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Sample records for bow direction reversal

  1. Articulated coordination of the right arm underlies control of bow parameters and quick bow reversals in skilled cello bowing

    PubMed Central

    Verrel, Julius; Woollacott, Marjorie; Lindenberger, Ulman

    2014-01-01

    Stringed instrument bowing is a complex coordinative motor skill acquired though years of intense practice. We apply a novel “freezing” analysis to investigate how movement at different joints contributes to bow transport (movement amplitude), stabilization of bow parameters (angle, velocity) during bow movements, and quick reversals of bow direction (acceleration amplitude). Participants were ten advanced or professional cellists (19–32 years, at least 10 years of practice) and ten age-matched novice players. Arm and bow movements were recorded using 3D motion capture. To assess how performance depends on articulated use of the right arm, actual data were compared to surrogate data, generated by artificially removing movement at (“freezing”) individual joints in measured arm movements. This analysis showed that both elbow and shoulder significantly contribute to bow transport in experts, while only the shoulder contributed to bow transport in novices. Moreover, experts showed more strongly increased variability of bow parameters and reduced acceleration amplitudes at bow reversals for surrogate compared to actual movement data. This indicates that movement across joints was organized to reduce bow variability and achieve quick bow reversals. Corresponding effects were less pronounced or absent in the novices, in particular for the wrist and elbow. Our results demonstrate the importance of articulated use of the right arm and clarify the contribution of different joints in experts’ bowing performance. Moreover, they support theories of motor control and learning that propose exploitation of biomechanical degrees of freedom, in particular of distal joints, as a critical component in skilled motor performance. PMID:25191284

  2. Three-dimensional plasma structures with anomalous flow directions near the earth's bow shock

    SciTech Connect

    Paschmann, G.; Haerendel, G.; Sckopke, N.; Moebius, E. ); Luehr, H. ); Carlson, C.W. )

    1988-10-01

    They authors examined AMPTE IRM data obtained in the solar wind near the Earth's bow shock and found 16 well-defined cases where a region of hot subsonic plasma is embedded in the solar wind. They also find the low ({approximately}200 km/s) flow velocities, strongly deflected from the solar wind, and they substantially strengthen the local time dependence of the flow which invariably is directed dawnward for prenoon events and duskward for postnoon events. The results differ from the reported ISEE results in two respects. First, the flows they observe tend to have larger angles relative to the solar wind, and they often even have a sunward component. Second, the events they have selected cannot be described as diamagnetic cavities. This apparent discrepancy may simply result from different event selection criteria. A quantitative analysis of the regions flanking the hot core shows they consist of fast, nearly perpendicular, supercritical shocks on the outside and tangential discontinuities on the inside. Another new finding concerns the presence of enhanced fluxes of > 70-keV electrons which appear to be of magnetospheric origin. The majority of events which are not embedded in the solar wind but occur between the solar wind and the magnetosheath, at times replacing the regular bow shock. Among the mechanisms discussed as causes for these events are the formation of sunward directed plasma jets from magnetopause reconnection, or from amplification of magnetic stresses associated with rotational discontinuities in the interplanetary medium; sudden and localized enhancements of bow shock reflection; and the interaction of the bow shock with tangential discontinuities having a specific internal structure.

  3. Pattern Switchable Antenna System Using Inkjet-Printed Directional Bow-Tie for Bi-Direction Sensing Applications.

    PubMed

    Eom, Seung-Hyun; Seo, Yunsik; Lim, Sungjoon

    2015-12-10

    In this paper, we propose a paper-based pattern switchable antenna system using inkjet-printing technology for bi-direction sensor applications. The proposed antenna system is composed of two directional bow-tie antennas and a switching network. The switching network consists of a single-pole-double-throw (SPDT) switch and a balun element. A double-sided parallel-strip line (DSPSL) is employed to convert the unbalanced microstrip mode to the balanced strip mode. Two directional bow-tie antennas have different radiation patterns because of the different orientation of the reflectors and antennas. It is demonstrated from electromagnetic (EM) simulation and measurement that the radiation patterns of the proposed antenna are successfully switched by the SPDT switch.

  4. Pattern Switchable Antenna System Using Inkjet-Printed Directional Bow-Tie for Bi-Direction Sensing Applications

    PubMed Central

    Eom, Seung-Hyun; Seo, Yunsik; Lim, Sungjoon

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a paper-based pattern switchable antenna system using inkjet-printing technology for bi-direction sensor applications. The proposed antenna system is composed of two directional bow-tie antennas and a switching network. The switching network consists of a single-pole-double-throw (SPDT) switch and a balun element. A double-sided parallel-strip line (DSPSL) is employed to convert the unbalanced microstrip mode to the balanced strip mode. Two directional bow-tie antennas have different radiation patterns because of the different orientation of the reflectors and antennas. It is demonstrated from electromagnetic (EM) simulation and measurement that the radiation patterns of the proposed antenna are successfully switched by the SPDT switch. PMID:26690443

  5. Violin bow vibrations.

    PubMed

    Gough, Colin E

    2012-05-01

    The modal frequencies and bending mode shapes of a freely supported tapered violin bow are investigated by finite element analysis and direct measurement, with and without tensioned bow hair. Such computations are used with analytic models to model the admittance presented to the stretched bow hairs at the ends of the bow and to the string at the point of contact with the bow. Finite element computations are also used to demonstrate the influence of the lowest stick mode vibrations on the low frequency bouncing modes, when the hand-held bow is pressed against the string. The possible influence of the dynamic stick modes on the sound of the bowed instrument is briefly discussed.

  6. Coordination in fast repetitive violin-bowing patterns.

    PubMed

    Schoonderwaldt, Erwin; Altenmüller, Eckart

    2014-01-01

    We present a study of coordination behavior in complex violin-bowing patterns involving simultaneous bow changes (reversal of bowing direction) and string crossings (changing from one string to another). Twenty-two violinists (8 advanced amateurs, 8 students with violin as major subject, and 6 elite professionals) participated in the experiment. We investigated the influence of a variety of performance conditions (specific bowing patterns, dynamic level, tempo, and transposition) and level of expertise on coordination behavior (a.o., relative phase and amplitude) and stability. It was found that the general coordination behavior was highly consistent, characterized by a systematic phase lead of bow inclination over bow velocity of about 15° (i.e., string crossings were consistently timed earlier than bow changes). Within similar conditions, a high individual consistency was found, whereas the inter-individual agreement was considerably less. Furthermore, systematic influences of performance conditions on coordination behavior and stability were found, which could be partly explained in terms of particular performance constraints. Concerning level of expertise, only subtle differences were found, the student and professional groups (higher level of expertise) showing a slightly higher stability than the amateur group (lower level of expertise). The general coordination behavior as observed in the current study showed a high agreement with perceptual preferences reported in an earlier study to similar bowing patterns, implying that complex bowing trajectories for an important part emerge from auditory-motor interaction.

  7. Coordination in Fast Repetitive Violin-Bowing Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Schoonderwaldt, Erwin; Altenmüller, Eckart

    2014-01-01

    We present a study of coordination behavior in complex violin-bowing patterns involving simultaneous bow changes (reversal of bowing direction) and string crossings (changing from one string to another). Twenty-two violinists (8 advanced amateurs, 8 students with violin as major subject, and 6 elite professionals) participated in the experiment. We investigated the influence of a variety of performance conditions (specific bowing patterns, dynamic level, tempo, and transposition) and level of expertise on coordination behavior (a.o., relative phase and amplitude) and stability. It was found that the general coordination behavior was highly consistent, characterized by a systematic phase lead of bow inclination over bow velocity of about 15° (i.e., string crossings were consistently timed earlier than bow changes). Within similar conditions, a high individual consistency was found, whereas the inter-individual agreement was considerably less. Furthermore, systematic influences of performance conditions on coordination behavior and stability were found, which could be partly explained in terms of particular performance constraints. Concerning level of expertise, only subtle differences were found, the student and professional groups (higher level of expertise) showing a slightly higher stability than the amateur group (lower level of expertise). The general coordination behavior as observed in the current study showed a high agreement with perceptual preferences reported in an earlier study to similar bowing patterns, implying that complex bowing trajectories for an important part emerge from auditory-motor interaction. PMID:25207542

  8. Bowed Strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossing, Thomas D.; Hanson, Roger J.

    In the next eight chapters, we consider some aspects of the science of bowed string instruments, old and new. In this chapter, we present a brief discussion of bowed strings, a subject that will be developed much more thoroughly in Chap. 16. Chapters 13-15 discuss the violin, the cello, and the double bass. Chapter 17 discusses viols and other historic string instruments, and Chap. 18 discusses the Hutchins-Schelleng violin octet.

  9. 29 GHz directly modulated 980 nm vertical-cavity surface emitting lasers with bow-tie shape transverse coupled cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalir, Hamed; Koyama, Fumio

    2013-08-01

    A concept for the bandwidth enhancement of directly modulated vertical-cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) using a transverse-coupled-cavity (TCC) scheme is proposed, which enables us to tailor the modulation-transfer function. A bow-tie shaped oxide aperture forms the transverse-coupled cavity resulting in optical feedback to boost the modulation speed. While the bandwidth of conventional VCSELs is 9-10 GHz, the 3 dB-bandwidth of the TCC VCSEL is increased by a factor of 3 far beyond the relaxation-oscillation frequency. The maximum bandwidth is currently limited by the photo-detector used in the experiment. Clear 36 Gbps eye opening was attained with an extinction ratio of 4 dB.

  10. Extraction of bowing parameters from violin performance combining motion capture and sensors.

    PubMed

    Schoonderwaldt, E; Demoucron, M

    2009-11-01

    A method is described for measurement of a complete set of bowing parameters in violin performance. Optical motion capture was combined with sensors for accurate measurement of the main bowing parameters (bow position, bow velocity, bow acceleration, bow-bridge distance, and bow force) as well as secondary control parameters (skewness, inclination, and tilt of the bow). In addition, other performance features (moments of on/off in bow-string contact, string played, and bowing direction) were extracted. Detailed descriptions of the calculations of the bowing parameters, features, and calibrations are given. The described system is capable of measuring all bowing parameters without disturbing the player, allowing for detailed studies of musically relevant aspects of bow control and coordination of bowing parameters in bowed-string instrument performance.

  11. Mapping the Structure of Directed Networks: Beyond the Bow-Tie Diagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timár, G.; Goltsev, A. V.; Dorogovtsev, S. N.; Mendes, J. F. F.

    2017-02-01

    We reveal a hierarchical, multilayer organization of finite components—i.e., tendrils and tubes—around the giant connected components in directed networks and propose efficient algorithms allowing one to uncover the entire organization of key real-world directed networks, such as the World Wide Web, the neural network of Caenorhabditis elegans, and others. With increasing damage, the giant components decrease in size while the number and size of tendril layers increase, enhancing the susceptibility of the networks to damage.

  12. Direct observation of time reversal violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernabéu, J.

    2013-06-01

    A direct evidence for Time Reversal Violation (TRV) means an experiment that, considered by itself, clearly shows TRV independent of, and unconnected to, the results for CP Violation. No existing result before the recent BABAR experiment with entangled neutral B mesons had demonstrated TRV in this sense. There is a unique opportunity for a search of TRV with unstable particles thanks to the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) Entanglement between the two neutral mesons in B, and PHI, Factories. The two quantum effects of the first decay as a filtering measurement and the transfer of information to the still living partner allow performing a genuine TRV asymmetry with the exchange of "in" and "out" states. With four independent TRV asymmetries, BABAR observes a large deviation of T-invariance with a statistical significance of 14 standard deviations, far more than needed to declare the result as a discovery. This is the first direct observation of TRV in the time evolution of any system.

  13. The supernumerary bows of the rainbow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Peter; Ricard, Jean; Barckicke, Jean

    2016-04-01

    Everyone appreciate the mysterious beauty of a Rainbow picture. The primary bow shows red on the outer part and violet on the inner side. It is caused by light being refracted when entering a droplet of water, then reflected inside on the back of the droplet and refracted again when leaving it. The secondaty bow is seen outside the primary arc, and has the order of its colours reversed, with red on the inner side of the arc. The supernumerary bows are alternating faint bows on the inner side of the primary rainbow (and also outside the secondary rainbow). In this presentation, we will describe the present knowledge and the future perspectives A fully funded PhD Scholarship on this topic is open at the University of Granada. Picture = Contrast-enhanced photograph of a primary bow picture (prepared by Andrew Dunn).

  14. Nystagmus intensity and direction in bow and lean test: an aid to diagnosis of lateral semicircular canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    PubMed

    Marcelli, V

    2016-12-01

    The objective was to evaluate nystagmus intensity and direction (NID) during bow and lean test (BLT) in subjects suffering from idiopathic lateral semicircular canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (LSC-BPPV), in order to differentiate between the geotropic and the apogeotropic form and to determine the affected ear before using classic diagnostic procedures. The BLT was performed in 32 subjects affected by LSC-BPPV. "Nystagmus intensity" evaluation allows distinguishing the geotropic variant from the apogeotropic one, while the "nystagmus direction" allows identification of the side. In particular, a more intense nystagmus in the bow position compared to the lean position indicates an ampullipetal flow caused by the presence of free-floating particles in the non-ampullary arm, and is suggestive of geotropic form. In this case, if the nystagmus in the bow position is left beating, the free-floating particles necessarily occupy the left LSC non-ampullary arm, while a right-beating nystagmus indicates the right LSC involvement. In contrast, a more intense nystagmus in the lean position compared to the bow position indicates an ampullifugal flow due to the presence of particles adherent to the cupula (cupulolithiasis) or free-floating in the ampullary arm (canalolithiasis), suggesting an apogeotropic form. In this situation, if the nystagmus in the lean position is left beating, the particles are in the left LSC ampullar arm or are coated on the left LSC cupula; vice versa, a right-beating nystagmus in the lean position is suggestive of the involvement of the right LSC. As a general rule, in both forms the direction of the more intense nystagmus points to the affected side. "NID-BLT" was effective in identifying the form and the side in 22/28 subjects (79% of the study population). The proper execution and interpretation of the "NID-BLT" helps to establish the form (geotropic versus apogeotropic) and side (right versus left) in most cases of LSC-BPPV. Unlike

  15. Accuracy of an earpiece face-bow.

    PubMed

    Palik, J F; Nelson, D R; White, J T

    1985-06-01

    The validity of the Hanau ear-bow to transfer an arbitrary hinge axis to a Hanau articulator was clinically compared with a Hanau kinematic face-bow. The study was conducted with 18 randomly selected patients. This investigation demonstrated a significant statistical difference between the arbitrary axis located with an ear-bow and the terminal hinge axis. This discrepancy was significant in the anteroposterior direction but not in the superior-inferior direction. Only 50% of the arbitrary hinge axes were within a 5 mm radius of the terminal hinge axis, while 89% were within a 6 mm radius. Furthermore, the ear-bow method was not repeatable statistically. Additional study is needed to determine the practical value of the arbitrary face-bow and to pursue modifications to improve its accuracy.

  16. Entropy Generation Across Earth's Bow Shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, George K.; McCarthy, Michael; Fu, Suiyan; Lee E. s; Cao, Jinbin; Goldstein, Melvyn L.; Canu, Patrick; Dandouras, Iannis S.; Reme, Henri; Fazakerley, Andrew; Lin, Naiguo; Wilber, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Earth's bow shock is a transition layer that causes an irreversible change in the state of plasma that is stationary in time. Theories predict entropy increases across the bow shock but entropy has never been directly measured. Cluster and Double Star plasma experiments measure 3D plasma distributions upstream and downstream of the bow shock that allow calculation of Boltzmann's entropy function H and his famous H-theorem, dH/dt O. We present the first direct measurements of entropy density changes across Earth's bow shock. We will show that this entropy generation may be part of the processes that produce the non-thermal plasma distributions is consistent with a kinetic entropy flux model derived from the collisionless Boltzmann equation, giving strong support that solar wind's total entropy across the bow shock remains unchanged. As far as we know, our results are not explained by any existing shock models and should be of interests to theorists.

  17. Bow and arrow dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marlow, W. C.

    1981-04-01

    Past analyses of bow and arrow dynamics have assumed the string to be inextensible. This results in predictions of efficiencies that are significantly higher than measured values (efficiencies over 90% are predicted versus 70% to 85% for measurements, circa 1960). The present analysis allows for an elastic string. It is found that arrow exit then takes place when the string and bow limbs still have substantial kinetic energy, and therefore this energy is unavailable for kinetic energy of the arrow. Moreover, the potential energy remaining in the string and bow limb system can also reduce the amount of energy available for the arrow. For the Hickman model of a long bow used in this study, the elastic string prediction of efficiency is 78%, whereas the inelastic prediction is 92%. The analysis utilizes a Lagrangian distributed mass formulation to develop the governing equations of motion and to generate an equivalent point mass model. The equations of motion were numerically integrated to obtain efficiency, arrow velocity, virtual masses, string tension, string extension, arrow exit time, string and limb potential energies, system momentum, and the dynamic force required to hold the bow handle stationary. Estimates of the effect of air resistance were made and found to be less than 2% of the total system energy. The vibratory dynamics of the string and bow limbs subsequent to arrow exit was analyzed. The results of the elastic string considerations are in reasonable agreement with experimental data and negate the usual explanation for the long-standing discrepancy between theory and experiment as due to air resistance and hysteresis losses in the string and bow limbs.

  18. Demographic noise can reverse the direction of deterministic selection

    PubMed Central

    Constable, George W. A.; Rogers, Tim; McKane, Alan J.; Tarnita, Corina E.

    2016-01-01

    Deterministic evolutionary theory robustly predicts that populations displaying altruistic behaviors will be driven to extinction by mutant cheats that absorb common benefits but do not themselves contribute. Here we show that when demographic stochasticity is accounted for, selection can in fact act in the reverse direction to that predicted deterministically, instead favoring cooperative behaviors that appreciably increase the carrying capacity of the population. Populations that exist in larger numbers experience a selective advantage by being more stochastically robust to invasions than smaller populations, and this advantage can persist even in the presence of reproductive costs. We investigate this general effect in the specific context of public goods production and find conditions for stochastic selection reversal leading to the success of public good producers. This insight, developed here analytically, is missed by the deterministic analysis as well as by standard game theoretic models that enforce a fixed population size. The effect is found to be amplified by space; in this scenario we find that selection reversal occurs within biologically reasonable parameter regimes for microbial populations. Beyond the public good problem, we formulate a general mathematical framework for models that may exhibit stochastic selection reversal. In this context, we describe a stochastic analog to r−K theory, by which small populations can evolve to higher densities in the absence of disturbance. PMID:27450085

  19. 43. Bow thruster room. Bow thruster engine not used for ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    43. Bow thruster room. Bow thruster engine not used for powering hydraulics to boom as in some other tenders in same class. - U.S. Coast Guard Cutter BRAMBLE, Waterfront at Lincoln Avenue, Port Huron, St. Clair County, MI

  20. Neptune inbound bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szabo, Adam; Lepping, Ronald P.

    1995-01-01

    Voyager 2 crossed the inbound or upstream Neptunian bow shock at 1430 spacecraft event time on August 24 in 1989 (Belcher et al., 1989). The plasma and magnetic field measurements allow us to study the solar wind interaction with the outermost gas giant. To fully utilize all of the spacecraft observations, an improved nonlinear least squares, 'Rankine-Hugoniot' magnetohydrodynamic shock-fitting technique has been developed (Szabo, 1994). This technique is applied to the Neptunian data set. We find that the upstream bow shock normal points nearly exactly toward the Sun consistent with any reasonable large-scale model of the bow shock for a near subsolar crossing. The shock was moving outward with a speed of 14 +/- 12 km/s. The shock can be characterized as a low beta, high Mach number, strong quasi-perpendicular shock. Finally, the shock microstructure features are resolved and found to scale well with theoretical expectations.

  1. Influence of wheelchair front caster wheel on reverse directional stability.

    PubMed

    Guo, Songfeng; Cooper, Rory A; Corfman, Tom; Ding, Dan; Grindle, Garrett

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to study directional stability during reversing of rear-wheel drive, electric powered wheelchairs (EPW) under different initial front caster orientations. Specifically, the weight distribution differences caused by certain initial caster orientations were examined as a possible mechanism for causing directional instability that could lead to accidents. Directional stability was quantified by measuring the drive direction error of the EPW by a motion analysis system. The ground reaction forces were collected to determine the load on the front casters, as well as back-emf data to attain the speed of the motors. The drive direction error was found to be different for various initial caster orientations. Drive direction error was greatest when both casters were oriented 90 degrees to the left or right, and least when both casters were oriented forward. The results show that drive direction error corresponds to the loading difference on the casters. The data indicates that loading differences may cause asymmetric drag on the casters, which in turn causes unbalanced torque load on the motors. This leads to a difference in motor speed and drive direction error.

  2. Differential Binding Models for Direct and Reverse Isothermal Titration Calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Isaac; Winnik, Mitchell A

    2016-03-10

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is a technique to measure the stoichiometry and thermodynamics from binding experiments. Identifying an appropriate mathematical model to evaluate titration curves of receptors with multiple sites is challenging, particularly when the stoichiometry or binding mechanism is not available. In a recent theoretical study, we presented a differential binding model (DBM) to study calorimetry titrations independently of the interaction among the binding sites (Herrera, I.; Winnik, M. A. J. Phys. Chem. B 2013, 117, 8659-8672). Here, we build upon our DBM and show its practical application to evaluate calorimetry titrations of receptors with multiple sites independently of the titration direction. Specifically, we present a set of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) with the general form d[S]/dV that can be integrated numerically to calculate the equilibrium concentrations of free and bound species S at every injection step and, subsequently, to evaluate the volume-normalized heat signal (δQ(V) = δq/dV) of direct and reverse calorimetry titrations. Additionally, we identify factors that influence the shape of the titration curve and can be used to optimize the initial concentrations of titrant and analyte. We demonstrate the flexibility of our updated DBM by applying these differentials and a global regression analysis to direct and reverse calorimetric titrations of gadolinium ions with multidentate ligands of increasing denticity, namely, diglycolic acid (DGA), citric acid (CIT), and nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), and use statistical tests to validate the stoichiometries for the metal-ligand pairs studied.

  3. The foreshock region upstream from the Comet Halley bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuselier, S. A.; Anderson, K. A.; Balsiger, H.; Glassmeier, K. H.; Goldstein, B. E.; Neugebauer, M.; Rosenbauer, H.; Shelley, E. G.

    1987-01-01

    A few hours prior to the crossing of the Comet Halley bow shock, the Giotto spacecraft intermittently encountered an electron foreshock region. The electron foreshock is characterized by magnetic connection to the cometary bow shock and increased field aligned electron heat flux directed away from the bow shock. A similar region was intermittently encountered by the ICE spacecraft prior to its crossing of the Giacobini-Zinner bow wave. During periods of magnetic connection with the Halley bow shock, enhanced magnetic field fluctuations were observed. These enhancements are interpreted as indirect evidence of an ion foreshock in the electron foreshock. No clearly identifiable backstreaming protons are observed during these periods of magnetic connection, however, because it may be difficult to separate a backstreaming population from the cometary pick-up proton population already present in the upstream region.

  4. The static response of a bowed inclined hot wire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smits, A. J.

    1984-01-01

    The directional sensitivity of a bowed, inclined hot wire is investigated using a simple model for the convective heat transfer. The static response is analyzed for subsonic and supersonic flows. It is shown that the effects of both end conduction and wire bowing are greater in supersonic flow. Regardless of the Mach number, however, these two phenomena have distinctly different effects; end conduction appears to be responsible for reducing the nonlinearity of the response, whereas bowing increases the directional sensitivity. Comparison with the available data suggests that the analysis is useful for interpreting the experimental results.

  5. Marble bowing: comparative studies of three different public building facades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegesmund, S.; Ruedrich, J.; Koch, A.

    2008-12-01

    The veneer cladding of the Oeconomicum (OEC, Göttingen), the State Theatre of Darmstadt (STD, Darmstadt) and of the State and University Library (SUB, Göttingen) is characterised by pronounced bowing after a short time of exposure. Direct comparison of bowing data related to measurements from 2000 to 2003 at the SUB clearly show that the amplitude in bowing had significantly increased. The bowing is different in intensity and orientation (concave, convex). The cladding material (Peccia marble, Rosa Estremoz marble and Carrara marble) are different in lattice preferred orientation, grain size distribution and grain interlocking. Depending on the bowing, panels may show cracks mostly initiated at the dowels. The percentage of visible cracks and breakouts increases with the amplitude of bowing except for the STD. Repetitive heating-cooling under dry conditions leads to considerable inelastic residual strain only after the first or second thermal cycle. The residual strain continuously increases again if water is present, whereby the moisture content after a thermal cycle has a certain impact on the decay rate. The water-enhanced thermal dilatation strongly correlates with the deterioration rate obtained from the laboratory bow test. Detailed petrophysical investigations provide evidence that with increasing bowing a decrease of mechanical properties (flexural strength or breaking load at dowel hole) occur. Marble degradation is also connected with the increase in porosity and a general shift of the maximum pore radii to larger pore sizes. On-site damage analyses were combined with laboratory tests of the bowing potential to constrain factors that may influence the risk failure. The experimental bowing data clearly demonstrate that after 40 heating cycles combined with the effect of moisture a certain impact on the decay rate is observed. In the case of demounted panels the bowing tests show that already strongly deformed panels from the building exhibit a lower

  6. Martian bow shock - Phobos observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwingenschuh, K.; Riedler, W.; Lichtenegger, H.; Eroshenko, E.; Sauer, K.

    1990-01-01

    Data obtained with the Magma magnetometer on the subsolar passes of the Phobos spacecraft during its 3 elliptic orbits reveals a turbulent bow shock with a strong foot consistent with the reflection of solar wind protons. The bow shock lies at a subsolar distance of 1.47 + or - .03 R(M). The circular orbit phase of the mission reveals a bow shock with a highly varying location. The median terminator crossing lies at 2.72 Mars radii. The location of the bow shock in the terminator plane is sensitive to neither the EUV flux nor to planetary longitude.

  7. Martian bow shock: Phobos observations

    SciTech Connect

    Schwingenschuh, K.; Riedler, W.; Lichtenegger, H. ); Yeroshenko, Ye. ); Sauer, K. ); Luhmann, J.G.; Ong, M.; Russell, C.T. )

    1990-05-01

    Data obtained with the MAGMA magnetometer on the subsolar passes of the Phobos spacecraft during its 3 elliptic orbits reveals a turbulent bow shock with a strong foot consistent with the reflection of solar wind protons. The bow shock lies at a subsolar distance of 1.47 {plus minus} .03 R{sub M}. The circular orbit phase of the mission reveals a bow shock with a highly varying location. The median terminator crossing lies at 2.72 Mars radii. The location of the bow shock in the terminator plane is sensitive to neither the EUV flux nor to planetary longitude.

  8. Martian bow shock - PHOBOS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwingenschuh, K.; Riedler, W.; Lichtenegger, H.; Yeroshenko, Ye.; Sauer, K.; Luhmann, J. G.; Ong, M.; Russell, C. T.

    1990-05-01

    Data obtained with the Magma magnetometer on the subsolar passes of the Phobos spacecraft during its 3 elliptic orbits reveals a turbulent bow shock with a strong foot consistent with the reflection of solar wind protons. The bow shock lies at a subsolar distance of 1.47 + or - .03 R(M). The circular orbit phase of the mission reveals a bow shock with a highly varying location. The median terminator crossing lies at 2.72 Mars radii. The location of the bow shock in the terminator plane is sensitive to neither the EUV flux nor to planetary longitude.

  9. Character Reversal in Children: The Prominent Role of Writing Direction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Jean-Paul

    2017-01-01

    Recent research has established that 5- to 6-year-old typically developing children in a left-right writing culture spontaneously reverse left-oriented characters (e.g., they write a [reversed J] instead of J) when they write single characters. Thus, children seem to implicitly apply a right-writing rule (RWR: see Fischer & Koch, 2016a). In…

  10. AOTV bow shock location

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desautel, D.

    1985-01-01

    Hypersonic bow-shock location and geometry are of central importance to the aerodynamics and aerothermodynamics of aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicles (AOTVs), but they are difficult to predict for a given vehicle configuration. This paper reports experimental measurements of shock standoff distance for the 70 deg cone AOTV configuration in shock-tunnel-test flows at Mach numbers of 3.8 to 7.9 and for angles of attack from 0 deg to 20 deg. The controlling parameter for hypersonic bow-shock standoff distance (for a given forebody shape) is the mean normal-shock density ratio. Values for this parameter in the tests reported are in the same range as those of the drag-brake AOTV perigee regime. Results for standoff distance are compared with those previously reported in the literature for this AOTV configuration. It is concluded that the AOTV shock standoff distance for the conical configuration, based on frustrum (base) radius, is equivalent to that of a sphere with a radius about 35 percent greater than that of the cone; the distance is, therefore, much less than reported in previous studies. Some reasons for the discrepancies between the present and previous are advanced. The smaller standoff distance determined here implies there will be less radiative heat transfer than was previously expected.

  11. Coordination of bowing and fingering in violin playing.

    PubMed

    Baader, Andreas P; Kazennikov, Oleg; Wiesendanger, Mario

    2005-05-01

    Playing string instruments implies motor skills including asymmetrical interlimb coordination. How special is musical skill as compared to other bimanually coordinated, non-musical skillful performances? We succeeded for the first time to measure quantitatively bimanual coordination in violinists playing repeatedly a simple tone sequence. A motion analysis system was used to record finger and bow trajectories for assessing the temporal structure of finger-press, finger-lift (left hand), and bow stroke reversals (right arm). The main results were: (1) fingering consisted of serial and parallel (anticipatory) mechanisms; (2) synchronization between finger and bow actions varied from -12 ms to 60 ms, but these 'errors' were not perceived. The results suggest that (1) bow-finger synchronization varied by about 50 ms from perfect simultaneity, but without impairing auditory perception; (2) the temporal structure depends on a number of combinatorial mechanisms of bowing and fingering. These basic mechanisms were observed in all players, including all amateurs. The successful biomechanical measures of fingering and bowing open a vast practical field of assessing motor skills. Thus, objective assessment of larger groups of string players with varying musical proficiency, or of professional string players developing movement disorders, may be helpful in music education.

  12. The earth's foreshock, bow shock, and magnetosheath

    SciTech Connect

    Onsager, T.G.; Thomsen, M.F. )

    1991-01-01

    Studies directly pertaining to the earth's foreshock, bow shock, and magnetosheath are reviewed, and some comparisons are made with data on other planets. Topics considered in detail include the electron foreshock, the ion foreshock, the quasi-parallel shock, the quasi-perpendicular shock, and the magnetosheath. Information discussed spans a broad range of disciplines, from large-scale macroscopic plasma phenomena to small-scale microphysical interactions. 184 refs.

  13. Analysis of the Giacobini-Zinner bow wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, E. J.; Slavin, J. A.; Bame, S. J.; Thomsen, M. F.; Cowley, S. W. H.; Richardson, I. G.; Hovestadt, D.; Ipavich, F. M.; Ogilvie, K. W.; Coplan, M. A.

    1986-01-01

    The cometary bow wave of P/Giacobini-Zinner has been analyzed using the complete set of ICE field and particle observations to determine if it is a shock. Changes in the magnetic field and plasma flow velocities from upstream to downstream have been analyzed to determine the direction of the normal and the propagation velocity of the bow wave. The velocity has then been compared with the fast magnetosonic wave speed upstream to derive the Mach number and establish whether it is supersonic, i.e., a shock, or subsonic, i.e., a large amplitude wave. The various measurements have also been compared with values derived from a Rankine-Hugoniot analysis. The results indicate that, inbound, the bow wave is a shock with M = 1.5. Outbound, a subsonic Mach number is obtained, however, arguments are presented that the bow wave is also likely to be a shock at this location.

  14. Analysis of the Giacobini-Zinner bow wave

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, E.J.; Slavin, J.A.; Bame, S.J.; Thomsen, M.F.; Cowley, S.W.H.; Richardson, I.G.; Hovestadt, D.; Ipavich, F.M.; Ogilvie, K.W.; Coplan, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    The cometary bow wave of P/Giacobini-Zinner has been analyzed using the complete set of ICE field and particle observations to determine if it is a shock. Changes in the magnetic field and plasma flow velocities from upstream to downstream have been analyzed to determine the direction of the normal and the propagation velocity of the bow wave. The velocity has then been compared with the fast magnetosonic wave speed upstream to derive the Mach number and establish whether it is ''supersonic'', i.e., a shock, or ''subsonic,'' i.e., a large amplitude wave. The various measurements have also been compared with values derived from a Rankine-Hugoniot analysis. The results indicate that, inbound, the bow wave is a shock with M = 1.5. Outbound, a subsonic mach number is obtained, however, arguments are presented that the bow wave is also likely to be a shock at this location. 11 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. A comparative review of bow shocks and magnetopauses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepping, R. P.

    1984-01-01

    Bow shock and magnetopauses formation is discussed. Plasma and magnetic field environments of all the planets from Mercury to Saturn were measured. It was found that all the planets have bow shocks and almost all have a magnetopause. Venus is the only planet with no measurable intrinsic magnetic field and the solar wind interacts directly with Venus' ionosphere. The bow shock characteristics depend on the changing solar wind conditions. The shape of a magnetopause or any obstacle to flow depends on the three dimensional pressure profile that it presents to the solar wind. Jupiter is unusual because of the considerable amount of plasma which is contained in its magnetosphere. Magnetopause boundaries in ecliptic plane projection are modelled by segments of ellipses, matched to straight lines for the magnetotool boundaries or parabolas. Specific properties of known planetary bow shocks and magnetopauses are reviewed.

  16. The influence of IMF clock angle on the cross section of the tail bow shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, M.; Lu, J. Y.; Kabin, K.; Yuan, H. Z.; Ma, X.; Liu, Z.-Q.; Yang, Y. F.; Zhao, J. S.; Li, G.

    2016-11-01

    We study effects of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) orientation on the terrestrial tail bow shock location and shape by using global MHD magnetosphere model and empirical bow shock models. It is shown that the tail bow shock cross section is well approximated by an ellipse with the direction of the major axis roughly perpendicular to the IMF clock angle direction. With the increasing IMF clock angle, the eccentricity of the bow shock cross section increases for northward IMF but decreases for southward IMF.

  17. Rare Etiology of Bow Hunter’s Syndrome and Systematic Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Rastogi, Vaibhav; Rawls, Ashley; Moore, Omar; Victorica, Benjamin; Khan, Sheema; Saravanapavan, Pradeepan; Midivelli, Sunitha; Raviraj, Prathap; Khanna, Anna; Bidari, Sharathchandra; Hedna, Vishnumurthy S

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Bow Hunter’s Syndrome is a mechanical occlusion of the vertebral artery which leads to a reduction in blood flow in posterior cerebral circulation resulting in transient reversible symptomatic vertebrobasilar insufficiency. CASE DESCRIPTION We present a case of Bow Hunter’s syndrome in a 53-year-old male that occurred after the patient underwent surgical correction of a proximal left subclavian artery aneurysm. Shortly after the surgery, the patient began to complain of transient visual changes, presyncopal spells, and dizziness upon turning his head to the left. A transcranial doppler ultrasound confirmed the diagnosis of Bow Hunter’s syndrome. SYSTEMIC REVIEW We analyzed the data on 153 patients with Bow Hunter’s syndrome from the literature. An osteophyte was the most common cause of vertebral artery occlusion, and left vertebral artery was more commonly involved in patients with Bow Hunter’s syndrome. Dynamic angiography was the definitive imaging modality to confirm the diagnosis, and surgery was most successful in alleviating symptoms. CONCLUSION We believe that this is the first case of iatrogenic Bow Hunter’s syndrome after surgical intervention for an aneurysm repair, and the largest review of literature of Bow Hunter’s syndrome. Dynamic angiography is the gold standard for the diagnosis of Bow Hunter’s syndrome. Surgery should be considered as the primary treatment approach in these patients, especially those who have bony compression as the etiology. PMID:26301025

  18. Propagation direction reversal of ionization zones in the transition between high and low current magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    School of Materials Science and Engineering, State Key Lab for Materials Processing and Die & Mold Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074, China; Department of Physics, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720, USA; Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, California 94720, USA; Yang, Yuchen; Liu, Jason; Liu, Lin; Anders, André

    2014-12-11

    Past research has revealed the propagation of dense, asymmetric ionization zones in both high and low current magnetron discharges. Here we report about the direction reversal of ionization zone propagation as observed with fast cameras. At high currents, zones move in the E B direction with velocities of 103 to 104 m/s. However at lower currents, ionization zones are observed to move in the opposite, the -E B direction, with velocities ~;; 103 m/s. It is proposed that the direction reversal is associated with the local balance of ionization and supply of neutrals in the ionization zone.

  19. Foreshock ions observed behind the Martian bow shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frahm, R. A.; Yamauchi, M.; Winningham, J. D.; Lundin, R.; Sharber, J. R.; Nilsson, H.; Coates, A. J.

    2016-08-01

    The Mars Express Analyzer of Space Plasmas and Energetic Atoms experiment contains ion and electron instruments for conducting plasma measurements. On January 23, 2012, during in-bound travel of Mars Express in the southern hemisphere of Mars from its dawn side toward periapsis at dusk, the plasma instruments measured foreshock-like ion beams extending from outside the bow shock and into the magnetosphere, continuing to a distance of about a proton gyroradius from the bow shock. These ion beams were mostly protons, were observed to have energies greater than solar wind protons, and were not gyrating, in agreement with reflections of the solar wind proton beam. Furthermore, in the foreshock region the ion energy gradually decreased toward the magnetosheath, in agreement with an acceleration by outward-directed electric field in the bowshock. The observations also suggest that this electric field exists even inside the magnetosheath within the distance of a proton gyroradius from the bow shock.

  20. Featured Image: A Search for Stellar Bow Shock Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-02-01

    These dynamic infrared images (click for the full view!) reveal what are known as bow shock nebulae nebulae that form at the interface between the interstellar medium and the stellar wind from a high-speed star zipping through the galaxy (the arrows show the direction of motion of the star). When the relative speed between the two is supersonic, an arc-shaped bow shock forms ahead of the star, like the six prototypical ones pictured here. A team of scientists led by Henry Kobulnicky (University of Wyoming) has recently searched through survey data from the Spitzer Space Telescope and the Wide Field Infrared Explorer (WISE) to build a catalog of more than 700 such bow-shock nebula candidates, the vast majority of which are new discoveries. To find out more about their sample, check out the paper below!CitationHenry A. Kobulnicky et al 2016 ApJS 227 18. doi:10.3847/0067-0049/227/2/18

  1. Reversing the direction of space and inverse Doppler effect in positive refraction index media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Fei; He, Sailing

    2017-01-01

    A negative refractive index medium, in which all spatial coordinates are reversed (i.e. a left-hand triplet is formed) by a spatial folding transformation, can create many novel electromagnetic phenomena, e.g. backward wave propagation, and inversed Doppler effect (IDE). In this study, we use coordinate rotation transformation to reverse only two spatial coordinates (e.g. x‧ and y‧), while keeping z‧ unchanged. In this case, some novel phenomena, e.g. radiation-direction-reversing illusions and IDE, can be achieved in a free space region wrapped by the proposed shell without any negative refractive index medium, which is easier for experimental realization and future applications.

  2. The player and the bowed string: coordination of bowing parameters in violin and viola performance.

    PubMed

    Schoonderwaldt, E

    2009-11-01

    An experiment was conducted with four violin and viola players, measuring their bowing performance using an optical motion capture system and sensors on the bow. The measurements allowed for a detailed analysis of the use and coordination of the main bowing parameters bow velocity, bow force, and bow-bridge distance. An analysis of bowing strategies in detache playing of notes of three durations (0.2, 2, and 4 s) at three dynamic levels (pp, mf, and f) on all four strings is presented, focusing on the "steady" part of the notes. The results revealed clear trends in the coordinated variations of the bowing parameters depending on the constraints of the task, reflecting a common behavior as well as individual strategies. Furthermore, there were clear indications that the players adapted the bowing parameters to the physical properties of the string and the instrument, respecting the limits of the playable control parameter space.

  3. Reversals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center on Educational Media and Materials for the Handicapped, Columbus, OH.

    Selected from the National Instructional Materials Information System (NIMIS)--a computer based on-line interactive retrieval system on special education materials--the bibliography covers nine materials for remediating reversals in handicapped students at the early childhood and elementary levels. Entries are presented in order of NIMIS accession…

  4. [Homicide by bow and arrow].

    PubMed

    Germerott, Tanja; Jänisch, Stefanie; Tröger, Hans Dieter; Günther, Detlef

    2010-01-01

    Since the invention of firearms, arrow wounds represent a rarity in the daily routine of forensic pathologists. In the present paper, we describe a homicide by a broadhead arrow shot from a compound bow in a domestic environment. Based on this homicide, we discuss the characteristics of the lesion caused by broadhead arrows and field-tip arrows. We look critically at the free saleability of this equipment mostly used for sport shooting in Germany.

  5. Effects of bowing on perception of attractiveness.

    PubMed

    Osugi, Takayuki; Kawahara, Jun I

    2015-07-01

    Bowing is a greeting behavior. The present study examined the modulation effect of bowing on perception of attractiveness. In each trial, a portrait digitized from university yearbooks was presented on a computer screen. The portrait was mildly tilted toward participants to simulate a greeting bow (25-degree angle). Participants evaluated the subjective attractiveness of the face using a visual analog scale (0-100). The mean attractiveness judgment of the bowing portrait was significantly higher relative to that of the bending-backward or standing-still control conditions (Experiment 1). Additional control experiments revealed that alternative accounts relying on apparent spatial proximity and physical characteristics could not solely explain the effect of bowing (Experiment 2) and indicated that the effect was specific to objects perceived as faces (Experiment 3). Furthermore, observers' in-return bowing behavior did not reduce the bowing effect (Experiment 4), and bowing motion increased the ratings of subjective politeness and submissiveness (Experiment 5). Finally, tilting the 3D faces elicited the same effect from observers as did tilting the still photos (Experiment 6). These results suggest that a tilting motion of portraits (or images of face-like objects) mimicking bowing enhances perceived attractiveness, at least as measured in a culture familiar with greeting by bowing.

  6. Direct Observation of the Controlled Magnetization Reversal Processes in Py/Al/Py Assymmetric Ring Stacks

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, L.; Schofield, M.A.; Zhu, Y.

    2009-07-27

    Electron holographic experiments were performed to study the magnetization reversal process of patterned Py/Al/Py (20nm/20nm/10nm) asymmetric ring stacks. By changing the in-plane field applied perpendicular to the ring's symmetric axis, we directly observed the vortex-based magnetization reversal process through controlled domain wall motion and annihilation. The two magnetic layers were found to switch at different critical fields, leading to the existence of various distinct domain state combinations. Quantitative agreement was obtained between measured phase shifts and those derived from micromagnetic calculations, which allows us to resolve the layer-by-layer magnetic behavior as a function of applied external field.

  7. Search for systemic mass loss in Algols with bow shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, A.; Deschamps, R.; Jorissen, A.

    2016-03-01

    Aims: Various studies indicate that interacting binary stars of Algol type evolve non-conservatively. However, direct detections of systemic mass loss in Algols have been scarce so far. We study the systemic mass loss in Algols by looking for the presence of infrared excesses originating from the thermal emission of dust grains, which is linked to the presence of a stellar wind. Methods: In contrast to previous studies, we make use of the fact that stellar and interstellar material is piled up at the edge of the astrosphere where the stellar wind interacts with the interstellar medium. We analyse WISE W3 12 μm and WISE W4 22 μm data of Algol-type binary Be and B[e] stars and the properties of their bow shocks. From the stand-off distance of the bow shock we are able to determine the mass-loss rate of the binary system. Results: Although the velocities of the stars with respect to the interstellar medium are quite low, we find bow shocks present in two systems, namely π Aqr, and ϕ Per; a third system, CX Dra, shows a more irregular circumstellar environment morphology which might somehow be related to systemic mass loss. The properties of the two bow shocks point to mass-loss rates and wind velocities typical of single B stars, which do not support an enhanced systemic mass loss.

  8. Direct and reverse pollen-mediated gene flow between GM rice and red rice weed

    PubMed Central

    Serrat, X.; Esteban, R.; Peñas, G.; Català, M. M.; Melé, E.; Messeguer, J.

    2013-01-01

    Potential risks of genetically modified (GM) crops must be identified before their commercialization, as happens with all new technologies. One of the major concerns is the proper risk assessment of adventitious presence of transgenic material in rice fields due to cross-pollination. Several studies have been conducted in order to quantify pollen-mediated gene flow from transgenic rice (Oryza sativa) to both conventional rice and red rice weed (O. sativa f. spontanea) under field conditions. Some of these studies reported GM pollen-donor rice transferring GM traits to red rice. However, gene flow also occurs in the opposite direction, in a phenomenon that we have called reverse gene flow, resulting in transgenic seeds that have incorporated the traits of wild red rice. We quantified reverse gene flow using material from two field trials. A molecular analysis based on amplified fragment length polymorphisms was carried out, being complemented with a phenotypic identification of red rice traits. In both field trials, the reverse gene flow detected was greater than the direct gene flow. The rate of direct gene flow varied according to the relative proportions of the donor (GM rice) and receptor (red rice) plants and was influenced by wind direction. The ecological impact of reverse gene flow is limited in comparison with that of direct gene flow because non-shattered and non-dormant seeds would be obtained in the first generation. Hybrid seed would remain in the spike and therefore most of it would be removed during harvesting. Nevertheless, this phenomenon must be considered in fields used for elite seed production and in developing countries where farmers often keep some seed for planting the following year. In these cases, there is a higher risk of GM red rice weed infestation increasing from year to year and therefore a proper monitoring plan needs to be established.

  9. The violin bow: taper, camber and flexibility.

    PubMed

    Gough, Colin

    2011-12-01

    An analytic, small-deflection, simplified model of the modern violin bow is introduced to describe the bending profiles and related strengths of an initially straight, uniform cross-section, stick as a function of bow hair tension. A number of illustrative bending profiles (cambers) of the bow are considered, which demonstrate the strong dependence of the flexibility of the bow on longitudinal forces across the ends of the bent stick. Such forces are shown to be comparable in strength to critical buckling loads causing excessive sideways buckling unless the stick is very straight. Non-linear, large deformation, finite element computations extend the analysis to bow hair tensions comparable with and above the critical buckling strength of the straight stick. The geometric model assumes an expression for the taper of Tourte bows introduced by Vuillaume, which is re-examined and generalized to describe violin, viola and cello bows. A comparison is made with recently published measurements of the taper and bending profiles of a particularly fine bow by Kittel.

  10. Reversible self-assembly and directed assembly of DNA-linked micrometer-sized colloids.

    PubMed

    Valignat, Marie-Pierre; Theodoly, Olivier; Crocker, John C; Russel, William B; Chaikin, Paul M

    2005-03-22

    We present a technique for the directed assembly and self-assembly of micrometer-scale structures based on the control of specific DNA linkages between colloidal particles. The use of DNA links combined with polymer brushes provides an effective way to regulate the range and magnitude of addressable forces between pairs (and further combinations) of different particles. We demonstrate that the autoassembly of alternate microbeads as well as their directed assembly, by using laser tweezers, is reversible. The key to reversibility is preventing the particles from falling into their van der Waals well at close distances. This goal is achieved by the use of adsorbed polymers that limit the number of DNA bridges to one to three between adjacent particles.

  11. Direct Observation of Reversible Magnesium Ion Intercalation into a Spinel Oxide Host

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Chunjoong; Phillips, Patrick J.; Key, Baris; Yi, Tanghong; Nordlund, Dennis; Yu, Young-Sang; Bayliss, Ryan D.; Han, Sang-Don; He, Meinan; Zhang, Zhengcheng; Burrell, Anthony K.; Klie, Robert F.; Cabana, Jordi

    2015-06-10

    Direct evidence of Mg2+ intercalation into a spinel-type Mn2O4 is provided. By com­bining tools with different sensitivities, from atomic-resolution X-ray spectro­scopy to bulk X-ray diffraction, it is demonstrated that Mg2+ reversibly occupies the tetrahedral sites of the spinel structure through the reduction of Mn when the electrochemical reaction is performed.

  12. Multispacecraft observations of energetic ions upstream and downstream of the bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholer, M.; Moebius, E.; Kistler, L. M.; Klecker, B.; Ipavich, F. M.

    1989-01-01

    Simultaneous measurements of energetic protons and alpha particles were obtained inside and outside of the magnetopause and upstream and downstream of the bow shock. In the magnetosheath, no gradient or streaming is found in the upstream direction. The present results are consistent with first-order Fermi acceleration at the bow shock and subsequent downstream convection, and exclude the possibility of a magnetospheric source for these particles.

  13. Bowing of marble panels: On-site damage analysis from the oeconomicum building at Goettingen (Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, A.; Siegesmund, S.

    2003-04-01

    The use of natural stone panels or cladding material for building facades has led to some durability problems, especially with marble slabs. To examine the effects of intrinsic and extrinsic parameters on bowing a very detailed study was performed on the Oeconomicum Building at the University of Goettingen. In total 1556 panels from the whole building were measured with respect to the bowing using a bow-meter. The variation of bowing ranges from concave (up to 23 mm/m) to convex (up to -11 mm/m). The variation is not controlled by the position with respect to the geographical coordinates, height above ground, shadows, temperature etc.. On the north facade the different rock structures visible on the panel surfaces are a result of the marble slabs being cut in different directions. The different degree in bowing is associated with the structure of the marble since all other influencing factors are relatively constant (position, temperature, moisture content, building physics). Experimental data on the expansion behaviour under dry and/or wet conditions reveal a different degree in bowing with respect to the rock fabric and may help to explain the observed differences in bowing. The effect of the rock fabric especially of the lattice preferred orientation in this case clearly controls the deterioration of the marble and the degree of bowing. The bowing is also characterized by an increase in the porosity, decreasing values of ultrasonic wave velocities and flexural strength. The loss of cohesion in the strongly deteriorated panels is clearly visible in the microstructure by the open grain boundaries which are interconnected to intergranular microcracks.

  14. The Neural Substrates for Letter String Readings in The Normal and Reverse Directions: An fMRI Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Sheng; Saito, Takashi; Wu, Jing-Long; Ogasawara, Jun-Ichi; Yamauchi, Shuichi; Matsunaga, Naofumi; Iramina, Keiji

    In order to investigate the difference in cortical activations between reading letter strings in the normal direction and the reverse direction, an fMRI study was conducted. In this study, the cortical activations elicited by Japanese letter string reading and Chinese letter string reading were investigated. The subjects performed the normal direction reading task (read letter strings from left to right), and the reverse direction reading task (read letter strings from right to left). According to the experimental results, the activated brain regions during the normal and the reverse direction reading tasks were compared. It was found that visuospatial transformation was involved in the reverse direction reading task, while this function was not significant during the normal direction reading task. Furthermore, we found that there was no significant difference in cortical activation between Japanese and Chinese letter string readings.

  15. Modeling nonthermal emission from stellar bow shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, V.; López-Santiago, J.; Miceli, M.; Bonito, R.; de Castro, E.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Runaway O- and early B-type stars passing through the interstellar medium at supersonic velocities and characterized by strong stellar winds may produce bow shocks that can serve as particle acceleration sites. Previous theoretical models predict the production of high-energy photons by nonthermal radiative processes, but their efficiency is still debated. Aims: We aim to test and explain the possibility of emission from the bow shocks formed by runaway stars traveling through the interstellar medium by using previous theoretical models. Methods: We applied our model to AE Aurigae, the first reported star with an X-ray detected bow shock, to BD+43 3654, in which the observations failed in detecting high-energy emission, and to the transition phase of a supergiant star in the late stages of its life. Results: From our analysis, we confirm that the X-ray emission from the bow shock produced by AE Aurigae can be explained by inverse Compton processes involving the infrared photons of the heated dust. We also predict low high-energy flux emission from the bow shock produced by BD+43 3654, and the possibility of high-energy emission from the bow shock formed by a supergiant star during the transition phase from blue to red supergiant. Conclusions: Bow shocks formed by different types of runaway stars are revealed as a new possible source of high-energy photons in our neighborhood.

  16. Viols and Other Historic Bowed String Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Murray; Campbell, Patsy

    While plucked strings have been used for musical purposes since at least the third millennium BCE, the idea of sounding a string by bowing it is a much more recent development. Bowed string instruments seem to have originated in Asia toward the end of the first millennium CE, and were in widespread use in Western Europe by the end of the eleventh century. For the next three centuries many different types of bowed instrument, with a bewildering variety of names, were in common use throughout Europe.

  17. The features of microstructure and mechanical properties of austenitic steel after direct and reverse martensitic transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litovchenko, I. Yu.; Akkuzin, S. A.; Polekhina, N. A.; Tyumentsev, A. N.; Naiden, E. P.

    2015-10-01

    The features of structural states of metastable austenitic steel after thermomechanical treatments, including low-temperature deformation, warm deformation and subsequent annealing are investigated. It is shown that under these conditions the direct (γ → α') and reverse (α' → γ) martensitic transformations occur and submicrocrystalline structural states are formed. The proposed thermomechanical treatment allows varying the strength and plastic properties of austenitic steel in a wide range. The strength of steel in submicrocrystalline state is 4-6 times higher than its original value.

  18. Light-Directed Reversible Assembly of Plasmonic Nanoparticles Using Plasmon-Enhanced Thermophoresis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Linhan; Peng, Xiaolei; Wang, Mingsong; Scarabelli, Leonardo; Mao, Zhangming; Liz-Marzán, Luis M; Becker, Michael F; Zheng, Yuebing

    2016-09-21

    Reversible assembly of plasmonic nanoparticles can be used to modulate their structural, electrical, and optical properties. Common and versatile tools in nanoparticle manipulation and assembly are optical tweezers, but these require tightly focused and high-power (10-100 mW/μm(2)) laser beams with precise optical alignment, which significantly hinders their applications. Here we present light-directed reversible assembly of plasmonic nanoparticles with a power intensity below 0.1 mW/μm(2). Our experiments and simulations reveal that such a low-power assembly is enabled by thermophoretic migration of nanoparticles due to the plasmon-enhanced photothermal effect and the associated enhanced local electric field over a plasmonic substrate. With software-controlled laser beams, we demonstrate parallel and dynamic manipulation of multiple nanoparticle assemblies. Interestingly, the assemblies formed over plasmonic substrates can be subsequently transported to nonplasmonic substrates. As an example application, we selected surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy, with tunable sensitivity. The advantages provided by plasmonic assembly of nanoparticles are the following: (1) low-power, reversible nanoparticle assembly, (2) applicability to nanoparticles with arbitrary morphology, and (3) use of simple optics. Our plasmon-enhanced thermophoretic technique will facilitate further development and application of dynamic nanoparticle assemblies, including biomolecular analyses in their native environment and smart drug delivery.

  19. Direct real-space observation of nearly stochastic behavior in magnetization reversal process on a nanoscale

    SciTech Connect

    Im, M.-Y.; Kim, D.-H.; Lee, K.-D.; Fischer, P.; Shin, S.-C.

    2007-06-01

    We report a non-deterministic nature in the magnetization reversal of nanograins of CoCrPt alloy film. Magnetization reversal process of CoCrPt alloy film is investigated using high resolution soft X-ray microscopy which provides real space images with a spatial resolution of 15 nm. Domain nucleation sites mostly appear stochastically distributed within repeated hysteretic cycles, where the correlation increases as the strength of the applied magnetic field increases in the descending and ascending branches of the major hysteresis loop. In addition, domain configuration is mostly asymmetric with inversion of an applied magnetic field in the hysteretic cycle. Nanomagnetic simulation considering thermal fluctuations of the magnetic moments of the grains explains the nearly stochastic nature of the domain nucleation behavior observed in CoCrPt alloy film. With the bit size in high-density magnetic recording media approaching nanometer length scale, one of the fundamental and crucial issues is whether the domain nucleation during magnetization reversal process exhibits a deterministic behavior. Repeatability of local domain nucleation and deterministic switching behavior are basic and essential factors for achieving high performance in high-density magnetic recording [1-3]. Most experimental studies on this issue reported so far have been mainly performed by indirect probes through macroscopic hysteresis loop and Barkhausen pattern measurements, which provide the ensemble-average magnetization. Thus, they are inadequate to gain insight into the domain-nucleation behavior on a nanometer length scale during the magnetization reversal process [4-6]. Very recently, coherent X-ray speckle metrology, where the speckle pattern observed in reciprocal space acts as a fingerprint of the domain configurations, was adopted to investigate stochastic behavior in the magnetization reversal of a Co/Pt multilayer film [7,8]. However, no direct observation on the stochastic behavior of

  20. Bow-shaped toroidal field coils

    SciTech Connect

    Bonanos, P.

    1981-05-01

    Design features of Bow-Shaped Toroidal Field Coils are described and compared with circular and D shaped coils. The results indicate that bow coils can produce higher field strengths, store more energy and be made demountable. The design offers the potential for the production of ultrahigh toroidal fields. Included are representative coil shapes and their engineering properties, a suggested structural design and an analysis of a specific case.

  1. The reverse-direction method links mass experimental data to human diseases.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Hideki; Atsumi, Toru; Bando, Hidenori; Sabharwal, Lavannya; Yamada, Moe; Jiang, Jing-Jing; Nakamura, Akihiro; Arima, Yasunobu; Kamimura, Daisuke; Murakami, Masaaki

    2014-02-01

    Genome-wide analyses such as DNA microarray, RNA sequencing and RNA interference-based high-throughput screening are prevalent to decipher a biological process of interest, and provide a large quantity of data to be processed. An ultimate goal for researchers must be extrapolation of their data to human diseases. We have conducted functional genome-wide screenings to elucidate molecular mechanisms of the inflammation amplifier, a NFκB/STAT3-dependent machinery that potently drives recruitment of immune cells to promote inflammation. Using a public database of genome-wide association studies (GWAS), we recently reported the reverse-direction method by which our mass screening data were successfully linked to many human diseases. As an example, the epiregulin-epidermal growth factor receptor pathway was identified as a regulator of the inflammation amplifier, and associated with human diseases by GWAS. In fact, serum epiregulin levels were higher in patients with chronic inflammatory disorders. The reverse-direction method can be a useful tool to narrow mass data down to focus on human disease-related genes.

  2. Specific and reversible DNA-directed self-assembly of oil-in-water emulsion droplets.

    PubMed

    Hadorn, Maik; Boenzli, Eva; Sørensen, Kristian T; Fellermann, Harold; Eggenberger Hotz, Peter; Hanczyc, Martin M

    2012-12-11

    Higher-order structures that originate from the specific and reversible DNA-directed self-assembly of microscopic building blocks hold great promise for future technologies. Here, we functionalized biotinylated soft colloid oil-in-water emulsion droplets with biotinylated single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides using streptavidin as an intermediary linker. We show the components of this modular linking system to be stable and to induce sequence-specific aggregation of binary mixtures of emulsion droplets. Three length scales were thereby involved: nanoscale DNA base pairing linking microscopic building blocks resulted in macroscopic aggregates visible to the naked eye. The aggregation process was reversible by changing the temperature and electrolyte concentration and by the addition of competing oligonucleotides. The system was reset and reused by subsequent refunctionalization of the emulsion droplets. DNA-directed self-assembly of oil-in-water emulsion droplets, therefore, offers a solid basis for programmable and recyclable soft materials that undergo structural rearrangements on demand and that range in application from information technology to medicine.

  3. Extended red objects and stellar-wind bow shocks in the Carina Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sexton, Remington O.; Povich, Matthew S.; Smith, Nathan; Babler, Brian L.; Meade, Marilyn R.; Rudolph, Alexander L.

    2015-01-01

    We report the results of infrared photometry on 39 extended red objects (EROs) in the Carina Nebula, observed with the Spitzer Space Telescope. Most EROs are identified by bright, extended 8.0 μm emission, which ranges from 10 arcsec to 40 arcsec in size, but our sample also includes four EROs identified by extended 24 μm emission. Of particular interest are nine EROs associated with late O- or early B-type stars and characterized by arc-shaped morphology, suggesting dusty, stellar-wind bow shocks. These objects are preferentially oriented towards the central regions of the Carina Nebula, suggesting that these bow shocks are generally produced by the interactions of OB winds with the bulk expansion of the H II region rather than high proper motion. We identify preferred regions of mid-infrared colour space occupied by our bow shock candidates, which also contain bow shock candidates in M17 and RCW 49 but are well separated from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission or circumstellar discs. Colour cuts identify an additional 12 marginally resolved bow shock candidates, 10 of which are also associated with known late O or early B stars. H II region expansion velocities derived from bow shock candidate standoff distances are ˜10 km s-1, assuming typical H II region gas densities, comparable to expansion velocities derived from bow shocks in M17 and RCW 49. One candidate bow shock provides direct evidence of physical interaction between the massive stellar winds originating in the Trumpler 15 and Trumpler 14 clusters, supporting the conclusion that both clusters are at similar heliocentric distances.

  4. Dielectric bow-tie nanocavity.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qijing; Shu, Fang-Jie; Zou, Chang-Ling

    2013-12-15

    We propose a novel dielectric bow-tie (DBT) nanocavity consisting of two opposing tip-to-tip triangle semiconductor nanowires, whose end faces are coated by silver nanofilms. Based on the advantages of the dielectric slot and tip structures, and the high reflectivity of the silver mirror, light can be confined in this nanocavity with low loss. We demonstrate that at 4.5 K (300 K) around the resonance wavelength of 1550 nm, the mode excited in this nanocavity has a deep subwavelength mode volume of 2.8×10(-4) μm³ and a high quality factor of 4.9×10(4) (401.3), corresponding to an ultrahigh Purcell factor of 1.6×10(7) (1.36×10(5)). This DBT nanocavity may find applications for integrated nanophotonic circuits, such as high-efficiency single photon sources, thresholdless nanolasers, and strong coupling in cavity quantum electrodynamics experiments.

  5. Planetary Embryo Bow Shocks as a Mechanism for Chondrule Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Christopher R.; Boley, Aaron C.; Morris, Melissa A.

    2016-02-01

    We use radiation hydrodynamics with direct particle integration to explore the feasibility of chondrule formation in planetary embryo bow shocks. The calculations presented here are used to explore the consequences of a Mars-size planetary embryo traveling on a moderately excited orbit through the dusty, early environment of the solar system. The embryo’s eccentric orbit produces a range of supersonic relative velocities between the embryo and the circularly orbiting gas and dust, prompting the formation of bow shocks. Temporary atmospheres around these embryos, which can be created via volatile outgassing and gas capture from the surrounding nebula, can non-trivially affect thermal profiles of solids entering the shock. We explore the thermal environment of solids that traverse the bow shock at different impact radii, the effects that planetoid atmospheres have on shock morphologies, and the stripping efficiency of planetoidal atmospheres in the presence of high relative winds. Simulations are run using adiabatic and radiative conditions, with multiple treatments for the local opacities. Shock speeds of 5, 6, and 7 km s-1 are explored. We find that a high-mass atmosphere and inefficient radiative conditions can produce peak temperatures and cooling rates that are consistent with the constraints set by chondrule furnace studies. For most conditions, the derived cooling rates are potentially too high to be consistent with chondrule formation.

  6. Planetary Embryo Bow Shocks as a Mechanism for Chondrule Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Christopher; Boley, Aaron C.; Morris, Melissa A.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the plausibility of a planetary embryo bow shock as a mechanism for chondrule formation in the early solar system. A Mars-size planetary embryo traveling on a moderately excited orbit through the dusty early environment of the solar system will experience supersonic velocities relative to the circularly orbiting gas and dust. The resulting bow shock can thermally process solids that pass through it, with a wide range of possible conditions depending on impact radius. Volatile outgassing by the embryo along with some gas capture from the surrounding nebula can produce temporary atmospheres. We use radiation hydrodynamics simulations with direct particle integration to model the consequences of solids that encounter a bow shock produced by a 3000 km embryo with relative speeds to the gas of 5, 6, and 7 km/s. The embryos are envisaged to be surrounded by low- and high-mass atmospheres (0.75 and 6.25 Martian-mass atmospheres, respectively), and we explore different opacities for the gas. We find that a high-mass atmosphere and low dust opacity can produce peak temperatures and cooling rates that are most consistent with constraints set by chondrule furnace studies for plausible shock speeds.

  7. PLANETARY EMBRYO BOW SHOCKS AS A MECHANISM FOR CHONDRULE FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, Christopher R.; Boley, Aaron C.; Morris, Melissa A.

    2016-02-20

    We use radiation hydrodynamics with direct particle integration to explore the feasibility of chondrule formation in planetary embryo bow shocks. The calculations presented here are used to explore the consequences of a Mars-size planetary embryo traveling on a moderately excited orbit through the dusty, early environment of the solar system. The embryo’s eccentric orbit produces a range of supersonic relative velocities between the embryo and the circularly orbiting gas and dust, prompting the formation of bow shocks. Temporary atmospheres around these embryos, which can be created via volatile outgassing and gas capture from the surrounding nebula, can non-trivially affect thermal profiles of solids entering the shock. We explore the thermal environment of solids that traverse the bow shock at different impact radii, the effects that planetoid atmospheres have on shock morphologies, and the stripping efficiency of planetoidal atmospheres in the presence of high relative winds. Simulations are run using adiabatic and radiative conditions, with multiple treatments for the local opacities. Shock speeds of 5, 6, and 7 km s{sup −1} are explored. We find that a high-mass atmosphere and inefficient radiative conditions can produce peak temperatures and cooling rates that are consistent with the constraints set by chondrule furnace studies. For most conditions, the derived cooling rates are potentially too high to be consistent with chondrule formation.

  8. Direct observation of microcontact behaviours in pattern-generation step of reverse offset printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusaka, Yasuyuki; Kanazawa, Shusuke; Yamamoto, Noritaka; Ushijima, Hirobumi

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we investigate the static and dynamic aspects of the nip formed during roll-to-sheet-type reverse offset printing. First, we show that several modes of roof collapses (bottom contact defects) could be formed depending on the poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) blanket thickness and pattern size. We regulate the manifestation of the defect modes driven by the local pile-up of the incompressible PDMS, as modelled by the contact mechanics formulation, together with a complementary numerical simulation. In dynamics, we first differentiate between the static nip and dynamic nip during printing, where the width is extended by the kinetically controlled adhesion of the blanket PDMS. Further, we observe that depending on the pattern structure, there was spatial deviation of the microscopic contact and subsequent separation behaviours of the cliché from a macroscopically recognizable nip, and consequently, local detachment rates were heterogeneous in the pattern-generation process of the reverse offset printing, even with a constant machine speed. In addition, we found that the parts of a pattern where the ink transfer fails in a high-speed patterning condition corresponded to the region of the locally enhanced detachment rates found during direct observation.

  9. The Reversal of Time Sequence and abrupt direction change of Astrophysical Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Biping

    2015-08-01

    The discrepancy in the propagation times from different parts of a moving source can result in an apparent transverse velocity exceeding the speed of light, which is the well known scenario of superluminal motion.This work shows that the same effect of time delay can even reverse the time sequence of appearance of components in a parsec-scale jets of active galactic nuclei like 3C 279. At such a scale, a component, reproduced somewhere in jet earlier but more distant from the observer, travels longer time to the observer, so that it can emerge later than those ones with shorter distance to the observer which actually generated later.Interestingly, this scenario well explains the increasing samples of abrupt change of jet direction exhibited by the long base line observation of jets of active galactic nuclei.Revealing such an effect of time reversal is of importance in the understanding of the nature of jets in different systems from active galactic nuclei to X-ray binaries.

  10. Direct current electric field assembly of colloidal crystals displaying reversible structural color.

    PubMed

    Shah, Aayush A; Ganesan, Mahesh; Jocz, Jennifer; Solomon, Michael J

    2014-08-26

    We report the application of low-voltage direct current (dc) electric fields to self-assemble close-packed colloidal crystals in nonaqueous solvents from colloidal spheres that vary in size from as large as 1.2 μm to as small as 0.1 μm. The assemblies are created rapidly (∼2 min) from an initially low volume fraction colloidal particle suspension using a simple capacitor-like electric field device that applies a steady dc electric voltage. Confocal microscopy is used to observe the ordering that is produced by the assembly method. This spatial evidence for ordering is consistent with the 6-fold diffraction patterns identified by light scattering. Red, green, and blue structural color is observed for the ordered assemblies of colloids with diameters of 0.50, 0.40, and 0.29 μm, respectively, consistent with spectroscopic measurements of reflectance. The diffraction and spectrophotometry results were found to be consistent with the theoretical Bragg's scattering expected for closed-packed crystals. By switching the dc electric field from on to off, we demonstrate reversibility of the structural color response on times scales ∼60 s. The dc electric field assembly method therefore represents a simple method to produce reversible structural color in colloidal soft matter.

  11. Accuracy details in realistic CFD modeling of an industrial centrifugal pump in direct and reverse modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Páscoa, J. C.; Silva, F. J.; Pinheiro, J. S.; Martins, D. J.

    2010-12-01

    Numerical computation of the flowfield inside a pump is herein used as a numerical laboratory, subject to the limitations of modeling assumptions and to experimental verification. A numerical computation of the flow inside a real industrial centrifugal pump is performed that includes a very sophisticated geometry. Conversely to other computations, in this test case no simplification of the geometry was introduced. Numerical computations are obtained using Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model. A detailed analysis of the turbulent flowstructure is performed for the design point and two off design conditions. Additional computations were performed in order to compare the numerical and experimental pump characteristics; these were obtained under normalized testing conditions. Further computations are presented for the pump working in reverse turbine mode (PAT). Detailed analyses of the flow allow a comparison of the internal flow losses when the pump is operating in direct and reverse mode. This is also useful to help in the selection of an adequate pump geometry that can work in both modes with best efficiency.

  12. A specific antidote for reversal of anticoagulation by direct and indirect inhibitors of coagulation factor Xa.

    PubMed

    Lu, Genmin; DeGuzman, Francis R; Hollenbach, Stanley J; Karbarz, Mark J; Abe, Keith; Lee, Gail; Luan, Peng; Hutchaleelaha, Athiwat; Inagaki, Mayuko; Conley, Pamela B; Phillips, David R; Sinha, Uma

    2013-04-01

    Inhibitors of coagulation factor Xa (fXa) have emerged as a new class of antithrombotics but lack effective antidotes for patients experiencing serious bleeding. We designed and expressed a modified form of fXa as an antidote for fXa inhibitors. This recombinant protein (r-Antidote, PRT064445) is catalytically inactive and lacks the membrane-binding γ-carboxyglutamic acid domain of native fXa but retains the ability of native fXa to bind direct fXa inhibitors as well as low molecular weight heparin-activated antithrombin III (ATIII). r-Antidote dose-dependently reversed the inhibition of fXa by direct fXa inhibitors and corrected the prolongation of ex vivo clotting times by such inhibitors. In rabbits treated with the direct fXa inhibitor rivaroxaban, r-Antidote restored hemostasis in a liver laceration model. The effect of r-Antidote was mediated by reducing plasma anti-fXa activity and the non-protein bound fraction of the fXa inhibitor in plasma. In rats, r-Antidote administration dose-dependently and completely corrected increases in blood loss resulting from ATIII-dependent anticoagulation by enoxaparin or fondaparinux. r-Antidote has the potential to be used as a universal antidote for a broad range of fXa inhibitors.

  13. Comparison of accelerated ion populations observed upstream of the bow shocks at Venus and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, M.; Futaana, Y.; Fedorov, A.; Frahm, R. A.; Winningham, J. D.; Dubinin, E.; Lundin, R.; Barabash, S.; Holmström, M.; Mazelle, C.; Sauvaud, J.-A.; Zhang, T. L.; Baumjohann, W.; Coates, A. J.; Fraenz, M.

    2011-03-01

    Foreshock ions are compared between Venus and Mars at energies of 0.6~20 keV using the same ion instrument, the Ion Mass Analyser, on board both Venus Express and Mars Express. Venus Express often observes accelerated protons (2~6 times the solar wind energy) that travel away from the Venus bow shock when the spacecraft location is magnetically connected to the bow shock. The observed ions have a large field-aligned velocity compared to the perpendicular velocity in the solar wind frame, and are similar to the field-aligned beams and intermediate gyrating component of the foreshock ions in the terrestrial upstream region. Mars Express does not observe similar foreshock ions as does Venus Express, indicating that the Martian foreshock does not possess the intermediate gyrating component in the upstream region on the dayside of the planet. Instead, two types of gyrating protons in the solar wind frame are observed very close to the Martian quasi-perpendicular bow shock within a proton gyroradius distance. The first type is observed only within the region which is about 400 km from the bow shock and flows tailward nearly along the bow shock with a similar velocity as the solar wind. The second type is observed up to about 700 km from the bow shock and has a bundled structure in the energy domain. A traversal on 12 July 2005, in which the energy-bunching came from bundling in the magnetic field direction, is further examined. The observed velocities of the latter population are consistent with multiple specular reflections of the solar wind at the bow shock, and the ions after the second reflection have a field-aligned velocity larger than that of the de Hoffman-Teller velocity frame, i.e., their guiding center has moved toward interplanetary space out from the bow shock. To account for the observed peculiarity of the Martian upstream region, finite gyroradius effects of the solar wind protons compared to the radius of the bow shock curvature and effects of cold ion

  14. Suicide using a compound bow and arrow.

    PubMed

    Cina, S J; Radentz, S S; Smialek, J E

    1998-03-01

    Accidental, suicidal, and homicidal injuries have been caused by arrows fired from crossbows. To our knowledge, a case of suicide using a full-size compound bow to fire a projectile has not been reported in the English literature. Described is a case of a 17-year-old man who shot himself in the chest with a broadhead hunting arrow fired from a compound bow. Examination of the footwear suggests that the decedent drew the bowstring with his left foot while holding the bow in his hands. The mechanism of injury is discussed. When dealing with a longbow-related fatality, examination of the weaponry used and reenactment of the fatal methodology are critical in determining whether self-inflicted injury is a probability.

  15. Bow-arrow interaction in archery.

    PubMed

    Kooi, B W

    1998-11-01

    A mathematical model of the flight of the arrow during its discharge from a bow was proposed by Pekalski (1990). His description of the model was incomplete. In this paper, I give a full description of the model. Furthermore, I propose some improvements that make his model more consistent with reality. One achievement is the modelling of contact of the arrow and grip; the pressure button is modelled as a unilateral elastic support. The acceleration force acting upon the arrow during the launch is predicted by an advanced mathematical model of bow dynamics. There is a satisfactory conformity of the simulation and experimental results. The new model predicts that the arrow leaves the pressure button before it leaves the string, as reported previously. The ability to model arrow dynamics can be used to improve the adjustment of the bow-arrow system for optimal performance.

  16. Reverse transcriptase directs viral evolution in a deep ocean methane seep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, B. G.; Bagby, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    Deep ocean methane seeps are sites of intense microbial activity, with complex communities fueled by aerobic and anaerobic methanotrophy. Methane consumption in these communities has a substantial impact on the global carbon cycle, yet little is known about their evolutionary history or their likely evolutionary trajectories in a warming ocean. As in other marine systems, viral predation and virally mediated horizontal gene transfer are expected to be major drivers of evolutionary change in these communities; however, the host cells' resistance to cultivation has impeded direct study of the viral population. We conducted a metagenomic study of viruses in the anoxic sediments of a deep methane seep in the Santa Monica Basin in the Southern California Bight. We retrieved 1660 partial viral genomes, tentatively assigning 1232 to bacterial hosts and 428 to archaea. One abundant viral genome, likely hosted by Clostridia species present in the sediment, was found to encode a diversity-generating retroelement (DGR), a module for reverse transcriptase-mediated directed mutagenesis of a distal tail fiber protein. While DGRs have previously been described in the viruses of human pathogens, where diversification of viral tail fibers permits infection of a range of host cell types, to our knowledge this is the first description of such an element in a marine virus. By providing a mechanism for massively broadening potential host range, the presence of DGRs in these systems may have a major impact on the prevalence of virally mediated horizontal gene transfer, and even on the phylogenetic distances across which genes are moved.

  17. Direct imaging of the magnetization reversal in microwires using all-MOKE microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stupakiewicz, A.; Chizhik, A.; Tekielak, M.; Zhukov, A.; Gonzalez, J.; Maziewski, A.

    2014-10-01

    We report a method of imaging of the magnetization reversal process using analysis of real-time images of magnetic domain structures in cylindrically shaped microwires. This method uses wide-field polarizing optical microscopy and is based on the magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE). The aperture diaphragm in MOKE microscope was used to control the incident angles of the light rays that reached the non-planar surface of the microwire and also determined the MOKE geometries. The movement of the non-central position of the hole in this diaphragm leads to a change in the orientation of the plane of incidence of the light along the perpendicular or the parallel direction to the axial direction of the wire. The visualization of the surface magnetic domain structures is obtained using polar and longitudinal MOKE geometries. The hysteresis loops were obtained by plotting the averaged image contrast as a function of the external magnetic field. The separation of the all-magnetization components is performed using different MOKE geometries in a microscope. We demonstrate the use of vector magnetometry to analyze the orientation of the magnetization in a cylindrically shaped microwire under the influence of an external magnetic field.

  18. Large amplitude MHD waves upstream of the Jovian bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. L.; Smith, C. W.; Matthaeus, W. H.

    1983-01-01

    Observations of large amplitude magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) waves upstream of Jupiter's bow shock are analyzed. The waves are found to be right circularly polarized in the solar wind frame which suggests that they are propagating in the fast magnetosonic mode. A complete spectral and minimum variance eigenvalue analysis of the data was performed. The power spectrum of the magnetic fluctuations contains several peaks. The fluctuations at 2.3 mHz have a direction of minimum variance along the direction of the average magnetic field. The direction of minimum variance of these fluctuations lies at approximately 40 deg. to the magnetic field and is parallel to the radial direction. We argue that these fluctuations are waves excited by protons reflected off the Jovian bow shock. The inferred speed of the reflected protons is about two times the solar wind speed in the plasma rest frame. A linear instability analysis is presented which suggests an explanation for many of the observed features of the observations.

  19. 2. VIEW NORTH OF BOW OF JFK IN DRYDOCK NO. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW NORTH OF BOW OF JFK IN DRYDOCK NO. 5; NOTE BOW ANCHOR AT TOP CENTER. - Naval Base Philadelphia-Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, Dry Dock No. 5, League Island, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  20. 1. View looking south on Montana Street. The Silver Bow ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. View looking south on Montana Street. The Silver Bow County Courthouse (1910-1912) is on the left. - Butte Historic District, Bounded by Copper, Arizona, Mercury & Continental Streets, Butte, Silver Bow County, MT

  1. Perseveration on a reversal-learning task correlates with rates of self-directed behavior in nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Judge, Peter G; Evans, David W; Schroepfer, Kara K; Gross, Alyssa C

    2011-09-12

    In humans and several nonhuman animals, repetitive behavior is associated with deficits on executive function tasks involving response inhibition. We tested for this relationship in nonhuman primates by correlating rates of normative behavior to performance on a reversal-learning task in which animals were required to inhibit a previously learned rule. We focused on rates of self-directed behavior (scratch, autogroom, self touch and manipulation) because these responses are known indicators of arousal or anxiety in primates, however, we also examined rates of other categories of behavior (e.g., locomotion). Behavior rates were obtained from 14 animals representing three nonhuman primate species (Macaca silenus, Saimiri sciureus, Cebus apella) living in separate social groups. The same animals were tested on a reversal-learning task in which they were presented with a black and a grey square on a touch screen and were trained to touch the black square. Once animals learned to select the black square, reward contingencies were reversed and animals were rewarded for selecting the grey square. Performance on the reversal-learning task was positively correlated to self-directed behavior in that animals that exhibited higher rates of self-directed behavior required more trials to achieve reversal. Reversal learning was not correlated to rates of any other category of behavior. Results indicate that rates of behavior associated with anxiety and arousal provide an indicator of executive function in nonhuman primates. The relationship suggests continuity between nonhuman primates and humans in the link between executive functioning and repetitive behavior.

  2. Characterising the Canine Oral Microbiome by Direct Sequencing of Reverse-Transcribed rRNA Molecules

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, James E.; Larsen, Niels; Pennington, Andrea; Connolly, John; Wallis, Corrin; Rooks, David J.; Hall, Neil; McCarthy, Alan J.; Allison, Heather E.

    2016-01-01

    PCR amplification and sequencing of phylogenetic markers, primarily Small Sub-Unit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) genes, has been the paradigm for defining the taxonomic composition of microbiomes. However, ‘universal’ SSU rRNA gene PCR primer sets are likely to miss much of the diversity therein. We sequenced a library comprising purified and reverse-transcribed SSU rRNA (RT-SSU rRNA) molecules from the canine oral microbiome and compared it to a general bacterial 16S rRNA gene PCR amplicon library generated from the same biological sample. In addition, we have developed BIONmeta, a novel, open-source, computer package for the processing and taxonomic classification of the randomly fragmented RT-SSU rRNA reads produced. Direct RT-SSU rRNA sequencing revealed that 16S rRNA molecules belonging to the bacterial phyla Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Proteobacteria and Spirochaetes, were most abundant in the canine oral microbiome (92.5% of total bacterial SSU rRNA). The direct rRNA sequencing approach detected greater taxonomic diversity (1 additional phylum, 2 classes, 1 order, 10 families and 61 genera) when compared with general bacterial 16S rRNA amplicons from the same sample, simultaneously provided SSU rRNA gene inventories of Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya, and detected significant numbers of sequences not recognised by ‘universal’ primer sets. Proteobacteria and Spirochaetes were found to be under-represented by PCR-based analysis of the microbiome, and this was due to primer mismatches and taxon-specific variations in amplification efficiency, validated by qPCR analysis of 16S rRNA amplicons from a mock community. This demonstrated the veracity of direct RT-SSU rRNA sequencing for molecular microbial ecology. PMID:27276347

  3. Extremely rapid directional change during Matuyama-Brunhes geomagnetic polarity reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagnotti, Leonardo; Scardia, Giancarlo; Giaccio, Biagio; Liddicoat, Joseph C.; Nomade, Sebastien; Renne, Paul R.; Sprain, Courtney J.

    2014-11-01

    We report a palaeomagnetic investigation of the last full geomagnetic field reversal, the Matuyama-Brunhes (M-B) transition, as preserved in a continuous sequence of exposed lacustrine sediments in the Apennines of Central Italy. The palaeomagnetic record provides the most direct evidence for the tempo of transitional field behaviour yet obtained for the M-B transition. 40Ar/39Ar dating of tephra layers bracketing the M-B transition provides high-accuracy age constraints and indicates a mean sediment accumulation rate of about 0.2 mm yr-1 during the transition. Two relative palaeointensity (RPI) minima are present in the M-B transition. During the terminus of the upper RPI minimum, a directional change of about 180 ° occurred at an extremely fast rate, estimated to be less than 2 ° per year, with no intermediate virtual geomagnetic poles (VGPs) documented during the transit from the southern to northern hemisphere. Thus, the entry into the Brunhes Normal Chron as represented by the palaeomagnetic directions and VGPs developed in a time interval comparable to the duration of an average human life, which is an order of magnitude more rapid than suggested by current models. The reported investigation therefore provides high-resolution integrated palaeomagnetic and radioisotopic data that document the fine details of the anatomy and tempo of the M-B transition in Central Italy that in turn are crucial for a better understanding of Earth's magnetic field, and for the development of more sophisticated models that are able to describe its global structure and behaviour.

  4. Swimming direction reversal of flagella through ciliary motion of mastigonemes 1

    PubMed Central

    Namdeo, S.; Khaderi, S. N.; den Toonder, J. M. J.; Onck, P. R.

    2011-01-01

    Bio-inspired designs can provide an answer to engineering problems such as swimming strategies at the micron or nano-scale. Scientists are now designing artificial micro-swimmers that can mimic flagella-powered swimming of micro-organisms. In an application such as lab-on-a-chip in which micro-object manipulation in small flow geometries could be achieved by micro-swimmers, control of the swimming direction becomes an important aspect for retrieval and control of the micro-swimmer. A bio-inspired approach for swimming direction reversal (a flagellum bearing mastigonemes) can be used to design such a system and is being explored in the present work. We analyze the system using a computational framework in which the equations of solid mechanics and fluid dynamics are solved simultaneously. The fluid dynamics of Stokes flow is represented by a 2D Stokeslets approach while the solid mechanics behavior is realized using Euler-Bernoulli beam elements. The working principle of a flagellum bearing mastigonemes can be broken up into two parts: (1) the contribution of the base flagellum and (2) the contribution of mastigonemes, which act like cilia. These contributions are counteractive, and the net motion (velocity and direction) is a superposition of the two. In the present work, we also perform a dimensional analysis to understand the underlying physics associated with the system parameters such as the height of the mastigonemes, the number of mastigonemes, the flagellar wave length and amplitude, the flagellum length, and mastigonemes rigidity. Our results provide fundamental physical insight on the swimming of a flagellum with mastigonemes, and it provides guidelines for the design of artificial flagellar systems. PMID:21918678

  5. Effects of the bow on social organization in Western North America.

    PubMed

    Bettinger, Robert L

    2013-01-01

    The bow more than doubled, likely tripled, the success of individuals bent on killing animal or human targets (Box ). The advent of this revolutionary technology generated different responses in western North America depending on subsistence and sociopolitical organization at the time of its arrival, roughly 2300 - 1300 B.P. Its effect was substantial in California and the Great Basin, particularly on group size, which in many places diminished as a consequence of the bow's reliability. The counter-intuitive result was to increase within group-relatedness enough to encourage intensification of plant resources, previously considered too costly. The bow rose to greatest direct economic importance with the arrival of the horse, and was put to most effective use by former Great Basin groups who maintained the family band system that had developed around intensive Great Basin plant procurement, adapting the same organization to a lifestyle centered on the equestrian pursuit of buffalo and warfare.

  6. Observations of low-energy electrons upstream of the earth's bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reasoner, D. L.

    1974-01-01

    Observations of electron fluxes with a lunar-based electron spectrometer when the moon was upstream of the earth have shown that a subset of observed fluxes are strongly controlled by the interplanetary magnetic field direction. The fluxes occur only when the IMF lines connect back to the earth's bow shock. Observed densities and temperatures were in the ranges 2-4 x 0,001/cu cm and 1.7-2.8 x 1,000,000 K. It is shown that these electrons can account for increases in effective solar wind electron temperatures on bow-shock connected field lines which have been observed previously by other investigators. It is further shown that if a model of the bow shock with an electrostatic potential barrier is assumed, the potential can be estimated to be 500 volts.

  7. An IRAS/ISSA Survey of Bow Shocks Around Runaway Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buren, David Van

    1995-01-01

    We searched for bow shock-like objects like those known around Oph and a Cam near the positions of 183 runaway stars. Based primarily on the presence and morphology of excess 60 micron emission we identify 56 new candidate bow shocks, for which we determine photometric and morphological parameters. Previously only a dozen or so were known. Well resolved structures are present around 25 stars. A comparison of the distribution of symmetry axes of the infrared nebulae with that of their proper motion vectors indicates that these two directions are very significantly aligned. The observed alignment strongly suggests that the structures we see arise from the interaction of stellar winds with the interstellar medium, justifying the identification of these far-infrared objects as stellar wind bow shocks.

  8. An IRAS/ISSA Survey of Bow Shocks Around Runaway Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Buren, Dave; Noriega-Crespo, Alberto; Dgani, Ruth

    1995-12-01

    We searched the IRAS data for bow shock-like objects like those known around ζ Oph and α Cam near the positions of 188 runaway stars. Based primarily on the presence and morphology of excess 60 μm emission we identify 58 candidate bow shocks, for which we determine photometric and morphological parameters. Previously only a dozen or so were known. Well-resolved structures are present around 25 stars. A comparison of the distribution of symmetry axes of the infrared nebulae with the proper motions of the stars indicate the two directions are very significantly aligned. The observed alignment strongly suggests that the structures we see arise from the interaction of stellar winds with the interstellar medium, justifying the identification of these far-infrared objects as stellar wind bow shocks.

  9. Comparison of cast positions by using four face-bows.

    PubMed

    Goska, J R; Christensen, L V

    1988-01-01

    The positions that the maxillary right and left first molars occupy when a maxillary cast is mounted in the three-dimensional space of a semiadjustable articulator (Hanau H2) were studied. Mountings were made by using four face-bows, the Hanau Kinematic Face-bow, the Hanau Facia-bow, the Hanau 159 Earpiece Face-bow, and the Hanau Twirl Earpiece Face-bow. A kinematically determined hinge-axis was used arbitrarily as the baseline for comparisons among the three other bows. Deviations from the baseline were measured along the X, Y, and Z axes by using a contour meter (Fig. 1). The deviations showed great variability (Table I), and because maxillary casts are mounted in relation to anatomic landmarks that differ from subject to subject, it was not possible to establish clinical superiority of one face-bow over another.

  10. The Enzyme-Mediated Direct Reversal of a Dithymine Photoproduct in Germinating Endospores

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Linlin; Li, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Spore photoproduct lyase (SPL) repairs a special thymine dimer, 5-thyminyl-5,6-dihydrothymine, which is commonly called spore photoproduct, or SP, in germinating endospores. SP is the exclusive DNA photo-damaging product found in endospores; its generation and swift repair by SPL are responsible for the spores’ extremely high UV resistance. Early in vivo studies suggested that SPL utilizes a direct reversal strategy to repair SP in the absence of light. Recently, it has been established that SPL belongs to the radical S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) superfamily. The enzymes in this superfamily utilize a tri-cysteine CXXXCXXC motif to bind a [4Fe-4S] cluster. The cluster provides an electron to the S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) to reductively cleave its C5′-S bond, generating a reactive 5′-deoxyadenosyl (5′-dA) radical. This 5′-dA radical abstracts the proR hydrogen atom from the C6 carbon of SP to initiate the repair process; the resulting SP radical subsequently fragments to generate a putative thymine methyl radical, which accepts a back-donated H atom to yield the repaired TpT. The H atom donor is suggested to be a conserved cysteine141 in B. subtilis SPL; the resulting thiyl radical likely interacts with a neighboring tyrosine99 before oxidizing the 5′-dA to 5′-dA radical and, subsequently, regenerating SAM. These findings suggest SPL to be the first enzyme in the large radical SAM superfamily (>44,000 members) to utilize a radical transfer pathway for catalysis; its study should shed light on the mechanistic understanding of the SAM regeneration process in other members of the superfamily. PMID:23799365

  11. Properties of bow-shock sources at the Galactic center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Bermudez, J.; Schödel, R.; Alberdi, A.; Muzić, K.; Hummel, C. A.; Pott, J.-U.

    2014-07-01

    Context. There exists an enigmatic population of massive stars around the Galactic center (GC) that were formed some Myr ago. A fraction of these stars has been found to orbit the supermassive black hole, Sgr A*, in a projected clockwise disk-like structure, which suggests that they were formed in a formerly existing dense disk around Sgr A*. Aims: We focus on a subgroup of objects, the extended, near-infrared (NIR) bright sources IRS 1W, IRS 5, IRS 10W, and IRS 21, that have been suggested to be young, massive stars that form bow shocks through their interaction with the interstellar medium (ISM). Their nature has impeded accurate determinations of their orbital parameters. We aim at establishing their nature and kinematics to test whether they form part of the clockwise disk. Methods: We performed NIR multiwavelength imaging with NACO/VLT using direct adaptive optics (AO) and AO-assisted sparse aperture masking (SAM). We introduce a new method for self-calibration of the SAM point spread function in dense stellar fields. The emission mechanism, morphology, and kinematics of the targets were examined via 3D models, combined with existing models of the gas flow in the central parsec. Results: We confirm previous findings that IRS 21, IRS 1W, and IRS 5 are bow-shocks created by the interaction between mass-losing stars and the interstellar gas. The nature of IRS 10W remains unclear. Our modeling shows that the bow-shock emission is caused by thermal emission, while the scattering of stellar light does not play a significant role. IRS 1W shows a morphology that is consistent with a bow shock produced by an anisotropic stellar wind or by locally inhomogeneous ISM density. Our best-fit models provide estimates of the local proper motion of the ISM in the Northern Arm that agree with previously published models that were based on radio interferometry and NIR spectroscopy. Assuming that all of the sources are gravitationally tied to Sagittarius A*, their orbital planes

  12. A BOW SHOCK NEAR A YOUNG STAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    NASA's Hubble Space Telescope continues to reveal various stunning and intricate treasures that reside within the nearby, intense star-forming region known as the Great Nebula in Orion. One such jewel is the bow shock around the very young star, LL Ori, featured in this Hubble Heritage image. Named for the crescent-shaped wave made by a ship as it moves through water, a bow shock can be created in space when two streams of gas collide. LL Ori emits a vigorous solar wind, a stream of charged particles moving rapidly outward from the star. Our own Sun has a less energetic version of this wind that is responsible for auroral displays on the Earth. The material in the fast wind from LL Ori collides with slow-moving gas evaporating away from the center of the Orion Nebula, which is located to the lower right in this Heritage image. The surface where the two winds collide is the crescent-shaped bow shock seen in the image. Unlike a water wave made by a ship, this interstellar bow shock is a three-dimensional structure. The filamentary emission has a very distinct boundary on the side facing away from LL Ori, but is diffuse on the side closest to the star, a characteristic common to many bow shocks. A second, fainter bow shock can be seen around a star near the upper right-hand corner of the Heritage image. Astronomers have identified numerous shock fronts in this complex star-forming region and are using this data to understand the many complex phenomena associated with the birth of stars. This image was taken in February 1995 as part of the Hubble Orion Nebula mosaic. A close visitor in our Milky Way galaxy, the nebula is only 1,500 light-years from Earth. The filters used in this color composite represent oxygen, nitrogen, and hydrogen emissions. Image Credit: NASA and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA) Acknowledgment: C. R. O'Dell (Vanderbilt University)

  13. Bow shock and magnetosheath waves at Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairfield, D. H.; Behannon, K. W.

    1975-01-01

    Mariner 10 measurements at the Mercury bow shock provide examples where the magnetic field is approximately parallel or perpendicular to the bow shock normal. Upstream of a broad irregular parallel shock, left hand circularly polarized waves are observed which cut off very sharply at approximately 4 Hz. Upstream of a perpendicular shock, right hand circularly polarized waves are observed which persist up to the Nyquist frequency of 12 Ha. Determination of the wave propagation vector as a function of frequency helps conclusively identify the waves as whistler mode waves propagating from the shock. The magnetosheath downstream of the parallel shock is disturbed more than that downstream of the perpendicular shock particularly below 1 Hz. In the latter case regular left hand polarized waves observed slightly above the proton gyrofrequency are identified as ion cyclotron waves with wavelength approximately 300 km which are Doppler shifted up to their observed frequency.

  14. A survey for Hα pulsar bow shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Brownsberger, Sasha; Romani, Roger W. E-mail: sashab@stanford.edu

    2014-04-01

    We report on a survey for Hα bow shock emission around nearby γ-detected energetic pulsars. This survey adds three Balmer-dominated neutron star bow shocks to the six previously confirmed examples. In addition to the shock around Fermi pulsar PSR J1741–2054, we now report Hα structures around two additional γ-ray pulsars, PSR J2030+4415 and PSR J1509–5850. These are the first known examples of Hα nebulae with pre-ionization halos. With new measurements, we show that a simple analytic model can account for the angular size and flux of the bow shocks' apices. The latter, in particular, provides a new pulsar probe and indicates large moments of inertia and smaller distances than previously assumed in several cases. In particular, we show that the re-measured PSR J0437–4715 shock flux implies I = (1.7 ± 0.2) × 10{sup 45}/(f {sub HI}sin i) g cm{sup 2}. We also derive a distance d ≈ 0.72 kpc for the γ-ray only pulsar PSR J2030+4415 and revised distances for PSRs J1959+2048 (1.4 kpc) and J2555+6535 (∼1 kpc), smaller than the conventional DM-estimated values. Finally, we report upper limits for 94 additional LAT pulsars. An estimate of the survey sensitivity indicates that for a warm neutral medium filling factor φ{sub WNM} ∼ 0.3 there should be a total of approximately nine Hα bow shocks in our LAT-targeted survey; given that seven such objects are now known, a much larger φ{sub WNM} seems problematic.

  15. Reversible light-directed red, green, and blue reflection with thermal stability enabled by a self-organized helical superstructure.

    PubMed

    Li, Yannian; Urbas, Augustine; Li, Quan

    2012-06-13

    Adding external, remote, and dynamic control to self-organized superstructures with desired properties is an important leap necessary in leveraging the fascinating molecular subsystems for employment in applications. Here two novel light-driven dithienylethene chiral molecular switches possessing remarkable changes in helical twisting power during photoisomerization as well as very high helical twisting powers were found to experience photochemically reversible isomerization with thermal stability in both isotropic organic solvents and anisotropic liquid crystal media. When doped into a commercially available achiral liquid crystal host, the chiral switch was able to either immediately induce an optically tunable helical superstructure or retain an achiral photoresponsive liquid crystal phase whose helical superstructure was induced and tuned reversibly upon light irradiation. Moreover, reversible light-directed red, green, and blue reflection colors with thermal stability in a single thin film were demonstrated.

  16. Structuration in the Interface of Direct and Reversed Micelles of Sucrose Esters, Studied by Fluorescent Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Sandoval, Catalina; Ortega, Anakenna; Sanchez, Susana A.; Morales, Javier; Gunther, German

    2015-01-01

    Background Reactors found in nature can be described as micro-heterogeneous systems, where media involved in each micro-environment can behave in a markedly different way compared with the properties of the bulk solution. The presence of water molecules in micro-organized assemblies is of paramount importance for many chemical processes, ranging from biology to environmental science. Self-organized molecular assembled systems are frequently used to study dynamics of water molecules because are the simplest models mimicking biological membranes. The hydrogen bonds between sucrose and water molecules are described to be stronger (or more extensive) than the ones between water molecules themselves. In this work, we studied the capability of sucrose moiety, attached to alkyl chains of different length, as a surface blocking agent at the water-interface and we compared its properties with those of polyethylenglycol, a well-known agent used for this purposes. Published studies in this topic mainly refer to the micellization process and the stability of mixed surfactant systems using glycosides. We are interested in the effect induced by the presence of sucrose monoesters at the interface (direct and reverse micelles) and at the palisade (mixtures with Triton X-100). We believe that the different functional group (ester), the position of alkyl chain (6-O) and the huge capability of sucrose to interact with water will dramatically change the water structuration at the interface and at the palisade, generating new possibilities for technological applications of these systems. Results Our time resolved and steady state fluorescence experiments in pure SEs micelles show that sucrose moieties are able to interact with a high number of water molecules promoting water structuration and increased viscosity. These results also indicate that the barrier formed by sucrose moieties on the surface of pure micelles is more effective than the polyoxyethylene palisade of Triton X-100

  17. Direct CRISPR spacer acquisition from RNA by a natural reverse-transcriptase-Cas1 fusion protein

    PubMed Central

    Sidote, David J.; Markham, Laura M.; Sanchez-Amat, Antonio; Bhaya, Devaki; Lambowitz, Alan M.; Fire, Andrew Z.

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeat) systems mediate adaptive immunity in diverse prokaryotes. CRISPR-associated Cas1 and Cas2 proteins have been shown to enable adaptation to new threats in Type I and II CRISPR systems by the acquisition of short segments of DNA (“spacers”) from invasive elements. In several Type III CRISPR systems, Cas1 is naturally fused to a reverse transcriptase (RT). In the marine bacterium Marinomonas mediterranea (MMB-1), we show that an RT-Cas1 fusion enables the acquisition of RNA spacers in vivo in an RT-dependent manner. In vitro, the MMB-1 RT-Cas1 and Cas2 proteins catalyze ligation of RNA segments into the CRISPR array, followed by reverse transcription. These observations outline a host-mediated mechanism for reverse information flow from RNA to DNA. PMID:26917774

  18. Direct integration of MEMS, dielectric pumping and cell manipulation with reversibly bonded gecko adhesive microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warnat, S.; King, H.; Wasay, A.; Sameoto, D.; Hubbard, T.

    2016-09-01

    We present an approach to form a microfluidic environment on top of MEMS dies using reversibly bonded microfluidics. The reversible polymeric microfluidics moulds bond to the MEMS die using a gecko-inspired gasket architecture. In this study the formed microchannels are demonstrated in conjunction with a MEMS mechanical single cell testing environment for BioMEMS applications. A reversible microfluidics placement technique with an x-y and rotational accuracy of  ±2 µm and 1° respectively on a MEMS die was developed. No leaks were observed during pneumatic pumping of common cell media (PBS, sorbitol, water, seawater) through the fluidic channels. Thermal chevron actuators were successful operated inside this fluidic environment and a performance deviation of ~15% was measured compared to an open MEMS configuration. Latex micro-spheres were pumped using traveling wave di-electrophoresis and compared to an open (no-microfluidics) configuration with velocities of 24 µm s-1 and 20 µm s-1.

  19. Influence of Additive and Multiplicative Structure and Direction of Comparison on the Reversal Error

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    González-Calero, José Antonio; Arnau, David; Laserna-Belenguer, Belén

    2015-01-01

    An empirical study has been carried out to evaluate the potential of word order matching and static comparison as explanatory models of reversal error. Data was collected from 214 undergraduate students who translated a set of additive and multiplicative comparisons expressed in Spanish into algebraic language. In these multiplicative comparisons…

  20. Directional climate change and potential reversal of desertification in arid and semiarid ecosystems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our objective was to determine if long-term increases in precipitation can maintain grasslands susceptible to desertification, and initiate a reversal of historic regime shifts on desertified shrublands. Long-term trends in desertification were documented using vegetation maps beginning in 1858. The...

  1. Observed Foreshock Ions which are Actually Behind the Martian Bow Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frahm, Rudy A.; Yamauchi, Masatoshi; Winningham, J. David; Lundin, Rickard; Sharber, James R.; Nilsson, Hans; Coates, Andrew J.; Mukherjee, Joey

    2016-04-01

    The Mars Express (MEx) Analyzer of Space Plasmas and Energetic Atoms (ASPERA-3) experiment contains ion and electron instruments for conducting plasma measurements. On January 23, 2012, during in-bound travel of MEx in the southern hemisphere of Mars traveling from its dawn side toward periapsis at dusk, the plasma instruments measured foreshock-like ion beams extending from outside the bow shock and into the magnetosphere, continuing to a distance of about a proton gyroradius from the bow shock. These ion beams were mostly protons, were observed to have energies greater than solar wind protons, and were not gyrating, in agreement with reflections of the solar wind proton beam. Furthermore, in the foreshock region, the ion energy gradually decreased toward the magnetosheath, in agreement with an acceleration by an outward-directed electric field in the bow shock. The observations also suggest that this electric field exists even inside the magnetosheath, within the distance of a proton gyroradius from the bow shock.

  2. CPR methodology with new steady-state criterion and more accurate statistical treatment of channel bow

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgartner, S.; Bieli, R.; Bergmann, U. C.

    2012-07-01

    An overview is given of existing CPR design criteria and the methods used in BWR reload analysis to evaluate the impact of channel bow on CPR margins. Potential weaknesses in today's methodologies are discussed. Westinghouse in collaboration with KKL and Axpo - operator and owner of the Leibstadt NPP - has developed an optimized CPR methodology based on a new criterion to protect against dryout during normal operation and with a more rigorous treatment of channel bow. The new steady-state criterion is expressed in terms of an upper limit of 0.01 for the dryout failure probability per year. This is considered a meaningful and appropriate criterion that can be directly related to the probabilistic criteria set-up for the analyses of Anticipated Operation Occurrences (AOOs) and accidents. In the Monte Carlo approach a statistical modeling of channel bow and an accurate evaluation of CPR response functions allow the associated CPR penalties to be included directly in the plant SLMCPR and OLMCPR in a best-estimate manner. In this way, the treatment of channel bow is equivalent to all other uncertainties affecting CPR. Emphasis is put on quantifying the statistical distribution of channel bow throughout the core using measurement data. The optimized CPR methodology has been implemented in the Westinghouse Monte Carlo code, McSLAP. The methodology improves the quality of dryout safety assessments by supplying more valuable information and better control of conservatisms in establishing operational limits for CPR. The methodology is demonstrated with application examples from the introduction at KKL. (authors)

  3. Measurement of Force of Bow Holding and Contact Force between Bow Hair and String in Violin Playing by Pressure Measuring Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsutani, Akihiro

    2001-09-01

    The force of bow holding and the contact force between bow hair and string in violin playing were measured by a pressure measuring film for the first time. It was scientifically identified that relaxed bowing was important for achieving a good violin tone. The proposed measurement manner may be helpful for objective evaluation of the bowing skill of amateur violinists.

  4. Image reversal for direct electron beam patterning of protein coated surfaces.

    PubMed

    Pesen, Devrim; Erlandsson, Anna; Ulfendahl, Mats; Haviland, David B

    2007-11-01

    Electron beam lithography (EBL) is used to create surfaces with protein patterns, which are characterized by immunofluorescence and atomic force microscopies. Both negative and positive image processes are realized by electron beam irradiation of proteins absorbed on a silicon surface, where image reversal is achieved by selectively binding a second species of protein to the electron beam exposed areas on the first protein layer. Biofunctionality at the cellular level was established by culturing cortical cells on patterned lines of fibronectin adsorbed on a bovine serum albumin background for 7 days in culture.

  5. Direct integration of vertical In2O3 nanowire arrays, nanosheet chains, and photoinduced reversible switching of wettability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Miao; Zheng, Maojun; Zeng, Ansheng; Ma, L.

    2008-03-01

    Large-scale In2O3 nanowire (NW) arrays and nanosheet chains are directly integrated on InP substrates via a simple chemical vapor deposition process, benefiting from the substrate-induced, self-assembly and self-catalyzed vapor-liquid-solid growth mechanism. Such particular structures could be expected to have potential applications such as gas sensors and field emission devices. Equally important, remarkable photoinduced wettability conversion between superhydrophobicity and high hydrophilicity has been observed on In2O3 NW arrays. This reversible behavior is ascribed to the photogenerated surface oxygen vacancies and the special nanostructures. Such reversibly switching surface will widen the applications of In2O3 films.

  6. Direct production of XYDMY− sex reversal female medaka (Oryzias latipes) by embryo microinjection of TALENs

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Daji; Liu, Yun; Chen, Ji; Xia, Xiaoqin; Cao, Mengxi; Cheng, Bin; Wang, Xuejuan; Gong, Wuming; Qiu, Chao; Zhang, Yunsheng; Ki Cheng, Christopher Hon; Zhu, Zuoyan; Hu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Medaka is an ideal model for sex determination and sex reversal, such as XY phenotypically female patients in humans. Here, we assembled improved TALENs targeting the DMY gene and generated XYDMY− mutants to investigate gonadal dysgenesis in medaka. DMY-TALENs resulted in indel mutations at the targeted loci (46.8%). DMY-nanos3UTR-TALENs induced mutations were passed through the germline to F1 generation with efficiencies of up to 91.7%. XYDMY− mutants developed into females, laid eggs, and stably passed the YDMY− chromosome to next generation. RNA-seq generated 157 million raw reads from WT male (WT_M_TE), WT female (WT_F_OV) and XYDMY− female medaka (TA_F_OV) gonad libraries. Differential expression analysis identified 144 up- and 293 down-regulated genes in TA_F_OV compared with WT_F_OV, 387 up- and 338 down-regulated genes in TA_F_OV compared with WT_M_TE. According to genes annotation and functional prediction, such as Wnt1 and PRCK, it revealed that incomplete ovarian function and reduced fertility of XYDMY− mutant is closely related to the wnt signaling pathway. Our results provided the transcriptional profiles of XYDMY− mutants, revealed the mechanism between sex reversal and DMY in medaka, and suggested that XYDMY− medaka was a novel mutant that is useful for investigating gonadal dysgenesis in phenotypic female patients with the 46, XY karyotype. PMID:26365677

  7. 46 CFR 45.69 - Correction for bow height.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Correction for bow height. 45.69 Section 45.69 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) LOAD LINES GREAT LAKES LOAD LINES Freeboards § 45.69 Correction for bow height. (a) The minimum summer freeboard of all manned vessels must...

  8. 46 CFR 45.69 - Correction for bow height.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Correction for bow height. 45.69 Section 45.69 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) LOAD LINES GREAT LAKES LOAD LINES Freeboards § 45.69 Correction for bow height. (a) The minimum summer freeboard of all manned vessels must...

  9. Evolution of Bow-Tie Architectures in Biology

    PubMed Central

    Friedlander, Tamar; Mayo, Avraham E.; Tlusty, Tsvi; Alon, Uri

    2015-01-01

    Bow-tie or hourglass structure is a common architectural feature found in many biological systems. A bow-tie in a multi-layered structure occurs when intermediate layers have much fewer components than the input and output layers. Examples include metabolism where a handful of building blocks mediate between multiple input nutrients and multiple output biomass components, and signaling networks where information from numerous receptor types passes through a small set of signaling pathways to regulate multiple output genes. Little is known, however, about how bow-tie architectures evolve. Here, we address the evolution of bow-tie architectures using simulations of multi-layered systems evolving to fulfill a given input-output goal. We find that bow-ties spontaneously evolve when the information in the evolutionary goal can be compressed. Mathematically speaking, bow-ties evolve when the rank of the input-output matrix describing the evolutionary goal is deficient. The maximal compression possible (the rank of the goal) determines the size of the narrowest part of the network—that is the bow-tie. A further requirement is that a process is active to reduce the number of links in the network, such as product-rule mutations, otherwise a non-bow-tie solution is found in the evolutionary simulations. This offers a mechanism to understand a common architectural principle of biological systems, and a way to quantitate the effective rank of the goals under which they evolved. PMID:25798588

  10. On the mechanics of the modern working-recurve bow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kooi, B. W.

    1991-09-01

    Characteristic for the bow are the slender elastic arms or limbs. The bow is braced by putting a string shorter than the bow between the tips of the limbs. Additional deformation energy is stored in the elastic limbs by drawing the bow into the fully drawn position. Part of this amount of energy is transformed into kinetic energy of a light arrow. In the 1930's the design of the bow became a subject of scientific research. Experiments were performed in which design parameters were changed more or less systematically. However, the mathematical models were rather simple. Because fast computers are now available the presented model in this paper can be much more advanced. The resulting set of partial differential equations with known initial values and moving boundaries is solved numberically using a finite-difference method. In this paper the design parameters associated with the developed model are charted accurately. Bows used in the past and nowadays on shooting meetings such as the Olympic Games are compared. It turns out that the application of better materials which can store more deformation energy per unit of mass and that this material is used to a larger extent, contribute most to the improvement of the bow. The parameters which fix the mechanical performance of the bow appear to be less important as is often claimed.

  11. Muscular activation patterns of the bow arm in recurve archery.

    PubMed

    Ertan, Hayri

    2009-05-01

    In archery shooting, the archer should hold the bow in place using only the pressure produced through drawing back the bowstring. Most coaches discourage the archer from gripping the bow as this is believed to produce a sideways deflecting torque on the bow and arrow during the release. The purpose of this study was to compare the bow hand forearm muscular activation patterns of elite archers with beginners to define the muscular contraction-relaxation strategies in the bow hand forearm muscles during archery shooting and investigate the effects of performance level on these strategies. Electromyographic activity of the M. flexor digitorum superficialis and the M. extensor digitorum of 10 elite and 10 beginner archers were recorded together with a pulse synchronized with the clicker snap. Raw electromyographic records as 1s before and after the clicker pulse were rectified, integrated, and normalized. The data was then averaged for successive shots of each subject and later for both groups of archers. The main difference between the elite and beginner archers was that the elite archers had a greater activation of the M. extensor digitorum, which indicates that they avoid gripping the bow-handle not only relaxing the flexor muscles, but also contracting the extensor muscle groups. This muscular contraction strategy secures the archer to not interfere with the forward movement of the bow, which is the forward acceleration of the bow caused by the pushing power of the bowstring.

  12. Auditory perception of note transitions in simulated complex bowing patterns.

    PubMed

    Schoonderwaldt, Erwin; Demoucron, Matthias; Altenmüller, Eckart; Leman, Marc

    2013-06-01

    Recent motion-capture measurements of violin bowing revealed an interesting coordination behavior in fast repetitive bowing patterns involving bow changes and string crossings; bow changes were consistently lagging behind string crossings, and the relative timing appeared to be an integral part of the bow-movement patterns. The aim of the current study was to investigate if there might be a perceptual explanation for the observed coordination behavior. For this purpose a virtual violin was used, controlled by simulated bowing gestures. A simplified coordination model is presented, which was implemented to allow real-time control of complex bowing patterns. This synthesis approach was employed in a perceptual experiment in which the participants were asked to optimize the sound by adjusting a slider controlling the main coordination parameters. It was found that the resulting coordination patterns were similar to those observed in performance, implying that complex bowing trajectories for an important part emerge from auditory-motor interaction. Further analysis of the responses shed light on temporal and spatial constraints of the simulated gestures associated with the note transitions. The results raise interesting questions with regard to auditory-motor interaction in complex instrumental control gestures.

  13. Mach 5 bow shock control by a nanosecond pulse surface dielectric barrier discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Nishihara, M.; Takashima, K.; Rich, J. W.; Adamovich, I. V.

    2011-06-15

    Bow shock perturbations in a Mach 5 air flow, produced by low-temperature, nanosecond pulse, and surface dielectric barrier discharge (DBD), are detected by phase-locked schlieren imaging. A diffuse nanosecond pulse discharge is generated in a DBD plasma actuator on a surface of a cylinder model placed in air flow in a small scale blow-down supersonic wind tunnel. Discharge energy coupled to the actuator is 7.3-7.8 mJ/pulse. Plasma temperature inferred from nitrogen emission spectra is a few tens of degrees higher than flow stagnation temperature, T = 340 {+-} 30 K. Phase-locked Schlieren images are used to detect compression waves generated by individual nanosecond discharge pulses near the actuator surface. The compression wave propagates upstream toward the baseline bow shock standing in front of the cylinder model. Interaction of the compression wave and the bow shock causes its displacement in the upstream direction, increasing shock stand-off distance by up to 25%. The compression wave speed behind the bow shock and the perturbed bow shock velocity are inferred from the Schlieren images. The effect of compression waves generated by nanosecond discharge pulses on shock stand-off distance is demonstrated in a single-pulse regime (at pulse repetition rates of a few hundred Hz) and in a quasi-continuous mode (using a two-pulse sequence at a pulse repetition rate of 100 kHz). The results demonstrate feasibility of hypersonic flow control by low-temperature, repetitive nanosecond pulse discharges.

  14. Mach 5 bow shock control by a nanosecond pulse surface dielectric barrier discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishihara, M.; Takashima, K.; Rich, J. W.; Adamovich, I. V.

    2011-06-01

    Bow shock perturbations in a Mach 5 air flow, produced by low-temperature, nanosecond pulse, and surface dielectric barrier discharge (DBD), are detected by phase-locked schlieren imaging. A diffuse nanosecond pulse discharge is generated in a DBD plasma actuator on a surface of a cylinder model placed in air flow in a small scale blow-down supersonic wind tunnel. Discharge energy coupled to the actuator is 7.3-7.8 mJ/pulse. Plasma temperature inferred from nitrogen emission spectra is a few tens of degrees higher than flow stagnation temperature, T = 340 ± 30 K. Phase-locked Schlieren images are used to detect compression waves generated by individual nanosecond discharge pulses near the actuator surface. The compression wave propagates upstream toward the baseline bow shock standing in front of the cylinder model. Interaction of the compression wave and the bow shock causes its displacement in the upstream direction, increasing shock stand-off distance by up to 25%. The compression wave speed behind the bow shock and the perturbed bow shock velocity are inferred from the Schlieren images. The effect of compression waves generated by nanosecond discharge pulses on shock stand-off distance is demonstrated in a single-pulse regime (at pulse repetition rates of a few hundred Hz) and in a quasi-continuous mode (using a two-pulse sequence at a pulse repetition rate of 100 kHz). The results demonstrate feasibility of hypersonic flow control by low-temperature, repetitive nanosecond pulse discharges.

  15. The bow and cultural complexity of the Canadian Plains.

    PubMed

    Walde, Dale

    2013-01-01

    The timing and circumstances of the introduction of the bow and arrow into past North American economic and social lifeways have been sources of interest and controversy among archeologists for a very long time. Initial interpretations of the adoption of the bow and arrow generally seem to have been based on the rather straightforward assumption of functional superiority as a hunting tool. That is, the bow and arrow was simply a better instrument than the atlatl-dart technology it replaced. More recently, however, researchers exploring the effectiveness of the atlatl as a hunting tool have responded with studies that challenge the assumed universal functional superiority of the bow and arrow as a hunting device. Social coercion and warfare theory presents an alternative perspective on the adoption of the bow and arrow.

  16. Direct observation of broken time-reversal symmetry on the surface of a magnetically doped topological insulator.

    PubMed

    Okada, Yoshinori; Dhital, Chetan; Zhou, Wenwen; Huemiller, Erik D; Lin, Hsin; Basak, S; Bansil, A; Huang, Y-B; Ding, H; Wang, Z; Wilson, Stephen D; Madhavan, V

    2011-05-20

    We study interference patterns of a magnetically doped topological insulator Bi(2-x)Fe(x)Te(3+d) by using Fourier transform scanning tunneling spectroscopy and observe several new scattering channels. A comparison with angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy allows us to unambiguously ascertain the momentum-space origin of distinct dispersing channels along high-symmetry directions and identify those originating from time-reversal symmetry breaking. Our analysis also reveals that the surface state survives far above the energy where angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy finds the onset of continuum bulk bands.

  17. Study of the relation between Pc 3 micropulsations and magnetosheath fluctuations and of the multisatellite, multimeasurement investigation of the earth's bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The structure and direction of bow shock waves and the occurence of Pc 3, 4 micropulsations were investigated. An observational description is given of a quasi-parallel structure in a plasma parameter regime. The use of approximation to estimate the thickness of thin, nearly perpendicular bow shocks at supralaminar Mach numbers is discussed. The pattern of energies of backstreaming protons in the foreshock are predicted.

  18. Laboratory studies of stagnating plasma flows with applications to inner solar system and stellar bow shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, T. E.; Smith, R. J.; Hsu, S. C.

    2016-10-01

    Supercritical magnetized collisionless shocks are thought to play a dominant role in the overall partition of energy throughout the universe by converting flow kinetic energy to other forms such as thermal and supra-thermal populations, magnetic field enhancement, turbulence, and energetic particles. The Magnetized Shock Experiment (MSX) at LANL creates conditions similar to those of inner solar system and stellar bow shocks by accelerating hot (100s of eV during translation) dense (1022 - 1023 m-3) Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) plasmoids to 100s of km/s; resulting in β 1, collisionless plasma flows with Msonic and MAlfvén 10. The drifting FRC can be made to impinge upon a variety of static obstacles including: a strong mirror or cusp magnetic field (mimicking magnetically excited shocks such as the Earth's bow shock), plasma pileup from a solid obstacle (similar to the bow shocks of Mercury and the Moon), and a neural gas puff (bow shocks of Venus or the comets). Characteristic shock length and time scales that are both large enough to observe yet small enough to fit within the experiment, enabling study of the complex interplay of kinetic and fluid processes that mediate cosmic shocks and can generate non-thermal distributions, produce density and magnetic field enhancements much greater than predicted by fluid theory, and accelerate particles. An overview of the experimental program will be presented, including recent results. This work is supported by the U.S. DOE, Office of Science, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25369.

  19. Observation of Motion of Bowed Strings and Resonant Strings in Violin Performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsutani, Akihiro

    2013-10-01

    The motion of a bowed string and a resonant string of a violin were simultaneously observed for the first time. The results of the direct observation of string motion in double stops and harmonics are also presented. The importance of the resonance was experimentally demonstrated from these observations. It is suggested that players should take account of the resonance and ideal Helmholtz motion in violin performances.

  20. Contaminants of emerging concern in reverse osmosis brine concentrate from indirect/direct water reuse applications.

    PubMed

    Romeyn, Travis R; Harijanto, Wesley; Sandoval, Sofia; Delagah, Saied; Sharbatmaleki, Mohamadali

    2016-01-01

    Water shortage is becoming more common due to droughts and global population increases resulting in the increasing popularity of water reuse to create new water sources. Reverse osmosis (RO) membrane systems are popular in these applications since they can produce drinking water quality effluent. Unfortunately, RO systems have the drawback of generating concentrate streams that contain contaminants rejected by the membrane including chemicals of emerging concern (CECs). CECs are chemicals such as hormones, steroids, pesticides, pharmaceuticals, and personal care products that are used for their intended purpose and then released into wastewater. CECs are believed to be detrimental to aquatic wildlife health and pose an unknown human health risk. This research gathered the existing knowledge on CEC presence in concentrate, available proven concentrate treatment methods, their CEC removal abilities, and current CEC regulations. It was found that 127 CECs have been measured in RO concentrate with 100 being detected at least once. The most potent treatment process available is UV/H2O2 as it offers the highest removal rates for the widest range of chemicals. The less expensive process of ozone/biologically activated carbon offers slightly lower removal abilities. This comprehensive report will provide the groundwork for better understanding, regulating and treating concentrate stream CECs.

  1. Population genetic structure and direct observations reveal sex-reversed patterns of dispersal in a cooperative bird

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Xavier A; York, Jennifer E; Young, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    Sex-biased dispersal is pervasive and has diverse evolutionary implications, but the fundamental drivers of dispersal sex biases remain unresolved. This is due in part to limited diversity within taxonomic groups in the direction of dispersal sex biases, which leaves hypothesis testing critically dependent upon identifying rare reversals of taxonomic norms. Here, we use a combination of observational and genetic data to demonstrate a rare reversal of the avian sex bias in dispersal in the cooperatively breeding white-browed sparrow weaver (Plocepasser mahali). Direct observations revealed that (i) natal philopatry was rare, with both sexes typically dispersing locally to breed, and (ii), unusually for birds, males bred at significantly greater distances from their natal group than females. Population genetic analyses confirmed these patterns, as (i) corrected Assignment index (AIc), FST tests and isolation-by-distance metrics were all indicative of longer dispersal distances among males than females, and (ii) spatial autocorrelation analysis indicated stronger within-group genetic structure among females than males. Examining the spatial scale of extra-group mating highlighted that the resulting ‘sperm dispersal’ could have acted in concert with individual dispersal to generate these genetic patterns, but gamete dispersal alone cannot account entirely for the sex differences in genetic structure observed. That leading hypotheses for the evolution of dispersal sex biases cannot readily account for these sex-reversed patterns of dispersal in white-browed sparrow weavers highlights the continued need for attention to alternative explanations for this enigmatic phenomenon. We highlight the potential importance of sex differences in the distances over which dispersal opportunities can be detected. PMID:25346189

  2. Processive steps in the reverse direction require uncoupling of the lead head lever arm of myosin VI.

    PubMed

    Ménétrey, Julie; Isabet, Tatiana; Ropars, Virginie; Mukherjea, Monalisa; Pylypenko, Olena; Liu, Xiaoyan; Perez, Javier; Vachette, Patrice; Sweeney, H Lee; Houdusse, Anne M

    2012-10-12

    Myosin VI is the only known reverse-direction myosin motor. It has an unprecedented means of amplifying movements within the motor involving rearrangements of the converter subdomain at the C terminus of the motor and an unusual lever arm projecting from the converter. While the average step size of a myosin VI dimer is 30-36 nm, the step size is highly variable, presenting a challenge to the lever arm mechanism by which all myosins are thought to move. Herein, we present structures of myosin VI that reveal regions of compliance that allow an uncoupling of the lead head when movement is modeled on actin. The location of the compliance restricts the possible actin binding sites and predicts the observed stepping behavior. The model reveals that myosin VI, unlike plus-end directed myosins, does not use a pure lever arm mechanism, but instead steps with a mechanism analogous to the kinesin neck-linker uncoupling model.

  3. Direct detection of infectious bursal disease virus from clinical samples by in situ reverse transcriptase-linked polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Tereza C; Rosa, Ana C G; Astolphi, Rafael D; Vincente, Rafael M; Novais, Juliana B; Hirata, Karina Y; Luvizotto, Maria Cecilia R

    2008-08-01

    The presence of the very virulent (vv) Brazilian strain of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) was determined in the bursa of Fabricius, thymus and liver of 2-week-old broilers from a flock with a higher than expected mortality. For this purpose, a direct in situ reverse transcriptase (RT)-linked polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method was developed using specific primers for vvIBDV. Unlabelled forward and reverse biotinylated oligonucleotides were used for RT-PCR in a one-step method and the respective products were revealed by a direct enzymatic reaction. The results were compared with those obtained by standard RT-PCR using general primers for IBDV and virus isolation. The virus isolation, RT-PCR and in situ RT-PCR revealed positive results on the bursa of Fabricius in 86%, 80% and 100%, respectively. The in situ RT-PCR detected vvIBDV in all tested thymus and liver samples, whereas the standard RT-PCR detected virus in 80% and 90% of the samples, respectively. After three consecutive passages on chicken embryonated eggs, IBDV was isolated from 64% of the thymus samples and 30% of the liver samples. In the present study, no classical or antigenic variants of IBDV were detected. The developed in situ RT-PCR assay was able to detect the very virulent strain of IBDV with a higher sensitivity than the conventional RT-PCR and virus isolation.

  4. Distant Bow Shock Observations by Explorer 33

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mihalov, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    Locations, orientations and magnetic field changes are given for 135 bow shock crossings at distances downstream from earth between 84 and 117 earth radii. The shock locations are dependent on the spacecraft trajectory and agree with locations calculated for the hypersonic analogue for a Mach number of 3.8. The shock normal vectors have been calculated using magnetic coplanarity. The average normal vectors have a greater inclination by approximately 17 + or - 5 deg from the symmetry axis than the Dryer and Heckman shock orientations for a 3.8 Mach number. Over a range of downstream distances from 60 to 115 earth radii, the median magnetic field magnitude jump across the shock changes from 1.90 to 1.70 times.

  5. Suprathermal Electrons at Saturn's Bow Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masters, A.; Sulaiman, A. H.; Sergis, N.; Stawarz, L.; Fujimoto, M.; Coates, A. J.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2016-07-01

    The leading explanation for the origin of galactic cosmic rays is particle acceleration at the shocks surrounding young supernova remnants (SNRs), although crucial aspects of the acceleration process are unclear. The similar collisionless plasma shocks frequently encountered by spacecraft in the solar wind are generally far weaker (lower Mach number) than these SNR shocks. However, the Cassini spacecraft has shown that the shock standing in the solar wind sunward of Saturn (Saturn's bow shock) can occasionally reach this high-Mach number astrophysical regime. In this regime Cassini has provided the first in situ evidence for electron acceleration under quasi-parallel upstream magnetic conditions. Here we present the full picture of suprathermal electrons at Saturn's bow shock revealed by Cassini. The downstream thermal electron distribution is resolved in all data taken by the low-energy electron detector (CAPS-ELS, <28 keV) during shock crossings, but the higher energy channels were at (or close to) background. The high-energy electron detector (MIMI-LEMMS, >18 keV) measured a suprathermal electron signature at 31 of 508 crossings, where typically only the lowest energy channels (<100 keV) were above background. We show that these results are consistent with the theory in which the “injection” of thermal electrons into an acceleration process involves interaction with whistler waves at the shock front, and becomes possible for all upstream magnetic field orientations at high Mach numbers like those of the strong shocks around young SNRs. A future dedicated study will analyze the rare crossings with evidence for relativistic electrons (up to ˜1 MeV).

  6. Optimization of bow shape for a non ballast water ship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van He, Ngo; Ikeda, Yoshiho

    2013-09-01

    In this research, a commercial CFD code "Fluent" was applied to optimization of bulbous bow shape for a non ballast water ships (NBS). The ship was developed at the Laboratory of the authors in Osaka Prefecture University, Japan. At first, accuracy of the CFD code was validated by comparing the CFD results with experimental results at towing tank of Osaka Prefecture University. In the optimizing process, the resistances acting on ships in calm water and in regular head waves were defined as the object function. Following features of bulbous bow shapes were considered as design parameters: volume of bulbous bow, height of its volume center, angle of bow bottom, and length of bulbous bow. When referring to the computed results given by the CFD like resistance, pressure and wave pattern made by ships in calm water and in waves, an optimal bow shape for ships was discovered by comparing the results in the series of bow shapes. In the computation on waves, the ship is in fully captured condition because shorter waves, λ/ L pp <0.6, are assumed.

  7. Direct and reversible hydrogenation of CO2 to formate by a bacterial carbon dioxide reductase.

    PubMed

    Schuchmann, K; Müller, V

    2013-12-13

    Storage and transportation of hydrogen is a major obstacle for its use as a fuel. An increasingly considered alternative for the direct handling of hydrogen is to use carbon dioxide (CO2) as an intermediate storage material. However, CO2 is thermodynamically stable, and developed chemical catalysts often require high temperatures, pressures, and/or additives for high catalytic rates. Here, we present the discovery of a bacterial hydrogen-dependent carbon dioxide reductase from Acetobacterium woodii directly catalyzing the hydrogenation of CO2. We also demonstrate a whole-cell system able to produce formate as the sole end product from dihydrogen (H2) and CO2 as well as syngas. This discovery opens biotechnological alternatives for efficient CO2 hydrogenation either by using the isolated enzyme or by employing whole-cell catalysis.

  8. The bow and arrow in northern North America.

    PubMed

    Maschner, Herbert; Mason, Owen K

    2013-01-01

    There were at least four waves of bow and arrow use in northern North America. These occurred at 12000, 4500, 2400, and after about 1300 years ago. But to understand the role of the bow and arrow in the north, one must begin in the eighteenth century, when the Russians first arrived in the Aleutian Islands. At that time, the Aleut were using both the atlatl and dart and the bow and arrow (Fig. ). This is significant for two particular and important reasons. First, there are few historic cases in which both technologies were used concurrently; second, the bow and arrow in the Aleutian Islands were used almost exclusively in warfare. The atlatl was a critical technology because the bow and arrow are useless for hunting sea mammals. One cannot launch an arrow from a kayak because it is too unstable and requires that both hands remain on a paddle. To use an atlatl, it is necessary only to stabilize the kayak with a paddle on one side and launch the atlatl dart with the opposite hand. The Aleut on the Alaska Peninsula did indeed use the bow and arrow to hunt caribou there. However, in the 1,400 km of the Aleutian Islands, there are no terrestrial mammals except humans and the bow was reserved almost exclusively for conflicts among them. The most significant event in the history of the bow and arrow is not its early introduction, but rather the Asian War Complex 1300 years ago, when the recurve and backed bows first entered the region, altering regional and hemispheric political dynamics forever. [Figure: see text].

  9. Structural changes in cuticles on violin bow hair caused by wear.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Tomoko; Sugiyama, Shigeru

    2010-01-01

    A bow with horse tail hair is used to play the violin. New and worn-out bow hairs were observed by atomic force microscopy. The cuticles of the new bow hair were already damaged by bleach and delipidation, however the worn-out bow hairs were much more damaged and broken off by force, which relates to wearing out.

  10. Geomorphic criteria to determine direction of lateral propagation of reverse faulting and folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, E. A.; Gurrola, Larry; Tierney, T. E.

    1999-06-01

    Fault-related folds develop above active faults, and as these faults propagate laterally so do the folds they produce. Geomorphic criteria useful in evaluating rates and direction of lateral propagation of active folds in the direction of propagation are: (1) decrease in drainage density and degree of dissection; (2) decrease in elevation of wind gaps; (3) decrease in relief of the topographic profile along the crest; (4) development of characteristic drainage patterns; (5) deformation of progressively younger deposits or landforms; and (6) decrease in rotation and inclination of forelimb. All these criteria are consistent with lateral propagation, but do not prove it. The presence of more than one wind or water gap formed by the same stream, however, is strong evidence of lateral propagation. Rates of lateral propagation of folding may be several times the rate of uplift and fault slip. Lateral propagation of anticlinal folds allows for a new explanation of how drainage may develop across active fold belts. Development of drainage across an active fold belt is probably a function of relatively long structurally controlled drainage diversion parallel to fold axes and development of relatively short antecedent stream reaches, around the nose (plunge panel) of a fold. Water and/or wind gaps form as uplift, drainage diversion, and stream capture associated with fold growth continue.

  11. High-Energy-Density Laboratory Astrophysics Studies of Jets and Bow Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, J. M.; Wilde, B. H.; Rosen, P. A.; Williams, R. J. R.; Blue, B. E.; Coker, R. F.; Drake, R. P.; Frank, A.; Keiter, P. A.; Khokhlov, A. M.; Knauer, J. P.; Perry, T. S.

    2005-11-01

    We present the first results from high-energy-density laboratory astrophysics experiments that explore the interaction of supersonic jets/outflows with an ambient medium. Our experiments were conducted on the Omega laser facility, a large Inertial Confinement Fusion facility. In our experiments, a laser pulse drives a supersonic jet into foam. High-resolution X-ray radiography reveals the resulting highly structured bow shock. These are the first laboratory astrophysics experiments to capture the behavior of both the jet and the bow shock. We discuss the astrophysical relevance of the flow processes that we observe in the experiments and in the accompanying numerical models. Scaling arguments suggest that our experiments are most directly relevant to active galactic nucleus jets and planetary nebula outflows, while future work may allow our experiments to extend into regimes relevant to radiative outflows from young stellar objects. Contains material © British Crown Copyright 2005/MOD, reprinted with permission.

  12. The density of cometary protons upstream of Comet Halley's bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neugebauer, M.; Goldstein, B. E.; Balsiger, H.; Neubauer, F. M.; Schwenn, R.

    1989-01-01

    Cometary protons picked up by the solar wind were detected by the high energy range spectrometer of the Giotto ion mass spectrometer starting at a cometocentric distance of about 12 million km. On the average, the density of cometary protons varied approximately as the inverse square of the cometocentric distance, reaching a value of 0.11/cu cm just outside the bow shock. The data can be successfully fit to models that include substantial amounts of both slow (1 km/s) and fast (8 km/s or greater) H atoms beyond the bow shock. Large local variations in the density of picked-up protons can be explained on the basis of variations in the direction of the interplanetary magnetic field in upstream regions where pitch angle scattering was weak.

  13. The density of cometary protons upstream of comet Halley's bow shock

    SciTech Connect

    Neugebauer, M.; Goldstein, B.E. ); Balsiger, H. ); Neubauer, F.M. ); Schwenn, R. ); Shelley, E.G. )

    1989-02-01

    Cometary protons picked up by the solar wind were detected by the high energy range spectrometer of the Giotto ion mass spectrometer starting at a cometocentric distance of {approximately}12 {times} 10{sup 6} km. On the average, the density of cometary protons varied approximately as the inverse square of the cometocentric distance, reaching a value of 0.11 cm{sup {minus}3} just outside the bow shock. The data can be successfully fit to models that include substantial amounts of both slow ({approximately}1 km/s) and fast ({ge} 8 km/s) H atoms beyond the bow shock. Large local variations in the density of picked-up protons can be explained on the basis of variations in the direction of the interplanetary magnetic field in upstream regions where pitch angle scattering was weak.

  14. Transcranial direct current stimulation reverses neurophysiological and behavioural effects of focal inhibition of human pharyngeal motor cortex on swallowing.

    PubMed

    Vasant, Dipesh H; Mistry, Satish; Michou, Emilia; Jefferson, Samantha; Rothwell, John C; Hamdy, Shaheen

    2014-02-15

    The human cortical swallowing system exhibits bilateral but functionally asymmetric representation in health and disease as evidenced by both focal cortical inhibition (pre-conditioning with 1 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation; rTMS) and unilateral stroke, where disruption of the stronger (dominant) pharyngeal projection alters swallowing neurophysiology and behaviour. Moreover, excitatory neurostimulation protocols capable of reversing the disruptive effects of focal cortical inhibition have demonstrated therapeutic promise in post-stroke dysphagia when applied contralaterally. In healthy participants (n = 15, 8 males, mean age (±SEM) 35 ± 9 years), optimal parameters of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) (anodal, 1.5 mA, 10 min) were applied contralaterally after 1 Hz rTMS pre-conditioning to the strongest pharyngeal projection. Swallowing neurophysiology was assessed in both hemispheres by intraluminal recordings of pharyngeal motor-evoked responses (PMEPs) to single-pulse TMS as a measure of cortical excitability. Swallowing behaviour was examined using a pressure-based reaction time protocol. Measurements were made before and for up to 60 min post intervention. Subjects were randomised to active or sham tDCS after 1 Hz rTMS on separate days and data were compared using repeated measures ANOVA. Active tDCS increased PMEPs bilaterally (F1,14 = 7.4, P = 0.017) reversing the inhibitory effects of 1 Hz rTMS in the pre-conditioned hemisphere (F1,14 = 10.1, P = 0.007). Active tDCS also enhanced swallowing behaviour, increasing the number of correctly timed challenge swallows compared to sham (F1,14 = 6.3, P = 0.025). Thus, tDCS to the contralateral pharyngeal motor cortex reverses the neurophysiological and behavioural effects of focal cortical inhibition on swallowing in healthy individuals and has therapeutic potential for dysphagia rehabilitation.

  15. Polarity reversal of the optical rotation signals with change in direction of impulse conduction along the lobster nerve.

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, A

    1993-01-01

    1. The optical rotation signal of nerve associated with excitation was recorded from peripheral nerve taken from a walking leg of a spiny lobster and its properties were analysed. 2. The polarity of the optical rotation signal was reversed when the site of stimulation was changed with reference to the site of optical recording, so that the direction of impulse conduction was reversed, in most of the preparations. 3. Apart from the main response, which is associated with the conducted impulse, a pre-response was found to exist, which manifested itself on anodic stimulation, in a tetrodotoxin-treated nerve, or during the refractory period of the nerve, when the site of stimulation was close to the site of optical recording. The polarity of the pre-response was also reversed when the site of stimulation was changed with reference to the site of optical recording. 4. When the nerve was inclined from the horizontal level, so that the angle of incidence of light to the nerve was changed, the main response changed its amplitude and sometimes its polarity, whereas the pre-response remained practically unchanged. Thus the dependence on the angle of incidence was different between the pre-response and the main response. 5. It is suggested that the dependence of amplitude and polarity of the main response on the angle of incidence of light cannot be explained by the change in molecular axes of the membrane macromolecules, but can only be explained by their conformational change; and therefore the main response can be used as a monitor for the molecular conformation. PMID:8410706

  16. High-Energy-Density, Laboratory-Astrophysics Studies of Jets and Bow Shocks

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, J M; Wilde, B H; Rosen, P A; Perry, T S; Khokhlov, A M; Coker, R F; Frank, A; Keiter, P A; Blue, B E; Drake, R P; Knauer, J P; Williams, R R

    2005-01-24

    Large-scale directional outflows of supersonic plasma, also known as ''jets'', are ubiquitous phenomena in astrophysics [1]. The interaction of such jets with surrounding matter often results in spectacular bow shocks, and intense radiation from radio to gamma-ray wavelengths. The traditional approach to understanding such phenomena is through theoretical analysis and numerical simulations. However, such numerical simulations have limited resolution, often assume axial symmetry, do not include all relevant physical processes, and fail to scale correctly in Reynolds number and perhaps other key dimensionless parameters. Additionally, they are frequently not tested by comparison with laboratory experiments. Recent advances in high-energy-density physics using large inertial-confinement-fusion devices now allow controlled laboratory experiments on macroscopic volumes of plasma of direct relevance relevant to astrophysics [2]. In this Letter we report the first results of experiments designed to study the evolution of supersonic plasma jets and the bow shocks they drive into a surrounding medium. Our experiments reveal both regular and highly complex flow patterns in the bow shock, thus opening a new window--complementary to computer simulations--into understanding the nature of three-dimensional astrophysical jets.

  17. Laser vibrometry measurements of vibration and sound fields of a bowed violin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gren, Per; Tatar, Kourosh; Granström, Jan; Molin, N.-E.; Jansson, Erik V.

    2006-04-01

    Laser vibrometry measurements on a bowed violin are performed. A rotating disc apparatus, acting as a violin bow, is developed. It produces a continuous, long, repeatable, multi-frequency sound from the instrument that imitates the real bow-string interaction for a 'very long bow'. What mainly differs is that the back and forward motion of the real bow is replaced by the rotating motion with constant velocity of the disc and constant bowing force (bowing pressure). This procedure is repeatable. It is long lasting and allows laser vibrometry techniques to be used, which measure forced vibrations by bowing at all excited frequencies simultaneously. A chain of interacting parts of the played violin is studied: the string, the bridge and the plates as well as the emitted sound field. A description of the mechanics and the sound production of the bowed violin is given, i.e. the production chain from the bowed string to the produced tone.

  18. Direct observation of solid-state reversed transformation from crystals to quasicrystals in a Mg alloy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian-Fang; Yang, Zhi-Qing; Ye, Heng-Qiang

    2015-06-12

    Phase transformation of quasicrystals is of interest in various fields of science and technology. Interestingly, we directly observed unexpected solid-state epitaxial nucleation and growth of Zn6Mg3Y icosahedral quasicrystals in a Mg alloy at about 573 K which is about 300 K below the melting point of Zn6Mg3Y, in contrast to formation of quasicrystals through solidification that was usually found in many alloys. Maximizing local packing density of atoms associated with segregation of Y and Zn in Mg adjacent to Mg/Zn3MgY interfaces triggered atomic rearrangement in Mg to form icosahedra coupled epitaxially with surface distorted icosahedra of Zn3MgY, which plays a critical role in the nucleation of icosahedral clusters. A local Zn:Mg:Y ratio close to 6:3:1, corresponding to a valence electron concentration of about 2.15, should have been reached to trigger the formation of quasicrystals at Mg/Zn3MgY interfaces. The solid-state icosahedral ordering in crystals opens a new window for growing quasicrystals and understanding their atomic origin mechanisms. Epitaxial growth of quasicrystals onto crystals can modify the surface/interface structures and properties of crystalline materials.

  19. Direct observation of solid-state reversed transformation from crystals to quasicrystals in a Mg alloy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jian-Fang; Yang, Zhi-Qing; Ye, Heng-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Phase transformation of quasicrystals is of interest in various fields of science and technology. Interestingly, we directly observed unexpected solid-state epitaxial nucleation and growth of Zn 6 Mg 3 Y icosahedral quasicrystals in a Mg alloy at about 573 K which is about 300 K below the melting point of Zn 6 Mg 3 Y, in contrast to formation of quasicrystals through solidification that was usually found in many alloys. Maximizing local packing density of atoms associated with segregation of Y and Zn in Mg adjacent to Mg/Zn 3 MgY interfaces triggered atomic rearrangement in Mg to form icosahedra coupled epitaxially with surface distorted icosahedra of Zn 3 MgY, which plays a critical role in the nucleation of icosahedral clusters. A local Zn:Mg:Y ratio close to 6:3:1, corresponding to a valence electron concentration of about 2.15, should have been reached to trigger the formation of quasicrystals at Mg/Zn 3 MgY interfaces. The solid-state icosahedral ordering in crystals opens a new window for growing quasicrystals and understanding their atomic origin mechanisms. Epitaxial growth of quasicrystals onto crystals can modify the surface/interface structures and properties of crystalline materials. PMID:26066096

  20. Controlled metal-semiconductor sintering/alloying by one-directional reverse illumination

    DOEpatents

    Sopori, Bhushan L.

    1993-01-01

    Metal strips deposited on a top surface of a semiconductor substrate are sintered at one temperature simultaneously with alloying a metal layer on the bottom surface at a second, higher temperature. This simultaneous sintering of metal strips and alloying a metal layer on opposite surfaces of the substrate at different temperatures is accomplished by directing infrared radiation through the top surface to the interface of the bottom surface with the metal layer where the radiation is absorbed to create a primary hot zone with a temperature high enough to melt and alloy the metal layer with the bottom surface of the substrate. Secondary heat effects, including heat conducted through the substrate from the primary hot zone and heat created by infrared radiation reflected from the metal layer to the metal strips, as well as heat created from some primary absorption by the metal strips, combine to create secondary hot zones at the interfaces of the metal strips with the top surface of the substrate. These secondary hot zones are not as hot as the primary hot zone, but they are hot enough to sinter the metal strips to the substrate.

  1. Reversed Pressure Compaction: A Novel Method for Processing Composite Materials Directly from Polymer Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Yachin; Rein, Dmitry M.; Vaykhansky, Lev

    2002-03-01

    “Single component” composite materials are processed directly from oriented polymer fibers without extraneous matrix. Bonding is achieved by entanglement of macromolecules that emanate from the fiber by controlled surface melting. The key element in the processing scheme is control of the fibers’ melting temperature by hydrostatic pressure, using the following steps: a) compression to high pressure (Pu) at low temperature (To), which deforms the fiber cross-section without melting. b) raising temperature to a high level (Tu), which is below the melting point of the oriented crystals at Pu. c) pPressure reduction to an intermediate level (Pm) for controlled time. At this pressure, the fibers’ begin melting from their surface and are consolidated. d) increase of pressure back to Pu stops the melting process. e) return to ambient temperature and pressure provides the finished material. This process is applicable to a wide range of polymeric materials such as ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE), polypropylene, fluorinated polymers and liquid-crystalline polymers. The fact that the main processing steps occur at a constant temperature, whereby melting and crystallization are effected by control of pressure, allows enhanced homogeneity of the fabricated material. High-performance substrates for microwave antennae and circuitry have been fabricated with this manner, as will be described in the presentation.

  2. VIEW EAST SHOWING THE WEST SIDE OF THE FORWARD (BOW) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW EAST SHOWING THE WEST SIDE OF THE FORWARD (BOW) SECTION - Rosie the Riveter National Historical Park, Rosie the Riveter Memorial, Off Regatta at Melville Square in Marina Park, Richmond, Contra Costa County, CA

  3. VIEW SOUTH FROM WITHING THE FORWARD (BOW) SECTION Rosie ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW SOUTH FROM WITHING THE FORWARD (BOW) SECTION - Rosie the Riveter National Historical Park, Rosie the Riveter Memorial, Off Regatta at Melville Square in Marina Park, Richmond, Contra Costa County, CA

  4. VIEW SOUTH SHOWING THE STRUCTURE REPRESENTING THE FORWARD (BOW) SECTION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW SOUTH SHOWING THE STRUCTURE REPRESENTING THE FORWARD (BOW) SECTION OF A LIBERTY SHIP - Rosie the Riveter National Historical Park, Rosie the Riveter Memorial, Off Regatta at Melville Square in Marina Park, Richmond, Contra Costa County, CA

  5. 17. SAME ROOMVIEW SOUTH TOWARDS TWO SKIFFS UNDER CONSTRUCTION (BOW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. SAME ROOM-VIEW SOUTH TOWARDS TWO SKIFFS UNDER CONSTRUCTION (BOW VIEW SHOWING CLAMPING JIG MOUNTED TO BEAMS ABOVE/PROFILE VIEW IN BACKGROUND SHOWING JIG). - Lowell's Boat Shop, 459 Main Street, Amesbury, Essex County, MA

  6. 15. Detail, northeast facade, operator's bow window and tower, showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Detail, northeast facade, operator's bow window and tower, showing knee braces carried on stone ancons used to support eaves, view to northwest, 90mm lens. - Southern Pacific Depot, 559 El Camino Real, San Carlos, San Mateo County, CA

  7. 4. View of bow from port side, forward, vessel is ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. View of bow from port side, forward, vessel is on marine railway. Hooper Strait Lighthouse beyond. - Two-Sail Bateau E. C. COLLIER, Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum, Mills Street, Saint Michaels, Talbot County, MD

  8. 3. VIEW NORTHEAST OF PORT BOW OF JFK IN DRYDOCK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW NORTHEAST OF PORT BOW OF JFK IN DRYDOCK NO. 5; PAINTERS WORKING APPLYING ANTI-FOULING PAINT BELOW WATER LINE. - Naval Base Philadelphia-Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, Dry Dock No. 5, League Island, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  9. 46 CFR 154.1870 - Bow and stern loading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... vapors with inert gas. (c) The person in charge of cargo transfer shall ensure that entrances, forced or... STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Operations § 154.1870 Bow and...

  10. 3. VIEW, LOOKING EAST, SHOWING BOW END OF VESSEL 37, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW, LOOKING EAST, SHOWING BOW END OF VESSEL 37, STERN OF VESSEL 38 WITH COLLAPSING LIVING QUARTERS TO RIGHT Susan Kardas, photographer, November 1984 - Shooters Island, Ships Graveyard, Vessel No. 37, Newark Bay, Staten Island (subdivision), Richmond County, NY

  11. 76 FR 12016 - MedBow-Routt Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-04

    ... meeting. SUMMARY: The MedBow-Routt Resource Advisory Committee will meet in Walden, Colorado. The... will be held at Parks Ranger District, 100 Main Street, Walden, Colorado. Written comments should...

  12. Geology and sediment accumulation rates at Carrie Bow Cay, Belize

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shinn, Eugene A.; Hudson, J. Harold; Halley, Robert B.; Lidz, Barbara H.; Robbin, Daniel M.; Macintyre, Ian G.; Ruetzler, Klaus; Macintyre, Ian G.

    1982-01-01

    Two other rotary cores were drilled landward of the reef crest. One was drilled on the reef flat to a depth of 8.8 m, and the other was drilled on the southwest tip of Carrie Bow Cay to a depth of 17.7 m. Both cores encountered essentially uncemented carbonate reef sands with some coral rubble. Of the four rotary cores, only the Carrie Bow Cay core encountered Pleistocene bedrock. Radiocarbon dating of a large head of Siderastrea siderea, growing on bedrock from the Carrie Bow Cay core at a depth of 15.04 m below sea level, gave an age of 6960±110 years. The leached calcitic coralline bedrock, at a depth of 15.7 m below sea level in the Carrie Bow Cay core, contained root marks, and iron staining indicative of subaerial exposure.

  13. 3. CAP; CONICAL CAP HAS BOWED RAFTERS MORTISED INTO A ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. CAP; CONICAL CAP HAS BOWED RAFTERS MORTISED INTO A BOSS; ALSO SEEN ARE THE BRAKE WHEEL, WINDSHAFT AND TOP BEARING OF THE UPRIGHT SHAFT - Hayground Windmill, Windmill Lane, East Hampton, Suffolk County, NY

  14. 6. VIEW OF BOW OF VESSEL FROM STARBOARD SIDE, SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW OF BOW OF VESSEL FROM STARBOARD SIDE, SHOWING DOCKING CREW PREPARING TO REMOVE FOREFOOT FROM VESSEL'S STEM IN ORDER TO DRAW VESSEL OFF LIFT DOCK - Bugeye "Louise Travers", Intersection of Routes 2 & 4, Solomons, Calvert County, MD

  15. 19. DETAIL VIEW OF SKIFF BOW WITH OAK STEM AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. DETAIL VIEW OF SKIFF BOW WITH OAK STEM AND FRAMES PLANKED IN CEDAR USING COPPER CLINCH NAILS. TRANSOM OF SECOND SKIFF CAN BE SEEN BACKGROUND. - Lowell's Boat Shop, 459 Main Street, Amesbury, Essex County, MA

  16. Reversal of coenzyme specificity and improvement of catalytic efficiency of Pichia stipitis xylose reductase by rational site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Qi-Kai; Du, Hong-Li; Wang, Jing-Fang; Wei, Dong-Qing; Wang, Xiao-Ning; Li, Yi-Xue; Lin, Ying

    2009-07-01

    A major problem when xylose is used for ethanol production is the intercellular redox imbalance arising from different coenzyme specificities of xylose reductase (XR) and xylitol dehydrogenase. The residue Lys21 in XR from Pichia stipitis was subjected to site-directed mutagenesis to alter its coenzyme specificity. The N272D mutant exhibited improved catalytic efficiency when NADH was the coenzyme. Both K21A and K21A/N272D preferred NADH to NADPH, their catalytic efficiencies for NADPH were almost zero. The catalytic efficiency of K21A/N272D for NADH was almost 9-fold and 2-fold that of K21A and the wild-type enzyme, respectively. Complete reversal of coenzyme specificity toward NADH and improved catalytic efficiency were achieved.

  17. Loco-regional cancer drug therapy: present approaches and rapidly reversible hydrophobization (RRH) of therapeutic agents as the future direction.

    PubMed

    Budker, Vladimir G; Monahan, Sean D; Subbotin, Vladimir M

    2014-12-01

    Insufficient drug uptake by solid tumors remains the major problem for systemic chemotherapy. Many studies have demonstrated anticancer drug effects to be dose-dependent, although dose-escalation studies have resulted in limited survival benefit with increased systemic toxicities. One solution to this has been the idea of loco-regional drug treatments, which offer dramatically higher drug concentrations in tumor tissues while minimizing systemic toxicity. Although loco-regional delivery has been most prominent in cancers of the liver, soft tissues and serosal peritoneal malignancies, survival benefits are very far from desirable. This review discusses the evolution of loco-regional treatments, the present approaches and offers rapidly reversible hydrophobization of drugs as the new future direction.

  18. Direct measurement of oxygen consumption rates from attached and unattached cells in a reversibly sealed, diffusionally isolated sample chamber

    PubMed Central

    Strovas, Timothy J.; McQuaide, Sarah C.; Anderson, Judy B.; Nandakumar, Vivek; Kalyuzhnaya, Marina G.; Burgess, Lloyd W.; Holl, Mark R.; Meldrum, Deirdre R.; Lidstrom, Mary E.

    2011-01-01

    Oxygen consumption is a fundamental component of metabolic networks, mitochondrial function, and global carbon cycling. To date there is no method available that allows for replicate measurements on attached and unattached biological samples without compensation for extraneous oxygen leaking into the system. Here we present the Respiratory Detection System, which is compatible with virtually any biological sample. The RDS can be used to measure oxygen uptake in microliter-scale volumes with a reversibly sealed sample chamber, which contains a porphyrin-based oxygen sensor. With the RDS, one can maintain a diffusional seal for up to three hours, allowing for the direct measurement of respiratory function of samples with fast or slow metabolic rates. The ability to easily measure oxygen uptake in small volumes with small populations or dilute samples has implications in cell biology, environmental biology, and clinical diagnostics. PMID:21546993

  19. Stable, polymer-directed and SPION-nucleated magnetic amphiphilic block copolymer nanoprecipitates with readily reversible assembly in magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giardiello, Marco; Hatton, Fiona L.; Slater, Rebecca A.; Chambon, Pierre; North, Jocelyn; Peacock, Anita K.; He, Tao; McDonald, Tom O.; Owen, Andrew; Rannard, Steve P.

    2016-03-01

    The formation of inorganic-organic magnetic nanocomposites using reactive chemistry often leads to a loss of super-paramagnetisim when conducted in the presence of iron oxide nanoparticles. We present here a low energy and chemically-mild process of co-nanoprecipitation using SPIONs and homopolymers or amphiphilic block copolymers, of varying architecture and hydrophilic/hydrophobic balance, which efficiently generates near monodisperse SPION-containing polymer nanoparticles with complete retention of magnetism, and highly reversible aggregation and redispersion behaviour. When linear and branched block copolymers with inherent water-solubility are used, a SPION-directed nanoprecipitation mechanism appears to dominate the nanoparticle formation presenting new opportunities for tailoring and scaling highly functional systems for a range of applications.The formation of inorganic-organic magnetic nanocomposites using reactive chemistry often leads to a loss of super-paramagnetisim when conducted in the presence of iron oxide nanoparticles. We present here a low energy and chemically-mild process of co-nanoprecipitation using SPIONs and homopolymers or amphiphilic block copolymers, of varying architecture and hydrophilic/hydrophobic balance, which efficiently generates near monodisperse SPION-containing polymer nanoparticles with complete retention of magnetism, and highly reversible aggregation and redispersion behaviour. When linear and branched block copolymers with inherent water-solubility are used, a SPION-directed nanoprecipitation mechanism appears to dominate the nanoparticle formation presenting new opportunities for tailoring and scaling highly functional systems for a range of applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional experimental details, NMR spectra, GPC chromatograms, kinetics experiments, graphs of nanopreciptate aggregation and cycling studies and SPION characterisation. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr00788k

  20. Femoral bowing plane adaptation to femoral anteversion

    PubMed Central

    Akman, Alp; Demirkan, Fahir; Sabir, Nuran; Oto, Murat; Yorukoglu, Cagdas; Kiter, Esat

    2017-01-01

    Background: Femoral bowing plane (FBP) is the unattended subject in the literature. More over the femoral shaft with its bowing is neglected in established anteversion determination methods. There is limited information about the relationship between FBP and anteversion. Thus we focused on this subject and hypothesized that there could be an adaptation of FBP to anteversion. Materials and Methods: FBP is determined on three-dimensional solid models derived from the left femoral computerized tomography data of 47 patients which were taken before for another reason and comparatively evaluated with anteversion. There were 20 women and 27 men. The mean age of patients was 56 years (range 21–84 years). Results: The anteversion values were found as the angle between a distal condylar axis (DCA) and femoral neck anteversion axis (FNAA) along an imaginary longitudinal femoral axis (LFA) in the true cranio-caudal view. The FBP was determined as a plane that passes through the centre-points of three pre-determinated sections on the femoral shaft. The angles between DCA, FNAA and FBP were comparatively evaluated. The independent samples t-test was used for statistical analysis. At the end, it was found that FBP lies nearly perpendicular to the anteversion axis for the mean of our sample which is around 89° in females and 93° in males (range 78–102°). On the other hand, FBP does not lie close to the sagittal femoral plane (SFP); instead, there is an average 12.5° external rotation relative to the SFP. FBP is correlated well with anteversion in terms of FBP inclination from SFP and femoral torsion (i.e., angle between FBP and femoral neck anteversion axis (P < 0.001; r = 0.680 and r = −0.682, respectively). Combined correlation is perfect (R2 = 1) as the FBP, SFP, and posterior femoral plane forms a triangle in the cranio-caudal view. Conclusions: We found that FBP adapts to anteversion. As FBP lies close to perpendicularity for the mean, femoral component positioning

  1. Tibial Bowing and Pseudarthrosis in Neurofibromatosis Type 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    bowed tibia. We have extracted DNA from peripheral blood of all individuals with tibial bowing and will continue to monitor them for development of...to improve bone quality prior to fracture in a non-invasive and age specific manner • DNA extraction from peripheral blood for somatic mutation...Johnson B, Rauen KA. Peripheral muscle weakness in RASopathies. Oral presentation at the Western Society for Pediatric Research, Carmel, California

  2. Tibial Bowing and Pseudarthrosis in Neurofibromatosis Type 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    observed in 5% of children with neurofibromatosis type 1 ( NF1 ), typically identified in infancy. The majority of NF1 individuals with tibial bowing...will sustain a fracture that will not heal (i.e. pseudarthrosis) resulting in multiple surgeries, poor limb function, and amputation. Some NF1 ...pseudarthrosis and better understand its pathophysiology. We have begun recruitment and assessed many individuals with NF1 with and with tibial bowing. QUS

  3. Mesoscale Surface Pressure and Temperature Features Associated with Bow Echoes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    contain several bowing segments. These multiple segments could occur at the same time and be located within the same bow, such as the serial derecho ...Examination of derecho environments using proximity soundings. Wea. Forecasting, 16, 329–342. Fovell, R. G., 2002: Upstream influence of numerically...Se- vere Local Storms, Hyannis, MA, Amer. Meteor. Soc., 4.6. Johns, R. H., and W. D. Hirt, 1987: Derechos : Widespread con- vectively induced

  4. 76. The Silver Bow County Courthouse, 19101912, at West Granite ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    76. The Silver Bow County Courthouse, 1910-1912, at West Granite and Montana Streets, was designed by Link and Haire. The building has a dressed sandstone foundation, brick walls, and sandstone trim, parapet and columns. It was used as a barracks for the State militia when the city was placed under martial law following the dynamiting of the Old Miners' Union Hall in September, 1914. - Butte Historic District, Bounded by Copper, Arizona, Mercury & Continental Streets, Butte, Silver Bow County, MT

  5. Correlated observations of energetic particles upstream of the bow shock, in the magnetosheath, and in the magnetosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Scholer, M.; Moebius, E.; Kistler, L.M. ); Ipavich, F.M.

    1990-12-01

    Simultaneous measurements of energetic protons and alpha particles by the ISEE 1 and AMPTE/IRM spacecraft in the region upstream of the Earth's bow shock are reported during the period 0700-0900 UT on October 19, 1984. IRM observes a diffuse distribution over the whole two hour period. In the spacecraft frame an anisotropy exists with more particles streaming toward the bow shock. ISEE 1 observes occasional bursts of energetic ions which exhibit a beam like distribution along the magnetic field away from the bow shock. The occurrence of these beams is in most cases correlated with a change of the longitudinal interplanetary magnetic field direction, such that a field line from the position of the spacecraft meets the shock with a smaller angle between magnetic field and shock normal. The differential intensity at IRM is about one order of magnitude higher than at ISEE 1. Simultaneously measured spectra by AMPTE/CCE within the magnetosphere close to the magnetopause are considerably harder than the spectra at both upstream locations. A comparison of a CCE spectrum in the magnetosheath with an upstream IRM spectrum shows that the proton intensity observed just outside of the magnetopause between 15 and 80 keV is lower than the upstream spectrum. In the magnetosheath the protons stream away from the bow shock toward the magnetopause and the anisotropy increases with energy. Predictions of the magnetospheric leakage model and of the bow shock acceleration model are compared, and it is shown that the observations are consistent with bow shock acceleration, whereas there are extreme difficulties with an explanation in terms of magnetospheric leakage.

  6. A new technique to characterize CT scanner bow-tie filter attenuation and applications in human cadaver dosimetry simulations

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xinhua; Shi, Jim Q.; Zhang, Da; Singh, Sarabjeet; Padole, Atul; Otrakji, Alexi; Kalra, Mannudeep K.; Xu, X. George; Liu, Bob

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To present a noninvasive technique for directly measuring the CT bow-tie filter attenuation with a linear array x-ray detector. Methods: A scintillator based x-ray detector of 384 pixels, 307 mm active length, and fast data acquisition (model X-Scan 0.8c4-307, Detection Technology, FI-91100 Ii, Finland) was used to simultaneously detect radiation levels across a scan field-of-view. The sampling time was as short as 0.24 ms. To measure the body bow-tie attenuation on a GE Lightspeed Pro 16 CT scanner, the x-ray tube was parked at the 12 o’clock position, and the detector was centered in the scan field at the isocenter height. Two radiation exposures were made with and without the bow-tie in the beam path. Each readout signal was corrected for the detector background offset and signal-level related nonlinear gain, and the ratio of the two exposures gave the bow-tie attenuation. The results were used in the geant4 based simulations of the point doses measured using six thimble chambers placed in a human cadaver with abdomen/pelvis CT scans at 100 or 120 kV, helical pitch at 1.375, constant or variable tube current, and distinct x-ray tube starting angles. Results: Absolute attenuation was measured with the body bow-tie scanned at 80–140 kV. For 24 doses measured in six organs of the cadaver, the median or maximum difference between the simulation results and the measurements on the CT scanner was 8.9% or 25.9%, respectively. Conclusions: The described method allows fast and accurate bow-tie filter characterization. PMID:26520720

  7. A new technique to characterize CT scanner bow-tie filter attenuation and applications in human cadaver dosimetry simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xinhua; Shi, Jim Q.; Zhang, Da; Singh, Sarabjeet; Padole, Atul; Otrakji, Alexi; Kalra, Mannudeep K.; Liu, Bob; Xu, X. George

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: To present a noninvasive technique for directly measuring the CT bow-tie filter attenuation with a linear array x-ray detector. Methods: A scintillator based x-ray detector of 384 pixels, 307 mm active length, and fast data acquisition (model X-Scan 0.8c4-307, Detection Technology, FI-91100 Ii, Finland) was used to simultaneously detect radiation levels across a scan field-of-view. The sampling time was as short as 0.24 ms. To measure the body bow-tie attenuation on a GE Lightspeed Pro 16 CT scanner, the x-ray tube was parked at the 12 o’clock position, and the detector was centered in the scan field at the isocenter height. Two radiation exposures were made with and without the bow-tie in the beam path. Each readout signal was corrected for the detector background offset and signal-level related nonlinear gain, and the ratio of the two exposures gave the bow-tie attenuation. The results were used in the GEANT4 based simulations of the point doses measured using six thimble chambers placed in a human cadaver with abdomen/pelvis CT scans at 100 or 120 kV, helical pitch at 1.375, constant or variable tube current, and distinct x-ray tube starting angles. Results: Absolute attenuation was measured with the body bow-tie scanned at 80–140 kV. For 24 doses measured in six organs of the cadaver, the median or maximum difference between the simulation results and the measurements on the CT scanner was 8.9% or 25.9%, respectively. Conclusions: The described method allows fast and accurate bow-tie filter characterization.

  8. 75 FR 40820 - City of Broken Bow, Oklahoma; Project No. 12470-001-Oklahoma Broken Bow Re-Regulation Dam...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-14

    ... Managing Properties Included in or Eligible for Inclusion in the National Register of Historic Places July... included in, or eligible for inclusion in, the National Register of Historic Places at the Broken Bow...

  9. Direct observation of λ-DNA molecule reversal movement within microfluidic channels under electric field with single molecule imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fengyun, Yang; Kaige, Wang; Dan, Sun; Wei, Zhao; Hai-qing, Wang; Xin, He; Gui-ren, Wang; Jin-tao, Bai

    2016-07-01

    The electrodynamic characteristics of single DNA molecules moving within micro-/nano-fluidic channels are important in the design of biomedical chips and bimolecular sensors. In this study, the dynamic properties of λ-DNA molecules transferring along the microchannels driven by the external electrickinetic force were systemically investigated with the single molecule fluorescence imaging technique. The experimental results indicated that the velocity of DNA molecules was strictly dependent on the value of the applied electric field and the diameter of the channel. The larger the external electric field, the larger the velocity, and the more significant deformation of DNA molecules. More meaningfully, it was found that the moving directions of DNA molecules had two completely different directions: (i) along the direction of the external electric field, when the electric field intensity was smaller than a certain threshold value; (ii) opposite to the direction of the external electric field, when the electric field intensity was greater than the threshold electric field intensity. The reversal movement of DNA molecules was mainly determined by the competition between the electrophoresis force and the influence of electro-osmosis flow. These new findings will theoretically guide the practical application of fluidic channel sensors and lab-on-chips for precisely manipulating single DNA molecules. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61378083), the International Cooperation Foundation of the National Science and Technology Major Project of the Ministry of Science and Technology of China (Grant No. 2011DFA12220), the Major Research Plan of National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 91123030), and the Natural Science Foundation of Shaanxi Province of China (Grant Nos. 2010JS110 and 2013SZS03-Z01).

  10. Magnetosheath Filamentary Structures Formed by Ion Acceleration at the Quasi-Parallel Bow Shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omidi, N.; Sibeck, D.; Gutynska, O.; Trattner, K. J.

    2014-01-01

    Results from 2.5-D electromagnetic hybrid simulations show the formation of field-aligned, filamentary plasma structures in the magnetosheath. They begin at the quasi-parallel bow shock and extend far into the magnetosheath. These structures exhibit anticorrelated, spatial oscillations in plasma density and ion temperature. Closer to the bow shock, magnetic field variations associated with density and temperature oscillations may also be present. Magnetosheath filamentary structures (MFS) form primarily in the quasi-parallel sheath; however, they may extend to the quasi-perpendicular magnetosheath. They occur over a wide range of solar wind Alfvénic Mach numbers and interplanetary magnetic field directions. At lower Mach numbers with lower levels of magnetosheath turbulence, MFS remain highly coherent over large distances. At higher Mach numbers, magnetosheath turbulence decreases the level of coherence. Magnetosheath filamentary structures result from localized ion acceleration at the quasi-parallel bow shock and the injection of energetic ions into the magnetosheath. The localized nature of ion acceleration is tied to the generation of fast magnetosonic waves at and upstream of the quasi-parallel shock. The increased pressure in flux tubes containing the shock accelerated ions results in the depletion of the thermal plasma in these flux tubes and the enhancement of density in flux tubes void of energetic ions. This results in the observed anticorrelation between ion temperature and plasma density.

  11. Variations and Effects of the Venusian Bow Shock from VEX Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Yansong; Jin, Shuanggen

    2014-04-01

    The upper atmosphere of Venus is not shielded by planetary magnetic field from direct interaction with the solar wind. The interaction of shocked solar wind and the ionosphere results in ionopause. Magnetic barrier, the inner region of dayside magnetosheath with the dominated magnetic pressure deflects the solar wind instead of the ionopause at solar maximum. Therefore, the structure and interaction of venusian ionosphere is very complex. Although the Venus Express (VEX) arrived at Venus in April 2006 provides more knowledge on the Venusian ionosphere and plasma environment, compared to Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) with about 14 years of observations, some important details are still unknown (e.g., long Venusian bow shock variations and effects). In this paper, the bow shock positions of Venus are determined and analyzed from magnetometer (MAG) and ASPERA-4 of the Venus Express mission from May 28, 2006 to August 17, 2010. Results show that the altitude of BS was mainly affected by SZA (solar zenith angle) and Venus bow shocks inbound and outbound are asymmetry.

  12. Magnetosheath filamentary structures formed by ion acceleration at the quasi-parallel bow shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omidi, N.; Sibeck, D.; Gutynska, O.; Trattner, K. J.

    2014-04-01

    Results from 2.5-D electromagnetic hybrid simulations show the formation of field-aligned, filamentary plasma structures in the magnetosheath. They begin at the quasi-parallel bow shock and extend far into the magnetosheath. These structures exhibit anticorrelated, spatial oscillations in plasma density and ion temperature. Closer to the bow shock, magnetic field variations associated with density and temperature oscillations may also be present. Magnetosheath filamentary structures (MFS) form primarily in the quasi-parallel sheath; however, they may extend to the quasi-perpendicular magnetosheath. They occur over a wide range of solar wind Alfvénic Mach numbers and interplanetary magnetic field directions. At lower Mach numbers with lower levels of magnetosheath turbulence, MFS remain highly coherent over large distances. At higher Mach numbers, magnetosheath turbulence decreases the level of coherence. Magnetosheath filamentary structures result from localized ion acceleration at the quasi-parallel bow shock and the injection of energetic ions into the magnetosheath. The localized nature of ion acceleration is tied to the generation of fast magnetosonic waves at and upstream of the quasi-parallel shock. The increased pressure in flux tubes containing the shock accelerated ions results in the depletion of the thermal plasma in these flux tubes and the enhancement of density in flux tubes void of energetic ions. This results in the observed anticorrelation between ion temperature and plasma density.

  13. Transcranial direct current stimulation reverses neurophysiological and behavioural effects of focal inhibition of human pharyngeal motor cortex on swallowing

    PubMed Central

    Vasant, Dipesh H; Mistry, Satish; Michou, Emilia; Jefferson, Samantha; Rothwell, John C; Hamdy, Shaheen

    2014-01-01

    The human cortical swallowing system exhibits bilateral but functionally asymmetric representation in health and disease as evidenced by both focal cortical inhibition (pre-conditioning with 1 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation; rTMS) and unilateral stroke, where disruption of the stronger (dominant) pharyngeal projection alters swallowing neurophysiology and behaviour. Moreover, excitatory neurostimulation protocols capable of reversing the disruptive effects of focal cortical inhibition have demonstrated therapeutic promise in post-stroke dysphagia when applied contralaterally. In healthy participants (n = 15, 8 males, mean age (±SEM) 35 ± 9 years), optimal parameters of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) (anodal, 1.5 mA, 10 min) were applied contralaterally after 1 Hz rTMS pre-conditioning to the strongest pharyngeal projection. Swallowing neurophysiology was assessed in both hemispheres by intraluminal recordings of pharyngeal motor-evoked responses (PMEPs) to single-pulse TMS as a measure of cortical excitability. Swallowing behaviour was examined using a pressure-based reaction time protocol. Measurements were made before and for up to 60 min post intervention. Subjects were randomised to active or sham tDCS after 1 Hz rTMS on separate days and data were compared using repeated measures ANOVA. Active tDCS increased PMEPs bilaterally (F1,14 = 7.4, P = 0.017) reversing the inhibitory effects of 1 Hz rTMS in the pre-conditioned hemisphere (F1,14 = 10.1, P = 0.007). Active tDCS also enhanced swallowing behaviour, increasing the number of correctly timed challenge swallows compared to sham (F1,14 = 6.3, P = 0.025). Thus, tDCS to the contralateral pharyngeal motor cortex reverses the neurophysiological and behavioural effects of focal cortical inhibition on swallowing in healthy individuals and has therapeutic potential for dysphagia rehabilitation. PMID:24247983

  14. Measurement of bow tie profiles in CT scanners using a real-time dosimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Whiting, Bruce R.; Evans, Joshua D.; Williamson, Jeffrey F.; Dohatcu, Andreea C.; Politte, David G.

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: Several areas of computed tomography (CT) research require knowledge about the intensity profile of the x-ray fan beam that is introduced by a bow tie filter. This information is considered proprietary by CT manufacturers, so noninvasive measurement methods are required. One method using real-time dosimeters has been proposed in the literature. A commercially available dosimeter was used to apply that method, and analysis techniques were developed to extract fan beam profiles from measurements. Methods: A real-time ion chamber was placed near the periphery of an empty CT gantry and the dose rate versus time waveform was recorded as the x-ray source rotated about the isocenter. In contrast to previously proposed analysis methods that assumed a pointlike detector, the finite-size ion chamber received varying amounts of coverage by the collimated x-ray beam during rotation, precluding a simple relationship between the source intensity as a function of fan beam angle and measured intensity. A two-parameter model for measurement intensity was developed that included both effective collimation width and source-to-detector distance, which then was iteratively solved to minimize the error between duplicate measurements at corresponding fan beam angles, allowing determination of the fan beam profile from measured dose-rate waveforms. Measurements were performed on five different scanner systems while varying parameters such as collimation, kVp, and bow tie filters. On one system, direct measurements of the bow tie profile were collected for comparison with the real-time dosimeter technique. Results: The data analysis method for a finite-size detector was found to produce a fan beam profile estimate with a relative error between duplicate measurement intensities of <5%. It was robust over a wide range of collimation widths (e.g., 1–40 mm), producing fan beam profiles that agreed with a relative error of 1%–5%. Comparison with a direct measurement technique on

  15. Linear modal stability analysis of bowed-strings.

    PubMed

    Debut, V; Antunes, J; Inácio, O

    2017-03-01

    Linearised models are often invoked as a starting point to study complex dynamical systems. Besides their attractive mathematical simplicity, they have a central role for determining the stability properties of static or dynamical states, and can often shed light on the influence of the control parameters on the system dynamical behaviour. While the bowed string dynamics has been thoroughly studied from a number of points of view, mainly by time-domain computer simulations, this paper proposes to explore its dynamical behaviour adopting a linear framework, linearising the friction force near an equilibrium state in steady sliding conditions, and using a modal representation of the string dynamics. Starting from the simplest idealisation of the friction force given by Coulomb's law with a velocity-dependent friction coefficient, the linearised modal equations of the bowed string are presented, and the dynamical changes of the system as a function of the bowing parameters are studied using linear stability analysis. From the computed complex eigenvalues and eigenvectors, several plots of the evolution of the modal frequencies, damping values, and modeshapes with the bowing parameters are produced, as well as stability charts for each system mode. By systematically exploring the influence of the parameters, this approach appears as a preliminary numerical characterisation of the bifurcations of the bowed string dynamics, with the advantage of being very simple compared to sophisticated numerical approaches which demand the regularisation of the nonlinear interaction force. To fix the idea about the potential of the proposed approach, the classic one-degree-of-freedom friction-excited oscillator is first considered, and then the case of the bowed string. Even if the actual stick-slip behaviour is rather far from the linear description adopted here, the results show that essential musical features of bowed string vibrations can be interpreted from this simple approach

  16. Social complexity and the bow in the Eastern Woodlands.

    PubMed

    Blitz, John H; Porth, Erik S

    2013-01-01

    Bingham and Souza have presented an evolutionary theory that specifies a causal relationship between the advent of powerful projectile weapons such as the bow and radical rearrangements in social relations and histories. They propose that the acquisition of weapons that permitted humans to kill at ever-increasing distances provided the coercive means to suppress conflicts of interest among nonkin, self-interested individuals in social groups, thus paving the way for greater social complexity. An unprecedented reduction in projectile point size identifies the arrival of the bow ca. A.D. 300 in the Eastern Woodlands of North America, which initiated a causal chain of cultural changes. In the Midwest, the bow, combined with food production, precipitated the decline of Hopewell by conferring household autonomy and dispersal, which at first suppressed social complexity, but later created conditions favorable to maize intensification. In the lower Southeast, where food production was unimportant, populations aggregated at concentrated wild-food sources, and the bow did not confer household autonomy. The relationship between the bow and social complexity varied under different environmental, social, and historical conditions.

  17. Bow-tie diagrams for risk management in anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Culwick, M D; Merry, A F; Clarke, D M; Taraporewalla, K J; Gibbs, N M

    2016-11-01

    Bow-tie analysis is a risk analysis and management tool that has been readily adopted into routine practice in many high reliability industries such as engineering, aviation and emergency services. However, it has received little exposure so far in healthcare. Nevertheless, its simplicity, versatility, and pictorial display may have benefits for the analysis of a range of healthcare risks, including complex and multiple risks and their interactions. Bow-tie diagrams are a combination of a fault tree and an event tree, which when combined take the shape of a bow tie. Central to bow-tie methodology is the concept of an undesired or 'Top Event', which occurs if a hazard progresses past all prevention controls. Top Events may also occasionally occur idiosyncratically. Irrespective of the cause of a Top Event, mitigation and recovery controls may influence the outcome. Hence the relationship of hazard to outcome can be viewed in one diagram along with possible causal sequences or accident trajectories. Potential uses for bow-tie diagrams in anaesthesia risk management include improved understanding of anaesthesia hazards and risks, pre-emptive identification of absent or inadequate hazard controls, investigation of clinical incidents, teaching anaesthesia risk management, and demonstrating risk management strategies to third parties when required.

  18. Large scale motions of Neptune's bow shock: Evidence for control of the shock position by the rotation phase of Neptune's magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, Iver H.; Smith, Charles W.; Kurth, William S.; Gurnett, Donald A.; Moses, Stewart L.

    1991-01-01

    The Voyager 2 spacecraft observed high levels of Langmuir waves before the inbound crossing of Neptune's bow shock, thereby signifying magnetic connection of the bow shock. The Langmuir waves occurred in multiple bursts throughout two distinct periods separated by an 85 minute absence of wave activity. The times of onsets, peaks, and disappearances of the waves were used together with the magnetic field directions and spacecraft position, to perform a 'remote-sensing' analysis of the shape and location of Neptune's bow shock prior to the inbound bow shock crossing. The bow shock is assumed to have a parabolidal shape with a nose location and flaring parameter determined independently for each wave event. The remote-sensing analysis give a shock position consistent with the time of the inbound shock crossing. The flaring parameter of the shock remains approximately constant throughout each period of wave activity but differs by a factor of 10 between the two periods. The absence of waves between two periods of wave activity coincides with a large rotation of the magnetic field and a large increase in the solar wind ram pressure' both these effects lead to magnetic disconnection of the spacecraft from shock. The planetwards motion of the shock's nose from 38.5 R(sub N) to 34.5 R(sub N) during the second time period occurred while the solar wind ram pressure remained constant to within 15 percent. This second period of planetwards motion of the shock is therefore strong evidence for Neptune's bow shock moving in response to the rotation of Neptune's oblique, tilted magnetic dipole. Normalizing the ram pressure, the remotely-sensed shock moves sunwards during the first wave period and planetwards in the second wave period. The maximum standoff distance occurs while the dipole axis is close to being perpendicular to the Sun-Neptune direction. The remote-sensing analysis provides strong evidence that the location of Neptune's bow shock is controlled by Neptune's rotation

  19. Ultra-high resolution steady-state micro-thermometry using a bipolar direct current reversal technique.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jason Yingzhi; Wu, Wei; Pettes, Michael Thompson

    2016-09-01

    The suspended micro-thermometry measurement technique is one of the most prominent methods for probing the in-plane thermal conductance of low dimensional materials, where a suspended microdevice containing two built-in platinum resistors that serve as both heater and thermometer is used to measure the temperature and heat flow across a sample. The presence of temperature fluctuations in the sample chamber and background thermal conductance through the device, residual gases, and radiation are dominant sources of error when the sample thermal conductance is comparable to or smaller than the background thermal conductance, on the order of 300 pW/K at room temperature. In this work, we present a high resolution thermal conductance measurement scheme in which a bipolar direct current reversal technique is adopted to replace the lock-in technique. We have demonstrated temperature resolution of 1.0-2.6 mK and thermal conductance resolution of 1.7-26 pW/K over a temperature range of 30-375 K. The background thermal conductance of the suspended microdevice is determined accurately by our method and allows for straightforward isolation of this parasitic signal. This simple and high-throughput measurement technique yields an order of magnitude improvement in resolution over similarly configured lock-in amplifier techniques, allowing for more accurate investigation of fundamental phonon transport mechanisms in individual nanomaterials.

  20. Ultra-high resolution steady-state micro-thermometry using a bipolar direct current reversal technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jason Yingzhi; Wu, Wei; Pettes, Michael Thompson

    2016-09-01

    The suspended micro-thermometry measurement technique is one of the most prominent methods for probing the in-plane thermal conductance of low dimensional materials, where a suspended microdevice containing two built-in platinum resistors that serve as both heater and thermometer is used to measure the temperature and heat flow across a sample. The presence of temperature fluctuations in the sample chamber and background thermal conductance through the device, residual gases, and radiation are dominant sources of error when the sample thermal conductance is comparable to or smaller than the background thermal conductance, on the order of 300 pW/K at room temperature. In this work, we present a high resolution thermal conductance measurement scheme in which a bipolar direct current reversal technique is adopted to replace the lock-in technique. We have demonstrated temperature resolution of 1.0-2.6 mK and thermal conductance resolution of 1.7-26 pW/K over a temperature range of 30-375 K. The background thermal conductance of the suspended microdevice is determined accurately by our method and allows for straightforward isolation of this parasitic signal. This simple and high-throughput measurement technique yields an order of magnitude improvement in resolution over similarly configured lock-in amplifier techniques, allowing for more accurate investigation of fundamental phonon transport mechanisms in individual nanomaterials.

  1. Optical Properties of Titania Coatings Prepared by Inkjet Direct Patterning of a Reverse Micelles Sol-Gel Composition.

    PubMed

    Schmiedova, Veronika; Dzik, Petr; Vesely, Michal; Zmeskal, Oldrich; Morozova, Magdalena; Kluson, Petr

    2015-08-12

    Thin layers of titanium dioxide were fabricated by direct inkjet patterning of a reverse micelles sol-gel composition onto soda-lime glass plates. Several series of variable thickness samples were produced by repeated overprinting and these were further calcined at different temperatures. The resulting layers were inspected by optical and scanning electronic microscopy and their optical properties were investigated by spectroscopic ellipsometry in the range of 200-1000 nm. Thus the influence of the calcination temperature on material as well as optical properties of the patterned micellar titania was studied. The additive nature of the deposition process was demonstrated by a linear dependence of total thickness on the number of printed layers without being significantly affected by the calcination temperature. The micellar imprints structure of the titania layer resulted into significant deviation of measured optical constants from the values reported for bulk titania. The introduction of a void layer into the ellipsometric model was found necessary for this particular type of titania and enabled correct ellipsometric determination of layer thickness, well matching the thickness values from mechanical profilometry.

  2. Enhancing Autophagy with Drugs or Lung-directed Gene Therapy Reverses the Pathological Effects of Respiratory Epithelial Cell Proteinopathy*

    PubMed Central

    Hidvegi, Tunda; Stolz, Donna B.; Alcorn, John F.; Yousem, Samuel A.; Wang, Jieru; Leme, Adriana S.; Houghton, A. McGarry; Hale, Pamela; Ewing, Michael; Cai, Houming; Garchar, Evelyn Akpadock; Pastore, Nunzia; Annunziata, Patrizia; Kaminski, Naftali; Pilewski, Joseph; Shapiro, Steven D.; Pak, Stephen C.; Silverman, Gary A.; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola; Perlmutter, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that autophagy mitigates the pathological effects of proteinopathies in the liver, heart, and skeletal muscle but this has not been investigated for proteinopathies that affect the lung. This may be due at least in part to the lack of an animal model robust enough for spontaneous pathological effects from proteinopathies even though several rare proteinopathies, surfactant protein A and C deficiencies, cause severe pulmonary fibrosis. In this report we show that the PiZ mouse, transgenic for the common misfolded variant α1-antitrypsin Z, is a model of respiratory epithelial cell proteinopathy with spontaneous pulmonary fibrosis. Intracellular accumulation of misfolded α1-antitrypsin Z in respiratory epithelial cells of the PiZ model resulted in activation of autophagy, leukocyte infiltration, and spontaneous pulmonary fibrosis severe enough to elicit functional restrictive deficits. Treatment with autophagy enhancer drugs or lung-directed gene transfer of TFEB, a master transcriptional activator of the autophagolysosomal system, reversed these proteotoxic consequences. We conclude that this mouse is an excellent model of respiratory epithelial proteinopathy with spontaneous pulmonary fibrosis and that autophagy is an important endogenous proteostasis mechanism and an attractive target for therapy. PMID:26494620

  3. A Stable but Reversible Integrated Surrogate Reporter for Assaying CRISPR/Cas9-Stimulated Homology-directed Repair.

    PubMed

    Wen, Yahong; Liao, Grace; Pritchard, Thomas; Zhao, Ting-Ting; Connelly, Jon P; Pruett-Miller, Shondra M; Blanc, Valerie; Davidson, Nicholas O; Madison, Blair B

    2017-02-22

    The discovery and application of CRISPR/Cas9 technology for genome editing has greatly accelerated targeted mutagenesis in a variety of organisms. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated site-specific cleavage is typically exploited for the generation of insertions or deletions (indels) following aberrant dsDNA repair via the endogenous non-homology end-joining (NHEJ) pathway, or alternatively, for enhancing homology directed repair (HDR) to facilitate the generation of a specific mutation (or knock-in). However, there is a need for efficient cellular assays that can measure Cas9/guide RNA (gRNA) activity. Reliable methods for enriching and identifying desired mutants are also lacking. Here we describe a method using the Piggybac transposon for stable genomic integration of an H2B-GFP reporter or a hygromycin resistance gene for assaying Cas9 target cleavage and homology-directed repair (HDR). The H2B-GFP fusion protein provides increased stability and an obvious pattern of nuclear localization. This method, called SRIRACCHA (i.e., a stable, but reversible, integrated reporter for assaying CRISPR/Cas-stimulated HDR activity), enables the enrichment of mutants via selection of GFP-positive or hygromycin-resistant mammalian cells (immortalized or non-immortalized) as a surrogate for the modification of the endogenous target site. Currently available hyperactive Piggybac transposase mutants allow both delivery and removal of the surrogate reporters, with minimal risk of generating undesirable mutations. This assay permits rapid screening for efficient gRNAs, and the accelerated identification of mutant clones, and is applicable to many cell types. We foresee the utility of this approach in contexts in which the maintenance of genomic integrity is essential, for example, when engineering cells for therapeutic purposes.

  4. The existence and nature of the interstellar bow shock

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Jaffel, Lotfi; Strumik, M.; Ratkiewicz, R.; Grygorczuk, J.

    2013-12-20

    We report a new diagnosis of two different states of the local interstellar medium (LISM) near our solar system by using a sensitivity study constrained by several distinct and complementary observations of the LISM, solar wind, and inner heliosphere. Assuming the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) He flow parameters for the LISM, we obtain a strength of ∼2.7 ± 0.2 μG and a direction pointing away from galactic coordinates (28, 52) ± 3° for the interstellar magnetic field as a result of fitting Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 in situ plasma measurements and IBEX energetic neutral atoms ribbon. When using Ulysses parameters for the LISM He flow, we recently reported the same direction but with a strength of 2.2 ± 0.1 μG. First, we notice that with Ulysses He flow, our solution is in the expected hydrogen deflection plane (HDP). In contrast, for the IBEX He flow, the solution is ∼20° away from the corresponding HDP plane. Second, the long-term monitoring of the interplanetary H I flow speed shows a value of ∼26 km s{sup –1} measured upwind from the Doppler shift in the strong Lyα sky background emission line. All elements of the diagnosis seem therefore to support Ulysses He flow parameters for the interstellar state. In that frame, we argue that reliable discrimination between superfast, subfast, or superslow states of the interstellar flow should be based on most existing in situ and remote observations used together with global modeling of the heliosphere. For commonly accepted LISM ionization rates, we show that a fast interstellar bow shock should be standing off upstream of the heliopause.

  5. Understanding the Impact of Reverse Transfer Students on Community Colleges. New Directions for Community Colleges, Number 106.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsend, Barbara K., Ed.

    1999-01-01

    This issue describes an enrollment pattern emerging in higher education--students who are matriculated at, or have graduated from, a four-year college who then transfer to a two-year school, a process labeled "reverse transfer." The following articles are included: (1) "What Do We Know about Reverse Transfer Students?" (Barbara K. Townsend and…

  6. [Correction of bowing in Paget's disease (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Postel, M; Senly, G

    1978-12-01

    Thirteen tibiae and seven femora suffering from bowing due to Paget's disease have been streightened operatively. In the tibiae, the deformities were of metaphysial genu varum with bowing in the sagittal plane of an average of 30 degrees combined with some medial rotation. In the femora, the main curve was anterolateral with some medial rotation and coxa vara. Seventeen cases united uneventfully after osteotomy. In three cases, there were septic complications, union occurred after removal of the internal fixation. Bowing recurred in three cases. The recurrence appeared to be related to incomplete correction leading to persistent mechanical strain on bones affected by rapid bone turnover. Inadequate internal fixation may also be a factor. All other cases were functionally improved by correction. Oblique osteotomy is indicated for the correction of tibial deformity when there is moderate medial rotation. Transverse osteotomy with fixation by intramedullary nailing is indicated for correction of femoral deformities.

  7. Electrostatic waves in the bow shock at Uranus

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, S.L.; Coroniti, F.V.; Kennel, C.F.; Scarf, F.L. ); Bagenal, F. ); Lepping, R.P. ); Quest, K.B. ); Kurth, W.S. )

    1989-10-01

    Electrostatic emissions measured by the Voyager 2 plasma wave detector (PWS) during the inbound crossing of the Uranian bow shock are shown to differ in some aspects from the waves measured during bow shock crossings at Jupiter and Saturn. The wave amplitudes in the foot of the bow shock at Uranus are in general much lower than those detected at the other out planets due to the unusually enhanced solar wind ion temperature during the crossing. This reduces the effectiveness of wave-particle interactions in heating the incoming electrons. Strong wave emissions are observed in the shock ramp that possibly arise from currents producing a Buneman mode instability. Plasma instrument (PLS) and magnetometer (MAG) measurements reveal a complicated shock structure reminiscent of computer simulations of high-Mach number shocks when the effects of anomalous resistivity are reduced, and are consistent with high ion temperatures restricting the growth of electrostatic waves.

  8. Bow and Oblique Shock Formation in Soap Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ildoo; Mandre, Shreyas; Sane, Aakash

    2015-11-01

    In recent years, soap films have been exploited primarily to approximate two-dimensional flows while their three-dimensional character is relatively unattended. An example of the three-dimensional character of the flow in a soap film is the observed Marangoni shock wave when the flow speed exceeds the wave speed. In this study, we investigated the formation of bow and oblique shocks in soap films generated by wedges with different deflection angles. When the wedge deflection angle is small and the film flows fast, oblique shocks are observed. When the oblique shock cannot exists, bow shock is formed upstream the wedge. We characterized the oblique shock angle as a function of the wedge deflection angle and the flow speed, and we also present the criteria for transition between bow and oblique Marangoni shocks in soap films.

  9. EVAPORATION OF ICY PLANETESIMALS DUE TO BOW SHOCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Kyoko K.; Yamamoto, Tetsuo; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Miura, Hitoshi; Nagasawa, Makiko; Nakamoto, Taishi

    2013-02-20

    We present the novel concept of evaporation of planetesimals as a result of bow shocks associated with planetesimals orbiting with supersonic velocities relative to the gas in a protoplanetary disk. We evaluate the evaporation rates of the planetesimals based on a simple model describing planetesimal heating and evaporation by the bow shock. We find that icy planetesimals with radius {approx}>100 km evaporate efficiently even outside the snow line in the stage of planetary oligarchic growth, where strong bow shocks are produced by gravitational perturbations from protoplanets. The obtained results suggest that the formation of gas giant planets is suppressed owing to insufficient accretion of icy planetesimals onto the protoplanet within the {approx}<5 AU disk region.

  10. Polarization Signatures of Bow Shocks in Stellar Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, M.; Hoffman, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    Bow shocks around massive stars provide important information regarding the motion of the star, the stellar wind properties, and the density of the surrounding interstellar medium. We use a Monte Carlo radiative transfer code to investigate the polarization created when photons from a central star scatter from electrons or dust grains in a surrounding bow shock. We discuss the behavior of the polarization with respect to viewing angle as a function of parameters such as optical depth and scattering medium in both the resolved and unresolved cases.

  11. 76 FR 13666 - Pitney Bowes, Inc., Mailing Solutions Management, Global Engineering Group, Including On-Site...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-14

    ... Solutions Management Division, Engineering Quality Assurance, Shelton, Connecticut. The Department's Notice... Employment and Training Administration Pitney Bowes, Inc., Mailing Solutions Management, Global Engineering... firm worker group should read: Pitney Bowes, Inc., Mailing Solutions Management, Global...

  12. Interplanetary magnetic field control of the Venus magnetosheath field and bow shock location

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, J. L.; Luhmann, J. G.; Russell, C. T.; Alexander, C. J.

    1986-01-01

    Six Venus years of Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) data are analyzed in a coordinate system which isolates magnetic effects. The field draping pattern features two lobes easily identifiable even in the near planet region. The magnetosheath magnetic magnitude has a hemispherical asymmetry controlled by the IMF orientation in a manner suggesting preferrential ion pickup in one hemisphere. This result complements recent findings that the bow shock position is responsive to IMF direction. Examination of the ionopause position to evaluate ionospheric effects on the overall asymmetry of thfe Venus-solar wind interaction produces negative but not conclusive results.

  13. HIGH-TEMPERATURE PROCESSING OF SOLIDS THROUGH SOLAR NEBULAR BOW SHOCKS: 3D RADIATION HYDRODYNAMICS SIMULATIONS WITH PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    Boley, A. C.; Morris, M. A.; Desch, S. J.

    2013-10-20

    A fundamental, unsolved problem in solar system formation is explaining the melting and crystallization of chondrules found in chondritic meteorites. Theoretical models of chondrule melting in nebular shocks have been shown to be consistent with many aspects of thermal histories inferred for chondrules from laboratory experiments; but, the mechanism driving these shocks is unknown. Planetesimals and planetary embryos on eccentric orbits can produce bow shocks as they move supersonically through the disk gas, and are one possible source of chondrule-melting shocks. We investigate chondrule formation in bow shocks around planetoids through three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations. A new radiation transport algorithm that combines elements of flux-limited diffusion and Monte Carlo methods is used to capture the complexity of radiative transport around bow shocks. An equation of state that includes the rotational, vibrational, and dissociation modes of H{sub 2} is also used. Solids are followed directly in the simulations and their thermal histories are recorded. Adiabatic expansion creates rapid cooling of the gas, and tail shocks behind the embryo can cause secondary heating events. Radiative transport is efficient, and bow shocks around planetoids can have luminosities ∼few× 10{sup –8} L{sub ☉}. While barred and radial chondrule textures could be produced in the radiative shocks explored here, porphyritic chondrules may only be possible in the adiabatic limit. We present a series of predicted cooling curves that merit investigation in laboratory experiments to determine whether the solids produced by bow shocks are represented in the meteoritic record by chondrules or other solids.

  14. Statistical analysis of diffuse ion events upstream of the Earth's bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trattner, K. J.; Mobius, E.; Scholer, M.; Klecker, B.; Hilchenbach, M.; Luehr, H.

    1994-01-01

    A statistical study of diffuse energetic ion events and their related waves upstream of the Earth's bow shock was performed using data from the Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracer Explorers/Ion Release Module (AMPTE/IRM) satellite over two 5-month periods in 1984 and 1985. The data set was used to test the assumption in the self-consistent model of the upstream wave and particle populations by Lee (1982) that the particle acceleration through hydromagnetic waves and the wave generation are directly coupled. The comparison between the observed wave power and the wave power predicted on the observed energetic particle energy density and solar wind parameters results in a high correlation coefficient of about 0.89. The intensity of diffuse ions falls off approximately exponentially with the distance upstream from the bow shock parallel to the magnetic field with e-folding distances which vary from approximately 3.3 R(sub E) to approximately 11.7 R(sub E) over the energy range from 10 keV/e to 67.3 keV/e for both protons and alpha particles. After normalizing the upstream particle densities to zero bow shock distance by using these exponential variations, a good correlation (0.7) of the density of the diffuse ions with the solar wind density was found. This supports the suggestion that the solar wind is the source of the diffuse ions. Furthermore, the spectral slope of the diffuse ions correlates well with the solar wind velocity component in the direction of the interplanetary magnetic field (0.68 and 0.66 for protons and alpha particles) which concurs with the notion that the solar wind plays an important role in the acceleration of the upstream particles.

  15. Forces and the Potential Energy Function for a Bow-and-Arrow System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Ken; Coutant, Blaine; Crow, Tatum; James, Austin

    2008-03-01

    The experiments described here consist of a series of investigations into the dynamics of a bow as it is bent (and released) under the influence of a stretched string. The bow is ``student-friendly'' and has no pulleys for facilitating stretch. The presentation will discuss the various approaches to characterizing the bow, the string, and its energy efficiency.

  16. 26 CFR 48.4161(b)-1 - Imposition and rates of tax; bows and arrows.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Imposition and rates of tax; bows and arrows. 48... Imposition and rates of tax; bows and arrows. (a) Imposition of tax. Section 4161(b) imposes a tax on the... bow or arrow described in subparagraph (1) or (2) of this paragraph; and (4) Any quiver suitable...

  17. Jupiter's magnetopause, bow shock, and 10-hour modulated magnetosheath: Voyagers 1 and 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepping, R. P.; Burlaga, L. F.; Klein, L. W.

    1980-01-01

    Fine scale magnetic field data from the Voyager 1 and 2 magnetopause and bow shock crossings at Jupiter were analyzed. Explicit models of the dawnside magnetopause and bow shock in Jupiter's orbital plane employ an axisymmetric parabola and hyperbola, respectively, and are determined separately for the encounters. A new phenomenon was discovered in the magnetosheath. It is manifested as (5 or) 10 hour quasi-periodic modulation of the direction of the magnetic field in the outbound magnetosheath, predominantly in the northward (N) and southward (S) directions. It was seen to occur during both encounters and appears most evident in Voyager 2 outbound observations, probably due to the extreme tailward extent of the Voyager 2 trajectory through the magnetosheath. The durations of the N to and from S transitions range from tens of minutes to approximately 3 hours. The directional variation of the field during these transitions is fairly well restricted to a plane parallel to the local model magnetopause location. These signatures may be due to magnetosheath field line draping modulated by the large scale motion of the magnetospheric plasma disk.

  18. 30. View of main deck at bow (looking aft from ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. View of main deck at bow (looking aft from samson post, upper deck removed), showing anchor windlass (left foreground), head (right foregound), and forward deckhouse; weather canopy overhead not an original or permanent feature - Schooner WAWONA, 1018 Valley Street, Seattle, King County, WA

  19. Detail of bow showing new frames and planking on starboard ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of bow showing new frames and planking on starboard side. Note oak trunnels used to fasten the planks to the frames. Frames are oak; planking is yellow pine. - Schooner ERNESTINA, New Bedford Whaling National Historical Park State Pier, New Bedford, Bristol County, MA

  20. 16. Detail, northeast facade, operator's bow window and tower; note ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Detail, northeast facade, operator's bow window and tower; note condition of slates on tower skirt roof, missing section of gutter at left side of skirt roof, missing window panes; note also knee braces carried on masonry ancons; view to southwest, 90mm lens. - Southern Pacific Depot, 559 El Camino Real, San Carlos, San Mateo County, CA

  1. Application of Bow-tie methodology to improve patient safety.

    PubMed

    Abdi, Zhaleh; Ravaghi, Hamid; Abbasi, Mohsen; Delgoshaei, Bahram; Esfandiari, Somayeh

    2016-05-09

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to apply Bow-tie methodology, a proactive risk assessment technique based on systemic approach, for prospective analysis of the risks threatening patient safety in intensive care unit (ICU). Design/methodology/approach - Bow-tie methodology was used to manage clinical risks threatening patient safety by a multidisciplinary team in the ICU. The Bow-tie analysis was conducted on incidents related to high-alert medications, ventilator associated pneumonia, catheter-related blood stream infection, urinary tract infection, and unwanted extubation. Findings - In total, 48 potential adverse events were analysed. The causal factors were identified and classified into relevant categories. The number and effectiveness of existing preventive and protective barriers were examined for each potential adverse event. The adverse events were evaluated according to the risk criteria and a set of interventions were proposed with the aim of improving the existing barriers or implementing new barriers. A number of recommendations were implemented in the ICU, while considering their feasibility. Originality/value - The application of Bow-tie methodology led to practical recommendations to eliminate or control the hazards identified. It also contributed to better understanding of hazard prevention and protection required for safe operations in clinical settings.

  2. A Study of Uranus' Bow Shock Motions Using Langmuir Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xue, S.; Cairns, I. H.; Smith, C. W.; Gurnett, D. A.

    1996-01-01

    During the Voyager 2 flyby of Uranus, strong electron plasma oscillations (Langmuir waves) were detected by the plasma wave instrument in the 1.78-kHz channel on January 23-24, 1986, prior to the inbound bow shock crossing. Langmuir waves are excited by energetic electrons streaming away from the bow shock. The goal of this work is to estimate the location and motion of Uranus' bow shock using Langmuir wave data, together with the spacecraft positions and the measured interplanetary magnetic field. The following three remote sensing analyses were performed: the basic remote sensing method, the lag time method, and the trace-back method. Because the interplanetary magnetic field was highly variable, the first analysis encountered difficulties in obtaining a realistic estimation of Uranus' bow shock motion. In the lag time method developed here, time lags due to the solar wind's finite convection speed are taken into account when calculating the shock's standoff distance. In the new trace-back method, limits on the standoff distance are obtained as a function of time by reconstructing electron paths. Most of the results produced by the latter two analyses are consistent with predictions based on the standard theoretical model and the measured solar wind plasma parameters. Differences between our calculations and the theoretical model are discussed.

  3. 4. DETAIL VIEW, LOOKING SOUTH, ACROSS HULL NEAR BOW END, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. DETAIL VIEW, LOOKING SOUTH, ACROSS HULL NEAR BOW END, TOP OF FORWARD STARBOARD CARGO HATCH IN FOREGROUND, OPENING FOR PORT HATCH BEYOND Edward Larrabee, photographer, November 1984 - Shooters Island, Ships Graveyard, Vessel No. 54, Newark Bay, Staten Island (subdivision), Richmond County, NY

  4. 25. VIEW OF ALABAMA (ALABAMIAN) FROM OFF PORT BOW; VESSEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. VIEW OF ALABAMA (ALABAMIAN) FROM OFF PORT BOW; VESSEL AT ANCHOR ON STATION IN GULF OF MEXICO WITH MOTOR BOAT TIED AT STERN Original 4-3/4'x6-3/4' photograph taken c. 1930? - Pilot Schooner "Alabama", Moored in harbor at Vineyard Haven, Vineyard Haven, Dukes County, MA

  5. 23. VIEW FROM STARBOARD BOW OF ALABAMA AS 'ALABAMIAN.' Uncopyrighted ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. VIEW FROM STARBOARD BOW OF ALABAMA AS 'ALABAMIAN.' Uncopyrighted 3-1/2'x5-5/8' postcard; image taken on station in Gulf of Mexico, c. 1930? - Pilot Schooner "Alabama", Moored in harbor at Vineyard Haven, Vineyard Haven, Dukes County, MA

  6. The Contemplative Bow in Teaching and Learning Pastoral Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koppel, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    This article elucidates theoretical underpinnings for the use of one's self in the pastoral theological classroom. The contemplative bow is developed as a capacious metaphor to describe appropriate self use and its necessary importance in the teaching and learning of pastoral arts in a theological curriculum. Central to the argument is the…

  7. Threequarter view of port bow of White Holly (WLM 543) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Three-quarter view of port bow of White Holly (WLM 543) on left, White Sage (WLM 544) on right. Note differences between the two. - U.S. Coast Guard Cutter WHITE HOLLY, U.S. Coast Guard 8th District Base, 4640 Urquhart Street, New Orleans, Orleans Parish, LA

  8. 41. AUGUST 9, 1948 BOW STARBOARD VIEW. TAKEN SOON AFTER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. AUGUST 9, 1948 BOW STARBOARD VIEW. TAKEN SOON AFTER COMMISSIONING INTO U.S. COAST GUARD. NOTE ORIGINAL CRANE AND HOISTING MECHANISM AND TWO ADDITIONAL PILES (SPUDS) THAT DROPPED INTO THE MUD BOTTOM TO STEADY THE VESSEL WHILE WORKING. - U.S. Coast Guard Cutter WHITE PINE, U.S. Coast Guard 8th District Base, South Broad Street, Mobile, Mobile County, AL

  9. 18. FROM DECK ABOVE CO'S STATEROOM, LOOKING TOWARDS BOW, AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. FROM DECK ABOVE CO'S STATEROOM, LOOKING TOWARDS BOW, AT DECK ABOVE PILOT HOUSE AND BEYOND IS MAST. - U.S. Coast Guard Cutter WHITE LUPINE, U.S. Coast Guard Station Rockland, east end of Tillson Avenue, Rockland, Knox County, ME

  10. 20. FROM DECK ABOVE CREW'S BERTHING, LOOKING TOWARDS THE BOW, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. FROM DECK ABOVE CREW'S BERTHING, LOOKING TOWARDS THE BOW, SHOWING WINCH FIDLY, STACK, AND UPPER DECKS. TO EITHER SIDE OF THE FIDLY IS A RHI (RIGID HULL INFLATABLE) AND CRANES. - U.S. Coast Guard Cutter WHITE LUPINE, U.S. Coast Guard Station Rockland, east end of Tillson Avenue, Rockland, Knox County, ME

  11. Double tibial osteotomy for bow leg patients: A case series

    PubMed Central

    Nazem, Khalilollah; Fouladi, Arash; Chinigarzadeh, Mozhdeh

    2013-01-01

    Background: High tibia osteotomy (HTO) is a common surgical operation for correction of genu varum deformity. In some patients, there are concurrent tibia vara and genu varum (bow leg). This study aimed to consider the possibility of better correction of bow leg deformity after double level tibial osteotomy (DLTO). Materials and Methods: A case series of 10 patients of genu varum in addition to tibia vara (bow leg) deformity who were referred to orthopedic ward of an academic hospital of Isfahan- Iran during 2009–2011 were included in the study. The mean age was 17.3 ± 3.1 years and all of them underwent DLTO. The results of treatment have been assessed based on clinical and radiological parameters before and after surgery. Results: The mean pre- and post operative values for Tibia-Femoral Angle, Medial Proximal of Tibia Angle (MPTA), and Lateral Distal of Tibia Angle (LDTA) were 18.13 ± 3.05° vs. 3.93 ± 0.66°, 79.13 ± 3.4° vs. 89.7 ± 1.8° and 96.40 ± 1.8° vs. 88.73 ± 3.0° respectively (P < 0.05). Improvement of all radiological parameters was meaningful. Seventy three percent of patients had normal mechanical axis of limb after surgery. The remaining cases had varus deformity in distal femur that was corrected by valgus supracondylar osteotomy in an additional operation. Limited range of motion (ROM) near knee and ankle was not observed. Conclusion: DLTO correct bow leg deformity in the point of alignment of limb and paralleling of knee and ankle joint more effectively. This method can be used in metabolic and congenital bow leg which deformities are present in throughout of the lower limb. We described this technique for the first time. PMID:24523802

  12. Static model of a violin bow: influence of camber and hair tension on mechanical behavior.

    PubMed

    Ablitzer, Frédéric; Dalmont, Jean-Pierre; Dauchez, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    Experienced bow makers empirically know the influence of wood, tapering, and camber on the playing and tonal qualities of a bow. However, the way each parameter affects the bow mechanical behavior is not clearly established. An in-plane finite element model is developed to highlight the link between the adjustable design parameters and the mechanical behavior of a bow. This model takes into account geometric nonlinearity as well as compliance of the hair. Its validity is discussed from measurements on a bow. Results from simulations are compared to experimental results from previous studies. The consequences of adjusting hair tension and camber are then investigated.

  13. 75 FR 33802 - City of Broken Bow, OK; Broken Bow Re-Regulation Dam; Hydropower Project; Notice of Proposed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-15

    ... in or Eligible for Inclusion in the National Register of Historic Places June 8, 2010. Rule 2010 of... eligible for inclusion in, the National Register of Historic Places at the Broken Bow Re-Regulation Dam... list for the above-captioned proceeding may request inclusion on the restricted service list, or...

  14. GYROSURFING ACCELERATION OF IONS IN FRONT OF EARTH's QUASI-PARALLEL BOW SHOCK

    SciTech Connect

    Kis, Arpad; Lemperger, Istvan; Wesztergom, Viktor; Agapitov, Oleksiy; Krasnoselskikh, Vladimir; Dandouras, Iannis E-mail: Kis.Arpad@csfk.mta.hu

    2013-07-01

    It is well known that shocks in space plasmas can accelerate particles to high energies. However, many details of the shock acceleration mechanism are still unknown. A critical element of shock acceleration is the injection problem; i.e., the presence of the so called seed particle population that is needed for the acceleration to work efficiently. In our case study, we present for the first time observational evidence of gyroresonant surfing acceleration in front of Earth's quasi-parallel bow shock resulting in the appearance of the long-suspected seed particle population. For our analysis, we use simultaneous multi-spacecraft measurements provided by the Cluster spacecraft ion (CIS), magnetic (FGM), and electric field and wave instrument (EFW) during a time period of large inter-spacecraft separation distance. The spacecraft were moving toward the bow shock and were situated in the foreshock region. The results show that the gyroresonance surfing acceleration takes place as a consequence of interaction between circularly polarized monochromatic (or quasi-monochromatic) transversal electromagnetic plasma waves and short large amplitude magnetic structures (SLAMSs). The magnetic mirror force of the SLAMS provides the resonant conditions for the ions trapped by the waves and results in the acceleration of ions. Since wave packets with circular polarization and different kinds of magnetic structures are very commonly observed in front of Earth's quasi-parallel bow shock, the gyroresonant surfing acceleration proves to be an important particle injection mechanism. We also show that seed ions are accelerated directly from the solar wind ion population.

  15. Shock-Resistibility of MEMS-Based Inertial Microswitch under Reverse Directional Ultra-High g Acceleration for IoT Applications

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qiu; Yang, Zhuoqing; Sun, Yunna; Lai, Liyan; Jin, Zhiyu; Ding, Guifu; Zhao, Xiaolin; Yao, Jinyuan; Wang, Jing

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a novel MEMS-based inertial microswitch design with multi-directional compact constraint structures for improving the shock-resistibility. Its shock-resistibility in the reverse-sensitive direction to ultra-high g acceleration (~hunderds of thousands) is simulated and analyzed. The dynamic response process indicates that in the designed inertial microswitch the proof mass weight G, the whole system’s stiffness k and the gap x2 between the proof mass and reverse constraint blocks have significant effect on the shock-resistibility. The MEMS inertial microswitch micro-fabricated by surface micromachining has been evaluated using the drop hammer test. The maximum allowable reverse acceleration, which does not cause the spurious trigger, is defined as the reverse acceleration threshold (athr). Test results show that athr increases with the decrease of the gap x2, and the proposed microswitch tends to have a better shock-resistibility under smaller gap. The measured responses of the microswitches with and without constraint structure indicates that the device without constraint structure is prone to spurious trigger, while the designed constraint structures can effectively improve the shock-resistibility. In this paper, the method for improving the shock-resistibility and reducing the spurious trigger has been discussed. PMID:28361893

  16. Shock-Resistibility of MEMS-Based Inertial Microswitch under Reverse Directional Ultra-High g Acceleration for IoT Applications.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qiu; Yang, Zhuoqing; Sun, Yunna; Lai, Liyan; Jin, Zhiyu; Ding, Guifu; Zhao, Xiaolin; Yao, Jinyuan; Wang, Jing

    2017-03-31

    This paper presents a novel MEMS-based inertial microswitch design with multi-directional compact constraint structures for improving the shock-resistibility. Its shock-resistibility in the reverse-sensitive direction to ultra-high g acceleration (~hunderds of thousands) is simulated and analyzed. The dynamic response process indicates that in the designed inertial microswitch the proof mass weight G, the whole system's stiffness k and the gap x2 between the proof mass and reverse constraint blocks have significant effect on the shock-resistibility. The MEMS inertial microswitch micro-fabricated by surface micromachining has been evaluated using the drop hammer test. The maximum allowable reverse acceleration, which does not cause the spurious trigger, is defined as the reverse acceleration threshold (athr). Test results show that athr increases with the decrease of the gap x2, and the proposed microswitch tends to have a better shock-resistibility under smaller gap. The measured responses of the microswitches with and without constraint structure indicates that the device without constraint structure is prone to spurious trigger, while the designed constraint structures can effectively improve the shock-resistibility. In this paper, the method for improving the shock-resistibility and reducing the spurious trigger has been discussed.

  17. O+ ion beams reflected below the Martian bow shock: MAVEN observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masunaga, K.; Seki, K.; Brain, D. A.; Fang, X.; Dong, Y.; Jakosky, B. M.; McFadden, J. P.; Halekas, J. S.; Connerney, J. E. P.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate a generation mechanism of O+ ion beams observed above the Martian bow shock by analyzing ion velocity distribution functions (VDFs) measured by the Suprathermal and Thermal Ion Composition instrument on the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) spacecraft. In the solar wind near Mars, MAVEN often observes energetic O+ ion beams (~10 keV or higher). Accompanied with the O+ ion beam events, we sometimes observe characteristic ion VDFs in the magnetosheath: a partial ring distribution. The partial ring distribution corresponds to pickup ions with a finite initial velocity (i.e., not newborn pickup ions), and its phase space density is much smaller than that of local pickup O+ ions of the magnetosheath. Thus, the partial ring distribution is most likely produced by the reflection of pickup O+ ions precipitating from the upstream solar wind below the bow shock. After being injected into the magnetosheath from the solar wind, the precipitating O+ ions are subject to the significantly enhanced magnetic field in this region and start to gyrate around the guiding center of the plasma frame in the magnetosheath. Consequently, a part of precipitating O+ ions are reflected back to the solar wind, generating O+ beams in the solar wind. The beams direct quasi-sunward near the subsolar region but have large angle with respect to the sunward direction at high solar zenith angles (>50°). The reflected O+ beams are accelerated by the convection electric field of the solar wind and may escape Mars.

  18. Enhancement in wafer bow of free-standing GaN substrates due to high-dose hydrogen implantation: implications for GaN layer transfer applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, R.; Radu, I.; Bruederl, G.; Eichler, C.; Haerle, V.; Gösele, U.; Christiansen, S. H.

    2007-04-01

    Two-inch free-standing GaN wafers were implanted by 100 keV H+2 ions with a dose of 1.3 × 1017 cm-2 at room temperature. The hydrogen implantation induced damage in GaN extends between 230 to 500 nm from the surface as measured by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM). The wafer bow of the free-standing GaN wafers was measured using a Tencor long range profilometer on a scan length of 48 mm before and after the hydrogen implantation. Before implantation the bow of two different free-standing GaN wafers (named A and B) with different thicknesses was 1.5 µm and 6 µm, respectively. Initially, both wafers were concave in shape. After implantation the bow changed to convex with a value of 36 µm for wafer A and a value of 32 µm for wafer B. High dose hydrogen implantation leads to an in-plane compressive stress in the top damaged layer of the GaN, which is responsible for the enhancement of wafer bow and change of bow direction. The high value of bow after implantation hinders the direct wafer bonding of the free-standing GaN wafers to sapphire or any other handle wafers. Tight bonding between hydrogen implanted GaN wafers and the handle wafers is a necessary requirement for the successful layer transfer of thin GaN layers onto other substrates based on wafer bonding and layer splitting (Smart-cut).

  19. Location Estimation of the Bow Shock and Theta angle (B, n) cuasiperpendicular magnetospheric, using data from 14 different events crossings shock recorded by THEMIS-C.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amazo-Gomez, Eliana; Alvarado-Gomez, Julian David; Calvo Mozo, Benjamin

    In this Work we calculated the average position of the bow shock, through the eigenvalues ​​and corresponding eigenvectors of the covariance matrix for the magnetic field developed from 10 different crosses shock events recorded by THEMIS A, during the years 2009 and 2010. With data obtained from previous calibration and the propagation direction of the magnetic field of the plasma is able to find the interaction quasi perpendicular angle Theta (B,n) which depends on the direction normal shock and the direction of incidence of field magnetic plasma. The importance of this type of analysis is that the understanding of the phenomenology of the bow shock, which is vital for the characterization of processes such as magnetic reconnection between magnetospheric lines terrestrial and interplanetary field lines carrying a large contribution from the Sun apparently lines will also be important for the description of how to enter the plasma charged particles from impacting the bow shock to the internal field lines to these particles subsequently lead to the Earth's atmosphere, these initially enter through the polar region (Polar Cusp) and then disseminated depending on the conditions of the plasma into the Earth's atmosphere , and parameters such as the position of the bow shock, this variation and interaction angle Theta (B,n) are basic to reach a minimal representation of the phenomenon. In events of great magnitude can have undesirable effects on satellites, power lines, communications and air travel, the latter is the interest on discrimination of some parameters of the phenomenon presented in this work. The study of the Bow shock, bow shock and Magnetospheric has as its starting point a detailed description of Earth's magnetosphere and solar wind phenomena must be understood independently initially and then trying to relate in terms of their interaction and communion in their respective limits, parameters such as the balance between dynamic and magnetic pressure

  20. Maskless direct laser writing with visible light: Breaking through the optical resolving limit with cooperative manipulations of nonlinear reverse saturation absorption and thermal diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Jingsong; Wang, Rui

    2014-03-28

    In this work, the resolving limit of maskless direct laser writing is overcome by cooperative manipulation from nonlinear reverse saturation absorption and thermal diffusion, where the nonlinear reverse saturation absorption can induce the formation of below diffraction-limited energy absorption spot, and the thermal diffusion manipulation can make the heat quantity at the central region of energy absorption spot propagate along the thin film thickness direction. The temperature at the central region of energy absorption spot transiently reaches up to melting point and realizes nanolithography. The sample “glass substrate/AgInSbTe” is prepared, where AgInSbTe is taken as nonlinear reverse saturation absorption thin film. The below diffraction-limited energy absorption spot is simulated theoretically and verified experimentally by near-field spot scanning method. The “glass substrate/Al/AgInSbTe” sample is prepared, where the Al is used as thermal conductive layer to manipulate the thermal diffusion channel because the thermal diffusivity coefficient of Al is much larger than that of AgInSbTe. The direct laser writing is conducted by a setup with a laser wavelength of 650 nm and a converging lens of NA=0.85, the lithographic marks with a size of about 100 nm are obtained, and the size is only about 1/10 the incident focused spot. The experimental results indicate that the cooperative manipulation from nonlinear reverse saturation absorption and thermal diffusion is a good method to realize nanolithography in maskless direct laser writing with visible light.

  1. Analytic MHD Theory for Earth's Bow Shock at Low Mach Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grabbe, Crockett L.; Cairns, Iver H.

    1995-01-01

    A previous MHD theory for the density jump at the Earth's bow shock, which assumed the Alfven M(A) and sonic M(s) Mach numbers are both much greater than 1, is reanalyzed and generalized. It is shown that the MHD jump equation can be analytically solved much more directly using perturbation theory, with the ordering determined by M(A) and M(s), and that the first-order perturbation solution is identical to the solution found in the earlier theory. The second-order perturbation solution is calculated, whereas the earlier approach cannot be used to obtain it. The second-order terms generally are important over most of the range of M(A) and M(s) in the solar wind when the angle theta between the normal to the bow shock and magnetic field is not close to 0 deg or 180 deg (the solutions are symmetric about 90 deg). This new perturbation solution is generally accurate under most solar wind conditions at 1 AU, with the exception of low Mach numbers when theta is close to 90 deg. In this exceptional case the new solution does not improve on the first-order solutions obtained earlier, and the predicted density ratio can vary by 10-20% from the exact numerical MHD solutions. For theta approx. = 90 deg another perturbation solution is derived that predicts the density ratio much more accurately. This second solution is typically accurate for quasi-perpendicular conditions. Taken together, these two analytical solutions are generally accurate for the Earth's bow shock, except in the rare circumstance that M(A) is less than or = 2. MHD and gasdynamic simulations have produced empirical models in which the shock's standoff distance a(s) is linearly related to the density jump ratio X at the subsolar point. Using an empirical relationship between a(s) and X obtained from MHD simulations, a(s) values predicted using the MHD solutions for X are compared with the predictions of phenomenological models commonly used for modeling observational data, and with the predictions of a

  2. First simultaneous measurements of waves generated at the bow shock in the solar wind, the magnetosphere and on the ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clausen, L. B. N.; Yeoman, T. K.; Fear, R. C.; Behlke, R.; Lucek, E. A.; Engebretson, M. J.

    2009-01-01

    On 5 September 2002 the Geotail satellite observed the cone angle of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) change to values below 30° during a 56 min interval between 18:14 and 19:10 UT. This triggered the generation of upstream waves at the bow shock, 13 RE downstream of the position of Geotail. Upstream generated waves were subsequently observed by Geotail between 18:30 and 18:48 UT, during times the IMF cone angle dropped below values of 10°. At 18:24 UT all four Cluster satellites simultaneously observed a sudden increase in wave power in all three magnetic field components, independent of their position in the dayside magnetosphere. We show that the 10 min delay between the change in IMF direction as observed by Geotail and the increase in wave power observed by Cluster is consistent with the propagation of the IMF change from the Geotail position to the bow shock and the propagation of the generated waves through the bow shock, magnetosheath and magnetosphere towards the position of the Cluster satellites. We go on to show that the wave power recorded by the Cluster satellites in the component containing the poloidal and compressional pulsations was broadband and unstructured; the power in the component containing toroidal oscillations was structured and shows the existence of multi-harmonic Alfvénic continuum waves on field lines. Model predictions of these frequencies fit well with the observations. An increase in wave power associated with the change in IMF direction was also registered by ground based magnetometers which were magnetically conjunct with the Cluster satellites during the event. To the best of our knowledge we present the first simultaneous observations of waves created by backstreaming ions at the bow shock in the solar wind, the dayside magnetosphere and on the ground.

  3. ApoE-directed therapeutics rapidly clear β-amyloid and reverse deficits in AD mouse models.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Paige E; Cirrito, John R; Wesson, Daniel W; Lee, C Y Daniel; Karlo, J Colleen; Zinn, Adriana E; Casali, Brad T; Restivo, Jessica L; Goebel, Whitney D; James, Michael J; Brunden, Kurt R; Wilson, Donald A; Landreth, Gary E

    2012-03-23

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is associated with impaired clearance of β-amyloid (Aβ) from the brain, a process normally facilitated by apolipoprotein E (apoE). ApoE expression is transcriptionally induced through the action of the nuclear receptors peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma and liver X receptors in coordination with retinoid X receptors (RXRs). Oral administration of the RXR agonist bexarotene to a mouse model of AD resulted in enhanced clearance of soluble Aβ within hours in an apoE-dependent manner. Aβ plaque area was reduced more than 50% within just 72 hours. Furthermore, bexarotene stimulated the rapid reversal of cognitive, social, and olfactory deficits and improved neural circuit function. Thus, RXR activation stimulates physiological Aβ clearance mechanisms, resulting in the rapid reversal of a broad range of Aβ-induced deficits.

  4. Directly observed reversible shape changes and hemoglobin stratification during centrifugation of human and Amphiuma red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Joseph F; Inoué, Shinya

    2006-02-21

    This paper describes changes that occur in human and Amphiuma red blood cells observed during centrifugation with a special microscope. Dilute suspensions of cells were layered, in a centrifuge chamber, above an osmotically matched dense solution, containing Nycodenz, Ficoll, or Percoll (Pharmacia) that formed a density gradient that allowed the cells to slowly settle to an equilibrium position. Biconcave human red blood cells moved downward at low forces with minimum wobble. The cells oriented vertically when the force field was increased and Hb sedimented as the lower part of each cell became bulged and assumed a "bag-like" shape. The upper centripetal portion of the cell became thinner and remained biconcave. These changes occurred rapidly and were completely reversible upon lowering the centrifugal force. Bag-shaped cells, upon touching red cells in rouleau, immediately reverted to biconcave disks as they flipped onto a stack. Amphiuma red cells displayed a different type of reversible stratification and deformation at high force fields. Here the cells became stretched, with the nucleus now moving centrifugally, the Hb moving centripetally, and the bottom of the cells becoming thinner and clear. Nevertheless, the distribution of the marginal bands at the cells' rim was unchanged. We conclude that centrifugation, per se, while changing a red cell's shape and the distribution of its intracellular constituents, does so in a completely reversible manner. Centrifugation of red cells harboring altered or missing structural elements could provide information on shape determinants that are still unexplained.

  5. Reversible near-infrared light directed reflection in a self-organized helical superstructure loaded with upconversion nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ling; Dong, Hao; Li, Yannian; Xue, Chenming; Sun, Ling-Dong; Yan, Chun-Hua; Li, Quan

    2014-03-26

    Adding external, dynamic control to self-organized superstructures with desired functionalities is an important leap necessary in leveraging the fascinating molecular systems for applications. Here, the new light-driven chiral molecular switch and upconversion nanoparticles, doped in a liquid crystal media, were able to self-organize into an optically tunable helical superstructure. The resulting nanoparticle impregnated helical superstructure was found to exhibit unprecedented reversible near-infrared (NIR) light-guided tunable behavior only by modulating the excitation power density of a continuous-wave NIR laser (980 nm). Upon irradiation by the NIR laser at the high power density, the reflection wavelength of the photonic superstructure red-shifted, whereas its reverse process occurred upon irradiation by the same laser but with the lower power density. Furthermore, reversible dynamic NIR-light-driven red, green, and blue reflections in a single thin film, achieved only by varying the power density of the NIR light, were for the first time demonstrated.

  6. Hot, diamagnetic cavities upstream from the earth's bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomsen, M. F.; Gosling, J. T.; Fuselier, S. A.; Bame, S. J.; Russell, C. T.

    1986-01-01

    On eight occasions the ISEE 1 and 2 spacecraft registered peculiar plasma structures upstream of the earth's bow shock. The events exhibit a temporary, strong reduction in the magnitude of the magnetic field and strong enhancements of the field strength bordering the reduction zone. The low field strength regions featured temperatures from 1-10 million k and pressure an order of magnitude greater than the solar wind. The pressure gradients exceeded the magnetic tension around the structures, although the field of the cavities may be a closed structure. A model is proposed of hot, expanding diamagnetic plasma cavities with scales on the order of a few earth radii. Speculations on the interaction and origin or impetus for the cavities within the bow shock, foreshock, the magnetosphere and the solar wind are discussed. Similarities between the phenomena detected and signatures obtained with the AMPTE releases of chemicals in the solar wind are noted.

  7. Magnetohydrodynamic and gasdynamic theories for planetary bow waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spreiter, J. R.; Stahara, S. S.

    1983-01-01

    A bow wave was previously observed in the solar wind upstream of each of the first six planets. The observed properties of these bow waves and the associated plasma flows are outlined, and those features identified that can be described by a continuum magnetohydrodynamic flow theory. An account of the fundamental concepts and current status of the magnetohydrodynamic and gas dynamic theories for solar wind flow past planetary bodies is provided. This includes a critical examination of: (1) the fundamental assumptions of the theories; (2) the various simplifying approximations introduced to obtain tractable mathematical problems; (3) the limitations they impose on the results; and (4) the relationship between the results of the simpler gas dynamic-frozen field theory and the more accurate but less completely worked out magnetohydrodynamic theory. Representative results of the various theories are presented and compared.

  8. MESSENGER Observations of Mercury's Bow Shock and Magnetopause

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, James A.; Boardsen, S. A.; Sarantos, M.; Acuna, M. H.; Anderson, B. J.; Baker, D. N.; Benna, M.; Gloeckler, G.; Gold, R. E.; Ho, G. C.; Korth, H.; Krimigis, S. M.; Livi, S. A.; McNutt, R. L., Jr.; Raines, J. M.; Schriver, D.; Solomon, S. C.; Travnicek, P.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2008-01-01

    MESSENGER'S 14 January 2008 encounter with Mercury will provide the first new observations of the solar wind interaction with this planet since the Mariner 10 flybys that took place over 30 years ago. The closest approach distance for this first MESSENGER flyby is targeted for an altitude of 200 km as compared with the 707 km and 327 km attained by Mariner 10 on 29 March 1974 and 16 March 1975, respectively. The locations of the bow shock and magnetopause boundaries observed by MESSENGER will be examined and compared against those found in the earlier Mariner 10 measurements and the predictions of theoretical models and numerical simulations. The structure of the magnetopause will be investigated for the presence of flux transfer events or other evidence of magnetic reconnection as will the more general implications of these new MESSENGER bow shock and magnetopause observations for the global solar wind interaction with Mercury.

  9. Technical Note: Measurement of bow tie profiles in CT scanners using radiochromic film

    PubMed Central

    Whiting, Bruce R.; Dohatcu, Andreea C.; Evans, Joshua D.; Politte, David G.; Williamson, Jeffrey F.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a noninvasive technique to measure the intensity profile of the fan beam in a computed tomography (CT) scanner that is cost effective and easily implemented without the need to access proprietary scanner information or service modes. Methods: The fabrication of an inexpensive aperture is described, which is used to expose radiochromic film in a rotating CT gantry. A series of exposures is made, each of which is digitized on a personal computer document scanner, and the resulting data set is analyzed to produce a self-consistent calibration of relative radiation exposure. The bow tie profiles were analyzed to determine the precision of the process and were compared to two other measurement techniques, direct measurements from CT gantry detectors and a dynamic dosimeter. Results: The radiochromic film method presented here can measure radiation exposures with a precision of ∼6% root-mean-square relative error. The intensity profiles have a maximum 25% root-mean-square relative error compared with existing techniques. Conclusions: The proposed radiochromic film method for measuring bow tie profiles is an inexpensive (∼$100 USD + film costs), noninvasive method to measure the fan beam intensity profile in CT scanners. PMID:26127044

  10. Technical Note: Measurement of bow tie profiles in CT scanners using radiochromic film

    SciTech Connect

    Whiting, Bruce R.; Dohatcu, Andreea C.; Evans, Joshua D.; Williamson, Jeffrey F.; Politte, David G.

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To provide a noninvasive technique to measure the intensity profile of the fan beam in a computed tomography (CT) scanner that is cost effective and easily implemented without the need to access proprietary scanner information or service modes. Methods: The fabrication of an inexpensive aperture is described, which is used to expose radiochromic film in a rotating CT gantry. A series of exposures is made, each of which is digitized on a personal computer document scanner, and the resulting data set is analyzed to produce a self-consistent calibration of relative radiation exposure. The bow tie profiles were analyzed to determine the precision of the process and were compared to two other measurement techniques, direct measurements from CT gantry detectors and a dynamic dosimeter. Results: The radiochromic film method presented here can measure radiation exposures with a precision of ∼6% root-mean-square relative error. The intensity profiles have a maximum 25% root-mean-square relative error compared with existing techniques. Conclusions: The proposed radiochromic film method for measuring bow tie profiles is an inexpensive (∼$100 USD + film costs), noninvasive method to measure the fan beam intensity profile in CT scanners.

  11. Bow-corridor local integrated resource plan: Draft plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This plan presents the Government of Alberta's resource management policy for public lands and resources within the Bow Corridor. Resource potentials and opportunities for development are identified to assist in the economic progress of the province. The plan includes identification of its purpose and scope and the context in which it is presented; and resource management objectives and guidelines for ecological and aesthetic resources, fisheries, forests, historical resources, minerals, range land, settlement, tourism/recreation, water and watersheds and wildlife.

  12. Cold ions at the Martian bow shock - PHOBOS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubinin, E.; Lundin, R.; Koskinen, H.; Norberg, O.

    1993-04-01

    Measurements carried out by the plasma spectrometer ASPERA aboard the Phobos 2 spacecraft show that the Martian bow shock is characterized by a sudden increase of ionization of the neutral corona. It acts as a source of new ions that can strongly modify the process of ion heating behind the shock front. The loss of momentum of solar wind protons due to their interaction with exospheric ions may lead to an increase in the effective scale of the obstacle.

  13. Mercury's magnetopause and bow shock from MESSENGER Magnetometer observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winslow, Reka M.; Anderson, Brian J.; Johnson, Catherine L.; Slavin, James A.; Korth, Haje; Purucker, Michael E.; Baker, Daniel N.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2013-05-01

    We have established the average shape and location of Mercury's magnetopause and bow shock from orbital observations by the MESSENGER Magnetometer. We fit empirical models to midpoints of boundary crossings and probability density maps of the magnetopause and bow shock positions. The magnetopause was fit by a surface for which the position R from the planetary dipole varies as [1 + cos(θ)]-α, where θ is the angle between R and the dipole-Sun line, the subsolar standoff distance Rss is 1.45 RM (where RM is Mercury's radius), and the flaring parameter α = 0.5. The average magnetopause shape and location were determined under a mean solar wind ram pressure PRam of 14.3 nPa. The best fit bow shock shape established under an average Alfvén Mach number (MA) of 6.6 is described by a hyperboloid having Rss = 1.96 RM and an eccentricity of 1.02. These boundaries move as PRam and MA vary, but their shapes remain unchanged. The magnetopause Rss varies from 1.55 to 1.35 RM for PRam in the range of 8.8-21.6 nPa. The bow shock Rss varies from 2.29 to 1.89 RM for MA in the range of 4.12-11.8. The boundaries are well approximated by figures of revolution. Additional quantifiable effects of the interplanetary magnetic field are masked by the large dynamic variability of these boundaries. The magnetotail surface is nearly cylindrical, with a radius of ~2.7 RM at a distance of 3 RM downstream of Mercury. By comparison, Earth's magnetotail flaring continues until a downstream distance of ~10 Rss.

  14. Bow shocks and magnetotails of Venus and Mars - A comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.; Ong, M.; Luhmann, J. G.; Schwingenschuh, K.; Riedler, W.; Eroshenko, E.

    1992-01-01

    Observations of the bow shock location and the structure of the magnetotail of Mars by the Phobos spacecraft and of Venus by the Pioneer Venus Orbiter reveal the solar wind interactions with these two planets to be quite similar. The subsolar bow shocks of both Venus and Mars lie at 1.47 planetary radii while at the terminator they are at 2.40 and 2.65 planetary radii, respectively. Both bow shocks have oval cross sections when viewed from the sun whose major axes are controlled by the orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field. The tail lobes of both planets are similarly controlled by the IMF orientation. The strength of the solar/antisolar component of the magnetic field is 17 nT at Venus and 14 nT at Mars. The component perpendicular to the tail axis is about 1/2 the corresponding IMF component at Venus and 2 times this component at Mars. However, when these measurements are compared in terms of the distance down the tail at which each were taken, the data from the two planets are quite consistent. Hence both Venus and Mars have principally induced magnetospheres and magnetotails which stand off the solar wind flow.

  15. Diffusive shock acceleration - comparison of a unified shock model to bow shock observations

    SciTech Connect

    Ellison, D.C.; Moebius, E.

    1987-07-01

    A comparison is made between recent AMPTE/IRM observations of diffuse ions detected upstream of the earth's bow shock when the interplanetary magnetic field was nearly parallel to the solar wind direction and a known collisionless quasi-parallel shock model. These observations, which provide the proton spectrum for all of velocity space, give a direct measure of the shock acceleration efficiency and show how thermal solar winds are injected into the diffusive shock acceleration mechanism. The model accurately describes the proton spectrum; moreover, it predicts the shock structure, the complete particle spectrum, the relative velocity distributions of different ion species in the down stream region, and the enhancement of heavy ions over protons relative to the unshocked solar wind. 68 references.

  16. Method for measuring violin sound radiation based on bowed glissandi and its application to sound synthesis.

    PubMed

    Perez Carrillo, Alfonso; Bonada, Jordi; Patynen, Jukka; Valimaki, Vesa

    2011-08-01

    This work presents a method for measuring and computing violin-body directional frequency responses, which are used for violin sound synthesis. The approach is based on a frame-weighted deconvolution of excitation and response signals. The excitation, consisting of bowed glissandi, is measured with piezoelectric transducers built into the bridge. Radiation responses are recorded in an anechoic chamber with multiple microphones placed at different angles around the violin. The proposed deconvolution algorithm computes impulse responses that, when convolved with any source signal (captured with the same transducer), produce a highly realistic violin sound very similar to that of a microphone recording. The use of motion sensors allows for tracking violin movements. Combining this information with the directional responses and using a dynamic convolution algorithm, helps to improve the listening experience by incorporating the violinist motion effect in stereo.

  17. Diffusive shock acceleration - Comparison of a unified shock model to bow shock observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellison, Donald C.; Moebius, Eberhard

    1987-01-01

    A comparison is made between recent AMPTE/IRM observations of diffuse ions detected upstream of the earth's bow shock when the interplanetary magnetic field was nearly parallel to the solar wind direction and a known collisionless quasi-parallel shock model. These observations, which provide the proton spectrum for all of velocity space, give a direct measure of the shock acceleration efficiency and show how thermal solar winds are injected into the diffusive shock acceleration mechanism. The model accurately describes the proton spectrum; moreover, it predicts the shock structure, the complete particle spectrum, the relative velocity distributions of different ion species in the down stream region, and the enhancement of heavy ions over protons relative to the unshocked solar wind.

  18. Investigation on Ring/Split-Ring Loaded Bow-Tie Antenna for Compactness and Notched-Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Lin; Xie, Ji-yang; Jiang, Xing; Li, Si-min

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, a Bow-tie antenna with size reduction, impedance matching and radiation pattern improvement characteristics is designed with an encircling ring. Moreover, further size reduction is achieved by utilizing two symmetric split rings with more frequency tuning flexibility. Research found the ring loaded Bow-tie antenna (RLBA) shows better performance than the referenced Bow-tie antenna (RBA), and the mechanisms of performance improvements are also investigated and found to be the loading ring acts as two symmetric dipoles in the direction of the antenna's polarization. Then, using two symmetric split rings on the opposite side of the substrate as replacement of the encircling ring will prolong the length of the dipoles, and achieves further size reduction. The antenna is denoted as dual split ring loaded Bow-tie antenna (DSRBA). The low cutoff frequencies of RBA, RLBA and DSRBA with identical antenna size are 2.65 GHz, 2.27 GHz and 2.06 GHz, respectively. Then, the corresponding diameters of the antennas are 0.353 λc, 0.303 λc, and 0.275 λc, where λc are their corresponding wavelength of the lower cutoff frequencies. Furthermore, a notched-band is generated as a byproduct of the split rings, and it is owing to the new resonance of the overlap areas of the split rings. The notch can be used to alleviate interference of WiMAX band by carefully choosing the split rings' size. Radiation patterns of RLBA and DSRBA are also improved as current distributions of the high frequencies are trained in order by the ring/split-rings. Measurements are performed to verify the designs.

  19. Similarities and Differences between the Termination Foreshock/ Bow Shock and Planetary Bow Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krimigis, S. M.; Decker, R. B.; Roelof, E. C.; Hill, M. E.

    2006-05-01

    It is now evident that Voyager 1 (V1) entered the termination foreshock (TFS) at ~~85 AU in mid-2002, exited this region in early 2003 and re-entered in the late 2003-early 2004 time frame, before finally crossing the termination shock (TS) at ~~94 AU on December 16, 2004. The TFS region is characterized by large intensities of tangentially outward-moving beams of energetic ions E > 40 keV, and generally isotropic electron intensity increases E > 350 keV (Krimigis et al, 2003; Decker et al, 2005). Elevated magnetic field intensities were observed throughout these periods (Burlaga et al, 2003, 2005) and comparison with particle pressures showed this region to be a high-beta plasma (Krimigis et al, 2004, 2005). Proximity of the TS was also evident from occasional electron plasma oscillations seen as early as 91 AU (Gurnett and Kurth, 2005). In this paper we examine the extent to which the TFS and TS exhibit properties seen in planetary bow shocks using data from Voyager?s flyby of the outer planets and Cassini data in the vicinity of Saturn. Magnetic field distributions in these high-beta regions appear to be Gaussian. A possible source for the TSF particles is the supertherma1 population residing in the heliosheath, similar to upstream ions observed leaking from planetary magnetospheres. Krimigis, S.M. et al, Nature, 426, pg 45-48, 2003. Decker, R. B. et al, Science, 309, 2020- 2024, 2005. Burlaga et al, Geophys. Res. Lett., 30, NO. 20, 2072, doi:10.1029/2003GL018291, 2003. Burlaga, L. F, et al, Science, 309, 2027-2029, 2005 Krimigis S. M., et al, V. Florinski, N. V. Pogorelov, and G. P. Zank (eds) CP719, American Institute of Physics, 0-7354-0199-3/04, 133-138, 2004. Krimigis, S. M., et al, Proceedings of the Solar Wind 11 / SOHO 16 Conference,12-17 June 2005, Whistler, Canada, , B. Fleck & T.H. Zurbuchen (eds), (ESA SP-592, September 2005) Gurnett, D. A., and W. S. Kurth, Science, 309, 2025- 2027, 2005

  20. Dependence of sound characteristics on the bowing position in a violin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roh, YuJi; Kim, Young H.

    2014-12-01

    A quantitative analysis of violin sounds produced for different bowing positions over the full length of a violin string has been carried out. An automated bowing machine was employed in order to keep the bowing parameters constant. A 3-dimensional profile of the frequency spectrum was introduced in order to characterize the violin's sound. We found that the fundamental frequency did not change for different bowing positions, whereas the frequencies of the higher harmonics were different. Bowing the string at 30 mm from the bridge produced musical sounds. The middle of the string was confirmed to be a dead zone, as reported in previous works. In addition, the quarter position was also found to be a dead zone. Bowing the string 90 mm from the bridge dominantly produces a fundamental frequency of 864 Hz and its harmonics.

  1. [Bow legged adjectives in ancient literature].

    PubMed

    Simon, Frantisek; Steger, Florian

    2011-01-01

    This article addresses the issue of capturing the medical entity called 'curved legs' in a terminologically exact way. In so doing, it refers to the long-lasting process of differentiation of exact nuances of meaning in Ancient Greek and Latin. In the chronological perusal of ancient Greek literature, it becomes evident that the various adjectives employed are often vague when looking at non-medical literature. By contrast, in the Hippocratic corpus these terms are for the first time annotated with explanations intended to lead to a more precise understanding of the described deformity. Further attempts of differentiation can be found in the writings of Galen, who not only distinguishes between outward and inward curvatures, but also between deformities of the thigh and lower leg as well as between pathological and natural curvatures. Latin literature also provides a series of adjectives that were initially often used in the meaning of 'curved' but it was not until Celsus that these were differentiated with respect to the type and direction of the curvature. When comparing Greek and Latin adjectives, it turns out that though the Latin term blaesus can be traced back etymologically to the Greek word beta lambda alpha iota sigma ó zeta, the meaning of beta lambda alpha iota sigma ó zeta does not fully correspond to that of the Latin word. It is not before the later common transliteration of Greek words that this adjective took on the meaning of beta lambda alpha iota sigma ó zeta; however, this was finally lost again. In summary, the article concludes that exact word meanings in ancient literature are often unclear and precise ascriptions of meanings are inconsistent. In the case of "curved legs," this has led to misunderstandings regarding the respective types and directions of the curvature.

  2. Sequential Polarity-Reversing Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labaw, Clayton C.

    1994-01-01

    Proposed circuit reverses polarity of electric power supplied to bidirectional dc motor, reversible electro-mechanical actuator, or other device operating in direction depending on polarity. Circuit reverses polarity each time power turned on, without need for additional polarity-reversing or direction signals and circuitry to process them.

  3. Validation and scopolamine-reversal of latent learning in the water maze utilizing a revised direct platform placement procedure.

    PubMed

    Malin, David H; Schaar, Krystal L; Izygon, Jonathan J; Nghiem, Duyen M; Jabitta, Sikirat Y; Henceroth, Mallori M; Chang, Yu-Hsuan; Daggett, Jenny M; Ward, Christopher P

    2015-08-01

    The Morris water maze is routinely used to explore neurobiological mechanisms of working memory. Humans can often acquire working memory relevant to performing a task by mere sensory observation, without having to actually perform the task followed by reinforcement. This can be modeled in the water maze through direct placement of a rat on the escape platform so that it can observe the location, and then assessing the subject's performance in swimming back to the platform. However, direct placement procedures have hardly been studied for two decades, reflecting a controversy about whether direct placement resulted in sufficiently rapid and direct swims back to the platform. In the present study, utilizing revised training methods, a more comprehensive measure of trajectory directness, a more rigorous sham-trained control procedure and an optimal placement-test interval, rats swam almost directly back to the platform in under 4s, significantly more quickly and directly than sham-trained subjects. Muscarinic cholinergic mechanisms, which are inactivated by scopolamine, are essential to memory for standard learning paradigms in the water maze. This experiment determined whether this would also be true for latent learning. ANOVA revealed significant negative effects of scopolamine on both speed and accuracy of trajectory, as well as significant positive effects of direct placement training vs. sham-training. In a probe trial, placement-trained animals without scopolamine spent significantly more time and path length in the target quadrant than trained rats with scopolamine and sham-trained rats without scopolamine. Scopolamine impairments are likely due to effects on memory, since the same dose had little effect on performance with a visible platform. The revised direct placement model offers a means of further comparing the neural mechanisms of latent learning with those of standard instrumental learning.

  4. Direction reversal of the optical spin torque on a Rayleigh absorptive sphere in vector Bessel polarized beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ruiping; Li, Renxian; Qin, Shitong; Ding, Chunying; Mitri, F. G.

    2017-02-01

    The effect of polarization on the optical spin torque (OST) exerted on an absorptive Rayleigh dielectric sphere by a vector Bessel beam is investigated using the dipole approximation method, with particular emphasis on the polarization of the plane wave component forming the beam. On the basis of the mathematical descriptions for the electric fields, which are derived using the angular spectrum decomposition method in plane waves, analytical formulas of the OST are established. The OSTs are numerically calculated, and the effects of polarization, beam-order, and half-cone angle are discussed in detail. Numerical results show that by choosing an appropriate polarization, order and half-cone angle, the transverse OST will manifest vortex-like behaviors, and the sphere will experience negative axial OSTs, i.e. OST sign reversal. Important applications in particle manipulation, rotation and handling using optical Bessel polarized beams would benefit from the results of the present investigation.

  5. Direct observation of magnetic phase coexistance and magnetization reversal in a Gd0.67Ca0.33MnO3 thin film

    SciTech Connect

    Kim J.; Nazaretski E.; Haberkorn, N.; Civale, L.; Dowden, P.; Saxena, A.; Thompson, J.D. & Movshovich, R.

    2012-01-11

    We have investigated the ferrimagnetic domain structure in a Gd{sub 0.67}Ca{sub 0.33}MnO{sub 3} thin film using magnetic force microscopy. We observe clear signs of phase separation, with magnetic islands embedded in a non-magnetic matrix. We also directly visualize the reversal of magnetization of ferrimagnetic domains as a function of temperature and attribute it to a change in the balance of magnetization of anti-aligned Mn and Gd sublattices.

  6. Utilization of the heat of catalytic combustion of low-calorie gaseous fuel mixtures by reversing the direction of their input

    SciTech Connect

    Boreskov, G.K.; Ivanov, A.G.; Matros, Y.S.

    1986-05-01

    In the recovery and processing of various industrial raw materials, gas-air mixtures are formed which contain small quantities of carbon monoxide, methane, and other combustible substances. This paper proposes and discusses a method of obtaining high-level heat from these low concentration gases. A nonsteady-state method is proposed in which the reaction mixture is fed at low temperature into a reactor and onto an initially warmed-up stationary catalyst bed; the direction of the feed is periodically reversed. This process forms a slowly migrating front of an exothermic chemical reaction in the bed.

  7. Pseudomorphic GeSn/Ge(001) quantum wells: Examining indirect band gap bowing

    SciTech Connect

    Tonkikh, Alexander A.; Eisenschmidt, Christian; Schmidt, Georg; Talalaev, Vadim G.; Zakharov, Nikolay D.; Werner, Peter; Schilling, Joerg

    2013-07-15

    A study of the bandgap character of compressively strained GeSn{sub 0.060-0.091}/Ge(001) quantum wells grown by molecular beam epitaxy is reported. The built-in strain in GeSn wells leads to an increased separation between L and {Gamma} conduction band minima. The prevalent indirect interband transitions in GeSn were probed by photoluminescence spectroscopy. As a result we could simulate the L-valley bowing parameter in GeSn alloys, b{sub L} = 0.80 {+-} 0.06 eV at 10 K. From this we conclude that even compressively strained GeSn/Ge(001) alloys could become direct band gap semiconductors at the Sn-fraction higher than 17.0 at. %.

  8. Discovery Of An Infrared Bow Shock Associated With Delta Cephei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remage Evans, Nancy; Marengo, M.; Barmby, P.; Matthews, L. D.; Bono, G.; Welch, D. L.; Romaniello, M.; Huelsman, D.; Su, K. Y. L.; Fazio, G.

    2010-05-01

    We have obtained Spitzer Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) and Multiband Infrared Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS) observations of a sample of classical Cepheids both to derive infrared Leavitt Laws (Period-Luminosity Relations) and to look for evidence of mass loss in the spectral energy distributions. The MIPS 24 and 70 micron images of Delta Cep were particularly striking, since they show an arc of emission offset about an arcmin from Delta Cep. The emission is shaped like a bow shock and is aligned with the space motion of the Cepheid, implying it is physically related to the star. Bow shock structures of this kind can be formed when ram pressure of the ambient ISM balances the wind from a mass-losing star, raising the intriguing possibility that delta Cep is undergoing mass-loss during the Cepheid phase. Circumstellar emission is not a general feature of our Cepheid observations, but 2 unusual circumstances may make it visible around Delta Cep. If the Cepheid was already surrounded by interstellar matter, mass loss from the star could have created the bow shock. Second, Delta Cep has a physical companion 40" to the South, HD 213317, itself a binary. This B7-8 III-IV star is hot enough that it may produce infrared emission by heating dust within the ejected material. This work is based on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under NASA contract 1407. P. B. and D. W. both acknowledge research support through Discovery Grants from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada. N. R. E. acknowledges support from the Chandra X-Ray Center grant NAS8-03060.

  9. Site-directed mutagenesis of α-L-rhamnosidase from Alternaria sp. L1 to enhance synthesis yield of reverse hydrolysis based on rational design.

    PubMed

    Xu, Li; Liu, Xiaohong; Yin, Zhenhao; Liu, Qian; Lu, Lili; Xiao, Min

    2016-12-01

    The α-L-rhamnosidase catalyzes the hydrolytic release of rhamnose from polysaccharides and glycosides and is widely used due to its applications in a variety of industrial processes. Our previous work reported that a wild-type α-L-rhamnosidase (RhaL1) from Alternaria sp. L1 could synthesize rhamnose-containing chemicals (RCCs) though reverse hydrolysis reaction with inexpensive rhamnose as glycosyl donor. To enhance the yield of reverse hydrolysis reaction and to determine the amino acid residues essential for the catalytic activity of RhaL1, site-directed mutagenesis of 11 residues was performed in this study. Through rationally designed mutations, the critical amino acid residues which may form direct or solvent-mediated hydrogen bonds with donor rhamnose (Asp(252), Asp(257), Asp(264), Glu(530), Arg(548), His(553), and Trp(555)) and may form the hydrophobic pocket in stabilizing donor (Trp(261), Tyr(302), Tyr(316), and Trp(369)) in active-site of RhaL1 were analyzed, and three positive mutants (W261Y, Y302F, and Y316F) with improved product yield stood out. From the three positive variants, mutant W261Y accelerated the reverse hydrolysis with a prominent increase (43.7 %) in relative yield compared to the wild-type enzyme. Based on the 3D structural modeling, we supposed that the improved yield of mutant W261Y is due to the adjustment of the spatial position of the putative catalytic acid residue Asp(257). Mutant W261Y also exhibited a shift in the pH-activity profile in hydrolysis reaction, indicating that introducing of a polar residue in the active site cavity may affect the catalysis behavior of the enzyme.

  10. Collision-induced photon echo at the transition 0{r_reversible}1 in ytterbium vapor: Direct proof of depolarizing collision anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Rubtsova, N. N.; Gol'dort, V. G.; Ishchenko, V. N.; Khvorostov, E. B.; Kochubei, S. A.; Reshetov, V. A.; Yevseyev, I. V.

    2011-09-15

    A collision-induced photon echo arising at the transition 0{r_reversible}1 of ytterbium in the presence of heavy atomic buffer is investigated. Collision-induced echo signal appears in the case of mutually orthogonal linear polarizations of exciting pulses and it is absent without buffer. Collision-induced echo power grows with buffer pressure up to the maximum value and decays exponentially at further buffer pressure growth. Collision-induced echo power is essentially less than that of the ordinary echo generated by pulses with parallel polarizations in the same mixture, and its polarization is linear with the polarization vector directed along that of the first exciting pulse. All the properties of collision-induced photon echo are explained on the basis of collision relaxation dependence on the direction of active atom velocity.

  11. SIS quasiparticle mixers with bow-tie antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xizhi; Richards, P. L.; Lloyd, F. L.

    1988-02-01

    Planar lithographed W-band SIS mixers with bow-tie antennas and several different RF coupling structures have been designed. Single junctions with inductive microstrips and five-junction arrays with parallel wire inductors showed good coupling over bandwiths of about 5 and 25 percent, respectively. Good agreement is obtained between design calculations based on a simple equivalent circuit and measurements of the frequency dependence of the mixer gain. No systematic difference was noted in the performance of Pb-In-Au/Pb-Bi junctions and Nb/Pb-In-Au junctions with similar capacitance and resistance.

  12. Work-place homicide by bow and arrow.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, A; Georén, B; Oström, M

    2000-07-01

    Arrow wounds represent an unusual class of wounds rarely seen by most forensic pathologists. In this paper we present a case of homicide by bow and arrow and the characteristics of such injuries. The essential characteristics of the lesions obtained from conically-tapered field points and from hunting broadhead tips are described and discussed in relation to injuries caused by firearm bullets. In the present case, three arrows struck the victim, and the order in which the injuries were sustained are analyzed. We also discuss the possibilities of localizing the shooter relative to the victim by analysis of the trajectories.

  13. Microinstabilities associated with a high Mach number, perpendicular bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, C. S.; Winske, D.; Tanaka, M.; Papadopoulos, K.; Akimoto, K.; Goodrich, C. C.; Zhou, Y. M.; Tsai, S. T.; Rodriguez, P.; Lin, C. S.

    1984-01-01

    Instability analyses incorporating insights gained through ISEE observations and hybrid simulations are used in an examination of the instabilities associated with a high Mach number perpendicular shock akin to the earth's bow shock. In the regions in front of, and at, the shock transition the cross-field instabilities are subdivided into the ion-ion streaming, kinetic cross-field streaming, and drift lower hybrid instability low frequency modes, as well as the electron cyclotron drift, ion sound, and electron whisker instability high frequency modes. Further downstream, ion ring-like and anisotropy-driven instabilities are considered. The implications of these results for wave signatures, plasma heating and acceleration are noted.

  14. Mercury's magnetopause and bow shock from MESSENGER observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winslow, R. M.; Anderson, B. J.; Johnson, C. L.; Slavin, J. A.; Korth, H.; Purucker, M. E.; Baker, D. N.; Solomon, S. C.

    2012-12-01

    We establish the time-averaged shape and location of Mercury's magnetopause and bow shock from orbital observations by the MESSENGER Magnetometer. We fit empirical models to the midpoints of boundary crossings as well as to probability density maps of the magnetopause and bow shock positions. The magnetopause is fit by two different surfaces: (1) a paraboloid, and (2) a surface for which the position R from the planetary dipole varies as [1+cos(θ)]-α, where θ is the angle between R and the dipole-Sun line, and α is a flaring parameter that governs whether the magnetotail is closed (α < 0.5) or open (α ≥ 0.5). The paraboloid magnetopause model is not able to fit simultaneously both the dayside and nightside magnetopause crossings, but the second surface gives the best-fit overall shape to the observations with a subsolar stand-off distance, Rss, of 1.45 RM (where RM is Mercury's radius), and a flaring parameter α = 0.5. The average magnetopause shape and location were determined under a mean solar wind ram pressure, PRam, of 14.3 nPa. The best-fit bow shock shape established under an average Alfvén Mach number (MA ) of 6.6 is described by a hyperboloid having Rss = 1.96 RM and an eccentricity of 1.02. These boundaries move as PRam and MA vary, but their shape remains unchanged. The magnetopause Rss varies from 1.55 RM to 1.35 RM for PRam in the range 8.8 to 21.6 nPa. The bow shock Rss varies from 2.29 RM to 1.89 RM for MA in the range 4.12 to 11.8. To first order, the boundaries are well approximated by figures of revolution. Additional effects of the interplanetary magnetic field are masked by the large dynamic variability of these boundaries. Despite the moderate average magnetic shear conditions at Mercury, the magnetotail surface is nearly cylindrical, with a radius of ~2.7 RM at a distance 3 RM downstream of Mercury. By comparison, Earth's magnetotail flaring continues until a downstream distance of ~10 Rss. This result may indicate that reconnection

  15. Optimization of UV-LED curable printing material for applications in direct writing systems: Inkjet, reverse offset, and micro dispensing GPD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varela, Ada Judith Ortega

    The quality of a product fabricated by direct writing methods will depend greatly on the properties of the printing material and its compatibility with the printing process. Although multiple advances in developing printing inks and pastes with novel properties are being made, the potential those can bring to electronics is hindered by their stability and performance during the printing process. In this study a UV-LED curable acrylic material was used to test the optimization of inks and pastes for three of the most common direct writing systems: Piezo-type Inkjet, Reverse Offset Roll to Plate, and Micro Deposition. The viscosity of the photosensitive acrylic matrix was controlled by either the addition of diluents or electronically functional reinforcement material. The contact angle of the optimized solutions on 16 different Polyester, Polyimide, and Paper films was observed. Solutions with larger contact angles showed better line definition for the Inkjet and the Micro Dispense systems. In addition to the contact angle differential, the rheological properties showed to be a determinant factor for the feasibility of a solution to undergo the reverse offset printing process. The UV curable acrylic demonstrated electrical conductivity when 2% (wt.) MWCNT were ultrasonically mixed in the matrix and then cured with a 385nm wavelength for 3 seconds. Only the micro deposition system was capable of printing the acrylic-MWCNT paste and the relationship between the contact angle, pattern accuracy, substrate selection, and electrical conductivity, was determined.

  16. Anatomy of the internal bow shocks in the IRAS 04166+2706 protostellar jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tafalla, M.; Su, Y.-N.; Shang, H.; Johnstone, D.; Zhang, Q.; Santiago-García, J.; Lee, C.-F.; Hirano, N.; Wang, L.-Y.

    2017-01-01

    Context. Highly collimated jets and wide-angle outflows are two related components of the mass-ejection activity associated with stellar birth. Despite decades of research, the relation between these two components remains poorly understood. Aims: We study the relation between the jet and the outflow in the IRAS 04166+2706 protostar. This Taurus protostar drives a molecular jet that contains multiple emission peaks symmetrically located from the central source. The protostar also drives a wide-angle outflow consisting of two conical shells. Methods: We have used the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) interferometer to observe two fields along the IRAS 04166+2706 jet. The fields were centered on a pair of emission peaks that correspond to the same ejection event. The observations were carried out in CO(2-1), SiO(5-4), and SO(JN = 65-54). Results: Both ALMA fields present spatial distributions that are approximately elliptical and have their minor axes aligned with the jet direction. As the velocity increases, the emission in each field moves gradually across the elliptical region. This systematic pattern indicates that the emitting gas in each field lies in a disk-like structure that is perpendicular to the jet axis and whose gas is expanding away from the jet. A small degree of curvature in the first-moment maps indicates that the disks are slightly curved in the manner expected for bow shocks moving away from the IRAS source. A simple geometrical model confirms that this scenario fits the main emission features. Conclusions: The emission peaks in the IRAS 04166+2706 jet likely represent internal bow shocks where material is being ejected laterally away from the jet axis. While the linear momentum of the ejected gas is dominated by the component in the jet direction, the sideways component is not negligible, and can potentially affect the distribution of gas in the surrounding outflow and core.

  17. Direct determination of benzalkonium chloride in ophthalmic systems by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Ambrus, G; Takahashi, L T; Marty, P A

    1987-02-01

    High-performance liquid chromatography has been used to quantitate benzalkonium chloride (alkylbenzyldimethylammonium chloride) in complex ophthalmic formulations at or below concentration levels of 50 ppm. The method involves a one-step dilution for sample preparation and direct injection; therefore, recovery and/or conversion problems are nonexistent. The assay is quick, specific, reproducible, and simple. This new approach makes routine determinations far simpler than previous methods and is especially useful for product stability studies and quality control procedures.

  18. Peptide YY directly inhibits ghrelin-activated neurons of the arcuate nucleus and reverses fasting-induced c-Fos expression.

    PubMed

    Riediger, Thomas; Bothe, Christine; Becskei, Csilla; Lutz, Thomas A

    2004-01-01

    The hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (Arc) monitors and integrates hormonal and metabolic signals involved in the maintenance of energy homeostasis. The orexigenic peptide ghrelin is secreted from the stomach during negative status of energy intake and directly activates neurons of the medial arcuate nucleus (ArcM) in rats. In contrast to ghrelin, peptide YY (PYY) is released postprandially from the gut and reduces food intake when applied peripherally. Neurons in the ArcM express ghrelin receptors and neuropeptide Y receptors. Thus, PYY may inhibit feeding by acting on ghrelin-sensitive Arc neurons. Using extracellular recordings, we (1) characterized the effects of PYY on the electrical activity of ghrelin-sensitive neurons in the ArcM of rats. In order to correlate the effect of PYY on neuronal activity with the energy status, we (2) investigated the ability of PYY to reverse fasting-induced c-Fos expression in Arc neurons of mice. In addition, we (3) sought to confirm that PYY reduces food intake under our experimental conditions. Superfusion of PYY reversibly inhibited 94% of all ArcM neurons by a direct postsynaptic mechanism. The PYY-induced inhibition was dose-dependent and occurred at a threshold concentration of 10(-8)M. Consistent with the opposite effects of ghrelin and PYY on food intake, a high percentage (50%) of Arc neurons was activated by ghrelin and inhibited by PYY. In line with this inhibitory action, peripherally injected PYY partly reversed the fasting-induced c-Fos expression in Arc neurons of mice. Similarly, refeeding of food-deprived mice reversed the fasting-induced activation in the Arc. Furthermore, peripherally injected PYY reduced food intake in 12-hour fasted mice. Thus the activity of Arc neurons correlated with the feeding status and was not only reduced by feeding but also by administration of PYY in non-refed mice. In conclusion, our current observations suggest that PYY may contribute to signaling a positive status of energy intake

  19. Lung deposition patterns of directly labelled salbutamol in normal subjects and in patients with reversible airflow obstruction.

    PubMed Central

    Melchor, R; Biddiscombe, M F; Mak, V H; Short, M D; Spiro, S G

    1993-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Earlier studies of aerosol deposition in the lungs have relied on indirect labelling of Teflon spheres of a similar size distribution to the drug in question and have assumed similar aerodynamic properties. Using a modification of a new technique for directly labelling salbutamol, the deposition of salbutamol within the lungs of normal subjects and patients with asthma has been studied with the use of a metered dose inhaler (MDI) alone, an MDI with a spacer device, and a dry powder inhaler (DPI). METHOD--Salbutamol was directly labelled with technetium-99m and placed in an MDI or DPI. Ten normal subjects and 19 patients with asthma inhaled 200 micrograms of salbutamol by means of the MDI alone, the MDI with a spacer device attached, and by DPI on separate days. Deposition was assessed by a dual headed gamma camera after inhalation of the drug. RESULTS--The total mean (SD) percentage deposition of the drug in the normal subjects was 21.6% (8.9%) with the MDI alone, 20.9% (7.8%) with the MDI with spacer, and 12.4% (3.5%) with the DPI. For the patients, the mean percentage deposition was 18.2% (7.8%) with the MDI alone, 19.0% (8.9%) with the MDI and spacer, and 11.4% (5.0%) with the DPI. Bronchodilatation achieved by the patients was similar with all three techniques. Mean peripheral lung deposition was significantly greater with a spacer device than when the MDI was used alone in both normal subjects (49.4% (6.1%) v 44.1% (9.9%)) and patients (38.6% (11.1%) v 30.4% (9.4%)). CONCLUSIONS--The deposition of directly labelled salbutamol from an MDI is greater than previously estimated by indirect labelling techniques. The deposition of labelled salbutamol from a DPI, however, is little different from that measured by indirect techniques. PMID:8322237

  20. Drumlins in reverse gear: observations against the relationship between drumlin stoss and lee asymmetry and flow direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spagnolo, M.; Clark, C. D.; Hughes, A. L.; Jordan, C.

    2008-12-01

    A well-known characteristic of drumlins is their longitudinal asymmetry in morphology with steep upstream slope angles (stoss) and more gentle downstream tails (lee). This characteristic is the main cue for deducing flow direction from drumlin fields. However, and although commonly accepted, few studies have actually quantified this drumlin property. How many drumlins in a field show this asymmetric form? Does it match with flow direction? Here we analyse drumlins from our mapping program of Great Britain, based on a high resolution DTM (5 m horizontal resolution, 0.7-1 m vertical accuracy) and yielding a GIS database of over 25,000 drumlins recorded as polygons, defined by their perimeter break-of-slope. Using GIS techniques we analysed long-profile asymmetry and compared this with the flow direction as derived from other information such as moraines, eskers, and spatial context within the ice sheet. Because drumlins may lie on a non- horizontal surface (i.e. hillslope), the first stage of analysis was to 'terrain correct' them. With all their bases adjusted to a horizontal plane, the highest point now also approximates the thickest part of the drumlin. We then computed a simple measure of asymmetry (Harry and Trenhaile, 1987) as the ratio of distances AB/(AB+BC), where A and C are the most upstream and downstream points respectively and B is the summit. In this paper we present the statistics of this analysis applied to the large sample of drumlins. The surprising result is that British drumlins are far from being "classically" asymmetrical. This is discussed in comparison to previous work and for its implication on drumlin formation theories.

  1. Transonic flow past a wedge profile with detached bow wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincenti, Walter G; Wagoner, Cleo B

    1952-01-01

    A theoretical study has been made of the aerodynamic characteristics at zero angle of attack of a thin, doubly symmetrical double-wedge profile in the range of supersonic flight speed in which the bow wave is detached. The analysis utilizes the equations of the transonic small-disturbance theory and involves no assumptions beyond those implicit in this theory. The mixed flow about the front half of the profile is calculated by relaxation solution of boundary conditions along the shock polar and sonic line. The purely subsonic flow about the rear of the profile is found by means of the method of characteristics specialized to the transonic small-disturbance theory. Complete calculations were made for four values of the transonic similarity parameter. These were found sufficient to bridge the gap between the previous results of Guderley and Yoshihara at a Mach number of 1 and the results which are readily obtained when the bow wave is attached and the flow is completely supersonic.

  2. Lunar Surface Potential Increases during Terrestrial Bow Shock Traversals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collier, Michael R.; Stubbs, Timothy J.; Hills, H. Kent; Halekas, Jasper; Farrell, William M.; Delory, Greg T.; Espley, Jared; Freeman, John W.; Vondrak, Richard R.; Kasper, Justin

    2009-01-01

    Since the Apollo era the electric potential of the Moon has been a subject of interest and debate. Deployed by three Apollo missions, Apollo 12, Apollo 14 and Apollo 15, the Suprathermal Ion Detector Experiment (SIDE) determined the sunlit lunar surface potential to be about +10 Volts using the energy spectra of lunar ionospheric thermal ions accelerated toward the Moon. We present an analysis of Apollo 14 SIDE "resonance" events that indicate the lunar surface potential increases when the Moon traverses the dawn bow shock. By analyzing Wind spacecraft crossings of the terrestrial bow shock at approximately this location and employing current balancing models of the lunar surface, we suggest causes for the increasing potential. Determining the origin of this phenomenon will improve our ability to predict the lunar surface potential in support of human exploration as well as provide models for the behavior of other airless bodies when they traverse similar features such as interplanetary shocks, both of which are goals of the NASA Lunar Science Institute's Dynamic Response of the Environment At the Moon (DREAM) team.

  3. Quasilinear simulations of interplanetary shocks and Earth's bow shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasiev, Alexandr; Battarbee, Markus; Ganse, Urs; Vainio, Rami; Palmroth, Minna; Pfau-Kempf, Yann; Hoilijoki, Sanni; von Alfthan, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    We have developed a new self-consistent Monte Carlo simulation model for particle acceleration in shocks. The model includes a prescribed large-scale magnetic field and plasma density, temperature and velocity profiles and a self-consistently computed incompressible ULF foreshock under the quasilinear approximation. Unlike previous analytical treatments, our model is time dependent and takes full account of the anisotropic particle distributions and scattering in the wave-particle interaction process. We apply the model to the problem of particle acceleration at traveling interplanetary (IP) shocks and Earth's bow shock and compare the results with hybrid-Vlasov simulations and spacecraft observations. A qualitative agreement in terms of spectral shape of the magnetic fluctuations and the polarization of the unstable mode is found between the models and the observations. We will quantify the differences of the models and explore the region of validity of the quasilinear approach in terms of shock parameters. We will also compare the modeled IP shocks and the bow shock, identifying the similarities and differences in the spectrum of accelerated particles and waves in these scenarios. The work has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 637324 (HESPERIA). The Academy of Finland is thanked for financial support. We acknowledge the computational resources provided by CSC - IT Centre for Science Ltd., Espoo.

  4. Smashing the Guitar: An Evolving Neutron Star Bow Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M.

    2004-01-01

    The Guitar Nebula is a spectacular example of an Hα bow shock nebula produced by the interaction of a neutron star with its environment. The radio pulsar B2224+65 is traveling at ~800-1600 km s-1 (for a distance of 1-2 kpc), placing it on the high-velocity tail of the pulsar velocity distribution. Here we report time evolution in the shape of the Guitar Nebula, the first such observations for a bow shock nebula, as seen in Hα imaging with the Hubble Space Telescope. The morphology of the nebula provides no evidence for anisotropy in the pulsar wind nor for fluctuations in the pulsar wind luminosity. The nebula shows morphological changes over two epochs spaced by 7 years that imply the existence of significant gradients and inhomogeneities in the ambient interstellar medium. These observations offer astrophysically unique, in situ probes of length scales between 5×10-4 and 0.012 pc. Model fitting suggests that the nebula axis-and thus the three-dimensional velocity vector-lies within 20° of the plane of the sky and also jointly constrains the distance to the neutron star and the ambient density.

  5. The bowing potential of granitic rocks: rock fabrics, thermal properties and residual strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegesmund, S.; Mosch, S.; Scheffzük, Ch.; Nikolayev, D. I.

    2008-10-01

    The bowing of natural stone panels is especially known for marble slabs. The bowing of granite is mainly known from tombstones in subtropical humid climate. Field inspections in combination with laboratory investigations with respect to the thermal expansion and the bowing potential was performed on two different granitoids (Cezlak granodiorite and Flossenbürg granite) which differ in the composition and rock fabrics. In addition, to describe and explain the effect of bowing of granitoid facade panels, neutron time-of-flight diffraction was applied to determine residual macro- and microstrain. The measurements were combined with investigations of the crystallographic preferred orientation of quartz and biotite. Both samples show a significant bowing as a function of panel thickness and destination temperature. In comparison to marbles the effect of bowing is more pronounced in granitoids at temperatures of 120°C. The bowing as well as the thermal expansion of the Cezlak sample is also anisotropic with respect to the rock fabrics. A quantitative estimate was performed based on the observed textures. The effect of the locked-in stresses may also have a control on the bowing together with the thermal stresses related to the different volume expansion of the rock-forming minerals.

  6. Correlation of bow shock plasma wave turbulence with solar wind parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, P.; Gurnett, D. A.

    1975-01-01

    The r.m.s. field strengths of electrostatic and electromagnetic turbulence in the earth's bow shock, measured in the frequency range 20 Hz to 200 kHz with IMP-6 satellite, are found to correlate with specific solar wind parameters measured upstream of the bow shock.

  7. Bow Shock Leads the Way for a Speeding Hot Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-09-01

    As hot Jupiters whip around their host stars, their speeds can exceed the speed of sound in the surrounding material, theoretically causing a shock to form ahead of them. Now, a study has reported the detection of such a shock ahead of transiting exoplanet HD 189733b, providing a potential indicator of the remarkably strong magnetic field of the planet.Rushing PlanetsDue to their proximity to their hosts, hot Jupiters move very quickly through the stellar wind and corona surrounding the star. When this motion is supersonic, the material ahead of the planet can be compressed by a bow shock and for a transiting hot Jupiter, this shock will cross the face of the host star in advance of the planets transit.In a recent study, a team of researchers by Wilson Cauley of Wesleyan University report evidence of just such a pre-transit. The teams target is exoplanet HD 189733b, one of the closest hot Jupiters to our solar system. When the authors examined high-resolution transmission spectra of this system, they found that prior to the optical transit of the planet, there was a large dip in the transmission of the first three hydrogen Balmer lines. This could well be the absorption of an optically-thick bow shock as it moves past the face of the star.Tremendous MagnetismOperating under this assumption, the authors create a model of the absorption expected from a hot Jupiter transiting with a bow shock ahead of it. Using this model, they show that a shock leading the planet at a distance of 12.75 times the planets radius reproduces the key features of the transmission spectrum.This stand-off distance is surprisingly large. Assuming that the location of the bow shock is set by the point where the planets magnetospheric pressure balances the pressure of the stellar wind or corona that it passes through, the planetary magnetic field would have to be at least 28 Gauss. This is seven times the strength of Jupiters magnetic field!Understanding the magnetic fields of exoplanets is

  8. Quantum Operation Time Reversal

    SciTech Connect

    Crooks, Gavin E.

    2008-03-25

    The dynamics of an open quantum system can be described by a quantum operation: A linear, complete positive map of operators. Here, I exhibit a compact expression for the time reversal of a quantum operation, which is closely analogous to the time reversal of a classical Markov transition matrix. Since open quantum dynamics are stochastic, and not, in general, deterministic, the time reversal is not, in general, an inversion of the dynamics. Rather, the system relaxes toward equilibrium in both the forward and reverse time directions. The probability of a quantum trajectory and the conjugate, time reversed trajectory are related by the heat exchanged with the environment.

  9. Effect of Body Structure on Skill Formation in a Force Precision Task Mimicking Cello Bowing Movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogihara, Naomichi; Yamazaki, Nobutoshi

    To elucidate the skill formation mechanism in a complex force precision task mimicking cello bowing movements, three-dimensional joint orientations and changes in bowing force are measured for 2 novice and 2 expert subjects. A rigid link model of the human upper limb is constructed in order to calculate changes in joint moment, potential energy and structural inductivity of motion during bowing, and the motions are compared kinetically. Results show that the novices generate low-in-potential energy bowing motion, but not suitable for skillful control of the bow. In contrast, the experts can fulfill a task requirement by skillfully coordinating the musculo-skeletal system, but the motion is not easy as that of the novices. It is suggested that the transition from a novice to an expert may be difficult due to the ease in the initially generated motion, which obstructs the search for the optimal skillful motion.

  10. Effect of thrust reverser operation on the lateral-directional characteristics of a three-surface F-15 model at transonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bare, E. A.; Pendergraft, O. C., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Langley 16 Foot Transonic Tunnel to determine the lateral directional aerodynamic characteristics of a fully metric 0.04 scale model of the F-15 three surface configuration (canards, horizontal tails) with twin two dimensional nozzles and twin axisymmetric nozzles installed. The effects of two dimensional nozzle in flight thrust reversing and rudder deflection were also determined. Test data were obtained at static conditions and at Mach numbers from 0.60 to 1.20 over an angle of attack range from -2 deg to 15 deg. Reynolds number varied from 2.6 million to 3.8 million. Angle of sideslip was set at approximately 0 deg and -5 deg for all configurations and at -10 deg for selected configurations.

  11. EGCG reverses human neutrophil elastase-induced migration in A549 cells by directly binding to HNE and by regulating α1-AT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiaokaiti, Yilixiati; Wu, Haoming; Chen, Ya; Yang, Haopeng; Duan, Jianhui; Li, Xin; Pan, Yan; Tie, Lu; Zhang, Liangren; Li, Xuejun

    2015-07-01

    Lung carcinogenesis is a complex process that occurs in unregulated inflammatory environment. EGCG has been extensively investigated as a multi-targeting anti-tumor and anti-inflammatory compound. In this study, we demonstrated a novel mechanism by which EGCG reverses the neutrophil elastase-induced migration of A549 cells. We found that neutrophil elastase directly triggered human adenocarcinoma A549 cell migration and that EGCG suppressed the elevation of tumor cell migration induced by neutrophil elastase. We observed that EGCG directly binds to neutrophil elastase and inhibits its enzymatic activity based on the CDOCKER algorithm, MD stimulation by GROMACS, SPR assay and elastase enzymatic activity assay. As the natural inhibitor of neutrophil elastase, α1-antitrypsin is synthesized in tumor cells. We further demonstrated that the expression of α1-antitrypsin was up-regulated after EGCG treatment in neutrophil elastase-treated A549 cells. We preliminarily discovered that the EGCG-mediated induction of α1-antitrypsin expression might be correlated with the regulatory effect of EGCG on the PI3K/Akt pathway. Overall, our results suggest that EGCG ameliorates the neutrophil elastase-induced migration of A549 cells. The mechanism underlying this effect may include two processes: EGCG directly binds to neutrophil elastase and inhibits its enzymatic activity; EGCG enhances the expression of α1-antitrypsin by regulating the PI3K/AKT pathway.

  12. Comparison of Automated Quantitative Reverse Transcription-PCR and Direct Fluorescent-Antibody Detection for Routine Rabies Diagnosis in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Dupuis, Michelle; Brunt, Scott; Appler, Kim; Rudd, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Rabies virus found worldwide and prevalent throughout the United States continues to be a public health concern. Direct-fluorescent antibody (DFA) detection remains the gold standard for rabies virus diagnostics. Assessing the utility of a high-throughput molecular platform such as the QIAsymphony SP/AS, in conjunction with quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR), to augment or potentially replace the DFA test, was the focus of this project. Here we describe a triplex qRT-PCR assay, including assembly and evaluation for sensitivity, specificity, and ability to detect variants. Additionally, we compared the qRT-PCR assay to the gold standard direct fluorescent-antibody test. More than 1,000 specimens submitted for routine rabies diagnosis were tested to directly compare the two methods. All results were in agreement between the two methods, with one additional specimen detected by qRT-PCR below the limits of the DFA sensitivity. With the proper continued validation for variant detection, molecular methods have a place in routine rabies diagnostics within the United States. PMID:26179300

  13. Template-dependent nucleotide addition in the reverse (3′-5′) direction by Thg1-like protein

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Shoko; Suzuki, Tateki; Chen, Meirong; Kato, Koji; Yu, Jian; Nakamura, Akiyoshi; Tanaka, Isao; Yao, Min

    2016-01-01

    Thg1-like protein (TLP) catalyzes the addition of a nucleotide to the 5′-end of truncated transfer RNA (tRNA) species in a Watson-Crick template–dependent manner. The reaction proceeds in two steps: the activation of the 5′-end by adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP)/guanosine 5′-triphosphate (GTP), followed by nucleotide addition. Structural analyses of the TLP and its reaction intermediates have revealed the atomic detail of the template-dependent elongation reaction in the 3′-5′ direction. The enzyme creates two substrate binding sites for the first- and second-step reactions in the vicinity of one reaction center consisting of two Mg2+ ions, and the two reactions are executed at the same reaction center in a stepwise fashion. When the incoming nucleotide is bound to the second binding site with Watson-Crick hydrogen bonds, the 3′-OH of the incoming nucleotide and the 5′-triphosphate of the tRNA are moved to the reaction center where the first reaction has occurred. That the 3′-5′ elongation enzyme performs this elaborate two-step reaction in one catalytic center suggests that these two reactions have been inseparable throughout the process of protein evolution. Although TLP and Thg1 have similar tetrameric organization, the tRNA binding mode of TLP is different from that of Thg1, a tRNAHis-specific G−1 addition enzyme. Each tRNAHis binds to three of the four Thg1 tetramer subunits, whereas in TLP, tRNA only binds to a dimer interface and the elongation reaction is terminated by measuring the accepter stem length through the flexible β-hairpin. Furthermore, mutational analyses show that tRNAHis is bound to TLP in a similar manner as Thg1, thus indicating that TLP has a dual binding mode. PMID:27051866

  14. Regulation of nitrogenase by 2-oxoglutarate-reversible, direct binding of a PII-like nitrogen sensor protein to dinitrogenase.

    PubMed

    Dodsworth, Jeremy A; Leigh, John A

    2006-06-27

    Posttranslational regulation of nitrogenase, or switch-off, in the methanogenic archaeon Methanococcus maripaludis requires both nifI(1) and nifI(2), which encode members of the PII family of nitrogen-regulatory proteins. Previous work demonstrated that nitrogenase activity in cell extracts was inhibited in the presence of NifI(1) and NifI(2), and that 2-oxoglutarate (2OG), a potential signal of nitrogen limitation, relieved this inhibition. To further explore the role of the NifI proteins in switch-off, we found proteins that interact with NifI(1) and NifI(2) and determined whether 2OG affected these interactions. Anaerobic purification of His-tagged NifI(2) resulted in copurification of NifI(1) and the dinitrogenase subunits NifD and NifK, and 2OG or a deletion mutation affecting the T-loop of NifI(2) prevented copurification of dinitrogenase but did not affect copurification of NifI(1). Similar results were obtained with His-tagged NifI(1). Gel-filtration chromatography demonstrated an interaction between purified NifI(1,2) and dinitrogenase that was inhibited by 2OG. The NifI proteins themselves formed a complex of approximately 85 kDa, which appeared to further oligomerize in the presence of 2OG. NifI(1,2) inhibited activity of purified nitrogenase when present in a 1:1 molar ratio to dinitrogenase, and 2OG fully relieved this inhibition. These results suggest a model for switch-off of nitrogenase activity, where direct interaction of a NifI(1,2) complex with dinitrogenase causes inhibition, which is relieved by 2OG. The presence of nifI(1) and nifI(2) in the nif operons of all nitrogen-fixing Archaea and some anaerobic Bacteria suggests that this mode of nitrogenase regulation may operate in a wide variety of diazotrophs.

  15. The Geomagnetic Field During a Reversal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heirtzler, James R.

    2003-01-01

    By modifying the IGRF it is possible to learn what may happen to the geomagnetic field during a geomagnetic reversal. If the entire IGRF reverses then the declination and inclination only reverse when the field strength is zero. If only the dipole component of the IGRF reverses a large geomagnetic field remains when the dipole component is zero and he direction of the field at the end of the reversal is not exactly reversed from the directions at the beginning of the reversal.

  16. Reversible logic for supercomputing.

    SciTech Connect

    DeBenedictis, Erik P.

    2005-05-01

    This paper is about making reversible logic a reality for supercomputing. Reversible logic offers a way to exceed certain basic limits on the performance of computers, yet a powerful case will have to be made to justify its substantial development expense. This paper explores the limits of current, irreversible logic for supercomputers, thus forming a threshold above which reversible logic is the only solution. Problems above this threshold are discussed, with the science and mitigation of global warming being discussed in detail. To further develop the idea of using reversible logic in supercomputing, a design for a 1 Zettaflops supercomputer as required for addressing global climate warming is presented. However, to create such a design requires deviations from the mainstream of both the software for climate simulation and research directions of reversible logic. These deviations provide direction on how to make reversible logic practical.

  17. The earth's bow shock in an oblique interplanetary field.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, W.-W.

    1972-01-01

    The pressure, magnetic field, temperature, particle density, and stream velocity throughout the magnetosheath have been calculated in the plane containing the interplanetary field and solar wind velocity vector for various orientations of the interplanetary magnetic field and various assumed ratios of specific heats of the compressed solar wind. Jump conditions at the bow shock gave initial conditions in the shocked plasma from which the appropriate hydromagnetic equations (for blunt bodies in the subsonic region near the subsolar point and for the method of characteristics in the supersonic region back in the tail) were integrated numerically back to the surface of the magnetosphere. Explicit consideration of the magnetic field shows that a net asymmetrical force on the magnetopause produces a side force, or 'lift' in addition to the well-known drag on the magnetosphere.

  18. CHONDRULE FORMATION IN BOW SHOCKS AROUND ECCENTRIC PLANETARY EMBRYOS

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, Melissa A.; Desch, Steven J.; Athanassiadou, Themis; Boley, Aaron C.

    2012-06-10

    Recent isotopic studies of Martian meteorites by Dauphas and Pourmand have established that large ({approx}3000 km radius) planetary embryos existed in the solar nebula at the same time that chondrules-millimeter-sized igneous inclusions found in meteorites-were forming. We model the formation of chondrules by passage through bow shocks around such a planetary embryo on an eccentric orbit. We numerically model the hydrodynamics of the flow and find that such large bodies retain an atmosphere with Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities allowing mixing of this atmosphere with the gas and particles flowing past the embryo. We calculate the trajectories of chondrules flowing past the body and find that they are not accreted by the protoplanet, but may instead flow through volatiles outgassed from the planet's magma ocean. In contrast, chondrules are accreted onto smaller planetesimals. We calculate the thermal histories of chondrules passing through the bow shock. We find that peak temperatures and cooling rates are consistent with the formation of the dominant, porphyritic texture of most chondrules, assuming a modest enhancement above the likely solar nebula average value of chondrule densities (by a factor of 10), attributable to settling of chondrule precursors to the midplane of the disk or turbulent concentration. We calculate the rate at which a planetary embryo's eccentricity is damped and conclude that a single planetary embryo scattered into an eccentric orbit can, over {approx}10{sup 5} years, produce {approx}10{sup 24} g of chondrules. In principle, a small number (1-10) of eccentric planetary embryos can melt the observed mass of chondrules in a manner consistent with all known constraints.

  19. Violin Pedagogy and the Physics of the Bowed String

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLeod, Alexander Rhodes

    The paper describes the mechanics of violin tone production using non-specialist language, in order to present a scientific understanding of tone production accessible to a broad readership. As well as offering an objective understanding of tone production, this model provides a powerful tool for analyzing the technique of string playing. The interaction between the bow and the string is quite complex. Literature reviewed for this study reveals that scientific investigations have provided important insights into the mechanics of string playing, offering explanations for factors which both contribute to and limit the range of tone colours and dynamics that stringed instruments can produce. Also examined in the literature review are significant works of twentieth century violin pedagogy exploring tone production on the violin, based on the practical experience of generations of teachers and performers. Hermann von Helmholtz described the stick-slip cycle which drives the string in 1863, which replaced earlier ideas about the vibration of violin strings. Later, scientists such as John Schelleng and Lothar Cremer were able to demonstrate how the mechanics of the bow-string interaction can create different tone colours. Recent research by Anders Askenfelt, Knut Guettler, and Erwin Schoonderwaldt have continued to refine earlier research in this area. The writings of Lucien Capet, Leopold Auer, Carl Flesch, Paul Rolland, Kato Havas, Ivan Galamian, and Simon Fischer are examined and analyzed. Each author describes a different approach to tone production on the violin, representing a different understanding of the underlying mechanism. Analyzing these writings within the context of a scientific understanding of tone production makes it possible to compare these approaches more consistently, and to synthesize different concepts drawn from the diverse sources evaluated.

  20. SPITZER OBSERVATIONS OF BOW SHOCKS AND OUTFLOWS IN RCW 38

    SciTech Connect

    Winston, E.; Wolk, S. J.; Bourke, T. L.; Spitzbart, B.; Megeath, S. T.; Gutermuth, R.

    2012-01-10

    We report Spitzer observations of five newly identified bow shocks in the massive star-forming region RCW 38. Four are visible at Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) wavelengths, the fifth is only visible at 24 {mu}m. Chandra X-ray emission indicates that winds from the central O5.5 binary, IRS 2, have caused an outflow to the northeast and southwest of the central subcluster. The southern lobe of hot ionized gas is detected in X-rays; shocked gas and heated dust from the shock front are detected with Spitzer at 4.5 and 24 {mu}m. The northern outflow may have initiated the present generation of star formation, based on the filamentary distribution of the protostars in the central subcluster. Further, the bow-shock driving star, YSO 129, is photo-evaporating a pillar of gas and dust. No point sources are identified within this pillar at near- to mid-IR wavelengths. We also report on IRAC 3.6 and 5.8 {mu}m observations of the cluster DBS2003-124, northeast of RCW 38, where 33 candidate young stellar objects (YSOs) are identified. One star associated with the cluster drives a parsec-scale jet. Two Herbig-Haro objects associated with the jet are visible at IRAC and Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS) wavelengths. The jet extends over a distance of {approx}3 pc. Assuming a velocity of 100 km s{sup -1} for the jet material gives an age of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} yr, indicating that the star (and cluster) are likely to be very young, with a similar or possibly younger age than RCW 38, and that star formation is ongoing in the extended RCW 38 region.

  1. Bow Shocks from Neutron Stars: Scaling Laws and Hubble Space Telescope Observations of the Guitar Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M.

    2002-08-01

    The interaction of high-velocity neutron stars with the interstellar medium produces bow shock nebulae, in which the relativistic neutron star wind is confined by ram pressure. We present multiwavelength observations of the Guitar Nebula, including narrowband Hα imaging with Hubble Space Telescope (HST) WFPC2, which resolves the head of the bow shock. The HST observations are used to fit for the inclination of the pulsar velocity vector to the line of sight and to determine the combination of spin-down energy loss, velocity, and ambient density that sets the scale of the bow shock. We find that the velocity vector is most likely in the plane of the sky. We use the Guitar Nebula and other observed neutron star bow shocks to test scaling laws for their size and Hα emission, discuss their prevalence, and present criteria for their detectability in targeted searches. The set of Hα bow shocks shows remarkable consistency, in spite of the expected variation in ambient densities and orientations. Together, they support the assumption that a pulsar's spin-down energy losses are carried away by a relativistic wind that is indistinguishable from being isotropic. Comparison of Hα bow shocks with X-ray and nonthermal radio-synchrotron bow shocks produced by neutron stars indicates that the overall shape and scaling is consistent with the same physics. It also appears that nonthermal radio emission and Hα emission are mutually exclusive in the known objects and perhaps in all objects.

  2. STEREO and Wind observations of intense cyclotron harmonic waves at the Earth's bow shock and inside the magnetosheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breneman, A. W.; Cattell, C. A.; Kersten, K.; Paradise, A.; Schreiner, S.; Kellogg, P. J.; Goetz, K.; Wilson, L. B.

    2013-12-01

    We present the first observations of electron cyclotron harmonic waves at the Earth's bow shock from STEREO and Wind burst waveform captures. These waves are observed at magnetic field gradients at a variety of shock geometries ranging from quasi-parallel to nearly perpendicular along with whistler mode waves, ion acoustic waves, and electrostatic solitary waves. Large amplitude cyclotron harmonic waveforms are also observed in the magnetosheath in association with magnetic field gradients convected past the bow shock. Amplitudes of the cyclotron harmonic waves range from a few tens to more than 500 mV/m peak-peak. A comparison between the short (15 m) and long (100 m) Wind spin plane antennas shows a similar response at low harmonics and a stronger response on the short antenna at higher harmonics. This indicates that wavelengths are not significantly larger than 100 m, consistent with the electron cyclotron radius. Waveforms are broadband and polarizations are distinctively comma-shaped with significant power both perpendicular and parallel to the magnetic field. Harmonics tend to be more prominent in the perpendicular directions. These observations indicate that the waves consist of a combination of perpendicular Bernstein waves and field-aligned waves without harmonics. A likely source is the electron cyclotron drift instability which is a coupling between Bernstein and ion acoustic waves. These waves are the most common type of high-frequency wave seen by STEREO during bow shock crossings and magnetosheath traversals and our observations suggest that they are an important component of the high-frequency turbulent spectrum in these regions.

  3. STEREO and Wind Observations of Intense Cyclotron Harmonic Waves at the Earth's Bow Shock and Inside the Magnetosheath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breneman, A. W.; Cattell, C.

    2013-01-01

    We present the first observations of electron cyclotron harmonic waves at the Earth's bow shock from STEREO and Wind burst waveform captures. These waves are observed at magnetic field gradients at a variety of shock geometries ranging from quasi-parallel to nearly perpendicular along with whistler mode waves, ion acoustic waves, and electrostatic solitary waves. Large amplitude cyclotron harmonic waveforms are also observed in the magnetosheath in association with magnetic field gradients convected past the bow shock. Amplitudes of the cyclotron harmonic waves range from a few tens to more than 500 millivolts/meter peak-peak. A comparison between the short (15 meters) and long (100 meters) Wind spin plane antennas shows a similar response at low harmonics and a stronger response on the short antenna at higher harmonics. This indicates that wavelengths are not significantly larger than 100 meters, consistent with the electron cyclotron radius. Waveforms are broadband and polarizations are distinctively comma-shaped with significant power both perpendicular and parallel to the magnetic field. Harmonics tend to be more prominent in the perpendicular directions. These observations indicate that the waves consist of a combination of perpendicular Bernstein waves and field-aligned waves without harmonics. A likely source is the electron cyclotron drift instability which is a coupling between Bernstein and ion acoustic waves. These waves are the most common type of high-frequency wave seen by STEREO during bow shock crossings and magnetosheath traversals and our observations suggest that they are an important component of the high-frequency turbulent spectrum in these regions.

  4. Direct evidence in vivo of impaired macrophage-specific reverse cholesterol transport in ATP-binding cassette transporter A1-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Calpe-Berdiel, Laura; Rotllan, Noemi; Palomer, Xavier; Ribas, Vicent; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco; Escolà-Gil, Joan Carles

    2005-12-30

    The ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) is a key regulator of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) metabolism. There is strong evidence that ABCA1 is a key regulator of reverse cholesterol transport (RCT). However, this could not be proved in vivo since hepatobiliary cholesterol transport was unchanged in ABCA1-deficient mice (ABCA1-/-). We used ABCA1-/- mice to test the hypothesis that ABCA1 is a critical determinant of macrophage-specific RCT. Although this cell-specific RCT only accounts for a tiny part of total RCT, it is widely accepted that it may have a major impact on atherosclerosis susceptibility. [(3)H]cholesterol-labeled endogenous macrophages were injected intraperitoneally into wild-type ABCA1+/+, ABCA1+/- and ABCA1-/- mice maintained on a chow diet. A direct relationship was observed between ABCA1 gene dose and plasma [(3)H]cholesterol at 24 and 48 h after the injection of tracer into the mice. Forty-eight hours after this injection, ABCA1-/- mice had significantly reduced [(3)H]cholesterol in liver (2.8-fold), small intestine enterocytes (1.7-fold) and feces (2-fold). To our knowledge, this is the first direct in vivo quantitative evidence that ABCA1 is a critical determinant of macrophage-specific RCT.

  5. Pioneer 8 plasma-wave measurements at distant bow-shock crossings.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scarf, F. L.

    1971-01-01

    Evaluation of enhanced low-frequency plasma-wave levels detected near the Pioneer 8 multiple bow-shock crossings encountered beyond 120 earth radii (Bavassano et al., 1971) and of high-frequency plasma waves detected in the upstream region. It is suggested that the distant interaction of the solar wind and the magnetosheath produced nonthermal electrons of the type commonly found upstream from the subsolar shock. The bow-shock position is compared with fluid model predictions, and some distinctions between the standing bow shock and the propagating interplanetary shock are considered.

  6. Bowing-reactivity trends in EBR-II assuming zero-swelling ducts

    SciTech Connect

    Meneghetti, D.

    1994-03-01

    Predicted trends of duct-bowing reactivities for the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) are correlated with predicted row-wise duct deflections assuming use of idealized zero-void-swelling subassembly ducts. These assume no irradiation induced swellings of ducts but include estimates of the effects of irradiation-creep relaxation of thermally induced bowing stresses. The results illustrate the manners in which at-power creeps may affect subsequent duct deflections at zero power and thereby the trends of the bowing component of a subsequent power reactivity decrement.

  7. Antisense directed against PS-1 gene decreases brain oxidative markers in aged senescence accelerated mice (SAMP8) and reverses learning and memory impairment: a proteomics study.

    PubMed

    Fiorini, Ada; Sultana, Rukhsana; Förster, Sarah; Perluigi, Marzia; Cenini, Giovanna; Cini, Chiara; Cai, Jian; Klein, Jon B; Farr, Susan A; Niehoff, Michael L; Morley, John E; Kumar, Vijaya B; Allan Butterfield, D

    2013-12-01

    Amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) plays a central role in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD) through the induction of oxidative stress. This peptide is produced by proteolytic cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) by the action of β- and γ-secretases. Previous studies demonstrated that reduction of Aβ, using an antisense oligonucleotide (AO) directed against the Aβ region of APP, reduced oxidative stress-mediated damage and prevented or reverted cognitive deficits in senescence-accelerated prone mice (SAMP8), a useful animal model for investigating the events related to Aβ pathology and possibly to the early phase of AD. In the current study, aged SAMP8 were treated by AO directed against PS-1, a component of the γ-secretase complex, and tested for learning and memory in T-maze foot shock avoidance and novel object recognition. Brain tissue was collected to identify the decrease of oxidative stress and to evaluate the proteins that are differently expressed and oxidized after the reduction in free radical levels induced by Aβ. We used both expression proteomics and redox proteomics approaches. In brain of AO-treated mice a decrease of oxidative stress markers was found, and the proteins identified by proteomics as expressed differently or nitrated are involved in processes known to be impaired in AD. Our results suggest that the treatment with AO directed against PS-1 in old SAMP8 mice reverses learning and memory deficits and reduces Aβ-mediated oxidative stress with restoration to the normal condition and identifies possible pharmacological targets to combat this devastating dementing disease.

  8. Do the Jovian Bow Shock and Magnetopause Surfaces in the Joy et al. (2002) Model Predict Measured Boundary Normals Correctly?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joy, S. P.; Kurth, W. S.; Kivelson, M. G.; Walker, R. J.

    2003-12-01

    Joy et al. (2002) provided probabilistic descriptions of the jovian bow shock and magnetopause by mapping spacecraft observations to the sub-solar point along model surfaces derived from the MHD simulation of Ogino et al. (1998). The resulting statistics are strongly affected by the surface models used in the mapping process. Here we analyze the quality of the surface models used in that mapping by comparing the normal directions of the observed boundary crossings to the normal directions predicted by the surface models. We have identified 116 magnetopause and 74 bow shock crossings in the Galileo data from orbits 0 through 34 using both the plasma wave (PWS) and magnetometer (MAG) data sets. We have determined the boundary normal directions for both these newly identified crossings and the previously published crossings of Galileo, Ulysses, Voyagers 1 and 2, and Pioneers 10 and 11. When possible, boundary normals were determined from the MAG data by using the minimum variance technique of Sonnerup and Cahill. Some boundary crossings could not be analyzed because of data gaps or inadequate sampling resolution. The boundary crossings are well distributed in local time ( ˜03:00 to 19:00) and are mostly near equatorial. Initial results indicate that the shape models used by Joy et al. (2002) are reasonable. We will examine the small non-zero mean difference between the observed and model boundary normal directions to determine whether the discrepancy is statistically significant. The large variance of the normal direction about the mean may imply that the normal directions fluctuate because of surface waves on the boundaries or that steady-state surface models do not apply in the presence of changing solar wind conditions.

  9. Prey fish escape by sensing the bow wave of a predator.

    PubMed

    Stewart, William J; Nair, Arjun; Jiang, Houshuo; McHenry, Matthew J

    2014-12-15

    Prey fish possess a remarkable ability to sense and evade an attack from a larger fish. Despite the importance of these events to the biology of fishes, it remains unclear how sensory cues stimulate an effective evasive maneuver. Here, we show that larval zebrafish (Danio rerio) evade predators using an escape response that is stimulated by the water flow generated by an approaching predator. Measurements of the high-speed responses of larvae in the dark to a robotic predator suggest that larvae respond to the subtle flows in front of the predator using the lateral line system. This flow, known as the bow wave, was visualized and modeled with computational fluid dynamics. According to the predictions of the model, larvae direct their escape away from the side of their body exposed to more rapid flow. This suggests that prey fish use a flow reflex that enables predator evasion by generating a directed maneuver at high speed. These findings demonstrate a sensory-motor mechanism that underlies a behavior that is crucial to the ecology and evolution of fishes.

  10. Fiber-Based Measurement of Bow-Shock Spectra for Reentry Flight Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schott, Timothy D.; Herring, Gregory C.; Munk, Michelle M.; Grinstead, Jay H.; Prabbu, Dinesh K.

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrated a fiber-based approach for obtaining optical spectra of a glowing bow shock in a high-enthalpy air flow. The work was performed in a ground test with the NASA Ames Aerodynamic Heating Facility (AHF) that is used for atmospheric reentry simulation. The method uses a commercial fiber optic that is embedded in the nose of an ablating bluntbody model and provides a line-of-sight view in the streamwise direction - directly upstream into the hot post-shock gas flow. Both phenolic impregnated carbon ablator (PICA) and phenolic carbon (PhenCarb 28) materials were used as thermal protection systems. Results show that the fibers survive the intense heat and operate sufficiently well during the first several seconds of a typical AHF run (20 MJ/kg). This approach allowed the acquisition of optical spectra, enabling a Boltzmann-based electronic excitation temperature measurement from Cu atom impurities (averaged over a line-of-sight through the gas cap, with a 0.04 sec integration time).

  11. Cluster observations of electrostatic solitary waves near the Earth's bow shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobara, Y.; Walker, S. N.; Balikhin, M.; Pokhotelov, O. A.; Gedalin, M.; Krasnoselskikh, V.; Hayakawa, M.; André, M.; Dunlop, M.; RèMe, H.; Fazakerley, A.

    2008-05-01

    Using a period of internal burst mode data from the Cluster Electric Field and Wave instrument a number of electrostatic solitary structures have been identified in the foot region of Earth's quasi-perpendicular bow shock. The four individual probe potential measurements are utilized to investigate the fundamental characteristics of the solitary wave structures such as wave propagation vector, propagation velocity, scale-size and potential amplitude. Two classes of waves are observed. Bipolar solitary waves typically propagate in the solar wind direction toward the shock but at a significant angle from the ambient magnetic field. Unipolar/tripolar solitary waves tend to propagate along the ambient magnetic field. The wave amplitude-scale size relation is similar to that obtained for similar structures observed in the auroral zone. The structures lie in the theoretically allowed region in width-amplitude space to be consistent with the BGK ion holes. Using a period of internal burst mode data from the Cluster Electric Field and Wave instrument a number of electrostatic solitary structures have been identified in the foot region of Earth's quasi-perpendicular bow shock. The four individual probe potential measurements are utilized to investigate the fundamental characteristics of the solitary wave structures such as wave propagation vector, propagation velocity, scale-size and potential amplitude. Two classes of waves are observed. Bipolar solitary waves typically propagate in the solar wind direction toward the shock but at a significant angle to the ambient magnetic field in contrast to most previous studies which assume parallel propagation to the ambient magnetic field. In contrast, unipolar/tripolar solitary waves tend to propagate along the ambient magnetic field. The wave amplitude-scale size relation is similar to that obtained for structures observed in the auroral zone. The structures lie in the theoretically allowed region in width-amplitude space to be

  12. MESSENGER observations of Mercury's bow shock and magnetopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slavin, J. A.; Acuña, M. H.; Anderson, B. J.; Benna, M.; Gloeckler, G.; Krimigis, S. M.; Raines, J. M.; Schriver, D.; Trávníček, P.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2008-09-01

    Abstract The MESSENGER spacecraft made the first of three flybys of Mercury on January 14, 2008 (1). New observations of solar wind interaction with Mercury were made with MESSENGER's Magnetometer (MAG) (2,3) and Energetic Particle and Plasma Spectrometer (EPPS) - composed of the Energetic Particle Spectrometer (EPS) and Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer (FIPS) (3,4). These MESSENGER observations show that Mercury's magnetosphere has a large-scale structure that is distinctly Earth-like, but it is immersed in a comet-like cloud of planetary ions [5]. Fig. 1 provides a schematic view of the coupled solar wind - magnetosphere - neutral atmosphere - solid planet system at Mercury. Here we present new models of bow shock and magnetopause shape and location that incorporate both the MESSENGER and earlier Mariner 10 measurements of these boundaries. A fast magnetosonic Mach number for the solar wind at Mercury's distance from the Sun of ~ 3 is derived from the shape of the bow shock. This value is consistent with earlier observations at these distances from the Sun by the Helios mission. The shape of Mercury's magnetopause and the thickness of the magnetosheath are found to be similar to that of the Earth, suggesting that the solar wind interaction is dominated by its dipolar magnetic field. MESSENGER measurements near the magnetopause do, however, indicate that internal plasma pressure does contribute to the pressure balance across this boundary. MAG and FIPS measurements are used to estimate the ratio of plasma thermal pressure to magnetic pressure at the dusk flank of the plasma sheet and dawn terminator regions, under the assumption that pressure is balanced across the inbound and outbound magnetopause crossings. To investigate the possible origins of the plasma ions in these regions, we utilize a combination of FIPS measurements and the results of 3-D hybrid [6] and magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the solar wind interaction with Mercury for the upstream conditions

  13. The solar cycle dependence of the location and shape of the Venus bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, T.-L.; Luhmann, J. G.; Russell, C. T.

    1990-01-01

    The Venus terminator bow shock position is monitored and it is shown that the shock radius increases as the solar cycle approaches a new maximum. It is also shown that the subsolar bow shock changes with the solar cycle, and that these positions are correlated with each other and with solar activity. It is hypothesized that, at solar minimum, the magnetic barrier is weak, and that some absorption of solar wind is to be expected.

  14. Defense Modernization Plans Through the 2020s: Addressing the Bow Wave

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-30

    45 p.m. Chair: Andrew Hunter, Senior Fellow in the International Security Program, Director of Defense-Industrial Initiatives Group , Center for...and has appeared on CNBC, CNN, NPR, Al Jazeera English, and Fox News. He has been a guest lecturer for organizations and teaches a class on the...their peak years of funding requirements at roughly the same time in the 2020s, creating a modernization bow wave. Just as a large bow wave slows a ship

  15. On the observability of bow shocks of Galactic runaway OB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, D. M.-A.; van Marle, A.-J.; Kuiper, R.; Kley, W.

    2016-06-01

    Massive stars that have been ejected from their parent cluster and supersonically sailing away through the interstellar medium (ISM) are classified as exiled. They generate circumstellar bow-shock nebulae that can be observed. We present two-dimensional, axisymmetric hydrodynamical simulations of a representative sample of stellar wind bow shocks from Galactic OB stars in an ambient medium of densities ranging from nISM = 0.01 up to 10.0 cm- 3. Independently of their location in the Galaxy, we confirm that the infrared is the most appropriated waveband to search for bow shocks from massive stars. Their spectral energy distribution is the convenient tool to analyse them since their emission does not depend on the temporary effects which could affect unstable, thin-shelled bow shocks. Our numerical models of Galactic bow shocks generated by high-mass ( ≈ 40 M⊙) runaway stars yield H α fluxes which could be observed by facilities such as the SuperCOSMOS H-Alpha Survey. The brightest bow-shock nebulae are produced in the denser regions of the ISM. We predict that bow shocks in the field observed at H α by means of Rayleigh-sensitive facilities are formed around stars of initial mass larger than about 20 M⊙. Our models of bow shocks from OB stars have the emission maximum in the wavelength range 3 ≤ λ ≤ 50 μm which can be up to several orders of magnitude brighter than the runaway stars themselves, particularly for stars of initial mass larger than 20 M⊙.

  16. Analysis of iodinated haloacetic acids in drinking water by reversed-phase liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization/tandem mass spectrometry with large volume direct aqueous injection.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongtao; Whitaker, Joshua S; McCarty, Christina L

    2012-07-06

    A large volume direct aqueous injection method was developed for the analysis of iodinated haloacetic acids in drinking water by using reversed-phase liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization/tandem mass spectrometry in the negative ion mode. Both the external and internal standard calibration methods were studied for the analysis of monoiodoacetic acid, chloroiodoacetic acid, bromoiodoacetic acid, and diiodoacetic acid in drinking water. The use of a divert valve technique for the mobile phase solvent delay, along with isotopically labeled analogs used as internal standards, effectively reduced and compensated for the ionization suppression typically caused by coexisting common inorganic anions. Under the optimized method conditions, the mean absolute and relative recoveries resulting from the replicate fortified deionized water and chlorinated drinking water analyses were 83-107% with a relative standard deviation of 0.7-11.7% and 84-111% with a relative standard deviation of 0.8-12.1%, respectively. The method detection limits resulting from the external and internal standard calibrations, based on seven fortified deionized water replicates, were 0.7-2.3 ng/L and 0.5-1.9 ng/L, respectively.

  17. Transient asymmetry in the projections of the rostral thalamus to the visual hyperstriatum of the chicken, and reversal of its direction by light exposure.

    PubMed

    Rogers, L J; Sink, H S

    1988-01-01

    Asymmetry in the visual pathways from the rostral thalamus to the hyperstriatum of the chicken has been found after injecting the retrograde tracer, True Blue (TB), into either the left or right hyperstriatum on day 2 or 12, post-hatching. There are ipsilateral connections from the ventromedial region of the left dorsolateral thalamus, lateral part (DLL) to the left hyperstriatum, and contralateral connections from the left dorsolateral thalamus, rostrolateral part (DLAlr) and the dorsolateral thalamus, dorsal part (DLLd) to the right hyperstriatum. On the right side of the thalamus, the ipsilateral connections from DLL to the right hyperstriatum are present, but there are only very few contralateral connections to the left hyperstriatum. No asymmetry in these pathways is seen in animals injected with TB on day 21. By this age the contralateral connections from the right thalamus to the left hyperstriatum have developed. Thus, the structural asymmetry in these visual pathways is transient, a finding which explains a controversy between two papers published recently in this journal, and which adds considerably to our understanding of the behavioural asymmetries known to occur in the chicken's response to stimuli presented to either the left or right eye. The direction of the asymmetry in visual pathways depends on asymmetrical light input to the eyes of the embryo. Normally the head of the embryo is oriented such that the left eye is occluded. If the head is withdrawn from the egg so that the right eye can be occluded and the left eye exposed to light, the direction of asymmetry in the thalamo-hyperstriatal pathways is reversed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Primary bowing tremor: a task-specific movement disorder of string instrumentalists.

    PubMed

    Lederman, Richard J

    2012-12-01

    Fear of a tremulous or unsteady bow is widespread among string instrumentalists. Faulty technique and performance anxiety have generally been blamed. The cases of 4 high-level violinists and 1 violist, 3 women and 2 men, with uncontrollable bow tremor are presented. Age at onset was from 16 to 75 years, and symptom duration 8 months to 20 years at the time of neurological evaluation. The degree of tremor varied with type of bow stroke and even the portion of the bow contacting the string. Only 1 patient had a slight postural tremor of the opposite limb. In 3 of 5 the tremor was task-specific; the other 2 had mild and nontroubling tremor with other activities. The tremor appeared to worsen over time but then seemed to stabilize. The characteristics of this tremor appear to be distinguishable from the features of both essential tremor and focal dystonia; comparison is made with representative string players afflicted by these other disorders. Analogy of this tremor is made with primary writing tremor, a well-defined task-specific movement disorder also sharing at least some features with both essential tremor and writers' cramp, a focal dystonia. Hence, it was decided to call this primary bowing tremor. Clinical features, family history, diagnostic studies, and responsiveness to treatment of primary writing tremor are discussed to emphasize the similarity to primary bowing tremor. This appears to represent a previously unreported form of task-specific movement disorder of string instrumentalists.

  19. Flow performance of highly loaded axial fan with bowed rotor blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L.; Liu, X. J.; Yang, A. L.; Dai, R.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, a partial bowed rotor blade was proposed for a newly designed high loaded axial fan. The blade was positively bowed 30 degrees from hub to 30 percent spanwise position. Flows of radial blade and bowed blade fans were numerically compared for various operation conditions. Results show that the fan's performance is improved. At the designed condition with flow coefficient of 0.52, the efficiency of the bowed blade fan is increased 1.44% and the static pressure rise is increased 11%. Comparing the flow structures, it can be found that the separated flow in the bowed fan is reduced and confined within 20 percent span, which is less than the 35 percent in the radial fan. It means that the bowed blade generates negative blade force and counteracts partial centrifugal force. It is alleviates the radial movements of boundary layers in fan's hub region. Flow losses due to 3D mixing are reduced in the rotor. Inlet flow to downstream stator is also improved.

  20. Bow Shocks Around Runaway Stars.III.The High Resolution Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noriega-Crespo, Alberto; van Buren, Dave; Dgani, Ruth

    1997-02-01

    In a recent survey for bow shock structures around OB runaway stars using the ISSA/IRAS archival data and excess maps at 60 \\mum, 58 candidates were found. These objects are surrounded by extended infrared emission at 60 \\mum, characteristic of warm dust heated by ultraviolet photons, a signature of wind bow shocks. High resolution IRAS (HiRes) images have been produced for these 58 objects and some of those spatially resolved are presented in this study. The images were used to distinguish between multiple confused IR sources, possible artifacts and unambiguous bow shocks, as the sources of the extended 60 \\mum emission. Six new bow shocks have been identified using this method, and three have been rejected. Twenty two of the targets, however, remain spatially unresolved even at the nominal HiRes resolution of ~ 1arcmin . For the larger and better defined bow shocks some internal substructure is discernible. The length of these features suggest that they arise as the result of a subtle dynamical instability. It can not be ruled out, however, that some of the bow shock morphology could be imprinted by the surrounding medium.

  1. Bow-shock pulsar-wind nebulae passing through density discontinuities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Doosoo; Heinz, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    Bow-shock pulsar-wind nebulae are a subset of pulsar-wind nebulae that form when the pulsar has high velocity due to the natal kick during the supernova explosion. The interaction between the relativistic wind from the fast-moving pulsar and the interstellar medium produces a bow-shock and a trail, which are detectable in Hα emission. Among such bow-shock pulsar-wind nebulae, the Guitar Nebula stands out for its peculiar morphology, which consists of a prominent bow-shock head and a series of bubbles further behind. We present a scenario in which multiple bubbles can be produced when the pulsar encounters a series of density discontinuities in the ISM. We tested the scenario using 2D and 3D hydrodynamic simulations. The shape of the Guitar Nebula can be reproduced if the pulsar traversed a region of declining low density. We also show that if a pulsar encounters an inclined density discontinuity, it produces an asymmetric bow-shock head, consistent with observations of the bow-shock of the millisecond pulsar J2124-3358.

  2. Effect of bow-type initial imperfection on reliability of minimum-weight, stiffened structural panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroud, W. Jefferson; Krishnamurthy, Thiagaraja; Sykes, Nancy P.; Elishakoff, Isaac

    1993-01-01

    Computations were performed to determine the effect of an overall bow-type imperfection on the reliability of structural panels under combined compression and shear loadings. A panel's reliability is the probability that it will perform the intended function - in this case, carry a given load without buckling or exceeding in-plane strain allowables. For a panel loaded in compression, a small initial bow can cause large bending stresses that reduce both the buckling load and the load at which strain allowables are exceeded; hence, the bow reduces the reliability of the panel. In this report, analytical studies on two stiffened panels quantified that effect. The bow is in the shape of a half-sine wave along the length of the panel. The size e of the bow at panel midlength is taken to be the single random variable. Several probability density distributions for e are examined to determine the sensitivity of the reliability to details of the bow statistics. In addition, the effects of quality control are explored with truncated distributions.

  3. Electron plasma waves upstream of the earth's bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacombe, C.; Mangeney, A.; Harvey, C. C.; Scudder, J. D.

    1985-01-01

    Electrostatic waves are observed around the plasma frequency fpe in the electron foreshock, together with electrons backstreaming from the bow shock. Using data from the sounder aboard ISEE 1, it is shown that this noise, previously understood as narrow band Langmuir waves more or less widened by Doppler shift or nonlinear effects, is in fact composed of two distinct parts: one is a narrow band noise, emitted just above fpe, and observed at the upstream boundary of the electron foreshock. This component has been interpreted as Langmuir waves emitted by a beam-plasma instability. It is suggested that it is of sufficiently large amplitude and monochromatic enough to trap resonant electrons. The other is a broad band noise, more impulsive than the narrow band noise, observed well above and/or well below fpe, deeper in the electron foreshock. The broad band noise has an average spectrum with a typical bi-exponential shape; its peak frequency is not exactly equal to fpe and depends on the Deybe length. This peak frequency also depends on the velocity for which the electron distribution has maximum skew. An experimental determination of the dispersion relation of the broad band noise shows that this noise, as well as the narrow band noise, may be due to the instability of a hot beam in a plasma.

  4. Electromyographic analysis of bow string release in highly skilled archers.

    PubMed

    Martin, P E; Siler, W L; Hoffman, D

    1990-01-01

    A predominant archery coaching tenet holds that the most effective means of releasing the bow string is by relaxation of the finger flexor muscles without activation of finger extensors. To evaluate the validity of this view, EMG patterns of the flexor digitorum superficialis and extensor digitorum muscles of the draw arm were examined using surface EMG electrodes in 15 highly skilled archers as each performed six shots. Each archer displayed consistent EMG patterns from shot-to-shot and two distinct flexor-extensor patterns were exhibited by the sample. The first, characterized by eight of the archers, supported the relaxation principle. For these archers, both flexor and extensor digitorum activity decreased markedly immediately prior to or at arrow release. The second pattern, characteristic of the remaining seven archers, contradicted the coaching tenet. While the flexor digitorum pattern was essentially the same as that described for the first pattern, the extensor digitorum displayed a marked increase in activity just prior to release, indicating that string release was facilitated by an active extension of the fingers. It was concluded that highly skilled archers do not predominantly reflect a release consistent with the coaching canon and that factors other than the string release mechanism discriminate the performances of skilled archers.

  5. Magnetohydrodynamic and gasdynamic theories for planetary bow waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spreiter, J. R.; Stahara, S. S.

    1984-01-01

    The observed properties of bow waves and the associated plasma flows are outlined, along with those features identified that can be described by a continuum magnetohydrodynamic flow theory as opposed to a more detailed multicomponent particle and field plasma theory. The primary objectives are to provide an account of the fundamental concepts and current status of the magnetohydrodynamic and gas dynamic theories for solar wind flow past planetary bodies. This includes a critical examination of: (1) the fundamental assumptions of the theories; (2) the various simplifying approximations introduced to obtain tractable mathematical problems; (3) the limitations they impose on the results; and (4) the relationship between the results of the simpler gas dynamic-frozen field theory and the more accurate but less completely worked out magnetohydrodynamic theory. Representative results of the various theories are presented and compared. A number of deficiencies, ambiguities, and suggestions for improvements are discussed, and several significant extensions of the theory required to provide comparable results for all planets, their satellites, and comets are noted.

  6. Characterizing the Bow Shock of the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setton, David; Besla, Gurtina; Hummels, Cameron

    2017-01-01

    The Circumgalactic Medium (CGM) surrounding our Milky Way plays an essential role in supplying the fuel needed to drive and sustain star formation in our Galaxy. However, the CGM is extremely diffuse (~10^28 g/cm^3), and therefore difficult to probe. Consequently, we know little about the structure, mass profile or evolution of the CGM. Using hydrodynamic simulations, we study the impact of the supersonic motions (Mach ~ 3) of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), the largest satellite galaxy of the Milky Way, on the structure of the CGM. We conclude that the LMC must induce a large bow shock in the CGM and use simulations to characterize its size, shape, temperature, and density structure. Using these properties, we propose possible observational signatures that could be used to confirm the existence of the shock, and illustrate how the shock may provide a tool to probe the CGM. These results illustrate that the CGM is a dynamic system, affected not only by outflows from the host galaxy, but also by the motions of the satellites that orbit within it.

  7. Evolution of the Bow Shock in the Guitar Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordes, James

    2001-07-01

    We propose WFPC2 observations of the Guitar Nebula, a bow shock produced by the high-velocity {V>1000 kms} pulsar B2224+65. By comparison with a previous observation in 1994, a new narrow-band H-alpha image will allow exploitation of the change in pulsar location { 1"}, in order to: {a} quantify ambient interstellar density variations on scales <=10^-3 pc that perturb the shape of the bowshock near the contact discontinuity {size 0.2"}; and {b} better model the bowshock to determine the orientation of the pulsar velocity vector. The results will be combined with a prior ROSAT image and a deep X-ray exposure {Chandra, October 2000} and ground based images from Palomar Observatory that constrain the shock heating and large scale structure of the nebula. PSR B2224+65 has the highest estimated space velocity of any pulsar: these results will also improve the pulsar distance and velocity estimates, which are important inputs for the study of pulsar kicks and supernovae asymmetry.

  8. Patterns and Controls of Cross-section Morphology for the Glaciated Bow River Valley, Canadian Rockies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapuis, A.; Martin, Y.; Sjogren, D.

    2006-12-01

    Glaciers are powerful agents of erosion that can broaden and deepen valley floors, steepen valley sides and enhance local relief. The objective of this research is to analyze downvalley patterns in valley cross-section profiles in the Canadian Rocky Mountains to infer information about controls on glacial valley genesis. This study focuses on the Bow River valley, located on the east side of the Great Divide in the Canadian Rockies. The valley is mainly situated parallel to overall geologic structure, with some valley locations oriented perpendicular to structure. The last glacial advance to affect the area was late-Pleistocene. Eleven valley cross-sections along the Bow River valley were extracted from a 30m DEM for analysis. Cross- sections were analysed using different mathematical models: (i) power law; (ii) quadratic; and (iii) variable width/depth ratio. As the shape of the valley in the present day is influenced by post-glacial filling, we also defined best-fit equations that estimate the erosional form, rather than the present day valley, by fitting equations for cross-sections to data points restricted to the valley sides. Equations were thus extrapolated below the surface deposits of the valley floor to estimate the depth of valley fill. No strong downvalley trend in steepness for the valley sidewalls is visible in the data, although two groups are evident; one group for cross-sections with steep valley walls and one for those with less steep valley walls. There is a possible decreasing trend in valley width in the downvalley direction, although the signal is weak. When cross-section data were analyzed in relation to geological structure, cross-sections oriented perpendicular to structure are found to be steeper and narrower than those which are not. This finding suggests a strong preconditioning on the cross-section form by geological structure. When the best-fit equations were extrapolated below the surface deposits to estimate the depth of valley fill

  9. The Interaction of Solar wind Discontinuities with the Earth's Bow Shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibeck, David G.

    2000-01-01

    Funding from NASA Grant No. NAG54679 was received in three installments. The first year's installment amounted to only one month of salary support and was used to prepare survey plots. The second year's installment allowed us to complete two research papers concerning the interaction of solar wind discontinuities with the Earth's bow shock. In the first (published) paper, we reported that the discontinuities launch slow mode waves into the magnetosheath and the slow mode waves always propagate antisunward through the flank magnetosheath. Because the sunward/antisunward sense of the magnetosheath magnetic field reverses across local noon, so does the (north/south or east/west) sense of the velocity fluctuations associated with the waves. Wind, Geotail, and IMP-8 observations were used for this study. In the second study, we used Wind and Interball-1 observations to demonstrate that pressure pulses in the magnetosheath occur in pairs and that they bound pressure cavities and/or brief intervals of outward magnetopause motion. This paper is now in press. Funding from the third year's installment has been used to investigate the two aspects of the foreshock. Two manuscripts are now in preparation for submission to the Journal of Geophysical Research. The first reports that waves within the foreshock account for many instances of poor correlations between two solar wind monitors. Remaining cases of poor correlation occur during intervals of nearly constant IMF orientations and magnetic field strengths. While the former category pose a significant difficulty for space weather forecasts, the latter do not. The second study surveys IMP-8 observations of the foreshock. We find that diamagnetic cavities are common, particularly during periods of high solar wind velocity and low solar wind density. Plasma densities, temperatures, and magnetic field strengths fall during intervals of enhanced energetic particle fluxes. The cavities are bounded by regions of decelerated solar

  10. Particle injection and acceleration at earth's bow shock - Comparison of upstream and downstream events

    SciTech Connect

    Ellison, D.C.; Moebius, E.; Paschmann, G. Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik und Astrophysik, Garching )

    1990-03-01

    The injection and acceleration of thermal solar wind ions at the quasi-parallel earth's bow shock during radial interplanetary magnetic field conditions is investigated. Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracer Explorers/Ion Release Module satellite observations of complete proton spectra, and of heavy ion spectra above 10 keV/Q, made on September 12, 1984 near the nose of the shock, are presented and compared to the predictions of a Monte Carlo shock simulation which includes diffusive shock acceleration. It is found that the spectral observations are in good agreement with the predictions of the simulation when it is assumed that all accelerated ions originate in the solar wind and are injected into the acceleration mechanism by thermal leakage from the downstream plasma. The efficiency, which is determined directly from the downstream observations, is high, with at least 15 percent of the solar wind energy flux going into accelerated particles. The comparisons allow constraints to be placed on the rigidity dependence of the scattering mean free path and suggest that the upstream solar wind must be slowed substantially by backstreaming accelerated ions prior to undergoing a sharp transition in the viscous subshock. 75 refs.

  11. Particle injection and acceleration at earth's bow shock - Comparison of upstream and downstream events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellison, Donald C.; Moebius, Eberhard; Paschmann, Goetz

    1990-01-01

    The injection and acceleration of thermal solar wind ions at the quasi-parallel earth's bow shock during radial interplanetary magnetic field conditions is investigated. Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracer Explorers/Ion Release Module satellite observations of complete proton spectra, and of heavy ion spectra above 10 keV/Q, made on September 12, 1984 near the nose of the shock, are presented and compared to the predictions of a Monte Carlo shock simulation which includes diffusive shock acceleration. It is found that the spectral observations are in good agreement with the predictions of the simulation when it is assumed that all accelerated ions originate in the solar wind and are injected into the acceleration mechanism by thermal leakage from the downstream plasma. The efficiency, which is determined directly from the downstream observations, is high, with at least 15 percent of the solar wind energy flux going into accelerated particles. The comparisons allow constraints to be placed on the rigidity dependence of the scattering mean free path and suggest that the upstream solar wind must be slowed substantially by backstreaming accelerated ions prior to undergoing a sharp transition in the viscous subshock.

  12. Theory of 2 omega(sub pe) radiation induced by the bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoon, Peter H.; Wu, C. S.; Vinas, A. F.-; Reiner, M. J.; Fainberg, J.; Stone, R. G.

    1994-01-01

    A new radiation emission mechanism is proposed to explain electomagnetic radiation observed at twice the electron plasma frequency, 2 omega(sub pe), in the upstream region of the Earth's bow shock. This radiation had its origin at the electron foreshock boundary where energetic electron beams and intense narrow-band Langmiur waves are observed. The proposed emission mechanism results from the interaction of the electron beam and Langmuir waves that are backscattered off thermal ions. This interaction is described by a nonlinear dispersion equation which incorporates an effect owing to electron trajectory modulation by the backscattered Langmuir waves. Subsequent analysis of the dispersion equation reveals two important consequences. First, a long-wavelength electrostatic quasi-mode with frequency at 2 omega(sub pe) is excited, and second, the quasi-mode and the electomagnetic mode are nonlinearly coupled. The implication is that, when the excited 2 omega(sub pe) quasi-mode propagates in an inhomgeneous medium with slightly decreasing density, the quasi-mode can be converted directly into an electromagnetic mode. Hense the electomagnetic radiation at twice the plasma frequency is generated. Numerical solutions of the dispersion equation with the choice of parameters that describe physical characteristics of the electron foreshock are presented, which illustrates the viability of the new mechanism.

  13. The upper Bow Island (Blackleaf) Formation of southwestern Alberta: Geological aspects and exploration approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Putnam, P.E.; Christensen, S.L. )

    1991-06-01

    The upper parts of the Bow Island Formation (Albian) of southwestern Alberta are significant gas reservoirs. The main westernmost reservoir zone is part of a complex package of interbedded lenticular sandstones, mudstones, and localized chert pebble conglomerates. The depositional setting for these sediments comprised a wave-dominated shoreline with conglomerates found proximal to drowned river mouths. The coarse nature of the upper Bow Island is related to tectonic movements associated with Crowsnest (Vaughn) volcanism. Conglomerates form the most impressive Bow Island reservoirs because of their thickness (up to 25 m) and petrophysical properties (17% porosity, 24 d permeability). Diagenesis dominantly comprises compaction features within grain-supported conglomerates. Increasing quartz content is related to decreasing grain size and is associated with porosity occlusion by quartz overgrowths. Bow Island reservoirs in southwestern Alberta are cool (under 50C) and significantly underpressured (0.2 psi). The high permeabilities and low pressures at depths of 1,000 to 1,500 m suggest the potential for formation damage is high, and many wells in the region were targeted for deeper, high-pressure zones. In spite of the low pressures, however, many Bow Island wells are capable of excellent gas deliveries with individual well recoveries of up to 10 bcf. All significant Bow Island porosity in the deepest, undisturbed parts of southwestern Alberta is gas saturated with updip aquifers flanking the gas. Seismic definition of the thickest Bow Island targets is feasible but has been hampered, in part, by difficult surface conditions and a prior emphasis on deeper targets.

  14. A bow-shaped thermal structure traveling upstream of the zonal wind flow of Venus atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taguchi, Makoto; Fukuhara, Tetsuya; Imamura, Takeshi; Kouyama, Toru; Nakamura, Masato; Sato, Takao M.; Ueno, Munetaka; Suzuki, Makoto; Iwagami, Naomoto; Sato, Mitsuteru; Hashimoto, George L.; Takagi, Seiko; Akatsuki Science Team

    2016-10-01

    The Longwave Infrared Camera (LIR) onboard the Japanese Venus orbiter Akatsuki acquires a snap shot of Venus in the middle infrared region, and provides a brightness temperature distribution at the cloud-top altitudes of about 65 km. Hundreds of images taken by LIR have been transferred to the ground since the successful Venus orbit insertion of Akatsuki on Dec. 7, 2015. Here we report that a bow shaped thermal structure extending from the northern high latitudes to the southern high latitudes was found in the brightness temperature map on Dec. 7, 2015, and that it lasted for four days at least surprisingly at almost same geographical position. The bow shape structure looks symmetrical with the equator, and consists of a high temperature region in east or upstream of the background strong westward wind or the super rotation of the Venus atmosphere followed by a low temperature region in west with an amplitude of 5 K. It appeared close to the evening terminator in the dayside, and seems not to have stayed in the same local time rather to have co-rotated with the slowly rotating ground where the western part of Aphrodite Continent was below the center of the bow shape. Meridionally aligned dark filaments similar to the bow shape structure in shape but in much smaller scale were also identified in the brightness temperature map on Dec. 7, and they propagated upstream of the zonal wind as well. The bow shape structure disappeared when LIR observed the same local time and longitude in the earliest opportunity on Jan. 16, 2016. Similar events, though their amplitudes were less than 1 K, were found on Apr. 15 and 26, 2016, but they appeared in different local times and longitudes. A simulation of a gravity wave generated in the lower atmosphere and propagating upward reproduces the observed bow shape structure. The bow shape structure could be a signature of transferring momentum from the ground to the upper atmosphere.

  15. Annual variations in the Martian bow shock location as observed by the Mars Express mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, B. E. S.; Lester, M.; Sánchez-Cano, B.; Nichols, J. D.; Andrews, D. J.; Edberg, N. J. T.; Opgenoorth, H. J.; Fränz, M.; Holmström, M.; Ramstad, R.; Witasse, O.; Cartacci, M.; Cicchetti, A.; Noschese, R.; Orosei, R.

    2016-11-01

    The Martian bow shock distance has previously been shown to be anticorrelated with solar wind dynamic pressure but correlated with solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) irradiance. Since both of these solar parameters reduce with the square of the distance from the Sun, and Mars' orbit about the Sun increases by ˜0.3 AU from perihelion to aphelion, it is not clear how the bow shock location will respond to variations in these solar parameters, if at all, throughout its orbit. In order to characterize such a response, we use more than 5 Martian years of Mars Express Analyser of Space Plasma and EneRgetic Atoms (ASPERA-3) Electron Spectrometer measurements to automatically identify 11,861 bow shock crossings. We have discovered that the bow shock distance as a function of solar longitude has a minimum of 2.39RM around aphelion and proceeds to a maximum of 2.65RM around perihelion, presenting an overall variation of ˜11% throughout the Martian orbit. We have verified previous findings that the bow shock in southern hemisphere is on average located farther away from Mars than in the northern hemisphere. However, this hemispherical asymmetry is small (total distance variation of ˜2.4%), and the same annual variations occur irrespective of the hemisphere. We have identified that the bow shock location is more sensitive to variations in the solar EUV irradiance than to solar wind dynamic pressure variations. We have proposed possible interaction mechanisms between the solar EUV flux and Martian plasma environment that could explain this annual variation in bow shock location.

  16. Investigating the Function of Play Bows in Dog and Wolf Puppies (Canis lupus familiaris, Canis lupus occidentalis)

    PubMed Central

    Espinosa, Julia; Marshall-Pescini, Sarah; Smuts, Barbara; Range, Friederike

    2016-01-01

    Animals utilize behavioral signals across a range of different contexts in order to communicate with others and produce probable behavioral outcomes. During play animals frequently adopt action patterns used in other contexts. Researchers have therefore hypothesized that play signals have evolved to clarify communicative intent. One highly stereotyped play signal is the canid play bow, but its function remains contested. In order to clarify how canid puppies use play bows, we used data on play bows in immature wolves (ages 2.7–7.8 months) and dogs (ages 2 to 5 months) to test hypotheses evaluated in a previous study of adult dogs. We found that young dogs used play bows similarly to adult dogs; play bows most often occurred after a brief pause in play followed by complementary highly active play states. However, while the relative number of play bows and total observation time was similar between dog and wolf puppies, wolves did not follow this behavioral pattern, as play bows were unsuccessful in eliciting further play activity by the partner. While some similarities for the function of play bows in dog and wolf puppies were documented, it appears that play bows may function differently in wolf puppies in regards to re-initiating play. PMID:28033358

  17. Unilateral Outer Bow Expanded Cervical Headgear Force System: 3D Analysis Using Finite Element Method

    PubMed Central

    Mortezai, Omid; Esmaily, Masomeh; Darvishpour, Hojat

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Headgears are among the effective orthodontic appliances to achieve treatment goals. Unilateral molar distal movement is sometimes needed during an orthodontic treatment, which can be achieved by an asymmetric headgear. Different unilateral headgears have been introduced. The main goal of this study was to analyze the force system of unilateral expanded outer bow asymmetric headgears by the finite element method (FEM). Materials and Methods: Six 3D finite element models of a mesiodistal slice of the maxilla containing upper first molars, their periodontal ligaments (PDLs), cancellous bone, cortical bone, and a cervical headgear with expanded outer bow attached to maxillary first molars were designed in SolidWorks 2010 and meshed in ANSYS Workbench ver. 12.1. The models were the same except for the degree of outer bow expansion. The outer bow ends were loaded with 2 N force. The distal driving force and the net moment were evaluated. Results: A decrease in the distalizing force in the normal side molar from 1.69 N to 1.37 N was shown by increasing the degree of unilateral expansion. At the same time, the force increased from 2.19 N to 2.49 N in the expanded side molar. A net moment increasing from 2.26 N.mm to 4.64 N.mm was also shown. Conclusion: Unilateral outer bow expansion can produce different distalizing forces in molars, which increase by increasing the expansion. PMID:26622282

  18. The Milky Way Project: A Citizen Science Catalog of Infrared Bow Shock Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, Don; Jayasinghe, Tharindu; Povich, Matthew S.

    2017-01-01

    We present preliminary results from the first citizen-science search for infrared stellar-wind bow shock candidates. This search uses the Milky Way project, hosted by the Zooniverse, an online platform with over 1 million volunteer citizen scientists. Milky Way Project volunteers examine 77,000 randomly-distributed Spitzer image cutouts at varying zoom levels. Volunteers mark the infrared arc of potential bow shock candidates as well as the star likely driving the nebula. We produce lists of candidates from bow shocks flagged by multiple volunteers, which after merging and final visual review form the basis for our catalog. Comparing our new catalog to a recently-published catalog of 709 infrared bow shock candidates identified by a small team of (primarily undergraduate) researchers will allow us to assess the effectiveness of citizen science for this type of search and should yield a more complete catalog. Planned studies using these large catalogs will improve constraints on the mass-loss rates for the massive stars that create these bow shock nebulae. Mass-loss rates are highly uncertain but are a critical component of evolutionary models for massive stars. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under grants CAREER-1454334, AST-1411851 (RUI) and AST-1412845.

  19. Bow-tie antennas on a dielectric half-space - Theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Compton, Richard C.; Mcphedran, Ross C.; Popovic, Zorana; Rebeiz, Gabriel M.; Tong, Peter P.

    1987-01-01

    A new formulation is discussed for the rigous calculation of the radiation pattern of a bow-tie antenna of finite length and infinitesimal thickness, placed on a lossless dielectric substrate. The analysis is based on a representation of the current density on the metal surface of the antenna as a sum of an imposed (quasistatic) term and a set of current modes with unknown amplitudes. Free-space fields that are expressed in terms of continuous spectra of symmetrized plane waves are matched to the current modes using the method of moments. The resulting set of equations are solved for the unknown current amplitudes. The calculations show that for increasing bow length the antenna impedance spirals rapidly to a value predicted by transmission line theory. The theory also shows that the E-plane pattern of a two-wavelength, 60-deg bow-tie antenna is dominated by low-loss current modes propagating at the dielectric wavenumber. As the bow tie narrows, the loss of the modes increases, and the dominant wavenumber tends to the quasi-static value. Pattern measurements made at 94 GHz are shown to agree well with theoretical predictions. Measurements for a long-wire antenna, a linear array of bow-tie elements, and a log-periodic antenna are also presented.

  20. BOW SHOCK FRAGMENTATION DRIVEN BY A THERMAL INSTABILITY IN LABORATORY ASTROPHYSICS EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Lebedev, S. V.; Pickworth, L. A.; Swadling, G. F.; Skidmore, J.; Hall, G. N.; Bennett, M.; Bland, S. N.; Burdiak, G.; De Grouchy, P.; Music, J.; Suttle, L.; Ciardi, A.; Rodriguez, R.; Gil, J. M.; Espinosa, G.; Hartigan, P.; Hansen, E.; Frank, A.

    2015-12-20

    The role of radiative cooling during the evolution of a bow shock was studied in laboratory-astrophysics experiments that are scalable to bow shocks present in jets from young stellar objects. The laboratory bow shock is formed during the collision of two counterstreaming, supersonic plasma jets produced by an opposing pair of radial foil Z-pinches driven by the current pulse from the MAGPIE pulsed-power generator. The jets have different flow velocities in the laboratory frame, and the experiments are driven over many times the characteristic cooling timescale. The initially smooth bow shock rapidly develops small-scale nonuniformities over temporal and spatial scales that are consistent with a thermal instability triggered by strong radiative cooling in the shock. The growth of these perturbations eventually results in a global fragmentation of the bow shock front. The formation of a thermal instability is supported by analysis of the plasma cooling function calculated for the experimental conditions with the radiative packages ABAKO/RAPCAL.

  1. Discovering Massive Runaway Stars with Infrared Bow Shock Nebulae: First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, Julian E.; Povich, Matthew S.; Kobulnicky, Henry A.; Chick, William T.; Dale, Daniel A.; Munari, Stephan; Olivier, Grace M.; Schurhammer, Danielle; Sorber, Rebecca L.; Wernke, Heather N.

    2016-01-01

    We have searched the plane of the Milky Way for candidate 22 μm and 24 μm infrared bow shock nebulae using the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) All-Sky Data Release and Spitzer GLIMPSE mosaic images. Infrared bow shocks driven by massive, OB stars can provide new constraints on stellar mass-loss rates and reveal new runaway late O- and early B-type stars. Candidate infrared bow shocks identified in this search were chosen using the criteria of a mostly symmetric arc-like morphology with the arc being bright in only 22 or 24 μm along with an apparent driving star associated with the bow shock in line with its axis of symmetry. Preliminary visible spectroscopic observations of candidate bow shock driving stars obtained using the Longslit Spectrograph at the Wyoming Infrared Observatory (WIRO) reveal that these visual inspections yield a 95% success rate of finding late O- or early B-type stars.This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under grants AST-1063146 (REU), AST-1411851 (RUI), and AST-1412845.

  2. The dynamics of Bow-shock Pulsar Wind Nebula: Reconstruction of multi-bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Doosoo; Heinz, Sebastian

    2014-08-01

    Bow-shock pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) exhibit a characteristic cometary shape due to the supersonic motion of the pulsar interacting with the interstellar medium (ISM). One of the spectacular bow-shock is the Guitar Nebula, which is produced by the fast pulsar PSR B2224+65 (vpsr > 1000 km s-1 ), and consists of a bright head, a faint neck, a two larger bubbles. We present that the peculiar mophology arises from variations in the interstellar medium density. We perform 3-D hydrodynamic simulation to understand the evolution of the pulsar as its moves through the density discontinuity. We found that when the pulsar encounters the low-density medium, the pressure balance at the head of the bow shock begins to collapse, producing the second bubble. The expansion rate of the bubble is related to the properties of both the pulsar and the ambient medium. Assuming that the pulsar’s properties, including spin-down energy, are constant, we conclude that the ambient density around the second bubble should be 4.46 times larger than around the first bubble in the Guitar body. We further found that when the pulsar encounters the inclined density dicontinuity, it can produce the asymmetric shape of the bow shock observed in a subset of bow-shock PWNe including J2124-3358.

  3. Bow shock nebulae of hot massive stars in a magnetized medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, D. M.-A.; Mignone, A.; Kuiper, R.; Raga, A. C.; Kley, W.

    2017-01-01

    A significant fraction of OB-type, main-sequence massive stars are classified as runaway and move supersonically through the interstellar medium (ISM). Their strong stellar winds interact with their surroundings, where the typical strength of the local ISM magnetic field is about 3.5-7 μG, which can result in the formation of bow shock nebulae. We investigate the effects of such magnetic fields, aligned with the motion of the flow, on the formation and emission properties of these circumstellar structures. Our axisymmetric, magneto-hydrodynamical simulations with optically thin radiative cooling, heating and anisotropic thermal conduction show that the presence of the background ISM magnetic field affects the projected optical emission of our bow shocks at Hα and [O III] λ 5007 which become fainter by about 1-2 orders of magnitude, respectively. Radiative transfer calculations against dust opacity indicate that the magnetic field slightly diminishes their projected infrared emission and that our bow shocks emit brightly at 60 μm. This may explain why the bow shocks generated by ionizing runaway massive stars are often difficult to identify. Finally, we discuss our results in the context of the bow shock of ζ Ophiuchi and we support the interpretation of its imperfect morphology as an evidence of the presence of an ISM magnetic field not aligned with the motion of its driving star.

  4. Acceleration of solar wind ions to 1 MeV by electromagnetic structures upstream of the Earth's bow shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stasiewicz, K.; Markidis, S.; Eliasson, B.; Strumik, M.; Yamauchi, M.

    2013-05-01

    We present measurements from the ESA/NASA Cluster mission that show in situ acceleration of ions to energies of 1 MeV outside the bow shock. The observed heating can be associated with the presence of electromagnetic structures with strong spatial gradients of the electric field that lead to ion gyro-phase breaking and to the onset of chaos in ion trajectories. It results in rapid, stochastic acceleration of ions in the direction perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field. The electric potential of the structures can be compared to a field of moguls on a ski slope, capable of accelerating and ejecting the fast running skiers out of piste. This mechanism may represent the universal mechanism for perpendicular acceleration and heating of ions in the magnetosphere, the solar corona and in astrophysical plasmas. This is also a basic mechanism that can limit steepening of nonlinear electromagnetic structures at shocks and foreshocks in collisionless plasmas.

  5. MicroRNA-532 and microRNA-3064 inhibit cell proliferation and invasion by acting as direct regulators of human telomerase reverse transcriptase in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Wang, Ai-Hua; Zhang, Luo-Ying; Bai, Jie

    2017-01-01

    Human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) plays a crucial role in ovarian cancer (OC) progression. However, the mechanisms underlying hTERT upregulation in OC, and the specific microRNAs (miRNAs) involved in the regulation of hTERT in OC cells, remains unclear. We performed a bioinformatics search to identify potential miRNAs that bind to the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) region of the hTERT mRNA. We examined the expression levels of miR-532/miR-3064 in OC tissues and normal ovarian tissues, and analyzed the correlation between miRNA expression and OC patient outcomes. The impacts of miR-532/miR-3064 on hTERT expression were evaluated by western blot analysis and hTERT 3'-UTR reporter assays. We investigated the effects of miR-532/miR-3064 on proliferation and invasion in OC cells. We found that miR-532 and miR-3064 are down-regulated in OC specimens. We observed a significant association between reduced miR-532/miR-3064 expression and poorer survival of patients with OC. We confirmed that in OC cells, these two miRNAs downregulate hTERT levels by directly targeting its 3'-UTR region, and inhibited proliferation, EMT and invasion of OC cells. In addition, the overexpression of the hTERT cDNA lacking the 3'-UTR partially restored miR-532/miR-3064-inhibited OC cell proliferation and invasion. The silencing of hTERT by siRNA oligonucleotides abolished these malignant features, and phenocopied the effects of miR-532/miR-3064 overexpression. Furthermore, overexpression of miR-532/miR-3064 inhibits the growth of OC cells in vivo. Our findings demonstrate a miR-532/miR-3064-mediated mechanism responsible for hTERT upregulation in OC cells, and reveal a possibility of targeting miR-532/miR-3064 for future treatment of OC. PMID:28291810

  6. Direct method for determination of Sudan I in FD&C Yellow No. 6 and D&C Orange No. 4 by reversed-phase liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Petigara, Bhakti R; Scher, Alan L

    2007-01-01

    A reversed-phase liquid chromatographic method was developed to determine parts-per-million and higher levels of Sudan 1, 1-(phenylazo)-2-naphthalenol, in the disulfo monoazo color additive FD&C Yellow No. 6 and in a related monosulfo monoazo color additive, D&C Orange No. 4. Sudan I, the corresponding unsulfonated monoazo dye, is a known impurity in these color additives. The color additives are dissolved in water and methanol, and the filtered solutions are directly chromatographed, without extraction or concentration, by using gradient elution at 0.25 mL/min. Calibrations from peak areas at 485 nm were linear. At a 99% confidence level, the limits of determination were 0.008 microg Sudan I/mL (0.4 ppm) in FD&C Yellow No. 6 and 0.011 microg Sudan I/mL (0.00011%) in D&C Orange No. 4. The confidence intervals were 0.202 +/- 0.002 microg Sudan I/mL (10.1 +/- 0.1 ppm) near the specification level for Sudan I in FD&C Yellow No. 6 and 20.0 +/- 0.2 microg Sudan I/mL (0.200 +/- 0.002%) near the highest concentration of Sudan I found in D&C Orange No. 4. A survey was conducted to determine Sudan I in 28 samples of FD&C Yellow No. 6 from 17 international manufacturers over 3 years, and in a pharmacology-tested sample. These samples were found to contain undetected levels (16 samples), 0.5-9.7 ppm Sudan I (0.01-0.194 microg Sudan I/mL in analyzed solutions; 11 samples including the pharmacology sample), and > or =10 ppm Sudan I (> or = 0.2 microg Sudan I/mL; 2 samples). Analyses of 21 samples of D&C Orange No. 4 from 8 international manufacturers over 4 years found Sudan I at undetected levels (8 samples), 0.0005 to < 0.005% Sudan I (0.05 to < 0.5 microg Sudan I/mL in analyzed solutions; 3 samples, including a pharmacology batch), 0.005 to <0.05% Sudan I (0.5 to <5 microg Sudan I/mL; 9 samples), and 0.18% Sudan I (18 microg Sudan I/mL; 1 sample).

  7. Studies with Cluster upstream and downstream of the bow shock: An experimenter's perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moebius, E.

    1995-01-01

    Some open questions in the physics of bow shock formation, the evolution of the particle distributions from solar wind into the magnetosheath, and the acceleration of ions at the moment of the shock are summarized. A layout of the current situation is presented in view of recent theoretical developments and the new diagnostic tools provided by the Cluster mission. The transition of ions across the quasi-perpendicular bow shock and their downstream thermalization are discussed. The processes and spatial scales are found to be species dependent and are discussed for H(+), He(2+), and He(+). The theory of particle acceleration at quasi-parallel shocks are reviewed. It is shown how Cluster can study the time variable structures of the shock as predicted by hybrid simulation. It is emphasized that high time resolution measurement with simultaneous species separation is necessary for the study of the ion acceleration. Suggestions for the spacecraft separations at the bow shock are suggested.

  8. Improved bow shock models for Herbig-Haro objects - Application to HH 2A-prime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raymond, John C.; Hartmann, Lee; Hartigan, Patrick

    1988-01-01

    An improved version of the bow shock theory previously applied to Herbig-Haro objects is presented. The modifications provide a more accurate calculation of the ionization state of material entering the bow shock. The revised preionization does not drastically affect the emission-line predictions for a 200 km/s bow shock model, though the effects will be more severe for slower shock velocities. The line profiles of the new models resemble the observed profiles somewhat more closely, and the relative emission-line intensities typically differ by 30 percent from those predicted by the older models. The models agree well with new IUE spectra and existing optical data for HH 2A-prime.

  9. Transport of Solar Wind H+ and He++ Ions across Earth’s Bow Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parks, G. K.; Lee, E.; Fu, S. Y.; Kim, H. E.; Ma, Y. Q.; Yang, Z. W.; Liu, Y.; Lin, N.; Hong, J.; Canu, P.; Dandouras, I.; Rème, H.; Goldstein, M. L.

    2016-07-01

    We have investigated the dependence of mass, energy, and charge of solar wind (SW) transport across Earth’s bow shock. An examination of 111 crossings during quiet SW in both quasi-perpendicular and quasi-parallel shock regions shows that 64 crossings had various degrees of heating and thermalization of SW. We found 22 crossings where the SW speed was <400 km s-1. The shock potential of a typical supercritical quasi-perpendicular shock estimated from deceleration of the SW and cutoff energy of electron flat top distribution is ˜50 Volts. We find that the temperatures of H+ and He++ beams that penetrate the shock can sometimes be nearly the same in the upstream and downstream regions, indicating little or no heating had occurred crossing the bow shock. None of the models predict that the SW can cross the bow shock without heating. Our observations are important constraints for new models of collisionless shocks.

  10. A numerical study on bow shocks around the lightning return stroke channel

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Qiang Chen, Bin Yi, Yun; Chen, P. F.; Mao, Yunfei; Xiong, Run

    2015-03-15

    Bow shock structures are important to various hydrodynamics and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) phenomena in geophysics and astrophysics. The formation and propagation of bow shocks around the lightning return stroke channel are investigated based on the self-similar motion theory and simulated with a two-dimensional Eulerian finite volume resistive radiation MHD code. In this framework, as verification of theoretical models, the evolving structures of many quantities, such as the plasma density, temperature, pressure, shock velocity, and magnetic field, can be obtained, which present all the characteristics of bow shocks in the lightning return stroke processes. The evolution characteristics and the configuration of the curved return stroke channels, e.g., the non-ideal effects and the scaling laws, are discussed in detail. The results may have applications for some observed features of the return stroke channels and other phenomena in the lightning discharge plasmas.

  11. Sedentism, social change, warfare, and the bow in the ancient Pueblo Southwest.

    PubMed

    Reed, Paul F; Geib, Phil R

    2013-01-01

    In the ancient American Southwest, use of the bow developed relatively rapidly among Pueblo people by the fifth century AD. This new technology replaced the millennia-old atlatl and dart weaponry system. Roughly 150 years later in the AD 600s, Pueblo socioeconomic organization began to evolve rapidly, as many groups adopted a much more sedentary life. Multiple factors converged to allow this sedentary pattern to emerge, but the role of the bow in this process has not been fully explored. In this paper, we trace the development of the bow and discuss its role as sedentism emerged and social changes occurred in ancient Puebloan society from the fifth through seventh centuries AD.

  12. Reversible Sterilization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Largey, Gale

    1977-01-01

    Notes that difficult questions arise concerning the use of sterilization for alleged eugenic and euthenic purposes. Thus, how reversible sterilization will be used with relation to the poor, mentally ill, mentally retarded, criminals, and minors, is questioned. (Author/AM)

  13. Reversible Cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Harsh; Madanieh, Raef; Kosmas, Constantine E; Vatti, Satya K; Vittorio, Timothy J

    2015-01-01

    Cardiomyopathies (CMs) have many etiological factors that can result in severe structural and functional dysregulation. Fortunately, there are several potentially reversible CMs that are known to improve when the root etiological factor is addressed. In this article, we discuss several of these reversible CMs, including tachycardia-induced, peripartum, inflammatory, hyperthyroidism, Takotsubo, and chronic illness–induced CMs. Our discussion also includes a review on their respective pathophysiology, as well as possible management solutions. PMID:26052233

  14. THEMIS Observations of Unusual Bow Shock Motion, Attending a Transient Magnetospheric Event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korotova, Galina; Sibeck, David; Omidi, N.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2013-01-01

    We present a multipoint case study of solar wind and magnetospheric observations during a transient magnetospheric compression at 2319 UT on October 15, 2008. We use high-time resolution magnetic field and plasma data from the THEMIS and GOES-11/12 spacecraft to show that this transient event corresponded to an abrupt rotation in the IMF orientation, a change in the location of the foreshock, and transient outward bow shock motion. We employ results from a global hybrid code model to reconcile the observations indicating transient inward magnetopause motion with the outward bow shock motion.

  15. Asymptotic Steady-state Solution to a Bow Shock with an Infinite Mach Number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yalinewich, Almog; Sari, Re'em

    2016-08-01

    The problem of a cold gas flowing past a stationary obstacle is considered. We study the bow shock that forms around the obstacle and show that at large distances from the obstacle the shock front forms a parabolic solid of revolution. The profiles of the hydrodynamic variables in the interior of the shock are obtained by solution of the hydrodynamic equations in parabolic coordinates. The results are verified with a hydrodynamic simulation. The drag force on the obstacle is also calculated. Finally, we use these results to model the bow shock around an isolated neutron star.

  16. An Evaluation Of The Effects Of The Low Energy Laser On Bowed Tendons In Horses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKibbin, L. S.

    1987-03-01

    Bowed tendons in the horse can greatly hinder it's racing career. A pulsed, 904 nm, infrared GaAs laser, peak power 2 watts, averaging .4 mW, 10 diodes per head, was used in reducing the area of the bowed tendon. This treatment proved to capacitate the horse for better race performance. Before application of the laser the wound area was shaved. A cast of playdoe was formed over the affected area. The cast was then removed and spread over a sheet of paper which consisted of a drawing of a grid in square centimeters. The squares were then counted.

  17. The Evolution and Structure of the Bow Echo/microburst Events.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wen-Chau

    The evolution and structure of several bow echo/microburst events are investigated in this study. Multiple Doppler radar analysis (three dimensional wind fields, pressure and buoyancy retrievals, vorticity budget and trajectory) is performed for the primary case of July 14, 1982 during the Joint Airport Weather Study (JAWS) experiment while single Doppler radar analysis is performed in 4 other bow echo/microburst events. The downdraft is initiated by precipitation loading at 4 km Above Ground Level (AGL) 7 min before the surface microburst. The precipitation particles within the reflectivity core contribute not only to the loading effect but also to the cooling effect via evaporation, melting and sublimation. The downdraft core initially coincides with the reflectivity core but shifts toward the weak echo region at the peak microburst time. A high perturbation pressure (maximum of 0.6 mb) builds up from the surface at the microburst center upon impact with the ground. At the surface, the microburst air is warmer than its environment. A maximum cooling of 3^circ C is located at 1.6 km at the reflectivity gradient region. The reflectivity core precedes the descent of the downdraft core, while the maximum w correlates well with the maximum negative buoyancy. The storm relative trajectories indicate that the source region of the microburst air is from 3-4 km level. A conceptual model of the single-cell type bow echo evolution is constructed based on the vorticity budget analysis. A bow echo is formed by the redistribution of hydrometeors by a vorticity couplet which is generated by the interaction between the downdraft and the vertical shear vector or the tilting effect. The rear inflow jet is induced by the vorticity couplet and its intensity should depend on the strength of the vorticity couplet. This model indicates that a bow echo may be produced by a weak downdraft as long as a proper vertical shear exists. However, strong downdrafts of microburst intensity will

  18. 75 FR 74678 - Medicine Bow-Routt National Forests and Thunder Basin National Grassland; Colorado and Wyoming...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-01

    ... Forest Service Medicine Bow-Routt National Forests and Thunder Basin National Grassland; Colorado and Wyoming; Medicine Bow-Routt National Forests and Thunder Basin National Grassland Invasive Plant... National Grassland (MBRTB) will prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS) to continue control...

  19. 78 FR 65609 - Medicine Bow-Routt National Forests and Thunder Basin National Grassland; Wyoming; Thunder Basin...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-01

    ... Forest Service Medicine Bow-Routt National Forests and Thunder Basin National Grassland; Wyoming; Thunder Basin National Grassland Prairie Dog Amendment Environmental Impact Statement; Correction AGENCY: Forest... Ranger, Douglas Ranger District, Medicine Bow-Routt National Forests and Thunder Basin National...

  20. Columbia University: Direct Reversal of Glucocorticoid Resistance by AKT inhibition in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (T-ALL) | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    The goal of this project is to identify key druggable regulators of glucocorticoid resistance in T-ALL. To this end, a reverse-engineered T-ALL context-specific regulatory interaction network was created from a phenotypically diverse T-ALL gene expression dataset, and then this network was interrogated using master regulator analysis to find drivers of glucocorticoid resistance.

  1. Simple Method for Converting Conventional Face-bow to Postural Face-bow for Recording the Relationship of Maxilla Relative to the Temporomandibular Joint

    PubMed Central

    Gooya, Ali; Zarakani, Houman; Memari, Yeganeh

    2015-01-01

    A fundamental assumption in prosthetic dentistry is that the axis-orbital plane will usually be parallel to the horizontal reference plane. Most articulator systems have incorporated this concept into their designs and use orbitale as the anterior reference point for transferring the vertical position of the maxilla to the articulator. Clinical observations of Cantonese patients suggest that in some individuals the Frankfort plane may not be horizontal, thus the orientation of the casts in the articulator is incorrect with respect to the horizontal plane. The purpose of this study was to introduce a simple method for converting the conventional face-bow to postural face-bow to reproduce the orientation of the occlusal plane relative to the true horizontal plane with the patient in Natural Head Posture (NHP). PMID:26005456

  2. Analysis of "Teno-uchi" maneuver in releasing Japanese-style bows based on muscle activities and forces acting on the bow.

    PubMed

    Hosoya, Satoshi; Byun, Keigo Ohyama; Okada, Morihiko

    2004-12-01

    Since a Japanese-style bow has a very complicated shape and structure, an archer has to apply the "Teno-uchi" maneuver including horizontally twisting torque, or "Nejiri", and sagittally down-pushing torque, or "Uwa-oshi", to the restoring bow in order to hit the target. The purpose of this study was to investigate the biomechanical relationship between the muscular activities of the left forearm and the operation of "Teno-uchi" maneuver. Surface EMG of left forearm muscles and the two kinds of torque acting on the bow around the time of release were recorded in 10 experienced subjects during arrow shooting. The "Biku", an involuntary resignation from release happening in the shooting, was also examined. Close analyses of the results revealed that activation of the extensor carpi ulnaris and extensor digitorum muscles together with inhibition of the flexor carpi ulnaris muscle brought about "Nejiri", while activation of the extensor carpi ulnaris as well as flexor carpi ulnaris muscles and inhibition of the extensor carpi redialis longus and extensor digitorum muscles gave rise to "Uwa-oshi", thus causing activities of trade-off nature in the extensor digitorum and flexor carpi ulnaris muscles for the "Nejiri" and "Uwa-oshi. The trade-off activities were presumably actualized through time-sharing coordination between the muscles.

  3. Nickel-hydrogen cell reversal characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lurie, Charles

    1994-01-01

    Nickel-hydrogen cell reversal characteristics are being studied as part of a TRW program directed towards development of a high current battery cell bypass switch. The following are discussed: cell bypass switch; nickel-hydrogen cell reversal characteristics; and nickel-hydrogen cell chemistry: discharge/reversal and overdischarge (reversal) with nickel and hydrogen precharge.

  4. Cluster Observations and Kinetic Simulations of Slow Mode Shocks at the Earth's Bow Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucharek, H.; Mouikis, C.; Scholer, M.; Eriksson, S.

    2007-12-01

    Slow shocks in association with reconnection are thought to be the main engine of the plasma heating, acceleration and dynamical changes of the magnetosphere. It is therefore very important to study their structure and the related physical processes. Measurements, from CLUSTER spacecraft show clear evidence for slow- mode shocks associated with magnetic reconnection in the near Earth magnetotail in connection with a substorm onset [S. Eriksson et al., 2004]. Most of the knowledge of slow mode shocks was derived from two-fluid theory together with extensive small-scale hybrid simulations of the shock transition. However, it is difficult to perform numerical simulations under realistic plasma conditions. First, it is important to use realistic proton electron mass ratios to study downstream electron heating. Second, the method to initiate a slow mode shock is Might have an impact of the obtained results. Using the piston method the slow mode shock will run into the downstream region of a preceding fast shock wave. Using switch off shock conditions the slow mode shock will run into a quite plasma environment. However, at the Earth's bow shock turbulence will always be around. Finally, dimensional effects in numerical simulations have effects on the results. For instance in 1D simulations all wave vectors are forced in the simulation direction. Furthermore, full particle simulations predict lower downstream ion temperature than predicted by hybrid simulations. This is attributed to electron kinetic processes. We performed a number of 1D full particle simulations with real proton to electron mass ratio and multi-dimensional hybrid simulations to address the above-mentioned topics. As input for the numerical simulations we used plasma- parameters from the established Cluster database. We investigated the dynamics, the structure, and the evolution of the simulated slow mode shocks using the piston and the "switch-off" method for hybrid and the 1D full particle simulations

  5. Towards an MHD Theory for the Standoff Distance of Earth's Bow Shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carins, Iver H.; Grabbe, Crockett L.

    1994-01-01

    A magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory is developed for the standoff distance a(s) of the bow shock and the thickness Delta(ms) of the magnetosheath, using the empirical Spreiter et al. relation Delta(ms) = kX and the MHD density ratio X across the shock. The theory includes as special cases the well-known gasdynamic theory and associated phenomenological MHD-like models for Delta(ms) and As. In general, however, MHD effects produce major differences from previous models, especially at low Alfev (Ma) and Sonic (Ms) Mach numbers. The magnetic field orientation Ma, Ms and the ratio of specific heats gamma are all important variables of the theory. In contrast, the fast mode Mach number need play no direct role. Three principle conclusions are reached. First the gasdynamic and phenomenological models miss important dependences of field orientation and Ms generally provide poor approximations to the MHD results. Second, changes in field orientation and Ms are predicted to cause factor of approximately 4 changes in Delta(ms) at low Ma. These effects should be important when predicting the shock's location or calculating gramma from observations. Third, using Spreiter et al.'s value for k in the MHD theory leads to maxima a(s) values at low Ma and nominal Ms that are much smaller than observations and MHD simulations require. Resolving this problem requires either the modified Spreiter-like relation and larger k found in recent MHD simulations and/or a breakdown in the Spreiter-like relation at very low Ma.

  6. Direct Analysis of Reversed-Phase HPTLC Separated Tryptic Protein Digests using a Liquid Microjunction Surface Sampling Probe/ESI-MS System

    SciTech Connect

    Emory, Joshua F; Walworth, Matthew J; Van Berkel, Gary J; Schulz, Michael; Minarik, susanne

    2010-01-01

    The sampling, ionization and detection of tryptic peptides separated in one-dimension on reversed phase HPTLC plates was performed using liquid microjunction surface sampling probe electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Tryptic digests of five proteins (cytochrome c., myoglobin, beta-casein, lysozyme, and bovine serum albumin) were spotted on reversed phase HPTLC RP-8 F254s and HPTLC RP-18 F254s plates. The plates were then developed using 70/30 methanol/water with 0.1 M ammonium acetate. A dual purpose extraction/electrospray solution containing 70/30/0.1 water/methanol/formic acid was infused through the sampling probe during analysis of the developed lanes. Both full scan mass spectra and data dependent tandem mass spectra were acquired for each development lane to detect and verify the peptide distributions. Data dependent tandem mass spectra provided both protein identification and sequence coverage information. Highest sequence coverages were achieved for cytochrome c. and myoglobin (62.5% and 58.3%, respectively) on reversed phase RP-8 plates. While the tryptic peptides were separated enough for identification, the peptide bands did show some overlap with most peptides located in the lower half of the development lane. Proteins whose peptides were more separated gave higher sequence coverage. Larger proteins such as beta-casein and BSA which were spotted in lower relative amounts gave much lower sequence coverage than the smaller proteins.

  7. Fuzzy Bayesian Network-Bow-Tie Analysis of Gas Leakage during Biomass Gasification

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Fang; Xu, Kaili; Yao, Xiwen; Li, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Biomass gasification technology has been rapidly developed recently. But fire and poisoning accidents caused by gas leakage restrict the development and promotion of biomass gasification. Therefore, probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) is necessary for biomass gasification system. Subsequently, Bayesian network-bow-tie (BN-bow-tie) analysis was proposed by mapping bow-tie analysis into Bayesian network (BN). Causes of gas leakage and the accidents triggered by gas leakage can be obtained by bow-tie analysis, and BN was used to confirm the critical nodes of accidents by introducing corresponding three importance measures. Meanwhile, certain occurrence probability of failure was needed in PSA. In view of the insufficient failure data of biomass gasification, the occurrence probability of failure which cannot be obtained from standard reliability data sources was confirmed by fuzzy methods based on expert judgment. An improved approach considered expert weighting to aggregate fuzzy numbers included triangular and trapezoidal numbers was proposed, and the occurrence probability of failure was obtained. Finally, safety measures were indicated based on the obtained critical nodes. The theoretical occurrence probabilities in one year of gas leakage and the accidents caused by it were reduced to 1/10.3 of the original values by these safety measures. PMID:27463975

  8. Hybrid functional calculations on the band gap bowing parameters of In x Ga1-x N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Lin; Yixu, Xu; Jianhua, Zhang; Shunqing, Wu; Zizhong, Zhu

    2016-04-01

    The electronic band structures and band gap bowing parameters of In x Ga1-x N are studied by the first-principles method based on the density functional theory. Calculations by employing both the Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerh of hybrid functional (HSE06) and the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) one are performed. We found that the theoretical band gap bowing parameter is dependent significantly on the calculation method, especially on the exchange-correlation functional employed in the DFT calculations. The band gap of In x Ga1-x N alloy decreases considerably when the In constituent x increases. It is the interactions of s-s and p-p orbitals between anions and cations that play significant roles in formatting the band gaps bowing. In general, the HSE06 hybrid functional could provide a good alternative to the PBE functional in calculating the band gap bowing parameters. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11204257, 21233004) and the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (No. 2012M511447).

  9. "Heaven Starts at Your Parents' Feet": Adolescent Bowing to Parents and Associated Spiritual Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thanissaro, Phra Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    In a quantitative survey of religious attitudes and practices in a multi-religious sample of 369 school pupils aged between 13 and 15 in London, the practice of bowing to parents was found widespread in 22% of adolescents spanning several religious affiliations and ethnicities--especially Buddhists, Hindus and those of Indian, African and…

  10. Modeling and numerical investigation of the inlet circumferential fluctuations of swept and bowed blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Mingzhi; Jin, Donghai; Gui, Xingmin

    2017-02-01

    The circumferential fluctuation (CF) source terms induced by the inviscid blade force can affect the inlet distribution of flow parameters and radial equilibrium of swept and bowed blades. However, these phenomena cannot be adequately described by throughflow methods based on the axisymmetric assumption. A transport model for the CF stresses is proposed and correlated to the distribution of circulation to reflect the effect of the inviscid blade force. To investigate the effect of the inlet CFs on swept and bowed blades, the model is integrated into a throughflow model and applied to a series of cascades with different sweep and bow angles. For swept cascades, the CF source terms change the distributions of incidence angles, as well as the radial equilibrium at the inlet of the blade passage. And the influence is enhanced as the absolute value of the sweep angle increases. For bowed cascades, the distributions of incidence angles are also altered. For both cases, the model can offer a good prediction of the inlet CF source terms, and prove to exert a better prediction of blade design key parameters such as flow angles.

  11. Transient bowing of core assemblies in advanced liquid metal fast reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Kamal, S.A.; Orechwa, Y.

    1986-01-01

    Two alternative core restraint concepts are considered for a conceptual design of a 900 MWth liquid metal fast reactor core with a heterogeneous layout. The two concepts, known as limited free bowing and free flowering, are evaluated based on core bowing criteria that emphasize the enhancement of inherent reactor safety. The core reactivity change during a postulated loss of flow transient is calculated in terms of the lateral displacements and displacement-reactivity-worths of the individual assemblies. The NUBOW-3D computer code is utilized to determine the assembly deformations and interassembly forces that arise when the assemblies are subjected to temperature gradients and irradiation induced creep and swelling during the reactor operation. The assembly ducts are made of the ferritic steel HT-9 and remain in the reactor core for four-years at full power condition. Whereas both restraint systems meet the bowing criteria, a properly designed limited free bowing system appears to be more advantageous than a free flowering system from the point of view of enhancing the reactor inherent safety.

  12. 10. VIEW TOWARD PORT BOW IN THE FOC'S'LE OF THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. VIEW TOWARD PORT BOW IN THE FOC'S'LE OF THE EVELINA M. GOULART. OBJECT IN THE FOREGROUND IS A FOLDING MESS TABLE LOCATED BETWEEN THE TIERS OF BUNKS. - Auxiliary Fishing Schooner "Evelina M. Goulart", Essex Shipbuilding Museum, 66 Main Street, Essex, Essex County, MA

  13. A three-dimensional analysis of finger and bow string movements during the release in archery.

    PubMed

    Horsak, Brian; Heller, Mario

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this paper was to examine finger and bow string movements during archery by investigating a top Austrian athlete (FITA score = 1233) under laboratory conditions. Maximum lateral bow string deflection and angular displacements for index, third, and ring fingers between the full draw position and the end of the release were quantified using a motion tracking system. Stepwise multiple regression analyses were used to determine whether bow string deflection and finger movements are predictive for scoring. Joint ranges of motion during the shot itself were large in the proximal and distal interphalangeal joints, and much smaller in the metacarpophalangeal joints. Contrary to our expectations, greater deflection leads to higher scores (R2 = .18, p < .001) and the distal interphalangeal joint of the third finger weakly predicts the deflection (R2 = .11, p < .014). More variability in the joint angles of the third finger was found in bad shots than in good shots. Findings in this study let presume that maximum lateral bow string deflection does not adversely affect the archer's performance.

  14. Acceleration at the Earth's Bow Shock: Spatial Depencence of Acceleration Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terasawa, Toshio; Saito, Y.; Mukai, T.

    2003-07-01

    < We present GEOTAIL observations of diffuse protons (˜40 keV) in the bow shock upstream region, covering from the nominal nose upstream region to > the predawn upstream region (Xgse ˜-70 Re). Our results give conclusive evidence for the earlier suggestion on the acceleration/transport process in the predawn region, which was based on the ISEE-3 observations in 1983.

  15. Sociopolitical effects of bow and arrow technology in prehistoric coastal California.

    PubMed

    Kennett, Douglas J; Lambert, Patricia M; Johnson, John R; Culleton, Brendan J

    2013-01-01

    Bow and arrow technology spread across California between ∼AD 250 and 1200, first appearing in the intermountain deserts of the Great Basin and later spreading to the coast. We critically evaluate the available data for the initial spread in bow and arrow technology and examine its societal effects on the well-studied Northern Channel Islands off the coast of Southern California. The introduction of this technology to these islands between AD 650 and 900 appears to predate the appearance of hereditary inequality between AD 900 and 1300. We conclude, based on the available data, that this technology did not immediately trigger intergroup warfare. We argue that the introduction of the bow and arrow contributed to sociopolitical instabilities that were on the rise within the context of increasing population levels and unstable climatic conditions, which stimulated intergroup conflict and favored the development of hereditary inequality. Population aggregation and economic intensification did occur with the introduction of the bow and arrow. This observation is consistent with the hypothesis that social coercion via intra-group "law enforcement" contributed to changes in societal scale that ultimately resulted in larger groups that were favored in inter-group conflict. We argue that the interplay between intra-group "law enforcement" and inter-group warfare were both essential for the ultimate emergence of social inequality between AD 900 and 1300.

  16. Lunar Surface Potential Changes Possible Associated with Traversals of the Bow Shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collier, M. R.; Stubbs, T. J.; Hills, H. K.

    2008-01-01

    We report an analysis of seven Apollo 14 Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package (ALSEP) Suprathermal Ion Detector Experiment (SIDE) "resonance" events from January 1972 through January 1973. The events appear to be associated with traversals of the Moon through the terrestrial bow shock.

  17. Tracing Sources Of Nitrate And Sulfate In The Bow River, Alberta Canada, Using Isotope Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, J.; Mayer, B.; Ryan, C.

    2009-05-01

    The Bow River in Alberta is a major tributary to the South Saskatchewan River in western Canada. Urban development and agricultural activities including feedlot operations within the Bow River Basin can potentially impact the river water quality by elevating nitrate and sulfate concentrations. In this project, we applied hydrological, chemical and isotopic techniques to identify sources of nitrate and sulfate in the Bow River. The study area stretches approximately 570km along the Bow River from Lake Louise in the Rocky Mountain headwaters to near its confluence with the Oldman River in the prairies. Between June 2007 and July 2008, monthly samples were taken from the Bow River for major ion chemistry and stable isotope ratio measurements of H, O, C, N and S. Flow data from Alberta Environment were used in combination with chemical data to estimate fluxes of nitrate, sulfate and other ionic solutes along the river. Isotope results show that Bow River water near Lake Louise was characterized by δ15N-NO3 values between 0 and +4‰ and δ18O-NO3 values between +7 and +11‰ falling within the range typical for nitrate produced by nitrification in forest ecosystems. Between Canmore and Calgary, δ15N- NO3 increased to values between +3 and +8‰, and δ18O-NO3 ranged between -5 and +5‰. Nitrate discharged from the Bonnybrook wastewater treatment plant in Calgary has elevated δ15N-NO3 values of +8‰ and low δ18O-NO3 values of -10‰. Nitrate flux increased over an order of magnitude in the river as a result of wastewater effluent discharge at Calgary. In the agricultural irrigation districts downstream of Calgary, δ15N-NO3 values varied between +6 and +11‰, whereas δ18O-NO3 values ranged between -11 and +1‰. The elevated δ15N-NO3 and low δ18O-NO3 values indicate that sewage derived nitrate from the wastewater treatment plant is the major cause for increased nitrate fluxes in the Bow River downstream of Calgary. At Lake Louise, δ34S-SO4 values varied

  18. THEMIS satellite observations of hot flow anomalies at Earth's bow shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Christina; Zhang, Hui; Sibeck, David; Otto, Antonius; Zong, QiuGang; Omidi, Nick; McFadden, James P.; Fruehauff, Dennis; Angelopoulos, Vassilis

    2017-03-01

    Hot flow anomalies (HFAs) at Earth's bow shock were identified in Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions During Substorms (THEMIS) satellite data from 2007 to 2009. The events were classified as young or mature and also as regular or spontaneous hot flow anomalies (SHFAs). The dataset has 17 young SHFAs, 49 mature SHFAs, 15 young HFAs, and 55 mature HFAs. They span a wide range of magnetic local times (MLTs) from approximately 7 to 16.5 MLT. The largest ratio of solar wind to HFA core density occurred near dusk and at larger distances from the bow shock. In this study, HFAs and SHFAs were observed up to 6.3 RE and 6.1 RE (Earth radii), respectively, upstream from the model bow shock. HFA-SHFA occurrence decreases with distance upstream from the bow shock. HFAs of the highest event core ion temperatures were not seen at the flanks. The ratio of HFA ion temperature increase to HFA electron temperature increase is highest around 12 MLT and slightly duskward. For SHFAs, (Tihfa/Tisw)/(Tehfa/Tesw) generally increased with distance from the bow shock. Both mature and young HFAs are more prevalent when there is an approximately radial interplanetary magnetic field. HFAs occur most preferentially for solar wind speeds from 550 to 600 km s-1. The correlation coefficient between the HFA increase in thermal energy density from solar wind values and the decrease in kinetic energy density from solar wind values is 0.62. SHFAs and HFAs do not show major differences in this study.

  19. Reversible Computing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-01

    will have been introduced. 9. Reversible celular autemata We shall assume the reader to have some familiarity with the concept of cel- lular...10003 Mr. Kin B. Thcmpson 1 copy Technical Director Information Systems Divisia.i Naval Research Laboratory (OP-91T) Technical Information Division

  20. REVERSE OSMOSIS,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    acetate membranes. Mechanisms of the process and porous cellulose acetate membrane technology are briefly reviewed. Based on a general capillary...The reverse osmosis process is discussed with particular reference to systems involving aqueous solutions and Loeb-Sourirajan-type porous cellulose

  1. Bowing in the Right Direction: Hiland Mountain Correctional Center Women's String Orchestra Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warfield, Duane

    2010-01-01

    The Hiland Mountain Correctional Center, a 400-bed facility for multi-level adult female offenders in Eagle River, Alaska, offers a unique educational programme to its prisoners: an orchestra. Founded in 2003, by volunteer Pati Crofut, orchestra membership grew from eight to 22 female offenders between 2003 and 2009. Crofut has devoted her time…

  2. Experimental investigation of the effect of bow profiles on resistance of an underwater vehicle in free surface motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javadi, Mehran; Manshadi, Mojtaba Dehghan; Kheradmand, Saeid; Moonesun, Mohammad

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, towing tank experiments are conducted to study the behavior of flow on a model of the underwater vehicle with various shapes of bows, i.e. tango and standard bows in free surface motion tests. The total resistances for different Froude numbers are considered experimentally. The towing tank is equipped with a trolley that can operate in through 0.05-6 m/s speed with ±0.02 m/s accuracy. Furthermore, the study is done on hydrodynamic coefficients i.e. total, residual and friction resistance coefficients, and the results are compared. Finally, the study on flow of wave fields around bows is done and wave filed around two bows are compared. The Froude number interval is between 0.099 and 0.349. Blockage fraction for the model is fixed to 0.005 3. The results showed that the residual resistance of the standard bow in 0.19 to 0.3 Froude number is more than the tango bow in surface motion which causes more total resistance for the submarine. Finally, details of wave generated by the bow are depicted and the effects of flow pattern on resistance drag are discussed.

  3. Polarization signatures of bow shocks: A diagnostic tool to constrain the properties of stellar winds and ISM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Manisha; Hoffman, Jennifer L.; Nielson, Hilding R.; Ignace, Richard

    2017-01-01

    When a stellar wind traveling at supersonic speed interacts with almost stationary ISM, a bow shock shape is formed. By studying a bow shock, we can obtain information about the properties of the stellar wind as well as the surrounding ISM. Bow shocks are asymmetric structures, and thus produce net polarization even if they are unresolved. Hence, polarization studies of bow shocks can provide complementary constraints on their properties.We simulate the polarization signatures of circumstellar material with bow shock geometries using a Monte Carlo radiative transfer code called SLIP. We use the analytic solution from Wilkin (1996) to define the geometry and mass surface density of the bow shock in our models. We present results from our simulations showing how changing CSM optical depth, CSM albedo, photon source, and scattering particles (electrons or different types of dust particles) affects the observed polarization in both resolved and unresolved cases. In the optically thin regime of the unresolved electron-scattering case, the polarization peaks at an inclination angle of 90°, in agreement with analytical single-scattering models. In optically thick cases, a second polarization peak appears near 130°, which we propose is due to multiple scattering. Given these results, an observed polarization value can constrain the inclination of an unresolved bow shock to two possible angles, which in turn constrain the motion of the star. In case of resolved bow shocks, our simulations produce polarization maps which we compare with observations.We also present results from our dust-scattering simulations, which show that multicolor broadband polarization observations can constrain the characteristics of the dust in a resolved or unresolved bow shock-shaped CSM configuration.

  4. Direct high-performance liquid chromatography enantioseparation of terazosin on an immobilised polysaccharide-based chiral stationary phase under polar organic and reversed-phase conditions.

    PubMed

    Ferretti, Rosella; Gallinella, Bruno; La Torre, Francesco; Zanitti, Leo; Turchetto, Luciana; Mosca, Antonina; Cirilli, Roberto

    2009-07-10

    High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) enantioseparation of terazosin (TER) was accomplished on the immobilised-type Chiralpak IC chiral stationary phase (CSP) under both polar organic and reversed-phase modes. A simple analytical method was validated using a mixture of methanol-water-DEA 95:5:0.1 (v/v/v) as a mobile phase. Under reversed-phase conditions good linearities were obtained over the concentration range 8.76-26.28 microg mL(-1) for both enantiomers. The limits of detection and quantification were 10 and 30 ng mL(-1), respectively. The intra- and inter-day assay precision was less than 1.66% (RSD%). The optimised conditions also allowed to resolve chiral and achiral impurities from the enantiomers of TER. The proposed HPLC method supports pharmacological studies on the biological effects of the both forms of TER and analytical investigations of potential drug formulations based on a single enantiomer. At the semipreparative scale, 5.3 mg of racemic sample were resolved with elution times less than 12 min using a mobile phase consisting of methanol-DEA 100:0.1 (v/v) and both enantiomers were isolated with a purity of > or = 99% enantiomeric excess (ee). The absolute configuration of TER enantiomers was assigned by comparison of the measured specific rotations with those reported in the literature.

  5. THE ROLE OF PICKUP IONS ON THE STRUCTURE OF THE VENUSIAN BOW SHOCK AND ITS IMPLICATIONS FOR THE TERMINATION SHOCK

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Quanming; Shan Lican; Zhang Tielong; Wu Mingyu; Wang Shui; Zank, Gary P.; Yang Zhongwei; Du Aimin

    2013-08-20

    The recent crossing of the termination shock by Voyager 2 has demonstrated the important role of pickup ions (PUIs) in the physics of collisionless shocks. The Venus Express (VEX) spacecraft orbits Venus in a 24 hr elliptical orbit that crosses the bow shock twice a day. VEX provides a unique opportunity to investigate the role of PUIs on the structure of collisionless shocks more generally. Using VEX observations, we find that the strength of the Venusian bow shock is weaker when solar activity is strong. We demonstrate that this surprising anti-correlation is due to PUIs mediating the Venusian bow shock.

  6. Vasectomy reversal.

    PubMed

    Belker, A M

    1987-02-01

    A vasovasostomy may be performed on an outpatient basis with local anesthesia, but also may be performed on an outpatient basis with epidural or general anesthesia. Local anesthesia is preferred by most of my patients, the majority of whom choose this technique. With proper preoperative and intraoperative sedation, patients sleep lightly through most of the procedure. Because of the length of time often required for bilateral microsurgical vasoepididymostomy, epidural or general anesthesia and overnight hospitalization are usually necessary. Factors influencing the preoperative choice for vasovasostomy or vasoepididymostomy in patients undergoing vasectomy reversal are considered. The preoperative planned choice of vasovasostomy or vasoepididymostomy for patients having vasectomy reversal described herein does not have the support of all urologists who regularly perform these procedures. My present approach has evolved as the data reported in Tables 1 and 2 have become available, but it may change as new information is evaluated. However, it offers a logical method for planning choices of anesthesia and inpatient or outpatient status for patients undergoing vasectomy reversal procedures.

  7. Directed, strong, and reversible immobilization of proteins tagged with a β-trefoil lectin domain: a simple method to immobilize biomolecules on plain agarose matrixes.

    PubMed

    López-Gallego, Fernando; Acebrón, Ivan; Mancheño, Jose Miguel; Raja, Sebastian; Lillo, M Pilar; Guisán Seijas, Jose Manuel

    2012-03-21

    A highly stable lipase from Geobacillus thermocatenolatus (BTL2) and the enhanced green fluorescent protein from Aquorea victoria (EGFP) were recombinantly produced N-terminally tagged to the lectin domain of the hemolytic pore-forming toxin LSLa from the mushroom Laetiporus sulphureus . Such a domain (LSL(150)), recently described as a novel fusion tag, is based on a β-trefoil scaffold with two operative binding sites for galactose or galactose-containing derivatives. The fusion proteins herein analyzed have enabled us to characterize the binding mode of LSL(150) to polymeric and solid substrates such as agarose beads. The lectin-fusion proteins are able to be quantitatively bound to both cross-linked and non-cross-linked agarose matrixes in a very rapid manner, resulting in a surprisingly dynamic protein distribution inside the porous beads that evolves from heterogeneous to homogeneous along the postimmobilization time. Such dynamic distribution can be related to the reversible nature of the LSL(150)-agarose interaction. Furthermore, this latter interaction is temperature dependent since it is 4-fold stronger when the immobilization takes place at 25 °C than when it does at 4 °C. The strongest lectin-agarose interaction is also quite stable under a survey of different conditions such as high temperatures (up to 60 °C) or high organic solvent concentrations (up to 60% of acetonitrile). Notably, the use of cross-linked agarose would endow the system with more robustness due to its better mechanical properties compared to the noncross-linked one. The stability of the LSL(150)-agarose interaction would prevent protein leaching during the operation process unless high pH media are used. In summary, we believe that the LSL(150) lectin domain exhibits interesting structural features as an immobilization domain that makes it suitable to reversibly immobilize industrially relevant enzymes in very simple carriers as agarose.

  8. Reverse shift mechanism for automotive manual transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Inui, M.; Ogawa, S.

    1987-03-03

    A reverse shift mechanism is described for an automotive manual transmission of a type having a reverse idler gear which is movable to selectively complete a reverse gear train, the reverse shift mechanism comprising: a reverse shift arm having a portion disposed adjacent the reverse idler gear and pivotally carried with respect to a transmission casing so that the portion rocks along a direction of axis of the reverse idler gear in response to shifting operation. The portion of the reverse shift arm is provided with a blind hole which is open at a first end toward the reverse idler gear and is closed at a second end away from the reverse idler gear; and a shift arm shoe carried by the portion of the reverse shift arm adjacent the reverse idler gear for pushing the reverse idler gear. The shift arm shoe has an end adapted to engage with a circumferential groove formed in the reverse idler gear and an opposing end shaped to fit in the blind hole of the reverse shift arm; whereby the shift arm shoe is prevented from coming off during assembly by virtue of a vacuum effect created by air confined in the blind hole by fitting engagement between the opposing end and the blind hole, and is held in place after assembly by being clamped between the groove of the reverse idler gear and the blind hole of the reverse shift arm.

  9. Reflection of solar wind protons on the Martian bow shock: Investigations by means of 3-dimensional simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richer, E.; Chanteur, G. M.; Modolo, R.; Dubinin, E.

    2012-09-01

    The reflection of solar wind protons on the Martian bow shock (BS) is investigated by means of three-dimensional simulation models. A two steps approach is adopted to allow a detailed analysis of the reflected population. Firstly, the 3-dimensional hybrid model of Modolo et al. (2005) is used to compute a stationary state of the interaction of the solar wind (SW) with Mars. Secondly, the motion of test particles is followed in the electromagnetic field computed by the hybrid simulation meanwhile detection criteria defined to identify reflected protons are applied. This study demonstrates some effects of the large curvature of a planetary BS on the structure of the foreshock. Reflected protons encounter the BS in a region encompassing parts of the quasi-perpendicular and quasi-parallel shocks, and exit the shock mainly from the quasi-parallel region. The energy spectrum of all reflected protons extends from 0 to almost 15keV. A virtual omnidirectional detector (VOD) is used to compute the local omnidirectional flux of reflected protons at various locations upstream of the BS. Spatial variations of this omnidirectional flux indicate the location and spatial extent of the proton foreshock and demonstrate its shift, increasing with the distance downstream, in the direction opposite to the motional electric field of the SW. Local energy spectra computed from the VOD observations demonstrate the existence of an energy gradient along the direction of the convection electric field.

  10. Attenuation Distance of Low Frequency Waves Upstream of the Pre-Dawn Bow Shock: GEOTAIL snd ISEE-3 Comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugiyama, T.; Terasawa, T.; Kawano, H.; Yamamoto, T.; Kokubun, S.; Frank, L.; Ackerson, K.; Tsurutani, B.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents a statistical study of the spatial distribution of low frequency waves in the region upstream of the pre-dawn to dawn side bow shock using both GEOTAIL and ISEE-3 magnetometer data.

  11. Reverse micelles directed synthesis of TiO{sub 2}-CeO{sub 2} mixed oxides and investigation of their crystal structure and morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Matejova, Lenka; Vales, Vaclav; Fajgar, Radek; Matej, Zdenek; Holy, Vaclav; Solcova, Olga

    2013-02-15

    The synthesis of TiO{sub 2}-CeO{sub 2} mixed oxides based on the sol-gel process controlled within reverse micelles of non-ionic surfactant Triton X-114 in cyclohexane is reported. The crystallization, phase composition, trends in nanoparticles growth and porous structure properties are studied as a function of Ti:Ce molar composition and annealing temperature by in-situ X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and physisorption. The brannerite-type CeTi{sub 2}O{sub 6} crystallizes as a single crystalline phase at Ti:Ce molar composition of 70:30 and in the mixture with cubic CeO{sub 2} and anatase TiO{sub 2} for composition 50:50. At Ti:Ce molar ratios 90:10 and 30:70 the mixtures of TiO{sub 2} anatase, rutile and cubic CeO{sub 2} appear. In these mixtures TiO{sub 2} rutile is formed at higher temperatures than conventionally. Additionally, the amount of a present amorphous phase in individual mixtures was estimated from diffraction data. The porous structure morphology depends both on molar composition and annealing temperature. This is correlated with the presence of carbon impurities of different character. - Graphical abstract: The phase composition of Ti90--Ce10 and Ti50--Ce50 oxide mixtures as a function of annealing temperature. The amount of the amorphous phase was estimated and attributed to TiO{sub 2}. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ti/Ce oxides were prepared using reverse micelles of Triton X-114. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Crystallization of TiO{sub 2}, CeO{sub 2} or CeTi{sub 2}O{sub 6} depends on Ti:Ce molar ratio. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Amorphous phase attributed to TiO{sub 2} was identified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Metal oxides surface area is influenced by the character of present carbon impurities.

  12. Learning strategy refinement reverses early sensory cortical map expansion but not behavior: Support for a theory of directed cortical substrates of learning and memory.

    PubMed

    Elias, Gabriel A; Bieszczad, Kasia M; Weinberger, Norman M

    2015-12-01

    Primary sensory cortical fields develop highly specific associative representational plasticity, notably enlarged area of representation of reinforced signal stimuli within their topographic maps. However, overtraining subjects after they have solved an instrumental task can reduce or eliminate the expansion while the successful behavior remains. As the development of this plasticity depends on the learning strategy used to solve a task, we asked whether the loss of expansion is due to the strategy used during overtraining. Adult male rats were trained in a three-tone auditory discrimination task to bar-press to the CS+ for water reward and refrain from doing so during the CS- tones and silent intertrial intervals; errors were punished by a flashing light and time-out penalty. Groups acquired this task to a criterion within seven training sessions by relying on a strategy that was "bar-press from tone-onset-to-error signal" ("TOTE"). Three groups then received different levels of overtraining: Group ST, none; Group RT, one week; Group OT, three weeks. Post-training mapping of their primary auditory fields (A1) showed that Groups ST and RT had developed significantly expanded representational areas, specifically restricted to the frequency band of the CS+ tone. In contrast, the A1 of Group OT was no different from naïve controls. Analysis of learning strategy revealed this group had shifted strategy to a refinement of TOTE in which they self-terminated bar-presses before making an error ("iTOTE"). Across all animals, the greater the use of iTOTE, the smaller was the representation of the CS+ in A1. Thus, the loss of cortical expansion is attributable to a shift or refinement in strategy. This reversal of expansion was considered in light of a novel theoretical framework (CONCERTO) highlighting four basic principles of brain function that resolve anomalous findings and explaining why even a minor change in strategy would involve concomitant shifts of involved brain

  13. LEARNING STRATEGY REFINEMENT REVERSES EARLY SENSORY CORTICAL MAP EXPANSION BUT NOT BEHAVIOR: SUPPORT FOR A THEORY OF DIRECTED CORTICAL SUBSTRATES OF LEARNING AND MEMORY

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Gabriel A.; Bieszczad, Kasia M.; Weinberger, Norman M.

    2015-01-01

    Primary sensory cortical fields develop highly specific associative representational plasticity, notably enlarged area of representation of reinforced signal stimuli within their topographic maps. However, overtraining subjects after they have solved an instrumental task can reduce or eliminate the expansion while the successful behavior remains. As the development of this plasticity depends on the learning strategy used to solve a task, we asked whether the loss of expansion is due to the strategy used during overtraining. Adult male rats were trained in a three-tone auditory discrimination task to bar-press to the CS+ for water reward and refrain from doing so during the CS− tones and silent intertrial intervals; errors were punished by a flashing light and time-out penalty. Groups acquired this task to a criterion within seven training sessions by relying on a strategy that was “bar-press from tone-onset-to-error signal” (“TOTE”). Three groups then received different levels of overtraining: Group ST, none; Group RT, one week; Group OT, three weeks. Post-training mapping of their primary auditory fields (A1) showed that Groups ST and RT had developed significantly expanded representational areas, specifically restricted to the frequency band of the CS+ tone. In contrast, the A1 of Group OT was no different from naïve controls. Analysis of learning strategy revealed this group had shifted strategy to a refinement of TOTE in which they self-terminated bar-presses before making an error (“iTOTE”). Across all animals, the greater the use of iTOTE, the smaller was the representation of the CS+ in A1. Thus, the loss of cortical expansion is attributable to a shift or refinement in strategy. This reversal of expansion was considered in light of a novel theoretical framework (CONCERTO) highlighting four basic principles of brain function that resolve anomalous findings and explaining why even a minor change in strategy would involve concomitant shifts of

  14. Upstream pressure variations associated with the bow shock and their effects on the magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairfield, D. H.; Baumjohann, W.; Paschmann, G.; Luehr, H.; Sibeck, D. G.

    1990-01-01

    The AMPTE IRM solar wind data are analyzed to determine the relationship between upstream pressure fluctuations and magnetospheric perturbations. It is argued that the upstream pressure variations are not inherent in the solar wind but rather are associated with the bow shock. This conclusion follows from the fact that the upstream field strength and density associated with perturbations are highly correlated with each other, while they tend to be anticorrelated in the undisturbed solar wind, and that the upstream perturbations occur within the foreshock or at its boundary. The results imply a mode of interaction between the solar wind upstream and the magnetosphere whereby density changes produced in the foreshock subsequently convect through the bow shock and impinge on the magnetosphere. Upstream pressure perturbations should create significant effects on the magnetopause and at the foot of nearby field lines that lead to the polar cusp ionosphere.

  15. Nonthermal ions and associated magnetic field behavior at a quasi-parallel earth's bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkinson, W. P.; Pardaens, A. K.; Schwartz, S. J.; Burgess, D.; Luehr, H.; Kessel, R. L.; Dunlop, M.; Farrugia, C. J.

    1993-01-01

    Attention is given to ion and magnetic field measurements at the earth's bow shock from the AMPTE-UKS and -IRM spacecraft, which were examined in high time resolution during a 45-min interval when the field remained closely aligned with the model bow shock normal. Dense ion beams were detected almost exclusively in the midst of short-duration periods of turbulent magnetic field wave activity. Many examples of propagation at large elevation angles relative to the ecliptic plane, which is inconsistent with reflection in the standard model shock configuration, were discovered. The associated waves are elliptically polarized and are preferentially left-handed in the observer's frame of reference, but are less confined to the maximum variance plane than other previously studied foreshock waves. The association of the wave activity with the ion beams suggests that the former may be triggered by an ion-driven instability, and possible candidates are discussed.

  16. The Effect of Metallic TPS Panel Bowing on the Surface Heating of the X-33 Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Grant; Kontinos, Dean; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The thermal protection system of the windward surface of the X-33 vehicle consists of metallic honeycomb sandwich panels. Thermal gradients experienced during the descent phase of the trajectory result in a different rate of thermal expansion between the inner and outer face sheets of the metallic panels. This causes the panels to bow outward when the temperature of the outer face sheet is larger than that of the inner face sheet and inward when the temperature of the outer face sheet is less than that of he inner face sheet. This results in a quilted-type body surface. Using computational fluid dynamic analysis, this study will determine the effect the metallic TPS panel bowing has on the surface heating.

  17. Nonlinear Development of ULF waves in the Upstream of Earth's Bow Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, E.; Parks, G. K.; Lin, N.; Hong, J.; Kim, K. H.; Lee, D. H.

    2015-12-01

    In the upstream region of Earth's bow shock ULF waves are frequently observed. These waves are usually associated with backstreaming ions from the bow shock. In this study we investigated nonlinear development of the ULF waves using multi-point measurements from the Cluster spacecraft. Small amplitude waves observed at spacecraft 3 (C3) rapidly grew and became nonlinear as they were observed at spacecraft 1 (C1) located downstream from C3. The nonlinear growth occurred within a few gyro-period of protons. Ion beams with Tperp/Tpara>1 were observed with the small amplitude waves at C3. As the waves grew nonlinearly, the core of the ion beams was decelerated, but they were also scattered both in energy and pitch angle producing more energetic, diffuse particles. This results in more diffuse distributions for the ULF waves with larger amplitude. During the interaction the original solar wind ions were not much disturbed.

  18. Bloodstain pattern analysis in a case of suicide with a compound bow and arrow.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Christopher I; Altschul, Samuel; Mead, Anthony; Flannagan, Lisa M

    2004-03-01

    The incidence of human fatalities due to arrow injuries in the medical literature is rare. We report an incident involving a 46-year-old man who was found in his secured apartment with a fatal arrow wound of his chest and abdomen. The initial scene investigation suggested that the victim impaled himself with an arrow attached to a razor-sharp, 4-bladed broad-head hunting tip before collapsing on the floor. However, analysis of the bloodstain patterns suggested that the victim used the compound bow to propel the arrow. When investigating deaths due to bows and arrows, thorough scene investigation along with bloodstain pattern analysis is essential in determining the mechanism of injury and manner of death.

  19. Conduction of thermal energy in the neighborhood of the earth's bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hohlfeld, R. G.

    1976-01-01

    The Rankine-Hugoniot equations for MHD shocks are generalized by the addition of a term to the energy conservation equation representing a nonzero heat flow in the plasma in the neighborhood of the shock. This generalization is found to be compatible with the assumption of infinite electrical conductivity. The effects of plasma waves in this treatment are of the order of the reciprocal Alfvenic Mach number squared and hence are neglected. The effect of alpha particles in the solar wind is discussed. Seven crossings of the earth's bow shock by Explorer 35 in lunar orbit are analyzed. Sufficient data are available so that the determination of a dimensionless parameter, psi, characterizing the heat-flow difference across the bow shock is possible. The values of psi indicate energy-flux densities due to heat flow which are a nonnegligible fraction of the total energy flux. Two possible interpretations of psi are discussed.

  20. Large amplitude ship motions and bow flare slamming pressures in regular head seas

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Z.; Incecik, A.

    1996-12-31

    In this paper, the motion equations incorporating nonlinear terms due to large amplitude motions and bow flare slamming pressures are described in regular head seas. Numerical predictions of ship motions based on a small amplitude linear theory and large amplitude nonlinear method and experimental data are compared with each other in the frequency and time domain. The nonlinear restoring force, nonlinear damping force and nonlinear fluid momentum force are considered in predicting ship motions. The frequency dependent added mass and damping coefficient are computed at the instantaneous submerged sections of the ship. The momentum slamming theory and Wagner theory are used to predict the bow flare slamming pressure. The total impact pressure is expressed as the sum of water immersion impact pressure and wave striking impact pressure. There is a satisfactory agreement between theoretical predictions and model test measurements.

  1. Theoretical study of the transonic lift of a double-wedge profile with detached bow wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincenti, Walter G; Wagoner, Cleo B

    1954-01-01

    A theoretical study is described of the aerodynamic characteristics at small angle of attack of a thin, double-wedge profile in the range of supersonic flight speed in which the bow wave is detached. The analysis is carried out within the framework of the transonic (nonlinear) small-disturbance theory, and the effects of angle of attack are regarded as a small perturbation on the flow previously calculated at zero angle. The mixed flow about the front half of the profile is calculated by relaxation solution of a suitably defined boundary-value problem for transonic small-disturbance equation in the hodograph plane (i.e., the Tricomi equation). The purely supersonic flow about the rear half is found by an extension of the usual numerical method of characteristics. Analytical results are also obtained, within the framework of the same theory, for the range of speed in which the bow wave is attached and the flow is completely supersonic.

  2. First Detection of a Pulsar Bow Shock Nebula in Far-UV: PSR J0437-4715

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangelov, Blagoy; Pavlov, George G.; Kargaltsev, Oleg; Durant, Martin; Bykov, Andrei M.; Krassilchtchikov, Alexandre

    2016-11-01

    Pulsars traveling at supersonic speeds are often accompanied by cometary bow shocks seen in Hα. We report on the first detection of a pulsar bow shock in the far-ultraviolet (FUV). We detected it in FUV images of the nearest millisecond pulsar J0437-4715 obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope. The images reveal a bow-like structure positionally coincident with part of the previously detected Hα bow shock, with an apex at 10″ ahead of the moving pulsar. Its FUV luminosity, L(1250{--}2000 \\mathringA )≈ 5 × {10}28 erg s-1, exceeds the Hα luminosity from the same area by a factor of 10. The FUV emission could be produced by the shocked interstellar medium matter or, less likely, by relativistic pulsar wind electrons confined by strong magnetic field fluctuations in the bow shock. In addition, in the FUV images we found a puzzling extended (≃3″ in size) structure overlapping with the limb of the bow shock. If related to the bow shock, it could be produced by an inhomogeneity in the ambient medium or an instability in the bow shock. We also report on a previously undetected X-ray emission extending for about 5″ ahead of the pulsar, possibly a pulsar wind nebula created by shocked pulsar wind, with a luminosity L(0.5-8 keV) ˜ 3 × 1028 erg s-1. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with programs GO 12917 and GO 10568.

  3. Reverse micelles directed synthesis of TiO2-CeO2 mixed oxides and investigation of their crystal structure and morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matějová, Lenka; Valeš, Václav; Fajgar, Radek; Matěj, Zdeněk; Holý, Václav; Šolcová, Olga

    2013-02-01

    The synthesis of TiO2-CeO2 mixed oxides based on the sol-gel process controlled within reverse micelles of non-ionic surfactant Triton X-114 in cyclohexane is reported. The crystallization, phase composition, trends in nanoparticles growth and porous structure properties are studied as a function of Ti:Ce molar composition and annealing temperature by in-situ X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and physisorption. The brannerite-type CeTi2O6 crystallizes as a single crystalline phase at Ti:Ce molar composition of 70:30 and in the mixture with cubic CeO2 and anatase TiO2 for composition 50:50. At Ti:Ce molar ratios 90:10 and 30:70 the mixtures of TiO2 anatase, rutile and cubic CeO2 appear. In these mixtures TiO2 rutile is formed at higher temperatures than conventionally. Additionally, the amount of a present amorphous phase in individual mixtures was estimated from diffraction data. The porous structure morphology depends both on molar composition and annealing temperature. This is correlated with the presence of carbon impurities of different character.

  4. Serendipitous discovery of an infrared bow shock near PSR J1549–4848 with Spitzer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhongxiang; Kaplan, David L.; Slane, Patrick; Morrell, Nidia; Kaspi, Victoria M.

    2013-06-01

    We report on the discovery of an infrared cometary nebula around PSR J1549–4848 in our Spitzer survey of a few middle-aged radio pulsars. Following the discovery, multi-wavelength imaging and spectroscopic observations of the nebula were carried out. We detected the nebula in Spitzer Infrared Array Camera 8.0, Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer 24 and 70 μm imaging, and in Spitzer IRS 7.5-14.4 μm spectroscopic observations, and also in the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer all-sky survey at 12 and 22 μm. These data were analyzed in detail, and we find that the nebula can be described with a standard bow shock shape, and that its spectrum contains polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and H{sub 2} emission features. However, it is not certain which object drives the nebula. We analyze the field stars and conclude that none of them can be the associated object because stars with a strong wind or mass ejection that usually produce bow shocks are much brighter than the field stars. The pulsar is approximately 15'' away from the region in which the associated object is expected to be located. In order to resolve the discrepancy, we suggest that a highly collimated wind could be emitted from the pulsar and produce the bow shock. X-ray imaging to detect the interaction of the wind with the ambient medium- and high-spatial resolution radio imaging to determine the proper motion of the pulsar should be carried out, which will help verify the association of the pulsar with the bow shock nebula.

  5. OPTICAL HYDROGEN ABSORPTION CONSISTENT WITH A THIN BOW SHOCK LEADING THE HOT JUPITER HD 189733B

    SciTech Connect

    Cauley, P. Wilson; Redfield, Seth; Jensen, Adam G.; Barman, Travis; Endl, Michael; Cochran, William D.

    2015-09-01

    Bow shocks are ubiquitous astrophysical phenomena resulting from the supersonic passage of an object through a gas. Recently, pre-transit absorption in UV metal transitions of the hot Jupiter (HJ) exoplanets HD 189733b and WASP12-b have been interpreted as being caused by material compressed in a planetary bow shock. Here we present a robust detection of a time-resolved pre-transit, as well as in-transit absorption signature around the HJ exoplanet HD 189733b using high spectral resolution observations of several hydrogen Balmer lines. The line shape of the pre-transit feature and the shape of the timeseries absorption provide the strongest constraints on the morphology and physical characteristics of extended structures around an exoplanet. The in-transit measurements confirm the previous exospheric Hα detection, although the absorption depth measured here is ∼50% lower. The pre-transit absorption feature occurs 125 minutes before the predicted optical transit, a projected linear distance from the planet to the stellar disk of 7.2 R{sub p}. The absorption strength observed in the Balmer lines indicates an optically thick, but physically small, geometry. We model this signal as the early ingress of a planetary bow shock. If the bow shock is mediated by a planetary magnetosphere, the large standoff distance derived from the model suggests a large planetary magnetic field strength of B{sub eq} = 28 G. Better knowledge of exoplanet magnetic field strengths is crucial to understanding the role these fields play in planetary evolution and the potential development of life on planets in the habitable zone.

  6. Congenital bowing of the tibia due to infantile lipofibromatosis corrected with a Taylor Spatial Frame.

    PubMed

    Joseph, George; Zenios, Michalis

    2014-12-01

    Congenital lipofibromatosis is a rare slow growing benign fibrofatty neoplasm presenting in childhood. The case of a boy presenting soon after birth with diffuse lower extremity enlargement associated with a significant tibial deformity is presented. Magnetic resonance imaging and soft tissue biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of lipofibromatosis. The child started having problems with his gait after the age of two. The tibial bowing was corrected gradually using a Taylor Spatial Frame resulting in a good clinical outcome.

  7. FORMATION OF COSMIC CRYSTALS IN HIGHLY SUPERSATURATED SILICATE VAPOR PRODUCED BY PLANETESIMAL BOW SHOCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Miura, H.; Yamada, J.; Tsukamoto, K.; Nozawa, J.; Tanaka, K. K.; Yamamoto, T.; Nakamoto, T.

    2010-08-10

    Several lines of evidence suggest that fine silicate crystals observed in primitive meteorite and interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) nucleated in a supersaturated silicate vapor followed by crystalline growth. We investigated evaporation of {mu}m-sized silicate particles heated by a bow shock produced by a planetesimal orbiting in the gas in the early solar nebula and condensation of crystalline silicate from the vapor thus produced. Our numerical simulation of shock-wave heating showed that these {mu}m-sized particles evaporate almost completely when the bow shock is strong enough to cause melting of chondrule precursor dust particles. We found that the silicate vapor cools very rapidly with expansion into the ambient unshocked nebular region; for instance, the cooling rate is estimated to be as high as 2000 K s{sup -1} for a vapor heated by a bow shock associated with a planetesimal of radius 1 km. The rapid cooling of the vapor leads to nonequilibrium gas-phase condensation of dust at temperatures much lower than those expected from the equilibrium condensation. It was found that the condensation temperatures are lower by a few hundred K or more than the equilibrium temperatures. This explains the results of the recent experimental studies of condensation from a silicate vapor that condensation in such large supercooling reproduces morphologies similar to those of silicate crystals found in meteorites. Our results strongly suggest that the planetesimal bow shock is one of the plausible sites for formation of not only chondrules but also other cosmic crystals in the early solar system.

  8. Numerical investigation of the bowed stator effects in a transonic fan at low Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Enliang; Zhao, Shengfeng; Gong, Jianbo; Lu, Xingen; Zhu, Junqiang

    2017-02-01

    The performance of fan stage in a small turbofan engines is significantly affected at high-altitude low Reynolds number. In order to examine the effect of low Reynolds number on the fan stage, 3D numerical simulation method was employed to analyse the performance variations and the underlying flow structure in the fan stage. For the sake of decreasing the influence of low Reynolds number, the different bowed stator airfoils were redesigned and the effect of the modified design was evaluated.

  9. Variation of the ratio of specific heats across a detached bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, J. K.; Wiskerchen, M. J.

    1974-01-01

    Equations are derived which allow the ratio of specific heats behind the earth's bow shock to be evaluated if several pre-shock parameters (the specific-heat ratio, the Alfvenic Mach number, the sonic Mach number, and the angle between the shock normal at the stagnation point and the magnetic field) and the density jump across the shock are known. Numerical examples show that the dependence of the post-shock ratio on the pre-shock ratio is weak.

  10. Farby-Perot observations and new models of the HH 47A and HH 47D bow shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morse, Jon A.; Hartigan, Patrick; Heathcote, Steve; Raymond, John C.; Cecil, Gerald

    1994-01-01

    We present new models for the HH 47A and HH 47D bow shocks based on line flux and velocity maps obtained with an imaging Fabry-Perot spectrometer. We confirm that HH 47A and HH 47D each show a bow shock/Mach disk morphology, and that velocity variability in the outflow can account for the observed structures. While it was suggested a decade ago that the inner working surface HH 47A appears to be traveling into the wake of HH 47D, we find kinematic evidence that the outer bow shock HH 47D is also not the primary ejection event in the outflow but follows in the wake of previously ejected material. By comparing the observed line ratios and line profiles to those predicted by our bow shock models, we find that both bow shocks have substantially lower shock velocities than their space motions would imply, and that the emission from each bow shock is systematically blueshifted from the rest-frame velocity of the ambient emission, indicating a comoving preshock medium. We derive kinematic ages of approximately 1150 yr for HH 47D and approximately 550 yr for HH 47A, which implies that the stellar driving source may undergo repetitive eruptions similar to FU Orionis-type outbursts every several hundred years. This timescale is similar to estimates made by Reipurth and collaborators for the separation between major outbursts in the HH 34 and HH 111 stellar jets.

  11. Numerical Simulation of Star Formation by the Bow Shock of the Centaurus A Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Carl L.; Jones, Jeremiah R.; Scannapieco, Evan; Windhorst, Rogier A.

    2017-02-01

    Recent Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of the extragalactic radio source Centaurus A (Cen A) display a young stellar population around the southwest tip of the inner filament 8.5 kpc from the galactic center of Cen A, with ages in the range 1–3 Myr. Crockett et al. have argued that the transverse bow shock of the Cen A jet triggered this star formation as it impacted dense molecular cores of clouds in the filament. To test this hypothesis, we perform three-dimensional numerical simulations of star formation induced by the jet bow shock in the inner filament of Cen A, using a positivity-preserving, weighted, essentially non-oscillatory method to solve the equations of gas dynamics with radiative cooling. We find that star clusters form inside a bow-shocked molecular cloud when the maximum initial density of the cloud is ≥slant 40 H2 molecules cm‑3. In a typical molecular cloud of mass {10}6 {M}ȯ and diameter 200 pc, approximately 20 star clusters of mass {10}4 {M}ȯ are formed, matching the HST images.

  12. Congenital posteromedial bowing of the tibia and fibula: treatment option by multilevel osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Napiontek, Marek; Shadi, Milud

    2014-03-01

    Few papers have described patients treated surgically with single osteotomy for congenital posteromedial bowing of the tibia and fibula. Only one paper has described two-level osteotomy for deformity correction: the first for deformity correction and the second for bone lengthening. There are no publications describing the surgical correction of deformation only by the method of multilevel tibial and fibular osteotomy. Research material included four children aged between 3.1 and 5.1 years (average age: 3.7 years) who were operated upon for bowing of the tibia and fibula exceeding 35° in the coronal plane. In all cases, tibial osteotomy was carried out at three or two levels accompanied by fibular osteotomy, and with intramedullary stabilization using K-wires (three patients) or Rush pin (one patient). Follow-up ranged from 3 to 7.7 years. In all cases, axis correction and bone healing were achieved. In large congenital posteromedial bowing of the tibia and fibula, a multilevel tibial and fibular osteotomy may be a better solution than an orthosis or a long time waiting for a spontaneous correction of the deformation. Large circumferential periosteal release that accompanied the surgery influenced the stimulation of bone growth. It may induce the process of lower limbs' equalization not to require the application of intensive surgical procedures.

  13. Interplanetary shock-bow shock interaction: Comparison of a global MHD model and observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, O.; Šafránková, J.; Němeček, Z.

    2015-09-01

    A fast forward shock passing through the bow shock would generate a train of new discontinuities that differ with the distance from the Sun-Earth line. However, interplanetary (IP) shocks are often followed by a rotation of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) over a large angle and a presence of this rotation can modify the interaction process. The present paper analyzes in detail one IP shock where data measured by Wind are used as an input to a global BATS-R-US MHD model and the model prediction is compared with Geotail magnetosheath observations. The study is based on three runs of the global MHD model that use different modifications of upstream conditions. We have found that (1) about 45% of IP shocks is followed by a significant IMF rotation within 15 min after the shock ramp; (2) the IMF rotation modifies the dynamics of the magnetospheric response to the IP shock arrival; (3) a train of new discontinuities created by an interaction of the IP shock with bow shock can be identified in MHD simulations as well as in the experimental data; and (4) a new discontinuity is created by the interaction of the IMF rotation with the bow shock.

  14. On the generation of magnetosheath high speed jets by bow shock ripples (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hietala, H.; Plaschke, F.

    2013-12-01

    The terrestrial magnetosheath is embedded with coherent high speed jets of about 1 RE in scale, predominantly during quasi-radial interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). When these high dynamic pressure (Pdyn) jets hit the magnetopause, they cause large indentations and further magnetospheric effects. The source of these jets has remained controversial. One of the proposed mechanisms is based on ripples of the quasi-parallel bow shock. In this paper, we combine for the first time four years of subsolar magnetosheath observations from the THEMIS mission and corresponding NASA/OMNI solar wind conditions with model calculations of a rippled bow shock. Concentrating on the magnetosheath close to the shock during low IMF cone-angles, we find that (1) 97% of the observed jets can be produced by local ripples of the shock under the observed upstream conditions; (2) the coherent jets form a significant fraction of the high Pdyn tail of the magnetosheath flow distribution; (3) the magnetosheath Pdyn distribution matches the flow from a bow shock with ripples that have a dominant amplitude to wavelength ratio of about 9% (~ 0.1 RE/1 RE) and are present ~12% of the time at any given location.

  15. Sociopolitical complexity and the bow and arrow in the American Southwest.

    PubMed

    VanPool, Todd L; O'Brien, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    The evolution of sociopolitical complexity, including heightened relations of cooperation and competition among large nonkin groups, has long been a central focus of anthropological research. Anthropologists suggest any number of variables that affect the waxing and waning of complexity and define the precise trajectories that groups take, including population density, subsistence strategies, warfare, the distribution of resources, and trade relationships. Changes in weaponry, here the introduction of the bow and arrow, can have profound implications for population aggregation and density, subsistence and settlement strategies, and access to resources, trade, and warfare.Bingham and Souza provide a general conceptual model for the relationship between complexity and the bow and arrow, arguing that this compound weapon system, whereby smaller projectiles travel at higher speed and are capable of hitting targets more accurately and at greater distances than hand-thrown darts, fundamentally favors the formation of larger groups because it allows for cost-effective means of dealing with conflicts of interest through social coercion, thereby dramatically transforming kin-based social relations. Here we consider the impacts the introduction of the bow and arrow had on sociopolitical complexity in the North American Southwest.

  16. Nonlinear PRD components of EBR-II compared with bowing analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Meneghetti, D.; Kucera, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    The nonlinear components of the power reactivity decrements (PRDs) for Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) runs 85A, 93A, 99A, and 122A have been reported. These nonlinear components were deduced by subtraction of the calculated linear (and Doppler) components from the measured PRD curves. The linear (and Doppler) components of the PRDs were calculated using the EBRPOCO program together with an addition to the program (RODCO) that accounts for the effects of positionings of the control rods. Corresponding calculated bowing components of these runs have now been calculated assuming that the hex can ducts are unirradiated and thus have been assumed to have neither swelling nor bowing at the zero-power level in the analyses. Furthermore, the initial separations of the subassemblies at the contact-button levels are all assumed to be the unirradiated nominal 0.002 in. (0.051 mm). Comparison of these calculations with the bowing components deduced from the measurements enable the signs and magnitudes of the effects of the unknown initial conditions to be ascertained.

  17. Exploring Astrophysically Relevant Bow Shocks Using MIFEDS and the OMEGA Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levesque, Joseph; Kuranz, Carolyn; Young, Rachel; Fiksel, Gennady; Manuel, Mario; Trantham, Matthew; Klein, Sallee; Hartigan, Patrick; Liao, Andy; Li, Chikang

    2016-10-01

    We present current experiments using the Omega Laser Facility and their magneto-inertial fusion electrical discharge system (MIFEDS) to observe the effect of magnetic pressure on bow shock dynamics in an astrophysically relevant regime. Astrophysical bow shocks are an interesting phenomenon in which a shock forms when incident supersonic flow encounters a sufficiently magnetized medium surrounding an object. The most well-known example of this phenomena is the interaction of the solar wind with the Earth's magnetic field, which creates our magnetosphere. In our experiment the magnetosphere will be emulated by a current flowing through a curved wire to create an azimuthal magnetic field. To create the analogous solar wind, lasers rear-irradiate two opposing graphite targets so the plasma outflows collide and then expand along the collision plane toward the magnetized wires. We use the UV Thomson scattering diagnostic technique to determine plasma parameters along with optical imaging and proton radiography to characterize the plasma flow and the bow shock that forms. This work is supported by the U.S. DOE, through NNSA Grants DE-NA0002956 (SSAA) and DE-NA0002719 (NLUF), by the LLE under DE-NA0001944, and by the LLNL under subcontract B614207 to DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  18. The Bow City structure, southern Alberta, Canada: The deep roots of a complex impact structure?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glombick, Paul; Schmitt, Douglas R.; Xie, Wei; Bown, Todd; Hathway, Ben; Banks, Christopher

    2014-05-01

    Geological and geophysical evidence is presented for a newly discovered, probable remnant complex impact structure. The structure, located near Bow City, southern Alberta, has no obvious morphological expression at surface. The geometry of the structure in the shallow subsurface, mapped using downhole geophysical well logs, is a semicircular structural depression approximately 8 km in diameter with a semicircular uplifted central region. Detailed subsurface mapping revealed evidence of localized duplication of stratigraphic section in the central uplift area and omission of strata within the surrounding annular region. Field mapping of outcrop confirmed an inlier of older rocks present within the center of the structure. Evidence of deformation along the eastern margin of the central uplift includes thrust faulting, folding, and steeply dipping bedding. Normal faults were mapped along the northern margin of the annular region. Isopach maps reveal that structural thickening and thinning were accommodated primarily within the Belly River Group. Evidence from legacy 2-D seismic data is consistent with the subsurface mapping and reveals additional insight into the geometry of the structure, including a series of listric normal faults in the annular region and complex faulting within the central uplift. The absence of any ejecta blanket, breccia, suevite, or melt sheet (based on available data) is consistent with the Bow City structure being the remnant of a deeply eroded, complex impact structure. Accordingly, the Bow City structure may provide rare access and insight into zones of deformation remaining beneath an excavated transient crater in stratified siliciclastic target rocks.

  19. Reconstructing the Guitar: Blowing Bubbles with a Pulsar Bow Shock Backflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Kerkwijk, Marten H.; Ingle, Ashleigh

    2008-08-01

    The Guitar Nebula is an Hα nebula produced by the interaction of the relativistic wind of a very fast pulsar, PSR B2224+65, with the interstellar medium. It consists of a ram-pressure confined bow shock near its head and a series of semicircular bubbles further behind, the two largest of which form the body of the Guitar. We present a scenario in which this peculiar morphology is due to instabilities in the backflow from the pulsar bow shock. From simulations, these backflows appear similar to jets and their kinetic energy is a large fraction of the total energy in the pulsar's relativistic wind. We suggest that, like jets, these flows become unstable some distance downstream, leading to rapid dissipation of the kinetic energy into heat, and the formation of an expanding bubble. We show that in this scenario the sizes, velocities, and surface brightnesses of the bubbles depend mostly on observables, and that they match roughly what is seen for the Guitar. Similar instabilities may account for features seen in other bow shocks.

  20. Vortioxetine, but not escitalopram or duloxetine, reverses memory impairment induced by central 5-HT depletion in rats: evidence for direct 5-HT receptor modulation.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Jesper Bornø; du Jardin, Kristian Gaarn; Song, Dekun; Budac, David; Smagin, Gennady; Sanchez, Connie; Pehrson, Alan Lars

    2014-01-01

    Depressed patients suffer from cognitive dysfunction, including memory deficits. Acute serotonin (5-HT) depletion impairs memory and mood in vulnerable patients. The investigational multimodal acting antidepressant vortioxetine is a 5-HT3, 5-HT7 and 5-HT1D receptor antagonist, 5-HT1B receptor partial agonist, 5-HT1A receptor agonist and 5-HT transporter (SERT) inhibitor that enhances memory in normal rats in novel object recognition (NOR) and conditioned fear (Mørk et al., 2013). We hypothesized that vortioxetine's 5-HT receptor mechanisms are involved in its memory effects, and therefore investigated these effects in 5-HT depleted rats. Four injections of the irreversible tryptophan hydroxylase inhibitor 4-chloro-dl-phenylalanine methyl ester hydrochloride (PCPA, 86mg/kg, s.c.) induced 5-HT depletion, as measured in hippocampal homogenate and microdialysate. The effects of acute challenge with vortioxetine or the 5-HT releaser fenfluramine on extracellular 5-HT were measured in PCPA-treated and control rats. PCPA's effects on NOR and spontaneous alternation (SA) performance were assessed along with the effects of acute treatment with 5-hydroxy-l-tryptophan (5-HTP), vortioxetine, the selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitor escitalopram, or the 5-HT norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor duloxetine. SERT occupancies were estimated by ex vivo autoradiography. PCPA depleted central 5-HT by >90% in tissue and microdialysate, and impaired NOR and SA performance. Restoring central 5-HT with 5-HTP reversed these deficits. At similar SERT occupancies (>90%) vortioxetine, but not escitalopram or duloxetine, restored memory performance. Acute fenfluramine significantly increased extracellular 5-HT in control and PCPA-treated rats, while vortioxetine did so only in control rats. Thus, vortioxetine restores 5-HT depletion impaired memory performance in rats through one or more of its receptor activities.

  1. Reversal bending fatigue testing

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Jy-An John; Wang, Hong; Tan, Ting

    2014-10-21

    Embodiments for apparatuses for testing reversal bending fatigue in an elongated beam are disclosed. Embodiments are configured to be coupled to first and second end portions of the beam and to apply a bending moment to the beam and create a pure bending condition in an intermediate portion of the beam. Embodiments are further configured to cyclically alternate the direction of the bending moment applied to the beam such that the intermediate portion of the beam cyclically bends in opposite directions in a pure bending condition.

  2. THE BALMER-DOMINATED BOW SHOCK AND WIND NEBULA STRUCTURE OF {gamma}-RAY PULSAR PSR J1741-2054

    SciTech Connect

    Romani, Roger W.; Shaw, Michael S.; Camilo, Fernando; Cotter, Garret; Sivakoff, Gregory R. E-mail: msshaw@stanford.ed

    2010-12-01

    We have detected an H{alpha} bow shock nebula around PSR J1741-2054, a pulsar discovered through its GeV {gamma}-ray pulsations. The pulsar is only {approx}1.''5 behind the leading edge of the shock. Optical spectroscopy shows that the nebula is non-radiative, dominated by Balmer emission. The H{alpha} images and spectra suggest that the pulsar wind momentum is equatorially concentrated and implies a pulsar space velocity {approx}150 km s{sup -1}, directed 15{sup 0} {+-} 10{sup 0} out of the plane of the sky. The complex H{alpha} profile indicates that different portions of the post-shock flow dominate line emission as gas moves along the nebula and provide an opportunity to study the structure of this unusual slow non-radiative shock under a variety of conditions. CXO ACIS observations reveal an X-ray pulsar wind nebula within this nebula, with a compact {approx}2.''5 equatorial structure and a trail extending several arcminutes behind. Together these data support a close ({<=}0.5 kpc) distance, a spin geometry viewed edge-on, and highly efficient {gamma}-ray production for this unusual, energetic pulsar.

  3. Structural Basis for the Inhibition of RNase H Activity of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase by RNase H Active Site-Directed Inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Hua-Poo; Yan, Youwei; Prasad, G. Sridhar; Smith, Robert F.; Daniels, Christopher L.; Abeywickrema, Pravien D.; Reid, John C.; Loughran, H. Marie; Kornienko, Maria; Sharma, Sujata; Grobler, Jay A.; Xu, Bei; Sardana, Vinod; Allison, Timothy J.; Williams, Peter D.; Darke, Paul L.; Hazuda, Daria J.; Munshi, Sanjeev

    2010-09-02

    HIV/AIDS continues to be a menace to public health. Several drugs currently on the market have successfully improved the ability to manage the viral burden in infected patients. However, new drugs are needed to combat the rapid emergence of mutated forms of the virus that are resistant to existing therapies. Currently, approved drugs target three of the four major enzyme activities encoded by the virus that are critical to the HIV life cycle. Although a number of inhibitors of HIV RNase H activity have been reported, few inhibit by directly engaging the RNase H active site. Here, we describe structures of naphthyridinone-containing inhibitors bound to the RNase H active site. This class of compounds binds to the active site via two metal ions that are coordinated by catalytic site residues, D443, E478, D498, and D549. The directionality of the naphthyridinone pharmacophore is restricted by the ordering of D549 and H539 in the RNase H domain. In addition, one of the naphthyridinone-based compounds was found to bind at a second site close to the polymerase active site and non-nucleoside/nucleotide inhibitor sites in a metal-independent manner. Further characterization, using fluorescence-based thermal denaturation and a crystal structure of the isolated RNase H domain reveals that this compound can also bind the RNase H site and retains the metal-dependent binding mode of this class of molecules. These structures provide a means for structurally guided design of novel RNase H inhibitors.

  4. The Cost of Unintended Pregnancies in Canada: Estimating Direct Cost, Role of Imperfect Adherence, and the Potential Impact of Increased Use of Long-Acting Reversible Contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Black, Amanda Y; Guilbert, Edith; Hassan, Fareen; Chatziheofilou, Ismini; Lowin, Julia; Jeddi, Mark; Filonenko, Anna; Trussell, James

    2015-12-01

    Objectif : Les grossesses non planifiées (GNP) sont associées à un fardeau financier considérable; au Canada, l’ampleur de ce fardeau demeure inconnue. Cette étude avait pour objectif de quantifier les coûts directs des GNP au Canada, la proportion des coûts liés aux GNP attribuables à une observance imparfaite du schéma posologique contraceptif et les économies potentielles associées à un accroissement de l’utilisation de modes de contraception réversible à action prolongée (CRAP). Méthodes : Un modèle de coût a été conçu pour estimer le nombre annuel de GNP et leurs coûts directs chez les femmes âgées de 18 à 44 ans. Les taux de GNP associés à l’observance ont été estimés au moyen des taux d’échec de la contraception en utilisation parfaite et en utilisation typique. Les modifications du nombre annuel de GNP et les effets sur le fardeau financier ont été projetés dans le cadre de trois scénarios prévoyant un accroissement du recours aux modes de CRAP. Des analyses simples de la variance en matière de sensibilité ont été menées pour évaluer les effets de variables clés sur les scénarios prévoyant un accroissement du recours aux modes de CRAP. Résultats : On compte plus de 180 700 GNP chaque année au Canada. Les coûts directs qui leur sont associés sont de plus de 320 millions de dollars. Cinquante-huit pour cent (58 %) des GNP se sont manifestées chez des femmes de 20 à 29 ans, ce qui représente un coût annuel de 175 millions de dollars; 82 % de ce coût (143 millions de dollars) étaient attribuables à la non-observance du schéma posologique contraceptif. L’accroissement du recours aux modes de CRAP a généré des économies de plus de 34 millions de dollars dans le cadre des trois scénarios de transition envisagés; les économies les plus importantes (35 millions de dollars) ont été constatées dans le cadre du scénario prévoyant que 10 % des utilisatrices de contraceptifs

  5. Effect of bow-type initial imperfection on the buckling load and mass of graphite-epoxy blade-stiffened panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroud, W. J.; Anderson, M. S.; Hennessy, K. W.

    1977-01-01

    A structural synthesis computer code which accounts for first order effects of an initial bow and which can be used for sizing stiffened composite panels having an arbitrary cross section is used to study graphite blade-stiffened panels. The effect of a small initial bow on both the load carrying ability of panels and on the mass of panels designed to carry a specified load is examined. Large reductions in the buckling load caused by a small initial bow emphasize the need for considering a bow when a panel is designed.

  6. Direct saponification preparation and analysis of free and conjugated phytosterols in sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum L.) by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Feng, Simin; Liu, Songbai; Luo, Zisheng; Tang, Kaichen

    2015-08-15

    A simple method based on direct saponification followed by RP-HPLC analysis was developed for quantification of free and conjugated sterols in sugarcane. Acid hydrolysis prior to alkaline saponification was used to determined acylated steryl glycoside and steryl glycoside in sugarcane. The applicability and generality of this method were improved with intensive investigation. Compared to traditional solvent extraction method, this method was more time saving and appropriate for characterization of sterol fractions in sugarcane. This method was successfully applied for determination of free and conjugated sterols in different sugarcane samples. The results exhibited that stigmasterol (varied from 883.3 ± 23.5 to 1823.9 ± 24.5 μg/g dry weigh) and β-sitosterol (varied from 117.6 ± 19.9 to 801.4 ± 33.5 μg/g dry weight) were major phytosterols in the sugarcane sample, and their glycosylated forms accounted for almost 87.0% of stigmasterol and 87.5% of β-sitosterol in sugarcane, respectively. In addition, among other parts of sugarcane, tips contained the greatest amount of phytosterols.

  7. Direct detection of Brucella spp. in raw milk by PCR and reverse hybridization with 16S-23S rRNA spacer probes.

    PubMed Central

    Rijpens, N P; Jannes, G; Van Asbroeck, M; Rossau, R; Herman, L M

    1996-01-01

    The 16S-23S rRNA spacer regions of Brucella abortus, B. melitensis, and B. suis were cloned and subcloned after PCR amplification. Sequence analysis of the inserts revealed a spacer of about 800 bp with very high ( > 99%) homology among the three species examined. Two genus-specific primer pairs, BRU-P5-BRU-P8 and BRU-P6-BRU-P7, that could be used in a nested PCR format and three genus-specific DNA probes, BRU-ICG2, BRU-ICG3, and BRU-ICG4, were deduced from this spacer. The specificity and sensitivity of both primer sets and probes were examined by testing them against a collection of 18 Brucella strains and 56 strains from other relevant taxa by using PCR and the Line Probe Assay (LiPA), respectively. A method for direct detection of Brucella spp. in 1 ml of raw milk was developed on the basis of enzymatic treatment of the milk components and subsequent PCR and LiPA hybridization. After a single PCR, sensitivities of 2.8 x 10(5) and 2.8 x 10(4) CFU/ml were obtained for detection by agarose gel electrophoresis and LiPA, respectively. Nested PCR yielded a sensitivity of 2.8 x 10(2) CFU/ml for both methods. PMID:8633866

  8. Direct analysis of pesticide residues in olive oil by on-line reversed phase liquid chromatography-gas chromatography using an automated through oven transfer adsorption desorption (TOTAD) interface.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Raquel; Vázquez, Ana; Riquelme, David; Villén, Jesús

    2003-10-08

    A fully automated on-line reversed phase liquid chromatography-gas chromatography system is described. The system uses a prototype of the automated through oven transfer adsorption desorption interface. The system is demonstrated by presenting a new rapid method for the determination of pesticide residue in olive oil, which is injected directly with no sample pretreatment step other than filtration. Methanol:water is used as the eluent in the LC preseparation step, while the LC fraction containing the pesticide is automatically transferred to the gas chromatograph. Detection limits of pesticides varied from 0.18 to 0.44 mg/L when a flame ionization detector was used. As an example, relative standard deviation and linear calibration are presented for terbutryne.

  9. Vocal Fold Bowing in Elderly Male Monozygotic Twins: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, Kristine; Sauder, Cara; Thibeault, Susan L.; Dromey, Christopher; Smith, Marshall E.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives This study examined case histories, diagnostic features, and treatment response in two 79-year-old male monozygotic (identical) twins with vocal fold bowing, exploring both genetic and environmental factors. Study Design Case study. Methods DNA concordance was examined via cheek swab. Case histories, videostroboscopy, auditory- and visual-perceptual assessment, electromyography, acoustic measures, and Voice Handicap ratings were undertaken. Both twins underwent surgical intervention and subsequent voice therapy. Results Monozygosity was confirmed for DNA polymorphisms, with 10 of 10 concordance for STR DNA markers. For both twins, auditory and visual-perceptual assessments indicated severe bowing, hoarseness and breathiness, although Twin 1 was judged to be extremely severe. Differences in RMS amplitudes were observed for TA and LCA muscles, with smaller relative amplitudes observed for the Twin 1 versus Twin 2. No consistent voice improvement was observed following surgical intervention(s), despite improved mid-membranous vocal fold closure. Marked reductions in Voice Handicap Index total scores were observed following behavioral voice therapy, coinciding with increased mid-membranous and posterior laryngeal (interarytenoid) glottal closure. No substantive differences in acoustic measures were observed. Conclusions Vocal fold bowing was more severe for Twin 1 versus Twin 2 despite identical heritability factors. Overall voice improvement with treatment was greater for Twin 2 than Twin 1. Environmental factors might partially account for the differences observed between the twins, including variability in their responsiveness to behavioral voice therapy. Voice therapy was useful in improving mid-membranous and posterior laryngeal closure, although dysphonia remained severe in both cases. PMID:19664899

  10. Discovering Massive Runaway Stars with Infrared Bow Shock Nebulae: Four OB Stars Found in WISE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wernke, Heather N.; Kobulnicky, Henry A.; Dale, Daniel A.; Povich, Matthew S.; Andrews, Julian E.; Chick, William T.; Munari, Stephan; Olivier, Grace M.; Schurhammer, Danielle; Sorber, Rebecca L.

    2016-01-01

    Supernovae, pulsars, and gamma-ray bursts are examples of the result of the death of massive (late-O and early-B type) stars. Determining stellar mass loss rates can help us predict the type of death the star will endure. We focus on stars that are located at the center of an infrared bow shock nebula, indicating that the star was flung from its birthplace at supersonic speed. Observing these massive, high-velocity, runaway stars with bow shock nebulae to determine their spectral type will help in the measurements of their stellar mass loss rates. The spectra of four OB stars driving bow shock candidates are presented. These four candidates were found by searching through the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) All-Sky Data Release and were the most visible in the WISE 21µm band. The spectrum for each star was obtained with the Longslit Spectrograph at the Wyoming Infrared Observatory (WIRO). The spectral types of G077.3617+01.16 (HD 229159), G079.8219+00.096 ([CPR2002]A10), G092.7265+00.18, and G076.0752-02.2044 (TYC 2697-1046-1) were found to be B1.0I, O9.0V, B0.0V, and B0.0V respectively. As predicted, the candidates are all either late-O or early-B type stars. Now that the spectral types of these stars are known, further analysis can be done to determine the velocities, temperatures, masses, and stellar mass loss rates.This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under grants AST-1063146 (REU), AST-1411851 (RUI), and AST-1412845.

  11. Optimization of Bow-Bulb Forms for Resistance and Seakeeping Characteristics.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    effort looked into _J the effects of a bow bulb similar to that found on the Italian frigate, - .2 • ---- au ab. ., I.,Wm .,.I._ , dm ~m,,m~m~~u...the other assumes the transom is completely dry . Since the model tests showed that the transom stern of the FFG-7 was dry at all speeds above 16 knots...curves represents the uncertainty " .] which is present in the transition from the wet transom to a dry stern. From these curves, the EHP ratio

  12. Plasma wave system measurements of the Martian bow shock from the Phobos 2 spacecraft

    SciTech Connect

    Trotignon, J.G. ); Grard, R. ); Savin, S. )

    1991-07-01

    The high-resolution data of the electric field observations performed by the plasma wave system (PWS) during some of the Martian bow shock intersections by Phobos 2 were analyzed. Plasma and wave detectors are very useful instruments for locating the shock transition region and studying structures in the upstream region, such as the foot or the electron foreshock. The electron plasma oscillations that develop in the latter give access to the plasma density of the solar wind. Shock surface models derived from the PWS data are compared to those obtained by other authors, and attention is paid to similarities and differences between the electric field measurements obtained for Mars, Venus, and Earth

  13. Primary task-specific bowing tremor: an entity of its own?

    PubMed

    Lee, André; Altenmüller, Eckart

    2012-12-01

    A professional violinist in his early 60s, playing in a prestigious German orchestra for more than 20 years, presented to our institute because of a task-induced tremor in his right arm when playing the violin. We describe the phenomenology of this tremor and its treatment options and compare it to findings in primary writing tremor (PWT). We then discuss whether primary bowing tremor is an entity of its own (similar to PWT) and propose hypotheses that would derive from such a definition.

  14. Homotopy method for inverse design of the bulbous bow of a container ship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yu-jia; Feng, Bai-wei; Hou, Guo-xiang; Gao, Liang; Xiao, Mi

    2017-03-01

    The homotopy method is utilized in the present inverse hull design problem to minimize the wave-making coefficient of a 1300 TEU container ship with a bulbous bow. Moreover, in order to improve the computational efficiency of the algorithm, a properly smooth function is employed to update the homotopy parameter during iteration. Numerical results show that the homotopy method has been successfully applied in the inverse design of the ship hull. This method has an advantage of high performance on convergence and it is credible and valuable for engineering practice.

  15. 3-D Hybrid Simulation of Quasi-Parallel Bow Shock and Its Effects on the Magnetosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Y.; Wang, X.Y.

    2005-08-01

    A three-dimensional (3-D) global-scale hybrid simulation is carried out for the structure of the quasi-parallel bow shock, in particular the foreshock waves and pressure pulses. The wave evolution and interaction with the dayside magnetosphere are discussed. It is shown that diamagnetic cavities are generated in the turbulent foreshock due to the ion beam plasma interaction, and these compressional pulses lead to strong surface perturbations at the magnetopause and Alfven waves/field line resonance in the magnetosphere.

  16. Heavy Solar Wind Ion Dynamics at and Downstream from the Bow Shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dougherty, Virginia M.

    1997-01-01

    This is a contract under the NASA Supporting Research and Technology Program for the analysis and interpretation of the scientific data from the Plasma Composition Experiment on the International Sun Earth Explorer 1 (ISEE-1) spacecraft and the Fast Plasma Experiment on the ISEE-1 and -2 spacecraft. These combined data sets will be used in a comprehensive study of the heavy solar wind ion dynamics at and downstream from the Earth's bow shock. The report summarizes activities during the above period and outlines expected activities during the forthcoming quarter.

  17. Near-field enhanced ultraviolet resonance Raman spectroscopy using aluminum bow-tie nano-antenna

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ling; Fang Lim, Shuang; Puretzky, Alexander A.; Riehn, Robert; Hallen, H. D.

    2012-01-01

    An aluminum bow-tie nano-antenna is combined with the resonance Raman effect in the deep ultraviolet to dramatically increase the sensitivity of Raman spectra to a small volume of material, such as benzene used here. We further demonstrate gradient-field Raman peaks for several strong infrared modes. We achieve a gain of ∼105 in signal intensity from the near field enhancement due to the surface plasmon resonance in the aluminum nanostructure. The on-line resonance enhancement contributes another factor of several thousands, limited by the laser line width. Thus, an overall gain of hundreds of million is achieved. PMID:23066168

  18. Critical experiment tests of bowing and expansion reactivity calculations for LMRS

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, R.W.

    1988-01-01

    Experiments done in several LMR-type critical assemblies simulated core axial expansion, core radial expansion and bowing, coolant expansion, and control driveline expansion. For the most part new experimental techniques were developed to do these experiments. Calculations of the experiments basically used design-level methods, except when it was necessary to investigate complexities peculiar to the experiments. It was found that these feedback reactivities generally are overpredicted, but the predictions are within 30% of the experimental values. 14 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Treatment of pseudo Class III malocclusion by modified Hawleys appliance with inverted labial bow.

    PubMed

    Negi, K S; Sharma, K R

    2011-01-01

    Pseudo Class III malocclusion is characterized by an anterior crossbite with functional forward mandibular displacement. Various appliances have been devised for early treatment of a pseudo Class III. The aim of this article is to highlight the method of construction and use a simple removable appliance termed as "Modified Hawleys appliance with inverted labial bow" to treat psuedo class III malocclusion in the mixed dentition period. It also emphasizes the importance of differentiating between true Class III and pseudo Class III. This appliance in this type of malocclusion enabled the correction of a dental malocclusion in a few months and therapeutic stability of a mesially positioned mandible encouraging favorable skeletal growth.

  20. The Quatro appliance: a removable aligner with a changeable labial bow.

    PubMed

    Singh, P; Ash, S; Mizrahi, E

    2007-12-01

    Lower labial segment irregularity is a feature that is presenting more frequently as greater emphasis is placed on aesthetics than ever before. The authors report on a removable appliance that is easy to construct and use and is designed to deal with mild labial tooth irregularity. In cases of crowding the aligner can be used in conjunction with inter-proximal stripping. The device incorporates a removable labial bow attached bilaterally to a sliding lock. This lock permits the addition of sectional archwires to the labial part of the appliance. The versatility of the aligner allows round and rectangular wires of different materials and dimensions to be placed with or without bends.

  1. Atmospheric helium and geomagnetic field reversals.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheldon, W. R.; Kern, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    The problem of the earth's helium budget is examined in the light of recent work on the interaction of the solar wind with nonmagnetic planets. It is proposed that the dominant mode of helium (He4) loss is ion pumping by the solar wind during geomagnetic field reversals, when the earth's magnetic field is very small. The interaction of the solar wind with the earth's upper atmosphere during such a period is found to involve the formation of a bow shock. The penetration altitude of the shock-heated solar plasma is calculated to be about 700 km, and ionization rates above this level are estimated for a cascade ionization (electron avalanche) process to average 10 to the 9th power ions/sq cm/sec. The calculated ionization rates and the capacity of the solar wind to remove ionized helium (He4) from the upper atmosphere during geomagnetic dipole reversals are sufficient to yield a secular equilibrium over geologic time scales. The upward transport of helium from the lower atmosphere under these conditions is found to be adequate to sustain the proposed loss rate.

  2. Preliminary report on radioactive conglomerates of Middle Precambrian age in the Sierra Madre and Medicine Bow Mountains of southeastern Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Houston, Robert Stroud; Graff, P.J.; Karlstrom, K.E.; Root, Forrest

    1977-01-01

    Middle Precambrian miogeosynclinal metasedimentary rocks o# the Sierra Madre and Medicine Bow Mountains of southeastern Wyoming contain radioactive quartz-pebble conglomerates of possible economic interest. These conglomerates do not contain ore-grade uranium in surface outcrops, but an earlier report on the geochemistry of the Arrastre Lake area of the Medicine Bow Mountains shows that ore-grade deposits may be present in the subsurface. This report describes the stratigraphy of the host metasedimentary rocks and the stratigraphic setting of the radioactive conglomerates in both the Sierra Madre and Medicine Bow Mountains, and compares these rock units with those of the Blind River-Elliot Lake uranium district in Canada. The location of radioactive .conglomerates is given so that further exploration may be undertaken by interested parties.

  3. Comparison of theory with atomic oxygen 130.4 nm radiation data from the Bow Shock ultraviolet 2 rocket flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levin, Deborah A.; Candler, Graham V.; Collins, Robert J.; Howlett, Carl L.; Espy, Patrick; Whiting, Ellis; Park, Chul

    1993-01-01

    Comparison is made between the results obtained from a state-of-the-art flow and radiative model and bow shock vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) data obtained the recent Bow Shock 2 Flight Experiment. An extensive data set was obtained from onboard rocket measurements at a reentry speed of 5 km/sec between the altitudes of approximately 65-85 km. A description of the NO photoionization cell used, the data, and the interpretation of the data will be presented. The primary purpose of the analyses is to assess the utility of the data and to propose a radiation model appropriate to the flight conditions of Bow Shock 2. Theoretical predictions based on flow modeling discussed in earlier work and a new radiation model are compared with data.

  4. Influence of electronic and steric effects on stability constants and electrochemical reversibility of divalent ion complexes with glycine and sarcosine. A glass electrode potentiometric, sampled direct current polarographic, virtual potentiometric, and molecular modelling study.

    PubMed

    Cukrowski, Ignacy; Marques, Helder M; Mkwizu, Tumaini S; Magampa, Philemon P; Serge, Claudette

    2007-05-08

    Cd(II) complexes with glycine (gly) and sarcosine (sar) were studied by glass electrode potentiometry, direct current polarography, virtual potentiometry, and molecular modelling. The electrochemically reversible Cd(II)-glycine-OH labile system was best described by a model consisting of M(HL), ML, ML2, ML3, ML(OH) and ML2(OH) (M = Cd(II), L = gly) with the overall stability constants, as log beta, determined to be 10.30+/-0.05, 4.21+/-0.03, 7.30+/-0.05, 9.84+/-0.04, 8.9+/-0.1, and 10.75+/-0.10, respectively. In case of the electrochemically quasi-reversible Cd(II)-sarcosine-OH labile system, only ML, ML2 and ML3 (M = Cd(II), L = sar) were found and their stability constants, as log beta, were determined to be 3.80+/-0.03, 6.91+/-0.07, and 8.9+/-0.4, respectively. Stability constants for the ML complexes, the prime focus of this work, were thus established with an uncertainty smaller than 0.05 log units. The observed departure from electrochemical reversibility for the Cd-sarcosine-OH system was attributed mainly to the decrease in the transfer coefficient alpha. The MM2 force field, supplemented by additional parameters, reproduced the reported crystal structures of diaqua-bis(glycinato-O,N)nickel(II) and fac-tri(glycinato)-nickelate(II) very well. These parameters were used to predict structures of all possible isomers of (i) [Ni(H2O)4(gly)]+ and [Ni(H2O)4(sar)]+; and (ii) [Ni(H2O)3(IDA)] and [Ni(H2O)3(MIDA)] (IDA = iminodiacetic acid, MIDA = N-methyl iminodiacetic acid) by molecular mechanics/simulated annealing methods. The change in strain energy, deltaU(str), that accompanies the substitution of one ligand by another (ML + L' --> ML' + L), was computed and a strain energy deltaU(str) = +0.28 kcal mol(-1) for the reaction [Ni(H2O)4(gly)]+ + sar --> [Ni(H2O)4(sar)]+ + gly was found. This predicts the monoglycine complex to be marginally more stable. By contrast, for the reaction [Ni(H2O)3IDA] + MIDA --> [Ni(H2O)3MIDA] + IDA, deltaU(str) = -0.64 kcal mol(-1

  5. On nonstationarity and rippling of the quasiperpendicular zone of the Earth bow shock: Cluster observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobzin, V. V.; Krasnoselskikh, V. V.; Musatenko, K.; Dudok de Wit, T.

    2008-09-01

    A new method for remote sensing of the quasiperpendicular part of the bow shock surface is presented. The method is based on analysis of high frequency electric field fluctuations corresponding to Langmuir, upshifted, and downshifted oscillations in the electron foreshock. Langmuir waves usually have maximum intensity at the upstream boundary of this region. All these waves are generated by energetic electrons accelerated by quasiperpendicular zone of the shock front. Nonstationary behavior of the shock, in particular due to rippling, should result in modulation of energetic electron fluxes, thereby giving rise to variations of Langmuir waves intensity. For upshifted and downshifted oscillations, the variations of both intensity and central frequency can be observed. For the present study, WHISPER measurements of electric field spectra obtained aboard Cluster spacecraft are used to choose 48 crossings of the electron foreshock boundary with dominating Langmuir waves and to perform for the first time a statistical analysis of nonstationary behavior of quasiperpendicular zone of the Earth's bow shock. Analysis of hidden periodicities in plasma wave energy reveals shock front nonstationarity in the frequency range 0.33 fBi

  6. Numerical modeling of a glow discharge through a supersonic bow shock in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rassou, S.; Packan, D.; Elias, P.-Q.; Tholin, F.; Chemartin, L.; Labaune, J.

    2017-03-01

    The interaction between a glow discharge and the bow shock of a Mach 3 air flow around a truncated conical model with a central spike is modeled, and comparison is made with prior experimental results. The KRONOS workflow for plasma modeling in flow fields, which has recently been developed at ONERA, was used for the modeling. Based on the quasi-neutral approximation, it couples hypersonic and reactive flow fields with electron chemistry, including the effect of non-Maxwellian electron energy distribution function. The model used for the discharge involves 12 species and 82 reactions, including ionization, electronic and vibrational excitation, and attachment. The simulations reproduce the main features of the discharge observed experimentally well, in particular, the very recognizable topology of the discharge. It was found from the simulations that behind the bow shock, in the afterglow, the negative ion flow ensures the electrical conduction and the establishment of the glow discharge. The influence of kinetic rates on the voltage-current characteristics is discussed.

  7. Diversity of sponges (Porifera) from cryptic habitats on the Belize barrier reef near Carrie Bow Cay.

    PubMed

    Rützler, Klaus; Piantoni, Carla; Van Soest, Rob W M; Díaz, M Cristina

    2014-05-29

    The Caribbean barrier reef near Carrie Bow Cay, Belize, has been a focus of Smithsonian Institution (Washington) reef and mangrove investigations since the early 1970s. Systematics and biology of sponges (Porifera) were addressed by several researchers but none of the studies dealt with cryptic habitats, such as the shaded undersides of coral rubble, reef crevices, and caves, although a high species diversity was recognized and samples were taken for future reference and study. This paper is the result of processing samples taken between 1972 and 2012. In all, 122 species were identified, 14 of them new (including one new genus). The new species are Tetralophophora (new genus) mesoamericana, Geodia cribrata, Placospongia caribica, Prosuberites carriebowensis, Timea diplasterina, Timea oxyasterina, Rhaphidhistia belizensis, Wigginsia curlewensis, Phorbas aurantiacus, Myrmekioderma laminatum, Niphates arenata, Siphonodictyon occultum, Xestospongia purpurea, and Aplysina sciophila. We determined that about 75 of the 122 cryptic sponge species studied (61%) are exclusive members of the sciophilic community, 47 (39 %) occur in both, light-exposed and shaded or dark habitats. Since we estimate the previously known sponge population of Carrie Bow reefs and mangroves at about 200 species, the cryptic fauna makes up 38 % of total diversity.

  8. Investigation of radiative bow-shocks in magnetically accelerated plasma flows

    SciTech Connect

    Bott-Suzuki, S. C. Caballero Bendixsen, L. S.; Cordaro, S. W.; Blesener, I. C.; Hoyt, C. L.; Cahill, A. D.; Kusse, B. R.; Hammer, D. A.; Gourdain, P. A.; Seyler, C. E.; Greenly, J. B.; Chittenden, J. P.; Niasse, N.; Lebedev, S. V.; Ampleford, D. J.

    2015-05-15

    We present a study of the formation of bow shocks in radiatively cooled plasma flows. This work uses an inverse wire array to provide a quasi-uniform, large scale hydrodynamic flow accelerated by Lorentz forces to supersonic velocities. This flow impacts a stationary object placed in its path, forming a well-defined Mach cone. Interferogram data are used to determine a Mach number of ∼6, which may increase with radial position suggesting a strongly cooling flow. Self-emission imaging shows the formation of a thin (<60 μm) strongly emitting shock region, where T{sub e} ∼ 40–50 eV, and rapid cooling behind the shock. Emission is observed upstream of the shock position which appears consistent with a radiation driven phenomenon. Data are compared to 2-dimensional simulations using the Gorgon MHD code, which show good agreement with the experiments. The simulations are also used to investigate the effect of magnetic field in the target, demonstrating that the bow-shocks have a high plasma β, and the influence of B-field at the shock is small. This consistent with experimental measurement with micro bdot probes.

  9. Compound semiconductor alloys: From atomic-scale structure to bandgap bowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnohr, C. S.

    2015-09-01

    Compound semiconductor alloys such as InxGa1-xAs, GaAsxP1-x, or CuInxGa1-xSe2 are increasingly employed in numerous electronic, optoelectronic, and photonic devices due to the possibility of tuning their properties over a wide parameter range simply by adjusting the alloy composition. Interestingly, the material properties are also determined by the atomic-scale structure of the alloys on the subnanometer scale. These local atomic arrangements exhibit a striking deviation from the average crystallographic structure featuring different element-specific bond lengths, pronounced bond angle relaxation and severe atomic displacements. The latter, in particular, have a strong influence on the bandgap energy and give rise to a significant contribution to the experimentally observed bandgap bowing. This article therefore reviews experimental and theoretical studies of the atomic-scale structure of III-V and II-VI zincblende alloys and I-III-VI2 chalcopyrite alloys and explains the characteristic findings in terms of bond length and bond angle relaxation. Different approaches to describe and predict the bandgap bowing are presented and the correlation with local structural parameters is discussed in detail. The article further highlights both similarities and differences between the cubic zincblende alloys and the more complex chalcopyrite alloys and demonstrates that similar effects can also be expected for other tetrahedrally coordinated semiconductors of the adamantine structural family.

  10. COMPUTING THE DUST DISTRIBUTION IN THE BOW SHOCK OF A FAST-MOVING, EVOLVED STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Van Marle, A. J.; Meliani, Z.; Keppens, R.; Decin, L.

    2011-06-20

    We study the hydrodynamical behavior occurring in the turbulent interaction zone of a fast-moving red supergiant star, where the circumstellar and interstellar material collide. In this wind-interstellar-medium collision, the familiar bow shock, contact discontinuity, and wind termination shock morphology form, with localized instability development. Our model includes a detailed treatment of dust grains in the stellar wind and takes into account the drag forces between dust and gas. The dust is treated as pressureless gas components binned per grain size, for which we use 10 representative grain size bins. Our simulations allow us to deduce how dust grains of varying sizes become distributed throughout the circumstellar medium. We show that smaller dust grains (radius <0.045 {mu}m) tend to be strongly bound to the gas and therefore follow the gas density distribution closely, with intricate fine structure due to essentially hydrodynamical instabilities at the wind-related contact discontinuity. Larger grains which are more resistant to drag forces are shown to have their own unique dust distribution, with progressive deviations from the gas morphology. Specifically, small dust grains stay entirely within the zone bound by shocked wind material. The large grains are capable of leaving the shocked wind layer and can penetrate into the shocked or even unshocked interstellar medium. Depending on how the number of dust grains varies with grain size, this should leave a clear imprint in infrared observations of bow shocks of red supergiants and other evolved stars.

  11. Optical hydrogen absorption consistent with a bow shock around the hot Jupiter HD 189733 b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cauley, P. Wilson; Redfield, Seth; Jensen, Adam G.; Barman, Travis; Endl, Michael; Cochran, William D.

    Hot Jupiters, i.e., Jupiter-mass planets with orbital semi major axes of <10 stellar radii, can interact strongly with their host stars. If the planet is moving supersonically through the stellar wind, a bow shock will form ahead of the planet where the planetary magnetosphere slams into the the stellar wind or where the planetary outflow and stellar wind meet. Here we present high resolution spectra of the hydrogen Balmer lines for a single transit of the hot Jupiter HD 189733 b. Transmission spectra of the Balmer lines show strong absorption ~70 minutes before the predicted optical transit, implying a significant column density of excited hydrogen orbiting ahead of the planet. We show that a simple geometric bow shock model is able to reproduce the important features of the absorption time series while simultaneously matching the line profile morphology. Our model suggests a large planetary magnetic field strength of ~28 G. Follow-up observations are needed to confirm the pre-transit signal and investigate any variability in the measurement.

  12. Evolution of the Magnetic Field during Chondrule Formation in Planetary Bow Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mai, Chuhong; Desch, Steven; Boley, Aaron C.

    2016-10-01

    Recent laboratory efforts (Fu et al., 2014, 2015) have constrained the remanent magnetizations of chondrules and the magnetic field strengths they were exposed to as they cooled below their Curie points. An outstanding question is whether these fields represent the background magnetic field of the solar nebula or were unique to the chondrule-forming environment. We investigate the amplification of the magnetic field above background values in a planetary bow shock, which is one proposed mechanism for chondrule formation. We use a hydrodynamic code to model the temperature and pressure around a 3000 km-radius planetary embryo as it moves supersonically through the nebula gas. We calculate the ionization of hot, shocked gas considering thermionic emission of electrons and ions from grains and thermal ionization of potassium. We calculate the magnetic diffusion rate, including Ohmic dissipation and ambipolar diffusion (assuming a magnetic field strength comparable to 0.5 G). We compute the steady-state magnetic field around in the bow shock and find that behind the planet the field is amplified, but everywhere else it quickly diffuses out of the shocked region and recovers the background value. We consider the trajectories taken by chondrules behind the shock and present likely values of the magnetic field amplification experienced by chondrules as they cool after melting in the shock.

  13. Relativistic Electrons Produced by Foreshock Disturbances Observed Upstream of Earth's Bow Shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, L. B., III; Sibeck, D. G.; Turner, D. L.; Osmane, A.; Caprioli, D.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2016-01-01

    Charged particles can be reflected and accelerated by strong (i.e., high Mach number) astrophysical collisionless shock waves, streaming away to form a foreshock region in communication with the shock. Foreshocks are primarily populated by suprathermal ions that can generate foreshock disturbances-largescale (i.e., tens to thousands of thermal ion Larmor radii), transient (approximately 5-10 per day) structures. They have recently been found to accelerate ions to energies of several keV. Although electrons in Saturn's high Mach number (M > 40) bow shock can be accelerated to relativistic energies (nearly 1000 keV), it has hitherto been thought impossible to accelerate electrons beyond a few tens of keV at Earth's low Mach number (1 =M <20) bow shock. Here we report observations of electrons energized by foreshock disturbances to energies up to at least approximately 300 keV. Although such energetic electrons have been previously observed, their presence has been attributed to escaping magnetospheric particles or solar events. These relativistic electrons are not associated with any solar or magnetospheric activity. Further, due to their relatively small Larmor radii (compared to magnetic gradient scale lengths) and large thermal speeds (compared to shock speeds), no known shock acceleration mechanism can energize thermal electrons up to relativistic energies. The discovery of relativistic electrons associated with foreshock structures commonly generated in astrophysical shocks could provide a new paradigm for electron injections and acceleration in collisionless plasmas.

  14. Modeling plasma glow discharges in Air near a Mach 3 bow shock with KRONOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rassou, Sebastien; Labaune, Julien; Packan, Denis; Elias, Paul-Quentin

    2016-09-01

    In this work, plasma glow discharge in Air is modeled near a Mach 3 bow shock. Numerical simulations are performed using the coupling KRONOS which have been developed at ONERA. The flow field is modeled using the code CFD: CEDRE from ONERA and the electrical and plasma part by the EDF open-source code CODE_SATURNE. The plasma kinetic modeling consists on a two-term Boltzmann equation solver and a chemical reaction solver depending of the electric field. The coupling KRONOS is fully parallelized and run on ONERA supercomputers. The shock wave is formed by the propagation of a supersonic flow (M = 3) through a truncated conical model mounted with a central spike. Depending on the spike's voltage value, corona, glow or arc regime could be obtained in a steady flow. The parameters for the supersonic flow and the spike configurations are chosen to be in glow discharge regime and to reproduce the experimental setup. In our simulations, 12 species and 80 reactions (ionization, electronic or vibrational excitation, attachment etc ...) are considered to properly model the glow discharge and the afterglow. In a stationary flow, glow discharge is observed only at the upstream of the shock wave near the high voltage spike. Behind the bow shock, in the afterglow, negative ions are provided by electrons attachment with O2. The negative ions flow convection ensures the electrical conduction and the establishment of the glow discharge.

  15. Relativistic Electrons Produced by Foreshock Disturbances Observed Upstream of Earth's Bow Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, L. B.; Sibeck, D. G.; Turner, D. L.; Osmane, A.; Caprioli, D.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2016-11-01

    Charged particles can be reflected and accelerated by strong (i.e., high Mach number) astrophysical collisionless shock waves, streaming away to form a foreshock region in communication with the shock. Foreshocks are primarily populated by suprathermal ions that can generate foreshock disturbances—large-scale (i.e., tens to thousands of thermal ion Larmor radii), transient (˜5 - 10 per day ) structures. They have recently been found to accelerate ions to energies of several keV. Although electrons in Saturn's high Mach number (M >40 ) bow shock can be accelerated to relativistic energies (nearly 1000 keV), it has hitherto been thought impossible to accelerate electrons beyond a few tens of keV at Earth's low Mach number (1 ≤M <20 ) bow shock. Here we report observations of electrons energized by foreshock disturbances to energies up to at least ˜300 keV . Although such energetic electrons have been previously observed, their presence has been attributed to escaping magnetospheric particles or solar events. These relativistic electrons are not associated with any solar or magnetospheric activity. Further, due to their relatively small Larmor radii (compared to magnetic gradient scale lengths) and large thermal speeds (compared to shock speeds), no known shock acceleration mechanism can energize thermal electrons up to relativistic energies. The discovery of relativistic electrons associated with foreshock structures commonly generated in astrophysical shocks could provide a new paradigm for electron injections and acceleration in collisionless plasmas.

  16. Cluster II Constraints on Electron Acceleration and Langmuir Waves at Earth's Bow Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cairns, I. H.; Krasnoselskikh, V. V.; Lobzin, V. V.; Lucek, E.; Lefebvre, B.

    2005-12-01

    Electron acceleration, Langmuir waves and radio emissions at multiples of the plasma frequency are associated with numerous shocks in the heliosphere, including Earth's bow shock and the shocks producing coronal and interplanetary type II radio bursts. Here Cluster data from the Whisper, FGM, and PEACE instruments are used to study electron acceleration at Earth's bow shock and by SLAMS, as well as the production of electron beams and Langmuir waves in Earth's foreshock. The results found include: (1) The most intense Langmuir waves are found where Cluster is magnetically connected to almost perpendicular regions of the shock with |θbn| > 70°. (2) The wave characteristics and analytic theory strongly imply that the `standard'' foreshock model is relevant: these electrons are produced by the magnetic mirror reflection/shock-drift acceleration (SDA) at the shock, the beams are produced by time-of-flight effects, and the waves are driven by beams with speeds greater than the electron thermal speed. (3) Weak bursts of broadband waves are found where |θbn| <70° and cutoff effects are unimportant. This is consistent with another electron acceleration or beam formation process being active. (4) Isolated SLAMS, even in periods between two SLAMS, produce only very weak, irregular bursts of Langmuir waves, implying that they are ineffective in accelerating electrons and/or forming beam distributions. This argues against SLAMS playing a role in type II bursts.

  17. A Parametric Investigation of Breaking Bow Waves using a 2D+T Wave Maker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxeiner, E. A.; Shakeri, M.; Duncan, J. H.

    2008-11-01

    An experimental study of bow waves generated by a 2D+T (Two Dimensions plus Time) wave maker in a tank that is 14.8 m long, 1.2 m wide and 2.2 m deep is presented. Rather than simulating a specific ship hull, here we use a parametric set of wave maker motions with each parameter simulating a common feature of a ship hull form. Three categories of wave maker motions are used: ``slap'' (rotation of the wave board (held flat) about the keel), ``fixed'' (translation the wave board while it is upper part remains flat and at a fixed angle relative to horizontal), and ``full'' (simultaneous rotation and translation). The wave maker motions are run over a range of speeds and, in the ``fixed'' cases, over a range of angles. The temporal histories of the wave profiles were measured using a cinematic LIF technique. The relationship between various geometrical features of the waves and the wave maker motion parameters is explored. Each category of wave maker motions produces waves that develop and break in markedly different ways, thus highlighting the complex nature of bow waves. The wave crest speeds vary between 2 and 2.5 times the maximum speed of the wave maker and, for a given class of wave maker motion, vary with wave maker speed.

  18. The Enigmatic Guitar Nebula: Bow Shock Nebulae, Pulsar Parallaxes and the Interstellar Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M.

    Bow shocks and pulsar wind nebulae probe the interaction of neutron star relativistic winds with the interstellar medium. We utilize scaling laws derived for bow shock nebulae, in combination with estimates of neutron star distances and velocities, to extract information about the interstellar medium as well as relativistic winds. Specifically, we report on Chandra X-ray Observatory and Hubble Space Telescope observations of the spectacular Guitar Nebula, produced by a high velocity but otherwise unremarkable neutron star. The observed time evolution in the position and morphology of the nebula leads us to infer the existence of small scale density fluctuations in the interstellar medium, while X-ray observations reveal potential evidence for magnetic reconnection. Increases in the sample of precise astrometric measurements, coupled with multi-wavelength observations, will enable a deeper understanding of neutron star relativistic winds: we introduce an ongoing project with the Very Long Baseline Array, which is expected to at least double the number of measured pulsar parallaxes in the next two years.

  19. Hydroelastic Response of Surface-Effect Ship Bow Seals: Large-Scale Experiments and Post-Buckling Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiggins, Andrew D.

    Bow seals are critical components on advanced marine vehicles that rely on aerostatic support to reduce drag. They consist of a series of open-ended fabric cylinders ("fingers") that contact the free surface and, when inflated, form a compliant pressure barrier. Bow seals are unique in that, unlike a majority of structures in civil and mechanical engineering, bow seals operate in a buckled state. The response characteristics of these structures are of practical interest due to unacceptable wear rates on seal components and difficulties in predicting seal performance. Despite this, the hydroelastic response of the seal system, particularly basic information on seal vibration modes and the mechanisms responsible for seal wear, remains largely unknown. Similarly, estimates of the hydrodynamic loads on the seal system are inaccurate and based on heuristic scaling of data from small-scale experiments, where similitude is challenging to maintain. Thus, a large-scale test system is necessary to obtain accurate estimates of bow seal response. The work is comprised of three parts. Part one presents detailed observations of bow seal response acquired using a large-scale test platform developed as part of the present study. These high-resolution observations, the first of their kind, show bow seal response to be characterized by complex post-buckling behavior. Part two proposes an analytical framework for interpreting the wide range of behavior observed at large scale. Using this framework, key parameters driving seal conformation and stability are identified. It is found that, due to their buckled state, bow seals are highly susceptible to a mode switching instability, which may be a potential mechanism responsible for the damaging vibrations. In part three, a benchtop experiment is used to demonstrate that the scalings identified in this study hold across a wide range of bending rigidities. This work has implications for improving drag and wear characteristics in future bow

  20. Two case presentations and surgical management of Bow Hunter's syndrome associated with bony abnormalities of the C7 vertebra.

    PubMed

    Lee, Victoria; Riles, Thomas S; Stableford, Jennifer; Berguer, Ramon

    2011-05-01

    Bow Hunter's syndrome is a condition in which patients experience vertebrobasilar symptoms on head turn. It may be a consequence of intrinsic factors such as atherosclerosis, or it may be secondary to mechanical compression. Most commonly, this occurs at the level of C2 or above. We present two rare cases of Bow Hunter's syndrome secondary to mechanical compression at the level of C7. Discussed are the anatomic conditions leading to this syndrome in these two patients, the methodology for confirming the diagnosis, and the successful management by partial resection of the transverse processes compressing the vertebral arteries.

  1. Study of relation between Pc 3 micropulsations and magnetosheath fluctuations, and multisatellite investigation of earth's bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenstadt, E. W.

    1975-01-01

    The validity is investigated of a suggested model according to which Pc 3 and/or Pc 4 micropulsations are excited by magnetosheath field (and plasma) fluctuations arising in the quasi-parallel structure of the subsolar bow shock. The influence of solar wind plasma parameters on local shock structure and on the configuration of the entire bow shock system is included. Simultaneous data from two or more spacecraft and from multiple diagnostics is used to evaluate the geometrical factor, field-to-shock normal angle, or its B-X equivalent, and the principal plasma parameters. Results are presented and discussed.

  2. Recent H-alpha Results on Pulsar B2224+65's Bow-Shock Nebula, the "Guitar"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolch, Timothy; Chatterjee, Shami; Clemens, Dan P.; Cordes, James M.; Cashmen, Lauren R.; Taylor, Brian W.

    2016-09-01

    We used the 4 m Discovery Channel Telescope (DCT) at Lowell observatory in 2014 to observe the Guitar Nebula, an Hα bow-shock nebula around the high-velocity radio pulsar B2224+65. Since the nebula's discovery in 1992, the structure of the bow-shock has undergone significant dynamical changes. We have observed the limb structure, targeting the “body” and “neck” of the guitar. Comparing the DCT observations to 1995 observations with the Palomar 200-inch Hale telescope, we found changes in both spatial structure and surface brightness in the tip, head, and body of the nebula.

  3. A benign form of congenital anterolateral bowing of the tibia associated with ipsilateral polydactyly of the hallux: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Han, Jiuhui; Qu, Lei; Li, Yazhou; Luo, Junzhong; Cao, Jinchao; Zhao, Wanyu

    2012-07-01

    Congenital anterolateral bowing of the tibia is generally considered a precursor of congenital pseudarthrosis of the tibia (CPT), which is usually associated with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), a common autosomal dominant genetic disorder. In many cases, NF1 is initially suspected following the presentation of a child with anterolateral tibial bowing. The prognosis of CPT is poor, and amputation may be required. Congenital anterolateral bowing of the tibia combined with ipsilateral polydactyly of the hallux (CABTP) is a rare entity that resembles the anterolateral tibial bowing that occurs in association with CPT, and may be misdiagnosed as NF1. However, spontaneous correction of the tibial bowing with an almost normal fibula has been described in all previously reported cases. Here, we report three patients with CABTP and discuss the physical and imaging characteristics and follow-up results. We suggest that given the spontaneous resolution of bowing, the absence of neurocutaneous signs and the relatively favorable prognosis, CABTP is a distinct entity that merits its own place within the field of anterolateral bowing of the tibia and has no association with CPT or NF1. This should help avoid unnecessary investigations and interventions for NF1. This article shows for the first time tibial duplication in the area of bowing, with two medullary canals surrounded by well-defined cortex on CT.

  4. Nested reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reactions targeting the messenger RNA of icl2, hspx, and rRNAP1 genes to detect viable Mycobacterium tuberculosis directly from clinical specimens.

    PubMed

    Lakshmipathy, Dhanurekha; Kulandai, Lily Therese; Ramasubban, Gayathri; Hajib Narahari Rao, Madhavan; Rathinam, Sridhar; Narasimhan, Meenakshi

    2015-12-01

    There is an urgent need for a rapid and reliable test to detect actively multiplying Mycobacterium tuberculosis directly from clinical specimens for an early initiation of the appropriate antituberculous treatment. This study was aimed at the optimization and application of nested reverse transcriptase-PCR (nRT-PCR) targeting the messenger RNA of the icl2, hspx, and rRNAP1 genes directly from sputum specimens, and their evaluation against the culture by the BACTEC MicroMGIT mycobacterial culture system. 203 Sputum samples from clinically suspected tuberculosis patients and 30 control specimens (clinically proven viral or bacterial infections other than tuberculosis) were included in this study. The mycobacterial culture was performed by the BACTEC MicroMGIT system following the manufacturer's instructions. The primers for nRT-PCRs targeting icl2, hspx, and rRNAP1 genes were indigenously designed using the Primer-BLAST software, and optimized for sensitivity and specificity. The icl2, hspx, and rRNAP1 genes were able to pick up 63.9%, 67.2%, and 58.75%, respectively, of culture-negative sputum specimens collected from clinically suspected tuberculosis patients. However, three (1.4%) were negative for nRT-PCR, but M. tuberculosis culture positive. All the 30 controls were negative for culture by the BACTEC MicroMGIT method and all three nRT-PCR. The novel nRT-PCRs targeting icl2, hspx, and rRNAP1 genes developed in this study are rapid and reliable diagnostic tools to detect viable M. tuberculosis directly from sputum specimens. However, further study by including a larger number of sputum specimens needs to be carried out to ascertain the diagnostic utility of the novel nRT-PCRs optimized in the study.

  5. Process of forming compounds using reverse micelle or reverse microemulsion systems

    DOEpatents

    Linehan, John C.; Fulton, John L.; Bean, Roger M.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a process for producing a nanometer-sized metal compound. The process comprises forming a reverse micelle or reverse microemulsion system comprising a polar fluid in a non-polar or low-polarity fluid. A first reactant comprising a multi-component, water-soluble metal compound is introduced into the polar fluid in a non-polar or low-polarity fluid. This first reactant can be introduced into the reverse micelle or reverse microemulsion system during formation thereof or subsequent to the formation of the reverse micelle or microemulsion system. The water-soluble metal compound is then reacted in the reverse micelle or reverse microemulsion system to form the nanometer-sized metal compound. The nanometer-sized metal compound is then precipitated from the reverse micelle or reverse microemulsion system.

  6. Time-reversed, flow-reversed ballistics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Zernow, L.; Chapyak, E. J.; Scheffler, D. R.

    2001-01-01

    Two-dimensional simulations of planar sheet jet formation are studied to examine the hydrodynamic issues involved when simulations are carried out in the inverse direction, that is, with reversed time and flow. Both a realistic copper equation of state and a shockless equation of state were used. These studies are an initial step in evaluating this technique as a ballistics design tool.

  7. Reactivation of epigenetically silenced miR-124 reverses the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and inhibits invasion in endometrial cancer cells via the direct repression of IQGAP1 expression

    PubMed Central

    Watari, Hidemichi; Hanley, Sharon J.B.; Yamada, Takahiro; Hosaka, Masayoshi; Kudo, Masataka; Yue, Junming; Sakuragi, Noriaki

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression of IQGAP1 and microRNA (miRNA) dysregulation are frequent in human tumors, but little is known about the role of IQGAP1 and its relationship to miRNA in endometrial carcinogenesis. We demonstrate that IQGAP1 activates the epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) program and that miR-124 directly represses IQGAP1 expression in endometrial cancer (EC) cells. The overexpression of IQGAP1 stimulates EMT features and enhances migration, invasion and proliferation of EC cells, whereas knocking down IQGAP1 expression reverses EMT and inhibits these malignant properties. Using miRNA microarray profiling, we identified 29 miRNAs (let-7b, let-7f, miR-10b, miR-15b, miR-23a, miR-24, miR-25, miR-27a, miR-29b, miR-30a-5p, miR-34a, miR-124, miR-127, miR-130b, miR-148a, miR-155, miR-191*, miR-194, miR-224, miR-362, miR-409-3p, miR-422b, miR-424, miR-453, miR-497, miR-518d, miR-518f*, miR-526a and miR-656) that are significantly down-regulated in an in vitro-selected highly invasive derivative cell line (HEC-50-HI) relative to the parental HEC-50 cells. We further identified miR-124 as a direct regulator of IQGAP1 in EC cells. Enforced expression of miR-124 suppresses EC cell invasion and proliferation. The expression of IQGAP1 mRNA was significantly elevated in EC tissues, while the expression of miR-124 was decreased. The downregulation of miR-124 correlates with a poor survival outcome for patients with EC. Treating EC cells with the demethylating agent 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine increased miR-124 expression and down-regulated IQGAP1 levels. Our data suggest that IQGAP1 promotes EMT, migration and invasion of EC cells. MiR-124, a novel tumor suppressor miRNA that is epigenetically silenced in EC, can reverse EMT and the invasive properties, by attenuating the expression of the IQGAP1 oncogene. PMID:26934121

  8. Comparative Investigations of Light Transmission in Aligned and Non-aligned Textures of Homogeneous Mixtures of 4-n-alkyl-4'-Cyanibiphenyl Mesogens at Direct and Reverse smectic A ↔ isotropic liquid Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesrullajev, Arif

    2017-03-01

    The thermo-optical properties of various types of textures (the homeotropic, planar, and tilted aligned and non-aligned textures) in liquid crystalline materials with smectic A mesophase have been investigated. Investigations have been carried out for large temperature interval and at the direct smectic A mesophase-isotropic liquid (SmA-I) and isotropic liquid-smectic A mesophase (I-SmA) phase transitions that have been carried out. Homogeneous mixtures of 4-n-octyl-4'-cyanobiphenyl with 4-n-decyl-4'-cyanobiphenyl were the objects of the investigations. Temperature dependences of the optical transmission for aligned and non-aligned textures have been measured. Temperature widths of the heterophase regions for the SmA-I and I-SmA phase transitions have been determined. The temperature shift in the optical transmission dependences to low temperatures for the reverse I-SmA phase transition temperatures and the thermal hysteresis has been found for the aligned and non-aligned textures.

  9. Conformation of yeast 18S rRNA. Direct chemical probing of the 5' domain in ribosomal subunits and in deproteinized RNA by reverse transcriptase mapping of dimethyl sulfate-accessible.

    PubMed Central

    Lempereur, L; Nicoloso, M; Riehl, N; Ehresmann, C; Ehresmann, B; Bachellerie, J P

    1985-01-01

    The structure of the 5' domain of yeast 18S rRNA has been probed by dimethyl sulfate (DMS), either in "native" deproteinized molecules or in the 40S ribosomal subunits. DMS-reacted RNA has been used as a template for reverse transcription and a large number of reactive sites, corresponding to all types of bases have been mapped by a primer extension procedure, taking advantage of blocks in cDNA elongation immediately upstream from bases methylated at atom positions involved in the base-pair recognition of the template. Since the same atom positions are protected from DMS in base-paired nucleotides, the secondary structure status of each nucleotide can be directly assessed in this procedure, thus allowing to evaluate the potential contribution of proteins in modulating subunit rRNA conformation. While the DMS probing of deproteinized rRNA confirms a number of helical stems predicted by phylogenetic comparisons, it is remarkable that a few additional base-pairings, while proven by the comparative analysis, appear to require the presence of the bound ribosomal subunit proteins to be stabilized. Images PMID:2417197

  10. Is "Bow" for an Arrow or for Hair? A Classroom Demonstration on Gender Differences in Interpreting Ambiguous Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fa-Kaji, Naomi; Nguyen, Linda; Hebl, Mikki; Skorinko, Jeanine

    2016-01-01

    This article details a classroom demonstration of how gender differences in cognitive schemas can result in men and women differentially interpreting the same information. Students heard a series of six homonyms (e.g., bow and nail) spoken aloud and wrote down the first word with which they free-associated each homonym. When hearing the words…

  11. Radiohumeral synostosis, femoral bowing, other skeletal anomalies and anal atresia, a variant example of Antley-Bixler syndrome?

    PubMed

    Antich, J; Iriondo, M; Lizarraga, I; Manzanares, R; Cusi, V

    1993-01-01

    We report a newborn with radiohumeral synostosis, femoral bowing, anal atresia, a prominent nose (pear shaped nose), slender ribs, long tapering fingers with distal camptodactyly, genital hypoplasia and a neonatal humeral fracture. Among the possible differential diagnoses a variant example of Antley-Bixler syndrome is considered to be the most likely final diagnosis.

  12. 76 FR 2710 - Pitney Bowes, Inc., Mailing Solutions Management Division Including On-Site Leased Workers of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-14

    ... Employment and Training Administration Pitney Bowes, Inc., Mailing Solutions Management Division Including On.... working within the Mailing Solutions Management Division who are located in remote work sites, including... partially separated from employment on or after June 23, 2009, through September 10, 2010, and all...

  13. 76 FR 78234 - Medicine Bow-Routt National Forests and Thunder Basin National Grassland, Campbell County, WY...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-16

    ... Forest Service Medicine Bow-Routt National Forests and Thunder Basin National Grassland, Campbell County... System (NFS) land on Thunder Basin National Grassland. The proposal comprises new construction of... Forests and Thunder Basin National Grassland, 2250 East Richards Street, Douglas, Wyoming 82633, or...

  14. 76 FR 35398 - Scoria Mining Addition, Medicine Bow-Routt National Forests and Thunder Basin National Grassland...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-17

    ... Grassland; Campbell County, WY AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of intent to prepare an... on parcels of National Forest System (NFS) lands on Thunder Basin National Grassland. NFS lands..., Medicine Bow-Routt National Forests and Thunder Basin National Grassland, 2250 East Richards...

  15. FEASIBILITY OF WIND TO SERVE UPPER SKAGIT'S BOW HILL TRIBAL LANDS AND FEASIBILITY UPDATE FOR RESIDENTIAL RENEWABLE ENERGY.

    SciTech Connect

    RICH, LAUREN

    2013-09-30

    A two year wind resource assessment was conducted to determine the feasibility of developing a community scale wind generation system for the Upper Skagit Indian Tribe's Bow Hill land base, and the project researched residential wind resource technologies to determine the feasibility of contributing renewable wind resource to the mix of energy options for our single and multi-family residential units.

  16. Observation of the reversed Cherenkov radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Zhaoyun; Tang, Xianfeng; Wang, Zhanliang; Zhang, Yabin; Chen, Xiaodong; Chen, Min; Gong, Yubin

    2017-03-01

    Reversed Cherenkov radiation is the exotic electromagnetic radiation that is emitted in the opposite direction of moving charged particles in a left-handed material. Reversed Cherenkov radiation has not previously been observed, mainly due to the absence of both suitable all-metal left-handed materials for beam transport and suitable couplers for extracting the reversed Cherenkov radiation signal. In this paper, we develop an all-metal metamaterial, consisting of a square waveguide loaded with complementary electric split ring resonators. We demonstrate that this metamaterial exhibits a left-handed behaviour, and we directly observe the Cherenkov radiation emitted predominantly near the opposite direction to the movement of a single sheet electron beam bunch in the experiment. These observations confirm the reversed behaviour of Cherenkov radiation. The reversed Cherenkov radiation has many possible applications, such as novel vacuum electronic devices, particle detectors, accelerators and new types of plasmonic couplers.

  17. Measurement of the potential drop across the earth's collisionless bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Formisano, V.

    1982-01-01

    The normal component of the dc electric field measured on ISEE-1 ordinarily exhibits an enhancement of a few mV/m over both upstream and downstream values at the earth's bow shock. Using the measured relative velocity between the shock and the spacecraft (from the ISEE-1/2 time delay in the magnetometer data), it is possible to transform the observed E enhancement to a potential drop (delta phi). For a subcritical shock the potential drop is found to be very close to the measured change of particle kinetic energy (delta phi, approximately 280 V on day 330, 1977), whereas for a supercritical shock the potential drop is only a fraction of the measured change of kinetic energy (delta phi, approximately 140 V on day 324, 1977).

  18. Quantitative spectroscopy on individual wire, slot, bow-tie, rectangular, and square-shaped optical antennas.

    PubMed

    Husnik, Martin; Niegemann, Jens; Busch, Kurt; Wegener, Martin

    2013-11-15

    By using a recently introduced approach combining a focus-modulation technique with a common-path interferometer, we measure quantitatively the extinction, scattering, and absorption cross-section spectra of individual optical antennas. The experimental results on thin-wire antennas, slot antennas, bow-tie antennas, rectangular antennas, and square-shaped antennas resonating at around 1.4 μm wavelength are discussed. We find increased resonant scattering cross sections for the latter four antennas compared to the thin-wire antenna, both in absolute terms and relative to the absorption cross section. The square-shaped antenna's resonant extinction cross section approaches the limit of a coherent point dipole. However, the ratio of the resonant extinction cross section to the geometrical cross section of 38 is largest for the simple thin-wire antenna.

  19. Detection of singly ionized energetic lunar pick-up ions upstream of earth's bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilchenbach, M.; Hovestadt, D.; Klecker, B.; Moebius, E.

    1992-01-01

    Singly ionized suprathermal ions upstream of the earth's bow shock have been detected by using the time-of-flight spectrometer SULEICA on the AMPTE/IRM satellite. The data were collected between August and December 1985. The flux of the ions in the mass range between 23 and 37 amu is highly anisotropic towards the earth. The ions are observed with a period of about 29 days around new moon (+/- 3 days). The correlation of the energy of the ions with the solar wind speed and the interplanetary magnetic field orientation indicates the relation to the pick-up process. We conclude that the source of these pick-up ions is the moon. We argue that due to the impinging solar wind, atoms are sputtered off the lunar surface, ionized in the sputtering process or by ensuing photoionization and picked up by the solar wind.

  20. Structure of a quasi-parallel, quasi-laminar bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenstadt, E. W.; Russell, C. T.; Formisano, V.; Hedgecock, P. C.; Scarf, F. L.; Neugebauer, M.; Holzer, R. E.

    1976-01-01

    A thick, quasi-parallel bow shock structure was observed with field and particle detectors of both HEOS 1 and OGO 5. The typical magnetic pulsation structure was at least 1 to 2 earth radii thick radially and was accompanied by irregular but distinct plasma distributions characteristic of neither the solar wind nor the magnetosheath. Waves constituting the large pulsations were polarized principally in the plane of the nominal shock, therefore also in the plane perpendicular to the average interplanetary field. A separate interpulsation regime detected between bursts of large amplitude oscillations was similar to the upstream wave region magnetically, but was characterized by disturbed plasma flux and enhanced noise around the ion plasma frequency. The shock structure appeared to be largely of an oblique, whistler type, probably complicated by counterstreaming high energy protons. Evidence for firehose instability-based structure was weak at best and probably negative.

  1. Simultaneous plasma wave and electron flux observations upstream of the Martian bow shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skalsky, A.; Grard, R.; Kiraly, P.; Klimov, S.; Kopanyi, V.; Schwingenschuh, K.; Trotignon, J. G.

    1993-03-01

    Flux enhancements of electrons with energies between 100 and 530 eV are observed simultaneously with electron plasma waves in the upstream region of the Martian bow shock. The electron flux appears to reach its maximum when the pitch angle is close to 0 deg, which corresponds to particles reflected from the shock region and backstreaming in the solar wind along the magnetic field. The correlation between high-frequency waves and enhanced electron fluxes is reminiscent of several studies on the electron foreshock of the Earth. Such a similarity indicates that, in spite of major differences between the global shock structures, the microscopic processes operating in the foreshocks of Earth and Mars are probably identical.

  2. Oxidation of graphene 'bow tie' nanofuses for permanent, write-once-read-many data storage devices.

    PubMed

    Pearson, A C; Jamieson, S; Linford, M R; Lunt, B M; Davis, R C

    2013-04-05

    We have fabricated nanoscale fuses from CVD graphene sheets with a 'bow tie' geometry for write-once-read-many data storage applications. The fuses are programmed using thermal oxidation driven by Joule heating. Fuses that were 250 nm wide with 2.5 μm between contact pads were programmed with average voltages and powers of 4.9 V and 2.1 mW, respectively. The required voltages and powers decrease with decreasing fuse sizes. Graphene shows extreme chemical and electronic stability; fuses require temperatures of about 400 °C for oxidation, indicating that they are excellent candidates for permanent data storage. To further demonstrate this stability, fuses were subjected to applied biases in excess of typical read voltages; stable currents were observed when a voltage of 10 V was applied to the devices in the off state and 1 V in the on state for 90 h each.

  3. On the origin of hot diamagnetic cavities near the earth's bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomsen, M. F.; Gosling, J. T.; Bame, S. J.; Quest, K. B.; Russell, C. T.

    1988-01-01

    The origin of hot diamagnetic cavities (HDCs) observed occasionally upstream from the earth's bow shock is investigated by examining the results of November 16, 1977, observation, when four of these events occurred on a single day, as well as plasma and field data from that day. The results suggest that HDCs may form as a result of an unusually strong interaction between shock-reflected ions and the incoming solar wind. It is proposed that this interaction stems from a temporary and localized reflection of a larger-than-normal fraction of the incident ions, which is stimulated by sudden changes in the upstream field orientation; the consequences of such a temporary overreflection are found to be consistent with many of the observed features of HDCs, including the strong slowing, deflection, and heating of the flow, as well as the localization, internal recoveries, and occasional formation upstream from the shock itself.

  4. Dynamics of bow-tie shaped bursting: Forced pendulum with dynamic feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hongray, Thotreithem; Balakrishnan, Janaki

    2016-12-01

    A detailed study is performed on the parameter space of the mechanical system of a driven pendulum with damping and constant torque under feedback control. We report an interesting bow-tie shaped bursting oscillatory behaviour, which is exhibited for small driving frequencies, in a certain parameter regime, which has not been reported earlier in this forced system with dynamic feedback. We show that the bursting oscillations are caused because of a transition of the quiescent state to the spiking state by a saddle-focus bifurcation, and because of another saddle-focus bifurcation, which leads to cessation of spiking, bringing the system back to the quiescent state. The resting period between two successive bursts (Trest) is estimated analytically.

  5. Dynamics of bow-tie shaped bursting: Forced pendulum with dynamic feedback.

    PubMed

    Hongray, Thotreithem; Balakrishnan, Janaki

    2016-12-01

    A detailed study is performed on the parameter space of the mechanical system of a driven pendulum with damping and constant torque under feedback control. We report an interesting bow-tie shaped bursting oscillatory behaviour, which is exhibited for small driving frequencies, in a certain parameter regime, which has not been reported earlier in this forced system with dynamic feedback. We show that the bursting oscillations are caused because of a transition of the quiescent state to the spiking state by a saddle-focus bifurcation, and because of another saddle-focus bifurcation, which leads to cessation of spiking, bringing the system back to the quiescent state. The resting period between two successive bursts (Trest) is estimated analytically.

  6. Juvenile Cerebral Infarction Caused by Bow Hunter’s Syndrome during Sport: Two Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    KAGEYAMA, Hiroto; YOSHIMURA, Shinichi; IIDA, Tomoko; SHIRAKAWA, Manabu; UCHIDA, Kazutaka; TOMOGANE, Yusuke; MIYAJI, Yuki

    2016-01-01

    We report two cases of juvenile cerebral infarction caused by bow hunter’s syndrome (BHS) during sport. Case 1 was a 17-year-old male who developed a partial visual field defect after playing basketball. BHS was diagnosed because cervical ultrasonography demonstrated occlusion of the vertebral artery when the neck was rotated. After C1–2 posterior fixation was performed, his symptoms resolved. Case 2 was an 18-year-old male with recurrent visual disturbance after playing handball. Cerebral infarction occurred repeatedly despite antiplatelet therapy. After 3 years, vertebral artery dissection was diagnosed and stenting was performed, but his symptoms did not resolve. BHS was diagnosed when he was examined at our department. C1–2 posterior fixation was performed and his symptoms resolved. In these two cases, BHS was caused by sporting activity. For accurate diagnosis and treatment of BHS, neuroimaging with cervical rotation is mandatory. PMID:27053329

  7. Magnetised bow shocks and oblique shock interactions: HEDLA experiments on the Magpie pulsed-power facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdiak, G. C.; Lebedev, S. V.; Chittenden, J. P.; Clayson, T.; Garcia, C.; Hare, J. D.; Niasse, N.; Suttle, L. G.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Frank, A.; Ciardi, A.

    2016-10-01

    We present results from magnetised shock experiments performed on the Magpie ( 1 MA, 250 ns) pulsed-power facility. Shocks are formed around cylindrical and oblique planar obstacles positioned in a supersonic, super-Alfvenic plasma flow (MS = 5 , MA = 2.5 , vf = 70 km/s). The plasma flow is produced by an inverse, exploding wire array z-pinch and carries an embedded magnetic field that is well frozen in (ReM = 20). We show how the structure of bow and oblique shocks is dramatically affected by the orientation of the advected magnetic field with respect to the obstacles. More complex obstacle geometries allow us to study the interaction of multiple magnetised oblique shocks. These systems can cause the annihilation of magnetic flux and the generation of shear flow along a slip layer. Work supported by DOE cooperative agreements No. DE-F03- 02NA00057 and No. DE-SC-0001063.

  8. Plasma waves associated with energetic particles streaming into the solar wind from the earth's bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, R. R.; Eastman, T. E.; Gurnett, D. A.; Frank, L. A.; Parks, G. K.

    1981-01-01

    Plasma wave and plasma data from ISEE 1 and 2 are examined. In the upstream solar wind, three dominant types of plasma waves are observed which are associated with energetic particle streams coming from the bow shock: ion acoustic waves, electron plasma oscillations, and whistler mode waves. The ion acoustic waves occur simultaneously with either ion beams or a dispersed ion population in the energy range from 0.5 to greater than 45 keV. The electron plasma oscillations are long-wavelength, nearly monochromatic electrostatic waves which are closely correlated with the flux of low-energy electrons, especially in the 0.2-1.5 keV range. Electromagnetic waves with frequencies below 200 Hz are observed when either ion beams or dispersed ion distributions are present; for these waves the refractive index determined from the wave B to E ratio is consistent with whistler mode radiation.

  9. Theory for the 2f(p) radiation upstream of the earth's bow shock

    SciTech Connect

    Cairns, I.H.; Melrose, D.B.

    1985-07-01

    The mechanism responsible for the radiation observed near the earth bow shock at twice the plasma frequency f(p) is investigated theoretically. A model comprising two three-wave steps and involving Langmuir (L), ion-sound (S), and EM (t) waves is proposed: L + or - S yields L-prime; L + L-prime yields t. This model is shown to be consistent with observations of low-frequency S-like waves (Anderson et al., 1981), and further observational tests are suggested. A critical examination of the theory of Fung et al. (1982) is included, and it is found that an important term in the absorption coefficient was neglected. Correcting this error leads to an intrinsic theoretical brightness-temperature limit of 3 x 10 to the 9th K, well below the observed brightness temperature of the 2 f(p) radiation, about 10 to the 11th K. 18 references.

  10. A model for generation of bow-shock-associated upstream waves. [in solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fredricks, R. W.

    1975-01-01

    A model is proposed for the generation of upstream hydromagnetic waves by proton beams reflected at the earth's bow shock. It is assumed that the reflection process can produce some gyrophase bunching of the protons, thus creating a gyrophase disturbance that propagates with the beam as it streams back along interplanetary field lines. This leads to the production of driven hydromagnetic waves in the left-hand mode. The resulting theory predicts a wave amplitude, frequency, and polarization in the solar wind rest frame. The amplitude depends on the fraction of protons assumed to be phase coherent in their gyromotion and on the plasma beta, beam velocity, temperatures, and the Alfven Mach number. The theory also predicts the Doppler-shifted frequencies and the apparent sense of polarization that would be observed in satellite measurement frames.

  11. The Guitar Nebula: A Bow Shock that Traces ISM Turbulence and Accelerates Relativistic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Shamibrata

    2005-09-01

    We propose joint Chandra and HST observations of the Guitar Nebula, an extraordinary bow-shock nebula produced by a very high-velocity but otherwise ordinary pulsar. Prior HST observations show epoch dependent changes in shock structure that signify changing ISM conditions. An enigmatic jet or filament is seen in a Chandra ACIS image (year 2000), unlike jets from the Crab or other young pulsars. New Chandra observations will reveal the relative motion of the jet and the pulsar (which has moved by 0.9 arcsec) and thus determine if self confinement or special structure in the ISM plays a dominant role in shaping the jet, and will constrain the particle acceleration mechanism. We request joint high-resolution HST observations to contemporaneously determine the ISM density profile.

  12. The Guitar Nebula: A Bow Shock that Traces ISM Turbulence and Accelerates Relativistic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Shami

    2005-07-01

    We propose joint Chandra and HST observations of the Guitar Nebula, an extraordinary bow-shock nebula produced by a very high-velocity but otherwise ordinary pulsar. Prior HST observations show epoch dependent changes in shock structure that signify changing ISM conditions. An enigmatic jet or filament is seen in a Chandra ACIS image {year 2000}, unlike jets from the Crab or other young pulsars. New Chandra observations will reveal the relative motion of the jet and the pulsar {which has moved by 0.9 arcsec} and thus determine if self confinement or special structure in the ISM plays a dominant role in shaping the jet, and will constrain the particle acceleration mechanism. We request joint high-resolution HST observations to contemporaneously determine the ISM density profile.

  13. On the proper Mach number and ratio of specific heats for modeling the Venus bow shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tatrallyay, M.; Russell, C. T.; Luhmann, J. G.; Barnes, A.; Mihalov, J. D.

    1984-01-01

    Observational data from the Pioneer Venus Orbiter are used to investigate the physical characteristics of the Venus bow shock, and to explore some general issues in the numerical simulation of collisionless shocks. It is found that since equations from gas-dynamic (GD) models of the Venus shock cannot in general replace MHD equations, it is not immediately obvious what the optimum way is to describe the desired MHD situation with a GD code. Test case analysis shows that for quasi-perpendicular shocks it is safest to use the magnetospheric Mach number as an input to the GD code. It is also shown that when comparing GD predicted temperatures with MHD predicted temperatures total energy should be compared since the magnetic energy density provides a significant fraction of the internal energy of the MHD fluid for typical solar wind parameters. Some conclusions are also offered on the properties of the terrestrial shock.

  14. Stellar Bow Shocks in the Northern Arm of the Galactic Center: More Members and Kinematics of the Massive Star Population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, A.; Ghez, A. M.; Morris, M. R.; Christou, J. C.

    2005-05-01

    We present new 2.2 μm diffraction-limited images from the W. M. Keck 10 m and Gemini 8 m telescopes of the cool Galactic center sources, IRS 1W, 5, 8, 10W, and 21, along with new proper motions for IRS 1W, 10W, and 21. These observations were carried out to test the bow shock hypothesis presented by Tanner et al. as an alternative to a very recent (104 yr) epoch of star formation within the tidal stream of gas and dust known as the northern arm. Resolved asymmetric structure is detected in all the sources, with bow shock morphologies associated with IRS 1W, 5, 8, and 10W. For IRS 1W and 10W, there is an agreement between the position angle of the asymmetry and that of the inferred relative velocity vector of the near-infrared source with respect to the northern arm gas, strengthening the bow shock hypothesis. We therefore conclude that the observed morphology is indeed a bow shock generated by sources plowing through the northern arm. Furthermore, the large extent of the resolved structures (310-1340 AU), along with their luminosities (~104-105 Lsolar), suggests that their central sources are Wolf-Rayet stars, comparable to the broad He emission-line stars, which have strong winds on the order of 1000 km s-1. The bow shock geometry, along with the proper motion measurements, provide three-dimensional orbital solutions for this enigmatic class of objects. The orientations of the orbital planes of IRS 1W and 10W are consistent with that of the putative clockwise plane which has been proposed as a solution for the He I emission-line stars. While these observations eliminate the need to invoke star formation within the northern arm, they increase by 10% the total known population of massive, young stars with strong winds, whose origin remains unexplained in the context of the nearby supermassive black hole.

  15. The Very High Alfvén Mach Number Bow Shock of Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulaiman, A.; Masters, A.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2014-12-01

    Collisionless shock waves are ubiquitous in the universe and fundamental to understanding the nature of collisionless plasmas. The interplay between particles (ions and electrons) and fields (electromagnetic) introduces a variety of both physical and geometrical parameters such as Mach numbers (e.g. MA, Mf), β, and θbn. These vary drastically from terrestrial to astrophysical regimes resulting in radically different characteristics of shocks. This poses two complexities. Firstly, separating the influences of these parameters on physical mechanisms such as energy dissipation. Secondly, correlating observations of shock waves over a wide range of each parameter, enough to span across different regimes. Investigating the latter has been restricted since the majority of studies on shocks at exotic regimes (such as supernova remnants) have been achieved either remotely or via simulations, but rarely by means of in-situ observations. It is not clear what happens in the higher MA regime. Here we show the parameter space of MA for all bow shock crossings from 2004-2012 as measured by the Cassini spacecraft. We found that the Saturnian bow shock exhibits characteristics akin to both terrestrial and astrophysical regimes (MA of order 100), which is principally controlled by the upstream magnetic field strength. Moreover, we estimated the θbn­ of each crossing and were able to further constrain the sample into categories of similar features. Our results demonstrate how MA plays a central role in controlling the onset of physical mechanisms in collisionless shocks, particularly instabilities, non-time stationarity and electron acceleration. We anticipate our comprehensive assessment to give deeper insight to high MA collisionless shocks and provide a broader scope for understanding the structures and mechanisms of collisionless shocks. This can potentially bridge the gap between more modest MA observed in near-Earth space and more exotic astrophysical regimes where shock

  16. Using Collaborative Modeling to Inform Policy Decisions in the Bow River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheer, A. S.; Sheer, D. P.; Hill, D.

    2011-12-01

    The Bow River in Alberta, Canada serves a wide range of municipal, agricultural, recreational, and industrial purposes in the province. In 2006, the basin was deemed over-allocation and closed to new licenses. The Calgary region, however, continues to expand. In the next 60 to 70 years, population levels are expected to reach 2.8 million (more than double the current 1.2 million) with 800,000 new jobs. This increasing pressure led several stakeholders to work together in the development of a new management model to improve the management of the system as an integrated watershed. The major previous model of the system allowed only limited flexibility in management, focusing instead on strict license based operations. Over a 6 month period, with numerous multi-party meetings, the group developed the Bow River Operations Model (BROM). Based in OASIS software, this model integrated input from the major water users in the region to emulate the real-life decisions that are actually made on a daily bases, even when technically in violation of the strict license agreements (e.x. junior licensees receiving water despite senior priority due to exceedingly low volume requirements). Using historical records as forecasts, and performance measures developed with the best available science through expert opinion, participants jointly developed a new reservoir operation strategy. Even with such a short timeframe, the BROM exercise showed that there was substantial room for improvement. Utilizing a "Water Bank" of purchased storage, downstream flows could be significantly improved without affecting quality. Additional benefits included fishery improvement, new recreation opportunities, dissolved oxygen improvement during critical periods, and the ability to accommodate long-term demand forecasts for surrounding municipalities. This strategy has been presented to, and favorably received by, the Alberta Minister of Environment for guidance during negotiations with the local

  17. ION ACCELERATION AT THE QUASI-PARALLEL BOW SHOCK: DECODING THE SIGNATURE OF INJECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Sundberg, Torbjörn; Haynes, Christopher T.; Burgess, D.; Mazelle, Christian X.

    2016-03-20

    Collisionless shocks are efficient particle accelerators. At Earth, ions with energies exceeding 100 keV are seen upstream of the bow shock when the magnetic geometry is quasi-parallel, and large-scale supernova remnant shocks can accelerate ions into cosmic-ray energies. This energization is attributed to diffusive shock acceleration; however, for this process to become active, the ions must first be sufficiently energized. How and where this initial acceleration takes place has been one of the key unresolved issues in shock acceleration theory. Using Cluster spacecraft observations, we study the signatures of ion reflection events in the turbulent transition layer upstream of the terrestrial bow shock, and with the support of a hybrid simulation of the shock, we show that these reflection signatures are characteristic of the first step in the ion injection process. These reflection events develop in particular in the region where the trailing edge of large-amplitude upstream waves intercept the local shock ramp and the upstream magnetic field changes from quasi-perpendicular to quasi-parallel. The dispersed ion velocity signature observed can be attributed to a rapid succession of ion reflections at this wave boundary. After the ions’ initial interaction with the shock, they flow upstream along the quasi-parallel magnetic field. Each subsequent wavefront in the upstream region will sweep the ions back toward the shock, where they gain energy with each transition between the upstream and the shock wave frames. Within three to five gyroperiods, some ions have gained enough parallel velocity to escape upstream, thus completing the injection process.

  18. Plasma and wave properties downstream of Martian bow shock: Hybrid simulations and MAVEN observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Chuanfei; Winske, Dan; Cowee, Misa; Bougher, Stephen W.; Andersson, Laila; Connerney, Jack; Epley, Jared; Ergun, Robert; McFadden, James P.; Ma, Yingjuan; Toth, Gabor; Curry, Shannon; Nagy, Andrew; Jakosky, Bruce

    2015-04-01

    Two-dimensional hybrid simulation codes are employed to investigate the kinetic properties of plasmas and waves downstream of the Martian bow shock. The simulations are two-dimensional in space but three dimensional in field and velocity components. Simulations show that ion cyclotron waves are generated by temperature anisotropy resulting from the reflected protons around the Martian bow shock. These proton cyclotron waves could propagate downward into the Martian ionosphere and are expected to heat the O+ layer peaked from 250 to 300 km due to the wave-particle interaction. The proton cyclotron wave heating is anticipated to be a significant source of energy into the thermosphere, which impacts atmospheric escape rates. The simulation results show that the specific dayside heating altitude depends on the Martian crustal field orientations, solar cycles and seasonal variations since both the cyclotron resonance condition and the non/sub-resonant stochastic heating threshold depend on the ambient magnetic field strength. The dayside magnetic field profiles for different crustal field orientation, solar cycle and seasonal variations are adopted from the BATS-R-US Mars multi-fluid MHD model. The simulation results, however, show that the heating of O+ via proton cyclotron wave resonant interaction is not likely in the relatively weak crustal field region, based on our simplified model. This indicates that either the drift motion resulted from the transport of ionospheric O+, or the non/sub-resonant stochastic heating mechanism are important to explain the heating of Martian O+ layer. We will investigate this further by comparing the simulation results with the available MAVEN data. These simulated ion cyclotron waves are important to explain the heating of Martian O+ layer and have significant implications for future observations.

  19. Ion Acceleration at the Quasi-parallel Bow Shock: Decoding the Signature of Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundberg, Torbjörn; Haynes, Christopher T.; Burgess, D.; Mazelle, Christian X.

    2016-03-01

    Collisionless shocks are efficient particle accelerators. At Earth, ions with energies exceeding 100 keV are seen upstream of the bow shock when the magnetic geometry is quasi-parallel, and large-scale supernova remnant shocks can accelerate ions into cosmic-ray energies. This energization is attributed to diffusive shock acceleration however, for this process to become active, the ions must first be sufficiently energized. How and where this initial acceleration takes place has been one of the key unresolved issues in shock acceleration theory. Using Cluster spacecraft observations, we study the signatures of ion reflection events in the turbulent transition layer upstream of the terrestrial bow shock, and with the support of a hybrid simulation of the shock, we show that these reflection signatures are characteristic of the first step in the ion injection process. These reflection events develop in particular in the region where the trailing edge of large-amplitude upstream waves intercept the local shock ramp and the upstream magnetic field changes from quasi-perpendicular to quasi-parallel. The dispersed ion velocity signature observed can be attributed to a rapid succession of ion reflections at this wave boundary. After the ions’ initial interaction with the shock, they flow upstream along the quasi-parallel magnetic field. Each subsequent wavefront in the upstream region will sweep the ions back toward the shock, where they gain energy with each transition between the upstream and the shock wave frames. Within three to five gyroperiods, some ions have gained enough parallel velocity to escape upstream, thus completing the injection process.

  20. Unusual locations of Earth's bow shock on September 24 - 25, 1987: Mach number effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, Iver H.; Fairfield, Donald H.; Anderson, Oger R.; Carlton, Victoria E. H.; Paularena, Karolen I.; Lazarus, Alan J.

    1995-01-01

    International Sun Earth Explorer 1 (ISEE 1) and Interplanetary Monitoring Platform 8 (IMP 8) data are used to identify 19 crossings of Earth's bow shock during a 30-hour period following 0000 UT on September 24, 1987. Apparent standoff distances for the shock are calculated for each crossing using two methods and the spacecraft location; one method assumes the average shock shape, while the other assumes a ram pressure-dependent shock shape. The shock's apparent standoff distance, normally approximately 14 R(sub E), is shown to increase from near 10 R(sub E) initially to near 19 R(sub E) during an 8-hour period, followed by an excursion to near 35 R(sub E) (where two IMP 8 shock crossings occur) and an eventual return to values smaller than 19 R(sub E). The Alfven M(sub A) and fast magnetosonic M(sub ms). Mach numbers remain above 2 and the number density above 4/cu cm for almost the entire period. Ram pressure effects produce the initial near-Earth shock location, whereas expansions and contractions of the bow shock due to low Mach number effects account, qualitatively and semiquantitatively, for the timing and existence of almost all the remaining ISEE crossings and both IMP 8 crossings. Significant quantitative differences exist between the apparent standoff distances for the shock crossings and those predicted using the observed plasma parameters and the standard model based on Spreiter et al.'s (1966) gasdynamic equation. These differences can be explained in terms of either a different dependence of the standoff distance on Mach number at low M(sub A) and M(sub ms), or variations in shock shape with M(sub A) and M(sub ms) (becoming increasingly "puffed up" with decreasing M(sub A) and M(sub ms), as expected theoretically), or by a combination of both effects.

  1. Neutron Star Kinematics: Pulsar Parallaxes, Bow Shock Nebulae and the Interstellar Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, S.

    2003-12-01

    The measurement of distances is a fundamental problem in astronomy. Parallaxes and proper motions of pulsars provide model-independent estimates of their distances and velocities, allowing us to probe the physics of neutron stars, constrain core collapse phenomena in supernovae, and investigate the distribution of matter in the interstellar medium. Here we present high-precision measurements of the trigonometric parallaxes and proper motions of three radio pulsars using the NRAO Very Long Baseline Array, and discuss how they have been used to investigate the interstellar medium, as well as the birth sites, cooling curves, and velocity distribution of neutron stars. Bow shocks and pulsar wind nebulae probe the interaction of neutron star relativistic winds with the interstellar medium. We utilize scaling laws derived for bow shock nebulae, in combination with estimates of neutron star distances and velocities, to extract information about the interstellar medium. The spectacular Guitar nebula, produced by a high velocity but otherwise unremarkable neutron star, was observed at two epochs with the Hubble Space Telescope. We report time evolution in the position and morphology of the nebula, and infer the existence of small scale density fluctuations in the interstellar medium. Increases in the sample of precise astrometric measurements will enable many such scientific applications: we introduce an ongoing project with the Very Long Baseline Array, which is expected to at least double the number of measured pulsar parallaxes in the next two years. This work was supported in part by NSF grants AST 9819931 and AST 0206036 to Cornell University. NRAO is a facility of the NSF operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc. Observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope were obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc.

  2. Stagnation point reverse flow combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zinn, Ben T. (Inventor); Neumeier, Yedidia (Inventor); Seitzman, Jerry M. (Inventor); Jagoda, Jechiel (Inventor); Weksler, Yoav (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A method for combusting a combustible fuel includes providing a vessel having an opening near a proximate end and a closed distal end defining a combustion chamber. A combustible reactants mixture is presented into the combustion chamber. The combustible reactants mixture is ignited creating a flame and combustion products. The closed end of the combustion chamber is utilized for directing combustion products toward the opening of the combustion chamber creating a reverse flow of combustion products within the combustion chamber. The reverse flow of combustion products is intermixed with combustible reactants mixture to maintain the flame.

  3. Reversible fluctuation rectifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, I. M.

    1999-10-01

    The analysis of a Feynman's ratchet system [J. M. R. Parrondo and P. Español, Am. J. Phys. 64, 1125 (1996)] and of its electrical counterpart, a diode engine [I. M. Sokolov, Europhys. Lett. 44, 278 (1998)] has shown that ``fluctuation rectifiers'' consisting of a nonlinear element (ratchet, diode) and a linear element (vane, resistor) kept at different temperatures always show efficiency smaller than the Carnot value, thus indicating the irreversible mode of operation. We show that this irreversibility is not intrinsic for a system in simultaneous contact with two heat baths at different temperatures and that a fluctuation rectifier can work reversibly. This is illustrated by a model with two diodes switched in opposite directions, where the Carnot efficiency is achieved when backward resistivity of the diodes tends to infinity.

  4. Reversibility in nucleocytoplasmic transport

    PubMed Central

    Kopito, Ronen Benjamine; Elbaum, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Nucleocytoplasmic exchange of proteins and RNAs is mediated by receptors that usher their cargo through the nuclear pores. Peptide localization signals on each cargo determine the receptors with which it will interact. Those interactions are normally regulated by the small GTPase Ran. Hydrolysis of GTP provides the chemical energy required to create a bona fide thermodynamic pump that selectively and directionally accumulates its substrates across the nuclear envelope. A common perception is that cargo delivery is irreversible, e.g., a protein imported to the nucleus does not return to the cytoplasm except perhaps via a specific export receptor. Quantitative measurements using cell-free nuclei reconstituted in Xenopus egg extract show that nuclear accumulation follows first-order kinetics and reaches steady state at a level that follows a Michaelis–Menten function of the cytoplasmic cargo concentration. This saturation suggests that receptor-mediated translocation across the nuclear pore occurs bidirectionally. The reversibility of accumulation was demonstrated directly by exchange of the cytosolic medium and by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. Based on our results, we offer a simple biophysical model that predicts the observed behavior. A far-reaching consequence is that the nuclear localization signal dictates the fate of a protein population rather than that of the individual molecules that bear it, which remain free to shuttle back and forth. This implies an open communication between the nucleus and cytoplasm and a ubiquitous mechanism for signaling in both directions. PMID:17646647

  5. Determination of and compensation for wafer bow and warp in a scanning electron microscope requiring precise feature locating and variable tilt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Duane C.

    1990-06-01

    Precise and accurate feature positioning in SEMs is becoming more critical. Moving the stage to a predetermined location must be done with accuracy and precision that put the feature ofinterest in the field ofview at a magnification high enough to detect orrecognize the same feature. Ifthis is notdone, some sort ofsearch, either automatic ormanual must be performed. This may not only be bothersome, but detrimental to inspection or measurement throughput performance. Ultra precise stages - for example, those using laser interferometers or linear encoders - are capable of positioning precisions, if not accuracies, to 0. 1 micron. In both optical and SEM systems where inspection is normal to the plane ofthe waler(cailed zero tilt), precise locating of features is possible without serious attention being paid to the bow or warp of a wafer. From the SEMI Standards Manuals, it is seen that a 200 mm wafer may have up to 65 microns of bow. In optical lithography tools and optical inspection or measurement systems, a vacuum chuck may alter or reduce the bow. However, in the vacuum chamber of the SEM this technique does not work. The bow or warp remains. The problem occurs in going to a particular numerical address whenthe waferis tilted, ifthat numerical address was determined at some different tilt -themost probable, of course, being zero iilt. Tilting of the wafer will cause the initially observed feature to move through an arc of "unknown" extent (unknown because it is a function of the bow and the bow is not known at that point). A 60 degree tilt of awafer with 40 microns of bow can cause about 35 microns oflaten.l displacement of a feature from where it would be expected for a wafer with no bow. The effect of this displacement on detectability is discussed. Actual displacement measurements on a 125 mm wafer ait plotted. These plots are compared with those derived from measurements made by optical and SEM systems specially set up to measure bow magnitudes. Bow

  6. Reversible Thermoset Adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mac Murray, Benjamin C. (Inventor); Tong, Tat H. (Inventor); Hreha, Richard D. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Embodiments of a reversible thermoset adhesive formed by incorporating thermally-reversible cross-linking units and a method for making the reversible thermoset adhesive are provided. One approach to formulating reversible thermoset adhesives includes incorporating dienes, such as furans, and dienophiles, such as maleimides, into a polymer network as reversible covalent cross-links using Diels Alder cross-link formation between the diene and dienophile. The chemical components may be selected based on their compatibility with adhesive chemistry as well as their ability to undergo controlled, reversible cross-linking chemistry.

  7. Comparison of multiplex real-time PCR and PCR-reverse blot hybridization assay for the direct and rapid detection of bacteria and antibiotic resistance determinants in positive culture bottles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hye-Young; Kim, Seoyong; Kim, Jungho; Park, Soon Deok; Kim, Hyo Youl; Uh, Young; Lee, Hyeyoung

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of a commercially available multiplex real-time PCR assay and a PCR-reverse blot hybridization assay (PCR-REBA) for the rapid detection of bacteria and identification of antibiotic resistance genes directly from blood culture bottles and to compare the results of these molecular assays with conventional culture methods. The molecular diagnostic methods were used to evaluate 593 blood culture bottles from patients with bloodstream infections. The detection positivity of multiplex real-time PCR assay for Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative bacteria and Candida spp. was equivalent to PCR-REBA as 99.6 %, 99.1 % and 100 %, respectively. Using conventional bacterial cultures as the gold standard, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of these two molecular methods were 99.5 % [95 % confidence interval (CI), 0.980-1.000; P<0.001), 100 % (95 % CI, 0.983-1.000; P<0.001), 100 % and 99 %, respectively. However, positivity of the Real-methicillin-resistant Staphylococcusaureus multiplex real-time PCR assay targeting the mecA gene to detect methicillin resistance was lower than that of the PCR-REBA method, detecting an overall positivity of 98.4 % (n=182; 95 % CI, 0.964-1.000; P<0.009) and 99.5 % (n=184; 95 % CI, 0.985-1.000; P<0.0001), respectively. The entire two methods take about 3 h, while results from culture can take up to 48-72 h. Therefore, the use of these two molecular methods was rapid and reliable for the characterization of causative pathogens in bloodstream infections.

  8. Vasectomy and its reversal.

    PubMed

    Belker, A M

    1985-12-01

    Techniques, results, complications, and medicolegal aspects of vasectomy are discussed in this article. Emphasis is placed on techniques that prevent spontaneous recanalization of the ends of the vas deferens after vasectomy. Factors that affect the reversibility of vasectomy are discussed. New microsurgical techniques of vasectomy reversal are described, and results of these new techniques are compared with results of nonmicrosurgical techniques of vasectomy reversal. Indications for bypass vasoepididymostomy during vasectomy reversal procedures, as well as techniques for performing vasoepididymostomy, are discussed.

  9. Reverse Correlation in Neurophysiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ringach, Dario; Shapley, Robert

    2004-01-01

    This article presents a review of reverse correlation in neurophysiology. We discuss the basis of reverse correlation in linear transducers and in spiking neurons. The application of reverse correlation to measure the receptive fields of visual neurons using white noise and m-sequences, and classical findings about spatial and color processing in…

  10. Disturbance of a Bow Shock Wave and of Flow Behind It in the Case of Flow Past Blunt Bodies in Polyatomic Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baryshnikov, A. S.; Basargin, I. V.; Bobashev, S. V.; Monakhov, N. A.; Popov, P. A.; Sakharov, V. A.; Chistyakova, M. V.

    2016-09-01

    A review has been presented of the results of experimental investigations, on a ballistic unit of the Physical-Technical Institute, into the distortion of a bow shock wave and of flow behind the body in CCl2F2 and CF4 polyatomic gases. The latest experimental works at the Physical-Technical Institute and abroad have also been reviewed. The distortion of the bow shock wave under the same conditions is identically manifested in the case of flow past a segmental body and past a sphere alike, although for the sphere, flow separation occurs farther downstream of the bow shock. In the case of flow past a cylinder the initial distribution of the flow is observed in the compression zone behind the bow shock wave.

  11. O+ pickup ions outside of Venus' bow shock: Venus Express observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yong; Fraenz, Markus; Dubinin, Eduard; Zhang, Tielong; Jarvinen, Riku; Wan, Weixing; Kallio, Esa; Collinson, Glyn; Barabash, Stars; Norbert, Krupp; Woch, Joachim; Lundin, Rickard; delva, Magda

    2013-04-01

    Pickup ions are ions of planetary origin that become assimilated into the solar wind flow through their interaction with the solar wind magnetic and electric field. The speed of pickup ions varies between zero and twice the underlying plasma flow component perpendicular to magnetic field vector. For the unmagnetized planet Venus and Mars, oxygen (O+) pickup ions are known to be important because they can modify the global configuration of planetary plasma environment and significantly contribute to the atmospheric O+ loss [1]. Since the kinetic energy of an O+ pickup ion can reach 64 times that of a co-moving proton, an instrument must be able to measure O+ ions with energy of at least tens of keV to investigate the O+ pickup ion distribution from planetary ionosphere to solar wind. The in-situ observations and simulations at Mars have shown that the energy of O+ pickup ions can be 55-72 keV outside of the bow shock [2]. For Venus case, the plasma analyzer (OPA) onboard Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO), which was designed for solar wind monitoring, has an 8 keV energy limit for O+ detection and the limited sampling and data rate [3]. Therefore, OPA can only measure the O+ pickup ions in the sheath flow or inside the induced magnetosphere where the speed of ambient plasma flow is significantly lower than that of the unshocked solar wind outside of the bow shock. In addition, Galileo also did not capture O+ outside bowshock during its 1-hour Venus flyby though its plasma instrument had ability to cover the energy band of O+ pickup ions [4]. The Ion Mass Analyzer (IMA), included in the Analyzer of Space Plasma and Energetic Atoms (ASPERA-4) package on board Venus Express (VEX), determines the composition, energy, and angular distribution of ions in the energy range ~10 eV/q to 30 keV/q. Note that an O+ ion moving at the typical solar wind speed 400 km/s has kinetic energy 13.4 keV. Therefore, IMA has ability to measure the O+ pickup ions outside of Venus' bow shock. We

  12. The Wind Interaction Regions of the VELA Pulsar: a Pulsar Jet and Bow Shock Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markwardt, Craig Bishop

    The Vela pulsar is a nearby young pulsar actively radiating radio to γ-rays. We present evidence in this work that the Vela pulsar is also interacting with its surroundings via a relativistic wind, which manifests itself as two different nebular structures. ROSAT PSPC observations of the Vela pulsar show that a 45 arcmin long collimated X-ray feature projects from the pulsar. We favor the interpretation that the feature is a 'cocoon' of heated gas formed when a jet outflow from the Vela pulsar interacts with the interior medium of the supernova remnant. This interpretation is consistent with the observed center-filled morphology and spectrum of the cocoon structure. Combined ROSAT + ASCA observations of the 'head' of the cocoon, the point where the jet is believed to interact with the supernova remnant, demonstrate that the spectrum has a thermal peak near 1 keV, but extends to at least 7 keV. No distinct spectral lines are seen. The spectral parameters of the cocoon could be produced by a cocoon with a pulsar jet whose speed is at least 800 km s-1, depending on the angle of inclination. The mechanical power driving the jet is ≥1036 erg s-1, consistent with the Vela pulsar's rotational energy loss rate. On smaller spatial scales, it has been known that the Vela pulsar is surrounded by a 2 arcmin diameter 'compact' nebula which has power law spectral emission. Our ROSAT HRI observations of the region show that the nebula very likely a bow shock structure formed by a nearly isotropic pulsar wind interacting with the supernova remnant. The axis of the nebula is aligned with the pulsar's known proper motion vector. The high particle energies and magnetic fields near the pulsar make the bow shock an ideal environment for generating X-ray synchrotron emission. We show that a full three dimensional model of the nebula, taking into account what is known about the geometry and pulsar wind physics, is consistent with the observations.

  13. Quantified Energy Dissipation Rates in the Terrestrial Bow Shock. 2; Waves and Dissipation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, L. B., III; Sibeck, D. G.; Breneman, A. W.; Le Contel, O.; Cully, C.; Turner, D. L.; Angelopoulos, V.; Malaspina, D. M.

    2014-01-01

    We present the first quantified measure of the energy dissipation rates, due to wave-particle interactions, in the transition region of the Earth's collision-less bow shock using data from the Time History of Events and Macro-Scale Interactions during Sub-Storms spacecraft. Our results show that wave-particle interactions can regulate the global structure and dominate the energy dissipation of collision-less shocks. In every bow shock crossing examined, we observed both low-frequency (less than 10 hertz) and high-frequency (approximately or greater than10 hertz) electromagnetic waves throughout the entire transition region and into the magnetosheath. The low-frequency waves were consistent with magnetosonic-whistler waves. The high-frequency waves were combinations of ion-acoustic waves, electron cyclotron drift instability driven waves, electrostatic solitary waves, and whistler mode waves. The high-frequency waves had the following: (1) peak amplitudes exceeding delta B approximately equal to 10 nanoteslas and delta E approximately equal to 300 millivolts per meter, though more typical values were delta B approximately equal to 0.1-1.0 nanoteslas and delta E approximately equal to 10-50 millivolts per meter (2) Poynting fluxes in excess of 2000 microWm(sup -2) (micro-waves per square meter) (typical values were approximately 1-10 microWm(sup -2) (micro-waves per square meter); (3) resistivities greater than 9000 omega meters; and (4) associated energy dissipation rates greater than 10 microWm(sup -3) (micro-waves per cubic meter). The dissipation rates due to wave-particle interactions exceeded rates necessary to explain the increase in entropy across the shock ramps for approximately 90 percent of the wave burst durations. For approximately 22 percent of these times, the wave-particle interactions needed to only be less than or equal to 0.1 percent efficient to balance the nonlinear wave steepening that produced the shock waves. These results show that wave

  14. Phase diagram, chemical bonds, and gap bowing of cubic InxAl1-xN alloys: Ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teles, L. K.; Scolfaro, L. M. R.; Leite, J. R.; Furthmüller, J.; Bechstedt, F.

    2002-12-01

    Thermodynamic, structural, and electronic properties of cubic InxAl1-xN alloys are studied by combining first-principles total energy calculations and the generalized quasichemical approach. Results for bond-lengths, second-nearest-neighbors distances, and bond angles in the alloy are presented. The calculated phase diagram of the alloy shows a broad and asymmetric miscibility gap. The gap fluctuations in the alloy allow for the definition of a minimum gap and an average gap with different bowing parameters, that can provide an explanation for the discrepancies found in the experimental values for the bowing parameter. It is also found that lattice matched In0.2Al0.8N with GaN is suitable to form a barrier material for electronic and optoelectronic nitride based devices.

  15. Attenuation distance of low frequency waves upstream of the pre-dawn bow shock: GEOTAIL and ISEE 3 comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugiyama, T.; Terasawa, T.; Kawano, H.; Yamamoto, T.; Kokubun, S.; Frank, L. A.; Ackerson, K.; Tsurutani, B. T.

    1995-01-01

    We have made a statistical study of the spatial distribution of low frequency waves (approx. 0.01-0.1 Hz) in the region upstream of the pre-dawn to dawn side bow shock (-50 Re less than X less than 15 Re) using both GEOTAIL and international sun earth explorer 3 (ISEE-3) magnetometer data. We have found that the wave amplitude dependence on D and X(sub s), where D is the distance from the bow shock and X(sub s) the x-coordinate position of shock foot point of the IMF, can be described by a functional form of A exp (X(sub s)/L(sub X)-D/L(sub D), with the characteristic attenuation distances, L(sub X) = 62 +/- 12 Re and L(sub D) = 59 +/- 38 Re.

  16. Reverse engineering of integrated circuits

    DOEpatents

    Chisholm, Gregory H.; Eckmann, Steven T.; Lain, Christopher M.; Veroff, Robert L.

    2003-01-01

    Software and a method therein to analyze circuits. The software comprises several tools, each of which perform particular functions in the Reverse Engineering process. The analyst, through a standard interface, directs each tool to the portion of the task to which it is most well suited, rendering previously intractable problems solvable. The tools are generally used iteratively to produce a successively more abstract picture of a circuit, about which incomplete a priori knowledge exists.

  17. Reverse Fluid Transport Due to Boundary Pulsations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coloma, Mikhail; Schaffer, David; Chiarot, Paul; Huang, Peter

    2016-11-01

    We investigate a reverse fluid transport mechanism consisting of peristaltic flow and boundary wave reflections. The reverse flow occurs in a rectangular conduit aligned in parallel between two cylindrical channels embedded in an elastic PDMS medium. The pulsating flow in the cylindrical channels, driven by a peristaltic pump, deform the PDMS medium and induce a pulsating flow in the rectangular conduit. Waveforms along the conduit boundaries, and their transmission and reflections, can be controlled by changing the PDMS rigidity. Our results show that while the overall wave propagation direction is in the forward direction, a reverse flow in the rectangular conduit can be preferentially induced by varying the elastic rigidity in one of the cylindrical channels. We study the overall flow velocity and direction under various PDMS rigidities. The identified set of experimental parameters that leads to a reverse flow will provide insights in understanding metabolic waste transport within the arterial walls in the brain.

  18. Magnetospheric response and reconfiguration times following IMF By reversals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenfjord, P.; Østgaard, N.; Strangeway, R.; Haaland, S.; Snekvik, K.; Laundal, K. M.; Reistad, J. P.; Milan, S. E.

    2017-01-01

    The interaction between the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) and the geomagnetic field at the dayside magnetopause leads to transfer of momentum and energy which changes the magnetospheric configuration, but only after a certain time. In this study we quantify this time, to advance our understanding of the causes for the delayed response of the magnetosphere. We study the response and reconfiguration time of the inner magnetosphere to IMF By reversals. A superposed epoch analysis of magnetic field measurements from four Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite spacecraft at different local times both for negative to positive IMF By reversals and for positive to negative reversals is presented. The magnetospheric response time at geosynchronous orbit to the sudden change of IMF By is less than 15 (˜10) min from the bow shock (magnetopause) arrival time, while the reconfiguration time is less than 46 (˜41) min. These results are consistent with a By component induced on closed magnetic field lines due to the asymmetric loading of flux following asymmetric dayside reconnection when IMF By≠0. Our results also confirm our earlier studies that nightside reconnection is not required for generating a By component on closed field lines.

  19. ISEE-3 observations of the earth's radio continuum through the bow shock and magnetosheath and in the magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinberg, J.-L.; Hoang, S.; Lacombe, C.; Zwickl, R. D.

    1988-01-01

    On October 1 1983, ISEE-3 crossed the earth's bow shock several times and entered the magnetosphere while continuously recording the nonthermal continuum (NTC) radio emission which is generated inside the magnetosphere. The effects of the solar wind, the bow shock, the magnetosheath, and the magnetopause on the propagation of the NTC are studied. On that day it is found that: (1) the relative values of the NTC low frequency cut-off in the solar wind and in the magnetosheath is due to an unusually high density overshoot in the bow shock, 7 to 11 times the solar wind density; (2) refraction at the interface between the magnetosheath and the solar wind can explain most of the decrease in the source angular size when the observer travels away from the earth; (3) plasma density irregularities in the magnetosheath cause considerable scattering of the NTC, and this effect gives a large apparent size to the NTC source when observed from inside the magnetosheath; and (4) the apparent source is also relatively large inside the magnetosphere, probably due to an approach to ray isotropy caused by oblique reflections from the magnetopause.

  20. The Planetesimal Bow Shock Model for Chondrule Formation: More Detailed Simulations in the Near Vicinity of the Planetesimal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, Lon L.; Ciesla, Fred J.

    2005-01-01

    Gas dynamic shock waves in a low temperature nebula have been considered to be a leading candidate mechanism for providing the repetitive, short-duration heating events that are believed to have been responsible for the formation of chondrules in chondrites. It has been found, for example, that shocks with Mach numbers greater than 4 or 5 would be capable of rapidly melting 0.1-1 mm sized silicate particles as required by meteoritic data. Near the nebula midplane where chondrite parent bodies are believed to have formed, possible energy sources for generating multiple shocks include mass concentrations in a gravitationally unstable nebula, tidal interactions of proto-Jupiter with the nebula, and bow waves upstream of planetesimals scattered gravitationally into eccentric orbits by proto- Jupiter. In a recent study, we have found that chondrule precursors that are melted following passage through a planetesimal bow shock would likely cool at rates that are too rapid to be consistent with meteoritic evidence. However, that study was limited to the bowshock exterior to about 1.5 planetesimal radii (measured perpendicular to the symmetry axis) to avoid complications interior to this distance where large pressure gradients and lateral flow occur as the gas flows around the planetesimal. In this paper, we reconsider the planetesimal bow shock model and report more detailed numerical simulations of chondrule precursor heating, cooling, and dynamical histories in the near vicinity of a representative planetesimal.