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Sample records for boundary layer transition

  1. Boundary layer transition studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watmuff, Jonathan H.

    1995-01-01

    A small-scale wind tunnel previously used for turbulent boundary layer experiments was modified for two sets of boundary layer transition studies. The first study concerns a laminar separation/turbulent reattachment. The pressure gradient and unit Reynolds number are the same as the fully turbulent flow of Spalart and Watmuff. Without the trip wire, a laminar layer asymptotes to a Falkner & Skan similarity solution in the FPG. Application of the APG causes the layer to separate and a highly turbulent and approximately 2D mean flow reattachment occurs downstream. In an effort to gain some physical insight into the flow processes a small impulsive disturbance was introduced at the C(sub p) minimum. The facility is totally automated and phase-averaged data are measured on a point-by-point basis using unprecedently large grids. The evolution of the disturbance has been tracked all the way into the reattachment region and beyond into the fully turbulent boundary layer. At first, the amplitude decays exponentially with streamwise distance in the APG region, where the layer remains attached, i.e. the layer is viscously stable. After separation, the rate of decay slows, and a point of minimum amplitude is reached where the contours of the wave packet exhibit dispersive characteristics. From this point, exponential growth of the amplitude of the disturbance is observed in the detached shear layer, i.e. the dominant instability mechanism is inviscid. A group of large-scale 3D vortex loops emerges in the vicinity of the reattachment. Remarkably, the second loop retains its identify far downstream in the turbulent boundary layer. The results provide a level of detail usually associated with CFD. Substantial modifications were made to the facility for the second study concerning disturbances generated by Suction Holes for laminar flow Control (LFC). The test section incorporates suction through interchangeable porous test surfaces. Detailed studies have been made using isolated

  2. Boundary layer transition studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watmuff, Jonathan H.

    1995-02-01

    A small-scale wind tunnel previously used for turbulent boundary layer experiments was modified for two sets of boundary layer transition studies. The first study concerns a laminar separation/turbulent reattachment. The pressure gradient and unit Reynolds number are the same as the fully turbulent flow of Spalart and Watmuff. Without the trip wire, a laminar layer asymptotes to a Falkner & Skan similarity solution in the FPG. Application of the APG causes the layer to separate and a highly turbulent and approximately 2D mean flow reattachment occurs downstream. In an effort to gain some physical insight into the flow processes a small impulsive disturbance was introduced at the C(sub p) minimum. The facility is totally automated and phase-averaged data are measured on a point-by-point basis using unprecedently large grids. The evolution of the disturbance has been tracked all the way into the reattachment region and beyond into the fully turbulent boundary layer. At first, the amplitude decays exponentially with streamwise distance in the APG region, where the layer remains attached, i.e. the layer is viscously stable. After separation, the rate of decay slows, and a point of minimum amplitude is reached where the contours of the wave packet exhibit dispersive characteristics. From this point, exponential growth of the amplitude of the disturbance is observed in the detached shear layer, i.e. the dominant instability mechanism is inviscid. A group of large-scale 3D vortex loops emerges in the vicinity of the reattachment. Remarkably, the second loop retains its identify far downstream in the turbulent boundary layer. The results provide a level of detail usually associated with CFD. Substantial modifications were made to the facility for the second study concerning disturbances generated by Suction Holes for laminar flow Control (LFC). The test section incorporates suction through interchangeable porous test surfaces. Detailed studies have been made using isolated

  3. Transition in hypersonic boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chuanhong; Zhu, Yiding; Chen, Xi; Yuan, Huijing; Wu, Jiezhi; Chen, Shiyi; Lee, Cunbiao; Gad-el-Hak, Mohamed

    2015-10-01

    Transition and turbulence production in a hypersonic boundary layer is investigated in a Mach 6 wind tunnel using Rayleigh-scattering visualization, fast-response pressure measurements, and particle image velocimetry. It is found that the second-mode instability is a key modulator of the transition process. Although the second-mode is primarily an acoustic wave, it causes the formation of high-frequency vortical waves, which triggers a fast transition to turbulence.

  4. Modelling the transitional boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narasimha, R.

    1990-01-01

    Recent developments in the modelling of the transition zone in the boundary layer are reviewed (the zone being defined as extending from the station where intermittency begins to depart from zero to that where it is nearly unity). The value of using a new non-dimensional spot formation rate parameter, and the importance of allowing for so-called subtransitions within the transition zone, are both stressed. Models do reasonably well in constant pressure 2-dimensional flows, but in the presence of strong pressure gradients further improvements are needed. The linear combination approach works surprisingly well in most cases, but would not be so successful in situations where a purely laminar boundary layer would separate but a transitional one would not. Intermittency-weighted eddy viscosity methods do not predict peak surface parameters well without the introduction of an overshooting transition function whose connection with the spot theory of transition is obscure. Suggestions are made for further work that now appears necessary for developing improved models of the transition zone.

  5. Towards Natural Transition in Compressible Boundary Layers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-29

    AFRL-AFOSR-CL-TR-2016-0011 Towards natural transition in compressible boundary layers Marcello Faraco de Medeiros FUNDACAO PARA O INCREMENTO DA...to 29-03-2016 Towards natural transition in compressible boundary layers FA9550-11-1-0354 Marcello A. Faraco de Medeiros Germán Andrés Gaviria...unlimited. 109 Final report Towards natural transition in compressible boundary layers Principal Investigator: Marcello Augusto Faraco de Medeiros

  6. Orbiter Boundary Layer Transition Prediction Tool Enhancements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott A.; King, Rudolph A.; Kegerise, Michael A.; Wood, William A.; McGinley, Catherine B.; Berger, Karen T.; Anderson, Brian P.

    2010-01-01

    Updates to an analytic tool developed for Shuttle support to predict the onset of boundary layer transition resulting from thermal protection system damage or repair are presented. The boundary layer transition tool is part of a suite of tools that analyze the local aerothermodynamic environment to enable informed disposition of damage for making recommendations to fly as is or to repair. Using mission specific trajectory information and details of each d agmea site or repair, the expected time (and thus Mach number) of transition onset is predicted to help define proper environments for use in subsequent thermal and stress analysis of the thermal protection system and structure. The boundary layer transition criteria utilized within the tool were updated based on new local boundary layer properties obtained from high fidelity computational solutions. Also, new ground-based measurements were obtained to allow for a wider parametric variation with both protuberances and cavities and then the resulting correlations were calibrated against updated flight data. The end result is to provide correlations that allow increased confidence with the resulting transition predictions. Recently, a new approach was adopted to remove conservatism in terms of sustained turbulence along the wing leading edge. Finally, some of the newer flight data are also discussed in terms of how these results reflect back on the updated correlations.

  7. Boundary Layer Transition on X-43A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott; Daryabeigi, Kamran; Wurster, Kathryn; Bittner, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The successful Mach 7 and 10 flights of the first fully integrated scramjet propulsion systems by the Hyper-X (X-43A) program have provided the means with which to verify the original design methodologies and assumptions. As part of Hyper-X s propulsion-airframe integration, the forebody was designed to include a spanwise array of vortex generators to promote boundary layer transition ahead of the engine. Turbulence at the inlet is thought to provide the most reliable engine design and allows direct scaling of flight results to groundbased data. Pre-flight estimations of boundary layer transition, for both Mach 7 and 10 flight conditions, suggested that forebody boundary layer trips were required to ensure fully turbulent conditions upstream of the inlet. This paper presents the results of an analysis of the thermocouple measurements used to infer the dynamics of the transition process during the trajectories for both flights, on both the lower surface (to assess trip performance) and the upper surface (to assess natural transition). The approach used in the analysis of the thermocouple data is outlined, along with a discussion of the calculated local flow properties that correspond to the transition events as identified in the flight data. The present analysis has confirmed that the boundary layer trips performed as expected for both flights, providing turbulent flow ahead of the inlet during critical portions of the trajectory, while the upper surface was laminar as predicted by the pre-flight analysis.

  8. Boundary layer transition detection by luminescence imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclachlan, B. G.; Bell, J. H.; Gallery, J.; Gouterman, M.; Callis, J.

    1993-01-01

    In recent experiments we have demonstrated the feasibility of a new approach to boundary layer transition detection. This new approach employs the temperature dependence of certain photoluminescent materials in the form of a surface coating or 'paint' to detect the change in heat transfer characteristics that accompany boundary layer transition. The feasibility experiments were conducted for low subsonic to transonic Mach numbers on two-dimensional airfoil and flat plate configurations. Paint derived transition locations were determined and compared to those obtained from Preston pressure probe measurements. Artificial heating of the models was used to obtain transition temperature signatures suitable for the instrumentation available to us. Initial estimates show, however, that passive kinetic heating at high Mach numbers is a promising alternative.

  9. Nonlinear Transient Growth and Boundary Layer Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paredes, Pedro; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Li, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Parabolized stability equations (PSE) are used in a variational approach to study the optimal, non-modal disturbance growth in a Mach 3 at plate boundary layer and a Mach 6 circular cone boundary layer. As noted in previous works, the optimal initial disturbances correspond to steady counter-rotating streamwise vortices, which subsequently lead to the formation of streamwise-elongated structures, i.e., streaks, via a lift-up effect. The nonlinear evolution of the linearly optimal stationary perturbations is computed using the nonlinear plane-marching PSE for stationary perturbations. A fully implicit marching technique is used to facilitate the computation of nonlinear streaks with large amplitudes. To assess the effect of the finite-amplitude streaks on transition, the linear form of plane- marching PSE is used to investigate the instability of the boundary layer flow modified by spanwise periodic streaks. The onset of bypass transition is estimated by using an N- factor criterion based on the amplification of the streak instabilities. Results show that, for both flow configurations of interest, streaks of sufficiently large amplitude can lead to significantly earlier onset of transition than that in an unperturbed boundary layer without any streaks.

  10. Boundary Layer Transition Results From STS-114

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott A.; Horvath, Thomas J.; Cassady, Amy M.; Kirk, Benjamin S.; Wang, K. C.; Hyatt, Andrew J.

    2006-01-01

    The tool for predicting the onset of boundary layer transition from damage to and/or repair of the thermal protection system developed in support of Shuttle Return to Flight is compared to the STS-114 flight results. The Boundary Layer Transition (BLT) Tool is part of a suite of tools that analyze the aerothermodynamic environment of the local thermal protection system to allow informed disposition of damage for making recommendations to fly as is or to repair. Using mission specific trajectory information and details of each damage site or repair, the expected time of transition onset is predicted to help determine the proper aerothermodynamic environment to use in the subsequent thermal and stress analysis of the local structure. The boundary layer transition criteria utilized for the tool was developed from ground-based measurements to account for the effect of both protuberances and cavities and has been calibrated against flight data. Computed local boundary layer edge conditions provided the means to correlate the experimental results and then to extrapolate to flight. During STS-114, the BLT Tool was utilized and was part of the decision making process to perform an extravehicular activity to remove the large gap fillers. The role of the BLT Tool during this mission, along with the supporting information that was acquired for the on-orbit analysis, is reviewed. Once the large gap fillers were removed, all remaining damage sites were cleared for reentry as is. Post-flight analysis of the transition onset time revealed excellent agreement with BLT Tool predictions.

  11. Numerical simulation of boundary-layer transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalart, P. R.

    1984-01-01

    The transition to turbulence in boundary layers was investigated by direct numerical solution of the nonlinear, three-dimensional, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in the half-infinite domain over a flat plate. Periodicity was imposed in the streamwise and spanwise directions. A body force was applied to approximate the effect of a nonparallel mean flow. The numerical method was spectra, based on Fourier series and Jacobi polynomials, and used divergence-free basis functions. Extremely rapid convergence was obtained when solving the linear Orr-Sommerfeld equation. The early nonlinear and three-dimensional stages of transition, in a boundary layer disturbed by a vibrating ribbon, were successfully simulated. Excellent qualitative agreement was observed with either experiments or weakly nonlinear theories. In particular, the breakdown pattern was staggered or nonstaggered depending on the disturbance amplitude.

  12. Analysis of Nosetip Boundary Layer Transition Mechanisms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-07-01

    requires enormous amounts of computational storage and time, and problems of sub -grid scale fluctuations must still be overcome. Despite the difficulties...Flow Research Report No. 60 July, 1975 -8- i for a two-dimensional boundary layer. When expressions of this form are sub - stituted into the equations...rate led to substantial reductions in the transition Reynolds number. The turbulent sublayer model vinualises the distortions in the mean flow profiles

  13. Bypass transition in compressible boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandervegt, J. J.

    1992-09-01

    Transition to turbulence in aerospace applications usually occurs in a strongly disturbed environment. For instance, the effects of free-stream turbulence, roughness and obstacles in the boundary layer strongly influence transition. Proper understanding of the mechanisms leading to transition is crucial in the design of aircraft wings and gas turbine blades, because lift, drag and heat transfer strongly depend on the state of the boundary layer, laminar or turbulent. Unfortunately, most of the transition research, both theoretical and experimental, has focused on natural transition. Many practical flows, however, defy any theoretical analysis and are extremely difficult to measure. Morkovin introduced in his review paper the concept of bypass transition as those forms of transition which bypass the known mechanisms of linear and non-linear transition theories and are currently not understood by experiments. In an effort to better understand the mechanisms leading to transition in a disturbed environment, experiments are conducted studying simpler cases, viz. the effects of free stream turbulence on transition on a flat plate. It turns out that these experiments are very difficult to conduct, because generation of free stream turbulence with sufficiently high fluctuation levels and reasonable homogeneity is non trivial. For a discussion see Morkovin. Serious problems also appear due to the fact that at high Reynolds numbers the boundary layers are very thin, especially in the nose region of the plate where the transition occurs, which makes the use of very small probes necessary. The effects of free-stream turbulence on transition are the subject of this research and are especially important in a gas turbine environment, where turbulence intensities are measured between 5 and 20 percent, Wang et al. Due to the fact that the Reynolds number for turbine blades is considerably lower than for aircraft wings, generally a larger portion of the blade will be in a laminar

  14. Sound radiation due to boundary layer transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Meng

    1993-01-01

    This report describes progress made to date towards calculations of noise produced by the laminar-turbulence transition process in a low Mach number boundary layer formed on a rigid wall. The primary objectives of the study are to elucidate the physical mechanisms by which acoustic waves are generated, to clarify the roles of the fluctuating Reynolds stress and the viscous stress in the presence of a solid surface, and to determine the relative efficiency as a noise source of the various transition stages. In particular, we will examine the acoustic characteristics and directivity associated with three-dimensional instability waves, the detached high-shear layer, and turbulent spots following a laminar breakdown. Additionally, attention will be paid to the unsteady surface pressures during the transition, which provide a source of flow noise as well as a forcing function for wall vibration in both aeronautical and marine applications.

  15. Simulations of Boundary-Layer Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herbert, Thorwald

    2007-01-01

    For incompressible benchmark flows, we have demonstrated the capability of the parabolized stability equations (PSE) to simulate the transition process in excellent agreement with microscopic experiments and direct Navier-Stokes simulations at modest computational cost. Encouraged by these results, we have developed the PSE methodology of three-dimensional boundary-layers in general curvilinear coordinates for the range from low to hypersonic speeds, and for both linear and nonlinear problems. For given initial and boundary conditions, the approach permits simulations from receptivity through linear and secondary instabilities into the late stages of transition where significant changes in skin friction and heat transfer coefficients occur. We have performed transition simulations for a variety of two- and three-dimensional similarity solutions and for realistic flows over swept wings at subsonic and supersonic speeds, the pressure ans suction side of turbine blades at low and medium turbulence levels, and over a blunt cone at Mach number Ma = 8. We present selected results for different transition mechanisms with emphasis on the late stage of transition and the evolution of wall-shear stress and heat transfer.

  16. Helical mode breakdown in transitional boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Rikhi; Durbin, Paul

    2016-11-01

    Results of direct numerical simulation of transition to turbulence in adverse pressure gradient boundary layers beneath free-stream turbulence will be presented. Instability waves are excited spontaneously and may be identified when intensity of free-stream turbulence (Tu) is sufficiently low. At very low Tu 0 . 1 % , secondary instability of the TS waves and at high Tu > 2 % , conventional bypass mechanisms trigger turbulent spot formation. At low Tu 1 % transition proceeds through formation of helical modes. Helical structures as in n = 1 instability modes of axisymmetric wakes and jets are clearly identifiable in visualizations of isosurfaces of stream-wise perturbation velocity. Helical modes also trigger transition at same level of Tu in zero pressure gradient boundary layers as well, provided that the inlet disturbances include a low amplitude time-periodic unstable TS wave. This indicates that these secondary instability modes might arise due to interaction of Klebanoff streaks and instability waves. Characteristically, the helical modes are inner instability modes. This work was supported by NSF Grant CBET-1228195. Computer time was provided by the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE).

  17. Large Eddy Simulation of Transitional Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayadi, Taraneh; Moin, Parviz

    2009-11-01

    A sixth order compact finite difference code is employed to investigate compressible Large Eddy Simulation (LES) of subharmonic transition of a spatially developing zero pressure gradient boundary layer, at Ma = 0.2. The computational domain extends from Rex= 10^5, where laminar blowing and suction excites the most unstable fundamental and sub-harmonic modes, to fully turbulent stage at Rex= 10.1x10^5. Numerical sponges are used in the neighborhood of external boundaries to provide non-reflective conditions. Our interest lies in the performance of the dynamic subgrid scale (SGS) model [1] in the transition process. It is observed that in early stages of transition the eddy viscosity is much smaller than the physical viscosity. As a result the amplitudes of selected harmonics are in very good agreement with the experimental data [2]. The model's contribution gradually increases during the last stages of transition process and the dynamic eddy viscosity becomes fully active and dominant in the turbulent region. Consistent with this trend the skin friction coefficient versus Rex diverges from its laminar profile and converges to the turbulent profile after an overshoot. 1. Moin P. et. al. Phys Fluids A, 3(11), 2746-2757, 1991. 2. Kachanov Yu. S. et. al. JFM, 138, 209-247, 1983.

  18. Flow Quality and Boundary Layer Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watmuff, Jonathan H; Tobak, M.; Davis, Sanford S. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The widely held view is that transition to turbulence in the Blasius boundary layer occurs via amplification and eventual nonlinear breakdown of initially small amplitude instabilities i.e. Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) waves. However this scenario is only observed for low amplitude free-stream turbulence levels, i.e. u/U < 0.1%. Bypass of linear TS instability mechanism occurs for higher EST levels, yet considerable differences exist between the few experiments carefully designed to assess the effect of EST on transition. The consensus is that EST leads to longitudinal streaks that form near the leading edge in the boundary layer . These streaks appeal to be regions of concentrated streamwise vorticity and they are often referred to as Klebanoff modes. The importance of mean flow free-stream nonuniformity (FSN) is not as widely appreciated as EST for characterizing wind tunnel flow quality. Here it is shown that, although the v like generated by a d=50micron wire located upstream of the contraction (Re(sub d)=6.6, x/d=45,000) is immeasurably small by the time it interacts with the leading edge in the test section, it is responsible for generation of a pair of weak streamwise vortices in the boundary layer downstream. The characteristics of these wake-induced vortices and their effect on TS waves are demonstrated. Small remnant FSN variations are also shown to exist downstream of a turbulence grid. The question arises Are the adverse effects introduced by the turbulence grid caused by FST or by small remnant FSN variations?

  19. Flow Quality and Boundary Layer Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watmuff, Jonathan H; Tobak, M.; Davis, Sanford S. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The widely held view is that transition to turbulence in the Blasius boundary layer occurs via amplification and eventual nonlinear breakdown of initially small amplitude instabilities i.e. Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) waves. However this scenario is only observed for low amplitude free-stream turbulence levels, i.e. u/U < 0.1%. Bypass of linear TS instability mechanism occurs for higher EST levels, yet considerable differences exist between the few experiments carefully designed to assess the effect of EST on transition. The consensus is that EST leads to longitudinal streaks that form near the leading edge in the boundary layer . These streaks appeal to be regions of concentrated streamwise vorticity and they are often referred to as Klebanoff modes. The importance of mean flow free-stream nonuniformity (FSN) is not as widely appreciated as EST for characterizing wind tunnel flow quality. Here it is shown that, although the v like generated by a d=50micron wire located upstream of the contraction (Re(sub d)=6.6, x/d=45,000) is immeasurably small by the time it interacts with the leading edge in the test section, it is responsible for generation of a pair of weak streamwise vortices in the boundary layer downstream. The characteristics of these wake-induced vortices and their effect on TS waves are demonstrated. Small remnant FSN variations are also shown to exist downstream of a turbulence grid. The question arises Are the adverse effects introduced by the turbulence grid caused by FST or by small remnant FSN variations?

  20. Boundary Layer Transition Flight Experiment Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, Karen T.; Anderson, Brian P.; Campbell, Charles H.; Garske, Michael T.; Saucedo, Luis A.; Kinder, Gerald R.; Micklos, Ann M.

    2011-01-01

    In support of the Boundary Layer Transition Flight Experiment (BLT FE) Project, a manufactured protuberance tile was installed on the port wing of Space Shuttle Orbiter Discovery for STS-119, STS-128, STS-131 and STS-133 as well as Space Shuttle Endeavour for STS-134. Additional instrumentation was installed in order to obtain more spatially resolved measurements downstream of the protuberance. This paper provides an overview of the BLT FE Project with emphasis on the STS-131 and STS-133 results. A high-level overview of the in-situ flight data is presented, along with a summary of the comparisons between pre- and post-flight analysis predictions and flight data. Comparisons show that empirically correlated predictions for boundary layer transition onset time closely match the flight data, while predicted surface temperatures were significantly higher than observed flight temperatures. A thermocouple anomaly observed on a number of the missions is discussed as are a number of the mitigation actions that will be taken on the final flight, STS-134, including potential alterations of the flight trajectory and changes to the flight instrumentation.

  1. X-33 Hypersonic Boundary Layer Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott A.; Horvath, Thomas J.; Hollis, Brian R.; Thompson, Richard A.; Hamilton, H. Harris, II

    1999-01-01

    Boundary layer and aeroheating characteristics of several X-33 configurations have been experimentally examined in the Langley 20-Inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel. Global surface heat transfer distributions, surface streamline patterns, and shock shapes were measured on 0.013-scale models at Mach 6 in air. Parametric variations include angles-of-attack of 20-deg, 30-deg, and 40-deg; Reynolds numbers based on model length of 0.9 to 6.6 million; and body-flap deflections of 0, 10 and 20-deg. The effects of discrete and distributed roughness elements on boundary layer transition, which included trip height, size, location, and distribution, both on and off the windward centerline, were investigated. The discrete roughness results on centerline were used to provide a transition correlation for the X-33 flight vehicle that was applicable across the range of reentry angles of attack. The attachment line discrete roughness results were shown to be consistent with the centerline results, as no increased sensitivity to roughness along the attachment line was identified. The effect of bowed panels was qualitatively shown to be less effective than the discrete trips; however, the distributed nature of the bowed panels affected a larger percent of the aft-body windward surface than a single discrete trip.

  2. Helical modes in boundary layer transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Rikhi; Durbin, Paul A.

    2016-11-01

    Observations are presented to show that in an adverse pressure gradient boundary layer, beneath free-stream turbulence, the interaction between Klebanoff streaks and naturally arising instability waves leads to helical disturbances which break down to form turbulent spots. This occurs under low to moderate levels, 1%-2%, of free-stream turbulence. At high levels of free-stream turbulence, conventional bypass mechanisms are seen. The helical structures are clearly identifiable in visualizations of isosurfaces of streamwise perturbation velocity. A direct numerical simulation also was performed in zero pressure gradient, with a time-periodic Tollmien-Schlichting wave eigenfunction at the inlet. Again, under a moderate level of free-stream turbulence, helices were observed, and found to trigger transition. Their wave speed is on the order of 1/2 U∞ , so helical breakdown can be viewed as a type of inner mode, secondary instability.

  3. Mechanics of Boundary Layer Transition. Part 5: Boundary Layer Stability theory in incompressible and compressible flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mack, L. M.

    1967-01-01

    The fundamentals of stability theory, its chief results, and the physical mechanisms at work are presented. The stability theory of the laminar boundary determines whether a small disturbance introduced into the boundary layer will amplify or damp. If the disturbance damps, the boundary layer remains laminar. If the disturbance amplifies, and by a sufficient amount, then transition to turbulence eventually takes place. The stability theory establishes those states of the boundary layer which are most likely to lead to transition, identifys those frequencies which are the most dangerous, and indicates how the external parameters can best be changed to avoid transition.

  4. Boundary Layer Transition Flight Experiment Implementation on OV-103

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spanos, Theodoros A.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the boundary layer transition experiment flown on Discovery. The purpose of the boundary layer transition flight experiment was to obtain hypersonic aero-thermodynamic data for the purpose of better understanding the flow transition from a laminar to turbulent boundary layer using a known height protuberance. The preparation of the shuttle is described, with the various groups responsibilities outlined. Views of the shuttle in flight with the experimental results are shown.

  5. Control of the Transitional Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belson, Brandt A.

    This work makes advances in the delay of boundary layer transition from laminar to turbulent flow via feedback control. The applications include the reduction of drag over streamline bodies (e.g., airplane wings) and the decrease of mixing and heat transfer (e.g., over turbine blades in jet engines). A difficulty in many fields is designing feedback controllers for high-dimensional systems, be they experiments or high-fidelity simulations, because the required time and resources are too large. A cheaper alternative is to approximate the high-dimensional system with a reduced-order model and design a controller for the model. We implement several model reduction algorithms in "modred", an open source and publicly available library that is applicable to a wide range of problems. We use this library to study the role of sensors and actuators in feedback control of transition in the 2D boundary layer. Previous work uses a feedforward configuration in which the sensor is upstream of the actuator, but we show that the actuator-sensor pair is unsuitable for feedback control due to an inability to sense the exponentially-growing Tollmien-Schlichting waves. A new actuator-sensor pair is chosen that more directly affects and measures the TS waves, and as a result it is effective in a feedback configuration. Lastly, the feedback controller is shown to outperform feedforward controllers in the presence of unmodeled disturbances. Next, we focus on a specific type of actuator, the single dielectric barrier discharge (SDBD) plasma actuator. An array of these plasma actuators is oriented to produce stream-wise vorticity and thus directly cancel the structures with the largest transient growth (so-called stream-wise streaks). We design a feedback controller using only experimental data by first developing an empirical input-output quasi-steady model. Then, we design feedback controllers for the model such that the controllers perform well when applied to the experiment. Lastly, we

  6. Towards Natural Transition in Compressible Boundary Layers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-29

    St., Ste 325 Arlington, VA 22203 James M. Fillerup AFOSR/NA and AFOSR/SOARD DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is...30-09-2011 to 29-03-2016, with Dr. James M. Fillerup serving as program manager. In this project, a DNS code was developed to investigate problems on...modes in compressible boundary layers. Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 586:295–322, 9 2007. [87] Adam P. Tunney, James P. Denier, Trent W. Mattner, and John

  7. A study of methods to investigate nozzle boundary layer transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauley, Laura L.

    1991-05-01

    To further investigate nozzle flow, numerical computations are employed. The computations produce complete flow velocity and temperature fields within the nozzle. As a check, these results can be compared with experimental data at the wall. Once an accurate numerical scheme has been validated, it can be used as a design tool to predict the performance of other nozzle designs without the cost of experimental testing. Typically, the numerical analysis assumes either a laminar boundary layer or a fully turbulent boundary layer which is steady and two-dimensional. Boundary layer transition is not considered. Computing both the completely laminar boundary layer and the completely turbulent boundary layer conditions gives the minimum and maximum wall heat flux possible for a specified geometry. When the experimental heat flux measurements lie between these two values, the nature of the boundary layer is unknown. The boundary layer may have transitioned from laminar to turbulent; three-dimensional structures may be present in the boundary layer, or the inlet flow conditions may not be correctly specified in the computation.

  8. Feasibility study of optical boundary layer transition detection method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azzazy, M.; Modarress, D.; Trolinger, J. D.

    1986-01-01

    A high sensitivity differential interferometer was developed to locate the region where the boundary layer flow undergoes transition from laminar to turbulent. Two laboratory experimental configurations were used to evaluate the performance of the interferometer: open shear layer, and low speed wind tunnel turbulent spot configuration. In each experiment, small temperature fluctuations were introduced as the signal source. Simultaneous cold wire measurements were compared with the interferometer data. The comparison shows that the interferometer is sensitive to very weak phase variations in the order of 0.001 the laser wavelength. An attempt to detect boundary layer transition over a flat plate at NASA-Langley Unitary Supersonic Wind Tunnel using the interferometer system was performed. The phase variations during boundary layer transition in the supersonic wind tunnel were beyond the minimum signal-to-noise level of the instrument.

  9. Flight Experiment Verification of Shuttle Boundary Layer Transition Prediction Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott A.; Berger, Karen T.; Horvath, Thomas J.; Wood, William A.

    2016-01-01

    Boundary layer transition at hypersonic conditions is critical to the design of future high-speed aircraft and spacecraft. Accurate methods to predict transition would directly impact the aerothermodynamic environments used to size a hypersonic vehicle's thermal protection system. A transition prediction tool, based on wind tunnel derived discrete roughness correlations, was developed and implemented for the Space Shuttle return-to-flight program. This tool was also used to design a boundary layer transition flight experiment in order to assess correlation uncertainties, particularly with regard to high Mach-number transition and tunnel-to-flight scaling. A review is provided of the results obtained from the flight experiment in order to evaluate the transition prediction tool implemented for the Shuttle program.

  10. Bypass transition and spot nucleation in boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreilos, Tobias; Khapko, Taras; Schlatter, Philipp; Duguet, Yohann; Henningson, Dan S.; Eckhardt, Bruno

    2016-08-01

    The spatiotemporal aspects of the transition to turbulence are considered in the case of a boundary-layer flow developing above a flat plate exposed to free-stream turbulence. Combining results on the receptivity to free-stream turbulence with the nonlinear concept of a transition threshold, a physically motivated model suggests a spatial distribution of spot nucleation events. To describe the evolution of turbulent spots a probabilistic cellular automaton is introduced, with all parameters directly obtained from numerical simulations of the boundary layer. The nucleation rates are then combined with the cellular automaton model, yielding excellent quantitative agreement with the statistical characteristics for different free-stream turbulence levels. We thus show how the recent theoretical progress on transitional wall-bounded flows can be extended to the much wider class of spatially developing boundary-layer flows.

  11. The Effect of Nonlinear Critical Layers on Boundary Layer Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Marvin E.

    1995-01-01

    Asymptotic methods are used to describe the nonlinear self-interaction between pairs of oblique instability modes that eventually develops when initially linear and spatially growing instability waves evolve downstream in nominally two-dimensional and spanwise periodic laminar boundary layers. The first nonlinear reaction takes place locally within a so-called 'critical layer' with the flow outside this layer consisting of a locally parallel mean flow plus an appropriate superposition of linear instability waves. The amplitudes of these waves are determined by either a single integro-differential equation or by a pair of integro-differential equations with quadratic to quartic-type nonlinearities.

  12. Simulating Dispersion in the Evening-Transition Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Alexander C.; Beare, Robert J.; Thomson, David J.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate dispersion in the evening-transition boundary layer using large-eddy simulation (LES). In the LES, a particle model traces pollutant paths using a combination of the resolved flow velocities and a random displacement model to represent subgrid-scale motions. The LES is forced with both a sudden switch-off of the surface heat flux and also a more gradual observed evolution. The LES shows `lofting' of plumes from near-surface releases in the pre-transition convective boundary layer; it also shows the subsequent `trapping' of releases in the post-transition near-surface stable boundary layer and residual layer above. Given the paucity of observations for pollution dispersion in evening transitions, the LES proves a useful reference. We then use the LES to test and improve a one-dimensional Lagrangian Stochastic Model (LSM) such as is often used in practical dispersion studies. The LSM used here includes both time-varying and skewed turbulence statistics. It is forced with the vertical velocity variance, skewness and dissipation from the LES for particle releases at various heights and times in the evening transition. The LSM plume spreads are significantly larger than those from the LES in the post-transition stable boundary-layer trapping regime. The forcing from the LES was thus insufficient to constrain the plume evolution, and inclusion of the significant stratification effects was required. In the so-called modified LSM, a correction to the vertical velocity variance was included to represent the effect of stable stratification and the consequent presence of wave-like motions. The modified LSM shows improved trapping of particles in the post-transition stable boundary layer.

  13. Optimal disturbances and bypass transition in boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Paul; Berggren, Martin; Henningson, Dan S.

    1999-01-01

    Streamwise streaks are ubiquitous in transitional boundary layers, particularly when subjected to high levels of free-stream turbulence. Using the steady boundary-layer approximation, the upstream disturbances experiencing maximum spatial energy growth are numerically calculated. The calculations use techniques commonly employed when solving optimal-control problems for distributed parameter systems. The calculated optimal disturbances consist of streamwise vortices developing into streamwise streaks. The maximum spatial energy growth was found to scale linearly with the distance from the leading edge. Based on these results, a simple model for prediction of transition location is proposed. Available experiments have been used to correlate the single constant appearing in the model.

  14. Comments on Hypersonic Boundary-Layer Transition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-09-01

    September .11 4 16 SUiPPLEMFNTARY NOTATION 172 COSA [i CODES 18SBETT M Cniu on rev"*rie if necessary and identify by block number) FELD 7 GROUP SUB GROUP...laver transition results from instabilities as described by linear stability theory, then the disturbance growth historias follow a prescribed

  15. Analysis of differential infrared thermography for boundary layer transition detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, A. D.; Eder, C.; Wolf, C. C.; Raffel, M.

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the differential infrared thermography (DIT) technique, a contactless method of measuring the unsteady movement of the boundary layer transition position on an unprepared surface. DIT has been shown to measure boundary layer transition positions which correlate well with those from other measurement methods. In this paper unsteady aerodynamics from a 2D URANS solution are used and the resulting wall temperatures computed. It is shown that the peak of the temperature difference signal correlates well with the boundary layer transition position, but that the start and end of boundary layer transition cannot be extracted. A small systematic time-lag cannot be reduced by using different surface materials, but the signal strength can be improved by reducing the heat capacity and heat transfer of the surface layer, for example by using a thin plastic coating. Reducing the image time separation used to produce the difference images reduces the time-lag and also the signal level, thus the optimum is when the signal to noise ratio is at the minimum which can be evaluated.

  16. The role of nonlinear critical layers in boundary layer transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M.E.

    1995-01-01

    Asymptotic methods are used to describe the nonlinear self-interaction between pairs of oblique instability modes that eventually develops when initially linear spatially growing instability waves evolve downstream in nominally two-dimensional laminar boundary layers. The first nonlinear reaction takes place locally within a so-called 'critical layer', with the flow outside this layer consisting of a locally parallel mean flow plus a pair of oblique instability waves - which may or may not be accompanied by an associated plane wave. The amplitudes of these waves, which are completely determined by nonlinear effects within the critical layer, satisfy either a single integro-differential equation or a pair of integro-differential equations with quadratic to quartic-type nonlinearities. The physical implications of these equations are discussed.

  17. Method for laminar boundary layer transition visualization in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Bruce J. (Inventor); Gall, Peter D. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    Disclosed is a method of visualizing laminar to turbulent boundary layer transition, shock location, and laminar separation bubbles around a test surface. A liquid crystal coating is formulated using an unencapsulated liquid crystal operable in a temperature bandwidth compatible with the temperature environment around the test surface. The liquid crystal coating is applied to the test surface, which is preferably pretreated by painting with a flat, black paint to achieve a deep matte coating, after which the surface is subjected to a liquid or gas flow. Color change in the liquid crystal coating is produced in response to differences in relative shear stress within the boundary layer around the test surface. The novelty of this invention resides in the use of liquid crystals which are sensitive to shear stress to show aerodynamic phenomena such as a boundary layer transition, shock location, and laminar separation bubbles around a test surface.

  18. Atmospheric boundary layer evening transitions over West Texas

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A systemic analysis of the atmospheric boundary layer behavior during some evening transitions over West Texas was done using the data from an extensive array of instruments which included small and large aperture scintillometers, net radiometers, and meteorological stations. The analysis also comp...

  19. Numerical simulation of transition in a decelerating boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Kyung Soo; Ferziger, Joel H.; Spalart, Philippe R.; Reed, Helen L.

    1988-01-01

    Transition in a decelerating flat-plate boundary layer is numerically simulated up to the beginning of three-dimensional breakdown, and the results are compared with an experiment. The adverse pressure gradient induced by deceleration increases the growth rate of disturbances and allows transition at lower Reynolds numbers. The primary instability is characterized by a wave packet, which undergoes three-dimensional distortion. Lambda vortices are locally observed, but they are not aligned with respect to the flow direction.

  20. On the Effects of Surface Roughness on Boundary Layer Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhari, Meelan M.; Li, Fei; Chang, Chau-Lyan; Edwards, Jack

    2009-01-01

    Surface roughness can influence laminar-turbulent transition in many different ways. This paper outlines selected analyses performed at the NASA Langley Research Center, ranging in speed from subsonic to hypersonic Mach numbers and highlighting the beneficial as well as adverse roles of the surface roughness in technological applications. The first theme pertains to boundary-layer tripping on the forebody of a hypersonic airbreathing configuration via a spanwise periodic array of trip elements, with the goal of understanding the physical mechanisms underlying roughness-induced transition in a high-speed boundary layer. The effect of an isolated, finite amplitude roughness element on a supersonic boundary layer is considered next. The other set of flow configurations examined herein corresponds to roughness based laminar flow control in subsonic and supersonic swept wing boundary layers. A common theme to all of the above configurations is the need to apply higher fidelity, physics based techniques to develop reliable predictions of roughness effects on laminar-turbulent transition.

  1. Grain-boundary layering transitions and phonon engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rickman, J. M.; Harmer, M. P.; Chan, H. M.

    2016-09-01

    We employ semi-grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation to investigate layering transitions at grain boundaries in a prototypical binary alloy. We demonstrate the existence of such transitions among various interfacial states and examine the role of elastic fields in dictating state equilibria. The results of these studies are summarized in the form of diagrams that highlight interfacial state coexistence in this system. Finally, we examine the impact of layering transitions on the phononic properties of the system, as given by the specific heat and, by extension, the thermal conductivity. Thus, it is suggested that by inducing interfacial layering transitions via changes in temperature or pressure, one can thereby engineer thermodynamic and transport properties in materials.

  2. Review of Orbiter Flight Boundary Layer Transition Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcginley, Catherine B.; Berry, Scott A.; Kinder, Gerald R.; Barnell, maria; Wang, Kuo C.; Kirk, Benjamin S.

    2006-01-01

    In support of the Shuttle Return to Flight program, a tool was developed to predict when boundary layer transition would occur on the lower surface of the orbiter during reentry due to the presence of protuberances and cavities in the thermal protection system. This predictive tool was developed based on extensive wind tunnel tests conducted after the loss of the Space Shuttle Columbia. Recognizing that wind tunnels cannot simulate the exact conditions an orbiter encounters as it re-enters the atmosphere, a preliminary attempt was made to use the documented flight related damage and the orbiter transition times, as deduced from flight instrumentation, to calibrate the predictive tool. After flight STS-114, the Boundary Layer Transition Team decided that a more in-depth analysis of the historical flight data was needed to better determine the root causes of the occasional early transition times of some of the past shuttle flights. In this paper we discuss our methodology for the analysis, the various sources of shuttle damage information, the analysis of the flight thermocouple data, and how the results compare to the Boundary Layer Transition prediction tool designed for Return to Flight.

  3. Minnowbrook II 1997 Workshop on Boundary Layer Transition in Turbomachines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaGraff John E. (Editor); Ashpis, David E. (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    The volume contains materials presented at the Minnowbrook II - 1997 Workshop on Boundary Layer Transition in Turbomachines, held at Syracuse University Minnowbrook Conference Center, New York, on September 7-10, 1997. The workshop followed the informal format at the 1993 Minnowbrook I workshop, focusing on improving the understanding of late stage (final breakdown) boundary layer transition, with the engineering application of improving design codes for turbomachinery in mind. Among the physical mechanisms discussed were hydrodynamic instabilities, laminar to turbulent transition, bypass transition, turbulent spots, wake interaction with boundary layers, calmed regions, and separation, all in the context of flow in turbomachinery, particularly in compressors and high and low pressure turbines. Results from experiments, DNS, computation, modeling and theoretical analysis were presented. Abstracts and copies of viewgraphs, a specifically commissioned summation paper prepared after the workshop, and a transcript of the extensive working group reports and discussions are included in this volume. They provide recommendations for future research and clearly highlight the need for continued vigorous research in the technologically important area of transition in turbomachines.

  4. Advanced boundary layer transition measurement methods for flight applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, B. J.; Croom, C. C.; Gail, P. D.; Manuel, G. S.; Carraway, D. L.

    1986-01-01

    In modern laminar flow flight research, it is important to understand the specific cause(s) of laminar to turbulent boundary-layer transition. Such information is crucial to the exploration of the limits of practical application of laminar flow for drag reduction on aircraft. The transition modes of interest in current flight investigations include the viscous Tollmien-Schlichting instability, the inflectional instability at laminar separation, and the crossflow inflectional instability, as well as others. This paper presents the results to date of research on advanced devices and methods used for the study of laminar boundary-layer transition phenomena in the flight environment. Recent advancements in the development of arrayed hot-film devices and of a new flow visualization method are discussed. Arrayed hot-film devices have been designed to detect the presence of laminar separation, and of crossflow vorticity. The advanced flow visualization method utilizes color changes in liquid-crystal coatings to detect boundary-layer transition at high altitude flight conditions. Flight and wind tunnel data are presented to illustrate the design and operation of these advanced methods. These new research tools provide information on disturbance growth and transition mode which is essential to furthering our understanding of practical design limits for applications of laminar flow technology.

  5. Roughness Induced Transition in a Supersonic Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakumar, Ponnampalam; Kergerise, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Direct numerical simulation is used to investigate the transition induced by threedimensional isolated roughness elements in a supersonic boundary layer at a free stream Mach number of 3.5. Simulations are performed for two different configurations: one is a square planform roughness and the other is a diamond planform roughness. The mean-flow calculations show that the roughness induces counter rotating streamwise vortices downstream of the roughness. These vortices persist for a long distance downstream and lift the low momentum fluid from the near wall region and place it near the outer part of the boundary layer. This forms highly inflectional boundary layer profiles. These observations agree with recent experimental observations. The receptivity calculations showed that the amplitudes of the mass-flux fluctuations near the neutral point for the diamond shape roughness are the same as the amplitude of the acoustic disturbances. They are three times smaller for the square shape roughness.

  6. Linear stability theory and three-dimensional boundary layer transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spall, Robert E.; Malik, Mujeeb R.

    1992-01-01

    The viewgraphs and discussion of linear stability theory and three dimensional boundary layer transition are provided. The ability to predict, using analytical tools, the location of boundary layer transition over aircraft-type configurations is of great importance to designers interested in laminar flow control (LFC). The e(sup N) method has proven to be fairly effective in predicting, in a consistent manner, the location of the onset of transition for simple geometries in low disturbance environments. This method provides a correlation between the most amplified single normal mode and the experimental location of the onset of transition. Studies indicate that values of N between 8 and 10 correlate well with the onset of transition. For most previous calculations, the mean flows were restricted to two-dimensional or axisymmetric cases, or have employed simple three-dimensional mean flows (e.g., rotating disk, infinite swept wing, or tapered swept wing with straight isobars). Unfortunately, for flows over general wing configurations, and for nearly all flows over fuselage-type bodies at incidence, the analysis of fully three-dimensional flow fields is required. Results obtained for the linear stability of fully three-dimensional boundary layers formed over both wing and fuselage-type geometries, and for both high and low speed flows are discussed. When possible, transition estimates form the e(sup N) method are compared to experimentally determined locations. The stability calculations are made using a modified version of the linear stability code COSAL. Mean flows were computed using both Navier Stokes and boundary-layer codes.

  7. Fluid Mechanics and Heat Transfer in Transitional Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ting

    2007-01-01

    Experiments have been performed to investigate the effects of elevated free-stream turbulence and streamwise acceleration on flow and thermal structures in transitional boundary layers. The free-stream turbulence ranges from 0.5 to 6.4% and the streamwise acceleration ranges from K = 0 to 0.8 x 10(exp -6). The onset of transition, transition length and the turbulent spot formation rate are determined. The statistical results and conditionally sampled results of th streamwise and cross-stream velocity fluctuations, temperature fluctuations, Reynolds stress and Reynolds heat fluxes are presented.

  8. Transition in Hypersonic Boundary Layers: Role of Dilatational Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yiding; Zhang, Chuanhong; Tang, Qing; Yuan, Huijing; Wu, Jiezhi; Chen, Shiyi; Lee, Cunbiao; Gad-El-Hak, Mohamed

    2015-11-01

    Transition and turbulence production in a hypersonic boundary layer is investigated in a Mach 6 quiet wind tunnel using Rayleigh-scattering visualization, fast-response pressure measurements, and particle image velocimetry. It is found that the second-mode instability is a key modulator of the transition process. Although the second mode is primarily an acoustic wave, it causes the formation of high-frequency vortical waves. While the growing acoustic wave itself is rapidly annihilated due to its large and sharp dissipation peak that is enhanced by the bulk viscosity, the acoustically generated high-frequency vortical wave keeps growing and triggers a fast transition to turbulence.

  9. Boundary-Layer Receptivity and Integrated Transition Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Chau-Lyan; Choudhari, Meelan

    2005-01-01

    The adjoint parabold stability equations (PSE) formulation is used to calculate the boundary layer receptivity to localized surface roughness and suction for compressible boundary layers. Receptivity efficiency functions predicted by the adjoint PSE approach agree well with results based on other nonparallel methods including linearized Navier-Stokes equations for both Tollmien-Schlichting waves and crossflow instability in swept wing boundary layers. The receptivity efficiency function can be regarded as the Green's function to the disturbance amplitude evolution in a nonparallel (growing) boundary layer. Given the Fourier transformed geometry factor distribution along the chordwise direction, the linear disturbance amplitude evolution for a finite size, distributed nonuniformity can be computed by evaluating the integral effects of both disturbance generation and linear amplification. The synergistic approach via the linear adjoint PSE for receptivity and nonlinear PSE for disturbance evolution downstream of the leading edge forms the basis for an integrated transition prediction tool. Eventually, such physics-based, high fidelity prediction methods could simulate the transition process from the disturbance generation through the nonlinear breakdown in a holistic manner.

  10. Boundary Layer Transition in the NTF: HSR Experience and Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, Lewis R., Jr.; Wahls, Richard A.; Hamner, Marvine P.

    1999-01-01

    Efforts towards understanding boundary layer transition characteristics on a High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT)-class configuration in the National Transonic Facility (NTF) are ongoing. The majority of the High Speed Research (HSR) data base in the NTF has free transition on the wing, even at low Reynolds numbers (Rn) attainable in conventional facilities. Limited data has been obtained and is described herein showing the effects of a conventional, Braslow method based wing boundary-layer trip on drag. Comparisons are made using force data polars and surface flow visualization at selected angles-of-attack and Mach number. Minimum drag data obtained in this study suggest that boundary layer transition occurred very near the wing leading edge by a chord Rn of 30 million. Sublimating chemicals were used in the air mode of operation only at low Rn and low angles-of-attack with no flap deflections; sublimation results suggest that the forebody and outboard wing panel are the only regions with significant laminar flow. The process and issues related to the sublimating chemical technique as applied in the NTF are discussed. Beyond the existing experience, status of efforts to develop a production transition detection system applicable to both air and cryogenic nitrogen environments is presented.

  11. Holographic Interferometric Survey of Boundary Layer Transition in an Axisymmetric Free Convection Thermal Boundary Layer.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    AD A0779 880 AIR FORCE INST OF TECH WRISHT-PATTERSON AFB OH SCHOO--ETC F/S 14/2 HOLOSRAPHIC INTERFEROMETRIC SURVEY OF BOUNDARY LAYER TRANSIT!ON--ETC...the Air Force Institute of Technology Air University in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Master of Science - A~tcces .iofl 1,o...graduation the Air Force Flight Dynamics Lab would take on the student to assist on projects that required optical measurements. A. G. Havener presented the

  12. A complex-lamellar description of boundary layer transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolla, Maureen Louise

    Flow transition is important, in both practical and phenomenological terms. However, there is currently no method for identifying the spatial locations associated with transition, such as the start and end of intermittency. The concept of flow stability and experimental correlations have been used, however, flow stability only identifies the location where disturbances begin to grow in the laminar flow and experimental correlations can only give approximations as measuring the start and end of intermittency is difficult. Therefore, the focus of this work is to construct a method to identify the start and end of intermittency, for a natural boundary layer transition and a separated flow transition. We obtain these locations by deriving a complex-lamellar description of the velocity field that exists between a fully laminar and fully turbulent boundary condition. Mathematically, this complex-lamellar decomposition, which is constructed from the classical Darwin-Lighthill-Hawthorne drift function and the transport of enstrophy, describes the flow that exists between the fully laminar Pohlhausen equations and Prandtl's fully turbulent one seventh power law. We approximate the difference in enstrophy density between the boundary conditions using a power series. The slope of the power series is scaled by using the shape of the universal intermittency distribution within the intermittency region. We solve the complex-lamellar decomposition of the velocity field along with the slope of the difference in enstrophy density function to determine the location of the laminar and turbulent boundary conditions. Then from the difference in enstrophy density function we calculate the start and end of intermittency. We perform this calculation on a natural boundary layer transition over a flat plate for zero pressure gradient flow and for separated shear flow over a separation bubble. We compare these results to existing experimental results and verify the accuracy of our transition

  13. Characteristics of Mach 10 transitional and turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, R. D.

    1978-01-01

    Measurements of the mean flow properties of transitional and turbulent boundary layers in helium on 4 deg and 5 deg wedges were made for flows with edge Mach numbers from 9.5 to 11.3, ratios of wall temperature to total temperature of 0.4 to 0.95, and maximum length Reynolds numbers of one hundred million. The data include pitot and total temperature surveys and measurements of heat transfer and surface shear. In addition, with the assumption of local similarity, turbulence quantities such as the mixing length were derived from the mean flow profiles. Low Reynolds number and precursor transition effects were significant factors at these test conditions and were included in finite difference boundary layer predictions.

  14. Modeling Disturbance Dynamics in Transitional and Turbulent Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosch, C. E.; Gatski, T. B. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The dynamics of an ensemble of linear disturbances in boundary-layer flows at various Reynolds numbers is studied through an analysis of the transport equations for the mean disturbance kinetic energy and energy dissipation rate. Effects of adverse and favorable pressure-gradients on the disturbance dynamics are also included in the analysis. Unlike the fully turbulent regime where nonlinear phase scrambling of the fluctuations affects the flow field even in proximity to the wall, the early stage transition regime fluctuations studied here are influenced across the boundary layer by the solid boundary. In addition, the dominating dynamics in the disturbance kinetic energy equation is governed by the energy production, pressure-transport and viscous diffusion - also in contrast to the fully turbulent regime. For the disturbance dissipation rate, a dynamic balance exists between the destruction and diffusion of dissipation.

  15. Boundary Layer Transition Experiments in Support of the Hypersonics Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott A.; Chen, Fang-Jenq; Wilder, Michael C.; Reda, Daniel C.

    2007-01-01

    Two experimental boundary layer transition studies in support of fundamental hypersonics research are reviewed. The two studies are the HyBoLT flight experiment and a new ballistic range effort. Details are provided of the objectives and approach associated with each experimental program. The establishment of experimental databases from ground and flight are to provide better understanding of high-speed flows and data to validate and guide the development of simulation tools.

  16. Navier-Stokes Simulation of Boundary-Layer Transition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-05-01

    AUTHOITY 3 DISTRIBUTION/AVAILABILITY OF REPORT Approved for publlo release, distri but ion unmlioe4 ’ AD-A226 351 5 . MONITORING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER...ARJSR 87-0237, "Navier-Stokes Simulation of Boundary-Layer Transition" escrs. 5 w ccessful efforts to computationally model the receptivity of the...3.1 Basic-State Results........................................ 4 3.2 Unsteady-Disturbance Results................................. 5 3.3 Conclusions

  17. Contributions on the mechanics of boundary-layer transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubauer, G B; Klebanoff, P S

    1956-01-01

    The manner in which flow in a boundary layer becomes turbulent was investigated on a flat plate at wind speeds generally below 100 feet per second. Hot-wire techniques were used, and many of the results are derived from oscillograms of velocity fluctuations in the transition region. Following a presentation of the more familiar aspects of transition, there are presented the very revealing facts discovered while studying the characteristics of artificially produced turbulent spots. These are: (1) oscillograms of natural transition are identical to oscillograms of spot passage; (2) transition starts from perturbations in the laminar flow as spots which then grow in accordance with the general concept proposed by Emmons. (3) Turbulence always moves downstream followed by laminar flow; (4) the following flow is in a state of calm for a period during which transition will not occur.

  18. Some characteristics of bypass transition in a heated boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sohn, K. H.; Obrien, J. E.; Reshotko, E.

    1989-01-01

    Experimental measurements of both mean and conditionally sampled characteristics of laminar, transitional and low Reynolds number turbulent boundary layers on a heated flat plate are presented. Measurements were obtained in air over a range of freestream turbulence intensities from 0.3 percent to 6 percent with a freestream velocity of 30.5 m/s and zero pressure gradient. Conditional sampling performed in the transitional boundary layers indicate the existence of a near-wall drop in intermittency, especially pronounced at low intermittencies. Nonturbulent intervals were observed to possess large levels of low-frequency unsteadiness, and turbulent intervals had peak intensities as much as 50 percent higher than were measured at fully turbulent stations. Heat transfer results were consistent with results of previous researchers and Reynolds analogy factors were found to be well predicted by laminar and turbulent correlations which accounted for unheated starting length. A small dependence of the turbulent Reynolds analogy factors on freestream turbulence level was observed. Laminar boundary layer spectra indicated selective amplification of unstable frequencies. These instabilities appear to play a dominant role in the transition process only for the lowest freestream turbulence level studied, however.

  19. Transitional boundary layers in low-Prandtl-number convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, Jörg; Bandaru, Vinodh; Pandey, Ambrish; Scheel, Janet D.

    2016-12-01

    The boundary layer structure of the velocity and temperature fields in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard flows in closed cylindrical cells of unit aspect ratio is revisited from a transitional and turbulent viscous boundary layer perspective. When the Rayleigh number is large enough, the dynamics at the bottom and top plates can be separated into an impact region of downwelling plumes, an ejection region of upwelling plumes, and an interior region away from the side walls. The latter is dominated by the shear of the large-scale circulation (LSC) roll, which fills the whole cell and continuously varies its orientation. The working fluid is liquid mercury or gallium at a Prandtl number Pr=0.021 for Rayleigh numbers 3 ×105≤Ra≤4 ×108 . The generated turbulent momentum transfer corresponds to macroscopic flow Reynolds numbers with 1.8 ×103≤Re≤4.6 ×104 . In highly resolved spectral element direct numerical simulations, we present the mean profiles of velocity, Reynolds stress, and temperature in inner viscous units and compare our findings with convection experiments and channel flow data. The complex three-dimensional and time-dependent structure of the LSC in the cell is compensated by a plane-by-plane symmetry transformation which aligns the horizontal velocity components and all its derivatives with the instantaneous orientation of the LSC. As a consequence, the torsion of the LSC is removed, and a streamwise direction in the shear flow can be defined. It is shown that the viscous boundary layers for the largest Rayleigh numbers are highly transitional and obey properties that are directly comparable to transitional channel flows at friction Reynolds numbers Reτ≲102 . The transitional character of the viscous boundary layer is also underlined by the strong enhancement of the fluctuations of the wall stress components with increasing Rayleigh number. An extrapolation of our analysis data suggests that the friction Reynolds number Reτ in the velocity boundary

  20. Numerical studies of natural transition in a decelerating boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Kyung-Soo; Spalart, Philippe R.; Ferziger, Joel H.

    1992-01-01

    The laminar-turbulent transition in a decelerating flat-plate boundary layer is investigated by solving numerically the incompressible time-dependent three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations. In the early stages of the transition, two-dimensional and slightly oblique waves are found to grow because of an inflexional instability. Their subsequent nonlinear interactions trigger the breakdown and determine the pattern of the Lambda vortices. The tips of the Lambda vortices are rarely aligned in the flow direction and appear in local patches, often near the dislocation in the initial wave pattern. The observed features are accounted for by a simple wave-interference model.

  1. LASTRAC.3d: Transition Prediction in 3D Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Chau-Lyan

    2004-01-01

    Langley Stability and Transition Analysis Code (LASTRAC) is a general-purpose, physics-based transition prediction code released by NASA for laminar flow control studies and transition research. This paper describes the LASTRAC extension to general three-dimensional (3D) boundary layers such as finite swept wings, cones, or bodies at an angle of attack. The stability problem is formulated by using a body-fitted nonorthogonal curvilinear coordinate system constructed on the body surface. The nonorthogonal coordinate system offers a variety of marching paths and spanwise waveforms. In the extreme case of an infinite swept wing boundary layer, marching with a nonorthogonal coordinate produces identical solutions to those obtained with an orthogonal coordinate system using the earlier release of LASTRAC. Several methods to formulate the 3D parabolized stability equations (PSE) are discussed. A surface-marching procedure akin to that for 3D boundary layer equations may be used to solve the 3D parabolized disturbance equations. On the other hand, the local line-marching PSE method, formulated as an easy extension from its 2D counterpart and capable of handling the spanwise mean flow and disturbance variation, offers an alternative. A linear stability theory or parabolized stability equations based N-factor analysis carried out along the streamline direction with a fixed wavelength and downstream-varying spanwise direction constitutes an efficient engineering approach to study instability wave evolution in a 3D boundary layer. The surface-marching PSE method enables a consistent treatment of the disturbance evolution along both streamwise and spanwise directions but requires more stringent initial conditions. Both PSE methods and the traditional LST approach are implemented in the LASTRAC.3d code. Several test cases for tapered or finite swept wings and cones at an angle of attack are discussed.

  2. Characterization of structural response to hypersonic boundary-layer transition

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Zachary B.; Deshmukh, Rohit; Miller, Brent A.; McNamara, Jack J.; Casper, Katya M.

    2016-05-24

    The inherent relationship between boundary-layer stability, aerodynamic heating, and surface conditions makes the potential for interaction between the structural response and boundary-layer transition an important and challenging area of study in high-speed flows. This paper phenomenologically explores this interaction using a fundamental two-dimensional aerothermoelastic model under the assumption of an aluminum panel with simple supports. Specifically, an existing model is extended to examine the impact of transition onset location, transition length, and transitional overshoot in heat flux and fluctuating pressure on the structural response of surface panels. Transitional flow conditions are found to yield significantly increased thermal gradients, and they can result in higher maximum panel temperatures compared to turbulent flow. Results indicate that overshoot in heat flux and fluctuating pressure reduces the flutter onset time and increases the strain energy accumulated in the panel. Furthermore, overshoot occurring near the midchord can yield average temperatures and peak displacements exceeding those experienced by the panel subject to turbulent flow. Lastly, these results suggest that fully turbulent flow does not always conservatively predict the thermo-structural response of surface panels.

  3. Characterization of structural response to hypersonic boundary-layer transition

    DOE PAGES

    Riley, Zachary B.; Deshmukh, Rohit; Miller, Brent A.; ...

    2016-05-24

    The inherent relationship between boundary-layer stability, aerodynamic heating, and surface conditions makes the potential for interaction between the structural response and boundary-layer transition an important and challenging area of study in high-speed flows. This paper phenomenologically explores this interaction using a fundamental two-dimensional aerothermoelastic model under the assumption of an aluminum panel with simple supports. Specifically, an existing model is extended to examine the impact of transition onset location, transition length, and transitional overshoot in heat flux and fluctuating pressure on the structural response of surface panels. Transitional flow conditions are found to yield significantly increased thermal gradients, and theymore » can result in higher maximum panel temperatures compared to turbulent flow. Results indicate that overshoot in heat flux and fluctuating pressure reduces the flutter onset time and increases the strain energy accumulated in the panel. Furthermore, overshoot occurring near the midchord can yield average temperatures and peak displacements exceeding those experienced by the panel subject to turbulent flow. Lastly, these results suggest that fully turbulent flow does not always conservatively predict the thermo-structural response of surface panels.« less

  4. Characterization of structural response to hypersonic boundary-layer transition

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Zachary B.; Deshmukh, Rohit; Miller, Brent A.; McNamara, Jack J.; Casper, Katya M.

    2016-05-24

    The inherent relationship between boundary-layer stability, aerodynamic heating, and surface conditions makes the potential for interaction between the structural response and boundary-layer transition an important and challenging area of study in high-speed flows. This paper phenomenologically explores this interaction using a fundamental two-dimensional aerothermoelastic model under the assumption of an aluminum panel with simple supports. Specifically, an existing model is extended to examine the impact of transition onset location, transition length, and transitional overshoot in heat flux and fluctuating pressure on the structural response of surface panels. Transitional flow conditions are found to yield significantly increased thermal gradients, and they can result in higher maximum panel temperatures compared to turbulent flow. Results indicate that overshoot in heat flux and fluctuating pressure reduces the flutter onset time and increases the strain energy accumulated in the panel. Furthermore, overshoot occurring near the midchord can yield average temperatures and peak displacements exceeding those experienced by the panel subject to turbulent flow. Lastly, these results suggest that fully turbulent flow does not always conservatively predict the thermo-structural response of surface panels.

  5. Infrared Imaging of Boundary Layer Transition Flight Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott A.; Horvath, Thomas J., Jr.; Schwartz, Richard; Ross, Martin; Anderson, Brian; Campbell, Charles H.

    2008-01-01

    The Hypersonic Thermodynamic Infrared Measurement (HYTHIRM) project is presently focused on near term support to the Shuttle program through the development of an infrared imaging capability of sufficient spatial and temporal resolution to augment existing on-board Orbiter instrumentation. Significant progress has been made with the identification and inventory of relevant existing optical imaging assets and the development, maturation, and validation of simulation and modeling tools for assessment and mission planning purposes, which were intended to lead to the best strategies and assets for successful acquisition of quantitative global surface temperature data on the Shuttle during entry. However, there are longer-term goals of providing global infrared imaging support to other flight projects as well. A status of HYTHIRM from the perspective of how two NASA-sponsored boundary layer transition flight experiments could benefit by infrared measurements is provided. Those two flight projects are the Hypersonic Boundary layer Transition (HyBoLT) flight experiment and the Shuttle Boundary Layer Transition Flight Experiment (BLT FE), which are both intended for reducing uncertainties associated with the extrapolation of wind tunnel derived transition correlations for flight application. Thus, the criticality of obtaining high quality flight data along with the impact it would provide to the Shuttle program damage assessment process are discussed. Two recent wind tunnel efforts that were intended as risk mitigation in terms of quantifying the transition process and resulting turbulent wedge locations are briefly reviewed. Progress is being made towards finalizing an imaging strategy in support of the Shuttle BLT FE, however there are no plans currently to image HyBoLT.

  6. Analysis of the photodiode boundary layer transition indicator

    SciTech Connect

    Kuntz, D.W.; Wilken, A.C.; Payne, J.L.

    1994-01-01

    The photodiode transition indicator is a device which has been successfully used to determine the onset of boundary layer transition on numerous hypersonic flight vehicles. The exact source of the electromagnetic radiation detected by the photodiode at transition was not understood. In some cases early saturation of the device occurred, and the device failed to detect transition. Analyses have been performed to determine the source of the radiation producing the photodiode signal. The results of these analyses indicate that the most likely source of the radiation is blackbody emission from the heatshield material bordering the quartz window of the device. Good agreement between flight data and calculations based on this radiation source has been obtained. Analyses also indicate that the most probable source of the radiation causing early saturation is blackbody radiation from carbon particles which break away from the nosetip during the ablation process.

  7. Turbulent heat flux measurements in a transitional boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sohn, K. H.; Zaman, K. B. M. Q.; Reshotko, E.

    1992-01-01

    During an experimental investigation of the transitional boundary layer over a heated flat plate, an unexpected result was encountered for the turbulent heat flux (bar-v't'). This quantity, representing the correlation between the fluctuating normal velocity and the temperature, was measured to be negative near the wall under certain conditions. The result was unexpected as it implied a counter-gradient heat transfer by the turbulent fluctuations. Possible reasons for this anomalous result were further investigated. The possible causes considered for this negative bar-v't' were: (1) plausible measurement error and peculiarity of the flow facility, (2) large probe size effect, (3) 'streaky structure' in the near wall boundary layer, and (4) contributions from other terms usually assumed negligible in the energy equation including the Reynolds heat flux in the streamwise direction (bar-u't'). Even though the energy balance has remained inconclusive, none of the items (1) to (3) appear to be contributing directly to the anomaly.

  8. Transition Delay in Hypersonic Boundary Layers via Optimal Perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paredes, Pedro; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Li, Fei

    2016-01-01

    The effect of nonlinear optimal streaks on disturbance growth in a Mach 6 axisymmetric flow over a 7deg half-angle cone is investigated in an e ort to expand the range of available techniques for transition control. Plane-marching parabolized stability equations are used to characterize the boundary layer instability in the presence of azimuthally periodic streaks. The streaks are observed to stabilize nominally planar Mack mode instabilities, although oblique Mack mode disturbances are destabilized. Experimentally measured transition onset in the absence of any streaks correlates with an amplification factor of N = 6 for the planar Mack modes. For high enough streak amplitudes, the transition threshold of N = 6 is not reached by the Mack mode instabilities within the length of the cone, but subharmonic first mode instabilities, which are destabilized by the presence of the streaks, reach N = 6 near the end of the cone. These results suggest a passive flow control strategy of using micro vortex generators to induce streaks that would delay transition in hypersonic boundary layers.

  9. Study of the morning transition of the atmospheric boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sastre, M.; Yagüe, C.; Maqueda, G.; Viana, S.

    2009-04-01

    In this work it will be analyzed the main physical processes related to the transition of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) that takes place from the last hours of the night until the first hours of the morning. In order to achieve that, it will be used data from field campaigns which took place in the Research Centre for the Lower Atmosphere (CIBA), especially those gathered in the campaign carried out in June, 2008 where information was obtained from a 10m height mast provided with temperature, wind speed and direction, and moisture sensors at several levels. Also a sonic anemometer (20 Hz sampling rate) at 10m was available. The database is complemented by a triangle of microbarometers installed next to the surface, and another two microbarometers placed in a 100m meteorological tower at 50 and 100m respectively. A GRIMM particle monitor (MODEL 365), which can be used to continuously measure each six seconds simultaneously the PM10, PM2.5 and PM1 values, was also available to evaluate the degree of mixing taking place near the surface. The thermodynamic characteristics of the first hundreds of meters remain registered from information obtained with a tethered balloon and with a RASS-SODAR. The main turbulent and stability parameters, as well as coherent structures present in the Nocturnal Boundary Layer are studied in connection to their influence in the developing of the next Convective Boundary Layer.

  10. A cloudiness transition in a marine boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betts, Alan K.; Boers, Reinout

    1990-01-01

    Boundary layer cloudiness plays several important roles in the energy budget of the earth. Low level stratocumulus are highly reflective clouds which reduce the net incoming shortwave radiation at the earth's surface. Climatically, the transition to a small area fraction of scattered cumulus clouds occurs as the air flows over warmer water. Although these clouds reflect less sunlight, they still play an important role in the boundary layer equilibrium by transporting water vapor upwards, and enhancing the surface evaporation. The First ISCCP (International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project) Regional Experiment (FIRE) included a marine stratocumulus experiment off the southern California coast from June 29 to July 19, 1987. The objectives of this experiment were to study the controls on fractional cloudiness, and to assess the role of cloud-top entrainment instability (CTEI) and mesoscale structure in determining cloud type. The focus is one research day, July 7, 1987, when coordinated aircraft missions were flown by four research aircraft, centered on a LANDSAT scene at 1830 UTC. The remarkable feature of this LANDSAT scene is the transition from a clear sky in the west through broken cumulus to solid stratocumulus in the east. The dynamic and thermodynamic structure of this transition in cloudiness is analyzed using data from the NCAR Electra. By averaging the aircraft data, the internal structure of the different cloud regimes is documented, and it is shown that the transition between broken cumulus and stratocumulus is associated with a change in structure with respect to the CTEI condition. However, this results not from sea surface temperature changes, but mostly from a transition in the air above the inversion, and the breakup appears to be at a structure on the unstable side of the wet virtual adiabat.

  11. LAMINAR TRANSITIONAL AND TURBULENT BOUNDARY LAYERS FOR COMPRESSIBLE AXISYMMETRIC FLOW

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albers, J. A.

    1994-01-01

    This is a finite-difference program for calculating the viscous compressible boundary layer flow over either planar or axisymmetric surfaces. The flow may be initially laminar and progress through a transitional zone to a fully turbulent flow, or it may remain laminar, depending on the imposed boundary conditions, laws of viscosity, and numerical solution of the momentum and energy equations. The flow may also be forced into a turbulent flow at a chosen spot by the data input. The input may contain factors of arbitrary Reynolds number, free-stream Mach number, free stream turbulence, wall heating or cooling, longitudinal wall curvature, wall suction or blowing, and wall roughness. The solution may start from an initial Falkner-Skan similarity profile, an approximate equilibrium turbulent profile, or an initial arbitrary input profile. This program has been implemented on the IBM 7094/7044 Direct Couple System. This program is written in FORTRAN IV and was developed in 1974.

  12. LAMINAR TRANSITIONAL AND TURBULENT BOUNDARY LAYERS FOR COMPRESSIBLE AXISYMMETRIC FLOW

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albers, J. A.

    1994-01-01

    This is a finite-difference program for calculating the viscous compressible boundary layer flow over either planar or axisymmetric surfaces. The flow may be initially laminar and progress through a transitional zone to a fully turbulent flow, or it may remain laminar, depending on the imposed boundary conditions, laws of viscosity, and numerical solution of the momentum and energy equations. The flow may also be forced into a turbulent flow at a chosen spot by the data input. The input may contain factors of arbitrary Reynolds number, free-stream Mach number, free stream turbulence, wall heating or cooling, longitudinal wall curvature, wall suction or blowing, and wall roughness. The solution may start from an initial Falkner-Skan similarity profile, an approximate equilibrium turbulent profile, or an initial arbitrary input profile. This program has been implemented on the IBM 7094/7044 Direct Couple System. This program is written in FORTRAN IV and was developed in 1974.

  13. Space Shuttle Boundary Layer Transition Flight Experiment Ground Testing Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, Karen T.; Anderson, Brian P.; Campbell, Charles H.

    2014-01-01

    In support of the Boundary Layer Transition (BLT) Flight Experiment (FE) Project in which a manufactured protuberance tile was installed on the port wing of Space Shuttle Orbiter Discovery for STS-119, STS- 128, STS-131 and STS-133 as well as Space Shuttle Orbiter Endeavour for STS-134, a significant ground test campaign was completed. The primary goals of the test campaign were to provide ground test data to support the planning and safety certification efforts required to fly the flight experiment as well as validation for the collected flight data. These test included Arcjet testing of the tile protuberance, aerothermal testing to determine the boundary layer transition behavior and resultant surface heating and planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) testing in order to gain a better understanding of the flow field characteristics associated with the flight experiment. This paper provides an overview of the BLT FE Project ground testing. High-level overviews of the facilities, models, test techniques and data are presented, along with a summary of the insights gained from each test.

  14. Transition and Breakdown to Turbulence in Incompressible Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakumar, Ponnampalam

    1998-01-01

    We have developed a code where the nonlinear terms are treated implicitly. The equations are discretized using the two-point fourth order compact scheme in the y-direction and the backward Euler method in the x-direction. We investigated the transition process in a Blasius boundary layer due to fundamental type breakdown. With 8 modes in the w and 3 planes, we could compute the evolution of disturbances up to Re(x)=910, which is well into the strongly nonlinear region. The transition onset point is located around Re(x)=850. The comparison with the measurements and with the DNS computations are very good up to Re(x)=880.

  15. Evolution of vortex-surface fields in transitional boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yue; Zhao, Yaomin; Xiong, Shiying

    2016-11-01

    We apply the vortex-surface field (VSF), a Lagrangian-based structure-identification method, to the DNS database of transitional boundary layers. The VSFs are constructed from the vorticity fields within a sliding window at different times and locations using a recently developed boundary-constraint method. The isosurfaces of VSF, representing vortex surfaces consisting of vortex lines with different wall distances in the laminar stage, show different evolutionary geometries in transition. We observe that the vortex surfaces with significant deformation evolve from wall-parallel planar sheets through hairpin-like structures and packets into a turbulent spot with regeneration of small-scale hairpins. From quantitative analysis, we show that a small number of representative or influential vortex surfaces can contribute significantly to the increase of the drag coefficient in transition, which implies a reduced-order model based on VSF. This work has been supported in part by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11472015, 11522215 and 11521091), and the Thousand Young Talents Program of China.

  16. Recommendations for Hypersonic Boundary Layer Transition Flight Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott A.; Kimmel, Roger; Reshotko, Eli

    2011-01-01

    Much has been learned about the physics underlying the transition process at supersonic and hypersonic speeds through years of analysis, experiment and computation. Generally, the application of this knowledge has been restricted to simple shapes like plates, cones and spherical bodies. However, flight reentry vehicles are in reality never simple. They typically are highly complex geometries flown at angle of attack so three-dimensional effects are very important, as are roughness effects due to surface features and/or ablation. This paper will review our present understanding of the physics of the transition process and look back at some of the recent flight test programs for their successes and failures. The goal of this paper is to develop rationale for new hypersonic boundary layer transition flight experiments. Motivations will be derived from both an inward look at what we believe constitutes a good flight test program as well as an outward review of the goals and objectives of some recent US based unclassified proposals and programs. As part of our recommendations, this paper will address the need for careful experimental work as per the guidelines enunciated years ago by the U.S. Transition Study Group. Following these guidelines is essential to obtaining reliable, usable data for allowing refinement of transition estimation techniques.

  17. Structure Identification Within a Transitioning Swept-Wing Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, Keith; Glauser, Mark

    1996-01-01

    Extensive measurements are made in a transitioning swept-wing boundary layer using hot-film, hot-wire and cross-wire anemometry. The crossflow-dominated flow contains stationary vortices that breakdown near mid-chord. The most amplified vortex wavelength is forced by the use of artificial roughness elements near the leading edge. Two-component velocity and spanwise surface shear-stress correlation measurements are made at two constant chord locations, before and after transition. Streamwise surface shear stresses are also measured through the entire transition region. Correlation techniques are used to identify stationary structures in the laminar regime and coherent structures in the turbulent regime. Basic techniques include observation of the spatial correlations and the spatially distributed auto-spectra. The primary and secondary instability mechanisms are identified in the spectra in all measured fields. The primary mechanism is seen to grow, cause transition and produce large-scale turbulence. The secondary mechanism grows through the entire transition region and produces the small-scale turbulence. Advanced techniques use Linear Stochastic Estimation (LSE) and Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) to identify the spatio-temporal evolutions of structures in the boundary layer. LSE is used to estimate the instantaneous velocity fields using temporal data from just two spatial locations and the spatial correlations. Reference locations are selected using maximum RMS values to provide the best available estimates. POD is used to objectively determine modes characteristic of the measured flow based on energy. The stationary vortices are identified in the first laminar modes of each velocity component and shear component. Experimental evidence suggests that neighboring vortices interact and produce large coherent structures with spanwise periodicity at double the stationary vortex wavelength. An objective transition region detection method is developed using

  18. Interaction of compliant surfaces with transitional and turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gad-El-Hak, M.; Riley, J. J.; Blackwelder, R. F.

    The interaction of plastisol gel coatings of different thicknesses and shear moduli with transitional and turbulent boundary layers was investigated over a range of velocities. Whenever the free-stream velocity within the fluid was comparable to the transverse wave speed within the solid, large-amplitude static-divergence waves appeared on the surface of the solid. The amplitude of the waves was always of the order of the coating thickness. As the free-stream velocity increased, the waves became less two-dimensional and developed larger variations in their amplitude along the crests. This disturbance led to the formation of additional waves downstream having a shorter span. Ways of reducing or eliminating the static-divergence waves are briefly discussed.

  19. Effect of free-stream turbulence on boundary layer transition.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, M E

    2014-07-28

    This paper is concerned with the transition to turbulence in flat plate boundary layers due to moderately high levels of free-stream turbulence. The turbulence is assumed to be generated by an (idealized) grid and matched asymptotic expansions are used to analyse the resulting flow over a finite thickness flat plate located in the downstream region. The characteristic Reynolds number Rλ based on the mesh size λ and free-stream velocity is assumed to be large, and the turbulence intensity ε is assumed to be small. The asymptotic flow structure is discussed for the generic case where the turbulence Reynolds number εRλ and the plate thickness and are held fixed (at O(1) and O(λ), respectively) in the limit as [Formula: see text] and ε→0. But various limiting cases are considered in order to explain the relevant transition mechanisms. It is argued that there are two types of streak-like structures that can play a role in the transition process: (i) those that appear in the downstream region and are generated by streamwise vorticity in upstream flow and (ii) those that are concentrated near the leading edge and are generated by plate normal vorticity in upstream flow. The former are relatively unaffected by leading edge geometry and are usually referred to as Klebanoff modes while the latter are strongly affected by leading edge geometry and are more streamwise vortex-like in appearance.

  20. Effect of suction and blowing on boundary-layer transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saric, W. S.; Reed, H. L.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of wall blowing and suction on boundary-layer stability and transition are studied on a flat plate. Titanium panels, in which 0.063 mm diameter holes were drilled on 0.635 mm centers, are inserted on the plate. Suction level and distribution are variable. Disturbances are introduced by means of a vibrating ribbon and measurements of both mean-flow and disturbance-flow velocities are made with a hot wire. Disturbance amplitudes are measured as a function of Reynolds number, frequency, and suction characteristics and compared with the previous Dynapore results of Reynolds and Saric. Transition measurements under natural and forced conditions are also made. The stabilizing effects of suction are documented. It is also shown that very high local flow rates through the suction holes (which approach a hole Reynolds number of 300) do not destabilize the flow. On the other hand, weak blowing lowers the transition Reynolds number but is found not to cause serious problems.

  1. Boundary-layer transition over aerodynamically-significant rotating bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, Stephen; Hussain, Zahir; Barrow, Alistair; Towers, Paul

    2010-11-01

    For practical reasons rotating-disk flow has served as the foremost model problem for studying transition in fully 3D incompressible boundary layers for over six decades and has a huge body of associated literature. However, continuing developments in spinning projectiles and aeroengines has led to the need to understand the onset of transition over rotating cones and spheroids as objects in their own right. Although numerous experimental observations have been published, these geometries received only little theoretical attention prior to 2002 when Garrett and co-workers commenced their work. In this paper we give a comparative study of the instability characteristics of the flows over these distinct geometries, discussing their similarities and differences with each other and the rotating-disk paradigm. The rotating-cone flow in particular is found to demonstrate significantly different characteristics as the half-angle is reduced below 40degs. This observation has led to the hypothesis and ultimate identification of an alternative instability mode which is expected to dominate for slender cones. Theoretical studies using numerical and asymptotic techniques are discussed. Comparisons are made to existing experimental data, and in many cases excellent agreement is observed for measurable properties. Where close agreement is not seen, we discuss possible reasons why.

  2. Receptivity and Transition of Supersonic Boundary Layers Over Swept Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakumar, Ponnampalam; King, Rudolph A.

    2010-01-01

    The receptivity, stability, and transition of three-dimensional supersonic boundary layers over (1) a swept cylinder, (2) a swept wing with a sharp leading edge, and (3) a swept wing with a blunt leading edge are numerically investigated for a free-stream Mach number of 3. These computations are compared to an earlier experimental and computational study performed by Archambaud et al.1 The steady flow fields with and without roughness elements are obtained by solving the full Navier-Stokes equations. The N-factors computed in this study at the transition onset locations reported in Ref. 1 for flow over the swept cylinder are approximately 16.5 for traveling crossflow disturbances and 9 for stationary disturbances. The N-factors for the traveling crossflow are high based on our past experiences. However, they are comparatively smaller than those reported by Archambaud et al., who found N-factor values in the range of 20 to 25 for traveling disturbances and 13 to 20 for stationary disturbances. Similarly, the N-factors computed in this study for the traveling and stationary disturbances for the flow over the sharp wing are approximately 7 and 2.5, respectively, and for the flow over the blunt wing are 6.5 and 4.8, respectively. Using the envelope method, Archambaud et al. obtained values of approximately 8.0 and 4.0 for the sharp wing case and 16.0 and 12.0 for the blunt wing case.

  3. Comparison of Methods for Determining Boundary Layer Edge Conditions for Transition Correlations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liechty, Derek S.; Berry, Scott A.; Hollis, Brian R.; Horvath, Thomas J.

    2003-01-01

    Data previously obtained for the X-33 in the NASA Langley Research Center 20-Inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel have been reanalyzed to compare methods for determining boundary layer edge conditions for use in transition correlations. The experimental results were previously obtained utilizing the phosphor thermography technique to monitor the status of the boundary layer downstream of discrete roughness elements via global heat transfer images of the X-33 windward surface. A boundary layer transition correlation was previously developed for this data set using boundary layer edge conditions calculated using an inviscid/integral boundary layer approach. An algorithm was written in the present study to extract boundary layer edge quantities from higher fidelity viscous computational fluid dynamic solutions to develop transition correlations that account for viscous effects on vehicles of arbitrary complexity. The boundary layer transition correlation developed for the X-33 from the viscous solutions are compared to the previous boundary layer transition correlations. It is shown that the boundary layer edge conditions calculated using an inviscid/integral boundary layer approach are significantly different than those extracted from viscous computational fluid dynamic solutions. The present results demonstrate the differences obtained in correlating transition data using different computational methods.

  4. Laminar boundary layer in conditions of natural transition to turbulent flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polyakov, N. F.

    1986-01-01

    Results of experimental study of regularities of a natural transition of a laminar boundary layer to a turbulent layer at low subsonic air flow velocities are presented, analyzed and compared with theory and model experiments.

  5. Orbiter Entry Aeroheating Working Group Viscous CFD Boundary Layer Transition Trailblazer Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, William A.; Erickson, David W.; Greene, Francis A.

    2007-01-01

    Boundary layer transition correlations for the Shuttle Orbiter have been previously developed utilizing a two-layer boundary layer prediction technique. The particular two-layer technique that was used is limited to Mach numbers less than 20. To allow assessments at Mach numbers greater than 20, it is proposed to use viscous CFD to the predict boundary layer properties. This report addresses if the existing Orbiter entry aeroheating viscous CFD solutions, which were originally intended to be used for heat transfer rate predictions, adequately resolve boundary layer edge properties and if the existing two-layer results could be leveraged to reduce the number of needed CFD solutions. The boundary layer edge parameters from viscous CFD solutions are extracted along the wind side centerline of the Space Shuttle Orbiter at reentry conditions, and are compared with results from the two-layer boundary layer prediction technique. The differences between the viscous CFD and two-layer prediction techniques vary between Mach 6 and 18 flight conditions and Mach 6 wind tunnel conditions, and there is not a straightforward scaling between the viscous CFD and two-layer values. Therefore: it is not possible to leverage the existing two-layer Orbiter flight boundary layer data set as a substitute for a viscous CFD data set; but viscous CFD solutions at the current grid resolution are sufficient to produce a boundary layer data set suitable for applying edge-based boundary layer transition correlations.

  6. Bypass transition in boundary layers including curvature and favorable pressure gradient effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volino, R. J.; Simon, T. W.

    1991-01-01

    Recent studies of 2-D boundary layers undergoing bypass transition were reviewed. Bypass transition is characterized by the sudden appearance of turbulent spots in boundary layer without first the regular, observable growth of disturbances predicted by linear stability theory. There are no standard criteria or parameters for defining bypass transition, but it is known to be the mode of transition when the flow is disturbed by perturbations of sufficient amplitude.

  7. Methods for direct simulation of transition in hypersonic boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandervegt, J. J. W.; Ferziger, J. H.

    1991-01-01

    An implicit numerical algorithm for the time accurate solution of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations is described. Results for steady flow past a finite flat plate are presented, together with preliminary results for the temporal simulation of second mode instability in a flat plate boundary layer at Mach 4.5.

  8. Free-stream disturbances, continuous eigenfunctions, boundary-layer instability and transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salwen, H.

    1980-01-01

    A rational foundation is provided for the application of the linear stability theory of parallel shear flows to transition prediction. An explicit method is given for carrying out the necessary calculations. The expansions are shown to be complete. Sample calculations show that a typical boundary layer is very sensitive to vorticity disturbance in the inner boundary layer near the critical layer. Vorticity disturbances three or four boundary layer thicknesses above the boundary are nearly uncoupled from the boundary layer, in that the amplitudes of the discrete Tollmein-Schlichting waves are an extremely small fraction of the amplitude of the disturbance.

  9. Free-stream disturbance, continuous Eigenfunctions, boundary-layer instability and transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosch, C. E.

    1980-01-01

    A rational foundation is presented for the application of the linear shear flows to transition prediction, and an explicit method is given for carrying out the necessary calculations. The expansions used are shown to be complete. Sample calculations show that a typical boundary layer is very sensitive to vorticity disturbances in the inner boundary layer, near the critical layer. Vorticity disturbances three or four boundary layer thicknesses above the boundary are nearly uncoupled from the boundary layer in that the amplitudes of the discrete Tollmien-Schlicting waves are an extremely small fraction of the amplitude of the disturbance.

  10. Effect of Protuberance Shape and Orientation on Space Shuttle Orbiter Boundary-Layer Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, RUdolph A.; Berry, Scott A.; Kegerise, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    This document describes an experimental study conducted to examine the effects of protuberances on hypersonic boundary-layer transition. The experiment was conducted in the Langley 20-Inch Mach 6 Tunnel on a series of 0.9%-scale Shuttle Orbiter models. The data were acquired to complement the existing ground-based boundary-layer transition database that was used to develop Version 1.0 of the boundary-layer transition RTF (return-to-flight) tool. The existing ground-based data were all acquired on 0.75%-scale Orbiter models using diamond-shaped ( pizza-box ) trips. The larger model scale facilitated in manufacturing higher fidelity protuberances. The end use of this experimental database will be to develop a technical basis (in the form of a boundary-layer transition correlation) to assess representative protrusion shapes, e.g., gap fillers and protrusions resulting from possible tile repair concepts. The primary objective of this study is to investigate the effects of protuberance-trip location and geometry on Shuttle Orbiter boundary-layer transition. Secondary goals are to assess the effects of gap-filler orientation and other protrusion shapes on boundary-layer transition. Global heat-transfer images using phosphor thermography of the Orbiter windward surface and the corresponding streamwise and spanwise heating distributions were used to infer the state of the boundary layer, i.e., laminar, transitional, or turbulent.

  11. Experimental studies on boundary-layer transition on a reentry vehicle at transonic and supersonic speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Kojiro; Abe, Takashi

    1995-03-01

    The boundary-layer transition on the EXPRESS reentry capsule at transonic and supersonic speeds is studied experimentally by the wind tunnel tests. For the diagnostic of the turbulent transition of the boundary layer, the China-clay method is used. The experimental results clarify that when the freestream Mach number increases, the transition point moves downstream on the body surface and the distance between the beginning of the transition and its completion to the fully turbulent flow becomes larger. The effects of the freestream Mach number on the location of the boundary-layer transition are described successfully in terms of two nondimensional quantities, that is, the transition Reynolds number and the local Mach number at the boundary-layer edge. The oil-flow pictures reveal that in the transonic regime, the separation bubble is formed at the junction between the blunt nose and the conical part of the body and therefore the transition begins behind the reattachment point of the separation bubble. The effects of the turbulent transition on the aerodynamic characteristics of the reentry body are investigated by using the technique of the boundary-layer trip and the experimental results show that the aerodynamic characteristics of the EXPRESS reentry vehicle are not sensitive to the boundary-layer transition.

  12. An experimental investigation of wall boundary layer transition Reynolds numbers in an expansion tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weilmuenster, K. J.

    1974-01-01

    Experimental measurements of boundary-layer transition in an expansion-tube test-gas flow are presented along with radial distributions of pitot pressure. An integral method for calculating constant Reynolds number lines for an expansion-tube flow is introduced. Comparison of experimental data and constant Reynolds number calculations has shown that for given conditions, wall boundary-layer transition occurs at a constant Reynolds number in an expansion-tube flow. Operating conditions in the expansion tube were chosen so that the effects of test-gas nonequilibrium on boundary-layer transition could be studied.

  13. Transition in a Supersonic Boundary Layer due to Acoustic Disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakumar, Ponnampalam

    2004-01-01

    The boundary layer receptivity process due to the interaction of three-dimensional slow and fast acoustic disturbances with a blunted flat plate is numerically investigated at a free stream Mach number of 3.5 and at a high Reynolds number of 106/inch. The computations are performed with and without two-dimensional isolated roughness element located near the leading edge. Both the steady and unsteady solutions are obtained by solving the full Navier-Stokes equations using the 5th-order accurate weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme for space discretization and using third-order total-variation-diminishing (TVD) Runge-Kutta scheme for time integration. The simulations showed that the linear instability waves are generated very close to the leading edge. The wavelength of the disturbances inside the boundary layer first increases gradually and becomes longer than the wavelength for the instability waves within a short distance from the leading edge. The wavelength then decreases gradually and merges with the wavelength for the Tollmien_Schlichting wave. The initial amplitudes of the instability waves near the neutral points, the receptivity coefficients, are about 1.20 and 0.07 times the amplitude of the free-stream disturbances for the slow and the fast waves respectively. It was also revealed that small isolated roughness element does not enhance the receptivity process for the given nose bluntness.

  14. Transition in a Supersonic Boundary Layer Due to Acoustic Disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakumar, P.

    2005-01-01

    The boundary layer receptivity process due to the interaction of three-dimensional slow and fast acoustic disturbances with a blunted flat plate is numerically investigated at a free stream Mach number of 3.5 and at a high Reynolds number of 10(exp 6)/inch. The computations are performed with and without two-dimensional isolated roughness element located near the leading edge. Both the steady and unsteady solutions are obtained by solving the full Navier-Stokes equations using the fifth-order accurate weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme for space discretization and using third-order total-variation-diminishing (TVD) Runge-Kutta scheme for time integration. The simulations showed that the linear instability waves are generated very close to the leading edge. The wavelength of the disturbances inside the boundary layer first increases gradually and becomes longer than the wavelength for the instability waves within a short distance from the leading edge. The wavelength then decreases gradually and merges with the wavelength for the Tollmien-Schlichting wave. The initial amplitudes of the instability waves near the neutral points, the receptivity coefficients, are about 1.20 and 0.07 times the amplitude of the free-stream disturbances for the slow and the fast waves respectively. It was also revealed that small isolated roughness element does not enhance the receptivity process for the given nose bluntness.

  15. Computer graphic visualization of orbiter lower surface boundary-layer transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Throckmorton, D. A.; Hartung, L. C.

    1984-01-01

    Computer graphic techniques are applied to the processing of Shuttle Orbiter flight data in order to create a visual presentation of the extent and movement of the boundary-layer transition front over the orbiter lower surface during entry. Flight-measured surface temperature-time histories define the onset and completion of the boundary-layer transition process at any measurement location. The locus of points which define the spatial position of the boundary-layer transition front on the orbiter planform is plotted at each discrete time for which flight data are available. Displaying these images sequentially in real-time results in an animated simulation of the in-flight boundary-layer transition process.

  16. Shuttle Return To Flight Experimental Results: Protuberance Effects on Boundary Layer Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liechty, Derek S.; Berry, Scott A.; Horvath, Thomas J.

    2006-01-01

    The effect of isolated roughness elements on the windward boundary layer of the Shuttle Orbiter has been experimentally examined in the Langley Aerothermodynamic Laboratory in support of an agency-wide effort to prepare the Shuttle Orbiter for return to flight. This experimental effort was initiated to provide a roughness effects database for developing transition criteria to support on-orbit decisions to repair damage to the thermal protection system. Boundary layer transition results were obtained using trips of varying heights and locations along the centerline and attachment lines of 0.0075-scale models. Global heat transfer images using phosphor thermography of the Orbiter windward surface and the corresponding heating distributions were used to infer the state of the boundary layer (laminar, transitional, or turbulent). The database contained within this report will be used to formulate protuberance-induced transition correlations using predicted boundary layer edge parameters.

  17. Computer graphic visualization of orbiter lower surface boundary-layer transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Throckmorton, D. A.; Hartung, L. C.

    1984-01-01

    Computer graphic techniques are applied to the processing of Shuttle Orbiter flight data in order to create a visual presentation of the extent and movement of the boundary-layer transition front over the orbiter lower surface during entry. Flight-measured surface temperature-time histories define the onset and completion of the boundary-layer transition process at any measurement location. The locus of points which define the spatial position of the boundary-layer transition front on the orbiter planform is plotted at each discrete time for which flight data are available. Displaying these images sequentially in real-time results in an animated simulation of the in-flight boundary-layer transition process.

  18. Study of boundary-layer transition using transonic-cone preston tube data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, T. D.; Moretti, P. M.

    1980-01-01

    The laminar boundary layer on a 10 degree cone in a transonic wind tunnel was studied. The inviscid flow and boundary layer development were simulated by computer programs. The effects of pitch and yaw angles on the boundary layer were examined. Preston-tube data, taken on the boundary-layer-transition cone in the NASA Ames 11 ft transonic wind tunnel, were used to develope a correlation which relates the measurements to theoretical values of laminar skin friction. The recommended correlation is based on a compressible form of the classical law-of-the-wall. The computer codes successfully simulates the laminar boundary layer for near-zero pitch and yaw angles. However, in cases of significant pitch and/or yaw angles, the flow is three dimensional and the boundary layer computer code used here cannot provide a satisfactory model. The skin-friction correlation is thought to be valid for body geometries other than cones.

  19. High-resolution PIV measurements of a transitional shock wave-boundary layer interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giepman, R. H. M.; Schrijer, F. F. J.; van Oudheusden, B. W.

    2015-06-01

    This study investigates the effects of boundary layer transition on an oblique shock wave reflection. The Mach number was 1.7, the unit Reynolds number was 35 × 106 m-1, and the pressure ratio over the interaction was 1.35. Particle image velocimetry is used as the main flow diagnostics tool, supported by oil-flow and Schlieren visualizations. At these conditions, the thickness of the laminar boundary layer is only 0.2 mm, and seeding proved to be problematic as practically no seeding was recorded in the lower 40 % of the boundary layer. The top 60 % could, however, still be resolved with good accuracy and is found to be in good agreement with the compressible Blasius solution. Due to the effects of turbulent mixing, the near-wall seeding deficiency disappears when the boundary layer transitions to a turbulent state. This allowed the seeding distribution to be used as an indicator for the state of the boundary layer, permitting to obtain an approximate intermittency distribution for the boundary layer transition region. This knowledge was then used for positioning the oblique shock wave in the laminar, transitional (50 % intermittency) or turbulent region of the boundary layer. Separation is only recorded for the laminar and transitional interactions. For the laminar interaction, a large separation bubble is found, with a streamwise length of 96. The incoming boundary layer is lifted over the separation bubble and remains in a laminar state up to the impingement point of the shock wave. After the shock, transition starts and a turbulent profile is reached approximately 80-90 downstream of the shock. Under the same shock conditions, the transitional interaction displays a smaller separation bubble (43), and transition is found to be accelerated over the separation bubble.

  20. Effects of mass addition on blunt-body boundary-layer transition and heat transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaattari, G. E.

    1978-01-01

    The model bodies tested at Mach number 7.32 were hemispheres, blunt cones, and spherical segments. The mass addition consisted of air ejected through porous forward surfaces of the models. The experimental data consisted of heat transfer measurements from which boundary layer transitions were deduced. The data verified various applicable boundary layer codes in the laminar and transitional flow regimes. Empirical heating rate data correlations were developed for the laminar and turbulent flow regimes.

  1. Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loitsianskii. L. G.

    1956-01-01

    The fundamental, practically the most important branch of the modern mechanics of a viscous fluid or a gas, is that branch which concerns itself with the study of the boundary layer. The presence of a boundary layer accounts for the origin of the resistance and lift force, the breakdown of the smooth flow about bodies, and other phenomena that are associated with the motion of a body in a real fluid. The concept of boundary layer was clearly formulated by the founder of aerodynamics, N. E. Joukowsky, in his well-known work "On the Form of Ships" published as early as 1890. In his book "Theoretical Foundations of Air Navigation," Joukowsky gave an account of the most important properties of the boundary layer and pointed out the part played by it in the production of the resistance of bodies to motion. The fundamental differential equations of the motion of a fluid in a laminar boundary layer were given by Prandtl in 1904; the first solutions of these equations date from 1907 to 1910. As regards the turbulent boundary layer, there does not exist even to this day any rigorous formulation of this problem because there is no closed system of equations for the turbulent motion of a fluid. Soviet scientists have done much toward developing a general theory of the boundary layer, and in that branch of the theory which is of greatest practical importance at the present time, namely the study of the boundary layer at large velocities of the body in a compressed gas, the efforts of the scientists of our country have borne fruit in the creation of a new theory which leaves far behind all that has been done previously in this direction. We shall herein enumerate the most important results by Soviet scientists in the development of the theory of the boundary layer.

  2. Forward-facing steps induced transition in a subsonic boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zh, Hui; Fu, Song

    2017-10-01

    A forward-facing step (FFS) immersed in a subsonic boundary layer is studied through a high-order flux reconstruction (FR) method to highlight the flow transition induced by the step. The step height is a third of the local boundary-layer thickness. The Reynolds number based on the step height is 720. Inlet disturbances are introduced giving rise to streamwise vortices upstream of the step. It is observed that these small-scale streamwise structures interact with the step and hairpin vortices are quickly developed after the step leading to flow transition in the boundary layer.

  3. Effect of adverse pressure gradient on high speed boundary layer transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franko, Kenneth J.; Lele, Sanjiva

    2014-02-01

    The effect of adverse pressure gradients (APG) on boundary layer stability, breakdown, and heat-transfer overshoot is investigated. Flat plate isothermal boundary layers initially at Mach 6 with APG imposed through the freestream boundary condition are simulated using suction and blowing to produce boundary layer instabilities. The three different transition mechanisms compared are first mode oblique breakdown, second mode oblique breakdown, and second mode fundamental resonance. For all of the transition mechanisms, an adverse pressure gradient increases the linear growth rates and quickens the transition to turbulence. However, the nonlinear breakdown for all three transition mechanisms is qualitatively the same as for a zero pressure gradient boundary layer. First mode oblique breakdown leads to the earliest transition location and an overshoot in heat transfer in the transitional region. Both types of Mack second mode forcing lead to a transitional boundary layer but even with the increased growth rates and N factors produced by the adverse pressure gradient, the breakdown process is still more gradual than first mode oblique breakdown because the primary Mack second mode instabilities saturate and produce streaks that breakdown further downstream.

  4. Measurements in a Transitional Boundary Layer Under Low-Pressure Turbine Airfoil Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Terrence W.; Qiu, Songgang; Yuan, Kebiao; Ashpis, David (Technical Monitor); Simon, Fred (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This report presents the results of an experimental study of transition from laminar to turbulent flow in boundary layers or in shear layers over separation zones on a convex-curved surface which simulates the suction surface of a low-pressure turbine airfoil. Flows with various free-stream turbulence intensity (FSTI) values (0.5%, 2.5% and 10%), and various Reynolds numbers (50,000, 100,000 200,000 and 300,000) are investigated. Reynold numbers in the present study are based on suction surface length and passage exit mean velocity. Flow separation followed by transition within the separated flow region is observed for the lower-Re cases at each of the FSTI levels. At the highest Reynolds numbers and at elevated FSn, transition of the attached boundary layer begins before separation, and the separation zone is small. Transition proceeds in the shear layer over the separation bubble. For both the transitional boundary layer and the transitional shear layer, mean velocity, turbulence intensity and intermittency (the fraction of the time the flow is turbulent) distributions are presented. The present data are compared to published distribution models for bypass transition, intermittency distribution through transition, transition start position, and transition length. A model developed for transition of separated flows is shown to adequately predict the location of the beginning of transition, for these cases, and a model developed for transitional boundary layer flows seems to adequately predict the path of intermittency through transition when the transition start and end are known. These results are useful for the design of low-pressure turbine stages which are known to operate under conditions replicated by these tests.

  5. Hypersonic Boundary Layer Transition Measurements Using NO2 approaches NO Photo-dissociation Tagging Velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bathel, Brett F.; Johansen, Craig T.; Danehy, Paul M.; Inman, Jennifer A.; Jones, Stephen B.; Goyne, Christopher P.

    2011-01-01

    Measurements of instantaneous and mean streamwise velocity profiles in a hypersonic laminar boundary layer as well as a boundary layer undergoing laminar-to-turbulent transition were obtained over a 10-degree half-angle wedge model. A molecular tagging velocimetry technique consisting of a NO2 approaches?NO photo-dissociation reaction and two subsequent excitations of NO was used. The measurement of the transitional boundary layer velocity profiles was made downstream of a 1-mm tall, 4-mm diameter cylindrical trip along several lines lying within a streamwise measurement plane normal to the model surface and offset 6-mm from the model centerline. For laminar and transitional boundary layer measurements, the magnitudes of streamwise velocity fluctuations are compared. In the transitional boundary layer the fluctuations were, in general, 2-4 times larger than those in the laminar boundary layer. Of particular interest were fluctuations corresponding to a height of approximately 50% of the laminar boundary layer thickness having a magnitude of nearly 30% of the mean measured velocity. For comparison, the measured fluctuations in the laminar boundary layer were approximately 5% of the mean measured velocity at the same location. For the highest 10% signal-to-noise ratio data, average single-shot uncertainties using a 1 ?Es and 50 ?Es interframe delay were 115 m/s and 3 m/s, respectively. By averaging single-shot measurements of the transitional boundary layer, uncertainties in mean velocity as low as 39 m/s were obtained in the wind tunnel. The wall-normal and streamwise spatial resolutions were 0.14-mm (2 pixel) and 0.82-mm (11 pixels), respectively. These measurements were performed in the 31-inch Mach 10 Air Wind Tunnel at the NASA Langley Research Center.

  6. Interaction Between Aerothermally Compliant Structures and Boundary-Layer Transition in Hypersonic Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, Zachary Bryce

    The use of thin-gauge, light-weight structures in combination with the severe aero-thermodynamic loading makes reusable hypersonic cruise vehicles prone to fluid-thermal-structural interactions. These interactions result in surface perturbations in the form of temperature changes and deformations that alter the stability and eventual transition of the boundary layer. The state of the boundary layer has a significant effect on the aerothermodynamic loads acting on a hypersonic vehicle. The inherent relationship between boundary-layer stability, aerothermodynamic loading, and surface conditions make the interaction between the structural response and boundary-layer transition an important area of study in high-speed flows. The goal of this dissertation is to examine the interaction between boundary layer transition and the response of aerothermally compliant structures. This is carried out by first examining the uncoupled problems of: (1) structural deformation and temperature changes altering boundary-layer stability and (2) the boundary layer state affecting structural response. For the former, the stability of boundary layers developing over geometries that typify the response of surface panels subject to combined aerodynamic and thermal loading is numerically assessed using linear stability theory and the linear parabolized stability equations. Numerous parameters are examined including: deformation direction, deformation location, multiple deformations in series, structural boundary condition, surface temperature, the combined effect of Mach number and altitude, and deformation mode shape. The deformation-induced pressure gradient alters the boundary-layer thickness, which changes the frequency of the most-unstable disturbance. In regions of small boundary-layer growth, the disturbance frequency modulation resulting from a single or multiple panels deformed into the flowfield is found to improve boundary-layer stability and potentially delay transition. For the

  7. Shock-tube chemistry. I - The laminar-to-turbulent boundary layer transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bander, J. A.; Sanzone, G.

    1977-01-01

    A model is proposed for calculating laminar-turbulent transition in the boundary layer of flows in chemical shock tubes. It is shown that the time to turbulent transition may be treated as the time required by the shocked gas to move over one shock-tube diameter. The model is shown to provide a means of predicting the turbulent transition time in any shock tube experiment, provided the condition of limiting flow is met. Knowing the transition time, it becomes possible to obtain the density and temperature profiles and, hence, to determine precisely the effect of shock tube boundary layers on the measurement of chemical rate constants.

  8. Modeling of the heat transfer in bypass transitional boundary-layer flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Frederick F.; Stephens, Craig A.

    1991-01-01

    A low Reynolds number k-epsilon turbulence model and conditioned momentum, energy and turbulence equations were used to predict bypass transition heat transfer on a flat plate in a high-disturbance environment with zero pressure gradient. The use of conditioned equations was demonstrated to be an improvement over the use of the global-time-averaged equations for the calculation of velocity profiles and turbulence intensity profiles in the transition region of a boundary layer. The approach of conditioned equations is extended to include heat transfer and a modeling of transition events is used to predict transition onset and the extent of transition on a flat plate. The events, which describe the boundary layer at the leading edge, result in boundary-layer regions consisting of: (1) the laminar, (2) pseudolaminar, (3) transitional, and (4) turbulent boundary layers. The modeled transition events were incorporated into the TEXSTAN 2-D boundary-layer code which is used to numerically predict the heat transfer. The numerical predictions in general compared well with the experimental data and revealed areas where additional experimental information is needed.

  9. Flight-measured laminar boundary-layer transition phenomena including stability theory analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obara, C. J.; Holmes, B. J.

    1985-01-01

    Flight experiments were conducted on a single-engine turboprop aircraft fitted with a 92-in-chord, 3-ft-span natural laminar flow glove at glove section lift coefficients from 0.15 to 1.10. The boundary-layer transition measurement methods used included sublimating chemicals and surface hot-film sensors. Transition occurred downstream of the minimum pressure point. Hot-film sensors provided a well-defined indication of laminar, laminar-separation, transitional, and turbulent boundary layers. Theoretical calculations of the boundary-layer parameters provided close agreement between the predicted laminar-separation point and the measured transition location. Tollmien-Schlichting (T-S) wave growth n-factors between 15 and 17 were calculated at the predicted point of laminar separation. These results suggest that for many practical airplane cruise conditions, laminar separation (as opposed to T-S instability) is the major cause of transition in predominantly two-dimensional flows.

  10. Assessment of a transitional boundary layer theory at low hypersonic Mach numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shamroth, S. J.; Mcdonald, H.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation was carried out to assess the accuracy of a transitional boundary layer theory in the low hypersonic Mach number regime. The theory is based upon the simultaneous numerical solution of the boundary layer partial differential equations for the mean motion and an integral form of the turbulence kinetic energy equation which controls the magnitude and development of the Reynolds stress. Comparisions with experimental data show the theory is capable of accurately predicting heat transfer and velocity profiles through the transitional regime and correctly predicts the effects of Mach number and wall cooling on transition Reynolds number. The procedure shows promise of predicting the initiation of transition for given free stream disturbance levels. The effects on transition predictions of the pressure dilitation term and of direct absorption of acoustic energy by the boundary layer were evaluated.

  11. Three-dimensional boundary layer stability and transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malik, M. R.; Li, F.

    1992-01-01

    Nonparallel and nonlinear stability of a three-dimensional boundary layer, subject to crossflow instability, is investigated using parabolized stability equations (PSEs). Both traveling and stationary disturbances are considered and nonparallel effect on crossflow instability is found to be destabilizing. Our linear PSE results for stationary disturbances agree well with the results from direct solution of Navier-Stokes equations obtained by Spalart (1989). Nonlinear calculations have been carried out for stationary vortices and the computed wall vorticity pattern results in streamwise streaks which resemble remarkably well with the surface oil-flow visualizations in swept-wing experiments. Other features of the stationary vortex development (half-mushroom structure, inflected velocity profiles, vortex doubling, etc.) are also captured in our nonlinear calculations. Nonlinear interaction of the stationary amplitude of the stationary vortex is large as compared to the traveling mode, and the stationary vortex dominates most of the downstream development. When the two modes have the same initial amplitude, the traveling mode dominates the downstream development owing to its higher growth rate, and there is a tendency for the stationary mode to be suppressed. The effect of nonlinear wave development on the skin-friction coefficient is also computed.

  12. Measurements in Separated and Transitional Boundary Layers Under Low-Pressure Turbine Airfoil Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volino, Ralph J.; Hultgren, Lennart .

    2000-01-01

    Detailed velocity measurements were made along a flat plate subject to the same dimensionless pressure gradient as the suction side of a modern low-pressure turbine airfoil. Reynolds numbers based on wetted plate length and nominal exit velocity were varied from 50,000 to 300,000, covering cruise to takeoff conditions. Low and high inlet free-stream turbulence intensities (0.2% and 7%) were set using passive grids. The location of boundary-layer separation does not depend strongly on the free-stream turbulence level or Reynolds number, as long as the boundary layer remains non-turbulent prior to separation. Strong acceleration prevents transition on the upstream part of the plate in all cases. Both free-stream turbulence and Reynolds number have strong effects on transition in the adverse pressure gradient region. Under low free-stream turbulence conditions transition is induced by instability waves in the shear layer of the separation bubble. Reattachment generally occurs at the transition start. At Re = 50,000 the separation bubble does not close before the trailing edge of the modeled airfoil. At higher Re, transition moves upstream, and the boundary layer reattaches. With high free-stream turbulence levels, transition appears to occur in a bypass mode, similar to that in attached boundary layers. Transition moves upstream, resulting in shorter separation regions. At Re above 200,000, transition begins before separation. Mean velocity, turbulence and intermittency profiles are presented.

  13. Computer program for calculating laminar, transitional, and turbulent boundary layers for a compressible axisymmetric flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albers, J. A.; Gregg, J. L.

    1974-01-01

    Finite-difference computer program calculates viscous compressible boundary layer flow over either planar or axisymmetric surfaces. Flow may be initially laminar and progress through transitional zone to fully turbulent flow, or it may remain laminar, depending on imposed boundary conditions, laws of viscosity, and numerical solution of momentum and energy equations.

  14. Flight and wind-tunnel correlation of boundary-layer transition on the AEDC transition cone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, D. L.; Dougherty, N. S., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Transition and fluctuating surface pressure data were acquired on a 10 deg included angle cone, using the same instrumentation and technique over a wide range of Mach and Reynolds numbers in 23 wind tunnels and in flight. Transition was detected with a traversing pitot-pressure probe in contact with the surface. The surface pressure fluctuations were measured with microphones set flush in the cone surface. Good correlation of end of transition Reynolds number RE(T) was obtained between data from the lower disturbance wind tunnels and flight up to a boundary layer edge Mach number, M(e) = 1.2. Above M(e) = 1.2, however, this correlation deteriorates, with the flight Re(T) being 25 to 30% higher than the wind tunnel Re(T) at M(e) = 1.6. The end of transition Reynolds number correlated within + or - 20% with the surface pressure fluctuations, according to the equation used. Broad peaks in the power spectral density distributions indicated that Tollmien-Schlichting waves were the probable cause of transition in flight and in some of the wind tunnels.

  15. Early Warning Signals for Regime Transition in the Stable Boundary Layer: A Model Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hooijdonk, I. G. S.; Moene, A. F.; Scheffer, M.; Clercx, H. J. H.; van de Wiel, B. J. H.

    2017-02-01

    The evening transition is investigated in an idealized model for the nocturnal boundary layer. From earlier studies it is known that the nocturnal boundary layer may manifest itself in two distinct regimes, depending on the ambient synoptic conditions: strong-wind or overcast conditions typically lead to weakly stable, turbulent nights; clear-sky and weak-wind conditions, on the other hand, lead to very stable, weakly turbulent conditions. Previously, the dynamical behaviour near the transition between these regimes was investigated in an idealized setting, relying on Monin-Obukhov (MO) similarity to describe turbulent transport. Here, we investigate a similar set-up, using direct numerical simulation; in contrast to MO-based models, this type of simulation does not need to rely on turbulence closure assumptions. We show that previous predictions are verified, but now independent of turbulence parametrizations. Also, it appears that a regime shift to the very stable state is signaled in advance by specific changes in the dynamics of the turbulent boundary layer. Here, we show how these changes may be used to infer a quantitative estimate of the transition point from the weakly stable boundary layer to the very stable boundary layer. In addition, it is shown that the idealized, nocturnal boundary-layer system shares important similarities with generic non-linear dynamical systems that exhibit critical transitions. Therefore, the presence of other, generic early warning signals is tested as well. Indeed, indications are found that such signals are present in stably stratified turbulent flows.

  16. Effect of Surface Waviness on Transition in Three-Dimensional Boundary-Layer Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masad, Jamal A.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of a surface wave on transition in three-dimensional boundary-layer flow over an infinite swept wing was studied. The mean flow computed using interacting boundary-layer theory, and transition was predicted using linear stability theory coupled with the empirical eN method. It was found that decreasing the wave height, sweep angle, or freestream unit Reynolds number, and increasing the freestream Mach number or suction level all stabilized the flow and moved transition onset to downstream locations.

  17. Shuttle Return To Flight Experimental Results: Cavity Effects on Boundary Layer Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liechty, Derek S.; Horvath, Thomas J.; Berry, Scott A.

    2006-01-01

    The effect of an isolated rectangular cavity on hypersonic boundary layer transition of the windward surface of the Shuttle Orbiter has been experimentally examined in the Langley Aerothermodynamics Laboratory in support of an agency-wide effort to prepare the Shuttle Orbiter for return to flight. This experimental study was initiated to provide a cavity effects database for developing hypersonic transition criteria to support on-orbit decisions to repair a damaged thermal protection system. Boundary layer transition results were obtained using 0.0075-scale Orbiter models with simulated tile damage (rectangular cavities) of varying length, width, and depth. The database contained within this report will be used to formulate cavity-induced transition correlations using predicted boundary layer edge parameters.

  18. Natural transition of boundary layers - The effects of turbulence, pressure gradient, and flow history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Ghannam, B. J.; Shaw, R.

    1980-10-01

    Natural transition of boundary layers is investigated for a flat plate in a low-speed wind tunnel with free-stream turbulence intensities ranging from 0.3 to 5 percent, and with pressure-gradient histories typical of turbomachinery blades without separation. Empirical relationships are proposed for the prediction of the start and end of transition, as well as the development of the boundary layer during transition. These relations are based on the recent measurements made with a hot-wire anemometer, and augmented, mainly for the start of transition, by results of previously reported research. Finally, these experimental relationships are used in conjunction with well established methods to predict the entire unseparated boundary layer. To utilize the prediction, all that is required is a knowledge of the free-stream turbulence level and the free-stream velocity distribution, which itself can be derived from potential flow theory.

  19. Boundary layer transition by interaction of streaks and Tollmien-Schlichting waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaki, Tamer A.; Liu, Yang; Durbin, Paul A.

    Transition to turbulence in zero-pressure-gradient boundary layers is studied using direct numerical simulations (DNS). Both discrete and discrete-continuous mode transition are considered by prescribing particular eigenmodes of the OrrSommerfeld (OS) equation at the inlet plane of our computational domain. The downstream evolution of the modes, secondary instability, and non-linear breakdown are computed using DNS.

  20. Experimental studies on the stability and transition of 3-dimensional boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nitschke-Kowsky, P.

    1987-01-01

    Three-dimensional unstable boundary layers were investigated as to their characteristic instabilities, leading to turbulence. Standing cross-flow instabilities and traveling waves preceding the transition were visualized with the hydrogen bubble technique in the boundary layer above the wall of a swept cylinder. With the sublimation method and hot film technique, a model consisting of a swept flat plate with a pressure-inducing displacement body in the 1 m wind tunnel was studied. Standing waves and traveling waves in a broad frequency are observed. The boundary layer of this model is close to the assumptions of the theory.

  1. Roles of Engineering Correlations in Hypersonic Entry Boundary Layer Transition Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Charles H.; King, Rudolph A.; Kergerise, Michael A.; Berry, Scott A.; Horvath, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    Efforts to design and operate hypersonic entry vehicles are constrained by many considerations that involve all aspects of an entry vehicle system. One of the more significant physical phenomenon that affect entry trajectory and thermal protection system design is the occurrence of boundary layer transition from a laminar to turbulent state. During the Space Shuttle Return To Flight activity following the loss of Columbia and her crew of seven, NASA's entry aerothermodynamics community implemented an engineering correlation based framework for the prediction of boundary layer transition on the Orbiter. The methodology for this implementation relies upon the framework of correlation techniques that have been in use for several decades. What makes the Orbiter boundary layer transition correlation implementation unique is that a statistically significant data set was acquired in multiple ground test facilities, flight data exists to assist in establishing a better correlation and the framework was founded upon state of the art chemical nonequilibrium Navier Stokes flow field simulations. The basic tenets that guided the formulation and implementation of the Orbiter Return To Flight boundary layer transition prediction capability will be reviewed as a recommended format for future empirical correlation efforts. The validity of this approach has since been demonstrated by very favorable comparison of recent entry flight testing performed with the Orbiter Discovery, which will be graphically summarized. These flight data can provide a means to validate discrete protuberance engineering correlation approaches as well as high fidelity prediction methods to higher confidence. The results of these Orbiter engineering and flight test activities only serve to reinforce the essential role that engineering correlations currently exercise in the design and operation of entry vehicles. The framework of information-related to the Orbiter empirical boundary layer transition

  2. Comparison of techniques for determination of boundary layer transition in shock wave induced flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, J. L.

    1974-01-01

    Three methods of determining transition times in shock wave-induced boundary layers are compared. Experimental transition data for these comparisons were obtained in two different shock tube facilities for shock wave Mach numbers from 3.0 to 5.5. Bias in determining transition times by the conventional thin-film temperature history and difficulty in reading schlieren photographs suggest the use of a new heat-flux technique for determining transition. It is suggested that the heat-flux technique be used when possible, because of better sensitivity and a view of the entire transition process and because it reveals important information concerning departures from theoretical laminar boundary-layer development. Transition results presented extend the range of data available in the literature and are in good agreement with existing data through transition Reynolds numbers of 1,000,000.

  3. DNS of surface roughness effects on laminar-turbulent transition in a supersonic boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khotyanovsky, Dmitry; Kudryavtsev, Alexey

    2016-10-01

    The effects of the distributed surface roughness on mean flow distortion and generation of flow instabilities in a supersonic boundary layer at Mach number 2 are studied with the direct numerical simulation. Roughness elements cause distortions of the mean flow field and flow unsteadiness in their wake. Farther downstream, growth of the fluctuations contained in the streamwise vortices and the interaction of the adjacent vortices lead to a breakup of the boundary layer manifesting the beginning of the laminar-turbulent transition.

  4. Transition Induced by Fixed and Freely Convecting Spherical Particles in Laminar Boundary Layers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-08-01

    91-J-1646 Sperical Particles in Laminar Boundary Layers " .AUTW0WS) H. L. Petrie, P. J. Morris, A. R. Bajwa, D. C. Vincent 7. PIMowG onuOaxnZ.ON NAWIS ...92 3.5.3 Method of Solution ......................... 94 3.5.4 Results and Discussion ....................... 94 3.5.4.1 Wake...laminar to turbulent flow is an important aspect of fluid dynamics in numerous engineering applications. Natural transition in laminar boundary layers

  5. Overview of Boundary Layer Transition Research in Support of Orbiter Return To Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott A.; Horvath, Thomas J.; Greene, Francis A.; Kinder, Gerald R.; Wang, K. C.

    2006-01-01

    A predictive tool for estimating the onset of boundary layer transition resulting from damage to and/or repair of the thermal protection system was developed in support of Shuttle Return to Flight. The boundary layer transition tool is part of a suite of tools that analyze the aerothermodynamic environment to the local thermal protection system to allow informed disposition of damage for making recommendations to fly as is or to repair. Using mission specific trajectory information and details of each damage site or repair, the expected time (and thus Mach number) at transition onset is predicted to help define the aerothermodynamic environment to use in the subsequent thermal and stress analysis of the local thermal protection system and structure. The boundary layer transition criteria utilized for the tool was developed from ground-based measurements to account for the effect of both protuberances and cavities and has been calibrated against select flight data. Computed local boundary layer edge conditions were used to correlate the results, specifically the momentum thickness Reynolds number over the edge Mach number and the boundary layer thickness. For the initial Return to Flight mission, STS-114, empirical curve coefficients of 27, 100, and 900 were selected to predict transition onset for protuberances based on height, and cavities based on depth and length, respectively.

  6. Experimental determination of the three-dimensional vorticity field in the boundary-layer transition process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, D. R.; Fasel, H.; Hama, F. R.

    1984-12-01

    Hot film anemometers have been used to measure all three velocity components at numerous grid points in a measuring volume that is centered on the location at which the vortex loop appears in flow visualization studies of boundary layer transition. The instantaneous vorticity field has been computed from the velocity field, and the vortex loop is revealed in the longitudinal component of vorticity. The fluid in the outer part of the boundary layer travels faster, and flows into the loop, forming the inflectional high shear layer that breaks down into the hairpin vortices. The magnitude of the high shear layer vorticity is about three times greater than that in the loop.

  7. Investigations of Effects of Surface Temperature and Single Roughness Elements on Boundary-Layer Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liepmann, Hans W; Fila, Gertrude H

    1947-01-01

    The laminar boundary layer and the position of the transition point were investigated on a heated flat plate. It was found that the Reynolds number of transition decreased as the temperature of the plate is increased. It is shown from simple qualitative analytical considerations that the effect of variable viscosity in the boundary layer due to the temperature difference produces a velocity profile with an inflection point if the wall temperature is higher than the free-stream temperature. This profile is confirmed by measurements. The instability of inflection-point profiles is discussed. Studies of the flow in the wake of large, two-dimensional roughness elements are presented. It is shown that a boundary-layer can separate and reattach itself to the wall without having transition take place.

  8. Characteristics of Boundary Layer Transition in a Multi-Stage Low-Pressure Turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisler, Dave; Halstead, David E.; Okiishi, Ted

    2007-01-01

    An experimental investigation of boundary layer transition in a multi-stage turbine has been completed using surface-mounted hot-film sensors. Tests were carried out using the two-stage Low Speed Research Turbine of the Aerodynamics Research Laboratory of GE Aircraft Engines. Blading in this facility models current, state-of-the-art low pressure turbine configurations. The instrumentation technique involved arrays of densely-packed hot-film sensors on the surfaces of second stage rotor and nozzle blades. The arrays were located at mid-span on both the suction and pressure surfaces. Boundary layer measurements were acquired over a complete range of relevant Reynolds numbers. Data acquisition capabilities provided means for detailed data interrogation in both time and frequency domains. Data indicate that significant regions of laminar and transitional boundary layer flow exist on the rotor and nozzle suction surfaces. Evidence of relaminarization both near the leading edge of the suction surface and along much of the pressure surface was observed. Measurements also reveal the nature of the turbulent bursts occuring within and between the wake segments convecting through the blade row. The complex character of boundary layer transition resulting from flow unsteadiness due to nozzle/nozzle, rotor/nozzle, and nozzle/rotor wake interactions are elucidated using these data. These measurements underscore the need to provide turbomachinery designers with models of boundary layer transition to facilitate accurate prediction of aerodynamic loss and heat transfer.

  9. Version 2 of the Protuberance Correlations for the Shuttle-Orbiter Boundary Layer Transition Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Rudolph A.; Kegerise, Michael A.; Berry, Scott A.

    2009-01-01

    Orbiter-specific transition data, acquired in four ground-based facilities (LaRC 20-Inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel, LaRC 31-Inch Mach 10 Air Tunnel, LaRC 20-Inch Mach 6 CF4 Tunnel, and CUBRC LENS-I Shock Tunnel) with three wind tunnel model scales (0.75, 0.90, and 1.8%) and from Orbiter historical flight data, have been analyzed to improve a pre-existing engineering tool for reentry transition prediction on the windward side of the Orbiter. Boundary layer transition (BLT) engineering correlations for transition induced by isolated protuberances are presented using a laminar Navier-Stokes (N-S) database to provide the relevant boundary-layer properties. It is demonstrated that the earlier version of the BLT correlation that had been developed using parameters derived from an engineering boundary-layer code has improved data collapse when developed with the N-S database. Of the new correlations examined, the proposed correlation 5, based on boundary-layer edge and wall properties, was found to provide the best overall correlation metrics when the entire database is employed. The second independent correlation (proposed correlation 7) selected is based on properties within the boundary layer at the protuberance height. The Aeroheating Panel selected a process to derive the recommended coefficients for Version 2 of the BLT Tool. The assumptions and limitations of the recommended protuberance BLT Tool V.2 are presented.

  10. Minnowbrook I: 1993 Workshop on End-Stage Boundary Layer Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaGraff, John E. (Editor)

    2007-01-01

    This volume contains materials presented at the Minnowbrook I-1993 Workshop on End-Stage Boundary Layer Transition, held at the Syracuse University Minnowbrook Conference Center, New York, from August 15 to 18, 1993. This volume was previously published as a Syracuse University report edited by John E. LaGraff. The workshop organizers were John E. LaGraff (Syracuse University), Terry V. Jones (Oxford University), and J. Paul Gostelow (University of Technology, Sydney). The workshop focused on physical understanding of the late stages of transition from laminar to turbulent flows, with the specific goal of contributing to improving engineering design of turbomachinery and wing airfoils. The workshop participants included academic researchers from the United States and abroad, and representatives from the gas-turbine industry and U.S. government laboratories. To improve interaction and discussions among the participants, no formal papers were required. The physical mechanisms discussed were related to natural and bypass transition, wake-induced transition, effects of freestream turbulence, turbulent spots, hairpin vortices, nonlinear instabilities and breakdown, instability wave interactions, intermittency, turbulence, numerical simulation and modeling of transition, heat transfer in boundary-layer transition, transition in separated flows, laminarization, transition in turbomachinery compressors and turbines, hypersonic boundary-layer transition, and other related topics. This volume contains abstracts and copies of the viewgraphs presented, organized according to the workshop sessions. The workshop summary and the plenary discussion transcript clearly outline future research needs.

  11. Measurements of turbulent boundary layer flow and surface fluxes over roughness and temperature transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markfort, Corey; Zhang, Wei; Porte-Agel, Fernando

    2016-11-01

    Often natural and engineered surfaces have spatially heterogeneous properties at a variety of scales that affect the structure of the turbulent boundary layer, which is no longer in equilibrium with the local surface. Predicting the spatial distributions of surface momentum and scalar fluxes over heterogeneous surfaces remains a challenge. We present measurements made in a thermally stratified boundary layer wind tunnel to characterize the turbulent flow and surface fluxes for abrupt transitions in surface temperature and roughness. We compare the development of internal boundary layers for momentum and heat, and associated mean surface flux for two cases. The first is a smooth boundary layer with an abrupt change in surface temperature and the second also involves a change from a fully rough to a smooth wall. The effects of roughness change on surface heat flux and implications for prediction are examined. The data will be compared to typical models that utilize Monin-Obukhov similarity theory.

  12. Holt film wall shear instrumentation for boundary layer transition research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Steven P.

    1994-01-01

    Measurements of the performance of hot-film wall-shear sensors were performed to aid development of improved sensors. The effect of film size and substrate properties on the sensor performance was quantified through parametric studies carried out both electronically and in a shock tube. The results show that sensor frequency response increases with decreasing sensor size, while at the same time sensitivity decreases. Substrate effects were also studied, through parametric variation of thermal conductivity and heat capacity. Early studies used complex dual-layer substrates, while later studies were designed for both single-layer and dual-layer substrates. Sensor failures and funding limitations have precluded completion of the substrate thermal-property tests.

  13. Hypersonic Boundary-Layer Transition for X-33 Phase 2 Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Richard A.; Hamilton, Harris H., II; Berry, Scott A.; Horvath, Thomas J.; Nowak, Robert J.

    1998-01-01

    A status review of the experimental and computational work performed to support the X-33 program in the area of hypersonic boundary-layer transition is presented. Global transition fronts are visualized using thermographic phosphor measurements. Results are used to derive transition correlations for "smooth body" and discrete roughness data and a computational tool is developed to predict transition onset for X-33 using these results. The X-33 thermal protection system appears to be conservatively designed for transition effects based on these studies. Additional study is needed to address concerns related to surface waviness. A discussion of future test plans is included.

  14. Boundary Layer Transition in the Leading Edge Region of a Swept Cylinder in High Speed Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coleman, Colin P.

    1998-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on a 76 degree swept cylinder to establish the behavior of the attachment line transition process in a low-disturbance level, Mach number 1.6 flow. For a near adiabatic wall condition, the attachment-line boundary layer remained laminar up to the highest attainable Reynolds number. The attachment-line boundary layer transition under the influence of trip wires depended on wind tunnel disturbance level, and a transition onset condition for this flow is established. Internal heating raised the surface temperature of the attachment line to induce boundary layer instabilities. This was demonstrated experimentally for the first time and the frequencies of the most amplified disturbances were determined over a range of temperature settings. Results were in excellent agreement to those predicted by a linear stability code, and provide the first experimental verification of theory. Transition onset along the heated attachment line at an R-bar of 800 under quiet tunnel conditions was found to correlate with an N factor of 13.2. Increased tunnel disturbance levels caused the transition onset to occur at lower cylinder surface temperatures and was found to correlate with an approximate N factor of 1 1.9, so demonstrating that the attachment-line boundary layer is receptive to increases in the tunnel disturbance level.

  15. Experimental Investigation of Separated and Transitional Boundary Layers Under Low-Pressure Turbine Airfoil Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.; Volino, Ralph J.

    2002-01-01

    Modern low-pressure turbine airfoils are subject to increasingly stronger pressure gradients as designers impose higher loading in an effort to improve efficiency and to reduce part count. The adverse pressure gradients on the suction side of these airfoils can lead to boundary-layer separation, particularly under cruise conditions. Separation bubbles, notably those which fail to reattach, can result in a significant degradation of engine efficiency. Accurate prediction of separation and reattachment is hence crucial to improved turbine design. This requires an improved understanding of the transition flow physics. Transition may begin before or after separation, depending on the Reynolds number and other flow conditions, has a strong influence on subsequent reattachment, and may even eliminate separation. Further complicating the problem are the high free-stream turbulence levels in a real engine environment, the strong pressure gradients along the airfoils, the curvature of the airfoils, and the unsteadiness associated with wake passing from upstream stages. Because of the complicated flow situation, transition in these devices can take many paths that can coexist, vary in importance, and possibly also interact, at different locations and instances in time. The present work was carried out in an attempt to systematically sort out some of these issues. Detailed velocity measurements were made along a flat plate subject to the same nominal dimensionless pressure gradient as the suction side of a modern low-pressure turbine airfoil ('Pak-B'). The Reynolds number based on wetted plate length and nominal exit velocity, Re, was varied from 50;000 to 300; 000, covering cruise to takeoff conditions. Low, 0.2%, and high, 7%, inlet free-stream turbulence intensities were set using passive grids. These turbulence levels correspond to about 0.2% and 2.5% turbulence intensity in the test section when normalized with the exit velocity. The Reynolds number and free

  16. Boundary Layer Transition During the Orion Exploration Flight Test 1 (EFT-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirk, Lindsay C.

    2016-01-01

    Boundary layer transition was observed in the thermocouple data on the windside backshell of the Orion reentry capsule. Sensors along the windside centerline, as well as off-centerline, indicated transition late in the flight at approximately Mach 4 conditions. Transition progressed as expected, beginning at the sensors closest to the forward bay cover (FBC) and moving towards the heatshield. Sensors placed in off-centerline locations did not follow streamlines, so the progression of transition observed in these sensors is less intuitive. Future analysis will include comparisons to pre-flight predictions and expected transitional behavior will be investigated. Sensors located within the centerline and off-centerline launch abort system (LAS) attach well cavities on the FBC also showed indications of boundary layer transition. The transition within the centerline cavity was observed in the temperature traces prior to transition onset on the sensors upstream of the cavity. Transition behavior within the off centerline LAS attach well cavity will also be investigated. Heatshield thermocouples were placed within Avcoat plugs to attempt to capture transitional behavior as well as better understand the aerothermal environments. Thermocouples were placed in stacks of two or five vertically within the plugs, but the temperature data obtained at the sensors closest to the surface did not immediately indicate transitional behavior. Efforts to use the in depth thermocouple temperatures to reconstruct the surface heat flux are ongoing and any results showing the onset of boundary layer transition obtained from those reconstructions will also be included in this paper. Transition on additional features of interest, including compression pad ramps, will be included if it becomes available.

  17. Predicting Boundary-Layer Transition on Space-Shuttle Re-Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott; Horvath, Tom; Merski, Ron; Liechty, Derek; Greene, Frank; Bibb, Karen; Buck, Greg; Hamilton, Harris; Weilmuenster, Jim; Campbell, Chuck; hide

    2008-01-01

    The BLT Prediction Tool ("BLT" signifies "Boundary Layer Transition") is provided as part of the Damage Assessment Team analysis package, which is utilized for analyzing local aerothermodynamics environments of damaged or repaired space-shuttle thermal protection tiles. Such analyses are helpful in deciding whether to repair launch-induced damage before re-entering the terrestrial atmosphere.

  18. In-Flight Boundary-Layer Transition of a Large Flat Plate at Supersonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, D. W.; Frederick, M. A.; Tracy, R. R.; Matisheck, J. R.; Vanecek, N. D.

    2012-01-01

    A flight experiment was conducted to investigate the pressure distribution, local-flow conditions, and boundary-layer transition characteristics on a large flat plate in flight at supersonic speeds up to Mach 2.00. The tests used a NASA testbed aircraft with a bottom centerline mounted test fixture. The primary objective of the test was to characterize the local flow field in preparation for future tests of a high Reynolds number natural laminar flow test article. A second objective was to determine the boundary-layer transition characteristics on the flat plate and the effectiveness of using a simplified surface coating. Boundary-layer transition was captured in both analog and digital formats using an onboard infrared imaging system. Surface pressures were measured on the surface of the flat plate. Flow field measurements near the leading edge of the test fixture revealed the local flow characteristics including downwash, sidewash, and local Mach number. Results also indicated that the simplified surface coating did not provide sufficient insulation from the metallic structure, which likely had a substantial effect on boundary-layer transition compared with that of an adiabatic surface. Cold wall conditions were predominant during the acceleration to maximum Mach number, and warm wall conditions were evident during the subsequent deceleration.

  19. Application of a transitional boundary-layer theory in the low hypersonic Mach number regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shamroth, S. J.; Mcdonald, H.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation is made to assess the capability of a finite-difference boundary-layer procedure to predict the mean profile development across a transition from laminar to turbulent flow in the low hypersonic Mach-number regime. The boundary-layer procedure uses an integral form of the turbulence kinetic-energy equation to govern the development of the Reynolds apparent shear stress. The present investigation shows the ability of this procedure to predict Stanton number, velocity profiles, and density profiles through the transition region and, in addition, to predict the effect of wall cooling and Mach number on transition Reynolds number. The contribution of the pressure-dilatation term to the energy balance is examined and it is suggested that transition can be initiated by the direct absorption of acoustic energy even if only a small amount (1 per cent) of the incident acoustic energy is absorbed.

  20. Heat transfer and fluid mechanics measurements in transitional boundary layers on convex-curved surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, T.; Simon, T. W.

    1987-01-01

    The test section of the present experiment to ascertain the effects of convex curvature and freestream turbulence on boundary layer momentum and heat transfer during natural transition provided a two-dimensional boundary layer flow on a uniformly heated curved surface, with bending to various curvature radii, R. Attention is given to results for the cases of R = infinity, 180 cm, and 90 cm, each with two freestream turbulence intensity levels. While the mild convex curvature of R = 180 cm delays transition, further bending to R = 90 cm leads to no signifucant further delay of transition. Cases with both curvature and higher freestream disturbance effects exhibit the latter's pronounced dominance. These data are pertinent to the development of transition prediction models for gas turbine blade design.

  1. Heat transfer and fluid mechanics measurements in transitional boundary layers on convex-curved surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, T.; Simon, T. W.

    1987-01-01

    The test section of the present experiment to ascertain the effects of convex curvature and freestream turbulence on boundary layer momentum and heat transfer during natural transition provided a two-dimensional boundary layer flow on a uniformly heated curved surface, with bending to various curvature radii, R. Attention is given to results for the cases of R = infinity, 180 cm, and 90 cm, each with two freestream turbulence intensity levels. While the mild convex curvature of R = 180 cm delays transition, further bending to R = 90 cm leads to no signifucant further delay of transition. Cases with both curvature and higher freestream disturbance effects exhibit the latter's pronounced dominance. These data are pertinent to the development of transition prediction models for gas turbine blade design.

  2. Knuckleball and Flying Disk: Boundary Layer Transitions, Separations and Vortex Wakes in Sports Aerodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higuchi, Hiroshi; Kiura, Toshiro; Goto, Yuichiro; Hiramoto, Riho

    2001-11-01

    In spite of their popularity, flow structures over common baseball and flying disks have not been studied in detail. A slowly rotating baseball is subject to erratic flight paths, and is known as a knuckleball. In the present experiment, the characteristic of force acting on a baseball was obtained and the velocity vector field near the surface of the ball and the wake were measured with the DPIV technique. The seam triggered the boundary layer transition or caused the boundary layer separation itself. The laminar/turbulent boundary layer separations were identified with specific ball orientations. Corresponding three-dimensional wake pattern and the side force result in unpredictable trajectories. In the second part of the talk, flow physics regarding a spin-stabilized flying disk is addressed. The roll-up of trailing vortices was visualized in detail and their vorticity field was measured with the DPIV. The vortical flow over the disk produced flow reattachment at a very high angle of attack. The boundary layer at low angles of attack was affected by the surface motion with asymmetric boundary layer transitions as evidenced by the flow visualization and the hot wire survey. The flow separation and attachment on the underside cavity were also affected by the rotation.

  3. Numerical modeling of the transitional boundary layer over a flat plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Dimitry; Chorny, Andrei

    2015-11-01

    Our example is connected with fundamental research on understanding how an initially laminar boundary layer becomes turbulent. We have chosen the flow over a flat plate as a prototype for boundary-layer flows around bodies. Special attention was paid to the near-wall region in order to capture all levels of the boundary layer. In this study, the numerical software package OpenFOAM has been used in order to solve the flow field. The results were used in a comparative study with data obtained from Large Eddy Simulation (LES). The composite SGS-wall model is presently incorporated into a computer code suitable for the LES of developing flat-plate boundary layers. Presently this model is extended to the LES of the zero-pressure gradient, flat-plate turbulent boundary layer. In current study the time discretization is based on a second order Crank-Nicolson/Adams-Bashforth method. LES solver using Smagorinsky and the one-equation LES turbulence models. The transition models significantly improve the prediction of the onset location compared to the fully turbulent models.LES methods appear to be the most promising new tool for the design and analysis of flow devices including transition regions of the turbulent flow.

  4. Boundary layer transition: A review of theory, experiment and related phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kistler, E. L.

    1971-01-01

    The overall problem of boundary layer flow transition is reviewed. Evidence indicates a need for new, basic physical hypotheses in classical fluid mechanics math models based on the Navier-Stokes equations. The Navier-Stokes equations are challenged as inadequate for the investigation of fluid transition, since they are based on several assumptions which should be expected to alter significantly the stability characteristics of the resulting math model. Strong prima facie evidence is presented to this effect.

  5. Detection and Characterization of Boundary-Layer Transition in Flight at Supersonic Conditions Using Infrared Thermography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Daniel W.

    2008-01-01

    Infrared thermography is a powerful tool for investigating fluid mechanics on flight vehicles. (Can be used to visualize and characterize transition, shock impingement, separation etc.). Updated onboard F-15 based system was used to visualize supersonic boundary layer transition test article. (Tollmien-Schlichting and cross-flow dominant flow fields). Digital Recording improves image quality and analysis capability. (Allows accurate quantitative (temperature) measurements, Greater enhancement through image processing allows analysis of smaller scale phenomena).

  6. Application of renormalization group theory to the large-eddy simulation of transitional boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piomelli, Ugo; Zang, Thomas A.; Speziale, Charles G.; Lund, Thomas S.

    1990-01-01

    An eddy viscosity model based on the renormalization group theory of Yakhot and Orszag (1986) is applied to the large-eddy simulation of transition in a flat-plate boundary layer. The simulation predicts with satisfactory accuracy the mean velocity and Reynolds stress profiles, as well as the development of the important scales of motion. The evolution of the structures characteristic of the nonlinear stages of transition is also predicted reasonably well.

  7. Application of renormalization group theory to the large-eddy simulation of transitional boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piomelli, Ugo; Zang, Thomas A.; Speziale, Charles G.; Lund, Thomas S.

    1990-01-01

    An eddy viscosity model based on the renormalization group theory of Yakhot and Orszag (1986) is applied to the large-eddy simulation of transition in a flat-plate boundary layer. The simulation predicts with satisfactory accuracy the mean velocity and Reynolds stress profiles, as well as the development of the important scales of motion. The evolution of the structures characteristic of the nonlinear stages of transition is also predicted reasonably well.

  8. Boundary-Layer Transition on a Slender Cone in Hypervelocity Flow with Real Gas Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewell, Joseph Stephen

    The laminar to turbulent transition process in boundary layer flows in thermochemical nonequilibrium at high enthalpy is measured and characterized. Experiments are performed in the T5 Hypervelocity Reflected Shock Tunnel at Caltech, using a 1 m length 5-degree half angle axisymmetric cone instrumented with 80 fast-response annular thermocouples, complemented by boundary layer stability computations using the STABL software suite. A new mixing tank is added to the shock tube fill apparatus for premixed freestream gas experiments, and a new cleaning procedure results in more consistent transition measurements. Transition location is nondimensionalized using a scaling with the boundary layer thickness, which is correlated with the acoustic properties of the boundary layer, and compared with parabolized stability equation (PSE) analysis. In these nondimensionalized terms, transition delay with increasing CO2 concentration is observed: tests in 100% and 50% CO2, by mass, transition up to 25% and 15% later, respectively, than air experiments. These results are consistent with previous work indicating that CO2 molecules at elevated temperatures absorb acoustic instabilities in the MHz range, which is the expected frequency of the Mack second-mode instability at these conditions, and also consistent with predictions from PSE analysis. A strong unit Reynolds number effect is observed, which is believed to arise from tunnel noise. NTr for air from 5.4 to 13.2 is computed, substantially higher than previously reported for noisy facilities. Time- and spatially-resolved heat transfer traces are used to track the propagation of turbulent spots, and convection rates at 90%, 76%, and 63% of the boundary layer edge velocity, respectively, are observed for the leading edge, centroid, and trailing edge of the spots. A model constructed with these spot propagation parameters is used to infer spot generation rates from measured transition onset to completion distance. Finally, a novel

  9. Transition due to streamwise streaks in a supersonic flat plate boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paredes, Pedro; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Li, Fei

    2016-12-01

    Transition induced by stationary streaks undergoing transient growth in a supersonic flat plate boundary layer flow is studied using numerical computations. While the possibility of strong transient growth of small-amplitude stationary perturbations in supersonic boundary layer flows has been demonstrated in previous works, its relation to laminar-turbulent transition cannot be established within the framework of linear disturbances. Therefore, this paper investigates the nonlinear evolution of initially linear optimal disturbances that evolve into finite amplitude streaks in the downstream region, and then studies the modal instability of those streaks as a likely cause for the onset of bypass transition. The nonmodal evolution of linearly optimal stationary perturbations in a supersonic, Mach 3 flat plate boundary layer is computed via the nonlinear plane-marching parabolized stability equations (PSE) for stationary perturbations, or equivalently, the perturbation form of parabolized Navier-Stokes equations. To assess the effect of the nonlinear finite-amplitude streaks on transition, the linear form of plane-marching PSE is used to investigate the instability of the boundary layer flow modified by the spanwise periodic streaks. The onset of transition is estimated using an N -factor criterion based on modal amplification of the secondary instabilities of the streaks. In the absence of transient growth disturbances, first mode instabilities in a Mach 3, zero pressure gradient boundary layer reach N =10 at Rex≈107 . However, secondary instability modes of the stationary streaks undergoing transient growth are able to achieve the same N -factor at Rex<2 ×106 when the initial streak amplitude is sufficiently large. In contrast to the streak instabilities in incompressible flows, subharmonic instability modes with twice the fundamental spanwise wavelength of the streaks are found to have higher amplification ratios than the streak instabilities at fundamental

  10. In-Flight Boundary-Layer Transition on a Large Flat Plate at Supersonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Daniel W.; Fredericks, Michael Alan; Tracy, Richard R.; Matisheck, Jason R.; Vanecek, Neal D.

    2012-01-01

    A flight experiment was conducted to investigate the pressure distribution, local flow conditions, and boundary-layer transition characteristics on a large flat plate in flight at supersonic speeds up to Mach 2.0. The primary objective of the test was to characterize the local flow field in preparation for future tests of a high Reynolds number natural laminar flow test article. The tests used a F-15B testbed aircraft with a bottom centerline mounted test fixture. A second objective was to determine the boundary-layer transition characteristics on the flat plate and the effectiveness of using a simplified surface coating for future laminar flow flight tests employing infrared thermography. Boundary-layer transition was captured using an onboard infrared imaging system. The infrared imagery was captured in both analog and digital formats. Surface pressures were measured with electronically scanned pressure modules connected to 60 surface-mounted pressure orifices. The local flow field was measured with five 5-hole conical probes mounted near the leading edge of the test fixture. Flow field measurements revealed the local flow characteristics including downwash, sidewash, and local Mach number. Results also indicated that the simplified surface coating did not provide sufficient insulation from the metallic structure, which likely had a substantial effect on boundary-layer transition compared with that of an adiabatic surface. Cold wall conditions were predominant during the acceleration to maximum Mach number, and warm wall conditions were evident during the subsequent deceleration. The infrared imaging system was able to capture shock wave impingement on the surface of the flat plate in addition to indicating laminar-to-turbulent boundary-layer transition.

  11. Experimental study of boundary layer transition with elevated freestream turbulence on a heated flat plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sohn, Ki-Hyeon; Reshotko, Eli

    1991-01-01

    A detailed investigation to document momentum and thermal development of boundary layers undergoing natural transition on a heated flat plate was performed. Experimental results of both overall and conditionally sampled characteristics of laminar, transitional, and low Reynolds number turbulent boundary layers are presented. Measurements were acquired in a low-speed, closed-loop wind tunnel with a freestream velocity of 100 ft/s and zero pressure gradient over a range of freestream turbulence intensities (TI) from 0.4 to 6 percent. The distributions of skin friction, heat transfer rate and Reynolds shear stress were all consistent with previously published data. Reynolds analogy factors for R(sub theta) is less than 2300 were found to be well predicted by laminar and turbulent correlations which accounted for an unheated starting length. The measured laminar value of Reynolds analogy factor was as much as 53 percent higher than the Pr(sup -2/3). A small dependence of turbulent results on TI was observed. Conditional sampling performed in the transitional boundary layer indicated the existence of a near-wall drop in intermittency, pronounced at certain low intermittencies, which is consistent with the cross-sectional shape of turbulent spots observed by others. Non-turbulent intervals were observed to possess large magnitudes of near-wall unsteadiness and turbulent intervals had peak values as much as 50 percent higher than were measured at fully turbulent stations. Non-turbulent and turbulent profiles in transitional boundary layers cannot be simply treated as Blasius and fully turbulent profiles, respectively. The boundary layer spectra indicate predicted selective amplification of T-S waves for TI is approximately 0.4 percent. However, for TI is approximately 0.8 and 1.1 percent, T-S waves are localized very near the wall and do not play a dominant role in transition process.

  12. Experimental Study of Bypass Transition in a Boundary Layer. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suder, Kenneth L.; Obrien, James E.; Reshotko, Eli

    1988-01-01

    A detailed investigation to compare the boundary layer transition process in a low intensity disturbance environment to that in an environment in which the disturbances are initially non-linear in amplitude was conducted using a flat plate model. The transition mechanism based on linear growth of Tollmien Schlichting (T-S) waves was associated with a freestream turbulence level of 0.3 percent; however, for a freestream turbulence intensity of 0.65 percent and higher, the bypass transition mechanism prevailed. The results of detailed measurements acquired to study and compare the two transition mechanisms indicate that there exists a critical value for the peak rms of the velocity fluctuations within the boundary layer of approximately 3 to 3.5 percent of the freestream velocity. Once the unsteadiness within the boundary layer reached this critical value, turbulent bursting initiated, regardless of the transition mechanism. The two point correlations and simultaneous time traces within the transition region illustrate the features of a turbulent burst and its effect on the surrounding flowfield.

  13. Shuttle Orbiter boundary-layer transition - A comparison of flight and wind tunnel data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, W. D.; Derry, S. M.; Bertin, J. J.

    1983-01-01

    Hypersonic boundary-layer transition data obtained on the windward centerline of the Shuttle Orbiter during entry for the first four flights are presented and analyzed. Because the Orbiter surface is composed of a large number of thermal protection tiles, the transition data include the effects of distributed roughness arising from tile misalignment and gaps. These data are used as a benchmark for assessing and improving the accuracy of boundary-layer transition predictions based on correlations of wind tunnel data taken on both aerodynamically rough and smooth Orbiter surfaces. By comparing these two data bases, the relative importance of tunnel free-stream noise and surface roughness on Orbiter boundary-layer transition correlation parameters can be assessed. This assessment indicates that accurate predictions of transition times can be made for the Orbiter at hypersonic flight conditions by using roughness dominated wind tunnel data. Specifically, times of transition onset and completion can be accurately predicted using a correlation based on critical and effective values of a roughness Reynolds number previously derived from wind tunnel data.

  14. Observations of the Early Morning Boundary-Layer Transition with Small Remotely-Piloted Aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wildmann, Norman; Rau, Gerrit Anke; Bange, Jens

    2015-12-01

    A remotely-piloted aircraft (RPA), equipped with a high resolution thermodynamic sensor package, was used to investigate physical processes during the morning transition of the atmospheric boundary layer over land. Experiments were conducted at a test site in heterogeneous terrain in south-west Germany on 5 days from June to September 2013 in an evolving shallow convective boundary layer, which then developed into a well-mixed layer later in the day. A combination of vertical profiling and constant-altitude profiling (CAP) at 100 m height above ground level was chosen as the measuring strategy throughout the experiment. The combination of flight strategies allows the application of mixed-layer scaling using the boundary-layer height z_i, convective velocity scale w_* and convective temperature scale θ _*. The hypothesis that mixed-layer theory is valid during the whole transition was not confirmed for all parameters. A good agreement is found for temperature variances, especially in the upper half of the boundary layer, and the normalized heat-flux profile. The results were compared to a previous study with the helicopter-borne turbulence probe Helipod, and it was found that similar data quality can be achieved with the RPA. On all days, the CAP flight level was within the entrainment zone for a short time, and the horizontal variability of temperature and water vapour along the flight path is presented as an example of the inhomogeneity of layer interfaces in the boundary layer. The study serves as a case study of the possibilities and limitations with state-of-the-art RPA technology in micrometeorology.

  15. Transitional boundary layer in low-Prandtl-number convection at high Rayleigh number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, Joerg; Bandaru, Vinodh; Pandey, Ambrish; Scheel, Janet

    2016-11-01

    The boundary layer structure of the velocity and temperature fields in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard flows in closed cylindrical cells of unit aspect ratio is revisited from a transitional and turbulent viscous boundary layer perspective. When the Rayleigh number is large enough the boundary layer dynamics at the bottom and top plates can be separated into an impact region of downwelling plumes, an ejection region of upwelling plumes and an interior region (away from side walls) that is dominated by a shear flow of varying orientation. This interior plate region is compared here to classical wall-bounded shear flows. The working fluid is liquid mercury or liquid gallium at a Prandtl number of Pr = 0 . 021 for a range of Rayleigh numbers of 3 ×105 <= Ra <= 4 ×108 . The momentum transfer response to these system parameters generates a fluid flow in the closed cell with a macroscopic flow Reynolds number that takes values in the range of 1 . 8 ×103 <= Re <= 4 . 6 ×104 . It is shown that particularly the viscous boundary layers for the largest Ra are highly transitional and obey some properties that are directly comparable to transitional channel flows at friction Reynolds numbers below 100. This work is supported by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft.

  16. Measurements in Transitional Boundary Layers Under High Free-Stream Turbulence and Strong Acceleration Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volino, Ralph J.; Simon, Terrence W.

    1995-01-01

    Measurements from transitional, heated boundary layers along a concave-curved test wall are presented and discussed. A boundary layer subject to low free-stream turbulence intensity (FSTI), which contains stationary streamwise (Gortler) vortices, is documented. The low FSTI measurements are followed by measurements in boundary layers subject to high (initially 8%) free-stream turbulence intensity and moderate to strong streamwise acceleration. Conditions were chosen to simulate those present on the downstream half of the pressure side of a gas turbine airfoil. Mean flow characteristics as well as turbulence statistics, including the turbulent shear stress, turbulent heat flux, and turbulent Prandtl number, are documented. A technique called "octant analysis" is introduced and applied to several cases from the literature as well as to data from the present study. Spectral analysis was applied to describe the effects of turbulence scales of different sizes during transition. To the authors'knowledge, this is the first detailed documentation of boundary layer transition under such high free-stream turbulence conditions.

  17. Measured Boundary Layer Transition and Rotor Hover Performance at Model Scale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Overmeyer, Austin D.; Martin, Preston B.

    2017-01-01

    An experiment involving a Mach-scaled, 11:08 f t: diameter rotor was performed in hover during the summer of 2016 at NASA Langley Research Center. The experiment investigated the hover performance as a function of the laminar to turbulent transition state of the boundary layer, including both natural and fixed transition cases. The boundary layer transition locations were measured on both the upper and lower aerodynamic surfaces simultaneously. The measurements were enabled by recent advances in infrared sensor sensitivity and stability. The infrared thermography measurement technique was enhanced by a paintable blade surface heater, as well as a new high-sensitivity long wave infrared camera. The measured transition locations showed extensive amounts, x=c>0:90, of laminar flow on the lower surface at moderate to high thrust (CT=s > 0:068) for the full blade radius. The upper surface showed large amounts, x=c > 0:50, of laminar flow at the blade tip for low thrust (CT=s < 0:045). The objective of this paper is to provide an experimental data set for comparisons to newly developed and implemented rotor boundary layer transition models in CFD and rotor design tools. The data is expected to be used as part of the AIAA Rotorcraft SimulationWorking Group

  18. Minnowbrook III: 2000 Workshop on Boundary Layer Transition and Unsteady Aspects of Turbomachinery Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaGraff, John E. (Editor); Ashpis, David E. (Editor)

    2002-01-01

    This volume and its accompanying CD-ROM contain materials presented at the Minnowbrook III-2000 Workshop on Boundary Layer Transition and Unsteady Aspects of Turbomachinery Flows held at the Syracuse University Minnowbrook Conference Center, Blue Mountain Lake, New York, August 20-23, 2000. Workshop organizers were John E. LaGraff (Syracuse University), Terry V Jones (Oxford University), and J. Paul Gostelow (University of Leicester). The workshop followed the theme, venue, and informal format of two earlier workshops: Minnowbrook I (1993) and Minnowbrook II (1997). The workshop was focused on physical understanding the late stage (final breakdown) boundary layer transition, separation, and effects of unsteady wakes with the specific goal of contributing to engineering application of improving design codes for turbomachinery. The workshop participants included academic researchers from the USA and abroad, and representatives from the gas-turbine industry and government laboratories. The physical mechanisms discussed included turbulence disturbance environment in turbomachinery, flow instabilities, bypass and natural transition, turbulent spots and calmed regions, wake interactions with attached and separated boundary layers, turbulence and transition modeling and CFD, and DNS. This volume contains abstracts and copies of the viewgraphs presented, organized according to the workshop sessions. The viewgraphs are included on the CD-ROM only. The workshop summary and the plenary-discussion transcripts clearly highlight the need for continued vigorous research in the technologically important area of transition, separated and unsteady flows in turbomachines.

  19. Heat transfer and fluid mechanics measurements in transitional boundary layer flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, T.; Simon, T. W.; Buddhavarapu, J.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental results are presented to document hydrodynamic and thermal development of flat-plate boundary layers undergoing natural transition. Local heat transfer coefficients, skin friction coefficients and profiles of velocity, temperature and Reynolds normal and shear stresses are presented. A case with no transition and transitional cases with 0.68% and 2.0% free-stream disturbance intensities were investigated. The locations of transition are consistent with earlier data. A late-laminar state with significant levels of turbulence is documented. In late-transitional and early-turbulent flows, turbulent Prandtl number and conduction layer thickness values exceed, and the Reynolds analogy factor is less than, values previously measured in fully turbulent flows.

  20. Heat transfer and fluid mechanics measurements in transitional boundary layer flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, T.; Simon, T. W.; Buddhavarapu, J.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental results are presented to document hydrodynamic and thermal development of flat-plate boundary layers undergoing natural transition. Local heat transfer coefficients, skin friction coefficients and profiles of velocity, temperature and Reynolds normal and shear stresses are presented. A case with no transition and transitional cases with 0.68 percent and 2.0 percent free-stream disturbance intensities were investigated. The locations of transition are consistent with earlier data. A late-laminar state with significant levels of turbulence is documented. In late-transitional and early-turbulent flows, turbulent Prandtl number and conduction layer thickness values exceed, and the Reynolds analogy factor is less than, values previously measured in fully turbulent flows.

  1. Wall Cooling Effects on Hypersonic Transitional/Turbulent Boundary Layers at High Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Ralph D.

    1975-01-01

    A 4 degree wedge was used to produce a thick turbulent boundary layer with an edge Mach number of 11. By using a two-dimensional model, the boundary layer was nearly free from upstream history effects associated with nozzle wall turbulent boundary layers. Heat-transfer distributions were used to define regions of laminar, transitional, and turbulent flow at several values of T(sub w)/T(sub t) for an edge unit Reynolds number of 0.47 x lot per cm. Pitot and total temperature profiles and skin-friction measurements were obtained at selected stations along the model. Turbulence parameters (mixing length/sigma and epsilon) were derived from the fully turbulent profiles and used to more completely define the "low Reynolds number" effect. Turbulent Prandtl number distributions are also presented.

  2. The lobe to plasma sheet boundary layer transition - Theory and observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schriver, D.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.; Treumann, R.; Nakamura, M.; Kistler, L. M.

    1990-01-01

    The lobe and the plasma sheet boundary layer in the earth's magnetotail are regions of different plasma conditions and share a common interface. The transition from the lobe to the plasma sheet boundary layer is examined here using AMPTE/IRM data. When the satellite crossed from the lobe to the plasma sheet boundary layer, intense narrow-banded wave bursts at 1 kHz were observed and broadband electrostatic noise (BEN) immediately followed. Simultaneous with the onset of BEN, high energy earthward streaming proton beams at more than 40 keV (more than 2700 km/s) were detected. These results are used as input into a numerical simulation to study ion beam instabilities in the PSBL.

  3. Boundary Layer Transition over Blunt Hypersonic Vehicles Including Effects of Ablation-Induced Out-Gassing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Fei; Choudhari, Meelan; Chang, Chau-Lyan; White, Jeffery

    2011-01-01

    Computations are performed to study the boundary layer instability mechanisms pertaining to hypersonic flow over blunt capsules. For capsules with ablative heat shields, transition may be influenced both by out-gassing associated with surface pyrolysis and the resulting modification of surface geometry including the formation of micro-roughness. To isolate the effects of out-gassing, this paper examines the stability of canonical boundary layer flows over a smooth surface in the presence of gas injection into the boundary layer. For a slender cone, the effects of out-gassing on the predominantly second mode instability are found to be stabilizing. In contrast, for a blunt capsule flow dominated by first mode instability, out-gassing is shown to be destabilizing. Analogous destabilizing effects of outgassing are also noted for both stationary and traveling modes of crossflow instability over a blunt sphere-cone configuration at angle of attack.

  4. Study of boundary-layer transition using transonic cone Preston tube data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, T. D.; Abu-Mostafa, A.

    1982-01-01

    Laminar layer Preston tube data on a sharp nose, ten degree cone obtained in the Ames 11 ft TWT and in flight tests are analyzed. During analyses of the laminar-boundary layer data, errors were discovered in both the wind tunnel and the flight data. A correction procedure for errors in the flight data is recommended which forces the flight data to exhibit some of the orderly characteristics of the wind tunnel data. From corrected wind tunnel data, a correlation is developed between Preston tube pressures and the corresponding values of theoretical laminar skin friction. Because of the uncertainty in correcting the flight data, a correlation for the unmodified data is developed, and, in addition, three other correlations are developed based on different correction procedures. Each of these correlations are used in conjunction with the wind tunnel correlation to define effective freestream unit Reynolds numbers for the 11 ft TWT over a Mach number range of 0.30 to 0.95. The maximum effective Reynolds numbers are approximately 6.5% higher than the normal values. These maximum values occur between freestream Mach numbers of 0.60 and 0.80. Smaller values are found outside this Mach number range. These results indicate wind tunnel noise affects the average laminar skin friction much less than it affects boundary layer transition. Data on the onset, extent, and end of boundary layer transition are summarized. Application of a procedure for studying the relative effects of varying nose radius on a ten degree cone at supercritical speeds indicates that increasing nose radius promotes boundary layer transition and separation of laminar boundary layers.

  5. Quadrant Analysis of the Heat and Momentum Fluxes at the Transition Layer between the Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer and the developed Internal Boundary Layer close to the coastline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panagiotis Raptis, Ioannis; Helmis, Constantinos

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this work is to study the main characteristics and the micro-structure of the Transition Layer between the Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer (MABL) and the developed Internal Boundary Layer (IBL), which is created downwind close to the coastline. The dynamics and the structure of this Transition Layer, which could be defined as the region where the growing IBL perturbations enter the MABL and mix the air, are of major interest affecting a variety of MABL' parameters. For this study data collected from CBLAST field campaign, conducted during summer 2003 at Nantucket Island USA, were used. More specifically data from sonic anemometer measurements at 20 Hz sampling frequency, at 10m height and 80m distance from the coastline were studied. According to our measurements during the night the recorded characteristics of the surface layer at 10m height had the behavior of the MABL, while during the day in most cases the developed IBL was recorded. Thus a diurnal cycle was noticed with the mechanically generated IBL during the night, being lower than the height of our instruments (10m) while a thermally generated IBL during the day was easily observed with characteristic perturbations. In many cases an intermediate state was observed, indicating the existence of the Transition Layer. In order to identify the layers and their characteristics, a conditional analysis was developed using multiple criteria, based mainly on values of the heat and momentum fluxes estimated by the eddy covariance method. We used the quadrant analysis method to study the coherent structures and compare the results under different atmospheric conditions. This method decomposes shear stress into four quadrants, separating the events that contribute to the downward and upward momentum fluxes. Events in quadrants 2 (ejections) and 4 (sweeps) compose the coherent turbulent structures while events in quadrants 1 and 3 compose the incoherent structures. The parameters γ and exuberance

  6. On the influence of free-stream turbulence length scales on boundary-layer transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fransson, Jens; Shahinfar, Shahab

    2015-11-01

    A measurement campaign on the free-stream turbulence (FST) induced boundary layer transition has been carried out in the Minimum-Turbulence-Level wind tunnel at KTH. Previous numerical investigations where the turbulence intensity (Tu) has been kept constant, while the integral length scale (Λx) has been varied, have shown that the transition location is advanced for increasing Λx. The present measurement campaign has been carried out using hot-wire anemometry and consists of 42 unique FST conditions with thorough measurements throughout the transitional region. Unlike other extensive FST induced transition measurements the free-stream velocity was here kept constant for all cases, implying that the boundary layer scale is locked up to transition onset. Our measurements confirm previous results on the advancement of the transition location with increasing Λx for low to moderate Tu levels, but show the opposite effect for higher levels, i.e. a delay in the transition location for larger Λx, which to the knowledge of the present authors so far is unreported. In addition, the common belief that the FST length scales have a negligible effect on the transition location with regards to the Tu level does not seem to be fully true.

  7. Transition effect on the shock wave / boundary layer interaction region and the wake at low supersonic Mach number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polivanov, P. A.; Sidorenko, A. A.; Maslov, A. A.

    2016-10-01

    The paper deals with an experimental study of effect of laminar, transitional and turbulent boundary layer on stationary and non-stationary characteristics of the shock wave / boundary layer interactions (SWBLI) and wake. Incident shock wave generated by a wedge induced the separation of the boundary layer developed on the flat plate. The boundary layer state was varied from laminar to turbulent by changing position of the interaction relative to the leading edge. The measurements were performed by PIV. It was found that the growth of the momentum thickness and coherent structures in wake strongly depends on the state of the incoming boundary layer.

  8. Transitional-turbulent spots and turbulent-turbulent spots in boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaohua; Moin, Parviz; Wallace, James M.; Skarda, Jinhie; Lozano-Durán, Adrián; Hickey, Jean-Pierre

    2017-07-01

    Two observations drawn from a thoroughly validated direct numerical simulation of the canonical spatially developing, zero-pressure gradient, smooth, flat-plate boundary layer are presented here. The first is that, for bypass transition in the narrow sense defined herein, we found that the transitional-turbulent spot inception mechanism is analogous to the secondary instability of boundary-layer natural transition, namely a spanwise vortex filament becomes a ΛΛ vortex and then, a hairpin packet. Long streak meandering does occur but usually when a streak is infected by a nearby existing transitional-turbulent spot. Streak waviness and breakdown are, therefore, not the mechanisms for the inception of transitional-turbulent spots found here. Rather, they only facilitate the growth and spreading of existing transitional-turbulent spots. The second observation is the discovery, in the inner layer of the developed turbulent boundary layer, of what we call turbulent-turbulent spots. These turbulent-turbulent spots are dense concentrations of small-scale vortices with high swirling strength originating from hairpin packets. Although structurally quite similar to the transitional-turbulent spots, these turbulent-turbulent spots are generated locally in the fully turbulent environment, and they are persistent with a systematic variation of detection threshold level. They exert indentation, segmentation, and termination on the viscous sublayer streaks, and they coincide with local concentrations of high levels of Reynolds shear stress, enstrophy, and temperature fluctuations. The sublayer streaks seem to be passive and are often simply the rims of the indentation pockets arising from the turbulent-turbulent spots.

  9. Laminar-Turbulent Transition Behind Discrete Roughness Elements in a High-Speed Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhari, Meelan M.; Li, Fei; Wu, Minwei; Chang, Chau-Lyan; Edwards, Jack R., Jr.; Kegerise, Michael; King, Rudolph

    2010-01-01

    Computations are performed to study the flow past an isolated roughness element in a Mach 3.5, laminar, flat plate boundary layer. To determine the effects of the roughness element on the location of laminar-turbulent transition inside the boundary layer, the instability characteristics of the stationary wake behind the roughness element are investigated over a range of roughness heights. The wake flow adjacent to the spanwise plane of symmetry is characterized by a narrow region of increased boundary layer thickness. Beyond the near wake region, the centerline streak is surrounded by a pair of high-speed streaks with reduced boundary layer thickness and a secondary, outer pair of lower-speed streaks. Similar to the spanwise periodic pattern of streaks behind an array of regularly spaced roughness elements, the above wake structure persists over large distances and can sustain strong enough convective instabilities to cause an earlier onset of transition when the roughness height is sufficiently large. Time accurate computations are performed to clarify additional issues such as the role of the nearfield of the roughness element during the generation of streak instabilities, as well as to reveal selected details of their nonlinear evolution. Effects of roughness element shape on the streak amplitudes and the interactions between multiple roughness elements aligned along the flow direction are also investigated.

  10. Transition induced by fixed and freely convecting spherical particles in laminar boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrie, H. L.; Morris, P. J.; Bajwa, A. R.; Vincent, D. C.

    1993-08-01

    An experimental and analytical study of aspects of transition induced by disturbances from spherical particles in laminar boundary layers is discussed. The generation of turbulent wedges by fixed spherical particles in a laminar boundary layer on or near the surface of a flat plate is considered experimentally using flow visualization with fluorescent dye and laser Doppler velocimetry. Turbulent spots generated by freely convecting spherical particles that are released in the freestream to fall into a flat plate laminar boundary layer and impact the plate are also discussed. A combination of dye flow visualization and a video based particle tracking technique was used to study the convecting particle problem. Although the Reynolds number at the critical condition for turbulent wedge generation by fixed particles and turbulent spot generation by convecting particles are similar, transition in these two situations appears to be fundamentally different. The development of a turbulent wedge near the critical condition is a relatively gradual process. In contrast, turbulent spots form relatively quickly after the convecting particles enter the boundary layer and impact the plate. Turbulent wedge formation downstream of a fixed particle results from the destabilization of the near wall flow by the vortical structures shed into particle wake. This shedding process is dominated by periodically shed loop shaped hairpin vortices. Observation of subharmonic oscillations at 1/2 and 1/4 of this shedding frequency suggest that a chaotic route to turbulence by a series of period doubling bifurcations is possible.

  11. High-Speed Boundary-Layer Transition Induced by an Isolated Roughness Element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kegerise, Michael A.; Owens, Lewis R.; King, Rudolph A.

    2010-01-01

    Progress on an experimental effort to quantify the instability mechanisms associated with roughness-induced transition in a high-speed boundary layer is reported in this paper. To simulate the low-disturbance environment encountered during high-altitude flight, the experimental study was performed in the NASA-Langley Mach 3.5 Supersonic Low-Disturbance Tunnel. A flat plate trip sizing study was performed first to identify the roughness height required to force transition. That study, which included transition onset measurements under both quiet and noisy freestream conditions, confirmed the sensitivity of roughness-induced transition to freestream disturbance levels. Surveys of the laminar boundary layer on a 7deg half-angle sharp-tipped cone were performed via hot-wire anemometry and pitot-pressure measurements. The measured mean mass-flux and Mach-number profiles agreed very well with computed mean-flow profiles. Finally, surveys of the boundary layer developing downstream of an isolated roughness element on the cone were performed. The measurements revealed an instability in the far wake of the roughness element that grows exponentially and has peak frequencies in the 150 to 250 kHz range.

  12. Bypass transition of low-speed boundary layers using realistic sandpaper roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capecelatro, Jesse; Zhang, Wentao; Fontaine, Ryan; Elliot, Gregory; Bodony, Daniel; Freund, Jonathan; The CenterExascale Simulation Of Plasma-Coupled Combustion (Xpacc) Team

    2015-11-01

    The transition process from laminar to turbulent flow over three-dimensional irregular surfaces is known to affect downstream quantities of interest. Properly simulating this transition numerically is therefore potentially critical for accurate predictions of turbulent flows. In this work, a numerical study of bypass transition of a Blasius boundary layer subjected to realistic sandgrain roughness is presented to analyze the effects of surface topography on the characteristics of the downstream turbulence. Direct numerical simulations are performed using a high-order finite difference scheme in general curvilinear coordinates that is fitted to the roughness. A main goal is to model sandpaper-induced transition and quantify its impact on downstream boundary layer turbulence. A simple but effective model for the sandpaper roughness is presented, and parameters for the roughness profile are chosen to match low-order moments of the surface height, in addition to the spectral content measured from real sandpaper. The effects of roughness Reynolds number and ratio of upstream laminar boundary layer thickness to the roughness height are also investigated.

  13. Observations of the Early Evening Boundary-Layer Transition Using a Small Unmanned Aerial System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonin, Timothy; Chilson, Phillip; Zielke, Brett; Fedorovich, Evgeni

    2013-01-01

    The evolution of the lower portion of the planetary boundary layer is investigated using the Small Multifunction Research and Teaching Sonde (SMARTSonde), an unmanned aerial vehicle developed at the University of Oklahoma. The study focuses on the lowest 200 m of the atmosphere, where the most noticeable thermodynamic changes occur during the day. Between October 2010 and February 2011, a series of flights was conducted during the evening hours on several days to examine the vertical structure of the lower boundary layer. Data from a nearby Oklahoma Mesonet tower was used to supplement the vertical profiles of temperature, humidity, and pressure, which were collected approximately every 30 min, starting 2 h before sunset and continuing until dusk. From the profiles, sensible and latent heat fluxes were estimated. These fluxes were used to diagnose the portion of the boundary layer that was most affected by the early evening transition. During the transition period, a shallow cool and moist layer near the ground was formed, and as the evening progressed the cooling affected an increasingly shallower layer just above the surface.

  14. Height-dependent transition from 3-D to 2-D turbulence in the hurricane boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, David; Zhang, Jun A.

    2013-04-01

    Here we show, from in situ aircraft measurements in the hurricane boundary layer, a height-dependent transition of the flow from 3-D to 2-D turbulence. This marks a fundamental change in the energy dynamics of the hurricane boundary layer due to the fact that in 3-D, energy flows downscale from larger to smaller scales, whereas in 2-D, it flows upscale, from smaller to larger scales. These results represent the first measurement of the 2-D upscale energy flux in the atmosphere and also the first to characterize the transition from 3-D to 2-D. It is shown that the large-scale parent vortex may gain energy directly from small scales in tropical cyclones.

  15. Shuttle Damage/Repair from the Perspective of Hypersonic Boundary Layer Transition - Experimental Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horvath, Thomas J.; Berry, Scott A.; Merski, N. Ronald; Berger, Karen T.; Buck, Gregory M.; Liechty, Derek S.; Schneider, Steven P.

    2006-01-01

    An overview is provided of the experimental wind tunnel program conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center Aerothermodynamics Laboratory in support of an agency-wide effort to prepare the Shuttle Orbiter for Return-to-Flight. The effect of an isolated protuberance and an isolated rectangular cavity on hypersonic boundary layer transition onset on the windward surface of the Shuttle Orbiter has been experimentally characterized. These experimental studies were initiated to provide a protuberance and cavity effects database for developing hypersonic transition criteria to support on-orbit disposition of thermal protection system damage or repair. In addition, a synergistic experimental investigation was undertaken to assess the impact of an isolated mass-flow entrainment source (simulating pyrolysis/outgassing from a proposed tile repair material) on boundary layer transition. A brief review of the relevant literature regarding hypersonic boundary layer transition induced from cavities and localized mass addition from ablation is presented. Boundary layer transition results were obtained using 0.0075-scale Orbiter models with simulated tile damage (rectangular cavities) of varying length, width, and depth and simulated tile damage or repair (protuberances) of varying height. Cavity and mass addition effects were assessed at a fixed location (x/L = 0.3) along the model centerline in a region of near zero pressure gradient. Cavity length-to-depth ratio was systematically varied from 2.5 to 17.7 and length-to-width ratio of 1 to 8.5. Cavity depth-to-local boundary layer thickness ranged from 0.5 to 4.8. Protuberances were located at several sites along the centerline and port/starboard attachment lines along the chine and wing leading edge. Protuberance height-to-boundary layer thickness was varied from approximately 0.2 to 1.1. Global heat transfer images and heating distributions of the Orbiter windward surface using phosphor thermography were used to infer the

  16. A quiet flow Ludwieg tube for study of transition in compressible boundary layers: Design and feasibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Steven P.

    1991-01-01

    Laminar-turbulent transition in high speed boundary layers is a complicated problem which is still poorly understood, partly because of experimental ambiguities caused by operating in noisy wind tunnels. The NASA Langley experience with quiet tunnel design has been used to design a quiet flow tunnel which can be constructed less expensively. Fabrication techniques have been investigated, and inviscid, boundary layer, and stability computer codes have been adapted for use in the nozzle design. Construction of such a facility seems feasible, at a reasonable cost. Two facilities have been proposed: a large one, with a quiet flow region large enough to study the end of transition, and a smaller and less expensive one, capable of studying low Reynolds number issues such as receptivity. Funding for either facility remains to be obtained, although key facility elements have been obtained and are being integrated into the existing Purdue supersonic facilities.

  17. Experimental study of boundary layer transition on a heated flat plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sohn, K. H.; Reshotko, E.; Zaman, K. B. M. Q.

    1991-01-01

    A detailed investigation to the document momentum and thermal development of boundary layers undergoing natural transition on a heated flat plate was performed. Experimental results of both overall and conditionally sampled characteristics of laminar, transitional, and low Reynolds number turbulent boundary layers are presented. Measurements were done in a low-speed, closed-loop wind tunnel with a freestream velocity of 100 ft/s and zero pressure gradient over a range of freestream turbulence intensities from 0.4 to 6 percent. The distributions of skin friction, heat transfer rate, and Reynolds shear stress were all consistent with previously published data. Reynolds analogy factors for momentum thickness Reynolds number, Re(sub theta) less than 2300 were found to be well predicted by laminar and turbulent correlations which accounted for an unheated starting length and uniform heat flux. A small dependence of turbulence results on the freestream turbulence intensity was observed.

  18. Boundary Layer Transition Flight Experiment Overview and In-Situ Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, Karen T.; Anderson, Brian P.; Campbell, Charles H.; Garske, Michael T.; Saucedo, Luis A.; Kinder, Gerald R.

    2010-01-01

    In support of the Boundary Layer Transition Flight Experiment (BLT FE) Project, a manufactured protuberance tile was installed on the port wing of Space Shuttle Orbiter Discovery for the flights of STS-119, STS-128 and STS-131. Additional instrumentation was installed in order to obtain more spatially resolved measurements downstream of the protuberance. This paper provides an overview of the BLT FE Project. Significant efforts were made to place the protuberance at an appropriate location on the Orbiter and to design the protuberance to withstand the expected environments. A high-level overview of the in-situ flight data is presented, along with a summary of the comparisons between pre- and post-flight analysis predictions and flight data. Comparisons show that predictions for boundary layer transition onset time closely match the flight data, while predicted temperatures were significantly higher than observed flight temperatures.

  19. Study of the evening transition to the nocturnal atmospheric boundary layer: statistical analysis and case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sastre, Mariano; Viana, Samuel; Maqueda, Gregorio; Yagüe, Carlos

    2010-05-01

    Turbulence is probably the most important feature dealing with the diffusion of contaminants in the planetary boundary layer. The main characteristics of turbulence are governed, apart from synoptic conditions, by the daily cycle of the Earth surface heating and cooling, so that, simplifying, two configurations are often found: convective and stable. The transition from a diurnal convective boundary layer to a typically stable nocturnal one is not still well understood (Edwards, 2009). Different micrometeorological conditions at sunset or a few hours previously may be critical for the establishment of a strong surface-based stability or a weak one, even for similar synoptic conditions. This work focuses on the characterization of the evening transition which takes place at the atmospheric boundary layer, considering the temporal interval 17.00-23.00 GMT. The methodology includes looking for some relations between meteorological variables, turbulent parameters and particulate matter (PM10, PM2.5 and PM1) concentrations measured by a GRIMM particle monitor (MODEL 365). Observational data (Summer 2009) is provided from permanent instrumentation at the Research Centre for the Lower Atmosphere (CIBA) in Valladolid (Spain), which is on a quite flat terrain (Cuxart et al., 2000). A 10m height mast equipped with temperature, wind speed and direction, and moisture sensors at several levels are available. Also two sonic anemometers (20 Hz sampling rate) at 1.5 and 10m were deployed in the mast. The database is complemented by a triangle of microbarometers installed next to the surface, and another three microbarometers placed in a 100m meteorological tower at 20, 50 and 100m respectively, which are ideal to study coherent structures present in the boundary layer. Statistical parameters of meteorological variables have been calculated and studied in order to find out connections with the most relevant physical processes. Moreover different cases studies will be analyzed

  20. Finishing and Inspection of Model Surfaces for Boundary Layer Transition Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkins, Max E.; Darsow, John F.

    1959-01-01

    Techniques which have been used for finishing and quantitatively specifying surface roughness on boundary-layer-transition models are reviewed. The appearance of a surface as far as roughness is concerned can be misleading when viewed either by the eye or with the aid of a microscope. The multiple-beam interferometer and the wire shadow method provide the best simple means of obtaining quantitative measurements.

  1. Streamwise Vortex Instability and Hypersonic Boundary-Layer Transition on the Hyper-2000

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-12-01

    portions of the gap, of a depth more than an inch, were refilled with Orthocast Inc.’s Orthodontic Plaster. Twice the quoted amount of water was used...Hamilton II, H.H. X-33 Hypersonic Boundary-Layer Transition. Journal of Spacecraft and Rockets, 38(5):646-657, September-October 2001. [5...Palmer, G., Kontinos, D., and Sherman, B. Surface Heating Effects of X-33 Vehicle Thermal-Protection-System Panel Bowing. Journal of Spacecraft and

  2. Transition and Turbulence Structure in the Boundary Layers of an Oscillating Airfoil

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-31

    measurements near the trailing edge of an oscillating NACA 64A010 airfoil operating at various fiequencies and in unstalled condition. It was...to identify: (i) the conditions under which a sinusoidally oscillating NACA 0012 airfoil operates with a leading edge separation bubble; (ii) the...vortex formation. These experiments were conducted using an NACA 0012 airfoil with a tripping wire to promote transition of the boundary layer. The

  3. Computational Investigation of Supersonic Boundary Layer Transition Over Canonical Fuselage Nose Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhari, Meelan M.; Tokugawa, Naoko; Li, Fei; Chang, Chau-Lyan; White, Jeffery A.; Ishikawa, Hiroaki; Ueda, Yoshine; Atobe, Takashi; Fujii, Keisuke

    2012-01-01

    Boundary layer transition over axisymmetric bodies at non-zero angle of attack in supersonic flow is numerically investigated as part of joint research between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). Transition over four axisymmetric bodies (namely, Sears-Haack body, semi-Sears-Haack body, 5-degree straight cone and flared cone) with different axial pressure gradients has been studied at Mach 2 in order to understand the effect of axial pressure gradient on instability amplification along the leeward symmetry plane and in the region of nonzero crossflow away from it. Comparisons are made with measured transition data in Mach 2 facilities as well as with predicted and measured transition characteristics for a 5-degree straight cone in a Mach 3.5 low disturbance tunnel. Limitations of using linear stability correlations for predicting transition over axisymmetric bodies at angle of attack are pointed out.

  4. Relationship between transition and modes of instability in supersonic boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masad, Jamal A.

    1993-01-01

    The relationship between the predicted transition location and the first and second modes of instability in two-dimensional supersonic boundary-layer flow on a flat plate is examined. Linear stability theory and the N-factor criterion are used to predict transition location. The effect of heat transfer is also studied; the results demonstrate that the transition reversal phenomenon can be explained by the opposite effect of cooling on the first and second modes of instability. Compressibility of destabilizing at free-stream Mach numbers of 2 to 3.5. The predicted transition location is due to the oblique first modes of instability, up to free-stream Mach numbers between 6 and 6.5. At higher Mach numbers, the predicted transition location is due to a combination of two-dimensional first and second modes of instability.

  5. Boundary Layer Transition Correlations and Aeroheating Predictions for Mars Smart Lander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollis, Brian R.; Liechty, Derek S.

    2002-01-01

    Laminar and turbulent perfect-gas air, Navier-Stokes computations have been performed for a proposed Mars Smart Lander entry vehicle at Mach 6 over a free stream Reynolds number range of 6.9 x 10(exp 6)/m to 2.4 x 10(exp 7)/m (2.1 x 10(exp 6)/ft to 7.3 x 10(exp 6)/ft) for angles-of-attack of 0-deg, 11-deg, 16-deg, and 20-deg, and comparisons were made to wind tunnel heating data obtained a t the same conditions. Boundary layer edge properties were extracted from the solutions and used to correlate experimental data on the effects of heat-shield penetrations (bolt-holes where the entry vehicle would be attached to the propulsion module during transit to Mars) on boundary-layer transition. A non-equilibrium Martian-atmosphere computation was performed for the peak heating point on the entry trajectory in order to determine if the penetrations would produce boundary-layer transition by using this correlation.

  6. Boundary Layer Transition Correlations and Aeroheating Predictions for Mars Smart Lander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollis, Brian R.; Liechty, Derek S.

    2002-01-01

    Laminar and turbulent perfect-gas air, Navier-Stokes computations have been performed for a proposed Mars Smart Lander entry vehicle at Mach 6 over a free stream Reynolds number range of 6.9 x 10(exp 6/m to 2.4 x 10(exp 7)m(2.1 x 10(exp 6)/ft to 7.3 x 10(exp 6)ft) for angles-of-attack of 0-deg, 11-deg, 16-deg, and 20-deg, and comparisons were made to wind tunnel heating data obtained at the same conditions. Boundary layer edge properties were extracted from the solutions and used to correlate experimental data on the effects of heat-shield penetrations (bolt-holes where the entry vehicle would be attached to the propulsion module during transit to Mars) on boundary-layer transition. A non-equilibrium Martian-atmosphere computation was performed for the peak heating point on the entry trajectory in order to determine if the penetrations would produce boundary-layer transition by using this correlation.

  7. The atmospheric boundary layer evening transitions: an observational and numerical study from two different datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sastre, Mariano; Yagüe, Carlos; Román-Cascón, Carlos; Maqueda, Gregorio; Ander Arrillaga, Jon

    2015-04-01

    In this work we study the temporal evolution of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) along the transition period from a diurnal typical convection to a nocturnal more frequently stable situation. This period is known as late afternoon or evening transition, depending on the specific definitions employed by different authors [1]. In order to obtain a proper characterization, we try to learn whether or not the behaviour of these transitional boundary layers is strongly dependent on local conditions. To do so, two sets of evening transitions are studied from data collected at two different experimental sites. These locations correspond to research facilities named CIBA (Spain) and CRA (France), which are the places where atmospheric field campaigns have been conducted during the last years, such as CIBA2008 and BLLAST 2011, respectively. In order to get comparable situations, we focus especially on transitions with weak synoptic forcing, and consider daily astronomical sunset as a reference time. A statistical analysis on main parameters related to the transition is carried out for both locations, and the average behaviour is shown as well as extreme values according to the timing. A similar pattern in the qualitative evolution of many variables is found. Nevertheless, several relevant differences in the progress of key variables are obtained too. Moisture, both from the soil and the air, is thought to have great relevance in explaining many of the differences found between the two sites. Some case studies are explored, focusing on the role played by the atmospheric turbulence. Complementary, numerical experiments are also performed using the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) mesoscale model, in order to test the role of humidity, by artificially varying it in some of the simulations. [1] Lothon, M. and coauthors (2014): The BLLAST field experiment: Boundary-Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 14, 10931-10960.

  8. Roles of Engineering Correlations in Hypersonic Entry Boundary Layer Transition Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Charles H.; Anderson, Brian P.; King, Rudolph A.; Kegerise, Michael A.; Berry, Scott A.; Horvath, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    Efforts to design and operate hypersonic entry vehicles are constrained by many considerations that involve all aspects of an entry vehicle system. One of the more significant physical phenomenon that affect entry trajectory and thermal protection system design is the occurrence of boundary layer transition from a laminar to turbulent state. During the Space Shuttle Return To Flight activity following the loss of Columbia and her crew of seven, NASA's entry aerothermodynamics community implemented an engineering correlation based framework for the prediction of boundary layer transition on the Orbiter. The methodology for this implementation relies upon similar correlation techniques that have been is use for several decades. What makes the Orbiter boundary layer transition correlation implementation unique is that a statistically significant data set was acquired in multiple ground test facilities, flight data exists to assist in establishing a better correlation and the framework was founded upon state of the art chemical nonequilibrium Navier Stokes flow field simulations. Recent entry flight testing performed with the Orbiter Discovery now provides a means to validate this engineering correlation approach to higher confidence. These results only serve to reinforce the essential role that engineering correlations currently exercise in the design and operation of entry vehicles. The framework of information related to the Orbiter empirical boundary layer transition prediction capability will be utilized to establish a fresh perspective on this role, and to discuss the characteristics which are desirable in a next generation advancement. The details of the paper will review the experimental facilities and techniques that were utilized to perform the implementation of the Orbiter RTF BLT Vsn 2 prediction capability. Statistically significant results for multiple engineering correlations from a ground testing campaign will be reviewed in order to describe why only

  9. Roles of Engineering Correlations in Hypersonic Entry Boundary Layer Transition Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Charles H.; Anderson, Brian P.; King, Rudolph A.; Kegerise, Michael A.; Berry, Scott A.; Horvath, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    Efforts to design and operate hypersonic entry vehicles are constrained by many considerations that involve all aspects of an entry vehicle system. One of the more significant physical phenomenon that affect entry trajectory and thermal protection system design is the occurrence of boundary layer transition from a laminar to turbulent state. During the Space Shuttle Return To Flight activity following the loss of Columbia and her crew of seven, NASA's entry aerothermodynamics community implemented an engineering correlation based framework for the prediction of boundary layer transition on the Orbiter. The methodology for this implementation relies upon similar correlation techniques that have been is use for several decades. What makes the Orbiter boundary layer transition correlation implementation unique is that a statistically significant data set was acquired in multiple ground test facilities, flight data exists to assist in establishing a better correlation and the framework was founded upon state of the art chemical nonequilibrium Navier Stokes flow field simulations. Recent entry flight testing performed with the Orbiter Discovery now provides a means to validate this engineering correlation approach to higher confidence. These results only serve to reinforce the essential role that engineering correlations currently exercise in the design and operation of entry vehicles. The framework of information related to the Orbiter empirical boundary layer transition prediction capability will be utilized to establish a fresh perspective on this role, and to discuss the characteristics which are desirable in a next generation advancement. The details of the paper will review the experimental facilities and techniques that were utilized to perform the implementation of the Orbiter RTF BLT Vsn 2 prediction capability. Statistically significant results for multiple engineering correlations from a ground testing campaign will be reviewed in order to describe why only

  10. Seasonal analysis of the planetary boundary-layer afternoon and evening transition through observational measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sastre, Mariano; Román-Cascón, Carlos; Yagüe, Carlos; Arrillaga, Jon A.; Maqueda, Gregorio

    2016-04-01

    From a typically convective diurnal situation to a stably stratified nocturnal one, the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) experiences the so-called afternoon and evening transition. This period is complex to study due to the presence of many different forcings, usually weak and opposite [1]. In this work, the transitional processes are studied by using 6-year data from permanent instrumentation at CIBA, a research center located in the Spanish Northern plateau. These measurements include particulate matter (PM) and turbulent records. Certain variables display a twin pattern in their time evolution for all the seasons, only differing in their absolute values. On the contrary, the air specific humidity behaves differently for each season, which is distinct to the results from a previous study at a different location [2]. Besides, a common pattern of increasing PM values near sunset is found, with a number of influences playing a role in PM concentrations: stability, turbulence and ABL thickness among others. In particular, the competing thermal and mechanical turbulent effects result in PM concentration reduction (settling on the ground or being advected) or increase, depending in each case on the specific season and particle group. Furthermore, the relative importance of the bigger PM (between 2.5 and 10 μm) is linked to the wind minimum around sunset, especially during summer. [1] Lothon, M. and coauthors (2014): The BLLAST field experiment: Boundary-Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 14, 10931-10960. [2] Wingo, S. M. and Knupp, K. R. (2015): Multi-platform observations characterizing the afternoon-to-evening transition of the planetary boundary layer in Northern Alabama, USA, Boundary-Layer Meteorol., 155, 29-53.

  11. Mixed mode transition in zero and adverse pressure gradient boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Rikhi; Durbin, Paul

    2015-11-01

    Flow regimes exist where interaction of Klebanoff streaks and the Tollmien-Sclichting waves trigger transition but either mode is individually insufficient. Such interaction between orderly and bypass routes of transition is called Mixed mode transition. In zero pressure gradient boundary layers, mixed mode transition follows three routes depending upon strength of these perturbation modes. At high free-stream turbulence intensity (Tu), bypass transition is dominant and the flow is very weakly sensitive to the TS mode strength. In the presence of a strong TS mode, low Tu triggers secondary instability of the TS wave forming Λ vortices. The Λ vortices are forced response due to the weak streaks rather than resonance mechanism seen in monochromatic excitations. When both of these modes are weak, secondary instability of streaks trigger consequent breakdown to turbulent spots. Three-dimensional visualization of the perturbation fields shows toroidal n = 0 and helical n = 1 modes observed in instability of axisymmetric jets and wakes. In adverese pressure gradient boundary layers, the presence of an inflection point significantly increases the growth rate of TS mode thereby strengthening the secondary instability route and the interaction is more interesting. This work was supported by NSF grant CBET-1228195. Computer time was provided by the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE).

  12. Transition Prediction in Hypersonic Boundary Layers Using Receptivity and Freestream Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakumar, P.; Chou, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    Boundary-layer transition in hypersonic flows over a straight cone can be predicted using measured freestream spectra, receptivity, and threshold values for the wall pressure fluctuations at the transition onset points. Simulations are performed for hypersonic boundary-layer flows over a 7-degree half-angle straight cone with varying bluntness at a freestream Mach number of 10. The steady and the unsteady flow fields are obtained by solving the two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations in axisymmetric coordinates using a 5th-order accurate weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme for space discretization and using a third-order total-variation-diminishing (TVD) Runge-Kutta scheme for time integration. The calculated N-factors at the transition onset location increase gradually with increasing unit Reynolds numbers for flow over a sharp cone and remain almost the same for flow over a blunt cone. The receptivity coefficient increases slightly with increasing unit Reynolds numbers. They are on the order of 4 for a sharp cone and are on the order of 1 for a blunt cone. The location of transition onset predicted from the simulation including the freestream spectrum, receptivity, and the linear and the weakly nonlinear evolutions yields a solution close to the measured onset location for the sharp cone. The simulations over-predict transition onset by about twenty percent for the blunt cone.

  13. Conditionally-Sampled Turbulent and Nonturbulent Measurements of Entropy Generation Rate in the Transition Region of Boundary Layers

    SciTech Connect

    D. M. McEligot; J. R. Wolf; K. P. Nolan; E. J. Walsh; R. J. Volino

    2006-05-01

    Conditionally-sampled boundary layer data for an accelerating transitional boundary layer have been analyzed to calculate the entropy generation rate in the transition region. By weighing the nondimensional dissipation coefficient for the laminar-conditioned-data and turbulent-conditioned-data with the intermittency factor the average entropy generation rate in the transition region can be determined and hence be compared to the time averaged data and correlations for steady laminar and turbulent flows. It is demonstrated that this method provides, for the first time, an accurate and detailed picture of the entropy generation rate during transition. The data used in this paper have been taken from detailed boundary layer measurements available in the literature. This paper provides, using an intermittency weighted approach, a methodology for predicting entropy generation in a transitional boundary layer.

  14. Analysis of the photodiode boundary layer transition indicator. LDRD final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kuntz, D.W.; Wilken, A.C.; Payne, J.L.

    1994-06-01

    The photodiode transition indicator is a device which has been successfully used to determine the onset of boundary layer transition on numerous hypersonic flight vehicles. The exact source of the electromagnetic radiation detected by the photodiode at transition was not understood. In some cases early saturation of the device occurred, and the device failed to detect transition. Analyses have been performed to determine the source of the radiation producing the photodiode signal. The results of these analyses indicate that the most likely source of the radiation is blackbody emission from the heatshield material bordering the quartz window of the device. Good agreement between flight data and calculations based on this radiation source has been obtained. Analyses also indicate that the most probable source of the radiation causing early saturation is blackbody radiation from carbon particles which break away from the nosetip during the ablation process.

  15. Analysis of flight data on boundary layer transition at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haigh, W. W.; Lake, B. M.; Ko, D. R. S.

    1972-01-01

    Boundary layer transition data were obtained on the flight of two cones which reentered at velocities of about 7.0 km/sec. One cone reentered at a nominal zero degree angle of attack and the other, due to an anomaly above the earth atmosphere, reentered at local angles of attack up to 7.0 km/sec. The transition data were obtained from on-board acoustic and electrostatic sensors. A description of the design, calibration, and method used to detect transition from the sensors is included. The flow field calculation used to obtain the local flow properties on the cones is described. Finally, the transition data found from both cone flights is correlated.

  16. Multigrid methods for flow transition in three-dimensional boundary layers with surface roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Chaoqun; Liu, Zhining; Mccormick, Steve

    1993-01-01

    The efficient multilevel adaptive method has been successfully applied to perform direct numerical simulations (DNS) of flow transition in 3-D channels and 3-D boundary layers with 2-D and 3-D isolated and distributed roughness in a curvilinear coordinate system. A fourth-order finite difference technique on stretched and staggered grids, a fully-implicit time marching scheme, a semi-coarsening multigrid method associated with line distributive relaxation scheme, and an improved outflow boundary-condition treatment, which needs only a very short buffer domain to damp all order-one wave reflections, are developed. These approaches make the multigrid DNS code very accurate and efficient. This allows us not only to be able to do spatial DNS for the 3-D channel and flat plate at low computational costs, but also to do spatial DNS for transition in the 3-D boundary layer with 3-D single and multiple roughness elements, which would have extremely high computational costs with conventional methods. Numerical results show good agreement with the linear stability theory, the secondary instability theory, and a number of laboratory experiments. The contribution of isolated and distributed roughness to transition is analyzed.

  17. Nonlinear optimal control of bypass transition in a boundary layer flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Dandan; Papadakis, George

    2016-11-01

    Bypass transition is observed in a flat-plate boundary-layer flow when high levels of free stream turbulence are present. This scenario is characterized by the formation of streamwise elongated streaks inside the boundary layer, their break down into turbulent spots and eventually fully turbulent flow. In the current work, we perform DNS simulations of control of bypass transition in a zero-pressure-gradient boundary layer. A non-linear optimal control algorithm is developed that employs the direct-adjoint approach to minimise a quadratic cost function based on the deviation from the Blasius velocity profile. Using the Lagrange variational approach, the distribution of the blowing/suction control velocity is found by solving iteratively the non-linear Navier-Stokes and its adjoint equations in a forward/backward loop. The optimisation is performed over a finite time horizon during which the Lagrange functional is to be minimised. Large values of optimisation horizon result in instability of the adjoint equations. The results show that the controller is able to reduce the turbulent kinetic energy of the flow in the region where the objective function is defined and the velocity profile is seen to approach the Blasius solution. Significant drag reduction is also achieved.

  18. WRF simulations of the atmospheric boundary layer evening transitions during the BLLAST field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sastre Marugán, Mariano; Steeneveld, Gert-Jan; Yagüe, Carlos; Román-Cascón, Carlos; Maqueda, Gregorio; van de Boer, Anneke

    2013-04-01

    The Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) is mainly ruled by both mechanical and thermal turbulence, and shows an evident diurnal cycle. In the evening transitional period, decay in turbulent kinetic energy occurs, but all the mechanisms behind this decay are still not well understood. In this framework, the BLLAST (Boundary Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence) project aims to improve the knowledge on the physical processes taking place during the late afternoon and evening transition in the lower troposphere. The BLLAST field campaign was organized in Lannemezan (France) from 14th June to 8th July 2011 [1]. Both in situ measurements (i.e., with meteorological towers, surface based instruments, tethered balloons…) and remote sensors (i.e., SODAR, scintillometer…) were used for this purpose, and two different approaches were developed: vertical structure of the boundary layer and spatial heterogeneity. Besides, Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models have exhibited substantial difficulties to properly simulate the diurnal cycle in the atmosphere and also the PBL afternoon and evening transition. Typically, some errors are found in air temperature and wind speed close to the surface. Regarding this fact, the main goal of this work is to study how the mesoscale model WRF (Weather Research and Forecast) performs simulations of the evening transition during the BLLAST field campaign. In particular, it is tested for permutations of different PBL and Land Surface Model (LSM) schemes. We try to understand why some differences in model results appear. A comparison between observations and combinations of PBL and LSM parameterizations is shown, testing the sensitivity to these options. We specifically evaluate the surface radiation budget (out- and incoming long- and shortwave radiation), and the surface energy budget variables (latent and sensible heat fluxes, as well as soil heat flux). Furthermore, the vertical profiles of some key variables (such as potential

  19. On strongly nonlinear vortex/wave interactions in boundary-layer transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Philip; Smith, Frank T.

    1989-01-01

    The interactions between longitudinal vortices and accompanying waves considered are strongly nonlinear, in the sense that the mean-flow profile throughout the boundary layer is completely altered from its original undisturbed state. Nonlinear interactions between vortex flow and Tollmien-Schlichting waves are addressed first, and some analytical and computational properties are described. These include the possibility in the spatial-development case of a finite-distance break-up, inducing a singularity in the displacement thickness. Second, vortex/Rayleigh wave nonlinear interactions are considered for the compressible boundary-layer, along with certain special cases of interest and some possible solution properties. Both types, vortex/Tollmien-Schlichting and vortex/Rayleigh, are short-scale/long-scale interactions and they have potential applications to many flows at high Reynolds numbers. The strongly nonlinear nature is believed to make them very relevant to fully fledged transition to turbulence.

  20. Tile Surface Thermocouple Measurement Challenges from the Orbiter Boundary Layer Transition Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Charles H.; Berger, Karen; Anderson, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Hypersonic entry flight testing motivated by efforts seeking to characterize boundary layer transition on the Space Shuttle Orbiters have identified challenges in our ability to acquire high quality quantitative surface temperature measurements versus time. Five missions near the end of the Space Shuttle Program implemented a tile surface protuberance as a boundary layer trip together with tile surface thermocouples to capture temperature measurements during entry. Similar engineering implementations of these measurements on Discovery and Endeavor demonstrated unexpected measurement voltage response during the high heating portion of the entry trajectory. An assessment has been performed to characterize possible causes of the issues experienced during STS-119, STS-128, STS-131, STS-133 and STS-134 as well as similar issues encountered during other orbiter entries.

  1. Experimental characterization of transition region in rotating-disk boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqui, M. E.; Mukund, V.; Scott, J.; Pier, B.

    2013-03-01

    The three-dimensional boundary layer due to a disk rotating in otherwise still fluid is well known for its sudden transition from a laminar to a turbulent regime, the location of which closely coincides with the onset of local absolute instability. The present experimental investigation focuses on the region around transition and analyses in detail the features that lead from the unperturbed boundary layer to a fully turbulent flow. Mean velocity profiles and high-resolution spectra are obtained by constant-temperature hot-wire anemometry. By carefully analysing these measurements, regions in the flow are identified that correspond to linear, weakly nonlinear, or turbulent dynamics. The frequency that dominates the flow prior to transition is explained in terms of spatial growth rates, derived from the exact linear dispersion relation. In the weakly nonlinear region, up to six clearly identifiable harmonic peaks are found. High-resolution spectra reveal the existence of discrete frequency components that are deemed to correspond to fluctuations stationary with respect to the disk surface. These discrete components are only found in the weakly nonlinear region. By systematically acquiring low- and high-resolution spectra over a range of narrowly spaced radial and axial positions, it is shown that while the transition from laminar to turbulent regimes occurs sharply at some distance from the disk surface, a complex weakly nonlinear region of considerable radial extent continues to prevail close to the disk surface.

  2. Boundary-layer instability & transition on a flared cone in a Mach 6 quiet wind tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofferth, Jerrod; Saric, William

    2011-11-01

    Measurements of boundary-layer transition location and instability growth on a sharp-tipped 5°-half-angle flared cone were conducted in a low-disturbance Mach 6 wind tunnel at a freestream unit Reynolds number of 10 × 106/m. Under quiet flow at these conditions, the boundary layer becomes transitional near the base of the cone, where significant second-mode instability growth is evident. Transition location is determined using an array of embedded thermocouples, and instability development is observed in mean and fluctuating mass flux data using hotwire anemometry. The present work seeks to reproduce and build upon previous experiments which used the same test article and similar diagnostics in the facility's former installation at NASA Langley. Together with comprehensive measurements of the freestream disturbance environment, these baseline cone data characterize the facility's performance relative to that in its previous installation. In addition, the current campaign establishes experimental readiness for future research, which will study the effects of periodic surface roughness and controlled-input disturbances. AFOSR/NASA National Center for Hypersonic Research in Laminar-Turbulent Transition; Grant FA9550-09-1-0341.

  3. A Quantitative Investigation of Surface Roughness Effects on Airfoil Boundary Layer Transition Using Infrared Thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beeby, Todd Daniel

    An investigation of the impact of subcritical leading edge distributed roughness elements on airfoil boundary layer transition location has been undertaken using infrared thermography. In particular, a quantitative approach to boundary layer transition location detection using a differential energy balance method was implemented using a heating pad to produce constant heat flux. This was performed on a S809 airfoil model at Re c = 0.75 and 1.0 x 106, using roughness elements of height k/c = 3.75, 4.25 and 5.00 x 10 --4, pattern densities of 2 to 10 %, and roughness locations of 1 to 6 % chord. Turbulator tape of height k/c = 6.67 x 10--4 was also examined. Results indicate significant impact on transition for all roughness cases, and a more pronounced influence of roughness density as compared to roughness element height. The phenomenon of early laminar bubble collapse was also found to occur for some roughness configurations. The quantitative method used was found to be an effective means for automated transition location determination.

  4. Neutrally Stratified Turbulent Ekman Boundary Layer: Universal Similarity for a Transitional Rough Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afzal, Noor

    2009-08-01

    The geostrophic Ekman boundary layer for large Rossby number ( Ro) has been investigated by exploring the role played by the mesolayer (intermediate layer) lying between the traditional inner and outer layers. It is shown that the velocity and Reynolds shear stress components in the inner layer (including the overlap region) are universal relations, explicitly independent of surface roughness. This universality of predictions has been supported by observations from experiment, field and direct numerical simulation (DNS) data for fully smooth, transitionally rough and fully rough surfaces. The maxima of Reynolds shear stresses have been shown to be located in the mesolayer of the Ekman boundary layer, whose scale corresponds to the inverse square root of the friction Rossby number. The composite wall-wake universal relations for geostrophic velocity profiles have been proposed, and the two wake functions of the outer layer have been estimated by an eddy viscosity closure model. The geostrophic drag and cross-isobaric angle predictions yield universal relations, which are also supported by extensive field, laboratory and DNS data. The proposed predictions for the geostrophic drag and the cross-isobaric angle compare well with data for Rossby number Ro ≥ 105. The data show low Rossby number effects for Ro < 105 and higher-order effects due to the mesolayer compare well with the data for Ro ≥ 103.

  5. Direct numerical simulations of transition and turbulence in smooth-walled Stokes boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozdemir, Celalettin E.; Hsu, Tian-Jian; Balachandar, S.

    2014-04-01

    Stokes boundary layer (SBL) is a time-periodic canonical flow that has several environmental, industrial, and physiological applications. Understanding the hydrodynamic instability and turbulence in SBL, therefore, will shed more light on the nature of such flows. Unlike its steady counterpart, the flow in a SBL varies both in space and time, which makes hydrodynamic instability and transition from laminar to turbulent state highly complicated. In this study, we utilized direct numerical simulations (DNS) to understand the characteristics of hydrodynamic instability, the transition from laminar to turbulent state, and the characteristics of intermittent turbulence in a smooth SBL for Re_Δ in the range of 500-1000. Simulation results show that nonlinear growth plays a critical role on the instability at Re_Δ = 500 and 600. However, the nonlinear growth does not warrant sustainable transition to turbulence and the outcome is highly dependent on the amplitude and spatial distribution of the initial velocity disturbance in addition to Re_Δ . Simulation results at Re_Δ = 500 confirm that instability and subsequent transitional flow will eventually decay. At Re_Δ = 600 nonlinear growth recurs at every modulation period but such transition does not evolve into fully developed turbulence at any time in the modulation cycle. At Re_Δ = 700, the flow shows features of fully developed turbulence during some modulation periods and the transitional character of Re_Δ = 600 at the remaining. Therefore, we conclude that flow in the range of Re_Δ = 600-700 is to be classified as self-sustaining transitional flow. For higher Reynolds number the flow indeed exhibits features of fully developed boundary layer turbulence for a portion of the wave period, which is known as the intermittently turbulent regime in the literature.

  6. Measurements in a Transitioning Cone Boundary Layer at Freestream Mach 3.5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Rudolph A.; Chou, Amanda; Balakumar, Ponnampalam; Owens, Lewis R.; Kegerise, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted in the Supersonic Low-Disturbance Tunnel to investigate naturally-occurring instabilities in a supersonic boundary layer on a 7 deg half- angle cone. All tests were conducted with a nominal freestream Mach number of M(sub infinity) = 3:5, total temperature of T(sub 0) = 299:8 K, and unit Reynolds numbers of Re(sub infinity) x 10(exp -6) = 9:89, 13.85, 21.77, and 25.73 m(exp -1). Instability measurements were acquired under noisy- ow and quiet- ow conditions. Measurements were made to document the freestream and the boundary-layer edge environment, to document the cone baseline flow, and to establish the stability characteristics of the transitioning flow. Pitot pressure and hot-wire boundary- layer measurements were obtained using a model-integrated traverse system. All hot- wire results were single-point measurements and were acquired with a sensor calibrated to mass ux. For the noisy-flow conditions, excellent agreement for the growth rates and mode shapes was achieved between the measured results and linear stability theory (LST). The corresponding N factor at transition from LST is N 3:9. The stability measurements for the quiet-flow conditions were limited to the aft end of the cone. The most unstable first-mode instabilities as predicted by LST were successfully measured, but this unstable first mode was not the dominant instability measured in the boundary layer. Instead, the dominant instabilities were found to be the less-amplified, low-frequency disturbances predicted by linear stability theory, and these instabilities grew according to linear theory. These low-frequency unstable disturbances were initiated by freestream acoustic disturbances through a receptivity process that is believed to occur near the branch I locations of the cone. Under quiet-flow conditions, the boundary layer remained laminar up to the last measurement station for the largest Re1, implying a transition N factor of N greater than 8:5.

  7. Experimental analysis of the boundary layer transition with zero and positive pressure gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnal, D.; Jullen, J. C.; Michel, R.

    1980-01-01

    The influence of a positive pressure gradient on the boundary layer transition is studied. The mean velocity and turbulence profiles of four cases are examined. As the intensity of the pressure gradient is increased, the Reynolds number of the transition onset and the length of the transition region are reduced. The Tollmein-Schlichting waves disturb the laminar regime; the amplification of these waves is in good agreement with the stability theory. The three dimensional deformation of the waves leads finally to the appearance of turbulence. In the case of zero pressure gradient, the properties of the turbulent spots are studied by conditional sampling of the hot-wire signal; in the case of positive pressure gradient, the turbulence appears in a progressive manner and the turbulent spots are much more difficult to characterize.

  8. Laminar-Boundary-Layer Oscillations and Transition on a Flat Plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubauer, G B; Skramstad, H K

    1948-01-01

    This is an account of an investigation in which oscillations were discovered in the laminar boundary layer along a flat plate. These oscillations were found during the course of an experiment in which transition from laminar to turbulent flow was being studied on the plate as the turbulence in the wind stream was being reduced to unusually low values by means of damping screens. The first part of the paper deals with experimental methods and apparatus, measurements of turbulence and sound, and studies of transition. A description is then given of the manner in which oscillations were discovered and how they were found to be related to transition, and then how controlled oscillations were produced and studied in detail.

  9. Controlling forebody asymmetries in flight: Experience with boundary layer transition strips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, David F.; Cobleigh, Brent R.

    1994-01-01

    The NASA Dryden Flight Research Center has an ongoing program to investigate aircraft flight characteristics at high angles of attack. As part of this investigation, longitudinal boundary layer transition strips were installed on the F-18 HARV forebody, a preproduction F/A-18 radome with a nose-slice tendency, and the X-31 aircraft forebody and noseboom to reduce asymmetric yawing moments at high angles of attack. The transition strips were effective on the F-18 HARV at angles of attack above 60 deg. On the preproduction F/A-18 radome at an angle of attack near 50 deg the strips were not effective. When the transition strips were installed on the X-31 noseboom, a favorable effect was observed on the yawing moment dynamics but the magnitude of the yawing moment was not decreased.

  10. Free-stream turbulence and concave curvature effects on heated, transitional boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, J.; Simon, T. W.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the transition process on flat-plate and concave curved-wall boundary layers for various free-stream turbulence levels was performed. Results show that for transition of a flat-plate, the two forms of boundary layer behavior, identified as laminar-like and turbulent-like, cannot be thought of as separate Blasius and fully-turbulent profiles, respectively. Thus, simple transition models in which the desired quantity is assumed to be an average, weighted on intermittency, of the theoretical laminar and fully turbulent values is not expected to be successful. Deviation of the flow identified as laminar-like from theoretical laminar behavior is shown to be due to recovery after the passage of a turbulent spot, while deviation of the flow identified as turbulent-like from the full-turbulent values is thought to be due to incomplete establishment of the fully-turbulent power spectral distribution. Turbulent Prandtl numbers for the transitional flow, computed from measured shear stress, turbulent heat flux and mean velocity and temperature profiles, were less than unity. For the curved-wall case with low free-stream turbulence intensity, the existence of Gortler vortices on the concave wall within both laminar and turbulent flows was established using liquid crystal visualization and spanwise velocity and temperature traverses. Transition was found to occur via a vortex breakdown mode. The vortex wavelength was quite irregular in both the laminar and turbulent flows, but the vortices were stable in time and space. The upwash was found to be more unstable, with higher levels of u' and u'v', and lower skin friction coefficients and shape factors. Turbulent Prandtl numbers, measured using a triple-wire probe, were found to be near unity for all post-transitional profiles, indicating no gross violation of Reynolds analogy. No evidence of streamwise vortices was seen in the high turbulence intensity case.

  11. Direct Numerical Simulation of Transition in a Swept-Wing Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duan, Lian; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Li, Fei

    2013-01-01

    Direct numerical simulation (DNS) is performed to examine laminar to turbulent transition due to high-frequency secondary instability of stationary crossflow vortices in a subsonic swept-wing boundary layer for a realistic natural-laminar-flow airfoil configuration. The secondary instability is introduced via inflow forcing derived from a two-dimensional, partial-differential-equation based eigenvalue computation; and the mode selected for forcing corresponds to the most amplified secondary instability mode which, in this case, derives a majority of its growth from energy production mechanisms associated with the wall-normal shear of the stationary basic state. Both the growth of the secondary instability wave and the resulting onset of laminar-turbulent transition are captured within the DNS computations. The growth of the secondary instability wave in the DNS solution compares well with linear secondary instability theory when the amplitude is small; the linear growth is followed by a region of reduced growth resulting from nonlinear effects before an explosive onset of laminar breakdown to turbulence. The peak fluctuations are concentrated near the boundary layer edge during the initial stage of transition, but rapidly propagates towards the surface during the process of laminar breakdown. Both time-averaged statistics and flow visualization based on the DNS reveal a sawtooth transition pattern that is analogous to previously documented surface flow visualizations of transition due to stationary crossflow instability. The memory of the stationary crossflow vortex is found to persist through the transition zone and well beyond the location of the maximum skin friction.

  12. DNS of Laminar-Turbulent Transition in Swept-Wing Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duan, L.; Choudhari, M.; Li, F.

    2014-01-01

    Direct numerical simulation (DNS) is performed to examine laminar to turbulent transition due to high-frequency secondary instability of stationary crossflow vortices in a subsonic swept-wing boundary layer for a realistic natural-laminar-flow airfoil configuration. The secondary instability is introduced via inflow forcing and the mode selected for forcing corresponds to the most amplified secondary instability mode that, in this case, derives a majority of its growth from energy production mechanisms associated with the wall-normal shear of the stationary basic state. An inlet boundary condition is carefully designed to allow for accurate injection of instability wave modes and minimize acoustic reflections at numerical boundaries. Nonlinear parabolized stability equation (PSE) predictions compare well with the DNS in terms of modal amplitudes and modal shape during the strongly nonlinear phase of the secondary instability mode. During the transition process, the skin friction coefficient rises rather rapidly and the wall-shear distribution shows a sawtooth pattern that is analogous to the previously documented surface flow visualizations of transition due to stationary crossflow instability. Fully turbulent features are observed in the downstream region of the flow.

  13. Correlations for Boundary-Layer Transition on Mars Science Laboratory Entry Vehicle Due to Heat-Shield Cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollis, Brian R.; Liechty, Derek S.

    2008-01-01

    The influence of cavities (for attachment bolts) on the heat-shield of the proposed Mars Science Laboratory entry vehicle has been investigated experimentally and computationally in order to develop a criterion for assessing whether the boundary layer becomes turbulent downstream of the cavity. Wind tunnel tests were conducted on the 70-deg sphere-cone vehicle geometry with various cavity sizes and locations in order to assess their influence on convective heating and boundary layer transition. Heat-transfer coefficients and boundary-layer states (laminar, transitional, or turbulent) were determined using global phosphor thermography.

  14. Determination of Boundary-Layer Transition on Three Symmetrical Airfoils in the NACA Full-Scale Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverstein, Abe; Becker, John V

    1938-01-01

    For the purpose of studying the transition from laminar to turbulent flow, boundary-layer measurements were made in the NACA full-scale wind tunnel on three symmetrical airfoils of NACA 0009, 0012, and 0018 sections. The effects of variations in lift coefficient, Reynolds number, and airfoil thickness on transition were investigated. Air speed in the boundary layer was measured by total-head tubes and by hot wires; a comparison of transition as indicated by the two techniques was obtained. The results indicate no unique value of Reynolds number for the transition, whether the Reynolds number is based upon the distance along the chord or upon the thickness of the boundary layer at the transition point. In general, the transition is not abrupt and occurs in a region that varies in length as a function of the test conditions.

  15. Free-stream turbulence and concave curvature effects on heated, transitional boundary layers, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, J.; Simon, T. W.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the transition process on flat-plate and concave curved-wall boundary layers for various free-streem turbulence levels was performed. Where possible, sampling according to the intermittency function was made. Such sampling allowed segregation of the signal into two types of behavior: laminar-like and turbulent-like. The results from the investigation are discussed. Documentation is presented in two volumes. Volume one contains the text of the report including figures and supporting appendices. Volume two contains data reduction program listings and tabulated data.

  16. Boundary-layer analysis for the convection/diffusion transition in dendritic growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glicksman, M. E.; Huang, S. C.

    1981-01-01

    The supercooling dependence of dendritic growth kinetics under the influence of convective heat transport is investigated theoretically and experimentally with emphasis on theoretical prediction of the supercooling level at which the transition from diffusion-controlled to convection-controlled dendritic growth occurs. It is shown that the crossover between diffusive and convective transport depends on the relative thickness of the Stefan length compared with the thermal boundary layer. These lengths become equal at a supercooling which may be calculated from diffusion theory and fluid mechanics. It is also shown that the crossover supercooling varies weakly with the gravitational acceleration, melt viscosity, and the volumetric expansion coefficient.

  17. Use of Boundary Layer Transition Detection to Validate Full-Scale Flight Performance Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamner, Marvine; Owens, L. R., Jr.; Wahls, R. A.; Yeh, David

    1999-01-01

    Full-scale flight performance predictions can be made using CFD or a combination of CFD and analytical skin-friction predictions. However, no matter what method is used to obtain full-scale flight performance predictions knowledge of the boundary layer state is critical. The implementation of CFD codes solving the Navier-Stokes equations to obtain these predictions is still a time consuming, expensive process. In addition, to ultimately obtain accurate performance predictions the transition location must be fixed in the CFD model. An example, using the M2.4-7A geometry, of the change in Navier-Stokes solution with changes in transition and in turbulence model will be shown. Oil flow visualization using the M2.4-7A 4.0% scale model in the 14'x22' wind tunnel shows that fixing transition at 10% x/c in the CFD model best captures the flow physics of the wing flow field. A less costly method of obtaining full-scale performance predictions is the use of non-linear Euler codes or linear CFD codes, such as panel methods, combined with analytical skin-friction predictions. Again, knowledge of the boundary layer state is critical to the accurate determination of full-scale flight performance. Boundary layer transition detection has been performed at 0.3 and 0.9 Mach numbers over an extensive Reynolds number range using the 2.2% scale Reference H model in the NTF. A temperature sensitive paint system was used to determine the boundary layer state for these conditions. Data was obtained for three configurations: the baseline, undeflected flaps configuration; the transonic cruise configuration; and, the high-lift configuration. It was determined that at low Reynolds number conditions, in the 8 to 10 million Reynolds number range, the baseline configuration has extensive regions of laminar flow, in fact significantly more than analytical skin-friction methods predict. This configuration is fully turbulent at about 30 million Reynolds number for both 0.3 and 0.9, Mach numbers

  18. Experimental analysis and computation of the onset and development of the boundary layer transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnal, D.; Juillen, J. C.; Michel, R.

    1978-01-01

    The transition of an incompressible boundary layer, with zero pressure gradient and low free-stream turbulence is studied. Mean velocity, turbulence and Reynolds shear stress profiles are presented. The development of the Tollmien-Schlichting waves is clearly shown until the turbulent spots appear. The intermittency phenomenon is studied by conditional sampling of the hotwire signal. The comparison with calculation results obtained by resolution of a set of transport equations shows a good agreement for the mean characteristics of the flow; discrepancies observed for the turbulent quantities evolution are due to the intermittency phenomenon.

  19. STAYLAM: A FORTRAN program for the suction transition analysis of a yawed wing laminar boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    A computer program called STAYLAM is presented for the computation of the compressible laminar boundary-layer flow over a yawed infinite wing including distributed suction. This program is restricted to the transonic speed range or less due to the approximate treatment of the compressibility effects. The prescribed suction distribution is permitted to change discontinuously along the chord measured perpendicular to the wing leading edge. Estimates of transition are made by considering leading edge contamination, cross flow instability, and instability of the Tollmien-Schlichting type. A program listing is given in addition to user instructions and a sample case.

  20. Turbulence vertical structure of the boundary layer during the afternoon transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darbieu, Clara; Lohou, Fabienne; Lothon, Marie; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, Jordi; Couvreux, Fleur; Durand, Pierre; Pino, David; Patton, Ned; Nilsson, Erik; Blay-Carreras, Estel; Gioli, Beniamino

    2015-04-01

    The transition from a well-mixed convective boundary layer to a residual layer overlying a stabilized nocturnal layer raises several issues, which remain difficult to address from both modeling and observational perspectives. The well mixed convective boundary layer is mainly forced by buoyancy, with fully developed turbulence. The daily decrease of the surface buoyancy flux leads to the decay of the turbulence kinetic energy (TKE), and a possible change of the structure of the turbulence before it reaches the stable regime, with more anisotropy and intermittency. It is important to better understand these processes, as they can impact on the dispersion of tracers in the atmosphere, and on the development of the nocturnal and daytime boundary layers of the following days. The presented work is based on both observations from the BLLAST (Boundary Layer Later Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence) experiment and Large-Eddy Simulation (NCAR LES code). The field campaign took place in summer 2011 in France, on the northern side of the Pyrenean foothills. A well-documented cloud-free weak wind day is considered here to analyze in details the evolution of the turbulence along the day, from midday to sunset. The case study combines observations of the mean structure and of the turbulence. It is the base of a complementary idealized numerical study with a large eddy simulation. From both observations and numerical simulations, the turbulence is described, according to time and height, with the characteristics of the spectral energy density, especially the typical turbulence lengthscales and the sharpness of the transition from energy-containing eddies to the inertial subrange. An analytical model proposed by Kristensen and Lenschow (1988) for homogeneous nonisotropic turbulence is used to approximate the observed and LES-modeled spectra and estimate their characteristics. The study points out the LES ability to reproduce th­e turbulence evolution throughout the afternoon. Two

  1. High-speed laminar-turbulent boundary layer transition induced by a discrete roughness element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, Prahladh; Mahesh, Krishnan

    2013-11-01

    Direct numerical simulation (DNS) is used to study laminar to turbulent transition induced by a discrete hemispherical roughness element in a high-speed laminar boundary layer. The simulations are performed under conditions matching the experiments of Danehy et al. (AIAA Paper 2009-394, 2009) for free-stream Mach numbers of 3.37, 5.26 and 8.23. It is observed that the Mach 8.23 flow remains laminar downstream of the roughness, while the lower Mach numbers undergo transition. The Mach 3.37 flow undergoes transition closer to the bump when compared with Mach 5.26, in agreement with experimental observations. Transition is accompanied by an increase in Cf and Ch (Stanton number). Even for the case that did not undergo transition (Mach 8.23), streamwise vortices induced by the roughness cause a significant rise in Cf until 20 D downstream. The mean van Driest transformed velocity and Reynolds stress for Mach 3.37 and 5.26 show good agreement with available data. A local Reynolds number based on the wall properties is seen to correlate with the onset of transition for the cases considered. Partially supported by NASA.

  2. Some Effects of Leading-Edge Sweep on Boundary-Layer Transition at Supersonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, Gray T.

    1961-01-01

    The effects of crossflow and shock strength on transition of the laminar boundary layer behind a swept leading edge have been investigated analytically and with the aid of available experimental data. An approximate method of determining the crossflow Reynolds number on a leading edge of circular cross section at supersonic speeds is presented. The applicability of the critical crossflow criterion described by Owen and Randall for transition on swept wings in subsonic flow was examined for the case of supersonic flow over swept circular cylinders. A wide range of applicability of the subsonic critical values is indicated. The corresponding magnitude of crossflow velocity necessary to cause instability on the surface of a swept wing at supersonic speeds was also calculated and found to be small. The effects of shock strength on transition caused by Tollmien-Schlichting type of instability are discussed briefly. Changes in local Reynolds number, due to shock strength, were found analytically to have considerably more effect on transition caused by Tollmien-Schlichting instability than on transition caused by crossflow instability. Changes in the mechanism controlling transition from Tollmien-Schlichting instability to crossflow instability were found to be possible as a wing is swept back and to result in large reductions in the length of laminar flow.

  3. Computer program for calculating laminar, transitional, and turbulent boundary layers for a compressible axisymmetric flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albers, J. A.; Gregg, J. L.

    1974-01-01

    A finite-difference program is described for calculating the viscous compressible boundary layer flow over either planar or axisymmetric surfaces. The flow may be initially laminar and progress through a transitional zone to fully turbulent flow, or it may remain laminar, depending on the imposed boundary conditions, laws of viscosity, and numerical solution of the momentum and energy equations. The flow may also be forced into a turbulent flow at a chosen spot by the data input. The input may contain the factors of arbitrary Reynolds number, free-stream Mach number, free-stream turbulence, wall heating or cooling, longitudinal wall curvature, wall suction or blowing, and wall roughness. The solution may start from an initial Falkner-Skan similarity profile, an approximate equilibrium turbulent profile, or an initial arbitrary input profile.

  4. A numerical method for the prediction of high-speed boundary-layer transition using linear theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mack, L. M.

    1975-01-01

    A method is described of estimating the location of transition in an arbitrary laminar boundary layer on the basis of linear stability theory. After an examination of experimental evidence for the relation between linear stability theory and transition, a discussion is given of the three essential elements of a transition calculation: (1) the interaction of the external disturbances with the boundary layer; (2) the growth of the disturbances in the boundary layer; and (3) a transition criterion. The computer program which carried out these three calculations is described. The program is first tested by calculating the effect of free-stream turbulence on the transition of the Blasius boundary layer, and is then applied to the problem of transition in a supersonic wind tunnel. The effects of unit Reynolds number and Mach number on the transition of an insulated flat-plate boundary layer are calculated on the basis of experimental data on the intensity and spectrum of free-stream disturbances. Reasonable agreement with experiment is obtained in the Mach number range from 2 to 4.5.

  5. Investigations on Laminar Boundary-Layer Stability and Transition on Curved Boundaries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1943-08-01

    research program sponsored by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. The purpose of this general program was to isolate the factors influ...problem requires the ex- trem.e reduction of all other factors influencing transi- tion. Hence, the pressure gradient along the boundary ._houl£ be as...divided by the w_ve length k phase velocity amplificatio_ fctor divided by tkc ,_.mvelength _mp!ificat ion factor of the To!!mmen-Scnl_cht_ng waves of the

  6. Diagnostics of boundary layer transition by shear stress sensitive liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapoval, E. S.

    2016-10-01

    Previous research indicates that the problem of boundary layer transition visualization on metal models in wind tunnels (WT) which is a fundamental question in experimental aerodynamics is not solved yet. In TsAGI together with Khristianovich Institute of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics (ITAM) a method of shear stress sensitive liquid crystals (LC) which allows flow visualization was proposed. This method allows testing several flow conditions in one wind tunnel run and does not need covering the investigated model with any special heat-insulating coating which spoils the model geometry. This coating is easily applied on the model surface by spray or even by brush. Its' thickness is about 40 micrometers and it does not spoil the surface quality. At first the coating obtains some definite color. Under shear stress the LC coating changes color and this change is proportional to shear stress. The whole process can be visually observed and during the tests it is recorded by camera. The findings of the research showed that it is possible to visualize boundary layer transition, flow separation, shock waves and the flow image on the whole. It is possible to predict that the proposed method of shear stress sensitive liquid crystals is a promise for future research.

  7. Boundary Layer Transition Flight Experiment Overview and In-Situ Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Brian P.; Campbell, Charles H.; Saucedo, Luis A.; Kinder, Gerald R.; Berger, Karen T.

    2010-01-01

    In support of the Boundary Layer Transition Flight Experiment (BLTFE) Project, a manufactured protuberance tile was installed on the port wing of Space Shuttle Orbiter Discovery for the flights of STS-119 and STS-128. Additional instrumentation was also installed in order to obtain more spatially resolved measurements downstream of the protuberance. This paper provides an overview of the BLTFE Project, including the project history, organizations involved, and motivations for the flight experiment. Significant efforts were made to place the protuberance at an appropriate location on the Orbiter and to design the protuberance to withstand the expected environments. Efforts were also extended to understand the as-fabricated shape of the protuberance and the thermal protection system tile configuration surrounding the protuberance. A high-level overview of the in-situ flight data is presented, along with a summary of the comparisons between pre- and post-flight analysis predictions and flight data. Comparisons show that predictions for boundary layer transition onset time closely match the flight data, while predicted temperatures were significantly higher than observed flight temperatures.

  8. Simultaneous Boundary-Layer Transition, Tip Vortex, and Blade Deformation Measurements of a Rotor in Hover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heineck, James; Schairer, Edward; Ramasamy, Manikandan; Roozeboom, Nettie

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes simultaneous optical measurements of a sub-scale helicopter rotor in the U.S. Army Hover Chamber at NASA Ames Research Center. The measurements included thermal imaging of the rotor blades to detect boundary layer transition; retro-reflective background-oriented schlieren (RBOS) to visualize vortices; and stereo photogrammetry to measure displacements of the rotor blades, to compute spatial coordinates of the vortices from the RBOS data, and to map the thermal imaging data to a three-dimensional surface grid. The test also included an exploratory effort to measure flow near the rotor tip by tomographic particle image velocimetry (tomo PIV)an effort that yielded valuable experience but little data. The thermal imaging was accomplished using an image-derotation method that allowed long integration times without image blur. By mapping the thermal image data to a surface grid it was possible to accurately locate transition in spatial coordinates along the length of the rotor blade.

  9. Flow-State Estimation Using Wall Information in a Transitional Boundary Layer.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naguib, Ahmed; Morrison, Jonathan

    2007-11-01

    This work is motivated by the overarching goal of implementing feedback control of transient growth in boundary-layer transition. An essential step towards such implementation is the ability to estimate the flowfield through surface measurements, coupled with low-order, efficient models. In the present study, a DNS database (Zaki - Ph.D. thesis, Stanford, 2006; Zaki and Durbin - JFM, 531, 2005) of bypass transition beneath a turbulent freestream is utilized for the assessment of flow-state estimation methods based on streamwise and spanwise surface-shear-stress measurements. The main focus of the investigation is on the estimation of the wall-normal velocity due to its significance in the resonant forcing of Squire modes. The results enable examination of the accuracy of the estimation approach through comparison between the estimated and true velocity fields. Moreover, practical issues, such as the number and configuration of wall sensors required for satisfactory estimation, are also addressed.

  10. Secondary instability analysis of pre-transitional streaks in boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hack, M. J. Philipp; Zaki, Tamer

    2011-11-01

    In the presence of free-stream vortical disturbances, laminar boundary layers develop streamwise-elongated perturbations of high amplitude, commonly known as Klebanoff streaks. The regions of shear surrounding these primary structures provide the potential for the growth of secondary instabilities which ultimately initiate bypass transition. By means of linear analysis, we examine the secondary instability which precedes the formation of turbulent spots. The base state is extracted from direct numerical simulations of the bypass process. The simulation setup is similar to the work of Jacobs & Durbin (2001), where transition is triggered by broadband free-stream vortical forcing. The velocity field therefore includes a spectrum of streaks with different structures and amplitudes. The stability analysis can nevertheless identify the streaks which indeed develop secondary instabilities and break down to turbulence. The predictions of linear theory, in particular the instability wavelength and phase speed, are compared to the streak instabilities recorded in the DNS of the full bypass process.

  11. Numerical simulation of boundary layers. Part 2: Ribbon-induced transition in Blasius flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalart, P.; Yang, K. S.

    1986-01-01

    The early three-dimensional stages of transition in Blasius boundary layers are studied by numerical solution of the Navier-Stokes equations. A finite-amplitude two-dimensional wave and random low-amplitude three-dimensional disturbances are introduced. Rapid amplification of the three-dimensional components is observed and leads to transition. For intermediate amplitudes of the two-dimensional wave the breakdown is of subharmonic type, and the dominant spanwise wave number increases with the amplitude. For high amplitudes the energy of the fundamental mode is comparable to the energy of the subharmonic mode, but never dominates it; the breakdown is of mixed type. Visualizations, energy histories, and spectra are presented. The sensitivity of the results to various physical and numerical parameters is studied. Agreement with experimental and theoretical results is discussed.

  12. Flat plate heat transfer for laminar transition and turbulent boundary layers using a shock tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brostmeyer, J. D.; Nagamatsu, H. T.

    1984-01-01

    Heat transfer results are presented for laminar, transition, and turbulent boundary layers for a Mach number of 0.12 with gas temperatures of 425 K and 1000 K over a flat plate at room temperature. The measurements were made in air for a Reynolds number range of 600 to 6 million. The heat transfer measurements were conducted in a 70-ft long, 4 in. diameter shock tube. Reflecting wedges were used to reflect the incident shock wave to produce a flow Mach number of 0.12 behind the reflected shock wave. Thin film platinum heat gages were mounted on the plate surface to measure the local heat flux. The laminar results for gas temperatures of 425 K to 1000 K agree well with theory. The turbulent results are also close to incompressible theory, with the 1000 K flow case being slightly higher. The transition results lie between the laminar and turbulent predictions.

  13. Experiments in bypass boundary layer transition under a stream with and without shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balamurugan, G.; Mandal, Alakesh C.

    2017-04-01

    Effect of mean flow shear on bypass boundary layer transition is investigated experimentally in a low-speed wind tunnel. To initiate bypass transition on a flat plate, the level of freestream turbulence is intensionally enhanced using a uniform parallel rod grid and a non-uniform parallel rod grid. The non-uniform grid produces a mean velocity profile with shear, and therefore, turbulence production due to this shear will be non-zero compared to a uniform grid which produces a mean velocity profile without shear. The growth rate of the disturbance energy for the non-uniform grid is found to be higher compared to the uniform grid. The intermittency values are also found to be higher for the non-uniform grid under same flow conditions. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements in the spanwise plane reveal instability characteristics similar to the one reported in the literature.

  14. Measured and calculated wall temperatures on air-cooled turbine vanes with boundary layer transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, C. H.; Gaugler, R. E.; Gladden, H. J.

    1982-01-01

    Convection cooled turbine vane metal wall temperatures experimentally obtained in a hot cascade for one vane design were compared with wall temperatures calculated with TACT1 and STAN5 computer codes which incorporated various models for predicting laminar-to-turbulent boundary layer transition. Favorable comparisons on both vane surface were obtained at high Reynolds number with only one of these transition models. When other models were used, temperature differences between calculated and experimental data obtained at the high Reynolds number were as much as 14 percent in the separation bubble region of the pressure surface. On the suction surface and at lower Reynolds number, predictions and data unsatisfactorily differed by as much as 22 percent. Temperature differences of this magnitude can represent orders of magnitude error in blade life prediction.

  15. Transition in a Supersonic Boundary-Layer Due to Roughness and Acoustic Disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakumar, P.

    2003-01-01

    The transition process induced by the interaction of an isolated roughness with acoustic disturbances in the free stream is numerically investigated for a boundary layer over a flat plate with a blunted leading edge at a free stream Mach number of 3.5. The roughness is assumed to be of Gaussian shape and the acoustic disturbances are introduced as boundary condition at the outer field. The governing equations are solved using the 5'h-rder accurate weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme for space discretization and using third- order total-variation-diminishing (TVD) Runge- Kutta scheme for time integration. The steady field induced by the two and three-dimensional roughness is also computed. The flow field induced by two-dimensional roughness exhibits different characteristics depending on the roughness heights. At small roughness heights the flow passes smoothly over the roughness, at moderate heights the flow separates downstream of the roughness and at larger roughness heights the flow separates upstream and downstream of the roughness. Computations also show that disturbances inside the boundary layer is due to the direct interaction of the acoustic waves and isolated roughness plays a minor role in generating instability waves.

  16. Experimental studies of hypersonic boundary-layer transition and effects of wind tunnel disturbances. [using different conical models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stainback, P. C.; Wagner, R. D.; Owen, F. K.; Horstman, C. C.

    1974-01-01

    Boundary layer transition data on cones and free stream disturbance levels were measured in a hypersonic wind tunnel and Mach 8 variable density hypersonic tunnel. Transition data were obtained by using different conical models and techniques for detecting the location of transition. The disturbance levels were measured by using hot wire anemometry and pressure transducers. The transition Reynolds numbers obtained from the tests correlated well when the fluctuating pressures measured at the surface of conical models were used as a correlating parameter.

  17. Computer program for solving compressible nonsimilar-boundary-layer equations for laminar, transitional, or turbulent flows of a perfect gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, J. M.; Harris, J. F.

    1972-01-01

    A computer program is described which solves the compressible laminar, transitional, or turbulent boundary-layer equations for planar or axisymmetric flows. Three-point implicit difference relations are used to reduce the momentum and energy equations to finite-difference form. These equations are solved simultaneously without iteration. Turbulent flow is treated by the inclusion of either a two-layer eddy-viscosity model or a mixing-length formulation. The eddy conductivity is related to the eddy viscosity through a static turbulent Prandtl number which may be an arbitrary function of the distance from the wall boundary. The transitional boundary layer is treated by the inclusion of an intermittency function which modifies the fully turbulent model. The laminar-boundary-layer equations are recovered when the intermittency is zero, and the fully turbulent equations are solved when the intermittency is unity.

  18. Free flight determination of boundary layer transition on small scale cones in the presence of surface ablation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkins, M. E.; Chapman, G. T.

    1972-01-01

    To assess the possibility of achieving extensive laminar flow on conical vehicles during hyperbolic entry, the Ames Research Center has had an ongoing program to study boundary-layer transition on ablating cones. Boundary layer transition results are presented from ballistic range experiments with models that ablated at dimensionless mass transfer rates comparable to those expected for full scale flight at speeds up to 17 km/sec. It was found possible to measure the surface recession and hence more accurately identify regions of laminar, transitional, and turbulent flow along generators of the recovered cones. Some preliminary results using this technique are presented.

  19. Turbulent boundary layer over roughness transition with variation in spanwise roughness length scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westerweel, Jerry; Tomas, Jasper; Eisma, Jerke; Pourquie, Mathieu; Elsinga, Gerrit; Jonker, Harm

    2016-11-01

    Both large-eddy simulations (LES) and water-tunnel experiments, using simultaneous stereoscopic PIV and LIF were done to investigate pollutant dispersion in a region where the surface changes from rural to urban roughness. This consists of rectangular obstacles where we vary the spanwise aspect ratio of the obstacles. A line source of passive tracer was placed upstream of the roughness transition. The objectives of the study are: (i) to determine the influence of the aspect ratio on the roughness-transition flow, and (ii) to determine the dominant mechanisms of pollutant removal from street canyons in the transition region. It is found that for a spanwise aspect ratio of 2 the drag induced by the roughness is largest of all considered cases, which is caused by a large-scale secondary flow. In the roughness transition the vertical advective pollutant flux is the main ventilation mechanism in the first three streets. Furthermore, by means of linear stochastic estimation the mean flow structure is identied that is responsible for exchange of the fluid between the roughness obstacles and the outer part of the boundary layer. Furthermore, it is found that the vertical length scale of this structure increases with increasing aspect ratio of the obstacles in the roughness region.

  20. Distributed-Roughness Effects on Stability and Transition In Swept-Wing Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carrillo, Ruben B., Jr.; Reibert, Mark S.; Saric, William S.

    1997-01-01

    Boundary-layer stability experiments are conducted in the Arizona State University Unsteady Wind Tunnel on a 45 deg swept airfoil. The pressure distribution and test conditions are designed to suppress Tollmien-Schlichting disturbances and provide crossflow-dominated transition. The surface of the airfoil is finely polished to a near mirror finish. Under these conditions, submicron surface irregularities cause the naturally occurring stationary crossflow waves to grow to nonuniform amplitudes. Spanwise-uniform stationary crossflow disturbances are generated through careful control of the initial conditions with full-span arrays of micron-high roughness elements near the attachment line. Detailed hot-wire measurements are taken to document the stationary crossflow structure and determine growth rates for the total and individual-mode disturbances. Naphthalene flow visualization provides transition location information. Roughness spacing and roughness height are varied to examine the effects on transition location and all amplified wavelengths. The measurements show that roughness spacings that do not contain harmonics equal to the most unstable wavelength as computed by linear stability theory effectively suppress the most unstable mode. Under certain conditions, subcritical roughness spacing delays transition past that of the corresponding smooth surface.

  1. Boundary Layer Transition on Slender Cones in Conventional and Low Disturbance Mach 6 Wind Tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horvath, Thomas J.; Berry, Scott A.; Hollis, Brian R.; Chang, Chau-Lyan; Singer, Bart A.

    2002-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted on a 5-degree half-angle cone and a 5-degree half-angle flared cone in a conventional Mach 6 wind tunnel to examine the effects of facility noise on boundary layer transition. The influence of tunnel noise was inferred by comparing transition onset locations determined from the present test to that previously obtained in a Mach 6 low disturbance quiet tunnel. Together, the two sets of experiments are believed to represent the first direct comparison of transition onset between a conventional and a low disturbance wind tunnel using a common test model and transition detection technique. In the present conventional hypersonic tunnel experiment, separate measurements of heat transfer and adiabatic wall temperatures were obtained on the conical models at small angles of attack over a range of Reynolds numbers, which resulted in laminar, transitional, and turbulent flow. Smooth model turbulent heating distributions are compared to that obtained with transition forced via discrete surface roughness. The model nosetip radius was varied to examine the effects of bluntness on transition onset. Despite wall to total temperature differences between the transient heating measurements and the adiabatic wall temperature measurement, the two methods for determining sharp cone transition onset generally yielded equivalent locations. In the 'noisy' mode of the hypersonic low disturbance tunnel, transition onset occurred earlier than that measured in the conventional hypersonic tunnel, suggesting higher levels of freestream acoustic radiation relative to the conventional tunnel. At comparable freestream conditions, the transition onset Reynolds number under low disturbance conditions was a factor of 1.3 greater than that measured on flared cone in the LaRC conventional hypersonic tunnel and a factor of 1.6 greater that the flared cone run in the low disturbance tunnel run 'noisy'. Navier-Stokes mean flow computations and linear stability

  2. Multigrid direct numerical simulation of the whole process of flow transition in 3-D boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Chaoqun; Liu, Zhining

    1993-01-01

    A new technology was developed in this study which provides a successful numerical simulation of the whole process of flow transition in 3-D boundary layers, including linear growth, secondary instability, breakdown, and transition at relatively low CPU cost. Most other spatial numerical simulations require high CPU cost and blow up at the stage of flow breakdown. A fourth-order finite difference scheme on stretched and staggered grids, a fully implicit time marching technique, a semi-coarsening multigrid based on the so-called approximate line-box relaxation, and a buffer domain for the outflow boundary conditions were all used for high-order accuracy, good stability, and fast convergence. A new fine-coarse-fine grid mapping technique was developed to keep the code running after the laminar flow breaks down. The computational results are in good agreement with linear stability theory, secondary instability theory, and some experiments. The cost for a typical case with 162 x 34 x 34 grid is around 2 CRAY-YMP CPU hours for 10 T-S periods.

  3. Large-Eddy Simulation of Transition to Turbulence in Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huai, Xiao-Li; Joslin, Ronald D.; Piomelli, Ugo

    1997-01-01

    Large-eddy simulation results for laminar-to-turbulent transition in a spatially developing boundary layer are presented. The disturbances are ingested into a laminar flow through an unsteady suction-and-blowing strip. The filtered, three-dimensional time- dependent Navier-Stokes equations are integrated numerically using spectral, high-order finite-difference, and three-stage low-storage Runge-Kutta methods. The buffer-domain technique is used for the outflow boundary condition. The localized dynamic model used to parameterize the subgrid-scale stresses begins to have a significant impact at the beginning of the nonlinear transition (or intermittency) region. The flow structures commonly found in experiments are also observed in the present simulation; the computed linear instability modes and secondary instability lambda-vortex structures are in agreement with the experiments, and the streak-like-structures and turbulent statistics compare with both the experiments and the theory. The physics captured in the present LES are consistent with the experiments and the full Navier-Stokes simulation (DNS), at a significant fraction of the DNS cost. A comparison of the results obtained with several SGS models shows that the localized model gives accurate results both in a statistical sense and in terms of predicting the dynamics of the energy-carrying eddies, without ad hoc adjustments.

  4. Control of boundary layer transition location and plate vibration in the presence of an external acoustic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maestrello, L.; Grosveld, F. W.

    The experiment is aimed at controlling the boundary layer transition location and the plate vibration when excited by a flow and an upstream sound source. Sound has been found to affect the flow at the leading edge and the response of a flexible plate in a boundary layer. Because the sound induces early transition, the panel vibration is acoustically coupled to the turbulent boundary layer by the upstream radiation. Localized surface heating at the leading edge delays the transition location downstream of the flexible plate. The response of the plate excited by a turbulent boundary layer (without sound) shows that the plate is forced to vibrate at different frequencies and with different amplitudes as the flow velocity changes indicating that the plate is driven by the convective waves of the boundary layer. The acoustic disturbances induced by the upstream sound dominate the response of the plate when the boundary layer is either turbulent or laminar. Active vibration control was used to reduce the sound induced displacement amplitude of the plate.

  5. Control of boundary layer transition location and plate vibration in the presence of an external acoustic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, L.; Grosveld, F. W.

    1991-01-01

    The experiment is aimed at controlling the boundary layer transition location and the plate vibration when excited by a flow and an upstream sound source. Sound has been found to affect the flow at the leading edge and the response of a flexible plate in a boundary layer. Because the sound induces early transition, the panel vibration is acoustically coupled to the turbulent boundary layer by the upstream radiation. Localized surface heating at the leading edge delays the transition location downstream of the flexible plate. The response of the plate excited by a turbulent boundary layer (without sound) shows that the plate is forced to vibrate at different frequencies and with different amplitudes as the flow velocity changes indicating that the plate is driven by the convective waves of the boundary layer. The acoustic disturbances induced by the upstream sound dominate the response of the plate when the boundary layer is either turbulent or laminar. Active vibration control was used to reduce the sound induced displacement amplitude of the plate.

  6. Control of boundary layer transition location and plate vibration in the presence of an external acoustic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, L.; Grosveld, F. W.

    1991-01-01

    The experiment is aimed at controlling the boundary layer transition location and the plate vibration when excited by a flow and an upstream sound source. Sound has been found to affect the flow at the leading edge and the response of a flexible plate in a boundary layer. Because the sound induces early transition, the panel vibration is acoustically coupled to the turbulent boundary layer by the upstream radiation. Localized surface heating at the leading edge delays the transition location downstream of the flexible plate. The response of the plate excited by a turbulent boundary layer (without sound) shows that the plate is forced to vibrate at different frequencies and with different amplitudes as the flow velocity changes indicating that the plate is driven by the convective waves of the boundary layer. The acoustic disturbances induced by the upstream sound dominate the response of the plate when the boundary layer is either turbulent or laminar. Active vibration control was used to reduce the sound induced displacement amplitude of the plate.

  7. Towards Feedback Control of Bypass Transition: Experiments on Laminar Boundary Layer Response to Dynamically Actuated Roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bade, Kyle; Naguib, Ahmed; Hanson, Ronald; Lavoie, Philippe

    2010-11-01

    The current work details observations of the growth of streamwise streaks emanating from cylindrical roughness elements undergoing dynamic actuation into-and-out of a Blasius boundary layer flow. The growth and streamwise propagation of these motions is of interest in a larger study in collaboration with Princeton University in which a multi-university effort aims to develop and implement a robust feedback control system for the weakening/elimination of the streaks (because of their role in initiating bypass transition). Phase-averaged hotwire measurements in the transverse and spanwise directions provide two-dimensional visualizations of the spatial and temporal growth of these motions. Various roughness heights as well as actuation velocities are examined in order to identify the actuation parameters range for which the streaks can be produced while avoiding the introduction of T-S wave packets. This work validates the ability to introduce the proper disturbances into the boundary layer in preparation for the follow up control study.

  8. Transition in oblique shock/boundary layer interactions at Mach 5.92

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwivedi, Anubhav; Shrestha, Prakash; Hildebrand, Nathaniel; Nichols, J. W.; Jovanovic, M. R.; Candler, G. V.

    2016-11-01

    We use the compressible flow solver US3D to perform DNS of an oblique shock wave interacting with a laminar boundary layer over an adiabatic flat plate at Mach 5 . 92 . Simulations are repeated with different spanwise extents. The adverse pressure gradient created by the shock causes the boundary layer to separate, leading to the formation of a recirculation bubble downstream. We consider interactions of various strengths by varying the shock angle. A sufficiently strong interaction causes the flow to become 3 - D , unsteady and eventually transition to turbulence. We observe long streamwise streaks downstream of the reattachment point which eventually break into turbulence. In the present work, we characterize the spatio-temporal dynamics of the unsteady separation bubble and these streaks using Fourier analysis and Sparsity Promoting Dynamic Mode Decomposition. To investigate the origin of these streaks we also analyze the role of linear Görtler instability resulting from the curvature of the streamlines induced by the separation bubble. Supported by ONR, Grant No. N00014-15-1-2522.

  9. A wavelet-based intermittency detection technique from PIV investigations in transitional boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simoni, Daniele; Lengani, Davide; Guida, Roberto

    2016-09-01

    The transition process of the boundary layer growing over a flat plate with pressure gradient simulating the suction side of a low-pressure turbine blade and elevated free-stream turbulence intensity level has been analyzed by means of PIV and hot-wire measurements. A detailed view of the instantaneous flow field in the wall-normal plane highlights the physics characterizing the complex process leading to the formation of large-scale coherent structures during breaking down of the ordered motion of the flow, thus generating randomized oscillations (i.e., turbulent spots). This analysis gives the basis for the development of a new procedure aimed at determining the intermittency function describing (statistically) the transition process. To this end, a wavelet-based method has been employed for the identification of the large-scale structures created during the transition process. Successively, a probability density function of these events has been defined so that an intermittency function is deduced. This latter strictly corresponds to the intermittency function of the transitional flow computed trough a classic procedure based on hot-wire data. The agreement between the two procedures in the intermittency shape and spot production rate proves the capability of the method in providing the statistical representation of the transition process. The main advantages of the procedure here proposed concern with its applicability to PIV data; it does not require a threshold level to discriminate first- and/or second-order time-derivative of hot-wire time traces (that makes the method not influenced by the operator); and it provides a clear evidence of the connection between the flow physics and the statistical representation of transition based on theory of turbulent spot propagation.

  10. Effect of free-stream turbulence properties on boundary layer laminar-turbulent transition: A new approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darag, Sakhr A.; Horák, Vladimír

    2012-11-01

    The effect of length scale on flat-plate by-pass transitional boundary layers subject to free stream turbulence intensities ranging from 1.3 to 6.0 percent has been investigated. The analysis is based on the recent experimental and numerical observations into non-equilibrium flows that considering the effect of turbulence properties at the plate leading edge on the transition onset. According to this analysis, physical correlation is developed and incorporated in a conventional boundary layer computer scheme for prediction of transitional flows. The scheme was proposed to calculate the characteristics of the boundary layers under the effect of moderate free-stream turbulence levels by enhancing established integral techniques in conjunction with intermittency weighted model of the transitional boundary layer. To support the results validation, the experimental ERCOFTAC Test Cases T3A, T3B and T3AM for transitional integral parameters have been represented. The results show that the transition location for turbulence level higher than 4% is only a function of turbulence intensity (Tu) and unaffected by significant changes in the length scale (Lx). Whereas for low level of the incoming turbulent flows the transition onset is extremely dependent on FST characteristics, turbulence intensity and integral length scale.

  11. Effect of Compliant Walls on Secondary Instabilities in Boundary-Layer Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joslin, Ronald D.; Morris, Philip J.

    1991-01-01

    For aerodynamic and hydrodynamic vehicles, it is highly desirable to reduce drag and noise levels. A reduction in drag leads to fuel savings. In particular for submersible vehicles, a decrease in noise levels inhibits detection. A suggested means to obtain these reduction goals is by delaying the transition from laminar to turbulent flow in external boundary layers. For hydrodynamic applications, a passive device which shows promise for transition delays is the compliant coating. In previous studies with a simple mechanical model representing the compliant wall, coatings were found that provided transition delays as predicted from the semi-empirical e(sup n) method. Those studies were concerned with the linear stage of transition where the instability of concern is referred to as the primary instability. For the flat-plate boundary layer, the Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) wave is the primary instability. In one of those studies, it was shown that three-dimensional (3-D) primary instabilities, or oblique waves, could dominate transition over the coatings considered. From the primary instability, the stretching and tilting of vorticity in the shear flow leads to a secondary instability mechanism. This has been theoretical described by Herbert based on Floquet theory. In the present study, Herbert's theory is used to predict the development of secondary instabilities over isotropic and non-isotropic compliant walls. Since oblique waves may be dominant over compliant walls, a secondary theory extention is made to allow for these 3-D primary instabilities. The effect of variations in primary amplitude, spanwise wavenumber, and Reynolds number on the secondary instabilities are examined. As in the rigid wall case, over compliant walls the subharmonic mode of secondary instability dominates for low-amplitude primary disturbances. Both isotropic and non-isotropic compliant walls lead to reduced secondary growth rates compared to the rigid wall results. For high frequencies

  12. Atmospheric Boundary-Layer Evening Transitions: A Comparison Between Two Different Experimental Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sastre, Mariano; Yagüe, Carlos; Román-Cascón, Carlos; Maqueda, Gregorio

    2015-12-01

    The planetary boundary-layer (PBL) afternoon and evening transition is investigated with measurements from two-month datasets, gathered at two experimental sites significantly different regarding heterogeneity, the degree of terrain wetness, and proximity to mountains. The period of 4 h prior to and after astronomical sunset is extensively analyzed. We show the mean evolution, average, maximum and minimum values of PBL variables, including wind speed, turbulent kinetic energy and potential temperature vertical gradient. Characteristic events, such as the wind minimum around sunset and a common pattern in the evolution of other variables, are identified. Results suggest that, for the establishment of the nocturnal stable boundary layer, moisture plays a more decisive role than turbulence. We also look into the occurrence of katabatic flows, finding more intense but less frequent events at the driest site. In contrast, at that location the crossover of the sensible heat flux takes place later. Time-scale evolution is investigated through case studies, and air humidity and soil moisture are found to have crucial importance explaining most of the site-to-site differences. Therefore, a humidity sensitivity experiment with the Weather Research and Forecasting model is performed, evaluating the role of moisture during the transition by increasing the soil humidity at the driest site and reducing it at the other location. The simulations reveal that humidity effects are more important until 1 h before sunset, both near the surface and at upper levels in the PBL. Furthermore, the moisture change is more relevant at the less humid and more homogeneous site, with intense and long-lasting effects after sunset.

  13. Transition prediction for oblique breakdown in supersonic boundary layers with uncertain disturbance spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serino, Gennaro; Marxen, Olaf; Rambaud, Patrick; Magin, Thierry

    2011-11-01

    Prediction of laminar-turbulent transition is important for the design of heat shields for planetary (re)-entry vehicles. The heat load may increase significantly if a previously laminar boundary layer on the vehicle surface becomes turbulent. Transition-prediction methods based on linear stability theory, such as the eN-method, offer an attractive compromise between simplicity and accuracy. However, non-linear stages of disturbance evolution as well as the receptivity stage are neglected, hampering the general use of these methods. Here we perform an investigation of the oblique breakdown scenario. In this scenario, a pair of oblique waves is convectively amplified and quickly leads to turbulence once these waves reach an amplitude of approximately two percent. This knowledge allows us to define a simple breakdown criterion as a model for the non-linear stage. The receptivity process, whose outcome provides the initial disturbance amplitudes, may not be as easily modeled. Flow physics of the receptivity process are neglected here. Instead, we assume an uncertain disturbance spectrum, which depends on the disturbance frequency and spanwise wave number. Using stochastic collocation, linear stability theory is then employed to yield a probabilistic transition prediction.

  14. Turbulent transitions in the stable boundary layer: Couette and Poiseuille flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holdsworth, Amber M.; Monahan, Adam H.

    2016-11-01

    The stable boundary layer (SBL) can be classified into two distinct regimes. The weakly stable regime (WSBL) which occurs in the presence of moderate to strong pressure gradients or cloudy skies and is characterized by continuous turbulent mixing, and the very stable regime (VSBL) which occurs in the presence of weak pressure gradients or clear skies and turbulence weakens to the point of collapse. Modelling and observational results indicate that transitions from the WSBL to the VSBL occur when the maximum sustainable heat flux (MSHF), or shear capacity, is exceeded. The collapse of turbulence in the SBL is investigated using a one dimensional model of Couette flow with a constant heat flux. We show that the MSHF framework for predicting turbulent collapse is qualitatively robust to the choice of turbulence parameterization and extend these earlier stability analyses by numerically determining the unstable modes along the unstable branch. To explore transitions between the VSBL and the WSBL we extend the model to include a horizontal pressure gradient and a surface radiation scheme. Analysis of the Poiseuille flow demonstrates how the idealized energy/momentum budget model with parameterized turbulence can reproduce the regime transitions present in atmospheric data. We acknowledge support from NSERC and the computing facilities of Westgrid and Compute Canada.

  15. Boundary-layer development and transition due to free-stream exothermic reactions in shock-induced flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, J. L.

    1974-01-01

    A study of the effect of free-stream thermal-energy release from shock-induced exothermic reactions on boundary-layer development and transition is presented. The flow model is that of a boundary layer developing behind a moving shock wave in two-dimensional unsteady flow over a shock-tube wall. Matched sets of combustible hydrogen-oxygen-nitrogen mixtures and inert hydrogen-nitrogen mixtures were used to obtain transition data over a range of transition Reynolds numbers from 1,100,000 to 21,300,000. The heat-energy is shown to significantly stabilize the boundary layer without changing its development character. A method for application of this data to flat-plate steady flows is included.

  16. Boundary-layer development and transition due to free-stream exothermic reactions in shock-induced flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, J. L.

    1974-01-01

    A study of the effect of free-stream thermal-energy release from shock-induced exothermic reactions on boundary-layer development and transition is presented. The flow model is that of a boundary layer developing behind a moving shock wave in two-dimensional unsteady flow over a shock-tube wall. Matched sets of combustible hydrogen-oxygen-nitrogen mixtures and inert hydrogen-nitrogen mixtures were used to obtain transition data over a range of transition Reynolds numbers from 1,100,000 to 21,300,000. The heat-energy is shown to significantly stabilize the boundary layer without changing its development character. A method for application of this data to flat-plate steady flows is included.

  17. Waves in the Turbulent Layer during the Morning Transition to the Convective Boundary Layer at Dome C, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petenko, Igor; Argentini, Stefania; Mastrantonio, Giangiuseppe; Kallistratova, Margarita; Viola, Angelo; Sozzi, Roberto; Casasanta, Giampietro; Conidi, Alessandro

    2015-04-01

    During January-February 2014, observations were carried out at the Concordia station, Dome C, Antarctica to study the behaviour of atmospheric turbulence in lower two hundred meters. The behaviour of thermal turbulence was observed remotely using a specially developed high-resolution sodar. In contrast to the all previous observations, in this experiment the turbulence pattern in the boundary layer was observed by sodar beginning from the lowest height of ≈2 m and with vertical resolution < 2 m. Sodar measurements were accompanied by in-situ measurements of the relevant meteorological variables as well as of some turbulent characteristics. Typical patterns of the diurnal evolution of the spatial and temporal distribution of turbulence detected by sodar were analysed. This study focuses on the transition period between stable stratification and the developed convective activity under the capping temperature inversion layer. Thank to the high resolution of sodar measurements, for the first time it was found that during developing the convection near the surface, above, in the elevated turbulent layer, a clear wave activity occurs. Undulation inside the elevating turbulent layer was observed during the significant part of the time. Mainly, the form of these waves can be classified as "cat eyes". Oscillations of wavy layers indicated with intense thermal turbulence inside them were characterized by the use of the methods of spectral and correlation analysis. The main characteristics (spatial and temporal scales, vertical extension) of the undulation structures were determined. The prevailing periodicity of the observed undulations is estimated to be 40-50 s. A descend rate of wavy fine turbulent layers was estimated by different ways and varies in the range 1-2 m s-1. The time behaviour of the top and the bottom of wavy layers were determined for the whole observational period.

  18. Transitioning from a single-phase fluid to a porous medium: a boundary layer approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalwadi, Mohit P.; Chapman, S. Jon; Oliver, James M.; Waters, Sarah L.

    2014-11-01

    Pressure-driven laminar channel flow is a classic problem in fluid mechanics, and the resultant Poiseuille flow is one of the few exact solutions to the Navier-Stokes equations. If the channel interior is a porous medium (governed by Darcy's law) rather than a single-phase fluid, the resultant behaviour is plug flow. But what happens when these two flow regions are coupled, as is the case for industrial membrane filtration systems or biological tissue engineering problems? How does one flow transition to the other? We use asymptotic methods to investigate pressure-driven flow through a long channel completely blocked by a finite-length porous obstacle. We analytically solve for the flow at both small and large Reynolds number (whilst remaining within the laminar regime). The boundary layer structure is surprisingly intricate for large Reynolds number. In that limit, the structure is markedly different depending on whether there is inflow or outflow through the porous medium, there being six asymptotic regions for inflow and three for outflow. We have extended this result to a wide class of 3D porous obstacles within a Hele-Shaw cell. We obtain general boundary conditions to couple the outer flows, and find that these conditions are far from obvious at higher order.

  19. Laminar-Boundary-Layer Oscillations and Transition on a Flat Plate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1943-04-01

    attempted to test the stability theory by producing sinusoidal fluetuations in the, bound- ary layer near the leading edge of a flat plate in water...section with the loading edge 6 feet from the upstream end. In order to reduce vibration, the test section of this tun- nel Is supported dirpctly...Boundary Layor Since a theoretical dl the boundary layer has been VI-2D and table IV), the ac est ae a test of agreement Traverses across the bounda

  20. On the Nature of the Transition Between Roll and Cellular Organization in the Convective Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salesky, Scott T.; Chamecki, Marcelo; Bou-Zeid, Elie

    2017-04-01

    Both observational and numerical studies of the convective boundary layer (CBL) have demonstrated that when surface heat fluxes are small and mean wind shear is strong, convective updrafts tend to organize into horizontal rolls aligned within 10-20° of the geostrophic wind direction. However, under large surface heat fluxes and weak to negligible shear, convection tends to organize into open cells, similar to turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection. Using a suite of 14 large-eddy simulations (LES) spanning a range of -z_i/L between zero (neutral) and 1041 (highly convective), where z_i is the CBL depth and L is the Obukhov length, the transition between roll- and cellular-type convection is investigated systematically for the first time using LES. Mean vertical profiles including velocity variances and turbulent transport efficiencies, as well the "roll factor," which characterizes the rotational symmetry of the vertical velocity field, indicate the transition occurs gradually over a range of -z_i/L; however, the most significant changes in vertical profiles and CBL organization occur from near-neutral conditions up to about -z_i/L ≈ 15-20. Turbulent transport efficiencies and quadrant analysis are used to characterize the turbulent transport of momentum and heat with increasing -z_i/L. It is found that turbulence transports heat efficiently from weakly to highly convective conditions; however, turbulent momentum transport becomes increasingly inefficient as -z_i/L increases.

  1. Transition along a finite-length cylinder in the presence of a thin boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hanfeng; Peng, Si; Zhou, Yu; He, Xuhui

    2016-05-01

    This work aims to investigate experimentally the transition of the aerodynamic forces on a cantilevered circular cylinder immersed in a thin boundary layer whose thickness is comparable to the cylinder diameter d. The aspect ratio H/ d of the cylinder is 5, where H is the cylinder height. The Reynolds number Re, based on the freestream velocity ( U ∞ ) and d, is varied from 0.68 × 105 to 6.12 × 105, covering the subcritical, critical and supercritical regimes. It has been found that the flow transition is non-uniform along the cylinder span, taking place at a smaller Re near the cylinder free end than near the base. Furthermore, the sectional drag coefficient of the cantilevered cylinder is smaller relative to that of a two-dimensional cylinder in the subcritical regime, but larger than the later in the supercritical regime. The sectional lift coefficient is not zero in the critical regime, with its maximum near the free end reaching almost four times of that near the base.

  2. Nonlinear interaction of near-planar TS waves and longitudinal vortices in boundary-layer transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, F. T.

    1988-01-01

    The nonlinear interactions that evolve between a planar or nearly planar Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) wave and the associated longitudinal vortices are considered theoretically for a boundary layer at high Reynolds number. The vortex flow is either induced by the TS nonlinear forcing or is input upstream, and similarly for the nonlinear wave development. Three major kinds of nonlinear spatial evolution, Types 1-3, are found. Each can start from secondary instability and then become nonlinear, Type 1 proving to be relatively benign but able to act as a pre-cursor to the Types 2, 3 which turn out to be very powerful nonlinear interactions. Type 2 involves faster stream-wise dependence and leads to a finite-distance blow-up in the amplitudes, which then triggers the full nonlinear 3-D triple-deck response, thus entirely altering the mean-flow profile locally. In contrast, Type 3 involves slower streamwise dependence but a faster spanwise response, with a small TS amplitude thereby causing an enhanced vortex effect which, again, is substantial enough to entirely alter the meanflow profile, on a more global scale. Streak-like formations in which there is localized concentration of streamwise vorticity and/or wave amplitude can appear, and certain of the nonlinear features also suggest by-pass processes for transition and significant changes in the flow structure downstream. The powerful nonlinear 3-D interactions 2, 3 are potentially very relevant to experimental findings in transition.

  3. On the Nature of the Transition Between Roll and Cellular Organization in the Convective Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salesky, Scott T.; Chamecki, Marcelo; Bou-Zeid, Elie

    2016-11-01

    Both observational and numerical studies of the convective boundary layer (CBL) have demonstrated that when surface heat fluxes are small and mean wind shear is strong, convective updrafts tend to organize into horizontal rolls aligned within 10-20° of the geostrophic wind direction. However, under large surface heat fluxes and weak to negligible shear, convection tends to organize into open cells, similar to turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection. Using a suite of 14 large-eddy simulations (LES) spanning a range of -z_i/L between zero (neutral) and 1041 (highly convective), where z_i is the CBL depth and L is the Obukhov length, the transition between roll- and cellular-type convection is investigated systematically for the first time using LES. Mean vertical profiles including velocity variances and turbulent transport efficiencies, as well the "roll factor," which characterizes the rotational symmetry of the vertical velocity field, indicate the transition occurs gradually over a range of -z_i/L ; however, the most significant changes in vertical profiles and CBL organization occur from near-neutral conditions up to about -z_i/L ≈ 15-20. Turbulent transport efficiencies and quadrant analysis are used to characterize the turbulent transport of momentum and heat with increasing -z_i/L . It is found that turbulence transports heat efficiently from weakly to highly convective conditions; however, turbulent momentum transport becomes increasingly inefficient as -z_i/L increases.

  4. Boundary Layer Transition Protuberance Tests at NASA JSC Arc-Jet Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larin, M. E.; Marichalar, J. J.; Kinder, G. R.; Campbell, C. H.; Riccio, J. R.; Nquyen, T. Q.; DelPapa, S. V.; Pulsonetti, M. V.

    2009-01-01

    A series of arc-jet tests in support of the Shuttle Orbiter Boundary Layer Transition flight experiment was conducted in the Channel Nozzle of the NASA Johnson Space Center Atmospheric Reentry Materials and Structures Facility. The boundary layer trip was a protrusion of a certain height and geometry fabricated as part of a 6"x6" tile insert, a special test article made of the Boeing Rigid Insulation tile material and coated with the Reaction Cured Glass used for the bottom fuselage tiles of the Space Shuttle Orbiter. A total of five such tile inserts were manufactured: four with the 0.25-in. trip height, and one with the 0.35-in. trip height. The tile inserts were interchangeably installed in the center of the 24"x24" variable configuration tile array mounted in the 24"x24" test section of the channel nozzle. The objectives of the test series were to demonstrate that the boundary layer trip can safely withstand the Space Shuttle Orbiter flight-like re-entry environments and provide temperature data on the protrusion surface, surfaces of the nearby tiles upstream and downstream of the trip, as well as the bond line between the tiles and the structure. The targeted test environments were defined for the tip of the protrusion, away from the nominal surface of the tile array. The arc jet test conditions were approximated in order to produce the levels of the free stream total enthalpy at the protrusion height similar to those expected in flight. The test articles were instrumented with surface, sidewall and bond line thermocouples. Additionally, Tempilaq temperature-indicating paint was applied to the nominal tiles of the tile array in locations not interfering with the protrusion trip. Five different grades of paint were used that disintegrate at different temperatures between 1500 and 2000 deg F. The intent of using the paint was to gauge the RCG-coated tile surface temperature, as well as determine its usefulness for a flight experiment. This paper provides an

  5. Boundary Layer Transition Protuberance Tests at NASA JSC Arc-Jet Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larin, M. E.; Marichalar, J. J.; Kinder, G. R.; Campbell, C. H.; Riccio, J. R.; Nquyen, T. Q.; DelPapa, S. V.; Pulsonetti, M. V.

    2009-01-01

    A series of arc-jet tests in support of the Shuttle Orbiter Boundary Layer Transition flight experiment was conducted in the Channel Nozzle of the NASA Johnson Space Center Atmospheric Reentry Materials and Structures Facility. The boundary layer trip was a protrusion of a certain height and geometry fabricated as part of a 6"x6" tile insert, a special test article made of the Boeing Rigid Insulation tile material and coated with the Reaction Cured Glass used for the bottom fuselage tiles of the Space Shuttle Orbiter. A total of five such tile inserts were manufactured: four with the 0.25-in. trip height, and one with the 0.35-in. trip height. The tile inserts were interchangeably installed in the center of the 24"x24" variable configuration tile array mounted in the 24"x24" test section of the channel nozzle. The objectives of the test series were to demonstrate that the boundary layer trip can safely withstand the Space Shuttle Orbiter flight-like re-entry environments and provide temperature data on the protrusion surface, surfaces of the nearby tiles upstream and downstream of the trip, as well as the bond line between the tiles and the structure. The targeted test environments were defined for the tip of the protrusion, away from the nominal surface of the tile array. The arc jet test conditions were approximated in order to produce the levels of the free stream total enthalpy at the protrusion height similar to those expected in flight. The test articles were instrumented with surface, sidewall and bond line thermocouples. Additionally, Tempilaq temperature-indicating paint was applied to the nominal tiles of the tile array in locations not interfering with the protrusion trip. Five different grades of paint were used that disintegrate at different temperatures between 1500 and 2000 deg F. The intent of using the paint was to gauge the RCG-coated tile surface temperature, as well as determine its usefulness for a flight experiment. This paper provides an

  6. Nonlinear optimal control of bypass transition in a boundary layer flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Dandan; Papadakis, George

    2017-05-01

    The central aim of the paper is to apply and assess a nonlinear optimal control strategy to suppress bypass transition, due to bimodal interactions [T. A. Zaki and P. A. Durbin, "Mode interaction and the bypass route to transition," J. Fluid Mech. 531, 85 (2005)] in a zero-pressure-gradient boundary layer. To this end, a Lagrange variational formulation is employed that results in a set of adjoint equations. The optimal wall actuation (blowing and suction from a control slot) is found by solving iteratively the nonlinear Navier-Stokes and the adjoint equations in a forward/backward loop using direct numerical simulation. The optimization is performed in a finite time horizon. Large values of optimization horizon result in the instability of the adjoint equations. The control slot is located exactly in the region of transition. The results show that the control is able to significantly reduce the objective function, which is defined as the spatial and temporal integral of the quadratic deviation from the Blasius profile plus a term that quantifies the control cost. The physical mechanism with which the actuation interacts with the flow field is investigated and analysed in relation to the objective function employed. Examination of the joint probability density function shows that the control velocity is correlated with the streamwise velocity in the near wall region but this correlation is reduced as time elapses. The spanwise averaged velocity is distorted by the control action, resulting in a significant reduction of the skin friction coefficient. Results are presented with and without zero-net mass flow constraint of the actuation velocity. The skin friction coefficient drops below the laminar value if there is no mass constraint; it remains however larger than laminar when this constraint is imposed. Results are also compared with uniform blowing using the same time-average velocity obtained from the nonlinear optimal algorithm.

  7. The effects of wall surface defects on boundary-layer transition in quiet and noisy supersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrisette, E. Leon; Creel, Theodore R., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The design of supersonic vehicles with laminar flow control and vehicles such as the Space Shuttle requires information on allowable transition tolerances to fabrication defects such as discrete surface roughness and waviness. A relatively large data base on the effects of discrete roughness on transition exists for subsonic and supersonic speeds. The existing supersonic wind tunnel transition data are contaminated by wind tunnel noise emanating from the turbulent boundary layers on the nozzle walls. Roughness and waviness transition data obtained in a quiet Mach 3.5 supersonic wind tunnel are compared with those obtained in conventional noisy flows.

  8. Comparison two different LES closure models of the transitional boundary layer flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Dimitry; Chorny, Andrei

    2016-11-01

    The goal of the present research is to measure the velocity profile in the thin boundary layer of a flat plate at zero angle of attack. We consider a flow over a flat plate with a uniform velocity profile. The uniform velocity fluid hits the leading edge of the flat plate, and a laminar boundary layer begins to develop. The near-wall, subgrid-scale (SGS) model is used to perform Large Eddy Simulation (LES) of the incompressible developing, smooth-wall, flat-plate turbulent boundary layer. In this model, the stretched-vortex, SGS closure is utilized in conjunction with a tailored, near-wall model designed to incorporate anisotropic vorticity scales in the presence of the wall. The composite SGS-wall model is presently incorporated into a computer code suitable for the LES of developing flat-plate boundary layers. Presently this model is extended to the LES of the zero-pressure gradient, flat-plate turbulent boundary layer. LES solver using Smagorinsky and the One-equation LES turbulence models. Results show that the normalized mean velocity profile is in good agreement with the universal law-of-the-wall and previous published data. In order to ensure the quality of the numerical results a convergence study was performed.

  9. Plasma Roughness for Transition Control in a 3-D Supersonic Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuele, Chan-Yong; Matlis, Eric; Corke, Thomas; Wilkinson, Stephen

    2011-11-01

    The design and use of patterned ``plasma roughness'' for control of transition to turbulence of the boundary layer with a supersonic free-stream is presented. The plasma roughness consisted of an azimuthal array of 20 nm thick electrodes that were equally spaced around the cone tip, just upstream of Branch I for cross-flow instability growth. The electrodes were part of a DBD arrangement that produced an azimuthally periodic stationary body force that acted on the flow. The azimuthal spacing of the electrodes was designed to either enhance the most amplified stationary mode growth (m = 45 in this case), or to excite a sub-critical mode number (m = 68) that was designed to suppress the most amplified mode. The experiment was performed on a 14° right-circular cone placed at a 4 .3° angle of attack in the NASA LaRC SLDT. Measurements consisted of azimuthal profiles of the total pressure just above the cone surface. These documented the mean flow distortion produced by the growing stationary cross-flow modes. Comparisons were made with and without the plasma roughness, as well as against passive patterned roughness with the same azimuthal mode numbers. The results indicated that the stationary cross-flow modes were receptive to the patterned plasma roughness, and that Retrans was increased. Supported under NASA Cooperative Agreement NNX08AB22A

  10. Robustness of reduced-order observer-based controllers in transitional 2D Blasius boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belson, Brandt; Semeraro, Onofrio; Rowley, Clarence; Pralits, Jan; Henningson, Dan

    2011-11-01

    In this work, we seek to delay transition in the Blasius boundary layer. We trip the flow with an upstream disturbance and dampen the growth of the resulting structures downstream. The observer-based controllers use a single sensor and a single localized body force near the wall. To formulate the controllers, we first find a reduced-order model of the system via the Eigensystem Realization Algorithm (ERA), then find the H2 optimal controller for this reduced-order system. We find the resulting controllers are effective only when the sensor is upstream of the actuator (in a feedforward configuration), but as is expected, are sensitive to model uncertainty. When the sensor is downstream of the actuator (in a feedback configuration), the reduced-order observer-based controllers are not robust and ineffective on the full system. In order to investigate the robustness properties of the system, an iterative technique called the adjoint of the direct adjoint (ADA) is employed to find a full-dimensional H2 optimal controller. This avoids the reduced-order modelling step and serves as a reference point. ADA is promising for investigating the lack of robustness previously mentioned.

  11. Boundary-Layer Transition Results from the F-16XL-2 Supersonic Laminar Flow Control Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, Laurie A.

    1999-01-01

    A variable-porosity suction glove has been flown on the F-16XL-2 aircraft to demonstrate the feasibility of this technology for the proposed High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). Boundary-layer transition data have been obtained on the titanium glove primarily at Mach 2.0 and altitudes of 53,000-55,000 ft. The objectives of this supersonic laminar flow control flight experiment have been to achieve 50- to 60-percent-chord laminar flow on a highly swept wing at supersonic speeds and to provide data to validate codes and suction design. The most successful laminar flow results have not been obtained at the glove design point (Mach 1.9 at an altitude of 50,000 ft). At Mach 2.0 and an altitude of 53,000 ft, which corresponds to a Reynolds number of 22.7 X 10(exp 6), optimum suction levels have allowed long runs of a minimum of 46-percent-chord laminar flow to be achieved. This paper discusses research variables that directly impact the ability to obtain laminar flow and techniques to correct for these variables.

  12. Analysis of the leading edge effects on the boundary layer transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, Pao-Liu

    1990-01-01

    A general theory of boundary layer control by surface heating is presented. Some analytical results for a simplified model, i.e., the optimal control of temperature fluctuations in a shear flow are described. The results may provide a clue to the effectiveness of the active feedback control of a boundary layer flow by wall heating. In a practical situation, the feedback control may not be feasible from the instrumentational point of view. In this case the vibrational control introduced in systems science can provide a useful alternative. This principle is briefly explained and applied to the control of an unstable wavepacket in a parallel shear flow.

  13. Exploratory Investigation of Boundary-Layer Transition on a Hollow Cylinder at a Mach Number of 6.9

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertram, Mitchel H

    1957-01-01

    The Reynolds number for transition on the outside of a hollow cylinder with heat transfer from the boundary layer to the wall has been investigated at a Mach number of 6.9 in the Langley 11-inch hypersonic tunnel. The type of boundary layer was determined from impact-pressure surveys and optical viewing. From a correlation of results obtained from various sources at lower Mach numbers (in the range 2.0 to 4.5) and data from the present tests with variable Reynolds number per inch, leading-edge thickness and free-stream Reynolds number per inch appear to be important considerations in flat-plate transition results. At a given Mach number, it appears that the Reynolds number based on leading-edge thickness is an important parameter that must be considered in comparisons of flat-plate transition data from various installations.

  14. The influence of flow parameters on the transition to turbulence in supersonic boundary layer on swept wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semionov, N. V.; Yermolaev, Yu. G.; Kosinov, A. D.; Dryasov, A. D.; Semenov, A. N.; Yatskikh, A. A.

    2016-10-01

    The paper is devoted to an experimental study of laminar-turbulent transition in a three-dimensional supersonic boundary layer. The experiments were conducted at the low nose supersonic wind tunnel T-325 of ITAM at Mach numbers M=2 - 4. Model is a symmetrical wing with a 45° sweep angle, a 3 percent-thick circular-arc airfoil. The influence of flow parameters, such as the Mach number, unit Reynolds number, angle of attack, level of perturbations on the transitions to turbulence are on the consideration. Transition Reynolds numbers are obtained. Analysis of all obtained data allow to determine reliable value of Retr of swept wing supersonic boundary layer, that especially important at consideration of experiments fulfilled at different flow conditions in different wind tunnels.

  15. Visualization of turbulent spots and unsteady wake-induced boundary-layer transition with thermochromic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, S.; Kittichaikan, C.; Hodson, H. P.; Ireland, P. T.

    1999-02-01

    A method of using thermochromic liquid crystals has been developed to visualize the thermal footprints of turbulent spots convecting downstream in an otherwise laminar boundary layer over a heated surface. This technique has been employed to visualize the development of turbulent spots under the influence of adverse pressure gradients. It has also been used to visualize the transitional events that occur during unsteady wake-induced boundary layer transition typically of those occurring in multi-stage turbomachines. The results show that liquid crystal is not only capable of providing quantitative information about the growth and development of individual spots but also allows a detailed study of formation of turbulent spots occurring naturally during a complicated transition process.

  16. Some Recent Contributions to the Study of Transition and Turbulent Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dryden, Hugh L

    1947-01-01

    The first part of this paper reviews the present state of the problem of the instability of laminar boundary layers which has formed an important part of the general lectures by von Karman at the first and fourth Congresses and by Taylor at the fifth Congress. This problem may now be considered as essentially solved as the result of work completed since 1938. When the velocity fluctuations of the free-stream flow are less than 0.1 percent of the mean speed, instability occurs as described by the well-known Tollmien-Schlichting theory. The Tollmien-Schlichting waves were first observed experimentally by Schubauer and Skramstad in 1940. They devised methods of introducing controlled small disturbances and obtained measured values of frequency, damping, and wave length at various Reynolds numbers which agreed well with the theoretical results. Their experimental results were confirmed by Liepmann. Much theoretical work was done in Germany in extending the Tol1mien-Schlichting theory to other boundary conditions, in particular to flow along a porous wall to which suction is applied for removing part of the boundary layer. The second part of this paper summarizes the present state of knowledge of the mechanics of turbulent boundary layers, and of the methods now being used for fundamental studies of the turbulent fluctuations in turbulent boundary layers. A brief review is given of the semi-empirical method of approach as developed by Buri, Gruschwitz, Fediaevsky, and Kalikhman. In recent years the National Advisory.Commsittee for Aeronautics has sponsored a detailed study at the National Bureau of Standards of the turbulent fluctuations in a turbulent boundary layer under adverse pressure gradient sufficient to produce separation. The aims of this investigation and its present status are described.

  17. Characterizing the Effects of Convection on the Afternoon to Evening Boundary Layer Transition During Pecan 2015

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-12-01

    26 3. Effects of Cloud Cover Events on the Boundary Layer...73 3. COARE Precipitation and Cloud Comparison ................ 76 V. SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS...June 14 - July 15, 2015. ................................ 76  Figure 46.  Scatter Plot Evaluation of COARE versus Observed Fluxes Low- Cloud Events June

  18. Laser transit anemometer and Pitot probe comparative measurements in a sharp cone boundary layer at Mach 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, W. W., Jr.; Ocheltree, S. L.; Russ, C. E., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Laser transit anemometer (LTA) measurements of a 7 degree sharp cone boundary layer were conducted in the Air Force/AEDC Supersonic Tunnel A Mach 4 flow field. These measurements are compared with Pitot probe measurements and tricone theory provided by AEDC staff. Measurements were made both in laminar and turbulent boundary layers of the model. Comparison of LTA measurements with theory showed agreement to better than 1 percent for the laminar boundary layer cases. This level of agreement was obtained after small position corrections, 0.01 to 0.6 mm, were applied to the experimental data sets. Pitot probe data when compared with theory also showed small positioning errors. The Pitot data value was also limited due to probe interference with the flow near the model. The LTA turbulent boundary layer data indicated a power law dependence of 6.3 to 6.9. The LTA data was analyzed in the time (Tau) domain in which it was obtained and in the velocity domain. No significant differences were noted between Tau and velocity domain results except in one turbulent boundary layer case.

  19. On the determination of the position of laminar-turbulent transition in boundary layer by optical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bountin, D. A.; Gromyko, Yu. V.; Maslov, A. A.; Polivanov, P. A.; Sidorenko, A. A.

    2015-11-01

    As a rule, aerodynamic studies at hypersonic flow velocities are carried out in short-duration wind-tunnel facilities. For such facilities, optical diagnostic methods are most preferable. In the present study, we give for the first time a comparison of two methods for determining the end of laminar-turbulent transition: from the distribution of heat fluxes and from schlieren visualization data for the boundary-layer flow. Parametric data on the position of the transition are obtained. These data can be used in the future as reference ones while calibrating semi-empirical calculation models for the transition.

  20. Variable Sweep Transition Flight Experiment (VSTFE)-Parametric Pressure Distribution Boundary Layer Stability Study and Wing Glove Design Task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rozendaal, Rodger A.

    1986-01-01

    The Variable Sweep Transition Flight Experiment (VSTFE) was initiated to establish a boundary-layer transition data base for laminar flow wing design. For this experiment, full-span upper-surface gloves will be fitted to a variable sweep F-14 aircraft. The results of two initial tasks are documented: a parametric pressure distribution/boundary-layer stability study and the design of an upper-surface glove for Mach 0.8. The first task was conducted to provide a data base from which wing-glove pressure distributions could be selected for glove designs. Boundary-layer stability analyses were conducted on a set of pressure distributions for various wing sweep angles, Mach numbers, and Reynolds number in the range of those anticipated for the flight-test program. The design procedure for the Mach 0.8 glove is described, and boundary-layer stability calculations and pressure distributions are presented both at design and off-design conditions. Also included is the analysis of the clean-up glove (smoothed basic wing) that will be flight-tested initially and the analysis of a Mach 0.7 glove designed at the NASA Langley Research Center.

  1. Design and Implementation of the Boundary Layer Transition Flight Experiment on Space Shuttle Discovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spanos, Theodoros A.; Micklos, Ann

    2010-01-01

    In an effort to better the understanding of high speed aerodynamics, a series of flight experiments were installed on Space Shuttle Discovery during the STS-119 and STS-128 missions. This experiment, known as the Boundary Layer Transition Flight Experiment (BLTFE), provided the technical community with actual entry flight data from a known height protuberance at Mach numbers at and above Mach 15. Any such data above Mach 15 is irreproducible in a laboratory setting. Years of effort have been invested in obtaining this valuable data, and many obstacles had to be overcome in order to ensure the success of implementing an Orbiter modification. Many Space Shuttle systems were involved in the installation of appropriate components that revealed 'concurrent engineering' was a key integration tool. This allowed the coordination of all various parts and pieces which had to be sequenced appropriately and installed at the right time. Several issues encountered include Orbiter configuration and access, design requirements versus current layout, implementing the modification versus typical processing timelines, and optimizing the engineering design cycles and changes. Open lines of communication within the entire modification team were essential to project success as the team was spread out across the United States, from NASA Kennedy Space Center in Florida, to NASA Johnson Space Center in Texas, to Boeing Huntington Beach, California among others. The forum permits the discussion of processing concerns from the design phase to the implementation phase, which eventually saw the successful flights and data acquisition on STS-119 in March 2009 and on STS-128 in September 2009.

  2. Single-column model and large eddy simulation of the evening transition in the planetary boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuchiara, Gustavo; Rappenglück, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    The transition from the convective boundary layer during the daytime to the stable stratified boundary layer during nighttime after sunset plays an important role in the transport and dispersion of atmospheric pollutants. However, our knowledge regarding this transition and its feedback on the structure of the subsequent nocturnal boundary layer is still restricted. This also prevents forecast models from accurate prediction of the onset and development of the nighttime boundary layer, which determines the redistribution of pollutants within the nocturnal surface layer and the residual layer aloft. In the present study, the well-known case of day 33 of the Wangara experiment is resimulated using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model in an idealized single-column mode to assess the performance of a frequently used planetary boundary layer (PBL) scheme, the Yonsei University (YSU) PBL scheme. These results are compared with two large eddy simulations (LES) for the same case study imposing different surface fluxes: one using previous surface fluxes calculated for the Wangara experiment and a second one using output from the WRF model. The results show a reasonable agreement of the PBL scheme in WRF with the LES. Overall, all the simulations presented a cold bias of ~3 Kelvin for the potential temperature and underestimation of the wind speed, especially after the transition to nighttime conditions (biases were up to 4 ms-1). Finally, an alternative set of eddy diffusivity equations was tested to represent the transition characteristics of a sunset period, with a stable layer below and a new parameterization for the convective decay regime typically observed in the RL aloft. This set of equations led to a gradual decrease of the eddy diffusivity, which replaces the instantaneous collapse of traditional diagnostics for eddy diffusivities. More appreciable changes were observed in air temperature, wind speed and specific humidity (up to 0.5 K, 0.6 ms-1, and 0

  3. Problem of calculation of swept-wing boundary-layer transition to turbulence at elevated freestream turbulence levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kachanov, Y. S.; Borodulin, V. I.; Ivanov, A. V.

    2016-10-01

    A universal criterion of the beginning of laminar flow turbulization in swept-wing boundary layers was found recently. This is a rather simple criterion: a threshold combined amplitude of boundary-layer disturbances (i.e. sum of zero-to-peak amplitudes of steady and traveling cross-flow instability modes) observed just prior to the transition beginning point in which one of kinds of local high-frequency secondary instability appears. The present paper is devoted to additional substantiation of the concept of universal criterion in the cases of elevated freestream turbulence levels and enhanced amplitudes of steady freestream vortices, as well as to development of ways of calculation of the transition beginning location based of the threshold combined amplitude criterion and on a generalized variable N-factor approach.

  4. Large-Eddy Simulation of Boundary Layer Transition on Swept Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huai, Xiaoli; Joslin, Ronald D.; Piomelli, Ugo

    1993-01-01

    The large-eddy simulation of the spatial evolution of a stationary crossflow vortex packet in a three-dimensional boundary layer was performed. Although a coarse grid was used (compared to that required by a direct numerical simulation) the essential features of the disturbance evolution, such as the spanwise disturbance spreading and the vortex rollover, were captured accurately. The eddy viscosity became significant only in the late nonlinear stages of the simulation.

  5. Trip-Induced Transition Measurements in a Hypersonic Boundary Layer Using Molecular Tagging Velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bathel, Brett F.; Danehy, Paul M.; Jones, Stephen B.; Johansen, Craig T.; Goyne, Christopher P.

    2013-01-01

    Measurements of mean streamwise velocity, fluctuating streamwise velocity, and instantaneous streamwise velocity profiles in a hypersonic boundary layer were obtained over a 10-degree half-angle wedge model. A laser-induced fluorescence-based molecular tagging velocimetry technique was used to make the measurements. The nominal edge Mach number was 4.2. Velocity profiles were measured both in an untripped boundary layer and in the wake of a 4-mm diameter cylindrical tripping element centered 75.4 mm downstream of the sharp leading edge. Three different trip heights were investigated: k = 0.53 mm, k = 1.0 mm and k = 2.0 mm. The laminar boundary layer thickness at the position of the measurements was approximately 1 mm, though the exact thickness was dependent on Reynolds number and wall temperature. All of the measurements were made starting from a streamwise location approximately 18 mm downstream of the tripping element. This measurement region continued approximately 30 mm in the streamwise direction. Additionally, measurements were made at several spanwise locations. An analysis of flow features show how the magnitude, spatial location, and spatial growth of streamwise velocity instabilities are affected by parameters such as the ratio of trip height to boundary layer thickness and roughness Reynolds number. The fluctuating component of streamwise velocity measured along the centerline of the model increased from approximately 75 m/s with no trip to +/-225 m/s with a 0.53-mm trip, and to +/-240 m/s with a 1-mm trip, while holding the freestream Reynolds number constant. These measurements were performed in the 31-inch Mach 10 Air Tunnel at the NASA Langley Research Center.

  6. Shock Tunnel Operation and Correlation of Boundary Layer Transition on a Cone in Hypervelocity Flow

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    conditions from the ideal reflected-shock pressure to measured reservoir pressure using an isentropic expan- sion. Furthermore, the 1-D nozzle computation...does not account for boundary layer growth within the nozzle , off-design operation conditions that lead to flow nonuni- formity, or vibration...translation nonequilibrium and freezing within the nozzle , which is significant for the N2 cases. For the uncertainties that can be quantified, we have combined

  7. Transition Delay in a Hypervelocity Boundary Layer using Nonequilibrium CO2 Injection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-28

    be isolated from any specific injection scheme. The obtained results demonstrated that the addition of CO2, even as a minor component of the test...reactions and energy transfer mechanisms affect the boundary layer stability. To isolate the thermochemical effects on the disturbances, we can use a...stability of chemistry in the distur- bances alone. Using a similar technique, we can isolate the effect of changes in the mean flow profiles. For example

  8. The Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennekes, Hendrik

    1974-01-01

    Discusses some important parameters of the boundary layer and effects of turbulence on the circulation and energy dissipation of the atmosphere. Indicates that boundary-layer research plays an important role in long-term forecasting and the study of air-pollution meteorology. (CC)

  9. The Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennekes, Hendrik

    1974-01-01

    Discusses some important parameters of the boundary layer and effects of turbulence on the circulation and energy dissipation of the atmosphere. Indicates that boundary-layer research plays an important role in long-term forecasting and the study of air-pollution meteorology. (CC)

  10. Study of Transitions in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Using Explicit Algebraic Turbulence Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazeroms, W. M. J.; Svensson, G.; Bazile, E.; Brethouwer, G.; Wallin, S.; Johansson, A. V.

    2016-10-01

    We test a recently developed engineering turbulence model, a so-called explicit algebraic Reynolds-stress (EARS) model, in the context of the atmospheric boundary layer. First of all, we consider a stable boundary layer used as the well-known first test case from the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment Atmospheric Boundary Layer Study (GABLS1). The model is shown to agree well with data from large-eddy simulations (LES), and this agreement is significantly better than for a standard operational scheme with a prognostic equation for turbulent kinetic energy. Furthermore, we apply the model to a case with a (idealized) diurnal cycle and make a qualitative comparison with a simpler first-order model. Some interesting features of the model are highlighted, pertaining to its stronger foundation on physical principles. In particular, the use of more prognostic equations in the model is shown to give a more realistic dynamical behaviour. This qualitative study is the first step towards a more detailed comparison, for which additional LES data are needed.

  11. COSAL: A black-box compressible stability analysis code for transition prediction in three-dimensional boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malik, M. R.

    1982-01-01

    A fast computer code COSAL for transition prediction in three dimensional boundary layers using compressible stability analysis is described. The compressible stability eigenvalue problem is solved using a finite difference method, and the code is a black box in the sense that no guess of the eigenvalue is required from the user. Several optimization procedures were incorporated into COSAL to calculate integrated growth rates (N factor) for transition correlation for swept and tapered laminar flow control wings using the well known e to the Nth power method. A user's guide to the program is provided.

  12. A search for the effect of a high frequency spark on boundary-layer transition at Mach 8.5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anders, J. B.; Boatright, W. B.; Nayadley, J. R., Sr.

    1972-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the use of a high frequency spark to promote early boundary layer transition on a wind tunnel model was conducted at a Mach number of 8.5. Test variables included four electrode configurations, a frequency range from 10 kHz to 50 kHz, and various power inputs to the spark. The general conclusion obtained from this investigation is that over the parameter range, the high frequency spark is ineffective in inducing early transition at the test Mach number.

  13. The plasma sheet boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eastman, T. E.; Frank, L. A.; Peterson, W. K.; Lennartsson, W.

    1984-01-01

    A spatially distinct, temporally variable, transition region between the magnetotail lobes and the central plasma sheet designated the plasma sheet boundary layer has been identified from a survey of particle spectra and three-dimensional distributions as sampled by the ISEE 1 LEPEDEA. The instrumentation and data presentation are described, and the signatures of the magnetotail plasma regimes are presented and discussed for the central plasma sheet and lobe and the plasma sheet boundary layer. Comparisons of plasma parameters and distribution fucntions are made and the evolution of ion velocity distributions within the plasma sheet boundary layer is discussed. The spatial distribution of the plasma sheet boundary layer is considered and ion composition measurements are presented.

  14. Calculation of compressible nonadiabatic boundary layers in laminar, transitional and turbulent flow by the method of integral relations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, G. D.

    1971-01-01

    A computer program was developed to do the calculations for two-dimensional or axisymmetric configurations from low speeds to hypersonic speeds with arbitrary streamwise pressure, temperature, and Mach number distributions. Options are provided for obtaining initial conditions either from experimental information or from a theoretical similarity solution. The transition region can be described either by an arbitrary distribution of intermittency or by a function based on Emmons' probability theory. Correlations were developed for use in estimating the parameters of the theoretical intermittency function. Correlations obtained from other sources are used for estimating the transition point. Comparisons were made between calculated and measured boundary layer quantities for laminar, transitional, and turbulent flows on flat plates, cones, cone flares, and a waisted body of revolution. Excellent agreement was obtained between the present theory and two other theories based on the method of finite differences. The intermittency required to reproduce some experimental heat transfer results in hypersonic flow was found to be quite different from the theoretical function. It is suggested that the simple probability theory of Emmons may not be valid for representing the intermittency of hypersonic transitional boundary layers and that the program could be useful as a tool for detailed study of the intermittency of the transition region.

  15. Assessing Uncertainties in Boundary Layer Transition Predictions for HIFiRE-1 at Non-zero Angles of Attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marek, Lindsay C.

    2011-01-01

    Boundary layer stability was analyzed for the HIFiRE-1 flight vehicle geometry for ground tests conducted at the CUBRC LENS I hypersonic shock test facility and the Langley Research Center (LaRC) 20- inch Mach 6 Tunnel. Boundary layer stability results were compared to transition onset location obtained from discrete heat transfer measurements from thin film gauges during the CUBRC test and spatially continuous heat transfer measurements from thermal phosphor paint data during the LaRC test. The focus of this analysis was on conditions at non-zero angles of attack as stability analysis has already been performed at zero degrees angle of attack. Also, the transition onset data obtained during flight testing was at nonzero angles of attack, so this analysis could be expanded in the future to include the results of the flight test data. Stability analysis was performed using the 2D parabolized stability software suite STABL (Stability and Transition Analysis for Hypersonic Boundary Layers) developed at the University of Minnesota and the mean flow solutions were computed using the DPLR finite volume Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solver. A center line slice of the 3D mean flow solution was used for the stability analysis to incorporate the angle of attack effects while still taking advantage of the 2D STABL software suite. The N-factors at transition onset and the value of Re(sub theta)/M(sub e), commonly used to predict boundary layer transition onset, were compared for all conditions analyzed. Ground test data was analyzed at Mach 7.2 and Mach 6.0 and angles of attack of 1deg, 3deg and 5deg. At these conditions, the flow was found to be second mode dominant for the HIFiRE-1 slender cone geometry. On the leeward side of the vehicle, a strong trend of transition onset location with angle of attack was observed as the boundary layer on the leeward side of the vehicle developed inflection points at streamwise positions on the vehicle that correlated to

  16. Effects of compressibility and free-stream turbulence on boundary layer transition in high-subsonic and transonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, S. V.; Steinle, F. W.

    1986-01-01

    Based on the existing boundary layer transition data, the effects of compressibility, pressure fluctuations, and free-stream turbulence have been reexamined for subsonic and transonic flow speeds. It is confirmed that the compressibility effects may be adequately expressed in terms of a simple correlation with free-stream Mach number. Pressure fluctuations, especially at low levels, do not seem to significantly affect the transition phenomenon. Effects of free-stream turbulence in high-subsonic and transonic flows are similar to the trends observed for low-speed flows and the transition process is hastened. The trends, as seen from slender cone flow data, seem to suggest power law correlations between transition Reynolds number and free-stream turbulence.

  17. Effects of compressibility and free-stream turbulence on boundary layer transition in high-subsonic and transonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, S. V.; Steinle, F. W.

    1986-01-01

    Based on the existing boundary layer transition data, the effects of compressibility, pressure fluctuations, and free-stream turbulence have been reexamined for subsonic and transonic flow speeds. It is confirmed that the compressibility effects may be adequately expressed in terms of a simple correlation with free-stream Mach number. Pressure fluctuations, especially at low levels, do not seem to significantly affect the transition phenomenon. Effects of free-stream turbulence in high-subsonic and transonic flows are similar to the trends observed for low-speed flows and the transition process is hastened. The trends, as seen from slender cone flow data, seem to suggest power law correlations between transition Reynolds number and free-stream turbulence.

  18. Ventilated Oscillatory Boundary Layers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-02-01

    AD-A266 226IllII !i III ll11111 II •" Ventilated Oscillatory Boundary Layers 0 Daniel -. Conley Douglas L. I nman C 0 UM U U U U till 1% w 1% W" Z t...A SIGNIFICANT NUMBER OF PAGES WHICH DO NOT REPRODUCE LEGIBLY. VENlTILATiD SCIILLAORY BOUNDARY LAYERS Daniel C. C7onley DoL’laN L. . ... La olDla...Wave Crest ........ 5. Boundary Layer Development Under the Wave Trough W 6 . Laboratory Observations .................. ................ 7

  19. The scaling transition of Nu number and boundary layer thickness in RB convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Hong-Yue; Chen, Xi; She, Zhen-Su

    2016-11-01

    A quantitative theory is developed for the vertical mean temperature profile (MTP) and mean velocity profile (MVP) in turbulent Rayleigh-Benard Convection (RBC), which explains the experimental and numerical observations of logarithmic law in MTP and the Rayleigh number (Ra)-dependence of its coefficient A. The theory extends a symmetry analysis of canonical wall-bounded turbulent flows, which allows to extract accurate Ra scaling of the sub-layer, buffer layer and log-layer thicknesses from the empirical data over a wide range of Ra. In particular, the scaling of the multi-layer thicknesses predicts that the log-law coefficient A follows a -0.121 scaling, which agrees well with the experimental data. More interestingly, a scaling transition is discovered for the kinetic sublayer thickness around Ra of 1010, which yields a scaling transition of Nu from 1/3 to 0.38. We also develop a new explanation for mean temperature logarithmic law: the effect of inverse pressure gradient drives plumes upwards near the side wall, and yields a similarity between temperature and momentum transport in the vertical direction.

  20. Performance of Renormalization Group Algebraic Turbulence Model on Boundary Layer Transition Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahn, Kyung H.

    1994-01-01

    The RNG-based algebraic turbulence model, with a new method of solving the cubic equation and applying new length scales, is introduced. An analysis is made of the RNG length scale which was previously reported and the resulting eddy viscosity is compared with those from other algebraic turbulence models. Subsequently, a new length scale is introduced which actually uses the two previous RNG length scales in a systematic way to improve the model performance. The performance of the present RNG model is demonstrated by simulating the boundary layer flow over a flat plate and the flow over an airfoil.

  1. A new method for laminar boundary layer transition visualization in flight: Color changes in liquid crystal coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, B. J.; Gall, P. D.; Croom, C. C.; Manuel, G. S.; Kelliher, W. C.

    1986-01-01

    The visualization of laminar to turbulent boundary layer transition plays an important role in flight and wind-tunnel aerodynamic testing of aircraft wing and body surfaces. Visualization can help provide a more complete understanding of both transition location as well as transition modes; without visualization, the transition process can be very difficult to understand. In the past, the most valuable transition visualization methods for flight applications included sublimating chemicals and oil flows. Each method has advantages and limitations. In particular, sublimating chemicals are impractical to use in subsonic applications much above 20,000 feet because of the greatly reduced rates of sublimation at lower temperatures (less than -4 degrees Farenheit). Both oil flow and sublimating chemicals have the disadvantage of providing only one good data point per flight. Thus, for many important flight conditions, transition visualization has not been readily available. This paper discusses a new method for visualizing transition in flight by the use of liquid crystals. The new method overcomes the limitations of past techniques, and provides transition visualization capability throughout almost the entire altitude and speed ranges of virtually all subsonic aircraft flight envelopes. The method also has wide applicability for supersonic transition visualization in flight and for general use in wind tunnel research over wide subsonic and supersonic speed ranges.

  2. Direct numerical simulation of hypersonic boundary layer transition over a blunt cone with a small angle of attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinliang; Fu, Dexun; Ma, Yanwen

    2010-02-01

    The direct numerical simulation of boundary layer transition over a 5° half-cone-angle blunt cone is performed. The free-stream Mach number is 6 and the angle of attack is 1°. Random wall blow-and-suction perturbations are used to trigger the transition. Different from the authors' previous work [Li et al., AIAA J. 46, 2899 (2008)], the whole boundary layer flow over the cone is simulated (while in the author's previous work, only two 45° regions around the leeward and the windward sections are simulated). The transition location on the cone surface is determined through the rapid increase in skin fraction coefficient (Cf). The transition line on the cone surface shows a nonmonotonic curve and the transition is delayed in the range of 20°≤θ≤30° (θ =0° is the leeward section). The mechanism of the delayed transition is studied by using joint frequency spectrum analysis and linear stability theory (LST). It is shown that the growth rates of unstable waves of the second mode are suppressed in the range of 20°≤θ≤30°, which leads to the delayed transition location. Very low frequency waves (VLFWs) are found in the time series recorded just before the transition location, and the periodic times of VLFWs are about one order larger than those of ordinary Mack second mode waves. Band-pass filter is used to analyze the low frequency waves, and they are deemed as the effect of large scale nonlinear perturbations triggered by LST waves when they are strong enough.

  3. A Low-Speed Experimental Investigation of the Effect of a Sandpaper Type of Roughness on Boundary-Layer Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Doenhoff, Albert E; Horton, Elmer A

    1958-01-01

    An investigation was made in the Langley low-turbulence pressure tunnel to determine the effect of size and location of a sandpaper type of roughness on the Reynolds number for transition. Transition was observed by means of a hot-wire anemometer located at various chordwise stations for each position of the roughness. These observations indicated that when the roughness is sufficiently submerged in the boundary layer to provide a substantially linear variation of boundary-layer velocity with distance from the surface up to the top of the roughness, turbulent "spots" begin to appear immediately behind the roughness when the Reynolds number based on the velocity at the top of the roughness height exceeds a value of approximately 600. At Reynolds numbers even slightly below the critical value (value for transition), the sandpaper type of roughness introduced no measurable disturbances into the laminar layer downstream of the roughness. The extent of the roughness area does not appear to have an important effect on the critical value of the roughness Reynolds number.

  4. Boundary-layer flow and power output in large wind farms during transition from neutral to stable conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allaerts, Dries; Meyers, Johan

    2016-11-01

    In wind farms, power deficits are directly related to ambient turbulence levels. Power deficits will therefore increase during the transition from a daytime, conventionally neutral boundary layer (CNBL) to the stable boundary layer (SBL) at night. Besides turbulent decay, a multitude of effects occurs during this transition. For instance, low-level jets may cause strong winds at high elevations, while the velocity near the surface generally decreases. Consequently, Coriolis forces induce a change in wind direction, which alters the apparent wind-farm layout in streamwise direction. In this study, we perform LES of a large onshore wind farm in the late-afternoon transition from an equilibrium CNBL to a surface-cooled SBL. The results of two different cooling rates are compared with the wind-farm performance in the CNBL. The power output decrease during the transition, with faster decrease for stronger surface cooling. However, the initial decrease is dominated by the reduction in wind speed, and the relative power deficits do not increase. Further, considerable wake deflection occurs, and a spatially heterogeneous distribution of temperature and heat flux is observed. The authors acknowledge support from the European Research Council (FP7-Ideas, Grant No. 306471).

  5. Predictions of Separated and Transitional Boundary Layers Under Low-Pressure Turbine Airfoil Conditions Using an Intermittency Transport Equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suzen, Y. Bora; Huang, P. G.; Hultgren, Lennart S.; Ashpis, David E.

    2001-01-01

    A new transport equation for the intermittency factor was proposed to predict separated and transitional boundary layers under low-pressure turbine airfoil conditions. The intermittent behavior of the transitional flows is taken into account and incorporated into computations by modifying the eddy viscosity, mu(sub t), with the intermittency factor, gamma. Turbulent quantities are predicted by using Menter's two-equation turbulence model (SST). The intermittency factor is obtained from a transport equation model, which not only can reproduce the experimentally observed streamwise variation of the intermittency in the transition zone, but also can provide a realistic cross-stream variation of the intermittency profile. In this paper, the intermittency model is used to predict a recent separated and transitional boundary layer experiment under low pressure turbine airfoil conditions. The experiment provides detailed measurements of velocity, turbulent kinetic energy and intermittency profiles for a number of Reynolds numbers and freestream turbulent intensity conditions and is suitable for validation purposes. Detailed comparisons of computational results with experimental data are presented and good agreements between the experiments and predictions are obtained.

  6. Predictions of Separated and Transitional Boundary Layers Under Low-Pressure Turbine Airfoil Conditions Using an Intermittency Transport Equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suzen, Y. B.; Huang, P. G.; Hultgren, Lennart S.; Ashpis, David E.

    2003-01-01

    A new transport equation for the intermittency factor was proposed to predict separated and transitional boundary layers under low-pressure turbine airfoil conditions. The intermittent behavior of the transitional flows is taken into account and incorporated into computations by modifying the eddy viscosity, t , with the intermittency factor, y. Turbulent quantities are predicted by using Menter s two-equation turbulence model (SST). The intermittency factor is obtained from a transport equation model, which not only can reproduce the experimentally observed streamwise variation of the intermittency in the transition zone, but also can provide a realistic cross-stream variation of the intermittency profile. In this paper, the intermittency model is used to predict a recent separated and transitional boundary layer experiment under low pressure turbine airfoil conditions. The experiment provides detailed measurements of velocity, turbulent kinetic energy and intermittency profiles for a number of Reynolds numbers and freestream turbulent intensity conditions and is suitable for validation purposes. Detailed comparisons of computational results with experimental data are presented and good agreements between the experiments and predictions are obtained.

  7. Swept-wing boundary-layer transition at various external perturbations: Scenarios, criteria, and problems of prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borodulin, V. I.; Ivanov, A. V.; Kachanov, Y. S.

    2017-09-01

    This experimental work is devoted to a parametric study of characteristics of the laminar-turbulent transition occurred in a model of a crossflow-dominated swept-wing boundary layer. The experiments are performed in 39 different regimes with low and elevated freestream turbulence levels both in the absence and in the presence of steady freestream vortices of various spanwise scales. The measurements are performed at several values of freestream velocity for two types of distributed surface roughness. Transition scenarios and criteria of turbulence onset are investigated and the problem of transition prediction is examined. It is shown that in all studied cases, the turbulence onset starts with the appearance of local high-frequency secondary instability of the base flow perturbed by primary instability modes. It is found that the 30% level of the threshold zero-to-peak amplitude of combined boundary-layer disturbances (i.e., the steady ones plus unsteady ones) can be used in all studied cases as a simplified turbulence-onset criterion, which was found in previous experiments at other flow and disturbance conditions. A very important, often decisive role of extremely weak steady free-steam disturbances produced by turbulence generating grids is investigated. A generalized combined variable N-factor method of transition prediction is suggested.

  8. Use of shear-stress-sensitive, temperature-insensitive liquid crystals for hypersonic boundary-layer transition detection

    SciTech Connect

    Aeschliman, D.P.; Croll, R.H.; Kuntz, D.W.

    1997-04-01

    The use of shear-stress-sensitive, temperature-insensitive (SSS/TI) liquid crystals (LCs) has been evaluated as a boundary-layer transition detection technique for hypersonic flows. Experiments were conducted at Mach 8 in the Sandia National Laboratories Hypersonic Wind Tunnel using a flat plate model at near zero-degree angle of attack over the freestream unit Reynolds number range 1.2-5.8x10{sup 6}/ft. Standard 35mm color photography and Super VHS color video were used to record LC color changes due to varying surface shear stress during the transition process for a range of commercial SSS liquid crystals. Visual transition data were compared to an established method using calorimetric surface heat-transfer measurements to evaluate the LC technique. It is concluded that the use of SSS/TI LCs can be an inexpensive, safe, and easy to use boundary-layer transition detection method for hypersonic flows. However, a valid interpretation of the visual records requires careful attention to illumination intensity levels and uniformity, lighting and viewing angles, some prior understanding of the general character of the flow, and the selection of the appropriate liquid crystal for the particular flow conditions.

  9. Correlations of supersonic boundary-layer transition on cones including effects of large axial variations in wind-tunnel noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, F. J.; Beckwith, I. E.; Creel, T. R., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Transition data on sharp tip cones in two pilot low disturbance wind tunnels at Mach numbers of 3.5 and 5 were correlated in terms of noise parameters with data from several conventional wind tunnels and with data from supersonic flight tests on a transition cone. The noise parameters were developed to account for the large axial variations of the free stream noise and the very high frequency noise spectra that occurred in the low disturbance tunnels for some test conditions. The noise could be varied in these tunnels from high levels, approaching those in conventional tunnels, to extremely low levels. The correlations indicated that transition in the low disturbance tunnels was dominated by the local stream noise that was incident on the cone boundary layer unstream of the neutral stability point. The correlation results also suggested that high frequency components of the low disturbance tunnel noise spectra had significant effects on transition when the noise was incident on the boundary layer both upstream and downstream of the neutral stability point.

  10. On role of kinetic fluctuations in laminar-turbulent transition in chemically nonequilibrium boundary layer flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tumin, Anatoli

    2015-11-01

    Zavol'skii and Reutov (1983), Luchini (2008, 2010), Fedorov (2010, 2012, 2014) explored potential role of kinetic fluctuations (KF) in incompressible and calorically perfect gas boundary layer flows. The results indicate that role of KF is comparable with other disturbance sources in flight experiments and in quiet wind tunnels. The analysis is based on the Landau and Lifshitz (1957) concept of fluctuating hydrodynamics representing the dissipative fluxes as an average and fluctuating parts. We are extending analysis of the receptivity problem to the fluctuating dissipative fluxes in chemically reacting nonequilibrium boundary layer flows of binary mixtures. There are new terms in the energy, and the species equations. The species conservation equation includes the dissipative diffusion flux and the species generation due to dissociation. The momentum equation includes fluctuating stress tensor. The energy equation includes fluctuating heat flux, energy flux due to diffusion of the species, and fluctuating dissipative flux due to viscosity. The effects are compared for the cases stemming from constraints of the HTV project (Klentzman and Tumin, AIAA Paper 2013-2882). Supported by AFOSR.

  11. Transitional Benthic Boundary Layers and their Influence on Nutrient Flux in Tidal Estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koetje, K. M.; Foster, D. L.; Lippmann, T. C.; Kalnejais, L. H.

    2016-12-01

    Quantifying the coupled physical and geochemical processes in the fluid-sediment interface is critical to managing coastal resources. This is of particular importance during times of enhanced hydrodynamic forcing where extreme tide or wind events can have a significant impact on water quality. A combination of field and laboratory experiments were used to examine the relationship between large-scale fluid shear stresses and geochemical fluxes at the fluid-sediment interface in the Great Bay Estuary, New Hampshire. Sediment geochemical measurements paired with flow field observations along estuary-wide transects over several tidal cycles provide nutrient load estimates that can be scaled to represent the whole Bay. Three-dimensional flow field measurements collected using a maneuverable personal watercraft were used to determine the spatial and temporal variability of the shear stress throughout the Bay. High-resolution bottom boundary layer dynamics were observed using a suite of acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCP) in order to improve the accuracy of diffusive flux estimates by directly measuring the thickness of the benthic boundary layer. Over the 2.5 m tidal range and at water depths ranging from 0.3 m to 1.5 m at mean lower low water, peak mean flows ranged from 0.2 m/s to 1 m/s at the sampling sites. The dominant contribution of hydrodynamic forcing to the Bay is due to tidal flows, which are largely unidirectional during flood tide. Sediment grain size analysis characterized the bed at sampling sites as fine-grained sandy mud (d50 = 47 μm). Sampling during typical tidal flow conditions, a smooth turbulent flow field was observed and the threshold of motion was not exceeded. Along with sediment characterization, porosity profiles and erosion chamber experiments were used to characterize nutrient release. This host of data provides shear stress estimates that can constrain nutrient loads under variable hydrodynamic conditions.

  12. Application of sound and temperature to control boundary-layer transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, Lucio; Parikh, Paresh; Bayliss, A.; Huang, L. S.; Bryant, T. D.

    1987-01-01

    The growth and decay of a wave packet convecting in a boundary layer over a concave-convex surface and its active control by localized surface heating are studied numerically using direct computations of the Navier-Stokes equations. The resulting sound radiations are computed using linearized Euler equations with the pressure from the Navier-Stokes solution as a time-dependent boundary condition. It is shown that on the concave portion the amplitude of the wave packet increases and its bandwidth broadens while on the convex portion some of the components in the packet are stabilized. The pressure field decays exponentially away from the surface and then algebraically, exhibiting a decay characteristic of acoustic waves in two dimensions. The far-field acoustic behavior exhibits a super-directivity type of behavior with a beaming downstream. Active control by surface heating is shown to reduce the growth of the wave packet but have little effect on acoustic far field behavior for the cases considered. Active control by sound emanating from the surface of an airfoil in the vicinity of the leading edge is experimentally investigated. The purpose is to control the separated region at high angles of attack. The results show that injection of sound at shedding frequency of the flow is effective in an increase of lift and reduction of drag.

  13. Spatial Direct Numerical Simulation of Boundary-Layer Transition Mechanisms: Validation of PSE Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joslin, R. D.; Streett, C. L.; Chang, C.-L.

    1991-01-01

    A study of instabilities in incompressible boundary-layer flow on a flat plate is conducted by spatial direct numerical simulation (DNS) of the Navier-Stokes equations. Here, the DNS results are used to critically evaluate the results obtained using parabolized stability equations (PSE) theory and to study mechanisms associated with breakdown from laminar to turbulent flow. Three test cases are considered: two-dimensional Tollmien-Schlichting wave propagation, subharmonic instability breakdown, and oblique-wave break-down. The instability modes predicted by PSE theory are in good quantitative agreement with the DNS results, except a small discrepancy is evident in the mean-flow distortion component of the 2-D test problem. This discrepancy is attributed to far-field boundary- condition differences. Both DNS and PSE theory results show several modal discrepancies when compared with the experiments of subharmonic breakdown. Computations that allow for a small adverse pressure gradient in the basic flow and a variation of the disturbance frequency result in better agreement with the experiments.

  14. Impact of ns-DBD plasma actuation on the boundary layer transition using convective heat transfer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullmer, Dirk; Peschke, Philip; Terzis, Alexandros; Ott, Peter; Weigand, Bernhard

    2015-09-01

    This paper demonstrates that the impact of nanosecond pulsed dielectric barrier discharge (ns-DBD) actuators on the structure of the boundary layer can be investigated using quantitative convective heat transfer measurements. For the experiments, the flow over a flat plate with a C4 leading edge thickness distribution was examined at low speed incompressible flow (6.6-11.5 m s-1). An ns-DBD plasma actuator was mounted 5 mm downstream of the leading edge and several experiments were conducted giving particular emphasis on the effect of actuation frequency and the freestream velocity. Local heat transfer distributions were measured using the transient liquid crystal technique with and without plasma activated. As a result, any effect of plasma on the structure of the boundary layer is interpreted by local heat transfer coefficient distributions which are compared with laminar and turbulent boundary layer correlations. The heat transfer results, which are also confirmed by hot-wire measurements, show the considerable effect of the actuation frequency on the location of the transition point elucidating that liquid crystal thermography is a promising method for investigating plasma-flow interactions very close to the wall. Additionally, the hot-wire measurements indicate possible velocity oscillations in the near wall flow due to plasma activation.

  15. Observations of the Nocturnal Boundary Layer and Morning Transitional Periods in Houston, Texas during the TexAQS II Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, B. M.; Clements, C. B.; Rappenglueck, B.

    2007-12-01

    High-temporal resolution tethersonde profiles taken during the TexAQS II field campaign in Houston were used to study the overnight development and progression of the nocturnal boundary layer (NBL) and the evolution of the convective boundary layer after sunrise. The measurements were made at the University of Houston campus, located approximately 4 km southeast of the downtown Houston central business district, and consisted of vertical profiles of potential temperature, water vapor mixing ratio, wind speed, wind direction, and ozone concentration. Profile heights averaged 250 m AGL with a few reaching 400 m AGL. Profiles were taken at approximately 30 min intervals throughout 4 nights during Intensive Observational Periods (IOPs), including both the evening and morning transitional periods. Tethersonde experiments also were performed during several additional morning break-up periods during the campaign. Preliminary results from the overnight experiments of Sept 7-8 and Sept 14-15, 2006 showed different NBL evolutions. Sept 7-8 exhibited a stronger and deeper inversion compared with Sept 14-15 when the inversion was weak with a fairly constant height throughout the night. The Sept 7-8 profiles showed elevated bluff-like structures in the virtual potential temperature profiles between 0300-0400 CDT, indicating neutral stability within the 40-90 m AGL level. And, just before sunrise a neutral layer with constant potential temperature developed between the surface and 75 m AGL reflecting horizontal cold air advection. Further analyses will be presented for other vertical profiles taken during the campaign, including the additional overnight profiles as well as the profiles taken during the morning transition to the convective boundary layer.

  16. The Effect of Backward-Facing Step Height on Instability Growth and Breakdown in Swept Wing Boundary-Layer Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eppink, Jenna L.; Wlezien, Richard W.; King, Rudolph A.; Choudhari, Meelan

    2015-01-01

    A low-speed experiment was performed on a swept at plate model with an imposed pressure gradient to determine the effect of a backward-facing step on transition in a stationary-cross flow dominated flow. Detailed hot-wire boundary-layer measurements were performed for three backward-facing step heights of approximately 36, 45, and 49% of the boundary-layer thickness at the step. These step heights correspond to a subcritical, nearly-critical, and critical case. Three leading-edge roughness configurations were tested to determine the effect of stationary-cross flow amplitude on transition. The step caused a local increase in amplitude of the stationary cross flow for the two larger step height cases, but farther downstream the amplitude decreased and remained below the baseline amplitude. The smallest step caused a slight local decrease in amplitude of the primary stationary cross flow mode, but the amplitude collapsed back to the baseline case far downstream of the step. The effect of the step on the amplitude of the primary cross flow mode increased with step height, however, the stationary cross flow amplitudes remained low and thus, stationary cross flow was not solely responsible for transition. Unsteady disturbances were present downstream of the step for all three step heights, and the amplitudes increased with increasing step height. The only exception is that the lower frequency (traveling crossflow-like) disturbance was not present in the lowest step height case. Positive and negative spikes in instantaneous velocity began to occur for the two larger step height cases and then grew in number and amplitude downstream of reattachment, eventually leading to transition. The number and amplitude of spikes varied depending on the step height and cross flow amplitude. Despite the low amplitude of the disturbances in the intermediate step height case, breakdown began to occur intermittently and the flow underwent a long transition region.

  17. Boundary layer simulator improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Praharaj, Sarat C.; Schmitz, Craig P.; Nouri, Joseph A.

    1989-01-01

    Boundary Layer Integral Matrix Procedure (BLIMPJ) has been identified by the propulsion community as the rigorous boundary layer program in connection with the existing JANNAF reference programs. The improvements made to BLIMPJ and described herein have potential applications in the design of the future Orbit Transfer Vehicle engines. The turbulence model is validated to include the effects of wall roughness and a way is devised to treat multiple smooth-rough surfaces. A prediction of relaminarization regions is examined as is the combined effects of wall cooling and surface roughness on relaminarization. A turbulence model to represent the effects of constant condensed phase loading is given. A procedure is described for thrust decrement calculation in thick boundary layers by coupling the T-D Kinetics Program and BLIMPJ and a way is provided for thrust loss optimization. Potential experimental studies in rocket nozzles are identified along with the required instrumentation to provide accurate measurements in support of the presented new analytical models.

  18. Development of perturbations in the boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dovgal, A. V.; Kachanov, Y. S.; Kozlov, V. V.; Levchenko, V. Y.; Maksimov, V. P.

    1986-01-01

    The transition of laminar flows into turbulent flows in a boundary layer is discussed. The individual aspects of the transition process, observed under controllable model conditions are examined. The aspect of this problem, namely the development or excitation of the natural oscillations in the boundary layer, the so-called Tollmin-Schlichting waves is covered. Three types of excitation of these waves are considered: (1) distributed generation throughout the boundary layer; (2) generation in the vicinity of the forward edge of a model, having either a sharp edge or an edge with a large radius or curvature, and (3) generation in a developed boundary layer by means of a focused effect.

  19. Towards Feedback Control of Bypass Transition: Experiments on Laminar Boundary Layer Response to a Pulsed Plasma Actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavoie, Philippe; Hanson, Ronald; Naguib, Ahmed

    2010-11-01

    Plasma actuators have recently been shown to negate the effect of the transient growth instability occurring in a Blasius boundary layer for the purpose of delaying bypass transition. Specifically, a spanwise array of symmetric plasma actuators generate a counter disturbance of spanwise periodic counter-rotating vortices. During steady operation, the total disturbance energy, introduced via an array of static cylindrical roughness elements, was reduced by up to 68%, as shown by Hanson et al (Exp. Fluids, 2010). The objective of this work is to elucidate the dynamic response of a laminar boundary layer to pulsed excitation by the actuators used in the aforementioned study. The temporal evolution and decay of the disturbance is studied using phase-averaged hotwire measurements at a single plane located downstream of the actuator. The data provide insight into the spatio-temporal character of the modes excited by pulsed plasma actuation. Results are discussed with respect to eventual integration with a feedback control system in collaboration with Princeton University in a multi-university research program aimed at transition control.

  20. Using Surface-based Downwelling Spectral Infrared Radiance Observations to Understand Atmospheric Boundary Layer Structure and Evolution: The Evening Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, D. D.; Blumberg, W. G.; Khosravian, K.

    2016-12-01

    The downwelling spectral infrared radiance at the surface depends on the vertical structure of temperature and trace gases such as water vapor and carbon dioxide, as well as the presence and optical properties of any cloud and aerosol layers. A 1-dimensional variational retrieval algorithm has been developed that retrieves profiles of temperature and humidity in the lowest 3 km of the troposphere, cloud properties, and limited information on carbon dioxide and methane from 20-s measurements of infrared radiance from a ground-based interferometer. These retrievals will be used to look at the evolution of the atmosphere during the afternoon-to-evening transition, when solar heating of the surface diminishes rapidly and a stable boundary layer develops.

  1. Active Wave Cancellation in a Transitional Flat-Plate Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izawa, Seiichiro; Sakai, Takeshi; Xiong, Ao-Kui; Fukunishi, Yu

    2004-11-01

    A semi-automatic feedback control system using an array of piezo-ceramic (PZT) actuators attached on a flat-plate surface is used to suppress the instability waves such as T-S waves and oblique waves in a flat-plate boundary layer. Target waves, T-S waves and oblique waves, are excited upstream by a combination of roughness elements on the plate surface (Scotch tapes) and an acoustic using a loud speaker. Six single hotwire probes are used to monitor the velocity fluctuations downstream. Based on the information, the phase and amplitude of a signal to operate each actuator is updated one by one, every time step. The adjustment continues until the waves are damped to a level below the criterion. The experimental results show that the control system can damp the two-dimensional T-S waves and the oblique waves of a fifteen-degree sweep angle, however the system is not capable of controlling the oblique waves of a thirty-degree sweep angle. The reason why the system has difficulty in controlling the oblique waves of large sweep angle is discussed.

  2. Multigrid mapping and box relaxation for simulation of the whole process of flow transition in 3-D boundary layers

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.; Liu, Z.

    1994-12-31

    A new multilevel technology was developed in this study which provides a successful numerical simulation for the whole process of flow transition in 3-D flat plate boundary layers, including linear growth, secondary instability, breakdown, and transition on a relatively coarse grid with low CPU cost. A fourth-order finite difference scheme on stretched and staggered grids, a fully implicit time-marching technique, a semi-coarsening multigrid based on the so-called approximate line-box relaxation, and a buffer domain for the outflow boundary conditions were all employed for high-order accuracy, good stability, and fast convergence. A new fine-coarse-fine grid mapping technique was developed to catch the large eddies and represent main roles of small eddies to keep the code running after the laminar flow breaks down. The computational results are in good agreement with linear stability theory, secondary instability theory, and some experiments. The computation also reproduced the K-type and C-type transition observed by laboratory experiments. The CPU cost for a typical case is around 2-9 CRAY-YMP hours.

  3. Effect of two-scale roughness on boundary layer transition over a heated flat plate: Part 1 -- Surface heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Pinson, M.W.; Wang, T.

    2000-04-01

    An experimental study was conducted to investigate surface heat transfer and boundary layer development associated with flow over a flat test surface covered with two roughness scales. Two-scale roughness was used because in-service aeroengines commonly display larger roughness concentrated at the leading edge with smaller roughness distributed downstream. The first scale, covering up to the first 5 cm of the test surface, was in the form of a sandpaper strip, an aluminum strip, or a cylinder. The second roughness scale covered the remainder of the test surface (2 m) in the form of sandpaper or a smooth surface. In Part 1, the surface heat transfer results are examined. Even though the roughness scales were hydraulically smooth, they induced significantly earlier transition onset, with the two-dimensional roughness causing earlier transition than three-dimensional roughness. All of the rough/smooth cases unexpectedly triggered earlier transition than rough/rough cases. This indicated that the scale of the step-change at the joint between two roughness scales was predominant over the downstream roughness on inducing early transition. Reducing the overall height of the step change was shown to have a greater effect on transition than the specific geometry of the roughness scale.

  4. Ultrasonic absorption characteristics of porous carbon-carbon ceramics with random microstructure for passive hypersonic boundary layer transition control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Alexander; Hannemann, Klaus; Kuhn, Markus

    2014-06-01

    Preceding studies in the high enthalpy shock tunnel Göttingen of the German Aerospace Center (DLR) revealed that carbon fibre reinforced carbon ceramic (C/C) surfaces can be utilized to damp hypersonic boundary layer instabilities leading to a delay of boundary layer transition onset. To assess the ultrasonic absorption properties of the material, a test rig was set up to measure the reflection coefficient at ambient pressures ranging from 0.1 × 105 to 1 × 105 Pa. For the first time, broadband ultrasonic sound transducers with resonance frequencies of up to 370 kHz were applied to directly cover the frequency range of interest with respect to the second-mode instabilities observed in previous experiments. The reflection of ultrasonic waves from three flat plate test samples with a porous layer thickness between 5 and 30 mm was investigated and compared to an ideally reflecting surface. C/C was found to absorb up to 19 % of the acoustic power transmitted towards the material. The absorption characteristics were investigated theoretically by means of the quasi-homogeneous absorber theory. The experimental results were found to be in good agreement with the theory.

  5. A comprehensive investigation on afternoon-evening transition of the atmospheric boundary layer over a tropical rural site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandeep, A.; Narayana Rao, T.; Rao, S. V. B.

    2014-12-01

    The transitory nature of the atmospheric boundary layer few hours before and after the time of sunset has been studied comprehensively over a tropical station, Gadanki (13.45° N, 79.18° E), using a suite of in-situ and remote sensing devices. This study addresses the following fundamental and important issues related to the afternoon-to-evening transition (AET). Which state variable first identifies it? Which variable best identifies it? Does the start time of AET varies with season and height? If so, which physical mechanism is responsible for the observed height variation in the start time of transition? The transition is seen first in temperature (T) and wind variance (σ2ws) variations at the surface, ∼ 100 min prior to the time of sunset, then in vertical temperature gradient and finally in water vapour mixing ratio variation. Aloft, the AET is observed nearly at the same time in signal to noise ratio (SNR) and spectral width (σ) measurements of wind profiler and sodar. TheT at the surface and SNR aloft identify the signature of transition unambiguously. Also, their distributions for start time of AET with reference to the time of sunset are narrow and consistent in total and seasonal plots. The start time of transition shows some seasonal variation with delayed transitions occurring mostly in the rainy and humid season of northeast monsoon. Interestingly, in contrast to the general perception, the signature of the transition is first seen in the profiler data then in sodar data and finally in the surface data, suggesting that the transition follows top-to-bottom evolution. It indicates that other forcings, like entrainment, play a major role in altering the structure of ABL during the AET, when the sensible heat flux decreases progressively. These forcing terms are quantified using a unique high-resolution dataset to understand their variation in light of the intriguing height dependency of the start time of AET.

  6. Control of Transient Growth Induced Transition in a Zero--Pressure Gradient Boundary Layer Using Plasma Actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Ronald Edwin

    The level of the skin friction drag depends on the boundary layer state, either low, for the laminar case or high for the turbulent case. Flow control is sought to attenuate the streamwise velocity streaks preceding sub-critical bypass transition to turbulence. In addition, the targeted instability is ubiquitous to the self-sustaining wall-bounded turbulence cycle and at the root of the long-term goal of turbulence control. The longer spatial and temporal scales associated with the laminar case make a physical demonstration of a model-based boundary layer flow control more tractable. The effectiveness of control systems is inherently linked to the ability of the actuator to alter the flow to a desired state. Therefore, actuators are a critical enabling technology component in any active flow control system. Arguably, the most important missing technology in boundary layer flow control is effective and robust actuators, which can be readily integrated with an active flow control system. Plasma actuators fulfil these characteristics and are an ideal candidate for the control of the bypass transition instability. In this thesis, the receptivity of the boundary layer to forcing by arrays of plasma actuators capable of producing streamwise streaks was characterized. Following, the transient growth instability was targeted in an open-loop framework to identify the physics of the attenuation mechanism, which was shown to be a linear process. The control loop was then closed with feedback from simultaneous spanwise distributed shear stress sensors. A wavenumber specific control objective was used to demonstrate the effectiveness of feedback for steady disturbance attenuation as well as to provide robustness to off-model conditions. For all cases, the targeted disturbance was reduced by over 94% of its initial energy. The control effectiveness was also validated for quasi-steady forcing by varying the input disturbance level. Ultimately, control of transient growth due to

  7. Effects of Mach Number, Leading-Edge Bluntness, and Sweep on Boundary-Layer Transition on a Flat Plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jillie, Don W.; Hopkins, Edward J.

    1961-01-01

    The effects of leading-edge bluntness and sweep on boundary-layer transition on flat plate models were investigated at Mach numbers of 2.00, 2.50, 3.00, and 4.00. The effect of sweep on transition was also determined on a flat plate model equipped with an elliptical nose at a Mach number of 0.27. Models used for the supersonic investigation had leading-edge radii varying from 0.0005 to 0.040 inch. The free-stream unit Reynolds number was held constant at 15 million per foot for the supersonic tests and the angle of attack was 0 deg. Surface flow conditions were determined by visual observation and recorded photographically. The sublimation technique was used to indicate transition, and the fluorescent-oil technique was used to indicate flow separation. Measured Mach number and sweep effects on transition are compared with those predicted from shock-loss considerations as described in NACA Rep. 1312. For the models with the blunter leading edges, the transition Reynolds number (based on free-stream flow conditions) was approximately doubled by an increase in Mach number from 2.50 to 4.00; and nearly the same result was predicted from shock-loss considerations. At all super- sonic Mach numbers, increases in sweep reduced the transition Reynolds number and the amount of reduction increased with increases in bluntness. The shock-loss method considerably underestimated- the sweep effects, possibly because of the existence of crossflow instability associated with swept wings. At a Mach number of 0.27, no reduction in the transition Reynolds number with sweep was measured (as would be expected with no shock loss) until the sweep angle was attained where crossflow instability appeared.

  8. Computer program for solving laminar, transitional, or turbulent compressible boundary-layer equations for two-dimensional and axisymmetric flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, J. E.; Blanchard, D. K.

    1982-01-01

    A numerical algorithm and computer program are presented for solving the laminar, transitional, or turbulent two dimensional or axisymmetric compressible boundary-layer equations for perfect-gas flows. The governing equations are solved by an iterative three-point implicit finite-difference procedure. The software, program VGBLP, is a modification of the approach presented in NASA TR R-368 and NASA TM X-2458, respectively. The major modifications are: (1) replacement of the fourth-order Runge-Kutta integration technique with a finite-difference procedure for numerically solving the equations required to initiate the parabolic marching procedure; (2) introduction of the Blottner variable-grid scheme; (3) implementation of an iteration scheme allowing the coupled system of equations to be converged to a specified accuracy level; and (4) inclusion of an iteration scheme for variable-entropy calculations. These modifications to the approach presented in NASA TR R-368 and NASA TM X-2458 yield a software package with high computational efficiency and flexibility. Turbulence-closure options include either two-layer eddy-viscosity or mixing-length models. Eddy conductivity is modeled as a function of eddy viscosity through a static turbulent Prandtl number formulation. Several options are provided for specifying the static turbulent Prandtl number. The transitional boundary layer is treated through a streamwise intermittency function which modifies the turbulence-closure model. This model is based on the probability distribution of turbulent spots and ranges from zero to unity for laminar and turbulent flow, respectively. Several test cases are presented as guides for potential users of the software.

  9. An experimental study of the edge effect on transition of the rotating-disk boundary-layer flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imayama, Shintaro; Lingwood, R. J.; Alfredsson, P. Henrik

    2011-11-01

    Lingwood [J. Fluid Mech., 299, 17 (1995)] showed that the flow instability in the rotating-disk boundary layer is not only of convective nature but also that the flow becomes absolutely unstable. Furthermore, in the absence of bypass mechanisms, the absolute instability triggers nonlinearity and transition to turbulence at a fixed Reynolds number (Re). Healey [J. Fluid Mech., 663, 148 (2010)] suggested that the observed spread (albeit small) in transition Re in different experiments is an effect of the Re at the disk edge and provided a nonlinear model to take this effect into account. Here, we further investigate this problem experimentally with hot-wire measurements on a rotating polished glass disk with a diameter of 474 mm and a total imbalance and surface roughness less than 10 μm. To investigate the influence of the disk edge, we vary Re at the disk edge by changing the rotational speed and map the development of the disturbance velocity in the radial direction. Furthermore, the effect of a stationary annular plate around the edge of the rotating disk is also investigated. Our experiments show no effect of the disk edge Re on the stability and transition, however there was a shift of both the growth curve and the transition Re by about 10 units with and without the outer stationary plate, with the lower Re observed with the plate.

  10. The atmospheric boundary layer

    SciTech Connect

    Garratt, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    This book is aimed at researchers in the atmospheric and associated sciences who require a moderately advanced text on the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) in which the many links between turbulence, air-surface transfer, boundary-layer structure and dynamics, and numerical modeling are discussed and elaborated upon. Chapter 1 serves as an introduction, with Chapters 2 and 3 dealing with the development of mean and turbulence equations, and the many scaling laws and theories that are the cornerstone of any serious ABL treatment. Modelling of the ABL is crucially dependent for its realism on the surface boundary conditions, and Chapters 4 and 5 deal with aerodynamic and energy considerations, with attention to both dry and wet land surfaces and the sea. The structure of the clear-sky, thermally stratified ABL is treated in Chapter 6, including the convective and stable cases over homogeneous land, the marine ABL and the internal boundary layer at the coastline. Chapter 7 then extends the discussion to the cloudy ABL. This is seen as particularly relevant since the extensive stratocumulus regions over the sub-tropical oceans and stratus regions over the Arctic are now identified as key players in the climate system. Finally, Chapters 8 and 9 bring much of the book's material together in a discussion of appropriate ABL and surface parameterization schemes for the general circulation models of the atmosphere that are being used for climate simulation.

  11. Numerical simulation of receptivity and transition in a boundary layer on a flat plate with a suction hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasel, Hermann F.

    1994-01-01

    A Navier-Stokes solver has been modified to allow for unsteady boundary conditions to be imposed at the inflow boundary. Because the streamwise derivatives are discretized with three-point compact differences, there is no need for special treatment of the points adjacent to the inflow boundary, provided that all necessary derivatives are properly specified at the boundary points. The unsteady boundary conditions can be obtained from a previous computation, from a solution of the parabolized stability equations (PSE), or from an analytical exact or approximate solution of the Navier-Stokes equations, e.g. an asymptotic expansion solution to model a sound wave interacting with the boundary layer.

  12. Towards Feedback Control of Bypass Transition: Numerical Simulations of Laminar Boundary Layer Response to a Plamsa Actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belson, Brandt; Rowley, Clarence

    2010-11-01

    We study the effects of single dielectric barrier discharge (SDBD) plasma actuators as a means to delay bypass transition in the Blasius boundary layer, with the eventual goal of closed-loop control. Since streamwise streaks are the structures with the largest transient growth, we orient an array of plasma actuators so as to produce spanwise forces and streamwise vorticity, and thus directly cancel the streaks. We use a pseudo-spectral solver to perform direct numerical simulations of the effect of plasma actuators, implemented as body forces. We compare two different models for the plasma actuator, and then apply each model to our spanwise geometry. We go on to compare each model's simulation results with experiments carried out by our collaborators at University of Toronto and Michigan State University as part of a multi-university research project.

  13. Boundary layer simulator improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Praharaj, S. C.; Schmitz, C.; Frost, C.; Engel, C. D.; Fuller, C. E.; Bender, R. L.; Pond, J.

    1984-01-01

    High chamber pressure expander cycles proposed for orbit transfer vehicles depend primarily on the heat energy transmitted from the combustion products through the thrust wall chamber wall. The heat transfer to the nozzle wall is affected by such variables as wall roughness, relamarization, and the presence of particles in the flow. Motor performance loss for these nozzles with thick boundary layers is inaccurate using the existing procedure coded BLIMPJ. Modifications and innovations to the code are examined. Updated routines are listed.

  14. Direct numerical simulation of transition and turbulence in a spatially evolving boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rai, Man M.; Moin, Parviz

    1991-01-01

    A high-order-accurate finite-difference approach to direct simulations of transition and turbulence in compressible flows is described. Attention is given to the high-free-stream disturbance case in which transition to turbulence occurs close to the leading edge. In effect, computation requirements are reduced. A method for numerically generating free-stream disturbances is presented.

  15. Numerical investigation on two-dimensional boundary layer flow with transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yong; Wang, Tianlin; Zong, Zhi

    2014-12-01

    As a basic problem in many engineering applications, transition from laminar to turbulence still remains a difficult problem in computational fluid dynamics (CFD). A numerical study of one transitional flow in two-dimensional is conducted by Reynolds averaged numerical simulation (RANS) in this paper. Turbulence model plays a significant role in the complex flows' simulation, and four advanced turbulence models are evaluated. Numerical solution of frictional resistance coefficient is compared with the measured one in the transitional zone, which indicates that Wilcox (2006) k-ω model with correction is the best candidate. Comparisons of numerical and analytical solutions for dimensionless velocity show that averaged streamwise dimensionless velocity profiles correct the shape rapidly in transitional region. Furthermore, turbulence quantities such as turbulence kinetic energy, eddy viscosity, and Reynolds stress are also studied, which are helpful to learn the transition's behavior.

  16. Effects of free-stream turbulence on boundary-layer transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herbert, TH.; Stuckert, G. K.; Esfahanian, V.

    1993-01-01

    Traditional methods for the prediction of the transition location rest either on lump parameters like the momentum thickness or on N factors obtained from the approximate linear stability characteristics of the flow. These methods account for the effects of the disturbance environment by empirical correlation with observed transition locations. We have developed a highly efficient and accurate approach to stability analysis and transition simulation based on parabolized stability equations (PSE). Here we present a first application of this approach to realistic problems of practical interest. We study the effects of the turbulence level on transition and heat transfer in flows over flat plates, curved plates, and the stator blade of a gas-turbine model. We discuss the formulation of an input model for the PSE analysis in the light of the present knowledge of receptivity mechanisms. The input model is used to compute transition locations for various configurations and flow conditions. The results compare favorably with experimental data.

  17. Active transition fixing and control of the boundary layer in air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, L.

    1985-01-01

    Active transition of flow over an airfoil surface and feedback control by sound is investigated in a wind tunnel at Caltech. Laminar instability forced by localized time dependent nonintrusive narrow heating strip causes abrupt changes in velocity to trigger instant transition at favorable pressure gradient. At zero and adverse pressure gradients these changes are only marginal. Feedback control by sound interaction at nearly normal incidence produces significant reduction in velocity perturbation in regions of transition. This reduction is in part at the expense of an increase in background disturbance since it is not possible to restore the flow to its undisturbed state.

  18. Influence of free-stream disturbances on boundary-layer transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, W. D.

    1978-01-01

    Considerable experimental evidence exists which shows that free stream disturbances (the ratio of root-mean-square pressure fluctuations to mean values) in conventional wind tunnels increase with increasing Mach number at low supersonic to moderate hypersonic speeds. In addition to local conditions, the free stream disturbance level influences transition behavior on simple test models. Based on this observation, existing noise transition data obtained in the same test facility were correlated for a large number of reference sharp cones and flat plates and are shown to collapse along a single curve. This result is a significant improvement over previous attempts to correlate noise transition data.

  19. Superfluid Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stagg, G. W.; Parker, N. G.; Barenghi, C. F.

    2017-03-01

    We model the superfluid flow of liquid helium over the rough surface of a wire (used to experimentally generate turbulence) profiled by atomic force microscopy. Numerical simulations of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation reveal that the sharpest features in the surface induce vortex nucleation both intrinsically (due to the raised local fluid velocity) and extrinsically (providing pinning sites to vortex lines aligned with the flow). Vortex interactions and reconnections contribute to form a dense turbulent layer of vortices with a nonclassical average velocity profile which continually sheds small vortex rings into the bulk. We characterize this layer for various imposed flows. As boundary layers conventionally arise from viscous forces, this result opens up new insight into the nature of superflows.

  20. Effects of Periodic Unsteady Wake Flow and Pressure Gradient on Boundary Layer Transition Along the Concave Surface of a Curved Plate. Part 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schobeiri, M. T.; Radke, R. E.

    1996-01-01

    Boundary layer transition and development on a turbomachinery blade is subjected to highly periodic unsteady turbulent flow, pressure gradient in longitudinal as well as lateral direction, and surface curvature. To study the effects of periodic unsteady wakes on the concave surface of a turbine blade, a curved plate was utilized. On the concave surface of this plate, detailed experimental investigations were carried out under zero and negative pressure gradient. The measurements were performed in an unsteady flow research facility using a rotating cascade of rods positioned upstream of the curved plate. Boundary layer measurements using a hot-wire probe were analyzed by the ensemble-averaging technique. The results presented in the temporal-spatial domain display the transition and further development of the boundary layer, specifically the ensemble-averaged velocity and turbulence intensity. As the results show, the turbulent patches generated by the wakes have different leading and trailing edge velocities and merge with the boundary layer resulting in a strong deformation and generation of a high turbulence intensity core. After the turbulent patch has totally penetrated into the boundary layer, pronounced becalmed regions were formed behind the turbulent patch and were extended far beyond the point they would occur in the corresponding undisturbed steady boundary layer.

  1. Nonlinear Interaction of Detuned Instability Waves in Boundary-Layer Transition: Resonant-Triad Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Sang Soo

    1998-01-01

    The non-equilibrium critical-layer analysis of a system of frequency-detuned resonant-triads is presented using the generalized scaling of Lee. It is shown that resonant-triads can interact nonlinearly within the common critical layer when their (fundamental) Strouhal numbers are different by a factor whose magnitude is of the order of the growth rate multiplied by the wavenumber of the instability wave. Since the growth rates of the instability modes become larger and the critical layers become thicker as the instability waves propagate downstream, the frequency-detuned resonant-triads that grow independently of each other in the upstream region can interact nonlinearly in the later downstream stage. In the final stage of the non-equilibrium critical-layer evolution, a wide range of instability waves with the scaled frequencies differing by almost an Order of (l) can nonlinearly interact. Low-frequency modes are also generated by the nonlinear interaction between oblique waves in the critical layer. The system of partial differential critical-layer equations along with the jump equations are presented here. The amplitude equations with their numerical solutions are given in Part 2. The nonlinearly generated low-frequency components are also investigated in Part 2.

  2. Boundary-layer transition and displacement thickness effects on zero-lift drag of a series of power-law bodies at Mach 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashby, G. C., Jr.; Harris, J. E.

    1974-01-01

    Wave and skin-friction drag have been numerically calculated for a series of power-law bodies at a Mach number of 6 and Reynolds numbers, based on body length, from 1.5 million to 9.5 million. Pressure distributions were computed on the nose by the inverse method and on the body by the method of characteristics. These pressure distributions and the measured locations of boundary-layer transition were used in a nonsimilar-boundary-layer program to determine viscous effects. A coupled iterative approach between the boundary-layer and pressure-distribution programs was used to account for boundary-layer displacement-thickness effects. The calculated-drag coefficients compared well with previously obtained experimental data.

  3. Simulating boundary layer transition with low-Reynolds-number k-epsilon turbulence models. I - An evaluation of prediction characteristics. II - An approach to improving the predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, R. C.; Patankar, S. V.

    1991-01-01

    The capability of two k-epsilon low-Reynolds number (LRN) turbulence models, those of Jones and Launder (1972) and Lam and Bremhorst (1981), to predict transition in external boundary-layer flows subject to free-stream turbulence is analyzed. Both models correctly predict the basic qualitative aspects of boundary-layer transition with free stream turbulence, but for calculations started at low values of certain defined Reynolds numbers, the transition is generally predicted at unrealistically early locations. Also, the methods predict transition lengths significantly shorter than those found experimentally. An approach to overcoming these deficiencies without abandoning the basic LRN k-epsilon framework is developed. This approach limits the production term in the turbulent kinetic energy equation and is based on a simple stability criterion. It is correlated to the free-stream turbulence value. The modification is shown to improve the qualitative and quantitative characteristics of the transition predictions.

  4. Transitional Boundary-Layer Solutions Using a Mixing-Length and a Two-Equation Turbulence Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, E. C.; Wilcox, D. C.

    1978-01-01

    Boundary-layer solutions were obtained using the conventional two-layer mixing-length turbulence model and the Wilcox-Traci two-equation model of turbulence. Both flatplate and blunt-body geometries were considered. The most significant result of the study is development of approximations for the two-equation model which permit streamwise stepsize comparable to that used in mixing-length computations. Additionally, a set of model-equation boundary conditions derived which apply equally well to both flat-plate and blunt-body geometries. Solutions obtained with the two-equations turbulence model are compared with experimental data and/or corresponding solutions obtained using the mixing-length model. Agreement is satisfactory for flat-plate boundary layers but not for blunt body boundary layers.

  5. Nonlinear Interaction of Detuned Instability Waves in Boundary-Layer Transition: Amplitude Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Sang Soo

    1998-01-01

    The non-equilibrium critical-layer analysis of a system of frequency-detuned resonant-triads is presented. In this part of the analysis, the system of partial differential critical-layer equations derived in Part I is solved analytically to yield the amplitude equations which are analyzed using a combination of asymptotic and numerical methods. Numerical solutions of the inviscid non-equilibrium oblique-mode amplitude equations show that the frequency-detuned self-interaction enhances the growth of the lower-frequency oblique modes more than the higher-frequency ones. All amplitudes become singular at the same finite downstream position. The frequency detuning delays the occurrence of the singularity. The spanwise-periodic mean-flow distortion and low-frequency nonlinear modes are generated by the critical-layer interaction between frequency-detuned oblique modes. The nonlinear mean flow and higher harmonics as well as the primary instabilities become as large as the base mean flow in the inviscid wall layer in the downstream region where the distance from the singularity is of the order of the wavelength scale.

  6. Investigation of the boundary layer during the transition from volume to surface dominated H⁻ production at the BATMAN test facility.

    PubMed

    Wimmer, C; Schiesko, L; Fantz, U

    2016-02-01

    BATMAN (Bavarian Test Machine for Negative ions) is a test facility equipped with a 18 scale H(-) source for the ITER heating neutral beam injection. Several diagnostics in the boundary layer close to the plasma grid (first grid of the accelerator system) followed the transition from volume to surface dominated H(-) production starting with a Cs-free, cleaned source and subsequent evaporation of caesium, while the source has been operated at ITER relevant pressure of 0.3 Pa: Langmuir probes are used to determine the plasma potential, optical emission spectroscopy is used to follow the caesiation process, and cavity ring-down spectroscopy allows for the measurement of the H(-) density. The influence on the plasma during the transition from an electron-ion plasma towards an ion-ion plasma, in which negative hydrogen ions become the dominant negatively charged particle species, is seen in a strong increase of the H(-) density combined with a reduction of the plasma potential. A clear correlation of the extracted current densities (j(H(-)), j(e)) exists with the Cs emission.

  7. Transitions of cloud-topped marine boundary layers characterized by AIRS, MODIS, and a large eddy simulation model

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, Qing; Kahn, Brian; Xiao, Heng; Schreier, Mathias; Fetzer, E. J.; Teixeira, J.; Suselj, Kay

    2013-08-16

    Cloud top entrainment instability (CTEI) is a hypothesized positive feedback between entrainment mixing and evaporative cooling near the cloud top. Previous theoretical and numerical modeling studies have shown that the persistence or breakup of marine boundary layer (MBL) clouds may be sensitive to the CTEI parameter. Collocated thermodynamic profile and cloud observations obtained from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments are used to quantify the relationship between the CTEI parameter and the cloud-topped MBL transition from stratocumulus to trade cumulus in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. Results derived from AIRS and MODIS are compared with numerical results from the UCLA large eddy simulation (LES) model for both well-mixed and decoupled MBLs. The satellite and model results both demonstrate a clear correlation between the CTEI parameter and MBL cloud fraction. Despite fundamental differences between LES steady state results and the instantaneous snapshot type of observations from satellites, significant correlations for both the instantaneous pixel-scale observations and the long-term averaged spatial patterns between the CTEI parameter and MBL cloud fraction are found from the satellite observations and are consistent with LES results. This suggests the potential of using AIRS and MODIS to quantify global and temporal characteristics of the cloud-topped MBL transition.

  8. Investigation of the boundary layer during the transition from volume to surface dominated H- production at the BATMAN test facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wimmer, C.; Schiesko, L.; Fantz, U.

    2016-02-01

    BATMAN (Bavarian Test Machine for Negative ions) is a test facility equipped with a 1/8 scale H- source for the ITER heating neutral beam injection. Several diagnostics in the boundary layer close to the plasma grid (first grid of the accelerator system) followed the transition from volume to surface dominated H- production starting with a Cs-free, cleaned source and subsequent evaporation of caesium, while the source has been operated at ITER relevant pressure of 0.3 Pa: Langmuir probes are used to determine the plasma potential, optical emission spectroscopy is used to follow the caesiation process, and cavity ring-down spectroscopy allows for the measurement of the H- density. The influence on the plasma during the transition from an electron-ion plasma towards an ion-ion plasma, in which negative hydrogen ions become the dominant negatively charged particle species, is seen in a strong increase of the H- density combined with a reduction of the plasma potential. A clear correlation of the extracted current densities (jH-, je) exists with the Cs emission.

  9. Numerical study of the primary instability in a separated boundary layer transition under elevated free-stream turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langari, Mostafa; Yang, Zhiyin

    2013-07-01

    Numerical studies of laminar-to-turbulent transition in a separation bubble subjected to two free-stream turbulence levels (FST) have been performed using Large-Eddy Simulation (LES). Separation of the laminar boundary layer occurs at a curvature change over a plate with a semi-circular leading edge at Re = 3450 based on the plate thickness and the uniform inlet velocity. A numerical trip is used to produce the targeted free-stream turbulence levels and the decay of free-stream turbulence is well predicted. A dynamic sub-grid-scale model is employed in the current study and a good agreement has been obtained between the LES results and the experimental data. Detailed analysis of the LES data has been carried out to investigate the primary instability mechanism. The flow visualisations and spectral analysis of the separated shear layer reveal that the 2D Kelvin-Helmholtz instability mode, well known to occur at low FST levels, is bypassed at higher levels leading to earlier breakdown to turbulence.

  10. Hypersonic Boundary/Shear Layer Transition for Blunt to Slender Configurations - A NASA Langley Experimental Perspective

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-10-01

    performances des vehicules aeriens militaires de l’OTAN par la gestion de l’interaction entre la transition et le decollement de la couche limite)., The...the Martian atmosphere. After an orbital rendezvous, the material samples would be autonomously transferred to the MSRO and stored in the US-designed...program was to demonstrate an autonomous return from low Earth orbit of an experimental flight test vehicle, with the ultimate goal of supporting

  11. Experimental transition and boundary-layer stability analysis for a slotted swept laminar flow control airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, William D.; Harris, Charles D.; Brooks, Cuyler W., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    A swept, supercritical laminar flow control (LFC) airfoil designated NASA SCLFC(1)-0513F was tested at subsonic and transonic speeds in the NASA Langley eight-foot Transonic Pressure Tunnel. This paper examines Tollmien-Schlichting and crossflow disturbance amplification for this airfoil using the linear stability method. The design methodology using linear stability analysis is evaluated and the results of the incompressible and compressible methods are compared. Experimental data on the swept, supercritical LFC airfoil and reference wind tunnel and flight results are used to correlate and evaluate the N-factor method for transition prediction over a speed range M(infinity) from zero to one.

  12. Boundary Layer Transition Detection on a Rotor Blade Using Rotating Mirror Thermography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heineck, James T.; Schuelein, Erich; Raffel, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Laminar-to-turbulent transition on a rotor blade in hover has been imaged using an area-scan infrared camera. A new method for tracking a blade using a rotating mirror was employed. The mirror axis of rotation roughly corresponded to the rotor axis of rotation and the mirror rotational frequency is 1/2 that of the rotor. This permitted the use of cameras whose integration time was too long to prevent image blur due to the motion of the blade. This article will show the use of this method for a rotor blade at different collective pitch angles.

  13. Boundary-layer transition and global skin friction measurement with an oil-fringe imaging technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monson, Daryl J.; Mateer, George G.; Menter, Florian R.

    1993-01-01

    A new oil-fringe imaging system skin friction (FISF) technique to measure skin friction on wind tunnel models is presented. In the method used to demonstrate the technique, lines of oil are applied on surfaces that connect the intended sets of measurement points, and then a wind tunnel is run so that the oil thins and forms interference fringes that are spaced in proportion to local skin friction. After a run the fringe spacings are imaged with a CCD-array digital camera and measured on a computer. Skin friction and transition measurements on a two-dimensional wing are presented and compared with computational predictions.

  14. The Boundary Layer Radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irshad, Ranah; Bowles, N. E.; Calcutt, S. B.; Hurley, J.

    2010-10-01

    The Boundary Layer Radiometer is a small, low mass (<1kg) radiometer with only a single moving part - a scan/calibration mirror. The instrument consists of a three mirror telescope system incorporating an intermediate focus for use with miniature infrared and visible filters. It also has an integrated low power blackbody calibration target to provide long-term calibration stability The instrument may be used as an upward looking boundary layer radiometer for both the terrestrial and Martian atmospheres with appropriate filters for the mid-infrared carbon dioxide band, as well as a visible channel for the detection of aerosol components such as dust. The scan mirror may be used to step through different positions from the local horizon to the zenith, allowing the vertical temperature profile of the atmosphere to be retrieved. The radiometer uses miniature infrared filter assemblies developed for previous space-based instruments by Oxford, Cardiff and Reading Universities. The intermediate focus allows for the use of upstream blocking filters and baffles, which not only simplifies the design of the filters and focal plane assembly, but also reduces the risk of problems due to stray light. Combined with the calibration target this means it has significant advantages over previous generations of small radiometers.

  15. Turbulent boundary layer heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finson, M. L.; Clarke, A. S.; Wu, P. K. S.

    1981-01-01

    A Reynolds stress model for turbulent boundary layers is used to study surface roughness effects on skin friction and heat transfer. The issues of primary interest are the influence of roughness character (element shape and spacing) and the nature of roughness effects at high Mach numbers. Computations based on the model compare satisfactorily with measurements from experiments involving variations in roughness character, in low speed and modestly supersonic conditions. The more limited data base at hypersonic Mach numbers is also examined with reasonable success, although no quantitative explanation is offered for the reduction of heat transfer with increasing roughness observed by Holden at Me -9.4. The present calculations indicate that the mean velocity is approximately uniform over much of the height range below the tops of the elements, y less than or equal to k. With this constant (roughness velocity,) it is simple to estimate the form drag on the elements. This roughness velocity has been investigated by systematically exercising the present model over ranges of potential parameters. The roughness velocity is found to be primarily a function of the projected element frontal area per unit surface area, thus providing a new and simple method for predicting roughness character effects. The model further suggests that increased boundary layer temperatures should be generated by roughness at high edge Mach numbers, which would tend to reduce skin friction and heat transfer, perhaps below smooth wall levels.

  16. The Diurnal Temperature Cycle and Its Relation to Boundary-Layer Structure During the Morning Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketzler, G.

    2014-05-01

    The morning portion of the near-surface diurnal temperature cycle is analyzed in combination with heat-flux and vertical temperature-gradient data. During summer, mean diurnal cycles of temperature rates-of-change show periods that can be related to defined points of the morning transition (MT). The start of the MT is clearly marked with a temperature discontinuity, apparent even on individual days, while the end of the transition is apparent only when using averages over many days. The findings concerning the timing of the MT using temperature cycle analysis correspond well with studies using heat-flux measurements. Mean diurnal cycles of temperature rates-of-change for stations in different urban and valley positions show differences that can partly be explained by apparent effects of the surroundings. For the valley situation, the timing differences and their relation to station position in the valley are generally plausible, while urban effects on the diurnal cycle are apparent but less distinct, which may be due to the small number of stations used. The results indicate that warming already begins before heat-flux crossover, which is the current definition of the beginning of the MT. This definition should be extended to include the phase between the temperature rate-of-change crossover and heat-flux crossover, which represents the early part of the MT before warming reaches instrument level.

  17. 3D Global PIC simulation of Alfvenic transition layers at the cusp outer boundary during IMF rotations from north to south

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, D. S.; Lembege, B.; Esmaeili, A.; Nishikawa, K.

    2013-12-01

    Statistical experimental observations of the cusp boundaries from CLUSTER mission made by Lavraud et al. (2005) have clearly evidenced the presence of a transition layer inside the magnetosheath near the outer boundary of the cusp. This layer characterized by Log(MA)~ 1 allows a transition from super-Alfvenic to sub-Alfvenic bulk flow from the exterior to the interior side of the outer cusp and has been mainly observed experimentally under northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). The role of this layer is important in order to understand the flow variations (and later the entry and precipitation of particles) when penetrating the outer boundary of the cusp. In order to analyze this layer, a large 3D PIC simulation of the global solar wind-terrestrial magnetosphere interaction have been performed, and the attention has been focused on the cusp region and its nearby surrounding during IMF rotation from north to south. Present results retrieve quite well the presence of this layer within the meridian plane for exactly northward IMF, but its location differs in the sense that it is located slightly below the X reconnection region associated to the nearby magnetopause (above the outer boundary of the cusp). In order to clarify this question, an extensive study has been performed as follows: (i) a 3D mapping of this transition layer in order to analyze more precisely the thickness, the location and the spatial extension of this layer on the magnetosphere flanks for a fixed Northward IMF configuration; (ii) a parametric study in order to analyze the impact of the IMF rotation from north to south on the persistence and the main features of this transition layer. The locations of this transition layer slightly radially expand and shrink during the IMF rotation and the thickness of the layer increases during the rotation. We show how these transition layers render the flow from super to sub Alfvenic and allow the particles enter into the magnetic cusp region. Alfven

  18. Boundary layer receptivity and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, D. C.

    1993-01-01

    Receptivity processes initiate natural instabilities in a boundary layer. The instabilities grow and eventually break down to turbulence. Consequently, receptivity questions are a critical element of the analysis of the transition process. Success in modeling the physics of receptivity processes thus has a direct bearing on technological issues of drag reduction. The means by which transitional flows can be controlled is also a major concern: questions of control are tied inevitably to those of receptivity. Adjoint systems provide a highly effective mathematical method for approaching many of the questions associated with both receptivity and control. The long term objective is to develop adjoint methods to handle increasingly complex receptivity questions, and to find systematic procedures for deducing effective control strategies. The most elementary receptivity problem is that in which a parallel boundary layer is forced by time-harmonic sources of various types. The characteristics of the response to such forcing form the building blocks for more complex receptivity mechanisms. The first objective of this year's research effort was to investigate how a parallel Blasius boundary layer responds to general direct forcing. Acoustic disturbances in the freestream can be scattered by flow non-uniformities to produce Tollmien-Schlichting waves. For example, scattering by surface roughness is known to provide an efficient receptivity path. The present effort is directed towards finding a solution by a simple adjoint analysis, because adjoint methods can be extended to more complex problems. In practice, flows are non-parallel and often three-dimensional. Compressibility may also be significant in some cases. Recent developments in the use of Parabolized Stability Equations (PSE) offer a promising possibility. By formulating and solving a set of adjoint parabolized equations, a method for mapping the efficiency with which external forcing excites the three

  19. Multi-platform Observations Characterizing the Afternoon-to-Evening Transition of the Planetary Boundary Layer in Northern Alabama, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wingo, Stephanie M.; Knupp, Kevin R.

    2015-04-01

    Observations from the University of Alabama in Huntsville campus and ground-based scanning radar for over 140 total spring, summer, and autumn cases are studied to contribute to the relative scarcity of long-term datasets documenting the afternoon-to-evening transition of the planetary boundary layer. A sunset relative frame of reference is employed, focusing on the period 3 h before to 2 h after astronomical sunset, and several findings are consistent with previous investigations. Fluctuating components of wind and temperature computed from nearly collocated surface, Doppler wind profiler, and vertically pointing Doppler lidar measurements show a consistent decline as turbulence intensity diminishes through the transition. When normalized by their initial values, a pattern emerges: temperature variances decline slowly at first then quite abruptly after about 90 min before sunset. After the temperature variances begin to wane, vertical velocity fluctuations decrease, and the rate of their decay increases as vigorous thermal structures diminish. The fastest decline of the horizontal wind variance occurs after an accelerated vertical wind variance decrease, and the horizontal wind fluctuations display the slowest rate of decrease among these quantities. Near-surface humidity measurements show increases in mean water vapour mixing ratio as a steady rise generally beginning about 80 min prior to sunset. Composites of mean lidar vertical motion show final convective-type towers of upward motion occur about an hour before sunset and are coherent through 800 m (all heights a.g.l.). Lidar vertical motion variance at 195 m decreases by more than an order of magnitude approaching sunset, then remains below 0.01 m s for the rest of the studied time frame. Subtle, but steady, increases in both horizontal wind speed and radar-derived horizontal wind convergence above the surface layer (at 300 m) span the entire 5-h time frame. While the convergence results show a broad range

  20. On the use of kriging for enhanced data reconstruction in a separated transitional flat-plate boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunes, Hasan; Rist, Ulrich

    2008-10-01

    Kriging method for data reconstruction and spatial enhancement of stereo-particle image velocimetry (S-PIV) data for a transitional boundary layer with a laminar separation bubble is investigated. Particularly, the effect of various variogram models and their parameters are studied in detail. In addition, we show that missing data clusters, or black zones, which often occur in PIV measurements, can be estimated using kriging provided the data are well correlated. An important issue in PIV measurements is that built-in PIV data processing software might have problems to detect or to correct spurious erroneous vectors called "outliers." It is shown that these outliers can be eliminated or greatly alleviated using kriging. λ2 isosurface and stream traces show that noisy vortical structures are eliminated but the main coherent structures are well preserved and smoothed, thus procedures for the detection and tracking of vortex core lines can be effectively applied on kriged data. Analytical test data for a more quantitative evaluation of the performance of kriging are given in the Appendices.

  1. Two-dimensional percolation transition at finite temperature: Phase boundary for in-plane magnetism in films with two atomic layers of Fe on W(110)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belanger, R.; Venus, D.

    2017-02-01

    A two-dimensional (2D) percolation transition in Fe/W(110) ultrathin magnetic films occurs when islands in the second atomic layer percolate and resolve a frustrated magnetic state to produce long-range in-plane ferromagnetic order. Novel measurements of percolation using the magnetic susceptibility χ (θ ) as the films are deposited at a constant temperature, allow the long-range percolation transition to be observed as a sharp peak consistent with a critical phase transition. The measurements are used to trace the paramagnetic-to-ferromagnetic phase boundary between the T =0 percolation magnetic transition and the thermal Curie magnetic transition of the undiluted film. A quantitative comparison to critical scaling theory is made by fitting the functional form of the phase boundary. The fitted parameters are then used in theoretical expressions for χ (T ) in the critical region of the paramagnetic state to provide an excellent, independent representation of the experimental measurements.

  2. LDV measurements of turbulent baroclinic boundary layers

    SciTech Connect

    Neuwald, P.; Reichenbach, H.; Kuhl, A.L.

    1993-07-01

    Described here are shock tube experiments of nonsteady, turbulent boundary layers with large density variations. A dense-gas layer was created by injecting Freon through the porous floor of the shock tube. As the shock front propagated along the layer, vorticity was created at the air-Freon interface by an inviscid, baroclinic mechanism. Shadow-schlieren photography was used to visualize the turbulent mixing in this baroclinic boundary layer. Laser-Doppler-Velocimetry (LDV) was used to measure the streamwise velocity histories at 14 heights. After transition, the boundary layer profiles may be approximated by a power-law function u {approximately} u{sup {alpha}} where {alpha} {approx_equal} 3/8. This value lies between the clean flat plate value ({alpha} = 1/7) and the dusty boundary layer value ({alpha} {approx_equal} 0.7), and is controlled by the gas density near the wall.

  3. Boundary-Layer & health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costigliola, V.

    2010-09-01

    It has long been known that specific atmospheric processes, such as weather and longer-term climatic fluctuations, affect human health. The biometeorological literature refers to this relationship as meteorotropism, defined as a change in an organism that is correlated with a change in atmospheric conditions. Plenty of (patho)physiological functions are affected by those conditions - like the respiratory diseases - and currently it is difficult to put any limits for pathologies developed in reply. Nowadays the importance of atmospheric boundary layer and health is increasingly recognised. A number of epidemiologic studies have reported associations between ambient concentrations of air pollution, specifically particulate pollution, and adverse health effects, even at the relatively low concentrations of pollution found. Since 1995 there have been over twenty-one studies from four continents that have explicitly examined the association between ambient air pollutant mixes and daily mortality. Statistically significant and positive associations have been reported in data from various locations around the world, all with varying air pollutant concentrations, weather conditions, population characteristics and public health policies. Particular role has been given to atmospheric boundary layer processes, the impact of which for specific patient-cohort is, however, not well understood till now. Assessing and monitoring air quality are thus fundamental to improve Europe's welfare. One of current projects run by the "European Medical Association" - PASODOBLE will develop and demonstrate user-driven downstream information services for the regional and local air quality sectors by combining space-based and in-situ data with models in 4 thematic service lines: - Health community support for hospitals, pharmacies, doctors and people at risk - Public information for regions, cities, tourist industry and sporting event organizers - Compliance monitoring support on particulate

  4. Observations of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Across the Land-Sea Transition Zone Using an Elastic Scanning Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Fei; Bergant, Klemen; Filipčič, Andrej; Forte, Biagio; Stanič, Samo; Veberič, Darko; Zavrtanik, Marko

    2010-05-01

    In the case of uneven terrain, atmospheric effects in the land-sea transition zone are numerous and diverse due to frequent changes in the wind direction and different effects of the heat flux on the sea and land surface. Such a case is the coastal region of the northernmost part of the Adriatic sea. Behind the coastal line the terrain rapidly rises to a Karst plateau (about 300 m a.s.l.), falls into the Vipava valley (60 m a.s.l.) and rises again to a mountainous region with maximum altitudes at about 1500 m a.s.l. To obtain complete meteorological status of the atmosphere in this region, a series of remote sensing experiments of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) across the land-sea transition zone were performed on 1 July 2009 using an elastic scattering lidar. The lidar system, which has vertical scanning and long-range detection functionality, was located at Otlica observatory in Slovenia, within 30 km of the coastal line and at an elevation of 945 m a.s.l. The atmosphere was scanned for elevation angles between 0° and 20° and the lidar data was processed into Cartesian 2-dimensional range-height-indicator plots with a spatial resolution of 50 m in both coordinates. Each pixel of the plot represents the weighted logarithm range-squared-corrected signal at that position and contains all the atmospheric information. Assuming horizontal atmospheric homogeneity, the optical depth, the extinction coefficients and the height of the ABL were calculated. The increase of the lidar detection range and the steepening of the optical depth profiles with time were observed, showing that on average the extinction coefficients in the ABL were decreasing during the experiment. The height of the ABL changed from 1.8 km to 0.55 km in about 3 hours. Rapid drop of the ABL height indicates highly variable atmospheric conditions in the land-sea transition zone and the adjacent mountainous region.

  5. Effect of porous surface on pre-transitional supersonic boundary-layer disturbances generated by free-stream vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricco, Pierre

    2013-11-01

    A supersonic laminar flat-plate boundary layer at Mach number M = 6 flowing over a porous surface is studied numerically and by asymptotic methods. The flow is perturbed by small-amplitude free-stream vortical disturbances of the convective gust type. These external agents generate streamwise-elongated low-frequency disturbances of the kinematic kind, i.e. compressible streaky Klebanoff modes, and of the thermal kind, i.e. thermal streaks, which grow algebraically downstream. For boundary layer fluctuations with a spanwise wavelength comparable with the boundary layer thickness, the porous surface has a negligible effect on the growth and evolution of the streaks. When the spanwise wavelength is instead larger than the boundary layer thickness, the disturbances are effectively attenuated by the porous surface. For a specified set of frequency and wavelengths, the streaky structures evolve into oblique Tollmien-Schlichting waves through a leading-edge-adjustment receptivity mechanism. The growth rate of these waves increases slightly over the porous set, thus confirming previous results obtained through stability analysis. Our receptivity analysis allows us to calculate the wave amplitude, which is attenuated by the porous surface. Further asymptotic analysis based on triple-deck theory confirms the numerical results.

  6. Wind-farms in shallow conventionally neutral boundary layers: effects of transition and gravity waves on energy budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, Johan; Allaerts, Dries

    2016-11-01

    Conventionally neutral boundary layers (CNBL) often arise in offshore conditions. In these situations the neutral boundary layer is capped by a strong inversion layer and a stably stratified free atmosphere aloft. We use large-eddy simulations to investigate the interaction between a CNBL and a large wind farm. Following the approach of Allaerts & Meyers (2015), a set of equilibrium CNBLs are produced in a precursor simulation, with a height of approx. 300, 500, and 1000m, respectively. These are used at the inlet of a large wind-farm with a fetch of 15 km, and 20 rows of turbines. We find that above the farm, an internal boundary layer (IBL) develops. For the two lower CNBL cases, the IBL growth is stopped by the overlying capping inversion. Moreover, the upward displacement of the CNBL excites gravity waves in the inversion layer and the free atmosphere above. For the lower CNBL cases, these waves induce significant pressure gradients in the farm. A detailed energy budget analysis of the CNBL is further presented. The authors acknowledge support from the European Research Council (FP7-Ideas, Grant No. 306471).

  7. Pollutant Dispersion in Boundary Layers Exposed to Rural-to-Urban Transitions: Varying the Spanwise Length Scale of the Roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomas, J. M.; Eisma, H. E.; Pourquie, M. J. B. M.; Elsinga, G. E.; Jonker, H. J. J.; Westerweel, J.

    2017-05-01

    Both large-eddy simulations (LES) and water-tunnel experiments, using simultaneous stereoscopic particle image velocimetry and laser-induced fluorescence, have been used to investigate pollutant dispersion mechanisms in regions where the surface changes from rural to urban roughness. The urban roughness was characterized by an array of rectangular obstacles in an in-line arrangement. The streamwise length scale of the roughness was kept constant, while the spanwise length scale was varied by varying the obstacle aspect ratio l / h between 1 and 8, where l is the spanwise dimension of the obstacles and h is the height of the obstacles. Additionally, the case of two-dimensional roughness (riblets) was considered in LES. A smooth-wall turbulent boundary layer of depth 10 h was used as the approaching flow, and a line source of passive tracer was placed 2 h upstream of the urban canopy. The experimental and numerical results show good agreement, while minor discrepancies are readily explained. It is found that for l/h=2 the drag induced by the urban canopy is largest of all considered cases, and is caused by a large-scale secondary flow. In addition, due to the roughness transition the vertical advective pollutant flux is the main ventilation mechanism in the first three streets. Furthermore, by means of linear stochastic estimation the mean flow structure is identified that is responsible for street-canyon ventilation for the sixth street and onwards. Moreover, it is shown that the vertical length scale of this structure increases with increasing aspect ratio of the obstacles in the canopy, while the streamwise length scale does not show a similar trend.

  8. Parallel data-driven decomposition algorithm for large-scale datasets: with application to transitional boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayadi, Taraneh; Schmid, Peter J.

    2016-10-01

    Many fluid flows of engineering interest, though very complex in appearance, can be approximated by low-order models governed by a few modes, able to capture the dominant behavior (dynamics) of the system. This feature has fueled the development of various methodologies aimed at extracting dominant coherent structures from the flow. Some of the more general techniques are based on data-driven decompositions, most of which rely on performing a singular value decomposition (SVD) on a formulated snapshot (data) matrix. The amount of experimentally or numerically generated data expands as more detailed experimental measurements and increased computational resources become readily available. Consequently, the data matrix to be processed will consist of far more rows than columns, resulting in a so-called tall-and-skinny (TS) matrix. Ultimately, the SVD of such a TS data matrix can no longer be performed on a single processor, and parallel algorithms are necessary. The present study employs the parallel TSQR algorithm of (Demmel et al. in SIAM J Sci Comput 34(1):206-239, 2012), which is further used as a basis of the underlying parallel SVD. This algorithm is shown to scale well on machines with a large number of processors and, therefore, allows the decomposition of very large datasets. In addition, the simplicity of its implementation and the minimum required communication makes it suitable for integration in existing numerical solvers and data decomposition techniques. Examples that demonstrate the capabilities of highly parallel data decomposition algorithms include transitional processes in compressible boundary layers without and with induced flow separation.

  9. Pollutant Dispersion in Boundary Layers Exposed to Rural-to-Urban Transitions: Varying the Spanwise Length Scale of the Roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomas, J. M.; Eisma, H. E.; Pourquie, M. J. B. M.; Elsinga, G. E.; Jonker, H. J. J.; Westerweel, J.

    2017-01-01

    Both large-eddy simulations (LES) and water-tunnel experiments, using simultaneous stereoscopic particle image velocimetry and laser-induced fluorescence, have been used to investigate pollutant dispersion mechanisms in regions where the surface changes from rural to urban roughness. The urban roughness was characterized by an array of rectangular obstacles in an in-line arrangement. The streamwise length scale of the roughness was kept constant, while the spanwise length scale was varied by varying the obstacle aspect ratio l / h between 1 and 8, where l is the spanwise dimension of the obstacles and h is the height of the obstacles. Additionally, the case of two-dimensional roughness (riblets) was considered in LES. A smooth-wall turbulent boundary layer of depth 10h was used as the approaching flow, and a line source of passive tracer was placed 2h upstream of the urban canopy. The experimental and numerical results show good agreement, while minor discrepancies are readily explained. It is found that for l/h=2 the drag induced by the urban canopy is largest of all considered cases, and is caused by a large-scale secondary flow. In addition, due to the roughness transition the vertical advective pollutant flux is the main ventilation mechanism in the first three streets. Furthermore, by means of linear stochastic estimation the mean flow structure is identified that is responsible for street-canyon ventilation for the sixth street and onwards. Moreover, it is shown that the vertical length scale of this structure increases with increasing aspect ratio of the obstacles in the canopy, while the streamwise length scale does not show a similar trend.

  10. Boundary-layer moisture regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahrt, L.

    1991-01-01

    Boundary-layer moisture fluctuations are estimated by analyzing HAPEX and FIFE data collected on 52 aircraft flight legs. Moisture fluctuations were given considerable attention in the HAPEX flights, which were 120 km long, and flew 150 m over one area of homogeneous terrain. The repetitions permit statistical consideration of motion characteristics on horizontal scales. Two prototypical boundary layer regimes are discovered: the entrainment-drying boundary layer, and the moistening boundary layer. The latter demonstrates positive moisture skewness close to the surface related to high surface evaporation. The former is characterized by boundary-layer instability, weak surface evaporation, and drier air aloft, leading to unexpected negative moisture skewness. It is noted that 10 km moisture variations with horizontal gradients are often found in narrow zones of horizontal convergence, called mesoscale moisture fronts. A negative moisture to temperature correlation, due to surface energy budget inhomogeneity, is shown to incur large mesoscale variations of relative humidity.

  11. Modeling the urban boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstrom, R. W., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    A summary and evaluation is given of the Workshop on Modeling the Urban Boundary Layer; held in Las Vegas on May 5, 1975. Edited summaries from each of the session chairpersons are also given. The sessions were: (1) formulation and solution techniques, (2) K-theory versus higher order closure, (3) surface heat and moisture balance, (4) initialization and boundary problems, (5) nocturnal boundary layer, and (6) verification of models.

  12. Characterization of the Afternoon to Evening Transition of the Planetary Boundary Layer Over North Alabama and Implication for Convective Maintenance, Enhancement, and Initiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wingo, Stephanie Mullins

    Investigation of 143 cases of the north Alabama planetary boundary layer's afternoon to evening transition (AET) using surface, profiling, and radar observations contributes to the relative scarcity of datasets for this period. Results indicate several characteristics previously deemed important for convective initiation and/or maintenance, namely a rise in boundary layer water vapor and convergence. Waning surface heating causes turbulent eddies to decay, decreasing vertical heat and momentum fluxes, evident in declining surface wind speeds as horizontal flow above the surface layer increases. After surface temperature variances decline, the rate at which vertical velocity fluctuations decay increases as vigorous thermals diminish, and the fastest decline of surface horizontal wind variance proceeds an accelerated decrease in the vertical wind variance. Steady increases in horizontal wind speed and radar-derived convergence above the surface layer span the entire AET. Detailed case studies evaluate structural changes along convergent boundaries propagating during the AET. Overall, analyses reveal a relative steadiness, or even increase, in convergence above the surface layer at the boundaries' leading edge, supporting the hypothesis that characteristic AET processes can contribute to convective maintenance or enhancement, and potentially aid in convective initiation. Dual-Doppler derived kinematic fields and the visual cloud field character generally exhibit a qualitative slabularity increase (decreased along-line variability) as boundary layer eddies diminish. Results also indicate that thermodynamic changes during the AET can promote substantial vertical cloud development, though this visual signal is often unobserved by radars. Further, a key finding among these studies is the evolution of gust fronts to wave-like entities near sunset, indicating the AET can be far more complex than initially perceived. In a simplified, 2-D modeling experiment, completed by

  13. FUNDAMENTAL AREAS OF PHENOMENOLOGY (INCLUDING APPLICATIONS): Wavelet Cross-Spectrum Analysis of Multi-Scale Disturbance Instability and Transition on Sharp Cone Hypersonic Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jian; Jiang, Nan

    2008-05-01

    Experimental measurement of hypersonic boundary layer stability and transition on a sharp cone with a half angle of 5° is carried out at free-coming stream Mach number 6 in a hypersonic wind tunnel. Mean and fluctuation surface-thermal-flux characteristics of the hypersonic boundary layer flow are measured by Pt-thin-film thermocouple temperature sensors installed at 28 stations on the cone surface along longitudinal direction. At hypersonic speeds, the dominant flow instabilities demonstrate that the growth rate of the second mode tends to exceed that of the low-frequency mode. Wavelet-based cross-spectrum technique is introduced to obtain the multi-scale cross-spectral characteristics of the fluctuating signals in the frequency range of the second mode. Nonlinear interactions both of the second mode disturbance and the first mode disturbance are demonstrated to be dominant instabilities in the initial stage of laminar-turbulence transition for hypersonic shear flow.

  14. Boundary-Layer Transition on Hollow Cylinders in Supersonic Free Flight as Affected by Mach Number and a Screwthread Type of Surface Roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Carlton S.

    1959-01-01

    The effects of Mach number and surface-roughness variation on boundary-layer transition were studied using fin-stabilized hollow-tube models in free flight. The tests were conducted over the Mach number range from 2.8 to 7 at a nominally constant unit Reynolds number of 3 million per inch, and with heat transfer to the model surface. A screwthread type of distributed two-dimensional roughness was used. Nominal thread heights varied from 100 microinches to 2100 microinches. Transition Reynolds number was found to increase with increasing Mach number at a rate depending simultaneously on Mach number and roughness height. The laminar boundary layer was found to tolerate increasing amounts of roughness as Mach number increased. For a given Mach number an optimum roughness height was found which gave a maximum laminar run greater than was obtained with a smooth surface.

  15. Boundary-layer control for drag reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, William D.

    1988-01-01

    Although the number of possible applications of boundary-layer control is large, a discussion is given only of those that have received the most attention recently at NASA Langley Research Center to improve airfoil drag characteristics. This research concerns stabilizing the laminar boundary layer through geometric shaping (natural laminar flow, NLF) and active control involving the removal of a portion of the laminar boundary layer (laminar flow control, LFC) either through discrete slots or a perforated surface. At low Reynolds numbers, a combination of shaping and forced transition has been used to achieve the desired run of laminar flow and control of laminar separation. In the design of both natural laminar flow and laminar flow control airfoils and wings, boundary layer stability codes play an important role. A discussion of some recent stability calculations using both incompressible and compressible codes is given.

  16. Aerothermodynamic Characteristics of Boundary Layer Transition and Trip Effectiveness of the HIFiRE Flight 5 Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, Karen T.; Rufer, Shann J.; Kimmel, Roger; Adamczak, David

    2009-01-01

    An experimental wind tunnel test was conducted in the NASA Langley Research Center s 20-Inch Mach 6 Tunnel in support of the Hypersonic International Flight Research Experimentation Program. The information in this report is focused on the Flight 5 configuration, one in a series of flight experiments. This report documents experimental measurements made over a range of Reynolds numbers and angles of attack on several scaled ceramic heat transfer models of the Flight 5 vehicle. The heat transfer rate was measured using global phosphor thermography and the resulting images and heat transfer rate distributions were used to infer the state of the boundary layer on the windside, leeside and side surfaces. Boundary layer trips were used to force the boundary layer turbulent, and a study was conducted to determine the effectiveness of the trips with various heights. The experimental data highlighted in this test report were used determine the allowable roughness height for both the windside and side surfaces of the vehicle as well as provide for future tunnel-to-tunnel comparisons.

  17. An Application of CFD to Guide Forced Boundary-Layer Transition for Low-Speed Tests of a Hybrid Wing-Body Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luckring, James M.; Deere, Karen A.; Childs, Robert E.; Stremel, Paul M.; Long, Kurtis R.

    2016-01-01

    A hybrid transition trip-dot sizing and placement test technique was developed in support of recent experimental research on a hybrid wing-body configuration under study for the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation project. The approach combines traditional methods with Computational Fluid Dynamics. The application had three-dimensional boundary layers that were simulated with either fully turbulent or transitional flow models using established Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes methods. Trip strip effectiveness was verified experimentally using infrared thermography during a low-speed wind tunnel test. Although the work was performed on one specific configuration, the process was based on fundamental flow physics and could be applicable to other configurations.

  18. Ground Test and Computation of Boundary Layer Transition on the Hypersonic International Flight Research and Experimentation (HIFiRE)-5 Vehicle

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-01

    Design,” AIAA paper 2007-0534, January 2007. 4 Wadhams, T. P., MacLean, M. G., Holden, M.S., and Mundy , E., “Pre-Flight Ground Testing of the Full...December 2008, pp. 1125-1133. 11 Wadhams, T. P., Mundy , E., MacLean, M. G., and Holden, M. S., “Ground Test Studies of the HIFiRE-1 Transition...44 Holden, M. S., Wadhams, T. P., MacLean, M. Mundy , E., “Review of Studies of Boundary Layer Transition in Hypersonic Flows Over Axisymmetric and

  19. Effects of Wing Sweep on Boundary-layer Transition for a Smooth F-14A Wing at Mach Numbers from 0.700 to 0.825

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Bianca Trujillo; Meyer, Robert R., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The results are discussed of the variable sweep transition flight experiment (VSTFE). The VSTFE was a natural laminar flow experiment flown on the swing wing F-14A aircraft. The main objective of the VSTFE was to determine the effects of wing sweep on boundary layer transition at conditions representative of transport aircraft. The experiment included the flight testing of two laminar flow wing gloves. Glove 1 was a cleanup of the existing F-14A wing. Glove 2, not discussed herein, was designed to provide favorable pressure distributions for natural laminar flow at Mach number (M) 0.700. The transition locations presented for glove 1 were determined primarily by using hot film sensors. Boundary layer rake data was provided as a supplement. Transition data were obtained for leading edge wing sweeps of 15, 20, 25, 30, and 35 degs, with Mach numbers ranging from 0.700 to 0.825, and altitudes ranging from 10,000 to 35,000 ft. Results show that a substantial amount of laminar flow was maintained at all the wing sweeps evaluated. The maximum transition Reynolds number of 13.7 x 10(exp 6) was obtained for the condition of 15 deg of sweep, M = 0.800, and an altitude of 20,000 ft.

  20. Infrared Images of Boundary Layer Transition on the D8 Transport Configuration in the LaRC 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Michelle L.; Gatlin, Gregory M.

    2015-01-01

    Grit, trip tape, or trip dots are routinely applied on the leading-edge regions of the fuselage, wings, tails or nacelles of wind tunnel models to trip the flow from laminar to turbulent. The thickness of the model's boundary layer is calculated for nominal conditions in the wind tunnel test to determine the effective size of the trip dots, but the flow over the model may not transition as intended for runs with different flow conditions. Temperature gradients measured with an infrared camera can be used to detect laminar to turbulent boundary layer transition on a wind tunnel model. This non-intrusive technique was used in the NASA Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel to visualize the behavior of the flow over a D8 transport configuration model. As the flow through the wind tunnel either increased to or decreased from the run conditions, a sufficient temperature difference existed between the air and the model to visualize the transition location (due to different heat transfer rates through the laminar and the turbulent boundary layers) for several runs in this test. Transition phenomena were visible without active temperature control in the atmospheric wind tunnel, whether the air was cooler than the model or vice-versa. However, when the temperature of the model relative to the air was purposely changed, the ability to detect transition in the infrared images was enhanced. Flow characteristics such as a wing root horseshoe vortex or the presence of fore-body vortical flows also were observed in the infrared images. The images of flow features obtained for this study demonstrate the usefulness of current infrared technology in subsonic wind tunnel tests.

  1. Boundary Layer Control on Airfoils.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerhab, George; Eastlake, Charles

    1991-01-01

    A phenomena, boundary layer control (BLC), produced when visualizing the fluidlike flow of air is described. The use of BLC in modifying aerodynamic characteristics of airfoils, race cars, and boats is discussed. (KR)

  2. Boundary Layer Control on Airfoils.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerhab, George; Eastlake, Charles

    1991-01-01

    A phenomena, boundary layer control (BLC), produced when visualizing the fluidlike flow of air is described. The use of BLC in modifying aerodynamic characteristics of airfoils, race cars, and boats is discussed. (KR)

  3. Removing Boundary Layer by Suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackeret, J

    1927-01-01

    Through the utilization of the "Magnus effect" on the Flettner rotor ship, the attention of the public has been directed to the underlying physical principle. It has been found that the Prandtl boundary-layer theory furnishes a satisfactory explanation of the observed phenomena. The present article deals with the prevention of this separation or detachment of the flow by drawing the boundary layer into the inside of a body through a slot or slots in its surface.

  4. The structure of APG turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gungor, Ayse G.; Maciel, Yvan; Simens, Mark P.; Soria, Julio

    2013-11-01

    A boundary layer under influence of a strong APG is studied using DNS. Transition to turbulence is triggered using a trip wire which is modelled using the immersed boundary method. The Reynolds number close to the exit of the numerical domain is Reθ = 2175 and the shape-factor H = 2 . 5 . Two dimensional two-point spatial correlation functions are obtained in this region and close to the transition region. Cvu with a reference point close to the transition region shows a flow periodicity until Reθ ~ 1600 . This periodicity is related to the shear layer instability of the separation bubble created as a result of the APG. The Cvv and Cww correlations obtained far from the transition region at Reθ = 2175 and at y / δ = 0 . 4 coincide with results obtained for a ZPG boundary layer. Implying that the structure of the v , w fluctuations is the same as in ZPG. However, Cuu indicates that the structure of the u fluctuation in an APG boundary layer is almost twice as short as the ZPG structures. The APG structures are also less correlated with the flow at the wall. The near wall structure of strong APG flows is different from ZPG flows in that streaks are much shorter or absent. Funded in part by ITU, NSERC of Canada, ARC Discovery Grant, and Multiflow program of the ERC.

  5. Boundary layer control of rotating convection systems.

    PubMed

    King, Eric M; Stellmach, Stephan; Noir, Jerome; Hansen, Ulrich; Aurnou, Jonathan M

    2009-01-15

    Turbulent rotating convection controls many observed features of stars and planets, such as magnetic fields, atmospheric jets and emitted heat flux patterns. It has long been argued that the influence of rotation on turbulent convection dynamics is governed by the ratio of the relevant global-scale forces: the Coriolis force and the buoyancy force. Here, however, we present results from laboratory and numerical experiments which exhibit transitions between rotationally dominated and non-rotating behaviour that are not determined by this global force balance. Instead, the transition is controlled by the relative thicknesses of the thermal (non-rotating) and Ekman (rotating) boundary layers. We formulate a predictive description of the transition between the two regimes on the basis of the competition between these two boundary layers. This transition scaling theory unifies the disparate results of an extensive array of previous experiments, and is broadly applicable to natural convection systems.

  6. Turbulent Spots Inside the Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skarda, Jinhie; Wu, Xiaohua; Moin, Parviz; Lozano-Duran, Adrian; Wallace, James; Hickey, Jean-Pierre

    2016-11-01

    We present evidence that the buffer region of the canonical turbulent boundary layer is populated by locally generated turbulent spots, which cause strong indentations on the near-wall low-momentum streaks. This evidence is obtained from a spatially-developing direct numerical simulation carrying the inlet Blasius boundary layer through a bypass transition to the turbulent boundary layer state over a moderate Reynolds number range. The turbulent spots are structurally analogous to their transitional counter-parts but without any direct causality connection. High-pass filtered time-history records are used to calculate the period of turbulent spot detection and this period is compared to the boundary layer bursting period reported in hot-wire experiments. The sensitivity of the results to parameters such as the high pass filter frequency and the amplitude discriminator level is examined. The characteristics of these turbulent spots are also quantified using a spatial connectivity based conditional sampling technique. This evidence seems to be at odds with the notion that the buffer region is dominated by quasi-streamwise vortices, and contributes to the potential unification of the studies on near-wall turbulent boundary layer dynamics.

  7. Forced Boundary-Layer Transition on X-43 (Hyper-X) in NASA LaRC 31-Inch Mach 10 Air Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott A.; DiFulvio, Michael; Kowalkowski, Matthew K.

    2000-01-01

    Aeroheating and boundary layer transition characteristics for the X-43 (Hyper-X) configuration have been experimentally examined in the Langley 31-Inch Mach 10 Air Tunnel. Global surface heat transfer distributions, and surface streamline patterns were measured on a 0.333-scale model of the Hyper-X forebody. Parametric variations include angles-of-attack of 0-deg, 2-deg, 3-deg, and 4-deg; Reynolds numbers based on model length of 1.2 to 5.1 million; and inlet cowl door both open and closed. The effects of discrete roughness elements on the forebody boundary layer, which included variations in trip configuration and height, were investigated. This document is intended to serve as a release of preliminary data to the Hyper-X program; analysis is limited to observations of the experimental trends in order to expedite dissemination.

  8. Forced Boundary-Layer Transition on X-43 (Hyper-X) in NASA LaRC 20-Inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott A.; DiFulvio, Michael; Kowalkowski, Matthew K.

    2000-01-01

    Aeroheating and boundary layer transition characteristics for the X-43 (Hyper-X) configuration have been experimentally examined in the Langley 20-Inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel. Global surface heat transfer distributions, and surface streamline patterns were measured on a 0.333-scale model of the Hyper-X forebody. Parametric variations include angles-of-attack of 0-deg, 2-deg, and 4-deg; Reynolds numbers based on model length of 1.2 to 15.4 million; and inlet cowl door both open and closed. The effects of discrete roughness elements on the forebody boundary layer, which included variations in trip configuration and height, were investigated. This document is intended to serve as a release of preliminary data to the Hyper-X program; analysis is limited to observations of the experimental trends in order to expedite dissemination.

  9. A computer program for two-dimensional and axisymmetric nonreacting perfect gas and equilibrium chemically reacting laminar, transitional and-or turbulent boundary layer flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miner, E. W.; Anderson, E. C.; Lewis, C. H.

    1971-01-01

    A computer program is described in detail for laminar, transitional, and/or turbulent boundary-layer flows of non-reacting (perfect gas) and reacting gas mixtures in chemical equilibrium. An implicit finite difference scheme was developed for both two dimensional and axisymmetric flows over bodies, and in rocket nozzles and hypervelocity wind tunnel nozzles. The program, program subroutines, variables, and input and output data are described. Also included is the output from a sample calculation of fully developed turbulent, perfect gas flow over a flat plate. Input data coding forms and a FORTRAN source listing of the program are included. A method is discussed for obtaining thermodynamic and transport property data which are required to perform boundary-layer calculations for reacting gases in chemical equilibrium.

  10. Flight survey of the 757 wing noise field and its effects on laminar boundary layer transition. Volume 3: Extended data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    A flight program was completed in June of 1985 using the Boeing 757 flight research aircraft with an NLF glove installed on the right wing just outboard of the engine. The objectives of this program were to measure noise levels on the wing and to investigate the effect of engine noise on the extent of laminar flow on the glove. Details of the flight test program and results are contained in Volume 1 of this document. Tabulations and plots of the measured data are contained in Volume 2. The present volume contains the results of additional engineering analysis of the data. The latter includes analysis of the measured noise data, a comparison of predicted and measured noise data, a boundary layer stability analysis of 21 flight data cases, and an analysis of the effect of noise on boundary layer transition.

  11. Stable Layers in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahalov, A.; Berman, N. S.; Fernando, H. J. S.; Yu, F.; Pardyjak, E.

    1998-11-01

    Field experimental studies on the establishment and growth of the nocturnal stable layer near the ground were made in January, 1998 using a tethered balloon at a site in Phoenix, Arizona. Days and nights with clear skies and light surface winds were of particular interest because small particle and carbon monoxide concentrations can be high during such times. Closest to the ground a shallow stable layer 20 meters deep with a buoyancy frequency (N) of 0.05 1/s rapidly developed before sundown. The height of this layer and N remained constant throughout the night. Above the 20-meter level, there was a transition layer which was also stable with N = 0.025 1/s. This transition layer grew throughout the night and reached 120 meters by dawn. Above the transition layer was a neutrally stable (residual) layer left over from the previous day. An unsteady layer 10 to 100 m thick with N = 0.025 1/s was also found at the top of the troposphere with the neutrally stable troposphere below and the stable stratosphere above. The growth and/or decay of turbulence in such stable layers will be discussed in light of recent theoretical developments.

  12. Alpha models and boundary-layer turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheskidov, Alexey

    We study boundary-layer turbulence using the Navier-Stokes-alpha model obtaining an extension of the Prandtl equations for the averaged flow in a turbulent boundary layer. In the case of a zero pressure gradient flow along a flat plate, we derive a nonlinear fifth-order ordinary differential equation, an extension of the Blasius equation. We study it analytically and prove the existence of a two-parameter family of solutions satisfying physical boundary conditions. From this equation we obtain a theoretical prediction of the skin-friction coefficient in a wide range of Reynolds numbers based on momentum thickness, and deduce the maximal value of the skin-friction coefficient in the turbulent boundary layer. The two-parameter family of solutions to the equation matches experimental data in the transitional boundary layers with different free stream turbulence intensity. A one-parameter sub-family of solutions, obtained using our skin-friction coefficient law, matches experimental data in the turbulent boundary layer for moderately large Reynolds numbers.

  13. Boundary-Layer Code For Supersonic Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinckney, S. Z.; Walton, J. T.

    1994-01-01

    HUD is integral computer code based on Spaulding-Chi method for predicting development of boundary layers in laminar, transitional, and turbulent regions of flows on two-dimensional or axisymmetric bodies. Approximates nonequilibrium velocity profiles as well as local surface friction in presence of pressure gradient. Predicts transfer of heat in turbulent boundary layer in presence of high axial presure gradient. Provides for pressure gradients both normal and lateral to surfaces. Also used to estimate requirements for cooling scramjet engines. Because of this capability, HUD program incorporated into several scramjet-cycle-performance-analysis codes, including SCRAM (ARC-12338) and SRGULL (LEW-15093). Written in FORTRAN 77.

  14. Direct numerical simulation of K-type and H-type transitions to turbulence in a low Mach number flat plate boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayadi, Taraneh; Hamman, Curtis; Moin, Parviz

    2011-11-01

    Transition to turbulence via spatially evolving secondary instabilities in compressible, zero-pressure-gradient flat plate boundary layers is numerically simulated for both the Klebanoff K-type and Herbert H-type disturbances. The objective of this work is to evaluate the universality of the breakdown process between different routes through transition in wall-bounded shear flows. Each localized linear disturbance is amplified through weak non-linear instability that grows into lambda-vortices and then hairpin-shaped eddies with harmonic wavelength, which become less organized in the late-transitional regime once a fully populated spanwise turbulent energy spectrum is established. For the H-type transition, the computational domain extends from Rex =105 , where laminar blowing and suction excites the most unstable fundamental and a pair of oblique waves, to fully turbulent stage at Rex = 10 . 6 ×105 . The computational domain for the K-type transition extends to Rex = 9 . 6 ×105 . The computational algorithm employs fourth-order central differences with non-reflective numerical sponges along the external boundaries. For each case, the Mach number is 0.2. Supported by the PSAAP program of DoE, ANL and LLNL.

  15. Experiments in Transitional Boundary Layers With Emphasis on High Free-Stream Disturbance Level, Surface Concave Curvature and Strong Favorable Streamwise Pressure Gradient Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, T. W.; Volino, R. J.

    2007-01-01

    Experiments on boundary layer transition with flat, concave and convex walls and various levels of free-stream disturbance and with zero and strong streamwise acceleration have been conducted. Measurements of both fluid mechanics and heat transfer processes were taken. Examples are profiles of mean velocity and temperature; Reynolds normal and shear stresses; turbulent streamwise and cross-stream heat fluxed; turbulent Prandtl number; and streamwise variations of wall skin friction and heat transfer coefficient values. Free-stream turbulence levels were varied over the range from about 0.3 percent to about 8 percent. The effects of curvature on the onset of transition under low disturbance conditions are clear; concave curvature leads to an earlier and more rapid transition and the opposite is true for convex curvature This was previously known but little documentation of the transport processes in the flow was available

  16. Influence of surface static-pressure orifices on boundary-layer transition. [tests conducted in the Langley Low-Turbulence Pressure Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Somers, D. M.; Stack, J. P.; Harvey, W. D.

    1982-01-01

    An investigation of the interaction of a laminar boundary layer and surface static-pressure orifices was conducted on a natural laminar flow airfoil. The effects of both favorable and adverse pressure gradients were studied at Reynolds numbers based on airfoil chord from approximately 500,000 to 6,000,000 with Mach number varying accordingly from about 0.03 to 0.42. The smaller the diameter of the orifice, the less likely it will cause premature transition. Locating the orifices in a chord-wise row aligned with the flow appears to have an additive, adverse effect on transition. Tube length-to-orifice diameter ration does not seem to have a consistent influence on transition.

  17. Path transition of the western boundary current with a gap due to mesoscale eddies: a 1.5-layer, wind-driven experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Po; Hou, Yijun

    2010-03-01

    Using a 1.5 layer nonlinear shallow-water reduced-gravity model, we executed numerical simulations to investigate the possibility of a western boundary current (WBC) path transition due to mesoscale eddies based on the background of the Kuroshio intrusion into the South China Sea (SCS) from the Luzon Strait. Because the WBC existed different current states with respect to different wind stress control parameters, we chose three steady WBC states (loop current, eddy shedding and leaping) as the background flow field and simulated the path transition of the WBC due to mesoscale eddies. Our simulations indicated that either an anticyclonic or cyclonic eddy can lead to path transition of the WBC with different modes. The simulation results also show that the mesoscale eddies can lead to path transition of the WBC from loop and eddy shedding state to leaping state because of the hysteresis effect. The leaping state is relatively stable compared with the mesoscale eddies. Moreover, an anticyclonic eddy is more effective in producing the WBC path transition for the path transition than a cyclonic eddy. Our results may help to explain some phenomena observed regarding the path transition of the Kuroshio due to the mesoscale eddies at the Luzon Strait.

  18. Effects of a modified leading edge on noise and boundary-layer transition in a rod-wall sound shield at Mach 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creel, T. R., Jr.; Holley, B. B.; Beckwith, I. E.

    1981-01-01

    A version of a rod wall sound shield was tested in the Mach 5 pilot quiet tunnel over a range of unit Reynolds numbers from 10 to 35 million per meter. The model was modified by inclining the leading edge plates to produce an initial 2 deg expansion to ascertain the sensitivity of boundary layer transition to leading edge disturbances. Rod surface pitot pressures, mean free stream pitot pressures, and static pressures on the rods and plenum walls were measured. Hot-wire measurements were also made in the model and nozzle free stream at a unit Reynolds number of 15 million per meter. The surface pitot pressures indicated that transition was much farther forward than for the previous tests due to the leading edge modification and minor fabrication flaws in the model. Early boundary layer transition on the rods was confirmed by hot-wire measurements which showed much higher noise levels in the free stream shield flow when compared with results from previous tests. Mean pitot pressure surveys within the shielded region inside the model indicated that there was an overexpansion and recompression that would limit the streamwise length of undisturbed flow to about 13 cm along the centerline.

  19. Physics of magnetospheric boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, Iver H.

    1995-01-01

    This final report was concerned with the ideas that: (1) magnetospheric boundary layers link disparate regions of the magnetosphere-solar wind system together; and (2) global behavior of the magnetosphere can be understood only by understanding its internal linking mechanisms and those with the solar wind. The research project involved simultaneous research on the global-, meso-, and micro-scale physics of the magnetosphere and its boundary layers, which included the bow shock, the magnetosheath, the plasma sheet boundary layer, and the ionosphere. Analytic, numerical, and simulation projects were performed on these subjects, as well as comparisons of theoretical results with observational data. Other related activity included in the research included: (1) prediction of geomagnetic activity; (2) global MHD (magnetohydrodynamic) simulations; (3) Alfven resonance heating; and (4) Critical Ionization Velocity (CIV) effect. In the appendixes are list of personnel involved, list of papers published; and reprints or photocopies of papers produced for this report.

  20. Boundary layer control for airships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pake, F. A.; Pipitone, S. J.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation is summarized of the aerodynamic principle of boundary layer control for nonrigid LTA craft. The project included a wind tunnel test on a BLC body of revolution at zero angle of attack. Theoretical analysis is shown to be in excellent agreement with the test data. Methods are evolved for predicting the boundary layer development on a body of revolution and the suction pumping and propulsive power requirements. These methods are used to predict the performance characteristics of a full-scale airship. The analysis indicates that propulsive power reductions of 15 to 25 percent and endurance improvements of 20 to 40 percent may be realized in employing boundary-layer control to nonrigid airships.

  1. Influence of Mach Number and Incoming Boundary Layer on Shock Boundary Layer Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stab, Ilona; Threadgill, James; Little, Jesse

    2016-11-01

    Wall pressure fluctuations, schlieren imaging, oil flow visualization and PIV measurements have been performed on the shock boundary layer interaction (SBLI) formed by a 10° compression ramp. The incoming Mach number and boundary layer characteristics are varied to examine their influence on the SBLI. Focus is placed on understanding the effect of these parameters on the structure and unsteadiness of the resultant interaction. Lower Mach numbers M = 2 . 3 (δ0 = 1 . 7 mm , θ = 0 . 29 mm , Reθ = 3115 , H = 1 . 4) and M = 3 (δ0 = 1 . 3 mm , θ = 0 . 25 mm , Reθ = 1800 , H = 1 . 8) show a turbulent or transitional approach boundary layer with no apparent separation at the ramp. Mach 4 has a large separated region which is seemingly a result of a now laminar or transitional approach boundary layer. Pulsations in the separated region correspond to the expected low frequency SBLI dynamics showing a broad peak around a Strouhal number of St = fLint /U∞ = 0 . 27 which is lower than the characteristic frequency of the turbulent boundary layer. Additional results examining the influence of boundary layer modifications (e.g. sweep) and wind tunnel side-walls are also included. Supported by Raytheon Missile Systems.

  2. Stability of Boundary Layer Flow.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-01

    and Teske (1975). We can conclude (as in the case of ducting) that theoretical models of boundary layer structure and associated radar structure...FI33 (Secret). Hitney, (1978) "Surface Duct Effects," Naval Ocean Systems Center, San Diego, Calif., Report No. TD144. Lewellen, W. S., and M. E. Teske

  3. Physics of magnetospheric boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, I. H.

    1993-01-01

    The central ideas of this grant are that the magnetospheric boundary layers link disparate regions of the magnetosphere together, and the global behavior of the magnetosphere can be understood only by understanding the linking mechanisms. Accordingly the present grant includes simultaneous research on the global, meso-, and micro-scale physics of the magnetosphere and its boundary layers. These boundary layers include the bow shock, magnetosheath, the plasma sheet boundary layer, and the ionosphere. Analytic, numerical and simulation projects have been performed on these subjects, as well as comparison of theoretical results with observational data. Very good progress has been made, with four papers published or in press and two additional papers submitted for publication during the six month period 1 June - 30 November 1993. At least two projects are currently being written up. In addition, members of the group have given papers at scientific meetings. The further structure of this report is as follows: section two contains brief accounts of research completed during the last six months, while section three describes the research projects intended for the grant's final period.

  4. Hurricane Boundary-Layer Theory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    interpretations offer a broad context in which to understand the role of the boundary layer in hurricane forecast models. A significant result of M3 was the...vortex aloft. In hurricane forecast models, it is necessary to parametrize the effects of the turbulent transfer of heat, moisture and momentum across the

  5. Local Aerodynamic Heat Transfer and Boundary-Layer Transition on Roughened Sphere-Ellipsoid Bodies at Mach Number 3.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deveikis, William D.; Walker, Robert W.

    1961-01-01

    A wind-tunnel investigation was made to determine heat-transfer distributions on three steel sphere-ellipsoid bodies with surface roughnesses of 5, 100, and 200 microinches. Tests were conducted in the Langley 9- by 6-foot thermal structures tunnel at a Mach number of 3.0, free-stream Reynolds numbers (based on model spherical diameter) of 4.25 x 10(exp 6) and 2.76 x l0(exp 6), and at a stagnation temperature of 650 F. Pressure distributions were obtained also on a fourth model. The results indicated that the combination of surface roughness and boundary-layer cooling tended to promote early transition and nullify the advantages attributable to the blunt shape of the model for reducing local temperatures. Good correlation between experimental heating rates and those calculated from laminar theory was achieved up to the start of boundary-layer transition. The correlation also was good with the values predicted by turbulent theory for surface stations downstream from the 45 deg. station.

  6. Flight survey of the 757 wing noise field and its effects on laminar boundary layer transition. Volume 1: Program description and data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    It was previously observed that an incident acoustic field on a wing with laminar flow can cause transition to turbulent flow if the fluctuating acoustic velocities are of sufficient amplitude and in the critical frequency range for an unstable laminar boundary layer. A section of a wing was modified with a natural laminar flow (NLF) glove to allow direct measurement of the effect of varying engine noise on the extent of laminar flow. The flight test program was completed in June, 1985. At each flight condition, the engine power was varied from about 2600 r/min (idle) to about 4500 r/min (maximum continuous power). The spectral data provides considerable insight into the influences of the various sound sources that contribute to the overall noise levels. Additional analysis will be required to assess the impact of these sources on boundary layer transition. These results demonstrate that substantial laminar flow on the wing of a transport configuration with wing-mounted engines can be obtained.

  7. The Design and Use of a Temperature-Compensated Hot-Film Anemometer System for Boundary-Layer Flow Transition Detection on Supersonic Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiles, Harry R.

    1988-01-01

    An airborne temperature-compensated hot-film anemometer system has been designed, fabricated, and used to obtain in-flight airfoil boundary-layer flow transition data by the NASA Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility. Salient features of the anemometer include near constant sensitivity over the full flight envelope, installation without coaxial wiring, low-noise outputs, and self-contained signal conditioning with dynamic and steady-state outputs. The small size, low-power dissipation, and modular design make the anemometer suitable for use in modern high-performance research aircraft. Design of the temperature-compensated hot-film anemometer and its use for flow transition detection on a laminar flow flight research project are described. Also presented are data gathered in flight which is representative of the temperature-compensated hot-film anemometer operation at subsonic, transonic, and supersonic flight conditions.

  8. Measurements of Aerodynamic Heat Transfer and Boundary-Layer Transition on a 15 deg. Cone in Free Flight at Supersonic Mach Numbers up to 5.2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumsey, Charles B.; Lee, Dorothy B.

    1961-01-01

    Measurements of aerodynamic heat transfer have been made at several stations on the 15 deg total-angle conical nose of a rocket-propelled model in free flight at Mach numbers up to 5.2. Data are presented for a range of local Mach number just outside the boundary layer from 1.40 to 4.65 and a range of local Reynolds number from 3.8 x 10(exp 6) to 46.5 x 10(exp 6), based on length from the nose tip to a measurement station. Laminar, transitional, and turbulent heat-transfer coefficients were measured. The laminar data were in agreement with laminar theory for cones, and the turbulent data agreed well with turbulent theory for cones using Reynolds number based on length from the nose tip. At a nearly constant ratio of wall to local static temperature of 1.2 the Reynolds number of transition increased from 14 x 10(exp 6) to 30 x 10(exp 6) as Mach number increased from 1.4 to 2.9 and then decreased to 17 x 10(exp 6) as Mach number increased to 3.7. At Mach numbers near 3.5, transition Reynolds numbers appeared to be independent of skin temperature at skin temperatures very cold with respect to adiabatic wall temperature. The transition Reynolds number was 17.7 x 10(exp 6) at a condition of Mach number and ratio of wall to local static temperature near that for which three-dimensional disturbance theory has been evaluated and has predicted laminar boundary-layer stability to very high Reynolds numbers (approximately 10(exp 12)).

  9. Two-equation low-Reynolds-number turbulence modeling of transitional boundary layer flows characteristic of gas turbine blades. Ph. D. Thesis. Final Contractor Report

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, R.C.; Patankar, S.V.

    1988-05-01

    The use of low Reynolds number (LRN) forms of the k-epsilon turbulence model in predicting transitional boundary layer flow characteristic of gas turbine blades is developed. The research presented consists of: (1) an evaluation of two existing models; (2) the development of a modification to current LRN models; and (3) the extensive testing of the proposed model against experimental data. The prediction characteristics and capabilities of the Jones-Launder (1972) and Lam-Bremhorst (1981) LRN k-epsilon models are evaluated with respect to the prediction of transition on flat plates. Next, the mechanism by which the models simulate transition is considered and the need for additional constraints is discussed. Finally, the transition predictions of a new model are compared with a wide range of different experiments, including transitional flows with free-stream turbulence under conditions of flat plate constant velocity, flat plate constant acceleration, flat plate but strongly variable acceleration, and flow around turbine blade test cascades. In general, calculational procedure yields good agreement with most of the experiments.

  10. Two-Equation Low-Reynolds-Number Turbulence Modeling of Transitional Boundary Layer Flows Characteristic of Gas Turbine Blades. Ph.D. Thesis. Final Contractor Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, Rodney C.; Patankar, Suhas V.

    1988-01-01

    The use of low Reynolds number (LRN) forms of the k-epsilon turbulence model in predicting transitional boundary layer flow characteristic of gas turbine blades is developed. The research presented consists of: (1) an evaluation of two existing models; (2) the development of a modification to current LRN models; and (3) the extensive testing of the proposed model against experimental data. The prediction characteristics and capabilities of the Jones-Launder (1972) and Lam-Bremhorst (1981) LRN k-epsilon models are evaluated with respect to the prediction of transition on flat plates. Next, the mechanism by which the models simulate transition is considered and the need for additional constraints is discussed. Finally, the transition predictions of a new model are compared with a wide range of different experiments, including transitional flows with free-stream turbulence under conditions of flat plate constant velocity, flat plate constant acceleration, flat plate but strongly variable acceleration, and flow around turbine blade test cascades. In general, calculational procedure yields good agreement with most of the experiments.

  11. Shock Wave Turbulent Boundary Layer Interaction in Hypersonic Flow

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-06-01

    An examination and correlation of skin friction heat transfer and pressure measurements in laminar, transitional and turbulent boundary layers on...and heat transfer measurements made In turbulent boundary layers DO 1 JAN 73 W3 EDITION OF 1 NOV 65 IS OBSOLETE ’ / Unclassified SECURITY...Eckert. The Van Driest II method is in best overall agreement with the measurements . From 50 to 100 boundary layer thicknesses are

  12. Boundary Layer Control for Hypersonic Airbreathing Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott A.; Nowak, Robert J.; Horvath, Thomas J.

    2004-01-01

    Active and passive methods for tripping hypersonic boundary layers have been examined in NASA Langley Research Center wind tunnels using a Hyper-X model. This investigation assessed several concepts for forcing transition, including passive discrete roughness elements and active mass addition (or blowing), in the 20-Inch Mach 6 Air and the 31-Inch Mach 10 Air Tunnels. Heat transfer distributions obtained via phosphor thermography, shock system details, and surface streamline patterns were measured on a 0.333-scale model of the Hyper-X forebody. The comparisons between the active and passive methods for boundary layer control were conducted at test conditions that nearly match the Hyper-X nominal Mach 7 flight test-point of an angle-of-attack of 2-deg and length Reynolds number of 5.6 million. For passive roughness, the primary parametric variation was a range of trip heights within the calculated boundary layer thickness for several trip concepts. The passive roughness study resulted in a swept ramp configuration, scaled to be roughly 0.6 of the calculated boundary layer thickness, being selected for the Mach 7 flight vehicle. For the active blowing study, the manifold pressure was systematically varied (while monitoring the mass flow) for each configuration to determine the jet penetration height, with schlieren, and transition movement, with the phosphor system, for comparison to the passive results. All the blowing concepts tested, which included various rows of sonic orifices (holes), two- and three-dimensional slots, and random porosity, provided transition onset near the trip location with manifold stagnation pressures on the order of 40 times the model surface static pressure, which is adequate to ensure sonic jets. The present results indicate that the jet penetration height for blowing was roughly half the height required with passive roughness elements for an equivalent amount of transition movement.

  13. Responses of boundary layers to strong external disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asai, Masahito

    1990-10-01

    The transition from laminar flow to turbulent flow of the boundary layer is an important phenomenon for various problems in astronautical engineering. When the turbulence in the flow is weak, the boundary layer transition starts from the spatial amplification of a viscous T-S (Tollmien Schlichting) wave. The initial wave starts as a two dimensional wave and grows rapidly to a three dimensional wave with amplification. Finally, it corrupts to small scale hairpin eddies. The transitions starting from these wave amplifications are studied, and instability mechanisms are analyzed. In order to analyze the mechanism, the strength of turbulence (eddies) in the air flow that develops a transitional structure in the boundary layer and leads to a turbulent flow transition is analyzed. The responses of the boundary layers to the strong external disturbances are studied experimentally by introducing sonic wave which simulates hairpin eddies in the lower part of the front edge of a flat plate.

  14. Boundary Layer Transition and Trip Effectiveness on an Apollo Capsule in the JAXA High Enthalpy Shock Tunnel (HIEST) Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirk, Lindsay C.; Lillard, Randolph P.; Olejniczak, Joseph; Tanno, Hideyuki

    2015-01-01

    Computational assessments were performed to size boundary layer trips for a scaled Apollo capsule model in the High Enthalpy Shock Tunnel (HIEST) facility at the JAXA Kakuda Space Center in Japan. For stagnation conditions between 2 MJ/kg and 20 MJ/kg and between 10 MPa and 60 MPa, the appropriate trips were determined to be between 0.2 mm and 1.3 mm high, which provided kappa/delta values on the heatshield from 0.15 to 2.25. The tripped configuration consisted of an insert with a series of diamond shaped trips along the heatshield downstream of the stagnation point. Surface heat flux measurements were obtained on a capsule with a 250 mm diameter, 6.4% scale model, and pressure measurements were taken at axial stations along the nozzle walls. At low enthalpy conditions, the computational predictions agree favorably to the test data along the heatshield centerline. However, agreement becomes less favorable as the enthalpy increases conditions. The measured surface heat flux on the heatshield from the HIEST facility was under-predicted by the computations in these cases. Both smooth and tripped configurations were tested for comparison, and a post-test computational analysis showed that kappa/delta values based on the as-measured stagnation conditions ranged between 0.5 and 1.2. Tripped configurations for both 0.6 mm and 0.8 mm trip heights were able to effectively trip the flow to fully turbulent for a range of freestream conditions.

  15. Stereo Particle Image Velocimetry Measurements of Transition Downstream of a Forward-Facing Step in a Swept-Wing Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eppink, Jenna L.

    2017-01-01

    Stereo particle image velocimetry measurements were performed downstream of a forward-facing step in a stationary-crossflow dominated flow. Three different step heights were studied with the same leading-edge roughness configuration to determine the effect of the step on the evolution of the stationary-crossflow. Above the critical step height, which is approximately 68% of the boundary-layer thickness at the step, the step caused a significant increase in the growth of the stationary crossflow. For the largest step height studied (68%), premature transition occurred shortly downstream of the step. The stationary crossflow amplitude only reached approximately 7% of U(sub e) in this case, which suggests that transition does not occur via the high-frequency secondary instabilities typically associated with stationary crossflow transition. The next largest step of 60% delta still caused a significant impact on the growth of the stationary crossflow downstream of the step, but the amplitude eventually returned to that of the baseline case, and the transition front remained the same. The smallest step height (56%) only caused a small increase in the stationary crossflow amplitude and no change in the transition front. A final case was studied in which the roughness on the leading edge of the model was enhanced for the lowest step height case to determine the impact of the stationary crossflow amplitude on transition. The stationary crossflow amplitude was increased by approximately four times, which resulted in premature transition for this step height. However, some notable differences were observed in the behavior of the stationary crossflow mode, which indicate that the interaction mechanism which results in the increased growth of the stationary crossflow downstream of the step may be different in this case compared to the larger step heights.

  16. Flow unsteadiness effects on boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, Sreedhara V.

    1989-01-01

    The development of boundary layers at high subsonic speeds in the presence of either mass flux fluctuations or acoustic disturbances (the two most important parameters in the unsteadiness environment affecting the aerodynamics of a flight vehicle) was investigated. A high quality database for generating detailed information concerning free-stream flow unsteadiness effects on boundary layer growth and transition in high subsonic and transonic speeds is described. The database will be generated with a two-pronged approach: (1) from a detailed review of existing literature on research and wind tunnel calibration database, and (2) from detailed tests in the Boundary Layer Apparatus for Subsonic and Transonic flow Affected by Noise Environment (BLASTANE). Special instrumentation, including hot wire anemometry, the buried wire gage technique, and laser velocimetry were used to obtain skin friction and turbulent shear stress data along the entire boundary layer for various free stream noise levels, turbulence content, and pressure gradients. This database will be useful for improving the correction methodology of applying wind tunnel test data to flight predictions and will be helpful for making improvements in turbulence modeling laws.

  17. Planetary Boundary Layer from AERI and MPL

    SciTech Connect

    Sawyer, Virginia

    2014-02-13

    The distribution and transport of aerosol emitted to the lower troposphere is governed by the height of the planetary boundary layer (PBL), which limits the dilution of pollutants and influences boundary-layer convection. Because radiative heating and cooling of the surface strongly affect the PBL top height, it follows diurnal and seasonal cycles and may vary by hundreds of meters over a 24-hour period. The cap the PBL imposes on low-level aerosol transport makes aerosol concentration an effective proxy for PBL height: the top of the PBL is marked by a rapid transition from polluted, well-mixed boundary-layer air to the cleaner, more stratified free troposphere. Micropulse lidar (MPL) can provide much higher temporal resolution than radiosonde and better vertical resolution than infrared spectrometer (AERI), but PBL heights from all three instruments at the ARM SGP site are compared to one another for validation. If there is agreement among them, the higher-resolution remote sensing-derived PBL heights can accurately fill in the gaps left by the low frequency of radiosonde launches, and thus improve model parameterizations and our understanding of boundary-layer processes.

  18. Three-Dimensional Boundary Layers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-02-01

    sketched in figure 1 . The model design is des- • cribed in more detail in reference 2. At measuring station 1 the turbulent boundary layer is very...layer methods are increasingly important as their use for design purposes increases. Specific recommendations for future work include the following. 1 ...MEMBERS M. 1 ’Ing. G&n C.Cap~lier Prof. Dr. Jr. J.L. van Ingen Directeur de l’A~rodynamique Department of Aerospace B.P. 72 Engineering% ONERA Delf

  19. Stability of compressible boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nayfeh, Ali H.

    1989-01-01

    The stability of compressible 2-D and 3-D boundary layers is reviewed. The stability of 2-D compressible flows differs from that of incompressible flows in two important features: There is more than one mode of instability contributing to the growth of disturbances in supersonic laminar boundary layers and the most unstable first mode wave is 3-D. Whereas viscosity has a destabilizing effect on incompressible flows, it is stabilizing for high supersonic Mach numbers. Whereas cooling stabilizes first mode waves, it destabilizes second mode waves. However, second order waves can be stabilized by suction and favorable pressure gradients. The influence of the nonparallelism on the spatial growth rate of disturbances is evaluated. The growth rate depends on the flow variable as well as the distance from the body. Floquet theory is used to investigate the subharmonic secondary instability.

  20. Effects of wing sweep on in-flight boundary-layer transition for a laminar flow wing at Mach numbers from 0.60 to 0.79

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Bianca Trujillo; Meyer, Robert R., Jr.

    1990-07-01

    The variable sweep transition flight experiment (VSTFE) was conducted on an F-14A variable sweep wing fighter to examine the effect of wing sweep on natural boundary layer transition. Nearly full span upper surface gloves, extending to 60 percent chord, were attached to the F-14 aircraft's wings. The results are presented of the glove 2 flight tests. Glove 2 had an airfoil shape designed for natural laminar flow at a wing sweep of 20 deg. Sample pressure distributions and transition locations are presented with the complete results tabulated in a database. Data were obtained at wing sweeps of 15, 20, 25, 30, and 35 deg, at Mach numbers ranging from 0.60 to 0.79, and at altitudes ranging from 10,000 to 35,000 ft. Results show that a substantial amount of laminar flow was maintained at all the wing sweeps evaluated. The maximum transition Reynolds number obtained was 18.6 x 10(exp 6) at 15 deg of wing sweep, Mach 0.75, and at an altitude of 10,000 ft.

  1. Transition of the Laminar Boundary Layer on a Delta Wing with 74 degree Sweep in Free Flight at Mach Numbers from 2.8 to 5.3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, Gary T.

    1961-01-01

    The tests were conducted at Mach numbers from 2.8 to 5.3, with model surface temperatures small compared to boundary-layer recovery temperature. The effects of Mach number, temperature ratio, unit Reynolds number, leading-edge diameter, and angle of attack were investigated in an exploratory fashion. The effect of heat-transfer condition (i.e., wall temperature to total temperature ratio) and Mach number can not be separated explicitly in free-flight tests. However, the data of the present report, as well as those of NACA TN 3473, were found to be more consistent when plotted versus temperature ratio. Decreasing temperature ratio increased the transition Reynolds number. The effect of unit Reynolds number was small as was the effect of leading-edge diameter within the range tested. At small values of angle of attack, transition moved forward on the windward surface and rearward on the leeward surface. This trend was reversed at high angles of attack (6 deg to 18 deg). Possible reasons for this are the reduction of crossflow on the windward side and the influence of the lifting vortices on the leeward surface. When the transition results on the 740 delta wing were compared to data at similar test conditions for an unswept leading edge, the results bore out the results of earlier research at nearly zero heat transfer; namely, sweep causes a large reduction in the transition Reynolds number.

  2. Effects of Wing Sweep on In-flight Boundary-layer Transition for a Laminar Flow Wing at Mach Numbers from 0.60 to 0.79

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Bianca Trujillo; Meyer, Robert R., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The variable sweep transition flight experiment (VSTFE) was conducted on an F-14A variable sweep wing fighter to examine the effect of wing sweep on natural boundary layer transition. Nearly full span upper surface gloves, extending to 60 percent chord, were attached to the F-14 aircraft's wings. The results are presented of the glove 2 flight tests. Glove 2 had an airfoil shape designed for natural laminar flow at a wing sweep of 20 deg. Sample pressure distributions and transition locations are presented with the complete results tabulated in a database. Data were obtained at wing sweeps of 15, 20, 25, 30, and 35 deg, at Mach numbers ranging from 0.60 to 0.79, and at altitudes ranging from 10,000 to 35,000 ft. Results show that a substantial amount of laminar flow was maintained at all the wing sweeps evaluated. The maximum transition Reynolds number obtained was 18.6 x 10(exp 6) at 15 deg of wing sweep, Mach 0.75, and at an altitude of 10,000 ft.

  3. Waves, Turbulence and Boundary Layers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-30

    turbulent bottom boundary layers to account for shallow water wave and streaming effects . OBJECTIVES 1. Derive the three-dimensional, wave...deficiency. 1 Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the collection of information is estimated to average...completing and reviewing the collection of information . Send comments regarding this burden estimate or any other aspect of this collection of

  4. The Martian Surface Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, G. R.; Joshi, M.

    1999-01-01

    The acquisition of meteorological data from the surface of Mars by the two Viking Landers and Mars Pathfinder make it possible to estimate atmospheric boundary layer parameters and surface properties at three different locations on the planet. Because the Martian atmosphere is so thin the majority of the solar radiance is converted to heat at the surface. The difference between surface and atmospheric temperature can also constraint surface albedo, thermal inertia, and infrared emissivity. The Mars Pathfinder Atmospheric Structure Instrument/Meteorological package (ASI/MET) was the most capable weather monitoring system ever sent to the surface of another planet to date. One of the prime objectives of the ASI/MET package is to characterize the surface boundary layer parameters, particularly the heat and momentum fluxes, scaling temperature and friction velocity, and estimate surface roughness. Other important boundary layer parameters, such as Richardson Number, Monin-Obukhov length, analysis of turbulence characteristics of wind and temperature, and atmospheric stability class can also be determined from these measurements.

  5. Turbulence kinetic energy budget during the afternoon transition - Part 1: Observed surface TKE budget and boundary layer description for 10 intensive observation period days

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, Erik; Lohou, Fabienne; Lothon, Marie; Pardyjak, Eric; Mahrt, Larry; Darbieu, Clara

    2016-07-01

    The decay of turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) and its budget in the afternoon period from midday until zero-buoyancy flux at the surface is studied in a two-part paper by means of measurements from the Boundary Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence (BLLAST) field campaign for 10 intensive observation period days. Here, in Part 1, near-surface measurements from a small tower are used to estimate a TKE budget. The overall boundary layer characteristics and mesoscale situation at the site are also described based upon taller tower measurements, radiosoundings and remote sensing instrumentation. Analysis of the TKE budget during the afternoon transition reveals a variety of different surface layer dynamics in terms of TKE and TKE decay. This is largely attributed to variations in the 8 m wind speed, which is responsible for different amounts of near-surface shear production on different afternoons and variations within some of the afternoon periods. The partitioning of near-surface production into local dissipation and transport in neutral and unstably stratified conditions was investigated. Although variations exist both between and within afternoons, as a rule of thumb, our results suggest that about 50 % of the near-surface production of TKE is compensated for by local dissipation near the surface, leaving about 50 % available for transport. This result indicates that it is important to also consider TKE transport as a factor influencing the near-surface TKE decay rate, which in many earlier studies has mainly been linked with the production terms of TKE by buoyancy and wind shear. We also conclude that the TKE tendency is smaller than the other budget terms, indicating a quasi-stationary evolution of TKE in the afternoon transition. Even though the TKE tendency was observed to be small, a strong correlation to mean buoyancy production of -0.69 was found for the afternoon period. For comparison with previous results, the TKE budget terms are normalized with

  6. Interference between boundary layer flow and wake flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanemoto, T.; Toyokura, T.; Kurokawa, J.

    1981-03-01

    The characteristics of a flow in which the laminar boundary layer along a flat plate at zero incidence interferes with the turbulent wake behind a circular cylinder are examined for several relative positions of the cylinder and the plate. It is shown that turbulent velocity fluctuation of the wake flow results in the boundary layer flow transition from the laminar to the turbulent region. It is also shown that the velocity profile in the boundary layer region, when the flows interfere, can be well approximated by subtracting the velocity defect of the boundary layer unaffected by the wake from the velocity distribution of the wake flow unaffected by the wall.

  7. The Langley Stability and Transition Analysis Code (LASTRAC) : LST, Linear and Nonlinear PSE for 2-D, Axisymmetric, and Infinite Swept Wing Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Chau-Lyan

    2003-01-01

    During the past two decades, our understanding of laminar-turbulent transition flow physics has advanced significantly owing to, in a large part, the NASA program support such as the National Aerospace Plane (NASP), High-speed Civil Transport (HSCT), and Advanced Subsonic Technology (AST). Experimental, theoretical, as well as computational efforts on various issues such as receptivity and linear and nonlinear evolution of instability waves take part in broadening our knowledge base for this intricate flow phenomenon. Despite all these advances, transition prediction remains a nontrivial task for engineers due to the lack of a widely available, robust, and efficient prediction tool. The design and development of the LASTRAC code is aimed at providing one such engineering tool that is easy to use and yet capable of dealing with a broad range of transition related issues. LASTRAC was written from scratch based on the state-of-the-art numerical methods for stability analysis and modem software technologies. At low fidelity, it allows users to perform linear stability analysis and N-factor transition correlation for a broad range of flow regimes and configurations by using either the linear stability theory (LST) or linear parabolized stability equations (LPSE) method. At high fidelity, users may use nonlinear PSE to track finite-amplitude disturbances until the skin friction rise. Coupled with the built-in receptivity model that is currently under development, the nonlinear PSE method offers a synergistic approach to predict transition onset for a given disturbance environment based on first principles. This paper describes the governing equations, numerical methods, code development, and case studies for the current release of LASTRAC. Practical applications of LASTRAC are demonstrated for linear stability calculations, N-factor transition correlation, non-linear breakdown simulations, and controls of stationary crossflow instability in supersonic swept wing boundary

  8. Development of a temperature-compensated hot-film anemometer system for boundary-layer transition detection on high-performance aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiles, H. R.; Johnson, J. B.

    1985-01-01

    A hot-film constant-temperature anemometer (CTA) system was flight-tested and evaluated as a candidate sensor for determining boundary-layer transition on high-performance aircraft. The hot-film gage withstood an extreme flow environment characterized by shock waves and high dynamic pressures, although sensitivity to the local total temperature with the CTA indicated the need for some form of temperature compensation. A temperature-compensation scheme was developed and two CTAs were modified and flight-tested on the F-104/Flight Test Fixture (FTF) facility at a variety of Mach numbers and altitudes, ranging from 0.4 to 1.8 and 5,000 to 40,000 ft respectively.

  9. Unsteady boundary layers on a flat plate disturbed by periodic wakes. Part 2: Measurements of unsteady boundary layers and discussion

    SciTech Connect

    Funazaki, K.

    1996-04-01

    As the second part of the study, detailed hot-wire anemometry measurements of wake-affected boundary layers on the flat plate are made. These measurements are organized in order, first, to check the standpoint of the modeling of the wake-induced transition proposed in Part 1, and second, to observe wake-boundary layer interaction in detail from a viewpoint of direct and indirect effect of the wake passage upon turbulent spot generation within the boundary layer, as described by Walker (1993). The validity of the presumed state of the wake-affected boundary layer in the distance-time domain, which constitutes the basis of the transition model, is confirmed to great extent. However, it is also found that the criterion for the onset of the wake-induced transition adopted in Part 1 should be reconsidered. Some successful attempts are therefore made to specify the transition onset.

  10. Experimental investigation of boundary layer transition on rotating cones in axial flow in 0 and 35 degrees angle of attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kargar, Ali; Mansour, Kamyar

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, experimental results using hot wire anemometer and smoke visualization are presented. The results obtained from the hot wire anemometer for critical Reynolds number and transitional Reynolds number are compared with previous results. Excellent agreement is found for the transitional Reynolds number. The results for the transitional Reynolds number are also compared to previous linear stability results. The results from the smoke visualization clearly show the crossflow vortices which arise in the transition process from a laminar to a turbulent flow. A non-zero angle of attack is also considered. we compare our results by linear stability theory which was done by. We just emphasis. Also we compare visualization and hot wire anemometer results graphically, our goal in this paper is to check reliability of using hot wire anemometer and smoke visualization in stability problem and check reliability of linear stability theory for this two cases and compare our results with some trusty experimental works.

  11. An investigation into the numerical prediction of boundary layer transition using the K.Y. Chien turbulence model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Craig A.; Crawford, Michael E.

    1990-01-01

    Assessments were made of the simulation capabilities of transition models developed at the University of Minnesota, as applied to the Launder-Sharma and Lam-Bremhorst two-equation turbulence models, and at The University of Texas at Austin, as applied to the K. Y. Chien two-equation turbulence model. A major shortcoming in the use of the basic K. Y. Chien turbulence model for low-Reynolds number flows was identified. The problem with the Chien model involved premature start of natural transition and a damped response as the simulation moved to fully turbulent flow at the end of transition. This is in contrast to the other two-equation turbulence models at comparable freestream turbulence conditions. The damping of the transition response of the Chien turbulence model leads to an inaccurate estimate of the start and end of transition for freestream turbulence levels greater than 1.0 percent and to difficulty in calculating proper model constants for the transition model.

  12. Effects of Blade Boundary Layer Transition and Daytime Atmospheric Turbulence on Wind Turbine Performance Analyzed with Blade-Resolved Simulation and Field Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandi, Tarak Nath

    Relevant to utility scale wind turbine functioning and reliability, the present work focuses on enhancing our understanding of wind turbine responses from interactions between energy-dominant daytime atmospheric turbulence eddies and rotating blades of a GE 1.5 MW wind turbine using a unique data set from a GE field experiment and computer simulations at two levels of fidelity. Previous studies have shown that the stability state of the lower troposphere has a major impact on the coherent structure of the turbulence eddies, with corresponding differences in wind turbine loading response. In this study, time-resolved aerodynamic data measured locally at the leading edge and trailing edge of three outer blade sections on a GE 1.5 MW wind turbine blade and high-frequency SCADA generator power data from a daytime field campaign are combined with computer simulations that mimic the GE wind turbine within a numerically generated atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) flow field which is a close approximation of the atmospheric turbulence experienced by the wind turbine in the field campaign. By combining the experimental and numerical data sets, this study describes the time-response characteristics of the local loadings on the blade sections in response to nonsteady nonuniform energetic atmospheric turbulence eddies within a daytime ABL which have spatial scale commensurate with that of the turbine blade length. This study is the first of its kind where actuator line and blade boundary layer resolved CFD studies of a wind turbine field campaign are performed with the motivation to validate the numerical predictions with the experimental data set, and emphasis is given on understanding the influence of the laminar to turbulent transition process on the blade loadings. The experimental and actuator line method data sets identify three important response time scales quantified at the blade location: advective passage of energy-dominant eddies (≈25 - 50 s), blade rotation (1P

  13. Boundary Layer Heights from CALIOP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuehn, R.; Ackerman, S. A.; Holz, R.; Roubert, L.

    2012-12-01

    This work is focused on the development of a planetary boundary layer (PBL) height retrieval algorithm for CALIOP and validation studies. Our current approach uses a wavelet covariance transform analysis technique to find the top of the boundary layer. We use the methodology similar to that found in Davis et. al. 2000, ours has been developed to work with the lower SNR data provided by CALIOP, and is intended to work autonomously. Concurrently developed with the CALIOP algorithm we will show results from a PBL height retrieval algorithm from profiles of potential temperature, these are derived from Aircraft Meteorological DAta Relay (AMDAR) observations. Results from 5 years of collocated AMDAR - CALIOP retrievals near O'Hare airport demonstrate good agreement between the CALIOP - AMDAR retrievals. In addition, because we are able to make daily retrievals from the AMDAR measurements, we are able to observe the seasonal and annual variation in the PBL height at airports that have sufficient instrumented-aircraft traffic. Also, a comparison has been done between the CALIOP retrievals and the NASA Langley airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) PBL height retrievals acquired during the GoMACCS experiment. Results of this comparison, like the AMDAR comparison are favorable. Our current work also involves the analysis and verification of the CALIOP PBL height retrieval from the 6 year CALIOP global data set. Results from this analysis will also be presented.

  14. Nonequilibrium chemistry boundary layer integral matrix procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tong, H.; Buckingham, A. C.; Morse, H. L.

    1973-01-01

    The development of an analytic procedure for the calculation of nonequilibrium boundary layer flows over surfaces of arbitrary catalycities is described. An existing equilibrium boundary layer integral matrix code was extended to include nonequilibrium chemistry while retaining all of the general boundary condition features built into the original code. For particular application to the pitch-plane of shuttle type vehicles, an approximate procedure was developed to estimate the nonequilibrium and nonisentropic state at the edge of the boundary layer.

  15. The Effect of Compliant Walls on Three-Dimensional Primary and Secondary Instabilities in Boundary Layer Transition.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-04-01

    formed by Wray and Hussaini (1980) and Zang and Hussaini (1988, 1989). This 9 is possible due only to advances in computers and computational methods...this type. Insufficient resolution is present for the nonlinear stages of the three-dimensional development. Additionally, computations suffer from the...the Class A-TSI and stabilizes the Class B-TWF. Additionally, Carpenter and Morris used the e-criteria by Smith and Gamberoni to compute transition

  16. An Investigation of the Effects of Heat Transfer on Boundary-Layer Transition on a Parabolic Body of Revolution (NACA RM-10) at a Mach Number of 1.61

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Czarnecki, K R; Sinclair, Archibald R

    1955-01-01

    Report presents the results of an investigation conducted to determine the effects of heat transfer on boundary-layer transition on a parabolic body of revolution (NACA rm-10 without fins) at Mach number of 1.61 and over a Reynolds number range from 2.5 x 10(6) to 35 x 10(6). The maximum cooling of the model used in these tests corresponded to a temperature ratio (ratio of model-surface temperature to free-stream temperature) of 1.12, a value somewhat higher than the theoretical value required for infinite boundary-layer stability at this Mach number. The maximum heating corresponded to a temperature ratio of about 1.85. Included in the investigation was a study of the effects of surface irregularities and disturbances generated in the airstream on the ability of heat transfer to influence boundary-layer transition.

  17. Acoustics of laminar boundary layers breakdown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Meng

    1994-01-01

    Boundary layer flow transition has long been suggested as a potential noise source in both marine (sonar-dome self noise) and aeronautical (aircraft cabin noise) applications, owing to the highly transient nature of process. The design of effective noise control strategies relies upon a clear understanding of the source mechanisms associated with the unsteady flow dynamics during transition. Due to formidable mathematical difficulties, theoretical predictions either are limited to early linear and weakly nonlinear stages of transition, or employ acoustic analogy theories based on approximate source field data, often in the form of empirical correlation. In the present work, an approach which combines direct numerical simulation of the source field with the Lighthill acoustic analogy is utilized. This approach takes advantage of the recent advancement in computational capabilities to obtain detailed information about the flow-induced acoustic sources. The transitional boundary layer flow is computed by solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations without model assumptions, thus allowing a direct evaluation of the pseudosound as well as source functions, including the Lighthill stress tensor and the wall shear stress. The latter are used for calculating the radiated pressure field based on the Curle-Powell solution of the Lighthill equation. This procedure allows a quantitative assessment of noise source mechanisms and the associated radiation characteristics during transition from primary instability up to the laminar breakdown stage. In particular, one is interested in comparing the roles played by the fluctuating volume Reynolds stress and the wall-shear-stresses, and in identifying specific flow processes and structures that are effective noise generators.

  18. Remote noncontacting measurements of heat transfer coefficients for detection of boundary layer transition in wind tunnel tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heath, D. Michele; Winfree, William P.; Carraway, Debra L.; Heyman, Joseph S.

    1987-01-01

    An infrared measurement system is used that consists of a laser heating source, an infrared camera for data acquisition, and a video recorder for data storage. A laser beam is scanned over an airfoil, heating its surface to a few degrees above ambient. An infrared camera then measures the temperature of the airfoil over a two-dimensional field, and these temperatures are stored as a function of time on a video recorder. The resulting temperature pictures are digitized and an iterative approximation algorithm is used to extract the heat transfer coefficient. The resulting values are normalized to the natural convection condition. The technique has been applied in low-speed wind tunnel tests and compared to well-established hot-film measurements which were made simultaneously to confirm the flow conditions. Heat transfer coefficients were determined using a linear scanning pattern, to indicate the position of natural and of artificially induced transition on an airfoil, at various wind speeds. The technique is shown to be sensitive to transition at low Mach numbers. The advantages of the technique are discussed.

  19. Boundary layer theory and subduction

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, A.C.

    1993-12-01

    Numerical models of thermally activated convective flow in Earth`s mantle do not resemble active plate tectonics because of their inability to model successfully the process of subduction, other than by the inclusion of artificial weak zones. Here we show, using a boundary layer argument, how the `rigid lid` style of convection favored by thermoviscous fluids leads to lithospheric stresses which may realistically exceed the yield stress and thus cause subduction ot occur through the visoc-plastic failure of lithospheric rock. An explicit criterion for the failure of the lid is given, which is sensitive to the internal viscosity eta(sub a) below the lid. For numbers appropriate to Earth`s mantle, this criterion is approximately eta(sub a) greater than 10(exp 21) Pa s.

  20. Vortex boundary-layer interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradshaw, P.

    1986-01-01

    Parametric studies to identify a vortex generator were completed. Data acquisition in the first chosen configuration, in which a longitudinal vortex pair generated by an isolated delta wing starts to merge with a turbulent boundary layer on a flat plate fairly close to the leading edge is nearly completed. Work on a delta-wing/flat-plate combination, consisting of a flow visualization and hot wire measurements taken with a computer controlled traverse gear and data logging system were completed. Data taking and analysis have continued, and sample results for another cross stream plane are presented. Available data include all mean velocity components, second order mean products of turbulent fluctuations, and third order mean products. Implementation of a faster data logging system was accomplished.

  1. Transitional Boundary Layers Under the Influence of High Free Stream Turbulence, Intensive Wall Cooling and High Pressure Gradients in Hot Gas Circulation. Ph.D. Thesis - Technische Hochschule, Karlsruhe, 1985

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rued, Klaus

    1987-01-01

    The requirements for fundamental experimental studies of the influence of free stream turbulence, pressure gradients and wall cooling are discussed. Under turbine-like free stream conditions, comprehensive tests of transitional boundary layers with laminar, reversing and turbulent flow increments were performed to decouple the effects of the parameters and to determine the effects during mutual interaction.

  2. Amplification of nonlinear surface waves in an inhomogeneous transition layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodin, G.; Gradov, O. M.

    1991-12-01

    A plasma with a boundary transition layer of variable depth in the presence of a powerful electromagnetic field is considered. It is shown that a displacement of the boundary will grow, and will propagate as a nonlinear surface wave in the direction in which the depth of the transition layer decreases.

  3. Outer layer effects in wind-farm boundary layers: Coriolis forces and boundary layer height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allaerts, Dries; Meyers, Johan

    2015-11-01

    In LES studies of wind-farm boundary layers, scale separation between the inner and outer region of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) is frequently assumed, i.e., wind turbines are presumed to fall within the inner layer and are not affected by outer layer effects. However, modern wind turbine and wind farm design tends towards larger rotor diameters and farm sizes, which means that outer layer effects will become more important. In a prior study, it was already shown for fully-developed wind farms that the ABL height influences the power performance. In this study, we use the in-house LES code SP-Wind to investigate the importance of outer layer effects on wind-farm boundary layers. In a suite of LES cases, the ABL height is varied by imposing a capping inversion with varying inversion strengths. Results indicate the growth of an internal boundary layer (IBL), which is limited in cases with low inversion layers. We further find that flow deceleration combined with Coriolis effects causes a change in wind direction throughout the farm. This effect increases with decreasing boundary layer height, and can result in considerable turbine wake deflection near the end of the farm. The authors are supported by the ERC (ActiveWindFarms, grant no: 306471). Computations were performed on VSC infrastructiure (Flemish Supercomputer Center), funded by the Hercules Foundation and the Flemish Government-department EWI.

  4. Microgravity Effects on Plant Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stutte, Gary; Monje, Oscar

    2005-01-01

    The goal of these series of experiment was to determine the effects of microgravity conditions on the developmental boundary layers in roots and leaves and to determine the effects of air flow on boundary layer development. It is hypothesized that microgravity induces larger boundary layers around plant organs because of the absence of buoyancy-driven convection. These larger boundary layers may affect normal metabolic function because they may reduce the fluxes of heat and metabolically active gases (e.g., oxygen, water vapor, and carbon dioxide. These experiments are to test whether there is a change in boundary layer associated with microgravity, quantify the change if it exists, and determine influence of air velocity on boundary layer thickness under different gravity conditions.

  5. Energy efficient engine, low-pressure turbine boundary layer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, W. B.

    1981-01-01

    A study was conducted to investigate development of boundary layers under the influence of velocity distributions simulating the suction side of two state-of-the-art turbine airfoils: a forward loaded airfoil (squared-off design) and an aft loaded airfoil (aft-loaded design). These velocity distributions were simulated in a boundary layer wind tunnel. Detailed measurements of boundary layer mean velocity and turbulence intensity profiles were obtained for an inlet turbulence level of 2.4 percent and an exit Reynolds number of 800,000. Flush-mounted hot film probes identified the boundary layer transition regimes in the adverse pressure gradient regions for both velocity distributions. Wall intermittency data showed good agreement with the correlations of Dhawan and Narasimha for the intermittency factor distribution in transitional flow regimes.

  6. Unified Parameterization of the Marine Boundary Layer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-30

    information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE 2010 2 . REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2010 to 00-00-2010...boundary layer closure for the convective boundary layer 2 . An EDMF approach to the vertical transport of TKE in convective boundary layers 3. EDMF in...4 implementation and extension to shallow cumulus parameterization is in progress. 2   An integrated TKE-based eddy-diffusivity/mass-flux

  7. Boundary-layer receptivity and laminar-flow airfoil design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerschen, Edward J.

    1987-01-01

    Boundary-layer receptivity examines the way in which external disturbances generate instability waves in boundary layers. Receptivity theory is complementary to stability theory, which studies the evolution of disturbances that are already present in the boundary layer. A transition prediction method which combines receptivity with linear stability theory would directly account for the influence of free-stream disturbances and also consider the characteristics of the boundary layer upstream of the neutral stability point. The current e sup N transition prediction methods require empirical correlations for the influence of environmental disturbances, and totally ignore the boundary layer characteristics upstream of the neutral stability point. The regions where boundary-layer receptivity occurs can be separated into two classes, one near the leading edges and the other at the downstream points where the boundary layer undergoes rapid streamwise adjustments. Analyses were developed for both types of regions, and parametric studies which examine the relative importance of different mechanisms were carried out. The work presented here has focused on the low Mach number case. Extensions to high subsonic and supersonic conditions are presently underway.

  8. The Martian Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrosyan, A.; Galperin, B.; Larsen, S. E.; Lewis, S. R.; Määttänen, A.; Read, P. L.; Renno, N.; Rogberg, L. P. H. T.; Savijärvi, H.; Siili, T.; Spiga, A.; Toigo, A.; Vázquez, L.

    2011-09-01

    The planetary boundary layer (PBL) represents the part of the atmosphere that is strongly influenced by the presence of the underlying surface and mediates the key interactions between the atmosphere and the surface. On Mars, this represents the lowest 10 km of the atmosphere during the daytime. This portion of the atmosphere is extremely important, both scientifically and operationally, because it is the region within which surface lander spacecraft must operate and also determines exchanges of heat, momentum, dust, water, and other tracers between surface and subsurface reservoirs and the free atmosphere. To date, this region of the atmosphere has been studied directly, by instrumented lander spacecraft, and from orbital remote sensing, though not to the extent that is necessary to fully constrain its character and behavior. Current data strongly suggest that as for the Earth's PBL, classical Monin-Obukhov similarity theory applies reasonably well to the Martian PBL under most conditions, though with some intriguing differences relating to the lower atmospheric density at the Martian surface and the likely greater role of direct radiative heating of the atmosphere within the PBL itself. Most of the modeling techniques used for the PBL on Earth are also being applied to the Martian PBL, including novel uses of very high resolution large eddy simulation methods. We conclude with those aspects of the PBL that require new measurements in order to constrain models and discuss the extent to which anticipated missions to Mars in the near future will fulfill these requirements.

  9. Hypersonic Boundary Layer Transition Experiments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-01

    fabricated of the same sphere-cone configuration. The camphor models were machined from billets formed by vacuum compression molding of granular material stock...62-393 (August 1962). 35. A. M. Morrison, J. M. Solomon, M. Ciment , and R. E. Ferguson, IIHandbook of Inviscid Sphere-Cone Flow Fields and Pressure

  10. Cyclone separator having boundary layer turbulence control

    DOEpatents

    Krishna, Coimbatore R.; Milau, Julius S.

    1985-01-01

    A cyclone separator including boundary layer turbulence control that is operable to prevent undue build-up of particulate material at selected critical areas on the separator walls, by selectively varying the fluid pressure at those areas to maintain the momentum of the vortex, thereby preventing particulate material from inducing turbulence in the boundary layer of the vortical fluid flow through the separator.

  11. Stabilization of boundary layer streaks by plasma actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riherd, Mark; Roy, Subrata

    2014-03-01

    A flow's transition from laminar to turbulent leads to increased levels of skin friction. In recent years, dielectric barrier discharge actuators have been shown to be able to delay the onset of turbulence in boundary layers. While the laminar to turbulent transition process can be initiated by several different instability mechanisms, so far, only stabilization of the Tollmien-Schlichting path to transition has received significant attention, leaving the stabilization of other transition paths using these actuators less explored. To fill that void, a bi-global stability analysis is used here to examine the stabilization of boundary layer streaks in a laminar boundary layer. These streaks, which are important to both transient and by-pass instability mechanisms, are damped by the addition of a flow-wise oriented plasma body force to the boundary layer. Depending on the magnitude of the plasma actuation, this damping can be up to 25% of the perturbation's kinetic energy. The damping mechanism appears to be due to highly localized effects in the immediate vicinity of the body force, and when examined using a linearized Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes energy balance, indicate negative production of the perturbation's kinetic energy. Parametric studies of the stabilization have also been performed, varying the magnitude of the plasma actuator's body force and the spanwise wavenumber of the actuation. Based on these parametric studies, the damping of the boundary layer streaks appears to be linear with respect to the total amount of body force applied to the flow.

  12. A mesobeta-scale model in boundary-layer coordinates

    SciTech Connect

    Seitter, K.L.; Colby, F.P. Jr. )

    1992-12-01

    A mesobeta-scale numerical model is described that is designed specifically for operational use on relatively small computers (supermicro-class computers of the MicroVAX 3000/4000 type). A major aspect of the model leading to improved computational efficiency is that rather than using many model layers near the surface to resolve the growth and decay of the boundary layer explicitly, the model treats the boundary layer as a single model layer of known structure whose depth can evolve during the integration. The model equations are recast in a coordinate system, referred to as boundary layer coordinates, based on the depth of the evolving boundary layer. The model described here does not include condensation processes, but it does include a radiation parameterization, schemes governing the structure of the stable and unstable boundary layers and the transitions between these regimes, and parameterizations for the fluxes of heat and moisture between the boundary layer and the earth's surface. Simulations have been carried out with a prototype model that has five layers and 20-km grid spacing in the fine grid mesh of its nested domain, Results of these simulations show that the model is capable of reproducing such mesoscale phenomena as mountain lee waves and the Florida sea-breeze circulation fairly well.

  13. Boundary Layers of Air Adjacent to Cylinders

    PubMed Central

    Nobel, Park S.

    1974-01-01

    Using existing heat transfer data, a relatively simple expression was developed for estimating the effective thickness of the boundary layer of air surrounding cylinders. For wind velocities from 10 to 1000 cm/second, the calculated boundary-layer thickness agreed with that determined for water vapor diffusion from a moistened cylindrical surface 2 cm in diameter. It correctly predicted the resistance for water vapor movement across the boundary layers adjacent to the (cylindrical) inflorescence stems of Xanthorrhoea australis R. Br. and Scirpus validus Vahl and the leaves of Allium cepa L. The boundary-layer thickness decreased as the turbulence intensity increased. For a turbulence intensity representative of field conditions (0.5) and for νwindd between 200 and 30,000 cm2/second (where νwind is the mean wind velocity and d is the cylinder diameter), the effective boundary-layer thickness in centimeters was equal to [Formula: see text]. PMID:16658855

  14. Structure of relaminarizing turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesh, O.; Patwardhan, Saurabh

    2014-11-01

    Relaminarization of a turbulent boundary layer in a strongly accelerated flow has received a great attention in recent times. It has been found that such relaminarization is a general and regularly occurring phenomenon in the leading-edge region of a swept wing of an airplane (van Dam et al., 1993). In this work, we investigate the effect of initial Reynolds number on the process of relaminarization in turbulent boundary layers. The experimental and numerical investigation of relaminarizing turbulent boundary layers undergoing same history reveals that the boundary layer with higher initial Reynolds number relaminarizes at a lower pressure gradient value compared to the one with lower Reynolds number. This effect can be explained on the inviscid theory proposed earlier in the literature. Further, various parameter criteria proposed to predict relaminarization, are assessed and the structure of relaminarizing boundary layers is investigated. A mechanism for stabilization of near-wall low speed streaks is proposed.

  15. Active Boundary Layer Trip for Supersonic Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schloegel, F.; Panigua, G.; Tirtey, S.

    2009-01-01

    The last decade has been full of excitement and success for the hypersonic community thanks to various Scramjet ground tests and launches. These studies have shown promising potentials but the viability to perform commercial flights at Mach 8 is still to be demonstrated. An ideal Scramjet is one which is capable of self- starting over a wide range of angles of attack and Mach number. The Scramjet designer has to ensure that the boundary layer over the inlet ramp is fully turbulent where shocks impact, hence reducing the risks of chocked flow conditions. Most studies have issued the efficiency of roughness trip to trigger the boundary layer transition. At hypersonic speed, heat transfer and drag dramatically increase resulting in skin friction averaging at 40% of the overall drag. This study investigates the possibility of triggering transition using perpendicular air jets on a flat plate place in a hypersonic cross-flow. Experiments were conducted in the von Karman Institute hypersonic blow down wind tunnel H3. This facility is mounted with a Mach 6 contoured nozzles and provides flows with Reynolds number in the range of 10x106/m to 30x106/m. The model consist of a flat plate manufactured with a built -in settling chamber, equipped with a pressure tap and a thermocouple to monitor the jet conditions. A first flat plate was manufactured with a black-coated Plexiglas top, for surface heat transfer measurement using an infrared camera. On the second model, a Upilex sheet equipped with 32 thin film gages was glued, time dependent heat transfer measurements up to 60kHz. The jet injection conditions have been varied and a Mach number of 5.5 kept constant. The flow topology was investigated using fast schlieren techniques and oil flow, in order to gain a better understanding.

  16. The current structure of stratified tidal planetary boundary layer flow

    SciTech Connect

    Myrhaug, D.; Slaattelid, O.H.

    1995-12-31

    The paper presents the bottom shear stress and velocity profiles in stratified tidal planetary boundary layer flow by using similarity theory. For a given seabed roughness length, free stream current velocity components, frequency of tidal oscillation, Coriolis parameter and stratification parameter the maximum bottom shear stress is determined for flow conditions in the rough, smooth and transitional smooth-to-rough turbulent regime. Further, the direction of the bottom shear stress and the velocity profiles are given. Comparison is made with data from field measurements of time-independent as well as tidal planetary boundary layer flow for neutral conditions, and the agreement between the predictions and the data is generally good. Further, an example of application for stable stratification is given, and qualitatively the predictions show, as expected, that the bottom shear stress and the thickness of the boundary layer become smaller for stable than for neutral stratification. Other features of the tidal planetary boundary layer flow are also discussed.

  17. Low Reynolds-number turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ting

    1993-06-01

    An experimental investigation was performed to determine the Reynolds analogy factor and turbulent Prandtl number in the transitional and low-Reynolds-number turbulent boundary layer. A miniature three-wire probe was specially designed to measure the mean velocity and temperature profiles and the Reynolds stresses and heat fluxes. Tests were conducted over a heated flat wall with zero pressure gradient and three levels of streamwise acceleration: K = 0.07, 0.16, and 0.25 x 10(exp -6). Mean temperature profiles lagged in development compared to the mean velocity profiles and the values of the Reynolds analogy factor, 2St/Cf, in the late-transition and early-turbulent regions were lower than the values known to apply to the high-Reynolds-number turbulent flow. The profiles of Reynolds cross-stream heat flux showed negative values in the near wall region. The region of negative vt narrowed as the flow proceeded downstream. These negative values of vt in a flow with a negative mean temperature gradient result in negative eddy thermal diffusivity and negative Pr(sub t). It is speculated that the negative values might be caused by the size of the sensor and the three-dimensional behavior of transition. A conditional sampling technique was utilized to separate the flow into turbulent and non-turbulent portions. Detailed flow and thermal structures were investigated.

  18. SUPERSONIC SHEAR INSTABILITIES IN ASTROPHYSICAL BOUNDARY LAYERS

    SciTech Connect

    Belyaev, Mikhail A.; Rafikov, Roman R.

    2012-06-20

    Disk accretion onto weakly magnetized astrophysical objects often proceeds via a boundary layer (BL) that forms near the object's surface, in which the rotation speed of the accreted gas changes rapidly. Here, we study the initial stages of formation for such a BL around a white dwarf or a young star by examining the hydrodynamical shear instabilities that may initiate mixing and momentum transport between the two fluids of different densities moving supersonically with respect to each other. We find that an initially laminar BL is unstable to two different kinds of instabilities. One is an instability of a supersonic vortex sheet (implying a discontinuous initial profile of the angular speed of the gas) in the presence of gravity, which we find to have a growth rate of order (but less than) the orbital frequency. The other is a sonic instability of a finite width, supersonic shear layer, which is similar to the Papaloizou-Pringle instability. It has a growth rate proportional to the shear inside the transition layer, which is of order the orbital frequency times the ratio of stellar radius to the BL thickness. For a BL that is thin compared to the radius of the star, the shear rate is much larger than the orbital frequency. Thus, we conclude that sonic instabilities play a dominant role in the initial stages of nonmagnetic BL formation and give rise to very fast mixing between disk gas and stellar fluid in the supersonic regime.

  19. Planetary Boundary Layer Simulation Using TASS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schowalter, David G.; DeCroix, David S.; Lin, Yuh-Lang; Arya, S. Pal; Kaplan, Michael

    1996-01-01

    Boundary conditions to an existing large-eddy simulation model have been changed in order to simulate turbulence in the atmospheric boundary layer. Several options are now available, including the use of a surface energy balance. In addition, we compare convective boundary layer simulations with the Wangara and Minnesota field experiments as well as with other model results. We find excellent agreement of modelled mean profiles of wind and temperature with observations and good agreement for velocity variances. Neutral boundary simulation results are compared with theory and with previously used models. Agreement with theory is reasonable, while agreement with previous models is excellent.

  20. Passive hypervelocity boundary layer control using an ultrasonically absorptive surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasheed, Adam

    A series of exploratory boundary layer transition experiments was performed on a sharp 5.06 degree half-angle round cone at zero angle-of-attack in the T5 Hypervelocity Shock Tunnel in order to test a novel hypersonic boundary layer control scheme. Recently performed linear stability analyses suggested that transition could be delayed in hypersonic boundary layers by using an ultrasonically absorptive surface that would damp the second mode (Mack mode). The cone used in the experiments was constructed with a smooth surface on half the cone (to serve as a control) and an acoustically absorptive porous surface on the other half. It was instrumented with flush-mounted thermocouples to detect the transition location. Test gases investigated included nitrogen and carbon dioxide at Mach 5 with specific reservoir enthalpy ranging from 1.3 MJ/kg to 13.0 MJ/kg and reservoir pressure ranging from 9.0 MPa to 50.0 MPa. Detailed comparisons were performed to insure that previous results obtained in similar boundary layer transition experiments (on a regular smooth surface) were reproduced and the results were extended to examine the effects of the porous surface. These experiments indicated that the porous surface was highly effective in delaying transition provided that the hole size was significantly smaller than the viscous length scale.

  1. Passive hypervelocity boundary layer control using an acoustically absortive surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasheed, Adam

    A series of exploratory boundary layer transition experiments was performed on a sharp 5.06 degree half-angle round cone at zero angle-of-attack in the T5 Hypervelocity Shock Tunnel in order to test a novel hypersonic boundary layer control scheme. Recently performed linear stability analyses suggested that transition could be delayed in hypersonic boundary layers by using an ultrasonically absorptive surface that would damp the second mode (Mack mode). The cone used in the experiments was constructed with a smooth surface on half the cone (to serve as a control) and an acoustically absorptive porous surface on the other half. It was instrumented with flush-mounted thermocouples to detect the transition location. Test gases investigated included nitrogen and carbon dioxide at M = 5 with specific reservoir enthalpy ranging from 1.3 MJ/kg to 13.0 MJ/kg and reservoir pressure ranging from 9.0 MPa to 50.0 MPa. Detailed comparisons were performed to insure that previous results obtained in similar boundary layer transition experiments (on a regular smooth surface) were reproduced and the results were extended to examine the effects of the porous surface. These experiments indicated that the porous surface was highly effective in delaying transition provided that the hole size was significantly smaller than the viscous length scale.

  2. Behavior of turbulent boundary layers on curved convex walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidbauer, Hans

    1936-01-01

    The system of linear differential equations which indicated the approach of separation and the so-called "boundary-layer thickness" by Gruschwitz is extended in this report to include the case where the friction layer is subject to centrifugal forces. Evaluation of the data yields a strong functional dependence of the momentum change and wall drag on the boundary-layer thickness radius of curvature ratio for the wall. It is further shown that the transition from laminar to turbulent flow occurs at somewhat higher Reynolds Numbers at the convex wall than at the flat plate, due to the stabilizing effect of the centrifugal forces.

  3. Energy transport using natural convection boundary layers

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R

    1986-04-01

    Natural convection is one of the major modes of energy transport in passive solar buildings. There are two primary mechanisms for natural convection heat transport through an aperture between building zones: (1) bulk density differences created by temperature differences between zones; and (2) thermosyphon pumping created by natural convection boundary layers. The primary objective of the present study is to compare the characteristics of bulk density driven and boundary layer driven flow, and discuss some of the advantages associated with the use of natural convection boundary layers to transport energy in solar building applications.

  4. Calculation methods for compressible turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, D. M.; Cary, A. M., Jr.; Harris, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    Calculation procedures for non-reacting compressible two- and three-dimensional turbulent boundary layers were reviewed. Integral, transformation and correlation methods, as well as finite difference solutions of the complete boundary layer equations summarized. Alternative numerical solution procedures were examined, and both mean field and mean turbulence field closure models were considered. Physics and related calculation problems peculiar to compressible turbulent boundary layers are described. A catalog of available solution procedures of the finite difference, finite element, and method of weighted residuals genre is included. Influence of compressibility, low Reynolds number, wall blowing, and pressure gradient upon mean field closure constants are reported.

  5. Wind tunnel noise reduction at Mach 5 with a rod-wall sound shield. [for prevention of premature boundary layer transition on wind tunnel models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creel, T. R.; Beckwith, I. E.

    1983-01-01

    A method of shielding a wind-tunnel model from noise radiated by the tunnel-wall boundary layer has been developed and tested at the Langley Research Center. The shield consists of a rectangular array of longitudinal rods with boundary-layer suction through gaps between the rods. Tests were conducted at Mach 5 over a unit Reynolds number range of 1.0-3.5 x 10 to the 7th/m. Hot-wire measurements indicated the freestream noise, expressed in terms of the rms pressure fluctuations normalized by the mean pressure, was reduced from about 1.4 percent just upstream of the shielded region of a minimum level of about 0.4 percent in the forward portion of the shielded flow.

  6. Wind tunnel noise reduction at Mach 5 with a rod-wall sound shield. [for prevention of premature boundary layer transition on wind tunnel models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creel, T. R.; Beckwith, I. E.

    1983-01-01

    A method of shielding a wind-tunnel model from noise radiated by the tunnel-wall boundary layer has been developed and tested at the Langley Research Center. The shield consists of a rectangular array of longitudinal rods with boundary-layer suction through gaps between the rods. Tests were conducted at Mach 5 over a unit Reynolds number range of 1.0-3.5 x 10 to the 7th/m. Hot-wire measurements indicated the freestream noise, expressed in terms of the rms pressure fluctuations normalized by the mean pressure, was reduced from about 1.4 percent just upstream of the shielded region of a minimum level of about 0.4 percent in the forward portion of the shielded flow.

  7. Stability of the Boundary Layer and the Spot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wygnanski, I.

    2007-01-01

    The similarity among turbulent spots observed in various transition experiments, and the rate in which they contaminate the surrounding laminar boundary layer is only cursory. The shape of the spot depends on the Reynolds number of the surrounding boundary layer and on the pressure gradient to which it and the surrounding laminar flow are exposed. The propagation speeds of the spot boundaries depend, in addition, on the location from which the spot originated and do not simply scale with the local free stream velocity. The understanding of the manner in which the turbulent manner in which the turbulent spot destabilizes the surrounding, vortical fluid is a key to the understanding of the transition process. We therefore turned to detailed observations near the spot boundaries in general and near the spanwise tip of the spot in particular.

  8. Transition within a Hypervelocity Boundary Layer on a 5-degree Half-Angle Cone in Freestream Air/CO2 Mixtures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    cells by 301 cells in the streamwise and wall-normal directions. The stability analyses are performed using the PSE -Chem solver, which is also part...of the STABL software suite. PSE -Chem (Johnson and Candler 2005) solves the reacting, two-dimensional, axi-symmetric, linear parabolized stability...equations to predict the amplification of disturbances as they interact with the boundary layer. The PSE -Chem solver includes finite-rate chemistry

  9. Nonlinear Equilibrium States in Growing Boundary Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Philip; Deguchi, Kengo

    2013-11-01

    Recently there has been much interest in vortex wave interaction/self sustained process/coherent structures in fully developed flows. In growing boundary layers the local Reynolds number varies in the flow direction and so the relevance of equilibrium states calculated for developed flows is in doubt. Here results are presented for nonlinear states in quite general boundary layers. Some of the structures we find using asymptotic and numerical methods are ``distant cousins'' of structures found in for example Couette flow whilst others are apparently unrelated. The new states are completely dependent on the background state being a boundary layer and are found have an elegant canonical asymptotic form. The new states are shown to be valid for quite general boundary layers; in addition they are related to experimental observations.

  10. Boundary-layer stability and airfoil design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viken, Jeffrey K.

    1986-01-01

    Several different natural laminar flow (NLF) airfoils have been analyzed for stability of the laminar boundary layer using linear stability codes. The NLF airfoils analyzed come from three different design conditions: incompressible; compressible with no sweep; and compressible with sweep. Some of the design problems are discussed, concentrating on those problems associated with keeping the boundary layer laminar. Also, there is a discussion on how a linear stability analysis was effectively used to improve the design for some of the airfoils.

  11. Solute boundary layer on a rotating crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Povinelli, Michelle L.; Korpela, Seppo A.; Chait, Arnon

    1994-11-01

    A perturbation analysis has been carried out for the solutal boundary layer next to a rotating crystal. Our aim is to extend the classical results of Burton, Prim and Slicher [1] in order to obtain higher order terms in asymptotic expansions for the concentration field and boundary-layer thickness. Expressions for the effective segregation coefficient are directly obtained from the concentration solution in the two limits that correspond to weak and strong rotation.

  12. Turbulent Boundary Layer in High Rayleigh Number Convection in Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    du Puits, Ronald; Li, Ling; Resagk, Christian; Thess, André; Willert, Christian

    2014-03-01

    Flow visualizations and particle image velocimetry measurements in the boundary layer of a Rayleigh-Bénard experiment are presented for the Rayleigh number Ra =1.4×1010. Our visualizations indicate that the appearance of the flow structures is similar to ordinary (isothermal) turbulent boundary layers. Our particle image velocimetry measurements show that vorticity with both positive and negative sign is generated and that the smallest flow structures are 1 order of magnitude smaller than the boundary layer thickness. Additional local measurements using laser Doppler velocimetry yield turbulence intensities up to I=0.4 as in turbulent atmospheric boundary layers. From our observations, we conclude that the convective boundary layer becomes turbulent locally and temporarily although its Reynolds number Re ≈200 is considerably smaller than the value 420 underlying existing phenomenological theories. We think that, in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection, the transition of the boundary layer towards turbulence depends on subtle details of the flow field and is therefore not universal.

  13. Turbulent boundary layer in high Rayleigh number convection in air.

    PubMed

    du Puits, Ronald; Li, Ling; Resagk, Christian; Thess, André; Willert, Christian

    2014-03-28

    Flow visualizations and particle image velocimetry measurements in the boundary layer of a Rayleigh-Bénard experiment are presented for the Rayleigh number Ra=1.4×1010. Our visualizations indicate that the appearance of the flow structures is similar to ordinary (isothermal) turbulent boundary layers. Our particle image velocimetry measurements show that vorticity with both positive and negative sign is generated and that the smallest flow structures are 1 order of magnitude smaller than the boundary layer thickness. Additional local measurements using laser Doppler velocimetry yield turbulence intensities up to I=0.4 as in turbulent atmospheric boundary layers. From our observations, we conclude that the convective boundary layer becomes turbulent locally and temporarily although its Reynolds number Re≈200 is considerably smaller than the value 420 underlying existing phenomenological theories. We think that, in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection, the transition of the boundary layer towards turbulence depends on subtle details of the flow field and is therefore not universal.

  14. Dense gas boundary layer experiments: Visualization, pressure measurements, concentration evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Reichenbach, H.; Neuwald, P.; Kuhl, A.L.

    1992-11-01

    This technical report describes methods that were applied to investigate turbulent boundary layers generated by inviscid, baroclinic effects. The Cranz-Schardin 24-sparks camera was used to visualize the interactions of a planar shock wave with a Freon R12-layer. The shock propagates more slowly in the Freon layer than in air because of its smaller sound speed. This causes the shock front to be curved and to be reflected between the wall and the layer interface. As a consequence of the reflection process, a series of compression and expansion waves radiate from the layer. Large fluctuations in the streamwise velocity and in pressure develop for about 1 ms. These waves strongly perturb the interface shear layer, which rapidly transitions to a turbulent boundary flow. Pressure measurements showed that the fluctuations in the Freon layer reach a peak pressure 4 times higher than in the turbulent boundary flow. To characterize the preshock Freon boundary layer, concentration measurements were performed with a differential interferometry technique. The refraction index of Freon R12 is so high that Mach-Zehnder interferometry was not successful in these experiments. The evaluation of the concentration profile is described here in detail. Method and results of corresponding LDV measurements under the same conditions are presented in a different report, EMI Report T 9/92. The authors plan to continue the dense gas layer investigations with the gas combination helium/Freon.

  15. The Ocean Boundary Layer beneath Hurricane Frances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasaro, E. A.; Sanford, T. B.; Terrill, E.; Price, J.

    2006-12-01

    The upper ocean beneath the peak winds of Hurricane Frances (57 m/s) was measured using several varieties of air-deployed floats as part of CBLAST. A multilayer structure was observed as the boundary layer deepened from 20m to 120m in about 12 hours. Bubbles generated by breaking waves create a 10m thick surface layer with a density anomaly, due to the bubbles, of about 1 kg/m3. This acts to lubricate the near surface layer. A turbulent boundary layer extends beneath this to about 40 m depth. This is characterized by large turbulent eddies spanning the boundary layer. A stratified boundary layer grows beneath this reaching 120m depth. This is characterized by a gradient Richardson number of 1/4, which is maintained by strong inertial currents generated by the hurricane, and smaller turbulent eddies driven by the shear instead of the wind and waves. There is little evidence of mixing beneath this layer. Heat budgets reveal the boundary layer to be nearly one dimensional through much of the deepening, with horizontal and vertical heat advection becoming important only after the storm had passed. Turbulent kinetic energy measurements support the idea of reduced surface drag at high wind speeds. The PWP model correctly predicts the degree of mixed layer deepening if the surface drag is reduced at high wind speed. Overall, the greatest uncertainty in understanding the ocean boundary layer at these extreme wind speeds is a characterization of the near- surface processes which govern the air-sea fluxes and surface wave properties.

  16. Modeling the summertime Arctic cloudy boundary layer

    SciTech Connect

    Curry, J.A.; Pinto, J.O.; McInnes, K.L.

    1996-04-01

    Global climate models have particular difficulty in simulating the low-level clouds during the Arctic summer. Model problems are exacerbated in the polar regions by the complicated vertical structure of the Arctic boundary layer. The presence of multiple cloud layers, a humidity inversion above cloud top, and vertical fluxes in the cloud that are decoupled from the surface fluxes, identified in Curry et al. (1988), suggest that models containing sophisticated physical parameterizations would be required to accurately model this region. Accurate modeling of the vertical structure of multiple cloud layers in climate models is important for determination of the surface radiative fluxes. This study focuses on the problem of modeling the layered structure of the Arctic summertime boundary-layer clouds and in particular, the representation of the more complex boundary layer type consisting of a stable foggy surface layer surmounted by a cloud-topped mixed layer. A hierarchical modeling/diagnosis approach is used. A case study from the summertime Arctic Stratus Experiment is examined. A high-resolution, one-dimensional model of turbulence and radiation is tested against the observations and is then used in sensitivity studies to infer the optimal conditions for maintaining two separate layers in the Arctic summertime boundary layer. A three-dimensional mesoscale atmospheric model is then used to simulate the interaction of this cloud deck with the large-scale atmospheric dynamics. An assessment of the improvements needed to the parameterizations of the boundary layer, cloud microphysics, and radiation in the 3-D model is made.

  17. The Boundary Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lothon, Marie; Lohou, Fabienne; Darbieu, Clara; Couvreux, Fleur; Pino, David; Blay, Estel; Vila-Guerau de Arellano, Jordi; Pietersen, Henk; Hartogensis, Oscar; Pardyjak, Eric; Alexander, Daniel; Reuder, Joachim; Baaserud, Line; Nilsson, Erik; Jimenez, Maria Antonia; Faloona, Ian; Sastre-Marugan, Mariano; Angevine, Wayne M.; Canut, Guylaine; Bazile, Eric

    2014-05-01

    The BLLAST (Boundary Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence) project aims at better understanding the turbulence processes which occur during the transition from a well-mixed convective boundary layer to a residual layer overlying a stabilized nocturnal layer. This phase of the diurnal cycle is challenging from both modeling and observational perspectives: it is transitory, most of the forcings are small or null during the transition and the turbulence regime changes from the fully convective regime of turbulence, close to homogeneous and isotropic, toward more heterogeneous and intermittent turbulence during its decay. Those issues motivated a field campaign that was conducted from 14 June to 8 July 2011 in southern France in complex terrain and consisted of a range of integrated instrument platforms including: full-size aircraft, Remotely Piloted Airplane Systems (RPAS), remote sensing instruments, radiosoundings, tethered balloons, surface flux stations, and various meteorological towers deployed over different surface covers. The boundary layer, from the earth's surface to free troposphere was densely probed during the entire day, with a focus and intense observations from midday until sunset. The field dataset now forms the base of a set of studies utilizing the observations and several types of models including: Large Eddy Simulation, Mesoscale models, forecast models. The presentation will expose an overview of this experiment and of the current observational and modeling studies, with the focus on: the turbulence decay process within the entire boundary layer from surface to the top, the mesoscale forcings of importance during BLLAST, the ability of the forecast models to represent the diurnal cycle, the relevance of the Monin Obukhov similarity theory, and shallow drainage flows. Reference: Lothon M. et al., 2012. The Boundary-Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence field experiment, Proc. of the 20th Symposium on Boundary-Layers and Turbulence, 7

  18. Streamline curvature effects on turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, D. C.; Chambers, T. L.

    1976-01-01

    A theoretical tool has been developed for predicting, in a nonempirical manner, effects of streamline curvature and coordinate-system rotation on turbulent boundary layers. The second-order closure scheme developed by Wilcox and Traci has been generalized for curved streamline flow and for flow in a rotating coordinate system. A physically based straightforward argument shows that curvature/rotation primarily affects the turbulent mixing energy; the argument yields suitable curvature/rotation terms which are added to the mixing-energy equation. Singular-perturbation solutions valid in the wall layer of a curved-wall boundary layer and a fully developed rotating channel flow demonstrate that, with the curvature/rotation terms, the model predicts the curved-wall and the rotating coordinate system laws of the wall. Results of numerical computations of curved-wall boundary layers and of rotating channel flow show that curvature/rotation effects can be computed accurately with second-order closure.

  19. FIFE atmospheric boundary layer budget methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betts, A. K.

    1992-01-01

    The budget methods and the mixed layer model employed to analyze the aircraft data from the First ISLSCP Field Experiment (FIFE) are described. Vector budgets for the mixed layer are discussed on conserved variable diagrams. Theoretical solutions are presented for the critical surface Bowen ratio that produces no boundary layer moistening or equivalent potential temperature rise as a function of the Bowen ratio at the inversion.

  20. Lear jet boundary layer/shear layer laser propagation experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, K.

    1980-01-01

    Optical degradations of aircraft turbulent boundary layers with shear layers generated by aerodynamic fences are analyzed. A collimated 2.5 cm diameter helium-neon laser (0.63 microns) traversed the approximate 5 cm thick natural aircraft boundary layer in double pass via a reflective airfoil. In addition, several flights examined shear layer-induced optical degradation. Flight altitudes ranged from 1.5 to 12 km, while Mach numbers were varied from 0.3 to 0.8. Average line spread function (LSF) and Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) data were obtained by averaging a large number of tilt-removed curves. Fourier transforming the resulting average MTF yields an LSF, thus affording a direct comparison of the two optical measurements. Agreement was good for the aerodynamic fence arrangement, but only fair in the case of a turbulent boundary layer. Values of phase variance inferred from the LSF instrument for a single pass through the random flow and corrected for a large aperture ranged from 0.08 to 0.11 waves (lambda = .63 microns) for the boundary layer. Corresponding values for the fence vary from 0.08 to 0.16 waves. Extrapolation of these values to 10.6 microns suggests negligible degradation for a CO2 laser transmitted through a 5 cm thick, subsonic turbulent boundary layer.

  1. High enthalpy hypersonic boundary layer flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yanow, G.

    1972-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental study of an ionizing laminar boundary layer formed by a very high enthalpy flow (in excess of 12 eV per atom or 7000 cal/gm) with allowance for the presence of helium driver gas is described. The theoretical investigation has shown that the use of variable transport properties and their respective derivatives is very important in the solution of equilibrium boundary layer equations of high enthalpy flow. The effect of low level helium contamination on the surface heat transfer rate is minimal. The variation of ionization is much smaller in a chemically frozen boundary layer solution than in an equilibrium boundary layer calculation and consequently, the variation of the transport properties in the case of the former was not essential in the integration. The experiments have been conducted in a free piston shock tunnel, and a detailed study of its nozzle operation, including the effects of low levels of helium driver gas contamination has been made. Neither the extreme solutions of an equilibrium nor of a frozen boundary layer will adequately predict surface heat transfer rate in very high enthalpy flows.

  2. Boundary Layer Cloudiness Parameterizations Using ARM Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce Albrecht

    2004-09-15

    This study used DOE ARM data and facilities to: (1) study macroscopic properties of continental stratus clouds at SGP and the factors controlling these properties, (2) develop a scientific basis for understanding the processes responsible for the formation of boundary layer clouds using ARM observations in conjunction with simple parametric models and LES, and (3) evaluate cumulus cloud characteristics retrieved from the MMCR operating at TWP-Nauru. In addition we have used high resolution 94 GHz observations of boundary layer clouds and precipitation to: (1) develop techniques for using high temporal resolution Doppler velocities to study large-eddy circulations and turbulence in boundary layer clouds and estimate the limitations of using current and past MMCR data for boundary layer cloud studies, (2) evaluate the capability and limitations of the current MMCR data for estimating reflectivity, vertical velocities, and spectral under low- signal-to-noise conditions associated with weak no n-precipitating clouds, (3) develop possible sampling modes for the new MMCR processors to allow for adequate sampling of boundary layer clouds, and (4) retrieve updraft and downdraft structures under precipitating conditions.

  3. The Kinematics of Turbulent Boundary Layer Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Stephen Kern

    1991-01-01

    The long history of research into the internal structure of turbulent boundary layers has not provided a unified picture of the physics responsible for turbulence production and dissipation. The goals of the present research are to: (1) define the current state of boundary layer structure knowledge; and (2) utilize direct numerical simulation results to help close the unresolved issues identified in part A and to unify the fragmented knowledge of various coherent motions into a consistent kinematic model of boundary layer structure. The results of the current study show that all classes of coherent motion in the low Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer may be related to vortical structures, but that no single form of vortex is representative of the wide variety of vortical structures observed. In particular, ejection and sweep motions, as well as entrainment from the free-streem are shown to have strong spatial and temporal relationships with vortical structures. Disturbances of vortex size, location, and intensity show that quasi-streamwise vortices dominate the buffer region, while transverse vortices and vortical arches dominate the wake region. Both types of vortical structure are common in the log region. The interrelationships between the various structures and the population distributions of vortices are combined into a conceptual kinematic model for the boundary layer. Aspects of vortical structure dynamics are also postulated, based on time-sequence animations of the numerically simulated flow.

  4. Boundary-Layer-Ingesting Inlet Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, Lewis R.; Allan, Brian G.; Gorton, Susan A.

    2008-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to provide the first demonstration of an active flow control system for a flush-mounted inlet with significant boundary-layer-ingestion in transonic flow conditions. The effectiveness of the flow control in reducing the circumferential distortion at the engine fan-face location was assessed using a 2.5%-scale model of a boundary-layer-ingesting offset diffusing inlet. The inlet was flush mounted to the tunnel wall and ingested a large boundary layer with a boundary-layer-to-inlet height ratio of 35%. Different jet distribution patterns and jet mass flow rates were used in the inlet to control distortion. A vane configuration was also tested. Finally a hybrid vane/jet configuration was tested leveraging strengths of both types of devices. Measurements were made of the onset boundary layer, the duct surface static pressures, and the mass flow rates through the duct and the flow control actuators. The distortion and pressure recovery were measured at the aerodynamic interface plane. The data show that control jets and vanes reduce circumferential distortion to acceptable levels. The point-design vane configuration produced higher distortion levels at off-design settings. The hybrid vane/jet flow control configuration reduced the off-design distortion levels to acceptable ones and used less than 0.5% of the inlet mass flow to supply the jets.

  5. Boundary Layer Flow Over a Moving Wavy Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendin, Gali; Toledo, Yaron

    2016-04-01

    novel self-similar solution is obtained from the first order set of equations. A second order solution is also obtained, stressing the role of small curvature on the boundary layer flow. The proposed model and solution for the boundary layer problem overlaying a moving wavy surface can also be used as a base flow for stability problems that can develop in a boundary layer, including phases of transitional states.

  6. Possibilities for drag reduction by boundary layer control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naiman, I.

    1946-01-01

    The mechanics of laminar boundary layer transition are reviewed. Drag possibilities for boundary layer control are analyzed using assumed conditions of transition Reynolds number, inlet loss, number of slots, blower efficiency, and duct losses. Although the results of such analysis are highly favorable, those obtained by experimental investigations yield conflicting results, showing only small gains, and sometimes losses. Reduction of this data indicates that there is a lower limit to the quantity of air which must be removed at the slot in order to stabilize the laminar flow. The removal of insufficient air permits transition to occur while the removal of excessive amounts of air results in high power costs, with a net drag increases. With the estimated value of flow coefficient and duct losses equal to half the dynamic pressure, drag reductions of 50% may be obtained; with twice this flow coefficient, the drag saving is reduced to 25%.

  7. Electrodynamic properties and height of atmospheric convective boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anisimov, S. V.; Galichenko, S. V.; Mareev, E. A.

    2017-09-01

    We consider the relations between the mixed layer height and atmospheric electric parameters affected by convective mixing. Vertical turbulent transport of radon, its progeny and electrically charged particles is described under Lagrangian stochastic framework, which is the next step to develop a consistent model for the formation of electrical conditions in the atmospheric boundary layer. Using the data from detailed and complex measurements of vertical profiles of the temperature and turbulence statistics as input, we calculated non-stationary vertical profiles of radon and its daughter products concentrations, atmospheric electric conductivity and intensity of electric field in the convective boundary layer from the morning transition through early afternoon quasi-stationary conditions. These profiles demonstrate substantial variability due to the changing turbulent regime in the evolving boundary layer. We obtained quantitative estimates of the atmospheric electric field variability range essentially related to the sunrise and convection development. It is shown that the local change in the electrical conductivity is the only factor that can change the intensity of electric field at the earth's surface more than twice during the transition from night to day. The established relations between electric and turbulent parameters of the boundary layer indicate that the effect of sunrise is more pronounced in the case when development of convection is accompanied by an increase in aerosol concentration and, hence, a decrease in local conductivity.

  8. Effects of forebody geometry on subsonic boundary-layer stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodbele, Simha S.

    1990-01-01

    As part of an effort to develop computational techniques for design of natural laminar flow fuselages, a computational study was made of the effect of forebody geometry on laminar boundary layer stability on axisymmetric body shapes. The effects of nose radius on the stability of the incompressible laminar boundary layer was computationally investigated using linear stability theory for body length Reynolds numbers representative of small and medium-sized airplanes. The steepness of the pressure gradient and the value of the minimum pressure (both functions of fineness ratio) govern the stability of laminar flow possible on an axisymmetric body at a given Reynolds number. It was found that to keep the laminar boundary layer stable for extended lengths, it is important to have a small nose radius. However, nose shapes with extremely small nose radii produce large pressure peaks at off-design angles of attack and can produce vortices which would adversely affect transition.

  9. The boundary layer on compressor cascade blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deutsch, S.; Zierke, W. C.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of NASA Research Grant NSG-3264 is to characterize the flowfield about an airfoil in a cascade at chord Reynolds number(R sub C)near 5 x 10 to the 5th power. The program is experimental and combines laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) measurements with flow visualization techniques in order to obtain detailed flow data, e.g., boundary layer profiles, points of separation and the transition zone, on a cascade of highly-loaded compressor blades. The information provided by this study is to serve as benchmark data for the evaluation of current and future compressor cascade predictive models, in this way aiding in the compressor design process. Summarized is the research activity for the period 1 December 1985 through 1 June 1986. Progress made from 1 June 1979 through 1 December 1985 is presented. Detailed measurements have been completed at the initial cascade angle of 53 deg. (incidence angle 5 degrees). A three part study, based on that data, has been accepted as part of the 1986 Gas Turbine Conference and will be submitted for subsequent journal publication. Also presented are data for a second cascade angle of 45 deg (an incidence angle of 3 degrees).

  10. Longitudinal vortices in concave surface boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, R. I.,; Winoto, S. H.

    1980-01-01

    Local measurements of mean and fluctuating velocity by laser anemometer were made inside the developing concave surface boundary layer in a free surface water channel at Reynolds numbers up to 16000. Concave surface radius was 3.5 times channel width and the ratio of spanwise mean boundary layer thickness to surface radius ranged between 0.03 and 0.11. Systems of longtitudinal vortices developed without artificial triggering. Vortex wavelength varied across the span by as much as a factor of 2, but mean wavelength was typically 1.3 times the boundary layer thickness and did not vary significantly in the flow direction. Continuous vortex growth at Reynolds number = 9800 contrasted with apparent breakup of the vortices at Reynolds number = 16000.

  11. Diffusion processes in the magnetopause boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsurutani, B. T.; Thorne, R. M.

    1982-01-01

    A quantitative estimate is calculated for the effect of wave-particle scattering on the structure of the magnetopause boundary layer. It is assumed that large cross-B electric fields are absent in the observed penetration of magnetosheath plasma into the magnetopause boundary layer, thus allowing for cross-field transport comparable to 10% of the Bohm diffusion. It is shown that magnetosheath ions, resonant with low frequency electrostatic waves, can account for the typical boundary layer thickness when transported at 10% of the diffusion rate 1000 sq km/sec. The conditions are required to occur at all local times and under all interplanetary conditions. Significant mass and momentum transfer are then possible across the magnetopause when field merging is not occurring.

  12. Asymptotic similarity in turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, Richard D.

    The turbulent boundary layer is one of the most fundamental and important applications of fluid mechanics. Despite great practical interest and its direct impact on frictional drag among its many important consequences, no theory absent of significant inference or assumption exists. Numerical simulations and empirical guidance are used to produce models and adequate predictions, but even minor improvements in modeling parameters or physical understanding could translate into significant improvements in the efficiency of aerodynamic and hydrodynamic vehicles. Classically, turbulent boundary layers and fully-developed turbulent channels and pipes are considered members of the same "family," with similar "inner" versus "outer" descriptions. However, recent advances in experiments, simulations, and data processing have questioned this, and, as a result, their fundamental physics. To address a full range of pressure gradient boundary layers, a new approach to the governing equations and physical description of wall-bounded flows is formulated, using a two variable similarity approach and many of the tools of the classical method with slight but significant variations. A new set of similarity requirements for the characteristic scales of the problem is found, and when these requirements are applied to the classical "inner" and "outer" scales, a "similarity map" is developed providing a clear prediction of what flow conditions should result in self-similar forms. An empirical model with a small number of parameters and a form reminiscent of Coles' "wall plus wake" is developed for the streamwise Reynolds stress, and shown to fit experimental and numerical data from a number of turbulent boundary layers as well as other wall-bounded flows. It appears from this model and its scaling using the free-stream velocity that the true asymptotic form of u'2 may not become self-evident until Retheta ≈ 275,000 or delta+ ≈ 105, if not higher. A perturbation expansion made possible

  13. Linear and nonlinear PSE for compressible boundary layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Chau-Lyan; Malik, Mujeeb R.; Erlebacher, Gordon; Hussaini, M. Yousuff

    1993-01-01

    Compressible stability of growing boundary layers is studied by numerically solving the partial differential equations under a parabolizing approximation. The resulting parabolized stability equations (PSE) account for nonparallel as well as nonlinear effects. Evolution of disturbances in compressible flat-plate boundary layers are studied for freestream Mach numbers ranging from 0 to 4.5. Results indicate that the effect of boundary-layer growth is important for linear disturbances. Nonlinear calculations are performed for various Mach numbers. Two-dimensional nonlinear results using the PSE approach agree well with those from direct numerical simulations using the full Navier-Stokes equations while the required computational time is less by an order of magnitude. Spatial simulation using PSE were carried out for both the fundamental and subharmonic type breakdown for a Mach 1.6 boundary layer. The promising results obtained show that the PSE method is a powerful tool for studying boundary-layer instabilities and for predicting transition over a wide range of Mach numbers.

  14. Stability of an oscillating boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levchenko, V. Y.; Solovyev, A. S.

    1985-01-01

    Levchenko and Solov'ev (1972, 1974) have developed a stability theory for space periodic flows, assuming that the Floquet theory is applicable to partial differential equations. In the present paper, this approach is extended to unsteady periodic flows. A complete unsteady formulation of the stability problem is obtained, and the stability characteristics over an oscillating period are determined from the solution of the problem. Calculations carried out for an oscillating incompressible boundary layer on a plate showed that the boundary layer flow may be regarded as a locally parallel flow.

  15. Heat Transfer and Boundary-Layer Transition on a Highly Polished Hemisphere-Cone in Free Flight at Mach Numbers Up to 3.14 and Reynolds Numbers Up to 24 x 10(exp 6)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buglia, James J.

    1961-01-01

    A highly polished hemisphere-cone having a ratio of nose radius to base radius of 0.74 and a half-angle of 14.5 was flight tested at Mach numbers up to 4.70. Temperature and pressure data were obtained at Mach numbers up to 3.14 and a free-stream Reynolds number of 24 x 10(exp 6) based on body diameter. The nose of the model had a surface roughness of 2 to 5 microinches as measured with an interferometer. The measured Stanton numbers were in good agreement with theory. Transition Reynolds numbers based on the laminar boundary-layer momentum thickness at transition ranged from 2,190 to 794. Comparison with results from previous tests of blunt shapes having a surface roughness of 20 to 40 microinches showed that the high degree of polish was instrumental in delaying the transition from laminar to turbulent flow.

  16. Glancing shock wave-turbulent boundary layer interaction with boundary layer suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnhart, P. J.; Greber, I.; Hingst, W. R.

    1988-01-01

    Tests conducted to ascertain the stagnation pressure and flow angularity profiles of a turbulent boundary layer subjected to boundary layer suction (BLS) as it crosses a glancing sidewall shock wave have determined that the boundary layer does not separate upon crossing the shock wave. Without BLS, the upstream influence of the shock wave-induced wall static pressure rise was extensive, of the order of four bloundary layer thicknesses; for the same case, with suction, the extent of upstream influence was 50 percent lower. In addition, flow angularities at the wall were found to be smaller with suction than without it.

  17. Glancing shock wave-turbulent boundary layer interaction with boundary layer suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnhart, P. J.; Greber, I.; Hingst, W. R.

    1988-01-01

    Tests conducted to ascertain the stagnation pressure and flow angularity profiles of a turbulent boundary layer subjected to boundary layer suction (BLS) as it crosses a glancing sidewall shock wave have determined that the boundary layer does not separate upon crossing the shock wave. Without BLS, the upstream influence of the shock wave-induced wall static pressure rise was extensive, of the order of four bloundary layer thicknesses; for the same case, with suction, the extent of upstream influence was 50 percent lower. In addition, flow angularities at the wall were found to be smaller with suction than without it.

  18. Calculation methods for compressible turbulent boundary layers, 1976

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, D. M.; Cary, A. M., Jr.; Harris, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    Equations and closure methods for compressible turbulent boundary layers are discussed. Flow phenomena peculiar to calculation of these boundary layers were considered, along with calculations of three dimensional compressible turbulent boundary layers. Procedures for ascertaining nonsimilar two and three dimensional compressible turbulent boundary layers were appended, including finite difference, finite element, and mass-weighted residual methods.

  19. Boundary-field-driven control of discontinuous phase transitions on hyperbolic lattices.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoju; Verstraete, Frank; Gendiar, Andrej

    2016-08-01

    The multistate Potts models on two-dimensional hyperbolic lattices are studied with respect to various boundary effects. The free energy is numerically calculated using the corner transfer matrix renormalization group method. We analyze phase transitions of the Potts models in the thermodynamic limit with respect to contracted boundary layers. A false phase transition is present even if a couple of the boundary layers are contracted. Its significance weakens, as the number of the contracted boundary layers increases, until the correct phase transition (deep inside the bulk) prevails over the false one. For this purpose, we derive a thermodynamic quantity, the so-called bulk excess free energy, which depends on the contracted boundary layers and memorizes additional boundary effects. In particular, the magnetic field is imposed on the outermost boundary layer. While the boundary magnetic field does not affect the second-order phase transition in the bulk if suppressing all the boundary effects on the hyperbolic lattices, the first-order (discontinuous) phase transition is significantly sensitive to the boundary magnetic field. Contrary to the phase transition on the Euclidean lattices, the discontinuous phase transition on the hyperbolic lattices can be continuously controlled (within a certain temperature coexistence region) by varying the boundary magnetic field.

  20. Boundary-field-driven control of discontinuous phase transitions on hyperbolic lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yoju; Verstraete, Frank; Gendiar, Andrej

    2016-08-01

    The multistate Potts models on two-dimensional hyperbolic lattices are studied with respect to various boundary effects. The free energy is numerically calculated using the corner transfer matrix renormalization group method. We analyze phase transitions of the Potts models in the thermodynamic limit with respect to contracted boundary layers. A false phase transition is present even if a couple of the boundary layers are contracted. Its significance weakens, as the number of the contracted boundary layers increases, until the correct phase transition (deep inside the bulk) prevails over the false one. For this purpose, we derive a thermodynamic quantity, the so-called bulk excess free energy, which depends on the contracted boundary layers and memorizes additional boundary effects. In particular, the magnetic field is imposed on the outermost boundary layer. While the boundary magnetic field does not affect the second-order phase transition in the bulk if suppressing all the boundary effects on the hyperbolic lattices, the first-order (discontinuous) phase transition is significantly sensitive to the boundary magnetic field. Contrary to the phase transition on t