochastic method can be extended to large volumes providing an efficient approach to compute hadronic matrix elements and form factors.

  3. Transient Finite Element Computations on a Variable Transputer System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smolinski, Patrick J.; Lapczyk, Ireneusz

    1993-01-01

    A parallel program to analyze transient finite element problems was written and implemented on a system of transputer processors. The program uses the explicit time integration algorithm which eliminates the need for equation solving, making it more suitable for parallel computations. An interprocessor communication scheme was developed for arbitrary two dimensional grid processor configurations. Several 3-D problems were analyzed on a system with a small number of processors.

  4. Implicit extrapolation methods for multilevel finite element computations

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, M.; Ruede, U.

    1994-12-31

    The finite element package FEMGP has been developed to solve elliptic and parabolic problems arising in the computation of magnetic and thermomechanical fields. FEMGP implements various methods for the construction of hierarchical finite element meshes, a variety of efficient multilevel solvers, including multigrid and preconditioned conjugate gradient iterations, as well as pre- and post-processing software. Within FEMGP, multigrid {tau}-extrapolation can be employed to improve the finite element solution iteratively to higher order. This algorithm is based on an implicit extrapolation, so that the algorithm differs from a regular multigrid algorithm only by a slightly modified computation of the residuals on the finest mesh. Another advantage of this technique is, that in contrast to explicit extrapolation methods, it does not rely on the existence of global error expansions, and therefore neither requires uniform meshes nor global regularity assumptions. In the paper the authors will analyse the {tau}-extrapolation algorithm and present experimental results in the context of the FEMGP package. Furthermore, the {tau}-extrapolation results will be compared to higher order finite element solutions.

  5. Automatic processing of an orientation map into a finite element mesh that conforms to grain boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dancette, S.; Browet, A.; Martin, G.; Willemet, M.; Delannay, L.

    2016-06-01

    A new procedure for microstructure-based finite element modeling of polycrystalline aggregates is presented. The proposed method relies (i) on an efficient graph-based community detection algorithm for crystallographic data segmentation and feature contour extraction and (ii) on the generation of selectively refined meshes conforming to grain boundaries. It constitutes a versatile and close to automatic environment for meshing complex microstructures. The procedure is illustrated with polycrystal microstructures characterized by orientation imaging microscopy. Hot deformation of a Duplex stainless steel is investigated based on ex-situ EBSD measurements performed on the same region of interest before and after deformation. A finite element mesh representing the initial microstructure is generated and then used in a crystal plasticity simulation of the plane strain compression. Simulation results and experiments are in relatively good agreement, confirming a large potential for such directly coupled experimental and modeling analyses, which is facilitated by the present image-based meshing procedure.

  6. Increasing computational efficiency of cochlear models using boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkhairy, Samiya A.; Shera, Christopher A.

    2015-12-01

    Our goal is to develop methods to improve the efficiency of computational models of the cochlea for applications that require the solution accurately only within a basal region of interest, specifically by decreasing the number of spatial sections needed for simulation of the problem with good accuracy. We design algebraic spatial and parametric transformations to computational models of the cochlea. These transformations are applied after the basal region of interest and allow for spatial preservation, driven by the natural characteristics of approximate spatial causality of cochlear models. The project is of foundational nature and hence the goal is to design, characterize and develop an understanding and framework rather than optimization and globalization. Our scope is as follows: designing the transformations; understanding the mechanisms by which computational load is decreased for each transformation; development of performance criteria; characterization of the results of applying each transformation to a specific physical model and discretization and solution schemes. In this manuscript, we introduce one of the proposed methods (complex spatial transformation) for a case study physical model that is a linear, passive, transmission line model in which the various abstraction layers (electric parameters, filter parameters, wave parameters) are clearer than other models. This is conducted in the frequency domain for multiple frequencies using a second order finite difference scheme for discretization and direct elimination for solving the discrete system of equations. The performance is evaluated using two developed simulative criteria for each of the transformations. In conclusion, the developed methods serve to increase efficiency of a computational traveling wave cochlear model when spatial preservation can hold, while maintaining good correspondence with the solution of interest and good accuracy, for applications in which the interest is in the solution

  7. Wavelet formulation of the polarizable continuum model. II. Use of piecewise bilinear boundary elements.

    PubMed

    Bugeanu, Monica; Di Remigio, Roberto; Mozgawa, Krzysztof; Reine, Simen Sommerfelt; Harbrecht, Helmut; Frediani, Luca

    2015-12-21

    The simplicity of dielectric continuum models has made them a standard tool in almost any Quantum Chemistry (QC) package. Despite being intuitive from a physical point of view, the actual electrostatic problem at the cavity boundary is challenging: the underlying boundary integral equations depend on singular, long-range operators. The parametrization of the cavity boundary should be molecular-shaped, smooth and differentiable. Even the most advanced implementations, based on the integral equation formulation (IEF) of the polarizable continuum model (PCM), generally lead to working equations which do not guarantee convergence to the exact solution and/or might become numerically unstable in the limit of large refinement of the molecular cavity (small tesserae). This is because they generally make use of a surface parametrization with cusps (interlocking spheres) and employ collocation methods for the discretization (point charges). Wavelets on a smooth cavity are an attractive alternative to consider: for the operators involved, they lead to highly sparse matrices and precise error control. Moreover, by making use of a bilinear basis for the representation of operators and functions on the cavity boundary, all equations can be differentiated to enable the computation of geometrical derivatives. In this contribution, we present our implementation of the IEFPCM with bilinear wavelets on a smooth cavity boundary. The implementation has been carried out in our module PCMSolver and interfaced with LSDalton, demonstrating the accuracy of the method both for the electrostatic solvation energy and for linear response properties. In addition, the implementation in a module makes our framework readily available to any QC software with minimal effort. PMID:26256401

  8. Diffraction of Rayleigh wave by simple surface irregularity using boundary element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eslami Haghighat, Abbas

    2015-06-01

    The topographic amplification effect is studied in this paper in the case of a semi-circular canyon under incident Rayleigh wave. Time-frequency domain boundary element method has been applied to investigate the wave diffraction phenomena. The model consists of a semi-circular canyon cut from an isotropic elastic half plane. The total response is decomposed into free field motion and scattered wave field. The former can be constructed analytically by superposing on incident and reflected Rayleigh waves in the half plane and the later by using boundary element method with linear elements. The analyses are performed in the frequency domain and then converted into time domain using fast Fourier transform (FFT) algorithm. It is shown that the weak and strong singularities in the governing integral equations for linear elements can be removed by analytical approaches. Different ranges of Rayleigh wavelengths from low to high are considered. The results are presented versus dimensionless frequency and distance. A limiting value for Rayleigh wavelength can be recognized beyond which the canyon has no important effects on scattering of harmonic incident waves. Furthermore, a parametric study has been performed for different values of Poisson’s ratios. The published works in the effects of this parameter are somewhat few and limited to specific values of Poisson’s ratio. Finally, the spatial variations of surface displacements for the Rayleigh wave impulse of Ricker wavelet type are obtained. The spatial distribution shows the generation of backward-scattered Rayleigh wave which its intensity depends on predominant frequency of the input impulse as well as Poisson’s ratio of the medium. Dynamic responses of the points just located at the edges of the semi-circular canyon are compared to each other which accounts for the isolation efficiency of the canyon.

  9. Acceleration of matrix element computations for precision measurements

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Brandt, Oleg; Gutierrez, Gaston; Wang, M. H.L.S.; Ye, Zhenyu

    2014-11-25

    The matrix element technique provides a superior statistical sensitivity for precision measurements of important parameters at hadron colliders, such as the mass of the top quark or the cross-section for the production of Higgs bosons. The main practical limitation of the technique is its high computational demand. Using the example of the top quark mass, we present two approaches to reduce the computation time of the technique by a factor of 90. First, we utilize low-discrepancy sequences for numerical Monte Carlo integration in conjunction with a dedicated estimator of numerical uncertainty, a novelty in the context of the matrix elementmore » technique. We then utilize a new approach that factorizes the overall jet energy scale from the matrix element computation, a novelty in the context of top quark mass measurements. The utilization of low-discrepancy sequences is of particular general interest, as it is universally applicable to Monte Carlo integration, and independent of the computing environment.« less

  10. Compute Element and Interface Box for the Hazard Detection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Villalpando, Carlos Y.; Khanoyan, Garen; Stern, Ryan A.; Some, Raphael R.; Bailey, Erik S.; Carson, John M.; Vaughan, Geoffrey M.; Werner, Robert A.; Salomon, Phil M.; Martin, Keith E.; Spaulding, Matthew D.; Luna, Michael E.; Motaghedi, Shui H.; Trawny, Nikolas; Johnson, Andrew E.; Ivanov, Tonislav I.; Huertas, Andres; Whitaker, William D.; Goldberg, Steven B.

    2013-01-01

    The Autonomous Landing and Hazard Avoidance Technology (ALHAT) program is building a sensor that enables a spacecraft to evaluate autonomously a potential landing area to generate a list of hazardous and safe landing sites. It will also provide navigation inputs relative to those safe sites. The Hazard Detection System Compute Element (HDS-CE) box combines a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) board for sensor integration and timing, with a multicore computer board for processing. The FPGA does system-level timing and data aggregation, and acts as a go-between, removing the real-time requirements from the processor and labeling events with a high resolution time. The processor manages the behavior of the system, controls the instruments connected to the HDS-CE, and services the "heavy lifting" computational requirements for analyzing the potential landing spots.

  11. Crack propagation analysis of welded thin-walled joints using boundary element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashiri, F. R.; Zhao, Xiao-Ling; Grundy, P.

    Tube-to-plate nodal joints under cyclic bending are widely used in the road transport and agricultural industry. The square hollow sections (SHS) used in these constructions are thin-walled and cold formed, and they have thicknesses of less than 4mm. Some fatigue failures have been observed. The weld undercut may affect the fatigue life of welded tubular joints especially for thin-walled sections. The undercut dimensions were measured using the silicon imprint technique. Modelling of thin-walled cruciform joints, as a simplification of welded tubular joints, is described in this paper to determine the effect of weld undercut on fatigue propagation life. The Boundary Element Analysis System Software (BEASY) is used. The results of the effect of weld toe undercut from this analysis are compared with results from previous research to determine the comparative reduction in fatigue life between thin-walled joints (T=3mm) and those made of thicker sections (T=20mm). The loss in fatigue strength of the thin-walled joints is found to be relatively more than that for thicker walled joints. A 3D model of a tube to plate T-joint is also modelled using the boundary element software, BEASY. The nodal joint consists of a square hollow section, 50×50×3 SHS, fillet welded to a 10-mm thick plate, and subjected to cyclic bending stress. Fatigue analyses are carried out and the results are compared with the only available S-N design curve.

  12. Multi-Region Boundary Element Analysis for Coupled Thermal-Fracturing Processes in Geomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Baotang; Kim, Hyung-Mok; Park, Eui-Seob; Kim, Taek-Kon; Wuttke, Manfred W.; Rinne, Mikael; Backers, Tobias; Stephansson, Ove

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a boundary element code development on coupled thermal-mechanical processes of rock fracture propagation. The code development was based on the fracture mechanics code FRACOD that has previously been developed by Shen and Stephansson (Int J Eng Fracture Mech 47:177-189, 1993) and FRACOM (A fracture propagation code—FRACOD, User's manual. FRACOM Ltd. 2002) and simulates complex fracture propagation in rocks governed by both tensile and shear mechanisms. For the coupled thermal-fracturing analysis, an indirect boundary element method, namely the fictitious heat source method, was implemented in FRACOD to simulate the temperature change and thermal stresses in rocks. This indirect method is particularly suitable for the thermal-fracturing coupling in FRACOD where the displacement discontinuity method is used for mechanical simulation. The coupled code was also extended to simulate multiple region problems in which rock mass, concrete linings and insulation layers with different thermal and mechanical properties were present. Both verification and application cases were presented where a point heat source in a 2D infinite medium and a pilot LNG underground cavern were solved and studied using the coupled code. Good agreement was observed between the simulation results, analytical solutions and in situ measurements which validates an applicability of the developed coupled code.

  13. A hybrid Boundary Element Unstructured Transmission-line (BEUT) method for accurate 2D electromagnetic simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, Daniel; Cools, Kristof; Sewell, Phillip

    2016-11-01

    Time domain electromagnetic simulation tools have the ability to model transient, wide-band applications, and non-linear problems. The Boundary Element Method (BEM) and the Transmission Line Modeling (TLM) method are both well established numerical techniques for simulating time-varying electromagnetic fields. The former surface based method can accurately describe outwardly radiating fields from piecewise uniform objects and efficiently deals with large domains filled with homogeneous media. The latter volume based method can describe inhomogeneous and non-linear media and has been proven to be unconditionally stable. Furthermore, the Unstructured TLM (UTLM) enables modelling of geometrically complex objects by using triangular meshes which removes staircasing and unnecessary extensions of the simulation domain. The hybridization of BEM and UTLM which is described in this paper is named the Boundary Element Unstructured Transmission-line (BEUT) method. It incorporates the advantages of both methods. The theory and derivation of the 2D BEUT method is described in this paper, along with any relevant implementation details. The method is corroborated by studying its correctness and efficiency compared to the traditional UTLM method when applied to complex problems such as the transmission through a system of Luneburg lenses and the modelling of antenna radomes for use in wireless communications.

  14. Automatic Generation of Individual Finite-Element Models for Computational Fluid Dynamics and Computational Structure Mechanics Simulations in the Arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazer, D.; Schmidt, E.; Unterhinninghofen, R.; Richter, G. M.; Dillmann, R.

    2009-08-01

    Abnormal hemodynamics and biomechanics of blood flow and vessel wall conditions in the arteries may result in severe cardiovascular diseases. Cardiovascular diseases result from complex flow pattern and fatigue of the vessel wall and are prevalent causes leading to high mortality each year. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), Computational Structure Mechanics (CSM) and Fluid Structure Interaction (FSI) have become efficient tools in modeling the individual hemodynamics and biomechanics as well as their interaction in the human arteries. The computations allow non-invasively simulating patient-specific physical parameters of the blood flow and the vessel wall needed for an efficient minimally invasive treatment. The numerical simulations are based on the Finite Element Method (FEM) and require exact and individual mesh models to be provided. In the present study, we developed a numerical tool to automatically generate complex patient-specific Finite Element (FE) mesh models from image-based geometries of healthy and diseased vessels. The mesh generation is optimized based on the integration of mesh control functions for curvature, boundary layers and mesh distribution inside the computational domain. The needed mesh parameters are acquired from a computational grid analysis which ensures mesh-independent and stable simulations. Further, the generated models include appropriate FE sets necessary for the definition of individual boundary conditions, required to solve the system of nonlinear partial differential equations governed by the fluid and solid domains. Based on the results, we have performed computational blood flow and vessel wall simulations in patient-specific aortic models providing a physical insight into the pathological vessel parameters. Automatic mesh generation with individual awareness in terms of geometry and conditions is a prerequisite for performing fast, accurate and realistic FEM-based computations of hemodynamics and biomechanics in the

  15. Interface and permittivity simultaneous reconstruction in electrical capacitance tomography based on boundary and finite-elements coupling method.

    PubMed

    Ren, Shangjie; Dong, Feng

    2016-06-28

    Electrical capacitance tomography (ECT) is a non-destructive detection technique for imaging the permittivity distributions inside an observed domain from the capacitances measurements on its boundary. Owing to its advantages of non-contact, non-radiation, high speed and low cost, ECT is promising in the measurements of many industrial or biological processes. However, in the practical industrial or biological systems, a deposit is normally seen in the inner wall of its pipe or vessel. As the actual region of interest (ROI) of ECT is surrounded by the deposit layer, the capacitance measurements become weakly sensitive to the permittivity perturbation occurring at the ROI. When there is a major permittivity difference between the deposit and the ROI, this kind of shielding effect is significant, and the permittivity reconstruction becomes challenging. To deal with the issue, an interface and permittivity simultaneous reconstruction approach is proposed. Both the permittivity at the ROI and the geometry of the deposit layer are recovered using the block coordinate descent method. The boundary and finite-elements coupling method is employed to improve the computational efficiency. The performance of the proposed method is evaluated with the simulation tests. This article is part of the themed issue 'Supersensing through industrial process tomography'. PMID:27185960

  16. Interface and permittivity simultaneous reconstruction in electrical capacitance tomography based on boundary and finite-elements coupling method.

    PubMed

    Ren, Shangjie; Dong, Feng

    2016-06-28

    Electrical capacitance tomography (ECT) is a non-destructive detection technique for imaging the permittivity distributions inside an observed domain from the capacitances measurements on its boundary. Owing to its advantages of non-contact, non-radiation, high speed and low cost, ECT is promising in the measurements of many industrial or biological processes. However, in the practical industrial or biological systems, a deposit is normally seen in the inner wall of its pipe or vessel. As the actual region of interest (ROI) of ECT is surrounded by the deposit layer, the capacitance measurements become weakly sensitive to the permittivity perturbation occurring at the ROI. When there is a major permittivity difference between the deposit and the ROI, this kind of shielding effect is significant, and the permittivity reconstruction becomes challenging. To deal with the issue, an interface and permittivity simultaneous reconstruction approach is proposed. Both the permittivity at the ROI and the geometry of the deposit layer are recovered using the block coordinate descent method. The boundary and finite-elements coupling method is employed to improve the computational efficiency. The performance of the proposed method is evaluated with the simulation tests. This article is part of the themed issue 'Supersensing through industrial process tomography'.

  17. Removal of line artifacts on mesh boundary in computer generated hologram by mesh phase matching.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae-Hyeung; Yeom, Han-Ju; Kim, Hee-Jae; Zhang, HuiJun; Li, BoNi; Ji, Yeong-Min; Kim, Sang-Hoo

    2015-03-23

    Mesh-based computer generated hologram enables realistic and efficient representation of three-dimensional scene. However, the dark line artifacts on the boundary between neighboring meshes are frequently observed, degrading the quality of the reconstruction. In this paper, we propose a simple technique to remove the dark line artifacts by matching the phase on the boundary of neighboring meshes. The feasibility of the proposed method is confirmed by the numerical and optical reconstruction of the generated hologram.

  18. Computer-aided boundary delineation of agricultural lands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Thomas D.; Angelici, Gary L.; Slye, Robert E.; Ma, Matt

    1989-01-01

    The National Agricultural Statistics Service of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) presently uses labor-intensive aerial photographic interpretation techniques to divide large geographical areas into manageable-sized units for estimating domestic crop and livestock production. Prototype software, the computer-aided stratification (CAS) system, was developed to automate the procedure, and currently runs on a Sun-based image processing system. With a background display of LANDSAT Thematic Mapper and United States Geological Survey Digital Line Graph data, the operator uses a cursor to delineate agricultural areas, called sampling units, which are assigned to strata of land-use and land-cover types. The resultant stratified sampling units are used as input into subsequent USDA sampling procedures. As a test, three counties in Missouri were chosen for application of the CAS procedures. Subsequent analysis indicates that CAS was five times faster in creating sampling units than the manual techniques were.

  19. HYDRA, A finite element computational fluid dynamics code: User manual

    SciTech Connect

    Christon, M.A.

    1995-06-01

    HYDRA is a finite element code which has been developed specifically to attack the class of transient, incompressible, viscous, computational fluid dynamics problems which are predominant in the world which surrounds us. The goal for HYDRA has been to achieve high performance across a spectrum of supercomputer architectures without sacrificing any of the aspects of the finite element method which make it so flexible and permit application to a broad class of problems. As supercomputer algorithms evolve, the continuing development of HYDRA will strive to achieve optimal mappings of the most advanced flow solution algorithms onto supercomputer architectures. HYDRA has drawn upon the many years of finite element expertise constituted by DYNA3D and NIKE3D Certain key architectural ideas from both DYNA3D and NIKE3D have been adopted and further improved to fit the advanced dynamic memory management and data structures implemented in HYDRA. The philosophy for HYDRA is to focus on mapping flow algorithms to computer architectures to try and achieve a high level of performance, rather than just performing a port.

  20. Computation of turbulent boundary layer flows with an algebraic stress turbulence model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Sang-Wook; Chen, Yen-Sen

    1986-01-01

    An algebraic stress turbulence model is presented, characterized by the following: (1) the eddy viscosity expression is derived from the Reynolds stress turbulence model; (2) the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate equation is improved by including a production range time scale; and (3) the diffusion coefficients for turbulence equations are adjusted so that the kinetic energy profile extends further into the free stream region found in most experimental data. The turbulent flow equations were solved using a finite element method. Examples include: fully developed channel flow, fully developed pipe flow, flat plate boundary layer flow, plane jet exhausting into a moving stream, circular jet exhausting into a moving stream, and wall jet flow. Computational results compare favorably with experimental data for most of the examples considered. Significantly improved results were obtained for the plane jet flow, the circular jet flow, and the wall jet flow; whereas the remainder are comparable to those obtained by finite difference methods using the standard kappa-epsilon turbulence model. The latter seems to be promising with further improvement of the expression for the eddy viscosity coefficient.

  1. A waveguide finite element and boundary element approach to calculating the sound radiated by railway and tram rails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, C.-M.; Jones, C. J. C.; Thompson, D. J.; Ryue, J.

    2009-04-01

    Engineering methods for modelling the generation of railway rolling noise are well established. However, these necessarily involve some simplifying assumptions to calculate the sound powers radiated by the wheel and the track. For the rail, this involves using an average vibration together with a radiation efficiency determined for a two-dimensional (2D) problem. In this paper, the sound radiation from a rail is calculated using a method based on a combination of waveguide finite elements and wavenumber boundary elements. This new method allows a number of the simplifying assumptions in the established methods to be avoided. It takes advantage of the 2D geometry of a rail to provide an efficient numerical approach but nevertheless takes into account the three-dimensional nature of the vibration and sound field and the infinite extent of the rail. The approach is used to study a conventional 'open' rail as well as an embedded tram rail of the type used for street running. In the former case it is shown that the conventional approach gives correct results and the complexity of the new method is mostly not necessary. However, for the embedded rail it is found that it is important to take into account the radiation from several wave types in the rail and embedding material. The damping effect of the embedding material on the rail vibration is directly taken into account and, for the example shown, causes the embedded rail to radiate less sound than the open rail above about 600 Hz. The free surface of the embedding material amplifies the sound radiation at some frequencies, while at other frequencies it moves out of phase with the rail and reduces the radiation efficiency. At low frequencies the radiation from the embedded rail resembles a line monopole source which produces greater power than the 'open' rail which forms a line dipole.

  2. Computations of Disturbance Amplification Behind Isolated Roughness Elements and Comparison with Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhari, Meelan; Li, Fei; Bynum, Michael; Kegerise, Michael; King, Rudolph

    2015-01-01

    Computations are performed to study laminar-turbulent transition due to isolated roughness elements in boundary layers at Mach 3.5 and 5.95, with an emphasis on flow configurations for which experimental measurements from low disturbance wind tunnels are available. The Mach 3.5 case corresponds to a roughness element with right-triangle planform with hypotenuse that is inclined at 45 degrees with respect to the oncoming stream, presenting an obstacle with spanwise asymmetry. The Mach 5.95 case corresponds to a circular roughness element along the nozzle wall of the Purdue BAMQT wind tunnel facility. In both cases, the mean flow distortion due to the roughness element is characterized by long-lived streamwise streaks in the roughness wake, which can support instability modes that did not exist in the absence of the roughness element. The linear amplification characteristics of the wake flow are examined towards the eventual goal of developing linear growth correlations for the onset of transition.

  3. Computation of the velocity field and mass balance in the finite-element modeling of groundwater flow

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, G. T.

    1980-01-01

    Darcian velocity has been conventionally calculated in the finite-element modeling of groundwater flow by taking the derivatives of the computed pressure field. This results in discontinuities in the velocity field at nodal points and element boundaries. Discontinuities become enormous when the computed pressure field is far from a linear distribution. It is proposed in this paper that the finite element procedure that is used to simulate the pressure field or the moisture content field also be applied to Darcy's law with the derivatives of the computed pressure field as the load function. The problem of discontinuity is then eliminated, and the error of mass balance over the region of interest is much reduced. The reduction is from 23.8 to 2.2% by one numerical scheme and from 29.7 to -3.6% by another for a transient problem.

  4. SYMBMAT: Symbolic computation of quantum transition matrix elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciappina, M. F.; Kirchner, T.

    2012-08-01

    We have developed a set of Mathematica notebooks to compute symbolically quantum transition matrices relevant for atomic ionization processes. The utilization of a symbolic language allows us to obtain analytical expressions for the transition matrix elements required in charged-particle and laser induced ionization of atoms. Additionally, by using a few simple commands, it is possible to export these symbolic expressions to standard programming languages, such as Fortran or C, for the subsequent computation of differential cross sections or other observables. One of the main drawbacks in the calculation of transition matrices is the tedious algebraic work required when initial states other than the simple hydrogenic 1s state need to be considered. Using these notebooks the work is dramatically reduced and it is possible to generate exact expressions for a large set of bound states. We present explicit examples of atomic collisions (in First Born Approximation and Distorted Wave Theory) and laser-matter interactions (within the Dipole and Strong Field Approximations and different gauges) using both hydrogenic wavefunctions and Slater-Type Orbitals with arbitrary nlm quantum numbers as initial states. Catalogue identifier: AEMI_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEMI_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC license, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 71 628 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 444 195 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Mathematica Computer: Single machines using Linux or Windows (with cores with any clock speed, cache memory and bits in a word) Operating system: Any OS that supports Mathematica. The notebooks have been tested under Windows and Linux and with versions 6.x, 7.x and 8.x Classification: 2.6 Nature of problem

  5. Boundary element solution of macromolecular electrostatics: interaction energy between two proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, H X

    1993-01-01

    The boundary element technique is implemented to solve for the electrostatic potential of macromolecules in an ionic solution. This technique entails solving surface integral equations that are equivalent to the Poisson and the Poisson-Boltzmann equations governing the electrostatic potential inside the macromolecules and and in the solvent. A simple but robust method is described for discretizing the macromolecular surfaces in order to approximate the integral equations by linear algebraic equations. Particular attention is paid to the interaction energy between two macromolecules, and an iterative procedure is devised to make the calculation more efficient. This iterative procedure is illustrated in the electron transfer system of cytochrome c and cytochrome c peroxidase. PMID:8218918

  6. Precision enhancement in boundary element methods with application to electron optics.

    PubMed

    Loyd, Jody S; Gregory, Don A

    2016-08-01

    A hybrid approach is presented for obtaining electric potentials for use in electron optics modeling. An initial solution from the boundary element method (BEM) is used to derive the bounding potential of a cylindrical subdomain subsequently used in a Fourier series solution. The approach combines the inherent precision of this analytic solution with the flexibility of BEM to describe practical, non-idealized systems of electrodes. The resulting lens field in the Fourier series subdomain is of higher precision, thereby allowing smaller errors in subsequent calculations of electron ray paths. The effects of aberrations are thus easier to observe in tracing non-paraxial rays. Example ray-traces through a simple, known einzel lens are given as validation of this approach.

  7. Precision enhancement in boundary element methods with application to electron optics.

    PubMed

    Loyd, Jody S; Gregory, Don A

    2016-08-01

    A hybrid approach is presented for obtaining electric potentials for use in electron optics modeling. An initial solution from the boundary element method (BEM) is used to derive the bounding potential of a cylindrical subdomain subsequently used in a Fourier series solution. The approach combines the inherent precision of this analytic solution with the flexibility of BEM to describe practical, non-idealized systems of electrodes. The resulting lens field in the Fourier series subdomain is of higher precision, thereby allowing smaller errors in subsequent calculations of electron ray paths. The effects of aberrations are thus easier to observe in tracing non-paraxial rays. Example ray-traces through a simple, known einzel lens are given as validation of this approach. PMID:27068123

  8. Enhanced plasmonic light absorption engineering of graphene: simulation by boundary-integral spectral element method.

    PubMed

    Niu, Jun; Luo, Ma; Zhu, Jinfeng; Liu, Qing Huo

    2015-02-23

    Graphene's relatively poor absorption is an essential obstacle for designing graphene-based photonic devices with satisfying photo-responsivity. To enhance the tunable light absorption of graphene, appropriate excitation of localized surface plasmon resonance is considered as a promising approach. In this work, the strategy of incorporating periodic cuboid gold nanoparticle (NP) cluster arrays and cylindrical gold NP arrays with Bragg reflectors into graphene-based photodetectors are theoretically studied by the boundary-integral spectral element method (BI-SEM). With the BI-SEM, the models can be numerically analyzed with excellent accuracy and efficiency. Numerical simulation shows that the proposed structures can effectively engineer the light absorption in graphene by tuning plasmon resonance. In the spectra of 300 nm to 1000 nm, a maximum light absorption of 67.54% is observed for the graphene layer with optimal parameters of the photodetector model.

  9. Noise simulation of aircraft engine fans by the boundary element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyatunin, K. R.; Arkharova, N. V.; Remizov, A. E.

    2016-07-01

    Numerical simulation results of the civil aircraft engine fan stage noise in the far field are presented. Non-steady-state rotor-stator interaction is calculated the commercial software that solves the Navier-Stokes equations using differentturbulence models. Noise propagation to the far acoustic field is calculated by the boundary element method using acoustic Lighthill analogies without taking into account the mean current in the air inlet duct. The calculated sound pressure levels at points 50 m from the engine are presented, and the directional patterns of the acoustic radiation are shown. The use of the eddy resolving turbulence model to calculate rotor-stator interaction increases the accuracy in predicting fan stage noise.

  10. Automatic Recognition of Element Classes and Boundaries in the Birdsong with Variable Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Okanoya, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Researches on sequential vocalization often require analysis of vocalizations in long continuous sounds. In such studies as developmental ones or studies across generations in which days or months of vocalizations must be analyzed, methods for automatic recognition would be strongly desired. Although methods for automatic speech recognition for application purposes have been intensively studied, blindly applying them for biological purposes may not be an optimal solution. This is because, unlike human speech recognition, analysis of sequential vocalizations often requires accurate extraction of timing information. In the present study we propose automated systems suitable for recognizing birdsong, one of the most intensively investigated sequential vocalizations, focusing on the three properties of the birdsong. First, a song is a sequence of vocal elements, called notes, which can be grouped into categories. Second, temporal structure of birdsong is precisely controlled, meaning that temporal information is important in song analysis. Finally, notes are produced according to certain probabilistic rules, which may facilitate the accurate song recognition. We divided the procedure of song recognition into three sub-steps: local classification, boundary detection, and global sequencing, each of which corresponds to each of the three properties of birdsong. We compared the performances of several different ways to arrange these three steps. As results, we demonstrated a hybrid model of a deep convolutional neural network and a hidden Markov model was effective. We propose suitable arrangements of methods according to whether accurate boundary detection is needed. Also we designed the new measure to jointly evaluate the accuracy of note classification and boundary detection. Our methods should be applicable, with small modification and tuning, to the songs in other species that hold the three properties of the sequential vocalization. PMID:27442240

  11. Automatic Recognition of Element Classes and Boundaries in the Birdsong with Variable Sequences.

    PubMed

    Koumura, Takuya; Okanoya, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Researches on sequential vocalization often require analysis of vocalizations in long continuous sounds. In such studies as developmental ones or studies across generations in which days or months of vocalizations must be analyzed, methods for automatic recognition would be strongly desired. Although methods for automatic speech recognition for application purposes have been intensively studied, blindly applying them for biological purposes may not be an optimal solution. This is because, unlike human speech recognition, analysis of sequential vocalizations often requires accurate extraction of timing information. In the present study we propose automated systems suitable for recognizing birdsong, one of the most intensively investigated sequential vocalizations, focusing on the three properties of the birdsong. First, a song is a sequence of vocal elements, called notes, which can be grouped into categories. Second, temporal structure of birdsong is precisely controlled, meaning that temporal information is important in song analysis. Finally, notes are produced according to certain probabilistic rules, which may facilitate the accurate song recognition. We divided the procedure of song recognition into three sub-steps: local classification, boundary detection, and global sequencing, each of which corresponds to each of the three properties of birdsong. We compared the performances of several different ways to arrange these three steps. As results, we demonstrated a hybrid model of a deep convolutional neural network and a hidden Markov model was effective. We propose suitable arrangements of methods according to whether accurate boundary detection is needed. Also we designed the new measure to jointly evaluate the accuracy of note classification and boundary detection. Our methods should be applicable, with small modification and tuning, to the songs in other species that hold the three properties of the sequential vocalization. PMID:27442240

  12. Improved three-dimensional bubble dynamics model based on boundary element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, A. M.; Liu, Y. L.

    2015-08-01

    Some new theoretical and numerical techniques are adopted in an improved 3D bubble dynamics model based on Boundary Element Method. Firstly, a numerical model under the incompressible potential assumption is established for 3D bubble dynamics, and the traditional technique for the vortex ring induced potential at the reference point in axisymmetric model is extended to arbitrary location in 3D model. Then, to homogenize the boundaries' mesh density, new Density Potential Method is put forward inspired by the Elastic Mesh Technique. It's combined together with the topology optimization based on edge swapping procedure to maintain a desirable mesh for the large deformation problem. Through the verification and the comparison by simulating a benchmark case, the improved model demonstrates good accuracy and stability. Particularly, more toroidal bubble evolution detailed features are captured which are in accordance with the axisymmetric model. Finally, bubble dynamics under different circumstances are simulated with the improved 3D numerical model presented in this paper, which shows that the improved model is also robust.

  13. Position-independent transgene expression mediated by boundary elements from the apolipoprotein B chromatin domain.

    PubMed Central

    Kalos, M; Fournier, R E

    1995-01-01

    The human apolipoprotein B (apoB) gene resides within a 47.5-kb chromatin domain that is flanked by sequences that bind to the nuclear matrix. These matrix attachment regions (MARs) are boundaries between nuclease-sensitive and -resistant chromatin. As domain boundaries are thought to function as insulator elements, shielding sequences between them from effects of neighboring chromatin, this raised the possibility that the apoB MARs have functions that could be assayed by transfection. To test this possibility, we examined effects of the apoB MARs on transgene expression in transiently and stably transfected rat and human hepatoma cells. The apoB MARs had no effects on expression of transiently transfected reporters, but they altered expression of stably integrated transgenes in dramatic and reproducible ways. Single integrated copies of transgenes that contained the apoB promoter and second intron enhancer, which are sufficient for high-level expression in transient assays, were expressed at low and variable levels in stable transfectant clones. In contrast, transgenes containing the apoB 5' and 3' MARs were expressed at levels nearly 200-fold higher than levels of the minimal reporters in stable transfectants, and expression was position independent. Transgenes that contained the apoB MARs and an additional 3.3 kb of apoB 5' flanking sequence were also expressed in an elevated, position-independent manner. Surprisingly, tandem transgene arrays in multicopy transfectants were transcriptionally inactive. These observations suggest that the apoB MARs function as insulator elements, shielding transgene expression from effects of neighboring chromatin domains. PMID:7799927

  14. The boundary element method for light scattering by ice crystals and its implementation in BEM++

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groth, S. P.; Baran, A. J.; Betcke, T.; Havemann, S.; Śmigaj, W.

    2015-12-01

    A number of methods exist for solving the problem of electromagnetic scattering by atmospheric ice crystals. Amongst these methods, only a few are used to generate "benchmark" results in the atmospheric science community. Most notably, the T-matrix method, Discrete Dipole Approximation, and the Finite-Difference Time-Domain method. The Boundary Element Method (BEM), however, has received considerably less attention in this community despite its extensive use and development in other areas of applied mathematics and engineering. Recently the group of Betcke et al. (2015 [1]) at University College London has released a high performance open source boundary element library called BEM++. In this paper, we employ BEM++ to calculate the scattering properties of hexagonal ice columns of fixed orientation, as well as more complicated particles such as hollow columns and bullet-rosettes. The results for hexagonal columns are compared to those obtained using a highly accurate and well-established T-matrix method (Baran et al., 2001 [2]) for a range of different wavelengths and size parameters. It is shown that the results are in excellent agreement and that BEM++ is a fast alternative to the T-matrix method and others for generating benchmark results. However, the large memory requirements of BEM++ cause it to be limited to size parameters ~15 on a standard desktop PC if an accuracy of roughly 1% is required. The main advantages of BEM++ over many other methods are its flexibility to be applied to homogeneous dielectric particles of arbitrarily complex shape, and its open availability. This flexibility is illustrated by the application of BEM++ to scattering by hollow columns with different cavity types, as well as bullet-rosettes with 2-6 branches.

  15. Boundary Element Modeling of Fault Cored Anticlines and Associated Blind Thrust Faults in Central California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, M. K.; Johnson, K. M.

    2015-12-01

    Recent literature investigating active folding indicates that crustal-scale anticlines grow primarily through slip on underlying faults. Such studies use the geometry and uplift rates of active fault-related folds to infer fault slip rate based upon an assumed kinematic relationship between fault slip and particle motion in the surrounding crust. Our method uses a boundary element model of flexural slip folding called BEAFS (Boundary Element Analysis of Flexural Slip), allowing us to focus on the mechanics of deformation.In many cases, the shallow geometry (<5km) of natural folds are well constrained by subsurface data. However, the geometry of the causative blind thrust faults are often not well imaged. By comparing our numerical simulations with published subsurface and surface data on naturally occurring active folds, we can determine fault geometry and the extent to which various mechanisms are controlling fold evolution. For this work, we present our model results for the underlying faults at Kettleman Hills South Dome, Kettleman Hills North Dome, and Coalinga Anticline in the San Joaquin Valley of Central California. The rupturing of blind thrust faults associated with actively growing anticlines such as these pose a significant global seismic hazard. Our study area is of particular interest as it is the site of two such recent earthquakes—a Mw=6.5 earthquake in 1983 at Coalinga and a Mw=6.1 in 1985 at Kettleman Hills North Dome. Thus, we can compare the published earthquake data from these events to the parameters predicted by our model results from BEAFS.

  16. Computer graphic visualization of orbiter lower surface boundary-layer transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Throckmorton, D. A.; Hartung, L. C.

    1984-01-01

    Computer graphic techniques are applied to the processing of Shuttle Orbiter flight data in order to create a visual presentation of the extent and movement of the boundary-layer transition front over the orbiter lower surface during entry. Flight-measured surface temperature-time histories define the onset and completion of the boundary-layer transition process at any measurement location. The locus of points which define the spatial position of the boundary-layer transition front on the orbiter planform is plotted at each discrete time for which flight data are available. Displaying these images sequentially in real-time results in an animated simulation of the in-flight boundary-layer transition process.

  17. External Boundary Conditions for Three-Dimensional Problems of Computational Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsynkov, Semyon V.

    1997-01-01

    We consider an unbounded steady-state flow of viscous fluid over a three-dimensional finite body or configuration of bodies. For the purpose of solving this flow problem numerically, we discretize the governing equations (Navier-Stokes) on a finite-difference grid. The grid obviously cannot stretch from the body up to infinity, because the number of the discrete variables in that case would not be finite. Therefore, prior to the discretization we truncate the original unbounded flow domain by introducing some artificial computational boundary at a finite distance of the body. Typically, the artificial boundary is introduced in a natural way as the external boundary of the domain covered by the grid. The flow problem formulated only on the finite computational domain rather than on the original infinite domain is clearly subdefinite unless some artificial boundary conditions (ABC's) are specified at the external computational boundary. Similarly, the discretized flow problem is subdefinite (i.e., lacks equations with respect to unknowns) unless a special closing procedure is implemented at this artificial boundary. The closing procedure in the discrete case is called the ABC's as well. In this paper, we present an innovative approach to constructing highly accurate ABC's for three-dimensional flow computations. The approach extends our previous technique developed for the two-dimensional case; it employs the finite-difference counterparts to Calderon's pseudodifferential boundary projections calculated in the framework of the difference potentials method (DPM) by Ryaben'kii. The resulting ABC's appear spatially nonlocal but particularly easy to implement along with the existing solvers. The new boundary conditions have been successfully combined with the NASA-developed production code TLNS3D and used for the analysis of wing-shaped configurations in subsonic (including incompressible limit) and transonic flow regimes. As demonstrated by the computational experiments

  18. A 2.5D boundary element formulation for modeling damped waves in arbitrary cross-section waveguides and cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzotti, M.; Bartoli, I.; Marzani, A.; Viola, E.

    2013-09-01

    Highlights: •Dispersive properties of viscoelastic waveguides and cavities are computed using a regularized 2.5D BEM. •Linear viscoelasticity is introduced at the constitutive level by means of frequency dependent complex moduli. •A contour integral algorithm is used to solve the nonlinear eigenvalue problem. •The Sommerfeld radiation condition is used to select the permissible Riemann sheets. •Attenuation of surface waves in cavities approaches the attenuation of Rayleigh waves. -- Abstract: A regularized 2.5D boundary element method (BEM) is proposed to predict the dispersion properties of damped stress guided waves in waveguides and cavities of arbitrary cross-section. The wave attenuation, induced by material damping, is introduced using linear viscoelastic constitutive relations and described in a spatial manner by the imaginary component of the axial wavenumber. The discretized dispersive wave equation results in a nonlinear eigenvalue problem, which is solved obtaining complex axial wavenumbers for a fixed frequency using a contour integral algorithm. Due to the singular characteristics and the multivalued feature of the wave equation, the requirement of holomorphicity inside the contour region over the complex wavenumber plane is fulfilled by the introduction of the Sommerfeld branch cuts and by the choice of the permissible Riemann sheets. A post processing analysis is developed for the extraction of the energy velocity of propagative guided waves. The reliability of the method is demonstrated by comparing the results obtained for a rail and a bar with square cross-section with those obtained from a 2.5D Finite Element formulation also known in literature as Semi Analytical Finite Element (SAFE) method. Next, to show the potential of the proposed numerical framework, dispersion properties are predicted for surface waves propagating along cylindrical cavities of arbitrary cross-section. It is demonstrated that the attenuation of surface waves

  19. Finite element formulation of fluctuating hydrodynamics for fluids filled with rigid particles using boundary fitted meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Corato, M.; Slot, J. J. M.; Hütter, M.; D'Avino, G.; Maffettone, P. L.; Hulsen, M. A.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we present a finite element implementation of fluctuating hydrodynamics with a moving boundary fitted mesh for treating the suspended particles. The thermal fluctuations are incorporated into the continuum equations using the Landau and Lifshitz approach [1]. The proposed implementation fulfills the fluctuation-dissipation theorem exactly at the discrete level. Since we restrict the equations to the creeping flow case, this takes the form of a relation between the diffusion coefficient matrix and friction matrix both at the particle and nodal level of the finite elements. Brownian motion of arbitrarily shaped particles in complex confinements can be considered within the present formulation. A multi-step time integration scheme is developed to correctly capture the drift term required in the stochastic differential equation (SDE) describing the evolution of the positions of the particles. The proposed approach is validated by simulating the Brownian motion of a sphere between two parallel plates and the motion of a spherical particle in a cylindrical cavity. The time integration algorithm and the fluctuating hydrodynamics implementation are then applied to study the diffusion and the equilibrium probability distribution of a confined circle under an external harmonic potential.

  20. Finite element modeling of reverberation and transmission loss in shallow water waveguides with rough boundaries.

    PubMed

    Isakson, Marcia J; Chotiros, Nicholas P

    2011-03-01

    A finite element model for the reverberation and propagation in a shallow water waveguide with a sandy bottom was calculated for five different environments at a center frequency of 250 Hz. The various environments included a rough water/sediment interface, a rough air/water interface, roughness at both interfaces and downward and upward refracting sound speed profiles with roughness at both interfaces. When compared to other models of reverberation such as ray theory, coupled modes, and parabolic equations, finite elements predicted higher levels of reverberation. At early times, this is due to the "fathometer" return, energy that is normally incident on the boundaries at zero range. At later times, the increased reverberation was due to high angle scattering paths between the two interfaces. Differences in reverberation levels among the environments indicated that scattered energy from the air/water interface is transmitted into the bottom at steep angles. This led to a large decrease in reverberation for a rough air/water interface relative to a rough water/sediment interface. Sound speed profile effects on reverberation were minimal at this frequency range. Calculations of the scintillation index of the different environments indicated that most of the reverberation was relatively Rayleigh-like with heavier tailed distributions at longer ranges.

  1. FLASH: A finite element computer code for variably saturated flow

    SciTech Connect

    Baca, R.G.; Magnuson, S.O.

    1992-05-01

    A numerical model was developed for use in performance assessment studies at the INEL. The numerical model, referred to as the FLASH computer code, is designed to simulate two-dimensional fluid flow in fractured-porous media. The code is specifically designed to model variably saturated flow in an arid site vadose zone and saturated flow in an unconfined aquifer. In addition, the code also has the capability to simulate heat conduction in the vadose zone. This report presents the following: description of the conceptual frame-work and mathematical theory; derivations of the finite element techniques and algorithms; computational examples that illustrate the capability of the code; and input instructions for the general use of the code. The FLASH computer code is aimed at providing environmental scientists at the INEL with a predictive tool for the subsurface water pathway. This numerical model is expected to be widely used in performance assessments for: (1) the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study process and (2) compliance studies required by the US Department of Energy Order 5820.2A.

  2. A finite element: Boundary integral method for electromagnetic scattering. Ph.D. Thesis Technical Report, Feb. - Sep. 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, J. D.; Volakis, John L.

    1992-01-01

    A method that combines the finite element and boundary integral techniques for the numerical solution of electromagnetic scattering problems is presented. The finite element method is well known for requiring a low order storage and for its capability to model inhomogeneous structures. Of particular emphasis in this work is the reduction of the storage requirement by terminating the finite element mesh on a boundary in a fashion which renders the boundary integrals in convolutional form. The fast Fourier transform is then used to evaluate these integrals in a conjugate gradient solver, without a need to generate the actual matrix. This method has a marked advantage over traditional integral equation approaches with respect to the storage requirement of highly inhomogeneous structures. Rectangular, circular, and ogival mesh termination boundaries are examined for two-dimensional scattering. In the case of axially symmetric structures, the boundary integral matrix storage is reduced by exploiting matrix symmetries and solving the resulting system via the conjugate gradient method. In each case several results are presented for various scatterers aimed at validating the method and providing an assessment of its capabilities. Important in methods incorporating boundary integral equations is the issue of internal resonance. A method is implemented for their removal, and is shown to be effective in the two-dimensional and three-dimensional applications.

  3. SYMBMAT: Symbolic computation of quantum transition matrix elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciappina, M. F.; Kirchner, T.

    2012-08-01

    We have developed a set of Mathematica notebooks to compute symbolically quantum transition matrices relevant for atomic ionization processes. The utilization of a symbolic language allows us to obtain analytical expressions for the transition matrix elements required in charged-particle and laser induced ionization of atoms. Additionally, by using a few simple commands, it is possible to export these symbolic expressions to standard programming languages, such as Fortran or C, for the subsequent computation of differential cross sections or other observables. One of the main drawbacks in the calculation of transition matrices is the tedious algebraic work required when initial states other than the simple hydrogenic 1s state need to be considered. Using these notebooks the work is dramatically reduced and it is possible to generate exact expressions for a large set of bound states. We present explicit examples of atomic collisions (in First Born Approximation and Distorted Wave Theory) and laser-matter interactions (within the Dipole and Strong Field Approximations and different gauges) using both hydrogenic wavefunctions and Slater-Type Orbitals with arbitrary nlm quantum numbers as initial states. Catalogue identifier: AEMI_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEMI_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC license, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 71 628 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 444 195 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Mathematica Computer: Single machines using Linux or Windows (with cores with any clock speed, cache memory and bits in a word) Operating system: Any OS that supports Mathematica. The notebooks have been tested under Windows and Linux and with versions 6.x, 7.x and 8.x Classification: 2.6 Nature of problem

  4. Computationally efficient finite element evaluation of natural patellofemoral mechanics.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Clare K; Baldwin, Mark A; Rullkoetter, Paul J

    2010-12-01

    Finite element methods have been applied to evaluate in vivo joint behavior, new devices, and surgical techniques but have typically been applied to a small or single subject cohort. Anatomic variability necessitates the use of many subject-specific models or probabilistic methods in order to adequately evaluate a device or procedure for a population. However, a fully deformable finite element model can be computationally expensive, prohibiting large multisubject or probabilistic analyses. The aim of this study was to develop a group of subject-specific models of the patellofemoral joint and evaluate trade-offs in analysis time and accuracy with fully deformable and rigid body articular cartilage representations. Finite element models of eight subjects were used to tune a pressure-overclosure relationship during a simulated deep flexion cycle. Patellofemoral kinematics and contact mechanics were evaluated and compared between a fully deformable and a rigid body analysis. Additional eight subjects were used to determine the validity of the rigid body pressure-overclosure relationship as a subject-independent parameter. There was good agreement in predicted kinematics and contact mechanics between deformable and rigid analyses for both the tuned and test groups. Root mean square differences in kinematics were less than 0.5 deg and 0.2 mm for both groups throughout flexion. Differences in contact area and peak and average contact pressures averaged 5.4%, 9.6%, and 3.8%, respectively, for the tuned group and 6.9%, 13.1%, and 6.4%, respectively, for the test group, with no significant differences between the two groups. There was a 95% reduction in computational time with the rigid body analysis as compared with the deformable analysis. The tuned pressure-overclosure relationship derived from the patellofemoral analysis was also applied to tibiofemoral (TF) articular cartilage in a group of eight subjects. Differences in contact area and peak and average contact

  5. TORO II: A finite element computer program for nonlinear quasi-static problems in electromagnetics: Part 1, Theoretical background

    SciTech Connect

    Gartling, D.K.

    1996-05-01

    The theoretical and numerical background for the finite element computer program, TORO II, is presented in detail. TORO II is designed for the multi-dimensional analysis of nonlinear, electromagnetic field problems described by the quasi-static form of Maxwell`s equations. A general description of the boundary value problems treated by the program is presented. The finite element formulation and the associated numerical methods used in TORO II are also outlined. Instructions for the use of the code are documented in SAND96-0903; examples of problems analyzed with the code are also provided in the user`s manual. 24 refs., 8 figs.

  6. An immersed boundary computational model for acoustic scattering problems with complex geometries.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaofeng; Jiang, Yongsong; Liang, An; Jing, Xiaodong

    2012-11-01

    An immersed boundary computational model is presented in order to deal with the acoustic scattering problem by complex geometries, in which the wall boundary condition is treated as a direct body force determined by satisfying the non-penetrating boundary condition. Two distinct discretized grids are used to discrete the fluid domain and immersed boundary, respectively. The immersed boundaries are represented by Lagrangian points and the direct body force determined on these points is applied on the neighboring Eulerian points. The coupling between the Lagrangian points and Euler points is linked by a discrete delta function. The linearized Euler equations are spatially discretized with a fourth-order dispersion-relation-preserving scheme and temporal integrated with a low-dissipation and low-dispersion Runge-Kutta scheme. A perfectly matched layer technique is applied to absorb out-going waves and in-going waves in the immersed bodies. Several benchmark problems for computational aeroacoustic solvers are performed to validate the present method.

  7. Inhomogeneous Radiation Boundary Conditions Simulating Incoming Acoustic Waves for Computational Aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, Christopher K. W.; Fang, Jun; Kurbatskii, Konstantin A.

    1996-01-01

    A set of nonhomogeneous radiation and outflow conditions which automatically generate prescribed incoming acoustic or vorticity waves and, at the same time, are transparent to outgoing sound waves produced internally in a finite computation domain is proposed. This type of boundary condition is needed for the numerical solution of many exterior aeroacoustics problems. In computational aeroacoustics, the computation scheme must be as nondispersive ans nondissipative as possible. It must also support waves with wave speeds which are nearly the same as those of the original linearized Euler equations. To meet these requirements, a high-order/large-stencil scheme is necessary The proposed nonhomogeneous radiation and outflow boundary conditions are designed primarily for use in conjunction with such high-order/large-stencil finite difference schemes.

  8. Efficient computation of the stability of three-dimensional compressible boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malik, M. R.; Orszag, S. A.

    1981-01-01

    Methods for the computer analysis of the stability of three-dimensional compressible boundary layers are discussed and the user-oriented Compressible Stability Analysis (COSAL) computer code is described. The COSAL code uses a matrix finite-difference method for local eigenvalue solution when a good guess for the eigenvalue is available and is significantly more computationally efficient than the commonly used initial-value approach. The local eigenvalue search procedure also results in eigenfunctions and, at little extra work, group velocities. A globally convergent eigenvalue procedure is also developed which may be used when no guess for the eigenvalue is available. The global problem is formulated in such a way that no unstable spurious modes appear so that the method is suitable for use in a black-box stability code. Sample stability calculations are presented for the boundary layer profiles of an LFC swept wing.

  9. GYC: A program to compute the turbulent boundary layer on a rotating cone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, R. D.

    1976-01-01

    A computer program, GYC, which is capable of computing the properties of a compressible turbulent boundary layer on a rotating axisymmetric cone-cylinder body, according to the principles of invariant modeling was studied. The program is extended to include the calculation of the turbulence scale by a differential equation. GYC is in operation on the CDC-7600 computer and has undergone several corrections and improvements as a result of the experience gained. The theoretical basis for the program and the method of implementation, as well as information on its operation are given.

  10. Numerical computation of transonic flows by finite-element and finite-difference methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hafez, M. M.; Wellford, L. C.; Merkle, C. L.; Murman, E. M.

    1978-01-01

    Studies on applications of the finite element approach to transonic flow calculations are reported. Different discretization techniques of the differential equations and boundary conditions are compared. Finite element analogs of Murman's mixed type finite difference operators for small disturbance formulations were constructed and the time dependent approach (using finite differences in time and finite elements in space) was examined.

  11. Overview of adaptive finite element analysis in computational geodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, D. A.; Schellart, W. P.; Moresi, L.

    2013-10-01

    The use of numerical models to develop insight and intuition into the dynamics of the Earth over geological time scales is a firmly established practice in the geodynamics community. As our depth of understanding grows, and hand-in-hand with improvements in analytical techniques and higher resolution remote sensing of the physical structure and state of the Earth, there is a continual need to develop more efficient, accurate and reliable numerical techniques. This is necessary to ensure that we can meet the challenge of generating robust conclusions, interpretations and predictions from improved observations. In adaptive numerical methods, the desire is generally to maximise the quality of the numerical solution for a given amount of computational effort. Neither of these terms has a unique, universal definition, but typically there is a trade off between the number of unknowns we can calculate to obtain a more accurate representation of the Earth, and the resources (time and computational memory) required to compute them. In the engineering community, this topic has been extensively examined using the adaptive finite element (AFE) method. Recently, the applicability of this technique to geodynamic processes has started to be explored. In this review we report on the current status and usage of spatially adaptive finite element analysis in the field of geodynamics. The objective of this review is to provide a brief introduction to the area of spatially adaptive finite analysis, including a summary of different techniques to define spatial adaptation and of different approaches to guide the adaptive process in order to control the discretisation error inherent within the numerical solution. An overview of the current state of the art in adaptive modelling in geodynamics is provided, together with a discussion pertaining to the issues related to using adaptive analysis techniques and perspectives for future research in this area. Additionally, we also provide a

  12. Impact of computer advances on future finite elements computations. [for aircraft and spacecraft design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fulton, Robert E.

    1985-01-01

    Research performed over the past 10 years in engineering data base management and parallel computing is discussed, and certain opportunities for research toward the next generation of structural analysis capability are proposed. Particular attention is given to data base management associated with the IPAD project and parallel processing associated with the Finite Element Machine project, both sponsored by NASA, and a near term strategy for a distributed structural analysis capability based on relational data base management software and parallel computers for a future structural analysis system.

  13. Gaseous elemental mercury in the marine boundary layer: evidence for rapid removal in anthropogenic pollution.

    PubMed

    Weiss-Penzias, Peter; Jaffe, Daniel A; McClintick, Anna; Prestbo, Eric M; Landis, Matthew S

    2003-09-01

    In this study, gas-phase elemental mercury (Hg0) and related species (including inorganic reactive gaseous mercury (RGM) and particulate mercury (PHg)) were measured at Cheeka Peak Observatory (CPO), Washington State, in the marine boundary layer during 2001-2002. Air of continental origin containing anthropogenic pollutants from the urban areas to the east contained on average 5.3% lower Hg0 levels as compared to the marine background. This result is difficult to reconcile since it is known that industrial emissions in our region are sources of Hg0. The rate of removal of Hg0 from a pollution plume necessary to account for our observations is inconsistent with the accepted view of Hg0 as a stable atmospheric pollutant. The largest and most frequent Hg0 loss events occurred in the presence of increased ozone (O3) during the summer. Hg0 and O3 also display diurnal cycles that are out-of-phase with one another. In other seasons Hg0 behavior is less consistent, as we observe weak positive correlations with O3 and occasional Hg0 enhancements in local pollution. RGM and PHg concentrations are enhanced only slightly during Hg0 loss events, comprising a small fraction of the mercury pool (approximately 3%). Long-range transported pollution of Asian origin was also detected at CPO, and this contains both higher and lower levels of Hg0 as compared to the background with maximum changes being <20%. Here, the more photochemically processed the air mass, as determined by propane/ethane ratios, the more likely we are to observe Hg0 loss. Air from the marine background in summer displays a significant diurnal cycle with a phase that matches the diurnal cycles seen in polluted air masses. A Junge lifetime for Hg0 in the clean marine boundary layer is calculated to be 7.1 months, which is on the low end of previous estimates (0.5-2 yr).

  14. Computation of turbulent boundary layers employing the defect wall-function method. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Douglas L.

    1994-01-01

    In order to decrease overall computational time requirements of spatially-marching parabolized Navier-Stokes finite-difference computer code when applied to turbulent fluid flow, a wall-function methodology, originally proposed by R. Barnwell, was implemented. This numerical effort increases computational speed and calculates reasonably accurate wall shear stress spatial distributions and boundary-layer profiles. Since the wall shear stress is analytically determined from the wall-function model, the computational grid near the wall is not required to spatially resolve the laminar-viscous sublayer. Consequently, a substantially increased computational integration step size is achieved resulting in a considerable decrease in net computational time. This wall-function technique is demonstrated for adiabatic flat plate test cases from Mach 2 to Mach 8. These test cases are analytically verified employing: (1) Eckert reference method solutions, (2) experimental turbulent boundary-layer data of Mabey, and (3) finite-difference computational code solutions with fully resolved laminar-viscous sublayers. Additionally, results have been obtained for two pressure-gradient cases: (1) an adiabatic expansion corner and (2) an adiabatic compression corner.

  15. Trace element and isotope geochemistry of Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary sediments: identification of extra-terrestrial and volcanic components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margolis, S. V.; Doehne, E. F.

    1988-01-01

    Trace element and stable isotope analyses were performed on a series of sediment samples crossing the Cretaceous-Tertiary (K-T) boundary from critical sections at Aumaya and Sopelano, Spain. The aim is to possibly distinguish extraterrestrial vs. volcanic or authigenic concentration of platinum group and other elements in K-T boundary transitional sediments. These sediments also have been shown to contain evidence for step-wise extinction of several groups of marine invertebrates, associated with negative oxygen and carbon isotope excursions occurring during the last million years of the Cretaceous. These isotope excursions have been interpreted to indicate major changes in ocean thermal regime, circulation, and ecosystems that may be related to multiple events during latest Cretaceous time. Results to date on the petrographic and geochemical analyses of the Late Cretaceous and Early Paleocene sediments indicate that diagenesis has obviously affected the trace element geochemistry and stable isotope compositions at Zumaya. Mineralogical and geochemical analysis of K-T boundary sediments at Zumaya suggest that a substantial fraction of anomalous trace elements in the boundary marl are present in specific mineral phases. Platinum and nickel grains perhaps represent the first direct evidence of siderophile-rich minerals at the boundary. The presence of spinels and Ni-rich particles as inclusions in aluminosilicate spherules from Zumaya suggests an original, non-diagenetic origin for the spherules. Similar spherules from southern Spain (Caravaca), show a strong marine authigenic overprint. This research represents a new approach in trying to directly identify the sedimentary mineral components that are responsible for the trace element concentrations associated with the K-T boundary.

  16. The impact of scaled boundary conditions on wall shear stress computations in atherosclerotic human coronary bifurcations.

    PubMed

    Schrauwen, Jelle T C; Schwarz, Janina C V; Wentzel, Jolanda J; van der Steen, Antonius F W; Siebes, Maria; Gijsen, Frank J H

    2016-05-15

    The aim of this study was to determine if reliable patient-specific wall shear stress (WSS) can be computed when diameter-based scaling laws are used to impose the boundary conditions for computational fluid dynamics. This study focused on mildly diseased human coronary bifurcations since they are predilection sites for atherosclerosis. Eight patients scheduled for percutaneous coronary intervention were imaged with angiography. The velocity proximal and distal of a bifurcation was acquired with intravascular Doppler measurements. These measurements were used for inflow and outflow boundary conditions for the first set of WSS computations. For the second set of computations, absolute inflow and outflow ratios were derived from geometry-based scaling laws based on angiography data. Normalized WSS maps per segment were obtained by dividing the absolute WSS by the mean WSS value. Absolute and normalized WSS maps from the measured-approach and the scaled-approach were compared. A reasonable agreement was found between the measured and scaled inflows, with a median difference of 0.08 ml/s [-0.01; 0.20]. The measured and the scaled outflow ratios showed a good agreement: 1.5 percentage points [-19.0; 4.5]. Absolute WSS maps were sensitive to the inflow and outflow variations, and relatively large differences between the two approaches were observed. For normalized WSS maps, the results for the two approaches were equivalent. This study showed that normalized WSS can be obtained from angiography data alone by applying diameter-based scaling laws to define the boundary conditions. Caution should be taken when absolute WSS is assessed from computations using scaled boundary conditions. PMID:26945083

  17. The impact of scaled boundary conditions on wall shear stress computations in atherosclerotic human coronary bifurcations.

    PubMed

    Schrauwen, Jelle T C; Schwarz, Janina C V; Wentzel, Jolanda J; van der Steen, Antonius F W; Siebes, Maria; Gijsen, Frank J H

    2016-05-15

    The aim of this study was to determine if reliable patient-specific wall shear stress (WSS) can be computed when diameter-based scaling laws are used to impose the boundary conditions for computational fluid dynamics. This study focused on mildly diseased human coronary bifurcations since they are predilection sites for atherosclerosis. Eight patients scheduled for percutaneous coronary intervention were imaged with angiography. The velocity proximal and distal of a bifurcation was acquired with intravascular Doppler measurements. These measurements were used for inflow and outflow boundary conditions for the first set of WSS computations. For the second set of computations, absolute inflow and outflow ratios were derived from geometry-based scaling laws based on angiography data. Normalized WSS maps per segment were obtained by dividing the absolute WSS by the mean WSS value. Absolute and normalized WSS maps from the measured-approach and the scaled-approach were compared. A reasonable agreement was found between the measured and scaled inflows, with a median difference of 0.08 ml/s [-0.01; 0.20]. The measured and the scaled outflow ratios showed a good agreement: 1.5 percentage points [-19.0; 4.5]. Absolute WSS maps were sensitive to the inflow and outflow variations, and relatively large differences between the two approaches were observed. For normalized WSS maps, the results for the two approaches were equivalent. This study showed that normalized WSS can be obtained from angiography data alone by applying diameter-based scaling laws to define the boundary conditions. Caution should be taken when absolute WSS is assessed from computations using scaled boundary conditions.

  18. Quasi-static image-based immersed boundary-finite element model of left ventricle under diastolic loading

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Hao; Wang, Huiming; Berry, Colin; Luo, Xiaoyu; Griffith, Boyce E

    2014-01-01

    Finite stress and strain analyses of the heart provide insight into the biomechanics of myocardial function and dysfunction. Herein, we describe progress toward dynamic patient-specific models of the left ventricle using an immersed boundary (IB) method with a finite element (FE) structural mechanics model. We use a structure-based hyperelastic strain-energy function to describe the passive mechanics of the ventricular myocardium, a realistic anatomical geometry reconstructed from clinical magnetic resonance images of a healthy human heart, and a rule-based fiber architecture. Numerical predictions of this IB/FE model are compared with results obtained by a commercial FE solver. We demonstrate that the IB/FE model yields results that are in good agreement with those of the conventional FE model under diastolic loading conditions, and the predictions of the LV model using either numerical method are shown to be consistent with previous computational and experimental data. These results are among the first to analyze the stress and strain predictions of IB models of ventricular mechanics, and they serve both to verify the IB/FE simulation framework and to validate the IB/FE model. Moreover, this work represents an important step toward using such models for fully dynamic fluid–structure interaction simulations of the heart. © 2014 The Authors. International Journal for Numerical Methods in Engineering published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:24799090

  19. A hybrid approach for simulating fluid loading effects on structures using experimental modal analysis and the boundary element method.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Micah R; Fahnline, John B; Dare, Tyler P; Hambric, Stephen A; Campbell, Robert L

    2015-11-01

    Many structural acoustics problems involve a vibrating structure in a heavy fluid. However, obtaining fluid-loaded natural frequencies and damping experimentally can be difficult and expensive. This paper presents a hybrid experimental-numerical approach to determine the heavy-fluid-loaded resonance frequencies and damping of a structure from in-air measurements. The approach combines in-air experimentally obtained mode shapes with simulated in-water acoustic resistance and reactance matrices computed using boundary element (BE) analysis. The procedure relies on accurate estimates of the mass-normalized, in vacuo mode shapes using singular value decomposition and rational fraction polynomial fitting, which are then used as basis modes for the in-water BE analysis. The method is validated on a 4.445 cm (1.75 in.) thick nickel-aluminum-bronze rectangular plate by comparing natural frequencies and damping obtained using the hybrid approach to equivalent data obtained from actual in-water measurements. Good agreement is shown for the fluid-loaded natural frequencies and one-third octave loss factors. Finally, the limitations of the hybrid approach are examined.

  20. A hybrid approach for simulating fluid loading effects on structures using experimental modal analysis and the boundary element method.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Micah R; Fahnline, John B; Dare, Tyler P; Hambric, Stephen A; Campbell, Robert L

    2015-11-01

    Many structural acoustics problems involve a vibrating structure in a heavy fluid. However, obtaining fluid-loaded natural frequencies and damping experimentally can be difficult and expensive. This paper presents a hybrid experimental-numerical approach to determine the heavy-fluid-loaded resonance frequencies and damping of a structure from in-air measurements. The approach combines in-air experimentally obtained mode shapes with simulated in-water acoustic resistance and reactance matrices computed using boundary element (BE) analysis. The procedure relies on accurate estimates of the mass-normalized, in vacuo mode shapes using singular value decomposition and rational fraction polynomial fitting, which are then used as basis modes for the in-water BE analysis. The method is validated on a 4.445 cm (1.75 in.) thick nickel-aluminum-bronze rectangular plate by comparing natural frequencies and damping obtained using the hybrid approach to equivalent data obtained from actual in-water measurements. Good agreement is shown for the fluid-loaded natural frequencies and one-third octave loss factors. Finally, the limitations of the hybrid approach are examined. PMID:26627781

  1. Evaluation of several non-reflecting computational boundary conditions for duct acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Willie R.; Zorumski, William E.; Hodge, Steve L.

    1994-01-01

    Several non-reflecting computational boundary conditions that meet certain criteria and have potential applications to duct acoustics are evaluated for their effectiveness. The same interior solution scheme, grid, and order of approximation are used to evaluate each condition. Sparse matrix solution techniques are applied to solve the matrix equation resulting from the discretization. Modal series solutions for the sound attenuation in an infinite duct are used to evaluate the accuracy of each non-reflecting boundary conditions. The evaluations are performed for sound propagation in a softwall duct, for several sources, sound frequencies, and duct lengths. It is shown that a recently developed nonlocal boundary condition leads to sound attenuation predictions considerably more accurate for short ducts. This leads to a substantial reduction in the number of grid points when compared to other non-reflecting conditions.

  2. Segment-based vs. element-based integration for mortar methods in computational contact mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farah, Philipp; Popp, Alexander; Wall, Wolfgang A.

    2015-01-01

    Mortar finite element methods provide a very convenient and powerful discretization framework for geometrically nonlinear applications in computational contact mechanics, because they allow for a variationally consistent treatment of contact conditions (mesh tying, non-penetration, frictionless or frictional sliding) despite the fact that the underlying contact surface meshes are non-matching and possibly also geometrically non-conforming. However, one of the major issues with regard to mortar methods is the design of adequate numerical integration schemes for the resulting interface coupling terms, i.e. curve integrals for 2D contact problems and surface integrals for 3D contact problems. The way how mortar integration is performed crucially influences the accuracy of the overall numerical procedure as well as the computational efficiency of contact evaluation. Basically, two different types of mortar integration schemes, which will be termed as segment-based integration and element-based integration here, can be found predominantly in the literature. While almost the entire existing literature focuses on either of the two mentioned mortar integration schemes without questioning this choice, the intention of this paper is to provide a comprehensive and unbiased comparison. The theoretical aspects covered here include the choice of integration rule, the treatment of boundaries of the contact zone, higher-order interpolation and frictional sliding. Moreover, a new hybrid scheme is proposed, which beneficially combines the advantages of segment-based and element-based mortar integration. Several numerical examples are presented for a detailed and critical evaluation of the overall performance of the different schemes within several well-known benchmark problems of computational contact mechanics.

  3. Cost Considerations in Nonlinear Finite-Element Computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Utku, S.; Melosh, R. J.; Islam, M.; Salama, M.

    1985-01-01

    Conference paper discusses computational requirements for finiteelement analysis using quasi-linear approach to nonlinear problems. Paper evaluates computational efficiency of different computer architecturtural types in terms of relative cost and computing time.

  4. 3D finite element analysis of a metallic sphere scatterer comparison of first and second order vector absorbing boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanellopoulos, V. N.; Webb, J. P.

    1993-03-01

    A 3D vector analysis of plane wave scattering by a metallic sphere using finite elements and Absorbing Boundary Conditions (ABCs) is presented. The ABCs are applied on the outer surface that truncates the infinitely extending domain. Mixed order curvilinear covariantprojection elements are used to avoid spurious corruptions. The second order ABC is superior to the first at no extra computational cost. The errors due to incomplete absorption decrease as the outer surface is moved further away from the scatterer. An error of about 1% in near-field values was obtained with the second order ABC, when the outer surface was less than half a wavelength from the scatterer. Une analyse tridimensionnelle vectorielle de la diffusion d'onde plane sur une sphère métallique utilisant des éléments finis et des Conditions aux Limites Absorbantes (CLA) est présentée. Les CLA sont appliquées sur la surface exteme tronquant le domaine s'étendant à l'infini. Des éléments curvilignes mixtes utilisant des projections covariantes sont utilisés pour éviter des solutions parasites. La CLA de second ordre est supérieure à celle de premier ordre sans effort de calcul additionnel. Les erreurs dues à l'absorption incomplète décroissent à mesure que l'on déplace la surface externe à une distance croissante du diffuseur. Un taux d'erreur d'environ 1 % dans les valeurs du champ proche a été obtenu avec les CLA de second ordre lorsque la surface externe était placée à une distance inférieure à une demi-longueur de la source de diffusion.

  5. Linear Algebra Aspects in the Equilibrium-Based Implementation of Finite/Boundary Element Methods for FGMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumont, Ney Augusto

    2008-02-01

    The paper briefly outlines the conventional and three variational implementations of the boundary element method, pointing out the conceptual imbrications of their constituent matrices. The nature of fundamental solutions is investigated in terms of the resulting matrix spectral properties, as applied to multiply-connected domains, reentering corners and FGMs.

  6. The Koshak section: Evidence for element fractionation and an oxidation event at the K/T boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nazarov, M. A.; Badjukov, D. D.; Barsukova, L. D.; Kolesov, G. M.; Naidin, D. P.

    1993-01-01

    The Koshak site is a new K/T section located about 125 km EEN of the Fort Shevchenko city, Mangyshlak, Kazakhstan. In this paper, we report results of geochemical and mineralogical studies of this section which indicate a deep element fractionation and an oxidation event at the K/T boundary.

  7. Boundary element analysis of packed silencers with protective cloth and embedded thin surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, T. W.; Cheng, C. Y. R.; Tao, Z.

    2003-03-01

    Bulk-reacting porous materials are often used as absorptive lining in packed silencers to reduce broadband noise. Modelling the entire silencer domain with a bulk-reacting material will inevitably involve two different acoustic media, air and the bulk-reacting material. A so-called direct mixed-body boundary element method (BEM) has recently been developed to model the two-medium problem in a single-domain fashion. The present paper is an extension of the direct mixed-body BEM to include protective cloth and embedded rigid surfaces. Protective cloth, an absorptive material itself with a higher flow resistivity than the primary lining material, is usually sandwiched between a perforated metal surface and the lining to protect the lining material from any abrasive effect of the grazing flow. Two different approaches are taken to model the protective cloth. One is to approximate sound pressure as a linear function across the cloth thickness and then use the bulk-reacting material properties of the cloth to obtain the transfer impedance. The other is to measure the transfer impedance of the cloth directly by an experimental set-up similar to the two-cavity method. As for an embedded thin surface, it is a rigid thin surface sandwiched between two bulk-reacting linings. Numerical modelling of an embedded thin surface is similar to the modelling of a rigid thin surface in air. Several test cases are given and the BEM results for transmission loss (TL) are verified by experimental TL measurements.

  8. An efficient quadrature for 2.5D boundary element calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasess, Christian H.; Kreuzer, Wolfgang; Waubke, Holger

    2016-11-01

    In recent years, the boundary element method has become a widely used tool for calculating the mitigation effects of noise barriers. However, since for large structures calculations in 3D become very inefficient, most of the standard implementations are only in 2D. This means that the noise source is implicitly assumed to be given by a coherent line source, which is not realistic in most cases. By using a Fourier transform with respect to a spatial coordinate along the length of the structure it is possible to reduce the 3D problem to several 2D problems with distinct wavenumbers which allows the simulation of more realistic noise sources and which is typically referred to as 2.5D BEM. To that end, it is necessary to numerically calculate a Fourier-like integral over all the 2D solutions. In this work, an efficient way to calculate this integral is given building on existing approaches using Clenshaw-Curtis-Filon quadrature and demodulation combined with an adaptive order-selection scheme. As BEM calculations are costly, the main focus of the method introduced lies on avoiding too many of these calculations. The efficiency of the method is illustrated using two different examples: a reflecting cylinder and an L-shaped noise barrier.

  9. Forensic seismology and boundary element method application vis-à-vis ROKS Cheonan underwater explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, So Gu

    2013-12-01

    On March 26, 2010 an underwater explosion (UWE) led to the sinking of the ROKS Cheonan. The official Multinational Civilian-Military Joint Investigation Group (MCMJIG) report concluded that the cause of the underwater explosion was a 250 kg net explosive weight (NEW) detonation at a depth of 6-9 m from a DPRK "CHT-02D" torpedo. Kim and Gitterman (2012a) determined the NEW and seismic magnitude as 136 kg at a depth of approximately 8m and 2.04, respectively using basic hydrodynamics based on theoretical and experimental methods as well as spectral analysis and seismic methods. The purpose of this study was to clarify the cause of the UWE via more detailed methods using bubble dynamics and simulation of propellers as well as forensic seismology. Regarding the observed bubble pulse period of 0.990 s, 0.976 s and 1.030 s were found in case of a 136 NEW at a detonation depth of 8 m using the boundary element method (BEM) and 3D bubble shape simulations derived for a 136 kg NEW detonation at a depth of 8 m approximately 5 m portside from the hull centerline. Here we show through analytical equations, models and 3D bubble shape simulations that the most probable cause of this underwater explosion was a 136 kg NEW detonation at a depth of 8m attributable to a ROK littoral "land control" mine (LCM).

  10. A boundary element approach to optimization of active noise control sources on three-dimensional structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunefare, K. A.; Koopmann, G. H.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents the theoretical development of an approach to active noise control (ANC) applicable to three-dimensional radiators. The active noise control technique, termed ANC Optimization Analysis, is based on minimizing the total radiated power by adding secondary acoustic sources on the primary noise source. ANC Optimization Analysis determines the optimum magnitude and phase at which to drive the secondary control sources in order to achieve the best possible reduction in the total radiated power from the noise source/control source combination. For example, ANC Optimization Analysis predicts a 20 dB reduction in the total power radiated from a sphere of radius at a dimensionless wavenumber ka of 0.125, for a single control source representing 2.5 percent of the total area of the sphere. ANC Optimization Analysis is based on a boundary element formulation of the Helmholtz Integral Equation, and thus, the optimization analysis applies to a single frequency, while multiple frequencies can be treated through repeated analyses.

  11. Adaptation of a program for nonlinear finite element analysis to the CDC STAR 100 computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pifko, A. B.; Ogilvie, P. L.

    1978-01-01

    The conversion of a nonlinear finite element program to the CDC STAR 100 pipeline computer is discussed. The program called DYCAST was developed for the crash simulation of structures. Initial results with the STAR 100 computer indicated that significant gains in computation time are possible for operations on gloval arrays. However, for element level computations that do not lend themselves easily to long vector processing, the STAR 100 was slower than comparable scalar computers. On this basis it is concluded that in order for pipeline computers to impact the economic feasibility of large nonlinear analyses it is absolutely essential that algorithms be devised to improve the efficiency of element level computations.

  12. Global Artificial Boundary Conditions for Computation of External Flow Problems with Propulsive Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsynkov, Semyon; Abarbanel, Saul; Nordstrom, Jan; Ryabenkii, Viktor; Vatsa, Veer

    1998-01-01

    We propose new global artificial boundary conditions (ABC's) for computation of flows with propulsive jets. The algorithm is based on application of the difference potentials method (DPM). Previously, similar boundary conditions have been implemented for calculation of external compressible viscous flows around finite bodies. The proposed modification substantially extends the applicability range of the DPM-based algorithm. In the paper, we present the general formulation of the problem, describe our numerical methodology, and discuss the corresponding computational results. The particular configuration that we analyze is a slender three-dimensional body with boat-tail geometry and supersonic jet exhaust in a subsonic external flow under zero angle of attack. Similarly to the results obtained earlier for the flows around airfoils and wings, current results for the jet flow case corroborate the superiority of the DPM-based ABC's over standard local methodologies from the standpoints of accuracy, overall numerical performance, and robustness.

  13. Numerical Computation of Mass Transport in Low Reynolds Number Flows and the Concentration Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Licata, Nicholas A.; Fuller, Nathaniel J.

    Understanding the physical mechanisms by which an individual cell interacts with its environment often requires detailed information about the fluid in which the cell is immersed. Mass transport between the interior of the cell and the external environment is influenced by the flow of the extracellular fluid and the molecular diffusivity. Analytical calculations of the flow field are challenging in simple geometries, and not generally available in more realistic cases with irregular domain boundaries. Motivated by these problems, we discuss the numerical solution of Stokes equation by implementing a Gauss-Seidel algorithm on a staggered computational grid. The computed velocity profile is used as input to numerically solve the advection-diffusion equation for mass transport. Special attention is paid to the case of two-dimensional flows at large Péclet number. The numerical results are compared with a perturbative analytical treatment of the concentration boundary layer.

  14. Computer simulation of grain boundaries in Ni/sub 3/Al: The effect of grain boundary composition

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.P.; Voter, A.F.; Srolovitz, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    The authors have performed atomistic simulations on three (001) symmetric tilt grain boundaries: 5(210), (310), and 13(320). Depending on which sub-lattice in each of the two grains is occupied by Al, the grain boundary may have different stoichiometries. All of the simulations show that the Al-rich grain boundaries have the highest grain boundary energies. Thus Al-rich grain boundaries are more likely to fail than those which have the bulk stoichiometry or are Ni-rich. This conclusion is consistent with the observed stoichiometry dependence of the beneficial boron effect. The similarity between the grain boundary energies (cohesive energies) of Ni/sub 3/Al and Ni and the much higher yield stress of Ni/sub 3/Al provides a justification for the ''inherent'' brittleness of Ni/sub 3/Al grain boundaries.

  15. Boundary condition computational procedures for inviscid, supersonic steady flow field calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbett, M. J.

    1971-01-01

    Results are given of a comparative study of numerical procedures for computing solid wall boundary points in supersonic inviscid flow calculatons. Twenty five different calculation procedures were tested on two sample problems: a simple expansion wave and a simple compression (two-dimensional steady flow). A simple calculation procedure was developed. The merits and shortcomings of the various procedures are discussed, along with complications for three-dimensional and time-dependent flows.

  16. MiniGhost : a miniapp for exploring boundary exchange strategies using stencil computations in scientific parallel computing.

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, Richard Frederick; Heroux, Michael Allen; Vaughan, Courtenay Thomas

    2012-04-01

    A broad range of scientific computation involves the use of difference stencils. In a parallel computing environment, this computation is typically implemented by decomposing the spacial domain, inducing a 'halo exchange' of process-owned boundary data. This approach adheres to the Bulk Synchronous Parallel (BSP) model. Because commonly available architectures provide strong inter-node bandwidth relative to latency costs, many codes 'bulk up' these messages by aggregating data into a message as a means of reducing the number of messages. A renewed focus on non-traditional architectures and architecture features provides new opportunities for exploring alternatives to this programming approach. In this report we describe miniGhost, a 'miniapp' designed for exploration of the capabilities of current as well as emerging and future architectures within the context of these sorts of applications. MiniGhost joins the suite of miniapps developed as part of the Mantevo project.

  17. A finite element method for the computation of transonic flow past airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberle, A.

    1980-01-01

    A finite element method for the computation of the transonic flow with shocks past airfoils is presented using the artificial viscosity concept for the local supersonic regime. Generally, the classic element types do not meet the accuracy requirements of advanced numerical aerodynamics requiring special attention to the choice of an appropriate element. A series of computed pressure distributions exhibits the usefulness of the method.

  18. Computation of sharp-fin-induced shockwave/turbulent boundary layer interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horstman, C. C.

    1986-01-01

    Solutions of the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations are presented and are compared with a family of experimental results for the three-dimensional interaction of a sharp-fin-induced shock wave with a turbulent boundary layer. The solutions predict most of the essential features of the flow fields for various shock-wave strengths. However, some features of the measured flow fields, such as secondary separation and size of the largest separated zones were not accurately computed. The computed flow fields, aided by particle tracing techniques, display a prominent vortical structure which can be correlated with the observed surface phenomena.

  19. An objective technique to estimate percentage of an ERTS-1 water boundary resolution element covered by water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erb, R. B. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. An objective technique was developed to measure the surface area of water bodies. Nineteen water bodies in the Houston and Galveston, Texas area were selected as a basis for the technique development. The actual surface area of each body was determined from rectified and enlarged NASA aircraft photography. A clustering algorithm was used to produce classification maps of the region from ERTS-1 data. Certain classes were identified as being 100% water. Other classes were identified as being mixtures of water with land or vegetation. The number of picture elements falling on each water body and its boundary were counted. A linear regression analysis was performed to relate the total number of picture elements and boundary elements counted to the actual surface area. The standard error of the estimate was 6.7 acres. The absolute error was not a function of the actual surface area of the water body.

  20. MPSalsa a finite element computer program for reacting flow problems. Part 2 - user`s guide

    SciTech Connect

    Salinger, A.; Devine, K.; Hennigan, G.; Moffat, H.

    1996-09-01

    This manual describes the use of MPSalsa, an unstructured finite element (FE) code for solving chemically reacting flow problems on massively parallel computers. MPSalsa has been written to enable the rigorous modeling of the complex geometry and physics found in engineering systems that exhibit coupled fluid flow, heat transfer, mass transfer, and detailed reactions. In addition, considerable effort has been made to ensure that the code makes efficient use of the computational resources of massively parallel (MP), distributed memory architectures in a way that is nearly transparent to the user. The result is the ability to simultaneously model both three-dimensional geometries and flow as well as detailed reaction chemistry in a timely manner on MT computers, an ability we believe to be unique. MPSalsa has been designed to allow the experienced researcher considerable flexibility in modeling a system. Any combination of the momentum equations, energy balance, and an arbitrary number of species mass balances can be solved. The physical and transport properties can be specified as constants, as functions, or taken from the Chemkin library and associated database. Any of the standard set of boundary conditions and source terms can be adapted by writing user functions, for which templates and examples exist.

  1. Nonlinear finite element simulations of injuries with free boundaries: application to surgical wounds.

    PubMed

    Valero, C; Javierre, E; García-Aznar, J M; Gómez-Benito, M J

    2014-06-01

    Wound healing is a process driven by biochemical and mechanical variables in which a new tissue is synthesised to recover original tissue functionality. Wound morphology plays a crucial role in this process, as the skin behaviour is not uniform along different directions. In this work, we simulate the contraction of surgical wounds, which can be characterised as elongated and deep wounds. Because of the regularity of this morphology, we approximate the evolution of the wound through its cross section, adopting a plane strain hypothesis. This simplification reduces the complexity of the computational problem; while allows for a thorough analysis of the role of wound depth in the healing process, an aspect of medical and computational relevance that has not yet been addressed. To reproduce wound contraction, we consider the role of fibroblasts, myofibroblasts, collagen and a generic growth factor. The contraction phenomenon is driven by cell-generated forces. We postulate that these forces are adjusted to the mechanical environment of the tissue where cells are embedded through a mechanosensing and mechanotransduction mechanism. To solve the nonlinear problem, we use the finite element method (FEM) and an updated Lagrangian approach to represent the change in the geometry. To elucidate the role of wound depth and width on the contraction pattern and evolution of the involved species, we analyse different wound geometries with the same wound area. We find that deeper wounds contract less and reach a maximum contraction rate earlier than superficial wounds.

  2. A computer program for calculating laminar and turbulent boundary layers for two-dimensional time-dependent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cebeci, T.; Carr, L. W.

    1978-01-01

    A computer program is described which provides solutions of two dimensional equations appropriate to laminar and turbulent boundary layers for boundary conditions with an external flow which fluctuates in magnitude. The program is based on the numerical solution of the governing boundary layer equations by an efficient two point finite difference method. An eddy viscosity formulation was used to model the Reynolds shear stress term. The main features of the method are briefly described and instructions for the computer program with a listing are provided. Sample calculations to demonstrate its usage and capabilities for laminar and turbulent unsteady boundary layers with an external flow which fluctuated in magnitude are presented.

  3. Algorithms for computer detection of symmetry elements in molecular systems.

    PubMed

    Beruski, Otávio; Vidal, Luciano N

    2014-02-01

    Simple procedures for the location of proper and improper rotations and reflexion planes are presented. The search is performed with a molecule divided into subsets of symmetrically equivalent atoms (SEA) which are analyzed separately as if they were a single molecule. This approach is advantageous in many aspects. For instance, in those molecules that are symmetric rotors, the number of atoms and the inertia tensor of the SEA provide one straight way to find proper rotations of any order. The algorithms are invariant to the molecular orientation and their computational cost is low, because the main information required to find symmetry elements is interatomic distances and the principal moments of the SEA. For example, our Fortran implementation, running on a single processor, took only a few seconds to locate all 120 symmetry operations of the large and highly symmetrical fullerene C720, belonging to the Ih point group. Finally, we show how the interatomic distances matrix of a slightly unsymmetrical molecule is used to symmetrize its geometry. PMID:24403016

  4. Adaptive finite element simulation of flow and transport applications on parallel computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, Benjamin Shelton

    design and to demonstrate the capability for resolving complex multiscale processes efficiently and reliably. The first application considered is the simulation of chemotactic biological systems such as colonies of Escherichia coli. This work appears to be the first application of AMR to chemotactic processes. These systems exhibit transient, highly localized features and are important in many biological processes, which make them ideal for simulation with adaptive techniques. A nonlinear reaction-diffusion model for such systems is described and a finite element formulation is developed. The solution methodology is described in detail. Several phenomenological studies are conducted to study chemotactic processes and resulting biological patterns which use the parallel adaptive refinement capability developed in this work. The other application study is much more extensive and deals with fine scale interactions for important hypersonic flows arising in aerospace applications. These flows are characterized by highly nonlinear, convection-dominated flowfields with very localized features such as shock waves and boundary layers. These localized features are well-suited to simulation with adaptive techniques. A novel treatment of the inviscid flux terms arising in a streamline-upwind Petrov-Galerkin finite element formulation of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations is also presented and is found to be superior to the traditional approach. The parallel adaptive finite element formulation is then applied to several complex flow studies, culminating in fully three-dimensional viscous flows about complex geometries such as the Space Shuttle Orbiter. Physical phenomena such as viscous/inviscid interaction, shock wave/boundary layer interaction, shock/shock interaction, and unsteady acoustic-driven flowfield response are considered in detail. A computational investigation of a 25°/55° double cone configuration details the complex multiscale flow features and investigates a

  5. Cohesive-zone-model formulation and implementation using the symmetric Galerkin boundary element method for homogeneous solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Távara, Luis; Mantič, Vladislav; Salvadori, Alberto; Gray, Leonard J.; París, Federico

    2013-04-01

    A new symmetric boundary integral formulation for cohesive cracks growing in the interior of homogeneous linear elastic isotropic media with a known crack path is developed and implemented in a numerical code. A crack path can be known due to some symmetry implications or the presence of a weak or bonded surface between two solids. The use of a two-dimensional exponential cohesive law and of a special technique for its inclusion in the symmetric Galerkin boundary element method allows us to develop a simple and efficient formulation and implementation of a cohesive zone model. This formulation is dependent on only one variable in the cohesive zone (relative displacement). The corresponding constitutive cohesive equations present a softening branch which induces to the problem a potential instability. The development and implementation of a suitable solution algorithm capable of following the growth of the cohesive zone and subsequent crack growth becomes an important issue. An arc-length control combined with a Newton-Raphson algorithm for iterative solution of nonlinear equations is developed. The boundary element method is very attractive for modeling cohesive crack problems as all nonlinearities are located along the boundaries (including the crack boundaries) of linear elastic domains. A Galerkin approximation scheme, applied to a suitable symmetric integral formulation, ensures an easy treatment of cracks in homogeneous media and excellent convergence behavior of the numerical solution. Numerical results for the wedge split and mixed-mode flexure tests are presented.

  6. Reflection and transmission operator for irregular interfaces derived from the indirect boundary element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoi, Toshiaki

    2002-01-01

    A method is presented to turn into reality the idea of the reflection and transmission operators in the space-frequency domain for infinitely spread irregular interface in terms of the indirect boundary element method (abbreviated to I-BEM), and to apply them to the wavefield in irregularly stratified media. This method is a hybrid between the strategy of the reflection and transmission matrices method (abbreviated to R/T-MM) developed in seismology and that of I-BEM developing in the engineering community. The I-BEM is one of the ways to disassemble the wavefield into up and down going waves in layers sandwiched between irregular interfaces. Green's function matrices of I-BEM play the role of the wave function of R/T-MM, and the imaginary forces distributed along both faces of interfaces that of the coefficients vectors. The usage of the reference solution, that is the wavefield in the corresponding horizontally stratified media, gives us a good approximation to handle infinitely spread interfaces. This method of calculation can stack the effect of reflection and transmission at irregular interfaces on the wavefield as the wave goes by. Therefore, for example, the waves coming directly from the seismic source can be extracted from latter phases. The test case for a 2-D homogeneous basin shows the incident wave and reflected waves that bounce up and down in the basin. It is expected that the formulation shown here can make consideration of the wavefield in complex velocity structures and the search for appropriate and efficient approximations easier.

  7. A continuum mechanics-based framework for boundary and finite element mesh optimization in two dimensions for application in excavation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zsáki, Attila M.; Curran, John H.

    2005-04-01

    The determination of the optimum excavation sequences in mining and civil engineering using numerical stress analysis procedures requires repeated solution of large models. Often such models contain much more complexity and geometric detail than required to arrive at an accurate stress analysis solution, especially considering our limited knowledge of rock mass properties. This paper develops an automated framework for estimating the effects of excavations at a region of interest, and optimizing the geometry used for stress analysis. It eliminates or simplifies the excavations in a model while maintaining the accuracy of analysis results. The framework can equally be applied to two-dimensional boundary and finite element models.The framework will have the largest impact for non-linear finite element analysis. It can significantly reduce computational times for such analysis by simplifying models. Error estimators are used in the framework to assess accuracy. The advantages of applying the framework are demonstrated on an excavation-sequencing scenario.

  8. Computation of incompressible viscous flows through artificial heart devices with moving boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiris, Cetin; Rogers, Stuart; Kwak, Dochan; Chang, I.-DEE

    1991-01-01

    The extension of computational fluid dynamics techniques to artificial heart flow simulations is illustrated. Unsteady incompressible Navier-Stokes equations written in 3-D generalized curvilinear coordinates are solved iteratively at each physical time step until the incompressibility condition is satisfied. The solution method is based on the pseudo compressibility approach and uses an implicit upwind differencing scheme together with the Gauss-Seidel line relaxation method. The efficiency and robustness of the time accurate formulation of the algorithm are tested by computing the flow through model geometries. A channel flow with a moving indentation is computed and validated with experimental measurements and other numerical solutions. In order to handle the geometric complexity and the moving boundary problems, a zonal method and an overlapping grid embedding scheme are used, respectively. Steady state solutions for the flow through a tilting disk heart valve was compared against experimental measurements. Good agreement was obtained. The flow computation during the valve opening and closing is carried out to illustrate the moving boundary capability.

  9. Assessment of Turbulent Shock-Boundary Layer Interaction Computations Using the OVERFLOW Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliver, A. B.; Lillard, R. P.; Schwing, A. M.; Blaisdell, G> A.; Lyrintzis, A. S.

    2007-01-01

    The performance of two popular turbulence models, the Spalart-Allmaras model and Menter s SST model, and one relatively new model, Olsen & Coakley s Lag model, are evaluated using the OVERFLOWcode. Turbulent shock-boundary layer interaction predictions are evaluated with three different experimental datasets: a series of 2D compression ramps at Mach 2.87, a series of 2D compression ramps at Mach 2.94, and an axisymmetric coneflare at Mach 11. The experimental datasets include flows with no separation, moderate separation, and significant separation, and use several different experimental measurement techniques (including laser doppler velocimetry (LDV), pitot-probe measurement, inclined hot-wire probe measurement, preston tube skin friction measurement, and surface pressure measurement). Additionally, the OVERFLOW solutions are compared to the solutions of a second CFD code, DPLR. The predictions for weak shock-boundary layer interactions are in reasonable agreement with the experimental data. For strong shock-boundary layer interactions, all of the turbulence models overpredict the separation size and fail to predict the correct skin friction recovery distribution. In most cases, surface pressure predictions show too much upstream influence, however including the tunnel side-wall boundary layers in the computation improves the separation predictions.

  10. COYOTE : a finite element computer program for nonlinear heat conduction problems. Part I, theoretical background.

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, Micheal W.; Hogan, Roy E., Jr.; Gartling, David K.

    2010-03-01

    The need for the engineering analysis of systems in which the transport of thermal energy occurs primarily through a conduction process is a common situation. For all but the simplest geometries and boundary conditions, analytic solutions to heat conduction problems are unavailable, thus forcing the analyst to call upon some type of approximate numerical procedure. A wide variety of numerical packages currently exist for such applications, ranging in sophistication from the large, general purpose, commercial codes, such as COMSOL, COSMOSWorks, ABAQUS and TSS to codes written by individuals for specific problem applications. The original purpose for developing the finite element code described here, COYOTE, was to bridge the gap between the complex commercial codes and the more simplistic, individual application programs. COYOTE was designed to treat most of the standard conduction problems of interest with a user-oriented input structure and format that was easily learned and remembered. Because of its architecture, the code has also proved useful for research in numerical algorithms and development of thermal analysis capabilities. This general philosophy has been retained in the current version of the program, COYOTE, Version 5.0, though the capabilities of the code have been significantly expanded. A major change in the code is its availability on parallel computer architectures and the increase in problem complexity and size that this implies. The present document describes the theoretical and numerical background for the COYOTE program. This volume is intended as a background document for the user's manual. Potential users of COYOTE are encouraged to become familiar with the present report and the simple example analyses reported in before using the program. The theoretical and numerical background for the finite element computer program, COYOTE, is presented in detail. COYOTE is designed for the multi-dimensional analysis of nonlinear heat conduction problems

  11. Wind-Turbine Gear-Box Roller-Bearing Premature-Failure Caused by Grain-Boundary Hydrogen Embrittlement: A Multi-physics Computational Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujicic, M.; Chenna, V.; Galgalikar, R.; Snipes, J. S.; Ramaswami, S.; Yavari, R.

    2014-11-01

    To help overcome the problem of horizontal-axis wind-turbine (HAWT) gear-box roller-bearing premature-failure, the root causes of this failure are currently being investigated using mainly laboratory and field-test experimental approaches. In the present work, an attempt is made to develop complementary computational methods and tools which can provide additional insight into the problem at hand (and do so with a substantially shorter turn-around time). Toward that end, a multi-physics computational framework has been developed which combines: (a) quantum-mechanical calculations of the grain-boundary hydrogen-embrittlement phenomenon and hydrogen bulk/grain-boundary diffusion (the two phenomena currently believed to be the main contributors to the roller-bearing premature-failure); (b) atomic-scale kinetic Monte Carlo-based calculations of the hydrogen-induced embrittling effect ahead of the advancing crack-tip; and (c) a finite-element analysis of the damage progression in, and the final failure of a prototypical HAWT gear-box roller-bearing inner raceway. Within this approach, the key quantities which must be calculated using each computational methodology are identified, as well as the quantities which must be exchanged between different computational analyses. The work demonstrates that the application of the present multi-physics computational framework enables prediction of the expected life of the most failure-prone HAWT gear-box bearing elements.

  12. Boundary-layer computational model for predicting the flow and heat transfer in sudden expansions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, J. P.; Pletcher, R. H.

    1986-01-01

    Fully developed turbulent and laminar flows through symmetric planar and axisymmetric expansions with heat transfer were modeled using a finite-difference discretization of the boundary-layer equations. By using the boundary-layer equations to model separated flow in place of the Navier-Stokes equations, computational effort was reduced permitting turbulence modelling studies to be economically carried out. For laminar flow, the reattachment length was well predicted for Reynolds numbers as low as 20 and the details of the trapped eddy were well predicted for Reynolds numbers above 200. For turbulent flows, the Boussinesq assumption was used to express the Reynolds stresses in terms of a turbulent viscosity. Near-wall algebraic turbulence models based on Prandtl's-mixing-length model and the maximum Reynolds shear stress were compared.

  13. Heat-transfer measurements and computations of swept-shock-wave boundary-layer interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Y.; Settles, G. S.; Horstman, C. C.

    1994-01-01

    An experimental and computational research program providing new knowledge of the heat transfer in swept-shock-wave/boundary-layer interactions is described. An equilibrium turbulent boundary layer on a flat plate is subjected to impingement by a swept planar shock wave generated by a sharp fin. Five different interactions with fin angles ranging from 10 to 20 deg at freestream Mach numbers of 3 and 4 produce a variety of interaction strengths ranging from weak to very strong. A foil heater generates a uniform heat flux over the flat plate surface, and miniature thin-film-resistance sensors are used to measure the local surface temperature. The heat convection equation is then solved for the heat transfer distribution within an interaction, yielding an uncertainty of about +/- 10%. These data are compared with numerical Navier-Stokes solutions that employ a k-epsilon turbulence model. A simple peak heat transfer correlation for fin interactions is suggested.

  14. A finite-element-boundary integral formulation for scattering by three-dimensional cavity-backed apertures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, Jian-Ming; Volakis, John L.

    1991-01-01

    A numerical technique is proposed for the electromagnetic characterization of the scattering by a three-dimensional cavity-backed aperture in an infinite ground plane. The technique combines the finite element and boundary integral methods to formulate a system of equations for the solution of the aperture fields and those inside the cavity. Specifically, the finite element method is used to formulate the fields in the cavity region and the boundary integral approach is used in conjunction with the equivalence principle to represent the fields above the ground plane. Unlike traditional approaches, the proposed technique does not require a knowledge of the cavity's Green's function and is, therefore, applicable to arbitrary shape depressions and material fillings. Furthermore, the proposed formulation leads to a system having a partly full and partly sparse as well as symmetric and banded matrix which can be solved efficiently using special algorithms.

  15. A finite element-boundary integral formulation for scattering by three-dimensional cavity-backed apertures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, Jian-Ming; Volakis, John L.

    1990-01-01

    A numerical technique is proposed for the electromagnetic characterization of the scattering by a three-dimensional cavity-backed aperture in an infinite ground plane. The technique combines the finite element and boundary integral methods to formulate a system of equations for the solution of the aperture fields and those inside the cavity. Specifically, the finite element method is employed to formulate the fields in the cavity region and the boundary integral approach is used in conjunction with the equivalence principle to represent the fields above the ground plane. Unlike traditional approaches, the proposed technique does not require knowledge of the cavity's Green's function and is, therefore, applicable to arbitrary shape depressions and material fillings. Furthermore, the proposed formulation leads to a system having a partly full and partly sparse as well as symmetric and banded matrix which can be solved efficiently using special algorithms.

  16. Simulation of steady-state flow in three-dimensional fracture networks using the boundary-element method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shapiro, A.M.; Andersson, J.

    1985-01-01

    An efficient method for simulating steady-state flow in three-dimensional fracture networks is formulated with the use of the boundary-element method. The host rock is considered to be impervious, and the fractures can be of any orientation and areal extent. The fractures are treated as surfaces where fluid movement is essentially two-dimensional. Fracture intersections are regarded as one-dimensional fluid conduits. Hence, the three-dimensional geometric characteristics of the fracture geometry is retained in solutions of coupled sets of one- and two-dimentional equations. Use of the boundary-element method to evaluate the fluid responses in the fractures precludes the need to internally discretize the areal extent of the fractures. ?? 1985.

  17. mFES: A Robust Molecular Finite Element Solver for Electrostatic Energy Computations.

    PubMed

    Sakalli, I; Schöberl, J; Knapp, E W

    2014-11-11

    We present a robust method for the calculation of electrostatic potentials of large molecular systems using tetrahedral finite elements (FE). Compared to the finite difference (FD) method using a regular simple cubic grid to solve the Poisson equation, the FE method can reach high accuracy and efficiency using an adaptive grid. Here, the grid points can be adjusted and are placed directly on the molecular surfaces to faithfully model surfaces and volumes. The grid point density decreases rapidly toward the asymptotic boundary to reach very large distances with just a few more grid points. A broad set of tools are applied to make the grid more regular and thus provide a more stable linear equation system, while reducing the number of grid points without compromising accuracy. The latter reduces the number of unknowns significantly and yields shorter solver execution times. The accuracy is further enhanced by using second order polynomials as shape functions. Generating the adaptive grid for a molecular system is expensive, but it pays off, if the same molecular geometry is used several times as is the case for pKA and redox potential computations of many charge variable groups in proteins. Application of the mFES method is also advantageous, if the molecular system is too large to reach sufficient accuracy when computing the electrostatic potential with conventional FD methods. The program mFES is free of charge and available at http://agknapp.chemie.fu-berlin.de/mfes . PMID:26584389

  18. mFES: A Robust Molecular Finite Element Solver for Electrostatic Energy Computations.

    PubMed

    Sakalli, I; Schöberl, J; Knapp, E W

    2014-11-11

    We present a robust method for the calculation of electrostatic potentials of large molecular systems using tetrahedral finite elements (FE). Compared to the finite difference (FD) method using a regular simple cubic grid to solve the Poisson equation, the FE method can reach high accuracy and efficiency using an adaptive grid. Here, the grid points can be adjusted and are placed directly on the molecular surfaces to faithfully model surfaces and volumes. The grid point density decreases rapidly toward the asymptotic boundary to reach very large distances with just a few more grid points. A broad set of tools are applied to make the grid more regular and thus provide a more stable linear equation system, while reducing the number of grid points without compromising accuracy. The latter reduces the number of unknowns significantly and yields shorter solver execution times. The accuracy is further enhanced by using second order polynomials as shape functions. Generating the adaptive grid for a molecular system is expensive, but it pays off, if the same molecular geometry is used several times as is the case for pKA and redox potential computations of many charge variable groups in proteins. Application of the mFES method is also advantageous, if the molecular system is too large to reach sufficient accuracy when computing the electrostatic potential with conventional FD methods. The program mFES is free of charge and available at http://agknapp.chemie.fu-berlin.de/mfes .

  19. Changes in element contents of four lichens over 11 years in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness, northern Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bennett, J.P.; Wetmore, C.M.

    1999-01-01

    Four species of lichen (Cladina rangiferina, Evernia mesomorpha, Hypogymnia physodes, and Parmelia sulcata) were sampled at six locations in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness three times over a span of 11 years and analyzed for concentrations of 16 chemical elements to test the hypotheses that corticolous species would accumulate higher amounts of chemical elements than terricolous species, and that 11 years were sufficient to detect spatial patterns and temporal trends in element contents. Multivariate analyses of over 2770 data points revealed two principal components that accounted for 68% of the total variance in the data. These two components, the first highly loaded with Al, B, Cr, Fe, Ni and S, and the second loaded with Ca, Cd, Mg and Mn, were inversely related to each other over time and space. The first component was interpreted as consisting of an anthropogenic and a dust component, while the second, primarily a nutritional component. Cu, K, Na, P, Pb and Zn were not highly loaded on either component. Component 1 decreased significantly over the 11 years and from west to east, while component 2 increased. The corticolous species were more enriched in heavy metals than the terricolous species. All four elements in component 2 in H. physodes were above enrichment thresholds for this species. Species differences on the two components were greater than the effects of time and space, suggesting that biomonitoring with lichens is strongly species dependent. Some localities in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness appear enriched in some anthropogenic elements for no obvious reasons.

  20. Invariant TAD Boundaries Constrain Cell-Type-Specific Looping Interactions between Promoters and Distal Elements around the CFTR Locus

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Emily M.; Lajoie, Bryan R.; Jain, Gaurav; Dekker, Job

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional genome structure plays an important role in gene regulation. Globally, chromosomes are organized into active and inactive compartments while, at the gene level, looping interactions connect promoters to regulatory elements. Topologically associating domains (TADs), typically several hundred kilobases in size, form an intermediate level of organization. Major questions include how TADs are formed and how they are related to looping interactions between genes and regulatory elements. Here we performed a focused 5C analysis of a 2.8 Mb chromosome 7 region surrounding CFTR in a panel of cell types. We find that the same TAD boundaries are present in all cell types, indicating that TADs represent a universal chromosome architecture. Furthermore, we find that these TAD boundaries are present irrespective of the expression and looping of genes located between them. In contrast, looping interactions between promoters and regulatory elements are cell-type specific and occur mostly within TADs. This is exemplified by the CFTR promoter that in different cell types interacts with distinct sets of distal cell-type-specific regulatory elements that are all located within the same TAD. Finally, we find that long-range associations between loci located in different TADs are also detected, but these display much lower interaction frequencies than looping interactions within TADs. Interestingly, interactions between TADs are also highly cell-type-specific and often involve loci clustered around TAD boundaries. These data point to key roles of invariant TAD boundaries in constraining as well as mediating cell-type-specific long-range interactions and gene regulation. PMID:26748519

  1. Invariant TAD Boundaries Constrain Cell-Type-Specific Looping Interactions between Promoters and Distal Elements around the CFTR Locus.

    PubMed

    Smith, Emily M; Lajoie, Bryan R; Jain, Gaurav; Dekker, Job

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional genome structure plays an important role in gene regulation. Globally, chromosomes are organized into active and inactive compartments while, at the gene level, looping interactions connect promoters to regulatory elements. Topologically associating domains (TADs), typically several hundred kilobases in size, form an intermediate level of organization. Major questions include how TADs are formed and how they are related to looping interactions between genes and regulatory elements. Here we performed a focused 5C analysis of a 2.8 Mb chromosome 7 region surrounding CFTR in a panel of cell types. We find that the same TAD boundaries are present in all cell types, indicating that TADs represent a universal chromosome architecture. Furthermore, we find that these TAD boundaries are present irrespective of the expression and looping of genes located between them. In contrast, looping interactions between promoters and regulatory elements are cell-type specific and occur mostly within TADs. This is exemplified by the CFTR promoter that in different cell types interacts with distinct sets of distal cell-type-specific regulatory elements that are all located within the same TAD. Finally, we find that long-range associations between loci located in different TADs are also detected, but these display much lower interaction frequencies than looping interactions within TADs. Interestingly, interactions between TADs are also highly cell-type-specific and often involve loci clustered around TAD boundaries. These data point to key roles of invariant TAD boundaries in constraining as well as mediating cell-type-specific long-range interactions and gene regulation. PMID:26748519

  2. Grid generation for two-dimensional finite element flowfield computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tatum, K. E.

    1980-01-01

    The finite element method for fluid dynamics was used to develop a two dimensional mesh generation scheme. The method consists of shearing and conformal maps with upper and lower surfaces handled independently to allow sharp leading edges. The method also generates meshes of triangular or quadrilateral elements.

  3. A new submodelling technique for multi-scale finite element computation of electromagnetic fields: Application in bioelectromagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aristovich, K. Y.; Khan, S. H.

    2010-07-01

    Complex multi-scale Finite Element (FE) analyses always involve high number of elements and therefore require very long time of computations. This is caused by the fact, that considered effects on smaller scales have greater influences on the whole model and larger scales. Thus, mesh density should be as high as required by the smallest scale factor. New submodelling routine has been developed to sufficiently decrease the time of computation without loss of accuracy for the whole solution. The presented approach allows manipulation of different mesh sizes on different scales and, therefore total optimization of mesh density on each scale and transfer results automatically between the meshes corresponding to respective scales of the whole model. Unlike classical submodelling routine, the new technique operates with not only transfer of boundary conditions but also with volume results and transfer of forces (current density load in case of electromagnetism), which allows the solution of full Maxwell's equations in FE space. The approach was successfully implemented for electromagnetic solution in the forward problem of Magnetic Field Tomography (MFT) based on Magnetoencephalography (MEG), where the scale of one neuron was considered as the smallest and the scale of whole-brain model as the largest. The time of computation was reduced about 100 times, with the initial requirements of direct computations without submodelling routine of 10 million elements.

  4. Solving the ECG forward problem by means of standard h- and h-hierarchical adaptive linear boundary element method: comparison with two refinement schemes.

    PubMed

    Shou, Guofa; Xia, Ling; Jiang, Mingfeng; Wei, Qing; Liu, Feng; Crozier, Stuart

    2009-05-01

    The boundary element method (BEM) is a commonly used numerical approach to solve biomedical electromagnetic volume conductor models such as ECG and EEG problems, in which only the interfaces between various tissue regions need to be modeled. The quality of the boundary element discretization affects the accuracy of the numerical solution, and the construction of high-quality meshes is time-consuming and always problem-dependent. Adaptive BEM (aBEM) has been developed and validated as an effective method to tackle such problems in electromagnetic and mechanical fields, but has not been extensively investigated in the ECG problem. In this paper, the h aBEM, which produces refined meshes through adaptive adjustment of the elements' connection, is investigated for the ECG forward problem. Two different refinement schemes: adding one new node (SH1) and adding three new nodes (SH3), are applied for the h aBEM calculation. In order to save the computational time, the h-hierarchical aBEM is also used through the introduction of the h-hierarchical shape functions for SH3. The algorithms were evaluated with a single-layer homogeneous sphere model with assumed dipole sources and a geometrically realistic heart-torso model. The simulations showed that h aBEM can produce better mesh results and is more accurate and effective than the traditional BEM for the ECG problem. While with the same refinement scheme SH3, the h-hierarchical aBEM can save the computational costs about 9% compared to the implementation of standard h aBEM.

  5. Computational Assessment of the Benefits of Boundary Layer Ingestion for the D8 Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandya, Shishir A.; Uranga, Alejandra

    2013-01-01

    To substantially reduce the fuel burn of future commercial transportation aircraft, the boundary layer ingestion idea is investigated. The idea is that an engine placed in the wake of the aircraft it is propelling is more efficient than a conventional engine placement under the wing or on pods mounted to the rear of the fuselage. The top, rear of the fuselage is thus designed to act as a diffuser such that the engines can be placed there with a minimal nacelle. The boundary layer thickens over the rear of the fuselage such that a large portion of it is ingested by the fan. To assess whether the boundary layer ingesting (BLI) engine placement is indeed advantageous, a study of the nacelle aerodynamics is carried out using Overflow, a viscous CFD flow solver that uses overset meshes. The computed forces and moments are compared to a wind tunnel experiment for validation. Some aspects of the design are verified using the simulation results. Finally, the effect of the nacelle placement is assessed by comparing the BLI nacelle configuration to a podded nacelle configuration and to the unpowered (without nacelles) aircraft.

  6. An Alternative Frictional Boundary Condition for Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulation of Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Gaoqiang; Feng, Zhili; Zhu, Yucan; Shi, Qingyu

    2016-07-01

    For better application of numerical simulation in optimization and design of friction stir welding (FSW), this paper presents a new frictional boundary condition at the tool/workpiece interface for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of FSW. The proposed boundary condition is based on an implementation of the Coulomb friction model. Using the new boundary condition, the CFD simulation yields non-uniform distribution of contact state over the tool/workpiece interface, as validated by the experimental weld macrostructure. It is found that interfacial sticking state is present over large area at the tool-workpiece interface, while significant interfacial sliding occurs at the shoulder periphery, the lower part of pin side, and the periphery of pin bottom. Due to the interfacial sticking, a rotating flow zone is found under the shoulder, in which fast circular motion occurs. The diameter of the rotating flow zone is smaller than the shoulder diameter, which is attributed to the presence of the interfacial sliding at the shoulder periphery. For the simulated welding condition, the heat generation due to friction and plastic deformation makes up 54.4 and 45.6% of the total heat generation rate, respectively. The simulated temperature field is validated by the good agreement to the experimental measurements.

  7. An Alternative Frictional Boundary Condition for Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulation of Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Gaoqiang; Feng, Zhili; Zhu, Yucan; Shi, Qingyu

    2016-09-01

    For better application of numerical simulation in optimization and design of friction stir welding (FSW), this paper presents a new frictional boundary condition at the tool/workpiece interface for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of FSW. The proposed boundary condition is based on an implementation of the Coulomb friction model. Using the new boundary condition, the CFD simulation yields non-uniform distribution of contact state over the tool/workpiece interface, as validated by the experimental weld macrostructure. It is found that interfacial sticking state is present over large area at the tool-workpiece interface, while significant interfacial sliding occurs at the shoulder periphery, the lower part of pin side, and the periphery of pin bottom. Due to the interfacial sticking, a rotating flow zone is found under the shoulder, in which fast circular motion occurs. The diameter of the rotating flow zone is smaller than the shoulder diameter, which is attributed to the presence of the interfacial sliding at the shoulder periphery. For the simulated welding condition, the heat generation due to friction and plastic deformation makes up 54.4 and 45.6% of the total heat generation rate, respectively. The simulated temperature field is validated by the good agreement to the experimental measurements.

  8. CONDENSED MATTER: STRUCTURE, MECHANICAL AND THERMAL PROPERTIES: Efficient and Robust Design for Absorbing Boundary Conditions in Atomistic Computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Ming; Tang, Shao-Qiang

    2009-11-01

    We propose an efficient and robust way to design absorbing boundary conditions in atomistic computations. An optimal discrete boundary condition is obtained by minimizing a functional of a reflection coefficient integral over a range of wave numbers. The minimization is performed with respect to a set of wave numbers, at which transparent absorption is reached. Compared with the optimization with respect to the boundary condition coefficients suggested by E and Huang [Phys. Rev. Lett. 87 (2001) 133501], we reduce considerably the number of independent variables and the computing cost. We further demonstrate with numerical examples that both the optimization and the wave absorption are more robust in the proposed design.

  9. Computation of plate wave dispersion diagrams and surface wave velocities without explicit boundary conditions.

    PubMed

    Laude, Vincent; Assouar, Badreddine; Hou, Zhilin

    2010-07-01

    We discuss the computation of the band structure of plate waves using the plane wave expansion (PWE) method. This method is generally used to formulate eigenvalue problems to compute dispersion diagrams for solid-solid phononic crystals. We show how the free surface boundary condition can be included implicitly in the form of the PWE solution, thus leading to an efficient eigenvalue problem. This generic method for wave dispersion is non-iterative and does not require an initial guess for the solution. Furthermore, surface acoustic wave velocities can be estimated from the slowest wave for large wave vectors. Examples for a single plate and a multilayer plate are given, and extension to piezoelectric materials is discussed.

  10. A computational study on oblique shock wave-turbulent boundary layer interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joy, Md. Saddam Hossain; Rahman, Saeedur; Hasan, A. B. M. Toufique; Ali, M.; Mitsutake, Y.; Matsuo, S.; Setoguchi, T.

    2016-07-01

    A numerical computation of an oblique shock wave incident on a turbulent boundary layer was performed for free stream flow of air at M∞ = 2.0 and Re1 = 10.5×106 m-1. The oblique shock wave was generated from a 8° wedge. Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulation with k-ω SST turbulence model was first utilized for two dimensional (2D) steady case. The results were compared with the experiment at the same flow conditions. Further, to capture the unsteadiness, a 2D Large Eddy Simulation (LES) with sub-grid scale model WMLES was performed which showed the unsteady effects. The frequency of the shock oscillation was computed and was found to be comparable with that of experimental measurement.

  11. WINE-1: Special-Purpose Computer forN-Body Simulations with a Periodic Boundary Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushige, Toshiyuki; Makino, Junichiro; Ito, Tomoyoshi; Okumura, Sachiko K.; Ebisuzaki, Toshikazu; Sugimoto, Daiichiro

    1993-06-01

    We have developed WINE-1 (Wave space INtegrator for Ewald method), a special-purpose computer for N-body simulations with a periodic boundary condition. In N-body simulations with a periodic boundary condition such as cosmological N-body simulations, we use the Ewald method to calculate the gravitational interaction. With the Ewald method, we can calculate the interaction more accurately than a calculation with other methods, such as the PM method, the P(3) M method, or the tree algorithm. In the Ewald method, the total force exerted on a particle is divided into contributions from real space and wave-number space so that the infinite sum can converge exponentially in both spaces. WINE is a special-purpose computer used to calculate the interaction in wave-number space. WINE is connected to a host computer via the VME bus. We have developed the first machine, WINE-1. It is made of one board having a size of 38 cm by 40 cm, on which 31 LSI chips and 46 IC chips are wire-wrapped. The peak speed of WINE-1 is equivalent to 480 Mflops. The summation in real space is calculated using a GRAPE system, another special-purpose computer for the direct calculation of the interparticle force. For example, we can perform a cosmological N-body simulation for N=80,000 (500 steps) within a week if we use GRAPE-2A for the summation in real space and WINE-1 for that in wave-number space.

  12. Brain–skull contact boundary conditions in an inverse computational deformation model

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Songbai; Roberts, David W.; Hartov, Alex; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2010-01-01

    Biomechanical models simulating brain motion under loading and boundary conditions in the operating room (OR) are gaining attention as alternatives for brain shift compensation during open cranial neurosurgeries. Although the significance of brain–skull boundary conditions (BCs) in these models has been explored in dynamic simulations, it has not been fully investigated in models representing the quasi-static brain motion that prevails during neurosurgery. In this study, we extend the application of a brain–skull contact BC by incorporating it into an inversion estimation scheme for the deformation field using the steepest gradient descent (SGD) framework. The technique allows parenchymal surface motion normal to the skull while maintaining stress-free BCs at the craniotomy and minimizing the effect of measurement noise. Application of the algorithm in five clinical cases using sparse data generated at the tumor boundary confirms the significance of brain–skull BCs in the model response. Specifically, the results demonstrate that the contact BC enhances model flexibility and achieves improved or comparable performance at the tumor boundary (recovering about 85% of the deformation) relative to that obtained when normal motion of the parenchymal surface is not allowed. It also significantly improves model estimation accuracy at the craniotomy (1.6 mm on average), especially when the normal motion is large. The importance of the method is that model performance significantly improves when brain–skull contact influences the deformation field but does not degrade when the contact is less critical and simpler BCs would suffice. The computational cost of the technique is currently 3.9 min on average, but may be further reduced by applying an iterative solver to the linear systems of equations involved and/or by local refinement of the mesh in regions of interest. PMID:19560393

  13. Utilizing spectral analysis of coastal discharge computed by a numerical model to determine boundary influence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swain, E.D.; Langevin, C.D.; Wang, J.D.

    2008-01-01

    In the present study, a spectral analysis was applied to field data and a numerical model of southeastern Everglades and northeastern Florida Bay that involved computing and comparing the power spectrum of simulated and measured flows at the primary coastal outflow creek. Four dominant power frequencies, corresponding to the S1, S2, M2, and 01 tidal periods, were apparent in the measured outflows. The model seemed to reproduce the magnitudes of the S1 and S2 components better than those of the M2 and 01 components. To determine the cause of the relatively poor representation of the M2 and 01 components, we created a steady-base version of the model by setting the time-varying forcing functions - rainfall, evapotranspiration, wind, and inland and tidal boundary conditions - to averaged values. The steady-base model was then modified to produce multiple simulations with only one time-varying forcing function for each model run. These experimental simulations approximated the individual effects of each forcing function on the system. The spectral analysis of the experimental simulations indicated that temporal fluctuations in rainfall, evapotranspiration, and inland water level and discharge boundaries have negligible effects on coastal creek flow fluctuations with periods of less than 48 hours. The tidal boundary seems to be the only forcing function inducing the M2 and 01 frequency flow fluctuations in the creek. An analytical formulation was developed, relating the errors induced by the tidal water-level gauge resolution to the errors in the simulated discharge fluctuations at the coastal creek. This formulation yielded a discharge-fluctuation error similar in magnitude to the errors observed when comparing the spectrum of the simulated and measured discharge. The dominant source of error in the simulation of discharge fluctuation magnitude is most likely the resolution of the water-level gauges used to create the model boundary.

  14. Computational hemodynamics in cerebral aneurysms: the effects of modeled versus measured boundary conditions.

    PubMed

    Marzo, Alberto; Singh, Pankaj; Larrabide, Ignacio; Radaelli, Alessandro; Coley, Stuart; Gwilliam, Matt; Wilkinson, Iain D; Lawford, Patricia; Reymond, Philippe; Patel, Umang; Frangi, Alejandro; Hose, D Rod

    2011-02-01

    Modeling of flow in intracranial aneurysms (IAs) requires flow information at the model boundaries. In absence of patient-specific measurements, typical or modeled boundary conditions (BCs) are often used. This study investigates the effects of modeled versus patient-specific BCs on modeled hemodynamics within IAs. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models of five IAs were reconstructed from three-dimensional rotational angiography (3DRA). BCs were applied using in turn patient-specific phase-contrast-MR (pc-MR) measurements, a 1D-circulation model, and a physiologically coherent method based on local WSS at inlets. The Navier-Stokes equations were solved using the Ansys®-CFX™ software. Wall shear stress (WSS), oscillatory shear index (OSI), and other hemodynamic indices were computed. Differences in the values obtained with the three methods were analyzed using boxplot diagrams. Qualitative similarities were observed in the flow fields obtained with the three approaches. The quantitative comparison showed smaller discrepancies between pc-MR and 1D-model data, than those observed between pc-MR and WSS-scaled data. Discrepancies were reduced when indices were normalized to mean hemodynamic aneurysmal data. The strong similarities observed for the three BCs models suggest that vessel and aneurysm geometry have the strongest influence on aneurysmal hemodynamics. In absence of patient-specific BCs, a distributed circulation model may represent the best option when CFD is used for large cohort studies.

  15. Turbulent Boundary Layers in Oscillating Flows. Part 1: an Experimental and Computational Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, W. J.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental-computational study of the behavior of turbulent boundary layers for oscillating air flows over a plane surface with a small favorable mean pressure gradient is described. Experimental studies were conducted for boundary layers generated on the test section wall of a facility that produces a flow with a mean free stream velocity and a superposed nearly-pure sinusoidal component over a wide range of frequency. Flow at a nominal mean free stream velocity of 50 m/s were studied at atmospheric pressure and temperature at selected axial positions over a 2 m test length for frequencies ranging from 4 to 29 Hz. Quantitative experimental results are presented for unsteady velocity profiles and longitudinal turbulence levels obtained from hot wire anemometer measurements at three axial positions. Mean velocity profiles for oscillating flows were found to exhibit only small deviations from corresponding steady flow profiles, while amplitudes and phase relationships exhibited a strong dependence on axial position and frequency. Since sinusoidal flows could be generated over a wide range of frequency, studies at fixed values of reduced frequency at different axial positions were studied. Results show that there is some utility in the use of reduced frequency to correlate unsteady velocity results. The turbulence level u' sub rms was observed to vary essentially sinusoidally around values close to those measured in steady flow. However, the amplitude of oscillation and phase relations for turbulence level were found to be strongly frequency dependent. Numerical predictions were obtained using an unsteady boundary layer computational code and the Cebeci-Smith and Glushko turbulence models. Predicted quantities related to unsteady velocity profiles exhibit fair agreement with experiment when the Cebeci-Smith turbulence model is used.

  16. 01010000 01001100 01000001 01011001: Play Elements in Computer Programming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breslin, Samantha

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the role of play in human interaction with computers in the context of computer programming. The author considers many facets of programming including the literary practice of coding, the abstract design of programs, and more mundane activities such as testing, debugging, and hacking. She discusses how these incorporate the…

  17. I-BIEM, an iterative boundary integral equation method for computer solutions of current distribution problems with complex boundaries: A new algorithm. I - Theoretical

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahan, B. D.; Scherson, Daniel; Reid, Margaret A.

    1988-01-01

    A new algorithm for an iterative computation of solutions of Laplace's or Poisson's equations in two dimensions, using Green's second identity, is presented. This algorithm converges strongly and geometrically and can be applied to curved, irregular, or moving boundaries with nonlinear and/or discontinuous boundary conditions. It has been implemented in Pascal on a number of micro- and minicomputers and applied to several geometries. Cases with known analytic solutions have been tested. Convergence to within 0.1 percent to 0.01 percent of the theoretical values are obtained in a few minutes on a microcomputer.

  18. Isoparametric 3-D Finite Element Mesh Generation Using Interactive Computer Graphics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kayrak, C.; Ozsoy, T.

    1985-01-01

    An isoparametric 3-D finite element mesh generator was developed with direct interface to an interactive geometric modeler program called POLYGON. POLYGON defines the model geometry in terms of boundaries and mesh regions for the mesh generator. The mesh generator controls the mesh flow through the 2-dimensional spans of regions by using the topological data and defines the connectivity between regions. The program is menu driven and the user has a control of element density and biasing through the spans and can also apply boundary conditions, loads interactively.

  19. Development of an integrated BEM (Boundary Element Mesh) for hot fluid-structure interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dargush, G. F.; Banerjee, P. K.

    1987-01-01

    A boundary integral representation for a coupled approach to fluid flow and solid deformation problems associated with the design of hot-section components such as those in the Space Shuttle Main Engine is discussed. The formulation is based on the fundamental analytical solution of the Navier-Stokes equation for fluid velocity in an infinite domain. This fundamental solution was obtained by decomposing a Navier-Stokes equation into vorticity and dilation transport equations. A boundary integral involving convolutions in time was then constructed in which the convective terms appear in the volume integral.

  20. HIFiRE-1 Turbulent Shock Boundary Layer Interaction - Flight Data and Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimmel, Roger L.; Prabhu, Dinesh

    2015-01-01

    The Hypersonic International Flight Research Experimentation (HIFiRE) program is a hypersonic flight test program executed by the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) and Australian Defence Science and Technology Organisation (DSTO). This flight contained a cylinder-flare induced shock boundary layer interaction (SBLI). Computations of the interaction were conducted for a number of times during the ascent. The DPLR code used for predictions was calibrated against ground test data prior to exercising the code at flight conditions. Generally, the computations predicted the upstream influence and interaction pressures very well. Plateau pressures on the cylinder were predicted well at all conditions. Although the experimental heat transfer showed a large amount of scatter, especially at low heating levels, the measured heat transfer agreed well with computations. The primary discrepancy between the experiment and computation occurred in the pressures measured on the flare during second stage burn. Measured pressures exhibited large overshoots late in the second stage burn, the mechanism of which is unknown. The good agreement between flight measurements and CFD helps validate the philosophy of calibrating CFD against ground test, prior to exercising it at flight conditions.

  1. Incorporation of rare earth elements in titanite: Stabilization of the A2/a dimorph by creation of antiphase boundaries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hughes, J.M.; Bloodaxe, E.S.; Hanchar, J.M.; Foord, E.E.

    1997-01-01

    The atomic arrangement of a natural rare-earth-rich titanite and two synthetic rare-earth-doped titanites have been refined in space group A2/a, and the atomic arrangement of an undoped P21/a synthetic titanite was also refined for comparison. Previous work has shown that titanite possesses a domain structure, with domains formed of like-displaced Ti atoms in the [100] octahedral chains. P21/a titanite results when the crystal is formed of a single domain, but as Ti-reversal sites occur in the octahedral chain the apparent A2/a structure results from the average of antiphase domains. Antiphase boundaries occur at O1, which is alternately overbonded or underbonded at the boundaries, depending on the displacement of the neighboring Ti atoms. Type 2 antiphase boundaries exist where two Ti atoms are displaced away from the intervening O1 atom and are energetically unfavorable because of underbonding of that O1 atom. However, substitution of a trivalent rare earth element in the adjacent Ca2+ site relieves that underbonding, favoring the creation of type 2 antiphase boundaries and stabilization of the A2/a dimorph. The results of high-precision crystal structure analyses demonstrate that rare earth substituents for Ca stabilize the A2/a dimorph at lower substitution levels than required for octahedral substitutions.

  2. Trace element patterns at a non-marine cretaceous-tertiary boundary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gilmore, J.S.; Knight, J.D.; Orth, C.J.; Pillmore, C.L.; Tschudy, R.H.

    1984-01-01

    At the fossil-pollen-defined Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary in the Raton Basin of New Mexico and Colorado, an iridium abundance anomaly and excess scandium, titanium, and chromium are associated with a thin ash or dust fallout bed (now kaolinitic clay) that was preserved in freshwater coal swamps. ?? 1984 Nature Publishing Group.

  3. A numerical model for ground-borne vibrations from underground railway traffic based on a periodic finite element boundary element formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degrande, G.; Clouteau, D.; Othman, R.; Arnst, M.; Chebli, H.; Klein, R.; Chatterjee, P.; Janssens, B.

    2006-06-01

    A numerical model is presented to predict vibrations in the free field from excitation due to metro trains in tunnels. The three-dimensional dynamic tunnel-soil interaction problem is solved with a subdomain formulation, using a finite element formulation for the tunnel and a boundary element method for the soil. The periodicity of the geometry in the longitudinal direction of the tunnel is exploited using the Floquet transform, limiting the discretization to a single-bounded reference cell. The responses of two different types of tunnel due to a harmonic load on the tunnel invert are compared, both in the frequency-wavenumber and spatial domains. The first tunnel is a shallow cut-and-cover masonry tunnel on the Paris metro network, embedded in layers of sand, while the second tunnel is a deep bored tunnel of London Underground, with a cast iron lining and embedded in the London clay.

  4. A computational study of nodal-based tetrahedral element behavior.

    SciTech Connect

    Gullerud, Arne S.

    2010-09-01

    This report explores the behavior of nodal-based tetrahedral elements on six sample problems, and compares their solution to that of a corresponding hexahedral mesh. The problems demonstrate that while certain aspects of the solution field for the nodal-based tetrahedrons provide good quality results, the pressure field tends to be of poor quality. Results appear to be strongly affected by the connectivity of the tetrahedral elements. Simulations that rely on the pressure field, such as those which use material models that are dependent on the pressure (e.g. equation-of-state models), can generate erroneous results. Remeshing can also be strongly affected by these issues. The nodal-based test elements as they currently stand need to be used with caution to ensure that their numerical deficiencies do not adversely affect critical values of interest.

  5. Parallelization of Finite Element Analysis Codes Using Heterogeneous Distributed Computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ozguner, Fusun

    1996-01-01

    Performance gains in computer design are quickly consumed as users seek to analyze larger problems to a higher degree of accuracy. Innovative computational methods, such as parallel and distributed computing, seek to multiply the power of existing hardware technology to satisfy the computational demands of large applications. In the early stages of this project, experiments were performed using two large, coarse-grained applications, CSTEM and METCAN. These applications were parallelized on an Intel iPSC/860 hypercube. It was found that the overall speedup was very low, due to large, inherently sequential code segments present in the applications. The overall execution time T(sub par), of the application is dependent on these sequential segments. If these segments make up a significant fraction of the overall code, the application will have a poor speedup measure.

  6. Improved plug valve computer-aided design of plug element

    SciTech Connect

    Wordin, J.J.

    1990-02-01

    The purpose of this document is to present derivations of equations for the design of a plug valve and to present a computer program which performs the design calculations based on the derivations. The valve is based on a plug formed from a tractrix of revolution called a pseudosphere. It is of interest to be able to calculate various parameters for the plug for design purposes. For example, the surface area, volume, and center of gravity are important to determine friction and wear of the valve. A computer program in BASIC has been written to perform the design calculations. The appendix contains a computer program listing and verifications of results using approximation methods. A sample run is included along with necessary computer commands to run the program. 1 fig.

  7. Finite Element Analysis in Concurrent Processing: Computational Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobieszczanski-Sobieski, Jaroslaw; Watson, Brian; Vanderplaats, Garrett

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate the potential application of new methods for solving large-scale static structural problems on concurrent computers. It is well known that traditional single-processor computational speed will be limited by inherent physical limits. The only path to achieve higher computational speeds lies through concurrent processing. Traditional factorization solution methods for sparse matrices are ill suited for concurrent processing because the null entries get filled, leading to high communication and memory requirements. The research reported herein investigates alternatives to factorization that promise a greater potential to achieve high concurrent computing efficiency. Two methods, and their variants, based on direct energy minimization are studied: a) minimization of the strain energy using the displacement method formulation; b) constrained minimization of the complementary strain energy using the force method formulation. Initial results indicated that in the context of the direct energy minimization the displacement formulation experienced convergence and accuracy difficulties while the force formulation showed promising potential.

  8. Reliable and efficient a posteriori error estimation for adaptive IGA boundary element methods for weakly-singular integral equations

    PubMed Central

    Feischl, Michael; Gantner, Gregor; Praetorius, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    We consider the Galerkin boundary element method (BEM) for weakly-singular integral equations of the first-kind in 2D. We analyze some residual-type a posteriori error estimator which provides a lower as well as an upper bound for the unknown Galerkin BEM error. The required assumptions are weak and allow for piecewise smooth parametrizations of the boundary, local mesh-refinement, and related standard piecewise polynomials as well as NURBS. In particular, our analysis gives a first contribution to adaptive BEM in the frame of isogeometric analysis (IGABEM), for which we formulate an adaptive algorithm which steers the local mesh-refinement and the multiplicity of the knots. Numerical experiments underline the theoretical findings and show that the proposed adaptive strategy leads to optimal convergence. PMID:26085698

  9. Adjoint Sensitivity Computations for an Embedded-Boundary Cartesian Mesh Method and CAD Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemec, Marian; Aftosmis,Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    Cartesian-mesh methods are perhaps the most promising approach for addressing the issues of flow solution automation for aerodynamic design problems. In these methods, the discretization of the wetted surface is decoupled from that of the volume mesh. This not only enables fast and robust mesh generation for geometry of arbitrary complexity, but also facilitates access to geometry modeling and manipulation using parametric Computer-Aided Design (CAD) tools. Our goal is to combine the automation capabilities of Cartesian methods with an eficient computation of design sensitivities. We address this issue using the adjoint method, where the computational cost of the design sensitivities, or objective function gradients, is esseutially indepeudent of the number of design variables. In previous work, we presented an accurate and efficient algorithm for the solution of the adjoint Euler equations discretized on Cartesian meshes with embedded, cut-cell boundaries. Novel aspects of the algorithm included the computation of surface shape sensitivities for triangulations based on parametric-CAD models and the linearization of the coupling between the surface triangulation and the cut-cells. The objective of the present work is to extend our adjoint formulation to problems involving general shape changes. Central to this development is the computation of volume-mesh sensitivities to obtain a reliable approximation of the objective finction gradient. Motivated by the success of mesh-perturbation schemes commonly used in body-fitted unstructured formulations, we propose an approach based on a local linearization of a mesh-perturbation scheme similar to the spring analogy. This approach circumvents most of the difficulties that arise due to non-smooth changes in the cut-cell layer as the boundary shape evolves and provides a consistent approximation tot he exact gradient of the discretized abjective function. A detailed gradient accurace study is presented to verify our approach

  10. Finite Element Solution of 1D Boundary Value Linear and Nonlinear Problems with Nonlocal Jump Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koleva, M. N.

    2007-10-01

    We consider stationary linear and nonlinear problems on non-connected layers with distinct material properties. A version of the finite element method (FEM) is used for discretization of the continuous problems. We formulate sufficient conditions under which we prove the discrete maximum principle and convergence of the numerical higher-order finite elements solution. Efficient algorithm for solution of the FEM algebraic equations is proposed. Numerical experiments are also discussed.

  11. Alternative formulations of the Laplace transform boundary element (LTBE) numerical method for the solution of diffusion-type equations

    SciTech Connect

    Moridis, G.

    1992-03-01

    The Laplace Transform Boundary Element (LTBE) method is a recently introduced numerical method, and has been used for the solution of diffusion-type PDEs. It completely eliminates the time dependency of the problem and the need for time discretization, yielding solutions numerical in space and semi-analytical in time. In LTBE solutions are obtained in the Laplace spare, and are then inverted numerically to yield the solution in time. The Stehfest and the DeHoog formulations of LTBE, based on two different inversion algorithms, are investigated. Both formulations produce comparable, extremely accurate solutions.

  12. A controllable canonical form implementation of time domain impedance boundary conditions for broadband aeroacoustic computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Siyang; Zhang, Xin; Huang, Xun

    2016-05-01

    A new method, which can be effectively and efficiently applied in the simulations of broadband noise problems, is proposed for time domain impedance boundary condition implementations by using the so-called controllable canonical form that is well known in linear system. Usually, the impedance boundary condition can be defined in frequency domain as a rational polynomial function with poles in the negative half of the complex plane to guarantee stability; otherwise, causality might be violated in the corresponding time domain implementation. To address this issue, various methodologies have been proposed previously that usually lead to complicated polynomials, whose numerical implementations are often indirect and intricate. The proposed method with a controllable canonical form, on the other hand, directly transforms the frequency domain transfer function (a quotient of rational polynomials) to an equivalent state space model, which consists of a series of first-order ordinary differential equations that can be numerically implemented in a straightforward way. The proposed method is demonstrated by using two benchmark problems: a two-dimensional Gaussian pulse propagating in a uniform flow with a lined wall and the test cases from the NASA Langley grazing incidence tube experiments. Good agreements demonstrate the potential of the proposed computational method.

  13. Accurate computation of surface stresses and forces with immersed boundary methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goza, Andres; Liska, Sebastian; Morley, Benjamin; Colonius, Tim

    2016-09-01

    Many immersed boundary methods solve for surface stresses that impose the velocity boundary conditions on an immersed body. These surface stresses may contain spurious oscillations that make them ill-suited for representing the physical surface stresses on the body. Moreover, these inaccurate stresses often lead to unphysical oscillations in the history of integrated surface forces such as the coefficient of lift. While the errors in the surface stresses and forces do not necessarily affect the convergence of the velocity field, it is desirable, especially in fluid-structure interaction problems, to obtain smooth and convergent stress distributions on the surface. To this end, we show that the equation for the surface stresses is an integral equation of the first kind whose ill-posedness is the source of spurious oscillations in the stresses. We also demonstrate that for sufficiently smooth delta functions, the oscillations may be filtered out to obtain physically accurate surface stresses. The filtering is applied as a post-processing procedure, so that the convergence of the velocity field is unaffected. We demonstrate the efficacy of the method by computing stresses and forces that converge to the physical stresses and forces for several test problems.

  14. Computation of crossing shock/turbulent boundary layer interaction at Mach 8.3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanswami, N.; Horstman, C. C.; Knight, D. D.

    1993-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) hypersonic crossing shock wave/turbulent boundary-layer interaction is examined numerically at Mach 8.3. The test geometry consists of a pair of opposing sharp fins of angle alpha = 15 deg, mounted on a flat plate. Two theoretical models are evaluated. The full (3D) Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations are solved using the Baldwin-Lomax and the Rodi (modified k-epsilon) turbulence models. Computed results for both cases show good agreement with experiment for flat plate surface pressure and for flowfield profiles of pitot pressure and yaw angle, indicating that the flowfield is primarily rotational and inviscid. Fair to poor agreement is obtained for surface heat transfer, indicating a need for more accurate turbulence models. The overall flowfield structure is similar to that observed in previous crossing shock interaction studies.

  15. Computer program for calculation of real gas turbulent boundary layers with variable edge entropy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boney, L. R.

    1974-01-01

    A user's manual for a computer program which calculates real gas turbulent boundary layers with variable edge entropy on a blunt cone or flat plate at zero angle of attack is presented. An integral method is used. The method includes the effect of real gas in thermodynamic equilibrium and variable edge entropy. A modified Crocco enthalpy velocity relationship is used for the enthalpy profiles and an empirical correlation of the N-power law profile is used for the velocity profile. The skin-friction-coefficient expressions of Spalding and Chi and Van Driest are used in the solution of the momentum equation and in the heat-transfer predictions that use several modified forms of Reynolds analogy.

  16. Assessment of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Models for Shock Boundary-Layer Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeBonis, James R.; Oberkampf, William L.; Wolf, Richard T.; Orkwis, Paul D.; Turner, Mark G.; Babinsky, Holger

    2011-01-01

    A workshop on the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) prediction of shock boundary-layer interactions (SBLIs) was held at the 48th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting. As part of the workshop numerous CFD analysts submitted solutions to four experimentally measured SBLIs. This paper describes the assessment of the CFD predictions. The assessment includes an uncertainty analysis of the experimental data, the definition of an error metric and the application of that metric to the CFD solutions. The CFD solutions provided very similar levels of error and in general it was difficult to discern clear trends in the data. For the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes methods the choice of turbulence model appeared to be the largest factor in solution accuracy. Large-eddy simulation methods produced error levels similar to RANS methods but provided superior predictions of normal stresses.

  17. Computation of a Synthetic Jet in a Turbulent Cross-Flow Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumsey, Christopher L.

    2004-01-01

    A series of unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes computations are performed for the flow of a synthetic jet issuing into a turbulent boundary layer through a circular orifice. This is one of the validation test cases from a synthetic jet validation workshop held in March 2004. Several numerical parameters are investigated, and the effects of three different turbulence models are explored. Both long-time-averaged and time-dependent phase-averaged results are compared to experiment. On the whole, qualitative comparisons of the mean flow quantities are fairly good. There are many differences evident in the quantitative comparisons. The calculations do not exhibit a strong dependence on the type of turbulence model employed.

  18. Fluid-dynamic computations on a connection machine - Preliminary timings and complex boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oran, Elaine S.; Boris, Jay P.; Brown, Eugene F.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the conversion and application of the explicit, time-dependent, fourth-order, phase-accurate, variable-grid flux-corrected transport module, LCPFCT, to the Connection Machine, a fine-grained SIMD parallel processor. Models developed are as similar to the production Cray codes as possible and include a variety of different realistic boundary conditions. Timing comparisons show that a 16K-processor Connection Machine allows computations at speeds up to a factor of seven faster than obtained on a Cray YMP for a functionally equivalent optimized, three-dimensional code. Test calculations of a two-dimensional exploding shock and a three-dimensional helically perturbed jet are described and discussed briefly.

  19. Computational optical palpation: micro-scale force mapping using finite-element methods (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijesinghe, Philip; Sampson, David D.; Kennedy, Brendan F.

    2016-03-01

    Accurate quantification of forces, applied to, or generated by, tissue, is key to understanding many biomechanical processes, fabricating engineered tissues, and diagnosing diseases. Many techniques have been employed to measure forces; in particular, tactile imaging - developed to spatially map palpation-mimicking forces - has shown potential in improving the diagnosis of cancer on the macro-scale. However, tactile imaging often involves the use of discrete force sensors, such as capacitive or piezoelectric sensors, whose spatial resolution is often limited to 1-2 mm. Our group has previously presented a type of tactile imaging, termed optical palpation, in which the change in thickness of a compliant layer in contact with tissue is measured using optical coherence tomography, and surface forces are extracted, with a micro-scale spatial resolution, using a one-dimensional spring model. We have also recently combined optical palpation with compression optical coherence elastography (OCE) to quantify stiffness. A main limitation of this work, however, is that a one-dimensional spring model is insufficient in describing the deformation of mechanically heterogeneous tissue with uneven boundaries, generating significant inaccuracies in measured forces. Here, we present a computational, finite-element method, which we term computational optical palpation. In this technique, by knowing the non-linear mechanical properties of the layer, and from only the axial component of displacement measured by phase-sensitive OCE, we can estimate, not only the axial forces, but the three-dimensional traction forces at the layer-tissue interface. We use a non-linear, three-dimensional model of deformation, which greatly increases the ability to accurately measure force and stiffness in complex tissues.

  20. An Atomistic Modeling Study of Alloying Element Impurity Element, and Transmutation Products on the cohesion of A Nickel E5 {l_brace}001{r_brace} Twist Grain Boundary

    SciTech Connect

    G.A. Young Jr.; R. Najafabadi; W. Strohmayer; D.G. Baldrey; B. Hamm; J. Harris; J. Sticht; E. Wimmer

    2003-06-16

    Atomistic modeling methods were employed to investigate the effects of impurity elements on the metallurgy, irradiation embrittlement, and environmentally assisted cracking of nickel-base alloys exposed to nuclear environments. Calculations were performed via ab initio atomistic modeling methods to ensure the accuracy and reliability of the results. A Griffith-type fracture criterion was used to quantitatively assess the effect of elements or element pairs on the grain boundary cohesive strength. In order of most embrittling to most strengthening, the elements are ranked as: He, Li, S, H, C, Zr, P, Fe, Mn, Nb, Cr, and B. Helium is strongly embrittling (-2.04 eV/atom lowering of the Griffith energy), phosphorus has little effect on the grain boundary (0.1 eV/atom), and boron offers appreciable strengthening (1.03 eV/atom increase in the Griffith energy). Calculations for pairs of elements (H-Li, H-B, H-C, H-P, and H-S) show little interaction on the grain boundary cohesive energy, so that for the conditions studied, linear superposition of elemental effects is a good approximation. These calculations help explain metallurgical effects (e.g. why boron can strengthen grain boundaries), irradiation embrittlement (e.g. how boron transmutation results in grain boundary embrittlement), as well as how grain boundary impurity elements can affect environmentally assisted cracking (i.e. low temperature crack propagation and stress corrosion cracking) of nickel-base alloys.

  1. Computer program for design of two-dimensional supersonic turbine rotor blades with boundary-layer correction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, L. J.; Scullin, V. J.

    1971-01-01

    A FORTRAN 4 computer program for the design of two-dimensional supersonic rotor blade sections corrected for boundary-layer displacement thickness is presented. The ideal rotor is designed by the method of characteristics to produce vortex flow within the blade passage. The boundary-layer parameters are calculated by Cohen and Reshotoko's method for laminar flow and Sasman and Cresci's method for turbulent flow. The program input consists essentially of the blade surface Mach number distribution and total flow conditions. The primary output is the corrected blade profile and the boundary-layer parameters.

  2. Computational discovery of regulatory elements in a continuous expression space

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Approaches for regulatory element discovery from gene expression data usually rely on clustering algorithms to partition the data into clusters of co-expressed genes. Gene regulatory sequences are then mined to find overrepresented motifs in each cluster. However, this ad hoc partition rarely fits the biological reality. We propose a novel method called RED2 that avoids data clustering by estimating motif densities locally around each gene. We show that RED2 detects numerous motifs not detected by clustering-based approaches, and that most of these correspond to characterized motifs. RED2 can be accessed online through a user-friendly interface. PMID:23186104

  3. FINITE ELEMENT MODELS FOR COMPUTING SEISMIC INDUCED SOIL PRESSURES ON DEEPLY EMBEDDED NUCLEAR POWER PLANT STRUCTURES.

    SciTech Connect

    XU, J.; COSTANTINO, C.; HOFMAYER, C.

    2006-06-26

    PAPER DISCUSSES COMPUTATIONS OF SEISMIC INDUCED SOIL PRESSURES USING FINITE ELEMENT MODELS FOR DEEPLY EMBEDDED AND OR BURIED STIFF STRUCTURES SUCH AS THOSE APPEARING IN THE CONCEPTUAL DESIGNS OF STRUCTURES FOR ADVANCED REACTORS.

  4. A Barrier-Only Boundary Element Delimits the Formation of Facultative Heterochromatin in Drosophila melanogaster and Vertebrates ▿

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Nianwei; Li, Xingguo; Cui, Kairong; Chepelev, Iouri; Tie, Feng; Liu, Bo; Li, Guangyao; Harte, Peter; Zhao, Keji; Huang, Suming; Zhou, Lei

    2011-01-01

    Formation of facultative heterochromatin at specific genomic loci is fundamentally important in defining cellular properties such as differentiation potential and responsiveness to developmental, physiological, and environmental stimuli. By the nature of their formation, heterochromatin and repressive histone marks propagate until the chain reaction is broken. While certain active promoters can block propagation of heterochromatin, there are also specialized DNA elements, referred to as chromatin barriers, that serve to demarcate the boundary of facultative heterochromatin formation. In this study, we identified a chromatin barrier that specifically limits the formation of repressive chromatin to a distal enhancer region so that repressive histone modifications cannot reach the promoter and promoter-proximal enhancer regions of reaper. Unlike all of the known boundary elements identified for Drosophila melanogaster, this IRER (irradiation-responsive enhancer region) left barrier (ILB) does not exhibit enhancer-blocking activity. Not only has the ILB been conserved in different Drosophila species, it can also function as an effective chromatin barrier in vertebrate cells. This suggests that the mechanism by which it functions to spatially restrict the formation of repressive chromatin marked by trimethylated H3K27 has also been conserved widely during evolution. PMID:21518956

  5. Computing the Evans function via solving a linear boundary value ODE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahl, Colin; Nguyen, Rose; Ventura, Nathaniel; Barker, Blake; Sandstede, Bjorn

    2015-11-01

    Determining the stability of traveling wave solutions to partial differential equations can oftentimes be computationally intensive but of great importance to understanding the effects of perturbations on the physical systems (chemical reactions, hydrodynamics, etc.) they model. For waves in one spatial dimension, one may linearize around the wave and form an Evans function - an analytic Wronskian-like function which has zeros that correspond in multiplicity to the eigenvalues of the linearized system. If eigenvalues with a positive real part do not exist, the traveling wave will be stable. Two methods exist for calculating the Evans function numerically: the exterior-product method and the method of continuous orthogonalization. The first is numerically expensive, and the second reformulates the originally linear system as a nonlinear system. We develop a new algorithm for computing the Evans function through appropriate linear boundary-value problems. This algorithm is cheaper than the previous methods, and we prove that it preserves analyticity of the Evans function. We also provide error estimates and implement it on some classical one- and two-dimensional systems, one being the Swift-Hohenberg equation in a channel, to show the advantages.

  6. Identification of topographic elements composition based on landform boundaries from radar interferometry segmentation (preliminary study on digital landform mapping)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widyatmanti, Wirastuti; Wicaksono, Ikhsan; Dinta Rahma Syam, Prima

    2016-06-01

    Dense vegetation that covers most landscapes in Indonesia becomes a common limitation in mapping the landforms in tropical region. This paper aims to examine the use of radar interferometry for landform mapping in tropical region; to examine the application of segmentation method to develop landform type boundaries; and to identify the topographic elements composition for each type of landform. Using Idrisi® and “eCognition ®” softwares, toposhape analysis, segmentation and multi-spectral classification were applied to identify the composition of topographic elements i.e. the types of land-cover from Landsat 8, elevation, slope, relief intensity and curvatures from SRTM (DEM). Visual interpretation on DEM and land-cover fusion imagery was conducted to derive basic control maps of landform and land-cover. The result shows that in segmentation method, shape and compactness levels are essential in obtaining land-cover, elevation, and slope class units to determine the most accurate class borders of each element. Despite a complex procedure applied in determining landform classification, the combination of topographic elements segmentation result presents a distinct border of each landform class. The comparison between landform maps derived from segmentation process and visual interpretation method demonstrates slight dissimilarities, meaning that multi-stage segmentation approach can improve and provide more effective digital landform mapping method in tropical region. Topographic elements on each type of landforms show distinctive composition key containing the percentage of each curvature elements per area unit. Supported by GIS programming and modeling in the future, this finding is significant in reducing effort in landform mapping using visual interpretation method for a very large coverage but in detail scale level.

  7. Implementation and efficiency analysis of an adaptive hp-finite element method for solving boundary value problems for the stationary reaction-diffusion equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolotareva, N. D.; Nikolaev, E. S.

    2016-05-01

    An iterative process implementing an adaptive hp-version of the finite element method (FEM) previously proposed by the authors for the approximate solution of boundary value problems for the stationary reaction-diffusion equation is described. The method relies on piecewise polynomial basis functions and makes use of an adaptive strategy for constructing a sequence of finite-dimensional subspaces based on the computation of correction indicators. Singularly perturbed boundary value test problems with smooth and not very smooth solutions are used to analyze the efficiency of the method in the situation when an approximate solution has to be found with high accuracy. The convergence of the approximate solution to the exact one is investigated depending on the value of the small parameter multiplying the highest derivative, on the family of basis functions and the quadrature formulas used, and on the internal parameters of the method. The method is compared with an adaptive h-version of FEM that also relies on correction indicators and with its nonadaptive variant based on the bisection of grid intervals.

  8. Computer modeling of batteries from non-linear circuit elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waaben, S.; Federico, J.; Moskowitz, I.

    1983-01-01

    A simple non-linear circuit model for battery behavior is given. It is based on time-dependent features of the well-known PIN change storage diode, whose behavior is described by equations similar to those associated with electrochemical cells. The circuit simulation computer program ADVICE was used to predict non-linear response from a topological description of the battery analog built from advice components. By a reasonable choice of one set of parameters, the circuit accurately simulates a wide spectrum of measured non-linear battery responses to within a few millivolts.

  9. Effectiveness of Multimedia Elements in Computer Supported Instruction: Analysis of Personalization Effects, Students' Performances and Costs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaidel, Mark; Luo, XiaoHui

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the efficiency of multimedia instruction at the college level by comparing the effectiveness of multimedia elements used in the computer supported learning with the cost of their preparation. Among the various technologies that advance learning, instructors and students generally identify interactive multimedia elements as…

  10. Adaptive finite element methods for two-dimensional problems in computational fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, J. B.; Bass, J. M.; Spradley, L. W.

    1994-01-01

    Some recent results obtained using solution-adaptive finite element methods in two-dimensional problems in linear elastic fracture mechanics are presented. The focus is on the basic issue of adaptive finite element methods for validating the new methodology by computing demonstration problems and comparing the stress intensity factors to analytical results.

  11. A computer program for anisotropic shallow-shell finite elements using symbolic integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andersen, C. M.; Bowen, J. T.

    1976-01-01

    A FORTRAN computer program for anisotropic shallow-shell finite elements with variable curvature is described. A listing of the program is presented together with printed output for a sample case. Computation times and central memory requirements are given for several different elements. The program is based on a stiffness (displacement) finite-element model in which the fundamental unknowns consist of both the displacement and the rotation components of the reference surface of the shell. Two triangular and four quadrilateral elements are implemented in the program. The triangular elements have 6 or 10 nodes, and the quadrilateral elements have 4 or 8 nodes. Two of the quadrilateral elements have internal degrees of freedom associated with displacement modes which vanish along the edges of the elements (bubble modes). The triangular elements and the remaining two quadrilateral elements do not have bubble modes. The output from the program consists of arrays corresponding to the stiffness, the geometric stiffness, the consistent mass, and the consistent load matrices for individual elements. The integrals required for the generation of these arrays are evaluated by using symbolic (or analytic) integration in conjunction with certain group-theoretic techniques. The analytic expressions for the integrals are exact and were developed using the symbolic and algebraic manipulation language.

  12. Computation of vibration mode elastic-rigid and effective weight coefficients from finite-element computer program output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, R.

    1991-01-01

    Post-processing algorithms are given to compute the vibratory elastic-rigid coupling matrices and the modal contributions to the rigid-body mass matrices and to the effective modal inertias and masses. Recomputation of the elastic-rigid coupling matrices for a change in origin is also described. A computational example is included. The algorithms can all be executed by using standard finite-element program eigenvalue analysis output with no changes to existing code or source programs.

  13. The direct and indirect measurement of boundary stress and drag on individual and complex arrays of elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinoco, Rafael O.; Cowen, Edwin A.

    2013-04-01

    Motivated by the study of drag on plant canopies, a novel non-intrusive drag measurement device was developed—its design, calibration, and validation are presented. The device is based on isolating a region of a test facility, a section of the bed of an open channel flume in the present case, from the facility itself. The drag plate, sufficiently large to allow for spatial averaging over multiple elements, is constrained to move on essentially frictionless rails in the direction of flow, and the force applied to the plate by the interaction of objects on the plate with the flow is monitored. In contrast to force balances used in wind tunnels, our design allows for easy mounting of multiple elements on different configurations, it holds large vertical loads with negligible effect to the horizontal forces measured, does not require intrusive frames to hold the elements within the flow, all of its components are externally located at the bottom of the flume, providing immediate access for adjustments, and the mounted load cell is easily interchangeable to increase the measurement dynamic range without system modifications. The measurement of two canonical, well-studied cases is used to validate the drag plate approach: drag induced by a turbulent boundary layer and the drag on a rigid cylinder. A third series of experiments, flow through arrays of rigid cylinders, is presented to show the applicability of the drag plate on more complex flows. The experimental results confirm the drag plate approach to be suitable for the accurate direct measurement of drag on simple and complex arrays of objects, which makes it ideal for studies of vegetated flows, natural rough boundary layers, coastal structures, and urban canopies, just to name a few possibilities.

  14. Computational Investigation of a Boundary-Layer Ingesting Propulsion System for the Common Research Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blumenthal, Brennan T.; Elmiligui, Alaa; Geiselhart, Karl A.; Campbell, Richard L.; Maughmer, Mark D.; Schmitz, Sven

    2016-01-01

    The present paper examines potential propulsive and aerodynamic benefits of integrating a Boundary-Layer Ingestion (BLI) propulsion system into a typical commercial aircraft using the Common Research Model (CRM) geometry and the NASA Tetrahedral Unstructured Software System (TetrUSS). The Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) environment is used to generate engine conditions for CFD analysis. Improvements to the BLI geometry are made using the Constrained Direct Iterative Surface Curvature (CDISC) design method. Previous studies have shown reductions of up to 25% in terms of propulsive power required for cruise for other axisymmetric geometries using the BLI concept. An analysis of engine power requirements, drag, and lift coefficients using the baseline and BLI geometries coupled with the NPSS model are shown. Potential benefits of the BLI system relating to cruise propulsive power are quantified using a power balance method, and a comparison to the baseline case is made. Iterations of the BLI geometric design are shown and any improvements between subsequent BLI designs presented. Simulations are conducted for a cruise flight condition of Mach 0.85 at an altitude of 38,500 feet and an angle of attack of 2 deg for all geometries. A comparison between available wind tunnel data, previous computational results, and the original CRM model is presented for model verification purposes along with full results for BLI power savings. Results indicate a 14.4% reduction in engine power requirements at cruise for the BLI configuration over the baseline geometry. Minor shaping of the aft portion of the fuselage using CDISC has been shown to increase the benefit from Boundary-Layer Ingestion further, resulting in a 15.6% reduction in power requirements for cruise as well as a drag reduction of eighteen counts over the baseline geometry.

  15. A computational transonic flutter boundary tracking procedure. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallman, J. W.; Batina, J. T.; Yang, T. Y.

    1986-01-01

    An automated flutter boundary tracking procedure for the efficient calculation of transonic flutter boundaries is presented. The procedure uses aeroelastic responses to march along the boundary by taking steps in speed and Mach number, thereby reducing the number of response calculations previously required to determine a transonic flutter boundary. Flutter boundary results are presented for a typical airfoil section oscillating with pitch and plunge degrees of freedom. These transonic flutter boundaries are in good agreement with exact boundaries calculated using the conventional time-marching method. The tracking procedure is extended to include static aeroelastic twist as a simulation of the static deformation of a wing and contains all of the essential features that are required to apply it to practical three-dimensional cases. The procedure is also applied to flutter boundaries as a function of structural parameters.

  16. Advanced development of the boundary element method for elastic and inelastic thermal stress analysis. Ph.D. Thesis, 1987 Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, Donald P., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The focus of this dissertation is on advanced development of the boundary element method for elastic and inelastic thermal stress analysis. New formulations for the treatment of body forces and nonlinear effects are derived. These formulations, which are based on particular integral theory, eliminate the need for volume integrals or extra surface integrals to account for these effects. The formulations are presented for axisymmetric, two and three dimensional analysis. Also in this dissertation, two dimensional and axisymmetric formulations for elastic and inelastic, inhomogeneous stress analysis are introduced. The derivatives account for inhomogeneities due to spatially dependent material parameters, and thermally induced inhomogeneities. The nonlinear formulation of the present work are based on an incremental initial stress approach. Two inelastic solutions algorithms are implemented: an iterative; and a variable stiffness type approach. The Von Mises yield criterion with variable hardening and the associated flow rules are adopted in these algorithms. All formulations are implemented in a general purpose, multi-region computer code with the capability of local definition of boundary conditions. Quadratic, isoparametric shape functions are used to model the geometry and field variables of the boundary (and domain) of the problem. The multi-region implementation permits a body to be modeled in substructured parts, thus dramatically reducing the cost of analysis. Furthermore, it allows a body consisting of regions of different (homogeneous) material to be studied. To test the program, results obtained for simple test cases are checked against their analytic solutions. Thereafter, a range of problems of practical interest are analyzed. In addition to displacement and traction loads, problems with body forces due to self-weight, centrifugal, and thermal loads are considered.

  17. Modeling of Rolling Element Bearing Mechanics: Computer Program Updates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, S. G.

    1997-01-01

    The Rolling Element Bearing Analysis System (REBANS) extends the capability available with traditional quasi-static bearing analysis programs by including the effects of bearing race and support flexibility. This tool was developed under contract for NASA-MSFC. The initial version delivered at the close of the contract contained several errors and exhibited numerous convergence difficulties. The program has been modified in-house at MSFC to correct the errors and greatly improve the convergence. The modifications consist of significant changes in the problem formulation and nonlinear convergence procedures. The original approach utilized sequential convergence for nested loops to achieve final convergence. This approach proved to be seriously deficient in robustness. Convergence was more the exception than the rule. The approach was changed to iterate all variables simultaneously. This approach has the advantage of using knowledge of the effect of each variable on each other variable (via the system Jacobian) when determining the incremental changes. This method has proved to be quite robust in its convergence. This technical memorandum documents the changes required for the original Theoretical Manual and User's Manual due to the new approach.

  18. A new hybrid transfinite element computational methodology for applicability to conduction/convection/radiation heat transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tamma, Kumar K.; Railkar, Sudhir B.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes new and recent advances in the development of a hybrid transfinite element computational methodology for applicability to conduction/convection/radiation heat transfer problems. The transfinite element methodology, while retaining the modeling versatility of contemporary finite element formulations, is based on application of transform techniques in conjunction with classical Galerkin schemes and is a hybrid approach. The purpose of this paper is to provide a viable hybrid computational methodology for applicability to general transient thermal analysis. Highlights and features of the methodology are described and developed via generalized formulations and applications to several test problems. The proposed transfinite element methodology successfully provides a viable computational approach and numerical test problems validate the proposed developments for conduction/convection/radiation thermal analysis.

  19. Computed tomography-based finite element analysis to assess fracture risk and osteoporosis treatment

    PubMed Central

    Imai, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Finite element analysis (FEA) is a computer technique of structural stress analysis and developed in engineering mechanics. FEA has developed to investigate structural behavior of human bones over the past 40 years. When the faster computers have acquired, better FEA, using 3-dimensional computed tomography (CT) has been developed. This CT-based finite element analysis (CT/FEA) has provided clinicians with useful data. In this review, the mechanism of CT/FEA, validation studies of CT/FEA to evaluate accuracy and reliability in human bones, and clinical application studies to assess fracture risk and effects of osteoporosis medication are overviewed. PMID:26309819

  20. Acceleration of computer-generated hologram by Greatly Reduced Array of Processor Element with Data Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiyama, Atsushi; Masuda, Nobuyuki; Oikawa, Minoru; Okada, Naohisa; Kakue, Takashi; Shimobaba, Tomoyoshi; Ito, Tomoyoshi

    2014-11-01

    We have implemented a computer-generated hologram (CGH) calculation on Greatly Reduced Array of Processor Element with Data Reduction (GRAPE-DR) processors. The cost of CGH calculation is enormous, but CGH calculation is well suited to parallel computation. The GRAPE-DR is a multicore processor that has 512 processor elements. The GRAPE-DR supports a double-precision floating-point operation and can perform CGH calculation with high accuracy. The calculation speed of the GRAPE-DR system is seven times faster than that of a personal computer with an Intel Core i7-950 processor.

  1. Boundary effects on backscattering by a solid aluminum cylinder: experiment and finite element model comparisons (L).

    PubMed

    La Follett, Jon R; Williams, Kevin L; Marston, Philip L

    2011-08-01

    Backscattering of sound by a solid aluminum cylinder was measured in the free field and with the cylinder near a flat surface. The target was suspended just below the surface of a water tank to simulate some aspects of backscattering when resting on the seabed. Measurements were compared with predictions made by an approximate hybrid approach based on multiple two-dimensional finite element calculations and the use of images. Many of the spectral features present in the tank data were present in the model. Comparing numerical model predictions with experimental data serves to build credibility for the modeling approach and can assist in developing insight into the underlying physical processes. PMID:21877778

  2. Effects of periodic boundary conditions on equilibrium properties of computer simulated fluids. II. Application to simple liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt, Lawrence R.; Haan, Steven W.

    1981-02-01

    The theory of the previous paper is used to predict anomalous size effects observed for computer simulated liquid Ar. The theoretical results for the boundary condition induced anisotropy of two-particle correlations are found to be large, and in excellent agreement with the computer experimental data of Mandell for densities near the Ar triple point density. The agreement is less good at higher densities.

  3. GRID3C: Computer program for generation of C type multilevel, three dimensional and boundary conforming periodic grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulikravich, D. S.

    1982-01-01

    A fast computer program, GRID3C, was developed for accurately generating periodic, boundary conforming, three dimensional, consecutively refined computational grids applicable to realistic axial turbomachinery geometries. The method is based on using two functions to generate two dimensional grids on a number of coaxial axisymmetric surfaces positioned between the centerbody and the outer radial boundary. These boundary fitted grids are of the C type and are characterized by quasi-orthogonality and geometric periodicity. The built in nonorthogonal coordinate stretchings and shearings cause the grid clustering in the regions of interest. The stretching parameters are part of the input to GRID3C. In its present version GRID3C can generate and store a maximum of four consecutively refined three dimensional grids. The output grid coordinates can be calculated either in the Cartesian or in the cylindrical coordinate system.

  4. Computation of unsteady turbulent boundary layers with flow reversal and evaluation of two separate turbulence models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cebeci, T.; Carr, L. W.

    1981-01-01

    A procedure which solves the governing boundary layer equations within Keller's box method was developed for calculating unsteady laminar flows with flow reversal. This method is extended to turbulent boundary layers with flow reversal. Test cases are used to investigate the proposition that unsteady turbulent boundary layers also remain free of singularities. Turbulent flow calculations are performed. The governing equations for both models are solved. As in laminar flows, the unsteady turbulent boundary layers are free from singularities, but there is a clear indication of rapid thickening of the boundary layer with increasing flow reversal. Predictions of both turbulence models are the same for all practical purposes.

  5. Effect of segregated elements on the interactions between twin boundaries and screw dislocations in Mg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Takashi; Yuasa, Motohiro; Mabuchi, Mamoru; Chino, Yasumasa

    2015-07-01

    Interactions of { 10 1 ¯ 2 } and { 10 1 ¯ 1 } twin boundaries (TBs), segregated by X (X = Sc, Y, or Nd), with screw partial dislocations were simulated using molecular dynamics (MD). In addition, mechanical tests were carried out on pure Mg and Mg-Y alloy. The MD simulation results suggested that the dislocations passed through the { 10 1 ¯ 2 } TB in all the models and that the shear strains for transmission in the Mg-X models were larger than that in the pure Mg model; in particular, the shear strain in the Mg-Y model was the largest. This corresponded to the experimental result that strain hardening was enhanced by Y addition. For interactions of a { 10 1 ¯ 1 } TB, some segregated atoms induced the emission of dislocations from the TB, whereas other segregated atoms locked the dislocation absorbed in the TB. As a result, the interaction behaviors of the { 10 1 ¯ 1 } TB were divided into five patterns. The interactions of this TB could be explained by the criterion of energy variations, as well as the interactions, of the { 10 1 ¯ 2 } TB, although segregation complicated the interactions of the { 10 1 ¯ 1 } TB.

  6. Effect of element Re on the grain boundary cohesion of α-Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zheng-Zheng; Wang, Chong-Yu

    2006-03-01

    The effect of Re segregation on the α-Fe Σ5 [001] (010) grain boundary (GB) is investigated by using a software called DMol and discrete variational method (DVM). Based on the Rice-Wang model, the calculated segregation energy and defect formation energy show that Re is a strong cohesive enhancer. We also calculated the interatomic energy (IE) and bond order (BO) of several atomic pairs to investigate the mechanism of the cohesive effect of Re microscopically and locally. The results show that IEs of atomic pairs formed by those atoms which cross the plane of GB are strengthened due to the segregation of Re, while the BOs of the corresponding pairs are slightly decreased. This discrepancy demonstrates that IE which contains the Hamiltonian of interaction between atoms is a good quantity to describe the bonding strength. The analysis suggests that the electronic effect between atomic pair which comes directly from Hamiltonian is the key factor. The charge density is also presented and the result indicates that the bonding strength between the Fe atoms on the GB is enhanced due to the segregation of Re, which is consistent with the analysis of IE.

  7. Molecular Computing And The Chemical Elements Of Logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Forrest L.

    1986-02-01

    Future developments in molecular electronicsi-b not only offer the possibility of high density archival memories, 1015 to 1018 gates/cc, but also new routes to fabrication of high levels of parallel processors (> 106) and hence to new computer architectures. A central theme of molecular electronics is that information can be stored as conformational changes in chemical moieties or functional groups. Further, these functional units are chosen or designed so that their structure facilitates the storage of information via reversible conformational changes, either in bond distances or in bond angles, or both. In exploring possible switching and information storage mechanisms at the molecular-size level, it has become apparent that there are many analogues or alternatives possible for any logical function which might be desired. It is even more exciting to realize that some structural chemical units or configurations offer completely new functional or logical capabilities. The example offered below is the molecular analogue of the CASE statement in PASCAL (proposed by an NRL summer student employee7). As suggested in the title, one of the purposes of this article is to enhance the appreciation of the universality of the 'chemical' or 'molecular' systems to express logical functions. The literature on molecular electronic concepts is growing and some reviews are available1-4. Two Molecular Electronic Device (MED) workshops5-6 have been held in Washington, D.C. (1981 and 1983) and an International Symposium on Bioelectric and Molecular Electronic Devices 8 was held in Tokyo, 20-21 November 1985. Beyond the strong interest current in Japan9, interest is also developing in England and Soviet block11.

  8. Mixing characteristics of injector elements in liquid rocket engines - A computational study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lohr, Jonathan C.; Trinh, Huu P.

    1992-01-01

    A computational study has been performed to better understand the mixing characteristics of liquid rocket injector elements. Variations in injector geometry as well as differences in injector element inlet flow conditions are among the areas examined in the study. Most results involve the nonreactive mixing of gaseous fuel with gaseous oxidizer but preliminary results are included that involve the spray combustion of oxidizer droplets. The purpose of the study is to numerically predict flowfield behavior in individual injector elements to a high degree of accuracy and in doing so to determine how various injector element properties affect the flow.

  9. COMGEN: A computer program for generating finite element models of composite materials at the micro level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melis, Matthew E.

    1990-01-01

    COMGEN (Composite Model Generator) is an interactive FORTRAN program which can be used to create a wide variety of finite element models of continuous fiber composite materials at the micro level. It quickly generates batch or session files to be submitted to the finite element pre- and postprocessor PATRAN based on a few simple user inputs such as fiber diameter and percent fiber volume fraction of the composite to be analyzed. In addition, various mesh densities, boundary conditions, and loads can be assigned easily to the models within COMGEN. PATRAN uses a session file to generate finite element models and their associated loads which can then be translated to virtually any finite element analysis code such as NASTRAN or MARC.

  10. Comparison of GEOS-5 AGCM Planetary Boundary Layer Depths Computed with Various Definitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgrath-Spangler, E. L.; Molod, A.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate models of planetary boundary layer (PBL) processes are important for forecasting weather and climate. The present study compares seven methods of calculating PBL depth in the GEOS-5 atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) over land. These methods depend on the eddy diffusion coefficients, bulk and local Richardson numbers, and the turbulent kinetic energy. The computed PBL depths are aggregated to the Koppen climate classes, and some limited comparisons are made using radiosonde profiles. Most methods produce similar midday PBL depths, although in the warm, moist climate classes, the bulk Richardson number method gives midday results that are lower than those given by the eddy diffusion coefficient methods. Additional analysis revealed that methods sensitive to turbulence driven by radiative cooling produce greater PBL depths, this effect being most significant during the evening transition. Nocturnal PBLs based on Richardson number are generally shallower than eddy diffusion coefficient based estimates. The bulk Richardson number estimate is recommended as the PBL height to inform the choice of the turbulent length scale, based on the similarity to other methods during the day, and the improved nighttime behavior.

  11. Computer program BL2D for solving two-dimensional and axisymmetric boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iyer, Venkit

    1995-01-01

    This report presents the formulation, validation, and user's manual for the computer program BL2D. The program is a fourth-order-accurate solution scheme for solving two-dimensional or axisymmetric boundary layers in speed regimes that range from low subsonic to hypersonic Mach numbers. A basic implementation of the transition zone and turbulence modeling is also included. The code is a result of many improvements made to the program VGBLP, which is described in NASA TM-83207 (February 1982), and can effectively supersede it. The code BL2D is designed to be modular, user-friendly, and portable to any machine with a standard fortran77 compiler. The report contains the new formulation adopted and the details of its implementation. Five validation cases are presented. A detailed user's manual with the input format description and instructions for running the code is included. Adequate information is presented in the report to enable the user to modify or customize the code for specific applications.

  12. Computer program BL2D for solving two-dimensional and axisymmetric boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, Venkit

    1995-05-01

    This report presents the formulation, validation, and user's manual for the computer program BL2D. The program is a fourth-order-accurate solution scheme for solving two-dimensional or axisymmetric boundary layers in speed regimes that range from low subsonic to hypersonic Mach numbers. A basic implementation of the transition zone and turbulence modeling is also included. The code is a result of many improvements made to the program VGBLP, which is described in NASA TM-83207 (February 1982), and can effectively supersede it. The code BL2D is designed to be modular, user-friendly, and portable to any machine with a standard fortran77 compiler. The report contains the new formulation adopted and the details of its implementation. Five validation cases are presented. A detailed user's manual with the input format description and instructions for running the code is included. Adequate information is presented in the report to enable the user to modify or customize the code for specific applications.

  13. A new magneto-cardiogram study using a vector model with a virtual heart and the boundary element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chen; Shou, Guo-Fa; Lu, Hong; Hua, Ning; Tang, Xue-Zheng; Xia, Ling; Ma, Ping; Tang, Fa-Kuan

    2013-09-01

    A cardiac vector model is presented and verified, and then the forward problem for cardiac magnetic fields and electric potential are discussed based on this model and the realistic human torso volume conductor model, including lungs. A torso—cardiac vector model is used for a 12-lead electrocardiographic (ECG) and magneto-cardiogram (MCG) simulation study by using the boundary element method (BEM). Also, we obtain the MCG wave picture using a compound four-channel HTc·SQUID system in a magnetically shielded room. By comparing the simulated results and experimental results, we verify the cardiac vector model and then do a preliminary study of the forward problem of MCG and ECG. Therefore, the results show that the vector model is reasonable in cardiac electrophysiology.

  14. A musculo-mechanical model of esophageal transport based on an immersed boundary-finite element approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kou, Wenjun; Griffith, Boyce E.; Pandolfino, John E.; Kahrilas, Peter J.; Patankar, Neelesh A.

    2015-11-01

    This work extends a fiber-based immersed boundary (IB) model of esophageal transport by incorporating a continuum model of the deformable esophageal wall. The continuum-based esophagus model adopts finite element approach that is capable of describing more complex and realistic material properties and geometries. The leakage from mismatch between Lagrangian and Eulerian meshes resulting from large deformations of the esophageal wall is avoided by careful choice of interaction points. The esophagus model, which is described as a multi-layered, fiber-reinforced nonlinear elastic material, is coupled to bolus and muscle-activation models using the IB approach to form the esophageal transport model. Cases of esophageal transport with different esophagus models are studied. Results on the transport characteristics, including pressure field and esophageal wall kinematics and stress, are analyzed and compared. Support from NIH grant R01 DK56033 and R01 DK079902 is gratefully acknowledged. BEG is supported by NSF award ACI 1460334.

  15. Loading and Boundary Condition Influences in a Poroelastic Finite Element Model of Cartilage Stresses in a Triaxial Compression Bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Kallemeyn, Nicole A; Grosland, Nicole M; Pedersen, Doug R; Martin, James A; Brown, Thomas D

    2006-01-01

    Background: We developed a poroelastic finite element (FE) model of cartilage in dynamic triaxial compression to parametrically analyze the effects of loading and boundary conditions on a baseline model. Conventional mechanical tests on articular cartilage such as confined and unconfined compression, indentation, etc., do not fully allow for modulation of compression and shear at physiological levels whereas triaxial compression does. A Triaxial Compression Bioreactor, or TRIAX, has been developed to study chondrocyte responses to multi-axial stress conditions under cyclic loading. In the triaxial setting, however, a cartilage explant's physical testing environment departs from the ideal homogeneous stress state that would occur from strict linear superposition of the applied axial and transverse pressure. Method of Approach: An axisymmetric poroelastic FE model of a cartilage explant (4 mm diameter, 1.5 mm thick) in cyclic triaxial compression was created. Axial and transverse loads (2 MPa at 1 Hz.) were applied via a platen and containment sheath. Parameters of interest included the rise time and magnitude of the applied load, in addition to the containment sheath modulus and the friction coefficient at the cartilage/platen interfaces. Metrics of interest in addition to whole explant axial strain included axial (surface normal) stress, shear stress, pore pressure, and the fluid load carriage fraction within the explant. Results: Strain results were compared to experimental data from explants tested in the TRIAX under conditions similar to the baseline model. Explant biomechanics varied considerably over numbers of load cycles and parameter values. Cyclic loading caused an increase in accumulated strain for the various loading and boundary conditions. Conclusions: Unlike what would be expected from linear superposition of the homogeneous stresses from the applied axial and transverse pressure, we have shown that the stress state within the TRIAX is considerably

  16. Finite element solution of double-diffusive boundary layer flow of viscoelastic nanofluids over a stretching sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyal, M.; Bhargava, R.

    2014-05-01

    This paper deals with the double-diffusive boundary layer flow of non-Newtonian nanofluid over a stretching sheet. In this model, where binary nanofluid is used, the Brownian motion and thermophoresis are classified as the main mechanisms which are responsible for the enhancement of the convection features of the nanofluid. The boundary layer equations governed by the partial differential equations are transformed into a set of ordinary differential equations with the help of group theory transformations. The variational finite element method (FEM) is used to solve these ordinary differential equations. We have examined the effects of different controlling parameters, namely, the Brownian motion parameter, the thermophoresis parameter, modified Dufour number, viscoelastic parameter, Prandtl number, regular Lewis number, Dufour Lewis number, and nanofluid Lewis number on the flow field and heat transfer characteristics. Graphical display of the numerical examine are performed to illustrate the influence of various flow parameters on the velocity, temperature, concentration, reduced Nusselt, reduced Sherwood and reduced nanofluid Sherwood number distributions. The present study has many applications in coating and suspensions, movement of biological fluids, cooling of metallic plate, melt-spinning, heat exchangers technology, and oceanography.

  17. An Immersed Boundary Finite-Element Solver for Flow-Induced Deformation of Soft Structures with Application in Cardiac Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhardwaj, Rajneesh; Mittal, Rajat

    2011-11-01

    The modeling of complex biological phenomena such as cardiac mechanics is challenging. It involves complex three dimensional geometries, moving structure boundaries inside the fluid domain and large flow-induced deformations of the structure. We present a fluid-structure interaction solver (FSI) which couples a sharp-interface immersed boundary method for flow simulation with a powerful finite-element based structure dynamics solver. An implicit partitioned (or segregated) approach is implemented to ensure the stability of the solver. We validate the FSI solver with published benchmark for a configuration which involves a thin elastic plate attached to a rigid cylinder. The frequency and amplitude of the oscillations of the plate are in good agreement with published results and non-linear dynamics of the plate and its coupling with the flow field are discussed. The FSI solver is used to understand left-ventricular hemodynamics and flow-induced dynamics of mitral leaflets during early diastolic filling and results from this study are presented.

  18. Identification of the Thermal Conductivity and Heat Capacity in Unsteady Nonlinear Heat Conduction Problems Using the Boundary Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesnic, D.; Elliott, L.; Ingham, D. B.

    1996-07-01

    In this study the inverse problem of the identification of temperature dependent thermal properties of a heat conducting body is investigated. The solution of the corresponding direct problem is obtained using a time marching boundary element method (BEM), which allows, without any need of interpolation and solution domain discretisation, efficient and accurate evaluation of the temperature everywhere inside the space-time dependent domain. Since the inverse problem, which requires the determination of the thermal conductivity and heat capacity from a finite set of temperature measurements taken inside the body, possesses poor uniqueness features, additional information is achieved by assuming that the thermal properties belong to a set of polynomials. Thus the inverse problem reduces to a parameter system estimation problem which is solved using the nonlinear least-squares method. Convergent and stable numerical results are obtained for the finite set of parameters which characterise the thermal properties for various test examples. Once the thermal properties are accurately obtained then the BEM determines automatically the temperature inside the solution domain and the remaining unspecified boundary values and the numerically obtained results show good agreement with the corresponding analytical solutions.

  19. Implementation of a boundary element method to solve for the near field effects of an array of WECs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oskamp, J. A.; Ozkan-Haller, H. T.

    2010-12-01

    When Wave Energy Converters (WECs) are installed, they affect the shoreline wave climate by removing some of the wave energy which would have reached the shore. Before large WEC projects are launched, it is important to understand the potential coastal impacts of these installations. The high cost associated with ocean scale testing invites the use of hydrodynamic models to play a major role in estimating these effects. In this study, a wave structure interaction program (WAMIT) is used to model an array of WECs. The program predicts the wave field throughout the array using a boundary element method to solve the potential flow fluid problem, taking into account the incident waves, the power dissipated, and the way each WEC moves and interacts with the others. This model is appropriate for a small domain near the WEC array in order to resolve the details in the interactions, but not extending to the coastline (where the far-field effects must be assessed). To propagate these effects to the coastline, the waves leaving this small domain will be used as boundary conditions for a larger model domain which will assess the shoreline effects caused by the array. The immediate work is concerned with setting up the WAMIT model for a small array of point absorbers. A 1:33 scale lab test is planned and will provide data to validate the WAMIT model on this small domain before it is nested with the larger domain to estimate shoreline effects.

  20. Wall-drag measurements of smooth- and rough-wall turbulent boundary layers using a floating element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baars, W. J.; Squire, D. T.; Talluru, K. M.; Abbassi, M. R.; Hutchins, N.; Marusic, I.

    2016-05-01

    The mean wall shear stress, overline{τ }_w, is a fundamental variable for characterizing turbulent boundary layers. Ideally, overline{τ }_w is measured by a direct means and the use of floating elements has long been proposed. However, previous such devices have proven to be problematic due to low signal-to-noise ratios. In this paper, we present new direct measurements of overline{τ }_w where high signal-to-noise ratios are achieved using a new design of a large-scale floating element with a surface area of 3 m (streamwise) × 1 m (spanwise). These dimensions ensure a strong measurement signal, while any error associated with an integral measurement of overline{τ }_w is negligible in Melbourne's large-scale turbulent boundary layer facility. Wall-drag induced by both smooth- and rough-wall zero-pressure-gradient flows are considered. Results for the smooth-wall friction coefficient, C_f ≡ overline{τ }_w/q_{∞}, follow a Coles-Fernholz relation C_f = [ 1/κ ln ( Re_{θ }) + C] ^{-2} to within 3 % (κ = 0.38 and C = 3.7) for a momentum thickness-based Reynolds number, Re_{θ } > 15{,}000. The agreement improves for higher Reynolds numbers to <1 % deviation for Re_{θ } > 38{,}000. This smooth-wall benchmark verification of the experimental apparatus is critical before attempting any rough-wall studies. For a rough-wall configuration with P36 grit sandpaper, measurements were performed for 10{,}500< Re_{θ } < 88{,}500, for which the wall-drag indicates the anticipated trend from the transitionally to the fully rough regime.

  1. Rare earth elements in pore waters from Cabo Friós western boundary upwelling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smoak, J. M.; Silva-Filho, E. V.; Rousseau, T.; Albuquerque, A. L.; Caldeira, P. P.; Moreira, M.

    2015-12-01

    Rare earth elements (REE) are a group of reactive trace elements in aqueous media, they have a coherent chemical behavior with however a subtle and gradual shift in physicochemical properties allowing their use as tracers of sources and processes. Uncertainties on their oceanic inputs and outputs still remains [Arsouze et al., 2009; Siddall et al., 2008; Tachikawa et al., 2003]. The water-sediment interface were early on identified as a relevant REE source due to the high distribution coefficient between sediments and pore waters [Elderfield and Sholkovitz, 1987] and substantially higher concentration then the water column [Abbott et al., 2015; Haley et al., 2004; Sholkovitz et al., 1989; Soyol-Erdene and Huh, 2013]. Here we present a cross shelf transect of 4 short pore waters REE profiles on a 680 km2 mud bank located in the region of Cabo Frio, Brazil. This study reveals similar trends at the four sites: a REE production zone reflected by a maximum in concentration at the top of the sediment evolving with depth toward a REE consumption zone reflected by a minimum in REE concentrations. PAAS normalized patterns shows 1) a progressive depletion in LREE with depth with HREE/LREE ratios comprised between 1.1 and 1.6 in the 2 first centimeters evolving gradually to ratios comprised between 2.8 and 4.7 above 7 cm 2) A sharp gradient in negative Ce anomaly with Ce/Ce* values reaching 0.3. With maximum Nd concentrations comprised between 780 and 1200 pmol.kg and considering that seawater Nd concentrations of Brazilian shelf bottom waters are comprised between 24 and 50 pmol.Kg-1 we apply the Fick´s First Law of diffusion and estimate that 340 +/- 90 nmol. m-2 Y-1 of Nd is released in the Cabo frio´s mudbank. This flux is in the same order of magnitude of recent estimates by [Abbott et al., 2015] in the slope of Oregon´s margin. Unraveling processes responsible for the REE production zone will help to refine the global REE fluxes estimates.

  2. Dynamic recycling of gaseous elemental mercury in the boundary layer of the Antarctic Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dommergue, A.; Barret, M.; Courteaud, J.; Cristofanelli, P.; Ferrari, C. P.; Gallée, H.

    2012-07-01

    Gaseous elemental mercury (Hg(0)) was investigated in the troposphere and in the interstitial air extracted from the snow at Dome Concordia station (alt. 3320 m) on the Antarctic Plateau during January 2009. Measurements showed evidence of a very dynamic and daily cycling of Hg(0) inside the mixing layer with a range of values from 0.2 ng m-3 up to 2.3 ng m-3. During low solar irradiation periods, fast Hg(0) oxidation processes in a confined layer were observed leading to an enrichment of the upper snow layers in divalent Hg. Unexpectedly high Hg(0) concentrations for such a remote place were measured under higher solar irradiation due to the reemission of Hg(0) by the snowpack via photochemical reactions. Hg(0) concentrations showed a negative correlation with ozone mixing ratios, which contrasts with atmospheric mercury depletion events observed during the Arctic spring. It remains unclear whether halogens are involved in Hg(0) oxidation. We suggest that snow surfaces may play a role in promoting the heterogeneous oxidation of Hg(0). The cycling of other oxidants should be investigated together with Hg in order to clarify the complex reactivity on the Antarctic Plateau.

  3. Development of an hp-version finite element method for computational optimal control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, Dewey H.; Warner, Michael S.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this research effort was to begin the study of the application of hp-version finite elements to the numerical solution of optimal control problems. Under NAG-939, the hybrid MACSYMA/FORTRAN code GENCODE was developed which utilized h-version finite elements to successfully approximate solutions to a wide class of optimal control problems. In that code the means for improvement of the solution was the refinement of the time-discretization mesh. With the extension to hp-version finite elements, the degrees of freedom include both nodal values and extra interior values associated with the unknown states, co-states, and controls, the number of which depends on the order of the shape functions in each element. One possible drawback is the increased computational effort within each element required in implementing hp-version finite elements. We are trying to determine whether this computational effort is sufficiently offset by the reduction in the number of time elements used and improved Newton-Raphson convergence so as to be useful in solving optimal control problems in real time. Because certain of the element interior unknowns can be eliminated at the element level by solving a small set of nonlinear algebraic equations in which the nodal values are taken as given, the scheme may turn out to be especially powerful in a parallel computing environment. A different processor could be assigned to each element. The number of processors, strictly speaking, is not required to be any larger than the number of sub-regions which are free of discontinuities of any kind.

  4. Computation of the shock-wave boundary layer interaction with flow separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ardonceau, P.; Alziary, T.; Aymer, D.

    1980-01-01

    The boundary layer concept is used to describe the flow near the wall. The external flow is approximated by a pressure displacement relationship (tangent wedge in linearized supersonic flow). The boundary layer equations are solved in finite difference form and the question of the presence and unicity of the solution is considered for the direct problem (assumed pressure) or converse problem (assumed displacement thickness, friction ratio). The coupling algorithm presented implicitly processes the downstream boundary condition necessary to correctly define the interacting boundary layer problem. The algorithm uses a Newton linearization technique to provide a fast convergence.

  5. A computer-aided system for malignancy risk assessment of nodules in thyroid US images based on boundary features.

    PubMed

    Savelonas, Michalis; Maroulis, Dimitris; Sangriotis, Manolis

    2009-10-01

    In this paper, a novel computer-based approach is proposed for malignancy risk assessment of thyroid nodules in ultrasound images. The proposed approach is based on boundary features and is motivated by the correlation which has been addressed in medical literature between nodule boundary irregularity and malignancy risk. In addition, local echogenicity variance is utilized so as to incorporate information associated with local echogenicity distribution within nodule boundary neighborhood. Such information is valuable for the discrimination of high-risk nodules with blurred boundaries from medium-risk nodules with regular boundaries. Analysis of variance is performed, indicating that each boundary feature under study provides statistically significant information for the discrimination of thyroid nodules in ultrasound images, in terms of malignancy risk. k-nearest neighbor and support vector machine classifiers are employed for the classification tasks, utilizing feature vectors derived from all combinations of features under study. The classification results are evaluated with the use of the receiver operating characteristic. It is derived that the proposed approach is capable of discriminating between medium-risk and high-risk nodules, obtaining an area under curve, which reaches 0.95.

  6. Self-adaptive difference method for the effective solution of computationally complex problems of boundary layer theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoenauer, W.; Daeubler, H. G.; Glotz, G.; Gruening, J.

    1986-01-01

    An implicit difference procedure for the solution of equations for a chemically reacting hypersonic boundary layer is described. Difference forms of arbitrary error order in the x and y coordinate plane were used to derive estimates for discretization error. Computational complexity and time were minimized by the use of this difference method and the iteration of the nonlinear boundary layer equations was regulated by discretization error. Velocity and temperature profiles are presented for Mach 20.14 and Mach 18.5; variables are velocity profiles, temperature profiles, mass flow factor, Stanton number, and friction drag coefficient; three figures include numeric data.

  7. A New Finite Element Approach for Prediction of Aerothermal Loads: Progress in Inviscid Flow Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bey, K. S.; Thornton, E. A.; Dechaumphai, P.; Ramakrishnan, R.

    1985-01-01

    Recent progress in the development of finite element methodology for the prediction of aerothermal loads is described. Two dimensional, inviscid computations are presented, but emphasis is placed on development of an approach extendable to three dimensional viscous flows. Research progress is described for: (1) utilization of a commerically available program to construct flow solution domains and display computational results, (2) development of an explicit Taylor-Galerkin solution algorithm, (3) closed form evaluation of finite element matrices, (4) vector computer programming strategies, and (5) validation of solutions. Two test problems of interest to NASA Langley aerothermal research are studied. Comparisons of finite element solutions for Mach 6 flow with other solution methods and experimental data validate fundamental capabilities of the approach for analyzing high speed inviscid compressible flows.

  8. Influence of Finite Element Software on Energy Release Rates Computed Using the Virtual Crack Closure Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Ronald; Goetze, Dirk; Ransom, Jonathon (Technical Monitor)

    2006-01-01

    Strain energy release rates were computed along straight delamination fronts of Double Cantilever Beam, End-Notched Flexure and Single Leg Bending specimens using the Virtual Crack Closure Technique (VCCT). Th e results were based on finite element analyses using ABAQUS# and ANSYS# and were calculated from the finite element results using the same post-processing routine to assure a consistent procedure. Mixed-mode strain energy release rates obtained from post-processing finite elem ent results were in good agreement for all element types used and all specimens modeled. Compared to previous studies, the models made of s olid twenty-node hexahedral elements and solid eight-node incompatible mode elements yielded excellent results. For both codes, models made of standard brick elements and elements with reduced integration did not correctly capture the distribution of the energy release rate acr oss the width of the specimens for the models chosen. The results suggested that element types with similar formulation yield matching results independent of the finite element software used. For comparison, m ixed-mode strain energy release rates were also calculated within ABAQUS#/Standard using the VCCT for ABAQUS# add on. For all specimens mod eled, mixed-mode strain energy release rates obtained from ABAQUS# finite element results using post-processing were almost identical to re sults calculated using the VCCT for ABAQUS# add on.

  9. A new parallel-vector finite element analysis software on distributed-memory computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qin, Jiangning; Nguyen, Duc T.

    1993-01-01

    A new parallel-vector finite element analysis software package MPFEA (Massively Parallel-vector Finite Element Analysis) is developed for large-scale structural analysis on massively parallel computers with distributed-memory. MPFEA is designed for parallel generation and assembly of the global finite element stiffness matrices as well as parallel solution of the simultaneous linear equations, since these are often the major time-consuming parts of a finite element analysis. Block-skyline storage scheme along with vector-unrolling techniques are used to enhance the vector performance. Communications among processors are carried out concurrently with arithmetic operations to reduce the total execution time. Numerical results on the Intel iPSC/860 computers (such as the Intel Gamma with 128 processors and the Intel Touchstone Delta with 512 processors) are presented, including an aircraft structure and some very large truss structures, to demonstrate the efficiency and accuracy of MPFEA.

  10. On finite element implementation and computational techniques for constitutive modeling of high temperature composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saleeb, A. F.; Chang, T. Y. P.; Wilt, T.; Iskovitz, I.

    1989-01-01

    The research work performed during the past year on finite element implementation and computational techniques pertaining to high temperature composites is outlined. In the present research, two main issues are addressed: efficient geometric modeling of composite structures and expedient numerical integration techniques dealing with constitutive rate equations. In the first issue, mixed finite elements for modeling laminated plates and shells were examined in terms of numerical accuracy, locking property and computational efficiency. Element applications include (currently available) linearly elastic analysis and future extension to material nonlinearity for damage predictions and large deformations. On the material level, various integration methods to integrate nonlinear constitutive rate equations for finite element implementation were studied. These include explicit, implicit and automatic subincrementing schemes. In all cases, examples are included to illustrate the numerical characteristics of various methods that were considered.

  11. Determination of an Initial Mesh Density for Finite Element Computations via Data Mining

    SciTech Connect

    Kanapady, R; Bathina, S K; Tamma, K K; Kamath, C; Kumar, V

    2001-07-23

    Numerical analysis software packages which employ a coarse first mesh or an inadequate initial mesh need to undergo a cumbersome and time consuming mesh refinement studies to obtain solutions with acceptable accuracy. Hence, it is critical for numerical methods such as finite element analysis to be able to determine a good initial mesh density for the subsequent finite element computations or as an input to a subsequent adaptive mesh generator. This paper explores the use of data mining techniques for obtaining an initial approximate finite element density that avoids significant trial and error to start finite element computations. As an illustration of proof of concept, a square plate which is simply supported at its edges and is subjected to a concentrated load is employed for the test case. Although simplistic, the present study provides insight into addressing the above considerations.

  12. Specialized chromatin structure domain boundary elements flanking a Drosophila heat shock gene locus are under torsional strain in vivo.

    PubMed

    Jupe, E R; Sinden, R R; Cartwright, I L

    1995-02-28

    An in vivo assay employing psoralen cross-linking was used to investigate the presence of unrestrained supercoiling in DNA sequences located in nontranscribed regions flanking the 3' ends of the pair of divergent heat shock protein 70 (hsp70) genes at locus 87A7 of Drosophila. Two of the regions examined contain sequences comprising the previously defined specialized chromatin structure elements (scs and scs'). Both of these putative chromosomal domain boundaries exhibited very similar levels of unrestrained negative supercoiling that remained high regardless of the transcriptional status of the hsp70 genes. The steric accessibility of the scs region before heat shock was 3-fold higher than either flanking region (consistent with its previously documented DNase I hypersensitivity); this increased an additional 2-fold following hsp70 gene activation without a concomitant rise in the accessibility of flanking regions. Most notably, a sequence which lies outside the presumed 87A7 domain, as defined by the centromere-proximal scs element, exhibited no detectable torsional tension regardless of gene activity in the domain. A sequence located just inside the scs region displayed a low level of tension that was also essentially unaffected by transcription, consistent with data obtained previously for a similarly situated fragment at the centromere-distal scs' location. The existence of a highly localized region of supercoiling within the scs and scs' sequences might be related to their activity in vivo as insulators of chromosomal position effects in Drosophila. PMID:7873544

  13. A Stiffness Reduction Method for efficient absorption of waves at boundaries for use in commercial Finite Element codes.

    PubMed

    Pettit, J R; Walker, A; Cawley, P; Lowe, M J S

    2014-09-01

    Commercially available Finite Element packages are being used increasingly for modelling elastic wave propagation problems. Demand for improved capability has resulted in a drive to maximise the efficiency of the solver whilst maintaining a reliable solution. Modelling waves in unbound elastic media to high levels of accuracy presents a challenge for commercial packages, requiring the removal of unwanted reflections from model boundaries. For time domain explicit solvers, Absorbing Layers by Increasing Damping (ALID) have proven successful because they offer flexible application to modellers and, unlike the Perfectly Matched Layers (PMLs) approach, they are readily implemented in most commercial Finite Element software without requiring access to the source code. However, despite good overall performance, this technique requires the spatial model to extend significantly outside the domain of interest. Here, a Stiffness Reduction Method (SRM) has been developed that operates within a significantly reduced spatial domain. The technique is applied by altering the damping and stiffness matrices of the system, inducing decay of any incident wave. Absorbing region variables are expressed as a function of known model constants, helping to apply the technique to generic elastodynamic problems. The SRM has been shown to perform significantly better than ALID, with results confirmed by both numerical and analytical means. PMID:24359871

  14. Metal-core piezoelectric fiber-based smart layer for damage detection using sparse virtual element boundary measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chao; Cheng, Li; Qiu, Jinhao; Wang, Hongyuan

    2016-04-01

    Metal-core Piezoelectric Fiber (MPF) was shown to have great potential to be a structurally integrated sensor for structural health monitoring (SHM) applications. Compared with the typical foil strain gauge, MPF is more suitable for high frequency strain measurement and can create direct conversion of mechanical energy into electric energy without the need for complex signal conditioners or gauge bridges. In this paper, a MPF-based smart layer is developed as an embedded network of distributed strain sensors that can be surface-mounted on a thin-walled structure. Each pair of the adjacent MPFs divides the entire structure into several "virtual elements (VEs)". By exciting the structure at the natural frequency of the VE, a "weak" formulation of the previously developed Pseudo-excitation (PE) approach based on sparse virtual element boundary measurement (VEBM) is proposed to detect the damage. To validate the effectiveness of the VEBM based approach, experiments are conducted to locate a small crack in a cantilever beam by using a MPF- based smart layer and a Laser Doppler Vibrometer (LDV). Results demonstrate that the proposed VEBM approach not only inherits the enhanced noise immunity capability of the "weak" formulation of the PE approach, but also allows a significant reduction in the number of measurement points as compared to the original version of the PE approach.

  15. Applications of the Space-Time Conservation Element and Solution Element (CE/SE) Method to Computational Aeroacoustic Benchmark Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Xiao-Yen; Himansu, Ananda; Chang, Sin-Chung; Jorgenson, Philip C. E.

    2000-01-01

    The Internal Propagation problems, Fan Noise problem, and Turbomachinery Noise problems are solved using the space-time conservation element and solution element (CE/SE) method. The problems in internal propagation problems address the propagation of sound waves through a nozzle. Both the nonlinear and linear quasi 1D Euler equations are solved. Numerical solutions are presented and compared with the analytical solution. The fan noise problem concerns the effect of the sweep angle on the acoustic field generated by the interaction of a convected gust with a cascade of 3D flat plates. A parallel version of the 3D CE/SE Euler solver is developed and employed to obtain numerical solutions for a family of swept flat plates. Numerical solutions for sweep angles of 0, 5, 10, and 15 deg are presented. The turbomachinery problems describe the interaction of a 2D vortical gust with a cascade of flat-plate airfoils with/without a downstream moving grid. The 2D nonlinear Euler Equations are solved and the converged numerical solutions are presented and compared with the corresponding analytical solution. All the comparisons demonstrate that the CE/SE method is capable of solving aeroacoustic problems with/without shock waves in a simple and efficient manner. Furthermore, the simple non-reflecting boundary condition used in the CE/SE method which is not based on the characteristic theory works very well in 1D, 2D and 3D problems.

  16. Effects induced by an earthquake on its fault plane:a boundary element study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonafede, Maurizio; Neri, Andrea

    2000-04-01

    Mechanical effects left by a model earthquake on its fault plane, in the post-seismic phase, are investigated employing the `displacement discontinuity method'. Simple crack models, characterized by the release of a constant, unidirectional shear traction are investigated first. Both slip components-parallel and normal to the traction direction-are found to be non-vanishing and to depend on fault depth, dip, aspect ratio and fault plane geometry. The rake of the slip vector is similarly found to depend on depth and dip. The fault plane is found to suffer some small rotation and bending, which may be responsible for the indentation of a transform tectonic margin, particularly if cumulative effects are considered. Very significant normal stress components are left over the shallow portion of the fault surface after an earthquake: these are tensile for thrust faults, compressive for normal faults and are typically comparable in size to the stress drop. These normal stresses can easily be computed for more realistic seismic source models, in which a variable slip is assigned; normal stresses are induced in these cases too, and positive shear stresses may even be induced on the fault plane in regions of high slip gradient. Several observations can be explained from the present model: low-dip thrust faults and high-dip normal faults are found to be facilitated, according to the Coulomb failure criterion, in repetitive earthquake cycles; the shape of dip-slip faults near the surface is predicted to be upward-concave; and the shallower aftershock activity generally found in the hanging block of a thrust event can be explained by `unclamping' mechanisms.

  17. The Efficiency of Various Computers and Optimizations in Performing Finite Element Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marcus, Martin H.; Broduer, Steve (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    With the advent of computers with many processors, it becomes unclear how to best exploit this advantage. For example, matrices can be inverted by applying several processors to each vector operation, or one processor can be applied to each matrix. The former approach has diminishing returns beyond a handful of processors, but how many processors depends on the computer architecture. Applying one processor to each matrix is feasible with enough ram memory and scratch disk space, but the speed at which this is done is found to vary by a factor of three depending on how it is done. The cost of the computer must also be taken into account. A computer with many processors and fast interprocessor communication is much more expensive than the same computer and processors with slow interprocessor communication. Consequently, for problems that require several matrices to be inverted, the best speed per dollar for computers is found to be several small workstations that are networked together, such as in a Beowulf cluster. Since these machines typically have two processors per node, each matrix is most efficiently inverted with no more than two processors assigned to it.

  18. A Method of Computing Electric Field Parameters on Boundaries between Two Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rizhov, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Many problems of electric field strength on a boundary between two media require college-level mathematical analysis. However, when the boundary between media is represented by a sphere or a flat plane, these types of problems can be solved algebraically, placing them within reach of high school students. This article presents a solution analysis…

  19. A specialized boundary element algorithm developed to calculate the state of stress in the Anza Gap, San Jacinto Fault Zone, Southern, CA

    SciTech Connect

    Aster, R.; Flores, R.; Fehler, M.

    1995-06-01

    The widely-used algorithm of Crouch and Starfield is unstable when used to solve our mixed boundary equation problem of interest. Altering the boundary conditions and correspondingly rearranging the system of equations to utilize double-sided boundary elements overcomes this drawback. The new algorithm described here is more physically realistic as in that it allows for rotation of the fault segments in the strain field resulting from satisfying the fault static shear strength condition. Preliminary test results indicate that a fault trifurcation gap model may describe the non-strike slip components to some of the seismicity.

  20. Clinical Evaluation of Soft Tissue Organ Boundary Visualization on Cone-Beam Computed Tomographic Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, Elisabeth; Wu Jian; Sleeman, William; Bryant, Joshua; Mitra, Priya; Myers, Michael; Ivanova, Tatjana; Mukhopadhyay, Nitai; Ramakrishnan, Viswanathan; Murphy, Martin; Williamson, Jeffrey

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: Cone-beam computed tomographic images (CBCTs) are increasingly used for setup correction, soft tissue targeting, and image-guided adaptive radiotherapy. However, CBCT image quality is limited by low contrast and imaging artifacts. This analysis investigates the detectability of soft tissue boundaries in CBCT by performing a multiple-observer segmentation study. Methods and Materials: In four prostate cancer patients prostate, bladder and rectum were repeatedly delineated by five observers on CBCTs and fan-beam CTs (FBCTs). A volumetric analysis of contouring variations was performed by calculating coefficients of variation (COV: standard deviation/average volume). The topographical distribution of contouring variations was analyzed using an average surface mesh-based method. Results: Observer- and patient-averaged COVs for FBCT/CBCT were 0.09/0.19 for prostate, 0.05/0.08 for bladder, and 0.09/0.08 for rectum. Contouring variations on FBCT were significantly smaller than on CBCT for prostate (p < 0.03) and bladder (p < 0.04), but not for rectum (p < 0.37; intermodality differences). Intraobserver variations from repeated contouring of the same image set were not significant for either FBCT or CBCT (p < 0.05). Average standard deviations of individual observers' contour differences from average surface meshes on FBCT vs. CBCT were 1.5 vs. 2.1 mm for prostate, 0.7 vs. 1.4 mm for bladder, and 1.3 vs. 1.5 mm for rectum. The topographical distribution of contouring variations was similar for FBCT and CBCT. Conclusion: Contouring variations were larger on CBCT than FBCT, except for rectum. Given the well-documented uncertainty in soft tissue contouring in the pelvis, improvement of CBCT image quality and establishment of well-defined soft tissue identification rules are desirable for image-guided radiotherapy.

  1. Multipacting analysis and electromagnetic field computation by the boundary integral equation method in RF cavities and waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yla-Oijala, Pasi

    Electron multipacting is a serious problem in many rf components operating in vacuum. Multipacting can cause remarkable power losses and heating of the walls. This phenomenon starts if certain resonant conditions for electron trajectories are fulfilled and if the impacted surface has a secondary yield larger than one. In this work new computational methods have been developed which combine the standard trajectory calculations with advanced searching and analyzing methods for multipacting resonances. These methods have been applied to the analysis of electron multipacting in TESLA superconducting cavities and input power couplers with ceramic windows. TESLA is an international linear collider research and development project. Since even small errors in the rf field may destroy the trajectory calculation of a relativistic electron, the electromagnetic fields must be known accurately, especially close to the surfaces. The electromagnetic field computation is carried out by the boundary integral equation method. Due to the singularities of the integral equations, the numerical computations become rather involved, especially when computing the fields near the boundaries. Therefore, in this work special integration techniques and algorithms have been developed. In the axisymmetric geometries the numerical efficiency of various boundary integral equations has been studied.

  2. A FORTRAN computer code for calculating flows in multiple-blade-element cascades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcfarland, E. R.

    1985-01-01

    A solution technique has been developed for solving the multiple-blade-element, surface-of-revolution, blade-to-blade flow problem in turbomachinery. The calculation solves approximate flow equations which include the effects of compressibility, radius change, blade-row rotation, and variable stream sheet thickness. An integral equation solution (i.e., panel method) is used to solve the equations. A description of the computer code and computer code input is given in this report.

  3. Computation of three-dimensional compressible boundary layers to fourth-order accuracy on wings and fuselages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iyer, Venkit

    1990-01-01

    A solution method, fourth-order accurate in the body-normal direction and second-order accurate in the stream surface directions, to solve the compressible 3-D boundary layer equations is presented. The transformation used, the discretization details, and the solution procedure are described. Ten validation cases of varying complexity are presented and results of calculation given. The results range from subsonic flow to supersonic flow and involve 2-D or 3-D geometries. Applications to laminar flow past wing and fuselage-type bodies are discussed. An interface procedure is used to solve the surface Euler equations with the inviscid flow pressure field as the input to assure accurate boundary conditions at the boundary layer edge. Complete details of the computer program used and information necessary to run each of the test cases are given in the Appendix.

  4. Solvent Boundary Potentials for Hybrid QM/MM Computations Using Classical Drude Oscillators: A Fully Polarizable Model.

    PubMed

    Boulanger, Eliot; Thiel, Walter

    2012-11-13

    Accurate quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) treatments should account for MM polarization and properly include long-range electrostatic interactions. We report on a development that covers both these aspects. Our approach combines the classical Drude oscillator (DO) model for the electronic polarizability of the MM atoms with the generalized solvent boundary Potential (GSBP) and the solvated macromolecule boundary potential (SMBP). These boundary potentials (BP) are designed to capture the long-range effects of the outer region of a large system on its interior. They employ a finite difference approximation to the Poisson-Boltzmann equation for computing electrostatic interactions and take into account outer-region bulk solvent through a polarizable dielectric continuum (PDC). This approach thus leads to fully polarizable three-layer QM/MM-DO/BP methods. As the mutual responses of each of the subsystems have to be taken into account, we propose efficient schemes to converge the polarization of each layer simultaneously. For molecular dynamics (MD) simulations using GSBP, this is achieved by considering the MM polarizable model as a dynamical degree of freedom, and hence contributions from the boundary potential can be evaluated for a frozen state of polarization at every time step. For geometry optimizations using SMBP, we propose a dual self-consistent field approach for relaxing the Drude oscillators to their ideal positions and converging the QM wave function with the proper boundary potential. The chosen coupling schemes are evaluated with a test system consisting of a glycine molecule in a water ball. Both boundary potentials are capable of properly reproducing the gradients at the inner-region atoms and the Drude oscillators. We show that the effect of the Drude oscillators must be included in all terms of the boundary potentials to obtain accurate results and that the use of a high dielectric constant for the PDC does not lead to a polarization

  5. Progress on interacting boundary-layer computations at high Reynolds number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, R. T.; Werle, M. J.

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review progress made in the solution of the interacting boundary-layer equations for subsonic flow. The interrelationship of triple deck theory and the interacting boundary-layer approach is discussed with emphasis placed on the development of efficient and reliable algorithms for the solution of the interacting boundary-layer equations. Example studies are presented for laminar and turbulent finite flat plate flow, laminar flow past a flat plate with a separation causing depression, and laminar and turbulent flow past a blunt based trailing edge.

  6. Three dimensional compressible boundary-layer computations for a finite swept wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nash, J. F.; Scruggs, R. M.

    1972-01-01

    Three-dimensional, compressible turbulent boundary-layer calculations have been performed for the finite supercritical wing of the NASA modified F8 transonic research airplane. Data on the boundary-layer thickness, displacement thickness, skin friction components, and integrated streamwise skin friction are presented for points along the streamwise stations of which the pressure measurements were previously made. Representative velocity profiles are shown, and boundary-layer-thickness contour plots and skin-friction vector plots are presented. Results are given for a Reynolds number of 1.5 million per foot, and for Mach numbers of 0.50 and 0.99.

  7. Exact transparent boundary condition for the three-dimensional Schrödinger equation in a rectangular cuboid computational domain.

    PubMed

    Feshchenko, R M; Popov, A V

    2013-11-01

    We report an exact transparent boundary condition (TBC) on the surface of a rectangular cuboid for the three-dimensional (3D) time-dependent Schrödinger equation. It is obtained as a generalization of the well-known TBC for the 1D Schrödinger equation and of the exact TBC in the rectangular domain for the 3D parabolic wave equation, which we reported earlier. Like all other TBCs, it is nonlocal in time domain and relates the boundary transverse derivative of the wave function at any given time to the boundary values of the same wave function at all preceding times. We develop a discretization of this boundary condition for the implicit Crank-Nicolson finite difference scheme. Several numerical experiments demonstrate evolution of the wave function in free space as well as propagation through a number of 3D spherically symmetrical and asymmetrical barriers, and, finally, scattering off an asymmetrical 3D potential. The proposed boundary condition is simple and robust, and can be useful in computational quantum mechanics when an accurate numerical solution of the 3D Schrödinger equation is required. PMID:24329380

  8. Calculation of eddy viscosity in a compressible turbulent boundary layer with mass injection and chemical reaction, volume 2. [computer programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omori, S.

    1973-01-01

    As described in Vol. 1, the eddy viscosity is calculated through the turbulent kinetic energy, in order to include the history of the flow and the effect of chemical reaction on boundary layer characteristics. Calculations can be performed for two different cooling concepts; that is, transpiration and regeneratively cooled wall cases. For the regenerative cooling option, coolant and gas side wall temperature and coolant bulk temperature in a rocket engine can be computed along the nozzle axis. Thus, this computer program is useful in designing coolant flow rate and cooling tube geometry, including the tube wall thickness as well as in predicting the effects of boundary layers along the gas side wall on thrust performances.

  9. Further Developments of BEM for Micro and Macromechanical Analyses of Composites: Boundary Element Software Technology-Composite User's Manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banerjee, P. K.; Henry, D. P.; Hopkins, D. A.; Goldberg, R. K.

    1997-01-01

    BEST-CMS (Boundary Element Solution Technology - Composite Modeling System) is an advanced engineering system for the micro-analysis of fiber composite structures. BEST-CMS is based upon the boundary element program BEST3D which was developed for NASA by Pratt and Whitney Aircraft and the State University of New York at Buffalo under contract NAS3-23697. BEST-CMS presently has the capabilities for elastostatic analysis, steady-state and transient heat transfer analysis, steady-state and transient concurrent thermoelastic analysis and elastoplastic and creep analysis. The fibers are assumed to be perfectly bonded to the composite matrix, or in the case of static or steady-state analysis, the fibers may be assumed to have spring connections, thermal resistance, and/or frictional sliding between the fibers and the composite matrix. The primary objective of this User's Manual is to provide an overview of all BEST-CMS capabilities, along with detailed descriptions of the input data requirements. A brief review of the theoretical background is presented for each analysis category. Then, Chapter 3 discusses the key aspects of the numerical implementation, while Chapter 4 provides a tutorial for the beginning BEST-CMS user. The heart of the manual, however, is in Chapter 5, where a complete description of all data input items is provided. Within this chapter, the individual entries are grouped on a functional basis for a more coherent presentation. Chapter 6 includes sample problems and should be of considerable assistance to the novice. Chapter 7 includes capsules of a number of fiber-composite analysis problems that have been solved using BEST-CMS. This chapter is primarily descriptive in nature and is intended merely to illustrate the level of analysis that is possible within the present BEST-CMS system. Chapter 8 contains a detailed description of the BEST-CMS Neutral File which is helpful in writing an interface between BEST- CMS and any graphic post-processor program

  10. Learning by statistical cooperation of self-interested neuron-like computing elements.

    PubMed

    Barto, A G

    1985-01-01

    Since the usual approaches to cooperative computation in networks of neuron-like computating elements do not assume that network components have any "preferences", they do not make substantive contact with game theoretic concepts, despite their use of some of the same terminology. In the approach presented here, however, each network component, or adaptive element, is a self-interested agent that prefers some inputs over others and "works" toward obtaining the most highly preferred inputs. Here we describe an adaptive element that is robust enough to learn to cooperate with other elements like itself in order to further its self-interests. It is argued that some of the longstanding problems concerning adaptation and learning by networks might be solvable by this form of cooperativity, and computer simulation experiments are described that show how networks of self-interested components that are sufficiently robust can solve rather difficult learning problems. We then place the approach in its proper historical and theoretical perspective through comparison with a number of related algorithms. A secondary aim of this article is to suggest that beyond what is explicitly illustrated here, there is a wealth of ideas from game theory and allied disciplines such as mathematical economics that can be of use in thinking about cooperative computation in both nervous systems and man-made systems.

  11. Automatic data generation scheme for finite-element method /FEDGE/ - Computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akyuz, F.

    1970-01-01

    Algorithm provides for automatic input data preparation for the analysis of continuous domains in the fields of structural analysis, heat transfer, and fluid mechanics. The computer program utilizes the natural coordinate systems concept and the finite element method for data generation.

  12. COYOTE: a finite-element computer program for nonlinear heat-conduction problems

    SciTech Connect

    Gartling, D.K.

    1982-10-01

    COYOTE is a finite element computer program designed for the solution of two-dimensional, nonlinear heat conduction problems. The theoretical and mathematical basis used to develop the code is described. Program capabilities and complete user instructions are presented. Several example problems are described in detail to demonstrate the use of the program.

  13. Unsteady Validation of a Mean Flow Boundary Condition for Computational Aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hixon, R.; Zhen, F.; Nallasamy, M.; Sawyer, S> ; Dyson, R.

    2004-01-01

    In this work, a previously developed mean flow boundary condition will be validated for unsteady flows. The test cases will be several reference benchmark flows consisting of vortical gusts convecting in a uniform mean flow, as well as the more realistic case of a vortical gust impinging on a loaded 2D cascade. The results will verify that the mean flow boundary condition both imposes the desired mean flow as well as having little or no effect on the instantaneous unsteady solution.

  14. Development and application of a volume penalization immersed boundary method for the computation of blood flow and shear stresses in cerebral vessels and aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Mikhal, Julia; Geurts, Bernard J

    2013-12-01

    A volume-penalizing immersed boundary method is presented for the simulation of laminar incompressible flow inside geometrically complex blood vessels in the human brain. We concentrate on cerebral aneurysms and compute flow in curved brain vessels with and without spherical aneurysm cavities attached. We approximate blood as an incompressible Newtonian fluid and simulate the flow with the use of a skew-symmetric finite-volume discretization and explicit time-stepping. A key element of the immersed boundary method is the so-called masking function. This is a binary function with which we identify at any location in the domain whether it is 'solid' or 'fluid', allowing to represent objects immersed in a Cartesian grid. We compare three definitions of the masking function for geometries that are non-aligned with the grid. In each case a 'staircase' representation is used in which a grid cell is either 'solid' or 'fluid'. Reliable findings are obtained with our immersed boundary method, even at fairly coarse meshes with about 16 grid cells across a velocity profile. The validation of the immersed boundary method is provided on the basis of classical Poiseuille flow in a cylindrical pipe. We obtain first order convergence for the velocity and the shear stress, reflecting the fact that in our approach the solid-fluid interface is localized with an accuracy on the order of a grid cell. Simulations for curved vessels and aneurysms are done for different flow regimes, characterized by different values of the Reynolds number (Re). The validation is performed for laminar flow at Re = 250, while the flow in more complex geometries is studied at Re = 100 and Re = 250, as suggested by physiological conditions pertaining to flow of blood in the circle of Willis.

  15. Finite element simulation of the mechanical impact of computer work on the carpal tunnel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mouzakis, Dionysios E; Rachiotis, George; Zaoutsos, Stefanos; Eleftheriou, Andreas; Malizos, Konstantinos N

    2014-09-22

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a clinical disorder resulting from the compression of the median nerve. The available evidence regarding the association between computer use and CTS is controversial. There is some evidence that computer mouse or keyboard work, or both are associated with the development of CTS. Despite the availability of pressure measurements in the carpal tunnel during computer work (exposure to keyboard or mouse) there are no available data to support a direct effect of the increased intracarpal canal pressure on the median nerve. This study presents an attempt to simulate the direct effects of computer work on the whole carpal area section using finite element analysis. A finite element mesh was produced from computerized tomography scans of the carpal area, involving all tissues present in the carpal tunnel. Two loading scenarios were applied on these models based on biomechanical data measured during computer work. It was found that mouse work can produce large deformation fields on the median nerve region. Also, the high stressing effect of the carpal ligament was verified. Keyboard work produced considerable and heterogeneous elongations along the longitudinal axis of the median nerve. Our study provides evidence that increased intracarpal canal pressures caused by awkward wrist postures imposed during computer work were associated directly with deformation of the median nerve. Despite the limitations of the present study the findings could be considered as a contribution to the understanding of the development of CTS due to exposure to computer work.

  16. Flood boundaries and water-surface profile for the computed 100-year flood, Swift Creek at Afton, Wyoming, 1986

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rankl, James G.; Wallace, Joe C.

    1989-01-01

    Flood flows on Swift Creek near Afton, Wyoming, were analyzed. Peak discharge with an average recurrence interval of 100 years was computed and used to determine the flood boundaries and water surface profile in the study reach. The study was done in cooperation with Lincoln County and the Town of Afton to determine the extent of flooding in the Town of Afton from a 100-year flood on Swift Creek. The reach of Swift Creek considered in the analysis extends upstream from the culvert at Allred County Road No. 12-135 to the US Geological Survey streamflow-gaging station located in the Bridger National Forest , a distance of 3.2 miles. Boundaries of the 100-year flood are delineated on a map using the computed elevation of the flood at each cross section, survey data, and a 1983 aerial photograph. The computed water surface elevation for the 100-year flood was plotted at each cross section, then the lateral extent of the flood was transferred to the flood map. Boundaries between cross sections were sketched using information taken from the aerial photograph. Areas that are inundated, but not part of the active flow, are designated on the cross sections. (Lantz-PTT)

  17. Application of taxonomy theory, Volume 1: Computing a Hopf bifurcation-related segment of the feasibility boundary. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Zaborszky, J.; Venkatasubramanian, V.

    1995-10-01

    Taxonomy Theory is the first precise comprehensive theory for large power system dynamics modeled in any detail. The motivation for this project is to show that it can be used, practically, for analyzing a disturbance that actually occurred on a large system, which affected a sizable portion of the Midwest with supercritical Hopf type oscillations. This event is well documented and studied. The report first summarizes Taxonomy Theory with an engineering flavor. Then various computational approaches are sighted and analyzed for desirability to use with Taxonomy Theory. Then working equations are developed for computing a segment of the feasibility boundary that bounds the region of (operating) parameters throughout which the operating point can be moved without losing stability. Then experimental software incorporating large EPRI software packages PSAPAC is developed. After a summary of the events during the subject disturbance, numerous large scale computations, up to 7600 buses, are reported. These results are reduced into graphical and tabular forms, which then are analyzed and discussed. The report is divided into two volumes. This volume illustrates the use of the Taxonomy Theory for computing the feasibility boundary and presents evidence that the event indeed led to a Hopf type oscillation on the system. Furthermore it proves that the Feasibility Theory can indeed be used for practical computation work with very large systems. Volume 2, a separate volume, will show that the disturbance has led to a supercritical (that is stable oscillation) Hopf bifurcation.

  18. Development of a boundary magnetic charge method for computing magnetic fields in a system containing saturated magnetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murata, H.; Ishigami, M.; Shimoyama, H.

    2016-01-01

    In previous research, we developed a three-dimensional (3D) boundary magnetic charge method (BMCM) for high-accuracy field calculations in a static magnetic field, even when there exist great differences between the magnitudes of permeability between neighboring magnetic materials. This method, however, cannot be applied to a system that contains saturated magnetic materials. In the present study, therefore, we have developed a novel method that addresses this issue. According to this new method, we divide the region containing the magnetic material into small-volume elements and divide the boundaries between neighboring small-volume elements into small-surface elements, assigning each element an appropriate initial value of permeability. The magnetic field inside and outside of the magnetic material is calculated using this permeability. The value of the permeability of each element is iteratively updated using μ-H data. The updated value of the permeability after the i-th iteration, μi, is compared with that of the previous value, μi-1. If the difference between the two values is within a preset range, the iteration process is judged to have converged and the value of μi is regarded as the final converged value of the permeability. The magnetic field at an arbitrary point in space and/or inside the body of the magnetic material is calculated from the converged permeability of each element. As a result, we have succeeded in developing a novel BMCM for the calculation of a static magnetic field with high accuracy in a system containing saturated magnetic materials.

  19. Computational Modeling For The Transitional Flow Over A Multi-Element Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, William W.; Liu, Feng-Jun; Rumsey, Chris L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The transitional flow over a multi-element airfoil in a landing configuration are computed using a two equation transition model. The transition model is predictive in the sense that the transition onset is a result of the calculation and no prior knowledge of the transition location is required. The computations were performed using the INS2D) Navier-Stokes code. Overset grids are used for the three-element airfoil. The airfoil operating conditions are varied for a range of angle of attack and for two different Reynolds numbers of 5 million and 9 million. The computed results are compared with experimental data for the surface pressure, skin friction, transition onset location, and velocity magnitude. In general, the comparison shows a good agreement with the experimental data.

  20. Real-Time Nonlinear Finite Element Computations on GPU - Application to Neurosurgical Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Joldes, Grand Roman; Wittek, Adam; Miller, Karol

    2010-01-01

    Application of biomechanical modeling techniques in the area of medical image analysis and surgical simulation implies two conflicting requirements: accurate results and high solution speeds. Accurate results can be obtained only by using appropriate models and solution algorithms. In our previous papers we have presented algorithms and solution methods for performing accurate nonlinear finite element analysis of brain shift (which includes mixed mesh, different non-linear material models, finite deformations and brain-skull contacts) in less than a minute on a personal computer for models having up to 50.000 degrees of freedom. In this paper we present an implementation of our algorithms on a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) using the new NVIDIA Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) which leads to more than 20 times increase in the computation speed. This makes possible the use of meshes with more elements, which better represent the geometry, are easier to generate, and provide more accurate results. PMID:21179562

  1. STARS: An integrated general-purpose finite element structural, aeroelastic, and aeroservoelastic analysis computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Kajal K.

    1991-01-01

    The details of an integrated general-purpose finite element structural analysis computer program which is also capable of solving complex multidisciplinary problems is presented. Thus, the SOLIDS module of the program possesses an extensive finite element library suitable for modeling most practical problems and is capable of solving statics, vibration, buckling, and dynamic response problems of complex structures, including spinning ones. The aerodynamic module, AERO, enables computation of unsteady aerodynamic forces for both subsonic and supersonic flow for subsequent flutter and divergence analysis of the structure. The associated aeroservoelastic analysis module, ASE, effects aero-structural-control stability analysis yielding frequency responses as well as damping characteristics of the structure. The program is written in standard FORTRAN to run on a wide variety of computers. Extensive graphics, preprocessing, and postprocessing routines are also available pertaining to a number of terminals.

  2. Experimental and Computational Investigation of Lift-Enhancing Tabs on a Multi-Element Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashby, Dale L.

    1996-01-01

    An experimental and computational investigation of the effect of lift-enhancing tabs on a two-element airfoil has been conducted. The objective of the study was to develop an understanding of the flow physics associated with lift-enhancing tabs on a multi-element airfoil. An NACA 63(2)-215 ModB airfoil with a 30% chord fowler flap was tested in the NASA Ames 7- by 10-Foot Wind Tunnel. Lift-enhancing tabs of various heights were tested on both the main element and the flap for a variety of flap riggings. A combination of tabs located at the main element and flap trailing edges increased the airfoil lift coefficient by 11% relative to the highest lift coefficient achieved by any baseline configuration at an angle of attack of 0 deg, and C(sub 1max) was increased by 3%. Computations of the flow over the two-element airfoil were performed using the two-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes code INS2D-UP. The computed results predicted all of the trends observed in the experimental data quite well. In addition, a simple analytic model based on potential flow was developed to provide a more detailed understanding of how lift-enhancing tabs work. The tabs were modeled by a point vortex at the air-foil or flap trailing edge. Sensitivity relationships were derived which provide a mathematical basis for explaining the effects of lift-enhancing tabs on a multi-element airfoil. Results of the modeling effort indicate that the dominant effects of the tabs on the pressure distribution of each element of the airfoil can be captured with a potential flow model for cases with no flow separation.

  3. Coupled boundary and finite element analysis of vibration from railway tunnels—a comparison of two- and three-dimensional models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, L.; Jones, C. J. C.

    2006-06-01

    The analysis of vibration from railway tunnels is of growing interest as new and higher-speed railways are built under the ground to address the transport problems of growing modern urban areas. Such analysis can be carried out using numerical methods but models and therefore computing times can be large. There is a need to be able to apply very fast calculations that can be used in tunnel design and studies of environmental impacts. Taking advantage of the fact that tunnels often have a two-dimensional geometry in the sense that the cross section is constant along the tunnel axis, it is useful to evaluate the potential uses of two-dimensional models before committing to much more costly three-dimensional approaches. The vibration forces in the track due to the passage of a train are by nature three-dimensional and a complete analysis undoubtedly requires a model of three-dimensional wave propagation. The aim of this paper is to investigate the quality of the information that can be gained from a two-dimensional model of a railway tunnel. The vibration transmission from the tunnel floor to the ground surface is analysed for the frequency range relevant to the perception of whole body vibration (about 4-80 Hz). A coupled finite element and boundary element scheme is applied in both two and three dimensions. Two tunnel designs are considered: a cut-and-cover tunnel for a double track and a single-track tunnel dug with the New Austrian tunnelling method (NATM).

  4. Non-uniform FFT for the finite element computation of the micromagnetic scalar potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Exl, L.; Schrefl, T.

    2014-08-01

    We present a quasi-linearly scaling, first order polynomial finite element method for the solution of the magnetostatic open boundary problem by splitting the magnetic scalar potential. The potential is determined by solving a Dirichlet problem and evaluation of the single layer potential by a fast approximation technique based on Fourier approximation of the kernel function. The latter approximation leads to a generalization of the well-known convolution theorem used in finite difference methods. We address it by a non-uniform FFT approach. Overall, our method scales O(M+N+Nlog N) for N nodes and M surface triangles. We confirm our approach by several numerical tests.

  5. Coupled finite difference and boundary element methods for fluid flow through a vessel with multibranches in tumours.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qiang; Wu, Guo Xiong

    2013-03-01

    A mathematical model and a numerical solution procedure are developed to simulate flow field through a 3D permeable vessel with multibranches embedded in a solid tumour. The model is based on Poisseuille's law for the description of the flow through the vessels, Darcy's law for the fluid field inside the tumour interstitium, and Starling's law for the flux transmitted across the vascular walls. The solution procedure is based on a coupled method, in which the finite difference method is used for the flow in the vessels and the boundary element method is used for the flow in the tumour. When vessels meet each other at a junction, the pressure continuity and mass conservation are imposed at the junction. Three typical representative structures within the tumour vasculature, symmetrical dichotomous branching, asymmetrical bifurcation with uneven radius of daughter vessels and trifurcation, are investigated in detail as case studies. These results have demonstrated the features of tumour flow environment by the pressure distributions and flow velocity field.

  6. Modelling magnetic anomalies of solid and fractal bodies with defined boundaries using the finite cube elements method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafa, Mostafa E.

    2009-04-01

    The finite cube elements method (FCEM) is a numerical tool designed for modelling gravity anomalies and estimating structural index (SI) of solid and fractal bodies with defined boundaries, tilted or in normal position and with variable density contrast. In this work, we apply FCEM to modelling magnetic anomalies and estimating SI of bodies with non-uniform magnetization having variable magnitude and direction. In magnetics as in gravity, FCEM allows us to study the spatial distribution of SI of the modelled bodies on contour maps and profiles. We believe that this will impact the forward and inverse modelling of potential field data, especially Euler deconvolution. As far as the author knows, this is the first time that gravity and magnetic anomalies, as well as SI, of self similar fractal bodies such as Menger sponges and Sierpinsky triangles are calculated using FCEM. The SI patterns derived from different order sponges and triangles are perfectly overlapped. This is true for bodies having variable property distributions (susceptibility or density contrast) under different field conditions (in case of magnetics) regardless of their orientation and depth of burial. We therefore propose SI as a new universal fractal-order-invariant measure which can be used in addition to the fractal dimensions for formulating potential field theory of fractal objects.

  7. 3D modeling of the total electric field induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation using the boundary element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salinas, F. S.; Lancaster, J. L.; Fox, P. T.

    2009-06-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) delivers highly localized brain stimulations via non-invasive externally applied magnetic fields. This non-invasive, painless technique provides researchers and clinicians with a unique tool capable of stimulating both the central and peripheral nervous systems. However, a complete analysis of the macroscopic electric fields produced by TMS has not yet been performed. In this paper, we addressed the importance of the secondary E-field created by surface charge accumulation during TMS using the boundary element method (BEM). 3D models were developed using simple head geometries in order to test the model and compare it with measured values. The effects of tissue geometry, size and conductivity were also investigated. Finally, a realistically shaped head model was used to assess the effect of multiple surfaces on the total E-field. Secondary E-fields have the greatest impact at areas in close proximity to each tissue layer. Throughout the head, the secondary E-field magnitudes typically range from 20% to 35% of the primary E-field's magnitude. The direction of the secondary E-field was generally in opposition to the primary E-field; however, for some locations, this was not the case (i.e. going from high to low conductivity tissues). These findings show that realistically shaped head geometries are important for accurate modeling of the total E-field.

  8. A Computational Investigation of Random Angle Grain Boundaries for CdTe Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buurma, Christopher; Chan, Maria; Klie, Robert; Sivananthan, Sivalingam; DOE Bridge Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    Grain boundaries (GB) in poly-CdTe solar cells play an important role in species diffusion, segregation, defect formation, and carrier recombination. Many studies on GBs in CdTe focus on either entire grain-boundary networks found in complete poly-CdTe devices, those exhibiting high symmetry such as the coincident site lattice (CSL) or symmetric tilt or twist, or on very small scale Scanning-Tunneling Electron Microscopse (STEM) viewable interfaces and dislocations. The topic of this talk is a comprehensive survey of the grain boundary parameter space regardless of the degree of symmetry found and whether the STEM channeling condition is satisfied. Our survey encompasses both near-CSL or vicinal grain boundaries decorated with nearby dislocations, as well as mixed tilt and twist interfaces with all possible symmetrically inequivalent grain boundary planes. Atomistic calculations using a Stillinger-Weber potential will be presented on a large representative sample of random-angle GBs. Trends in interfacial energies and atomistic structures as a function of tilt/twist/displacement parameters will be investigated. First principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations will be performed on a subset of these GBs to reveal their electronic structures and their implications towards PV performance. DoE Sunshot program contract DOE DEEE005956. Use of the Center for Nanoscale Materials was supported by the USDoE, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  9. Computer Modeling of Transport of Oxidizing Species in Grain Boundaries during Zirconium Corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Xian-Ming Bai; Yongfeng Zhang; Michael R. Tonks

    2014-06-01

    Zirconium (Zr) based alloys are widely used as the cladding materials in light-water reactors. The water-side corrosion of these alloys degrades their structural integrity and poses serious safety concerns. During the Zr corrosion process, a thin Zr oxide (ZrO2) layer forms on the alloy surface and serves as a barrier layer for further corrosion. The majority of the oxide has the monoclinic phase. At the transition region between the oxide and the metal, the oxide contains a thin layer of stabilized tetragonal phase. It is found that the texture of the tetragonal layer determines the protectiveness of the oxide for corrosion. The transport of oxidizing species, such as anion defects, cation defects, and electron through the tetragonal oxide layer could be the rate limiting step of the corrosion. The defect diffusion can be affected by the growing stresses and microstructures such as grain boundaries and dislocations. In this work molecular dynamics simulations are used to investigate the anion and cation diffusion in bulk and at grain boundaries in tetragonal ZrO2. The results show that defect diffusion at grain boundaries is complex and the behavior strongly depends on the grain boundary type. For most of the grain boundaries studied the defect diffusion are much slower than in the bulk, implying that grain boundaries may not be fast defect transport paths during corrosion. The connection between the modeling results and published experimental work will also be discussed. This work is funded by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program at Idaho National Laboratory.

  10. Applications of Parallel Computation in Micro-Mechanics and Finite Element Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan, Hui-Qian

    1996-01-01

    This project discusses the application of parallel computations related with respect to material analyses. Briefly speaking, we analyze some kind of material by elements computations. We call an element a cell here. A cell is divided into a number of subelements called subcells and all subcells in a cell have the identical structure. The detailed structure will be given later in this paper. It is obvious that the problem is "well-structured". SIMD machine would be a better choice. In this paper we try to look into the potentials of SIMD machine in dealing with finite element computation by developing appropriate algorithms on MasPar, a SIMD parallel machine. In section 2, the architecture of MasPar will be discussed. A brief review of the parallel programming language MPL also is given in that section. In section 3, some general parallel algorithms which might be useful to the project will be proposed. And, combining with the algorithms, some features of MPL will be discussed in more detail. In section 4, the computational structure of cell/subcell model will be given. The idea of designing the parallel algorithm for the model will be demonstrated. Finally in section 5, a summary will be given.

  11. Solution of free-boundary problems using finite-element/Newton methods and locally refined grids - Application to analysis of solidification microstructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsiveriotis, K.; Brown, R. A.

    1993-01-01

    A new method is presented for the solution of free-boundary problems using Lagrangian finite element approximations defined on locally refined grids. The formulation allows for direct transition from coarse to fine grids without introducing non-conforming basis functions. The calculation of elemental stiffness matrices and residual vectors are unaffected by changes in the refinement level, which are accounted for in the loading of elemental data to the global stiffness matrix and residual vector. This technique for local mesh refinement is combined with recently developed mapping methods and Newton's method to form an efficient algorithm for the solution of free-boundary problems, as demonstrated here by sample calculations of cellular interfacial microstructure during directional solidification of a binary alloy.

  12. Receptivity of a laminar boundary layer to the interaction of a three-dimensional roughness element with time-harmonic free-stream disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tadjfar, M.; Bodonyi, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    Receptivity of a laminar boundary layer to the interaction of time-harmonic free-stream disturbances with a 3D roughness element is studied. The 3D nonlinear triple-deck equations are solved numerically to provide the basic steady-state motion. At high Reynolds numbers, the governing equations for the unsteady motion are the unsteady linearized 3D triple-deck equations. These equations can only be solved numerically. In the absence of any roughness element, the free-stream disturbances, to the first order, produce the classical Stokes flow, in the thin Stokes layer near the wall (on the order of our lower deck). However, with the introduction of a small 3D roughness element, the interaction between the hump and the Stokes flow introduces a spectrum of all spatial disturbances inside the boundary layer.

  13. Design of computer-generated beam-shaping holograms by iterative finite-element mesh adaption.

    PubMed

    Dresel, T; Beyerlein, M; Schwider, J

    1996-12-10

    Computer-generated phase-only holograms can be used for laser beam shaping, i.e., for focusing a given aperture with intensity and phase distributions into a pregiven intensity pattern in their focal planes. A numerical approach based on iterative finite-element mesh adaption permits the design of appropriate phase functions for the task of focusing into two-dimensional reconstruction patterns. Both the hologram aperture and the reconstruction pattern are covered by mesh mappings. An iterative procedure delivers meshes with intensities equally distributed over the constituting elements. This design algorithm adds new elementary focuser functions to what we call object-oriented hologram design. Some design examples are discussed.

  14. Level set discrete element method for three-dimensional computations with triaxial case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamoto, Reid; Andò, Edward; Viggiani, Gioacchino; Andrade, José E.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we outline the level set discrete element method (LS-DEM) which is a discrete element method variant able to simulate systems of particles with arbitrary shape using level set functions as a geometric basis. This unique formulation allows seamless interfacing with level set-based characterization methods as well as computational ease in contact calculations. We then apply LS-DEM to simulate two virtual triaxial specimens generated from XRCT images of experiments and demonstrate LS-DEM's ability to quantitatively capture and predict stress-strain and volume-strain behavior observed in the experiments.

  15. MAPVAR - A Computer Program to Transfer Solution Data Between Finite Element Meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Wellman, G.W.

    1999-03-01

    MAPVAR, as was the case with its precursor programs, MERLIN and MERLIN II, is designed to transfer solution results from one finite element mesh to another. MAPVAR draws heavily from the structure and coding of MERLIN II, but it employs a new finite element data base, EXODUS II, and offers enhanced speed and new capabilities not available in MERLIN II. In keeping with the MERLIN II documentation, the computational algorithms used in MAPVAR are described. User instructions are presented. Example problems are included to demonstrate the operation of the code and the effects of various input options.

  16. A hybrid finite element-boundary integral for the analysis of cavity-backed antennas of arbitrary shape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gong, Jian; Volakis, John L.; Woo, A. C.; Wang, H. T. G.

    1993-01-01

    This is the final report on this project which was concerned with the analysis of cavity-backed antennas and more specifically spiral antennas. The project was a continuation of a previous analysis, which employed rectangular brick elements, and was, thus, restricted to planar rectangular patch antennas. A total of five reports were submitted under this project and we expect that at least four journal papers will result from the research described in these reports. The abstracts of the four previous reports are included. The first of the reports (028918-1-T) is over 75 pages and describes the general formulation using tetrahedral elements and the computer program. Report 028918-2-T was written after the completion of the computer program and reviews the capability of the analysis and associated software for planar circular rectangular patches and for a rectangular planar spiral. Measurements were also done at the University of Michigan and at Mission Research Corp. for the purpose of validating the software. We are pleased to acknowledge a partial support from Mission Research Corp. in carrying out the work described in this report. The third report (028918-3-T) describes the formulation and partial validation (using 2D data) for patch antennas on a circular platform. The 3D validation and development of the formulation for patch antennas on circular platforms is still in progress. The fourth report (028918-4-T) is basically an invited journal paper which will appear in the 'J. Electromagnetic Waves and Applications' in early 1994. It describes the application of the finite element method in electromagnetics and is primarily based on our work here at U-M. This final report describes the culmination of our efforts in characterizing complex cavity-backed antennas on planar platforms. The report describes for the first time the analysis of non-planar spirals and non-rectangular slot antennas as well as traditional planar patch antennas. The comparisons between

  17. Computational Study of Surface Tension and Wall Adhesion Effects on an Oil Film Flow Underneath an Air Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Celic, Alan; Zilliac, Gregory G.

    1998-01-01

    The fringe-imaging skin friction (FISF) technique, which was originally developed by D. J. Monson and G. G. Mateer at Ames Research Center and recently extended to 3-D flows, is the most accurate skin friction measurement technique currently available. The principle of this technique is that the skin friction at a point on an aerodynamic surface can be determined by measuring the time-rate-of-change of the thickness of an oil drop placed on the surface under the influence of the external air boundary layer. Lubrication theory is used to relate the oil-patch thickness variation to shear stress. The uncertainty of FISF measurements is estimated to be as low as 4 percent, yet little is known about the effects of surface tension and wall adhesion forces on the measured results. A modified version of the free-surface Navier-Stokes solver RIPPLE, developed at Los Alamos National Laboratories, was used to compute the time development of an oil drop on a surface under a simulated air boundary layer. RIPPLE uses the volume of fluid method to track the surface and the continuum surface force approach to model surface tension and wall adhesion effects. The development of an oil drop, over a time period of approximately 4 seconds, was studied. Under the influence of shear imposed by an air boundary layer, the computed profile of the drop rapidly changes from its initial circular-arc shape to a wedge-like shape. Comparison of the time-varying oil-thickness distributions computed using RIPPLE and also computed using a greatly simplified numerical model of an oil drop equation which does not include surface tension and wall adhesion effects) was used to evaluate the effects of surface tension on FISF measurement results. The effects of surface tension were found to be small but not necessarily negligible in some cases.

  18. Water-surface profile and flood boundaries for the computed 100-year flood, Muddy Creek, Northern Cheyenne Indian Reservation, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Omang, R.J.

    1994-01-01

    Hydrologic and hydraulic evaluations of Muddy Creek were made to determine the magnitude of the 100-year flood and the extent of flooding that would occur as the result of this flood. Forty-three cross sections were surveyed and 14 cross sections were synthesized along a 6.7-mile reach of Muddy Creek. Data from the surveys were used to calculate the water-surface flood elevation at each cross section using a computer program (WSPRO) developed by the U.S. Geological Survey. The water-surface profile of the computed 100-year flood elevations was then drawn. The profile shows the streambed elevation and the location of one bridge, one culvert, and cross sections. The computed 100-year flood elevation at each cross section was used to delineate the width of the flood plain at that section. Flood boundaries between cross sections were interpolated using contour lines on topographic maps.

  19. Recursion-transform method for computing resistance of the complex resistor network with three arbitrary boundaries.

    PubMed

    Tan, Zhi-Zhong

    2015-05-01

    We develop a general recursion-transform (R-T) method for a two-dimensional resistor network with a zero resistor boundary. As applications of the R-T method, we consider a significant example to illuminate the usefulness for calculating resistance of a rectangular m×n resistor network with a null resistor and three arbitrary boundaries, a problem never solved before, since Green's function techniques and Laplacian matrix approaches are invalid in this case. Looking for the exact calculation of the resistance of a binary resistor network is important but difficult in the case of an arbitrary boundary since the boundary is like a wall or trap which affects the behavior of finite network. In this paper we obtain several general formulas of resistance between any two nodes in a nonregular m×n resistor network in both finite and infinite cases. In particular, 12 special cases are given by reducing one of the general formulas to understand its applications and meanings, and an integral identity is found when we compare the equivalent resistance of two different structures of the same problem in a resistor network. PMID:26066134

  20. Program design by a multidisciplinary team. [for structural finite element analysis on STAR-100 computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voigt, S.

    1975-01-01

    The use of software engineering aids in the design of a structural finite-element analysis computer program for the STAR-100 computer is described. Nested functional diagrams to aid in communication among design team members were used, and a standardized specification format to describe modules designed by various members was adopted. This is a report of current work in which use of the functional diagrams provided continuity and helped resolve some of the problems arising in this long-running part-time project.

  1. On current aspects of finite element computational fluid mechanics for turbulent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, A. J.

    1982-01-01

    A set of nonlinear partial differential equations suitable for the description of a class of turbulent three-dimensional flow fields in select geometries is identified. On the basis of the concept of enforcing a penalty constraint to ensure accurate accounting of ordering effects, a finite element numerical solution algorithm is established for the equation set and the theoretical aspects of accuracy, convergence and stability are identified and quantized. Hypermatrix constructions are used to formulate the reduction of the computational aspects of the theory to practice. The robustness of the algorithm, and the computer program embodiment, have been verified for pertinent flow configurations.

  2. Merlin 2 - A computer program to transfer solution data betwwen finite element meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Gartling, D.K.

    1991-07-01

    The MERLIN 2 program is designed to transfer data between finite element meshes of arbitrary geometry. The program is structured to accurately interpolate previously computed solutions onto a given mesh and format the resulting data for immediate use in another analysis program. Data from either two-dimensional or three-dimensional meshes may be considered. The theoretical basis and computational algorithms used in the program are described and complete user instructions are presented. Several example problems are included to demonstrate program usage. 13 refs. 15 figs.

  3. Conservative supra-characteristics method for splitting the hyperbolic systems of gasdynamics with computed boundaries for real and perfect gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lombard, C. K.; Oliger, J.; Yang, J. Y.; Davy, W. C.

    1982-01-01

    Implicit methods developed by Beam and Warming (1978 and Briley and McDonald (1977) make it possible to overcome the hyperbolic stiffness of the conservative compressible Navier-Stokes equations in the fine wall region computational mesh for high Reynold's number flow. Certain difficulties related to the use of these methods could be overcome by employing an approach reported by Roe (1981). In the present investigation Roe's conceptual framework has been adopted for constructing globally conservative finite difference methods. A globally conservative upwind finite difference method (CSCM) consisting of both implicit interior point and boundary point equations is constructed from a new characteristics based flux difference splitting. It is found that the employed upwind eigenvector split scheme which combines fully coupled implicit interior point and boundary point approximations has the desired properties of robust stability and accuracy.

  4. Stress interaction at the Lazufre volcanic region, as constrained by InSAR, seismic tomography and boundary element modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikkhoo, Mehdi; Walter, Thomas R.; Lundgren, Paul; Spica, Zack; Legrand, Denis

    2016-04-01

    The Azufre-Lastarria volcanic complex in the central Andes has been recognized as a major region of magma intrusion. Both deep and shallow inflating reservoirs inferred through InSAR time series inversions, are the main sources of a multi-scale deformation accompanied by pronounced fumarolic activity. The possible interactions between these reservoirs, as well as the path of propagating fluids and the development of their pathways, however, have not been investigated. Results from recent seismic noise tomography in the area show localized zones of shear wave velocity anomalies, with a low shear wave velocity region at 1 km depth and another one at 4 km depth beneath Lastarria. Although the inferred shallow zone is in a good agreement with the location of the shallow deformation source, the deep zone does not correspond to any deformation source in the area. Here, using the boundary element method (BEM), we have performed an in-depth continuum mechanical investigation of the available ascending and descending InSAR data. We modelled the deep source, taking into account the effect of topography and complex source geometry on the inversion. After calculating the stress field induced by this source, we apply Paul's criterion (a variation on Mohr-Coulomb failure) to recognize locations that are liable for failure. We show that the locations of tensile and shear failure almost perfectly coincide with the shallow and deep anomalies as identified by shear wave velocity, respectively. Based on the stress-change models we conjecture that the deep reservoir controls the development of shallower hydrothermal fluids; a hypothesis that can be tested and applied to other volcanoes.

  5. GRID3O: Computer program for fast generation of multilevel, three-dimensional boundary-conforming O-type computational grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulikravich, D. S.

    1981-01-01

    A fast algorithm was developed for accurately generating boundary-conforming, three-dimensional, consecutively refined computational grids applicable to arbitrary wing-body and axial turbomachinery geometries. The method is based on using an analytic function to generate two-dimensional grids on a number of coaxial axisymmetric surfaces positioned between the centerbody and the outer radial boundary. These grids are of the O-type and are characterized by quasi-orthogonality, geometric periodicity, and an adequate resolution throughout the flow field. Because the built-in nonorthogonal coordinate stretching and shearing cause the grid lines leaving the blade or wing trailing edge to end at downstream infinity, the numerical treatment of the three-dimensional trailing vortex sheets is simplified.

  6. Computing element evolution towards Exascale and its impact on legacy simulation codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colin de Verdière, Guillaume J. L.

    2015-12-01

    In the light of the current race towards the Exascale, this article highlights the main features of the forthcoming computing elements that will be at the core of next generations of supercomputers. The market analysis, underlying this work, shows that computers are facing a major evolution in terms of architecture. As a consequence, it is important to understand the impacts of those evolutions on legacy codes or programming methods. The problems of dissipated power and memory access are discussed and will lead to a vision of what should be an exascale system. To survive, programming languages had to respond to the hardware evolutions either by evolving or with the creation of new ones. From the previous elements, we elaborate why vectorization, multithreading, data locality awareness and hybrid programming will be the key to reach the exascale, implying that it is time to start rewriting codes.

  7. Partitioning strategy for efficient nonlinear finite element dynamic analysis on multiprocessor computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Peters, Jeanne M.

    1989-01-01

    A computational procedure is presented for the nonlinear dynamic analysis of unsymmetric structures on vector multiprocessor systems. The procedure is based on a novel hierarchical partitioning strategy in which the response of the unsymmetric and antisymmetric response vectors (modes), each obtained by using only a fraction of the degrees of freedom of the original finite element model. The three key elements of the procedure which result in high degree of concurrency throughout the solution process are: (1) mixed (or primitive variable) formulation with independent shape functions for the different fields; (2) operator splitting or restructuring of the discrete equations at each time step to delineate the symmetric and antisymmetric vectors constituting the response; and (3) two level iterative process for generating the response of the structure. An assessment is made of the effectiveness of the procedure on the CRAY X-MP/4 computers.

  8. A new computational scheme on quantitative inner pipe boundary identification based on the estimation of effective thermal conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Chunli; Sun, Fengrui; Yang, Li

    2008-10-01

    In the paper, the irregular configuration of the inner pipe boundary is identified based on the estimation of the circumferential distribution of the effective thermal conductivity of pipe wall. In order to simulate the true temperature measurement in the numerical examples, the finite element method is used to calculate the temperature distribution at the outer pipe surface based on the irregular shaped inner pipe boundary to be determined. Then based on this simulated temperature distribution the inverse identification work is conducted by employing the modified one-dimensional correction method, along with the finite volume method, to estimate the circumferential distribution of the effective thermal conductivity of the pipe wall. Thereafter, the inner pipe boundary shape is calculated based on the conductivity estimation result. A series of numerical experiments with different temperature measurement errors and different thermal conductivities of pipe wall have certified the effectiveness of the method. It is proved that the method is a simple, fast and accurate one for this inverse heat conduction problem.

  9. Computational micromechanical analysis of the representative volume element of bituminous composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozer, Hasan; Ghauch, Ziad G.; Dhasmana, Heena; Al-Qadi, Imad L.

    2016-08-01

    Micromechanical computational modeling is used in this study to determine the smallest domain, or Representative Volume Element (RVE), that can be used to characterize the effective properties of composite materials such as Asphalt Concrete (AC). Computational Finite Element (FE) micromechanical modeling was coupled with digital image analysis of surface scans of AC specimens. Three mixtures with varying Nominal Maximum Aggregate Size (NMAS) of 4.75 mm, 12.5 mm, and 25 mm, were prepared for digital image analysis and computational micromechanical modeling. The effects of window size and phase modulus mismatch on the apparent viscoelastic response of the composite were numerically examined. A good agreement was observed in the RVE size predictions based on micromechanical computational modeling and image analysis. Micromechanical results indicated that a degradation in the matrix stiffness increases the corresponding RVE size. Statistical homogeneity was observed for window sizes equal to two to three times the NMAS. A model was presented for relating the degree of statistical homogeneity associated with each window size for materials with varying inclusion dimensions.

  10. Three-Dimensional Effects on Multi-Element High Lift Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumsey, Christopher L.; Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Watson, Ralph D.

    2002-01-01

    In an effort to discover the causes for disagreement between previous 2-D computations and nominally 2-D experiment for flow over the 3-clement McDonnell Douglas 30P-30N airfoil configuration at high lift, a combined experimental/CFD investigation is described. The experiment explores several different side-wall boundary layer control venting patterns, document's venting mass flow rates, and looks at corner surface flow patterns. The experimental angle of attack at maximum lift is found to be sensitive to the side wall venting pattern: a particular pattern increases the angle of attack at maximum lift by at least 2 deg. A significant amount of spanwise pressure variation is present at angles of attack near maximum lift. A CFD study using 3-D structured-grid computations, which includes the modeling of side-wall venting, is employed to investigate 3-D effects of the flow. Side-wall suction strength is found to affect the angle at which maximum lift is predicted. Maximum lift in the CFD is shown to be limited by the growth of all off-body corner flow vortex and consequent increase in spanwise pressure variation and decrease in circulation. The 3-D computations with and without wall venting predict similar trends to experiment at low angles of attack, but either stall too earl or else overpredict lift levels near maximum lift by as much as 5%. Unstructured-grid computations demonstrate that mounting brackets lower die the levels near maximum lift conditions.

  11. On Boundary Stimulation and Optimal Boundary Control of the Bidomain Equations

    PubMed Central

    Nagaiah, Chamakuri; Kunisch, Karl; Plank, Gernot

    2014-01-01

    The bidomain equations with Neumann boundary stimulation and optimal control of these stimuli are investigated. First an analytical framework for boundary control is provided. Then a parallel finite element based algorithm is devised and its efficiency is demonstrated not only for the direct problem but also for the optimal control problem. The computations realize a model configuration corresponding to optimal boundary defibrillation of a reentry phenomenon by applying current density stimuli. PMID:23856647

  12. Fiber pushout test: A three-dimensional finite element computational simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mital, Subodh K.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1990-01-01

    A fiber pushthrough process was computationally simulated using three-dimensional finite element method. The interface material is replaced by an anisotropic material with greatly reduced shear modulus in order to simulate the fiber pushthrough process using a linear analysis. Such a procedure is easily implemented and is computationally very effective. It can be used to predict fiber pushthrough load for a composite system at any temperature. The average interface shear strength obtained from pushthrough load can easily be separated into its two components: one that comes from frictional stresses and the other that comes from chemical adhesion between fiber and the matrix and mechanical interlocking that develops due to shrinkage of the composite because of phase change during the processing. Step-by-step procedures are described to perform the computational simulation, to establish bounds on interfacial bond strength and to interpret interfacial bond quality.

  13. FEATS - Finite element thermal stress analysis of plane or axisymmetric solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, J. A.

    1971-01-01

    FEATS computer code uses finite element analysis to calculate steady state temperature and thermal stress fields for either axisymmetric or plane two-dimensional bodies with boundary conditions, including specified displacements, loads, and thermal boundary conditions.

  14. Experimental and computational investigation of lift-enhancing tabs on a multi-element airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashby, Dale

    1996-01-01

    An experimental and computational investigation of the effect of lift enhancing tabs on a two-element airfoil was conducted. The objective of the study was to develop an understanding of the flow physics associated with lift enhancing tabs on a multi-element airfoil. A NACA 63(sub 2)-215 ModB airfoil with a 30 percent chord Fowler flap was tested in the NASA Ames 7 by 10 foot wind tunnel. Lift enhancing tabs of various heights were tested on both the main element and the flap for a variety of flap riggings. Computations of the flow over the two-element airfoil were performed using the two-dimensional incompressible Navier-Stokes code INS2D-UP. The computer results predict all of the trends in the experimental data quite well. When the flow over the flap upper surface is attached, tabs mounted at the main element trailing edge (cove tabs) produce very little change in lift. At high flap deflections. however, the flow over the flap is separated and cove tabs produce large increases in lift and corresponding reductions in drag by eliminating the separated flow. Cove tabs permit high flap deflection angles to be achieved and reduce the sensitivity of the airfoil lift to the size of the flap gap. Tabs attached to the flap training edge (flap tabs) are effective at increasing lift without significantly increasing drag. A combination of a cove tab and a flap tab increased the airfoil lift coefficient by 11 percent relative to the highest lift tab coefficient achieved by any baseline configuration at an angle of attack of zero percent and the maximum lift coefficient was increased by more than 3 percent. A simple analytic model based on potential flow was developed to provide a more detailed understanding of how lift enhancing tabs work. The tabs were modeled by a point vortex at the training edge. Sensitivity relationships were derived which provide a mathematical basis for explaining the effects of lift enhancing tabs on a multi-element airfoil. Results of the modeling

  15. Computational Analysis of Enhanced Magnetic Bioseparation in Microfluidic Systems with Flow-Invasive Magnetic Elements

    PubMed Central

    Khashan, S. A.; Alazzam, A.; Furlani, E. P.

    2014-01-01

    A microfluidic design is proposed for realizing greatly enhanced separation of magnetically-labeled bioparticles using integrated soft-magnetic elements. The elements are fixed and intersect the carrier fluid (flow-invasive) with their length transverse to the flow. They are magnetized using a bias field to produce a particle capture force. Multiple stair-step elements are used to provide efficient capture throughout the entire flow channel. This is in contrast to conventional systems wherein the elements are integrated into the walls of the channel, which restricts efficient capture to limited regions of the channel due to the short range nature of the magnetic force. This severely limits the channel size and hence throughput. Flow-invasive elements overcome this limitation and enable microfluidic bioseparation systems with superior scalability. This enhanced functionality is quantified for the first time using a computational model that accounts for the dominant mechanisms of particle transport including fully-coupled particle-fluid momentum transfer. PMID:24931437

  16. Computational analysis of enhanced magnetic bioseparation in microfluidic systems with flow-invasive magnetic elements.

    PubMed

    Khashan, S A; Alazzam, A; Furlani, E P

    2014-01-01

    A microfluidic design is proposed for realizing greatly enhanced separation of magnetically-labeled bioparticles using integrated soft-magnetic elements. The elements are fixed and intersect the carrier fluid (flow-invasive) with their length transverse to the flow. They are magnetized using a bias field to produce a particle capture force. Multiple stair-step elements are used to provide efficient capture throughout the entire flow channel. This is in contrast to conventional systems wherein the elements are integrated into the walls of the channel, which restricts efficient capture to limited regions of the channel due to the short range nature of the magnetic force. This severely limits the channel size and hence throughput. Flow-invasive elements overcome this limitation and enable microfluidic bioseparation systems with superior scalability. This enhanced functionality is quantified for the first time using a computational model that accounts for the dominant mechanisms of particle transport including fully-coupled particle-fluid momentum transfer. PMID:24931437

  17. Dynamic finite-strain modelling of the human left ventricle in health and disease using an immersed boundary-finite element method

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Hao; Carrick, David; Berry, Colin; Griffith, Boyce E.; Luo, Xiaoyu

    2016-01-01

    Detailed models of the biomechanics of the heart are important both for developing improved interventions for patients with heart disease and also for patient risk stratification and treatment planning. For instance, stress distributions in the heart affect cardiac remodelling, but such distributions are not presently accessible in patients. Biomechanical models of the heart offer detailed three-dimensional deformation, stress and strain fields that can supplement conventional clinical data. In this work, we introduce dynamic computational models of the human left ventricle (LV) that are derived from clinical imaging data obtained from a healthy subject and from a patient with a myocardial infarction (MI). Both models incorporate a detailed invariant-based orthotropic description of the passive elasticity of the ventricular myocardium along with a detailed biophysical model of active tension generation in the ventricular muscle. These constitutive models are employed within a dynamic simulation framework that accounts for the inertia of the ventricular muscle and the blood that is based on an immersed boundary (IB) method with a finite element description of the structural mechanics. The geometry of the models is based on data obtained non-invasively by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR). CMR imaging data are also used to estimate the parameters of the passive and active constitutive models, which are determined so that the simulated end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes agree with the corresponding volumes determined from the CMR imaging studies. Using these models, we simulate LV dynamics from enddiastole to end-systole. The results of our simulations are shown to be in good agreement with subject-specific CMR-derived strain measurements and also with earlier clinical studies on human LV strain distributions. PMID:27041786

  18. Calculation for path-domain independent J integral with elasto-viscoplastic consistent tangent operator concept-based boundary element methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong, Liu; Qichao, Hong; Lihua, Liang

    1999-05-01

    This paper presents an elasto-viscoplastic consistent tangent operator (CTO) based boundary element formulation, and application for calculation of path-domain independent J integrals (extension of the classical J integrals) in nonlinear crack analysis. When viscoplastic deformation happens, the effective stresses around the crack tip in the nonlinear region is allowed to exceed the loading surface, and the pure plastic theory is not suitable for this situation. The concept of consistency employed in the solution of increment viscoplastic problem, plays a crucial role in preserving the quadratic rate asymptotic convergence of iteractive schemes based on Newton's method. Therefore, this paper investigates the viscoplastic crack problem, and presents an implicit viscoplastic algorithm using the CTO concept in a boundary element framework for path-domain independent J integrals. Applications are presented with two numerical examples for viscoplastic crack problems and J integrals.

  19. Experimental analysis and computation of the onset and development of the boundary layer transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnal, D.; Juillen, J. C.; Michel, R.

    1978-01-01

    The transition of an incompressible boundary layer, with zero pressure gradient and low free-stream turbulence is studied. Mean velocity, turbulence and Reynolds shear stress profiles are presented. The development of the Tollmien-Schlichting waves is clearly shown until the turbulent spots appear. The intermittency phenomenon is studied by conditional sampling of the hotwire signal. The comparison with calculation results obtained by resolution of a set of transport equations shows a good agreement for the mean characteristics of the flow; discrepancies observed for the turbulent quantities evolution are due to the intermittency phenomenon.

  20. Vortical gust boundary condition for realistic rotor wake/stator interaction noise prediction using computational aeroacoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hixon, Ray; Sescu, Adrian; Sawyer, Scott

    2011-08-01

    In this work, the NASA Glenn Research Center Broadband Aeroacoustic Stator Simulation (BASS) code is extended for use in the prediction of noise produced by realistic three-dimensional rotor wakes impinging on a downstream stator row. In order to accurately simulate such a flow using a nonlinear time-accurate solver, the inflow and outflow boundary conditions must simultaneously maintain the desired mean flow, allow outgoing vortical, entropic, and acoustic waves to cleanly exit the domain, and accurately impose the desired incoming flow disturbances. This work validates a new method for the acoustics-free imposition of three-dimensional vortical disturbances using benchmark test cases.

  1. Numerical modeling of multi-mode active control of turbofan tonal noise using a boundary element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireland, Laralee Gordon

    A numerical model was developed to investigate the possibility of implementing active control (ANC) to minimize noise radiation from high-bypass turbofan engines. Previous experimental work on the NASA Glenn Research Center active noise control fan (ANCF) was encouraging, but the question remained whether the modal approach investigated could be effective on real engines. The engine model developed for this research project uses an indirect boundary element method, implemented with Sysnoise, and a multi-mode Newton's algorithm, implemented with MATLAB(TM), to simulate the active control. Noise from the inlet was targeted. Both the experimental and numerical results based on the NASA ANCF simplified cylindrical engine geometry indicate overall reductions in the m = 2 component of the noise. Reductions obtained at the numerical sensor rings range from 17 dB to 63 dB and at a plane in the duct inlet, -8 dB to 33 dB. Rings mounted on the inlet duct are unable to accurately predict the total reduction of the inlet field, but the controller is still able to effectively reduce the total acoustic field. Generally, one sensor ring and one actuator ring per propagating mode were necessary to control the inlet field. At frequencies close to the cut-off frequency of a mode, an additional sensor and actuator ring were needed to adequately control the inlet field due to the evanescent mode. A more realistic, but still axisymmetric, engine geometry based on the GE CF6-80C engine was developed and the same algorithm used. Reductions obtained at the sensor rings range from 4 dB to 56 dB and at the duct inlet plane, from 12 dB to 26 dB. The overall far field noise radiation from the engine remained unchanged (0.4 dB) or decreased slightly (3.6 dB). The inlet noise was controlled at all frequencies but the noise from the exhaust was increased. The effect of inlet control on the exhaust radiation suggests the need for a controller that targets both the inlet and exhaust noise

  2. Development of an integrated BEM approach for hot fluid structure interaction: BEST-FSI: Boundary Element Solution Technique for Fluid Structure Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dargush, G. F.; Banerjee, P. K.; Shi, Y.

    1992-01-01

    As part of the continuing effort at NASA LeRC to improve both the durability and reliability of hot section Earth-to-orbit engine components, significant enhancements must be made in existing finite element and finite difference methods, and advanced techniques, such as the boundary element method (BEM), must be explored. The BEM was chosen as the basic analysis tool because the critical variables (temperature, flux, displacement, and traction) can be very precisely determined with a boundary-based discretization scheme. Additionally, model preparation is considerably simplified compared to the more familiar domain-based methods. Furthermore, the hyperbolic character of high speed flow is captured through the use of an analytical fundamental solution, eliminating the dependence of the solution on the discretization pattern. The price that must be paid in order to realize these advantages is that any BEM formulation requires a considerable amount of analytical work, which is typically absent in the other numerical methods. All of the research accomplishments of a multi-year program aimed toward the development of a boundary element formulation for the study of hot fluid-structure interaction in Earth-to-orbit engine hot section components are detailed. Most of the effort was directed toward the examination of fluid flow, since BEM's for fluids are at a much less developed state. However, significant strides were made, not only in the analysis of thermoviscous fluids, but also in the solution of the fluid-structure interaction problem.

  3. Computational fluid dynamics analysis of cyclist aerodynamics: performance of different turbulence-modelling and boundary-layer modelling approaches.

    PubMed

    Defraeye, Thijs; Blocken, Bert; Koninckx, Erwin; Hespel, Peter; Carmeliet, Jan

    2010-08-26

    This study aims at assessing the accuracy of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for applications in sports aerodynamics, for example for drag predictions of swimmers, cyclists or skiers, by evaluating the applied numerical modelling techniques by means of detailed validation experiments. In this study, a wind-tunnel experiment on a scale model of a cyclist (scale 1:2) is presented. Apart from three-component forces and moments, also high-resolution surface pressure measurements on the scale model's surface, i.e. at 115 locations, are performed to provide detailed information on the flow field. These data are used to compare the performance of different turbulence-modelling techniques, such as steady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS), with several k-epsilon and k-omega turbulence models, and unsteady large-eddy simulation (LES), and also boundary-layer modelling techniques, namely wall functions and low-Reynolds number modelling (LRNM). The commercial CFD code Fluent 6.3 is used for the simulations. The RANS shear-stress transport (SST) k-omega model shows the best overall performance, followed by the more computationally expensive LES. Furthermore, LRNM is clearly preferred over wall functions to model the boundary layer. This study showed that there are more accurate alternatives for evaluating flow around bluff bodies with CFD than the standard k-epsilon model combined with wall functions, which is often used in CFD studies in sports.

  4. MP Salsa: a finite element computer program for reacting flow problems. Part 1--theoretical development

    SciTech Connect

    Shadid, J.N.; Moffat, H.K.; Hutchinson, S.A.; Hennigan, G.L.; Devine, K.D.; Salinger, A.G.

    1996-05-01

    The theoretical background for the finite element computer program, MPSalsa, is presented in detail. MPSalsa is designed to solve laminar, low Mach number, two- or three-dimensional incompressible and variable density reacting fluid flows on massively parallel computers, using a Petrov-Galerkin finite element formulation. The code has the capability to solve coupled fluid flow, heat transport, multicomponent species transport, and finite-rate chemical reactions, and to solver coupled multiple Poisson or advection-diffusion- reaction equations. The program employs the CHEMKIN library to provide a rigorous treatment of multicomponent ideal gas kinetics and transport. Chemical reactions occurring in the gas phase and on surfaces are treated by calls to CHEMKIN and SURFACE CHEMKIN, respectively. The code employs unstructured meshes, using the EXODUS II finite element data base suite of programs for its input and output files. MPSalsa solves both transient and steady flows by using fully implicit time integration, an inexact Newton method and iterative solvers based on preconditioned Krylov methods as implemented in the Aztec solver library.

  5. Computer simulation analysis of fracture dislocation of the proximal interphalangeal joint using the finite element method.

    PubMed

    Akagi, T; Hashizume, H; Inoue, H; Ogura, T; Nagayama, N

    1994-10-01

    Stress is a proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint model was analyzed by the two-dimensional and three-dimensional finite element methods (FEM) to study the onset mechanisms of the middle phalangeal base fracture. The structural shapes were obtained from sagittally sectioned specimens of the PIP joint for making FEM models. In those models, four different material properties were given corresponding to cortical bone, subchondral bone, cancellous bone and cartilage. Loading conditions were determined by estimating the amount and position of axial pressure added to the middle phalanx. A general finite element program (MARC) was used for computer simulation analysis. The results of the fracture experiments compared with the clinical manifestation of the fractures justify the applicability of the computer simulation models using FEM analysis. The stress distribution changed as the angle of the PIP joint changed. Concentrated stress was found on the volar side of the middle phalangeal base in the hyperextension position, and was found on the dorsal side in the flexion position. In the neutral position, the stress was found on both sides. Axial stress on the middle phalanx causes three different types of fractures (volar, dorsal and both) depending upon the angle of the PIP joint. These results demonstrate that the type of PIP joint fracture dislocation depends on the angle of the joint at the time of injury. The finite element method is one of the most useful methods for analyzing the onset mechanism of fractures.

  6. STARS: An Integrated, Multidisciplinary, Finite-Element, Structural, Fluids, Aeroelastic, and Aeroservoelastic Analysis Computer Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, K. K.

    1997-01-01

    A multidisciplinary, finite element-based, highly graphics-oriented, linear and nonlinear analysis capability that includes such disciplines as structures, heat transfer, linear aerodynamics, computational fluid dynamics, and controls engineering has been achieved by integrating several new modules in the original STARS (STructural Analysis RoutineS) computer program. Each individual analysis module is general-purpose in nature and is effectively integrated to yield aeroelastic and aeroservoelastic solutions of complex engineering problems. Examples of advanced NASA Dryden Flight Research Center projects analyzed by the code in recent years include the X-29A, F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle/Thrust Vectoring Control System, B-52/Pegasus Generic Hypersonics, National AeroSpace Plane (NASP), SR-71/Hypersonic Launch Vehicle, and High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) projects. Extensive graphics capabilities exist for convenient model development and postprocessing of analysis results. The program is written in modular form in standard FORTRAN language to run on a variety of computers, such as the IBM RISC/6000, SGI, DEC, Cray, and personal computer; associated graphics codes use OpenGL and IBM/graPHIGS language for color depiction. This program is available from COSMIC, the NASA agency for distribution of computer programs.

  7. Computational design of ICCP systems: Lessons learned and future directions

    SciTech Connect

    DeGiorgi, V.G.; Lucas, K.E.

    1999-07-01

    Computational modeling using boundary element techniques has been proposed for design and evaluation of shipboard impressed current cathodic protection (ICCP) systems. LaPlace's equation, the governing differential equation for electrochemical corrosion, is well suited for solution by the boundary element method. There has been much work performed in this field during the past two decades. Computational modeling efforts designed to validate boundary element procedures are reviewed. US Navy ship systems discussed are CG-59, CG-66, and CVN-068. Computational analysis accuracy is determined by comparison with physical scale modeling experimental results. Lessons learned from the analysis described are summarized. Advantages and disadvantages of boundary element modeling are discussed.

  8. Development of an adaptive hp-version finite element method for computational optimal control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, Dewey H.; Warner, Michael S.

    1994-01-01

    In this research effort, the usefulness of hp-version finite elements and adaptive solution-refinement techniques in generating numerical solutions to optimal control problems has been investigated. Under NAG-939, a general FORTRAN code was developed which approximated solutions to optimal control problems with control constraints and state constraints. Within that methodology, to get high-order accuracy in solutions, the finite element mesh would have to be refined repeatedly through bisection of the entire mesh in a given phase. In the current research effort, the order of the shape functions in each element has been made a variable, giving more flexibility in error reduction and smoothing. Similarly, individual elements can each be subdivided into many pieces, depending on the local error indicator, while other parts of the mesh remain coarsely discretized. The problem remains to reduce and smooth the error while still keeping computational effort reasonable enough to calculate time histories in a short enough time for on-board applications.

  9. Large-scale computation of incompressible viscous flow by least-squares finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Bo-Nan; Lin, T. L.; Povinelli, Louis A.

    1993-01-01

    The least-squares finite element method (LSFEM) based on the velocity-pressure-vorticity formulation is applied to large-scale/three-dimensional steady incompressible Navier-Stokes problems. This method can accommodate equal-order interpolations and results in symmetric, positive definite algebraic system which can be solved effectively by simple iterative methods. The first-order velocity-Bernoulli function-vorticity formulation for incompressible viscous flows is also tested. For three-dimensional cases, an additional compatibility equation, i.e., the divergence of the vorticity vector should be zero, is included to make the first-order system elliptic. The simple substitution of the Newton's method is employed to linearize the partial differential equations, the LSFEM is used to obtain discretized equations, and the system of algebraic equations is solved using the Jacobi preconditioned conjugate gradient method which avoids formation of either element or global matrices (matrix-free) to achieve high efficiency. To show the validity of this scheme for large-scale computation, we give numerical results for 2D driven cavity problem at Re = 10000 with 408 x 400 bilinear elements. The flow in a 3D cavity is calculated at Re = 100, 400, and 1,000 with 50 x 50 x 50 trilinear elements. The Taylor-Goertler-like vortices are observed for Re = 1,000.

  10. Quantitative Computed Tomography Protocols Affect Material Mapping and Quantitative Computed Tomography-Based Finite-Element Analysis Predicted Stiffness.

    PubMed

    Giambini, Hugo; Dragomir-Daescu, Dan; Nassr, Ahmad; Yaszemski, Michael J; Zhao, Chunfeng

    2016-09-01

    Quantitative computed tomography-based finite-element analysis (QCT/FEA) has become increasingly popular in an attempt to understand and possibly reduce vertebral fracture risk. It is known that scanning acquisition settings affect Hounsfield units (HU) of the CT voxels. Material properties assignments in QCT/FEA, relating HU to Young's modulus, are performed by applying empirical equations. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of QCT scanning protocols on predicted stiffness values from finite-element models. One fresh frozen cadaveric torso and a QCT calibration phantom were scanned six times varying voltage and current and reconstructed to obtain a total of 12 sets of images. Five vertebrae from the torso were experimentally tested to obtain stiffness values. QCT/FEA models of the five vertebrae were developed for the 12 image data resulting in a total of 60 models. Predicted stiffness was compared to the experimental values. The highest percent difference in stiffness was approximately 480% (80 kVp, 110 mAs, U70), while the lowest outcome was ∼1% (80 kVp, 110 mAs, U30). There was a clear distinction between reconstruction kernels in predicted outcomes, whereas voltage did not present a clear influence on results. The potential of QCT/FEA as an improvement to conventional fracture risk prediction tools is well established. However, it is important to establish research protocols that can lead to results that can be translated to the clinical setting. PMID:27428281

  11. Computer modeling of single-cell and multicell thermionic fuel elements

    SciTech Connect

    Dickinson, J.W.; Klein, A.C.

    1996-05-01

    Modeling efforts are undertaken to perform coupled thermal-hydraulic and thermionic analysis for both single-cell and multicell thermionic fuel elements (TFE). The analysis--and the resulting MCTFE computer code (multicell thermionic fuel element)--is a steady-state finite volume model specifically designed to analyze cylindrical TFEs. It employs an interactive successive overrelaxation solution technique to solve for the temperatures throughout the TFE and a coupled thermionic routine to determine the total TFE performance. The calculated results include temperature distributions in all regions of the TFE, axial interelectrode voltages and current densities, and total TFE electrical output parameters including power, current, and voltage. MCTFE-generated results compare experimental data from the single-cell Topaz-II-type TFE and multicell data from the General Atomics 3H5 TFE to benchmark the accuracy of the code methods.

  12. Computational Investigation of Supersonic Boundary Layer Transition Over Canonical Fuselage Nose Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhari, Meelan M.; Tokugawa, Naoko; Li, Fei; Chang, Chau-Lyan; White, Jeffery A.; Ishikawa, Hiroaki; Ueda, Yoshine; Atobe, Takashi; Fujii, Keisuke

    2012-01-01

    Boundary layer transition over axisymmetric bodies at non-zero angle of attack in supersonic flow is numerically investigated as part of joint research between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). Transition over four axisymmetric bodies (namely, Sears-Haack body, semi-Sears-Haack body, 5-degree straight cone and flared cone) with different axial pressure gradients has been studied at Mach 2 in order to understand the effect of axial pressure gradient on instability amplification along the leeward symmetry plane and in the region of nonzero crossflow away from it. Comparisons are made with measured transition data in Mach 2 facilities as well as with predicted and measured transition characteristics for a 5-degree straight cone in a Mach 3.5 low disturbance tunnel. Limitations of using linear stability correlations for predicting transition over axisymmetric bodies at angle of attack are pointed out.

  13. CCM Continuity Constraint Method: A finite-element computational fluid dynamics algorithm for incompressible Navier-Stokes fluid flows

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, P.T.

    1993-09-01

    As the field of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) continues to mature, algorithms are required to exploit the most recent advances in approximation theory, numerical mathematics, computing architectures, and hardware. Meeting this requirement is particularly challenging in incompressible fluid mechanics, where primitive-variable CFD formulations that are robust, while also accurate and efficient in three dimensions, remain an elusive goal. This dissertation asserts that one key to accomplishing this goal is recognition of the dual role assumed by the pressure, i.e., a mechanism for instantaneously enforcing conservation of mass and a force in the mechanical balance law for conservation of momentum. Proving this assertion has motivated the development of a new, primitive-variable, incompressible, CFD algorithm called the Continuity Constraint Method (CCM). The theoretical basis for the CCM consists of a finite-element spatial semi-discretization of a Galerkin weak statement, equal-order interpolation for all state-variables, a 0-implicit time-integration scheme, and a quasi-Newton iterative procedure extended by a Taylor Weak Statement (TWS) formulation for dispersion error control. Original contributions to algorithmic theory include: (a) formulation of the unsteady evolution of the divergence error, (b) investigation of the role of non-smoothness in the discretized continuity-constraint function, (c) development of a uniformly H{sup 1} Galerkin weak statement for the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes pressure Poisson equation, (d) derivation of physically and numerically well-posed boundary conditions, and (e) investigation of sparse data structures and iterative methods for solving the matrix algebra statements generated by the algorithm.

  14. COED Transactions, Vol. X, No. 9, September 1978. Use of the Analog/Hybrid Computer in Boundary Layer and Convection Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Eugene E., Ed.

    In certain boundary layer or natural convection work, where a similarity transformation is valid, the equations can be reduced to a set of nonlinear ordinary differential equations. They are therefore well-suited to a fast solution on an analog/hybrid computer. This paper illustrates such usage of the analog/hybrid computer by a set of…

  15. SAGUARO: a finite-element computer program for partially saturated porous flow problems

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, R.R.; Gartling, D.K.; Larson, D.E.

    1983-06-01

    SAGUARO is a finite element computer program designed to calculate two-dimensional flow of mass and energy through porous media. The media may be saturated or partially saturated. SAGUARO solves the parabolic time-dependent mass transport equation which accounts for the presence of partially saturated zones through the use of highly non-linear material characteristic curves. The energy equation accounts for the possibility of partially saturated regions by adjusting the thermal capacitances and thermal conductivities according to the volume fraction of water present in the local pores. Program capabilities, user instructions and a sample problem are presented in this manual.

  16. SAGUARO: A finite-element computer program for partially saturated porous flow problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Easton, R. R.; Gartling, D. K.; Larson, D. E.

    1983-11-01

    SAGUARO is finite element computer program designed to calculate two-dimensional flow of mass and energy through porous media. The media may be saturated or partially saturated. SAGUARO solves the parabolic time-dependent mass transport equation which accounts for the presence of partially saturated zones through the use of highly non-linear material characteristic curves. The energy equation accounts for the possibility of partially saturated regions by adjusting the thermal capacitances and thermal conductivities according to the volume fraction of water present in the local pores. Program capabilities, user instructions and a sample problem are presented in this manual.

  17. Computing ferrite core losses at high frequency by finite elements method including temperature influence

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, B.; Ahmad, J.; Guy, G.

    1994-09-01

    A finite elements method coupled with the Preisach model of hysteresis is used to compute-the ferrite losses in medium power transformers (10--60 kVA) working at relatively high frequencies (20--60 kHz) and with an excitation level of about 0.3 Tesla. The dynamic evolution of the permeability is taken into account. The simple and doubly cubic spline functions are used to account for temperature effects respectively on electric and on magnetic parameters of the ferrite cores. The results are compared with test data obtained with 3C8 and B50 ferrites at different frequencies.

  18. Wing-Body Aeroelasticity Using Finite-Difference Fluid/Finite-Element Structural Equations on Parallel Computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byun, Chansup; Guruswamy, Guru P.; Kutler, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    In recent years significant advances have been made for parallel computers in both hardware and software. Now parallel computers have become viable tools in computational mechanics. Many application codes developed on conventional computers have been modified to benefit from parallel computers. Significant speedups in some areas have been achieved by parallel computations. For single-discipline use of both fluid dynamics and structural dynamics, computations have been made on wing-body configurations using parallel computers. However, only a limited amount of work has been completed in combining these two disciplines for multidisciplinary applications. The prime reason is the increased level of complication associated with a multidisciplinary approach. In this work, procedures to compute aeroelasticity on parallel computers using direct coupling of fluid and structural equations will be investigated for wing-body configurations. The parallel computer selected for computations is an Intel iPSC/860 computer which is a distributed-memory, multiple-instruction, multiple data (MIMD) computer with 128 processors. In this study, the computational efficiency issues of parallel integration of both fluid and structural equations will be investigated in detail. The fluid and structural domains will be modeled using finite-difference and finite-element approaches, respectively. Results from the parallel computer will be compared with those from the conventional computers using a single processor. This study will provide an efficient computational tool for the aeroelastic analysis of wing-body structures on MIMD type parallel computers.

  19. Platinum Element Group and Other Metal Element Variations at the Permo-Triassic Boundary in Kashmir and British Columbia and Their Significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brookfield, M. E.; Schnellnutt, G.; Qi, L.; Hannigan, R.; Bhat, G. M.; Wignall, P.

    2009-05-01

    The end Permian marks the greatest extinction in the geological record, but there is little consensus on whether it was caused by terrestrial or extraterrestrial factors. We report here detailed analyses of platinum group element(PGE) and other metals from relatively narrowly spaced (30 cm. in Kashmir) intervals in two expanded sections from the Permo-Triassic northern and southern hemispheres that confirm a terrestrial volcanic source for the elements. But a mechanism is required that can distribute such elements world-wide from their volcanic sources, currently only exposed in the Permo-Triassic northern hemisphere.

  20. Symbolic algorithms for the computation of Moshinsky brackets and nuclear matrix elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ursescu, D.; Tomaselli, M.; Kuehl, T.; Fritzsche, S.

    2005-12-01

    To facilitate the use of the extended nuclear shell model (NSM), a FERMI module for calculating some of its basic quantities in the framework of MAPLE is provided. The Moshinsky brackets, the matrix elements for several central and non-central interactions between nuclear two-particle states as well as their expansion in terms of Talmi integrals are easily given within a symbolic formulation. All of these quantities are available for interactive work. Program summaryTitle of program:Fermi Catalogue identifier:ADVO Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADVO Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions:None Computer for which the program is designed and others on which is has been tested:All computers with a licence for the computer algebra package MAPLE [Maple is a registered trademark of Waterloo Maple Inc., produced by MapleSoft division of Waterloo Maple Inc.] Instalations:GSI-Darmstadt; University of Kassel (Germany) Operating systems or monitors under which the program has beentested: WindowsXP, Linux 2.4 Programming language used:MAPLE 8 and 9.5 from MapleSoft division of Waterloo Maple Inc. Memory required to execute with typical data:30 MB No. of lines in distributed program including test data etc.:5742 No. of bytes in distributed program including test data etc.:288 939 Distribution program:tar.gz Nature of the physical problem:In order to perform calculations within the nuclear shell model (NSM), a quick and reliable access to the nuclear matrix elements is required. These matrix elements, which arise from various types of forces among the nucleons, can be calculated using Moshinsky's transformation brackets between relative and center-of-mass coordinates [T.A. Brody, M. Moshinsky, Tables of Transformation Brackets, Monografias del Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, 1960] and by the proper use of the nuclear states in different coupling notations