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Sample records for bovine roots restored

  1. Fracture resistance of structurally compromised root filled bovine teeth restored with accessory glass fibre posts.

    PubMed

    Martelli, H; Pellizzer, E P; Rosa, B T; Lopes, M B; Gonini, A

    2008-08-01

    To evaluate the mechanical behaviour of structurally compromised root filled bovine roots after restoration with accessory glass fibre posts. Fifty roots of bovine teeth received conventional post preparations with a cervical diameter of 3.5 mm. The roots were assigned to five groups (n = 10): group MP - cast metal post, group GP - glass fibre post and group AGP - glass fibre post plus accessory glass fibre posts. In groups GP-R and AGP-R (similar to groups GP and AGP), 2 mm of coronal tooth structure were left intact. All groups were subjected to an elastic limit assay and tested in an universal machine for fracture resistance. Repeated measures anova were performed to examine differences in fracture resistance; fracture modes were analysed by Fischer's exact test. The mean fracture resistance values (kgf) were 61.8 (MP), 63.1 (GP), 55.5 (AGP), 56 (GP-R) and (53.1) AGP-R. No statistically significant difference was found between groups. The Fisher's exact test indicated significant differences (P < 0.05) in the fracture mode amongst groups MP, GP and AGP, indicating 100%, 50% and 10% of catastrophic fractures, respectively. The use of accessory glass fibre posts affected the fracture mode favorably: 90% of fractures in group AGP were in the coronal third.

  2. FRACTURE STRENGTH OF FLARED BOVINE ROOTS RESTORED WITH DIFFERENT INTRARADICULAR POSTS

    PubMed Central

    Clavijo, Victor Grover Rene; Reis, José Maurício dos Santos Nunes; Kabbach, William; Silva, André Luis Faria e; de Oliveira, Osmir Batista; de Andrade, Marcelo Ferrarezi

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the fracture strength and failure mode of flared bovine roots restored with different intraradicular posts. Material and Methods: Fifty bovine incisors with similar dimensions were selected and their roots were flared until 1.0 mm of dentin wall remained. Next, the roots were allocated into five groups (n=10): GI-cast metal post-and-core; GII-fiber posts plus accessory fiber posts; GIII- direct anatomic post; GIV- indirect anatomic post and GV- control (specimens without intraradicular post). A polyether impression material was used to simulate the periodontal ligament. After periodontal ligament simulation, the specimens were subjected to a compressive load at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min in a servo-hydraulic testing machine (MTS 810) applied at 135° to the long axis of the tooth until failure. The data (N) were subjected to ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test (α=0.05). Results: GI and GIV presented higher fracture strength (p<0.05) than GII. GIII presented intermediate values without statistically significant differences (p>0.05) from GI, GII and GIV. Control specimens (GV) produced the lowest fracture strength mean values (p<0.05). Despite obtaining the highest mean value, GI presented 100% of unfavorable failures. GII presented 20% of unfavorable failures. GIII, GIV and GV presented only favorable failures. Conclusions: Although further in vitro and in vivo studies are necessary, the results of this study showed that the use of direct and indirect anatomic posts in flared roots could be an alternative to cast metal post-and-core. PMID:20027429

  3. Effect of two restorative materials on root dentine erosion.

    PubMed

    Domiciano, Silvia Jorge; Colucci, Vivian; Serra, Mônica Campos

    2010-05-01

    This study sought to evaluate the microhardness of root dentine adjacent to glass-ionomer and composite resin restorations after erosive challenge. A crossover study was performed in two phases of 4 consecutive days each. One hundred twelve bovine root dentine slabs were obtained, and standardized box-shaped cavities were prepared at center of each specimen. The prepared cavities were randomly restored with glass-ionomer cement or composite resin. The slabs were randomly assigned among 14 volunteers, which wore intraoral palatal device containing four restored root dentin slabs. Starting on the second day, half of the palatal acrylic devices were immersed extraorally in a lemonade-like carbonated soft drink for 90 s, four times daily for 3 days. After 3-day wash-out, dentine slabs restored with the alternative material were placed into palatal appliance and the volunteers started the second phase of this study. After erosive challenges, microhardness measurements were performed. Regardless of the restorative material employed, eroded specimens demonstrated lower microhardness value (p < 0.0001). At eroded condition examined in this study, dentine restored with glass-ionomer cement showed higher microhardness values (p < 0.0001). It may be concluded that the glass-ionomer cement decreases the progression of root dentine erosion at restoration margin. (c) 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Fracture resistance of weakened roots restored with different intracanal retainers.

    PubMed

    Broch, Juliana; Marchionatti, Ana Maria Estivalete; Bergoli, Cesar Dalmolin; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Kaizer, Osvaldo Bazzan

    2015-01-01

    The purposes of the study were to evaluate the effect of mechanical cycling (MC) on the fracture resistance of endodontically treated weakened roots restored with different intraradicular retainers and to analyze the failure mode. Eighty bovine roots were prepared and restored: 20 roots were reconstructed with cast post-and-cores (CPCs); 20 with fiber posts (FPs); 20 with fiber posts with larger coronal diameter (FPLs); and 20 with anatomic posts (APs). Metal crowns were cemented in all the roots. Half of specimens from each restoration strategy (n = 10) were submitted to MC: CPC-MC, FP-MC, FPL-MC, and AP-MC. The specimens were subjected to a fracture resistance test. The results showed that the type of retainer used was statistically significant (P < 0.0004). The CPC specimens demonstrated a fracture resistance similar to that of the APs, but greater than that of the FPs and FPLs. MC was statistically significant (P < 0.003) and affected AP-MC fracture resistance, which was lower than that of CPC-MC and similar to those of FP-MC and FPL-MC.

  5. Study on the potential inhibition of root dentine wear adjacent to fluoride-containing restorations.

    PubMed

    Turssi, Cecilia Pedroso; Hara, Anderson Takeo; Domiciano, Silvia Jorge; Serra, Mônica Campos

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to determine whether the vicinity of root dentine that had been restored with fluoride-releasing materials was at reduced risk for erosive/abrasive wear compared to root dentine restored with a non-fluoride-containing material. According to a randomized complete block design, standardized cavities prepared on the surface of 150 bovine root dentine slabs were restored with glass-ionomer cement, resin-modified glass ionomer, polyacid-modified resin composite, fluoride-containing or conventional composite. Specimens were coated with two layers of an acid-resistant nail varnish exposing half of the dentine surface and half of the restoration. Subsequently, specimens were either eroded in an acidic drink or left uneroded, then exposed to artificial saliva and abraded in a toothbrushing machine. Wear depth in the vicinity of restorations was quantified by a stylus profilometer, based on the nonabraded areas surrounding the erosion/abrasion region. Two-way ANOVA did not demonstrate significant interaction between restoratives and eroded-uneroded dentine (p=0.5549) nor significant difference among restorative materials (p=0.8639). Tukey's test ascertained that the wear depth was higher for eroded than for uneroded groups. Fluoride-releasing materials seemed to negligibly inhibit wear in the vicinity of restored root dentine subjected to erosive/abrasive challenges.

  6. Leakage of bovine serum albumin in root canals obturated with super-EBA and IRM.

    PubMed

    Malcic, Ana; Jukic, Silvana; Brzovic, Valentina; Miletic, Ivana; Anic, Ivica

    2006-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the leakage of SuperEBA and intermediate restorative material (IRM) in root canal samples, with or without orthograde filling, by evaluating bovine serum albumin (BSA) microleakage using spectrophotometry. Thirty-five single-rooted teeth were divided into five groups, instrumented, and had apices resected. Root-end cavities in groups I and II were filled with SuperEBA and IRM. The samples from the groups III, IV, and V were filled with gutta-percha and sealer. In groups IV and V, root-end cavities were filled with SuperEBA and IRM. After 60 days, the greatest microleakage of BSA was observed in group II (4.1 +/- 0.0011 ng), followed by group III (3.4 +/- 0.0064 ng), and then group I (2.6 +/- 0.0019 ng). Samples from groups IV and V leaked the least (0.7 +/- 0.0014 ng). Significantly less leakage (p < 0.05) occurred in samples filled with orthograde and root-end fillings than did in samples filled only with an orthograde approach and the samples with IRM root-end fillings.

  7. Fatigue resistance of bovine teeth restored with resin-bonded fiber posts: effect of post surface conditioning.

    PubMed

    Zamboni, Sandra C; Baldissara, Paolo; Pelogia, Fernanda; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Scotti, Roberto; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of post surface conditioning on the fatigue resistance of bovine teeth restored with resin-bonded fiber-reinforced composite (FRC). Root canals of 20 single-rooted bovine teeth (16 mm long) were prepared to 12 mm using a preparation drill of a double-tapered fiber post system. Using acrylic resin, each specimen was embedded (up to 3.0 mm from the cervical part of the specimen) in a PVC cylinder and allocated into one of two groups (n = 10) based on the post surface conditioning method: acid etching plus silanization or tribochemical silica coating (30 pm SiO(x) + silanization). The root canal dentin was etched (H2PO3 for 30 seconds), rinsed, and dried. A multi-step adhesive system was applied to the root dentin and the fiber posts were cemented with resin cement. The specimens were submitted to one million fatigue cycles. After fatigue testing, a score was given based on the number of fatigue cycles until fracture. All of the specimens were resistant to fatigue. No fracture of the root or the post and no loss of retention of the post were observed. The methodology and the results of this study indicate that tribochemical silica coating and acid etching performed equally well when dynamic mechanical loading was used.

  8. Cariostatic effect of fluoride-containing restorative materials associated with fluoride gels on root dentin

    PubMed Central

    BORGES, Fernanda Tavares; CAMPOS, Wagner Reis da Costa; MUNARI, Lais Sant'ana; MOREIRA, Allyson Nogueira; PAIVA, Saul Martins; MAGALHÃES, Claudia Silami

    2010-01-01

    Secondary caries is still the main cause of restoration replacement, especially on the root surface Objective This in vitro study evaluated the cariostatic effects of fluoride-containing restorative materials associated with fluoride gels, on root dentin. Materials and Methods A randomized complete block design was used to test the effects of the restorative systems, fluoride regimes and the interactions among them at different distances from restoration margins. Standardized cavities were prepared on 240 bovine root specimens and randomly assigned to 15 groups of treatments (n=16). Cavities were filled with the following restorative materials: Ketac-Fil (3M-ESPE); Vitremer (3M-ESPE); Dyract/Prime & Bond NT (Dentsply); Charisma/Gluma One Bond (Heraeus Kulzer) and the control, Z250/Single Bond (3M-ESPE). The specimens were subjected to a pH-cycling model designed to simulate highcaries activity. During the cycles, 1.23% acidulated phosphate fluoride, 2.0% neutral sodium fluoride or deionized/distilled water (control) was applied to the specimens for 4 min. The surface Knoop microhardness test was performed before (KHNi) and after (KHNf) the pH cycles at 100, 200 and 300 mm from the margins. Dentin microhardness loss was represented by the difference in initial and final values (KHNi - KHNf). Data were analyzed by Friedman's and Wilcoxon's tests, ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=5%). Results The interaction of restorative systems and topical treatments was not significant (p=0.102). Dentin microhardness loss was lowest closer to the restoration. Ketac-fil presented the highest cariostatic effect. Vitremer presented a moderate effect, while Dyract and Charisma did not differ from the control, Z250. The effects of neutral and acidulated fluoride gels were similar to each other and higher than the control. Conclusion Conventional and resin-modified glass ionomer cements as well as neutral and acidulated fluoride gels inhibit the progression of artificial caries adjacent to

  9. Comparison of resin push-out strength to root dentin of bovine- and human-teeth.

    PubMed

    Galhano, Graziela; de Melo, Renata Marques; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Bottino, Marco Antonio

    2009-01-01

    To compare the push-out strength of bovine- and human-root dentin and, thus, evaluate the suitability of bovine-root dentin to substitute human-root dentin for bond strength testing. Ten single-rooted human-teeth and ten bovine incisors were prepared using a #3 bur of a fiber post system (12 mm long). The posts were duplicated with resin cement (Duolink). The root canals were treated with All Bond 2 adhesive system and the resin posts were cemented using Duolink. The specimens were cut perpendicular to their long axis, yielding disc-specimens with 1.5 mm thickness, which were submitted to a push-out test (1 mm/min). Ten bond strength values per group (n = 10) were used for statistical analysis (Student t test, alpha =.05). Statistically significant differences were found for the bond strength values between bovine- (4.1 +/- 1.3 MPa) and human-root dentin (8.6 +/- 5.7 MPa) (P =.0001). The push-out strengths of bovine- and human-root dentin were statistically different.

  10. Fracture strength and fracture patterns of root filled teeth restored with direct resin restorations.

    PubMed

    Taha, N A; Palamara, J E; Messer, H H

    2011-08-01

    To compare fracture characteristics of root-filled teeth with variable cavity design and resin composite restoration. 80 extracted intact maxillary premolars were divided randomly into eight groups; (1) intact teeth; (2) unrestored MOD cavity; (3) unrestored MOD cavity plus endodontic access through the occlusal floor; (4) unrestored MOD plus endodontic access with axial walls removed; (5) MOD restored with resin composite; (6) MOD plus endodontic access, resin composite; (7) MOD plus extensive endodontic access, resin composite; (8) MOD plus extensive endodontic access, GIC core and resin composite. A ramped oblique load was applied to the buccal cusp in a servohydraulic testing machine. Fracture load and fracture patterns were recorded. Fracture loads were compared statistically using 1-way ANOVA, with Dunnett test for multiple comparisons. Unrestored teeth became progressively weaker with more extensive preparations. Endodontic access confined within the occlusal floor did not significantly affect strength compared to an MOD cavity. Loss of axial walls weakened teeth considerably [292+80N vs 747+130N for intact teeth]. Restoration increased the strength of prepared teeth particularly in teeth without axial walls. Teeth with a GIC core were not significantly weaker than intact teeth [560+167N]. Failures were mostly adhesive at the buccal interface, with the fracture propagating from the buccal line angle of the occlusal floor (MOD and MOD plus access groups) or of the proximal box (axial wall removed). Direct restorations increased fracture resistance of root filled teeth with extensive endodontic access. Both restored and unrestored teeth showed similar fracture patterns. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Passive restoration augments active restoration in deforested landscapes: the role of root suckering adjacent to planted stands of Acacia koa

    Treesearch

    Paul G. Scowcroft; Justin T. Yeh

    2013-01-01

    Active forest restoration in Hawaii’s Hakalau Forest National Wildlife Refuge has produced a network of Acacia koa tree corridors and islands in deforested grasslands. Passive restoration by root suckering has potential to expand tree cover and close gaps between planted stands. This study documents rates of encroachment into grassland, clonal...

  12. Radiopacity of different shades of resin-based restorative materials compared to human and bovine teeth.

    PubMed

    Pekkan, Gurel; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the radiopacity of different shades of resin-based restorative materials and compared the results to human and bovine dental hard tissues. Disk specimens 6 mm in diameter and 1 mm thick (N = 220, n = 10) were prepared from the following restorative materials: · eight shades of nanofilled composite (Aelite Aesthetic Enamel), · seven shades of nanohybrid composite (Grandio Universal), · six shades of photopolymerized polyacid modified compomer (Glasiosite), and · one shade of hybrid composite (X-tra fil U). Human canine dentin (n = 10), bovine enamel (n = 10), and an aluminum (Al) step wedge were used as references. The optical density values of each material were measured from radiographic images using a transmission densitometer. Al step wedge thickness and optical density values were plotted, and equivalent Al thickness (eq Al) values were determined for radiopacity measurements of each material. The data were analyzed using a non-parametric one-way ANOVA (Kruskal-Wallis), and multiple comparisons were made with a Student-Newman-Keuls post hoc test (a = 0.05). Different shades of resin-based restorative materials tested did not reveal statistically significant differences within each material group (p > 0.05). Radiopacity values of the resin-based restorative materials investigated varied depending on their types; however, within different shades of one material type, radiopacity values were comparable. Every shade of nanocomposite material other than Aelite Aesthetic Enamel Incisal LT Gray showed comparable radiopacity to human dentin. Other materials tested demonstrated higher radiopacity compared to human dentin and bovine enamel.

  13. Comparative Analysis of Root Dentin Morphology and Structure of Human Versus Bovine Primary Teeth.

    PubMed

    Costa, Bruna M; Iwamoto, Alexsandra S; Puppin-Rontani, Regina M; Pascon, Fernanda M

    2015-06-01

    This study evaluated the structural and morphological differences between human and bovine primary root canals. Primary human maxillary central incisors (H) (n=9) and primary bovine incisors (B) (n=9) were selected. The roots were sectioned in the vestibular-lingual direction, planed and delimited in cervical, middle, and apical thirds. Tubule density (number of tubules per mm2) and diameter were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (1,000 and 5,000×) using Image J 1.47 software. Data were submitted to two-way repeated measures ANOVA and Tukey tests (α=0.05). The highest tubule density was observed for B (28.527±1.717 mm2) compared with H (15.931±0.170 mm2) (p<0.01). Regarding root thirds, the cervical third presented a greater tubule density (26.417±11.654 mm2) than the apical third (17.999±5.873 mm2). The diameter of the dentin tubules was not different for cervical (3.50±0.08 µm), middle (3.45±0.30 µm) and apical thirds (3.42±0.33 µm) and substrate (H-3.29±0.14 µm; B-3.63±0.06 µm). It could be concluded that: (1) the radicular dentin structure of human and bovine primary teeth and root thirds differ in terms of the tubule density; (2) the radicular dentin morphology of human and bovine primary teeth and root thirds are similar in terms of the diameter of the dentin tubules.

  14. In vitro fluoride uptake by bovine enamel from aesthetic restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Ahiropoulos, Vasilis; Helvatjoglu-Antoniades, Maria; Papadogiannis, Yannis

    2008-07-01

    The purposes of this in vitro study were to determine whether different types of fluoride-containing restoratives produce differing levels of fluoride uptake by bovine enamel, and to determine the effect of time on this uptake. Seven aesthetic restorative materials were evaluated. Forty bovine enamel slabs were prepared for each tested material, five of which were used to determine baseline fluoride concentrations. Each slab was attached to a disc of the tested material and suspended in synthetic saliva for up to 64 days. After removal, the specimens were acid etched with perchloric acid, and the dissolved enamel was analysed for fluoride and calcium. Fluoride was determined by direct potensiometric analysis, whereas the amount of calcium was evaluated by means of atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Higher values of fluoride uptake, not significantly different, were recorded in the first two groups. A statistically significant difference was found in fluoride uptake between Fuji II LC and the three compomers in all test intervals. No significant differences were found in the amounts of fluoride uptake between the three compomers. The highest fluoride uptake from all compomers was recorded by F2000. Enamel acquired significant amounts of fluoride from all materials with variations during the test intervals.

  15. Root disease and other unforeseen variables that confound restoration efforts

    Treesearch

    William J. Otrosina; Shi-Jean S. Sung; Stanley J. Zarnoch; Brian T. Sullivan; Charles H. Walkinshaw

    2002-01-01

    Unanticipated disease problems thwarting restoration efforts can emerge in forest ecosystems. An example is the longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) ecosystem. This species once occupied nearly 30 million ha but now its range is reduced to approximately 1.5 million ha. Restoring longleaf pine to many sites in its former range is an important goal...

  16. Functional tooth restoration by allogeneic mesenchymal stem cell-based bio-root regeneration in swine.

    PubMed

    Wei, Fulan; Song, Tieli; Ding, Gang; Xu, Junji; Liu, Yi; Liu, Dayong; Fan, Zhipeng; Zhang, Chunmei; Shi, Songtao; Wang, Songlin

    2013-06-15

    Our previous proof-of-concept study showed the feasibility of regenerating the dental stem cell-based bioengineered tooth root (bio-root) structure in a large animal model. Here, we used allogeneic dental mesenchymal stem cells to regenerate bio-root, and then installed a crown on the bio-root to restore tooth function. A root shape hydroxyapatite tricalcium phosphate scaffold containing dental pulp stem cells was covered by a Vc-induced periodontal ligament stem cell sheet and implanted into a newly generated jaw bone implant socket. Six months after implantation, a prefabricated porcelain crown was cemented to the implant and subjected to tooth function. Clinical, radiological, histological, ultrastructural, systemic immunological evaluations and mechanical properties were analyzed for dynamic changes in the bio-root structure. The regenerated bio-root exhibited characteristics of a normal tooth after 6 months of use, including dentinal tubule-like and functional periodontal ligament-like structures. No immunological response to the bio-roots was observed. We developed a standard stem cell procedure for bio-root regeneration to restore adult tooth function. This study is the first to successfully regenerate a functional bio-root structure for artificial crown restoration by using allogeneic dental stem cells and Vc-induced cell sheet, and assess the recipient immune response in a preclinical model.

  17. Functional Tooth Restoration by Allogeneic Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Based Bio-Root Regeneration in Swine

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Fulan; Song, Tieli; Ding, Gang; Xu, Junji; Liu, Yi; Liu, Dayong; Fan, Zhipeng; Zhang, Chunmei

    2013-01-01

    Our previous proof-of-concept study showed the feasibility of regenerating the dental stem cell-based bioengineered tooth root (bio-root) structure in a large animal model. Here, we used allogeneic dental mesenchymal stem cells to regenerate bio-root, and then installed a crown on the bio-root to restore tooth function. A root shape hydroxyapatite tricalcium phosphate scaffold containing dental pulp stem cells was covered by a Vc-induced periodontal ligament stem cell sheet and implanted into a newly generated jaw bone implant socket. Six months after implantation, a prefabricated porcelain crown was cemented to the implant and subjected to tooth function. Clinical, radiological, histological, ultrastructural, systemic immunological evaluations and mechanical properties were analyzed for dynamic changes in the bio-root structure. The regenerated bio-root exhibited characteristics of a normal tooth after 6 months of use, including dentinal tubule-like and functional periodontal ligament-like structures. No immunological response to the bio-roots was observed. We developed a standard stem cell procedure for bio-root regeneration to restore adult tooth function. This study is the first to successfully regenerate a functional bio-root structure for artificial crown restoration by using allogeneic dental stem cells and Vc-induced cell sheet, and assess the recipient immune response in a preclinical model. PMID:23363023

  18. Single crowns versus conventional fillings for the restoration of root filled teeth.

    PubMed

    Fedorowicz, Zbys; Carter, Ben; de Souza, Raphael Freitas; Chaves, Carolina de Andrade Lima; Nasser, Mona; Sequeira-Byron, Patrick

    2012-05-16

    Endodontic treatment, involves removal of the dental pulp and its replacement by a root canal filling. Restoration of root filled teeth can be challenging due to structural differences between vital and non-vital root filled teeth. Direct restoration involves placement of a restorative material e.g. amalgam or composite directly into the tooth. Indirect restorations consist of cast metal or ceramic (porcelain) crowns. The choice of restoration depends on the amount of remaining tooth which may influence long term survival and cost. The comparative in service clinical performance of crowns or conventional fillings used to restore root filled teeth is unclear. To assess the effects of restoration of endodontically treated teeth (with or without post and core) by crowns versus conventional filling materials. We searched the following databases: the Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE via OVID, EMBASE via OVID, CINAHL via EBSCO, LILACS via BIREME and the reference lists of articles as well as ongoing trials registries.There were no restrictions regarding language or date of publication. Date of last search was 13 February 2012. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) or quasi-randomised controlled trials in participants with permanent teeth which have undergone endodontic treatment. Single full coverage crowns compared with any type of filling materials for direct restoration, as well as indirect partial restorations (e.g. inlays and onlays). Comparisons considered the type of post and core used (cast or prefabricated post), if any. Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. One trial judged to be at high risk of bias due to missing outcome data, was included. 117 participants with a root filled premolar tooth restored with a carbon fibre post, were randomised to either a full coverage metal-ceramic crown or direct adhesive composite restoration. At 3 years there was no reported difference between the non

  19. Protection offered by root-surface restorative materials against biofilm challenge.

    PubMed

    Yip, H K; Guo, J; Wong, W H S

    2007-05-01

    The prevalence of root-surface caries is increasing. We hypothesized that some restorative materials are protective against cariogenic challenge on root surfaces. Our goal was to study the effects of different restorative materials on root surfaces incubated with an oral biofilm generated in an artificial mouth. A biofilm of Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sobrinus, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, and Actinomyces naeslundii was co-cultured for 21 days on 24 glass-ionomer cement, resin-modified glass-ionomer cement, or resin-composite-restored root surfaces. These surfaces were then examined with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron energy-dispersive spectroscopy. Only glass-ionomer restorations showed a significant increase in log calcium-to-phosphorus ratio (P < 0.01), and a significantly lower log amide I-to-hydrogen phosphate ratio on the root surface after incubation in the artificial mouth. Glass-ionomer restoratives conferred a preventive effect on the root surfaces against initial cariogenic challenge with a mixed-species oral biofilm without therapeutic intervention.

  20. Bio-Root and Implant-Based Restoration as a Tooth Replacement Alternative.

    PubMed

    Gao, Z H; Hu, L; Liu, G L; Wei, F L; Liu, Y; Liu, Z H; Fan, Z P; Zhang, C M; Wang, J S; Wang, S L

    2016-06-01

    We previously reported that dental stem cell-mediated bioengineered tooth root (bio-root) regeneration could restore tooth loss in a miniature pig model. As a potential new method for tooth restoration, it is essential to compare this method with the widely used commercial dental implant-based method of tooth restoration. Tooth loss models were created by extracting mandibular incisors from miniature pigs. Allogeneic periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) and dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) were isolated and cultured. A PDLSC sheet was prepared by adding 20.0 µg/mL vitamin C to the culture medium; in addition, a hydroxyapatite tricalcium phosphate (HA/TCP)/DPSC graft was fabricated and cultured in a 3-dimensional culture system. A total of 46 bio-root implantations and 9 dental implants were inserted, and crown restorations were performed 6 mo after implantation. Histological, radiological, biomechanical, and elemental analyses were used to evaluate and compare tissue-engineered bio-roots and dental implants to the natural tooth roots. After 6 mo, both computed tomography scans and histological examinations showed that root-like structures and dentin-like tissues had formed. Three months after crown restoration, clinical assessments revealed that tooth function was equivalent in the regenerated bio-root and the dental implant. Biomechanical testing showed that the bio-roots were similar to natural tooth roots in compressive strength, modulus of elasticity, and torsional force; however, these properties were significantly higher in the dental implants. Elemental analysis revealed a higher similarity in elemental composition between bio-roots and natural tooth roots than between bio-roots and dental implants. However, the dental implant success rate was 100% (9 of 9) and the bio-root success rate was only 22% (10 of 46). Taken together, we showed that an allogeneic HA/TCP/DPSC/PDLSC sheet could successfully build a bio-root with structure and function similar to

  1. Restoration of the root-filled tooth: pre-operative assessment.

    PubMed

    Tait, C M E; Ricketts, D N J; Higgins, A J

    2005-04-09

    This is the first in a series of four papers related to the management of root canal treated teeth. When teeth compromised by extensive restorations become non-vital, suggestions have been given as to how root canal treatment can be carried out with the greatest chance of success. Once root canal treated, either by a previous dentist or by the current dentist, a review of the assessment process that should be carried out prior to placing costly indirect definitive restorations is given. It will be clear that post-retained restorations are mainly reserved for anterior or single-rooted teeth, posterior teeth rarely requiring a post for core retention. The second paper in this series describes the basic tooth preparation that should be carried out prior to placing a post. Depending on the type of post system used, further modifications to tooth preparation may be required and the cementation techniques may also have to be modified. The third paper therefore discusses the various post types, when and how they should be used for optimum results. The final paper addresses reinforcement and restoration of compromised root canals, such as those with immature, open apices, or those that have been over-prepared for previous post-retained restorations.

  2. The effect of glass fiber posts and ribbons on the fracture strength of teeth with flared root canals restored using composite resin post and cores.

    PubMed

    Komada, Wataru; Kubo, Mariko; Otake, Shiho; Inagaki, Tasuku; Omori, Satoshi; Miura, Hiroyuki

    2017-08-23

    This study evaluated the fracture strength and mode of failure of structurally compromised teeth with flared root canals restored using composite resin with four different systems. Sixty endodontically treated bovine teeth were uniformly shaped to simulate human mandibular premolars with flared root canals. The roots were divided into four groups of 15 specimens each based on the type of restoration: composite resin core only (control), glass fiber post, cylindroid glass fiber ribbons, and glass fiber post and ribbons. All specimens were loaded until fracture occurred using a universal testing machine. Average fracture loads were compared with a one-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD test (α=.05). The modes of failure were observed and the Fisher exact test and Bonferroni correction were used for statistical analysis. The fiber post and ribbon group (1035.70N) and the fiber ribbon group (881.77N) showed significantly higher fracture strength than the controls (567.97N) (p<.05). The fiber post and ribbon group also showed significantly higher fracture strength than the fiber post group (769.40N). Almost all specimens showed unrestorable root fractures (p<.008). The control group had a significantly higher ratio of core sectional fractures (p<.017). Cylindroid glass fiber ribbons significantly increased the fracture strength of the composite resin post and cores in the case of the dentin within the thin root canal wall. Based on the results, this study recommends the combined use of glass fiber post and ribbons. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Single crowns versus conventional fillings for the restoration of root-filled teeth.

    PubMed

    Sequeira-Byron, Patrick; Fedorowicz, Zbys; Carter, Ben; Nasser, Mona; Alrowaili, Eman F

    2015-09-25

    Endodontic treatment involves removal of the dental pulp and its replacement by a root canal filling. Restoration of root filled teeth can be challenging due to structural differences between vital and non-vital root-filled teeth. Direct restoration involves placement of a restorative material e.g. amalgam or composite, directly into the tooth. Indirect restorations consist of cast metal or ceramic (porcelain) crowns. The choice of restoration depends on the amount of remaining tooth, and may influence durability and cost. The decision to use a post and core in addition to the crown is clinician driven. The comparative clinical performance of crowns or conventional fillings used to restore root-filled teeth is unknown. This review updates the original, which was published in 2012. To assess the effects of restoration of endodontically treated teeth (with or without post and core) by crowns versus conventional filling materials. We searched the following databases: the Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE via OVID, EMBASE via OVID, CINAHL via EBSCO, LILACS via BIREME. We also searched the reference lists of articles and ongoing trials registries.There were no restrictions regarding language or date of publication. The search is up-to-date as of 26 March 2015. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) or quasi-randomised controlled trials in participants with permanent teeth that have undergone endodontic treatment. Single full coverage crowns compared with any type of filling materials for direct restoration or indirect partial restorations (e.g. inlays and onlays). Comparisons considered the type of post and core used (cast or prefabricated post), if any. Two review authors independently extracted data from the included trial and assessed its risk of bias. We carried out data analysis using the 'treatment as allocated' patient population, expressing estimates of intervention effect for dichotomous data as risk ratios, with 95% confidence

  4. Fracture strength of root filled premolar teeth restored with silorane and methacrylate-based resin composite.

    PubMed

    Taha, N A; Maghaireh, G A; Bagheri, R; Abu Holy, A

    2015-06-01

    To compare fracture characteristics of root-filled teeth with variable cavity design restored with a low shrinkage silorane and methacrylate-based resin composite. 77 extracted maxillary premolars were divided randomly into seven groups: (Group 1) intact teeth; (Groups 2-4) MOD plus endodontic access with the buccopalatal width of the occlusal isthmus equals one third of the intercuspal width; (Groups 5-7) MOD plus endodontic access with the buccopalatal width of the occlusal isthmus equals one half of the intercuspal width. Groups 2 and 5 were left unrestored, Groups 3 and 6 were restored with a silorane-based resin composite (Filtek P90) and Groups 4 and 7 with a methacrylate-based resin composite (Z250). Teeth were loaded in a universal testing machine; load and fracture patterns were recorded and compared statistically using 2-way ANOVA and t-test for pairwise comparisons and 1-way ANOVA with Dunnett test for multiple comparisons. Unrestored teeth became progressively weaker with more extensive preparations, Group 5 (unfilled ½) showed the lowest fracture load among the groups (71±22N, P<0.001). Restorations increased the fracture strength of unrestored teeth regardless of cavity size (P<0.001), but was still significantly weaker than sound teeth, with no significant difference between silorane and methacrylate groups. Failure of restored teeth was mostly adhesive at the tooth restoration interface. Silorane-based resin composite have no superior strengthening effect over the conventional methacrylate-based resin composite in restoration of root filled teeth. Both materials showed similar fracture patterns. Root filled teeth are considerably weakened via restorative and endodontic procedures. A direct adhesive restoration will aid in preserving tooth structure as far as it provides enough strength. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Potential of decaying wood to restore root-available base cations in depleted forest soils

    Treesearch

    Walter C. Shortle; Kevin T. Smith; Jody Jellison; Jonathan S. Schilling

    2012-01-01

    The depletion of root-available Ca in northern forest soils exposed to decades of increased acid deposition adversely affects forest health and productivity. Laboratory studies indicated the potential of wood-decay fungi to restore lost Ca. This study presents changes in concentration of Ca, Mg, and K in sapwood of red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.),...

  6. Antibacterial substantivity of Carvacrol and sodium hypochlorite in infected bovine root dentin

    PubMed Central

    Sharifian, Mohammad Reza; Shokouhinejad, Noushin; Aligholi, Marzieh; Emaneini, Mohammad; Alizadeh, Javad

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Various methods commonly used for cleaning and shaping root canals have not been successful in completely eradicating bacteria due to anatomic complexity and root canals irregularities. Disinfecting the canals with intracanal irrigants in addition to proper cleaning and shaping can produce a successful outcome. Antimicrobials with sustained antibacterial activity would be desirable for irrigation. The purpose of this study was to compare the antimicrobial substantivity of Carvacrol and 5.25% NaOCl in infected bovine root dentin. MATERIALS AND METHODS: One hundred and twenty dentin tubes prepared from bovine incisors were infected in vitro for 14 days with Enterococcus (E) faecalis. The specimens were divided into four groups including 1) Carvacrol, 2) NaOCl, 3) infected dentin tubes (positive control); and 4) sterile dentin tubes (negative control). Dentin chips were collected at five intervals (days 0, 1, 3, 7 and 28) using round burs with sequentially increasing diameters (which includes five layers of dentin) into Brain Heart Infusion (BHI) broth. In order to compare the pre- and post-irrigation antimicrobial activity of the irrigants the colony-forming units (CFU) were counted and classified as ‘CFU-before’ and ‘CFU-after’. After culturing, the number of CFU with the various experimental time and dentinal layers was recounted. Two-way ANOVA test was used to analyze the effects of time and materials. One-way ANOVA and supplemental Tukey HSD test were used for pair comparison. RESULTS: CFU was significantly reduced in NaOCl group when compared to all other experimental groups (P<0.05). CONCLUSION: The substantivity of NaOCl was significantly greater than Carvacrol. Further studies are required to investigate and approve Carvacrol as a final irrigant. PMID:23940484

  7. Root canal filling: fracture strength of fiber-reinforced composite-restored roots and finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Rippe, Marília Pivetta; Santini, Manuela Favarin; Bier, Carlos Alexandre Souza; Borges, Alexandre Luiz Souto; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2013-01-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the effect of root canal filling techniques on root fracture resistance and to analyze, by finite element analysis (FEA), the expansion of the endodontic sealer in two different root canal techniques. Thirty single-rooted human teeth were instrumented with rotary files to a standardized working length of 14 mm. The specimens were embedded in acrylic resin using plastic cylinders as molds, and allocated into 3 groups (n=10): G(lateral) - lateral condensation; G(single-cone) - single cone; G(tagger) - Tagger's hybrid technique. The root canals were prepared to a length of 11 mm with the #3 preparation bur of a tapered glass fiber-reinforced composite post system. All roots received glass fiber posts, which were adhesively cemented and a composite resin core was built. All groups were subjected to a fracture strength test (1 mm/min, 45°). Data were analyzed statistically by one-way ANOVA with a significance level of 5%. FEA was performed using two models: one simulated lateral condensation and Tagger's hybrid technique, and the other one simulated the single-cone technique. The second model was designed with an amount of gutta-percha two times smaller and a sealer layer two times thicker than the first model. The results were analyzed using von Mises stress criteria. One-way ANOVA indicated that the root canal filling technique affected the fracture strength (p=0.004). The G(lateral) and G(tagger) produced similar fracture strength values, while G(single-cone) showed the lowest values. The FEA showed that the single-cone model generated higher stress in the root canal walls. Sealer thickness seems to influence the fracture strength of restored endodontically treated teeth.

  8. Restoration of root surface caries in vulnerable elderly patients: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Amer, R S; Kolker, J L

    2013-01-01

    The authors conducted a review to evaluate the current literature addressing root surface caries treatment in the vulnerable elderly, to identify any gaps in the literature that will need to be addressed in the future. The authors conducted a literature search of the electronic databases using MEDLINE, PubMed, to identify original clinical research articles regarding treatment of root caries lesions, with emphasis on research focused on the vulnerable elderly. Five articles were clinical studies of root caries restorations. Only one was conducted on a vulnerable elderly population. The results of the literature review show that there is a need for further studies addressing the restorative needs of the vulnerable elderly. With the aging of the American population, more research is needed to provide adequate care to this population. At this time, glass ionomers are a good treatment option. ©2012 Special Care Dentistry Association and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Inhibition of artificial secondary caries in root by fluoride-releasing restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Torii, Y; Itota, T; Okamoto, M; Nakabo, S; Nagamine, M; Inoue, K

    2001-01-01

    This investigation evaluated the fluoride-releasing properties of various fluoride-releasing restorative materials, including resin-modified glass-ionomer cements (Fuji ionomer TypeII LC, Photac-Fil Aplicap, Vitremer), compomers (Ionosit FIL, Compoglass, Dyract) and fluoride-releasing resin composites (Heliomolar radiopaque, Degufill mineral). The study also estimated the effects of those materials on the inhibition of artificial secondary caries around restorations using a bacterial caries-inducing system. The amount of fluoride released from the materials in deionized water was measured every one week for 10 weeks. Class V cavities with the gingival margin located in the root were prepared in extracted human premolars and restored with each of the materials. The restored teeth were incubated in the bacterial artificial caries chamber, and the artificial lesion created around the restoration was observed microradiographically. The resin-modified glass-ionomer cements released the largest amount of fluoride and created a thick radio-opaque zone in the artificial lesion along the restoration-dentin interface. These results indicated that the fluoride-releasing restorative materials have the potential to inhibit secondary caries formation around restorations. Resin-modified glass-ionomer cements presented a particularly strong effect, compared with compomers and fluoride-releasing resin composites.

  10. Assessment of laminate technique using glass ionomer and resin composite for restoration of root filled teeth.

    PubMed

    Taha, N A; Palamara, J E; Messer, H H

    2012-08-01

    To evaluate the open laminate technique using glass ionomer cements (GIC) in association with a low shrink composite for restoring root filled premolars. Extensive MOD cavities plus endodontic access and root filling were performed in intact extracted maxillary premolars. Three restoration types were evaluated: (1) resin composite alone; (2) resin-modified GIC (RM-GIC) open laminate plus resin composite; (3) conventional GIC open laminate plus resin composite (n=8 for all groups and tests). Three tests were conducted to assess restorations: (A) inward cusp deflection during light curing, using DCDTs; (B) fracture strength using a ramped oblique load at 45° to the long axis in a servohydraulic testing machine in comparison with intact and unrestored teeth; (C) proximal marginal leakage using methylene blue dye and the effect of thermocycling. Data were analysed using 1-way ANOVA for cuspal deflection and fracture strength and Fisher's exact test for leakage. Laminate restorations resulted in significantly less cuspal deflection compared with resin composite (4.2±1.2 μm for RM-GIC and 5.1±2.3 μm for conventional GIC vs. 12.2±2.6 μm for composite, P<0.001). Fracture strength was not significantly different among all groups. Failure with all restorations was predominantly adhesive at the tooth-restoration interface. The two laminate groups showed significantly better marginal seal than composite alone, but sealing ability of conventional GIC deteriorated after thermocycling. Laminate restoration of root filled teeth had beneficial effects in terms of reducing cuspal deflection and marginal seal, with acceptable fracture strength. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Impact of the quality of coronal restoration versus the quality of root canal fillings on success of root canal treatment: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gillen, Brian M.; Looney, Stephen W.; Gu, Li-Sha; Loushine, Bethany A.; Weller, Roger N.; Loushine, Robert J.; Pashley, David H.; Tay, Franklin R.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Thorough cleaning and shaping of root canals are essential for periapical healing. Restoration of endodontically-treated teeth is also required for them to function and prevent coronal leakage. This study compared the impact of the quality of root canal treatment versus the quality of coronal restoration in treatment outcomes. Methods Literature search was conducted using the search terms “coronal restoration”, “root canal”, “periapical status” and “quality”. Articles that evaluated the effect of the quality of root filling and coronal restoration or both on the success of root canal treatment were selected. Nine articles were identified and were reviewed by three investigators. Data were collected based on pre-determined criteria. Percentages of teeth without apical periodontitis were recorded for each category: Adequate Root Canal Treatment (AE), Inadequate Root Canal Treatment (IE), Adequate Restoration (AR), Inadequate Restoration (IR). Data were analyzed using meta-analysis for odds ratios (ORs). Results After adjusting for significant covariates to reduce heterogeneity, the results were combined to obtain pooled estimates of the common OR for the comparison of AR/AE vs AR/IE (OR 2.734; 95% CI 2.61–2.88; p<0.001) and AR/AE vs IR/AE (OR 2.808; 95% CI 2.64–2.97; p<0.001). Conclusion On the basis of the current best available evidence, the odds for healing of apical periodontitis increase with both adequate root canal treatment and adequate restorative treatment. Although poorer clinical outcomes may be expected with adequate root filling-inadequate coronal restoration and inadequate root filling-adequate coronal restoration, there is no significant difference in the odds of healing between these two combinations. PMID:21689541

  12. Effect of restoration technique on stress distribution in roots with flared canals: an FEA study.

    PubMed

    Belli, Sema; Eraslan, Öznur; Eraslan, Oğuz; Eskitaşcıoğlu, Gürcan

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this finite element analysis (FEA) study was to test the effect of different restorative techniques on stress distribution in roots with flared canals. Five three-dimensional (3D) FEA models that simulated a maxillary incisor with excessive structure loss and flared root canals were created and restored with the following techniques/materials: 1) a prefabricated post: 2) one main and two accessory posts; 3) i-TFC post-core (Sun Medical); 4) the thickness of the root was increased by using composite resin and the root was then restored using a prefabricated post; 5) an anatomic post was created by using composite resin and a prefabricated glass-fiber post. Composite cores and ceramic crowns were created. A 300-N static load was applied at the center of the palatal surface of the tooth to calculate stress distributions. SolidWorks/Cosmosworks structural analysis programs were used for FEA analysis. The analysis of the von Mises and tensile stress values revealed that prefabricated post, accessory post, and i-TFC post systems showed similar stress distributions. They all showed high stress areas at the buccal side of the root (3.67 MPa) and in the cervical region of the root (> 3.67 MPa) as well as low stress accumulation within the post space (0 to 1 MPa). The anatomic post kept the stress within its body and directed less stress towards the remaining tooth structure. The creation of an anatomic post may save the remaining tooth structure in roots with flared canals by reducing the stress levels.

  13. Experimental Salix shoot and root growth statistics on the alluvial sediment of a restored river corridor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquale, N.; Perona, P.; Verones, F.; Francis, R.; Burlando, P.

    2009-12-01

    River restoration projects encompass not only the amelioration of flood protection but also the rehabilitation of the riverine ecosystem. However, the interactions and feedbacks between river hydrology, riparian vegetation and aquifer dynamics are still poorly understood. Vegetation interacts with river hydrology on multiple time scales. Hence, there is considerable interest in understanding the morphodynamics of restored river reaches in relation to the characteristics of vegetation that may colonize the bare sediment, and locally stabilize it by root anchoring. In this paper we document results from a number of ongoing experiments within the project RECORD (Restored CORridor Dynamics, sponsored by CCES - www.cces.ch - and Cantons Zurich and Thurgau, CH). In particular, we discuss both the above and below ground biomass growth dynamics of 1188 Salix cuttings (individual and group survival rate, growth of the longest shoots and number of branches and morphological root analysis) in relation to local river hydrodynamics. Cuttings were organized in square plots of different size and planted in spring 2009 on a gravel island of the restored river section of River Thur in Switzerland. By periodical monitoring the plots we obtained a detailed and quite unique set of data, including root statistics of uprooted samples derived from image analysis from a high-resolution scanner. Beyond describing the survival rate dynamics in relation to river hydrology, we show the nature and strength of correlations between island topography and cutting growth statistics. In particular, by root analysis and by comparing empirical histograms of the vertical root distribution vs satured water surface in the sediment, we show that main tropic responses on such environment are oxytropism, hydrotropism and thigmotropism. The main factor influencing the survival rate is naturally found in erosion by floods, of which we also give an interesting example that helps demonstrate the role of river

  14. Clinical outcome of root caries restorations using ART and rotary techniques in institutionalized elders.

    PubMed

    Cruz Gonzalez, Alberto Carlos; Marín Zuluaga, Dairo Javier

    2016-05-31

    The aim of this study was to compare the clinical performance of root caries restorations after a six-month period using two methods, a conventional technique with rotary instruments and an atraumatic restorative technique (ART), in an institutionalized elderly population in the city of Bogotá, Colombia. Root caries represents a multifactorial, progressive, chronic lesion with softened, irregular and darkened tissue involving the radicular surface; it is highly prevalent in the elderly, especially in those who are physically or cognitively impaired. A quasi-experimental, double-blind, longitudinal study was carried out after cluster randomization of the sample. Two different experienced dentists, previously trained, performed the restorations using each technique. After six months, two new investigators performed a blind evaluation of the condition of the restorations. The results showed a significantly higher rate of success (92.9%) using the conventional technique (p < 0.03). However, we concluded that ART may have been the preferred technique in the study population because 81% of those restorations survived or were successful during the observation period.

  15. Influence of remaining coronal structure and finish line on the fracture strength of roots restored with metallic posts.

    PubMed

    Carlini-Jr, Bruno; Cecchin, Doglas; Pereira, Gisele Damiana da Silveira; Paulillo, Luis Alexandre Maffei Sartini

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the fracture strength of roots that were prosthetically restored with metallic posts with or without any remaining coronal structure and with different finish lines. Sixty bovine incisors were sectioned below the cementoenamel junction, endodontically treated, and randomly divided into six experimental groups (n = 10) containing teeth with or without any remaining coronal structure, and with a beveled shoulder, a bevel, or a shoulder finish line design. The metallic posts were luted with dual-cured resin cement. The cores were made with composite resin, and metal crowns were cemented with zinc phosphate cement. The specimens were subjected to a tangential compressive load (135º angle) at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until failure, using a universal testing machine. The fracture strength data were analyzed using the ANOVA and LSMeans (least square means) tests (α= 0.05). The data indicated that the teeth with 2 mm of remaining coronal structure showed the highest fracture strength values when compared with the teeth without any remaining structure (p < 0.05). As to the different finish line designs, the highest fracture strength values were obtained for the beveled shoulder, followed by the bevel and then by the shoulder designs (p < 0.05). It may be concluded that, to increase fracture strength, a beveled shoulder and 2 mm of remaining coronal structure are the ideal conditions.

  16. Periradicular status and quality of root canal fillings and coronal restorations in an urban Colombian population.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Jaime O; Alves, Flávio R F; Gonçalves, Lúcio S; Martinez, Angela M; Rôças, Isabela N; Siqueira, José F

    2013-05-01

    This cross-sectional study determined the prevalence of apical periodontitis in 1086 root canal-treated teeth from an urban Colombian population and evaluated the association of several factors with the periradicular status. Periapical radiographs were used for analyses, and teeth were classified as healthy or diseased according to the periradicular status. Other factors were also evaluated for their association with the periradicular conditions, including gender, quality of both endodontic treatment and coronal restoration, apical level of filling, and presence of post restoration. Fifty-one percent of the treated teeth were classified as healthy. Only 33% of the teeth had endodontic treatment rated as adequate. The quality of both endodontic treatment and coronal restoration significantly influenced the periradicular conditions (P < .001). Combined data revealed that teeth with both adequate endodontic treatment and adequate restorations showed significantly better periradicular status than the other combinations (P < .01), except for teeth with adequate treatment and inadequate restoration (P = .08). Canals filled up to 0-2 mm short of the apex had a significantly higher number of teeth rated as healthy than overfilled or underfilled cases (P = .02). Regression analysis showed that the quality of endodontic treatment was the most significant factor influencing the periradicular status (P < .001). Gender and presence of post restoration had no association with the periradicular conditions. Data from this Colombian population showed a relatively high prevalence of apical periodontitis in root canal-treated teeth. This was largely due to an equally high prevalence of treatments performed under substandard technical quality. The quality of the endodontic treatment was the most determinant factor for healthy periradicular status. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Long-Term bacterial leakage along obturated roots restored with temporary and adhesive fillings.

    PubMed

    Barthel, C R; Zimmer, S; Wussogk, R; Roulet, J F

    2001-09-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether obturated roots combined with several adhesive and temporary filling materials can be bypassed by bacteria. Standardized cavities were coronally prepared into 130 straight roots mimicking clinical access cavities. After obturation the roots were assigned to six test and three control groups and coronally sealed with either Clearfil, CoreRestore, IRM, Ketac Fil, or a combination of IRM/wax or Ketac Fil/wax. The roots were then fixed between a top and a bottom chamber each. The top chamber contained soy broth with 108 Staphylococcus epidermidis colony-forming units/ml, and the bottom chamber contained sterile soy broth. For 1 yr the mounts were checked on a regular basis for turbidity in their bottom chambers indicating bacterial growth. After 1 yr only three samples from the CoreRestore group and two samples from the Clearfil group resisted leakage. At termination there was no significant difference in number of leaking samples among the groups. At the beginning of the experiment IRM performed worst. Between months 5 and 10 Clearfil showed the least leaking samples; for some months this was statistically significant compared with IRM or Ketac Fil.

  18. Restoring a maize root signal that attracts insect-killing nematodes to control a major pest

    PubMed Central

    Degenhardt, Jörg; Hiltpold, Ivan; Köllner, Tobias G.; Frey, Monika; Gierl, Alfons; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Hibbard, Bruce E.; Ellersieck, Mark R.; Turlings, Ted C. J.

    2009-01-01

    When attacked by herbivorous insects, plants emit volatile compounds that attract natural enemies of the insects. It has been proposed that these volatile signals can be manipulated to improve crop protection. Here, we demonstrate the full potential of this strategy by restoring the emission of a specific belowground signal emitted by insect-damaged maize roots. The western corn rootworm induces the roots of many maize varieties to emit (E)-β-caryophyllene, which attracts entomopathogenic nematodes that infect and kill the voracious root pest. However, most North American maize varieties have lost the ability to emit (E)-β-caryophyllene and may therefore receive little protection from the nematodes. To restore the signal, a nonemitting maize line was transformed with a (E)-β-caryophyllene synthase gene from oregano, resulting in constitutive emissions of this sesquiterpene. In rootworm-infested field plots in which nematodes were released, the (E)-β-caryophyllene-emitting plants suffered significantly less root damage and had 60% fewer adult beetles emerge than untransformed, nonemitting lines. This demonstration that plant volatile emissions can be manipulated to enhance the effectiveness of biological control agents opens the way for novel and ecologically sound strategies to fight a variety of insect pests. PMID:19666594

  19. Fracture strength of teeth with flared root canals restored with glass fibre posts.

    PubMed

    Bonfante, Gerson; Kaizer, Osvaldo Bazzan; Pegoraro, Luiz Fernando; do Valle, Accácio Lins

    2007-06-01

    To investigate the fracture strength and pattern of failure of teeth with weakened roots reconstructed by different procedures. In an in vitro study root posts were placed in 50 endodontically treated canines, divided into 5 groups (n=10) as follows: cast metallic post; glass fibre post with smaller diameter than the root canal; glass fibre post with smaller diameter than the root canal + glass fibre strips; glass fibre post with smaller diameter than the root canal + accessory glass fibre posts; anatomical post (glass fibre post with smaller diameter than the root canal, relined with low viscosity composite resin). Posts were luted with resin cement and the coronal portion of posts was constructed with composite resin. Metallic crowns were cemented on the posts. Specimens were submitted to compressive load in a universal testing machine. Fracture strength values of each group were compared. Fracture strength values were for Groups 1-5 respectively: 1087.06; 745.69; 775.41; 920.64; 876.12kgf, with significant differences between Groups 1 and 2 and between Groups 1 and 3 (p<0.05). Observed patterns of fracture were: Group 1 - 100% of roots fractured; Groups 2 and 4 - variable fracture modes; Group 3 - 60% of fractures occurred in the cervical root third; Group 5 - 50% of failures occurred in the coronal portion of the post. The fracture strength of teeth with cast metallic posts, teeth with anatomical posts or teeth with glass fibre posts combined with accessory posts was similar. All teeth restored with cast metallic posts presented fractures and were unfavourable to maintenance of the remaining tooth structure. Teeth with fibre posts (Groups 2 to 5) presented variable fracture modes; however, the maximum percentage of unfavourable fractures was 30%.

  20. Finite element analysis of weakened roots restored with composite resin and posts.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Carla Santina de Miranda; Biffi, João Carlos Gabrielli; Silva, Gisele Rodrigues da; Abrahão, Anthony; Campos, Roberto Elias; Soares, Carlos José

    2009-11-01

    Finite element analysis (FEA) was used to investigate the influence of different post systems on the stress distribution of weakened teeth under oblique-load application. A maxillary central incisor root obtained from a sound tooth was weakened by partial removal of dentin inside the root canal. Seven two-dimensional numerical models, one from the sound tooth and six from the weakened root restored with composite resin and post systems were created as follows - ST: sound tooth; CPC: cast CuAl post and core; SSP: stainless steel post + composite core; GP: fiberglass + composite core; CP: carbon fiber + composite core; ZP: zirconium dioxide post + composite core; TP: titanium post + composite core. The numerical models were considered to be restored with a leucite-reinforced all-ceramic crown and received a 45 masculine occlusal load (10 N) on the lingual surface.All the materials and structures were considered linear elastic, homogeneous, and isotropic, with the exception of fiberglass and carbon fiber posts which assumed orthotropic behavior. The numerical models were plotted and meshed with isoparametric elements, and the results were analyzed using von Mises and Sy stress criteria. When compared with the sound tooth, FEA revealed differences in stress distribution when post systems were used. Among the restored teeth, the use of CPC, SSP, ZP, and TP resulted in higher stress concentration in the post itself when compared to GP and CP. Therefore, results from the FEA images suggested that the use of non-metallic post systems could result in improved mechanical behavior for the weakened restored teeth.

  1. Coronal caries, root fragments, and restoration and cusp fractures in US adults.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, G H; Antonson, D E; Mjor, I A; Ringelberg, M L; Dolan, T A; Foerster, U; Legler, D W; Heft, M W; Duncan, R P

    1996-01-01

    The Florida Dental Care Study is a longitudinal study of changes in oral health that included at baseline 873 subjects (Ss) who had at least 1 tooth, were 45 years or older, and participated for an interview and examination. Forty-five percent of Ss had active coronal caries; 94% of the coronal carious surfaces were primary decay, and only 6% were secondary/recurrent. Ten percent of Ss had 1 or more root fragments, 16% of Ss had 1 or more teeth with restoration fractures, and 14% of Ss had 1 or more teeth with cusp fractures. Blacks, poor persons, and irregular attenders had more caries, root fragments, and cusp fractures, even though they had significantly fewer teeth. Blacks, poor persons, and irregular attenders were not at increased risk for restoration fractures, probably because fractures were associated with dental care use. These findings regarding caries and restorative treatment needs are consistent with a substantial burden in adult high-risk groups, and are relevant for dental primary health care policy.

  2. Influence of endodontic sealer composition and time of fiber post cementation on sealer adhesiveness to bovine root dentin.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Ricardo Abreu da; Barreto, Mirela Sangoi; Moraes, Rafael do Amaral; Broch, Juliana; Bier, Carlos Alexandre Souza; Só, Marcus Vinícius Reis; Kaizer, Osvaldo Bazzan; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the influence of the type of endodontic sealer (salicylate resin-based sealer vs. two endodontic sealers) and the time of fiber post cementation after root filling on the post adhesion to bovine root dentin. Sixty bovine roots were assigned to six groups (n=10), considering an experimental design with two factors (factorial 3x2): endodontic sealer factor in three levels [epoxy resin-based sealer (AH Plus), eugenol-based sealer (Endofill), and salicylate resin-based sealer plus mineral trioxide aggregate - MTA (MTA Fillapex)] and time for post cementation factor in two levels (immediate post cementation or 15 days after root canal filling). After post cementation, 2-mm-thick slices were produced and submitted to push-out test. The failure modes were analyzed under a 40× stereomicroscope and scored as: adhesive at cement/dentin interface; adhesive at cement/post interface; cement cohesive; post cohesive; dentin cohesive; or mixed. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc tests (α=0.05). When the fiber posts were cemented immediately after the root canal filling, the bond strengths were similar, independent of the endodontic sealer type. However, after 15 days, the epoxy resin-based sealer presented higher bond strength than the other sealers (p<0.05). Comparison between each sealer in different experimental times did not reveal any differences. The main failure type was adhesive at dentin/cement interface (89.4%). The time elapsed between the root canal filling and post cementation has no influence on post/root dentin adhesion. On the contrary, the type of endodontic sealer can influence the adhesion between fiber posts and root dentin.

  3. [Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria community composition at the root zones of aquatic plants after ecological restoration].

    PubMed

    Xing, Peng; Kong, Fan-xiang; Chen, Kai-ning; Chen, Mei-jun; Wu, Xiao-dong

    2008-08-01

    To investigate the effects of aquatic plants on ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) at their root zones, four species of aquatic plants were selected, Phragmites communis, Typha angustifolia L., Potamogeton crispus L., and Limnanthemun nymphoides, which were widely used in ecological restorations. AOB in the samples were enumerated by most-probable-number (MPN) method. Nested polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) procedures were performed with ammonia oxidizer-selective primers. Main DGGE bands were excised from the gel and sequenced for phylogenetic affiliation. Results indicate that AOB densities are always higher at the root zones of emergent plants (Phragmites communis 2.8 x 10(5) cells/g and Typha angustifolia L.4.3 x 10(5) cells/g) than those of submerged and floating-leaved plant (Potamogeton crispus L. 9.3 x 10(4) cells/g and Limnanthemun nymphoides 7.7 x 10(4) cells/g). At the root zones, the oxidation-reduction potential is above zero and NH4+ concentration is lower than it in the bare surface sediment. Fourteen major bands were recovered from the DGGE gel, re-amplified and sequenced. Although the identified bands have their respective similar sequences in GenBank, most of them are related to Nitrosomonas-like. This type of bacteria would play an important role of nitrogen cycle in lake sediment after ecological restoration.

  4. Fracture resistance of root filled molar teeth restored with glass fibre bundles.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, F B; Paranhos, M P G; Spohr, A M; Oshima, H M S; Carlini, B; Burnett, L H

    2010-05-01

    To evaluate the effect of unidirectional or woven glass fibre tapes inserted into MOD cavity preparations on the fracture resistance of root filled molar teeth. Extracted human molar teeth were randomly divided into six groups (n = 15) : G1 - sound teeth, control; G2 - MOD cavity preparation; G3 - MOD + root canal treatment (Endo); G4 - MOD + Endo + composite resin restoration (Resin); G5 - MOD + Endo + unidirectional fibre (UF) + Resin; G6 - MOD + ;Endo + woven fibre (WF) + Resin. The teeth were subjected to a compressive fracture test in a universal testing machine. After testing, two failure modes were classified: pulp chamber floor or cusp. The highest and the lowest mean fracture strengths were found in sound teeth (G1) (4960N) and MOD + root canal treatment (G3) (612.84N), respectively, with significant differences from the other groups (P < 0.05). The remaining groups had statistically similar means. In G5 and G6, there was a tendency for fracture to occur in the pulp chamber floor compromising tooth integrity. The insertion of glass fibres into MOD cavity preparations and restoring them with composite resin was not different than molar teeth filled with composite resin only in terms of fracture resistance. Fibres placed into MOD cavities do not reinforce teeth.

  5. Impact of the quality of coronal restoration and root canal filling on the periapical health in adult syrian subpopulation

    PubMed Central

    Alafif, Hisham

    2014-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to determine the status of periapical tissues of endodontically treated teeth according to coronal restorations and root canal fillings separately and in concomitant in adult Syrian subpopulation. Methods: 784 endodontically treated teeth from two hundred randomly selected Syrian adult patients were radiographically evaluated. According to predetermined criteria, the quality of coronal restorations and root canal filling of each tooth was scored as adequate or inadequate. The status of periapical tissues was also classified as healthy or diseased. Results were analyzed using Chi-squared test. Results: Adequate coronal restorations were determined in 58.54% of cases which was accompanied with less periapical pathosis than that in teeth with inadequate restorations (P < 0.01). 14% of teeth were restored by posts which showed no significant impact on the periapical tissues health. 18.5% of endodontic treatments were evaluated as adequate with less number of periapical radiolucencies than that of inadequate root canal fillings (P < 0.01). Absence of periapical pathosis was 96.6% in cases with both adequate coronal restorations and root canals fillings. The rate was 88.5% in cases with only adequate root canals fillings, and about 70% in cases with only adequate coronal restorations. When the treatment was inadequate in both coronal and root canals fillings, success rate was only observed in 48.8%. Conclusion: The most important factor with regard to the periradicular tissue health is the quality of root canal filling without neglecting the influence of coronal restoration (regardless of its type). There is a high prevalence rate of periapical pathosis in Syrian subpopulation due to poor dental practice. PMID:25565729

  6. Influence of core material on fracture resistance and marginal adaptation of restored root filled teeth.

    PubMed

    Reill, M I; Rosentritt, M; Naumann, M; Handel, G

    2008-05-01

    To investigate ex vivo the influence of direct placement core materials on the fracture strength and marginal adaptation of root filled maxillary central incisors restored with glass fibre-reinforced posts, various core materials and all-ceramic crowns. Forty-eight human maxillary incisors were root filled. Posts were placed and teeth restored with composite cores and crowns (n = 8). Six core materials were examined after thermal cyclic and mechanical loading (TCML). Fracture force was determined under static loading. The marginal adaptation at the interfaces between cement-tooth and cement-crown were categorized as 'intact margin' or 'marginal gap' using scanning electron microscopy. Statistical analysis was undertaken with the Mann-Whitney U-test (alpha = P < or = 0.05). Median fracture strength varied between 204 N (low viscous experimental core) and 1094 N (Multicore). No difference in fracture resistance was found with varying viscosity of the core material. The layering technique improved the fracture performance (P = 0.059) to a minor degree. Crowns with dedicated core materials (Rebilda 1063 N; Multicore 1094 N) had a significantly higher fracture resistance than crowns with a conventional restorative material (Tetric Ceram 509 N). Significantly poorer marginal adaptation before TCML was found for the layering technique at the tooth-cement interface and for all experimental cores after TCML. At the crown-cement interface significant differences in marginal adaptation could be determined between Multicore-layered core (P = 0.002) and Multicore-Rebilda (P = 0.001) after TCML. The fracture strength of post and core restorations was dependent on the core material and bonding system. Marginal adaptation was influenced by the method of application of the core material and by TCML.

  7. Effect of coronal macroretentions and diameter of a glass-FRC on fracture resistance of bovine teeth restored with fiber posts.

    PubMed

    Amaral, M; Favarin Santini, M; Wandscher, V; Villaça Zogheib, L; Valandro, L F

    2009-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate fracture resistance of bovine teeth restored with glass fiber posts of different diameter and shape. Eighty single-rooted bovine teeth were prepared, embedded in a PVC cylinder using acrylic resin, and allocated into eight groups (N.=10) based on the post diameter (White Post DC) and shape: smooth double-tapered fiber post -- G1, G2, G3, and G4 with cervical diameters of 1.4 mm, 1.6 mm, 1.8 mm, and 2 mm, respectively; double-tapered fiber post with coronal macroretentions -- G5, G6, G7, and G8 with cervical diameters of 1.4 mm, 1.6 mm, 1.8 mm, and 2 mm, respectively. A three-step etch-and.rinse adhesive and resin cement system was used for postcementation. Afterwards, the core build-up was standardized with composite resin (Oppalis). The specimens were stored for seven days and later submitted to monotonic load at a crosshead speed of 0.05 cm/min (45 degrees ) until failure. The fracture loads were determined and the fracture mode was recorded. The post diameter (P=0.0007) and post-surface characteristic (P=0.0149) factors affected the fracture resistance results significantly (2-way ANOVA). Low fracture strength values were noted in the group with narrower diameter and macroretentions (G5). The macroretentions damaged the fracture resistance results when post diameter was 1.4 mm (G1 and G5). On fiber posts having diameters of 1.6 mm, 1.8 mm, and 2 mm, macroretentions did not impair fracture strengths significantly. A direct relation between the diameter of the fiber post and the fracture strength seems likely. Coronal macroretentions reduced fracture strength in thinner fiber posts.

  8. Stability of antibacterial activity of Chlorhexidine and Doxycycline in bovine root dentine

    PubMed Central

    Khademi, Abbas Ali; Saleh, Marjan; Khabiri, Masoud; Jahadi, Sanaz

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the substantivity of chlorhexidine (CHX) and doxycycline bond to the dentin in diffusion disk method. Methods: A total of 92 dentin disks were prepared from Bovine's teeth root. After removing cementum and standardizing disks in weight and outer diameter, they were irrigated with sodium hypochlorite 2.5%, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid 17% and sterile saline and sterilled in autoclave. Then, the first group (n = 36) were irrigated with chlrohexine 2% and the second group (n = 36) with doxycycline 100 mg/mL, each for a period of 10 min. The third group (n = 20) was considered as the control group. Samples were divided into four subgroups, which after 1 day, 3, 6, and 12 weeks were incubated in plates containing Muller Hinton agar broth and Enterococcus faecalis for a period of 48 h at 37°C temperature; then the diameter of the zone of inhibition was measured. The antimicrobial effect of irrigating solutions without binding to the dentin was also studied using the plate well method. One-way and univariate variance tests as well as Post-hoc Tukey were used for data analyses. Findings: The diameter of the zone of inhibition of doxycycline group was significantly more than the CHX group from the beginning to the 3rd week (P < 0.005). After 3rd week, mean diameter in doxycycline group declined as compared with the CHX group up to 12th week (P < 0.005). The difference between means in two groups was not significant in the 3rd week (P = 0.87). Conclusion: The results of this study show that CHX and doxycycline show antibacterial activity for 12 weeks; although after 3rd week, the substantivity of CHX was significantly greater than doxycycline. Both of these irrigants can be used in other pharmacological and medical fields whenever a long-lasting antibacterial action is needed. PMID:24991631

  9. Assessment of periapical health, quality of root canal filling, and coronal restoration by using cone-beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Cakici, E B; Yildirim, E; Cakici, F; Erdogan, A S

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to use cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) to describe the prevalence of apical health, the quality of root canal filling, and coronal restorations of endodontically treated teeth in the east Anatolian subpopulation of Turkey. CBCT scans were taken from 748 patients attending for the 1st time to the clinic at the Oral Diagnosis and Radiology Department at Ataturk University's Faculty of Dentistry in Erzurum, Turkey. All images were analyzed by two research assistants who were trained using examples of CBCT images with and without the presence of periapical radiolucency. The two examiners assessed images from the experiment independently, and the readings were then compared. All data were entered on an MS Excel 2007 spreadsheet and SPSS software 15.0 which was used for statistical analysis. The Chi-square test was used to determine if a patient's periapical status was associated with the technical quality of root filling, coronal status, and to evaluate differences between tooth subgroups. In total, 147 teeth from 748 patients were found to have been treated endodontically. Sixty three teeth were found to have short root canal fillings, whereas 74 teeth had adequate root canal fillings, and the remaining 10 teeth had over extended root canal filling. A significant correlation was observed between the length of root filling and apical periodontitis (P = 0,023). Inadequately dense root canal filling was observed in 141 teeth, whereas adequately dense filling was found in only six teeth. There was a significant correlation between the density of root filling and apical periodontitis (P = 0.044). Coronal restoration was found in 90 teeth, but was not observed in all the three teeth. A crown was present in 54 teeth. There was a significant correlation between coronal restoration and apical periodontitis (P = 0.028). The results indicate that the quality of both the root filling and restoration were found to have impact on the periapical

  10. Effect of different root caries treatments on the sealing ability of conventional glass ionomer cement restorations.

    PubMed

    Geraldo-Martins, Vinicius R; Lepri, Cesar P; Palma-Dibb, Regina G

    2012-01-01

    In this study we compared the microleakage of conventional glass ionomer cement (GIC) restorations following the use of different methods of root caries removal. In vitro root caries were induced in 75 human root dentin samples that were divided in five groups of 15 each according to the method used for caries removal: in group 1 spherical carbide burs at low speed were used, in group 2 a hand-held excavator was used, and in groups 3 to 5 an Er,Cr:YSGG laser was used at 2.25 W, 40.18 J/cm(2) (group 3), 2.50 W, 44.64 J/cm(2) (group 4) and 2.75 W, 49.11 J/cm(2) (group 5). The air/water cooling during irradiation was set to 55%/65% respectively. All cavities were filled with GIC. Five samples from each group were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and the other ten samples were thermocycled and submitted to a microleakage test. The data obtained were compared by ANOVA followed by Fisher's test (p≤0.05). Group 4 showed the lowest microleakage index (56.65 6.30; p<0.05). There were no significant differences among the other groups. On SEM images samples of groups 1 and 2 showed a more regular interface than the irradiated samples. Demineralized dentin below the restoration was observed, that was probably affected dentin. Group 4 showed the lowest microleakage values compared to the other experimental groups, so under the conditions of the present study the method that provided the lowest microleakage was the Er,Cr:YSGG laser with a power output of 2.5 W yielding an energy density of 44.64 J/cm(2).

  11. Bovine pericardium based non-cross linked collagen matrix for successful root coverage, a clinical study in human

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to clinically assess the capacity of a novel bovine pericardium based, non-cross linked collagen matrix in root coverage. Methods 62 gingival recessions of Miller class I or II were treated. The matrix was adapted underneath a coronal repositioned split thickness flap. Clinical values were assessed at baseline and after six months. Results The mean recession in each patient was 2.2 mm at baseline. 6 Months after surgery 86.7% of the exposed root surfaces were covered. On average 0,3 mm of recession remained. The clinical attachment level changed from 3.5 ± 1.3 mm to 1,8 ( ± 0,7) mm during the observational time period. No statistically significant difference was found in the difference of probing depth. An increase in the width of gingiva was significant. With a baseline value of 1.5 ± 0.9 mm an improvement of 2.4 ± 0.8 mm after six month could be observed. 40 out of 62 recessions were considered a thin biotype at baseline. After 6 months all 62 sites were assessed thick. Conclusions The results demonstrate the capacity of the bovine pericardium based non-cross linked collagen matrix for successful root coverage. This material was able to enhance gingival thickness and the width of keratinized gingiva. The percentage of root coverage achieved thereby is comparable to existing techniques. This method might contribute to an increase of patient's comfort and an enhanced aesthetical outcome. PMID:22390875

  12. Early impacts of forest restoration treatments on the ectomycorrhizal fungal community and fine root biomass in a mixed conifer forest.

    Treesearch

    Jane E. Smith; Donaraye McKay; Greg Brenner; Jim McIver; Joseph W. Spatafora

    2005-01-01

    1. The obligate symbiosis formed between ectomycorrhizal fungi (EMF) and roots of tree species in the Pinaceae influences nutrient uptake and surrounding soil structure. Understanding how EMF respond to prescribed fire and thinning will assist forest managers in selecting fuel-reducing restoration treatments that maintain critical soil processes and site productivity....

  13. Bactericidal effect of a 980-nm diode laser in the root canal wall dentin of bovine teeth.

    PubMed

    Gutknecht, N; Franzen, R; Schippers, M; Lampert, F

    2004-02-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the antibacterial depth effect of continuous wave laser irradiation with a wavelength of 980 nm in the root canal wall dentin of bovine teeth. The long-term success of an endodontic therapy often fails due to remaining bacteria in the root canal or dentin tubules, which cannot be sufficiently eliminated through the classical root canal preparation technique nor through rinsing solutions. A total of 102 slices of bovine root dentin of different thicknesses (100, 300 and 500 micro m) were prepared. The samples were inoculated from one side with 5 micro L of an enterococcus faecalis suspension of defined concentration. Four slices per slice thickness served as a control group; the rest of the 30 slices per thickness were subjected to laser irradiation - 10 each of these slices were irradiated with distal outputs of 1.75, 2.3, and 2.8 Watts (W). After drying them for 30 sec, the back of the inoculated dentin slice was irradiated for 32 seconds with a 200- micro m fiber optical waveguide under constant movement of the fibers. The remaining bacteria were then detached in NaCl under vibration. The eluate produced by this was - taking account of the degree of dilution - plated out on sheep blood agar plates. After 24 h of incubation, the grown bacterial colonies were able to be counted out and evaluated. By doing so, they were compared with the non-irradiated, but otherwise identically treated control group. With a slice thickness of 100 micro m, the 980-nm diode laser achieved a maximum bacterial reduction of 95% at 1.75 W, 96% at 2.3 W, and 97% at 2.8 W. With a slice thickness of 300 micro m, a maximum of 77% of the bacteria was destroyed at 1.75 W, 87% at 2.3 W, and 89% at 2.8 W. The maximum bacterial reduction with a slice thickness of 500 micro m was 57% at 1.75 W, 66% at 2.3 W, and 86% at 2.8 W. The results of this research show that the 980-nm diode laser can eliminate bacteria that have immigrated deep into the

  14. Biodentine versus Mineral Trioxide Aggregate versus Intermediate Restorative Material for Retrograde Root End Filling: An Invitro Study.

    PubMed

    Soundappan, Saravanapriyan; Sundaramurthy, Jothi Latha; Raghu, Sandhya; Natanasabapathy, Velmurugan

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the marginal adaptation of Biodentine in comparison with Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA) and Intermediate Restorative Material (IRM), as a root end filling material, using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Thirty permanent maxillary central incisors were chemo-mechanically prepared and obturated. Three millimetres of the root end were resected and 3mm retro cavity preparation was done using ultrasonic retrotips. The samples were randomly divided into three groups (n=10) and were restored with root end filling materials: Group I - MTA, Group II - Biodentine, Group III - IRM. The root ends were sectioned transversely at 1mm and 2mm levels and evaluated for marginal adaptation using SEM. The gap between dentin and retro filling material was measured at four quadrants. The mean gap at 1mm level and 2mm level from the resected root tip and combined mean were calculated. The data were statistically analyzed, using one-way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD post hoc test for intergroup analysis and paired t-test for intragroup analysis. The overall results showed no statistically significant difference between MTA and IRM but both were superior when compared to Biodentine. At 1mm level there was no statistically significant difference among any of the tested materials. At 2mm level MTA was superior to both IRM and Biodentine. In overall comparison, MTA and IRM were significantly superior when compared to Biodentine in terms of marginal adaptation, when used as retrograde filling material.

  15. Fracture resistance of bovine incisors restored with different glass fiber posts: effect of the diameter of fiber post.

    PubMed

    Zogheib, Lucas Villaça; Vasconcellos, Luis Gustavo Oliveira; Salvia, Ana Carolina Rodrigues Danzi; Balducci, Ivan; Pagani, Clovis; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2012-01-01

    Compare the effect of three post designs on the fracture resistance and failure modes of composite core - fiber post - crownless tooth sets. Ninety bovine incisors were selected and divided into nine groups of 10 specimens. The teeth were assigned to three groups based on the post design: Cylindrical, tapered, and double-tapered. Each group was subdivided into three subgroups in accordance with the diameter of the post: Small (No.1), medium (No.2), and large (No.3). The Panavia F system was used for post cementation. The specimens were mounted in acrylic resin blocks with a layer of silicone rubber covering the roots. A universal testing machine compressively loaded the specimens from the palatal side at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min and at an angle of 135Ί to the long axis of the teeth, until failure occurred. The failure mode was determined by a stereomicroscope inspection of all the specimens. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and the Tukey test (P < 0.05). The fracture resistance was affected by the type of post (P < 0.0001). A narrower diameter for all of the post systems allowed for higher resistance. The main failure mode in the large cylindrical group was catastrophic fractures, while the main failures in the other eight groups were favorable. Narrower diameter posts showed higher fracture resistance. The dominant failure pattern was repairable fracture, except for those with large cylindrical groups.

  16. Influence of remaining coronal structure and of the marginal design on the fracture strength of roots restored with cast post and core.

    PubMed

    Carlini-Júnior, Bruno; Cecchin, Doglas; Farina, Ana P; Pereira, Gisele D S; Prieto, Lúcia T; Paulillo, Luis A M S

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the fracture strength of roots that were prosthetically restored with cast post and core with or without any remaining coronal structure and with different finish lines. Sixty bovine incisors were sectioned below the cementoenamel junction, endodontically treated and randomly divided into six experimental groups (n = 10) containing teeth with or without any remaining coronal structure and with a beveled shoulder, a chanfered or a shoulder finish line design. The cast post and core were luted with dual-cured resin cement. The metal crowns were cemented with zinc phosphate cement. The specimens were subjected to a tangential compressive load (135° angle) at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until failure, using a universal testing machine. The fracture strength data were analyzed using the ANOVA and LSMeans (least square means) tests (α = 0.05). The data indicated that the teeth with 2 mm of remaining coronal structure showed the highest fracture strength values when compared with the teeth without any remaining structure (p < 0.05). As to the different finish line designs, the highest fracture strength values were obtained for the beveled shoulder, followed by the chanfered and then by the shoulder designs (p < 0.05). It may be concluded that, to increase fracture strength, a beveled shoulder and 2 mm of remaining coronal structure are the ideal conditions.

  17. Effect of antibacterial varnishes applied to root dentin on shear bond strength of tooth-colored restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Korkmaz, Yonca; Baseren, Meserret

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of certain varnishes on the bond strength of different tooth-colored restorative materials applied to root dentin. One-hundred and eighty tooth slabs, including mesial and distal surfaces, were attained through dividing the teeth, then embedding them in methylmethacrylate. The root surfaces were ground flat through cementum, exposing the dentin. The samples were then randomly divided into three main groups: Group 1: Cervitec; Group 2: Fluor Protector and Group 3: No applications (control). Cervitec and Fluor Protector were applied to the root dentin surfaces according to the manufacturer's instructions. All the samples were kept in artificial saliva for six months. Each main group was subdivided into five groups of 12 teeth each: Group A: Flowable Resin Composite (Grandio Flow); Group B: Microhybrid Resin Composite (Artemis); Group C: Polyacid Modified Resin Composite (Dyract Extra); Group D: Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Cement (Vitremer) and Group E: Conventional Glass-Ionomer Cement (Ionofil Molar). Restorative materials were applied to the root dentin surfaces using a cylindrical mold. After thermocycling (1000 cycles, 5 degrees C/55 degrees C, dwell time 30 seconds), the shear bond strength of the restored samples was determined by a universal testing machine (Zwick Test Machine, Zwick GmbH & Co, Ulm, Germany) at a 5 mm/minute crosshead speed. Failure mode was determined under a stereomicroscope. The data were evaluated statistically by using one-way Analysis of Variance and Duncan tests (p< or =0.05). In the fluoride varnish group, all of the restorative materials except for Ionofil Molar, showed lower bond strengths when compared to the control group (p<0.05). In the Cervitec group, Artemis and Dyract Extra showed lower bond strengths; whereas, Ionofil Molar showed a higher bond strength than the control group (p<0.05). The highest percentage of cohesive fracture was observed in Artemis and Dyract Extra in the control group.

  18. Sediment budgeting and restoration planning in a heterogeneous landscape, the Root River watershed, southeastern Minnesota.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemmis, J. M.; Souffront, M.; Stout, J. C.; Belmont, P.

    2014-12-01

    Excessive sedimentation in streams and rivers is one of the top water quality concerns in the U.S. and globally. While sediment is a natural constituent of stream ecosystems, excessive amounts cause high levels of turbidity which can reduce primary and secondary production, reduce nutrient retention, and have negative impacts on fish reproduction and physiology. Fine sediment particles adsorb pollutants such as mercury, metals, polychlorinated biphenyl compounds and bacteria. Key questions remain regarding the origin of excessive sediment as well as the transport pathways of sediment through the landscape and channel network of the 4,300 km2 Root River watershed in southeastern Minnesota. To answer these questions, we are developing a sediment budget to account for inputs, outputs, and changes in sediment storage reservoirs within the system. Because watershed sediment fluxes are determined as the sum of many small changes (erosion and deposition) across a vast area, multiple, redundant techniques are required to adequately constrain all parts of the sediment budget. Specifically, this budget utilizes four years of field research and surveys, an extensive set of sediment fingerprinting data, watershed-wide measurements of channel widening and meander migration, and watershed modeling, all evaluated and extrapolated in a geomorphically sensitive manner. Analyses of sediment deposition within channel cutoffs throughout the watershed help constrain sediment storage. These overlapping methods, reconciled within the hard constraint of direct measurements of water and sediment fluxes, improve the reliability of the budget. The sediment budget highlights important sources and sinks and identifies locations that are likely to be more, or less, sensitive to changes in land and water management to support watershed-wide prioritization of conservation and restoration actions.

  19. The tomato res mutant which accumulates JA in roots in non-stressed conditions restores cell structure alterations under salinity.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Abellan, José O; Fernandez-Garcia, Nieves; Lopez-Berenguer, Carmen; Egea, Isabel; Flores, Francisco B; Angosto, Trinidad; Capel, Juan; Lozano, Rafael; Pineda, Benito; Moreno, Vicente; Olmos, Enrique; Bolarin, Maria C

    2015-11-01

    Jasmonic acid (JA) regulates a wide spectrum of plant biological processes, from plant development to stress defense responses. The role of JA in plant response to salt stress is scarcely known, and even less known is the specific response in root, the main plant organ responsible for ionic uptake and transport to the shoot. Here we report the characterization of the first tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) mutant, named res (restored cell structure by salinity), that accumulates JA in roots prior to exposure to stress. The res tomato mutant presented remarkable growth inhibition and displayed important morphological alterations and cellular disorganization in roots and leaves under control conditions, while these alterations disappeared when the res mutant plants were grown under salt stress. Reciprocal grafting between res and wild type (WT) (tomato cv. Moneymaker) indicated that the main organ responsible for the development of alterations was the root. The JA-signaling pathway is activated in res roots prior to stress, with transcripts levels being even higher in control condition than in salinity. Future studies on this mutant will provide significant advances in the knowledge of JA role in root in salt-stress tolerance response, as well as in the energy trade-off between plant growth and response to stress.

  20. Fracture resistance of structurally compromised premolar roots restored with single and accessory glass or quartz fiber posts

    PubMed Central

    Sharafeddin, Farahnaz; Alavi, Ali Asghar; Zare, Samira

    2014-01-01

    Background: Glass and quartz fiber posts are used in restoration of structurally compromised roots. Accessory fiber posts are recently introduced to enhance the fiber post adaptation. This study evaluated the effectiveness of glass versus quartz accessory fiber posts. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 40 mandibular premolar roots with similar dimension (radius of 3.5 ± 0.2 mm and length of 13 ± 0.5 mm) were selected and their root canals were flared until 1.5 mm of dentin wall remained. They were randomly assigned to four groups (n = 10) and restored as follows: Exacto glass fiber post (EX), Exacto glass fiber post + 2 Reforpin accessories (EXR), D. T. Light quartz fiber post (DT), and D. T. Light quartz fiber post + 2 Fibercone accessories (DTF). All posts were cemented with Duo-Link resin cement and the cores were built with the particulate filler composite. Following 1-week water storage, specimens were subjected to fracture loads in a universal testing machine. The maximum loads and failure modes were recorded and analyzed with the two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Fisher's exact tests (α = 0.05). Results: The mean fracture resistance values (N) were 402.8 (EX), 378.4 (EXR), 400.1 (DT), and 348.5 (DTF). Two-way ANOVA test showed neither reinforcing method (P = 0.094), nor post composition (P = 0.462) had statistically significant differences on fracture resistance of the structurally compromised premolar teeth. Fisher's exact test also demonstrated no statistically significant difference regarding two variables (P = 0.695). Core fracture was the most common failure mode (62.5%). Conclusion: Glass and quartz fiber posts with or without accessories restored the weakened premolar roots equally. PMID:24932200

  1. Fracture resistance of structurally compromised premolar roots restored with single and accessory glass or quartz fiber posts.

    PubMed

    Sharafeddin, Farahnaz; Alavi, Ali Asghar; Zare, Samira

    2014-03-01

    Glass and quartz fiber posts are used in restoration of structurally compromised roots. Accessory fiber posts are recently introduced to enhance the fiber post adaptation. This study evaluated the effectiveness of glass versus quartz accessory fiber posts. In this experimental study, 40 mandibular premolar roots with similar dimension (radius of 3.5 ± 0.2 mm and length of 13 ± 0.5 mm) were selected and their root canals were flared until 1.5 mm of dentin wall remained. They were randomly assigned to four groups (n = 10) and restored as follows: Exacto glass fiber post (EX), Exacto glass fiber post + 2 Reforpin accessories (EXR), D. T. Light quartz fiber post (DT), and D. T. Light quartz fiber post + 2 Fibercone accessories (DTF). All posts were cemented with Duo-Link resin cement and the cores were built with the particulate filler composite. Following 1-week water storage, specimens were subjected to fracture loads in a universal testing machine. The maximum loads and failure modes were recorded and analyzed with the two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Fisher's exact tests (α = 0.05). The mean fracture resistance values (N) were 402.8 (EX), 378.4 (EXR), 400.1 (DT), and 348.5 (DTF). Two-way ANOVA test showed neither reinforcing method (P = 0.094), nor post composition (P = 0.462) had statistically significant differences on fracture resistance of the structurally compromised premolar teeth. Fisher's exact test also demonstrated no statistically significant difference regarding two variables (P = 0.695). Core fracture was the most common failure mode (62.5%). Glass and quartz fiber posts with or without accessories restored the weakened premolar roots equally.

  2. Biodentine versus Mineral Trioxide Aggregate versus Intermediate Restorative Material for Retrograde Root End Filling: An Invitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Soundappan, Saravanapriyan; Sundaramurthy, Jothi Latha; Raghu, Sandhya; Natanasabapathy, Velmurugan

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the marginal adaptation of Biodentine in comparison with Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA) and Intermediate Restorative Material (IRM), as a root end filling material, using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Materials and Methods: Thirty permanent maxillary central incisors were chemo-mechanically prepared and obturated. Three millimetres of the root end were resected and 3mm retro cavity preparation was done using ultrasonic retrotips. The samples were randomly divided into three groups (n=10) and were restored with root end filling materials: Group I – MTA, Group II – Biodentine, Group III – IRM. The root ends were sectioned transversely at 1mm and 2mm levels and evaluated for marginal adaptation using SEM. The gap between dentin and retro filling material was measured at four quadrants. The mean gap at 1mm level and 2mm level from the resected root tip and combined mean were calculated. The data were statistically analyzed, using one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s HSD post hoc test for intergroup analysis and paired t-test for intragroup analysis. Results: The overall results showed no statistically significant difference between MTA and IRM but both were superior when compared to Biodentine. At 1mm level there was no statistically significant difference among any of the tested materials. At 2mm level MTA was superior to both IRM and Biodentine. Conclusion: In overall comparison, MTA and IRM were significantly superior when compared to Biodentine in terms of marginal adaptation, when used as retrograde filling material. PMID:24910689

  3. Biofilm Formation within the Interface of Bovine Root Dentin Treated with Conjugated Chitosan and Sealer Containing Chitosan Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    DaSilva, Luis; Finer, Yoav; Friedman, Shimon; Basrani, Bettina; Kishen, Anil

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess biofilm formation within sealer-dentin interfaces of root segments filled with gutta-percha and sealer incorporated with chitosan (CS) nanoparticles, without and with canal surface treatment with different formulations of CS. Methods Standardized canals of 4 mm bovine root segments (n=35) were filled with gutta-percha and Pulp Canal Sealer incorporated with CS nanoparticles without surface treatment (group CS), or after surface treatment with phosphorylated CS (group PHCS), CS-conjugated Rose Bengal and photodynamic irradiation (group CSRB) and a combination of both PHCS and CSRB (group RBPH). The control group was filled with gutta-percha and unmodified sealer. After 7 d of setting, specimens were aged in buffered solution at 37° C for 1 or 4 wks. Monospecies biofilms of Enterococcus faecalis were grown on specimens for 7 d in a chemostat-based biofilm fermentor. Biofilm formation within the sealer-dentin interface was assessed with confocal laser scanning microscopy. Results In the 4-wk aged specimens only, the mean biofilm areas were significantly smaller than in the control for CS (p=0.008), PHCS (p=0.012) and RBPH (p=0.034). Percentage of biofilm-covered interface also was significantly lower than in the control for CS (p=0.024) and PHCS (p=0.003). CS, PHCS and RBPH did not differ significantly. Conclusions Incorporating CS nanoparticles into the zinc-oxide eugenol sealer inhibited biofilm formation within the sealer-dentin interface. This effect was maintained when canals were treated with phosphorylated CS, and it was moderated by canal treatment with chitosan-conjugated Rose Bengal and irradiation. PMID:23321239

  4. Management of external perforating root resorption by intentional replantation followed by Biodentine restoration

    PubMed Central

    Pruthi, Preeti Jain; Dharmani, Umesh; Roongta, Ruchika; Talwar, Sangeeta

    2015-01-01

    Resorption of tooth structures can occur as a result of physiological, pathological, and idiopathic factors. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment can prevent its serious complications. This case report presents surgical endodontic management of a trauma-induced perforating external root resorption, which was diagnosed with the help of cone beam computed tomography. Following root canal treatment, intentional replantation of the tooth was performed so as to expose the opening of the resorption defect to allow for complete debridement and closure. Eighteen months follow-up showed arrest of root resorption, and progressive healing of the defect. PMID:26604965

  5. Crystallographic Texture and Elemental Composition Mapped in Bovine Root Dentin at the 200 nm Level

    PubMed Central

    Deymier-Black, A. C.; Veis, A.; Cai, Z.; Stock, S. R.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The relationship between the mineralization of peritubular dentin (PTD) and intertubular dentin (ITD) is not well understood. Tubules are quite small, diameter ~2 μm, and this makes the near-tubule region of dentin difficult to study. Here, advanced characterization techniques are applied in a novel way to examine what organic or nanostructural signatures may indicate the end of ITD or the beginning of PTD mineralization. X-ray fluorescence intensity (Ca, P, and Zn) and X-ray diffraction patterns from carbonated apatite (cAp) were mapped around dentintubules at resolutions ten times smaller than the feature size (200 nm pixels), representing a 36% increase in resolution over earlier work. In the near tubule volumes of near-pulp, root dentin, Zn intensity was higher than in ITD remote from the tubules. This increase in Zn2+, as determined by X-ray absorption near edge structure analysis, may indicate the presence of metalloenzymes or transcription factors important to ITD or PTD mineralization. The profiles of the cAp 00.2 X-ray diffraction rings were fitted with a pseudo-Voigt function, and the spatial and azimuthal distribution of these rings’ integrated intensities indicated that the cAp platelets were arranged with their c-axes aligned tangential to the edge of the tubule lumen. This texture was continuous throughout the dentin indicating a lack of structural difference between in the Zn rich near-tubular region and the remote ITD. PMID:23630059

  6. Restoration of elbow flexion in root lesions of brachial plexus injuries.

    PubMed

    Nagano, A; Ochiai, N; Okinaga, S

    1992-09-01

    A retrospective review of 87 patients with loss of elbow flexion secondary to root injuries of the brachial plexus was carried out. Results of nerve grafting, direct nerve transfer with the intercostal nerve, or tendon transfer were analyzed, and treatment recommendations were developed. Nerve transfer provided good or excellent results for injuries that included avulsion of the C5 and/or C6 roots. Nerve grafts were used successfully in cases of single or combined ruptures of C5 and C6. Tendon transfers provided good or excellent results in C5-C6 or C5-C7 avulsions, where nerve grafting was not possible and transferable muscles had good strength. Somatosensory evoked potentials were necessary to demonstrate nerve root avulsions in cases in which the roots appeared ruptured on visual inspection.

  7. Testing and implementing methods for managing Phytophthora root diseases in California native habitats and restoration sites

    Treesearch

    Tedmund J. Swiecki; Elizabeth A. Bernhardt

    2017-01-01

    Over the past 14 years, a variety of native plant communities in northern California have been identified where introduced root-rotting Phytophthora species, most notably Phytophthora cinnamomi, P. cambivora, and P. cactorum, are causing decline and mortality of...

  8. Influence of fatigue testing and cementation mode on the load-bearing capability of bovine incisors restored with crowns and zirconium dioxide posts.

    PubMed

    Nothdurft, F P; Schmitt, T; Motter, P J; Pospiech, P R

    2008-12-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of fatigue and cementation mode on the fracture behavior of endodontically treated bovine incisors restored with zirconium dioxide posts and crowns. Forty-eight endodontically treated bovine primary incisors were restored with zirconium dioxide posts (Cerapost, Brasseler), composite build-ups, and crowns cast from a chromium cobalt alloy. In 16 teeth, each of the posts was cemented conventionally with KetacCem (3M ESPE) or adhesively with Panavia F (Kuraray) or RelyX UniCem (3M ESPE). One-half of the specimens in each group were subjected to thermocycling with 10,000 cycles at 5-55 degrees C and mechanical aging, loading the specimens at an angle of 45 degrees in 1,200,000 cycles with 50 N. Fracture resistance was determined by loading the specimens until fracture at an angle of 45 degrees to the long axis of the teeth. The loading test showed that neither cementation mode nor fatigue testing had an influence on the load bearing capability. Most specimens fractured in a favorable way, independent from the type of cementation.

  9. Fracture resistance of simulated immature tooth roots reinforced with MTA or restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Karapinar-Kazandag, Meric; Basrani, Bettina; Tom-Kun Yamagishi, Valerie; Azarpazhooh, Amir; Friedman, Shimon

    2016-04-01

    Immature endodontically treated teeth may require reinforcing to reduce the risk of root fracture. This study assessed the fracture resistance of simulated immature tooth roots reinforced with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) or two composite resin (CR) materials. One hundred extracted roots of mature human maxillary incisors were decoronated and sectioned 9 mm further apically from the decoronation line and randomly divided into five groups (n = 20). In Group 1 (negative control), roots received no treatment. In groups 2-5, canals were enlarged to 2.1 mm diameter to simulate immature roots, dressed with calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2 ) and incubated for 7 days. After removal of Ca(OH)2 , canals in Group 2 (positive control) were left unfilled. Canals in groups 3, 4 and 5 were filled with MTA, BisFil 2B flowable CR or BisFil II posterior CR, respectively. After further incubation for 30 days, specimens were embedded in acrylic cylinders and horizontally loaded in a universal testing machine at cross head speed of 5 mm min(-1) until fracture occurred. Load (N) at and pattern of fracture were recorded. Load at fracture was significantly lower (t-test, P = 0.003) in Group 2 (630 ± 199.12) than in Group 1 (896.98 ± 311.79). It did not differ significantly among groups 1, 3, 4 and 5 (anova, P > 0.07). Pattern of fracture did not differ among the groups either. Within the limitations of this study, root canal filling with MTA and two CR materials affected reinforcement of simulated immature roots to levels comparable with intact roots. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Grafting the C5 root to the musculocutaneous nerve partially restores hand sensation in complete palsies of the brachial plexus.

    PubMed

    Bertelli, Jayme Augusto; Ghizoni, Marcos Flávio

    2012-08-01

    In complete brachial plexus palsy, we have hypothesized that grafting to the musculocutaneous nerve should restore some hand sensation because the musculocutaneous nerve can drive hand sensation directly or via communication with the radial and median nerves. To investigate sensory recovery in the hand and forearm after C5 root grafting to the musculocutaneous nerve in patients with a total brachial plexus injury. Eleven patients who had recovered elbow flexion after musculocutaneous nerve grafting from a preserved C5 root and who had been followed for a minimum of 3 years were screened for sensory recovery in the hand and forearm. Six matched patients who had not undergone surgery served as controls. Methods of assessment included testing for pain sensation using Adson forceps, cutaneous pressure threshold measurements using Semmes-Weinstein monofilaments, and the static 2-point discrimination test. Deep sensation was evaluated by squeezing the first web space, and thermal sensation was assessed using warm and cold water. All grafted patients recovered sensation in a variable territory extending from just over the thenar eminence to the entire lateral forearm and hand. Seven patients were capable of perceiving 2-0 monofilament pressure on the thenar eminence, palm, and dorsoradial aspect of the hand. All could differentiate warm and cold water. None recovered 2-point discrimination. None of the patients in the control group recovered any kind of sensation in the affected limb. Grafting the musculocutaneous nerve can restore nociceptive sensation on the radial side of the hand.

  11. Restored river corridors: first results on the effects of flow variability on vegetation cuttings survival rate and related root architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquale, N.; Perona, P.; Jiang, Z.; Burlando, P.

    2009-04-01

    Understanding and predicting the evolution of river alluvial bed forms toward a vegetated or a non-vegetated morphology have important implications for restored river corridors and the related ecosystem functioning (see also Schäppi et al, this session). Vegetation recruitment and growth on non-cohesive material of river corridors, such as gravel bars and islands of braided river, depend on the ability of roots to develop and anchor efficiently such to resist against flow erosion. In this work, we study the interannual morphological evolution of a gravel bar island, the survival rate and the growth of a number of plots with different density and orientation of transplanted cuttings (Salix Alba), the space and time dynamics of which depend on erosion and deposition processes due to floods. Our purpose is to identify island locations where the hydrodynamic conditions are more suitable for plants germination, growth and survival in relation to the river hydrograph statistics. This information is a first step to build a stochastic model able to predict the future evolution and progress of the restoration action of the investigated river reach. We focus at the main island of River Thur at Niederneunforn (Canton Thurgau, Switzerland), the restoration success of which is investigated from a mechanistic viewpoint in the research project "REstored CORridor Dynamics" (www.record.ethz.ch). Accordingly, we analyze two recent Digital Elevation Models (1 year difference), which were first corrected to account for the river bathymetry, and then we compare them in order to extract relevant interannual morphological changes. Using a two dimensional numerical hydrodynamic model we simulate several flow conditions ranging from the minimum recorded flow up to the one that completely inundates the island. Hence, we build inundation maps of the island that we associate to the frequency and the submergence duration of every area. We then correlate such results to the observed survival

  12. Cross-sectional evaluation of the periapical status as related to quality of root canal fillings and coronal restorations in a rural adult male population of Turkey.

    PubMed

    Gündüz, Kaan; Avsever, Hakan; Orhan, Kaan; Demirkaya, Kadriye

    2011-06-20

    To determine the prevalence of periapical lesions in root canal-treated teeth in a rural, male adult, Turkish population and to investigate the influence of the quality of root canal fillings on prevalence of periapical lesions. The sample for this cross-sectional study consisted of 552 adult male patients, 18-32 years of age, presenting consecutively as new patients seeking routine dental care at the Dental Sciences of Gulhane Military Medicine, Ankara. The radiographs of the 1014 root canal-treated teeth were evaluated. The teeth were grouped according to the radiographic quality of the root canal filling and the coronal restoration. The criteria used for the examination were slightly modified from those described by De Moor. Periapical status was assessed by the Periapical Index scores (PAI) proposed by Orstavik. The overall success rate of root canal treatment was 32.1%. The success rates of adequately root canal treatment were significantly higher than inadequately root canal treatment, regardless of the quality or presence of the coronal restoration (P < .001). In addition, the success rate of inadequate root canal treatment was also significantly affected by the quality of coronal restorations. Our results revealed a high prevalence of periapical lesions in root canal treatment, which is comparable to that reported in other methodologically compatible studies from diverse geographical locations. In addition, the results from the present study confirm the findings of other studies that found the quality of the root canal treatment to be a key factor for prognosis with or without adequate coronal restoration.

  13. Cross-sectional evaluation of the periapical status as related to quality of root canal fillings and coronal restorations in a rural adult male population of Turkey

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To determine the prevalence of periapical lesions in root canal-treated teeth in a rural, male adult, Turkish population and to investigate the influence of the quality of root canal fillings on prevalence of periapical lesions. Methods The sample for this cross-sectional study consisted of 552 adult male patients, 18-32 years of age, presenting consecutively as new patients seeking routine dental care at the Dental Sciences of Gulhane Military Medicine, Ankara. The radiographs of the 1014 root canal-treated teeth were evaluated. The teeth were grouped according to the radiographic quality of the root canal filling and the coronal restoration. The criteria used for the examination were slightly modified from those described by De Moor. Periapical status was assessed by the Periapical Index scores (PAI) proposed by Orstavik. Results The overall success rate of root canal treatment was 32.1%. The success rates of adequately root canal treatment were significantly higher than inadequately root canal treatment, regardless of the quality or presence of the coronal restoration (P < .001). In addition, the success rate of inadequate root canal treatment was also significantly affected by the quality of coronal restorations. Conclusions Our results revealed a high prevalence of periapical lesions in root canal treatment, which is comparable to that reported in other methodologically compatible studies from diverse geographical locations. In addition, the results from the present study confirm the findings of other studies that found the quality of the root canal treatment to be a key factor for prognosis with or without adequate coronal restoration. PMID:21689415

  14. [Clinical evaluation of residual crowns and roots restored by glass fiber post and core, cast metal post and core or directly].

    PubMed

    Ma, Hongxue; Shen, Lili; Liu, Kun; Su, Linwang

    2013-02-01

    To evaluate the survival rate and complications of endodontically treated residual crowns and roots restored directly or by glass fiber post and core or cast metal post and core. In this study, 96 patients with a total of 142 teeth were selected. All the teeth were undergone root canal therapy. And then, according to different situations, some of them were restored with glass fiber post and core, another with cast metal post and core, the rest were restored directly in the strict controlled indications. The teeth (135) in 89 patients were divided into three groups. The first group contained 73 (54.1%) teeth restored with glass fiber post and composite resin core. The survival rate reached 97.3% in the average observation period of (5.7 +/- 1.9) years. The second group contained 40 teeth, restored with pure titanium casting post and core. The survival rate reached 87.5% in the average observation period of (6.2 +/- 2.2) years. The last group contained 22 teeth received no treatment. The survival rate reached 90.9% in the average observation period of (5.4 +/- 1.8) years. The success rate had no significant difference among the three groups. The most common complications after restored included root fracture (6.7%), retention loss (2.2%), secondary caries (1.5%) and periapical periodontitis (0.7%). Under the premise of high quality root canal treatment and standard restoration treatment, the abutment teeth, whether are restored by glass fiber post and core, cast metal post and core or without post, have a higher survival rate over 5 years of observation period and complications especially root fracture still should attract the necessary attention.

  15. Evaluation of a new hardness tester (Cariotester): Comparison with transverse microradiography for assessing the inhibitory effect of fluoride application on bovine root dentin demineralization.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Toyotaro; Nakashima, Syozi; Shimizu, Akihiko; Tagami, Junji; Momoi, Yasuko

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the correlation between CT depth, indentation depth determined by a new hardness tester (Cariotester), and the transverse microradiography (TMR) parameters, i.e., lesion depth and mineral loss. For that purpose, this study evaluated the feasibility of using Cariotester as a root caries diagnostic system and capability of Cariotester to detect effect of fluoride application on inhibiting dentin demineralization. Fluorides were applied to bovine root dentin specimens, which were subsequently demineralized for 1-21 days and then CT depth and TMR parameters were assessed. There were significant correlations between CT depth and TMR parameters in fluoride and non-fluoride groups. There were significant differences between fluoride and non-fluoride groups for CT depth and TMR parameters respectively. Current results suggested that Cariotester may be capable of providing an objective evaluation of root caries progression and the fluoride effect on inhibiting dentin demineralization.

  16. Investigating the addition of collagen and its integrin binding sequence (RGD) to glass polyalkenoate: In terms of material and cellular properties to explore a more biocompatible method of root caries restoration.

    PubMed

    Salem, A M; Jones, S J; Ellis, I R; Chadwick, R G

    2016-11-01

    Placement of a restoration to treat root caries disrupts many tissues. There is scope for the restorative material to interact with these to augment reductions in micro leakage afforded by an adhesive restorative material. 1) To investigate the effects of incorporating bioactive molecules into a glass polyalkenoate (GPA) 2) To quantify the changes in physical properties of the material. Biocompatibility of the GPA cement (Chemfil Superior, Dentsply De Trey, Konstanz, Germany) in unmodified and modified forms was ascertained using cell culture techniques. The optimum concentration of bioactive components required to promote cell attachment was determined indirectly by quantification and localisation of the fibroblast marker vimentin. The properties of surface hardness, compressive strength and adhesive bond strength were also determined prior to and following addition of the bio-additives: collagen type I and a pentapeptide containing Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD). Addition of Type I Collagen (100μg/ml) and RGD (5mg/ml) to ChemFil Superior had no statistically significant effect upon the compressive strength and bond strength to bovine enamel but significantly (P<0.05) increased the materials shore hardness. The addition of RGD to ChemFil Superior increased most the expression of vimentin, indicating that the cells had become more fibroblastic. This may be indicative of increased synthesis of extracellular matrix macromolecules with the potential to foster adhesion of the modified glass polyalkenoate to distracted gingival tissues. The results suggest that addition of bioactive molecules to GPA cement for subgingival restorations has potential clinical applications. It is possible to envisage that the additions, as described in this paper, could foster the attachment of displaced gingival tissues to GPA restorative materials placed subgingivally where root caries has been treated. This would offer potential to form a seal around the restoration by the attached gingival tissues

  17. Marginal quality and fracture strength of root-canal treated mandibular molars with overlay restorations after thermocycling and mechanical loading.

    PubMed

    Dere, Mustafa; Ozcan, Mutlu; Göhring, Till N

    2010-08-01

    To evaluate marginal quality, fracture modes, and loads-to-failure of different overlay restorations in rootcanal treated molars in a laboratory setup. Thirty-two mandibular first molars were randomly assigned to four groups (n = 8): UTR= untreated (control), RCT-COM= root canal treated (RCT)+ lab-made composite overlay, RCT-FRC= RCT+composite resin overlay with two layers of multidirectional woven glass fibers; RCT-CER: RCT+ceramic overlay. The teeth in all groups were subjected to thermocycling and mechanical loading (TCML) in a computer-controlled masticator (1,200,000 loads, 49 N, 1.7 Hz, 3000 temperature cycles of 5°C to 50°C). Marginal adaptation was evaluated before and after TCML with scanning electron microscopy at 200X at the tooth-to-luting composite (IF1) and luting composite-to restoration (IF2) interfaces. After TCML, all specimens were loaded to failure in a universal testing machine at 0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed with ANOVA and Bonferroni correction. Marginal adaptation decreased from 93 ± 3.4 to 82 ± 6.5 % at IF1 after TCML (p > 0.001) but the decrease was not significant between the groups (p = 0.8130). At IF2, ceramic overlays showed about 10% lower marginal adaptation than composite overlays (p < 0.0001). Loads-to-failure (in N) were as follows in descending order: RCT-FRC: 3619 ± 520; UTR: 3048 ± 905; RCT-COM: 2770 ± 457; RCT-CER 2036 ± 319. RCT-FRC showed significantly higher results than those of RCT-COM (p = 0.0077) and RCT-CER (p < 0.0001). Only RCT-CER showed significantly lower results than that of the control (p = 0.0019). While the fractures in the UTR occurred exclusively above the cementoenamel junction (Mode 1 and Mode 2) and were rated reparable, RCT-COM and RCT-CER showed exclusively catastrophic failures in varying modes (nodes 3 to 5). Only in group RCT-FRC, half of the specimens fractured in a reparable fracture mode (modes 1 and 2) with veneering composite delamination from the glass-fiber weaver layer. As cusp

  18. Effect of superoxidized water and sodium hypochlorite, associated or not with EDTA, on organic and inorganic components of bovine root dentin.

    PubMed

    Ghisi, Alexandre Corrêa; Kopper, Patrícia Maria Poli; Baldasso, Flávia E R; Stürmer, Caroline P; Rossi-Fedele, Giampiero; Steier, Liviu; de Figueiredo, José Antonio Poli; Morgental, Renata Dornelles; Vier-Pelisser, Fabiana Vieira

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of Sterilox (Sx), a superoxidized water, 5% and 2% sodium hypochlorite (5NaOCl and 2NaOCl), and 17% EDTA (E) on the organic and inorganic components of bovine dentin. Eighty bovine incisors were randomly divided into 8 groups (n = 10): 5NaOCl, 5NaOCl + E, 2NaOCl, 2NaOCl + E, Sx, Sx + E, E alone, and distilled water (H2O). Root canal instrumentation was performed by using the corresponding irrigant. The apical 15 mm was longitudinally sectioned into 2 fragments, one for light microscopy analysis in slides stained with picrosirius red (organic component) and the other for scanning electron microscopy analysis (inorganic component). Scores data obtained in the light microscopy analysis were submitted to the Kruskal-Wallis test, followed by multiple comparisons test (P < .05). Scanning electron microscopy images were analyzed descriptively. The chemical solution 5NaOCl had a greater effect on the organic component of dentin in area and depth than 2NaOCl. The chemical solutions 5NaOCl + E, 5NaOCl and 2NaOCl + E caused the greatest change in the collagenous organic matrix near the root canal lumen. The chemical solution 2NaOCl showed similar behavior to Sx, associated or not with E, promoting more superficial disorganization of collagen in a smaller area. Demineralization was observed in all groups in which E was used. However, areas of erosion and open dentinal tubules were detected only when it was combined with NaOCl. Five percent NaOCl promoted the most extensive damage to the organic component of dentin, and when associated to EDTA, dentinal erosion could be seen. Considering these specific aspects, 2% NaOCl and Sx had milder effects on bovine root dentin. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Similar influence of stabilized alkaline and neutral sodium hypochlorite solutions on the fracture resistance of root canal-treated bovine teeth.

    PubMed

    Souza, Erick Miranda; Calixto, Amanda Martins; Lima, Camila Nara E; Pappen, Fernanda Geraldo; De-Deus, Gustavo

    2014-10-01

    Stabilizing sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) at an alkaline pH is proposed to increase solution stability and tissue dissolution ability; however, a reduction on the flexural strength of dentin discs has been found to be a side effect. This study sought to determine whether a stabilized alkaline NaOCl reduces the fracture resistance of root canal-treated bovine teeth after root canal preparation compared with a neutral solution counterpart. The 4 anterior incisors were removed from 20 mandibular bovine jaws, and each 1 was randomly assigned to 1 of 4 groups (20 teeth each). Teeth were prepared with a sequence of 6 K-type files. The following experimental groups received a different irrigation regimen: G1: distilled water (negative control), G2: 5% NaOCl at a pH of 7.2, and G3: 5% NaOCl at a pH of 12.8; in the positive control group (G4), teeth remained untreated. The time of contact and volume of solution were carefully standardized. After bone and periodontal ligament simulation, teeth were subjected to a fracture resistance test. A significant difference was observed among the 4 groups tested (analysis of variance, P < .05). The 5% NaOCl groups (G2 and G3) presented significantly lower resistance to fracture than the control (G1 and G4) (Tukey test, P < .05). Both NaOCl solutions similarly reduced the fracture resistance at approximately 30% (Tukey test, P > .05). No differences were observed between positive and negative control groups (Tukey test, P > .05). Stabilized alkaline and neutral NaOCl solutions similarly reduced the fracture resistance of root canal-treated bovine teeth by about 30%. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Reinforcing effect of a resin glass ionomer in the restoration of immature roots in vitro.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Fernando; Kaplan, Andrea; Roitman, Marcela; Manfré, Susana; Picca, Mariana

    2002-04-01

    Fifty-six extracted maxillary central incisors were used for this study. The crown of each tooth was removed in order to obtain a standard length of 13 mm. Root canals were enlarged to simulate immature teeth after apexification. The apical 2 mm of the root canal was obturated with gutta-percha and AH26 sealer. The specimens were divided into two groups. Group A was unrestored and served as positive control. In group B, the canal walls were reinforced with a resin modified glass ionomer using a translucent curing post. All teeth were subjected to compressive force using an Instron testing machine until fracture occurred. Group B showed an increased resistance to fracture (456.02 +/- 172.47 N) compared with group A (263.46 +/- 98.00 N). The difference between groups was statistically significant (P < 0.005).

  1. Influence of periodontal ligament simulation on bond strength and fracture resistance of roots restored with fiber posts.

    PubMed

    Marchionatti, Ana Maria Estivalete; Wandscher, Vinícius Felipe; Broch, Juliana; Bergoli, César Dalmolin; Maier, Juliana; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Kaizer, Osvaldo Bazzan

    2014-01-01

    Considering that periodontal ligament simulation may influence the stress distribution over teeth restored with intraradicular retainers, this study aimed to assess the combined effect of mechanical cycling and periodontal ligament simulation on both the bond strength between fiber posts and root dentin and the fracture resistance of teeth restored using glass fiber posts. Ninety roots were randomly distributed into 3 groups (n=10) (C-MC: control; P-MC: polyether; AS-MC: addition silicone) to test bond strength and 6 groups (n=10) (C: control; P: polyether; AS: addition silicone, without mechanical cycling, and C-MC, P-MC and AS-MC with mechanical cycling) to test fracture strength, according to the material used to simulate the periodontal ligament. For the bond strength test, fiber posts were cemented, cores were built, mechanical cycling was applied (2×10(6) cycles, 88 N, 2.2 Hz, and 45º incline), and the teeth cut into 3 slices (2 mm), which were then subjected to the push-out test at 1 mm/min. For the fracture strength test, fiber posts were cemented, cores were built, and half of the groups received mechanical cycling, followed by the compressive strength (45° to the long axis and 1 mm/min) performed on all groups. Periodontal ligament simulation did not affect the bond strength (p=0.244) between post and dentin. Simulation of periodontal ligament (p=0.153) and application of mechanical cycling (p=0.97) did not affect fracture resistance. The materials used to simulate the periodontal ligament did not affect fracture or bond strength, therefore periodontal ligament simulation using the tested materials could be considered optional in the conditions of the study.

  2. Influence of periodontal ligament simulation on bond strength and fracture resistance of roots restored with fiber posts

    PubMed Central

    MARCHIONATTI, Ana Maria Estivalete; WANDSCHER, Vinícius Felipe; BROCH, Juliana; BERGOLI, César Dalmolin; MAIER, Juliana; VALANDRO, Luiz Felipe; KAIZER, Osvaldo Bazzan

    2014-01-01

    Objective Considering that periodontal ligament simulation may influence the stress distribution over teeth restored with intraradicular retainers, this study aimed to assess the combined effect of mechanical cycling and periodontal ligament simulation on both the bond strength between fiber posts and root dentin and the fracture resistance of teeth restored using glass fiber posts. Material and Methods Ninety roots were randomly distributed into 3 groups (n=10) (C-MC: control; P-MC: polyether; AS-MC: addition silicone) to test bond strength and 6 groups (n=10) (C: control; P: polyether; AS: addition silicone, without mechanical cycling, and C-MC, P-MC and AS-MC with mechanical cycling) to test fracture strength, according to the material used to simulate the periodontal ligament. For the bond strength test, fiber posts were cemented, cores were built, mechanical cycling was applied (2×106 cycles, 88 N, 2.2 Hz, and 45º incline), and the teeth cut into 3 slices (2 mm), which were then subjected to the push-out test at 1 mm/min. For the fracture strength test, fiber posts were cemented, cores were built, and half of the groups received mechanical cycling, followed by the compressive strength (45° to the long axis and 1 mm/min) performed on all groups. Results Periodontal ligament simulation did not affect the bond strength (p=0.244) between post and dentin. Simulation of periodontal ligament (p=0.153) and application of mechanical cycling (p=0.97) did not affect fracture resistance. Conclusions The materials used to simulate the periodontal ligament did not affect fracture or bond strength, therefore periodontal ligament simulation using the tested materials could be considered optional in the conditions of the study. PMID:25466478

  3. [Fatigue and fracture resistance of the flared roots restored with computer aided design and computer aided manufacturing glass fiber posts].

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi; Wang, Xin-zhi; Gao, Cheng-zhi; Ivo, Krejci

    2013-02-18

    To evaluate the fatigue and fracture resistance of the flared roots restored with computer aided design (CAD) and computer aided manufacturing (CAM) glass fiber posts. In the study, 32 maxillary central incisors with roots longer than 13 mm were selected and their canals were flared, and the roots were allocated into 4 groups (n=8) by a random number chart: CAD/CAM glass fiber posts, prefabricated quartz fiber posts, cast gold alloy posts, and CAD/CAM zirconia posts. The posts were luted to the roots by resin cement and fabricate zirconia crown for every specimen. An addition-type silicone impression material was used to simulate the periodontal ligament. All the specimens were submitted to 1.2×10(6) cycles loaded with a 49 N force, at 45 degree to the long axis of the teeth simultaneously with 3 000 thermal cycles (5 °C-50 °C-5 °C). After that, the specimens were subjected to a load at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min in a servo-hydraulic testing machine applied at 45 degree to the long axis of the tooth until fracture. The data were subjected to ANOVA test and the patterns of the failure were examined. After the cycling loading, 4 crowns from prefabricated quartz fiber posts groups were deboned, and no other failure was found after the cycling loading; the fracture strengths of CAD/CAM glass fiber posts group [(441.5± 103.2) N] and cast gold alloy posts group [(462.9±170.0) N] were higher (F=4.613, P<0.05) than those of CAD/CAM zirconia posts group [(284.1±99.0) N] and prefabricated quartz fiber posts group [(315.4±112.3) N]; the entire specimens presented unfavorable failures. Although further in vitro and in vivo studies are necessary, the results of this study show that the use of CAD/CAM glass fiber posts and cast gold alloy posts may achieve better outcomes in flared roots than that of CAD/CAM zirconia posts and prefabricated quartz fiber posts.

  4. Comparison of conventional and semilunar coronally positioned flap techniques for root coverage in teeth with cervical abrasion restored with pink resin.

    PubMed

    Santos, Felipe Rychuv; Storrer, Carmen Lucia Mueller; Cunha, Emanuelle Juliana; Ulbrich, Lucienne M; Lopez, Camilo Andress Villabona; Deliberador, Tatiana Miranda

    2017-01-01

    Gingival recession is the most common mucogingival defect, characterized by apical migration of the gingival margin from the cementoenamel junction and root exposure. Several surgical techniques are reported for the treatment of gingival recession. Here we present a comparison of the conventional (coronally advanced flap) and semilunar coronally positioned flap techniques for root coverage in teeth with cervical abrasion restored with pink resin that mimics the color of the gingiva. Although the conventional technique is more predictable, we found that both techniques were effective in achieving satisfactory and esthetic root coverage.

  5. Comparison of conventional and semilunar coronally positioned flap techniques for root coverage in teeth with cervical abrasion restored with pink resin

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Felipe Rychuv; Storrer, Carmen Lucia Mueller; Cunha, Emanuelle Juliana; Ulbrich, Lucienne M; Lopez, Camilo Andress Villabona; Deliberador, Tatiana Miranda

    2017-01-01

    Gingival recession is the most common mucogingival defect, characterized by apical migration of the gingival margin from the cementoenamel junction and root exposure. Several surgical techniques are reported for the treatment of gingival recession. Here we present a comparison of the conventional (coronally advanced flap) and semilunar coronally positioned flap techniques for root coverage in teeth with cervical abrasion restored with pink resin that mimics the color of the gingiva. Although the conventional technique is more predictable, we found that both techniques were effective in achieving satisfactory and esthetic root coverage. PMID:28331369

  6. Influence of fatigue testing and cementation mode on the load-bearing capability of bovine incisors restored with crowns and FRC posts.

    PubMed

    Nothdurft, Frank P; Schmitt, Thomas; Rupf, Stefan; Pospiech, Peter R

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of fatigue and cementation mode on the fracture behaviour of endodontically treated bovine incisors restored with fiber-reinforced-composite (FRC) posts and crowns. Forty-eight endodontically treated incisors were restored with FRC posts, composite build-ups, and cast crowns. In 16 teeth, each of the posts were cemented conventionally with KetacCem (3M Espe) or adhesively with Panavia F (Kuraray) or RelyXUniCem (3M Espe). One-half of the specimens in each group were subjected to thermal cycling with 10,000 cycles at 5-55°C and mechanical aging, loading the specimens in 1,200,000 cycles with 50 N. Fracture resistance was determined by loading the specimens until fracture at an angle of 45°. The loading test showed that cementation mode and fatigue testing had an influence on the load bearing capability. Before fatigue testing no statistically significant differences between the different cementation modes could be detected. After fatigue testing, conventionally cemented FRC posts lead to statistically significant higher fracture loads compared to adhesively luted posts. Most specimens fractured in a favourable way, independent from the type of cementation.

  7. Prevalence of periradicular radiolucencies and its association with the quality of root canal procedures and coronal restorations in an adult urban Indian population

    PubMed Central

    Archana, Durvasulu; Gopikrishna, Velayutham; Gutmann, James L.; Savadamoorthi, Kamatchi Subramani; Kumar, Angambakkam Rajasekaran Pradeep; Narayanan, L. Lakshmi

    2015-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this cross-sectional study was to determine the prevalence of periradicular radiolucencies (PR) from an urban adult Indian population and to investigate the quality of root canal procedures and coronal restorations and their association with prevalence of PR in root-filled teeth. Settings and Design: Cross-sectional study. Material and Methods: A total of 1,340 subjects (18+ years of age) who reported for non-emergency dental care to 5 different dental care centers had their panoramic radiographs taken during the period from January to December 2013. The periradicular status of 30,098 teeth in these radiographs was evaluated using the Periapical Index Score (PAI). The assessment of the technical quality of the procedure was evaluated based on the criteria of root canal filling length and quality of coronal restoration. Statistical Analysis Used: The data was analyzed statistically by chi-squared test and odds ratio. Results: PR was found in 65% of subjects (n = 865) and 5.8% (n = 1,759) of the 30,098 teeth evaluated (4.30% untreated teeth and 1.53% were root-filled teeth). In all, 4.1% of the teeth (n = 1,234) had some filling material in the root canal(s) and the prevalence of PR in these root-filled teeth was 37.4%, while the remaining 62.6% of root canal-filled teeth showed no evidence of PR. PR occurred significantly more often in teeth where root canal filling was filled more than 2 mm short of radiographic apex or when root filling extruded through the apex. Conclusions: The prevalence of PR in teeth with untreated root canals in India is 4.30%, which is more than twice the weighted world average, while the prevalence of root-filled teeth (4.1%) is lower than the world average (9.6%). The prevalence of PR in root-filled teeth in India is comparable to that in other populations. Inadequate root canal treatment and poor quality of coronal restoration were associated with increased prevalence of PR. PMID:25657524

  8. Periapical status of non-root-filled teeth with resin composite, amalgam, or full crown restorations: a cross-sectional study of a Swedish adult population.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Victoria; Petersson, Kerstin; Wolf, Eva; Akerman, Sigvard

    2014-09-01

    Experimental studies show that dental pulp cells respond unfavorably to contact with resin composite restorative material. Hypothetically, in a random population, the frequency of apical periodontitis should be higher for teeth restored with resin composite than with amalgam. Therefore, the aim was to compare the periapical status of non-root-filled teeth restored with resin composite, amalgam, or laboratory-fabricated crowns in an adult Swedish population. The subjects comprised 440 individuals from a randomly selected sample of 1,000 adult residents of a Swedish county. The type, material, and quality of the restorations were recorded for all non-root-filled teeth by clinical examination and intraoral clinical photographs. Periapical status was evaluated on panoramic radiographs. The association between periapical status and type, material, and quality of the restorations was analyzed using the chi-square test and logistic regression analysis. There was no significant difference in the frequency of apical periodontitis (AP) between teeth restored with resin composite or amalgam (1.3% and 1.1%, respectively). The frequency of AP for teeth restored with laboratory-fabricated crowns was significantly higher (6.3%). Regression analysis showed no association between AP and resin composite restorations but a significant association with laboratory-fabricated crowns. The results indicate that the risk of damage to the pulp-dentin complex from exposure to resin composite material and dentin bonding agents shown in experimental studies is not reflected in the clinical setting. However, in the study sample, AP was diagnosed in a significantly higher proportion of teeth restored with laboratory-fabricated crowns. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of a CO2 Laser on the Inhibition of Root Surface Caries Adjacent to Restorations of Glass Ionomer Cement or Composite Resin: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, L. C.; Araújo, F. C.; Zancopé, B. R.; Hanashiro, F. S.; Nobre-dos-Santos, M.; Youssef, M. N.; Souza-Zaroni, W. C.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of CO2 laser irradiation on the inhibition of secondary caries on root surfaces adjacent to glass ionomer cement (GIC) or composite resin (CR) restorations. 40 dental blocks were divided into 4 groups: G1 (negative control): cavity preparation + adhesive restoration with CR; G2: (positive control) cavity preparation + GIC restoration; G3: equal to group 1 + CO2 laser with 6 J/cm2; G4: equal to group 2 + CO2 laser. The blocks were submitted to thermal and pH cycling. Dental demineralization around restorations was quantified using microhardness analyses and Light-Induced Fluorescence (QLF). The groups showed no significant differences in mineral loss at depths between 20 μm and 40 μm. At 60 μm, G2 and G3 ≠ G1, but G4 = G1, G2 and G3. At 80 μm, G4 ≠ G1, and at 100 μm, G4 = G2 = G1. At 140 and 220 μm, G2, G3, and G4 = G1. The averages obtained using QFL in groups 1, 2, 3, and 4 were 0.637, 0.162, 0.095, and 0.048, respectively. QLF and microhardness analyses showed that CO2 laser irradiation reduced mineral loss around the CR restorations but that it did not increase the anticariogenic effect of GIC restorations. PMID:26347900

  10. Immediate Implant Placement of a Single Central Incisor Using a CAD/CAM Crown-Root Form Technique: Provisional to Final Restoration.

    PubMed

    Vafiadis, Dean; Goldstein, Gary; Garber, David; Lambrakos, Anthony; Kowalski, Bj

    2017-02-01

    Preserving soft and hard tissues after extraction and implant placement is crucial for anterior esthetics. This technique will show how the information gathered from a cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan of the maxillary left central incisor and an intra-oral digital impression can be merged to fabricate a CAD/CAM crown-root matrix to be used as an immediate provisional restoration that mimics the natural anatomy. Due to trauma, a left central incisor appeared to be fractured and was scheduled for extraction and implant placement. The crown-root configuration captured by the CBCT scan was merged with the digital files from an intra-oral digital impression. A CAD/CAM crown-root matrix was fabricated. Because the matrix shell was fabricated with the exact anatomy of the natural tooth, it replicated the position and three dimensional anatomy of the soft and hard tissue. It was connected to the implant with a customized provisional abutment. A digital impression of a coded healing abutment was made to fabricate the final implant abutment and final restoration. Throughout the treatment time and 36 months after completion, the thickness of tissue, emergence profile, and adjacent papilla was analyzed by clinical evaluation and photography and seemed to be maintained. The use of a pre-operative intra-oral digital scan of the clinical crown-root architecture and the CBCT scan of the bone/root anatomy, can be used together to fabricate a CAD/CAM crown-root form provisional matrix. This digital design helps in the preservation of the 3D tissue topography, as well as the final restoration. The preservation of soft and hard tissue after extraction and implant placement has always been paramount for ideal anterior implant esthetics. Using the information from digital files from CBCT scans and intra-oral scans may help the clinician identify critical anatomical features that can be replicated in the provisional and final CAD/CAM restoration. (J Esthet Restor Dent 29

  11. Fracture Resistance of Endodontically Treated Roots Restored with Fiber Posts Using Different Resin Cements- An In-vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Irodi, Sujatha; Mehta, Deepak; Subramanya, Shankar; Govindaraju, Vinay Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The influence of the remaining coronal tooth structure along with intra-radicular esthetic posts increases fracture resistance of fractured teeth especially in the anterior region. The advent of resin based luting cements improves the adhesion of fiber posts. Aim To evaluate the fracture resistance of endodontically treated roots restored with fiber posts using different resin cements – Calibra (etch and rinse), PermaFlo® DC (self-etch primer) and SmartCem2 (self-adhesive). Materials and Methods Extracted human maxillary central incisors having similar dimensions were decoronated at the Cemento-Enamel Junction (CEJ) to create 16mm long specimens and endodontically treated. A total of 45 teeth were divided into three groups with 15 teeth each for cementation of easy fiber posts (size1, 0.8mm diameter). Post spaces were prepared to a depth of 10mm. Group 1 – Caulk 34% phosphoric acid gel, dual cure adhesive Prime and Bond NT followed by luting of post with Calibra cement. Group 2 – Ultra – etch then Primer A and Primer B, and PermaFlo® DC was used to cement the post. Group 3 – SmartCem2 [1:1 ratio] was used to cement the post. The excess lengths of posts were seared and teeth were mounted on acrylic blocks and loaded under compressive force to the long axis of the tooth which increased in periodic pattern of 1mm/min. The value of the force at which each root section gets fractured was noted. The data were statistically analysed using ANOVA and Tukey’s Test. Results The mean fracture load (and SD) were as follows Group 1 – 762.400 (251.490); Group 2 – 662.933 (206.709); Group 3 – 657.800 (57.372). No statistically significant differences were seen among all three Groups, p-value (0.228). Conclusion Posts cemented using self -adhesive resin cement SmartCem2 have highest fracture resistance and bonding efficacy of self-adhesive technique showed reliably better results but was comparable to total–etch and self–etch techniques. PMID

  12. Bacterial leakage of mineral trioxide aggregate as compared with zinc-free amalgam, intermediate restorative material, and Super-EBA as a root-end filling material.

    PubMed

    Fischer, E J; Arens, D E; Miller, C H

    1998-03-01

    Several dye leakage studies have demonstrated the fact that mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) leaks significantly less than other root-end filling materials. The purpose of this study was to determine the time needed for Serratia marcescens to penetrate a 3 mm thickness of zinc-free amalgam, Intermediate Restorative Material (IRM), Super-EBA, and MTA when these materials were used as root-end filling materials. Fifty-six, single-rooted extracted human teeth were cleaned and shaped with a series of .04 Taper rotary instruments (Pro-series 29 files). Once the canals were prepared in a crown down approach, the ends were resected and 48 root-end cavities were ultrasonically prepared to a 3 mm depth. The teeth were then steam sterilized. Using an aseptic technique, under a laminar air flow hood, the root-end cavities were filled with amalgam, IRM, Super-EBA, and MTA. Four root-end cavities were filled with thermoplasticized gutta-percha without a root canal sealer and served as positive controls. Another four root-end cavities were filled with sticky wax covered with two layers of nail polish and served as negative controls. The teeth were attached to presterilized (ethylene oxide gas) plastic caps, and the root ends were placed into 12-ml vials of phenol red broth. Using a micropipette, a tenth of a milliliter of S. marcescens was placed into the root canal of each tooth. To test the sterility of the apparatus set-up, the root canals of two teeth with test root-end filling materials and one tooth from the positive and negative control groups were filled with sterile saline. The number of days required for S. marcescens to penetrate the four root-end filling materials and grow in the phenol red broth was recorded and analyzed. Most of the samples filled with zinc-free amalgam leaked bacteria in 10 to 63 days. IRM began leaking 28 to 91 days. Super-EBA began leaking 42 to 101 days. MTA did not begin leaking until day 49. At the end of the study, four of the MTA samples

  13. The effect of CO2 laser irradiation plus fluoride dentifrice on the inhibition of secondary caries on root surfaces adjacent to glass ionomer cement or composite resin restorations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, S. R.; Moraes, M.; Hanashiro, F. S.; Youssef, M. N.; Brugnera Junior, A.; Nobre-dos-Santos, M.; de Souza-Zaroni, W. C.

    2016-02-01

    Although the cariostatic effects of CO2 laser on the root surface have been shown, there is scarce information regarding its effects on root secondary caries. The objective of this research was to investigate the effect of the association of CO2 laser and a fluoride dentifrice on the inhibition of secondary caries on root surfaces adjacent to composite-resin or glass-ionomer-cement restorations. Dental blocks of human roots were divided into two groups: composite resin (CR) or glass ionomer cement (GIC). Subsequently, the blocks were divided into four subgroups (n  =  10): C, non-fluoride dentifrice; FD, fluoride dentifrice; L, CO2 laser with an energy density of 6.0 J cm-2  +  non-fluoride dentifrice; and L  +  FD, CO2 laser  +  fluoride dentifrice. The blocks were subjected to pH cycling to simulate a high cariogenic challenge. Dental demineralization around the restorations was quantified by microhardness analysis. The results were subjected to analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Tukey-Kramer test (p  ⩽  0.05). As for mineral loss, it can be observed that all the groups that were treated with a fluoride dentifrice and laser, used alone or not, were statistically similar and superior to the RC-C group. It was concluded that CO2 laser irradiation and a fluoride dentifrice used alone or combined with each other are efficient surface treatments for preventing secondary root caries, regardless of the restorative material used.

  14. Effect of different filling materials in combination with intraradicular posts on the resistance to fracture of weakened roots.

    PubMed

    Marchi, G M; Paulillo, L A M S; Pimenta, L A F; De Lima, F A P

    2003-06-01

    The preservation and restoration of severely weakened pulpless teeth is a difficult and relatively unpredictable procedure. This study evaluated the resistance to fracture of experimentally weakened bovine roots internally reconstructed with different filling materials in combination with prefabricated post compared with restored roots that were relatively intact. The roots of 75 mandibular bovine incisors with similar bulks were selected. Of these, 60 were internally prepared to standardized dimensions, thereby simulating weakness. All roots were filled with different restorative materials. The specimens were submitted to the fracture resistance testing with the application of a tangential compressive loading at an angle of 135 degrees in relation to the long axes of the roots. Results indicated statistically significant differences in relation to the root conditions. Weakened roots were less resistant to fracture than were controls. The roots restored with the resin cement demonstrated the lowest fracture resistance values, but statistically significant differences were observed only when compared with those restored by the resin-modified glass-ionomer cement. Resin-modified glass-ionomer cement, polyacid-modified resin composite and resin composite behaved similarly without statistically significant differences among them. None of the materials evaluated were capable of achieving the fracture resistance recorded for unweakened controls.

  15. Marginal adaptation and fracture resistance of root-canal treated mandibular molars with intracoronal restorations: effect of thermocycling and mechanical loading.

    PubMed

    Hitz, Thomas; Ozcan, Mutlu; Göhring, Till N

    2010-08-01

    This study evaluated the marginal adaptation, fracture modes, and loads to failure of different mesio-occlusal- distal (MOD) restorations in root canal treated molars in vitro. Forty mandibular first molars were randomly assigned to five groups (n = 8): UTR= untreated, RCT-AM= root-canal treated (RCT)+amalgam filling; RCT-COM= RCT+direct composite resin restoration; RCTFRC= RCT+composite resin restoration with two layers of multidirectional woven glass fibers; RCT-CER= RCT+ceramic inlay. All teeth were subjected to thermocycling and mechanical loading (TCML) in a computer-controlled masticator (1,200,000 loads, 49 N, 1.7 Hz, 3000 temperature cycles of 5°C to 50°C). Marginal adaptation was evaluated before and after TCML by scanning electron microscopy at 200X at the tooth/restoration interfaces. After TCML, all specimens were loaded to failure in a universal testing machine at 0.5 mm/min. Failure types were analyzed and scored (reparable: modes 1 and 2; catastrophic: modes 3 to 5). Data were analyzed with ANOVA and Bonferroni correction. Marginal adaptation decreased significantly after TCML in all groups. The highest decrease was observed in RCT-FRC (before: 89.9 ± 2.2%, after TCML: 49.8 ± 11.9%) and the lowest in RCT-CER (before TCML: 90.3 ± 2.6% after TCML 80.4 ± 9.0%). Loads to failure (in N) were in descending order as follows: UTR: 3048 ± 905; RCT-CER: 1853 ± 477; RCT-AM: 1447 ± 363; RCT-FRC: 1066 ± 306; RCT-COM 960 ± 228. While UTR resulted in statistically higher loads to failure than those of all other groups (p < 0.0001), RCT-CER showed significantly higher results than those of RCT-COM (p = 0.0014) and RCT-FRC (p = 0.0042). The UTR group showed exclusively reparable failures in the form of either superficial (mode 1) or complete cusp chipping (mode 2), but all restored teeth exhibited catastrophic failures involving fractures along or through the restoration (modes 3 to 5). None of the restored teeth in any group were able to bear the same

  16. Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium and Escherichia coli Contamination of Root and Leaf Vegetables Grown in Soils with Incorporated Bovine Manure

    PubMed Central

    Natvig, Erin E.; Ingham, Steven C.; Ingham, Barbara H.; Cooperband, Leslie R.; Roper, Teryl R.

    2002-01-01

    Bovine manure, with or without added Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (three strains), was incorporated into silty clay loam (SCL) and loamy sand (LS) soil beds (53- by 114-cm surface area, 17.5 cm deep) and maintained in two controlled-environment chambers. The S. enterica serovar Typhimurium inoculum was 4 to 5 log CFU/g in manure-fertilized soil. The conditions in the two environmental chambers, each containing inoculated and uninoculated beds of manure-fertilized soil, simulated daily average Madison, Wis., weather conditions (hourly temperatures, rainfall, daylight, and humidity) for a 1 March or a 1 June manure application and subsequent vegetable growing seasons ending 9 August or 28 September, respectively. Core soil samples were taken biweekly from both inoculated and uninoculated soil beds in each chamber. Radishes, arugula, and carrots were planted in soil beds, thinned, and harvested. Soils, thinned vegetables, and harvested vegetables were analyzed for S. enterica serovar Typhimurium and Escherichia coli (indigenous in manure). After the 1 March manure application, S. enterica serovar Typhimurium was detected at low levels in both soils on 31 May, but not on vegetables planted 1 May and harvested 12 July from either soil. After the 1 June manure application, S. enterica serovar Typhimurium was detected in SCL soil on 7 September and on radishes and arugula planted in SCL soil on 15 August and harvested on 27 September. In LS soil, S. enterica serovar Typhimurium died at a similar rate (P ≥ 0.05) after the 1 June manure application and was less often detected on arugula and radishes harvested from this soil compared to the SCL soil. Pathogen levels on vegetables were decreased by washing. Manure application in cool (daily average maximum temperature of <10°C) spring conditions is recommended to ensure that harvested vegetables are not contaminated with S. enterica serovar Typhimurium. Manure application under warmer (daily average maximum

  17. Effects of NaOCl, EDTA and MTAD when applied to dentine on stress distribution in post-restored roots with flared canals.

    PubMed

    Belli, S; Eraslan, O; Eraslan, O; Eskitascioglu, M; Eskitascioglu, G

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the effect of NaOCl, EDTA and MTAD on the stress distribution and levels in roots with flared canals and three different aesthetic post systems using finite element stress analysis (FEA). Three-dimensional (3D) FEA models simulating a maxillary incisor with excessive structural loss and flared root canals were created. The dentine of the first models of each post group was assumed as homogenous, whereas the others were deemed as having their elastic modulus affected up to 100 μm deep as a result of irrigation protocol (5.25 NaOCl, 17% EDTA and MTAD for 2 h). A sound incisor tooth model was used as the control. Restorations were created according to the post system used (pre-fabricated fibre post (PFP)), polyethylene fibre (Ribbond) post and core build-up (RBP), and one-piece milled zirconia post and core (ZP). Ceramic crowns were added to the models. A 300-N static load was applied at the centre of the palatal surface of the models to calculate the stress distributions. The SolidWorks/Cosmosworks structural analysis programmes were used for FEA analysis. Results were presented by considering von Mises criteria. The analysis of the von Mises stresses revealed that RBP created less stress in the remaining root dentine when compared to PFP and ZP. ZP maintained the stresses inside its body and reduced stress on the palatal surface of the root; however, it forwarded more stress towards the apical area. NaOCl-, EDTA- and MTAD-treated dentine increased the stresses within the root structure regardless of the effect of the post system used (11-15.4 MPa for PFP, 9.5-13.02 MPa for RBP and 14.2 MPa for ZP). Amongst the irrigation solutions used, EDTA and MTAD increased the stresses more than NaOCl in all models. All the irrigation solutions showed the same stress levels and distributions in the ZP model. NaOCl-, EDTA- and MTAD- treated dentine and a rigid post with high elastic modulus may increase fracture risk in roots with flared canals by increasing the

  18. Crystallographic texture and elemental composition mapped in bovine root dentin at the 200 nm level.

    PubMed

    Deymier-Black, A C; Veis, A; Cai, Z; Stock, S R

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between the mineralization of peritubular dentin (PTD) and intertubular dentin (ITD) is not well understood. Tubules are quite small, diameter ∼2 µm, and this makes the near-tubule region of dentin difficult to study. Here, advanced characterization techniques are applied in a novel way to examine what organic or nanostructural signatures may indicate the end of ITD or the beginning of PTD mineralization. X-ray fluorescence intensity (Ca, P, and Zn) and X-ray diffraction patterns from carbonated apatite (cAp) were mapped around dentintubules at resolutions ten times smaller than the feature size (200 nm pixels), representing a 36% increase in resolution over earlier work. In the near tubule volumes of near-pulp, root dentin, Zn intensity was higher than in ITD remote from the tubules. This increase in Zn(2+), as determined by X-ray absorption near edge structure analysis, may indicate the presence of metalloenzymes or transcription factors important to ITD or PTD mineralization. The profiles of the cAp 00.2 X-ray diffraction rings were fitted with a pseudo-Voigt function, and the spatial and azimuthal distribution of these rings' integrated intensities indicated that the cAp platelets were arranged with their c-axes aligned tangential to the edge of the tubule lumen. This texture was continuous throughout the dentin indicating a lack of structural difference between in the Zn rich near-tubular region and the remote ITD.

  19. Fracture resistance of single-rooted pulpless teeth using hybrid CAD/CAM blocks for post and core restoration.

    PubMed

    Passos, Leandro; Barino, Bianca; Laxe, Laisa; Street, Alexandre

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether there is a significant difference in the fracture strengths of hybrid computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) blocks and fiber posts for post and core restorations in both ferrule and nonferrule pulpless mandibular canines. Forty extracted human mandibular canines were divided into ferrule and nonferrule groups and restored with hybrid CAD/CAM blocks using either the CAD/CAM system or fiber posts (control). Thus, there were four subgroups of ten specimens each. A 45-degree oblique load was applied with a crosshead of 0.5 mm/min, and the fracture loads were recorded. The mode of fracture was evaluated using an optical microscope at 3× magnification, and the data were tabulated and statistically analyzed using the Mann-Whitney U test and the t test, respectively, for the existence of significant difference at a 0.05 significance level. No statistically significant difference was found between the fracture strength under oblique loading when using hybrid CAD/CAM blocks and fiber posts in both ferrule and nonferrule groups. The failure mode distribution of the nonferrule group presented no unfavorable failures, whereas failures in the ferrule groups were spread out between the Favorable and Unfavorable groups. The results show that hybrid CAD/CAM blocks can be considered as an alternative restorative system in post and core restorations. Further basic and clinical research should be conducted to support the improvement of this system.

  20. The role of river hydrology on Salix shoot and root survival statistics on the alluvial sediment of a restored river corridor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquale, Nicola; Perona, Paolo; Verones, Francesca; Francis, Robert; Burlando, Paolo

    2010-05-01

    In river restoration projects there is considerable interest in understanding the morphodynamics of river reaches in relation to the characteristics of vegetation that may colonize the bare alluvial sediment, and locally stabilize it by root anchoring. Vegetation interacts with river hydrology on multiple time scales, but such interactions are at present still poorly understood. In this contribution, we discuss both the above and below ground biomass growth dynamics of 1188 Salix cuttings (individual and group survival rate, growth of the longest shoots and number of branches and morphological root analysis) in relation to local river hydrodynamics. Cuttings were organized in square plots of different size and planted in spring 2009 on a gravel island of the restored river section of River Thur (Niederneunforn, Canton Thurgau, Switzerland). Cuttings in the plots were monitored regularly, from the beginning of the campaign (March) until the end of the growing season (October). We obtained a detailed and quite unique set of data, which includes, among others, root characteristic statistics obtained from image and high-resolution scanner analysis of carefully uprooted samples. Beyond describing the survival rate dynamics in relation to river hydrology, we show the nature and strength of correlations between island topography, cutting growth statistics and local reach morphodynamics (see also Pasquale et. al.3, session HS 3.1). In particular, by comparing empirical histograms of the vertical root distribution vs. those of the saturated water surface in the sediment, we show that main tropic responses are oxytropism, hydrotropism and thigmotropism. Moreover, by numerical modelling of the local hydrodynamics, we can also identify the spatial distribution of preferential locations of oxytropism and hydrotropism. As far as factors causing mortality are concerned, we also show that erosion by flood is responsible for influencing the spatial and temporal distribution of the

  1. Management of Invasive Cervical Root Resorption in a Mandibular Canine Using Biodentine as a Restorative Material: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Eftekhar, Leila; Ashraf, Hengameh; Jabbari, Sanaa

    2017-01-01

    Invasive cervical root resorption (ICR) is the reversible/irreversible loss of tooth structure in the connective tissue attachment zone with unclear etiology. In the present case a history of periodontal surgery was presumed to be the predisposing factor. Early diagnosis and proper treatment may lead to long-term retention of the tooth. The tooth is usually asymptomatic and diagnosis is commonly made as a result of a routine radiographic finding. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is extremely useful in diagnosis and treatment planning of ICR. The treatment should aim toward complete removal of the resorptive defect and reconstruction by placement of a suitable filling material. The present report demonstrates the management of a mandibular canine with invasive cervical root resorption using Biodentine for the defect. PMID:28808471

  2. MicroCT analysis of a retrieved root restored with a bonded fiber-reinforced composite dowel: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Lorenzoni, Fabio Cesar; Bonfante, Estevam A; Bonfante, Gerson; Martins, Leandro M; Witek, Lukasz; Silva, Nelson R F A

    2013-08-01

    This evaluation aimed to (1) validate micro-computed tomography (microCT) findings using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging, and (2) quantify the volume of voids and the bonded surface area resulting from fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) dowel cementation technique using microCT scanning technology/3D reconstructing software. A fiberglass dowel was cemented in a condemned maxillary lateral incisor prior to its extraction. A microCT scan was performed of the extracted tooth creating a large volume of data in DICOM format. This set of images was imported to image-processing software to inspect the internal architecture of structures. The outer surface and the spatial relationship of dentin, FRC dowel, cement layer, and voids were reconstructed. Three-dimensional spatial architecture of structures and volumetric analysis revealed that 9.89% of the resin cement was composed of voids and that the bonded area between root dentin and cement was 60.63% larger than that between cement and FRC dowel. SEM imaging demonstrated the presence of voids similarly observed using microCT technology (aim 1). MicroCT technology was able to nondestructively measure the volume of voids within the cement layer and the bonded surface area at the root/cement/FRC interfaces (aim 2). The interfaces at the root dentin/cement/dowel represent a timely and relevant topic where several efforts have been conducted in the past few years to understand their inherent features. MicroCT technology combined with 3D reconstruction allows for not only inspecting the internal arrangement rendered by fiberglass adhesively bonded to root dentin, but also estimating the volume of voids and contacted bond area between the dentin and cement layer. © 2013 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  3. Intercostal nerve crossing to restore elbow flexion and sensibility of the hand for a root avulsion type of brachial plexus injury.

    PubMed

    Ogino, T; Naito, T

    1995-01-01

    Ten patients with a root avulsion type of brachial plexus injury were treated with simultaneous intercostal nerve crossing to the musculocutaneous and median nerves, and nine cases were followed for more than 40 months. The average interval from injury to surgery was 2.7 months. The average age at operation was 18.6 years. The elbow flexor was M4 in six patients, M3 in two patients, and M1 in one patient. The wrist flexor was more than M3 in six patients and less than M2 in four patients. The finger flexor was more than M3 in four patients and less than M2 in five patients. Protective sensation in the areas innervated by the musculocutaneous and median nerves was restored in all cases.

  4. The radio-radial nerve transfer for elbow extension restoration in C5 to C7 nerve root injury.

    PubMed

    Flores, Leandro Pretto

    2012-01-01

    Extension of the elbow is required to oppose gravity; however, activation of the triceps brachii is frequently underestimated during the surgical planning for brachial plexus injuries. This report aims to describe a novel technique of distal nerve transfer designed for elbow extension reconstruction in patients sustaining a C5-C7 nerve root injury. We report a patient sustaining a brachial plexus injury with triceps palsy and preserved finger extension motion; after careful intraneural dissection of the radial nerve, a fascicle innervating the extensor digitorum communis muscle was sectioned, derouted and connected to a motor branch to the lateral head of the triceps. Eleven months after surgery, elbow extension strength scored MRC M4. No deficits on finger extension were observed. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Rectal gel application of Withania somnifera root extract expounds anti-inflammatory and muco-restorative activity in TNBS-induced Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) is marked with chronic inflammation of intestinal epithelium driven by oxidative stress. Traditional treatments with plant extracts gained renewed interest due to their ability to ameliorate the multi factorial conditions like inflammation. We investigated the beneficial effects of Withania somnifera in Trinitro Benzyl Sulfonic Acid (TNBS) induced experimental IBD through a rectally applicable formulation. Methods The study included (i) preparation of gel formulation from aqueous Withania somnifera root extract (WSRE), (ii) biochemical assays to determine its performance potential, (iii) testing of formulation efficacy in TNBS-induced IBD rat model, and (iv) histo-patholgical studies to assess its healing and muco-regenerative effect in IBD-induced rats. For this purpose, concentration dependant antioxidant activity of the extracts were evaluated using biochemical assays like (a) inhibition of lipid peroxidation, (b) NO scavenging, (c) H2O2 scavenging, and (d) ferric reducing power assay. Results The extract, at 500 μg/ml, the highest concentration tested, showed 95.6% inhibition of lipid peroxidation, 14.8% NO scavenging, 81.79% H2O2 scavenging and a reducing capacity of 0.80. The results were comparable with standard antioxidants, ascorbic acid and curcumin. WSRE treatment positively scored on histopathological parameters like necrosis, edema, neutrophil infiltration. The post treatment intestinal features showed restoration at par with the healthy intestine. In view of these results, gel formulation containing an aqueous extract of W. somnifera, prepared for rectal application was tested for its anti-inflammatory activity in TNBS-induced rat models for IBD. Commercially available anti-inflammatory drug Mesalamine was used as the standard in this assay. Conclusions Dose of the rectal gel applied at 1000 mg of WSRE per kg rat weight showed significant muco-restorative efficacy in the IBD-induced rats, validated by histo

  6. Characterization of set Intermediate Restorative Material, Biodentine, Bioaggregate and a prototype calcium silicate cement for use as root-end filling materials.

    PubMed

    Grech, L; Mallia, B; Camilleri, J

    2013-07-01

    To investigate the composition of materials and leachate of a hydrated prototype cement composed of tricalcium silicate and radiopacifier and compare this to other tricalcium silicate-based cements (Biodentine and Bioaggregate) to assess whether the additives in the proprietary brand cements affect the hydration of the materials, using Intermediate Restorative Material (IRM), a standard root-end filling material as a control. The materials investigated included a prototype-radiopacified tricalcium silicate cement, Biodentine, Bioaggregate and Intermediate Restorative Material (IRM). The pH and calcium ion concentration of the leachate were investigated. The hydrated cements were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray energy dispersive analysis (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). All the cements tested were alkaline. The tricalcium silicate-based cements leached calcium in solution. Scanning electron microscopy of the prototype-radiopacified tricalcium silicate cement, Biodentine and Bioaggregate displayed hydrating cement grains, surrounded by a matrix composed of calcium silicate hydrate and calcium hydroxide. The presence of calcium hydroxide was evident from the XRD plots. FT-IR indicated the occurrence of a poorly crystalline calcium silicate hydrate. Biodentine displayed the presence of calcium carbonate. Bioaggregate incorporated a phosphate-containing phase. IRM consisted of zinc oxide interspersed in an organic matrix. The hydration of prototype-radiopacified tricalcium silicate cement, Biodentine and Bioaggregate resulted in the formation of calcium silicate hydrate and calcium hydroxide, which was leached in solution. The hydrated materials were composed of a cementitous phase that was rich in calcium and silicon and a radiopacifying material. Biodentine included calcium carbonate, and Bioaggregate included silica and calcium phosphate in the powders. IRM was composed of zinc oxide

  7. Comparison of marginal adaptation of mineral trioxide aggregate, glass ionomer cement and intermediate restorative material as root-end filling materials, using scanning electron microscope: An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Gundam, Sirisha; Patil, Jayaprakash; Venigalla, Bhuvan Shome; Yadanaparti, Sravanthi; Maddu, Radhika; Gurram, Sindhura Reddy

    2014-11-01

    The present study compares the marginal adaption of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA), Glass Ionomer Cement (GIC) and Intermediate Restorative Material (IRM) as root-end filling materials in extracted human teeth using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Thirty single rooted human teeth were obturated with Gutta-percha after cleaning and shaping. Apical 3 mm of roots were resected and retrofilled with MTA, GIC and IRM. One millimeter transverse section of the retrofilled area was used to study the marginal adaptation of the restorative material with the dentin. Mounted specimens were examined using SEM at approximately 15 Kv and 10(-6) Torr under high vacuum condition. At 2000 X magnification, the gap size at the material-tooth interface was recorded at 2 points in microns. One way ANOVA Analysis of the data from the experimental group was carried out with gap size as the dependent variable, and material as independent variable. The lowest mean value of gap size was recorded in MTA group (0.722 ± 0.438 μm) and the largest mean gap in GIC group (1.778 ± 0.697 μm). MTA showed least gap size when compared to IRM and GIC suggesting a better marginal adaptation.

  8. Comparison of marginal adaptation of mineral trioxide aggregate, glass ionomer cement and intermediate restorative material as root-end filling materials, using scanning electron microscope: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Gundam, Sirisha; Patil, Jayaprakash; Venigalla, Bhuvan Shome; Yadanaparti, Sravanthi; Maddu, Radhika; Gurram, Sindhura Reddy

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The present study compares the marginal adaption of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA), Glass Ionomer Cement (GIC) and Intermediate Restorative Material (IRM) as root-end filling materials in extracted human teeth using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Materials and Methods: Thirty single rooted human teeth were obturated with Gutta-percha after cleaning and shaping. Apical 3 mm of roots were resected and retrofilled with MTA, GIC and IRM. One millimeter transverse section of the retrofilled area was used to study the marginal adaptation of the restorative material with the dentin. Mounted specimens were examined using SEM at approximately 15 Kv and 10-6 Torr under high vacuum condition. At 2000 X magnification, the gap size at the material-tooth interface was recorded at 2 points in microns. Statistical Analysis: One way ANOVA Analysis of the data from the experimental group was carried out with gap size as the dependent variable, and material as independent variable. Results: The lowest mean value of gap size was recorded in MTA group (0.722 ± 0.438 μm) and the largest mean gap in GIC group (1.778 ± 0.697 μm). Conclusion: MTA showed least gap size when compared to IRM and GIC suggesting a better marginal adaptation. PMID:25506146

  9. The Impact of a 940 nm Diode Laser with Radial Firing Tip and Bare End Fiber Tip on Enterococcus faecalis in the Root Canal Wall Dentin of Bovine Teeth: An In Vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Schulte-Lünzum, Ruth; Gutknecht, Norbert; Conrads, Georg; Franzen, Rene

    2017-07-01

    This in vitro study aimed to compare the bactericidal effect of two different laser delivery systems, a radial firing tip (RFT) and bare end fiber tip (BFT) used with the 940 nm diode laser on Enterococcus faecalis inoculated onto bovine radicular dentin. A total of 100 bovine dentin slices with a defined thickness of 500 and 1000 μm were prepared. They were assigned into four test groups together with untreated samples served as control for each slice thickness. The slices were inoculated on one side with 1 μL E. faecalis suspension and laser irradiation was performed indirectly on the opposite side with the 940 nm diode laser delivered with a 200 μm RFT and a BFT at 1 and 1.5 W in continuous wave mode for 8 sec per cycle and repeated four times. After irradiation, the remaining bacteria were detached and the produced suspension was diluted and plated onto blood agar plates with 5% sheep blood and incubated overnight at 37°C in a CO2-rich atmosphere. The colony-forming units of E. faecalis were counted and the bacterial reduction was analyzed. The diode laser equipped with RFT fiber design further reduced the number of vital E. faecalis cells significantly compared with BFT design, regardless of the used power and dentin thickness (p < 0.0001). The highest average value of 4 log kills was observed in 500 μm slice thickness irradiated with RFT at 1.5 W. Temperature measurements on the external root surface at 1 mm from the apex did not elicit a harmful temperature elevation in both power settings and fiber designs. Within the studied parameters, 940 nm diode laser in conjugation with RFT showed a satisfactory bactericidal effect without any thermal side effect to the tooth-supporting tissues.

  10. The combination of a mineral trioxide aggregate and an adhesive restorative approach to treat a crown-root fracture coupled with lateral root perforation in a mandibular second molar: a case report.

    PubMed

    Wang, P; Wang, S; Ni, L

    2009-01-01

    The current paper describes a modified treatment procedure for a traumatized mandibular left second molar resulting in a crown-root fracture and root perforation with the fracture line below the gingival attachment and alveolar bone crest. After the mobile crown-root fragment was extracted, the root perforation was obturated with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), and the subgingival defect was directly repaired with polyacid-modified resin composites (Ionosite Baseline). A 24-month recall showed no evidence of periodontal inflammation and no adverse symptoms, and the treated tooth exhibited good healing and normal function.

  11. Comparing the reinforcing effects of a resin modified glassionomer cement, Flowable compomer, and Flowable composite in the restoration of calcium hydroxide-treated immature roots in vitro.

    PubMed

    Prathibha, Rani S

    2011-01-01

    One hundred and sixty human permanent central incisors were enlarged to a 120 file size after crown removal procedure to simulate immature teeth. The root canals were filled with calcium hydroxide and stored for 15 days (phase I), 30 days (phase II), 90 days (phase III), and 180 days (Phase IV). At the end of these selected time periods, calcium hydroxide was cleaned off the root canals of forty teeth that were randomly selected and obturated with gutta-percha points in the apical 2 mm of the root canals with a sealer. The specimens were further equally divided into four groups. Unrestored Group I served as control and the root canals of teeth in the other three group specimens were reinforced with resin modified glassionomer cement (RMGIC) (Group II), Flowable Compomer (Group III), and Flowable Composite (Group IV), respectively, using a translucent curing post. All specimens were subjected to compressive force using an Instron Testing machine, until fracture occurred. All the materials evaluated substantially reinforced the root specimens compared to the control. At the end of 180 days, Flowable composites showed maximum reinforcement compared to the other groups; however, no significant differences were found between the reinforcement capabilities of Flowable Compomer and RMGIC.

  12. Effect of two-step adhesive systems on inhibition of secondary caries around fluoride-releasing resin composite restorations in root dentine.

    PubMed

    Itota, Toshiyuki; Nakabo, Satoshi; Narukami, Tomoko; Tashiro, Yoko; Torii, Yasuhiro; McCabe, John F; Yoshiyama, Masahiro

    2005-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of two-step adhesive systems on secondary caries inhibition around fluoride-releasing materials in vitro. Two self-etching primer systems, Clearfil SE Bond (SE) and UniFil Bond (UB), and two one-bottle systems with a total-etch wet-bonding technique, Single Bond (SB) and One-Step (OS), were used prior to placement of resin composites either with (Reactmer) or without (Z100) fluoride release. Class V cavities prepared in extracted human premolars were restored with various combinations of materials: Reactmer/SE, Reactmer/UB, Reactmer/SB, Reactmer/OS, Z100/SE, Z100/UB, Z100/SB and Z100/OS. After storage for 14 days, the restored teeth were incubated in bacterial medium containing sucrose with Streptoccus mutans for 2 weeks. Water sorption and desorption of the adhesives and fluoride release from the resins either coated with adhesive or uncoated were also determined. The one-bottle groups showed higher water sorption and desorption than the self-etching primer groups. Although fluoride release from the Reactmer specimens was suppressed by the adhesive coating, the one-bottle groups allowed significantly higher fluoride release than the self-etching primer groups. On microradiographs, the radio-opaque layers adjacent to the Reactmer restorations were thick and clear, while the layers adjacent to the Z100 restorations were thin and unclear. For the Reactmer restorations, the radio-opaque layers associated with the one-bottle groups were significantly thicker than for the self-etching primer groups. These results indicated that the use of one-bottle wet-bonding systems for bonding of fluoride-releasing resin composites to dentine may contribute to inhibit secondary caries compared to self-etching primer systems.

  13. In vitro study of the effect of a pulsed 10.6μm CO2 laser and fluoride on the reduction of carious lesions progression in bovine root dentin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parisotto, Thaís M.; Sacramento, Patrícia A.; Alves, Marcelo C.; Puppin-Rontani, Regina M.; Gavião, Maria Beatriz D.; Nobre-dos-Santos, Marin"s.

    2010-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the combined in vitro effects a pulsed 10.6 μm CO2 laser and fluoride on the reduction of carious lesion progression in root dentin. Sixty five slabs of previously demineralized bovine root dentin were assigned into five groups (n=13): control (no treatment), acidulated phosphate fluoride gel 1.23% (FFA), CO2 Laser (L), FFA+L, L+FFA. The lasered groups were irradiated with 4.0J/cm2. After a 7 day pH cycling regime, the knoop hardness number (KHN) was determined by cross-sectional microhardness testing (5g, 5s, 10-60 μm, 10 μm interval). The data was analyzed by ANOVA and Student's t-test (α= 0.05). A significant interaction between KHN and the indentation depths was found (p<0.05). At 10-20 μm, FFA+L (KHN:12.12+/-0.95/13.07+/-1.03) and FFA (KHN:12.86+/-4.54/12.60+/-3.93) inhibited caries progression when compared to control group (KHN:8.76+/-0.95/9.50+/-1.03) (p<0.05), but did not differ with neither each other nor from group L (p>0.05). At 30 μm, the KHN was significantly higher than the control only in the FFA group (KHN:15.35+/-1.16). At 40 μm, the groups FFA (KHN: 15.87+/-3.76), L (KHN: 15.57+/-5.71) and L+FFA (KHN:15.50+/-5.08) were capable of significantly inhibiting caries progression, however they did not differ each other (p>0.05). At depths of 50-60 μm, only group L (KHN:17.05+/-1.29/18.26+/-1.30) differed statistically from the control (KHN:13.43+/-1.24/13.81+/-1.25), but not from the other groups. In conclusion, CO2 laser alone was able to inhibit caries progression in the deepest layers. However, no synergistic effect was obtained when CO2 laser irradiation and FFA application and were combined.

  14. Root rots

    Treesearch

    Kathryn Robbins; Philip M. Wargo

    1989-01-01

    Root rots of central hardwoods are diseases caused by fungi that infect and decay woody roots and sometimes also invade the butt portion of the tree. By killing and decaying roots, root rotting fungi reduce growth, decrease tree vigor, and cause windthrow and death. The most common root diseases of central hardwoods are Armillaria root rot, lnonotus root rot, and...

  15. River restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohl, Ellen; Angermeier, Paul L.; Bledsoe, Brian; Kondolf, G. Mathias; Macdonnell, Larry; Merritt, David M.; Palmer, Margaret A.; Poff, N. Leroy; Tarboton, David

    2005-10-01

    River restoration is at the forefront of applied hydrologic science. However, many river restoration projects are conducted with minimal scientific context. We propose two themes around which a research agenda to advance the scientific basis for river restoration can be built. First, because natural variability is an inherent feature of all river systems, we hypothesize that restoration of process is more likely to succeed than restoration aimed at a fixed end point. Second, because physical, chemical, and biological processes are interconnected in complex ways across watersheds and across timescales, we hypothesize that restoration projects are more likely to be successful in achieving goals if undertaken in the context of entire watersheds. To achieve restoration objectives, the science of river restoration must include (1) an explicit recognition of the known complexities and uncertainties, (2) continued development of a theoretical framework that enables us to identify generalities among river systems and to ask relevant questions, (3) enhancing the science and use of restoration monitoring by measuring the most effective set of variables at the correct scales of measurement, (4) linking science and implementation, and (5) developing methods of restoration that are effective within existing constraints. Key limitations to river restoration include a lack of scientific knowledge of watershed-scale process dynamics, institutional structures that are poorly suited to large-scale adaptive management, and a lack of political support to reestablish delivery of the ecosystem amenities lost through river degradation. This paper outlines an approach for addressing these shortcomings.

  16. Nerve root replantation.

    PubMed

    Carlstedt, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Traumatic avulsion of nerve roots from the spinal cord is a devastating event that usually occurs in the brachial plexus of young adults following motor vehicle or sports accidents or in newborn children during difficult childbirth. A strategy to restore motor function in the affected arm by reimplanting into the spinal cord the avulsed ventral roots or autologous nerve grafts connected distally to the avulsed roots has been developed. Surgical outcome is good and useful recovery in shoulder and proximal arm muscles occurs. Pain is alleviated with motor recovery but sensory improvement is poor when only motor conduits have been reconstructed. In experimental studies, restoration of sensory connections with general improvement in the outcome from this surgery is pursued.

  17. Effects of alpha-tocopherol on fracture resistance after endodontic treatment, bleaching and restoration.

    PubMed

    Jordão-Basso, Keren Cristina Fagundes; Kuga, Milton Carlos; Dantas, Andrea Abi Rached; Tonetto, Mateus Rodrigues; Lima, Suellen Nogueira Linhares; Bandéca, Matheus Coêlho

    2016-05-20

    This study evaluated the effects of 10% alphatocopherol on the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth subjected to tooth bleaching with hydrogen peroxide and immediately restored with composite resin. Fifty bovine incisors were selected, including 10 sound teeth that constituted the control group (G1 (C)). The remaining 40 teeth, which were endodontically treated, were divided into four groups (n = 10): G2 (CR), consisting of teeth immediately restored with composite resin; G3 (HP + CR), consisting of teeth subjected to tooth bleaching with 38% hydrogen peroxide and immediately restored with composite resin; G4 (HP + SA + CR), which received treatment similar to that used for G3, but with 10% sodium ascorbate gel applied after the bleaching protocol; and G5 (HP + AT + CR), which was similar to G4 but included 10% alphatocopherol gel as an antioxidant. After 24 h, composite restorations were performed, and teeth were subjected to a fracture resistance test at a speed of 0.5 mm/min in an electromechanical testing machine. The axial force was applied with an angle of incidence of 135° relative to the long axis of the root. Data were subjected to ANOVA and Tukey tests (p = 0.05). G1 exhibited the highest fracture resistance (p < 0.05). No significant differences among the other experimental groups were observed. The 10% sodium ascorbate and 10% alphatocopherol gels did not improve the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth subjected to bleaching with 38% hydrogen peroxide.

  18. Preservation & Restoration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Online-Offline, 2000

    2000-01-01

    This theme issue on preservation and restoration presents selected resources for elementary and secondary education that include Web sites, CD-ROM and software, videos, books, magazines, and professional resources as well as classroom activities. Age levels are specified for most materials. I Sidebars discuss restoring a masterpiece, a bug's life,…

  19. Fracture resistance of weakened teeth restored using accessory glass fiber posts.

    PubMed

    da Rosa, Ricardo Abreu; Barreto, Mirela Sangoi; da Rosa, Tiago Abreu; Reis, Katia Rodrigues; Kaizer, Osvaldo Bazzan

    2013-01-01

    This study used differential root weakening to evaluate the fracture resistance of bovine teeth restored using glass fiber posts (with or without accessory glass fiber posts). Fifty bovine mandibular incisors were sectioned 14 mm from the apex, fixed in acrylic resin blocks, and divided into 5 groups: healthy roots with a glass fiber post (Group 1), partially weakened teeth with a glass fiber post (Group 2), partially weakened teeth with a glass fiber post and 2 accessory glass fiber posts (Group 3), extensively weakened teeth with a glass fiber post (Group 4), and extensively weakened teeth with a glass fiber post and 5 accessory glass fiber posts (Group 5). Posts were luted with resin cement, cores were prepared using composite resin, and metallic crowns were cemented. The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for more than 72 hours until the fracture resistance test. Specimens were loaded at 135 degrees relative to the long axis of the tooth at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/minute in a universal testing machine. All groups predominantly exhibited favorable failure patterns and there were no statistically significant differences between groups (two-way ANOVA, α = 0.05).

  20. Survival of extensively damaged endodontically treated incisors restored with different types of posts-and-core foundation restoration material.

    PubMed

    Lazari, Priscilla Cardoso; de Carvalho, Marco Aurélio; Del Bel Cury, Altair A; Magne, Pascal

    2017-09-16

    Which post-and-core combination will best improve the performance of extensively damaged endodontically treated incisors without a ferrule is still unclear. The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate the restoration of extensively damaged endodontically treated incisors without a ferrule using glass-ceramic crowns bonded to various composite resin foundation restorations and 2 types of posts. Sixty decoronated endodontically treated bovine incisors without a ferrule were divided into 4 groups and restored with various post-and-core foundation restorations. NfPfB=no-ferrule (Nf) with glass-fiber post (Pf) and bulk-fill resin foundation restoration (B); NfPfP=no-ferrule (Nf) with glass-fiber post (Pf) and dual-polymerized composite resin core foundation restoration (P); NfPt=no-ferrule (Nf) with titanium post (Pt) and resin core foundation restoration; and NfPtB=no-ferrule (Nf) with titanium post (Pt) and bulk-fill resin core foundation restoration (B). Two additional groups from previously published data from the same authors (FPf=2mm of ferrule (F) and glass-fiber post (Pf) and composite resin core foundation restoration; and NfPf=no-ferrule (Nf) with glass-fiber post (Pf) and composite resin core foundation restoration), which were tested concomitantly and using the same experimental arrangement, were included for comparison. All teeth were prepared to receive bonded glass-ceramic crowns luted with dual-polymerized resin cement and were subjected to accelerated fatigue testing under submerged conditions at room temperature. Cyclic isometric loading was applied to the incisal edge at an angle of 30 degrees with a frequency of 5 Hz, beginning with a load of 100 N (5000 cycles). A 100-N load increase was applied every 15000 cycles. The specimens were loaded until failure or to a maximum of 1000 N (140000 cycles). The 6 groups (4 groups from the present study and 2 groups from the previously published study) were compared using the Kaplan-Meier survival

  1. Fracture resistance of prepared teeth restored with bonded inlay restorations.

    PubMed

    St-Georges, Annie J; Sturdevant, John R; Swift, Edward J; Thompson, Jeffrey Y

    2003-06-01

    intact, prepared, and restored human maxillary premolars. Fifty intact, noncarious human maxillary premolars were divided into 5 groups of 10 and were mounted with their roots imbedded in autopolymerized acrylic. In the first group, the teeth were intact with no preparation. In the other 4 groups, Class II MOD preparations were made with a water-cooled high-speed hand piece. In 1 group, the cavity preparations were restored with bonded CAD/CAM ceramic inlays. In 2 groups, the preparations were restored with bonded CAD/CAM composite inlays (acid etched or air particle abraded). In the final group, the teeth were prepared but unrestored. Specimens were tested individually in a universal testing machine, in which a 4.82-mm-diameter steel sphere plunger was mounted in the crosshead moving at 0.5 mm/min. The plunger contacted the facial and lingual triangular ridges beyond the margins of the restorations. Peak load to fracture (N) was measured for each specimen. Means were calculated and analyzed with analysis of variance (PRestoring the teeth with ceramic or composite inlays did not significantly strengthen the teeth under this testing system. Of the restored teeth, those restored with indirect composite inlays cemented following manufacturer's recommendations had the highest fracture resistance. Within the limitations of this study, under static compression load testing, bonded inlay restorations did not strengthen maxillary premolars with large MOD preparations.

  2. EFFECT OF RELINING ON FIBER POST RETENTION TO ROOT CANAL

    PubMed Central

    Faria-E-Silva, André Luís; Pedrosa, Celso de Freitas; Menezes, Murilo de Sousa; da Silveira, Daniele Machado; Martins, Luís Roberto Marcondes

    2009-01-01

    One of the clinically relevant problems dentists face when restoring endodontically treated teeth is the mismatch between fiber post and post space diameters, which results in an excessively thick resin cement layer. Fiber post relining appears as a solution for this problem. Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of fiber post relining with composite resin on push-out bond strength. Material and Methods: Twenty bovine incisors were selected to assess post retention. The crowns were removed below the cementoenamel junction and the root canals were treated endodontically and flared with diamond burs. The roots were allocated into two groups (n=10): G1: fiber posts without relining and G2: fiber posts relined with composite resin. The posts were cemented with a dual-cured resin cement and the specimens were sectioned transversally. Three 1.5-mm thick slabs were obtained per root and identified as cervical, medium and apical thirds. The push-out test was performed at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until post dislodgement occurred. The failure mode of fractured specimens was analyzed under scanning electron microscopy. Data were analyzed by split-plot ANOVA and post-hoc Tukey's test at a pre-set alpha of 0.05. Results: Relined fiber posts presented higher retention values than non-relined post in all thirds. No statistically significant differences (p>0.05) were found among thirds for relined posts. All failures occurred at the interface between resin cement and root dentin. Conclusions: Relining with composite resin seems to be an effective method to improve the retention of fiber posts to flared root canals. PMID:20027434

  3. Effect of relining on fiber post retention to root canal.

    PubMed

    Faria-e-Silva, André Luís; Pedrosa-Filho, Celso de Freitas; Menezes, Murilo de Sousa; Silveira, Daniele Machado da; Martins, Luís Roberto Marcondes

    2009-01-01

    One of the clinically relevant problems dentists face when restoring endodontically treated teeth is the mismatch between fiber post and post space diameters, which results in an excessively thick resin cement layer. Fiber post relining appears as a solution for this problem. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of fiber post relining with composite resin on push-out bond strength. Twenty bovine incisors were selected to assess post retention. The crowns were removed below the cementoenamel junction and the root canals were treated endodontically and flared with diamond burs. The roots were allocated into two groups (n=10): G1: fiber posts without relining and G2: fiber posts relined with composite resin. The posts were cemented with a dual-cured resin cement and the specimens were sectioned transversally. Three 1.5-mm thick slabs were obtained per root and identified as cervical, medium and apical thirds. The push-out test was performed at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until post dislodgement occurred. The failure mode of fractured specimens was analyzed under scanning electron microscopy. Data were analyzed by split-plot ANOVA and post-hoc Tukey's test at a pre-set alpha of 0.05. Relined fiber posts presented higher retention values than non-relined post in all thirds. No statistically significant differences (p>0.05) were found among thirds for relined posts. All failures occurred at the interface between resin cement and root dentin. Relining with composite resin seems to be an effective method to improve the retention of fiber posts to flared root canals.

  4. Neural reconstruction methods of restoring bladder function

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Amaya, Sandra M.; Barbe, Mary F.; de Groat, William C.; Brown, Justin M.; Tuite, Gerald F.; Corcos, Jacques; Fecho, Susan B.; Braverman, Alan S.; Ruggieri, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    During the past century, diverse studies have focused on the development of surgical strategies to restore function of a decentralized bladder after spinal cord or spinal root injury via repair of the original roots or by transferring new axonal sources. The techniques included end-to-end sacral root repairs, transfer of roots from other spinal segments to sacral roots, transfer of intercostal nerves to sacral roots, transfer of various somatic nerves to the pelvic or pudendal nerve, direct reinnervation of the detrusor muscle, or creation of an artificial reflex pathway between the skin and the bladder via the central nervous system. All of these surgical techniques have demonstrated specific strengths and limitations. The findings made to date already indicate appropriate patient populations for each procedure, but a comprehensive assessment of the effectiveness of each technique to restore urinary function after bladder decentralization is required to guide future research and potential clinical application. PMID:25666987

  5. Bovine coronavirus associated syndromes.

    PubMed

    Boileau, Mélanie J; Kapil, Sanjay

    2010-03-01

    Bovine coronaviruses, like other animal coronaviruses, have a predilection for intestinal and respiratory tracts. The viruses responsible for enteric and respiratory symptoms are closely related antigenically and genetically. Only 4 bovine coronavirus isolates have been completely sequenced and thus, the information about the genetics of the virus is still limited. This article reviews the clinical syndromes associated with bovine coronavirus, including pneumonia in calves and adult cattle, calf diarrhea, and winter dysentery; diagnostic methods; prevention using vaccination; and treatment, with adjunctive immunotherapy.

  6. 78 FR 73993 - Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy; Importation of Bovines and Bovine Products

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-10

    ... Health Inspection Service 9 CFR Parts 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, and 98 RIN 0579-AC68 Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy; Importation of Bovines and Bovine Products Corrections In rule document 2013-28228 appearing on...

  7. 77 FR 20319 - Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy; Importation of Bovines and Bovine Products

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-04

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service 9 CFR Part 93 RIN 0579-AC68 Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy; Importation of Bovines and Bovine Products Correction In proposed rule document...

  8. Unlocking the bovine genome

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The draft genome sequence of cattle (Bos taurus) has now been analyzed by the Bovine Genome Sequencing and Analysis Consortium and the Bovine HapMap Consortium, which together represent an extensive collaboration involving more than 300 scientists from 25 different countries. ...

  9. Natural restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Kamlet, K.S.

    1993-02-01

    After a company pays millions of dollars to clean up contaminated site, its liability may not be over. It may have to spend tens of millions more to restore damaged natural resources under an oft-overlooked Superfund program. Examples of liability are cited in this report from the Exxon Valdez oil spill and a pcb leak which contaminated a harbor.

  10. Ecological restoration

    Treesearch

    Christopher D. Barton; John I. Blake; Donald W. Imm

    2005-01-01

    The long history of human settlement, agriculture, and industry at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has created extensive opportunities for ecological restoration. Two hundred years of farming, drainage, dam construction, stream channeling, fire protection, subsistence hunting and fishing, exotic animal and plant introduction, and selective timber harvesting have caused...

  11. Restoration Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    In the accompanying photos, a laboratory technician is restoring the once-obliterated serial number of a revolver. The four-photo sequence shows the gradual progression from total invisibility to clear readability. The technician is using a new process developed in an applications engineering project conducted by NASA's Lewis Research Center in conjunction with Chicago State University. Serial numbers and other markings are frequently eliminated from metal objects to prevent tracing ownership of guns, motor vehicles, bicycles, cameras, appliances and jewelry. To restore obliterated numbers, crime laboratory investigators most often employ a chemical etching technique. It is effective, but it may cause metal corrosion and it requires extensive preparatory grinding and polishing. The NASA-Chicago State process is advantageous because it can be applied without variation to any kind of metal, it needs no preparatory work and number recovery can be accomplished without corrosive chemicals; the liquid used is water.

  12. Selective Root Retreatment: A Novel Approach.

    PubMed

    Nudera, William J

    2015-08-01

    Root canal retreatment is traditionally considered an "all or none" treatment approach. It is typically recommended that all restorative and obturation materials be removed from all roots regardless of the presence or absence of periapical pathosis. In contrast, surgical endodontics is not viewed as an "all or none" treatment approach. Traditionally, only the diseased root(s) is addressed via root-end resection and root-end filling. The use of cone-beam computed tomographic imaging allows for a more accurate evaluation of the periapical status of individual roots associated with multirooted teeth. This information has introduced a novel and conservative treatment alternative for previously endodontically treated teeth with multiple roots presenting with post-treatment disease. This new approach is termed selective root retreatment. Advanced imaging allows the clinician to make predictable treatment decisions with respect to the presence or absence of periapical pathosis of individual roots as opposed to making assumptions about the tooth as a whole. Selective root retreatment combines the approach of nonsurgical retreatment with the selectivity of surgical root resection. In this manner, retreatment could be limited to a single root or roots clearly showing periapical pathosis while leaving the root(s) with no visible or perceived pathosis untouched. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Comparison of the mechanical effects of a toothbrush and standard abrasive on human and bovine dentine in vitro.

    PubMed

    Imfeld, T

    2001-01-01

    Dentine abrasion is an important possible side effect of individually used mechanical oral hygiene products. Since human teeth are sometimes not available in sufficient numbers for research purposes, bovine teeth are often used as a substitute for in vitro tests of dentine abrasion. The aim of the present comparative study was to determine the mechanical effects of a manual toothbrush and a standard abrasive on human and bovine dentine under standardized conditions. Roots of human and bovine teeth were radioactivated and subjected to standardized machine brushing using a manual toothbrush and a standard abrasive slurry. Dentine abrasion was assessed by measuring radioactive phosphorus contained in the slurry after brushing. Non-radioactive human and bovine roots were brushed in the same machine, and the generated surface roughness was assessed using profilometry. Artificially stained human and bovine roots were brushed as described, and the cleaning effect was expressed as the extent of stain-free surfaces after different brushing times. The results for abrasion and surface roughening found with bovine and human dentine suggest that if standardized methods are used, roots of bovine mandibular front teeth can be used in place of human roots for in vitro studies of the mechanical effects of toothbrushes and toothpastes on dentine. The use of bovine dentine for measuring the cleaning effects of these products is, however, not recommended.

  14. Fatigue resistance of teeth restored with fiber posts and different post cementation strengths.

    PubMed

    Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Zardin, Lucas Wadas; de Villa, Marco Antonio; Amaral, Marina; Galhano, Graziela; Baldissara, Paolo; Bottino, Marco Antonio

    2009-01-01

    This study sought to evaluate how different post cementation strategies affected the fatigue resistance of bovine teeth restored with glass fiber posts. The canals of 63 single-rooted bovine teeth (each 16 mm in length) were prepared to 9 mm using a preparation drill from a double-tapered fiber post system. Each specimen was embedded in a PVC cylinder using acrylic resin up to 3 mm of the most coronal portion of the specimen and was allocated into one of seven groups (n = 9) based on the strategies for cementation. After cementation, a standard core build-up was made with composite resin. The specimens were stored for seven days and submitted to mechanical cycling (50 N, 8 Hz, 37 degrees C). After fatigue testing, a score was given to each specimen, based on the number of fatigue cycles required to fracture the specimens; the scores were submitted to statistic analysis (Kruskal-Wallis, alpha = 0.05). The strategy for post cementation did not affect the resistance to fatigue (P = 0.8669). Based on the results, the resistance to fatigue does not appear to depend on the post cementation strategy.

  15. Root Hairs

    PubMed Central

    Grierson, Claire; Nielsen, Erik; Ketelaarc, Tijs; Schiefelbein, John

    2014-01-01

    Roots hairs are cylindrical extensions of root epidermal cells that are important for acquisition of nutrients, microbe interactions, and plant anchorage. The molecular mechanisms involved in the specification, differentiation, and physiology of root hairs in Arabidopsis are reviewed here. Root hair specification in Arabidopsis is determined by position-dependent signaling and molecular feedback loops causing differential accumulation of a WD-bHLH-Myb transcriptional complex. The initiation of root hairs is dependent on the RHD6 bHLH gene family and auxin to define the site of outgrowth. Root hair elongation relies on polarized cell expansion at the growing tip, which involves multiple integrated processes including cell secretion, endomembrane trafficking, cytoskeletal organization, and cell wall modifications. The study of root hair biology in Arabidopsis has provided a model cell type for insights into many aspects of plant development and cell biology. PMID:24982600

  16. Forest restoration paradigms

    Treesearch

    John Stanturf; Brian J. Palik; Mary I. Williams; R. Kasten Dumroese

    2014-01-01

    An estimated 2 billion ha of forests are degraded globally and global change suggests even greater need for forest restoration. Four forest restoration paradigms are identified and discussed: revegetation, ecological restoration, functional restoration, and forest landscape restoration. Restoration is examined in terms of a degraded starting point and an ending point...

  17. Restoration of biogeochemical function in mangrove forests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKee, K.L.; Faulkner, P.L.

    2000-01-01

    Forest structure of mangrove restoration sites (6 and 14 years old) at two locations (Henderson Creek [HC] and Windstar [WS]) in southwest Florida differed from that of mixed-basin forests (>50 years old) with which they were once contiguous. However, the younger site (HC) was typical of natural, developing forests, whereas the older site (WS) was less well developed with low structural complexity. More stressful physicochemical conditions resulting from incomplete tidal flushing (elevated salinity) and variable topography (waterlogging) apparently affected plant survival and growth at the WS restoration site. Lower leaf fall and root production rates at the WS restoration site, compared with that at HC were partly attributable to differences in hydroedaphic conditions and structural development. However, leaf and root inputs at each restoration site were not significantly different from that in reference forests within the same physiographic setting. Macrofaunal consumption of tethered leaves also did not differ with site history, but was dramatically higher at HC compared with WS, reflecting local variation in leaf litter processing rates, primarily by snails (Melampus coffeus). Degradation of leaves and roots in mesh bags was slow overall at restoration sites, however, particularly at WS where aerobic decomposition may have been more limited. These findings indicate that local or regional factors such as salinity regime act together with site history to control primary production and turnover rates of organic matter in restoration sites. Species differences in senescent leaf nitrogen content and degradation rates further suggest that restoration sites dominated by Laguncularia racemosa and Rhizophora mangle should exhibit slower recycling of nutrients compared with natural basin forests where Avicennia germinans is more abundant. Structural development and biogeochemical functioning of restored mangrove forests thus depend on a number of factors, but site

  18. Viability of using enamel and dentin from bovine origin as a substitute for human counterparts in an intraoral erosion model.

    PubMed

    Turssi, Cecilia Pedroso; Messias, Danielle Furtado; Corona, Silmara Milori; Serra, Mônica Campos

    2010-01-01

    This study ascertained whether under dental erosion models that closely mimics the real-life situation enamel and root dentin from bovine origin would be reliable substitutes for human counterparts. Through a 2x2 crossover design, in a first trial, 14 volunteers wore a palatal device containing slabs of bovine and human enamel. Half of the participants ingested (4x daily, for 10 days) orange juice first, crossing over to mineral water, while the remainder received the reverse sequence. In a second trial, volunteers wore devices with slabs of bovine and human root dentin. Except for the duration of each intraoral phase, which lasted 2 rather 10 days, the experiment with root dentin run exactly as for enamel. Dental substrates were analyzed for surface microhardness. Two-way ANOVAs (α=0.05) indicated no difference between the microhardness values recorded for human and bovine enamel (p=0.1350), but bovine root dentin had lower microhardness compared to its human counterpart (p=0.0432). While bovine enamel can reliably substitute its human counterpart in in situ dental erosion models, bovine root dentin does not seem to be a viable alternative to the corresponding human tissue.

  19. Is bovine dentine an appropriate substitute in abrasion studies?

    PubMed

    Wegehaupt, Florian J; Widmer, Raffaella; Attin, Thomas

    2010-04-01

    The study aimed to compare the wear behaviour of human and bovine dentine due to toothbrushing with different relative dentin abrasivity (RDA) toothpastes. Forty human and 40 bovine dentine samples were prepared from bovine lower incisors or human premolars roots, and baseline surface profiles were recorded. The samples were distributed to four groups (each group n = 10 human and 10 bovine samples) and brushed with fluoridated experimental toothpastes with different RDAs (group A: RDA 10, B: RDA 20, C: RDA 50, and D: RDA 100). Toothbrushing was performed in an automatic brushing machine with a brushing frequency of 60 strokes per minute and a brushing force of 2.5 N. After 2, 5, 10, and 25 min of toothbrushing, new surface profiles were recorded, and the dentine wear was calculated with a customized computer programme. The dentine wear of human and bovine dentine within the four groups was compared with unpaired t tests. No statistically significant difference was recorded for the dentine wear of human and bovine samples within the different groups.

  20. Root growth

    Treesearch

    Terrell T. Baker; William H. Conner; B. Graeme Lockaby; Marianne K. Burke; John A. Stanturf

    2000-01-01

    While vegetation dynamics of forested floodplains have received considerable attention (Megonigal and others 1997, Mitch and Gosselink 1993), the highly dynamic fine root component of these ecosystems has been primarily ignored. Characterizing fine root growth is a challenging endeavor in any system, but the difficulties are particularly evident in forested floodplains...

  1. Nursery stock quality as an indicator of bottomland hardwood forest restoration success in the Lower Mississippi River Alluvial Valley

    Treesearch

    Douglass F. Jacobs; Rosa C. Goodman; Emile S. Gardiner; K Frances Salifu; Ronald P. Overton; George Hernandez

    2012-01-01

    Seedling morphological quality standards are lacking for bottomland hardwood restoration plantings in the Lower Mississippi River Alluvial Valley, USA, which may contribute toward variable restoration success. We measured initial seedling morphology (shoot height, root collar diameter, number of first order lateral roots, fresh mass, and root volume), second year field...

  2. Roots and Root Function: Introduction

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A number of current issues related to water management, ecohydrology, and climate change are giving impetus to new research aimed at understanding roots and their functioning. Current areas of research include: use of advanced imaging technologies such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging to observe roots...

  3. Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Restorative Justice: Developing Insights for Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cremin, Hilary; Sellman, Edward; McCluskey, Gillean

    2012-01-01

    This article takes restorative justice as an example of an initiative that crosses disciplinary boundaries, and that has been usefully applied within educational contexts. Grounded in criminology, restorative justice also has roots in psychology, education, sociology, peace studies, philosophy and law. The article draws on an ESRC funded seminar…

  4. Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Restorative Justice: Developing Insights for Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cremin, Hilary; Sellman, Edward; McCluskey, Gillean

    2012-01-01

    This article takes restorative justice as an example of an initiative that crosses disciplinary boundaries, and that has been usefully applied within educational contexts. Grounded in criminology, restorative justice also has roots in psychology, education, sociology, peace studies, philosophy and law. The article draws on an ESRC funded seminar…

  5. Relational Restorative Justice Pedagogy in Educator Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaandering, Dorothy

    2014-01-01

    What would a professional development experience rooted in the philosophy, principles, and practices of restorative justice look and feel like? This article describes how such a professional development project was designed to implement restorative justice principles and practices into schools in a proactive, relational and sustainable manner by…

  6. Relational Restorative Justice Pedagogy in Educator Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaandering, Dorothy

    2014-01-01

    What would a professional development experience rooted in the philosophy, principles, and practices of restorative justice look and feel like? This article describes how such a professional development project was designed to implement restorative justice principles and practices into schools in a proactive, relational and sustainable manner by…

  7. Protein Crystal Bovine Insulin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The comparison of protein crystal, Bovine Insulin space-grown (left) and earth-grown (right). Facilitates the incorporation of glucose into cells. In diabetics, there is either a decrease in or complete lack of insulin, thereby leading to several harmful complications. Principal Investigator is Larry DeLucas.

  8. Protein Crystal Bovine Insulin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The comparison of protein crystal, Bovine Insulin space-grown (left) and earth-grown (right). Facilitates the incorporation of glucose into cells. In diabetics, there is either a decrease in or complete lack of insulin, thereby leading to several harmful complications. Principal Investigator is Larry DeLucas.

  9. Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) is caused by a novel contagion, known to as a prion. Prions are proteins capable of converting a normal cellular protein into a prion, thereby propagating an infection. BSE is the first known prion zoonotic. As such it has attracted broad scientific and, to a r...

  10. Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), also referred to as “mad cow disease” is a chronic, non-febrile, neuro-degenerative disease affecting the central nervous system. The transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) of domestic animals, of which BSE is a member includes scrapie of sheep...

  11. Bovine milk exosome proteome

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Exosomes are 40-100 nm membrane vesicles of endocytic origin and are found in blood, urine, amniotic fluid, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, as well as human and bovine milk. Exosomes are extracellular organelles important in intracellular communication/signaling, immune function, and biomarkers ...

  12. Genotyping bovine coronaviruses.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bovine coronaviruses (BoCV) are enveloped, single-stranded, positive-sense RNA viruses of the Coronaviridae family. Infection is associated with enteritis and pneumonia in calves and Winter Dysentery in adult cattle. Strains, isolated more than 50 years ago, are used in vaccines and as laboratory ...

  13. Manganese toxicity thresholds for restoration grass species.

    PubMed

    Paschke, Mark W; Valdecantos, Alejandro; Redente, Edward F

    2005-05-01

    Manganese toxicity thresholds for restoration plants have not been established. As a result, ecological risk assessments rely on toxicity thresholds for agronomic species, which may differ from those of restoration species. Our objective was to provide Mn toxicity thresholds for grasses commonly used in restoration. We used a greenhouse screening study where seedlings of redtop, slender wheatgrass, tufted hairgrass, big bluegrass, basin wildrye, and common wheat were grown in sand culture and exposed to increasing concentrations of Mn. The LC50, EC50-plant, EC50-shoot, EC50-root, PT50-shoot, and the PT50-root were then determined. Phytotoxicity thresholds and effective concentrations for the restoration species were generally higher than values reported for agronomic species. Our estimates of PT50-shoot for the five restoration grasses range from 41,528 to 120,082 mg Mn kg(-1). Measures of EC50-plant for these restoration grasses ranged from 877 to >6,000 mg Mn l(-1). These thresholds might be more useful for risk assessors than those based on crop plants that are widely used.

  14. Inhibition of auxin movement from the shoot into the root inhibits lateral root development in Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, R. C.; Brady, S. R.; Muday, G. K.

    1998-01-01

    In roots two distinct polar movements of auxin have been reported that may control different developmental and growth events. To test the hypothesis that auxin derived from the shoot and transported toward the root controls lateral root development, the two polarities of auxin transport were uncoupled in Arabidopsis. Local application of the auxin-transport inhibitor naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) at the root-shoot junction decreased the number and density of lateral roots and reduced the free indoleacetic acid (IAA) levels in the root and [3H]IAA transport into the root. Application of NPA to the basal half of or at several positions along the root only reduced lateral root density in regions that were in contact with NPA or in regions apical to the site of application. Lateral root development was restored by application of IAA apical to NPA application. Lateral root development in Arabidopsis roots was also inhibited by excision of the shoot or dark growth and this inhibition was reversible by IAA. Together, these results are consistent with auxin transport from the shoot into the root controlling lateral root development.

  15. Inhibition of auxin movement from the shoot into the root inhibits lateral root development in Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, R. C.; Brady, S. R.; Muday, G. K.

    1998-01-01

    In roots two distinct polar movements of auxin have been reported that may control different developmental and growth events. To test the hypothesis that auxin derived from the shoot and transported toward the root controls lateral root development, the two polarities of auxin transport were uncoupled in Arabidopsis. Local application of the auxin-transport inhibitor naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) at the root-shoot junction decreased the number and density of lateral roots and reduced the free indoleacetic acid (IAA) levels in the root and [3H]IAA transport into the root. Application of NPA to the basal half of or at several positions along the root only reduced lateral root density in regions that were in contact with NPA or in regions apical to the site of application. Lateral root development was restored by application of IAA apical to NPA application. Lateral root development in Arabidopsis roots was also inhibited by excision of the shoot or dark growth and this inhibition was reversible by IAA. Together, these results are consistent with auxin transport from the shoot into the root controlling lateral root development.

  16. How to bond to root canal dentin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nica, Luminita; Todea, Carmen; Furtos, Gabriel; Baldea, Bogdan

    2014-01-01

    Bonding to root canal dentin may be difficult due to various factors: the structural characteristic of the root canal dentin, which is different from that of the coronal dentin; the presence of the organic tissue of the dental pulp inside the root canal, which has to be removed during the cleaning-shaping of the root canal system; the smear-layer resulted after mechanical instrumentation, which may interfere with the adhesion of the filling materials; the type of the irrigants used in the cleaning protocol; the type of the sealer and core material used in the obturation of the endodontic space; the type of the materials used for the restoration of the endodontically treated teeth. The influence of the cleaning protocol, of the root canal filling material, of the type of the adhesive system used in the restoration of the treated teeth and of the region of the root canal, on the adhesion of several filling and restorative materials to root canal dentin was evaluated in the push-out bond strength test on 1-mm thick slices of endodontically treated human teeth. The results showed that all these factors have a statistically significant influence on the push-out bond strength. Formation of resin tags between radicular dentin and the investigated materials was observed in some of the samples at SEM analysis.

  17. Restorative Case Report: Flexibility of Fibre-Posts.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, Paula E

    2015-06-01

    Restoration of an anterior root-filled tooth with little remaining coronal tooth-tissue can utilise a post to retain a core, enabling definitive restoration. Post material was, until recently, primarily metal--be it cast or prefabricated. Currently, fibre-posts are promoted as being advantageous due to a favourable failure mechanism which may protect the root from fracture. This Case Report demonstrates failure of the structural integrity of a fibre-post in a maxillary lateral incisor, with a proposed explanation. Retreatment employed a diamond-coated ultrasonic tip for removal of the residual fibre-post and restoration with a cast-post and metal ceramic crown.

  18. Effect of different cements on the biomechanical behavior of teeth restored with cast dowel-and-cores-in vitro and FEA analysis.

    PubMed

    Soares, Carlos José; Raposo, Luís Henrique Araújo; Soares, Paulo Vinícius; Santos-Filho, Paulo César Freitas; Menezes, Murilo Sousa; Soares, Priscilla Barbosa Ferreira; Magalhães, Denildo

    2010-02-01

    To test the hypothesis that the type of cement used for fixation of cast dowel-and-cores might influence fracture resistance, fracture mode, and stress distribution of single-rooted teeth restored with this class of metallic dowels. The coronal portion was removed from 40 bovine incisors, leaving a 15 mm root. After endodontic treatment and standardized root canal relief at 10 mm, specimens were embedded in polystyrene resin, and the periodontal ligament was simulated with polyether impression material. The specimens were randomly divided into four groups (n = 10), and restored with Cu-Al cast dowel-and-cores cemented with one of four options: conventional glass ionomer cement (GI); resin-modified glass ionomer cement (GR); dual-cure resin cement (RC); or zinc-phosphate cement (ZP). Sequentially, fracture resistance of the specimens was tested with a tangential load at a 135 degrees angle with a 0.5 mm/min crosshead speed. Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Fisher test. Two-dimensional finite element analysis (2D-FEA) was then performed with representative models of each group simulating a 100 microm cement layer. Results were analyzed based on von Mises stress distribution criteria. The mean fracture resistance values were (in N): RC, 838.2 +/- 135.9; GI, 772.4 +/- 169.8; GR, 613.4 +/- 157.5; ZP, 643.6 +/- 106.7. FEA revealed that RC and GR presented lower stress values than ZP and GI. The higher stress concentration was coincident with more catastrophic failures, and consequently, with lower fracture resistance values. The type of cement influenced fracture resistance, failure mode, and stress distribution on teeth restored with cast dowel-and-cores.

  19. Heritable bovine fetal abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Whitlock, B K; Kaiser, L; Maxwell, H S

    2008-08-01

    The etiologies for congenital bovine fetal anomalies can be divided into heritable, toxic, nutritional, and infectious categories. Although uncommon in most herds, inherited congenital anomalies are probably present in all breeds of cattle and propagated as a result of specific trait selection that inadvertently results in propagation of the defect. In some herds, the occurrence of inherited anomalies has become frequent, and economically important. Anomalous traits can affect animals in a range of ways, some being lethal or requiring euthanasia on humane grounds, others altering structure, function, or performance of affected animals. Veterinary practitioners should be aware of the potential for inherited defects, and be prepared to investigate and report animals exhibiting abnormal characteristics. This review will discuss the morphologic characteristics, mode of inheritance, breeding lines affected, and the availability of genetic testing for selected heritable bovine fetal abnormalities.

  20. Selenium in bovine spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Niemi, S M; Kuzan, F B; Senger, P L

    1981-05-01

    This study investigated the association of selenium with ejaculated bovine spermatozoa. Over 75% of the radioactive spermatozoa. Over 75% of the radioactive selenium-75 was released after 30 min of incubation in 2 X 10(-3) dithiothreitol. Of the selenium-75 released by dithiothreitol, 85% was associated with spermatozoal protein. Protein containing selenium-75 was found predominantly in a single band after polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Molecular weight was approximately 21,500 daltons.

  1. Restoration of endodontically treated teeth: criteria and technique considerations.

    PubMed

    Trushkowsky, Richard D

    2014-01-01

    The restoration of endodontically treated teeth is often required and may represent a challenge as there is no consensus on ideal treatment. The failure of endodontically treated teeth is usually not a consequence of endodontic treatment, but inadequate restorative therapy or periodontal reasons. Prior to the initiation of endodontic treatment the restorability, occlusal function, periodontal health, biologic width, and crown-to-root ratio need to be assessed. If acceptable, the appropriate technique, material, and type of restoration to restore function need to be considered. Posts are used to provide retention for the core material and to replace missing tooth structure. The residual amount of tooth structure will determine its stability for restoration. The creation of adequate ferrule (approaching 2 mm circumferentially is ideal) minimizes the damaging effects of lateral and rotational forces on the restoration and post.

  2. Automated Root Tracking with "Root System Analyzer"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnepf, Andrea; Jin, Meina; Ockert, Charlotte; Bol, Roland; Leitner, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Crucial factors for plant development are water and nutrient availability in soils. Thus, root architecture is a main aspect of plant productivity and needs to be accurately considered when describing root processes. Images of root architecture contain a huge amount of information, and image analysis helps to recover parameters describing certain root architectural and morphological traits. The majority of imaging systems for root systems are designed for two-dimensional images, such as RootReader2, GiA Roots, SmartRoot, EZ-Rhizo, and Growscreen, but most of them are semi-automated and involve mouse-clicks in each root by the user. "Root System Analyzer" is a new, fully automated approach for recovering root architectural parameters from two-dimensional images of root systems. Individual roots can still be corrected manually in a user interface if required. The algorithm starts with a sequence of segmented two-dimensional images showing the dynamic development of a root system. For each image, morphological operators are used for skeletonization. Based on this, a graph representation of the root system is created. A dynamic root architecture model helps to determine which edges of the graph belong to an individual root. The algorithm elongates each root at the root tip and simulates growth confined within the already existing graph representation. The increment of root elongation is calculated assuming constant growth. For each root, the algorithm finds all possible paths and elongates the root in the direction of the optimal path. In this way, each edge of the graph is assigned to one or more coherent roots. Image sequences of root systems are handled in such a way that the previous image is used as a starting point for the current image. The algorithm is implemented in a set of Matlab m-files. Output of Root System Analyzer is a data structure that includes for each root an identification number, the branching order, the time of emergence, the parent

  3. Root gravitropism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masson, P. H.

    1995-01-01

    When a plant root is reoriented within the gravity field, it responds by initiating a curvature which eventually results in vertical growth. Gravity sensing occurs primarily in the root tip. It may involve amyloplast sedimentation in the columella cells of the root cap, or the detection of forces exerted by the mass of the protoplast on opposite sides of its cell wall. Gravisensing activates a signal transduction cascade which results in the asymmetric redistribution of auxin and apoplastic Ca2+ across the root tip, with accumulation at the bottom side. The resulting lateral asymmetry in Ca2+ and auxin concentration is probably transmitted to the elongation zone where differential cellular elongation occurs until the tip resumes vertical growth. The Cholodny-Went theory proposes that gravity-induced auxin redistribution across a gravistimulated plant organ is responsible for the gravitropic response. However, recent data indicate that the gravity-induced reorientation is more complex, involving both auxin gradient-dependent and auxin gradient-independent events.

  4. Root (Botany)

    Treesearch

    Robert R. Ziemer

    1981-01-01

    Plant roots can contribute significantly to the stability of steep slopes. They can anchor through the soil mass into fractures in bedrock, can cross zones of weakness to more stable soil, and can provide interlocking long fibrous binders within a weak soil mass. In deep soil, anchoring to bedrock becomes negligible, and lateral reinforcement predominates

  5. Diagnostic imaging in bovine orthopedics.

    PubMed

    Kofler, Johann; Geissbühler, Urs; Steiner, Adrian

    2014-03-01

    Although a radiographic unit is not standard equipment for bovine practitioners in hospital or field situations, ultrasound machines with 7.5-MHz linear transducers have been used in bovine reproduction for many years, and are eminently suitable for evaluation of orthopedic disorders. The goal of this article is to encourage veterinarians to use radiology and ultrasonography for the evaluation of bovine orthopedic disorders. These diagnostic imaging techniques improve the likelihood of a definitive diagnosis in every bovine patient but especially in highly valuable cattle, whose owners demand increasingly more diagnostic and surgical interventions that require high-level specialized techniques.

  6. High volume individual fibre post versus low volume fibre post: the fracture load of the restored tooth.

    PubMed

    Hatta, Minori; Shinya, Akikazu; Vallittu, Pekka K; Shinya, Akiyoshi; Lassila, Lippo V J

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the fracture loads of post-and-core systems with two different individually formed fibre post designs and polymerization conditions. Totally seventy-two (n=8/group) bovine teeth were cut and made up the root length of 15.0mm. They were divided into 3 main groups (Group A, B, C). A: one glass fibre post was light-cured before cementation, B: fibres were bundled to fill the entire root canal opening and light-cured before cementation, C: one unpolymerized glass fibre post was inserted into cement-filled root canal and light-cured with luting cement (ParaCem). Moreover specimens of each group were divided into 3 subgroups according to the post length: subgroup 1: 10mm; subgroup 2: 7.5mm; subgroup 3: 5.0mm. After cementation, the core was built up, and then made the composite resin crown (Filtek Z250). Fabricated specimen was loaded from 45° of palatal side at a crosshead speed of 1.0mm/min. The first load drop and maximum fracture loads were statistically analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test. Maximum fracture load of Group B (433 N) and C (418 N) are significantly higher than Group A (284 N) (p<0.01). Short post (5mm) provided higher fracture loads in all main groups, especially in Group C. Using short and thick fibre post system (the same diameter as the root canal) showed higher strength than one fibre post only. In addition, by curing the cement and the fibre material simultaneously, the strength of the restored tooth was increased. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Restoration technology branch

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2007-01-01

    The mission of Leetown Science Center (LSC), Restoration Technology Branch (RTB) is to conduct research needed to restore or protect the chemical, physical and biological integrity of desirable aquatic systems.

  8. Restoration of Gooseberry Creek

    Treesearch

    Jonathan W. Long

    2000-01-01

    Grazing exclusion and channel modifications were used to restore wet meadows along a stream on the Fort Apache Indian Reservation. The efforts are reestablishing functional processes to promote long-term restoration of wetland health and species conservation.

  9. Quartermaster Reach Restoration Project

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Information about the SFBWQP Quartermaster Reach Restoration Project, part of an EPA competitive grant program to improve SF Bay water quality focused on restoring impaired waters and enhancing aquatic resources.

  10. Breuner Marsh Restoration Project

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Information about the San Francisco Bay Water Quality Project (SFBWQP) Breuner Marsh Restoration Project, part of an EPA competitive grant program to improve SF Bay water quality focused on restoring impaired waters and enhancing aquatic resources.

  11. Lower Walnut Creek Restoration

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Lower Walnut Creek Restoration Project will restore and enhance coastal wetlands along southern shoreline of Suisun Bay from Suisun Bay upstream along Walnut Creek, improving habitat quality, diversity, and connectivity along three miles of creek channel.

  12. Clinical technique for invasive cervical root resorption

    PubMed Central

    Silveira, Luiz Fernando Machado; Silveira, Carina Folgearini; Martos, Josué; Piovesan, Edno Moacir; César Neto, João Batista

    2011-01-01

    This clinical case report describes the diagnosis and treatment of an external invasive cervical resorption. A 17-year-old female patient had a confirmed diagnosis of invasive cervical resorption class 4 by cone beam computerized tomography. Although, there was no communication with the root canal, the invasive resorption process was extending into the cervical and middle third of the root. The treatment of the cervical resorption of the lateral incisor interrupted the resorptive process and restored the damaged root surface and the dental functions without any esthetic sequelae. Both the radiographic examination and computed tomography are imperative to reveal the extent of the defect in the differential diagnosis. PMID:22144822

  13. Tear and decohesion of bovine pericardial tissue.

    PubMed

    Tobaruela, Almudena; Elices, Manuel; Bourges, Jean Yves; Rojo, Francisco Javier; Atienza, José Miguel; Guinea, Gustavo

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate quantitatively the fracture-by tear and delamination-of bovine pericardium tissues which are usually employed for the manufacture of bioprosthetic valves. A large number of samples (77) were tested in root-to-apex and circumferential directions, according to a standardised tear test (ASTM D 1938). Before performing the tear test, some samples were subjected to 1000 cycles of fatigue to a maximum stress of 3MPa. Fracture toughness of tearing and delamination were computed by following a simple fracture model. The study showed significantly lower values of delamination toughness compared with tear delamination. Moreover, tear forces were different in each test direction, revealing a clear orthotropic behaviour. All these results, as well as the testing procedure, could be of value for future research in the physiological function of pericardium tissues and clinical applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Restoration of Soldier Spring

    Treesearch

    Jonathan W. Long; Benrita M. Burnette

    2000-01-01

    Various restoration techniques were employed to restore an ecologically and culturally important stream on the Fort Apache Indian Reservation. The methods were specially developed to address the unique character of this water body. The results show promise for restoring steep gradient riparian ecosystems.

  15. Restorative dentistry for children.

    PubMed

    Donly, Kevin J

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses contemporary pediatric restorative dentistry. Indications and contraindications for the choice of different restorative materials in different clinical situations, including the risk assessment of the patient, are presented. The specific use of glass ionomer cement or resin-modified glass ionomer cement, resin-based composite, and stainless steel crowns is discussed so that preparation design and restoration placement is understood.

  16. Linking restoration ecology with coastal dune restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lithgow, D.; Martínez, M. L.; Gallego-Fernández, J. B.; Hesp, P. A.; Flores, P.; Gachuz, S.; Rodríguez-Revelo, N.; Jiménez-Orocio, O.; Mendoza-González, G.; Álvarez-Molina, L. L.

    2013-10-01

    Restoration and preservation of coastal dunes is urgently needed because of the increasingly rapid loss and degradation of these ecosystems because of many human activities. These activities alter natural processes and coastal dynamics, eliminate topographic variability, fragment, degrade or eliminate habitats, reduce diversity and threaten endemic species. The actions of coastal dune restoration that are already taking place span contrasting activities that range from revegetating and stabilizing the mobile substrate, to removing plant cover and increasing substrate mobility. Our goal was to review how the relative progress of the actions of coastal dune restoration has been assessed, according to the ecosystem attributes outlined by the Society of Ecological Restoration: namely, integrity, health and sustainability and that are derived from the ecological theory of succession. We reviewed the peer reviewed literature published since 1988 that is listed in the ISI Web of Science journals as well as additional references, such as key books. We exclusively focused on large coastal dune systems (such as transgressive and parabolic dunefields) located on natural or seminatural coasts. We found 150 articles that included "coastal dune", "restoration" and "revegetation" in areas such as title, keywords and abstract. From these, 67 dealt specifically with coastal dune restoration. Most of the studies were performed in the USA, The Netherlands and South Africa, during the last two decades. Restoration success has been assessed directly and indirectly by measuring one or a few ecosystem variables. Some ecosystem attributes have been monitored more frequently (ecosystem integrity) than others (ecosystem health and sustainability). Finally, it is important to consider that ecological succession is a desirable approach in restoration actions. Natural dynamics and disturbances should be considered as part of the restored system, to improve ecosystem integrity, health and

  17. Could Prefab Blood Vessels Revolutionize Root Canals?

    MedlinePlus

    ... concerns, such as the need for dentures or dental implants." Bertassoni is an assistant professor of restorative dentistry and biomedical engineering at OHSU. His team developed a way to engineer new blood vessels in teeth with root canals. "This result proves that fabrication ...

  18. Fracture strength and stress distributions of pulpless premolars restored with fiber posts.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Yu; Huang, Shih-Hao; Takeda, Yuko; Fok, Alex; Hayashi, Mikako

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the effect of glass fiber posts on increasing the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth. Extracted upper premolars with two canals in a root were divided into three groups according to the number of posts they were restored with: none, one, or two. All teeth were endodontically treated, crown-sectioned, and restored with a composite core and a metallic crown. A static oblique load was applied to the restored tooth until fracture, and the fracture pattern was recorded. Stress distributions were examined by finite element analysis (FEA). Teeth with glass fiber post(s) showed significantly higher fracture loads compared with those without posts. In the premolars without posts, von Mises and maximum principal stresses were found on the root surface alone; in premolars restored with posts, stresses were distributed on both root and post surfaces. Risk of root dentin fracture was significantly lowest in teeth restored with two posts.

  19. Root status and future developments

    SciTech Connect

    Rene Brun et al.

    2003-10-01

    In this talk the authors review the major additions and improvements made to the ROOT system in the last 18 months and present their plans for future developments. The additions and improvements range from modifications to the I/O sub-system to allow users to save and restore objects of classes that have not been instrumented by special ROOT macros, to the addition of a geometry package designed for building, browsing, tracking and visualizing detector geometries. Other improvements include enhancements to the quick analysis sub-system (TTree::Draw()), the addition of classes that allow inter-file object references (TRef, TRefArray), better support for templates and STL classes, amelioration of the Automatic Script Compiler and the incorporation of new fitting and mathematical tools. Efforts have also been made to increase the modularity of the ROOT system with the introduction of more abstract interfaces and the development of a plug-in manager. In the near future, they intend to continue the development of PROOF and its interfacing with GRID environments. They plan on providing an interface between Geant3, Geant4 and Fluka and the new geometry package. The ROOT-GUI classes will finally be available on Windows and they plan to release a GUI inspector and builder. In the last year, ROOT has drawn the endorsement of additional experiments and institutions. It is now officially supported by CERN and used as key I/O component by the LCG project.

  20. Microleakage of root-end filling materials.

    PubMed

    Fogel, H M; Peikoff, M D

    2001-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the microleakage of various root-end filling materials using a fluid filtration system. Sixty extracted human single-rooted teeth were used. The crowns were removed, the canals prepared, and root-end fillings placed. The samples were divided into two control and five experimental groups. The root-end filling materials tested were: amalgam, Intermediate Restorative Material (IRM), a dentin-bonded resin, Super-EBA, and mineral trioxide aggregate. The results showed that amalgam root-end fillings demonstrated significantly more microleakage than Super-EBA, dentin-bonded resin, or mineral trioxide aggregate. There was no significant difference between amalgam and IRM. However IRM was also not significantly different from the other three groups. There were no significant differences between the other three groups.

  1. Positive Root Bounds and Root Separation Bounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Aaron Paul

    In this thesis, we study two classes of bounds on the roots of a polynomial (or polynomial system). A positive root bound of a polynomial is an upper bound on the largest positive root. A root separation bound of a polynomial is a lower bound on the distance between the roots. Both classes of bounds are fundamental tools in computer algebra and computational real algebraic geometry, with numerous applications. In the first part of the thesis, we study the quality of positive root bounds. Higher quality means that the relative over-estimation (the ratio of the bound and the largest positive root) is smaller. We find that all known positive root bounds can be arbitrarily bad. We then show that a particular positive root bound is tight for certain important classes of polynomials. In the remainder of the thesis, we turn to root separation bounds. We observe that known root separation bounds are usually very pessimistic. To our surprise, we also find that known root separation bounds are not compatible with the geometry of the roots (unlike positive root bounds). This motivates us to derive new root separation bounds. In the second part of this thesis, we derive a new root separation for univariate polynomials by transforming a known bound into a new improved bound. In the third part of this thesis, we use a similar strategy to derive a new improved root separation bound for polynomial systems.

  2. Biocompatibility of root-end filling materials: recent update

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Saurabh Kumar; Newaskar, Vilas

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of a root-end filling is to establish a seal between the root canal space and the periradicular tissues. As root-end filling materials come into contact with periradicular tissues, knowledge of the tissue response is crucial. Almost every available dental restorative material has been suggested as the root-end material of choice at a certain point in the past. This literature review on root-end filling materials will evaluate and comparatively analyse the biocompatibility and tissue response to these products, with primary focus on newly introduced materials. PMID:24010077

  3. Power system restoration planning

    SciTech Connect

    Adibi, M.M. ); Fink, L.H.

    1994-02-01

    System restoration, as an extraordinary mode of system operation, requires careful planning and operator training. The generic tasks of restoration include determination of system and equipment status, preparation of plants and network for systematic restoration, reenergization of the network, and system rebuilding. The procedures for developing an effective restoration plan include formation of a qualified planning team, review of relevant system characteristics, formulation of assumptions regarding blackout scenarios, agreement on restoration goals, development of strategy and tactics, validation of the plan, training, and documentation.

  4. The synergistic necrohemorrhagic action of Clostridium perfringens perfringolysin and alpha toxin in the bovine intestine and against bovine endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Bovine necrohemorrhagic enteritis is a major cause of mortality in veal calves. Clostridium perfringens is considered as the causative agent, but there has been controversy on the toxins responsible for the disease. Recently, it has been demonstrated that a variety of C. perfringens type A strains can induce necrohemorrhagic lesions in a calf intestinal loop assay. These results put forward alpha toxin and perfringolysin as potential causative toxins, since both are produced by all C. perfringens type A strains. The importance of perfringolysin in the pathogenesis of bovine necrohemorrhagic enteritis has not been studied before. Therefore, the objective of the current study was to evaluate the role of perfringolysin in the development of necrohemorrhagic enteritis lesions in calves and its synergism with alpha toxin. A perfringolysin-deficient mutant, an alpha toxin-deficient mutant and a perfringolysin alpha toxin double mutant were less able to induce necrosis in a calf intestinal loop assay as compared to the wild-type strain. Only complementation with both toxins could restore the activity to that of the wild-type. In addition, perfringolysin and alpha toxin had a synergistic cytotoxic effect on bovine endothelial cells. This endothelial cell damage potentially explains why capillary hemorrhages are an initial step in the development of bovine necrohemorrhagic enteritis. Taken together, our results show that perfringolysin acts synergistically with alpha toxin in the development of necrohemorrhagic enteritis in a calf intestinal loop model and we hypothesize that both toxins act by targeting the endothelial cells. PMID:23782465

  5. Restoration of fractured endodontically treated mandibular first molar using custom made cast post and core.

    PubMed

    Guruprasada

    2015-07-01

    The successful treatment of posterior tooth with substantial damage to the tooth structure not only depends on root canal treatment but also by prompt restoration of lost coronal tooth structure. Endodontically treated teeth undergo loss of tooth substance due to dental caries, endodontic therapy or previous restoration and changes in physical characteristics, such as a reduced modulus of elasticity, which often leads to increased fracture susceptibility when compared to unrestored vital teeth.(1) Restoration of endodontically treated posterior teeth is more challenging because of their additional functional requirements. The restorative treatment of such teeth includes the decision of whether or not a post should be used. Post is a dental material placed in the root of structurally insufficient tooth when additional retention is needed to retain the core and coronal restoration.(2,3) However, preparation of a post space adds a certain degree of risk to restorative procedure like perforations and root fracture, especially if an over sized post channel is prepared.

  6. Restoring the incisal edge.

    PubMed

    Terry, Douglas A

    2005-01-01

    Restorative dentistry evolves with each development of new material and innovative technique. Selection of improved restorative materials that simulate the physical properties and other characteristics of natural teeth, in combination with restorative techniques such as the proximal adaptation and incremental layering, provide the framework that ensures the optimal development of an esthetic restoration. These advanced placement techniques offer benefits such as enhanced chromatic integration, polychromatism, ideal anatomical form and function, optimal proximal contact, improved marginal integrity and longer lasting directly placed composite restorations. The purpose of this article is to give the reader a better understanding of the complex restorative challenge in achieving true harmonization of the primary parameters in esthetics (that is, color, shape and texture) represented by the replacement of a single anterior tooth. The case presented demonstrates the restoration of a Class IV fracture integrating basic adhesive principles with these placement techniques and a recently developed nanoparticle hybrid composite resin system (Premise, Kerr/Sybron, Orange, CA). The clinical presentation describes preoperative considerations, tooth preparation, development of the body layer, internal characterization with tints, development of the artificial enamel layer, shaping and contouring, and polishing of a Class IV composite restoration. The clinical significance is that anterior tooth fractures can be predictably restored using contemporary small particle hybrid composite resin systems with the aforementioned restorative techniques. These placement techniques when used with proper attention to preparation design, adhesive protocol and finishing and polishing procedures, allow the clinician to successfully restore form, function and esthetics to the single anterior tooth replacement.

  7. Characterization of rat apical tissues in different root development stage.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lin; Yang, Zhenhua; Jin, Fang; Duan, Yinzhong; Jin, Yan

    2011-10-01

    In this study, we try to compare the histological characteristics and the odontogenic capability of apical tissues (AT) at different root development stages of rat molar teeth. AT of mandibular first molars from 8-day-old, 21-day-old, and 35-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats were selected as being representative of root-initiating, root-forming, and root-completing stages, respectively. Cell counting, flow cytometry assays, alkaline phosphatase activity, alizarin red staining, and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction were performed to assess the proliferation and mineralization potential of apical tissue cells at different stages of root development in vitro. In vivo transplantation of apical tissue cells combined with ceramic bovine bone was used to characterize the differentiation capacity. It was shown that there was a structurally and functionally dynamic change in the apical tissue of developing tooth root of rats, of which the unique developmental potential will reduce gradually with the ending up of root development. The AT of root-initiating and root-forming stage exhibited much higher proliferation and tissue-regenerative capacity than those of root-completing stage. Our present results indicate that the apical tissue, with the sustainable developmental ability throughout almost the whole process of tooth development, can yet be regarded as a competent candidate source for root/periodontal tissues regeneration.

  8. Biologic restoration of primary anterior teeth: a case report.

    PubMed

    Mandroli, P S

    2003-09-01

    Restoration of primary maxillary incisors, severely destroyed by trauma or caries is a commonly faced problem in a Pediatric dental clinic. Most cases are observed in children with early childhood caries. In the past, the only option would have been to extract the affected teeth and replace them with prosthetic substitutes. However, the availability of natural crowns and roots would allow the use of biologic restorations to preserve the integrity of patient's natural dentition as presented in this case report.

  9. Radiopacity of different resin-based and conventional luting cements compared to human and bovine teeth.

    PubMed

    Pekkan, Gürel; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2012-02-03

    This study evaluated the radiopacity of different resin-based luting materials and compared the results to human and bovine dental hard tissues. Disc specimens (N=130, n=10 per group) (diameter: 6 mm, thickness: 1 mm) were prepared from 10 resin-based and 3 conventional luting cements. Human canine dentin (n=10), bovine enamel (n=10), bovine dentin (n=10) and Aluminium (Al) step wedge were used as references. The optical density values of each material were measured from radiographic images using a transmission densitometer. Al step wedge thickness and optical density values were plotted and equivalent Al thickness values were determined for radiopacity measurements of each material. The radiopacity values of conventional cements and two resin luting materials (Rely X Unicem and Variolink II), were significantly higher than that of bovine enamel that could be preferred for restorations cemented on enamel. Since all examined resin-based luting materials showed radiopacity values equivalent to or greater than that of human and bovine dentin, they could be considered suitable for the restorations cemented on dentin.

  10. Microleakage evaluation of class V restorations with conventional and resin-modified glass ionomer cements.

    PubMed

    Pontes, Danielson Guedes; Guedes-Neto, Manoel Valcacio; Cabral, Maria Fernanda Costa; Cohen-Carneiro, Flávia

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the marginal microleakage of conventional Glass Ionomer Cements (GIC) and Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Cements (RMGIC). The tested materials were grouped as follows: GIC category - G1 (Vidrion R - SSWhite); G2 (Vitro Fill - DFL); G3 (Vitro Molar - DFL); G4 (Bioglass R - Biodinâmica); and G5 (Ketac Fill - 3M/ESPE); and RMGIC category - G6 (Vitremer - 3M/ESPE); G7 (Vitro Fill LC - DFL); and G8 (Resiglass - Biodinâmica). Therefore, 80 class V cavities (2.0X2.0 mm) were prepared in bovine incisors, either in the buccal face. The samples were randomly divided into 8 groups and restored using each material tested according to the manufacturer. The root apices were then sealed with acrylic resin. The teeth were stored for 24 h in 100% humidity at 37°C. After storage, the specimens were polished with extra-slim burs and silicon disc (Soft-lex - 3M/ESPE), then were isolated with cosmetic nail polish up to 1 mm around the restoration. Then, the samples were immersed in 50% AgNO3 solution for 12 h and in a developing solution for 30 min. They were rinsed and buccal-lingual sectioned. The evaluation of the microleakage followed scores from 0 to 3. The Kruskal-Wallis test and Dunn method test were applied (a=0.05). The results showed that there was no difference between the enamel and dentin margins. However, GIC materials presented more microleakage than RMGIC.

  11. Watershed Restoration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Julie Thompson; Betsy Macfarlan

    2007-09-27

    In 2003, the U.S. Department of Energy issued the Eastern Nevada Landscape Coalition (ENLC) funding to implement ecological restoration in Gleason Creek and Smith Valley Watersheds. This project was made possible by congressionally directed funding that was provided through the US Department of Energy, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of the Biomass Program. The Ely District Bureau of Land Management (Ely BLM) manages these watersheds and considers them priority areas within the Ely BLM district. These three entities collaborated to address the issues and concerns of Gleason Creek and Smith Valley and prepared a restoration plan to improve the watersheds’ ecological health and resiliency. The restoration process began with watershed-scale vegetation assessments and state and transition models to focus on restoration sites. Design and implementation of restoration treatments ensued and were completed in January 2007. This report describes the restoration process ENLC undertook from planning to implementation of two watersheds in semi-arid Eastern Nevada.

  12. Conservative restoration of severely damaged endodontically treated premolar teeth: a FEM study.

    PubMed

    Eraslan, Öznur; Eraslan, Oğuz; Eskitaşcıoğlu, Gürcan; Belli, Sema

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this finite element method (FEM) study was to test two different restorative techniques used for construction of severely damaged endodontically treated premolar teeth using Finite Element Stress Analysis Method. In this study, four types of three-dimensional (3-D) FEM mathematical models simulating (1) a sound lower single rooted premolar tooth with supporting structures; (2) a root-filled lower premolar tooth without lingual cusp, restored with resin composite; (3) a root-filled lower premolar tooth without lingual cusp restored with resin composite in combination with a polyethylene fiber which is placed circumferentially to help to create a composite lingual wall; (4) a root-filled lower premolar tooth without lingual cusp restored with resin composite in combination with a glass fiber post, were modeled. A 300-N static vertical occlusal load was applied on the node at the center of occlusal surface of the tooth to calculate stress distributions. Solidworks/Cosmosworks structural analysis programs were used for FEM analysis. The analysis of the von Mises stress values revealed that maximum stress concentrations were located at loading areas for all models. Root dentine tissue, lingual cortical bone, and apical bone structures were other stress concentration regions. There were stress concentration differences among the models at root dentine tissue. Although the distribution pattern was similar with composite resin restored tooth model, highest stress values were observed at root dentine in the model restored with post-and-core. Post structure accumulated more stress on its own body. Stress distribution patterns of sound tooth and fiber-reinforced restoration models were found as similar. The present study showed that the use of post material increased the stress values at root dentine structure while reinforcing the restoration with a fiber decreases stress transmission. Fiber-reinforced restoration provided stress distributions similar to sound

  13. Inhibition of rat and bovine trypsins and chymotrypsins by soybean, bovine basic pancreatic, and bovine colostrum trypsin inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Esparza, I; Brock, J H

    1978-01-01

    1. Bovine (Bos taurus) trypsin and trypsin activity in rat (Rattus norvegicus) pancreatic extract were inhibited by soybean trypsin inhibitor and by bovine basic pancreatic and colostrum inhibitors. 2. Bovine alpha-chymotrypsin was inhibited by soybean and bovine basic pancreatic inhibitors but only weakly by colostrum inhibitor. 3. Chymotrypsin activity in rat pancreatic extract was due to at least three different components against all of which the inhibitors were largely ineffective. 4. It is concluded that bovine colostrum inhibitor has a more limited inhibition spectrum than the phylogenetically related basic pancreatic inhibitor which, in turn, is less active against rat than against bovine enzymes.

  14. Seedling root targets

    Treesearch

    Diane L. Haase

    2011-01-01

    Roots are critical to seedling performance after outplanting. Although root quality is not as quick and simple to measure as shoot quality, target root characteristics should be included in any seedling quality assessment program. This paper provides a brief review of root characteristics most commonly targeted for operational seedling production. These are: root mass...

  15. Restoring the smile: Inexpensive biologic restorations

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Neeti P.

    2014-01-01

    Extensive breakdown of primary teeth to the cervical level and their loss in very young children is not uncommon. Owing to increasing concerns over self-appearance, due considerations to esthetic aspects in addition to restoring function are necessary aspects of rehabilitation of mutilated teeth to help children grow into a psychologically balanced personality. The present article describes rehabilitation of grossly decayed teeth with biologic restorations such as dentine posts, dentine post and core and biologic shell crown. This treatment modality provided a cost-effective esthetic solution. PMID:25097656

  16. Ecological restoration [book review

    Treesearch

    Eric J. Gustafson

    2010-01-01

    Ecological restoration has increased in prominence in recent years as environmental policies have slowed the rate of environmental degradation in many parts of the world and practitioners have looked for active ways to reverse the damage. Because of the vast number of types and contexts of degraded ecological systems, the field of ecological restoration is still very...

  17. Utah Paiute Tribal Restoration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Allen C.

    The Paiute Indian Tribe of Utah Restoration Act (1980) restored federal recognition of the tribe after a quarter century of ambiguous political status, and resulted in significant improvements of educational status of tribal members and intensification of the political presence of Southern Paiutes. Following the Paiute Indian Termination Act…

  18. What is forest restoration?

    Treesearch

    John A. Stanturf

    2005-01-01

    The need to repair habitat and restore forest structure and funciton is recognized throughout the temperate and boreal zones as a component of sustainable forest management (Krishnaswamy and Hanson 1999; Dobson et al. 1997). Forest restoration is a complex task, complicated by diverse ecological and social conditions, that challenges our understanding of forest...

  19. Restoration of southern ecosystems

    Treesearch

    John A. Stanturf; Emile S. Gardiner; Kenneth Outcalt; William H. Conner; James M. Guldin

    2004-01-01

    Restoration of the myriad communities of bottomland hardwood and wetland forests and of the diverse communities of fire-dominated pine forests is the subject of intense interest in the Southern United States. Restoration practice is relatively advanced for bottomland hardwoods and longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.), and less so for swamps and...

  20. Power system restoration issues

    SciTech Connect

    Adibi, M.M. ); Kafka, R.J. )

    1991-04-01

    This article describes some of the problems encountered in the three phases of power system restoration (PSR). The three phases of PSR are: Planning for restart and reintegration of the bulk power supply; Actions during system degradation for saving and retaining critical sources of power; Restoration when the power system has stabilized at some degraded level.

  1. Restored Moonwalk Footage Release

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-15

    Mike Inchalik, president of Lowry Digital, talks about the job of restoring Apollo 11 moonwalk footage at a NASA briefing where restored Apollo 11 moonwalk footage was revealed for the first time at the Newseum, Thursday, July 16, 2009, in Washington, DC. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  2. Restored Moonwalk Footage Release

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-15

    Archived and restored Apollo 11 moonwalk footage is shown on a large video monitor above panelists at a NASA briefing where restored Apollo 11 moonwalk footage was revealed for the first time at the Newseum, Thursday, July 16, 2009, in Washington, DC. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  3. Gill's 'History' restored

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurn, Mark

    2009-06-01

    Note about the restoration of the copy of Sir David Gill's 'A History and Description of the Royal Observatory, Cape of Good Hope' in the Library of the Institute of Astronomy, Cambridge. The book was restored with funds provided by the SHA in thanks for facilities for meetings provided to the Institute.

  4. Restoration of bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.; Hanau, H.

    1977-01-01

    Process consisting of grinding raceways to oversize but original quality condition and installing new oversize balls or bearings restores wornout ball and roller bearings to original quality, thereby doubling their operating life. Evaluations reveal process results in restoration of 90% of replaced bearings at less than 50% of new-bearing costs.

  5. Restoration of White Springs

    Treesearch

    Jonathan W. Long; Delbin Endfield

    2000-01-01

    Rock structures, road closures, fencing and revegetation methods were employed to restore a culturally and ecologically important spring that had been damaged in the aftermath of a wildfire. The project has reestablished the stability of the spring and has moved it closer to its former condition. School groups were an essential part of the restoration project, and...

  6. Vaccination against bovine babesiosis.

    PubMed

    De Vos, A J; Bock, R E

    2000-01-01

    Bovine babesiosis is an important disease caused by Babesia bovis, B. bigemina, and B. divergens. Solid immunity develops after infection and this feature has been exploited with the use of live attenuated organisms as immunogens. Attributes of live vaccines include a durable immunity to heterologous challenge after one vaccination. To overcome disadvantages relating to poor quality control (risk of contamination and adverse reactions), production procedures have been modified to meet the requirements of codes of good manufacturing practice. This includes development of methods to allow production of cryopreserved vaccine and limit antigenic drift. Killed vaccines have also been used on a limited basis and consist of antigens extracted from cultured material or blood of infected calves, and given with adjuvant. The degree and duration of immunity against heterologous challenge is not well documented. Attempts are being made to develop subunit vaccines but the progress has been slow. A better understanding of the mechanisms involved in the expression of protective immunity against Babesia spp will aid in the identification of protective antigens.

  7. Pathology of bovine tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Domingo, M; Vidal, E; Marco, A

    2014-10-01

    Bovine tuberculosis (bTB) is a chronic granulomatous caseous-necrotising inflammatory process that mainly affects the lungs and their draining lymph nodes (Ln.). The pathological changes associated with bTB infection reflect the interplay between the host defence mechanisms and the mycobacterial virulence factors and the balance between the immunologic protective responses and the damaging inflammatory processes. Inhalation is the most common infection route and causes lesions of the nasopharynx and lower respiratory tract, including its associated lymph nodes. The initial infection (primary complex) may be followed by chronic (post-primary) tuberculosis or may be generalised. Goat tuberculosis often produces liquefactive necrosis and caverns, similarly to human TB. The assessment of the severity of TB lesions is crucial for vaccine trials. Semi-quantitative gross lesion scoring systems have been developed for cattle, but imaging technology has allowed the development of more standardised, objective, and quantitative methods, such as multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT), which provides quantitative measures of lesion volume.

  8. Retributive and restorative justice.

    PubMed

    Wenzel, Michael; Okimoto, Tyler G; Feather, Norman T; Platow, Michael J

    2008-10-01

    The emergence of restorative justice as an alternative model to Western, court-based criminal justice may have important implications for the psychology of justice. It is proposed that two different notions of justice affect responses to rule-breaking: restorative and retributive justice. Retributive justice essentially refers to the repair of justice through unilateral imposition of punishment, whereas restorative justice means the repair of justice through reaffirming a shared value-consensus in a bilateral process. Among the symbolic implications of transgressions, concerns about status and power are primarily related to retributive justice and concerns about shared values are primarily related to restorative justice. At the core of these processes, however, lies the parties' construal of their identity relation, specifically whether or not respondents perceive to share an identity with the offender. The specific case of intergroup transgressions is discussed, as are implications for future research on restoring a sense of justice after rule-breaking.

  9. The permeability of dentine from bovine incisors in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tagami, J; Tao, L; Pashley, D H; Horner, J A

    1989-01-01

    The permeability of coronal dentine was investigated by measuring the hydraulic conductance of dentine discs. Reductions in dentine thickness from the enamel side of disc resulted in a greater increase in permeability than reductions from the pulpal side. Scanning electron microscopy revealed fewer dentinal tubules with smaller diameters in superficial dentine than in deep dentine. The permeability of coronal incisor bovine dentine is six to eight times less than that of unerupted coronal human third molar dentine but similar to that of human root dentine.

  10. A simplified technique for the restoration of severely mutilated primary anterior teeth.

    PubMed

    Mortada, A; King, N M

    2004-01-01

    The restoration of severely carious primary anterior teeth is a challenge to the pediatric dentist. The introduction of new materials and technologies makes re-evaluation of existing treatment philosophies necessary. A technique involving the placement of an omega shaped stainless steel wire extension into the entrance of the root canal prior to restoring the crown with a compomer material is described. 96 restorations were placed in 25 children. After 18 months 81.2% of the 96 restorations, which were available for evaluation, 60 (79.9%) were intact. The technique for restoring primary anterior teeth was simple, quick and effective.

  11. Reversible loss of gravitropic sensitivity in maize roots after tip application of calcium chelators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. S.; Mulkey, T. J.; Evans, M. L.

    1983-01-01

    The application of calcium chelating agents (EDTA or EGTA) to the tips of maize roots caused a loss of gravitropic sensitivity. When the chelator was replaced with calcium chloride, gravitropic sensitivity was restored. Asymmetric application of calcium chloride near the tip of a vertical root caused curvature toward the calcium source. When the calcium was applied to the upper surface of the tip of a root oriented horizontally, the root curved upward even though control roots exhibited strong downward curvature. Application of calcium chloride to the tips of decapped roots, which are known to be gravitropically insensitive, did not restore gravitropic sensitivity. However, asymmetric application of calcium chloride near the tips of decapped roots caused curvature toward the calcium source. Calcium may play a key role in linking gravity detection to gravitropic curvature in roots.

  12. Reversible loss of gravitropic sensitivity in maize roots after tip application of calcium chelators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. S.; Mulkey, T. J.; Evans, M. L.

    1983-01-01

    The application of calcium chelating agents (EDTA or EGTA) to the tips of maize roots caused a loss of gravitropic sensitivity. When the chelator was replaced with calcium chloride, gravitropic sensitivity was restored. Asymmetric application of calcium chloride near the tip of a vertical root caused curvature toward the calcium source. When the calcium was applied to the upper surface of the tip of a root oriented horizontally, the root curved upward even though control roots exhibited strong downward curvature. Application of calcium chloride to the tips of decapped roots, which are known to be gravitropically insensitive, did not restore gravitropic sensitivity. However, asymmetric application of calcium chloride near the tips of decapped roots caused curvature toward the calcium source. Calcium may play a key role in linking gravity detection to gravitropic curvature in roots.

  13. Bovine trophectoderm cell lines induced from bovine fibroblasts with reprogramming factors

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bovine trophectoderm (TE) cells were induced [induced bovine trophectoderm-like (iBT)] from bovine fetal liver-derived fibroblasts, and other bovine fetal fibroblasts, after viral-vector transduction with either four or six reprogramming factors (RF), including POU5F1, KLF4, SOX2, C-MYC, SV40 large ...

  14. Bovine respiratory disease model based on dual infections with infection with bovine viral diarrhea virus and bovine corona virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC) is the leading cause of economic loss in the U.S. cattle industry. BRDC likely results from simultaneous or sequential infections with multiple pathogens including both viruses and bacteria. Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) and bovine corona virus (BoCV...

  15. A metagenomics and case-control study to identify viruses associated with bovine respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Ng, Terry Fei Fan; Kondov, Nikola O; Deng, Xutao; Van Eenennaam, Alison; Neibergs, Holly L; Delwart, Eric

    2015-05-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is a common health problem for both dairy and beef cattle, resulting in significant economic loses. In order to identify viruses associated with BRD, we used a metagenomics approach to enrich and sequence viral nucleic acids in the nasal swabs of 50 young dairy cattle with symptoms of BRD. Following deep sequencing, de novo assembly, and translated protein sequence similarity searches, numerous known and previously uncharacterized viruses were identified. Bovine adenovirus 3, bovine adeno-associated virus, bovine influenza D virus, bovine parvovirus 2, bovine herpesvirus 6, bovine rhinitis A virus, and multiple genotypes of bovine rhinitis B virus were identified. The genomes of a previously uncharacterized astrovirus and picobirnaviruses were also partially or fully sequenced. Using real-time PCR, the rates of detection of the eight viruses that generated the most reads were compared for the nasal secretions of 50 animals with BRD versus 50 location-matched healthy control animals. Viruses were detected in 68% of BRD-affected animals versus 16% of healthy control animals. Thirty-eight percent of sick animals versus 8% of controls were infected with multiple respiratory viruses. Significantly associated with BRD were bovine adenovirus 3 (P < 0.0001), bovine rhinitis A virus (P = 0.005), and the recently described bovine influenza D virus (P = 0.006), which were detected either alone or in combination in 62% of animals with BRD. A metagenomics and real-time PCR detection approach in carefully matched cases and controls can provide a rapid means to identify viruses associated with a complex disease, paving the way for further confirmatory tests and ultimately to effective intervention strategies. Bovine respiratory disease is the most economically important disease affecting the cattle industry, whose complex root causes include environmental, genetics, and infectious factors. Using an unbiased metagenomics approach, we characterized

  16. Response of imperiled Okaloosa darters to stream restoration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reeves, David B.; Tate, William B.; Jelks, Howard; Jordan, Frank

    2016-01-01

    The Okaloosa Darter Etheostoma okaloosae is a small percid endemic to six stream drainages in northwestern Florida. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service listed Okaloosa Darters as endangered in 1973 and downlisted them to threatened in 2011 because of habitat improvements and increasing abundance across much of their geographic range. Delisting is possible if remaining recovery criteria are met, including restoration of degraded stream reaches. Impounded reaches of Anderson Branch, Mill Creek, and Toms Creek were restored by removing impediments to water flow, draining impoundments, and reconstructing stream reaches. Restorations of Anderson Branch and Mill Creek were designed to rehabilitate populations of Okaloosa Darters without significantly affecting popular recreational activities at these locations. Restorations were evaluated from 2007 to 2013 by comparing counts of Okaloosa Darters and the composition of microhabitats in restored and nearby undisturbed reference sites. Okaloosa Darters were absent from degraded stream reaches at the beginning of the study, but they rapidly colonized once restorations were completed. Counts of Okaloosa Darters in reference and restoration sites in Anderson Branch were similar by the end of the study, whereas counts in restoration sites were significantly lower than nearby reference sites in Mill and Toms creeks. Restoration sites tended to have lower coverage of sand and root and higher coverage of macrophytes. As riparian vegetation surrounding restoration sites matures to a closed canopy that reduces excessive growth of macrophytes, stream microhabitats and numbers of darters will probably become similar to reference sites. Restoration of degraded stream sites increased abundance and distribution of Okaloosa Darters and reconnected formerly isolated upstream and downstream populations. These projects demonstrated that restoration is a useful conservation tool for imperiled fishes such as Okaloosa Darters and can be

  17. Primary Postnatal Dorsal Root Ganglion Culture from Conventionally Slaughtered Calves

    PubMed Central

    Fadda, A.; Bärtschi, M.; Hemphill, A.; Widmer, H. R.; Zurbriggen, A.; Perona, P.; Vidondo, B.; Oevermann, A.

    2016-01-01

    Neurological disorders in ruminants have an important impact on veterinary health, but very few host-specific in vitro models have been established to study diseases affecting the nervous system. Here we describe a primary neuronal dorsal root ganglia (DRG) culture derived from calves after being conventionally slaughtered for food consumption. The study focuses on the in vitro characterization of bovine DRG cell populations by immunofluorescence analysis. The effects of various growth factors on neuron viability, neurite outgrowth and arborisation were evaluated by morphological analysis. Bovine DRG neurons are able to survive for more than 4 weeks in culture. GF supplementation is not required for neuronal survival and neurite outgrowth. However, exogenously added growth factors promote neurite outgrowth. DRG cultures from regularly slaughtered calves represent a promising and sustainable host specific model for the investigation of pain and neurological diseases in bovines. PMID:27936156

  18. THE ROLE OF THERMAL REGIMEN IN TUNDRA PLANT COMMUNITY RESTORATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mineral extraction activities in the Arctic regions of the world produce long-lasting ecological disturbances. Assisted recovery from such disturbances may require restoration of the tundra thermal regime. We transplanted plugs of entire root zone and live tundra plants to a dist...

  19. Meeting forest restoration challenges: Using the Target Plant Concept

    Treesearch

    Kas Dumroese; Thomas D. Landis; Jeremy Pinto; Diane L. Haase; Kim W. Wilkinson; Anthony S. Davis

    2016-01-01

    Meeting forest restoration challenges relies on successful establishment of plant materials (e.g., seeds, cuttings, rooted cuttings, or seedlings, etc.; hereafter simply "seedlings"). The Target Plant Concept (TPC) provides a flexible framework that nursery managers and their clients can use to improve the survival and growth of these seedlings. The...

  20. Endodontic and restorative management of incompletely fractured molar teeth.

    PubMed

    Gutmann, J L; Rakusin, H

    1994-11-01

    The treatment of fractured teeth poses significant problems for the practitioner. However, once the treatment planning decision has been made to attempt to retain the tooth, various practical regimens are available to effect this goal. This paper addresses the specific use of glass ionomer in the restorative management of incompletely, vertically fractured molar teeth integrated with specific root canal treatment techniques.

  1. THE ROLE OF THERMAL REGIMEN IN TUNDRA PLANT COMMUNITY RESTORATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mineral extraction activities in the Arctic regions of the world produce long-lasting ecological disturbances. Assisted recovery from such disturbances may require restoration of the tundra thermal regime. We transplanted plugs of entire root zone and live tundra plants to a dist...

  2. Bearing restoration by grinding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanau, H.; Parker, R. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.; Chen, S. M.; Bull, H. L.

    1976-01-01

    A joint program was undertaken by the NASA Lewis Research Center and the Army Aviation Systems Command to restore by grinding those rolling-element bearings which are currently being discarded at aircraft engine and transmission overhaul. Three bearing types were selected from the UH-1 helicopter engine (T-53) and transmission for the pilot program. No bearing failures occurred related to the restoration by grinding process. The risk and cost of a bearing restoration by grinding programs was analyzed. A microeconomic impact analysis was performed.

  3. [Root canal retreatment or surgical apicoectomy?].

    PubMed

    van der Meer, W J; Stegenga, B

    2004-11-01

    Failure of root canal therapy is usually due to re-infection of the root canal system. In most of these cases, an endodontic retreatment is indicated. Patients with persisting apical periodontitis frequently are referred to an oral surgeon for apical surgery, although endodontic retreatment would have been possible in a majority of these cases. When endodontic retreatment is not possible or does not resolve the patient's problems, surgical apicoectomy or extraction might be the only possibilities left. Apical surgery is usually performed by an oral sugeon or by a specially trained dentist. In most surgical clinics beveled resection, followed by an preparation and restoration is performed. New developments, such as microscopic sugery, ultrasonic preparation and newly developed restorative materials are described in this article. Since there is a lack of well-designed comparative clinical studies, no definite conclusions can be drawn with regard to the clinical value of these modern techniques.

  4. Principles of Wetland Restoration

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    the return of a degraded ecosystem to a close approximation of its remaining natural potential - is experiencing a groundswell of support across the United States. The number of stream, river, lake, wetland and estuary restoration projects grows yearly

  5. Restoration of Ailing Wetlands

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Oswald J.

    2012-01-01

    It is widely held that humankind's destructive tendencies when exploiting natural resources leads to irreparable harm to the environment. Yet, this thinking runs counter to evidence that many ecological systems damaged by severe natural environmental disturbances (e.g., hurricanes) can restore themselves via processes of natural recovery. The emerging field of restoration ecology is capitalizing on the natural restorative tendencies of ecological systems to build a science of repairing the harm inflicted by humans on natural environment. Evidence for this, for example, comes from a new meta-analysis of 124 studies that synthesizes recovery of impacted wetlands worldwide. While it may take up to two human generations to see full recovery, there is promise, given human will, to restore many damaged wetlands worldwide. PMID:22291573

  6. The Menominee Restoration Act

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deer, Ada E.

    1973-01-01

    The article discusses the background and current status of the Menominee Restoration Bill, which will reverse the termination of Federal responsibility effected on the Wisconsin Menominee Tribe in 1961. (KM)

  7. ESTUARINE HABITAT RESTORATION

    SciTech Connect

    Thom, Ronald M.; Borde, Amy B.

    2015-09-01

    Restoring estuarine habitats generally means repairing damages caused by humans and natural forces. Because of the extensive human occupation, development, and use of coastal areas for centuries, the extensive estuarine habitats have been either destroyed or significantly impaired.

  8. Ecosystem restoration: Chapter 4

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cullinane Thomas, Catherine M.; Skrabis, K. E.; Gascoigne, William

    2012-01-01

    The Department of the Interior extensively supports―through its mission, policy, programs, and funding― the study, planning, implementation, and monitoring of ecosystem restoration. This commitment is reflected in the Department's FY2011-2016 Strategic Plan.

  9. Material Properties of Inorganic Bovine Cancellous Bovine: Nukbone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piña, Cristina; Palma, Benito; Munguía, Nadia

    2006-09-01

    In this work, inorganic cancellous bovine bone implants prepared in the Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales — UNAM were characterized. Elementary chemical analysis was made, toxic elements concentration were measured and the content of organic matter also. These implants fulfill all the requirements of the ASTM standards, and therefore it is possible their use in medical applications.

  10. Guiding Restoration Principles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-12-01

    Taylor and Bentzen 1993, Th orpe et al. 1998). Reproductive sites are oft en perceived as critical core areas for preservation and restoration...in ecosystem condition. Th e conservation strategy should consider the following: 1. protection of key sites of high quality that currently provide a...high level of support for nearshore habitat functions; 2. provision of eff ective corridors between protected and restored sites for the necessary

  11. Restoring primary anterior teeth.

    PubMed

    Waggoner, William F

    2002-01-01

    A variety of esthetic restorative materials are available for restoring primary incisors. Knowledge of the specific strengths, weakness, and properties of each material will enhance the clinician's ability to make the best choice of selection for each individual situation. Intracoronal restorations of primary teeth may utilize resin composites, glass ionomer cements, resin-modified ionomers, or polyacid-modified resins. Each has distinct advantages and disadvantages and the clinical conditions of placement may be a strong determining factor as to which material is utilized. Full coronal restoration of primary incisors may be indicated for a number of reasons. Crowns available for restoration of primary incisors include those that are directly bonded onto the tooth, which generally are a resin material, and those crowns that are luted onto the tooth and are some type of stainless steel crown. However, due to lack of supporting clinical data, none of the crowns can be said to be superior to the others under all circumstances. Though caries in the mandibular region is rare, restorative solutions for mandibular incisors are needed. Neither stainless steel crowns nor celluloid crown forms are made specifically for mandibular incisors. Many options exist to repair carious primary incisors, but there is insufficient controlled, clinical data to suggest that one type of restoration is superior to another. This does not discount the fact that dentists have been using many of these crowns for years with much success. Operator preferences, esthetic demands by parents, the child's behavior, and moisture and hemorrhage control are all variables which affect the decision and ultimate outcome of whatever restorative treatment is chosen.

  12. A restoration practitioner's guide to the restoration gene pool concept

    Treesearch

    Thomas A. Jones; Thomas A. Monaco

    2007-01-01

    Choosing plant materials for each desired species is often one of the most difficult steps in developing a restoration plan. The Restoration Gene Pool concept was developed to clarify the options available to the ecological restoration practitioner in terms of plant materials. We present a decision-making flowchart incorporating the issues delineated in the Restoration...

  13. Wood decay fungi restore essential calcium to acidic soils in northern New England

    Treesearch

    Walter C. Shortle; Kevin T. Smith

    2015-01-01

    The depletion of root-available calcium in northern forests soils exposed to decades of increased acid deposition adversely affects forest health and productivity. Laboratory studies indicated the potential of wood-decay fungi to restore lost calcium to the rooting zone of trees. This study reports changes in concentrations of Ca, Mg, and K during decay of sapwood of...

  14. Applying geomorphologic principles to restore streams impacted by surface mining

    SciTech Connect

    Ellison, M.S.

    1996-12-31

    The combination of geomorphic principles and native material restoration techniques provides a viable alternative to traditional engineering approaches to restore rivers and streams affected by surface mining. Channels can be designed to reflect ranges of stability known to occur in natural streams for measurable parameters such as bankfull width, depth, gradient, meander radius, sinuosity and entrenchment. Stable channel geometry reduces stresses on the stream bed and banks and eliminate the need for channel lining. Methods to utilize native materials have been developed and refined to stabilize stream channels constructed to appropriate dimensions until planted riparian vegetation develops mature root systems. These native materials include root wads, willow bundles, and boulders. These methods result in improved wildlife habitat in and around channels that maintain equilibria between sediment supply and sediment transport, and between erosional and depositional rates and patterns. Two streams in Baltimore County, Maryland were disturbed during mining operations and are being restored using this approach. Goodwin Run had been channelized to allow quarrying of the Cockeysville Marble. Approximately 1100 feet of stream were restored in the fall of 1992. White Marsh Run has been channelized and relocated several times to facilitate sand and gravel mining between an urbanized area and sensitive habitats of the Chesapeake Bay. The design of the White Marsh Run Restoration Project incorporated refinements to techniques used at Goodwin Run, and entails the restoration of over 5000 feet of stream and adjacent wetland habitat.

  15. Effect of root canal preparation, type of endodontic post and mechanical cycling on root fracture strength

    PubMed Central

    RIPPE, Marília Pivetta; SANTINI, Manuela Favarin; BIER, Carlos Alexandre Souza; BALDISSARA, Paolo; VALANDRO, Luiz Felipe

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the impact of the type of root canal preparation, intraradicular post and mechanical cycling on the fracture strength of roots. Material and Methods eighty human single rooted teeth were divided into 8 groups according to the instruments used for root canal preparation (manual or rotary instruments), the type of intraradicular post (fiber posts- FRC and cast post and core- CPC) and the use of mechanical cycling (MC) as follows: Manual and FRC; Manual, FRC and MC; Manual and CPC; Manual, CPC and MC; Rotary and FRC; Rotary, FRC and MC; Rotary and CPC; Rotary, CPC and MC. The filling was performed by lateral compactation. All root canals were prepared for a post with a 10 mm length, using the custom #2 bur of the glass fiber post system. For mechanical cycling, the protocol was applied as follows: an angle of incidence of 45°, 37°C, 88 N, 4 Hz, 2 million pulses. All groups were submitted to fracture strength test in a 45° device with 1 mm/ min cross-head speed until failure occurred. Results The 3-way ANOVA showed that the root canal preparation strategy (p<0.03) and post type (p<0.0001) affected the fracture strength results, while mechanical cycling (p=0.29) did not. Conclusion The root canal preparation strategy only influenced the root fracture strength when restoring with a fiber post and mechanical cycling, so it does not seem to be an important factor in this scenario. PMID:25025556

  16. Megasessions for Robotic Hair Restoration.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Joa O Carlos; Pereira Filho, Joa O Carlos; Cabrera Pereira, Joa O Pedro

    2016-11-01

    A robotic system can select and remove individual hair follicles from the donor area with great precision and without fatigue. This report describes the use of the robotic system in a megasession for hair restoration. Patients were instructed to cut their hair to 1.0 to 1.2 mm before surgery. The robot selected and removed 600 to 800 grafts per hour so the follicular units (FU)s could be transplanted manually to recipient sites. The robot arm consists of a sharp inner punch and a blunt outer punch which together separate FUs from the sur- rounding tissue. Stereoscopic cameras controlled by image processing software allow the system to identify the angle and direction of hair growth. The physician and one assistant control the harvesting with a hand-held remote control and computer monitor while the patient is positioned in an adjustable chair. When the robot has harvested all the FUs they are removed by technicians with small forceps. Hairline design, creation of recipient sites, and graft placement are performed manually by the physician. Clinical photographs before and after surgery show that patients experience excellent outcomes with the robotic megasession. Phy- sician fatigue during graft extraction is reduced because the robot performs the repetitive movements without fatigue. Variability of graft extraction is minimized because the robot's optical system can be programmed to choose the best FUs. The transection rate is reduced because the robot's graft extraction system uses two needles, a sharp one to piece the skin and a blunt needle to dissect the root without trauma. A robotic megasession for hair restoration is minimally invasive, does not result in linear scars in the donor area, and is associated with minimal fatigue and discomfort for both patient and physician. Healing is rapid and patients experience a high level of satisfaction with the results. J Drugs Dermatol. 2016;15(11):1407-1412..

  17. Role of provisional restorations in endodontic therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sivakumar, Jambai Sampathkumar; Suresh Kumar, Beri Narasimiah; Shyamala, Palaniyandi Vadivel

    2013-01-01

    Root-canal treatment can be carried out in single visit in vital, non-infected teeth, eliminating the need for dressing and provisionalization. Many clinical cases with infected canals require dressing with antibacterial medicaments in a multivisit treatment in which effective provisionalization for different periods of time becomes mandatory. Successful root-canal treatment requires effective mechanical and chemical debridement, elimination of bacteria and pulp tissue remnants and proper canal shaping to facilitate effective obturation. Lack of satisfactory temporary restorations during endodontic therapy ranked second amongst the contributing factors in continuing pain after the commencement of treatment. This review aims to provide an overview of the materials used for provisionalization during and immediately after endodontic treatment. PMID:23946564

  18. Influence of photoactivation method and mold for restoration on the Knoop hardness of resin composite restorations.

    PubMed

    Brandt, William Cunha; Silva-Concilio, Lais Regiane; Neves, Ana Christina Claro; de Souza-Junior, Eduardo Jose Carvalho; Sinhoreti, Mario Alexandre Coelho

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the Knoop hardness in the top and bottom of composite photo activated by different methods when different mold materials were used. Z250 (3M ESPE) and XL2500 halogen unit (3M ESPE) were used. For hardness test, conical restorations were made in extracted bovine incisors (tooth mold) and also metal mold (approximately 2 mm top diameter × 1.5 mm bottom diameter × 2 mm in height). Different photoactivation methods were tested: high-intensity continuous (HIC), low-intensity continuous (LIC), soft-start, or pulse-delay (PD), with constant radiant exposure. Knoop readings were performed on top and bottom restoration surfaces. Data were submitted to two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (p = 0.05). On the top, regardless of the mold used, no significant difference in the Knoop hardness (Knoop hardness number, in kilograms-force per square millimeter) was observed between the photoactivation methods. On the bottom surface, the photoactivation method HIC shows higher means of hardness than LIC when tooth and metal were used. Significant differences of hardness on the top and in the bottom were detected between tooth and metal. The photoactivation method LIC and the material mold can interfere in the hardness values of composite restorations.

  19. Ecosystem Restoration: A Manager's Perspective

    Treesearch

    James G. Kenna; Gilpin R., Jr. Robinson; Bill Pell; Michael A. Thompson; Joe McNeel

    1999-01-01

    Elements of ecological restoration underlie much of what we think of as ecosystem management, and restoration projects on federal lands represent some of the most exciting, challenging, and convincing demonstrations of applied ecosystem management. The Society for Ecological Restoration defined restoration as "the process of reestablishing to the extent possible...

  20. ROOT HAIR DEFECTIVE SIX-LIKE Class I Genes Promote Root Hair Development in the Grass Brachypodium distachyon

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chul Min

    2016-01-01

    Genes encoding ROOT HAIR DEFECTIVE SIX-LIKE (RSL) class I basic helix loop helix proteins are expressed in future root hair cells of the Arabidopsis thaliana root meristem where they positively regulate root hair cell development. Here we show that there are three RSL class I protein coding genes in the Brachypodium distachyon genome, BdRSL1, BdRSL2 and BdRSL3, and each is expressed in developing root hair cells after the asymmetric cell division that forms root hair cells and hairless epidermal cells. Expression of BdRSL class I genes is sufficient for root hair cell development: ectopic overexpression of any of the three RSL class I genes induces the development of root hairs in every cell of the root epidermis. Expression of BdRSL class I genes in root hairless Arabidopsis thaliana root hair defective 6 (Atrhd6) Atrsl1 double mutants, devoid of RSL class I function, restores root hair development indicating that the function of these proteins has been conserved. However, neither AtRSL nor BdRSL class I genes is sufficient for root hair development in A. thaliana. These data demonstrate that the spatial pattern of class I RSL activity can account for the pattern of root hair cell differentiation in B. distachyon. However, the spatial pattern of class I RSL activity cannot account for the spatial pattern of root hair cells in A. thaliana. Taken together these data indicate that that the functions of RSL class I proteins have been conserved among most angiosperms—monocots and eudicots—despite the dramatically different patterns of root hair cell development. PMID:27494519

  1. Influence of repeated prescribed fire and herbicide application on the fine root biomass of young longleaf pine

    Treesearch

    Mary Anne Sword Sayer; Eric A. Kuehler

    2010-01-01

    Photosynthate from mature foliage provides the energy source necessary for longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) root system expansion. Crown scorch caused by repeated prescribed fire could decrease this energy and, in turn, reduce new root production. We conducted a study to assess the root biomass of restored longleaf pine saplings in response to...

  2. Bovine colostrum improves intestinal function following formula-induced gut inflammation in preterm pigs.

    PubMed

    Støy, Ann Cathrine F; Heegaard, Peter M H; Thymann, Thomas; Bjerre, Mette; Skovgaard, Kerstin; Boye, Mette; Stoll, Barbara; Schmidt, Mette; Jensen, Bent B; Sangild, Per T

    2014-04-01

    Only few hours of formula feeding may induce proinflammatory responses and predispose to necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) in preterm pigs. We hypothesized that bovine colostrum, rich in bioactive factors, would improve intestinal function in preterm pigs following an initial exposure to formula feeding after some days of total parenteral nutrition (TPN). After receiving TPN for 2 days, preterm pigs were fed formula (FORM, n = 14), bovine colostrum (COLOS, n = 6), or formula (6 h) followed by bovine colostrum (FCOLOS, n = 14). Intestinal lesions, function, and structure, abundance and location of bacteria, and inflammation markers were investigated. NEC severity and interleukins (IL)-1β and -8 protein concentrations were lower, while villus height, galactose absorption, and brush-border enzyme activities were increased in the distal small intestine in COLOS and FCOLOS pigs, relative to FORM pigs. Intestinal gene expression of serum amyloid A, IL-1β, -6 and -8, and bacterial abundance, correlated positively with NEC severity of the distal small intestine. Bovine colostrum restores intestinal function after initial formula-induced inflammation in preterm pigs. Further studies are required to test if bovine colostrum may also benefit preterm infants during the challenging transition from total parenteral nutrition to enteral nutrition, when human milk is unavailable. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparing root architectural models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnepf, Andrea; Javaux, Mathieu; Vanderborght, Jan

    2017-04-01

    Plant roots play an important role in several soil processes (Gregory 2006). Root architecture development determines the sites in soil where roots provide input of carbon and energy and take up water and solutes. However, root architecture is difficult to determine experimentally when grown in opaque soil. Thus, root architectural models have been widely used and been further developed into functional-structural models that are able to simulate the fate of water and solutes in the soil-root system (Dunbabin et al. 2013). Still, a systematic comparison of the different root architectural models is missing. In this work, we focus on discrete root architecture models where roots are described by connected line segments. These models differ (a) in their model concepts, such as the description of distance between branches based on a prescribed distance (inter-nodal distance) or based on a prescribed time interval. Furthermore, these models differ (b) in the implementation of the same concept, such as the time step size, the spatial discretization along the root axes or the way stochasticity of parameters such as root growth direction, growth rate, branch spacing, branching angles are treated. Based on the example of two such different root models, the root growth module of R-SWMS and RootBox, we show the impact of these differences on simulated root architecture and aggregated information computed from this detailed simulation results, taking into account the stochastic nature of those models. References Dunbabin, V.M., Postma, J.A., Schnepf, A., Pagès, L., Javaux, M., Wu, L., Leitner, D., Chen, Y.L., Rengel, Z., Diggle, A.J. Modelling root-soil interactions using three-dimensional models of root growth, architecture and function (2013) Plant and Soil, 372 (1-2), pp. 93 - 124. Gregory (2006) Roots, rhizosphere and soil: the route to a better understanding of soil science? European Journal of Soil Science 57: 2-12.

  4. Two stage surgical procedure for root coverage.

    PubMed

    George, Anjana Mary; Rajesh, K S; Hegde, Shashikanth; Kumar, Arun

    2012-07-01

    Gingival recession may present problems that include root sensitivity, esthetic concern, and predilection to root caries, cervical abrasion and compromising of a restorative effort. When marginal tissue health cannot be maintained and recession is deep, the need for treatment arises. This literature has documented that recession can be successfully treated by means of a two stage surgical approach, the first stage consisting of creation of attached gingiva by means of free gingival graft, and in the second stage, a lateral sliding flap of grafted tissue to cover the recession. This indirect technique ensures development of an adequate width of attached gingiva. The outcome of this technique suggests that two stage surgical procedures are highly predictable for root coverage in case of isolated deep recession and lack of attached gingiva.

  5. Restoring the prairie

    SciTech Connect

    Mlot, C.

    1990-12-01

    The US DOE at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Batavia, Illinois, prairie restoration is taking place in order to conserve the rich topsoil. This is the largest of many prairie restoration experiments. Big bluestem grass (Andropogon gerardi), blue grama (Bouteloua gracilis), and buffalo grass (Buchloe dactyloides) are the main initial grasses grown. After their growth reaches enough biomass to sustain a fire, other prairie plants such as purple prairie clover and dropseed grass appear. The goal of this is to provide a generous refuge for disappearing native plants and animals, a site for scientific research, and a storehouse of genes adapted to a region that produces much of the worlds food. Plans for restoring the marsh and oak savanna, also native to the Fermilab site are also in the works.

  6. Experiences in reconciling risk management and restorative justice: how circles of support and accountability work restoratively in the risk society.

    PubMed

    Hannem, Stacey

    2013-03-01

    Circles of Support and Accountability (COSA) is a restorative justice-based model that originated in Canada in the mid-1990s for the postincarceration reintegration of those who have offended sexually. Although the roots of COSA are in restorative justice philosophy, the program has also found favour, to some degree, with organisations such as police services and corrections that are traditionally concerned more with protecting community safety than with the ideals of restorative justice. Informed by the author's research and personal experience as a COSA volunteer, and analysis of recent and historical representations of COSA, this article explores theoretically how the development of the COSA initiative has been influenced by the seemingly disparate concerns of both the restorative justice and community protection movements, and examines the importance of balancing these paradigms in the everyday practices of circles.

  7. Everglades Restoration Critiqued

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    The monitoring and assessment plan for the $7.8-billion effort to restore the hydrologic regime of the remaining wetlands of Florida's Everglades needs to be strengthened, according to a 2 April study by a committee of the National Academy of Sciences. The evolving monitoring and assessment plan of the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan is grounded in current scientific theory and practice of adaptive management, according to the report. However, the least-developed aspects of the management are feedback mechanisms to connect monitoring to planning and management, the report notes.

  8. [New direct restorative materials].

    PubMed

    Hickel, R; Dasch, W; Janda, R; Tyas, M; Anusavice, K

    1999-04-01

    People worldwide have become increasingly aware of the potential adverse effects on the environment, of pollution control and of toxic effects of food, drugs and biomaterials. Amalgam and its potential toxic side effects (still scientifically unproven) continue to be discussed with increasing controversy by the media in some countries. Consequently, new direct restorative materials are now being explored by dentists, materials scientists and patients who are searching for the so-called 'amalgam substitute' or 'amalgam alternative'. From a critical point of view some of the new direct restorative materials are good with respect in aesthetics, but all material characteristics must be considered, such as mechanical properties, biological effects, and longterm clinical behaviour.

  9. Overvoltage control during restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Adibi, M.M. ); Alexander, R.W. ); Avra-Movic, B. )

    1992-11-01

    This paper is one in a series presented on behalf of the System Operation Subcommittee with the intent of focusing industry attention on power system restoration issues. Restoration of a bulk power supply system presents the operator with unique challenges not normally encountered in daily operations. The initial, and even intermediate transmission system topologies are quite different from the well integrated systems during normal operation. There are several problems that pertain to these non-normal topologies that are of common concern to operators and need to be addressed. One of these, the problem of overvoltages, is the subject of this paper.

  10. [The influence of ferrule effect on post-restored restoration using extended finite element method].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiyi; Ayiguli, Abudusimu; Li, Qing; Wang, Yining

    2014-06-01

    To investigate the stress distributions and cracks initiation and propagation within the cementation of post and core restored teeth with various ferrule heights. Three-dimensional finite element (FE) models of post and core restored teeth with different ferrule heights (0, 1, 2, 3 mm) were created by using the data of a three-dimensional non-contact digital scanning.Vertical oblique forces of 350 N (45° to the long axis of the root) were applied on the lingual surface of the teeth (4 mm below the incisal edge). Both linear analysis and extended finite element methods (XFEM) were used to investigate stress distributions, especially those in the adhesive interfaces. Linear analysis results showed that the stress distributions within the root were quite similar among the groups. However, obvious stress concentrations were detected on palatal glass ionomer cement layer in the groups with 0 mm and 1 mm ferrule. According to the XFEM results, cracks were firstly initiated within the glass ionomer cement layer, and then propagated towards the adhesive resin cement layer. The ultimate loads that induced the damage within glass ionomer cement layer and adhesive resin cement layer in 0 mm ferrule group (50.4 and 94.7 N) were less than those in 3 mm ferrule group (65.9 and 228.2 N). Adhesive interface was the susceptible structure of post and core restored teeth.Increasing ferrule height can significantly reduced the stress concentration within the palatal adhesive interface.

  11. Using Square Roots

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, William Wynne

    1976-01-01

    This article describes techniques which enable the user of a comparatively simple calculator to perform calculations of cube roots, nth roots, trigonometric, and inverse trigonometric functions, logarithms, and exponentials. (DT)

  12. The Root Pressure Phenomenon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsh, A. R.

    1972-01-01

    Describes experiments demonstrating that root pressure in plants is probably controlled by a circadian rhythm (biological clock). Root pressure phenomenon plays significant part in water transport in contradiction with prevalent belief. (PS)

  13. The Root Pressure Phenomenon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsh, A. R.

    1972-01-01

    Describes experiments demonstrating that root pressure in plants is probably controlled by a circadian rhythm (biological clock). Root pressure phenomenon plays significant part in water transport in contradiction with prevalent belief. (PS)

  14. Discrete square root smoothing.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaminski, P. G.; Bryson, A. E., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    The basic techniques applied in the square root least squares and square root filtering solutions are applied to the smoothing problem. Both conventional and square root solutions are obtained by computing the filtered solutions, then modifying the results to include the effect of all measurements. A comparison of computation requirements indicates that the square root information smoother (SRIS) is more efficient than conventional solutions in a large class of fixed interval smoothing problems.

  15. Corky root rot

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Corky root rot (corchosis) was first reported in Argentina in 1985, but the disease was presumably present long before that. The disease occurs in most alfalfa-growing areas of Argentina but is more common in older stands. In space-planted alfalfa trials scored for root problems, corky root rot was ...

  16. Root production method system

    Treesearch

    Wayne Lovelace

    2002-01-01

    The RPM system (Root Production Method) is a multistep production system of container tree production that places primary emphasis on the root system because the root system ultimately determines the tree's survival and performance in its outplanted environment. This particular container production system has been developed to facilitate volume production, in a...

  17. WHY ROOTING FAILS.

    SciTech Connect

    CREUTZ,M.

    2007-07-30

    I explore the origins of the unphysical predictions from rooted staggered fermion algorithms. Before rooting, the exact chiral symmetry of staggered fermions is a flavored symmetry among the four 'tastes.' The rooting procedure averages over tastes of different chiralities. This averaging forbids the appearance of the correct 't Hooft vertex for the target theory.

  18. Actin turnover-mediated gravity response in maize root apices: gravitropism of decapped roots implicates gravisensing outside of the root cap.

    PubMed

    Mancuso, Stefano; Barlow, Peter W; Volkmann, Dieter; Baluska, Frantisek

    2006-03-01

    The dynamic actin cytoskeleton has been proposed to be linked to gravity sensing in plants but the mechanistic understanding of these processes remains unknown. We have performed detailed pharmacological analyses of the role of the dynamic actin cytoskeleton in gravibending of maize (Zea mays) root apices. Depolymerization of actin filaments with two drugs having different mode of their actions, cytochalasin D and latrunculin B, stimulated root gravibending. By contrast, drug-induced stimulation of actin polymerization and inhibition of actin turnover, using two different agents phalloidin and jasplakinolide, compromised the root gravibending. Importantly, all these actin drugs inhibited root growth to similar extents suggesting that high actin turnover is essential for the gravity-related growth responses rather than for the general growth process. Both latrunculin B and cytochalasin D treatments inhibited root growth but restored gravibending of the decapped root apices, indicating that there is a strong potential for effective actin-mediated gravity sensing outside the cap. This elusive gravity sensing outside the root cap is dependent not only on the high rate of actin turnover but also on weakening of myosin activities, as general inhibition of myosin ATPases induced stimulation of gravibending of the decapped root apices. Collectively, these data provide evidence for the actin turnover-mediated gravity sensing outside the root cap.

  19. An Nfic-hedgehog signaling cascade regulates tooth root development

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Feng, Jifan; Li, Jingyuan; Zhao, Hu; Ho, Thach-Vu; Chai, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Coordination between the Hertwig's epithelial root sheath (HERS) and apical papilla (AP) is crucial for proper tooth root development. The hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway and Nfic are both involved in tooth root development; however, their relationship has yet to be elucidated. Here, we establish a timecourse of mouse molar root development by histological staining of sections, and we demonstrate that Hh signaling is active before and during root development in the AP and HERS using Gli1 reporter mice. The proper pattern of Hh signaling activity in the AP is crucial for the proliferation of dental mesenchymal cells, because either inhibition with Hh inhibitors or constitutive activation of Hh signaling activity in transgenic mice leads to decreased proliferation in the AP and shorter roots. Moreover, Hh activity is elevated in Nfic−/− mice, a root defect model, whereas RNA sequencing and in situ hybridization show that the Hh attenuator Hhip is downregulated. ChIP and RNAscope analyses suggest that Nfic binds to the promoter region of Hhip. Treatment of Nfic−/− mice with Hh inhibitor partially restores cell proliferation, AP growth and root development. Taken together, our results demonstrate that an Nfic-Hhip-Hh signaling pathway is crucial for apical papilla growth and proper root formation. This discovery provides insight into the molecular mechanisms regulating tooth root development. PMID:26293299

  20. Modelling hydrological management for the restoration of acidified floating fens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekker, Stefan C.; Barendregt, Aat; Bootsma, Margien C.; Schot, Paul P.

    2005-12-01

    Wetlands show a large decline in biodiversity. To protect and restore this biodiversity, many restoration projects are carried out. Hydrology in wetlands controls the chemical and biological processes and may be the most important factor regulating wetland function and development. Hydrological models may be used to simulate these processes and to evaluate management scenarios for restoration. HYDRUS2D, a combined saturated-unsaturated groundwater flow and transport model, is presented. This simulates near-surface hydrological processes in an acidified floating fen, with the aim to evaluate the effect of hydrological restoration in terms of conditions for biodiversity. In the acidified floating fen in the nature reserve Ilperveld (The Netherlands), a trench system was dug for the purpose of creating a runoff channel for acid rainwater in wet periods and to enable circum-neutral surface water to enter the fen in dry periods. The model is calibrated against measured conductivity values for a 5 year period. From the model simulations, it was found that lateral flow in the floating raft is limited. Furthermore, the model shows that the best management option is a combination of trenches and inundation, which gave the best soil water quality in the root zone. It is concluded that hydrological models can be used for the calculation of management scenarios in restoration projects. The combined saturated-unsaturated model concept used in this paper is able to incorporate the governing hydrological processes in the wetland root zones. Copyright

  1. The Deep Roots of the Fairness Committee in Kohlberg's Moral Development Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Christine

    2011-01-01

    Earlier essays in this symposium describe Restorative Justice processes in schools, referred to in our school as a Fairness Committee. Implementing these collaborative, restorative processes does not come without challenges. This essay will explore some of the historical and theoretical roots of the Fairness Committee in Lawrence Kohlberg's work…

  2. The Deep Roots of the Fairness Committee in Kohlberg's Moral Development Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Christine

    2011-01-01

    Earlier essays in this symposium describe Restorative Justice processes in schools, referred to in our school as a Fairness Committee. Implementing these collaborative, restorative processes does not come without challenges. This essay will explore some of the historical and theoretical roots of the Fairness Committee in Lawrence Kohlberg's work…

  3. Stable transduction of bovine TLR4 and bovine MD-2 into LPS-nonresponsive cells and soluble CD14 promote the ability to respond to LPS.

    PubMed

    Sauter, Kay-Sara; Brcic, Marija; Franchini, Marco; Jungi, Thomas W

    2007-07-15

    The interaction of bovine cells with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was explored using human embryo kidney (HEK) 293 cell line stably transduced with bovine toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) alone or in combination with bovine MD-2. These lines and mock-transduced HEK293 cells were tested by flow cytometry for LPS-fluorescein isothiocyanate (LPS-FITC) binding, nuclear factor kappa B (NFkappaB) activation, interleukin-8 (IL-8) production and interferon-beta mRNA expression/interferon (IFN) type I production. Whereas bovine TLR4 was sufficient to promote binding of high concentrations of LPS-FITC, both bovine TLR4 and MD-2 were required for activation by LPS, as assessed by NFkappaB activation and IL-8 production. Induction of IFN bioactivity was not observed in doubly transduced HEK293 cells, and no evidence for IFN-beta mRNA induction in response to LPS was obtained, although cells responded by IFN-beta mRNA expression to stimulation by Sendai virus and poly-inosinic acid-poly-cytidylic acid (poly(I:C)). Cells stably transduced with both bovine TLR4 and bovine MD-2 responded to LPS by IL-8 production, in decreasing order, in the presence of fetal bovine serum (FCS), of human serum, and of human serum albumin (HSA). The reduced activity in the presence of HSA could be restored by the addition of soluble CD14 (sCD14) but not of LPS binding protein (LBP). This is in contrast to macrophages which show a superior response to LPS in the presence of HSA when compared with macrophages stimulated by LPS in the presence of FCS. This suggests that macrophages but not HEK293 cells express factors rendering LPS stimulation serum-independent. Stably double-transduced cells reacted, in decreasing order, to LPS from Rhodobacter sphaeroides, to LPS from Escherichia coli, to synthetic lipd-IVa (compound 406), to diphosphoryl-lipid-A (S. minnesota) and to monophosphoryl-lipid-A (S. minnesota). They failed to react to the murine MD-2/TLR4 ligand taxol. This resembles the reactivity of bovine

  4. Restoring Wyoming big sagebrush

    Treesearch

    Cindy R. Lysne

    2005-01-01

    The widespread occurrence of big sagebrush can be attributed to many adaptive features. Big sagebrush plays an essential role in its communities by providing wildlife habitat, modifying local environmental conditions, and facilitating the reestablishment of native herbs. Currently, however, many sagebrush steppe communities are highly fragmented. As a result, restoring...

  5. Restoring Forested Wetland Ecosystems

    Treesearch

    John A. Stanturf; Emile S. Gardiner; Melvin L. Warren

    2003-01-01

    Forests as natural systems are intrinsically linked to the sustainability of fresh-water systems. Efforts worldwide to restore forest ecosystems seek to counteract centuries of forest conversion to agriculture and other uses. Afforestation, the practice of regenerating forests on land deforested for agriculture or other uses, is occurring at an intense pace in the...

  6. Realistic restoration targets

    Treesearch

    Melissa Thomas-Van Gundy; Robert. Whetsell

    2016-01-01

    These reference ecosystems and historic range of variability may be hard to define or determine, but accepted methods can include cultural evidence such as written descriptions, oral histories, maps and photographs, and survey records (Egan and Howell 2001). Another tactic is to focus on restoring species composition (such as returning the American chestnut) and...

  7. Restoring Fossil Creek

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flaccus, Kathleen; Vlieg, Julie; Marks, Jane C.; LeRoy, Carri J.

    2004-01-01

    Fossil Creek had been dammed for the past 90 years, and plans were underway to restore the stream. The creek runs through Central Arizona and flows from the high plateaus to the desert, cutting through the same formations that form the Grand Canyon. This article discusses the Fossil Creek monitoring project. In this project, students and teachers…

  8. Nitriding of restored crankshafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponukalin, V. V.; Aleksandrov, V. N.

    1984-02-01

    The following technology is recommended for restoration of steel crankshafts: facing with an Sv-08 electrode wire under an AN-348A flux with chromium and niobium introduced into the melt in accordance with the method used at automotive-repair plants and subsequent gas nitriding at (570±10)°C for 12 h.

  9. Restored Moonwalk Footage Release

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-15

    Stan Lebar, former Westinghouse Electric program manager, talks about the Apollo era TV cameras during NASA's briefing where restored Apollo 11 moonwalk footage was revealed for the first time at the Newseum, Thursday, July 16, 2009, in Washington, DC. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  10. Restored Moonwalk Footage Release

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-15

    Stan Lebar, former Westinghouse Electric program manager, left, talks about the Apollo era TV cameras such as the one on display in the foreground as Richard Nafzger, team lead and Goddard engineer, listens at NASA's briefing where restored Apollo 11 moonwalk footage was revealed for the first time at the Newseum, Thursday, July 16, 2009, in Washington, DC. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  11. Restored Moonwalk Footage Release

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-15

    Graphics showing how TV signals were sent from the Apollo 11 mission back to Earth are shown on a large video monitor above panelists at NASA's briefing where restored Apollo 11 moonwalk footage was revealed for the first time at the Newseum, Thursday, July 16, 2009, in Washington, DC. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  12. Restored Moonwalk Footage Release

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-15

    The Apollo 11 logo is seen on a large video monitor above panelists at NASA's briefing where restored Apollo 11 moonwalk footage was revealed for the first time at the Newseum, Thursday, July 16, 2009, in Washington, DC. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  13. Restored Moonwalk Footage Release

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-15

    Footage of the Saturn V Apollo 11 rocket launch is seen on a large video monitor above panelists at NASA's briefing where restored Apollo 11 moonwalk footage was revealed for the first time at the Newseum, Thursday, July 16, 2009, in Washington, DC. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  14. Restoring Fossil Creek

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flaccus, Kathleen; Vlieg, Julie; Marks, Jane C.; LeRoy, Carri J.

    2004-01-01

    Fossil Creek had been dammed for the past 90 years, and plans were underway to restore the stream. The creek runs through Central Arizona and flows from the high plateaus to the desert, cutting through the same formations that form the Grand Canyon. This article discusses the Fossil Creek monitoring project. In this project, students and teachers…

  15. Model for Coastal Restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Thom, Ronald M.; Judd, Chaeli

    2007-07-27

    Successful restoration of wetland habitats depends on both our understanding of our system and our ability to characterize it. By developing a conceptual model, looking at different spatial scales and integrating diverse data streams: GIS datasets and NASA products, we were able to develop a dynamic model for site prioritization based on both qualitative and quantitative relationships found in the coastal environment.

  16. A new Approach for Quantifying Root-Reinforcement of Streambanks: the RipRoot Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollen, N. L.; Simon, A.

    2003-12-01

    streambank had a Fs of 0.98 without vegetation, indicating instability. With the addition of cohesion from 200 River Birch roots this value increased to 1.22 using the RipRoot value (Conditionally Stable) and 1.37 using the Wu et al. equation (Stable). In this example both of the root models produced cohesion values that were large enough to make the bank more stable, but the more conservative value from RipRoot suggests the bank may only be conditionally stable. Results to date indicate that the dynamic nature of RipRoot removes some of the overestimation from the static equation of Wu et al. (1979), therefore producing more realistic values for root reinforcement, which are particularly useful and important in the context of river management and restoration.

  17. Digital restoration of multichannel images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galatsanos, Nikolas P.; Chin, Roland T.

    1989-01-01

    The Wiener solution of a multichannel restoration scheme is presented. Using matrix diagonalization and block-Toeplitz to block-circulant approximation, the inversion of the multichannel, linear space-invariant imaging system becomes feasible by utilizing a fast iterative matrix inversion procedure. The restoration uses both the within-channel (spatial) and between-channel (spectral) correlation; hence, the restored result is a better estimate than that produced by independent channel restoration. Simulations are also presented.

  18. Effect of Lesion Baseline Severity and Mineral Distribution on Remineralization and Progression of Human and Bovine Dentin Caries Lesions.

    PubMed

    Lippert, Frank; Churchley, David; Lynch, Richard J

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this laboratory study were to compare the effects of lesion baseline severity, mineral distribution and substrate on remineralization and progression of caries lesions created in root dentin. Lesions were formed in dentin specimens prepared from human and bovine dentin using three protocols, each utilizing three demineralization periods to create lesions of different mineral distributions (subsurface, moderate softening, extreme softening) and severity within each lesion type. Lesions were then either remineralized or demineralized further and analyzed using transverse microradiography. At lesion baseline, no differences were found between human and bovine dentin for integrated mineral loss (x0394;Z). Differences in mineral distribution between lesion types were apparent. Human dentin lesions were more prone to secondary demineralization (x0394;x0394;Z) than bovine dentin lesions, although there were no differences in x0394;L. Likewise, smaller lesions were more susceptible to secondary demineralization than larger ones. Subsurface lesions were more acid-resistant than moderately and extremely softened lesions. After remineralization, differences between human and bovine dentin lesions were not apparent for x0394;x0394;Z although bovine dentin lesions showed greater reduction in lesion depth L. For lesion types, responsiveness to remineralization (x0394;x0394;Z) was in the order extremely softened>moderately softened>subsurface. More demineralized lesions exhibited greater remineralization than shallower ones. In summary, some differences exist between human and bovine dentin and their relative responsiveness to de- and remineralization. These differences, however, were overshadowed by the effects of lesion baseline mineral distribution and severity. Thus, bovine dentin appears to be a suitable substitute for human dentin in mechanistic root caries studies.

  19. Prairie Restoration for Wisconsin Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Molly Fifield; Greenler, Robin McC.

    This packet is composed of several resources for teachers interested in prairie ecology and restoration. "A Guide to Restoration from Site Analysis to Management" focuses on the Prairie/Oak Savanna communities of Wisconsin and takes teachers through the planning and design process for a restoration project on school grounds including…

  20. Prairie Restoration for Wisconsin Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Molly Fifield; Greenler, Robin McC.

    This packet is composed of several resources for teachers interested in prairie ecology and restoration. "A Guide to Restoration from Site Analysis to Management" focuses on the Prairie/Oak Savanna communities of Wisconsin and takes teachers through the planning and design process for a restoration project on school grounds including…

  1. Adaptive wiener image restoration kernel

    DOEpatents

    Yuan, Ding

    2007-06-05

    A method and device for restoration of electro-optical image data using an adaptive Wiener filter begins with constructing imaging system Optical Transfer Function, and the Fourier Transformations of the noise and the image. A spatial representation of the imaged object is restored by spatial convolution of the image using a Wiener restoration kernel.

  2. Engineering approaches to ecosystem restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, D.F.

    1998-07-01

    This proceedings CD ROM contains 127 papers on developing and evaluating engineering approaches to wetlands and river restoration. The latest engineering developments are discussed, providing valuable insights to successful approaches for river restoration, wetlands restoration, watershed management, and constructed wetlands for stormwater and wastewater treatment. Potential solutions to a wide variety of ecosystem concerns in urban, suburban, and coastal environments are presented.

  3. The challenge of ecological restoration

    Treesearch

    John A. Stanturf

    2012-01-01

    Recent estimates by the World Conservation Union (IUCN) and World Resources Institute (WRI) suggest that over 2 billion ha of forests are degraded and in need of restoration. Goren Persson, former prime minister of Sweden, proposed the formation of a Global Restoration council to implement the Bonn Challenge to restore 150 million ha of degraded forests by 2020. The...

  4. Ecosystem Restoration: Fact or Fancy?

    Treesearch

    John A. Stanturf; Callie J. Schweitzer; Stephen H. Schoenholtz; James P. Barnett; Charles K. McMahon; Donald J. Tomszak

    1998-01-01

    Ecological restoration is generally accepted as the reestablishment of natural ecological processes that produce certain dynamic ecosystem properties of structure, function, and processes. But restore to what? The most frequently used conceptual model for the restoration process is the shift of conditions from some current (degraded) dynamic state to some past dynamic...

  5. Bovine polymorphonuclear leukocyte killing of Tritrichomonas foetus.

    PubMed

    Aydintug, M K; Widders, P R; Leid, R W

    1993-07-01

    The role of bovine antibody and complement in bovine neutrophil-mediated killing of Tritrichomonas foetus was investigated. No neutrophil-mediated trichomonacidal activity was detected when Hanks' balanced salt solution, a widely utilized and weakly buffered medium, was used. This lack of neutrophil activity was evident even in the presence of specific bovine antibody and bovine complement. Moreover, the pH of the weakly buffered Hanks' balanced salt solution was observed to fall from pH 7.0 to 5.8 in 4 h at 37 degrees C in the presence of T. foetus. The pH of 5.8 inhibited the bactericidal activity of bovine neutrophils for Staphylococcus epidermidis by 53.2% and may have contributed to the lack of neutrophil-mediated trichomonacidal activity in the weakly buffered salt solution. However, T. foetus was susceptible to bovine neutrophil-mediated destruction when a HEPES (N-2-hydroxyethylpiperazine-N'-2-ethanesulfonic acid)-buffered Hanks' balanced salt solution was used (21.8% killing by neutrophils alone). Neither specific bovine immune serum nor purified immune bovine immunoglobulin G2 alone enhanced bovine neutrophil-mediated killing. When complement-sensitized trichomonads were incubated with bovine neutrophils, killing of T. foetus was observed, a result which represented the additive effects of each treatment. Significant (P < 0.05) killing of trichomonads was observed when antibody- and complement-opsonized trichomonads were exposed to bovine neutrophils (> 70% parasite destruction), an effect which reflected the additive nature of each treatment.

  6. Retention of composite resin restorations in class IV preparations.

    PubMed

    Eid, Hani

    2002-01-01

    Clinicians often utilized composite resin restorations in combination with different types of preparation to restore class IV fractures on anterior incisors. A new preparation technique called (stair-step chamfer technique) is investigated in this study to detect bond strength to tooth structure. Eighty-eight bovine teeth were divided into 4 groups. Group I had twenty-three samples with a 45 degree bevel that extended 2 millimeters beyond the fracture line. Group II had twenty-three samples with a circumferential chamfer, which extended 2 mm beyond the fracture line and half the enamel thickness in depth. Group III had twenty-three samples with a facial stair-step chamfer, which followed the anatomical contour and extended 2 mm beyond the fracture line with a lingual plain chamfer. Group IV had eighteen samples as controls, which were untreated teeth. The first three groups were prepared and restored with hybrid composite resin in conjunction with a single step bonding agent and as surface penetrating sealer, then tested for shear-bond strength on the Instron machine. The results were that there was no significant difference found between the treated teeth when tested for shear-bond strength. However, according to the site of the fracture, the stair-step chamfer technique gave significantly better results. It can be concluded that, the stir-step chamfer technique provides the clinician better environment to place a composite resin restoration resulting in good shear-bond strength and better esthetics.

  7. How can science education foster students' rooting?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Østergaard, Edvin

    2015-06-01

    The question of how to foster rooting in science education points towards a double challenge; efforts to prevent (further) uprooting and efforts to promote rooting/re-rooting. Wolff-Michael Roth's paper discusses the uprooting/rooting pair of concepts, students' feeling of alienation and loss of fundamental sense of the earth as ground, and potential consequences for teaching science in a rooted manner. However, the argumentation raises a number of questions which I try to answer. My argumentation rests on Husserl's critique of science and the "ontological reversal", an ontological position where abstract models from science are considered as more real than the everyday reality itself, where abstract, often mathematical, models are taken to be the real causes behind everyday experiences. In this paper, measures towards an "ontological re-reversal" are discussed by drawing on experiences from phenomenon-based science education. I argue that perhaps the most direct and productive way of promoting rooting in science class is by intentionally cultivating the competencies of sensing and aesthetic experience. An aesthetic experience is defined as a precognitive, sensuous experience, an experience that is opened up for through sensuous perception. Conditions for rooting in science education is discussed against three challenges: Restoring the value of aesthetic experience, allowing time for open inquiry and coping with curriculum. Finally, I raise the question whether dimensions like "reality" or "nature" are self-evident for students. In the era of constructivism, with its focus on cognition and knowledge building, the inquiry process itself has become more important than the object of inquiry. I argue that as educators of science teachers we have to emphasize more explicitly "the nature of nature" as a field of exploration.

  8. Relativistic Linear Restoring Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, D.; Franklin, J.; Mann, N.

    2012-01-01

    We consider two different forms for a relativistic version of a linear restoring force. The pair comes from taking Hooke's law to be the force appearing on the right-hand side of the relativistic expressions: d"p"/d"t" or d"p"/d["tau"]. Either formulation recovers Hooke's law in the non-relativistic limit. In addition to these two forces, we…

  9. Restored Moonwalk Footage Release

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-15

    NASA moderator Mark Hess, left, directs reporters' questions to former Westinghouse Electric program manager Stan Lebar, second from left, team lead and Goddard engineer Richard Nafzger and president of Lowry Digital Mike Inchalik, far right, at a NASA briefing where restored Apollo 11 moonwalk footage was revealed for the first time at the Newseum, Thursday, July 16, 2009, in Washington, DC. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  10. Restored Moonwalk Footage Release

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-15

    A photograph from the 1960's showing Stan Lebar, former Westinghouse Electric program manager, holding two cameras used during the Apollo missions is seen on a large video monitor above panelists, including Stan Lebar, at NASA's briefing where restored Apollo 11 moonwalk footage was revealed for the first time at the Newseum, Thursday, July 16, 2009, in Washington, DC. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  11. Relativistic Linear Restoring Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, D.; Franklin, J.; Mann, N.

    2012-01-01

    We consider two different forms for a relativistic version of a linear restoring force. The pair comes from taking Hooke's law to be the force appearing on the right-hand side of the relativistic expressions: d"p"/d"t" or d"p"/d["tau"]. Either formulation recovers Hooke's law in the non-relativistic limit. In addition to these two forces, we…

  12. Isolation and characterization of three benzylisoquinoline alkaloids from Thalictrum minus L. and their antibacterial activity against bovine mastitis.

    PubMed

    Mushtaq, Saleem; Rather, Muzafar Ahmad; Qazi, Parvaiz H; Aga, Mushtaq A; Shah, Aabid Manzoor; Shah, Aiyatullah; Ali, Md Niamat

    2016-12-04

    The roots of Thalictrum minus are traditionally used in the treatment of inflammation and infectious diseases such as bovine mastitis. However, there are no reports available in literature till date regarding the antibacterial studies of T. minus against bovine mastitis. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the antibacterial potential of crude extract of T. minus (root) and some of its isolated constituents against bovine mastitis in order to scientifically validate its traditional use. A total of three alkaloid compounds were isolated from the DCM: MeOH extract of roots of T. minus using silica gel column chromatography. Structural elucidation of the isolated compounds was done by using spectroscopic techniques like mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy. Pathogens were isolated from cases of bovine mastitis and identified by using 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The broth micro-dilution method was used to evaluate the antibacterial activities of DCM: MeOH extract and isolated compounds against mastitis pathogens. The three isolated compounds were identified as benzylisoquinoline alkaloids (1) 5'-Hydroxythalidasine, (2) Thalrugosaminine and (3) O-Methylthalicberine. Compounds (2) and (3) are reported for the first time from the roots of T. minus. Five mastitis pathogens viz., Staphylococcus xylosus, Staphylococcus lentus, Staphylococcus equorum, Enterococcus faecalis and Pantoea agglomerans were identified on the basis of sequence analysis of isolates using the nucleotide BLAST algorithm. This study reports for the first time the isolation and molecular characterization of mastitis pathogens from Kashmir valley, India. The DCM: MeOH extract exhibited broad spectrum antibacterial activities that varied between the bacterial species (MIC=250-500µg/ml). 5'-Hydroxythalidasine and Thalrugosaminine showed promising antibacterial activity with MIC values of 64-128µg/ml while Staphylococcus species were found to be the most sensitive strains. The antibacterial

  13. Restoration of Complicated Epicanthus

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Yoon Jae; Han, Kyung Eun; Park, Bo Young

    2017-01-01

    Purpose We had reported the surgical outcome of reverse skin redraping technique for restoration of previously performed epicanthoplasty. In this study, we introduce a modified reverse skin redraping technique that added mini-epicanthoplasty in patients with unsatisfactory results after epicanthoplasty. Methods Three hundred twenty-four patients (288 female and 36 male patients) who had unsatisfied results with previous epicanthoplasty and that were treated with our modified restoration surgery were included in this study. Results The mean preoperative interepicanthal distance was 33.6 mm, and the mean postoperative interepicanthal distance was 36.9 mm; the mean difference in the interepicanthal distance before and after restoration surgery was 3.3 mm. Satisfactory aesthetic results were obtained with improvements in areas of asymmetry, overexposure of the caruncle, and the appearance of the previous scar. Only minor complications developed in 15 patients (4.6%) that were resolved with minor revisions. No severe complications requiring reoperations were noted. Conclusions Our modified method involving reverse skin redraping and mini-epicanthoplasty is simple and reproducible and is useful for resolution of unsatisfactory results to obtain a naturally shaped epicanthus. PMID:28177970

  14. Effect of material properties on stresses at the restoration-dentin interface of composite restorations during polymerization.

    PubMed

    Kahler, Bill; Kotousov, Andrei; Borkowski, Krzysztof

    2006-10-01

    Numerous analyses for the shrinkage stress in the adhesive resin-based composite restorations mostly rely on numerical models. However, various finite element studies have inherent difficulties and inconsistencies associated with the use of different anatomy (tooth and restoration), boundary conditions (root and interfaces) and shrinkage models. As a consequence many numerical results remain inconclusive. The objective of this paper is to develop a simplified analytical model of shrinkage stress and investigate effects of material properties of the restorative material, size of the restoration and volumetric shrinkage on the magnitude of the shrinkage stress in the vicinity of the dental-restoration interface. The model is based on the following assumptions. The geometry is axisymmetric; all materials are linear-elastic; and the polymerization of the restoration material results in uniform volume shrinkage. An application of compatibility conditions leads to the system of five linear algebraic equations to five unknown variables, which can be easily resolved using standard techniques. An explicit equation for the tensile stress at the interface was obtained. It was shown that higher Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio and volume shrinkage of the restorative material normally lead to larger tensile stress at the interface, which increases the risk of debonding. The results obtained based in this work, in general, are in a good agreement with published results of finite element studies. The model allows comparison of different adhesive restorative materials with respect to the fracture risk of the interface induced by the development of the shrinkage stress at the restoration-dentine interface during polymerization. The model can be used to validate more sophisticated computational models as well as to conduct various optimization studies and preliminary assessments of fracture risk.

  15. Association of Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus with Multiple Viral Infections in Bovine Respiratory Disease Outbreaks

    PubMed Central

    Richer, Lisette; Marois, Paul; Lamontagne, Lucie

    1988-01-01

    We investigated eleven outbreaks of naturally occurring bovine respiratory diseases in calves and adult animals in the St-Hyacinthe area of Quebec. Specific antibodies to bovine herpesvirus-1, bovine viral diarrhea virus, respiratory syncytial virus, parainfluenza type 3 virus, reovirus type 3, and serotypes 1 to 7 of bovine adenovirus were found in paired sera from diseased animals. Several bovine viruses with respiratory tropism were involved concomitantly in herds during an outbreak of bovine respiratory disease. In addition, concomitant fourfold rises of antibody titers were frequently observed to two or more viral agents in seroconverted calves (61%) or adult animals (38%). Bovine viral diarrhea virus was found to be the most frequent viral agent associated with multiple viral infection in calves only (92%). PMID:17423116

  16. Reinforcement of thin-walled root canal structures for placement of esthetic dowels: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Ayad, Mohamed F; Bahannan, Salma A; Rosenstiel, Stephen F

    2011-01-01

    Thin-walled root canals always present a challenge to dentists to select a restorative treatment that does not further weaken the thin tooth structure. The prognosis of dowel and core restorations can be unpredictable. This clinical report describes the treatment of a patient with extensive caries extending into the root canal of an endodontically treated maxillary central incisor. The use of a flowable composite resin in combination with a quartz fiber reinforced post is described, resulting in the rehabilitation of a structurally compromised root canal with satisfactory esthetic and functional outcomes.

  17. Factors to achieve aesthetics in all-ceramic restorations.

    PubMed

    Barão, Valentim Adelino Ricardo; Gennari-Filho, Humberto; Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; dos Santos, Daniela Micheline; Pesqueira, Aldiéris Alves

    2010-11-01

    The demand for aesthetic restorations has increased during the last years. Dental ceramics are a successful alternative for some cases because of aesthetics and biocompatibility. Therefore, the aim of this literature review was to present the factors necessary to fabricate all-ceramic restorations with aesthetics similar to natural dentition. A search of English-language peer-review literature was completed using MEDLINE database from 1975 to 2009 including the keywords "aesthetic," "metal-free crown," "all-ceramic," and "color." It was observed that several factors influence aesthetics of all-ceramic restorations. Color scale, light source during color evaluation, characteristic of core material, color of supporting tooth, presence of root post, and type of cement are clinical factors that may influence color of the restorations. Laboratorial factors as technique for ceramic condensation, thickness, temperature, and number of firing cycles also influence the result of these crowns. Although several clinical and laboratorial factors influence aesthetics of all-ceramic restorations, the aesthetic success and longevity of these restorations depend on the integration with surrounding periodontal tissue.

  18. The fracture resistance of teeth restored with different adhesive dowels.

    PubMed

    Sari, Tugrul; Ozyesil, Atilla Gokhan

    2013-09-01

    Fiber-reinforced composite dowels are suggested to be a better alternative to metal dowels. This in vitro study evaluated the fracture resistance and fracture modes of teeth restored with nine different dowel systems. Ninety mandibular pre-molar teeth were decoronated and nine homogenous groups were composed. Root canal and dowel canal preparations were made and nine different dowel systems were used to fabricate restorations. Core build-ups were made with a composite resin core material. Specimens were mounted in acrylic resin blocks and continuous compressive force was applied until fracture occurred. Fracture resistance and fracture mode data were collected. One-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov and one-way ANOVA tests were performed for the fracture resistance data of the groups. There were no significant differences among the fracture resistances of the groups. All specimens of the pre-fabricated stainless steel dowel group fractured catastrophically. However, even in the worst-case, five specimens of the fiber-reinforced composite groups had favorable fracture modes. The teeth restored with fiber reinforced composite dowels were as resistant to fracture as teeth restored with stainless steel dowels. Fracture modes of teeth restored with fiber reinforced composite dowels were more advantageous than teeth restored with pre-fabricated stainless steel dowels.

  19. [Direct restoration of the tooth crown using various core build-up materials].

    PubMed

    Maksimovskaya, L N; Krutov, V A; Kuprin, P V; Kuprina, M A

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess direct restorations mechanical properties (both in vitro and in vivo) to improve dental restorations quality after root canal treatment. Laboratory tests showed that using nanocomposite materials of dual curing with the fiberglass reinforced posts improves restoration strength in endodontically treated teeth: by 3.9±5.8% in class II Peroz restorations, 12.6±5.9 and 24.2±4.2% in class III and IV, correspondently. Using fiberglass reinforced posts (LuxaPost) for the restoration of the tooth crown after endodontic treatment significantly decreases the number of complications associated with marginal leakage of the restoration during first 2 years after treatment (p<005).

  20. A geometric model of the normal human aortic root and design of a fully anatomic aortic root graft.

    PubMed

    Crooke, Philip S; Beavan, L Alan; Griffin, Charles D; Mazzitelli, Domenico; Rankin, J Scott

    2015-01-01

    Available aortic root grafts generally flare outward in the sinus region, and this feature improves procedural ease. However, no current device is based on normal aortic root geometry, and a fully anatomic aortic root graft could further facilitate valve-sparing root operations. To develop a model of the normal human aortic root, high-resolution computed tomographic angiogram images from 11 normal human aortas generated high-density x, y, z coordinates of valve and root structures in Mathematica. Three-dimensional least-squares regression analyses assessed geometry of the aortic valve and root. Shapes and dimensions were quantified, and minor variations in geometry were simplified during graft design. Normal aortic valve and root geometry was represented as three leaflet-sinus general ellipsoids nested within a cylindrical aorta. Sinotubular junction diameter was 5 mm larger than the valve base-with a slight funnel-shaped outward commissural flare but cylindrical geometry above the midvalve. The valve base was elliptical, but the midvalve and the sinotubular junction were circular above the midvalve level. Commissural locations on the base circumference were equidistant. On the basis of average three-dimensional geometry, a root graft was designed for root remodeling procedures-to be used with an internal geometric annuloplasty ring of the same design. An aortic root graft was designed on the basis of mathematical analyses of computed tomographic angiogram images. The design incorporated three anatomic sinuses, commissural symmetry, and compatibility with geometric ring annuloplasty. The anatomic graft may prove useful for restoring aortic root geometry toward normal during aortic valve and root surgery.

  1. Improvement of bovine in vitro embryo production by vitamin K₂ supplementation.

    PubMed

    Baldoceda-Baldeon, Luis Manuel; Gagné, Dominic; Vigneault, Christian; Blondin, Patrick; Robert, Claude

    2014-11-01

    Mitochondria play an important role during early development in mammalian embryos. It has been shown that properly controlled follicular preparation increases the likelihood of in-vitro-produced bovine embryos reaching the blastocyst stage and that competent embryos exhibit heightened expression of genes associated with mitochondrial function. We hypothesized that apparently incompetent embryos could be rescued by restoring mitochondrial function. It has been shown that vitamin K2 (a membrane-bound electron carrier similar to ubiquinone) can restore mitochondrial dysfunction in eukaryotic cells. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate the effects of vitamin K2 on bovine embryonic development in vitro. The vitamin was found most effective when added 72 h after fertilization. It produced a significant (P<0.05) increase in the percentage of blastocysts (+8.6%), more expanded blastocysts (+7.8%), and embryos of better morphological quality. It improved the mitochondrial activity significantly and had a measurable impact on gene expression. This is the first demonstration that current standard conditions of in vitro production of bovine embryos may be inadequate due to the lack of support for mitochondrial function and may be improved significantly by supplementing the culture medium with vitamin K2. © 2014 Society for Reproduction and Fertility.

  2. A circannual rhythm in bovine pineal serotonin.

    PubMed

    Philo, R; Reiter, R J

    1980-06-15

    Bovine pineal serotonin (5-HT) was analyzed at the time of the solstices and equinoxes from December, 1975 until June, 1978. The highest values of 5-HT were detected at the winter solstices and lowest values at the summer solstices of each year examined. The peaks in bovine pineal 5-HT correspond with a lessened fertility in cattle reported during the winter months.

  3. Root canal irrigants.

    PubMed

    Kandaswamy, Deivanayagam; Venkateshbabu, Nagendrababu

    2010-10-01

    Successful root canal therapy relies on the combination of proper instrumentation, irrigation, and obturation of the root canal. Of these three essential steps of root canal therapy, irrigation of the root canal is the most important determinant in the healing of the periapical tissues. The primary endodontic treatment goal must thus be to optimize root canal disinfection and to prevent reinfection. In this review of the literature, various irrigants and the interactions between irrigants are discussed. We performed a Medline search for English-language papers published untill July 2010. The keywords used were 'root canal irrigants' and 'endodontic irrigants.' The reference lists of each article were manually checked for additional articles of relevance.

  4. Root canal irrigants

    PubMed Central

    Kandaswamy, Deivanayagam; Venkateshbabu, Nagendrababu

    2010-01-01

    Successful root canal therapy relies on the combination of proper instrumentation, irrigation, and obturation of the root canal. Of these three essential steps of root canal therapy, irrigation of the root canal is the most important determinant in the healing of the periapical tissues. The primary endodontic treatment goal must thus be to optimize root canal disinfection and to prevent reinfection. In this review of the literature, various irrigants and the interactions between irrigants are discussed. We performed a Medline search for English-language papers published untill July 2010. The keywords used were ‘root canal irrigants’ and ‘endodontic irrigants.’ The reference lists of each article were manually checked for additional articles of relevance. PMID:21217955

  5. Container Oak Seedlings for Bottomland Hardwood (BLH) Restoration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-08-01

    artificial stratification, necessary to break seed dormancy . Following the stratification period, seeds should be sown directly into containers filled...when flooding extends into the growing season. Traditionally, restoration has been accomplished with bare-root seedlings or direct seeding with acorns...operators must harvest seedlings before preparation of the seed bed for next year’s crop. If planting occurs prior to flooding, seedlings must tolerate

  6. Robust Image Restoration for Ground-Based Space Surveillance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    Figure 8 shows a different case in which the AO system was not running. This target is the Hubble Space Telescope and data were collected with...data. Both images are shown on a square root scale.     Figure 8. The Hubble Space Telescope . Left: Raw data frame with AO in open loop...Robust image restoration for ground-based space surveillance Douglas A. Hope, Michael Hart, Stuart M. Jefferies and James Nagy Hart Scientific

  7. Restoration of congenitally missing maxillary lateral incisors using mini implants.

    PubMed

    Collins, Ron

    2013-07-01

    In this author's opinion, the advent of mini implants, or small diameter implants (SDIs) as they are more frequently being called, are becoming in many situations a viable alternative to the more traditional root form implants. They offer advantages of less cost, a more simplified placement technique, usually faster healing times, and generally less post-operative complications. A case presentation is given to demonstrate their usage for a narrow ridge application to restore congenitally missing maxillary lateral incisors.

  8. Restoration of congenitally missing maxillary lateral incisors using mini implants.

    PubMed

    Collins, Ron

    2013-11-01

    In this author's opinion, the advent of mini implants, or small diameter implants (SDIs) as they are more frequently being called, is becoming in many situations a viable alternative to the more traditional root form implants. They offer advantages of less cost, a more simplified placement technique, usually faster healing times, and generally less post-operative complications. A case presentation is given to demonstrate their usage for a narrow ridge application to restore congenitally missing maxillary lateral incisors.

  9. Effect of light-curing units on push-out fiber post bond strength in root canal dentin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calixto, L. R.; Bandéca, M. C.; Silva, F. B.; Rastelli, A. N. S.; Porto-Neto, S. T.; Andrade, M. F.

    2009-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of different light-curing units on the bond strength (push-out) of glass fiber posts in the different thirds of the root (cervical, middle and apical) with different adhesive luting resin systems (dual-cure total-etch; dual-cured and self-etch bonding system; and dual-cure self-adhesive cements), Disks of the samples ( n = 144) were used, with approximately 1 mm of thickness of 48 bovine roots restored with glass fiber posts, that were luted with resin cements photo-activated by halogen LCU (QTH, Optilux 501) and blue LED (Ultraled), with power densities of 600 and 550 mW/cm2, respectively. A universal testing machine (MTS 810 Material Test System) was used with a 1 mm diameter steel rod at cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/min until post extrusion, with load cell of 50 kg, for evaluation of the push-out strength in the different thirds of each sample. The push-out strength values in kgf were converted to MPa and analyzed through Analysis of Variance and Tukey’s test, at significance level of 5%. The results showed that there were no statistical differences between the QTH and LED LCUs. The self-adhesive resin cement had lower values of retention. The total-etch and self-adhesive system resin cements seem to be a possible alternative for glass fiber posts cementation into the radicular canal and the LED LCU can be applied as an alternative to halogen light on photo-activation of dual-cured resin cements.

  10. Models of bovine babesiosis including juvenile cattle.

    PubMed

    Saad-Roy, C M; Shuai, Zhisheng; van den Driessche, P

    2015-03-01

    Bovine Babesiosis in cattle is caused by the transmission of protozoa of Babesia spp. by ticks as vectors. Juvenile cattle (<9 months of age) have resistance to Bovine Babesiosis, rarely show symptoms, and acquire immunity upon recovery. Susceptibility to the disease varies between breeds of cattle. Models of the dynamics of Bovine Babesiosis transmitted by the cattle tick that include these factors are formulated as systems of ordinary differential equations. Basic reproduction numbers are calculated, and it is proved that if these numbers are below the threshold value of one, then Bovine Babesiosis dies out. However, above the threshold number of one, the disease may approach an endemic state. In this case, control measures are suggested by determining target reproduction numbers. The percentage of a particular population (for example, the adult bovine population) needed to be controlled to eradicate the disease is evaluated numerically using Columbia data from the literature.

  11. Fiber post techniques for anatomical root variations.

    PubMed

    Boksman, Leendert; Hepburn, Alejandro Bertoldi; Kogan, Enrique; Friedman, Manny; de Rijk, Waldemar

    2011-05-01

    In contemporary dental practice, there is no remaining reason to use metallic posts, custom or prefabricated. Many cases that several years ago would have required a retentive post will not require that post today, because of the many improvements in bonding agents and composite resin restoratives. However, in cases where less than 50% of coronal tooth structure remains--or in other cases wherein the judgment of the clinician a post is indicated--there are now aesthetic, non-corrosive, fracture resistant and radiopaque alternatives for all varieties that save time and money without compromise. Their most compelling advantage, regardless of the geometry or amount of residual tooth structure, is the protection from root fracture that a low modulus restoration provides. In selecting the materials (posts, resins) for these techniques, the dentist is advised not to cut corners, and to seek the strongest and most radiopaque products available.

  12. Bovine dentine organic matrix down-regulates osteoclast activity.

    PubMed

    Sriarj, Wantida; Aoki, Kazuhiro; Ohya, Keiichi; Takagi, Yuzo; Shimokawa, Hitoyata

    2009-01-01

    Physiological root resorption is a phenomenon that normally takes place in deciduous teeth; root resorption of permanent teeth occurs only under pathological conditions. The molecular mechanisms underlying these processes are still unclear. Our previous study showed that osteoclasts cultured on deciduous dentine exhibited a higher degree of resorption and higher levels of cathepsin K and MMP-9 mRNA than osteoclasts cultured on permanent dentine. These results could be because of different susceptibilities to acid and the different organic matrices between deciduous and permanent dentine. Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of dentine extracts from bovine deciduous and permanent dentine on osteoclast activity. Osteoclasts, obtained from mouse bone marrow cells co-cultured with an osteoblast-rich fraction in the presence of 1,25-(OH)(2)-vitamin D3 and PGE2, were incubated with or without 0.6 M HCl extracts from bovine deciduous or permanent dentine for 48 h. TRAP positive cell number, TRAP activity, the areas of resorption pits, and mRNA levels of TRAP, v-ATPase, calcitonin receptor, cathepsin K, and MMP-9 were examined. The results illustrated that TRAP activity, the resorbed area, and the mRNA levels of osteoclast marker genes seemed to be suppressed by both deciduous and permanent dentine extracts. These findings indicate that some factors that suppress osteoclast activity are contained in both deciduous and permanent dentine extracts. Although there was no significant difference in osteoclast activity between deciduous and permanent dentine extracts, osteoclasts incubated with permanent dentine extracts tend to exhibit less resorption activity than those incubated with deciduous dentine extracts. However, we could not clearly explain the causes of this.

  13. Arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization of giant sequoia (Sequoiadendron giganteum) in response to restoration practices.

    PubMed

    Fahey, Catherine; York, Robert A; Pawlowska, Teresa E

    2012-01-01

    Interactions with soil microbiota determine the success of restoring plants to their native habitats. The goal of our study was to understand the effects of restoration practices on interactions of giant sequoia Sequoiadendron giganteum with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi (Glomeromycota). Natural regeneration of Sequoiadendron is threatened by the absence of severe fires that create forest canopy gaps. Generating artificial canopy gaps offers an alternative tool for giant sequoia restoration. We investigated the effect of regeneration practices, including (i) sapling location within gaps, (ii) gap size and (iii) soil substrate, on AM fungal colonization of giant sequoia sapling roots in a native giant sequoia grove of the Sierra Nevada, California. We found that the extent of AM fungal root colonization was positively correlated with sapling height and light availability, which were related to the location of the sapling within the gap and the gap size. While colonization frequency by arbuscules in saplings on ash substrate was higher relative to saplings in mineral soil, the total AM fungal root colonization was similar between the substrates. A negative correlation between root colonization by Glomeromycota and non-AM fungal species indicated antagonistic interactions between different classes of root-associated fungi. Using DNA genotyping, we identified six AM fungal taxa representing genera Glomus and Ambispora present in Sequoiadendron roots. Overall, we found that AM fungal colonization of giant sequoia roots was associated with availability of plant-assimilated carbon to the fungus rather than with the AM fungal supply of mineral nutrients to the roots. We conclude that restoration practices affecting light availability and carbon assimilation alter feedbacks between sapling growth and activity of AM fungi in the roots.

  14. Bovine papillomavirus isolation by ultracentrifugation.

    PubMed

    Araldi, R P; Giovanni, D N S; Melo, T C; Diniz, N; Mazzuchelli-de-Souza, J; Sant'Ana, T A; Carvalho, R F; Beçak, W; Stocco, R C

    2014-11-01

    The bovine papillomavirus (BPV) is the etiological agent of bovine papillomatosis, which causes significant economic losses to livestock, characterized by the presence of papillomas that regress spontaneously or persist and progress to malignancy. Currently, there are 13 types of BPVs described in the literature as well as 32 putative new types. This study aimed to isolate viral particles of BPV from skin papillomas, using a novel viral isolation method. The virus types were previously identified with new primers designed. 77 cutaneous papilloma samples of 27 animals, Simmental breed, were surgically removed. The DNA was extracted and subjected to PCR using Delta-Epsilon and Xi primers. The bands were purified and sequenced. The sequences were analyzed using software and compared to the GenBank database, by BLAST tool. The viral typing showed a prevalence of BPV-2 in 81.81% of samples. It was also detected the presence of the putative new virus type BR/UEL2 in one sample. Virus isolation was performed by ultracentrifugation in a single density of cesium chloride. The method of virus isolation is less laborious than those previously described, allowing the isolation of complete virus particles of BPV-2.

  15. Bovine somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Ross, Pablo J; Cibelli, Jose B

    2010-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is a technique by which the nucleus of a differentiated cell is introduced into an oocyte from which its genetic material has been removed by a process called enucleation. In mammals, the reconstructed embryo is artificially induced to initiate embryonic development (activation). The oocyte turns the somatic cell nucleus into an embryonic nucleus. This process is called nuclear reprogramming and involves an important change of cell fate, by which the somatic cell nucleus becomes capable of generating all the cell types required for the formation of a new individual, including extraembryonic tissues. Therefore, after transfer of a cloned embryo to a surrogate mother, an offspring genetically identical to the animal from which the somatic cells where isolated, is born. Cloning by nuclear transfer has potential applications in agriculture and biomedicine, but is limited by low efficiency. Cattle were the second mammalian species to be cloned after Dolly the sheep, and it is probably the most widely used species for SCNT experiments. This is, in part due to the high availability of bovine oocytes and the relatively higher efficiency levels usually obtained in cattle. Given the wide utilization of this species for cloning, several alternatives to this basic protocol can be found in the literature. Here we describe a basic protocol for bovine SCNT currently being used in our laboratory, which is amenable for the use of the nuclear transplantation technique for research or commercial purposes.

  16. Adipogenesis of bovine perimuscular preadipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Taniguchi, Masaaki; Le Luo Guan; Zhang Bing; Dodson, Michael V.; Okine, Erasmus; Moore, Stephen S.

    2008-02-01

    In this study, non-transformed progeny adipofibroblasts, derived from mature adipocyte dedifferentiation, was used as a novel in vitro model to study adipogenic gene expression in cattle. Adipofibroblasts from dedifferentiated mature perimuscular fat (PMF) tissue were cultured with differentiation stimulants until the cells exhibited morphological differentiation. Treated cells were harvested from day 2 to 16 for RNA extraction, whereas control cells were cultured without addition of stimulants. Results from time course gene expression assays by quantitative real-time PCR revealed that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-{gamma}), sterol regulatory element binding protein 1 (SREBP-1) and their six down-stream genes were co-expressed at day 2 post-differentiation induction. When compared to other adipogenesis culture systems, the adipogenic gene expression of bovine PMF adipofibroblasts culture was different, especially to the rodent model. Collectively, these results demonstrated PPAR-{gamma} and SREBP-1 cooperatively play a key role to regulate the re-differentiation of bovine adipofibroblasts, during early conversion stages in vitro.

  17. [Toxinology of bovine paraplegic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Sevcik, C; Brito, J C; D'Suze, G; Mijares, A J; Domínguez, M G

    1993-01-01

    A clinical entity named "Bovine Paraplegic Syndrome" ("Síndrome Parapléjico de los Bovinos") has spread alarmingly, in the cattle growing areas of the central and eastern plains of Venezuela. Approximately four million cattle are bread in the area were the disease occurs. The mortality index due to the disease ranges 5 to 25% of the animals at risk, mostly cows, pregnant or lactating. The principal characteristic of the bovine paraplegic syndrome is decubitus, ventral or sternal, in animals that make vane efforts to stand when stimulated. The diagnosis is established ruling out, clinically and with laboratory findings, that the animals are suffering known diseases with similar symptoms such as paralytic rabies, botulism and blood parasites such Trypanosoma sp., Babesia sp., and Anaplasma sp.. Death occurs always, usually after few days, and to this date there is no known treatment able to save the sick cows. In this work, we describe results that suggest the presence of a toxin in the cattle suffering and prone to suffer the syndrome; it is a natural toxin produced by ruminal bacteria. In squid giant axons under voltage clamp conditions, this toxin is very specific to block sodium current during nerve electrical activity.

  18. Eight-year results of site retention of anorganic bovine bone and anorganic bovine matrix.

    PubMed

    Degidi, Marco; Perrotti, Vittoria; Piattelli, Adriano; Iezzi, Giovanna

    2013-12-01

    The long-term fate of some biomaterials is still unknown, and the reports present in the literature are not conclusive as to whether these biomaterials are resorbed over time or not. Different reports can be found with regard to the resorption behavior of anorganic bovine bone (ABB). The aim of the present study was to provide a comparative histological and histomorphometrical evaluation, in the same patient, of 2 specimens retrieved from a sinus augmented with ABB and with anorganic bovine matrix added to a cell-binding peptide (PepGen P-15), respectively, after a healing period of 6 months and after 8 years of implant loading, to evaluate the resorption of both biomaterials. A unilateral sinus augmentation procedure with ABB (50%) and with PepGen P-15 (50%) was performed in a 54-year-old male patient. Two titanium dental implants with a sandblasted and acid-etched surface were inserted after 6 months. During this procedure, 2 tissue cores were retrieved from the sinus with a trephine, before implant insertion. After an additional 6 months, a fixed prosthetic restoration was fabricated. One of these implants, after a loading period of 8 years, fractured in the coronal portion and was removed. Both specimens, one retrieved after a 6-month healing period and the other after an 8-year loading period, were treated to obtain thin ground sections. In the 6-month specimen, the histomorphometry showed that the percentage of newly formed bone was 27.2% ± 3.6%, marrow spaces 35.6% ± 2.3%, residual ABB particles 25.1% ± 1.2%, and residual PepGen P-15 particles 12.1% ± 2.2%. In the 8-year specimen, the histomorphometry showed that the percentage of newly formed bone was 51.4% ± 4.8%, marrow spaces 40% ± 7.1%, residual ABB particles 6.2% ± 0.7%, and residual PepGen P-15 particles 2.4% ± 0.5%. Both biomaterials underwent significant resorption over the course of this study.

  19. Tape Dump and Restore.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-28

    VM/ CMS as provided at Virginia Tech and to make it possible to transfer files from this system to other computer systems , possibly machines using the...Technical Memorandum No. 80-5 DTI(-C August 28, 1980 DEC T.77w S DEC23 1980 F ABSTRACT A set of three programs to write CMS disk files on magnetic...tape in a variety of formats suitable for reading on a variety of computing systems and for restoring these tape files to disk within the restrictions

  20. Effect of maternal antibody upon vaccination with infectious bovine rhinotracheitis and bovine virus diarrhea vaccines.

    PubMed Central

    Menanteau-Horta, A M; Ames, T R; Johnson, D W; Meiske, J C

    1985-01-01

    This report presents the normal rate of decay of maternal antibody and the influence of maternal antibody on responses to a single vaccination with modified-live bovine virus diarrhea and infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus vaccines at 196 days of age and on response to vaccinations with the same vaccines given twice at 84 and 196 days of age. Passive immunity decreased to near zero over the first six months of life for both bovine virus diarrhea and infectious bovine rhinotracheitis controls. All calves seroconverted to bovine virus diarrhea vaccine at 84 days of age, even though high levels (greater than 1:32) of maternal antibodies were present. These calves did not seroconvert to infectious bovine rhinotracheitis vaccine at 84 days of age when high levels (less than 1:16) of maternal antibodies were present. Calves responded well to bovine virus diarrhea and infectious bovine rhinotracheitis vaccines given only once at 196 days of age after passive immunity disappeared. Calves which were revaccinated with infectious bovine rhinotracheitis seroconverted showing a more rapid response than the single vaccinates. Those revaccinated with bovine virus diarrhea showed an immediate response of small magnitude. PMID:2985214

  1. Implant placement in alveolar composite defects regenerated with rhBMP-2, anorganic bovine bone, and titanium mesh: a report of eight reconstructed sites.

    PubMed

    Butura, Caesar C; Galindo, Daniel F

    2014-01-01

    To present a retrospective report of eight significant alveolar defects in which the alveolus was regenerated with recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2 (rhBMP-2) combined with anorganic bovine bone and contoured using titanium mesh to facilitate implant-supported restorations. A total of seven patients underwent extractions and debridement of the compromised alveolar sites with simultaneous grafting using a mixture of rhBMP-2 and anorganic bovine bone. The three-dimensional contour of the compromised alveolus was reestablished using titanium mesh with rigid screw fixation. Implants were placed a minimum of 6 months after healing and subsequently were restored. The treated defects were successfully regenerated and did not require any additional surgery prior to implant placement or prosthetic restoration. A total of 14 implants were placed and restored with fixed single or multiple restorations. Thirteen of the 23 treated sites were in the anterior esthetic zone. Vertical and horizontal alveolar bone defects can be predictably regenerated by grafting with a combination of rhBMP-2 and anorganic bovine bone contained by titanium mesh to successfully accommodate implant placement.

  2. 21 CFR 184.1034 - Catalase (bovine liver).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Catalase (bovine liver). 184.1034 Section 184.1034... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1034 Catalase (bovine liver). (a) Catalase (bovine liver) (CAS Reg. No. 81457-95-6) is an enzyme preparation obtained from extracts of bovine liver. It...

  3. 21 CFR 184.1034 - Catalase (bovine liver).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Catalase (bovine liver). 184.1034 Section 184.1034... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1034 Catalase (bovine liver). (a) Catalase (bovine liver) (CAS Reg. No. 81457-95-6) is an enzyme preparation obtained from extracts of bovine liver. It...

  4. Irrational Square Roots

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Misiurewicz, Michal

    2013-01-01

    If students are presented the standard proof of irrationality of [square root]2, can they generalize it to a proof of the irrationality of "[square root]p", "p" a prime if, instead of considering divisibility by "p", they cling to the notions of even and odd used in the standard proof?

  5. The Roots of Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Yetta M.

    This review of research with children aged two to six on their reading, writing, and oral language development speaks of five roots of a tree of literate life that require nourishment in the soil of a written language environment. The roots discussed are the development of print awareness in situational contexts, the development of print awareness…

  6. Irrational Square Roots

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Misiurewicz, Michal

    2013-01-01

    If students are presented the standard proof of irrationality of [square root]2, can they generalize it to a proof of the irrationality of "[square root]p", "p" a prime if, instead of considering divisibility by "p", they cling to the notions of even and odd used in the standard proof?

  7. Trees and Roots.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Lethonee A.

    Constructing a family history can be significant in helping persons understand and appreciate the root system that supports and sustains them. Oral history can be a valuable resource in family research as Alex Haley demonstrated in writing "Roots." The major difficulty of using oral tradition in tracing a family history is that family…

  8. Trees and Roots.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Lethonee A.

    Constructing a family history can be significant in helping persons understand and appreciate the root system that supports and sustains them. Oral history can be a valuable resource in family research as Alex Haley demonstrated in writing "Roots." The major difficulty of using oral tradition in tracing a family history is that family…

  9. Optical characterization of one dental composite resin using bovine enamel as reinforcing filler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tribioli, J. T.; Jacomassi, D.; Rastelli, A. N. S.; Pratavieira, S.; Bagnato, V. S.; Kurachi, C.

    2012-01-01

    The use of composite resins for restorative procedure in anterior and posterior cavities is highly common in Dentistry due to its mechanical and aesthetic properties that are compatible with the remaining dental structure. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the optical characterization of one dental composite resin using bovine enamel as reinforcing filler. The same organic matrix of the commercially available resins was used for this experimental resin. The reinforcing filler was obtained after the gridding of bovine enamel fragments and a superficial treatment was performed to allow the adhesion of the filler particles with the organic matrix. Different optical images as fluorescence and reflectance were performed to compare the experimental composite with the human teeth. The present experimental resin shows similar optical properties compared with human teeth.

  10. Sensitivity to zinc of Mediterranean woody species important for restoration.

    PubMed

    Disante, Karen B; Fuentes, David; Cortina, Jordi

    2010-04-15

    Heavy metals have increased in natural woodlands and shrublands over the last several decades as a consequence of anthropogenic activities. However, our knowledge of the effects of these elements on woody species is scarce. In this study, we examined the responses of six Mediterranean woody species to increasing levels of zinc in hydroponic culture and discussed the possible implications for the restoration of contaminated sites. The species used, Pinus pinea L., Pinus pinaster Ait., Pinus halepensis Mill., Tetraclinis articulata (Vahl) Mast., Rhamnus alaternus L. and Quercus suber L. represent a climatic gradient from dry sub-humid to semi-arid conditions. Zinc concentrations in shoots ranged from 53 microg g(-1) in Q. suber to 382 microg g(-1) in T. articulata and were well below the levels found in roots. Zinc inhibited root elongation and root biomass and changed the root length distribution per diameter class, but the magnitude of the effects was species-specific. Only P. halepensis and Q. suber showed toxicity symptoms in aboveground parts. Species more characteristic from xeric environments (T. articulata, R. alaternus and P. halepensis) were more sensitive to zinc than species from mesic environments (Q. suber, P. pinaster and P. pinea). According to the Zn responses and bioaccumulation, Q. suber P. pinea and P. halepensis are the best candidates for field trials to test the value of woody species to restore contaminated sites. None of the species tested seemed suitable for phytoremediation.

  11. Sugarbeet root aphid on postharvest root storage

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The sugarbeet root aphid (SBRA), Pemphigus betae Doane, is a serious insect pest of sugarbeet in several North American sugarbeet production areas; however, it is rarely an economic pest in the Red River Valley (RRV). In 2012 and 2013, all RRV factory districts were impacted by SBRA outbreaks, and ...

  12. Use of glass fiber post and composite resin in restoration of a vertical fractured tooth.

    PubMed

    Fidel, Sandra Rivera; Sassone, Luciana; Alvares, Gustavo Ribeiro; Guimarães, Rodrigo Prada Sant'anna; Fidel, Rivail Antônio Sérgio

    2006-12-01

    Combined coronal and vertical root fractures are difficult to treat and extraction of the affected tooth is quite often indicated. In anterior teeth, esthetics and function must be reestablished immediately. This case describes the restoration of a fractured upper right central incisor using a glass fiber post and adhesive composite. At the follow-up appointment, 13 months later, clinical and radiographical examinations revealed the glass fiber post and restoration in place, suggesting the efficacy of the treatment in maintaining fractured tooth.

  13. Root nutrient foraging.

    PubMed

    Giehl, Ricardo F H; von Wirén, Nicolaus

    2014-10-01

    During a plant's lifecycle, the availability of nutrients in the soil is mostly heterogeneous in space and time. Plants are able to adapt to nutrient shortage or localized nutrient availability by altering their root system architecture to efficiently explore soil zones containing the limited nutrient. It has been shown that the deficiency of different nutrients induces root architectural and morphological changes that are, at least to some extent, nutrient specific. Here, we highlight what is known about the importance of individual root system components for nutrient acquisition and how developmental and physiological responses can be coupled to increase nutrient foraging by roots. In addition, we review prominent molecular mechanisms involved in altering the root system in response to local nutrient availability or to the plant's nutritional status.

  14. Root Nutrient Foraging1

    PubMed Central

    Giehl, Ricardo F.H.; von Wirén, Nicolaus

    2014-01-01

    During a plant's lifecycle, the availability of nutrients in the soil is mostly heterogeneous in space and time. Plants are able to adapt to nutrient shortage or localized nutrient availability by altering their root system architecture to efficiently explore soil zones containing the limited nutrient. It has been shown that the deficiency of different nutrients induces root architectural and morphological changes that are, at least to some extent, nutrient specific. Here, we highlight what is known about the importance of individual root system components for nutrient acquisition and how developmental and physiological responses can be coupled to increase nutrient foraging by roots. In addition, we review prominent molecular mechanisms involved in altering the root system in response to local nutrient availability or to the plant's nutritional status. PMID:25082891

  15. Restoration of Endodontically Treated Teeth Review and Treatment Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Slutzky-Goldberg, Iris; Slutzky, Hagay; Gorfil, Colin; Smidt, Ami

    2009-01-01

    Coronal restorations and posts can positively influence the long-term prognosis of teeth following root canal therapy. Final sealing the canal by placing an appropriate post and core will minimize leakage of oral fluids and bacteria into the periradicular area and is recommended as soon as possible after completion of root canal filling. Glass ionomer or MTA placed over the residual root canal filling after post space preparation may be effective to prevent bacterial leakage. A ferrule of 1-2 mm of tooth tissue coronal to the finish line of the crown significantly improves the fracture resistance of the tooth and is more important than the type of the material the core and post are made of. PMID:20309408

  16. Abscisic Acid and LATERAL ROOT ORGAN DEFECTIVE/NUMEROUS INFECTIONS AND POLYPHENOLICS Modulate Root Elongation via Reactive Oxygen Species in Medicago truncatula1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chang; Bousquet, Amanda; Harris, Jeanne M.

    2014-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) modulates root growth in plants grown under normal and stress conditions and can rescue the root growth defects of the Medicago truncatula lateral root-organ defective (latd) mutant. Here, we demonstrate that reactive oxygen species (ROS) function downstream of ABA in the regulation of root growth by controlling cell elongation. We also show that the MtLATD/NUMEROUS INFECTIONS AND POLYPHENOLICS (NIP) nitrate transporter is required for ROS homeostasis and cell elongation in roots and that this balance is perturbed in latd mutants, leading to an excess of superoxide and hydrogen peroxide and a corresponding decrease in cell elongation. We found that expression of the superoxide-generating NADPH oxidase genes, MtRbohA and MtRbohC (for respiratory burst oxidase homologs), is increased in latd roots and that inhibition of NADPH oxidase activity pharmacologically can both reduce latd root ROS levels and increase cell length, implicating NADPH oxidase function in latd root growth defects. Finally, we demonstrate that ABA treatment alleviates ectopic ROS accumulation in latd roots, restores MtRbohC expression to wild-type levels, and promotes an increase in cell length. Reducing the expression of MtRbohC using RNA interference leads to increased root elongation in both wild-type and latd roots. These results reveal a mechanism by which the MtLATD/NIP nitrate transporter and ABA modulate root elongation via superoxide generation by the MtRbohC NADPH oxidase. PMID:25192698

  17. Redwoods, restoration, and implications for carbon budgets

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madej, M.A.

    2010-01-01

    The coast redwoods (Sequoia sempervirens) of California have several unique characteristics that influence interactions between vegetation and geomorphic processes. Case studies, using a combination of in-channel wood surveys and an air photo inventory of landslides, illustrate current conditions in a redwood-dominated watershed undergoing restoration work, and the influence of wood loading and landslides on the carbon budget. Redwood trees have extremely large biomass (trunk wood volumes of 700 to 1000 m3) and are very decay-resistant; consequently, they have a large and persistent influence on in-channel wood loading. Large wood surveys indicate high wood loading in streams in uncut forests (0.3-0.5 m3/m2 of channel), but also show that high wood loading can persist in logged basin with unlogged riparian buffers because of the slow decay of fallen redwoods. Through a watershed restoration program, Redwood National Park increases in-channel wood loading in low-order streams, but the effectiveness of this technique has not yet been tested by a large flood. Another unique characteristic of redwood is its ability to resprout from basal burls after cutting, so that root strength may not decline as sharply following logging as in other types of forests. An air photo inventory of landslides following a large storm in 1997 indicated: 1) that in the Redwood Creek watershed the volume of material displaced by landslides in harvested areas was not related to the time elapsed since logging, suggesting that the loss of root strength was not a decisive factor in landslide initiation, 2) landslide production on decommissioned logging roads was half that of untreated roads, and 3) landslides removed an estimated 28 Mg of organic carbon/km2 from hillslopes. The carbon budget of a redwood-dominated catchment is dominated by the vegetative component, but is also influenced by the extent of mass movement, erosion control work, and in-channel storage of wood.

  18. Longevity of silicate ceramic restorations.

    PubMed

    Beier, Ulrike Stephanie; Dumfahrt, Herbert

    2014-09-01

    The demand for esthetic restorations has resulted in an increased use of dental ceramics as a biocompatible and functionally sufficient alternative to conventional restorative materials. Silicate ceramic restorations are widely used for veneers, inlays, onlays, and crowns in dentistry. Long-term data are of crucial importance to optimize clinical practice. The purpose of the present article is to summarize data of the Innsbruck ceramic evaluation up to 261 months with the focus on longevity and failure characteristics.

  19. [Advantages and disadvantages of applying yttrium stabilized zirconium-dioxide post and core restorations].

    PubMed

    Pétercsák, Anita; Radics, Tünde; Hegedus, Csaba

    2014-03-01

    Full ceramic restorations are associated with metal free post and core prosthodontics for teeth with seriously destroyed clinical crowns. Using custom made zirconium-dioxide post and cores can be flattering not only to give a good aesthetic result, but also to provide excellent retention. As none of the post systems stands all demands, prudent planning is mandatory. Our paper deals with favourable and unfavourable conditions as well as common causes of failures of post and core restorations. We took morphological, esthetical and functional considerations that can help to achieve the best results. Amongst them individual anatomic constitution, shape, width and length of the root and root canal, shape of the clinical crown, direction and magnitude of chewing forces are the most important factors. To give examples we present two cases of zirconium-dioxide post and core restorations. In our first case the missing clinical crown and a too wide root canal entrance created a questionable prognosis. To minimize adverse effect of the missing ferrule effect we applied custom-made zirconium-dioxide post and core and an additional abutment. After 7 years the restoration is still functioning. The second case represented a much favourable situation with 1,5 mm clinical crown height. The restoration was a custom-made zirconia post and core and a full-ceramic crown as a single tooth restoration. Although in this case we expected a better prognosis, 15 months later the patient showed up with a post fracture for applying extreme forces on the crown.

  20. Paul Davis Restoration Information Sheet

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Paul Davis Restoration (the Company) is located in Nicholasville, Kentucky. The settlement involves renovation activities conducted at a property constructed prior to 1978, located in Lexington, Kentucky.

  1. Longevity of Posterior Composite Restorations

    PubMed Central

    Opdam, N.J.M.; van de Sande, F.H.; Bronkhorst, E.; Cenci, M.S.; Bottenberg, P.; Pallesen, U.; Gaengler, P.; Lindberg, A.; Huysmans, M.C.D.N.J.M.; van Dijken, J.W.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this meta-analysis, based on individual participant data from several studies, was to investigate the influence of patient-, materials-, and tooth-related variables on the survival of posterior resin composite restorations. Following Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, we conducted a search resulting in 12 longitudinal studies of direct posterior resin composite restorations with at least 5 years’ follow-up. Original datasets were still available, including placement/failure/censoring of restorations, restored surfaces, materials used, reasons for clinical failure, and caries-risk status. A database including all restorations was constructed, and a multivariate Cox regression method was used to analyze variables of interest [patient (age; gender; caries-risk status), jaw (upper; lower), number of restored surfaces, resin composite and adhesive materials, and use of glass-ionomer cement as base/liner (present or absent)]. The hazard ratios with respective 95% confidence intervals were determined, and annual failure rates were calculated for subgroups. Of all restorations, 2,816 (2,585 Class II and 231 Class I) were included in the analysis, of which 569 failed during the observation period. Main reasons for failure were caries and fracture. The regression analyses showed a significantly higher risk of failure for restorations in high-caries-risk individuals and those with a higher number of restored surfaces. PMID:25048250

  2. Monoblocks in root canals - a hypothetical or a tangible goal

    PubMed Central

    Tay, Franklin R.; Pashley, David H.

    2007-01-01

    The term “monoblock” has become a familiar term in the endodontic literature with recent interest in the application of dentin adhesive technology to endodontics. Endodontic “monoblocks” have generated controversial discussions among academicians and clinicians as to whether they are able to improve the quality of seal in root fillings and to strengthen roots. This review attempts to provide a broader meaning to the term “monoblock” and see how this definition may be applied to the materials that have been used in the past and present for rehabilitation of the root canal space. The potential of currently available bondable materials to achieve mechanically homogeneous units with root dentin is then discussed in relation to the classical concept in which the term “monoblock” was first employed in restorative dentistry, and subsequently in endodontics. PMID:17368325

  3. Color stability and polymerization behavior of direct esthetic restorations.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Dayane Carvalho Ramos Salles de; Souza-Júnior, Eduardo José; Prieto, Lúcia Trazzi; Coppini, Erick Kamiya; Maia, Rodrigo Rocha; Paulillo, Luís Alexandre Maffei Sartini

    2014-01-01

    The current study evaluated the effect of accelerated artificial aging (AAA) on the color stability (CS) and degree of conversion (DC) of nanofilled and nanohybrid resin composites associated to different adhesive systems in direct esthetic restorations. Eighty bovine incisors were used to obtained dentin blocks (4 × 4 × 1 mm). The restorative systems were bonded to the blocks and photoactivated according to the manufacturer's instructions. Three adhesive systems were used: Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (conventional of three steps), Tetric N-Bond (conventional of two steps) and ClearFill SE Bond (self-etching). Also, two composites were used: Filtek Z350 XT (nanofilled) and IPS Empress Direct (nanohybrid). The restorations were made using a silicone mold placed on top of the prepared dentin blocks (N = 10). CS was measured after 300 hours of AAA by means of ultraviolet light using a spectrophotometer and CIE L*a*b* parameters on the top surface of the composite and at the bonded interface. The DC was performed using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (N = 10). Data were analyzed using two-way analysis of variance and Tukey's test (α = 0.05). The adhesive systems had no significant influence on the color stability (ΔE) of either the restoration surface (α = 0.90) or the bonded interface (α = 0.78). However, composite influenced the color as measured by ΔE and isolated coordinates (α < 0.001). The nanohybrid composite showed increased DC values (67%) compared with the nanofilled (61%) with statistically significant differences (α < 0.001). The adhesive system did not affect the final color of direct esthetic restorations. The nanohybrid composite demonstrated a higher DC and increased color stability after AAA compared to the nanofilled composite. The long-term color stability of composite restorations is a critical aspect of esthetic restorative procedures. Optimal Polymerization behavior of resin composite as

  4. Saturated hydrocarbons in bovine liver

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Bartholomew; Modzeleski, Vincent E.; Scott, Ward M.

    1969-01-01

    A homologous series of n-alkanes (C14–C33) and two isoprenoid hydrocarbons, 2,6,10,14-tetramethylhexadecane (phytane) and 2,6,10,14-tetramethylpentadecane (pristane) have been identified in bovine liver. Another branched but non-isoprenoid alkane and three isomers of molecular formula C20H40 were partially identified. Phytane and the C18–C22 and C29–C33 n-alkanes were found to be the major components in liver, suggesting that at least the main hydrocarbon components were derived from various plants in the diet. The hydrocarbons were separated and identified by a series of steps involving solvent extraction, saponification, elution chromatography on alumina and silica gel columns, molecular sieving and by infrared and ultraviolet spectroscopy, followed by combined capillary gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. PMID:5820649

  5. Bovine mastitis: frontiers in immunogenetics.

    PubMed

    Thompson-Crispi, Kathleen; Atalla, Heba; Miglior, Filippo; Mallard, Bonnie A

    2014-01-01

    Mastitis is one of the most prevalent and costly diseases in the dairy industry with losses attributable to reduced milk production, discarded milk, early culling, veterinary services, and labor costs. Typically, mastitis is an inflammation of the mammary gland most often, but not limited to, bacterial infection, and is characterized by the movement of leukocytes and serum proteins from the blood to the site of infection. It contributes to compromised milk quality and the potential spread of antimicrobial resistance if antibiotic treatment is not astutely applied. Despite the implementation of management practises and genetic selection approaches, bovine mastitis control continues to be inadequate. However, some novel genetic strategies have recently been demonstrated to reduce mastitis incidence by taking advantage of a cow's natural ability to make appropriate immune responses against invading pathogens. Specifically, dairy cattle with enhanced and balanced immune responses have a lower occurrence of disease, including mastitis, and they can be identified and selected for using the high immune response (HIR) technology. Enhanced immune responsiveness is also associated with improved response to vaccination, increased milk, and colostrum quality. Since immunity is an important fitness trait, beneficial associations with longevity and reproduction are also often noted. This review highlights the genetic regulation of the bovine immune system and its vital contributions to disease resistance. Genetic selection approaches currently used in the dairy industry to reduce the incidence of disease are reviewed, including the HIR technology, genomics to improve disease resistance or immune response, as well as the Immunity(+)™ sire line. Improving the overall immune responsiveness of cattle is expected to provide superior disease resistance, increasing animal welfare and food quality while maintaining favorable production levels to feed a growing population.

  6. Bovine Mastitis: Frontiers in Immunogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Thompson-Crispi, Kathleen; Atalla, Heba; Miglior, Filippo; Mallard, Bonnie A.

    2014-01-01

    Mastitis is one of the most prevalent and costly diseases in the dairy industry with losses attributable to reduced milk production, discarded milk, early culling, veterinary services, and labor costs. Typically, mastitis is an inflammation of the mammary gland most often, but not limited to, bacterial infection, and is characterized by the movement of leukocytes and serum proteins from the blood to the site of infection. It contributes to compromised milk quality and the potential spread of antimicrobial resistance if antibiotic treatment is not astutely applied. Despite the implementation of management practises and genetic selection approaches, bovine mastitis control continues to be inadequate. However, some novel genetic strategies have recently been demonstrated to reduce mastitis incidence by taking advantage of a cow’s natural ability to make appropriate immune responses against invading pathogens. Specifically, dairy cattle with enhanced and balanced immune responses have a lower occurrence of disease, including mastitis, and they can be identified and selected for using the high immune response (HIR) technology. Enhanced immune responsiveness is also associated with improved response to vaccination, increased milk, and colostrum quality. Since immunity is an important fitness trait, beneficial associations with longevity and reproduction are also often noted. This review highlights the genetic regulation of the bovine immune system and its vital contributions to disease resistance. Genetic selection approaches currently used in the dairy industry to reduce the incidence of disease are reviewed, including the HIR technology, genomics to improve disease resistance or immune response, as well as the Immunity+™ sire line. Improving the overall immune responsiveness of cattle is expected to provide superior disease resistance, increasing animal welfare and food quality while maintaining favorable production levels to feed a growing population. PMID

  7. Root hydrotropism: an update.

    PubMed

    Cassab, Gladys I; Eapen, Delfeena; Campos, María Eugenia

    2013-01-01

    While water shortage remains the single-most important factor influencing world agriculture, there are very few studies on how plants grow in response to water potential, i.e., hydrotropism. Terrestrial plant roots dwell in the soil, and their ability to grow and explore underground requires many sensors for stimuli such as gravity, humidity gradients, light, mechanical stimulations, temperature, and oxygen. To date, extremely limited information is available on the components of such sensors; however, all of these stimuli are sensed in the root cap. Directional growth of roots is controlled by gravity, which is fixed in direction and intensity. However, other environmental factors, such as water potential gradients, which fluctuate in time, space, direction, and intensity, can act as a signal for modifying the direction of root growth accordingly. Hydrotropism may help roots to obtain water from the soil and at the same time may participate in the establishment of the root system. Current genetic analysis of hydrotropism in Arabidopsis has offered new players, mainly AHR1, NHR1, MIZ1, and MIZ2, which seem to modulate how root caps sense and choose to respond hydrotropically as opposed to other tropic responses. Here we review the mechanism(s) by which these genes and the plant hormones abscisic acid and cytokinins coordinate hydrotropism to counteract the tropic responses to gravitational field, light or touch stimuli. The biological consequence of hydrotropism is also discussed in relation to water stress avoidance.

  8. Restoration islands: A tool for efficently restoring dryland ecosystems

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Restoration islands are concentrated plantings in strategic locations, created to efficiently use resources and capitalize on landscape-scale processes to achieve restoration goals. These methods have been used effectively in mesic ecosystems, particularly tropical forests, where the goal of island ...

  9. Growth and metabolism of murine and bovine embryos in bovine uterine flushing-supplemented culture media.

    PubMed Central

    Rondeau, M; Guay, P; Goff, A K; Cooke, G M

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the development and metabolic activity of cultured murine and bovine embryos in 2 standard media (HAM F-10 and RPMI) in the presence or absence of bovine uterine flushings. Murine morulae (n = 653) and day 7 bovine embryos (n = 273) were cultured for 18 h or 36 h in either HAM F-10 or RPMI in the presence or absence of bovine uterine flushings. After culture, the development, quality, and metabolic activity (glucose utilization or methionine uptake and incorporation) of embryos was assessed. It was found that HAM F-10 (without uterine flushings) was a more suitable medium than RPMI for optimal development and metabolism of murine and bovine embryos. Poor quality and development, as well as decreased metabolism, were evident after culture of murine embryos in RPMI; in contrast, this medium had no adverse effects on bovine embryos in culture. Supplementation of HAM F-10 with bovine uterine flushings improved the growth of murine embryos and the protein synthesis (as measured by an increased methionine incorporation) for both murine and bovine embryos. However, supplementation with bovine uterine flushings could not overcome deficiencies of an inappropriate medium (RPMI) for murine embryos. Supplementation of a well-defined culture medium with uterine flushings increased metabolism of embryos in culture, and thus might help to increase pregnancy rates after transfer of such embryos to recipient cows. PMID:8825988

  10. Restoring medical professionalism.

    PubMed

    Bernat, James L

    2012-08-21

    The essence of medical professionalism is placing dedication to the welfare of patients above physicians' personal or proprietary interests. Medicine has become deprofessionalized as a consequence of socioeconomic factors leading to increasing commercialization and perverse financial incentives converting it into a business, the presence of unmanaged conflicts of interest, challenges to medical authority by insurance companies and the consumerism movement, and by gradual changes in the attitudes of physicians. Organized medicine has responded by making explicit its standards of professionalism and its dedication to preserving them. Medical educators have studied the means to develop professional attitudes and behaviors among medical students and residents. Modeling the characteristics of professional behavior by virtuous physicians remains the most effective method to instill professional behaviors in trainees. Restoring professionalism may be abetted by changes in physicians' financial incentives through innovative models of health care delivery, by physicians reducing their conflicts of interest, and by medical societies rejecting a guild identity.

  11. Restoring the Everglades

    SciTech Connect

    Goforth, G.; Jackson, J.B.; Fink, L.

    1994-03-01

    In recent decades, increasing volumes of phosphorus-enriched water have been pumped into the Everglades and have upset the system's natural balance. Most of this water comes from the 700,000 acre Everglades Agricultural Area (EAA) situated between Lake Okeechobee and the Everglades. Between 1979 and 1988, approximately 220 tons of phosphorus was discharged annually into the Everglades water conservation area from the EAA. This article examines reconstructed wetlands as an effective management strategy for restoring and protecting Florida's Everglades from phosphorus overenrichment caused by agricultural storm-water runoff. A recently completed 4,000 acre project--the largest of its kind so far--could serve as the model for a much larger system, provided political, financial and legal obstacles stalling the Everglades Protection Project can be resolved.

  12. Relativistic linear restoring force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, D.; Franklin, J.; Mann, N.

    2012-09-01

    We consider two different forms for a relativistic version of a linear restoring force. The pair comes from taking Hooke’s law to be the force appearing on the right-hand side of the relativistic expressions: dp/dt or dp/dτ. Either formulation recovers Hooke’s law in the non-relativistic limit. In addition to these two forces, we introduce a form of retardation appropriate for the description of a linear (in displacement) force arising from the interaction of a pair of particles with a relativistic field. The procedure is akin to replacing Coulomb’s law in electromagnetism with a retarded form (the first correction in the full relativistic case). This retardation leads to the expected oscillation, but with amplitude growth in both its relativistic and non-relativistic incarnations.

  13. Orthodontic-surgical-endodontic management of unerupted maxillary central incisor with distoangular root dilaceration.

    PubMed

    Valladares Neto, José; de Pinho Costa, Sérgio; Estrela, Carlos

    2010-04-01

    Root dilaceration refers to a dental anomaly characterized by an abrupt deviation in the longitudinal axis of the tooth. It can be localized in the crown, between the crown and the root, or, most frequently, in the root. This report describes a horizontally unerupted maxillary central incisor with distoangular root dilacerations most likely caused by a traumatic dental injury to its primary predecessor. Surgical-orthodontic traction was applied after the redistribution of the space in the anterior maxillary region. Root dilaceration of the tractioned tooth was evident and did not allow the alignment of the tooth into proper position in the dental arch. Root canal filling and apicoectomy were performed. This procedure restored the normal appearance of the anterior maxillary teeth. Long-term follow-up (8 years) by periapical radiography indicated stable periodontal health without the presence of root resorption. Copyright (c) 2010 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Proton efflux from corn roots induced by tripropyltin

    SciTech Connect

    Chastain, C.J.; Hanson, J.B.

    1981-10-01

    Tripropyltin restores medium acidification by washed corn root tissue in which electrogenic H/sup +/ efflux has been blocked by ATPase inhibitors or injury. However, the restore H/sup +/ efflux is not electrogenic and will not drive K/sup +/ influx, and, by itself, tripropyltin is inhibitory to K/sup +/ influx. Tripropyltin elicits a 5-fold increase in endogenous chloride efflux, and Cl/sup -//OH/sup -/ exchange can, thus, account for the observed acidification of the medium. This explanation cannot be applied equally to the acidification produced by the K/sup +//H/sup +/ exchanging ionophore nigericin.

  15. 15 CFR 990.56 - Restoration selection-use of a Regional Restoration Plan or existing restoration project.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Restoration selection-use of a..., DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE OIL POLLUTION ACT REGULATIONS NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS Restoration Planning Phase § 990.56 Restoration selection—use of a Regional Restoration Plan or existing restoration...

  16. Economic strategies of plant absorptive roots vary with root diameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, D. L.; Wang, J. J.; Kardol, P.; Wu, H. F.; Zeng, H.; Deng, X. B.; Deng, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Plant roots typically vary along a dominant ecological axis, the root economics spectrum, depicting a tradeoff between resource acquisition and conservation. For absorptive roots, which are mainly responsible for resource acquisition, we hypothesized that root economic strategies differ with increasing root diameter. To test this hypothesis, we used seven plant species (a fern, a conifer, and five angiosperms from south China) for which we separated absorptive roots into two categories: thin roots (thickness of root cortex plus epidermis < 247 µm) and thick roots. For each category, we analyzed a range of root traits related to resource acquisition and conservation, including root tissue density, different carbon (C), and nitrogen (N) fractions (i.e., extractive, acid-soluble, and acid-insoluble fractions) as well as root anatomical traits. The results showed significant relationships among root traits indicating an acquisition-conservation tradeoff for thin absorptive roots while no such trait relationships were found for thick absorptive roots. Similar results were found when reanalyzing data of a previous study including 96 plant species. The contrasting economic strategies between thin and thick absorptive roots, as revealed here, may provide a new perspective on our understanding of the root economics spectrum.

  17. Quantitative measurements of root water uptake and root hydraulic conductivities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarebanadkouki, Mohsen; Javaux, Mathieu; Meunier, Felicien; Couvreur, Valentin; Carminati, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    How is root water uptake distributed along the root system and what root properties control this distribution? Here we present a method to: 1) measure root water uptake and 2) inversely estimate the root hydraulic conductivities. The experimental method consists in using neutron radiography to trace deuterated water (D2O) in soil and roots. The method was applied to lupines grown aluminium containers filled with a sandy soil. When the lupines were 4 weeks old, D2O was locally injected in a selected soil regions and its transport was monitored in soil and roots using time-series neutron radiography. By image processing, we quantified the concentration of D2O in soil and roots. We simulated the transport of D2O into roots using a diffusion-convection numerical model. The diffusivity of the roots tissue was inversely estimated by simulating the transport of D2O into the roots during night. The convective fluxes (i.e. root water uptake) were inversely estimating by fitting the experiments during day, when plants were transpiring, and assuming that root diffusivity did not change. The results showed that root water uptake was not uniform along the roots. Water uptake was higher at the proximal parts of the lateral roots and it decreased by a factor of 10 towards the distal parts. We used the data of water fluxes to inversely estimate the profile of hydraulic conductivities along the roots of transpiring plants growing in soil. The water fluxes in the lupine roots were simulated using the Hydraulic Tree Model by Doussan et al. (1998). The fitting parameters to be adjusted were the radial and axial hydraulic conductivities of the roots. The results showed that by using the root architectural model of Doussan et al. (1998) and detailed information of water fluxes into different root segments we could estimate the profile of hydraulic conductivities along the roots. We also found that: 1) in a tap-rooted plant like lupine water is mostly taken up by lateral roots; (2) water

  18. Quantitative microleakage of some dentinal bonding restorative systems.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, T; Retief, D H

    1993-03-01

    The quantitative microleakage of class V cementum (dentin) cavities restored with six dentinal bonding restorative systems was determined in vitro. Ninety extracted human permanent first and second mandibular and maxillary premolars were used in this study. Class V preparations were made in cementum (dentin) at the root facial surfaces. The preparations were restored with 1) a dentin bonding system containing 2% HEMA and BisGMA and a light-cured microfilled composite; 2) the same materials only substituting META/MMA base and TBB catalyst monomers for the BisGMA sealer; 3) a dentin bonding system containing 35% HEMA with META/MMA base and TBB catalyst, and a light-cured hybrid composite; 5) the same dentin bonding system only substituting the 35% glycerylmethacrylate for the 35% HEMA and using the microfilled composite; and 6) the previously described system with a substitution of 0.5 mol EDTA for the 10% citric acid -3% FeCl3. Fifteen teeth were restored with each procedure. The restorations were finished with 12-bladed carbide burs 15 min after placement, the teeth were stored in saline at 37 degrees C for 24 h, finished with Sof-Lex discs and then thermocycled in 2% methylene blue solution 500 times between 50 degrees C and 8 degrees C with a dwell time of 15 s. Quantitative microleakage was determined by a spectrophotometric dye-recovery method and expressed in microgram/dye/restoration. The data were analyzed by ANOVA, Student-Newman-Keuls and Kruskal-Wallis tests. The quantitative microleakage of the teeth restored with the adhesive systems containing 35% glyceryl methacrylate was significantly reduced. The bonding mechanism of glyceryl methacrylate is not known.

  19. An in vitro Evaluation of Fracture Resistance of endodontically treated Teeth with Different Restorative Materials.

    PubMed

    Sangwan, Babita; Rishi, Rahul; Seal, Mukut; Jain, Kanav; Dutt, Pranjali; Talukdar, Pratim

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the present study is to compare and assess the fracture resistance of root canal treated teeth with different restorative materials. The present in vitro study was carried out on seventy-five freshly extracted, noncarious, single-canal human lower-first premolars with similar anatomic characteristics. Teeth were randomly assigned to five groups with 15 teeth being present in each group. Group I is control group (no alteration done), group II is restored with silver amalgam after endodontic therapy, group III is restored with posterior composite after end-odontic therapy, group IV is restored with posterior glass ionomer cement (GIC) after endodontic therapy, and group V is restored with miracle mix after endodontic therapy. Universal testing machine was used to assess the fracture strength. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) test followed by Tukey's post hoc test were used to determine the significant difference between each group. A p-value of < 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. The mean fracture resistance of control group showed highest fracture resistance with a mean Newton of 1083.33 ± 136.78. Among the restorative material, the highest fracture resistance was shown by teeth restored by composite (845.46 ± 47.36), followed by silver amalgam (845.46 ± 47.36). There was statistically significant difference among all the restorative materials compared with the control group (p < 0.05). However, among the teeth restored with silver amalgam and miracle mix, there was no statistical significance (p > 0.05). The present study concludes that composites are found to be having more fracture resistance followed by silver amalgam on endodontically treated premolar teeth. Restoring nonvital teeth represents a major challenge for clinicians as they are extensively damaged due to caries and endodontic access preparations. With various restorative materials in the market, it becomes difficult for the clinician to choose the better restorative material

  20. Survey on restoration of endodontically treated anterior teeth: a questionnaire based study.

    PubMed

    Ratnakar, P; Bhosgi, Rashmi; Metta, Kiran Kumar; Aggarwal, Kanika; Vinuta, S; Singh, Navneet

    2014-01-01

    The aim of endodontic and restorative dentistry is the conservation of natural tooth structure. Endodontically treated tooth (ETT) undergoes loss of tooth structure and changes in physical characteristics. Therefore, proper selection of restoration for ETT is mandatory. The clinical approach of restoring ETT needs taking into considerations several issues. However, the best way to restore teeth after root canal treatment has long been and still a controversial subject to debate. Therefore, this study was carried out to detect the frequency of preferred methods of restoring ETT under different conditions. A questionnaire was framed and distributed among prosthodontists, endodontist and general practitioners of north India region to find out the frequency of best suitable material and method regarding restoration of ETT. 220 questionnaires were sent by electronic mail out of which 110 were received back. The questionnaire contained different methods of restoration of endodontically treated anterior teeth at different conditions (percentages) of remaining sound tooth structure. Respondents were asked to indicate their preferred method of restoration of those teeth. Results showed that majority of respondents (51.82%) preferred to restore the tooth only with a tooth-color restorative material in condition A. In condition B, majority of respondents preferred to use tooth colored crown (44.55%) and prefabricated post and tooth colored restoration (24.5%). Whereas in condition C, most of the respondents preferred to use a cast post and core/crown (80.91%). From the findings of the present study, it can be concluded that the unrestored ETT is susceptible to fracture, which could lead to loss of tooth and that the maximum preservation of healthy tooth structure and use of restorative materials with mechanical properties similar to dental structure favor greater longevity of tooth restoration complex.

  1. Auxin and Ethylene Response Interactions during Arabidopsis Root Hair Development Dissected by Auxin Influx Modulators

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Abidur; Hosokawa, Satoko; Oono, Yutaka; Amakawa, Taisaku; Goto, Nobuharu; Tsurumi, Seiji

    2002-01-01

    The plant hormones auxin and ethylene have been shown to play important roles during root hair development. However, cross talk between auxin and ethylene makes it difficult to understand the independent role of either hormone. To dissect their respective roles, we examined the effects of two compounds, chromosaponin I (CSI) and 1-naphthoxyacetic acid (1-NOA), on the root hair developmental process in wild-type Arabidopsis, ethylene-insensitive mutant ein2-1, and auxin influx mutants aux1-7, aux1-22, and double mutant aux1-7 ein2. β-Glucuronidase (GUS) expression analysis in the BA-GUS transgenic line, consisting of auxin-responsive domains of PS-IAA4/5 promoter and GUS reporter, revealed that 1-NOA and CSI act as auxin uptake inhibitors in Arabidopsis roots. The frequency of root hairs in ein2-1 roots was greatly reduced in the presence of CSI or 1-NOA, suggesting that endogenous auxin plays a critical role for the root hair initiation in the absence of an ethylene response. All of these mutants showed a reduction in root hair length, however, the root hair length could be restored with a variable concentration of 1-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA). NAA (10 nm) restored the root hair length of aux1 mutants to wild-type level, whereas 100 nm NAA was needed for ein2-1 and aux1-7 ein2 mutants. Our results suggest that insensitivity in ethylene response affects the auxin-driven root hair elongation. CSI exhibited a similar effect to 1-NOA, reducing root hair growth and the number of root hair-bearing cells in wild-type and ein2-1 roots, while stimulating these traits in aux1-7and aux1-7ein2 roots, confirming that CSI is a unique modulator of AUX1. PMID:12481073

  2. Auxin and ethylene response interactions during Arabidopsis root hair development dissected by auxin influx modulators.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Abidur; Hosokawa, Satoko; Oono, Yutaka; Amakawa, Taisaku; Goto, Nobuharu; Tsurumi, Seiji

    2002-12-01

    The plant hormones auxin and ethylene have been shown to play important roles during root hair development. However, cross talk between auxin and ethylene makes it difficult to understand the independent role of either hormone. To dissect their respective roles, we examined the effects of two compounds, chromosaponin I (CSI) and 1-naphthoxyacetic acid (1-NOA), on the root hair developmental process in wild-type Arabidopsis, ethylene-insensitive mutant ein2-1, and auxin influx mutants aux1-7, aux1-22, and double mutant aux1-7 ein2. Beta-glucuronidase (GUS) expression analysis in the BA-GUS transgenic line, consisting of auxin-responsive domains of PS-IAA4/5 promoter and GUS reporter, revealed that 1-NOA and CSI act as auxin uptake inhibitors in Arabidopsis roots. The frequency of root hairs in ein2-1 roots was greatly reduced in the presence of CSI or 1-NOA, suggesting that endogenous auxin plays a critical role for the root hair initiation in the absence of an ethylene response. All of these mutants showed a reduction in root hair length, however, the root hair length could be restored with a variable concentration of 1-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA). NAA (10 nM) restored the root hair length of aux1 mutants to wild-type level, whereas 100 nM NAA was needed for ein2-1 and aux1-7 ein2 mutants. Our results suggest that insensitivity in ethylene response affects the auxin-driven root hair elongation. CSI exhibited a similar effect to 1-NOA, reducing root hair growth and the number of root hair-bearing cells in wild-type and ein2-1 roots, while stimulating these traits in aux1-7and aux1-7ein2 roots, confirming that CSI is a unique modulator of AUX1.

  3. Modulatory effects of Cissus quadrangularis on periodontal regeneration by bovine-derived hydroxyapatite in intrabony defects: exploratory clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Jain, Anurag; Dixit, Jaya; Prakash, Dhan

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of the present study was to clinically evaluate the efficacy of bovine-derived hydroxyapatite (HA) combined with Cissus quadrangularis (CQ), as compared to bovine-derived hydroxyapatite alone in the treatment of intrabony defects. Twenty patients with one intrabony defect each were selected for this study. After scaling and root planing, twenty sites were randomly selected to receive either a combination of bovine-derived HA and CQ (test group) or bovine-derived HA alone (control group). Baseline and 6-month surgical reentry measurements were taken and appropriate statistical analysis was performed. Favorable clinical results for both hard and soft tissue measurements were obtained for both groups when compared to baseline (p < 0.001), but there was no statistically significant difference for any of the measured clinical parameters between the two groups. The mean bone fill and percentage bone fill for bovine-derived HA was 2.7 +/- 0.82 mm and 63.2 +/- 17.8%, whereas for composite graft material it was 3.3 +/- 0.82 mm and 69.8 +/- 14.2%. Although composite graft material has shown a trend towards better performance, no statistically significant intergroup difference was found. Further studies are needed to establish CQ as a modulator in periodontal regenerative therapy.

  4. A Restorative Approach to Postvention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schubert, Judith

    2007-01-01

    Restorative principles are at the core of effective response to crisis situations. The goal of these interventions is to repair hurt and rebuild trust between persons and within the community. Restorative practices can be implemented in a wide variety of settings, offering an opportunity for healing to take place in a way which benefits not only…

  5. Public Attitudes Toward Ecological Restoration

    Treesearch

    Alan D. Bright; Susan C. Barro; Randall T. Burtz

    2002-01-01

    We examined the relationship between attitudes toward urban ecological restoration and cognitive (perceived outcomes, value orientation, and objective knowledge), affective (emotional responses), and behavioral factors using residents of the Chicago Metropolitan Region. Positive and negative attitudes were both related to perceived outcomes of ecological restoration....

  6. Forest restoration is forward thinking

    Treesearch

    R. Kasten Dumroese; Brian J. Palik; John A. Stanturf

    2015-01-01

    It is not surprising to us that the topic of forest restoration is being discussed in the Journal of Forestry. It is a topic frequently bantered about in the literature; a quick search in Google Scholar for "forest restoration" generates more than 1 million hits. A significant portion of the debate centers on the search for succinct, holistic, universally...

  7. Restorative Nurse Assistant. Instructor Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This curriculum material covers the basic orientation and necessary skills which would enable the practicing Certified Nurse Assistant to be trained as a Restorative Nurse Assistant. The shift in emphasis from maintenance care to restorative care in the long-term care setting has created a need for trained paraprofessionals who are competent in…

  8. Prescribed burning for understory restoration

    Treesearch

    Kenneth W. Outcalt

    2006-01-01

    Because the longleaf ecosystem evolved with and is adapted to frequent fire, every 2 to 8 years, prescribed burning is often useful for restoring understory communities to a diverse ground layer of grasses, herbs, and small shrubs. This restoration provides habitat for a number of plant and animal species that are restricted to or found mostly in longleaf pine...

  9. Restorative Nurse Assistant. Instructor Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This curriculum material covers the basic orientation and necessary skills which would enable the practicing Certified Nurse Assistant to be trained as a Restorative Nurse Assistant. The shift in emphasis from maintenance care to restorative care in the long-term care setting has created a need for trained paraprofessionals who are competent in…

  10. Root lattices and quasicrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baake, M.; Joseph, D.; Kramer, P.; Schlottmann, M.

    1990-10-01

    It is shown that root lattices and their reciprocals might serve as the right pool for the construction of quasicrystalline structure models. All noncrystallographic symmetries observed so far are covered in minimal embedding with maximal symmetry.

  11. Root lattices and quasicrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baake, M.; Joseph, D.; Kramer, P.; Schlottmann, M.

    1990-10-01

    It is shown how root lattices and their reciprocals might serve as the right pool for the construction of quasicrystalline structure models. All non-periodic symmetries observed so far are covered in minimal embedding with maximal symmetry.

  12. Grass Rooting the System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perlman, Janice E.

    1976-01-01

    Suggests a taxonomy of the grass roots movement and gives a general descriptive over view of the 60 groups studied with respect to origin, constituency, size, funding, issues, and ideology. (Author/AM)

  13. Rooting of carnation cuttings

    PubMed Central

    Oliveros-Valenzuela, M Rocío; Nicolás, Carlos; Sánchez-Bravo, José

    2009-01-01

    The rooting of stem cuttings is a common vegetative propagation practice in many ornamental species. Among other signals, auxin polarly transported through the stem plays a key role in the formation and growth of adventitious roots. Unlike in other plant species, auxin from mature leaves plays a decisive role in the rooting of carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus. L) cuttings. The gene DcAUX1, which codifies an auxin influx carrier involved in polar auxin transport, has now been cloned and characterized in carnation. The expression pattern of this gene was seen to depend on the organ, the cultivar and the time of cold storage. The variations observed in its expression could be related with the rooting ability of different carnation cultivars. PMID:19721760

  14. Activation of bovine neutrophils by Brucella spp.

    PubMed

    Keleher, Lauren L; Skyberg, Jerod A

    2016-09-01

    Brucellosis is a globally important zoonotic infectious disease caused by gram negative bacteria of the genus Brucella. While many species of Brucella exist, Brucella melitensis, Brucella abortus, and Brucella suis are the most common pathogens of humans and livestock. The virulence of Brucella is largely influenced by its ability to evade host factors, including phagocytic killing mechanisms, which are critical for the host response to infection. The aim of this study was to characterize the bovine neutrophil response to virulent Brucella spp. Here, we found that virulent strains of smooth B. abortus, B. melitensis, B. suis, and virulent, rough, strains of Brucella canis possess similar abilities to resist killing by resting, or IFN-γ-activated, bovine neutrophils. Bovine neutrophils responded to infection with a time-dependent oxidative burst that varied little between Brucella spp. Inhibition of TAK1, or SYK kinase blunted the oxidative burst of neutrophils in response to Brucella infection. Interestingly, Brucella spp. did not induce robust death of bovine neutrophils. These results indicate that bovine neutrophils respond similarly to virulent Brucella spp. In addition, virulent Brucella spp., including naturally rough strains of B. canis, have a conserved ability to resist killing by bovine neutrophils. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Influence of blood contamination before or after surface treatment on adhesion of 4-META/MMA-TBB resin to root dentin.

    PubMed

    Takefu, Hiroe; Shimoji, Shinji; Sugaya, Tsutomu; Kawanami, Masamitsu

    2012-02-03

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of blood contamination before or after surface treatment on adhesion of 4-META/MMA-TBB resin. After bovine root dentin surfaces were contaminated with blood before or after dentin surface treatment with 10-3 solution, the contaminated surface was rinsed with water, air-dried, or re-treated with 10-3 solution. Dye leakage and microtensile bond strength (MTBS) of 4-META/MMA-TBB resin to dentin were measured after storage in water for 24 h. When blood contamination occurred before surface treatment, there was no significant difference in the leakage value and MTBS as compared with that of the uncontaminated group. When blood contamination occurred after surface treatment, the leakage value increased and MTBS significantly decreased (p<0.05) even if the blood was washed away. However, when the surface was re-treated with 10-3 solution after rinsing with water, the leakage value and MTBS were restored to those of the uncontaminated group.

  16. Valve sparing: aortic root replacement with the reimplantation technique.

    PubMed

    Mastrobuoni, Stefano; Tamer, Sadallah; de Kerchove, Laurent; El Khoury, Gebrine

    2015-01-01

    Aortic valve-sparing procedures are alternative options to aortic valve replacement in patients with aortic root aneurysm and/or severe aortic regurgitation reducing the risk of prosthesis-related complications, such as thromboembolism, and have no need for long-term oral anticoagulation. However, these techniques are technically demanding and long-term results are highly dependent on perfect intraoperative restoration of valve function. We describe a systematic approach to aortic valve-sparing aortic root replacement with the reimplantation technique the way it is currently performed in our institution.

  17. [Clinical application of optimal designed Upcera super transparent zirconia all-ceramic restorations].

    PubMed

    Ding, Chen; Yu, Qing; Jing, Jian-long; Liu, Zheng-ming

    2013-10-01

    To summarize the clinical application of special designed Upcera ST zirconia all-ceramic restorations in cases with limited occlusal space. Twenty-one patients with 23-unit restorations were enrolled in this study. First, the shape of abutment teeth and diagnostic wax-up were captured and digitized by Sirona inEos system. Then, each individually shaped framework to grant a defined ST zirconia base core was created by the reduced program of inLab software. Finally, all restorations were veneered with VITA VM9 and evaluated at placement using modified U.S.Public Health Service Criteria 6 to 12 months after restoration. Patients were inquired with satisfaction questionnaire at the same time. During 6 to 12 months of follow-up visit, except for one of 23 restorations was rated as failure by fractured root, none was replaced due to framework fracture or unrestorable delamination of the ceramic veneer. The shape and colour of all restorations were satisfactory. To ensure optimum long-term clinical results of all-ceramic crown restorations, one important key is to overcome the fragmentation of dental prosthesis through modifying the shape of restoration. Based on the results of this study, the specially designed processing technology shows sufficient stability for ST zirconia all-ceramic restorations within a short term, which is deserved to be used in selected cases.

  18. Mandibular first molar with six root canals: a rare entity

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Muhammad; Rahman, Munawar; Saad, Najeeb

    2014-01-01

    Recently, there has been an ongoing trend of case reports that highlight the presence of more than four root canals in mandibular first molars. This tendency warns clinicians to be more prudent when dealing with mandibular first molars requiring endodontic treatment. Moreover, radiographic examination should be taken as a clue providing tool rather than as an absolute guide to anatomy and its associated aberrances. This case reports the successful non-surgical endodontic management of a mandibular first molar with six root canal systems with three canals in the mesial root and three in the distal root. The classification of root canal systems found in this case was Sert and Bayirli type XV in both the roots. After non-surgical endodontic treatment, the tooth was restored definitively with a resin composite core followed by porcelain fused to the metal crown. This case adds to the library of previously reported cases of mandibular first molars with six root canals and further emphasises on the importance of rare morphological deviations that may occur in the mandibular first molars. PMID:25082869

  19. Relationships between root diameter, root length and root branching along lateral roots in adult, field-grown maize.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qian; Pagès, Loïc; Wu, Jie

    2016-03-01

    Root diameter, especially apical diameter, plays an important role in root development and function. The variation in diameter between roots, and along roots, affects root structure and thus the root system's overall foraging performance. However, the effect of diameter variation on root elongation, branching and topological connections has not been examined systematically in a population of high-order roots, nor along the roots, especially for mature plants grown in the field. A method combining both excavation and analysis was applied to extract and quantify root architectural traits of adult, field-grown maize plants. The relationships between root diameter and other root architectural characteristics are analysed for two maize cultivars. The basal diameter of the lateral roots (orders 1-3) was highly variable. Basal diameter was partly determined by the diameter of the bearing segment. Basal diameter defined a potential root length, but the lengths of most roots fell far short of this. This was explained partly by differences in the pattern of diameter change along roots. Diameter tended to decrease along most roots, with the steepness of the gradient of decrease depending on basal diameter. The longest roots were those that maintained (or sometimes increased) their diameters during elongation. The branching density (cm(-1)) of laterals was also determined by the diameter of the bearing segment. However, the location of this bearing segment along the mother root was also involved - intermediate positions were associated with higher densities of laterals. The method used here allows us to obtain very detailed records of the geometry and topology of a complex root system. Basal diameter and the pattern of diameter change along a root were associated with its final length. These relationships are especially useful in simulations of root elongation and branching in source-sink models. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals

  20. Relationships between root diameter, root length and root branching along lateral roots in adult, field-grown maize

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qian; Pagès, Loïc; Wu, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Root diameter, especially apical diameter, plays an important role in root development and function. The variation in diameter between roots, and along roots, affects root structure and thus the root system’s overall foraging performance. However, the effect of diameter variation on root elongation, branching and topological connections has not been examined systematically in a population of high-order roots, nor along the roots, especially for mature plants grown in the field. Methods A method combining both excavation and analysis was applied to extract and quantify root architectural traits of adult, field-grown maize plants. The relationships between root diameter and other root architectural characteristics are analysed for two maize cultivars. Key Results The basal diameter of the lateral roots (orders 1–3) was highly variable. Basal diameter was partly determined by the diameter of the bearing segment. Basal diameter defined a potential root length, but the lengths of most roots fell far short of this. This was explained partly by differences in the pattern of diameter change along roots. Diameter tended to decrease along most roots, with the steepness of the gradient of decrease depending on basal diameter. The longest roots were those that maintained (or sometimes increased) their diameters during elongation. The branching density (cm–1) of laterals was also determined by the diameter of the bearing segment. However, the location of this bearing segment along the mother root was also involved – intermediate positions were associated with higher densities of laterals. Conclusions The method used here allows us to obtain very detailed records of the geometry and topology of a complex root system. Basal diameter and the pattern of diameter change along a root were associated with its final length. These relationships are especially useful in simulations of root elongation and branching in source–sink models. PMID:26744490

  1. Anti-Bovine Programmed Death-1 Rat–Bovine Chimeric Antibody for Immunotherapy of Bovine Leukemia Virus Infection in Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Okagawa, Tomohiro; Konnai, Satoru; Nishimori, Asami; Maekawa, Naoya; Ikebuchi, Ryoyo; Goto, Shinya; Nakajima, Chie; Kohara, Junko; Ogasawara, Satoshi; Kato, Yukinari; Suzuki, Yasuhiko; Murata, Shiro; Ohashi, Kazuhiko

    2017-01-01

    Blockade of immunoinhibitory molecules, such as programmed death-1 (PD-1)/PD-ligand 1 (PD-L1), is a promising strategy for reinvigorating exhausted T cells and preventing disease progression in a variety of chronic infections. Application of this therapeutic strategy to cattle requires bovinized chimeric antibody targeting immunoinhibitory molecules. In this study, anti-bovine PD-1 rat–bovine chimeric monoclonal antibody 5D2 (Boch5D2) was constructed with mammalian expression systems, and its biochemical function and antiviral effect were characterized in vitro and in vivo using cattle infected with bovine leukemia virus (BLV). Purified Boch5D2 was capable of detecting bovine PD-1 molecules expressed on cell membranes in flow cytometric analysis. In particular, Biacore analysis determined that the binding affinity of Boch5D2 to bovine PD-1 protein was similar to that of the original anti-bovine PD-1 rat monoclonal antibody 5D2. Boch5D2 was also capable of blocking PD-1/PD-L1 binding at the same level as 5D2. The immunomodulatory and therapeutic effects of Boch5D2 were evaluated by in vivo administration of the antibody to a BLV-infected calf. Inoculated Boch5D2 was sustained in the serum for a longer period. Boch5D2 inoculation resulted in activation of the proliferation of BLV-specific CD4+ T cells and decrease in the proviral load of BLV in the peripheral blood. This study demonstrates that Boch5D2 retains an equivalent biochemical function to that of the original antibody 5D2 and is a candidate therapeutic agent for regulating antiviral immune response in vivo. Clinical efficacy of PD-1/PD-L1 blockade awaits further experimentation with a large number of animals. PMID:28638381

  2. Anti-Bovine Programmed Death-1 Rat-Bovine Chimeric Antibody for Immunotherapy of Bovine Leukemia Virus Infection in Cattle.

    PubMed

    Okagawa, Tomohiro; Konnai, Satoru; Nishimori, Asami; Maekawa, Naoya; Ikebuchi, Ryoyo; Goto, Shinya; Nakajima, Chie; Kohara, Junko; Ogasawara, Satoshi; Kato, Yukinari; Suzuki, Yasuhiko; Murata, Shiro; Ohashi, Kazuhiko

    2017-01-01

    Blockade of immunoinhibitory molecules, such as programmed death-1 (PD-1)/PD-ligand 1 (PD-L1), is a promising strategy for reinvigorating exhausted T cells and preventing disease progression in a variety of chronic infections. Application of this therapeutic strategy to cattle requires bovinized chimeric antibody targeting immunoinhibitory molecules. In this study, anti-bovine PD-1 rat-bovine chimeric monoclonal antibody 5D2 (Boch5D2) was constructed with mammalian expression systems, and its biochemical function and antiviral effect were characterized in vitro and in vivo using cattle infected with bovine leukemia virus (BLV). Purified Boch5D2 was capable of detecting bovine PD-1 molecules expressed on cell membranes in flow cytometric analysis. In particular, Biacore analysis determined that the binding affinity of Boch5D2 to bovine PD-1 protein was similar to that of the original anti-bovine PD-1 rat monoclonal antibody 5D2. Boch5D2 was also capable of blocking PD-1/PD-L1 binding at the same level as 5D2. The immunomodulatory and therapeutic effects of Boch5D2 were evaluated by in vivo administration of the antibody to a BLV-infected calf. Inoculated Boch5D2 was sustained in the serum for a longer period. Boch5D2 inoculation resulted in activation of the proliferation of BLV-specific CD4(+) T cells and decrease in the proviral load of BLV in the peripheral blood. This study demonstrates that Boch5D2 retains an equivalent biochemical function to that of the original antibody 5D2 and is a candidate therapeutic agent for regulating antiviral immune response in vivo. Clinical efficacy of PD-1/PD-L1 blockade awaits further experimentation with a large number of animals.

  3. Stem cell research: a novel boulevard towards improved bovine mastitis management.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Neelesh; Jeong, Dong Kee

    2013-01-01

    The dairy industry is a multi-billion dollar industry catering the nutritional needs of all age groups globally through the supply of milk. Clinical mastitis has a severe impact on udder tissue and is also an animal welfare issue. Moreover, it significantly reduces animal value and milk production. Mammary tissue damage reduces the number and activity of epithelial cells and consequently contributes to decreased milk production. The high incidence, low cure rate of this highly economic and sometimes deadly disease is an alarming for dairy sector as well as policy makers. Bovine mammary epithelial cells (MECs) and their stem cells are very important in milk production and bioengineering. The adult mammary epithelium consists of two main cell types; an inner layer of luminal epithelial cells, which produce the milk during lactation, and an outer layer of myoepithelial cells resting on a basement membrane, which are responsible for pushing the milk through the ductal network to the teat cistern. Inner layer of columner/luminal cells of bovine MECs, is characterized by cytokeratin18, 19 (CK18, CK19) and outer layer such as myoepithelial cells which are characterized by CK14, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and p63. Much work has been done in mouse and human, on mammary gland stem cell research, particularly in cancer therapy, but stem cell research in bovine is still in its infancy. Such stem/progenitor cell discoveries in human and mouse mammary gland bring some hope for application in bovines. These progenitors may be therapeutically adopted to correct the structural/cytological defects in the bovine udder due to mastitis. In the present review we focused on various kinds of stem/progenitor cells which can have therapeutic utility and their possibilities to use as a potential stem cell therapy in the management of bovine post-mastitis damage in orders to restore milk production. The possibilities of bovine mammary stem cell therapy offers significant potential for

  4. Stem Cell Research: A Novel Boulevard towards Improved Bovine Mastitis Management

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Neelesh; Jeong, Dong Kee

    2013-01-01

    The dairy industry is a multi-billion dollar industry catering the nutritional needs of all age groups globally through the supply of milk. Clinical mastitis has a severe impact on udder tissue and is also an animal welfare issue. Moreover, it significantly reduces animal value and milk production. Mammary tissue damage reduces the number and activity of epithelial cells and consequently contributes to decreased milk production. The high incidence, low cure rate of this highly economic and sometimes deadly disease is an alarming for dairy sector as well as policy makers. Bovine mammary epithelial cells (MECs) and their stem cells are very important in milk production and bioengineering. The adult mammary epithelium consists of two main cell types; an inner layer of luminal epithelial cells, which produce the milk during lactation, and an outer layer of myoepithelial cells resting on a basement membrane, which are responsible for pushing the milk through the ductal network to the teat cistern. Inner layer of columner/luminal cells of bovine MECs, is characterized by cytokeratin18, 19 (CK18, CK19) and outer layer such as myoepithelial cells which are characterized by CK14, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and p63. Much work has been done in mouse and human, on mammary gland stem cell research, particularly in cancer therapy, but stem cell research in bovine is still in its infancy. Such stem/progenitor cell discoveries in human and mouse mammary gland bring some hope for application in bovines. These progenitors may be therapeutically adopted to correct the structural/cytological defects in the bovine udder due to mastitis. In the present review we focused on various kinds of stem/progenitor cells which can have therapeutic utility and their possibilities to use as a potential stem cell therapy in the management of bovine post-mastitis damage in orders to restore milk production. The possibilities of bovine mammary stem cell therapy offers significant potential for

  5. Bovine viral diarrhea virus: involvement in bovine respiratory disease and diagnostic challenges

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This paper reviews the contribution of bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDV) to the development of Bovine Respiratory Disease (BRD). Veterinarians and producers generally consider BRD as one of the most significant diseases affecting production in the cattle industry. BRD can affect the performance (...

  6. Antimicrobial activity of bovine NK-lysin-derived peptides on bovine respiratory pathogen Histophilus somni

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bovine NK-lysins, which are functionally and structurally similar to human granulysin and porcine NK-lysin, are predominantly found in the granules of cytotoxic T-lymphocytes and NK-cells. Although antimicrobial activity of bovine NK-lysin has been assessed for several bacterial pathogens, not all t...

  7. The Hip Restoration Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Stubbs, Allston Julius; Atilla, Halis Atil

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Despite the rapid advancement of imaging and arthroscopic techniques about the hip joint, missed diagnoses are still common. As a deep joint and compared to the shoulder and knee joints, localization of hip symptoms is difficult. Hip pathology is not easily isolated and is often related to intra and extra-articular abnormalities. In light of these diagnostic challenges, we recommend an algorithmic approach to effectively diagnoses and treat hip pain. Methods In this review, hip pain is evaluated from diagnosis to treatment in a clear decision model. First we discuss emergency hip situations followed by the differentiation of intra and extra-articular causes of the hip pain. We differentiate the intra-articular hip as arthritic and non-arthritic and extra-articular pain as surrounding or remote tissue generated. Further, extra-articular hip pain is evaluated according to pain location. Finally we summarize the surgical treatment approach with an algorithmic diagram. Conclusion Diagnosis of hip pathology is difficult because the etiologies of pain may be various. An algorithmic approach to hip restoration from diagnosis to rehabilitation is crucial to successfully identify and manage hip pathologies. Level of evidence: V. PMID:28066734

  8. Multiple phytohormones promote root hair elongation by regulating a similar set of genes in the root epidermis in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shan; Huang, Linli; Yan, An; Liu, Yihua; Liu, Bohan; Yu, Chunyan; Zhang, Aidong; Schiefelbein, John; Gan, Yinbo

    2016-01-01

    Multiple phytohormones, including auxin, ethylene, and cytokinin, play vital roles in regulating cell development in the root epidermis. However, their interactions in specific root hair cell developmental stages are largely unexplored. To bridge this gap, we employed genetic and pharmacological approaches as well as transcriptional analysis in order to dissect their distinct and overlapping roles in root hair initiation and elongation in Arabidopsis thaliana. Our results show that among auxin, ethylene, and cytokinin, only ethylene induces ectopic root hair cells in wild-type plants, implying a special role of ethylene in the hair initiation stage. In the subsequent elongation stage, however, auxin, ethylene, and cytokinin enhance root hair tip growth equally. Our data also suggest that the effect of cytokinin is independent from auxin and ethylene in this process. Exogenous cytokinin restores root hair elongation when the auxin and ethylene signal is defective, whereas auxin and ethylene also sustain elongation in the absence of the cytokinin signal. Notably, transcriptional analyses demonstrated that auxin, ethylene, and cytokinin regulate a similar set of root hair-specific genes. Together these analyses provide important clues regarding the mechanism of hormonal interactions and regulation in the formation of single-cell structures. PMID:27799284

  9. Penetration of 38% hydrogen peroxide into the pulp chamber in bovine and human teeth submitted to office bleach technique.

    PubMed

    Camargo, Samira Esteves Afonso; Valera, Marcia Carneiro; Camargo, Carlos Henrique Ribeiro; Gasparoto Mancini, Maria Nadir; Menezes, Marcia Maciel

    2007-09-01

    This study evaluated the pulp chamber penetration of peroxide bleaching agent in human and bovine teeth after office bleach technique. All the teeth were sectioned 3 mm apical of the cement-enamel junction and were divided into 2 groups, A (70 third human molars) and B (70 bovine lateral incisors), that were subdivided into A1 and B1 restored by using composite resin, A2 and B2 by using glass ionomer cement, and A3 and B3 by using resin-modified glass ionomer cement; A4, A5, B4, and B5 were not restored. Acetate buffer was placed in the pulp chamber, and the bleaching agent was applied for 40 minutes as follows: A1-A4 and B1-B4, 38% hydrogen peroxide exposure and A5 and B5, immersion into distilled water. The buffer solution was transferred to a glass tube in which leuco crystal violet and horseradish peroxidase were added, producing a blue solution. The optical density of the blue solution was determined by spectrophotometer and converted into microgram equivalents of hydrogen peroxide. Data were submitted to analysis of variance and Dunnett, Kruskal-Wallis, and Tukey tests (5%). A higher level of hydrogen peroxide penetrated into the pulp chamber in resin-modified glass ionomer cements in bovine (0.79 +/- 0.61 microg) and human (2.27 +/- 0.41 microg) groups. The bleaching agent penetration into the pulp chamber was higher in human teeth for any experimental situation. The penetration of the hydrogen peroxide depends on restorative materials, and under the conditions of this study human teeth are more susceptible to penetration of bleaching agent into the pulp chamber than bovine teeth.

  10. Effect of disinfecting the cavity with chlorhexidine on the marginal gaps of Cl V giomer restorations

    PubMed Central

    Pournaghi-Azar, Fatemeh; Naser-Alavi, Fereshteh; Salari, Ashkan

    2017-01-01

    Background Considering the effect of cavity disinfecting agents on the bonding and sealing ability of restorations bonded to dentin, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of chlorhexidine (CHX) disinfecting agent on the marginal gaps of Cl V giomer restorations. Material and Methods Cl V cavities were prepared on the buccal surfaces of 60 sound bovine permanent incisors in this in vitro study, with the occlusal and gingival margins in enamel and dentin, respectively. The teeth were randomly divided into two groups (n=30). The teeth in groups 1 and 2 were restored without and with the use of the disinfecting agent in the cavity, respectively, before applying the adhesive. BeautiBond one-step self-etch adhesive and Beautifil II giomer were used to restore the cavities in both groups. After thermocycling and sectioning of the samples, the sizes of marginal gaps at gingival margins were measured in µm under a stereomicroscope. Mann-Whitney U test was used to compare marginal gaps at P<0.05 level of significance. Results The means of marginal gaps were significantly different between the two study groups (U=180, P<0.001), with higher means of marginal gaps in group 2 (with CHX disinfection) compared to group 1 (without CHX disinfection) (P<0.0005). Conclusions Application of CHX for the disinfection of cavities in giomer restorations resulted in an increase in gingival margin gaps. Key words:Chlorhexidine, dental marginal adaptation, dental restorations. PMID:28210436

  11. Effect of hemostatic agent on marginal gaps of class V giomer restorations.

    PubMed

    Kimyai, Soodabeh; Pournaghi-Azar, Fatemeh; Mohammadi, Narmin; Babri, Mahdieh

    2017-05-01

    Contamination of dentin with hemostatic agents might exert a deleterious effect on adhesive procedures on dentin. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of aluminum chloride hemostatic agent on marginal gaps in Cl V giomer restorations. Fifty sound bovine permanent incisors were selected for the purpose of this in vitro study and Cl V cavities were prepared on their buccal surfaces; the gingival margins of the cavities were placed in dentin. The tooth samples were randomly assigned to two groups (n=25). The samples in groups 1 and 2 underwent a restorative procedure without and with the application of aluminum chloride hemostatic agent in the cavity, respectively, before application of the adhesive. BeautiBond one-step self-etch adhesive and Beautifil II giomer restorative material were used for the restoration of the cavities in both groups. The samples were thermocycled and sectioned, followed by measuring the gap sizes at gingival margins in µm under a stereomicroscope. The marginal gaps were compared with Mann-Whitney U test. Statistical significance was set at P<0.05. The results showed significant differences in the mean marginal gaps between the two groups under study (P<0.001); the mean marginal gaps were higher in group 2 (with hemostatic agent) compared to those in group 1 (without hemostatic agent) (P<0.0005). Contamination with aluminum chloride hemostatic agent in giomer restorations gave rise to higher gingival margin gaps. Key words:Dental adhesives, giomer restorative material, hemostatic agent, marginal adaptation.

  12. Intraoral environment conditions and their influence on marginal leakage in composite resin restorations.

    PubMed

    Mathias, Paula; Rocha, Viviane; Saraiva, Letícia; Cavalcanti, Andrea N; Azevedo, Juliana F; Paulillo, Luís Alexandre M S

    2010-01-01

    Color matching in the anterior superior incisor region (ASIR) is very difficult when using a rubber dam during restorative procedures. This study measured temperature/relative humidity parameters in the ASIR and evaluated the influence of the inhalation/downtime/exhalation mouth-breathing cycle on microleakage in composite resin restorations performed in the region, using three different adhesive systems. Sixty bovine incisors were randomly assigned to six groups (n=10) according to environmental conditions (laboratory environment or intraoral conditions) and the three adhesive systems being tested (Prime & Bond NT (PB), Single Bond (SB) and Clearfil SE Bond (CL)). The composite resin restored specimens were thermocycled (800 cycles, 5-55 degrees C), immersed in a 2% methylene blue-buffered solution and sectioned longitudinally The dye penetration on the margin of the restoration was evaluated and non-parametric statistical analyses were performed. The temperature and humidity parameters in the ASIR showed significant differences when compared to the laboratory environment. Restorations performed in the ASIR environment showed no increases in microleakage. As it was shown that temperature/humidity in ASIR do not affect marginal sealing in direct composite resin restorations negatively, better color matching can be safely achieved without the use of a rubber dam.

  13. Root architecture simulation improves the inference from seedling root phenotyping towards mature root systems

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jiangsan; Rewald, Boris; Leitner, Daniel; Nagel, Kerstin A.; Nakhforoosh, Alireza

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Root phenotyping provides trait information for plant breeding. A shortcoming of high-throughput root phenotyping is the limitation to seedling plants and failure to make inferences on mature root systems. We suggest root system architecture (RSA) models to predict mature root traits and overcome the inference problem. Sixteen pea genotypes were phenotyped in (i) seedling (Petri dishes) and (ii) mature (sand-filled columns) root phenotyping platforms. The RSA model RootBox was parameterized with seedling traits to simulate the fully developed root systems. Measured and modelled root length, first-order lateral number, and root distribution were compared to determine key traits for model-based prediction. No direct relationship in root traits (tap, lateral length, interbranch distance) was evident between phenotyping systems. RootBox significantly improved the inference over phenotyping platforms. Seedling plant tap and lateral root elongation rates and interbranch distance were sufficient model parameters to predict genotype ranking in total root length with an RSpearman of 0.83. Parameterization including uneven lateral spacing via a scaling function substantially improved the prediction of architectures underlying the differently sized root systems. We conclude that RSA models can solve the inference problem of seedling root phenotyping. RSA models should be included in the phenotyping pipeline to provide reliable information on mature root systems to breeding research. PMID:28168270

  14. Root architecture simulation improves the inference from seedling root phenotyping towards mature root systems.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jiangsan; Bodner, Gernot; Rewald, Boris; Leitner, Daniel; Nagel, Kerstin A; Nakhforoosh, Alireza

    2017-02-01

    Root phenotyping provides trait information for plant breeding. A shortcoming of high-throughput root phenotyping is the limitation to seedling plants and failure to make inferences on mature root systems. We suggest root system architecture (RSA) models to predict mature root traits and overcome the inference problem. Sixteen pea genotypes were phenotyped in (i) seedling (Petri dishes) and (ii) mature (sand-filled columns) root phenotyping platforms. The RSA model RootBox was parameterized with seedling traits to simulate the fully developed root systems. Measured and modelled root length, first-order lateral number, and root distribution were compared to determine key traits for model-based prediction. No direct relationship in root traits (tap, lateral length, interbranch distance) was evident between phenotyping systems. RootBox significantly improved the inference over phenotyping platforms. Seedling plant tap and lateral root elongation rates and interbranch distance were sufficient model parameters to predict genotype ranking in total root length with an RSpearman of 0.83. Parameterization including uneven lateral spacing via a scaling function substantially improved the prediction of architectures underlying the differently sized root systems. We conclude that RSA models can solve the inference problem of seedling root phenotyping. RSA models should be included in the phenotyping pipeline to provide reliable information on mature root systems to breeding research. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  15. The "Green" Root Beer Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clary, Renee; Wandersee, James

    2010-01-01

    No, your students will not be drinking green root beer for St. Patrick's Day--this "green" root beer laboratory promotes environmental awareness in the science classroom, and provides a venue for some very sound science content! While many science classrooms incorporate root beer-brewing activities, the root beer lab presented in this article has…

  16. The "Green" Root Beer Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clary, Renee; Wandersee, James

    2010-01-01

    No, your students will not be drinking green root beer for St. Patrick's Day--this "green" root beer laboratory promotes environmental awareness in the science classroom, and provides a venue for some very sound science content! While many science classrooms incorporate root beer-brewing activities, the root beer lab presented in this article has…

  17. How roots respond to gravity.

    PubMed

    Evans, M L; Moore, R; Hasenstein, K H

    1986-12-01

    Current knowledge about the mechanisms of plant root response to gravity is reviewed. The roles of the columella region and amyloplasts in the root cap are examined. Results of experiments related to gravistimulation in corn roots with and without root caps are explained. The role of auxin, abscisic acid, and calcium also are examined.

  18. CRITERIA FOR PRIORITIZATION OF ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Prioritization of ecosystem restoration measures is important for state and federal agencies, watershed coalitions, science advisory boards and other groups responsible for decision-making regarding restoration activities. Although widely utilized, the term "restoration prioriti...

  19. CRITERIA FOR PRIORITIZATION OF ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Prioritization of ecosystem restoration measures is important for state and federal agencies, watershed coalitions, science advisory boards and other groups responsible for decision-making regarding restoration activities. Although widely utilized, the term "restoration prioriti...

  20. Vaccination against bovine respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Phillip, J I

    1975-01-01

    Vaccination is but one element in a control programme for bovine respiratory disease. Its laboratory study can be divorced from the others but its field application cannot. The problems associated with the development of effective vaccines fall into two broad groups: multiplicity and ubiquity of pathogens and secondly the identification of the crucial elements in an immune response. Agricultural systems which experience annual outbreaks of respiratory disease attributable to the same pathogen in cattle of specific age have the choice of using passive or active immunity of minimal valency. In the majority of systems the cause and timing of an outbreak cannot be predicted and therefore multivalent vaccines are required. Both inactivated and modified live products are available for use against the well-known pathogens. Their relative advantages hinge on the significance attributed to the ability to stimulate the production of particular immunoglobulins at specific body sites and the persistence of the responses. The widely held view that success requires the stimulation of secretory antibodies by intranasal administration of living vaccines is not universally accepted. An assessment of their protective value is not easily made because of the difficulty of reproducing an adequate field challenge in the laboratory. The measurement of serological responses and virus shedding times following challenge are of limited value as alternatives.

  1. Bovine acidosis: implications on laminitis.

    PubMed

    Nocek, J E

    1997-05-01

    Bovine lactic acidosis syndrome is associated with large increases of lactic acid in the rumen, which result from diets that are high in ruminally available carbohydrates, or forage that is low in effective fiber, or both. The syndrome involves two separate anatomical areas, the gastrointestinal tract and body fluids, and is related to the rate and extent of lactic acid production, utilization, and absorption. Clinical manifestations range from loss of appetite to death. Lactic acid accumulates in the rumen when the bacteria that synthesize lactic acid outnumber those that utilize lactic acid. The systemic impact of acidosis may have several physiological implications, including laminitis, a diffuse aseptic inflammation of the laminae (corium). Although a nutritional basis for the disease exists, etiology includes a multitude of interactive factors, such as metabolic and digestive disorders, postpartum stress, and localized trauma, which lead to the release of vasoactive substances that trigger mechanisms that cause degenerative changes in the foot. The severity of laminitis is related to the frequency, intensity, and duration of systemic acidotic insults on the mechanisms responsible for the release of vasoactive substance. The critical link between acidosis and laminitis appears to be associated with a persistent hypoperfusion, which results in ischemia in the digit. Management of acidosis is critical in preventing laminitis. High producing dairy herds attempting to maximize energy intake are continually confronted with subclinical acidosis and laminitis. Management of feeding and husbandry practices can be implemented to reduce incidence of disease.

  2. Bovine colostrum: an emerging nutraceutical.

    PubMed

    Bagwe, Siddhi; Tharappel, Leo J P; Kaur, Ginpreet; Buttar, Harpal S

    2015-09-01

    Nutraceutical, a term combining the words "nutrition" and "pharmaceuticals", is a food or food product that provides health benefits as an adjuvant or alternative therapy, including the treatment and prevention of infectious diseases in children and adults. There is emerging evidence that bovine colostrum (BC) may be one of the promising nutraceuticals which can prevent or mitigate various diseases in newborns and adults. Immunity-related disorders are one of the leading causes of mortality in the world. BC is rich in immunity, growth and antimicrobial factors, which promote tissue growth and the maturation of digestive tract and immune function in neonatal animals and humans. The immunoglobulins and lactoferrin present in colostrum are known to build natural immunity in newborns which helps to reduce the mortality rate in this population. Also, the side-effect profile of colostrum proteins and possible lactose intolerance is relatively less in comparison with milk. In general, BC is considered safe and well tolerated. Since colostrum has several important nutritional constituents, well-designed, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies with colostrum products should be conducted to widen its therapeutic use. The objectives of this review are to create awareness about the nutraceutical properties of colostrum and to discuss the various ongoing alternative treatments of colostrum and its active ingredients as well as to address colostrum's future nutraceutical and therapeutic implications in humans.

  3. Steroidogenesis in fetal bovine gonads.

    PubMed Central

    Dominguez, M M; Liptrap, R M; Basrur, P K

    1988-01-01

    Gonadal steroidogenesis in bovine fetuses of 40 to 125 days gestation was examined using histochemical procedures and radioimmunoassay on gonadal cultures to determine the physiological correlates of gonadal morphogenesis in cattle. Gonadal morphology and the in vitro secretion patterns were distinct between the sexes by 45 days when testes secreted significantly higher levels of testosterone and androstenedione and lower levels of estrone and 17 beta-estradiol that the ovaries (p less than 0.0001). It would appear that the main steroid route in the ovaries of 45 to 70 day old fetuses is the androstenedione to estrone to 17 beta-estradiol pathway. The high estrone secretion and the decreasing levels of 17 beta-estradiol and testosterone in the ovaries of 70 to 125 day fetuses suggest an inhibition of 17 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity. It is postulated that this shift in steroid biosynthetic pathways may be related to the change in cellular events from mitosis to meiosis in fetal ovaries. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 7. PMID:3196968

  4. Immunoproteomic identification of bovine pericardium xenoantigens

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Leigh G.; Choe, Leila H.; Reardon, Kenneth F.; Dow, Steven W.; Orton, E. Christopher

    2008-01-01

    Bovine pericardium is an important biomaterial with current application in glutaraldehyde-fixed bioprosthetic heart valves and possible future application as an unfixed biological scaffold for tissue engineering. The importance of both humoral and cell-mediated rejection responses toward fixed and unfixed xenogeneic tissues has become increasingly apparent. However, the full scope and specific identities of bovine pericardium proteins that can elicit an immune response remain largely unknown. In this study, an immunoproteomic approach was used to survey bovine pericardium proteins for their ability to elicit a humoral immune response in rabbits. A two-stage protein extraction protocol was used to separate bovine pericardium proteins into water- and lipid-soluble fractions. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was performed to separate the proteins from each fraction. Western blots were generated from two-dimensional gels of both bovine pericardium protein fractions. These blots were probed with serum from rabbits immunized with bovine pericardium and a secondary antibody was used to assess for IgG positivity. Western blots were compared to duplicate two-dimensional gels and proteins in matched spots were identified by tandem mass spectrometry. Thirty-one putative protein antigens were identified, eight of which are known to be antigenic from previous studies. All of the putative antigens demonstrated progressive staining intensity with increasing days of post-exposure serum. Identified antigenic proteins represented a variety of functional and structural protein types, and included both cellular and matrix proteins. The results of this study have implications for the use of bovine pericardium as a biomaterial in bioprostheses and tissue engineering applications, as well as xenotransplantation in general. PMID:18514307

  5. Fernald restoration: ecologists and engineers integrate restoration and cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, Eric; Homer, John

    2002-07-15

    As cleanup workers excavate pits and tear down buildings at the Fernald site in southwest Ohio, site ecologists are working side-by-side to create thriving wetlands and develop the early stages of forest, prairie, and savanna ecosystems to restore natural resources that were impacted by years of site operations. In 1998, the U.S. Department of Energy-Fernald Office (DOE-FN) and its cleanup contractor, Fluor Fernald, Inc., initiated several ecological restoration projects in perimeter areas of the site (e.g., areas not used for or impacted by uranium processing or waste management). The projects are part of Fernald's final land use plan to restore natural resources over 904 acres of the 1,050-acre site. Pete Yerace, the DOE-FN Natural Resource Trustee representative is working with the Fernald Natural Resource Trustees in an oversight role to resolve the state of Ohio's 1986 claim against DOE for injuries to natural resources. Fluor Fernald, Inc., and DOE-FN developed the ''Natural Resource Restoration Plan'', which outlines 15 major restoration projects for the site and will restore injured natural resources at the site. In general, Fernald's plan includes grading to maximize the formation of wetlands or expanded floodplain, amending soil where topsoil has been removed during excavation, and establishing native vegetation throughout the site. Today, with cleanup over 35 percent complete and site closure targeted for 2006, Fernald is entering a new phase of restoration that involves heavily remediated areas. By working closely with engineers and cleanup crews, site ecologists can take advantage of remediation fieldwork (e.g., convert an excavated depression into a wetland) and avoid unnecessary costs and duplication. This collaboration has also created opportunities for relatively simple and inexpensive restoration of areas that were discovered during ongoing remediation. To ensure the survival of the plant material in heavily disturbed soils, Fernald will use

  6. Outplanting long tubes with the expandable stinger: A new treatment for riparian restoration

    Treesearch

    David E. Steinfeld; Thomas D. Landis; Dan Culley

    2002-01-01

    Long tubes are a new stock type developed specifically for restoration of challenging sites such as disturbed riparian areas. Constructed out of polyvinyl chloride plastic pipe, long tubes have a Vexar lining to promote good root growth and easier extraction. The expandable stinger is a new invention that was developed to outplant long tubes. The stinger is attached to...

  7. Soil preparation methods promoting ectomycorrhizal colonization and American chestnut Castanea dentata establishment in coal mine restoration

    Treesearch

    Jenise M. Bauman; Carolyn H. Keiffer; Shiv Hiremath; Brian C. McCarthy

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this research was to evaluate soil subsurface methods that may aid in seedling establishment and encourage root colonization from a diverse group of ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi during restoration projects. American chestnut Castanea dentata Marsh. Borkh. and backcrossed chestnuts seedlings were planted on a reclaimed coal mine site...

  8. Biological restorations using tooth fragments.

    PubMed

    Busato, A L; Loguercio, A D; Barbosa, A N; Sanseverino, M do C; Macedo, R P; Baldissera, R A

    1998-02-01

    A "biological" restoration technique using dental fragments and adhesive materials is described. These fragments were obtained from extracted human teeth which had been previously sterilized and stored in a tooth bank. The advantages are: the use of extracted teeth as restorative material, esthetics, and treatment cost. The positive sensation of having back the missing tooth was the most mentioned comment among patients. The disadvantages are: the difficulty of obtaining teeth with the needed characteristics, problems of making an indirect restoration, matching the original color, and the non-acceptance by some patients who consider it strange to have other people's teeth placed in their mouths.

  9. Image restoration for a hypertelescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakai, Yuto; Baba, Naoshi; Murakami, Naoshi; Miura, Noriaki; Tamura, Motohide

    2016-08-01

    An effective aperture with several tens or more kilometers is needed to resolve exoplanets. A hypertelescope consists of multiple elemental telescopes like an interferometric array. Light beams from the elemental telescopes are collected and densified and used to form a snap-shot image. Thus formed image, however, does not exhibit high quality features, because the spatial frequency sampling is not dense enough to image properly exoplanets. Some kind of image restoration should be implemented to reveal the surface features of exoplanets. We conduct the image restoration and show the results and the effectiveness of the image restoration through computer simulations.

  10. Root-end resection.

    PubMed

    Blahuta, R; Stanko, P

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the retrospective clinical study was to analyse a complex of patients who underwent a root end resection in the Department of Dentistry and Maxillofacial Surgery, Comenius University, St. Elisabeth Hospital, Bratislava, Slovakia between January 2006 and December 2009 on the small surgery court. A total number of 285 patients who underwent root end resection. Factors examined include sex, patients age structure, total number of resected teeth and their position in upper or lower jaw and the 10 most resected teeth. From 285 patients 103 (36.14 %) were males and 182 (63.86 %) were females. A total number of 378 root end resections was performed, 55 (14.55 %) in the lower jaw and 323 (85.45 %) in the upper jaw. The most resected teeth are from the first and second quadrant. There is a decrease trend by the number of patients who underwent root end resection and teeth which were resected in the timeline between 2006-2009. This process is positive and matches the worldwide trend, by making better and successfull endodontic treatment which results in healing of periapical pathology without the need of root end resection (Tab. 2, Fig. 2, Ref. 20). Full Text in PDF www.elis.sk.

  11. Former Hawaii Restoration Ecologist Now Favors 'Tinkering' Over Rigor. Review of Cabin, Robert J. 2011. Intelligent tinkering: bridging the gap between science and practice.

    Treesearch

    Susan Cordell

    2012-01-01

    In his new book, Bob Cabin uses his personal involvement in the restoration of Hawai'i dry forests to illustrate the tensions that he feels exists between the science and practice of ecological restoration. It is a journey that starts out among the multidisciplinary, multi-interest perspectives associated with a grass-roots communitybased working group (Part 1,...

  12. Root architecture and root and tuber crop productivity.

    PubMed

    Villordon, Arthur Q; Ginzberg, Idit; Firon, Nurit

    2014-07-01

    It is becoming increasingly evident that optimization of root architecture for resource capture is vital for enabling the next green revolution. Although cereals provide half of the calories consumed by humans, root and tuber crops are the second major source of carbohydrates globally. Yet, knowledge of root architecture in root and tuber species is limited. In this opinion article, we highlight what is known about the root system in root and tuber crops, and mark new research directions towards a better understanding of the relation between root architecture and yield. We believe that unraveling the role of root architecture in root and tuber crop productivity will improve global food security, especially in regions with marginal soil fertility and low-input agricultural systems.

  13. Light-induced root hair formation in lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. cv. Grand Rapids) roots at low pH is brought by chlorogenic acid synthesis and sugar.

    PubMed

    Narukawa, Megumi; Watanabe, Keiji; Inoue, Yasunori

    2010-11-01

    Previously, we reported that chlorogenic acid (CGA) facilitated root hair formation at pH 4.0 in lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. cv. Grand Rapids). Light was essential for this process. In the present study, we determined relationships between CGA, light, and sugar during root hair formation in lettuce seedlings. The amount of CGA increased with white light in intact seedlings. Exogenously applied CGA restored root hair formation in dark-grown intact seedlings at pH 4.0. However, no root hair formation was induced in decapitated seedlings regardless of light exposure and CGA application. Application of sucrose or glucose induced both root hair formation and CGA synthesis in light-grown decapitated seedlings at pH 4.0. Blue light was the most effective for both root hair formation and CGA synthesis when supplied with sucrose to decapitated seedlings. Addition of sucrose and CGA together induced root hair formation at pH 4.0 in dark-grown decapitated seedlings. Results suggest that light induced CGA synthesis from sugar in the roots. Sugar was also required for root hair formation other than starting material of CGA synthesis. In addition, an unknown low pH-induced factor was essential for lettuce root hair formation.

  14. Serological responses in calves to vaccines against bovine respiratory syncytial, infectious bovine rhinotracheitis, bovine viral diarrhoea and parainfluenza-3 viruses.

    PubMed

    Tollis, M; Di Trani, L; Cordioli, P; Vignolo, E; Di Pasquale, I

    1996-01-01

    The Istituto Superiore di Sanità (ISS), the National Veterinary Services Laboratory in Italy, is in charge of assessing the quality, safety and efficacy of veterinary vaccines before and after licensing. To evaluate the relative potency of several vaccines against bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV), infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus (IBRV), bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) and parainfluenza-3 virus (PI3V), the serological responses in vaccinated calves were studied. Vaccination with any of the vaccines under study induced specific antibody titres against the different viral antigens. The differences of the mean antibody titres within and among the test group vaccines were statistically significant. The results confirm and support those obtained by other authors in similar studies, suggesting that serological responses in vaccinated calves can be used as a helpful means of assessing the relative potency of vaccines against viral respiratory diseases of cattle. The criteria allowing such an evaluation are discussed.

  15. Mechanical fatigue cycling on teeth restored with fiber posts: impact of coronal grooves and diameter of glass fiber post on fracture resistance.

    PubMed

    Santini, M F; Wandscher, V; Amaral, M; Baldissara, P; Valandro, L F

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this paper was to evaluate the effect of different diameters and surface characteristics of a glass fiber post on the fracture resistance of teeth restored with fiber posts. Eighty single-rooted bovine teeth were prepared, embedded in a PVC cylinder using acrylic resin, and allocated into 8 groups (N.=10) according to post diameter and shape: (smooth double-tapered fiber post) G1, G2, G3, and G4 with cervical diameters of 1.4 mm, 1.6 mm, 1.8 mm, and 2 mm, respectively; (double-tapered fiber posts with coronal grooves) G5, G6, G7, and G8 with cervical diameters of 1.4 mm, 1.6 mm, 1.8 mm, and 2 mm, respectively. A self-adhesive cement was used for post cementation, and the core build-up was standardized and made with composite resin. Specimens were stored for 7 days and then submitted to the mechanical fatigue testing (load=50 N., angle= 45°, frequency=1 Hz, temperature=37 ± 1 °C, number of cycles=1000000); the specimens that survived were submitted to static resistance testing (1 mm/min, 45°). The fracture loads and fracture modes was recorded. Data were submitted to 2-way ANOVA, post-hoc Tukey test and Pearson Correlation analysis. The cervical diameter of the post (P<0.0001) and surface characteristics (P=0.01013) significantly affected the fracture resistance (2-way ANOVA). Grooves reduced the fracture resistance when post diameter was 1.4 mm (G1 and G5). A moderate positive correlation was found between the fracture resistance and the fiber post diameter (r2=0.4445; P<0.0001) (Pearson correlation test). It appears that there is a direct relation between the diameter of the fiber post and the fracture strength of roots restored with fiber posts. But other factors may have influenced the fracture strength such as the reduction of intracanal dentin by the preparation for placement of wider fiber posts, since no difference was found for smooth fiber posts with different diameter. Otherwise, grooves at coronal part of the fiber post can damage the

  16. Wired to the roots

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Amutha Sampath; Bais, Harsh P.

    2012-01-01

    Often, plant-pathogenic microbe interactions are discussed in a host-microbe two-component system, however very little is known about how the diversity of rhizospheric microbes that associate with plants affect host performance against pathogens. There are various studies, which specially direct the importance of induced systemic defense (ISR) response in plants interacting with beneficial rhizobacteria, yet we don’t know how rhizobacterial associations modulate plant physiology. In here, we highlight the many dimensions within which plant roots associate with beneficial microbes by regulating aboveground physiology. We review approaches to study the causes and consequences of plant root association with beneficial microbes on aboveground plant-pathogen interactions. The review provides the foundations for future investigations into the impact of the root beneficial microbial associations on plant performance and innate defense responses. PMID:23073006

  17. Recent Progress in Cryopreservation of Bovine Oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Hochi, Shinichi

    2014-01-01

    Principle of oocyte cryoinjury is first overviewed and then research history of cryopreservation using bovine oocytes is summarized for the last two decades with a few special references to recent progresses. Various types of cryodevices have been developed to accelerate the cooling rate and applied to the oocytes from large domestic species enriched with cytoplasmic lipid droplets. Two recent approaches include the qualitative improvement of IVM oocytes prior to the vitrification and the short-term recovery culture of vitrified-warmed oocytes prior to the subsequent IVF. Supplementation of L-carnitine to IVM medium of bovine oocytes has been reported to reduce the amount of cytoplasmic lipid droplets and improve the cryotolerance of the oocytes, but it is still controversial whether the positive effect of L-carnitine is reproducible. Incidence of multiple aster formation, a possible cause for low developmental potential of vitrified-warmed bovine oocytes, was inhibited by a short-term culture of the postwarm oocytes in the presence of Rho-associated coiled-coil kinase (ROCK) inhibitor. Use of an antioxidant α-tocopherol, instead of the ROCK inhibitor, also supported the revivability of the postwarm bovine oocytes. Further improvements of the vitrification procedure, combined with pre- and postvitrification chemical treatment, would overcome the high sensitivity of bovine oocytes to cryopreservation. PMID:24738063

  18. Bovine viral diarrhea virus: biotypes and disease.

    PubMed Central

    Deregt, D; Loewen, K G

    1995-01-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus continues to produce significant economic losses for the cattle industry and challenges investigators with the complexity of diseases it produces and the mechanisms by which it causes disease. This paper updates and attempts to clarify information regarding the roles of noncytopathic and cytopathic bovine viral diarrhea viruses in persistent infections and mucosal disease. It also covers, in brief, what is known of the new diseases: thrombocytopenia and hemorrhagic disease, and a disease resembling mucosal disease that is apparently caused solely by noncytopathic virus. Although a good understanding of the roles of the 2 biotypes in the production of persistent infections and the precipitation of mucosal disease has been obtained, there are still unanswered questions regarding the origin of cytopathic viruses and the mechanism by which they cause pathological changes in cells. It is apparent, however, that cytopathic bovine viral diarrhea viruses arise by mutation of noncytopathic viruses, and it is known that p80 is the marker protein for cytopathic viruses. The previous distinction between mild bovine viral diarrhea and fatal mucosal disease has been eroded with the emergence of new virulent bovine viral diarrhea viruses. The new diseases pose a threat to the cattle industry and present a new challenge for investigators. Index Veterinarius (1984-1994) and Medline (1985-1994) databases and personal files updated since 1987 from BIOSIS Previews and Biosciences Information Services were used to search the literature. Images Figure 1. PMID:7648541

  19. Recent progress in cryopreservation of bovine oocytes.

    PubMed

    Hwang, In-Sul; Hochi, Shinichi

    2014-01-01

    Principle of oocyte cryoinjury is first overviewed and then research history of cryopreservation using bovine oocytes is summarized for the last two decades with a few special references to recent progresses. Various types of cryodevices have been developed to accelerate the cooling rate and applied to the oocytes from large domestic species enriched with cytoplasmic lipid droplets. Two recent approaches include the qualitative improvement of IVM oocytes prior to the vitrification and the short-term recovery culture of vitrified-warmed oocytes prior to the subsequent IVF. Supplementation of L-carnitine to IVM medium of bovine oocytes has been reported to reduce the amount of cytoplasmic lipid droplets and improve the cryotolerance of the oocytes, but it is still controversial whether the positive effect of L-carnitine is reproducible. Incidence of multiple aster formation, a possible cause for low developmental potential of vitrified-warmed bovine oocytes, was inhibited by a short-term culture of the postwarm oocytes in the presence of Rho-associated coiled-coil kinase (ROCK) inhibitor. Use of an antioxidant α-tocopherol, instead of the ROCK inhibitor, also supported the revivability of the postwarm bovine oocytes. Further improvements of the vitrification procedure, combined with pre- and postvitrification chemical treatment, would overcome the high sensitivity of bovine oocytes to cryopreservation.

  20. Kondolf Diagram for River Restoration

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rehabilitation, protection, and management of riverine backwaters (floodplain aquatic habitats that are seasonally or periodically connected to the main channel) are becoming increasingly common. General criteria for selecting restoration goals and evaluating alternative designs are lacking. An app...

  1. Basic research for environmental restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is in the midst of a major environmental restoration effort to reduce the health and environmental risks resulting from past waste management and disposal practices at DOE sites. This report describes research needs in environmental restoration and complements a previously published document, DOE/ER-0419, Evaluation of Mid-to-Long Term Basic Research for Environmental Restoration. Basic research needs have been grouped into five major categories patterned after those identified in DOE/ER-0419: (1) environmental transport and transformations; (2) advanced sampling, characterization, and monitoring methods; (3) new remediation technologies; (4) performance assessment; and (5) health and environmental effects. In addition to basic research, this document deals with education and training needs for environmental restoration. 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  2. Trauma from occlusion. Restorative concerns.

    PubMed

    Neff, P

    1995-04-01

    Trauma from occlusion and restorative concerns may affect the tooth itself, the supporting structures inside and around the tooth's immediate structures, and the total articulating system, which includes the neuromuscular system, the temporomandibular joints, and other systems such as the impairment of hearing or vision and many other peripheral conditions. A thorough examination and a differential diagnosis procedure is essential to restore the health of the articulating system and reverse peripheral condition. This includes the ability to restore the individual tooth in its best anatomic position as a complement to the articulating system using all individual disciplines of dentistry in the finest abilities of treatment and the ability to share and distinguish the possible parafunctional habits and the need for behavioral understanding, support, and management to limit or lessen the wear and destruction of the individual tissues and to restore a healthier physical support.

  3. Temperature-compensating dc restorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, H. M.

    1980-01-01

    Circuit provides stable references restoration in addition to temperature compensation. Possible TV monitor applications include traffic and security surveillance systems, where cameras are subject to environmental extremes, as in unheated warehouses or outdoors.

  4. Optimum constrained image restoration filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riemer, T. E.; Mcgillem, C. D.

    1974-01-01

    The filter was developed in Hilbert space by minimizing the radius of gyration of the overall or composite system point-spread function subject to constraints on the radius of gyration of the restoration filter point-spread function, the total noise power in the restored image, and the shape of the composite system frequency spectrum. An iterative technique is introduced which alters the shape of the optimum composite system point-spread function, producing a suboptimal restoration filter which suppresses undesirable secondary oscillations. Finally this technique is applied to multispectral scanner data obtained from the Earth Resources Technology Satellite to provide resolution enhancement. An experimental approach to the problems involving estimation of the effective scanner aperture and matching the ERTS data to available restoration functions is presented.

  5. Wetlands Restoration Definitions and Distinctions

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Ecological restoration is a valuable endeavor that has proven very difficult to define. The term indicates that degraded and destroyed natural wetland systems will be reestablished to sites where they once existed. But, what wetland ecosystems are we talki

  6. Stepwise Excavation Allows Apexogenesis in Permanent Molars with Deep Carious Lesions and Incomplete Root Formation.

    PubMed

    Hernandéz-Gatón, Patrícia; Serrano, César Ruiz; Nelson Filho, Paulo; De Castañeda, Esther Ruiz; Lucisano, Marília P; Silva, Raquel A B da; Silva, Léa A B da

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the stepwise excavation technique in 138 permanent molars with deep carious lesions and incomplete root formation within a 24-month clinical and radiographic follow-up period. In 96.7% of the cases, success was observed (no pain, integrity of restoration margins, absence of radiographic alterations and apexogenesis). The cases of failure (3.3%) were due to the loss of the temporary restoration. In conclusion, the stepwise excavation is a promising technique for permanent teeth with deep carious lesions and incomplete root formation as a minimally invasive approach because it allows the preservation of pulp vitality and occurrence of apexogenesis.

  7. Management of Horizontal Root Fracture in the Middle Third via Intraradicular Splinting Using a Fiber Post

    PubMed Central

    Gulve, Meenal N.

    2016-01-01

    Radicular fractures in permanent teeth are uncommon injuries and account for only 0.5–7% of dental traumas. These fractures commonly result from a horizontal impact and are transverse to oblique in direction. Their incidence is more in the middle third of the root than at the apical and cervical thirds. This paper describes a case of complicated crown fracture of maxillary incisors along with horizontal root fracture at the middle third of maxillary right central and lateral incisor. The fractured root fragments of the upper right central and lateral incisor were united with the help of a glass fiber post after receiving an endodontic treatment. The other two incisors were treated endodontically followed by post endodontic restorations. Eventually the four incisors were restored with porcelain fused to metal crowns. A one-year follow-up revealed a well stabilized assembly of the root fragments and the post. PMID:26904313

  8. 65 FR 63227 - Declaration of Emergency Because of Bovine Tuberculosis

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2000-10-23

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Office of the Secretary Declaration of Emergency Because of Bovine Tuberculosis Bovine tuberculosis (tuberculosis) is a chronic debilitating disease caused by Mycobacterium bovis. The... animal health agencies to eradicate tuberculosis from domestic livestock in the United States...

  9. Restoring Detroit's Street Lighting System

    SciTech Connect

    Kinzey, Bruce

    2015-09-30

    The City of Detroit is in the midst of a comprehensive restoration of its street lighting system that includes transitioning the existing HPS sources to LED. This report provides an objective review of the circumstances surrounding the system restoration, the processes undertaken and decisions made, and the results so far — and contains useful information about issues that arise during large-scale LED street lighting projects.

  10. Artefacts in Cone Beam CT Mimicking an Extrapalatal Canal of Root-Filled Maxillary Molar.

    PubMed

    Camilo, Carla Cristina; Brito-Júnior, Manoel; Faria-E-Silva, André Luis; Quintino, Alex Carvalho; de Paula, Adrianne Freire; Cruz-Filho, Antônio Miranda; Sousa-Neto, Manoel Damião

    2013-01-01

    Despite the advantages of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), the images provided by this diagnostic tool can produce artifacts and compromise accurate diagnostic assessment. This paper describes an endodontic treatment of a maxillary molar where CBCT images suggested the presence of a nonexistent third root canal in the palatal root. An endodontic treatment was performed in a first maxillary molar with palatal canals, and the tooth was restored with a cast metal crown. The patient returned four years later presenting with a discomfort in chewing, which was reduced after occlusal adjustment. CBCT was prescribed to verify additional diagnostic information. Axial scans on coronal, middle, and apical palatal root sections showed images similar to a third root canal. However, sagittal scans demonstrated that these images were artifacts caused by root canal fillings. A careful interpretation of CBCT images in root-filled teeth must be done to avoid mistakes in treatment.

  11. Artefacts in Cone Beam CT Mimicking an Extrapalatal Canal of Root-Filled Maxillary Molar

    PubMed Central

    Camilo, Carla Cristina; Brito-Júnior, Manoel; Faria-e-Silva, André Luis; Quintino, Alex Carvalho; de Paula, Adrianne Freire; Cruz-Filho, Antônio Miranda; Sousa-Neto, Manoel Damião

    2013-01-01

    Despite the advantages of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), the images provided by this diagnostic tool can produce artifacts and compromise accurate diagnostic assessment. This paper describes an endodontic treatment of a maxillary molar where CBCT images suggested the presence of a nonexistent third root canal in the palatal root. An endodontic treatment was performed in a first maxillary molar with palatal canals, and the tooth was restored with a cast metal crown. The patient returned four years later presenting with a discomfort in chewing, which was reduced after occlusal adjustment. CBCT was prescribed to verify additional diagnostic information. Axial scans on coronal, middle, and apical palatal root sections showed images similar to a third root canal. However, sagittal scans demonstrated that these images were artifacts caused by root canal fillings. A careful interpretation of CBCT images in root-filled teeth must be done to avoid mistakes in treatment. PMID:23606995

  12. Partial aortic root replacement for aneurysm of the right sinus of Valsalva.

    PubMed

    Osada, Hiroaki; Kyogoku, Masahisa; Fujino, Takahisa; Nakajima, Hiroyuki

    2015-06-01

    An aneurysm of the sinus of Valsalva is clinically rare, and its operative indications and procedures are controversial. We herein report the rare case of a 68-year-old woman with severe right ventricular outflow tract obstruction caused by an aneurysm of the right sinus of Valsalva. We performed partial aortic root reconstruction using a bovine pericardial patch, and aortic valve replacement. Although this case provides evidence that these are suitable surgical techniques for treatment of aneurysm of the sinus of Valsalva, total aortic root replacement should have been chosen based on the pathological finding of aortic medial and valve degeneration.

  13. Bovine Eimeria species in Austria.

    PubMed

    Koutny, H; Joachim, A; Tichy, A; Baumgartner, W

    2012-05-01

    Bovine eimeriosis is considered to be of considerable importance for the productivity and health of cattle worldwide. Despite the importance of cattle farming in Austria, little is known in this country about the abundance and distribution of bovine Eimeria spp. The objective of this study was to obtain detailed information about the occurrence of different Eimeria spp. on Austrian dairy farms. Fecal samples from individual calves (n = 868) from 296 farms all over Austria (82 districts) were collected. Additionally, each farmer was questioned about the occurrence of calf diarrhea, and about the knowledge on coccidiosis and possible control measures. On 97.97% of the investigated farms, calves excreted Eimeria oocysts, and 83.67% of the individual samples were positive. After sporulation of positive samples pooled from each farm, 11 Eimeria species were found, with E. bovis (in 65.54% of the samples and 27.74% of the farms), E.zuernii (63.85%/13.86%), E. auburnensis (56.76%/13.41%) and E. ellipsoidalis (54.05%/14.38%) being the most prevalent, followed by E. alabamensis (45.61%/11.56%), E. subspherica (35.14%/5.5.05%), E. cylindrica (33.11%/7.00%), and E. canadensis (31.08%/7.74%). E. wyomingensis, E. pellita and E. bukidnonensis were only found sporadically (3.04-4.73% of the samples and 0.16-0.59% of the farms). Mixed infections were present on all farms (2-9 Eimeria species/farm). Prevalences by state provinces were high throughout with 77.1-87.9% of the samples and 93.8-100% of the farms. Lower Austria had the highest percentage of positive farms, and Vorarlberg the lowest. Individual OPG (oocysts per gram of feces) values were generally low; 75% of the samples had an OPG of 1,000 or less. The highest detected OPG was 72,400. The mean OPG was 2,525 with above average numbers in Tirol, Carinthia, and Lower Austria. The mean OPG values were significantly positively correlated with the cattle density in the different districts. The majority of the samples were from

  14. Restoring hydrologic function in urban landscapes with suburban subsoiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Stuart S.; Smith, Brennan

    2016-12-01

    Dramatic persistent hydrologic changes accompany urban land development, most commonly attributed to increased impervious area and drainage infrastructure. Modern land development and mass grading practices also result in the routine development of urban landscapes with highly disturbed compacted soil profiles. The common predictable result is an urban pervious landscape with greatly diminished infiltration capacity in greenspace that might best be described as grass growing in a thin veneer of topsoil on compacted fill. This paper describes the use of soil decompaction and amendment to restore hydrologic function following the removal of an impervious asphalt playground at a public school in Baltimore, MD, USA. The combination of soil decompaction with deep ripping and compost amendment is referred to as suburban subsoiling, alluding to the adaptation of agricultural subsoiling practices to restore hydrologic function in disturbed compacted urban soils. In this field-scale comparison with standard grading and landscaping practices, suburban subsoiling supported the highest infiltration rates, with the densest turf cover, highest soil organic matter and root zone soil moisture, and the lowest soil bulk density. As a sustainable alternative to traditional grading and topsoiling practices, suburban subsoiling offers a proverbial win-win solution, providing superior landscaping and restored hydrologic services with lower life-cycle costs. Though significantly different than current grading and landscaping practices, suburban subsoiling can be readily integrated in modern land development with only minor incremental changes in standard practices. Suburban subsoiling can transform the built environment through superior sustainable landscaping that restores the hydrologic function of urban pervious landscapes.

  15. Plant and Soil Responses to High and Low Diversity Grassland Restoration Practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bach, Elizabeth M.; Baer, Sara G.; Six, Johan

    2012-02-01

    The USDA's Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) has predominantly used only a few species of dominant prairie grasses (CP2 practice) to reduce soil erosion, but recently has offered a higher diversity planting practice (CP25) to increase grassland habitat quality. We quantified plant community composition in CP25 and CP2 plantings restored for 4 or 8 years and compared belowground properties and processes among restorations and continuously cultivated soils in southeastern Nebraska, USA. Relative to cultivated soils, restoration increased soil microbial biomass ( P = 0.033), specifically fungi ( P < 0.001), and restored soils exhibited higher rates of carbon (C) mineralization ( P = 0.010). High and low diversity plantings had equally diverse plant communities; however, CP25 plantings had greater frequency of cool-season (C3) grasses ( P = 0.007). Older (8 year) high diversity restorations contained lower microbial biomass ( P = 0.026), arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) biomass ( P = 0.003), and C mineralization rates ( P = 0.028) relative to 8 year low diversity restorations; older plantings had greater root biomass than 4 year plantings in all restorations ( P = 0.001). Low diversity 8 year plantings contained wider root C:N ratios, and higher soil microbial biomass, microbial community richness, AMF biomass, and C mineralization rate relative to 4 year restorations ( P < 0.050). Net N mineralization and nitrification rates were lower in 8 year than 4 year high diversity plantings ( P = 0.005). We attributed changes in soil C and N pools and fluxes to increased AMF associated with C4 grasses in low diversity plantings. Thus, reduced recovery of AMF in high diversity plantings restricted restoration of belowground microbial diversity and microbially-mediated soil processes over time.

  16. Cardiolipin-depleted bovine heart cytochrome c oxidase: Binding stoichiometry and affinity for cardiolipin derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, N.C.; Zborowski, J.; Talbert, L.H. )

    1990-09-25

    Detergent-solubilized bovine heart cytochrome c oxidase requires 2 mol of tightly bound cardiolipin (CL) per mole of monomeric complex for functional activity. Four lines of evidence support this conclusion: (1) Phospholipid depletion shows that two tightly bound CL's must remain associated with cytochrome c oxidase in order to maintain full electron transport activity. (2) Removal of the two tightly bound CL's correlates with decreased activity that is restored by reassociation of 2 mol of exogenous CL. (3) CL-depleted cytochrome c oxidase has two high-affinity binding sites for 2-({sup 14}C)acetylcardiolipin (AcCL), K{sub d,app} <0.1 {mu}M, that are not present in enzyme containing endogenous CL. (4) CL, monolysocardiolipin (MLCL), and dilysocardiolipin (DLCL) complete for AcCL binding with approximately the same relative affinities as those measured by the restoration of electron transport activity (MLCL competes much better than DLCL). However, MLCL and DLCL are only 60% and 15% as effective as CL in restoring maximum activity when they are bound to high-affinity sites. The binding specificity of CL, MLCL, DLCL, and some of their acylated derivatives indicates that the apolar tails are most important for binding, not the polar head group. The authors therefore, conclude that restoration of activity to CL-depleted cytochrome c oxidase is highly specific and requires the reassociation of CL, or structurally similar compounds, with two high-affinity binding sites.

  17. Dietary requirement for serum-derived bovine immunoglobulins in the clinical management of patients with enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Petschow, Bryon W; Burnett, Bruce P; Shaw, Audrey L; Weaver, Eric M; Klein, Gerald L

    2015-01-01

    A variety of human disease conditions are associated with chronic intestinal disorders or enteropathies that are characterized by intestinal inflammation, increased gut permeability, and reduced capacity to absorb nutrients. Such disruptions in the homeostasis of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract can lead to symptoms of abdominal pain and discomfort, bloating, abnormal bowel function, and malabsorption of nutrients. While significant advances have been made in understanding the factors that influence the complex and fragile balance between the gut microbiota, intestinal epithelial cell integrity, and the underlying immune system, effective therapies for restoring intestinal balance during enteropathy are still not available. Numerous studies have demonstrated the ability of oral immunoglobulins to improve weight gain, support gut barrier function, and reduce the severity of enteropathy in animals. More recently, studies in humans provide evidence that serum-derived bovine immunoglobulin/protein isolate is safe and improves nutritional status and GI symptoms in patients with enteropathy associated with irritable bowel syndrome or infection with the human immunodeficiency virus. This review summarizes studies showing the impact of enteropathy on nutritional status and how specially formulated bovine immunoglobulins may help restore intestinal homeostasis and nutritional status in patients with specific enteropathies. Such protein preparations may provide distinct nutritional support required for the dietary management of patients who, because of therapeutic or chronic medical needs, have limited or impaired capacity to digest, absorb, or metabolize ordinary foodstuffs or certain nutrients, or other special medically determined nutrient requirements that cannot be satisfied by changes to the normal diet alone.

  18. Bovine serum albumin: survival and osmolarity effect in bovine spermatozoa stored above freezing point.

    PubMed

    Nang, C F; Osman, K; Budin, S B; Ismail, M I; Jaffar, F H F; Mohamad, S F S; Ibrahim, S F

    2012-05-01

    Liquid nitrogen preservation in remote farms is a limitation. The goal of this study was to determine optimum temperature above freezing point for bovine spermatozoa preservation using bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a supplementation. Pooled semen sample from three ejaculates was subjected to various BSA concentration (1, 4, 8 and 12 mg ml(-1)), before incubation in different above freezing point temperatures (4, 25 and 37 °C). Viability assessment was carried out against time from day 0 (fresh sample) until all spermatozoa become nonviable. Optimal condition for bovine spermatozoa storage was at 4 °C with 1 mg ml(-1) BSA for almost 7 days. BSA improved bovine spermatozoa viability declining rate to 44.28% at day 4 and 57.59% at day 7 compared to control, with 80.54% and 98.57% at day 4 and 7 respectively. Increase in BSA concentration did not improve sperm viability. Our results also confirmed that there was a strong negative correlation between media osmolarity and bovine spermatozoa survival rate with r = 0.885, P < 0.0001. Bovine serum albumin helps to improve survival rate of bovine spermatozoa stored above freezing point. © 2011 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  19. Bovine immunoglobulin protein isolates for the nutritional management of enteropathy.

    PubMed

    Petschow, Bryon W; Blikslager, Anthony T; Weaver, Eric M; Campbell, Joy M; Polo, Javier; Shaw, Audrey L; Burnett, Bruce P; Klein, Gerald L; Rhoads, J Marc

    2014-09-07

    The gastrointestinal tract is responsible for a multitude of digestive and immune functions which depend upon the balanced interaction of the intestinal microbiota, diet, gut barrier function, and mucosal immune response. Disruptions in one or more of these factors can lead to intestinal disorders or enteropathies which are characterized by intestinal inflammation, increased gut permeability, and reduced capacity to absorb nutrients. Enteropathy is frequently associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, inflammatory bowel disease, autoimmune enteropathy, radiation enteritis, and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), where pathologic changes in the intestinal tract lead to abdominal discomfort, bloating, abnormal bowel function (e.g., diarrhea, urgency, constipation and malabsorption). Unfortunately, effective therapies for the management of enteropathy and restoring intestinal health are still not available. An accumulating body of preclinical studies has demonstrated that oral administration of plasma- or serum-derived protein concentrates containing high levels of immunoglobulins can improve weight, normalize gut barrier function, and reduce the severity of enteropathy in animal models. Recent studies in humans, using serum-derived bovine immunoglobulin/protein isolate, demonstrate that such protein preparations are safe and improve symptoms, nutritional status, and various biomarkers associated with enteropathy. Benefits have been shown in patients with HIV infection or diarrhea-predominant IBS. This review summarizes preclinical and clinical studies with plasma/serum protein concentrates and describes the effects on host nutrition, intestinal function, and markers of intestinal inflammation. It supports the concept that immunoglobulin-containing protein preparations may offer a new strategy for restoring functional homeostasis in the intestinal tract of patients with enteropathy.

  20. Influence of endodontic treatment, post insertion, and ceramic restoration on the fracture resistance of maxillary premolars.

    PubMed

    Bitter, K; Meyer-Lueckel, H; Fotiadis, N; Blunck, U; Neumann, K; Kielbassa, A M; Paris, S

    2010-06-01

    To investigate the effects of endodontic treatment, post placement and ceramic restoration type on the fracture resistance of premolars. One hundred and twenty teeth maxillary premolars were allocated to four groups (A-D; n = 30). In group A, mesio-occlusal-distal-inlays with a buccal and palatal wall of 2 mm (MOD), in group B partial onlays with palatal cusp coverage and in group C total onlays with buccal and palatal cusp coverage were prepared. Group D served as untreated controls. Groups A-C were divided into three subgroups (n = 10): (i) teeth received solely the described preparations, (ii) teeth were root filled, (iii) teeth were root filled and quartz fibre posts were placed. Teeth were restored using Computer-assisted design/computer-assisted machining-ceramic-restorations and subjected to thermo-mechanical-loading; subsequently, the buccal cusp was loaded until fracture. Group D revealed significantly higher fracture resistance [mean (standard deviation)] [738 (272) N] compared to all other groups (P < 0.05; post hoc test Dunnett). For groups A-C, fracture resistance was significantly affected by the restoration type (P = 0.043) and endodontic treatment/post placement (P = 0.039; 2-way anova). Group A [380 (146) N] showed significantly lower fracture resistance compared to group B [470 (158) N] (P = 0.048; post hoc test Tukey). Compared to non-endodontically treated teeth [487 (120) N], root filled teeth revealed significantly lower fracture resistance [389 (171) N] (P = 0.031). The restoration of cavities with a remaining wall thickness of 2 mm using ceramic MOD-inlays is inferior with respect to the fracture resistance compared to partial onlay restorations. Root filled teeth without post placement show lower fracture resistance compared to non-endodontically treated teeth.

  1. Parthenogenetic activation of bovine oocytes using bovine and murine phospholipase C zeta

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Pablo J; Beyhan, Zeki; Iager, Amy E; Yoon, Sook-Young; Malcuit, Christopher; Schellander, Karl; Fissore, Rafael A; Cibelli, Jose B

    2008-01-01

    Background During natural fertilization, sperm fusion with the oocyte induces long lasting intracellular calcium oscillations which in turn are responsible for oocyte activation. PLCZ1 has been identified as the factor that the sperm delivers into the egg to induce such a response. We tested the hypothesis that PLCZ1 cRNA injection can be used to activate bovine oocytes. Results Mouse and bovine PLCZ1 cRNAs were injected into matured bovine oocytes at different concentrations. Within the concentrations tested, mouse PLCZ1 injection activated bovine oocytes at a maximum rate when the pipette concentration of cRNA ranged from 0.25 to 1 μg/μL, while bovine PLCZ1 was optimal at 0.1 μg/μL. At their most effective concentrations, PLCZ1 induced parthenogenetic development at rates similar to those observed using other activation stimuli such as Ionomycin/CHX and Ionomycin/DMAP. Injection of mouse and bovine PLCZ1 cRNA induced dose-dependent sperm-like calcium oscillations whose frequency increased over time. Injection of bovine and mouse PLCZ1 cRNA also induced IP3R-1 degradation, although bovine PLCZ1 cRNA evoked greater receptor degradation than its mouse counterpart. Conclusion Injection of PLCZ1 cRNA efficiently activated bovine oocytes by inducing a sperm-like calcium oscillatory pattern. Importantly, the high rate of aneuploidy encountered in parthenogenetic embryos activated by certain chemical means was not observed in PLCZ1 activated embryos. PMID:18284699

  2. Arachidonate metabolism in bovine gallbladder muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, M.; Hidaka, T.; Ueta, T.; Ogura, R.

    1983-04-01

    Incubation of (1-/sup 14/C)arachidonic acid (AA) with homogenates of bovine gallbladder muscle generated a large amount of radioactive material having the chromatographic mobility of 6-keto-PGF1 alpha (stable product of PGI2) and smaller amounts of products that comigrated with PGF2 alpha PGE2. Formation of these products was inhibited by the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin. The major radioactive product identified by thin-layer chromatographic mobility and by gas chromatography - mass spectrometric analysis was found to be 6-keto-PGF1 alpha. The quantitative metabolic pattern of (1-/sup 14/C)PGH2 was virtually identical to that of (1-/sup 14/C)AA. Incubation of arachidonic acid with slices of bovine gallbladder muscle released labile anti-aggregatory material in the medium, which was inhibited by aspirin or 15-hydroperoxy-AA. These results indicate that bovine gallbladder muscle has a considerable enzymatic capacity to produce PGI2 from arachidonic acid.

  3. Epidemiologic survey of bovine diseases in Suriname.

    PubMed

    Corbett, W T; Guy, J; Lieuw-A-Joe, R; Hunter, L; Grindem, C; Levy, M; Cullen, J; Vaz, V

    1989-01-01

    A seroepidemiologic survey of cattle diseases was undertaken in Suriname in 1985 to help assess the livestock disease situation in that country. The six diseases covered by the survey were bovine coronavirus infection, bovine rhinotracheitis, bovine virus diarrhea, brucellosis, parainfluenza-3 infection, and respiratory syncytial virus infection. The results indicated relatively low prevalences of these diseases compared to the prevalences found in most developed countries. The reasons for this are uncertain, but the finding suggests that the cattle population in Suriname could lack extensive exposure to these diseases and so could be highly susceptible to them. In addition, the evident need for more thoroughgoing survey data points up the need to establish a continuous animal data health monitoring system in Suriname--as well as in other developing countries where there is a need to objectively assess the livestock disease picture.

  4. Calcium and protein phosphorylation in the transduction of gravity signal in corn roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedmann, M.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1991-01-01

    The involvement of calcium and protein phosphorylation in the transduction of gravity signal was studied using corn roots of a light-insensitive variety (Zea mays L., cv. Patriot). The gravitropic response was calcium-dependent. Horizontal placement of roots preloaded with 32P for three minutes resulted in changes in protein phosphorylation of polypeptides of 32 and 35 kD. Calcium depletion resulted in decreased phosphorylation of these phosphoproteins and replenishment of calcium restored the phosphorylation.

  5. Calcium and protein phosphorylation in the transduction of gravity signal in corn roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedmann, M.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1991-01-01

    The involvement of calcium and protein phosphorylation in the transduction of gravity signal was studied using corn roots of a light-insensitive variety (Zea mays L., cv. Patriot). The gravitropic response was calcium-dependent. Horizontal placement of roots preloaded with 32P for three minutes resulted in changes in protein phosphorylation of polypeptides of 32 and 35 kD. Calcium depletion resulted in decreased phosphorylation of these phosphoproteins and replenishment of calcium restored the phosphorylation.

  6. Arabidopsis Root-Type Ferredoxin:NADP(H) Oxidoreductase 2 is Involved in Detoxification of Nitrite in Roots.

    PubMed

    Hachiya, Takushi; Ueda, Nanae; Kitagawa, Munenori; Hanke, Guy; Suzuki, Akira; Hase, Toshiharu; Sakakibara, Hitoshi

    2016-11-01

    Ferredoxin:NADP(H) oxidoreductase (FNR) plays a key role in redox metabolism in plastids. Whereas leaf FNR (LFNR) is required for photosynthesis, root FNR (RFNR) is believed to provide electrons to ferredoxin (Fd)-dependent enzymes, including nitrite reductase (NiR) and Fd-glutamine-oxoglutarate aminotransferase (Fd-GOGAT) in non-photosynthetic conditions. In some herbal species, however, most nitrate reductase activity is located in photosynthetic organs, and ammonium in roots is assimilated mainly by Fd-independent NADH-GOGAT. Therefore, RFNR might have a limited impact on N assimilation in roots grown with nitrate or ammonium nitrogen sources. AtRFNR genes are rapidly induced by application of toxic nitrite. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that RFNR could contribute to nitrite reduction in roots by comparing Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings of the wild type with loss-of-function mutants of RFNR2 When these seedlings were grown under nitrate, nitrite or ammonium, only nitrite nutrition caused impaired growth and nitrite accumulation in roots of rfnr2 Supplementation of nitrite with nitrate or ammonium as N sources did not restore the root growth in rfnr2 Also, a scavenger for nitric oxide (NO) could not effectively rescue the growth impairment. Thus, nitrite toxicity, rather than N depletion or nitrite-dependent NO production, probably causes the rfnr2 root growth defect. Our results strongly suggest that RFNR2 has a major role in reduction of toxic nitrite in roots. A specific set of genes related to nitrite reduction and the supply of reducing power responded to nitrite concomitantly, suggesting that the products of these genes act co-operatively with RFNR2 to reduce nitrite in roots.

  7. Abrasion of eroded root dentine brushed with different toothpastes.

    PubMed

    De Menezes, Márcio; Turssi, Cecilia Pedroso; Hara, Anderson Takeo; Messias, Danielle Cristine Furtado; Serra, Mônica Campos

    2004-09-01

    This study evaluated the surface roughness change and wear provided by different dentifrices on root dentine previously exposed to erosive challenges. According to a randomized complete block design, 150 slabs of bovine root dentine (6 x 3 x 2 mm) were ground flat and polished. In an area of 4 x 3 mm on the dentine surface, specimens were submitted to five erosive/abrasive events, each one composed by: exposure to Sprite Diet or distilled water for 5 min, then to a remineralizing solution for 1 min, and simulation of 5,000 brushing strokes. Four dentifrices--regular (RE), baking soda (BS), whitening (WT) and tartar control (TC)--and distilled water (CO), used as control, were compared. Final texture and the wear depth were evaluated using a profilometer. ANOVA did not show significant interaction, indicating that the effect of dentifrices on both surface roughness change and wear did not depend on whether or not the dentine was eroded ( p>0.05). There was no difference between abrasion of eroded and sound dentine. The Tukey's test revealed that WT, BS and TC provided the highest increase in surface roughness differing from RE and CO. TC yielded the deepest wear of root dentine, whereas RE and CO, the shallowest. No significant difference in wear among BS, TC and WT were observed. Within the limitations of this study, the data showed that abrasion of both eroded and sound root dentine was dependent on the dentifrice used.

  8. Functional reconstitution of prostaglandin E receptor from bovine adrenal medulla with guanine nucleotide binding proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Negishi, M.; Ito, S.; Yokohama, H.; Hayashi, H.; Katada, T.; Ui, M.; Hayaishi, O.

    1988-05-15

    Prostaglandin E/sub 2/ (PEG/sub 2/) was found to bind specifically to a 100,000 x g pellet prepared from bovine adrenal medulla. The PGE receptor was associated with a GTP-binding protein (G-protein) and could be covalently cross-linked with this G-protein by dithiobis(succinimidyl propionate) in the 100,000 x g pellet. In order to characterize the G-protein associated with the PGE receptor and reconstitute these proteins in phospholipid vesicles, the authors purified the G-protein to apparent homogeneity from the 100,000 x g pellet. The G-protein served as a substrate of pertussis toxin but differed in its ..cap alpha.. subunit from two known pertussis toxin substrate G-proteins (G/sub i/ and G/sub 0/) purified from bovine brain. The molecular weight of the ..cap alpha.. subunit was 40,000, which is between those of G/sub i/ and G/sub 0/. The purified protein was also distinguished immunologically from G/sub i/ and G/sub 0/ and was referred to as G/sub am/. Reconstitution of the PGE receptor with pure C/sub am/, G/sub i/, or G/sub 0/ in phospholipid vesicles resulted in a remarkable restoration of (/sup 3/H)PGE/sub 2/ binding activity in a GTP-dependent manner. The efficiency of these three G-proteins in this capacity was roughly equal. When pertussis toxin- or N-ethylmaleimide-treated G-proteins, instead of the native ones, were reconstituted into vesicles, the restoration of binding activity was no longer observed. These results indicate that the PGE receptor can couple functionally with G/sub am/, G/sub i/, or G/sub 0/ in phospholipid vesicles and suggest that G/sub am/ may be involved in signal transduction of the PGE receptor in bovine adrenal medulla.

  9. Eradication of Infectious Bovine Rhinotracheitis Virus (Bovine Herpesvirus 1) from a Herd of Beef Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    Infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus was eradicated from a 150 cow beef herd at the Animal Diseases Research Institute, Lethbridge, Alberta. Tests used to accomplish this included standard and modified serum-virus neutralization tests and an enzymelinked immunosorbent assay. These results and those of preliminary pilot studies in the herd and in a nonvaccinated, infectious bovine rhinotracheitis-infected 450 cow beef herd suggest that eradication of infectious bovine rhinotracheitis infection can be considered as a practical control alternative to vaccination, and that young animals in purebred herds could be monitored serologically and isolated, to enhance their eligibility for entry into artificial insemination studs or for export. PMID:17422544

  10. 21 CFR 522.1125 - Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine). 522.1125 Section... § 522.1125 Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine). (a) Specifications. Each 125 milliliter bag contains 13 grams per deciliter of polymerized hemoglobin of bovine origin in modified Lactated Ringer's Solution...

  11. 21 CFR 522.1125 - Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine). 522.1125 Section... § 522.1125 Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine). (a) Specifications. Each 125 milliliter bag contains 13 grams per deciliter of polymerized hemoglobin of bovine origin in modified Lactated Ringer's Solution...

  12. 21 CFR 522.1125 - Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine). 522.1125 Section... § 522.1125 Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine). (a) Specifications. Each 125 milliliter bag contains 13 grams per deciliter of polymerized hemoglobin of bovine origin in modified Lactated Ringer's Solution...

  13. 21 CFR 522.1125 - Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine). 522.1125 Section... § 522.1125 Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine). (a) Specifications. Each 125 milliliter bag contains 13 grams per deciliter of polymerized hemoglobin of bovine origin in modified Lactated Ringer's Solution...

  14. 21 CFR 522.1125 - Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine). 522.1125 Section... § 522.1125 Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine). (a) Specifications. Each 125 milliliter bag contains 13 grams per deciliter of polymerized hemoglobin of bovine origin in modified Lactated Ringer's Solution...

  15. 76 FR 26239 - Bovine Tuberculosis and Brucellosis; Public Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-06

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Bovine Tuberculosis and Brucellosis... framework being developed for the bovine tuberculosis and brucellosis programs in the United States. The... tuberculosis (TB) and bovine brucellosis in the United States. In keeping with its commitment to partnering...

  16. 76 FR 38602 - Bovine Tuberculosis and Brucellosis; Program Framework

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-01

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Bovine Tuberculosis and Brucellosis; Program Framework AGENCY... extending the comment period on a new framework being developed for the bovine tuberculosis and brucellosis... (USDA) is currently developing proposed revisions to its programs regarding bovine tuberculosis (TB) and...

  17. Relationship between periodontics and restorative procedures: surgical treatment of the restorative alveolar interface (rai)--case series.

    PubMed

    Almeida, A L P F; Esper, L A; Sbrana, M C; Cunha, M J S; Greghi, S L A; Carrilho, G P B; Pegoraro, L F

    2013-12-01

    Maintenance of a healthy periodontium is fundamental for the long term success of prosthetic restorations. Thus, prosthetic procedures with subgingival margins may affect the periodontal health if the distances between the junctional epithelium and supracrestal connective tissue attachment aren't respected, or if there is insufficient space to maintain the health of the interproximal tissues, leading to gingival inflammation, connective tissue attachment loss and bone resorption. The restorative alveolar interface (RAI) technique was described as the portion of the root surface extending from the alveolar crest apically to the restorative margin coronally. RAI consists of modifying the restorative margin position into a healthier environment, respecting the biological width and therefore allowing effective plaque control. This paper describes four clinical cases with indication for the RAI technique for maintenance of periodontal health. The cases were associated with prostheses. All cases were evaluated at 90 days and exhibited a healthy periodontal tissue. Successful outcomes were observed in the different indications for the RAI technique.

  18. Partial dentures as an independent indicator of root caries risk in a group of older adults.

    PubMed

    Steele, J G; Walls, A W; Murray, J J

    1997-01-01

    To estimate the independent association between the wearing of removable partial dentures (RPD) and the presence of root caries in a population of older adults. Multivariate logistic regression modeling of root caries prevalence using different measures of root caries as dependent variables. The model included measures of disease history as indicators of historical risk. Data collected in the field from three areas of England. Random sample of adults aged 60 years and over, drawn from lists of patients registered with general medical practitioners. Field measurements of a range of oral health variables including oral disease, disease history, oral status and various social and demographic measures. The presence of root caries, unsound and sound root restorations. Of the five different models of root caries prevalence which were used, RPDs featured as an independent risk indicator for root surface caries in the three which were related to the presence of untreated disease. The odds ratios for the contribution made by RPDs were all over 1.6, and when considered alone was in excess of 2 in one model. These models were generally well fitting. RPDs did not feature as a risk indicator in the two models which related only to the presence of root surface restorations. In this study, where RPDs were present, the odds of untreated disease being present increased substantially.

  19. Great Plains Roots.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frey, Jennifer

    2001-01-01

    Sandy White Hawk, Sicangu Lakota, was adopted by white missionaries as an infant and suffered child abuse. After 33 years, she found her birth family and formed First Nations Orphans Association, which uses songs and ceremonies to help adoptees return to their roots. Until the 1970s, federal agencies and welfare organizations facilitated removal…

  20. The Roots Of Alienation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bronfenbrenner, Urie

    1973-01-01

    Alienation in our society takes several forms--withdrawal, hostility, or efforts to reform. The author traces the roots of alienation to our neglect of many of the needs of children, particularly their need for interaction with adults. Among his many recommendations are: modified work schedules to permit more time with children and systems for…

  1. Rooting of conifer propagules

    Treesearch

    R.L. Mott

    1977-01-01

    An outline of the general problems involved with the propagation of elite conifer clones by rooted cuttings is drawn from published reports. New approaches for resolving these problems can come from studies of clone production through tissue culture methods. Probable extension of tissue culture techniques will permit the establishment of clones from adult, proven trees...

  2. Root hair sweet growth

    PubMed Central

    Velasquez, Silvia M; Iusem, Norberto D

    2011-01-01

    Root hairs are single cells specialized in the absorption of water and nutrients from the soil. Growing root hairs require intensive cell-wall changes to accommodate cell expansion at the apical end by a process known as tip or polarized growth. We have recently shown that cell wall glycoproteins such as extensins (EXTs) are essential components of the cell wall during polarized growth. Proline hydroxylation, an early posttranslational modification of cell wall EXTs that is catalyzed by prolyl 4-hydroxylases (P4Hs), defines the subsequent O-glycosylation sites in EXTs. Biochemical inhibition or genetic disruption of specific P4Hs resulted in the blockage of polarized growth in root hairs. Our results demonstrate that correct hydroxylation and also further O-glycosylation on EXTs are essential for cell-wall self-assembly and, hence, root hair elongation. The changes that O-glycosylated cell-wall proteins like EXTs undergo during cell growth represent a starting point to unravel the entire biochemical pathway involved in plant development. PMID:21918376

  3. Great Plains Roots.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frey, Jennifer

    2001-01-01

    Sandy White Hawk, Sicangu Lakota, was adopted by white missionaries as an infant and suffered child abuse. After 33 years, she found her birth family and formed First Nations Orphans Association, which uses songs and ceremonies to help adoptees return to their roots. Until the 1970s, federal agencies and welfare organizations facilitated removal…

  4. Armillaria Root Disease

    Treesearch

    R.E. Williams; C.G. III Shaw; P.M. Wargo; W.H. Sites

    1986-01-01

    Armillaria root disease is found throughout temperate and tropical regions of the world. In the continental United States, the disease has been reported in nearly every State. Hosts include hundreds of species of trees, shrubs, vines, and forbs growing in forests, along roadsides, and in cultivated areas. The disease is caused by fungi, which live as parasites on...

  5. Multiple external root resorption.

    PubMed

    Yusof, W Z; Ghazali, M N

    1989-04-01

    Presented is an unusual case of multiple external root resorption. Although the cause of this resorption was not determined, several possibilities are presented. Trauma from occlusion, periodontal and pulpal inflammation, and resorption of idiopathic origin are all discussed as possible causes.

  6. Grass Roots Project Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wick, John W.

    Some aspects of a grass roots evaluation training program are presented. The program consists of two elements: (1) a series of 11 slide/tape individualized self-paced units, and (2) a six-week summer program. Three points of view on this program are: (1) University graduate programs in quantitative areas are usually consumed by specialists; (2)…

  7. The Roots of Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montoya, Colleen, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This newsletter covers educational issues affecting schools in the Western Regional Educational Laboratory's 4-state region (Arizona, California, Nevada, and Utah) and nationwide. The following articles appear in the Volume 4, Number 1 issue: (1) "The Roots of Reading"; (2) "Breaking the Code: Reading Literacy in K-3"; (3)…

  8. Stachbotrys Root Rot

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Stachybotrys root rot is caused by Stachybotrys chartarum, a cellulytic saprophytic hyphomycete fungus. The pathogen produces mycotoxins including a host of immunosupressant compounds for human and is one of the causes of the "sick building syndrome." Although S. chartarum is rarely known as a plan...

  9. Mycorrhizal colonization across hydrologic gradients in restored and reference freshwater wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bauer, C.R.; Kellogg, C.H.; Bridgham, S.D.; Lamberti, G.A.

    2003-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizae, which are plant root-fungal symbioses, are common associates of vascular plants. Such relationships, however, are thought to be rare in wetland plant roots, although several recent studies suggest that arbuscular mycorrhizae may be important in wetland ecosystems. Our objectives were to determine (1) the level of arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization of plant roots in three freshwater marshes and (2) the effect of restoration status, hydrologic zone, and plant species identity on mycorrhizal colonization. We quantified the percentage of plant roots colonized by mycorrhizal fungi in one reference and two restored freshwater marshes in northern Indiana, USA during summer 1999. Roots were collected from soil cores taken around dominant plant species present in each of three hydrologic zones and then stained for microscopic examination of mycorrhizal colonization. Mycorrhizae were present in each wetland, in all hydrologic zones and in all sampled plants, including Carex and Scirpus species previously thought to be non-mycorrhizal. Both restored and reference wetlands had moderate levels of mycorrhizal colonization, but no clear trends in colonization were seen with hydrologic zone, which has been hypothesized to regulate the formation of mycorrhizae in wetlands. Mycorrhizal colonization levels in the roots of individual species ranged from 3 to 90% and were particularly large in members of the Poaceae (grass) family. Our results suggest that arbuscular mycorrhizae may be widely distributed across plant species and hydrologic zones in both restored and reference freshwater marshes. Thus, future research should examine the functional role of mycorrhizal fungi in freshwater wetlands. ?? 2003, The Society of Wetland Scientists.

  10. Environmental Restoration Quality Program Plan. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Colley, J.S.

    1992-08-01

    The Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Environmental Restoration (ER) Program was initially chartered on October 1, 1989, as a ``entral Environmental Restoration Division`` to manage the investigation and remediation of inactive sites and facilities that have been declared surplus and have no further programmatic use. The Energy Systems ER Division was established to support the DOE Oak Ridge Field Office (DOE-OR) consolidated ER Program. The DOE-OR Assistant Manager for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management provides program and budget direction to the Energy Systems ER Program for environmental restoration activities at the sites operated by Energy Systems (Oak Ridge K-25 Site, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant) and at the off-site locations. The Energy Systems ER Division is specifically charged with assessing these sites for potential contamination and managing the cleanup processes. The Energy Systems Environmental Restoration Division was chartered on October 1, 1989, as a central organization to manage the Remedial Action (RA) Program. The purpose of this document is to ensure that: senior ER management provides planning, organization, direction, control, and support to achieve the organization`s objectives; the line organization achieves quality; and overall performance is reviewed and evaluated using a rigorous assessment process.

  11. Demecolcine-assisted enucleation for bovine cloning.

    PubMed

    Tani, Tetsuya; Shimada, Hiroaki; Kato, Yoko; Tsunoda, Yukio

    2006-01-01

    The present study demonstrated that demecolcine treatment for at least 30 min produces a membrane protrusion in metaphase II-stage bovine oocytes. The maternal chromosome mass is condensed within the protrusion, which makes it easy to remove the maternal chromosomes for nuclear transfer (NT). Maturation promoting factor activity, but not mitogen-activated protein kinase activity, increased up to 30% in oocytes during demecolcine treatment. One normal healthy calf was obtained after transfer of four NT blastocysts produced following demecolcine treatment. Demecolcine treatment did not increase the potential of NT oocytes to develop into blastocysts. The present study demonstrated that chemically-assisted removal of chromosomes is effective for bovine cloning.

  12. Horizontal root fractures in posterior teeth without dental trauma: tooth/root distribution and clinical characteristics.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Y-L; Liao, W-C; Wang, C-Y; Chang, M-C; Chang, S-H; Chang, S-F; Chang, C-W; Huang, Y-D; Chan, C-P; Jeng, J-H

    2017-09-01

    To describe the clinical characteristics and radiographic findings of horizontal root fractures (HRF) in posterior teeth without a history of dental trauma. A total 24 patients and 31 HRF cases in 28 posterior teeth were collected from 2006 to 2015. Clinical examinations and radiographic imaging were evaluated. Value of confidence intervals of the proportions was calculated for data presentation. The number of males (54%) was similar to females (46%). The patients were predominantly between 50 and 70 years of age (75%). Most HRF cases were found in nonendodontically treated teeth (79%), without crown and bridge restorations (82%), and maxillary molars (54%). Many roots of maxillary molars had developed HRF, and the probability was nearly equal. Fractured teeth usually presented with periodontal and apical bone loss, and most patients (92%) were diagnosed with full mouth chronic periodontitis. Tooth wear was another common clinical feature amongst these patients. HRF in posterior teeth without dental trauma occurred mainly in patients aged between 50 and 70, in nonendodontically treated teeth, teeth with attrition but without crown and bridge restorations, maxillary molars and with periodontal and periapical bony destruction. Periodontal condition, occlusal wear and patients' age at diagnosis were the possible related factors. HRF in posterior teeth without dental trauma is a diagnostic challenge and even misdiagnosed. A thorough clinical examination, radiographic analysis and recognition of the clinical characteristics are helpful in the early diagnosis and treatment of HRF. © 2016 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Esthetic restoration of infra-occluded retained primary mandibular incisors with all-ceramic crowns in adult dentition.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Kuang-Wei; Shen, Yu-Fu

    2004-12-01

    The prevalence of hypodontia is reported to be between 1.5% to 10% in the permanent dentition. In the anterior teeth, maxillary lateral incisors and mandibular central incisors are the most frequently involved teeth. This causes esthetic problems for the patient. Several reports have focused on restoration of retained maxillary primary anterior teeth, but none have described restoration of retained mandibular primary incisors. This clinical report describes the restoration of infra-occluded retained primary mandibular central incisors of a 17 year-old girl diagnosed with hypodontia. All-ceramic crowns made with computer-aided design/ computer-aided manufacturing technology were used to restore the teeth incisally and interproximally. Due to a relatively short root length and inadequate crown-root ratio, the primary mandibular central incisors were splinted and adjusted to distribute the protrusive force evenly across the maxillary and mandibular incisors. Functional and esthetic results were achieved.

  14. The Tennessee study: factors affecting treatment outcome and healing time following nonsurgical root canal treatment.

    PubMed

    Azim, A A; Griggs, J A; Huang, G T-J

    2016-01-01

    To determine factors that may influence treatment outcome and healing time following root canal treatment. Root filled and restored teeth by pre-doctoral students were included in this study. Teeth/roots were followed-up regularly, and treatment outcome was evaluated at every follow-up appointment (healed, healing, uncertain or unsatisfactory). Host (age, immune condition, pulp/periapical diagnosis, tooth/root type, location and anatomy) and treatment factors (master apical file size, apical extension, voids and density of root filling) were recorded from patient dental records. Univariate, bivariate and multivariate analyses were performed to determine the impact of the factors on treatment outcomes and healing times. A total of 422 roots from 291 teeth met the inclusion criteria with a mean follow-up period of 2 years. The preoperative pulp condition, procedural errors during treatment, apical extension and density of root fillings significantly affected the treatment outcome. The average time required for a periapical lesion to heal was 11.78 months. The healing time increased in patients with compromised healing, patients older than 40 years, roots with Weine type II root canal systems, root canal systems prepared to a master apical file size <35, and roots with overextended fillings (P < 0.1). Multiple host and treatment factors affected the healing time and outcome of root canal treatment. Follow-up protocols should consider these factors before concluding the treatment outcome: patient's age, immune condition, as well as roots with overextended fillings, root canal systems with smaller apical preparations (size <35) or roots with complex canal systems. Intervention may be recommended if the treatment quality was inadequate or if patients became symptomatic. © 2015 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. The Mechanics and Energetics of Soil Bioturbation by Plant Roots and Earthworms - Plastic Deformation Considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Siul; Or, Dani; Schymanski, Stanislaus

    2014-05-01

    Soil structure plays a critical factor in the agricultural, hydrological and ecological functions of soils. These services are adversely impacted by soil compaction, a damage that could last for many years until functional structure is restored. An important class of soil structural restoration processes are related to biomechanical activity associated with burrowing of earthworms and root proliferation in impacted soil volumes. We study details of the mechanical processes and energetics associated with quantifying the rates and mechanical energy required for soil structural restoration. We first consider plastic cavity expansion to describe earthworm and plant root radial expansion under various conditions. We then use cone penetration models as analogues to wedging induced by root tip growth and worm locomotion. The associated mechanical stresses and strains determine the mechanical energy associated with bioturbation for different hydration conditions and root/earthworm geometries. Results illustrate a reduction in strain energy with increasing water content and trade-offs between pressure and energy investment for various root and earthworm geometries. The study provides the basic building blocks for estimating rates of soil structural alteration, the associated energetic requirements (soil carbon, plant assimilates) needed to sustain structure regeneration by earthworms and roots, and highlights potential mechanical cut-offs for such activities.

  16. Hypertrophy of cultured bovine aortic endothelium following irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, E.M.; Vinter, D.W.; Goldberg, I.D.

    1989-03-01

    The vascular endothelium is a vital multifunctional tissue which covers the entire luminal surface of the circulatory system. Loss of continuity of the endothelial lining normally results in cell migration and proliferation to make up for cell loss and to ensure that exposure of the thrombogenic subendothelium to platelets and clotting factors is minimized. We showed that ionizing radiation (400-3000 cGy) causes dose-dependent cell loss from confluent monolayer cultures of bovine aortic endothelium, which cannot immediately be compensated by cell proliferation. Within 24 h, the remaining attached cells undergo substantial somatic hypertrophy (evidenced by increased protein content, cell volume, and attachment area) but remain diploid. If cell loss is not excessive, monolayer continuity is restored within several days. Although reduced protein degradation may contribute, most of the protein accumulation is due to synthesis of new protein. Unlike endothelium, irradiation of smooth muscle cultures causes neither cell loss nor increased protein synthesis. Hypertrophy of irradiated endothelial cells appears to be a consequence of a proliferative stimulus (cell loss) in a population of cells which is unable to divide. It can be modulated by replating irradiated cells at different densities. We suggest that endothelial hypertrophy is an early vascular homeostatic response before clonal proliferation of surviving cells or repopulation by cells from outside of the irradiated field can compensate for cell loss.

  17. Oak restoration trials: Santa Catalina Island

    Treesearch

    Lisa Stratton

    2002-01-01

    Two restoration trials involving four oak species have been implemented as part of a larger restoration program for Catalina Island. In 1997 the Catalina Island Conservancy began an active program of restoration after 50 years of ranching and farming activities on the island. The restoration program includes removing feral goats and pigs island-wide and converting 80...

  18. Contemporary forest restoration: A review emphasizing function

    Treesearch

    John A. Stanturf; Brian J. Palik; R. Kasten Dumroese

    2014-01-01

    The forest restoration challenge (globally 2 billion ha) and the prospect of changing climate with increasing frequency of extreme events argues for approaching restoration from a functional and landscape perspective. Because the practice of restoration utilizes many techniques common to silviculture, no clear line separates ordinary forestry practices from restoration...

  19. Microhardness of different resin cement shades inside the root canal.

    PubMed

    Vignolo, Valeria; Fuentes, Maria-Victoria; Garrido, Miguel-Angel; Rodríguez, Jesús; Ceballos, Laura

    2012-09-01

    To compare microhardness along the root canal post space of two resin cements in different shades and a dual-cure resin core material. Root canals of 21 bovine incisors were prepared for post space. Translucent posts (X∘Post, Dentsply DeTrey) were luted using one the following resin luting agent: Calibra (Dentsply DeTrey) in Translucent, Medium and Opaque shades, RelyX Unicem (3M ESPE) in Translucent, A2 and A3 shades and the dual-cure resin core material Core∘X flow. All materials were applied according to manufacturers' instructions and were all photopolymerized (Bluephase LED unit, Ivoclar Vivadent, 40s). After 24 hours, roots were transversally cut into 9 slices 1 mm thick from the coronal to apical extremes, three corresponding to each root third. Then, VHNs were recorded (100gf, 30 s) on the resin luting materials along the adhesive interface in all sections. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and SNK tests (α=0.05). A significant influence on microhardness of resin luting material in their respective shades (p<0.0001), root third (p<0.0001) and interactions between them was detected (p<0.0001). RelyX Unicem cement showed the highest microhardness values and Calibra the lowest, regardless of the shade selected. All resin luting materials tested exhibited a significantly higher microhardness in the cervical third. Microhardness of resin luting agents tested inside the canal is dependent on material brand and resin cement shade seems to be a less relevant factor. Microhardness decreased along the root canal, regardless of the shade selected.

  20. Native plants for effective coastal wetland restoration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howard, Rebecca J.

    2003-01-01

    Plant communities, along with soils and appropriate water regimes, are essential components of healthy wetland systems. In Louisiana, the loss of wetland habitat continues to be an issue of major concern. Wetland loss is caused by several interacting factors, both natural and human-induced (e.g., erosion and saltwater intrusion from the construction of canals and levees). Recent estimates of annual coastal land loss rates of about 62 km2 (24 mi2 ) over the past decade emphasize the magnitude of this problem. In an attempt to slow the rate of loss and perhaps halt the overall trend, resource managers in Louisiana apply various techniques to restore damaged or degraded habitats to functioning wetland systems.Researchers at the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Wetlands Research Center (NWRC) have cooperated with the Louisiana Department of Natural Resources in studies that address effective restoration strategies for coastal wetlands. The studies have identified differences in growth that naturally exist in native Louisiana wetland plant species and genetic varieties (i.e., clones) within species. Clones of a species have a distinctive genetic identity, and some clones may also have distinctive growth responses under various environmental conditions (i.e., preferences). Indeed, large areas of coastal marsh are typically populated by several clones of a plant species, each growing in a microenvironment suited to its preferences.These studies will provide information that will assist resource managers in selecting plant species and clones of species with known growth characteristics that can be matched to environmental conditions at potential restoration sites. Before the studies began, a collection of several clones from four plant species native to coastal Louisiana was established. The species collected included saltgrass (Distichlis spicata), common reed (Phragmites australis), giant bulrush (Schoenoplectus californicus), and saltmarsh bulrush (Schoenoplectus

  1. Fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth with different direct corono-radicular restoration methods

    PubMed Central

    Moosavi, Horieh; Manari, Fatemeh

    2017-01-01

    Background Endodontically treated teeth are widely considered to be more susceptible to fracture than vital teeth. Obturation procedures and post placement have been a main cause of vertical root fracture. Material and Methods Forty-eight human premolars with standardized weakened roots were endodontically treated and allocated to four experimental groups (n=12). After root canal treatment, in group 1, fiber posts #1 were cemented in root canals using Estelite Core Quick, and the crowns were restored with resin composite. For group 2 and 3, the roots and crowns were restored using a light-cured and self-cured adhesive and resin composites respectively. In group 4, it was used the Panavia F 2.0 resin cement and resin composite for corono-radicular reconstruction. In group 5, the teeth remained untouched. After 24 hours storage and 1000 thermocycles, samples were loaded at a cross head speed of 1 mm per minute. Results A significant difference was observed in fracture resistance among groups 4 and 5 compared to other groups. Conclusions Root reconstruction with fiber post and Panavia resin cement, and crown building using light-cured resin composite resulted in increased fracture resistance equal to that of intact teeth. Key words:Fracture resistance, fiber post, resin cement, resin composite. PMID:28298991

  2. Fracture resistance of incisor teeth restored using fibre-reinforced posts and threaded metal posts: effect of post length, location, pretreatment and cementation of the final restoration.

    PubMed

    Schmitter, M; Lippenberger, S; Rues, S; Gilde, H; Rammelsberg, P

    2010-05-01

    The hypothesis of this study was that the fracture load of incisor teeth restored using short, threaded, parallel-sided posts (TMP) is, under special conditions, not inferior to that of teeth restored using long TMPs or fibre-reinforced posts (FRP). Seventy-two maxillary incisors and 72 mandibular incisors were collected. Sixty-four in each group were root filled; in half of these FRPs were cemented, and in the other half TMPs were used. Half of the FRPs were pretreated; the others were not pretreated. In the TMP-group, half of the teeth received a long post (10 mm), the other half a short post (3 mm). Crowns were fabricated and cemented with Ketac-cem or Panavia. Eight maxillary incisors and eight mandibular incisors with intact natural crowns were used as control groups. All specimens were loaded until fracture. Fracture loads were higher for pretreated FRPs than for untreated FRPs. If the FRPs were not pretreated, fracture loads for maxillary incisors after use of short metal posts were significantly higher (248 N compared with 133 N, P = 0.027). Fracture loads for teeth restored using long TMPs were not higher than for teeth restored using short TMPs (277 N compared with 266 N). Fracture loads for mandibular incisors restored using long (10 mm) pretreated FRP were higher than for mandibular incisors restored using short (3 mm) metal posts (436 N compared with 285 N). Cementation of the crowns using an adhesive resin cement did not increase the fracture load for mandibular incisors, whereas for maxillary incisors, this cementation technique tended to increase fracture loads in teeth restored with FRP, although this increase was not significant at the P < 0.05 level (P = 0.06). In both groups, fracture loads were higher for mandibular incisors. Short, threaded, parallel-sided metal posts might be an alternative to fibre- reinforced posts for maxillary incisors, for teeth with short roots or when FRP cannot be pretreated.

  3. Covalent coupling of bovine growth hormone to its receptor in bovine liver membranes.

    PubMed

    Badinga, L; Collier, R J; Thatcher, W W; Quintana, S J; Bazer, F W

    1987-07-01

    The structure of bovine somatotropin receptor was examined following covalent coupling of iodinated recombinant bovine growth hormone ([125I]rbGH) to bovine liver membrane receptors using ethylene glycol bis(succinimidyl succinate). Iodinated rbGH was incorporated into a complex of estimated Mr of 140,000 under reducing conditions. Excess unlabeled rbGH, but not bovine prolactin (bPRL), inhibited completely the incorporation of [125I]rbGH into the Mr = 140,000 species. In dairy bulls, the Mr = 140,000 complex was undetectable soon after birth but became predominant at 6 months of age. No evidence was found to support presence of bPRL receptors in steer liver membranes. Assuming a 1:1 stoichiometry of hormone binding to receptor, it appears that bGH binds to a major receptor subunit of Mr = 119,000 which does not recognize bPRL.

  4. Environmental Restoration Quality Program Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Colley, J.S.

    1992-08-01

    The Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Environmental Restoration (ER) Program was initially chartered on October 1, 1989, as a entral Environmental Restoration Division'' to manage the investigation and remediation of inactive sites and facilities that have been declared surplus and have no further programmatic use. The Energy Systems ER Division was established to support the DOE Oak Ridge Field Office (DOE-OR) consolidated ER Program. The DOE-OR Assistant Manager for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management provides program and budget direction to the Energy Systems ER Program for environmental restoration activities at the sites operated by Energy Systems (Oak Ridge K-25 Site, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant) and at the off-site locations. The Energy Systems ER Division is specifically charged with assessing these sites for potential contamination and managing the cleanup processes. The Energy Systems Environmental Restoration Division was chartered on October 1, 1989, as a central organization to manage the Remedial Action (RA) Program. The purpose of this document is to ensure that: senior ER management provides planning, organization, direction, control, and support to achieve the organization's objectives; the line organization achieves quality; and overall performance is reviewed and evaluated using a rigorous assessment process.

  5. Mechanical Restoration and Failure Analyses of a Hydrogel and Scaffold Composite Strategy for Annulus Fibrosus Repair

    PubMed Central

    Long, Rose G; Bürki, Alexander; Zysset, Philippe; Eglin, David; Grijpma, Dirk W.; Blanquer, Sebastien BG; Hecht, Andrew C; Iatridis, James C

    2015-01-01

    Unrepaired defects in the annulus fibrosus of intervertebral discs are associated with degeneration and persistent back pain. A clinical need exists for a disc repair strategy that can seal annular defects, be easily delivered during surgical procedures, and restore biomechanics with low risk of herniation. Multiple annulus repair strategies were developed using poly(trimethylene carbonate) scaffolds optimized for cell delivery, polyurethane membranes designed to prevent herniation, and fibrin-genipin adhesive tuned to annulus fibrosus shear properties. This three-part study evaluated repair strategies for biomechanical restoration, herniation risk and failure mode in torsion, bending and compression at physiological and hyper-physiological loads using a bovine injury model. Fibrin-genipin hydrogel restored some torsional stiffness, bending ROM and disc height loss, with negligible herniation risk and failure was observed histologically at the fibrin-genipin mid-substance following rigorous loading. Scaffold-based repairs partially restored biomechanics, but had high herniation risk even when stabilized with sutured membranes and failure was observed histologically at the interface between scaffold and fibrin-genipin adhesive. Fibrin-genipin was the simplest annulus fibrosus repair solution evaluated that involved an easily deliverable adhesive that filled irregularly-shaped annular defects and partially restored disc biomechanics with low herniation risk, suggesting further evaluation for disc repair may be warranted. PMID:26577987

  6. Effect of cyclic loading on the bond strength of class II restorations with different composite materials.

    PubMed

    Cavalcanti, Andrea Nóbrega; Mitsui, Fabio Hiroyuki Ogata; Silva, Flávia; Peris, Alessandra Rezende; Bedran-Russo, Ana; Marchi, Giselle Maria

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of cyclic loading on the bond strength of Class II restorations using different composite materials. Class II preparations with gingival margins located in dentin were performed on the mesial surface of 80 bovine incisors. The teeth were randomly allocated to eight groups (n=10) according to resin composite (Filtek Z250, Filtek Supreme, Tetric Ceram HB and Esthet-X) and use of cyclic loading. The restorations were bonded with the Single Bond adhesive system. Simulated aging groups were cyclic loaded for 200,000 cycles with 80N load (2Hz). The specimens were vertically sectioned (two slabs per restoration) and further trimmed into an hour-glass shape at the adhesive interface to obtain a final bonded area 1 mm2. Samples were placed in an apparatus and tested under tension using a universal testing machine. The data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey test with a 95% confidence level. Aged groups presented significantly lower means when compared to the groups that were not aged (p=0.03). However, significant differences among composite materials were not observed (p=0.17). Regardless of the restorative composite material used, it could be concluded that the bond strength of Class II restorations at the gingival wall was affected by simulated cyclic loading.

  7. Tooth bleaching effects 
on the adhesive interface 
of composite restorations.

    PubMed

    Silva, Lorena; Thedei, Geraldo; Menezes-Oliveira, Maria Angélica; Nogueira, Ruchele D; Geraldo-Martins, Vinicius

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of different bleaching techniques on the tooth-restoration interface of composite restorations. Cavities (3 x 3 x 2 mm) were prepared in 100 bovine incisor fragments, which were etched with a conventional adhesive system and restored with a nanocomposite. The fragments were randomly divided into five groups (n = 20): Control (no bleaching), At-home bleaching (HB) (10% hydrogen peroxide [HP]), In-office bleaching (OB) (35% HP), LED-activated bleaching (LB) (35% HP activated by LED), and Laser-activated bleaching (LaB) (35% HP activated by diode laser, λ = 880 nm). After bleaching, 10 samples per group were thermocycled (500 cycles, 5°C to 55°C), immersed in 50% silver nitrate solution, sectioned, evaluated under a stereomicroscope, and scored for microleakage. The other samples were pH cycled for 14 consecutive days, sectioned, and the enamel adjacent to the adhesive interface assessed by cross-sectional Knoop hardness. The data were compared using the one-way ANOVA (α = 0.05). No differences between the microleakage indexes found for the control and experimental groups were observed. The enamel of the bleached groups located near the adhesive interface presented the same Knoop hardness numbers as the samples of the control group. Tooth bleaching does not damage the tooth-restoration interface of composite restorations.

  8. Yellow-Poplar Rooting Habits

    Treesearch

    John K. Francis

    1979-01-01

    Although the configuration of pole-sized yellow-poplar root systems in Tennessee is quite variable, a branched taproot with several widely spreading laterals is typical. Rooting depth is particularly limited by clayey texture, wetness, and firmness of subsoils.

  9. Restoration of primary anterior teeth: review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jacob K

    2002-01-01

    This paper reviews the published data on restorations of primary anterior teeth. The discussion includes Class III restorations, Class V restorations, various forms of full coronal restorations, atraumatic restorative technique (ART) and recommendations for future research.

  10. Advances in root reinforcement experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giadrossich, Filippo; Schwarz, Massimiliano; Niedda, Marcello

    2013-04-01

    Root reinforcement is considered in many situations an important effect of vegetation for slope stability. In the past 20 years many studies analyzed root reinforcement in laboratory and field experiments, as well as through modeling frameworks. Nearby the important contribution of roots to shear strength, roots are recognized to impart stabilization also through lateral (parallel to slope) redistribution of forces under tension. Lateral root reinforcement under tensile solicitations (such as in the upper part of a shallow landslide) was documented and discussed by some studies. The most common method adopted to measure lateral root reinforcement are pullout tests where roots (single or as bundle) are pulled out from a soil matrix. These conditions are indeed representative for the case where roots within the mass of a landslide slip out from the upper stable part of the slope (such in a tension crack). However, there is also the situation where roots anchored at the upper stable part of the slope slip out from the sliding soil mass. In this last case it is difficult to quantify root reinforcement and no study discussed this mechanism so far. The main objective of this study is to quantify the contribution of roots considering the two presented cases of lateral root reinforcement discussed above - roots slipping out from stable soil profile or sliding soil matrix from anchored roots-, and discuss the implication of the results for slope stability modeling. We carried out a series of laboratory experiments for both roots pullout and soil sliding mechanisms using a tilting box with a bundle of 15 roots. Both Douglas (Pseudotsuga menziesii) roots and soil were collected from the study area in Sardinia (Italy), and reconstructed in laboratory, filling the root and soil layer by layer up to 0.4 meter thickness. The results show that the ratio between pullout force and force transferred to the root during soil sliding range from 0.5 to 1. This results indicate that

  11. Effect of ultrasonics on Enterococcus faecalis biofilm in a bovine tooth model.

    PubMed

    Gründling, Grasiela Longhi; Zechin, Janaína Guzzo; Jardim, Wagner Mariano; de Oliveira, Sílvia Dias; de Figueiredo, José Antônio Poli

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate in vitro the effect of the ultrasonic irrigation of sodium hypochlorite and EDTA in root canals of bovine teeth infected with Enterococcus faecalis. Eighty-four bovine incisors were inoculated with E. faecalis, remaining in culture for 50 days for biofilm formation. The teeth were divided into four groups: the control group, which received no treatment; the ultrasonic + distilled water group; the conventional irrigation with sodium hypochlorite + EDTA group; and the passive ultrasonic irrigation with sodium hypochlorite + EDTA group. Microbiological tests and analysis in scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were performed. In microbiological testing, groups using sodium hypochlorite did not show bacterial growth. There were significant differences between the control group and the ultrasonic + distilled water group and between these groups and groups using sodium hypochlorite. In SEM analysis, at the canal wall area, there was no significant difference between the groups using sodium hypochlorite, but these were different from the others groups. The control group was significantly different from the ultrasonic + distilled water group. At the exposed tubule area, there was no significant difference between the groups. Passive ultrasonic irrigation can be an aid in cleaning the root canal; however, the main role in bacteria elimination is played by the irrigant. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A Hemoglobin Based Oxygen Carrier, Bovine Polymerized Hemoglobin (HBOC-201) versus Hetastarch (HEX) in an Uncontrolled Liver Injury Hemorrhagic Shock Swine Model with Delayed Evacuation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-10-01

    A Hemoglobin Based Oxygen Carrier, Bovine Polymerized Hemoglobin (HBOC-201) versus Hetastarch (HEX) in an Uncontrolled Liver Injury Hemorrhagic Shock...Transcutaneous tis- sue oxygenation was restored more rap- idly in HBOC-201 pigs, there was a trend to lower lactic acid, and base deficit was less...lactic acidosis and base deficit (BD) abnormalities, indicating on-going hypoperfusion.2–4 As these abnormalities measured upon hospital arrival

  13. Concurrent Bovine Virus Diarrhea and Bovine Papular Stomatitis Infection in a Calf

    PubMed Central

    Bohac, J. G.; Yates, W. D. G.

    1980-01-01

    A case of concurrent infection with the viruses of bovine virus diarrhea and papular stomatitis in a calf is reported. The difficulties posed by such situations are described and the criteria used for diagnosis outlined. The two diseases are reviewed briefly and the possible mechanisms whereby bovine virus diarrhea virus is suspected of facilitating infection by other agents are discussed. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4. PMID:7459795

  14. Angles of multivariable root loci

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, P. M.; Stein, G.; Laub, A. J.

    1982-01-01

    A generalized eigenvalue problem is demonstrated to be useful for computing the multivariable root locus, particularly when obtaining the arrival angles to finite transmission zeros. The multivariable root loci are found for a linear, time-invariant output feedback problem. The problem is then employed to compute a closed-loop eigenstructure. The method of computing angles on the root locus is demonstrated, and the method is extended to a multivariable optimal root locus.

  15. [Comparative study of root canal morphology of mandibular incisors by cone-beam CT and canal staining and clearing technique].

    PubMed

    Wen, Shan-hui; Lin, Zi-tong; Zhu, Min; Ge, Jiu-yu; Wang, Tie-mei

    2016-02-01

    To compare the root canal morphology of mandibular incisors by using cone-beam CT (CBCT) and canal staining and clearing technique. Sixty-one extracted mandibular incisors with complete dental root and apex which received no endodontic treatment and no post crown restoration were selected. Each tooth was radiographed with CBCT, and the root canal system was stained by canal staining and clearing technique. The consistency of the number of root canal, root canal Vertucci type of mandibular permanent incisors between the two methods were compared, and the differences of the detection rate on root canal branch structure between the two methods were analyzed. The results were statistically analyzed with SPSS 17.0 software package. The Kappa value of single and double root canal types between CBCT and canal staining and clearing technique was 0.847 (P<0.001). The Kappa value of Vertucci root canal types between CBCT and canal staining and clearing technique was 0.861 (P<0.001). The detection rates of root canal branch structure were 8.19% and 22.95%, respectively, with significant difference between the two methods (P=0.025). The canal staining and clearing technique was significantly better than CBCT in detection of root canal branch structure. CBCT can reflect the root canal types nearly perfectly, but inferior to canal staining and clearing technique in detection of root canal branch structure, CBCT is a relatively accurate clinical diagnosis tool of root canal morphology.

  16. Abnormal fibrillin metabolism in bovine Marfan syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Potter, K. A.; Hoffman, Y.; Sakai, L. Y.; Byers, P. H.; Besser, T. E.; Milewicz, D. M.

    1993-01-01

    Bovine Marfan syndrome is a disorder that closely resembles human Marfan syndrome in its clinical signs and pathological lesions. The similarities between the human and bovine diseases suggest that similar metabolic defects could be responsible. Although indirect immunofluorescent assays for fibrillin in skin biopsies did not distinguish affected cattle from control animals, cultures of skin fibroblasts of affected animals were distinguished from normal, unrelated control animals and normal half-siblings on the basis of fibrillin staining. After 72 to 96 hours in culture, stained with anti-fibrillin monoclonal antibody 201, hyperconfluent fibroblast cultures of affected cattle had less immunoreactive fibrillin than control cultures, and the staining pattern was granular rather than fibrillar. Under similar culture conditions, normal bovine aortic smooth muscle cells produced large amounts of immunoreactive fibrillin, but smooth muscle cells from a single affected cow showed markedly less fibrillin staining. In pulse-chase metabolic labeling experiments with [35S]cysteine, dermal fibroblasts from 6 affected calves, incorporated far less fibrillin into the extracellular matrix than control cells. These findings are similar to those reported in human Marfan syndrome, and they suggest that the bovine Marfan syndrome, like the human disorder, is caused by a mutation in fibrillin, leading to defective microfibrillar synthesis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8456941

  17. Molecular biology of bovine viral diarrhea virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDV) are arguably the most important viral pathogen of ruminants worldwide and can cause severe economic loss. Clinical symptoms of the disease caused by BVDV range from subclinical to severe acute hemorrhagic syndrome, with the severity of disease being strain depend...

  18. Recombinant Bovine Growth Hormone Criticism Grows.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaard, Greta

    1995-01-01

    Discusses concerns related to the use of recombinant bovine growth hormone in the United States and other countries. Analyses the issue from the perspectives of animal rights, human health, world hunger, concerns of small and organic farmers, costs to the taxpayer, and environmental questions. A sidebar discusses Canadian review of the hormone.…

  19. Bovine immunodeficiency virus: facts and questions.

    PubMed

    Belloc, C; Polack, B; Schwartz-Cornil, I; Brownlie, J; Lévy, D

    1996-01-01

    Bovine immunodeficiency virus (BIV) is a lentivirus whose serologic prevalence is worldwide. Little is known about its impact on animal health status, pathogenesis and mode of transmission. Understanding BIV biology implies isolation of new viral strains and long-term studies on experimentally-infected cows and surrogate hosts such as rabbits.

  20. Control of bovine hepatic fatty acid oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Jesse, B.W.; Emery, R.S.; Thomas, J.W.

    1986-09-01

    Fatty acid oxidation by bovine liver slices and mitochondria was examined to determine potential regulatory sites of fatty acid oxidation. Conversion of 1-(/sup 14/C)palmitate to /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ and total (/sup 14/C)acid-soluble metabolites was used to measure fatty acid oxidation. Oxidation of palmitate (1 mM) was linear in both liver slice weight and incubation time. Carnitine stimulated palmitate oxidation; 2 mM dl-carnitine produced maximal stimulation of palmitate oxidation to both CO/sup 2/ and acid-soluble metabolites. Propionate (10 mM) inhibited palmitate oxidation by bovine liver slices. Propionate (.5 to 10 mM) had no effect on palmitate oxidation by mitochondria, but malonyl Coenzyme A, the first committed intermediate of fatty acid synthesis, inhibited mitochondrial palmitate oxidation (inhibition constant = .3 ..mu..M). Liver mitochonndrial carnitine palmitoyltransferase exhibited Michaelis constants for palmitoyl Coenzyme A and l-carnitine of 11.5 ..mu..M and .59 mM, respectively. Long-chain fatty acid oxidation in bovine liver is regulated by mechanisms similar to those in rats but adapted to the unique digestive physiology of the bovine.