Science.gov

Sample records for boundary layer thickness

  1. Turbulent Boundary Layer Thickness Estimation Method and Apparatus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-04-02

    correlation coefficient is computed with measured data from the recorded voltage. A laboratory non- dimensional value of the correlation coefficient is independently determined from laboratory data. The real non-dimensional value is compared with the laboratory non-dimensional value to obtain a boundary layer thickness having a value which minimizes a difference between the values of the real non-dimensional value and the laboratory non-dimensional

  2. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent boundary layer with constant thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yichen; Xu, Chunxiao; Huang, Weixi

    2016-11-01

    Direct numerical simulation is performed to turbulent boundary layer (TBL) with constant thickness at Reθ = 1420 . Periodic boundary condition is applied in the streamwise direction, and a mean body force equivalent to the convection term in the mean momentum equation is imposed in this direction. The body force is calculated using the published TBL data of Schlatter and Orlu (2010) at Reθ = 1420 . The presently simulated TBL is compared with the conventional TBL and turbulent channel flow at the prescribed Reynolds number. The turbulent statistics agrees well with that of Schlatter and Orlu (2010). The pre-multiplied energy spectra in current simulation also present high similarity with the conventional TBL, while differ obviously with those in turbulent channel. The successful replication of turbulent boundary in the current simulation provides an alternative method for boundary layer simulation with much less computational cost. Meanwhile, in aspect of both turbulent statistics and flow structures, the current results indicate that the differences between turbulent channel and boundary layer flow mainly caused by the discrepancy in driving force distribution rather than the periodic boundary restriction. National Natural Science Foundation of China (Project No. 11490551, 11472154, 11322221, 11132005).

  3. Minimum Wind Dynamic Soaring Trajectories under Boundary Layer Thickness Limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bousquet, Gabriel; Triantafyllou, Michael; Slotine, Jean-Jacques

    2015-11-01

    Dynamic soaring is the flight technique where a glider, either avian or manmade, extracts its propulsive energy from the non-uniformity of horizontal winds. Albatrosses have been recorded to fly an impressive 5000 km/week at no energy cost of their own. In the sharp boundary layer limit, we show that the popular image, where the glider travels in a succession of half turns, is suboptimal for travel speed, airspeed, and soaring ability. Instead, we show that the strategy that maximizes the three criteria simultaneously is a succession of infinitely small arc-circles connecting transitions between the calm and windy layers. The model is consistent with the recordings of albatross flight patterns. This lowers the required wind speed for dynamic soaring by over 50% compared to previous beliefs. In the thick boundary layer limit, energetic considerations allow us to predict a minimum wind gradient necessary for sustained soaring consistent with numerical models.

  4. Influence of bulk turbulence and entrance boundary layer thickness on the curved duct flow field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, R. A.

    1988-01-01

    The influence of bulk turbulence and boundary layer thickness on the secondary flow development in a square, 90 degree turning duct was investigated. A three-dimensional laser velocimetry system was utilized to measure the mean and fluctuating components of velocity at six cross-planes in the duct. The results from this investigation, with entrance boundary layer thickness of 20 percent, were compared with the thin boundary layer results documented in NASA CR-174811. The axial velocity profiles, cross-flow velocities, and turbulence intensities were compared and evaluated with regard to the influence of bulk turbulence intensity and boundary layer thickness, and the influence was significant. The results of this investigation expand the 90 degree curved duct experimental data base to higher turbulence levels and thicker entrance boundary layers. The experimental results provide a challenging benchmark data base for computational fluid dynamics code development and validation. The variation of inlet bulk turbulence intensity provides additional information to aid in turbulence model evaluation.

  5. Influence of bulk turbulence and entrance boundary layer thickness on the curved duct flow field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, R. A.

    1988-11-01

    The influence of bulk turbulence and boundary layer thickness on the secondary flow development in a square, 90 degree turning duct was investigated. A three-dimensional laser velocimetry system was utilized to measure the mean and fluctuating components of velocity at six cross-planes in the duct. The results from this investigation, with entrance boundary layer thickness of 20 percent, were compared with the thin boundary layer results documented in NASA CR-174811. The axial velocity profiles, cross-flow velocities, and turbulence intensities were compared and evaluated with regard to the influence of bulk turbulence intensity and boundary layer thickness, and the influence was significant. The results of this investigation expand the 90 degree curved duct experimental data base to higher turbulence levels and thicker entrance boundary layers. The experimental results provide a challenging benchmark data base for computational fluid dynamics code development and validation. The variation of inlet bulk turbulence intensity provides additional information to aid in turbulence model evaluation.

  6. Identification of atmospheric boundary layer thickness using doppler radar datas and WRF - ARW model in Merauke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putri, R. J. A.; Setyawan, T.

    2017-01-01

    In the synoptic scale, one of the important meteorological parameter is the atmospheric boundary layer. Aside from being a supporter of the parameters in weather and climate models, knowing the thickness of the layer of the atmosphere can help identify aerosols and the strength of the vertical mixing of pollutants in it. The vertical wind profile data from C-band Doppler radar Mopah-Merauke which is operated by BMKG through Mopah-Merauke Meteorological Station can be used to identify the peak of Atmospheric Boundaryu Layer (ABL). ABL peak marked by increasing wind shear over the layer blending. Samples in January 2015 as a representative in the wet and in July 2015 as the representation of a dry month, shows that ABL heights using WRF models show that in July (sunny weather) ABL height values higher than in January (cloudy)

  7. The computation of thick axisymmetric boundary layers and wakes around bodies of revolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markatos, N. C.

    The paper is concerned with the computational investigation of thick, axisymmetric, turbulent boundary layers and wakes around bodies of revolution. The procedures employed take full account of the influence of longitudinal and transverse surface curvatures and normal pressure gradients on the development of the boundary layer and wake, and also the viscous-inviscid interaction in the tail region of the body. The method makes it possible to calculate the static pressure and the velocity profiles along the body as well as the drag components; and it is applicable to both two- and three-dimensional situations, enabling, for example, the prediction of flows around ships' and submarines' hulls to be made. The application of the fully-elliptic calculation procedure to a body of revolution is described, and comparisons made between predictions and experimental measurements. The calculated axial variation of skin friction and pressure coefficient, and the velocity profiles are shown to be in fair agreement with experimental values.

  8. Instability of a compressible circular free jet with consideration of the influence of the jet boundary layer thickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michalke, A.

    1977-01-01

    The instability of a circular jet was investigated by means of the inviscid linearized stability theory. By variation of a jet parameter which takes the ratio of jet radius to boundary layer thickness into account, the influence of axisymmetry on the spatial growth rate and disturbance phase velocity is studied. The influence of Mach number and temperature ratio is discussed. A comparison with measurements shows that the instability of a turbulent jet boundary layer may also be explained by these results.

  9. Estimation of thickness of concentration boundary layers by osmotic volume flux determination.

    PubMed

    Jasik-Ślęzak, Jolanta S; Olszówka, Kornelia M; Slęzak, Andrzej

    2011-06-01

    The estimation method of the concentration boundary layers thicknesses (δ) in a single-membrane system containing non-electrolytic binary or ternary solutions was devised using the Kedem-Katchalsky formalism. A square equation used in this method contains membrane transport (L(p), σ, ω) and solution (D, C) parameters as well as a volume osmotic flux (J(v)). These values can be determined in a series of independent experiments. Calculated values δ are nonlinearly dependent on the concentrations of investigated solutions and the membrane system configuration. These nonlinearities are the effect of a competition between spontaneously occurring diffusion and natural convection. The mathematical model based on Kedem-Katchalsky equations and a concentration Rayleigh number (R(C)) was presented. On the basis of this model we introduce the dimensionless parameter, called by us a Katchalsky number (Ka), modifies R(C) of membrane transport. The critical value of this number well describes a moment of transition from the state of diffusion into convective diffusion membrane transport.

  10. Dust devil height and spacing with relation to the martian planetary boundary layer thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenton, Lori K.; Lorenz, Ralph

    2015-11-01

    In most remote and unmonitored places, little is known about the characteristics of daytime turbulent activity. Few processes render the optically transparent atmospheres of Earth and Mars visible; put more plainly, without clever instruments it is difficult to "see the unseen". To address this, we present a pilot study of images of martian dust devils (DDs) testing the hypothesis that DD height and spacing correlates with the thickness of the planetary boundary layer (PBL), h. The survey includes Context Camera (CTX) images from a 580 × 590 km2 area (196-208°E, 30-40°N) in northern Amazonis Planitia, spanning ∼3.6 Mars Years (MY) from Ls = 134.55°, MY 28 (13 November 2006) to Ls = 358.5°, MY 31 (28 July 2013). DD activity follows a repeatable seasonal pattern similar to that found in previous surveys, with a distinct "on" season during local summer, beginning shortly before the northern spring equinox (Ls = 0°) and lasting until just after the northern fall equinox (Ls = 180°). DD heights measured from shadow lengths varied considerably, with median values peaking at local midsummer. Modeled PBL heights, constrained by those measured from radio occultation data, follow a similar seasonal trend, and correlation of the two suggests that the martian PBL thickness is approximately 5 times the median DD height. These results compare favorably to the limited terrestrial data available. DD spacing was measured using nearest neighbor statistics, following the assumption that because convection cell widths have been measured to be ∼1.2 ± 0.2h (Willis, G.E., Deardorff, J.W. [1979]. J. Geophys. Res. 84(C1), 295-302), a preference for DD formation at vertices of convection cells intersections could be used to estimate the PBL height. During local spring and summer, the DD average nearest neighbor (ANN) ranged from ∼1 to 2h, indicating that DD spacing does indeed correlate with PBL height. However, this result is complicated by two factors: (1) convection cell

  11. The scaling transition of Nu number and boundary layer thickness in RB convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Hong-Yue; Chen, Xi; She, Zhen-Su

    2016-11-01

    A quantitative theory is developed for the vertical mean temperature profile (MTP) and mean velocity profile (MVP) in turbulent Rayleigh-Benard Convection (RBC), which explains the experimental and numerical observations of logarithmic law in MTP and the Rayleigh number (Ra)-dependence of its coefficient A. The theory extends a symmetry analysis of canonical wall-bounded turbulent flows, which allows to extract accurate Ra scaling of the sub-layer, buffer layer and log-layer thicknesses from the empirical data over a wide range of Ra. In particular, the scaling of the multi-layer thicknesses predicts that the log-law coefficient A follows a -0.121 scaling, which agrees well with the experimental data. More interestingly, a scaling transition is discovered for the kinetic sublayer thickness around Ra of 1010, which yields a scaling transition of Nu from 1/3 to 0.38. We also develop a new explanation for mean temperature logarithmic law: the effect of inverse pressure gradient drives plumes upwards near the side wall, and yields a similarity between temperature and momentum transport in the vertical direction.

  12. Quantification of Mixing of a Sonic Jet in Supersonic Crossflow due to Thick Turbulent Boundary Layer Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossmann, Tobias; Pizzaia, Adam

    2013-11-01

    The upstream injection surface boundary layer is shown to have a significant effect on the mixing characteristics of a sonic jet in supersonic cross flow. A circular, high-pressure, sonic jet is injected into a M =3.5 supersonic crossflow through different boundary layer thickness (δ/D = 7.5 and 1), with variable injection angles (-20 to +20 degrees), and variable momentum ratios (J = 2, 5, and 10). Planar Laser Mie Scattering of condensed ethanol droplets is used to quantitatively image the injected fluid concentration in both the side and end views. Jet fluid concentrations PDFs are constructed to better understand the mixing dynamics. These PDFs are integrated to create mixed fluid fraction profiles that are then reduced to mixing efficiency. Mixing efficiency values are computed from different two-dimensional planes to determine if centerline mixing efficiencies are characteristic of the entire three-dimensional flow. Through these analyses, it is seen that thick boundary layers tend to marginally alter jet penetration and spread, but significantly worsen jet mixing capabilities, regardless of momentum ratio or injection angle.

  13. The Thermal And Hydrodynamic Behavior of Thick, Rough-Wall, Turbulent Boundary Layers,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-08-01

    In d ~- 0 9 it .00y .T TN - u0t’ o CctP - c. or. r- o w’ 0 -~L C’~~N𔄃~ 0( 6 c 00 c C: I 0 0 ; 0 a C ,)aC D0C DaC 0CC 0 C0C MM CI 0 r - 0-( C’ I’ C-4...made by H. W. Coleman, E. J. Kerschen, D . J. Vitanye, and K. W. Randall. The authors thank these individuals and other members of the Department of...Conclusions .. ........ ...... 40 Vi ... -- d Chapter Page 3 EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS: FULLY ROUGH AND TRANSITIONALLY ROUGH TURBULENT BOUNDARY LAYERS

  14. Effects of Boundary-Layer Thickness on Unsteady Flow Characteristics Inside Open Cavities at Subsonic and Transonic Speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Dang-Guo; Li, Jian-Qiang; Fan, Zhao-Lin; Luo, Xin-Fu

    An experimental study was conducted in a 0.6m by 0.6m wind-tunnel to analyze effects of boundary-layer thickness on unsteady flow characteristics inside a rectangular open cavity at subsonic and transonic speeds. The sound pressure level (SPL) distributions at the centerline of the cavity floor and Sound pressure frequency spectrum (SPFS) characteristics on some measurement positions presented herein was obtained with cavity length-to-depth ratio (L/D) of 8 over Mach numbers (Ma) of 0.6 and 1.2 at a Reynolds numbers (Re) of 1.23 × 107 and 2.02 × 107 per meter under different boundary-layer thickness to cavity-depth ratios (δ/D). The experimental angle of attack, yawing and rolling angles were 0°. The results indicate that decrease in δ/D leads to severe flow separation and unsteady pressure fluctuation, which induces increase in SPL at same measurement points inside the cavity at Ma of 0.6. At Ma of 1.2, decrease in δ/D results in enhancing compressible waves. Generally, decrease in δ/D induces more flow self-sustained oscillation frequencies. It also makes severer aerodynamic noise inside the open cavity.

  15. Boundary layer simulator improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Praharaj, Sarat C.; Schmitz, Craig P.; Nouri, Joseph A.

    1989-01-01

    Boundary Layer Integral Matrix Procedure (BLIMPJ) has been identified by the propulsion community as the rigorous boundary layer program in connection with the existing JANNAF reference programs. The improvements made to BLIMPJ and described herein have potential applications in the design of the future Orbit Transfer Vehicle engines. The turbulence model is validated to include the effects of wall roughness and a way is devised to treat multiple smooth-rough surfaces. A prediction of relaminarization regions is examined as is the combined effects of wall cooling and surface roughness on relaminarization. A turbulence model to represent the effects of constant condensed phase loading is given. A procedure is described for thrust decrement calculation in thick boundary layers by coupling the T-D Kinetics Program and BLIMPJ and a way is provided for thrust loss optimization. Potential experimental studies in rocket nozzles are identified along with the required instrumentation to provide accurate measurements in support of the presented new analytical models.

  16. Flutter Sensitivity to Boundary Layer Thickness, Structural Damping, and Static Pressure Differential for a Shuttle Tile Overlay Repair Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Robert C.; Bartels, Robert E.

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines the aeroelastic stability of an on-orbit installable Space Shuttle patch panel. CFD flutter solutions were obtained for thick and thin boundary layers at a free stream Mach number of 2.0 and several Mach numbers near sonic speed. The effect of structural damping on these flutter solutions was also examined, and the effect of structural nonlinearities associated with in-plane forces in the panel was considered on the worst case linear flutter solution. The results of the study indicated that adequate flutter margins exist for the panel at the Mach numbers examined. The addition of structural damping improved flutter margins as did the inclusion of nonlinear effects associated with a static pressure difference across the panel.

  17. Boundary layer simulator improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Praharaj, S. C.; Schmitz, C.; Frost, C.; Engel, C. D.; Fuller, C. E.; Bender, R. L.; Pond, J.

    1984-01-01

    High chamber pressure expander cycles proposed for orbit transfer vehicles depend primarily on the heat energy transmitted from the combustion products through the thrust wall chamber wall. The heat transfer to the nozzle wall is affected by such variables as wall roughness, relamarization, and the presence of particles in the flow. Motor performance loss for these nozzles with thick boundary layers is inaccurate using the existing procedure coded BLIMPJ. Modifications and innovations to the code are examined. Updated routines are listed.

  18. Investigation of High-Subsonic Performance Characteristics of a 12 Degree 21-Inch Conical Diffuser, Including the Effects of Change in Inlet-Boundary-Layer Thickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copp, Martin R.; Klevatt, Paul L.

    1950-01-01

    Investigations were conducted of a 12 degree 21-inch conical diffuser of 2:l area ratio to determine the interrelation of boundary layer growth and performance characteristics. surveys were made of inlet and exit from, longitudinal static pressures were recorded, and velocity profiles were obtained through an inlet Reynolds number range, determined From mass flows and based on inlet diameter of 1.45 x 10(exp 6) to 7.45 x 10(exp 6) and a Mach number range of 0.11 to approximately choking. These investigations were made to two thicknesses of inlet boundary layer. The mean value, over the entire range of inlet velocities, of the displacement thickness of the thinner inlet boundary layer was approximately 0.035 inch and that of the thicker inlet boundary layer was approximately six times this value. The loss coefficient in the case of the thinner inlet boundary layer had a value between 2 to 3 percent of the inlet impact pressure over most of the air-flow range. The loss coefficient with the thicker inlet boundary layer was of the order of twice that of the thinner inlet boundary layer at low speeds and approximately three times at high speeds. In both cases the values were substantially less than those given in the literature for fully developed pipe flow. The static-pressure rise for the thinner inlet boundary layer was of the order of 95 percent of that theoretically possible over the entire speed range. For the thicker inlet boundary layer the static pressure rise, as a percentage of that theoretically possible, ranged from 82 percent at low speeds to 68 percent at high speeds.

  19. Boundary-layer transition and displacement thickness effects on zero-lift drag of a series of power-law bodies at Mach 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashby, G. C., Jr.; Harris, J. E.

    1974-01-01

    Wave and skin-friction drag have been numerically calculated for a series of power-law bodies at a Mach number of 6 and Reynolds numbers, based on body length, from 1.5 million to 9.5 million. Pressure distributions were computed on the nose by the inverse method and on the body by the method of characteristics. These pressure distributions and the measured locations of boundary-layer transition were used in a nonsimilar-boundary-layer program to determine viscous effects. A coupled iterative approach between the boundary-layer and pressure-distribution programs was used to account for boundary-layer displacement-thickness effects. The calculated-drag coefficients compared well with previously obtained experimental data.

  20. A Method to Predict the Thickness of Poorly-Bonded Material Along Spray and Spray-Layer Boundaries in Cold Spray Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yangfan; Hamada, Yukitaka; Otobe, Katsunori; Ando, Teiichi

    2017-02-01

    Multi-traverse CS provides a unique means for the production of thick coatings and bulk materials from powders. However, the material along spray and spray-layer boundaries is often poorly bonded as it is laid by the leading and trailing peripheries of the spray that carry powder particles with insufficient kinetic energy. For the same reason, the splats in the very first layer deposited on the substrate may not be bonded well either. A mathematical spray model was developed based on an axisymmetric Gaussian mass flow rate distribution and a stepped deposition yield to predict the thickness of such poorly-bonded layers in multi-traverse CS deposition. The predicted thickness of poorly-bonded layers in a multi-traverse Cu coating falls in the range of experimental values. The model also predicts that the material that contains poorly bonded splats could exceed 20% of the total volume of the coating.

  1. A Method to Predict the Thickness of Poorly-Bonded Material Along Spray and Spray-Layer Boundaries in Cold Spray Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yangfan; Hamada, Yukitaka; Otobe, Katsunori; Ando, Teiichi

    2016-12-01

    Multi-traverse CS provides a unique means for the production of thick coatings and bulk materials from powders. However, the material along spray and spray-layer boundaries is often poorly bonded as it is laid by the leading and trailing peripheries of the spray that carry powder particles with insufficient kinetic energy. For the same reason, the splats in the very first layer deposited on the substrate may not be bonded well either. A mathematical spray model was developed based on an axisymmetric Gaussian mass flow rate distribution and a stepped deposition yield to predict the thickness of such poorly-bonded layers in multi-traverse CS deposition. The predicted thickness of poorly-bonded layers in a multi-traverse Cu coating falls in the range of experimental values. The model also predicts that the material that contains poorly bonded splats could exceed 20% of the total volume of the coating.

  2. Open and closed-loop experiments to identify the separated flow dynamics of a thick turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaqarin, T.; Braud, C.; Coudert, S.; Stanislas, M.

    2013-02-01

    Open and closed-loop flow control experiments were performed on the transient attachment and separation mechanisms of a thick turbulent boundary layer (TBL). Without actuation, the TBL is subjected to an adverse pressure gradient and separates downstream of a sharp variation in the wall geometry. Departing from a given geometry and steady operations of vortex generator actuators, the control objective was to attach the flow in the separated region with a minimum of injected fluid using adaptation of the closed-loop control. The large scale of the facility (i.e., δ = 20 cm upstream of separation) induces large time scales and large Reynolds numbers of the flow to be controlled. It is found to consequently induce large time scales of the separation/attachment mechanisms, making the dynamic closed-loop implementation easier. Open-loop tests were first performed to extract the adequate input/output variables for closed-loop implementations. The chosen input variable was the Duty Cycle, DC, which enables sending of a control action at least 10 times faster than the time scales of the attachment/separation process. The chosen output variable was the voltage signal from a hot-film probe located on the flap which characterizes the degree of separation. In open loop, both the large scale (i.e., large time scales) of the present facility (Carlier and Stanislas in J Fluid Mech 535(36):143-188, 2005) and the well-defined excitation (Braud and Dyment in Phys Fluids 24:047102, 2012) help to extract the different time scales involved and to identify the whole system (actuators, baseline flow and sensor). Three Reynolds numbers based on the momentum thickness of the boundary layer near the actuators and upstream of separation were investigated ( Re θ = 7,500, 10,500 and 12,600) through variation of the free-stream velocity ( U ∞ = 5, 8, 10 m/s). These three systems were found to behave like first-order linear systems, with coefficients that need to be adapted depending on the

  3. The Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennekes, Hendrik

    1974-01-01

    Discusses some important parameters of the boundary layer and effects of turbulence on the circulation and energy dissipation of the atmosphere. Indicates that boundary-layer research plays an important role in long-term forecasting and the study of air-pollution meteorology. (CC)

  4. Flight-measured base pressure coefficients for thick boundary-layer flow over an aft-facing step for Mach numbers from 0.4 to 2.5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goecke, S. A.

    1973-01-01

    A 0.56-inch thick aft-facing step was located 52.1 feet from the leading edge of the left wing of an XB-70 airplane. A boundary-layer rake at a mirror location on the right wing was used to obtain local flow properties. Reynolds numbers were near 10 to the 8th power, resulting in a relatively thick boundary-layer. The momentum thickness ranged from slightly thinner to slightly thicker than the step height. Surface static pressures forward of the step were obtained for Mach numbers near 0.9, 1.5, 2.0, and 2.4. The data were compared with thin boundary-layer results from flight and wind-tunnel experiments and semiempirical relationships. Significant differences were found between the thick and the thin boundary-layer data.

  5. Steady incompressible variable thickness shear layer aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chi, M. R.

    1976-01-01

    A shear flow aerodynamic theory for steady incompressible flows is presented for both the lifting and non lifting problems. The slow variation of the boundary layer thickness is considered. The slowly varying behavior is treated by using multitime scales. The analysis begins with the elementary wavy wall problem and, through Fourier superpositions over the wave number space, the shear flow equivalents to the aerodynamic transfer functions of classical potential flow are obtained. The aerodynamic transfer functions provide integral equations which relate the wall pressure and the upwash. Computational results are presented for the pressure distribution, the lift coefficient, and the center of pressure travel along a two dimensional flat plate in a shear flow. The aerodynamic load is decreased by the shear layer, compared to the potential flow. The variable thickness shear layer decreases it less than the uniform thickness shear layer based upon equal maximum shear layer thicknesses.

  6. The atmospheric boundary layer

    SciTech Connect

    Garratt, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    This book is aimed at researchers in the atmospheric and associated sciences who require a moderately advanced text on the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) in which the many links between turbulence, air-surface transfer, boundary-layer structure and dynamics, and numerical modeling are discussed and elaborated upon. Chapter 1 serves as an introduction, with Chapters 2 and 3 dealing with the development of mean and turbulence equations, and the many scaling laws and theories that are the cornerstone of any serious ABL treatment. Modelling of the ABL is crucially dependent for its realism on the surface boundary conditions, and Chapters 4 and 5 deal with aerodynamic and energy considerations, with attention to both dry and wet land surfaces and the sea. The structure of the clear-sky, thermally stratified ABL is treated in Chapter 6, including the convective and stable cases over homogeneous land, the marine ABL and the internal boundary layer at the coastline. Chapter 7 then extends the discussion to the cloudy ABL. This is seen as particularly relevant since the extensive stratocumulus regions over the sub-tropical oceans and stratus regions over the Arctic are now identified as key players in the climate system. Finally, Chapters 8 and 9 bring much of the book's material together in a discussion of appropriate ABL and surface parameterization schemes for the general circulation models of the atmosphere that are being used for climate simulation.

  7. Microgravity Effects on Plant Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stutte, Gary; Monje, Oscar

    2005-01-01

    The goal of these series of experiment was to determine the effects of microgravity conditions on the developmental boundary layers in roots and leaves and to determine the effects of air flow on boundary layer development. It is hypothesized that microgravity induces larger boundary layers around plant organs because of the absence of buoyancy-driven convection. These larger boundary layers may affect normal metabolic function because they may reduce the fluxes of heat and metabolically active gases (e.g., oxygen, water vapor, and carbon dioxide. These experiments are to test whether there is a change in boundary layer associated with microgravity, quantify the change if it exists, and determine influence of air velocity on boundary layer thickness under different gravity conditions.

  8. Microgravity Effects on Plant Boundary Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutte, Gary; Monje, Oscar

    2005-08-01

    The goal of these series of experiment was to determine the effects of microgravity conditions on the developmental boundary layers in roots and leaves and to determine the effects of air flow on boundary layer development. It is hypothesized that microgravity induces larger boundary layers around plant organs because of the absence of buoyancy-driven convection. These larger boundary layers may affect normal metabolic function because they may reduce the fluxes of heat and metabolically active gases (e.g., oxygen, water vapor, and carbon dioxide. These experiments are to test whether there is a change in boundary layer associated with microgravity, quantify the change if it exists, and determine influence of air velocity on boundary layer thickness under different gravity conditions.

  9. Separation behavior of boundary layers on three-dimensional wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stock, H. W.

    1981-01-01

    An inverse boundary layer procedure for calculating separated, turbulent boundary layers at infinitely long, crabbing wing was developed. The procedure was developed for calculating three dimensional, incompressible turbulent boundary layers was expanded to adiabatic, compressible flows. Example calculations with transsonic wings were made including viscose effects. In this case an approximated calculation method described for areas of separated, turbulent boundary layers, permitting calculation of this displacement thickness. The laminar boundary layer development was calculated with inclined ellipsoids.

  10. Boundary layer transition studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watmuff, Jonathan H.

    1995-01-01

    A small-scale wind tunnel previously used for turbulent boundary layer experiments was modified for two sets of boundary layer transition studies. The first study concerns a laminar separation/turbulent reattachment. The pressure gradient and unit Reynolds number are the same as the fully turbulent flow of Spalart and Watmuff. Without the trip wire, a laminar layer asymptotes to a Falkner & Skan similarity solution in the FPG. Application of the APG causes the layer to separate and a highly turbulent and approximately 2D mean flow reattachment occurs downstream. In an effort to gain some physical insight into the flow processes a small impulsive disturbance was introduced at the C(sub p) minimum. The facility is totally automated and phase-averaged data are measured on a point-by-point basis using unprecedently large grids. The evolution of the disturbance has been tracked all the way into the reattachment region and beyond into the fully turbulent boundary layer. At first, the amplitude decays exponentially with streamwise distance in the APG region, where the layer remains attached, i.e. the layer is viscously stable. After separation, the rate of decay slows, and a point of minimum amplitude is reached where the contours of the wave packet exhibit dispersive characteristics. From this point, exponential growth of the amplitude of the disturbance is observed in the detached shear layer, i.e. the dominant instability mechanism is inviscid. A group of large-scale 3D vortex loops emerges in the vicinity of the reattachment. Remarkably, the second loop retains its identify far downstream in the turbulent boundary layer. The results provide a level of detail usually associated with CFD. Substantial modifications were made to the facility for the second study concerning disturbances generated by Suction Holes for laminar flow Control (LFC). The test section incorporates suction through interchangeable porous test surfaces. Detailed studies have been made using isolated

  11. Boundary layer transition studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watmuff, Jonathan H.

    1995-02-01

    A small-scale wind tunnel previously used for turbulent boundary layer experiments was modified for two sets of boundary layer transition studies. The first study concerns a laminar separation/turbulent reattachment. The pressure gradient and unit Reynolds number are the same as the fully turbulent flow of Spalart and Watmuff. Without the trip wire, a laminar layer asymptotes to a Falkner & Skan similarity solution in the FPG. Application of the APG causes the layer to separate and a highly turbulent and approximately 2D mean flow reattachment occurs downstream. In an effort to gain some physical insight into the flow processes a small impulsive disturbance was introduced at the C(sub p) minimum. The facility is totally automated and phase-averaged data are measured on a point-by-point basis using unprecedently large grids. The evolution of the disturbance has been tracked all the way into the reattachment region and beyond into the fully turbulent boundary layer. At first, the amplitude decays exponentially with streamwise distance in the APG region, where the layer remains attached, i.e. the layer is viscously stable. After separation, the rate of decay slows, and a point of minimum amplitude is reached where the contours of the wave packet exhibit dispersive characteristics. From this point, exponential growth of the amplitude of the disturbance is observed in the detached shear layer, i.e. the dominant instability mechanism is inviscid. A group of large-scale 3D vortex loops emerges in the vicinity of the reattachment. Remarkably, the second loop retains its identify far downstream in the turbulent boundary layer. The results provide a level of detail usually associated with CFD. Substantial modifications were made to the facility for the second study concerning disturbances generated by Suction Holes for laminar flow Control (LFC). The test section incorporates suction through interchangeable porous test surfaces. Detailed studies have been made using isolated

  12. Temperature and gas-phase composition measurements in supersonic flows using tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy: the effect of condensation on the boundary-layer thickness.

    PubMed

    Tanimura, Shinobu; Zvinevich, Yury; Wyslouzil, Barbara E; Zahniser, Mark; Shorter, Joanne; Nelson, David; McManus, Barry

    2005-05-15

    We used a tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer and a static-pressure probe to follow changes in temperature, vapor-phase concentration of D2O, and static pressure during condensation in a supersonic nozzle. Using the measured static-pressure ratio p/p0 and the mass fraction of the condensate g as inputs to the diabatic flow equations, we determined the area ratio (A/A*)wet and the corresponding centerline temperature of the flow during condensation. From (A/A*)wet we determined the boundary-layer displacement thickness during condensation (delta#)wet. We found that (delta#)wet first increases relative to the value of delta# in a dry expansion (delta#)Dry before becoming distinctly smaller than (delta#)Dry downstream of the condensation region. After correcting the temperature gradient across the boundary layers, the temperature determined from p/p0 and g agreed with the temperature determined by the laser-absorption measurements within our experimental error (+/-2 K), except when condensation occurred too close to the throat. The agreement between the two temperature measurements let us draw the following two conclusions. First, the differences in the temperature and mole fraction of D2O determined by the two experimental techniques, first observed in our previous study [P. Paci, Y. Zvinevich, S. Tanimura, B. E. Wyslouzil, M. Zahniser, J. Shorter, D. Nelson, and B. McManus, J. Chem. Phys. 121, 9964 (2004)], can be explained sufficiently by changes in delta# caused by the condensation of D2O, except when the phase transition occurs too close to the throat. Second, the extrapolation of the equation, which expresses the temperature dependence of the heat of vaporization of bulk D2O liquid, is a good estimate of the heat of condensation of supercooled D2O down to 210 K.

  13. Transient nonlinear optically-thick radiative-convective double-diffusive boundary layers in a Darcian porous medium adjacent to an impulsively started surface: Network simulation solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anwar Bég, O.; Zueco, J.; Takhar, H. S.; Bég, T. A.; Sajid, A.

    2009-11-01

    A boundary-layer model is described for the two-dimensional nonlinear transient thermal convection heat and mass transfer in an optically-thick fluid in a Darcian porous medium adjacent to an impulsively started vertical surface, in the presence of significant thermal radiation and buoyancy forces in an (X∗,Y∗,t∗) coordinate system. An algebraic approximation is employed to simplify the integro-differential equation of radiative transfer for unidirectional flux normal to the plate into the boundary-layer regime, by incorporating this flux term in the energy conservation equation. The conservation equations are non-dimensionalized into an (X,Y,T) coordinate system and solved using the Network Simulation Method (NSM), a robust numerical technique which demonstrates high efficiency and accuracy. The transient variation of non-dimensional streamwise velocity component (u) and temperature (T) and concentration (C) functions is computed for various selected values of Stark number (radiation-conduction interaction parameter) and Darcy number. Transient velocity (u) and steady-state local skin friction (τX) are also studied for various thermal Grashof number (Gr), species Grashof number (Gm), Schmidt number (Sc) and Stark number (N) values. These computations for the infinite permeability case (Da → ∞) are compared with previous finite difference solutions [Prasad et al. Int J Therm Sci 2007;46(12):1251-8] and shown to be in excellent agreement. An increase in Darcy number is seen to accelerate the flow and boost velocity. A decrease in Stark number (corresponding to an increase in thermal radiation heat transfer contribution) is shown to increase the velocity values. Temperature function is observed to fall in value with a rise in Da and increase with decrease in N (corresponding to an increase in thermal radiation heat transfer contribution). Applications of the study include rocket combustion chambers, astrophysical flows, spacecraft thermal fluid dynamics in

  14. Turbulent boundary layer heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finson, M. L.; Clarke, A. S.; Wu, P. K. S.

    1981-01-01

    A Reynolds stress model for turbulent boundary layers is used to study surface roughness effects on skin friction and heat transfer. The issues of primary interest are the influence of roughness character (element shape and spacing) and the nature of roughness effects at high Mach numbers. Computations based on the model compare satisfactorily with measurements from experiments involving variations in roughness character, in low speed and modestly supersonic conditions. The more limited data base at hypersonic Mach numbers is also examined with reasonable success, although no quantitative explanation is offered for the reduction of heat transfer with increasing roughness observed by Holden at Me -9.4. The present calculations indicate that the mean velocity is approximately uniform over much of the height range below the tops of the elements, y less than or equal to k. With this constant (roughness velocity,) it is simple to estimate the form drag on the elements. This roughness velocity has been investigated by systematically exercising the present model over ranges of potential parameters. The roughness velocity is found to be primarily a function of the projected element frontal area per unit surface area, thus providing a new and simple method for predicting roughness character effects. The model further suggests that increased boundary layer temperatures should be generated by roughness at high edge Mach numbers, which would tend to reduce skin friction and heat transfer, perhaps below smooth wall levels.

  15. Solute boundary layer on a rotating crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Povinelli, Michelle L.; Korpela, Seppo A.; Chait, Arnon

    1994-11-01

    A perturbation analysis has been carried out for the solutal boundary layer next to a rotating crystal. Our aim is to extend the classical results of Burton, Prim and Slicher [1] in order to obtain higher order terms in asymptotic expansions for the concentration field and boundary-layer thickness. Expressions for the effective segregation coefficient are directly obtained from the concentration solution in the two limits that correspond to weak and strong rotation.

  16. Boundary-Layer & health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costigliola, V.

    2010-09-01

    It has long been known that specific atmospheric processes, such as weather and longer-term climatic fluctuations, affect human health. The biometeorological literature refers to this relationship as meteorotropism, defined as a change in an organism that is correlated with a change in atmospheric conditions. Plenty of (patho)physiological functions are affected by those conditions - like the respiratory diseases - and currently it is difficult to put any limits for pathologies developed in reply. Nowadays the importance of atmospheric boundary layer and health is increasingly recognised. A number of epidemiologic studies have reported associations between ambient concentrations of air pollution, specifically particulate pollution, and adverse health effects, even at the relatively low concentrations of pollution found. Since 1995 there have been over twenty-one studies from four continents that have explicitly examined the association between ambient air pollutant mixes and daily mortality. Statistically significant and positive associations have been reported in data from various locations around the world, all with varying air pollutant concentrations, weather conditions, population characteristics and public health policies. Particular role has been given to atmospheric boundary layer processes, the impact of which for specific patient-cohort is, however, not well understood till now. Assessing and monitoring air quality are thus fundamental to improve Europe's welfare. One of current projects run by the "European Medical Association" - PASODOBLE will develop and demonstrate user-driven downstream information services for the regional and local air quality sectors by combining space-based and in-situ data with models in 4 thematic service lines: - Health community support for hospitals, pharmacies, doctors and people at risk - Public information for regions, cities, tourist industry and sporting event organizers - Compliance monitoring support on particulate

  17. Glancing shock wave-turbulent boundary layer interaction with boundary layer suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnhart, P. J.; Greber, I.; Hingst, W. R.

    1988-01-01

    Tests conducted to ascertain the stagnation pressure and flow angularity profiles of a turbulent boundary layer subjected to boundary layer suction (BLS) as it crosses a glancing sidewall shock wave have determined that the boundary layer does not separate upon crossing the shock wave. Without BLS, the upstream influence of the shock wave-induced wall static pressure rise was extensive, of the order of four bloundary layer thicknesses; for the same case, with suction, the extent of upstream influence was 50 percent lower. In addition, flow angularities at the wall were found to be smaller with suction than without it.

  18. Modeling the urban boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstrom, R. W., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    A summary and evaluation is given of the Workshop on Modeling the Urban Boundary Layer; held in Las Vegas on May 5, 1975. Edited summaries from each of the session chairpersons are also given. The sessions were: (1) formulation and solution techniques, (2) K-theory versus higher order closure, (3) surface heat and moisture balance, (4) initialization and boundary problems, (5) nocturnal boundary layer, and (6) verification of models.

  19. Longitudinal vortices in concave surface boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, R. I.,; Winoto, S. H.

    1980-01-01

    Local measurements of mean and fluctuating velocity by laser anemometer were made inside the developing concave surface boundary layer in a free surface water channel at Reynolds numbers up to 16000. Concave surface radius was 3.5 times channel width and the ratio of spanwise mean boundary layer thickness to surface radius ranged between 0.03 and 0.11. Systems of longtitudinal vortices developed without artificial triggering. Vortex wavelength varied across the span by as much as a factor of 2, but mean wavelength was typically 1.3 times the boundary layer thickness and did not vary significantly in the flow direction. Continuous vortex growth at Reynolds number = 9800 contrasted with apparent breakup of the vortices at Reynolds number = 16000.

  20. Lear jet boundary layer/shear layer laser propagation experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, K.

    1980-01-01

    Optical degradations of aircraft turbulent boundary layers with shear layers generated by aerodynamic fences are analyzed. A collimated 2.5 cm diameter helium-neon laser (0.63 microns) traversed the approximate 5 cm thick natural aircraft boundary layer in double pass via a reflective airfoil. In addition, several flights examined shear layer-induced optical degradation. Flight altitudes ranged from 1.5 to 12 km, while Mach numbers were varied from 0.3 to 0.8. Average line spread function (LSF) and Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) data were obtained by averaging a large number of tilt-removed curves. Fourier transforming the resulting average MTF yields an LSF, thus affording a direct comparison of the two optical measurements. Agreement was good for the aerodynamic fence arrangement, but only fair in the case of a turbulent boundary layer. Values of phase variance inferred from the LSF instrument for a single pass through the random flow and corrected for a large aperture ranged from 0.08 to 0.11 waves (lambda = .63 microns) for the boundary layer. Corresponding values for the fence vary from 0.08 to 0.16 waves. Extrapolation of these values to 10.6 microns suggests negligible degradation for a CO2 laser transmitted through a 5 cm thick, subsonic turbulent boundary layer.

  1. Boundary Layer Control on Airfoils.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerhab, George; Eastlake, Charles

    1991-01-01

    A phenomena, boundary layer control (BLC), produced when visualizing the fluidlike flow of air is described. The use of BLC in modifying aerodynamic characteristics of airfoils, race cars, and boats is discussed. (KR)

  2. The plasma sheet boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eastman, T. E.; Frank, L. A.; Peterson, W. K.; Lennartsson, W.

    1984-01-01

    A spatially distinct, temporally variable, transition region between the magnetotail lobes and the central plasma sheet designated the plasma sheet boundary layer has been identified from a survey of particle spectra and three-dimensional distributions as sampled by the ISEE 1 LEPEDEA. The instrumentation and data presentation are described, and the signatures of the magnetotail plasma regimes are presented and discussed for the central plasma sheet and lobe and the plasma sheet boundary layer. Comparisons of plasma parameters and distribution fucntions are made and the evolution of ion velocity distributions within the plasma sheet boundary layer is discussed. The spatial distribution of the plasma sheet boundary layer is considered and ion composition measurements are presented.

  3. Removing Boundary Layer by Suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackeret, J

    1927-01-01

    Through the utilization of the "Magnus effect" on the Flettner rotor ship, the attention of the public has been directed to the underlying physical principle. It has been found that the Prandtl boundary-layer theory furnishes a satisfactory explanation of the observed phenomena. The present article deals with the prevention of this separation or detachment of the flow by drawing the boundary layer into the inside of a body through a slot or slots in its surface.

  4. Alpha models and boundary-layer turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheskidov, Alexey

    We study boundary-layer turbulence using the Navier-Stokes-alpha model obtaining an extension of the Prandtl equations for the averaged flow in a turbulent boundary layer. In the case of a zero pressure gradient flow along a flat plate, we derive a nonlinear fifth-order ordinary differential equation, an extension of the Blasius equation. We study it analytically and prove the existence of a two-parameter family of solutions satisfying physical boundary conditions. From this equation we obtain a theoretical prediction of the skin-friction coefficient in a wide range of Reynolds numbers based on momentum thickness, and deduce the maximal value of the skin-friction coefficient in the turbulent boundary layer. The two-parameter family of solutions to the equation matches experimental data in the transitional boundary layers with different free stream turbulence intensity. A one-parameter sub-family of solutions, obtained using our skin-friction coefficient law, matches experimental data in the turbulent boundary layer for moderately large Reynolds numbers.

  5. The Ocean Boundary Layer beneath Hurricane Frances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasaro, E. A.; Sanford, T. B.; Terrill, E.; Price, J.

    2006-12-01

    The upper ocean beneath the peak winds of Hurricane Frances (57 m/s) was measured using several varieties of air-deployed floats as part of CBLAST. A multilayer structure was observed as the boundary layer deepened from 20m to 120m in about 12 hours. Bubbles generated by breaking waves create a 10m thick surface layer with a density anomaly, due to the bubbles, of about 1 kg/m3. This acts to lubricate the near surface layer. A turbulent boundary layer extends beneath this to about 40 m depth. This is characterized by large turbulent eddies spanning the boundary layer. A stratified boundary layer grows beneath this reaching 120m depth. This is characterized by a gradient Richardson number of 1/4, which is maintained by strong inertial currents generated by the hurricane, and smaller turbulent eddies driven by the shear instead of the wind and waves. There is little evidence of mixing beneath this layer. Heat budgets reveal the boundary layer to be nearly one dimensional through much of the deepening, with horizontal and vertical heat advection becoming important only after the storm had passed. Turbulent kinetic energy measurements support the idea of reduced surface drag at high wind speeds. The PWP model correctly predicts the degree of mixed layer deepening if the surface drag is reduced at high wind speed. Overall, the greatest uncertainty in understanding the ocean boundary layer at these extreme wind speeds is a characterization of the near- surface processes which govern the air-sea fluxes and surface wave properties.

  6. Flow visualization of turbulent boundary layer structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Head, M. R.; Bandyopadhyay, P.

    1980-01-01

    The results from flow visualization experiments performed using an argon-ion laser to illuminate longitudinal and transverse sections of the smoke filled boundary layer in zero pressure gradient are discussed. Most of the experiments were confined to the range 600 Re sub theta 10,000. Results indicate that the boundary layer consists almost exclusively of vortex loops or hairpins, some of which may extend through the complete boundary layer thickness and all of which are inclined at a more or less constant characteristic angle of approximately 45 deg to the wall. Since the cross-stream dimensions of the hairpins appear to scale roughly with the wall variables U sub tau and nu, while their length is limited only by the boundary layer thickness, there are very large scale effects on the turbulence structure. At high Reynolds numbers (Re sub theta = 10,000) there is little evidence of large-scale coherent motions, other than a slow overturning of random agglomerations of the hairpins just mentioned.

  7. Correlation Between Grain and Grain-Boundary Critical Current Densities in ex situ Coated Conductors with Variable YBa2Cu3O7- δ Layer Thickness

    SciTech Connect

    Palau, A.; Puig, T.; Obradors, X.; Feenstra, Roeland; Gapud, Albert Agcaoili

    2006-01-01

    The dependence of the percolative critical current density at low magnetic fields on YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} (YBCO) layer thickness is studied by comparing grain, J{sub c}{sup G}, and grain-boundary, J{sub c}{sup GB}, critical current densities for a series of ex situ processed YBCO films on a RABiTS template. Both critical current densities decrease as a function of thickness and the values of J{sub c}{sup G} and J{sub c}{sup GB} show a clear correlation which suggests the existence of an interaction between Abrikosov-Josephson vortices on the grain boundaries and Abrikosov vortices in the bulk of the grains. This opens the possibility to improve J{sub c}{sup GB} by optimizing the pinning capabilities of the grains.

  8. Physics of magnetospheric boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, Iver H.

    1995-01-01

    This final report was concerned with the ideas that: (1) magnetospheric boundary layers link disparate regions of the magnetosphere-solar wind system together; and (2) global behavior of the magnetosphere can be understood only by understanding its internal linking mechanisms and those with the solar wind. The research project involved simultaneous research on the global-, meso-, and micro-scale physics of the magnetosphere and its boundary layers, which included the bow shock, the magnetosheath, the plasma sheet boundary layer, and the ionosphere. Analytic, numerical, and simulation projects were performed on these subjects, as well as comparisons of theoretical results with observational data. Other related activity included in the research included: (1) prediction of geomagnetic activity; (2) global MHD (magnetohydrodynamic) simulations; (3) Alfven resonance heating; and (4) Critical Ionization Velocity (CIV) effect. In the appendixes are list of personnel involved, list of papers published; and reprints or photocopies of papers produced for this report.

  9. Shock Wave Turbulent Boundary Layer Interaction in Hypersonic Flow

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-06-01

    An examination and correlation of skin friction heat transfer and pressure measurements in laminar, transitional and turbulent boundary layers on...and heat transfer measurements made In turbulent boundary layers DO 1 JAN 73 W3 EDITION OF 1 NOV 65 IS OBSOLETE ’ / Unclassified SECURITY...Eckert. The Van Driest II method is in best overall agreement with the measurements . From 50 to 100 boundary layer thicknesses are

  10. An Equation for the Mean Velocity Distribution of Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandborn, V. A.

    1959-01-01

    A general relation, empirical in origin, for the mean velocity distribution of both laminar and turbulent boundary layers is proposed. The equation, in general, accurately describes the profiles in both laminar and turbulent flows. The calculation of profiles is based on a prior knowledge of momentum, displacement, and boundary-layer thickness together with free-stream conditions. The form for turbulent layers agrees with the present concepts of similarity of the outer layer. For the inner region or turbulent boundary layers the present relation agrees very closely with experimental measurements even in cases where the logarithmic law of the wall is inadequate. A unique relation between profile form factors and the ratio of displacement thickness to boundary-layer thickness is obtained for turbulent separation. A similar criterion is also obtained for laminar separation. These relations are demonstrated to serve as an accurate criterion for identifying separation in known profiles.

  11. Physics of magnetospheric boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, I. H.

    1993-01-01

    The central ideas of this grant are that the magnetospheric boundary layers link disparate regions of the magnetosphere together, and the global behavior of the magnetosphere can be understood only by understanding the linking mechanisms. Accordingly the present grant includes simultaneous research on the global, meso-, and micro-scale physics of the magnetosphere and its boundary layers. These boundary layers include the bow shock, magnetosheath, the plasma sheet boundary layer, and the ionosphere. Analytic, numerical and simulation projects have been performed on these subjects, as well as comparison of theoretical results with observational data. Very good progress has been made, with four papers published or in press and two additional papers submitted for publication during the six month period 1 June - 30 November 1993. At least two projects are currently being written up. In addition, members of the group have given papers at scientific meetings. The further structure of this report is as follows: section two contains brief accounts of research completed during the last six months, while section three describes the research projects intended for the grant's final period.

  12. Stability of Boundary Layer Flow.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-01

    and Teske (1975). We can conclude (as in the case of ducting) that theoretical models of boundary layer structure and associated radar structure...FI33 (Secret). Hitney, (1978) "Surface Duct Effects," Naval Ocean Systems Center, San Diego, Calif., Report No. TD144. Lewellen, W. S., and M. E. Teske

  13. Dynamic behavior of an unsteady trubulent boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parikh, P. G.; Reynolds, W. C.; Jayaramen, R.; Carr, L. W.

    1981-01-01

    Experiments on an unsteady turbulent boundary layer are reported in which the upstream portion of the flow is steady (in the mean) and in the downstream region, the boundary layer sees a linearly decreasing free stream velocity. This velocity gradient oscillates in time, at frequencies ranging from zero to approximately the bursting frequency. For the small amplitude, the mean velocity and mean turbulence intensity profiles are unaffected by the oscillations. The amplitude of the periodic velocity component, although as much as 70% greater than that in the free stream for very low frequencies, becomes equal to that in the free stream at higher frequencies. At high frequencies, both the boundary layer thickness and the Reynolds stress distribution across the boundary layer become frozen. The behavior at higher amplitude is quite similar. At sufficiently high frequencies, the boundary layer thickness remains frozen at the mean value over the oscillation cycle, even though flow reverses near the wall during a part of the cycle.

  14. Further Improvements to Nozzle Boundary Layer Calculations in BLIMPJ

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Praharaj, S. C.; Gross, Klaus W.

    1989-01-01

    Further improvements made to advance the current Boundary Layer Integral Matrix Procedure - Version J (BLIMPJ) containing previously modeled simplified calculation methods by accounting for condensed phase, thick boundary layer and free stream turbulence effects are discussed. The condensed phase effects were included through species composition effect considered via input to the code and through particle damping effect considered via a turbulence model. The thrust loss calculation procedure for thick boundary layer effects was improved and the optimization of net thrust with respect to nozzle length was performed. The effects of free stream turbulence were approximately modeled in the turbulence model.

  15. On an Asymptotically Consistent Unsteady Interacting Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartels, Robert E.

    2007-01-01

    This paper develops the asymptotic matching of an unsteady compressible boundary layer to an inviscid flow. Of particular importance is the velocity injection or transpiration boundary condition derived by this theory. It is found that in general the transpiration will contain a slope of the displacement thickness and a time derivative of a density integral. The conditions under which the second term may be neglected, and its consistency with the established results of interacting boundary layer are discussed.

  16. Three-Dimensional Boundary Layers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-02-01

    sketched in figure 1 . The model design is des- • cribed in more detail in reference 2. At measuring station 1 the turbulent boundary layer is very...layer methods are increasingly important as their use for design purposes increases. Specific recommendations for future work include the following. 1 ...MEMBERS M. 1 ’Ing. G&n C.Cap~lier Prof. Dr. Jr. J.L. van Ingen Directeur de l’A~rodynamique Department of Aerospace B.P. 72 Engineering% ONERA Delf

  17. Analytic prediction for planar turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xi; She, Zhen-Su

    2016-11-01

    Analytic predictions of mean velocity profile (MVP) and streamwise ( x) development of related integral quantities are presented for flows in channel and turbulent boundary layer (TBL), based on a symmetry analysis of eddy length and total stress. Specific predictions include the relations for momentum Reynolds number ( Re θ) with friction Re τ and streamwise Re x : Re θ ≈ 3.27 Re τ, and Re x / Re θ = 4.94 [(ln Re θ + 1.88)2 + 1]; the streamwise development of the friction velocity u τ: U e / u τ ≈ 2.22ln Re x + 2.86 - 3.83ln(ln Re x ), and of the boundary layer thickness δ e : x/δ e ≈ 7.27ln Re x -5.18-12.52ln(ln Re x ), which are fully validated by recent reliable data.

  18. Analytic prediction for planar turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    She, Zhen-Su; Chen, Xi

    2016-11-01

    Analytic predictions of mean velocity profile (MVP) and streamwise (x) development of related integral quantities are presented for flows in channel and turbulent boundary layer (TBL), based on a symmetry analysis of eddy length and total stress. Specific predictions include the relations for momentum Reynolds number (Reθ) with friction Reτ and streamwise Rex : Reθ 3 . 27 Reτ and Rex / Reθ = 4 . 94 [(lnReθ + 1 . 88) 2 + 1 ] ; the streamwise development of the friction velocityuτ: Ue /uτ 2 . 22 lnRex + 2 . 86 - 3 . 83 ln (lnRex) , and of the boundary layer thickness δe: x /δe 7 . 27 lnRex - 5 . 18 - 12 . 52 ln (lnRex) , which are fully validated by recent reliable data.

  19. Turbulent boundary layer over flexible plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostami, Parand; Ioppolo, Tindaro

    2016-11-01

    This research describes the structure of a turbulent boundary layer flow with a zero pressure gradient over elastic plates. The elastic plates made of a thin aluminum sheets with thickness between 50 and 500 microns were placed on the floor of a subsonic wind tunnel and exposed to a turbulent boundary layer flow with a free stream velocity between 20m/s and 100m/s. The ceiling of the test section of the wind tunnel is adjustable so that a nearly zero pressure gradient is obtained in the test section. Hot-wire anemometry was used to measure the velocity components. Mean, fluctuating velocities and Reynolds stresses will be presented and compared with the values of a rigid plate.

  20. Boundary Layer Control for Hypersonic Airbreathing Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott A.; Nowak, Robert J.; Horvath, Thomas J.

    2004-01-01

    Active and passive methods for tripping hypersonic boundary layers have been examined in NASA Langley Research Center wind tunnels using a Hyper-X model. This investigation assessed several concepts for forcing transition, including passive discrete roughness elements and active mass addition (or blowing), in the 20-Inch Mach 6 Air and the 31-Inch Mach 10 Air Tunnels. Heat transfer distributions obtained via phosphor thermography, shock system details, and surface streamline patterns were measured on a 0.333-scale model of the Hyper-X forebody. The comparisons between the active and passive methods for boundary layer control were conducted at test conditions that nearly match the Hyper-X nominal Mach 7 flight test-point of an angle-of-attack of 2-deg and length Reynolds number of 5.6 million. For passive roughness, the primary parametric variation was a range of trip heights within the calculated boundary layer thickness for several trip concepts. The passive roughness study resulted in a swept ramp configuration, scaled to be roughly 0.6 of the calculated boundary layer thickness, being selected for the Mach 7 flight vehicle. For the active blowing study, the manifold pressure was systematically varied (while monitoring the mass flow) for each configuration to determine the jet penetration height, with schlieren, and transition movement, with the phosphor system, for comparison to the passive results. All the blowing concepts tested, which included various rows of sonic orifices (holes), two- and three-dimensional slots, and random porosity, provided transition onset near the trip location with manifold stagnation pressures on the order of 40 times the model surface static pressure, which is adequate to ensure sonic jets. The present results indicate that the jet penetration height for blowing was roughly half the height required with passive roughness elements for an equivalent amount of transition movement.

  1. Boundary layer receptivity and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, D. C.

    1993-01-01

    Receptivity processes initiate natural instabilities in a boundary layer. The instabilities grow and eventually break down to turbulence. Consequently, receptivity questions are a critical element of the analysis of the transition process. Success in modeling the physics of receptivity processes thus has a direct bearing on technological issues of drag reduction. The means by which transitional flows can be controlled is also a major concern: questions of control are tied inevitably to those of receptivity. Adjoint systems provide a highly effective mathematical method for approaching many of the questions associated with both receptivity and control. The long term objective is to develop adjoint methods to handle increasingly complex receptivity questions, and to find systematic procedures for deducing effective control strategies. The most elementary receptivity problem is that in which a parallel boundary layer is forced by time-harmonic sources of various types. The characteristics of the response to such forcing form the building blocks for more complex receptivity mechanisms. The first objective of this year's research effort was to investigate how a parallel Blasius boundary layer responds to general direct forcing. Acoustic disturbances in the freestream can be scattered by flow non-uniformities to produce Tollmien-Schlichting waves. For example, scattering by surface roughness is known to provide an efficient receptivity path. The present effort is directed towards finding a solution by a simple adjoint analysis, because adjoint methods can be extended to more complex problems. In practice, flows are non-parallel and often three-dimensional. Compressibility may also be significant in some cases. Recent developments in the use of Parabolized Stability Equations (PSE) offer a promising possibility. By formulating and solving a set of adjoint parabolized equations, a method for mapping the efficiency with which external forcing excites the three

  2. Boundary layer problem on a hyperbolic system arising from chemotaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Qianqian; Wang, Zhi-An; Zhao, Kun

    2016-11-01

    This paper is concerned with the boundary layer problem for a hyperbolic system transformed via a Cole-Hopf type transformation from a repulsive chemotaxis model with logarithmic sensitivity proposed in [23,34] modeling the biological movement of reinforced random walkers which deposit a non-diffusible (or slowly moving) signal that modifies the local environment for succeeding passages. By prescribing the Dirichlet boundary conditions to the transformed hyperbolic system in an interval (0 , 1), we show that the system has the boundary layer solutions as the chemical diffusion coefficient ε → 0, and further use the formal asymptotic analysis to show that the boundary layer thickness is ε 1 / 2. Our work justifies the boundary layer phenomenon that was numerically found in the recent work [25]. However we find that the original chemotaxis system does not possess boundary layer solutions when the results are reverted to the pre-transformed system.

  3. New layer thickness parameterization of diffusive convection in the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Sheng-Qi; Lu, Yuan-Zheng; Song, Xue-Long; Fer, Ilker

    2016-03-01

    In the present study, a new parameterization is proposed to describe the convecting layer thickness in diffusive convection. By using in situ observational data of diffusive convection in the lakes and oceans, a wide range of stratification and buoyancy flux is obtained, where the buoyancy frequency N varies between 10-4 and 0.1 s-1 and the heat-related buoyancy flux qT varies between 10-12 and 10-7 m2 s-3. We construct an intrinsic thickness scale, H0 =[qT3 / (κTN8) ] 1 / 4, here κT is the thermal diffusivity. H0 is suggested to be the scale of an energy-containing eddy and it can be alternatively represented as H0 = ηRebPr1/4, here η is the dissipation length scale, Reb is the buoyant Reynolds number, and Pr is the Prandtl number. It is found that the convective layer thickness H is directly linked to the stability ratio Rρ and H0 with the form of H ∼ (Rρ - 1)2H0. The layer thickness can be explained by the convective instability mechanism. To each convective layer, its thickness H reaches a stable value when its thermal boundary layer develops to be a new convecting layer.

  4. Boundary Layer Heights from CALIOP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuehn, R.; Ackerman, S. A.; Holz, R.; Roubert, L.

    2012-12-01

    This work is focused on the development of a planetary boundary layer (PBL) height retrieval algorithm for CALIOP and validation studies. Our current approach uses a wavelet covariance transform analysis technique to find the top of the boundary layer. We use the methodology similar to that found in Davis et. al. 2000, ours has been developed to work with the lower SNR data provided by CALIOP, and is intended to work autonomously. Concurrently developed with the CALIOP algorithm we will show results from a PBL height retrieval algorithm from profiles of potential temperature, these are derived from Aircraft Meteorological DAta Relay (AMDAR) observations. Results from 5 years of collocated AMDAR - CALIOP retrievals near O'Hare airport demonstrate good agreement between the CALIOP - AMDAR retrievals. In addition, because we are able to make daily retrievals from the AMDAR measurements, we are able to observe the seasonal and annual variation in the PBL height at airports that have sufficient instrumented-aircraft traffic. Also, a comparison has been done between the CALIOP retrievals and the NASA Langley airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) PBL height retrievals acquired during the GoMACCS experiment. Results of this comparison, like the AMDAR comparison are favorable. Our current work also involves the analysis and verification of the CALIOP PBL height retrieval from the 6 year CALIOP global data set. Results from this analysis will also be presented.

  5. Nonequilibrium chemistry boundary layer integral matrix procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tong, H.; Buckingham, A. C.; Morse, H. L.

    1973-01-01

    The development of an analytic procedure for the calculation of nonequilibrium boundary layer flows over surfaces of arbitrary catalycities is described. An existing equilibrium boundary layer integral matrix code was extended to include nonequilibrium chemistry while retaining all of the general boundary condition features built into the original code. For particular application to the pitch-plane of shuttle type vehicles, an approximate procedure was developed to estimate the nonequilibrium and nonisentropic state at the edge of the boundary layer.

  6. Approximation theory for boundary layer suction through individual slits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walz, A.

    1979-01-01

    The basic concepts of influencing boundary layers are summarized, especially the prevention of flow detachment and the reduction of frictional resistance. A mathematical analysis of suction through a slit is presented with two parameters, for thickness and for shape of the boundary layer, being introduced to specify the flow's velocity profile behind the slit. An approximation of the shape parameter produces a useful formula, which can be used to determine the most favorable position of the slit. An aerodynamic example is given.

  7. Structure of the zero-pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layer.

    PubMed

    Barenblatt, G I; Chorin, A J; Hald, O H; Prostokishin, V M

    1997-07-22

    A processing of recent experimental data by Nagib and Hites [Nagib, H. & Hites, M. (1995) AIAA paper 95-0786, Reno, NV) shows that the flow in a zero-pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layer, outside the viscous sublayer, consists of two self-similar regions, each described by a scaling law. The results concerning the Reynolds-number dependence of the coefficients of the wall-region scaling law are consistent with our previous results concerning pipe flow, if the proper definition of the boundary layer Reynolds number (or boundary layer thickness) is used.

  8. Vortex boundary-layer interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradshaw, P.

    1986-01-01

    Parametric studies to identify a vortex generator were completed. Data acquisition in the first chosen configuration, in which a longitudinal vortex pair generated by an isolated delta wing starts to merge with a turbulent boundary layer on a flat plate fairly close to the leading edge is nearly completed. Work on a delta-wing/flat-plate combination, consisting of a flow visualization and hot wire measurements taken with a computer controlled traverse gear and data logging system were completed. Data taking and analysis have continued, and sample results for another cross stream plane are presented. Available data include all mean velocity components, second order mean products of turbulent fluctuations, and third order mean products. Implementation of a faster data logging system was accomplished.

  9. Boundary layer theory and subduction

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, A.C.

    1993-12-01

    Numerical models of thermally activated convective flow in Earth`s mantle do not resemble active plate tectonics because of their inability to model successfully the process of subduction, other than by the inclusion of artificial weak zones. Here we show, using a boundary layer argument, how the `rigid lid` style of convection favored by thermoviscous fluids leads to lithospheric stresses which may realistically exceed the yield stress and thus cause subduction ot occur through the visoc-plastic failure of lithospheric rock. An explicit criterion for the failure of the lid is given, which is sensitive to the internal viscosity eta(sub a) below the lid. For numbers appropriate to Earth`s mantle, this criterion is approximately eta(sub a) greater than 10(exp 21) Pa s.

  10. Aerosol fluxes in the marine boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petelski, Tomasz; Zieliński, Tymon; Makuch, Przemysław; Kowalczyk, Jakub; Ponczkowska, Agnieszka; Drozdowska, Violetta; Piskozub, Jacek

    2010-05-01

    We present aerosol emission fluxes and concentrations calculated from in-situ measurement in the Nordic Sea from R/V Oceania. We compare vertical fluxes calculated with the eddy correlation and gradient methods. We use the results to test the hypothesis that marine aerosol emitted from the sea surface helps to clear the boundary layer from other aerosol particles. As the emitted droplets do not dry out in the highly humid surface layer air and because of their sizes most of them are deposited quickly at the sea surface. Therefore marine aerosol has many features of rain meaning that the deposition in the marine boundary layer in high wind events is controlled not only by the "dry" processes but also by the "wet" scavenging. We have estimated the effectiveness of the process using our own measurements of vertical aerosol fluxes in the Nordic Seas. This process could explain observed phenomenon of lower Arctic aerosol optical thickness (AOT) when the air masses moved over open sea than over sea-ice. We show a negative correlation between the sea-ice coverage in the seas adjacent to Svalbard and monthly AOT values in Ny Alesund.

  11. Outer layer effects in wind-farm boundary layers: Coriolis forces and boundary layer height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allaerts, Dries; Meyers, Johan

    2015-11-01

    In LES studies of wind-farm boundary layers, scale separation between the inner and outer region of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) is frequently assumed, i.e., wind turbines are presumed to fall within the inner layer and are not affected by outer layer effects. However, modern wind turbine and wind farm design tends towards larger rotor diameters and farm sizes, which means that outer layer effects will become more important. In a prior study, it was already shown for fully-developed wind farms that the ABL height influences the power performance. In this study, we use the in-house LES code SP-Wind to investigate the importance of outer layer effects on wind-farm boundary layers. In a suite of LES cases, the ABL height is varied by imposing a capping inversion with varying inversion strengths. Results indicate the growth of an internal boundary layer (IBL), which is limited in cases with low inversion layers. We further find that flow deceleration combined with Coriolis effects causes a change in wind direction throughout the farm. This effect increases with decreasing boundary layer height, and can result in considerable turbine wake deflection near the end of the farm. The authors are supported by the ERC (ActiveWindFarms, grant no: 306471). Computations were performed on VSC infrastructiure (Flemish Supercomputer Center), funded by the Hercules Foundation and the Flemish Government-department EWI.

  12. Unified Parameterization of the Marine Boundary Layer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-30

    information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE 2010 2 . REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2010 to 00-00-2010...boundary layer closure for the convective boundary layer 2 . An EDMF approach to the vertical transport of TKE in convective boundary layers 3. EDMF in...4 implementation and extension to shallow cumulus parameterization is in progress. 2   An integrated TKE-based eddy-diffusivity/mass-flux

  13. Development of perturbations in the boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dovgal, A. V.; Kachanov, Y. S.; Kozlov, V. V.; Levchenko, V. Y.; Maksimov, V. P.

    1986-01-01

    The transition of laminar flows into turbulent flows in a boundary layer is discussed. The individual aspects of the transition process, observed under controllable model conditions are examined. The aspect of this problem, namely the development or excitation of the natural oscillations in the boundary layer, the so-called Tollmin-Schlichting waves is covered. Three types of excitation of these waves are considered: (1) distributed generation throughout the boundary layer; (2) generation in the vicinity of the forward edge of a model, having either a sharp edge or an edge with a large radius or curvature, and (3) generation in a developed boundary layer by means of a focused effect.

  14. Boundary layer effects on liners for aircraft engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabard, Gwénaël

    2016-10-01

    The performance of acoustic treatments installed on aircraft engines is strongly influenced by the boundary layer of the grazing flow on the surface of the liner. The parametric study presented in this paper illustrates the extent of this effect and identifies when it is significant. The acoustic modes of a circular duct with flow are calculated using a finite difference method. The parameters are representative of the flow conditions, liners and sound fields found in current turbofan engines. Both the intake and bypass ducts are considered. Results show that there is a complex interplay between the boundary layer thickness, the direction of propagation and the liner impedance and that the boundary layer can have a strong impact on liner performance for typical configurations (including changes of the order of 30 dB on the attenuation of modes associated with tonal fan noise). A modified impedance condition including the effect of a small but finite boundary layer thickness is considered and compared to the standard Myers condition based on an infinitely thin boundary layer. We show how this impedance condition can be implemented in a mode calculation method by introducing auxiliary variables. This condition is able to capture the trends associated with the boundary layer effects and in most cases provides improved predictions of liner performance.

  15. The Martian Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrosyan, A.; Galperin, B.; Larsen, S. E.; Lewis, S. R.; Määttänen, A.; Read, P. L.; Renno, N.; Rogberg, L. P. H. T.; Savijärvi, H.; Siili, T.; Spiga, A.; Toigo, A.; Vázquez, L.

    2011-09-01

    The planetary boundary layer (PBL) represents the part of the atmosphere that is strongly influenced by the presence of the underlying surface and mediates the key interactions between the atmosphere and the surface. On Mars, this represents the lowest 10 km of the atmosphere during the daytime. This portion of the atmosphere is extremely important, both scientifically and operationally, because it is the region within which surface lander spacecraft must operate and also determines exchanges of heat, momentum, dust, water, and other tracers between surface and subsurface reservoirs and the free atmosphere. To date, this region of the atmosphere has been studied directly, by instrumented lander spacecraft, and from orbital remote sensing, though not to the extent that is necessary to fully constrain its character and behavior. Current data strongly suggest that as for the Earth's PBL, classical Monin-Obukhov similarity theory applies reasonably well to the Martian PBL under most conditions, though with some intriguing differences relating to the lower atmospheric density at the Martian surface and the likely greater role of direct radiative heating of the atmosphere within the PBL itself. Most of the modeling techniques used for the PBL on Earth are also being applied to the Martian PBL, including novel uses of very high resolution large eddy simulation methods. We conclude with those aspects of the PBL that require new measurements in order to constrain models and discuss the extent to which anticipated missions to Mars in the near future will fulfill these requirements.

  16. Some measurements in synthetic turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savas, O.

    1980-01-01

    Synthetic turbulent boundary layers are examined which were constructed on a flat plate by generating systematic moving patterns of turbulent spots in a laminar flow. The experiments were carried out in a wind tunnel at a Reynolds number based on plate length of 1,700,000. Spots were generated periodically in space and time near the leading edge to form a regular hexagonal pattern. The disturbance mechanism was a camshaft which displaced small pins momentarily into the laminar flow at frequencies up to 80 Hz. The main instrumentation was a rake of 24 hot wires placed across the flow in a line parallel to the surface. The main measured variable was local intermittency; i.e., the probability of observing turbulent flow at a particular point in space and time. The results are reported in x-t diagrams showing the evolution of various synthetic flows along the plate. The dimensionless celerity or phase velocity of the large eddies is found to be 0.88, independent of eddy scale. All patterns with sufficiently small scales eventually showed loss of coherence as they moved downstream. A novel phenomenon called eddy transposition was observed in several flows which contained appreciable laminar regions. The large eddies shifted in formation to new positions, intermediate to their original ones, while preserving their hexagonal pattern. The present results, together with some empirical properties of a turbulent spot, are used to estimate the best choice of scales for constructing a synthetic boundary layer suitable for detailed study. The values recommended are: spanwise scale/thickness = 2.5, streamwise scale/thickness = 8.

  17. Interacting turbulent boundary layer over a wavy wall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polak, A.; Werle, M. J.

    1977-01-01

    The two dimensional supersonic flow of a thick turbulent boundary layer over a train of relatively small wave-like protuberances is considered. The flow conditions and the geometry are such that there exists a strong interaction between the viscous and inviscid flow. The problem cannot be solved without inclusion of interaction effects due to the occurrence of the separation singularity in classical boundary layer methods. The interacting boundary layer equations are solved numerically using a time-like relaxation method with turbulence effects represented by the inclusion of the eddy viscosity model. Results are presented for flow over a train of up to six waves for Mach numbers of 10 and 32 million/meter, and wall temperature rations (T sub w/T sub 0) of 0.4 and 0.8. Limited comparisons with independent experimental and analytical results are also given. Detailed results on the influence of small protuberances on surface heating by boundary layers are presented.

  18. The current structure of stratified tidal planetary boundary layer flow

    SciTech Connect

    Myrhaug, D.; Slaattelid, O.H.

    1995-12-31

    The paper presents the bottom shear stress and velocity profiles in stratified tidal planetary boundary layer flow by using similarity theory. For a given seabed roughness length, free stream current velocity components, frequency of tidal oscillation, Coriolis parameter and stratification parameter the maximum bottom shear stress is determined for flow conditions in the rough, smooth and transitional smooth-to-rough turbulent regime. Further, the direction of the bottom shear stress and the velocity profiles are given. Comparison is made with data from field measurements of time-independent as well as tidal planetary boundary layer flow for neutral conditions, and the agreement between the predictions and the data is generally good. Further, an example of application for stable stratification is given, and qualitatively the predictions show, as expected, that the bottom shear stress and the thickness of the boundary layer become smaller for stable than for neutral stratification. Other features of the tidal planetary boundary layer flow are also discussed.

  19. Cyclone separator having boundary layer turbulence control

    DOEpatents

    Krishna, Coimbatore R.; Milau, Julius S.

    1985-01-01

    A cyclone separator including boundary layer turbulence control that is operable to prevent undue build-up of particulate material at selected critical areas on the separator walls, by selectively varying the fluid pressure at those areas to maintain the momentum of the vortex, thereby preventing particulate material from inducing turbulence in the boundary layer of the vortical fluid flow through the separator.

  20. Structure of relaminarizing turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesh, O.; Patwardhan, Saurabh

    2014-11-01

    Relaminarization of a turbulent boundary layer in a strongly accelerated flow has received a great attention in recent times. It has been found that such relaminarization is a general and regularly occurring phenomenon in the leading-edge region of a swept wing of an airplane (van Dam et al., 1993). In this work, we investigate the effect of initial Reynolds number on the process of relaminarization in turbulent boundary layers. The experimental and numerical investigation of relaminarizing turbulent boundary layers undergoing same history reveals that the boundary layer with higher initial Reynolds number relaminarizes at a lower pressure gradient value compared to the one with lower Reynolds number. This effect can be explained on the inviscid theory proposed earlier in the literature. Further, various parameter criteria proposed to predict relaminarization, are assessed and the structure of relaminarizing boundary layers is investigated. A mechanism for stabilization of near-wall low speed streaks is proposed.

  1. LDV measurements of turbulent baroclinic boundary layers

    SciTech Connect

    Neuwald, P.; Reichenbach, H.; Kuhl, A.L.

    1993-07-01

    Described here are shock tube experiments of nonsteady, turbulent boundary layers with large density variations. A dense-gas layer was created by injecting Freon through the porous floor of the shock tube. As the shock front propagated along the layer, vorticity was created at the air-Freon interface by an inviscid, baroclinic mechanism. Shadow-schlieren photography was used to visualize the turbulent mixing in this baroclinic boundary layer. Laser-Doppler-Velocimetry (LDV) was used to measure the streamwise velocity histories at 14 heights. After transition, the boundary layer profiles may be approximated by a power-law function u {approximately} u{sup {alpha}} where {alpha} {approx_equal} 3/8. This value lies between the clean flat plate value ({alpha} = 1/7) and the dusty boundary layer value ({alpha} {approx_equal} 0.7), and is controlled by the gas density near the wall.

  2. Diamagnetic boundary layers - A kinetic theory. [for collisionless magnetized plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemaire, J.; Burlaga, L. F.

    1976-01-01

    A kinetic theory is presented for boundary layers associated with MHD tangential 'discontinuities' in a collisionless magnetized plasma, such as those observed in the solar wind. The theory consists of finding self-consistent solutions of Vlasov's equation and Maxwell's equation for stationary one-dimensional boundary layers separating two Maxwellian plasma states. Layers in which the current is carried by electrons are found to have a thickness of the order of a few electron gyroradii, but the drift speed of the current-carrying electrons is found to exceed the Alfven speed, and accordingly such layers are not stable. Several types of layers in which the current is carried by protons are discussed; in particular, cases are considered in which the magnetic-field intensity, direction, or both, changed across the layer. In every case, the thickness was of the order of a few proton gyroradii, and the field changed smoothly, although the characteristics depended somewhat on the boundary conditions. The drift speed was always less than the Alfven speed, consistent with stability of such structures. These results are consistent with observations of boundary layers in the solar wind near 1 AU.

  3. Obtaining Thickness Maps of Corneal Layers Using the Optimal Algorithm for Intracorneal Layer Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Rabbani, Hossein; Kazemian Jahromi, Mahdi; Jorjandi, Sahar; Mehri Dehnavi, Alireza; Hajizadeh, Fedra; Peyman, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is one of the most informative methodologies in ophthalmology and provides cross sectional images from anterior and posterior segments of the eye. Corneal diseases can be diagnosed by these images and corneal thickness maps can also assist in the treatment and diagnosis. The need for automatic segmentation of cross sectional images is inevitable since manual segmentation is time consuming and imprecise. In this paper, segmentation methods such as Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM), Graph Cut, and Level Set are used for automatic segmentation of three clinically important corneal layer boundaries on OCT images. Using the segmentation of the boundaries in three-dimensional corneal data, we obtained thickness maps of the layers which are created by these borders. Mean and standard deviation of the thickness values for normal subjects in epithelial, stromal, and whole cornea are calculated in central, superior, inferior, nasal, and temporal zones (centered on the center of pupil). To evaluate our approach, the automatic boundary results are compared with the boundaries segmented manually by two corneal specialists. The quantitative results show that GMM method segments the desired boundaries with the best accuracy. PMID:27247559

  4. Obtaining Thickness Maps of Corneal Layers Using the Optimal Algorithm for Intracorneal Layer Segmentation.

    PubMed

    Rabbani, Hossein; Kafieh, Rahele; Kazemian Jahromi, Mahdi; Jorjandi, Sahar; Mehri Dehnavi, Alireza; Hajizadeh, Fedra; Peyman, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is one of the most informative methodologies in ophthalmology and provides cross sectional images from anterior and posterior segments of the eye. Corneal diseases can be diagnosed by these images and corneal thickness maps can also assist in the treatment and diagnosis. The need for automatic segmentation of cross sectional images is inevitable since manual segmentation is time consuming and imprecise. In this paper, segmentation methods such as Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM), Graph Cut, and Level Set are used for automatic segmentation of three clinically important corneal layer boundaries on OCT images. Using the segmentation of the boundaries in three-dimensional corneal data, we obtained thickness maps of the layers which are created by these borders. Mean and standard deviation of the thickness values for normal subjects in epithelial, stromal, and whole cornea are calculated in central, superior, inferior, nasal, and temporal zones (centered on the center of pupil). To evaluate our approach, the automatic boundary results are compared with the boundaries segmented manually by two corneal specialists. The quantitative results show that GMM method segments the desired boundaries with the best accuracy.

  5. Linear theory of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in the low-latitude boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rajaram, R.; Sibeck, D. G.; Mcentire, R. W.

    1991-01-01

    The feasibility is examined of establishing characteristic profiles across the magnetospheric low-latitude boundary layer for the Kelvin-Helmholtz mode so that these profiles can be compared with satellite observations or a latitudinal chain of ground stations. An anisotropic collisionless fluid model is used instead of conventional MHD, and the finite thickness of the boundary layer and the thickness and position of the current layer are taken into account. The instability is found to be enhanced by a decrease in the thickness of the shear layer and of the current layer and by the proximity of the 'current layer' to the outer edge of the shear layer. The velocity threshold for the onset of instability is insensitive to the thickness. Characteristic profiles of the variation of plasma and field parameters across the boundary are obtained, and the importance of parameters specifying the current layer position and thickness is demonstrated.

  6. Calculation methods for compressible turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, D. M.; Cary, A. M., Jr.; Harris, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    Calculation procedures for non-reacting compressible two- and three-dimensional turbulent boundary layers were reviewed. Integral, transformation and correlation methods, as well as finite difference solutions of the complete boundary layer equations summarized. Alternative numerical solution procedures were examined, and both mean field and mean turbulence field closure models were considered. Physics and related calculation problems peculiar to compressible turbulent boundary layers are described. A catalog of available solution procedures of the finite difference, finite element, and method of weighted residuals genre is included. Influence of compressibility, low Reynolds number, wall blowing, and pressure gradient upon mean field closure constants are reported.

  7. Turbulent Boundary Layer in High Rayleigh Number Convection in Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    du Puits, Ronald; Li, Ling; Resagk, Christian; Thess, André; Willert, Christian

    2014-03-01

    Flow visualizations and particle image velocimetry measurements in the boundary layer of a Rayleigh-Bénard experiment are presented for the Rayleigh number Ra =1.4×1010. Our visualizations indicate that the appearance of the flow structures is similar to ordinary (isothermal) turbulent boundary layers. Our particle image velocimetry measurements show that vorticity with both positive and negative sign is generated and that the smallest flow structures are 1 order of magnitude smaller than the boundary layer thickness. Additional local measurements using laser Doppler velocimetry yield turbulence intensities up to I=0.4 as in turbulent atmospheric boundary layers. From our observations, we conclude that the convective boundary layer becomes turbulent locally and temporarily although its Reynolds number Re ≈200 is considerably smaller than the value 420 underlying existing phenomenological theories. We think that, in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection, the transition of the boundary layer towards turbulence depends on subtle details of the flow field and is therefore not universal.

  8. Stability of Supersonic Boundary Layers Over Blunt Wedges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakumar, Ponnampalam

    2006-01-01

    Receptivity and stability of supersonic boundary layers over blunt flat plates and wedges are numerically investigated at a free stream Mach number of 3.5 and at a high Reynolds number of 10(exp 6)/inch. Both the steady and unsteady solutions are obtained by solving the full Navier-Stokes equations using the 5th-order accurate weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme for space discretization and using third-order total-variation-diminishing (TVD) Runge-Kutta scheme for time integration. Computations are performed for a flat plate with leading edge thicknesses of 0.0001, 0.001, 0.005 and 0.01 inches that give Reynolds numbers based on the leading edge thickness ranging from 1000 to 10000. Calculations are also performed for a wedge of 10 degrees half angle with different leading edge radii 0.001 and 0.01 inches. The linear stability results showed that the bluntness has a strong stabilizing effect on the stability of two-dimensional boundary layers. The transition Reynolds number for a flat plate with a leading edge thickness of 0.01 inches is about 3.5 times larger than it is for the Blasius boundary layer. It was also revealed that boundary layers on blunt wedges are far more stable than on blunt flat plates.

  9. An Innovative Flow-Measuring Device: Thermocouple Boundary Layer Rake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Danny P.; Fralick, Gustave C.; Martin, Lisa C.; Wrbanek, John D.; Blaha, Charles A.

    2001-01-01

    An innovative flow-measuring device, a thermocouple boundary layer rake, was developed. The sensor detects the flow by using a thin-film thermocouple (TC) array to measure the temperature difference across a heater strip. The heater and TC arrays are microfabricated on a constant-thickness quartz strut with low heat conductivity. The device can measure the velocity profile well into the boundary layer, about 65 gm from the surface, which is almost four times closer to the surface than has been possible with the previously used total pressure tube.

  10. Boundary-layer control for drag reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, William D.

    1988-01-01

    Although the number of possible applications of boundary-layer control is large, a discussion is given only of those that have received the most attention recently at NASA Langley Research Center to improve airfoil drag characteristics. This research concerns stabilizing the laminar boundary layer through geometric shaping (natural laminar flow, NLF) and active control involving the removal of a portion of the laminar boundary layer (laminar flow control, LFC) either through discrete slots or a perforated surface. At low Reynolds numbers, a combination of shaping and forced transition has been used to achieve the desired run of laminar flow and control of laminar separation. In the design of both natural laminar flow and laminar flow control airfoils and wings, boundary layer stability codes play an important role. A discussion of some recent stability calculations using both incompressible and compressible codes is given.

  11. Boundary-layer stability and airfoil design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viken, Jeffrey K.

    1986-01-01

    Several different natural laminar flow (NLF) airfoils have been analyzed for stability of the laminar boundary layer using linear stability codes. The NLF airfoils analyzed come from three different design conditions: incompressible; compressible with no sweep; and compressible with sweep. Some of the design problems are discussed, concentrating on those problems associated with keeping the boundary layer laminar. Also, there is a discussion on how a linear stability analysis was effectively used to improve the design for some of the airfoils.

  12. Free-stream disturbances, continuous eigenfunctions, boundary-layer instability and transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salwen, H.

    1980-01-01

    A rational foundation is provided for the application of the linear stability theory of parallel shear flows to transition prediction. An explicit method is given for carrying out the necessary calculations. The expansions are shown to be complete. Sample calculations show that a typical boundary layer is very sensitive to vorticity disturbance in the inner boundary layer near the critical layer. Vorticity disturbances three or four boundary layer thicknesses above the boundary are nearly uncoupled from the boundary layer, in that the amplitudes of the discrete Tollmein-Schlichting waves are an extremely small fraction of the amplitude of the disturbance.

  13. Free-stream disturbance, continuous Eigenfunctions, boundary-layer instability and transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosch, C. E.

    1980-01-01

    A rational foundation is presented for the application of the linear shear flows to transition prediction, and an explicit method is given for carrying out the necessary calculations. The expansions used are shown to be complete. Sample calculations show that a typical boundary layer is very sensitive to vorticity disturbances in the inner boundary layer, near the critical layer. Vorticity disturbances three or four boundary layer thicknesses above the boundary are nearly uncoupled from the boundary layer in that the amplitudes of the discrete Tollmien-Schlicting waves are an extremely small fraction of the amplitude of the disturbance.

  14. Interferometric data for a shock-wave/boundary-layer interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunagan, Stephen E.; Brown, James L.; Miles, John B.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental study of the axisymmetric shock-wave / boundary-layer strong interaction flow generated in the vicinity of a cylinder-cone intersection was conducted. The study data are useful in the documentation and understanding of compressible turbulent strong interaction flows, and are part of a more general effort to improve turbulence modeling for compressible two- and three-dimensional strong viscous/inviscid interactions. The nominal free stream Mach number was 2.85. Tunnel total pressures of 1.7 and 3.4 atm provided Reynolds number values of 18 x 10(6) and 36 x 10(6) based on model length. Three cone angles were studied giving negligible, incipient, and large scale flow separation. The initial cylinder boundary layer upstream of the interaction had a thickness of 1.0 cm. The subsonic layer of the cylinder boundary layer was quite thin, and in all cases, the shock wave penetrated a significant portion of the boundary layer. Owing to the thickness of the cylinder boundary layer, considerable structural detail was resolved for the three shock-wave / boundary-layer interaction cases considered. The primary emphasis was on the application of the holographic interferometry technique. The density field was deduced from an interferometric analysis based on the Able transform. Supporting data were obtained using a 2-D laser velocimeter, as well as mean wall pressure and oil flow measurements. The attached flow case was observed to be steady, while the separated cases exhibited shock unsteadiness. Comparisons with Navier-Stokes computations using a two-equation turbulence model are presented.

  15. Sidewall boundary-layer measurements with upstream suction in the Langley 0.3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, A. V.

    1988-01-01

    The Langley 0.3 Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel has provision for boundary removal from the sidewalls to reduce sidewall interference effects on the test data. The tests carried out to determine the change in the empty test section sidewall boundary layer thickness at the model station with upstream boundary layer mass removal are described. The boundary layer measurements showed that the upstream removal region is effective in reducing the boundary layer thickness at the model station. The boundary layer displacement thickness reduced from about 1.2 percent to about .4 percent of the test section width. The boundary layer velocity profiles followed a power law variation in the outer region and showed good correlation when plotted in terms of boundary layer momentum thickness.

  16. Heat transfer through turbulent boundary layers - The effects of introduction of and recovery from convex curvature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, T. W.; Moffat, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    Measurements have been made of the heat transfer through a turbulent boundary layer on a convexly curved isothermal wall and on a flat plate following the curved section. Data were taken for one free-stream velocity and two different ratios of boundary layer thickness to radius of curvature delta/R = 0.051 and delta/R = 0.077. Only small differences were observed in the distribution of heat transfer rates for the two boundary layer thicknesses tested, although differences were noted in the temperature distributions within the boundary layer

  17. Modeling the summertime Arctic cloudy boundary layer

    SciTech Connect

    Curry, J.A.; Pinto, J.O.; McInnes, K.L.

    1996-04-01

    Global climate models have particular difficulty in simulating the low-level clouds during the Arctic summer. Model problems are exacerbated in the polar regions by the complicated vertical structure of the Arctic boundary layer. The presence of multiple cloud layers, a humidity inversion above cloud top, and vertical fluxes in the cloud that are decoupled from the surface fluxes, identified in Curry et al. (1988), suggest that models containing sophisticated physical parameterizations would be required to accurately model this region. Accurate modeling of the vertical structure of multiple cloud layers in climate models is important for determination of the surface radiative fluxes. This study focuses on the problem of modeling the layered structure of the Arctic summertime boundary-layer clouds and in particular, the representation of the more complex boundary layer type consisting of a stable foggy surface layer surmounted by a cloud-topped mixed layer. A hierarchical modeling/diagnosis approach is used. A case study from the summertime Arctic Stratus Experiment is examined. A high-resolution, one-dimensional model of turbulence and radiation is tested against the observations and is then used in sensitivity studies to infer the optimal conditions for maintaining two separate layers in the Arctic summertime boundary layer. A three-dimensional mesoscale atmospheric model is then used to simulate the interaction of this cloud deck with the large-scale atmospheric dynamics. An assessment of the improvements needed to the parameterizations of the boundary layer, cloud microphysics, and radiation in the 3-D model is made.

  18. Optical measurements of degradation in aircraft boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelsall, D.

    1980-01-01

    Visible wavelength measurements of the degradation of optical beams when transmitted through the thin aerodynamic boundary layers around an aircraft are reviewed. The measured results indicated degradation levels for the KC-135 airplanes between 0.10 to 0.13 lambda increasing to 0.18 lambda (rms wavefront distortion). For the Lear Jet, degradation with a 25 mm diameter optics was roughly 0.07 lambda. The corresponding infinite aperture degradation levels are also calculated. The corresponding measured correlation lengths of roughly 12 mm for the KC-135 aircraft and 6 mm for the Lear Jet scale to roughly 20 and 25 mm, respectively, for infinite apertures. These boundary layer correlation lengths do not appear to reflect the different boundary layer thicknesses on the two different aircraft.

  19. Interacting turbulent boundary layer over a wavy wall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polak, A.; Werle, M. J.

    1977-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the two-dimensional supersonic flow of a thick turbulent boundary layer over a train of relatively small wave-like protuberances. The flow conditions and the geometry are such that there exists a strong interaction between the viscous and inviscid flow. The problem cannot be solved without inclusion of interaction effects due to the occurrence of the separation singularity in classical boundary layer methods. Here the interacting boundary layer equations are solved numerically using a time-like relaxation method with turbulence effects represented by the inclusion of the eddy viscosity model of Cebeci and Smith. Results are presented for flow over a train of up to six waves for Mach numbers of 2.5 and 3.5, Reynolds numbers of 10,000,000/m and 32,000,000/m, and wall temperature ratios of 0.4 and 0.8. Limited comparisons with independent experimental and analytical results are also given.

  20. Supersonic separated turbulent boundary - layer over a wavy wall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polak, A.; Werle, M. J.

    1977-01-01

    A prediction method is developed for calculating distributions of surface heating rates, pressure and skin friction over a wavy wall in a two-dimensional supersonic flow. Of particular interest is the flow of thick turbulent boundary layers. The surface geometry and the flow conditions considered are such that there exists a strong interaction between the viscous and inviscid flow. First, using the interacting turbulent boundary layer equations, the problem is formulated in physical coordinates and then a reformulation of the governing equations in terms of Levy-Lees variables is given. Next, a numerical scheme for solving interacting boundary layer equations is adapted. A number of modifications which led to the improvement of the numerical algorithm are discussed. Finally, results are presented for flow over a train of up to six waves at various flow conditions.

  1. Finite volume solution of the compressible boundary-layer equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loyd, B.; Murman, E. M.

    1986-01-01

    A box-type finite volume discretization is applied to the integral form of the compressible boundary layer equations. Boundary layer scaling is introduced through the grid construction: streamwise grid lines follow eta = y/h = const., where y is the normal coordinate and h(x) is a scale factor proportional to the boundary layer thickness. With this grid, similarity can be applied explicity to calculate initial conditions. The finite volume method preserves the physical transparency of the integral equations in the discrete approximation. The resulting scheme is accurate, efficient, and conceptually simple. Computations for similar and non-similar flows show excellent agreement with tabulated results, solutions computed with Keller's Box scheme, and experimental data.

  2. Separation criteria for three-dimensional boundary-layer calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raven, H. C.

    1984-04-01

    The behavior of the numerical solution of the boundary-layer equations for 3D viscous flow around streamlined objects in the vicinity of separation-line singularities is investigated. The turbulent boundary layer on a 35-deg swept wing of infinite span is analyzed using the finite-difference-method boundary-layer program described by Raven (1980) and a spanwise-marching approach. A discontinuity in the displacement thickness and other characteristics at the separation line is shown to produce a forbidden region within which the calculated results are grid dependent and may be physically meaningless. The use of local grid refinement to evaluate separation singularities and identify erroneous results is recommended.

  3. Streamline curvature effects on turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, D. C.; Chambers, T. L.

    1976-01-01

    A theoretical tool has been developed for predicting, in a nonempirical manner, effects of streamline curvature and coordinate-system rotation on turbulent boundary layers. The second-order closure scheme developed by Wilcox and Traci has been generalized for curved streamline flow and for flow in a rotating coordinate system. A physically based straightforward argument shows that curvature/rotation primarily affects the turbulent mixing energy; the argument yields suitable curvature/rotation terms which are added to the mixing-energy equation. Singular-perturbation solutions valid in the wall layer of a curved-wall boundary layer and a fully developed rotating channel flow demonstrate that, with the curvature/rotation terms, the model predicts the curved-wall and the rotating coordinate system laws of the wall. Results of numerical computations of curved-wall boundary layers and of rotating channel flow show that curvature/rotation effects can be computed accurately with second-order closure.

  4. Surface modes in sheared boundary layers over impedance linings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brambley, E. J.

    2013-08-01

    Surface modes, being duct modes localized close to the duct wall, are analysed within a lined cylindrical duct with uniform flow apart from a thin boundary layer. As well as full numerical solutions of the Pridmore-Brown equation, simplified mathematical models are given where the duct lining and boundary layer are lumped together and modelled using a single boundary condition (a modification of the Myers boundary condition previously proposed by the author), from which a surface mode dispersion relation is derived. For a given frequency, up to six surface modes are shown to exist, rather than the maximum of four for uniform slipping flow. Not only is the different number and behaviour of surface modes important for frequency-domain mode-matching techniques, which depend on having found all relevant modes during matching, but the thin boundary layer is also shown to lead to different convective and absolute stability than for uniform slipping flow. Numerical examples are given comparing the predictions of the surface mode dispersion relation to full solutions of the Pridmore-Brown equation, and the accuracy with which surface modes are predicted is shown to be significantly increased compared with the uniform slipping flow assumption. The importance of not only the boundary layer thickness but also its profile (tanh or linear) is demonstrated. A Briggs-Bers stability analysis is also performed under the assumption of a mass-spring-damper or Helmholtz resonator impedance model.

  5. Receptivity of Supersonic Boundary Layers to Acoustic Disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malik, Mujeeb R.; Balakumar, P.

    2005-01-01

    Boundary layer receptivity to two-dimensional slow and fast acoustic waves is investigated by solving Navier-Stokes equations for Mach 4.5 flow over a flat plate with a finite-thickness leading edge. Higher order spatial and temporal schemes are employed to obtain the solution whereby the flat-plate leading edge region is resolved by providing a sufficiently refined grid. The results show that the instability waves are generated in the leading edge region and that the boundary-layer is much more receptive to slow acoustic waves (by almost a factor of 20) as compared to the fast waves. Hence, this leading-edge receptivity mechanism is expected to be more relevant in the transition process for high Mach number flows. The effect of acoustic wave incidence angle is also studied and it is found that the receptivity of the boundary layer on the windward side (with respect to the acoustic forcing) decreases by more than a factor of 4 when the incidence angle is increased from 0 to 45 deg. However, the receptivity coefficient for the leeward side is found to vary relatively weakly with the incidence angle. The effect of leading-edge thickness is also studied and bluntness is found to stabilize the boundary layer. The relative significance of fast acoustic waves is enhanced in the presence of bluntness.

  6. The Kinematics of Turbulent Boundary Layer Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Stephen Kern

    1991-01-01

    The long history of research into the internal structure of turbulent boundary layers has not provided a unified picture of the physics responsible for turbulence production and dissipation. The goals of the present research are to: (1) define the current state of boundary layer structure knowledge; and (2) utilize direct numerical simulation results to help close the unresolved issues identified in part A and to unify the fragmented knowledge of various coherent motions into a consistent kinematic model of boundary layer structure. The results of the current study show that all classes of coherent motion in the low Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer may be related to vortical structures, but that no single form of vortex is representative of the wide variety of vortical structures observed. In particular, ejection and sweep motions, as well as entrainment from the free-streem are shown to have strong spatial and temporal relationships with vortical structures. Disturbances of vortex size, location, and intensity show that quasi-streamwise vortices dominate the buffer region, while transverse vortices and vortical arches dominate the wake region. Both types of vortical structure are common in the log region. The interrelationships between the various structures and the population distributions of vortices are combined into a conceptual kinematic model for the boundary layer. Aspects of vortical structure dynamics are also postulated, based on time-sequence animations of the numerically simulated flow.

  7. Turbulent Spots Inside the Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skarda, Jinhie; Wu, Xiaohua; Moin, Parviz; Lozano-Duran, Adrian; Wallace, James; Hickey, Jean-Pierre

    2016-11-01

    We present evidence that the buffer region of the canonical turbulent boundary layer is populated by locally generated turbulent spots, which cause strong indentations on the near-wall low-momentum streaks. This evidence is obtained from a spatially-developing direct numerical simulation carrying the inlet Blasius boundary layer through a bypass transition to the turbulent boundary layer state over a moderate Reynolds number range. The turbulent spots are structurally analogous to their transitional counter-parts but without any direct causality connection. High-pass filtered time-history records are used to calculate the period of turbulent spot detection and this period is compared to the boundary layer bursting period reported in hot-wire experiments. The sensitivity of the results to parameters such as the high pass filter frequency and the amplitude discriminator level is examined. The characteristics of these turbulent spots are also quantified using a spatial connectivity based conditional sampling technique. This evidence seems to be at odds with the notion that the buffer region is dominated by quasi-streamwise vortices, and contributes to the potential unification of the studies on near-wall turbulent boundary layer dynamics.

  8. Boundary Layer Cloudiness Parameterizations Using ARM Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce Albrecht

    2004-09-15

    This study used DOE ARM data and facilities to: (1) study macroscopic properties of continental stratus clouds at SGP and the factors controlling these properties, (2) develop a scientific basis for understanding the processes responsible for the formation of boundary layer clouds using ARM observations in conjunction with simple parametric models and LES, and (3) evaluate cumulus cloud characteristics retrieved from the MMCR operating at TWP-Nauru. In addition we have used high resolution 94 GHz observations of boundary layer clouds and precipitation to: (1) develop techniques for using high temporal resolution Doppler velocities to study large-eddy circulations and turbulence in boundary layer clouds and estimate the limitations of using current and past MMCR data for boundary layer cloud studies, (2) evaluate the capability and limitations of the current MMCR data for estimating reflectivity, vertical velocities, and spectral under low- signal-to-noise conditions associated with weak no n-precipitating clouds, (3) develop possible sampling modes for the new MMCR processors to allow for adequate sampling of boundary layer clouds, and (4) retrieve updraft and downdraft structures under precipitating conditions.

  9. High enthalpy hypersonic boundary layer flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yanow, G.

    1972-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental study of an ionizing laminar boundary layer formed by a very high enthalpy flow (in excess of 12 eV per atom or 7000 cal/gm) with allowance for the presence of helium driver gas is described. The theoretical investigation has shown that the use of variable transport properties and their respective derivatives is very important in the solution of equilibrium boundary layer equations of high enthalpy flow. The effect of low level helium contamination on the surface heat transfer rate is minimal. The variation of ionization is much smaller in a chemically frozen boundary layer solution than in an equilibrium boundary layer calculation and consequently, the variation of the transport properties in the case of the former was not essential in the integration. The experiments have been conducted in a free piston shock tunnel, and a detailed study of its nozzle operation, including the effects of low levels of helium driver gas contamination has been made. Neither the extreme solutions of an equilibrium nor of a frozen boundary layer will adequately predict surface heat transfer rate in very high enthalpy flows.

  10. Boundary-Layer-Ingesting Inlet Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, Lewis R.; Allan, Brian G.; Gorton, Susan A.

    2008-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to provide the first demonstration of an active flow control system for a flush-mounted inlet with significant boundary-layer-ingestion in transonic flow conditions. The effectiveness of the flow control in reducing the circumferential distortion at the engine fan-face location was assessed using a 2.5%-scale model of a boundary-layer-ingesting offset diffusing inlet. The inlet was flush mounted to the tunnel wall and ingested a large boundary layer with a boundary-layer-to-inlet height ratio of 35%. Different jet distribution patterns and jet mass flow rates were used in the inlet to control distortion. A vane configuration was also tested. Finally a hybrid vane/jet configuration was tested leveraging strengths of both types of devices. Measurements were made of the onset boundary layer, the duct surface static pressures, and the mass flow rates through the duct and the flow control actuators. The distortion and pressure recovery were measured at the aerodynamic interface plane. The data show that control jets and vanes reduce circumferential distortion to acceptable levels. The point-design vane configuration produced higher distortion levels at off-design settings. The hybrid vane/jet flow control configuration reduced the off-design distortion levels to acceptable ones and used less than 0.5% of the inlet mass flow to supply the jets.

  11. Leading-edge effects on boundary-layer receptivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatski, Thomas B.; Kerschen, Edward J.

    1990-01-01

    Numerical calculations are presented for the incompressible flow over a parabolic cylinder. The computational domain extends from a region upstream of the body downstream to the region where the Blasius boundary-layer solution holds. A steady mean flow solution is computed and the results for the scaled surface vorticity, surface pressure and displacement thickness are compared to previous studies. The unsteady problem is then formulated as a perturbation solution starting with and evolving from the mean flow. The response to irrotational time harmonic pulsation of the free-stream is examined. Results for the initial development of the velocity profile and displacement thickness are presented. These calculations will be extended to later times to investigate the initiation of instability waves within the boundary-layer.

  12. Mechanics of Boundary Layer Transition. Part 5: Boundary Layer Stability theory in incompressible and compressible flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mack, L. M.

    1967-01-01

    The fundamentals of stability theory, its chief results, and the physical mechanisms at work are presented. The stability theory of the laminar boundary determines whether a small disturbance introduced into the boundary layer will amplify or damp. If the disturbance damps, the boundary layer remains laminar. If the disturbance amplifies, and by a sufficient amount, then transition to turbulence eventually takes place. The stability theory establishes those states of the boundary layer which are most likely to lead to transition, identifys those frequencies which are the most dangerous, and indicates how the external parameters can best be changed to avoid transition.

  13. Aerosol-Cloud-Drizzle-Turbulence Interactions in Boundary Layer Clouds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    understanding of the effects of aerosol-cloud interactions and drizzle and entrainment processes in boundary layer clouds for the purpose of developing...thickness, cloud turbulence intensity, and aerosols on precipitation production; 4) study the processing of aerosols by cloud processes ; 5) explore mass...drizzle processes to the artificial introduction of CCN and giant nuclei under differing aerosol backgrounds. In addition, a set of aerosol and cloud

  14. A Review of Unsteady Turbulent Boundary-Layer Experiments.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-01

    thickness. A good example of this phenomenon is shown in Fig. 17, from Houdeville et al. (1976). Here the adverse pressure gradient has combined with...e) When existing data are plotted using the dimensionless frequency, S , quasisteady results occur for only a small range of amplitude or frequency...Houdeville, R.; Raynaud , M.: Oscillating turbulent boundary layer with strong mean pressure gradient. Presented at 2nd Symposium on Turbulent Shear

  15. User's manual for the Langley boundary layer noise propagation program (MRS-BLP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spence, Peter L.

    1991-01-01

    A computer program, McAninch-Rawls-Spence Boundary Layer Propagation (MRS-BLP), is described. This program models the refractive and scattering effects on acoustic pressure waves propagating through a boundary layer encompassing an aircraft's fuselage. The noise source is assumed known and generated by a propeller. The fuselage is represented by an infinitely long cylinder embedded in a longitudinal flow. By matching a numerical solution inside the boundary layer with an analytical solution outside the boundary layer, the program calculates the acoustic pressure at the surface of the cylinder given the incident field at the top of the boundary layer. The boundary layer flow velocity and sound speed profiles, as well as the boundary layer thickness may be specified by the user. A detailed description of the input parameters and how to execute the program is given. Example executions of MRS-BLP showing results are also included.

  16. Provenance of the K/T boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hildebrand, A. R.; Boynton, W. V.

    1988-01-01

    An array of chemical, physical and isotopic evidence indicates that an impact into oceanic crust terminated the Cretaceous Period. Approximately 1500 cu km of debris, dispersed by the impact fireball, fell out globally in marine and nonmarine environments producing a 2 to 4 mm thick layer (fireball layer). In North American locales, the fireball layer overlies a 15 to 25 mm thick layer of similar but distinct composition. This 15 to 25 mm layer (ejecta layer) may represent approximately 1000 cu km of lower energy ejecta from a nearby impact site. Isotopic and chemical evidence supports a mantle provenance for the bulk of the layers. The extraordinary REE pattern of the boundary clays was modelled as a mixture of oceanic crust, mantle, and approximately 10 percent continental material. The results are presented. If the siderophiles of the ejecta layer were derived solely from the mantle, a test may be available to see if the siderophile element anomaly of the fireball layer had an extraterrestrial origin. Radiogenic Os-187 is depleted in the mantle relative to an undifferentiated chondritic source. Os-187/Os-186 ratios of 1.049 and 1.108 were calculated for the ejecta and fireball layers, respectively.

  17. Boundary-Layer Code For Supersonic Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinckney, S. Z.; Walton, J. T.

    1994-01-01

    HUD is integral computer code based on Spaulding-Chi method for predicting development of boundary layers in laminar, transitional, and turbulent regions of flows on two-dimensional or axisymmetric bodies. Approximates nonequilibrium velocity profiles as well as local surface friction in presence of pressure gradient. Predicts transfer of heat in turbulent boundary layer in presence of high axial presure gradient. Provides for pressure gradients both normal and lateral to surfaces. Also used to estimate requirements for cooling scramjet engines. Because of this capability, HUD program incorporated into several scramjet-cycle-performance-analysis codes, including SCRAM (ARC-12338) and SRGULL (LEW-15093). Written in FORTRAN 77.

  18. Boundary-layer model of pattern formation in solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ben-Jacob, E.; Goldenfeld, N.; Langer, J. S.; Schon, G.

    1984-01-01

    A model of pattern formation in crystal growth is proposed, and its analytic properties are investigated. The principal dynamical variables in this model are the curvature of the solidification front and the thickness (or heat content) of a thermal boundary layer, both taken to be functions of position along the interface. This model is mathematically much more tractable than the realistic, fully nonlocal version of the free-boundary problem, and still recaptures many of the features that seem essential for studying dendritic behavior, for example. Preliminary numerical solutions produce snowflakelike patterns similar to those seen in nature.

  19. System for etching thick aluminum layers minimizes bridging and undercutting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Four step photoresist process for etching thick aluminum layers for semiconductor device contacts produces uniform contact surfaces, eliminates bridging, minimizes undercutting, and may be used on various materials of any thickness.

  20. Calculation methods for compressible turbulent boundary layers, 1976

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, D. M.; Cary, A. M., Jr.; Harris, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    Equations and closure methods for compressible turbulent boundary layers are discussed. Flow phenomena peculiar to calculation of these boundary layers were considered, along with calculations of three dimensional compressible turbulent boundary layers. Procedures for ascertaining nonsimilar two and three dimensional compressible turbulent boundary layers were appended, including finite difference, finite element, and mass-weighted residual methods.

  1. Boundary-layer theory for blast waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, K. B.; Berger, S. A.; Kamel, M. M.; Korobeinikov, V. P.; Oppenheim, A. K.

    1975-01-01

    It is profitable to consider the blast wave as a flow field consisting of two regions: the outer, which retains the properties of the inviscid solution, and the inner, which is governed by flow equations including terms expressing the effects of heat transfer and, concomitantly, viscosity. The latter region thus plays the role of a boundary layer. Reported here is an analytical method developed for the study of such layers, based on the matched asymptotic expansion technique combined with patched solutions.

  2. On the period of the coherent structure in boundary layers at large Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, M. A. B.; Marvin, J. G.

    1978-01-01

    The period of the large coherent structure in a subsonic, compressible, turbulent boundary layer was determined using the autocorrelation of the velocity and pressure fluctuations for Reynolds numbers between 5,000 and 35,000. In low Reynolds number flows the overall correlation period scaled with the outer variables - namely, the free stream velocity and the boundary layer thickness.

  3. Unsteady turbulent boundary layers in swimming rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Yanase, Kazutaka; Saarenrinne, Pentti

    2015-05-01

    The boundary layers of rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, swimming at 1.02±0.09 L s(-1) (mean±s.d., N=4), were measured by the particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique at a Reynolds number of 4×10(5). The boundary layer profile showed unsteadiness, oscillating above and beneath the classical logarithmic law of the wall with body motion. Across the entire surface regions that were measured, local Reynolds numbers based on momentum thickness, which is the distance that is perpendicular to the fish surface through which the boundary layer momentum flows at free-stream velocity, were greater than the critical value of 320 for the laminar-to-turbulent transition. The skin friction was dampened on the convex surface while the surface was moving towards a free-stream flow and increased on the concave surface while retreating. These observations contradict the result of a previous study using different species swimming by different methods. Boundary layer compression accompanied by an increase in local skin friction was not observed. Thus, the overall results may not support absolutely the Bone-Lighthill boundary layer thinning hypothesis that the undulatory motions of swimming fish cause a large increase in their friction drag because of the compression of the boundary layer. In some cases, marginal flow separation occurred on the convex surface in the relatively anterior surface region, but the separated flow reattached to the fish surface immediately downstream. Therefore, we believe that a severe impact due to induced drag components (i.e. pressure drag) on the swimming performance, an inevitable consequence of flow separation, was avoided.

  4. Vortex unwinding in a turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcginley, Catherine B.; Beeler, George B.

    1987-01-01

    The vortex unwinding method is used as a tool in performing vortex cancellation in a turbulent boundary layer. Sufficient reduction in the isotach variation was achieved to verify the usefulness of this technique, for the cases of both wall turbulence control and horseshoe vortex alleviation. More detailed measurements of vortex strength and position improve the optimization process and increase the amount of vortex unwinding.

  5. Astrophysical Boundary Layers: A New Picture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, Mikhail; Rafikov, Roman R.; Mclellan Stone, James

    2016-04-01

    Accretion is a ubiquitous process in astrophysics. In cases when the magnetic field is not too strong and a disk is formed, accretion can proceed through the mid plane all the way to the surface of the central compact object. Unless that compact object is a black hole, a boundary layer will be formed where the accretion disk touches its surfaces. The boundary layer is both dynamically and observationally significant as up to half of the accretion energy is dissipated there.Using a combination of analytical theory and computer simulations we show that angular momentum transport and accretion in the boundary layer is mediated by waves. This breaks with the standard astrophysical paradigm of an anomalous turbulent viscosity that drives accretion. However, wave-mediated angular momentum transport is a natural consequence of "sonic instability." The sonic instability, which we describe analytically and observe in our simulations, is a close cousin of the Papaloizou-Pringle instability. However, it is very vigorous in the boundary layer due to the immense radial velocity shear present at the equator.Our results are applicable to accreting neutron stars, white dwarfs, protostars, and protoplanets.

  6. The structure of APG turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gungor, Ayse G.; Maciel, Yvan; Simens, Mark P.; Soria, Julio

    2013-11-01

    A boundary layer under influence of a strong APG is studied using DNS. Transition to turbulence is triggered using a trip wire which is modelled using the immersed boundary method. The Reynolds number close to the exit of the numerical domain is Reθ = 2175 and the shape-factor H = 2 . 5 . Two dimensional two-point spatial correlation functions are obtained in this region and close to the transition region. Cvu with a reference point close to the transition region shows a flow periodicity until Reθ ~ 1600 . This periodicity is related to the shear layer instability of the separation bubble created as a result of the APG. The Cvv and Cww correlations obtained far from the transition region at Reθ = 2175 and at y / δ = 0 . 4 coincide with results obtained for a ZPG boundary layer. Implying that the structure of the v , w fluctuations is the same as in ZPG. However, Cuu indicates that the structure of the u fluctuation in an APG boundary layer is almost twice as short as the ZPG structures. The APG structures are also less correlated with the flow at the wall. The near wall structure of strong APG flows is different from ZPG flows in that streaks are much shorter or absent. Funded in part by ITU, NSERC of Canada, ARC Discovery Grant, and Multiflow program of the ERC.

  7. Planetary Boundary Layer from AERI and MPL

    DOE Data Explorer

    Sawyer, Virginia

    2014-02-13

    The distribution and transport of aerosol emitted to the lower troposphere is governed by the height of the planetary boundary layer (PBL), which limits the dilution of pollutants and influences boundary-layer convection. Because radiative heating and cooling of the surface strongly affect the PBL top height, it follows diurnal and seasonal cycles and may vary by hundreds of meters over a 24-hour period. The cap the PBL imposes on low-level aerosol transport makes aerosol concentration an effective proxy for PBL height: the top of the PBL is marked by a rapid transition from polluted, well-mixed boundary-layer air to the cleaner, more stratified free troposphere. Micropulse lidar (MPL) can provide much higher temporal resolution than radiosonde and better vertical resolution than infrared spectrometer (AERI), but PBL heights from all three instruments at the ARM SGP site are compared to one another for validation. If there is agreement among them, the higher-resolution remote sensing-derived PBL heights can accurately fill in the gaps left by the low frequency of radiosonde launches, and thus improve model parameterizations and our understanding of boundary-layer processes.

  8. Boundary Layer Transition on X-43A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott; Daryabeigi, Kamran; Wurster, Kathryn; Bittner, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The successful Mach 7 and 10 flights of the first fully integrated scramjet propulsion systems by the Hyper-X (X-43A) program have provided the means with which to verify the original design methodologies and assumptions. As part of Hyper-X s propulsion-airframe integration, the forebody was designed to include a spanwise array of vortex generators to promote boundary layer transition ahead of the engine. Turbulence at the inlet is thought to provide the most reliable engine design and allows direct scaling of flight results to groundbased data. Pre-flight estimations of boundary layer transition, for both Mach 7 and 10 flight conditions, suggested that forebody boundary layer trips were required to ensure fully turbulent conditions upstream of the inlet. This paper presents the results of an analysis of the thermocouple measurements used to infer the dynamics of the transition process during the trajectories for both flights, on both the lower surface (to assess trip performance) and the upper surface (to assess natural transition). The approach used in the analysis of the thermocouple data is outlined, along with a discussion of the calculated local flow properties that correspond to the transition events as identified in the flight data. The present analysis has confirmed that the boundary layer trips performed as expected for both flights, providing turbulent flow ahead of the inlet during critical portions of the trajectory, while the upper surface was laminar as predicted by the pre-flight analysis.

  9. Nonlinear Transient Growth and Boundary Layer Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paredes, Pedro; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Li, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Parabolized stability equations (PSE) are used in a variational approach to study the optimal, non-modal disturbance growth in a Mach 3 at plate boundary layer and a Mach 6 circular cone boundary layer. As noted in previous works, the optimal initial disturbances correspond to steady counter-rotating streamwise vortices, which subsequently lead to the formation of streamwise-elongated structures, i.e., streaks, via a lift-up effect. The nonlinear evolution of the linearly optimal stationary perturbations is computed using the nonlinear plane-marching PSE for stationary perturbations. A fully implicit marching technique is used to facilitate the computation of nonlinear streaks with large amplitudes. To assess the effect of the finite-amplitude streaks on transition, the linear form of plane- marching PSE is used to investigate the instability of the boundary layer flow modified by spanwise periodic streaks. The onset of bypass transition is estimated by using an N- factor criterion based on the amplification of the streak instabilities. Results show that, for both flow configurations of interest, streaks of sufficiently large amplitude can lead to significantly earlier onset of transition than that in an unperturbed boundary layer without any streaks.

  10. Flow unsteadiness effects on boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, Sreedhara V.

    1989-01-01

    The development of boundary layers at high subsonic speeds in the presence of either mass flux fluctuations or acoustic disturbances (the two most important parameters in the unsteadiness environment affecting the aerodynamics of a flight vehicle) was investigated. A high quality database for generating detailed information concerning free-stream flow unsteadiness effects on boundary layer growth and transition in high subsonic and transonic speeds is described. The database will be generated with a two-pronged approach: (1) from a detailed review of existing literature on research and wind tunnel calibration database, and (2) from detailed tests in the Boundary Layer Apparatus for Subsonic and Transonic flow Affected by Noise Environment (BLASTANE). Special instrumentation, including hot wire anemometry, the buried wire gage technique, and laser velocimetry were used to obtain skin friction and turbulent shear stress data along the entire boundary layer for various free stream noise levels, turbulence content, and pressure gradients. This database will be useful for improving the correction methodology of applying wind tunnel test data to flight predictions and will be helpful for making improvements in turbulence modeling laws.

  11. 2007 Program of Study: Boundary Layers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    of boundary layer flows Jan Zika , University of New South Wales ..................................................................143 Double...Angel Ruiz-Angulo Caltech Henrik van Lengerich Cornell University Andrew Wells University of Cambridge Jan Zika University of New South Wales Staff...Gallet, Frederic Laliberte, Henrik van Lengerich, Jan Zika , Iva Kavcic. Second row (L/R): Ed Spiegel (standing), Charles Doering, Willem Malkus, Vitalii

  12. Orbiter Boundary Layer Transition Prediction Tool Enhancements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott A.; King, Rudolph A.; Kegerise, Michael A.; Wood, William A.; McGinley, Catherine B.; Berger, Karen T.; Anderson, Brian P.

    2010-01-01

    Updates to an analytic tool developed for Shuttle support to predict the onset of boundary layer transition resulting from thermal protection system damage or repair are presented. The boundary layer transition tool is part of a suite of tools that analyze the local aerothermodynamic environment to enable informed disposition of damage for making recommendations to fly as is or to repair. Using mission specific trajectory information and details of each d agmea site or repair, the expected time (and thus Mach number) of transition onset is predicted to help define proper environments for use in subsequent thermal and stress analysis of the thermal protection system and structure. The boundary layer transition criteria utilized within the tool were updated based on new local boundary layer properties obtained from high fidelity computational solutions. Also, new ground-based measurements were obtained to allow for a wider parametric variation with both protuberances and cavities and then the resulting correlations were calibrated against updated flight data. The end result is to provide correlations that allow increased confidence with the resulting transition predictions. Recently, a new approach was adopted to remove conservatism in terms of sustained turbulence along the wing leading edge. Finally, some of the newer flight data are also discussed in terms of how these results reflect back on the updated correlations.

  13. The influence of boundary layers on supersonic inlet flow unstart induced by mass injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, Hyungrok; Im, Seong-Kyun; Mungal, M. Godfrey; Cappelli, Mark A.

    2011-09-01

    A transverse jet is injected into a supersonic model inlet flow to induce unstart. Planar laser Rayleigh scattering from condensed CO2 particles is used to visualize flow dynamics during the unstart process, while in some cases, wall pressure traces are simultaneously recorded. Studies conducted over a range of inlet configurations reveal that the presence of turbulent wall boundary layers strongly affect the unstart dynamics. It is found that relatively thick turbulent boundary layers in asymmetric wall boundary layer conditions prompt the formation of unstart shocks; in symmetric boundary conditions lead to the propagation of pseudo-shocks; and in both cases facilitate fast inlet unstart, when compared with thin, laminar boundary layers. Incident shockwaves and associated reflections are found to affect the speed of pressure disturbances. These disturbances, which induce boundary layer separation, are found to precede the formation of unstart shocks. The results confirm the importance of and need to better understand shock-boundary layer interactions in inlet unstart dynamics.

  14. Numerical methods for hypersonic boundary layer stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malik, M. R.

    1990-01-01

    Four different schemes for solving compressible boundary layer stability equations are developed and compared, considering both the temporal and spatial stability for a global eigenvalue spectrum and a local eigenvalue search. The discretizations considered encompass: (1) a second-order-staggered finite-difference scheme; (2) a fourth-order accurate, two-point compact scheme; (3) a single-domain Chebychev spectral collocation scheme; and (4) a multidomain spectral collocation scheme. As Mach number increases, the performance of the single-domain collocation scheme deteriorates due to the outward movement of the critical layer; a multidomain spectral method is accordingly designed to furnish superior resolution of the critical layer.

  15. INDIVIDUAL TURBULENT CELL INTERACTION: BASIS FOR BOUNDARY LAYER ESTABLISHMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Boundary layers are important in determining the forces on objects in flowing fluids, mixing characteristics, and other phenomena. For example, benthic boundary layers are frequently active resuspension layers that determine bottom turbidity and transniissivity. Traditionally, bo...

  16. Thermal instability of forced convection boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, K.; Chen, M. M.

    1981-11-01

    The thermal instability of forced convection boundary layers with non-zero streamwise pressure gradient is examined. An analysis is carried out for the family of Falkner-Skan flows, and only the streamwise buoyancy generated instability for fluid layers with shear at low Reynolds number are considered. When the wedge angle is equal to one, the perturbation equations based on the boundary layer equations are identical to the exact perturbation equations for the stagnation flow. Calculated critical Rayleigh numbers and wave numbers are found to be independent of wedge angle in the limiting case of infinite Prandtl number, and results are compared with previous experimental results by Gilpin et al. (1978), showing good agreement.

  17. Direct determination of the thickness of stratospheric layers from single-channel satellite radiance measurements.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quiroz, R. S.; Gelman, M. E.

    1972-01-01

    The direct use of measured radiances for determining the thickness of stratospheric layers is investigated. Layers based at 100-10 mb, with upper boundaries at 10-0.5 mb, are investigated using a carefully selected family of stratospheric temperature profiles and computed radiances. On the basis of physical reasoning, a high correlation of thickness with radiance is anticipated for deep layers, such as the 100- to 2-mb layer (from about 15 to 43 km), that emit a substantial part of the infrared energy reaching a satellite radiometer in a particular channel. Empirical regression curves relating thickness and radiance are developed and are compared with blackbody curves obtained by substituting the blackbody temperature in the hydrostatic equation. Maximum thickness-radiance correlation is found, for each infrared channel, for the layer having the best agreement of empirical and blackbody curves.

  18. Bursting frequency prediction in turbulent boundary layers

    SciTech Connect

    LIOU,WILLIAM W.; FANG,YICHUNG

    2000-02-01

    The frequencies of the bursting events associated with the streamwise coherent structures of spatially developing incompressible turbulent boundary layers were predicted using global numerical solution of the Orr-Sommerfeld and the vertical vorticity equations of hydrodynamic stability problems. The structures were modeled as wavelike disturbances associated with the turbulent mean flow. The global method developed here involves the use of second and fourth order accurate finite difference formula for the differential equations as well as the boundary conditions. An automated prediction tool, BURFIT, was developed. The predicted resonance frequencies were found to agree very well with previous results using a local shooting technique and measured data.

  19. Cloud-Scale Numerical Modeling of the Arctic Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krueger, Steven K.

    1998-01-01

    The interactions between sea ice, open ocean, atmospheric radiation, and clouds over the Arctic Ocean exert a strong influence on global climate. Uncertainties in the formulation of interactive air-sea-ice processes in global climate models (GCMs) result in large differences between the Arctic, and global, climates simulated by different models. Arctic stratus clouds are not well-simulated by GCMs, yet exert a strong influence on the surface energy budget of the Arctic. Leads (channels of open water in sea ice) have significant impacts on the large-scale budgets during the Arctic winter, when they contribute about 50 percent of the surface fluxes over the Arctic Ocean, but cover only 1 to 2 percent of its area. Convective plumes generated by wide leads may penetrate the surface inversion and produce condensate that spreads up to 250 km downwind of the lead, and may significantly affect the longwave radiative fluxes at the surface and thereby the sea ice thickness. The effects of leads and boundary layer clouds must be accurately represented in climate models to allow possible feedbacks between them and the sea ice thickness. The FIRE III Arctic boundary layer clouds field program, in conjunction with the SHEBA ice camp and the ARM North Slope of Alaska and Adjacent Arctic Ocean site, will offer an unprecedented opportunity to greatly improve our ability to parameterize the important effects of leads and boundary layer clouds in GCMs.

  20. The Effect of Nonlinear Critical Layers on Boundary Layer Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Marvin E.

    1995-01-01

    Asymptotic methods are used to describe the nonlinear self-interaction between pairs of oblique instability modes that eventually develops when initially linear and spatially growing instability waves evolve downstream in nominally two-dimensional and spanwise periodic laminar boundary layers. The first nonlinear reaction takes place locally within a so-called 'critical layer' with the flow outside this layer consisting of a locally parallel mean flow plus an appropriate superposition of linear instability waves. The amplitudes of these waves are determined by either a single integro-differential equation or by a pair of integro-differential equations with quadratic to quartic-type nonlinearities.

  1. HIFiRE-5 Boundary Layer Transition and HIFiRE-1 Shock Boundary Layer Interaction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    For this work, new capabilities in ground test and in flight data analysis were developed. Also, as a necessary precursor to wind tunnel tests on...necessary precursor to wind tunnel tests on boundary layer transition on the leeside of a cone at angle of attack, extensive computations were undertaken...analysis of the HIFiRE-1 shock boundary layer interaction experiment was completed. Tests at the Purdue University Mach 6 quiet wind tunnel demonstrated a

  2. Influence of Mach Number and Incoming Boundary Layer on Shock Boundary Layer Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stab, Ilona; Threadgill, James; Little, Jesse

    2016-11-01

    Wall pressure fluctuations, schlieren imaging, oil flow visualization and PIV measurements have been performed on the shock boundary layer interaction (SBLI) formed by a 10° compression ramp. The incoming Mach number and boundary layer characteristics are varied to examine their influence on the SBLI. Focus is placed on understanding the effect of these parameters on the structure and unsteadiness of the resultant interaction. Lower Mach numbers M = 2 . 3 (δ0 = 1 . 7 mm , θ = 0 . 29 mm , Reθ = 3115 , H = 1 . 4) and M = 3 (δ0 = 1 . 3 mm , θ = 0 . 25 mm , Reθ = 1800 , H = 1 . 8) show a turbulent or transitional approach boundary layer with no apparent separation at the ramp. Mach 4 has a large separated region which is seemingly a result of a now laminar or transitional approach boundary layer. Pulsations in the separated region correspond to the expected low frequency SBLI dynamics showing a broad peak around a Strouhal number of St = fLint /U∞ = 0 . 27 which is lower than the characteristic frequency of the turbulent boundary layer. Additional results examining the influence of boundary layer modifications (e.g. sweep) and wind tunnel side-walls are also included. Supported by Raytheon Missile Systems.

  3. Boundary Layer Theory. Part 1; Laminar Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlichting, H.

    1949-01-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to give you a survey of a field of aerodynamics which has for a number of years been attracting an ever growing interest. The subject is the theory of flows with friction, and, within that field, particularly the theory of friction layers, or boundary layers. As you know, a great many considerations of aerodynamics are based on the so-called ideal fluid, that is, the frictionless incompressible fluid. By neglect of compressibility and friction the extensive mathematical theory of the ideal fluid (potential theory) has been made possible.

  4. Boundary layer transition detection by luminescence imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclachlan, B. G.; Bell, J. H.; Gallery, J.; Gouterman, M.; Callis, J.

    1993-01-01

    In recent experiments we have demonstrated the feasibility of a new approach to boundary layer transition detection. This new approach employs the temperature dependence of certain photoluminescent materials in the form of a surface coating or 'paint' to detect the change in heat transfer characteristics that accompany boundary layer transition. The feasibility experiments were conducted for low subsonic to transonic Mach numbers on two-dimensional airfoil and flat plate configurations. Paint derived transition locations were determined and compared to those obtained from Preston pressure probe measurements. Artificial heating of the models was used to obtain transition temperature signatures suitable for the instrumentation available to us. Initial estimates show, however, that passive kinetic heating at high Mach numbers is a promising alternative.

  5. Turbulent shear stresses in compressible boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laderman, A. J.; Demetriades, A.

    1979-01-01

    Hot-wire anemometer measurements of turbulent shear stresses in a Mach 3 compressible boundary layer were performed in order to investigate the effects of heat transfer on turbulence. Measurements were obtained by an x-probe in a flat plate, zero pressure gradient, two dimensional boundary layer in a wind tunnel with wall to freestream temperature ratios of 0.94 and 0.71. The measured shear stress distributions are found to be in good agreement with previous results, supporting the contention that the shear stress distribution is essentially independent of Mach number and heat transfer for Mach numbers from incompressible to hypersonic and wall to freestream temperature ratios of 0.4 to 1.0. It is also found that corrections for frequency response limitations of the electronic equipment are necessary to determine the correct shear stress distribution, particularly at the walls.

  6. BOREAS AFM-6 Boundary Layer Height Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilczak, James; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-6 team from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Adminsitration/Environment Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) operated a 915-MHz wind/Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS) profiler system in the Southern Study Area (SSA) near the Old Jack Pine (OJP) site. This data set provides boundary layer height information over the site. The data were collected from 21 May 1994 to 20 Sep 1994 and are stored in tabular ASCII files. The boundary layer height data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  7. Direct Numerical Simulations of Sound-Orifice-Boundary Layer Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qi; Bodony, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    We report on a series of direct numerical simulations (DNS) of the interaction of a monochromatic incident acoustic field with a cavity-backed circular orifice in the presence of laminar and turbulent boundary layers of freestream Mach number 0.5 and momentum thickness Reynolds number 2,300, with application to acoustic liners. The simulations show that the addition of the orifice increases the drag and can induce laminar-to-turbulent transition at sufficiently high acoustic levels. Furthermore, the sound-orifice-boundary layer system support three distinct timescales whose spatial distributions change with the phase of the incident sound. Details of the near-orifice interaction are studied to create a model of the orifice discharge coefficient that is part of a time-domain, nonlinear reduced-order model (ROM) for the liner impedance. Comparisons between the ROM-predicted and DNS-measured near-orifice flow and acoustic impedance are given.

  8. Inverse boundary-layer technique for airfoil design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, M. L.

    1979-01-01

    A description is presented of a technique for the optimization of airfoil pressure distributions using an interactive inverse boundary-layer program. This program allows the user to determine quickly a near-optimum subsonic pressure distribution which meets his requirements for lift, drag, and pitching moment at the desired flow conditions. The method employs an inverse turbulent boundary-layer scheme for definition of the turbulent recovery portion of the pressure distribution. Two levels of pressure-distribution architecture are used - a simple roof top for preliminary studies and a more complex four-region architecture for a more refined design. A technique is employed to avoid the specification of pressure distributions which result in unrealistic airfoils, that is, those with negative thickness. The program allows rapid evaluation of a designed pressure distribution off-design in Reynolds number, transition location, and angle of attack, and will compute an airfoil contour for the designed pressure distribution using linear theory.

  9. Boundary Layer Transition Results From STS-114

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott A.; Horvath, Thomas J.; Cassady, Amy M.; Kirk, Benjamin S.; Wang, K. C.; Hyatt, Andrew J.

    2006-01-01

    The tool for predicting the onset of boundary layer transition from damage to and/or repair of the thermal protection system developed in support of Shuttle Return to Flight is compared to the STS-114 flight results. The Boundary Layer Transition (BLT) Tool is part of a suite of tools that analyze the aerothermodynamic environment of the local thermal protection system to allow informed disposition of damage for making recommendations to fly as is or to repair. Using mission specific trajectory information and details of each damage site or repair, the expected time of transition onset is predicted to help determine the proper aerothermodynamic environment to use in the subsequent thermal and stress analysis of the local structure. The boundary layer transition criteria utilized for the tool was developed from ground-based measurements to account for the effect of both protuberances and cavities and has been calibrated against flight data. Computed local boundary layer edge conditions provided the means to correlate the experimental results and then to extrapolate to flight. During STS-114, the BLT Tool was utilized and was part of the decision making process to perform an extravehicular activity to remove the large gap fillers. The role of the BLT Tool during this mission, along with the supporting information that was acquired for the on-orbit analysis, is reviewed. Once the large gap fillers were removed, all remaining damage sites were cleared for reentry as is. Post-flight analysis of the transition onset time revealed excellent agreement with BLT Tool predictions.

  10. Entropy production in relativistic jet boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    2015-01-01

    Hot relativistic jets, passing through a background medium with a pressure gradient p ∝ r-η where 2 < η ≤ 8/3, develop a shocked boundary layer containing a significant fraction of the jet power. In previous work, we developed a self-similar description of the boundary layer assuming isentropic flow, but we found that such models respect global energy conservation only for the special case η = 8/3. Here, we demonstrate that models with η < 8/3 can be made self-consistent if we relax the assumption of constant specific entropy. Instead, the entropy must increase with increasing r along the boundary layer, presumably due to multiple shocks driven into the flow as it gradually collimates. The increase in specific entropy slows the acceleration rate of the flow and provides a source of internal energy that could be channelled into radiation. We suggest that this process may be important for determining the radiative characteristics of tidal disruption events and gamma-ray bursts from collapsars.

  11. LES of a Stratified Boundary Layer under an Oscillating Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gayen, Bishakhdatta; Sarkar, Sutanu; Taylor, John

    2008-11-01

    A numerical study based on large-eddy simulation (LES) is performed in the case of an oscillating tidal flow with a uniform ambient stratification. Here, the Reynolds number Reδ=U0δs/ν=1790 (U0= maximum amplitude of the outer flow, δs= √2 ν/φ is the Stokes layer thickness, ν is the kinematic viscosity of the fluid and φ the angular frequency of the oscillatory current), and N∞^2/2̂= 500 where N∞ is the buoyancy frequency of the overlying stratified layer. Turbulence appears at a tidal phase of approximately π/4 and is sustained throughout the deceleration phase (π/2<φtd<π, 3π/2<φtd<2π). Production of turbulence is confined to the the wall region and, for stratified flow, in the mixed layer between the wall and the thermocline. For both the stratified and unstratified cases, there is a log layer over a significant extent of the tidal cycle. Our unstratified flow results are verified against the numerical simulations of Salon et ; al (2007) %. JFM, 2007, vol 570, 253-296 and experimental data of Jensen et ; al. (1987). %JFM, 1987, vol 206, 256-297. In the presence of stratification, the boundary layer height decreases substantially and the wall shear stress increases slightly with respect to the unstratified case. Stratification effects on boundary layer turbulence and on the thermal field including the formation and collapse of the thermocline will be discussed.

  12. The role of nonlinear critical layers in boundary layer transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M.E.

    1995-01-01

    Asymptotic methods are used to describe the nonlinear self-interaction between pairs of oblique instability modes that eventually develops when initially linear spatially growing instability waves evolve downstream in nominally two-dimensional laminar boundary layers. The first nonlinear reaction takes place locally within a so-called 'critical layer', with the flow outside this layer consisting of a locally parallel mean flow plus a pair of oblique instability waves - which may or may not be accompanied by an associated plane wave. The amplitudes of these waves, which are completely determined by nonlinear effects within the critical layer, satisfy either a single integro-differential equation or a pair of integro-differential equations with quadratic to quartic-type nonlinearities. The physical implications of these equations are discussed.

  13. Computation of the shock-wave boundary layer interaction with flow separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ardonceau, P.; Alziary, T.; Aymer, D.

    1980-01-01

    The boundary layer concept is used to describe the flow near the wall. The external flow is approximated by a pressure displacement relationship (tangent wedge in linearized supersonic flow). The boundary layer equations are solved in finite difference form and the question of the presence and unicity of the solution is considered for the direct problem (assumed pressure) or converse problem (assumed displacement thickness, friction ratio). The coupling algorithm presented implicitly processes the downstream boundary condition necessary to correctly define the interacting boundary layer problem. The algorithm uses a Newton linearization technique to provide a fast convergence.

  14. The Lowest Atmosphere: Atmospheric Boundary Layer Including Atmospheric Surface Layer.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-04-01

    troposphere" as a result of frictional forces. A good definition of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) (provided to me by the late Dr. Rudy...wind extends light flag. Raises dust and loose paper; small branches are moved. Small trees in leaf begin to sway; crested wavelets form on inland...Calm. Sea like a mirror. Light air Ripples like scales, no foam crest. Light breeze Small wavelets ; crests have glassy appearance, do not break

  15. A fast, uncoupled, compressible, two-dimensional, unsteady boundary layer algorithm with separation for engine inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roach, Robert L.; Nelson, Chris; Sakowski, Barbara; Darling, Douglas; Vandewall, Allan G.

    1992-01-01

    A finite difference boundary layer algorithm was developed to model viscous effects when an inviscid core flow solution is given. This algorithm solved each boundary layer equation separately, then iterated to find a solution. Solving the boundary layer equations sequentially was 2.4 to 4.0 times faster than solving the boundary layer equations simultaneously. This algorithm used a modified Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model, a weighted average of forward and backward differencing of the pressure gradient, and a backward sweep of the pressure. With these modifications, the boundary layer algorithm was able to model flows with and without separation. The number of grid points used in the boundary layer algorithm affected the stability of the algorithm as well as the accuracy of the predictions of friction coefficients and momentum thicknesses. Results of this boundary layer algorithm compared well with experimental observations of friction coefficients and momentum thicknesses. In addition, when used interactively with an inviscid flow algorithm, this boundary layer algorithm corrected for viscous effects to give a good match with experimental observations for pressures in a supersonic inlet.

  16. Acoustic Radiation From a Mach 14 Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Chao; Duan, Lian; Choudhari, Meelan M.

    2016-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) are used to examine the turbulence statistics and the radiation field generated by a high-speed turbulent boundary layer with a nominal freestream Mach number of 14 and wall temperature of 0:18 times the recovery temperature. The flow conditions fall within the range of nozzle exit conditions of the Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) Hypervelocity Tunnel No. 9 facility. The streamwise domain size is approximately 200 times the boundary-layer thickness at the inlet, with a useful range of Reynolds number corresponding to Re 450 ?? 650. Consistent with previous studies of turbulent boundary layer at high Mach numbers, the weak compressibility hypothesis for turbulent boundary layers remains applicable under this flow condition and the computational results confirm the validity of both the van Driest transformation and Morkovin's scaling. The Reynolds analogy is valid at the surface; the RMS of fluctuations in the surface pressure, wall shear stress, and heat flux is 24%, 53%, and 67% of the surface mean, respectively. The magnitude and dominant frequency of pressure fluctuations are found to vary dramatically within the inner layer (z/delta 0.< or approx. 0.08 or z+ < or approx. 50). The peak of the pre-multiplied frequency spectrum of the pressure fluctuation is f(delta)/U(sub infinity) approx. 2.1 at the surface and shifts to a lower frequency of f(delta)/U(sub infinity) approx. 0.7 in the free stream where the pressure signal is predominantly acoustic. The dominant frequency of the pressure spectrum shows a significant dependence on the freestream Mach number both at the wall and in the free stream.

  17. Parameterization of continental boundary layer clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ping; Zhao, Wei

    2008-05-01

    Large eddy simulations (LESs) of continental boundary layer clouds (BLCs) observed at the southern Great Plains (SGP) are used to study issues associated with the parameterization of sub-grid BLCs in large scale models. It is found that liquid water potential temperature θl and total specific humidity qt, which are often used as parameterization predictors in statistical cloud schemes, do not share the same probability distribution in the cloud layer with θl skewed to the left (negatively skewed) and qt skewed to the right (positively skewed). The skewness and kurtosis change substantially in time and space when the development of continental BLCs undergoes a distinct diurnal variation. The wide range of skewness and kurtosis of θl and qt can hardly be described by a single probability distribution function. To extend the application of the statistical cloud parameterization approach, this paper proposes an innovative cloud parameterization scheme that uses the boundary layer height and the lifting condensation level as the primary parameterization predictors. The LES results indicate that the probability distribution of these two quantities is relatively stable compared with that of θl and qt during the diurnal variation and nearly follows a Gaussian function. Verifications using LES output and the observations collected at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ARCF) SGP site indicate that the proposed scheme works well to represent continental BLCs.

  18. Acoustic radar investigations of boundary layer phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marks, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    A comparison is made between acoustic radar echoes and conventional meteorological data obtained from the WKY tower, for the purpose of better understanding the relationships between acoustic radar echoes and boundary layer processes. Two thunderstorm outflow cases are presented and compared to both acoustic radar data and Charba's gust front model. The acoustic radar echoes reveal the boundary between warm and cold air and other areas of mixing and strong thermal gradient quite well. The thunderstorm outflow of 27 June 1972 is found to compare with in most respects to Charba's gust front model. The major difference is the complete separation of the head from the main body of cold air, probably caused by erosion of the area behind the head by mixing with the ambient air. Two cases of nocturnal inversions caused by advection of warmer air aloft are presented. It is found that areas of turbulent mixing or strong thermal gradient can be identified quite easily in the acoustic radar record.

  19. Flow Quality and Boundary Layer Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watmuff, Jonathan H; Tobak, M.; Davis, Sanford S. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The widely held view is that transition to turbulence in the Blasius boundary layer occurs via amplification and eventual nonlinear breakdown of initially small amplitude instabilities i.e. Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) waves. However this scenario is only observed for low amplitude free-stream turbulence levels, i.e. u/U < 0.1%. Bypass of linear TS instability mechanism occurs for higher EST levels, yet considerable differences exist between the few experiments carefully designed to assess the effect of EST on transition. The consensus is that EST leads to longitudinal streaks that form near the leading edge in the boundary layer . These streaks appeal to be regions of concentrated streamwise vorticity and they are often referred to as Klebanoff modes. The importance of mean flow free-stream nonuniformity (FSN) is not as widely appreciated as EST for characterizing wind tunnel flow quality. Here it is shown that, although the v like generated by a d=50micron wire located upstream of the contraction (Re(sub d)=6.6, x/d=45,000) is immeasurably small by the time it interacts with the leading edge in the test section, it is responsible for generation of a pair of weak streamwise vortices in the boundary layer downstream. The characteristics of these wake-induced vortices and their effect on TS waves are demonstrated. Small remnant FSN variations are also shown to exist downstream of a turbulence grid. The question arises Are the adverse effects introduced by the turbulence grid caused by FST or by small remnant FSN variations?

  20. Boundary-Layer-Ingesting Inlet Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, Lewis R.; Allan, Brian G.; Gorton, Susan A.

    2006-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of a research study conducted in support of the small-scale demonstration of an active flow control system for a boundary-layer-ingesting (BLI) inlet. The effectiveness of active flow control in reducing engine inlet circumferential distortion was assessed using a 2.5% scale model of a 35% boundary-layer-ingesting flush-mounted, offset, diffusing inlet. This experiment was conducted in the NASA Langley 0.3-meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel at flight Mach numbers with a model inlet specifically designed for this type of testing. High mass flow actuators controlled the flow through distributed control jets providing the active flow control. A vortex generator point design configuration was also tested for comparison purposes and to provide a means to examine a hybrid vortex generator and control jets configuration. Measurements were made of the onset boundary layer, the duct surface static pressures, and the mass flow through the duct and the actuators. The distortion and pressure recovery were determined by 40 total pressure measurements on 8 rake arms each separated by 45 degrees and were located at the aerodynamic interface plane. The test matrix was limited to a maximum free-stream Mach number of 0.85 with scaled mass flows through the inlet for that condition. The data show that the flow control jets alone can reduce circumferential distortion (DPCP(sub avg)) from 0.055 to about 0.015 using about 2.5% of inlet mass flow. The vortex generators also reduced the circumferential distortion from 0.055 to 0.010 near the inlet mass flow design point. Lower inlet mass flow settings with the vortex generator configuration produced higher distortion levels that were reduced to acceptable levels using a hybrid vortex generator/control jets configuration that required less than 1% of the inlet mass flow.

  1. Boundary-Layer-Ingesting Inlet Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, Lewis R.; Allan, Brian G.; Gorton, Susan A.

    2006-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of a research study conducted in support of the small-scale demonstration of an active flow control system for a boundary-layer-ingesting (BLI) inlet. The effectiveness of active flow control in reducing engine inlet circumferential distortion was assessed using a 2.5% scale model of a 35% boundary-layer-ingesting flush-mounted, offset, diffusing inlet. This experiment was conducted in the NASA Langley 0.3-meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel at flight Mach numbers with a model inlet specifically designed for this type of testing. High mass flow actuators controlled the flow through distributed control jets providing the active flow control. A vortex generator point design configuration was also tested for comparison purposes and to provide a means to examine a hybrid vortex generator and control jets configuration. Measurements were made of the onset boundary layer, the duct surface static pressures, and the mass flow through the duct and the actuators. The distortion and pressure recovery were determined by 40 total pressure measurements on 8 rake arms each separated by 45 degrees and were located at the aerodynamic interface plane. The test matrix was limited to a maximum free-stream Mach number of 0.85 with scaled mass flows through the inlet for that condition. The data show that the flow control jets alone can reduce circumferential distortion (DPCPavg) from 0.055 to about 0.015 using about 2.5% of inlet mass flow. The vortex generators also reduced the circumferential distortion from 0.055 to 0.010 near the inlet mass flow design point. Lower inlet mass flow settings with the vortex generator configuration produced higher distortion levels that were reduced to acceptable levels using a hybrid vortex generator/control jets configuration that required less than 1% of the inlet mass flow.

  2. Reliability of Intra-Retinal Layer Thickness Estimates

    PubMed Central

    Oberwahrenbrock, Timm; Weinhold, Maria; Mikolajczak, Janine; Zimmermann, Hanna; Paul, Friedemann; Beckers, Ingeborg; Brandt, Alexander U.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Measurement of intra-retinal layer thickness using optical coherence tomography (OCT) has become increasingly prominent in multiple sclerosis (MS) research. Nevertheless, the approaches used for determining the mean layer thicknesses vary greatly. Insufficient data exist on the reliability of different thickness estimates, which is crucial for their application in clinical studies. This study addresses this lack by evaluating the repeatability of different thickness estimates. Methods Studies that used intra-retinal layer segmentation of macular OCT scans in patients with MS were retrieved from PubMed. To investigate the repeatability of previously applied layer estimation approaches, we generated datasets of repeating measurements of 15 healthy subjects and 13 multiple sclerosis patients using two OCT devices (Cirrus HD-OCT and Spectralis SD-OCT). We calculated each thickness estimate in each repeated session and analyzed repeatability using intra-class correlation coefficients and coefficients of repeatability. Results We identified 27 articles, eleven of them used the Spectralis SD-OCT, nine Cirrus HD-OCT, two studies used both devices and two studies applied RTVue-100. Topcon OCT-1000, Stratus OCT and a research device were used in one study each. In the studies that used the Spectralis, ten different thickness estimates were identified, while thickness estimates of the Cirrus OCT were based on two different scan settings. In the simulation dataset, thickness estimates averaging larger areas showed an excellent repeatability for all retinal layers except the outer plexiform layer (OPL). Conclusions Given the good reliability, the thickness estimate of the 6mm-diameter area around the fovea should be favored when OCT is used in clinical research. Assessment of the OPL was weak in general and needs further investigation before OPL thickness can be used as a reliable parameter. PMID:26349053

  3. Contraction ratio effect on boundary layer separation induced by shockwave boundary layer interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Seongkyun; di Cristina, Giovanni; Do, Hyungrok

    2016-11-01

    Boundary layer separations induced by shockwave boundary layer interaction at various contraction ratios were investigated at a Mach 4.5 flow. Stagnation pressure and temperature condition of 10 bars and 295 K were used, and a high-speed schlieren system visualized the flow features. A shockwave generator with 12 degree wedge generated an impinging shockwave onto a laminar boundary layer on a flat plate. The contraction ratio of the flow was varied by changing the distance between the shockwave generator and the flat plate. The location of the shockwave impingement was fixed while the contraction ratios were changed. Flow visualization showed that the flow separation and its size were influenced by the contraction ratio although overall flow features were similar. At higher contraction ratio, stronger impinging shockwave and more severe flow separation were observed.

  4. Manipulation of Turbulent Boundary Layers Using Synthetic Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Zachary; Gomit, Guillaume; Lavoie, Philippe; Ganapathisubramani, Bharath

    2015-11-01

    This work focuses on the application of active flow control, in the form of synthetic jet actuators, of turbulent boundary layers. An array of 2 synthetic jets are oriented in the spanwise direction and located approximately 2.7 meters downstream from the leading edge of a flat plate. Actuation is applied perpendicular to the surface of the flat plate with varying blowing ratios and reduced frequencies (open-loop). Two-component large window particle image velocimetry (PIV) was performed at the University of Southampton, in the streamwise-wall-normal plane. Complementary stereo PIV measurements were performed at the University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies (UTIAS), in the spanwise-wall-normal plane. The freestream Reynolds number is 3x104, based on the boundary layer thickness. The skin friction Reynolds number is 1,200 based on the skin friction velocity. The experiments at Southampton allow for the observation of the control effects as the flow propagates downstream. The experiments at UTIAS allow for the observation of the streamwise vorticity induced from the actuation. Overall the two experiments provide a 3D representation of the flow field with respect to actuation effects. The current work focuses on the comparison of the two experiments, as well as the effects of varying blowing ratios and reduced frequencies on the turbulent boundary layer. Funded Supported by Airbus.

  5. Heterogeneous Vapor Condensation in Boundary Layers

    SciTech Connect

    Bonilla, L. L.; Carpio, A.; Neu, J. C.

    2008-09-01

    We consider heterogeneous condensation of vapors mixed with a carrier gas in stagnation point boundary layer flow near a cold wall in the presence of solid particles much larger than the mean free path of vapor particles. The supersaturated vapor condenses on the particles by diffusion, particles and droplets are thermophoretically attracted to the wall. We sketch three asymptotic theories of the condensation process, calculate the flow-induced shift in the dew point interface, vapor density profile and deposition rates at the wall, and compare them to direct numerical simulation.

  6. Thickness of the retinal nerve fiber layer in primate eyes.

    PubMed

    Radius, R L

    1980-09-01

    Thickness of the retinal nerve fiber layer is studied in the eyes of three primate species. Measurements are made at various points throughout the fundus, including the peripapillary, arcuate, macular (area centralis), equatorial, and peripheral parts of the retina. Anatomic findings are compared with the clinical appearance of retinal light reflexes in these way. It is proposed that the nature of this light reflex is, in part, determined by the thickness of the retinal nerve fiber layer.

  7. Boundary-Layer Flow on an Axisymmetric Body with an Inflected Stern.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-01

    factor 6 Boundary layer thickness where u s/Ue 0.995, 6 60.995 6 Radial boundary layer thicknessr Planar displacement thickness, 6 = - dr 0...6 pty ] T Nondimensional correlation distance 6 Ux U x 6 Planar momentum thickness, O = I- r - dr A Axisymmetric displacement area, A = (i ) r dr ri...0 viii ’ U U U1 2 u 2 Microscale of the turbulence, )2 = Kinematic viscosity of the fluid P Mass density of the fluid PAB( dr ) Spatial correlation

  8. Boundary-layer and stalling characteristics of two symmetrical NACA low-drag airfoil sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccullough, George B; Gault, Donald E

    1947-01-01

    Two symmetrical airfoils, an NACA 633-018 and an NACA 631-012, were investigated for the purpose of determining their stalling and boundary-layer characteristics with a view toward the eventual application of this information to the problem of boundary-layer control. Force measurements, pressure distributions, tuft studies, and boundary-layer-profile measurements were made at a value of 5,800,000 Reynolds number. It was found that the 18-percent-thick airfoil stalled progressively from the trailing edge because of separation of the turbulent boundary layer. In contrast, the12-percent-thick airfoil stalled abruptly from a separation of flow near the leading edge before the turbulent boundary layer became subject to separation. From this it was concluded that if high values of lift are to be obtained with thin, high-critical-speed sections by means of boundary-layer control, the work must be directed toward delaying the separation of flow near the leading edge. It was found that the presence of a nose flap on the 12-percent-thick section caused the airfoil to stall in a manner similar to that of the 18-percent-thick section.

  9. Layer thickness-dependent phonon properties and thermal conductivity of MoS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Xiaokun; Li, Baowen; Yang, Ronggui

    2016-02-01

    For conventional materials, the thermal conductivity of thin films is usually suppressed when the thickness decreases due to phonon-boundary scattering. However, this is not necessarily true for the van der Waals solids if the thickness is reduced to only a few layers. In this letter, the layer thickness-dependent phonon properties and thermal conductivity in the few-layer MoS2 are studied using the first-principles-based Peierls-Boltzmann transport equation approach. The basal-plane thermal conductivity of 10-μm-long samples is found to monotonically reduce from 138 W/mK to 98 W/mK for naturally occurring MoS2, and from 155 W/mK to 115 W/mK for isotopically pure MoS2, when its thickness increases from one layer to three layers. The thermal conductivity of tri-layer MoS2 approaches to that of bulk MoS2. Both the change of phonon dispersion and the thickness-induced anharmonicity are important for explaining such a thermal conductivity reduction. The increased anharmonicity in bi-layer MoS2 results in stronger phonon scattering for ZAi modes, which is linked to the breakdown of the symmetry in single-layer MoS2.

  10. Sound radiation due to boundary layer transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Meng

    1993-01-01

    This report describes progress made to date towards calculations of noise produced by the laminar-turbulence transition process in a low Mach number boundary layer formed on a rigid wall. The primary objectives of the study are to elucidate the physical mechanisms by which acoustic waves are generated, to clarify the roles of the fluctuating Reynolds stress and the viscous stress in the presence of a solid surface, and to determine the relative efficiency as a noise source of the various transition stages. In particular, we will examine the acoustic characteristics and directivity associated with three-dimensional instability waves, the detached high-shear layer, and turbulent spots following a laminar breakdown. Additionally, attention will be paid to the unsteady surface pressures during the transition, which provide a source of flow noise as well as a forcing function for wall vibration in both aeronautical and marine applications.

  11. Transition effect on the shock wave / boundary layer interaction region and the wake at low supersonic Mach number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polivanov, P. A.; Sidorenko, A. A.; Maslov, A. A.

    2016-10-01

    The paper deals with an experimental study of effect of laminar, transitional and turbulent boundary layer on stationary and non-stationary characteristics of the shock wave / boundary layer interactions (SWBLI) and wake. Incident shock wave generated by a wedge induced the separation of the boundary layer developed on the flat plate. The boundary layer state was varied from laminar to turbulent by changing position of the interaction relative to the leading edge. The measurements were performed by PIV. It was found that the growth of the momentum thickness and coherent structures in wake strongly depends on the state of the incoming boundary layer.

  12. Lumley decomposition of turbulent boundary layer at high Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tutkun, Murat; George, William K.

    2017-02-01

    The decomposition proposed by Lumley in 1966 is applied to a high Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer. The experimental database was created by a hot-wire rake of 143 probes in the Laboratoire de Mécanique de Lille wind tunnel. The Reynolds numbers based on momentum thickness (Reθ) are 9800 and 19 100. Three-dimensional decomposition is performed, namely, proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) in the inhomogeneous and bounded wall-normal direction, Fourier decomposition in the homogeneous spanwise direction, and Fourier decomposition in time. The first POD modes in both cases carry nearly 50% of turbulence kinetic energy when the energy is integrated over Fourier dimensions. The eigenspectra always peak near zero frequency and most of the large scale, energy carrying features are found at the low end of the spectra. The spanwise Fourier mode which has the largest amount of energy is the first spanwise mode and its symmetrical pair. Pre-multiplied eigenspectra have only one distinct peak and it matches the secondary peak observed in the log-layer of pre-multiplied velocity spectra. Energy carrying modes obtained from the POD scale with outer scaling parameters. Full or partial reconstruction of turbulent velocity signal based only on energetic modes or non-energetic modes revealed the behaviour of urms in distinct regions across the boundary layer. When urms is based on energetic reconstruction, there exists (a) an exponential decay from near wall to log-layer, (b) a constant layer through the log-layer, and (c) another exponential decay in the outer region. The non-energetic reconstruction reveals that urms has (a) an exponential decay from the near-wall to the end of log-layer and (b) a constant layer in the outer region. Scaling of urms using the outer parameters is best when both energetic and non-energetic profiles are combined.

  13. Interaction of compliant surfaces with transitional and turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gad-El-Hak, M.; Riley, J. J.; Blackwelder, R. F.

    The interaction of plastisol gel coatings of different thicknesses and shear moduli with transitional and turbulent boundary layers was investigated over a range of velocities. Whenever the free-stream velocity within the fluid was comparable to the transverse wave speed within the solid, large-amplitude static-divergence waves appeared on the surface of the solid. The amplitude of the waves was always of the order of the coating thickness. As the free-stream velocity increased, the waves became less two-dimensional and developed larger variations in their amplitude along the crests. This disturbance led to the formation of additional waves downstream having a shorter span. Ways of reducing or eliminating the static-divergence waves are briefly discussed.

  14. Sound Radiation from a Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laufer, J.

    1961-01-01

    If the restriction of incompressibility in the turbulence problem is relaxed, the phenomenon of energy radiation in the form of sound from the turbulent zone arises. In order to calculate this radiated energy, it is shown that new statistical quantities, such as time-space correlation tensors, have to be known within the turbulent zone in addition to the conventional quantities. For the particular case of the turbulent boundary layer, indications are that the intensity of radiation becomes significant only in supersonic flows. Under these conditions, the recent work of Phillips is examined together with some experimental findings of the author. It is shown that the qualitative features of the radiation field (intensity, directionality) as predicted by the theory are consistent with the measurements; however, even for the highest Mach number flow, some of the assumptions of the asymptotic theory are not yet satisfied in the experiments. Finally, the question of turbulence damping due to radiation is discussed, with the result that in the Mach number range covered by the experiments, the energy lost from the boundary layer due to radiation is a small percentage of the work done by the wall shearing stresses.

  15. X-33 Hypersonic Boundary Layer Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott A.; Horvath, Thomas J.; Hollis, Brian R.; Thompson, Richard A.; Hamilton, H. Harris, II

    1999-01-01

    Boundary layer and aeroheating characteristics of several X-33 configurations have been experimentally examined in the Langley 20-Inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel. Global surface heat transfer distributions, surface streamline patterns, and shock shapes were measured on 0.013-scale models at Mach 6 in air. Parametric variations include angles-of-attack of 20-deg, 30-deg, and 40-deg; Reynolds numbers based on model length of 0.9 to 6.6 million; and body-flap deflections of 0, 10 and 20-deg. The effects of discrete and distributed roughness elements on boundary layer transition, which included trip height, size, location, and distribution, both on and off the windward centerline, were investigated. The discrete roughness results on centerline were used to provide a transition correlation for the X-33 flight vehicle that was applicable across the range of reentry angles of attack. The attachment line discrete roughness results were shown to be consistent with the centerline results, as no increased sensitivity to roughness along the attachment line was identified. The effect of bowed panels was qualitatively shown to be less effective than the discrete trips; however, the distributed nature of the bowed panels affected a larger percent of the aft-body windward surface than a single discrete trip.

  16. Optimal Growth in Hypersonic Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paredes, Pedro; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Li, Fei; Chang, Chau-Lyan

    2016-01-01

    The linear form of the parabolized linear stability equations is used in a variational approach to extend the previous body of results for the optimal, nonmodal disturbance growth in boundary-layer flows. This paper investigates the optimal growth characteristics in the hypersonic Mach number regime without any high-enthalpy effects. The influence of wall cooling is studied, with particular emphasis on the role of the initial disturbance location and the value of the spanwise wave number that leads to the maximum energy growth up to a specified location. Unlike previous predictions that used a basic state obtained from a self-similar solution to the boundary-layer equations, mean flow solutions based on the full Navier-Stokes equations are used in select cases to help account for the viscous- inviscid interaction near the leading edge of the plate and for the weak shock wave emanating from that region. Using the full Navier-Stokes mean flow is shown to result in further reduction with Mach number in the magnitude of optimal growth relative to the predictions based on the self-similar approximation to the base flow.

  17. Helical mode breakdown in transitional boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Rikhi; Durbin, Paul

    2016-11-01

    Results of direct numerical simulation of transition to turbulence in adverse pressure gradient boundary layers beneath free-stream turbulence will be presented. Instability waves are excited spontaneously and may be identified when intensity of free-stream turbulence (Tu) is sufficiently low. At very low Tu 0 . 1 % , secondary instability of the TS waves and at high Tu > 2 % , conventional bypass mechanisms trigger turbulent spot formation. At low Tu 1 % transition proceeds through formation of helical modes. Helical structures as in n = 1 instability modes of axisymmetric wakes and jets are clearly identifiable in visualizations of isosurfaces of stream-wise perturbation velocity. Helical modes also trigger transition at same level of Tu in zero pressure gradient boundary layers as well, provided that the inlet disturbances include a low amplitude time-periodic unstable TS wave. This indicates that these secondary instability modes might arise due to interaction of Klebanoff streaks and instability waves. Characteristically, the helical modes are inner instability modes. This work was supported by NSF Grant CBET-1228195. Computer time was provided by the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE).

  18. Soot profiles in boundary-layer flames

    SciTech Connect

    Beier, R.A.; Pagni, P.J.

    1981-12-01

    Carbon particulate volume fractions and approximate particle size distributions are measured in a free laminar combusting boundary layer for liquid hydrocarbon fuels (n-heptane, iso-octane, cyclohexane, cyclohexene, toluene) and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). A multiwavelength laser transmission technique determines a most probable radius and the total particle concentration, which are two parameters in an assumed form for the size distribution. In the combusting boundary layer, a sooting region exists between the pyrolyzing fuel surface and the flame zone. The liquid fuel soot volume fractions, f/sub v/, range from f/sub v/ approx. 10/sup -7/ for n-heptane, a paraffin, to f/sub v approx. 10/sup -5/ for toluene, an aromatic. The PMMA volume fractions, f/sub v/ approx. 5 X 10/sup -7/, are approximately the same as the values previously reported for pool fires. The soot volume fractions increase with height; convection of carbon particles downstream widens the soot region with height. For all fuels tested, the most probable radius is between 20 nm and 50 nm, and it changes only slightly with height and distance from the fuel surface.

  19. Boundary Layer Transition Flight Experiment Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, Karen T.; Anderson, Brian P.; Campbell, Charles H.; Garske, Michael T.; Saucedo, Luis A.; Kinder, Gerald R.; Micklos, Ann M.

    2011-01-01

    In support of the Boundary Layer Transition Flight Experiment (BLT FE) Project, a manufactured protuberance tile was installed on the port wing of Space Shuttle Orbiter Discovery for STS-119, STS-128, STS-131 and STS-133 as well as Space Shuttle Endeavour for STS-134. Additional instrumentation was installed in order to obtain more spatially resolved measurements downstream of the protuberance. This paper provides an overview of the BLT FE Project with emphasis on the STS-131 and STS-133 results. A high-level overview of the in-situ flight data is presented, along with a summary of the comparisons between pre- and post-flight analysis predictions and flight data. Comparisons show that empirically correlated predictions for boundary layer transition onset time closely match the flight data, while predicted surface temperatures were significantly higher than observed flight temperatures. A thermocouple anomaly observed on a number of the missions is discussed as are a number of the mitigation actions that will be taken on the final flight, STS-134, including potential alterations of the flight trajectory and changes to the flight instrumentation.

  20. Skin friction and Reynolds stress measurements for a turbulent boundary layer following manipulation using flat plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westphal, R. V.

    1986-01-01

    Research has been undertaken to experimentally study the alterations in turbulent boundary-layer properties due to turbulence manipulation using thin flat plates. Plate geometry and placement within the boundary layer were selected to coincide with recent studies. Direct, local measurements of skin friction and Reynolds stresses were made within the boundary layer downstream of the manipulator devices for cases with an approach momentum thickness Reynolds number of 3700. A strong tendency for recovery of the Reynolds stresses was observed, accompanied by local skin-friction reductions of up to 15 percent. The mean velocity profile in the manipulated flow displayed the same similarity shape in the logarithmic region as a natural boundary layer, but had an enhanced wake component. The results indicate that the plate wake plays an important role in the boundary layer response to this sort of manipulation.

  1. Mean velocity and turbulence measurements in a 90 deg curved duct with thin inlet boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, R. A.; Peters, C. E.; Steinhoff, J.; Hornkohl, J. O.; Nourinejad, J.; Ramachandran, K.

    1985-01-01

    The experimental database established by this investigation of the flow in a large rectangular turning duct is of benchmark quality. The experimental Reynolds numbers, Deans numbers and boundary layer characteristics are significantly different from previous benchmark curved-duct experimental parameters. This investigation extends the experimental database to higher Reynolds number and thinner entrance boundary layers. The 5% to 10% thick boundary layers, based on duct half-width, results in a large region of near-potential flow in the duct core surrounded by developing boundary layers with large crossflows. The turbulent entrance boundary layer case at R sub ed = 328,000 provides an incompressible flowfield which approaches real turbine blade cascade characteristics. The results of this investigation provide a challenging benchmark database for computational fluid dynamics code development.

  2. Discussion of Boundary-Layer Characteristics Near the Wall of an Axial-Flow Compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mager, Artur; Mohoney, John J; Budinger, Ray E

    1952-01-01

    The boundary-layer velocity profiles in the tip region of an axial-flow compressor downstream of the guide vanes and downstream of the rotor were measured by use of total-pressure and claw-type yaw probes. These velocities were resolved into two components: one along the streamline of the flow outside the boundary layer, and the other perpendicular to it. The affinity among all profiles was thus demonstrated with the boundary-layer thickness and the deflection of the boundary layer at the wall as the generalizing parameters. By use of these results and the momentum-integral equations, boundary-layer characteristics on the walls of an axial-flow compressor were qualitatively evaluated.

  3. Modification in drag of turbulent boundary layers resulting from manipulation of large-scale structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corke, T. C.; Guezennec, Y.; Nagib, H. M.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of placing a parallel-plate turbulence manipulator in a boundary layer are documented through flow visualization and hot wire measurements. The boundary layer manipulator was designed to manage the large scale structures of turbulence leading to a reduction in surface drag. The differences in the turbulent structure of the boundary layer are summarized to demonstrate differences in various flow properties. The manipulator inhibited the intermittent large scale structure of the turbulent boundary layer for at least 70 boundary layer thicknesses downstream. With the removal of the large scale, the streamwise turbulence intensity levels near the wall were reduced. The downstream distribution of the skin friction was also altered by the introduction of the manipulator.

  4. The Interaction between a Compliant Material and an Unstable Boundary Layer Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, M. S.

    1988-05-01

    The response of a compliant coating to pressure fluctuations due to an unsteady boundary layer flow and the effect of the response on the stability of the flow field are examined. A pseudospectral solution of the Navier-Stokes equations is coupled to a finite element calculation of the behavior of the compliant material. In particular, the effect of material response on the growth rate of a Tollmien-Schlichting type instability in an unstable boundary layer is examined. Results are presented for three materials; a soft polyvinylchloride (PVC), a stiffer PVC, and a two-layer material consisting of a thick layer of soft PVC covered by a thin layer of neoprene.

  5. Corrections for attached sidewall boundary-layer effects in 2-dimensional airfoil testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, A. V.

    1985-01-01

    The problems of sidewall boundary-layer effects in airfoil testing is treated by considering the changes in the flow area due to boundary-layer thinning under the influence of the airfoil flowfield. Using von Karman's momentum integral equation, it is shown that the sidewall boundary-layer thickness in the region of the airfoil can reduce to about half the undisturbed value under the conditions prevailing in testing of supercritical airfoils. A Mach number correction due to this increased width of the flow passage is proposed. Using the small disturbance approximation, the effect of the sidewall boundary-layers is shown to be equivalent to a change in the test Mach number and also in the airfoil thickness. Comparison of the results of this approach with other similarity rules and correlation of the experimental data demonstrate the applicability of the analysis presented from low speeds to transonic speeds.

  6. Effects of boundary layer on flame propagation generated by forced ignition behind an incident shock wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, S.; Tamura, S.; Ishii, K.; Kataoka, H.

    2016-09-01

    To study the effects of the boundary layer on the deflagration to detonation transition (DDT) process, the mixture behind an incident shock wave was ignited using laser breakdown. Ignition timing was controlled so that the interaction of the resulting flame with a laminar or turbulent boundary layer could be examined. In the case of the interaction with a laminar boundary layer, wrinkling of the flame was observed after the flame reached the corner of the channel. On the other hand, interaction with the turbulent boundary layer distorted the flame front and increased the spreading rate of the flame followed by prompt DDT. The inner structure of the turbulent boundary layer plays an important role in the DDT process. The region that distorted the flame within the turbulent boundary layer was found to be the intermediate region 0.01< y/δ < 0.4, where y is the distance from the wall and δ is the boundary layer thickness. The flame disturbance by the turbulent motions is followed by the flame interaction with the inner layer near the wall, which in turn generates a secondary-ignition kernel that produced a spherical accelerating flame, which ultimately led to the onset of detonation. After the flame reached the intermediate region, the time required for DDT was independent of the ignition position. The effect of the boundary layer on the propagating flame, thus, became relatively small after the accelerating flame was generated.

  7. Effects of small-scale freestream turbulence on turbulent boundary layers with and without thermal convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagata, Kouji; Sakai, Yasuhiko; Komori, Satoru

    2011-06-01

    Effects of weak, small-scale freestream turbulence on turbulent boundary layers with and without thermal convection are experimentally investigated using a wind tunnel. Two experiments are carried out: the first is isothermal boundary layers with and without grid turbulence, and the second is non-isothermal boundary layers with and without grid turbulence. Both boundary layers develop under a small favorable pressure gradient. For the latter case, the bottom wall of the test section is heated at a constant wall temperature to investigate the effects of thermal convection under the effects of freestream turbulence. For both cases, the turbulence intensity in the freestream is Tu = 1.3% ˜ 2.4%, and the integral length scale of freestream turbulence, L∞, is much smaller than the boundary layer thickness δ, i.e., L∞/δ ≪1. The Reynolds numbers Reθ based on the momentum thickness and freestream speed U∞ are Reθ = 560, 1100, 1310, and 2330 in isothermal boundary layers without grid turbulence. Instantaneous velocities, U and V, and instantaneous temperature T are simultaneously measured using a hot-wire anemometry and a constant-current resistance thermometer. The results show that the rms velocities and Reynolds shear stress normalized by the friction velocity are strongly suppressed by the freestream turbulence throughout the boundary layer in both isothermal and non-isothermal boundary layers. In the non-isothermal boundary layers, the normalized rms temperature and vertical turbulent heat flux are also strongly suppressed by the freestream turbulence. Turbulent momentum and heat transfer at the wall are enhanced by the freestream turbulence and the enhancement is notable in unstable stratification. The power spectra of u, v, and θ and their cospectra show that motions of almost all scales are suppressed by the freestream turbulence in both the isothermal and non-isothermal boundary layers.

  8. Computation of three-dimensional mixed convective boundary layer flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gadepalli, Prashandt; Rahman, Muhammad M.

    1995-01-01

    The paper presents the numerical solution of heat and mass transfer during cross-flow (orthogonal) mixed convection. In this class of flow, a buoyancy-driven transport in the vertical direction and a forced convective flow in the horizontal direction results in a three-dimensional boundary layer structure adjacent to the plate. The rates of heat and mass transfer are determined by a combined influence of the two transport processes. The equations for the conservation of mass, momentum, energy, and species concentration were solved along with appropriate boundary conditions to determine the distributions of velocity components, temperature, and concentration across the thickness of the boundary layer at different locations on the plate. Results were expressed in dimensionless form using Reynolds number, Richardson number for heat transfer, Richardson number for mass transfer, Prandtl number, and Schmidt number as parameters. It was found that the transport is dominated by buoyancy at smaller vertical locations and at larger distances away from the forced convection leading edge. Effects of forced convection appeared to be very strong at smaller horizontal distances from the leading edge. The cross stream forced convection enhanced the rate of heat and mass transfer by a very significant amount.

  9. Chemistry of a polluted cloudy boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacob, Daniel J.; Gottlieb, Elaine W.; Prather, Michael J.

    1989-01-01

    A one-dimensional photochemical model for cloud-topped boundary layers has been developed to include descriptions of gas- and aqueous-phase chemistry and the radiation field in and below the cloud. The model is applied to the accumulation of pollutants during a wintertime episode with low stratus over Bakersfield, CA. The mechanisms of sulfate production and the balance between the concentrations of acids and bases are examined. It is shown that most of the sulfate production may be explained by the Fe(III)-catalyzed autoxidation of S(IV). Another source of sulfate is the oxidation of SO2 by OH in both the gas and the aqueous phase. It is shown that the sulfate production in the model is controlled by the availability of NH3. It is suggested that this explains the balance observed between total concentration of acids and bases.

  10. Persistent Structures in the Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palumbo, Dan; Chabalko, Chris

    2005-01-01

    Persistent structures in the turbulent boundary layer are located and analyzed. The data are taken from flight experiments on large commercial aircraft. An interval correlation technique is introduced which is able to locate the structures. The Morlet continuous wavelet is shown to not only locates persistent structures but has the added benefit that the pressure data are decomposed in time and frequency. To better understand how power is apportioned among these structures, a discrete Coiflet wavelet is used to decompose the pressure data into orthogonal frequency bands. Results indicate that some structures persist a great deal longer in the TBL than would be expected. These structure contain significant power and may be a primary source of vibration energy in the airframe.

  11. Modelling of the Evolving Stable Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorbjan, Zbigniew

    2014-06-01

    A single-column model of the evolving stable boundary layer (SBL) is tested for self-similar properties of the flow and effects of ambient forcing. The turbulence closure of the model is diagnostic, based on the K-theory approach, with a semi-empirical form of the mixing length, and empirical stability functions of the Richardson number. The model results, expressed in terms of local similarity scales, are universal functions, satisfied in the entire SBL. Based on similarity expression, a realizability condition is derived for the minimum allowable turbulent heat flux in the SBL. Numerical experiments show that the development of "horse-shoe" shaped, fixed-elevation hodographs in the interior of the SBL around sunrise is controlled by effects imposed by surface thermal forcing.

  12. Helical modes in boundary layer transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Rikhi; Durbin, Paul A.

    2016-11-01

    Observations are presented to show that in an adverse pressure gradient boundary layer, beneath free-stream turbulence, the interaction between Klebanoff streaks and naturally arising instability waves leads to helical disturbances which break down to form turbulent spots. This occurs under low to moderate levels, 1%-2%, of free-stream turbulence. At high levels of free-stream turbulence, conventional bypass mechanisms are seen. The helical structures are clearly identifiable in visualizations of isosurfaces of streamwise perturbation velocity. A direct numerical simulation also was performed in zero pressure gradient, with a time-periodic Tollmien-Schlichting wave eigenfunction at the inlet. Again, under a moderate level of free-stream turbulence, helices were observed, and found to trigger transition. Their wave speed is on the order of 1/2 U∞ , so helical breakdown can be viewed as a type of inner mode, secondary instability.

  13. Linear Controllers for Turbulent Boundary Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Junwoo; Kim, John; Kang, Sung-Moon; Speyer, Jason

    2000-11-01

    Several recent studies have shown that controllers based on a linear system theory work surprisingly well in turbulent flows, suggesting that a linear mechanism may play an important role even in turbulent flows. It has been also shown that non-normality of the linearized Navier-Stokes equations is an essential characteristic in the regeneration of near-wall turbulence structures in turbulent boundary layers. A few controllers designed to reduce the role of different linear mechanisms, including that to minimize the non-normality of the linearized Navier-Stokes equations, have been developed and applied to a low Reynolds nubmer turbulent channel flow. A reduced-order model containing the most controllable and observables modes is derived for each system. Other existing control schemes, such as Choi et al's opposition control, have been examined from the point of a linear system control. Further discussion on controller design, such as choice of cost function and other control parameters, will be presented.

  14. Direct numerical simulation of a separated turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Y.; Moin, P.

    1998-09-01

    A separated turbulent boundary layer over a flat plate was investigated by direct numerical simulation of the incompressible Navier Stokes equations. A suction-blowing velocity distribution was prescribed along the upper boundary of the computational domain to create an adverse-to-favourable pressure gradient that produces a closed separation bubble. The Reynolds number based on inlet free-stream velocity and momentum thickness is 300. Neither instantaneous detachment nor reattachment points are fixed in space but fluctuate significantly. The mean detachment and reattachment locations determined by three different definitions, i.e. (i) location of 50% forward flow fraction, (ii) mean dividing streamline ([psi]=0), (iii) location of zero wall-shear stress ([tau]w=0), are in good agreement. Instantaneous vorticity contours show that the turbulent structures emanating upstream of separation move upwards into the shear layer in the detachment region and then turn around the bubble. The locations of the maximum turbulence intensities as well as Reynolds shear stress occur in the middle of the shear layer. In the detached flow region, Reynolds shear stresses and their gradients are large away from the wall and thus the largest pressure fluctuations are in the middle of the shear layer. Iso-surfaces of negative pressure fluctuations which correspond to the core region of the vortices show that large-scale structures grow in the shear layer and agglomerate. They then impinge on the wall and subsequently convect downstream. The characteristic Strouhal number St=f[delta]*in/U0 associated with this motion ranges from 0.0025 to 0.01. The kinetic energy budget in the detachment region is very similar to that of a plane mixing layer.

  15. Acoustics of laminar boundary layers breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Meng

    1994-01-01

    Boundary layer flow transition has long been suggested as a potential noise source in both marine (sonar-dome self noise) and aeronautical (aircraft cabin noise) applications, owing to the highly transient nature of process. The design of effective noise control strategies relies upon a clear understanding of the source mechanisms associated with the unsteady flow dynamics during transition. Due to formidable mathematical difficulties, theoretical predictions either are limited to early linear and weakly nonlinear stages of transition, or employ acoustic analogy theories based on approximate source field data, often in the form of empirical correlation. In the present work, an approach which combines direct numerical simulation of the source field with the Lighthill acoustic analogy is utilized. This approach takes advantage of the recent advancement in computational capabilities to obtain detailed information about the flow-induced acoustic sources. The transitional boundary layer flow is computed by solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations without model assumptions, thus allowing a direct evaluation of the pseudosound as well as source functions, including the Lighthill stress tensor and the wall shear stress. The latter are used for calculating the radiated pressure field based on the Curle-Powell solution of the Lighthill equation. This procedure allows a quantitative assessment of noise source mechanisms and the associated radiation characteristics during transition from primary instability up to the laminar breakdown stage. In particular, one is interested in comparing the roles played by the fluctuating volume Reynolds stress and the wall-shear-stresses, and in identifying specific flow processes and structures that are effective noise generators.

  16. Active Boundary Layer Trip for Supersonic Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schloegel, F.; Panigua, G.; Tirtey, S.

    2009-01-01

    The last decade has been full of excitement and success for the hypersonic community thanks to various Scramjet ground tests and launches. These studies have shown promising potentials but the viability to perform commercial flights at Mach 8 is still to be demonstrated. An ideal Scramjet is one which is capable of self- starting over a wide range of angles of attack and Mach number. The Scramjet designer has to ensure that the boundary layer over the inlet ramp is fully turbulent where shocks impact, hence reducing the risks of chocked flow conditions. Most studies have issued the efficiency of roughness trip to trigger the boundary layer transition. At hypersonic speed, heat transfer and drag dramatically increase resulting in skin friction averaging at 40% of the overall drag. This study investigates the possibility of triggering transition using perpendicular air jets on a flat plate place in a hypersonic cross-flow. Experiments were conducted in the von Karman Institute hypersonic blow down wind tunnel H3. This facility is mounted with a Mach 6 contoured nozzles and provides flows with Reynolds number in the range of 10x106/m to 30x106/m. The model consist of a flat plate manufactured with a built -in settling chamber, equipped with a pressure tap and a thermocouple to monitor the jet conditions. A first flat plate was manufactured with a black-coated Plexiglas top, for surface heat transfer measurement using an infrared camera. On the second model, a Upilex sheet equipped with 32 thin film gages was glued, time dependent heat transfer measurements up to 60kHz. The jet injection conditions have been varied and a Mach number of 5.5 kept constant. The flow topology was investigated using fast schlieren techniques and oil flow, in order to gain a better understanding.

  17. Large Eddy Simulation of Transitional Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayadi, Taraneh; Moin, Parviz

    2009-11-01

    A sixth order compact finite difference code is employed to investigate compressible Large Eddy Simulation (LES) of subharmonic transition of a spatially developing zero pressure gradient boundary layer, at Ma = 0.2. The computational domain extends from Rex= 10^5, where laminar blowing and suction excites the most unstable fundamental and sub-harmonic modes, to fully turbulent stage at Rex= 10.1x10^5. Numerical sponges are used in the neighborhood of external boundaries to provide non-reflective conditions. Our interest lies in the performance of the dynamic subgrid scale (SGS) model [1] in the transition process. It is observed that in early stages of transition the eddy viscosity is much smaller than the physical viscosity. As a result the amplitudes of selected harmonics are in very good agreement with the experimental data [2]. The model's contribution gradually increases during the last stages of transition process and the dynamic eddy viscosity becomes fully active and dominant in the turbulent region. Consistent with this trend the skin friction coefficient versus Rex diverges from its laminar profile and converges to the turbulent profile after an overshoot. 1. Moin P. et. al. Phys Fluids A, 3(11), 2746-2757, 1991. 2. Kachanov Yu. S. et. al. JFM, 138, 209-247, 1983.

  18. Wall Boundary Layer Measurements for the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wieseman, Carol D.; Bennett, Robert M.

    2007-01-01

    Measurements of the boundary layer parameters in the NASA Langley Transonic Dynamics tunnel were conducted during extensive calibration activities following the facility conversion from a Freon-12 heavy-gas test medium to R-134a. Boundary-layer rakes were mounted on the wind-tunnel walls, ceiling, and floor. Measurements were made over the range of tunnel operation envelope in both heavy gas and air and without a model in the test section at three tunnel stations. Configuration variables included open and closed east sidewall wall slots, for air and R134a test media, reentry flap settings, and stagnation pressures over the full range of tunnel operation. The boundary layer thickness varied considerably for the six rakes. The thickness for the east wall was considerably larger that the other rakes and was also larger than previously reported. There generally was some reduction in thickness at supersonic Mach numbers, but the effect of stagnation pressure, and test medium were not extensive.

  19. Boundary Layer for the Navier-Stokes-alpha Model of Fluid Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheskidov, A.

    We study boundary-layer turbulence using the Navier-Stokes-alpha model obtaining an extension of the Prandtl equations for the averaged flow in a turbulent boundary layer. In the case of a zero pressure gradient flow along a flat plate, we derive a nonlinear fifth-order ordinary differential equation, which is an extension of the Blasius equation. We study it analytically and prove the existence of a two-parameter family of solutions satisfying physical boundary conditions. Matching these parameters with the skin-friction coefficient and the Reynolds number based on momentum thickness, we get an agreement of the solutions with experimental data in the laminar and transitional boundary layers, as well as in the turbulent boundary layer for moderately large Reynolds numbers.

  20. Three-dimensional turbulent boundary layers in turbomachines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshminarayana, B.

    Turbulent shear layers in turbomachines are compared with turbulent boundary layers on airfoils. The effects of turbulent boundary layers on turbomachine performance (rotating blade, stator blade, end wall, annulus wall, rotating hub) are listed. Generalized equations; momentum integral techniques; velocity profile models; and skin friction stress calculation are summarized.

  1. Improved Boundary Layer Depth Retrievals from MPLNET

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Jasper R.; Welton, Ellsworth J.; Molod, Andrea M.; Joseph, Everette

    2013-01-01

    Continuous lidar observations of the planetary boundary layer (PBL) depth have been made at the Micropulse Lidar Network (MPLNET) site in Greenbelt, MD since April 2001. However, because of issues with the operational PBL depth algorithm, the data is not reliable for determining seasonal and diurnal trends. Therefore, an improved PBL depth algorithm has been developed which uses a combination of the wavelet technique and image processing. The new algorithm is less susceptible to contamination by clouds and residual layers, and in general, produces lower PBL depths. A 2010 comparison shows the operational algorithm overestimates the daily mean PBL depth when compared to the improved algorithm (1.85 and 1.07 km, respectively). The improved MPLNET PBL depths are validated using radiosonde comparisons which suggests the algorithm performs well to determine the depth of a fully developed PBL. A comparison with the Goddard Earth Observing System-version 5 (GEOS-5) model suggests that the model may underestimate the maximum daytime PBL depth by 410 m during the spring and summer. The best agreement between MPLNET and GEOS-5 occurred during the fall and they diered the most in the winter.

  2. Acoustic sounding in the planetary boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, E. H.

    1974-01-01

    Three case studies are presented involving data from an acoustic radar. The first two cases examine data collected during the passage of a mesoscale cold-air intrusion, probably thunderstorm outflow, and a synoptic-scale cold front. In these studies the radar data are compared to conventional meteorological data obtained from the WKY tower facility for the purpose of radar data interpretation. It is shown that the acoustic radar echoes reveal the boundary between warm and cold air and other areas of turbulent mixing, regions of strong vertical temperature gradients, and areas of weak or no wind shear. The third case study examines the relationship between the nocturnal radiation inversion and the low-level wind maximum or jet in the light of conclusions presented by Blackadar (1957). The low-level jet is seen forming well above the top of the inversion. Sudden rapid growth of the inversion occurs which brings the top of the inversion to a height equal that of the jet. Coincident with the rapid growth of the inversion is a sudden decrease in the intensity of the acoustic radar echoes in the inversion layer. It is suggested that the decrease in echo intensity reveals a decrease in turbulent mixing in the inversion layer as predicted by Blackadar. It is concluded that the acoustic radar can be a valuable tool for study in the lower atmosphere.

  3. Automated segmentation of intraretinal layers from spectral-domain macular OCT: reproducibility of layer thickness measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyungmoo; Abràmoff, Michael D.; Sonka, Milan; Garvin, Mona K.

    2011-03-01

    Changes in intraretinal layer thickness occur in a variety of diseases such as glaucoma, macular edema and diabetes. To segment the intraretinal layers from macular spectral-domain OCT (SD-OCT) scans, we previously introduced an automated multiscale 3-D graph search method and validated its performance by computing unsigned border positioning differences when compared with human expert tracings. However, it is also important to study the reproducibility of resulting layer thickness measurements, as layer thickness is a commonly used clinical parameter. In this work, twenty eight (14 x 2) repeated macular OCT volumes were acquired from the right eyes of 14 normal subjects using two Zeiss-Cirrus SD-OCT scanners. After segmentation of 10 intraretinal layers and rigid registration of layer thickness maps from the repeated OCT scans, the thickness difference of each layer was calculated. The overall mean global and regional thickness differences of 10 intraretinal layers were 0.46 +/- 0.25 μm (1.70 +/- 0.72 %) and 1.16 +/- 0.84 μm (4.03 +/- 2.05 %), respectively. No specific local region showed a consistent thickness difference across the layers.

  4. Boundary Layer Transition Flight Experiment Implementation on OV-103

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spanos, Theodoros A.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the boundary layer transition experiment flown on Discovery. The purpose of the boundary layer transition flight experiment was to obtain hypersonic aero-thermodynamic data for the purpose of better understanding the flow transition from a laminar to turbulent boundary layer using a known height protuberance. The preparation of the shuttle is described, with the various groups responsibilities outlined. Views of the shuttle in flight with the experimental results are shown.

  5. Electromagnetic precipitation and ducting of particles in turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davey, K. R.; Melcher, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    A method for analyzing magnetic migration of particles in turbulent flows is applied to the prediction of particle trajectories and densities in turbulent aerodynamic boundary layers. Results for conditions typical of aircraft with 30-40 micron particles indicate a large upstream collection and a 5% loss of particles during one pass through the boundary layer. The capacity of the magnetic field to achieve a balance with turbulent diffusion in confining the particles to the boundary layer is discussed.

  6. Development of a laminar boundary layer behind a suction point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wuest, Walter

    1952-01-01

    A theoretical investigation is made of the development of a laminar boundary layer behind a suction slot that is assumed to cut off part of the boundary layer without exerting any sink effect. The development, which is approximate, is based on the heat conduction equation. The heat conduction equation enters the analysis through a linearization of the Prandtl-Mises form of the boundary-layer equation.

  7. Simulating supercell thunderstorms in a convective boundary layer: Effects on storm and boundary layer properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowotarski, Christopher J.

    Nearly all previous numerical simulations of supercell thunderstorms have neglected surface uxes of heat, moisture, and momentum as well as horizontal inhomogeneities in the near-storm environment from resulting dry boundary layer convection. This investigation uses coupled radiation and land-surface schemes within an idealized cloud model to identify the effects of organized boundary layer convection in the form of horizontal convective rolls (HCRs) on the strength, structure, and evolution of simulated supercell thunderstorms. The in uence of HCRs and the importance of their orientation relative to storm motion is tested by comparing simulations with a convective boundary layer (CBL) against those with a horizontally homogeneous base state having the same mean environment. The impact of anvil shading on the CBL is tested by comparing simulations with and without the effects of clouds in the radiative transfer scheme. The results of these simulations indicate that HCRs provide a potentially important source of environmental vertical vorticity in the sheared, near-storm boundary layer. These vorticity perturbations are amplified both beneath the main supercell updraft and along the trailing out ow boundary, leading to the formation of occasionally intense misovortices. HCRs perpendicular to storm motion are found to have a detrimental effect on the strength and persistence of the lowlevel mesocyclone, particularly during its initial development. Though the mean environment is less supportive of low-level rotation with a wind profile conducive to HCRs oriented parallel to storm motion, such HCRs are found to often enhance the low-level mesocyclone circulation. When anvil shading is included, stabilization results in generally weaker low-level mesocyclone circulation, regardless of HCR orientation. Moreover, HCRs diminish in the near-storm environment such that the effects of HCRs on the supercell are mitigated. HCRs are also shown to be a necessary condition for the

  8. Effects of Hybrid Flow Control on a Normal Shock Boundary-Layer Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirt, Stefanie M.; Vyas, Manan A.

    2013-01-01

    Hybrid flow control, a combination of micro-ramps and steady micro-jets, was experimentally investigated in the 15x15 cm Supersonic Wind Tunnel at the NASA Glenn Research Center. A central composite design of experiments method, was used to develop response surfaces for boundary-layer thickness and reversed-flow thickness, with factor variables of inter-ramp spacing, ramp height and chord length, and flow injection ratio. Boundary-layer measurements and wall static pressure data were used to understand flow separation characteristics. A limited number of profiles were measured in the corners of the tunnel to aid in understanding the three-dimensional characteristics of the flowfield.

  9. Incorporation of the planetary boundary layer in atmospheric models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moeng, Chin-Hoh; Wyngaard, John; Pielke, Roger; Krueger, Steve

    1993-01-01

    The topics discussed include the following: perspectives on planetary boundary layer (PBL) measurements; current problems of PBL parameterization in mesoscale models; and convective cloud-PBL interactions.

  10. Control of the Transitional Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belson, Brandt A.

    This work makes advances in the delay of boundary layer transition from laminar to turbulent flow via feedback control. The applications include the reduction of drag over streamline bodies (e.g., airplane wings) and the decrease of mixing and heat transfer (e.g., over turbine blades in jet engines). A difficulty in many fields is designing feedback controllers for high-dimensional systems, be they experiments or high-fidelity simulations, because the required time and resources are too large. A cheaper alternative is to approximate the high-dimensional system with a reduced-order model and design a controller for the model. We implement several model reduction algorithms in "modred", an open source and publicly available library that is applicable to a wide range of problems. We use this library to study the role of sensors and actuators in feedback control of transition in the 2D boundary layer. Previous work uses a feedforward configuration in which the sensor is upstream of the actuator, but we show that the actuator-sensor pair is unsuitable for feedback control due to an inability to sense the exponentially-growing Tollmien-Schlichting waves. A new actuator-sensor pair is chosen that more directly affects and measures the TS waves, and as a result it is effective in a feedback configuration. Lastly, the feedback controller is shown to outperform feedforward controllers in the presence of unmodeled disturbances. Next, we focus on a specific type of actuator, the single dielectric barrier discharge (SDBD) plasma actuator. An array of these plasma actuators is oriented to produce stream-wise vorticity and thus directly cancel the structures with the largest transient growth (so-called stream-wise streaks). We design a feedback controller using only experimental data by first developing an empirical input-output quasi-steady model. Then, we design feedback controllers for the model such that the controllers perform well when applied to the experiment. Lastly, we

  11. Masking ability of opaque thickness on layered metal-ceramic.

    PubMed

    Pieper, Cari M; Waldemarin, Renato Fa; Camacho, Guilherme B

    2016-09-01

    This study evaluated the masking ability of two opaques applied in different thicknesses. Eighty NiCr metal discs 16 mm in diameter and 1.0 mm thick were prepared. The disks were divided into 8 groups (n = 10). Ceramic opaque in paste (groups 1 to 4) or powder (groups 5 to 8) presentations were applied. They were machined with aluminum oxide burs to the following thicknesses: G1 and G5 = 0.10 mm; G2 and G6 = 0.15 mm; G3 and G7 = 0.20 mm and G4 and G8 = 0.30 mm. Dentin ceramic 0.7 mm thick was applied over these discs, sintered and glazed according manufacturer's instructions. Color was assessed with a Minolta CR10 spectrocolorimeter on the CIELab scale. Powder opaque had higher values on (L) and (ΔE) variables, and lower values on (a) and (b) variables compared to paste opaque. For opaque thickness, 0.10 mm had higher ΔE than all other thicknesses. L values were higher for 0.20 mm and 0.30 mm. Lowest and highest a* values were observed for 0.10 mm and 0.30 mm, respectively. No difference was observed for b* values. There were differences between paste and powder opaque types; 0.10 mm thickness behaves differently from the other thicknesses, with higher ΔE, while 0.15 mm does not differ statistically from thicker layers.

  12. On the development of turbulent boundary layer with wall transpiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferro, Marco; Downs, Robert S., III; Fallenius, Bengt E. G.; Fransson, Jens H. M.

    2015-11-01

    An experimental study of the development of the transpired boundary layer in zero pressure gradient is carried out on a 6.4 m long hydrodynamically smooth and perforated plate. The relatively longer development length of the present perforated plate compared to the ones used in previous studies allows us to investigate whether an asymptotic suction boundary layer with constant thickness is achieved for the turbulent state, analogously to what happens in the laminar state. Velocity profiles are obtained via hot-wire anemometry while the wall shear stress is measured at several streamwise locations with hot-film and wall-wire probes as well as with oil-film interferometry. The threshold suction coefficient above which relaminarization starts to occur is examined. The scaling of the mean velocity and of higher order velocity moments is discussed in light of the measured wall shear stress data. Support from the European Research Council of the Advanced Fluid Research On Drag reduction in Turbulence Experiments (AFRODITE) is acknowledged.

  13. Flowfield Measurements Inside a Boundary-Layer Bleed Slot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, D. O.; Willis, B. P.; Hingst, W. R.

    1996-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the flowfield inside a bleed slot used to control an oblique shock-wave and turbulent boundary-layer interaction. The slot was oriented normal to the primary flow direction and had a width of 1.0 cm (primary flow direction) and a length of 2.54 cm and spanned 16.5 cm. The approach boundary layer upstream of the interaction was nominally 3.0 cm thick. Two operating conditions were studied: M = 1.98 with a shock generator deflection angle of 6 deg and M = 2.46 with a shock generator deflection angle of 8 deg. Measurements include surface and flowfield static pressure, pitot pressure, and total mass flow through the slot. The results show that despite an initially two-dimensional interaction for the zero-bleed-flow case, the slot does not remove mass uniformly in the spanwise direction. Inside the slot, the flow is characterized bv two separation regions, which significantly reduce the effective flow area. The upper separation region acts as an aerodynamic throat, resulting in supersonic flow through much of the slot.

  14. Distortion of upstream disturbances in a Hiemenz boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Zhongmin; Lele, Sanjiva K.

    2004-11-01

    A theoretical analysis of the distortion of unsteady three-dimensional disturbances in a Hiemenz boundary layer and its effect on the heat transfer enhancement is presented. It is shown that the disturbance length scale is a critical parameter in determining the amplification ratio of the incoming vorticity. For large disturbance length scales, the amplification ratio increases when the length scale decreases, and a maximum value occurs at a length scale close to five times the boundary-layer thickness. The unsteadiness of the disturbances is found to reduce the vorticity amplification, but the effect is second order when the frequency is low compared to the mean flow strain rate. The impinging disturbances induce large-amplitude vorticity of opposite sign at the wall whose magnitude controls the heat transfer enhancement. As an application of the present analysis, a new scaling correlation is derived for stagnation-point heat transfer in the presence of free-stream turbulence. The theoretical correlation, expressed in terms of turbulence intensity, integral length scale and mean flow Reynolds number, agrees reasonably well with recent experimental data.

  15. Competing disturbance amplification mechanisms in two-fluid boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Sandeep; Page, Jacob; Zaki, Tamer

    2015-11-01

    The linear stability of boundary layers above a thin wall film of lower viscosity is analyzed. Appropriate choice of the film thickness and viscosity excludes the possibility of interfacial instabilities. Transient amplification of disturbances is therefore the relevant destabilizing influence, and can take place via three different mechanisms in the two-fluid configuration. Each is examined in detail by solving an initial value problem whose initial condition comprises a pair of appropriately chosen eigenmodes from the discrete, continuous and interface modes. Two regimes are driven by the lift-up mechanism: (i) The response to a streamwise vortex and (ii) the normal vorticity generated by a stable Tollmien-Schlichting wave. Both are damped due to the film. The third regime is associated with the wall-normal vorticity that is generated by the interface displacement. It can lead to appreciable streamwise velocity disturbances in the near-wall region at relatively low viscosity ratios. The results demonstrate that a wall film can stabilize the early linear stages of boundary-layer transition, and explain the observations from the recent nonlinear direct numerical simulations of this configuration by Jung & Zaki (J. Fluid Mech., vol 772, 2015, 330-360).

  16. Characteristics of turbulent boundary layer flow over algal biofilm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Elizabeth; Barros, Julio; Schultz, Michael; Steppe, Cecily; Flack, Karen; Reidenbach, Matthew

    2015-11-01

    Algal biofilms are an important fouling community on ship hulls, with severe economic consequences due to drag-induced increases in fuel use and cleaning costs. Here, we characterize the boundary layer flow structure in turbulent flow over diatomaceous slime, a type of biofilm. Diatomaceous slime composed of three species of diatoms commonly found on ship hulls was grown on acrylic test plates under shear stress. The slime averages 1.6 mm in thickness and has a high density of streamers, which are flexible elongated growths with a length on the order of 1- 2 mm located at the top of the biofilm that interact with the flow. Fouled acrylic plates were placed in a water tunnel facility specialized for detailed turbulent boundary layer measurements. High resolution Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) data are analyzed for mean velocity profile as well as local turbulent stresses and turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) production, dissipation and transport. Quadrant analysis is used to characterize the impact of the instantaneous events of Reynolds shear stress (RSS) in the flow. To investigate the coherence of the large-scale motion in the flow two-point correlation analysis is employed. Funding provided by the Office of Naval Research and the National Science Foundation.

  17. Mapping liquefiable layer thickness for seismic hazard assessment

    SciTech Connect

    O`Rourke, T.D.; Pease, J.W.

    1997-01-01

    Investigations of liquefaction sites, combining subsurface mapping and evaluation of liquefaction damage, are summarized for four areas in San Francisco affected by 1906 and 1989 earthquakes, where more than 950 borehole and sounding records were collected and analyzed. The maps developed from this database provide a comprehensive picture of subsurface conditions with substantial practical value. Postliquefaction settlement, horizontal displacement caused by lateral spread, and earthquake damage to buried pipelines are shown to be related closely with the thickness of underlying liquefiable soil. The influence of surface and liquefiable layer thicknesses on liquefaction damage is evaluated. Mapping liquefiable layer thickness is shown to be an excellent means of locating areas of potentially severe liquefaction, which is adapted easily to geographic information systems (GIS) for planning and design purposes.

  18. Turbulence in the Stable Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernando, Harindra; Kit, Eliezer; Conry, Patrick; Hocut, Christopher; Liberzon, Dan

    2016-11-01

    During the field campaigns of the Mountain Terrain Atmospheric Modeling and Observations (MATERHORN) Program, fine-scale measurements of turbulence in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) were made using a novel sonic and hot-film anemometer dyad (a combo probe). A swath of scales, from large down to Kolmogorov scales, was covered. The hot-film was located on a gimbal within the sonic probe volume, and was automated to rotate in the horizontal plane to align with the mean flow measured by sonic. This procedure not only helped satisfy the requirement of hot-film alignment with the mean flow, but also allowed in-situ calibration of hot-films. This paper analyzes a period of nocturnal flow that was similar to an idealized stratified parallel shear flow. Some new phenomena were identified, which included the occurrence of strong bursts in the velocity records indicative of turbulence generation at finer scales that are not captured by conventional sonic anemometers. The spectra showed bottleneck effect, but its manifestation did not fit into the framework of previous bottleneck-effect theories and was unequivocally related to bursts of turbulence. The measurements were also used to evaluate the energetics of stratified shear flows typical of the environment. ONR # N00014-11-1-0709; NSF # AGS-1528451; ISF 408/15.

  19. Effect of sound on boundary layer stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saric, William S. (Principal Investigator); Spencer, Shelly Anne

    1993-01-01

    Experiments are conducted in the Arizona State University Unsteady Wind Tunnel with a zero-pressure-gradient flat-plate model that has a 67:1 elliptical leading edge. Boundary-layer measurements are made of the streamwise fluctuating-velocity component in order to identify the amplified T-S waves that are forced by downstream-travelling, sound waves. Measurements are taken with circular 3-D roughness elements placed at the Branch 1 neutral stability point for the frequency under consideration, and then with the roughness element downstream of Branch 1. These roughness elements have a principal chord dimension equal to 2(lambda)(sub TS)/pi, of the T-S waves under study and are 'stacked' in order to resemble a Gaussian height distribution. Measurements taken just downstream of the roughness (with leading-edge T-S waves, surface roughness T-S waves, instrumentation sting vibrations and the Stokes wave subtracted) show the generation of 3-D-T-S waves, but not in the characteristic heart-shaped disturbance field predicted by 3-D asymptotic theory. Maximum disturbance amplitudes are found on the roughness centerline. However, some near-field characteristics predicted by numerical modelling are observed.

  20. Effect of sound on boundary layer stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saric, William S.; Spencer, Shelly Anne

    1993-01-01

    Experiments are conducted in the Arizona State University Unsteady Wind Tunnel with a zero-pressure-gradient flat-plate model that has a 67:1 elliptical leading edge. Boundary-layer measurements are made of the streamwise fluctuating-velocity component in order to identify the amplified T-S waves that are forced by downstream-traveling sound waves. Measurements are taken with circular 3-D roughness elements placed at the Branch 1 neutral stability point for the frequency under consideration, and then with the roughness element downstream of Branch 1. These roughness elements have a principal chord dimension equal to 2 lambda(sub TS)/pi of the T-S waves under study and are 'stacked' in order to resemble a Gaussian height distribution. Measurements taken just downstream of the roughness (with leading-edge T-S waves, surface roughness T-S waves, instrumentation sting vibrations, and the Stokes wave subtracted) show the generation of 3-D T-S waves, but not in the characteristic heart-shaped disturbance field predicted by 3-D asymptotic theory. Maximum disturbance amplitudes are found on the roughness centerline. However, some near-field characteristics predicted by numerical modeling are observed.

  1. Green House Gases Flux Model in Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurgaliev, Ildus

    Analytical dynamic model of the turbulent flux in the three-layer boundary system is presented. Turbulence is described as a presence of the non-zero vorticity. The generalized advection-diffusion-reaction equation is derived for an arbitrary number of components in the flux. The fluxes in the layers are objects for matching requirements on the boundaries between the layers. Different types of transport mechanisms are dominant on the different levels of the layers.

  2. Dissipation scaling in constant-pressure turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedić, Jovan; Tavoularis, Stavros; Marusic, Ivan

    2017-03-01

    Using results from previous direct numerical simulations and experiments in the outer region of spatially evolving turbulent boundary layers, we compute the streamwise evolution and the wall-normal variation of the dissipation parameter Cɛ, namely, the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate, normalized by appropriate powers of the local turbulent kinetic energy and integral length scale. For Reθ≳10 000 (Reθ is a Reynolds number on the freestream velocity and the local momentum thickness), Cɛ is essentially constant in the streamwise direction, but varies by up to 50% in the wall-normal direction. For Reθ<10000 , Cɛ is additionally found to vary in the streamwise direction and is inversely proportional to the local turbulence Reynolds number Reλ.

  3. Quantification of retinal layer thickness changes in acute macular neuroretinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Munk, Marion R; Beck, Marco; Kolb, Simone; Larsen, Michael; Hamann, Steffen; Valmaggia, Christophe; Zinkernagel, Martin S

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To quantitatively evaluate retinal layer thickness changes in acute macular neuroretinopathy (AMN). Methods AMN areas were identified using near-infrared reflectance (NIR) images. Intraretinal layer segmentation using Heidelberg software was performed. The inbuilt ETDRS -grid was moved onto the AMN lesion and the mean retinal layer thicknesses of the central grid were recorded and compared with the corresponding area of the fellow eye at initial presentation and during follow-up. Results Eleven patients were included (mean age 26±6 years). AMN lesions at baseline had a significantly thinner outer nuclear layer (ONL) (51±21 µm vs 73±17 µm, p=0.002). The other layers, including inner nuclear layer (37±8 µm vs 38±6 µm, p=0.9) and outer plexiform layer (OPL) (45±19 µm vs 33±16 µm, p=0.1) did not show significant differences between the study eyes and fellow eyes. Adjacent to NIR image lesions, areas of OPL thickening were identified (study eye: 50±14 µm vs fellow eye: 39±16 µm, p=0.005) with corresponding thinning of ONL (study eye: 52±16 µm vs fellow eye: 69±16 µm, p=0.002). Conclusions AMN presents with characteristic quantitative retinal changes and the extent of the lesion may be more extensive than initially presumed from NIR image lesions. PMID:27170518

  4. The effects of external conditions in turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzek, Brian G.

    The effects of multiple external conditions on turbulent boundary layers were studied in detail. These external conditions include: surface roughness, upstream turbulence intensity, and pressure gradient. Furthermore, the combined effects of these conditions show the complicated nature of many realistic flow conditions. It was found that the effects of surface roughness are difficult to generalize, given the importance of so many parameters. These parameters include: roughness geometry, roughness regime, roughness height to boundary layer thickness, (k/delta), roughness parameter, ( k+), Reynolds number, and roughness function (Delta B+). A further complication, is the difficulty in computing the wall shear stress, tauw/rho. For the sand grain type roughness, the mean velocity and Reynolds stresses were studied in inner and outer variables, as well as, boundary layer parameters, anisotropy tensor, production term, and viscous stress and form drag contributions. To explore the effects of roughness and Reynolds number dependence in the boundary layer, a new experiment was carefully designed to properly capture the x-dependence of the single-point statistics. It was found that roughness destroys the viscous layer near the wall, thus, reducing the contribution of the viscous stress in the wall region. As a result, the contribution in the skin friction due to form drag increases, while the viscous stress decreases. This yields Reynolds number invariance in the skin friction, near-wall roughness parameters, and inner velocity profiles as k + increases into the fully rough regime. However, in the transitionally rough regime, (i.e., 5 < k+ < 70), it was found that these parameters are functions of both Reynolds number and roughness. For the sand grain type roughnesses, only the Zagarola and Smits scaling, Uinfinitydelta*/delta, is able to remove the effects of roughness and Reynolds number from the velocity profiles in outer variables, provided there is no freestream

  5. Effects of Riblets on Skin Friction in High-Speed Turbulent Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duan, Lian; Choudhari, Meelan M.

    2012-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations of spatially developing turbulent boundary layers over riblets are conducted to examine the effects of riblets on skin friction at supersonic speeds. Zero-pressure gradient boundary layers with an adiabatic wall, a Mach number of M1 = 2.5, and a Reynolds number based on momentum thickness of Re = 1720 are considered. Simulations are conducted for boundary-layer flows over a clean surface and symmetric V- groove riblets with nominal spacings of 20 and 40 wall units. The DNS results confirm the few existing experimental observations and show that a drag reduction of approximately 7% is achieved for riblets with proper spacing. The influence of riblets on turbulence statistics is analyzed in detail with an emphasis on identifying the differences, if any, between the drag reduction mechanisms for incompressible and high-speed boundary layers.

  6. The response of a laminar boundary layer in supersonic flow to small amplitude progressive waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duck, Peter W.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of a small amplitude progressive wave on the laminar boundary layer on a semi-infinite flat plate, due to a uniform supersonic freestream flow, is considered. The perturbation to the flow divides into two streamwise zones. In the first, relatively close to the leading edge of the plate, on a transverse scale comparable to the boundary layer thickness, the perturbation flow is described by a form of the unsteady linearized compressible boundary layer equations. In the freestream, this component of flow is governed by the wave equation, the solution of which provides the outer velocity conditions for the boundary layer. This system is solved numerically, and also the asymptotic structure in the far downstream limit is studied. This reveals a breakdown and a subsequent second streamwise zone, where the flow disturbance is predominantly inviscid. The two zones are shown to match in a proper asymptotic sense.

  7. Tables for correcting airfoil data obtained in the Langley 0.3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel for sidewall boundary-layer effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, R. V.; Adcock, J. B.

    1986-01-01

    Tables for correcting airfoil data taken in the Langley 0.3-meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel for the presence of sidewall boundary layer are presented. The corrected Mach number and the correction factor are minutely altered by a 20 percent change in the boundary layer virtual origin distance. The sidewall boundary layer displacement thicknesses measured for perforated sidewall inserts and without boundary layer removal agree with the values calculated for solid sidewalls.

  8. Assessing the Relationship between Central Corneal Thickness and Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness in Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Mumcuoglu, Tarkan; Townsend, Kelly A; Wollstein, Gadi; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Bilonick, Richard A; Sung, Kyung Rim; Kagemann, Larry; Schuman, Joel S

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To determine the relationship between central corneal thickness (CCT) and retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness obtained by scanning laser polarimetry (GDx-VCC; Carl Zeiss Meditec, Dublin, CA) confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (HRT II; Heidelberg Engineering, Heidelberg, Germany) and optical coherence tomography (Stratus OCT; Carl Zeiss Meditec, Dublin, CA). Design Multi-center clinical trial, retrospective cross-sectional study. Methods One hundred and nine healthy subjects from the Advanced Imaging in Glaucoma Study were enrolled in this study. All subjects had a standard clinical examination, including visual field and good quality scans from all three imaging devices. Central corneal thickness was measured using an ultrasonic pachymeter. A linear mixed effects model was used to assess the relationship between RNFL thickness and CCT, accounting for clustering of eyes within subjects, testing site, ethnicity, family history of glaucoma, axial length intraocular pressure and visual field global indices. Results For OCT and GDx, there was a slight non-statistically significant positive relationship between CCT and RNFL thickness. For HRT, there was a slight non-statistically significant negative relationship between CCT and RNFL thickness. Relationships for each device were found to differ between sites. Conclusions CCT was not statistically significantly related to RNFL thickness in healthy eyes. PMID:18657796

  9. A study of methods to investigate nozzle boundary layer transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauley, Laura L.

    1991-05-01

    To further investigate nozzle flow, numerical computations are employed. The computations produce complete flow velocity and temperature fields within the nozzle. As a check, these results can be compared with experimental data at the wall. Once an accurate numerical scheme has been validated, it can be used as a design tool to predict the performance of other nozzle designs without the cost of experimental testing. Typically, the numerical analysis assumes either a laminar boundary layer or a fully turbulent boundary layer which is steady and two-dimensional. Boundary layer transition is not considered. Computing both the completely laminar boundary layer and the completely turbulent boundary layer conditions gives the minimum and maximum wall heat flux possible for a specified geometry. When the experimental heat flux measurements lie between these two values, the nature of the boundary layer is unknown. The boundary layer may have transitioned from laminar to turbulent; three-dimensional structures may be present in the boundary layer, or the inlet flow conditions may not be correctly specified in the computation.

  10. Near independence of OLED operating voltage on transport layer thickness

    SciTech Connect

    Swensen, James S.; Wang, Liang; Polikarpov, Evgueni; Rainbolt, James E.; Koech, Phillip K.; Cosimbescu, Lelia; Padmaperuma, Asanga B.

    2013-01-01

    We report organic light emitting devices (OLEDs) with weak drive voltage dependence on the thickness of the hole transport layer (HTL) for thicknesses up to 1150 Å using the N,N'-Bis(naphthalen-1-yl)-N,N'-bis(phenyl)-benzidine (α-NPD) and N,N'-bis(3-methyl phenyl)-N,N'-diphenyl-[1,1'-biphenyl]-4,4'diamine (TPD), both of which have hole mobilities in the range of 2 × 10-3 cm2V-1s-1. Lower mobility HTL materials show larger operating voltage dependence on thickness. The near independence of the operating voltage for high mobility transport material thickness was only observed when the energy barrier for charge injection into the transport material was minimized. To ensure low injection barriers, a thin film of 2-(3-(adamantan-1-yl)propyl)-3,5,6-trifluorotetracyanoquinodimethane (F3TCNQ-Adl) was cast from solution onto the ITO surface. These results indicate that thick transport layers can be integrated into OLED stacks without the need for bulk conductivity doping.

  11. Changes in the turbulent boundary layer structure associated with net drag reduction by outer layer manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashidnia, N.; Falco, R. E.

    1987-01-01

    A specially designed wind tunnel was used to examine the effects of tandemly arranged parallel plate manipulators (TAPPMs) on a turbulent boundary-layer structure and the associated drag. Momentum balances, as well as measurements of the local shear stress from the velocity gradient near the wall, were used to obtain the net drag and local skin friction changes. Two TAPPMs, identical except for the thickness of their plates, were used in the study. Results with .003 inch plates were a maximum net drag reduction of 10 percent at 58 beta sub o (using a momentum balance). At 20 beta sub o, simultaneous laser sheet flow visualization and hot-wire anemometry data showed that the Reynolds stress in the large eddies was significantly reduced, as were the streamwise and normal velocity components. Using space-time correlations the reductions were again identified. Furthermore, quantitative flow visualization showed that the outward normal velocity of the inner region was also significantly decreased in the region around 20 beta sub o. However, throughout the first 130 beta sub o, the measured sublayer thickness with the TAPPMs in place was 15 to 20 percent greater. The data showed that the skin friction, as well as the structure of the turbulence, was strongly modified in the first 35 beta sub o, but that they both significantly relaxed toward unmanipulated boundary layer values by 50 beta sub o.

  12. Measuring for thickness distribution of recording layer of PLH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiao-Chun; Guo, Lurong; Guo, Yongkang

    1991-07-01

    An interference microscope is employed to take a photo of the interfering fringes, and its density is analyzed by a computer image system to measure the thickness distribution of a photolithographic hologram (PLH). This method is much more simple than that of SEM. The theory of measuring is presented in the paper. The authors measured the distributions of photolithographic gratings before and after the etching process. Comparing both the thickness distributions of corresponding recording layers, some primary rules of pattern transfer process by etching were identified.

  13. Symmetries in Turbulent Boundary Layer Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oberlack, M.

    1996-01-01

    The objective is the development of a new theory which enables the algorithmic computation of all self-similar mean velocity profiles. The theory is based on Liegroup analysis and unifies a large set of self-similar solutions for the mean velocity of stationary parallel turbulent shear flows. The results include the logarithmic law of the wall, an algebraic law, the viscous sublayer, the linear region in the middle of a Couette flow and in the middle of a rotating channel flow, and a new exponential mean velocity profile not previously reported. Experimental results taken in the outer parts of a high Reynolds number flat-plate boundary layer, strongly support the exponential profile. From experimental as well as from DNS data of a turbulent channel flow the algebraic scaling law could be confirmed in both the center region and in the near wall region. In the case of the logarithmic law of the wall, the scaling with the wall distance arises as a result of the analysis and has not been assumed in the derivation. The crucial part of the derivation of all the different mean velocity profiles is to consider the invariance of the equation for the velocity fluctuations at the same time as the invariance of the equation for the velocity product equations. The latter is the dyad product of the velocity fluctuations with the equation for the velocity fluctuations. It has been proven that all the invariant solutions are also consistent with similarity of all velocity moment equations up to any arbitrary order.

  14. Aeolian Sand Transport by Boundary Layer Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baas, A. C.

    2007-12-01

    The erratic and intermittent nature of wind-driven sand transport challenges our current transport models, which lack physical mechanisms for explaining and taking into account this spatio-temporal variability. This paper presents a collective overview of results from investigations into the nature of spatio-temporal variability in sand transport generally, and the formation and behaviour of aeolian streamers specifically. This includes three principal studies. First, the results of field investigations into the formation and behaviour of aeolian streamers in coastal and desert environments, where spatio-temporal transport variability and associated turbulence characteristics were assessed with an extensive instrument array. Streamers were measured with a transverse array of Safires, while the wind field and associated turbulent structures were monitored with cup-anemometry and a rake of hot-film probes. Second, these field data were used to assess the statistical trends in transport variability as a function of spanwise scale of measurement and the temporal scale of time-averaging transport rates. Third, spectral wavelet analysis of high-frequency collocated wind speed (hot- film probes) and transport flux (Safires) time-series revealed distinct forcing-response regimes at different temporal scales. The transitions between these regimes and their ranges compare favourably with physically meaningful scales, such as the minimum temporal scale of saltation response to wind speed fluctuations, and the integral time-scale of the observed internal boundary layer turbulence dynamics. The paper concludes with a tentative conceptual framework that attempts to integrate the results and insights from these studies towards an improved understanding of aeolian sediment transport processes.

  15. Destiny of earthward streaming plasma in the plasmasheet boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, J. L.; Horwitz, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    The dynamics of the earth's magnetotail have been investigated, and it has become clear that the plasmasheet boundary layer field lines map into the Region I Field-Aligned Currents (FAC) of the auroral zone. It is pointed out that the role of earthward streaming ions in the plasmasheet boundary layer may be of fundamental importance in the understanding of magnetotail dynamics, auroral zone physics, and especially for ionospheric-magnetospheric interactions. The present paper has the objective to evaluate propagation characteristics for the earthward streaming ions observed in the plasmasheet boundary layer. An investigation is conducted of the propagation characteristics of protons in the plasmasheet boundary layer using independent single particle dynamics, and conclusions are discussed. The density of earthward streaming ions found in the plasmasheet boundary layer should include the ring current as well as the auroral zone precipitaiton and inner plasmasheet regions of the magnetosphere.

  16. Compression response of thick layer composite laminates with through-the-thickness reinforcement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L.; Smith, Barry T.; Maiden, Janice

    1992-01-01

    Compression and compression-after-impact (CAI) tests were conducted on seven different AS4-3501-6 (0/90) 0.64-cm thick composite laminates. Four of the seven laminates had through-the-thickness (TTT) reinforcement fibers. Two TTT reinforcement methods, stitching and integral weaving, and two reinforcement fibers, Kevlar and carbon, were used. The remaining three laminates were made without TTT reinforcements and were tested to establish a baseline for comparison with the laminates having TTT reinforcement. Six of the seven laminates consisted of nine thick layers whereas the seventh material was composed of 46 thin plies. The use of thick-layer material has the potential for reducing structural part cost because of the reduced part count (layers of material). The compression strengths of the TTT reinforced laminates were approximately one half those of the materials without TTT reinforcements. However, the CAI strengths of the TTT reinforced materials were approximately twice those of materials without TTT reinforcements. The improvement in CAI strength is due to an increase in interlaminar strength produced by the TTT reinforcement. Stitched laminates had slightly higher compression and CAI strengths than the integrally woven laminates.

  17. Effect of Pressure Gradients on Plate Response and Radiation in a Supersonic Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frendi, Abdelkader

    1997-01-01

    Using the model developed by the author for zero-pressure gradient turbulent boundary layers, results are obtained for adverse and favorable pressure gradients. It is shown that when a flexible plate is located in an adverse pressure gradient area, it vibrates more than if it were in a favorable pressure gradient one. Therefore the noise generated by the plate in an adverse pressure gradient is much greater than that due to the plate in a favorable pressure gradient. The effects of Reynolds number and boundary layer thickness are also analyzed and found to have the same effect in both adverse and favorable pressure gradient cases. Increasing the Reynolds number is found to increase the loading on the plate and therefore acoustic radiation. An increase in boundary layer thickness is found to decrease the level of the high frequencies and therefore the response and radiation at these frequencies. The results are in good qualitative agreement with experimental measurements.

  18. In-situ observation of impurity diffusion boundary layer in silicon Czochralski growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakimoto, Koichi; Eguchi, Minoru; Watanabe, Hisao; Hibiya, Taketoshi

    1990-01-01

    In-situ observation of the impurity diffusion boundary layer during single crystal growth of indium-doped silicon was carried out by X-ray radiography. The difference in the transmitted X-ray image compared with molten silicon just beneath the crystal-melt interface was attributed to the concentration of indium impurities having a larger absorption coefficient. The intensity profile of the transmitted X-ray can be reproduced by a transmittance calculation that considers the meniscus shape and impurity distribution. The impurity distribution profile near the crystal-melt interface was estimated using the Burton-Prim-Slichter (BPS) equation. The observed impurity diffusion boundary layer thickness was about 0.5 mm. It was found that the boundary layer thickness was not constant in the radial direction, which cannot be explained by the BPS theory, since it is based on a one-dimensional calculation.

  19. The effects of forcing on a single stream shear layer and its parent boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haw, Richard C.; Foss, John F.

    1990-01-01

    Forcing and its effect on fluid flows has become an accepted tool in the study and control of flow systems. It has been used both as a diagnostic tool, to explore the development and interaction of coherent structures, and as a method of controlling the behavior of the flow. A number of forcing methods have been used in order to provide a perturbation to the flow; among these are the use of an oscillating trailing edge, acoustically driven slots, external acoustic forcing, and mechanical piston methods. The effect of a planar mechanical piston forcing on a single stream shear layer is presented; it can be noted that this is one of the lesser studied free shear layers. The single stream shear layer can be characterized by its primary flow velocity scale and the thickness of the separating boundary layer. The velocity scale is constant over the length of the flow field; theta (x) can be used as a width scale to characterize the unforced shear layer. In the case of the forced shear layer the velocity field is a function of phase time and definition of a width measure becomes somewhat problematic.

  20. Flight experience with a pivoting traversing boundary-layer probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montoya, L. C.; Brauns, D. A.; Cissell, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    A pivoting traversing boundary layer probe was evaluated in flight on an F-104 airplane. The evaluation was performed at free stream Mach numbers from 0.8 to 2.0. The unit is described, and operating problems and their solutions are discussed. Conventional boundary layer profiles containing variations in flow angle within the viscous layer are shown for free stream Mach numbers of 0.8, 1.6, and 2.0. Although the unit was not optimized for size and weight, it successfully measured simultaneously flow angularity, probe height, and pitot pressure through the boundary layer.

  1. The measurement of boundary layers on a compressor blade in cascade. II - Suction surface boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deutsch, Steven; Zierke, William C.

    1987-01-01

    A one-component laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) has been used to measure the two-dimensional, periodic flow field about a double circular arc, compressor blade in cascade. Eleven boundary layer profiles were taken on both the pressure and suction surfaces of the blade, and two were taken in the near wake. In this part of the study, the LDV system is described and the suction surface flow field is documented. The suction surface profiles appear to separate both at the leading edge and again somewhat beyond midchord; the leading edge separation apparently reattaches by 2.6 percent chord.

  2. Separation attenuation in swept shock wave-boundary-layer interactions using different microvortex generator geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martis, R. R.; Misra, A.

    2017-03-01

    A numerical study is conducted to determine the effectiveness of six different microvortex generator geometries in controlling swept shock wave/boundary-layer interactions. The geometries considered are base ramp, base ramp with declining angle of 45°, blunt ramp, split ramp, thick vanes, and ramped vanes. Microvortex generators with a gap were found to be better suited for delaying the separation. Thick vanes showed the largest delay in separation among the devices studied.

  3. Optimal Control of Shock Wave Turbulent Boundary Layer Interactions Using Micro-Array Actuation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Bernhard H.; Tinapple, Jon; Surber, Lewis

    2006-01-01

    The intent of this study on micro-array flow control is to demonstrate the viability and economy of Response Surface Methodology (RSM) to determine optimal designs of micro-array actuation for controlling the shock wave turbulent boundary layer interactions within supersonic inlets and compare these concepts to conventional bleed performance. The term micro-array refers to micro-actuator arrays which have heights of 25 to 40 percent of the undisturbed supersonic boundary layer thickness. This study covers optimal control of shock wave turbulent boundary layer interactions using standard micro-vane, tapered micro-vane, and standard micro-ramp arrays at a free stream Mach number of 2.0. The effectiveness of the three micro-array devices was tested using a shock pressure rise induced by the 10 shock generator, which was sufficiently strong as to separate the turbulent supersonic boundary layer. The overall design purpose of the micro-arrays was to alter the properties of the supersonic boundary layer by introducing a cascade of counter-rotating micro-vortices in the near wall region. In this manner, the impact of the shock wave boundary layer (SWBL) interaction on the main flow field was minimized without boundary bleed.

  4. Hypersonic Boundary Layer Transition Measurements Using NO2 approaches NO Photo-dissociation Tagging Velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bathel, Brett F.; Johansen, Craig T.; Danehy, Paul M.; Inman, Jennifer A.; Jones, Stephen B.; Goyne, Christopher P.

    2011-01-01

    Measurements of instantaneous and mean streamwise velocity profiles in a hypersonic laminar boundary layer as well as a boundary layer undergoing laminar-to-turbulent transition were obtained over a 10-degree half-angle wedge model. A molecular tagging velocimetry technique consisting of a NO2 approaches?NO photo-dissociation reaction and two subsequent excitations of NO was used. The measurement of the transitional boundary layer velocity profiles was made downstream of a 1-mm tall, 4-mm diameter cylindrical trip along several lines lying within a streamwise measurement plane normal to the model surface and offset 6-mm from the model centerline. For laminar and transitional boundary layer measurements, the magnitudes of streamwise velocity fluctuations are compared. In the transitional boundary layer the fluctuations were, in general, 2-4 times larger than those in the laminar boundary layer. Of particular interest were fluctuations corresponding to a height of approximately 50% of the laminar boundary layer thickness having a magnitude of nearly 30% of the mean measured velocity. For comparison, the measured fluctuations in the laminar boundary layer were approximately 5% of the mean measured velocity at the same location. For the highest 10% signal-to-noise ratio data, average single-shot uncertainties using a 1 ?Es and 50 ?Es interframe delay were 115 m/s and 3 m/s, respectively. By averaging single-shot measurements of the transitional boundary layer, uncertainties in mean velocity as low as 39 m/s were obtained in the wind tunnel. The wall-normal and streamwise spatial resolutions were 0.14-mm (2 pixel) and 0.82-mm (11 pixels), respectively. These measurements were performed in the 31-inch Mach 10 Air Wind Tunnel at the NASA Langley Research Center.

  5. Boundary Layer Rolls Observed Above and Below a Jet in a Marine Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, R. C.; Emmitt, G. D.; Godwin, K.; Greco, S.

    2013-12-01

    We have flown a coherent Doppler wind lidar (DWL) on the Cirpas Twin Otter off the California coast near Monterey since 2003. One scientific purpose of these flights is to understand the relationship between the turbulent fluxes measured on the aircraft or on other platforms and the observed structure of the marine boundary layer (MBL). Two common features are found in the MBL flow: (1) a strong jet at approximately 200 m above the sea surface; and (2) organized large eddies (OLE) in the form of roll vortices that are approximately aligned along the mean wind direction. On two flights (April 13, 2007 and September 30, 2012), the DWL data indicated that roll OLE existed simultaneously both above and below the jet. The DWL winds suggest that the OLE in these layers are sometimes independent and sometimes connected. Standard flux data are obtained on the Twin Otter at flight level, which is nominally 300 m. The 10 Hz wind and temperature data exhibit variability at spatial scales corresponding to the OLE wavelength. We have constructed a nonlinear theoretical model that includes triad wave-wave interactions to test the hypothesis that rolls could form both above and below the jet. This model shows that this is possible and that the rolls in the two layers could have unique characteristics compared to standard boundary layer rolls. The model further shows that the rolls above and below the jet are due to separate instabilities that interact. This is consistent with the observations of both connected and independent OLE above and below the jet. Contrast-enhanced DWL line-of-sight winds. Jet maximum 200 m below aircraft. Typical resonant triad solution for rolls above and below a PBL jet.

  6. On Reflection of Shock Waves from Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liepmann, H W; Roshko, A; Dhawan, S

    1952-01-01

    Measurements are presented at Mach numbers from about 1.3 to 1.5 of reflection characteristics and the relative upstream influence of shock waves impinging on a flat surface with both laminar and turbulent boundary layers. The difference between impulse and step waves is discussed and their interaction with the boundary layer is compared. General considerations on the experimental production of shock waves from wedges and cones and examples of reflection of shock waves from supersonic shear layers are also presented.

  7. The layer boundary effect on multi-layer mesoporous TiO2 film based dye sensitized solar cells

    DOE PAGES

    Xu, Feng; Zhu, Kai; Zhao, Yixin

    2016-10-10

    Multi-layer mesoporous TiO2 prepared by screen printing is widely used for fabrication of high-efficiency dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Here, we compare the three types of ~10 um thick mesoporous TiO2 films, which were screen printed as 1-, 2- and 4-layers using the same TiO2 nanocrystal paste. The layer boundary of the multi-layer mesoporous TiO2 films was observed in the cross-section SEM. The existence of a layer boundary could reduce the photoelectron diffusion length with the increase of layer number. However, the photoelectron diffusion lengths of the Z907 dye sensitized solar cells based on these different layered mesoporous TiO2 films aremore » all longer than the film thickness. Consequently, the photovoltaic performance seems to have little dependence on the layer number of the multi-layer TiO2 based DSSCs.« less

  8. Effect of free-stream turbulence on boundary layer transition.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, M E

    2014-07-28

    This paper is concerned with the transition to turbulence in flat plate boundary layers due to moderately high levels of free-stream turbulence. The turbulence is assumed to be generated by an (idealized) grid and matched asymptotic expansions are used to analyse the resulting flow over a finite thickness flat plate located in the downstream region. The characteristic Reynolds number Rλ based on the mesh size λ and free-stream velocity is assumed to be large, and the turbulence intensity ε is assumed to be small. The asymptotic flow structure is discussed for the generic case where the turbulence Reynolds number εRλ and the plate thickness and are held fixed (at O(1) and O(λ), respectively) in the limit as [Formula: see text] and ε→0. But various limiting cases are considered in order to explain the relevant transition mechanisms. It is argued that there are two types of streak-like structures that can play a role in the transition process: (i) those that appear in the downstream region and are generated by streamwise vorticity in upstream flow and (ii) those that are concentrated near the leading edge and are generated by plate normal vorticity in upstream flow. The former are relatively unaffected by leading edge geometry and are usually referred to as Klebanoff modes while the latter are strongly affected by leading edge geometry and are more streamwise vortex-like in appearance.

  9. On the theory of laminar boundary layers involving separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Karman, TH; Millikan, C

    1934-01-01

    This paper presents a mathematical discussion of the laminar boundary layer, which was developed with a view of facilitating the investigation of those boundary layers in particular for which the phenomenon of separation occurs. The treatment starts with a slight modification of the form of the boundary layer equation first published by Von Mises. Two approximate solutions of this equation are found, one of which is exact at the outer edge of the boundary layer while the other is exact at the wall. The final solution is obtained by joining these two solutions at the inflection points of the velocity profiles. The final solution is given in terms of a series of universal functions for a fairly broad class of potential velocity distributions outside of the boundary layer. Detailed calculations of the boundary layer characteristics are worked out for the case in which the potential velocity is a linear function of the distance from the upstream stagnation point. Finally, the complete separation point characteristics are determined for the boundary layer associated with a potential velocity distribution made up of two linear functions of the distance from the stagnation point. It appears that extensions of the detailed calculations to more complex potential flows can be fairly easily carried out by using the explicit formulae given in the paper. (author)

  10. Spatial Linear Instability of Confluent Wake/Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, William W.; Liu, Feng-Jun; Rumsey, C. L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The spatial linear instability of incompressible confluent wake/boundary layers is analyzed. The flow model adopted is a superposition of the Blasius boundary layer and a wake located above the boundary layer. The Orr-Sommerfeld equation is solved using a global numerical method for the resulting eigenvalue problem. The numerical procedure is validated by comparing the present solutions for the instability of the Blasius boundary layer and for the instability of a wake with published results. For the confluent wake/boundary layers, modes associated with the boundary layer and the wake, respectively, are identified. The boundary layer mode is found amplified as the wake approaches the wall. On the other hand, the modes associated with the wake, including a symmetric mode and an antisymmetric mode, are stabilized by the reduced distance between the wall and the wake. An unstable mode switching at low frequency is observed where the antisymmetric mode becomes more unstable than the symmetric mode when the wake velocity defect is high.

  11. Influence of thickness and permeability of endothelial surface layer on transmission of shear stress in capillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, SongPeng; Zhang, XiangJun; Tian, Yu; Meng, YongGang; Lipowsky, Herbert

    2015-07-01

    The molecular coating on the surface of microvascular endothelium has been identified as a barrier to transvascular exchange of solutes. With a thickness of hundreds of nanometers, this endothelial surface layer (ESL) has been treated as a porous domain within which fluid shear stresses are dissipated and transmitted to the solid matrix to initiate mechanotransduction events. The present study aims to examine the effects of the ESL thickness and permeability on the transmission of shear stress throughout the ESL. Our results indicate that fluid shear stresses rapidly decrease to insignificant levels within a thin transition layer near the outer boundary of the ESL with a thickness on the order of ten nanometers. The thickness of the transition zone between free fluid and the porous layer was found to be proportional to the square root of the Darcy permeability. As the permeability is reduced ten-fold, the interfacial fluid and solid matrix shear stress gradients increase exponentially two-fold. While the interfacial fluid shear stress is positively related to the ESL thickness, the transmitted matrix stress is reduced by about 50% as the ESL thickness is decreased from 500 to 100 nm, which may occur under pathological conditions. Thus, thickness and permeability of the ESL are two main factors that determine flow features and the apportionment of shear stresses between the fluid and solid phases of the ESL. These results may shed light on the mechanisms of force transmission through the ESL and the pathological events caused by alterations in thickness and permeability of the ESL.

  12. Pressure-sensing performance of upright cylinders in a Mach 10 boundary-layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Steven; Murphy, Kelly

    1994-01-01

    An experimental research program to provide basic knowledge of the pressure-sensing performance of upright, flushported cylinders in a hypersonic boundary layer is described. Three upright cylinders of 0.25-, 0.5- and l.0-in. diameters and a conventional rake were placed in the test section sidewall boundary layer of the 31 Inch Mach 10 Wind Tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. Boundary-layer pressures from these cylinders were compared to those measured with a conventional rake. A boundary-layer thickness-to-cylinder-diameter ratio of 8 proved sufficient to accurately measure an overall pressure profile and ascertain the boundary-layer thickness. Effects of Reynolds number, flow angularity, and shock wave impingement on pressure measurement were also investigated. Although Reynolds number effects were negligible at the conditions studied, flow angularity above 10 deg significantly affects the measured pressures. Shock wave impingement was used to investigate orifice-to-orifice pressure crosstalk. No crosstalk was measured. The lower pressure measured above the oblique shock wave impingement showed no influence of the higher pressure generated at the lower port locations.

  13. Hypersonic Boundary Layer Stability Experiments in a Quiet Wind Tunnel with Bluntness Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lachowicz, Jason T.; Chokani, Ndaona

    1996-01-01

    Hypersonic boundary layer measurements over a flared cone were conducted in a Mach 6 quiet wind tunnel at a freestream unit Reynolds number of 2.82 million/ft. This Reynolds number provided laminar-to-transitional flow over the cone model in a low-disturbance environment. Four interchangeable nose-tips, including a sharp-tip, were tested. Point measurements with a single hot-wire using a novel constant voltage anemometer were used to measure the boundary layer disturbances. Surface temperature and schlieren measurements were also conducted to characterize the transitional state of the boundary layer and to identify instability modes. Results suggest that second mode disturbances were the most unstable and scaled with the boundary layer thickness. The second mode integrated growth rates compared well with linear stability theory in the linear stability regime. The second mode is responsible for transition onset despite the existence of a second mode subharmonic. The subharmonic disturbance wavelength also scales with the boundary layer thickness. Furthermore, the existence of higher harmonics of the fundamental suggests that nonlinear disturbances are not associated with 'high' free stream disturbance levels. Nose-tip radii greater than 2.7% of the base radius completely stabilized the second mode.

  14. Overview of Boundary Layer Transition Research in Support of Orbiter Return To Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott A.; Horvath, Thomas J.; Greene, Francis A.; Kinder, Gerald R.; Wang, K. C.

    2006-01-01

    A predictive tool for estimating the onset of boundary layer transition resulting from damage to and/or repair of the thermal protection system was developed in support of Shuttle Return to Flight. The boundary layer transition tool is part of a suite of tools that analyze the aerothermodynamic environment to the local thermal protection system to allow informed disposition of damage for making recommendations to fly as is or to repair. Using mission specific trajectory information and details of each damage site or repair, the expected time (and thus Mach number) at transition onset is predicted to help define the aerothermodynamic environment to use in the subsequent thermal and stress analysis of the local thermal protection system and structure. The boundary layer transition criteria utilized for the tool was developed from ground-based measurements to account for the effect of both protuberances and cavities and has been calibrated against select flight data. Computed local boundary layer edge conditions were used to correlate the results, specifically the momentum thickness Reynolds number over the edge Mach number and the boundary layer thickness. For the initial Return to Flight mission, STS-114, empirical curve coefficients of 27, 100, and 900 were selected to predict transition onset for protuberances based on height, and cavities based on depth and length, respectively.

  15. Space-Time Correlations and Spectra of Wall Pressure in a Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willmarth, W. W.

    1959-01-01

    Measurements of the statistical properties of the fluctuating wall pressure produced by a subsonic turbulent boundary layer are described. The measurements provide additional information about the structure of the turbulent boundary layer; they are applicable to the problems of boundary-layer induced noise inside an airplane fuselage and to the generation of waves-on water. The spectrum of the wall pressure is presented in dimensionless form. The ratio of the root-mean-square wall pressure to the free-stream dynamic pressure is found to be a constant square root of bar P(sup 2)/q(sub infinity) = 0.006 independent of Mach number and Reynolds number. In addition, space- time correlation measurements in the stream direction show that pressure fluctuations whose scale is greater than or equal to 0.3 times the boundary-layer thickness are convected with the convection speed U(sub c) = 0.82U(sub infinity) where U(infinity) is the free-stream velocity and have lost their identity in a distance approximately equal to 10 boundary-layer thicknesses.

  16. Locomotion of bacteria in liquid flow and the boundary layer effect on bacterial attachment

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Chao; Liao, Qiang; Chen, Rong; Zhu, Xun

    2015-06-12

    The formation of biofilm greatly affects the performance of biological reactors, which highly depends on bacterial swimming and attachment that usually takes place in liquid flow. Therefore, bacterial swimming and attachment on flat and circular surfaces with the consideration of flow was studied experimentally. Besides, a mathematical model comprehensively combining bacterial swimming and motion with flow is proposed for the simulation of bacterial locomotion and attachment in flow. Both experimental and theoretical results revealed that attached bacteria density increases with decreasing boundary layer thickness on both flat and circular surfaces, the consequence of which is inherently related to the competition between bacterial swimming and the non-slip motion with flow evaluated by the Péclet number. In the boundary layer, where the Péclet number is relatively higher, bacterial locomotion mainly depends on bacterial swimming. Thinner boundary layer promotes bacterial swimming towards the surface, leading to higher attachment density. To enhance the performance of biofilm reactors, it is effective to reduce the boundary layer thickness on desired surfaces. - Highlights: • Study of bacterial locomotion in flow as an early stage in biofilm formation. • Mathematical model combining bacterial swimming and the motion with flow. • Boundary layer plays a key role in bacterial attachment under flow condition. • The competition between bacterial swimming and the motion with flow is evaluated.

  17. Shock wave-boundary layer interactions in rarefied gas flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bird, G. A.

    1991-01-01

    A numerical study is presented, using the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method, of shock wave-boundary layer interactions in low density supersonic flows. Test cases include two-dimensional, axially-symmetric and three-dimensional flows. The effective displacement angle of the boundary layer is calculated for representative flat plate, wedge, and cone flows. The maximum pressure, shear stress, and heat transfer in the shock formation region is determined in each case. The two-dimensional reflection of an oblique shock wave from a flat plate is studied, as is the three-dimensional interaction of such a wave with a sidewall boundary layer.

  18. Structure of turbulence in three-dimensional boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subramanian, Chelakara S.

    1993-01-01

    This report provides an overview of the three dimensional turbulent boundary layer concepts and of the currently available experimental information for their turbulence modeling. It is found that more reliable turbulence data, especially of the Reynolds stress transport terms, is needed to improve the existing modeling capabilities. An experiment is proposed to study the three dimensional boundary layer formed by a 'sink flow' in a fully developed two dimensional turbulent boundary layer. Also, the mean and turbulence field measurement procedure using a three component laser Doppler velocimeter is described.

  19. Formation of pre-sheath boundary layers in electronegative plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Vitello, P., LLNL

    1998-05-01

    In electronegative plasmas Coulomb scattering between positive and negative ions can lead to the formation of a pre-sheath boundary layer containing the bulk of the negative ions. The negative ion boundary layer forms when momentum transfer from positive to negative ions dominates the negative ion acceleration from the electric field. This condition is met in Inductively Coupled Plasma reactors that operate at low pressure and high plasma density. Simulations of the GEC reactor for Chlorine and Oxygen chemistries using the INDUCT95 2D model are presented showing the pre-sheath boundary layer structure as a function of applied power and neutral pressure.

  20. Stable Boundary Layer Education (STABLE) Final Campaign Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, David D.

    2016-03-01

    The properties of, and the processes that occur in, the nocturnal stable boundary layer are not well understood, making it difficult to represent adequately in numerical models. The nocturnal boundary layer often is characterized by a temperature inversion and, in the Southern Great Plains region, a low-level jet. To advance our understanding of the nocturnal stable boundary layer, high temporal and vertical resolution data on the temperature and wind properties are needed, along with both large-eddy simulation and cloud-resolving modeling.

  1. Effects of Interaction Between Normal Shock and Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donaldson, Coleman duP.

    1944-01-01

    A discussion of the interaction between normal shocks and boundary layers on the basis of experimental evidence obtained in studies of supersonic flows in passages is given. The investigation was made as a result of the inability of the existing normal-shock theory to explain phenomena involving normal shocks that occurred in the presence of boundary layers. Assumptions with regard to the character of the effects of interaction between boundary layer and normal shock are proposed; these assumptions seem to give good agreement with certain experimental results.

  2. The Effects of Rotation on Boundary Layers in Turbomachine Rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, J. P.

    1974-01-01

    The boundary layers in turbomachine rotors are subject to Coriolis forces which can (1) contribute directly to the development of secondary flows and (2) indirectly influence the behavior of boundary layers by augmentation and/or suppression of turbulence production in the boundary layers on blades. Both these rotation-induced phenomena are particularly important in the development of understanding of flow and loss mechanisms in centrifugal and mixed flow machines. The primary objective of this paper is to review the information available on these effects.

  3. Studies of planetary boundary layer by infrared thermal imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Albina, Bogdan; Dimitriu, Dan Gheorghe Gurlui, Silviu Octavian; Cazacu, Marius Mihai; Timofte, Adrian

    2014-11-24

    The IR camera is a relatively novel device for remote sensing of atmospheric thermal processes from the Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) based on measurements of the infrared radiation. Infrared radiation is energy radiated by the motion of atoms and molecules on the surface of aerosols, when their temperature is more than absolute zero. The IR camera measures directly the intensity of radiation emitted by aerosols which is converted by an imaging sensor into an electric signal, resulting a thermal image. Every image pixel that corresponds to a specific radiance is pre-processed to identify the brightness temperature. The thermal infrared imaging radiometer used in this study, NicAir, is a precision radiometer developed by Prata et al. The device was calibrated for the temperature range of 270–320 K and using a calibration table along with image processing software, important information about variations in temperature can be extracted from acquired IR images. The PBL is the lowest layer of the troposphere where the atmosphere interacts with the ground surfaces. The importance of PBL lies in the fact that it provides a finite but varying volume in which pollutants can disperse. The aim of this paper is to analyze the PBL altitude and thickness variations over Iasi region using the IR imaging camera as well as its behavior from day to night and thermal processes occurring in PBL.

  4. On the turbulent boundary layer over geophysical-like topographies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamorro, Leonardo P.; Hamed, Ali M.; Castillo, Luciano

    2016-11-01

    The developing and developed flows over 2D and 3D large-scale wavy walls were experimentally studied with high-resolution planar PIV in a refractive-index-matching channel. The 2D wall is described by a sinusoidal wave in the streamwise direction with amplitude to wavelength ratio a/ λx = 0.05, while the 3D wall has an additional wave in the spanwise direction with a/ λy = 0.1. The flow was characterized at Re = 4000 and 40000, based on the bulk velocity and the channel half height. The walls have amplitude to boundary layer thickness ratio a /δ99 0 . 1 and resemble large-scale and geophysical-like roughnesses found in rivers and natural terrain. Instantaneous velocity fields and time-averaged turbulence quantities reveal strong coupling between large-scale topography and the turbulence dynamics near the wall, and the presence of a well-structured shear layer that enhances the turbulence for both walls. However, the 3D wall exhibits spanwise flow that is thought to be responsible for distinctive flow features, including comparatively reduced spanwise vorticity and decreased turbulence levels. Further insight is drawn in the developed and developing regions through proper orthogonal decomposition and quadrant analysis.

  5. Aerodynamically-driven condensate layer thickness distributions on isothermal cylindrical surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, D. E.; Gunes, D.; Nazih-Anous, N.

    1983-01-01

    A simple yet rather general mathematical model is presented for predicting the distribution of condensate layer thickness when aerodynamic shear is the dominant mechanism of liquid flow along the surface. The Newtonian condensate film is treated using well-known thin-layer (lubrication theory) approximations, and condensate supply is taken to be the result of either convective diffusion or inertial impaction. Illustrative calculations for a circular cylinder in a crossflow at Re = 100,000 reveal the consequences of alternate condensate arrival mechanisms and the existence of thicker reverse-flow films behind the position of gas boundary-layer separation. The present formulation is readily generalized to include transient liquid layer flows on noncircular objects of variable surface temperature, as encountered in turbine-blade materials testing or operation.

  6. Aerodynamically-driven condensate layer thickness distributions on isothermal cylindrical surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosner, D. E.; Gunes, D.; Nazih-Anous, N.

    A simple yet rather general mathematical model is presented for predicting the distribution of condensate layer thickness when aerodynamic shear is the dominant mechanism of liquid flow along the surface. The Newtonian condensate film is treated using well-known thin-layer (lubrication theory) approximations, and condensate supply is taken to be the result of either convective diffusion or inertial impaction. Illustrative calculations for a circular cylinder in a crossflow at Re = 100,000 reveal the consequences of alternate condensate arrival mechanisms and the existence of thicker reverse-flow films behind the position of gas boundary-layer separation. The present formulation is readily generalized to include transient liquid layer flows on noncircular objects of variable surface temperature, as encountered in turbine-blade materials testing or operation.

  7. Nanoscale Hot-Wire Probes for Boundary-Layer Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tedjojuwono, Ken T.; Herring, Gregory C.

    2003-01-01

    Hot-wire probes having dimensions of the order of nanometers have been proposed for measuring temperatures (and possibly velocities) in boundary-layer flows at spatial resolutions much finer and distances from walls much smaller than have been possible heretofore. The achievable resolutions and minimum distances are expected to be of the order of tens of nanometers much less than a typical mean free path of a molecule and much less than the thickness of a typical flow boundary layer in air at standard temperature and pressure. An additional benefit of the small scale of these probes is that they would perturb the measured flows less than do larger probes. The hot-wire components of the probes would likely be made from semiconducting carbon nanotubes or ropes of such nanotubes. According to one design concept, a probe would comprise a single nanotube or rope of nanotubes laid out on the surface of an insulating substrate between two metallic wires. According to another design concept, a nanotube or rope of nanotubes would be electrically connected and held a short distance away from the substrate surface by stringing it between two metal electrodes. According to a third concept, a semiconducting nanotube or rope of nanotubes would be strung between the tips of two protruding electrodes made of fully conducting nanotubes or ropes of nanotubes. The figure depicts an array of such probes that could be used to gather data at several distances from a wall. It will be necessary to develop techniques for fabricating the probes. It will also be necessary to determine whether the probes will be strong enough to withstand the aerodynamic forces and impacts of micron-sized particles entrained in typical flows of interest.

  8. Numerical Computations of Hypersonic Boundary-Layer over Surface Irregularities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Chau-Lyan; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Li, Fei

    2010-01-01

    Surface irregularities such as protuberances inside a hypersonic boundary layer may lead to premature transition on the vehicle surface. Early transition in turn causes large localized surface heating that could damage the thermal protection system. Experimental measurements as well as numerical computations aimed at building a knowledge base for transition Reynolds numbers with respect to different protuberance sizes and locations have been actively pursued in recent years. This paper computationally investigates the unsteady wake development behind large isolated cylindrical roughness elements and the scaled wind-tunnel model of the trip used in a recent flight measurement during the reentry of space shuttle Discovery. An unstructured mesh, compressible flow solver based on the space-time conservation element, solution element (CESE) method is used to perform time-accurate Navier-Stokes calculations for the flow past a roughness element under several wind-tunnel conditions. For a cylindrical roughness element with a height to the boundary-layer thickness ratio from 0.8 to 2.5, the wake flow is characterized by a mushroom-shaped centerline streak and horse-shoe vortices. While time-accurate solutions converged to a steady-state for a ratio of 0.8, strong flow unsteadiness is present for a ratio of 1.3 and 2.5. Instability waves marked by distinct disturbance frequencies were found in the latter two cases. Both the centerline streak and the horse-shoe vortices become unstable downstream. The oscillatory vortices eventually reach an early breakdown stage for the largest roughness element. Spectral analyses in conjunction with the computed root mean square variations suggest that the source of the unsteadiness and instability waves in the wake region may be traced back to possible absolute instability in the front-side separation region.

  9. Foliar trichomes, boundary layers, and gas exchange in 12 species of epiphytic Tillandsia (Bromeliaceae).

    PubMed

    Benz, Brett W; Martin, Craig E

    2006-04-01

    We examined the relationships between H2O and CO2 gas exchange parameters and leaf trichome cover in 12 species of Tillandsia that exhibit a wide range in trichome size and trichome cover. Previous investigations have hypothesized that trichomes function to enhance boundary layers around Tillandsioid leaves thereby buffering the evaporative demand of the atmosphere and retarding transpirational water loss. Data presented herein suggest that trichome-enhanced boundary layers have negligible effects on Tillandsia gas exchange, as indicated by the lack of statistically significant relationships in regression analyses of gas exchange parameters and trichome cover. We calculated trichome and leaf boundary layer components, and their associated effects on H2O and CO2 gas exchange. The results further indicate trichome-enhanced boundary layers do not significantly reduce transpirational water loss. We conclude that although the trichomes undoubtedly increase the thickness of the boundary layer, the increase due to Tillandsioid trichomes is inconsequential in terms of whole leaf boundary layers, and any associated reduction in transpirational water loss is also negligible within the whole plant gas exchange pathway.

  10. Use of a membrane-bound fluorophore to characterize diffusion boundary layers around human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Williams, J B; Kutchai, H

    1986-02-01

    A novel method is used to demonstrate the presence of diffusion boundary layers around erythrocytes following rapid mixing in a stopped-flow spectrophotometer and to estimate the apparent dimensions of the diffusion boundary layers. Pink erythrocyte ghosts labeled on their external surfaces with tetramethyl rhodamine isothiocyanate (TRITC) were mixed in a stopped-flow apparatus with 50 mM NaI in Ringer's solutions. I- is an effective collisional quencher of TRITC fluorescence. TRITC fluorescence after flow stopped decreased monoexponentially with time. The concentration of I- at the cell surface as a function of time was estimated from the dependence of TRITC fluorescence on I- concentration in steady-state experiments. The kinetics of the increase in I- concentration at the cell surface was fit to two diffusional models: a planar erythrocyte ghost bounded by planar diffusion boundary layer and a spherical erythrocyte surrounded by a spherical shell diffusion boundary layer. The planar model best fits the experimental data with a diffusion boundary layer 4.68 microns thick. Using the spherical model the experimental data is best fit by a 6.9 microns diffusion boundary layer.

  11. Size distributions of boundary-layer clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Stull, R.; Berg, L.; Modzelewski, H.

    1996-04-01

    Scattered fair-weather clouds are triggered by thermals rising from the surface layer. Not all surface layer air is buoyant enough to rise. Also, each thermal has different humidities and temperatures, resulting in interthermal variability of their lifting condensation levels (LCL). For each air parcel in the surface layer, it`s virtual potential temperature and it`s LCL height can be computed.

  12. A New View on Origin, Role and Manipulation of Large Scales in Turbulent Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corke, T. C.; Nagib, H. M.; Guezennec, Y. G.

    1982-01-01

    The potential of passive 'manipulators' for altering the large scale turbulent structures in boundary layers was investigated. Utilizing smoke wire visualization and multisensor probes, the experiment verified that the outer scales could be suppressed by simple arrangements of parallel plates. As a result of suppressing the outer scales in turbulent layers, a decrease in the streamwise growth of the boundary layer thickness was achieved and was coupled with a 30 percent decrease in the local wall friction coefficient. After accounting for the drag on the manipulator plates, the net drag reduction reached a value of 20 percent within 55 boundary layer thicknesses downstream of the device. No evidence for the reoccurrence of the outer scales was present at this streamwise distance thereby suggesting that further reductions in the net drag are attainable. The frequency of occurrence of the wall events is simultaneously dependent on the two parameters, Re2 delta sub 2 and Re sub x. As a result of being able to independently control the inner and outer boundary layer characteristics with these manipulators, a different view of these layers emerged.

  13. Observations of the magnetopause current layer: Cases with no boundary layer and tests of recent models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eastman, Timothy E.

    1995-01-01

    Evidence for the probable existence of magnetospheric boundary layers was first presented by Hones, et al. (1972), based on VELA satellite plasma observations (no magnetic field measurements were obtained). This magnetotail boundary layer is now known to be the tailward extension of the high-latitude boundary layer or plasma mantle (first uniquely identified using HEOS 2 plasma and field observations by Rosenbauer et al., 1975) and the low-latitude boundary layer (first uniquely identified using IMP 6 plasma and field observations by Eastman et al., 1976). The magnetospheric boundary layer is the region of magnetosheath-like plasma located Earthward of, but generally contiguous with the magnetopause. This boundary layer is typically identified by comparing low-energy (less than 10 keV) ion spectra across the magnetopause. Low-energy electron measurements are also useful for identifying the boundary layer because the shocked solar wind or magnetosheath has a characteristic spectral signature for electrons as well. However, there are magnetopause crossings where low-energy electrons might suggest a depletion layer outside the magnetopause even though the traditional field-rotation signature indicates that this same region is a boundary layer Earthward of the current layer. Our analyses avoided crossings which exhibit such ambiguities. Pristine magnetopause crossings are magnetopause crossings for which the current layer is well defined and for which there is no adjoining magnetospheric boundary layer as defined above. Although most magnetopause models to date apply to such crossings, few comparisons between such theory and observations of pristine magnetopause crossings have been made because most crossings have an associated magnetospheric boundary layer which significantly affects the applicable boundary conditions for the magnetopause current layer. Furthermore, almost no observational studies of magnetopause microstructure have been done even though key

  14. Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness in Amblyopic Eyes

    PubMed Central

    Repka, Michael X.; Kraker, Raymond T.; Tamkins, Susanna M.; Suh, Donny W.; Sala, Nicholas A.; Beck, Roy W.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To compare the peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness of amblyopic and fellow eyes. We hypothesized that the RNFL of the amblyopic eye might be thinner. Design Prospective cross-sectional observational case series Methods Optical coherence tomography (OCT) of the peripapillary RNFL thickness of amblyopic and fellow eyes was performed in 37 patients age 7 to 12 years (mean 9.2 ± 1.5) with unilateral strabismic, anisometropic or combined mechanism amblyopia enrolled in a randomized treatment trial. Results Mean global RNFL thickness of the amblyopic and fellow eyes was 111.4 microns and 109.6 microns, respectively (mean difference = 1.8 microns thicker in the amblyopic eyes, 95% confidence interval -0.6 to +4.3 microns). The amblyopic eye was 8 or more microns thicker than the fellow eye in 9 patients (24%); the fellow eye was 8 or more microns thicker than the amblyopic eye in 2 patients (5%); and the difference was within test-retest variability (7 microns) in 26 patients (70%). Conclusions Our findings do not indicate that peripapillary RNFL thickness is thinner in eyes with moderate amblyopia compared with their fellow eyes. PMID:19327749

  15. High-resolution PIV measurements of a transitional shock wave-boundary layer interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giepman, R. H. M.; Schrijer, F. F. J.; van Oudheusden, B. W.

    2015-06-01

    This study investigates the effects of boundary layer transition on an oblique shock wave reflection. The Mach number was 1.7, the unit Reynolds number was 35 × 106 m-1, and the pressure ratio over the interaction was 1.35. Particle image velocimetry is used as the main flow diagnostics tool, supported by oil-flow and Schlieren visualizations. At these conditions, the thickness of the laminar boundary layer is only 0.2 mm, and seeding proved to be problematic as practically no seeding was recorded in the lower 40 % of the boundary layer. The top 60 % could, however, still be resolved with good accuracy and is found to be in good agreement with the compressible Blasius solution. Due to the effects of turbulent mixing, the near-wall seeding deficiency disappears when the boundary layer transitions to a turbulent state. This allowed the seeding distribution to be used as an indicator for the state of the boundary layer, permitting to obtain an approximate intermittency distribution for the boundary layer transition region. This knowledge was then used for positioning the oblique shock wave in the laminar, transitional (50 % intermittency) or turbulent region of the boundary layer. Separation is only recorded for the laminar and transitional interactions. For the laminar interaction, a large separation bubble is found, with a streamwise length of 96. The incoming boundary layer is lifted over the separation bubble and remains in a laminar state up to the impingement point of the shock wave. After the shock, transition starts and a turbulent profile is reached approximately 80-90 downstream of the shock. Under the same shock conditions, the transitional interaction displays a smaller separation bubble (43), and transition is found to be accelerated over the separation bubble.

  16. Oil shale ash-layer thickness and char combustion kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Aldis, D.F.; Singleton, M.F.; Watkins, B.E.; Thorsness, C.B.; Cena, R.J.

    1992-04-15

    A Hot-Recycled-Solids (HRS) oil shale retort is being studied at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. In the HRS process, raw shale is heated by mixing it with burnt retorted shale. Retorted shale is oil shale which has been heated in an oxygen deficient atmosphere to pyrolyze organic carbon, as kerogen into oil, gas, and a nonvolatile carbon rich residue, char. In the HRS retort process, the char in the spent shale is subsequently exposed to an oxygen environment. Some of the char, starting on the outer surface of the shale particle, is burned, liberating heat. In the HRS retort, the endothermic pyrolysis step is supported by heat from the exothermic char combustion step. The rate of char combustion is controlled by three resistances; the resistance of oxygen mass transfer through the gas film surrounding the solid particle, resistance to mass transfer through a ash layer which forms on the outside of the solid particles as the char is oxidized and the resistance due to the intrinsic chemical reaction rate of char and oxygen. In order to estimate the rate of combustion of the char in a typical oil shale particle, each of these resistances must be accurately estimated. We begin by modeling the influence of ash layer thickness on the over all combustion rate of oil shale char. We then present our experimental measurements of the ash layer thickness of oil shale which has been processed in the HRS retort.

  17. Flowfield measurements in a separated and reattached flat plate turbulent boundary layer. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick, W.P.

    1987-03-01

    The separation and reattachment of a large-scale, two-dimensional turbulent boundary layer at low subsonic speed on a flat plate has been studied experimentally. The separation bubble was 55 cm long and had a maximum bubble thickness, measured to the height of the mean dividing streamline, of 17 cm, which was twice the thickness of the inlet boundary layer. A combination of laser velocimetry, hot-wire anemometry, pneumatic probing techniques, and flow visualization were used as diagnostics. Principal findings were that an outer inviscid rotational flow was defined which essentially convected over the blockage associated with the inner, viscously dominated bubble recirculation region. A strong backflow region in which the flow moved upstream 100 percent of the time was measured near the test surface over the central 35 percent of the bubble. A laminar backflow boundary layer having pseudo-turbulent characteristics including a log-linear velocity profile was generated under the highly turbulent backflow. Velocity profile shapes in the reversed flow region matched a previously developed universal backflow profile at the upstream edge of the separation region but not in the steady backflow region downstream. A smoke flow visualization movie and hot-film measurements revealed low frequency nonperiodic flapping at reattachment. However, forward flow fraction data at reattachment and mean velocity profiles in the redeveloping boundary layer downstream of reattachment correlated with backward-facing step data when the axial dimension was scaled by the distance from the maximum bubble thickness to reattachment.

  18. Turbulent boundary-layer velocity profiles on a nonadiabatic at Mach number 6.5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keener, E. R.; Hopkins, E. J.

    1972-01-01

    Velocity profiles were obtained from pitot-pressure and total-temperature measurements within a turbulent boundary layer on a large sharp-edged flat plate. Momentum-thickness Reynolds number ranged from 2590 to 8860 and wall-to-adiabatic-wall temperature ratios ranged from 0.3 to 0.5. Measurements were made both with and without boundary layer trips. Five methods are evaluated for correlating the measured velocity profiles with the incompressible law-of-the-wall and the velocity defect law. The mixing-length generalization of Van Driest gives the best correlation.

  19. Energy efficient engine, low-pressure turbine boundary layer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, W. B.

    1981-01-01

    A study was conducted to investigate development of boundary layers under the influence of velocity distributions simulating the suction side of two state-of-the-art turbine airfoils: a forward loaded airfoil (squared-off design) and an aft loaded airfoil (aft-loaded design). These velocity distributions were simulated in a boundary layer wind tunnel. Detailed measurements of boundary layer mean velocity and turbulence intensity profiles were obtained for an inlet turbulence level of 2.4 percent and an exit Reynolds number of 800,000. Flush-mounted hot film probes identified the boundary layer transition regimes in the adverse pressure gradient regions for both velocity distributions. Wall intermittency data showed good agreement with the correlations of Dhawan and Narasimha for the intermittency factor distribution in transitional flow regimes.

  20. Impact of incident Mach wave on supersonic boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaganov, A. V.; Ermolaev, Yu. G.; Kolosov, G. L.; Kosinov, A. D.; Panina, A. V.; Semionov, N. V.; Yatskikh, A. A.

    2016-01-01

    Results of an experimental study of the excitation of high-intensity disturbances by a weak external shock wave in laminar boundary layer on flat-plate models with sharp and blunted leading edges at M = 2.5 are reported. The field of disturbances produced by a 2D sticker in turbulent boundary layer on the wall of wind-tunnel test section in the free stream is shown to have the form of an N-wave. It is found that, on the blunted plate, the intensity of pulsations produced by weak external shock waves in boundary layer several times exceeds the intensity of pulsations produced in boundary layer on the model with a sharp leading edge.

  1. Calculations of unsteady turbulent boundary layers with flow reversal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nash, J. F.; Patel, V. C.

    1975-01-01

    The results are presented of a series of computational experiments aimed at studying the characteristics of time-dependent turbulent boundary layers with embedded reversed-flow regions. A calculation method developed earlier was extended to boundary layers with reversed flows for this purpose. The calculations were performed for an idealized family of external velocity distributions, and covered a range of degrees of unsteadiness. The results confirmed those of previous studies in demonstrating that the point of flow reversal is nonsingular in a time-dependent boundary layer. A singularity was observed to develop downstream of reversal, under certain conditions, accompanied by the breakdown of the boundary-layer approximations. A tentative hypothesis was advanced in an attempt to predict the appearance of the singularity, and is shown to be consistent with the calculated results.

  2. A compressible boundary layer algorithm for use with SINDA '85

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakowski, Barbara; Darling, Douglas; Vandewall, Allan

    1992-01-01

    It is useful to interface a high-speed-flow solution and SINDA to analyze the thermal behavior of systems that include both conduction and high speed flows. When interfacing a high-speed-flow solution to SINDA, it may be necessary to include the viscous effects in the energy equations. Boundary layer effects of interest include heat transfer coefficients (including convection and viscous dissipation) and friction coefficients. To meet this need, a fast, uncoupled, compressible, two-dimensional, boundary layer algorithm was developed that can model flows with and without separation. This algorithm was used as a subroutine with SINDA. Given the core flow properties and the wall heat flux from SINDA, the boundary layer algorithm returns a wall temperature to SINDA and boundary layer algorithm are iterated until they predict the same wall temperature.

  3. Experimental measurements of unsteady turbulent boundary layers near separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    Investigations conducted to document the behavior of turbulent boundary layers on flat surfaces that separate due to adverse pressure gradients are reported. Laser and hot wire anemometers measured turbulence and flow structure of a steady free stream separating turbulent boundary layer produced on the flow of a wind tunnel section. The effects of sinusoidal and unsteadiness of the free stream velocity on this separating turbulent boundary layer at a reduced frequency were determined. A friction gage and a thermal tuft were developed and used to measure the surface skin friction and the near wall fraction of time the flow moves downstream for several cases. Abstracts are provided of several articles which discuss the effects of the periodic free stream unsteadiness on the structure or separating turbulent boundary layers.

  4. Accretion disc boundary layers around pre-main-sequence stars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godon, P.

    1996-04-01

    One-dimensional time-dependent calculations of geometrically thin accretion disc boundary layers in pre-main-sequence stars are carried out for mass-accretion rates in the range M˙ = 5×10-7 to 10-4 Msunyr-1, α = 0.005-0.3 and different inner boundary conditions on the temperature. Two kinds of solution are obtained: those with a distinct thermal boundary layer (BL) component and those without a thermal boundary layer. For M˙ up to ≍10-5Msunyr-1, and for a α > αcritic ≍ 0.04, solutions with a thermal BL are obtained. For M˙ ≍ 10-4Msunyr-1 or for α < αcritic solutions without a thermal BL are obtained. The inner boundary condition Fr = σTeff4 leads to hotter solutions and higher threshold values αcritic while the no-flux boundary condition dT/dr=0 leads to cooler solutions. For a very low mass-accretion rate (M˙ ≍ 5×10-7Msunyr-1), the temperature in the disc drops below 104K and the ionization front is adjacent to the outer edge of the hot thermal boundary layer. In the vicinity of the ionization front, the medium becomes slightly optically thin. For a very high mass accretion rate, advection of energy (ζ = Ladv/Lacc ≍ 0.1-0.2) from the boundary layer into the inner boundary becomes important, and the boundary layer luminosity is only a fraction of its expected value.

  5. Transport Processes in the Coastal Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    coastlines or boundary layer processes at the coast. The transported constituents may be properties of the marine boundary layer, e.g. humidity, air ... pollution or aerosols, the latter both of natural and man-made origin. In particular I am interested in the cross-coast mixing potential. By this I mean...speed maximas. Also some properties of the coastal marine air , e.g. the presence of aerosol and low clouds, are detrimental to remote sensing based on

  6. Tropical boundary layer equilibrium in the last ice age

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betts, Alan K.; Ridgway, W.

    1992-01-01

    A radiative-convective boundary layer model is used to assess the effect of changing sea surface temperature, pressure, wind speed, and the energy export from the tropics on the boundary layer equilibrium equivalent potential temperature. It remains difficult to reconcile the observations that during the last glacial maximum (18,000 yr BP) the snowline on the tropical mountains fell 950 m, while the tropical sea surface temperatures fell only 1-2 K.

  7. Acoustic sources in the low Mach number turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardin, Jay C.

    1991-01-01

    The sources of sound production in a low Mach number turbulent boundary layer are examined. The sources are shown to be quadrupole in nature and to result from supersonically convecting wave-number components of the fluctuating Reynolds' normal stresses. The primary Tollmien-Schlichting instability of the boundary layer is found to radiate no sound. Analysis of various vortical phenomena suggests that the primary source is the process of formation of horseshoe vortices, with viscous sublayer bursts a possible secondary source.

  8. Computation of Three-Dimensional Boundary Layers Including Separation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-02-01

    such boundary layers, the x-dependence is eliminated, so the integral equations give algebraic relationships between CE and the boundary layer...this way, the equations are transformed in a set of algebraic equations. One of the rules to construct a correct numerical approximation is the...to explain a departure from the isotropic eddy viscosity. The modelling of transport equations is often simplified to give the so-called algebraic

  9. Wave phenomena in a high Reynolds number compressible boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayliss, A.; Maestrello, L.; Parikh, P.; Turkel, E.

    1985-01-01

    Growth of unstable disturbances in a high Reynolds number compressible boundary layer is numerically simulated. Localized periodic surface heating and cooling as a means of active control of these disturbances is studied. It is shown that compressibility in itself stabilizes the flow but at a lower Mach number, significant nonlinear distortions are produced. Phase cancellation is shown to be an effective mechanism for active boundary layer control.

  10. Turbulent oceanic western-boundary layers at low latitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quam Cyrille Akuetevi, Cataria; Wirth, Achim

    2013-04-01

    Low latitude oceanic western-boundary layers range within the most turbulent regions in the worlds ocean. The Somali current system with the Great Whirl and the Brazilian current system with its eddy shedding are the most prominent examples. Results from analytical calculations and integration of a one layer reduced-gravity fine resolution shallow water model is used to entangle this turbulent dynamics. Two types of wind-forcing are applied: a remote Trade wind forcing with maximum shear along the equator and a local Monsoon wind forcing with maximum shear in the vicinity of the boundary. For high values of the viscosity (> 1000m2s-1) the stationary solutions compare well to analytical predictions using Munk and inertial layer theory. When lowering the friction parameter time dependence results. The onset of instability is strongly influenced by inertial effects. The unstable boundary current proceeds as a succession of anti-cyclonic coherent eddies performing a chaotic dynamics in a turbulent flow. The dynamics is governed by the turbulent fluxes of mass and momentum. We determine these fluxes by analyzing the (potential) vorticity dynamics. We demonstrate that the boundary-layer can be separated in four sub-layers, which are (starting from the boundary): (1) the viscous sub-layer (2) the turbulent buffer-layer (3) the layer containing the coherent structures and (4) the extended boundary layer. The characteristics of each sub-layer and the corresponding turbulent fluxes are determined, as are the dependence on latitude and the type of forcing. A new pragmatic method of determining the eddy viscosity, based on Munk-layer theory, is proposed. Results are compared to observations and solutions of the multi-level primitive equation model (DRAKKAR).

  11. Transient Heat Transfer in a Semitransparent Radiating Layer with Boundary Convection and Surface Reflections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, Robert

    1996-01-01

    Surface convection and refractive index are examined during transient radiative heating or cooling of a grey semitransparent layer with internal absorption, emission and conduction. Each side of the layer is exposed to hot or cold radiative surroundings, while each boundary is heated or cooled by convection. Emission within the layer and internal reflections depend on the layer refractive index. The reflected energy and heat conduction distribute energy across the layer and partially equalize the transient temperature distributions. Solutions are given to demonstrate the effect of radiative heating for layers with various optical thicknesses, the behavior of the layer heated by radiation on one side and convectively cooled on the other, and a layer heated by convection while being cooled by radiation. The numerical method is an implicit finite difference procedure with non-uniform space and time increments. The basic method developed in earlier work is expanded to include external convection and incident radiation.

  12. Experimental Study of Fillets to Reduce Corner Effects in an Oblique Shock-Wave/Boundary Layer Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirt, Stefanie M.

    2015-01-01

    A test was conducted in the 15 cm x 15 cm supersonic wind tunnel at NASA Glenn Research Center that focused on corner effects of an oblique shock-wave/boundary-layer interaction. In an attempt to control the interaction in the corner region, eight corner fillet configurations were tested. Three parameters were considered for the fillet configurations: the radius, the fillet length, and the taper length from the square corner to the fillet radius. Fillets effectively reduced the boundary-layer thickness in the corner; however, there was an associated penalty in the form of increased boundary-layer thickness at the tunnel centerline. Larger fillet radii caused greater reductions in boundary-layer thickness along the corner bisector. To a lesser, but measureable, extent, shorter fillet lengths resulted in thinner corner boundary layers. Overall, of the configurations tested, the largest radius resulted in the best combination of control in the corner, evidenced by a reduction in boundary-layer thickness, coupled with minimal impacts at the tunnel centerline.

  13. Usage of Neural Network to Predict Aluminium Oxide Layer Thickness

    PubMed Central

    Michal, Peter; Vagaská, Alena; Gombár, Miroslav; Kmec, Ján; Spišák, Emil; Kučerka, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    This paper shows an influence of chemical composition of used electrolyte, such as amount of sulphuric acid in electrolyte, amount of aluminium cations in electrolyte and amount of oxalic acid in electrolyte, and operating parameters of process of anodic oxidation of aluminium such as the temperature of electrolyte, anodizing time, and voltage applied during anodizing process. The paper shows the influence of those parameters on the resulting thickness of aluminium oxide layer. The impact of these variables is shown by using central composite design of experiment for six factors (amount of sulphuric acid, amount of oxalic acid, amount of aluminium cations, electrolyte temperature, anodizing time, and applied voltage) and by usage of the cubic neural unit with Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm during the results evaluation. The paper also deals with current densities of 1 A·dm−2 and 3 A·dm−2 for creating aluminium oxide layer. PMID:25922850

  14. Dense gas boundary layer experiments: Visualization, pressure measurements, concentration evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Reichenbach, H.; Neuwald, P.; Kuhl, A.L.

    1992-11-01

    This technical report describes methods that were applied to investigate turbulent boundary layers generated by inviscid, baroclinic effects. The Cranz-Schardin 24-sparks camera was used to visualize the interactions of a planar shock wave with a Freon R12-layer. The shock propagates more slowly in the Freon layer than in air because of its smaller sound speed. This causes the shock front to be curved and to be reflected between the wall and the layer interface. As a consequence of the reflection process, a series of compression and expansion waves radiate from the layer. Large fluctuations in the streamwise velocity and in pressure develop for about 1 ms. These waves strongly perturb the interface shear layer, which rapidly transitions to a turbulent boundary flow. Pressure measurements showed that the fluctuations in the Freon layer reach a peak pressure 4 times higher than in the turbulent boundary flow. To characterize the preshock Freon boundary layer, concentration measurements were performed with a differential interferometry technique. The refraction index of Freon R12 is so high that Mach-Zehnder interferometry was not successful in these experiments. The evaluation of the concentration profile is described here in detail. Method and results of corresponding LDV measurements under the same conditions are presented in a different report, EMI Report T 9/92. The authors plan to continue the dense gas layer investigations with the gas combination helium/Freon.

  15. Interaction between a compliant material and an unstable boundary layer flow

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, M.S.

    1988-05-01

    The response of a compliant coating to pressure fluctuations due to an unsteady boundary layer flow and the effect of the response on the stability of the flow field are examined. A pseudospectral solution of the Navier--Stokes equations is coupled to a finite element calculation of the behavior of the compliant material. In particular, the effect of material response on the growth rate of a Tollmien--Schlichting type instability in an unstable boundary layer is examined. Results are presented for three materials; a soft polyvinylchloride (PVC), a stiffer PVC, and a two-layer material consisting of a thick layer of soft PVC covered by a thin layer of neoprene. copyright 1988 Academic Press, Inc.

  16. Boundary Layer Flow Over a Moving Wavy Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendin, Gali; Toledo, Yaron

    2016-04-01

    Boundary Layer Flow Over a Moving Wavy Surface Gali Hendin(1), Yaron Toledo(1) January 13, 2016 (1)School of Mechanical Engineering, Tel-Aviv University, Israel Understanding the boundary layer flow over surface gravity waves is of great importance as various atmosphere-ocean processes are essentially coupled through these waves. Nevertheless, there are still significant gaps in our understanding of this complex flow behaviour. The present work investigates the fundamentals of the boundary layer air flow over progressive, small-amplitude waves. It aims to extend the well-known Blasius solution for a boundary layer over a flat plate to one over a moving wavy surface. The current analysis pro- claims the importance of the small curvature and the time-dependency as second order effects, with a meaningful impact on the similarity pattern in the first order. The air flow over the ocean surface is modelled using an outer, inviscid half-infinite flow, overlaying the viscous boundary layer above the wavy surface. The assumption of a uniform flow in the outer layer, used in former studies, is now replaced with a precise analytical solution of the potential flow over a moving wavy surface with a known celerity, wavelength and amplitude. This results in a conceptual change from former models as it shows that the pressure variations within the boundary layer cannot be neglected. In the boundary layer, time-dependent Navier-Stokes equations are formulated in a curvilinear, orthogonal coordinate system. The formulation is done in an elaborate way that presents additional, formerly neglected first-order effects, resulting from the time-varying coordinate system. The suggested time-dependent curvilinear orthogonal coordinate system introduces a platform that can also support the formulation of turbulent problems for any surface shape. In order to produce a self-similar Blasius-type solution, a small wave-steepness is assumed and a perturbation method is applied. Consequently, a

  17. High-order Finite Element Analysis of Boundary Layer Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Alvin; Sahni, Onkar

    2014-11-01

    Numerical analysis of boundary layer flows requires careful approximations, specifically the use of a mesh with layered and graded elements near the (viscous) walls. This is referred to as a boundary layer mesh, which for complex geometries is composed of triangular elements on the walls that are inflated or extruded into the volume along the wall-normal direction up to a desired height while the rest of the domain is filled with unstructured tetrahedral elements. Linear elements with C0 inter-element continuity are employed and in some situations higher order C0 elements are also used. However, these elements only enforce continuity whereas high-order smoothness is not attained as will be the case with C1 inter-element continuity and higher. As a result, C0 elements result in a poor approximation of the high-order boundary layer behavior. To achieve greater inter-element continuity in boundary layer region, we employ B-spline basis functions along the wall-normal direction (i.e., only in the layered portion of the mesh). In the rest of the fully unstructured mesh, linear or higher order C0 elements are used as appropriate. In this study we demonstrate the benefits of finite-element analysis based on such higher order and continuity basis functions for boundary layer flows.

  18. Application of a Reynolds stress model to separating boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, Sung HO

    1993-01-01

    Separating turbulent boundary layers occur in many practical engineering applications. Nonetheless, the physics of separation/reattachment of flows is poorly understood. During the past decade, various turbulence models were proposed and their ability to successfully predict some types of flows was shown. However. prediction of separating/reattaching flows is still a formidable task for model developers. The present study is concerned with the process of separation from a smooth surface. Features of turbulent separating boundary layers that are relevant to modeling include the following: the occurrence of zero wall shear stress, which causes breakdown of the boundary layer approximation; the law of the wall not being satisfied in the mean back flow region; high turbulence levels in the separated region; a significant low-frequency motion in the separation bubble; and the turbulence structure of the separated shear layer being quite different from that of either the mixing layers or the boundary layers. These special characteristics of separating boundary layers make it difficult for simple turbulence models to correctly predict their behavior.

  19. Matching boundary layer and inviscid flowfields at hypersonic speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harwell, Karen Elizabeth

    2000-10-01

    Boundary layer equations are developed and incorporated into an implicit finite-difference technique solving non-similar, axi-symmetric boundary layer equations for both laminar and turbulent flow. The new equations match all the boundary layer properties with the variation of the inviscid solution near the edge, except for the normal velocity. In this way entropy layer swallowing effects are automatically included in the solution. The method also incorporates more inviscid flowfield information into the boundary layer solution than other methods at a negligible increase in run-time. Results show that the new technique can provide improved heating rates and skin friction predictions for preliminary design of vehicles where shear layers and entropy layer swallowing are important. Solutions are presented for three sphere-cone configurations at high Mach number and comparisons are made with the SABLE boundary layer code, Navier-Stokes solutions, and Viscous Shock Layer solutions. Use of a new L'Hopital rule-based inviscid velocity gradient provides better prediction of stagnation-point heating rates. Heating rates are predicted more accurately in both the nose region and areas near the sphere-cone juncture than SABLE's final iteration. Shear stress results are also improved in the sphere-cone juncture area. The new technique's impact is seen readily in cases where the inviscid flowfield experiences velocity and enthalpy gradients near the wall. Little effect was seen on cases where the inviscid velocity ratios at the boundary layer edge was less than 1.5 and the enthalpy ratio greater than 0.9.

  20. A high-latitude, low-latitude boundary layer model of the convection current system

    SciTech Connect

    Siscoe, G.L. ); Lotko, W.; Sonnerup, B.U.O. )

    1991-03-01

    Observations suggest that both the high- and low-latitude boundary layers contribute to magnetospheric convection, and that their contributions are linked. In the interpretation pursued here, the high-latitude boundary layer (HBL) generates the voltage while the low-latitude boundary layer (LBL) generates the current for the part of the convection electric circuit that closes through the ionosphere. This paper gives a model that joins the high- and low-latitude boundary layers consistently with the ionospheric Ohm's law. It describes an electric circuit linking both boundary layers, the region 1 Birkeland currents, and the ionospheric Pedersen closure currents. The model works by using the convection electric field that the ionosphere receives from the HBL to determine two boundary conditions to the equations that govern viscous LBL-ionosphere coupling. The result provides the needed self-consistent coupling between the two boundary layers and fully specifies the solution for the viscous LBL-ionosphere coupling equations. The solution shows that in providing the current required by the ionospheric Ohm's law, the LBL needs only a tenth of the voltage that spans the HBL. The solution also gives the latitude profiles of the ionospheric electric field, parallel currents, and parallel potential. It predicts that the plasma in the inner part of the LBL moves sunward instead of antisunward and that, as the transpolar potential decreases below about 40 kV, reverse polarity (region 0) currents appear at the poleward border of the region 1 currents. A possible problem with the model is its prediction of a thin boundary layer ({approximately}1000 km), whereas thicknesses inferred from satellite data tend to be greater.

  1. Validation of High-Speed Turbulent Boundary Layer and Shock-Boundary Layer Interaction Computations with the OVERFLOW Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliver, A. B.; Lillard, R. P.; Blaisdell, G. A.; Lyrintizis, A. S.

    2006-01-01

    The capability of the OVERFLOW code to accurately compute high-speed turbulent boundary layers and turbulent shock-boundary layer interactions is being evaluated. Configurations being investigated include a Mach 2.87 flat plate to compare experimental velocity profiles and boundary layer growth, a Mach 6 flat plate to compare experimental surface heat transfer,a direct numerical simulation (DNS) at Mach 2.25 for turbulent quantities, and several Mach 3 compression ramps to compare computations of shock-boundary layer interactions to experimental laser doppler velocimetry (LDV) data and hot-wire data. The present paper describes outlines the study and presents preliminary results for two of the flat plate cases and two small-angle compression corner test cases.

  2. Unsteady boundary layers on a flat plate disturbed by periodic wakes. Part 2: Measurements of unsteady boundary layers and discussion

    SciTech Connect

    Funazaki, K.

    1996-04-01

    As the second part of the study, detailed hot-wire anemometry measurements of wake-affected boundary layers on the flat plate are made. These measurements are organized in order, first, to check the standpoint of the modeling of the wake-induced transition proposed in Part 1, and second, to observe wake-boundary layer interaction in detail from a viewpoint of direct and indirect effect of the wake passage upon turbulent spot generation within the boundary layer, as described by Walker (1993). The validity of the presumed state of the wake-affected boundary layer in the distance-time domain, which constitutes the basis of the transition model, is confirmed to great extent. However, it is also found that the criterion for the onset of the wake-induced transition adopted in Part 1 should be reconsidered. Some successful attempts are therefore made to specify the transition onset.

  3. Ultrasonic eggshell thickness measurement for selection of layers.

    PubMed

    Kibala, Lucyna; Rozempolska-Rucinska, Iwona; Kasperek, Kornel; Zieba, Grzegorz; Lukaszewicz, Marek

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to develop a methodology for using ultrasonic technology (USG) to record eggshell thickness for selection of layers. Genetic correlations between eggshell strength and its thickness have been reported to be around 0.8, making shell thickness a selection index candidate element. Applying ultrasonic devices to measure shell thickness leaves an egg intact for further handling. In this study, eggs from 2 purebred populations of Rhode Island White (RIW) and Rhode Island Red (RIR) hens were collected on a single day in the 33rd week of the farm laying calendar from 2,414 RIR and 4,525 RIW hens. Beginning from the large end of the egg, measurements were taken at 5 latitudes: 0º (USG0), 45º (USG45), 90º (USG90), 135º (USG135), and 180º (USG180). To estimate the repeatability of readings, measurements were repeated at each parallel on 3 meridians. Electronic micrometer measurement ( EMM: ) were taken with an electronic micrometer predominantly at the wider end of eggs from 2,397 RIR and 4,447 RIW hens. A multiple-trait statistical model fit the fixed effect of year-of-hatch × hatch-within-year, and random effects due to repeated measurements (except EMM) and an animal's additive genetic component. The shell was thinnest in the region where chicks break it upon hatching (USG0, USG45). Heritabilities of shell thickness in different regions of the shell ranged from 0.09 to 0.19 (EMM) in RIW and from 0.12 to 0.23 (EMM) in RIR and were highest for USG45 and USG0. Because the measurement repeatabilities were all above 0.90, our recommendation for balancing egg strength against hatching ease is to take a single measurement of USG45. Due to high positive genetic correlations between shell thickness in different regions of the shell its thickness in the pointed end region will be modified accordingly, in response to selection for USG45.

  4. The separated turbulent boundary layer over a wavy wall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polak, A.; Werle, M. J.

    1977-01-01

    A study and application of the fourth order spline collocation procedure, numerical solution of boundary layer like differential equations, is presented. A simple inversion algorithm for the simultaneous solution of the resulting difference equations is given. Particular attention is focused on the boundary condition representation for the spline second derivative approximations. Solutions using the spline procedure, as well as the three point finite difference method, are presented for several model problems in order to assess and improve the spline numerical scheme. Application of the resulting algorithm to the incompressible laminar self similar boundary layer equations is presented.

  5. Structure of a mushy layer at the inner core boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deguen, R.; Huguet, L.; Bergman, M. I.; Labrosse, S.; Alboussiere, T.

    2015-12-01

    We present experimental results on the solidification of ammonium chloride from an aqueous solution, yielding a mushy zone, under hyper-gravity. A commercial centrifuge has been equipped with a slip-ring so that electric power, temperature and ultrasonic signals could be transmitted between the experimental setup and the laboratory. A Peltier element provides cooling at the bottom of the cell. Probes monitor the temperature along the height of the cell. Ultrasound measurements (2 to 6 MHz) is used to detect the position of the front of the mushy zone and to determine attenuation in the mush. A significant increase of solid fraction (or decrease of mushy layer thickness) and attenuation in the mush is observed as gravity is increased. Kinetic undercooling is significant in our experiments and has been included in a macroscopic mush model. The other ingredients of the model are conservation of energy and chemical species, along with heat/species transfer between the mush and the liquid phase: boundary-layer exchanges at the top of the mush and bulk convection within the mush (formation of chimneys). The outputs of the model compare well with our experiments. We have then run the model in a range of parameters suitable for the Earth's inner core, which has shown the role of bulk mush convection for the inner core and the reason why a solid fraction very close to unity should be expected. We have also run melting experiments: after crystallization of a mush, the liquid has been heated from above until the mush started to melt, while the bottom cold temperature was maintained. These melting experiments were motivated by the possible local melting at the inner core boundary that has been invoked to explain the formation of the anomalously slow F-layer at the bottom of the outer core or inner core hemispherical asymmetry. Oddly, the consequences of melting are an increase in solid fraction and a decrease in attenuation. It is hence possible that surface seismic velocity

  6. Predicting the mean fields of compressible turbulent boundary layer via a symmetry approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Wei-Tao; Wu, Bin; She, Zhen-Su

    2016-11-01

    A symmetry approach for canonical wall turbulence is extended to develop mean-field predictions for compressible turbulent boundary layer (CTBL). A stress length and a weighted heat flux length are identified to obey the multilayer dilation symmetry of canonical flows, giving rise to predictions of the mean velocity and temperature profiles for a range of Reynolds number (Re), Mach number (Ma) and wall temperature (Tw). Also predicted are the streamwise developments of the shape factor, the boundary layer edge velocity and the boundary layer thicknesses, etc. Only three parameters are involved in the predictions, which have sound physics and organized behaviors with respect to the Re, Ma and Tw effects. The predictions are extensively validated by direct numerical simulation and experimental data, showing better accuracies than the previous theories. The results provide new quantifications that can be used to assess computations, measurements and turbulence models of CTBL, as well as to provide new insights for the CTBL physics.

  7. Experimental study of nozzle wall boundary layers at Mach numbers 20 to 47

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kemp, J. H., Jr.; Owen, F. K.

    1972-01-01

    The nozzle wall boundary layer of an M-50 helium tunnel was investigated with pitot pressure, total temperature, skin friction, and wall heat transfer measurements at five stations and hot wire measurements at two stations. The results indicated that the boundary layer was turbulent with a thick viscous sublayer. Pressure gradients were observed across the boundary layer; the effect of these gradients on the equations of motion are discussed. The direct skin friction measurements were higher than expected from empirical predictions; the Reynolds analogy factors however were lower than expected. Hot wire measurements indicated mass flow fluctuations as large as 80 percent of the local mean mass flow at the edge of the viscous sublayer with a maximum value relative to the edge mass flow of about 15 percent at gamma about equal to 0.8.

  8. Boundary-Layer Effects on Acoustic Transmission Through Narrow Slit Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, G. P.; Lovelock, R. K.; Murray, A. R. J.; Hibbins, A. P.; Sambles, J. R.; Smith, J. D.

    2015-07-01

    We explore the slit-width dependence of the resonant transmission of sound in air through both a slit array formed of aluminum slats and a single open-ended slit cavity in an aluminum plate. Our experimental results accord well with Lord Rayleigh's theory concerning how thin viscous and thermal boundary layers at a slit's walls affect the acoustic wave across the whole slit cavity. By measuring accurately the frequencies of the Fabry-Perot-like cavity resonances, we find a significant 5% reduction in the effective speed of sound through the slits when an individual viscous boundary layer occupies only 5% of the total slit width. Importantly, this effect is true for any airborne slit cavity, with the reduction being achieved despite the slit width being on a far larger scale than an individual boundary layer's thickness. This work demonstrates that the recent prevalent loss-free treatment of narrow slit cavities within acoustic metamaterials is unrealistic.

  9. Aerodynamic heating in gaps of thermal protection system tile arrays in laminar and turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avery, D. E.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental heat-transfer investigation was conducted on two staggered arrays of metallic tiles in laminar and turbulent boundary layers. This investigation was conducted for two purposes. The impingement heating distribution where flow in a longitudinal gap intersects a transverse gap and impinges on a downstream blocking tile was defined. The influence of tile and gap geometries was analyzed to develop empirical relationships for impingement heating in laminar and turbulent boundary layers. Tests were conducted in a high temperature structures tunnel at a nominal Mach number of 7, a nominal total temperature of 1800 K, and free-stream unit Reynolds numbers from 1.0 x 10 million to 4.8 x 10 million per meter. The test results were used to assess the impingement heating effects produced by parameters that include gap width, longitudinal gap length, slope of the tile forward-facing wall, boundary-layer displacement thickness, Reynolds number, and local surface pressure.

  10. Boundary-Layer Effects on Acoustic Transmission Through Narrow Slit Cavities.

    PubMed

    Ward, G P; Lovelock, R K; Murray, A R J; Hibbins, A P; Sambles, J R; Smith, J D

    2015-07-24

    We explore the slit-width dependence of the resonant transmission of sound in air through both a slit array formed of aluminum slats and a single open-ended slit cavity in an aluminum plate. Our experimental results accord well with Lord Rayleigh's theory concerning how thin viscous and thermal boundary layers at a slit's walls affect the acoustic wave across the whole slit cavity. By measuring accurately the frequencies of the Fabry-Perot-like cavity resonances, we find a significant 5% reduction in the effective speed of sound through the slits when an individual viscous boundary layer occupies only 5% of the total slit width. Importantly, this effect is true for any airborne slit cavity, with the reduction being achieved despite the slit width being on a far larger scale than an individual boundary layer's thickness. This work demonstrates that the recent prevalent loss-free treatment of narrow slit cavities within acoustic metamaterials is unrealistic.

  11. An Evaluation of Four Experimental Methods for Measuring Mean Properties of a Supersonic Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nothwang, George J

    1957-01-01

    Surveys were made through a turbulent boundary layer on a flat plate by means of a pitot probe, an x-ray densitometer, and hot-wire and cold-wire probes. Results from these surveys were analyzed to determine (a) the reliability of the basic data and hence the methods by which they were obtained, and (b) how well the actual distributions of properties in the boundary layer compare with those commonly assumed in semiempirical and theoretical analyses. All surveys were made at the same longitudinal station on the flat plate. The tests were conducted in a an 8- by 8-inch supersonic nozzle. The free-stream Mach number was 3.03 and the Reynolds number was approximately 210,000 based on boundary-layer thickness.

  12. Wall Cooling Effects on Hypersonic Transitional/Turbulent Boundary Layers at High Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Ralph D.

    1975-01-01

    A 4 degree wedge was used to produce a thick turbulent boundary layer with an edge Mach number of 11. By using a two-dimensional model, the boundary layer was nearly free from upstream history effects associated with nozzle wall turbulent boundary layers. Heat-transfer distributions were used to define regions of laminar, transitional, and turbulent flow at several values of T(sub w)/T(sub t) for an edge unit Reynolds number of 0.47 x lot per cm. Pitot and total temperature profiles and skin-friction measurements were obtained at selected stations along the model. Turbulence parameters (mixing length/sigma and epsilon) were derived from the fully turbulent profiles and used to more completely define the "low Reynolds number" effect. Turbulent Prandtl number distributions are also presented.

  13. The effects of anisotropic free-stream turbulence on turbulent boundary layer behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang-Wei, F.; Hoffman, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of near-isotropic and highly anisotropic free-stream turbulence on mean flow properties of the turbulence structure of turbulent boundary layers in a near zero pressure gradient flow has been experimentally evaluated. Turbulence levels vary from 0.5% to 8.0% and the momentum thickness Reynolds number varies from 800 to 1100. The results indicate that the effects of free-stream turbulence on the classical boundary layer properties for near-isotropic turbulence which have been published by other investigators are similar to the case of highly anisotropic turbulence fields, while the effects of free-stream turbulence on the properties of the turbulent structure within the boundary layer for the case of near-isotropic turbulence are quite different compared to the highly anisotropic case.

  14. Beam stresses induced by a turbulent boundary layer and simulated with a reverberant acoustic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutzenhofer, L. A.

    1981-01-01

    Unsteady pressure fluctuations are a feature of the flow field of an airplane or a space vehicle in atmospheric flight. Undesirable effects of these fluctuations range from internal (cabin) noise to structural fatigue and damage of avionic and ordnance systems. The integrity to withstand these fluctuating loads is established through reverberant room acoustical qualification testing. The purpose of this paper is to develop a methodology of simulating turbulent boundary layer fluctuating pressure loading for a simply supported beam with a reverberant acoustic field. This goal was accomplished using normal mode vibration analysis. The main results were developed in terms of dimensionless quantities such as turbulent boundary layer spectrums, reverberant acoustical field simulation spectrums, and stress response spectrums with parameters: dimensionless fundamental frequency, Mach number, and relative boundary layer displacement thickness.

  15. ON AERODYNAMIC AND BOUNDARY LAYER RESISTANCES WITHIN DRY DEPOSITION MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    There have been many empirical parameterizations for the aerodynamic and boundary layer resistances proposed in the literature, e.g. those of the Meyers Multi-Layer Deposition Model (MLM) used with the nation-wide dry deposition network. Many include arbitrary constants or par...

  16. Boundary Layer Parameterization for a Global Spectral Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-27

    assume an upside down structure with the main source of shear generation occurring near the top of the surface invesion layer (Mahrt, 1985). The local...1980: The structure of a fair weather boundary layer Nkcho!ls, S. based on the results of several inasuarement strategies . Mon. Wea. Rev., 108, 349-364

  17. Diffusion or advection? Mass transfer and complex boundary layer landscapes of the brown alga Fucus vesiculosus.

    PubMed

    Lichtenberg, Mads; Nørregaard, Rasmus Dyrmose; Kühl, Michael

    2017-03-01

    The role of hyaline hairs on the thallus of brown algae in the genus Fucus is long debated and several functions have been proposed. We used a novel motorized set-up for two-dimensional and three-dimensional mapping with O2 microsensors to investigate the spatial heterogeneity of the diffusive boundary layer (DBL) and O2 flux around single and multiple tufts of hyaline hairs on the thallus of Fucus vesiculosus. Flow was a major determinant of DBL thickness, where higher flow decreased DBL thickness and increased O2 flux between the algal thallus and the surrounding seawater. However, the topography of the DBL varied and did not directly follow the contour of the underlying thallus. Areas around single tufts of hyaline hairs exhibited a more complex mass-transfer boundary layer, showing both increased and decreased thickness when compared with areas over smooth thallus surfaces. Over thallus areas with several hyaline hair tufts, the overall effect was an apparent increase in the boundary layer thickness. We also found indications for advective O2 transport driven by pressure gradients or vortex shedding downstream from dense tufts of hyaline hairs that could alleviate local mass-transfer resistances. Mass-transfer dynamics around hyaline hair tufts are thus more complex than hitherto assumed and may have important implications for algal physiology and plant-microbe interactions.

  18. An experimental investigation of turbulent boundary layers along curved surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    So, R. M. C.; Mellor, G. L.

    1972-01-01

    A curved wall tunnel was designed, and an equilibrium turbulent boundary layer was set up on the straight section preceding the curved test section. Turbulent boundary layer flows with uniform and adverse pressure distributions along convex and concave walls were investigated. Hot-wire measurements along the convex surface indicated that turbulent mixing between fluid layers was very much reduced. However, the law of the wall held and the skin friction, thus determined, correlated well with other measurements. Hot-wire measurements along the concave test wall revealed a system of longitudinal vortices inside the boundary layer and confirmed that concave curvature enhances mixing. A self-consistent set of turbulent boundary layer equations for flows along curved surfaces was derived together with a modified eddy viscosity. Solution of these equations together with the modified eddy viscosity gave results that correlated well with the present data on flows along the convex surface with arbitrary pressure distribution. However, it could only be used to predict the mean characteristics of the flow along concave walls because of the existence of the system of longitudinal vortices inside the boundary layer.

  19. A numerical investigation of boundary layer quasi-equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thayer-Calder, K.; Randall, David

    2015-01-01

    Despite the large energy input from surface evaporation, the moist static energy (MSE) of the tropical boundary layer remains relatively constant on large spatial and temporal scales due to lifting of vapor by cloudy updrafts and the addition of dry air from the layers above. Arakawa and Schubert (1974) suggested that drying is due mainly to clear-air turbulent entrainment between cloudy updrafts, while Raymond (1995) described drying due mainly to convective downdrafts. We used cloud-resolving numerical simulations to investigate the transport of MSE into the boundary layer and found turbulent entrainment between clouds to be the dominant process.

  20. Numerical Studies of Boundary-Layer Receptivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Helen L.

    1995-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of the acoustic receptivity process on a semi-infinite flat plate with a modified-super-elliptic (MSE) leading edge are performed. The incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved in stream-function/vorticity form in a general curvilinear coordinate system. The steady basic-state solution is found by solving the governing equations using an alternating direction implicit (ADI) procedure which takes advantage of the parallelism present in line-splitting techniques. Time-harmonic oscillations of the farfield velocity are applied as unsteady boundary conditions to the unsteady disturbance equations. An efficient time-harmonic scheme is used to produce the disturbance solutions. Buffer-zone techniques have been applied to eliminate wave reflection from the outflow boundary. The spatial evolution of Tollmien-Schlichting (T-S) waves is analyzed and compared with experiment and theory. The effects of nose-radius, frequency, Reynolds number, angle of attack, and amplitude of the acoustic wave are investigated. This work is being performed in conjunction with the experiments at the Arizona State University Unsteady Wind Tunnel under the direction of Professor William Saric. The simulations are of the same configuration and parameters used in the wind-tunnel experiments.

  1. Boundary Layer CO2 budgets at long timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, I. N.; Riley, W. J.; Berry, J. A.; Torn, M. S.; Biraud, S.

    2009-12-01

    This study demonstrates a strong timescale dependence of boundary layer entrainment and storage in six years of high frequency observations from the U.S. Southern Great Plains Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility. A scalar conservation equation was applied to aircraft and tower CO2 measurements, soundings, eddy covariance fluxes, cloud radar, and mesoscale model analyses, over a range of timescales from diurnal to annual. Entrainment fluxes and storage become order of magnitude smaller than large-scale vertical and horizontal advection at seasonal and longer timescales and order of magnitude larger than advection at diurnal and shorter timescales. The results are compactly summarized in terms of a dimensionless number involving a residence time calculated from large-scale (vertical) wind velocity and boundary layer depth. This number provides a useful metric for determining the validity of equilibrium boundary layer theory versus traditional boundary layer budgets. The implication of this study for annual mean surface flux inversions is that large scale transport and convective cloud mass fluxes are more likely sources of transport model error than high frequency fluctuations (i.e. diurnal) in boundary layer concentrations and depth. The implication for field studies of boundary layer scalar budgets is that the results of any one study are relevant only in the context of the timescale over which the measurements were sampled or averaged. This timescale dependence is also seen over a wider range of meteorological conditions and surface vegetation types at measurements sites across the Northern Hemisphere. We conclude that the relevant physics associated with boundary layer scalar budgets are a function of the time scale of interest.

  2. Shock-like structures in the tropical cyclone boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Gabriel J.; Taft, Richard K.; McNoldy, Brian D.; Schubert, Wayne H.

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents high horizontal resolution solutions of an axisymmetric, constant depth, slab boundary layer model designed to simulate the radial inflow and boundary layer pumping of a hurricane. Shock-like structures of increasing intensity appear for category 1-5 hurricanes. For example, in the category 3 case, the u>(∂u/∂r>) term in the radial equation of motion produces a shock-like structure in the radial wind, i.e., near the radius of maximum tangential wind the boundary layer radial inflow decreases from approximately 22 m s-1 to zero over a radial distance of a few kilometers. Associated with this large convergence is a spike in the radial distribution of boundary layer pumping, with updrafts larger than 22 m s-1 at a height of 1000 m. Based on these model results, it is argued that observed hurricane updrafts of this magnitude so close to the ocean surface are attributable to the dry dynamics of the frictional boundary layer rather than moist convective dynamics. The shock-like structure in the boundary layer radial wind also has important consequences for the evolution of the tangential wind and the vertical component of vorticity. On the inner side of the shock the tangential wind tendency is essentially zero, while on the outer side of the shock the tangential wind tendency is large due to the large radial inflow there. The result is the development of a U-shaped tangential wind profile and the development of a thin region of large vorticity. In many respects, the model solutions resemble the remarkable structures observed in the boundary layer of Hurricane Hugo (1989).

  3. Theory of the low-latitude boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnerup, B. U. OE.

    1980-01-01

    A one-dimensional steady state fluid mechanical model is developed of the low-latitude plasma boundary layer inside the dawn and dusk magnetopause. Momentum transfer in the layer is produced by viscosity and/or mass diffusion. Coupling to the ionosphere is achieved via field-aligned currents, the magnitude of which is limited by parallel potential drops. These currents flow into and out of the ionosphere in the manner described by Iijima and Potemra. The higher-latitude (region 1) currents are associated with the boundary layer proper, while the lower-latitude (region 2) ones are associated with a region of sunward return flow adjacent to the boundary layer. The parallel potential drops have a magnitude of typically 2-3 kV and a north-south extent of 100-200 km. The calculated potential profile corresponds reasonably well to observed inverted V precipitation events.

  4. Feasibility study of optical boundary layer transition detection method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azzazy, M.; Modarress, D.; Trolinger, J. D.

    1986-01-01

    A high sensitivity differential interferometer was developed to locate the region where the boundary layer flow undergoes transition from laminar to turbulent. Two laboratory experimental configurations were used to evaluate the performance of the interferometer: open shear layer, and low speed wind tunnel turbulent spot configuration. In each experiment, small temperature fluctuations were introduced as the signal source. Simultaneous cold wire measurements were compared with the interferometer data. The comparison shows that the interferometer is sensitive to very weak phase variations in the order of 0.001 the laser wavelength. An attempt to detect boundary layer transition over a flat plate at NASA-Langley Unitary Supersonic Wind Tunnel using the interferometer system was performed. The phase variations during boundary layer transition in the supersonic wind tunnel were beyond the minimum signal-to-noise level of the instrument.

  5. Direct Numerical Simulations of Very Stable Atmospheric Boundary Layers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-10

    Ekman boundary layers. Very high resolution, three-dimensional, time-dependent simulations are carried out on computational grids of the order of...turbulent Ekman layers", Annual Meeting of the Division of Fluid Dynamics of the American Physical Society, Long Beach. O Flores and JJ Riley. August...September, 2011. "DNS of a strati ed Ekman layer with a capping inversion", 13th European Turbulence Conference, Warsaw, Poland. Number of

  6. Curvature Effects of Three-Dimensional Thick Stern Boundary Layers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    J.L. Hess I Woods Hole/Ocean Eng I Newport News Shipbuilding/Lib I Worchester P1/Tech Lib I Nielsen Eng & Research I SNAME/Tech Lib I Northrop Corp...McCarthy 1 54 P. Granville - 1 1542 T.T. Huang I N.C. Groves 15 Y.T. Lee *I M.S. Chang * -I F. Noblesse I D. Hendrix *1 1544 F. Peterson 1 156 D.S

  7. Nature, theory and modelling of geophysical convective planetary boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zilitinkevich, Sergej

    2015-04-01

    Geophysical convective planetary boundary layers (CPBLs) are still poorly reproduced in oceanographic, hydrological and meteorological models. Besides the mean flow and usual shear-generated turbulence, CPBLs involve two types of motion disregarded in conventional theories: 'anarchy turbulence' comprised of the buoyancy-driven plumes, merging to form larger plumes instead of breaking down, as postulated in conventional theory (Zilitinkevich, 1973), large-scale organised structures fed by the potential energy of unstable stratification through inverse energy transfer in convective turbulence (and performing non-local transports irrespective of mean gradients of transporting properties). C-PBLs are strongly mixed and go on growing as long as the boundary layer remains unstable. Penetration of the mixed layer into the weakly turbulent, stably stratified free flow causes turbulent transports through the CPBL outer boundary. The proposed theory, taking into account the above listed features of CPBL, is based on the following recent developments: prognostic CPBL-depth equation in combination with diagnostic algorithm for turbulence fluxes at the CPBL inner and outer boundaries (Zilitinkevich, 1991, 2012, 2013; Zilitinkevich et al., 2006, 2012), deterministic model of self-organised convective structures combined with statistical turbulence-closure model of turbulence in the CPBL core (Zilitinkevich, 2013). It is demonstrated that the overall vertical transports are performed mostly by turbulence in the surface layer and entrainment layer (at the CPBL inner and outer boundaries) and mostly by organised structures in the CPBL core (Hellsten and Zilitinkevich, 2013). Principal difference between structural and turbulent mixing plays an important role in a number of practical problems: transport and dispersion of admixtures, microphysics of fogs and clouds, etc. The surface-layer turbulence in atmospheric and marine CPBLs is strongly enhanced by the velocity shears in

  8. The Boundary Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lothon, Marie; Lohou, Fabienne; Darbieu, Clara; Couvreux, Fleur; Pino, David; Blay, Estel; Vila-Guerau de Arellano, Jordi; Pietersen, Henk; Hartogensis, Oscar; Pardyjak, Eric; Alexander, Daniel; Reuder, Joachim; Baaserud, Line; Nilsson, Erik; Jimenez, Maria Antonia; Faloona, Ian; Sastre-Marugan, Mariano; Angevine, Wayne M.; Canut, Guylaine; Bazile, Eric

    2014-05-01

    The BLLAST (Boundary Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence) project aims at better understanding the turbulence processes which occur during the transition from a well-mixed convective boundary layer to a residual layer overlying a stabilized nocturnal layer. This phase of the diurnal cycle is challenging from both modeling and observational perspectives: it is transitory, most of the forcings are small or null during the transition and the turbulence regime changes from the fully convective regime of turbulence, close to homogeneous and isotropic, toward more heterogeneous and intermittent turbulence during its decay. Those issues motivated a field campaign that was conducted from 14 June to 8 July 2011 in southern France in complex terrain and consisted of a range of integrated instrument platforms including: full-size aircraft, Remotely Piloted Airplane Systems (RPAS), remote sensing instruments, radiosoundings, tethered balloons, surface flux stations, and various meteorological towers deployed over different surface covers. The boundary layer, from the earth's surface to free troposphere was densely probed during the entire day, with a focus and intense observations from midday until sunset. The field dataset now forms the base of a set of studies utilizing the observations and several types of models including: Large Eddy Simulation, Mesoscale models, forecast models. The presentation will expose an overview of this experiment and of the current observational and modeling studies, with the focus on: the turbulence decay process within the entire boundary layer from surface to the top, the mesoscale forcings of importance during BLLAST, the ability of the forecast models to represent the diurnal cycle, the relevance of the Monin Obukhov similarity theory, and shallow drainage flows. Reference: Lothon M. et al., 2012. The Boundary-Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence field experiment, Proc. of the 20th Symposium on Boundary-Layers and Turbulence, 7

  9. Spatio-temporal modeling of Active Layer Thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Touyz, J.; Apanasovich, T. V.; Streletskiy, D. A.; Shiklomanov, N. I.

    2015-12-01

    Arctic Regions are experiencing an unprecedented rate of environmental and climate change. The active layer (the uppermost layer of soil between the atmosphere and permafrost that freezes in winter and thaws in summer) is sensitive to both climate and environmental changes and plays an important role in the functioning of Arctic ecosystems, planning, and economic activities. Knowledge about spatio-temporal variability of ALT is crucial for environmental and engineering applications. The objective of this study is to provide the methodology to model and estimate spatio-temporal variation in the active layer thickness (ALT) at several sites located in the Circumpolar region spanning the Alaska North Slope, and to demonstrate its use in spatio-temporal interpolation as well as time-forward prediction. In our data analysis we estimate a parametric trend and examine residuals for the presence of spatial and temporal dependence. We propose models that provide a description of residual space-time variability in ALT. Formulations that take into account interaction among spatial and temporal components are also developed. Moreover, we compare our models to naive models in which residual spatio-temporal and temporal correlations are not considered. The predicted root mean squared and absolute errors are significantly reduced when our approach is employed. While the methodology is developed in the context of ALT, it can also be applied to model and predict other environmental variables which use similar spatio-temporal sampling designs.

  10. Coordinated Parameterization Development and Large-Eddy Simulation for Marine and Arctic Cloud-Topped Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bretherton, Christopher S.

    1998-01-01

    The goal of this project was to compare observations of marine and arctic boundary layers with (i) parameterization systems used in climate and weather forecast models, and (ii) two and three dimensional eddy resolving (LES) models for turbulent fluid flow. Based on this comparison, we hoped to better understand, predict, and parameterize the boundary layer structure and cloud amount, type and thickness as functions of large scale conditions that are predicted by global climate models.

  11. Vortex Generators to Control Boundary Layer Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babinsky, Holger (Inventor); Loth, Eric (Inventor); Lee, Sang (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Devices for generating streamwise vorticity in a boundary includes various forms of vortex generators. One form of a split-ramp vortex generator includes a first ramp element and a second ramp element with front ends and back ends, ramp surfaces extending between the front ends and the back ends, and vertical surfaces extending between the front ends and the back ends adjacent the ramp surfaces. A flow channel is between the first ramp element and the second ramp element. The back ends of the ramp elements have a height greater than a height of the front ends, and the front ends of the ramp elements have a width greater than a width of the back ends.

  12. Evaluation of Flush-Mounted, S-Duct Inlets With Large Amounts of Boundary Layer Ingestion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berrier, Bobby L.; Morehouse, Melissa B.

    2003-01-01

    A new high Reynolds number test capability for boundary layer ingesting inlets has been developed for the NASA Langley Research Center 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel. Using this new capability, an experimental investigation of four S-duct inlet configurations with large amounts of boundary layer ingestion (nominal boundary layer thickness of about 40% of inlet height) was conducted at realistic operating conditions (high subsonic Mach numbers and full-scale Reynolds numbers). The objectives of this investigation were to 1) develop a new high Reynolds number, boundary-layer ingesting inlet test capability, 2) evaluate the performance of several boundary layer ingesting S-duct inlets, 3) provide a database for CFD tool validation, and 4) provide a baseline inlet for future inlet flow-control studies. Tests were conducted at Mach numbers from 0.25 to 0.83, Reynolds numbers (based on duct exit diameter) from 5.1 million to a fullscale value of 13.9 million, and inlet mass-flow ratios from 0.39 to 1.58 depending on Mach number. Results of this investigation indicate that inlet pressure recovery generally decreased and inlet distortion generally increased with increasing Mach number. Except at low Mach numbers, increasing inlet mass-flow increased pressure recovery and increased distortion. Increasing the amount of boundary layer ingestion (by decreasing inlet throat height and increasing inlet throat width) or ingesting a boundary layer with a distorted profile decreased pressure recovery and increased distortion. Finally, increasing Reynolds number had almost no effect on inlet distortion but increased inlet recovery by about one-half percent at a Mach number near cruise.

  13. Buckling of stiffened shells with random initial imperfections, thickness and boundary conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elishakoff, I.; Arbocz, J.; Starnes, J. H., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The paper proposes a method to predict the buckling load of stiffened, composite shells reliably, where besides the randomness of the initial geometric imperfections also a random variation of the wall thickness and the uncertainty of the precise edge conditions is included in the analysis. The introduction of the variability in the thickness from shell to shell, in an ensemble of nominally identical shells, produced by the same manufacturing procedure is motivated by the growing realization of the importance of thickness variations by composite shells. The probabilistic treatment of the boundary conditions is dictated by the fact that 'true', deterministically specified boundary conditions are unlikely to be realizable in practice.

  14. Numerical Study of Pressure Fluctuations due to High-Speed Turbulent Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duan, Lian; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Wu, Minwei

    2012-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) are used to examine the pressure fluctuations generated by fully developed turbulence in supersonic turbulent boundary layers with an emphasis on both pressure fluctuations at the wall and the acoustic fluctuations radiated into the freestream. The wall and freestream pressure fields are first analyzed for a zero pressure gradient boundary layer with Mach 2.5 and Reynolds number based on momentum thickness of approximately 2835. The single and multi-point statistics reported include the wall pressure fluctuation intensities, frequency spectra, space-time correlations, and convection velocities. Single and multi-point statistics of surface pressure fluctuations show good agreement with measured data and previously published simulations of turbulent boundary layers under similar flow conditions. Spectral analysis shows that the acoustic fluctuations outside the boundary layer region have much lower energy content within the high-frequency region. The space-time correlations reflect the convective nature of the pressure field both at the wall and in the freestream, which is characterized by the downstream propagation of pressure-carrying eddies. Relative to those at the wall, the pressure-carrying eddies associated with the freestream signal are larger and convect at a significantly lower speed. The preliminary DNS results of a Mach 6 boundary layer show that the pressure rms in the freestream region is significantly higher than that of the lower Mach number case.

  15. Quasi-simultaneous interaction method for solving 2D boundary layer flows over plates and airfoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijleveld, H. A.; Veldman, A. E. P.

    2012-11-01

    This paper studies unsteady 2D boundary layer flows over dented plates and a NACA 0012 airfoil. An inviscid flow is assumed to exist outside the boundary layer and is solved iteratively with the boundary layer flow together with the interaction method until a matching solution is achieved. Hereto a quasi-simultaneous interaction method is applied, in which the integral boundary layer equations are solved together with an interaction-law equation. The interaction-law equation is an approximation of the external flow and based on thin-airfoil theory. It is an algebraic relation between the velocity and displacement thickness. The interaction-law equation ensures that the eigenvalues of the system of equations do not have a sign change and that no singularities occur. Three numerical schemes are used to solve the boundary layer flow with the interaction method. These are: a standard scheme, a splitting method and a characteristics solver. All schemes use a finite difference discretization. The three schemes yield comparable results for the simulations carried out. The standard scheme is deviating most from the splitting and characteristics solvers. The results show that the eigenvalues remain positive, even in separation. As expected, the addition of the interaction-law equation prevents a sign change of the eigenvalues. The quasi-simultaneous interaction scheme is applicable to the three numerical schemes tested.

  16. Physical modeling of the atmospheric boundary layer for wind energy and wind engineering studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor-Power, Gregory; Turner, John; Wosnik, Martin

    2015-11-01

    The Flow Physics Facility (FPF) at UNH has test section dimensions W6.0m, H2.7m, L=72m. It can achieve high Reynolds number boundary layers, enabling turbulent boundary layer, wind energy and wind engineering research with exceptional spatial and temporal instrument resolution. We examined the FPF's ability to experimentally simulate different types of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL): the stable, unstable, and neutral ABL. The neutral ABL is characterized by a zero potential temperature gradient, which is readily achieved in the FPF by operating when air and floor temperatures are close to equal. The stable and unstable ABLs have positive and negative vertical temperature gradients, respectively, which are more difficult to simulate without direct control of air or test section floor temperature. The test section floor is a 10 inch thick concrete cement slab and has significant thermal mass. When combined with the diurnal temperature variation of the ambient air, it is possible to achieve vertical temperature gradients in the test section, and produce weakly stable or weakly unstable boundary layer. Achievable Richardson numbers and Obukhov lengths are estimated. The different boundary layer profiles were measured, and compared to theoretical atmospheric models. Supported by UNH Hamel Center for Undergraduate Research SURF.

  17. An experimental study of low Re cavity vortex formation embedded in a laminar boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Sashank; Lang, Amy; Wilroy, Jacob

    2016-11-01

    Laminar boundary layer flow across a grooved surface leads to the formation of vortices inside rectangular cavities. The nature and stability of the vortex inside any single cavity is determined by the Re and cavity geometry. According to the hypothesis, under low Re and stable vortex conditions a single cavity vortex leads to a roller-bearing effect which results in a decrease in drag as quantified by velocity profiles measured within the boundary layer. At higher Re once the vortex becomes unstable, drag should increase due to the mixing of low-momentum fluid within the cavity and the outer boundary layer flow. The primary objective of this experiment is to document the phenomenon using DPIV in a tow tank facility. This study focuses on the transition of the cavity flow from a steady to an unsteady state as the Re is increased above a critical value. The change in boundary layer momentum and cavity vortex characteristics are documented as a function of Re and boundary layer thickness. Funding from NSF CBET fluid dynamics Grant 1335848 is gratefully acknowledged.

  18. Turbulent boundary layer heat transfer experiments: Convex curvature effects, including introduction and recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, T. W.; Moffat, R. J.; Johnston, J. P.; Kays, W. M.

    1980-01-01

    Heat transfer rates were measured through turbulent and transitional boundary layers on an isothermal, convexly curved wall and downstream flat plate. The effect of convex curvature on the fully turbulent boundary layer was a reduction of the local Stanton numbers 20-50% below those predicted for a flat wall under the same circumstances. The recovery of the heat transfer rates on the downstream flat wall was extremely slow. After 60 cm of recovery length, the Stanton number was still typically 15-20% below the flat wall predicted value. Various effects important in the modeling of curved flows were studied separately. These are: (1) the effect of initial boundary layer thickness; (2) the effect of freestream velocity; (3) the effect of freestream acceleration; (4) the effect of unheated starting length; and (5) the effect of the maturity of the boundary layer. Regardless of the initial state, curvature eventually forced the boundary layer into an asymptotic curved condition. The slope, minus one, is believed to be significant.

  19. Computer program for design of two-dimensional supersonic turbine rotor blades with boundary-layer correction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, L. J.; Scullin, V. J.

    1971-01-01

    A FORTRAN 4 computer program for the design of two-dimensional supersonic rotor blade sections corrected for boundary-layer displacement thickness is presented. The ideal rotor is designed by the method of characteristics to produce vortex flow within the blade passage. The boundary-layer parameters are calculated by Cohen and Reshotoko's method for laminar flow and Sasman and Cresci's method for turbulent flow. The program input consists essentially of the blade surface Mach number distribution and total flow conditions. The primary output is the corrected blade profile and the boundary-layer parameters.

  20. Scaling properties of the mean wall-normal velocity in zero-pressure-gradient boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Tie; Klewicki, Joseph

    2016-12-01

    The scaling properties of the mean wall-normal velocity V (x ,y ) in zero-pressure-gradient laminar and turbulent boundary-layer flows are investigated using numerical simulation data, physical experiment data, and integral analyses of the governing equations. The maximum mean wall-normal velocity V∞ and the boundary-layer thickness δ are evidenced to be the proper scaling for V over most if not all of the boundary layer. This is different from the behavior of the mean streamwise velocity U or the turbulent shear stress T =-ρ , which depend on different characteristic length scales in the regions near and away from the surface, respectively. The reason for this apparent difference in scaling behaviors is described physically relative to the downstream development of the U velocity profile and the mechanisms of boundary-layer growth. Insights pertaining to this are further surmised from an analytical relationship for the ratio of the displacement to momentum thickness, i.e., shape factor H . Integral analyses using the continuity and mean momentum equation show that U∞V∞/uτ2=H , where uτ is the friction velocity. Both the laminar similarity solution and direct numerical simulation data in post-transitional flows convincingly support this relation. Over the transitional regime, data of sufficiently high quality are lacking to check if this relation remains valid.

  1. Laminar-Turbulent Transition Behind Discrete Roughness Elements in a High-Speed Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhari, Meelan M.; Li, Fei; Wu, Minwei; Chang, Chau-Lyan; Edwards, Jack R., Jr.; Kegerise, Michael; King, Rudolph

    2010-01-01

    Computations are performed to study the flow past an isolated roughness element in a Mach 3.5, laminar, flat plate boundary layer. To determine the effects of the roughness element on the location of laminar-turbulent transition inside the boundary layer, the instability characteristics of the stationary wake behind the roughness element are investigated over a range of roughness heights. The wake flow adjacent to the spanwise plane of symmetry is characterized by a narrow region of increased boundary layer thickness. Beyond the near wake region, the centerline streak is surrounded by a pair of high-speed streaks with reduced boundary layer thickness and a secondary, outer pair of lower-speed streaks. Similar to the spanwise periodic pattern of streaks behind an array of regularly spaced roughness elements, the above wake structure persists over large distances and can sustain strong enough convective instabilities to cause an earlier onset of transition when the roughness height is sufficiently large. Time accurate computations are performed to clarify additional issues such as the role of the nearfield of the roughness element during the generation of streak instabilities, as well as to reveal selected details of their nonlinear evolution. Effects of roughness element shape on the streak amplitudes and the interactions between multiple roughness elements aligned along the flow direction are also investigated.

  2. DNS study of large-scale structures in a separated turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Hiroyuki; Mizobuchi, Yasuhiro; Matsuo, Yuichi

    2011-11-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNSs) of a separated flat-plate turbulent boundary layer have been carried out. The inlet data are prescribed by DNSs of a zero-pressure-gradient turbulent boundary layer with the rescaling-recycling method; blowing and suction are imposed at the upper boundary for producing a separation bubble. The Reynolds numbers at the inlet are set to be Reθ =300, 600 and 900, where Reθ is the Reynolds number based on the freestream velocity and the momentum thickness. Particular attention is given to large- scale structures existing in a separated region. Results indicate that large-scale organized structures of the streamwise velocity fluctuation appear in a detached shear layer when a large separated region is formed. The latter structures consist of positive and negative regions alternating in the spanwise direction with a spacing of about 2 ~ 3δ99 (δ99 denotes the 99% boundary layer thickness at the inlet), which become more apparent with increasing Reynolds number. They are most likely associated with large-scale spanwise meandering of the separation line. There is also close relationship between the large-scale structures and vortical structures, the latter tending to form vortex clusters where hairpin-like vortices are also observed.

  3. Acoustic Receptivity of Mach 4.5 Boundary Layer with Leading- Edge Bluntness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malik, Mujeeb R.; Balakumar, Ponnampalam

    2007-01-01

    Boundary layer receptivity to two-dimensional slow and fast acoustic waves is investigated by solving Navier-Stokes equations for Mach 4.5 flow over a flat plate with a finite-thickness leading edge. Higher order spatial and temporal schemes are employed to obtain the solution whereby the flat-plate leading edge region is resolved by providing a sufficiently refined grid. The results show that the instability waves are generated in the leading edge region and that the boundary-layer is much more receptive to slow acoustic waves (by almost a factor of 20) as compared to the fast waves. Hence, this leading-edge receptivity mechanism is expected to be more relevant in the transition process for high Mach number flows where second mode instability is dominant. Computations are performed to investigate the effect of leading-edge thickness and it is found that bluntness tends to stabilize the boundary layer. Furthermore, the relative significance of fast acoustic waves is enhanced in the presence of bluntness. The effect of acoustic wave incidence angle is also studied and it is found that the receptivity of the boundary layer on the windward side (with respect to the acoustic forcing) decreases by more than a factor of 4 when the incidence angle is increased from 0 to 45 deg. However, the receptivity coefficient for the leeward side is found to vary relatively weakly with the incidence angle.

  4. Estimates of the potential temperature profile from lidar measurements of boundary layer evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holder, H. E.; Eichinger, W. E.

    2006-10-01

    The Soil Moisture-Atmosphere Coupling Experiment (SMACEX) was conducted in the Walnut Creek Watershed near Ames, Iowa, over the period from 15 June to 11 July 2002. A main focus of SMACEX is the investigation of the interactions between the atmospheric boundary layer, surface moisture, and canopy. A vertically staring elastic lidar was used to provide a high time resolution, continuous record of the mixed layer height at the edge between a soybean and a corn field. The height and thickness of the entrainment zone are used to estimate the vertical potential temperature profile in the boundary layer using surface energy measurements in the Batchvarova-Gryning mixed layer model. Calculated values of potential temperature compared well to radiosonde measurements taken simultaneously with the lidar measurements. The root-mean-square difference between the lidar-derived values and the balloon-based values is 1.20°C.

  5. An investigation of streaklike instabilities in laminar boundary layer flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Colin; Finney, Mark; Forthofer, Jason; McAllister, Sara; Gollner, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Observations of coherent structures in boundary layer flames, particularly wildland fires, motivated an investigation on flame instabilities within a boundary layer. This experimental study examined streaklike structures in a stationary diffusion flame stabilized within a laminar boundary layer. Flame streaks were found to align with pre-existing velocity perturbations, enabling stabilization of these coherent structures. Thermocouple measurements were used to quantify streamwise amplification of flame streaks. Temperature mapping indicated a temperature rise in the flame streaks, while the region in between these streaks, the trough, decreased in temperature. The heat flux to the surface was measured with a total heat flux gauge, and the heat flux below the troughs was found to be higher at all measurement locations. This was likely a function of the flame standoff distance, and indicated that the flame streaks were acting to modify the spanwise distribution of heat flux. Instabilities in boundary layer combustion can have an effect on the spanwise distribution of heat transfer. This finding has significant implications for boundary layer combustion, indicating that instantaneous properties can vary significantly in a three-dimensional flow field.

  6. Particle motion in atmospheric boundary layers of Mars and Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, B. R.; Iversen, J. D.; Greeley, R.; Pollack, J. B.

    1975-01-01

    To study the eolian mechanics of saltating particles, both an experimental investigation of the flow field around a model crater in an atmospheric boundary layer wind tunnel and numerical solutions of the two- and three-dimensional equations of motion of a single particle under the influence of a turbulent boundary layer were conducted. Two-dimensional particle motion was calculated for flow near the surfaces of both Earth and Mars. For the case of Earth both a turbulent boundary layer with a viscous sublayer and one without were calculated. For the case of Mars it was only necessary to calculate turbulent boundary layer flow with a laminar sublayer because of the low values of friction Reynolds number; however, it was necessary to include the effects of slip flow on a particle caused by the rarefied Martian atmosphere. In the equations of motion the lift force functions were developed to act on a single particle only in the laminar sublayer or a corresponding small region of high shear near the surface for a fully turbulent boundary layer. The lift force functions were developed from the analytical work by Saffman concerning the lift force acting on a particle in simple shear flow.

  7. Linear and nonlinear PSE for compressible boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Chau-Lyan; Malik, Mujeeb R.; Erlebacher, Gordon; Hussaini, M. Yousuff

    1993-01-01

    Compressible stability of growing boundary layers is studied by numerically solving the partial differential equations under a parabolizing approximation. The resulting parabolized stability equations (PSE) account for nonparallel as well as nonlinear effects. Evolution of disturbances in compressible flat-plate boundary layers are studied for freestream Mach numbers ranging from 0 to 4.5. Results indicate that the effect of boundary-layer growth is important for linear disturbances. Nonlinear calculations are performed for various Mach numbers. Two-dimensional nonlinear results using the PSE approach agree well with those from direct numerical simulations using the full Navier-Stokes equations while the required computational time is less by an order of magnitude. Spatial simulation using PSE were carried out for both the fundamental and subharmonic type breakdown for a Mach 1.6 boundary layer. The promising results obtained show that the PSE method is a powerful tool for studying boundary-layer instabilities and for predicting transition over a wide range of Mach numbers.

  8. The inner core thermodynamics of the tropical cyclone boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Gabriel J.

    2016-10-01

    Although considerable progress has been made in understanding the inner-core dynamics of the tropical cyclone boundary layer (TCBL), our knowledge of the inner-core thermodynamics of the TCBL remains limited. In this study, the inner-core budgets of potential temperature (θ), specific humidity ( q), and reversible equivalent potential temperature (θ _e) are examined using a high-resolution multilevel boundary layer model. The potential temperature budgets show that the heat energy is dominated by latent heat release in the eyewall, evaporative cooling along the outer edge of the eyewall, and upward surface fluxes of sensible and latent heat from the underlying warm ocean. It is shown that the vertical θ advection overcompensates the sum of radial advective warming from the boundary layer outflow jet and latent heating for the development of cooling in the eyewall within the TCBL. The moisture budgets show the dominant upward transport of moisture in the eyewall updrafts, partly by the boundary-layer outflow jet from the bottom eye region, so that the eyewall remains nearly saturated. The θ _e budgets reveal that the TCBL is maintained thermodynamically by the upward surface flux of higher-θ _e air from the underlying warm ocean, the radial transport of low-θ _e air from the outer regions of the TCBL, and the dry adiabatic cooling associated by eyewall updrafts. These results underscore the significance of vertical motion and the location of the boundary layer outflow jet in maintaining the inner core thermal structure of the TCBL.

  9. A simplified Reynolds stress model for unsteady turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fan, Sixin; Lakshminarayana, Budugur

    1993-01-01

    A simplified Reynolds stress model has been developed for the prediction of unsteady turbulent boundary layers. By assuming that the net transport of Reynolds stresses is locally proportional to the net transport of the turbulent kinetic energy, the time dependent full Reynolds stress model is reduced to a set of ordinary differential equations. These equations contain only time derivatives and can be readily integrated in a time dependent boundary layer or Navier-Stokes code. The turbulent kinetic energy and dissipation rate needed for the model are obtained by solving the k-epsilon equations. This simplified Reynolds stress turbulence model (SRSM) does not use the eddy viscosity assumption, which may not be valid for unsteady turbulent flows. The anisotropy of both the steady and the unsteady turbulent normal stresses can be captured by the SRSM model. Through proper damping of the shear stresses, the present model can be used in the near wall region of turbulent boundary layers. This model has been validated against data for steady and unsteady turbulent boundary layers, including periodic turbulent boundary layers subjected to a mean adverse pressure gradient. For the cases tested, the predicted unsteady velocity and turbulent stress components agree well with the experimental data. Comparison between the predictions from the SRSM model and a k-epsilon model is also presented.

  10. Bending Boundary Layers in Laminated-Composite Circular Cylindrical Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Michael P.; Smeltzer, Stanley S., III

    2000-01-01

    A study of the attenuation of bending boundary layers in balanced and unbalanced, symmetrically and unsymmetrically laminated cylindrical shells is presented for nine contemporary material systems. The analysis is based on the linear Sanders-Koiter shell equations and specializations to the Love-Kirchhoff shell equations and Donnell's equations are included. Two nondimensional parameters are identified that characterize the effects of laminate orthotropy and anisotropy on the bending boundary-layer decay length in a very general manner. A substantial number of structural design technology results are presented for a wide range of laminated-composite cylinders. For all laminates considered, the results show that the differences between results obtained with the Sanders-Koiter shell equations, the Love-Kirchhoff shell equations, and Donnell's equations are negligible. The results also show that the effect of anisotropy in the form of coupling between pure bending and twisting has a negligible effect on the size of the bending boundary-layer decay length of the balanced, symmetrically laminated cylinders considered. Moreover, the results show that coupling between the various types of shell anisotropies has a negligible effect on the calculation of the bending boundary-layer decay length in most cases. The results also show that, in some cases, neglecting the shell anisotropy results in underestimating the bending boundary-layer decay length and, in other cases, results in an overestimation.

  11. Bending Boundary Layers in Laminated-Composite Circular Cylindrical Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Michael P.; Smeltzer, Stanley S., III

    2000-01-01

    An analytical, parametric study of the attenuation of bending boundary layers or edge effects in balanced and unbalanced, symmetrically and unsymmetrically laminated thin cylindrical shells is presented for nine contemporary material systems. The analysis is based on the linear Sanders-Koiter shell equations and specializations to the Love-Kirchhoff shell equations and Donnell's equations are included. Two nondimensional parameters are identified that characterize and quantify the effects of laminate orthotropy and laminate anisotropy on the bending boundary-layer decay length in a very general and encompassing manner. A substantial number of structural design technology results are presented for a wide range of laminated-composite cylinders. For all the laminate constructions considered, the results show that the differences between results that were obtained with the Sanders-Koiter shell equations, the Love-Kirchhoff shell equations, and Donnell's equations are negligible. The results also show that the effect of anisotropy in the form of coupling between pure bending and twisting has a negligible effect on the size of the bending boundary-layer decay length of the balanced, symmetrically laminated cylinders considered. Moreover, the results show that coupling between the various types of shell anisotropies has a negligible effect on the calculation of the bending boundary-layer decay length in most cases. The results also show that in some cases neglecting the shell anisotropy results in underestimating the bending boundary-layer decay length and in other cases it results in an overestimation.

  12. Summary of experimentally determined facts concerning the behavior of the boundary layer and performance of boundary layer measurements. [considering sailing flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanness, W.

    1978-01-01

    A summary report of boundary layer studies is presented. Preliminary results of experimental measurements show that: (1) A very thin layer (approximately 0.4 mm) of the boundary layer seems to be accelerated; (2) the static pressure of the outer flow does not remain exactly constant through the boundary layer; and (3) an oncoming boundary layer which is already turbulent at the suction point can again become laminar behind this point without being completely sucked off.

  13. Reduction in retinal nerve fiber layer thickness in migraine patients.

    PubMed

    Gipponi, Stefano; Scaroni, Niccolò; Venturelli, Elisabetta; Forbice, Eliana; Rao, Renata; Liberini, Paolo; Padovani, Alessandro; Semeraro, Francesco

    2013-06-01

    Migraine is a common disorder and its pathogenesis remains still unclear. Several hypotheses about the mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of migraine have been proposed, but the issue is still far from being fully clarified. Neurovascular system remains one of the most important mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of migraine and it could be possible that hypoperfusion might involve other areas besides brain, including the retina. This is, for example, of particular interest in a form of migraine, the retinal migraine, which has been associated with hypoperfusion and vasoconstriction of the retinal vasculature. Although vasoconstriction of cerebral and retinal blood vessels is a transient phenomenon, the chronic nature of the migraine might cause permanent structural abnormalities of the brain and also of the retina. On this basis, a few studies have evaluated whether retina is involved in migraine patients: Tan et al. have not found differences in retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness between migraine patients and healthy subjects, while Martinez et al. have shown that RNFL in the temporal retinic quadrant of migraineurs is thinner than in normal people. The aim of our study was to analyze if there are differences in retinal nerve fiber layer thickness between migraine patients and normal subjects by studying 24 consecutive migraine patients who presented at the Headache Center of our Neurological Department. Migraine diagnosis has been made according to the International Classification of Headache disorder (ICHD-II). Patients have been recruited according to strict inclusion criteria; then patients have undergone a complete ophthalmological examination at the Ophthalmological Department. All patients and controls who met the ophthalmological criteria have been examined with ocular coherence tomography spectral domain (OCT-SD) after pupillary dilation. OCT-SD is an optical system designed to acquire the retinal layer images simultaneously with fundus

  14. Characteristics of the nocturnal boundary layer inferred from ozone measurements onboard a Zeppelin airship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohrer, Franz; Li, Xin; Hofzumahaus, Andreas; Ehlers, Christian; Holland, Frank; Klemp, Dieter; Lu, Keding; Mentel, Thomas F.; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Wahner, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    The nocturnal boundary layer (NBL) is a sublayer within the planetary boundary layer (PBL) which evolves above solid land each day in the late afternoon due to radiation cooling of the surface. It is a region of several hundred meters thickness which inhibits vertical mixing. A residual and a surface layer remain above and below the NBL. Inside the surface layer, almost all direct emissions of atmospheric constituents take place during this time. This stratification lasts until the next morning after sunrise. Then, the heating of the surface generates a new convectionally mixed layer which successively eats up the NBL from below. This process lasts until shortly before noon when the NBL disappears completely and the PBL is mixed convectionally. Ozone measurements onboard a Zeppelin airship in The Netherlands, in Italy, and in Finland are used to analyse this behaviour with respect to atmospheric constituents and consequences for the diurnal cycles observed in the surface layer, the nocturnal boundary layer, and the residual layer are discussed.

  15. On the dynamic behavior of composite panels under turbulent boundary layer excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciappi, E.; De Rosa, S.; Franco, F.; Vitiello, P.; Miozzi, M.

    2016-03-01

    In this work high Mach number aerodynamic and structural measurements acquired in the CIRA (Italian Aerospace Research Center) transonic wind tunnel and the models used to analyze the response of composite panels to turbulent boundary layer excitation are presented. The two investigated panels are CFRP (Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polymer) composite plates and their lay-up is similar to configurations used in aeronautical structures. They differ only for the presence of an embedded viscoelastic layer. The experimental set-up has been designed to reproduce a pressure fluctuations field beneath a turbulent boundary layer as close as possible to those in flight. A tripping system, specifically conceived to this aim for this facility, has been used to generate thick turbulent boundary layers at Mach number values ranging between 0.4 and 0.8. It is shown that the designed setup provides a realistic representation of full scale size pressure spectra in the frequency range of interest for the noise component inside the fuselage, generated by turbulent boundary layer. The significant role of the viscoelastic layer at reducing panel's response is detailed and discussed. Finally, it is demonstrated that at high Mach number the aeroelastic effect cannot be neglected when analyzing the panel response, especially when composite materials are considered.

  16. User guide for STRMLN: A boundary-layer program for contoured wind-tunnel liner design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, E. C.

    1979-01-01

    A 2-D boundary layer computer code developed to process data for an arbitrary number of streamlines is presented. Provisions are included for the computer code to determine either mass transfer rates necessary for an effective boundary layer displacement of zero thickness or the effective displacement thickness for a specified mass transfer-rate distribution. The computer code was developed to be compatible with other computer codes which are being modified and/or developed at the NASA-Langley Research Center in order to design the three dimensional, contoured, wind tunnel liner used in transonic testing of a laminar flow control system installed on a supercritical airfoil section. A brief discription of the liner design procedure, representative liner calculations, adaptive-wall design for a two dimensional wind tunnel test, and other applications are reported.

  17. Spectral scales in the atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, A. H.; Irwin, J. S.; Mathis, J. J., Jr.; Kahler, J. P.; Petersen, W. B.

    1982-01-01

    Wind data taken from 10 levels between 18 and 305 m were examined to determine the properties of atmospheric turbulence within and above the atmospheric surface layer into the PBL. The samples were averaged over 40 min intervals, with all periods of rain, fog, and other disturbances being eliminated from the 16 days of monitoring. Turbulence spectra were calculated using a fast Fourier transformation. The tower was located in rolling terrain covered with pine forests, waist-high scrub, and cultivated fields. Results are presented for the wavelength and Eulerian length scales, considering the neutral, stable, and unstable PBL. Correlation coefficients were found between velocity fluctuations and wavelengths for the stability classes. Good agreements were found for measured and computed spectra in all but unstable conditions.

  18. Stability of the Boundary Layer and the Spot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wygnanski, I.

    2007-01-01

    The similarity among turbulent spots observed in various transition experiments, and the rate in which they contaminate the surrounding laminar boundary layer is only cursory. The shape of the spot depends on the Reynolds number of the surrounding boundary layer and on the pressure gradient to which it and the surrounding laminar flow are exposed. The propagation speeds of the spot boundaries depend, in addition, on the location from which the spot originated and do not simply scale with the local free stream velocity. The understanding of the manner in which the turbulent manner in which the turbulent spot destabilizes the surrounding, vortical fluid is a key to the understanding of the transition process. We therefore turned to detailed observations near the spot boundaries in general and near the spanwise tip of the spot in particular.

  19. Hypersonic flow separation in shock wave boundary layer interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamed, A.; Kumar, Ajay

    1992-01-01

    An assessment is presented for the experimental data on separated flow in shock wave turbulent boundary layer interactions at hypersonic and supersonic speeds. The data base consists mainly of two dimensional and axisymmetric interactions in compression corners or cylinder-flares, and externally generated oblique shock interactions with boundary layers over flat plates or cylindrical surfaces. The conditions leading to flow separation and the subsequent changes in the flow empirical correlations for incipient separation are reviewed. The effects of the Mach number, Reynolds number, surface cooling and the methods of detecting separation are discussed. The pertinent experimental data for the separated flow characteristics in separated turbulent boundary layer shock interaction are also presented and discussed.

  20. Atmospheric boundary layer processes during a total solar eclipse

    SciTech Connect

    SethuRaman, S.; Prabhu, A.; Narahari Rao, K.; Narasimha, R.

    1980-01-01

    The total solar eclipse that occurred over the southern part of India on February 16, 1980, gave a unique opportunity to study the earth's atmospheric boundary layer. The meteorological experiments during the 1980 solar eclipse were conducted at Raichur, India (16/sup 0/12'N, 77/sup 0/21'E) located in the state of Karnataka, approximately 400-m above sea level. The main objective was to determine the changes in the earth's atmosphere during and immediately after the eclipse. The goal was to study the changes in the momentum and heat fluxes in the boundary layer due to the eclipse. Measurements were made for 2 days prior to and 1 day after the day of the eclipse to determine background characteristics of the boundary layer which might be site-dependent.

  1. Bypass transition and spot nucleation in boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreilos, Tobias; Khapko, Taras; Schlatter, Philipp; Duguet, Yohann; Henningson, Dan S.; Eckhardt, Bruno

    2016-08-01

    The spatiotemporal aspects of the transition to turbulence are considered in the case of a boundary-layer flow developing above a flat plate exposed to free-stream turbulence. Combining results on the receptivity to free-stream turbulence with the nonlinear concept of a transition threshold, a physically motivated model suggests a spatial distribution of spot nucleation events. To describe the evolution of turbulent spots a probabilistic cellular automaton is introduced, with all parameters directly obtained from numerical simulations of the boundary layer. The nucleation rates are then combined with the cellular automaton model, yielding excellent quantitative agreement with the statistical characteristics for different free-stream turbulence levels. We thus show how the recent theoretical progress on transitional wall-bounded flows can be extended to the much wider class of spatially developing boundary-layer flows.

  2. Effect of bulk viscosity on a hypersonic boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emanuel, George

    1992-03-01

    The bulk viscosity mu(b) is generally set equal to zero (Stokes' hypothesis). For certain gases, such as CO2, mu(b)/mu exceeds 1000, where mu is the shear viscosity. In this circumstance, the bulk viscosity may substantially alter a hypersonic boundary layer. A general, nonsimilar, laminar, boundary-layer formulation is provided in which the bulk viscosity terms are included as a correction. To obtain explicit results, flow over a flat plate is considered. In addition to the heat transfer, the transverse pressure gradient inside the boundary layer is not zero, whereas the skin friction is unaltered by the bulk viscosity. This analysis is relevant to aerogravity-assisted maneuvers in planetary atmospheres that largely consist of CO2.

  3. Effect of bulk viscosity on a hypersonic boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emanuel, George

    1992-03-01

    The bulk viscosity μb is generally set equal to zero (Stokes' hypothesis). For certain gases, such as CO2, μb/μ exceeds 103, where μ is the shear viscosity. In this circumstance, the bulk viscosity may substantially alter a hypersonic boundary layer. A general, nonsimilar, laminar, boundary-layer formulation is provided in which the bulk viscosity terms are included as a correction. To obtain explicit results, flow over a flat plate is considered. In addition to the heat transfer, the transverse pressure gradient inside the boundary layer is not zero, whereas the skin friction is unaltered by the bulk viscosity. This analysis is relevant to aerogravity-assisted maneuvers in planetary atmospheres that largely consist of CO2.

  4. Spatial Optimal Disturbances in Three-Dimensional Boundary Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tempelmann, David; Hanifi, Ardeshir; Henningson, Dan S.

    A parabolised set of equations is used to compute spatial optimal disturbances in Falkner-Skan-Cooke boundary layers. These disturbances associated with maximum energy growth initially take the form of vortices which are tilted against the direction of the mean crossflow shear. They evolve into bended streaks while traveling downstream and finally into crossflow disturbances when entering the supercritical domain of the boundary layer. Two physical mechanisms, namely the lift-up and the Orr-mechanism, can be identified as being responsible for nonmodal growth in three-dimensional boundary layers. A parametric study is presented where, amongst others, the influences of pressure gradient and sweep angle on optimal growth are investigated. It turns out that substantial disturbance growth is already found in regions of the flow where modal disturbances are damped.

  5. Effects of forebody geometry on subsonic boundary-layer stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodbele, Simha S.

    1990-01-01

    As part of an effort to develop computational techniques for design of natural laminar flow fuselages, a computational study was made of the effect of forebody geometry on laminar boundary layer stability on axisymmetric body shapes. The effects of nose radius on the stability of the incompressible laminar boundary layer was computationally investigated using linear stability theory for body length Reynolds numbers representative of small and medium-sized airplanes. The steepness of the pressure gradient and the value of the minimum pressure (both functions of fineness ratio) govern the stability of laminar flow possible on an axisymmetric body at a given Reynolds number. It was found that to keep the laminar boundary layer stable for extended lengths, it is important to have a small nose radius. However, nose shapes with extremely small nose radii produce large pressure peaks at off-design angles of attack and can produce vortices which would adversely affect transition.

  6. Lag model for turbulent boundary layers over rough bleed surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.; Sloan, M. L.; Paynter, G. C.

    1994-07-01

    Boundary-layer mass removal (bleed) through spanwise bands of holes on a surface is used to prevent or control separation and to stabilize the normal shock in supersonic inlets. The addition of a transport equation lag relationship for eddy viscosity to the rough wall algebraic turbulence model of Cebeci and Chang was found to improve agreement between predicted and measured mean velocity distributions downstream of a bleed band. The model was demonstrated for a range of bleed configurations, bleed rates, and local freestream Mach numbers. In addition, the model was applied to the boundary-layer development over acoustic lining materials for the inlets and nozzles of commercial aircraft. The model was found to yield accurate results for integral boundary-layer properties unless there was a strong adverse pressure gradient.

  7. The analysis of a nonsimilar laminar boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stalmach, D. D.; Bertin, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    A computer code is described which yields accurate solutions for a broad range of laminar, nonsimilar boundary layers, providing the inviscid flow field is known. The boundary layer may be subject to mass injection for perfect-gas, nonreacting flows. If no mass injection is present, the code can be used with either perfect-gas or real-gas thermodynamic models. Solutions, ranging from two-dimensional similarity solutions to solutions for the boundary layer on the Space Shuttle Orbiter during reentry conditions, have been obtained with the code. Comparisons of these solutions, and others, with solutions presented in the literature; and with solutions obtained from other codes, demonstrate the accuracy of the present code.

  8. Simple turbulence models and their application to boundary layer separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wadcock, A. J.

    1980-01-01

    Measurements in the boundary layer and wake of a stalled airfoil are presented in two coordinate systems, one aligned with the airfoil chord, the other being conventional boundary layer coordinates. The NACA 4412 airfoil is studied at a single angle of attack corresponding to maximum lift, the Reynolds number based on chord being 1.5 x 10 to the 6th power. Turbulent boundary layer separation occurred at the 85 percent chord position. The two-dimensionality of the flow was documented and the momentum integral equation studied to illustrate the importance of turbulence contributions as separation is approached. The assumptions of simple eddy-viscosity and mixing-length turbulence models are checked directly against experiment. Curvature effects are found to be important as separation is approached.

  9. Numerical Simulations of Wake/Boundary Layer Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piomelli, Ugo; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Ovchinnikov, Victor; Balaras, Elias

    2003-01-01

    Direct and large-eddy simulations of the interaction between the wake of a circular cylinder and a flat-plate boundary layer are conducted. Two Reynolds numbers are examined. The simulations indicate that at the lower Reynolds number the boundary layer is buffeted by the unsteady Karman vortex street shed by the cylinder. The fluctuations, however, cannot be self-sustained due to the low Reynolds-number, and the flow does not reach a turbulent state within the computational domain. In contrast, in the higher Reynolds-number case, boundary-layer fluctuations persist after the wake has decayed (due, in part, to the higher values of the local Reynolds number Re(sub theta) achieved in this case); some evidence could be observed that a self-sustaining turbulence generation cycle was beginning to be established.

  10. Boundary layer effects on particle impaction and capture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosner, D. E.; Fernandez De La Mora, J.

    1984-01-01

    The inertial impaction and deposition of small particles on larger bodies with viscous boundary layers are considered theoretically, in a detailed comment on a paper by Menguturk et al. (1983). Topics addressed include cushion effects, the dimensionless groups corresponding to the diameter range (3-6 microns) examined by Menguturk et al. in a numerical example, analogous effects of particle-gas energy and mass exchange in boundary layers, and the combined effects of particle inertia and diffusion. It is argued that the inertial effects can be characterized in terms of a body, boundary-layer, or sublayer Stokes number. In a reply by Menguturk et al., the focus is on the application of the theoretical model to the erosion of blade surfaces in large gas turbines; the Stokes number is found to be of limited practical value in these cases, because the particle motion is not primarily normal to the blade surfaces.

  11. Method for laminar boundary layer transition visualization in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Bruce J. (Inventor); Gall, Peter D. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    Disclosed is a method of visualizing laminar to turbulent boundary layer transition, shock location, and laminar separation bubbles around a test surface. A liquid crystal coating is formulated using an unencapsulated liquid crystal operable in a temperature bandwidth compatible with the temperature environment around the test surface. The liquid crystal coating is applied to the test surface, which is preferably pretreated by painting with a flat, black paint to achieve a deep matte coating, after which the surface is subjected to a liquid or gas flow. Color change in the liquid crystal coating is produced in response to differences in relative shear stress within the boundary layer around the test surface. The novelty of this invention resides in the use of liquid crystals which are sensitive to shear stress to show aerodynamic phenomena such as a boundary layer transition, shock location, and laminar separation bubbles around a test surface.

  12. Instability of a Supersonic Boundary-Layer with Localized Roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marxen, Olaf; Iaccarino, Gianluca; Shaqfeh, Eric S. G.

    2010-01-01

    A localized 3-D roughness causes boundary-layer separation and (weak) shocks. Most importantly, streamwise vortices occur which induce streamwise (low U, high T) streaks. Immersed boundary method (volume force) suitable to represent roughness element in DNS. Favorable comparison between bi-global stability theory and DNS for a "y-mode" Outlook: Understand the flow physics (investigate "z-modes" in DNS through sinuous spanwise forcing, study origin of the beat in DNS).

  13. Theoretical face pressure and drag characteristics of forward-facing steps in supersonic turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, D. K.; Czarnecki, K. R.

    1975-01-01

    A theoretical investigation of the pressure distributions and drag characteristics was made for forward facing steps in turbulent flow at supersonic speeds. An approximate solution technique proposed by Uebelhack has been modified and extended to obtain a more consistent numerical procedure. A comparison of theoretical calculations with experimental data generally indicated good agreement over the experimentally available range of ratios of step height to boundary layer thickness from 7 to 0.05.

  14. Cell poking: quantitative analysis of indentation of thick viscoelastic layers.

    PubMed

    Duszyk, M; Schwab, B; Zahalak, G I; Qian, H; Elson, E L

    1989-04-01

    A recently introduced device, the cell poker, measures the force required to indent the exposed surface of a cell adherent to a rigid substratum. The cell poker has provided phenomenological information about the viscoelastic properties of several different types of cells, about mechanical changes triggered by external stimuli, and about the role of the cytoskeleton in these mechanical functions. Except in special cases, however, it has not been possible to extract quantitative estimates of viscosity and elasticity moduli from cell poker measurements. This paper presents cell poker measurements of well characterized viscoelastic polymeric materials, polydimethylsiloxanes of different degrees of polymerization, in a simple shape, a flat, thick layer, which for our purposes can be treated as a half space. Analysis of the measurements in terms of a linear viscoelasticity theory yields viscosity values for three polymer samples in agreement with those determined by measurements on a macroscopic scale. Theoretical analysis further indicates that the measured limiting static elasticity of the layers may result from the tension generated at the interface between the polymer and water. This work demonstrates the possibility of obtaining quantitative viscoelastic material properties from cell poker measurements and represents the first step in extending these quantitative studies to more complicated structures including cells.

  15. Cell poking: quantitative analysis of indentation of thick viscoelastic layers.

    PubMed Central

    Duszyk, M; Schwab, B; Zahalak, G I; Qian, H; Elson, E L

    1989-01-01

    A recently introduced device, the cell poker, measures the force required to indent the exposed surface of a cell adherent to a rigid substratum. The cell poker has provided phenomenological information about the viscoelastic properties of several different types of cells, about mechanical changes triggered by external stimuli, and about the role of the cytoskeleton in these mechanical functions. Except in special cases, however, it has not been possible to extract quantitative estimates of viscosity and elasticity moduli from cell poker measurements. This paper presents cell poker measurements of well characterized viscoelastic polymeric materials, polydimethylsiloxanes of different degrees of polymerization, in a simple shape, a flat, thick layer, which for our purposes can be treated as a half space. Analysis of the measurements in terms of a linear viscoelasticity theory yields viscosity values for three polymer samples in agreement with those determined by measurements on a macroscopic scale. Theoretical analysis further indicates that the measured limiting static elasticity of the layers may result from the tension generated at the interface between the polymer and water. This work demonstrates the possibility of obtaining quantitative viscoelastic material properties from cell poker measurements and represents the first step in extending these quantitative studies to more complicated structures including cells. PMID:2720066

  16. Additive thermochemical effects in turbulent erosive boundary layers

    SciTech Connect

    Buckingham, A.C.; Levatin, J.L.

    1983-01-18

    Previously obtained interior ballistics and wall boundary layer modeling results indicate that significant reduction in erosive heating can be expected when finely divided particles are dispersed through the propellant combustion flow field. Attention was first placed on the particle size influences, together with particle dispersal dynamics in both turbulent combustion core flow and the erosive wall boundary layer region. Submicron thermochemically inert particles were predicted to disperse readily to the near wall region where they were then entrained in the boundary layer. This was estimated to substantially reduce the predicted erosive heat and mass transfer and experimentally confirmed. Examination of the time-averaged turbulent boundary layer macrostructure changes indicated that inertial influences were primarily responsible for this reduction in erosive heating to gun barrel walls. The boundary layers were thickened by the additives and erosive diffusion gradients were correspondingly reduced. The isolated inertial mechanisms are now understood but are difficult to apply in general dimensional analysis scaling or in analytical heat transfer correlation predictions. Three major factors which contribute to these difficulties are: time dependence of both developing mean flow and particle field; turbulence-particle interactions; and thermochemical heat release and exchange between reactive gas components and particles, particles and wall surface, and reactive gas and wall surface. To help illustrate the influence of thes mechanisms and provide a basis for prediction, the influence of submicron additives in unsteady turbulent boundary layer growth and interaction regions adjacent to a model of a chemically active metallic (steel) surface are examined. Equilibrium chemistry is assumed for all phases.

  17. Numerical Modeling of the Evolving Stable Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorbjan, Z.

    2013-12-01

    A single-column model of the evolving stable boundary layer is tested for the consistency of turbulence parameterization, self-similar properties of the flow, and effects of ambient forcing. The turbulence closure of the model is based on the K-theory approach, with stability functions based on empirical data, and a semi-empirical form of the mixing length. The model has one internal, governing stability parameter, the Richardson number Ri, which dynamically adjusts to the boundary conditions and to external forcing. Model results, expressed in terms of local similarity scales, are universal functions of the Richardson number, i.e. they are satisfied in the entire stable boundary layer, for all instants of time, and all kinds of external forcing. Based on similarity expression, a realizability condition is derived for the minimum turbulent heat flux in the stable boundary layer. Numerical experiments show that the development of 'horse-shoe' shaped, 'fixed-elevation' wind hodographs in the interior of the stable boundary layer are solely caused by effects imposed by surface thermal forcing, and are not related to the inertial oscillation mechanism.

  18. Non-Equilibrium Effects on Hypersonic Turbulent Boundary Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Pilbum

    Understanding non-equilibrium effects of hypersonic turbulent boundary layers is essential in order to build cost efficient and reliable hypersonic vehicles. It is well known that non-equilibrium effects on the boundary layers are notable, but our understanding of the effects are limited. The overall goal of this study is to improve the understanding of non-equilibrium effects on hypersonic turbulent boundary layers. A new code has been developed for direct numerical simulations of spatially developing hypersonic turbulent boundary layers over a flat plate with finite-rate reactions. A fifth-order hybrid weighted essentially non-oscillatory scheme with a low dissipation finite-difference scheme is utilized in order to capture stiff gradients while resolving small motions in turbulent boundary layers. The code has been validated by qualitative and quantitative comparisons of two different simulations of a non-equilibrium flow and a spatially developing turbulent boundary layer. With the validated code, direct numerical simulations of four different hypersonic turbulent boundary layers, perfect gas and non-equilibrium flows of pure oxygen and nitrogen, have been performed. In order to rule out uncertainties in comparisons, the same inlet conditions are imposed for each species, and then mean and turbulence statistics as well as near-wall turbulence structures are compared at a downstream location. Based on those comparisons, it is shown that there is no direct energy exchanges between internal and turbulent kinetic energies due to thermal and chemical non-equilibrium processes in the flow field. Instead, these non-equilibria affect turbulent boundary layers by changing the temperature without changing the main characteristics of near-wall turbulence structures. This change in the temperature induces the changes in the density and viscosity and the mean flow fields are then adjusted to satisfy the conservation laws. The perturbation fields are modified according to

  19. Turbulent boundary layer on perforated surfaces with vector injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eroshenko, V. M.; Zaichik, L. I.; Klimov, A. A.; Ianovskii, L. S.; Kondratev, V. I.

    1980-10-01

    The paper presents an experimental investigation of a turbulent boundary layer on perforated plates with uniform vector injection at various angles to gas flow. It was shown that with strong injection at angles oriented in the flow direction the intensity of turbulent pulsation is decreased, while injection at angles in the opposite direction increase the intensity. A relationship was established between the critical parameters of the boundary layer injection angles; it was concluded that the asymptotic theory of Kutateladze and Leontiev can be used for determining the coefficient of friction of vector injection.

  20. Carbon vaporization into a nonequilibrium, stagnation-point boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suzuki, T.

    1978-01-01

    The heat transfer to the stagnation point of an ablating carbonaceous heat shield, where both the gas-phase boundary layer and the heterogeneous surface reactions are not in chemical equilibrium, is examined. Specifically, the nonequilibrium changes in the mass fraction profiles of carbon species calculated for frozen flow are studied. A set of equations describing the steady-state, nonequilibrium laminar boundary layer in the axisymmetric stagnation region, over an ablating graphite surface, is solved, with allowance for the effects of finite rate of carbon vaporization.

  1. Optimal disturbances and bypass transition in boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Paul; Berggren, Martin; Henningson, Dan S.

    1999-01-01

    Streamwise streaks are ubiquitous in transitional boundary layers, particularly when subjected to high levels of free-stream turbulence. Using the steady boundary-layer approximation, the upstream disturbances experiencing maximum spatial energy growth are numerically calculated. The calculations use techniques commonly employed when solving optimal-control problems for distributed parameter systems. The calculated optimal disturbances consist of streamwise vortices developing into streamwise streaks. The maximum spatial energy growth was found to scale linearly with the distance from the leading edge. Based on these results, a simple model for prediction of transition location is proposed. Available experiments have been used to correlate the single constant appearing in the model.

  2. Characteristics of turbulence in boundary layer with zero pressure gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klebanoff, P S

    1955-01-01

    The results of an experimental investigation of a turbulent boundary layer with zero pressure gradient are presented. Measurements with the hot-wire anemometer were made of turbulent energy and turbulent shear stress, probability density and flattening factor of u-fluctuation (fluctuation in x-direction), spectra of turbulent energy and shear stress, and turbulent dissipation. The importance of the region near the wall and the inadequacy of the concept of local isotropy are demonstrated. Attention is given to the energy balance and the intermittent character of the outer region of the boundary layer. Also several interesting features of the spectral distribution of the turbulent motions are discussed.

  3. Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment (LABLE) Final Campaign Report

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, P; Bonin, TA; Newman, JF; Turner, DD; Chilson, P; Blumberg, WG; Mishra, S; Wainwright, CE; Carney, M; Jacobsen, EP; Wharton, S

    2015-11-01

    The Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer Experiment (LABLE) included two measurement campaigns conducted at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains site in Oklahoma during 2012 and 2013. LABLE was designed as a multi-phase, low-cost collaboration among the University of Oklahoma, the National Severe Storms Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and the ARM program. A unique aspect was the role of graduate students in LABLE. They served as principal investigators and took the lead in designing and conducting experiments using different sampling strategies to best resolve boundary-layer phenomena.

  4. Controversy of critical layer thickness for InGaAs/GaAs strained-layer epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Gourley, P.L.; Fritz, I.J.; Dawson, L.R.

    1988-02-01

    The critical layer thickness for In/sub x/Ga/sub 1-//sub x/As layers in In/sub x/Ga/sub 1-//sub x/As/GaAs single strained quantum wells (SSQW's) and strained-layer superlattices (SLS's) are investigated. Photoluminescence microscopy (PLM) images and x-ray rocking curves for two series of SSQW and SLS structures corresponding to many different layer thicknesses were obtained. We find that the PLM technique, which directly images dislocations and is sensitive to low dislocation densities, is much more suitable for determining the onset of dislocation creation. The x-ray technique can detect lattice relaxation by dislocations but only at relatively high densities of dislocations. Using the former technique, we determine critical thicknesses of 190 A for SSQW's and 250 A for SLS's with xapprox. =0.2. These results are near the theoretical predictions of J. W. Matthews, S. Mader, and T. B. Light (J. Appl. Phys. 41, 3800 (1970)) (150 and 300 A, respectively) and are much lower than results obtained by x-ray or other techniques which sense lattice relaxation.

  5. Perfectly matched layer absorbing boundary condition for nonlinear two-fluid plasma equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, X. F.; Jiang, Z. H.; Hu, X. W.; Zhuang, G.; Jiang, J. F.; Guo, W. X.

    2015-04-01

    Numerical instability occurs when coupled Maxwell equations and nonlinear two-fluid plasma equations are solved using finite difference method through parallel algorithm. Thus, a perfectly matched layer (PML) boundary condition is set to avoid the instability caused by velocity and density gradients between vacuum and plasma. A splitting method is used to first decompose governing equations to time-dependent nonlinear and linear equations. Then, a proper complex variable is used for the spatial derivative terms of the time-dependent nonlinear equation. Finally, with several auxiliary function equations, the governing equations of the absorbing boundary condition are derived by rewriting the frequency domain PML in the original physical space and time coordinates. Numerical examples in one- and two-dimensional domains show that the PML boundary condition is valid and effective. PML stability depends on the absorbing coefficient and thickness of absorbing layers.

  6. The high-order statistics of APG turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciel, Yvan; Gungor, Ayse G.; Simens, Mark P.; Soria, Julio

    2013-11-01

    One and two-point statistics are presented from a new direct numerical simulation of an adverse pressure gradient boundary layer, at Reθ = 250 - 2175 , in which the transition to turbulence is triggered by a trip wire which is modeled using the immersed boundary method. Mean velocity results in the attached turbulent region do not show log law profiles. Departure from the law of the wall occurs throughout the inner region. The production and Reynolds stress peaks move to roughly the middle of the boundary layer. The profiles of the uv correlation factor reveal that de-correlation between u and v takes place throughout the boundary layer, but especially near the wall, as the mean velocity defect increases. The non-dimensional stress ratios and quadrant analysis of uv indicate changes to the turbulence structure. The structure parameter is low, similar to equilibrium APG flows and mixing layers in the present flow and seems to be decreasing as the mean velocity defect increases. The statistics of the upper half of the APG flow show resemblance with results for a mixing layer. Funded in part by ITU, NSERC of Canada, ARC Discovery Grant, and Multiflow program of the ERC.

  7. The velocity field created by a shallow bump in a boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaster, Michael; Grosch, Chester E.; Jackson, Thomas L.

    1994-01-01

    We report the results of measurements of the disturbance velocity field generated in a boundary layer by a shallow three-dimensional bump oscillating at a very low frequency on the surface of a flat plate. Profiles of the mean velocity, the disturbance velocity at the fundamental frequency and at the first harmonic are presented. These profiles were measured both upstream and downstream of the oscillating bump. Measurements of the disturbance velocity were also made at various spanwise and downstream locations at a fixed distance from the boundary of one displacement thickness. Finally, the spanwise spectrum of the disturbances at three locations downstream of the bump are presented.

  8. An experimental investigation of the effect of boundary layer refraction on the noise from a high-speed propeller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dittmar, J. H.; Burns, R. J.; Leciejewski, D. J.

    1984-01-01

    Models of supersonic propellers were previously tested for acoustics in the Lewis 8- by 6-Foot Wind Tunnel using pressure transducers mounted in the tunnel ceiling. The boundary layer on the tunnel ceiling is believed to refract some of the propeller noise away from the measurement transducers. Measurements were made on a plate installed in the wind tunnel which had a thinner boundary layer than the ceiling boundary layer. The plate was installed in two locations for comparison with tunnel ceiling noise data and with fuselage data taken on the NASA Dryden Jetstar airplane. Analysis of the data indicates that the refraction increases with: increasing boundary layer thickness; increasing free stream Mach number; increasing frequency; and decreasing sound radiation angle (toward the inlet axis). At aft radiation angles greater than about 100 deg there was little or no refraction. Comparisons with the airplane data indicated that not only is the boundary layer thickness important but also the shape of the velocity profile. Comparisons with an existing two-dimensional theory, using an idealized shear layer to approximate the boundary layer, showed that the theory and data had the same trends. Analysis of the data taken in the tunnel at two different distances from the propeller indicates a decay with distance in the wind tunnel at high Mach numbers but the decay at low Mach numbers is not as clear.

  9. Roles of Engineering Correlations in Hypersonic Entry Boundary Layer Transition Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Charles H.; King, Rudolph A.; Kergerise, Michael A.; Berry, Scott A.; Horvath, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    prediction capability will be utilized to establish a fresh perspective on this role, to illustrate how quantitative statistical evaluations of empirical correlations can and should be used to assess accuracy and to discuss what the authors' perceive as a recent heightened interest in the application of high fidelity numerical modeling of boundary layer transition. Concrete results will also be developed related to empirical boundary layer transition onset correlations. This will include assessment of the discrete protuberance boundary layer transition onset data assembled for the Orbiter configuration during post-Columbia Return To Flight. Assessment of these data will conclude that momentum thickness Reynolds number based correlations have superior coefficients and uncertainty in comparison to roughness height based Reynolds numbers, aka Re(sub k) or Re(sub kk). In addition, linear regression results from roughness height Reynolds number based correlations will be evaluated, leading to a hypothesis that non-continuum effects play a role in the processes associated with incipient boundary layer transition on discrete protuberances.

  10. The Effects of an Absorbing Smoke Layer on MODIS Marine Boundary Layer Cloud Optical Property Retrievals and Radiative Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Kerry; Platnick, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Clouds, aerosols, and their interactions are widely considered to be key uncertainty components in our current understanding of the Earth's atmosphere and radiation budget. The work presented here is focused on the quasi-permanent marine boundary layer . (MBL) clouds off the southern Atlantic coast of Africa and the effects on MODIS cloud optical property retrievals (MOD06) of an overlying absorbing smoke layer. During much of August and September, a persistent smoke layer resides over this region, produced from extensive biomass burning throughout the southern African savanna. The resulting absorption, which increases with decreasing wavelength, potentially introduces biases into the MODIS cloud optical property retrievals of the underlying MBL clouds. This effect is more pronounced in the cloud optical thickness retrievals, which over ocean are derived from the wavelength channel centered near 0.86 micron (effective particle size retrievals are derived from the longer-wavelength near-IR channels at 1.6, 2.1, and 3.7 microns). Here, the spatial distributions of the scalar statistics of both the cloud and aerosol layers are first determined from the CALIOP 5 km layer products. Next, the MOD06 look-up tables (LUTs) are adjusted by inserting an absorbing smoke layer of varying optical thickness over the cloud. Retrievals are subsequently performed for a subset of MODIS pixels collocated with the CALIOP ground track, using smoke optical thickness from the CALIOP 5km aerosol layer product to select the appropriate LUT. The resulting differences in cloud optical property retrievals due to the inclusion of the smoke layer in the LUTs will be examined. In addition, the direct radiative forcing of this smoke layer will be investigated from the perspective of the cloud optical property retrieval differences.

  11. Magnetic field maxima in the low latitude boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnerup, B.; Paschmann, G.; Phan, T.-D.; Luehr, H.

    1992-01-01

    The magnetic field often exhibits a maximum in the earth's low-latitude boundary layer. Examples of this behavior are shown using data from the AMPTE/IRM spacecraft, and it is argued that two fundamentally distinct causes exist for the excess field: (1) a depression, within the layer, of the population of medium-energy ions of magnetospheric origin and (2) field curvature effects associated with undulations of the magnetopause itself.

  12. Characterization of an incipiently separated shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreyer, A.-M.; Dussauge, J.-P.; Krämer, E.

    2017-03-01

    The turbulence structure in a shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interaction at incipient separation was investigated in order to get insight into turbulence generation and amplification mechanisms in such flow fields. The flow along a two-dimensional 11.5° compression corner was studied experimentally at a Mach number of M=2.53 and with a momentum-thickness Reynolds number of Re_{θ }=5370. From hot-wire boundary layer traverses and surface heat-flux density fluctuation measurements with the fast-response atomic layer thermopile, the turbulence structure and amplification was described. Space-time correlations of the mass-flux fluctuations across the boundary layer and the surface heat-flux density fluctuations were measured to further characterize the development of the turbulence structure across the interaction. The large-scale boundary layer structures are concealed by shock-related effects in the strongly disturbed shock-foot region. Shortly downstream, however, large-scale structures dominate the signal again, just as in the incoming flow. A mechanism explaining this behavior is suggested.

  13. Vapour phase growth and grain boundary structure of molybdenum disulphide atomic layers.

    PubMed

    Najmaei, Sina; Liu, Zheng; Zhou, Wu; Zou, Xiaolong; Shi, Gang; Lei, Sidong; Yakobson, Boris I; Idrobo, Juan-Carlos; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Lou, Jun

    2013-08-01

    Single-layered molybdenum disulphide with a direct bandgap is a promising two-dimensional material that goes beyond graphene for the next generation of nanoelectronics. Here, we report the controlled vapour phase synthesis of molybdenum disulphide atomic layers and elucidate a fundamental mechanism for the nucleation, growth, and grain boundary formation in its crystalline monolayers. Furthermore, a nucleation-controlled strategy is established to systematically promote the formation of large-area, single- and few-layered films. Using high-resolution electron microscopy imaging, the atomic structure and morphology of the grains and their boundaries in the polycrystalline molybdenum disulphide atomic layers are examined, and the primary mechanisms for grain boundary formation are evaluated. Grain boundaries consisting of 5- and 7- member rings are directly observed with atomic resolution, and their energy landscape is investigated via first-principles calculations. The uniformity in thickness, large grain sizes, and excellent electrical performance signify the high quality and scalable synthesis of the molybdenum disulphide atomic layers.

  14. On the Formation Mechanisms of Artificially Generated High Reynolds Number Turbulent Boundary Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-López, Eduardo; Bruce, Paul J. K.; Buxton, Oliver R. H.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the evolution of an artificially thick turbulent boundary layer generated by two families of small obstacles (divided into uniform and non-uniform wall normal distributions of blockage). One- and two-point velocity measurements using constant temperature anemometry show that the canonical behaviour of a boundary layer is recovered after an adaptation region downstream of the trips presenting 150~% higher momentum thickness (or equivalently, Reynolds number) than the natural case for the same downstream distance (x≈ 3 m). The effect of the degree of immersion of the trips for h/δ ≳ 1 is shown to play a secondary role. The one-point diagnostic quantities used to assess the degree of recovery of the canonical properties are the friction coefficient (representative of the inner motions), the shape factor and wake parameter (representative of the wake regions); they provide a severe test to be applied to artificially generated boundary layers. Simultaneous two-point velocity measurements of both spanwise and wall-normal correlations and the modulation of inner velocity by the outer structures show that there are two different formation mechanisms for the boundary layer. The trips with high aspect ratio and uniform distributed blockage leave the inner motions of the boundary layer relatively undisturbed, which subsequently drive the mixing of the obstacles' wake with the wall-bounded flow (wall-driven). In contrast, the low aspect-ratio trips with non-uniform blockage destroy the inner structures, which are then re-formed further downstream under the influence of the wake of the trips (wake-driven).

  15. Evaluation of Flush-Mounted, S-Duct Inlets with Large Amounts of Boundary Layer Ingestion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berrier, Bobby L.; Morehouse, Melissa B.

    2003-01-01

    A new high Reynolds number test capability for boundary layer ingesting inlets has been developed for the NASA Langley Research Center 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel. Using this new capability, an experimental investigation of four S-duct inlet configurations with large amounts of boundary layer ingestion (nominal boundary layer thickness of about 40% of inlet height) was conducted at realistic operating conditions (high subsonic Mach numbers and full-scale Reynolds numbers). The objectives of this investigation were to 1) provide a database for CFD tool validation on boundary layer ingesting inlets operating at realistic conditions and 2) provide a baseline inlet for future inlet flow-control studies. Tests were conducted at Mach numbers from 0.25 to 0.83, Reynolds numbers (based on duct exit diameter) from 5.1 million to a full-scale value of 13.9 million, and inlet mass-flow ratios from 0.39 to 1.58 depending on Mach number. Results of this investigation indicate that inlet pressure recovery generally decreased and inlet distortion generally increased with increasing Mach number. Except at low Mach numbers, increasing inlet mass-flow increased pressure recovery and increased distortion. Increasing the amount of boundary layer ingestion (by decreasing inlet throat height) or ingesting a boundary layer with a distorted (adverse) profile decreased pressure recovery and increased distortion. Finally, increasing Reynolds number had almost no effect on inlet distortion but increased inlet recovery by about one-half percent at a Mach number near cruise.

  16. Structure of the turbulent/non-turbulent interface of turbulent boundary layers - DNS results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, Takashi; Ogasawara, Hiroki; Hunt, Julian C. R.

    2013-11-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of turbulent boundary layers (TBL) along a flat plate are used to study the properties of turbulent/non-turbulent (T/NT) interface of the TBL. The values of the momentum-thickness-based Reynolds numbers, Reθ , used for this study, are 500 - 2200 . Analysis of the conditional statistics near the interface of the TBL shows that there is a small peak in the span-wise vorticity, and an associated small jump in stream-wise velocity. It is shown that the interfacial layer has a double structure which consists of a turbulent sub-layer with thickness of the order of the Taylor micro scale and its outer boundary (super layer) with thickness of the order of the Kolmogorov length scale. An approximate profile of the conditional average of span-wise vorticity near the interface fits well to the DNS data. The velocity jump near the T/NT interface of the TBL is of the order of the rms value of velocity fluctuations near the interface. Conditional cross correlations of the stream-wise or the wall-normal velocity fluctuations change sharply across the interface, which are consistent with the blocking mechanism of the interface (Hunt and Durbin 1999).

  17. A General-Coordinate Formulation For Boundary-Layer Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steger, Joseph L.; Van Dalsem, William R.; Panaras, Argyris G.; Rao, K. V.

    1991-01-01

    Formulation for solution of equations of boundary-layer flow in general body-fitted curvilinear coordinates retains velocities in Cartesian coordinates. Increases stability of numerical simulations by avoiding coordinate source terms. In formulation, curvilinear coordinates do not have to be orthogonal, and much of software developed previously for use in numerical simulations of flow based on Navier-Stokes equations used.

  18. FLUID MODELING OF ATMOSPHERIC DISPERSION IN THE CONVECTIVE BOUNDARY LAYER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Study of convective boundary layer (CBL) processes has depended largely upon laboratory analogs for many years. The pioneering work of Willis and Deardorff (1974) and some 35 subsequent papers by the same authors showed that much useful research could be accomplished with a re...

  19. Turbulent boundary layer measurements over high-porosity surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efstathiou, Christoph; Luhar, Mitul

    2016-11-01

    Porous surfaces are ubiquitous across a variety of turbulent boundary layer flows of scientific and engineering interest. While turbulent flows over smooth and rough walls have been studied extensively, experimental measurements over porous walls have thus far focused on packed beds, which are limited in porosity (Φ = 0 . 3 - 0 . 5) by their geometry. The current project seeks to address this limitation. A two-component laser doppler velocimeter (LDV) is used to generate velocity measurements in turbulent boundary layer flows over commercially available reticulated foams and 3D-printed porous media at Reynolds number Reθ 3000 - 4000 . Smooth wall profiles for mean and turbulent quantities are compared to data over substrates with porosity Φ > 0 . 8 and average pore sizes in the range 0.4-2.5mm (corresponding to 8 - 50 viscous units). Previous analytical and simulation efforts indicate that the effects of porous substrates on boundary layer flows depend on a modified Reynolds number defined using the length scale √{ κ}, where κ is substrate permeability. A custom permeameter is currently being developed to estimate κ for the substrates tested in the boundary layer experiments.

  20. Turbulent Boundary Layer on a Cylinder in Axial Flow

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-29

    wall- norma 6caling or Rao’s wall-normal scaling. Other measurements of the mean velocity in a cylindrical boundary layer should be mentioned for...located near the wall at three azimuthal locations that w𔃽re 900 apa ,-t and at several streamwise spacings for flow conditions resulting in 8/a=8

  1. Three dimensional boundary layers on submarine conning towers and rudders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleyzes, C.

    1988-01-01

    Solutions for the definition of grids adapted to the calculation of three-dimensional boundary layers on submarine conning towers and on submarine rudders and fins are described. The particular geometry of such bodies (oblique shaped hull, curved fins) required special adaptations. The grids were verified on examples from a test basin.

  2. ON HYDROMAGNETIC STRESSES IN ACCRETION DISK BOUNDARY LAYERS

    SciTech Connect

    Pessah, Martin E.; Chan, Chi-kwan E-mail: ckch@nordita.org

    2012-05-20

    Detailed calculations of the physical structure of accretion disk boundary layers, and thus their inferred observational properties, rely on the assumption that angular momentum transport is opposite to the radial angular frequency gradient of the disk. The standard model for turbulent shear viscosity satisfies this assumption by construction. However, this behavior is not supported by numerical simulations of turbulent magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) accretion disks, which show that angular momentum transport driven by the magnetorotational instability (MRI) is inefficient in disk regions where, as expected in boundary layers, the angular frequency increases with radius. In order to shed light on physically viable mechanisms for angular momentum transport in this inner disk region, we examine the generation of hydromagnetic stresses and energy density in differentially rotating backgrounds with angular frequencies that increase outward in the shearing-sheet framework. We isolate the modes that are unrelated to the standard MRI and provide analytic solutions for the long-term evolution of the resulting shearing MHD waves. We show that, although the energy density of these waves can be amplified significantly, their associated stresses oscillate around zero, rendering them an inefficient mechanism to transport significant angular momentum (inward). These findings are consistent with the results obtained in numerical simulations of MHD accretion disk boundary layers and challenge the standard assumption of efficient angular momentum transport in the inner disk regions. This suggests that the detailed structure of turbulent MHD accretion disk boundary layers could differ appreciably from those derived within the standard framework of turbulent shear viscosity.

  3. Passive hypervelocity boundary layer control using an ultrasonically absorptive surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasheed, Adam

    A series of exploratory boundary layer transition experiments was performed on a sharp 5.06 degree half-angle round cone at zero angle-of-attack in the T5 Hypervelocity Shock Tunnel in order to test a novel hypersonic boundary layer control scheme. Recently performed linear stability analyses suggested that transition could be delayed in hypersonic boundary layers by using an ultrasonically absorptive surface that would damp the second mode (Mack mode). The cone used in the experiments was constructed with a smooth surface on half the cone (to serve as a control) and an acoustically absorptive porous surface on the other half. It was instrumented with flush-mounted thermocouples to detect the transition location. Test gases investigated included nitrogen and carbon dioxide at Mach 5 with specific reservoir enthalpy ranging from 1.3 MJ/kg to 13.0 MJ/kg and reservoir pressure ranging from 9.0 MPa to 50.0 MPa. Detailed comparisons were performed to insure that previous results obtained in similar boundary layer transition experiments (on a regular smooth surface) were reproduced and the results were extended to examine the effects of the porous surface. These experiments indicated that the porous surface was highly effective in delaying transition provided that the hole size was significantly smaller than the viscous length scale.

  4. Passive hypervelocity boundary layer control using an acoustically absortive surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasheed, Adam

    A series of exploratory boundary layer transition experiments was performed on a sharp 5.06 degree half-angle round cone at zero angle-of-attack in the T5 Hypervelocity Shock Tunnel in order to test a novel hypersonic boundary layer control scheme. Recently performed linear stability analyses suggested that transition could be delayed in hypersonic boundary layers by using an ultrasonically absorptive surface that would damp the second mode (Mack mode). The cone used in the experiments was constructed with a smooth surface on half the cone (to serve as a control) and an acoustically absorptive porous surface on the other half. It was instrumented with flush-mounted thermocouples to detect the transition location. Test gases investigated included nitrogen and carbon dioxide at M = 5 with specific reservoir enthalpy ranging from 1.3 MJ/kg to 13.0 MJ/kg and reservoir pressure ranging from 9.0 MPa to 50.0 MPa. Detailed comparisons were performed to insure that previous results obtained in similar boundary layer transition experiments (on a regular smooth surface) were reproduced and the results were extended to examine the effects of the porous surface. These experiments indicated that the porous surface was highly effective in delaying transition provided that the hole size was significantly smaller than the viscous length scale.

  5. Stability of the laminar boundary layer for an imperfect gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasperas, G.

    The linear perturbation equations are derived for the general case of a compressible imperfect gas characterized by an equation of state utilizing a compressibility factor. The specific case of the Beattie-Bridgeman gas is chosen for calculation. Amplification curves calculated using the Beattie-Bridgeman equation of state for two representative flat plate boundary layers are presented.

  6. Determination of Stability and Translation in a Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crepeau, John; Tobak, Murray

    1996-01-01

    Reducing the infinite degrees of freedom inherent in fluid motion into a manageable number of modes to analyze fluid motion is presented. The concepts behind the center manifold technique are used. Study of the Blasius boundary layer and a precise description of stability within the flow field are discussed.

  7. Boundary-Layer Receptivity and Integrated Transition Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Chau-Lyan; Choudhari, Meelan

    2005-01-01

    The adjoint parabold stability equations (PSE) formulation is used to calculate the boundary layer receptivity to localized surface roughness and suction for compressible boundary layers. Receptivity efficiency functions predicted by the adjoint PSE approach agree well with results based on other nonparallel methods including linearized Navier-Stokes equations for both Tollmien-Schlichting waves and crossflow instability in swept wing boundary layers. The receptivity efficiency function can be regarded as the Green's function to the disturbance amplitude evolution in a nonparallel (growing) boundary layer. Given the Fourier transformed geometry factor distribution along the chordwise direction, the linear disturbance amplitude evolution for a finite size, distributed nonuniformity can be computed by evaluating the integral effects of both disturbance generation and linear amplification. The synergistic approach via the linear adjoint PSE for receptivity and nonlinear PSE for disturbance evolution downstream of the leading edge forms the basis for an integrated transition prediction tool. Eventually, such physics-based, high fidelity prediction methods could simulate the transition process from the disturbance generation through the nonlinear breakdown in a holistic manner.

  8. Atmospheric boundary layer evening transitions over West Texas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A systemic analysis of the atmospheric boundary layer behavior during some evening transitions over West Texas was done using the data from an extensive array of instruments which included small and large aperture scintillometers, net radiometers, and meteorological stations. The analysis also comp...

  9. Turbulent Boundary Layers on a Systematically Varied Rough Wall

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    Aeronaut. Sci. 21, 91 1954. 47I. P. Castro, “Rough-wall boundary layers: Mean flow universality,” J. Fluid Mech. 585, 469 2007. 48P. S. Granville ...Properties of d- and k-type roughness in turbulent channel flow,” Phys. Fluids 19, 125101 2007. 50D. H. Wood and R. A. Antonia, “Measurements in a

  10. Laminarization of Turbulent Boundary Layer on Flexible and Rigid Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, Lucio

    2001-01-01

    An investigation of the control of turbulent boundary layer flow over flexible and rigid surfaces downstream of a concave-convex geometry has been made. The concave-convex curvature induces centrifugal forces and a pressure gradient on the growth of the turbulent boundary layer. The favorable gradient is not sufficient to overcome the unfavorable; thus, the net effect is a destabilizing, of the flow into Gortler instabilities. This study shows that control of the turbulent boundary layer and structural loading can be successfully achieved by using localized surface heating because the subsequent cooling and geometrical shaping downstream over a favorable pressure gradient is effective in laminarization of the turbulence. Wires embedded in a thermally insulated substrate provide surface heating. The laminarized velocity profile adjusts to a lower Reynolds number, and the structure responds to a lower loading. In the laminarization, the turbulent energy is dissipated by molecular transport by both viscous and conductivity mechanisms. Laminarization reduces spanwise vorticity because of the longitudinal cooling gradient of the sublayer profile. The results demonstrate that the curvature-induced mean pressure gradient enhances the receptivity of the flow to localized surface heating, a potentially viable mechanism to laminarize turbulent boundary layer flow; thus, the flow reduces the response of the flexible structure and the resultant sound radiation.

  11. Fifty Years of Boundary-Layer Theory and Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dryden, Hugh L.

    1955-01-01

    The year 1954 marked the 50th anniversary of the Prandtl boundary-layer theory from which we may date the beginning of man's understanding of the dynamics of real fluids. A backward look at this aspect of the history of the last 50 years may be instructive. This paper (1) attempts to compress the events of those 50 years into a few thousand words, to tell in this brief space the interesting story of the development of a new concept, its slow acceptance and growth, its spread from group to group within its country of origin, and its diffusion to other countries of the world. The original brief paper of Prandtl (2) was presented at the Third International Mathematical Congress at Heidelberg in 1904 and published in the following year. It was an attempt to explain the d'Alembert paradox, namely, that the neglect of the small friction of air in the theory resulted in the prediction of zero resistance to motion. Prandtl set himself the task of computing the motion of a fluid of small friction, so small that its effect could be neglected everywhere except where large velocity differences were present or a cumulative effect of friction occurred This led to the concept of boundary layer, or transition layer, near the wall of a body immersed in a fluid stream in which the velocity rises from zero to the free-stream value. It is interesting that Prandtl used the term Grenzsehicht (boundary layer) only once and the term Ubergangsschicht (transition layer) seven times in the brief article. Later writers also used Reibungsschicht (friction layer), but most writers today use Grenzschicht (boundary layer).

  12. Pressure Fluctuations Induced by a Hypersonic Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duan, Lian; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Zhang, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) are used to examine the pressure fluctuations generated by a spatially-developed Mach 5.86 turbulent boundary layer. The unsteady pressure field is analyzed at multiple wall-normal locations, including those at the wall, within the boundary layer (including inner layer, the log layer, and the outer layer), and in the free stream. The statistical and structural variations of pressure fluctuations as a function of wall-normal distance are highlighted. Computational predictions for mean velocity pro les and surface pressure spectrum are in good agreement with experimental measurements, providing a first ever comparison of this type at hypersonic Mach numbers. The simulation shows that the dominant frequency of boundary-layer-induced pressure fluctuations shifts to lower frequencies as the location of interest moves away from the wall. The pressure wave propagates with a speed nearly equal to the local mean velocity within the boundary layer (except in the immediate vicinity of the wall) while the propagation speed deviates from the Taylor's hypothesis in the free stream. Compared with the surface pressure fluctuations, which are primarily vortical, the acoustic pressure fluctuations in the free stream exhibit a significantly lower dominant frequency, a greater spatial extent, and a smaller bulk propagation speed. The freestream pressure structures are found to have similar Lagrangian time and spatial scales as the acoustic sources near the wall. As the Mach number increases, the freestream acoustic fluctuations exhibit increased radiation intensity, enhanced energy content at high frequencies, shallower orientation of wave fronts with respect to the flow direction, and larger propagation velocity.

  13. On Supersonic-Inlet Boundary-Layer Bleed Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harloff, Gary J.; Smith, Gregory E.

    1995-01-01

    Boundary-layer bleed in supersonic inlets is typically used to avoid separation from adverse shock-wave/boundary-layer interactions and subsequent total pressure losses in the subsonic diffuser and to improve normal shock stability. Methodologies used to determine bleed requirements are reviewed. Empirical sonic flow coefficients are currently used to determine the bleed hole pattern. These coefficients depend on local Mach number, pressure ratio, hole geometry, etc. A new analytical bleed method is presented to compute sonic flow coefficients for holes and narrow slots and predictions are compared with published data to illustrate the accuracy of the model. The model can be used by inlet designers and as a bleed boundary condition for computational fluid dynamic studies.

  14. Modeling Disturbance Dynamics in Transitional and Turbulent Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosch, C. E.; Gatski, T. B. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The dynamics of an ensemble of linear disturbances in boundary-layer flows at various Reynolds numbers is studied through an analysis of the transport equations for the mean disturbance kinetic energy and energy dissipation rate. Effects of adverse and favorable pressure-gradients on the disturbance dynamics are also included in the analysis. Unlike the fully turbulent regime where nonlinear phase scrambling of the fluctuations affects the flow field even in proximity to the wall, the early stage transition regime fluctuations studied here are influenced across the boundary layer by the solid boundary. In addition, the dominating dynamics in the disturbance kinetic energy equation is governed by the energy production, pressure-transport and viscous diffusion - also in contrast to the fully turbulent regime. For the disturbance dissipation rate, a dynamic balance exists between the destruction and diffusion of dissipation.

  15. Linear and nonlinear stability of the Blasius boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertolotti, F. P.; Herbert, TH.; Spalart, P. R.

    1992-01-01

    Two new techniques for the study of the linear and nonlinear instability in growing boundary layers are presented. The first technique employs partial differential equations of parabolic type exploiting the slow change of the mean flow, disturbance velocity profiles, wavelengths, and growth rates in the streamwise direction. The second technique solves the Navier-Stokes equation for spatially evolving disturbances using buffer zones adjacent to the inflow and outflow boundaries. Results of both techniques are in excellent agreement. The linear and nonlinear development of Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) waves in the Blasius boundary layer is investigated with both techniques and with a local procedure based on a system of ordinary differential equations. The results are compared with previous work and the effects of non-parallelism and nonlinearity are clarified. The effect of nonparallelism is confirmed to be weak and, consequently, not responsible for the discrepancies between measurements and theoretical results for parallel flow.

  16. Anomalous plasma diffusion and the magnetopause boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treumann, Rudolf A.; Labelle, James; Haerendel, Gerhard; Pottelette, Raymond

    1992-01-01

    An overview of the current state of anomalous diffusion research at the magnetopause and its role in the formation of the magnetopause boundary layer is presented. Plasma wave measurements in the boundary layer indicate that most of the relevant unstable wave modes contribute negligibly to the diffusion process at the magnetopause under magnetically undisturbed northward IMF conditions. The most promising instability is the lower hybrid drift instability, which may yield diffusion coefficients of the right order if the highest measured wave intensities are assumed. It is concluded that global stationary diffusion due to wave-particle interactions does not take place at the magnetopause. Microscopic wave-particle interaction and anomalous diffusion may contribute to locally break the MD frozen-in conditions and help in transporting large amounts of magnetosheath plasma across the magnetospheric boundary.

  17. Effective Receptivity Prediction in Three--Dimensional Boundary Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrinsky, Alex Y.; Collis, S. Scott

    2002-11-01

    While the Parabolized Stability Equations (PSE) have been used in the past to study stability and receptivity of boundary layers, it is unclear how effective they are in the highly nonparallel three-dimensional boundary-layers that occur near the leading edge of swept wings. In this talk, we compare results obtained using Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) with predictions based on PSE for Hiemenz flow subject to wall boundary excitations. After establishing the validity of PSE for stability prediction, we evaluate the Adjoint Parabolized Stability Equations (APSE) for receptivity prediction in Hiemenz flow by comparing with both adjoint Navier--Stokes and DNS as well as results from prior investigations. Along the way, we highlight some important implementational issues of the APSE method necessary to obtain correct receptivity predictions and conclude with general recommendations of when and how PSE and APSE methods should be used to yield accurate receptivity results.

  18. In-plane thermal conductivity of sub-20 nm thick suspended mono-crystalline Si layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrando-Villalba, P.; Lopeandia, A. F.; Abad, Ll; Llobet, J.; Molina-Ruiz, M.; Garcia, G.; Gerbolès, M.; Alvarez, F. X.; Goñi, A. R.; Muñoz-Pascual, F. J.; Rodríguez-Viejo, J.

    2014-05-01

    We measure the thermal conductivity of a 17.5-nm-thick single crystalline Si layer by using a suspended structure developed from a silicon-on-insulator wafer, in which the Si layer bridges the suspended platforms. The obtained value of 19 Wm-1 K-1 at room temperature represents a tenfold reduction with respect to bulk Si. This design paves the way for subsequent lateral nanostructuration of the layer with lithographic techniques, to define different geometries such as Si nanowires, nanostrips or phononic grids. As a proof of concept, nanostrips of 0.5 × 10 μm have been defined by focused ion beam (FIB) in the ultrathin Si layer. After the FIB cutting process with Ga ions at 30 kV and 100 pA, the measured thermal conductivity dramatically decreased to 1.7 Wm-1 K-1, indicating that the structure became severely damaged (amorphous). Re-crystallization of the structure was promoted by laser annealing while monitoring the Raman spectra. The thermal conductivity of the layer increased again to a value of 9.5 Wm-1 K-1 at room temperature, below that of the single crystalline material due to phonon scattering at the grain boundaries.

  19. In-plane thermal conductivity of sub-20 nm thick suspended mono-crystalline Si layers.

    PubMed

    Ferrando-Villalba, P; Lopeandia, A F; Abad, Ll; Llobet, J; Molina-Ruiz, M; Garcia, G; Gerbolès, M; Alvarez, F X; Goñi, A R; Muñoz-Pascual, F J; Rodríguez-Viejo, J

    2014-05-09

    We measure the thermal conductivity of a 17.5-nm-thick single crystalline Si layer by using a suspended structure developed from a silicon-on-insulator wafer, in which the Si layer bridges the suspended platforms. The obtained value of 19 Wm(-1) K(-1) at room temperature represents a tenfold reduction with respect to bulk Si. This design paves the way for subsequent lateral nanostructuration of the layer with lithographic techniques, to define different geometries such as Si nanowires, nanostrips or phononic grids. As a proof of concept, nanostrips of 0.5 × 10 μm have been defined by focused ion beam (FIB) in the ultrathin Si layer. After the FIB cutting process with Ga ions at 30 kV and 100 pA, the measured thermal conductivity dramatically decreased to 1.7 Wm(-1) K(-1), indicating that the structure became severely damaged (amorphous). Re-crystallization of the structure was promoted by laser annealing while monitoring the Raman spectra. The thermal conductivity of the layer increased again to a value of 9.5 Wm(-1) K(-1) at room temperature, below that of the single crystalline material due to phonon scattering at the grain boundaries.

  20. Oxygen inhibition layer of composite resins: effects of layer thickness and surface layer treatment on the interlayer bond strength.

    PubMed

    Bijelic-Donova, Jasmina; Garoushi, Sufyan; Lassila, Lippo V J; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2015-02-01

    An oxygen inhibition layer develops on surfaces exposed to air during polymerization of particulate filling composite. This study assessed the thickness of the oxygen inhibition layer of short-fiber-reinforced composite in comparison with conventional particulate filling composites. The effect of an oxygen inhibition layer on the shear bond strength of incrementally placed particulate filling composite layers was also evaluated. Four different restorative composites were selected: everX Posterior (a short-fiber-reinforced composite), Z250, SupremeXT, and Silorane. All composites were evaluated regarding the thickness of the oxygen inhibition layer and for shear bond strength. An equal amount of each composite was polymerized in air between two glass plates and the thickness of the oxygen inhibition layer was measured using a stereomicroscope. Cylindrical-shaped specimens were prepared for measurement of shear bond strength by placing incrementally two layers of the same composite material. Before applying the second composite layer, the first increment's bonding site was treated as follows: grinding with 1,000-grit silicon-carbide (SiC) abrasive paper, or treatment with ethanol or with water-spray. The inhibition depth was lowest (11.6 μm) for water-sprayed Silorane and greatest (22.9 μm) for the water-sprayed short-fiber-reinforced composite. The shear bond strength ranged from 5.8 MPa (ground Silorane) to 36.4 MPa (water-sprayed SupremeXT). The presence of an oxygen inhibition layer enhanced the interlayer shear bond strength of all investigated materials, but its absence resulted in cohesive and mixed failures only with the short-fiber-reinforced composite. Thus, more durable adhesion with short-fiber-reinforced composite is expected.

  1. Boundary layer flow visualisation patterns on a riblet surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, D. G.

    Boundary layer flow visualization methods, developed at Queen Mary and Westfield College, have been applied to a riblet surface. The results reveal cellular crossflows developing in the grooves between the riblets. These local flor regimes appear to have little direct effect on the flow in the wall layers immediately adjacent to them. Qualitatively, the behavior of the wall layers appears to be that which would be expected if a virtual surface existed at a level slightly above the riblet tops, but a tendency for the origin of longitudinal eddy pairs to become anchored to the top of a riblet is noted.

  2. On the Use of Lagrangian Variables in Descriptions of Unsteady Boundary- Layer Separation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-07-01

    appear in each term of (5.7c, d) when the relevant governing equations are solved, are fixed either by matching with the Hiemenz layer adjacent to the...perturbed Hiemenz front stagnation point boundary-layer profile exists: v , vo(’) + 7- 1vI(y) + 7- 2v2(y) + 7- 3V3(Y) +... (5.8a) where Y - 3o , (5.8b...and 030 - 0.64790 is the Hiemenz displacement thickness. Runge-Kutta solutions of the governing equations for the vj, using the following asymptotic

  3. Composite Fermion Spin Polarization Energy with Finite Layer Thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shayegan, Mansour; Liu, Yang; Hasdemir, Sukret; Pfeiffer, Loren; West, Ken; Baldwin, Kirk

    2014-03-01

    We study the spin polarization transitions of fractional quantum Hall (FQH) states in the filling range 1 < ν < 2 in symmetric quantum wells (QWs), as a function of density. Our results reveal a strong well-width dependence of the critical density nC and ratio between the Zeeman energy (EZ) normalized to the Coulomb energy (e2 / 4 πɛlB), above which a certain FQH state becomes spin polarized. For example, the ν = 7 / 5 FQH state becomes spin polarized at about 3 times higher density or 1.7 times larger EZ in the 31-nm-wide QW than in the 65-nm-wide QW. This well-width dependence of the spin polarization stems from by the finite electron layer thickness in these QWs and the resulting softening of the Coulomb interaction. We acknowledge support through the DOE BES (DE-FG02-00-ER45841) for measurements, and the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation (Grant GBMF2719), Keck Foundation, and the NSF (DMR-0904117, DMR-1305691 and MRSEC DMR-0819860) for sample fabrication. Work at Arg.

  4. Shock-boundary layer interaction and transonic flutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tumkur Karnick, Pradeepa; Venkatraman, Kartik

    2012-11-01

    The transonic flutter dip of an aeroelastic system is primarily caused by compressibility of the flowing fluid. Viscous effects are not dominant in the pre-transonic dip region. In fact, an Euler solver can predict this flutter boundary with considerable accuracy. However with an increase in Mach number the shock moves towards the trailing edge causing shock induced separation. This shock-boundary layer interaction changes the flutter boundary in the transonic and post-transonic dip region significantly. We discuss the effect of viscosity in changing the flutter boundary in the post-transonic dip region using a RANS solver coupled to a two-degree of freedom model of the structural dynamics of a wing.

  5. Trip-Induced Transition Measurements in a Hypersonic Boundary Layer Using Molecular Tagging Velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bathel, Brett F.; Danehy, Paul M.; Jones, Stephen B.; Johansen, Craig T.; Goyne, Christopher P.

    2013-01-01

    Measurements of mean streamwise velocity, fluctuating streamwise velocity, and instantaneous streamwise velocity profiles in a hypersonic boundary layer were obtained over a 10-degree half-angle wedge model. A laser-induced fluorescence-based molecular tagging velocimetry technique was used to make the measurements. The nominal edge Mach number was 4.2. Velocity profiles were measured both in an untripped boundary layer and in the wake of a 4-mm diameter cylindrical tripping element centered 75.4 mm downstream of the sharp leading edge. Three different trip heights were investigated: k = 0.53 mm, k = 1.0 mm and k = 2.0 mm. The laminar boundary layer thickness at the position of the measurements was approximately 1 mm, though the exact thickness was dependent on Reynolds number and wall temperature. All of the measurements were made starting from a streamwise location approximately 18 mm downstream of the tripping element. This measurement region continued approximately 30 mm in the streamwise direction. Additionally, measurements were made at several spanwise locations. An analysis of flow features show how the magnitude, spatial location, and spatial growth of streamwise velocity instabilities are affected by parameters such as the ratio of trip height to boundary layer thickness and roughness Reynolds number. The fluctuating component of streamwise velocity measured along the centerline of the model increased from approximately 75 m/s with no trip to +/-225 m/s with a 0.53-mm trip, and to +/-240 m/s with a 1-mm trip, while holding the freestream Reynolds number constant. These measurements were performed in the 31-inch Mach 10 Air Tunnel at the NASA Langley Research Center.

  6. Some Basic Aspects of Magnetohydrodynamic Boundary-Layer Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, Robert V.

    1959-01-01

    An appraisal is made of existing solutions of magnetohydrodynamic boundary-layer equations for stagnation flow and flat-plate flow, and some new solutions are given. Since an exact solution of the equations of magnetohydrodynamics requires complicated simultaneous treatment of the equations of fluid flow and of electromagnetism, certain simplifying assumptions are generally introduced. The full implications of these assumptions have not been brought out properly in several recent papers. It is shown in the present report that for the particular law of deformation which the magnetic lines are assumed to follow in these papers a magnet situated inside the missile nose would not be able to take up any drag forces; to do so it would have to be placed in the flow away from the nose. It is also shown that for the assumption that potential flow is maintained outside the boundary layer, the deformation of the magnetic lines is restricted to small values. The literature contains serious disagreements with regard to reductions in heat-transfer rates due to magnetic action at the nose of a missile, and these disagreements are shown to be mainly due to different interpretations of reentry conditions rather than more complicated effects. In the present paper the magnetohydrodynamic boundary-layer equation is also expressed in a simple form that is especially convenient for physical interpretation. This is done by adapting methods to magnetic forces which in the past have been used for forces due to gravitational or centrifugal action. The simplified approach is used to develop some new solutions of boundary-layer flow and to reinterpret certain solutions existing in the literature. An asymptotic boundary-layer solution representing a fixed velocity profile and shear is found. Special emphasis is put on estimating skin friction and heat-transfer rates.

  7. The influence of bulges on boundary-layer instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elli, S.; Vandam, C. P.

    Local disturbances caused by a spanwise surface corrugation affect the position of the boundary-layer transition, and so the drag, of an object. This premature transition from laminar to turbulent flow is often associated with a separation of the laminar boundary-layer from its surface. Also the roughness-induced separation bubble provides an important link between the pressure and velocity fluctuations in the environment and the development of the disturbance in the laminar boundary-layer, i.e., the receptivity problem. To investigate the influence of a laminar separation bubble on boundary-layer instability, a separated flow generated by a velocity gradient over a flat plate was analyzed by direct numerical simulation using finite-difference solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations. The bubble acts as a strong amplifier of the instability waves and a highly nonlinear flow field is shown to develop downstream of the bubble. Consequently, the results of the direct numerical simulation differ noticeably from those of the classical linear stability theory proving the fact that the nonparallel effects together with the nonlinear interactions are crucial to this flow development. In the present paper, the effect of physical perturbations such as humps and hollows on boundary-layer instability is analyzed. This problem has been considered theoretically by several researchers (e.g., Nayfeh et al., 1987 and 1990; Cebeci et al., 1988). They used linear stability theory in their approach which does not include the nonparallel nor the nonlinear effects. Therefore, to account for these important effects in studying flow over humps and hollows the direct simulation technique is being implemented in generalized coordinates.

  8. Turbulent boundary layer on a convex, curved surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillis, J. C.; Johnston, J. P.; Kays, W. M.; Moffat, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of strong convex curvature on boundary layer turbulence were investigated. The data gathered on the behavior of Reynolds stress suggested the formulation of a simple turbulence model. Three sets of data were taken on two separate facilities. Both rigs had flow from a flat surface, over a convex surface with 90 deg of turning, and then onto a flat recovery surface. The geometry was adjusted so that, for both rigs, the pressure gradient along the test surface was zero - thus avoiding any effects of streamwise acceleration on the wall layers. Results show that after a sudden introduction of curvature, the shear stress in the outer part of the boundary layer is sharply diminished and is even slightly negative near the edge. The wall shear also drops off quickly downstream. In contrast, when the surface suddenly becomes flat again, the wall shear and shear stress profiles recover very slowly towards flat wall conditions.

  9. Buoyancy effects in an unstably stratified turbulent boundary layer flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dong; Luo, Kun; Fan, Jianren

    2017-01-01

    Direct numerical simulation has been performed to investigate the effect of buoyancy on an unstably stratified turbulent boundary layer with the Oberbeck-Boussinesq approximation. The simulation results show that the mean values of the streamwise velocity and scalar fields are increased in the near-wall region but decreased in the outer layer under the effect of buoyancy, which leads to significant increases in the skin-friction drag and heat transfer. In addition, it is found that the unstable thermal stratification results in large increases in the intensities of the near-wall streamwise vortices and high- and low-speed streaks, and a reduction in the mean diameter of the vortical structures. Moreover, the turbulent coherent structures become less organized due to the stratification effect. With respect to the neutral boundary layer flow, the outer vortical structures tend to bias the direction of the principal extensional strain towards the vertical plane in the unstably stratified flow.

  10. Investigations on entropy layer along hypersonic hyperboloids using a defect boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brazier, J. P.; Aupoix, B.; Cousteix, J.

    1992-01-01

    A defect approach coupled with matched asymptotic expansions is used to derive a new set of boundary layer equations. This method ensures a smooth matching of the boundary layer with the inviscid solution. These equations are solved to calculate boundary layers over hypersonic blunt bodies involving the entropy gradient effect. Systematic comparisons are made for both axisymmetric and plane flows in several cases with different Mach and Reynolds numbers. After a brief survey of the entropy layer characteristics, the defect boundary layer results are compared with standard boundary layer and full Navier-Stokes solutions. The entropy gradient effects are found to be more important in the axisymmetric case than in the plane one. The wall temperature has a great influence on the results through the displacement effect. Good predictions can be obtained with the defect approach over a cold wall in the nose region, with a first order solution. However, the defect approach gives less accurate results far from the nose on axisymmetric bodies because of the thinning of the entropy layer.

  11. Behaviour of Atmospheric Boundary Layer Height at Dome C, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietroni, I.; Argentini, S.

    2009-09-01

    The Antarctic Atmospheric Boundary Layer presents characteristics which are substantially different from the mid-latitudes ABLs. On the Antarctic plateau two different extreme situations are observed. During the summer a mixing height develops during the warmer hours of the day although the sensible heat flux is reduced compared to that at mid-latitudes. During the winter a long lived stable boundary layer is continuously present, the residual layer is never observed, consequently the inversion layer is connected at the free atmosphere. To understand the stable ABL process the STABLEDC (Study of the STAble Boundary Layer Environmental at Dome C) experimental field was held at Concordia, the French Italian plateau station at Dome C, during 2005. In the same period the RMO (Routine Measurements Observations) started. The data included turbulence data at the surface, temperature profiles by a microwave profiler (MTP-5P), a mini-sodar and radio-soundings. In this work we will show the results of a comparison of the ABL height at Concordia (3233 m a.s.l) during the summer and the winter using direct measurements and parameterization. The winter ABL height was estimated directly using experimental data (radio-soundings and radiometer temperature and wind velocity profiles) and different methods proposed in literature. The stable ABL height was also estimated using the formulation proposed by Zilitinkevich et al. (2007) for the long-lived stable boundary layer. The correlation of ABL height with the temperature and wind speed is also shown. The summer mixing height was instead estimated by mini-sodar data and compared with the height given by the model suggested by Batchvarova and Gryning (1991) which use as input the turbulence data.

  12. On buffer layers as non-reflecting computational boundaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayder, M. Ehtesham; Turkel, Eli L.

    1996-01-01

    We examine an absorbing buffer layer technique for use as a non-reflecting boundary condition in the numerical simulation of flows. One such formulation was by Ta'asan and Nark for the linearized Euler equations. They modified the flow inside the buffer zone to artificially make it supersonic in the layer. We examine how this approach can be extended to the nonlinear Euler equations. We consider both a conservative and a non-conservative form modifying the governing equations in the buffer layer. We compare this with the case that the governing equations in the layer are the same as in the interior domain. We test the effectiveness of these buffer layers by a simulation of an excited axisymmetric jet based on a nonlinear compressible Navier-Stokes equations.

  13. Interaction of aerodynamic noise with laminar boundary layers in supersonic wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schopper, M. R.

    1984-01-01

    The interaction between incoming aerodynamic noise and the supersonic laminar boundary layer is studied. The noise field is modeled as a Mach wave radiation field consisting of discrete waves emanating from coherent turbulent entities moving downstream within the supersonic turbulent boundary layer. The individual disturbances are likened to miniature sonic booms and the laminar boundary layer is staffed by the waves as the sources move downstream. The mean, autocorrelation, and power spectral density of the field are expressed in terms of the wave shapes and their average arrival rates. Some consideration is given to the possible appreciable thickness of the weak shock fronts. The emphasis in the interaction analysis is on the behavior of the shocklets in the noise field. The shocklets are shown to be focused by the laminar boundary layer in its outer region. Borrowing wave propagation terminology, this region is termed the caustic region. Using scaling laws from sonic boom work, focus factors at the caustic are estimated to vary from 2 to 6 for incoming shocklet strengths of 1 to .01 percent of the free stream pressure level. The situation regarding experimental evidence of the caustic region is reviewed.

  14. Direct Numerical Simulation of Hypersonic Turbulent Boundary Layer inside an Axisymmetric Nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Junji; Zhang, Chao; Duan, Lian; Choudhari, Meelan M.

    2017-01-01

    As a first step toward a study of acoustic disturbance field within a conventional, hypersonic wind tunnel, direct numerical simulations (DNS) of a Mach 6 turbulent boundary layer on the inner wall of a straight axisymmetric nozzle are conducted and the results are compared with those for a flat plate. The DNS results for a nozzle radius to boundary-layer thickness ratio of 5:5 show that the turbulence statistics of the nozzle-wall boundary layer are nearly unaffected by the transverse curvature of the nozzle wall. Before the acoustic waves emanating from different parts of the nozzle surface can interfere with each other and undergo reflections from adjacent portions of the nozzle surface, the rms pressure fluctuation beyond the boundary layer edge increases toward the nozzle axis, apparently due to a focusing effect inside the axisymmetric configuration. Spectral analysis of pressure fluctuations at both the wall and the freestream indicates a similar distribution of energy content for both the nozzle and the flat plate, with the peak of the premultiplied frequency spectrum at a frequency of [(omega)(delta)]/U(sub infinity) approximately 6.0 inside the free stream and at [(omega)(delta)]/U(sub infinity) approximately 2.0 along the wall. The present results provide the basis for follow-on simulations involving reverberation effects inside the nozzle.

  15. The effect of a shear boundary layer on the stability of a capillary jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganan-Calvo, Alfonso; Montanero, Jose M.; Herrada, Miguel A.

    2014-11-01

    The generic stabilization effect of a shear boundary layer over the free surface of a capillary jet is here studied from analytical (asymptotic), numerical and experimental approaches. In first place, we show the consistency of the proposed asymptotic analysis by a linear stability (numerical) analysis of the Navier-Stokes equations for a finite boundary layer thickness. We show how the convective-to-absolute instability transition departs drastically from the flat velocity profile case as the axial coordinate becomes closer to the origin of the boundary layer development. For large enough axial distances from that origin, Rayleigh's dispersion relation is recovered. A collection of experimental observations is analyzed from the perspective provided by these results. We propose a systematic framework to the dynamics of capillary jets issued from a nozzle, either by direct injection into a quiescent atmosphere or in a co-flow (e.g. gas flow-focused jets), which exhibit peculiarities now definitely attributable in first order to the formation of shear boundary layers. Partial support from the Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness, Junta de Extremadura, and Junta de Andalucia (Spain) through Grant Nos. DPI2010-21103, GR10047, P08-TEP-04128, and TEP-7465, respectively, is gratefully acknowledged.

  16. A Simple Parameterization Coupling the Convective Daytime Boundary Layer and Fair-Weather Cumuli

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, Larry K.; Stull, Roland B.

    2005-06-15

    A new parameterization for boundary-layer cumulus clouds, called the Cumulus Potential (CuP) scheme is introduced. This scheme uses Joint Probability Density Functions (JPDFs) of virtual potential temperature and water-vapor mixing ratio, as well as the mean vertical profiles of virtual potential temperature to predict the amount and size distribution of boundary-layer cloud cover. This model considers the diversity of air parcels over a heterogeneous surface, and recognizes that some parcels rise above their lifting condensation level to become cumulus, while other parcels might rise as non-cloud updrafts. This model has several unique features: (1) cloud cover is determined from the boundary-layer JPDF of virtual potential temperature vs. water-vapor mixing ratio , (2) clear and cloudy thermals are allowed to coexist at the same altitude, and (3) a range of cloud-base heights, cloud-top heights, and cloud thicknesses are predicted within any one cloud field, as observed. Using data from Boundary Layer Experiment 1996, and a model intercomparsion study using Large Eddy Simulation (LES) based on BOMEX, it is shown that the CuP model does a good job predicting cloud-base height and cloud-top height. The model also shows promise in predicting cloud cover, and is found to give better cloud-cover estimates than three other cumulus parameterizations: one based on relative humidity, a statistical scheme based on the saturation deficit, and a slab model.

  17. Turbulent boundary layer heat transfer experiments: Convex curvature effects including introduction and recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, T. W.; Moffat, R. J.; Johnston, J. P.; Kays, W. M.

    1982-01-01

    Measurements were made of the heat transfer rate through turbulent and transitional boundary layers on an isothermal, convexly curved wall and downstream flat plate. The effect of convex curvature on the fully turbulent boundary layer was a reduction of the local Stanton numbers 20% to 50% below those predicted for a flat wall under the same circumstances. The recovery of the heat transfer rates on the downstream flat wall was extremely slow. After 60 cm of recovery length, the Stanton number was still typically 15% to 20% below the flat wall predicted value. Various effects important in the modeling of curved flows were studied separately. These are: the effect of initial boundary layer thickness, the effect of freestream velocity, the effect of freestream acceleration, the effect of unheated starting length, and the effect of the maturity of the boundary layer. An existing curvature prediction model was tested against this broad heat transfer data base to determine where it could appropriately be used for heat transfer predictions.

  18. Porous and Microporous Honeycomb Composites as Potential Boundary-Layer Bleed Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, D. O.; Willis, B. P.; Schoenenberger, M.

    1997-01-01

    Results of an experimental investigation are presented in which the use of porous and microporous honeycomb composite materials is evaluated as an alternate to perforated solid plates for boundary-layer bleed in supersonic aircraft inlets. The terms "porous" and "microporous," respectively, refer to bleed orifice diameters roughly equal to and much less than the displacement thickness of the approach boundary-layer. A Baseline porous solid plate, two porous honeycomb, and three microporous honeycomb configurations are evaluated. The performance of the plates is characterized by the flow coefficient and relative change in boundary-layer profile parameters across the bleed region. The tests were conducted at Mach numbers of 1.27 and 1.98. The results show the porous honeycomb is not as efficient at removing mass compared to the baseline. The microporous plates were about equal to the baseline with one plate demonstrating a significantly higher efficiency. The microporous plates produced significantly fuller boundary-layer profiles downstream of the bleed region for a given mass flow removal rate than either the baseline or the porous honeycomb plates.

  19. Active flow control insight gained from a modified integral boundary layer equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, Avraham

    2016-11-01

    Active Flow Control (AFC) can alter the development of boundary layers with applications (e.g., reducing drag by separation delay or separating the boundary layers and enhancing vortex shedding to increase drag). Historically, significant effects of steady AFC methods were observed. Unsteady actuation is significantly more efficient than steady. Full-scale AFC tests were conducted with varying levels of success. While clearly relevant to industry, AFC implementation relies on expert knowledge with proven intuition and or costly and lengthy computational efforts. This situation hinders the use of AFC while simple, quick and reliable design method is absent. An updated form of the unsteady integral boundary layer (UIBL) equations, that include AFC terms (unsteady wall transpiration and body forces) can be used to assist in AFC analysis and design. With these equations and given a family of suitable velocity profiles, the momentum thickness can be calculated and matched with an outer, potential flow solution in 2D and 3D manner to create an AFC design tool, parallel to proven tools for airfoil design. Limiting cases of the UIBL equation can be used to analyze candidate AFC concepts in terms of their capability to modify the boundary layers development and system performance.

  20. Eliminating Flow Separation and Reducing Viscous Drag Through Boundary Layer Analysis and Manipulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oser, Matthew D.

    1995-01-01

    As both computers and flow-analyzing equations have increased in sophistication, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) has evolved into a fixture for advanced aircraft design. While CFD codes have improved in accuracy and efficiency, their ability to encompass viscous effects is lacking in certain areas. For example, current CFD codes cannot accurately predict or correct for the increased drag due to these viscous effects at some flow conditions. However, by analyzing an airfoil's turbulent boundary layer, one can predict not only flow separation via the shape factor parameter, but also viscous drag via the momentum thickness. Various codes have been written which can calculate turbulent boundary layer parameters. The goal of my research is to develop procedures for modifying an airfoil (via its local pressure distribution) to eliminate boundary layer separation and/or to reduce viscous drag. The modifications to the local pressure distribution necessary to achieve these objectives will be determined using a direct-iterative method installed into a turbulent boundary layer analyzer. Furthermore, the modifications should preserve the basic characteristics of the original airfoil.

  1. Coordinated Parameterization Development and Large-Eddy Simulation for Marine and Arctic Cloud-Topped Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bretherton, Christopher S.

    2002-01-01

    The goal of this project was to compare observations of marine and arctic boundary layers with: (1) parameterization systems used in climate and weather forecast models; and (2) two and three dimensional eddy resolving (LES) models for turbulent fluid flow. Based on this comparison, we hoped to better understand, predict, and parameterize the boundary layer structure and cloud amount, type, and thickness as functions of large scale conditions that are predicted by global climate models. The principal achievements of the project were as follows: (1) Development of a novel boundary layer parameterization for large-scale models that better represents the physical processes in marine boundary layer clouds; and (2) Comparison of column output from the ECMWF global forecast model with observations from the SHEBA experiment. Overall the forecast model did predict most of the major precipitation events and synoptic variability observed over the year of observation of the SHEBA ice camp.

  2. Experimental study of the use of vortex generators to reduce fluctuating pressure loads in shock wave turbulent boundary layer interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barter, John W.; Dolling, David S.

    1995-01-01

    Fluctuating wall pressure measurements have been made in a separated shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interaction produced by an unswept compression corner in a Mach 5 flow. Wheeler doublet vortex generators were placed 15.8 boundary layer thicknesses upstream of the corner to study their effect on the fluctuating pressure loads produced by the translating separation shock. The vortex generators produced significant three-dimensionality in an otherwise two-dimensional interaction. They reduced the upstream influence and the length of the region of shock motion by 60% and 64%, respectively, decreased the maximum wall pressure rms by 23%, and shifted the fluctuations to a higher frequency band. The maximum fraction of energy in the 100-500 Hz frequency band is decreased by 11%. These changes are due to a fuller boundary layer profile, a weaker separation shock, and increased boundary layer turbulence causing increased separation shock jitter.

  3. A general integral form of the boundary-layer equation for incompressible flow with an application to the calculation of the separation point of turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tetervin, Neal; Lin, Chia Chiao

    1951-01-01

    A general integral form of the boundary-layer equation, valid for either laminar or turbulent incompressible boundary-layer flow, is derived. By using the experimental finding that all velocity profiles of the turbulent boundary layer form essentially a single-parameter family, the general equation is changed to an equation for the space rate of change of the velocity-profile shape parameter. The lack of precise knowledge concerning the surface shear and the distribution of the shearing stress across turbulent boundary layers prevented the attainment of a reliable method for calculating the behavior of turbulent boundary layers.

  4. BLSTA: A boundary layer code for stability analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wie, Yong-Sun

    1992-01-01

    A computer program is developed to solve the compressible, laminar boundary-layer equations for two-dimensional flow, axisymmetric flow, and quasi-three-dimensional flows including the flow along the plane of symmetry, flow along the leading-edge attachment line, and swept-wing flows with a conical flow approximation. The finite-difference numerical procedure used to solve the governing equations is second-order accurate. The flow over a wide range of speed, from subsonic to hypersonic speed with perfect gas assumption, can be calculated. Various wall boundary conditions, such as wall suction or blowing and hot or cold walls, can be applied. The results indicate that this boundary-layer code gives velocity and temperature profiles which are accurate, smooth, and continuous through the first and second normal derivatives. The code presented herein can be coupled with a stability analysis code and used to predict the onset of the boundary-layer transition which enables the assessment of the laminar flow control techniques. A user's manual is also included.

  5. Shallow oceanic crust: Full waveform tomographic images of the seismic layer 2A/2B boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christeson, Gail L.; Morgan, Joanna V.; Warner, Michael R.

    2012-05-01

    We present results of full-waveform tomographic inversions of four profiles acquired over young intermediate- and fast spreading rate oceanic crust. The mean velocity-depth functions from our study include a 0.25-0.30 km-thick low-velocity, low-gradient region beneath the seafloor overlying a 0.24-0.28-km-thick high-gradient region; together these regions compose seismic layer 2A. Mean layer 2A interval velocities are 3.0-3.2 km/s. The mean depth to the layer 2A/2B boundary is 0.49-0.54 km, and mean velocities within the upper 0.25 km of layer 2B are 4.7-4.9 km/s. Previous velocity analyses of the study areas using 1-D ray tracing underestimate the thickness of the high-gradient region at the base of layer 2A. We observe differences in the waveform inversion velocity models that correspond to imaging of the layer 2A event; regions with a layer 2A event have higher velocity gradients at the base of layer 2A. Intermittent high velocities, which we interpret as massive flows, are observed in the waveform inversion velocity models at 0.05-0.10 km below the seafloor (bsf) over 10-25% of the intermediate-spreading profiles and 20-45% of the fast spreading profiles. The high-gradient region located 0.25-0.54 km bsf at the base of layer 2A may be associated with an increased prevalence of massive flows, the first appearance of dikes (lava-dike transition zone), or with increased crack sealing by hydrothermal products. The upper portion of layer 2B, which begins at 0.49-0.54 km bsf, may correspond to sheeted dikes or the top of the transition zone of lavas and dikes.

  6. Numerical Simulation of a Spatially Evolving Supersonic Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatski, T. B.; Erlebacher, G.

    2002-01-01

    The results from direct numerical simulations of a spatially evolving, supersonic, flat-plate turbulent boundary-layer flow, with free-stream Mach number of 2.25 are presented. The simulated flow field extends from a transition region, initiated by wall suction and blowing near the inflow boundary, into the fully turbulent regime. Distributions of mean and turbulent flow quantities are obtained and an analysis of these quantities is performed at a downstream station corresponding to Re(sub x)= 5.548 x10(exp 6) based on distance from the leading edge.

  7. Edge Plasma Boundary Layer Generated By Kink Modes in Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    L.E. Zakharov

    2010-11-22

    This paper describes the structure of the electric current generated by external kink modes at the plasma edge using the ideally conducting plasma model. It is found that the edge current layer is created by both wall touching and free boundary kink modes. Near marginal stability, the total edge current has a universal expression as a result of partial compensation of the δ-functional surface current by the bulk current at the edge. The resolution of an apparent paradox with the pressure balance across the plasma boundary in the presence of the surface currents is provided.

  8. On the application of the universal law of velocity defect to nonequilibrium flows in a turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lashkov, Yu. A.; Mikhailov, V. V.; Samoilova, N. V.; Uspenskii, A. A.

    2008-09-01

    On the basis of the results of measurements of the mean velocity profile of a 2-D turbulent boundary layer of an incompressible liquid, the previously proposed universal law of velocity defect has been refined. It has been shown that the refined relations are also applicable to nonequilibrium flows in the boundary layer. The proposed method makes it possible to determine the friction coefficient by the known values of the form parameter and the Reynolds number calculated by the displacement thickness of the layer in a wider range of these values compared to the known Ludwieg-Tillman formula.

  9. Turbulence spectra of the FIRE stratocumulus-topped boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, G. S.; Nucciarone, J. J.; Albrecht, Bruce A.

    1990-01-01

    There are at least four physical phenomena which contribute to the FIRE boundary layer turbulence spectra: boundary layer spanning eddies resulting from buoyant and mechanical production of turbulent kinetic energy (the microscale subrange); inertial subrange turbulence which cascades this energy to smaller scales; quasi-two dimensional mesoscale variations; and gravity waves. The relative contributions of these four phenomena to the spectra depend on the altitude of observation and variable involved (vertical velocity, temperature and moisture spectra are discussed). The physical origins of these variations in relative contribution are discussed. As expected from the theory (Kaimal et al., 1976), mixed layer scaling of the spectra (i.e., nondimensionalizing wavelength by Z(sub i) and spectral density by Z(sub i) and the dissipation rates) is successful for the microscale subrange and inertial subrange but not for the mesoscale subrange. The most striking feature of the normalized vertical velocity spectra is the lack of any significant mesoscale contribution. The spectral peak results from buoyant and mechanical production on scales similar to the boundary layer depth. The decrease in spectral density at larger scales results from the suppression of vertical velocity perturbations with large horizontal scales by the shallowness of the atmosphere. The spectral density also decreases towards smaller scales following the well known inertial subrange slope. There is a significant variation in the shape of the normalized spectra with height.

  10. Scaling properties of the mean wall-normal velocity in the zero pressure gradient boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Tie; Klewicki, Joseph

    2016-11-01

    The scaling properties of the mean wall-normal velocity, V (x , y) , in zero-pressure-gradient laminar and turbulent boundary layer flows is investigated using numerical simulation data, physical experiment data, and integral analyses of governing equations. The maximum mean wall-normal velocity, V∞, and the boundary layer thickness, δ, are evidenced to be the proper scaling for V over most if not the entire boundary layer. This is different from the behavior of the mean streamwise velocity (U) or the turbulent shear stress (T = - ρ < uv >), which depend on different characteristic length scales in the regions near to and away from the surface. Insights pertaining to this are further surmised from an analytical relationship for the ratio of the displacement to momentum thickness, i.e., shape factor, H. Integral analyses using the continuity and mean momentum equation show that (U∞V∞) /uτ2 = H , where uτ is the friction velocity. Both the laminar similarity solution and DNS data in post-transitional flows convincingly support this relation. Over the transitional regime, sufficiently high quality data is still lacking to check if this relation remains valid.

  11. LES of spatially developing turbulent boundary layer over a concave surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arolla, Sunil; Durbin, Paul

    2013-11-01

    We revisit the problem of spatially developing turbulent boundary layer over a concave surface. Unlike previous investigations, we simulate the combined effects of curvature-induced pressure gradients as well as streamline curvature on the turbulence. Our focus is on investigating the response of the turbulent boundary layer to the sudden onset of curvature and the destabilizing influence of concave surface in the presence of pressure gradients. This is of interest for evaluating the turbulence closure models. Numerical simulations have been performed using the large eddy simulation framework in OpenFOAM. The dynamic Smagorinsky model is used to account for the sub-grid scale stresses. A variant of the recycling and rescaling method is used to generate the inflow turbulence. At the beginning of the curve, the momentum thickness Reynolds number is 1300 and the ratio of boundary layer thickness to the radius of curvature is δ0 / R = 0 . 055 . The radial profiles of the mean velocity and turbulence statistics at different locations along the concave surface are presented. In addition, the secondary flow structures observed are reported.

  12. Accuracy of the diffusive gradients in thin-films technique: diffusive boundary layer and effective sampling area considerations.

    PubMed

    Warnken, Kent W; Zhang, Hao; Davison, William

    2006-06-01

    When using the diffusive gradients in thin-films (DGT) technique in well-stirred solutions, the diffusive boundary layer has generally been ignored on the assumption that it is negligibly thin compared to the total thickness of delta g, i.e., the sum of the thickness of the prefilter and diffusive gel. Deployment of devices with different diffusive layer thicknesses showed that the thickness of the DBL was approximately 0.23 mm in moderate to well-stirred solutions, but substantially thicker in poorly or unstirred solutions. Measurement of the distribution of Cd in the DGT resin gel at high spatial resolution (100 microm) using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry showed that the effective sampling window had a larger diameter (2.20 cm) than the geometric diameter of the exposure window (2.00 cm). Lateral diffusion in the gel, which had previously been neglected, therefore increased the effective surface area of the device by approximately 20%. The concentrations measured by DGT agreed well with the known concentrations in standard solutions for all diffusion layer thicknesses, when the effective area and the appropriate diffusive boundary layer (DBL) were used. The extent of the error associated with neglecting the DBL and using the geometric window area depends on the gel layer thickness and the true thickness of the DBL, as determined by the deployment geometry and flow regime. When DGT measurements were made in well-stirred solutions using a 0.80-mm diffusive gel, the effect of neglecting the DBL and using the inappropriate geometric area offset each other, with the error being <+/-10%. For precise measurements, and especially work involving speciation or kinetic measurements, where DGT devices with different diffusive gel layer thicknesses are deployed, it is necessary to use the effective area and the appropriate DBL thickness in the full DGT equation, which allows for the use of layer-specific diffusion coefficients.

  13. A Numerical Study of Sea-Spray Aerosol Motion in a Coastal Thermal Internal Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Tinghao; Yu, Xiping

    2016-08-01

    A three-dimensional large-eddy simulation model is applied to the study of sea-spray aerosol transport, dispersion and settling in the coastal thermal internal boundary layer (IBL) formed by cool airflow from the open sea to the warm land. An idealized situation with constant inflow from the ocean and constant heat flux over the coastal land is considered. The numerical results confirm that the thickness of the coastal thermal IBL increases with the distance from the coastline until the outer edge of the IBL penetrates into the capping inversion layer. The thickness increases also with time until a fully-developed thermal boundary layer is formed. In addition, the thickness of the coastal thermal IBL increases more rapidly when the heat flux over the land is greater. Existence of large-scale eddies within the thermal IBL is identified and the turbulence intensity within the thermal IBL is also found to be significantly higher than that above. It is also indicated that the vertical position of the maximum concentration does not occur at the surface but increases as sea-spray aerosols are transported inland. The vertical position of the maximum flux of sea-spray aerosols within the coastal thermal IBL is shown to coincide with that of the maximum vertical velocity fluctuations when the coastal thermal IBL is fully developed with increased distance in the airflow direction.

  14. Transitional boundary layers in low-Prandtl-number convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, Jörg; Bandaru, Vinodh; Pandey, Ambrish; Scheel, Janet D.

    2016-12-01

    The boundary layer structure of the velocity and temperature fields in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard flows in closed cylindrical cells of unit aspect ratio is revisited from a transitional and turbulent viscous boundary layer perspective. When the Rayleigh number is large enough, the dynamics at the bottom and top plates can be separated into an impact region of downwelling plumes, an ejection region of upwelling plumes, and an interior region away from the side walls. The latter is dominated by the shear of the large-scale circulation (LSC) roll, which fills the whole cell and continuously varies its orientation. The working fluid is liquid mercury or gallium at a Prandtl number Pr=0.021 for Rayleigh numbers 3 ×105≤Ra≤4 ×108 . The generated turbulent momentum transfer corresponds to macroscopic flow Reynolds numbers with 1.8 ×103≤Re≤4.6 ×104 . In highly resolved spectral element direct numerical simulations, we present the mean profiles of velocity, Reynolds stress, and temperature in inner viscous units and compare our findings with convection experiments and channel flow data. The complex three-dimensional and time-dependent structure of the LSC in the cell is compensated by a plane-by-plane symmetry transformation which aligns the horizontal velocity components and all its derivatives with the instantaneous orientation of the LSC. As a consequence, the torsion of the LSC is removed, and a streamwise direction in the shear flow can be defined. It is shown that the viscous boundary layers for the largest Rayleigh numbers are highly transitional and obey properties that are directly comparable to transitional channel flows at friction Reynolds numbers Reτ≲102 . The transitional character of the viscous boundary layer is also underlined by the strong enhancement of the fluctuations of the wall stress components with increasing Rayleigh number. An extrapolation of our analysis data suggests that the friction Reynolds number Reτ in the velocity boundary

  15. Boundary-Value Problem for Two-Dimensional Fluctuations in Boundary Layers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-07-01

    inviscid analysis by P. Durbin "Distortion of turbulence by a constant-shear layer adjacent to a wall," private communication (1977). (l.2e) 2-D...vortices near a boundary," ~ of the Americ~ p ~ ~ , Volume 20, Number 9 (November 1975). 21. Hultgren, Lennart S. and Gustavsson, L. Hakan, " Algebraic

  16. Determination of Boundary-Layer Transition on Three Symmetrical Airfoils in the NACA Full-Scale Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverstein, Abe; Becker, John V

    1938-01-01

    For the purpose of studying the transition from laminar to turbulent flow, boundary-layer measurements were made in the NACA full-scale wind tunnel on three symmetrical airfoils of NACA 0009, 0012, and 0018 sections. The effects of variations in lift coefficient, Reynolds number, and airfoil thickness on transition were investigated. Air speed in the boundary layer was measured by total-head tubes and by hot wires; a comparison of transition as indicated by the two techniques was obtained. The results indicate no unique value of Reynolds number for the transition, whether the Reynolds number is based upon the distance along the chord or upon the thickness of the boundary layer at the transition point. In general, the transition is not abrupt and occurs in a region that varies in length as a function of the test conditions.

  17. Simulation and optimal control of wind-farm boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, Johan; Goit, Jay

    2014-05-01

    In large wind farms, the effect of turbine wakes, and their interaction leads to a reduction in farm efficiency, with power generated by turbines in a farm being lower than that of a lone-standing turbine by up to 50%. In very large wind farms or `deep arrays', this efficiency loss is related to interaction of the wind farms with the planetary boundary layer, leading to lower wind speeds at turbine level. Moreover, for these cases it has been demonstrated both in simulations and wind-tunnel experiments that the wind-farm energy extraction is dominated by the vertical turbulent transport of kinetic energy from higher regions in the boundary layer towards the turbine level. In the current study, we investigate the use of optimal control techniques combined with Large-Eddy Simulations (LES) of wind-farm boundary layer interaction for the increase of total energy extraction in very large `infinite' wind farms. We consider the individual wind turbines as flow actuators, whose energy extraction can be dynamically regulated in time so as to optimally influence the turbulent flow field, maximizing the wind farm power. For the simulation of wind-farm boundary layers we use large-eddy simulations in combination with actuator-disk and actuator-line representations of wind turbines. Simulations are performed in our in-house pseudo-spectral code SP-Wind that combines Fourier-spectral discretization in horizontal directions with a fourth-order finite-volume approach in the vertical direction. For the optimal control study, we consider the dynamic control of turbine-thrust coefficients in an actuator-disk model. They represent the effect of turbine blades that can actively pitch in time, changing the lift- and drag coefficients of the turbine blades. Optimal model-predictive control (or optimal receding horizon control) is used, where the model simply consists of the full LES equations, and the time horizon is approximately 280 seconds. The optimization is performed using a

  18. Self-consistent high Reynolds number asymptotics based on the log-law for ZPG turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monkewitz, Peter A.; Nagib, Hassan M.; Chauhan, Kapil A.

    2007-11-01

    The large Reynolds number behavior of flat plate turbulent boundary layers under zero pressure gradient (ZPG) is revisited. Starting from the classical two-layer approach of Millikan and Clauser with a logarithmic velocity profile in the overlap region between ``inner" and ``outer" layer, a fully self-consistent leading-order description of the mean velocity profile, all integral parameters and the downstream evolution of the boundary layer thickness is developed. The latter requires the knowledge of the virtual origin of the boundary layer which is determined from the K'arm'an equation. It is demonstrated that this self-consistent description based on the classical log-law fits all the known high Reynolds number data, and in particular their Reynolds number dependence, exceedingly well; i.e. within experimental errors.

  19. Layer-by-layer Assembly of Thick, Cu2+-Chelating Films

    PubMed Central

    Wijeratne, Salinda; Bruening, Merlin L.; Baker, Gregory L.

    2013-01-01

    Layer-by-layer adsorption of protonated poly(allylamine) (PAH) and deprotonated poly(N,N-dicarboxymethylallyl amine) (PDCMAA) yields thick films with a high density of iminodiacetic acid (IDA) ligands that bind metal ions. When film deposition occurs at pH 3.0, PAH/PDCMAA bilayer thicknesses reach 200 nm, and Cu2+ binding capacities are ~2.5 mmoles per cm3 of film. (PAH/PDCMAA)10 films deposited at pH 3.0 are 4- to 8-fold thicker than films formed at pH 5.0, 7.0, or 9.0, presumably because of the low charge density on PDCMAA chains at pH 3.0. However, with normalization to film thickness, all films bind similar amounts of Cu2+ from pH 4.1 solutions of CuSO4. In μm-thick films, equilibration of binding sites with Cu2+ requires ~4 h due to a low Cu2+ diffusion coefficient (~2.6×10−12 cm2/sec). Sorption isotherms determined at several temperatures show that Cu2+ binding is endothermic with a positive entropy (binding constants increase with increasing temperature), presumably because metal-ion complexation involves displacement of both a proton from IDA and water molecules from Cu2+. (PAH/PDCMAA)10 films retain their binding capacity over 4 absorption/elution cycles and may prove useful in metal-ion scavenging, catalysis, and protein binding. PMID:24044576

  20. Boundary layer ozone - An airborne survey above the Amazon Basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Gerald L.; Browell, Edward V.; Warren, Linda S.

    1988-01-01

    Ozone data obtained over the forest canopy of the Amazon Basin during July and August 1985 in the course of NASA's Amazon Boundary Layer Experiment 2A are discussed, and ozone profiles obtained during flights from Belem to Tabatinga, Brazil, are analyzed to determine any cross-basin effects. The analyses of ozone data indicate that the mixed layer of the Amazon Basin, for the conditions of undisturbed meteorology and in the absence of biomass burning, is a significant sink for tropospheric ozone. As the coast is approached, marine influences are noted at about 300 km inland, and a transition from a forest-controlled mixed layer to a marine-controlled mixed layer is noted.

  1. Magnetic and magnetoresistance studies of nanometric electrodeposited Co films and Co/Cu layered structures: Influence of magnetic layer thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zsurzsa, S.; Péter, L.; Kiss, L. F.; Bakonyi, I.

    2017-01-01

    The magnetic properties and the magnetoresistance behavior were investigated for electrodeposited nanoscale Co films, Co/Cu/Co sandwiches and Co/Cu multilayers with individual Co layer thicknesses ranging from 1 nm to 20 nm. The measured saturation magnetization values confirmed that the nominal and actual layer thicknesses are in fairly good agreement. All three types of layered structure exhibited anisotropic magnetoresistance for thick magnetic layers whereas the Co/Cu/Co sandwiches and Co/Cu multilayers with thinner magnetic layers exhibited giant magnetoresistance (GMR), the GMR magnitude being the largest for the thinnest Co layers. The decreasing values of the relative remanence and the coercive field when reducing the Co layer thickness down to below about 3 nm indicated the presence of superparamagnetic (SPM) regions in the magnetic layers which could be more firmly evidenced for these samples by a decomposition of the magnetoresistance vs. field curves into a ferromagnetic and an SPM contribution. For thicker magnetic layers, the dependence of the coercivity (Hc) on magnetic layer thickness (d) could be described for each of the layered structure types by the usual equation Hc=Hco+a/dn with an exponent around n=1. The common value of n suggests a similar mechanism for the magnetization reversal by domain wall motion in all three structure types and hints also at the absence of coupling between magnetic layers in the Co/Cu/Co sandwiches and Co/Cu multilayers.

  2. Generalization of Boundary-Layer Momentum-Integral Equations to Three-Dimensional Flows Including Those of Rotating System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mager, Arthur

    1952-01-01

    The Navier-Stokes equations of motion and the equation of continuity are transformed so as to apply to an orthogonal curvilinear coordinate system rotating with a uniform angular velocity about an arbitrary axis in space. A usual simplification of these equations as consistent with the accepted boundary-layer theory and an integration of these equations through the boundary layer result in boundary-layer momentum-integral equations for three-dimensional flows that are applicable to either rotating or nonrotating fluid boundaries. These equations are simplified and an approximate solution in closed integral form is obtained for a generalized boundary-layer momentum-loss thickness and flow deflection at the wall in the turbulent case. A numerical evaluation of this solution carried out for data obtained in a curving nonrotating duct shows a fair quantitative agreement with the measures values. The form in which the equations are presented is readily adaptable to cases of steady, three-dimensional, incompressible boundary-layer flow like that over curved ducts or yawed wings; and it also may be used to describe the boundary-layer flow over various rotating surfaces, thus applying to turbomachinery, propellers, and helicopter blades.

  3. Properties of the turbulent/non-turbulent interface in boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borrell, Guillem; Jiménez, Javier

    2016-08-01

    The turbulent/non-turbulent interface is analysed in a direct numerical simulation of a boundary layer in the range $Re_\\theta=2800-6600$, with emphasis on the behaviour of the relatively large-scale fractal intermittent region. This requires the introduction of a new definition of the distance between a point and a general surface, which is compared with the more usual vertical distance to the top of the layer. Interfaces are obtained by thresholding the enstrophy field and the magnitude of the rate-of-strain tensor, and it is concluded that, while the former are physically relevant features, the latter are not. By varying the threshold, a topological transition is identified as the interface moves from the free stream into the turbulent core. A vorticity scale is defined that collapses that transition for different Reynolds numbers, roughly equivalent to the root-mean-squared vorticity at the edge of the boundary layer. Conditionally averaged flow variables are analysed as functions of the new distance, both within and outside the interface. It is found that the interface contains a nonequilibrium layer whose thickness scales well with the Taylor microscale, enveloping a self-similar layer spanning a fixed fraction of the boundary-layer thickness. Interestingly, the straining structure of the flow is similar in both regions. Irrotational pockets within the turbulent core are also studied. They form a self-similar set whose size decreases with increasing depth, presumably due to break-up by the turbulence, but the rate of viscous diffusion is independent of the pocket size. The raw data used in the analysis are freely available from our web page (http://torroja.dmt.upm.es).

  4. Experimental determination of the boundary layer at air-sample inlet positions on the NASA CV 990 aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowen, S. W.; Vedder, J. F.; Condon, E. P.

    1984-01-01

    Full-scale, in-flight measurements of the boundary-layer thickness, velocity profile, and flow angle have been made at several sample collection stations on the fuselage of the NASA CV 990. These results are given as functions of Mach number, Reynolds number, yaw, and angle of attack.

  5. Instability of a Local Downflow in a Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundgren, Thomas

    2006-11-01

    In the laminar Hiemenz stagnation point flow a downflow produces a straining flow along the boundary. This flow is unstable (Hammerlin,1955) with neutral eigensolution consisting of alternating sign vortex cells of uniform strength along the flow direction. Low-speed and high-speed streaks at the cell boundaries increase in amplitude in the flow direction. In the turbulent problem a local downflow is envisioned to be caused by large scale structures in the outer part of the boundary layer. The Reynolds-averaged equations were employed with an eddy viscosity which depens only on the distance from the wall. The resulting equations are unstable to longitudinal vortices with a structure similar to the Hiemenz neutral egensolutin, with a continuous spectrum of the spanwise wavenumber. It is found that the wavenumber must be smaller than a critical value which depends on the local strainrate. In general when the downflow is weaker the critical wavenuber is smaller (streak spacing larger).

  6. Entropy generation in the viscous parts of turbulent boundary layers

    SciTech Connect

    Donald M. McEligot; Edmund J. Walsh; Eckart Laurien; Philippe R. Spalart

    2008-06-01

    The local (pointwise) entropy generation rate per unit volume S is a key to improving many energy processes and applications. Consequently, in the present study, the objectives are to examine the effects of Reynolds number and favorable streamwise pressure gradients on entropy generation rates across turbulent boundary layers on flat plates and—secondarily—to assess a popular approximate technique for their evaluation. About two-thirds or more of the entropy generation occurs in the viscous part, known as the viscous layer. Fundamental new results for entropy generation in turbulent boundary layers are provided by extending available direct numerical simulations. It was found that, with negligible pressure gradients, results presented in wall coordinates are predicted to be near “universal” in the viscous layer. This apparent universality disappears when a significant pressure gradient is applied; increasing the pressure gradient decreases the entropy generation rate. Within the viscous layer, the approximate evaluation of S differs significantly from the “proper” value but its integral, the entropy generation rate per unit surface area S, agrees within 5% at its edge.

  7. Boundary-layer turbulence as a kangaroo process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekker, H.; de Leeuw, G.; Maassen van den Brink, A.

    1995-09-01

    A nonlocal mixing-length theory of turbulence transport by finite size eddies is developed by means of a novel evaluation of the Reynolds stress. The analysis involves the contruct of a sample path space and a stochastic closure hypothesis. The simplifying property of exhange (strong eddies) is satisfied by an analytical sampling rate model. A nonlinear scaling relation maps the path space onto the semi-infinite boundary layer. The underlying near-wall behavior of fluctuating velocities perfectly agrees with recent direct numerical simulations. The resulting integro-differential equation for the mixing of scalar densities represents fully developed boundary-layer turbulence as a nondiffusive (Kubo-Anderson or kangaroo) type of stochastic process. The model involves a scaling exponent ɛ (with ɛ-->∞ in the diffusion limit). For the (partly analytical) solution for the mean velocity profile, excellent agreement with the experimental data yields ɛ~=0.58.

  8. Temporally optimized spanwise vorticity sensor measurements in turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrill-Winter, C.; Klewicki, J.; Baidya, R.; Marusic, I.

    2015-12-01

    Multi-element hot-wire anemometry was used to measure spanwise vorticity fluctuations in turbulent boundary layers. Smooth wall boundary layer profiles, with very good spatial and temporal resolution, were acquired over a Kármán number range of 2000-12,700 at the Melbourne Wind Tunnel at the University of Melbourne and the University of New Hampshire's Flow Physics Facility. A custom hot-wire probe was necessary to simultaneously obtain velocity and spanwise vorticity measurements centered at a fixed point in space. A custom calibration/processing scheme was developed to utilize single-wall-parallel wires to optimize the accuracy of the measured wall-normal velocity fluctuations derived from the sensor's ×-array.

  9. Turbulence structures in a strongly decelerated boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gungor, Ayse G.; Maciel, Yvan; Simens, Mark P.

    2014-11-01

    The characteristics of three-dimensional intense Reynolds shear stress structures (Qs) are presented from a direct numerical simulation of an adverse pressure gradient boundary layer at Reθ = 1500 -2175. The intense Q2 (ejections) and Q4 (sweeps) structures separate into two groups: wall-attached and wall-detached structures. In the region where turbulent activity is maximal, between 0 . 2 δ and 0 . 6 δ , 94 % of the structures are detached structures. In comparison to canonical wall flows, the large velocity defect turbulent boundary layers are less efficient in extracting turbulent energy from the mean flow. There is, furthermore, much less turbulence activity and less velocity coherence near the wall. Additionally, the wall-detached structures are more frequent and carry a much larger amount of Reynolds shear stress. Funded in part by ITU, NSERC of Canada, and Multiflow program of the ERC.

  10. Investigation of Turbulent Boundary-Layer Separation Using Laser Velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Modarress, D.; Johnson, D. A.

    1979-01-01

    Boundary-layer measurements realized by laser velocimetry are presented for a Much 2.9, two-dimensional, shock-wave/turbulent boundary-layer interaction containing an extensive region of separated flow. Mean velocity and turbulent intensity profiles were obtained from upstream of the interaction zone to downstream of the mean reattachment point. The superiority of the laser velocimeter technique over pressure sensors in turbulent separated flows is demonstrated by a comparison of the laser velocimeter data with results obtained from local pilot and static pressure measurements for the same flow conditions. The locations of the mean separation and reattachment points as deduced from the mean velocity measurements are compared to oil-now visualization results. Representative velocity probability density functions obtained in the separated now region are also presented. Critical to the success of this investigation were: the use of Bragg cell frequency shifting and artificial seeding of the now with submicron light-scattering particles.

  11. Evaporation estimates using weather station data and boundary layer theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentine, P.; Chhang, A.; Rigden, A.; Salvucci, G.

    2016-11-01

    Global estimates of evapotranspiration remain a challenge. In this study, we show that the daily course of air temperature and specific humidity available at routine weather stations can be used to estimate evapotranspiration and the evaporative fraction, the ratio of latent heat flux to available energy at the surface. Indeed, the diurnal increase in air temperature reflects the magnitude of the sensible heat flux and the increase of specific humidity after sunrise reflects the amplitude of evapotranspiration. The method is physically constrained and based on the budget of heat and moisture in the boundary layer. Unlike land surface-based estimates, the proposed boundary layer estimate does not rely on ad hoc surface resistance parameterizations (e.g., Penman-Monteith). The proposed methodology can be applied to data collected at weather stations to estimate evapotranspiration and evaporative fraction under cloudy conditions and in the pre-remote sensing era.

  12. Influence of localised double suction on a turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyewola, O.; Djenidi, L.; Antonia, R. A.

    2007-07-01

    The effects of localised suction applied through a pair of porous wall strips on a turbulent boundary layer have been quantified through the measurements of mean velocity and Reynolds stresses. The results indicate that the use of second strip extends the pseudo-relaminarisation zone but also reduces the overshoot in the longitudinal and normal r.m.s. velocities. While the minimum r.m.s. occurs at x/δo=3.0 (one strip) and x/δo=12 (two strips), the reduction observed for the latter case is larger. Relative to no suction, the turbulence level is modified by suction and the effect is enhanced with double suction. This increased effectiveness reflects the fact that the second strip acts on a boundary layer whose near-wall active motion has been seriously weakened by the first strip.

  13. A review of unsteady turbulent boundary-layer experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, L. W.

    1981-01-01

    The essential results of a comprehensive review of existing unsteady turbulent boundary-layer experiments are presented. Different types of unsteady flow facilities are described, and the related unsteady turbulent boundary-layer experiments are cataloged and discussed. The measurements that were obtained in the various experiments are described, and a complete list of experimental results is presented. All the experiments that measured instantaneous values of velocity, turbulence intensity, or turbulent shear stress are identified, and the availability of digital data is indicated. The results of the experiments are analyzed, and several significant trends are identified. An assessment of the available data is presented, delineating gaps in the existing data, and indicating where new or extended information is needed. Guidelines for future experiments are included.

  14. Atmospheric surface and boundary layers of the Amazon Basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garstang, Michael

    1987-01-01

    Three phases of work were performed: design of and preparation for the Amazon Boundary Layer Experiment (ABLE 2-A); execution of the ABLE 2-A field program; and analysis of the ABLE 2-A data. Three areas of experiment design were dealt with: surface based meteorological measurements; aircraft missions; and project meteorological support. The primary goal was to obtain a good description of the structure of the atmosphere immediately above the rain forest canopy (top of canopy to a few thousand meters), to describe this region during the growing daytime phase of the boundary layer; and to examine the nighttime stratified state. A secondary objective was to examine the role that deep convective storms play in the vertical transport of heat, water vapor, and other trace gases. While significant progress was made, much of the analysis remains to be done.

  15. Excitation of Crossflow Instabilities in a Swept Wing Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Mark H.; Choudhari, Meelan; Li, Fei; Streett, Craig L.; Chang, Chau-Lyan

    2010-01-01

    The problem of crossflow receptivity is considered in the context of a canonical 3D boundary layer (viz., the swept Hiemenz boundary layer) and a swept airfoil used recently in the SWIFT flight experiment performed at Texas A&M University. First, Hiemenz flow is used to analyze localized receptivity due to a spanwise periodic array of small amplitude roughness elements, with the goal of quantifying the effects of array size and location. Excitation of crossflow modes via nonlocalized but deterministic distribution of surface nonuniformity is also considered and contrasted with roughness induced acoustic excitation of Tollmien-Schlichting waves. Finally, roughness measurements on the SWIFT model are used to model the effects of random, spatially distributed roughness of sufficiently small amplitude with the eventual goal of enabling predictions of initial crossflow disturbance amplitudes as functions of surface roughness parameters.

  16. Flight Experiment Verification of Shuttle Boundary Layer Transition Prediction Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott A.; Berger, Karen T.; Horvath, Thomas J.; Wood, William A.

    2016-01-01

    Boundary layer transition at hypersonic conditions is critical to the design of future high-speed aircraft and spacecraft. Accurate methods to predict transition would directly impact the aerothermodynamic environments used to size a hypersonic vehicle's thermal protection system. A transition prediction tool, based on wind tunnel derived discrete roughness correlations, was developed and implemented for the Space Shuttle return-to-flight program. This tool was also used to design a boundary layer transition flight experiment in order to assess correlation uncertainties, particularly with regard to high Mach-number transition and tunnel-to-flight scaling. A review is provided of the results obtained from the flight experiment in order to evaluate the transition prediction tool implemented for the Shuttle program.

  17. Boundary layer integral matrix procedure code modifications and verifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, R. M.; Morse, H. L.

    1974-01-01

    A summary of modifications to Aerotherm's Boundary Layer Integral Matrix Procedure (BLIMP) code is presented. These modifications represent a preliminary effort to make BLIMP compatible with other JANNAF codes and to adjust the code for specific application to rocket nozzle flows. Results of the initial verification of the code for prediction of rocket nozzle type flows are discussed. For those cases in which measured free stream flow conditions were used as input to the code, the boundary layer predictions and measurements are in excellent agreement. In two cases, with free stream flow conditions calculated by another JANNAF code (TDK) for use as input to BLIMP, the predictions and the data were in fair agreement for one case and in poor agreement for the other case. The poor agreement is believed to result from failure of the turbulent model in BLIMP to account for laminarization of a turbulent flow. Recommendations for further code modifications and improvements are also presented.

  18. Optimal disturbances in boundary layers subject to streamwise pressure gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashpis, David E.; Tumin, Anatoli

    2003-01-01

    An analysis of the optimal non-modal growth of perturbations in a boundary layer in the presence of a streamwise pressure gradient is presented. The analysis is based on PSE equations for an incompressible fluid. Examples with Falkner-Scan profiles indicate that a favorable pressure gradient decreases the non-modal growth, while an unfavorable pressure gradient leads to an increase of the amplification. It is suggested that the transient growth mechanism be utilized to choose optimal parameters of tripping elements on a low-pressure turbine (LPT) airfoil. As an example, a boundary layer flow with a streamwise pressure gradient corresponding to the pressure distribution over a LPT airfoil is considered. It is shown that there is an optimal spacing of the tripping elements and that the transient growth effect depends on the starting point.

  19. Characteristics of Mach 10 transitional and turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, R. D.

    1978-01-01

    Measurements of the mean flow properties of transitional and turbulent boundary layers in helium on 4 deg and 5 deg wedges were made for flows with edge Mach numbers from 9.5 to 11.3, ratios of wall temperature to total temperature of 0.4 to 0.95, and maximum length Reynolds numbers of one hundred million. The data include pitot and total temperature surveys and measurements of heat transfer and surface shear. In addition, with the assumption of local similarity, turbulence quantities such as the mixing length were derived from the mean flow profiles. Low Reynolds number and precursor transition effects were significant factors at these test conditions and were included in finite difference boundary layer predictions.

  20. Works on theory of flapping wing. [considering boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golubev, V. V.

    1980-01-01

    It is shown mathematically that taking account of the boundary layer is the only way to develop a theory of flapping wings without violating the basic observations and mathematics of hydromechanics. A theory of thrust generation by flapping wings can be developed if the conventional downstream velocity discontinuity surface is replaced with the observed Karman type vortex streets behind a flapping wing. Experiments show that the direction of such vortices is the reverse of that of conventional Karman streets. The streets form by breakdown of the boundary layer. Detailed analysis of the movements of certain birds and insects during flight 'in place' is fully consistent with this theory of the lift, thrust and drag of flapping wings. Further directions for research into flight with flapping wings are indicated.

  1. Modeling roughness effects in turbulent boundary layers using elliptic relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Jacob; de Simone, Alejandro; Iaccarino, Gianluca; Jimenez, Javier

    2010-11-01

    We present results from the efforts towards modeling roughness in turbulent boundary layers using elliptic relaxation. This scheme, included in the v^2-f model and first formulated by Durbin (1993, JFM, vol. 249, p.465) for smooth-walls, uses an elliptic partial differential equation to incorporate near-wall turbulence anisotropy and non-local pressure-strain effects. The use of the elliptic PDE is extended to model roughness effects in various transitionally-rough and fully-rough boundary layers consisting of a uniform and sparse distribution of cylinders for which experimental data is available. The roughness effects are incorporated through the elliptic PDE by including the length and time scales that the roughness imposes upon the flow, which the experiment has shown to be constant within the rough-walls. Further modeling of roughness effects is considered by altering the source terms in the elliptic PDE.

  2. Optimal control of wind turbines in a turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, Ali Emre; Meyers, Johan

    2016-11-01

    In recent years, optimal control theory was combined with large-eddy simulations to study the optimal control of wind farms and their interaction with the atmospheric boundary layer. The individual turbine's induction factors were dynamically controlled in time with the aim of increasing overall power extraction. In these studies, wind turbines were represented using an actuator disk method. In the current work, we focus on optimal control on a much finer mesh (and a smaller computational domain), representing turbines with an actuator line method. Similar to Refs., optimization is performed using a gradient-based method, and gradients are obtained employing an adjoint formulation. Different cases are investigated, that include a single and a double turbine case both with uniform inflow, and with turbulent-boundary-layer inflow. The authors acknowledge support from the European Research Council (FP7-Ideas, Grant No. 306471).

  3. Construction of a Non-Equilibrium Thermal Boundary Layer Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biles, Drummond; Ebadi, Alireza; Ma, Allen; White, Christopher

    2015-11-01

    A thermally conductive, electrically heated wall-plate forming the bottom wall of a wind tunnel has been constructed and validation tests have been performed. The wall-plate is a sectioned wall design, where each section is independently heated and controlled. Each section consists of an aluminum 6061 plate, an array of resistive heaters affixed to the bottom of the aluminum plate, and a calcium silicate holder used for thermal isolation. Embedded thermocouples in the aluminum plates are used to monitor the wall temperature and for feedback control of wall heating. The wall-plate is used to investigate thermal transport in both equilibrium and non-equilibrium boundary layers. The non-equilibrium boundary layer flow investigated is oscillatory flow produced by a rotor-stator mechanism placed downstream of the test section of the wind tunnel.

  4. Planetary boundary layer dynamics over the Amazon rain forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereiradeoliveira, Amauri

    Observations of the diurnal evolution of the planetary boundary layer (PBL) over the Amazon rain forest, in the area of the Amazon boundary layer experiment (ABLE) 2A and 2B experiments showed the existence of a low level circulation with low level nocturnal maxima winds. These circulations are shown to be induced by the thermal contrast between the river and the forest. A linear model was applied to identify the horizontal extent of these circulations and an associated perturbation pressure gradient consistent with the observations. A second order closure model was used to simulate changes in the PBL caused by the thermal circulation. Good agreement with the observations was obtained when the forcing was a horizontal pressure gradient equal to 0.5 mb/100km of limited vertical extent. The dynamics of the equatorial PBL was shown to be plausibly explained using a hypothesis of a river breeze circulation.

  5. Boundary layer energization by means of optimized vortex generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barber, T. J.; Mounts, J. S.; Mccormick, D. C.

    1993-01-01

    A three-dimensional, multi-block, multi-zone, Euler analysis has been developed and applied to analyze the flow processes induced by a lateral array of low profile vortex generators (VG). These vortex generators have been shown to alleviate boundary layer separation through the generation of streamwise vorticity. The analysis has been applied to help develop improved VG configurations in an efficient manner. Special attention has been paid to determining the accuracy requirements of the solver for calculations in which vortical mechanisms are dominant. The analysis has been used to assess the effectiveness or boundary layer energization capacity of different VG's, including the effect of scale and shape variation. Finally, the analysis has been validated through comparisons with experimental data obtained in a large-scale low-speed wind tunnel.

  6. Possibilities for drag reduction by boundary layer control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naiman, I.

    1946-01-01

    The mechanics of laminar boundary layer transition are reviewed. Drag possibilities for boundary layer control are analyzed using assumed conditions of transition Reynolds number, inlet loss, number of slots, blower efficiency, and duct losses. Although the results of such analysis are highly favorable, those obtained by experimental investigations yield conflicting results, showing only small gains, and sometimes losses. Reduction of this data indicates that there is a lower limit to the quantity of air which must be removed at the slot in order to stabilize the laminar flow. The removal of insufficient air permits transition to occur while the removal of excessive amounts of air results in high power costs, with a net drag increases. With the estimated value of flow coefficient and duct losses equal to half the dynamic pressure, drag reductions of 50% may be obtained; with twice this flow coefficient, the drag saving is reduced to 25%.

  7. Investigation of blown boundary layers with an improved wall jet system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saripalli, K. R.; Simpson, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    Measurements were made in a two dimensional incompressible wall jet submerged under a thick upstream boundary layer with a zero pressure gradient and an adverse pressure gradient. The measurements included mean velocity and Reynolds stresses profiles, skin friction, and turbulence spectra. The measurements were confined to practical ratios (less than 2) of the jet velocity to the free stream velocity. The wall jet used in the experiments had an asymmetric velocity profile with a relatively higher concentration of momentum away from the wall. An asymmetric jet velocity profile has distinct advantages over a uniform jet velocity profile, especially in the control of separation. Predictions were made using Irwin's (1974) method for blown boundary layers. The predictions clearly show the difference in flow development between an asymmetric jet velocity profile and a uniform jet velocity profile.

  8. Experimental investigation of sound generation by a protuberance in a laminar boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, M.; Asai, M.; Inasawa, A.

    2014-08-01

    Sound radiation from a two-dimensional protuberance glued on the wall in a laminar boundary layer was investigated experimentally at low Mach numbers. When the protuberance was as high as the boundary-layer thickness, a feedback-loop mechanism set in between protuberance-generated sound and Tollmien-Schlichting (T-S) waves generated by the leading-edge receptivity to the upstream-propagating sound. Although occurrence of a separation bubble immediately upstream of the protuberance played important roles in the evolution of instability waves into vortices interacting with the protuberance, the frequency of tonal vortex sound was determined by the selective amplification of T-S waves in the linear instability stage upstream of the separation bubble and was not affected by the instability of the separation bubble.

  9. The Compressible Laminar Boundary Layer with Heat Transfer and Arbitrary Pressure Gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Clarence B; Reshotko, Eli

    1956-01-01

    An approximate method for the calculation of the compressible laminar boundary layer with heat transfer and arbitrary pressure gradient, based on Thwaites' correlation concept, is presented. With the definition of dimensionless shear and heat-transfer parameters and an assumed correlation of these parameters in terms of a momentum parameter, a complete system of relations for calculating skin friction and heat transfer results. Knowledge of velocity or temperature profiles is not necessary in using this calculation method. When the method is applied to a convergent-divergent, axially symmetric rocket nozzle, it shows that high rates of heat transfer are obtained at the initial stagnation point and at the throat of the nozzle. Also indicated are negative displacement thicknesses in the convergent portion of the nozzle; these occur because of the high density within the lower portions of the cooled boundary layer. (author)

  10. Experimental investigation of sound generation by a protuberance in a laminar boundary layer

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, M.; Asai, M.; Inasawa, A.

    2014-08-15

    Sound radiation from a two-dimensional protuberance glued on the wall in a laminar boundary layer was investigated experimentally at low Mach numbers. When the protuberance was as high as the boundary-layer thickness, a feedback-loop mechanism set in between protuberance-generated sound and Tollmien-Schlichting (T-S) waves generated by the leading-edge receptivity to the upstream-propagating sound. Although occurrence of a separation bubble immediately upstream of the protuberance played important roles in the evolution of instability waves into vortices interacting with the protuberance, the frequency of tonal vortex sound was determined by the selective amplification of T-S waves in the linear instability stage upstream of the separation bubble and was not affected by the instability of the separation bubble.

  11. Experimental study of boundary layer transition on a heated flat plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sohn, K. H.; Reshotko, E.; Zaman, K. B. M. Q.

    1991-01-01

    A detailed investigation to the document momentum and thermal development of boundary layers undergoing natural transition on a heated flat plate was performed. Experimental results of both overall and conditionally sampled characteristics of laminar, transitional, and low Reynolds number turbulent boundary layers are presented. Measurements were done in a low-speed, closed-loop wind tunnel with a freestream velocity of 100 ft/s and zero pressure gradient over a range of freestream turbulence intensities from 0.4 to 6 percent. The distributions of skin friction, heat transfer rate, and Reynolds shear stress were all consistent with previously published data. Reynolds analogy factors for momentum thickness Reynolds number, Re(sub theta) less than 2300 were found to be well predicted by laminar and turbulent correlations which accounted for an unheated starting length and uniform heat flux. A small dependence of turbulence results on the freestream turbulence intensity was observed.

  12. Toward improved solar radiation forecasts: Intercomparison of Planetary Boundary Layer parameterizations for marine boundary layer clouds in Southern Californian coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, C. K.; Kleissl, J. P.; Sahu, D. K.; Ghonima, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate forecasts of solar irradiance are required for electric utilities to economically integrate substantial amounts of solar power into their power generation portfolios. A common shortcoming of numerical weather models is the prediction of marine boundary layer clouds such as over the California coast as boundary layer processes are not resolved well. There are two turbulence parameterizations employed in the Weather Research and Forecasting model. The MYNN scheme is based on the turbulent kinetic energy that is explicit calculated in the model while the YSU scheme produces the exchange coefficients based on K-profiles for unstable and stable conditions. The microphysical and dynamical characteristics of marine boundary layer clouds are compared between two turbulence parameterizations and then sensitivity tests are conducted to enhance the exchange coefficients for momentum and heat. The results from the simulations show that increasing the exchange coefficient leads to enhanced vertical mixing and a deeper mixed layer over both sea and land surfaces. In this condition, clouds become deeper increasing cloud lifetime and reducing surface irradiance. These changes will reduce the bias of day-ahead solar forecasting over coastal California.

  13. Grey zone simulations of the morning convective boundary layer development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efstathiou, G. A.; Beare, R. J.; Osborne, S.; Lock, A. P.

    2016-05-01

    Numerical simulations of two cases of morning boundary layer development are conducted to investigate the impact of grid resolution on mean profiles and turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) partitioning from the large eddy simulation (LES) to the mesoscale limit. Idealized LES, using the 3-D Smagorinsky scheme, is shown to be capable of reproducing the boundary layer evolution when compared against measurements. However, increasing grid spacing results in the damping of resolved TKE and the production of superadiabatic temperature profiles in the boundary layer. Turbulence initiation is significantly delayed, exhibiting an abrupt onset at intermediate resolutions. Two approaches, the bounding of vertical diffusion coefficient and the blending of the 3-D Smagorinsky with a nonlocal 1D scheme, are used to model subgrid diffusion at grey zone resolutions. Simulations are compared against the coarse-grained fields from the validated LES results for each case. Both methods exhibit particular strengths and weaknesses, indicating the compromise that needs to be made currently in high-resolution numerical weather prediction. The blending scheme is able to reproduce the adiabatic profiles although turbulence is underestimated in favor of the parametrized heat flux, and the spin-up of TKE remains delayed. In contrast, the bounding approach gives an evolution of TKE that follows the coarse-grained LES very well, relying on the resolved motions for the nonlocal heat flux. However, bounding gives unrealistic static instability in the early morning temperature profiles (similar to the 3-D Smagorinsky scheme) because model dynamics are unable to resolve TKE when the boundary layer is too shallow compared to the grid spacing.

  14. Vortex/boundary-layer interactions: Data report, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutler, A. D.; Bradshaw, P.

    1987-01-01

    This report summarizes the work done under NASA Grant NAGw-581, Vortex/Boundary Layer Interactions. The experimental methods are discussed in detail and numerical results are presented, but are not fully interpreted. This report should be useful to anyone who wishes to make further use of the data (available on floppy disc or magnetic tape) for the development of turbulence models or the validation of predictive methods. Journal papers are in course of preparation.

  15. Vortex/boundary-layer interactions: Data report, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutler, A. D.; Bradshaw, P.

    1987-01-01

    This report summarizes the work done under NASA grant NAGw-581, Vortex/Boundary-Layer Interactions, to date. The experimental methods are discussed in detail and the results presented as a large number of figures, but are not fully interpreted. This report should be useful to anyone who wishes to make further use of the data (available on floppy disc or magnetic tape) for the development of turbulence models or the validation of predictive methods. Journal papers are in preparation.

  16. Study of EM Signals Propagation Through Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-09-30

    transmision properties. REFERENCES Barrick, D.E., and Weber, B.L., ’On the nonlinear theory for gravity waves on the ocean’s surface. Part II...and Friehe C., 2000. Boundary-Layer Meteorology, 97, 293-307. Ishimaru, A. 1978, Wave propagation and scattering in random media . Academic Press...Irvine. Rytov, S. M., Y. A. Kravtsov, and V. I. Tatarskii: 1987, Principles of statistical radiophysics 4: Wave propagation through random media

  17. Study of Vortices Embedded in Boundary Layers with Film Cooling.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-01

    Turbine parts may be protected from heat loads resulting from exposure to gas at high temperatures by using a coolant within turbine passages and along...then protects metal surfaces by forming a protective insulating film between the blades and the mainstream, and by acting as a heat sink. The flow...boundary layer. In order to understand the effects that this complex flow field has upon heat transfer, vortex characteristics and their interaction with

  18. Partially exposed polymer dispersed liquid crystals for boundary layer investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parmar, Devendra S.; Singh, Jag J.

    1992-01-01

    A new configuration termed partially exposed polymer dispersed liquid crystal in which the liquid crystal microdroplets dispersed in a rigid polymer matrix are partially entrapped on the free surface of the thin film deposited on a glass substrate is reported. Optical transmission characteristics of the partially exposed polymer dispersed liquid crystal thin film in response to an air flow induced shear stress field reveal its potential as a sensor for gas flow and boundary layer investigations.

  19. Boundary layer elasto-optic switching in ferroelectric liquid crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parmar, D. S.

    1992-01-01

    The first experimental observation of a change in the director azimuthal angle due to applied shear stress is reported in a sample configuration involving a liquid-crystal-coated top surface exposed directly to gas flow. The electrooptic response caused by the shear stress is large, fast, and reversible. These findings are relevant to the use of liquid crystals in boundary layer investigations on wind tunnel models.

  20. SCALING OF THE ANOMALOUS BOOST IN RELATIVISTIC JET BOUNDARY LAYER

    SciTech Connect

    Zenitani, Seiji; Hesse, Michael; Klimas, Alex

    2010-04-01

    We investigate the one-dimensional interaction of a relativistic jet and an external medium. Relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations show an anomalous boost of the jet fluid in the boundary layer, as previously reported. We describe the boost mechanism using an ideal relativistic fluid and magnetohydrodynamic theory. The kinetic model is also examined for further understanding. Simple scaling laws for the maximum Lorentz factor are derived, and verified by the simulations.