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Sample records for boundary lubricating conditions

  1. Reduced Need of Lubricity Additives in Soybean Oil Blends Under Boundary Lubrication Conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Converging prices of vegetable oils and petroleum, along with increased focus on renewable resources, gave more momentum to vegetable oil lubricants. Boundary lubrication properties of four Extreme Pressure (EP) additive blends in conventional Soy Bean Oil (SBO) and Paraffinic Mineral Oil (PMO) of ...

  2. Comparison of Extreme Pressure Additive Treat Rates in Soybean and Mineral Oils Under Boundary Lubrication Conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Traditionally, it is considered that, under boundary lubrication conditions, the reduction in friction and wear is mostly dependent on Extreme Pressure (EP) additives, rather than the basestock. However, several studies indicate that vegetable oils also contribute to the lubricity under this regime...

  3. Combined solid and liquid lubrication of silicon nitride under boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajayi, O. O.; Erdemir, A.; Hsieh, J. H.; Erck, R. A.; Fenske, G. R.

    1992-07-01

    The present study showed that an effective way of lubricating ceramic surfaces under boundary conditions both at room temperature and at high temperatures of 150 and 250 C was the combined effect of solid, i.e., soft metal-Ag, and liquid lubricants, i.e., polyol-ester-based synthetic oil. Compared to dry sliding of uncoated materials, oil-lubricated sliding of silver-coated silicon nitride surfaces resulted, for the conditions tested, in a decrease of the friction coefficient by a factor of 18 and of specific wear rate by more than four orders of magnitude. The Ag coating, which was formed in part by ion-beam-assisted deposition, was effective in preventing ceramic-to-ceramic contact under boundary-lubricated regimes. The only observed drawback was the occurrence of a chemical interaction between the Ag film and sulfur from the oil, which reduced the durability of the Ag film.

  4. Evaluation of PS 212 Coatings Under Boundary Lubrication Conditions with an Ester-based Oil to 300 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.; Loomis, William R.; Dellacorte, Christopher

    1994-01-01

    High friction and wear of turbine engine components occur during high temperature excursions above the oxidation threshold of the liquid lubricant. This paper reports on research to study the use of a high temperature self lubricating coating, PS 212 for back-up lubrication in the event of failure of the liquid lubricant. Pin on disk tests were performed under dry and boundary-lubricated conditions at disk temperatures up to 300 C. The liquid lubricant was a formulated polyol ester qualified under MIL L-23699. At test temperatures above the oil's thermal degradation level, the use of PS 212 reduced wear, providing a back-up lubricant effect.

  5. Boundary lubrication: Revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    A review of the various lubrication regimes, with particular, emphasis on boundary lubrication, is presented. The types of wear debris and extent of surface damage is illustrated for each regime. The role of boundary surface films along with their modes of formation and important physical properties are discussed. In addition, the effects of various operating parameters on friction and wear in the boundary lubrication regime are considered.

  6. Axisymmetric Stagnation-Point Flow with a General Slip Boundary Condition over a Lubricated Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajid, M.; K., Mahmood; Z., Abbas

    2012-02-01

    We investigate the axisymmetric stagnation-point flow of a viscous fluid over a lubricated surface by imposing a generalized slip condition at the fluid-fluid interface. The power law non-Newtonian fluid is considered as a lubricant. The lubrication layer is thin and assumed to have a variable thickness. The transformed nonlinear ordinary differential equation governing the flow is linearized using quasilinearization. The method of superposition is adopted to convert the boundary value problem into an initial value problem and the solution is obtained numerically by using the fourth-order Runge—Kutta method. The results are discussed to see the influence of pertinent parameters. The limiting cases of Navier and no-slip boundary conditions are obtained as the special cases and found to be in excellent agreement with the existing results in the literature.

  7. Reduction of friction and wear by grooves applied on the nanoscale polished surface in boundary lubrication conditions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of a friction surface geometry with initially directed microscale grooves on a nanoscale polished surface in ring-on-block sliding contact is studied experimentally. Reduced wear and friction is observed when the orientation of grooves coincides with the direction of sliding. A new compressive-vacuum hypothesis of friction force nature under a condition of boundary lubrication is proposed, which successfully explains the observed phenomena. Grooves supply lubricant into the contact zone and facilitate its devacuumization, which lead to substantial reduction of surface wear. The obtained results enable developing optimized roughness profiles of friction surfaces to create high-performance durable friction units. PMID:24872807

  8. Enhancement of Perfluoropolyether Boundary Lubrication Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.; Ajayi, O. O.; Wedeven, L. D.

    1996-01-01

    A ball bearing simulator operating under starved conditions was used to perform screening tests to evaluate the boundary lubrication performance of a branched perfluoropolyether (PFPE), K-143 AB. Several approaches to enhance boundary lubrication were studied. These included: (1) soluble boundary additives, (2) bearing surface modifications, (3) 'run-in' surface films, and (4) ceramic bearing components. In addition, results were compared with two non-perfluorinated liquid lubricant formulations. Based on these tests, the following tentative conclusions can be made: (1) Substantial improvements in boundary lubrication performance were observed with a beta-diketone boundary additive and a tricresyl phosphate (TCP) liquid surface pretreatment, (2) the use of rough Si3N4 balls (R(sub a) = 40 micro-inch) also provided increases in test duration, but with concomitant abrasive wear, (3) moderate improvements were seen with two boundary additives (a phosphine and a phosphatriazine) and a neat (100%) fluid (a carboxylic acid terminated PFPE); and small improvements with surface pretreatments with synthetic hydrocarbons, a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) coating, and TiC coated 440 C and smooth Si3N4 balls (R(sub a) = 1 micro-inch), and (4) two non-PFPE lubricant formulations (a polyalphaolefin (PAO) and synthetic hydrocarbon) yielded substantial improvements.

  9. Binding and lubrication of biomimetic boundary lubricants on articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Samaroo, Kirk J; Tan, Mingchee; Putnam, David; Bonassar, Lawrence J

    2017-03-01

    The glycoprotein, lubricin, is the primary boundary lubricant of articular cartilage and has been shown to prevent cartilage damage after joint injury. In this study, a library of eight bottle-brush copolymers were synthesized to mimic the structure and function of lubricin. Polyethylene glycol (PEG) grafted onto a polyacrylic acid (pAA) core mimicked the hydrophilic mucin-like domain of lubricin, and a thiol terminus anchored the polymers to cartilage surfaces much like lubricin's C-terminus. These copolymers, abbreviated as pAA-g-PEG, rapidly bound to cartilage surfaces with binding time constants ranging from 20 to 39 min, and affected lubrication under boundary mode conditions with coefficients of friction ranging from 0.140 ± 0.024 to 0.248 ± 0.030. Binding and lubrication were highly correlated (r(2)  = 0.89-0.99), showing that boundary lubrication in this case strongly depends on the binding of the lubricant to the surface. Along with time-dependent and dose-dependent behavior, lubrication and binding of the lubricin-mimetics also depended on copolymer structural parameters including pAA backbone length, PEG side chain length, and PEG:AA brush density. Polymers with larger backbone sizes, brush sizes, or brush densities took longer to bind (p < 0.05). Six of the eight polymers reduced friction relative to denuded cartilage plugs (p < 0.05), suggesting their potential to lubricate and protect cartilage in vivo. In copolymers with shorter pAA backbones, increasing hydrodynamic size inhibited lubrication (p < 0.08), while the opposite was observed in copolymers with longer backbones (p < 0.05). These polymers show similar in vitro lubricating efficacy as recombinant lubricins and as such have potential for in vivo treatment of post-traumatic osteoarthritis. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:548-557, 2017.

  10. Spectroscopic Analysis of Perfluoropolyether Lubricant Degradation During Boundary Lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrera-Fierro, Pilar; Shogrin, Bradley A.; Jones, William R., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    The degradation of a branched perfluoropolyether (PFPE) under boundary lubrication conditions was studied using mu-FTIR and mu-Raman spectroscopies. Stainless steel (440C) discs coated with thin (600A), uniform films of the PFPE were tested in a ball-on-disc apparatus until various levels of friction coefficient were attained. Discs were then examined using the above techniques. When the friction coefficient surpassed the value obtained with an un-lubricated control, the lubricant film had either been physically displaced or partially transformed in to a 'friction polymer'. Infrared analysis of this 'friction polymer' indicated the presence of a polymeric fluorinated acid species (R(sub f)COOH). Raman spectroscopy indicated the presence of amorphous carbon in the wear track and in the friction polymer. Some reaction mechanisms are suggested to explain the results.

  11. Boundary cartilage lubrication: review of current concepts.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Matej

    2014-03-01

    Effective lubrication of synovial joints is important to prevent cartilage degeneration and to keep the joints healthy. This paper sets out the basics of engineering lubrication with respect to the composition and properties of synovial fluid constituents. Two basic types of boundary lubrication are discussed: the presence of highly hydrophilic proteoglycans that provide a water liquid film, and the existence of multilamellar phospholipids lubricating layers at the surface ofarticular cartilage. Based on current knowledge, we may conclude that no single mechanism of boundary lubrication exists, and that effective boundary lubrication of synovial joints is maintained by the synergic effect of all synovial fluid constituents.

  12. Effect of boundary conditions on the performances of gas-lubricated micro journal bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Sheng; Lei, Kangbin; Luo, Xilian; Gu, Zhaolin; Kiwamu, Kase

    2010-06-01

    As significant components of micromechanics, gas-lubricated microbearings are more prevalent for their special advantages than other types. The fluid dynamics of the microbearing is different from their larger cousins due to the noncontinuum effect and surface-dominated effect, which may make the Navier-Stokes equations invalid. In this paper, by considering the accommodation coefficients on journal (α i) and that on bearing (α o) separately, the microbearings with different bearing numbers under the assumption of large L/D (length to diameter) are simulated using direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) program incorporated with a Volume-CAD software. The diffuse reflection model and Cercignani-Lampis-Lord (CLL) model are applied to model the molecule-surface interaction. The flow field characteristics, as well as the performances of gas-lubricated journal bearings including load-carrying capacity, attitude angle and bearing drag are obtained. The results reveal that αi and αo have different effects to flow field characteristics and bearing performances. The bearing number has significantly impact on the bearing performances. The method developed in this paper would be very useful for designing and evaluating the gas-lubricated journal microbearing.

  13. Structural lubricity under ambient conditions

    PubMed Central

    Cihan, Ebru; İpek, Semran; Durgun, Engin; Baykara, Mehmet Z.

    2016-01-01

    Despite its fundamental importance, physical mechanisms that govern friction are poorly understood. While a state of ultra-low friction, termed structural lubricity, is expected for any clean, atomically flat interface consisting of two different materials with incommensurate structures, some associated predictions could only be quantitatively confirmed under ultra-high vacuum (UHV) conditions so far. Here, we report structurally lubric sliding under ambient conditions at mesoscopic (∼4,000–130,000 nm2) interfaces formed by gold islands on graphite. Ab initio calculations reveal that the gold–graphite interface is expected to remain largely free from contaminant molecules, leading to structurally lubric sliding. The experiments reported here demonstrate the potential for practical lubrication schemes for micro- and nano-electromechanical systems, which would mainly rely on an atomic-scale structural mismatch between the slider and substrate components, via the utilization of material systems featuring clean, atomically flat interfaces under ambient conditions. PMID:27350035

  14. Structural lubricity under ambient conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cihan, Ebru; Ipek, Semran; Durgun, Engin; Baykara, Mehmet Z.

    2016-06-01

    Despite its fundamental importance, physical mechanisms that govern friction are poorly understood. While a state of ultra-low friction, termed structural lubricity, is expected for any clean, atomically flat interface consisting of two different materials with incommensurate structures, some associated predictions could only be quantitatively confirmed under ultra-high vacuum (UHV) conditions so far. Here, we report structurally lubric sliding under ambient conditions at mesoscopic (~4,000-130,000 nm2) interfaces formed by gold islands on graphite. Ab initio calculations reveal that the gold-graphite interface is expected to remain largely free from contaminant molecules, leading to structurally lubric sliding. The experiments reported here demonstrate the potential for practical lubrication schemes for micro- and nano-electromechanical systems, which would mainly rely on an atomic-scale structural mismatch between the slider and substrate components, via the utilization of material systems featuring clean, atomically flat interfaces under ambient conditions.

  15. Investigation of lubricants under boundary friction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidebroek, E; Pietsch, E

    1942-01-01

    Numerous observations of such lubrication processes within range of boundary friction on journal bearings and gear tooth profiles have strengthened the supposition that it should be possible to study the attendant phenomena with engineering methods and equipment. These considerations formed the basis of the present studies, which have led to the discovery of relations governing the suitability of bearing surfaces and the concept of "lubricating quality."

  16. Enhancement of perfluoropolyether boundary lubrication performance: I. Preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.; Ajayi, O. O.; Goodell, A. J.; Wedeven, L. D.; Devine, E.; Premore, R. E.

    1995-01-01

    A ball bearing simulator operating under starved conditions was used to evaluate the boundary lubrication performance of a perfluoropolyether (PFPE) Krytox 143 AB. Several approaches to enhance boundary lubrication were studied. These included: (1) soluble boundary additives, (2) bearing surface modifications, (3) 'run-in' surface films, and (4) ceramic bearing components. In addition, results were compared with two non-perfluorinated liquid lubricant formulations. Based on these preliminary tests, the following tentative conclusions can be made: (1) substantial improvements in boundary lubrication performance were observed with a beta-diketone boundary additive and a tricresyl phosphate (TCP) liquid surface pretreatment; (2) the use of rough Si3N4 balls (Ra = 40 micro-in) also provided substantial improvement but with concomitant abrasive wear; (3) marginal improvements were seen with two boundary additives (a phosphine and a phosphatriazine) and a neat (100%) fluid (a carboxylic acid terminated PFPE); and surface pretreatments with a synthetic hydrocarbon, a PTFE coating, and TiC coated 440C and smooth Si3N4 balls (R(sub a) less than 1 micro-in); and (4) two non-PFPE lubricant formulations (a PAO and a synthetic hydrocarbon) yielded substantial improvements.

  17. Effect of fullerene containing lubricants on wear resistance of machine components in boundary lubrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, Andriy

    Fullerenes, a new form of carbon nanomaterials, possess unique physical and mechanical properties that make their use as additives to liquid lubricants potentially beneficial. The goal of this study was to investigate the effect of fullerene containing lubricants on wear resistance of steel-bronze couples operating under boundary lubrication conditions. A mathematical model of deformed asperity contact was built to calculate real contact area and real contact pressure. Computer controlled wear friction testing methodology and equipment were designed, developed and implemented for obtaining reliable and objective experimental data. In addition, optical and scanning electron microscopy and standard surface texture analysis were employed. Heavy duty motor oil SAE 10 was modified by admixing fullerenes C60, a fullerene mixture of C60 and C70, fullerene containing soot, and graphite powder. The experiments showed that all of the selected fullerene additives dissolved in liquid lubricants reduce wear of the tested materials. In addition, it was found that despite improvements in wear resistance, the selected modified lubricants did not significantly change friction characteristics. Improvement of wear resistance of contact surfaces operating with fullerene modified lubricants can be explained by the presence of fullerenes in real contact while the liquid lubricant is squeezed out. Fullerenes are considered to function as minute hard particles that do not break down under applied normal force, and tend to separate direct contact of functional surfaces of selected materials.

  18. Steady-state wear and friction in boundary lubrication studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loomis, W. R.; Jones, W. R., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A friction and wear study was made at 20 C to obtain improved reproducibility and reliability in boundary lubrication testing. Ester-base and C-ether-base fluids were used to lubricate a pure iron rider in sliding contact with a rotating M-50 steel disk in a friction and wear apparatus. Conditions included loads of 1/2 and 1 kg and sliding velocities of 3.6 to 18.2 m/min in a dry air atmosphere and stepwise time intervals from 1 to 250 min for wear measurements. The wear rate results were compared with those from previous studies where a single 25 min test period was used. Satisfactory test conditions for studying friction and wear in boundary lubrication for this apparatus were found to be 1 kg load; sliding velocities of 7.1 to 9.1 m/min (50 rpm disk speed); and use of a time stepwise test procedure. Highly reproducible steady-state wear rates and steady-state friction coefficients were determined under boundary conditions. Wear rates and coefficients of friction were constant following initially high values during run-in periods.

  19. Boundary mode lubrication of articular cartilage by recombinant human lubricin.

    PubMed

    Gleghorn, Jason P; Jones, Aled R C; Flannery, Carl R; Bonassar, Lawrence J

    2009-06-01

    Lubrication of cartilage involves a variety of physical and chemical factors, including lubricin, a synovial glycoprotein that has been shown to be a boundary lubricant. It is unclear how lubricin boundary lubricates a wide range of bearings from tissue to artificial surfaces, and if the mechanism is the same for both soluble and bound lubricin. In the current study, experiments were conducted to investigate the hypothesis that recombinant human lubricin (rh-lubricin) lubricates cartilage in a dose-dependent manner and that soluble and bound fractions of rh-lubricin both contribute to the lubrication process. An rh-lubricin dose response was observed with maximal lubrication achieved at concentrations of rh-lubricin greater than 50 microg/mL. A concentration-response variable-slope model was fit to the data, and indicated that rh-lubricin binding to cartilage was not first order. The pattern of decrease in equilibrium friction coefficient indicated that aggregation of rh-lubricin or steric arrangement may regulate boundary lubrication. rh-lubricin localized at the cartilage surface was found to lubricate a cartilage-glass interface in boundary mode, as did soluble rh-lubricin at high concentrations (150 microg/mL); however, the most effective lubrication occurred when both soluble and bound rh-lubricin were present at the interface. These findings point to two distinct mechanisms by which rh-lubricin lubricates, one mechanism involving lubricin bound to the tissue surface and the other involving lubricin in solution.

  20. Improved boundary lubrication with formulated C-ethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loomis, W. R.

    1982-01-01

    A comparison of five recently developed C-ether-formulated fluids with an advanced formulated MIL-L-27502 candidate ester is described. Steady state wear and friction measurements were made with a sliding pin on disk friction apparatus. Conditions included disk temperatures up to 260 C, dry air test atmosphere, 1 kilogram load, 50 rpm disk speed, and test times to 130 minutes. Based on wear rates and coefficients of friction, three of the C-ether formulations as well as the C-ether base fluid gave better boundary lubrication than the ester fluid under all test conditions. The susceptibility of C-ethers to selective additive treatment (phosphinic esters or acids and other antiwear additives) was demonstrated when two of the formulations gave somewhat improved lubrication over the base fluid. The increased operating potential for this fluid was shown in relationship to bulk oil temperature limits for MIL-L-23699 and MIL-L-27502 type esters.

  1. Biphasic and boundary lubrication mechanisms in artificial hydrogel cartilage: A review.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Teruo; Yarimitsu, Seido; Nakashima, Kazuhiro; Sakai, Nobuo; Yamaguchi, Tetsuo; Sawae, Yoshinori; Suzuki, Atsushi

    2015-12-01

    Various studies on the application of artificial hydrogel cartilage to cartilage substitutes and artificial joints have been conducted. It is expected in clinical application of artificial hydrogel cartilage that not only soft-elastohydrodynamic lubrication but biphasic, hydration, gel-film and boundary lubrication mechanisms will be effective to sustain extremely low friction and minimal wear in daily activities similar to healthy natural synovial joints with adaptive multimode lubrication. In this review article, the effectiveness of biphasic lubrication and boundary lubrication in hydrogels in thin film condition is focused in relation to the structures and properties of hydrogels. As examples, the tribological behaviors in three kinds of poly(vinyl alcohol) hydrogels with high water content are compared, and the importance of lubrication mechanism in biomimetic artificial hydrogel cartilage is discussed to extend the durability of cartilage substitute.

  2. Supramolecular synergy in the boundary lubrication of synovial joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seror, Jasmine; Zhu, Linyi; Goldberg, Ronit; Day, Anthony J.; Klein, Jacob

    2015-03-01

    Hyaluronan, lubricin and phospholipids, molecules ubiquitous in synovial joints, such as hips and knees, have separately been invoked as the lubricants responsible for the remarkable lubrication of articular cartilage; but alone, these molecules cannot explain the extremely low friction at the high pressures of such joints. We find that surface-anchored hyaluronan molecules complex synergistically with phosphatidylcholine lipids present in joints to form a boundary lubricating layer, which, with coefficient of friction μ≈0.001 at pressures to over 100 atm, has a frictional behaviour resembling that of articular cartilage in the major joints. Our findings point to a scenario where each of the molecules has a different role but must act together with the others: hyaluronan, anchored at the outer surface of articular cartilage by lubricin molecules, complexes with joint phosphatidylcholines to provide the extreme lubrication of synovial joints via the hydration-lubrication mechanism.

  3. Supramolecular synergy in the boundary lubrication of synovial joints.

    PubMed

    Seror, Jasmine; Zhu, Linyi; Goldberg, Ronit; Day, Anthony J; Klein, Jacob

    2015-03-10

    Hyaluronan, lubricin and phospholipids, molecules ubiquitous in synovial joints, such as hips and knees, have separately been invoked as the lubricants responsible for the remarkable lubrication of articular cartilage; but alone, these molecules cannot explain the extremely low friction at the high pressures of such joints. We find that surface-anchored hyaluronan molecules complex synergistically with phosphatidylcholine lipids present in joints to form a boundary lubricating layer, which, with coefficient of friction μ≈0.001 at pressures to over 100 atm, has a frictional behaviour resembling that of articular cartilage in the major joints. Our findings point to a scenario where each of the molecules has a different role but must act together with the others: hyaluronan, anchored at the outer surface of articular cartilage by lubricin molecules, complexes with joint phosphatidylcholines to provide the extreme lubrication of synovial joints via the hydration-lubrication mechanism.

  4. Viscous boundary lubrication of hydrophobic surfaces by mucin.

    PubMed

    Yakubov, Gleb E; McColl, James; Bongaerts, Jeroen H H; Ramsden, Jeremy J

    2009-02-17

    The lubricating behavior of the weakly charged short-side-chain glycoprotein mucin "Orthana" (Mw=0.55 MDa) has been investigated between hydrophobic and hydrophilic PDMS substrates using soft-contact tribometry. It was found that mucin facilitates lubrication between hydrophobic PDMS surfaces, leading to a 10-fold reduction in boundary friction coefficient for rough surfaces. The presence of mucin also results in a shift of the mixed lubrication regime to lower entrainment speeds. The observed boundary lubrication behavior of mucin was found to depend on the bulk concentration, and we linked this to the structure and dynamics of the adsorbed mucin films, which are assessed using optical waveguide light spectroscopy. We observe a composite structure of the adsorbed mucin layer, with its internal structure governed by entanglement. The film thickness of this adsorbed layer increases with concentration, while the boundary friction coefficient for rough surfaces was found to be inversely proportional to the thickness of the adsorbed film. This link between lubrication and structure of the film is consistent with a viscous boundary lubrication mechanism, i.e., a thicker adsorbed film, at a given sliding speed, results in a lower local shear rate and, hence, in a lower local shear stress. The estimated local viscosities of the adsorbed layer, derived from the friction measurements and the polymer layer density, are in agreement with each other.

  5. Origins of extreme boundary lubrication by phosphatidylcholine liposomes.

    PubMed

    Sorkin, Raya; Kampf, Nir; Dror, Yael; Shimoni, Eyal; Klein, Jacob

    2013-07-01

    Phosphatidylcholine (PC) vesicles have been shown to have remarkable boundary lubricating properties under physiologically-high pressures. Here we carry out a systematic study, using a surface force balance, of the normal and shear (frictional) forces between two opposing surfaces bearing different PC vesicles across water, to elucidate the origin of these properties. Small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs, diameters < 100 nm) of the symmetric saturated diacyl PCs DMPC (C(14)), DPPC (C(16)) and DSPC (C(18)) attached to mica surfaces were studied in their solid-ordered (SO) phase on the surface. Overall liposome lubrication ability improves markedly with increasing acyl chain length, and correlates strongly with the liposomes' structural integrity on the substrate surface: DSPC-SUVs were stable on the surface, and provided extremely efficient lubrication (friction coefficient μ ≈ 10(-4)) at room temperature at pressures up to at least 18 MPa. DMPC-SUVs ruptured following adsorption, providing poor high-pressure lubrication, while DPPC-SUVs behavior was intermediate between the two. These results can be well understood in terms of the hydration-lubrication paradigm, but suggest that an earlier conjecture, that highly-efficient lubrication by PC-SUVs depended simply on their being in the SO rather than in the liquid-disordered phase, should be more nuanced. Our results indicate that the resistance of the SUVs to mechanical deformation and rupture is the dominant factor in determining their overall boundary lubrication efficiency in our system.

  6. Cationic polymer lubricant (CPL): A new bond and mobile boundary lubricant with self-healing capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Erik Hsiao

    The boundary film formation and lubrication effects of low-molecular-weight silicone molecules with cationic side groups were studied. Poly-(N,N,N-trimethylamine-3- propylmethylsiloxane-co-dimethylsiloxane) iodide was synthesized and deposited on silicon oxide surfaces to form a bound-and-mobile lubricant film. The effects of the ionically bound layer and mobile multilayers were investigated. Both nano- and macro-scale tribological tests revealed superior lubrication performance of the silicon molecule with cationic side chains over the neutral silicon molecule (which was modeled with polydimethylsiloxane with the same molecule weight). The multilayer films exhibited characteristic topographic features due to ionic interactions within the polymeric film. In the macro-scale, the effects of ionic content, environmental condition, and advantage of the bound layer on self-healing will be discussed to demonstrate the wear resistance and selfhealing capability. The multilayer spreading rates were estimated to be ~10-11 m2/s. In the nanoscale, the results of disjoining pressure and viscosity measurements help understand the lateral spreading of the mobile layer and identify the mobile species. The mobile species are the reduced tertiary amine form of CPL. The hydrophobic but hygroscopic properties of CPL are also investigated with SFG and ATR-IR. The CPL-coated surfaces are hydrophobic which prevents the detrimental effects of humidity on wear of silicon. In addition, the hygroscopic nature of CPL allows humidity to be absorbed into the film, which enhances the self-healing capabilities. Finally, by texturing the silicon surface with nanowells, self-healing is enhanced when the nanowells are filled with CPL. The nanowells serve as CPL reservoirs that are readily available for self-healing within the wear track for faster cycle intervals. However, the nanowells deteriorate the self-healing from surrounding the contact region due to the refilling of the empty nanowells.

  7. Galectin-3 Binds to Lubricin and Reinforces the Lubricating Boundary Layer of Articular Cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reesink, Heidi L.; Bonnevie, Edward D.; Liu, Sherry; Shurer, Carolyn R.; Hollander, Michael J.; Bonassar, Lawrence J.; Nixon, Alan J.

    2016-05-01

    Lubricin is a mucinous, synovial fluid glycoprotein that enables near frictionless joint motion via adsorption to the surface of articular cartilage and its lubricating properties in solution. Extensive O-linked glycosylation within lubricin’s mucin-rich domain is critical for its boundary lubricating function; however, it is unknown exactly how glycosylation facilitates cartilage lubrication. Here, we find that the lubricin glycome is enriched with terminal β-galactosides, known binding partners for a family of multivalent lectins called galectins. Of the galectin family members present in synovial fluid, we find that galectin-3 is a specific, high-affinity binding partner for lubricin. Considering the known ability of galectin-3 to crosslink glycoproteins, we hypothesized that galectins could augment lubrication via biomechanical stabilization of the lubricin boundary layer. We find that competitive inhibition of galectin binding results in lubricin loss from the cartilage surface, and addition of multimeric galectin-3 enhances cartilage lubrication. We also find that galectin-3 has low affinity for the surface layer of osteoarthritic cartilage and has reduced affinity for sialylated O-glycans, a glycophenotype associated with inflammatory conditions. Together, our results suggest that galectin-3 reinforces the lubricin boundary layer; which, in turn, enhances cartilage lubrication and may delay the onset and progression of arthritis.

  8. Galectin-3 Binds to Lubricin and Reinforces the Lubricating Boundary Layer of Articular Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Reesink, Heidi L.; Bonnevie, Edward D.; Liu, Sherry; Shurer, Carolyn R.; Hollander, Michael J.; Bonassar, Lawrence J.; Nixon, Alan J.

    2016-01-01

    Lubricin is a mucinous, synovial fluid glycoprotein that enables near frictionless joint motion via adsorption to the surface of articular cartilage and its lubricating properties in solution. Extensive O-linked glycosylation within lubricin’s mucin-rich domain is critical for its boundary lubricating function; however, it is unknown exactly how glycosylation facilitates cartilage lubrication. Here, we find that the lubricin glycome is enriched with terminal β-galactosides, known binding partners for a family of multivalent lectins called galectins. Of the galectin family members present in synovial fluid, we find that galectin-3 is a specific, high-affinity binding partner for lubricin. Considering the known ability of galectin-3 to crosslink glycoproteins, we hypothesized that galectins could augment lubrication via biomechanical stabilization of the lubricin boundary layer. We find that competitive inhibition of galectin binding results in lubricin loss from the cartilage surface, and addition of multimeric galectin-3 enhances cartilage lubrication. We also find that galectin-3 has low affinity for the surface layer of osteoarthritic cartilage and has reduced affinity for sialylated O-glycans, a glycophenotype associated with inflammatory conditions. Together, our results suggest that galectin-3 reinforces the lubricin boundary layer; which, in turn, enhances cartilage lubrication and may delay the onset and progression of arthritis. PMID:27157803

  9. Boundary lubrication by sodium salts: a Hofmeister series effect.

    PubMed

    Garrec, D A; Norton, I T

    2012-08-01

    Boundary lubrication plays an important role in the function of sliding surfaces in contact. Of particular interest in this study, boundary regime tribology is relevant for understanding textural attributes perceived during oral consumption of food, where the tongue squeezes and slides against the hard palate. This work investigates aqueous lubrication of a sliding/rolling ball-on-disc contact by sodium anions of the Hofmeister series in both water and guar gum solutions. Low concentrations (0.001 M) of strongly kosmotropic salts provide reduced friction coefficients in both systems (water and guar gum solutions), although a different mechanism prevails in each. Surface-bound hydrated ions are responsible in the case of water, and salt-promoted adsorption of hydrated-polymer chains dominate with guar gum. In each system, friction decreases in accordance with the Hofmeister series: iodide, nitrate, bromide, chloride, fluoride, phosphate and citrate. The addition of salt has little impact on solution of bulk viscosity, and so this work demonstrates that significant boundary lubrication can be provided without surface modification and with lubricants of viscosity similar to that of water.

  10. The forced vibrational response of a rectangular parallelepiped with rigid-lubricated boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, E. v. K.; Egle, D. M.

    1982-01-01

    The Green function for a rectangular parallelepiped with rigid-lubricated boundaries is developed by a normal mode approach, the free vibration solutions being used. Explicit solutions are presented for a concentrated impulse, which serves as a model for an acoustic emission stress wave, and for a concentrated step force. Numerical results for short times show good agreement with the infinite space solution. Analogous solutions are developed for the inverse boundary conditions.

  11. Boundary lubrication of heterogeneous surfaces and the onset of cavitation in frictional contacts

    PubMed Central

    Savio, Daniele; Pastewka, Lars; Gumbsch, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Surfaces can be slippery or sticky depending on surface chemistry and roughness. We demonstrate in atomistic simulations that regular and random slip patterns on a surface lead to pressure excursions within a lubricated contact that increase quadratically with decreasing contact separation. This is captured well by a simple hydrodynamic model including wall slip. We predict with this model that pressure changes for larger length scales and realistic frictional conditions can easily reach cavitation thresholds and significantly change the load-bearing capacity of a contact. Cavitation may therefore be the norm, not the exception, under boundary lubrication conditions. PMID:27051871

  12. Frictional anisotropy under boundary lubrication: effect of surface texture.

    SciTech Connect

    Ajayi, O. O.; Erck, R. A.; Lorenzo-Martin, C.; Fenske, G. R.; Energy Systems

    2009-06-15

    The friction coefficient was measured under boundary lubrication with a ball-on-flat contact configuration in unidirectional sliding. The ball was smooth and hardened 52100 steel. Discs were made from case-carburized and hardened 4620, annealed 1080, and 1018 steels with directionally ground surfaces. A synthetic lubricant of stock polyalphaolefin was used for testing. During testing with each material, a frictional spike was observed whenever the ball slid parallel to the grinding ridge on the disc surface. The average friction coefficient for all tests was about 0.1, which is typical for the boundary lubrication regime. The magnitude of the frictional spikes, which reached as high as a friction coefficient of 0.25, and their persistence depended on the hardness of the disc surface. On the basis of elastohydrodynamic theory, coupled with the observation of severe plastic deformation on the ridges parallel to the sliding direction, the frictional spike could be due to localized plastic deformation on the disc surface at locations of minimal thickness for the lubricant fluid film. This hypothesis was further supported by lack of frictional spikes in tests using discs coated with a thin film of diamond-like carbon, in which plastic deformation is minimal.

  13. Clean and cost-effective dry boundary lubricants for aluminum forming.

    SciTech Connect

    Erdemir, A.; Fenske, G. R.

    1997-12-05

    Preliminary research in our laboratory has demonstrated that boric acid is an effective lubricant with an unusual capacity to reduce sliding fiction (providing friction coefficients as low as 0.02) and wear of metallic and ceramic materials. More recent studies have revealed that water or methanol solutions of boric acid can be used to prepare strongly bonded layers of boric acid on aluminum surfaces. It appears that boric acid molecules have a strong tendency to bond chemically to the naturally oxidized surfaces of aluminum and its alloys and to make these surfaces very slippery. Recent metal formability tests indicated that the boric acid films formed on aluminum surfaces by spraying or dipping worked quite well; improving draw scale performance by 58 to 75%. These findings have increased the prospect that boric acid can be formulated and optimized as an effective boundary lubricant and used to solve the friction, galling, and severe wear problems currently encountered in cold-forming of aluminum products. Accordingly, the major goal of this paper is to demonstrate the usefulness and lubrication capacity of thin boric acid films formed on aluminum surfaces by simple dipping or spraying processes and to describe the lubrication mechanisms under typical metal forming conditions. We will also examine the nature of chemical bonding between boric acid and aluminum surfaces and develop new ways to optimize its performance as an effective boundary lubricant.

  14. Steady-state boundary lubrication with formulated C-ethers to 260 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loomis, W. R.

    1981-01-01

    Steady state wear and friction studies were made at boundary lubrication conditions in a pin on disk (pure iron on rotating CVM M 50 steel) sliding friction apparatus with five C ether formulated fluids (modified polyphenyl ether containing phosphrous ester, organic acid, and other additives). Conditions included 20, 150, and 260 C disk temperatures, dry air test atmosphere, 1 kilogram load, 50 rpm disk speed, and test times to 130 minutes. Results were compared with those obtained with a formulated MIL L 27502 candidate ester and the C ether base fluid. Three of the C ether formulations gave better lubrication than both reference fluids under most conditions. The other two C ether formulations yielded higher wear rates and friction coefficients than the C ether base fluid for most of the temperature range. Only one C ether formulation showed consistently higher steady state wear rates than the ester.

  15. The mechanism of boundary lubrication and the properties of the lubricating film. Short- and long-range action in the theory of boundary lubrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deryaguin, B. V.; Karassev, V. V.; Zakhavaeva, N. N.; Lazarev, V. P.

    1994-04-01

    Two versions of the blow-off method are described, by means of which the dependence of the viscosity of oils and other non-volatile fluids on the distance from the solid wall can be measured, and the viscosity localized with an accuracy of 10 Å. In the case of non-polar specially purified vaseline oil the viscosity remains strictly constant to a distance of the order of 10 -7 cm from the wall. The addition of polar additives causes changes in the viscosity near the wall. In a number of cases the viscosity changes discontinuously at some distances of the order of 10 -6 to 10 -5 cm from the wall. In the case of polar liquids the viscosity may rise or fall on approaching the wall, depending on the molecular structure. The results obtained prove that the solid wall is capable of altering the orientation of the molecules in adjacent layers of the liquid up to 10 -5 cm thick, and even up to 10 -3 cm thick in the case of polymeric liquids. This effect plays a substantial part in the mechanism of boundary lubrication, since oiliness always disappears if it is absent. In conclusion, an examination is made of the mechanical properties of the boundary lubrication layer which explain both the existence of static friction and the observation of the two-term friction law derived by DERYAGUIN from the molecular theory of friction. The general conclusion is the impossibility of accounting for the phenomenon of boundary lubrication without taking into consideration the specific properties of the polymolecular boundary layers of liquids.

  16. Lubrication approximation in completed double layer boundary element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasseri, S.; Phan-Thien, N.; Fan, X.-J.

    This paper reports on the results of the numerical simulation of the motion of solid spherical particles in shear Stokes flows. Using the completed double layer boundary element method (CDLBEM) via distributed computing under Parallel Virtual Machine (PVM), the effective viscosity of suspension has been calculated for a finite number of spheres in a cubic array, or in a random configuration. In the simulation presented here, the short range interactions via lubrication forces are also taken into account, via the range completer in the formulation, whenever the gap between two neighbouring particles is closer than a critical gap. The results for particles in a simple cubic array agree with the results of Nunan and Keller (1984) and Stoksian Dynamics of Brady etal. (1988). To evaluate the lubrication forces between particles in a random configuration, a critical gap of 0.2 of particle's radius is suggested and the results are tested against the experimental data of Thomas (1965) and empirical equation of Krieger-Dougherty (Krieger, 1972). Finally, the quasi-steady trajectories are obtained for time-varying configuration of 125 particles.

  17. Boundary lubrication of formulated C-ethers in air to 300 C. 2: Organic acid additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Friction and wear measurements were made on CVM M-50 steel lubricated with three C-ether (modified polyphenyl ether) formulations in dry and moist air. Results were compared to those obtained with a formulated Type 2 ester and the C-ether base fluid. A ball-on-disk sliding friction apparatus was used. Experimental conditions were a 1-kilogram load, a 17-meter/minute surface speed, and a 25 to 300 C (77 to 572 F) disk temperature range. The three C-ether formulations yielded better boundary lubricating characteristics than the Type 2 ester under most test conditions. All C-ether formulations exhibited higher friction coefficients than the ester from 150 to 300 C (302 to 572 F) and similar or lower values from 25 to 150 C (77 to 302 F).

  18. Evaluation of boundary lubricants using steady-state wear and friction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loomis, W. R.; Jones, W. R., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    A friction and wear study was made at 20 C to establish operating limits and procedures for obtaining improved reproducibility and reliability in boundary lubrication testing. Ester base and C-other base fluids were used to lubricate a pure iron rider in sliding contact with a rotating M-50 steel disk in a pin-on-disk apparatus. Results of a parametric study with varying loads and speeds slowed that satisfactory test conditions for studying the direction and wear characteristics in the boundary lubrication regime with this test device were found to be 1 kilogram load; 7 to 9 meters-per-minute (50 rpm) surface speed; dry air test atmosphere (less than 100 ppm H2O); and use of a time stepwise procedure for measuring wear. Highly reproducible steady-state wear rates resulted from the two fluid studies which had a linearity of about 99 percent after initially higher wear rates and friction coefficients during run-in periods of 20 to 40 minutes.

  19. Both hyaluronan and collagen type II keep proteoglycan 4 (lubricin) at the cartilage surface in a condition that provides low friction during boundary lubrication.

    PubMed

    Majd, Sara Ehsani; Kuijer, Roel; Köwitsch, Alexander; Groth, Thomas; Schmidt, Tannin A; Sharma, Prashant K

    2014-12-09

    Wear resistant and ultralow friction in synovial joints is the outcome of a sophisticated synergy between the major macromolecules of the synovial fluid, e.g., hyaluronan (HA) and proteoglycan 4 (PRG4), with collagen type II fibrils and other non-collagenous macromolecules of the cartilage superficial zone (SZ). This study aimed at better understanding the mechanism of PRG4 localization at the cartilage surface. We show direct interactions between surface bound HA and freely floating PRG4 using the quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D). Freely floating PRG4 was also shown to bind with surface bound collagen type II fibrils. Albumin, the most abundant protein of the synovial fluid, effectively blocked the adsorption of PRG4 with HA, through interaction with C and N terminals on PRG4, but not that of PRG4 with collagen type II fibrils. The above results indicate that collagen type II fibrils strongly contribute in keeping PRG4 in the SZ during cartilage articulation in situ. Furthermore, PRG4 molecules adsorbed very well on mimicked SZ of absorbed HA molecules with entangled collagen type II fibrils and albumin was not able to block this interaction. In this last condition PRG4 adsorption resulted in a coefficient of friction (COF) of the same order of magnitude as the COF of natural cartilage, measured with an atomic force microscope in lateral mode.

  20. Numerical Boundary Condition Procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Topics include numerical procedures for treating inflow and outflow boundaries, steady and unsteady discontinuous surfaces, far field boundaries, and multiblock grids. In addition, the effects of numerical boundary approximations on stability, accuracy, and convergence rate of the numerical solution are discussed.

  1. Boundary friction in liquid and dry film biobased lubricants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Farm-based raw materials such as fats, seed oils, starches, proteins, and gums can be subjected to various degrees of processing to make them suitable for use in lubrication. The resulting biobased ingredients are then blended with each other and/or with synthetic ingredients to formulate lubricant...

  2. Lubrication of starch in ionic liquid-water mixtures: Soluble carbohydrate polymers form a boundary film on hydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Yakubov, Gleb E; Zhong, Lei; Li, Ming; Boehm, Michael W; Xie, Fengwei; Beattie, David A; Halley, Peter J; Stokes, Jason R

    2015-11-20

    Soluble starch polymers are shown to enhance the lubrication of ionic liquid-water solvent mixtures in low-pressure tribological contacts between hydrophobic substrates. A fraction of starch polymers become highly soluble in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate (EMIMAc)-water solvents with ionic liquid fraction ≥60wt%. In 65wt% EMIMAc, a small amount of soluble starch (0.33wt%) reduces the boundary friction coefficient by up to a third in comparison to that of the solvent. This low-friction is associated with a nanometre thick film (ca. 2nm) formed from the amylose fraction of the starch. In addition, under conditions where there is a mixture of insoluble starch particles and solubilised starch polymers, it is found that the presence of dissolved amylose enhances the lubrication of starch suspensions between roughened substrates. These findings open up the possibility of utilising starch biopolymers, as well as other hydrocolloids, for enhancing the performance of ionic liquid lubricants.

  3. Nanostructure and Composition of Tribo-Boundary Films Formed in Ionic Liquid Lubrication

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Jun; Chi, Miaofang; Meyer III, Harry M; Blau, Peter Julian; Dai, Sheng; Luo, Huimin

    2011-01-01

    Since the idea of using ionic liquids (ILs) as lubricants was raised in 2001, many studies have been conducted in this area and results have demonstrated superior lubricating performance for a variety of ionic liquids. It is widely believed that tribochemical reactions occur between the metal surface and the IL during the wear process to form a protective tribo-boundary film on the contact area that reduces friction and wear. However, the study of this critical boundary film has been limited to top surface two-dimensional topography examination and chemical analysis in the literature. A more comprehensive characterization is needed to help understand the film formation process and the lubricating mechanism. This study demonstrated a multi-technique three-dimensional approach to characterize the IL-formed boundary films, including top surface morphology examination, cross section nanostructure characterization, and layered chemical analysis. Characterization was carried out on both ferrous and aluminum surfaces lubricated by an ammonium IL. The focused-ion-beam (FIB) technique enabled TEM/EDS examination on the cross section of the boundary film to provide direct measurement of the film thickness, visualization of the nanostructure, and analysis of composition. In addition, composition-depth profiles were generated using XPS aided by ion-sputtering to reveal the composition change at different levels of the boundary film to investigate the film formation process.

  4. Hydration lubrication and shear-induced self-healing of lipid bilayer boundary lubricants in phosphatidylcholine dispersions.

    PubMed

    Sorkin, Raya; Kampf, Nir; Zhu, Linyi; Klein, Jacob

    2016-03-14

    Measurements of normal and shear (frictional) forces between mica surfaces across small unilamellar vesicle (SUV) dispersions of the phosphatidylcholine (PC) lipids DMPC (14:0), DPPC (16:0) and DSPC (18:0) and POPC (16:0, 18:1), at physiologically high pressures, are reported. We have previously studied the normal and shear forces between two opposing surfaces bearing PC vesicles across pure water and showed that liposome lubrication ability improved with increasing acyl chain length, and correlated strongly with the SUV structural integrity on the substrate surface (DSPC > DPPC > DMPC). In the current study, surprisingly, we discovered that this trend is reversed when the measurements are conducted in SUV dispersions, instead of pure water. In their corresponding SUV dispersion, DMPC SUVs ruptured and formed bilayers, which were able to provide reversible and reproducible lubrication with extremely low friction (μ < 10(-4)) up to pressures of 70-90 atm. Similarly, POPC SUVs also formed bilayers which exhibited low friction (μ < 10(-4)) up to pressures as high as 160 atm. DPPC and DSPC SUVs also provided good lubrication, but with slightly higher friction coefficients (μ = 10(-3)-10(-4)). We believe these differences originate from fast self-healing of the softer surface layers (which are in their liquid disordered phase, POPC, or close to it, DMPC), which renders the robustness of the DPPC or DSPC (both in their solid ordered phase) less important in these conditions. Under these circumstances, the enhanced hydration of the less densely packed POPC and DMPC surface layers is now believed to play an important role, and allows enhanced lubrication via the hydration lubrication mechanism. Our findings may have implications for the understanding of complex biological systems such us biolubrication of synovial joints.

  5. Measurement of Lubricating Condition between Swashplate and Shoe in Swashplate Compressors under Practical Operating Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Hisashi; Fukuta, Mitsuhiro; Yanagisawa, Tadashi

    In this paper, lubricating conditions between a swashplate and a shoe in a swashplate compressor for automotive air conditioners is investigated experimentally. The conditions are measured with an electric resistance method that utilizes the swash plate and the shoe as electrodes respectively. The instrumented compressor is connected to an experimental cycle with R134a and operated under various operating conditions of pressure and rotational speed. An improved measurement technique and applying a solid contact ratio to the measurement results permit to measure the lubricating condition at high rotational speed (more than 8000 rpm) and to predic an occurrence of scuffing between the swashplate and the shoe, and therefore enables a detailed study of lubricating characteristics. It is shown by the measurement that the voltage of the contact signal decreases, which means better lubricating condition, with the decrease of the compression pressure and with the increase of the rotational speed from 1000 rpm through 5000 rpm. The lubricating condition tends to worsen at more than 5000 rpm. Furthermore, it is confirmed that the lubricating condition under transient operation is worse obviously as compared with that under steady-state operation.

  6. Effects of Chlorinated Paraffin and ZDDP Concentrations on Boundary Lubrication Properties of Mineral and Soybean Oils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of chlorinated paraffin (CP) and zinc di-ethylhexyl dithio phosphate (ZDDP) concentration in polar and non-polar base fluids on boundary lubrication properties was investigated. The non-polar fluid was a solvent refined low sulfur heavy paraffinic mineral oil (150N oil); and the polar fl...

  7. Adsorption Behavior of Heat Modified Soybean Oil via Boundary Lubrication Coefficient of Friction Measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The frictional behaviors of soybean oil and heat modified soybean oils with different Gardner scale viscosities as additives in hexadecane have been examined in a boundary lubrication test regime (steel contacts) using Langmuir adsorption model. The free energy of adsorption (delta-Gads) of various...

  8. An integrated lubricant oil conditioning sensor using signal multiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiaoliang; Du, Li; Zhe, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    One effective approach to detect signs of potential failure of a rotating or reciprocating machine is to examine the conditions of its lubrication oil. Here we present an integrated oil condition sensor for detecting both wear debris and lubricant properties. The integrated sensor consists of miniature multiplexed sensing elements for detection of wear debris and measurements of viscosity and moisture. The oil debris sensing element consists of eight sensing channels to detect wear debris in parallel; the elements for measuring oil viscosity and moisture, based on interdigital electrode sensing, were fabricated using micromachining. The integrated sensor was installed and tested in a laboratory lubricating system. Signal multiplexing was applied to the outputs of the three sensing elements such that responses from all sensing elements were obtained within two measurements, and the signal-to-noise ratio was improved. Testing results show that the integrated sensor is capable of measuring wear debris (>50 µm), moisture (>50 ppm) and viscosity (>12.4 cSt) at a high throughput (200 ml min-1). The device can be potentially used for online health monitoring of rotating machines.

  9. Effect of stress nonhomogeneity on the shear melting of a thin boundary lubrication layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyashenko, Iakov A.; Filippov, Alexander E.; Popov, Mikhail; Popov, Valentin L.

    2016-11-01

    We consider the dynamical properties of boundary lubrication in contact between two atomically smooth solid surfaces separated by an ultrathin layer of lubricant. In contrast to previous works on this topic, we explicitly consider the heterogeneity of tangential stresses, which arises in a contact of elastic bodies that are moved tangentially relative to each other. To describe phase transitions between structural states of the lubricant we use an approach based on the field theory of phase transitions. It is assumed that the lubricant layer, when stressed, can undergo a shear-melting transition of first or second order. While solutions for the homogeneous system can be easily obtained analytically, the kinetics of the phase transitions in the spatially heterogeneous system can only be studied numerically. In our numerical experiments melting of the lubricant layer starts from the outer boundary of contact and propagates to its center. The melting wave is followed by a wave of solidification. This process repeats itself periodically, following the stick-slip pattern that is characteristic of such systems. Depending on the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of the model, different modes of sliding with almost complete or only partial intermediate solidification are possible.

  10. Evidence of a molecular boundary lubricant at snakeskin surfaces.

    PubMed

    Baio, Joe E; Spinner, Marlene; Jaye, Cherno; Fischer, Daniel A; Gorb, Stanislav N; Weidner, Tobias

    2015-12-06

    During slithering locomotion the ventral scales at a snake's belly are in direct mechanical interaction with the environment, while the dorsal scales provide optical camouflage and thermoregulation. Recent work has demonstrated that compared to dorsal scales, ventral scales provide improved lubrication and wear protection. While biomechanic adaption of snake motion is of growing interest in the fields of material science and robotics, the mechanism for how ventral scales influence the friction between the snake and substrate, at the molecular level, is unknown. In this study, we characterize the outermost surface of snake scales using sum frequency generation (SFG) spectra and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) images collected from recently shed California kingsnake (Lampropeltis californiae) epidermis. SFG's nonlinear optical selection rules provide information about the outermost surface of materials; NEXAFS takes advantage of the shallow escape depth of the electrons to probe the molecular structure of surfaces. Our analysis of the data revealed the existence of a previously unknown lipid coating on both the ventral and dorsal scales. Additionally, the molecular structure of this lipid coating closely aligns to the biological function: lipids on ventral scales form a highly ordered layer which provides both lubrication and wear protection at the snake's ventral surface.

  11. Evidence of a molecular boundary lubricant at snakeskin surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Spinner, Marlene; Jaye, Cherno; Fischer, Daniel A.; Gorb, Stanislav N.; Weidner, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    During slithering locomotion the ventral scales at a snake's belly are in direct mechanical interaction with the environment, while the dorsal scales provide optical camouflage and thermoregulation. Recent work has demonstrated that compared to dorsal scales, ventral scales provide improved lubrication and wear protection. While biomechanic adaption of snake motion is of growing interest in the fields of material science and robotics, the mechanism for how ventral scales influence the friction between the snake and substrate, at the molecular level, is unknown. In this study, we characterize the outermost surface of snake scales using sum frequency generation (SFG) spectra and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) images collected from recently shed California kingsnake (Lampropeltis californiae) epidermis. SFG's nonlinear optical selection rules provide information about the outermost surface of materials; NEXAFS takes advantage of the shallow escape depth of the electrons to probe the molecular structure of surfaces. Our analysis of the data revealed the existence of a previously unknown lipid coating on both the ventral and dorsal scales. Additionally, the molecular structure of this lipid coating closely aligns to the biological function: lipids on ventral scales form a highly ordered layer which provides both lubrication and wear protection at the snake's ventral surface. PMID:26655468

  12. Support of Oil Lubrication by Bonded Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holinski, R.

    1984-01-01

    A new generation of lubricating lacquers for treatment of metal surfaces has been developed. These coatings have proved to be oil-compatible and are used in oil-lubricated systems. The oil lubrication is supported thereby through reduction of friction and increase of load-carrying capacity during boundary conditions. For difficult tribological systems, the problem-solving lubricating concept has proved to be the beneficial combination of lubricating oil and bonded coatings. A number of practical applications are presented.

  13. Lubricant

    SciTech Connect

    Shubkin, R.L.

    1980-08-19

    Hydrogenated dimers of /sup 12 -18/C alpha olefins (e.g., 1-tetradecene) made using a friedel-crafts catalyst (e.g., /sup 3/Bf promoted with water) have low pour points, low volatility and viscosities which make them suitable as crankcase lubricants for internal combustion engines.

  14. Boundary Condition for Modeling Semiconductor Nanostructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Seungwon; Oyafuso, Fabiano; von Allmen, Paul; Klimeck, Gerhard

    2006-01-01

    A recently proposed boundary condition for atomistic computational modeling of semiconductor nanostructures (particularly, quantum dots) is an improved alternative to two prior such boundary conditions. As explained, this boundary condition helps to reduce the amount of computation while maintaining accuracy.

  15. Tidal Boundary Conditions in SEAWAT

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mulligan, Ann E.; Langevin, Christian; Post, Vincent E.A.

    2011-01-01

    SEAWAT, a U.S. Geological Survey groundwater flow and transport code, is increasingly used to model the effects of tidal motion on coastal aquifers. Different options are available to simulate tidal boundaries but no guidelines exist nor have comparisons been made to identify the most effective approach. We test seven methods to simulate a sloping beach and a tidal flat. The ocean is represented in one of the three ways: directly using a high hydraulic conductivity (high-K) zone and indirect simulation via specified head boundaries using either the General Head Boundary (GHB) or the new Periodic Boundary Condition (PBC) package. All beach models simulate similar water fluxes across the upland boundary and across the sediment-water interface although the ratio of intertidal to subtidal flow is different at low tide. Simulating a seepage face results in larger intertidal fluxes and influences near-shore heads and salinity. Major differences in flow occur in the tidal flat simulations. Because SEAWAT does not simulate unsaturated flow the water table only rises via flow through the saturated zone. This results in delayed propagation of the rising tidal signal inland. Inundation of the tidal flat is delayed as is flow into the aquifer across the flat. This is severe in the high-K and PBC models but mild in the GHB models. Results indicate that any of the tidal boundary options are fine if the ocean-aquifer interface is steep. However, as the slope of that interface decreases, the high-K and PBC approaches perform poorly and the GHB boundary is preferable.

  16. Mean Flow Boundary Conditions for Computational Aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hixon, R.; Nallasamy, M.; Sawyer, S.; Dyson, R.

    2003-01-01

    In this work, a new type of boundary condition for time-accurate Computational Aeroacoustics solvers is described. This boundary condition is designed to complement the existing nonreflective boundary conditions while ensuring that the correct mean flow conditions are maintained throughout the flow calculation. Results are shown for a loaded 2D cascade, started with various initial conditions.

  17. Influence of liquid lubricant properties on their performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wedeven, V.

    1972-01-01

    The influence of lubricant properties on performance is considered in connection with various mechanisms of lubrication. The effects of temperature and pressure on viscosity, which is important in hydrodynamic and elastohydrodynamic lubrication, is presented using a correlation postulated by Roelands. Under elastohydrodynamic conditions it is important to distinguish between the influence of lubricant properties within the inlet region and the Hertz region since each performs different functions. The role of lubricant transport properties such as surface tension is considered in connection with lubricant starvation. Since the lubrication of practical surfaces usually involves boundary as well as hydrodynamic mechanisms, both the chemical and physical properties significantly influence the lubricant's performance.

  18. Object shape-based optical sensing methodology and system for condition monitoring of contaminated engine lubricants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordatchev, Evgueni; Aghayan, Hamid; Yang, Jun

    2014-03-01

    Presence of contaminants, such as gasoline, moisture, and coolant in the engine lubricant indicates mechanical failure within the engine and significantly reduces lubricant quality. This paper describes a novel sensing system, its methodology and experimental verifications for analysis of the presence of contaminants in the engine lubricants. The sensing methodology is based on the statistical shape analysis methodology utilizing optical analysis of the distortion effect when an object image is obtained through a thin random optical medium. The novelty of the proposed sensing system lies within the employed methodology which an object with a known periodic shape is introduced behind a thin film of the contaminated lubricant. In this case, an acquired image represents a combined lubricant-object optical appearance, where an a priori known periodical structure of the object is distorted by a contaminated lubricant. The object, e.g. a stainless steel woven wire cloth with a mesh size of 65×65 µm2 and a circular wire diameter of 33 µm was placed behind a microfluidic channel, containing engine lubricant and optical images of flowing lubricant with stationary object were acquired and analyzed. Several parameters of acquired optical images, such as, color of lubricant and object, object shape width at object and lubricant levels, object relative color, and object width non-uniformity coefficient, were proposed. Measured on-line parameters were used for optical analysis of fresh and contaminated lubricants. Estimation of contaminant presence and lubricant condition was performed by comparison of parameters for fresh and contaminated lubricants. Developed methodology was verified experimentally showing ability to distinguish lubricants with 1%, 4%, 7%, and 10% coolant, gasoline and water contamination individually and in a combination form of coolant (0%-5%) and gasoline (0%-5%).

  19. Absorbing boundary conditions for exterior problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hariharan, S. I.

    1985-01-01

    Elliptic and hyperbolic problems in unbounded regions are considered. These problems, when one wants to solve them numerically, have the difficulty of prescribing boundary conditions at infinity. Computationally, one needs a finite region in which to solve these problems. The corresponding conditions at infinity imposed on the finite distance boundaries should dictate the boundary condition at infinity and be accurate with respect to the interior numerical scheme. Such boundary conditions are commonly referred to as absorbing boundary conditions. A treatment is given of these boundary conditions for wave-like equations.

  20. Quantum "violation" of Dirichlet boundary condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, I. Y.

    2017-02-01

    Dirichlet boundary conditions have been widely used in general relativity. They seem at odds with the holographic property of gravity simply because a boundary configuration can be varying and dynamic instead of dying out as required by the conditions. In this work we report what should be a tension between the Dirichlet boundary conditions and quantum gravitational effects, and show that a quantum-corrected black hole solution of the 1PI action no longer obeys, in the naive manner one may expect, the Dirichlet boundary conditions imposed at the classical level. We attribute the 'violation' of the Dirichlet boundary conditions to a certain mechanism of the information storage on the boundary.

  1. Stick-slip control in nanoscale boundary lubrication by surface wettability.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Foster, Adam S; Alava, Mikko J; Laurson, Lasse

    2015-03-06

    We study the effect of atomic-scale surface-lubricant interactions on nanoscale boundary-lubricated friction by considering two example surfaces-hydrophilic mica and hydrophobic graphene-confining thin layers of water in molecular dynamics simulations. We observe stick-slip dynamics for thin water films confined by mica sheets, involving periodic breaking-reforming transitions of atomic-scale capillary water bridges formed around the potassium ions of mica. However, only smooth sliding without stick-slip events is observed for water confined by graphene, as well as for thicker water layers confined by mica. Thus, our results illustrate how atomic-scale details affect the wettability of the confining surfaces and consequently control the presence or absence of stick-slip dynamics in nanoscale friction.

  2. The effect of oxygen concentration on the boundary lubricating characteristics of an unformulated C-ether to 300 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The effect of oxygen concentration on the boundary lubricating characteristics of an unformulated C-ether was studied with the use of a ball-on disk sliding-friction apparatus. Results were compared with those obtained with a polyphenyl ether. Experimental conditions included oxygen concentrations ranging from 20 percent (air) to 0.001 percent (nitrogen), a load of 1 kilogram, a sliding speed of 17 meters per minute, and disk temperatures ranging from 20 to 300 C (77 to 572 F). The C-ether yielded better boundary lubricating characteristics than did the polyphenyl ether in air and nitrogen over most of the temperature range. The C-ether exhibited lower wear at high oxygen levels (10 to 20 percent O2) from 25 to 200 C (77 to 392 F) and at low oxygen levels (0.001 to 1.0 percent O2) from 200 to 300 C (392 to 572 F). Friction polymer was observed around the wear scars of most test specimens. Friction polymer generation and its effect on wear are discussed in light of current theories.

  3. Probability of boundary conditions in quantum cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suenobu, Hiroshi; Nambu, Yasusada

    2017-02-01

    One of the main interest in quantum cosmology is to determine boundary conditions for the wave function of the universe which can predict observational data of our universe. For this purpose, we solve the Wheeler-DeWitt equation for a closed universe with a scalar field numerically and evaluate probabilities for boundary conditions of the wave function of the universe. To impose boundary conditions of the wave function, we use exact solutions of the Wheeler-DeWitt equation with a constant scalar field potential. These exact solutions include wave functions with well known boundary condition proposals, the no-boundary proposal and the tunneling proposal. We specify the exact solutions by introducing two real parameters to discriminate boundary conditions, and obtain the probability for these parameters under the requirement of sufficient e-foldings of the inflation. The probability distribution of boundary conditions prefers the tunneling boundary condition to the no-boundary boundary condition. Furthermore, for large values of a model parameter related to the inflaton mass and the cosmological constant, the probability of boundary conditions selects an unique boundary condition different from the tunneling type.

  4. Comparison of Single Grade and Multiviscosity Lubricants in M60 Tanks under Hot Ambient Conditions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-01

    Montemayor E.C. Owens Belvoir Fuels and Lubricants Research Facility (SwRI) Southwest Research Institute San Antonio, Texas Under Contract to U.S. Army...Multiviscosity Lubricants in M60 Tanks Under Hot Ambient Conditions (U) 12. PERSONAL AUTHORISI Montemayor , A.F. and Owens, Edwin C. 13a. TYPE OF REPORT

  5. Influence of steel type on the propensity for tribochemical wear in boundary lubrication with a wind turbine gear oil

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Ryan D.; Doll, Gary L.; Hager, C H; Howe, Jane Y

    2010-01-01

    Tribochemical wear may occur at the interface between a surface and a lubricant as a result of chemical and mechanical interactions in a tribological contact. Understanding the onset of tribochemical wear damage on component surfaces requires the use of high resolution techniques such as transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In this study, two steel types, case carburized AISI 3310 and through-hardened AISI 52100, were wear tested using a ball-on-disk rolling/sliding contact tribometer in fully formulated commercial wind turbine gearbox oil under boundary lubrication conditions with 10% slip. With the exception of steel type, all other test conditions were held constant. Conventional tribofilm analysis in the wear tracks was performed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and no significant composition differences were detected in the tribofilms for the different steel disk types. However, TEM analysis revealed significant tribochemical wear differences between the two steel types at multiple length scales, from the near-surface material microstructure (depth < 500 nm) to the tribofilm nanostructure. Nanometer-scale interfacial cracking and surface particle detachment was observed for the AISI 52100 case, whereas the tribofilm/substrate interface was abrupt and undamaged for the AISI 3310 case. Differences in tribofilm structure, including the location and orientation of MoS{sub 2} single sheet inclusions, were observed as a function of steel type as well. It is suggested that the tribochemical wear modes observed in these experiments may be origins of macroscopic surface-initiated damage such as micropitting in bearings and gears.

  6. Boundary conditions of methamphetamine craving.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Richard B; Onyemekwu, Chukwudi; Hart, Carl L; Ochsner, Kevin N; Kober, Hedy

    2015-12-01

    Methamphetamine use has increased significantly and become a global health concern. Craving is known to predict methamphetamine use and relapse following abstinence. Some have suggested that cravings are automatic, generalized, and uncontrollable, but experimental work addressing these claims is lacking. In 2 exploratory studies, we tested the boundary conditions of methamphetamine craving by asking: (a) is craving specific to users' preferred route of administration?, and (b) can craving be regulated by cognitive strategies? Two groups of methamphetamine users were recruited. In Study 1, participants were grouped by their preferred route of administration (intranasal vs. smoking), and rated their craving in response to photographs and movies depicting methamphetamine use (via the intranasal vs. smoking route). In Study 2, methamphetamine smokers implemented cognitive regulation strategies while viewing photographs depicting methamphetamine smoking. Strategies involved either focusing on the positive aspects of smoking methamphetamine or the negative consequences of doing so-the latter strategy based on treatment protocols for addiction. In Study 1, we found a significant interaction between group and route of administration, such that participants who preferred to smoke methamphetamine reported significantly stronger craving for smoking stimuli, whereas those who preferred the intranasal route reported stronger craving for intranasal stimuli. In Study 2, participants reported significantly lower craving when focusing on the negative consequences associated with methamphetamine use. Taken together, these findings suggest that strength of craving for methamphetamine is moderated by users' route of administration and can be reduced by cognitive strategies. This has important theoretical, methodological, and clinical implications.

  7. Electrical techniques for monitoring the condition of lubrication oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, J. D.; Austin, L.

    2003-10-01

    The lubricating oil used in engines for vehicle and other applications is renewed according to a schedule specified by the manufacturer. This timetable is, naturally, very conservative, and makes no allowance for the way in which the engine is operated. Constant-speed operation (such as motorway use) is much less harmful to the lubricant than variable-speed operation, such as urban driving, during which the oil experiences extreme variations of temperature and engine speed. The net result of the conservative lubricant replacement schedule is that most engine oil is discarded well before it has reached the end of its useful life. This paper reports a study in which changes to the dielectric and magnetic properties of the oil are assessed as methods of measuring the degradation of lubricating oil. The relationship between oil use (measured by the distance a vehicle has travelled) and oil viscosity is also measured. The conclusions from this work are that simple distance travelled (miles/kilometres) is not a good indicator of the state of an oil, as estimated by measuring its viscosity. The magnetic characteristics of lubricating oil (i.e. its magnetic permeability) do change as the oil degrades, but the measurements were poorly correlated with viscosity and do not seem to offer much promise as the basis of an oil monitoring system. The dielectric properties of lubricating oil are reasonably well correlated with viscosity, and it is proposed that this could form the basis of a useful sensing technique.

  8. Logarithmic minimal models with Robin boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourgine, Jean-Emile; Pearce, Paul A.; Tartaglia, Elena

    2016-06-01

    We consider general logarithmic minimal models LM≤ft( p,{{p}\\prime}\\right) , with p,{{p}\\prime} coprime, on a strip of N columns with the (r, s) Robin boundary conditions introduced by Pearce, Rasmussen and Tipunin. On the lattice, these models are Yang-Baxter integrable loop models that are described algebraically by the one-boundary Temperley-Lieb algebra. The (r, s) Robin boundary conditions are a class of integrable boundary conditions satisfying the boundary Yang-Baxter equations which allow loop segments to either reflect or terminate on the boundary. The associated conformal boundary conditions are organized into infinitely extended Kac tables labelled by the Kac labels r\\in {Z} and s\\in {N} . The Robin vacuum boundary condition, labelled by ≤ft(r,s-\\frac{1}{2}\\right)=≤ft(0,\\frac{1}{2}\\right) , is given as a linear combination of Neumann and Dirichlet boundary conditions. The general (r, s) Robin boundary conditions are constructed, using fusion, by acting on the Robin vacuum boundary with an (r, s)-type seam consisting of an r-type seam of width w columns and an s-type seam of width d  =  s  -  1 columns. The r-type seam admits an arbitrary boundary field which we fix to the special value ξ =-\\fracλ{2} where λ =\\frac≤ft( {{p}\\prime}-p\\right)π{{{p}\\prime}} is the crossing parameter. The s-type boundary introduces d defects into the bulk. We consider the commuting double-row transfer matrices and their associated quantum Hamiltonians and calculate analytically the boundary free energies of the (r, s) Robin boundary conditions. Using finite-size corrections and sequence extrapolation out to system sizes N+w+d≤slant 26 , the conformal spectrum of boundary operators is accessible by numerical diagonalization of the Hamiltonians. Fixing the parity of N for r\

  9. Effects of Equine Joint Injury on Boundary Lubrication of Articular Cartilage by Synovial Fluid: Role of Hyaluronan

    PubMed Central

    Antonacci, Jennifer M.; Schmidt, Tannin A.; Serventi, Lisa A.; Cai, Matthew Z.; Shu, YuYu L.; Schumacher, Barbara L.; McIlwraith, C. Wayne; Sah, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To compare equine synovial fluid (eSF) from post-injury and control joints for (1) cartilage boundary lubrication function, (2) putative boundary lubricant molecules hyaluronan (HA), proteoglycan-4 (PRG4), and surface-active phospholipids (SAPL), (3) relationships between lubrication function and composition, and (4) lubrication restoration by addition of HA. Methods eSF from normal (NL), acute injury (AI), and chronic injury (CI) joints were analyzed for boundary lubrication of normal articular cartilage as kinetic friction coefficient (μkinetic). eSF were also analyzed for HA, PRG4, and SAPL concentrations and HA molecular weight (MW) distribution. The effect of addition of HA, of different concentrations and MW, to AI- and NL-eSF samples on μkinetic was determined. Results The μkinetic of AI-eSF (0.036) was higher (+39%) than that of NL-eSF (0.026). Compared to NL-eSF, AI-eSF had a lower HA concentration (−30%) of lower MW forms, higher PRG4 concentration (+83%), and higher SAPL concentration (+144%). CI-eSF had μkinetic, HA, PRG4, and SAPL characteristics intermediate to that of AI-eSF and NL-eSF. Regression analysis revealed that μkinetic decreased with increasing HA concentration in eSF. The friction-reducing properties of HA alone improved with increasing concentration and MW. Addition of high-MW HA (4,000kDa) to AI-eSF reduced μkinetic to a value near that of NL-eSF. Conclusion In the acute post-injury stage, eSF exhibits poor boundary lubrication properties as indicated by a high μkinetic. HA of diminished concentration and MW may be the basis for this, and adding HA to deficient eSF restored lubrication function. PMID:22605527

  10. Effect of surface condition on the formation of solid lubricating films at high temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanyaloglu, Bengi; Graham, E. E.

    1992-01-01

    Solid films were produced on active metal or ceramic surfaces using lubricants (such as tricresyl phosphate) delivered as a vapor at high temperatures, and the lubricity of these deposits under different dynamic wear conditions was investigated. A method is described for chemically activating ceramic surfaces resulting in a surface that could promote the formation of lubricating polymeric derivative of TCP. Experiments were carried out to evaluate the wear characteristics of unlubricated cast iron and of Sialon ceramic at 25 and 280 C, and lubricated with a vapor of TCP at 280 C. It is shown that continuous vapor phase lubrication of chemically treated Sialon reduced its coefficient of friction from 0.7 to less than 0.1.

  11. Comparative study of boundary conditions with helix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillay, Shamini; Kumar, Deepak; Phua, Y. N.

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents a comparative study of dispersion characteristics of the circular waveguide with helical windings. Our waveguide is doubly unconventional in the choice of reverse boundary condition, in the choice of normal boundary condition and further with the presence of sheath helix between the core and cladding parameters. Two methods of winding the helix between the core and cladding are considered namely from right to left and left to right. Through mathematical analysis using field components and boundary conditions the modal characteristics are derived for both conditions. Normal boundary condition and reverse boundary conditions are used respectively to represent the helical windings. Here the characteristic equation is obtained in the form of Bessel and modified Bessel for both waveguides. Using the modal characteristic equation the dispersion curves are plotted for numerous angles and wavelengths. We find that the method of wrapping the helical material has significant effect on the dispersion properties with regards to the way the modes propagate.

  12. Storage of Synthetic Turbine Lubricants under Adverse Conditions.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-04-01

    lubricants is the quantity of base, expressed in milligrams of potassium hydroxide required to neutralize all ac.idic constituents present in one...Bright Scum at Scum at Scum at Scum at Dark Scun in Water Dark Scum in Wart , Oil/Wa- Oil/Wa- Oil/Wa- Oil/Wa- Layer. Layer. ter In- ter In- ter In- ter In

  13. Boundary conditions for unsteady supersonic inlet analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, David W.; Paynter, Gerald C.

    1994-06-01

    New bleed and compressor face boundary conditions have been developed to improve the accuracy of unsteady supersonic inlet calculations. The new bleed boundary conditions relate changes in the bleed hole discharge coefficient to changes in the local flow conditions; the local bleed flow rate can more than double as a shock moves forward over a bleed band in response to inlet flow disturbances. The effects of inlet flow disturbances on the flow at the compressor face are represented more realistically with this new boundary condition than with traditional fixed static pressure or mass flow conditions.

  14. On boundary conditions in lattice Boltzmann methods

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.; Martinez, D. |; Mei, R.

    1996-09-01

    A lattice Boltzmann boundary condition for simulation of fluid flow using simple extrapolation is proposed. Numerical simulations, including two-dimensional Poiseuille flow, unsteady Couette flow, lid-driven square cavity flow, and flow over a column of cylinders for a range of Reynolds numbers, are carried out, showing that this scheme is of second order accuracy in space discretization. Applications of the method to other boundary conditions, including pressure condition and flux condition are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Thermal Behavior of Aerospace Spur Gears in Normal and Loss-of-Lubrication Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    Testing of instrumented spur gears operating at aerospace rotorcraft conditions was conducted. The instrumented gears were operated in a normal and in a loss-of-lubrication environment. Thermocouples were utilized to measure the temperature at various locations on the test gears and a test utilized a full-field, high-speed infrared thermal imaging system. Data from thermocouples was recorded during all testing at 1 Hz. One test had the gears shrouded and a second test was run without the shrouds to permit the infrared thermal imaging system to take date during loss-of-lubrication operation. Both tests using instrumented spur gears were run in normal and loss-of-lubrication conditions. Also the result from four other loss-of-lubrication tests will be presented. In these tests two different torque levels were used while operating at the same rotational speed (10000 rpm).

  16. Thermal Behavior of Aerospace Spur Gears in Normal and Loss-of-Lubrication Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    Testing of instrumented spur gears operating at aerospace rotorcraft conditions was conducted. The instrumented gears were operated in a normal and in a loss-of-lubrication environment. Thermocouples were utilized to measure the temperature at various locations on the test gears and a test utilized a full-field, high-speed infrared thermal imaging system. Data from thermocouples was recorded during all testing at 1 hertz. One test had the gears shrouded and a second test was run without the shrouds to permit the infrared thermal imaging system to take data during loss-of-lubrication operation. Both tests using instrumented spur gears were run in normal and loss-of-lubrication conditions. Also the result from four other loss-of-lubrication tests will be presented. In these tests two different torque levels were used while operating at the same rotational speed (10000 revolutions per minute).

  17. The role of thermal and lubricant boundary layers in the transient thermal analysis of spur gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Bayoumy, L. E.; Akin, L. S.; Townsend, D. P.; Choy, F. C.

    1989-01-01

    An improved convection heat-transfer model has been developed for the prediction of the transient tooth surface temperature of spur gears. The dissipative quality of the lubricating fluid is shown to be limited to the capacity extent of the thermal boundary layer. This phenomenon can be of significance in the determination of the thermal limit of gears accelerating to the point where gear scoring occurs. Steady-state temperature prediction is improved considerably through the use of a variable integration time step that substantially reduces computer time. Computer-generated plots of temperature contours enable the user to animate the propagation of the thermal wave as the gears come into and out of contact, thus contributing to better understanding of this complex problem. This model has a much better capability at predicting gear-tooth temperatures than previous models.

  18. Role of thermal and lubricant boundary layers in the transient thermal analysis of spur gears

    SciTech Connect

    El-Bayoumy, L.E.; Akin, L.S.; Townsend, D.P.; Choy, F.C.

    1989-01-01

    An improved convection heat-transfer model has been developed for the prediction of the transient tooth surface temperature of spur gears. The dissipative quality of the lubricating fluid is shown to be limited to the capacity extent of the thermal boundary layer. This phenomenon can be of significance in the determination of the thermal limit of gears accelerating to the point where gear scoring occurs. Steady-state temperature prediction is improved considerably through the use of a variable integration time step that substantially reduces computer time. Computer-generated plots of temperature contours enable the user to animate the propagation of the thermal wave as the gears come into and out of contact, thus contributing to better understanding of this complex problem. This model has a much better capability at predicting gear-tooth temperatures than previous models.

  19. Lubricant oil condition monitoring using a scattering-free single-wavelength optical scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignani, A. G.; Ciaccheri, L.; Mencaglia, Andrea A.; Adriani, G.; Paccagnini, A.; Campatelli, M.; Ottevaere, H.; Thienpont, H.

    2014-05-01

    A simple and low-cost optical setup can be used for monitoring online the condition of lubricant oil in big machineries, as an action of preventive maintenance. The total acid number and the water content, as indicators of the lubricant oil quality, can be assessed by means of an integrating sphere for achieving scattering-free absorption measurements. For each indicator, spectroscopy showed that a peculiar wavelength is enough for predicting with good accuracy the value of the indicator.

  20. Downstream boundary conditions for viscous flow problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fix, G.; Gunzburger, M.

    1977-01-01

    The problem of the specification of artificial outflow conditions in flow problems is studied. It is shown that for transport type equations incorrect outflow conditions will adversely affect the solution only in a small region near the outflow boundary, while for elliptic equations, e.g. those governing the streamfunction or pressure, a correct boundary specification is essential. In addition, integral outflow boundary conditions for fluid dynamical problems are considered. It is shown that such conditions are well posed, and their effect on the solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations is also considered.

  1. Boundary Conditions of the Heliosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, Jonathan D.; Frisch, Priscilla C .

    2001-01-01

    We present new calculations of the ionization of the Local Interstellar Cloud (LIC) by directly observed sources including nearby stellar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) sources and the diffuse emission of the Soft X-ray Background (SXRB). In addition, we model the important, unobserved EUV emission both from the hot gas responsible for the SXRB and from a possible evaporative boundary between the LIC and the hot gas. We show that these ionization sources can provide the necessary ionization and heating of the cloud to match observations. Including the radiation from the conductive boundary, while not required, does improve the agreement with observations of the temperature of the LIC. The ionization predicted in our models shows good agreement with pickup ion results, interstellar absorption line data towards epsilon CMa, and EUV opacity measurements of nearby white dwarf stars. The areas of disagreement point to a possible underabundance (relative to solar abundance) of neon in the LIC. The presence of dust in the cloud, or at least depleted abundances, is necessary to maintain the heating/cooling balance and reach the observed temperature.

  2. The lubrication performance of the ceramic-on-ceramic hip implant under starved conditions.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qingen; Wang, Jing; Yang, Peiran; Jin, Zhongmin; Fisher, John

    2015-10-01

    Lubrication plays an important role in the clinical performance of the ceramic-on-ceramic (CoC) hip implant in terms of reducing wear and avoiding squeaking. All the previous lubrication analyses of CoC hip implants assumed that synovial fluid was sufficiently supplied to the contact area. The aim of this study was to investigate the lubrication performance of the CoC hip implant under starved conditions. A starved lubrication model was presented for the CoC hip implant. The model was solved using multi-grid techniques. Results showed that the fluid film thickness of the CoC hip implant was affected by fluid supply conditions: with the increase in the supplied fluid layer, the lubrication film thickness approached to that of the fully blooded solution; when the available fluid layer reduced to some level, the fluid film thickness considerably decreased with the supplying condition. The above finding provides new insights into the lubrication performance of hip implants.

  3. The lubrication performance of the ceramic-on-ceramic hip implant under starved conditions

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Qingen; Wang, Jing; Yang, Peiran; Jin, Zhongmin; Fisher, John

    2015-01-01

    Lubrication plays an important role in the clinical performance of the ceramic-on-ceramic (CoC) hip implant in terms of reducing wear and avoiding squeaking. All the previous lubrication analyses of CoC hip implants assumed that synovial fluid was sufficiently supplied to the contact area. The aim of this study was to investigate the lubrication performance of the CoC hip implant under starved conditions. A starved lubrication model was presented for the CoC hip implant. The model was solved using multi-grid techniques. Results showed that the fluid film thickness of the CoC hip implant was affected by fluid supply conditions: with the increase in the supplied fluid layer, the lubrication film thickness approached to that of the fully blooded solution; when the available fluid layer reduced to some level, the fluid film thickness considerably decreased with the supplying condition. The above finding provides new insights into the lubrication performance of hip implants. PMID:26114217

  4. NHWAVE: Consistent boundary conditions and turbulence modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derakhti, Morteza; Kirby, James T.; Shi, Fengyan; Ma, Gangfeng

    2016-10-01

    Large-scale σ-coordinate ocean circulation models neglect the horizontal variation of σ in the calculation of stress terms and boundary conditions. Following this practice, the effects of surface and bottom slopes in the dynamic surface and bottom boundary conditions have been usually neglected in the available non-hydrostatic wave-resolving models using a terrain-following grid. In this paper, we derive consistent surface and bottom boundary conditions for the normal and tangential stress fields as well as a Neumann-type boundary condition for scalar fluxes. Further, we examine the role of surface slopes in the predicted near-surface velocity and turbulence fields in surface gravity waves. By comparing the predicted velocity field in a deep-water standing wave in a closed basin, we show that the consistent boundary conditions do not generate unphysical vorticity at the free surface, in contrast to commonly used, simplified stress boundary conditions developed by ignoring all contributions except vertical shear in the transformation of stress terms. In addition, it is shown that the consistent boundary conditions significantly improve predicted wave shape, velocity and turbulence fields in regular surf zone breaking waves, compared with the simplified case. A more extensive model-data comparison of various breaking wave properties in different types of surface breaking waves is presented in companion papers (Derakhti et al., 2016a,b).

  5. Probing temperature chaos through thermal boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenlong; Machta, Jonathan; Katzgraber, Helmut

    2015-03-01

    Using population annealing Monte Carlo, we numerically study temperature chaos in the three-dimensional Edwards-Anderson Ising spin glass using thermal boundary conditions. In thermal boundary conditions all eight combinations of periodic vs antiperiodic boundary conditions in the three spatial directions appear in the ensemble with their respective Boltzmann weights, thus minimizing finite-size corrections due to domain walls. By studying salient features in the specific heat we show evidence of temperature chaos. Our results suggest that these bumps are mainly caused by system-size excitations where the free energy of two boundary conditions cross. Furthermore, we study the scaling of both entropy and energy at boundary condition crossings and find that the scaling of the energy is very different from the scaling obtained by a simple change of boundary conditions. We attribute this difference to the stronger finite-size effects induced via a simple change of boundary conditions. Finally, we show that temperature chaos occurs more frequently at higher temperatures within the spin-glass phase and for larger system sizes, while the normalized distribution function with respect to temperature is about the same for different system sizes. The work is supported from NSF (Grant No. DMR-1208046).

  6. Compatibility of refrigerants and lubricants with electrical sheet insulation under retrofit conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Doerr, R.G.; Waite, T.D.

    1996-11-01

    To determine whether exposure to the original refrigerant/mineral oil would affect compatibility of sheet insulation with alternative refrigerant/lubricant after retrofit, sheet insulation was exposed at elevated temperature to the original refrigerant and mineral oil for 500 hours, followed by exposure to the alternative refrigerant and lubricant for 500 hours. Most of the sheet insulation materials exposed to the alternative refrigerant and lubricant (after an initial exposure to the original refrigerant and mineral oil) appeared to be compatible with the alternative refrigerant and lubricant. The only concern was delamination and blistering of the sheet insulation containing Nomex, especially after removal of absorbed refrigerant at high temperature. This was attributed to incompatibility of the adhesive and not to the Nomex itself. Embrittlement of the polyethylene terephthalate (PET) sheet was initially observed, but 2048 subsequent tests under extremely dry conditions showed that embrittlement of the PET materials was attributed to moisture present during the exposure.

  7. Normal and shear interactions between hyaluronan-aggrecan complexes mimicking possible boundary lubricants in articular cartilage in synovial joints.

    PubMed

    Seror, Jasmine; Merkher, Yulia; Kampf, Nir; Collinson, Lisa; Day, Anthony J; Maroudas, Alice; Klein, Jacob

    2012-11-12

    Using a surface force balance, normal and shear interactions have been measured between two atomically smooth surfaces coated with hyaluronan (HA), and with HA/aggrecan (Agg) complexes stabilized by cartilage link protein (LP). Such HA/Agg/LP complexes are the most abundant mobile macromolecular species permeating articular cartilage in synovial joints and have been conjectured to be present as boundary lubricants at its surface. The aim of the present study is to gain insight into the extremely efficient lubrication when two cartilage surfaces slide past each other in healthy joints, and in particular to elucidate the possible role in this of the HA/Agg/LP complexes. Within the range of our parameters, our results reveal that the HA/Agg/LP macromolecular surface complexes are much better boundary lubricants than HA alone, likely because of the higher level of hydration, due to the higher charge density, of the HA/Agg/LP layers with respect to the HA alone. However, the friction coefficients (μ) associated with the mutual interactions and sliding of opposing HA/Agg/LP layers (μ ≈ 0.01 up to pressure P of ca. 12 atm, increasing sharply at higher P) suggest that such complexes by themselves cannot account for the remarkable boundary lubrication observed in mammalian joints (up to P > 50 atm).

  8. Stable boundary conditions for Cartesian grid calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, M. J.; Leveque, R. J.

    1990-01-01

    The inviscid Euler equations in complicated geometries are solved using a Cartesian grid. This requires solid wall boundary conditions in the irregular grid cells near the boundary. Since these cells may be orders of magnitude smaller than the regular grid cells, stability is a primary concern. An approach to this problem is presented and its use is illustrated.

  9. Wear behaviors of HVOF sprayed WC-12Co coatings by laser remelting under lubricated condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dejun, Kong; Tianyuan, Sheng

    2017-03-01

    A HVOF (high velocity oxygen fuel) sprayed WC-12Co coating was remelted with a CO2 laser. The surface-interface morphologies and phases were analyzed by means of SEM (scanning electron microscopy), and XRD (X-ray diffraction), respectively. The friction and wear behaviors of WC-12Co coating under the dry and lubricated conditions were investigated with a wear test. The morphologies and distributions of chemical elements on worn scar were analyzed with a SEM, and its configured EDS (energy diffusive spectrometer), respectively, and the effects of lubricated condition on COFs (coefficient of friction) and wear performance were also discussed. The results show that the adhesion between the coating and the substrate is stronger after laser remetling (LR), in which mechanical bonding, accompanying with metallurgical bonding, was found. At the load of 80 N, the average COF under the dry and lubricated friction conditions is 0.069, and 0.052, respectively, the latter lowers by 23.3% than the former, and the wear rate under the lubricated condition decreases by 302.3% than that under the dry condition. The wear mechanism under the dry and lubrication conditions is primarily composed of abrasive wear, cracking, and fatigue failure.

  10. Next Generation Refrigeration Lubricants for Low Global Warming Potential/Low Ozone Depleting Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hessell, Edward Thomas

    2013-12-31

    The goal of this project is to develop and test new synthetic lubricants that possess high compatibility with new low ozone depleting (LOD) and low global warming potential (LGWP) refrigerants and offer improved lubricity and wear protection over current lubricant technologies. The improved compatibility of the lubricants with the refrigerants, along with improved lubricating properties, will resulted in lower energy consumption and longer service life of the refrigeration systems used in residential, commercial and industrial heating, ventilating and air-conditioning (HVAC) and refrigeration equipment.

  11. Gas cushion model and hydrodynamic boundary conditions for superhydrophobic textures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nizkaya, Tatiana V.; Asmolov, Evgeny S.; Vinogradova, Olga I.

    2014-10-01

    Superhydrophobic Cassie textures with trapped gas bubbles reduce drag, by generating large effective slip, which is important for a variety of applications that involve a manipulation of liquids at the small scale. Here we discuss how the dissipation in the gas phase of textures modifies their friction properties. We propose an operator method, which allows us to map the flow in the gas subphase to a local slip boundary condition at the liquid-gas interface. The determined uniquely local slip length depends on the viscosity contrast and underlying topography, and can be immediately used to evaluate an effective slip of the texture. Besides superlubricating Cassie surfaces, our approach is valid for rough surfaces impregnated by a low-viscosity "lubricant," and even for Wenzel textures, where a liquid follows the surface relief. These results provide a framework for the rational design of textured surfaces for numerous applications.

  12. Lubrication background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.; Dowson, D.

    1981-01-01

    Surface topography, including the various physical methods of measuring surfaces, and the various lubrication regimes (hydrodynamic, elastohydrodynamic, boundary, and mixed) are discussed. The historical development of elastohydrodynamic lubrication is outlined. The major accomplishments in four periods, the pre-1950's, the 1950's, the 1960's, and the 1970's are presented.

  13. Experiments on initial and boundary conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moretti, G.

    1980-01-01

    Effects of three different models for the treatment of subsonic boundary conditions, applied to the problem of flow in a channel with a bump, are discussed. A preliminary discussion of the numerical treatment of the corners is presented.

  14. An outflow boundary condition for aeroacoustic computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayder, M. Ehtesham; Hagstrom, Thomas

    1995-01-01

    A formulation of boundary condition for flows with small disturbances is presented. The authors test their methodology in an axisymmetric jet flow calculation, using both the Navier-Stokes and Euler equations. Solutions in the far field are assumed to be oscillatory. If the oscillatory disturbances are small, the growth of the solution variables can be predicted by linear theory. Eigenfunctions of the linear theory are used explicitly in the formulation of the boundary conditions. This guarantees correct solutions at the boundary in the limit where the predictions of linear theory are valid.

  15. Complexation and synergistic boundary lubrication of porcine gastric mucin and branched poly(ethyleneimine) in neutral aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Patil, Navinkumar J; Rishikesan, Sankaranarayanan; Nikogeorgos, Nikolaos; Guzzi, Rita; Lee, Seunghwan; Zappone, Bruno

    2017-01-18

    Lubrication of soft polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elastomer interfaces was studied in aqueous mixtures of porcine gastric mucin (PGM) and branched polyethyleneimine (b-PEI) at neutral pH and various ionic strengths (0.1-1.0 M). While neither PGM nor b-PEI improved lubrication compared to polymer-free buffer solution, their mixtures produced a synergistic lubricating effect by reducing friction coefficients by nearly two orders of magnitude, especially at slow sliding speed in the boundary lubrication regime. An array of spectroscopic studies revealed that small cationic b-PEI molecules were able to strongly bind and penetrate into large anionic PGM molecules, producing an overall contraction of the randomly coiled PGM conformation. The interaction also affected the structure of the folded PGM protein terminals, decreased the surface potential and increased light absorbance in PGM:b-PEI mixtures. Adding an electrolyte (NaCl) weakened the aggregation between PGM and b-PEI, and degraded the lubrication synergy, indicating that electrostatic interactions drive PGM:b-PEI complexation.

  16. Surface roughness effects with solid lubricants dispersed in mineral oils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cusano, C.; Goglia, P. R.; Sliney, H. E.

    1983-01-01

    The lubricating effectiveness of solid-lubricant dispersions are investigated in both point and line contacts using surfaces with both random and directional roughness characteristics. Friction and wear data obtained at relatively low speeds and at room temperature, indicate that the existence of solid lubricants such as graphite, MoS2, and PTFE in a plain mineral oil generally will not improve the effectiveness of the oil as a lubricant for such surfaces. Under boundary lubrication conditions, the friction force, as a function of time, initially depends upon the directional roughness properties of the contacting surfaces irrespective of whether the base oil or dispersions are used as lubricants.

  17. Effects of supply conditions on film thickness in lubricated Hertzian contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalmaz, G.; Godet, M.

    1980-01-01

    A generalization of the hydrodynamic expression for Hertzian contacts is described and various methods for calculating the thickness of the oil film winter steady-state, isothermal conditions are given. This is important for engineering applications such as gears and bearings because these results are closer to real operating conditions. Theories of lubrication are discussed, and the mathematics involved are presented using approximately 30 equations and 13 figures. For lubricated, linear, elliptical or point Hertzian contacts it is demonstrated how to calculate the thickness of the oil film at the center of the contact for steady-state isothermal conditions.

  18. Hard-on-hard lubrication in the artificial hip under dynamic loading conditions.

    PubMed

    Sonntag, Robert; Reinders, Jörn; Rieger, Johannes S; Heitzmann, Daniel W W; Kretzer, J Philippe

    2013-01-01

    The tribological performance of an artificial hip joint has a particularly strong influence on its success. The principle causes for failure are adverse short- and long-term reactions to wear debris and high frictional torque in the case of poor lubrication that may cause loosening of the implant. Therefore, using experimental and theoretical approaches models have been developed to evaluate lubrication under standardized conditions. A steady-state numerical model has been extended with dynamic experimental data for hard-on-hard bearings used in total hip replacements to verify the tribological relevance of the ISO 14242-1 gait cycle in comparison to experimental data from the Orthoload database and instrumented gait analysis for three additional loading conditions: normal walking, climbing stairs and descending stairs. Ceramic-on-ceramic bearing partners show superior lubrication potential compared to hard-on-hard bearings that work with at least one articulating metal component. Lubrication regimes during the investigated activities are shown to strongly depend on the kinematics and loading conditions. The outcome from the ISO gait is not fully confirmed by the normal walking data and more challenging conditions show evidence of inferior lubrication. These findings may help to explain the differences between the in vitro predictions using the ISO gait cycle and the clinical outcome of some hard-on-hard bearings, e.g., using metal-on-metal.

  19. Boundary lubrication of formulated C-ethers in air to 300 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Friction and wear measurements were made in dry and moist air on CVM M-50 steel lubricated with six C-ether formulations containing phosphorus ester and organic acid additives. Results were compared to those obtained with a formulated Type 2 ester and the C-ether base fluid. A ball-on-disk sliding friction apparatus was used. Experimental conditions were a 1-kilogram load, 17 meter-per-minute (100 rpm) surface speed, and a 25 to 300 C disk temperature range. The C-ether base fluid and the C-ether formulations yielded lower wear than the ester under most test conditions. The C-ether formulations exhibited higher friction coefficients than the ester from 150 to 300 C and similar or lower values from 25 to 150 C.

  20. On High-Order Radiation Boundary Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagstrom, Thomas

    1995-01-01

    In this paper we develop the theory of high-order radiation boundary conditions for wave propagation problems. In particular, we study the convergence of sequences of time-local approximate conditions to the exact boundary condition, and subsequently estimate the error in the solutions obtained using these approximations. We show that for finite times the Pade approximants proposed by Engquist and Majda lead to exponential convergence if the solution is smooth, but that good long-time error estimates cannot hold for spatially local conditions. Applications in fluid dynamics are also discussed.

  1. Boundary conditions for the gravitational field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winicour, Jeffrey

    2012-06-01

    A review of the treatment of boundaries in general relativity is presented with the emphasis on application to the formulations of Einstein's equations used in numerical relativity. At present, it is known how to treat boundaries in the harmonic formulation of Einstein's equations and a tetrad formulation of the Einstein-Bianchi system. However, a universal approach valid for other formulations is not in hand. In particular, there is no satisfactory boundary theory for the 3+1 formulations which have been highly successful in binary black hole simulation. I discuss the underlying problems that make the initial-boundary-value problem much more complicated than the Cauchy problem. I review the progress that has been made and the important open questions that remain. Science is a differential equation. Religion is a boundary condition. (Alan Turing, quoted in J D Barrow, ‘Theories of Everything’)

  2. Spatial periodic boundary condition for MODFLOW.

    PubMed

    Laattoe, Tariq; Post, Vincent E A; Werner, Adrian D

    2014-01-01

    Small-scale hyporheic zone (HZ) models often use a spatial periodic boundary (SPB) pair to simulate an infinite repetition of bedforms. SPB's are common features of commercially available multiphysics modeling packages. MODFLOW's lack of this boundary type has precluded it from being effectively utilized in this area of HZ research. We present a method to implement the SPB in MODFLOW by development of the appropriate block-centered finite-difference expressions. The implementation is analogous to MODFLOW's general head boundary package. The difference is that the terms on the right hand side of the solution equations must be updated with each iteration. Consequently, models that implement the SPB converge best with solvers that perform both inner and outer iterations. The correct functioning of the SPB condition in MODFLOW is verified by two examples. This boundary condition allows users to build HZ-bedform models in MODFLOW, facilitating further research using related codes such as MT3DMS and PHT3D.

  3. Velocity boundary conditions at a tokamak resistive wall

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, H. R.

    2014-03-15

    Velocity boundary conditions appropriate for magnetohydrodynamic simulations have been controversial recently. A comparison of numerical simulations of sideways wall force in disruptions is presented for Dirichlet, Neumann, Robin, and DEBS boundary conditions. It is shown that all the boundary conditions give qualitatively similar results. It is shown that Dirichlet boundary conditions are valid in the small Larmor radius limit of electromagnetic sheath boundary conditions.

  4. Boundary conditions for unsteady supersonic inlet analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, David W.; Paynter, Gerald C.

    1994-06-01

    New bleed and compresor face boundary conditions have been developed to improve the accuracy of unsteady supersonic inlet calculations. The new bleed boundary condition relates changes in the bleed hole discharge coefficient to change the local flow conditions; the local bleed flow rate can more than double as a shock moves forward over a bleed band in response to inlet flow disturbances. The stability margin of the inlet is strongly dependent on the throat bleed configuration since the locally rapid increase in bleed flow has a stong effect on the motion of the normal shock. The new compressor face boundary condition accounts for changes in the unsteady flow conditions at the compressor face by specifying the compressor face corrected mass flow or Mach number either as a constant or as a linear function of the stagnation conditions. The effects of inlet flow disturbances on the flow at the compressor face are represented more realistically with this new boundary condition than with traditional fixed static pressure or mass flow conditions. Euler calculations of the dynamic response of an inlet flow to a flow disturbance at the compressor face with 20- and 90-deg throat bleed hole angles are reported. These results indicate that an extra margin of stability for the inlet is obtained with 90-deg bleed holes because the increase in bleed flow rate as the shock moves forward over a bleed is much larger for 90-deg holes than for 20-deg holes.

  5. Polymer Brushes that Mimic Repulsive Properties of the Boundary Lubricant Glycoprotein Lubricin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Jahn; Jay, Gregory; Ni, Qian; Bello, David; Bothun, Geoffrey; Kim, Kyung-Suk

    2011-03-01

    This is a report on the design of tailored functional groups which mimic the repulsive forces at work in the natural-joint boundary lubricant known as lubricin. Lubricin, an amphiphilic polyelectrolyte biomolecule, decreases friction and cellular adhesion by exhibiting surface force fields based on steric hindrance, Debye electrostatic double layer repulsion and hydration repulsive forces. We have identified a physically and chemically stable candidate polymers for anti-fouling coatings that will mimic lubricin's repulsive properties. Synthetic polymer brushes mimicking lubricin have been produced using these polymers grafted onto a glass surfaces. The average adhesive forces for the polymer brushes measured through atomic force microscopy are as low (56.796 +/- 0.796 mN/m), similar to those exhibited by lubricin coated surfaces and on the same order of magnitude as superhydrophobic surfaces. This work was supported by the Coatings/Biofouling Program and the Maritime Sensing Program of the Office of Naval Research as well as the ILIR Program of the Naval Undersea Warfare Center DIVNPT.

  6. Scalar boundary conditions in Lifshitz spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeler, Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the conditions imposable on a scalar field at the boundary of the so-called Lifshitz spacetime which has been proposed as the dual to Lifshitz field theories. For effective mass squared between -( d + z - 1)2 /4 and z 2 - ( d + z - 1)2 /4, we find a one-parameter choice of boundary condition type. The bottom end of this range corresponds to a Breitenlohner-Freedman bound; below it, the Klein-Gordon operator need not be positive, so we cannot make sense of the dynamics. Above the top end of the range, only one boundary condition type is available; here we expect compact initial data will remain compact in the future.

  7. Determining hydrodynamic boundary conditions from equilibrium fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shuyu; Wang, Han; Qian, Tiezheng; Sheng, Ping

    2015-10-01

    The lack of a first-principles derivation has made the hydrodynamic boundary condition a classical issue for the past century. The fact that the fluid can have interfacial structures adds additional complications and ambiguities to the problem. Here we report the use of molecular dynamics to identify from equilibrium thermal fluctuations the hydrodynamic modes in a fluid confined by solid walls, thereby extending the application of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem to yield not only the accurate location of the hydrodynamic boundary at the molecular scale, but also the relevant parameter value(s) for the description of the macroscopic boundary condition. We present molecular dynamics results on two examples to illustrate the application of this approach—one on the hydrophilic case and one on the hydrophobic case. It is shown that the use of the orthogonality condition of the modes can uniquely locate the hydrodynamic boundary to be inside the fluid in both cases, separated from the molecular solid-liquid interface by a small distance Δ that is a few molecules in size. The eigenvalue equation of the hydrodynamic modes directly yields the slip length, which is about equal to Δ in the hydrophilic case but is larger than Δ in the hydrophobic case. From the decay time we also obtain the bulk viscosity which is in good agreement with the value obtained from dynamic simulations. To complete the picture, we derive the Green-Kubo relation for a finite fluid system and show that the boundary fluctuations decouple from the bulk only in the infinite-fluid-channel limit; and in that limit we recover the interfacial fluctuation-dissipation theorem first presented by Bocquet and Barrat. The coupling between the bulk and the boundary fluctuations provides both the justification and the reason for the effectiveness of the present approach, which promises broad utility for probing the hydrodynamic boundary conditions relevant to structured or elastic interfaces, as well as

  8. XPS analysis of 440C steel surfaces lubricated with perfluoropolyethers under sliding conditions in high vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrera-Fierro, Pilar; Masuko, Masabumi; Jones, William R., Jr.; Pepper, Stephen V.

    1994-01-01

    This work presents the results of the X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) analysis of AISI 440C ball surfaces lubricated with perfluoropolyether (PFPE) oils after friction experiments under sliding conditions at high load in air and vacuum environments. The PFPE lubricants tested were Demnum S100, Fomblin Z-25, and Krytox 143AB. It was found that all the PFPE lubricants were degraded by sliding contact causing the formation of inorganic fluorides on the metallic surfaces and a layer of organic decomposition products. KRYTOX 143AB was the least reactive of the three lubricants tested. It was also found that metal fluoride formed at off-scar areas. This suggests the formation of reactive species, such as COF2 or R(sub f)COF, during sliding experiments, which can diffuse through the lubricant film and react with the metallic surfaces away from the contact region. Comparison of reference specimens before sliding with those that had undergone the sliding tests showed that the amount of non-degraded PFPE remaining on the surface of the balls after the sliding experiments was greater than that of the balls without sliding.

  9. Filtration effects on ball bearing life and condition in a contaminated lubricant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenthal, S. H.; Moyer, D. W.

    1978-01-01

    Ball bearings were fatigue tested with a noncontaminated MIL-L-23699 lubricant and with a contaminated MIL-L-23699 lubricant under four levels of filtration. The test filters had absolute particle removal ratings of 3, 30, 49, and 105 microns. Aircraft turbine engine contaminants were injected into the filter's supply line at a constant rate of 125 milligrams per bearing hour. Bearing life and running track condition generally improved with finer filtration. The experimental lives of 3- and 30-micron filter bearings were statistically equivalent, approaching those obtained with the noncontaminated lubricant bearings. Compared to these bearings, the lives of the 49-micron bearings were statistically lower. The 105-micron bearings experienced gross wear. The degree of surface distress, weight loss, and probable failure mode were dependent on filtration level, with finer filtration being clearly beneficial.

  10. Filtration effects on ball bearing life and condition in a contaminated lubricant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenthal, S. H.; Moyer, D. W.

    1978-01-01

    Ball bearings were fatigue tested with a noncontaminated lubricant and with a contaminated lubricant under four levels of filtration. The test filters had absolute particle removal ratings of 3, 30, 49, and 105 microns. Aircraft turbine engine contaminants were injected into the filter's supply line at a constant rate of 125 milligrams per bearing hour. Bearing life and running track condition generally improved with finer filtration. The experimental lives of 3 and 30 micron filter bearings were statistically equivalent, approaching those obtained with the noncontaminated lubricant bearings. Compared to these bearings, the lives of the 49 micron bearings were statistically lower. The 105 micron bearings experienced gross wear. The degree of surface distress, weight loss, and probable failure mode were dependent on filtration level, with finer filtration being clearly beneficial.

  11. Analysis of Lubricant Films in Bearings Under Incipient Failure Conditions.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    Physical Phenomena at LuLricant Boundaries," James L. Lauer. Critical Review Presented at the "Inter- disciplinary Collaboration in Tribology ( ICT ...cr1en grain les elt ~ rt h ge wstt sers rut rch longer t ianttile liiol of ha~il irviilticior. flowevt it ciitild wsell lie related ivl to, a -piut’ il

  12. Boundary conditions in tunneling via quantum hydrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nassar, Antonio B.

    1993-01-01

    Via the hydrodynamical formulation of quantum mechanics, an approach to the problem of tunneling through sharp-edged potential barriers is developed. Above all, it is shown how more general boundary conditions follow from the continuity of mass, momentum, and energy.

  13. Boundary Value Problems With Integral Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karandzhulov, L. I.; Sirakova, N. D.

    2011-12-01

    The weakly perturbed nonlinear boundary value problems (BVP) for almost linear systems of ordinary differential equations (ODE) are considered. We assume that the nonlinear part contain an additional function, which defines the perturbation as singular. Then the Poincare method is not applicable. The problem of existence, uniqueness and construction of a solution of the posed BVP with integral condition is studied.

  14. Halogen-Containing Gases as Boundary Lubricants for Corrosion-Resistant Alloys at 1200 F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, Donald H.; Johnson, Robert L.

    1959-01-01

    The extreme temperatures anticipated for lubricated parts in advanced flight powerplants dictate the consideration of unconventional methods of lubrication such as solid lubricants and the reactive gases described in the present research. These halogen-containing "reactive" gases such as dichlorodifluoromethane, CF2Cl2, are among the most stable of organic molecules. The high "flash" temperatures generated at the contacting asperities as a result of frictional heat are sufficient to cause local decomposition of the halogen-containing gases. The active atoms thus released (e.g., chlorine) then react with the metal to be lubricated to form halides capable of effective lubrication. The presence of small amounts of a sulfur-containing gas (e.g., 1 percent sulfur hexafluoride, SF6) was found to catalyze the formation of metal halides. Friction and wear studies were made with a hemisphere (3/16-in. rad.) rider sliding in a circumferential path on the flat surface of a rotating disk (2 1/2-in. diam.). The specimens of corrosion-resistant 2 alloys were run in an atmosphere of the various gases with a load of 1200 grams, a sliding velocity of 120 feet per minute, and temperature from 75 to 1200 F. An effective lubricant for ferritic materials (M-1 tool steel) was CF2Cl2, but significant corrosion occurred above 600 F. Corrosion evaluation in CF2Cl2 suggested a number of nickel- and cobalt-base alloys for additional lubrication study. Several combinations of gases and these metals were found to lubricate to 1200 F without excessive corrosion. The gases were CF2Cl2 Plus 1 percent SF6, monobromotrifluoromethane CF3Br plus 1 percent SF6, dibromodifluoromethane CF2Br2, iodotrifluoromethane, CF3I, and I2. Careful selection of metals and gas are necessary for successful lubrication over specific temperature ranges. Optimum combinations give friction coefficients as low as 0.05 without

  15. Mechanical stability and lubrication by phosphatidylcholine boundary layers in the vesicular and in the extended lamellar phases.

    PubMed

    Sorkin, Raya; Dror, Yael; Kampf, Nir; Klein, Jacob

    2014-05-06

    The lubrication properties of 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DSPC) extended supported bilayers were studied and compared to those of surface-attached DSPC small unilamellar vesicles (liposomes) in order to elucidate the effect of phospholipid geometrical packaging on the lubrication and mechanical properties of these boundary layers. The topography and response to the nanoindentation of bilayer- and liposome-covered surfaces were studied by an atomic force microscope (AFM). In parallel, normal and shear (frictional) forces between two opposing surfaces bearing DSPC vesicles/bilayers across water were studied with the surface force balance (SFB). A correlation between nanomechanical performance in the AFM and stability and lubrication in the SFB was observed. Bilayers were readily punctured by the AFM tip and exhibited substantial hysteresis between approach and retraction curves, whereas liposomes were not punctured and exhibited purely elastic behavior. At the same time, SFB measurements showed that bilayers are less stable and less efficient lubricants compared to liposomes. Bilayers provided efficient lubrication with very low friction coefficients, 0.002-0.008 up to pressures of more then 50 atm. However, bilayers were less robust and tended to detach from the surface as a result of shear, leading to high friction for subsequent approaches at the same contact position. In contrast, liposomes showed reversible and reproducible behavior under shear and compression, exhibiting ultralow friction coefficients of μ ≈ 10(-4) for pressures as high as 180 atm. This is attributed to the increased mechanical stability of the self-closed, closely packed liposomes, which we believe results from the more defect-free nature of the finitely sized vesicles.

  16. Boundary Conditions for Unsteady Compressible Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hariharan, S. I.; Johnson, D. K.

    1994-01-01

    This paper explores solutions to the spherically symmetric Euler equations. Motivated by the work of Hagstrom and Hariharan and Geer and Pope, we modeled the effect of a pulsating sphere in a compressible medium. The literature available on this suggests that an accurate numerical solution requires artificial boundary conditions which simulate the propagation of nonlinear waves in open domains. Until recently, the boundary conditions available were in general linear and based on nonreflection. Exceptions to this are the nonlinear nonreflective conditions of Thompson, and the nonlinear reflective conditions of Hagstrom and Hariharan. The former are based on the rate of change of the incoming characteristics; the latter rely on asymptotic analysis and the method of characteristics and account for the coupling of incoming and outgoing characteristics. Furthermore, Hagstrom and Hariharan have shown that, in a test situation in which the flow would reach a steady state over a long time, Thompson's method could lead to an incorrect steady state. The current study considers periodic flows and includes all possible types and techniques of boundary conditions. The technique recommended by Hagstrom and Hariharan proved superior to all others considered and matched the results of asymptotic methods that are valid for low subsonic Mach numbers.

  17. Aspects of implementing constant traction boundary conditions in computational homogenization via semi-Dirichlet boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javili, A.; Saeb, S.; Steinmann, P.

    2017-01-01

    In the past decades computational homogenization has proven to be a powerful strategy to compute the overall response of continua. Central to computational homogenization is the Hill-Mandel condition. The Hill-Mandel condition is fulfilled via imposing displacement boundary conditions (DBC), periodic boundary conditions (PBC) or traction boundary conditions (TBC) collectively referred to as canonical boundary conditions. While DBC and PBC are widely implemented, TBC remains poorly understood, with a few exceptions. The main issue with TBC is the singularity of the stiffness matrix due to rigid body motions. The objective of this manuscript is to propose a generic strategy to implement TBC in the context of computational homogenization at finite strains. To eliminate rigid body motions, we introduce the concept of semi-Dirichlet boundary conditions. Semi-Dirichlet boundary conditions are non-homogeneous Dirichlet-type constraints that simultaneously satisfy the Neumann-type conditions. A key feature of the proposed methodology is its applicability for both strain-driven as well as stress-driven homogenization. The performance of the proposed scheme is demonstrated via a series of numerical examples.

  18. Symmetry boundary condition in dissipative particle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Souvik; Lan, Chuanjin; Li, Zhen; Hirleman, E. Daniel; Ma, Yanbao

    2015-07-01

    Dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) is a coarse-grained particle method for modeling mesoscopic hydrodynamics. Most of the DPD simulations are carried out in 3D requiring remarkable computation time. For symmetric systems, this time can be reduced significantly by simulating only one half or one quarter of the systems. However, such simulations are not yet possible due to a lack of schemes to treat symmetric boundaries in DPD. In this study, we propose a numerical scheme for the implementation of the symmetric boundary condition (SBC) in both dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) and multibody dissipative particle dynamics (MDPD) using a combined ghost particles and specular reflection (CGPSR) method. We validate our scheme in four different configurations. The results demonstrate that our scheme can accurately reproduce the system properties, such as velocity, density and meniscus shapes of a full system with numerical simulations of a subsystem. Using a symmetric boundary condition for one half of the system, we demonstrate about 50% computation time saving in both DPD and MDPD. This approach for symmetric boundary treatment can be also applied to other coarse-grained particle methods such as Brownian and Langevin Dynamics to significantly reduce computation time.

  19. Compatibility of refrigerants and lubricants with motor materials under retrofit conditions. Final report, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Doerr, R.G.; Waite, T.D.

    1996-10-01

    Compatibility tests were conducted on motor materials to determine if exposure to the original refrigerant/mineral oil would affect compatibility of the motor materials after retrofit to the alternative refrigerant/lubricant. The motor materials were exposed at elevated temperature to the original refrigerant and mineral oil for 500 hours, followed by exposure to the alternative refrigerant and lubricant for 500 hours. Measurements were also taken after 168 and 336 hours. As a control, some samples were exposed to the original refrigerant/mineral oil for a total of 1000 hours. The original refrigerants and the Alternatives tested for retrofit were as follows: Most motor materials exposed to the alternative refrigerant and lubricant (after an initial exposure to the original refrigerant and mineral oil) were compatible with the alternative refrigerant and lubricant. The only concern was delamination and blistering of the sheet insulation containing Nomex, especially after removal of absorbed refrigerant. This was attributed to solution of the adhesive and not to the Nomex itself. Embrittlement of the polyethylene terephthalate (PET) found in Mylar and Melinex sheet and sleeving insulations was initially observed, but subsequent tests under dry conditions showed that embrittlement of the PET materials was caused by moisture present during the exposure. Compatibility tests of elastomers with R-245ca, retrofitted from R-11 and R-123, showed that the nitrile was compatible with both R-11 and R-245ca, but not with R-123. The neoprene was unsatisfactory because of shrinkage in the R-245ca.

  20. Time-dependent elastohydrodynamic lubrication analysis of total knee replacement under walking conditions.

    PubMed

    Su, Yonglin; Yang, Peiran; Fu, Zengliang; Jin, Zhongmin; Wang, Chengtao

    2011-06-01

    This work is concerned with the lubrication analysis of artificial knee joints, which plays an increasing significant role in clinical performance and longevity of components. Time-dependent elastohydrodynamic lubrication analysis for normal total knee replacement is carried out under the cyclic variation in both load and speed representative of normal walking. An equivalent ellipsoid-on-plane model is adopted to represent an actual artificial knee. A full numerical method is developed to simultaneously solve the Reynolds and elasticity equations using the multigrid technique. The elastic deformation is based on the constrained column model. Results show that, under the combined effect of entraining and squeeze-film actions throughout the walking cycle, the predicted central film thickness tends to decrease in the stance phase but keeps a relatively larger value at the swing phase. Furthermore, the geometry of knee joint implant is verified to play an important role under its lubrication condition, and the length of time period is a key point to influence the lubrication performance of joint components.

  1. Compatibility of refrigerants and lubricants with motor materials under retrofit conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Doerr, R.G.; Waite, T.D.

    1995-12-01

    Compatibility tests were conducted on motor materials to determine whether exposure to the original refrigerant/mineral oil would affect compatibility of the motor materials with the alternative refrigerant/lubricant after retrofit. The motor materials were exposed at elevated temperature to the original refrigerant and mineral oil for 500 hours, followed by exposure to the alternative refrigerant and lubricant for 500 hours. Motor materials exposed to the alternative refrigerant and lubricant (after an initial exposure to the original refrigerant and mineral oil) appeared to be compatible with the alternative refrigerant and lubricant. The only concern was delamination and blistering of the sheet insulation containing Nomex, especially after removal of absorbed refrigerant at high temperature. This was attributed to incompatibility of the adhesive and not to the Nomex itself. Embrittlement of the polyethylene terephthalate (PET) sheet and sleeving insulations was initially observed, but subsequent tests under extremely dry conditions showed that embrittlement of the PET materials was attributed to moisture present during the exposure.

  2. Flux boundary conditions in particle simulations.

    PubMed

    Flekkøy, Eirik G; Delgado-Buscalioni, Rafael; Coveney, Peter V

    2005-08-01

    Flux boundary conditions are interesting in a number of contexts ranging from multiscale simulations to simulations of molecular hydrodynamics in nanoscale systems. Here we introduce, analyze, and test a general scheme to impose boundary conditions that simultaneously control the momentum and energy flux into open particle systems The scheme is shown to handle far from equilibrium simulations. It acquires its main characteristics from the requirement that it fulfills the second law of thermodynamics and thus minimizes the entropy production, when it is applied to reversible processes. It is shown both theoretically and through simulations that the scheme emulates the effect of an extended particle system as far as particle number fluctuations, temperature, and density profiles are concerned. The numerical scheme is further shown to be accurate and stable in both equilibrium and far from equilibrium contexts.

  3. Nonperiodic boundary conditions for solvated systems.

    PubMed

    Petraglio, Gabriele; Ceccarelli, Matteo; Parrinello, Michele

    2005-07-22

    The simulation of charged and/or strongly polar solutes represents a challenge for standard molecular-dynamics techniques. The use of periodic boundary conditions (PBCs) leads to artifacts due to the interaction between two replicas in the presence of the long-range Coulomb forces. A way to avoid these problems is the use of nonperiodic boundary conditions. A possible realization is to consider a finite system, a sphere, embedded in a reaction field described by the method of the images. In the present work the modified image approximation has been implemented in a molecular-dynamics code and optimized for the use of two standard solvents, water and acetonitrile. The methodology has then been applied to investigate the conformational changes in water-solvated alanine dipeptide. The free-energy surface calculated with this method is comparable to that obtained with PBC.

  4. Advances in Numerical Boundary Conditions for Computational Aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, Christopher K. W.

    1997-01-01

    Advances in Computational Aeroacoustics (CAA) depend critically on the availability of accurate, nondispersive, least dissipative computation algorithm as well as high quality numerical boundary treatments. This paper focuses on the recent developments of numerical boundary conditions. In a typical CAA problem, one often encounters two types of boundaries. Because a finite computation domain is used, there are external boundaries. On the external boundaries, boundary conditions simulating the solution outside the computation domain are to be imposed. Inside the computation domain, there may be internal boundaries. On these internal boundaries, boundary conditions simulating the presence of an object or surface with specific acoustic characteristics are to be applied. Numerical boundary conditions, both external or internal, developed for simple model problems are reviewed and examined. Numerical boundary conditions for real aeroacoustic problems are also discussed through specific examples. The paper concludes with a description of some much needed research in numerical boundary conditions for CAA.

  5. Increasing Accuracy in Computed Inviscid Boundary Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyson, Roger

    2004-01-01

    A technique has been devised to increase the accuracy of computational simulations of flows of inviscid fluids by increasing the accuracy with which surface boundary conditions are represented. This technique is expected to be especially beneficial for computational aeroacoustics, wherein it enables proper accounting, not only for acoustic waves, but also for vorticity and entropy waves, at surfaces. Heretofore, inviscid nonlinear surface boundary conditions have been limited to third-order accuracy in time for stationary surfaces and to first-order accuracy in time for moving surfaces. For steady-state calculations, it may be possible to achieve higher accuracy in space, but high accuracy in time is needed for efficient simulation of multiscale unsteady flow phenomena. The present technique is the first surface treatment that provides the needed high accuracy through proper accounting of higher-order time derivatives. The present technique is founded on a method known in art as the Hermitian modified solution approximation (MESA) scheme. This is because high time accuracy at a surface depends upon, among other things, correction of the spatial cross-derivatives of flow variables, and many of these cross-derivatives are included explicitly on the computational grid in the MESA scheme. (Alternatively, a related method other than the MESA scheme could be used, as long as the method involves consistent application of the effects of the cross-derivatives.) While the mathematical derivation of the present technique is too lengthy and complex to fit within the space available for this article, the technique itself can be characterized in relatively simple terms: The technique involves correction of surface-normal spatial pressure derivatives at a boundary surface to satisfy the governing equations and the boundary conditions and thereby achieve arbitrarily high orders of time accuracy in special cases. The boundary conditions can now include a potentially infinite number

  6. Some observations on boundary conditions for numerical conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamowitz, David

    1988-01-01

    Four choices of outflow boundary conditions are considered for numerical conservation laws. All four methods are stable for linear problems, for which examples are presented where either a boundary layer forms or the numerical scheme, together with the boundary condition, is unstable due to the formation of a reflected shock. A simple heuristic argument is presented for determining the suitability of the boundary condition.

  7. Open Boundary Conditions for Dissipative MHD

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, E T

    2011-11-10

    In modeling magnetic confinement, astrophysics, and plasma propulsion, representing the entire physical domain is often difficult or impossible, and artificial, or 'open' boundaries are appropriate. A novel open boundary condition (BC) for dissipative MHD, called Lacuna-based open BC (LOBC), is presented. LOBC, based on the idea of lacuna-based truncation originally presented by V.S. Ryaben'kii and S.V. Tsynkov, provide truncation with low numerical noise and minimal reflections. For hyperbolic systems, characteristic-based BC (CBC) exist for separating the solution into outgoing and incoming parts. In the hyperbolic-parabolic dissipative MHD system, such separation is not possible, and CBC are numerically unstable. LOBC are applied in dissipative MHD test problems including a translating FRC, and coaxial-electrode plasma acceleration. Solution quality is compared to solutions using CBC and zero-normal derivative BC. LOBC are a promising new open BC option for dissipative MHD.

  8. Formation of high molecular weight products from benzene during boundary lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morales, W.

    1985-01-01

    High molecular weight products were detected on the wear track of an iron disk at the end of a sliding friction and wear test using benzene as a lubricant. Size exclusion chromagography in conjunction with UV analysis gave evidence that the high molecular weight products are polyphenyl ether type substances. Organic electrochemistry was used to elucidate the possible surface reaction mechanisms.

  9. Combined Effect of Textured Patterns and Graphene Flake Additives on Tribological Behavior under Boundary Lubrication.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zhen-bing; Zhao, Lei; Zhang, Xu; Yue, Wen; Zhu, Min-hao

    2016-01-01

    A ball-on-plate wear test was employed to investigate the effectiveness of graphene (GP) nanoparticles dispersed in a synthetic-oil-based lubricant in reducing wear. The effect by area ratio of elliptically shaped dimple textures and elevated temperatures were also explored. Pure PAO4 based oil and a mixture of this oil with 0.01 wt% GP were compared as lubricants. At pit area ratio of 5%, GP-base oil effectively reduced friction and wear, especially at 60 and 100 °C. Under pure PAO4 oil lubrication, the untextured surfaces gained low friction coefficients (COFs) and wear rates under 60 and 100 °C. With increasing laser--texture area ratio, the COF and wear rate decreased at 25 and 150 °C but increased at 60 and 100 °C. Under the GP-based oil lubrication, the textured surface with 5% area ratio achieved the lowest COF among those of the area ratios tested at all test temperatures. Meanwhile, the textured surface with 20% area ratio obtained the highest COF among those of the area ratios. With the joint action of GP and texture, the textured surface with 10% area ratio exhibited the best anti-wear performance among all of the textured surfaces at all test temperatures.

  10. Combined Effect of Textured Patterns and Graphene Flake Additives on Tribological Behavior under Boundary Lubrication

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Zhen-bing; Zhao, Lei; Zhang, Xu; Yue, Wen; Zhu, Min-hao

    2016-01-01

    A ball-on-plate wear test was employed to investigate the effectiveness of graphene (GP) nanoparticles dispersed in a synthetic-oil-based lubricant in reducing wear. The effect by area ratio of elliptically shaped dimple textures and elevated temperatures were also explored. Pure PAO4 based oil and a mixture of this oil with 0.01 wt% GP were compared as lubricants. At pit area ratio of 5%, GP-base oil effectively reduced friction and wear, especially at 60 and 100°C. Under pure PAO4 oil lubrication, the untextured surfaces gained low friction coefficients (COFs) and wear rates under 60 and 100°C. With increasing laser—texture area ratio, the COF and wear rate decreased at 25 and 150°C but increased at 60 and 100°C. Under the GP-based oil lubrication, the textured surface with 5% area ratio achieved the lowest COF among those of the area ratios tested at all test temperatures. Meanwhile, the textured surface with 20% area ratio obtained the highest COF among those of the area ratios. With the joint action of GP and texture, the textured surface with 10% area ratio exhibited the best anti-wear performance among all of the textured surfaces at all test temperatures. PMID:27054762

  11. Boundary conditions and consistency of effective theories

    SciTech Connect

    Polonyi, Janos; Siwek, Alicja

    2010-04-15

    Effective theories are nonlocal at the scale of the eliminated heavy particles modes. The gradient expansion, which represents such nonlocality, must be truncated to have treatable models. This step leads to the proliferation of the degrees of freedom, which renders the identification of the states of the effective theory nontrivial. Furthermore, it generates nondefinite metric in the Fock space, which in turn endangers the unitarity of the effective theory. It is shown that imposing a generalized Kubo-Martin-Schwinger boundary conditions for the new degrees of freedom leads to reflection positivity for a wide class of Euclidean effective theories, thereby these lead to acceptable theories when extended to real-time.

  12. A study on the noise characteristics of polymer ball bearings under various lubrication conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinç, S. K.; Temiz, V.; Kamburoǧlu, E.

    2013-12-01

    Polymer bearings are generally praised by the manufacturers for running silently. However such statements never go beyond qualitative assumptions. Therefore, studying polymer ball bearing noise would have been meaningful solely on the perspective of silent running machinery. On the other hand, the service life of a polymer ball bearing is unpredictable and there's no preventive maintenance practice that provides data regarding the condition of a polymer ball bearing. In this study, we assume that an investigation of their noise characteristics could also reveal clues concerning their performances. The main objective of this study is to determine the noise characteristics of polymer ball bearings lubricated with different lubricant greases of varying viscosity grades through experimental means. Sound pressure level measurements of SKF brand polymer bearings with polypropylene rings, polypropylene cage and glass balls were made with a 1/2 inch microphone in 1/3-octave bands, at frequencies up to 12.5 kHz, under various radial loads and rotational speeds. The bearings were mounted on a shaft driven by an AC motor with stepless speed control, adjustable between 0 - 1400 rpm. The ball bearings were running inside an acoustic chamber designed for the insulation of environmental noise and the noise of the motor at target frequencies. The resulting sound pressure level spectra were evaluated and the effects of the lubrication conditions on the noise of the ball bearing and possible diagnostic insight that could be gained through studying bearing noise characteristics were discussed.

  13. Wear behavior of electroless Ni-P-W coating under lubricated condition - a Taguchi based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Arkadeb; Duari, Santanu; Barman, Tapan Kumar; Sahoo, Prasanta

    2016-09-01

    The present study aims to investigate the tribological behavior of electroless Ni-P-W coating under engine oil lubricated condition to ascertain its suitability in automotive applications. Coating is deposited onto mild steel specimens by the electroless method. The experiments are carried out on a pin - on - disc type tribo tester under lubrication. Three tribotesting parameters namely the applied normal load, sliding speed and sliding duration are varied at their three levels and their effects on the wear depth of the deposits are studied. The experiments are carried out based on the combinations available in Taguchi's L27 orthogonal array (OA). Optimization of the tribo-testing parameters is carried out using Taguchi's S/N ratio method to minimize the wear depth. Analysis of variance carried out at a confidence level of 99% indicates that the sliding speed is the most significant parameter in controlling the wear behavior of the deposits. Coating characterization is done using scanning electron microscope, energy dispersive X-ray analysis and X-ray diffraction techniques. It is seen that the wear mechanism under lubricated condition is abrasive in nature.

  14. A novel polyvinyl alcohol hydrogel functionalized with organic boundary lubricant for use as low-friction cartilage substitute: synthesis, physical/chemical, mechanical, and friction characterization.

    PubMed

    Blum, Michelle M; Ovaert, Timothy C

    2012-10-01

    A novel material design was developed by functionalizing polyvinyl alcohol hydrogel with an organic low-friction boundary lubricant (molar ratios of 0.2, 0.5, and 1.0 moles of lauroyl chloride). The hydrogels were fabricated using two different techniques. First, the boundary lubricant was initially functionalized to the polymer, then the hydrogels were created by physically crosslinking the reacted polymer. Second, hydrogels were initially created by crosslinking pure polyvinyl alcohol, with the functionalization reaction performed on the fully formed gel. After the reaction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and attenuated total reflectance spectra revealed a clear ester peak, the diminishment of the alcohol peak, and the amplification of the alkyl peaks, which confirmed attachment of the hydrocarbon chains to the polymer. Additional chemical characterization occurred through elemental analysis where an average increase of 22% carbon and 40% hydrogen provided further confirmation of attachment. Physical characterization of the boundary lubricant functionalized hydrogels was performed by water content and contact angle measurements. Water content dependency showed that method 1 had a direct relationship with boundary lubricant concentration, and method 2 displayed an inverse relationship. The contact angle increased as boundary lubricant concentration increased for the pure matrix material for both processing methods, suggesting that the hydrocarbons produced surface properties that mimic natural cartilage, and contact behavior of the biphasic system was dependent on processing method. Friction tests demonstrated a significant decrease in friction coefficient, with a maximum decrease of 70% and a minimum decrease of 24% for boundary lubricant functionalized hydrogels compared with nonfunctionalized polyvinyl alcohol hydrogels.

  15. Effects of nano-LaF3 on the friction and wear behaviors of PTFE-based bonded solid lubricating coatings under different lubrication conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Yulong; Wan, Hongqi; Chen, Lei; Zhou, Huidi; Chen, Jianmin

    2016-09-01

    Influence of nanometer lanthanum fluoride (nano-LaF3) on the tribological behaviors of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) bonded solid lubricating coatings were investigated using a ring-on-block friction-wear tester under dry friction and RP-3 jet fuel lubrication conditions. The worn surfaces and transfer films formed on the counterpart steel rings were observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and optical microscope (OM), respectively. The microstructures of the nano-LaF3 modified coatings and the distribution states of nano-LaF3 were studied by field-emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), respectively. The results show that incorporation of nano-LaF3 improves the microhardness and the friction-reduced and anti-wear abilities of PTFE bonded solid lubricating coatings. The wear life of the modified coating is about 6 times longer than that of the coating without nano-LaF3 filler at a relatively low applied load (200 N) and rotary speed (1000 rev/min) under dry friction condition. The friction coefficient and wear life of the modified coating decrease with increase of applied load under dry friction, but the friction coefficient has hardly any variation and wear life decreases under RP-3 jet fuel lubrication condition. In addition, the friction coefficient of the modified coating reduces with the rotary speed increasing under dry sliding but has little change under RP-3 lubrication, the wear life increases firstly and then decreases. The results indicated that the wear failure mechanism is dominated by applied load, which plays an important role in guidance of application of nano-LaF3 modified PTFE bonded coating under different working environment.

  16. Thermal field theories and shifted boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giusti, L.; Meyer, H.

    The analytic continuation to an imaginary velocity of the canonical partition function of a thermal system expressed in a moving frame has a natural implementation in the Euclidean path-integral formulation in terms of shifted boundary conditions. The Poincare' invariance underlying a relativistic theory implies a dependence of the free-energy on the compact length L_0 and the shift xi only through the combination beta=L_0(1+xi^2)^(1/2). This in turn implies that the energy and the momentum distributions of the thermal theory are related, a fact which is encoded in a set of Ward identities among the correlators of the energy-momentum tensor. The latter have interesting applications in lattice field theory: they offer novel ways to compute thermodynamic potentials, and a set of identities to renormalize non-perturbatively the energy-momentum tensor. At fixed bare parameters the shifted boundary conditions also provide a simple method to vary the temperature in much smaller steps than with the standard procedure.

  17. Spiral Orbit Tribometry. 2; Evaluation of Three Liquid Lubricants in Vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, Stephen V.; Kingsbury, Edward P.; Kiraly, Louis J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The coefficients of friction and relative degradation rates of three lubricants run in the boundary regime in vacuum are evaluated in a Spiral Orbit Tribometer. This tribometer subjected the lubricants to rolling contact conditions similar to those found in angular contact ball bearings. A multiply alkylated cyclopentane (MAC) hydrocarbon lubricant suffered degradation at a rate almost two orders of magnitude less than the degradation rate of two perfluoropolyalkylether (PFPE) lubricants.

  18. Ultrathin MoS2 Nanosheets with Superior Extreme Pressure Property as Boundary Lubricants

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhe; Liu, Xiangwen; Liu, Yuhong; Gunsel, Selda; Luo, Jianbin

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a new kind of oil-soluble ultrathin MoS2 nanosheets is prepared through a one-pot process. A superior extreme pressure property, which has not been attained with other nano-additives, is discovered when the nanosheets are used as lubricant additives. The as-synthesized MoS2 nanosheet is only a few atomic layers thick and tens of nanometers wide, and it is surface-modified with oleylamine so it can be well dispersed in oil or lubricant without adscititious dispersants or surfactants. By adding 1 wt% ultrathin MoS2 nanosheets, at the temperature of 120 °C, the highest load liquid paraffin can bear is tremendously improved from less than 50 N to more than 2000 N. Based on the tribological tests and analysis of the wear scar, a lubrication mechanism is proposed. It is believed that the good dispersion and the ultrathin shape of the nanosheets ensure that they can enter the contact area of the opposite sliding surfaces and act like a protective film to prevent direct contact and seizure between them. This work enriches the investigation of ultrathin MoS2 and has potential application in the mechanical industry. PMID:26249536

  19. Ultrathin MoS2 Nanosheets with Superior Extreme Pressure Property as Boundary Lubricants.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhe; Liu, Xiangwen; Liu, Yuhong; Gunsel, Selda; Luo, Jianbin

    2015-08-07

    In this paper, a new kind of oil-soluble ultrathin MoS2 nanosheets is prepared through a one-pot process. A superior extreme pressure property, which has not been attained with other nano-additives, is discovered when the nanosheets are used as lubricant additives. The as-synthesized MoS2 nanosheet is only a few atomic layers thick and tens of nanometers wide, and it is surface-modified with oleylamine so it can be well dispersed in oil or lubricant without adscititious dispersants or surfactants. By adding 1 wt% ultrathin MoS2 nanosheets, at the temperature of 120 °C, the highest load liquid paraffin can bear is tremendously improved from less than 50 N to more than 2000 N. Based on the tribological tests and analysis of the wear scar, a lubrication mechanism is proposed. It is believed that the good dispersion and the ultrathin shape of the nanosheets ensure that they can enter the contact area of the opposite sliding surfaces and act like a protective film to prevent direct contact and seizure between them. This work enriches the investigation of ultrathin MoS2 and has potential application in the mechanical industry.

  20. Ultrathin MoS2 Nanosheets with Superior Extreme Pressure Property as Boundary Lubricants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhe; Liu, Xiangwen; Liu, Yuhong; Gunsel, Selda; Luo, Jianbin

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, a new kind of oil-soluble ultrathin MoS2 nanosheets is prepared through a one-pot process. A superior extreme pressure property, which has not been attained with other nano-additives, is discovered when the nanosheets are used as lubricant additives. The as-synthesized MoS2 nanosheet is only a few atomic layers thick and tens of nanometers wide, and it is surface-modified with oleylamine so it can be well dispersed in oil or lubricant without adscititious dispersants or surfactants. By adding 1 wt% ultrathin MoS2 nanosheets, at the temperature of 120 °C, the highest load liquid paraffin can bear is tremendously improved from less than 50 N to more than 2000 N. Based on the tribological tests and analysis of the wear scar, a lubrication mechanism is proposed. It is believed that the good dispersion and the ultrathin shape of the nanosheets ensure that they can enter the contact area of the opposite sliding surfaces and act like a protective film to prevent direct contact and seizure between them. This work enriches the investigation of ultrathin MoS2 and has potential application in the mechanical industry.

  1. Conformal counterterms and boundary conditions for open strings

    SciTech Connect

    de Beer, W.

    1988-03-15

    It is explained how Neumann boundary conditions still lead to the mixed boundary conditions required to calculate the functional determinants in the Polyakov model. Neumann boundary conditions on the conformal factor are obtained, thereby negating the need for a finite counterterm in the quantum bare action.

  2. Slip boundary conditions over curved surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Lin; Chen, Shiyi; Robbins, Mark O.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to investigate the influence of surface curvature on the slip boundary condition for a simple fluid. The slip length is measured for flows in planar and cylindrical geometries with a range of wall-fluid interactions. As wall curvature increases, the slip length decreases dramatically for closely packed surfaces and increases for sparse ones. The magnitude of the changes depends on the crystallographic orientation and differs for flow along and perpendicular to the direction of curvature. These different patterns of behavior are related to the curvature-induced variation in the ratio of the spacing between fluid atoms to the spacing between minima in the potential from the solid surface. The results are consistent with a microscopic theory for the viscous friction between fluid and wall that expresses the slip length in terms of the lateral response of the fluid to the wall potential and the characteristic decay time of this response.

  3. Towards Arbitrary Accuracy Inviscid Surface Boundary Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyson, Rodger W.; Hixon, Ray

    2002-01-01

    Inviscid nonlinear surface boundary conditions are currently limited to third order accuracy in time for non-moving surfaces and actually reduce to first order in time when the surfaces move. For steady-state calculations it may be possible to achieve higher accuracy in space, but high accuracy in time is required for efficient simulation of multiscale unsteady phenomena. A surprisingly simple technique is shown here that can be used to correct the normal pressure derivatives of the flow at a surface on a Cartesian grid so that arbitrarily high order time accuracy is achieved in idealized cases. This work demonstrates that nonlinear high order time accuracy at a solid surface is possible and desirable, but it also shows that the current practice of only correcting the pressure is inadequate.

  4. Thermal momentum distribution from shifted boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giusti, L.

    At finite temperature the distribution of the total momentum is an observable characterizing the thermal state of a field theory, and its cumulants are related to thermodynamic potentials. In a relativistic system at zero chemical potential, for instance, the thermal variance of the total momentum is a direct measure of the entropy. We relate the generating function of the cumulants to the ratio of a path integral with properly shifted boundary conditions in the compact direction over the ordinary partition function. In this form it is well suited for Monte-Carlo evaluation, and the cumulants can be extracted straightforwardly. We test the method in the SU(3) Yang--Mills theory, and obtain the entropy density at three different temperatures.

  5. Wear of aluminum and hypoeutectic aluminum-silicon alloys in boundary-lubricated pin-on disk sliding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, J.; Brainard, W. A.

    1979-01-01

    The friction and wear of pure aluminum and a number of hypoeutectic aluminum-silicon alloys (with 3 to 12 wt %Si) were studied with a pin-on-disk apparatus. The contacts were lubricated with mineral oil and sliding was in the boundary-lubrication regime at 2.6 cm/sec. Surfaces were analyzed with photomicrographs, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray dispersive analysis, and diamond pyramid hardness measurements. There were two wear regimes for the alloys - high and low - whereas pure aluminum exhibited a high wear rate throughout the test period. Wear rate decreased and the transition stress from high to low wear increased with increasing hardness. There was no correlation between friction coefficient and hardness. A least squares curve fit indicated a wear-rate dependence greater than the inverse first power of hardness. The lower wear rates of the alloys may be due to the composites of silicon platelets in aluminum resulting in increased hardness and thus impairing the shear of the aluminum.

  6. Characteristic boundary conditions for three-dimensional transonic unsteady aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitlow, W., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Characteristic far-field boundary conditions for the three-dimensional unsteady transonic small disturbance potential equation have been developed. The boundary conditions were implemented in the XTRAN3S finite difference code and tested for a flat plate rectangular wing with a pulse in angle of attack; the freestream Mach number was 0.85. The calculated force response shows that the characteristic boundary conditions reduce disturbances that are reflected from the computational boundaries.

  7. The effect of environmental conditions on the persistence of common lubricants on skin for cases of sexual assault investigation.

    PubMed

    Tonkin, Megan; Yeap, Li Foong; Bartle, Emma K; Reeder, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    The potential for lubricant trace evidence to be used as associative evidence is often overlooked in forensic investigations. Published studies in this area have focused on the identification of analytical techniques suitable for the detection of this evidence type. However, detection of trace lubricant is also dependent on the length of time it persists on skin and mucosal surfaces. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of environmental conditions on the persistence of oil- and glycerol-based lubricants on skin surfaces. Lubricated skin samples exposed to three different test environments were swabbed at regular intervals over a 24-h period. Compounds of interest were extracted from the swabs and analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The effect of glycerol derivatization prior to GC-MS analysis was also investigated. In general, oil-based lubricants persisted longer than glycerol-based. Persistence on skin was greatest in lower temperature conditions away from direct sunlight exposure. The results of this investigation are relevant in the context of sexual assault investigations given the possible detection of lubricant on the skin of the external genitalia.

  8. Time-Domain Impedance Boundary Conditions for Computational Aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, Christopher K. W.; Auriault, Laurent

    1996-01-01

    It is an accepted practice in aeroacoustics to characterize the properties of an acoustically treated surface by a quantity known as impedance. Impedance is a complex quantity. As such, it is designed primarily for frequency-domain analysis. Time-domain boundary conditions that are the equivalent of the frequency-domain impedance boundary condition are proposed. Both single frequency and model broadband time-domain impedance boundary conditions are provided. It is shown that the proposed boundary conditions, together with the linearized Euler equations, form well-posed initial boundary value problems. Unlike ill-posed problems, they are free from spurious instabilities that would render time-marching computational solutions impossible.

  9. Absorbing boundary conditions for second-order hyperbolic equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Hong; Wong, Yau Shu

    1989-01-01

    A uniform approach to construct absorbing artificial boundary conditions for second-order linear hyperbolic equations is proposed. The nonlocal boundary condition is given by a pseudodifferential operator that annihilates travelling waves. It is obtained through the dispersion relation of the differential equation by requiring that the initial-boundary value problem admits the wave solutions travelling in one direction only. Local approximation of this global boundary condition yields an nth-order differential operator. It is shown that the best approximations must be in the canonical forms which can be factorized into first-order operators. These boundary conditions are perfectly absorbing for wave packets propagating at certain group velocities. A hierarchy of absorbing boundary conditions is derived for transonic small perturbation equations of unsteady flows. These examples illustrate that the absorbing boundary conditions are easy to derive, and the effectiveness is demonstrated by the numerical experiments.

  10. Boundary Behavior of Viscous Fluids: Influence of Wall Roughness and Friction-driven Boundary Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucur, Dorin; Feireisl, Eduard; Nečasová, Šárka

    2010-07-01

    We consider a family of solutions to the evolutionary Navier-Stokes system supplemented with the complete slip boundary conditions on domains with rough boundaries. We give a complete description of the asymptotic limit by means of Γ-convergence arguments, and identify a general class of boundary conditions.

  11. Measuring the entropy from shifted boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giusti, L.; Pepe, M.

    We explore a new computational strategy for determining the equation of state of the SU(3) Yang-Mills theory. By imposing shifted boundary conditions, the entropy density is computed from the vacuum expectation value of the off-diagonal components T_{0k} of the energy-momentum tensor. A step-scaling function is introduced to span a wide range in temperature values. We present preliminary numerical results for the entropy density and its step-scaling function obtained at eight temperature values in the range T_c - 15 T_c. At each temperature, discretization effects are removed by simulating the theory at several lattice spacings and by extrapolating the results to the continuum limit. Finite-size effects are always kept below the statistical errors. The absence of ultraviolet power divergences and the remarkably small discretization effects allow for a precise determination of the step-scaling function in the explored temperature range. These findings establish this strategy as a viable solution for an accurate determination of the equation of state in a wide range of temperature values.

  12. Onset of frictional sliding of rubber–glass contact under dry and lubricated conditions

    PubMed Central

    Tuononen, Ari J.

    2016-01-01

    Rubber friction is critical in many applications ranging from automotive tyres to cylinder seals. The process where a static rubber sample transitions to frictional sliding is particularly poorly understood. The experimental and simulation results in this paper show a completely different detachment process from the static situation to sliding motion under dry and lubricated conditions. The results underline the contribution of the rubber bulk properties to the static friction force. In fact, simple Amontons’ law is sufficient as a local friction law to produce the correct detachment pattern when the rubber material and loading conditions are modelled properly. Simulations show that micro-sliding due to vertical loading can release initial shear stresses and lead to a high static/dynamic friction coefficient ratio, as observed in the measurements. PMID:27291939

  13. Analysis of Boundary Conditions for Crystal Defect Atomistic Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrlacher, V.; Ortner, C.; Shapeev, A. V.

    2016-12-01

    Numerical simulations of crystal defects are necessarily restricted to finite computational domains, supplying artificial boundary conditions that emulate the effect of embedding the defect in an effectively infinite crystalline environment. This work develops a rigorous framework within which the accuracy of different types of boundary conditions can be precisely assessed. We formulate the equilibration of crystal defects as variational problems in a discrete energy space and establish qualitatively sharp regularity estimates for minimisers. Using this foundation we then present rigorous error estimates for (i) a truncation method (Dirichlet boundary conditions), (ii) periodic boundary conditions, (iii) boundary conditions from linear elasticity, and (iv) boundary conditions from nonlinear elasticity. Numerical results confirm the sharpness of the analysis.

  14. Divergence Boundary Conditions for Vector Helmholtz Equations with Divergence Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kangro, Urve; Nicolaides, Roy

    1997-01-01

    The idea of replacing a divergence constraint by a divergence boundary condition is investigated. The connections between the formulations are considered in detail. It is shown that the most common methods of using divergence boundary conditions do not always work properly. Necessary and sufficient conditions for the equivalence of the formulations are given.

  15. Incorporation of a circular boundary condition into the program POISSON

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, S.; Helm, M.; Laslett, L.J.

    1984-03-02

    Two-dimensional problems in electrostatics or magnetostatics frequently are solved numerically by means of relaxation techniques. In many such problems the ''sources'' (charges or currents, and regions of permeable material) lie exclusively within a finite closed boundary curve and the relaxation process in principle then could be confined to the region interior to such a boundary - provided a suitable boundary condition is imposed onto the solution at that boundary. The present notes discuss and illustrate the use of a boundary condition of such a nature as to imply the absence of external sources, in order thereby to avoid the inaccuracies and more extensive meshes present when alternatively a simple Dirichlet or Neumann boundary condition is specified on a somewhat more remote outer boundary.

  16. Simulation of lubricating behavior of a thioether liquid lubricant by an electrochemical method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morales, W.

    1984-01-01

    An electrochemical cell was constructed to explore the possible radical anion forming behavior of a thioether liquid lubricant. The electrochemical behavior of the thioether was compared with the electrochemical behavior of biphenyl, which is known to form radical anions. Under controlled conditions biphenyl undergoes a reversible reaction to a radical anion, whereas the thioether undergoes an irreversible reduction yielding several products. These results are discussed in relation to boundary lubrication.

  17. Boundary stability under nonequilibrium conditions. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hackney, S.A.; Lee, J.K.; Plichta, M.R.

    1999-08-01

    Summaries of research accomplished are given for the following areas: Morphological (Diffusional) Stability; A New Algorithm for Numerical Modeling of Non-equilibrium Materials Behavior; A Unified Treatment of Single and Microcrystalline Film Edge Instabilities; and Validation of the Structure Based Grain Boundary Diffusion/Migration Model.

  18. Implementation of nonreflecting boundary conditions for the nonlinear Euler equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atassi, Oliver V.; Galán, José M.

    2008-01-01

    Computationally efficient nonreflecting boundary conditions are derived for the Euler equations with acoustic, entropic and vortical inflow disturbances. The formulation linearizes the Euler equations near the inlet/outlet boundaries and expands the solution in terms of Fourier-Bessel modes. This leads to an 'exact' nonreflecting boundary condition, local in space but nonlocal in time, for each Fourier-Bessel mode of the perturbation pressure. The perturbation velocity and density are then calculated using acoustic, entropic and vortical mode splitting. Extension of the boundary conditions to nonuniform swirling flows is presented for the narrow annulus limit which is relevant to many aeroacoustic problems. The boundary conditions are implemented for the nonlinear Euler equations which are solved in space using the finite volume approximation and integrated in time using a MacCormack scheme. Two test problems are carried out: propagation of acoustic waves in an annular duct and the scattering of a vortical wave by a cascade. Comparison between the present exact conditions and commonly used approximate local boundary conditions is made. Results show that, unlike the local boundary conditions whose accuracy depends on the group velocity of the scattered waves, the present conditions give accurate solutions for a range of problems that have a wide array of group velocities. Results also show that this approach leads to a significant savings in computational time and memory by obviating the need to store the pressure field and calculate the nonlocal convolution integral at each point in the inlet and exit boundaries.

  19. Effects of initial and boundary conditions on thermal explosion development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novozhilov, Vasily

    2017-01-01

    The paper investigates effects of non-uniform initial conditions, as well as oscillatory boundary conditions on critical conditions for thermal explosion. It is shown that natural convection plays significant role in case of initial non-uniformities in the temperature distribution. The role of convection is quantified considering critical Frank-Kamenetskii parameters at different Rayleigh numbers, relative to the same parameter at no-convection conditions. Preliminary results are presented for the effect of oscillatory boundary conditions. It is demonstrated that the system may develop thermal explosion if oscillations are imposed at the boundaries of otherwise thermally stable medium.

  20. Chaos in spin glasses revealed through thermal boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenlong; Machta, Jonathan; Katzgraber, Helmut G.

    2015-09-01

    We study the fragility of spin glasses to small temperature perturbations numerically using population annealing Monte Carlo. We apply thermal boundary conditions to a three-dimensional Edwards-Anderson Ising spin glass. In thermal boundary conditions all eight combinations of periodic versus antiperiodic boundary conditions in the three spatial directions are present, each appearing in the ensemble with its respective statistical weight determined by its free energy. We show that temperature chaos is revealed in the statistics of crossings in the free energy for different boundary conditions. By studying the energy difference between boundary conditions at free-energy crossings, we determine the domain-wall fractal dimension. Similarly, by studying the number of crossings, we determine the chaos exponent. Our results also show that computational hardness in spin glasses and the presence of chaos are closely related.

  1. Finite difference time domain implementation of surface impedance boundary conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beggs, John H.; Luebbers, Raymond J.; Yee, Kane S.; Kunz, Karl S.

    1991-01-01

    Surface impedance boundary conditions are employed to reduce the solution volume during the analysis of scattering from lossy dielectric objects. In a finite difference solution, they also can be utilized to avoid using small cells, made necessary by shorter wavelengths in conducting media throughout the solution volume. The standard approach is to approximate the surface impedance over a very small bandwidth by its value at the center frequency, and then use that result in the boundary condition. Two implementations of the surface impedance boundary condition are presented. One implementation is a constant surface impedance boundary condition and the other is a dispersive surface impedance boundary condition that is applicable over a very large frequency bandwidth and over a large range of conductivities. Frequency domain results are presented in one dimension for two conductivity values and are compared with exact results. Scattering width results from an infinite square cylinder are presented as a 2-D demonstration. Extensions to 3-D should be straightforward.

  2. Finite difference time domain implementation of surface impedance boundary conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beggs, John H.; Luebbers, Raymond J.; Yee, Kane S.; Kunz, Karl S.

    1991-01-01

    Surface impedance boundary conditions are employed to reduce the solution volume during the analysis of scattering from lossy dielectric objects. In the finite difference solution, they also can be utilized to avoid using small cells, made necessary by shorter wavelengths in conducting media throughout the solution volume. The standard approach is to approximate the surface impedance over a very small bandwidth by its value at the center frequency, and then use that result in the boundary condition. Here, two implementations of the surface impedance boundary condition are presented. One implementation is a constant surface impedance boundary condition and the other is a dispersive surface impedance boundary condition that is applicable over a very large frequency bandwidth and over a large range of conductivities. Frequency domain results are presented in one dimension for two conductivity values and are compared with exact results. Scattering width results from an infinite square cylinder are presented as a two dimensional demonstration. Extensions to three dimensions should be straightforward.

  3. Boundary conditions for direct simulations of compressible viscous flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poinsot, T. J.; Lele, S. K.

    1992-01-01

    The present consideration of procedures for the definition of boundary conditions for the Navier-Stokes equations emphasizes the derivation of boundary conditions that are compatible with nondissipative algorithms applicable to direct simulations of turbulent flows. A novel formulation for the Euler equations is derived on the basis of characteristic wave relations through boundaries; this formulation is generalized to the Navier-Stokes equations. The method, which applies to both sub- and supersonic flows, is used in reflecting and nonreflecting boundary-condition treatments. Attention is given to practical implementations involving inlet and outlet boundaries and slip and nonslip walls, as well as the test cases of a ducted shear layer, vortices propagating through boundaries, and Poiseuille flow.

  4. Wear characteristics of bonded solid film lubricant under high load condition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hiraoka, Naofumi; Sasaki, Akira; Kawashima, Noritsugu; Honda, Toshio

    1991-01-01

    Wear properties of phenolic resin bonded molybdenum disulfide film lubricant were studied. In-vacuo journal bearing tests were performed to evaluate the wear-life of this film lubricant. The wear-life depends on substrate materials and on sliding velocity. Pretreated substrate surfaces were examined to reveal the reasons for these results. Additionally, investigations on film wear mechanisms were made.

  5. Lubrication of Machine Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.

    1984-01-01

    The understanding of hydrodynamic lubrication began with the classical experiments of Tower and Petrov. Reynolds used a reduced form of the Navier-Stokes equations and the continuity equation to generate a second order differential equation for the pressure in the narrow, converging gap of a bearing contact. Such a pressure enables a load to be transmitted between the surfaces with very low friction since the surfaces are completely separated by a film of fluid. In such a situation it is the physical properties of the lubricant, notably the dynamic viscosity, that dictate the behavior of the contact. The understanding of boundary lubrication is normally attributed to Hardy and Doubleday. In boundary lubrication it is the physical and chemical properties of thin films of molecular proportions and the surfaces to which they are attached that determine contact behavior. The lubricant viscosity is not an influential parameter. Research is devoted to a better understanding and more precise definition of other lubrication regimes between these extremes. One such regime, elastohydrodynamic lubrication, occurs in nonconformal contacts, where the pressures are high and the bearing surfaces deform elastically. In this situation the viscosity of the lubricant may raise considerably, and this further assists the formation of an effective fluid film. The science of these three lubrication regimes (hydrodynamic, elastohydrodynamic, and boundary) are described and the manner in which this science is used in the design of machine elements is examined.

  6. A non-local computational boundary condition for duct acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zorumski, William E.; Watson, Willie R.; Hodge, Steve L.

    1994-01-01

    A non-local boundary condition is formulated for acoustic waves in ducts without flow. The ducts are two dimensional with constant area, but with variable impedance wall lining. Extension of the formulation to three dimensional and variable area ducts is straightforward in principle, but requires significantly more computation. The boundary condition simulates a nonreflecting wave field in an infinite duct. It is implemented by a constant matrix operator which is applied at the boundary of the computational domain. An efficient computational solution scheme is developed which allows calculations for high frequencies and long duct lengths. This computational solution utilizes the boundary condition to limit the computational space while preserving the radiation boundary condition. The boundary condition is tested for several sources. It is demonstrated that the boundary condition can be applied close to the sound sources, rendering the computational domain small. Computational solutions with the new non-local boundary condition are shown to be consistent with the known solutions for nonreflecting wavefields in an infinite uniform duct.

  7. Lubricant compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A.L.; Lawson, R.D.; Root, J.C.

    1981-12-15

    Lubricant compositions adapted for use under extreme pressure conditions are disclosed. They comprise a major proportion of a lubricating grease, and a minor proportion of an additive consisting essentially of a solid, oil insoluble arylene sulfide polymer, and a metal salt, particularly an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal salt, particularly an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal salt of a phosphorus acid, for example, mono- or dicalcium phosphate, or an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal carbonate exemplified by calcium carbonate, or a mixture of such a phosphate salt and carbonate.

  8. Determining the Thermal Properties of Space Lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maldonado, Christina M.

    2004-01-01

    Many mechanisms used in spacecrafts, such as satellites or the space shuttle, employ ball bearings or gears that need to be lubricated. Normally this is not a problem, but in outer space the regular lubricants that are used on Earth will not function properly. Regular lubricants will quickly vaporize in the near vacuum of space. A unique liquid called a perfluoropolyalkylether (PFPE) has an extremely low vapor pressure, around l0(exp -10) torr at 20 C, and has been used in numerous satellites and is currently used in the space shuttle. Many people refer to the PFPEs as "liquid Teflon". PFPE lubricants however, have a number of problems with them. Lubricants need many soluble additives, especially boundary and anti-wear additives, in them to function properly. All the regular known boundary additives are insoluble in PFPEs and so PFPEs lubricate poorly under highly loaded conditions leading to many malfunctioning ball bearings and gears. JAXA, the Japanese Space Agency, is designing and building a centrifuge rotor to be installed in the International Space Station. The centrifuge rotor is part of a biology lab module. They have selected a PFPE lubricant to lubricate the rotor s ball bearings and NASA bearing experts feel this is not a wise choice. An assessment of the centrifuge rotor design is being conducted by NASA and part of the assessment entails knowing the physical and thermal properties of the PFPE lubricant. One important property, the thermal diffusivity, is not known. An experimental apparatus was set up in order to measure the thermal diffusivity of the PFPE. The apparatus consists of a constant temperature heat source, cylindrical Pyrex glassware, a thermal couple and digital thermometer. The apparatus was tested and calibrated using water since the thermal diffusivity of water is known.

  9. Oxygen Diffusion Enables Anti-Wear Boundary Film Formation on Titanium Surfaces in Zinc-Dialkyl-Dithiophosphate (ZDDP)-Containing Lubricants

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Jun; Blau, Peter Julian; Howe, Jane Y; Meyer III, Harry M

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports a wear reduction by up to six orders of magnitude for Ti-6Al-4V alloy when treated by an oxygen diffusion (OD) process and subsequently tested in a zinc-dialkyl-dithiophosphate (ZDDP)-containing lubricant. In addition to case hardening, it is discovered that OD enables the formation of an anti-wear boundary film on the titanium surface. Transmission electron microscopy and surface chemical analyses revealed that this boundary film has a two-layer structure comprising an amorphous oxide interlayer and a ZDDP-based top film with complex compounds.

  10. Boundary condition effects on maximum groundwater withdrawal in coastal aquifers.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chunhui; Chen, Yiming; Luo, Jian

    2012-01-01

    Prevention of sea water intrusion in coastal aquifers subject to groundwater withdrawal requires optimization of well pumping rates to maximize the water supply while avoiding sea water intrusion. Boundary conditions and the aquifer domain size have significant influences on simulating flow and concentration fields and estimating maximum pumping rates. In this study, an analytical solution is derived based on the potential-flow theory for evaluating maximum groundwater pumping rates in a domain with a constant hydraulic head landward boundary. An empirical correction factor, which was introduced by Pool and Carrera (2011) to account for mixing in the case with a constant recharge rate boundary condition, is found also applicable for the case with a constant hydraulic head boundary condition, and therefore greatly improves the usefulness of the sharp-interface analytical solution. Comparing with the solution for a constant recharge rate boundary, we find that a constant hydraulic head boundary often yields larger estimations of the maximum pumping rate and when the domain size is five times greater than the distance between the well and the coastline, the effect of setting different landward boundary conditions becomes insignificant with a relative difference between two solutions less than 2.5%. These findings can serve as a preliminary guidance for conducting numerical simulations and designing tank-scale laboratory experiments for studying groundwater withdrawal problems in coastal aquifers with minimized boundary condition effects.

  11. Hydrodynamic boundary conditions and dynamic forces between bubbles and surfaces.

    PubMed

    Manor, Ofer; Vakarelski, Ivan U; Tang, Xiaosong; O'Shea, Sean J; Stevens, Geoffrey W; Grieser, Franz; Dagastine, Raymond R; Chan, Derek Y C

    2008-07-11

    Dynamic forces between a 50 microm radius bubble driven towards and from a mica plate using an atomic force microscope in electrolyte and in surfactant exhibit different hydrodynamic boundary conditions at the bubble surface. In added surfactant, the forces are consistent with the no-slip boundary condition at the mica and bubble surfaces. With no surfactant, a new boundary condition that accounts for the transport of trace surface impurities explains variations of dynamic forces at different speeds and provides a direct connection between dynamic forces and surface transport effects at the air-water interface.

  12. Hydrodynamic Boundary Conditions and Dynamic Forces between Bubbles and Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manor, Ofer; Vakarelski, Ivan U.; Tang, Xiaosong; O'Shea, Sean J.; Stevens, Geoffrey W.; Grieser, Franz; Dagastine, Raymond R.; Chan, Derek Y. C.

    2008-07-01

    Dynamic forces between a 50μm radius bubble driven towards and from a mica plate using an atomic force microscope in electrolyte and in surfactant exhibit different hydrodynamic boundary conditions at the bubble surface. In added surfactant, the forces are consistent with the no-slip boundary condition at the mica and bubble surfaces. With no surfactant, a new boundary condition that accounts for the transport of trace surface impurities explains variations of dynamic forces at different speeds and provides a direct connection between dynamic forces and surface transport effects at the air-water interface.

  13. Electrodynamic boundary conditions for planar arrays of thin magnetic elements

    SciTech Connect

    Lisenkov, Ivan; Tyberkevych, Vasyl; Slavin, Andrei; Nikitov, Sergei

    2015-08-24

    Approximate electrodynamic boundary conditions are derived for an array of dipolarly coupled magnetic elements. It is assumed that the elements' thickness is small compared to the wavelength of an electromagnetic wave in a free space. The boundary conditions relate electric and magnetic fields existing at the top and bottom sides of the array through the averaged uniform dynamic magnetization of the array. This dynamic magnetization is determined by the collective dynamic eigen-excitations (spin wave modes) of the array and is found using the external magnetic susceptibility tensor. The problem of oblique scattering of a plane electromagnetic wave on the array is considered to illustrate the use of the derived boundary conditions.

  14. Lubrication of Nitinol 60

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, Stephen V.; DellaCorte, Christopher; Glennon, Glenn

    2010-01-01

    The mechanical properties of Nitinol 60, 60 wt% Ni, 40 wt% Ti (55 at.% Ni, 45 at.% Ti) are sufficiently attractive to warrant its consideration as a lubricated triboelement. Triboelements are always run lubricated. The ability to lubricate Nitinol 60 by the oils usually used on spacecraft mechanisms--Pennzane 2001A, Krytox 143AC and Castrol 815Z--was experimentally determined. These oils were run in the boundary lubrication regime for Nitinol 60 balls running against Nitinol 60 counterfaces in the vacuum spiral orbit tribometer. Test results consisting of the coefficient of friction versus time (friction traces) and relative degradation rates of the oils are presented. Contrary to the inability to successfully lubricate other metal alloys with high titanium content, it was found that Nitinol 60 is able to be lubricated by these oils. Overall, the results presented here indicate that Nitinol 60 is a credible candidate material for bearing applications.

  15. Mixed Convective Peristaltic Flow of Water Based Nanofluids with Joule Heating and Convective Boundary Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Hayat, Tasawar; Nawaz, Sadaf; Alsaedi, Ahmed; Rafiq, Maimona

    2016-01-01

    Main objective of present study is to analyze the mixed convective peristaltic transport of water based nanofluids using five different nanoparticles i.e. (Al2O3, CuO, Cu, Ag and TiO2). Two thermal conductivity models namely the Maxwell's and Hamilton-Crosser's are used in this study. Hall and Joule heating effects are also given consideration. Convection boundary conditions are employed. Furthermore, viscous dissipation and heat generation/absorption are used to model the energy equation. Problem is simplified by employing lubrication approach. System of equations are solved numerically. Influence of pertinent parameters on the velocity and temperature are discussed. Also the heat transfer rate at the wall is observed for considered five nanofluids using the two phase models via graphs. PMID:27104596

  16. Mixed Convective Peristaltic Flow of Water Based Nanofluids with Joule Heating and Convective Boundary Conditions.

    PubMed

    Hayat, Tasawar; Nawaz, Sadaf; Alsaedi, Ahmed; Rafiq, Maimona

    2016-01-01

    Main objective of present study is to analyze the mixed convective peristaltic transport of water based nanofluids using five different nanoparticles i.e. (Al2O3, CuO, Cu, Ag and TiO2). Two thermal conductivity models namely the Maxwell's and Hamilton-Crosser's are used in this study. Hall and Joule heating effects are also given consideration. Convection boundary conditions are employed. Furthermore, viscous dissipation and heat generation/absorption are used to model the energy equation. Problem is simplified by employing lubrication approach. System of equations are solved numerically. Influence of pertinent parameters on the velocity and temperature are discussed. Also the heat transfer rate at the wall is observed for considered five nanofluids using the two phase models via graphs.

  17. New statistical boundary conditions for argon-tungsten interactions.

    PubMed

    Ozhgibesov, M S; Leu, T S; Cheng, C H; Utkin, A V

    2012-09-01

    In this study, scattering processes of argon beam impinging on tungsten surface are investigated numerically by applying molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Energy transfer, momentum change, and scattering processes of argon gas atoms from W(110) surface are discussed. A new model of argon-tungsten (Ar-W) interaction is proposed. Based on the new proposed model, one can simplify the boundary conditions of this problem. The new boundary conditions are proved to be in line with previous experimental and theoretical results. This paper demonstrates how to proceed normalization and further conversion of the MD simulation results into boundary conditions. Application of the new proposed boundary conditions for Ar-W interactions provides a significant speedup of computations.

  18. Two Baryons with Twisted Boundary Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Briceno, Raul; Davoudi, Zohreh; Luu, Thomas; Savage, Martin

    2014-04-01

    The quantization condition for two particle systems with arbitrary number of two-body open coupled-channels, spin and masses in a finite cubic volume is presented. The condition presented is in agreement with all previous studies of two-body systems in a finite volume. The result is fully relativistic and holds for all momenta below inelastic thresholds and is exact up to exponential volume corrections that are governed by m{sub {pi}} L, where m{sub {pi}} is the pion mass and L is the spatial extent of my box. Its implication for the studies of coupled-channel baryon-baryon systems is discussed, and the necessary tools for implementing the formalism are review.

  19. Effect of boundary conditions on thermal plume growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondrashov, A.; Sboev, I.; Rybkin, K.

    2016-07-01

    We have investigated the influence of boundary conditions on the growth rate of convective plumes. Temperature and rate fields were studied in a rectangular convective cell heated by a spot heater. The results of the full-scale test were compared with the numerical data calculated using the ANSYS CFX software package. The relationship between the heat plume growth rate and heat boundary conditions, the width and height of the cell, size of heater for different kinds of liquid was established.

  20. Boundary conditions for direct computation of aerodynamic sound generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colonius, Tim; Lele, Sanjiva K.; Moin, Parviz

    1992-01-01

    A numerical scheme suitable for the computation of both the near field acoustic sources and the far field sound produced by turbulent free shear flows utilizing the Navier-Stokes equations is presented. To produce stable numerical schemes in the presence of shear, damping terms must be added to the boundary conditions. The numerical technique and boundary conditions are found to give stable results for computations of spatially evolving mixing layers.

  1. Optimal control problem for impulsive systems with integral boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashyralyev, Allaberen; Sharifov, Y. A.

    2012-08-01

    In the present work the optimal control problem is considered, when the state of the system is described by the impulsive differential equations with integral boundary conditions. Applying the Banach contraction principle the existence and uniqueness of solution is proved for the corresponding boundary problem by the fixed admissible control. The first and second variation of the functional is calculated. Various necessary conditions of optimality of the first and second order are obtained by the help of the variation of the controls.

  2. Coleman-Gurtin type equations with dynamic boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal, Ciprian G.; Shomberg, Joseph L.

    2015-02-01

    We present a new formulation and generalization of the classical theory of heat conduction with or without fading memory. As a special case, we investigate the well-posedness of systems which consist of Coleman-Gurtin type equations subject to dynamic boundary conditions, also with memory. Nonlinear terms are defined on the interior of the domain and on the boundary and subject to either classical dissipation assumptions, or to a nonlinear balance condition in the sense of Gal (2012). Additionally, we do not assume that the interior and the boundary share the same memory kernel.

  3. Time-domain boundary conditions for outdoor ground surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, Sandra L.; Ostashev, Vladimir E.; Wilson, D. Keith; Marlin, David H.

    2003-10-01

    Finite-difference time-domain techniques are promising for detailed dynamic simulations of sound propagation in complex atmospheric environments. Success of such simulations requires the development of new techniques to accurately handle the reflective and absorptive properties of a porous ground. One method of treating the ground boundary condition in the time domain [Salomons et al., Acta Acust. 88, 483-492 (2002)] is to use modified fluid dynamic equations, where the ground is considered as a porous medium described by its physical properties. However, this approach significantly increases computation time, as the domain must be extended into the ground and a large number of grid points are needed. Standard impedance models for the ground boundary condition are frequency-domain models, which generally are non-causal [Y. H. Berthelot, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 109, 1736-1739 (2001)]. The development of a time-domain boundary condition from these models requires removing the singularity from the impedance equation when transforming from the frequency domain to the time domain. Alternatively, as the impedance boundary condition is a flux equation, a time-domain boundary condition can be derived from first principles, using the physical properties of the ground. We report on our development of a time-domain ground boundary condition.

  4. A novel periodic boundary condition for computational hemodynamics studies.

    PubMed

    Bahramian, Fereshteh; Mohammadi, Hadi

    2014-07-01

    In computational fluid dynamics models for hemodynamics applications, boundary conditions remain one of the major issues in obtaining accurate fluid flow predictions. For major cardiovascular models, the realistic boundary conditions are not available. In order to address this issue, the whole computational domain needs to be modeled, which is practically impossible. For simulating fully developed turbulent flows using the large eddy simulation and dynamic numerical solution methods, which are very popular in hemodynamics studies, periodic boundary conditions are suitable. This is mainly because the computational domain can be reduced considerably. In this study, a novel periodic boundary condition is proposed, which is based on mass flow condition. The proposed boundary condition is applied on a square duct for the sake of validation. The mass-based condition was shown to obtain the solution in 15% less time. As such, the mass-based condition has two decisive advantages: first, the solution for a given Reynolds number can be obtained in a single simulation because of the direct specification of the mass flow, and second, simulations can be made more quickly.

  5. Scattering through a straight quantum waveguide with combined boundary conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Briet, Ph. Soccorsi, E.; Dittrich, J.

    2014-11-15

    Scattering through a straight two-dimensional quantum waveguide R×(0,d) with Dirichlet boundary conditions on (R{sub −}{sup *}×(y=0))∪(R{sub +}{sup *}×(y=d)) and Neumann boundary condition on (R{sub −}{sup *}×(y=d))∪(R{sub +}{sup *}×(y=0)) is considered using stationary scattering theory. The existence of a matching conditions solution at x = 0 is proved. The use of stationary scattering theory is justified showing its relation to the wave packets motion. As an illustration, the matching conditions are also solved numerically and the transition probabilities are shown.

  6. Boundary lubrication of formulated C-ether in air to 300 deg C. 1: Phosphorus ester additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.; Hady, W. F.

    1972-01-01

    Friction and wear measurements were made on CVM M-50 steel lubricated with three C-ether (modified polyphenyl ether) formulations in dry and wet air. Results were compared to those obtained with a formulated Type 2 ester and the C-ether base fluid. A ball-on-disk sliding friction apparatus was used. Experimental conditions were a 1-kilogram load, a 17-meter-perminute (100-rpm) surface speed, and a 25 to 300 C (77 to 572 F) disk temperature range. The C-ether base fluid and the three formulated C-ether fluids yielded lower wear than the Type 2 ester over the entire temperature range. All C-ether fluids exhibited slightly higher friction coefficients than the ester from 150 to 300 C (302 to 572 F) and similar values from 25 to 150 C (77 to 302 F). In general, lower wear rates were observed with the C-ethers when tested in wet air as compared to a dry air atmosphere.

  7. Asymptotic boundary conditions for dissipative waves: General theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagstrom, Thomas

    1990-01-01

    An outstanding issue in the computational analysis of time dependent problems is the imposition of appropriate radiation boundary conditions at artificial boundaries. Accurate conditions are developed which are based on the asymptotic analysis of wave propagation over long ranges. Employing the method of steepest descents, dominant wave groups are identified and simple approximations to the dispersion relation are considered in order to derive local boundary operators. The existence of a small number of dominant wave groups may be expected for systems with dissipation. Estimates of the error as a function of domain size are derived under general hypotheses, leading to convergence results. Some practical aspects of the numerical construction of the asymptotic boundary operators are also discussed.

  8. Geometry and starvation effects in hydrodynamic lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewe, D. E.; Hamrock, B. J.

    1982-01-01

    Numerical methods were used to determine the effects of lubricant starvation on the minimum film thickness under conditions of a hydrodynamic point contact. Starvation was effected by varying the fluid inlet level. The Reynolds boundary conditions were applied at the cavitation boundary and zero pressure was stipulated at the meniscus or inlet boundary. A minimum-film-thickness equation as a function of both the ratio of dimensionless load to dimensionless speed and inlet supply level was determined. By comparing the film generated under the starved inlet condition with the film generated from the fully flooded inlet, an expression for the film reduction factor was obtained. Based on this factor a starvation threshold was defined as well as a critically starved inlet. The changes in the inlet pressure buildup due to changing the available lubricant supply are presented in the form of three dimensional isometric plots and also in the form of contour plots.

  9. Vibration of thermally stressed plates with various boundary conditions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, C. D.

    1973-01-01

    By discarding Lurie's (1952) assumption of mode identity, it is shown that linear theory correctly predicts the frequency of all modes of a thermally stressed cantilever plate as well as the frequency and modes of plates with other boundary conditions. The thermal stress distribution is obtained for whatever temperature distribution and boundary conditions that may be specified. Experimental results are compared to calculated results for several different plates. Boundary conditions for the plates range from a plate with edges completely clamped to a plate with edges completely free with various other combinations of mixed and uniform edge conditions. Comparison of calculated data to experimental data shows that accurate, quantitative results can be obtained from linear theory for 'as cut' real plates for a significant range of heating when the assumption of mode identity is discarded.

  10. Exponential dichotomy for hyperbolic systems with periodic boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klyuchnyk, R.; Kmit, I.; Recke, L.

    2017-02-01

    We investigate evolution families generated by general linear first-order hyperbolic systems in one space dimension with periodic boundary conditions. We state explicit conditions on the coefficient functions that are sufficient for the existence of exponential dichotomies on R in the space of continuous periodic functions.

  11. Compatibility of refrigerants and lubricants with motor materials under retrofit conditions. Final report, Volume IV - pictures

    SciTech Connect

    Doerr, R.G.; Waite, T.D.

    1996-10-01

    Compatibility tests were conducted on motor materials to determine if exposure to the original refrigerant/mineral oil would affect compatibility of the motor materials after retrofit to the alternative refrigerant/lubricant. The motor materials were exposed at elevated temperature to the original refrigerant and mineral oil for 500 hours, followed by exposure to the alternative refrigerant and lubricant for 500 hours. Measurements were also taken after 168 and 336 hours. As a control, some samples were exposed to the original refrigerant/mineral oil for a total of 1000 hours.

  12. Boundary conditions for electropositive and electronegative radio-frequency sheaths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolewski, Mark

    2016-09-01

    Plasma sheaths play a dominant role in determining ion bombardment energies. To optimize plasma processes, sheaths must be understood and carefully controlled, which requires predictive models. One very efficient approach is to only model the sheath, excluding the bulk plasma. This approach, however, requires boundary conditions at the plasma/sheath boundary. Models that use the step approximation for electron density require initial ion velocities. More exact models with Boltzmann electrons (and, for electronegative discharges, negative ions) require the electron temperature (and the temperature and relative density of negative ions). It is often assumed that these boundary conditions have negligible effects on ion energies, but, for certain conditions in radio-frequency sheaths, this is not true. Analytic models as well as numerical simulations show that, at low frequencies (<= 1 MHz) and high bias voltages, the amplitude of the low-energy peak in ion energy distributions (IEDs) at the electrode is very sensitive to the boundary conditions. By measuring IEDs and sheath voltage waveforms, we obtain the most appropriate values of the boundary conditions for electropositive (Ar) as well as electronegative (CF4) discharges and insight into their presheath dynamics.

  13. Elastohydrodynamic lubrication of elliptical contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.

    1981-01-01

    The determination of the minimum film thickness within contact is considered for both fully flooded and starved conditions. A fully flooded conjunction is one in which the film thickness is not significantly changed when the amount of lubricant is increased. The fully flooded results presented show the influence of contact geometry on minimum film thickness as expressed by the ellipticity parameter and the dimensionless speed, load, and materials parameters. These results are applied to materials of high elastic modulus (hard EHL), such as metal, and to materials of low elastic modulus(soft EHL), such as rubber. In addition to the film thickness equations that are developed, contour plots of pressure and film thickness are given which show the essential features of elastohydrodynamically lubricated conjunctions. The crescent shaped region of minimum film thickness, with its side lobes in which the separation between the solids is a minimum, clearly emerges in the numerical solutions. In addition to the 3 presented for the fully flooded results, 15 more cases are used for hard EHL contacts and 18 cases are used for soft EHL contacts in a theoretical study of the influence of lubricant starvation on film thickness and pressure. From the starved results for both hard and soft EHL contacts, a simple and important dimensionless inlet boundary distance is specified. This inlet boundary distance defines whether a fully flooded or a starved condition exists in the contact. Contour plots of pressure and film thickness in and around the contact are shown for conditions.

  14. Kac boundary conditions of the logarithmic minimal models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, Paul A.; Tartaglia, Elena; Couvreur, Romain

    2015-01-01

    We develop further the implementation and analysis of Kac boundary conditions in the general logarithmic minimal models { {LM}}(p,p\\prime) with 1 ⩽ p < p‧ and p, p‧ coprime. Specifically, working in a strip geometry, we consider the (r, s) Kac boundary conditions. These boundary conditions are organized into infinitely extended Kac tables labeled by the Kac labels r, s = 1, 2, 3, …. They are conjugate to Virasoro Kac representations with conformal dimensions Δr, s given by the usual Kac formula. On a finite strip of width N, built from a square lattice, the associated integrable boundary conditions are constructed by acting on the vacuum (1, 1) boundary with an s-type seam of width s - 1 columns and an r-type seam of width ρ - 1 columns. The r-type seam contains an arbitrary boundary field ξ. While the usual fusion construction of the r-type seam relies on the existence of Wenzl-Jones projectors restricting its application to r ⩽ ρ < p‧, this limitation was recently removed by Pearce et al who further conjectured that the conformal boundary conditions labeled by r are realized, in particular, for ρ=ρ(r)=\\lfloor \\frac{rp\\prime}{p}\\rfloor . In this paper, we confirm this conjecture by performing extensive numerics on the commuting double row transfer matrices and their associated quantum Hamiltonian chains. Letting [x] denote the fractional part, we fix the boundary field to the specialized values ξ=\\fracπ{2} if [\\fracρ{p\\prime}]=0 and ξ=[\\fracρ p}{p\\prime}]\\frac{π{2} otherwise. For these boundary conditions, we obtain the Kac conformal weights Δr, s by numerically extrapolating the finite-size corrections to the lowest eigenvalue of the quantum Hamiltonians out to sizes N ⩽ 32 - ρ - s. Additionally, by solving local inversion relations, we obtain general analytic expressions for the boundary free energies allowing for more accurate estimates of the conformal data. This paper is dedicated to Jean-Bernard Zuber on the occassion

  15. Modeling sea-water intrusion with open boundary conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Padilla, F.; Cruz-Sanjulian, J.

    1997-07-01

    The present study concerns the application of a new numerical approach to describe the fresh-water/sea-water relationships in coastal aquifers. Essentially, a solution to the partial differential equation governing the regional motion of a phreatic surface and the resulting interface between fresh water and salt water is analyzed by a Galerkin finite-element formulation. A single-phase steady numerical model was applied to approximate, with simple triangular elements, the regional behavior of a coastal aquifer under appropriate sinks, sources, Neumann, outflow face, and open boundary conditions. On the one hand, outflow open boundaries at the coastline were not treated with other classical boundary conditions, but instead with a formal numerical approach for open boundaries inspired in this particular case by the Dupuit approximation of horizontal outflow at the boundary. The solution to this numerical model, together with the Ghyben-Herzberg principle, allows the correct simulation of fresh-water heads and the position of the salt-water interface for a steeply sloping coast. Although the solutions were precise and do not present classical numerical oscillations, this approach requires a previous solution with Dirichlet boundary conditions at the coastline in order to find a good convergence of the solution algorithm. On the other hand, the same precise results were obtained with a more restrictive open boundary condition, similar in a way to the outflow face approach, which required less computer time, did not need a prior numerical solution and could be extended to different coastline conditions. The steady-state problem was solved for different hypothetical coastal aquifers and fresh-water usage through three types of numerical tests.

  16. Transport synthetic acceleration with opposing reflecting boundary conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Zika, M.R.; Adams, M.L.

    2000-02-01

    The transport synthetic acceleration (TSA) scheme is extended to problems with opposing reflecting boundary conditions. This synthetic method employs a simplified transport operator as its low-order approximation. A procedure is developed that allows the use of the conjugate gradient (CG) method to solve the resulting low-order system of equations. Several well-known transport iteration algorithms are cast in a linear algebraic form to show their equivalence to standard iterative techniques. Source iteration in the presence of opposing reflecting boundary conditions is shown to be equivalent to a (poorly) preconditioned stationary Richardson iteration, with the preconditioner defined by the method of iterating on the incident fluxes on the reflecting boundaries. The TSA method (and any synthetic method) amounts to a further preconditioning of the Richardson iteration. The presence of opposing reflecting boundary conditions requires special consideration when developing a procedure to realize the CG method for the proposed system of equations. The CG iteration may be applied only to symmetric positive definite matrices; this condition requires the algebraic elimination of the boundary angular corrections from the low-order equations. As a consequence of this elimination, evaluating the action of the resulting matrix on an arbitrary vector involves two transport sweeps and a transmission iteration. Results of applying the acceleration scheme to a simple test problem are presented.

  17. Boundary conditions on internal three-body wave functions

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Kevin A.; Littlejohn, Robert G.

    1999-10-01

    For a three-body system, a quantum wave function {Psi}{sub m}{sup {ell}} with definite {ell} and m quantum numbers may be expressed in terms of an internal wave function {chi}{sub k}{sup {ell}} which is a function of three internal coordinates. This article provides necessary and sufficient constraints on {chi}{sub k}{sup {ell}} to ensure that the external wave function {Psi}{sub k}{sup {ell}} is analytic. These constraints effectively amount to boundary conditions on {chi}{sub k}{sup {ell}} and its derivatives at the boundary of the internal space. Such conditions find similarities in the (planar) two-body problem where the wave function (to lowest order) has the form r{sup |m|} at the origin. We expect the boundary conditions to prove useful for constructing singularity free three-body basis sets for the case of nonvanishing angular momentum.

  18. Tribological properties of Ti-doped DLC coatings under ionic liquids lubricated conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xin; Xia, Yanqiu

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, titanium doped diamond-like carbon (Ti-DLC) coatings were prepared onto AISI 52100 steel substrates using medium frequency magnetic sputtering process, and were analyzed using the Raman and transmission electron microscope (TEM). Two kinds of 1,3-dialkyl imidazolium ionic liquids (ILs) were synthesized and evaluated as lubricants for Ti-DLC/steel contacts at room temperature, and PFPE as comparison lubricant. The tribological properties of the ILs were investigated using a ball-on-disk type UMT reciprocating friction tester. The results indicated that the ILs have excellent friction-reducing properties, the friction coefficient kept at a relatively stable value of 0.07-0.06, which was reduced approximately by 47% compared with perfluoropolyether (PFPE). The worn surfaces of Ti-DLC coatings were observed and analyzed using a MICROXAM-3D non-contact surface profiler, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The Ti-DLC coatings using ionic liquids lubricating systems are considered as potential lubricating system in vacuum and space moving friction pairs.

  19. Effect of kinetic boundary condition on the thermal transpiration coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Hiroshi; Amakawa, Kenjiro

    2014-12-01

    The effect of kinetic boundary condition on the free molecular thermal transpiration coefficient γ is analyzed numerically. The Maxwell model boundary condition is applied in its original form in the sense that its accommodation coefficient depends on the speed of incident molecules. The results show that the value of γ depends much on the velocity dependency of the accommodation coefficient. The experimental result, γ < 0.5, can be reproduced if the grazing molecules reflect diffusely. This makes a sharp contrast with the previous works that γ =0.5 for the velocity independent accommodation coefficient.

  20. Thermodynamically admissible boundary conditions for the regularized 13 moment equations

    SciTech Connect

    Rana, Anirudh Singh; Struchtrup, Henning

    2016-02-15

    A phenomenological approach to the boundary conditions for linearized R13 equations is derived using the second law of thermodynamics. The phenomenological coefficients appearing in the boundary conditions are calculated by comparing the slip, jump, and thermal creep coefficients with linearized Boltzmann solutions for Maxwell’s accommodation model for different values of the accommodation coefficient. For this, the linearized R13 equations are solved for viscous slip, thermal creep, and temperature jump problems and the results are compared to the solutions of the linearized Boltzmann equation. The influence of different collision models (hard-sphere, Bhatnagar–Gross–Krook, and Maxwell molecules) and accommodation coefficients on the phenomenological coefficients is studied.

  1. Boundary conditions in a meshless staggered particle code

    SciTech Connect

    Libersky, L.D.; Randles, P.W.

    1998-07-01

    A meshless method utilizing two sets of particles and generalized boundary conditions is introduced. Companion sets of particles, one carrying velocity and the other carrying stress, are employed to reduce the undesirable effects of colocation of all field variables and increase accuracy. Boundary conditions implemented within this staggered framework include contact, stress-free, stress, velocity, and symmetry constraints. Several test problems are used to evaluate the method. Of particular importance is the motion of stress particles relative to velocity particles in higher dimensions. Early results show promise, but difficulties remain that must be overcome if the staggered technique is to be successful.

  2. Poroelastic modeling of seismic boundary conditions across afracture

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenberg, M.A.; Nakagawa, S.

    2006-06-29

    A fracture within a porous background is modeled as a thin porous layer with increased compliance and finite permeability. For small layer thickness, a set of boundary conditions can be derived that relate particle velocity and stress across a fracture, induced by incident poroelastic waves. These boundary conditions are given via phenomenological parameters that can be used to examine and characterize the seismic response of a fracture. One of these parameters, here it is called membrane permeability, is shown through several examples to control the scattering amplitude of the slow P waves for very low-permeability fractures, which in turn controls the intrinsic attenuation of the waves.

  3. Maxwell boundary condition and velocity dependent accommodation coefficient

    SciTech Connect

    Struchtrup, Henning

    2013-11-15

    A modification of Maxwell's boundary condition for the Boltzmann equation is developed that allows to incorporate velocity dependent accommodation coefficients into the microscopic description. As a first example, it is suggested to consider the wall-particle interaction as a thermally activated process with three parameters. A simplified averaging procedure leads to jump and slip boundary conditions for hydrodynamics. Coefficients for velocity slip, temperature jump, and thermal transpiration flow are identified and compared with those resulting from the original Maxwell model and the Cercignani-Lampis model. An extension of the model leads to temperature dependent slip and jump coefficients.

  4. Effective boundary condition at a rough surface starting from a slip condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalibard, Anne-Laure; Gérard-Varet, David

    We consider the homogenization of the Navier-Stokes equation, set in a channel with a rough boundary, of small amplitude and wavelength ɛ. It was shown recently that, for any non-degenerate roughness pattern, and for any reasonable condition imposed at the rough boundary, the homogenized boundary condition in the limit ɛ=0 is always no-slip. We give in this paper error estimates for this homogenized no-slip condition, and provide a more accurate effective boundary condition, of Navier type. Our result extends those obtained in Basson and Gérard-Varet (2008) [6] and Gerard-Varet and Masmoudi (2010) [13], in which the special case of a Dirichlet condition at the rough boundary was examined.

  5. Boundary condition optimal control problem in lava flow modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail-Zadeh, Alik; Korotkii, Alexander; Tsepelev, Igor; Kovtunov, Dmitry; Melnik, Oleg

    2016-04-01

    We study a problem of steady-state fluid flow with known thermal conditions (e.g., measured temperature and the heat flux at the surface of lava flow) at one segment of the model boundary and unknown conditions at its another segment. This problem belongs to a class of boundary condition optimal control problems and can be solved by data assimilation from one boundary to another using direct and adjoint models. We derive analytically the adjoint model and test the cost function and its gradient, which minimize the misfit between the known thermal condition and its model counterpart. Using optimization algorithms, we iterate between the direct and adjoint problems and determine the missing boundary condition as well as thermal and dynamic characteristics of the fluid flow. The efficiency of optimization algorithms - Polak-Ribiere conjugate gradient and the limited-memory Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno (L-BFGS) algorithms - have been tested with the aim to get a rapid convergence to the solution of this inverse ill-posed problem. Numerical results show that temperature and velocity can be determined with a high accuracy in the case of smooth input data. A noise imposed on the input data results in a less accurate solution, but still acceptable below some noise level.

  6. The Ablowitz-Ladik system with linearizable boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biondini, Gino; Bui, Anh

    2015-09-01

    The boundary value problem (BVP) for the Ablowitz-Ladik (AL) system on the natural numbers with linearizable boundary conditions is studied. In particular: (i) a discrete analogue is derived of the Bäcklund transformation that was used to solved similar BVPs for the nonlinear Schrödinger equation; (ii) an explicit proof is given that the Bäcklund-transformed solution of AL remains within the class of solutions that can be studied by the inverse scattering transform; (iii) an explicit linearizing transformation for the Bäcklund transformation is provided; (iv) explicit relations are obtained among the norming constants associated with symmetric eigenvalues; (v) conditions for the existence of self-symmetric eigenvalues are obtained. The results are illustrated by several exact soliton solutions, which describe the soliton reflection at the boundary with or without the presence of self-symmetric eigenvalues. This article is dedicated to Mark Ablowitz on the occasion of his seventieth birthday.

  7. Boundary conditions for the Boltzmann equation for rough walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brull, Stéphane; Charrier, Pierre

    2014-12-01

    In some applications, rarefied gases have to considered in a domain whose boundary presents some nanoscale roughness. That is why, we have considered (Brull,2014) a new derivation of boundary conditions for the Boltzmann equation, where the wall present some nanoscale roughness. In this paper, the interaction between the gas and the wall is represented by a kinetic equation defined in a surface layer at the scale of the nanometer close to the wall. The boundary conditions are obtained from a formal asymptotic expansion and are describded by a scattering kernel satisfying classical properties (non-negativeness, normalization, reciprocity). Finally, we present some numerical simulations of scattering diagrams showing the importance of the consideration of roughness for small scales in the model.

  8. A Robust Absorbing Boundary Condition for Compressible Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loh, Ching Y.; orgenson, Philip C. E.

    2005-01-01

    An absorbing non-reflecting boundary condition (NRBC) for practical computations in fluid dynamics and aeroacoustics is presented with theoretical proof. This paper is a continuation and improvement of a previous paper by the author. The absorbing NRBC technique is based on a first principle of non reflecting, which contains the essential physics that a plane wave solution of the Euler equations remains intact across the boundary. The technique is theoretically shown to work for a large class of finite volume approaches. When combined with the hyperbolic conservation laws, the NRBC is simple, robust and truly multi-dimensional; no additional implementation is needed except the prescribed physical boundary conditions. Several numerical examples in multi-dimensional spaces using two different finite volume schemes are illustrated to demonstrate its robustness in practical computations. Limitations and remedies of the technique are also discussed.

  9. Lubrication of Articular Cartilage.

    PubMed

    Jahn, Sabrina; Seror, Jasmine; Klein, Jacob

    2016-07-11

    The major synovial joints such as hips and knees are uniquely efficient tribological systems, able to articulate over a wide range of shear rates with a friction coefficient between the sliding cartilage surfaces as low as 0.001 up to pressures of more than 100 atm. No human-made material can match this. The means by which such surfaces maintain their very low friction has been intensively studied for decades and has been attributed to fluid-film and boundary lubrication. Here, we focus especially on the latter: the reduction of friction by molecular layers at the sliding cartilage surfaces. In particular, we discuss such lubrication in the light of very recent advances in our understanding of boundary effects in aqueous media based on the paradigms of hydration lubrication and of the synergism between different molecular components of the synovial joints (namely hyaluronan, lubricin, and phospholipids) in enabling this lubrication.

  10. Origins of hydration lubrication.

    PubMed

    Ma, Liran; Gaisinskaya-Kipnis, Anastasia; Kampf, Nir; Klein, Jacob

    2015-01-14

    Why is friction in healthy hips and knees so low? Hydration lubrication, according to which hydration shells surrounding charges act as lubricating elements in boundary layers (including those coating cartilage in joints), has been invoked to account for the extremely low sliding friction between surfaces in aqueous media, but not well understood. Here we report the direct determination of energy dissipation within such sheared hydration shells. By trapping hydrated ions in a 0.4-1 nm gap between atomically smooth charged surfaces as they slide past each other, we are able to separate the dissipation modes of the friction and, in particular, identify the viscous losses in the subnanometre hydration shells. Our results shed light on the origins of hydration lubrication, with potential implications both for aqueous boundary lubricants and for biolubrication.

  11. Multicomponent Gas Diffusion and an Appropriate Momentum Boundary Condition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David A.

    1994-01-01

    Multicomponent gas diffusion is reviewed with particular emphasis on gas flows near solid boundaries-the so-called Kramers-Kistemaker effect. The aim is to derive an appropriate momentum boundary condition which governs many gaseous species diffusing together. The many species' generalization of the traditional single gas condition, either as slip or stick (no-slip), is not obvious, particularly for technologically important cases of lower gas pressures and very dissimilar molecular weight gases. No convincing theoretical case exists for why two gases should interact with solid boundaries equally but in opposite flow directions, such that the total gas flow exactly vanishes. ln this way, the multicomponent no-slip boundary requires careful treatment The approaches discussed here generally adopt a microscopic model for gas-solid contact. The method has the advantage that the mathematics remain tractable and hence experimentally testable. Two new proposals are put forward, the first building in some molecular collision physics, the second drawing on a detailed view of surface diffusion which does not unphysically extrapolate bulk gas properties to govern the adsorbed molecules. The outcome is a better accounting of previously anomalous experiments. Models predict novel slip conditions appearing even for the case of equal molecular weight components. These approaches become particularly significant in view of a conceptual contradiction found to arise in previous derivations of the appropriate boundary conditions. The analogous case of three gases, one of which is uniformly distributed and hence non-diffusing, presents a further refinement which gives unexpected flow reversals near solid boundaries. This case is investigated alone and for aggregating gas species near their condensation point. In addition to predicting new physics, this investigation carries practical implications for controlling vapor diffusion in the growth of crystals used in medical diagnosis (e

  12. Lubrication and friction prediction in metal-on-metal hip implants.

    PubMed

    Wang, F C; Brockett, C; Williams, S; Udofia, I; Fisher, J; Jin, Z M

    2008-03-07

    A general methodology of mixed lubrication analysis and friction prediction for a conforming spherical bearing in hip implants was developed, with particular reference to a typical metal-on-metal hip replacement. Experimental measurement of frictional torque for a similar implant was carried out to validate the theoretical prediction. A ball-in-socket configuration was adopted to represent the articulation between the femoral head and the acetabular cup under cyclic operating conditions of representative load and motion. The mixed lubrication model presented in this study was first applied to identify the contact characteristics on the bearing surfaces, consisting of both fluid-film and boundary lubricated regions. The boundary lubricated contact was assumed to occur when the predicted fluid film thickness was less than a typical boundary protein layer absorbed on the bearing surfaces. Subsequently, the friction was predicted from the fluid-film lubricated region with viscous shearing due to both Couette and Poiseuille flows and the boundary protein layer contact region with a constant coefficient of friction. The predicted frictional torque of the typical metal-on-metal hip joint implant was compared with the experimental measurement conducted in a functional hip simulator and a reasonably good agreement was found. The mixed lubrication regime was found to be dominant for the conditions considered. Although the percentage of the boundary lubricated region was quite small, the corresponding contribution to friction was quite large and the resultant friction factor was quite high.

  13. Yang - Mills - Higgs equations with nonhomogeneous boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tafel, Jacek

    1997-01-01

    The Yang - Mills - Higgs equations in a spatially bounded subset of the Minkowski space are studied under the assumption of a temporal gauge. It is shown that the Cauchy problem for these equations is uniquely solvable (locally in time) if nonhomogeneous boundary conditions of the metallic type are imposed.

  14. Investigation of Boundary Conditions for Flexible Multibody Spacecraft Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacLean, John R.; Huynh, An; Quiocho, Leslie J.

    2007-01-01

    In support of both the Space Shuttle and International Space Station programs, a set of generic multibody dynamics algorithms integrated within the Trick simulation environment have addressed the variety of on-orbit manipulator simulation requirements for engineering analysis, procedures development and crew familiarization/training at the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC). Enhancements to these dynamics algorithms are now being driven by a new set of Constellation program requirements for flexible multibody spacecraft simulation. One particular issue that has been discussed within the NASA community is the assumption of cantilever-type flexible body boundary conditions. This assumption has been commonly utilized within manipulator multibody dynamics formulations as it simplifies the computation of relative motion for articulated flexible topologies. Moreover, its use for modeling of space-based manipulators such as the Shuttle Remote Manipulator System (SRMS) and Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) has been extensively validated against flight data. For more general flexible spacecraft applications, however, the assumption of cantilever-type boundary conditions may not be sufficient. This paper describes the boundary condition assumptions that were used in the original formulation, demonstrates that this formulation can be augmented to accommodate systems in which the assumption of cantilever boundary conditions no longer applies, and verifies the approach through comparison with an independent model previously validated against experimental hardware test data from a spacecraft flexible dynamics emulator.

  15. Calculation of Multistage Turbomachinery Using Steady Characteristic Boundary Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chima, Rodrick V.

    1998-01-01

    A multiblock Navier-Stokes analysis code for turbomachinery has been modified to allow analysis of multistage turbomachines. A steady averaging-plane approach was used to pass information between blade rows. Characteristic boundary conditions written in terms of perturbations about the mean flow from the neighboring blade row were used to allow close spacing between the blade rows without forcing the flow to be axisymmetric. In this report the multiblock code is described briefly and the characteristic boundary conditions and the averaging-plane implementation are described in detail. Two approaches for averaging the flow properties are also described. A two-dimensional turbine stator case was used to compare the characteristic boundary conditions with standard axisymmetric boundary conditions. Differences were apparent but small in this low-speed case. The two-stage fuel turbine used on the space shuttle main engines was then analyzed using a three-dimensional averaging-plane approach. Computed surface pressure distributions on the stator blades and endwalls and computed distributions of blade surface heat transfer coefficient on three blades showed very good agreement with experimental data from two tests.

  16. Unconstrained periodic boundary conditions for solid state elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linna, R. P.; Åström, J. A.; Timonen, J.

    2004-03-01

    We introduce a method to implement dynamics on an elastic lattice without imposing constraints via boundary or loading conditions. Using this method we are able to examine fracture processes in two-dimensional systems previously inaccessible for reliable computer simulations. We show the validity of the method by benchmarking and report a few preliminary results.

  17. Poroelastic modeling of seismic boundary conditions across a fracture.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Seiji; Schoenberg, Michael A

    2007-08-01

    Permeability of a fracture can affect how the fracture interacts with seismic waves. To examine this effect, a simple mathematical model that describes the poroelastic nature of wave-fracture interaction is useful. In this paper, a set of boundary conditions is presented which relate wave-induced particle velocity (or displacement) and stress including fluid pressure across a compliant, fluid-bearing fracture. These conditions are derived by modeling a fracture as a thin porous layer with increased compliance and finite permeability. Assuming a small layer thickness, the boundary conditions can be derived by integrating the governing equations of poroelastic wave propagation. A finite jump in the stress and velocity across a fracture is expressed as a function of the stress and velocity at the boundaries. Further simplification for a thin fracture yields a set of characteristic parameters that control the seismic response of single fractures with a wide range of mechanical and hydraulic properties. These boundary conditions have potential applications in simplifying numerical models such as finite-difference and finite-element methods to compute seismic wave scattering off nonplanar (e.g., curved and intersecting) fractures.

  18. On boundary conditions in the Lattice-Boltzmann method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tessarotto, Massimo; Sarmah, Deep

    2004-11-01

    A critical issue in computational fluid dynamics is the treatment of boundary conditions adopted in particle-simulation methods based on discrete Lattice-Boltzmann (LB) kinetic descriptions. In fact, although progress has been in the past made regarding the mathematical treatment of boundary conditions in LB approaches [see for example 1,2 and references therein], the problem cannot be considered fully solved from the physical standpoint for several different reasons. In particular, the action of surface forces or local volume forces ( localized interactions), may be significant not only in the case of free boundaries, but also for fixed or moving boundaries characterized by prescribed velocity. Purpose of this work is to propose a novel LB approach which embodies not only the possible effect of localized interactions but also assures the correct fulfillment of fluid equations on fixed or moving boundaries. References 1 - R.Mei, W.Shyy, L.Luo, J.Comput.Phys.161(2), 680 (2000). 2 - X.Zhang, J.W.Crawford, A.G.Bengough, Y.M.Young, Ad. Wat. Res. 25, 601 (2002).

  19. Sheath Physics and Boundary Conditions for Edge Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, R H; Ryutov, D D

    2003-09-03

    The boundary conditions of mass, momentum, energy, and charge appropriate for fluid formulations of edge plasmas are surveyed. We re-visit the classic problem of 1-dimensional flow, and note that the ''Bohm sheath criterion'' is requirement of connectivity of the interior plasma with the external world, not the result of termination of the plasma by a wall. We show that the nature of the interior plasma solution is intrinsically different for ion sources that inject above and below the electron sound speed. We survey the appropriate conditions to apply, and resultant fluxes, for a magnetic field obliquely incident on a wall, including the presence of drifts and radial transport. We discuss the consequences of toroidal asymmetries in wall properties, as well as experimental tests of such effects. Finally, we discuss boundary-condition modifications in the case of rapidly varying plasma conditions.

  20. Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Continuous Boundary Force method for Navier-Stokes equations subject to Robin boundary condition

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Wenxiao; Bao, Jie; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2014-02-15

    Robin boundary condition for the Navier-Stokes equations is used to model slip conditions at the fluid-solid boundaries. A novel Continuous Boundary Force (CBF) method is proposed for solving the Navier-Stokes equations subject to Robin boundary condition. In the CBF method, the Robin boundary condition at boundary is replaced by the homogeneous Neumann boundary condition at the boundary and a volumetric force term added to the momentum conservation equation. Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method is used to solve the resulting Navier-Stokes equations. We present solutions for two-dimensional and three-dimensional flows in domains bounded by flat and curved boundaries subject to various forms of the Robin boundary condition. The numerical accuracy and convergence are examined through comparison of the SPH-CBF results with the solutions of finite difference or finite element method. Taken the no-slip boundary condition as a special case of slip boundary condition, we demonstrate that the SPH-CBF method describes accurately both no-slip and slip conditions.

  1. On the Huygens absorbing boundary conditions for electromagnetics

    SciTech Connect

    Berenger, Jean-Pierre

    2007-09-10

    A new absorbing boundary condition (ABC) is presented for the solution of Maxwell equations in unbounded spaces. Called the Huygens ABC, this condition is a generalization of two previously published ABCs, namely the multiple absorbing surfaces (MAS) and the re-radiating boundary condition (rRBC). The properties of the Huygens ABC are derived theoretically in continuous spaces and in the finite-difference (FDTD) discretized space. A solution is proposed to render the Huygens ABC effective for the absorption of evanescent waves. Numerical experiments with the FDTD method show that the effectiveness of the Huygens ABC is close to that of the PML ABC in some realistic problems of numerical electromagnetics. It is also shown in the paper that a combination of the Huygens ABC with the PML ABC is very well suited to the solution of some particular problems.

  2. DIESEL FUEL LUBRICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Jun

    2012-01-01

    The diesel fuel injector and pump systems contain many sliding interfaces that rely for lubrication upon the fuels. The combination of the poor fuel lubricity and extremely tight geometric clearance between the plunger and bore makes the diesel fuel injector vulnerable to scuffing damage that severely limits the engine life. In order to meet the upcoming stricter diesel emission regulations and higher engine efficiency requirements, further fuel refinements that will result in even lower fuel lubricity due to the removal of essential lubricating compounds, more stringent operation conditions, and tighter geometric clearances are needed. These are expected to increase the scuffing and wear vulnerability of the diesel fuel injection and pump systems. In this chapter, two approaches are discussed to address this issue: (1) increasing fuel lubricity by introducing effective lubricity additives or alternative fuels, such as biodiesel, and (2) improving the fuel injector scuffing-resistance by using advanced materials and/or surface engineering processes. The developing status of the fuel modification approach is reviewed to cover topics including fuel lubricity origins, lubricity improvers, alternative fuels, and standard fuel lubricity tests. The discussion of the materials approach is focused on the methodology development for detection of the onset of scuffing and evaluation of the material scuffing characteristics.

  3. Time-domain implementation of an impedance boundary condition with boundary layer correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brambley, E. J.; Gabard, G.

    2016-09-01

    A time-domain boundary condition is derived that accounts for the acoustic impedance of a thin boundary layer over an impedance boundary, based on the asymptotic frequency-domain boundary condition of Brambley (2011) [25]. A finite-difference reference implementation of this condition is presented and carefully validated against both an analytic solution and a discrete dispersion analysis for a simple test case. The discrete dispersion analysis enables the distinction between real physical instabilities and artificial numerical instabilities. The cause of the latter is suggested to be a combination of the real physical instabilities present and the aliasing and artificial zero group velocity of finite-difference schemes. It is suggested that these are general properties of any numerical discretization of an unstable system. Existing numerical filters are found to be inadequate to remove these artificial instabilities as they have a too wide pass band. The properties of numerical filters required to address this issue are discussed and a number of selective filters are presented that may prove useful in general. These filters are capable of removing only the artificial numerical instabilities, allowing the reference implementation to correctly reproduce the stability properties of the analytic solution.

  4. Micro-droplets lubrication film thickness dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huerre, Axel; Theodoly, Olivier; Cantat, Isabelle; Leshansky, Alexander; Valignat, Marie-Pierre; Jullien, Marie-Caroline; MMN Team; LAI Team; IPR Team; Department of Chemical Engineering Team

    2014-11-01

    The motion of droplets or bubbles in confined geometries has been extensively studied; showing an intrinsic relationship between the lubrication film thickness and the droplet velocity. When capillary forces dominate, the lubrication film thickness evolves non linearly with the capillary number due to viscous dissipation between meniscus and wall. However, this film may become thin enough that intermolecular forces come into play and affect classical scalings. We report here the first experimental evidence of the disjoining pressure effect on confined droplets by measuring droplet lubrication film thicknesses in a microfluidic Hele-Shaw cell. We find and characterize two distinct dynamical regimes, dominated respectively by capillary and intermolecular forces. In the former case rolling boundary conditions at the interface are evidenced through film thickness dynamics, interface velocity measurement and film thickness profile.

  5. The effect of refrigerants in the mixed lubrication regime

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuhara, Kazuyuki; Tomimoto, Makoto

    1997-12-31

    Because of environmental concerns, CFC (chlorofluorocarbon) refrigerants must be replaced with HFCs (hydrofluorocarbons). As a result, many tribological problems are caused especially in rotary piston compressors. To solve the problem, the effects of refrigerants on friction and wear characteristics of the oil and refrigerant mixtures at the mixed lubrication regime are investigated. The difference in refrigerants are clearly observed not only in boundary but also in the mixed lubrication regime. The effects of operating conditions on sliding conditions and experimental results are also discussed. It is concluded that for practical application where long life is essential, experiments must be conducted under the mixed lubrication regime. Also, the importance of defining the lubrication regime in terms of film parameter is emphasized.

  6. Matched interface and boundary (MIB) for the implementation of boundary conditions in high-order central finite differences

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shan; Wei, G. W.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY High-order central finite difference schemes encounter great difficulties in implementing complex boundary conditions. This paper introduces the matched interface and boundary (MIB) method as a novel boundary scheme to treat various general boundary conditions in arbitrarily high-order central finite difference schemes. To attain arbitrarily high order, the MIB method accurately extends the solution beyond the boundary by repeatedly enforcing only the original set of boundary conditions. The proposed approach is extensively validated via boundary value problems, initial-boundary value problems, eigenvalue problems, and high-order differential equations. Successful implementations are given to not only Dirichlet, Neumann, and Robin boundary conditions, but also more general ones, such as multiple boundary conditions in high-order differential equations and time-dependent boundary conditions in evolution equations. Detailed stability analysis of the MIB method is carried out. The MIB method is shown to be able to deliver high-order accuracy, while maintaining the same or similar stability conditions of the standard high-order central difference approximations. The application of the proposed MIB method to the boundary treatment of other non-standard high-order methods is also considered. PMID:20485574

  7. Bond chaos in spin glasses revealed through thermal boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenlong; Machta, Jonathan; Katzgraber, Helmut G.

    2016-06-01

    Spin glasses have competing interactions that lead to a rough energy landscape which is highly susceptible to small perturbations. These chaotic effects strongly affect numerical simulations and, as such, gaining a deeper understanding of chaos in spin glasses is of much importance. The use of thermal boundary conditions is an effective approach to study chaotic phenomena. Here we generalize population annealing Monte Carlo, combined with thermal boundary conditions, to study bond chaos due to small perturbations in the spin-spin couplings of the three-dimensional Edwards-Anderson Ising spin glass. We show that bond and temperature-induced chaos share the same scaling exponents and that bond chaos is stronger than temperature chaos.

  8. Revisiting Johnson and Jackson boundary conditions for granular flows

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tingwen; Benyahia, Sofiane

    2012-07-01

    In this article, we revisit Johnson and Jackson boundary conditions for granular flows. The oblique collision between a particle and a flat wall is analyzed by adopting the classic rigid-body theory and a more realistic semianalytical model. Based on the kinetic granular theory, the input parameter for the partial-slip boundary conditions, specularity coefficient, which is not measurable in experiments, is then interpreted as a function of the particle-wall restitution coefficient, the frictional coefficient, and the normalized slip velocity at the wall. An analytical expression for the specularity coefficient is suggested for a flat, frictional surface with a low frictional coefficient. The procedure for determining the specularity coefficient for a more general problem is outlined, and a working approximation is provided.

  9. Benchmarking sheath subgrid boundary conditions for macroscopic-scale simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, T. G.; Smithe, D. N.

    2015-02-01

    The formation of sheaths near metallic or dielectric-coated wall materials in contact with a plasma is ubiquitous, often giving rise to physical phenomena (sputtering, secondary electron emission, etc) which influence plasma properties and dynamics both near and far from the material interface. In this paper, we use first-principles PIC simulations of such interfaces to formulate a subgrid sheath boundary condition which encapsulates fundamental aspects of the sheath behavior at the interface. Such a boundary condition, based on the capacitive behavior of the sheath, is shown to be useful in fluid simulations wherein sheath scale lengths are substantially smaller than scale lengths for other relevant physical processes (e.g. radiofrequency wavelengths), in that it enables kinetic processes associated with the presence of the sheath to be numerically modeled without explicit resolution of spatial and temporal sheath scales such as electron Debye length or plasma frequency.

  10. A Boundary Condition for Simulation of Flow Over Porous Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frink, Neal T.; Bonhaus, Daryl L.; Vatsa, Veer N.; Bauer, Steven X. S.; Tinetti, Ana F.

    2001-01-01

    A new boundary condition is presented.for simulating the flow over passively porous surfaces. The model builds on the prior work of R.H. Bush to eliminate the need for constructing grid within an underlying plenum, thereby simplifying the numerical modeling of passively porous flow control systems and reducing computation cost. Code experts.for two structured-grid.flow solvers, TLNS3D and CFL3D. and one unstructured solver, USM3Dns, collaborated with an experimental porosity expert to develop the model and implement it into their respective codes. Results presented,for the three codes on a slender forebody with circumferential porosity and a wing with leading-edge porosity demonstrate a good agreement with experimental data and a remarkable ability to predict the aggregate aerodynamic effects of surface porosity with a simple boundary condition.

  11. Boundary conditions for simulating large SAW devices using ANSYS.

    PubMed

    Peng, Dasong; Yu, Fengqi; Hu, Jian; Li, Peng

    2010-08-01

    In this report, we propose improved substrate left and right boundary conditions for simulating SAW devices using ANSYS. Compared with the previous methods, the proposed method can greatly reduce computation time. Furthermore, the longer the distance from the first reflector to the last one, the more computation time can be reduced. To verify the proposed method, a design example is presented with device center frequency 971.14 MHz.

  12. Hydrodynamic boundary condition of water on hydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Schaeffel, David; Yordanov, Stoyan; Schmelzeisen, Marcus; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Kappl, Michael; Schmitz, Roman; Dünweg, Burkhard; Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Koynov, Kaloian

    2013-05-01

    By combining total internal reflection fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy with Brownian dynamics simulations, we were able to measure the hydrodynamic boundary condition of water flowing over a smooth solid surface with exceptional accuracy. We analyzed the flow of aqueous electrolytes over glass coated with a layer of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (advancing contact angle Θ = 108°) or perfluorosilane (Θ = 113°). Within an error of better than 10 nm the slip length was indistinguishable from zero on all surfaces.

  13. Stability analysis of intermediate boundary conditions in approximate factorization schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    South, J. C., Jr.; Hafez, M. M.; Gottlieb, D.

    1986-01-01

    The paper discusses the role of the intermediate boundary condition in the AF2 scheme used by Holst for simulation of the transonic full potential equation. It is shown that the treatment suggested by Holst led to a restriction on the time step and ways to overcome this restriction are suggested. The discussion is based on the theory developed by Gustafsson, Kreiss, and Sundstrom and also on the von Neumann method.

  14. Energy Based Multiscale Modeling with Non-Periodic Boundary Conditions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-13

    was implemented numerically utilizing Python scripting to invoke the nested FE solution within the commercial FE software ABAQUS. To reduce initial...between Python and the ABAQUS solver. The left-hand side of Figure 8 highlights the localization process which involves passing of the macroscopic...deformation gradient from the UMAT to the custom Python script which then modifies the boundary conditions to a unit-cell, or RVE, ABAQUS input file

  15. Arterial wall tethering as a distant boundary condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodis, S.; Zamir, M.

    2009-11-01

    A standing difficulty in the problem of blood vessel tethering has been that only one of the two required boundary conditions can be fully specified, namely, that at the inner (endothelial) wall surface. The other, at the outer layer of the vessel wall, is not known except in the limiting case where the wall is fully tethered such that its outer layer is prevented from any displacement. In all other cases, where the wall is either free or partially tethered, a direct boundary condition is not available. We present a method of determining this missing boundary condition by considering the limiting case of a semi-infinite wall. The result makes it possible to define the degree of tethering imposed by surrounding tissue more accurately in terms of the displacement of the outer layer of the vessel wall, rather than in terms of equivalent added mass which has been done in the past. This new approach makes it possible for the first time to describe the effect of partial tethering in its full range, from zero to full tethering. The results indicate that high tethering leads to high stresses and low displacements within the vessel wall, while low tethering leads to low stresses and high displacements. Since both extremes would be damaging to wall tissue, particularly elastin, this suggest that moderate tethering would be optimum in the physiological setting.

  16. High Energy Boundary Conditions for a Cartesian Mesh Euler Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandya, Shishir A.; Murman, Scott M.; Aftosmis, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    Inlets and exhaust nozzles are often omitted or fared over in aerodynamic simulations of aircraft due to the complexities involving in the modeling of engine details such as complex geometry and flow physics. However, the assumption is often improper as inlet or plume flows have a substantial effect on vehicle aerodynamics. A tool for specifying inlet and exhaust plume conditions through the use of high-energy boundary conditions in an established inviscid flow solver is presented. The effects of the plume on the flow fields near the inlet and plume are discussed.

  17. Inflow/Outflow Boundary Conditions with Application to FUN3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Jan-Renee

    2011-01-01

    Several boundary conditions that allow subsonic and supersonic flow into and out of the computational domain are discussed. These boundary conditions are demonstrated in the FUN3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code which solves the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations on unstructured computational meshes. The boundary conditions are enforced through determination of the flux contribution at the boundary to the solution residual. The boundary conditions are implemented in an implicit form where the Jacobian contribution of the boundary condition is included and is exact. All of the flows are governed by the calorically perfect gas thermodynamic equations. Three problems are used to assess these boundary conditions. Solution residual convergence to machine zero precision occurred for all cases. The converged solution boundary state is compared with the requested boundary state for several levels of mesh densities. The boundary values converged to the requested boundary condition with approximately second-order accuracy for all of the cases.

  18. Research on Liquid Lubricants for Space Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, William R., Jr.; Shogrin, Bradley A.; Jansen, Mark J.

    1999-01-01

    Four research areas at the NASA Glenn Research Center involving the tribology of space mechanisms are highlighted. These areas include: soluble boundary lubrication additives for perfluoropolyether liquid lubricants, a Pennzane dewetting phenomenon, the effect of ODC-free bearing cleaning processes on bearing lifetimes and the development of a new class of liquid lubricants based on silahydrocarbons.

  19. Research on liquid lubricants for space mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, William R., Jr.; Shogrin, Bradley A.; Jansen, Mark J.

    1998-01-01

    Four research areas at the NASA Lewis Research Center involving the tribology of space mechanisms are highlighted. These areas include: soluble boundary lubrication additives for perfluoropolyether liquid lubricants, a Pennzane dewetting phenomenon, the effect of ODC-free bearing cleaning processes on bearing lifetimes, and the development of a new class of liquid lubricants based on silahydrocarbons.

  20. Nonstationary Stokes System in Cylindrical Domains Under Boundary Slip Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaja¸czkowski, Wojciech M.

    2017-03-01

    Existence and uniqueness of solutions to the nonstationary Stokes system in a cylindrical domain {Ωsubset{R}^3} and under boundary slip conditions are proved in anisotropic Sobolev spaces. Assuming that the external force belong to {L_r(Ω×(0,T))} and initial velocity to {W_r^{2-2/r}(Ω)} there exists a solution such that velocity belongs to {W_r^{2,1}(Ω×(0,T))} and gradient of pressure to {L_r(Ω×(0,T))}, {rin(1,∞)}, {T > 0}. Thanks to the slip boundary conditions and a partition of unity the Stokes system is transformed to the Poisson equation for pressure and the heat equation for velocity. The existence of solutions to these equations is proved by applying local considerations. In this case we have to consider neighborhoods near the edges which by local mapping can be transformed to dihedral angle {π/2}. Hence solvability of the problem bases on construction local Green functions (near an interior point, near a point of a smooth part of the boundary, near a point of the edge) and their appropriate estimates. The technique presented in this paper can also work in other functional spaces: Sobolev-Slobodetskii, Besov, Nikolskii, Hölder and so on.

  1. Study on plate silencer with general boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Gongmin; Zhao, Xiaochen; Zhang, Wenping; Li, Shuaijun

    2014-09-01

    A plate silencer consists of an expansion chamber with two side-branch rigid cavities covered by plates. Previous studies showed that, in a duct, the introduction of simply supported or clamped plates into an air conveying system could achieve broadband quieting from low to medium frequencies. In this study, analytical formulation is extended to the plate silencer with general boundary conditions. A set of static beam functions, which are a combination of sine series and third-order polynomial, is employed as the trial functions of the plate vibration velocity. Greens function and Kirchhoff-Helmholtz integral are used to solve the sound radiation in the duct and the cavity, and then the vibration velocity of the plate is obtained. Having obtained the vibration velocity, the pressure perturbations induced by the plate oscillation and the transmission loss are found. Optimization is carried out in order to obtain the widest stopband. The transmission loss calculated by the analytical method agrees closely with the result of the finite element method simulation. Further studies with regard to the plate under several different classical boundary conditions based on the validated model show that a clamped-free plate silencer has the worst stopband. Attempts to release the boundary restriction of the plate are also made to study its effect on sound reflection. Results show that a softer end for a clamped-clamped plate silencer helps increase the optimal bandwidth, while the same treatment for simply supported plate silencer will result in performance degradation.

  2. A Poisson-Boltzmann dynamics method with nonperiodic boundary condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Qiang; Luo, Ray

    2003-12-01

    We have developed a well-behaved and efficient finite difference Poisson-Boltzmann dynamics method with a nonperiodic boundary condition. This is made possible, in part, by a rather fine grid spacing used for the finite difference treatment of the reaction field interaction. The stability is also made possible by a new dielectric model that is smooth both over time and over space, an important issue in the application of implicit solvents. In addition, the electrostatic focusing technique facilitates the use of an accurate yet efficient nonperiodic boundary condition: boundary grid potentials computed by the sum of potentials from individual grid charges. Finally, the particle-particle particle-mesh technique is adopted in the computation of the Coulombic interaction to balance accuracy and efficiency in simulations of large biomolecules. Preliminary testing shows that the nonperiodic Poisson-Boltzmann dynamics method is numerically stable in trajectories at least 4 ns long. The new model is also fairly efficient: it is comparable to that of the pairwise generalized Born solvent model, making it a strong candidate for dynamics simulations of biomolecules in dilute aqueous solutions. Note that the current treatment of total electrostatic interactions is with no cutoff, which is important for simulations of biomolecules. Rigorous treatment of the Debye-Hückel screening is also possible within the Poisson-Boltzmann framework: its importance is demonstrated by a simulation of a highly charged protein.

  3. Transport across nanogaps using self-consistent boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, D.; Kumar, R.

    2012-06-01

    Charge particle transport across nanogaps is studied theoretically within the Schrodinger-Poisson mean field framework. The determination of self-consistent boundary conditions across the gap forms the central theme in order to allow for realistic interface potentials (such as metal-vacuum) which are smooth at the boundary and do not abruptly assume a constant value at the interface. It is shown that a semiclassical expansion of the transmitted wavefunction leads to approximate but self consistent boundary conditions without assuming any specific form of the potential beyond the gap. Neglecting the exchange and correlation potentials, the quantum Child-Langmuir law is investigated. It is shown that at zero injection energy, the quantum limiting current density (Jc) is found to obey the local scaling law Jc ~ Vgα/D5-2α with the gap separation D and voltage Vg. The exponent α > 1.1 with α → 3/2 in the classical regime of small de Broglie wavelengths.

  4. Electrostatics of solvated systems in periodic boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreussi, Oliviero; Marzari, Nicola

    2014-12-01

    Continuum solvation methods can provide an accurate and inexpensive embedding of quantum simulations in liquid or complex dielectric environments. Notwithstanding a long history and manifold applications to isolated systems in open boundary conditions, their extension to materials simulations, typically entailing periodic boundary conditions, is very recent, and special care is needed to address correctly the electrostatic terms. We discuss here how periodic boundary corrections developed for systems in vacuum should be modified to take into account solvent effects, using as a general framework the self-consistent continuum solvation model developed within plane-wave density-functional theory [O. Andreussi et al., J. Chem. Phys. 136, 064102 (2012), 10.1063/1.3676407]. A comprehensive discussion of real- and reciprocal-space corrective approaches is presented, together with an assessment of their ability to remove electrostatic interactions between periodic replicas. Numerical results for zero- and two-dimensional charged systems highlight the effectiveness of the different suggestions, and underline the importance of a proper treatment of electrostatic interactions in first-principles studies of charged systems in solution.

  5. Sporting Good Lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Sun Coast Chemicals was originally contracted by Lockheed Martin Space Operations to formulate a spray lubricant free of environmental drawbacks for the Mobile Launch Platform used to haul the Space Shuttle from the Kennedy Space Center Vehicle Assembly Building to a launch pad. From this work, Sun Coast introduced Train Track Lubricant, Penetrating Spray Lube, and Biodegradable Hydraulic Fluid. Based on the original lubricant work, two more products have also been introduced. First, the X-1R Super Gun Cleaner and Lubricant protects guns from rust and corrosion caused by environmental conditions. Second, the X-1R Tackle Pack, endorsed by both fresh and saltwater guides and certain reel manufacturers, penetrates, cleans, reduces friction, lubricates, and provides extra protection against rust and corrosion.

  6. Assessment of infrared spectroscopy and multivariate techniques for monitoring the service condition of diesel-engine lubricating oils.

    PubMed

    Caneca, Arnobio Roberto; Pimentel, M Fernanda; Galvão, Roberto Kawakami Harrop; da Matta, Cláudia Eliane; de Carvalho, Florival Rodrigues; Raimundo, Ivo M; Pasquini, Celio; Rohwedder, Jarbas J R

    2006-09-15

    This paper presents two methodologies for monitoring the service condition of diesel-engine lubricating oils on the basis of infrared spectra. In the first approach, oils samples are discriminated into three groups, each one associated to a given wear stage. An algorithm is proposed to select spectral variables with good discriminant power and small collinearity for the purpose of discriminant analysis classification. As a result, a classification accuracy of 93% was obtained both in the middle (MIR) and near-infrared (NIR) ranges. The second approach employs multivariate calibration methods to predict the viscosity of the lubricant. In this case, the use of absorbance measurements in the NIR spectral range was not successful, because of experimental difficulties associated to the presence of particulate matter. Such a problem was circumvented by the use of attenuated total reflectance (ATR) measurements in the MIR spectral range, in which an RMSEP of 3.8cSt and a relative average error of 3.2% were attained.

  7. Negative bending mode curvature via Robin boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Samuel D. M.; Craster, Richard V.; Guenneau, Sébastien

    2009-06-01

    We examine the band spectrum, and associated Floquet-Bloch eigensolutions, arising in straight walled acoustic waveguides that have periodic structure along the guide. Homogeneous impedance (Robin) conditions are imposed along the guide walls and we find that in certain circumstances, negative curvature of the lowest (bending) mode can be achieved. This is unexpected, and has not been observed in a variety of physical situations examined by other authors. Further unexpected properties include the existence of the bending mode only on a subset of the Brillouin zone, as well as permitting otherwise unobtainable velocities of energy transmission. We conclude with a discussion of how such boundary conditions might be physically reproduced using effective conditions and homogenization theory, although the methodology to achieve these effective conditions is an open problem. To cite this article: S.D.M. Adams et al., C. R. Physique 10 (2009).

  8. Boundary conditions towards realistic simulation of jet engine noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhamankar, Nitin S.

    Strict noise regulations at major airports and increasing environmental concerns have made prediction and attenuation of jet noise an active research topic. Large eddy simulation coupled with computational aeroacoustics has the potential to be a significant research tool for this problem. With the emergence of petascale computer clusters, it is now computationally feasible to include the nozzle geometry in jet noise simulations. In high Reynolds number experiments on jet noise, the turbulent boundary layer on the inner surface of the nozzle separates into a turbulent free shear layer. Inclusion of a nozzle with turbulent inlet conditions is necessary to simulate this phenomenon realistically. This will allow a reasonable comparison of numerically computed noise levels with the experimental results. Two viscous wall boundary conditions are implemented for modeling the nozzle walls. A characteristic-based approach is compared with a computationally cheaper, extrapolation-based formulation. In viscous flow over a circular cylinder under two different regimes, excellent agreement is observed between the results of the two approaches. The results agree reasonably well with reference experimental and numerical results. Both the boundary conditions are thus found to be appropriate, the extrapolation-based formulation having an edge with its low cost. This is followed with the crucial step of generation of a turbulent boundary layer inside the nozzle. A digital filter-based turbulent inflow condition, extended in a new way to non-uniform curvilinear grids is implemented to achieve this. A zero pressure gradient flat plate turbulent boundary layer is simulated at a high Reynolds number to show that the method is capable of producing sustained turbulence. The length of the adjustment region necessary for synthetic inlet turbulence to recover from modeling errors is estimated. A low Reynolds number jet simulation including a round nozzle geometry is performed and the method

  9. Convolution quadrature for the wave equation with impedance boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauter, S. A.; Schanz, M.

    2017-04-01

    We consider the numerical solution of the wave equation with impedance boundary conditions and start from a boundary integral formulation for its discretization. We develop the generalized convolution quadrature (gCQ) to solve the arising acoustic retarded potential integral equation for this impedance problem. For the special case of scattering from a spherical object, we derive representations of analytic solutions which allow to investigate the effect of the impedance coefficient on the acoustic pressure analytically. We have performed systematic numerical experiments to study the convergence rates as well as the sensitivity of the acoustic pressure from the impedance coefficients. Finally, we apply this method to simulate the acoustic pressure in a building with a fairly complicated geometry and to study the influence of the impedance coefficient also in this situation.

  10. Applying twisted boundary conditions for few-body nuclear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Körber, Christopher; Luu, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    We describe and implement twisted boundary conditions for the deuteron and triton systems within finite volumes using the nuclear lattice EFT formalism. We investigate the finite-volume dependence of these systems with different twist angles. We demonstrate how various finite-volume information can be used to improve calculations of binding energies in such a framework. Our results suggests that with appropriate twisting of boundaries, infinite-volume binding energies can be reliably extracted from calculations using modest volume sizes with cubic length L ≈8 -14 fm. Of particular importance is our derivation and numerical verification of three-body analogs of "i-periodic" twist angles that eliminate the leading-order finite-volume effects to the three-body binding energy.

  11. Boundary Condition Effects on Taylor States in SSX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jeremy; Shrock, Jaron; Kaur, Manjit; Brown, Michael; Schaffner, David

    2016-10-01

    Three different boundary conditions are applied to the SSX 0.15 m diameter plasma wind tunnel and the resultant Taylor states are characterized. The glass walls of the wind tunnel act as an insulating boundary condition. For the second condition, a flux conserver is wrapped around the tunnel to trap magnetic field lines inside the SSX. For the last condition, the flux conserver is segmented to add theta pinch coils, which will accelerate the plasma. We used resistive stainless steel and copper mesh for the flux conservers, which have soak times of 3 μs and 250 μs , respectively. The goal is to increase the speed, temperature, and density of the plasma plume by adding magnetic energy into the system using the coils and compressing the plasma into small volumes by stagnation. The time of flight is measured by using a linear array of magnetic pick-up loops, which track the plasma plume's location as a function of time. The density is measured by precision quadrature He-Ne laser interferometry, and the temperature is measured by ion Doppler spectroscopy. Speed and density without the coils are 30km /s and 1015cm-3 . We will reach a speed of 100km /s and density of 1016cm-3 by adding the coil. Work supported by DOE OFES and ARPA-E ALPHA program.

  12. Influence of boundary conditions and turntable speeds on the stability of hydrostatic oil cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhaomiao; Zhang, Chengyin; Shen, Feng

    2011-09-01

    The flow, bearing, and carrying capacity of the cycloidal hydrostatic oil cavity in hydrostatic turntable systems are numerically simulated, considering the rotation speeds of a turntable from 0 to 5 m/s and different boundary conditions. The vortex effect is weakened, and the stability of the oil cavity is enhanced with the increase in lubricant viscosity. However, the increase in inlet speed, depth, and inlet radius of the oil cavity causes the vortex effect to increase and the stability of oil cavity to reduce. With the increase in the oil film thickness, the carrying capacity of the oil cavity diminishes. The oil cavity pressure increases along the direction of the motion of the turntable; it is distributed unevenly because of the rotation of the turntable. With the increase in turntable speed, the location and size of the vortex scope in the oil cavity flow field and the strength of the vortex near the entrance gradually weaken and move away from the entry. The distribution of pressure is determined by the locations of the vortex. When the vortex is close to the wall, the wall pressure increases at its location. Otherwise, the wall pressure decreases first and then increases after the center of the vortex.

  13. Study of Lubricant Jet Flow Phenomena in Spur Gears: Out of Mesh Condition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, D. P.; Akin, L. S.

    1977-01-01

    Oil jet lubrication on the disengaging side of a gear mesh was analyzed. Results of the analysis were computerized and used to determine the oil jet impingement depth for several gear ratios and oil jet to pitch line velocity ratios. A gear test rig using high speed photography was used to experimentally determine the oil jet impingement depth on the disengaging side of mesh. Impingement depth reached a maximum at gear ratio near 1.5 where chopping by the leading gear tooth limited impingement depth. The pinion impingement depth is zero above a gear ratio of 1.172 for a jet velocity to pitch time velocity ration of 1.0 and is similar for other velocity ratios. The impingement depth for gear and pinion are equal and approximately one half the maximum at a gear ration of 7.0.

  14. Three dimensional dynamics of rotating structures under mixed boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bediz, Bekir; Romero, L. A.; Ozdoganlar, O. Burak

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents the spectral-Tchebychev (ST) technique for solution of three dimensional (3D) dynamics of rotating structures. In particular, structures that exhibit coupled dynamic response require a 3D modeling approach to capture their dynamic behavior. Rotational motions further complicate this behavior, inducing coriolis, centrifugal softening, and (nonlinear) stress-stiffening effects. Therefore, a 3D solution approach is needed to accurately capture the rotational dynamics. The presented 3D-ST technique provides a fast-converging and precise solution approach for rotational dynamics of structures with complex geometries and mixed boundary conditions. Specifically, unlike finite elements techniques, the presented technique uses a series expansion approach considering distributed-parameter system equations: The integral boundary value problem for rotating structures is discretized using the spectral-Tchebychev approach. To simplify the domain of the structures, cross-sectional and rotational transformations are applied to problems with curved cross-section and pretwisted geometry. The nonlinear terms included in the integral boundary value problem are linearized around an equilibrium solution using the quasi-static method. As a result, mass, damping, and stiffness matrices, as well as a forcing vector, are obtained for a given rotating structure. Several case studies are then performed to demonstrate the application and effectiveness of the 3D-ST solution. For each problem, the natural frequencies and modes shapes from the 3D-ST solution are compared to those from the literature (when available) and to those from a commercial finite elements software. The case studies include rotating/spinning parallelepipeds under free and mixed boundary conditions, and a cantilevered pretwisted beam (i.e., rotating blade) with an airfoil geometry rotating on a hub. It is seen that the natural frequencies and mode shapes from the 3D-ST technique differ from those from the

  15. On the nonlinear Schrodinger equation with nonzero boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagerstrom, Emily

    integral, provided the initial condition satisfies further conditions. Modulational instability (focusing NLS with symmetric nonzero boundary conditions at infinity.) The focusing NLS equation is considered with potentials that are "box-like" piecewise constant functions. Several results are obtained. In particular, it is shown that there are conditions on the parameters of the potential for which there are no discrete eigenvalues. Thus there is a class of potentials for which the corresponding solutions of the NLS equation have no solitons. Hence, solitons cannot be the medium for the modulational instability. This contradicts a recent conjecture by Zakharov. On the other hand, it is shown for a different class of potentials the scattering problem always has a discrete eigenvalue along the imaginary axis. Thus, there exist arbitrarily small perturbations of the constant potential for which solitons exist, so no area theorem is possible. The existence, number and location of discrete eigenvalues in other situations are studied numerically. Finally, the small-deviation limit of the IST is computed and compared with the direct linearization of the NLS equation around a constant background. From this it is shown that there is an interval of the continuous spectrum on which the eigenvalue is imaginary and the scattering parameter is imaginary. The Jost eigenfunctions corresponding to this interval are the nonlinear analogue of the unstable Fourier modes. Defocusing NLS equation with asymmetric boundary conditions at infinity. The defocusing NLS equation with asymmetric boundary conditions is considered. To do so, first the case of symmetric boundary conditions is revisited. While the IST for this case has been formulated in the literature, it is usually done through the use of a uniformization variable. This was done because the eigenvalues of the scattering problem have branching; the uniformization variable allows one to move from a 2-sheeted Riemann surface to the complex

  16. The effects of external conditions in turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzek, Brian G.

    The effects of multiple external conditions on turbulent boundary layers were studied in detail. These external conditions include: surface roughness, upstream turbulence intensity, and pressure gradient. Furthermore, the combined effects of these conditions show the complicated nature of many realistic flow conditions. It was found that the effects of surface roughness are difficult to generalize, given the importance of so many parameters. These parameters include: roughness geometry, roughness regime, roughness height to boundary layer thickness, (k/delta), roughness parameter, ( k+), Reynolds number, and roughness function (Delta B+). A further complication, is the difficulty in computing the wall shear stress, tauw/rho. For the sand grain type roughness, the mean velocity and Reynolds stresses were studied in inner and outer variables, as well as, boundary layer parameters, anisotropy tensor, production term, and viscous stress and form drag contributions. To explore the effects of roughness and Reynolds number dependence in the boundary layer, a new experiment was carefully designed to properly capture the x-dependence of the single-point statistics. It was found that roughness destroys the viscous layer near the wall, thus, reducing the contribution of the viscous stress in the wall region. As a result, the contribution in the skin friction due to form drag increases, while the viscous stress decreases. This yields Reynolds number invariance in the skin friction, near-wall roughness parameters, and inner velocity profiles as k + increases into the fully rough regime. However, in the transitionally rough regime, (i.e., 5 < k+ < 70), it was found that these parameters are functions of both Reynolds number and roughness. For the sand grain type roughnesses, only the Zagarola and Smits scaling, Uinfinitydelta*/delta, is able to remove the effects of roughness and Reynolds number from the velocity profiles in outer variables, provided there is no freestream

  17. Breaking generalized covariance, classical renormalization, and boundary conditions from superpotentials

    SciTech Connect

    Livshits, Gideon I.

    2014-02-15

    Superpotentials offer a direct means of calculating conserved charges associated with the asymptotic symmetries of space-time. Yet superpotentials have been plagued with inconsistencies, resulting in nonphysical or incongruent values for the mass, angular momentum, and energy loss due to radiation. The approach of Regge and Teitelboim, aimed at a clear Hamiltonian formulation with a boundary, and its extension to the Lagrangian formulation by Julia and Silva have resolved these issues, and have resulted in a consistent, well-defined and unique variational equation for the superpotential, thereby placing it on a firm footing. A hallmark solution of this equation is the KBL superpotential obtained from the first-order Lovelock Lagrangian. Nevertheless, here we show that these formulations are still insufficient for Lovelock Lagrangians of higher orders. We present a paradox, whereby the choice of fields affects the superpotential for equivalent on-shell dynamics. We offer two solutions to this paradox: either the original Lagrangian must be effectively renormalized, or that boundary conditions must be imposed, so that space-time be asymptotically maximally symmetric. Non-metricity is central to this paradox, and we show how quadratic non-metricity in the bulk of space-time contributes to the conserved charges on the boundary, where it vanishes identically. This is a realization of the gravitational Higgs mechanism, proposed by Percacci, where the non-metricity is the analogue of the Goldstone boson.

  18. Compressible turbulent channel flow with impedance boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalo, Carlo; Bodart, Julien; Lele, Sanjiva

    2014-11-01

    We have performed large-eddy simulations of compressible turbulent channel flow at one bulk Reynolds number, Reb = 6900, for bulk Mach numbers Mb = 0.05, 0.2, 0.5, with linear acoustic impedance boundary conditions (IBCs). The IBCs are formulated in the time domain following Fung and Ju (2004) and coupled with a Navier-Stokes solver. The impedance model adopted is a three-parameter Helmholtz oscillator with resonant frequency tuned to the outer layer eddies. The IBC's resistance, R, has been varied in the range, R = 0.01, 0.10, 1.00. Tuned IBCs result in a noticeable drag increase for sufficiently high Mb and/or low R, exceeding 300% for Mb = 0.5 and R = 0.01, and thus represents a promising passive control technique for delaying boundary layer separation and/or enhancing wall heat transfer. Alterations to the turbulent flow structure are confined to the first 15% of the boundary layer thickness where the classical buffer-layer coherent vortical structures are replaced by an array of Kelvin-Helmholtz-like rollers. The non-zero asymptotic value of the Reynolds shear stress gradient at the wall results in the disappearance of the viscous sublayer and very early departure of the mean velocity profiles from the law of the wall.

  19. Artificial Boundary Conditions Based on the Difference Potentials Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsynkov, Semyon V.

    1996-01-01

    While numerically solving a problem initially formulated on an unbounded domain, one typically truncates this domain, which necessitates setting the artificial boundary conditions (ABC's) at the newly formed external boundary. The issue of setting the ABC's appears to be most significant in many areas of scientific computing, for example, in problems originating from acoustics, electrodynamics, solid mechanics, and fluid dynamics. In particular, in computational fluid dynamics (where external problems present a wide class of practically important formulations) the proper treatment of external boundaries may have a profound impact on the overall quality and performance of numerical algorithms. Most of the currently used techniques for setting the ABC's can basically be classified into two groups. The methods from the first group (global ABC's) usually provide high accuracy and robustness of the numerical procedure but often appear to be fairly cumbersome and (computationally) expensive. The methods from the second group (local ABC's) are, as a rule, algorithmically simple, numerically cheap, and geometrically universal; however, they usually lack accuracy of computations. In this paper we first present a survey and provide a comparative assessment of different existing methods for constructing the ABC's. Then, we describe a relatively new ABC's technique of ours and review the corresponding results. This new technique, in our opinion, is currently one of the most promising in the field. It enables one to construct such ABC's that combine the advantages relevant to the two aforementioned classes of existing methods. Our approach is based on application of the difference potentials method attributable to V. S. Ryaben'kii. This approach allows us to obtain highly accurate ABC's in the form of certain (nonlocal) boundary operator equations. The operators involved are analogous to the pseudodifferential boundary projections first introduced by A. P. Calderon and then

  20. Simulation Study of the Flow Boundary Condition for Rough Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Gang; Robbins, Mark O.

    2001-03-01

    In order to solve a flow problem with the continuum Navier-Stokes equation, a boundary condition must be assumed. In most cases, a no-slip condition is used, i.e. the velocity of the fluid is set equal to that of a bounding solid at their interface. Deviations from this condition can be quantified by a slip length S that represents the additional width of fluid that would be needed to accomodate any velocity difference at the interface. Previous simulations with atomically flat surfaces show that S can be very large in certain limits. (P. A. Thompson and M. O. Robbins, Phys. Rev. A, 41), 6830(1990). ( J.-L. Barrat and L. Bocquet, Phys. Rev. Lett., 82), 4671(1999). A dramatic divergence with S as shear rate increases has also been seen.( P. A. Thompson and S. M. Troian, Nature, 389), 360(1997) We have extended these simulations to surfaces with random roughness, steps, and angled facets typical of twin boundaries. In all cases, S decreases rapidly as the roughness increases. When peak-to-peak roughness is only two atomic diameters, values of S have dropped from more than 20 diameters to only one or two. In addition, the non-linear regime where S diverges with shear rate is supressed by surface roughness. These results suggest that the experimental behavior of atomically flat surfaces such as mica may be very different than that of more typical rough surfaces.

  1. Hawking radiation, covariant boundary conditions, and vacuum states

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Rabin; Kulkarni, Shailesh

    2009-04-15

    The basic characteristics of the covariant chiral current and the covariant chiral energy-momentum tensor are obtained from a chiral effective action. These results are used to justify the covariant boundary condition used in recent approaches of computing the Hawking flux from chiral gauge and gravitational anomalies. We also discuss a connection of our results with the conventional calculation of nonchiral currents and stress tensors in different (Unruh, Hartle-Hawking and Boulware) states.

  2. Proceedings for the ICASE Workshop on Heterogeneous Boundary Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, A. Louise; Scroggs, Jeffrey S.

    1991-01-01

    Domain Decomposition is a complex problem with many interesting aspects. The choice of decomposition can be made based on many different criteria, and the choice of interface of internal boundary conditions are numerous. The various regions under study may have different dynamical balances, indicating that different physical processes are dominating the flow in these regions. This conference was called in recognition of the need to more clearly define the nature of these complex problems. This proceedings is a collection of the presentations and the discussion groups.

  3. Analytical solutions with Generalized Impedance Boundary Conditions (GIBC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Syed, H. H.; Volakis, John L.

    1991-01-01

    Rigorous uniform geometrical theory of diffraction (UTD) diffraction coefficients are presented for a coated convex cylinder simulated with generalized impedance boundary conditions. In particular, ray solutions are obtained which remain valid in the transition region and reduce uniformly to those in the deep lit and shadow regions. These involve new transition functions in place of the usual Fock-type integrals, characteristics to the impedance cylinder. A uniform asymptotic solution is also presented for observations in the close vicinity of the cylinder. The diffraction coefficients for the convex cylinder are obtained via a generalization of the corresponding ones for the circular cylinder.

  4. Periodic boundary conditions for dislocation dynamics simulations in three dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Bulatov, V V; Rhee, M; Cai, W

    2000-11-20

    This article presents an implementation of periodic boundary conditions (PBC) for Dislocation Dynamics (DD) simulations in three dimensions (3D). We discuss fundamental aspects of PBC development, including preservation of translational invariance and line connectivity, the choice of initial configurations compatible with PBC and a consistent treatment of image stress. On the practical side, our approach reduces to manageable proportions the computational burden of updating the long-range elastic interactions among dislocation segments. The timing data confirms feasibility and practicality of PBC for large-scale DD simulations in 3D.

  5. Boundary conditions and generalized functions in a transition radiation problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villavicencio, M.; Jiménez, J. L.

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this work is to show how all the components of the electromagnetic field involved in the transition radiation problem can be obtained using distribution functions. The handling of the products and derivatives of distributions appearing in the differential equations governing transition radiation, allows to obtain the necessary boundary conditions, additional to those implied by Maxwell's equations, in order to exactly determine the longitudinal components of the electromagnetic field. It is shown that this method is not only useful but it is really convenient to achieve a full analysis of the problem.

  6. Boundary conditions for soft glassy flows: slippage and surface fluidization.

    PubMed

    Mansard, Vincent; Bocquet, Lydéric; Colin, Annie

    2014-09-28

    We explore the question of surface boundary conditions for the flow of a dense emulsion. We make use of microlithographic tools to create surfaces with well controlled roughness patterns and measure using dynamic confocal microscopy both the slip velocity and the shear rate close to the wall, which we relate to the notion of surface fluidization. Both slippage and wall fluidization depend non-monotonously on the roughness. We interpret this behavior within a simple model in terms of the building of a stratified layer and the activation of plastic events by the surface roughness.

  7. Reconnection properties in collisionless plasma with open boundary conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, H. E.; Ma, Z. W.; Huang, J.

    2014-07-15

    Collisionless magnetic reconnection in a Harris current sheet with different initial thicknesses is investigated using a 21/2 -D Darwin particle-in-cell simulation with the magnetosonic open boundary condition. It is found that the thicknesses of the ion dissipation region and the reconnection current sheet, when the reconnection rate E{sub r} reaches its first peak, are independent of the initial thickness of the current sheet; while the peak reconnection rate depends on it. The peak reconnection rate increases with decrease of the current sheet thickness as E{sub r}∼a{sup −1/2}, where a is the initial current sheet half-thickness.

  8. Magnetospheric conditions near the equatorial footpoints of proton isotropy boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeev, V. A.; Chernyaev, I. A.; Angelopoulos, V.; Ganushkina, N. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Data from a cluster of three THEMIS (Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms) spacecraft during February-March 2009 frequently provide an opportunity to construct local data-adaptive magnetospheric models, which are suitable for the accurate mapping along the magnetic field lines at distances of 6-9 Re in the nightside magnetosphere. This allows us to map the isotropy boundaries (IBs) of 30 and 80 keV protons observed by low-altitude NOAA POES (Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellites) to the equatorial magnetosphere (to find the projected isotropy boundary, PIB) and study the magnetospheric conditions, particularly to evaluate the ratio KIB (Rc/rc; the magnetic field curvature radius to the particle gyroradius) in the neutral sheet at that point. Special care is taken to control the factors which influence the accuracy of the adaptive models and mapping. Data indicate that better accuracy of an adaptive model is achieved when the PIB distance from the closest spacecraft is as small as 1-2 Re. For this group of most accurate predictions, the spread of KIB values is still large (from 4 to 32), with the median value KIB ~13 being larger than the critical value Kcr ~ 8 expected at the inner boundary of nonadiabatic angular scattering in the current sheet. It appears that two different mechanisms may contribute to form the isotropy boundary. The group with K ~ [4,12] is most likely formed by current sheet scattering, whereas the group having KIB ~ [12,32] could be formed by the resonant scattering of low-energy protons by the electromagnetic ion-cyclotron (EMIC) waves. The energy dependence of the upper K limit and close proximity of the latter event to the plasmapause locations support this conclusion. We also discuss other reasons why the K ~ 8 criterion for isotropization may fail to work, as well as a possible relationship between the two scattering mechanisms.

  9. Piezoviscosity In Lubrication Of Nonconformal Contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeng, Yeau-Ren; Hamrock, Bernard J.; Brewe, David E.

    1988-01-01

    Developments in theory of lubrication. Analysis of piezoviscous-rigid regime of lubrication of two ellipsoidal contacts. Begins with Reynolds equation for point contact. Equation nondimensionalized using Roelands empirical formula and Dowson and Higginson formula. Equation solved numerically. Solutions obtained for full spectrum of conditions to find effects of dimensionless load, speed, parameters of lubricated and lubricating materials, and angle between direction of rolling and direction of entrainment of lubricant.

  10. Solvability of a fourth-order boundary value problem with periodic boundary conditions II

    DOE PAGES

    Gupta, Chaitan P.

    1991-01-01

    Lemore » t f : [ 0 , 1 ] × R 4 → R be a function satisfying Caratheodory's conditions and e ( x ) ∈ L 1 [ 0 , 1 ] . This paper is concerned with the solvability of the fourth-order fully quasilinear boundary value problem d 4 u d x 4 + f ( x , u ( x ) , u ′ ( x ) , u ″ ( x ) , u ‴ ( x ) ) = e ( x ) ,    0 < x < 1 , with u ( 0 ) − u ( 1 ) = u ′ ( 0 ) − u ′ ( 1 ) = u ″ ( 0 ) - u ″ ( 1 ) = u ‴ ( 0 ) - u ‴ ( 1 ) = 0 . This problem was studied earlier by the author in the special case when f was of the form f ( x , u ( x ) ) , i.e., independent of u ′ ( x ) , u ″ ( x ) , u ‴ ( x ) . It turns out that the earlier methods do not apply in this general case. The conditions need to be related to both of the linear eigenvalue problems d 4 u d x 4 = λ 4 u and d 4 u d x 4 = − λ 2 d 2 u d x 2 with periodic boundary conditions.« less

  11. Tear film dynamics with evaporation, wetting, and time-dependent flux boundary condition on an eye-shaped domain

    PubMed Central

    Li, Longfei; Braun, R. J.; Maki, K. L.; Henshaw, W. D.; King-Smith, P. E.

    2014-01-01

    We study tear film dynamics with evaporation on a wettable eye-shaped ocular surface using a lubrication model. The mathematical model has a time-dependent flux boundary condition that models the cycles of tear fluid supply and drainage; it mimics blinks on a stationary eye-shaped domain. We generate computational grids and solve the nonlinear governing equations using the OVERTURE computational framework. In vivo experimental results using fluorescent imaging are used to visualize the influx and redistribution of tears for an open eye. Results from the numerical simulations are compared with the experiment. The model captures the flow around the meniscus and other dynamic features of human tear film observed in vivo. PMID:24926191

  12. Effective slip boundary conditions for sinusoidally corrugated surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Lin; Chen, Shiyi; Robbins, Mark O.

    2016-11-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to investigate the effective slip boundary condition for a simple fluid flowing over surfaces with one-dimensional sinusoidal roughness in the Wenzel state. The effective slip length is calculated as a function of the corrugation amplitude for flows along two principal orientations: transverse and longitudinal to the corrugation. Different atomic configurations, bent and stepped, are examined for strong and weak wall-fluid interactions and high and low wall densities. Molecular dynamics results for sparse bent surfaces quantitatively agree with continuum hydrodynamic predictions with a constant local slip length. Increasing the roughness amplitude reduces the effective slip length and the reduction is larger for transverse flow than longitudinal flow. Atomic effects become important for dense surfaces, because the local slip length varies with the local curvature and atomic spacing along the wall. These effects can be captured by applying a spatially varying boundary condition to the Navier-Stokes equations. Results for stepped surfaces are qualitatively different than continuum predictions, with the effect of corrugation rising linearly with corrugation amplitude rather than quadratically. There is an increased drag for transverse flow that is proportional to the density of step edges and lowers the slip length. Edges tend to increase the slip length for longitudinal flow because of order induced along the edges.

  13. Mixed singular-regular boundary conditions in multislab radiation transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Abreu, Marcos Pimenta

    2004-06-01

    This article reports a computational method for approximately solving radiation transport problems with anisotropic scattering defined on multislab domains irradiated from one side with a beam of monoenergetic neutral particles. We assume here that the incident beam may have a monodirectional component and a continuously distributed component in angle. We begin by defining the target problem representing the class of radiation transport problems that we are focused on. We then Chandrasekhar decompose the target problem into an uncollided transport problem with left singular boundary conditions and a diffusive transport problem with regular boundary conditions. We perform an analysis of these problems to derive the exact solution of the uncollided transport problem and a discrete ordinates solution in open form to the diffusive transport problem. These solutions are the basis for the definition of a computational method for approximately solving the target problem. We illustrate the numerical accuracy of our method with three basic problems in radiative transfer and neutron transport, and we conclude this article with a discussion and directions for future work.

  14. Complex Wall Boundary Conditions for Modeling Combustion in Catalytic Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Huayang; Jackson, Gregory

    2000-11-01

    Monolith catalytic reactors for exothermic oxidation are being used in automobile exhaust clean-up and ultra-low emissions combustion systems. The reactors present a unique coupling between mass, heat, and momentum transport in a channel flow configuration. The use of porous catalytic coatings along the channel wall presents a complex boundary condition when modeled with the two-dimensional channel flow. This current work presents a 2-D transient model for predicting the performance of catalytic combustion systems for methane oxidation on Pd catalysts. The model solves the 2-D compressible transport equations for momentum, species, and energy, which are solved with a porous washcoat model for the wall boundary conditions. A time-splitting algorithm is used to separate the stiff chemical reactions from the convective/diffusive equations for the channel flow. A detailed surface chemistry mechanism is incorporated for the catalytic wall model and is used to predict transient ignition and steady-state conversion of CH4-air flows in the catalytic reactor.

  15. Spatial heterogeneity of ocean surface boundary conditions under sea ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthélemy, Antoine; Fichefet, Thierry; Goosse, Hugues

    2016-06-01

    The high heterogeneity of sea ice properties implies that its effects on the ocean are spatially variable at horizontal scales as small as a few meters. Previous studies have shown that taking this variability into account in models could be required to simulate adequately mixed layer processes and the upper ocean temperature and salinity structures. Although many advanced sea ice models include a subgrid-scale ice thickness distribution, potentially providing heterogeneous surface boundary conditions, the information is lost in the coupling with a unique ocean grid cell underneath. The present paper provides a thorough examination of boundary conditions at the ocean surface in the NEMO-LIM model, which can be used as a guideline for studies implementing subgrid-scale ocean vertical mixing schemes. Freshwater, salt, solar heat and non-solar heat fluxes are examined, as well as the norm of the surface stress. All of the thermohaline fluxes vary considerably between the open water and ice fractions of grid cells. To a lesser extent, this is also the case for the surface stress. Moreover, the salt fluxes in both hemispheres and the solar heat fluxes in the Arctic show a dependence on the ice thickness category, with more intense fluxes for thinner ice, which promotes further subgrid-scale heterogeneity. Our analysis also points out biases in the simulated open water fraction and in the ice thickness distribution, which should be investigated in more details in order to ensure that the latter is used to the best advantage.

  16. On free convection heat transfer with well defined boundary conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, M.R.D.; Newport, D.T.; Dalton, T.M.

    1999-07-01

    The scaling of free convection heat transfer is investigated. The non-dimensional groups for Boussinesq and fully compressible variable property free convection, driven by isothermal surfaces, are derived using a previously published novel method of dimensional analysis. Both flows are described by a different set of groups. The applicability of each flow description is experimentally investigated for the case of the isothermal horizontal cylinder in an air-filled isothermal enclosure. The approach taken to the boundary conditions differs from that of previous investigations. Here, it is argued that the best definition of the boundary conditions is achieved for heat exchange between the cylinder and the enclosure rather than the cylinder and an arbitrarily chosen fluid region. The enclosure temperature is shown both analytically and experimentally to affect the Nusselt number. The previously published view that the Boussinesq approximation has only a limited range of application is confirmed, and the groups derived for variable property compressible free convection are demonstrated to be correct experimentally. A new correlation for horizontal cylinder Nusselt number prediction is presented.

  17. Boundary conditions on the vapor liquid interface at strong condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryukov, A. P.; Levashov, V. Yu.

    2016-07-01

    The problem of the formulation of boundary conditions on the vapor-liquid interface is considered. The different approaches to this problem and their difficulties are discussed. Usually, a quasi-equilibrium scheme is used. At sufficiently large deviations from thermodynamic equilibrium, a molecular kinetics approach should be used for the description of the vapor flow at condensation. The formulation of the boundary conditions at the vapor liquid interface to solve the Boltzmann kinetic equation for the distribution of molecules by velocity is a sophisticated problem. It appears that molecular dynamics simulation (MDS) can be used to provide this solution at the interface. The specific problems occur in the realization of MDS on large time and space scales. Some of these problems, and a hierarchy of continuum, kinetic and molecular dynamic time scales, are discussed in the paper. A description of strong condensation at the kinetic level is presented for the steady one-dimensional problem. A formula is provided for the calculation of the limiting condensation coefficient. It is shown that as the condensation coefficient approaches the limiting value, the vapor pressure rises significantly. The results of the corresponding calculations for the Mach number and temperature at different vapor flows are demonstrated. As a result of the application of the molecular kinetics method and molecular dynamics simulation to the problem of the determination of argon condensation coefficients in the range of temperatures of vapor and liquid ratio 1.0-4.0, it is concluded that the condensation coefficient is close to unity.

  18. A Comparison of Transparent Boundary Conditions for the Fresnel Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yevick, David; Friese, Tilmann; Schmidt, Frank

    2001-04-01

    We consider two numerical transparent boundary conditions that have been previously introduced in the literature. The first condition (BPP) was proposed by Baskakov and Popov (1991, Wave Motion14, 121-128) and Papadakis et al. (1992, J. Acoust. Soc. Am.92, 2030-2038) while the second (SDY) is that of Schmidt and Deuflhard (1995, Comput. Math. Appl.29, 53-76) and Schmidt and Yevick (1997, J. Comput. Phys.134, 96-107). The latter procedure is explicitly tailored to the form of the underlying numerical propagation scheme and is therefore unconditionally stable and highly precise. Here we present a new derivation of the SDY approach. As a result of this analysis, we obtain a simple modification of the BPP method that guarantees accuracy and stability for long propagation step lengths.

  19. Influence of Spanwise Boundary Conditions on Slat Noise Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockard, David P.; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Buning, Pieter G.

    2015-01-01

    The slat noise from the 30P/30N high-lift system is being investigated through computational fluid dynamics simulations with the OVERFLOW code in conjunction with a Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings acoustics solver. In the present study, two different spanwise grids are being used to investigate the effect of the spanwise extent and periodicity on the near-field unsteady structures and radiated noise. The baseline grid with periodic boundary conditions has a short span equal to 1/9th of the stowed chord, whereas the other, longer span grid adds stretched grids on both sides of the core, baseline grid to allow inviscid surface boundary conditions at both ends. The results indicate that the near-field mean statistics obtained using the two grids are similar to each other, as are the directivity and spectral shapes of the radiated noise. However, periodicity forces all acoustic waves with less than one wavelength across the span to be two-dimensional, without any variation in the span. The spanwise coherence of the acoustic waves is what is needed to make estimates of the noise that would be radiated from realistic span lengths. Simulations with periodic conditions need spans of at least six slat chords to allow spanwise variation in the low-frequencies associated with the peak of broadband slat noise. Even then, the full influence of the periodicity is unclear, so employing grids with a fine, central region and highly stretched meshes that go to slip walls may be a more efficient means of capturing the spanwise decorrelation of low-frequency acoustic phenomena.

  20. Structural modifications of the salivary conditioning film upon exposure to sodium bicarbonate: implications for oral lubrication and mouthfeel.

    PubMed

    Ash, A; Wilde, P J; Bradshaw, D J; King, S P; Pratten, J R

    2016-03-14

    The salivary conditioning film (SCF) that forms on all surfaces in the mouth plays a key role in lubricating the oral cavity. As this film acts as an interface between tongue, enamel and oral mucosa, it is likely that any perturbations to its structure could potentially lead to a change in mouthfeel perception. This is often experienced after exposure to oral hygiene products. For example, consumers that use dentifrice that contain a high concentration of sodium bicarbonate (SB) often report a clean mouth feel after use; an attribute that is clearly desirable for oral hygiene products. However, the mechanisms by which SB interacts with the SCF to alter lubrication in the mouth is unknown. Therefore, saliva and the SCF was exposed to high ionic strength and alkaline solutions to elucidate whether the interactions observed were a direct result of SB, its high alkalinity or its ionic strength. Characteristics including bulk viscosity of saliva and the viscoelasticity of the interfacial salivary films that form at both the air/saliva and hydroxyapatite/saliva interfaces were tested. It was hypothesised that SB interacts with the SCF in two ways. Firstly, the ionic strength of SB shields electrostatic charges of salivary proteins, thus preventing protein crosslinking within the film and secondly; the alkaline pH (≈8.3) of SB reduces the gel-like structure of mucins present in the pellicle by disrupting disulphide bridging of the mucins via the ionization of their cysteine's thiol group, which has an isoelectric point of ≈8.3.

  1. SYNTHETIC LUBRICANTS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    of synthetic lubricants for use at low and high temperatures. The diesters of straight-chain dibasic acids lead the field of esters mutable as...lubricants for use at both low and high temperatures, because of their desirable combinations of properties and potentially good availability. Adipic ...azelaic, and sebacic acids are the most readily available dibasic acids suitable for ester lubricant production, while the petroleum derived Oxo alcohols

  2. Solid lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.

    1991-01-01

    The state of knowledge of solid lubricants is reviewed. The results of research on solid lubricants from the 1940's to the present are presented from a historical perspective. Emphasis is placed largely, but not exclusively, on work performed at NASA Lewis Research Center with a natural focus on aerospace applications. However, because of the generic nature of the research, the information presented in this review is applicable to most areas where solid lubricant technology is useful.

  3. Solid lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.

    1993-01-01

    The state of knowledge of solid lubricants is reviewed. The results of research on solid lubricants from the 1940's to the present are presented from a historical perspective. Emphasis is placed largely, but not exclusively, on work performed at NASA Lewis Research Center with a natural focus on aerospace applications. However, because of the generic nature of the research, the information presented in this review is applicable to most areas where solid lubricant technology is useful.

  4. Homogenized boundary conditions and resonance effects in Faraday cages

    PubMed Central

    Hewitt, I. J.

    2016-01-01

    We present a mathematical study of two-dimensional electrostatic and electromagnetic shielding by a cage of conducting wires (the so-called ‘Faraday cage effect’). Taking the limit as the number of wires in the cage tends to infinity, we use the asymptotic method of multiple scales to derive continuum models for the shielding, involving homogenized boundary conditions on an effective cage boundary. We show how the resulting models depend on key cage parameters such as the size and shape of the wires, and, in the electromagnetic case, on the frequency and polarization of the incident field. In the electromagnetic case, there are resonance effects, whereby at frequencies close to the natural frequencies of the equivalent solid shell, the presence of the cage actually amplifies the incident field, rather than shielding it. By appropriately modifying the continuum model, we calculate the modified resonant frequencies, and their associated peak amplitudes. We discuss applications to radiation containment in microwave ovens and acoustic scattering by perforated shells. PMID:27279775

  5. Homogenized boundary conditions and resonance effects in Faraday cages.

    PubMed

    Hewett, D P; Hewitt, I J

    2016-05-01

    We present a mathematical study of two-dimensional electrostatic and electromagnetic shielding by a cage of conducting wires (the so-called 'Faraday cage effect'). Taking the limit as the number of wires in the cage tends to infinity, we use the asymptotic method of multiple scales to derive continuum models for the shielding, involving homogenized boundary conditions on an effective cage boundary. We show how the resulting models depend on key cage parameters such as the size and shape of the wires, and, in the electromagnetic case, on the frequency and polarization of the incident field. In the electromagnetic case, there are resonance effects, whereby at frequencies close to the natural frequencies of the equivalent solid shell, the presence of the cage actually amplifies the incident field, rather than shielding it. By appropriately modifying the continuum model, we calculate the modified resonant frequencies, and their associated peak amplitudes. We discuss applications to radiation containment in microwave ovens and acoustic scattering by perforated shells.

  6. Homogenized boundary conditions and resonance effects in Faraday cages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewett, D. P.; Hewitt, I. J.

    2016-05-01

    We present a mathematical study of two-dimensional electrostatic and electromagnetic shielding by a cage of conducting wires (the so-called `Faraday cage effect'). Taking the limit as the number of wires in the cage tends to infinity, we use the asymptotic method of multiple scales to derive continuum models for the shielding, involving homogenized boundary conditions on an effective cage boundary. We show how the resulting models depend on key cage parameters such as the size and shape of the wires, and, in the electromagnetic case, on the frequency and polarization of the incident field. In the electromagnetic case, there are resonance effects, whereby at frequencies close to the natural frequencies of the equivalent solid shell, the presence of the cage actually amplifies the incident field, rather than shielding it. By appropriately modifying the continuum model, we calculate the modified resonant frequencies, and their associated peak amplitudes. We discuss applications to radiation containment in microwave ovens and acoustic scattering by perforated shells.

  7. Nonlinear acoustic wave propagation in atmosphere. Absorbing boundary conditions for exterior problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hariharan, S. I.

    1985-01-01

    Elliptic and hyperbolic problems in unbounded regions are considered. These problems, when one wants to solve them numerically, have the difficulty of prescribing boundary conditions at infinity. Computationally, one needs a finite region in which to solve these problems. The corresponding conditions at infinity imposed on the finite distance boundaries should dictate the boundary conditions at infinity and be accurate with respect to the interior numerical scheme. The treatment of these boundary conditions for wave-like equations is discussed.

  8. Analysis of starvation effects on hydrodynamic lubrication in nonconforming contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewe, D. E.; Hamrock, B. J.

    1981-01-01

    Numerical methods were used to determine the effects of lubricant starvation on the minimum film thickness under conditions of a hydrodynamic point contact. Starvation was effected by varying the fluid inlet level. The Reynolds boundary conditions were applied at the cavitation boundary and zero pressure was stipulated at the meniscus or inlet boundary. A minimum-fill-thickness equation as a function of both the ratio of dimensionless load to dimensionless speed and inlet supply level was determined. By comparing the film generated under the starved inlet condition with the film generated from the fully flooded inlet, an expression for the film reduction factor was obtained. Based on this factor a starvation threshold was defined as well as a critically starved inlet. The changes in the inlet pressure buildup due to changing the available lubricant supply are presented in the form of three dimensional isometric plots and also in the form of contour plots.

  9. Atom-partitioned multipole expansions for electrostatic potential boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, M.; Leiter, K.; Eisner, C.; Knap, J.

    2017-01-01

    Applications such as grid-based real-space density functional theory (DFT) use the Poisson equation to compute electrostatics. However, the expected long tail of the electrostatic potential requires either the use of a large and costly outer domain or Dirichlet boundary conditions estimated via multipole expansion. We find that the oft-used single-center spherical multipole expansion is only appropriate for isotropic mesh domains such as spheres and cubes. In this work, we introduce a method suitable for high aspect ratio meshes whereby the charge density is partitioned into atomic domains and multipoles are computed for each domain. While this approach is moderately more expensive than a single-center expansion, it is numerically stable and still a small fraction of the overall cost of a DFT calculation. The net result is that when high aspect ratio systems are being studied, form-fitted meshes can now be used in lieu of cubic meshes to gain computational speedup.

  10. Fluid flow in nanopores: Accurate boundary conditions for carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokhan, Vladimir P.; Nicholson, David; Quirke, Nicholas

    2002-11-01

    Steady-state Poiseuille flow of a simple fluid in carbon nanopores under a gravitylike force is simulated using a realistic empirical many-body potential model for carbon. Building on our previous study of slit carbon nanopores we show that fluid flow in a nanotube is also characterized by a large slip length. By analyzing temporal profiles of the velocity components of particles colliding with the wall we obtain values of the Maxwell coefficient defining the fraction of molecules thermalized by the wall and, for the first time, propose slip boundary conditions for smooth continuum surfaces such that they are equivalent in adsorption, diffusion, and fluid flow properties to fully dynamic atomistic models.

  11. Modeling solar wind with boundary conditions from interplanetary scintillations

    DOE PAGES

    Manoharan, P.; Kim, T.; Pogorelov, N. V.; ...

    2015-09-30

    Interplanetary scintillations make it possible to create three-dimensional, time- dependent distributions of the solar wind velocity. Combined with the magnetic field observations in the solar photosphere, they help perform solar wind simulations in a genuinely time-dependent way. Interplanetary scintillation measurements from the Ooty Radio Astronomical Observatory in India provide directions to multiple stars and may assure better resolution of transient processes in the solar wind. In this paper, we present velocity distributions derived from Ooty observations and compare them with those obtained with the Wang-Sheeley-Arge (WSA) model. We also present our simulations of the solar wind flow from 0.1 AUmore » to 1 AU with the boundary conditions based on both Ooty and WSA data.« less

  12. Modeling solar wind with boundary conditions from interplanetary scintillations

    SciTech Connect

    Manoharan, P.; Kim, T.; Pogorelov, N. V.; Arge, C. N.

    2015-09-30

    Interplanetary scintillations make it possible to create three-dimensional, time- dependent distributions of the solar wind velocity. Combined with the magnetic field observations in the solar photosphere, they help perform solar wind simulations in a genuinely time-dependent way. Interplanetary scintillation measurements from the Ooty Radio Astronomical Observatory in India provide directions to multiple stars and may assure better resolution of transient processes in the solar wind. In this paper, we present velocity distributions derived from Ooty observations and compare them with those obtained with the Wang-Sheeley-Arge (WSA) model. We also present our simulations of the solar wind flow from 0.1 AU to 1 AU with the boundary conditions based on both Ooty and WSA data.

  13. Simulating flight boundary conditions for orbiter payload modal survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Y. T.; Sernaker, M. L.; Peebles, J. H.

    1993-01-01

    An approach to simulate the characteristics of the payload/orbiter interfaces for the payload modal survey was developed. The flexure designed for this approach is required to provide adequate stiffness separation in the free and constrained interface degrees of freedom to closely resemble the flight boundary condition. Payloads will behave linearly and demonstrate similar modal effective mass distribution and load path as the flight if the flexure fixture is used for the payload modal survey. The potential non-linearities caused by the trunnion slippage during the conventional fixed base modal survey may be eliminated. Consequently, the effort to correlate the test and analysis models can be significantly reduced. An example is given to illustrate the selection and the sensitivity of the flexure stiffness. The advantages of using flexure fixtures for the modal survey and for the analytical model verification are also demonstrated.

  14. Dynamic behaviour of thin composite plates for different boundary conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Sprintu, Iuliana E-mail: rotaruconstantin@yahoo.com; Rotaru, Constantin E-mail: rotaruconstantin@yahoo.com

    2014-12-10

    In the context of composite materials technology, which is increasingly present in industry, this article covers a topic of great interest and theoretical and practical importance. Given the complex design of fiber-reinforced materials and their heterogeneous nature, mathematical modeling of the mechanical response under different external stresses is very difficult to address in the absence of simplifying assumptions. In most structural applications, composite structures can be idealized as beams, plates, or shells. The analysis is reduced from a three-dimensional elasticity problem to a oneor two-dimensional problem, based on certain simplifying assumptions that can be made because the structure is thin. This paper aims to validate a mathematical model illustrating how thin rectangular orthotropic plates respond to the actual load. Thus, from the theory of thin plates, new analytical solutions are proposed corresponding to orthotropic rectangular plates having different boundary conditions. The proposed analytical solutions are considered both for solving equation orthotropic rectangular plates and for modal analysis.

  15. Thermal Momentum Distribution from Path Integrals with Shifted Boundary Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giusti, Leonardo; Meyer, Harvey B.

    2011-04-01

    For a thermal field theory formulated in the grand canonical ensemble, the distribution of the total momentum is an observable characterizing the thermal state. We show that its cumulants are related to thermodynamic potentials. In a relativistic system, for instance, the thermal variance of the total momentum is a direct measure of the enthalpy. We relate the generating function of the cumulants to the ratio of (a) a partition function expressed as a Matsubara path integral with shifted boundary conditions in the compact direction and (b) the ordinary partition function. In this form the generating function is well suited for Monte Carlo evaluation, and the cumulants can be extracted straightforwardly. We test the method in the SU(3) Yang-Mills theory and obtain the entropy density at three different temperatures.

  16. Micromagnetic simulations with periodic boundary conditions: Hard-soft nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Wysocki, Aleksander L.; Antropov, Vladimir P.

    2016-12-01

    Here, we developed a micromagnetic method for modeling magnetic systems with periodic boundary conditions along an arbitrary number of dimensions. The main feature is an adaptation of the Ewald summation technique for evaluation of long-range dipolar interactions. The method was applied to investigate the hysteresis process in hard-soft magnetic nanocomposites with various geometries. The dependence of the results on different micromagnetic parameters was studied. We found that for layered structures with an out-of-plane hard phase easy axis the hysteretic properties are very sensitive to the strength of the interlayer exchange coupling, as long as the spontaneous magnetization for the hard phase is significantly smaller than for the soft phase. The origin of this behavior was discussed. Additionally, we investigated the soft phase size optimizing the energy product of hard-soft nanocomposites.

  17. Micromagnetic simulations with periodic boundary conditions: Hard-soft nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wysocki, Aleksander L.; Antropov, Vladimir P.

    2017-04-01

    We developed a micromagnetic method for modeling magnetic systems with periodic boundary conditions along an arbitrary number of dimensions. The main feature is an adaptation of the Ewald summation technique for evaluation of long-range dipolar interactions. The method was applied to investigate the hysteresis process in hard-soft magnetic nanocomposites with various geometries. The dependence of the results on different micromagnetic parameters was studied. We found that for layered structures with an out-of-plane hard phase easy axis the hysteretic properties are very sensitive to the strength of the interlayer exchange coupling, as long as the spontaneous magnetization for the hard phase is significantly smaller than for the soft phase. The origin of this behavior was discussed. Additionally, we investigated the soft phase size optimizing the energy product of hard-soft nanocomposites.

  18. Micromagnetic simulations with periodic boundary conditions: Hard-soft nanocomposites

    DOE PAGES

    Wysocki, Aleksander L.; Antropov, Vladimir P.

    2016-12-01

    Here, we developed a micromagnetic method for modeling magnetic systems with periodic boundary conditions along an arbitrary number of dimensions. The main feature is an adaptation of the Ewald summation technique for evaluation of long-range dipolar interactions. The method was applied to investigate the hysteresis process in hard-soft magnetic nanocomposites with various geometries. The dependence of the results on different micromagnetic parameters was studied. We found that for layered structures with an out-of-plane hard phase easy axis the hysteretic properties are very sensitive to the strength of the interlayer exchange coupling, as long as the spontaneous magnetization for the hardmore » phase is significantly smaller than for the soft phase. The origin of this behavior was discussed. Additionally, we investigated the soft phase size optimizing the energy product of hard-soft nanocomposites.« less

  19. Unsteady Squeezing Flow of Carbon Nanotubes with Convective Boundary Conditions.

    PubMed

    Hayat, Tasawar; Muhammad, Khursheed; Farooq, Muhammad; Alsaedi, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Unsteady flow of nanofluids squeezed between two parallel plates is discussed in the presence of viscous dissipation. Heat transfer phenomenon is disclosed via convective boundary conditions. Carbon nanotubes (single-wall and multi-wall) are used as nanoparticles which are homogeneously distributed in the base fluid (water). A system of non-linear differential equations for the flow is obtained by utilizing similarity transformations through the conservation laws. Influence of various emerging parameters on the velocity and temperature profiles are sketched graphically and discussed comprehensively. Analyses of skin fraction coefficient and Nusselt number are also elaborated numerically. It is found out that velocity is smaller for squeezing parameter in the case of multi-wall carbon nanotubes when compared with single-wall carbon nanotubes.

  20. On boundary condition in heat-exchange processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolyarov, E. P.

    2016-10-01

    This paper describes the numerical study of heat-exchange of solid body with high-temperature external flow. As follows from the Newton's boundary condition, connecting a heat-flux density with temperature difference between the flow and a body, the heat-exchange coefficient is physically equivalent to the body-surface-normal component of the entropy flux from external flow at equilibrium flow regime. The method of determination of the heat-exchange characteristics using the time-history temperature measurements by a thin-film thermocouple sensor is described. As it is shown from the numerical analysis, the asymptotic value of the heat-exchange coefficient that corresponded to equilibrium regime of external flow exists. Implementation time of this value, i.e. relaxation time, may be of some characteristic time scales of the sensor measuring layer.

  1. Estimating Thermal Inertia with a Maximum Entropy Boundary Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nearing, G.; Moran, M. S.; Scott, R.; Ponce-Campos, G.

    2012-04-01

    Thermal inertia, P [Jm-2s-1/2K-1], is a physical property the land surface which determines resistance to temperature change under seasonal or diurnal heating. It is a function of volumetric heat capacity, c [Jm-3K-1], and thermal conductivity, k [Wm-1K-1] of the soil near the surface: P=√ck. Thermal inertia of soil varies with moisture content due the difference between thermal properties of water and air, and a number of studies have demonstrated that it is feasible to estimate soil moisture given thermal inertia (e.g. Lu et al, 2009, Murray and Verhoef, 2007). We take the common approach to estimating thermal inertia using measurements of surface temperature by modeling the Earth's surface as a 1-dimensional homogeneous diffusive half-space. In this case, surface temperature is a function of the ground heat flux (G) boundary condition and thermal inertia and a daily value of P was estimated by matching measured and modeled diurnal surface temperature fluctuations. The difficulty is in measuring G; we demonstrate that the new maximum entropy production (MEP) method for partitioning net radiation into surface energy fluxes (Wang and Bras, 2011) provides a suitable boundary condition for estimating P. Adding the diffusion representation of heat transfer in the soil reduces the number of free parameters in the MEP model from two to one, and we provided a sensitivity analysis which suggests that, for the purpose of estimating P, it is preferable to parameterize the coupled MEP-diffusion model by the ratio of thermal inertia of the soil to the effective thermal inertia of convective heat transfer to the atmosphere. We used this technique to estimate thermal inertia at two semiarid, non-vegetated locations in the Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed in southeast AZ, USA and compared these estimates to estimates of P made using the Xue and Cracknell (1995) solution for a linearized ground heat flux boundary condition, and we found that the MEP-diffusion model produced

  2. Equilibrium boundary conditions, dynamic vacuum energy, and the big bang

    SciTech Connect

    Klinkhamer, F. R.

    2008-10-15

    The near-zero value of the cosmological constant {lambda} in an equilibrium context may be due to the existence of a self-tuning relativistic vacuum variable q. Here, a cosmological nonequilibrium context is considered with a corresponding time-dependent cosmological parameter {lambda}(t) or vacuum energy density {rho}{sub V}(t). A specific model of a closed Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe is presented, which is determined by equilibrium boundary conditions at one instant of time (t=t{sub eq}) and a particular form of vacuum-energy dynamics (d{rho}{sub V}/dt{proportional_to}{rho}{sub M}). This homogeneous and isotropic model has a standard big bang phase at early times (t<

  3. Sensitivity and uncertainty analysis of the recharge boundary condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jyrkama, M. I.; Sykes, J. F.

    2006-01-01

    The reliability analysis method is integrated with MODFLOW to study the impact of recharge on the groundwater flow system at a study area in New Jersey. The performance function is formulated in terms of head or flow rate at a pumping well, while the recharge sensitivity vector is computed efficiently by implementing the adjoint method in MODFLOW. The developed methodology not only quantifies the reliability of head at the well in terms of uncertainties in the recharge boundary condition, but it also delineates areas of recharge that have the highest impact on the head and flow rate at the well. The results clearly identify the most important land use areas that should be protected in order to maintain the head and hence production at the pumping well. These areas extend far beyond the steady state well capture zone used for land use planning and management within traditional wellhead protection programs.

  4. Introduction of periodic boundary conditions into UNRES force field.

    PubMed

    Sieradzan, Adam K

    2015-05-05

    In this article, implementation of periodic boundary conditions (PBC) into physics-based coarse-grained UNited RESidue (UNRES) force field is presented, which replaces droplet-like restraints previously used. Droplet-like restraints are necessary to keep multichain systems together and prevent them from dissolving to infinitely low concentration. As an alternative for droplet-like restrains cuboid PBCs with imaging of the molecules were introduced. Owing to this modification, artificial forces which arose from restraints keeping a droplet together were eliminated what leads to more realistic trajectories. Due to computational reasons cutoff and smoothing functions were introduced on the long range interactions. The UNRES force field with PBC was tested by performing microcanonical simulations. Moreover, to asses the behavior of the thermostat in PBCs Langevin and Berendsen thermostats were studied. The influence of PBCs on association pattern was compared with droplet-like restraints on the ββα hetero tetramer 1 protein system.

  5. Unsteady Squeezing Flow of Carbon Nanotubes with Convective Boundary Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Hayat, Tasawar; Muhammad, Khursheed; Farooq, Muhammad; Alsaedi, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Unsteady flow of nanofluids squeezed between two parallel plates is discussed in the presence of viscous dissipation. Heat transfer phenomenon is disclosed via convective boundary conditions. Carbon nanotubes (single-wall and multi-wall) are used as nanoparticles which are homogeneously distributed in the base fluid (water). A system of non-linear differential equations for the flow is obtained by utilizing similarity transformations through the conservation laws. Influence of various emerging parameters on the velocity and temperature profiles are sketched graphically and discussed comprehensively. Analyses of skin fraction coefficient and Nusselt number are also elaborated numerically. It is found out that velocity is smaller for squeezing parameter in the case of multi-wall carbon nanotubes when compared with single-wall carbon nanotubes. PMID:27149208

  6. Behavior of the Reversed Field Pinch with Nonideal Boundary Conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Yung-Lung

    The linear and nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic stability of current-driven modes is studied for a reversed field pinch with nonideal boundary conditions. The plasma is bounded by a thin resistive shell surrounded by a vacuum region out to a radius at which a perfectly conducting wall is situated. The distant wall and the thin shell problems are studied by removing either the resistive shell or the conducting wall. Linearly, growth rates of tearing modes and kink modes are calculated by analytical solutions based on the modified Bessel function model for the equilibrium. The effects of variation of the shell resistivity and wall proximity on the growth rates are investigated. The modes that may be important in different parameter regimes and with different boundary conditions are identified. These results then help to guide the nonlinear study, and also help to interpret the quasilinear aspect of the nonlinear results. The nonlinear behaviors are studied with a three -dimensional magnetohydrodynamics code. The fluctuations generally rise with increasing distance between the conducting wall and the plasma. The enhanced fluctuation induced v times b electric field primarily oppose toroidal current; hence, loop voltage must increase to sustain the constant. If the loop voltage is held constant, the current decreases and the plasma evolves toward a nonreversed tokamak-like state. Quasilinear interaction between modes typically associated with the dynamo action is identified as the most probable nonlinear destabilization mechanism. The helicity and energy balance properties of the simulation results are discussed. The interruption of current density along field lines intersecting the resistive shell is shown to lead to surface helicity leakage. This effect is intimately tied to stability, as fluctuation induced v times b electric field is necessary to transport the helicity to the surface. In this manner, all aspects of helicity balance, i.e., injection, transport, and

  7. Behavior of the reversed field pinch with nonideal boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Yung-Lung

    1988-11-01

    The linear and nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic stability of current-driven modes are studied for a reversed field pinch with nonideal boundary conditions. The plasma is bounded by a thin resistive shell surrounded by a vacuum region out to a radius at which a perfectly conducting wall is situated. The distant wall and the thin shell problems are studied by removing either the resistive shell or the conducting wall. Linearly, growth rates of tearing modes and kink modes are calculated by analytical solutions based on the modified Bessel function model for the equilibrium. The effects of variation of the shell resistivity and wall proximity on the growth rates are investigated. The modes that may be important in different parameter regimes and with different boundary conditions are identified. The nonlinear behaviors are studied with a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics code. The fluctuations generally rise with increasing distance between the conducting wall and the plasma. The enhanced fluctuation induced v x b electric field primarily oppose toroidal current; hence, loop voltage must increase to sustain the constant. Quasilinear interaction between modes typically associated with the dynamo action is identified as the most probable nonlinear destabilization mechanism. The helicity and energy balance properties of the simulation results are discussed. The interruption of current density along field lines intersecting the resistive shell is shown to lead to surface helicity leakage. This effect is intimately tied to stability, as fluctuation induced v x b electric field is necessary to transport the helicity to the surface. In this manner, all aspects of helicity balance, i.e., injection, transport, and dissipation, are considered self-consistently. The importance of the helicity and energy dissipation by the mean components of the magnetic field and current density is discussed.

  8. Solution of the Boundary Value Problems with Boundary Conditions in the Form of Gravitational Curvatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprlak, M.; Novak, P.; Pitonak, M.; Hamackova, E.

    2015-12-01

    Values of scalar, vectorial and second-order tensorial parameters of the Earth's gravitational field have been collected by various sensors in geodesy and geophysics. Such observables have been widely exploited in different parametrization methods for the gravitational field modelling. Moreover, theoretical aspects of these quantities have extensively been studied and are well understood. On the other hand, new sensors for observing gravitational curvatures, i.e., components of the third-order gravitational tensor, are currently under development. This fact may be documented by the terrestrial experiments Dulkyn and Magia, as well as by the proposal of the gravity-dedicated satellite mission called OPTIMA. As the gravitational curvatures represent new types of observables, their exploitation for modelling of the Earth's gravitational field is a subject of this study. Firstly, we derive integral transforms between the gravitational potential and gravitational curvatures, i.e., we find analytical solutions of the boundary value problems with gravitational curvatures as boundary conditions. Secondly, properties of the corresponding Green kernel functions are studied in the spatial and spectral domains. Thirdly, the correctness of the new analytical solutions is tested in a simulation study. The presented mathematical apparatus reveal important properties of the gravitational curvatures. It also extends the Meissl scheme, i.e., an important theoretical paradigm that relates various parameters of the Earth's gravitational field.

  9. Compressible turbulent channel flow with impedance boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalo, Carlo; Bodart, Julien; Lele, Sanjiva K.

    2015-03-01

    We have performed large-eddy simulations of isothermal-wall compressible turbulent channel flow with linear acoustic impedance boundary conditions (IBCs) for the wall-normal velocity component and no-slip conditions for the tangential velocity components. Three bulk Mach numbers, Mb = 0.05, 0.2, 0.5, with a fixed bulk Reynolds number, Reb = 6900, have been investigated. For each Mb, nine different combinations of IBC settings were tested, in addition to a reference case with impermeable walls, resulting in a total of 30 simulations. The adopted numerical coupling strategy allows for a spatially and temporally consistent imposition of physically realizable IBCs in a fully explicit compressible Navier-Stokes solver. The IBCs are formulated in the time domain according to Fung and Ju ["Time-domain impedance boundary conditions for computational acoustics and aeroacoustics," Int. J. Comput. Fluid Dyn. 18(6), 503-511 (2004)]. The impedance adopted is a three-parameter damped Helmholtz oscillator with resonant angular frequency, ωr, tuned to the characteristic time scale of the large energy-containing eddies. The tuning condition, which reads ωr = 2πMb (normalized with the speed of sound and channel half-width), reduces the IBCs' free parameters to two: the damping ratio, ζ, and the resistance, R, which have been varied independently with values, ζ = 0.5, 0.7, 0.9, and R = 0.01, 0.10, 1.00, for each Mb. The application of the tuned IBCs results in a drag increase up to 300% for Mb = 0.5 and R = 0.01. It is shown that for tuned IBCs, the resistance, R, acts as the inverse of the wall-permeability and that varying the damping ratio, ζ, has a secondary effect on the flow response. Typical buffer-layer turbulent structures are completely suppressed by the application of tuned IBCs. A new resonance buffer layer is established characterized by large spanwise-coherent Kelvin-Helmholtz rollers, with a well-defined streamwise wavelength λx, traveling downstream with

  10. Combining characteristic forms of boundary conditions and conservation equations at boundaries of cell-centered Euler-flow calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boerstoel, J. W.

    1987-04-01

    A numerical method to obtain the additional equations in Euler-flow calculations based on cell-centered schemes when the number of equations required to determine the flow-state evaluation at grid points half a mesh outside the flow domain exceeds the number of boundary-condition equations provided by characteristic theory, is presented. A layer of auxiliary cells on flow boundaries is introduced, and semidiscrete conservation equations for these cells are defined. The time variations of the state in these auxiliary cells at the boundary are transformed into characteristic form, and time variations of characteristic variables corresponding to incoming information from the boundary into the flow are replaced by boundary conditions for these time variations. The boundary equations so obtained are mapped back into a form with primitive variables, and numerically integrated in time. The characteristic boundary conditions are first-order differential equations for time variations at boundary points of characteristic variables. These equations may be chosen to express that given functions of the flow state on the boundary should asymptotically tend with time to prescribed steady-state values.

  11. Solid lubrication design methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aggarwal, B. B.; Yonushonis, T. M.; Bovenkerk, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    A single element traction rig was used to measure the traction forces at the contact of a ball against a flat disc at room temperature under combined rolling and sliding. The load and speed conditions were selected to match those anticipated for bearing applications in adiabatic diesel engines. The test program showed that the magnitude of traction forces were almost the same for all the lubricants tested; a lubricant should, therefore, be selected on the basis of its ability to prevent wear of the contact surfaces. Traction vs. slide/roll ratio curves were similar to those for liquid lubricants but the traction forces were an order of magnitude higher. The test data was used to derive equations to predict traction force as a function of contact stress and rolling speed. Qualitative design guidelines for solid lubricated concentrated contacts are proposed.

  12. Influence of lubrication forces in direct numerical simulations of particle-laden flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maitri, Rohit; Peters, Frank; Padding, Johan; Kuipers, Hans

    2016-11-01

    Accurate numerical representation of particle-laden flows is important for fundamental understanding and optimizing the complex processes such as proppant transport in fracking. Liquid-solid flows are fundamentally different from gas-solid flows because of lower density ratios (solid to fluid) and non-negligible lubrication forces. In this interface resolved model, fluid-solid coupling is achieved by incorporating the no-slip boundary condition implicitly at particle's surfaces by means of an efficient second order ghost-cell immersed boundary method. A fixed Eulerian grid is used for solving the Navier-Stokes equations and the particle-particle interactions are implemented using the soft sphere collision and sub-grid scale lubrication model. Due to the range of influence of lubrication force on a smaller scale than the grid size, it is important to implement the lubrication model accurately. In this work, different implementations of the lubrication model on particle dynamics are studied for various flow conditions. The effect of a particle surface roughness on lubrication force and the particle transport is also investigated. This study is aimed at developing a validated methodology to incorporate lubrication models in direct numerical simulation of particle laden flows. This research is supported from Grant 13CSER014 of the Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM), which is part of the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO).

  13. Towards Direct Simulations of Counterflow Flames with Consistent Differential-Algebraic Boundary Conditions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-05

    discretization of the steady- state Navier-Stokes equations at the inflow boundaries, numerically algebraic equations are imposed as boundary conditions...conditions for the counterflow configuration is presented. Upon discretization of the steady- state Navier-Stokes equations at the inflow boundaries...boundary conditions for the counterflow configu- ration is presented. Upon discretization of the steady- state Navier-Stokes equations at the inflow

  14. A 3×3 wear debris sensor array for real time lubricant oil conditioning monitoring using synchronized sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiaoliang; Du, Li; Zhe, Jiang

    2017-01-01

    A high throughput wear debris sensor consisting of 3×3 sensing channels is presented for real time online lubricant oil conditioning monitoring. Time division multiplexing was applied to the sensing channels for measuring responses of multiple channels using one set of measurement electronics. Crosstalk among the 3×3 sensing channels was eliminated by diodes that are connected in series with each channel. Parallel L-C-R resonance was also applied to each sensing coil to increase the sensitivity. Furthermore, a unique synchronized sampling method was used to reduce the date size 50 times. Finally, we demonstrated that the sensor is capable of real time detection of wear debris as small as 50 μm in SAE 0W-5 at a flow rate of 460 ml/min; the measured debris concentration is in good agreement with the estimated actual concentration. The design can be extended to a N×N sensor array for an extremely high throughput without sacrificing the sensitivity, and can potentially be used for real time wear debris monitoring for health condition of rotating or reciprocating machineries.

  15. On dualities for SSEP and ASEP with open boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohkubo, J.

    2017-03-01

    Duality relations for simple exclusion processes with general open boundaries are discussed. It is shown that a combination of spin operators and bosonic operators enables us to have a unified discussion about duality relations with open boundaries. As for the symmetric simple exclusion process (SSEP), more general results than those from previous studies are obtained. It is clarified that not only the absorbing sites, but also additional sites—called copying sites— are needed for the boundaries in the dual process for the SSEP. The role of the copying sites is to conserve information about the particle states on the boundary sites. Similar discussions are applied to the asymmetric simple exclusion process (ASEP), in which the q-analogues are employed, and it is clarified that the ASEP with open boundaries has a complicated dual process on the boundaries.

  16. Reconstructing geographical boundary conditions for palaeoclimate modelling during the Cenozoic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baatsen, Michiel; van Hinsbergen, Douwe J. J.; von der Heydt, Anna S.; Dijkstra, Henk A.; Sluijs, Appy; Abels, Hemmo A.; Bijl, Peter K.

    2016-08-01

    Studies on the palaeoclimate and palaeoceanography using numerical model simulations may be considerably dependent on the implemented geographical reconstruction. Because building the palaeogeographic datasets for these models is often a time-consuming and elaborate exercise, palaeoclimate models frequently use reconstructions in which the latest state-of-the-art plate tectonic reconstructions, palaeotopography and -bathymetry, or vegetation have not yet been incorporated. In this paper, we therefore provide a new method to efficiently generate a global geographical reconstruction for the middle-late Eocene. The generalised procedure is also reusable to create reconstructions for other time slices within the Cenozoic, suitable for palaeoclimate modelling. We use a plate-tectonic model to make global masks containing the distribution of land, continental shelves, shallow basins and deep ocean. The use of depth-age relationships for oceanic crust together with adjusted present-day topography gives a first estimate of the global geography at a chosen time frame. This estimate subsequently needs manual editing of areas where existing geological data indicate that the altimetry has changed significantly over time. Certain generic changes (e.g. lowering mountain ranges) can be made relatively easily by defining a set of masks while other features may require a more specific treatment. Since the discussion regarding many of these regions is still ongoing, it is crucial to make it easy for changes to be incorporated without having to redo the entire procedure. In this manner, a complete reconstruction can be made that suffices as a boundary condition for numerical models with a limited effort. This facilitates the interaction between experts in geology and palaeoclimate modelling, keeping reconstructions up to date and improving the consistency between different studies. Moreover, it facilitates model inter-comparison studies and sensitivity tests regarding certain

  17. A new method of imposing boundary conditions in pseudospectral approximations of hyperbolic equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funaro, D.; Gottlieb, D.

    1988-01-01

    A new method to impose boundary conditions for pseudospectral approximations to hyperbolic equations is suggested. This method involves the collocation of the equation at the boundary nodes as well as satisfying boundary conditions. Stability and convergence results are proven for the Chebyshev approximation of linear scalar hyperbolic equations. The eigenvalues of this method applied to parabolic equations are shown to be real and negative.

  18. Eigenmode Analysis of Boundary Conditions for One-Dimensional Preconditioned Euler Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darmofal, David L.

    1998-01-01

    An analysis of the effect of local preconditioning on boundary conditions for the subsonic, one-dimensional Euler equations is presented. Decay rates for the eigenmodes of the initial boundary value problem are determined for different boundary conditions. Riemann invariant boundary conditions based on the unpreconditioned Euler equations are shown to be reflective with preconditioning, and, at low Mach numbers, disturbances do not decay. Other boundary conditions are investigated which are non-reflective with preconditioning and numerical results are presented confirming the analysis.

  19. Testing within the continuum of multiple lubrication and failure mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Wedeven, L.D.; Totten, G.E.; Bishop, R.J. Jr.

    1997-12-31

    The inherent difficulty of bench testing for the tribological performance of hydraulic fluids is the interaction of multiple lubrication and failure mechanisms. The engineer judges the performance limits in descriptive terms relating to what the load bearing surfaces have experienced. The lubrication and failure pathway that leads to the final surface condition is at the mercy of what lubrication and failure mechanisms have been invoked. Lubrication mechanisms, such as hydrodynamic, elastohydrodynamic, and boundary can be isolated with specialized testing, along with failure mechanisms, such as those described in general terms of wear, scuffing, and pitting. The interaction and competitive nature of these mechanisms, which exist in hardware, makes bench testing a nightmare. A rational approach using a highly flexible and computerized test machine, WAM3, is described. The approach demonstrates how performance attributes of fluids and materials can be evaluated as they are made to travel through multiple lubrication and failure pathways. The testing protocol is terminated with the test specimen`s surface reaches the same failure condition the engineer uses to judge performance limits of component hardware. Testing pathways are demonstrated that lead to wear, scuffing and micro-pitting. Along the testing pathway, viscous film-forming attributes and chemical boundary lubrication attributes of the fluid are characterized. Tests conducted with a range of fluid types, including two hydraulic fluids, demonstrate a wide range of traction, viscous film-forming and boundary film attributes. The continuum approach, which maps out performance in terms of hardware relevant criteria, provides a means to determine the impact of development strategies based on fluid and material technologies.

  20. Space-fractional advection-diffusion and reflective boundary condition.

    PubMed

    Krepysheva, Natalia; Di Pietro, Liliana; Néel, Marie-Christine

    2006-02-01

    Anomalous diffusive transport arises in a large diversity of disordered media. Stochastic formulations in terms of continuous time random walks (CTRWs) with transition probability densities showing space- and/or time-diverging moments were developed to account for anomalous behaviors. A broad class of CTRWs was shown to correspond, on the macroscopic scale, to advection-diffusion equations involving derivatives of noninteger order. In particular, CTRWs with Lévy distribution of jumps and finite mean waiting time lead to a space-fractional equation that accounts for superdiffusion and involves a nonlocal integral-differential operator. Within this framework, we analyze the evolution of particles performing symmetric Lévy flights with respect to a fluid moving at uniform speed . The particles are restricted to a semi-infinite domain limited by a reflective barrier. We show that the introduction of the boundary condition induces a modification in the kernel of the nonlocal operator. Thus, the macroscopic space-fractional advection-diffusion equation obtained is different from that in an infinite medium.

  1. Heating the Solar Corona: Observations for Model Boundary Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nestlerode, C. M.; Poland, A. I.

    2005-12-01

    A prominent question in solar physics concerns the sources of coronal heating. This problem can be addressed through observations of closed magnetic loops which have high enough density to provide adequate temporal, spatial, and spectral resolution. Measurements of temperature, density, and velocity throughout the loop can be used for boundary conditions and compared with quantities for model calculations. In this paper, we present Solar Ultraviolet Measurements from Emitted Radiation (SUMER) data from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory's (SOHO's) JOP 161 program. The SUMER instrument has high spatial and spectral resolution over several different spectral lines and therefore the data cover a large temperature range. The analyzed lines include Mg VIII, Mg IX, N III, N IV, Ne VIII, O IV, O V, S IV, S V, and S X with temperatures ranging from 60,000 K (S IV) to 0.9 MK (Mg IX). The velocity profiles are created using Gaussian fitting with wavelength calibration determined using average quiet Sun velocities from known Doppler velocity shifts. The velocity profiles show important changes in solar foot point plasma speed both spatially and temporally. This analysis builds on previous analysis of solar spectral lines observed with the SOHO Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer (CDS); the advantage of the SUMER instrument is better resolution, both spectrally and spatially. This work was funded by NASA, Living with a Star Program.

  2. Brain-skull boundary conditions in a computational deformation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Songbai; Liu, Fenghong; Roberts, David; Hartov, Alex; Paulsen, Keith

    2007-03-01

    Brain shift poses a significant challenge to accurate image-guided neurosurgery. To this end, finite element (FE) brain models have been developed to estimate brain motion during these procedures. The significance of the brain-skull boundary conditions (BCs) for accurate predictions in these models has been explored in dynamic impact and inertial rotation injury computational simulations where the results have shown that the brain mechanical response is sensitive to the type of BCs applied. We extend the study of brain-skull BCs to quasi-static brain motion simulations which prevail in neurosurgery. Specifically, a frictionless brain-skull BC using a contact penalty method master-slave paradigm is incorporated into our existing deformation forward model (forced displacement method). The initial brain-skull gap (CSF thickness) is assumed to be 2mm for demonstration purposes. The brain surface nodes are assigned as either fixed (at bottom along the gravity direction), free (at brainstem), with prescribed displacement (at craniotomy) or as slave nodes potentially in contact with the skull (all the remaining). Each slave node is assigned a penalty parameter (β=5) such that when the node penetrates the rigid body skull inner-surface (master surface), a contact force is introduced proportionally to the penetration. Effectively, brain surface nodes are allowed to move towards or away from the cranium wall, but are ultimately restricted from penetrating the skull. We show that this scheme improves the model's ability to represent the brain-skull interface.

  3. Positive solutions of quasilinear parabolic systems with nonlinear boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pao, C. V.; Ruan, W. H.

    2007-09-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the existence, uniqueness, and asymptotic behavior of solutions for a coupled system of quasilinear parabolic equations under nonlinear boundary conditions, including a system of quasilinear parabolic and ordinary differential equations. Also investigated is the existence of positive maximal and minimal solutions of the corresponding quasilinear elliptic system as well as the uniqueness of a positive steady-state solution. The elliptic operators in both systems are allowed to be degenerate in the sense that the density-dependent diffusion coefficients Di(ui) may have the property Di(0)=0 for some or all i. Our approach to the problem is by the method of upper and lower solutions and its associated monotone iterations. It is shown that the time-dependent solution converges to the maximal solution for one class of initial functions and it converges to the minimal solution for another class of initial functions; and if the maximal and minimal solutions coincide then the steady-state solution is unique and the time-dependent solution converges to the unique solution. Applications of these results are given to three model problems, including a porous medium type of problem, a heat-transfer problem, and a two-component competition model in ecology. These applications illustrate some very interesting distinctive behavior of the time-dependent solutions between density-independent and density-dependent diffusions.

  4. Positive solutions of quasilinear parabolic systems with Dirichlet boundary condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pao, C. V.; Ruan, W. H.

    Coupled systems for a class of quasilinear parabolic equations and the corresponding elliptic systems, including systems of parabolic and ordinary differential equations are investigated. The aim of this paper is to show the existence, uniqueness, and asymptotic behavior of time-dependent solutions. Also investigated is the existence of positive maximal and minimal solutions of the corresponding quasilinear elliptic system. The elliptic operators in both systems are allowed to be degenerate in the sense that the density-dependent diffusion coefficients D(u) may have the property D(0)=0 for some or all i=1,…,N, and the boundary condition is u=0. Using the method of upper and lower solutions, we show that a unique global classical time-dependent solution exists and converges to the maximal solution for one class of initial functions and it converges to the minimal solution for another class of initial functions; and if the maximal and minimal solutions coincide then the steady-state solution is unique and the time-dependent solution converges to the unique solution. Applications of these results are given to three model problems, including a scalar polynomial growth problem, a coupled system of polynomial growth problem, and a two component competition model in ecology.

  5. Tribological Performance Optimization of Electroless Ni-B Coating under Lubricated Condition using Hybrid Grey Fuzzy Logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Arkadeb; Duari, Santanu; Barman, Tapan Kumar; Sahoo, Prasanta

    2016-10-01

    Deposition of nickel coating and its alloys using electroless method has received wide acceptance by researchers and even the industries because of their excellent tribological properties. The present experimental investigation deals with the behaviour of electroless Ni-B coating under lubricated condition on a pin-on-disc tribotester. An attempt is made to minimize the friction and wear characteristics simultaneously by optimizing three test parameters i.e. the applied normal load, speed and time of sliding using grey fuzzy reasoning analysis. The friction and wear tests are carried out based on Taguchi's L27 orthogonal array of experiments. 3D surface and contour plots are generated to analyze the trends in variation of friction and wear of the deposits considering the combined effect of the design variables. Analysis of variance is done to find out the contribution of each test parameter and their interactions in controlling the friction and wear behaviour of electroless Ni-B coating. Surface morphology, phase transformation and coating composition analysis are done with the help of scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis and energy dispersive X-ray analysis respectively.

  6. High Energy Boundary Conditions for a Cartesian Mesh Euler Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandya, Shishir; Murman, Scott; Aftosmis, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Inlets and exhaust nozzles are common place in the world of flight. Yet, many aerodynamic simulation packages do not provide a method of modelling such high energy boundaries in the flow field. For the purposes of aerodynamic simulation, inlets and exhausts are often fared over and it is assumed that the flow differences resulting from this assumption are minimal. While this is an adequate assumption for the prediction of lift, the lack of a plume behind the aircraft creates an evacuated base region thus effecting both drag and pitching moment values. In addition, the flow in the base region is often mis-predicted resulting in incorrect base drag. In order to accurately predict these quantities, a method for specifying inlet and exhaust conditions needs to be available in aerodynamic simulation packages. A method for a first approximation of a plume without accounting for chemical reactions is added to the Cartesian mesh based aerodynamic simulation package CART3D. The method consists of 3 steps. In the first step, a components approach where each triangle is assigned a component number is used. Here, a method for marking the inlet or exhaust plane triangles as separate components is discussed. In step two, the flow solver is modified to accept a reference state for the components marked inlet or exhaust. In the third step, the flow solver uses these separated components and the reference state to compute the correct flow condition at that triangle. The present method is implemented in the CART3D package which consists of a set of tools for generating a Cartesian volume mesh from a set of component triangulations. The Euler equations are solved on the resulting unstructured Cartesian mesh. The present methods is implemented in this package and its usefulness is demonstrated with two validation cases. A generic missile body is also presented to show the usefulness of the method on a real world geometry.

  7. Zero-derivative boundary condition for pulsed distributed systems. [column chromatography example

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lashmet, P. K.; Woodrow, P. T.

    1975-01-01

    To permit use of experimentally determined Peclet numbers in numerical simulations of pulsed distributed flow systems such as chromatograph columns, substitution of the zero-derivative boundary condition for the infinite boundary condition used in treating data is examined. Moment analysis shows that application of the zero-derivative condition external to the column will yield equivalent numerical results for the two boundary conditions. Criteria for locating this position are provided as a function of the Peclet number.

  8. A Discrete Analysis of Non-reflecting Boundary Conditions for Discontinuous Galerkin Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Fang Q.; Atkins, Harold L.

    2003-01-01

    We present a discrete analysis of non-reflecting boundary conditions for the discontinuous Galerkin method. The boundary conditions considered in this paper include the recently proposed Perfectly Matched Layer absorbing boundary condition for the linearized Euler equation and two non-reflecting boundary conditions based on the characteristic decomposition of the flux on the boundary. The analyses for the three boundary conditions are carried out in a unifled way. In each case, eigensolutions of the discrete system are obtained and applied to compute the numerical reflection coefficients of a specified out-going wave. The dependencies of the reflections at the boundary on the out-going wave angle and frequency as well as the mesh sizes arc? studied. Comparisons with direct numerical simulation results are also presented.

  9. Asymptotic boundary conditions with immersed finite elements for interface magnetostatic/electrostatic field problems with open boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Yuchuan; Cao, Yong; He, Xiaoming; Luo, Min

    2011-11-01

    Many of the magnetostatic/electrostatic field problems encountered in aerospace engineering, such as plasma sheath simulation and ion neutralization process in space, are not confined to finite domain and non-interface problems, but characterized as open boundary and interface problems. Asymptotic boundary conditions (ABC) and immersed finite elements (IFE) are relatively new tools to handle open boundaries and interface problems respectively. Compared with the traditional truncation approach, asymptotic boundary conditions need a much smaller domain to achieve the same accuracy. When regular finite element methods are applied to an interface problem, it is necessary to use a body-fitting mesh in order to obtain the optimal convergence rate. However, immersed finite elements possess the same optimal convergence rate on a Cartesian mesh, which is critical to many applications. This paper applies immersed finite element methods and asymptotic boundary conditions to solve an interface problem arising from electric field simulation in composite materials with open boundary. Numerical examples are provided to demonstrate the high global accuracy of the IFE method with ABC based on Cartesian meshes, especially around both interface and boundary. This algorithm uses a much smaller domain than the truncation approach in order to achieve the same accuracy.

  10. Development and validation of characteristic boundary conditions for cell-centered Euler flow calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Berg, J. I.; Boerstoel, J. W.

    An overview of the development, analysis, and numerical validation of a solid-wall boundary condition for cell-centered Euler-flow calculations is presented. This solid-wall boundary condition is provided by the theory of characteristics, and is based on a central-difference scheme. The boundary condition was developed to investigate the effect of various boundary-condition algorithms on the accuracy of calculation results for three-dimensional Euler flows around delta wings. A mathematical analysis of the boundary condition was performed. The numerical validation consists of a comparison of calculation results with various boundary conditions. Also discretization and convergence errors were investigated. As a test case, the NLR 7301 profile under supercritical, shock-free flow conditions of M = 0.721, alpha = -0.194 deg, were chosen.

  11. Ultralow Friction of Steel Surfaces Using a 1,3-Diketone Lubricant in the Thin Film Lubrication Regime.

    PubMed

    Li, Ke; Amann, Tobias; List, Mathias; Walter, Michael; Moseler, Michael; Kailer, Andreas; Rühe, Jürgen

    2015-10-13

    Ultralow friction (coefficient of friction μ ≈ 0.005) is observed when two steel surfaces are brought into sliding contact in the presence of a particular 1,3-diketone lubricant (1-(4-ethyl phenyl) nonane-1,3-dione). We investigate the friction process of such a system both experimentally and theoretically and show that the superlubricity is caused by a novel, unique mechanism: The formation of iron-1,3-diketonato complexes during frictional contact leads to a self-limiting, tribochemical polishing process while at the same time a self-assembled monolayer of the diketone is formed on the employed steel surfaces. This polishing process reduces the contact pressure and at the same time leads to formation of a boundary lubricant layer. During sliding the system transits from the original boundary lubrication regime toward hydrodynamic lubrication. Conductivity measurements across the friction gap during sliding show that the lubricant layer present in the gap between the two shearing surfaces is a only few 10 nanometers thick, so that the molecules experience under typical sliding conditions shear rates of a few 10(6) s(-1). Simulations show that under such strong shear the molecules become strongly oriented in the friction gap and the effective viscosity in sliding direction is significantly reduced so that the system is in the thin film lubrication regime and superlubricity is observed. The results of the experiments suggest that such diketones are promising lubricants to achieve a decrease of energy loss and frictional damage in steel based mechanical devices.

  12. Improvement of boundary conditions for non-planar boundaries represented by polygons with an initial particle arrangement technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tiangang; Koshizuka, Seiichi; Murotani, Kohei; Shibata, Kazuya; Ishii, Eiji; Ishikawa, Masanori

    2016-02-01

    The boundary conditions represented by polygons in moving particle semi-implicit (MPS) method (Koshizuka and Oka, Nuclear Science and Engineering, 1996) have been widely used in the industry simulations since it can simply simulate complex geometry with high efficiency. However, the inaccurate particle number density near non-planar wall boundaries dramatically affects the accuracy of simulations. In this paper, we propose an initial boundary particle arrangement technique coupled with the wall weight function method (Zhang et al. Transaction of JSCES, 2015) to improve the particle number density near slopes and curved surfaces with boundary conditions represented by polygons in three dimensions. Two uniform grids are utilized in the proposed technique. The grid points in the first uniform grid are used to construct boundary particles, and the second uniform grid stores the same information as in the work by Zhang et al. The wall weight functions of the grid points in the second uniform grid are calculated by newly constructed boundary particles. The wall weight functions of the fluid particles are interpolated from the values stored on the grid points in the second uniform grid. Because boundary particles are located on the polygons, complex geometries can be accurately represented. The proposed method can dramatically improve the particle number density and maintain the high efficiency. The performance of the previously proposed wall weight function (Zhang et al.) with the boundary particle arrangement technique is verified in comparison with the wall weight function without boundary particle arrangement by investigating two example geometries. The simulations of a water tank with a wedge and a complex geometry show the general applicability of the boundary particle arrangement technique to complex geometries and demonstrate its improvement of the wall weight function near the slopes and curved surfaces.

  13. Many-body-localization transition: sensitivity to twisted boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monthus, Cécile

    2017-03-01

    For disordered interacting quantum systems, the sensitivity of the spectrum to twisted boundary conditions depending on an infinitesimal angle ϕ can be used to analyze the many-body-localization transition. The sensitivity of the energy levels {{E}n}(φ ) is measured by the level curvature {{K}n}=En\\prime \\prime(0) , or more precisely by the Thouless dimensionless curvature {{k}n}={{K}n}/{{ Δ }n} , where {{ Δ }n} is the level spacing that decays exponentially with the size L of the system. For instance {{ Δ }n}\\propto {{2}-L} in the middle of the spectrum of quantum spin chains of L spins, while the Drude weight {{D}n}=L{{K}n} studied recently by Filippone et al (arxiv:1606.07291v1) involves a different rescaling. The sensitivity of the eigenstates |{{\\psi}n}(φ )> is characterized by the susceptibility {χn}=-Fn\\prime \\prime(0) of the fidelity {{F}n}= |<{{\\psi}n}(0)|{{\\psi}n}(φ )>| . Both observables are distributed with probability distributions displaying power-law tails {{P}β}(k)≃ {{A}β}|k{{|}-(2+β )} and Q(χ )≃ {{B}β}{χ-\\frac{3+β{2}}} , where β is the level repulsion index taking the values {β\\text{GOE}}=1 in the ergodic phase and {β\\text{loc}}=0 in the localized phase. The amplitudes {{A}β} and {{B}β} of these two heavy tails are given by some moments of the off-diagonal matrix element of the local current operator between two nearby energy levels, whose probability distribution has been proposed as a criterion for the many-body-localization transition by Serbyn et al (2015 Phys. Rev. X 5 041047).

  14. Marine Lubricants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, B. H.; Green, D.

    Marine diesel engines are classified by speed, either large (medium speed) or very large (slow speed) with high efficiencies and burning low-quality fuel. Slow-speed engines, up to 200 rpm, are two-stroke with separate combustion chamber and sump connected by a crosshead, with trunk and system oil lubricants for each. Medium-speed diesels, 300-1500 rpm, are of conventional automotive design with one lubricant. Slow-speed engines use heavy fuel oil of much lower quality than conventional diesel with problems of deposit cleanliness, acidity production and oxidation. Lubricants are mainly SAE 30/40/50 monogrades using paraffinic basestocks. The main types of additives are detergents/dispersants, antioxidants, corrosion inhibitors, anti-wear/load-carrying/ep, pour-point depressants and anti-foam compounds. There are no simple systems for classifying marine lubricants, as for automotive, because of the wide range of engine design, ratings and service applications they serve. There are no standard tests; lubricant suppliers use their own tests or the Bolnes 3DNL, with final proof from field tests. Frequent lubricant analyses safeguard engines and require standard sampling procedures before determination of density, viscosity, flash point, insolubles, base number, water and wear metal content.

  15. Error transport equation boundary conditions for the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Tyrone S.; Derlaga, Joseph M.; Roy, Christopher J.; Borggaard, Jeff

    2017-02-01

    Discretization error is usually the largest and most difficult numerical error source to estimate for computational fluid dynamics, and boundary conditions often contribute a significant source of error. Boundary conditions are described with a governing equation to prescribe particular behavior at the boundary of a computational domain. Boundary condition implementations are considered sufficient when discretized with the same order of accuracy as the primary governing equations; however, careless implementations of boundary conditions can result in significantly larger numerical error. Investigations into different numerical implementations of Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions for Burgers' equation show a significant impact on the accuracy of Richardson extrapolation and error transport equation discretization error estimates. The development of boundary conditions for Burgers' equation shows significant improvements in discretization error estimates in general and a significant improvement in truncation error estimation. The latter of which is key to accurate residual-based discretization error estimation. This research investigates scheme consistent and scheme inconsistent implementations of inflow and outflow boundary conditions up to fourth order accurate and a formulation for a slip wall boundary condition for truncation error estimation are developed for the Navier-Stokes and Euler equations. The scheme consistent implementation resulted in much smoother truncation error near the boundaries and more accurate discretization error estimates.

  16. Constructing non-reflecting boundary conditions using summation-by-parts in time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frenander, Hannes; Nordström, Jan

    2017-02-01

    In this paper we provide a new approach for constructing non-reflecting boundary conditions. The boundary conditions are based on summation-by-parts operators and derived without Laplace transformation in time. We prove that the new non-reflecting boundary conditions yield a well-posed problem and that the corresponding numerical approximation is unconditionally stable. The analysis is demonstrated on a hyperbolic system in two space dimensions, and the theoretical results are confirmed by numerical experiments.

  17. Simplified transfer matrix approach in the two-dimensional Ising model with various boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastening, Boris

    2002-11-01

    A recent simplified transfer matrix solution of the two-dimensional Ising model on a square lattice with periodic boundary conditions is generalized to periodic-antiperiodic, antiperiodic-periodic, and antiperiodic-antiperiodic boundary conditions. It is suggested to employ linear combinations of the resulting partition functions to investigate finite-size scaling. An exact relation of such a combination to the partition function corresponding to Brascamp-Kunz boundary conditions is found.

  18. Revisit boundary conditions for the self-adjoint angular flux formulation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yaqi; Gleicher, Frederick N.

    2015-03-01

    We revisit the boundary conditions for SAAF. We derived the equivalent parity variational form ready for coding up. The more rigorous approach of evaluating odd parity should be solving the odd parity equation coupled with the even parity. We proposed a symmetric reflecting boundary condition although neither positive definiteness nor even-odd decoupling is achieved. A simple numerical test verifies the validity of these boundary conditions.

  19. Boundary Conditions for Scalar Conservation Laws from a Kinetic Point of View

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouri, A.; Omrane, A.; Vila, J. P.

    1999-03-01

    Boundary conditions for multidimensional scalar conservation laws are obtained in the context of hydrodynamic limits from a kinetic point of view. The initial boundary value kinetic problem is well posed since inward and outward characteristics of the domain can be distinguished. The convergence of the first momentum of the distribution function to an entropy solution of the conservation law is established. Boundary conditions are obtained. The equivalence with the Bardos, Leroux, and Nedelec conditions is studied.

  20. Periodic Time-Domain Nonlocal Nonreflecting Boundary Conditions for Duct Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Willie R.; Zorumski, William E.

    1996-01-01

    Periodic time-domain boundary conditions are formulated for direct numerical simulation of acoustic waves in ducts without flow. Well-developed frequency-domain boundary conditions are transformed into the time domain. The formulation is presented here in one space dimension and time; however, this formulation has an advantage in that its extension to variable-area, higher dimensional, and acoustically treated ducts is rigorous and straightforward. The boundary condition simulates a nonreflecting wave field in an infinite uniform duct and is implemented by impulse-response operators that are applied at the boundary of the computational domain. These operators are generated by convolution integrals of the corresponding frequency-domain operators. The acoustic solution is obtained by advancing the Euler equations to a periodic state with the MacCormack scheme. The MacCormack scheme utilizes the boundary condition to limit the computational space and preserve the radiation boundary condition. The success of the boundary condition is attributed to the fact that it is nonreflecting to periodic acoustic waves. In addition, transient waves can pass rapidly out of the solution domain. The boundary condition is tested for a pure tone and a multitone source in a linear setting. The effects of various initial conditions are assessed. Computational solutions with the boundary condition are consistent with the known solutions for nonreflecting wave fields in an infinite uniform duct.

  1. An Explicit Time-Domain Hybrid Formulation Based on the Unified Boundary Condition

    SciTech Connect

    Madsen, N; Fasenfest, B J; White, D; Stowell, M; Jandhyala, V; Pingenot, J; Champagne, N J; Rockway, J D

    2007-02-28

    An approach to stabilize the two-surface, time domain FEM/BI hybrid by means of a unified boundary condition is presented. The first-order symplectic finite element formulation [1] is used along with a version of the unified boundary condition of Jin [2] reformulated for Maxwell's first-order equations in time to provide both stability and accuracy over the first-order ABC. Several results are presented to validate the numerical solutions. In particular the dipole in a free-space box is analyzed and compared to the Dirchlet boundary condition of Ziolkowski and Madsen [3] and to a Neuman boundary condition approach.

  2. Almost exact boundary condition for one-dimensional Schrödinger equations.

    PubMed

    Pang, Gang; Bian, Lei; Tang, Shaoqiang

    2012-12-01

    An explicit local boundary condition is proposed for finite-domain simulations of the linear Schrödinger equation on an unbounded domain. Based on an exact boundary condition in terms of the Bessel functions, it takes a simple form with 16 neighboring grid points, and it involves no empirical parameter. While the computing load is rather low, the proposed boundary condition is effective in reflection suppression, comparable to the exact convolution treatments. An extension to nonlinear Schrödinger equations is also proposed. Numerical comparisons clearly demonstrate the effectiveness of this ALmost EXact (ALEX) boundary condition for both the linear and the cubic nonlinear Schrödinger equations.

  3. Conditions at the downstream boundary for simulations of viscous incompressible flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagstrom, Thomas

    1990-01-01

    The proper specification of boundary conditions at artificial boundaries for the simulation of time-dependent fluid flows has long been a matter of controversy. A general theory of asymptotic boundary conditions for dissipative waves is applied to the design of simple, accurate conditions at downstream boundary for incompressible flows. For Reynolds numbers far enough below the critical value for linear stability, a scaling is introduced which greatly simplifies the construction of the asymptotic conditions. Numerical experiments with the nonlinear dynamics of vortical disturbances to plane Poiseuille flow are presented which illustrate the accuracy of our approach. The consequences of directly applying the scalings to the equations are also considered.

  4. Compatibility of refrigerants and lubricants with motor materials under retrofit conditions. Final report, Volume II - data tables, high pressure refrigerants

    SciTech Connect

    Doerr, R.G.; Waite, T.D.

    1996-10-01

    Compatibility tests were conducted on motor materials to determine if exposure to the original refrigerant/mineral oil would affect compatibility of the motor materials after retrofit to the alternative refrigerant/lubricant. The motor materials were exposed at elevated temperature to the original refrigerant and mineral oil for 500 hours, followed by exposure to the alternative refrigerant and lubricant for 500 hours. Measurements were also taken after 168 and 336 hours. As a control, some samples were exposed to the original refrigerant/mineral oil for a total of 1000 hours.

  5. Compatibility of refrigerants and lubricants with motor materials under retrofit conditions. Final report, Volume III - data tables, low pressure refrigerants

    SciTech Connect

    Doerr, R.G.; Waite, T.D.

    1996-10-01

    Compatibility tests were conducted on motor materials to determine if exposure to the original refrigerant/mineral oil would affect compatibility of the motor materials after retrofit to the alternative refrigerant/lubricant. The motor materials were exposed at elevated temperature to the original refrigerant and mineral oil for 500 hours, followed by exposure to the alternative refrigerant and lubricant for 500 hours. Measurements were also taken after 168 and 336 hours. As a control, some samples were exposed to the original refrigerant/mineral oil for a total of 1000 hours.

  6. Boundary conditions for conformally coupled scalar in AdS4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Jae-Hyuk

    2015-06-01

    We consider conformally coupled scalar with ɸ4 coupling in AdS4 and study its various boundary conditions on AdS boundary. We have obtained perturbative solutions of equation of motion of the conformally coupled scalar with power expansion order by order in ɸ4 coupling λ up to λ2 order. In its dual CFT, we get 2, 4 and 6 point functions by using this solution with Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions via AdS/CFT dictionary. We also consider marginal deformation on AdS boundary and get its on-shell and boundary effective actions.

  7. A Novel Method for Modeling Neumann and Robin Boundary Conditions in Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, Emily M.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Amon, Cristina

    2010-08-26

    In this paper we present an improved method for handling Neumann or Robin boundary conditions in smoothed particle hydrodynamics. The Neumann and Robin boundary conditions are common to many physical problems (such as heat/mass transfer), and can prove challenging to model in volumetric modeling techniques such as smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). A new SPH method for diffusion type equations subject to Neumann or Robin boundary conditions is proposed. The new method is based on the continuum surface force model [1] and allows an efficient implementation of the Neumann and Robin boundary conditions in the SPH method for geometrically complex boundaries. The paper discusses the details of the method and the criteria needed to apply the model. The model is used to simulate diffusion and surface reactions and its accuracy is demonstrated through test cases for boundary conditions describing different surface reactions.

  8. Computational Chemistry and Lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zehe, Michael J.

    1998-01-01

    Members of NASA Lewis Research Center's Tribology and Surface Science Branch are applying high-level computational chemistry techniques to the development of new lubrication systems for space applications and for future advanced aircraft engines. The next generation of gas turbine engines will require a liquid lubricant to function at temperatures in excess of 350 C in oxidizing environments. Conventional hydrocarbon-based lubricants are incapable of operating in these extreme environments, but a class of compounds known as the perfluoropolyether (PFAE) liquids (see the preceding illustration) shows promise for such applications. These commercially available products are already being used as lubricants in conditions where low vapor pressure and chemical stability are crucial, such as in satellite bearings and composite disk platters. At higher temperatures, however, these compounds undergo a decomposition process that is assisted (catalyzed) by metal and metal oxide bearing surfaces. This decomposition process severely limits the applicability of PFAE's at higher temperatures. A great deal of laboratory experimentation has revealed that the extent of fluid degradation depends on the chemical properties of the bearing surface materials. Lubrication engineers would like to understand the chemical breakdown mechanism to design a less vulnerable PFAE or to develop a chemical additive to block this degradation.

  9. Lubricating compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, J.J.; Campbell, C.B.

    1993-08-03

    A lubricating composition is described comprising a major amount of oil of lubricating viscosity and a minor amount of an oil-soluble composition selected from the group consisting of: (A) an alkali metal salt of a polyalkenyl succinimide which is the reaction product of (a) a polyalkenyl succinic acid or polyalkenyl succinic anhydride, with (b) an amine selected from the group consisting of polyamines and hydroxy-substituted polyamines; and (B) a mixture comprising: (1) an oil-soluble alkali metal compound; and (2) a polyalkenyl succinimide which is the reaction product of (a) a polyalkenyl succinic acid or polyalkenyl succinic anhydride, with (b) an amine selected from the group consisting of polyamines and hydroxy-substituted polyamines; wherein the polyalkenyl succinic acid and polyalkenyl succinic anhydride are prepared by a thermal reaction, and the lubricating composition has a sufficient amount of basic nitrogen content so that the use of from 7.91 to about 50 mmoles of alkali metal/kg lubricant composition provides for reductions in the lower piston deposits as compared to the lubricant composition not containing alkali.

  10. Entropy Stable Wall Boundary Conditions for the Compressible Navier-Stokes Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsani, Matteo; Carpenter, Mark H.; Nielsen, Eric J.

    2014-01-01

    Non-linear entropy stability and a summation-by-parts framework are used to derive entropy stable wall boundary conditions for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations. A semi-discrete entropy estimate for the entire domain is achieved when the new boundary conditions are coupled with an entropy stable discrete interior operator. The data at the boundary are weakly imposed using a penalty flux approach and a simultaneous-approximation-term penalty technique. Although discontinuous spectral collocation operators are used herein for the purpose of demonstrating their robustness and efficacy, the new boundary conditions are compatible with any diagonal norm summation-by-parts spatial operator, including finite element, finite volume, finite difference, discontinuous Galerkin, and flux reconstruction schemes. The proposed boundary treatment is tested for three-dimensional subsonic and supersonic flows. The numerical computations corroborate the non-linear stability (entropy stability) and accuracy of the boundary conditions.

  11. Entropy Stable Wall Boundary Conditions for the Three-Dimensional Compressible Navier-Stokes Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsani, Matteo; Carpenter, Mark H.; Nielsen, Eric J.

    2015-01-01

    Non-linear entropy stability and a summation-by-parts framework are used to derive entropy stable wall boundary conditions for the three-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations. A semi-discrete entropy estimate for the entire domain is achieved when the new boundary conditions are coupled with an entropy stable discrete interior operator. The data at the boundary are weakly imposed using a penalty flux approach and a simultaneous-approximation-term penalty technique. Although discontinuous spectral collocation operators on unstructured grids are used herein for the purpose of demonstrating their robustness and efficacy, the new boundary conditions are compatible with any diagonal norm summation-by-parts spatial operator, including finite element, finite difference, finite volume, discontinuous Galerkin, and flux reconstruction/correction procedure via reconstruction schemes. The proposed boundary treatment is tested for three-dimensional subsonic and supersonic flows. The numerical computations corroborate the non-linear stability (entropy stability) and accuracy of the boundary conditions.

  12. Neumann and Robin boundary conditions for heat conduction modeling using smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmaili Sikarudi, M. A.; Nikseresht, A. H.

    2016-01-01

    Smoothed particle hydrodynamics is a robust Lagrangian particle method which is widely used in various applications, from astrophysics to hydrodynamics and heat conduction. It has intrinsic capabilities for simulating large deformation, composites, multiphysics events, and multiphase fluid flows. It is vital to use reliable boundary conditions when boundary value problems like heat conduction or Poisson equation for incompressible flows are solved. Since smoothed particle hydrodynamics is not a boundary fitted grids method, implementation of boundary conditions can be problematic. Many methods have been proposed for enhancing the accuracy of implementation of boundary conditions. In the present study a new approach for facilitating the implementation of Robin and Neumann boundary conditions is proposed and proven to give accurate results. Also there is no need to use complicated preprocessing as in virtual particle method. The new method is compared to an equivalent one dimensional moving least square scheme and it is shown that the present method is less sensitive to particle disorder.

  13. Green's function of a heat problem with a periodic boundary condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erzhanov, Nurzhan E.

    2016-08-01

    In the paper, a nonlocal initial-boundary value problem for a non-homogeneous one-dimensional heat equation is considered. The domain under consideration is a rectangle. The classical initial condition with respect to t is put. A nonlocal periodic boundary condition by a spatial variable x is put. It is well-known that a solution of problem can be constructed in the form of convergent orthonormal series according to eigenfunctions of a spectral problem for an operator of multiple differentiation with periodic boundary conditions. Therefore Green's function can be also written in the form of an infinite series with respect to trigonometric functions (Fourier series). For classical first and second initial-boundary value problems there also exists a second representation of the Green's function by Jacobi function. In this paper we find the representation of the Green's function of the nonlocal initial-boundary value problem with periodic boundary conditions in the form of series according to exponents.

  14. Absorption and impedance boundary conditions for phased geometrical-acoustics methods.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2012-10-01

    Defining accurate acoustical boundary conditions is of crucial importance for room acoustic simulations. In predicting sound fields using phased geometrical acoustics methods, both absorption coefficients and surface impedances of the boundary surfaces can be used, but no guideline has been developed on which boundary condition produces accurate results. In this study, various boundary conditions in terms of normal, random, and field incidence absorption coefficients and normal incidence surface impedance are used in a phased beam tracing model, and the simulated results are validated with boundary element solutions. Two rectangular rooms with uniform and non-uniform absorption distributions are tested. Effects of the neglect of reflection phase shift are also investigated. It is concluded that the impedance, random incidence, and field incidence absorption boundary conditions produce reasonable results with some exceptions at low frequencies for acoustically soft materials.

  15. QCT/FEA predictions of femoral stiffness are strongly affected by boundary condition modeling

    PubMed Central

    Rossman, Timothy; Kushvaha, Vinod; Dragomir-Daescu, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative computed tomography-based finite element models of proximal femora must be validated with cadaveric experiments before using them to assess fracture risk in osteoporotic patients. During validation it is essential to carefully assess whether the boundary condition modeling matches the experimental conditions. This study evaluated proximal femur stiffness results predicted by six different boundary condition methods on a sample of 30 cadaveric femora and compared the predictions with experimental data. The average stiffness varied by 280% among the six boundary conditions. Compared with experimental data the predictions ranged from overestimating the average stiffness by 65% to underestimating it by 41%. In addition we found that the boundary condition that distributed the load to the contact surfaces similar to the expected contact mechanics predictions had the best agreement with experimental stiffness. We concluded that boundary conditions modeling introduced large variations in proximal femora stiffness predictions. PMID:25804260

  16. Effect of microscale texture on cutting performance of WC/Co-based TiAlN coated tools under different lubrication conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kedong; Deng, Jianxin; Xing, Youqiang; Li, Shipeng; Gao, Huanhuan

    2015-01-01

    Commonly known the severe friction between the tool and chip affects the tool life and the quality of the machined surfaces. Introducing a lubricant into the tool-chip interface can be used to alleviate the friction, the effectiveness of which may be improved by surface texturing of the tools. Thus, surface textures were fabricated using laser on the rake of the cemented carbide (WC/Co) inserts, then TiAlN films were coated on the textured tools. The effect of the textures on the cutting performance was investigated using the textured coated tools and conventional coated tools in cutting AISI 1045 hardened steel tests. Two batches of cutting tests were carried out, in regimes of full and starved lubrication. The machining performance was assessed in terms of the cutting forces, friction coefficient at the tool-chip interface, surface roughness of machined workpiece and tool wear on the rake face. Results show that the cutting performance of textured tools was enhanced, especially under the full lubrication condition.

  17. An outflow boundary condition and algorithm for incompressible two-phase flows with phase field approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, S.

    2014-06-01

    We present an effective outflow boundary condition, and an associated numerical algorithm, within the phase-field framework for dealing with two-phase outflows or open boundaries. The set of two-phase outflow boundary conditions for the phase-field and flow variables are designed to prevent the un-controlled growth in the total energy of the two-phase system, even in situations where strong backflows or vortices may be present at the outflow boundaries. We also present an additional boundary condition for the phase field function, which together with the usual Dirichlet condition can work effectively as the phase-field inflow conditions. The numerical algorithm for dealing with these boundary conditions is developed on top of a strategy for de-coupling the computations of all flow variables and for overcoming the performance bottleneck caused by variable coefficient matrices associated with variable density/viscosity. The algorithm contains special constructions, for treating the variable dynamic viscosity in the outflow boundary condition, and for preventing a numerical locking at the outflow boundaries for time-dependent problems. Extensive numerical tests with incompressible two-phase flows involving inflow and outflow boundaries demonstrate that, the two-phase outflow boundary conditions and the numerical algorithm developed herein allow for the fluid interface and the two-phase flow to pass through the outflow or open boundaries in a smooth and seamless fashion, and that our method produces stable simulations when large density ratios and large viscosity ratios are involved and when strong backflows are present at the outflow boundaries.

  18. Development, characterization and simulation of boundary lubricant functionalized hydrogels for use as a low-friction cartilage substitute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, Michelle M.

    Canada is the second highest producer of hydroelectric energy in the world. Nearly 50 of the hydroelectric reservoirs in the country have a capacity larger than 1 billion m3. Despite the great number and extent of hydropower developments in Canada and around the world, relatively little is known about how dams and their operations influence terrestrial and semi-aquatic wildlife. Reservoirs at northern latitudes are characterized by large fluctuations in water level, which create modified shorelines called drawdown zones. To evaluate the impact of these disturbances on amphibians and reptiles, I conducted visual encounter surveys at two sites in the drawdown zone of Kinbasket Reservoir, near Valemount, B.C. From April to August of 2010 and 2011, I documented the habitat use, reproductive phenology, and body condition of two amphibian species (Anaxyrus boreas and Rana luteiventris) as well as the growth, movements, diet, and distribution of one species of garter snake (Thamnophis sirtalis). At two sites in the drawdown zone, A. boreas and R. luteiventris were present for the duration of the summer and utilized several ponds for reproduction. The presence and abundance of Rana luteiventris eggs were generally associated with ponds that had higher mean temperatures, higher mean pH, and the presence of fish. In 2010, there was sufficient time for amphibian breeding and metamorphosis to occur before the reservoir inundated the drawdown zone, but low precipitation levels in that year led to desiccation of many breeding ponds. In 2011, high rainfall and snowmelt led to early inundation of breeding ponds, and thousands of tadpoles were presumably swept into the reservoir. Gravid Thamnophis sirtalis were found at just one of two sites in the drawdown zone, but both sites were frequented by foraging individuals of this species. Anaxyrus boreas appears to be the primary prey of T. sirtalis in the drawdown zone. An improved understanding of how the amphibians and reptiles at

  19. General Considerations of the Electrostatic Boundary Conditions in Oxide Heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Higuchi, Takuya

    2011-08-19

    When the size of materials is comparable to the characteristic length scale of their physical properties, novel functionalities can emerge. For semiconductors, this is exemplified by the 'superlattice' concept of Esaki and Tsu, where the width of the repeated stacking of different semiconductors is comparable to the 'size' of the electrons, resulting in novel confined states now routinely used in opto-electronics. For metals, a good example is magnetic/non-magnetic multilayer films that are thinner than the spin-scattering length, from which giant magnetoresistance (GMR) emerged, used in the read heads of hard disk drives. For transition metal oxides, a similar research program is currently underway, broadly motivated by the vast array of physical properties that they host. This long-standing notion has been recently invigorated by the development of atomic-scale growth and probe techniques, which enables the study of complex oxide heterostructures approaching the precision idealized in Fig. 1(a). Taking the subset of oxides derived from the perovskite crystal structure, the close lattice match across many transition metal oxides presents the opportunity, in principle, to develop a 'universal' heteroepitaxial materials system. Hand-in-hand with the continual improvements in materials control, an increasingly relevant challenge is to understand the consequences of the electrostatic boundary conditions which arise in these structures. The essence of this issue can be seen in Fig. 1(b), where the charge sequence of the sublayer 'stacks' for various representative perovskites is shown in the ionic limit, in the (001) direction. To truly 'universally' incorporate different properties using different materials components, be it magnetism, ferroelectricity, superconductivity, etc., it is necessary to access and join different charge sequences, labelled here in analogy to the designations 'group IV, III-V, II-VI' for semiconductors. As we will review, interfaces between

  20. Inflow/outflow with Dirichlet boundary conditions for pressure in ISPH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunz, P.; Hirschler, M.; Huber, M.; Nieken, U.

    2016-12-01

    In the present work we propose a new algorithm for open boundary treatment in ISPH. In the literature a few models for open boundary conditions are available, but most of them are applied to weakly compressible SPH (WCSPH) only. In our method the inflow/outflow is driven by true Dirichlet boundary conditions of the projected pressure field. We ensure the Dirichlet boundary condition by a particle mirroring technique at the open boundary to compute the pressure field. This procedure enables us to handle variable inlet velocities across the open boundary. The Dirichlet boundary conditions are introduced for the projected pressure matrix. We apply an error analysis for a Hagen-Poiseuille flow driven by a pressure gradient and demonstrate the robustness and accuracy with a flow around a cylinder and an oscillating flow, where inlet and outlet conditions periodically change. Additionally, a volume flux controller is presented in combination with variable pressure boundary conditions. Finally, the new open boundary treatment is applied to a bubble formation process during gas injection and validated with experimental results.

  1. Hydromagnetic conditions near the core-mantle boundary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Backus, George E.

    1995-01-01

    The main results of the grant were (1) finishing the manuscript of a proof of completeness of the Poincare modes in an incompressible nonviscous fluid corotating with a rigid ellipsoidal boundary, (2) partial completion of a manuscript describing a definition of helicity that resolved questions in the literature about calculating the helicities of vector fields with complicated topologies, and (3) the beginning of a reexamination of the inverse problem of inferring properties of the geomagnetic field B just outside the core-mantle boundary (CMB) from measurements of elements of B at and above the earth's surface. This last work has led to a simple general formalism for linear and nonlinear inverse problems that appears to include all the inversion schemes so far considered for the uniqueness problem in geomagnetic inversion. The technique suggests some new methods for error estimation that form part of this report.

  2. Conditions affecting boundary response to messages out of awareness.

    PubMed

    Fisher, S

    1976-05-01

    Multiple studies evaluated the role of the following parameters in mediating the effects of auditory subliminal inputs upon the body boundary: being made aware that exposure to subliminal stimuli is occurring, nature of the priming preliminary to the input, length of exposure, competing sensory input, use of specialized content messages, tolerance for unrealistic experience, and masculinity-feminity. A test-retest design was typically employed that involved measuring the baseline Barrier score with the Holtzman bolts and then ascertaining the Barrier change when responding to a second series of Holtzman blots at the same time that subliminal input was occurring. Complex results emerged that defined in considerably new detail what facilitates and blocks the boundary-disrupting effects of subliminal messages in men and to a lesser degree in women.

  3. Advanced Lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Three Sun Coast Chemicals (SCC) of Daytona, Inc. products were derived from NASA technology: Train Track Lubricant, Penetrating Spray Lube, and Biodegradable Hydraulic Fluid. NASA contractor Lockheed Martin Space Operations contacted SCC about joining forces to develop an environmentally safe spray lubricant for the Shuttle Crawler. The formula was developed over an eight-month period resulting in new products which are cost effective and environmentally friendly. Meeting all Environmental Protection Agency requirements, the SCC products are used for applications from train tracks to bicycle chains.

  4. The effect of external boundary conditions on condensation heat transfer in rotating heat pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, T. C.; Williams, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    Experimental evidence shows the importance of external boundary conditions on the overall performance of a rotating heat pipe condenser. Data are presented for the boundary conditions of constant heat flux and constant wall temperature for rotating heat pipes containing either pure vapor or a mixture of vapor and noncondensable gas as working fluid.

  5. Impacts of Lateral Boundary Conditions on U.S. Ozone Modeling Analyses

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical boundary conditions are a key input to regional-scale photochemical models. In this study, we perform annual simulations over North America with chemical boundary conditions prepared from two global models (GEOS-CHEM and Hemispheric CMAQ). Results indicate that the impac...

  6. On the Effective Construction of Compactly Supported Wavelets Satisfying Homogenous Boundary Conditions on the Interval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiavassa, G.; Liandrat, J.

    1996-01-01

    We construct compactly supported wavelet bases satisfying homogeneous boundary conditions on the interval (0,1). The maximum features of multiresolution analysis on the line are retained, including polynomial approximation and tree algorithms. The case of H(sub 0)(sup 1)(0, 1)is detailed, and numerical values, required for the implementation, are provided for the Neumann and Dirichlet boundary conditions.

  7. Open boundary conditions for ISPH and their application to micro-flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschler, Manuel; Kunz, Philip; Huber, Manuel; Hahn, Friedemann; Nieken, Ulrich

    2016-02-01

    Open boundary conditions for incompressible Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (ISPH) are rare. For stable simulations with open boundary conditions, one needs to specify all boundary conditions correctly in the pressure force as well as in the linear equation system for pressure calculation. Especially for homogeneous or non-homogeneous Dirichlet boundary conditions for pressure there exist several possibilities but only a few lead to stable results. However, this isn't trivial for open boundary conditions. We introduce a new approach for open boundary conditions for ISPH to enable stable simulations. In contrast to existing models for weakly-compressible SPH, we can specify open pressure boundary conditions because in ISPH, pressure can be calculated independently of the density. The presented approach is based on the mirror particle approach already introduced for solid wall boundary conditions. Here we divide the mirror axis in several segments with time-dependent positions. We validate the presented approach for the example of Poiseuille flow and flow around a cylinder at different Reynolds numbers and show that we get good agreement with references. Then, we demonstrate that the approach can be applied to free surface flows. Finally, we apply the new approach to micro-flow through a random porous medium with a different number of in- and outlets and demonstrate its benefits.

  8. Existence Result for the Kinetic Neutron Transport Problem with a General Albedo Boundary Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Richard; Bourhrara, Lahbib

    2011-09-01

    We present an existence result for the kinetic neutron transport equation with a general albedo boundary condition. The proof is constructive in the sense that we build a sequence that converges to the solution of the problem by iterating on the albedo term. Both nonhomogeneous and albedo boundary conditions are studied.

  9. Trickle-down boundary conditions in aeolian dune-field pattern formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewing, R. C.; Kocurek, G.

    2015-12-01

    One the one hand, wind-blown dune-field patterns emerge within the overarching boundary conditions of climate, tectonics and eustasy implying the presence of these signals in the aeolian geomorphic and stratigraphic record. On the other hand, dune-field patterns are a poster-child of self-organization, in which autogenic processes give rise to patterned landscapes despite remarkable differences in the geologic setting (i.e., Earth, Mars and Titan). How important are climate, tectonics and eustasy in aeolian dune field pattern formation? Here we develop the hypothesis that, in terms of pattern development, dune fields evolve largely independent of the direct influence of 'system-scale' boundary conditions, such as climate, tectonics and eustasy. Rather, these boundary conditions set the stage for smaller-scale, faster-evolving 'event-scale' boundary conditions. This 'trickle-down' effect, in which system-scale boundary conditions indirectly influence the event scale boundary conditions provides the uniqueness and richness of dune-field patterned landscapes. The trickle-down effect means that the architecture of the stratigraphic record of dune-field pattern formation archives boundary conditions, which are spatially and temporally removed from the overarching geologic setting. In contrast, the presence of an aeolian stratigraphic record itself, reflects changes in system-scale boundary conditions that drive accumulation and preservation of aeolian strata.

  10. On the Boundary Condition Between Two Multiplying Media

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Friedman, F. L.; Wigner, E. P.

    1944-04-19

    The transition region between two parts of a pile which have different compositions is investigated. In the case where the moderator is the same in both parts of the pile, it is found that the diffusion constant times thermal neutron density plus diffusion constant times fast neutron density satisfies the usual pile equations everywhere, right to the boundary. More complicated formulae apply in a more general case.

  11. On global solutions for quasilinear one-dimensional parabolic problems with dynamical boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gvelesiani, Simon; Lippoth, Friedrich; Walker, Christoph

    2015-12-01

    We provide sufficient and almost optimal conditions for global existence of classical solutions in parabolic Hölder spaces to quasilinear one-dimensional parabolic problems with dynamical boundary conditions.

  12. Role of free-surface boundary conditions and nonlinearities in wave/boundary-layer and wake interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jung-Eun

    1993-01-01

    In Part One of this two-part thesis, laminar and turbulent solutions are presented for the Stokes-wave/flat-plate boundary-layer and wake for small - large wave steepness, including exact and approximate treatments of the viscous free-surface boundary conditions. The macro-scale flow exhibits the wave-induced pressure-gradient effects described in a precursory work. For laminar flow, the micro-scale flow indicates that the free-surface boundary conditions have a profound influence over the boundary layer and near and intermediate wake: the wave elevation and slopes correlate with the depthwise velocity; the streamwise and transverse velocities and vorticity display large variations, including islands of maximum/minimum values, whereas the depthwise velocity and pressure indicate small variations; significant free-surface vorticity flux and complex vorticity transport are displayed; wave-induced effects normalized by wave steepness are larger for small steepness with the exception of wave-induced separation; order-of-magnitude estimates are confirmed; and appreciable errors are introduced through approximations to the free-surface boundary conditions. For turbulent flow, the results are similar, but preliminary due to the present uncertainty in appropriate treatment of the free-surface boundary conditions and meniscus boundary layer. In Part Two, Navier-Stokes, boundary-layer, and perturbation expansion solutions are presented for the model problem of a flat-plate boundary layer and wake with temporal, spatial, and traveling horizontal-wave external flows, which are characterized by Stokes-layer overshoots, phase angles, and streaming and nonlinearities. The temporal wave displays close agreement with previous studies and is useful for validation and placing the current work in technical perspective. The spatial wave indicates significantly increased magnitudes and complex nature (e.g., wake bias), which is attributed to nonlinearities associated with large

  13. Dynamics of solid dispersions in oil during the lubrication of point contacts. Part 1: Graphite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cusano, C.; Sliney, H. E.

    1981-01-01

    A Hertzian contact was lubricated with dispersed graphite in mineral oils under boundary lubrication conditions. The contact was optically observed under pure rolling, combined rolling and sliding, and pure sliding conditions. The contact was formed with a steel ball on the flat surface of a glass disk. Photomicrographs are presented which show the distribution of the graphite in and around the contact. Friction and surface damage are also shown for conditions when the base oils are used alone and when graphite is added to the base oils. Under pure rolling and combined rolling and sliding conditions, it is found that, for low speeds, a graphite film can form which will separate the contacting surfaces. Under pure sliding conditions, graphite accumulates at the inlet and sweeps around the contact, but very little of the graphite passes through the contact. The accumulated graphite appears to act as a barrier which reduces the supply of oil available to the contact for boundary lubrication. Friction data show no clear short term beneficial or detrimental effect caused by addition of graphite to the base oil. However, during pure sliding, more abrasion occurs on the polished balls lubricated with the dispersion than on those lubricated with the base oil alone. All observations were for the special case of a highly-polished ball on a glass surface and may not be applicable to other geometries and materials, or to rougher surfaces.

  14. Finite-size corrections in the Ising model with special boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izmailian, N. Sh.

    2010-11-01

    The Ising model in two dimensions with the special boundary conditions of Brascamp and Kunz (BK) is analyzed. We derive exact finite-size corrections for the free energy F of the critical ferromagnetic Ising model on the M×N square lattice with Brascamp-Kunz boundary conditions [H.J. Brascamp, H. Kunz, J. Math. Phys. 15 (1974) 66]. We show that finite-size corrections strongly depend not only on the boundary conditions but also on the shape and pattern of the lattice. In the limit N→∞ we obtain the expansion of the free energy and the inverse correlation lengths for infinitely long strip with BK boundary conditions. Our results are consistent with the conformal field theory prediction for the mixed boundary conditions.

  15. Structural acoustic control of plates with variable boundary conditions: design methodology.

    PubMed

    Sprofera, Joseph D; Cabell, Randolph H; Gibbs, Gary P; Clark, Robert L

    2007-07-01

    A method for optimizing a structural acoustic control system subject to variations in plate boundary conditions is provided. The assumed modes method is used to build a plate model with varying levels of rotational boundary stiffness to simulate the dynamics of a plate with uncertain edge conditions. A transducer placement scoring process, involving Hankel singular values, is combined with a genetic optimization routine to find spatial locations robust to boundary condition variation. Predicted frequency response characteristics are examined, and theoretically optimized results are discussed in relation to the range of boundary conditions investigated. Modeled results indicate that it is possible to minimize the impact of uncertain boundary conditions in active structural acoustic control by optimizing the placement of transducers with respect to those uncertainties.

  16. Neumann-Type Boundary Conditions for Hamilton-Jacobi Equations in Smooth Domains

    SciTech Connect

    Day, Martin V.

    2006-05-15

    Neumann or oblique derivative boundary conditions for viscosity solutions of Hamilton-Jacobi equations are considered. As developed by P.L. Lions, such boundary conditions are naturally associated with optimal control problems for which the state equations employ 'Skorokhod' or reflection dynamics to ensure that the state remains in a prescribed set, assumed here to have a smooth boundary. We develop connections between the standard formulation of viscosity boundary conditions and an alternative formulation using a naturally occurring discontinuous Hamiltonian which incorporates the reflection dynamics directly. (This avoids the dependence of such equivalence on existence and uniqueness results, which may not be available in some applications.) At points of differentiability, equivalent conditions for the boundary conditions are given in terms of the Hamiltonian and the geometry of the state trajectories using optimal controls.

  17. A convective-like energy-stable open boundary condition for simulations of incompressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, S.

    2015-12-01

    We present a new energy-stable open boundary condition, and an associated numerical algorithm, for simulating incompressible flows with outflow/open boundaries. This open boundary condition ensures the energy stability of the system, even when strong vortices or backflows occur at the outflow boundary. Under certain situations it can be reduced to a form that can be analogized to the usual convective boundary condition. One prominent feature of this boundary condition is that it provides a control over the velocity on the outflow/open boundary. This is not available with the other energy-stable open boundary conditions from previous works. Our numerical algorithm treats the proposed open boundary condition based on a rotational velocity-correction type strategy. It gives rise to a Robin-type condition for the discrete pressure and a Robin-type condition for the discrete velocity on the outflow/open boundary, respectively at the pressure and the velocity sub-steps. We present extensive numerical experiments on a canonical wake flow and a jet flow in open domain to test the effectiveness and performance of the method developed herein. Simulation results are compared with the experimental data as well as with other previous simulations to demonstrate the accuracy of the current method. Long-time simulations are performed for a range of Reynolds numbers, at which strong vortices and backflows occur at the outflow/open boundaries. The results show that our method is effective in overcoming the backflow instability, and that it allows for the vortices to discharge from the domain in a fairly natural fashion even at high Reynolds numbers.

  18. Open boundary conditions for the Diffuse Interface Model in 1-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desmarais, J. L.; Kuerten, J. G. M.

    2014-04-01

    New techniques are developed for solving multi-phase flows in unbounded domains using the Diffuse Interface Model in 1-D. They extend two open boundary conditions originally designed for the Navier-Stokes equations. The non-dimensional formulation of the DIM generalizes the approach to any fluid. The equations support a steady state whose analytical approximation close to the critical point depends only on temperature. This feature enables the use of detectors at the boundaries switching between conventional boundary conditions in bulk phases and a multi-phase strategy in interfacial regions. Moreover, the latter takes advantage of the steady state approximation to minimize the interface-boundary interactions. The techniques are applied to fluids experiencing a phase transition and where the interface between the phases travels through one of the boundaries. When the interface crossing the boundary is fully developed, the technique greatly improves results relative to cases where conventional boundary conditions can be used. Limitations appear when the interface crossing the boundary is not a stable equilibrium between the two phases: the terms responsible for creating the true balance between the phases perturb the interior solution. Both boundary conditions present good numerical stability properties: the error remains bounded when the initial conditions or the far field values are perturbed. For the PML, the influence of its main parameters on the global error is investigated to make a compromise between computational costs and maximum error. The approach can be extended to multiple spatial dimensions.

  19. Modeling mixed boundary conditions in a Hilbert space with the complex variable boundary element method (CVBEM).

    PubMed

    Johnson, Anthony N; Hromadka, T V

    2015-01-01

    The Laplace equation that results from specifying either the normal or tangential force equilibrium equation in terms of the warping functions or its conjugate can be modeled as a complex variable boundary element method or CVBEM mixed boundary problem. The CVBEM is a well-known numerical technique that can provide solutions to potential value problems in two or more dimensions by the use of an approximation function that is derived from the Cauchy Integral in complex analysis. This paper highlights three customizations to the technique.•A least squares approach to modeling the complex-valued approximation function will be compared and analyzed to determine if modeling error on the boundary can be reduced without the need to find and evaluated additional linearly independent complex functions.•The nodal point locations will be moved outside the problem domain.•Contour and streamline plots representing the warping function and its complementary conjugate are generated simultaneously from the complex-valued approximating function.

  20. Modeling mixed boundary conditions in a Hilbert space with the complex variable boundary element method (CVBEM)

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Anthony N.; Hromadka, T.V.

    2015-01-01

    The Laplace equation that results from specifying either the normal or tangential force equilibrium equation in terms of the warping functions or its conjugate can be modeled as a complex variable boundary element method or CVBEM mixed boundary problem. The CVBEM is a well-known numerical technique that can provide solutions to potential value problems in two or more dimensions by the use of an approximation function that is derived from the Cauchy Integral in complex analysis. This paper highlights three customizations to the technique.•A least squares approach to modeling the complex-valued approximation function will be compared and analyzed to determine if modeling error on the boundary can be reduced without the need to find and evaluated additional linearly independent complex functions.•The nodal point locations will be moved outside the problem domain.•Contour and streamline plots representing the warping function and its complementary conjugate are generated simultaneously from the complex-valued approximating function. PMID:26151000

  1. Robust and general method for determining surface fluid flow boundary conditions in articular cartilage contact mechanics modeling.

    PubMed

    Pawaskar, Sainath Shrikant; Fisher, John; Jin, Zhongmin

    2010-03-01

    Contact detection in cartilage contact mechanics is an important feature of any analytical or computational modeling investigation when the biphasic nature of cartilage and the corresponding tribology are taken into account. The fluid flow boundary conditions will change based on whether the surface is in contact or not, which will affect the interstitial fluid pressurization. This in turn will increase or decrease the load sustained by the fluid phase, with a direct effect on friction, wear, and lubrication. In laboratory experiments or clinical hemiarthroplasty, when a rigid indenter or metallic prosthesis is used to apply load to the cartilage, there will not be any fluid flow normal to the surface in the contact region due to the impermeable nature of the indenter/prosthesis. In the natural joint, on the other hand, where two cartilage surfaces interact, flow will depend on the pressure difference across the interface. Furthermore, in both these cases, the fluid would flow freely in non-contacting regions. However, it should be pointed out that the contact area is generally unknown in advance in both cases and can only be determined as part of the solution. In the present finite element study, a general and robust algorithm was proposed to decide nodes in contact on the cartilage surface and, accordingly, impose the fluid flow boundary conditions. The algorithm was first tested for a rigid indenter against cartilage model. The algorithm worked well for two-dimensional four-noded and eight-noded axisymmetric element models as well as three-dimensional models. It was then extended to include two cartilages in contact. The results were in excellent agreement with the previous studies reported in the literature.

  2. Solidification of Boundary Lubricant Films.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-12-01

    ambient pressure (Figure lOB). This is more clearl y seen in the d if f e r e n c e specr um given in Figure l4B , wh ich was obtained by sub trac ti...Branch , AFS—140 Cameron Station 800 Independence Avenue , S.W . Alexandria , V irginia 22314 Wash ington, D.C. 20591 Defense Supp ly Agency US Atomic

  3. Towards Perfectly Absorbing Boundary Conditions for Euler Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayder, M. Ehtesham; Hu, Fang Q.; Hussaini, M. Yousuff

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, we examine the effectiveness of absorbing layers as non-reflecting computational boundaries for the Euler equations. The absorbing-layer equations are simply obtained by splitting the governing equations in the coordinate directions and introducing absorption coefficients in each split equation. This methodology is similar to that used by Berenger for the numerical solutions of Maxwell's equations. Specifically, we apply this methodology to three physical problems shock-vortex interactions, a plane free shear flow and an axisymmetric jet- with emphasis on acoustic wave propagation. Our numerical results indicate that the use of absorbing layers effectively minimizes numerical reflection in all three problems considered.

  4. Lubrication Flows.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papanastasiou, Tasos C.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses fluid mechanics for undergraduates including the differential Navier-Stokes equations, dimensional analysis and simplified dimensionless numbers, control volume principles, the Reynolds lubrication equation for confined and free surface flows, capillary pressure, and simplified perturbation techniques. Provides a vertical dip coating…

  5. Bonded Lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Another spinoff to the food processing industry involves a dry lubricant developed by General Magnaplate Corp. of Linden, N.J. Used in such spacecraft as Apollo, Skylab and Viking, the lubricant is a coating bonded to metal surfaces providing permanent lubrication and corrosion resistance. The coating lengthens equipment life and permits machinery to be operated at greater speed, thus increasing productivity and reducing costs. Bonded lubricants are used in scores of commercia1 applications. They have proved particularly valuable to food processing firms because, while increasing production efficiency, they also help meet the stringent USDA sanitation codes for food-handling equipment. For example, a cookie manufacturer plagued production interruptions because sticky batter was clogging the cookie molds had the brass molds coated to solve the problem. Similarly, a pasta producer faced USDA action on a sanitation violation because dough was clinging to an automatic ravioli-forming machine; use of the anti-stick coating on the steel forming plates solved the dual problem of sanitation deficiency and production line downtime.

  6. Variance reduction through robust design of boundary conditions for stochastic hyperbolic systems of equations

    SciTech Connect

    Nordström, Jan Wahlsten, Markus

    2015-02-01

    We consider a hyperbolic system with uncertainty in the boundary and initial data. Our aim is to show that different boundary conditions give different convergence rates of the variance of the solution. This means that we can with the same knowledge of data get a more or less accurate description of the uncertainty in the solution. A variety of boundary conditions are compared and both analytical and numerical estimates of the variance of the solution are presented. As an application, we study the effect of this technique on Maxwell's equations as well as on a subsonic outflow boundary for the Euler equations.

  7. A quenched study of the Schroedinger functional with chirally rotated boundary conditions: non-perturbative tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Lopez, Jennifer; Jansen, Karl; Renner, Dru B.; Shindler, Andrea

    2013-02-01

    The use of chirally rotated boundary conditions provides a formulation of the Schroedinger functional that is compatible with automatic O(a) improvement of Wilson fermions up to O(a) boundary contributions. The elimination of bulk O(a) effects requires the non-perturbative tuning of the critical mass and one additional boundary counterterm. We present the results of such a tuning in a quenched setup for several values of the renormalized gauge coupling, from perturbative to non-perturbative regimes, and for a range of lattice spacings. We also check that the correct boundary conditions and symmetries are restored in the continuum limit.

  8. Comparison of Methods for Determining Boundary Layer Edge Conditions for Transition Correlations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liechty, Derek S.; Berry, Scott A.; Hollis, Brian R.; Horvath, Thomas J.

    2003-01-01

    Data previously obtained for the X-33 in the NASA Langley Research Center 20-Inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel have been reanalyzed to compare methods for determining boundary layer edge conditions for use in transition correlations. The experimental results were previously obtained utilizing the phosphor thermography technique to monitor the status of the boundary layer downstream of discrete roughness elements via global heat transfer images of the X-33 windward surface. A boundary layer transition correlation was previously developed for this data set using boundary layer edge conditions calculated using an inviscid/integral boundary layer approach. An algorithm was written in the present study to extract boundary layer edge quantities from higher fidelity viscous computational fluid dynamic solutions to develop transition correlations that account for viscous effects on vehicles of arbitrary complexity. The boundary layer transition correlation developed for the X-33 from the viscous solutions are compared to the previous boundary layer transition correlations. It is shown that the boundary layer edge conditions calculated using an inviscid/integral boundary layer approach are significantly different than those extracted from viscous computational fluid dynamic solutions. The present results demonstrate the differences obtained in correlating transition data using different computational methods.

  9. New approximate boundary conditions for large eddy simulations of wall-bounded flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piomelli, Ugo; Ferziger, Joel; Moin, Parviz; Kim, John

    1989-01-01

    Two new approximate boundary conditions have been applied to the large eddy simulation of channel flow with and without transpiration. These new boundary conditions give more accurate results than those previously in use, and allow significant reduction of the required CPU time over simulations in which no-slip conditions are applied. Mean velocity profiles and turbulence intensities compare well both with experimental data and with the results of resolved simulations. The influence of the approximate boundary conditions remains confined near the point of application and does not affect the turbulence statistics in the core of the flow.

  10. Boundary conditions for simulations of oscillating bubbles using the non-linear acoustic approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, J. R. C.; Ziolkowski, A. M.; Ruffert, M.

    2015-03-01

    We have developed a new boundary condition for finite volume simulations of oscillating bubbles. Our method uses an approximation to the motion outside the domain, based on the solution at the domain boundary. We then use this approximation to apply boundary conditions by defining incoming characteristic waves at the domain boundary. Our boundary condition is applicable in regions where the motion is close to spherically symmetric. We have tested our method on a range of one- and two-dimensional test cases. Results show good agreement with previous studies. The method allows simulations of oscillating bubbles for long run times (5 ×105 time steps with a CFL number of 0.8) on highly truncated domains, in which the boundary condition may be applied within 0.1% of the maximum bubble radius. Conservation errors due to the boundary conditions are found to be of the order of 0.1% after 105 time steps. The method significantly reduces the computational cost of fixed grid finite volume simulations of oscillating bubbles. Two-dimensional results demonstrate that highly asymmetric bubble features, such as surface instabilities and the formation of jets, may be captured on a small domain using this boundary condition.

  11. Inferring Lower Boundary Driving Conditions Using Vector Magnetic Field Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuck, Peter W.; Linton, Mark; Leake, James; MacNeice, Peter; Allred, Joel

    2012-01-01

    Low-beta coronal MHD simulations of realistic CME events require the detailed specification of the magnetic fields, velocities, densities, temperatures, etc., in the low corona. Presently, the most accurate estimates of solar vector magnetic fields are made in the high-beta photosphere. Several techniques have been developed that provide accurate estimates of the associated photospheric plasma velocities such as the Differential Affine Velocity Estimator for Vector Magnetograms and the Poloidal/Toroidal Decomposition. Nominally, these velocities are consistent with the evolution of the radial magnetic field. To evolve the tangential magnetic field radial gradients must be specified. In addition to estimating the photospheric vector magnetic and velocity fields, a further challenge involves incorporating these fields into an MHD simulation. The simulation boundary must be driven, consistent with the numerical boundary equations, with the goal of accurately reproducing the observed magnetic fields and estimated velocities at some height within the simulation. Even if this goal is achieved, many unanswered questions remain. How can the photospheric magnetic fields and velocities be propagated to the low corona through the transition region? At what cadence must we observe the photosphere to realistically simulate the corona? How do we model the magnetic fields and plasma velocities in the quiet Sun? How sensitive are the solutions to other unknowns that must be specified, such as the global solar magnetic field, and the photospheric temperature and density?

  12. Boundary conditions for Maxwell fields in Kerr-AdS spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mengjie

    2016-05-01

    Perturbative methods are useful to study the interaction between black holes and test fields. The equation for a perturbation itself, however, is not complete to study such a composed system if we do not assign physically relevant boundary conditions. Recently we have proposed a new type of boundary conditions for Maxwell fields in Kerr-anti-de Sitter (Kerr-AdS) spacetimes, from the viewpoint that the AdS boundary may be regarded as a perfectly reflecting mirror, in the sense that energy flux vanishes asymptotically. In this paper, we prove explicitly that a vanishing energy flux leads to a vanishing angular momentum flux. Thus, these boundary conditions may be dubbed as vanishing flux boundary conditions.

  13. An implicit-iterative solution of the heat conduction equation with a radiation boundary condition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, S. D.; Curry, D. M.

    1977-01-01

    For the problem of predicting one-dimensional heat transfer between conducting and radiating mediums by an implicit finite difference method, four different formulations were used to approximate the surface radiation boundary condition while retaining an implicit formulation for the interior temperature nodes. These formulations are an explicit boundary condition, a linearized boundary condition, an iterative boundary condition, and a semi-iterative boundary method. The results of these methods in predicting surface temperature on the space shuttle orbiter thermal protection system model under a variety of heating rates were compared. The iterative technique caused the surface temperature to be bounded at each step. While the linearized and explicit methods were generally more efficient, the iterative and semi-iterative techniques provided a realistic surface temperature response without requiring step size control techniques.

  14. Assessment of lubricated contacts: Mechanisms of scuffing and scoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyson, A.; Wedeven, L. D.

    1983-01-01

    Scoring and scuffing are defined as two distinct but related forms of failure of hardened ferrous components lubricated by liquids. Experimental observations of these phenomena are described, and criteria for scoring and scuffing are discussed. The mechanisms proposed by various authors to explain these observations are enumerated. The view presented here is that, under conditions yet to be defined, scoring is a gradual breakdown of the lubrication of interacting asperities, such lubrication being boundary or microelastohydrodynamic in nature, or a mixture of the two. The final scuffing stage represents a breakdown of the main elastohydrodynamic system, but this may be triggered by the deterioration in surface topography as a result of scoring. An extension of published theoretical treatment of elastohydrodynamic breakdown is proposed, and a critical experiment to assess the importance of edge effects in band contacts is suggested. The practical implications of the proposed mechanism are reviewed, and recommendations for further work are made. A possible thermal instability mechanism for the breakdown of boundary lubrication is outlined.

  15. MHD free convective boundary layer flow of a nanofluid past a flat vertical plate with Newtonian heating boundary condition.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Mohammed J; Khan, Waqar A; Ismail, Ahmed I

    2012-01-01

    Steady two dimensional MHD laminar free convective boundary layer flows of an electrically conducting Newtonian nanofluid over a solid stationary vertical plate in a quiescent fluid taking into account the Newtonian heating boundary condition is investigated numerically. A magnetic field can be used to control the motion of an electrically conducting fluid in micro/nano scale systems used for transportation of fluid. The transport equations along with the boundary conditions are first converted into dimensionless form and then using linear group of transformations, the similarity governing equations are developed. The transformed equations are solved numerically using the Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg fourth-fifth order method with shooting technique. The effects of different controlling parameters, namely, Lewis number, Prandtl number, buoyancy ratio, thermophoresis, Brownian motion, magnetic field and Newtonian heating on the flow and heat transfer are investigated. The numerical results for the dimensionless axial velocity, temperature and nanoparticle volume fraction as well as the reduced Nusselt and Sherwood number have been presented graphically and discussed. It is found that the rate of heat and mass transfer increase as Newtonian heating parameter increases. The dimensionless velocity and temperature distributions increase with the increase of Newtonian heating parameter. The results of the reduced heat transfer rate is compared for convective heating boundary condition and found an excellent agreement.

  16. MHD Free Convective Boundary Layer Flow of a Nanofluid past a Flat Vertical Plate with Newtonian Heating Boundary Condition

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, Mohammed J.; Khan, Waqar A.; Ismail, Ahmed I.

    2012-01-01

    Steady two dimensional MHD laminar free convective boundary layer flows of an electrically conducting Newtonian nanofluid over a solid stationary vertical plate in a quiescent fluid taking into account the Newtonian heating boundary condition is investigated numerically. A magnetic field can be used to control the motion of an electrically conducting fluid in micro/nano scale systems used for transportation of fluid. The transport equations along with the boundary conditions are first converted into dimensionless form and then using linear group of transformations, the similarity governing equations are developed. The transformed equations are solved numerically using the Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg fourth-fifth order method with shooting technique. The effects of different controlling parameters, namely, Lewis number, Prandtl number, buoyancy ratio, thermophoresis, Brownian motion, magnetic field and Newtonian heating on the flow and heat transfer are investigated. The numerical results for the dimensionless axial velocity, temperature and nanoparticle volume fraction as well as the reduced Nusselt and Sherwood number have been presented graphically and discussed. It is found that the rate of heat and mass transfer increase as Newtonian heating parameter increases. The dimensionless velocity and temperature distributions increase with the increase of Newtonian heating parameter. The results of the reduced heat transfer rate is compared for convective heating boundary condition and found an excellent agreement. PMID:23166688

  17. Inverse Lax-Wendroff procedure for numerical boundary conditions of convection-diffusion equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jianfang; Fang, Jinwei; Tan, Sirui; Shu, Chi-Wang; Zhang, Mengping

    2016-07-01

    We consider numerical boundary conditions for high order finite difference schemes for solving convection-diffusion equations on arbitrary geometry. The two main difficulties for numerical boundary conditions in such situations are: (1) the wide stencil of the high order finite difference operator requires special treatment for a few ghost points near the boundary; (2) the physical boundary may not coincide with grid points in a Cartesian mesh and may intersect with the mesh in an arbitrary fashion. For purely convection equations, the so-called inverse Lax-Wendroff procedure [28], in which we convert the normal derivatives into the time derivatives and tangential derivatives along the physical boundary by using the equations, has been quite successful. In this paper, we extend this methodology to convection-diffusion equations. It turns out that this extension is non-trivial, because totally different boundary treatments are needed for the diffusion-dominated and the convection-dominated regimes. We design a careful combination of the boundary treatments for the two regimes and obtain a stable and accurate boundary condition for general convection-diffusion equations. We provide extensive numerical tests for one- and two-dimensional problems involving both scalar equations and systems, including the compressible Navier-Stokes equations, to demonstrate the good performance of our numerical boundary conditions.

  18. Dynamics of solid dispersions in oil during the lubrication of point contacts. I - Graphite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cusano, C.; Sliney, H. E.

    1981-01-01

    A Hertzian contact is lubricated with dispersed graphite in mineral oils under boundary lubrication conditions. The contacts are optically observed under pure rolling, combined rolling and sliding, and pure sliding conditions. The contact is formed with a steel ball on the flat surface of a glass disk. Under pure rolling and combined rolling and sliding conditions, it is found that, for low speeds, a graphite film can form which will separate the contacting surfaces. In contrast, under pure sliding conditions, graphite accumulates at the inlet and sweeps around the contact, but very little of graphite passes through the contact. The accumulated graphite appears to act as a barrier which reduces the supply of oil available to the contact for boundary lubrication. Friction data show no clear short-term beneficial or detrimental effect caused by addition of graphite to the base oil. However, during pure sliding, more abrasion occurs on the polished balls lubricated with the dispersion than on those lubricated with the base oil alone.

  19. On the resolvent of multidimensional operators with frequently changing boundary conditions in the case of the homogenized Dirichlet condition

    SciTech Connect

    Sharapov, T F

    2014-10-31

    We consider an elliptic operator in a multidimensional domain with frequently changing boundary conditions in the case when the homogenized operator contains the Dirichlet boundary condition. We prove the uniform resolvent convergence of the perturbed operator to the homogenized operator and obtain estimates for the rate of convergence. A complete asymptotic expansion is constructed for the resolvent when it acts on sufficiently smooth functions. Bibliography: 41 titles.

  20. Some new evidence on human joint lubrication.

    PubMed Central

    Unsworth, A; Dowson, D; Wright, V

    1975-01-01

    Theoretical consideration has been given to the use of pendulum machines which are used to examine the frictional properties of human joints by incorporating them as fulcra. As a result, a new type of pendulum machine has been built which incorporates the facility to apply sudden loads to the joint on starting the swinging motion, and also the ability to measure directly the frictional torque experienced by the joint. The results obtained from natural hip joints indicate the presence of squeeze film lubrication under conditions of sudden loading of a joint. In addition, a self-generated fluid film process was observed at low loads while at higher loads boundary lubrication appeared to be important. These results have been used to describe the lubrication regimens occurring in a normal activity such as walking. A single experiment carried out on a hip from a patient suffering from severe rheumatoid arthritis has also been reported and the frictional resistance was seen to be increased fifteenfold compared to a normal hip. Images PMID:1190847

  1. Time dependent inflow-outflow boundary conditions for 2D acoustic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Willie R.; Myers, Michael K.

    1989-01-01

    An analysis of the number and form of the required inflow-outflow boundary conditions for the full two-dimensional time-dependent nonlinear acoustic system in subsonic mean flow is performed. The explicit predictor-corrector method of MacCormack (1969) is used. The methodology is tested on both uniform and sheared mean flows with plane and nonplanar sources. Results show that the acoustic system requires three physical boundary conditions on the inflow and one on the outflow boundary. The most natural choice for the inflow boundary conditions is judged to be a specification of the vorticity, the normal acoustic impedance, and a pressure gradient-density gradient relationship normal to the boundary. Specification of the acoustic pressure at the outflow boundary along with these inflow boundary conditions is found to give consistent reliable results. A set of boundary conditions developed earlier, which were intended to be nonreflecting is tested using the current method and is shown to yield unstable results for nonplanar acoustic waves.

  2. Second-Order Far Field Computational Boundary Conditions for Inviscid Duct Flow Problems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-03-01

    COMPUTATIONAL BOUNDARY CONDITIONS INTERNAL FLOW COMPUTATIONS EULER METHODS 19. ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if necessary and identify by block number...SOLUTIONS OF THE LINEARIZED, SECOND-ORDER EULER EQUATIONS. THE EULER EQUATIONS ARE LINEARIZED ABOUT A CONSTANT PRESSURE, RECTILINEAR FLOW C)NDITION...THE BOUNDARY PROCEDURE CAN BE USED WITH ANY NUMERICAL EULER SOLUTION METHOD AND ALLOWS COMPUTATIONAL BOUNDARIES TO BE LOCATED EXTREMELY CLOSE TO THE

  3. Magnetic Boundary Conditions at Non-Conducting Planetary Bodies: Applications to Ganymede

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saur, J.; Duling, S.; Seufert, M.; Wicht, J.

    2013-12-01

    The interaction of planetary bodies with their surrounding magnetized plasma can often be described with the magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) equations, which are commonly solved by numerical models. For these models it is necessary to define physically correct boundary conditions. Many planetary bodies have electrically non-conductive surfaces, which do not allow electric current to penetrate their surfaces. Magnetic boundary conditions, which correctly consider that the associated radial electric current at the planetary surface is zero, are however difficult to implement because they include the curl of the magnetic field. Here we derive new boundary conditions for the magnetic field at non-conducting surfaces by a decomposition of the magnetic field in poloidal and toroidal components and their spherical harmonics expansions. We find that the toroidal part of the magnetic field needs to vanish at the surface of the isolator. For the spectral spherical harmonics coefficients of the poloidal part we derive a Cauchy boundary condition, which includes the Gauss coefficients of a possible intrinsic field. Our non-conducting boundary condition can thus additionally include intrinsic dynamo fields as well as induction fields within electrically conductive subsurface layers such as subsurface oceans. We implement the new boundary condition in the MHD simulation code ZEUS-MP using spherical geometry. We apply these new magnetic boundary conditions to a model for Ganymede's plasma environment. With this model we can describe the in-situ observations by the Galileo spacecraft and Hubble Space Telescope observations of Ganmyede's aurora very well.

  4. Surface boundary conditions for the numerical solution of the Euler equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dadone, A.; Grossman, B.

    1993-01-01

    We consider the implementation of boundary conditions at solid walls in inviscid Euler solutions by upwind, finite-volume methods. We review some current methods for the implementation of surface boundary conditions and examine their behavior for the problem of an oblique shock reflecting off a planar surface. We show the importance of characteristic boundary conditions for this problem and introduce a method of applying the classical flux-difference splitting of Roe as a characteristic boundary condition. Consideration of the equivalent problem of the intersection of two (equal and opposite) oblique shocks was very illuminating on the role of surface boundary conditions for an inviscid flow and led to the introduction of two new boundary-condition procedures, denoted as the symmetry technique and the curvature-corrected symmetry technique. Examples of the effects of the various surface boundary conditions considered are presented for the supersonic blunt body problem and the subcritical compressible flow over a circular cylinder. Dramatic advantages of the curvature-corrected symmetry technique over the other methods are shown, with regard to numerical entropy generation, total pressure loss, drag and grid convergence.

  5. Exploring the Boundary Conditions of the Redundancy Principle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCrudden, Matthew T.; Hushman, Carolyn J.; Marley, Scott C.

    2014-01-01

    This experiment investigated whether study of a scientific text and a visual display that contained redundant text segments would affect memory and transfer. The authors randomly assigned 42 students from a university in the southwestern United States in equal numbers to 1 of 2 conditions: (a) a redundant condition, in which participants studied a…

  6. Boundary conditions for the Baumgarte-Shapiro-Shibata-Nakamura formulation of Einstein's field equations

    SciTech Connect

    Nunez, Dario; Sarbach, Olivier

    2010-02-15

    We discuss the initial-boundary value problem for the Baumgarte-Shapiro-Shibata-Nakamura evolution system of Einstein's field equations which has been used extensively in numerical simulations of binary black holes and neutron stars. We specify nine boundary conditions for this system with the following properties: (i) they impose the momentum constraint at the boundary, which is shown to preserve all the constraints throughout evolution; (ii) they approximately control the incoming gravitational degrees of freedom by specifying the Weyl scalar {Psi}{sub 0} at the boundary; (iii) they control the gauge freedom by requiring a Neumann boundary condition for the lapse, by setting the normal component of the shift to zero, and by imposing a Sommerfeld-like condition on the tangential components of the shift; and (iv) they are shown to yield a well-posed problem in the limit of weak gravity. Possible numerical applications of our results are also discussed briefly.

  7. Wideband finite difference time domain implementation of surface impedance boundary conditions for good conductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beggs, John H.; Luebbers, Raymond J.; Kunz, Karl S.; Yee, Kane S.

    1991-01-01

    Surface impedance boundary conditions are used to reduce the solution volume during the analysis of scattering from lossy dielectric objects. In a finite difference solution, they also can be used to avoid using small cells, made necessary by shorter wavelengths in conducting media, throughout the solution volume. A one dimensional implementation is presented for a surface impedance boundary condition for good conductors in the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) technique. In order to illustrate the FDTD surface impedance boundary condition, a planar air-lossy dielectric interface is considered.

  8. The PPP model of alternant cyclic polyenes with modified boundary conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Bendazzoli, G.L.; Evangelisti, S.

    1995-08-15

    The extension of the PPP Hamiltonian for alternant cyclic polyenes to noninteger values of the pseudomomentum by imposing modified boundary conditions is discussed in detail. It is shown that a computer program for periodic boundary conditions can be easily adapted to the new boundary conditions. Full CI computations are carried out for some low-lying states of the PPP model of alternant cyclic polyenes (CH){sub N} (N even) at half-filling. The energy values obtained by using periodic (Bloch) and antiperiodic (Moebius) orbitals are used to perform energy extrapolations for N {yields} {infinity}. 38 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. Solution of Poisson's Equation with Global, Local and Nonlocal Boundary Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aliev, Nihan; Jahanshahi, Mohammad

    2002-01-01

    Boundary value problems (BVPs) for partial differential equations are common in mathematical physics. The differential equation is often considered in simple and symmetric regions, such as a circle, cube, cylinder, etc., with global and separable boundary conditions. In this paper and other works of the authors, a general method is used for the…

  10. An Existence Theorem for Fractional q-Difference Inclusions with Nonlocal Substrip Type Boundary Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Alsaedi, Ahmed; Ntouyas, Sotiris K.; Ahmad, Bashir

    2015-01-01

    By employing a nonlinear alternative for contractive maps, we investigate the existence of solutions for a boundary value problem of fractional q-difference inclusions with nonlocal substrip type boundary conditions. The main result is illustrated with the aid of an example. PMID:25629085

  11. Towards an effective non-reflective boundary condition for computational aeroacoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gill, James; Fattah, Ryu; Zhang, Xin

    2017-03-01

    A generic, non-reflective zonal transverse characteristic boundary condition is described for computational aeroacoustics, which shows superior performance to existing non-reflective boundary conditions for two-dimensional linearized Euler simulations. The new condition is based on a characteristic non-reflective method, and also contains optimised use of transverse characteristic terms and a zonal forcing region. The performance of the new method and several existing non-reflective acoustic boundary conditions is quantitatively compared using a plane wave test case. The performance of buffer zone, perfectly matched layer, far-field, and characteristic non-reflective methods is compared, following an optimisation of the tuneable parameters in each method to give best performance. The study uses a high-order linearised Euler equation solver to assess non-reflective boundary conditions with a variety of cases. The performance is compared for downstream travelling acoustic waves with varying frequency and incident angle, and at various Mach numbers. The current study includes a more comprehensive evaluation than previous studies which used constant values of tuneable parameters or qualitative assessment methods. The new zonal transverse characteristic boundary condition is shown to give improved performance in comparison to the other tested outflow boundary conditions for two-dimensional linearized Euler simulations, and is also shown to give good performance when used as an inflow condition.

  12. Geomagnetic Secular Variation Prediction with Thermal Heterogeneous Boundary Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuang, Weijia; Tangborn, Andrew; Jiang, Weiyuan

    2011-01-01

    It has long been conjectured that thermal heterogeneity at the core-mantle boundary (CMB) affects the geodynamo substantially. The observed two pairs of steady and strong magnetic flux lobes near the Polar Regions and the low secular variation in the Pacific over the past 400 years (and perhaps longer) are likely the consequences of this CMB thermal heterogeneity. There are several studies on the impact of the thermal heterogeneity with numerical geodynamo simulations. However, direct correlation between the numerical results and the observations is found very difficult, except qualitative comparisons of certain features in the radial component of the magnetic field at the CMB. This makes it difficult to assess accurately the impact of thermal heterogeneity on the geodynamo and the geomagnetic secular variation. We revisit this problem with our MoSST_DAS system in which geomagnetic data are assimilated with our geodynamo model to predict geomagnetic secular variations. In this study, we implement a heterogeneous heat flux across the CMB that is chosen based on the seismic tomography of the lowermost mantle. The amplitude of the heat flux (relative to the mean heat flux across the CMB) varies in the simulation. With these assimilation studies, we will examine the influences of the heterogeneity on the forecast accuracies, e.g. the accuracies as functions of the heterogeneity amplitude. With these, we could be able to assess the model errors to the true core state, and thus the thermal heterogeneity in geodynamo modeling.

  13. Tribological behavior of oil-lubricated, TiN-coated steel

    SciTech Connect

    Ajayi, O.O.; Erdemir, A.; Fenske, G.R.; Nichols, F.A.; Sproul, W.D.; Graham, M.; Rudnik, P.J.

    1992-02-01

    The effects of titanium nitride (TiN) coatings on the tribological behavior of M50 and 52100 steels under both dry and synthetic polyol ester-based oil lubrication were evaluated using a reciprocating sliding pin-on-flat test machine. Under dry conditions, the TiN coating reduced the wear, which occurred by abrasion as well as the oxidation of the sliding surface. It also reduced the amount of wear-debris accumulation at the contact interface. During oil lubrication, wear and roughening of the contact area, usually associated with the boundary lubrication regime, was eliminated by the TiN coating. Formation of boundary film by the chemical interaction between the oil additives and wearing surface was also prevented by the TiN coating.

  14. Tethered Lubricants

    SciTech Connect

    Archer, Lynden

    2010-09-15

    We have performed extensive experimental and theoretical studies of interfacial friction, relaxation dynamics, and thermodynamics of polymer chains tethered to points, planes, and particles. A key result from our tribology studies using lateral force microscopy (LFM) measurements of polydisperse brushes of linear and branched chains densely grafted to planar substrates is that there are exceedingly low friction coefficients for these systems. Specific project achievements include: (1) Synthesis of three-tiered lubricant films containing controlled amounts of free and pendent PDMS chains, and investigated the effect of their molecular weight and volume fraction on interfacial friction. (2.) Detailed studies of a family of hairy particles termed nanoscale organic hybrid materials (NOHMs) and demonstration of their use as lubricants.

  15. Hydrodynamic and thermal slip flow boundary layers over a flat plate with constant heat flux boundary condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziz, Abdul

    2010-03-01

    In this paper the boundary layer flow over a flat plat with slip flow and constant heat flux surface condition is studied. Because the plate surface temperature varies along the x direction, the momentum and energy equations are coupled due to the presence of the temperature gradient along the plate surface. This coupling, which is due to the presence of the thermal jump term in Maxwell slip condition, renders the momentum and energy equations non-similar. As a preliminary study, this paper ignores this coupling due to thermal jump condition so that the self-similar nature of the equations is preserved. Even this fundamental problem for the case of a constant heat flux boundary condition has remained unexplored in the literature. It was therefore chosen for study in this paper. For the hydrodynamic boundary layer, velocity and shear stress distributions are presented for a range of values of the parameter characterizing the slip flow. This slip parameter is a function of the local Reynolds number, the local Knudsen number, and the tangential momentum accommodation coefficient representing the fraction of the molecules reflected diffusively at the surface. As the slip parameter increases, the slip velocity increases and the wall shear stress decreases. These results confirm the conclusions reached in other recent studies. The energy equation is solved to determine the temperature distribution in the thermal boundary layer for a range of values for both the slip parameter as well as the fluid Prandtl number. The increase in Prandtl number and/or the slip parameter reduces the dimensionless surface temperature. The actual surface temperature at any location of x is a function of the local Knudsen number, the local Reynolds number, the momentum accommodation coefficient, Prandtl number, other flow properties, and the applied heat flux.

  16. Generalized adjoint consistent treatment of wall boundary conditions for compressible flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Ralf; Leicht, Tobias

    2015-11-01

    In this article, we revisit the adjoint consistency analysis of Discontinuous Galerkin discretizations of the compressible Euler and Navier-Stokes equations with application to the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes and k- ω turbulence equations. Here, particular emphasis is laid on the discretization of wall boundary conditions. While previously only one specific combination of discretizations of wall boundary conditions and of aerodynamic force coefficients has been shown to give an adjoint consistent discretization, in this article we generalize this analysis and provide a discretization of the force coefficients for any consistent discretization of wall boundary conditions. Furthermore, we demonstrate that a related evaluation of the cp- and cf-distributions is required. The freedom gained in choosing the discretization of boundary conditions without loosing adjoint consistency is used to devise a new adjoint consistent discretization including numerical fluxes on the wall boundary which is more robust than the adjoint consistent discretization known up to now. While this work is presented in the framework of Discontinuous Galerkin discretizations, the insight gained is also applicable to (and thus valuable for) other discretization schemes. In particular, the discretization of integral quantities, like the drag, lift and moment coefficients, as well as the discretization of local quantities at the wall like surface pressure and skin friction should follow as closely as possible the discretization of the flow equations and boundary conditions at the wall boundary.

  17. High order local absorbing boundary conditions for acoustic waves in terms of farfield expansions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villamizar, Vianey; Acosta, Sebastian; Dastrup, Blake

    2017-03-01

    We devise a new high order local absorbing boundary condition (ABC) for radiating problems and scattering of time-harmonic acoustic waves from obstacles of arbitrary shape. By introducing an artificial boundary S enclosing the scatterer, the original unbounded domain Ω is decomposed into a bounded computational domain Ω- and an exterior unbounded domain Ω+. Then, we define interface conditions at the artificial boundary S, from truncated versions of the well-known Wilcox and Karp farfield expansion representations of the exact solution in the exterior region Ω+. As a result, we obtain a new local absorbing boundary condition (ABC) for a bounded problem on Ω-, which effectively accounts for the outgoing behavior of the scattered field. Contrary to the low order absorbing conditions previously defined, the error at the artificial boundary induced by this novel ABC can be easily reduced to reach any accuracy within the limits of the computational resources. We accomplish this by simply adding as many terms as needed to the truncated farfield expansions of Wilcox or Karp. The convergence of these expansions guarantees that the order of approximation of the new ABC can be increased arbitrarily without having to enlarge the radius of the artificial boundary. We include numerical results in two and three dimensions which demonstrate the improved accuracy and simplicity of this new formulation when compared to other absorbing boundary conditions.

  18. Liquid lubrication for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, Robert L.; Khonsari, Michael M.

    1993-01-01

    Reviewed here is the state of the art of liquid lubrication for space applications. The areas discussed are types of liquid lubrication mechanisms, space environmental effects on lubrication, classification of lubricants, liquid lubricant additives, grease lubrication, mechanism materials, bearing anomalies and failures, lubricant supply techniques, and application types and lubricant needs for those applications.

  19. Liquid lubrication for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, Robert L.; Khonsari, Michael M.

    1992-01-01

    Reviewed here is the state of the art of liquid lubrication for space applications. The areas discussed are types of liquid lubrication mechanisms, space environmental effects on lubrication, classification of lubricants, liquid lubricant additives, grease lubrication, mechanism materials, bearing anomalies and failures, lubricant supply techniques, and application types and lubricant needs for those applications.

  20. A Boundary Mixture Approach to Violations of Conditional Independence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braeken, Johan

    2011-01-01

    Conditional independence is a fundamental principle in latent variable modeling and item response theory. Violations of this principle, commonly known as local item dependencies, are put in a test information perspective, and sharp bounds on these violations are defined. A modeling approach is proposed that makes use of a mixture representation of…

  1. On the Wave Equation with Hyperbolic Dynamical Boundary Conditions, Interior and Boundary Damping and Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitillaro, Enzo

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the problem u_{tt}-Δ u+P(x,u_t)=f(x,u) quad & in (0,∞)×Ω, u=0 & on (0,∞)× Γ_0, u_{tt}+partial_ν u-Δ_Γ u+Q(x,u_t)=g(x,u)quad & on (0,∞)× Γ_1, u(0,x)=u_0(x),quad u_t(0,x)=u_1(x) & in overline Ω, where {Ω} is a open bounded subset of R^N with C 1 boundary ({N ≥ 2}), {Γ = partialΩ}, {(Γ0,Γ1)} is a measurable partition of {Γ}, {Δ_{Γ}} denotes the Laplace-Beltrami operator on {Γ}, {ν} is the outward normal to {Ω}, and the terms P and Q represent nonlinear damping terms, while f and g are nonlinear subcritical perturbations. In the paper a local Hadamard well-posedness result for initial data in the natural energy space associated to the problem is given. Moreover, when {Ω} is C 2 and {overline{Γ0} \\cap overline{Γ1} = emptyset}, the regularity of solutions is studied. Next a blow-up theorem is given when P and Q are linear and f and g are superlinear sources. Finally a dynamical system is generated when the source parts of f and g are at most linear at infinity, or they are dominated by the damping terms.

  2. Principal Eigenvalue Minimization for an Elliptic Problem with Indefinite Weight and Robin Boundary Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Hintermueller, M.; Kao, C.-Y.; Laurain, A.

    2012-02-15

    This paper focuses on the study of a linear eigenvalue problem with indefinite weight and Robin type boundary conditions. We investigate the minimization of the positive principal eigenvalue under the constraint that the absolute value of the weight is bounded and the total weight is a fixed negative constant. Biologically, this minimization problem is motivated by the question of determining the optimal spatial arrangement of favorable and unfavorable regions for a species to survive. For rectangular domains with Neumann boundary condition, it is known that there exists a threshold value such that if the total weight is below this threshold value then the optimal favorable region is like a section of a disk at one of the four corners; otherwise, the optimal favorable region is a strip attached to the shorter side of the rectangle. Here, we investigate the same problem with mixed Robin-Neumann type boundary conditions and study how this boundary condition affects the optimal spatial arrangement.

  3. Influence of Boundary Conditions on Simulated U.S. Air Quality

    EPA Science Inventory

    One of the key inputs to regional-scale photochemical models frequently used in air quality planning and forecasting applications are chemical boundary conditions representing background pollutant concentrations originating outside the regional modeling domain. A number of studie...

  4. Evaluation of wall boundary condition parameters for gas-solids fluidized bed simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tingwen; Benyahia, Sofiane

    2013-10-01

    Wall boundary conditions for the solids phase have significant effects on numerical predictions of various gas-solids fluidized beds. Several models for the granular flow wall boundary condition are available in the open literature for numerical modeling of gas-solids flow. In this study, a model for specularity coefficient used in Johnson and Jackson boundary conditions by Li and Benyahia (AIChE Journal, 2012, 58, 2058-2068) is implemented in the open-source CFD code-MFIX. The variable specularity coefficient model provides a physical way to calculate the specularity coefficient needed by the partial-slip boundary conditions for the solids phase. Through a series of 2-D numerical simulations of bubbling fluidized bed and circulating fluidized bed riser, the model predicts qualitatively consistent trends to the previous studies. Furthermore, a quantitative comparison is conducted between numerical results of variable and constant specularity coefficients to investigate the effect of spatial and temporal variations in specularity coefficient.

  5. On the Ideal Boundary Condition in a General Toroidal Geometry for a Mixed Magnetic Field Representation

    SciTech Connect

    X. Z. Tang

    2000-12-18

    Subtleties of implementing the standard perfectly conducting wall boundary condition in a general toroidal geometry are clarified for a mixed scalar magnetic field representation. An iterative scheme based on Ohm's law is given.

  6. Simulating thermal boundary conditions of spin-lattice models with weighted averages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenlong

    2016-07-01

    Thermal boundary conditions have played an increasingly important role in revealing the nature of short-range spin glasses and is likely to be relevant also for other disordered systems. Diffusion method initializing each replica with a random boundary condition at the infinite temperature using population annealing has been used in recent large-scale simulations. However, the efficiency of this method can be greatly suppressed because of temperature chaos. For example, most samples have some boundary conditions that are completely eliminated from the population in the process of annealing at low temperatures. In this work, I study a weighted average method to solve this problem by simulating each boundary conditions separately and collect data using weighted averages. The efficiency of the two methods is studied using both population annealing and parallel tempering, showing that the weighted average method is more efficient and accurate.

  7. Bicategories for Boundary Conditions and for Surface Defects in 3-d TFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Jürgen; Schweigert, Christoph; Valentino, Alessandro

    2013-07-01

    We analyze topological boundary conditions and topological surface defects in three-dimensional topological field theories of Reshetikhin-Turaev type based on arbitrary modular tensor categories. Boundary conditions are described by central functors that lift to trivializations in the Witt group of modular tensor categories. The bicategory of boundary conditions can be described through the bicategory of module categories over any such trivialization. A similar description is obtained for topological surface defects. Using string diagrams for bicategories we also establish a precise relation between special symmetric Frobenius algebras and Wilson lines involving special defects. We compare our results with previous work of Kapustin-Saulina and of Kitaev-Kong on boundary conditions and surface defects in abelian Chern-Simons theories and in Turaev-Viro type TFTs, respectively.

  8. On Korn's first inequality for tangential or normal boundary conditions with explicit constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Sebastian; Pauly, Dirk

    2016-12-01

    We will prove that for piecewise smooth and concave domains Korn's first inequality holds for vector fields satisfying homogeneous normal or tangential boundary conditions with explicit Korn constant square root of 2.

  9. An analysis of boundary condition effects on the thermomechanical modeling of the FSW process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guedoiri, A.; Moufki, A.; Favier, V.; Zahrouni, H.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to study the influence of thermal boundary conditions on the simulation of friction stir welding process "FSW". Generally, dimensions of the workpieces to be welded are very large and a very small zone surrounding the welding tool is modeled for the thermomechanical study of the process. This area, named box, should be small enough to reduce the computation time and large enough to minimize effects of boundary conditions. It is well known that during welding, the mixing zone is closed arround the tool; it is easily identified by analyzing the velocity field which is complex in contact interface with the tool and which tends rapidly to the tool traverse speed far from the tool. In the thermal analysis, the boundary conditions are not obvious since they depend on the welding parameters, on the workpiece dimensions and on its vicinity. We propose in this study a numerical strategy for determining the thermal boundary conditions on the box.

  10. Implementation of a Compressor Face Boundary Condition Based on Small Disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, John W.; Paynter, Gerald C.

    2000-01-01

    A compressor-face boundary condition that models the unsteady interactions of acoustic and convective velocity disturbances with a compressor has been implemented into a three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics code. Locally one-dimensional characteristics along with a small-disturbance model are used to compute the acoustic response as a function of the local stagger angle and the strength and direction of the disturbance. Simulations of the inviscid flow in a straight duct, a duct coupled to a compressor, and a supersonic inlet demonstrate the behavior of the boundary condition in relation to existing boundary conditions. Comparisons with experimental data show a large improvement in accuracy over existing boundary conditions in the ability to predict the reflected disturbance from the interaction of an acoustic disturbance with a compressor.

  11. A bridging technique to analyze the influence of boundary conditions on instability patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Heng; Damil, Noureddine; Potier-Ferry, Michel

    2011-05-10

    In this paper, we present a new numerical technique that permits to analyse the effect of boundary conditions on the appearance of instability patterns. Envelope equations of Landau-Ginzburg type are classically used to predict pattern formation, but it is not easy to associate boundary conditions for these macroscopic models. Indeed, envelope equations ignore boundary layers that can be important, for instance in cases where the instability starts first near the boundary. In this work, the full model is considered close to the boundary, an envelope equation in the core and they are bridged by the Arlequin method . Simulation results are presented for the problem of buckling of long beams lying on a non-linear elastic foundation.

  12. Boundary conditions on faster-than-light transportation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Gary L.; Knowles, H. B.

    1993-01-01

    In order to be consistent with current physical theories, any proposal of a faster-than light (FTL) transportation system must satisfy several critical conditions. It must predict the mass, space, and time dimensional changes predicted by relativity physics when velocity falls below the speed of light. It must also not violate causality, and remain consistent with quantum physics in the limit of microscopic systems. It is also essential that the proposal conserve energy.

  13. Rheology in lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, H. S.

    1973-01-01

    The rheological effects on lubrication are discussed. The types of lubrication considered are thick film hydrodynamic lubrication and thin film elastohydrodynamic lubrication. The temperature-viscosity, viscoelastic, shear-thinning, and normal stess effects on the lubrication of journal bearings are analyzed. A graph of the pressure distribution of viscoelastic liquids in journal bearings is provided. Mathematical models are developed to define the effects of various properties of the lubricants on friction reduction.

  14. Wideband finite difference time domain implementation of surface impedance boundary conditions for good conductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beggs, John H.; Luebbers, Raymond J.; Kunz, Karl S.; Yee, Kane S.

    1991-01-01

    Surface impedance boundary conditions are employed to reduce the solution volume during the analysis of scattering from lossy dielectric objects. In a finite difference solution, they also can be utilized to avoid using small cells, made necessary by shorter wavelengths in conducting media, throughout the solution volume. A 1-D implementation for a surface impedance boundary condition for good conductors in the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) technique.

  15. Unsteady Validation of a Mean Flow Boundary Condition for Computational Aeroacoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hixon, R.; Zhen, F.; Nallasamy, M.; Sawyer, S> ; Dyson, R.

    2004-01-01

    In this work, a previously developed mean flow boundary condition will be validated for unsteady flows. The test cases will be several reference benchmark flows consisting of vortical gusts convecting in a uniform mean flow, as well as the more realistic case of a vortical gust impinging on a loaded 2D cascade. The results will verify that the mean flow boundary condition both imposes the desired mean flow as well as having little or no effect on the instantaneous unsteady solution.

  16. Towards Direct Simulations of Counterflow Flames with Consistent Numerical Differential-Algebraic Boundary Conditions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-18

    Towards direct simulations of counterflow flames with consistent numerical differential-algebraic boundary conditions The views, opinions and/or...Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 counterflow laminar flame model REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT NUMBER(S) 10. SPONSOR...simulations of counterflow flames with consistent numerical differential-algebraic boundary conditions Report Title A new approach for the

  17. Design and Verification Methodology of Boundary Conditions for Finite Volume Schemes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    and Grossman advocate a curvature corrected symmetry condition for an inviscid wall [3]. Balakrishnan and Fernandez advocate a variety of other methods...boundary source terms is straightforward, generally requiring much less algebraic manipulation than interior source terms. A number of test cases...Meeting, Reno, NV, January 1986. [3] A. Dadone and B. Grossman . Surface boundary conditions for the numerical solution of the euler equations. AIAA

  18. Sobolev type equations of time-fractional order with periodical boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plekhanova, Marina

    2016-08-01

    The existence of a unique local solution for a class of time-fractional Sobolev type partial differential equations endowed by the Cauchy initial conditions and periodical with respect to every spatial variable boundary conditions on a parallelepiped is proved. General results are applied to study of the unique solvability for the initial boundary value problem to Benjamin-Bona-Mahony-Burgers and Allair partial differential equations.

  19. On pressure and velocity boundary conditions for the lattice Boltzmann BGK model

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, Q. |; He, X.

    1997-06-01

    Pressure (density) and velocity boundary conditions are studied for 2-D and 3-D lattice Boltzmann BGK models (LBGK) and a new method to specify these conditions is proposed. These conditions are constructed in consistency with the wall boundary condition, based on the idea of bounceback of the non-equilibrium distribution. When these conditions are used together with the incompressible LBGK model [J. Stat. Phys. {bold 81}, 35 (1995)] the simulation results recover the analytical solution of the plane Poiseuille flow driven by a pressure (density) difference. The half-way wall bounceback boundary condition is also used with the pressure (density) inlet/outlet conditions proposed in this paper and in Phys. Fluids {bold 8}, 2527 (1996) to study 2-D Poiseuille flow and 3-D square duct flow. The numerical results are approximately second-order accurate. The magnitude of the error of the half-way wall bounceback boundary condition is comparable with that of other published boundary conditions and it has better stability behavior. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Investigations of lubricant rheology as applied to elastohydrodynamic lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, S.; Turchina, V.; Jakobsen, J.; Sanborn, D. M.; Winer, W. O.

    1973-01-01

    The pressure viscometer was modified to permit the measurement of viscosity at elevated pressures and shear stresses up to 5 x 10 to the 6th power N/sq m (720 psi). This shear stress is within a factor of three of the shear stress occurring in a sliding ehd point contact such as occurs in the ehd simulator. Viscosity data were taken on five lubricant samples, and it was found that viscous heating effects on the viscosity were predominant and not non-Newtonian behavior at the high shear stresses. The development of the infrared temperature measuring technique for the ehd simulator was completed, and temperature data for a set of operating conditions and one lubricant are reported. The numerical analysis of the behavior of nonlinear lubricants in the lubrication of rollers is reported.

  1. A hybrid FEM-BEM unified boundary condition with sub-cycling for electromagnetic radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Fasenfest, B; White, D; Stowell, M; Rieben, R; Sharpe, R; Madsen, N; Rockway, J; Champagne, N J; Jandhyala, V; Pingenot, J

    2006-01-12

    Hybrid solutions to time-domain electromagnetic problems offer many advantages when solving open-region scattering or radiation problems. Hybrid formulations use a finite-element or finite-difference discretization for the features of interest, then bound this region with a layer of planar boundary elements. The use of volume discretization allows for intricate features and many changes in material within the structure, while the boundary-elements provide a highly accurate radiating boundary condition. This concept has been implemented previously, using the boundary elements to set the E-field, H-field, or both for an FDTD grid, for example in [1][2][3], or as a mixed boundary condition for the second order wave equation solved by finite elements [4]. Further study has focused on using fast methods, such as the Plane Wave Time Domain method [3][4] to accelerate the BEM calculations. This paper details a hybrid solver using the coupled first-order equations for the E and H fields in the finite-element region. This formulation is explicit, with a restriction on the time step for stability. When this time step is used in conjunction with the boundary elements forming either a inhomogeneous Dirichlet or Neuman boundary condition on the finite-element mesh, late time instabilities occur. To combat this, a Unified Boundary Condition (UBC), similar to the one in [4] for the second-order wave equation, is used. Even when this UBC is used, the late time instabilities are merely delayed if standard testing in time is used. However, the late time instabilities can be removed by replacing centroid based time interpolation with quadrature point based time interpolation for the boundary elements, or by sub-cycling the boundary element portion of the formulation. This sub-cycling, used in [3] for FDTD to reduce complexity, is shown here to improve stability and overall accuracy of the technique.

  2. A stable penalty method for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations. 1: Open boundary conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesthaven, J. S.; Gottlieb, D.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present asymptotically stable open boundary conditions for the numerical approximation of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations in three spatial dimensions. The treatment uses the conservation form of the Navier-Stokes equations and utilizes linearization and localization at the boundaries based on these variables. The proposed boundary conditions are applied through a penalty procedure, thus ensuring correct behavior of the scheme as the Reynolds number tends to infinity. The versatility of this method is demonstrated for the problem of a compressible flow past a circular cylinder.

  3. A finite element algorithm for high-lying eigenvalues with Neumann and Dirichlet boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Báez, G.; Méndez-Sánchez, R. A.; Leyvraz, F.; Seligman, T. H.

    2014-01-01

    We present a finite element algorithm that computes eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the Laplace operator for two-dimensional problems with homogeneous Neumann or Dirichlet boundary conditions, or combinations of either for different parts of the boundary. We use an inverse power plus Gauss-Seidel algorithm to solve the generalized eigenvalue problem. For Neumann boundary conditions the method is much more efficient than the equivalent finite difference algorithm. We checked the algorithm by comparing the cumulative level density of the spectrum obtained numerically with the theoretical prediction given by the Weyl formula. We found a systematic deviation due to the discretization, not to the algorithm itself.

  4. Continuous matrix product states with periodic boundary conditions and an application to atomtronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draxler, Damian; Haegeman, Jutho; Verstraete, Frank; Rizzi, Matteo

    2017-01-01

    We introduce a time evolution algorithm for one-dimensional quantum field theories with periodic boundary conditions. This is done by applying the Dirac-Frenkel time-dependent variational principle to the set of translational invariant continuous matrix product states with periodic boundary conditions. Moreover, the ansatz is accompanied with additional boundary degrees of freedom to study quantum impurity problems. The algorithm allows for a cutoff in the spectrum of the transfer matrix and thus has an efficient computational scaling. In particular we study the prototypical example of an atomtronic system—an interacting Bose gas rotating in a ring shaped trap in the presence of a localized barrier potential.

  5. ALmost EXact boundary conditions for transient Schrödinger–Poisson system

    SciTech Connect

    Bian, Lei; Pang, Gang; Tang, Shaoqiang; Arnold, Anton

    2016-05-15

    For the Schrödinger–Poisson system, we propose an ALmost EXact (ALEX) boundary condition to treat accurately the numerical boundaries. Being local in both space and time, the ALEX boundary conditions are demonstrated to be effective in suppressing spurious numerical reflections. Together with the Crank–Nicolson scheme, we simulate a resonant tunneling diode. The algorithm produces numerical results in excellent agreement with those in Mennemann et al. [1], yet at a much reduced complexity. Primary peaks in wave function profile appear as a consequence of quantum resonance, and should be considered in selecting the cut-off wave number for numerical simulations.

  6. Effect of different wall boundary conditions on the numerical simulation of bubbling fluidized beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghgoo, Mohammad Reza; Bergstrom, Donald J.; Spiteri, Raymond J.

    2015-11-01

    There are distinct wall boundary conditions proposed in the literature for the particulate phase in the context of a continuum description of gas-particle flows. It is not yet clear how these different wall boundary conditions affect the simulated flow behavior, nor is it clear which are the most realistic. To investigate this issue, an Eulerian-Eulerian two-fluid model was used to investigate the effect of different particle-phase wall boundary conditions on the numerical prediction of bubbling/slugging gas-particle fluidized beds. Because the bed dynamics are strongly influenced by the motion of the bubbles, the impact of wall boundary conditions on the bubble statistics was examined specifically. In addition, the averaged field variables, such as the particle velocity, were compared to published experimental measurements. The comparison shows good agreement between the numerical results, generated by the Mfix code, and their experimental counterparts. It is found that the particle wall boundary condition does play a significant role in predicting the flow behavior. However, it appears that the influence of the wall boundary conditions is more significant for the instantaneous flow variables and bubble statistics than for the averaged quantities.

  7. Finite Element Based Structural Damage Detection Using Artificial Boundary Conditions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    ER, barp, shape, error, a_cp, modep , ap, % modelabelp, FOMABClabelp, FOMPLUSlabelp % abc_con, abc_conT % ABC, base % plus_con, plus_conT...error = round(rel_freqERROR(ER:ER+15)*100)/100; a_cp = 1; for modep = 1:3 %3 sets of modes per boundry condition ap = [a_cp...int2str(a_cp:a_cp+4); FOMABC = int2str(FOM_ABC5per(intervelp+ modep )); FOMABClabelp = sprintf(’System FOM = %s’, FOMABC

  8. Instanton-dyon ensembles with quarks with modified boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Rasmus; Shuryak, Edward

    2016-11-01

    We modify the quark periodicity condition on the thermal circle by the introduction of some phases—known also as "flavor holonomies"— different quark flavors. These phases provide a valuable tool, to be used for better understanding of deconfinement and chiral restoration phase transitions: by changing them, one can dramatically modify both phase transitions. In the language of instanton constituents—instanton-dyons or monopoles—changing the quark periodicity condition has a very direct explanation: the interplay of flavor and color holonomies can switch topological zero modes between various dyon types. The model we will study in detail, the so-called ZN c-symmetric QCD model with equal number of colors and flavors Nc=Nf=2 and special arrangement of flavor and color holonomies, ensures the "most democratic" setting, in which each quark flavor and each dyon type are in one-to-one correspondence. The usual QCD has the opposite "most exclusive" arrangement: all quarks are antiperiodic and, thus, all zero modes fall on only one—twisted or L —dyon type. As we show by ensemble simulation, deconfinement and chiral restoration phase transitions in these two models are dramatically different. In the usual QCD, both are smooth crossovers: but in the case of the Z2-symmetric model, deconfinement becomes a strong first-order transition, while chiral symmetry remains broken for all dyon densities studied. These results are in good correspondence with those from recent lattice simulations.

  9. Adaptive mechanically controlled lubrication mechanism found in articular joints.

    PubMed

    Greene, George W; Banquy, Xavier; Lee, Dong Woog; Lowrey, Daniel D; Yu, Jing; Israelachvili, Jacob N

    2011-03-29

    Articular cartilage is a highly efficacious water-based tribological system that is optimized to provide low friction and wear protection at both low and high loads (pressures) and sliding velocities that must last over a lifetime. Although many different lubrication mechanisms have been proposed, it is becoming increasingly apparent that the tribological performance of cartilage cannot be attributed to a single mechanism acting alone but on the synergistic action of multiple "modes" of lubrication that are adapted to provide optimum lubrication as the normal loads, shear stresses, and rates change. Hyaluronic acid (HA) is abundant in cartilage and synovial fluid and widely thought to play a principal role in joint lubrication although this role remains unclear. HA is also known to complex readily with the glycoprotein lubricin (LUB) to form a cross-linked network that has also been shown to be critical to the wear prevention mechanism of joints. Friction experiments on porcine cartilage using the surface forces apparatus, and enzymatic digestion, reveal an "adaptive" role for an HA-LUB complex whereby, under compression, nominally free HA diffusing out of the cartilage becomes mechanically, i.e., physically, trapped at the interface by the increasingly constricted collagen pore network. The mechanically trapped HA-LUB complex now acts as an effective (chemically bound) "boundary lubricant"--reducing the friction force slightly but, more importantly, eliminating wear damage to the rubbing/shearing surfaces. This paper focuses on the contribution of HA in cartilage lubrication; however, the system as a whole requires both HA and LUB to function optimally under all conditions.

  10. Impact of Boundary Conditions on Pumping in a Fully Bounded Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, C.; Xin, P.; Li, L.; Luo, J.

    2014-12-01

    The flow field may be affected by aquifer boundaries, when pumping in a small-scale aquifer or a long term pumping activity is required especially under a large pumping rate. Using potential theory, the image-well method and superposition principle, analytical solutions are derived for pumping in a fully bounded rectangular aquifer with five different boundary condition scenarios: (1) one constant-head boundary (in horizontal direction in plan view) and three impermeable boundaries, (2) two parallel constant-head boundaries (in horizontal direction) and two parallel impermeable boundaries (in vertical direction), (3) two pairs of orthogonal impermeable and constant-head boundaries, (4) three constant-head boundaries and one impermeable boundary, and (5) four constant-head boundaries. For each scenario, closed-form expressions are derived in three different types: (1) summation of the series in horizontal and vertical directions; (2) summation of the series in horizontal direction and exact potential in vertical direction, and (3) summation of the series in vertical direction and exact potential in horizontal direction. It is found that all the three types of closed-form expressions can produce an accurate potential for scenarios (3)-(5). For scenarios (1) and (2), by contrast, the third type closed-form expression can yield an accurate solution, while the second type close-form expression always generates an unacceptable solution. Therefore, the third type closed-form is recommended to solve the potential of a flow field created by a pumping well subjected to multiple impermeable and/or constant-head boundary conditions, due to its accuracy as well as computational efficiency.

  11. Small-charge underwater explosion bubble experiments under various boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, P.; Zhang, A. M.; Wang, S. P.

    2016-11-01

    Small-charge underwater explosion experiments were performed to investigate bubbles subjected to gravity and various boundary conditions, including single boundary (free surface and rigid wall boundary), combined boundaries of free surface and solid wall, solid wall boundaries with a circular opening, and resilient wall boundaries. With high speed camera and pressure sensors, the behavior of explosion bubbles was studied and features of associated pressure pulses were analyzed. Detailed image analysis on the final stages of bubble collapse was carried out and revealed a possible explanation for the weakening of pressure waves at bubble rebound as the bubble approaches a wall boundary. Certain features also indicate that the magnitude of the pressure peaks induced by bubble rebound is related to the shape of the bubble shape during collapse. Pressure pulses arising from the two types of bubble behavior, specifically the collision of an annular jet and the impact of a jet with the wall boundary, were measured. Other curious types of bubble behavior were found, including jetting induced by suction when a bubble collapses covering a circular opening on a solid wall, and bubble splitting in interaction with a resilient wall boundary.

  12. An energy absorbing far-field boundary condition for the elastic wave equation

    SciTech Connect

    Petersson, N A; Sjogreen, B

    2008-07-15

    The authors present an energy absorbing non-reflecting boundary condition of Clayton-Engquist type for the elastic wave equation together with a discretization which is stable for any ratio of compressional to shear wave speed. They prove stability for a second order accurate finite-difference discretization of the elastic wave equation in three space dimensions together with a discretization of the proposed non-reflecting boundary condition. The stability proof is based on a discrete energy estimate and is valid for heterogeneous materials. The proof includes all six boundaries of the computational domain where special discretizations are needed at the edges and corners. The stability proof holds also when a free surface boundary condition is imposed on some sides of the computational domain.

  13. Nonreflecting Far-Field Boundary Conditions for Unsteady Transonic Flow Computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwak, D.

    1981-01-01

    The approximate nonreflecting far-field boundary condition, as proposed by Engquisi and Majda, is implemented In the computer code LTRAN2. This code solves the Implicit finite-difference representation of the small-disturbance equations for unsteady transonic flows about airfoils. The nonreflecting boundary condition and the description of the algorithm for Implementing these conditions In LTRAN2 tire discussed. Various cases re computed and compared with results from the older, more conventional procedures. One concludes that the nonreflecting far-field boundary approximation allows the far-field boundary to be located closer to the airfoil; this permits a decrease in the computer lime required to obtain the solution through the use of fewer mesh points.

  14. Nonreflecting boundary conditions for the complete unsteady transonic small-disturbance equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitlow, W., Jr.; Seidel, D. A.

    1985-02-01

    Nonreflecting far-field boundary conditions that are consistent with the complete transonic small-disturbance (TSD) equations are derived. They are implemented in a new code for solving the complete TSD equation and are tested for a harmonically oscillating NACA 64A010 airfoil in transonic flow and for a flat-plate airfoil with a pulse in the angle of attack. Using the new boundary conditions on a relatively small grid, solutions for the airfoil that are obtained that agree with large-grid calculations, resulting in a 44 percent savings in computer time. Frequency responses for the flat plate show that most of the disturbances incident on the computational boundaries are absorbed by the boundary conditions.

  15. A direct approach to finding unknown boundary conditions in steady heat conduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Thomas J.; Dulikravich, George S.

    1993-01-01

    The capability of the boundary element method (BEM) in determining thermal boundary conditions on surfaces of a conducting solid where such quantities are unknown was demonstrated. The method uses a non-iterative direct approach in solving what is usually called the inverse heat conduction problem (IHCP). Given any over-specified thermal boundary conditions such as a combination of temperature and heat flux on a surface where such data is readily available, the algorithm computes the temperature field within the object and any unknown thermal boundary conditions on surfaces where thermal boundary values are unavailable. A two-dimensional, steady-state BEM program was developed and was tested on several simple geometries where the analytic solution was known. Results obtained with the BEM were in excellent agreement with the analytic values. The algorithm is highly flexible in treating complex geometries, mixed thermal boundary conditions, and temperature-dependent material properties and is presently being extended to three-dimensional and unsteady heat conduction problems. The accuracy and reliability of this technique was very good but tended to deteriorate when the known surface conditions were only slightly over-specified and far from the inaccessible surface.

  16. Critical dense polymers with Robin boundary conditions, half-integer Kac labels and Z4 fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, Paul A.; Rasmussen, Jørgen; Tipunin, Ilya Yu.

    2014-12-01

    For general Temperley-Lieb loop models, including the logarithmic minimal models LM (p ,p‧) with p ,p‧ coprime integers, we construct an infinite family of Robin boundary conditions on the strip as linear combinations of Neumann and Dirichlet boundary conditions. These boundary conditions are Yang-Baxter integrable and allow loop segments to terminate on the boundary. Algebraically, the Robin boundary conditions are described by the one-boundary Temperley-Lieb algebra. Solvable critical dense polymers is the first member LM (1 , 2) of the family of logarithmic minimal models and has loop fugacity β = 0 and central charge c = - 2. Specialising to LM (1 , 2) with our Robin boundary conditions, we solve the model exactly on strips of arbitrary finite size N and extract the finite-size conformal corrections using an Euler-Maclaurin formula. The key to the solution is an inversion identity satisfied by the commuting double row transfer matrices. This inversion identity is established directly in the Temperley-Lieb algebra. We classify the eigenvalues of the double row transfer matrices using the physical combinatorics of the patterns of zeros in the complex spectral parameter plane and obtain finitised characters related to spaces of coinvariants of Z4 fermions. In the continuum scaling limit, the Robin boundary conditions are associated with irreducible Virasoro Verma modules with conformal weights Δ r , s -1/2 =1/32 (L2 - 4) where L = 2 s - 1 - 4 r, r ∈ Z, s ∈ N. These conformal weights populate a Kac table with half-integer Kac labels. Fusion of the corresponding modules with the generators of the Kac fusion algebra is examined and general fusion rules are proposed.

  17. Open boundary conditions for internal gravity wave modelling using polarization relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsaleix, Patrick; Ulses, Caroline; Pairaud, Ivane; Herrmann, Marine Julie; Floor, Jochem Willem; Estournel, Claude; Auclair, Francis

    This paper proposes an original approach of the open boundary condition problem, within the framework of internal hydrostatic wave theory. These boundary conditions are based on the relations of polarization of internal waves. The method is presented progressively, beginning with a simple case (non-rotating regime, propagation direction normal to the open boundary), ending with a more general situation (rotating regime, multimodal & multi-dimensional propagations and variable background field). In the non-rotating case and as far as we assume that the direction of propagation is locally normal to the open boundary, the so-called PRM (polarization relation method) scheme can be seen as a three-dimensional version of the barotropic Flather boundary conditions. The discrete form of the scheme is detailed. Numerical stability issues proper to leap-frog time stepping are in particular discussed. It is shown that errors on phase speed prescribed in the boundary conditions can notably deteriorate radiation properties. The normal mode approach is introduced to identify coherent structures of propagation and their corresponding phase speed. A simple and robust multi-dimensional propagation scheme can easily be derived from polarization relations. The rotating case is more difficult but it is possible, to some extent, to get around the dependency of phase speed on wave frequency and to keep the non-rotating formulation of the PRM conditions almost unchanged. The PRM scheme being applied to field anomalies, the question of the background reference state is addressed. The latter can be used to introduce incoming waves across the open boundaries or, alternatively, to represent the low-frequency variability of the model itself. The consistency of the pressure and tracer boundary conditions is finally discussed.

  18. On the Nature of Boundary Conditions for Flows with Moving Free Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renardy, Michael; Renardy, Yuriko

    1991-04-01

    We consider small perturbations of plane parallel flow between a wall and a moving free surface. The problem is posed on a rectangle with inflow and outflow boundaries. The usual boundary conditions are posed at the wall and the free surface, and the fluid satisfies the Navier-Stokes equations. We examine the nature of boundary conditions which can be imposed at the inflow and outflow boundaries in order to yield a well-posed problem. This question turns out to be more delicate than is generally appreciated. Depending on the precise situation and on the regularity required of the solution, boundary conditions at just one or both endpoints of the free surface need to be imposed. For example, we show that if the velocities at te inflow and outflow boundaries are prescribed, then the position of the free surface at the inflow boundary can be prescribed, but not at the outflow if an H1-solution is desired. Numerical simulations with the FIDAP package are used to illustrate our analytical results.

  19. Lubricant composition

    SciTech Connect

    Baile, G.H.

    1980-12-16

    Lubricating compositions and shaped articles composed thereof are described which consist essentially of about 30 to about 60% by weight of an oil of lubricating viscosity, about 20 to about 50% by weight of a high molecular weight polymer, and about 20 about 50% by weight of a heat conductive agent capable of conducting heat away from a bearing surface where it is generated. The high molecular weight polymer may, for example, be polyethylene, having average molecular weights in the range from about 1.0 X 105 to about 5.0 X 106. The oil may be a mineral oil, a diester oil or preferably a synthetic hydrocarbon oil having a viscosity in the range from about 13 to about 1200 mm''/s (Mm2/s) at 38/sup 0/C. (100/sup 0/F.) the heat conductive agent may be powdered zinc oxide, aluminum powder, or equivalents thereof in this invention. The compositions are semi-rigid gels which may be formed in a mold and used as is, or which may be shaped further after molding. The gels are formed by blending the heat conductive agent and polymer and then blending that mixture with the oil and heating to a temperature above the softening temperature of the polymer for a period of time (About 5 to about 75 minutes) sufficient that the mixture will form a firm, tough solid gel on cooling having an oily surface provided by oil exuding from the gel thus producing a lubricative mass operable for extended periods of time. The heat conductive substance dispersed in the gel aids in dissipating heat produced at the bearing surfaces during use thus improving the performance of the gel both in withstanding higher bulk operating temperatures and in resisting breakdown of the gel under prolonged use.

  20. Three Boundary Conditions for Computing the Fixed-Point Property in Binary Mixture Data.

    PubMed

    van Maanen, Leendert; Couto, Joaquina; Lebreton, Mael

    2016-01-01

    The notion of "mixtures" has become pervasive in behavioral and cognitive sciences, due to the success of dual-process theories of cognition. However, providing support for such dual-process theories is not trivial, as it crucially requires properties in the data that are specific to mixture of cognitive processes. In theory, one such property could be the fixed-point property of binary mixture data, applied-for instance- to response times. In that case, the fixed-point property entails that response time distributions obtained in an experiment in which the mixture proportion is manipulated would have a common density point. In the current article, we discuss the application of the fixed-point property and identify three boundary conditions under which the fixed-point property will not be interpretable. In Boundary condition 1, a finding in support of the fixed-point will be mute because of a lack of difference between conditions. Boundary condition 2 refers to the case in which the extreme conditions are so different that a mixture may display bimodality. In this case, a mixture hypothesis is clearly supported, yet the fixed-point may not be found. In Boundary condition 3 the fixed-point may also not be present, yet a mixture might still exist but is occluded due to additional changes in behavior. Finding the fixed-property provides strong support for a dual-process account, yet the boundary conditions that we identify should be considered before making inferences about underlying psychological processes.

  1. Solution of the three-dimensional Helmholtz equation with nonlocal boundary conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, Steve L.; Zorumski, William E.; Watson, Willie R.

    1995-01-01

    The Helmholtz equation is solved within a three-dimensional rectangular duct with a nonlocal radiation boundary condition at the duct exit plane. This condition accurately models the acoustic admittance at an arbitrarily-located computational boundary plane. A linear system of equations is constructed with second-order central differences for the Helmholtz operator and second-order backward differences for both local admittance conditions and the gradient term in the nonlocal radiation boundary condition. The resulting matrix equation is large, sparse, and non-Hermitian. The size and structure of the matrix makes direct solution techniques impractical; as a result, a nonstationary iterative technique is used for its solution. The theory behind the nonstationary technique is reviewed, and numerical results are presented for radiation from both a point source and a planar acoustic source. The solutions with the nonlocal boundary conditions are invariant to the location of the computational boundary, and the same nonlocal conditions are valid for all solutions. The nonlocal conditions thus provide a means of minimizing the size of three-dimensional computational domains.

  2. Engine Lubricant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    PS 212, a plasma-sprayed coating developed by NASA, is used to coat valves in a new rotorcam engine. The coating eliminates the need for a liquid lubricant in the rotorcam, which has no crankshaft, flywheel, distributor or water pump. Developed by Murray United Development Corporation, it is a rotary engine only 10 inches long with four cylinders radiating outward from a central axle. Company officials say the engine will be lighter, more compact and cheaper to manufacture than current engines and will feature cleaner exhaust emissions. A licensing arrangement with a manufacturer is under negotiation. Primary applications are for automobiles, but the engine may also be used in light aircraft.

  3. Solid lubrication design methodology, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pallini, R. A.; Wedeven, L. D.; Ragen, M. A.; Aggarwal, B. B.

    1986-01-01

    The high temperature performance of solid lubricated rolling elements was conducted with a specially designed traction (friction) test apparatus. Graphite lubricants containing three additives (silver, phosphate glass, and zinc orthophosphate) were evaluated from room temperature to 540 C. Two hard coats were also evaluated. The evaluation of these lubricants, using a burnishing method of application, shows a reasonable transfer of lubricant and wear protection for short duration testing except in the 200 C temperature range. The graphite lubricants containing silver and zinc orthophosphate additives were more effective than the phosphate glass material over the test conditions examined. Traction coefficients ranged from a low of 0.07 to a high of 0.6. By curve fitting the traction data, empirical equations for slope and maximum traction coefficient as a function of contact pressure (P), rolling speed (U), and temperature (T) can be developed for each lubricant. A solid lubricant traction model was incorporated into an advanced bearing analysis code (SHABERTH). For comparison purposes, preliminary heat generation calculations were made for both oil and solid lubricated bearing operation. A preliminary analysis indicated a significantly higher heat generation for a solid lubricated ball bearing in a deep groove configuration. An analysis of a cylindrical roller bearing configuration showed a potential for a low friction solid lubricated bearing.

  4. Effect of triangular texture on the tribological performance of die steel with TiN coatings under lubricated sliding condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ping; Xiang, Xin; Shao, Tianmin; La, Yingqian; Li, Junling

    2016-12-01

    The friction and wear of stamping die surface can affect the service life of stamping die and the quality of stamping products. Surface texturing and surface coating have been widely used to improve the tribological performance of mechanical components. This study experimentally investigated the effect of triangular surface texture on the friction and wear properties of the die steel substrate with TiN coatings under oil lubrication. TiN coatings were deposited on a die steel (50Cr) substrate through a multi-arc ion deposition system, and then triangular surface texturing was fabricated by a laser surface texturing. The friction and wear test was conducted by a UMT-3 pin-on-disk tribometer under different sliding speeds and different applied loads, respectively. The adhesion test was performed to evaluate the effectiveness of triangular texturing on the interfacial bonding strength between the TiN coating and the die steel substrate. Results show that the combination method of surface texturing process and surface coating process has excellent tribological properties (the lowest frictional coefficient and wear volume), compared with the single texturing process or the single coating process. The tribological performance is improved resulting from the high hardness and low elastic modulus of TiN coatings, and the generation of hydrodynamic pressure, function of micro-trap for wear debris and micro-reservoirs for lubricating oil of the triangular surface texture. In addition, the coating bonding strength of the texturing sample is 3.63 MPa, higher than that of the single coating sample (3.48 MPa), but the mechanisms remain to be further researched.

  5. Radiation boundary condition and anisotropy correction for finite difference solutions of the Helmholtz equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, Christopher K. W.; Webb, Jay C.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper finite-difference solutions of the Helmholtz equation in an open domain are considered. By using a second-order central difference scheme and the Bayliss-Turkel radiation boundary condition, reasonably accurate solutions can be obtained when the number of grid points per acoustic wavelength used is large. However, when a smaller number of grid points per wavelength is used excessive reflections occur which tend to overwhelm the computed solutions. Excessive reflections are due to the incompability between the governing finite difference equation and the Bayliss-Turkel radiation boundary condition. The Bayliss-Turkel radiation boundary condition was developed from the asymptotic solution of the partial differential equation. To obtain compatibility, the radiation boundary condition should be constructed from the asymptotic solution of the finite difference equation instead. Examples are provided using the improved radiation boundary condition based on the asymptotic solution of the governing finite difference equation. The computed results are free of reflections even when only five grid points per wavelength are used. The improved radiation boundary condition has also been tested for problems with complex acoustic sources and sources embedded in a uniform mean flow. The present method of developing a radiation boundary condition is also applicable to higher order finite difference schemes. In all these cases no reflected waves could be detected. The use of finite difference approximation inevita bly introduces anisotropy into the governing field equation. The effect of anisotropy is to distort the directional distribution of the amplitude and phase of the computed solution. It can be quite large when the number of grid points per wavelength used in the computation is small. A way to correct this effect is proposed. The correction factor developed from the asymptotic solutions is source independent and, hence, can be determined once and for all. The

  6. Green's function of the heat equation with periodic and antiperiodic boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imanbaev, Nurlan; Erzhanov, Nurzhan

    2016-12-01

    In this work a non-local initial-boundary value problem for a non-homogeneous one-dimensional heat equation is con-sidered. The domain under consideration is a rectangle. The classical initial condition with respect to t is put. A non-local periodic boundary condition with respect to a spatial variable x is put. It is well-known that a solution of problem can be constructed in the form of convergent orthonormal series according to eigenfunctions of a spectral problem for an operator of multiple differentiation with periodic boundary conditions. Therefore Green's function can be also written in the form of an infinite series with respect to trigonometric functions (Fourier series). For classical first and second initial-boundary value problems there also exists a second representation of the Green's function by Jacobi function. In this paper we find the representation of the Green's function of the non-local initial-boundary value problem with periodic boundary conditions in the form of series according to exponents.

  7. Effect of thermal boundary condition on wall-bounded, stably-stratified turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Oscar; Garcia-Villalba, Manuel

    2012-11-01

    The dynamics of stably stratified wall-bounded turbulent flows are of great importance for many engineering and geophysical problems. In some cases, like the stably stratified atmospheric boundary layer, it is unclear which is the most appropriate thermal boundary condition, i.e. constant temperature or constant flux at the ground. Here, we analyze the effect that this boundary condition has on the dynamics of turbulent motions in the near-wall region in the case of strong stable stratification. Two Direct Numerical Simulations of turbulent channels will be used, at Reτ =uτ h / ν = 560 and Riτ = Δρgh /ρ0uτ2 = 600 - 900 , which are described in detail in Flores & Riley (2011, Boundary-Layer Meteorol) and Garcia-Villalba & del Alamo (2011, Phys.Fluids). For this range of Reynolds and Richardson numbers, the near-wall region is intermittent, with patches of laminar flow embedded in the otherwise turbulent flow. It is in this regime where the differences between the constant temperature and the constant flux boundary conditions are expected to be larger, with the thermal boundary condition affecting how the local relaminarization of the flow takes place. This research has been supported by ARO, NSF and the German Research Foundation.

  8. Boundary Condition Error for Parametric Updating of In-Operation SYSTEMS—APPLICATION to Piping Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    FRIKHA, S.; GAUDIN, M.; COFFIGNAL, G.

    2001-03-01

    There is an increasing interest in experimental analysis of in-operation structures where a part of the boundary conditions is poorly known. This concerns particularly the case of coupled systems where some complex physical phenomena make the behaviour of both the system and its connectivity dependent on the functioning conditions. In this context, this paper presents a new frequency approach for parametric structural updating in the vibration and acoustic fields. This methodology is developed here in the case of piping systems. It follows the boundary conditions identification method previously developed by the authors. A boundary conditions error is presented and its efficiency to translate structural parameters error is shown. Thus, the proposed approach allows performing the identification of some unknown boundary conditions and, simultaneously, updating the model of the tested structure. The pertinence of a frequency choice criteria based on the smallest singular value of the solved system during the identification of the boundary conditions is shown. It specifically allows avoiding the bands of critical frequencies. The developed updating technique is tested with two actual cases: a laboratory test case and an industrial example.

  9. Semi-analytical solution for the generalized absorbing boundary condition in molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chung-Shuo; Chen, Yan-Yu; Yu, Chi-Hua; Hsu, Yu-Chuan; Chen, Chuin-Shan

    2017-02-01

    We present a semi-analytical solution of a time-history kernel for the generalized absorbing boundary condition in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. To facilitate the kernel derivation, the concept of virtual atoms in real space that can conform with an arbitrary boundary in an arbitrary lattice is adopted. The generalized Langevin equation is regularized using eigenvalue decomposition and, consequently, an analytical expression of an inverse Laplace transform is obtained. With construction of dynamical matrices in the virtual domain, a semi-analytical form of the time-history kernel functions for an arbitrary boundary in an arbitrary lattice can be found. The time-history kernel functions for different crystal lattices are derived to show the generality of the proposed method. Non-equilibrium MD simulations in a triangular lattice with and without the absorbing boundary condition are conducted to demonstrate the validity of the solution.

  10. Reflecting boundary conditions for classical molecular dynamics simulations of nonideal plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrinenko, Ya S.; Morozov, I. V.; Valuev, I. A.

    2016-11-01

    The influence of boundary conditions on results of the classical molecular dynamics simulations of nonideal electron-ion plasma is analyzed. A comprehensive study is performed for the convergence of per-particle potential energy and pressure with the number of particles using both the nearest image method (periodic boundaries) and harmonic reflective boundaries. As a result an error caused by finiteness of the simulation box is estimated. Moreover the electron oscillations given by the spectra of the current autocorrelation function are analyzed for both types of the boundary conditions. Nonideal plasmas with the nonideality parameter in range 0.26-2.6 is considered. To speed up the classical molecular dynamics simulations the graphics accelerators code is used.

  11. USDOE Top-of-Rail Lubricant Project

    SciTech Connect

    Mohumad F. Alzoubi; George R. Fenske; Robert A. Erck; Amrit S. Boparai

    2002-02-01

    Lubrication of wheel/rail systems has been recognized for the last two decades as a very important issue for railroads. Energy savings and less friction and wear can be realized if a lubricant can be used at the wheel/rail interface. On the other hand, adverse influences are seen in operating and wear conditions if improper or excessive lubrication is used. Also, inefficiencies in lubrication need to be avoided for economic and environmental reasons. The top-of-rail (TOR) lubricant concept was developed by Texaco Corporation to lubricate wheels and rails effectively and efficiently. Tranergy Corporation has been developing its SENTRAEN 2000{trademark} lubrication system for the last ten years, and this revolutionary new high-tech on-board rail lubrication system promises to dramatically improve the energy efficiency, performance, safety, and track environment of railroads. The system is fully computer-controlled and ensures that all of the lubricant is consumed as the end of the train passes. Lubricant quantity dispensed is a function of grade, speed, curve, and axle load. Tranergy also has its LA4000{trademark} wheel and rail simulator, a lubrication and traction testing apparatus. The primary task of this project was collecting and analyzing the volatile and semivolatile compounds produced as the lubricant was used. The volatile organic compounds were collected by Carbotrap cartridges and analyzed by adsorption and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The semivolatile fraction was obtained by collecting liquid that dripped from the test wheel. The collected material was also analyzed by GC/MS. Both of these analyses were qualitative. The results indicated that in the volatile fraction, the only compounds on the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Superfund List of Analytes detected were contaminants either in the room air or from other potential contamination sources in the laboratory. Similarly, in the semivolatile fraction none of the detected

  12. Buckling of stiffened shells with random initial imperfections, thickness and boundary conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elishakoff, I.; Arbocz, J.; Starnes, J. H., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The paper proposes a method to predict the buckling load of stiffened, composite shells reliably, where besides the randomness of the initial geometric imperfections also a random variation of the wall thickness and the uncertainty of the precise edge conditions is included in the analysis. The introduction of the variability in the thickness from shell to shell, in an ensemble of nominally identical shells, produced by the same manufacturing procedure is motivated by the growing realization of the importance of thickness variations by composite shells. The probabilistic treatment of the boundary conditions is dictated by the fact that 'true', deterministically specified boundary conditions are unlikely to be realizable in practice.

  13. On a Non-Reflecting Boundary Condition for Hyperbolic Conservation Laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loh, Ching Y.

    2003-01-01

    A non-reflecting boundary condition (NRBC) for practical computations in fluid dynamics and aeroacoustics is presented. The technique is based on the hyperbolicity of the Euler equation system and the first principle of plane (simple) wave propagation. The NRBC is simple and effective, provided the numerical scheme maintains locally a C(sup 1) continuous solution at the boundary. Several numerical examples in ID, 2D and 3D space are illustrated to demonstrate its robustness in practical computations.

  14. Far Field Numerical Boundary Conditions for Internal and Cascade Flow Computations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-11-01

    for the treatment of the fa field boundary conditions, Verhoff and O’Neil (1984), to more ,,eneral formulations of the Euler equations and to cascade...4eometries. linearized solutions ,-f the Euler equations are developed for the perturbations from the tiniform free stream, for ducts and cascades...Fourier expansion in the direction al on tlie inlet or exit boundaries. Resul obtained from an Euler code are shown ftor duCts and cascadels , rompa rin

  15. Numerical Boundary Conditions for Specular Reflection in a Level-Sets-Based Wavefront Propagation Method

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-01

    then et∗ →0 as hl →0. This is essentially modifying the grid to include the point zb, and that modification could be different for each fixed x. But in...convergence rate, a rectangu- lar grid is used over the physical space. When the physical domain does not conform to the rectangular grid , appropriate...boundary conditions to represent reflection must be derived to apply at grid locations that are not coincident with the reflecting boundary. A related

  16. On a Non-Reflecting Boundary Condition for Hyperbolic Conservation Laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loh, Ching Y.

    2003-01-01

    A non-reflecting boundary condition (NRBC) for practical computations in fluid dynamics and aeroacoustics is presented. The technique is based on the first principle of non-reflecting, plane wave propagation and the hyperbolicity of the Euler equation system. The NRBC is simple and effective, provided the numerical scheme maintains locally a C(sup 1) continuous solution at the boundary. Several numerical examples in 1D, 2D, and 3D space are illustrated to demonstrate its robustness in practical computations.

  17. Lubrication Of Nonconformal Contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeng, Yeau-Ren

    1991-01-01

    Report discusses advances in knowledge of lubrication of nonconformal contacts in bearings and other machine elements. Reviews previous developments in theory of lubrication, presents advances in theory of lubrication to determine minimum film thickness, and describes experiments designed to investigate one of regimes of lubrication for ball bearings.

  18. Influence of liquid lubricant properties on their performance.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wedeven, V.

    1972-01-01

    The influence of lubricant properties on performance is considered in connection with various mechanisms of lubrication. The effects of temperature and pressure on viscosity, which is important in hydrodynamic and elastohydrodynamic lubrication, is presented using a correlation postulated by Roelands. Under elastohydrodynamic conditions it is important to distinguish between the influence of lubricant properties within the inlet region and the Hertz region since each performs different functions. The role of lubricant transport properties such as surface tension is considered in connection with lubricant starvation.

  19. Spectrum of one BVP with discontinuities and spectral parameter in the boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydemir, K.; Mukhtarov, O. Sh.; Olǧar, H.

    2016-04-01

    The aim this of paper is to investigate the spectral problem for the equation -(pu')'(x) + q(x)u(x) = λu(x), under eigen-dependent boundary conditions and supplementary transmission conditions at finite number interior points. By modifying some techniques of classical Sturm-Liouville theory and suggesting own approaches we esthabilish some properties of the eigenvalues and eigenfunction.

  20. Miscibility of lubricants with refrigerants

    SciTech Connect

    Pate, M.B.; Zoz, S.C.; Berkenbosch, L.J.

    1992-07-01

    Miscibility data is being obtained for a variety of non-CFC refrigerants and their potential lubricants. Ten different refrigerants and seven different lubricants are being investigated. Experiments are being performed in two phases: Phase I focuses on performing screening tests and Phase II consists of developing miscibility plots. The miscibility tests are being performed in a test facility consisting of a series of miniature test cells submerged in a constant temperature bath. The bath temperature can be precisely controlled over a temperature range of -50{degrees}C to 100{degrees}C. The test cells are constructed to allow for complete visibility of lubricant-refrigerant mixtures under all test conditions. Early in this reporting period, new procedures for charging the lubricant and refrigerant into the cells for testing were adopted. All of the refrigerants and all but one of the lubricants have been received from the manufacturers. Data obtained to date includes that for R-134a, R142b, R-32, R-134, R-125, and R-143a with four lubricants, namely, two esters and two polypropylene glycols.

  1. Boundary conditions for plasma fluid models at the magnetic presheath entrance

    SciTech Connect

    Loizu, J.; Ricci, P.; Halpern, F. D.; Jolliet, S.

    2012-12-15

    The proper boundary conditions at the magnetic presheath entrance for plasma fluid turbulence models based on the drift approximation are derived, focusing on a weakly collisional plasma sheath with T{sub i} Much-Less-Than T{sub e} and a magnetic field oblique to a totally absorbing wall. First, the location of the magnetic presheath entrance is rigorously derived. Then boundary conditions at the magnetic presheath entrance are analytically deduced for v{sub ||i}, v{sub ||e}, n, {phi}, T{sub e}, and for the vorticity {omega}={nabla}{sub Up-Tack }{sup 2}{phi}. The effects of E Multiplication-Sign B and diamagnetic drifts on the boundary conditions are also investigated. Kinetic simulations are performed that confirm the analytical results. Finally, the new set of boundary conditions is implemented in a three-dimensional global fluid code for the simulation of plasma turbulence and, as an example, the results of a tokamak scrape-off layer simulation are discussed. The framework presented can be generalized to obtain boundary conditions at the magnetic presheath entrance in more complex scenarios.

  2. Repulsive Casimir effect from extra dimensions and Robin boundary conditions: From branes to pistons

    SciTech Connect

    Elizalde, E.; Odintsov, S. D.; Saharian, A. A.

    2009-03-15

    We evaluate the Casimir energy and force for a massive scalar field with general curvature coupling parameter, subject to Robin boundary conditions on two codimension-one parallel plates, located on a (D+1)-dimensional background spacetime with an arbitrary internal space. The most general case of different Robin coefficients on the two separate plates is considered. With independence of the geometry of the internal space, the Casimir forces are seen to be attractive for special cases of Dirichlet or Neumann boundary conditions on both plates and repulsive for Dirichlet boundary conditions on one plate and Neumann boundary conditions on the other. For Robin boundary conditions, the Casimir forces can be either attractive or repulsive, depending on the Robin coefficients and the separation between the plates, what is actually remarkable and useful. Indeed, we demonstrate the existence of an equilibrium point for the interplate distance, which is stabilized due to the Casimir force, and show that stability is enhanced by the presence of the extra dimensions. Applications of these properties in braneworld models are discussed. Finally, the corresponding results are generalized to the geometry of a piston of arbitrary cross section.

  3. Supersonic far-field boundary conditions for transonic small-disturbance theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbons, Michael D.; Batina, John T.

    1989-01-01

    Characteristic far-field boundary conditions for supersonic freestream flow have been developed and implemented within a transonic small-disturbance code. The boundary conditions have been implemented within the CAP-TSD code which has been developed recently for aeroelastic analysis of complete aircraft configurations. These boundary conditions improve the accuracy of the solutions for supersonic freestream applications. They also allow the extent of the grid to be much smaller, thus providing savings in the computational time required to obtain solutions. Comparisons are shown between surface pressures computed using large and small grid extents for the NACA 0012 airfoil and the F-5 wing at various Mach numbers and angles of attack. Both steady and unsteady results are presented and comparisons are made with Euler results and with experimental data to assess the accuracy of the new far-field boundary conditions. Comparisons of these results show that the supersonic boundary conditions allow a much smaller grid to be used without losing accuracy.

  4. Integral Method of Boundary Characteristics in Solving the Stefan Problem: Dirichlet Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kot, V. A.

    2016-09-01

    The integral method of boundary characteristics is considered as applied to the solution of the Stefan problem with a Dirichlet condition. On the basis of the multiple integration of the heat-conduction equation, a sequence of identical equalities with boundary characteristics in the form of n-fold integrals of the surface temperature has been obtained. It is shown that, in the case where the temperature profile is defined by an exponential polynomial and the Stefan condition is not fulfilled at a moving interphase boundary, the accuracy of solving the Stefan problem with a Dirichlet condition by the integral method of boundary characteristics is higher by several orders of magnitude than the accuracy of solving this problem by other known approximate methods and that the solutions of the indicated problem with the use of the fourth-sixth degree polynomials on the basis of the integral method of boundary characteristics are exact in essence. This method surpasses the known numerical methods by many orders of magnitude in the accuracy of calculating the position of the interphase boundary and is approximately equal to them in the accuracy of calculating the temperature profile.

  5. Constant-concentration boundary condition: Lessons from the HYDROCOIN variable-density groundwater benchmark problem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konikow, L.F.; Sanford, W.E.; Campbell, P.J.

    1997-01-01

    In a solute-transport model, if a constant-concentration boundary condition is applied at a node in an active flow field, a solute flux can occur by both advective and dispersive processes. The potential for advective release is demonstrated by reexamining the Hydrologic Code Intercomparison (HYDROCOIN) project case 5 problem, which represents a salt dome overlain by a shallow groundwater system. The resulting flow field includes significant salinity and fluid density variations. Several independent teams simulated this problem using finite difference or finite element numerical models. We applied a method-of-characteristics model (MOCDENSE). The previous numerical implementations by HYDROCOIN teams of a constant-concentration boundary to represent salt release by lateral dispersion only (as stipulated in the original problem definition) was flawed because this boundary condition allows the release of salt into the flow field by both dispersion and advection. When the constant-concentration boundary is modified to allow salt release by dispersion only, significantly less salt is released into the flow field. The calculated brine distribution for case 5 depends very little on which numerical model is used, as long as the selected model is solving the proper equations. Instead, the accuracy of the solution depends strongly on the proper conceptualization of the problem, including the detailed design of the constant-concentration boundary condition. The importance and sensitivity to the manner of specification of this boundary does not appear to have been recognized previously in the analysis of this problem.

  6. Improving variational mass-consistent models of hydrodynamic flows via boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Núñez, M. A.

    2012-04-01

    Variational mass-consistent models for the velocity field v have been used by mesoscale meteorological community to modeling the wind field from an observed field v 0 in a bounded region Ω with boundary Γ. Variational calculus reduces the problem to the solution of an elliptic equation for a Lagrange multiplier λ subject to Dirichlet Boundary Condition (DBC) on flow-through boundaries. In this work, it is shown that DBC decreases the regularity of λ and this in turn decreases the accuracy with which the velocity field satisfies the mass-balance. The boundary condition (BC) v · n = v T · ngiven by the true field v T on the whole boundary Γ, leads only to a Neumann boundary condition (NBC) for λ. Approximations of this BC are studied. Analytic and numerical results show that the velocity field U 0 obtained from v 0 by direct integration of the continuity equation, yields a NBC that improves significantly the fields obtained with DBC's.

  7. Conformal field theory of critical Casimir forces between surfaces with alternating boundary conditions in two dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubail, J.; Santachiara, R.; Emig, T.

    2017-03-01

    Systems as diverse as binary mixtures and inclusions in biological membranes, and many more, can be described effectively by interacting spins. When the critical fluctuations in these systems are constrained by boundary conditions, critical Casimir forces (CCF) emerge. Here we analyze CCF between boundaries with alternating boundary conditions in two dimensions, employing conformal field theory (CFT). After presenting the concept of boundary changing operators, we specifically consider two different boundary configurations for a strip of critical Ising spins: (I) alternating equi-sized domains of up and down spins on both sides of the strip, with a possible lateral shift, and (II) alternating domains of up and down spins of different size on one side and homogeneously fixed spins on the other side of the strip. Asymptotic results for the CCF at small and large distances are derived. We introduce a novel modified Szegö formula for determinants of real antisymmetric block Toeplitz matrices to obtain the exact CCF and the corresponding scaling functions at all distances. We demonstrate the existence of a surface renormalization group flow between universal force amplitudes of different magnitude and sign. The Casimir force can vanish at a stable equilibrium position that can be controlled by parameters of the boundary conditions. Lateral Casimir forces assume a universal simple cosine form at large separations.

  8. A cartilage-inspired lubrication system.

    PubMed

    Greene, George W; Olszewska, Anna; Osterberg, Monika; Zhu, Haijin; Horn, Roger

    2014-01-14

    Articular cartilage is an example of a highly efficacious water-based, natural lubrication system that is optimized to provide low friction and wear protection at both low and high loads and sliding velocities. One of the secrets of cartilage's superior tribology comes from a unique, multimodal lubrication strategy consisting of both a fluid pressurization mediated lubrication mechanism and a boundary lubrication mechanism supported by surface bound macromolecules. Using a reconstituted network of highly interconnected cellulose fibers and simple modification through the immobilization of polyelectrolytes, we have recreated many of the mechanical and chemical properties of cartilage and the cartilage lubrication system to produce a purely synthetic material system that exhibits some of the same lubrication mechanisms, time dependent friction response, and high wear resistance as natural cartilage tissue. Friction and wear studies demonstrate how the properties of the cellulose fiber network can be used to control and optimize the lubrication and wear resistance of the material surfaces and highlight what key features of cartilage should be duplicated in order to produce a cartilage-mimetic lubrication system.

  9. An effective absorbing boundary condition for linear long-wave and linear dispersive-wave tsunami simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Takuto; Tsushima, Hiroaki; Furumura, Takashi

    2016-04-01

    We numerically simulated the propagation of tsunami waves with finite difference methods by using perfectly matched layer (PML) boundary conditions to effectively eliminate artificial reflections from model boundaries. The PML method damps the tsunami height and velocity of seawater only in directions perpendicular to the boundary. Although the additional terms required to implement the PML conditions make the use of the PML technique difficult for linear dispersive tsunami waves, we have proposed an empirical extension of the PML method for modeling dispersive tsunami waves. Even for heterogeneous, realistic bathymetries, numerical tests demonstrated that the PML boundary condition dramatically decreased artificial reflections from model boundaries compared to the use of traditional boundary conditions. The use of PML boundary conditions for numerical modeling of tsunamis is especially useful because it facilitates use of the later phases of tsunamis that would otherwise be compromised by artifacts caused by reflections from model boundaries.

  10. Lubricant Evaluation and Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-04-01

    Changes on COBRA Response 313 c. Nature of Charge Carrier in COBRA Active Lubricants 313 (I) Adsorption Chromatography of Degraded Lubricants 316 (2...Lubricant 0-67-1 160 (5) Summary 162 b. Micro Carbon Residue Tester (MCRT) 163 (1) Introduction 163 (2) Test Apparatus and Procedure 164 (3) Test...Other COBRA Active Compounds 326 d. Conclusions 329 4. DIELECTRIC BREAKDOWN STRENGTH OF MIL-L-7808 LUBRICANTS 330 V LUBRICANT LOAD CARRYING

  11. Friction-term response to boundary-condition type in flow models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaffranek, R.W.; Lai, C.

    1996-01-01

    The friction-slope term in the unsteady open-channel flow equations is examined using two numerical models based on different formulations of the governing equations and employing different solution methods. The purposes of the study are to analyze, evaluate, and demonstrate the behavior of the term in a set of controlled numerical experiments using varied types and combinations of boundary conditions. Results of numerical experiments illustrate that a given model can respond inconsistently for the identical resistance-coefficient value under different types and combinations of boundary conditions. Findings also demonstrate that two models employing different dependent variables and solution methods can respond similarly for the identical resistance-coefficient value under similar types and combinations of boundary conditions. Discussion of qualitative considerations and quantitative experimental results provides insight into the proper treatment, evaluation, and significance of the friction-slope term, thereby offering practical guidelines for model implementation and calibration.

  12. Accuracy of the Frensley inflow boundary condition for Wigner equations in simulating resonant tunneling diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Haiyan; Cai Wei; Tsu, Raphael

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, the accuracy of the Frensley inflow boundary condition of the Wigner equation is analyzed in computing the I-V characteristics of a resonant tunneling diode (RTD). It is found that the Frensley inflow boundary condition for incoming electrons holds only exactly infinite away from the active device region and its accuracy depends on the length of contacts included in the simulation. For this study, the non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) with a Dirichlet to Neumann mapping boundary condition is used for comparison. The I-V characteristics of the RTD are found to agree between self-consistent NEGF and Wigner methods at low bias potentials with sufficiently large GaAs contact lengths. Finally, the relation between the negative differential conductance (NDC) of the RTD and the sizes of contact and buffer in the RTD is investigated using both methods.

  13. Scale effect of slip boundary condition at solid–liquid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagayama, Gyoko; Matsumoto, Takenori; Fukushima, Kohei; Tsuruta, Takaharu

    2017-03-01

    Rapid advances in microelectromechanical systems have stimulated the development of compact devices, which require effective cooling technologies (e.g., microchannel cooling). However, the inconsistencies between experimental and classical theoretical predictions for the liquid flow in microchannel remain unclarified. Given the larger surface/volume ratio of microchannel, the surface effects increase as channel scale decreases. Here we show the scale effect of the boundary condition at the solid–liquid interface on single-phase convective heat transfer characteristics in microchannels. We demonstrate that the deviation from classical theory with a reduction in hydraulic diameters is due to the breakdown of the continuum solid–liquid boundary condition. The forced convective heat transfer characteristics of single-phase laminar flow in a parallel-plate microchannel are investigated. Using the theoretical Poiseuille and Nusselt numbers derived under the slip boundary condition at the solid–liquid interface, we estimate the slip length and thermal slip length at the interface.

  14. Scale effect of slip boundary condition at solid–liquid interface

    PubMed Central

    Nagayama, Gyoko; Matsumoto, Takenori; Fukushima, Kohei; Tsuruta, Takaharu

    2017-01-01

    Rapid advances in microelectromechanical systems have stimulated the development of compact devices, which require effective cooling technologies (e.g., microchannel cooling). However, the inconsistencies between experimental and classical theoretical predictions for the liquid flow in microchannel remain unclarified. Given the larger surface/volume ratio of microchannel, the surface effects increase as channel scale decreases. Here we show the scale effect of the boundary condition at the solid–liquid interface on single-phase convective heat transfer characteristics in microchannels. We demonstrate that the deviation from classical theory with a reduction in hydraulic diameters is due to the breakdown of the continuum solid–liquid boundary condition. The forced convective heat transfer characteristics of single-phase laminar flow in a parallel-plate microchannel are investigated. Using the theoretical Poiseuille and Nusselt numbers derived under the slip boundary condition at the solid–liquid interface, we estimate the slip length and thermal slip length at the interface. PMID:28256536

  15. Perfectly matched layer absorbing boundary condition for nonlinear two-fluid plasma equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, X. F.; Jiang, Z. H.; Hu, X. W.; Zhuang, G.; Jiang, J. F.; Guo, W. X.

    2015-04-01

    Numerical instability occurs when coupled Maxwell equations and nonlinear two-fluid plasma equations are solved using finite difference method through parallel algorithm. Thus, a perfectly matched layer (PML) boundary condition is set to avoid the instability caused by velocity and density gradients between vacuum and plasma. A splitting method is used to first decompose governing equations to time-dependent nonlinear and linear equations. Then, a proper complex variable is used for the spatial derivative terms of the time-dependent nonlinear equation. Finally, with several auxiliary function equations, the governing equations of the absorbing boundary condition are derived by rewriting the frequency domain PML in the original physical space and time coordinates. Numerical examples in one- and two-dimensional domains show that the PML boundary condition is valid and effective. PML stability depends on the absorbing coefficient and thickness of absorbing layers.

  16. Boundary condition handling approaches for the model reduction of a vehicle frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Qingxi; Zhang, Nong; Zhang, Bangji; Ji, Jinchen

    2016-06-01

    In order to apply model reduction technique to improve the computational efficiency for the large-scale FEM model of a vehicle, this paper presents the handling approaches for three widely-used boundary conditions, namely fixed boundary condition (FBC), prescribed motion (PSM) and coupling (COUP), respectively. It is found that iterated improved reduction system (IIRS) reduction method tends to generate better reduction approximation. Guyan method is not sensitive to the sequence of reduction and constraint under FBC, and can thus provide flexibility in handling different boundary conditions for the same system. As for PSM, 'constraint first' is recommended no matter which reduction method is used, and then separate reduction models can be coupled to form a new model with relative small dofs. By selecting appropriate master dofs for model reduction, the coupled model based on reduced models could produce same results as the original full one.

  17. Damping solitary wave under the second and third boundary condition of a viscous plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, G.; Ren, Y.-Q.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, the solitary waves of a viscous plasma confined in a cylindrical pipe is investigated under two types of boundary condition. By using the reductive perturbation theory, a quasi-KdV equation is derived and a damping solitary wave is obtained. It is found that the damping rate increases with the viscosity coefficient of the plasma ν ' increasing and the radius of the cylindrical pipe R decreasing for second and third boundary condition. The magnitude of the damping rate is also dominated by boundary condition type. From the fact that the amplitude reduces rapidly when R approaches zero or ν ' approaches infinite, we confirm the existence of a damping solitary wave.

  18. Scale effect of slip boundary condition at solid-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Nagayama, Gyoko; Matsumoto, Takenori; Fukushima, Kohei; Tsuruta, Takaharu

    2017-03-03

    Rapid advances in microelectromechanical systems have stimulated the development of compact devices, which require effective cooling technologies (e.g., microchannel cooling). However, the inconsistencies between experimental and classical theoretical predictions for the liquid flow in microchannel remain unclarified. Given the larger surface/volume ratio of microchannel, the surface effects increase as channel scale decreases. Here we show the scale effect of the boundary condition at the solid-liquid interface on single-phase convective heat transfer characteristics in microchannels. We demonstrate that the deviation from classical theory with a reduction in hydraulic diameters is due to the breakdown of the continuum solid-liquid boundary condition. The forced convective heat transfer characteristics of single-phase laminar flow in a parallel-plate microchannel are investigated. Using the theoretical Poiseuille and Nusselt numbers derived under the slip boundary condition at the solid-liquid interface, we estimate the slip length and thermal slip length at the interface.

  19. Euler calculations with embedded Cartesian grids and small-perturbation boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, W.; Koh, E. P. C.; Tsai, H. M.; Liu, F.

    2010-05-01

    This study examines the use of stationary Cartesian mesh for steady and unsteady flow computations. The surface boundary conditions are imposed by reflected points. A cloud of nodes in the vicinity of the surface is used to get a weighted average of the flow properties via a gridless least-squares technique. If the displacement of the moving surface from the original position is typically small, a small-perturbation boundary condition method can be used. To ensure computational efficiency, multigrid solution is made via a framework of embedded grids for local grid refinement. Computations of airfoil wing and wing-body test cases show the practical usefulness of the embedded Cartesian grids with the small-perturbation boundary conditions approach.

  20. A Formulation of Asymptotic and Exact Boundary Conditions Using Local Operators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagstrom, T.; Hariharan, S. I.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper we describe a systematic approach for constructing asymptotic boundary conditions for isotropic wave-like equations using local operators. The conditions take a recursive form with increasing order of accuracy. In three dimensions the recursion terminates and the resulting conditions are exact for solutions which are described by finite combinations of angular spherical harmonics. First, we develop the expansion for the two-dimensional wave equation and construct a sequence of easily implementable boundary conditions. We show that in three dimensions and analogous conditions are again easily implementable in addition to being exact. Also, we provide extensions of these ideas to hyperbolic systems. Namely, Maxwell's equations for TM waves are used to demonstrate the construction. Finally, we provide numerical examples to demonstrate the effectiveness of these conditions for a model problem governed by the wave equation.