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Sample records for box thalamic dopamine

  1. Thinking Outside a Less Intact Box: Thalamic Dopamine D2 Receptor Densities Are Negatively Related to Psychometric Creativity in Healthy Individuals

    PubMed Central

    de Manzano, Örjan; Cervenka, Simon; Karabanov, Anke; Farde, Lars; Ullén, Fredrik

    2010-01-01

    Several lines of evidence support that dopaminergic neurotransmission plays a role in creative thought and behavior. Here, we investigated the relationship between creative ability and dopamine D2 receptor expression in healthy individuals, with a focus on regions where aberrations in dopaminergic function have previously been associated with psychotic symptoms and a genetic liability to schizophrenia. Scores on divergent thinking tests (Inventiveness battery, Berliner Intelligenz Struktur Test) were correlated with regional D2 receptor densities, as measured by Positron Emission Tomography, and the radioligands [11C]raclopride and [11C]FLB 457. The results show a negative correlation between divergent thinking scores and D2 density in the thalamus, also when controlling for age and general cognitive ability. Hence, the results demonstrate that the D2 receptor system, and specifically thalamic function, is important for creative performance, and may be one crucial link between creativity and psychopathology. We suggest that decreased D2 receptor densities in the thalamus lower thalamic gating thresholds, thus increasing thalamocortical information flow. In healthy individuals, who do not suffer from the detrimental effects of psychiatric disease, this may increase performance on divergent thinking tests. In combination with the cognitive functions of higher order cortical networks, this could constitute a basis for the generative and selective processes that underlie real life creativity. PMID:20498850

  2. Dopamine, fronto-striato-thalamic circuits and risk for psychosis.

    PubMed

    Dandash, Orwa; Pantelis, Christos; Fornito, Alex

    2017-02-01

    A series of parallel, integrated circuits link distinct regions of prefrontal cortex with specific nuclei of the striatum and thalamus. Dysfunction of these fronto-striato-thalamic systems is thought to play a major role in the pathogenesis of psychosis. In this review, we examine evidence from human and animal investigations that dysfunction of a specific dorsal fronto-striato-thalamic circuit, linking the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, dorsal (associative) striatum, and mediodorsal nucleus of the thalamus, is apparent across different stages of psychosis, including prior to the onset of a first episode, suggesting that it represents a candidate risk biomarker. We consider how abnormalities at distinct points in the circuit may give rise to the pattern of findings seen in patient populations, and how these changes relate to disruptions in dopamine, glutamate and GABA signaling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The effects of nigrostriatal dopamine depletion on the thalamic parafascicular nucleus.

    PubMed

    Kusnoor, Sheila V; Bubser, Michael; Deutch, Ariel Y

    2012-03-29

    Neuronal loss in Parkinson's disease (PD) is seen in a number of brain regions in addition to the substantia nigra (SN). Among these is the thalamic parafascicular nucleus (PF), which sends glutamatergic projections to the striatum and receives GABAergic inputs from the SN. Recent data suggest that lesions of nigrostriatal dopamine axons cause a loss of PF neurons, which has been interpreted to suggest that the PF cell loss seen in PD is secondary to dopamine denervation. However, the extent of a PF dopamine innervation in the rat is unclear, and it is possible that PF cell loss in parkinsonism is independent of nigrostriatal dopamine degeneration. We characterized the dopamine innervation of the PF in the rat and determined if 6-hydroxydopamine SN lesions cause PF neuron degeneration. Dual-label immunohistochemistry revealed that almost all tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive (TH-ir) axons in the PF also expressed dopamine-beta-hydroxylase and were therefore noradrenergic or adrenergic. Moreover, an antibody directed against dopamine revealed only very rare PF dopaminergic axons. Retrograde-tract tracing-immunohistochemistry did not uncover an innervation of the PF from midbrain dopamine neurons. Nigrostriatal dopamine neuron lesions did not elicit degeneration of PF cells, as reflected by a lack of FluoroJade C staining. Similarly, neither unilateral 6-OHDA lesions of nigrostriatal axons nor the dorsal noradrenergic bundle decreased the number of PF neurons or the number of PF neurons retrogradely-labeled from the striatum. These data suggest that the loss of thalamostriatal PF neurons in Parkinson's Disease is a primary event rather than secondary to nigrostriatal dopamine degeneration.

  4. Minocycline Attenuates High Mobility Group Box 1 Translocation, Microglial Activation, and Thalamic Neurodegeneration after Traumatic Brain Injury in Postnatal Day 17 Rats.

    PubMed

    Simon, Dennis W; Aneja, Rajesh K; Alexander, Henry; Bell, Michael J; Bayır, Hülya; Kochanek, Patrick M; Clark, Robert S B

    2017-08-22

    In response to cell injury, the danger signal high mobility group box-1 (HMGB) is released, activating macrophages by binding pattern recognition receptors. We investigated the role of the anti-inflammatory drug minocycline in attenuating HMGB1 translocation, microglial activation, and neuronal injury in a rat model of pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI). Post-natal day 17 Sprague-Dawley rats underwent moderate-severe controlled cortical impact (CCI). Animals were randomized to treatment with minocycline (90 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) or vehicle (saline) at 10 min and 20 h after injury. Shams received anesthesia and craniotomy. We analyzed HMGB1 translocation (protein fractionation and Western blotting), microglial activation (Iba-1 immunohistochemistry), neuronal death (Fluoro-Jade-B [FJB] immunofluorescence), and neuronal cell counts (unbiased stereology). Behavioral assessments included motor and Morris-water maze testing. Nuclear to cytosolic translocation of HMGB1 in the injured brain was attenuated in minocycline versus vehicle-treated rats at 24 h (p < 0.001). Treatment with minocycline reduced microglial activation in the ipsilateral cortex, hippocampus, and thalamus (p < 0.05 vs. vehicle, all regions); attenuated neurodegeneration (FJB-positive neurons) at seven days (p < 0.05 vs. vehicle); and increased thalamic neuronal survival at 14 days (naïve 22773 ± 1012 cells/mm(3), CCI + vehicle 11753 ± 464, CCI + minocycline 17047 ± 524; p < 0.001). Minocycline-treated rats demonstrated delayed motor recovery early after injury but had no injury effect on Morris-water maze whereas vehicle-treated rats performed worse than sham on the final two days of testing (both p < 0.05 vs. vehicle). Minocycline globally attenuated HMGB1 translocation and microglial activation in injured brain in a pediatric TBI model and afforded selective thalamic neuroprotection. The HMGB1 translocation and thalamic injury may represent novel

  5. Striatal dopamine D2 receptor availability predicts the thalamic and medial prefrontal responses to reward in cocaine abusers three years later

    PubMed Central

    Asensio, Samuel; Romero, Maria J.; Romero, Francisco J.; Wong, Christopher; Alia-Klein, Nelly; Tomasi, Dardo; Wang, Gene-Jack; Telang, Frank; Volkow, Nora D.; Goldstein, Rita Z.

    2009-01-01

    Low levels of dopamine (DA) D2 receptor availability at a resting baseline have been previously reported in drug addicted individuals and have been associated with reduced ventral and dorsal prefrontal metabolism. The reduction in DA D2 receptor availability along with the reduced ventral frontal metabolism is thought to underlie compromised sensitivity to non-drug reward, a core characteristic of drug addiction. We therefore hypothesized that variability in DA D2 receptor availability at baseline will covary with dynamic responses to monetary reward in addicted individuals. Striatal DA D2 receptor availability was measured with [11C]raclopride and positron emission tomography and response to monetary reward was measured (an average of 3 years later) with functional magnetic resonance imaging in seven cocaine addicted individuals. Results show that low DA D2 receptor availability in the dorsal striatum was associated with decreased thalamic response to monetary reward; while low availability in ventral striatum was associated with increased medial prefrontal (Brodmann Area 6/8/32) response to monetary reward. These preliminary results, that need to be replicated in larger sample sizes and validated with healthy controls, suggest that resting striatal DA D2 receptor availability predicts variability in functional responses to a non-drug reinforcer (money) in prefrontal cortex, implicated in behavioral monitoring, and in thalamus, implicated in conditioned responses and expectation, in cocaine addicted individuals. PMID:20034014

  6. Striatal dopamine D2 receptor availability predicts the thalamic and medial prefrontal responses to reward in cocaine abusers three years later

    SciTech Connect

    Asensio, S.; Goldstein, R.; Asensio, S.; Romero, M.J.; Romero, F.J.; Wong, C.T.; Alia-Klein, N.; Tomasi, D.; Wang, G.-J.; Telang, F..; Volkow, N.D.; Goldstein, R.Z.

    2010-05-01

    Low levels of dopamine (DA) D2 receptor availability at a resting baseline have been previously reported in drug addicted individuals and have been associated with reduced ventral and dorsal prefrontal metabolism. The reduction in DA D2 receptor availability along with the reduced ventral frontal metabolism is thought to underlie compromised sensitivity to nondrug reward, a core characteristic of drug addiction. We therefore hypothesized that variability in DA D2 receptor availability at baseline will covary with dynamic responses to monetary reward in addicted individuals. Striatal DA D2 receptor availability was measured with [{sup 11}C]raclopride and positron emission tomography and response to monetary reward was measured (an average of three years later) with functional magnetic resonance imaging in seven cocaine-addicted individuals. Results show that low DA D2 receptor availability in the dorsal striatum was associated with decreased thalamic response to monetary reward; while low availability in ventral striatum was associated with increased medial prefrontal (Brodmann Area 6/8/32) response to monetary reward. These preliminary results, that need to be replicated in larger sample sizes and validated with healthy controls, suggest that resting striatal DA D2 receptor availability predicts variability in functional responses to a nondrug reinforcer (money) in prefrontal cortex, implicated in behavioral monitoring, and in thalamus, implicated in conditioned responses and expectation, in cocaine-addicted individuals.

  7. Thalamic neglect.

    PubMed

    Watson, R T; Heilman, K M

    1979-05-01

    Three patients with right thalamic hemorrhage showed contralateral neglect and limb akinesia. They also had anosognosia, visuospatial disorders, and emotional flattening. In animals, neglect can be induced by lesions along a cortico-limbic-reticular loop including the intralaminar thalamic nuclei. We propose that an activation defect is responsible not only for the neglect and akinesia, but also for the visuospatial and emotional defects usually associated with right-hemisphere cortical dysfunction.

  8. Immunohistochemical localization of the D1 dopamine receptor in rat brain reveals its axonal transport, pre- and postsynaptic localization, and prevalence in the basal ganglia, limbic system, and thalamic reticular nucleus.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Q; Zhou, D; Chase, K; Gusella, J F; Aronin, N; DiFiglia, M

    1992-01-01

    D1 dopamine receptor localization was examined by immunohistochemistry using a polyclonal anti-peptide antibody which (i) immunoprecipitated a protein fragment encoded by a D1 receptor cDNA and (ii) on Western blots of solubilized striatal and hippocampal membranes recognized two proteins of approximately 50 kDa and 75 kDa, corresponding to reported sizes of D1 receptor proteins. Immunoreactivity overlapped with dopamine-containing pathways, patterns of D1 receptor binding, and mRNA expression. Staining was concentrated in prefrontal, cingulate, parietal, piriform, entorhinal, and hippocampal cortical areas and subcortically in the basal ganglia, amygdala, septal area, substantia inominata, thalamus, hypothalamus, and neurohypophysis. Prominent labeling was seen in the thalamic reticular nucleus, a region known to integrate ascending basal forebrain inputs with thalamocortical and corticothalamic pathways and in fiber bundles interconnecting limbic areas. In striatal neuropil, staining appeared in spines (heads and necks), at postsynaptic sites in dendrites, and in axon terminals; in the pars reticulata of the substantia nigra, labeling was prevalent in myelinated and unmyelinated axons and dendrites. These data provide direct evidence for the regional and subcellular distribution of D1 receptor protein in the brain and for its pre- and postsynaptic localization in the basal ganglia. The prominent immunoreactivity seen in the limbic system and thalamic reticular nucleus supports an important role for this receptor subtype in mediating integrative processes involved with learning, memory, and cognition. Images PMID:1281547

  9. Frontal-thalamic circuits associated with language.

    PubMed

    Barbas, Helen; García-Cabezas, Miguel Ángel; Zikopoulos, Basilis

    2013-07-01

    Thalamic nuclei associated with language including the ventral lateral, ventral anterior, intralaminar and mediodorsal form a hub that uniquely receives the output of the basal ganglia and cerebellum, and is connected with frontal (premotor and prefrontal) cortices through two parallel circuits: a thalamic pathway targets the middle frontal cortical layers focally, and the other innervates widely cortical layer 1, poised to recruit other cortices and thalamic nuclei for complex cognitive operations. Return frontal pathways to the thalamus originate from cortical layers 6 and 5. Information through this integrated thalamo-cortical system is gated by the inhibitory thalamic reticular nucleus and modulated by dopamine, representing a specialization in primates. The intricate dialogue of distinct thalamic nuclei with the basal ganglia, cerebellum, and specific dorsolateral prefrontal and premotor cortices associated with language, suggests synergistic roles in the complex but seemingly effortless sequential transformation of cognitive operations for speech production in humans.

  10. Dopamine D4 receptor stimulation in GABAergic projections of the globus pallidus to the reticular thalamic nucleus and the substantia nigra reticulata of the rat decreases locomotor activity.

    PubMed

    Erlij, David; Acosta-García, Jacqueline; Rojas-Márquez, Martín; González-Hernández, Brenda; Escartín-Perez, Erick; Aceves, Jorge; Florán, Benjamín

    2012-02-01

    Dopamine D4 receptors are localized in the GABAergic projections that globus pallidus (GP) neurons send to the reticular nucleus of the thalamus (RTN), the substantia nigra reticulata (SNr) and the subthalamic nucleus (STN). Deficient D4 function in this network could lead to hyperactivity and thus be important in generating some of the symptoms of ADHD (attention deficit hyperactivity disorder), a condition associated with polymorphisms of dopamine D4 receptors. It is then, unexpected that systemic injections of D4 ligands have no significant effects on the motor activity of normal rats. We further examined this issue by microinjecting D4 ligands and psychostimulant drugs in relevant structures. Interstitial dopamine overflow in the RTN was increased by reverse microdialysis of both methylphenidate and methamphetamine. Intranuclear injections in the RTN of methylphenidate, methamphetamine and the selective D4 agonist PD 168,077 reduced motor activity. Intraperitoneal injection of the D4 antagonist L 745,870 blocked the effects of these intranuclear injections. Similarly, intranuclear injections of PD 168,077 in the SNr inhibited motor activity, an effect that was also blocked by intraperitoneal L 745,870. In rats with 6-OHDA induced hemiparkinsonism, intraperitoneal PD 168,077 produced ipsilateral turning behavior that was blocked by L 745,870. Our results suggest that diminished D4 signaling in GP projections could lead to increased traffic through the relay nuclei of the thalamus and hyperactivity. Hence this basal-ganglia-thalamus network may be one of the targets of the beneficial effects that psychostimulant drugs have in disorders associated with D4 receptor abnormalities. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder'.

  11. Subsequent bilateral thalamic haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Jesus; Scherle, Claudio; Machado, Calixto

    2009-01-01

    Simultaneous or subsequent bilateral thalamic haemorrhage is rare, and most reported cases are from Asian countries. An 80-year-old white Cuban man, with a history of arterial hypertension, suffered sudden onset of right hemiparesis. Computed tomography (CT) scan showed a left posteromedial thalamic haemorrhage. Two days later his condition suddenly deteriorated: blood pressure was 220/105 mm Hg, he was stuporous and tetraplegic, respiration was ataxic, and his gaze was fixed and deviated downward and inward. CT scan showed haemorrhages in both thalami, extending to the ventricles. 32 h later the patient died. There are few previous publications of simultaneous or subsequent bilateral thalamic haemorrhages and this is the first report involving a Hispanic patient. Prognosis in patients with bilateral thalamic haemorrhage is poor, and the mechanism underlying the development of subsequent and symmetrical bleeding is not clear. PMID:21709830

  12. Thalamic alexia with agraphia

    PubMed Central

    de Gobbi Porto, Fábio Henrique; d'Ávila Freitas, Maria Isabel; de Oliveira, Maira Okada; Lucato, Leandro Tavares; Orsini, Marco; de Menezes, Sara Lúcia Silveira; Magaldi, Regina Miksian; Porto, Cláudia Sellitto; Dozzi Brucki, Sonia Maria; Nitrini, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    Alexia with agraphia is defined as an acquired impairment affecting reading and writing ability. It can be associated with aphasia, but can also occur as an isolated entity. This impairment has classically been associated with a left angular gyrus lesion In the present study, we describe a case involving a patient who developed alexia with agraphia and other cognitive deficits after a thalamic hemorrhage. In addition, we discuss potential mechanisms of this cortical dysfunction syndrome caused by subcortical injury. We examined a patient who presented with alexia with agraphia and other cognitive deficits due to a hemorrhage in the left thalamus. Neuropsychological evaluation showed attention, executive function, arithmetic and memory impairments. In addition, language tests revealed severe alexia with agraphia in the absence of aphasia. Imaging studies disclosed an old thalamic hemorrhage involving the anterior, dorsomedial and pulvinar nuclei. Tractography revealed asymmetric thalamocortical radiations in the parietal region (left thalamic lesions. The probable mechanism is a diaschisis phenomenon involving thalamic tract disconnections. PMID:22593808

  13. Thalamic semantic paralexia

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Alexia may be divided into different subtypes, with semantic paralexia being particularly rare. A 57 year old woman with a discreet left thalamic stroke and semantic paralexia is described. Language evalution with the Boston Diagnostic Aphasia Battery confirmed the semantic paralexia (deep alexia). Multimodality magnetic resonance imaging brain scanning excluded other cerebral lesions. A good recovery ensued. PMID:22593810

  14. Thalamic alexia with agraphia.

    PubMed

    de Gobbi Porto, Fábio Henrique; d'Ávila Freitas, Maria Isabel; de Oliveira, Maira Okada; Lucato, Leandro Tavares; Orsini, Marco; de Menezes, Sara Lúcia Silveira; Magaldi, Regina Miksian; Porto, Cláudia Sellitto; Dozzi Brucki, Sonia Maria; Nitrini, Ricardo

    2012-01-09

    Alexia with agraphia is defined as an acquired impairment affecting reading and writing ability. It can be associated with aphasia, but can also occur as an isolated entity. This impairment has classically been associated with a left angular gyrus lesion In the present study, we describe a case involving a patient who developed alexia with agraphia and other cognitive deficits after a thalamic hemorrhage. In addition, we discuss potential mechanisms of this cortical dysfunction syndrome caused by subcortical injury. We examined a patient who presented with alexia with agraphia and other cognitive deficits due to a hemorrhage in the left thalamus. Neuropsychological evaluation showed attention, executive function, arithmetic and memory impairments. In addition, language tests revealed severe alexia with agraphia in the absence of aphasia. Imaging studies disclosed an old thalamic hemorrhage involving the anterior, dorsomedial and pulvinar nuclei. Tractography revealed asymmetric thalamocortical radiations in the parietal region (left thalamic lesions. The probable mechanism is a diaschisis phenomenon involving thalamic tract disconnections.

  15. Broca's area - thalamic connectivity.

    PubMed

    Bohsali, Anastasia A; Triplett, William; Sudhyadhom, Atchar; Gullett, Joseph M; McGregor, Keith; FitzGerald, David B; Mareci, Thomas; White, Keith; Crosson, Bruce

    2015-02-01

    Broca's area is crucially involved in language processing. The sub-regions of Broca's area (pars triangularis, pars opercularis) presumably are connected via corticocortical pathways. However, growing evidence suggests that the thalamus may also be involved in language and share some of the linguistic functions supported by Broca's area. Functional connectivity is thought to be achieved via corticothalamic/thalamocortical white matter pathways. Our study investigates structural connectivity between Broca's area and the thalamus, specifically ventral anterior nucleus and pulvinar. We demonstrate that Broca's area shares direct connections with these thalamic nuclei and suggest a local Broca's area-thalamus network potentially involved in linguistic processing. Thalamic connectivity with Broca's area may serve to selectively recruit cortical regions storing multimodal features of lexical items and to bind them together during lexical-semantic processing. In addition, Broca's area-thalamic circuitry may enable cortico-thalamo-cortical information transfer and modulation between BA 44 and 45 during language comprehension and production. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Central Thalamic Deep-Brain Stimulation Alters Striatal-Thalamic Connectivity in Cognitive Neural Behavior.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hui-Ching; Pan, Han-Chi; Lin, Sheng-Huang; Lo, Yu-Chun; Shen, Elise Ting-Hsin; Liao, Lun-De; Liao, Pei-Han; Chien, Yi-Wei; Liao, Kuei-Da; Jaw, Fu-Shan; Chu, Kai-Wen; Lai, Hsin-Yi; Chen, You-Yin

    2015-01-01

    Central thalamic deep brain stimulation (CT-DBS) has been proposed as an experimental therapeutic approach to produce consistent sustained regulation of forebrain arousal for several neurological diseases. We investigated local field potentials (LFPs) induced by CT-DBS from the thalamic central lateral nuclei (CL) and the striatum as potential biomarkers for the enhancement of lever-pressing skill learning. LFPs were simultaneously recorded from multiple sites in the CL, ventral striatum (Vstr), and dorsal striatum (Dstr). LFP oscillation power and functional connectivity were assessed and compared between the CT-DBS and sham control groups. The theta and alpha LFP oscillations were significantly increased in the CL and striatum in the CT-DBS group. Furthermore, interhemispheric coherences between bilateral CL and striatum were increased in the theta band. Additionally, enhancement of c-Fos activity, dopamine D2 receptor (Drd2), and α4-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α4-nAChR) occurred after CT-DBS treatment in the striatum and hippocampus. CT-DBS strengthened thalamic-striatal functional connectivity, which demonstrates that the inter-regional connectivity enhancement might contribute to synaptic plasticity in the striatum. Altered dopaminergic and cholinergic receptors resulted in modulation of striatal synaptic plasticity's ability to regulate downstream signaling cascades for higher brain functions of lever-pressing skill learning.

  17. Central Thalamic Deep-Brain Stimulation Alters Striatal-Thalamic Connectivity in Cognitive Neural Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hui-Ching; Pan, Han-Chi; Lin, Sheng-Huang; Lo, Yu-Chun; Shen, Elise Ting-Hsin; Liao, Lun-De; Liao, Pei-Han; Chien, Yi-Wei; Liao, Kuei-Da; Jaw, Fu-Shan; Chu, Kai-Wen; Lai, Hsin-Yi; Chen, You-Yin

    2016-01-01

    Central thalamic deep brain stimulation (CT-DBS) has been proposed as an experimental therapeutic approach to produce consistent sustained regulation of forebrain arousal for several neurological diseases. We investigated local field potentials (LFPs) induced by CT-DBS from the thalamic central lateral nuclei (CL) and the striatum as potential biomarkers for the enhancement of lever-pressing skill learning. LFPs were simultaneously recorded from multiple sites in the CL, ventral striatum (Vstr), and dorsal striatum (Dstr). LFP oscillation power and functional connectivity were assessed and compared between the CT-DBS and sham control groups. The theta and alpha LFP oscillations were significantly increased in the CL and striatum in the CT-DBS group. Furthermore, interhemispheric coherences between bilateral CL and striatum were increased in the theta band. Additionally, enhancement of c-Fos activity, dopamine D2 receptor (Drd2), and α4-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α4-nAChR) occurred after CT-DBS treatment in the striatum and hippocampus. CT-DBS strengthened thalamic-striatal functional connectivity, which demonstrates that the inter-regional connectivity enhancement might contribute to synaptic plasticity in the striatum. Altered dopaminergic and cholinergic receptors resulted in modulation of striatal synaptic plasticity's ability to regulate downstream signaling cascades for higher brain functions of lever-pressing skill learning. PMID:26793069

  18. The primate thalamus is a key target for brain dopamine.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-González, Miguel Angel; García-Cabezas, Miguel Angel; Rico, Beatriz; Cavada, Carmen

    2005-06-29

    The thalamus relays information to the cerebral cortex from subcortical centers or other cortices; in addition, it projects to the striatum and amygdala. The thalamic relay function is subject to modulation, so the flow of information to the target regions may change depending on behavioral demands. Modulation of thalamic relay by dopamine is not currently acknowledged, perhaps because dopamine innervation is reportedly scant in the rodent thalamus. We show that dopaminergic axons profusely target the human and macaque monkey thalamus using immunolabeling with three markers of the dopaminergic phenotype (tyrosine hydroxylase, dopamine, and the dopamine transporter). The dopamine innervation is especially prominent in specific association, limbic, and motor thalamic nuclei, where the densities of dopaminergic axons are as high as or higher than in the cortical area with the densest dopamine innervation. We also identified the dopaminergic neurons projecting to the macaque thalamus using retrograde tract-tracing combined with immunohistochemistry. The origin of thalamic dopamine is multiple, and thus more complex, than in any other dopaminergic system defined to date: dopaminergic neurons of the hypothalamus, periaqueductal gray matter, ventral mesencephalon, and the lateral parabrachial nucleus project bilaterally to the monkey thalamus. We propose a novel dopaminergic system that targets the primate thalamus and is independent from the previously defined nigrostriatal, mesocortical, and mesolimbic dopaminergic systems. Investigating this "thalamic dopaminergic system" should further our understanding of higher brain functions and conditions such as Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia, and drug addiction.

  19. Combined thalamic ptosis and astasia.

    PubMed

    Kausar, Hena; Antonios, Nader

    2013-11-01

    Isolated cases of astasia or ptosis have each been reported in ischemic or hemorrhagic strokes involving the thalamus. We report a 70-year-old man with a medical history of hypertension who presented with left ptosis and gait disturbance despite intact motor strength in the legs and normal sensory function. MRI of the brain showed an evolving subacute infarction confined to the anteromedial-medial part of the left thalamus with no other areas of recent infarction identified. To our knowledge, combined ptosis and astasia in thalamic infarction has not been reported in the English literature. We identified 11 patients with thalamic ptosis and 21 with thalamic astasia in the literature. Patients who had ptosis, or gait abnormality which would not be related to thalamic stroke, were excluded; for example, evidence of infarction in the hypothalamus, midbrain, pons, cerebellum, or cingulate gyrus. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Big Box, Little Box.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Child Care, 2002

    2002-01-01

    This article presents activities for young children in child care settings using boxes of various sizes. Suggestions include making shape sorters and sensory boxes for infants and toddlers, and constructing personal collection boxes, book boxes, games, and playhouses for older children. (Author/KB)

  1. Magical Boxes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costello, Judith

    2005-01-01

    Students get excited when they realize that they can transform a flat sheet of paper into a box. By using different sizes of paper, they can make different sizes of boxes and put a box inside a box, inside a box. These magical boxes within boxes can contain unwanted emotions or special treasures. The project described in this article incorporates…

  2. Magical Boxes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costello, Judith

    2005-01-01

    Students get excited when they realize that they can transform a flat sheet of paper into a box. By using different sizes of paper, they can make different sizes of boxes and put a box inside a box, inside a box. These magical boxes within boxes can contain unwanted emotions or special treasures. The project described in this article incorporates…

  3. Jeweled Boxes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coy, Mary

    2009-01-01

    While an empty cardboard box from a ream of copy paper may be the most coveted box among teachers in the author's school, for other people, brass boxes from India, Khokhlova lacquer boxes from Russia, and puzzle boxes from Japan are more the type that are collected and admired. Whether it is used for storage or decoration, a box can evoke a sense…

  4. Jeweled Boxes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coy, Mary

    2009-01-01

    While an empty cardboard box from a ream of copy paper may be the most coveted box among teachers in the author's school, for other people, brass boxes from India, Khokhlova lacquer boxes from Russia, and puzzle boxes from Japan are more the type that are collected and admired. Whether it is used for storage or decoration, a box can evoke a sense…

  5. Thalamic role in spatial memory.

    PubMed

    Greene, E; Naranjo, J N

    1986-02-01

    The contribution of structures in the limbic diencephalon to spatial memory function was investigated. Rats with lesions of either the anteroventral thalamus, anteromedial thalamus, dorsomedial thalamus or mammillary bodies were compared in their ability to perform a delayed alternation task. The results indicate the ablation of the thalamic nuclei did not impair delayed-alternation memory, but there was impairment following damage to the mammillary bodies. Placement of the discrete lesions was verified using Nissl sections and by tracing the pattern of projections using a silver degeneration stain. The results suggest that individual thalamic nuclei are not essential in the storage and/or retrieval of spatial memory. The data are discussed in terms of spatial deficits resulting from damage to the hippocampus proper or to the pathways connecting it to other brain structures.

  6. Posterior thalamic hemorrhage induces "pusher syndrome".

    PubMed

    Karnath, Hans-Otto; Johannsen, Leif; Broetz, Doris; Küker, Wilhelm

    2005-03-22

    Recent findings argue for a pathway in humans for sensing the orientation of gravity and controlling upright body posture, separate from the one for orientation perception of the visual world. Stroke patients with contraversive pushing were shown to experience their body as oriented upright when actually tilted about 20 degrees to the ipsilesional side, in spite of normal visual-vestibular functioning. A recent study suggested the involvement of posterolateral thalamus typically associated with the disorder. To evaluate the relationship between pushing behavior and thalamic function. Over a 3-year period the authors prospectively investigated 40 patients with left- or right-sided thalamic strokes. Twenty-eight percent showed contraversive pushing. The authors found a strong relationship between etiology, vascular territory, lesion size, and neurologic disorders associated with contraversive pushing. Pusher patients had larger lesions that typically were caused by hemorrhage (vs infarcts) located in the posterior thalamus (vs anterior thalamic lesions in those patients without pushing behavior). A paresis of the contralesional extremities was more frequent and more severe in pusher patients. Further, these patients showed more additional spatial neglect with right thalamic lesions, while they tended to be more aphasic with left thalamic lesions. Posterior thalamus seems to be fundamentally involved in our control of upright body posture. Higher pressure, swelling, and other secondary pathologic processes associated with posterior thalamic hemorrhage (vs thalamic infarction) may provoke contraversive pushing in combination with additional neurologic symptoms.

  7. Excitatory actions of peptide histidine isoleucine on thalamic relay neurons.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Hun; Cox, Charles L

    2008-12-01

    Peptide histidine isoleucine (PHI) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) are neuropeptides synthesized from a common precursor, prepro-VIP, and share structural similarity and biological functions in many systems. Within the central nervous system and peripheral tissues, PHI and VIP have overlapping distribution. PHI-mediated functions are generally via activation of VIP receptors; however, the potency and affinity of PHI for VIP receptors are significantly lower than VIP. In addition, several studies suggest distinct PHI receptors that are independent of VIP receptors. PHI receptors have been cloned and characterized in fish, but their existence in mammals is still unknown. This study focuses on the functional role of PHI in the thalamus because of the localization of both PHI and VIP receptors in this brain region. Using extracellular multiple-unit recording techniques, we found that PHI strongly attenuated the slow intrathalamic rhythmic activity. Using intracellular recording techniques, we found that PHI selectively depolarized thalamic relay neurons via an enhancement of the hyperpolarization-activated mixed cation current, Ih. Further, the actions of PHI were occluded by VIP and dopamine, indicating these modulators converge onto a common mechanism. In contrast to previous work, we found that PHI was more potent than VIP in producing excitatory actions on thalamic neurons. We next used the transgenic mice lacking a specific VIP receptor, VPAC2, to identify its possible role in PHI-mediated actions in the thalamus. PHI depolarized all relay neurons tested from wild-type mice (VPAC2(+/+)); however, in knockout mice (VPAC2(-/-)), PHI produced no change in membrane potential in all neurons tested. Our findings indicate that excitatory actions of PHI are mediated by VPAC2 receptors, not by its own PHI receptors and the excitatory actions of PHI clearly attenuate intrathalamic rhythmic activities, and likely influence information transfer through thalamocortical

  8. Thalamic Pain Misdiagnosed as Cervical Disc Herniation.

    PubMed

    Lim, Tae Ha; Choi, Soo Il; Yoo, Jee In; Choi, Young Soon; Lim, Young Su; Sang, Bo Hyun; Bang, Yun Sic; Kim, Young Uk

    2016-04-01

    Thalamic pain is a primary cause of central post-stroke pain (CPSP). Clinical symptoms vary depending on the location of the infarction and frequently accompany several pain symptoms. Therefore, correct diagnosis and proper examination are not easy. We report a case of CPSP due to a left acute thalamic infarction with central disc protrusion at C5-6. A 45-year-old-male patient experiencing a tingling sensation in his right arm was referred to our pain clinic under the diagnosis of cervical disc herniation. This patient also complained of right cramp-like abdominal pain. After further evaluations, he was diagnosed with an acute thalamic infarction. Therefore detailed history taking should be performed and examiners should always be aware of other symptoms that could suggest a more dangerous disease.

  9. Thalamic Bursts Down-regulate Cortical Theta and Nociceptive Behavior.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, Brian W; Cross, Brent; Smith, Kelsey A; Roach, Catherine; Xia, Jimmy; Chao, Yu-Chieh; Levitt, Joshua; Koyama, Suguru; Moore, Christopher I; Saab, Carl Y

    2017-05-30

    We tested the relation between pain behavior, theta (4-8 Hz) oscillations in somatosensory cortex and burst firing in thalamic neurons in vivo. Optically-induced thalamic bursts attenuated cortical theta and mechanical allodynia. It is proposed that thalamic bursts are an adaptive response to pain that de-synchronizes cortical theta and decreases sensory salience.

  10. Boxed In!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Judith

    2007-01-01

    Early years practitioners know what parents are reminded of every Christmas Day--it does not matter how long families spend carefully selecting the presents, the children are likely to spend longer playing with the empty boxes! Children are fascinated with boxes and practitioners can capitalise on this and support early mathematical development…

  11. Bento Boxes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hasio, Cindy

    2010-01-01

    Bento boxes are common objects in Japanese culture, designed to hold enough lunch for one person. They have individual compartments and sometimes multiple tiers for rice, vegetables, and other side dishes. They are made of materials ranging from wood, cloth, aluminum, or plastic. In general, the greater the number of foods, the better the box is…

  12. Bento Boxes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hasio, Cindy

    2010-01-01

    Bento boxes are common objects in Japanese culture, designed to hold enough lunch for one person. They have individual compartments and sometimes multiple tiers for rice, vegetables, and other side dishes. They are made of materials ranging from wood, cloth, aluminum, or plastic. In general, the greater the number of foods, the better the box is…

  13. Thalamic pain alleviated by stellate ganglion block

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chenlong; Yang, Min; Liu, Pengfei; Zhong, Wenxiang; Zhang, Wenchuan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Thalamic pain is a distressing and treatment-resistant type of central post-stroke pain. Although stellate ganglion block is an established intervention used in pain management, its use in the treatment of thalamic pain has never been reported. Patient concerns: A 66-year-old woman presented with a 3-year history of severe intermittent lancinating pain on the right side of the face and the right hand. The pain started from the ulnar side of the right forearm after a mild ischemic stroke in bilateral basal ganglia and left thalamus. Weeks later, the pain extended to the dorsum of the finger tips and the whole palmar surface, becoming more severe. Meanwhile, there was also pain with similar characteristics emerging on her right face, resembling atypical trigeminal neuralgia. Diagnoses: Thalamic pain was diagnosed. Interventions: After refusing the further invasive treatment, she was suggested to try stellate ganglion block. Outcomes: After a 3-day period of pain free (numerical rating scale: 0) postoperatively, she reported moderate to good pain relief with a numerical rating scale of about 3 to 4 lasting 1 month after the first injection. Pain as well as the quality of life was markedly improved with less dose of analgesic agents. Lessons: Stellate ganglion block may be an optional treatment for thalamic pain. PMID:28151918

  14. Film Boxes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osterer, Irv

    2002-01-01

    Presents an art lesson in which students created three-dimensional designs for 35mm film packages to improve graphic arts learning. Describes how the students examined and created film boxes using QuarkXPress software. (CMK)

  15. Film Boxes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osterer, Irv

    2002-01-01

    Presents an art lesson in which students created three-dimensional designs for 35mm film packages to improve graphic arts learning. Describes how the students examined and created film boxes using QuarkXPress software. (CMK)

  16. Functional organization of the thalamic input to the thalamic reticular nucleus.

    PubMed

    Lam, Ying-Wan; Sherman, S Murray

    2011-05-04

    Most axons connecting the thalamus and cortex in both directions pass through the thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN), a thin layer of GABAergic cells adjacent to the thalamus, and innervate neurons there. The TRN, therefore, is in a strategic location to regulate thalamocortical communication. We recorded neurons of the somatosensory region of the TRN in a thalamocortical slice preparation and studied the spatial organization of their thalamic input using laser scanning photostimulation. We show that the thalamoreticular pathway is organized topographically for most neurons. The somatosensory region of the TRN can be organized into three tiers. From the inner (thalamoreticular) border to the outer, in a manner roughly reciprocal to the reticulothalamic pathway, each of these tiers receives its input from one of the somatosensory relays of the thalamus--the posterior medial, ventroposterior medial, and ventroposterior lateral nuclei. What is surprising is that approximately a quarter of the recorded neurons received input from multiple thalamic regions usually located in different nuclei. These neurons distribute evenly throughout the thickness of the TRN. Our results, therefore, suggest that there exist a subpopulation of TRN neurons that receive convergent inputs from multiple thalamic sources and engage in more complex patterns of inhibition of relay cells. We propose these neurons enable the TRN to act as an externally driven "searchlight" that integrates cortical and subcortical inputs and then inhibits or disinhibits specific thalamic relay cells, so that appropriate information can get through the thalamus to the cortex.

  17. Neurochemical pathways that converge on thalamic trigeminovascular neurons: potential substrate for modulation of migraine by sleep, food intake, stress and anxiety.

    PubMed

    Noseda, Rodrigo; Kainz, Vanessa; Borsook, David; Burstein, Rami

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic thalamic regulation of sensory signals allows the cortex to adjust better to rapidly changing behavioral, physiological and environmental demands. To fulfill this role, thalamic neurons must themselves be subjected to constantly changing modulatory inputs that originate in multiple neurochemical pathways involved in autonomic, affective and cognitive functions. Our overall goal is to define an anatomical framework for conceptualizing how a 'decision' is made on whether a trigeminovascular thalamic neuron fires, for how long, and at what frequency. To begin answering this question, we determine which neuropeptides/neurotransmitters are in a position to modulate thalamic trigeminovascular neurons. Using a combination of in-vivo single-unit recording, juxtacellular labeling with tetramethylrhodamine dextran (TMR) and in-vitro immunohistochemistry, we found that thalamic trigeminovascular neurons were surrounded by high density of axons containing biomarkers of glutamate, GABA, dopamine and serotonin; moderate density of axons containing noradrenaline and histamine; low density of axons containing orexin and melanin concentrating hormone (MCH); but not axons containing CGRP, serotonin 1D receptor, oxytocin or vasopressin. In the context of migraine, the findings suggest that the transmission of headache-related nociceptive signals from the thalamus to the cortex may be modulated by opposing forces (i.e., facilitatory, inhibitory) that are governed by continuous adjustments needed to keep physiological, behavioral, cognitive and emotional homeostasis.

  18. [Disappearance of essential tremor after thalamic infarction].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Y; Miura, K; Yamada, I; Takada, K

    1999-01-01

    Stereotactic thalamotomy has been used with some benefit in the treatment of essential tremor. We report a 73-year-old woman whose essential tremor of the right hand spontaneously disappeared after thalamic infarction. She had suffered hand tremor of the right hand for seven years. One morning, she noticed mild muscular weakness in her right upper and lower extremities, numbness around her mouth and paresthesia in her right arm. Simultaneously, she noticed disappearance of the tremor of her right hand. Several days later, right hemiplegia and paresthesia completely resolved. Neurological examination revealed no postural tremor or resting tremor. T 2-weighted brain MR imaging showed a high-intensity signal in the left thalamus that involved the ventralis intermedius nucleus. Clinical recovery from the effect of the infarct on essential tremor was complete. Therefore, it seems that thalamic infarction in this patient had an effect on essential tremor similar to that achieved with thalamotomy.

  19. Midline thalamic reuniens lesions improve executive behaviors.

    PubMed

    Prasad, J A; Abela, A R; Chudasama, Y

    2017-03-14

    The role of the thalamus in complex cognitive behavior is a topic of increasing interest. Here we demonstrate that lesions of the nucleus reuniens (NRe), a midline thalamic nucleus interconnected with both hippocampal and prefrontal circuitry, lead to enhancement of executive behaviors typically associated with the prefrontal cortex. Rats were tested on four behavioral tasks: (1) the combined attention-memory (CAM) task, which simultaneously assessed attention to a visual target and memory for that target over a variable delay; (2) spatial memory using a radial arm maze, (3) discrimination and reversal learning using a touchscreen operant platform, and (4) decision-making with delayed outcomes. Following NRe lesions, the animals became more efficient in their performance, responding with shorter reaction times but also less impulsively than controls. This change, combined with a decrease in perseverative responses, led to focused attention in the CAM task and accelerated learning in the visual discrimination task. There were no observed changes in tasks involving either spatial memory or value-based decision making. These data complement ongoing efforts to understand the role of midline thalamic structures in human cognition, including the development of thalamic stimulation as a therapeutic strategy for acquired cognitive disabilities (Schiff, 2008; Mair et al., 2011), and point to the NRe as a potential target for clinical intervention.

  20. Enlarged thalamic volumes and increased fractional anisotropy in the thalamic radiations in veterans with suicide behaviors.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Larson, Melissa; King, Jace B; McGlade, Erin; Bueler, Elliott; Stoeckel, Amanda; Epstein, Daniel J; Yurgelun-Todd, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Post-mortem studies have suggested a link between the thalamus, psychiatric disorders, and suicide. We evaluated the thalamus and anterior thalamic radiations (ATR) in a group of Veterans with and without a history of suicidal behavior (SB) to determine if thalamic abnormalities were associated with an increased risk of SB. Forty Veterans with mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) and no SB (TBI-SB), 19 Veterans with mild TBI and a history of SB (TB + SB), and 15 healthy controls (HC) underwent magnetic resonance imaging scanning including a structural and diffusion tensor imaging scan. SBs were evaluated utilizing the Columbia Suicide Rating Scale and impulsivity was measured using the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS). Differences in thalamic volumes and ATR fractional anisotropy (FA) were examined between (1) TBI + SB versus HC and (2) TBI + SB versus combined HC and TBI-SB and (3) between TBI + SB and TBI-SB. Left and right thalamic volumes were significantly increased in those with TBI + SB compared to the HC, TBI-SB, and the combined group. Veterans with TBI + SB had increased FA bilaterally compared to the HC, HC and TBI-SB group, and the TBI-SB only group. Significant positive associations were found for bilateral ATR and BIS in the TBI + SB group. Our findings of thalamic enlargement and increased FA in individuals with TBI + SB suggest that this region may be a biomarker for suicide risk. Our findings are consistent with previous evidence indicating that suicide may be associated with behavioral disinhibition and frontal-thalamic-limbic dysfunction and suggest a neurobiologic mechanism that may increase vulnerability to suicide.

  1. Enlarged Thalamic Volumes and Increased Fractional Anisotropy in the Thalamic Radiations in Veterans with Suicide Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Larson, Melissa; King, Jace B.; McGlade, Erin; Bueler, Elliott; Stoeckel, Amanda; Epstein, Daniel J.; Yurgelun-Todd, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Post-mortem studies have suggested a link between the thalamus, psychiatric disorders, and suicide. We evaluated the thalamus and anterior thalamic radiations (ATR) in a group of Veterans with and without a history of suicidal behavior (SB) to determine if thalamic abnormalities were associated with an increased risk of SB. Forty Veterans with mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) and no SB (TBI-SB), 19 Veterans with mild TBI and a history of SB (TB + SB), and 15 healthy controls (HC) underwent magnetic resonance imaging scanning including a structural and diffusion tensor imaging scan. SBs were evaluated utilizing the Columbia Suicide Rating Scale and impulsivity was measured using the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS). Differences in thalamic volumes and ATR fractional anisotropy (FA) were examined between (1) TBI + SB versus HC and (2) TBI + SB versus combined HC and TBI-SB and (3) between TBI + SB and TBI-SB. Left and right thalamic volumes were significantly increased in those with TBI + SB compared to the HC, TBI-SB, and the combined group. Veterans with TBI + SB had increased FA bilaterally compared to the HC, HC and TBI-SB group, and the TBI-SB only group. Significant positive associations were found for bilateral ATR and BIS in the TBI + SB group. Our findings of thalamic enlargement and increased FA in individuals with TBI + SB suggest that this region may be a biomarker for suicide risk. Our findings are consistent with previous evidence indicating that suicide may be associated with behavioral disinhibition and frontal-thalamic-limbic dysfunction and suggest a neurobiologic mechanism that may increase vulnerability to suicide. PMID:23964245

  2. Exploding Boxes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinney; Jan

    2011-01-01

    How do you teach the "same old, same old" in an interesting and inexpensive way? Art teachers are forever looking for new angles on the good-old elements and principles. And, as budgets tighten, they are trying to be as frugal as possible while still holding their students' attention. Enter exploding boxes! In conceptualizing the three types of…

  3. Exploding Boxes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinney; Jan

    2011-01-01

    How do you teach the "same old, same old" in an interesting and inexpensive way? Art teachers are forever looking for new angles on the good-old elements and principles. And, as budgets tighten, they are trying to be as frugal as possible while still holding their students' attention. Enter exploding boxes! In conceptualizing the three types of…

  4. Dopaminergic projections of the subparafascicular thalamic nucleus to the auditory brainstem

    PubMed Central

    Nevue, Alexander A.; Felix, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Neuromodulators can alter the response properties of sensory neurons, including those in the auditory system. Dopamine, which plays a major role in reward and movement, has been shown to alter neural responses in the auditory brainstem and midbrain. Recently we identified the subparafascicular thalamic nucleus (SPF), part of the A11 dopaminergic cell group, as the source of dopamine to the inferior colliculus (IC). The superior olivary complex (SOC) is also a likely target of dopaminergic projections from the SPF because it receives projections from the SPF and contains fibers and terminals immunoreactive for tyrosine hydroxylase, the rate limiting enzyme in dopamine synthesis. However, it is unknown if the projections from the SPF to SOC are dopaminergic, and if single neurons in the SPF project to both the IC and SOC. Using anterograde tracing combined with fluorescent immunohistochemistry, we found that the SPF sends dopaminergic projections to the superior paraolivary nucleus and the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body, but not the lateral superior olive. We confirmed these projections using a retrograde tracer. By making dual retrograde deposits in the IC and SOC, we found that individual dopaminergic cells innervate both the IC and SOC. These results suggest dopaminergic innervation, likely released in a context dependent manner, occurs at multiple levels of the auditory pathway. PMID:27620513

  5. Einstein's boxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norsen, Travis

    2005-02-01

    At the 1927 Solvay conference, Albert Einstein presented a thought experiment intended to demonstrate the incompleteness of the quantum mechanical description of reality. In the following years, the experiment was modified by Einstein, de Broglie, and several other commentators into a simple scenario involving the splitting in half of the wave function of a single particle in a box. This paper collects together several formulations of this thought experiment from the literature, analyzes and assesses it from the point of view of the Einstein-Bohr debates, the EPR dilemma, and Bell's theorem, and argues for "Einstein's Boxes" taking its rightful place alongside similar but historically better known quantum mechanical thought experiments such as EPR and Schrödinger's Cat.

  6. Bilateral thalamic infarction and DSA demonstrated AOP after thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Wenjie; Dong, Qiang; Li, Linxin; Dong, Yi

    2012-01-01

    Bilateral paramedian thalamic stroke is a special ischemic pattern that results from occlusion of the artery of Percheron (AOP), a rare anatomic variant of the paramedian arteries. We report a case of bilateral thalamic infarctions, with a dramatic improvement after thrombolysis. DSA demonstrated recanalization of AOP with possible unreported variation.

  7. Bilateral thalamic infarction and DSA demonstrated AOP after thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Wenjie; Dong, Qiang; Li, Linxin; Dong, Yi

    2012-01-01

    Bilateral paramedian thalamic stroke is a special ischemic pattern that results from occlusion of the artery of Percheron (AOP), a rare anatomic variant of the paramedian arteries. We report a case of bilateral thalamic infarctions, with a dramatic improvement after thrombolysis. DSA demonstrated recanalization of AOP with possible unreported variation. PMID:23986825

  8. [Increased level of Gerstmann's syndrome secondary to thalamic hematoma].

    PubMed

    Casado, J L; Jarrín, S; Madrid, A; Gil-Peralta, A

    1995-01-01

    A patient developed enlarged Gerstmann syndrome after left thalamic haematoma. Single photon emission computerised tomography (SPECT) showed left parietal-temporal cortical hypocapture. These findings would lead us to believe that the clinical picture of our patient was due to a thalamic-cortical diaschitic phenomenon.

  9. Thalamic Shape and Cognitive Performance in Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Changtae; Lee, Chang-Uk; Won, Wang Yeon; Joo, Soo-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to investigate thalamic shape alterations and their relationships with various episodic memory impairments in subjects with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI). Methods We compared volumes and morphological alterations of the thalamus between aMCI subjects and healthy controls. In addition, we investigated the correlation between thalamic deformations and various memory impairments in aMCI subjects using a comprehensive neuropsychological battery. Results The normalized left thalamic volumes of the aMCI group were significantly smaller than those of the healthy control group (p<0.0001). aMCI subjects exhibited significant thalamic deformations in the left thalamic dorso-medial and antero-medial areas compared with healthy individuals. CERAD-K Word List Memory scores were significantly correlated with the left dorso-medial areas in aMCI subjects. There were no significant correlations between verbal fluency, Boston naming test, constructional praxis, Word List Recognition, and Visuospatial Recall scores and thalamic shape in aMCI subjects. Verbal delayed recall scores were also significantly correlated with the left dorso-medial areas in the aMCI group. Conclusion Structural alterations in the thalamic deformations in the left dorso-medial and antero-medial areas might be core underlying neurobiological mechanisms of thalamic dysfunction related to Word List Memory and delayed verbal recall in individuals with aMCI. PMID:27757128

  10. Thalamic neuromodulation and its implications for executive networks.

    PubMed

    Varela, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    The thalamus is a key structure that controls the routing of information in the brain. Understanding modulation at the thalamic level is critical to understanding the flow of information to brain regions involved in cognitive functions, such as the neocortex, the hippocampus, and the basal ganglia. Modulators contribute the majority of synapses that thalamic cells receive, and the highest fraction of modulator synapses is found in thalamic nuclei interconnected with higher order cortical regions. In addition, disruption of modulators often translates into disabling disorders of executive behavior. However, modulation in thalamic nuclei such as the midline and intralaminar groups, which are interconnected with forebrain executive regions, has received little attention compared to sensory nuclei. Thalamic modulators are heterogeneous in regards to their origin, the neurotransmitter they use, and the effect on thalamic cells. Modulators also share some features, such as having small terminal boutons and activating metabotropic receptors on the cells they contact. I will review anatomical and physiological data on thalamic modulators with these goals: first, determine to what extent the evidence supports similar modulator functions across thalamic nuclei; and second, discuss the current evidence on modulation in the midline and intralaminar nuclei in relation to their role in executive function.

  11. Thalamic neuromodulation and its implications for executive networks

    PubMed Central

    Varela, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    The thalamus is a key structure that controls the routing of information in the brain. Understanding modulation at the thalamic level is critical to understanding the flow of information to brain regions involved in cognitive functions, such as the neocortex, the hippocampus, and the basal ganglia. Modulators contribute the majority of synapses that thalamic cells receive, and the highest fraction of modulator synapses is found in thalamic nuclei interconnected with higher order cortical regions. In addition, disruption of modulators often translates into disabling disorders of executive behavior. However, modulation in thalamic nuclei such as the midline and intralaminar groups, which are interconnected with forebrain executive regions, has received little attention compared to sensory nuclei. Thalamic modulators are heterogeneous in regards to their origin, the neurotransmitter they use, and the effect on thalamic cells. Modulators also share some features, such as having small terminal boutons and activating metabotropic receptors on the cells they contact. I will review anatomical and physiological data on thalamic modulators with these goals: first, determine to what extent the evidence supports similar modulator functions across thalamic nuclei; and second, discuss the current evidence on modulation in the midline and intralaminar nuclei in relation to their role in executive function. PMID:25009467

  12. Cortical and Thalamic Excitation Mediate the Multiphasic Responses of Striatal Cholinergic Interneurons to Motivationally Salient Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Doig, Natalie M.; Magill, Peter J.; Apicella, Paul; Bolam, J. Paul

    2014-01-01

    Cholinergic interneurons are key components of striatal microcircuits. In primates, tonically active neurons (putative cholinergic interneurons) exhibit multiphasic responses to motivationally salient stimuli that mirror those of midbrain dopamine neurons and together these two systems mediate reward-related learning in basal ganglia circuits. Here, we addressed the potential contribution of cortical and thalamic excitatory inputs to the characteristic multiphasic responses of cholinergic interneurons in vivo. We first recorded and labeled individual cholinergic interneurons in anesthetized rats. Electron microscopic analyses of these labeled neurons demonstrated that an individual interneuron could form synapses with cortical and, more commonly, thalamic afferents. Single-pulse electrical stimulation of ipsilateral frontal cortex led to robust short-latency (<20 ms) interneuron spiking, indicating monosynaptic connectivity, but firing probability progressively decreased during high-frequency pulse trains. In contrast, single-pulse thalamic stimulation led to weak short-latency spiking, but firing probability increased during pulse trains. After initial excitation from cortex or thalamus, interneurons displayed a “pause” in firing, followed by a “rebound” increase in firing rate. Across all stimulation protocols, the number of spikes in the initial excitation correlated positively with pause duration and negatively with rebound magnitude. The magnitude of the initial excitation, therefore, partly determined the profile of later components of multiphasic responses. Upon examining the responses of tonically active neurons in behaving primates, we found that these correlations held true for unit responses to a reward-predicting stimulus, but not to the reward alone, delivered outside of any task. We conclude that excitatory inputs determine, at least in part, the multiphasic responses of cholinergic interneurons under specific behavioral conditions. PMID

  13. Contributions of the paraventricular thalamic nucleus in the regulation of stress, motivation, and mood

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, David T.; Kirouac, Gilbert J.; Zubieta, Jon-Kar; Bhatnagar, Seema

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to describe how the function and connections of the paraventricular thalamic nucleus (Pa) may play a role in the regulation of stress and negative emotional behavior. Located in the dorsal midline thalamus, the Pa is heavily innervated by serotonin, norepinephrine, dopamine (DA), corticotropin-releasing hormone, and orexins (ORX), and is the only thalamic nucleus connected to the group of structures comprising the amygdala, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST), nucleus accumbens (NAcc), and infralimbic/subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (sgACC). These neurotransmitter systems and structures are involved in regulating motivation and mood, and display abnormal functioning in several psychiatric disorders including anxiety, substance use, and major depressive disorders (MDD). Furthermore, rodent studies show that the Pa is consistently and potently activated following a variety of stressors and has a unique role in regulating responses to chronic stressors. These observations provide a compelling rationale for investigating the Pa in the link between stress and negative emotional behavior, and for including the Pa in the neural pathways of stress-related psychiatric disorders. PMID:24653686

  14. In vivo monitoring of evoked noradrenaline release in the rat anteroventral thalamic nucleus by continuous amperometry.

    PubMed

    Dugast, C; Cespuglio, R; Suaud-Chagny, M F

    2002-08-01

    Continuous amperometry coupled with untreated carbon-fibre electrodes was used in anaesthetized rats to measure the noradrenaline release evoked in the anteroventral thalamic nucleus by electrical stimulation of the dorsal noradrenergic bundle. As expected, the variations in the oxidation current detected in the anteroventral thalamic nucleus exhibited the characteristics of the in vivo noradrenaline release. They were closely correlated with stimulation and consistent with the anatomy of the noradrenergic system involved. They were abolished by the ejection of tetrodotoxin in the vicinity of the carbon-fibre electrode, diminished by clonidine, an alpha-2 agonist, and restored by yohimbine, an alpha-2 antagonist. Furthermore, the time course of these variations was dramatically increased by desipramine, a specific noradrenaline reuptake blocker. In contrast, neither dopamine nor serotonin reuptake blockers, nor the monoamine oxidase inhibitor pargyline were able to alter them. The main advantage of the present approach is its excellent time resolution. We show here for the first time that after single pulse stimulation, noradrenaline is released and eliminated in 118 milliseconds, this time lapse corresponding to the maximal period beyond which subsequent noradrenaline releases could not add up. These observations are in good agreement with the physiological relationship previously observed between impulse flow and noradrenaline overflow.

  15. Lesion of the Centromedian Thalamic Nucleus in MPTP-Treated Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Lanciego, Jose L.; Rodríguez-Oroz, Maria C.; Blesa, Francisco J.; Alvarez-Erviti, Lydia; Guridi, Jorge; Barroso-Chinea, Pedro; Smith, Yoland; Obeso, Jose A.

    2015-01-01

    The caudal intralaminar nuclei are a major source of glutamatergic afferents to the basal ganglia. Experiments in the 6-hydroxydopamine rat model have shown that the parafascicular nucleus is overactive and its lesion alleviates basal ganglia neurochemical abnormalities associated with dopamine depletion. Accordingly, removal of this excitatory innervation of the basal ganglia could have a beneficial value in the parkinsonian state. To test this hypothesis, unilateral kainate-induced chemical ablation of the centromedian thalamic nucleus (CM) has been performed in MPTP-treated monkeys. Successful lesions restricted to the CM boundaries (n = 2) without spreading over other neighboring thalamic nuclei showed an initial, short-lasting, and mild change in the parkinsonian motor scale but no effect against levodopa-induced dyskinesias. The lack of significant and persistent motor improvement leads us to conclude that unilateral selective lesion of the CM alone cannot be considered as a suitable surgical approach for the treatment of PD or levo-dopa-induced dyskinesias. The role of the caudal intralaminar nuclei in the pathophysiology of movement disorders of basal ganglia origin remains to be clarified. PMID:18175345

  16. Subthalamic Nucleus Stimulation Modulates Thalamic Neuronal Activity

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Weidong; Russo, Gary S.; Hashimoto, Takao; Zhang, Jianyu; Vitek, Jerrold L.

    2009-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is an effective tool for the treatment of advanced Parkinson’s disease. The mechanism by which STN DBS elicits its beneficial effect, however, remains unclear. We previously reported STN stimulation increased the rate and produced a more regular and periodic pattern of neuronal activity in the internal segment of the globus pallidus (GPi). Here we extend our observations to neurons in the pallidal (ventralis lateralis pars oralis (VLo) and ventralis anterior (VA)) and cerebellar (ventralis lateralis posterior pars oralis (VPLo)) receiving areas of the motor thalamus during STN DBS. Stimulation parameters that produced improvement in rigidity and bradykinesia resulted in changes in the pattern and power of oscillatory activity of neuronal activity that were similar in both regions of the motor thalamus. Neurons in both VA/VLo and VPLo tended to become more periodic and regular with a shift in oscillatory activity from low to high frequencies. Burst activity was reduced in VA/VLo, but was not significantly changed in VPLo. There was also a significant shift in the population of VA/VLo neurons that were inhibited during STN DBS, while VPLo neurons tended to be activated. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that STN DBS increases output from the nucleus and produces a change in the pattern and periodicity of neuronal activity in the basal ganglia thalamic network, and that these changes include cerebellar pathways likely via activation of adjacent cerebello-thalamic fiber bundles. PMID:19005057

  17. Dopamine controls Parkinson's tremor by inhibiting the cerebellar thalamus.

    PubMed

    Dirkx, Michiel F; den Ouden, Hanneke E M; Aarts, Esther; Timmer, Monique H M; Bloem, Bastiaan R; Toni, Ivan; Helmich, Rick C

    2017-01-09

    Parkinson's resting tremor is related to altered cerebral activity in the basal ganglia and the cerebello-thalamo-cortical circuit. Although Parkinson's disease is characterized by dopamine depletion in the basal ganglia, the dopaminergic basis of resting tremor remains unclear: dopaminergic medication reduces tremor in some patients, but many patients have a dopamine-resistant tremor. Using pharmacological functional magnetic resonance imaging, we test how a dopaminergic intervention influences the cerebral circuit involved in Parkinson's tremor. From a sample of 40 patients with Parkinson's disease, we selected 15 patients with a clearly tremor-dominant phenotype. We compared tremor-related activity and effective connectivity (using combined electromyography-functional magnetic resonance imaging) on two occasions: ON and OFF dopaminergic medication. Building on a recently developed cerebral model of Parkinson's tremor, we tested the effect of dopamine on cerebral activity associated with the onset of tremor episodes (in the basal ganglia) and with tremor amplitude (in the cerebello-thalamo-cortical circuit). Dopaminergic medication reduced clinical resting tremor scores (mean 28%, range -12 to 68%). Furthermore, dopaminergic medication reduced tremor onset-related activity in the globus pallidus and tremor amplitude-related activity in the thalamic ventral intermediate nucleus. Network analyses using dynamic causal modelling showed that dopamine directly increased self-inhibition of the ventral intermediate nucleus, rather than indirectly influencing the cerebello-thalamo-cortical circuit through the basal ganglia. Crucially, the magnitude of thalamic self-inhibition predicted the clinical dopamine response of tremor. Dopamine reduces resting tremor by potentiating inhibitory mechanisms in a cerebellar nucleus of the thalamus (ventral intermediate nucleus). This suggests that altered dopaminergic projections to the cerebello-thalamo-cortical circuit have a role

  18. Cortical connections of the rat lateral posterior thalamic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Kamishina, Hiroaki; Conte, William L; Patel, Sarika S; Tai, Rachel J; Corwin, James V; Reep, Roger L

    2009-04-06

    Spatial processing related to directed attention is thought to be mediated by a specific cortical-basal ganglia-thalamic-cortical network in the rat. Key components of this network are associative cortical areas medial agranular cortex (AGm) and posterior parietal cortex (PPC), dorsocentral striatum (DCS), and lateral posterior (LP) thalamic nucleus, all of which are interconnected. Previously, we found that thalamostriatal projections reaching DCS arise from separate populations of neurons of the mediorostral part of LP (LPMR). The far medial LPMR (fmLPMR) terminates in central DCS, a projection area of AGm, whereas central LPMR terminates in dorsal DCS, a projection area of PPC. This represents segregated regional convergence in DCS from different sources of thalamic and cortical inputs. In the present study, thalamocortical and corticothalamic projections arising from and terminating in LPMR and neighboring thalamic nuclei were studied by anterograde and retrograde tracing techniques in order to further understand the anatomical basis of this neural circuitry. A significant finding was that within LPMR, separate neuronal populations provide thalamic inputs to AGm or PPC and that these cortical areas project to separate regions in LPMR, from which they receive thalamic inputs. Other cortical areas adjacent to AGm or PPC also demonstrated reciprocal connections with LP or surrounding nuclei in a topographic manner. Our findings suggest that the cortical-basal ganglia-thalamic network mediating directed attention in the rat is formed by multiple loops, each having reciprocal connections that are organized in a precise and segregated topographical manner.

  19. Isolated thalamic tuberculoma presenting as ataxic hemiparesis

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Ritesh; Patil, Tushar B; Kori, Prakash; Shukla, Rakesh

    2013-01-01

    Lacunar syndrome is a neurodeficit secondary to a deep cerebral lesion, usually because of microatheroma of small arteries. Ataxic hemiparesis (AH) is a lacunar syndrome with unilateral pyramidal weakness and ipsilateral ataxia. Thalamic tuberculoma, as a cause of AH, has not been previously described in the literature. We describe an elderly man who presented with left hemiparesis and ipsilateral ataxia. Clinical examination revealed upper motor neuron left facial paresis and left-sided hemiparesis. The patient had incoordination in left upper and lower limbs. Mantoux test was positive and erythrocyte sedimentation rate was elevated. MRI of brain showed a conglomerated hypointense lesion in the right thalamus with a peripheral hyperintensity on T1-weighted imaging and a hyperintense lesion in T2-weighted imaging with significant perilesional oedema, suggesting a tuberculoma. The patient was treated with antitubercular therapy and was symptomatically better at the 9 months follow-up. PMID:23580686

  20. Fatal thalamic abscess secondary to dental infection.

    PubMed

    Basyuni, Shadi; Sharma, Valmiki; Santhanam, Vijay; Ferro, Ashley

    2015-12-17

    We present the case of poor neurological recovery and subsequent death secondary to a thalamic abscess in a 53-year-old man. This patient initially presented with sudden dysarthria and left hemiparesis while driving. Neuroimaging showed a multilobular abscess involving the right thalamus with oedema extending to the basal ganglionic region and brainstem. The source of the abscess was initially unknown and it required draining multiple times while the different causes were being explored. The patient's neurological state along with intubation made for a difficult and inconclusive oral examination. It was only after neuroimaging included tooth-bearing areas that it became evident that this patient had extensive periodontal disease with multiple areas of periapical radiolucencies. The patient underwent complete dental clearance alongside repeated drainage of the abscess. Despite initial postoperative improvement, the patient never recovered from the neurological damage and died 3 weeks later.

  1. Cessation of Smoking and Alcohol Addiction Following Thalamic Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Najeeb, Fatima; Silver, Brian; Khan, Muhib

    2016-11-01

    We describe a case of thalamic intracerebral hemorrhage leading to cessation of smoking. A 53-year-old female presented to the emergency department with right-sided weakness and dysarthria. Initial systolic blood pressure was 220 mm Hg. Computed tomography scan showed a left thalamic hemorrhage with associated edema and hemorrhage extending into the left lateral and third ventricle. She recovered uneventfully and was discharged to inpatient rehabilitation and eventually transitioned home. Three months later in the clinic, she reported that following the stroke, she abruptly stopped smoking without any smoking cessation aid. She reported that she had no craving for cigarettes. She also developed an aversion to drinking alcohol. Cessation of smoking following a thalamic intracerebral hemorrhage is not reported earlier. This observation suggests that the thalamus may play a role in nicotine and alcohol addiction. Further studies are needed to elucidate the possible involvement of the thalamic circuits in addiction pathways and as a potential target for modulation.

  2. Disrupted thalamic resting-state functional networks in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hsiao-Lan Sharon; Rau, Chi-Lun; Li, Yu-Mei; Chen, Ya-Ping; Yu, Rongjun

    2015-01-01

    The thalamus plays a key role in filtering or gating information and has extensive interconnectivity with other brain regions. Recent studies provide evidence of thalamus abnormality in schizophrenia, but the resting functional networks of the thalamus in schizophrenia is still unclear. We characterize the thalamic resting-state networks (RSNs) in 72 patients with schizophrenia and 73 healthy controls, using a standard seed-based whole-brain correlation. In comparison with controls, patients exhibited enhance thalamic connectivity with bilateral precentral gyrus, dorsal medial frontal gyrus, middle occipital gyrus, and lingual gyrus. Reduced thalamic connectivity in schizophrenia was found in bilateral superior frontal gyrus, anterior cingualte cortex, inferior parietal lobe, and cerebellum. Our findings question the “disconnectivity model” of schizophrenia by showing the over-connected thalamic network during resting state in schizophrenia and highlight the thalamus as a key hub in the schizophrenic network abnormality. PMID:25762911

  3. Hypersexuality and dysexecutive syndrome after a thalamic infarct.

    PubMed

    Spinella, Marcello

    2004-12-01

    Hypersexuality can result from insults to several neuroanatomical structures that regulate sexual behavior. A case is presented of an adult male with a thalamic infarct resulting in a paramedian thalamic syndrome, consisting of hypersomnolence, confabulatory anterograde amnesia (including reduplicative paramnesia), vertical gaze deficits, and hypophonic speech. A dysexecutive syndrome also manifested, consisting of social disinhibition, apathy, witzelsucht, motor inhibition deficits, and environmental dependence. Hypersexuality uncharacteristic of his premorbid behavior was evident in instances of exhibitionism, public masturbation, and verbal sexual obscenities. In contrast to the few previous reports of hypersexuality following thalamic infarct, this case neither involved mania nor hemichorea. The relevance of the mediodorsal thalamic nucleus in limbic and prefrontal circuits is discussed.

  4. Subjective cognitive-affective status following thalamic stroke.

    PubMed

    Liebermann, Daniela; Ostendorf, Florian; Kopp, Ute A; Kraft, Antje; Bohner, Georg; Nabavi, Darius G; Kathmann, Norbert; Ploner, Christoph J

    2013-02-01

    Previous patient studies suggest that thalamic stroke may yield persistent deficits in several cognitive domains. At present, the subjective dimension and everyday relevance of these impairments is unclear, since many patients with thalamic stroke only show minor changes on physical examination. Here, we have studied subjective consequences of focal thalamic lesions. A sample of 68 patients with a history of ischemic thalamic stroke was examined by using established clinical self-report questionnaires assessing memory, attention, executive functions, emotional status and health-related quality of life. In order to control for general factors related to cerebrovascular disease, self-reports were compared to an age-matched group of 34 patients with a history of transient ischemic attack. Thalamic lesions were co-registered to an atlas of the human thalamus. Lesion overlap and subtraction analyses were used for lesion-to-symptom mapping. When both patient groups were compared, no significant differences were found for either questionnaire. However, when subgroups were compared, patients with infarctions involving the posterior thalamus showed significant emotional disturbances and elevated anxiety levels compared to patients with more anterior lesions. Our findings thus point to the existence of a persistent affective impairment associated with chronic lesions of the posterior thalamus. This syndrome may result from damage to connections between medial pulvinar and extra-thalamic regions involved in affective processing. Our findings suggest that the posterior thalamus may contribute significantly to the regulation of mood.

  5. Midline thalamic neurons are differentially engaged during hippocampus network oscillations.

    PubMed

    Lara-Vásquez, Ariel; Espinosa, Nelson; Durán, Ernesto; Stockle, Marcelo; Fuentealba, Pablo

    2016-07-14

    The midline thalamus is reciprocally connected with the medial temporal lobe, where neural circuitry essential for spatial navigation and memory formation resides. Yet, little information is available on the dynamic relationship between activity patterns in the midline thalamus and medial temporal lobe. Here, we report on the functional heterogeneity of anatomically-identified thalamic neurons and the differential modulation of their activity with respect to dorsal hippocampal rhythms in the anesthetized mouse. Midline thalamic neurons expressing the calcium-binding protein calretinin, irrespective of their selective co-expression of calbindin, discharged at overall low levels, did not increase their activity during hippocampal theta oscillations, and their firing rates were inhibited during hippocampal sharp wave-ripples. Conversely, thalamic neurons lacking calretinin discharged at higher rates, increased their activity during hippocampal theta waves, but remained unaffected during sharp wave-ripples. Our results indicate that the midline thalamic system comprises at least two different classes of thalamic projection neuron, which can be partly defined by their differential engagement by hippocampal pathways during specific network oscillations that accompany distinct behavioral contexts. Thus, different midline thalamic neuronal populations might be selectively recruited to support distinct stages of memory processing, consistent with the thalamus being pivotal in the dialogue of cortical circuits.

  6. Midline thalamic neurons are differentially engaged during hippocampus network oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Lara-Vásquez, Ariel; Espinosa, Nelson; Durán, Ernesto; Stockle, Marcelo; Fuentealba, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    The midline thalamus is reciprocally connected with the medial temporal lobe, where neural circuitry essential for spatial navigation and memory formation resides. Yet, little information is available on the dynamic relationship between activity patterns in the midline thalamus and medial temporal lobe. Here, we report on the functional heterogeneity of anatomically-identified thalamic neurons and the differential modulation of their activity with respect to dorsal hippocampal rhythms in the anesthetized mouse. Midline thalamic neurons expressing the calcium-binding protein calretinin, irrespective of their selective co-expression of calbindin, discharged at overall low levels, did not increase their activity during hippocampal theta oscillations, and their firing rates were inhibited during hippocampal sharp wave-ripples. Conversely, thalamic neurons lacking calretinin discharged at higher rates, increased their activity during hippocampal theta waves, but remained unaffected during sharp wave-ripples. Our results indicate that the midline thalamic system comprises at least two different classes of thalamic projection neuron, which can be partly defined by their differential engagement by hippocampal pathways during specific network oscillations that accompany distinct behavioral contexts. Thus, different midline thalamic neuronal populations might be selectively recruited to support distinct stages of memory processing, consistent with the thalamus being pivotal in the dialogue of cortical circuits. PMID:27411890

  7. Thalamic Circuit Diversity: Modulation of the Driver/Modulator Framework

    PubMed Central

    Bickford, Martha E.

    2016-01-01

    The idea that dorsal thalamic inputs can be divided into “drivers”, which provide the primary excitatory drive for the relay of information to cortex, and “modulators”, which alter the gain of signal transmission, has provided a valuable organizing principle for the study of thalamic function. This view further promoted the identification of “first order” and “higher order” thalamic nuclei, based on the origin of their driving inputs. Since the introduction of this influential terminology, a number of studies have revealed the existence of a wide variety of thalamic organizational schemes. For example, some thalamic nuclei are not innervated by typical driver inputs, but instead receive input from terminals which exhibit features distinct from those of either classic drivers or modulators. In addition, many thalamic nuclei contain unique combinations of convergent first order, higher order, and/or other “driver-like” inputs that do not conform with the driver/modulator framework. The assortment of synaptic arrangements identified in the thalamus are reviewed and discussed from the perspective that this organizational diversity can dramatically increase the computational capabilities of the thalamus, reflecting its essential roles in sensory, motor, and sensory-motor circuits. PMID:26793068

  8. Thalamic nuclei after human blunt head injury.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, William L; MacKinnon, Mary Anne; Smith, Douglas H; McIntosh, Tracy K; Graham, David I

    2006-05-01

    Paraffin-embedded blocks from the thalamus of 9 control patients, 9 moderately disabled, 12 severely disabled, and 10 vegetative head-injured patients assessed using the Glasgow Outcome Scale and identified from the Department of Neuropathology archive. Neurons, astrocytes, macrophages, and activated microglia were differentiated by Luxol fast blue/cresyl violet, GFAP, CD68, and CR3/43 staining and stereological techniques used to estimate cell number in a 28-microm-thick coronal section. Counts were made in subnuclei of the mediodorsal, lateral posterior, and ventral posterior nuclei, the intralaminar nuclei, and the related internal lamina. Neuronal loss occurred from mediodorsal parvocellularis, rostral center medial, central lateral and paracentral nuclei in moderately disabled patients; and from mediodorsal magnocellularis, caudal center medial, rhomboid, and parafascicular nuclei in severely disabled patients; and all of the above and the centre median nucleus in vegetative patients. Neuronal loss occurred primarily from cognitive and executive function nuclei, a lesser loss from somatosensory nuclei and the least loss from limbic motor nuclei. There was an increase in the number of reactive astrocytes, activated microglia, and macrophages with increasing severity of injury. The study provides novel quantitative evidence for differential neuronal loss, with survival after human head injury, from thalamic nuclei associated with different aspects of cortical activation.

  9. Thalamic nuclei in the opossum Monodelphis domestica.

    PubMed

    Olkowicz, Seweryn; Turlejski, Kris; Bartkowska, Katarzyna; Wielkopolska, Ewa; Djavadian, Rouzanna L

    2008-10-01

    We investigated nuclear divisions of the thalamus in the gray short-tailed opossum (Monodelphis domestica) to gain detailed information for further developmental and comparative studies. Nissl and myelin staining, histochemistry for acetylcholinesterase and immunohistochemistry for calretinin and parvalbumin were performed on parallel series of sections. Many features of the Monodelphis opossum thalamus resemble those in Didelphis and small eutherians showing no particular sensory specializations, particularly in small murid rodents. However, several features of thalamic organization in Monodelphis were distinct from those in rodents. In the opossum the anterior and midline nuclear groups are more clearly separated from adjacent structures than in eutherians. The dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (LGNd) starts more rostrally and occupies a large part of the lateral wall of the thalamus. As in other marsupials, two cytoarchitectonically different parts, alpha and beta are discernible in the LGNd of the opossum. Each of them may be subdivided into two additional bands in acetylcholinesterase staining, while in murid rodents the LGNd consists of a homogeneous mass of cells. Therefore, differentiation of the LGNd of the Monodelphis opossum is more advanced than in murid rodents. The medial geniculate body consists of three nuclei (medial, dorsal and ventral) that are cytoarchitectonically distinct and stain differentially for parvalbumin. The relatively large size of the MG and LGNd points to specialization of the visual and auditory systems in the Monodelphis opossum. In contrast to rodents, the lateral dorsal and lateral posterior nuclei in the opossum are poorly differentiated cytoarchitectonically.

  10. Mechanisms Underlying Desynchronization of Cholinergic-Evoked Thalamic Network Activity

    PubMed Central

    Pita-Almenar, Juan Diego; Yu, Dinghui; Lu, Hui-Chen

    2014-01-01

    Synchronous neuronal activity in the thalamocortical system is critical for a number of behaviorally relevant computations, but hypersynchrony can limit information coding and lead to epileptiform responses. In the somatosensory thalamus, afferent inputs are transformed by networks of reciprocally connected thalamocortical neurons in the ventrobasal nucleus (VB) and GABAergic neurons in the thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN). These networks can generate oscillatory activity, and studies in vivo and in vitro have suggested that thalamic oscillations are often accompanied by synchronous neuronal activity, in part mediated by widespread divergence and convergence of both reticulothalamic and thalamoreticular pathways, as well as by electrical synapses interconnecting TRN neurons. However, the functional organization of thalamic circuits and its role in shaping input-evoked activity patterns remain poorly understood. Here we show that optogenetic activation of cholinergic synaptic afferents evokes near-synchronous firing in mouse TRN neurons that is rapidly desynchronized in thalamic networks. We identify several mechanisms responsible for desynchronization: (1) shared inhibitory inputs in local VB neurons leading to asynchronous and imprecise rebound bursting; (2) TRN-mediated lateral inhibition that further desynchronizes firing in the VB; and (3) powerful yet sparse thalamoreticular connectivity that mediates re-excitation of the TRN but preserves asynchronous firing. Our findings reveal how distinct local circuit features interact to desynchronize thalamic network activity. PMID:25339757

  11. Corticothalamic Activation Modulates Thalamic Firing Through Glutamate "Metabotropic" Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCormick, David A.; von Krosigk, Marcus

    1992-04-01

    The mammalian thalamus forms an obligatory relay for nearly all sensory information that reaches the cerebral cortex. The transmission of sensory information by the thalamus varies in a state-dependent manner, such that during slow wave sleep or drowsiness thalamic responsiveness is markedly reduced, whereas during the waking, attentive state transmission is enhanced. Although activation of brainstem inputs to thalamic neurons has long been assumed to underlie this gating of sensory transfer through the thalamus, numerically the largest input to thalamic relay neurons derives from layer VI cells of the cerebral cortex. Here we report that activation of corticothalamic fibers causes a prolonged excitatory postsynaptic potential in guinea pig dorsal lateral geniculate relay neurons resulting from the reduction of a potassium conductance, consistent with the activation of glutamatergic "metabotropic" receptors. This slow depolarization can switch firing of thalamic neurons from the burst firing mode, which is prevalent during slow wave sleep, to the single spike mode, which is prevalent during waking, thereby facilitating transmission of sensory information through the thalamus. This prolonged enhancement of thalamic transfer may allow the cerebral cortex to gate or control selective fields of sensory inputs in a manner that facilitates arousal, attention, and cognition.

  12. Thalamic mediation of hypoxic respiratory depression in lambs.

    PubMed

    Koos, Brian J; Rajaee, Arezoo; Ibe, Basil; Guerra, Catalina; Kruger, Lawrence

    2016-04-01

    Immaturity of respiratory controllers in preterm infants dispose to recurrent apnea and oxygen deprivation. Accompanying reductions in brain oxygen tensions evoke respiratory depression, potentially exacerbating hypoxemia. Central respiratory depression during moderate hypoxia is revealed in the ventilatory decline following initial augmentation. This study determined whether the thalamic parafascicular nuclear (Pf) complex involved in adult nociception and sensorimotor regulation (Bentivoglio M, Balerecia G, Kruger L. Prog Brain Res 87: 53-80, 1991) also becomes a postnatal controller of hypoxic ventilatory decline. Respiratory responses to moderate isocapnic hypoxia were studied in conscious lambs. Hypoxic ventilatory decline was compared with peak augmentation. Pf and/or adjacent thalamic structures were destroyed by the neuron-specific toxin ibotenic acid (IB). IB lesions involving the thalamic Pf abolished hypoxic ventilatory decline. Lesions of adjacent thalamic nuclei that spared Pf and control injections of vehicle failed to blunt hypoxic respiratory depression. Our findings reveal that the thalamic Pf region is a critical controller of hypoxic ventilatory depression and thus a key target for exploring molecular concomitants of forebrain pathways regulating hypoxic ventilatory depression in early development.

  13. The turtle thalamic anterior entopeduncular nucleus shares connectional and neurochemical characteristics with the mammalian thalamic reticular nucleus.

    PubMed

    Kenigfest, Natalia; Belekhova, Margarita; Repérant, Jacques; Rio, Jean Paul; Ward, Roger; Vesselkin, Nikolai

    2005-10-01

    Neurochemical and key connectional characteristics of the anterior entopeduncular nucleus (Enta) of the turtle (Testudo horsfieldi) were studied by axonal tracing techniques and immunohistochemistry of parvalbumin, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD). We showed that the Enta, which is located within the dorsal peduncle of the lateral forebrain bundle (Pedd), has roughly topographically organized reciprocal connections with the dorsal thalamic visual nuclei, the nucleus rotundus (Rot) and dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (GLd). The Enta receives projections from visual telencephalic areas, the anterior dorsal ventricular ridge and dorsolateral cortex/pallial thickening. Most Enta neurons contained GABA and parvalbumin, and some of them were retrogradely labeled when the tracer was injected into the visual dorsal thalamic nuclei. Further experiments using double immunofluorescence revealed colocalization of GAD and parvalbumin in the vast majority of Enta neurons, and many of these cells showed retrograde labeling with Fluoro-gold injected into the Rot and/or GLd. According to these data, the Enta may be considered as a structural substrate for recurrent inhibition of the visual thalamic nuclei. Based on morphological and neurochemical similarity of the turtle Enta, caiman Pedd nucleus, the superior reticular nucleus in birds, and the thalamic reticular nucleus in mammals, we suggest that these structures represent a characteristic component which is common to the thalamic organization in amniotes.

  14. Bursting of thalamic neurons and states of vigilance.

    PubMed

    Llinás, Rodolfo R; Steriade, Mircea

    2006-06-01

    This article addresses the functional significance of the electrophysiological properties of thalamic neurons. We propose that thalamocortical activity, is the product of the intrinsic electrical properties of the thalamocortical (TC) neurons and the connectivity their axons weave. We begin with an overview of the electrophysiological properties of single neurons in different functional states, followed by a review of the phylogeny of the electrical properties of thalamic neurons, in several vertebrate species. The similarity in electrophysiological properties unambiguously indicates that the thalamocortical system must be as ancient as the vertebrate branch itself. We address the view that rather than simply relays, thalamic neurons have sui generis intrinsic electrical properties that govern their specific functional dynamics and regulate natural functional states such as sleep and vigilance. In addition, thalamocortical activity has been shown to be involved in the genesis of several neuropsychiatric conditions collectively described as thalamocortical dysrhythmia syndrome.

  15. Alleviation of acquired stuttering with human centremedian thalamic stimulation.

    PubMed Central

    Bhatnagar, S C; Andy, O J

    1989-01-01

    Despite many investigations, the cerebral mechanism for stuttering remains unknown. Recently, increased attention has been paid to acquired stuttering of adult onset in the hope that the events associated with it might provide clues to the biological mechanism underlying stuttering. This attention has focused exclusively on the cortical substrates. We present our observations of acquired dysfluency, presumably of subcortical origin in a neurosurgical subject with intractable pain. The stuttering was relieved by thalamic electric stimulation. The effect of thalamic stimulation on the stuttering suggests that the pathophysiology of transient asynchronisation in the balancing and sequencing of multiple impulses is amenable to a diffusely orchestrated functional tuning of the thalamic and brainstem implicated subcortical structures and pathways. Images PMID:2795045

  16. Thalamic Circuit Mechanisms Link Sensory Processing in Sleep and Attention.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhe; Wimmer, Ralf D; Wilson, Matthew A; Halassa, Michael M

    2015-01-01

    The correlation between sleep integrity and attentional performance is normally interpreted as poor sleep causing impaired attention. Here, we provide an alternative explanation for this correlation: common thalamic circuits regulate sensory processing across sleep and attention, and their disruption may lead to correlated dysfunction. Using multi-electrode recordings in mice, we find that rate and rhythmicity of thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) neurons are predictive of their functional organization in sleep and suggestive of their participation in sensory processing across states. Surprisingly, TRN neurons associated with spindles in sleep are also associated with alpha oscillations during attention. As such, we propose that common thalamic circuit principles regulate sensory processing in a state-invariant manner and that in certain disorders, targeting these circuits may be a more viable therapeutic strategy than considering individual states in isolation.

  17. Symmetrical thalamic calcification: A trio whole exome sequencing negative series.

    PubMed

    Gorman, Kathleen Mary; Aird, John James; Conroy, Judith; Devaney, Deirdre; Farrell, Michael; King, Mary Dolores

    2017-05-01

    Symmetrical thalamic calcification or bilateral symmetrical thalamic gliosis presents at delivery with hypertonia, fixed flexion contractures and prominent bulbar signs, without preceding perinatal asphyxia. At post-mortem, there is evidence of bilateral symmetrical selective thalamic neuronal encrustation and gliosis. To date, 27 cases are published with no underlying diagnosis identified. Two affected children from singleton pregnancies were reported and therefore, a genetic cause proposed. No previous reports have performed genetic testing to confirm or reject this hypothesis. We report three additional cases of this rare condition, expanding the clinical and pathological phenotype. We performed trio whole exome sequencing, the first in this cohort of patients, and did not identify a pathogenic variant. As postulated in the original report, the likely underlying mechanism is antenatal hypoxia in the third trimester. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Thalamic Circuit Mechanisms Link Sensory Processing in Sleep and Attention

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhe; Wimmer, Ralf D.; Wilson, Matthew A.; Halassa, Michael M.

    2016-01-01

    The correlation between sleep integrity and attentional performance is normally interpreted as poor sleep causing impaired attention. Here, we provide an alternative explanation for this correlation: common thalamic circuits regulate sensory processing across sleep and attention, and their disruption may lead to correlated dysfunction. Using multi-electrode recordings in mice, we find that rate and rhythmicity of thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) neurons are predictive of their functional organization in sleep and suggestive of their participation in sensory processing across states. Surprisingly, TRN neurons associated with spindles in sleep are also associated with alpha oscillations during attention. As such, we propose that common thalamic circuit principles regulate sensory processing in a state-invariant manner and that in certain disorders, targeting these circuits may be a more viable therapeutic strategy than considering individual states in isolation. PMID:26778969

  19. Cortical and thalamic innervation of direct and indirect pathway medium-sized spiny neurons in mouse striatum.

    PubMed

    Doig, Natalie M; Moss, Jonathan; Bolam, J Paul

    2010-11-03

    The striatum receives major excitatory inputs from the cortex and thalamus that predominantly target the spines of medium-sized spiny neurons (MSNs). We aimed to determine whether there is any selectivity of these two excitatory afferents in their innervation of direct and indirect pathway MSNs. To address this, we used bacterial artificial chromosome transgenic mice, in which enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) reports the presence of D(1) or D(2) dopamine receptor subtypes, markers of direct and indirect pathway MSNs, respectively. Excitatory afferents were identified by the selective expression of vesicular glutamate transporter type 1 (VGluT1) by corticostriatal afferents and vesicular glutamate transporter type 2 (VGluT2) by thalamostriatal afferents. A quantitative electron microscopic analysis was performed on striatal tissue from D(1) and D(2) mice that was double immunolabeled to reveal the EGFP and VGluT1 or VGluT2. We found that the proportion of synapses formed by terminals derived from the cortex and thalamus was similar for both direct and indirect pathway MSNs. Furthermore, qualitative analysis revealed that individual cortical or thalamic terminals form synapses with both direct and indirect pathway MSNs. Similarly, we observed a convergence of cortical and thalamic inputs onto individual MSNs of both direct and indirect pathway: individual EGFP-positive structures received input from both VGluT2-positive and VGluT2-negative terminals. These findings demonstrate that direct and indirect pathway MSNs are similarly innervated by cortical and thalamic afferents; both projections are thus likely to be critical in the control of MSNs and hence play fundamental roles in the expression of basal ganglia function.

  20. Projections to the rostral reticular thalamic nucleus in the rat.

    PubMed

    Cornwall, J; Cooper, J D; Phillipson, O T

    1990-01-01

    Afferent pathways to the rostral reticular thalamic nucleus (Rt) in the rat were studied using anterograde and retrograde lectin tracing techniques, with sensitive immunocytochemical methods. The analysis was carried out to further investigate previously described subregions of the reticular thalamic nucleus, which are related to subdivisions of the dorsal thalamus, in the paraventricular and midline nuclei and three segments of the mediodorsal thalamic nucleus. Cortical inputs to the rostral reticular nucleus were found from lamina VI of cingulate, orbital and infralimbic cortex. These projected with a clear topography to lateral, intermediate and medial reticular nucleus respectively. Thalamic inputs were found from lateral and central segments of the mediodorsal nucleus to the lateral and intermediate rostral reticular nucleus respectively and heavy paraventricular thalamic inputs were found to the medial reticular nucleus. In the basal forebrain, afferents were found from the vertical and horizontal limbs of the diagonal band, substantia innominata, ventral pallidum and medial globus pallidus. Brainstem projections were identified from ventrolateral periaqueductal grey and adjacent sites in the mesencephalic reticular formation, laterodorsal tegmental nucleus, pedunculopontine nucleus, medial pretectum and ventral tegmental area. The results suggest a general similarity in the organisation of some brainstem Rt afferents in rat and cat, but also show previously unsuspected inputs. Furthermore, there appear to be at least two functional subdivisions of rostral Rt which is reflected by their connections with cortex and thalamus. The studies also extend recent findings that the ventral striatum, via inputs from the paraventricular thalamic nucleus, is included in the circuitry of the rostral Rt, providing further evidence that basal ganglia may function in concert with Rt. Evidence is also outlined with regard to the possibility that rostral Rt plays a significant

  1. Orthostatic Tremor Responds to Bilateral Thalamic Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Mark K.; Behbahani, Mandana; Boucher, Orland K.; Caviness, John N.; Evidente, Virgilio Gerald H.

    2012-01-01

    Background Orthostatic tremor (OT) is a disabling movement disorder manifested by postural and gait disturbance. Primarily a condition of elderly people, it can be progressive in up to 15% of patients. The primary treatments are medications that are often ineffective. Case Report A 75-year-old male presented with a 10-year history of progressive and disabling OT. He had tried various medications without significant benefits. He underwent bilateral thalamic Vim deep brain stimulation (DBS). At 30-month follow-up, he has had continued significant improvement of his OT. Discussion Bilateral thalamic DBS may be a viable option for medically refractory OT. PMID:23439685

  2. Transient stabbing headache from an acute thalamic hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Matthew S

    2011-06-01

    Stabbing headache can be encountered in both primary and secondary forms, but has been infrequently reported among patients with stroke, and is not known to be associated with a small well-circumscribed brain lesion. A 95-year-old woman taking warfarin presented with the sudden onset of stabbing headache strictly in the right frontal and supraorbital regions, along with gait imbalance and dysarthria. Neuroimaging revealed a small left thalamic hematoma. This association of an acute thalamic lesion with stabbing headache in the contralateral trigeminal distribution is discussed, along with a brief review of stabbing headache occurring in cerebrovascular disease.

  3. Dysexecutive syndrome following anterior thalamic ischemia in the dominant hemisphere.

    PubMed

    Línek, Vladimír; Sonka, Karel; Bauer, Jirí

    2005-03-15

    In the article, we describe a rare case: a 52-year-old male patient with an isolated lesion of the anterior thalamic nuclei in the dominant hemisphere due to an ischemic stroke. The patient's syndrome of disordered verbal fluency, working memory, learning and executive functions is seen as a part of a lesion in the dorsolateral complex circuit. During the following 6 months, we observed significant improvement in visual learning, recent memory and categorisation of subjects, while verbal learning and visuospatial planning remained insufficient. In this context, the preservation of thalamic structures in different types of cognitive deterioration is discussed.

  4. Thalamic syndrome as the heralding manifestation of atlantoaxial dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Rajesh; Sahu, Ritesh; Ojha, B K; Junewar, Vivek

    2013-01-01

    In India, Atlantoaxial dislocation (AAD) is the commonest skeletal craniovertebral junction (CVJ) anomaly, followed by occipitalisation of atlas and basilar invagination. The usual presentation is progressive neurological deficit (76–95% cases) involving the high cervical cord, lower brainstem and cranial nerves. The association between vertebro-basilar insufficiency and skeletal CVJ anomalies is well recognised and angiographic abnormalities of the vertebrobasilar arteries and their branches have been reported; however, initial presentation of CVJ anomaly as thalamic syndrome due to posterior circulation stroke is extremely rare. Here, we report one such rare case of thalamic syndrome as the initial presentation of CVJ anomaly with AAD. PMID:23314448

  5. [Isolated cheiro-facial formication caused by a thalamic hematoma].

    PubMed

    Awada, A

    1989-01-01

    A 25 year-old Saudi female patient presented with numbness of the left half of the face and the tongue and the left hand. Neurological and neuropsychological examinations were normal. Brain CT showed a small hematoma (5 to 7 mm diameter) of the right thalamus probably destroying or compressing the ventropostero-median and ventropostero-lateral thalamic nuclei. Thalamic hematoma has been reported only twice as a cause of pure sensory stroke. The absence of clinical signs together with the presence of symptoms, and the particular topography of the symptoms are discussed.

  6. Thalamic theta phase alignment predicts human memory formation and anterior thalamic cross-frequency coupling.

    PubMed

    Sweeney-Reed, Catherine M; Zaehle, Tino; Voges, Jürgen; Schmitt, Friedhelm C; Buentjen, Lars; Kopitzki, Klaus; Hinrichs, Hermann; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Rugg, Michael D; Knight, Robert T; Richardson-Klavehn, Alan

    2015-05-20

    Previously we reported electrophysiological evidence for a role for the anterior thalamic nucleus (ATN) in human memory formation (Sweeney-Reed et al., 2014). Theta-gamma cross-frequency coupling (CFC) predicted successful memory formation, with the involvement of gamma oscillations suggesting memory-relevant local processing in the ATN. The importance of the theta frequency range in memory processing is well-established, and phase alignment of oscillations is considered to be necessary for synaptic plasticity. We hypothesized that theta phase alignment in the ATN would be necessary for memory encoding. Further analysis of the electrophysiological data reveal that phase alignment in the theta rhythm was greater during successful compared with unsuccessful encoding, and that this alignment was correlated with the CFC. These findings support an active processing role for the ATN during memory formation.

  7. Thalamic theta phase alignment predicts human memory formation and anterior thalamic cross-frequency coupling

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney-Reed, Catherine M; Zaehle, Tino; Voges, Jürgen; Schmitt, Friedhelm C; Buentjen, Lars; Kopitzki, Klaus; Hinrichs, Hermann; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Rugg, Michael D; Knight, Robert T; Richardson-Klavehn, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Previously we reported electrophysiological evidence for a role for the anterior thalamic nucleus (ATN) in human memory formation (Sweeney-Reed et al., 2014). Theta-gamma cross-frequency coupling (CFC) predicted successful memory formation, with the involvement of gamma oscillations suggesting memory-relevant local processing in the ATN. The importance of the theta frequency range in memory processing is well-established, and phase alignment of oscillations is considered to be necessary for synaptic plasticity. We hypothesized that theta phase alignment in the ATN would be necessary for memory encoding. Further analysis of the electrophysiological data reveal that phase alignment in the theta rhythm was greater during successful compared with unsuccessful encoding, and that this alignment was correlated with the CFC. These findings support an active processing role for the ATN during memory formation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07578.001 PMID:25993559

  8. Rationale for targeting the thalamic centre-median parafascicular complex in the surgical treatment of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Kerkerian-Le Goff, Lydia; Jouve, Loreline; Melon, Christophe; Salin, Pascal

    2009-12-01

    The thalamic centre median-parafascicular complex (CM/Pf), a main input and output station of the basal ganglia, is attracting increasing interest in the field of movement disorders, including Parkinson's disease (PD). CM/Pf undergoes partial neurodegeneration in PD patients and some rodent models. Cellular evidence has been provided in experimental animals that thalamic degeneration may not aggravate but rather counteract the effects of dopamine lesion. But functional changes in the circuits involving the spared neurons could play a detrimental role. This view fits with converging anecdotic and recent direct experience in patients that stress the potential of CM/PF deep brain stimulation (DBS) to alleviate motor disorders, notably tremor and dyskinesias. As a preclinical contribution to the characterization of this target, we investigated the functional impact of CM/Pf-DBS in the 6-hydroxydopamine hemiparkinsonian rat model of PD. When testing different frequencies (25, 60, 130 Hz), only high frequency stimulation (HFS) had significant antiakinetic action as evidenced by alleviation of limb use asymmetry in the cylinder test. Although less efficient than HFS of the subthalamic nucleus in the latter task, CM/PF-HFS completely corrected lateralized neglect in the corridor task. Unlike subthalamic nucleus, CM/Pf-HFS did not induce per se dyskinesias. Finally, the benefits provided by CM/Pf-HFS were associated with widespread impact on the changes in neuronal metabolic activity induced by the dopamine depletion in the basal ganglia. These data point to own particular outcome of CM/Pf-DBS that may be of interest in currently developing multi-target strategies.

  9. EPA EcoBox

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This tool box of ecological risk assessment (Eco-box) includes over 400+ links to tools, models, and databases found within EPA and our Government partners designed that can aid risk assessors with performing exposure assessments.

  10. Lateral and Anterior Thalamic Lesions Impair Independent Memory Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Anna S.; Dalrymple-Alford, John C.

    2006-01-01

    Damage to the medial region of the thalamus, both in clinical cases (e.g., patients with infarcts or the Korsakoff's syndrome) and animal lesion models, is associated with variable amnesic deficits. Some studies suggest that many of these memory deficits rely on the presence of lateral thalamic lesions (LT) that include the intralaminar nuclei,…

  11. [Complete recovery from transient coma in bilateral paramedian thalamic infarctions].

    PubMed

    Casado, J L; Arenas, C; Serrano, V; Moreno Rojas, A; Gil-Néciga, E; Gil-Peralta, A

    1995-01-01

    Bilateral paramedian thalamic infarcts (BPTI) can begin clinically with transient coma, after which symptoms of fluctuating hypersomnolence, irrational behaviour, or amnesic states may be observed. We present two patients with BPTI who began with coma, recovering spontaneously in under eight hours, with no accompanying symptoms.

  12. Lateral and Anterior Thalamic Lesions Impair Independent Memory Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Anna S.; Dalrymple-Alford, John C.

    2006-01-01

    Damage to the medial region of the thalamus, both in clinical cases (e.g., patients with infarcts or the Korsakoff's syndrome) and animal lesion models, is associated with variable amnesic deficits. Some studies suggest that many of these memory deficits rely on the presence of lateral thalamic lesions (LT) that include the intralaminar nuclei,…

  13. Thalamic control of sensory selection in divided attention.

    PubMed

    Wimmer, Ralf D; Schmitt, L Ian; Davidson, Thomas J; Nakajima, Miho; Deisseroth, Karl; Halassa, Michael M

    2015-10-29

    How the brain selects appropriate sensory inputs and suppresses distractors is unknown. Given the well-established role of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) in executive function, its interactions with sensory cortical areas during attention have been hypothesized to control sensory selection. To test this idea and, more generally, dissect the circuits underlying sensory selection, we developed a cross-modal divided-attention task in mice that allowed genetic access to this cognitive process. By optogenetically perturbing PFC function in a temporally precise window, the ability of mice to select appropriately between conflicting visual and auditory stimuli was diminished. Equivalent sensory thalamocortical manipulations showed that behaviour was causally dependent on PFC interactions with the sensory thalamus, not sensory cortex. Consistent with this notion, we found neurons of the visual thalamic reticular nucleus (visTRN) to exhibit PFC-dependent changes in firing rate predictive of the modality selected. visTRN activity was causal to performance as confirmed by bidirectional optogenetic manipulations of this subnetwork. Using a combination of electrophysiology and intracellular chloride photometry, we demonstrated that visTRN dynamically controls visual thalamic gain through feedforward inhibition. Our experiments introduce a new subcortical model of sensory selection, in which the PFC biases thalamic reticular subnetworks to control thalamic sensory gain, selecting appropriate inputs for further processing.

  14. Effects of Intralaminar Thalamic Stimulation on Language Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhatnagar, Subhash C.; Mandybur, George T.

    2005-01-01

    Fifteen neurosurgical subjects, who were undergoing thalamic chronic electrode implants as a treatment for dyskinesia and chronic pain, were evaluated on a series of neurolinguistic functions to determine if the stimulation of the centromedianum nucleus of the thalamus affected language and cognitive processing. Analysis of the data revealed that…

  15. Effects of Intralaminar Thalamic Stimulation on Language Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhatnagar, Subhash C.; Mandybur, George T.

    2005-01-01

    Fifteen neurosurgical subjects, who were undergoing thalamic chronic electrode implants as a treatment for dyskinesia and chronic pain, were evaluated on a series of neurolinguistic functions to determine if the stimulation of the centromedianum nucleus of the thalamus affected language and cognitive processing. Analysis of the data revealed that…

  16. Outcome After Pituitary Radiosurgery for Thalamic Pain Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Motohiro Chernov, Mikhail F.; Taira, Takaomi; Ochiai, Taku; Nakaya, Kotaro; Tamura, Noriko; Goto, Shinichi; Yomo, Shoji; Kouyama, Nobuo; Katayama, Yoko; Kawakami, Yoriko; Izawa, Masahiro; Muragaki, Yoshihiro

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate outcomes after pituitary radiosurgery in patients with post-stroke thalamic pain syndrome. Methods and Materials: From 2002 to 2006, 24 patients with thalamic pain syndrome underwent pituitary radiosurgery at Tokyo Women's Medical University and were followed at least 12 months thereafter. The radiosurgical target was defined as the pituitary gland and its connection with the pituitary stalk. The maximum dose varied from 140 to 180 Gy. Mean follow-up after treatment was 35 months (range, 12-48 months). Results: Initial pain reduction, usually within 48 h after radiosurgery, was marked in 17 patients (71%). However, in the majority of cases the pain recurred within 6 months after treatment, and at the time of the last follow-up examination durable pain control was marked in only 5 patients (21%). Ten patients (42%) had treatment-associated side effects. Anterior pituitary abnormalities were marked in 8 cases and required hormonal replacement therapy in 3; transient diabetes insipidus was observed in 2 cases, transient hyponatremia in 1, and clinical deterioration due to increase of the numbness severity despite significant reduction of pain was seen once. Conclusions: Pituitary radiosurgery for thalamic pain results in a high rate of initial efficacy and is accompanied by acceptable morbidity. It can be used as a primary minimally invasive management option for patients with post-stroke thalamic pain resistant to medical therapy. However, in the majority of cases pain recurrence occurs within 1 year after treatment.

  17. Visual Orientation and Directional Selectivity through Thalamic Synchrony

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Garrett B.; Jin, Jianzhong; Wang, Yushi; Desbordes, Gaëlle; Wang, Qi; Black, Michael J.; Alonso, Jose-Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Thalamic neurons respond to visual scenes by generating synchronous spike trains on the timescale of 10 – 20 ms that are very effective at driving cortical targets. Here we demonstrate that this synchronous activity contains unexpectedly rich information about fundamental properties of visual stimuli. We report that the occurrence of synchronous firing of cat thalamic cells with highly overlapping receptive fields is strongly sensitive to the orientation and the direction of motion of the visual stimulus. We show that this stimulus selectivity is robust, remaining relatively unchanged under different contrasts and temporal frequencies (stimulus velocities). A computational analysis based on an integrate-and-fire model of the direct thalamic input to a layer 4 cortical cell reveals a strong correlation between the degree of thalamic synchrony and the nonlinear relationship between cortical membrane potential and the resultant firing rate. Together, these findings suggest a novel population code in the synchronous firing of neurons in the early visual pathway that could serve as the substrate for establishing cortical representations of the visual scene. PMID:22745507

  18. Thalamic transitory ischemic attacks presenting as Jacksonian sensory march.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Victoria; Lauxmann, Stephan; Bender, Benjamin; Lerche, Holger

    2017-09-11

    Spreading somatosensory symptoms appearing as Jacksonian sensory march are usually considered to be due to an epileptic seizure. We report on three cases in which these symptoms were caused by thalamic ischemia. Two patients presented with stereotypically recurring hemiparesthesias lasting 2-5 min that gradually spread from the face to the arm and leg on one side. A first cerebral magnetic resonance imaging including DWI was negative in both cases, whereas new thalamic infarctions appeared on repeated imaging when clinical symptoms remained. A third case with a thalamic ischemia did not show recurring events, but also presented with purely sensory spreading symptoms. In all three cases EEG and cardiovascular diagnostics revealed normal results. Pure sensory stroke has previously been described as a result of ischemia of the thalamus or the internal capsule presenting as a sudden onset hemisensory deficit, but spreading symptoms have rarely been reported. According to our observations, thalamic TIAs are an important differential diagnosis of somatosensory epileptic auras presenting with Jacksonian sensory march which require a different clinical management.

  19. Thalamic control of sensory selection in divided attention

    PubMed Central

    Wimmer, Ralf D.; Schmitt, L. Ian; Davidson, Thomas J.; Nakajima, Miho; Deisseroth, Karl; Halassa, Michael M.

    2015-01-01

    How the brain selects appropriate sensory inputs and suppresses distractors is a central unsolved mystery in neuroscience. Given the well-established role of prefrontal cortex (PFC) in executive function1, its interactions with sensory cortical areas during attention have been hypothesized to control sensory selection2–5. To test this idea and more generally dissect the circuits underlying sensory selection, we developed a cross-modal divided attention task in mice enabling genetic access to this cognitive process. By optogenetically perturbing PFC function in a temporally-precise window, the ability of mice to appropriately select between conflicting visual and auditory stimuli was diminished. Surprisingly, equivalent sensory thalamo-cortical manipulations showed that behavior was causally dependent on PFC interactions with sensory thalamus, not cortex. Consistent with this notion, we found neurons of the visual thalamic reticular nucleus (visTRN) to exhibit PFC-dependent changes in firing rate predictive of the modality selected. visTRN activity was causal to performance as confirmed via subnetwork-specific bi-directional optogenetic manipulations. Through a combination of electrophysiology and intracellular chloride photometry, we demonstrated that visTRN dynamically controls visual thalamic gain through feedforward inhibition. Combined, our experiments introduce a new subcortical model of sensory selection, where prefrontal cortex biases thalamic reticular subnetworks to control thalamic sensory gain, selecting appropriate inputs for further processing. PMID:26503050

  20. Thalamic Activation in the Kleine-Levin Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Engström, Maria; Karlsson, Thomas; Landtblom, Anne-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: The objective of this study was to investigate if combined measures of activation in the thalamus and working memory capacity could guide the diagnosis of Kleine-Levin Syndrome (KLS). A second objective was to obtain more insight into the neurobiological causes of KLS. Design: Matched group and consecutive recruitment. Setting: University hospital neurology department and imaging center. Patients or Participants: Eighteen patients with KLS diagnosed according to the International Classification of Sleep Disorders and 26 healthy controls were included. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: Working memory capacity was assessed by the listening span task. A version of this task (reading span) was presented to the participants during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Activation in the thalamus was measured in a region of interest analysis. A combination of the working memory capacity and the thalamic activation measures resulted in 80% prediction accuracy, 81% sensitivity, and 78% specificity regarding the ability to separate KLS patients from healthy controls. The controls had an inverse relation between working memory capacity and thalamic activation; higher performing participants had lower thalamic activation (r = -0.41). KLS patients showed the opposite relationship; higher performing participants had a tendency to higher thalamic activation (r = -0.35). Conclusions: This study shows that functional neuroimaging of the thalamus combined with neuropsychological assessment of working memory function provides a means to guide diagnosis of Kleine-Levin Syndrome. Results in this study also indicate that imaging of brain function and evaluation of cognitive capacity can give insights into the neurobiological mechanisms of Kleine-Levin Syndrome. Citation: Engström M; Karlsson T; Landtblom AM. Thalamic activation in the Kleine-Levin Syndrome. SLEEP 2014;37(2):379-386. PMID:24497666

  1. Essential thalamic contribution to slow waves of natural sleep.

    PubMed

    David, François; Schmiedt, Joscha T; Taylor, Hannah L; Orban, Gergely; Di Giovanni, Giuseppe; Uebele, Victor N; Renger, John J; Lambert, Régis C; Leresche, Nathalie; Crunelli, Vincenzo

    2013-12-11

    Slow waves represent one of the prominent EEG signatures of non-rapid eye movement (non-REM) sleep and are thought to play an important role in the cellular and network plasticity that occurs during this behavioral state. These slow waves of natural sleep are currently considered to be exclusively generated by intrinsic and synaptic mechanisms within neocortical territories, although a role for the thalamus in this key physiological rhythm has been suggested but never demonstrated. Combining neuronal ensemble recordings, microdialysis, and optogenetics, here we show that the block of the thalamic output to the neocortex markedly (up to 50%) decreases the frequency of slow waves recorded during non-REM sleep in freely moving, naturally sleeping-waking rats. A smaller volume of thalamic inactivation than during sleep is required for observing similar effects on EEG slow waves recorded during anesthesia, a condition in which both bursts and single action potentials of thalamocortical neurons are almost exclusively dependent on T-type calcium channels. Thalamic inactivation more strongly reduces spindles than slow waves during both anesthesia and natural sleep. Moreover, selective excitation of thalamocortical neurons strongly entrains EEG slow waves in a narrow frequency band (0.75-1.5 Hz) only when thalamic T-type calcium channels are functionally active. These results demonstrate that the thalamus finely tunes the frequency of slow waves during non-REM sleep and anesthesia, and thus provide the first conclusive evidence that a dynamic interplay of the neocortical and thalamic oscillators of slow waves is required for the full expression of this key physiological EEG rhythm.

  2. Thalamic Reorganization in Chronic Patients With Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Sung Ho; Chang, Chul Hoon; Kim, Seong Ho; Jung, Young Jin; Hong, Ji Heon

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to investigate changes of synaptic area of the spinothalamic tract and its thalamocortical pathway (STT) in the thalamus in chronic patients with putaminal hemorrhage. Twenty four patients with a lesion in the ventral posterior lateral nucleus (VPL) of the thalamus following putaminal hemorrhage were recruited for this study. The subscale for tactile sensation of the Nottingham Sensory Assessment (NSA) was used for the determination of somatosensory function. Diffusion tensor tractography of the STT was reconstructed using the Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain Software Library. We classified patients according to 2 groups: the VPL group, patients whose STTs were synapsed in the VPL; and the non-VPL group, patients whose STTs were synapsed in other thalamic areas, except for the VPL. Thirteen patients belonged to the VPL group, and 8 patients belonged to the non-VPL group. Three patients were excluded from grouping due to interrupted integrity of the STTs. The tactile sensation score of the NSA in the non-VPL group (10.50 ± 0.93) was significantly decreased compared with that of the VPL group (19.45 ± 1.33) (P < 0.05). We found that 2 types of patient had recovered via the VPL area or other areas of the STT. It appears that patients who showed shifting of the thalamic synaptic area of the STT might have recovered by the process of thalamic reorganization following thalamic injury. In addition, thalamic reorganization appears to be related to poorer somatosensory outcome. PMID:26313781

  3. Essential Thalamic Contribution to Slow Waves of Natural Sleep

    PubMed Central

    David, François; Schmiedt, Joscha T.; Taylor, Hannah L.; Orban, Gergely; Di Giovanni, Giuseppe; Uebele, Victor N.; Renger, John J.; Lambert, Régis C.; Leresche, Nathalie

    2013-01-01

    Slow waves represent one of the prominent EEG signatures of non-rapid eye movement (non-REM) sleep and are thought to play an important role in the cellular and network plasticity that occurs during this behavioral state. These slow waves of natural sleep are currently considered to be exclusively generated by intrinsic and synaptic mechanisms within neocortical territories, although a role for the thalamus in this key physiological rhythm has been suggested but never demonstrated. Combining neuronal ensemble recordings, microdialysis, and optogenetics, here we show that the block of the thalamic output to the neocortex markedly (up to 50%) decreases the frequency of slow waves recorded during non-REM sleep in freely moving, naturally sleeping-waking rats. A smaller volume of thalamic inactivation than during sleep is required for observing similar effects on EEG slow waves recorded during anesthesia, a condition in which both bursts and single action potentials of thalamocortical neurons are almost exclusively dependent on T-type calcium channels. Thalamic inactivation more strongly reduces spindles than slow waves during both anesthesia and natural sleep. Moreover, selective excitation of thalamocortical neurons strongly entrains EEG slow waves in a narrow frequency band (0.75–1.5 Hz) only when thalamic T-type calcium channels are functionally active. These results demonstrate that the thalamus finely tunes the frequency of slow waves during non-REM sleep and anesthesia, and thus provide the first conclusive evidence that a dynamic interplay of the neocortical and thalamic oscillators of slow waves is required for the full expression of this key physiological EEG rhythm. PMID:24336724

  4. Heterogeneity of firing properties among rat thalamic reticular nucleus neurons

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Hun; Govindaiah, G; Cox, Charles L

    2007-01-01

    The thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) provides inhibitory innervation to most thalamic relay nuclei and receives excitatory innervation from both cortical and thalamic neurons. Ultimately, information transfer through the thalamus to the neocortex is strongly influenced by TRN. In addition, the reciprocal synaptic connectivity between TRN with associated thalamic relay nuclei is critical in generating intrathalamic rhythmic activities that occur during certain arousal states and pathophysiological conditions. Despite evidence suggesting morphological heterogeneity amongst TRN neurons, the heterogeneity of intrinsic properties of TRN neurons has not been systematically examined. One key characteristic of virtually all thalamic neurons is the ability to produce action potentials in two distinct modes: burst and tonic. In this study, we have examined the prevalence of burst discharge within TRN neurons. Our intracellular recordings revealed that TRN neurons can be differentiated by their action potential discharge modes. The majority of neurons in the dorsal TRN (56%) lack burst discharge, and the remaining neurons (35%) show an atypical burst that consists of an initial action potential followed by small amplitude, long duration depolarizations. In contrast, most neurons in ventral TRN (82%) display a stereotypical burst discharge consisting of a transient, high frequency discharge of multiple action potentials. TRN neurons that lack burst discharge typically did not produce low threshold calcium spikes or produced a significantly reduced transient depolarization. Our findings clearly indicate that TRN neurons can be differentiated by differences in their spike discharge properties and these subtypes are not uniformly distributed within TRN. The functional consequences of such intrinsic differences may play an important role in modality-specific thalamocortical information transfer as well as overall circuit level activities. PMID:17463035

  5. Segregation of parallel inputs to the anteromedial and anteroventral thalamic nuclei of the rat.

    PubMed

    Wright, Nicholas F; Vann, Seralynne D; Erichsen, Jonathan T; O'Mara, Shane M; Aggleton, John P

    2013-09-01

    Many brain structures project to both the anteroventral thalamic nucleus and the anteromedial thalamic nucleus. In the present study, pairs of different tracers were placed into these two thalamic sites in the same rats to determine the extent to which these nuclei receive segregated inputs. Only inputs from the laterodorsal tegmental nucleus, the principal extrinsic cholinergic source for these thalamic nuclei, showed a marked degree of collateralization, with approximately 13% of all cells labeled in this tegmental area projecting to both nuclei. Elsewhere, double-labeled cells were very scarce, making up ∼1% of all labeled cells. Three general patterns of anterior thalamic innervation were detected in these other areas. In some sites, e.g., prelimbic cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, and secondary motor area, cells projecting to the anteromedial and anteroventral thalamic nuclei were closely intermingled, with often only subtle distribution differences. These same projections were also often intermingled with inputs to the mediodorsal thalamic nucleus, but again there was little or no collateralization. In other sites, e.g., the subiculum and retrosplenial cortex, there was often less overlap of cells projecting to the two anterior thalamic nuclei. A third pattern related to the dense inputs from the medial mammillary nucleus, where well-defined topographies ensured little intermingling of the neurons that innervate the two thalamic nuclei. The finding that a very small minority of cortical and limbic inputs bifurcates to innervate both anterior thalamic nuclei highlights the potential for parallel information streams to control their functions, despite arising from common regions.

  6. Assessing the risk of central post-stroke pain of thalamic origin by lesion mapping.

    PubMed

    Sprenger, Till; Seifert, Christian L; Valet, Michael; Andreou, Anna P; Foerschler, Annette; Zimmer, Claus; Collins, D Louis; Goadsby, Peter J; Tölle, Thomas R; Chakravarty, M Mallar

    2012-08-01

    Central post-stroke pain of thalamic origin is an extremely distressing and often refractory disorder. There are no well-established predictors for pain development after thalamic stroke, and the role of different thalamic nuclei is unclear. Here, we used structural magnetic resonance imaging to identify the thalamic nuclei, specifically implicated in the generation of central post-stroke pain of thalamic origin. Lesions of 10 patients with central post-stroke pain of thalamic origin and 10 control patients with thalamic strokes without pain were identified as volumes of interest on magnetic resonance imaging data. Non-linear deformations were estimated to match each image with a high-resolution template and were applied to each volume of interest. By using a digital atlas of the thalamus, we elucidated the involvement of different nuclei with respect to each lesion. Patient and control volumes of interest were summed separately to identify unique areas of involvement. Voxelwise odds ratio maps were calculated to localize the anatomical site where lesions put patients at risk of developing central post-stroke pain of thalamic origin. In the patients with pain, mainly lateral and posterior thalamic nuclei were affected, whereas a more anterior-medial lesion pattern was evident in the controls. The lesions of 9 of 10 pain patients overlapped at the border of the ventral posterior nucleus and the pulvinar, coinciding with the ventrocaudalis portae nucleus. The lesions of this area showed an odds ratio of 81 in favour of developing thalamic pain. The high odds ratio at the ventral posterior nucleus-pulvinar border zone indicates that this area is crucial in the pathogenesis of thalamic pain and demonstrates the feasibility of identifying patients at risk of developing central post-stroke pain of thalamic origin early after thalamic insults. This provides a basis for pre-emptive treatment studies.

  7. An Improved Box Theater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huster, Michael E.

    2011-09-01

    While designing an optics lab for a conceptual physics course, I came across a "box theater" activity. The box theater is a pinhole camera obscura made from a box that students put over their heads and shoulders. I use the activity as a capstone experience to explain optical systems. (Classroom demonstrations of the camera obscura have been described by others.2) First, the students build and experiment with a camera obscura made from a plastic cup and a convex lens with a focal length of 7.5 cm, and then "wear" the box theater. The difficulty with the box theater is the dimness of the image. A cloth drape has to be hung from the bottom of the box around the shoulders of the students to prevent light leakage, and the students have to wait a few minutes for their eyes to adjust to the darkness.

  8. GLOVE BOX ATTACHMENT

    DOEpatents

    Butts, H.L.

    1962-02-13

    This invention comprises a housing unit to be fitted between a glove box port and a glove so that a slidable plate within the housing seals off the glove box port for evacuation of the glove box without damage to the glove. The housing and the glove may be evacuated without damage to the glove since movement of the glove is restricted during evacuation by the slidable plate. (AEC)

  9. Bilateral paramedian thalamic artery infarcts: report of eight cases.

    PubMed Central

    Gentilini, M; De Renzi, E; Crisi, G

    1987-01-01

    Eight consecutive patients with CT scan evidence of a bilateral infarct in the territory of the paramedian thalamic artery are reported. In seven cases the infarct also extended to the territory of the polar artery. The main symptoms were: disorder of vigilance which cleared in a few days, and hypersomnolence which lasted longer and in two patients was still present a year later; amnesia, detectable clinically in four patients and only with tests in two patients, which persisted in one patient for three years; changes of mood and bulimia present in five and four patients respectively; and vertical gaze paresis in five patients. Only one patient died, and in the remainder the symptoms tended to subside, but none of the patients who could be followed-up for a year returned to normal behaviour. Clinical and CT scan correlations pointed to the mammillo-thalamic tract as the structure whose damage was responsible for the memory disorders. Images PMID:3625213

  10. Thalamic abscess caused by a rare pathogen: streptococcus constellatus

    PubMed Central

    Şenol, Özgür; Süslü, Hikmet Turan; Tatarlı, Necati; Tiryaki, Mehmet; Güçlü, Bülent

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus constellatus is a microorganism that lives commensally in the oropharyngeal region, urogenital region, and intestinal tract. However, it can cause infection in patients with certain predisposing factors. Rarely, this microorganism can cause a brain abscess. Thalamic localization of brain abscesses is much rarer than abscesses in other locations of the brain. Brain abscess caused by streptococcus constellatus are very rarely been reported in the literature. We present a rare case of a left-sided thalamic abscess caused by streptococcus constellatus in a 25-year-old male patient who was injured by shrapnel pieces in the head and who was malnourished. The patient was successfully treated by stereotactic aspiration and antibiotherapy. PMID:27800109

  11. Pseudocortical and dissociate discriminative sensory dysfunction in a thalamic stroke.

    PubMed

    Notturno, Francesca; Sepe, Rosamaria; Caulo, Massimo; Uncini, Antonino; Committeri, Giorgia

    2013-01-01

    In thalamic lesions a pseudocortical syndrome has been occasionally described but the effect of the lesion on the cortical network of tactile recognition has never been studied. We report a patient who developed tactile agnosia in the left hand after right thalamic stroke, configuring a pseudocortical sensory syndrome. The discriminative sensory dysfunction was dissociate because only tactile agnosia and mild pseudoathetosis were present. A functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study showed that tactile recognition with the unaffected hand recruited a bilateral fronto-parietal network. During recognition with the left hand the activation was restricted and lateralized to the ipsilateral hemisphere. In this patient with pseudocortical discriminative sensory dysfunction the lack of activation of the whole cortical network, implicated in tactile recognition, demonstrates that pseudocortical is functionally equivalent to cortical tactile agnosia.

  12. Decoding thalamic afferent input using microcircuit spiking activity

    PubMed Central

    Sederberg, Audrey J.; Palmer, Stephanie E.

    2015-01-01

    A behavioral response appropriate to a sensory stimulus depends on the collective activity of thousands of interconnected neurons. The majority of cortical connections arise from neighboring neurons, and thus understanding the cortical code requires characterizing information representation at the scale of the cortical microcircuit. Using two-photon calcium imaging, we densely sampled the thalamically evoked response of hundreds of neurons spanning multiple layers and columns in thalamocortical slices of mouse somatosensory cortex. We then used a biologically plausible decoder to characterize the representation of two distinct thalamic inputs, at the level of the microcircuit, to reveal those aspects of the activity pattern that are likely relevant to downstream neurons. Our data suggest a sparse code, distributed across lamina, in which a small population of cells carries stimulus-relevant information. Furthermore, we find that, within this subset of neurons, decoder performance improves when noise correlations are taken into account. PMID:25695647

  13. Decoding thalamic afferent input using microcircuit spiking activity.

    PubMed

    Sederberg, Audrey J; Palmer, Stephanie E; MacLean, Jason N

    2015-04-01

    A behavioral response appropriate to a sensory stimulus depends on the collective activity of thousands of interconnected neurons. The majority of cortical connections arise from neighboring neurons, and thus understanding the cortical code requires characterizing information representation at the scale of the cortical microcircuit. Using two-photon calcium imaging, we densely sampled the thalamically evoked response of hundreds of neurons spanning multiple layers and columns in thalamocortical slices of mouse somatosensory cortex. We then used a biologically plausible decoder to characterize the representation of two distinct thalamic inputs, at the level of the microcircuit, to reveal those aspects of the activity pattern that are likely relevant to downstream neurons. Our data suggest a sparse code, distributed across lamina, in which a small population of cells carries stimulus-relevant information. Furthermore, we find that, within this subset of neurons, decoder performance improves when noise correlations are taken into account. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  14. Holmes' tremor as a delayed complication of thalamic stroke.

    PubMed

    Martins, William Alves; Marrone, Luiz Carlos Porcello; Fussiger, Helena; Vedana, Viviane Maria; Cristovam, Rafael do Amaral; Taietti, Marjorye Z; Marrone, Antonio Carlos Huf

    2016-04-01

    Movement disorders are not commonly associated with stroke. Accordingly, thalamic strokes have rarely been associated with tremor, pseudo-athetosis and dystonic postures. We present a 75-year-old man who developed a disabling tremor 1 year after a posterolateral thalamic stroke. This tremor had low frequency (3-4 Hz), did not disappear on focus and was exacerbated by maintaining a static posture and on target pursuit, which made it very difficult to perform basic functions. MRI demonstrated an old ischemic lesion at the left posterolateral thalamus. Treatment with levodopa led to symptom control. Lesions in the midbrain, cerebellum and thalamus may cause Holmes' tremor. Delayed onset of symptoms is usually seen, sometimes appearing 2 years after the original injury. This may be due to maturation of a complex neuronal network, leading to slow dopaminergic denervation. Further studies are needed to improve our understanding of this unique disconnection syndrome.

  15. Convulsive Movements in Bilateral Paramedian Thalamic and Midbrain Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Yamashiro, Kazuo; Furuya, Tsuyoshi; Noda, Kazuyuki; Urabe, Takao; Hattori, Nobutaka; Okuma, Yasuyuki

    2011-01-01

    Although some previous reports have described convulsive movements in bilateral paramedian thalamic and midbrain infarction, little is known about their nature. A 71-year-old man presented with impaired consciousness and clonic movements of both arms. Each series of movements lasted 10 to 20 s and occurred at 2-to 3-min intervals, which disappeared after intravenous administration of diazepam and phenytoin. Magnetic resonance imaging showed acute bilateral paramedian thalamic and midbrain infarction. A review of the literature revealed that convulsive movements were observed mostly at the onset of infarction. Clonic movements appeared frequently in the limbs, particularly in both arms. Clinical observations and results of animal experiments suggest that these seizures might originate from the mesencephalic reticular formation. Physicians should recognize this condition, because not only seizure control but also early management of ischemic stroke is required. PMID:22187542

  16. Synaptic mechanisms underlying cholinergic control of thalamic reticular nucleus neurons

    PubMed Central

    Beierlein, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal networks of the thalamus are the target of extensive cholinergic projections from the basal forebrain and the brainstem. Activation of these afferents can regulate neuronal excitability, transmitter release, and firing patterns in thalamic networks, thereby altering the flow of sensory information during distinct behavioural states. However, cholinergic regulation in the thalamus has been primarily examined by using receptor agonist and antagonist, which has precluded a detailed understanding of the spatiotemporal dynamics that govern cholinergic signalling under physiological conditions. This review summarizes recent studies on cholinergic synaptic transmission in the thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN), a brain structure intimately involved in the control of sensory processing and the generation of rhythmic activity in the thalamocortical system. This work has shown that acetylcholine (ACh) released from individual axons can rapidly and reliably activate both pre- and postsynaptic cholinergic receptors, thereby controlling TRN neuronal activity with high spatiotemporal precision. PMID:24973413

  17. Thalamic volume as a biomarker for disorders of consciousness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubeaux, Mathieu; Mahalingam, Jamuna Jayashri; Gomez, Francisco; Nelson, Marvin; Vanhaudenhuyse, Audrey; Bruno, Marie-Aurélie; Gosseries, Olivia; Laureys, Steven; Soddu, Andrea; Lepore, Natasha

    2015-01-01

    Disorders of consciousness (DOC) may be characterized by the degree at which consciousness is impaired, and include for example vegetative state (VS) and minimally conscious state (MCS) patients. Using a reliable marker as a measure of the level of consciousness in such patients is of utmost necessity and importance for their appropriate diagnosis and prognosis. Identification of VS and MCS states based on their behaviors sometimes leads to incorrect inferences due to the influence of a range of factors like motor impairment, fluctuating arousal levels and rapidly habituating responses to name a few.1 The extent of damage in the thalamus, a structure known for its role in arousal regulation, may provide an imaging biomarker to better differentiate between VS and MCS. In this study, we manually segmented the thalamus from T1-weighted brain MRI images in a large cohort of 19 VS and 23 MCS subjects that were examined using the French version of the Coma Recovery Scale Revised (CRS-R).2 This scale is the most trustworthy behavioural diagnosis tool3 for patients with DOC available. The aim was to determine whether a relationship between thalamus volume and consciousness level exists. Results show that total thalamic volume tends to decrease over time after a severe brain injury. Moreover, for subjects in chronic state, the thalamic volume seems to differ with respect to the degree of consciousness that was diagnosed. Finally, for these same chronic patients, the total thalamic volume is varying linearly as a function of the CRS-R score obtained, indicating that thalamic volume may be used as a biomarker to measure the level of consciousness.

  18. Successful thalamic deep brain stimulation for orthostatic tremor.

    PubMed

    Guridi, Jorge; Rodriguez-Oroz, Maria C; Arbizu, Javier; Alegre, Manuel; Prieto, Elena; Landecho, Ignacio; Manrique, Miguel; Artieda, Julio; Obeso, Jose A

    2008-10-15

    We report a patient with severe orthostatic tremor (OT) unresponsive to pharmacological treatments that was successfully controlled with thalamic (Vim, ventralis intermedius nucleus) deep brain stimulation (DBS) over a 4-year period. Cortical activity associated with the OT revealed by EEG back-averaging and fluoro-deoxi-glucose PET were also suppressed in parallel with tremor arrest. This case suggests that Vim-DBS may be a useful therapeutic approach for patients highly disabled by OT.

  19. Electroresponsive properties of rat central medial thalamic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Jhangiani-Jashanmal, Iman T.; Yamamoto, Ryo; Gungor, Nur Zeynep

    2016-01-01

    The central medial thalamic (CMT) nucleus is a poorly known component of the middle thalamic complex that relays nociceptive inputs to the basolateral amygdala and cingulate cortex and plays a critical role in the control of awareness. The present study was undertaken to characterize the electroresponsive properties of CMT neurons. Similar to relay neurons found throughout the dorsal thalamus, CMT cells assumed tonic or burst-firing modes, depending on their membrane potentials (Vm). However, they showed little evidence of the hyperpolarization-activated mixed cationic conductance (IH)-mediated inward rectification usually displayed by dorsal thalamic relay cells at hyperpolarized Vm. Two subtypes of CMT neurons were identified when comparing their responses with depolarization applied from negative potentials. Some cells generated a low-threshold spike burst followed by tonic firing, whereas others remained silent after the initial burst, irrespective of the amount of depolarizing current injected. Equal proportions of the two cell types were found among neurons retrogradely labeled from the basolateral amygdala. Their morphological properties were heterogeneous but distinct from the classical bushy relay cell type that prevails in most of the dorsal thalamus. We propose that the marginal influence of IH in CMT relative to other dorsal thalamic nuclei has significant network-level consequences. Because IH promotes the genesis of highly coherent delta oscillations in thalamocortical networks during sleep, these oscillations may be weaker or less coherent in CMT. Consequently, delta oscillations would be more easily disrupted by peripheral inputs, providing a potential mechanism for the reported role of CMT in eliciting arousal from sleep or anesthesia. PMID:26763778

  20. Reproducibility of thalamic segmentation based on probabilistic tractography.

    PubMed

    Traynor, Catherine; Heckemann, Rolf A; Hammers, Alexander; O'Muircheartaigh, Jonathan; Crum, William R; Barker, Gareth J; Richardson, Mark P

    2010-08-01

    Reliable identification of thalamic nuclei is required to improve targeting of electrodes used in Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS), and for exploring the role of thalamus in health and disease. A previously described method using probabilistic tractography to segment the thalamus based on connections to cortical target regions was implemented. Both within- and between-subject reproducibility were quantitatively assessed by the overlap of the resulting segmentations; the effect of two different numbers of target regions (6 and 31) on reproducibility of the segmentation results was also investigated. Very high reproducibility was observed when a single dataset was processed multiple times using different starting conditions. Thalamic segmentation was also very reproducible when multiple datasets from the same subject were processed using six cortical target regions. Within-subject reproducibility was reduced when the number of target regions was increased, particularly in medial and posterior regions of the thalamus. A large degree of overlap in segmentation results from different subjects was obtained, particularly in thalamic regions classified as connecting to frontal, parietal, temporal and pre-central cortical target regions.

  1. How do mammillary body inputs contribute to anterior thalamic function?

    PubMed Central

    Dillingham, Christopher M.; Frizzati, Aura; Nelson, Andrew J.D.; Vann, Seralynne D.

    2015-01-01

    It has long been assumed that the main function of the mammillary bodies is to provide a relay for indirect hippocampal inputs to the anterior thalamic nuclei. Such models afford the mammillary bodies no independent role in memory and overlook the importance of their other, non-hippocampal, inputs. This review focuses on recent advances that herald a new understanding of the importance of the mammillary bodies, and their inputs from the limbic midbrain, for anterior thalamic function. It has become apparent that the mammillary bodies’ contribution to memory is not dependent on afferents from the subicular complex. Rather, the ventral tegmental nucleus of Gudden is a vital source of inputs that support memory processes within the medial mammillary bodies. In parallel, the lateral mammillary bodies, via their connections with the dorsal tegmental nucleus of Gudden, are critical for generating head-direction signals. These two parallel, but distinct, information streams converge on the anterior thalamic nuclei and support different aspects of spatial memory. PMID:25107491

  2. What does a comparison of the alcoholic Korsakoff syndrome and thalamic infarction tell us about thalamic amnesia?

    PubMed

    Kopelman, Michael D

    2015-07-01

    In this review, the clinical, neuropsychological, and neuroimaging findings in the alcoholic Korsakoff syndrome and in thalamic amnesia, resulting from focal infarction, are compared. In both disorders, there is controversy over what is the critical site for anterograde amnesia to occur-damage to the anterior thalamus/mammillo-thalamic tract has most commonly been cited, but damage to the medio-dorsal nuclei has also been advocated. Both syndromes show 'core' features of an anterograde amnesic syndrome; but retrograde amnesia is generally much more extensive (going back many years or decades) in the Korsakoff syndrome. Likewise, spontaneous confabulation occurs more commonly in the Korsakoff syndrome, although seen in only a minority of chronic cases. These differences are attributed to the greater prevalence of frontal atrophy and frontal damage in Korsakoff cases. Copyright © 2014 The Author. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Math in the Box

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeYoung, Mary J.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how to make an origami paper box and explores the algebra, geometry, and other mathematics that unfolds. A set of origami steps that transforms the paper into an open box can hold mathematical surprises for both students and teachers. An origami lesson can engage students in an open-ended exploration of the relationship…

  4. Math in the Box

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeYoung, Mary J.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how to make an origami paper box and explores the algebra, geometry, and other mathematics that unfolds. A set of origami steps that transforms the paper into an open box can hold mathematical surprises for both students and teachers. An origami lesson can engage students in an open-ended exploration of the relationship…

  5. Thinking outside the Box

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fanshawe, Simon; Sriskandarajah, Dhananjayan

    2010-01-01

    Britain is not only more diverse than ever before, but that diversity itself is growing more diverse. Britain's simplistic "tick-box" approach to identity is in danger of inhibiting the very equality it seeks to promote. To question the tick-box is not to accuse local authorities of "political correctness gone mad". The notion…

  6. Straw in a Box

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jerrard, Richard; Schneider, Joel; Smallberg, Ralph; Wetzel, John

    2006-01-01

    A problem on a state's high school exit exam asked for the longest straw that would fit in a box. The examiners apparently wanted the length of a diagonal of the box, but the figure accompanying the question suggested otherwise--that the radius of the straw be considered. This article explores that more general problem.

  7. Boxing with neutrino oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, D.J. |; Weiler, T.J.

    1999-06-01

    We develop a characterization of neutrino oscillations based on the coefficients of the oscillating terms. These coefficients are individually observable; although they are quartic in the elements of the unitary mixing matrix, they are independent of the conventions chosen for the angle and phase parametrization of the mixing matrix. We call these reparametrization-invariant observables {open_quotes}boxes{close_quotes} because of their geometric relation to the mixing matrix, and because of their association with the Feynman box diagram that describes oscillations in field theory. The real parts of the boxes are the coefficients for the {ital CP}- or {ital T}-even oscillation modes, while the imaginary parts are the coefficients for the {ital CP}- or {ital T}-odd oscillation modes. Oscillation probabilities are linear in the boxes, so measurements can straightforwardly determine values for the boxes (which can then be manipulated to yield magnitudes of mixing matrix elements). We examine the effects of unitarity on the boxes and discuss the reduction of the number of boxes to a minimum basis set. For the three-generation case, we explicitly construct the basis. Using the box algebra, we show that {ital CP} violation may be inferred from measurements of neutrino flavor mixing even when the oscillatory factors have averaged. The framework presented here will facilitate general analyses of neutrino oscillations among n{ge}3 flavors. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  8. Thinking outside the Box

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fanshawe, Simon; Sriskandarajah, Dhananjayan

    2010-01-01

    Britain is not only more diverse than ever before, but that diversity itself is growing more diverse. Britain's simplistic "tick-box" approach to identity is in danger of inhibiting the very equality it seeks to promote. To question the tick-box is not to accuse local authorities of "political correctness gone mad". The notion…

  9. X-box-binding protein 1-modified neural stem cells for treatment of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Si, Lihui; Xu, Tianmin; Wang, Fengzhang; Liu, Qun; Cui, Manhua

    2012-04-05

    X-box-binding protein 1-transfected neural stem cells were transplanted into the right lateral ventricles of rats with rotenone-induced Parkinson's disease. The survival capacities and differentiation rates of cells expressing the dopaminergic marker tyrosine hydroxylase were higher in X-box-binding protein 1-transfected neural stem cells compared to non-transfected cells. Moreover, dopamine and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid levels in the substantia nigra were significantly increased, α-synuclein expression was decreased, and neurological behaviors were significantly ameliorated in rats following transplantation of X-box-binding protein 1-transfected neural stem cells. These results indicate that transplantation of X-box-binding protein 1-transfected neural stem cells can promote stem cell survival and differentiation into dopaminergic neurons, increase dopamine and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid levels, reduce α-synuclein aggregation in the substantia nigra, and improve the symptoms of Parkinson's disease in rats.

  10. Cortical Control of Striatal Dopamine Transmission via Striatal Cholinergic Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Kosillo, Polina; Zhang, Yan-Feng; Threlfell, Sarah; Cragg, Stephanie J.

    2016-01-01

    Corticostriatal regulation of striatal dopamine (DA) transmission has long been postulated, but ionotropic glutamate receptors have not been localized directly to DA axons. Striatal cholinergic interneurons (ChIs) are emerging as major players in striatal function, and can govern DA transmission by activating nicotinic receptors (nAChRs) on DA axons. Cortical inputs to ChIs have historically been perceived as sparse, but recent evidence indicates that they strongly activate ChIs. We explored whether activation of M1/M2 corticostriatal inputs can consequently gate DA transmission, via ChIs. We reveal that optogenetic activation of channelrhodopsin-expressing corticostriatal axons can drive striatal DA release detected with fast-scan cyclic voltammetry and requires activation of nAChRs on DA axons and AMPA receptors on ChIs that promote short-latency action potentials. By contrast, DA release driven by optogenetic activation of intralaminar thalamostriatal inputs involves additional activation of NMDA receptors on ChIs and action potential generation over longer timescales. Therefore, cortical and thalamic glutamate inputs can modulate DA transmission by regulating ChIs as gatekeepers, through ionotropic glutamate receptors. The different use of AMPA and NMDA receptors by cortical versus thalamic inputs might lead to distinct input integration strategies by ChIs and distinct modulation of the function of DA and striatum. PMID:27566978

  11. Direct inhibition of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor channel by dopamine and (+)-SKF38393.

    PubMed

    Castro, N G; de Mello, M C; de Mello, F G; Aracava, Y

    1999-04-01

    1. Dopamine is known to modulate glutamatergic synaptic transmission in the retina and in several brain regions by activating specific G-protein-coupled receptors. We have examined the possibility of a different type of mechanism for this modulation, one involving direct interaction of dopamine with ionotropic glutamate receptors. 2. Ionic currents induced by fast application of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) were recorded under whole-cell patch-clamp in cultured striatal, thalamic and hippocampal neurons of the rat and in retinal neurons of the chick. Dopamine at concentrations above 100 microM inhibited the NMDA response in all four neuron types, exhibiting an IC50 of 1.2 mM in hippocampal neurons. The time course of this inhibition was fast, developing in less than 100 ms. 3. The D1 receptor agonist (+)-SKF38393 mimicked the effect of dopamine, with an IC50 of 58.9 microM on the NMDA response, while the enantiomer (-)-SKF38393 was ineffective at 50 microM. However, the D1 antagonist R(+)-SCH23390 did not prevent the inhibitory effect of (+)-SKF38393. 4. The degree of inhibition by dopamine and (+)-SKF38393 depended on transmembrane voltage, increasing 2.7 times with a hyperpolarization of about 80 mV. The voltage-dependent block by dopamine was also observed in the presence of MgCl2 1 mM. 5. Single-channel recordings showed that the open times of NMDA-gated channels were shortened by (+)-SKF38393. 6. These data suggested that the site to which the drugs bound to produce the inhibitory effect was distinct from the classical D1-type dopamine receptor sites, possibly being located inside the NMDA channel pore. It is concluded that dopamine and (+)-SKF38393 are NMDA channel ligands.

  12. Direct inhibition of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor channel by dopamine and (+)-SKF38393

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Newton G; de Mello, Maria Christina F; de Mello, Fernando G; Aracava, Yasco

    1999-01-01

    Dopamine is known to modulate glutamatergic synaptic transmission in the retina and in several brain regions by activating specific G-protein-coupled receptors. We have examined the possibility of a different type of mechanism for this modulation, one involving direct interaction of dopamine with ionotropic glutamate receptors.Ionic currents induced by fast application of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) were recorded under whole-cell patch-clamp in cultured striatal, thalamic and hippocampal neurons of the rat and in retinal neurons of the chick. Dopamine at concentrations above 100 μM inhibited the NMDA response in all four neuron types, exhibiting an IC50 of 1.2 mM in hippocampal neurons. The time course of this inhibition was fast, developing in less than 100 ms.The D1 receptor agonist (+)-SKF38393 mimicked the effect of dopamine, with an IC50 of 58.9 μM on the NMDA response, while the enantiomer (−)-SKF38393 was ineffective at 50 μM. However, the D1 antagonist R(+)-SCH23390 did not prevent the inhibitory effect of (+)-SKF38393.The degree of inhibition by dopamine and (+)-SKF38393 depended on transmembrane voltage, increasing 2.7 times with a hyperpolarization of about 80 mV. The voltage-dependent block by dopamine was also observed in the presence of MgCl2 1 mM.Single-channel recordings showed that the open times of NMDA-gated channels were shortened by (+)-SKF38393.These data suggested that the site to which the drugs bound to produce the inhibitory effect was distinct from the classical D1-type dopamine receptor sites, possibly being located inside the NMDA channel pore. It is concluded that dopamine and (+)-SKF38393 are NMDA channel ligands. PMID:10372829

  13. Modulation of GABA release from the thalamic reticular nucleus by cocaine and caffeine: role of serotonin receptors.

    PubMed

    Goitia, Belén; Rivero-Echeto, María Celeste; Weisstaub, Noelia V; Gingrich, Jay A; Garcia-Rill, Edgar; Bisagno, Verónica; Urbano, Francisco J

    2016-02-01

    Serotonin receptors are targets of drug therapies for a variety of neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. Cocaine inhibits the re-uptake of serotonin (5-HT), dopamine, and noradrenaline, whereas caffeine blocks adenosine receptors and opens ryanodine receptors in the endoplasmic reticulum. We studied how 5-HT and adenosine affected spontaneous GABAergic transmission from thalamic reticular nucleus. We combined whole-cell patch clamp recordings of miniature inhibitory post-synaptic currents (mIPSCs) in ventrobasal thalamic neurons during local (puff) application of 5-HT in wild type (WT) or knockout mice lacking 5-HT2A receptors (5-HT2A -/-). Inhibition of mIPSCs frequency by low (10 μM) and high (100 μM) 5-HT concentrations was observed in ventrobasal neurons from 5-HT2A -/- mice. In WT mice, only 100 μM 5-HT significantly reduced mIPSCs frequency. In 5-HT2A -/- mice, NAN-190, a specific 5-HT1A antagonist, prevented the 100 μM 5-HT inhibition while blocking H-currents that prolonged inhibition during post-puff periods. The inhibitory effects of 100 μM 5-HT were enhanced in cocaine binge-treated 5-HT2A -/- mice. Caffeine binge treatment did not affect 5-HT-mediated inhibition. Our findings suggest that both 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors are present in pre-synaptic thalamic reticular nucleus terminals. Serotonergic-mediated inhibition of GABA release could underlie aberrant thalamocortical physiology described after repetitive consumption of cocaine. Our findings suggest that both 5-HT1A , 5-HT2A and A1 receptors are present in pre-synaptic TRN terminals. 5-HT1A and A1 receptors would down-regulate adenylate cyclase, whereas 5-HT1A would also increase the probability of the opening of G-protein-activated inwardly rectifying K(+) channels (GIRK). Sustained opening of GIRK channels would hyperpolarize pre-synaptic terminals activating H-currents, resulting in less GABA release. 5-HT2A -would activate PLC and IP3 , increasing intracellular [Ca(2+) ] and

  14. Glove box shield

    DOEpatents

    Brackenbush, Larry W.; Hoenes, Glenn R.

    1981-01-01

    According to the present invention, a shield for a glove box housing radioactive material is comprised of spaced apart clamping members which maintain three overlapping flaps in place therebetween. There is a central flap and two side flaps, the side flaps overlapping at the interior edges thereof and the central flap extending past the intersection of the side flaps in order to insure that the shield is always closed when the user withdraws his hand from the glove box. Lead loaded neoprene rubber is the preferred material for the three flaps, the extent of lead loading depending upon the radiation levels within the glove box.

  15. Glove box shield

    DOEpatents

    Brackenbush, L.W.; Hoenes, G.R.

    A shield for a glove box housing radioactive material is comprised of spaced apart clamping members which maintain three overlapping flaps in place therebetween. There is a central flap and two side flaps, the side flaps overlapping at the interior edges thereof and the central flap extending past the intersection of the side flaps in order to insure that the shield is always closed when the user wthdraws his hand from the glove box. Lead loaded neoprene rubber is the preferred material for the three flaps, the extent of lead loading depending upon the radiation levels within the glove box.

  16. Glove box shield

    SciTech Connect

    Brackenbush, L.W.; Hoenes, G.R.

    1981-02-17

    According to the present invention, a shield for a glove box housing radioactive material is comprised of spaced apart clamping members which maintain three overlapping flaps in place therebetween. There is a central flap and two side flaps, the side flaps overlapping at the interior edges thereof and the central flap extending past the intersection of the side flaps in order to insure that the shield is always closed when the user withdraws his hand from the glove box. Lead loaded neoprene rubber is the preferred material for the three flaps, the extent of lead loading depending upon the radiation levels within the glove box. 2 figs.

  17. Dopamine triggers Heterosynaptic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Masago; Otaka, Mami; Huang, Yanhua; Neumann, Peter A.; Winters, Bradley D.; Grace, Anthony A.; Schlüter, Oliver M.; Dong, Yan

    2013-01-01

    As a classic neuromodulator, dopamine has long been thought to modulate, rather than trigger, synaptic plasticity. In contrast, our present results demonstrate that within the parallel projections of dopaminergic and GABAergic terminals from the ventral tegmental area (VTA) to nucleus accumbens core (NAcCo), action potential-activated release of dopamine heterosynaptically triggers LTD at GABAergic synapses, which is likely mediated by activating presynaptically-located dopamine D1 class receptors and expressed by inhibiting presynaptic release of GABA. Moreover, this dopamine-mediated heterosynaptic LTD is abolished after withdrawal from cocaine exposure. These results suggest that action potential-dependent dopamine release triggers very different cellular consequences from those induced by volume release or pharmacological manipulation. Activation of the VTA-to-NAcCo projections is essential for emotional and motivational responses. This dopamine-mediated LTD allows a flexible output of NAcCo neurons, whereas disruption of this LTD may contribute to the rigid emotional and motivational state observed in addicts during cocaine withdrawal. PMID:23595734

  18. Decreased striatal and enhanced thalamic dopaminergic responsivity in detoxified cocaine abusers

    SciTech Connect

    Volkow, N.D.; Wang, G.J.; Fowler, J.S.

    1997-05-01

    It has been hypothesized that cocaine addiction could result from decreased brain dopamine (DA) function. However, little is known about changes in (DA) neurotransmission in human cocaine addiction. We used PET and [C-11]raclopride, a DA D2 receptor ligand sensitive to competition with endogenous DA, to measure relative changes in extracellular DA induced by methylphenidate (MP) in 20 cocaine abusers (3-6 weeks after cocaine discontinuation) and 23 controls. MP did not affect the transport of [C-11]raclopride from blood to brain (K1); however it induced a significant reduction in DA D2 receptor availability (Bmax/Kd) in striatum. The magnitude of ND-induced changes in striatal [C-11]raclopride binding were significantly larger in controls (21 + 13% change from baseline) than in cocaine abusers (9 {+-} 13 %) (ANOVA p < 0.005). In cocaine abusers, but not in controls, MP also decreased Bmax/Kd values in thalamus (29 {+-} 35 %) (ANOVA p < 0.005). There were no differences in plasma MP concentration between the groups. In striatum MP-induced changes in Bmax/Kd were significantly correlated with MP-induced changes in self reports of restlessness (r = 0.49, df 42, p < 0.002). In thalamus MP-induced changes in Bmax/Kd were significantly correlated with ND-induced changes in self reports of cocaine craving (r = 0.57, df 42, p < 0.0001). These results are compatible with a decrease in striatal DA brain function in cocaine abusers. They also suggest a participation of thalamic DA pathways in cocaine addiction.

  19. Thalamic and extrathalamic mechanisms of consciousness after severe brain injury.

    PubMed

    Lutkenhoff, Evan S; Chiang, Jeffrey; Tshibanda, Luaba; Kamau, Evelyn; Kirsch, Murielle; Pickard, John D; Laureys, Steven; Owen, Adrian M; Monti, Martin M

    2015-07-01

    What mechanisms underlie the loss and recovery of consciousness after severe brain injury? We sought to establish, in the largest cohort of patients with disorders of consciousness (DOC) to date, the link between gold standard clinical measures of awareness and wakefulness, and specific patterns of local brain pathology-thereby possibly providing a mechanistic framework for patient diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment development. Structural T1-weighted magnetic resonance images were collected, in a continuous sample of 143 severely brain-injured patients with DOC (and 96 volunteers), across 2 tertiary expert centers. Brain atrophy in subcortical regions (bilateral thalamus, basal ganglia, hippocampus, basal forebrain, and brainstem) was assessed across (1) healthy volunteers and patients, (2) clinical entities (eg, vegetative state, minimally conscious state), (3) clinical measures of consciousness (Coma Recovery Scale-Revised), and (4) injury etiology. Compared to volunteers, patients exhibited significant atrophy across all structures (p < 0.05, corrected). Strikingly, we found almost no significant differences across clinical entities. Nonetheless, the clinical measures of awareness and wakefulness upon which differential diagnosis rely were systematically associated with tissue atrophy within thalamic and basal ganglia nuclei, respectively; the basal forebrain was atrophied in proportion to patients' response to sensory stimulation. In addition, nontraumatic injuries exhibited more extensive thalamic atrophy. These findings provide, for the first time, a grounding in pathology for gold standard behavior-based clinical measures of consciousness, and reframe our current models of DOC by stressing the different links tying thalamic mechanisms to willful behavior and extrathalamic mechanisms to behavioral (and electrocortical) arousal. © 2015 American Neurological Association.

  20. The syndrome of polymicrogyria, thalamic hypoplasia, and epilepsy with CSWS.

    PubMed

    Bartolini, Emanuele; Falchi, Melania; Zellini, Francesco; Parrini, Elena; Grisotto, Laura; Cosottini, Mirco; Posar, Annio; Parmeggiani, Antonia; Ambrosetto, Giovanni; Ferrari, Anna Rita; Santucci, Margherita; Salas-Puig, Javier; Barba, Carmen; Guerrini, Renzo

    2016-03-29

    We explored the long-term follow-up of continuous spike-and-wave complexes during sleep (CSWS) in polymicrogyria and the anatomic volumetric variables that influence the risk of developing this age-related epileptic encephalopathy. We performed prospective follow-up of 27 patients with polymicrogyria/CSWS (mean follow-up 14.3 years; range 2-31 years) and comparative volumetric analysis of the polymicrogyric hemispheres and ipsilateral thalami vs 3 subgroups featuring polymicrogyria without CSWS, benign rolandic epilepsy (BRE), and headache. Receiver operator characteristic analysis of the power of volumetric values was determined to predict CSWS. CSWS peaked between 5 and 7 years (mean age at onset 4.7 years). Remission occurred within 2 years from onset in 21%, within 4 years in 50%, and by age 13 years in 100%. We found smaller thalamic and hemispheric volumes in polymicrogyria/CSWS with respect to polymicrogyria without CSWS (p = 0.0021 for hemispheres; p = 0.0003 for thalami), BRE, and controls with headache (p < 0.0001). Volumes of the malformed hemispheres and ipsilateral thalami reliably identified the risk of incurring CSWS, with a 68-fold increased risk for values lower than optimal diagnostic cutoffs (436,150 mm(3) for malformed hemispheres or 4,616 mm(3) for ipsilateral thalami; sensitivity 92.54%; specificity 84.62%). The risk increased by 2% for every 1,000 mm(3) reduction of the polymicrogyric hemispheres and by 15% for every 100 mm(3) reduction of ipsilateral thalami. The polymicrogyria/CSWS syndrome is likely caused by a cortico-thalamic malformation complex and is characterized by remission of epilepsy within early adolescence. Early assessment of hemispheric and thalamic volumes in children with polymicrogyria and epilepsy can reliably predict CSWS. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  1. Voice box (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The larynx, or voice box, is located in the neck and performs several important functions in the body. The larynx is involved in swallowing, breathing, and voice production. Sound is produced when the air which ...

  2. Climate in a Box

    NASA Image and Video Library

    NASA's Climate in a Box Project is exploring the utility of supercomputers in providing a complete, pre-packaged, ready-to-use toolkit of climate research products and on-demand access to a high-pe...

  3. Fornical and nonfornical projections from the rat hippocampal formation to the anterior thalamic nuclei.

    PubMed

    Dillingham, Christopher M; Erichsen, Jonathan T; O'Mara, Shane M; Aggleton, John P; Vann, Seralynne D

    2015-09-01

    The hippocampal formation and anterior thalamic nuclei form part of an interconnected network thought to support memory. A central pathway in this mnemonic network comprises the direct projections from the hippocampal formation to the anterior thalamic nuclei, projections that, in the primate brain, originate in the subicular cortices to reach the anterior thalamic nuclei by way of the fornix. In the rat brain, additional pathways involving the internal capsule have been described, linking the dorsal subiculum to the anteromedial thalamic nucleus, as well as the postsubiculum to the anterodorsal thalamic nucleus. Confirming such pathways is essential in order to appreciate how information is transferred from the hippocampal formation to the anterior thalamus and how it may be disrupted by fornix pathology. Accordingly, in the present study, pathway tracers were injected into the anterior thalamic nuclei and the dorsal subiculum of rats with fornix lesions. Contrary to previous descriptions, projections from the subiculum to the anteromedial thalamic nucleus overwhelmingly relied on the fornix. Dorsal subiculum projections to the majority of the anteroventral nucleus also predominantly relied on the fornix, although postsubicular inputs to the lateral dorsal part of the anteroventral nucleus, as well as to the anterodorsal and laterodorsal thalamic nuclei, largely involved a nonfornical pathway, via the internal capsule.

  4. Thalamic activity and biochemical changes in individuals with neuropathic pain following spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Gustin, S.M.; Wrigley, P.J.; Youssef, A.M.; McIndoe, L.; Wilcox, S.L.; Rae, C.D.; Edden, R; Siddall, P.J.; Henderson, L.A.

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing evidence relating thalamic changes to the generation and/or maintenance of neuropathic pain. We have recently reported that neuropathic orofacial pain is associated with altered thalamic anatomy, biochemistry and activity, which may result in disturbed thalamocortical oscillatory circuits. Despite this evidence, it is possible that these thalamic changes are not responsible for the presence of pain per se, but result as a consequence of the injury. To clarify this subject, we compared brain activity and biochemistry in 12 people with below-level neuropathic pain after complete thoracic spinal cord injury to 11 people with similar injuries and no neuropathic pain and 21 age and gender matched healthy controls. Quantitative arterial spinal labelling was used to measure thalamic activity and magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to determine changes in neuronal variability quantifying N-acetylaspartate and alterations in inhibitory function quantifying gamma amino butyric acid. This study revealed that the presence of neuropathic pain is associated with significant changes in thalamic biochemistry and neuronal activity. More specifically, the presence of neuropathic pain following spinal cord injury is associated with significant reductions in thalamic N-acetylaspartate, gamma amino butyric acid content and blood flow in the region of the thalamic reticular nucleus. Spinal cord injury on its own did not account for these changes. These findings support the hypothesis that neuropathic pain is associated with altered thalamic structure and function, which may disturb central processing and play a key role in the experience of neuropathic pain. PMID:24530612

  5. Transient Relay Function of Midline Thalamic Nuclei during Long-Term Memory Consolidation in Humans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thielen, Jan-Willem; Takashima, Atsuko; Rutters, Femke; Tendolkar, Indira; Fernández, Guillén

    2015-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that thalamic midline nuclei play a transient role in memory consolidation, we reanalyzed a prospective functional MRI study, contrasting recent and progressively more remote memory retrieval. We revealed a transient thalamic connectivity increase with the hippocampus, the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), and a…

  6. Developmental Alterations of Frontal-Striatal-Thalamic Connectivity in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, Kate Dimond; Welsh, Robert C.; Stern, Emily R.; Angstadt, Mike; Hanna, Gregory L.; Abelson, James L.; Taylor, Stephan F.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder is characterized by abnormalities of frontal-striatal-thalamic circuitry that appear near illness onset and persist over its course. Distinct frontal-striatal-thalamic loops through cortical centers for cognitive control (anterior cingulate cortex) and emotion processing (ventral medial frontal…

  7. Transient Relay Function of Midline Thalamic Nuclei during Long-Term Memory Consolidation in Humans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thielen, Jan-Willem; Takashima, Atsuko; Rutters, Femke; Tendolkar, Indira; Fernández, Guillén

    2015-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that thalamic midline nuclei play a transient role in memory consolidation, we reanalyzed a prospective functional MRI study, contrasting recent and progressively more remote memory retrieval. We revealed a transient thalamic connectivity increase with the hippocampus, the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), and a…

  8. Developmental Alterations of Frontal-Striatal-Thalamic Connectivity in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, Kate Dimond; Welsh, Robert C.; Stern, Emily R.; Angstadt, Mike; Hanna, Gregory L.; Abelson, James L.; Taylor, Stephan F.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder is characterized by abnormalities of frontal-striatal-thalamic circuitry that appear near illness onset and persist over its course. Distinct frontal-striatal-thalamic loops through cortical centers for cognitive control (anterior cingulate cortex) and emotion processing (ventral medial frontal…

  9. Altered thalamocortical and intra-thalamic functional connectivity during light sleep compared with wake.

    PubMed

    Hale, Joanne R; White, Thomas P; Mayhew, Stephen D; Wilson, Rebecca S; Rollings, David T; Khalsa, Sakhvinder; Arvanitis, Theodoros N; Bagshaw, Andrew P

    2016-01-15

    The transition from wakefulness into sleep is accompanied by modified activity in the brain's thalamocortical network. Sleep-related decreases in thalamocortical functional connectivity (FC) have previously been reported, but the extent to which these changes differ between thalamocortical pathways, and patterns of intra-thalamic FC during sleep remain untested. To non-invasively investigate thalamocortical and intra-thalamic FC as a function of sleep stage we recorded simultaneous EEG-fMRI data in 13 healthy participants during their descent into light sleep. Visual scoring of EEG data permitted sleep staging. We derived a functional thalamic parcellation during wakefulness by computing seed-based FC, measured between thalamic voxels and a set of pre-defined cortical regions. Sleep differentially affected FC between these distinct thalamic subdivisions and their associated cortical projections, with significant increases in FC during sleep restricted to sensorimotor connections. In contrast, intra-thalamic FC, both within and between functional thalamic subdivisions, showed significant increases with advancement into sleep. This work demonstrates the complexity and state-specific nature of functional thalamic relationships--both with the cortex and internally--over the sleep/wake cycle, and further highlights the importance of a thalamocortical focus in the study of sleep mechanisms.

  10. The Role of Thalamic Population Synchrony in the Emergence of Cortical Feature Selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Sean T.; Kremkow, Jens; Jin, Jianzhong; Wang, Yushi; Wang, Qi; Alonso, Jose-Manuel; Stanley, Garrett B.

    2014-01-01

    In a wide range of studies, the emergence of orientation selectivity in primary visual cortex has been attributed to a complex interaction between feed-forward thalamic input and inhibitory mechanisms at the level of cortex. Although it is well known that layer 4 cortical neurons are highly sensitive to the timing of thalamic inputs, the role of the stimulus-driven timing of thalamic inputs in cortical orientation selectivity is not well understood. Here we show that the synchronization of thalamic firing contributes directly to the orientation tuned responses of primary visual cortex in a way that optimizes the stimulus information per cortical spike. From the recorded responses of geniculate X-cells in the anesthetized cat, we synthesized thalamic sub-populations that would likely serve as the synaptic input to a common layer 4 cortical neuron based on anatomical constraints. We used this synchronized input as the driving input to an integrate-and-fire model of cortical responses and demonstrated that the tuning properties match closely to those measured in primary visual cortex. By modulating the overall level of synchronization at the preferred orientation, we show that efficiency of information transmission in the cortex is maximized for levels of synchronization which match those reported in thalamic recordings in response to naturalistic stimuli, a property which is relatively invariant to the orientation tuning width. These findings indicate evidence for a more prominent role of the feed-forward thalamic input in cortical feature selectivity based on thalamic synchronization. PMID:24415930

  11. Spatial Hyperschematia without Spatial Neglect after Insulo-Thalamic Disconnection

    PubMed Central

    Saj, Arnaud; Wilcke, Juliane C.; Gschwind, Markus; Emond, Héloïse; Assal, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    Different spatial representations are not stored as a single multipurpose map in the brain. Right brain-damaged patients can show a distortion, a compression of peripersonal and extrapersonal space. Here we report the case of a patient with a right insulo-thalamic disconnection without spatial neglect. The patient, compared with 10 healthy control subjects, showed a constant and reliable increase of her peripersonal and extrapersonal egocentric space representations - that we named spatial hyperschematia - yet left her allocentric space representations intact. This striking dissociation shows that our interactions with the surrounding world are represented and processed modularly in the human brain, depending on their frame of reference. PMID:24302992

  12. Nonneurologic emergencies in boxing.

    PubMed

    Coletta, Domenic F

    2009-10-01

    Professional boxing has done an admirable job in promoting safety standards in its particular sport. However, injuries occur during the normal course of competition and, unfortunately, an occasional life-threatening emergency may arise. Although most common medical emergencies in boxing are injuries from closed head trauma, in this article those infrequent but potentially catastrophic nonneurologic conditions are reviewed along with some less serious emergencies that the physician must be prepared to address.

  13. Freedom to box.

    PubMed Central

    Warburton, N

    1998-01-01

    The british Medical Association wants to criminalise all boxing. This article examines the logic of the arguments it uses and finds them wanting. The move from medical evidence about the risk of brain damage to the conclusion that boxing should be banned is not warranted. The BMA's arguments are a combination of inconsistent paternalism and legal moralism. Consistent application of the principles implicit in the BMA's arguments would lead to absurd consequences and to severe limitations being put on individual freedom. PMID:9549684

  14. [Boxing: traumatology and prevention].

    PubMed

    Cabanis, Emmanuel-Alain; Iba-Zizen, Marie-Thérèse; Perez, Georges; Senegas, Xavier; Furgoni, Julien; Pineau, Jean-Claude; Louquet, Jean-Louis; Henrion, Roger

    2010-10-01

    In 1986, a surgeon who, as an amateur boxer himself was concerned with boxers' health, approached a pioneering Parisian neuroimaging unit. Thus began a study in close cooperation with the French Boxing Federation, spanning 25 years. In a first series of 52 volunteer boxers (13 amateurs and 39 professionals), during which MRI gradually replaced computed tomography, ten risk factors were identified, which notably included boxing style: only one of 40 "stylists" with a good boxing technique had cortical atrophy (4.5 %), compared to 15 % of "sloggers". Changes to the French Boxing Federation rules placed the accent on medical prevention. The second series, of 247 boxers (81 amateurs and 266 professionals), showed a clear improvement, as lesions were suspected in 14 individuals, of which only 4 (1.35 %) were probably due to boxing. The third and fourth series were part of a protocol called "Brain-Boxing-Ageing", which included 76 boxers (11 having suffered KOs) and 120 MRI scans, with reproducible CT and MRI acquisitions (9 sequences with 1.5 T then 3 T, and CT). MRI anomalies secondary to boxing were found in 11 % of amateurs and 38 % of professionals (atrophy, high vascular T2 signal areas, 2 cases of post-KO subdural bleeding). CT revealed sinus damage in 13 % of the amateurs and 19 % of the professionals. The risk of acute and chronic facial and brain damage was underline, along with detailed precautionary measures (organization of bouts, role of the referee and ringside doctor, and application of French Boxing Federation rules).

  15. Infectious disease and boxing.

    PubMed

    King, Osric S

    2009-10-01

    There are no unique boxing diseases but certain factors contributing to the spread of illnesses apply strongly to the boxer, coach, and the training facility. This article examines the nature of the sport of boxing and its surrounding environment, and the likelihood of spread of infection through airborne, contact, or blood-borne routes of transmission. Evidence from other sports such as running, wrestling, and martial arts is included to help elucidate the pathophysiologic elements that could be identified in boxers.

  16. Automatic box loader

    DOEpatents

    Eldridge, Harry H.; Jones, Robert A.; Lindner, Gordon M.; Hight, Paul H.

    1976-01-01

    This invention relates to a system for repetitively forming an assembly consisting of a single layer of tubes and a row of ferromagnetic armatures underlying the same, electromagnetically conveying the resulting assembly to a position overlying a storage box, and depositing the assembly in the box. The system includes means for simultaneously depositing a row of the armatures on the inclined surface of a tube retainer. Tubes then are rolled down the surface to form a single tube layer bridging the armatures. A magnet assembly carrying electromagnets respectively aligned with the armatures is advanced close to the tube layer, and in the course of this advance is angularly displaced to bring the pole pieces of the electromagnets into parallelism with the tube layer. The magnets then are energized to pick up the assembly. The loaded magnet assembly is retracted to a position overlying the box, and during this retraction is again displaced to bring the pole pieces of the electromagnets into a horizontal plane. Means are provided for inserting the loaded electromagnets in the box and then de-energizing the electromagnets to deposit the assembly therein. The system accomplishes the boxing of fragile tubes at relatively high rates. Because the tubes are boxed as separated uniform layers, subsequent unloading operations are facilitated.

  17. Local and thalamic origins of correlated ongoing and sensory-evoked cortical activities

    PubMed Central

    Cohen-Kashi Malina, Katayun; Mohar, Boaz; Rappaport, Akiva N.; Lampl, Ilan

    2016-01-01

    Thalamic inputs of cells in sensory cortices are outnumbered by local connections. Thus, it was suggested that robust sensory response in layer 4 emerges due to synchronized thalamic activity. To investigate the role of both inputs in the generation of correlated cortical activities, we isolated the thalamic excitatory inputs of cortical cells by optogenetically silencing cortical firing. In anaesthetized mice, we measured the correlation between isolated thalamic synaptic inputs of simultaneously patched nearby layer 4 cells of the barrel cortex. Here we report that in contrast to correlated activity of excitatory synaptic inputs in the intact cortex, isolated thalamic inputs exhibit lower variability and asynchronous spontaneous and sensory-evoked inputs. These results are further supported in awake mice when we recorded the excitatory inputs of individual cortical cells simultaneously with the local field potential in a nearby site. Our results therefore indicate that cortical synchronization emerges by intracortical coupling. PMID:27615520

  18. Cable Tester Box

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jason H.

    2011-01-01

    Cables are very important electrical devices that carry power and signals across multiple instruments. Any fault in a cable can easily result in a catastrophic outcome. Therefore, verifying that all cables are built to spec is a very important part of Electrical Integration Procedures. Currently, there are two methods used in lab for verifying cable connectivity. (1) Using a Break-Out Box and an ohmmeter this method is time-consuming but effective for custom cables and (2) Commercial Automated Cable Tester Boxes this method is fast, but to test custom cables often requires pre-programmed configuration files, and cables used on spacecraft are often uniquely designed for specific purposes. The idea is to develop a semi-automatic continuity tester that reduces human effort in cable testing, speeds up the electrical integration process, and ensures system safety. The JPL-Cable Tester Box is developed to check every single possible electrical connection in a cable in parallel. This system indicates connectivity through LED (light emitting diode) circuits. Users can choose to test any pin/shell (test node) with a single push of a button, and any other nodes that are shorted to the test node, even if they are in the same connector, will light up with the test node. The JPL-Cable Tester Boxes offers the following advantages: 1. Easy to use: The architecture is simple enough that it only takes 5 minutes for anyone to learn how operate the Cable Tester Box. No pre-programming and calibration are required, since this box only checks continuity. 2. Fast: The cable tester box checks all the possible electrical connections in parallel at a push of a button. If a cable normally takes half an hour to test, using the Cable Tester Box will improve the speed to as little as 60 seconds to complete. 3. Versatile: Multiple cable tester boxes can be used together. As long as all the boxes share the same electrical potential, any number of connectors can be tested together.

  19. Localization of dopamine D4 receptors in GABAergic neurons of the primate brain.

    PubMed

    Mrzljak, L; Bergson, C; Pappy, M; Huff, R; Levenson, R; Goldman-Rakic, P S

    1996-05-16

    Dopamine receptors are the principal targets of drugs used in the treatment of schizophrenia. Among the five mammalian dopamine-receptor subtypes, the D4 subtype is of particular interest because of its high affinity for the atypical neuroleptic clozapine. Interest in clozapine stems from its effectiveness in reducing positive and negative symptoms in acutely psychotic and treatment-resistant schizophrenic patients without eliciting extrapyramidal side effects. We have produced a subtype-specific antibody against the D4 receptor and localized it within specific cellular elements and synaptic circuits of the central nervous system. The D4-receptor antibody labelled GABAergic neurons in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, thalamic reticular nucleus, globus pallidus and the substantia nigra (pars reticulata). Labelling was also observed in a subset of cortical pyramidal cells. Our findings suggest that clozapine's beneficial effects in schizophrenia may be achieved, in part, through D4-mediated GABA modulation, possibly implicating disinhibition of excitatory transmission in intrinsic cortical, thalamocortical and extrapyramidal pathways.

  20. Thalamic Shape Abnormalities in Antipsychotic Naïve Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Danivas, Vijay; Kalmady, Sunil V.; Venkatasubramanian, Ganesan; Gangadhar, Bangalore N.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Neurodevelopmental hypothesis of schizophrenia states abnormal pruning as one of the pathogenetic mechanism in schizophrenia. Though thalamic volume abnormalities have been documented, the shape differences of thalamus in antipsychotic-free schizophrenia in comparison with age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers need validation. Materials and Methods: We examined antipsychotic naïve schizophrenia patients (n=60) and age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers (n=44). The thalamic shape abnormalities were analyzed from their coded structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data using three-dimensional automated image analysis software, FMRIB's (Oxford Center for the functional MRI of the brain) tools-FIRST (FMRIB's Integrated Registration and Segmentation Tool) by creating deformable mesh model. Correlation with the psychopathology scores was carried out using F-statistics. Results: Patients with schizophrenia showed significant inward deformations in the regions corresponding to anterior, ventromedial, mediodorsal, and pulvinar nuclei. There was a direct correlation between negative syndrome score and the deformation in the right mediodorsal and right pulvinar nuclei. Conclusion: The inward deformations of thalamus in antipsychotic naive schizophrenia patients correspond to those nuclei which have reciprocal connections with frontal, superior temporal, and anterior cingulate regions and support the neurodevelopmental hypothesis of schizophrenia. PMID:23833340

  1. [Thalamic neuro inhibition in the treatment of post traumatic tremor].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Mañas, R; Rumià, J; Valldeoriola, F; Ferrer, E; Tolosa, E

    Severe head trauma could be followed by a wide range of movement disorders. Usually, they appear as a moderate or severe intention tremor that causes great patient disability. Those movement disorders use to be refractary to medical treatment, although sometimes they would be spontaneusly controlled by a year. 14 year old boy who suffered severe head trauma at age of 8. One year after the injury he developed an action tremor and choreiform dyskinesia with hemibalistic features evocated by the movement. Medical treatment was ineffective. Due to the great patients disability, we chose the surgical treatment based on the placement of an stimulation electrode in thalamic Vop/Vim complex, obtaining a tremor abolition with an improvement in the scales of tremor and quality of life. Surgical treatment of postraumatic tremors tryes to improve in terms of function and activities of daily living, more than suppresion of a symptom. The aim of this treatment is cut the palidal thalamic cortical pathways. Anyway, target is defined by the tremor related cells and, it is more a functional target than an anatomical one. We prefer stimulation more than lesion, due to the lack of brain definitive injury because its reversibility and adjustability features.

  2. Thalamic contribution to cortical processing of taste and expectation

    PubMed Central

    Samuelsen, Chad L.; Gardner, Matthew P. H.; Fontanini, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    Taste related information reaches the gustatory cortex (GC) through two routes: a thalamic and a limbic pathway. While evidence is accumulating on limbic-cortical interactions in taste, very little information is available on the function of the gustatory thalamus in shaping GC activity. Here we rely on behavioral electrophysiological techniques to study taste-evoked activity in GC before and after inactivation of the parvicellular portion of the ventroposteromedial nucleus of thalamus (VPMpc; i.e. the gustatory thalamus). Gustatory stimuli were presented to rats either alone or preceded by an anticipatory cue. The reliance on two different behavioral contexts allowed us to investigate how the VPMpc mediates GC responses to uncued tastants, cued tastants and anticipatory cues. Inactivation of the thalamus resulted in a dramatic reduction of taste processing in GC. However, responses to anticipatory cues were unaffected by this manipulation. The use of a cue-taste association paradigm also allowed for the identification of two subpopulations of taste specific neurons: those that responded to gustatory stimulation and to the cue (i.e. cue-and-taste) and those that responded to tastants only (i.e. taste-only). Analyses of these two populations revealed differences in response dynamics and connectivity with the VPMpc. The results provide novel evidence for the role of VPMpc in shaping GC activity and demonstrate a previously unknown association between responsiveness to behavioral events, temporal dynamics and thalamic connectivity in GC. PMID:23365221

  3. Thalamic, brainstem, and cerebellar glucose metabolism in the hemiplegic monkey

    SciTech Connect

    Shimoyama, I.; Dauth, G.W.; Gilman, S.; Frey, K.A.; Penney, J.B. Jr.

    1988-12-01

    Unilateral ablation of cerebral cortical areas 4 and 6 of Brodmann in the macaque monkey results in a contralateral hemiplegia that resolves partially with time. During the phase of dense hemiplegia, local cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (1CMRG1c) is decreased significantly in most of the thalamic nuclei ipsilateral to the ablation, and there are slight contralateral decreases. The lCMRGlc is reduced bilaterally in most of the brainstem nuclei and bilaterally in the deep cerebellar nuclei, but only in the contralateral cerebellar cortex. During the phase of partial motor recovery, lCMRGlc is incompletely restored in many of the thalamic nuclei ipsilateral to the ablation and completely restored in the contralateral nuclei. In the brainstem and deep cerebellar nuclei, poor to moderate recovery occurs bilaterally. Moderate recovery occurs in the contralateral cerebellar cortex. The findings demonstrate that a unilateral cerebral cortical lesion strongly affects lCMRGlc in the thalamus ipsilaterally and in the cerebellar cortex contralaterally, but in the brainstem bilaterally. Partial recovery of lCMRGlc accompanies the progressive motor recovery. The structures affected include those with direct, and also those with indirect, connections to the areas ablated.

  4. Redefining thalamic vascularization vicariously through gerald percheron: a historical vignette.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Nitin; Chaudhari, Amit; Hansberry, David R; Prestigiacomo, Charles J

    2014-01-01

    Gerard Percheron, M.D., a practicing neurologist and prolific researcher at the Institute Nationale de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale (INSERM), made significant and valuable contributions to medicine, in particular, to the vascular anatomy of the basal ganglia. His particular interest in the thalamus eventually led to the identification of an anatomic variation in its vascular supply. This newly identified artery was subsequently named the artery of Percheron (AOP). Given the estimated prevalence of the AOP in up to one third of the population and its significant proportion of all thalamic infarcts, it is necessary for physicians to be aware of this anatomic vascular variant and its clinical consequences. Although occlusion of the AOP may present similar to other arterial thalamic occlusions, it can be identified through susceptibility-weighted imaging and ruled out with conventional or magnetic resonance angiography. Occlusion of the AOP typically causes a simultaneous and symmetric infarction. Treatment efficacy is time-dependent and necessitates thrombolytics and anticoagulative medications. Here, we trace a course from the artery's initial description in 1973 to its current implications in cerebrovascular stroke, and offer a synopsis of the proposed treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Thalamic segmentation based on improved fuzzy connectedness in structural MRI.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chunlan; Wang, Qian; Wu, Weiwei; Xue, Yanqing; Lu, Wangsheng; Wu, Shuicai

    2015-11-01

    Thalamic segmentation serves an important function in localizing targets for deep brain stimulation (DBS). However, thalamic nuclei are still difficult to identify clearly from structural MRI. In this study, an improved algorithm based on the fuzzy connectedness framework was developed. Three-dimensional T1-weighted images in axial orientation were acquired through a 3D SPGR sequence by using a 1.5 T GE magnetic resonance scanner. Twenty-five normal images were analyzed using the proposed method, which involved adaptive fuzzy connectedness combined with confidence connectedness (AFCCC). After non-brain tissue removal and contrast enhancement, the seed point was selected manually, and confidence connectedness was used to perform an ROI update automatically. Both image intensity and local gradient were taken as image features in calculating the fuzzy affinity. Moreover, the weight of the features could be automatically adjusted. Thalamus, ventrointermedius (Vim), and subthalamic nucleus were successfully segmented. The results were evaluated with rules, such as similarity degree (SD), union overlap, and false positive. SD of thalamus segmentation reached values higher than 85%. The segmentation results were also compared with those achieved by the region growing and level set methods, respectively. Higher SD of the proposed method, especially in Vim, was achieved. The time cost using AFCCC was low, although it could achieve high accuracy. The proposed method is superior to the traditional fuzzy connectedness framework and involves reduced manual intervention in time saving.

  6. Alexia without agraphia following biopsy of a left thalamic tumor.

    PubMed

    Tamhankar, Madhura A; Coslett, Harry B; Fisher, Michael J; Sutton, Leslie N; Liu, Grant T

    2004-02-01

    Alexia without agraphia is a rare disconnection syndrome characterized by the loss of reading ability with retention of writing and verbal comprehension. We report a patient who developed alexia without agraphia after undergoing a biopsy for a malignant glioma involving the left thalamus. A 15-year-old right-handed male presented with 3 days of severe headache, and vomiting, and 1 month of blurry vision in his right visual field. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain disclosed a large exophytic mass originating in the left thalamus, with mass effect and hydrocephalus. The patient underwent biopsy of the left thalamic mass via a transcallosal approach. Postoperatively, the patient complained of inability to read or identify letters. Examination revealed alexia without agraphia. The syndrome of alexia without agraphia can be rarely caused after surgery. A transcallosal procedure through the splenium of the corpus callosum may disrupt the visual association fibers traveling from the right occipital cortex to the left angular gyrus. In our case the syndrome occurred because of a preexisting right homonymous hemianopia resulting from a left thalamic tumor.

  7. A dopamine-secreting pheochromocytoma.

    PubMed

    Yasunari, K; Kohno, M; Minami, M; Kano, H; Ohhira, M; Nakamura, K; Yoshikawa, J

    2000-01-01

    We describe a patient with pheochromocytoma, which secretes dopamine. He was admitted to hospital because of chronic diarrhea. After surgical resection of the tumor, dramatic cessation of the diarrhea and blood pressure elevation were observed. Decreased expression of dopamine beta-hydroxylase in the tumor was considered a possible mechanism of producing a pathophysiological concentration of dopamine. This case shows that excessive excretion of dopamine, a vasodilative hormone, may affect blood pressure.

  8. From Parkinsonian thalamic activity to restoring thalamic relay using deep brain stimulation: new insights from computational modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meijer, H. G. E.; Krupa, M.; Cagnan, H.; Lourens, M. A. J.; Heida, T.; Martens, H. C. F.; Bour, L. J.; van Gils, S. A.

    2011-10-01

    We present a computational model of a thalamocortical relay neuron for exploring basal ganglia thalamocortical loop behavior in relation to Parkinson's disease and deep brain stimulation (DBS). Previous microelectrode, single-unit recording studies demonstrated that oscillatory interaction within and between basal ganglia nuclei is very often accompanied by synchronization at Parkinsonian rest tremor frequencies (3-10 Hz). These oscillations have a profound influence on thalamic projections and impair the thalamic relaying of cortical input by generating rebound action potentials. Our model describes convergent inhibitory input received from basal ganglia by the thalamocortical cells based on characteristics of normal activity, and/or low-frequency oscillations (activity associated with Parkinson's disease). In addition to simulated input, we also used microelectrode recordings as inputs for the model. In the resting state, and without additional sensorimotor input, pathological rebound activity is generated for even mild Parkinsonian input. We have found a specific stimulation window of amplitudes and frequencies for periodic input, which corresponds to high-frequency DBS, and which also suppresses rebound activity for mild and even more prominent Parkinsonian input. When low-frequency pathological rebound activity disables the thalamocortical cell's ability to relay excitatory cortical input, a stimulation signal with parameter settings corresponding to our stimulation window can restore the thalamocortical cell's relay functionality.

  9. Progressive deterioration of thalamic nuclei relates to cortical network decline in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Cobia, Derin J; Smith, Matthew J; Salinas, Ilse; Ng, Charlene; Gado, Mokhtar; Csernansky, John G; Wang, Lei

    2017-02-01

    Thalamic abnormalities are considered part of the complex pathophysiology of schizophrenia, particularly the involvement of specific thalamic nuclei. The goals of this study were to: introduce a novel atlas-based parcellation scheme for defining various thalamic nuclei; compare their integrity in a schizophrenia sample against healthy individuals at baseline and follow-up time points, as well as rates of change over time; examine relationships between the nuclei and abnormalities in known connected cortical regions; and finally, to determine if schizophrenia-related thalamic nuclei changes relate to cognitive functioning and clinical symptoms. Subjects were from a larger longitudinal 2-year follow-up study, schizophrenia (n=20) and healthy individuals (n=20) were group-matched for age, gender, and recent-alcohol use. We used high-dimensional brain mapping to obtain thalamic morphology, and applied a novel atlas-based method for delineating anterior, mediodorsal, and pulvinar nuclei. Results from cross sectional GLMs revealed group differences in bilateral mediodorsal and anterior nuclei, while longitudinal models revealed significant group-by-time interactions for the mediodorsal and pulvinar nuclei. Cortical correlations were the strongest for the pulvinar in frontal, temporal and parietal regions, followed by the mediodorsal nucleus in frontal regions, but none in the anterior nucleus. Thalamic measures did not correlate with cognitive and clinical scores at any time point or longitudinally. Overall, findings revealed a pattern of persistent progressive abnormalities in thalamic nuclei that relate to advancing cortical decline in schizophrenia, but not with measures of behavior.

  10. Bidirectional modulation of fear extinction by mediodorsal thalamic firing in mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sukchan; Ahmed, Touqeer; Lee, Soojung; Kim, Huisu; Choi, Sukwoo; Kim, Duk-Soo; Kim, Sang Jeong; Cho, Jeiwon; Shin, Hee-Sup

    2011-12-25

    The mediodorsal thalamic nucleus has been implicated in the control of memory processes. However, the underlying neural mechanism remains unclear. Here we provide evidence for bidirectional modulation of fear extinction by the mediodorsal thalamic nucleus. Mice with a knockout or mediodorsal thalamic nucleus-specific knockdown of phospholipase C β4 exhibited impaired fear extinction. Mutant mediodorsal thalamic nucleus neurons in slices showed enhanced burst firing accompanied by increased T-type Ca(2+) currents; blocking of T channels in vivo rescued the fear extinction. Tetrode recordings in freely moving mice revealed that, during extinction, the single-spike (tonic) frequency of mediodorsal thalamic nucleus neurons increased in wild-type mice, but was static in mutant mice. Furthermore, tonic-evoking microstimulations of the mediodorsal thalamic nucleus, contemporaneous with the extinction tones, rescued fear extinction in mutant mice and facilitated it in wild-type mice. In contrast, burst-evoking microstimulation suppressed extinction in wild-type mice, mimicking the mutation. These results suggest that the firing mode of the mediodorsal thalamic nucleus is critical for the modulation of fear extinction.

  11. Developmental synergy between thalamic structure and interhemispheric connectivity in the visual system of preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Ceschin, Rafael; Wisnowski, Jessica L.; Paquette, Lisa B.; Nelson, Marvin D.; Blüml, Stefan; Panigrahy, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Thalamic structural co-variation with cortical regions has been demonstrated in preterm infants, but its relationship to cortical function and severity of non-cystic white matter injury (non-cystic WMI) is unclear. The relationship between thalamic morphology and both cortical network synchronization and cortical structural connectivity has not been established. We tested the hypothesis that in preterm neonates, thalamic volume would correlate with primary cortical visual function and microstructural integrity of cortico-cortical visual association pathways. A total of 80 term-equivalent preterm and 44 term-born infants underwent high-resolution structural imaging coupled with visual functional magnetic resonance imaging or diffusion tensor imaging. There was a strong correlation between thalamic volume and primary visual cortical activation in preterms with non-cystic WMI (r = 0.81, p-value = 0.001). Thalamic volume also correlated strongly with interhemispheric cortico-cortical connectivity (splenium) in preterm neonates with a relatively higher severity of non-cystic WMI (p-value < 0.001). In contrast, there was lower correlation between thalamic volume and intrahemispheric cortico-cortical connectivity, including the inferior longitudinal fasciculus and inferior frontal orbital fasciculus. This study shows distinct temporal overlap in the disruption of thalamo-cortical and interhemispheric cortico-cortical connectivity in preterm infants suggesting developmental synergy between thalamic morphology and the emergence of cortical networks in the last trimester. PMID:26106571

  12. Dystonia after striatopallidal and thalamic stroke: clinicoradiological correlations and pathophysiological mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Krystkowiak, P; Martinat, P; Defebvre, L; Pruvo, J; Leys, D; Destee, A

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To establish the pathophysiological mechanisms of striatopallidal and thalamic dystonia.
METHODS—Five patients from among 26 who presented (between March 1987 and July 1996) with focal dystonia, segmental dystonia, or hemidystonia caused by a single localised vascular lesion, were selected. Patients with lesions with indefinite boundaries, and diffuse, or multiple, or large brain lesions were excluded. Three dimensional T1 weighted MRI (1.5 tesla) was performed to determine the topography of the lesions. The atlas of Hassler allowed the stereotactic localisation of the lesions to be specified exactly.
RESULTS—Three patients had dystonic spasms associated with striatopallidal lesions and one with a thalamic and striatopallidal lesion. One other patient presented with a myoclonic dystonia related to a thalamic lesion. The striatopallidal lesions were located in the sensorimotor area with a somatotopical distribution. The pure thalamic lesion involved the centromedian nucleus, the sensory nuclei, and the pulvinar whereas the thalamic and striatopallidal lesion was located in the pallidonigral thalamic territory, which receives pallidonigral inputs.
CONCLUSION—The striatopallidal dystonia might be the consequence of the interruption of the cortico-striato-pallido-thalamo-cortical loop induced by lesions located within the sensorimotor part of the striatopallidal complex. By contrast, it is suggested that thalamic dystonia might be caused by lesions located in the centromedian or the ventral intermediate nuclei, outside the pallidonigral territory, but leading also to a dysfunction of the cort ico -striat o - pallido - thalamo - cort ica l loop.

 PMID:9810942

  13. Anatomical Variations in the Posterior Circle of Willis and Vascular Pathologies in Isolated Unilateral Thalamic Infarction.

    PubMed

    Goerlitz, Johannes; Wenz, Holger; Al-Zghloul, Mansour; Kerl, Hans U; Groden, Christoph; Förster, Alex

    2015-01-01

    To characterize relations between configurations of the posterior part of the Circle of Willis (CoW) and the occurrence of unilateral thalamic infarction. From a magnetic resonance imaging report database, we identified and analyzed 111 patients with acute isolated unilateral thalamic infarction on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). Vascular pathologies were noted on magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and the diameter of the posterior communicating artery (PComA) and the P1 and P2 segments of the posterior cerebral artery determined. Most infarctions were observed in the territory of the inferolateral arteries (70.2%), followed by the paramedian (16.3%), tuberothalamic (8.7%), and posterior choroidal arteries (4.8%). Relevant vascular pathologies included stenosis of the basilar artery (4.5%), P1 segment stenosis (4.5%)/occlusion (.9%), and P2 segment stenosis (14.4%)/occlusion (4.5%). Paramedian thalamic infarction was associated with ipsilateral P1 segment hypoplasia/absence (P < .001); tuberothalamic infarction with ipsilateral PComA hypoplasia/absence (P = .08). Furthermore, the diameter of the relevant CoW segment was smaller in patients with ipsilateral thalamic infarction. Assessment of CoW configuration on MRA may be helpful to understand the appearance of unilateral thalamic stroke independent from stroke etiology. A smaller diameter of the relevant CoW segment might be a risk factor for ipsilateral thalamic stroke in the corresponding thalamic vascular territory. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  14. Amphetamine Paradoxically Augments Exocytotic Dopamine Release and Phasic Dopamine Signals

    PubMed Central

    Daberkow, DP; Brown, HD; Bunner, KD; Kraniotis, SA; Doellman, MA; Ragozzino, ME; Garris, PA; Roitman, MF

    2013-01-01

    Drugs of abuse hijack brain reward circuitry during the addiction process by augmenting action potential-dependent phasic dopamine release events associated with learning and goal-directed behavior. One prominent exception to this notion would appear to be amphetamine (AMPH) and related analogs, which are proposed instead to disrupt normal patterns of dopamine neurotransmission by depleting vesicular stores and promoting non-exocytotic dopamine efflux via reverse transport. This mechanism of AMPH action, though, is inconsistent with its therapeutic effects and addictive properties - which are thought to be reliant on phasic dopamine signaling. Here we used fast-scan cyclic voltammetry in freely moving rats to interrogate principal neurochemical responses to AMPH in the striatum and relate these changes to behavior. First, we showed that AMPH dose-dependently enhanced evoked dopamine responses to phasic-like current pulse trains for up to two hours. Modeling the data revealed that AMPH inhibited dopamine uptake but also unexpectedly potentiated vesicular dopamine release. Second, we found that AMPH increased the amplitude, duration and frequency of spontaneous dopamine transients, the naturally occurring, non-electrically evoked, phasic increases in extracellular dopamine. Finally, using an operant sucrose reward paradigm, we showed that low-dose AMPH augmented dopamine transients elicited by sucrose-predictive cues. However, operant behavior failed at high-dose AMPH, which was due to phasic dopamine hyperactivity and the decoupling of dopamine transients from the reward predictive cue. These findings identify up-regulation of exocytotic dopamine release as a key AMPH action in behaving animals and support a unified mechanism of abused drugs to activate phasic dopamine signaling. PMID:23303926

  15. GABAB receptors suppress burst-firing in reticular thalamic neurons.

    PubMed

    Cain, Stuart M; Garcia, Esperanza; Waheed, Zeina; Jones, Karen L; Bushell, Trevor J; Snutch, Terrance P

    2017-07-25

    Burst-firing in thalamic neurons is known to play a key role in mediating thalamocortical (TC) oscillations that are associated with non-REM sleep and some types of epileptic seizure. Within the TC system the primary output of GABAergic neurons in the reticular thalamic nucleus (RTN) is thought to induce the de-inactivation of T-type calcium channels in thalamic relay (TR) neurons, promoting burst-firing drive to the cortex and the propagation of TC network activity. However, RTN neurons also project back onto other neurons within the RTN. The role of this putative negative feedback upon the RTN itself is less well understood, although is hypothesized to induce de-synchronization of RTN neuron firing leading to the suppression of TC oscillations. Here we tested two hypotheses concerning possible mechanisms underlying TC oscillation modulation. Firstly, we assessed the burst-firing behavior of RTN neurons in response to GABAB receptor activation using acute brain slices. The selective GABAB receptor agonist baclofen was found to induce suppression of burst-firing concurrent with effects on membrane input resistance. Secondly, RTN neurons express CaV3.2 and CaV3.3 T-type calcium channel isoforms known to contribute toward TC burst-firing and we examined the modulation of these channels by GABAB receptor activation. Utilizing exogenously expressed T-type channels we assessed whether GABAB receptor activation could directly alter T-type calcium channel properties. Overall, GABAB receptor activation had only modest effects on CaV3.2 and CaV3.3 isoforms. The only effect that could be predicted to suppress burst-firing was a hyperpolarized shift in the voltage-dependence of inactivation, potentially causing lower channel availability at membrane potentials critical for burst-firing. Conversely, other effects observed such as a hyperpolarized shift in the voltage-dependence of activation of both CaV3.2 and CaV3.3 as well as increased time constant of activation of the CaV3

  16. Acute Pseudobulbar Palsy After Bilateral Paramedian Thalamic Infarction: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Bilateral paramedian thalamic infarction is a rare subtype of stroke caused by occlusion of the artery of Percheron, an uncommon variant originating from one of the posterior cerebral arteries. This type of stroke has several major clinical presentations: altered mental status, behavioral amnestic impairment, aphasia or dysarthria, ocular movement disorders, motor deficits, cerebellar signs, and others. Few cases of bilateral paramedian thalamic infarction-related pseudobulbar palsy characterized by dysarthria, dysphagia, and facial and tongue weakness have been reported. We report here a rare case of acute severe pseudobulbar palsy as a manifestation of bilateral paramedian thalamic infarction. PMID:27606284

  17. Dopamine and anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Södersten, P; Bergh, C; Leon, M; Zandian, M

    2016-01-01

    We have suggested that reduced food intake increases the risk for anorexia nervosa by engaging mesolimbic dopamine neurons, thereby initially rewarding dieting. Recent fMRI studies have confirmed that dopamine neurons are activated in anorexia nervosa, but it is not clear whether this response is due to the disorder or to its resulting nutritional deficit. When the body senses the shortage of nutrients, it rapidly shifts behavior toward foraging for food as a normal physiological response and the mesolimbic dopamine neurons may be involved in that process. On the other hand, the altered dopamine status of anorexics has been suggested to result from a brain abnormality that underlies their complex emotional disorder. We suggest that the outcomes of the treatments that emerge from that perspective remain poor because they target the mental symptoms that are actually the consequences of the food deprivation that accompanies anorexia. On the other hand, a method that normalizes the disordered eating behavior of anorexics results in much better physiological, behavioral, and emotional outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. 6. VIEW OF INTERIOR GLOVE BOX DURING CONSTRUCTION. GLOVE BOXES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW OF INTERIOR GLOVE BOX DURING CONSTRUCTION. GLOVE BOXES CONTAINED ALL PRODUCTION OPERATIONS AND WERE INTERCONNECTED BY CONVEYORS. (9/21/59) - Rocky Flats Plant, Plutonium Fabrication, Central section of Plant, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  19. Looking Southwest at Reactor Box Furnaces With Reactor Boxes and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking Southwest at Reactor Box Furnaces With Reactor Boxes and Repossessed Uranium in Recycle Recovery Building - Hematite Fuel Fabrication Facility, Recycle Recovery Building, 3300 State Road P, Festus, Jefferson County, MO

  20. Thinking "Inside" the Box

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeffries, Carolyn

    2011-01-01

    The authors conducted a test to determine whether they could incorporate a discovery box into a preschool setting was successful. It stimulated the students' natural inquiry processes while promoting understanding of healthy foods and allowing for practice of fine-motor skills. It was easily incorporated into the curriculum and classroom space.…

  1. Hydrophobic, Porous Battery Boxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg, Bobby J.; Casey, John E., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    Boxes made of porous, hydrophobic polymers developed to contain aqueous potassium hydroxide electrolyte solutions of zinc/air batteries while allowing air to diffuse in as needed for operation. Used on other types of batteries for in-cabin use in which electrolytes aqueous and from which gases generated during operation must be vented without allowing electrolytes to leak out.

  2. EPA ExpoBox

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA ExpoBox is a toolbox for exposure assessors. Its purpose is to provide a compendium of exposure assessment and risk characterization tools that will present comprehensive step-by-step guidance and links to relevant exposure assessment data bases, mode

  3. Drawing inside the Box

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Ranella

    2007-01-01

    When working with very young children and/or students with special needs, it is beneficial for teachers to think "outside the box" in order to preserve and enhance a child's natural curiosity. In an effort to teach young children to control their drawing tools, they are often presented with coloring book-type pages and instructed to "stay inside…

  4. Mystery Box Marvels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santos, Joel; Centurio, Tina

    2012-01-01

    What happens in the first week of school could very well set the stage for the rest of the school year. Setting high standards for science activities based in inquiry can start on the first day of science class and develop as the year unfolds. With the use of simple, readily available, inexpensive materials, an efficient mystery box lesson can be…

  5. Shoe Box Circuits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandifer, Cody

    2009-01-01

    Students' eyes grow wide with wonder as they get a motor to work or make a bulb light for the first time. As these daunting feats of electrical engineering remind us, teaching electricity is invariably rewarding and worthwhile. In this inquiry-based science project, elementary students work in pairs to design and wire a shoe box "room" that meets…

  6. The Idea Box.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association for the Education of Young Children, Washington, DC.

    Five pamphlets offer helpful ideas and instructions on teacher planning, learning environments, teaching with nature, a creative curriculum, and ideas for administrators in "The Idea Box," compiled by members of the Austin Association for the Education of Young Children. Each pamphlet contains useful information for working with young children.…

  7. Teaching with Box Tops.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raiser, Lynne; D'Zamko, Mary Elizabeth

    1984-01-01

    Using environmental materials (such as the phone book and placemats from fast food restaurants) can be a motivating way to teach learning disabled students skills and concepts, as shown in an approach to reading, math, science and nutrition, and social studies instruction using a JELL-O brand gelatin box. (CL)

  8. Thinking "Inside" the Box

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeffries, Carolyn

    2011-01-01

    The authors conducted a test to determine whether they could incorporate a discovery box into a preschool setting was successful. It stimulated the students' natural inquiry processes while promoting understanding of healthy foods and allowing for practice of fine-motor skills. It was easily incorporated into the curriculum and classroom space.…

  9. Teaching with Box Tops.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raiser, Lynne; D'Zamko, Mary Elizabeth

    1984-01-01

    Using environmental materials (such as the phone book and placemats from fast food restaurants) can be a motivating way to teach learning disabled students skills and concepts, as shown in an approach to reading, math, science and nutrition, and social studies instruction using a JELL-O brand gelatin box. (CL)

  10. Shoe Box Circuits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandifer, Cody

    2009-01-01

    Students' eyes grow wide with wonder as they get a motor to work or make a bulb light for the first time. As these daunting feats of electrical engineering remind us, teaching electricity is invariably rewarding and worthwhile. In this inquiry-based science project, elementary students work in pairs to design and wire a shoe box "room" that meets…

  11. Mystery Box Marvels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santos, Joel; Centurio, Tina

    2012-01-01

    What happens in the first week of school could very well set the stage for the rest of the school year. Setting high standards for science activities based in inquiry can start on the first day of science class and develop as the year unfolds. With the use of simple, readily available, inexpensive materials, an efficient mystery box lesson can be…

  12. Drawing inside the Box

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Ranella

    2007-01-01

    When working with very young children and/or students with special needs, it is beneficial for teachers to think "outside the box" in order to preserve and enhance a child's natural curiosity. In an effort to teach young children to control their drawing tools, they are often presented with coloring book-type pages and instructed to "stay inside…

  13. Cereal Box Totems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, AnnMarie

    2002-01-01

    Presents a multicultural project used with fourth-grade students in which they created a three-dimensional totem pole using leftover cereal boxes. Discusses in detail how to create the totem pole. Explains that students learned about Northwest American Indians in class. (CMK)

  14. "Can" the Black Box

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lestingi, Francis S.

    1975-01-01

    Describes the use of the "Arcane (mysterious) Can" which is a "tin" can which is permanently sealed, both air- and water-tight, by means of a home canning device. The canning procedure permits the use of a large variety of materials which can not be utilized in the ordinary mystery box. This Can activity is valuable for…

  15. Thalamic Volume Is Reduced in Cervical and Laryngeal Dystonias.

    PubMed

    Waugh, Jeff L; Kuster, John K; Levenstein, Jacob M; Makris, Nikos; Multhaupt-Buell, Trisha J; Sudarsky, Lewis R; Breiter, Hans C; Sharma, Nutan; Blood, Anne J

    2016-01-01

    Dystonia, a debilitating movement disorder characterized by abnormal fixed positions and/or twisting postures, is associated with dysfunction of motor control networks. While gross brain lesions can produce secondary dystonias, advanced neuroimaging techniques have been required to identify network abnormalities in primary dystonias. Prior neuroimaging studies have provided valuable insights into the pathophysiology of dystonia, but few directly assessed the gross volume of motor control regions, and to our knowledge, none identified abnormalities common to multiple types of idiopathic focal dystonia. We used two gross volumetric segmentation techniques and one voxelwise volumetric technique (voxel based morphometry, VBM) to compare regional volume between matched healthy controls and patients with idiopathic primary focal dystonia (cervical, n = 17, laryngeal, n = 7). We used (1) automated gross volume measures of eight motor control regions using the FreeSurfer analysis package; (2) blinded, anatomist-supervised manual segmentation of the whole thalamus (also gross volume); and (3) voxel based morphometry, which measures local T1-weighted signal intensity and estimates gray matter density or volume at the level of single voxels, for both whole-brain and thalamus. Using both automated and manual gross volumetry, we found a significant volume decrease only in the thalamus in two focal dystonias. Decreases in whole-thalamic volume were independent of head and brain size, laterality of symptoms, and duration. VBM measures did not differ between dystonia and control groups in any motor control region. Reduced thalamic gross volume, detected in two independent analyses, suggests a common anatomical abnormality in cervical dystonia and spasmodic dysphonia. Defining the structural underpinnings of dystonia may require such complementary approaches.

  16. Thalamic Volume Is Reduced in Cervical and Laryngeal Dystonias

    PubMed Central

    Waugh, Jeff L.; Kuster, John K.; Levenstein, Jacob M.; Makris, Nikos; Multhaupt-Buell, Trisha J.; Sudarsky, Lewis R.; Breiter, Hans C.; Sharma, Nutan; Blood, Anne J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Dystonia, a debilitating movement disorder characterized by abnormal fixed positions and/or twisting postures, is associated with dysfunction of motor control networks. While gross brain lesions can produce secondary dystonias, advanced neuroimaging techniques have been required to identify network abnormalities in primary dystonias. Prior neuroimaging studies have provided valuable insights into the pathophysiology of dystonia, but few directly assessed the gross volume of motor control regions, and to our knowledge, none identified abnormalities common to multiple types of idiopathic focal dystonia. Methods We used two gross volumetric segmentation techniques and one voxelwise volumetric technique (voxel based morphometry, VBM) to compare regional volume between matched healthy controls and patients with idiopathic primary focal dystonia (cervical, n = 17, laryngeal, n = 7). We used (1) automated gross volume measures of eight motor control regions using the FreeSurfer analysis package; (2) blinded, anatomist-supervised manual segmentation of the whole thalamus (also gross volume); and (3) voxel based morphometry, which measures local T1-weighted signal intensity and estimates gray matter density or volume at the level of single voxels, for both whole-brain and thalamus. Results Using both automated and manual gross volumetry, we found a significant volume decrease only in the thalamus in two focal dystonias. Decreases in whole-thalamic volume were independent of head and brain size, laterality of symptoms, and duration. VBM measures did not differ between dystonia and control groups in any motor control region. Conclusions Reduced thalamic gross volume, detected in two independent analyses, suggests a common anatomical abnormality in cervical dystonia and spasmodic dysphonia. Defining the structural underpinnings of dystonia may require such complementary approaches. PMID:27171035

  17. Neuropsychological correlates of a right unilateral lacunar thalamic infarction

    PubMed Central

    Werf, Y; Weerts, J; Jolles, J; Witter, M; Lindeboom, J; Scheltens, P.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To report on a patient with a lacunar infarction in the right intralaminar nuclei of the thalamus. The role of the thalamic intralaminar nuclei in cognitive function is as yet insufficiently known. The patient described has shown signs of apathy and loss of initiative, in combination with cognitive deficits, which have persisted essentially unaltered up to the present day since an abrupt onset 17 years ago.
METHODS—High resolution MRI was performed to show the extent of the lesion; a combination of published and experimental neuropsychological techniques was administered to show the nature of the cognitive defects; Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was employed to obtain a measure of cortical perfusion.
RESULTS—Brain MRI disclosed an isolated lacunar infarction in the dorsal caudal intralaminar nuclei of the thalamus. Neuropsychological evaluation indicated problems with attention and concentration, executive disturbances, and memory deficits both in the visual and verbal domains. The memory deficits could not be attributed to problems in the early stages of information processing, and are hence regarded as resulting from a failure of retrieval rather than encoding or storage. Brain SPECT disclosed a hypoperfusion of the right frontal cortex.
CONCLUSION—The data indicate that the cognitive profile is the result of a dysfunction of executive functions. This is corroborated by the finding of decreased blood flow in the right frontal cortex, and by evidence from the neuroanatomical literature. Thus the dysexecutive symptoms are thought to be caused by disconnection of the prefrontal cortex from the brainstem activating nuclei through the strategic localisation of the right thalamic infarction.

 PMID:9886448

  18. Ocular complications of boxing.

    PubMed

    Bianco, M; Vaiano, A S; Colella, F; Coccimiglio, F; Moscetti, M; Palmieri, V; Focosi, F; Zeppilli, P; Vinger, P F

    2005-02-01

    To investigate the prevalence of ocular injuries in a large population of boxers over a period of 16 years, in particular, the most severe lesions that may be vision threatening. Clinical records of the medical archive of the Italian Boxing Federation were analysed. A total of 1032 boxers were examined from February 1982 to October 1998. A complete ophthalmological history was available for 956, who formed the study population (a total of 10 697 examinations). The following data were collected: age when started boxing; duration of competitive boxing career (from the date of the first bout); weight category; a thorough ocular history. The following investigations were carried out: measurement of visual acuity and visual fields, anterior segment inspection, applanation tonometry, gonioscopy, and examination of ocular fundus. Eighty age matched healthy subjects, who had never boxed, formed the control group. Of the 956 boxers examined, 428 were amateur (44.8%) and 528 professional (55.2%). The median age at first examination was 23.1 (4.3) years (range 15-36). The prevalence of conjunctival, corneal, lenticular, vitreal, ocular papilla, and retinal alterations in the study population was 40.9% compared with 3.1% in the control group (p< or =0.0001). The prevalence of serious ocular findings (angle, lens, macula, and peripheral retina alterations) was 5.6% in boxers and 3.1% in controls (NS). Boxing does not result in a higher prevalence of severe ocular lesions than in the general population. However, the prevalence of milder lesions (in particular with regard to the conjunctiva and cornea) is noteworthy, justifying the need for adequate ophthalmological surveillance.

  19. Ocular complications of boxing

    PubMed Central

    Bianco, M; Vaiano, A; Colella, F; Coccimiglio, F; Moscetti, M; Palmieri, V; Focosi, F; Zeppilli, P; Vinger, P

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the prevalence of ocular injuries in a large population of boxers over a period of 16 years, in particular, the most severe lesions that may be vision threatening. Methods: Clinical records of the medical archive of the Italian Boxing Federation were analysed. A total of 1032 boxers were examined from February 1982 to October 1998. A complete ophthalmological history was available for 956, who formed the study population (a total of 10 697 examinations). The following data were collected: age when started boxing; duration of competitive boxing career (from the date of the first bout); weight category; a thorough ocular history. The following investigations were carried out: measurement of visual acuity and visual fields, anterior segment inspection, applanation tonometry, gonioscopy, and examination of ocular fundus. Eighty age matched healthy subjects, who had never boxed, formed the control group. Results: Of the 956 boxers examined, 428 were amateur (44.8%) and 528 professional (55.2%). The median age at first examination was 23.1 (4.3) years (range 15–36). The prevalence of conjunctival, corneal, lenticular, vitreal, ocular papilla, and retinal alterations in the study population was 40.9% compared with 3.1% in the control group (p⩽0.0001). The prevalence of serious ocular findings (angle, lens, macula, and peripheral retina alterations) was 5.6% in boxers and 3.1% in controls (NS). Conclusions: Boxing does not result in a higher prevalence of severe ocular lesions than in the general population. However, the prevalence of milder lesions (in particular with regard to the conjunctiva and cornea) is noteworthy, justifying the need for adequate ophthalmological surveillance. PMID:15665199

  20. Thalamus parcellation using multi-modal feature classification and thalamic nuclei priors

    PubMed Central

    Glaister, Jeffrey; Carass, Aaron; Stough, Joshua V.; Calabresi, Peter A.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2016-01-01

    Segmentation of the thalamus and thalamic nuclei is useful to quantify volumetric changes from neurodegenerative diseases. Most thalamus segmentation algorithms only use T1-weighted magnetic resonance images and current thalamic parcellation methods require manual interaction. Smaller nuclei, such as the lateral and medial geniculates, are challenging to locate due to their small size. We propose an automated segmentation algorithm using a set of features derived from diffusion tensor image (DTI) and thalamic nuclei location priors. After extracting features, a hierarchical random forest classifier is trained to locate the thalamus. A second random forest classifies thalamus voxels as belonging to one of six thalamic nuclei classes. The proposed algorithm was tested using a leave-one-out cross validation scheme and compared with state-of-the-art algorithms. The proposed algorithm has a higher Dice score compared to other methods for the whole thalamus and several nuclei. PMID:27582600

  1. Multiple clusters of release sites formed by individual thalamic afferents onto cortical interneurons ensure reliable transmission.

    PubMed

    Bagnall, Martha W; Hull, Court; Bushong, Eric A; Ellisman, Mark H; Scanziani, Massimo

    2011-07-14

    Thalamic afferents supply the cortex with sensory information by contacting both excitatory neurons and inhibitory interneurons. Interestingly, thalamic contacts with interneurons constitute such a powerful synapse that even one afferent can fire interneurons, thereby driving feedforward inhibition. However, the spatial representation of this potent synapse on interneuron dendrites is poorly understood. Using Ca imaging and electron microscopy we show that an individual thalamic afferent forms multiple contacts with the interneuronal proximal dendritic arbor, preferentially near branch points. More contacts are correlated with larger amplitude synaptic responses. Each contact, consisting of a single bouton, can release up to seven vesicles simultaneously, resulting in graded and reliable Ca transients. Computational modeling indicates that the release of multiple vesicles at each contact minimally reduces the efficiency of the thalamic afferent in exciting the interneuron. This strategy preserves the spatial representation of thalamocortical inputs across the dendritic arbor over a wide range of release conditions.

  2. Prenatal thalamic waves regulate cortical area size prior to sensory processing

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Juan, Verónica; Filipchuk, Anton; Antón-Bolaños, Noelia; Mezzera, Cecilia; Gezelius, Henrik; Andrés, Belen; Rodríguez-Malmierca, Luis; Susín, Rafael; Schaad, Olivier; Iwasato, Takuji; Schüle, Roland; Rutlin, Michael; Nelson, Sacha; Ducret, Sebastien; Valdeolmillos, Miguel; Rijli, Filippo M.; López-Bendito, Guillermina

    2017-01-01

    The cerebral cortex is organized into specialized sensory areas, whose initial territory is determined by intracortical molecular determinants. Yet, sensory cortical area size appears to be fine tuned during development to respond to functional adaptations. Here we demonstrate the existence of a prenatal sub-cortical mechanism that regulates the cortical areas size in mice. This mechanism is mediated by spontaneous thalamic calcium waves that propagate among sensory-modality thalamic nuclei up to the cortex and that provide a means of communication among sensory systems. Wave pattern alterations in one nucleus lead to changes in the pattern of the remaining ones, triggering changes in thalamic gene expression and cortical area size. Thus, silencing calcium waves in the auditory thalamus induces Rorβ upregulation in a neighbouring somatosensory nucleus preluding the enlargement of the barrel-field. These findings reveal that embryonic thalamic calcium waves coordinate cortical sensory area patterning and plasticity prior to sensory information processing. PMID:28155854

  3. Prenatal thalamic waves regulate cortical area size prior to sensory processing.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Juan, Verónica; Filipchuk, Anton; Antón-Bolaños, Noelia; Mezzera, Cecilia; Gezelius, Henrik; Andrés, Belen; Rodríguez-Malmierca, Luis; Susín, Rafael; Schaad, Olivier; Iwasato, Takuji; Schüle, Roland; Rutlin, Michael; Nelson, Sacha; Ducret, Sebastien; Valdeolmillos, Miguel; Rijli, Filippo M; López-Bendito, Guillermina

    2017-02-03

    The cerebral cortex is organized into specialized sensory areas, whose initial territory is determined by intracortical molecular determinants. Yet, sensory cortical area size appears to be fine tuned during development to respond to functional adaptations. Here we demonstrate the existence of a prenatal sub-cortical mechanism that regulates the cortical areas size in mice. This mechanism is mediated by spontaneous thalamic calcium waves that propagate among sensory-modality thalamic nuclei up to the cortex and that provide a means of communication among sensory systems. Wave pattern alterations in one nucleus lead to changes in the pattern of the remaining ones, triggering changes in thalamic gene expression and cortical area size. Thus, silencing calcium waves in the auditory thalamus induces Rorβ upregulation in a neighbouring somatosensory nucleus preluding the enlargement of the barrel-field. These findings reveal that embryonic thalamic calcium waves coordinate cortical sensory area patterning and plasticity prior to sensory information processing.

  4. Characteristics of thalamic local field potentials in patients with disorders of consciousness.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yongzhi; He, Jianghong; Green, Alexander L; Aziz, Tipu Z; Stein, John F; Wang, Shouyan

    2015-08-01

    A functioning thalamus is essential for treatment of patients with disorders of consciousness (DOC) using deep brain stimulation (DBS). This work aims to identify the potential biomarkers related to consciousness from the thalamic deep brain local field potentials (LFPs) in DOC patients. The frequency features of central thalamic LFPs were characterized with spectral analysis. The features were further compared to those of LFPs from the ventroposterior lateral nucleus of the thalamus (VPL) in patients with pain. There are several distinct characteristics of thalamic LFPs found in patients with DOC. The most important feature is the oscillation around 10Hz which could be relevant to the existence of residual consciousness, whereas high power below 8Hz seemed to be associated with loss of consciousness. The invasive deep brain recording tool opens a unique way to explore the brain function in consciousness, awareness and alertness and clarify the potential mechanisms of thalamic stimulation in DOC.

  5. Thalamus parcellation using multi-modal feature classification and thalamic nuclei priors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaister, Jeffrey; Carass, Aaron; Stough, Joshua V.; Calabresi, Peter A.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2016-03-01

    Segmentation of the thalamus and thalamic nuclei is useful to quantify volumetric changes from neurodegenerative diseases. Most thalamus segmentation algorithms only use T1-weighted magnetic resonance images and current thalamic parcellation methods require manual interaction. Smaller nuclei, such as the lateral and medial geniculates, are challenging to locate due to their small size. We propose an automated segmentation algorithm using a set of features derived from diffusion tensor image (DTI) and thalamic nuclei location priors. After extracting features, a hierarchical random forest classifier is trained to locate the thalamus. A second random forest classifies thalamus voxels as belonging to one of six thalamic nuclei classes. The proposed algorithm was tested using a leave-one-out cross validation scheme and compared with state-of-the-art algorithms. The proposed algorithm has a higher Dice score compared to other methods for the whole thalamus and several nuclei.

  6. Thalamic relay functions and their role in corticocortical communication: generalizations from the visual system.

    PubMed

    Guillery, R W; Sherman, S Murray

    2002-01-17

    All neocortical areas receive thalamic inputs. Some thalamocortical pathways relay information from ascending pathways (first order thalamic relays) and others relay information from other cortical areas (higher order thalamic relays), thus serving a role in corticocortical communication. Most, possibly all, afferents reaching thalamus, ascending and cortical, are branches of axons that innervate lower (motor) centers, so that thalamocortical pathways can be viewed generally as monitors of ongoing motor instructions. In terms of numbers, the thalamic relay is dominated by synapses that modulate the relay functions. One of the roles of these modulatory pathways is to change the transfer of information through the thalamus, in accord with current attentional demands. Other roles remain to be explored. These modulatory functions can be expected to act on corticocortical communication in addition to their action on ascending pathways.

  7. Clinical and topographic magnetic resonance imaging characteristics of suspected thalamic infarcts in 16 dogs.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Rita; Carrera, Inés; Garosi, Laurent; Smith, Peter M; Fraser McConnell, J; Penderis, Jacques

    2011-04-01

    Sixteen dogs with acute-onset, non-progressive signs of brain dysfunction and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics compatible with thalamic infarction are described. Topographically the MRI lesions could be grouped in three thalamic regions, namely, paramedian (8/16), extensive dorsal (5/16) and ventrolateral (3/16). Paramedian lesions resulted in signs typical of vestibular dysfunction. Extensive dorsal lesions were associated with vestibular ataxia, circling and contralateral menace response deficits. Ventrolateral lesions resulted in circling and contralateral proprioceptive deficits. In several dogs, regions other than the thalamus were also affected: four extended into the midbrain; six extended to the internal capsule, and two dogs had a second lesion in the cerebellum. Three clinical syndromes were identified in association with thalamic infarction. These signs varied somewhat, most likely because lesions were not confined to specific nuclear boundaries and involved different combinations of thalamic nuclei.

  8. Fast cortical oscillation after thalamic degeneration: pivotal role of NMDA receptor.

    PubMed

    Kyuhou, Shin-ichi; Gemba, Hisae

    2007-04-27

    We examined electrophysiological and molecular changes of the thalamocortical system after thalamic degeneration in Purkinje cell degeneration (pcd) mice. In pcd mice, neurons in specific thalamic nuclei including the ventral medial geniculate nucleus began to degenerate around postnatal day 50, whereas the visual thalamic nucleus and nonspecific thalamic nuclei remained almost intact. In association with the morphological changes, auditory evoked potentials in the primary auditory cortex (AC) began to decrease gradually. Fast Fourier transform analysis of spontaneous cortical field potentials revealed that fast oscillation (FO) around 25 Hz occurred in the AC but not in the visual cortex. Quantitative mRNA analysis demonstrated that expression of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor was up-regulated in the AC but not in the visual cortex. Systemic administration of an NMDA antagonist abolished the FO in the AC. These results indicate that increased NMDA activity may cause the FO in the AC of pcd mice.

  9. Dopamine and binge eating behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Bello, Nicholas T.; Hajnal, Andras

    2010-01-01

    Central dopaminergic mechanisms are involved in the motivational aspects of eating and food choices. This review focuses on human and animal data examining the importance of dopamine on binge eating behaviors. Early works examining dopamine metabolites in the cerebrospinal fluid and plasma of bulimic individuals suggested decreased dopamine turnover during the active phase of the illness. While neuroimaging studies of dopamine mechanisms in bulimia nervosa (BN) and binge eating disorder (BED) are limited, genetic studies in humans have implicated an increased frequency of dopamine transporter and associated D2 receptor polymorphisms with binge pathology. Recent examinations of rodent models of dietary-induced binge eating (DIBE) have investigated plausible dopamine mechanisms involved in sustaining binge eating behaviors. In DIBE models, highly palatable foods (fats, sugars and their combination), as well as restricted access conditions appear to promote ingestive responses and result in sustained dopamine stimulation within the nucleus accumbens. Taken together with studies examining the comorbidity of illicit drug use and eating disorders, the data reviewed here support a role for dopamine in perpetuating the compulsive feeding patterns of BN and BED. As such, we propose that sustained stimulation of the dopamine systems by bingeing promoted by preexisting conditions (e.g., genetic traits, dietary restraint, stress, etc.) results in progressive impairments of dopamine signaling. To disrupt this vicious cycle, novel research-based treatment options aiming at the neural substrates of compulsive eating patterns are necessary. PMID:20417658

  10. Hermit Points on a Box

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, Richard; Grinstead, Charles; Grindstead, Marshall; Bergstrand, Deborah

    2008-01-01

    Suppose that we are given a rectangular box in 3-space. Given any two points on the surface of this box, we can define the surface distance between them to be the length of the shortest path between them on the surface of the box. This paper determines the pairs of points of maximum surface distance for all boxes. It is often the case that these…

  11. Hermit Points on a Box

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, Richard; Grinstead, Charles; Grindstead, Marshall; Bergstrand, Deborah

    2008-01-01

    Suppose that we are given a rectangular box in 3-space. Given any two points on the surface of this box, we can define the surface distance between them to be the length of the shortest path between them on the surface of the box. This paper determines the pairs of points of maximum surface distance for all boxes. It is often the case that these…

  12. Making Connections with Memory Boxes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whatley, April

    2000-01-01

    Addresses the use of children's literature within the social studies classroom on the topic of memory boxes. Includes discussions of four books: (1) "The Littlest Angel" (Charles Tazewell); (2) "The Hundred Penny Box" (Sharon Bell Mathis); (3) "Wilfrid Gordon McDonald Partridge" (Mem Fox); and (4) "The Memory Box" (Mary Bahr). (CMK)

  13. Making Connections with Memory Boxes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whatley, April

    2000-01-01

    Addresses the use of children's literature within the social studies classroom on the topic of memory boxes. Includes discussions of four books: (1) "The Littlest Angel" (Charles Tazewell); (2) "The Hundred Penny Box" (Sharon Bell Mathis); (3) "Wilfrid Gordon McDonald Partridge" (Mem Fox); and (4) "The Memory Box" (Mary Bahr). (CMK)

  14. Multicultural and Nonsexist Prop Boxes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boutte, Gloria S.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Discusses how prop boxes enhance learning and are resources in multicultural and nonsexist primary education, focusing on play, experimentation, and cooperation. Examines integration of prop boxes into the curricula and activities, and presents examples of generic and specific multicultural prop boxes that incorporate art, music, foods,…

  15. Dissociable spatial and non-spatial attentional deficits after circumscribed thalamic stroke.

    PubMed

    Kraft, Antje; Irlbacher, Kerstin; Finke, Kathrin; Kaufmann, Christian; Kehrer, Stefanie; Liebermann, Daniela; Bundesen, Claus; Brandt, Stephan A

    2015-03-01

    Thalamic nuclei act as sensory, motor and cognitive relays between multiple subcortical areas and the cerebral cortex. They play a crucial role in cognitive functions such as executive functioning, memory and attention. In the acute period after thalamic stroke attentional deficits are common. The precise functional relevance of specific nuclei or vascular sub regions of the thalamus for attentional sub functions is still unclear. The theory of visual attention (TVA) allows the measurement of four independent attentional parameters (visual short term memory storage capacity (VSTM), visual perceptual processing speed, selective control and spatial weighting). We combined parameter-based assessment based on TVA with lesion symptom mapping in standard stereotactic space in sixteen patients (mean age 41.2 ± 11.0 SD, 6 females), with focal thalamic lesions in the medial (N = 9), lateral (N = 5), anterior (N = 1) or posterior (N = 1) vascular territories of the thalamus. Compared with an age-matched control group of 52 subjects (mean age 40.1 ± 6.4, 35 females), the patients with thalamic lesions were, on the group level, mildly impaired in visual processing speed and VSTM. Patients with lateral thalamic lesions showed a deficit in processing speed while all other TVA parameters were within the normal range. Medial thalamic lesions can be associated with a spatial bias and extinction of targets either in the ipsilesional or the contralesional field. A posterior case with a thalamic lesion of the pulvinar replicated a finding of Habekost and Rostrup (2006), demonstrating a spatial bias to the ipsilesional field, as suggested by the neural theory of visual attention (NTVA) (Bundesen, Habekost, & Kyllingsbæk, 2011). A case with an anterior-medial thalamic lesion showed reduced selective attentional control. We conclude that lesions in distinct vascular sub regions of the thalamus are associated with distinct attentional syndromes (medial = spatial bias, lateral

  16. Thalamic activity and biochemical changes in individuals with neuropathic pain after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Gustin, S M; Wrigley, P J; Youssef, A M; McIndoe, L; Wilcox, S L; Rae, C D; Edden, R A E; Siddall, P J; Henderson, L A

    2014-05-01

    There is increasing evidence relating thalamic changes to the generation and/or maintenance of neuropathic pain. We have recently reported that neuropathic orofacial pain is associated with altered thalamic anatomy, biochemistry, and activity, which may result in disturbed thalamocortical oscillatory circuits. Despite this evidence, it is possible that these thalamic changes are not responsible for the presence of pain per se, but result as a consequence of the injury. To clarify this subject, we compared brain activity and biochemistry in 12 people with below-level neuropathic pain after complete thoracic spinal cord injury with 11 people with similar injuries and no neuropathic pain and 21 age- and gender-matched healthy control subjects. Quantitative arterial spinal labelling was used to measure thalamic activity, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to determine changes in neuronal variability quantifying N-acetylaspartate and alterations in inhibitory function quantifying gamma amino butyric acid. This study revealed that the presence of neuropathic pain is associated with significant changes in thalamic biochemistry and neuronal activity. More specifically, the presence of neuropathic pain after spinal cord injury is associated with significant reductions in thalamic N-acetylaspartate, gamma amino butyric acid content, and blood flow in the region of the thalamic reticular nucleus. Spinal cord injury on its own did not account for these changes. These findings support the hypothesis that neuropathic pain is associated with altered thalamic structure and function, which may disturb central processing and play a key role in the experience of neuropathic pain. Copyright © 2014 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Why do lesions in the rodent anterior thalamic nuclei cause such severe spatial deficits?

    PubMed

    Aggleton, John P; Nelson, Andrew J D

    2015-07-01

    Lesions of the rodent anterior thalamic nuclei cause severe deficits to multiple spatial learning tasks. Possible explanations for these effects are examined, with particular reference to T-maze alternation. Anterior thalamic lesions not only impair allocentric place learning but also disrupt other spatial processes, including direction learning, path integration, and relative length discriminations, as well as aspects of nonspatial learning, e.g., temporal discriminations. Working memory tasks, such as T-maze alternation, appear particularly sensitive as they combine an array of these spatial and nonspatial demands. This sensitivity partly reflects the different functions supported by individual anterior thalamic nuclei, though it is argued that anterior thalamic lesion effects also arise from covert pathology in sites distal to the thalamus, most critically in the retrosplenial cortex and hippocampus. This two-level account, involving both local and distal lesion effects, explains the range and severity of the spatial deficits following anterior thalamic lesions. These findings highlight how the anterior thalamic nuclei form a key component in a series of interdependent systems that support multiple spatial functions.

  18. Thalamic lesions in multiple sclerosis by 7T MRI: clinical implications and relationship to cortical pathology

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Daniel M.; Oh, Jiwon; Roy, Snehashis; Wood, Emily T.; Whetstone, Anna; Seigo, Michaela A.; Jones, Craig K.; Pham, Dzung; van Zijl, Peter; Reich, Daniel S.; Calabresi, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Pathology in both cortex and deep gray matter contribute to disability in multiple sclerosis (MS). We used the increased signal-to-noise ratio of 7-tesla (7T) MRI to visualize small lesions within the thalamus and to relate this to clinical information and cortical lesions. Methods 7T MRI scans were obtained on 34 MS cases and 15 healthy volunteers. Thalamic lesion number and volume were related to demographic data, clinical disability measures, and lesions in cortical gray matter. Results Thalamic lesions were found in 24/34 of MS cases. Two lesion subtypes were noted: discrete, ovoid lesions, and more diffuse lesional areas lining the periventricular surface. The number of thalamic lesions was greater in progressive MS compared to relapsing remitting (mean ± SD, 10.7 ± 0.7 vs. 3.0 ± 0.7, respectively, p < 0.001). Thalamic lesion burden (count and volume) correlated with EDSS score and measures of cortical lesion burden, but not with white matter lesion burden or white matter volume. Conclusions 7T MRI allows identification of thalamic lesions in MS, which are associated with disability, progressive disease, and cortical lesions. Thalamic lesion analysis may be a simpler, more rapid estimate of overall gray matter lesion burden in MS. PMID:25583851

  19. Thalamic stimulation to improve level of consciousness after seizures: evaluation of electrophysiology and behavior.

    PubMed

    Gummadavelli, Abhijeet; Motelow, Joshua E; Smith, Nicholas; Zhan, Qiong; Schiff, Nicholas D; Blumenfeld, Hal

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the neural mechanisms that support human consciousness is an important frontier in neuroscience and medicine. We previously developed a rodent model of temporal lobe seizures that recapitulates the human electroencephalography (EEG) signature of ictal and postictal neocortical slow waves associated with behavioral impairments in level of consciousness. The mechanism of slow-wave production in epilepsy may involve suppression of the subcortical arousal systems including the brainstem and intralaminar thalamic nuclei. We hypothesized that intralaminar thalamic stimulation may lead to electrophysiologic and functional rescue from postictal slow waves and behavioral arrest. We electrically stimulated the central lateral thalamic nucleus (a member of the intralaminar nuclei) under anesthesia and after electrically induced hippocampal seizures in anesthetized and in awake-behaving animal model preparations. We demonstrated a proof-of-principle restoration of electrophysiologic and behavioral measures of consciousness by stimulating the intralaminar thalamic nuclei after seizures. We measured decreased cortical slow waves and increased desynchronization and multiunit activity in the cortex with thalamic stimulation following seizures. Functionally, thalamic stimulation produced resumption of exploratory behaviors in the postictal state. Targeting of nodes in the neural circuitry of consciousness has important medical implications. Impaired consciousness with epilepsy has dangerous consequences including decreased school/work performance, social stigmatization, and impaired airway protection. These data suggest a novel therapeutic approach for restoring consciousness after seizures. If paired with responsive neurostimulation, this may allow rapid implementation to improve level of consciousness in patients with epilepsy. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2014 International League Against Epilepsy.

  20. Selective importance of the rat anterior thalamic nuclei for configural learning involving distal spatial cues

    PubMed Central

    Dumont, Julie R; Amin, Eman; Aggleton, John P

    2013-01-01

    To test potential parallels between hippocampal and anterior thalamic function, rats with anterior thalamic lesions were trained on a series of biconditional learning tasks. The anterior thalamic lesions did not disrupt learning two biconditional associations in operant chambers where a specific auditory stimulus (tone or click) had a differential outcome depending on whether it was paired with a particular visual context (spot or checkered wall-paper) or a particular thermal context (warm or cool). Likewise, rats with anterior thalamic lesions successfully learnt a biconditional task when they were reinforced for digging in one of two distinct cups (containing either beads or shredded paper), depending on the particular appearance of the local context on which the cup was placed (one of two textured floors). In contrast, the same rats were severely impaired at learning the biconditional rule to select a specific cup when in a particular location within the test room. Place learning was then tested with a series of go/no-go discriminations. Rats with anterior thalamic nuclei lesions could learn to discriminate between two locations when they were approached from a constant direction. They could not, however, use this acquired location information to solve a subsequent spatial biconditional task where those same places dictated the correct choice of digging cup. Anterior thalamic lesions produced a selective, but severe, biconditional learning deficit when the task incorporated distal spatial cues. This deficit mirrors that seen in rats with hippocampal lesions, so extending potential interdependencies between the two sites. PMID:24215178

  1. Changes in Activity of the Same Thalamic Neurons to Repeated Nociception in Behaving Mice.

    PubMed

    Huh, Yeowool; Cho, Jeiwon

    2015-01-01

    The sensory thalamus has been reported to play a key role in central pain sensory modulation and processing, but its response to repeated nociception at thalamic level is not well known. Current study investigated thalamic response to repeated nociception by recording and comparing the activity of the same thalamic neuron during the 1st and 2nd formalin injection induced nociception, with a week interval between injections, in awake and behaving mice. Behaviorally, the 2nd injection induced greater nociceptive responses than the 1st. Thalamic activity mirrored these behavioral changes with greater firing rate during the 2nd injection. Analysis of tonic and burst firing, characteristic firing pattern of thalamic neurons, revealed that tonic firing activity was potentiated while burst firing activity was not significantly changed by the 2nd injection relative to the 1st. Likewise, burst firing property changes, which has been consistently associated with different phases of nociception, were not induced by the 2nd injection. Overall, data suggest that repeated nociception potentiated responsiveness of thalamic neurons and confirmed that tonic firing transmits nociceptive signals.

  2. Why do lesions in the rodent anterior thalamic nuclei cause such severe spatial deficits?

    PubMed Central

    Aggleton, John P.; Nelson, Andrew J.D.

    2015-01-01

    Lesions of the rodent anterior thalamic nuclei cause severe deficits to multiple spatial learning tasks. Possible explanations for these effects are examined, with particular reference to T-maze alternation. Anterior thalamic lesions not only impair allocentric place learning but also disrupt other spatial processes, including direction learning, path integration, and relative length discriminations, as well as aspects of nonspatial learning, e.g., temporal discriminations. Working memory tasks, such as T-maze alternation, appear particularly sensitive as they combine an array of these spatial and nonspatial demands. This sensitivity partly reflects the different functions supported by individual anterior thalamic nuclei, though it is argued that anterior thalamic lesion effects also arise from covert pathology in sites distal to the thalamus, most critically in the retrosplenial cortex and hippocampus. This two-level account, involving both local and distal lesion effects, explains the range and severity of the spatial deficits following anterior thalamic lesions. These findings highlight how the anterior thalamic nuclei form a key component in a series of interdependent systems that support multiple spatial functions. PMID:25195980

  3. Growth of dopamine crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Patil, Vidya Patki, Mugdha

    2016-05-06

    Many nonlinear optical (NLO) crystals have been identified as potential candidates in optical and electro-optical devices. Use of NLO organic crystals is expected in photonic applications. Hence organic nonlinear optical materials have been intensely investigated due to their potentially high nonlinearities, and rapid response in electro-optic effect compared to inorganic NLO materials. There are many methods to grow organic crystals such as vapor growth method, melt growth method and solution growth method. Out of these methods, solution growth method is useful in providing constraint free crystal. Single crystals of Dopamine have been grown by evaporating the solvents from aqueous solution. Crystals obtained were of the size of orders of mm. The crystal structure of dopamine was determined using XRD technique. Images of crystals were obtained using FEG SEM Quanta Series under high vacuum and low KV.

  4. Growth of dopamine crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Vidya; Patki, Mugdha

    2016-05-01

    Many nonlinear optical (NLO) crystals have been identified as potential candidates in optical and electro-optical devices. Use of NLO organic crystals is expected in photonic applications. Hence organic nonlinear optical materials have been intensely investigated due to their potentially high nonlinearities, and rapid response in electro-optic effect compared to inorganic NLO materials. There are many methods to grow organic crystals such as vapor growth method, melt growth method and solution growth method. Out of these methods, solution growth method is useful in providing constraint free crystal. Single crystals of Dopamine have been grown by evaporating the solvents from aqueous solution. Crystals obtained were of the size of orders of mm. The crystal structure of dopamine was determined using XRD technique. Images of crystals were obtained using FEG SEM Quanta Series under high vacuum and low KV.

  5. Updating dopamine reward signals

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Wolfram

    2013-01-01

    Recent work has advanced our knowledge of phasic dopamine reward prediction error signals. The error signal is bidirectional, reflects well the higher order prediction error described by temporal difference learning models, is compatible with model-free and model-based reinforcement learning, reports the subjective rather than physical reward value during temporal discounting and reflects subjective stimulus perception rather than physical stimulus aspects. Dopamine activations are primarily driven by reward, and to some extent risk, whereas punishment and salience have only limited activating effects when appropriate controls are respected. The signal is homogeneous in terms of time course but heterogeneous in many other aspects. It is essential for synaptic plasticity and a range of behavioural learning situations. PMID:23267662

  6. The Electronic Battle Box

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouin, Denis; Turcotte, Guy; Lebel, Eric; Gilbert, Annie

    2000-08-01

    The Electronic Battle Box is an integrated suite of planning and decision-aid tools specially designed to facilitate Canadian Armed Force Officers during their training and during their tasks of preparing and conducting military operations. It is the result of a collaborative effort between the Defence Research Establishment Valcartier, the Directorate of Army Doctrine (DAD), the Directorate of Land Requirements (DLR), the G4 staff of 1Cdn Div HQ and CGI Information and Management Consultants Inc. Distributed on CD-ROM, the Electronic Battle Box contains efficient and user-friendly tools that significantly reduce the planning time for military operations and ensure staff officers a better focus on significant tasks. Among the tools are an OrBat Browser and an Equipment Browser allowing to view and edit military organizations, a Task Browser providing facilities to prepare plans using Gantt charts, a Logistic Planner allowing to estimate supply requirements applying complex calculations, and Road, Air and Rail Movement Planners. EBB also provides staff officers with a large set of doctrinal documents in an electronic format. This paper provides an overview of the various tools of the Electronic Battle Box.

  7. Learning with Box Kernels.

    PubMed

    Melacci, Stefano; Gori, Marco

    2013-04-12

    Supervised examples and prior knowledge on regions of the input space have been profitably integrated in kernel machines to improve the performance of classifiers in different real-world contexts. The proposed solutions, which rely on the unified supervision of points and sets, have been mostly based on specific optimization schemes in which, as usual, the kernel function operates on points only. In this paper, arguments from variational calculus are used to support the choice of a special class of kernels, referred to as box kernels, which emerges directly from the choice of the kernel function associated with a regularization operator. It is proven that there is no need to search for kernels to incorporate the structure deriving from the supervision of regions of the input space, since the optimal kernel arises as a consequence of the chosen regularization operator. Although most of the given results hold for sets, we focus attention on boxes, whose labeling is associated with their propositional description. Based on different assumptions, some representer theorems are given which dictate the structure of the solution in terms of box kernel expansion. Successful results are given for problems of medical diagnosis, image, and text categorization.

  8. Learning with box kernels.

    PubMed

    Melacci, Stefano; Gori, Marco

    2013-11-01

    Supervised examples and prior knowledge on regions of the input space have been profitably integrated in kernel machines to improve the performance of classifiers in different real-world contexts. The proposed solutions, which rely on the unified supervision of points and sets, have been mostly based on specific optimization schemes in which, as usual, the kernel function operates on points only. In this paper, arguments from variational calculus are used to support the choice of a special class of kernels, referred to as box kernels, which emerges directly from the choice of the kernel function associated with a regularization operator. It is proven that there is no need to search for kernels to incorporate the structure deriving from the supervision of regions of the input space, because the optimal kernel arises as a consequence of the chosen regularization operator. Although most of the given results hold for sets, we focus attention on boxes, whose labeling is associated with their propositional description. Based on different assumptions, some representer theorems are given that dictate the structure of the solution in terms of box kernel expansion. Successful results are given for problems of medical diagnosis, image, and text categorization.

  9. Damage to the dorsomedial thalamic nucleus, central lateral intralaminar thalamic nucleus, and midline thalamic nuclei on the right-side impair executive function and attention under conditions of high demand but not low demand.

    PubMed

    Edelstyn, N M J; Mayes, A R; Ellis, S J

    2014-04-01

    This study reports a patient, OG, with a unilateral right-sided thalamic lesion. High resolution 3T magnetic resonance imaging revealed damage to the parvicellular and magnocellular subdivisions of the dorsomedial thalamus (DMT), the central lateral intralaminar nucleus (also known as the paralamellar DMT), the paraventricular and the central medial midline thalamic nuclei. According to the neuropsychological literature, the DMT, the midline and intralaminar thalamic nuclei influence a wide array of cognitive functions by virtue of their modulatory influences on executive function and attention, and this is particularly indicated under conditions of low arousal or high cognitive demand. We explored this prediction in OG, and compared his performance on a range of low and high demand versions of tests that tapped executive function and attention to a group of 6 age- and IQ-matched controls. OG, without exception, significantly under performed on the high-demand attention and executive function tasks, but performed normally on the low-demand versions. These findings extend and refine current understanding of the effects of thalamic lesion on attention and executive function.

  10. Stimulation of movement in a quiescent, hibernation-like form of Caenorhabditis elegans by dopamine signaling.

    PubMed

    Gaglia, Marta Maria; Kenyon, Cynthia

    2009-06-03

    One of the characteristics of animals in hibernation is reduced behavioral activity. The Caenorhabditis elegans dauer state is a hibernation-like state of diapause that displays a dramatic reduction in spontaneous locomotion. A similar dauer-like quiescent state is produced in adults by relatively strong mutations in the insulin/IGF-1 receptor homolog daf-2. In this study, we show that mutations affecting the neurotransmitter dopamine, which regulates voluntary movement in many organisms, can stimulate movement in dauers and dauer-like quiescent adults. Surprisingly, the movement of quiescent animals is stimulated by conditions that reduce dopamine signaling and also by conditions predicted to increase dopamine signaling. Reducing dopamine signaling is likely to stimulate movement by activating a foraging response also seen in nondauers after withdrawal of food. In contrast, the stimulation of movement by increased dopamine is much more pronounced in quiescent daf-2(-) dauer and dauer-like adult animals than in nondauaer animals. This altered response to dopamine is primarily attributable to activity of the FOXO (forkhead box O) transcription factor DAF-16 in neurons. We suggest that dauers and dauer-like quiescent adults may have underlying changes in the dopamine system that enable them to respond differently to environmental stimulation.

  11. Improvement of Learning and Increase in Dopamine Level in the Frontal Cortex by Methylphenidate in Mice Lacking Dopamine Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Takamatsu, Y.; Hagino, Y.; Sato, A.; Takahashi, T.; Nagasawa, S.Y.; Kubo, Y.; Mizuguchi, M.; Uhl, G.R.; Sora, I.; Ikeda, K.

    2015-01-01

    The symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are characterized by inattention and hyperactivity-impulsivity. It is a common childhood neurodevelopmental disorder that often persists into adulthood. Improvements in ADHD symptoms using psychostimulants have been recognized as a paradoxical calming effect. The psychostimulant methylphenidate (MPH) is currently used as the first-line medication for the management of ADHD. Recent studies have drawn attention to altered dopamine-mediated neurotransmission in ADHD, particularly reuptake by the dopamine transporter (DAT). This hypothesis is supported by the observation that DAT knockout mice exhibit marked hyperactivity that is responsive to acute MPH treatment. However, other behaviors relevant to ADHD have not been fully clarified. In the present study, we observed learning impairment in shuttle-box avoidance behavior together with hyperactivity in a novel environment in DAT knockout mice. Methylphenidate normalized these behaviors and enhanced escape activity in the tail suspension test. Interestingly, the effective dose of MPH increased extracellular dopamine in the prefrontal cortex but not striatum, suggesting an important role for changes in prefrontal dopamine in ADHD. Research that uses rodent models such as DAT knockout mice may be useful for elucidating the pathophysiology of ADHD. PMID:25817856

  12. In vivo electrophysiology of nigral and thalamic neurons in alpha-synuclein-overexpressing mice highlights differences from toxin-based models of parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Lobb, C. J.; Zaheer, A. K.; Smith, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Numerous studies have suggested that alpha-synuclein plays a prominent role in both familial and idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD). Mice in which human alpha-synuclein is overexpressed (ASO) display progressive motor deficits and many nonmotor features of PD. However, it is unclear what in vivo pathophysiological mechanisms drive these motor deficits. It is also unknown whether previously proposed pathophysiological features (i.e., increased beta oscillations, bursting, and synchronization) described in toxin-based, nigrostriatal dopamine-depletion models are also present in ASO mice. To address these issues, we first confirmed that 5- to 6-mo-old ASO mice have robust motor dysfunction, despite the absence of significant nigrostriatal dopamine degeneration. In the same animals, we then recorded simultaneous single units and local field potentials (LFPs) in the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNpr), the main basal ganglia output nucleus, and one of its main thalamic targets, the ventromedial nucleus, as well as LFPs in the primary motor cortex in anesthetized ASO mice and their age-matched, wild-type littermates. Neural activity was examined during slow wave activity and desynchronized cortical states, as previously described in 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats. In contrast to toxin-based models, we found a small decrease, rather than an increase, in beta oscillations in the desynchronized state. Similarly, synchronized burst firing of nigral neurons observed in toxin-based models was not observed in ASO mice. Instead, we found more subtle changes in pauses of SNpr firing compared with wild-type control mice. Our results suggest that the pathophysiology underlying motor dysfunction in ASO mice is distinctly different from striatal dopamine-depletion models of parkinsonism. PMID:24068758

  13. Small, Lightweight, Collapsible Glove Box

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Jerry

    2009-01-01

    A small, lightweight, collapsible glove box enables its user to perform small experiments and other tasks. Originally intended for use aboard a space shuttle or the International Space Station (ISS), this glove box could also be attractive for use on Earth in settings in which work space or storage space is severely limited and, possibly, in which it is desirable to minimize weight. The development of this glove box was prompted by the findings that in the original space-shuttle or ISS setting, (1) it was necessary to perform small experiments in a large general-purpose work station, so that, in effect, they occupied excessive space; and it took excessive amounts of time to set up small experiments. The design of the glove box reflects the need to minimize the space occupied by experiments and the time needed to set up experiments, plus the requirement to limit the launch weight of the box and the space needed to store the box during transport into orbit. To prepare the glove box for use, the astronaut or other user has merely to insert hands through the two fabric glove ports in the side walls of the box and move two hinges to a locking vertical position (see figure). The user could do this while seated with the glove box on the user fs lap. When stowed, the glove box is flat and has approximately the thickness of two pieces of 8-in. (.20 cm) polycarbonate.

  14. Thalamic and parietal brain morphology predicts auditory category learning.

    PubMed

    Scharinger, Mathias; Henry, Molly J; Erb, Julia; Meyer, Lars; Obleser, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    Auditory categorization is a vital skill involving the attribution of meaning to acoustic events, engaging domain-specific (i.e., auditory) as well as domain-general (e.g., executive) brain networks. A listener's ability to categorize novel acoustic stimuli should therefore depend on both, with the domain-general network being particularly relevant for adaptively changing listening strategies and directing attention to relevant acoustic cues. Here we assessed adaptive listening behavior, using complex acoustic stimuli with an initially salient (but later degraded) spectral cue and a secondary, duration cue that remained nondegraded. We employed voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to identify cortical and subcortical brain structures whose individual neuroanatomy predicted task performance and the ability to optimally switch to making use of temporal cues after spectral degradation. Behavioral listening strategies were assessed by logistic regression and revealed mainly strategy switches in the expected direction, with considerable individual differences. Gray-matter probability in the left inferior parietal lobule (BA 40) and left precentral gyrus was predictive of "optimal" strategy switch, while gray-matter probability in thalamic areas, comprising the medial geniculate body, co-varied with overall performance. Taken together, our findings suggest that successful auditory categorization relies on domain-specific neural circuits in the ascending auditory pathway, while adaptive listening behavior depends more on brain structure in parietal cortex, enabling the (re)direction of attention to salient stimulus properties. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Centromedian thalamic nuclei deep brain stimulation in refractory status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Valentín, Antonio; Nguyen, Huy Q; Skupenova, Alena M; Agirre-Arrizubieta, Zaloa; Jewell, Sharon; Mullatti, Nandini; Moran, Nicholas F; Richardson, Mark P; Selway, Richard P; Alarcón, Gonzalo

    2012-10-01

    Refractory status epilepticus (RSE) is associated with high mortality. We report a potential treatment alternative. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the centromedian thalamic nuclei (CMN) can be effective in the treatment of RSE. Report of the evolution of RSE after DBS of the CMN in a 27-year-old man. In the course of an encephalopathy of unknown origin, and after a cardiac arrest, the patient developed RSE with myoclonic jerks and generalized tonic-clonic seizures. The EEG showed continuous generalized periodic epileptiform discharges (GPEDS). Five weeks after RSE onset, bilateral DBS of the CMN was started. This treatment was immediately followed by disappearance of tonic-clonic seizures and GPEDS, suggesting a resolution of RSE. The patient continued having multifocal myoclonic jerks, probably subcortical in origin, which resolved after 4 weeks. The patient remained clinically stable for 2 months in a persistent vegetative state. The remission of RSE, the abolition of GPEDS, and the patient survival suggest that DBS of the CMN may be efficacious in the treatment of refractory, generalized status epilepticus. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Getting signals into the brain: visual prosthetics through thalamic microstimulation

    PubMed Central

    Pezaris, John S.; Eskandar, Emad N.

    2010-01-01

    Common causes of blindness are diseases that affect the ocular structures, such as glaucoma, retinitis pigmentosa, and macular degeneration, rendering the eyes no longer sensitive to light. The visual pathway, however, as a predominantly central structure, is largely spared in these cases. It is thus widely thought that a device-based prosthetic approach to restoration of visual function will be effective and will enjoy similar success as cochlear implants have for restoration of auditory function. In this article the authors review the potential locations for stimulation electrode placement for visual prostheses, assessing the anatomical and functional advantages and disadvantages of each. Of particular interest to the neurosurgical community is placement of deep brain stimulating electrodes in thalamic structures that has shown substantial promise in an animal model. The theory of operation of visual prostheses is discussed, along with a review of the current state of knowledge. Finally, the visual prosthesis is proposed as a model for a general high-fidelity machine-brain interface. PMID:19569894

  17. 'Distorteidolias' - fantastic perceptive distortion. A new, pure dorsomedial thalamic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Montserrat G; Bogousslavsky, Julien

    2013-01-01

    The role of the thalamus in the pathogenesis of the visual and auditory hallucinations has been reported under the name of peduncular hallucinosis, usually with coexisting midbrain involvement. These hallucinations typically take the form of dreamy de novo productions (phanteidolias), less often that of transformations of perceptions into new items (such as seeing faces in clouds) called pareidolias. However, hallucinations taking the form of a complex distortion of perception is a different phenomenon, which to our knowledge has not been reported. We studied 2 patients with complex, 'fantastic', perceptive distortion involving the visual and auditory systems after thalamic stroke limited to the region of the dorsomedial nucleus, sparing the intralaminar nuclei and the midbrain (explaining the lack of disorders of consciousness and confusional state). Our patients reported the modification of usual stimuli (face, body, voices) into unreal, fantastically distorted perceptions (monstrous change of shapes or sounds without appearance of new items). While the exact mechanism leading to such perceptive distortions remains unknown, a release phenomenon due to damage to the dorsomedial thalamus (probably affecting cholinergic system) responsible for a disinhibition of cortical function involved in familiarity of perception seems likely. We suggest that these hallucinations should be called 'distorteidolias'.

  18. Thalamic reticular nucleus in Caiman crocodilus: Relationship with the dorsal thalamus.

    PubMed

    Pritz, M B

    2016-05-13

    The thalamic reticular nucleus was investigated in one group of crocodilians, Caiman crocodilus. This neuronal aggregate is composed of two parts: a compact portion and a diffuse region made up of scattered cells within the forebrain bundles. In Caiman, both the lateral and medial forebrain bundles project to the telencephalon and the thalamic reticular nucleus is associated with each fiber tract. In the lateral forebrain bundle, the compact area is termed the nucleus of the dorsal peduncle (dorsal peduncular nucleus) while the diffuse part is called the perireticular area. In the medial forebrain bundle, the interstitial nucleus comprises one part of the compact area while another region without a specific neuronal label is also present. Similar to the perireticular cells of the lateral forebrain bundle, scattered cells are also present in the medial forebrain bundle. Morphological features of the thalamic reticular nucleus are revealed with stains for the following: fibers; cells; succinic acid dehydrogenase; and acetylcholinesterase. Regardless of which dorsal thalamic nucleus was injected, a localized region of the thalamic reticular nucleus contained retrogradely labeled cells and anterogradely labeled axons and terminals. This grouping was termed clusters and was felt to represent the densest interconnection between the dorsal thalamus and the reticular nucleus. Using clusters as an index of interconnections, the reticular nucleus was divided into sectors, each of which was associated with a specific dorsal thalamic nucleus. An organization similar to that found in Caiman is present in other sauropsids as well as in mammals. These data suggest that a thalamic reticular nucleus is present in all amniotes and has morphological properties similar to those described in this analysis. Lastly, a hypothesis is presented to explain how the external shape of the reticular nucleus in Caiman might be transformed into the homologous area in a representative bird and

  19. Resting-state alpha in autism spectrum disorder and alpha associations with thalamic volume.

    PubMed

    Edgar, J Christopher; Heiken, Kory; Chen, Yu-Han; Herrington, John D; Chow, Vivian; Liu, Song; Bloy, Luke; Huang, Mingxiong; Pandey, Juhi; Cannon, Katelyn M; Qasmieh, Saba; Levy, Susan E; Schultz, Robert T; Roberts, Timothy P L

    2015-03-01

    Alpha circuits (8-12 Hz), necessary for basic and complex brain processes, are abnormal in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The present study obtained estimates of resting-state (RS) alpha activity in children with ASD and examined associations between alpha activity, age, and clinical symptoms. Given that the thalamus modulates cortical RS alpha rhythms, associations between thalamic structure and alpha activity were examined. RS magnetoencephalography was obtained from 47 typically-developing children (TDC) and 41 children with ASD. RS alpha activity was measured using distributed source localization. Left and right thalamic volume measurements were also obtained. In both groups, the strongest alpha activity was observed in Calcarine Sulcus regions. In Calcarine regions, only TDC showed the expected association between age and alpha peak frequency. ASD had more alpha activity than TDC in regions bordering the Central Sulcus as well as parietal association cortices. In ASD, whereas greater left Central Sulcus relative alpha activity was associated with higher Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS) scores, greater Calcarine region relative alpha activity was associated with lower SRS scores. Although thalamic volume group differences were not observed, relationships between thalamic volume and Calcarine alpha power were unique to TDC. The present study also identified a failure to shift peak alpha frequency as a function of age in primary alpha-generating areas in children with ASD. Findings suggested that increased RS alpha activity in primary motor and somatosensory as well as parietal multimodal areas-with increased alpha thought to reflect greater inhibition-might impair the ability to identify or interpret social cues. Finally, to our knowledge, this is the first study to report associations between thalamic volume and alpha power, an association observed only in TDC. The lack of thalamic and alpha associations in ASD suggests thalamic contributions to RS alpha

  20. Properties of a T-type Ca2+channel-activated slow afterhyperpolarization in thalamic paraventricular nucleus and other thalamic midline neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Renaud, Leo P; Kolaj, Miloslav

    2009-06-01

    Burst firing mediated by a low-threshold spike (LTS) is the hallmark of many thalamic neurons. However, postburst afterhyperpolarizations (AHPs) are relatively uncommon in thalamus. We now report data from patch-clamp recordings in rat brain slice preparations that reveal an LTS-induced slow AHP (sAHP) in thalamic paraventricular (PVT) and other midline neurons, but not in ventrobasal or reticular thalamic neurons. The LTS-induced sAHP lasts 8.9 +/- 0.4 s and has a novel pharmacology, with resistance to tetrodotoxin and cadmium and reduction by Ni(2+) or nominally zero extracellular calcium concentration, which also attenuate both the LTS and sAHP. The sAHP is inhibited by 10 mM intracellular EGTA or by equimolar replacement of extracellular Ca(2+) with Sr(2+), consistent with select activation of LVA T-type Ca(2+) channels and subsequent Ca(2+) influx. In control media, the sAHP reverses near E(K(+)), shifting to -78 mV in 10.1 mM [K(+)](o) and is reduced by Ba(2+) or tetraethylammonium. Although these data are consistent with opening of Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels, this sAHP lacks sensitivity to specific Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel blockers apamin, iberiotoxin, charybdotoxin, and UCL-2077. The LTS-induced sAHP is suppressed by a beta-adrenoceptor agonist isoproterenol, a serotonin 5-HT(7) receptor agonist 5-CT, a neuropeptide orexin-A, and by stimulation of the cAMP/protein kinase A pathway with 8-Br-cAMP and forskolin. The data suggest that PVT and certain midline thalamic neurons possess an LTS-induced sAHP that is pharmacologically distinct and may be important for information transfer in thalamic-limbic circuitry during states of attentiveness and motivation.

  1. Projection optics box

    DOEpatents

    Hale, Layton C.; Malsbury, Terry; Hudyma, Russell M.; Parker, John M.

    2000-01-01

    A projection optics box or assembly for use in an optical assembly, such as in an extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) system using 10-14 nm soft x-ray photons. The projection optics box utilizes a plurality of highly reflective optics or mirrors, each mounted on a precision actuator, and which reflects an optical image, such as from a mask, in the EUVL system onto a point of use, such as a target or silicon wafer, the mask, for example, receiving an optical signal from a source assembly, such as a developed from laser system, via a series of highly reflective mirrors of the EUVL system. The plurality of highly reflective optics or mirrors are mounted in a housing assembly comprised of a series of bulkheads having wall members secured together to form a unit construction of maximum rigidity. Due to the precision actuators, the mirrors must be positioned precisely and remotely in tip, tilt, and piston (three degrees of freedom), while also providing exact constraint.

  2. The Classroom Animal: Box Turtles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, David C.

    1986-01-01

    Provides basic information on the anatomy, physiology, behaviors, and distribution patterns of the box turtle. Offers suggestions for the turtle's care and maintenance in a classroom environment. (ML)

  3. The Classroom Animal: Box Turtles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, David C.

    1986-01-01

    Provides basic information on the anatomy, physiology, behaviors, and distribution patterns of the box turtle. Offers suggestions for the turtle's care and maintenance in a classroom environment. (ML)

  4. Intralaminar and medial thalamic influence on cortical synchrony, information transmission and cognition

    PubMed Central

    Saalmann, Yuri B.

    2014-01-01

    The intralaminar and medial thalamic nuclei are part of the higher-order thalamus, which receives little sensory input, and instead forms extensive cortico-thalamo-cortical pathways. The large mediodorsal thalamic nucleus predominantly connects with the prefrontal cortex, the adjacent intralaminar nuclei connect with fronto-parietal cortex, and the midline thalamic nuclei connect with medial prefrontal cortex and medial temporal lobe. Taking into account this connectivity pattern, it is not surprising that the intralaminar and medial thalamus has been implicated in a variety of cognitive functions, including memory processing, attention and orienting, as well as reward-based behavior. This review addresses how the intralaminar and medial thalamus may regulate information transmission in cortical circuits. A key neural mechanism may involve intralaminar and medial thalamic neurons modulating the degree of synchrony between different groups of cortical neurons according to behavioral demands. Such a thalamic-mediated synchronization mechanism may give rise to large-scale integration of information across multiple cortical circuits, consequently influencing the level of arousal and consciousness. Overall, the growing evidence supports a general role for the higher-order thalamus in the control of cortical information transmission and cognitive processing. PMID:24847225

  5. Corneal afferents differentially target thalamic- and parabrachial-projecting neurons in spinal trigeminal nucleus caudalis.

    PubMed

    Aicher, S A; Hermes, S M; Hegarty, D M

    2013-03-01

    Dorsal horn neurons send ascending projections to both thalamic nuclei and parabrachial nuclei; these pathways are thought to be critical pathways for central processing of nociceptive information. Afferents from the corneal surface of the eye mediate nociception from this tissue which is susceptible to clinically important pain syndromes. This study examined corneal afferents to the trigeminal dorsal horn and compared inputs to thalamic- and parabrachial-projecting neurons. We used anterograde tracing with cholera toxin B subunit to identify corneal afferent projections to trigeminal dorsal horn, and the retrograde tracer FluoroGold to identify projection neurons. Studies were conducted in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. Our analysis was conducted at two distinct levels of the trigeminal nucleus caudalis (Vc) which receive corneal afferent projections. We found that corneal afferents project more densely to the rostral pole of Vc than the caudal pole. We also quantified the number of thalamic- and parabrachial-projecting neurons in the regions of Vc that receive corneal afferents. Corneal afferent inputs to both groups of projection neurons were also more abundant in the rostral pole of Vc. Finally, by comparing the frequency of corneal afferent appositions to thalamic- versus parabrachial-projecting neurons, we found that corneal afferents preferentially target parabrachial-projecting neurons in trigeminal dorsal horn. These results suggest that nociceptive pain from the cornea may be primarily mediated by a non-thalamic ascending pathway. Copyright © 2012 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Corneal afferents differentially target thalamic- and parabrachial-projecting neurons in trigeminal subnucleus caudalis

    PubMed Central

    Aicher, Sue A.; Hermes, Sam M.; Hegarty, Deborah M.

    2012-01-01

    Dorsal horn neurons send ascending projections to both thalamic nuclei and parabrachial nuclei; these pathways are thought to be critical pathways for central processing of nociceptive information. Afferents from the corneal surface of the eye mediate nociception from this tissue which is susceptible to clinically important pain syndromes. This study examined corneal afferents to the trigeminal dorsal horn and compared inputs to thalamic- and parabrachial-projecting neurons. We used anterograde tracing with cholera toxin B subunit to identify corneal afferent projections to trigeminal dorsal horn, and the retrograde tracer FluoroGold to identify projection neurons. Studies were conducted in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. Our analysis was conducted at two distinct levels of the trigeminal subnucleus caudalis (Vc) which receive corneal afferent projections. We found that corneal afferents project more densely to the rostral pole of Vc than the caudal pole. We also quantified the number of thalamic- and parabrachial-projecting neurons in the regions of Vc that receive corneal afferents. Corneal afferent inputs to both groups of projection neurons were also more abundant in the rostral pole of Vc. Finally, by comparing the frequency of corneal afferent appositions to thalamic- versus parabrachial-projecting neurons, we found that corneal afferents preferentially target parabrachial-projecting neurons in trigeminal dorsal horn. These results suggest that nociceptive pain from the cornea may be primarily mediated by a non-thalamic ascending pathway. PMID:23201828

  7. Effect of Spinal Cord Stimulation on Gait in a Patient with Thalamic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Masahiro; Ishi, Kazuhiko; Osumi, Michihiro; Katsuhira, Junji; Chiba, Ryosuke; Haga, Nobuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Thalamic pain is a central neuropathic pain disorder which occurs after stroke. Its severe chronic pain is often intractable to pharmacotherapies and affects the patients' activities of daily living (ADL) and quality of life (QOL). Recently, spinal cord stimulation (SCS) has been reported to be effective in relieving the pain of thalamic pain; however, the effect of SCS on gait performance in patients is unknown. Therefore, we evaluated the gait performance before and after SCS in a case with thalamic pain. A 73-year-old male with thalamic pain participated in this study. We evaluated the gait of the patient two times: before SCS insertion and after 6 days of SCS. At the second evaluation, we measured the gait in three conditions: stimulation off, comfortable stimulation, and strong stimulation. SCS succeeded in improving the pain from 7 to 2 on an 11-point numerical rating scale. Step frequency and the velocity of gait tended to increase between pre- and poststimulation periods. There were no apparent differences in gait among the three stimulation conditions (off, comfortable, and strong) at the poststimulation period. SCS may be effective on gait in patients with thalamic pain. PMID:27579198

  8. Differential effects of methylphenidate and cocaine on GABA transmission in sensory thalamic nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Goitia, Belén; Raineri, Mariana; González, Laura E.; Rozas, José L.; Garcia-Rill, Edgar; Bisagno, Verónica; Urbano, Francisco J.

    2013-01-01

    Methylphenidate (MPH) is widely used to treat children and adolescents diagnosed with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Although MPH shares mechanistic similarities to cocaine, its effects on GABAergic transmission in sensory thalamic nuclei are unknown. Our aim was to compare cocaine and MPH effects on GABAergic projections between thalamic reticular and ventrobasal (VB) nuclei. Mice (P18-30) were subjected to binge-like cocaine and MPH acute and sub-chronic administrations. Cocaine and MPH enhanced hyperlocomotion, though sub-chronic cocaine-mediated effects were stronger than MPH effects. Cocaine and MPH sub-chronic administration altered paired-pulse and spontaneous GABAergic input differently. The effects of cocaine on evoked paired-pulse GABA-A mediated currents changed from depression to facilitation with the duration of the protocols used, while MPH induced a constant increase throughout administration protocols. Thalamic reticular nucleus GAD67 and VB CaV3.1 protein levels were measured using Western blot in order to better understand their link to increased GABA release. Both proteins were increased by sub-chronic administration of cocaine. These results suggest that cocaine and MPH produced distinct presynaptic alterations on GABAergic transmission. MPH showed effects on GABAergic transmission that seems less disruptive than cocaine. Unique effects of cocaine on postsynaptic VB calcium currents might explain deleterious cocaine effects on sensory thalamic nuclei. These results might help to understand the impact of MPH repetitive administration on sensory thalamic nuclei. PMID:23205768

  9. REDUCED THALAMIC VOLUME IN PRETERM INFANTS IS ASSOCIATED WITH ABNORMAL WHITE MATTER METABOLISM INDEPENDENT OF INJURY

    PubMed Central

    Wisnowski, Jessica L.; Ceschin, Rafael C.; Choi, So Young; Schmithorst, Vincent J.; Painter, Michael J.; Nelson, Marvin D.; Blüml, Stefan; Panigrahy, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Altered thalamocortical development is hypothesized to be a key substrate underlying neurodevelopmental disabilities in preterm infants. However, the pathogenesis of this abnormality is not well-understood. We combined magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the parietal white matter and morphometric analyses of the thalamus to investigate the association between white matter metabolism and thalamic volume and tested the hypothesis that thalamic volume would be associated with diminished N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA), a measure of neuronal/axonal maturation, independent of white matter injury. Methods Data from 106 preterm infants (mean gestational age at birth: 31.0 weeks ± 4.3; range 23–36 weeks) who underwent MR examinations under clinical indications were included in this study. Results Linear regression analyses demonstrated a significant association between parietal white matter NAA concentration and thalamic volume. This effect was above and beyond the effect of white matter injury and age at MRI and remained significant even when preterm infants with punctate white matter lesions (pWMLs) were excluded from the analysis. Furthermore, choline, and amongst the preterm infants without pWMLs, lactate concentrations were also associated with thalamic volume. Of note, the associations between NAA and choline concentration and thalamic volume remained significant even when the sample was restricted to neonates who were term-equivalent age or older. Conclusion These observations provide convergent evidence of a neuroimaging phenotype characterized by widespread abnormal thalamocortical development and suggest that the pathogenesis may involve impaired axonal maturation. PMID:25666231

  10. Differential impact of thalamic versus subthalamic deep brain stimulation on lexical processing.

    PubMed

    Krugel, Lea K; Ehlen, Felicitas; Tiedt, Hannes O; Kühn, Andrea A; Klostermann, Fabian

    2014-10-01

    Roles of subcortical structures in language processing are vague, but, interestingly, basal ganglia and thalamic Deep Brain Stimulation can go along with reduced lexical capacities. To deepen the understanding of this impact, we assessed word processing as a function of thalamic versus subthalamic Deep Brain Stimulation. Ten essential tremor patients treated with thalamic and 14 Parkinson׳s disease patients with subthalamic Deep Brain Stimulation performed an acoustic Lexical Decision Task ON and OFF stimulation. Combined analysis of task performance and event-related potentials allowed the determination of processing speed, priming effects, and N400 as neurophysiological correlate of lexical stimulus processing. 12 age-matched healthy participants acted as control subjects. Thalamic Deep Brain Stimulation prolonged word decisions and reduced N400 potentials. No comparable ON-OFF effects were present in patients with subthalamic Deep Brain Stimulation. In the latter group of patients with Parkinson' disease, N400 amplitudes were, however, abnormally low, whether under active or inactive Deep Brain Stimulation. In conclusion, performance speed and N400 appear to be influenced by state functions, modulated by thalamic, but not subthalamic Deep Brain Stimulation, compatible with concepts of thalamo-cortical engagement in word processing. Clinically, these findings specify cognitive sequels of Deep Brain Stimulation in a target-specific way.

  11. Pure amnesia after unilateral left polar thalamic infarct: topographic and sequential neuropsychological and metabolic (PET) correlations.

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, S; Assal, G; Bogousslavsky, J; Regli, F; Townsend, D W; Leenders, K L; Blecic, S

    1994-01-01

    A 54-year-old patient who had an isolated small polar thalamic infarct and acute global amnesia with slight frontal type dysfunction but without other neurological dysfunction was studied. Memory improved partially within 8 months. At all stages the impairment was more severe for verbal than non-verbal memory. Autobiographic recollections and newly acquired information tended to be disorganised with respect to temporal order. Procedural memory was unaffected. Both emotional involvement and pleasure in reading were lost. On MRI, the infarct was limited to the left anterior thalamic nuclei and the adjacent mamillothalamic tract. The regional cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (measured with PET) was decreased on the left in the thalamus, amygdala, and posterior cingulate cortex 2 weeks after the infarct, and in the thalamus and posterior cingulate cortex 9 months later. These findings stress the specific role of the left anterior thalamic region in memory and confirm that longlasting amnesia from a thalamic lesion can occur without significant structural damage to the dorsomedial nucleus. Furthermore, they suggest that the anterior thalamic nuclei and possibly their connections with the posterior cingulate cortex play a role in emotional involvement linked to ipsilateral hemispheric functions. Images PMID:8301301

  12. Neuromodulation of the inferior thalamic peduncle for major depression and obsessive compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, F; Velasco, F; Salín-Pascual, R; Velasco, M; Nicolini, H; Velasco, A L; Castro, G

    2007-01-01

    Neuromodulation of the inferior thalamic peduncle is a new surgical treatment for major depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder. The inferior thalamic peduncle is a bundle of fibers connecting the orbito-frontal cortex with the non-specific thalamic system in a small area behind the fornix and anterior to the polar reticular thalamic nucleus. Electrical stimulation elicits characteristic frontal cortical responses (recruiting responses and direct current (DC)-shift) that confirm correct localization of this anatomical structure. A female with depression for 23 years and a male with obsessive-compulsive disorder for 9 years had stereotactic implantation of electrodes in the inferior thalamic peduncle and were evaluated over a long-term period. Initial OFF stimulation period (1 month) showed no consistent changes in the Hamilton Depression Scale (HAM-D), Yale Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (YBOCS), or Global Assessment of Functioning scale (GAF). The ON stimulation period (3-5 V, 130-Hz frequency, 450-msec pulse width in a continuous program) showed significant decrease in depression, obsession, and compulsion symptoms. GAF improved significantly in both cases. The neuropsychological tests battery showed no significant changes except from a reduction in the perseverative response of the obsessive-compulsive patient and better performance in manual praxias of the female depressive patient. Moderate increase in weight (5 kg on average) was observed in both cases.

  13. [Thalamic dementia due to infarct of the left thalamus and genum of the right internal capsule].

    PubMed

    Porta-Etessam, J; Martínez-Salio, A; Berbel, A; Benito-León, J; García-Muñoz, A; Kesler, P; Mateo, S

    Thalamic dementia is the clinical consequence of a disorder of both thalami. It is generally secondary to bilateral paramedial thalamic infarcts due to disorders of small blood vessels or cardioembolism. We report a case of dementia of acute onset involving the left thalamus and the genum of the right internal capsule. A 33 year old man, HIV positive, category B2, admitted to hospital for tuberculous meningitis presented with the acute onset of somnolence, followed by marked bradypsychism, personality changes, marked disorder of executive explicit memory without associated praxic, gnosic or language disorders. Ocular motility remained normal. There was left central facial paralysis with inverse emotive voluntary dissociation. The other cranial nerves were normal. There was left hemiparesia with extensor plantar reflex. No other alterations. Cerebral MR imaging was compatible with paramedial infarcts of the left thalamus and genum of the right internal capsule. Thalamic dementia generally occurs in bilateral paramedian thalamic disorders. There are cases of disorders of executive memory secondary to infarcts of the genum of the internal capsule due to interruption of the thalamotemporal pathways and a contralateral paramedial thalamic lesion.

  14. Complexity of dopamine metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) coincides with a dramatic loss of dopaminergic neurons within the substantia nigra. A key player in the loss of dopaminergic neurons is oxidative stress. Dopamine (DA) metabolism itself is strongly linked to oxidative stress as its degradation generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) and DA oxidation can lead to endogenous neurotoxins whereas some DA derivatives show antioxidative effects. Therefore, DA metabolism is of special importance for neuronal redox-homeostasis and viability. In this review we highlight different aspects of dopamine metabolism in the context of PD and neurodegeneration. Since most reviews focus only on single aspects of the DA system, we will give a broader overview by looking at DA biosynthesis, sequestration, degradation and oxidation chemistry at the metabolic level, as well as at the transcriptional, translational and posttranslational regulation of all enzymes involved. This is followed by a short overview of cellular models currently used in PD research. Finally, we will address the topic from a medical point of view which directly aims to encounter PD. PMID:23683503

  15. 2. UPPER NOTTINGHAM MINE, WOODEN BOXES. BOXES ARE LOCATED APPROXIMATELY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. UPPER NOTTINGHAM MINE, WOODEN BOXES. BOXES ARE LOCATED APPROXIMATELY 10 YARDS TO THE RIGHT AND DOWNSLOPE OF THE ADIT IN ID-31-F-1. CAMERA IS POINTED EAST-SOUTHEAST. - Florida Mountain Mining Sites, Upper Nottingham Mine, West face of Florida Mountain, head of Jacobs Gulch, Silver City, Owyhee County, ID

  16. Association between striatal dopamine D2/D3 receptors and brain activation during visual attention: effects of sleep deprivation.

    PubMed

    Tomasi, D; Wang, G-J; Volkow, N D

    2016-05-31

    Sleep deprivation (SD) disrupts dopamine (DA) signaling and impairs attention. However, the interpretation of these concomitant effects requires a better understanding of dopamine's role in attention processing. Here we test the hypotheses that D2/D3 receptors (D2/D3R) in dorsal and ventral striatum would distinctly regulate the activation of attention regions and that, by decreasing D2/D3, SD would disrupt these associations. We measured striatal D2/D3R using positron emission tomography with [(11)C]raclopride and brain activation to a visual attention (VA) task using 4-Tesla functional magnetic resonance imaging. Fourteen healthy men were studied during rested wakefulness and also during SD. Increased D2/D3R in striatum (caudate, putamen and ventral striatum) were linearly associated with higher thalamic activation. Subjects with higher D2/D3R in caudate relative to ventral striatum had higher activation in superior parietal cortex and ventral precuneus, and those with higher D2/D3R in putamen relative to ventral striatum had higher activation in anterior cingulate. SD impaired the association between striatal D2/D3R and VA-induced thalamic activation, which is essential for alertness. Findings suggest a robust DAergic modulation of cortical activation during the VA task, such that D2/D3R in dorsal striatum counterbalanced the stimulatory influence of D2/D3R in ventral striatum, which was not significantly disrupted by SD. In contrast, SD disrupted thalamic activation, which did not show counterbalanced DAergic modulation but a positive association with D2/D3R in both dorsal and ventral striatum. The counterbalanced dorsal versus ventral striatal DAergic modulation of VA activation mirrors similar findings during sensorimotor processing (Tomasi et al., 2015) suggesting a bidirectional influence in signaling between the dorsal caudate and putamen and the ventral striatum.

  17. Association between striatal dopamine D2/D3 receptors and brain activation during visual attention: effects of sleep deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Tomasi, D; Wang, G-J; Volkow, N D

    2016-01-01

    Sleep deprivation (SD) disrupts dopamine (DA) signaling and impairs attention. However, the interpretation of these concomitant effects requires a better understanding of dopamine's role in attention processing. Here we test the hypotheses that D2/D3 receptors (D2/D3R) in dorsal and ventral striatum would distinctly regulate the activation of attention regions and that, by decreasing D2/D3, SD would disrupt these associations. We measured striatal D2/D3R using positron emission tomography with [11C]raclopride and brain activation to a visual attention (VA) task using 4-Tesla functional magnetic resonance imaging. Fourteen healthy men were studied during rested wakefulness and also during SD. Increased D2/D3R in striatum (caudate, putamen and ventral striatum) were linearly associated with higher thalamic activation. Subjects with higher D2/D3R in caudate relative to ventral striatum had higher activation in superior parietal cortex and ventral precuneus, and those with higher D2/D3R in putamen relative to ventral striatum had higher activation in anterior cingulate. SD impaired the association between striatal D2/D3R and VA-induced thalamic activation, which is essential for alertness. Findings suggest a robust DAergic modulation of cortical activation during the VA task, such that D2/D3R in dorsal striatum counterbalanced the stimulatory influence of D2/D3R in ventral striatum, which was not significantly disrupted by SD. In contrast, SD disrupted thalamic activation, which did not show counterbalanced DAergic modulation but a positive association with D2/D3R in both dorsal and ventral striatum. The counterbalanced dorsal versus ventral striatal DAergic modulation of VA activation mirrors similar findings during sensorimotor processing (Tomasi et al., 2015) suggesting a bidirectional influence in signaling between the dorsal caudate and putamen and the ventral striatum. PMID:27219347

  18. Does dopamine connect the dots in ADPKD?

    PubMed

    Chapman, Arlene B

    2015-02-01

    Healthy autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) patients with normal kidney function demonstrate reduced endothelial-dependent vasodilation that improves with increasing local dopamine levels. Dopamine regulates renal sodium excretion, and dopamine receptors are located on primary cilia in both vascular and renal tubular epithelial cells. The study by Lorthioir and colleagues links endothelial function and dopamine availability in ADPKD patients.

  19. Reticular thalamic responses to nociceptive inputs in anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Yen, Chen-Tung; Shaw, Fu-Zen

    2003-04-11

    The present study compares nociceptive responses of neurons in the reticular thalamic nucleus (RT) to those of the ventroposterior lateral nucleus (VPL). Extracellular single-unit activities of cells in the RT and VPL were recorded in anesthetized rats. Only units with identified tactile receptive fields in the forepaw or hindpaw were studied. In the first series of experiments, RT and VPL responses to pinching with a small artery clamp were tested with the rats under pentobarbital, urethane, ketamine, or halothane anesthesia. Under all types of anesthesia, many RT units were inhibited. Second, the specificity of the nociceptive response was tested by pinching and noxious heating of the unit's tactile receptive field. Of the 39 VPL units tested, 20 were excited by both types of noxious stimuli. In sharp contrast, of the 30 RT units tested, none were excited and 17 were inhibited. In a third series of experiments, low-intensity and beam-diffused CO(2) laser irradiation was used to activate peripheral nociceptive afferents. Wide-dynamic-range VPL units responded with short- and long-latency excitations. In contrast, RT units had short-latency excitation followed by long-latency inhibition. Nociceptive input inhibited RT units in less than 500 ms. We conclude that a significant portion of RT neurons were polysynaptically inhibited by nociceptive inputs. Since all the cells tested were excited by light tactile inputs, the somatosensory RT may serve in the role of a modality gate, which modifies (i.e. inhibits) tactile inputs while letting noxious inputs pass.

  20. Thalamic control of human attention driven by memory and learning.

    PubMed

    de Bourbon-Teles, José; Bentley, Paul; Koshino, Saori; Shah, Kushal; Dutta, Agneish; Malhotra, Paresh; Egner, Tobias; Husain, Masud; Soto, David

    2014-05-05

    The role of the thalamus in high-level cognition-attention, working memory (WM), rule-based learning, and decision making-remains poorly understood, especially in comparison to that of cortical frontoparietal networks [1-3]. Studies of visual thalamus have revealed important roles for pulvinar and lateral geniculate nucleus in visuospatial perception and attention [4-10] and for mediodorsal thalamus in oculomotor control [11]. Ventrolateral thalamus contains subdivisions devoted to action control as part of a circuit involving the basal ganglia [12, 13] and motor, premotor, and prefrontal cortices [14], whereas anterior thalamus forms a memory network in connection with the hippocampus [15]. This connectivity profile suggests that ventrolateral and anterior thalamus may represent a nexus between mnemonic and control functions, such as action or attentional selection. Here, we characterize the role of thalamus in the interplay between memory and visual attention. We show that ventrolateral lesions impair the influence of WM representations on attentional deployment. A subsequent fMRI study in healthy volunteers demonstrates involvement of ventrolateral and, notably, anterior thalamus in biasing attention through WM contents. To further characterize the memory types used by the thalamus to bias attention, we performed a second fMRI study that involved learning of stimulus-stimulus associations and their retrieval from long-term memory to optimize attention in search. Responses in ventrolateral and anterior thalamic nuclei tracked learning of the predictiveness of these abstract associations and their use in directing attention. These findings demonstrate a key role for human thalamus in higher-level cognition, notably, in mnemonic biasing of attention.

  1. Membrane Bistability in Thalamic Reticular Neurons During Spindle Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Fuentealba, Pablo; Timofeev, Igor; Bazhenov, Maxim; Sejnowski, Terrence J.; Steriade, Mircea

    2010-01-01

    The thalamic reticular (RE) nucleus is a major source of inhibition in the thalamus. It plays a crucial role in regulating the excitability of thalamocortical networks and in generating some sleep rhythms. Current-clamp intracellular recordings of RE neurons in cats under barbiturate anesthesia revealed the presence of membrane bistability in ~20% of neurons. Bistability consisted of two alternate membrane potentials, separated by ~17–20 mV. While non-bistable (common) RE neurons fired rhythmic spike-bursts during spindles, bistable RE neurons fired tonically, with burst modulation, throughout spindle sequences. Bistability was strongly voltage dependent and only expressed under resting conditions (i.e. no current injection). The transition from the silent to the active state was a regenerative event that could be activated by brief depolarization, whereas brief hyperpolarizations could switch the membrane potential from the active to the silent state. These effects outlasted the current pulses. Corticothalamic stimulation could also switch the membrane potential from silent to active states. Addition of QX-314 in the recording micropipette either abolished or disrupted membrane bistability, suggesting INa(p) to be responsible for its generation. Thalamocortical cells presented various patterns of spindling that reflected the membrane bistability in RE neurons. Finally, experimental data and computer simulations predicted a role for RE neurons’ membrane bistability in inducing various patterns of spindling in target thalamocortical cells. We conclude that membrane bistability of RE neurons is an intrinsic property, likely generated by INa(p) and modulated by cortical influences, as well as a factor that determines different patterns of spindle rhythms in thalamocortical neurons. PMID:15331618

  2. Characterization of the thalamic-subthalamic circuit involved in the placebo response through single-neuron recording in Parkinson patients.

    PubMed

    Frisaldi, Elisa; Carlino, Elisa; Lanotte, Michele; Lopiano, Leonardo; Benedetti, Fabrizio

    2014-11-01

    The placebo effect, or response, is a complex phenomenon whereby an inert treatment can induce a therapeutic benefit if the subject is made to believe that it is effective. One of the main mechanisms involved is represented by expectations of clinical improvement which, in turn, have been found to either reduce anxiety or activate reward mechanisms. Therefore, the study of the placebo effect allows us to understand how emotions may affect both behavior and therapeutic outcome. The high rate of placebo responders in clinical trials of Parkinson's disease provided the motivation to investigate the biological underpinnings of the placebo response in Parkinsonian patients. The placebo effect in Parkinson's disease is induced through the administration of an inert substance which the patient believes to improve motor performance. By using this approach, different behavioral and neuroimaging studies have documented objective improvements in motor performance and an increase of endogenous dopamine release in both the dorsal and ventral striatum. Recently, single-neuron recording from the subthalamic and thalamic regions during the implantation of electrodes for deep brain stimulation has been used to investigate the firing pattern of different neurons before and after placebo administration. The results show that the subthalamic nucleus, the substantia nigra pars reticulata, and the ventral anterior thalamus are all involved in the placebo response in Parkinson patients, thus making intraoperative recording an excellent model to characterize the neuronal circuit that is involved in the placebo response in Parkinson's disease as well as in other disorders of movement. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. More box codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, G.

    1992-01-01

    A new investigation shows that, starting from the BCH (21,15;3) code represented as a 7 x 3 matrix and adding a row and column to add even parity, one obtains an 8 x 4 matrix (32,15;8) code. An additional dimension is obtained by specifying odd parity on the rows and even parity on the columns, i.e., adjoining to the 8 x 4 matrix, the matrix, which is zero except for the fourth column (of all ones). Furthermore, any seven rows and three columns will form the BCH (21,15;3) code. This box code has the same weight structure as the quadratic residue and BCH codes of the same dimensions. Whether there exists an algebraic isomorphism to either code is as yet unknown.

  4. ACYSYS in a box

    SciTech Connect

    Briegel, C.; Finstrom, D.; Hendricks, B.; King, C.; Lackey, S.; Neswold, R.; Nicklaus, D.; Patrick, J.; Petrov, A.; Rechenmacher, R.; Schumann, C.; /Fermilab

    2011-11-01

    The Accelerator Control System at Fermilab has evolved to enable this relatively large control system to be encapsulated into a 'box' such as a laptop. The goal was to provide a platform isolated from the 'online' control system. This platform can be used internally for making major upgrades and modifications without impacting operations. It also provides a standalone environment for research and development including a turnkey control system for collaborators. Over time, the code base running on Scientific Linux has enabled all the salient features of the Fermilab's control system to be captured in an off-the-shelf laptop. The anticipated additional benefits of packaging the system include improved maintenance, reliability, documentation, and future enhancements.

  5. Impedance Measurement Box

    ScienceCinema

    Christophersen, Jon

    2016-07-12

    Energy storage devices, primarily batteries, are now more important to consumers, industries and the military. With increasing technical complexity and higher user expectations, there is also a demand for highly accurate state-of-health battery assessment techniques. IMB incorporates patented, proprietary, and tested capabilities using control software and hardware that can be part of an embedded monitoring system. IMB directly measures the wideband impedance spectrum in seconds during battery operation with no significant impact on service life. It also can be applied to batteries prior to installation, confirming health before entering active service, as well as during regular maintenance. For more information about this project, visit http://www.inl.gov/rd100/2011/impedance-measurement-box/

  6. Impedance Measurement Box

    SciTech Connect

    Christophersen, Jon

    2011-01-01

    Energy storage devices, primarily batteries, are now more important to consumers, industries and the military. With increasing technical complexity and higher user expectations, there is also a demand for highly accurate state-of-health battery assessment techniques. IMB incorporates patented, proprietary, and tested capabilities using control software and hardware that can be part of an embedded monitoring system. IMB directly measures the wideband impedance spectrum in seconds during battery operation with no significant impact on service life. It also can be applied to batteries prior to installation, confirming health before entering active service, as well as during regular maintenance. For more information about this project, visit http://www.inl.gov/rd100/2011/impedance-measurement-box/

  7. Mediodorsal thalamic nucleus receives a direct retinal input in marmoset monkey (Callithrix jacchus): a subunit B cholera toxin study.

    PubMed

    de Sousa, Twyla Barros; de Santana, Melquisedec Abiaré Dantas; Silva, Alane de Medeiros; Guzen, Fausto Pierdoná; Oliveira, Francisco Gilberto; Cavalcante, Judney Cley; Cavalcante, Jeferson de Souza; Costa, Miriam Stela Maris Oliveira; Nascimento, Expedito Silva do

    2013-01-01

    The mediodorsal thalamic nucleus is a prominent nucleus in the thalamus, positioned lateral to the midline nuclei and medial to the intralaminar thalamic complex in the dorsal thalamus. Several studies identify the mediodorsal thalamic nucleus as a key structure in learning and memory, as well as in emotional mechanisms and alertness due to reciprocal connections with the limbic system and prefrontal cortex. Fibers from the retina to the mediodorsal thalamic nucleus have recently been described for the first time in a crepuscular rodent, suggesting a possible regulation of the mediodorsal thalamic nucleus by visual activity. The present study shows retinal afferents in the mediodorsal thalamic nucleus of a new world primate, the marmoset (Callithrix jacchus), using B subunit of cholera toxin (CTb) as an anterograde tracer. A small population of labeled retinofugal axonal arborizations is consistently labeled in small domains of the medial and lateral periphery of the caudal half of the mediodorsal nucleus. Retinal projections in the mediodorsal thalamic nucleus are exclusively contralateral and the morphology of the afferent endings was examined. Although the functional significance of this projection remains unknown, this retina-mediodorsal thalamic nucleus pathway may be involved in a wide possibility of functional implications.

  8. Effects of Donepezil on Behavioral Manifestations of Thalamic Infarction: A Single-Case Observation

    PubMed Central

    Riveros, Rodrigo; Chabriat, Hughes; Flores, Rodrigo; Alvarez, Gonzalo; Slachevsky, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To examine the effect of donepezil for the treatment of cognitive and behavioral disorders associated with thalamic lesions in a 45-year-old male who suffered an infarct in the left thalamus. Background: Recent studies suggest that donepezil may improve executive functions impairments due to subcortical ischemic lesions. Method: The effects of donepezil were analyzed in a single-case of thalamic infarction with cognitive and behavioral alterations in an open label study. Results: Significant behavioral modifications related to improved performances in executive functions were observed with the treatment. Conclusion: The results suggest that donepezil may have significant effect on executive functions that can alter behavioral outcomes after thalamic infarctions. PMID:21472029

  9. Accelerated forgetting of contextual details due to focal medio-dorsal thalamic lesion

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Sicong; Miller, Laurie; Piguet, Olivier; Hornberger, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Effects of thalamic nuclei damage and related white matter tracts on memory performance are still debated. This is particularly evident for the medio-dorsal thalamus which has been less clear in predicting amnesia than anterior thalamus changes. The current study addresses this issue by assessing 7 thalamic stroke patients with consistent unilateral lesions focal to the left medio-dorsal nuclei for immediate and delayed memory performance on standard visual and verbal tests of anterograde memory, and over the long-term (>24 h) on an object-location associative memory task. Thalamic patients showed selective impairment to delayed recall, but intact recognition memory. Patients also showed accelerated forgetting of contextual details after a 24 h delay, compared to controls. Importantly, the mammillothalamic tract was intact in all patients, which suggests a role for the medio-dorsal nuclei in recall and early consolidation memory processes. PMID:25309371

  10. Accelerated forgetting of contextual details due to focal medio-dorsal thalamic lesion.

    PubMed

    Tu, Sicong; Miller, Laurie; Piguet, Olivier; Hornberger, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Effects of thalamic nuclei damage and related white matter tracts on memory performance are still debated. This is particularly evident for the medio-dorsal thalamus which has been less clear in predicting amnesia than anterior thalamus changes. The current study addresses this issue by assessing 7 thalamic stroke patients with consistent unilateral lesions focal to the left medio-dorsal nuclei for immediate and delayed memory performance on standard visual and verbal tests of anterograde memory, and over the long-term (>24 h) on an object-location associative memory task. Thalamic patients showed selective impairment to delayed recall, but intact recognition memory. Patients also showed accelerated forgetting of contextual details after a 24 h delay, compared to controls. Importantly, the mammillothalamic tract was intact in all patients, which suggests a role for the medio-dorsal nuclei in recall and early consolidation memory processes.

  11. Mood disorder in a patient with a benign thalamic cystic lesion: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The thalamus is increasingly gaining importance in psychiatric disorders. There are case reports in the literature of neuropsychiatric symptoms associated with thalamic infarcts. The present report elucidates the complexities of linking neuropsychiatric symptoms to a benign thalamic brain lesion, and its impact on management. Case presentation We present the case of a Caucasian man in his early 30s, who presented with a difficult to treat bipolar illness and coexisting thalamic lesion. Conclusions In this report we explore the possible links between our patient’s symptoms and his brain lesion. We discuss the possible neuronal mechanisms that may be involved and debate the most appropriate management strategies. We hope this report will assist further insights into the role of the thalamus in psychiatric disorders. PMID:23594838

  12. ErbB4 regulation of a thalamic reticular nucleus circuit for sensory selection

    PubMed Central

    Ahrens, Sandra; Jaramillo, Santiago; Yu, Kai; Ghosh, Sanchari; Hwang, Ga-Ram; Paik, Raehum; Lai, Cary; He, Miao; Huang, Z. Josh; Li, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Selective processing of behaviorally relevant sensory inputs against irrelevant ones is a fundamental cognitive function, impairments of which have been implicated in major psychiatric disorders. It is known that the thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) gates sensory information en route to the cortex, however the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here we show in mice that deficiency of Erbb4 gene in somatostatin-expressing TRN neurons markedly altered behaviors dependent on sensory selection. Whereas performance in identifying targets from distractors was improved, the ability to switch attention between conflicting sensory cues was impaired. These behavioral changes were mediated by enhanced cortical drive onto TRN that promotes the TRN-mediated cortical feedback inhibition of thalamic neurons. Our results uncover a previously unknown role of ErbB4 in regulating cortico-TRN-thalamic circuit function. We propose that ErbB4 sets the sensitivity of TRN to cortical inputs at levels that can support sensory selection while allowing behavioral flexibility. PMID:25501036

  13. T-Type Calcium Channels Mediate the Transition between Tonic and Phasic Firing in Thalamic Neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Setsuo; Rogawski, Michael A.

    1989-09-01

    Thalamic neurons undergo a shift from tonic to phasic (burst) firing upon hyperpolarization. This state transition results from deinactivation of a regenerative depolarizing event referred to as the low-threshold spike. Isolated adult guinea pig thalamic (dorsal lateral geniculate) neurons exhibited low-threshold spikes that could be blocked by low concentrations of nickel but were unaffected by the dihydropyridine nimodipine. Whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings from these cells demonstrated a low-threshold, rapidly inactivating (T) Ca2+ current that manifested similar voltage dependency and time course as the low-threshold spike. Like low-threshold spikes, the T-type Ca2+ current was eliminated by nickel but was unaffected by nimodipine. In thalamic neurons, T-type Ca2+ channels underlie the low-threshold spike and, therefore, play a critical role in regulating the firing pattern of these cells.

  14. Being Creative "Inside the Box"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomascoff, Rocky

    2011-01-01

    Artist Joseph Cornell (1903-1972) created wonderful environments inside boxes using mostly found objects. They were often Surrealistic in nature. Some boxes were designed with glass fronts, and others were meant to be interactive with the viewer, wherein the objects could be handled. With Joseph Cornell in mind, the author introduces an art…

  15. Cardboard Boxes: Learning Concepts Galore!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warner, Laverne; Wilmoth, Linda

    2007-01-01

    Mrs. Keenan, a preschool teacher, observed her 3-year-old granddaughter Riley pull, tug, and stack piles of holiday boxes on the floor. She remembered that her child care director had suggested using boxes as a curriculum theme, but she hadn't given much thought about the idea until now. She said to herself, "I wonder if my children would be as…

  16. What Makes a Better Box?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moyer, Richard; Everett, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Every morning, many Americans start their day with a bowl of cereal. Some spend time while they eat breakfast reading the back of the cereal box, but few consider its size, shape, and construction, or realize that it was designed by an engineer. This article describes a lesson in which students design, build, and critique cereal boxes. The lesson…

  17. Spirit Boxes: Expressions of Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMuro, Ted

    1984-01-01

    After studying the culture and art of the ancient civilizations of South America, Mesopotamia, Greece, and Egypt, secondary level art students made spirit boxes as expressions of the various cultures. How to make the boxes and how to prepare the face molds are described. (RM)

  18. Being Creative "Inside the Box"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomascoff, Rocky

    2011-01-01

    Artist Joseph Cornell (1903-1972) created wonderful environments inside boxes using mostly found objects. They were often Surrealistic in nature. Some boxes were designed with glass fronts, and others were meant to be interactive with the viewer, wherein the objects could be handled. With Joseph Cornell in mind, the author introduces an art…

  19. Spirit Boxes: Expressions of Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMuro, Ted

    1984-01-01

    After studying the culture and art of the ancient civilizations of South America, Mesopotamia, Greece, and Egypt, secondary level art students made spirit boxes as expressions of the various cultures. How to make the boxes and how to prepare the face molds are described. (RM)

  20. What Makes a Better Box?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moyer, Richard; Everett, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Every morning, many Americans start their day with a bowl of cereal. Some spend time while they eat breakfast reading the back of the cereal box, but few consider its size, shape, and construction, or realize that it was designed by an engineer. This article describes a lesson in which students design, build, and critique cereal boxes. The lesson…

  1. Cardboard Boxes: Learning Concepts Galore!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warner, Laverne; Wilmoth, Linda

    2007-01-01

    Mrs. Keenan, a preschool teacher, observed her 3-year-old granddaughter Riley pull, tug, and stack piles of holiday boxes on the floor. She remembered that her child care director had suggested using boxes as a curriculum theme, but she hadn't given much thought about the idea until now. She said to herself, "I wonder if my children would be as…

  2. Dissociation of Recognition and Recency Memory Judgments After Anterior Thalamic Nuclei Lesions in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Dumont, Julie R.; Aggleton, John P.

    2013-01-01

    The anterior thalamic nuclei form part of a network for episodic memory in humans. The importance of these nuclei for recognition and recency judgments remains, however, unclear. Rats with anterior thalamic nuclei lesions and their controls were tested on object recognition, along with two types of recency judgment. The spontaneous discrimination of a novel object or a novel odor from a familiar counterpart (recognition memory) was not affected by anterior thalamic lesions when tested after retention delays of 1 and 60 min. To measure recency memory, rats were shown two familiar objects, one of which had been explored more recently. In one condition, rats were presented with two lists (List A, List B) of objects separated by a delay, thereby creating two distinct blocks of stimuli. After an additional delay, rats were presented with pairs of objects, one from List A and one from List B (between-block recency). No lesion-induced deficit was apparent for recency discriminations between objects from different lists, despite using three different levels of task difficulty. In contrast, rats with anterior thalamic lesions were significantly impaired when presented with a continuous list of objects and then tested on their ability to distinguish between those items early and late in the same list (within-block recency). The contrasting effects on recognition and recency support the notion that interlinked hippocampal–anterior thalamic interconnections support aspects of both spatial and nonspatial learning, although the role of the anterior thalamic nuclei may be restricted to a subclass of recency judgments (within-block). PMID:23731076

  3. Validation of connectivity-based thalamic segmentation with direct electrophysiologic recordings from human sensory thalamus.

    PubMed

    Elias, W Jeffrey; Zheng, Zhong A; Domer, Paul; Quigg, Mark; Pouratian, Nader

    2012-02-01

    Connectivity-based segmentation has been used to identify functional gray matter subregions that are not discernable on conventional magnetic resonance imaging. However, the accuracy and reliability of this technique has only been validated using indirect means. In order to provide direct electrophysiologic validation of connectivity-based thalamic segmentations within human subjects, we assess the correlation of atlas-based thalamic anatomy, connectivity-based thalamic maps, and somatosensory evoked thalamic potentials in two adults with medication-refractory epilepsy who were undergoing intracranial EEG monitoring with intrathalamic depth and subdural cortical strip electrodes. MRI with atlas-derived localization was used to delineate the anatomic boundaries of the ventral posterolateral (VPL) nucleus of the thalamus. Somatosensory evoked potentials with intrathalamic electrodes physiologically identified a discrete region of phase reversal in the ventrolateral thalamus. Finally, DTI was obtained so that probabilistic tractography and connectivity-based segmentation could be performed to correlate the region of thalamus linked to sensory areas of the cortex, namely the postcentral gyrus. We independently utilized these three different methods in a blinded fashion to localize the "sensory" thalamus, demonstrating a high-degree of reproducible correlation between electrophysiologic and connectivity-based maps of the thalamus. This study provides direct electrophysiologic validation of probabilistic tractography-based thalamic segmentation. Importantly, this study provides an electrophysiological basis for using connectivity-based segmentation to further study subcortical anatomy and physiology while also providing the clinical basis for targeting deep brain nuclei with therapeutic stimulation. Finally, these direct recordings from human thalamus confirm early inferences of a sensory thalamic component of the N18 waveform in somatosensory evoked potentials.

  4. Topographic organization of subcortical projections to the anterior thalamic nuclei in the rat.

    PubMed

    Shibata, H

    1992-09-01

    Subcortical projections to the anterior thalamic nuclei were studied in the rat, with special reference to projections from the mammillary nuclei, by retrograde and anterograde transport of wheat germ agglutinin conjugated to horseradish peroxidase. The medial mammillary nucleus (MM) projects predominantly ipsilaterally to the entire anterior thalamic nuclei, whereas the lateral mammillary nucleus projects bilaterally to the anterodorsal nucleus (AD) of the anterior thalamic nuclei. A topographic relationship was recognized between the MM and the anterior thalamic nuclei. The dorsal region of the pars mediana of the MM projects to the interanteromedial nucleus (IAM), whereas the ventral region projects to the rostral part of the anteromedial nucleus (AM). The dorsal and the ventral regions of the pars medialis project to the dorsomedial part of the AM at its caudal and rostral levels, respectively. The dorsomedial region of the pars lateralis projects to the ventral AM. The ventrolateral region of the pars lateralis projects to the ventral part of the anteroventral nucleus (AV) in such a manner that rostral cells project rostrally and caudal cells project caudally. The pars basalis projects predominantly ipsilaterally to the dorsolateral AV and bilaterally to the AD. The rostrolateral region of the pars posterior projects to the lateral AV, whereas the medial and the caudal regions of the pars posterior project to the dorsomedial AV. The rostrodorsal part of the nucleus reticularis thalami was found to project to the anterior thalamic nuclei; cells located rostrally in this part project to the IAM and AM, whereas cells located caudodorsally project to the AV and AD. The laterodorsal tegmental nucleus projects predominantly ipsilaterally to the AV, especially to its dorsolateral part. The present study demonstrates that subdivisions of the subcortical structures are connected to the subnuclei of the anterior thalamic nuclei, with a clear-cut topography arranged in

  5. Selective importance of the rat anterior thalamic nuclei for configural learning involving distal spatial cues.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Julie R; Amin, Eman; Aggleton, John P

    2014-01-01

    To test potential parallels between hippocampal and anterior thalamic function, rats with anterior thalamic lesions were trained on a series of biconditional learning tasks. The anterior thalamic lesions did not disrupt learning two biconditional associations in operant chambers where a specific auditory stimulus (tone or click) had a differential outcome depending on whether it was paired with a particular visual context (spot or checkered wall-paper) or a particular thermal context (warm or cool). Likewise, rats with anterior thalamic lesions successfully learnt a biconditional task when they were reinforced for digging in one of two distinct cups (containing either beads or shredded paper), depending on the particular appearance of the local context on which the cup was placed (one of two textured floors). In contrast, the same rats were severely impaired at learning the biconditional rule to select a specific cup when in a particular location within the test room. Place learning was then tested with a series of go/no-go discriminations. Rats with anterior thalamic nuclei lesions could learn to discriminate between two locations when they were approached from a constant direction. They could not, however, use this acquired location information to solve a subsequent spatial biconditional task where those same places dictated the correct choice of digging cup. Anterior thalamic lesions produced a selective, but severe, biconditional learning deficit when the task incorporated distal spatial cues. This deficit mirrors that seen in rats with hippocampal lesions, so extending potential interdependencies between the two sites. © 2013 The Authors. European Journal of Neuroscience published by Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Leading role of thalamic over cortical neurons during postinhibitory rebound excitation

    PubMed Central

    Grenier, F.; Timofeev, I.; Steriade, M.

    1998-01-01

    The postinhibitory rebound excitation is an intrinsic property of thalamic and cortical neurons that is implicated in a variety of normal and abnormal operations of neuronal networks, such as slow or fast brain rhythms during different states of vigilance as well as seizures. We used dual simultaneous intracellular recordings of thalamocortical neurons from the ventrolateral nucleus and neurons from the motor cortex, together with thalamic and cortical field potentials, to investigate the temporal relations between thalamic and cortical events during the rebound excitation that follows prolonged periods of stimulus-induced inhibition. Invariably, the rebound spike-bursts in thalamocortical cells occurred before the rebound depolarization in cortical neurons and preceded the peak of the depth-negative, rebound field potential in cortical areas. Also, the inhibitory-rebound sequences were more pronounced and prolonged in cortical neurons when elicited by thalamic stimuli, compared with cortical stimuli. The role of thalamocortical loops in the rebound excitation of cortical neurons was shown further by the absence of rebound activity in isolated cortical slabs. However, whereas thalamocortical neurons remained hyperpolarized after rebound excitation, because of the prolonged spike-bursts in inhibitory thalamic reticular neurons, the rebound depolarization in cortical neurons was prolonged, suggesting the role of intracortical excitatory circuits in this sustained activity. The role of intrathalamic events in triggering rebound cortical activity should be taken into consideration when analyzing information processes at the cortical level; at each step, corticothalamic volleys can set into action thalamic inhibitory neurons, leading to rebound spike-bursts that are transferred back to the cortex, thus modifying cortical activities. PMID:9811903

  7. Apathy, cognitive dysfunction and impaired social cognition in a patient with bilateral thalamic infarction.

    PubMed

    Ioannidis, Anestis E; Kimiskidis, Vasilios K; Loukopoulou, Eleni; Geroukis, Triantafyllos; Vlaikidis, Nikolaos; Kosmidis, Mary H

    2013-01-01

    We describe the case of a patient with bilateral thalamic lesions due to brain infarcts in the paramedian thalamic artery territories. The patient demonstrated symptoms of apathy (e.g., loss of initiative and interest in others, poor motivation, flattened affect). Neuropsychological assessment 3 and 5 years post-infarct revealed severe deficits in verbal and non-verbal immediate and delayed memory, attention, and executive functioning, with minimal improvement over time. Also, he demonstrated difficulties in social cognition (i.e., perception of facial expressions of others and of sarcasm). These findings are discussed and interpreted in light of current theories regarding the neurobiological substrate of apathy.

  8. Dystonia and tremor secondary to thalamic infarction successfully treated with thalamotomy of the ventralis intermedius nucleus.

    PubMed

    Álvarez, Mario; Quintanal, Nelson; Díaz, Amado; Prince, José; García, Ivan; Carballo, Maylen; Rodríguez, Rafael; Maragoto, Carlos; Pedroso, Ivonne; Macías, Raul

    2014-08-01

    Focal thalamic lesions have been associated with a variety of involuntary movements such as tremor, dystonia, and chorea-ballism. We describe a patient with severe hyperkinesias of the right arm secondary to a thalamic infarction in the left postero-ventral region of the thalamus. The dystonia and tremor of the right upper limb were subsequently controlled with another surgical lesion of the ventralis intermedius nucleus of the thalamus. This observation suggests that ablative surgery might be applied to treat a movement disorder induced by the lesion of the same nucleus, which in addition lead to interesting pathophysiological conjectures. © 2014 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  9. IDH1 status is significantly different between high-grade thalamic and superficial gliomas.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Mingrong; Li, Mao; Chen, Ni; Yu, Tianping; Kong, Bing; Liang, Ruofei; Wang, Xiang; Mao, Qing; Liu, Yanhui

    2017-08-23

    While major progress has been made in diagnosis and treatment of gliomas based on molecules, molecular features of thalamic glioma have rarely been reported till now. IDH1 mutation is important for prognosis of gliomas and represents a distinctive category of glioma. We intended to survey specific molecular abnormalities in high-grade thalamic gliomas (WHO III-IV). We collected data of 50 and 93 newly diagnosed high-grade thalamic and superficial glioma patients respectively and conducted a comparative analysis of molecular characteristics between them. We analyzed expressions of molecules as follow: IDH1/2, P53, Ki-67, ATRX, PTEN, MMP9 and MGMT by Immunohistochemistry (IHC). Direct gene sequencing was performed to test the IDH1(R 132H) mutation. We found a significant difference of IDH1 mutation between those high-grade gliomas, with 92% (46/50) of the thalamic tumors and 71% (66/93) of the superficial gliomas showing IDH1 wild-type (p= 0.004). It also showed that IDH1 mutation in superficial glioblastomas 18.6% (13/70) occurred more than thalamic glioblastomas 2.6% (1/39) (p= 0.017). As to high-grade superficial gliomas, there were 26 patients with IDH1 mutation, which contained 7, 13, and 6 high, moderate and low Ki-67 expression gliomas, respectively. The IDH1 wild-type group (62 patients), was composed of 29, 30, and 3 high, moderate and low Ki-67 expression gliomas, respectively. There was a significant distinction between the IDH1 mutation and Ki-67 expressions (p= 0.024). We also noted that the occurrence of low Ki-67 expressions 23.1% (6/26) in IDH1 mutation group was outnumbered than IDH1 wild-type group 4.8% (3/62) (p= 0.018). In addition, we found PTEN negative correlated with MMP9 negative in thalamic high-grade gliomas, whereas no such difference was found in superficial gliomas (p= 0.016). The rare occurrence of IDH1 mutant high-grade thalamic gliomas strongly suggested that the high-grade thalamic glioma is another distinct tumor entity as compared

  10. Thalamic inflammation after brain trauma is associated with thalamo-cortical white matter damage.

    PubMed

    Scott, Gregory; Hellyer, Peter J; Ramlackhansingh, Anil F; Brooks, David J; Matthews, Paul M; Sharp, David J

    2015-12-01

    Traumatic brain injury can trigger chronic neuroinflammation, which may predispose to neurodegeneration. Animal models and human pathological studies demonstrate persistent inflammation in the thalamus associated with axonal injury, but this relationship has never been shown in vivo. Using [(11)C]-PK11195 positron emission tomography, a marker of microglial activation, we previously demonstrated thalamic inflammation up to 17 years after traumatic brain injury. Here, we use diffusion MRI to estimate axonal injury and show that thalamic inflammation is correlated with thalamo-cortical tract damage. These findings support a link between axonal damage and persistent inflammation after brain injury.

  11. Lucid dreams, an atypical sleep disturbance in anterior and mediodorsal thalamic strokes.

    PubMed

    Sagnier, S; Coulon, P; Chaufton, C; Poli, M; Debruxelles, S; Renou, P; Rouanet, F; Olindo, S; Sibon, I

    2015-11-01

    Cognitive, affective, and behavioural disturbances are commonly reported following thalamic strokes. Conversely, sleep disorders are rarely reported in this context. Herein, we report the cases of two young patients admitted for an ischemic stroke located in the territories of the left pre-mammillary and paramedian arteries. Together with aphasia, memory complaint, impaired attention and executive functions, they reported lucid dreams with catastrophic content or conflicting situations. Lucid dreams are an atypical presentation in thalamic strokes. These cases enlarge the clinical spectrum of sleep-wake disturbances potentially observed after an acute cerebrovascular event. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Dopamine reward prediction error coding

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Wolfram

    2016-01-01

    Reward prediction errors consist of the differences between received and predicted rewards. They are crucial for basic forms of learning about rewards and make us strive for more rewards—an evolutionary beneficial trait. Most dopamine neurons in the midbrain of humans, monkeys, and rodents signal a reward prediction error; they are activated by more reward than predicted (positive prediction error), remain at baseline activity for fully predicted rewards, and show depressed activity with less reward than predicted (negative prediction error). The dopamine signal increases nonlinearly with reward value and codes formal economic utility. Drugs of addiction generate, hijack, and amplify the dopamine reward signal and induce exaggerated, uncontrolled dopamine effects on neuronal plasticity. The striatum, amygdala, and frontal cortex also show reward prediction error coding, but only in subpopulations of neurons. Thus, the important concept of reward prediction errors is implemented in neuronal hardware. PMID:27069377

  13. Dopamine reward prediction error coding.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Wolfram

    2016-03-01

    Reward prediction errors consist of the differences between received and predicted rewards. They are crucial for basic forms of learning about rewards and make us strive for more rewards-an evolutionary beneficial trait. Most dopamine neurons in the midbrain of humans, monkeys, and rodents signal a reward prediction error; they are activated by more reward than predicted (positive prediction error), remain at baseline activity for fully predicted rewards, and show depressed activity with less reward than predicted (negative prediction error). The dopamine signal increases nonlinearly with reward value and codes formal economic utility. Drugs of addiction generate, hijack, and amplify the dopamine reward signal and induce exaggerated, uncontrolled dopamine effects on neuronal plasticity. The striatum, amygdala, and frontal cortex also show reward prediction error coding, but only in subpopulations of neurons. Thus, the important concept of reward prediction errors is implemented in neuronal hardware.

  14. Thinking Inside the Box

    SciTech Connect

    Boeheim, Charles T.; /SLAC

    2007-11-16

    In early 2007, SLAC was faced with a shortage of both electrical power and cooling in the main computer building, at the same time that the BaBar collaboration needed a new cluster of 250 batch machines installed. A number of different options were explored for the expansion. Provision of additional electrical power to the building was estimated to take one to two years, and cost several million dollars; additional cooling was even worse. Space in a Silicon Valley co-location facilities was reasonable on a one-year timescale, but broke even in costs by the end of three years, and were more expensive after that. There were also unresolved questions about the affects of additional latency from an offsite compute cluster to the onsite disk servers. The option of converting existing experimental hall space into computer space was estimated at one year, with uncertain availability. An option to aggressively replace several existing clusters with more power-efficient equipment was studied closely, but was disruptive to continued operations, expensive, and didn't provide any additional headroom. Finally, the installation of a Sun Project Blackbox (PBB) unit was selected as providing the capacity on a timescale of six months for a reasonable cost with minimal disruption to service. SLAC obtained and installed a beta unit and have been running it in production since September 2007. The experiences described are with the Early Access version of the PBB. The production version of the box has engineering changes based in part on our experiences.

  15. Thalamic thermo-algesic transmission: ventral posterior (VP) complex versus VMpo in the light of a thalamic infarct with central pain.

    PubMed

    Montes, Carmen; Magnin, Michel; Maarrawi, Joseph; Frot, Maud; Convers, Philippe; Mauguière, François; Garcia-Larrea, Luis

    2005-01-01

    The respective roles of the ventral posterior complex (VP) and of the more recently described VMpo (posterior part of the ventral medial nucleus) as thalamic relays for pain and temperature pathways have recently been the subject of controversy. Data we obtained in one patient after a limited left thalamic infarct bring some new insights into this debate. This patient presented sudden right-sided hypesthesia for both lemniscal (touch, vibration, joint position) and spinothalamic (pain and temperature) modalities. He subsequently developed right-sided central pain with allodynia. Projection of 3D magnetic resonance images onto a human thalamic atlas revealed a lesion involving the anterior two thirds of the ventral posterior lateral nucleus (VPL) and, to a lesser extent, the ventral posterior medial (VPM) and inferior (VPI) nuclei. Conversely, the lesion did not extend posterior and ventral enough to concern the putative location of the spinothalamic-afferented nucleus VMpo. Neurophysiological studies showed a marked reduction (67%) of cortical responses depending on dorsal column-lemniscal transmission, while spinothalamic-specific, CO2-laser induced cortical responses were only moderately attenuated (33%). Our results show that the VP is definitely involved in thermo-algesic transmission in man, and that its selective lesion can lead to central pain. However, results also suggest that much of the spino-thalamo-cortical volley elicited by painful heat stimuli does not transit through VP, supporting the hypothesis that a non-VP locus lying more posteriorly in the human thalamus is important for thermo-algesic transmission.

  16. Dopamine, Affordance and Active Inference

    PubMed Central

    Friston, Karl J.; Shiner, Tamara; FitzGerald, Thomas; Galea, Joseph M.; Adams, Rick; Brown, Harriet; Dolan, Raymond J.; Moran, Rosalyn; Stephan, Klaas Enno; Bestmann, Sven

    2012-01-01

    The role of dopamine in behaviour and decision-making is often cast in terms of reinforcement learning and optimal decision theory. Here, we present an alternative view that frames the physiology of dopamine in terms of Bayes-optimal behaviour. In this account, dopamine controls the precision or salience of (external or internal) cues that engender action. In other words, dopamine balances bottom-up sensory information and top-down prior beliefs when making hierarchical inferences (predictions) about cues that have affordance. In this paper, we focus on the consequences of changing tonic levels of dopamine firing using simulations of cued sequential movements. Crucially, the predictions driving movements are based upon a hierarchical generative model that infers the context in which movements are made. This means that we can confuse agents by changing the context (order) in which cues are presented. These simulations provide a (Bayes-optimal) model of contextual uncertainty and set switching that can be quantified in terms of behavioural and electrophysiological responses. Furthermore, one can simulate dopaminergic lesions (by changing the precision of prediction errors) to produce pathological behaviours that are reminiscent of those seen in neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease. We use these simulations to demonstrate how a single functional role for dopamine at the synaptic level can manifest in different ways at the behavioural level. PMID:22241972

  17. Dynamic Nigrostriatal Dopamine Biases Action Selection.

    PubMed

    Howard, Christopher D; Li, Hao; Geddes, Claire E; Jin, Xin

    2017-03-22

    Dopamine is thought to play a critical role in reinforcement learning and goal-directed behavior, but its function in action selection remains largely unknown. Here we demonstrate that nigrostriatal dopamine biases ongoing action selection. When mice were trained to dynamically switch the action selected at different time points, changes in firing rate of nigrostriatal dopamine neurons, as well as dopamine signaling in the dorsal striatum, were found to be associated with action selection. This dopamine profile is specific to behavioral choice, scalable with interval duration, and doesn't reflect reward prediction error, timing, or value as single factors alone. Genetic deletion of NMDA receptors on dopamine or striatal neurons or optogenetic manipulation of dopamine concentration alters dopamine signaling and biases action selection. These results unveil a crucial role of nigrostriatal dopamine in integrating diverse information for regulating upcoming actions, and they have important implications for neurological disorders, including Parkinson's disease and substance dependence. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Complex neurological symptoms in bilateral thalamic stroke due to Percheron artery occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Caruso, Paola; Manganotti, Paolo; Moretti, Rita

    2017-01-01

    The artery of Percheron is a rare anatomical variant where a single thalamic perforating artery arises from the proximal posterior cerebral artery (P1 segment) between the basilar artery and the posterior communicating artery and supplies the rostral mesencephalon and both paramedian territories of the thalami. Almost one-third of human brains present this variant. Occlusion of the artery of Percheron mostly results in a bilateral medial thalamic infarction, which usually manifests with altered consciousness (including coma), vertical gaze paresis, and cognitive disturbance. The presentation is similar to the “top of the basilar syndrome”, and early recognition should be prompted. We describe the case of a young female with this vessel variant who experienced a bilateral thalamic stroke. Magnetic resonance angiography demonstrated bilateral thalamic infarcts and a truncated artery of Percheron. Occlusion of the vessel was presumably due to embolism from a patent foramen ovale. Thrombolysis was performed, with incomplete symptom remission, cognitive impairment, and persistence of speech disorders. Early recognition and treatment of posterior circulation strokes is mandatory, and further investigation for underlying stroke etiologies is needed. PMID:28053539

  19. Short Pauses in Thalamic Deep Brain Stimulation Promote Tremor and Neuronal Bursting

    PubMed Central

    Swan, Brandon D.; Brocker, David T.; Hilliard, Justin D.; Tatter, Stephen B.; Gross, Robert E.; Turner, Dennis A.; Grill, Warren M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective We conducted intraoperative measurements of tremor during DBS containing short pauses (≤50 ms) to determine if there is a minimum pause duration that preserves tremor suppression. Methods Nine subjects with ET and thalamic DBS participated during IPG replacement surgery. Patterns of DBS included regular 130 Hz stimulation interrupted by 0, 15, 25 or 50 ms pauses. The same patterns were applied to a model of the thalamic network to quantify effects of pauses on activity of model neurons. Results All patterns of DBS decreased tremor relative to ‘off’. Patterns with pauses generated less tremor reduction than regular high frequency DBS. The model revealed that rhythmic burst-driver inputs to thalamus were masked during DBS, but pauses in stimulation allowed propagation of bursting activity. The mean firing rate of bursting-type model neurons as well as the firing pattern entropy of model neurons were both strongly correlated with tremor power across stimulation conditions. Conclusion The temporal pattern of stimulation influences the efficacy of thalamic DBS. Pauses in stimulation resulted in decreased tremor suppression indicating that masking of pathological bursting is a mechanism of thalamic DBS for tremor. Significance Pauses in stimulation decreased the efficacy of open-loop DBS for suppression of tremor. PMID:26330131

  20. Alertness opens the effective flow of sensory information through rat thalamic posterior nucleus.

    PubMed

    Sobolewski, Aleksander; Kublik, Ewa; Swiejkowski, Daniel A; Kamiński, Jan; Wróbel, Andrzej

    2015-05-01

    Behavioural reactions to sensory stimuli vary with the level of arousal, but little is known about the underlying reorganization of neuronal networks. In this study, we use chronic recordings from the somatosensory regions of the thalamus and cortex of behaving rats together with a novel analysis of functional connectivity to show that during low arousal tactile signals are transmitted via the ventral posteromedial thalamic nucleus (VPM), a first-order thalamic relay, to the primary somatosensory (barrel) cortex and then from the cortex to the posterior medial thalamic nucleus (PoM), which plays a role of a higher-order thalamic relay. By contrast, during high arousal this network scheme is modified and both VPM and PoM transmit peripheral input to the barrel cortex acting as first-order relays. We also show that in urethane anaesthesia PoM is largely excluded from the thalamo-cortical loop. We thus demonstrate a way in which the thalamo-cortical system, despite its fixed anatomy, is capable of dynamically reconfiguring the transmission route of a sensory signal in concert with the behavioural state of an animal.

  1. Thalamic modulation of cingulate seizure activity via the regulation of gap junctions in mice thalamocingulate slice.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wei-Pang; Wu, José Jiun-Shian; Shyu, Bai-Chuang

    2013-01-01

    The thalamus is an important target for deep brain stimulation in the treatment of seizures. However, whether the modulatory effect of thalamic inputs on cortical seizures occurs through the modulation of gap junctions has not been previously studied. Therefore, we tested the effects of different gap junction blockers and couplers in a drug-resistant seizure model and studied the role of gap junctions in the thalamic modulation on cortical seizures. Multielectrode array and calcium imaging were used to record the cortical seizures induced by 4-aminopyridine (250 µM) and bicuculline (5-50 µM) in a novel thalamocingulate slice preparation. Seizure-like activity was significantly attenuated by the pan-gap junction blockers carbenoxolone and octanol and specific neuronal gap junction blocker mefloquine. The gap junction coupler trimethylamine significantly enhanced seizure-like activity. Gap junction blockers did not influence the initial phase of seizure-like activity, but they significantly decreased the amplitude and duration of the maintenance phase. The development of seizures is regulated by extracellular potassium concentration. Carbenoxolone partially restored the amplitude and duration after removing the thalamic inputs. A two-dimensional current source density analysis showed that the sink and source signals shifted to deeper layers after removing the thalamic inputs during the clonic phase. These results indicate that the regulatory mechanism of deep brain stimulation in the thalamus occurs partially though gap junctions.

  2. Thalamic Modulation of Cingulate Seizure Activity Via the Regulation of Gap Junctions in Mice Thalamocingulate Slice

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Wei-Pang; Wu, José Jiun-Shian; Shyu, Bai-Chuang

    2013-01-01

    The thalamus is an important target for deep brain stimulation in the treatment of seizures. However, whether the modulatory effect of thalamic inputs on cortical seizures occurs through the modulation of gap junctions has not been previously studied. Therefore, we tested the effects of different gap junction blockers and couplers in a drug-resistant seizure model and studied the role of gap junctions in the thalamic modulation on cortical seizures. Multielectrode array and calcium imaging were used to record the cortical seizures induced by 4-aminopyridine (250 µM) and bicuculline (5–50 µM) in a novel thalamocingulate slice preparation. Seizure-like activity was significantly attenuated by the pan-gap junction blockers carbenoxolone and octanol and specific neuronal gap junction blocker mefloquine. The gap junction coupler trimethylamine significantly enhanced seizure-like activity. Gap junction blockers did not influence the initial phase of seizure-like activity, but they significantly decreased the amplitude and duration of the maintenance phase. The development of seizures is regulated by extracellular potassium concentration. Carbenoxolone partially restored the amplitude and duration after removing the thalamic inputs. A two-dimensional current source density analysis showed that the sink and source signals shifted to deeper layers after removing the thalamic inputs during the clonic phase. These results indicate that the regulatory mechanism of deep brain stimulation in the thalamus occurs partially though gap junctions. PMID:23690968

  3. Central Neurogenic Hyperventilation Related to Post-Hypoxic Thalamic Lesion in a Child

    PubMed Central

    Gençpinar, Pinar; Karaali, Kamil; Haspolat, Şenay; Dursun, Oğuz

    2016-01-01

    Central neurogenic hyperventilation (CNH) is a rare clinical condition, whose mechanism is still unclear. Here, we report a 3-year-old male patient, who had bilateral thalamic, putaminal and globus pallideal infarction resulted in CNH without brainstem involvement. This case may illustrate a possible role for the thalamus in regulating ventilation. PMID:27127601

  4. Selective pharmacological manipulation of cortical-thalamic co-cultures in a dual-compartment device.

    PubMed

    Kanagasabapathi, Thirukumaran T; Franco, Maria; Barone, Rocco Andrea; Martinoia, Sergio; Wadman, Wytse J; Decré, Michel M J

    2013-03-30

    In this study, we demonstrate capabilities to selectively manipulate dissociated co-cultures of neurons plated in dual-compartment devices. Synaptic receptor antagonists and tetrodotoxin solutions were used to selectively control and study the network-wide burst propagation and cell firing in cortical-cortical and cortical-thalamic co-culture systems. The results show that in cortical-thalamic dissociated co-cultures, burst events initiate in the cortical region and propagate to the thalamic region and the burst events in thalamic region can be controlled by blocking the synaptic receptors in the cortical region. Whereas, in cortical-cortical co-culture system, one of the region acts as a site of burst initiation and facilitate propagation of bursts in the entire network. Tetrodotoxin, a sodium channel blocker, when applied to either of the regions blocks the firing of neurons in that particular region with significant influence on the firing of neurons in the other region. The results demonstrate selective pharmacological manipulation capabilities of co-cultures in a dual compartment device and helps understand the effects of neuroactive compounds on networks derived from specific CNS tissues and the dynamic interaction between them. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Acute Korsakoff-like amnestic syndrome resulting from left thalamic infarction following a right hippocampal hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Rahme, R; Moussa, R; Awada, A; Ibrahim, I; Ali, Y; Maarrawi, J; Rizk, T; Nohra, G; Okais, N; Samaha, E

    2007-04-01

    Korsakoff-like amnestic syndromes have been rarely described following structural lesions of the central nervous system. In this report, we describe a case of acute Korsakoff-like syndrome resulting from the combination of a left anteromedian thalamic infarct and a right hippocampal hemorrhage. We also review the literature relevant to the neuropathology and pathophysiology of Korsakoff syndrome and anterograde amnesia.

  6. Anterior Thalamic Lesions Alter Both Hippocampal-Dependent Behavior and Hippocampal Acetylcholine Release in the Rat

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savage, Lisa M.; Hall, Joseph M.; Vetreno, Ryan P.

    2011-01-01

    The anterior thalamic nuclei (ATN) are important for learning and memory as damage to this region produces a persistent amnestic syndrome. Dense connections between the ATN and the hippocampus exist, and importantly, damage to the ATN can impair hippocampal functioning. Acetylcholine (ACh) is a key neurotransmitter in the hippocampus, and in vivo…

  7. Impairment of Syntax and Lexical Semantics in a Patient with Bilateral Paramedian Thalamic Infarction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Witte, Lieve; Wilssens, Ineke; Engelborghs, Sebastian; De Deyn, Peter P.; Marien, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Bilateral vascular thalamic lesions are rare. Although a variety of neurobehavioral manifestations have been described, the literature is less documented with regard to accompanying linguistic disturbances. This article presents an in-depth neurolinguistic analysis of the language symptoms of a patient who incurred bilateral paramedian ischemic…

  8. Chronic thalamic stimulation improves tremor and levodopa induced dyskinesias in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Caparros-Lefebvre, D; Blond, S; Vermersch, P; Pécheux, N; Guieu, J D; Petit, H

    1993-01-01

    Chronic thalamic stimulation was performed in 10 Parkinsonian patients with disabling tremor and poor response to drug therapy. During the stereotactic procedure, an electrode was introduced in the ventralis intermediate nucleus of the thalamus. Test stimulation was performed during the intra-operative procedure and a few days after surgery using an external stimulator. When tremor was obviously reduced by thalamic stimulation, an internal stimulator was implanted under the clavicle. Tremor was initially suppressed in all cases and reappeared whenever stimulation was stopped. Patients were followed for 22 to 34 months. Tremor was controlled in eight cases but reappeared after three months in two cases. Levodopa induced dyskinesias were observed before electrode implantation in 5 cases. They consisted of peak-dose choreic or ballistic dyskinesias in 4 cases and biphasic dystonic dyskinesias in 3 cases. Peak-dose dyskinesias were greatly improved or suppressed in all cases. Biphasic dyskinesias were improved in 2 cases. Thalamic stimulation was well tolerated. Mild dystonic hand posture related to the deep brain stimulation was observed in one case. No neuropsychological side-effects were noted. Thalamic stimulation could prove to be an adequate treatment for resistant tremor and levodopa induced dyskinesias. PMID:8459243

  9. Postsynaptic Mechanisms Govern the Differential Excitation of Cortical Neurons by Thalamic Inputs

    PubMed Central

    Hull, Court; Isaacson, Jeffry S.; Scanziani, Massimo

    2009-01-01

    Thalamocortical (TC) afferents relay sensory input to the cortex by making synapses onto both excitatory regular-spiking principal cells (RS cells) and inhibitory fast-spiking interneurons (FS cells). This divergence plays a crucial role in coordinating excitation with inhibition during the earliest steps of somatosensory processing in the cortex. Although the same TC afferents contact both FS and RS cells, FS cells receive larger and faster excitatory inputs from individual TC afferents. Here, we show that this larger thalamic excitation of FS cells occurs via GluR2-lacking AMPA receptors (AMPARs), and results from a 4-fold larger quantal amplitude as compared to the thalamic inputs onto RS cells. Thalamic afferents also activate NMDA receptors (NMDARs) at synapses onto both cells types, yet RS cell NMDAR currents are slower and pass more current at physiological membrane potentials. Due to these synaptic specializations, GluR2-lacking AMPARs selectively maintain feedforward inhibition of RS cells, while NMDARs contribute to the spiking of RS cells and hence to cortical recurrent excitation. Thus, thalamic afferent activity diverges into two routes that rely on unique complements of postsynaptic AMPARs and NMDARs to orchestrate the dynamic balance of excitation and inhibition as sensory input enters the cortex. PMID:19605650

  10. Postsynaptic mechanisms govern the differential excitation of cortical neurons by thalamic inputs.

    PubMed

    Hull, Court; Isaacson, Jeffry S; Scanziani, Massimo

    2009-07-15

    Thalamocortical (TC) afferents relay sensory input to the cortex by making synapses onto both excitatory regular-spiking principal cells (RS cells) and inhibitory fast-spiking interneurons (FS cells). This divergence plays a crucial role in coordinating excitation with inhibition during the earliest steps of somatosensory processing in the cortex. Although the same TC afferents contact both FS and RS cells, FS cells receive larger and faster excitatory inputs from individual TC afferents. Here, we show that this larger thalamic excitation of FS cells occurs via GluR2-lacking AMPA receptors (AMPARs), and results from a fourfold larger quantal amplitude compared with the thalamic inputs onto RS cells. Thalamic afferents also activate NMDA receptors (NMDARs) at synapses onto both cells types, yet RS cell NMDAR currents are slower and pass more current at physiological membrane potentials. Because of these synaptic specializations, GluR2-lacking AMPARs selectively maintain feedforward inhibition of RS cells, whereas NMDARs contribute to the spiking of RS cells and hence to cortical recurrent excitation. Thus, thalamic afferent activity diverges into two routes that rely on unique complements of postsynaptic AMPARs and NMDARs to orchestrate the dynamic balance of excitation and inhibition as sensory input enters the cortex.

  11. Discovering frequency sensitive thalamic nuclei from EEG microstate informed resting state fMRI.

    PubMed

    Schwab, Simon; Koenig, Thomas; Morishima, Yosuke; Dierks, Thomas; Federspiel, Andrea; Jann, Kay

    2015-09-01

    Microstates (MS), the fingerprints of the momentarily and time-varying states of the brain derived from electroencephalography (EEG), are associated with the resting state networks (RSNs). However, using MS fluctuations along different EEG frequency bands to model the functional MRI (fMRI) signal has not been investigated so far, or elucidated the role of the thalamus as a fundamental gateway and a putative key structure in cortical functional networks. Therefore, in the current study, we used MS predictors in standard frequency bands to predict blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal fluctuations. We discovered that multivariate modeling of BOLD-fMRI using six EEG-MS classes in eight frequency bands strongly correlated with thalamic areas and large-scale cortical networks. Thalamic nuclei exhibited distinct patterns of correlations for individual MS that were associated with specific EEG frequency bands. Anterior and ventral thalamic nuclei were sensitive to the beta frequency band, medial nuclei were sensitive to both alpha and beta frequency bands, and posterior nuclei such as the pulvinar were sensitive to delta and theta frequency bands. These results demonstrate that EEG-MS informed fMRI can elucidate thalamic activity not directly observable by EEG, which may be highly relevant to understand the rapid formation of thalamocortical networks.

  12. Impairment of Syntax and Lexical Semantics in a Patient with Bilateral Paramedian Thalamic Infarction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Witte, Lieve; Wilssens, Ineke; Engelborghs, Sebastian; De Deyn, Peter P.; Marien, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Bilateral vascular thalamic lesions are rare. Although a variety of neurobehavioral manifestations have been described, the literature is less documented with regard to accompanying linguistic disturbances. This article presents an in-depth neurolinguistic analysis of the language symptoms of a patient who incurred bilateral paramedian ischemic…

  13. Anterior Thalamic Lesions Alter Both Hippocampal-Dependent Behavior and Hippocampal Acetylcholine Release in the Rat

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savage, Lisa M.; Hall, Joseph M.; Vetreno, Ryan P.

    2011-01-01

    The anterior thalamic nuclei (ATN) are important for learning and memory as damage to this region produces a persistent amnestic syndrome. Dense connections between the ATN and the hippocampus exist, and importantly, damage to the ATN can impair hippocampal functioning. Acetylcholine (ACh) is a key neurotransmitter in the hippocampus, and in vivo…

  14. Silent diabetes mellitus, periodontitis and a new case of thalamic abscess

    PubMed Central

    Karageorgiou, Ioannis; Chandler, Christopher; Whyte, Martin Brunel

    2014-01-01

    Brain abscess is an unusual complication of uncontrolled diabetes. A solitary thalamic abscess is an uncommon type of brain abscess. We report a case of thalamic abscess, whereupon diabetes mellitus and periodontitis were diagnosed. The diagnosis and management of thalamic abscess, and the interplay of type 2 diabetes and periodontitis are discussed. A 56-year-old, Caucasian, man with no medical or travel history, presented with 5-day symptoms of meningeal irritation. Body mass index 30.6 kg/m2. CT demonstrated a solitary midline lesion with neoplasia as a differential diagnosis. It was biopsied and cultures grew Streptococcus milleri. He was treated by stereotactic puncture, external drainage and targeted intrathecal and systemic antibiotic therapy. HIV negative but glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) 10.7% (93 mmol/mol). Dental examination revealed a small molar abscess. Radiological resolution of the thalamic abscess occurred within 2 months. Diabetes improved with 7 weeks of insulin, and maintained on metformin, HbA1c 6.9% (51 mmol/mol). There was no residual neurological disability. PMID:25053670

  15. Silent diabetes mellitus, periodontitis and a new case of thalamic abscess.

    PubMed

    Karageorgiou, Ioannis; Chandler, Christopher; Whyte, Martin Brunel

    2014-07-21

    Brain abscess is an unusual complication of uncontrolled diabetes. A solitary thalamic abscess is an uncommon type of brain abscess. We report a case of thalamic abscess, whereupon diabetes mellitus and periodontitis were diagnosed. The diagnosis and management of thalamic abscess, and the interplay of type 2 diabetes and periodontitis are discussed. A 56-year-old, Caucasian, man with no medical or travel history, presented with 5-day symptoms of meningeal irritation. Body mass index 30.6 kg/m(2). CT demonstrated a solitary midline lesion with neoplasia as a differential diagnosis. It was biopsied and cultures grew Streptococcus milleri. He was treated by stereotactic puncture, external drainage and targeted intrathecal and systemic antibiotic therapy. HIV negative but glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) 10.7% (93 mmol/mol). Dental examination revealed a small molar abscess. Radiological resolution of the thalamic abscess occurred within 2 months. Diabetes improved with 7 weeks of insulin, and maintained on metformin, HbA1c 6.9% (51 mmol/mol). There was no residual neurological disability. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  16. Thalamic amnesia after infarct: The role of the mammillothalamic tract and mediodorsal nucleus.

    PubMed

    Danet, Lola; Barbeau, Emmanuel J; Eustache, Pierre; Planton, Mélanie; Raposo, Nicolas; Sibon, Igor; Albucher, Jean-François; Bonneville, Fabrice; Peran, Patrice; Pariente, Jérémie

    2015-12-15

    To improve current understanding of the mechanisms behind thalamic amnesia, as it is unclear whether it is directly related to damage to specific nuclei, in particular to the anterior or mediodorsal nuclei, or indirectly related to lesions of the mammillothalamic tract (MTT). We recruited 12 patients with a left thalamic infarction and 25 healthy matched controls. All underwent a comprehensive neuropsychological assessment of verbal and visual memory, executive functions, language, and affect, and a high-resolution structural volumetric MRI scan. Thalamic lesions were manually segmented and automatically localized with a computerized thalamic atlas. As well as comparing patients with controls, we divided patients into subgroups with intact or damaged MTT. Only one patient had a small lesion of the anterior nucleus. Most of the lesions included the mediodorsal (n = 11) and intralaminar nuclei (n = 12). Patients performed worse than controls on the verbal memory tasks, but the 5 patients with intact MTT who showed isolated lesions of the mediodorsal nucleus (MD) only displayed moderate memory impairment. The 7 patients with a damaged MTT performed worse on the verbal memory tasks than those whose MTT was intact. Lesions in the MTT and in the MD result in memory impairment, severely in the case of MTT and to a lesser extent in the case of MD, thus highlighting the roles played by these 2 structures in memory circuits. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  17. Differential effects of methylphenidate and cocaine on GABA transmission in sensory thalamic nuclei.

    PubMed

    Goitia, Belén; Raineri, Mariana; González, Laura E; Rozas, José L; Garcia-Rill, Edgar; Bisagno, Verónica; Urbano, Francisco J

    2013-03-01

    Methylphenidate (MPH) is widely used to treat children and adolescents diagnosed with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Although MPH shares mechanistic similarities to cocaine, its effects on GABAergic transmission in sensory thalamic nuclei are unknown. Our objective was to compare cocaine and MPH effects on GABAergic projections between thalamic reticular and ventrobasal (VB) nuclei. Mice (P18-30) were subjected to binge-like cocaine and MPH acute and sub-chronic administrations. Cocaine and MPH enhanced hyperlocomotion, although sub-chronic cocaine-mediated effects were stronger than MPH effects. Cocaine and MPH sub-chronic administration altered paired-pulse and spontaneous GABAergic input differently. The effects of cocaine on evoked paired-pulse GABA-mediated currents changed from depression to facilitation with the duration of the protocols used, while MPH induced a constant increase throughout the administration protocols. Thalamic reticular nucleus GAD67 and VB Ca(V) 3.1 protein levels were measured using western blot to better understand their link to increased GABA release. Both proteins were increased by sub-chronic administration of cocaine. MPH showed effects on GABAergic transmission that seems less disruptive than cocaine. Unique effects of cocaine on postsynaptic VB calcium currents might explain deleterious cocaine effects on sensory thalamic nuclei. These results suggest that cocaine and MPH produced distinct presynaptic alterations on GABAergic transmission.

  18. Aphasia and unilateral spatial neglect due to acute thalamic hemorrhage: clinical correlations and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Osawa, Aiko; Maeshima, Shinichiro

    2016-04-01

    Thalamic hemorrhages are associated with a variety of cognitive dysfunctions, and it is well known that such cognitive changes constitute a limiting factor of recovery of the activities of daily living (ADL). The relationship between cognitive dysfunction and hematomas is unclear. In this study, we investigated the relationship between aphasia/neglect and hematoma volume, hematoma type, and the ADL. One hundred fifteen patients with thalamic hemorrhage (70 men and 45 women) were studied. Their mean age was 68.9 ± 10.3 years, and patients with both left and right lesions were included. We calculated hematoma volume and examined the presence or absence of aphasia/neglect and the relationships between these dysfunctions and hematoma volume, hematoma type, and the ADL. Fifty-nine patients were found to have aphasia and 35 were found to have neglect. Although there was no relationship between hematoma type and cognitive dysfunction, hematoma volume showed a correlation with the severity of cognitive dysfunction. The ADL score and ratio of patient discharge for patients with aphasia/neglect were lower than those for patients without aphasia/neglect. We observed a correlation between the hematoma volume in thalamic hemorrhage and cognitive dysfunction. Aphasia/neglect is found frequently in patients with acute thalamic hemorrhage and may influence the ADL.

  19. Antioxidant therapeutics: Pandora's box.

    PubMed

    Day, Brian J

    2014-01-01

    Evolution has favored the utilization of dioxygen (O2) in the development of complex multicellular organisms. O2 is actually a toxic mutagenic gas that is highly oxidizing and combustible. It is thought that plants are largely to blame for polluting the earth's atmosphere with O2 owing to the development of photosynthesis by blue-green algae over 2 billion years ago. The rise of the plants and atmospheric O2 levels placed evolutionary stress on organisms to adapt or become extinct. This implies that all the surviving creatures on our planet are mutants that have adapted to the "abnormal biology" of O2. Much of the adaptation to the presence of O2 in biological systems comes from well-coordinated antioxidant and repair systems that focus on converting O2 to its most reduced form, water (H2O), and the repair and replacement of damaged cellular macromolecules. Biological systems have also harnessed O2's reactive properties for energy production, xenobiotic metabolism, and host defense and as a signaling messenger and redox modulator of a number of cell signaling pathways. Many of these systems involve electron transport systems and offer many different mechanisms by which antioxidant therapeutics can alternatively produce an antioxidant effect without directly scavenging oxygen-derived reactive species. It is likely that each agent will have a different set of mechanisms that may change depending on the model of oxidative stress, organ system, or disease state. An important point is that all biological processes of aerobes have coevolved with O2 and this creates a Pandora's box for trying to understand the mechanism(s) of action of antioxidants being developed as therapeutic agents. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Altered Neurocircuitry in the Dopamine Transporter Knockout Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaowei; Bearer, Elaine L.; Boulat, Benoit; Hall, F. Scott; Uhl, George R.; Jacobs, Russell E.

    2010-01-01

    The plasma membrane transporters for the monoamine neurotransmitters dopamine, serotonin, and norepinephrine modulate the dynamics of these monoamine neurotransmitters. Thus, activity of these transporters has significant consequences for monoamine activity throughout the brain and for a number of neurological and psychiatric disorders. Gene knockout (KO) mice that reduce or eliminate expression of each of these monoamine transporters have provided a wealth of new information about the function of these proteins at molecular, physiological and behavioral levels. In the present work we use the unique properties of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to probe the effects of altered dopaminergic dynamics on meso-scale neuronal circuitry and overall brain morphology, since changes at these levels of organization might help to account for some of the extensive pharmacological and behavioral differences observed in dopamine transporter (DAT) KO mice. Despite the smaller size of these animals, voxel-wise statistical comparison of high resolution structural MR images indicated little morphological change as a consequence of DAT KO. Likewise, proton magnetic resonance spectra recorded in the striatum indicated no significant changes in detectable metabolite concentrations between DAT KO and wild-type (WT) mice. In contrast, alterations in the circuitry from the prefrontal cortex to the mesocortical limbic system, an important brain component intimately tied to function of mesolimbic/mesocortical dopamine reward pathways, were revealed by manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI). Analysis of co-registered MEMRI images taken over the 26 hours after introduction of Mn2+ into the prefrontal cortex indicated that DAT KO mice have a truncated Mn2+ distribution within this circuitry with little accumulation beyond the thalamus or contralateral to the injection site. By contrast, WT littermates exhibit Mn2+ transport into more posterior midbrain nuclei and contralateral mesolimbic structures at

  1. Contrary roles of kainate receptors in transmitter release at corticothalamic synapses onto thalamic relay and reticular neurons.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Mariko; Imoto, Keiji

    2009-03-01

    Corticothalamic fibres, which originate from layer VI pyramidal neurons in the cerebral cortex, provide excitatory synaptic inputs to both thalamic relay neurons and reticular neurons; reticular neurons in turn supply inhibitory inputs to thalamic relay neurons. Pyramidal cells in layer VI in the mouse somatosensory cortex highly express mRNA encoding kainate receptors, which facilitate or depress transmitter release at several synapses in the central nervous system. We report here that contrary modulation of transmitter release from corticothalamic fibres onto thalamic relay and reticular neurons is mediated by activation of kainate receptors in mouse thalamic ventrobasal complex and thalamic reticular nucleus. Exogenous kainate presynaptically depresses the synaptic transmission at corticothalamic synapses onto thalamic relay neurons, but facilitates it at corticothalamic synapses onto reticular neurons. Meanwhile, the lemniscal synaptic transmission, which sends primary somatosensory inputs to relay neurons, is not affected by kainate. In addition, GluR5-containing kainate receptors are involved in the depression of corticothalamic synaptic transmission onto relay neurons, but not onto reticular neurons. Furthermore, synaptically activated kainate receptors mimic these effects; high-frequency stimulation of corticothalamic fibres depresses synaptic transmission onto relay neurons, but facilitates it onto reticular neurons. Our results suggest that the opposite sensitivity of kainate receptors at the two corticothalamic synapses is governed by cortical activity and regulates the balance of excitatory and inhibitory inputs to thalamic relay neurons and therefore their excitability.

  2. Visualization of intra-thalamic nuclei with optimized white-matter-nulled MPRAGE at 7T.

    PubMed

    Tourdias, Thomas; Saranathan, Manojkumar; Levesque, Ives R; Su, Jason; Rutt, Brian K

    2014-01-01

    Novel MR image acquisition strategies have been investigated to elicit contrast within the thalamus, but direct visualization of individual thalamic nuclei remains a challenge because of their small size and the low intrinsic contrast between adjacent nuclei. We present a step-by-step specific optimization of the 3D MPRAGE pulse sequence at 7T to visualize the intra-thalamic nuclei. We first measured T1 values within different sub-regions of the thalamus at 7T in 5 individuals. We used these to perform simulations and sequential experimental measurements (n=17) to tune the parameters of the MPRAGE sequence. The optimal set of parameters was used to collect high-quality data in 6 additional volunteers. Delineation of thalamic nuclei was performed twice by one rater and MR-defined nuclei were compared to the classic Morel histological atlas. T1 values within the thalamus ranged from 1400ms to 1800ms for adjacent nuclei. Using these values for theoretical evaluations combined with in vivo measurements, we showed that a short inversion time (TI) close to the white matter null regime (TI=670ms) enhanced the contrast between the thalamus and the surrounding tissues, and best revealed intra-thalamic contrast. At this particular nulling regime, lengthening the time between successive inversion pulses (TS=6000ms) increased the thalamic signal and contrast and lengthening the α pulse train time (N*TR) further increased the thalamic signal. Finally, a low flip angle during the gradient echo acquisition (α=4°) was observed to mitigate the blur induced by the evolution of the magnetization along the α pulse train. This optimized set of parameters enabled the 3D delineation of 15 substructures in all 6 individuals; these substructures corresponded well with the known anatomical structures of the thalamus based on the classic Morel atlas. The mean Euclidean distance between the centers of mass of MR- and Morel atlas-defined nuclei was 2.67mm (±1.02mm). The reproducibility of

  3. Visualization of intra-thalamic nuclei with optimized white-matter-nulled MPRAGE at 7T

    PubMed Central

    Tourdias, Thomas; Saranathan, Manojkumar; Levesque, Ives R.; Su, Jason; Rutt, Brian K.

    2013-01-01

    Novel MR image acquisition strategies have been investigated to elicit contrast within the thalamus, but direct visualization of individual thalamic nuclei remains a challenge because of their small size and the low intrinsic contrast between adjacent nuclei. We present a step-by-step specific optimization of the 3D MPRAGE pulse sequence at 7T to visualize the intra-thalamic nuclei. We first measured T1 values within different sub-regions of the thalamus at 7T in 5 individuals. We used these to perform simulations and sequential experimental measurements (n=17) to tune the parameters of the MPRAGE sequence. The optimal set of parameters was used to collect high-quality data in 6 additional volunteers. Delineation of thalamic nuclei was performed twice by one rater and MR-defined nuclei were compared to the classic Morel histological atlas. T1 values within the thalamus ranged from 1400ms to 1800ms for adjacent nuclei. Using these values for theoretical evaluations combined with in vivo measurements, we showed that a short inversion time (TI) close to the white matter null regime (TI=670ms) enhanced the contrast between the thalamus and the surrounding tissues, and best revealed intra-thalamic contrast. At this particular nulling regime, lengthening the time between successive inversion pulses (TS=6000ms) increased the thalamic signal and contrast and lengthening the α pulse train time (N*TR) further increased the thalamic signal. Finally, a low flip angle during the gradient echo acquisition (α=4°) was observed to mitigate the blur induced by the evolution of the magnetization along the α pulse train. This optimized set of parameters enabled the 3D delineation of 15 substructures in all 6 individuals; these substructures corresponded well with the known anatomical structures of the thalamus based on the classical Morel atlas. The mean Euclidean distance between the centers of mass of MR- and Morel atlas-defined nuclei was 2.67mm (±1.02mm). The reproducibility

  4. Mouse Thalamic Differentiation: Gli-Dependent Pattern and Gli-Independent Prepattern

    PubMed Central

    Haddad-Tóvolli, Roberta; Heide, Michael; Zhou, Xunlei; Blaess, Sandra; Alvarez-Bolado, Gonzalo

    2012-01-01

    Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling is essential for thalamic development. The Gli transcription factors act downstream of Shh – while Gli2 is the major activator (GliA), Gli3 acts primarily as a repressor (GliR). The thalamus is remarkable among dorsal structures because of its proximity to the mid-diencephalic organizer, a unique dorsal Shh source. This lends complexity to the interactions between Shh, Gli2, and Gli3, suggesting the presence of a dorsal Gli activator which elsewhere is found only ventrally, and making the dissection of thalamic Gli functions particularly interesting. A current model based on mutant phenotypes in telencephalon and midbrain postulates a degree of reciprocal antagonism of Shh and Gli3 in dorsal brain regions. To approach the role of Gli factors in thalamic specification we first analyzed mice deficient in Gli2 or Gli3. In Gli2 mutants, the thalamus is small and poorly differentiated with the exception of the medial and intralaminar nuclei which, in contrast, are specifically and severely affected by Gli3 inactivation. Gbx2 expression is very reduced in the Gli3 mutant. Most thalamic nuclei are present in both mutants, although incompletely differentiated, as reflected by the loss of specific markers. The ventral posterior group, revealed by novel specific marker Hes1, is present in both mutants and extends axons to the telencephalon. To test the Gli3/Shh interaction we generated a novel mutant deficient in Gli3 and neuroepithelial Shh. The thalamus of the n-Shh/Gli3 double mutants is very large and very poorly differentiated except for a broad domain of Gbx2, Lhx2, and Calb2 expression. In utero electroporation experiments on wild type embryos suggest that a stage-specific factor acting early is responsible for this prepattern. We show that, in the thalamus, GliA acts downstream of Shh to specify pattern and size of the thalamic nuclei to the exception of the medial and intralaminar groups. Gli3A can partially substitute for Gli2A in

  5. Thalamic cholinergic innervation is spared in Alzheimer disease compared to parkinsonian disorders.

    PubMed

    Kotagal, Vikas; Müller, Martijn L T M; Kaufer, Daniel I; Koeppe, Robert A; Bohnen, Nicolaas I

    2012-04-18

    There are two major sources of cholinergic projections in the brain. The nucleus basalis of Meynert provides the principal cholinergic input of the cortical mantle and the pedunculopontine nucleus-laterodorsal tegmental complex (PPN-LDTC; hereafter referred to as PPN) provides the major cholinergic input to the thalamus. Cortical cholinergic denervation has previously been shown to be part of Alzheimer and parkinsonian dementia but there is less information about subcortical thalamic cholinergic denervation. We investigated thalamic cholinergic afferent integrity by measuring PPN-Thalamic (PPN-Thal) acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity via PET imaging in Alzheimer (AD), Parkinson disease without dementia (PD), Parkinson disease with dementia (PDD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). AD (n=13; mean age 75.4 ± 5.5), PD (n=11; age 71.4 ± 6.4), PDD (n=6; age 70.8±4.7), DLB (n=6; age 68.0 ± 8.6) and normal controls (NC; n=14; age 69.0 ± 7.5) subjects underwent AChE [¹¹C]-methyl-4-piperidinyl propionate (PMP) PET imaging. PPN-Thal PET data were analyzed using the Nagatsuka method. There were no significant differences in mean age between the groups (F=1.86, p=0.134). Kruskal-Wallis testing demonstrated a significant group effect for PPN-Thal AChE hydrolysis rates (F=9.62, p<0.0001). Compared to NC, reduced thalamic k3 hydrolysis rate was noted in subjects with PDD (-19.8%; AChE k3 hydrolysis rates 0.1072 ± 0.0143 min⁻¹), DLB (-17.4%; 0.1103 ± 0.0112 min⁻¹) and PD (-12.8%; 0.1165 ± 0.0114 min⁻¹). Each of these 3 subgroups was statistically different from AD subjects (-0.7%; 0.1326 ± 0.0095 min⁻¹) who showed relatively spared thalamic k3 hydrolysis rates which were comparable to NC (0.1336 ± 0.0142 min⁻¹). Thalamic cholinergic denervation is present in PD, PDD, and DLB but not in AD. Neurodegenerative involvement of thalamic cholinergic afferent projections may contribute to disease-specific motor and cognitive abnormalities. Copyright © 2012

  6. Breaking out of Our Boxes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, William

    2003-01-01

    Argues that educators must "think outside the box" to improve school performance. Suggests several areas for expanded thought, including school size, curriculum coverage, grading practices, use of time, organization of students, time management, and belief statement. (PKP)

  7. Breaking out of Our Boxes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, William

    2003-01-01

    Argues that educators must "think outside the box" to improve school performance. Suggests several areas for expanded thought, including school size, curriculum coverage, grading practices, use of time, organization of students, time management, and belief statement. (PKP)

  8. Center Spot: Shoe Box Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Jan

    1976-01-01

    This is the second "Center Spot" devoted to Jan Hoffman's "Shoe Box Science," a program that organizes manipulative materials so that children can identify, describe, order, construct, name and distinguish on their own.

  9. Dopamine Receptors and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Rangel-Barajas, Claudia; Coronel, Israel; Florán, Benjamín

    2015-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) is one of the major neurotransmitters and participates in a number of functions such as motor coordination, emotions, memory, reward mechanism, neuroendocrine regulation etc. DA exerts its effects through five DA receptors that are subdivided in 2 families: D1-like DA receptors (D1 and D5) and the D2-like (D2, D3 and D4). All DA receptors are widely expressed in the central nervous system (CNS) and play an important role in not only in physiological conditions but also pathological scenarios. Abnormalities in the DAergic system and its receptors in the basal ganglia structures are the basis Parkinson’s disease (PD), however DA also participates in other neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington disease (HD) and multiple sclerosis (MS). Under pathological conditions reorganization of DAergic system has been observed and most of the times, those changes occur as a mechanism of compensation, but in some cases contributes to worsening the alterations. Here we review the changes that occur on DA transmission and DA receptors (DARs) at both levels expression and signals transduction pathways as a result of neurotoxicity, inflammation and in neurodegenerative processes. The better understanding of the role of DA receptors in neuropathological conditions is crucial for development of novel therapeutic approaches to treat alterations related to neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26425390

  10. Biphasic cholinergic synaptic transmission controls action potential activity in thalamic reticular nucleus neurons.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yan-Gang; Pita-Almenar, Juan D; Wu, Chia-Shan; Renger, John J; Uebele, Victor N; Lu, Hui-Chen; Beierlein, Michael

    2013-01-30

    Cholinergic neurons in the basal forebrain and the brainstem form extensive projections to a number of thalamic nuclei. Activation of cholinergic afferents during distinct behavioral states can regulate neuronal firing, transmitter release at glutamatergic and GABAergic synapses, and synchrony in thalamic networks, thereby controlling the flow of sensory information. These effects are thought to be mediated by slow and persistent increases in extracellular ACh levels, resulting in the modulation of populations of thalamic neurons over large temporal and spatial scales. However, the synaptic mechanisms underlying cholinergic signaling in the thalamus are not well understood. Here, we demonstrate highly reliable cholinergic transmission in the mouse thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN), a brain structure essential for sensory processing, arousal, and attention. We find that ACh release evoked by low-frequency stimulation leads to biphasic excitatory-inhibitory (E-I) postsynaptic responses, mediated by the activation of postsynaptic α4β2 nicotinic ACh receptors (nAChRs) and M2 muscarinic ACh receptors (mAChRs), respectively. In addition, ACh can bind to mAChRs expressed near cholinergic release sites, resulting in autoinhibition of release. We show that the activation of postsynaptic nAChRs by transmitter release from only a small number of individual axons is sufficient to trigger action potentials in TRN neurons. Furthermore, short trains of cholinergic synaptic inputs can powerfully entrain ongoing TRN neuronal activity. Our study demonstrates fast and precise synaptic E-I signaling mediated by ACh, suggesting novel computational mechanisms for the cholinergic control of neuronal activity in thalamic circuits.

  11. High frequency stimulation abolishes thalamic network oscillations: an electrophysiological and computational analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kendall H.; Hitti, Frederick L.; Chang, Su-Youne; Lee, Dongchul C.; Roberts, David W.; McIntyre, Cameron C.; Leiter, James C.

    2011-08-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the thalamus has been demonstrated to be effective for the treatment of epilepsy. To investigate the mechanism of action of thalamic DBS, we examined the effects of high frequency stimulation (HFS) on spindle oscillations in thalamic brain slices from ferrets. We recorded intracellular and extracellular electrophysiological activity in the nucleus reticularis thalami (nRt) and in thalamocortical relay (TC) neurons in the lateral geniculate nucleus, stimulated the slice using a concentric bipolar electrode, and recorded the level of glutamate within the slice. HFS (100 Hz) of TC neurons generated excitatory post-synaptic potentials, increased the number of action potentials in both TC and nRt neurons, reduced the input resistance, increased the extracellular glutamate concentration, and abolished spindle wave oscillations. HFS of the nRt also suppressed spindle oscillations. In both locations, HFS was associated with significant and persistent elevation in extracellular glutamate levels and suppressed spindle oscillations for many seconds after the cessation of stimulation. We simulated HFS within a computational model of the thalamic network, and HFS also disrupted spindle wave activity, but the suppression of spindle activity was short-lived. Simulated HFS disrupted spindle activity for prolonged periods of time only after glutamate release and glutamate-mediated activation of a hyperpolarization-activated current (Ih) was incorporated into the model. Our results suggest that the mechanism of action of thalamic DBS as used in epilepsy may involve the prolonged release of glutamate, which in turn modulates specific ion channels such as Ih, decreases neuronal input resistance, and abolishes thalamic network oscillatory activity.

  12. Thalamic neuron models encode stimulus information by burst-size modulation

    PubMed Central

    Elijah, Daniel H.; Samengo, Inés; Montemurro, Marcelo A.

    2015-01-01

    Thalamic neurons have been long assumed to fire in tonic mode during perceptive states, and in burst mode during sleep and unconsciousness. However, recent evidence suggests that bursts may also be relevant in the encoding of sensory information. Here, we explore the neural code of such thalamic bursts. In order to assess whether the burst code is generic or whether it depends on the detailed properties of each bursting neuron, we analyzed two neuron models incorporating different levels of biological detail. One of the models contained no information of the biophysical processes entailed in spike generation, and described neuron activity at a phenomenological level. The second model represented the evolution of the individual ionic conductances involved in spiking and bursting, and required a large number of parameters. We analyzed the models' input selectivity using reverse correlation methods and information theory. We found that n-spike bursts from both models transmit information by modulating their spike count in response to changes to instantaneous input features, such as slope, phase, amplitude, etc. The stimulus feature that is most efficiently encoded by bursts, however, need not coincide with one of such classical features. We therefore searched for the optimal feature among all those that could be expressed as a linear transformation of the time-dependent input current. We found that bursting neurons transmitted 6 times more information about such more general features. The relevant events in the stimulus were located in a time window spanning ~100 ms before and ~20 ms after burst onset. Most importantly, the neural code employed by the simple and the biologically realistic models was largely the same, implying that the simple thalamic neuron model contains the essential ingredients that account for the computational properties of the thalamic burst code. Thus, our results suggest the n-spike burst code is a general property of thalamic neurons. PMID

  13. The effects of DBS patterns on basal ganglia activity and thalamic relay : a computational study.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Rahul; Sarma, Sridevi V

    2012-08-01

    Thalamic neurons receive inputs from cortex and their responses are modulated by the basal ganglia (BG). This modulation is necessary to properly relay cortical inputs back to cortex and downstream to the brain stem when movements are planned. In Parkinson's disease (PD), the BG input to thalamus becomes pathological and relay of motor-related cortical inputs is compromised, thereby impairing movements. However, high frequency (HF) deep brain stimulation (DBS) may be used to restore relay reliability, thereby restoring movements in PD patients. Although therapeutic, HF stimulation consumes significant power forcing surgical battery replacements, and may cause adverse side effects. Here, we used a biophysical-based model of the BG-Thalamus motor loop in both healthy and PD conditions to assess whether low frequency stimulation can suppress pathological activity in PD and enable the thalamus to reliably relay movement-related cortical inputs. We administered periodic pulse train DBS waveforms to the sub-thalamic nucleus (STN) with frequencies ranging from 0-140 Hz, and computed statistics that quantified pathological bursting, oscillations, and synchronization in the BG as well as thalamic relay of cortical inputs. We found that none of the frequencies suppressed all pathological activity in BG, though the HF waveforms recovered thalamic reliability. Our rigorous study, however, led us to a novel DBS strategy involving low frequency multi-input phase-shifted DBS, which successfully suppressed pathological symptoms in all BG nuclei and enabled reliable thalamic relay. The neural restoration remained robust to changes in the model parameters characterizing early to late PD stages.

  14. The lithium vapor box divertor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldston, R. J.; Myers, R.; Schwartz, J.

    2016-02-01

    It has long been recognized that volumetric dissipation of the plasma heat flux from a fusion power system is preferable to its localized impingement on a material surface. Volumetric dissipation mitigates both the anticipated very high heat flux and intense particle-induced damage due to sputtering. Recent projections to a tokamak demonstration power plant suggest an immense upstream parallel heat flux, of order 20 GW m-2, implying that fully detached operation may be a requirement for the success of fusion power. Building on pioneering work on the use of lithium by Nagayama et al and by Ono et al as well as earlier work on the gas box divertor by Watkins and Rebut, we present here a concept for a lithium vapor box divertor, in which lithium vapor extracts momentum and energy from a fusion-power-plant divertor plasma, using fully volumetric processes. At the high powers and pressures that are projected this requires a high density of lithium vapor, which must be isolated from the main plasma in order to avoid lithium build-up on the chamber walls or in the plasma. Isolation is achieved through a powerful multi-box differential pumping scheme available only for condensable vapors. The preliminary box-wise calculations are encouraging, but much more work is required to demonstrate the practical viability of this scheme, taking into account at least 2D plasma and vapor flows within and between the vapor boxes and out of the vapor boxes to the main plasma.

  15. Dopamine, reward learning, and active inference

    PubMed Central

    FitzGerald, Thomas H. B.; Dolan, Raymond J.; Friston, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Temporal difference learning models propose phasic dopamine signaling encodes reward prediction errors that drive learning. This is supported by studies where optogenetic stimulation of dopamine neurons can stand in lieu of actual reward. Nevertheless, a large body of data also shows that dopamine is not necessary for learning, and that dopamine depletion primarily affects task performance. We offer a resolution to this paradox based on an hypothesis that dopamine encodes the precision of beliefs about alternative actions, and thus controls the outcome-sensitivity of behavior. We extend an active inference scheme for solving Markov decision processes to include learning, and show that simulated dopamine dynamics strongly resemble those actually observed during instrumental conditioning. Furthermore, simulated dopamine depletion impairs performance but spares learning, while simulated excitation of dopamine neurons drives reward learning, through aberrant inference about outcome states. Our formal approach provides a novel and parsimonious reconciliation of apparently divergent experimental findings. PMID:26581305

  16. Dopamine regulates body size in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Takashi; Oami, Eitaro; Kutsuna, Natsumaro; Ishiura, Shoichi; Suo, Satoshi

    2016-04-01

    The nervous system plays a critical role in the regulation of animal body sizes. In Caenorhabditis elegans, an amine neurotransmitter, dopamine, is required for the tactile perception of food and food-dependent behavioral changes, while its role in development is unknown. In this study, we show that dopamine negatively regulates body size through a D2-like dopamine receptor, DOP-3, in C. elegans. Dopamine alters body size without affecting food intake or developmental rate. We also found that dopamine promotes egg-laying, although the regulation of body size by dopamine was not solely caused by this effect. Furthermore, dopamine negatively regulates body size through the suppression of signaling by octopamine and Gq-coupled octopamine receptors, SER-3 and SER-6. Our results demonstrate that dopamine and octopamine regulate the body size of C. elegans and suggest a potential role for perception in addition to ingestion of food for growth.

  17. 30 CFR 57.12006 - Distribution boxes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Distribution boxes. 57.12006 Section 57.12006... and Underground § 57.12006 Distribution boxes. Distribution boxes shall be provided with a... deenergized, and the distribution box shall be labeled to show which circuit each device controls....

  18. Plate forming and break down pizza box

    DOEpatents

    Pantisano, Frank; Devine, Scott M.

    1992-01-01

    A standard corrugated paper pizza box is provided with slit cuts cut through the top panel of the pizza box in a shape to form four circular serving plates with a beveled raised edge and cross slit cuts through the bottom panel of the pizza box separating the box into four essentially equal portions for easy disposal.

  19. Dopamine controls neurogenesis in the adult salamander midbrain in homeostasis and during regeneration of dopamine neurons.

    PubMed

    Berg, Daniel A; Kirkham, Matthew; Wang, Heng; Frisén, Jonas; Simon, András

    2011-04-08

    Appropriate termination of regenerative processes is critical for producing the correct number of cells in tissues. Here we provide evidence for an end-product inhibition of dopamine neuron regeneration that is mediated by dopamine. Ablation of midbrain dopamine neurons leads to complete regeneration in salamanders. Regeneration involves extensive neurogenesis and requires activation of quiescent ependymoglia cells, which express dopamine receptors. Pharmacological compensation for dopamine loss by L-dopa inhibits ependymoglia proliferation and regeneration in a dopamine receptor-signaling-dependent manner, specifically after ablation of dopamine neurons. Systemic administration of the dopamine receptor antagonist haloperidol alone causes ependymoglia proliferation and the appearance of excessive number of neurons. Our data show that stem cell quiescence is under dopamine control and provide a model for termination once normal homeostasis is restored. The findings establish a role for dopamine in the reversible suppression of neurogenesis in the midbrain and have implications for regenerative strategies in Parkinson's disease.

  20. Chaotic behavior in dopamine neurodynamics.

    PubMed Central

    King, R; Barchas, J D; Huberman, B A

    1984-01-01

    We report the results of the dynamics of a model of the central dopaminergic neuronal system. In particular, for certain values of a parameter k, which monitors the efficacy of dopamine at the postsynaptic receptor, chaotic solutions of the dynamical equations appear--a prediction that correlates with the observed increased variability in behavior among schizophrenics, the rapid fluctuations in motor activity among Parkinsonian patients treated chronically with L-dopa, and the lability of mood in some patients with an affective disorder. Moreover our hypothesis offers specific results concerning the appearance or disappearance of erratic solutions as a function of k and the external input to the dopamine neuronal system. PMID:6583705

  1. Chaotic behavior in dopamine neurodynamics.

    PubMed

    King, R; Barchas, J D; Huberman, B A

    1984-02-01

    We report the results of the dynamics of a model of the central dopaminergic neuronal system. In particular, for certain values of a parameter k, which monitors the efficacy of dopamine at the postsynaptic receptor, chaotic solutions of the dynamical equations appear--a prediction that correlates with the observed increased variability in behavior among schizophrenics, the rapid fluctuations in motor activity among Parkinsonian patients treated chronically with L-dopa, and the lability of mood in some patients with an affective disorder. Moreover our hypothesis offers specific results concerning the appearance or disappearance of erratic solutions as a function of k and the external input to the dopamine neuronal system.

  2. Can Chronic Remote Cortical Hypoperfusion Induced by Thalamic Infarction Cause Damage of Tracts Passing through Those Hypoperfused Regions?

    PubMed

    Magnin, Eloi; Chamard, Ludivine; Vuillier, Fabrice; Tatu, Laurent; Berger, Eric

    2013-01-01

    We report the case of a woman presenting with changes on cerebral imaging a year and a half after a bi-thalamic (predominantly left-sided) infarction including lateral and medial thalamic nuclei. Lateral geniculate body and pulvinar were not damaged. Hypoperfusion was observed in left cortical and basal structures. White matter FLAIR hyperintense lesions occurred in the left hemisphere and the occipital region 1 year and half after stroke. Medial and lateral thalamic nuclei are not highly connected to the occipital cortex. Therefore, in addition to Wallerian degeneration after thalamic stroke, we hypothesize that the chronic left temporal hypoperfusion induced by diaschisis can lead to a lateralized chronic hypoxic damage of the occipital fiber tract (optic radiation) that passes through the temporal lobe.

  3. Selective excitatory actions of DNQX and CNQX in rat thalamic neurons.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Hun; Govindaiah, G; Cox, Charles L

    2010-04-01

    The thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) consists of GABA-containing neurons that form reciprocal synaptic connections with thalamic relay nuclei. Excitatory synaptic innervation of TRN neurons arises from glutamatergic afferents from thalamocortical relay neurons and deep layer corticothalamic neurons, and they produce excitation via both N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and non-NMDA receptors. Quinoxaline derivatives [e.g., 6,7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (DNQX), 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX)] have routinely been used as non-NMDA receptor antagonists over the last two decades. In this study, we examined whether quinoxaline derivatives alter the intrinsic properties of thalamic neurons in light of recent findings indicating that these compounds can alter neuronal excitability in hippocampal and cerebellar neurons via transmembrane AMPA receptor (AMPAR) regulatory proteins (TARPs). Whole cell recordings were obtained from TRN and ventrobasal (VB) thalamic relay neurons in vitro. DNQX and CNQX produced a consistent depolarization in all TRN neurons tested. The depolarization persisted in tetrodotoxin and low Ca²+/high Mg²+ conditions, suggesting a postsynaptic site of action. In contrast, DNQX and CNQX produced little or no change in VB thalamocortical relay neurons. The nonspecific ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonist, kynurenic acid, and the selective AMPAR antagonist, 4-(8-methyl-9H-1,3-dioxolo[4,5-h][2,3]benzodiazepin-5-yl)-benzenamine hydrochloride, blocked the DNQX-mediated depolarizations. Our results indicate that the DNQX- and CNQX-mediated depolarizations are mediated by AMPAR but not kainate receptors in TRN neurons. The AMPAR-positive allosteric modulator, trichloromethiazide, potentiated the DNQX-mediated depolarization in TRN neurons but did not unmask any excitatory actions of DNQX/CNQX in relay neurons. This selective action may not only reveal a differential TARP distribution among thalamic neurons but also may provide insight into

  4. Selective Excitatory Actions of DNQX and CNQX in Rat Thalamic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Hun; Govindaiah, G.

    2010-01-01

    The thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) consists of GABA-containing neurons that form reciprocal synaptic connections with thalamic relay nuclei. Excitatory synaptic innervation of TRN neurons arises from glutamatergic afferents from thalamocortical relay neurons and deep layer corticothalamic neurons, and they produce excitation via both N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) and non-NMDA receptors. Quinoxaline derivatives [e.g., 6,7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (DNQX), 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX)] have routinely been used as non-NMDA receptor antagonists over the last two decades. In this study, we examined whether quinoxaline derivatives alter the intrinsic properties of thalamic neurons in light of recent findings indicating that these compounds can alter neuronal excitability in hippocampal and cerebellar neurons via transmembrane AMPA receptor (AMPAR) regulatory proteins (TARPs). Whole cell recordings were obtained from TRN and ventrobasal (VB) thalamic relay neurons in vitro. DNQX and CNQX produced a consistent depolarization in all TRN neurons tested. The depolarization persisted in tetrodotoxin and low Ca2+/high Mg2+ conditions, suggesting a postsynaptic site of action. In contrast, DNQX and CNQX produced little or no change in VB thalamocortical relay neurons. The nonspecific ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonist, kynurenic acid, and the selective AMPAR antagonist, 4-(8-methyl-9H-1,3-dioxolo[4,5-h][2,3]benzodiazepin-5-y l)-benzenamine hydrochloride, blocked the DNQX-mediated depolarizations. Our results indicate that the DNQX- and CNQX-mediated depolarizations are mediated by AMPAR but not kainate receptors in TRN neurons. The AMPAR-positive allosteric modulator, trichloromethiazide, potentiated the DNQX-mediated depolarization in TRN neurons but did not unmask any excitatory actions of DNQX/CNQX in relay neurons. This selective action may not only reveal a differential TARP distribution among thalamic neurons but also may provide insight into

  5. Restriction of dopamine signaling to the dorsolateral striatum is sufficient for many cognitive behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Darvas, Martin; Palmiter, Richard D.

    2009-01-01

    The striatum is a vital substrate for performance, procedural memory, and learning. The ventral and medial striatum are thought to be critical for acquisition of tasks while the dorsolateral striatum is important for performance and habitual enactment of skills. Evidence based on cortical, thalamic, and amygdaloid inputs to the striatum suggests a medio-lateral zonation imposed on the classical dorso-ventral distinction. We therefore investigated the functional significance of dopaminergic signaling in cognitive tasks by studying dopamine-deficient (DD) mice and mice with dopamine signaling restored to only the dorsolateral (DL) striatum by viral rescue (vrDD-DL mice). Whereas DD mice failed in all of the tasks examined here, vrDD-DL mice displayed intact discriminatory learning, object recognition, visuospatial learning and spatial memory. Acquisition of operant behavior for food rewards was delayed in vrDD-DL mice and their motivation in a progressive ratio experiments was reduced. Therefore, dopaminergic signaling in the dorsolateral striatum is sufficient for mice to learn several different cognitive tasks although the rate of learning some of them was reduced. These results indicate that dopaminergic signaling in the ventromedial striatum is not absolutely necessary for mastery of these behaviors, but may facilitate them. PMID:19667174

  6. The lithium vapor box divertor

    SciTech Connect

    Goldston, R. J.; Myers, R.; Schwartz, J.

    2016-01-13

    It has long been recognized that volumetric dissipation of the plasma heat flux from a fusion power system is preferable to its localized impingement on a material surface. Volumetric dissipation mitigates both the anticipated very high heat flux and intense particle-induced damage due to sputtering. Our recent projections to a tokamak demonstration power plant suggest an immense upstream parallel heat flux, of order 20 GW m-2, implying that fully detached operation may be a requirement for the success of fusion power. Building on pioneering work on the use of lithium by Nagayama et al and by Ono et al as well as earlier work on the gas box divertor by Watkins and Rebut, we present here a concept for a lithium vapor box divertor, in which lithium vapor extracts momentum and energy from a fusion-power-plant divertor plasma, using fully volumetric processes. Furthermore, at the high powers and pressures that are projected this requires a high density of lithium vapor, which must be isolated from the main plasma in order to avoid lithium build-up on the chamber walls or in the plasma. Isolation is achieved through a powerful multi-box differential pumping scheme available only for condensable vapors. The preliminary box-wise calculations are encouraging, but much more work is required in order to demonstrate the practical viability of this scheme, taking into account at least 2D plasma and vapor flows within and between the vapor boxes and out of the vapor boxes to the main plasma.

  7. The lithium vapor box divertor

    DOE PAGES

    Goldston, R. J.; Myers, R.; Schwartz, J.

    2016-01-13

    It has long been recognized that volumetric dissipation of the plasma heat flux from a fusion power system is preferable to its localized impingement on a material surface. Volumetric dissipation mitigates both the anticipated very high heat flux and intense particle-induced damage due to sputtering. Our recent projections to a tokamak demonstration power plant suggest an immense upstream parallel heat flux, of order 20 GW m-2, implying that fully detached operation may be a requirement for the success of fusion power. Building on pioneering work on the use of lithium by Nagayama et al and by Ono et al asmore » well as earlier work on the gas box divertor by Watkins and Rebut, we present here a concept for a lithium vapor box divertor, in which lithium vapor extracts momentum and energy from a fusion-power-plant divertor plasma, using fully volumetric processes. Furthermore, at the high powers and pressures that are projected this requires a high density of lithium vapor, which must be isolated from the main plasma in order to avoid lithium build-up on the chamber walls or in the plasma. Isolation is achieved through a powerful multi-box differential pumping scheme available only for condensable vapors. The preliminary box-wise calculations are encouraging, but much more work is required in order to demonstrate the practical viability of this scheme, taking into account at least 2D plasma and vapor flows within and between the vapor boxes and out of the vapor boxes to the main plasma.« less

  8. [Role of dopamine-dependent negative feedback in the hippocampal--basal ganglia--thalamo---hippocampal loop in response decrement].

    PubMed

    Sil'kis, I G

    2007-03-01

    The mechanism of response decrement in hippocampal and dopaminergic neurons on repeating stimuli based on the dopamine-dependent negative feedback in the hippocampal--basal ganglia--thalamo--hippocampal loop is suggested. Activation of hippocampal neurons caused by new stimulus facilitates occurrence of reaction of dopaminergic cells due to their disinhibition through striatopallidal cells of nucleus accumbens and ventral pallidum. However, increase in dopamine level and activation accumbens and ventral pallidum. However, increase in dopamine level and activation of D2 receptors on the striatopallidal cell, while promoting depression of hippocampal inputs, prevents disinhibition of dopaminergic cells, and their reactions start their decrement. The subsequent decrease in D1 receptor activation leads to reduction of efficiency of neuron excitation in the hippocampal CA1 fields, as well as in striatonigral cells of nucleus accumbens. This leads to a decrease of disinhibition through a direct pathway via the basal ganglia of thalamic nucleus reunions which activates neurons of the CA1 field. This effect causes decrement of reactions of the hippocampal neurons, a subsequent reduction of dopaminergic cell disinhibition, and further decrement of their responses.

  9. Voxel-based statistical analysis of thalamic glucose metabolism in traumatic brain injury: relationship with consciousness and cognition.

    PubMed

    Lull, Nuria; Noé, Enrique; Lull, Juan José; García-Panach, Javier; Chirivella, Javier; Ferri, Joan; López-Aznar, Diego; Sopena, Pablo; Robles, Montse

    2010-01-01

    To study the relationship between thalamic glucose metabolism and neurological outcome after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Forty-nine patients with severe and closed TBI and 10 healthy control subjects with (18)F-FDG PET were studied. Patients were divided into three groups: MCS&VS group (n = 17), patients in a vegetative or a minimally conscious state; In-PTA group (n = 12), patients in a state of post-traumatic amnesia (PTA); and Out-PTA group (n = 20), patients who had emerged from PTA. SPM5 software implemented in MATLAB 7 was used to determine the quantitative differences between patients and controls. FDG-PET images were spatially normalized and an automated thalamic ROI mask was generated. Group differences were analysed with two sample voxel-wise t-tests. Thalamic hypometabolism was the most prominent in patients with low consciousness (MCS&VS group) and the thalamic hypometabolism in the In-PTA group was more prominent than that in the Out-PTA group. Healthy control subjects showed the greatest thalamic metabolism. These differences in metabolism were more pronounced in the internal regions of the thalamus. The results confirm the vulnerability of the thalamus to suffer the effect of the dynamic forces generated during a TBI. Patients with thalamic hypometabolism could represent a sub-set of subjects that are highly vulnerable to neurological disability after TBI.

  10. Classical three-box 'paradox'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkpatrick, K. A.

    2003-05-01

    A simple classical probabilistic system (a simple card game) classically exemplifies Aharonov and Vaidman's 'three-box 'paradox'' (1991 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 24 2315), implying that the three-box example is neither quantal nor a paradox and leaving one with less difficulty to busy the interpreters of quantum mechanics. An ambiguity in the usual expression of the retrodiction formula is shown to have misled Albert et al (1985 Phys. Rev. Lett. 54 5) to a result not, in fact, 'curious'; the discussion illustrates how to avoid this ambiguity.

  11. Interactions between thalamic and cortical rhythms during semantic memory recall in human

    PubMed Central

    Slotnick, Scott D.; Moo, Lauren R.; Kraut, Michael A.; Lesser, Ronald P.; Hart, John

    2002-01-01

    Human scalp electroencephalographic rhythms, indicative of cortical population synchrony, have long been posited to reflect cognitive processing. Although numerous studies employing simultaneous thalamic and cortical electrode recording in nonhuman animals have explored the role of the thalamus in the modulation of cortical rhythms, direct evidence for thalamocortical modulation in human has not, to our knowledge, been obtained. We simultaneously recorded from thalamic and scalp electrodes in one human during performance of a cognitive task and found a spatially widespread, phase-locked, low-frequency rhythm (7–8 Hz) power decrease at thalamus and scalp during semantic memory recall. This low-frequency rhythm power decrease was followed by a spatially specific, phase-locked, fast-rhythm (21–34 Hz) power increase at thalamus and occipital scalp. Such a pattern of thalamocortical activity reflects a plausible neural mechanism underlying semantic memory recall that may underlie other cognitive processes as well. PMID:11972063

  12. Control of Absence Seizures by the Thalamic Feed-Forward Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mingming; Guo, Daqing; Xia, Yang; Yao, Dezhong

    2017-01-01

    As a subtype of idiopathic generalized epilepsies, absence epilepsy is believed to be caused by pathological interactions within the corticothalamic (CT) system. Using a biophysical mean-field model of the CT system, we demonstrate here that the feed-forward inhibition (FFI) in thalamus, i.e., the pathway from the cerebral cortex (Ctx) to the thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) and then to the specific relay nuclei (SRN) of thalamus that are also directly driven by the Ctx, may participate in controlling absence seizures. In particular, we show that increasing the excitatory Ctx-TRN coupling strength can significantly suppress typical electrical activities during absence seizures. Further, investigation demonstrates that the GABAA- and GABAB-mediated inhibitions in the TRN-SRN pathway perform combination roles in the regulation of absence seizures. Overall, these results may provide an insightful mechanistic understanding of how the thalamic FFI serves as an intrinsic regulator contributing to the control of absence seizures. PMID:28491031

  13. COMMUNICATION Designing a somatosensory neural prosthesis: percepts evoked by different patterns of thalamic stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heming, Ethan; Sanden, Andrew; Kiss, Zelma H. T.

    2010-12-01

    Although major advances have been made in the development of motor prostheses, fine motor control requires intuitive somatosensory feedback. Here we explored whether a thalamic site for a somatosensory neural prosthetic could provide natural somatic sensation to humans. Different patterns of electrical stimulation (obtained from thalamic spike trains) were applied in patients undergoing deep brain stimulation surgery. Changes in pattern produced different sensations, while preserving somatotopic representation. While most percepts were reported as 'unnatural', some stimulations produced more 'natural' sensations than others. However, the additional patterns did not elicit more 'natural' percepts than high-frequency (333 Hz) electrical stimulation. These features suggest that despite some limitations, the thalamus may be a feasible site for a somatosensory neural prosthesis and different stimulation patterns may be useful in its development.

  14. Thalamic structures and associated cognitive functions: Relations with age and aging

    PubMed Central

    Fama, Rosemary; Sullivan, Edith V.

    2015-01-01

    The thalamus, with its cortical, subcortical, and cerebellar connections, is a critical node in networks supporting cognitive functions known to decline in normal aging, including component processes of memory and executive functions of attention and information processing. The macrostructure, microstructure, and neural connectivity of the thalamus changes across the adult lifespan. Structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) have demonstrated, regional thalamic volume shrinkage and microstructural degradation, with anterior regions generally more compromised than posterior regions. The integrity of selective thalamic nuclei and projections decline with advancing age, particularly those in thalamofrontal, thalamoparietal, and thalamolimbic networks. This review presents studies that assess the relations between age and aging and the structure, function, and connectivity of the thalamus and associated neural networks and focuses on their relations with processes of attention, speed of information processing, and working and episodic memory. PMID:25862940

  15. The olfactory thalamus: unanswered questions about the role of the mediodorsal thalamic nucleus in olfaction

    PubMed Central

    Courtiol, Emmanuelle; Wilson, Donald A.

    2015-01-01

    The mediodorsal thalamic nucleus (MDT) is a higher order thalamic nucleus and its role in cognition is increasingly well established. Interestingly, components of the MDT also have a somewhat unique sensory function as they link primary olfactory cortex to orbitofrontal associative cortex. In fact, anatomical evidence firmly demonstrates that the MDT receives direct input from primary olfactory areas including the piriform cortex and has dense reciprocal connections with the orbitofrontal cortex. The functions of this olfactory pathway have been poorly explored but lesion, imaging, and electrophysiological studies suggest that these connections may be involved in olfactory processing including odor perception, discrimination, learning, and attention. However, many important questions regarding the MDT and olfaction remain unanswered. Our goal here is not only to briefly review the existing literature but also to highlight some of the remaining questions that need to be answered to better define the role(s) of the MDT in olfactory processing. PMID:26441548

  16. Crossed cerebellar and uncrossed basal ganglia and thalamic diaschisis in Alzheimer's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Akiyama, H.; Harrop, R.; McGeer, P.L.; Peppard, R.; McGeer, E.G.

    1989-04-01

    We detected crossed cerebellar as well as uncrossed basal ganglia and thalamic diaschisis in Alzheimer's disease by positron emission tomography (PET) using /sup 18/F-fluorodeoxyglucose. We studied a series of 26 consecutive, clinically diagnosed Alzheimer cases, including 6 proven by later autopsy, and compared them with 9 age-matched controls. We calculated asymmetry indices (AIs) of cerebral metabolic rate for matched left-right regions of interest (ROIs) and determined the extent of diaschisis by correlative analyses. For the Alzheimer group, we found cerebellar AIs correlated negatively, and thalamic AIs positively, with those of the cerebral hemisphere and frontal, temporal, parietal, and angular cortices, while basal ganglia AIs correlated positively with frontal cortical AIs. The only significant correlation of AIs for normal subjects was between the thalamus and cerebral hemisphere. These data indicate that PET is a sensitive technique for detecting diaschisis.

  17. [Motor neglect of thalamic origin: report on two cases (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Laplane, D; Escourolle, R; Degos, J D; Sauron, B; Massiou, H

    1982-01-01

    Two cases of thalamic lesions with motor neglect are presented. The syndrome of motor neglect was complete in those cases with a) underutilization of left limbs, but good utilization upon verbal orders, b) loss of placement reaction, c) weakness of movement when hand was approaching the target, d) weakness of motor reaction to nociceptive stimuli. Those cases confirm that motor neglect exists after thalamic lesions and bring pathologic clues for topographic discussion. Motor neglect seems to be a particular case of partial unilateral neglect throwing some doubt on the hypothesis of a global trouble of hemispheric activation. Prevalence of left motor neglects suggests some linkage between propositional motility and language. One may suppose that in the right hemisphere language is able to have a vicarious action when spontaneous activation is lost; at the opposite, in the left hemisphere language and motility would be too linked to let this dissociation be generally possible.

  18. Lesions of the paraventricular thalamic nucleus attenuates prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle reflex.

    PubMed

    Öz, Pınar; Kaya Yertutanol, F Duygu; Gözler, Tayfun; Özçetin, Ayşe; Uzbay, I Tayfun

    2017-03-06

    The paraventricular thalamic nucleus (PVT) is a midline nucleus with strong connections to cortical and subcortical brain regions such as the prefrontal cortex, amygdala, nucleus accumbens and hippocampus and receives strong projections from brain stem nuclei. Prepulse inhibition (PPI) is mediated and modulated by complex cortical and subcortical networks that are yet to be fully identified in detail. Here, we suggest that the PVT may be an important brain region for the modulation of PPI. In our study, the paraventricular thalamic nuclei of rats were electrolytically lesioned. Two weeks after the surgery, the PPI responses of the animals were monitored and recorded using measurements of acoustic startle reflex. Our results show that disruption of the PVT dramatically attenuated PPI at prepulse intensities of 74, 78 and 86dB compared to that in the sham lesion group. Thus, we suggest that the PVT may be an important part of the PPI network in the rat brain.

  19. Psychostimulants affect dopamine transmission through both dopamine transporter-dependent and independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    dela Peña, Ike; Gevorkiana, Ruzanna; Shi, Wei-Xing

    2015-10-05

    The precise mechanisms by which cocaine and amphetamine-like psychostimulants exert their reinforcing effects are not yet fully defined. It is widely believed, however, that these drugs produce their effects by enhancing dopamine neurotransmission in the brain, especially in limbic areas such as the nucleus accumbens, by inducing dopamine transporter-mediated reverse transport and/or blocking dopamine reuptake though the dopamine transporter. Here, we present the evidence that aside from dopamine transporter, non-dopamine transporter-mediated mechanisms also participate in psychostimulant-induced dopamine release and contribute to the behavioral effects of these drugs, such as locomotor activation and reward. Accordingly, psychostimulants could increase norepinephrine release in the prefrontal cortex, the latter then alters the firing pattern of dopamine neurons resulting in changes in action potential-dependent dopamine release. These alterations would further affect the temporal pattern of dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens, thereby modifying information processing in that area. Hence, a synaptic input to a nucleus accumbens neuron may be enhanced or inhibited by dopamine depending on its temporal relationship to dopamine release. Specific temporal patterns of dopamine release may also be required for certain forms of synaptic plasticity in the nucleus accumbens. Together, these effects induced by psychostimulants, mediated through a non-dopamine transporter-mediated mechanism involving norepinephrine and the prefrontal cortex, may also contribute importantly to the reinforcing properties of these drugs.

  20. Psychostimulants affect dopamine transmission through both dopamine transporter-dependent and independent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    dela Peña, Ike; Gevorkiana, Ruzanna; Shi, Wei-Xing

    2015-01-01

    The precise mechanisms by which cocaine and amphetamine-like psychostimulants exert their reinforcing effects are not yet fully defined. It is widely believed, however, that these drugs produce their effects by enhancing dopamine neurotransmission in the brain, especially in limbic areas such as the nucleus accumbens, by inducing dopamine transporter-mediated reverse transport and/or blocking dopamine reuptake though the dopamine transporter. Here, we present the evidence that aside from dopamine transporter, non-dopamine transporter-mediated mechanisms also participate in psychostimulant-induced dopamine release and contribute to the behavioral effects of these drugs, such as locomotor activation and reward. Accordingly, psychostimulants could increase norepinephrine release in the prefrontal cortex, the latter then alters the firing pattern of dopamine neurons resulting in changes in action potential-dependent dopamine release. These alterations would further affect the temporal pattern of dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens, thereby modifying information processing in that area. Hence, a synaptic input to a nucleus accumbens neuron may be enhanced or inhibited by dopamine depending on its temporal relationship to dopamine release. Specific temporal patterns of dopamine release may also be required for certain forms of synaptic plasticity in the nucleus accumbens. Together, these effects induced by psychostimulants, mediated through a non-dopamine transporter-mediated mechanism involving norepinephrine and the prefrontal cortex, may also contribute importantly to the reinforcing properties of these drugs. PMID:26209364

  1. Effect of spinal manipulation thrust magnitude on trunk mechanical activation thresholds of lateral thalamic neurons.

    PubMed

    Reed, William R; Pickar, Joel G; Sozio, Randall S; Long, Cynthia R

    2014-06-01

    High-velocity low-amplitude spinal manipulation (HVLA-SM), as performed by doctors who use manual therapy (eg, doctors of chiropractic and osteopathy), results in mechanical hypoalgesia in clinical settings. This hypoalgesic effect has previously been attributed to alterations in peripheral and/or central pain processing. The objective of this study was to determine whether thrust magnitude of a simulated HVLA-SM alters mechanical trunk response thresholds in wide dynamic range (WDR) and/or nociceptive specific (NS) lateral thalamic neurons. Extracellular recordings were carried out in the thalamus of 15 anesthetized Wistar rats. Lateral thalamic neurons having receptive fields, which included the lumbar dorsal-lateral trunk, were characterized as either WDR (n=22) or NS (n=25). Response thresholds to electronic von Frey (rigid tip) mechanical trunk stimuli were determined in 3 directions (dorsal-ventral, 45° caudalward, and 45° cranialward) before and immediately after the dorsal-ventral delivery of a 100-millisecond HVLA-SM at 3 thrust magnitudes (control, 55%, 85% body weight). There was a significant difference in mechanical threshold between 85% body weight manipulation and control thrust magnitudes in the dorsal-ventral direction in NS neurons (P=.01). No changes were found in WDR neurons at either HVLA-SM thrust magnitude. This study is the first to investigate the effect of HVLA-SM thrust magnitude on WDR and NS lateral thalamic mechanical response threshold. Our data suggest that, at the single lateral thalamic neuron level, there may be a minimal spinal manipulative thrust magnitude required to elicit an increase in trunk mechanical response thresholds. Copyright © 2014 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of Spinal Manipulation Thrust Magnitude on Trunk Mechanical Thresholds of Lateral Thalamic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Reed, William R.; Pickar, Joel G.; Sozio, Randall S.; Long, Cynthia R.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives High velocity low amplitude spinal manipulation (HVLA-SM), as performed by manual therapists (eg, doctors of chiropractic and osteopathy) results in mechanical hypoalgesia in clinical settings. This hypoalgesic effect has previously been attributed to alterations in peripheral and/or central pain processing. The objective of this study was to determine whether thrust magnitude of a simulated HVLA-SM alters mechanical trunk response thresholds in wide dynamic range (WDR) and/or nociceptive specific (NS) lateral thalamic neurons. Methods Extracellular recordings were carried out in the thalamus of 15 anesthetized Wistar rats. Lateral thalamic neurons having receptive fields which included the lumbar dorsal-lateral trunk were characterized as either WDR (n=22) or NS (n=25). Response thresholds to electronic von Frey (rigid tip) mechanical trunk stimuli were determined in three directions (dorsal-ventral, 45°caudalward, and 45°cranialward) prior to and immediately following the dorsal-ventral delivery of a 100ms HVLA-SM at three thrust magnitudes (control, 55%, 85% body weight; (BW)). Results There was a significant difference in mechanical threshold between 85% BW manipulation and control thrust magnitudes in the dorsal-ventral direction in NS neurons (p=.01). No changes were found in WDR neurons at either HVLA-SM thrust magnitude. Conclusions This study is the first to investigate the effect of HVLA-SM thrust magnitude on WDR and NS lateral thalamic mechanical response threshold. Our data suggest that at the single lateral thalamic neuron level, there may be a minimal spinal manipulative thrust magnitude required to elicit an increase in trunk mechanical response thresholds. PMID:24928636

  3. Thalamic rosette-forming a glioneuronal tumor in an elderly patient: Case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Cebula, H; Chibbaro, S; Santin, M N; Kremer, S; Chaussemy, D; Proust, F

    2016-02-01

    The rosette-forming glioneuronal tumor (RGNT) is a novel type of brain tumor recently listed in the WHO 2007 classification of central nervous system (CNS) tumors. We report the case of a 75-year-old woman harboring a thalamic RGNT with third ventricle dissemination. Age and location make the present case exceptional and which has never previously been reported. A review of the clinical, pathological and radiological features is presented along with the relevant literature.

  4. [Typical Patterns of Neuronal Activity in Relay and Nonspecific Thalamic Nuclei in Patients with Spasmodic Torticollis].

    PubMed

    Devetiarov, D A; Semenova, U N; Butiaeva, L I; Sedov, A S

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal activity of 50 neurons in nonspecific (Rt, MD) and relay (Voi, Voa) thalamic nuclei was analyzed. Data were obtained by microelectrode technique during 14 stereotactic operations in patients with spasmodic torticollis. Application of Poincare maps and Gap-statistics allowed to reveal 3 main patterns of neuronal activity: irregular single spikes, low-threshold Ca(2+)-dependent rhythmic (3-5 Hz) bursts and combination of bursts and single spikes. In some cases, grouping (in Voi and Rt nuclei) and long burst (in Voa nucleus) patterns were observed. Grouping pattern consist of low-density groups of spikes with tendency to periodicity in range 1-1.5 Hz. Long burst pattern consist of long dense groups of spikes with random length and invariant interburst intervals. Main numerical estimations of 3 most spread patterns of neuronal activity were obtained by parametric analysis. In results, investigated thalamic nuclei significantly distinguished from each other by characteristics of burst activity but average firing rate of these nuclei hadn't significant differences. These data may be useful for functional identification of thalamic nuclei during stereotactic neurosurgery operation in patients with movement disorders.

  5. The thalamic mGluR1-PLCβ4 pathway is critical in sleep architecture.

    PubMed

    Hong, Joohyeon; Lee, Jungryun; Song, Kiyeong; Ha, Go Eun; Yang, Yong Ryoul; Ma, Ji Su; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Shin, Hee-Sup; Suh, Pann-Ghill; Cheong, Eunji

    2016-12-21

    The transition from wakefulness to a nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep state at the onset of sleep involves a transition from low-voltage, high-frequency irregular electroencephalography (EEG) waveforms to large-amplitude, low-frequency EEG waveforms accompanying synchronized oscillatory activity in the thalamocortical circuit. The thalamocortical circuit consists of reciprocal connections between the thalamus and cortex. The cortex sends strong excitatory feedback to the thalamus, however the function of which is unclear. In this study, we investigated the role of the thalamic metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGluR1)-phospholipase C β4 (PLCβ4) pathway in sleep control in PLCβ4-deficient (PLCβ4(-/-)) mice. The thalamic mGluR1-PLCβ4 pathway contains synapses that receive corticothalamic inputs. In PLCβ4(-/-) mice, the transition from wakefulness to the NREM sleep state was stimulated, and the NREM sleep state was stabilized, which resulted in increased NREM sleep. The power density of delta (δ) waves increased in parallel with the increased NREM sleep. These sleep phenotypes in PLCβ4(-/-) mice were consistent in TC-restricted PLCβ4 knockdown mice. Moreover, in vitro intrathalamic oscillations were greatly enhanced in the PLCβ4(-/-) slices. The results of our study showed that thalamic mGluR1-PLCβ4 pathway was critical in controlling sleep architecture.

  6. Simulation of thalamic prosthetic vision: reading accuracy, speed, and acuity in sighted humans

    PubMed Central

    Vurro, Milena; Crowell, Anne Marie; Pezaris, John S.

    2014-01-01

    The psychophysics of reading with artificial sight has received increasing attention as visual prostheses are becoming a real possibility to restore useful function to the blind through the coarse, pseudo-pixelized vision they generate. Studies to date have focused on simulating retinal and cortical prostheses; here we extend that work to report on thalamic designs. This study examined the reading performance of normally sighted human subjects using a simulation of three thalamic visual prostheses that varied in phosphene count, to help understand the level of functional ability afforded by thalamic designs in a task of daily living. Reading accuracy, reading speed, and reading acuity of 20 subjects were measured as a function of letter size, using a task based on the MNREAD chart. Results showed that fluid reading was feasible with appropriate combinations of letter size and phosphene count, and performance degraded smoothly as font size was decreased, with an approximate doubling of phosphene count resulting in an increase of 0.2 logMAR in acuity. Results here were consistent with previous results from our laboratory. Results were also consistent with those from the literature, despite using naive subjects who were not trained on the simulator, in contrast to other reports. PMID:25408641

  7. Dissociable effects of anterior and mediodorsal thalamic lesions on spatial goal-directed behavior.

    PubMed

    Alcaraz, Fabien; Naneix, Fabien; Desfosses, Emilie; Marchand, Alain R; Wolff, Mathieu; Coutureau, Etienne

    2016-01-01

    Goal-directed behaviors are thought to be supported by a neural circuit encompassing the prefrontal cortex, the dorsomedial striatum, the amygdala, and, as more recently suggested, the limbic thalamus. Since evidence indicates that the various thalamic nuclei contribute to dissociable functions, we directly compared the functional contribution of the mediodorsal thalamus (MD) and of the anterior thalamic nuclei (ATN) in a new task assessing spatial goal-directed behavior in a cross-maze. Rats sustaining lesions of the mediodorsal or the anterior thalamus were trained to associate each of the two goal arms with a distinctive food reward. Unlike control rats, both lesioned groups failed to express a bias for the goal arm corresponding to the non-devalued outcome following devaluation by sensory-specific satiety. In addition, MD rats were slower than the other groups to complete the trials. When tested for spatial working memory using a standard non-matching-to-place procedure in the same apparatus, ATN rats were severely impaired but MD rats performed as well as controls, even when spatial or temporal challenges were introduced. Finally, all groups displayed comparable breaking points in a progressive ratio test, indicating that the slower choice performance of MD rats did not result from motivational factors. Thus, a spatial task requiring the integration of instrumental and Pavlovian contingencies reveals a fundamental deficit of MD rats in adapting their choice according to goal value. By contrast, the deficit associated with anterior thalamic lesions appears to simply reflect the inability to process spatial information.

  8. Improvement of sleep architecture in the follow up of a patient with bilateral paramedian thalamic stroke.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Ana Catarina; Geraldes, Ruth; Pires, Joana; Falcão, Filipa; Bentes, Carla; Melo, Teresa Pinho E

    2011-12-01

    Normal sleep architecture and arousal require an intact thalamus. Thalamic vascular lesions, particularly in the paramedian region may cause arousal disturbances and hypersomnolence. Although hypersomnolence is one of the main characteristics of acute bilateral paramedian thalamic infarcts, there are only scarce reports in literature concerning polysomnographic follow-up of these patients. The few reported cases in literature show that sleep stages do not significantly change from the acute to chronic phase. We present a case report of a patient with a bilateral paramedian thalamic infarct in which a polysomnographic evaluation of sleep was performed four days and five months after stroke. In the acute phase, polysomnography showed an impairment of phase 2 NREM and absence of phase 3 and 4 NREM with absent sleep spindles. After the acute stroke phase, hypersomnolence improved and sleep spindles reappeared as well as phase 3 and 4 of NREM sleep. Our patient clear clinical and polysomnographic improvement makes us suppose that in this case the initial impairment could have been essentially due to a functional transitory impairment of the thalamocortical and corticothalamic connections. This case report is peculiar because it discloses a marked improvement of sleep architecture which to the best of our knowledge has not been clearly described before. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Thalamic physiology of intentional essential tremor is more like cerebellar tremor than postural essential tremor

    PubMed Central

    Zakaria, R; Lenz, FA; Hua, S; Avin, BH; Liu, CC; Mari, Z

    2013-01-01

    The neuronal physiological correlates of clinical heterogeneity in human essential tremor are unknown. We now test the hypothesis that thalamic neuronal and EMG activities during intention essential tremor are similar to those of the intention tremor which is characteristic of cerebellar lesions. Thalamic neuronal firing was studied in a cerebellar relay nucleus (ventral intermediate, Vim) and in a pallidal relay nucleus (ventral oral posterior, Vop) during stereotactic surgery for the treatment of tremor. Nine patients with essential tremor were divided clinically into two categories: one with a substantial component of tremor with intention (termed intention ET) and the other without (postural ET). These types of essential tremor were compared with patients having intention tremor plus other clinical signs of cerebellar disease (cerebellar tremor). Neurons in patients with either intention ET or cerebellar tremor had lower firing rates and lower spike × EMG coherence than those in patients with postural ET. Patients with intention ET had a lower spike × EMG phase lead than those with postural ET. Overall, thalamic activity measures of intention ET were different from postural ET but not apparently different from those of cerebellar tremor. One patient with the intention ET (number 4) had a good response to a left thalamotomy and then suffered a right cerebellar hemispheric infarct five years later. After the stroke the intention ET recurred, which is consistent with our hypothesis that intention ET is similar to that of the intention tremor which is characteristic of cerebellar lesions. PMID:23856324

  10. Feature-linked synchronization of thalamic relay cell firing induced by feedback from the visual cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sillito, Adam M.; Jones, Helen E.; Gerstein, George L.; West, David C.

    1994-06-01

    THE function of the massive feedback projection from visual cortex to its thalamic relay nucleus1,2 has so far eluded any clear overview. This feedback exerts a range of effects3-6, including an increase in the inhibition elicited by moving contours7,8, but the functional logic of the direct connections to the thalamic cells that relay the retinal input to the cortex9-11 remains largely unknown. In contrast to its thalamic nucleus, the visual cortex is characterized by cells that are strongly sensitive to the orientation of moving contours. Here we report that when driven by moving oriented visual stimuli the cortical feedback induces correlated firing in relay cells. This cortically induced correlation of relay cell activity produces coherent firing in those groups of relay cells with receptive field alignments appropriate to signalling the particular orientation of the moving contour to the cortex. Synchronization of relay cell firing means that they will elicit temporally overlapping excitatory postsynaptic potentials in their cortical target cells, thus increasing the chance that the cortical cells will fire. Effectively this increases the gain of the input for feature-linked events detected by the cortex. We propose that this feedback loop serves to lock or focus the appropriate circuitry onto the stimulus feature.

  11. The neurobiology of thalamic amnesia: Contributions of medial thalamus and prefrontal cortex to delayed conditional discrimination.

    PubMed

    Mair, Robert G; Miller, Rikki L A; Wormwood, Benjamin A; Francoeur, Miranda J; Onos, Kristen D; Gibson, Brett M

    2015-07-01

    Although medial thalamus is well established as a site of pathology associated with global amnesia, there is uncertainty about which structures are critical and how they affect memory function. Evidence from human and animal research suggests that damage to the mammillothalamic tract and the anterior, mediodorsal (MD), midline (M), and intralaminar (IL) nuclei contribute to different signs of thalamic amnesia. Here we focus on MD and the adjacent M and IL nuclei, structures identified in animal studies as critical nodes in prefrontal cortex (PFC)-related pathways that are necessary for delayed conditional discrimination. Recordings of PFC neurons in rats performing a dynamic delayed non-matching-to position (DNMTP) task revealed discrete populations encoding information related to planning, execution, and outcome of DNMTP-related actions and delay-related activity signaling previous reinforcement. Parallel studies recording the activity of MD and IL neurons and examining the effects of unilateral thalamic inactivation on the responses of PFC neurons demonstrated a close coupling of central thalamic and PFC neurons responding to diverse aspects of DNMTP and provide evidence that thalamus interacts with PFC neurons to give rise to complex goal-directed behavior exemplified by the DNMTP task.

  12. Increased thalamic resting-state connectivity as a core driver of LSD-induced hallucinations.

    PubMed

    Müller, F; Lenz, C; Dolder, P; Lang, U; Schmidt, A; Liechti, M; Borgwardt, S

    2017-09-21

    It has been proposed that the thalamocortical system is an important site of action of hallucinogenic drugs and an essential component of the neural correlates of consciousness. Hallucinogenic drugs such as LSD can be used to induce profoundly altered states of consciousness, and it is thus of interest to test the effects of these drugs on this system. 100 μg LSD was administrated orally to 20 healthy participants prior to fMRI assessment. Whole brain thalamic functional connectivity was measured using ROI-to-ROI and ROI-to-voxel approaches. Correlation analyses were used to explore relationships between thalamic connectivity to regions involved in auditory and visual hallucinations and subjective ratings on auditory and visual drug effects. LSD caused significant alterations in all dimensions of the 5D-ASC scale and significantly increased thalamic functional connectivity to various cortical regions. Furthermore, LSD-induced functional connectivity measures between the thalamus and the right fusiform gyrus and insula correlated significantly with subjective auditory and visual drug effects. Hallucinogenic drug effects might be provoked by facilitations of cortical excitability via thalamocortical interactions. Our findings have implications for the understanding of the mechanism of action of hallucinogenic drugs and provide further insight into the role of the 5-HT2A -receptor in altered states of consciousness. © 2017 The Authors Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Reduced mediodorsal thalamic volume and prefrontal cortical spindle activity in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Buchmann, Andreas; Dentico, Daniela; Peterson, Michael J; Riedner, Brady A; Sarasso, Simone; Massimini, Marcello; Tononi, Giulio; Ferrarelli, Fabio

    2014-11-15

    We recently found marked deficits in sleep spindles, non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep oscillations that are generated within the thalamus and then amplified and sustained in the cortex, in patients with schizophrenia compared to both healthy and psychiatric controls. Here, we investigated the thalamic and cortical contributions to these sleep spindle deficits. Anatomical volume of interest analysis (i.e., thalamic volumes) and electroencephalogram (EEG) source modeling (i.e., spindle-related cortical currents) were performed in patients with schizophrenia and healthy comparison subjects. Schizophrenia patients had reduced mediodorsal (MD) thalamic volumes, especially on the left side, compared to healthy controls, whereas whole thalami and lateral geniculate nuclei did not differ between groups. Furthermore, left MD volumes were strongly correlated with the number of scalp-recorded spindles in an anterior frontal region, and cortical currents underlying these anterior frontal spindles were localized in the prefrontal cortex, in Brodmann area (BA) 10. Finally, prefrontal currents at the peak of spindle activity were significantly reduced in schizophrenia patients and correlated with their performance in an abstraction/working memory task. Altogether, these findings point to deficits in a specific thalamo-cortical circuitry in schizophrenia, which is associated with some cognitive deficits commonly reported in those patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Reduced mediodorsal thalamic volume and prefrontal cortical spindle activity in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Buchmann, Andreas; Dentico, Daniela; Peterson, Michael J.; Riedner, Brady A.; Sarasso, Simone; Massimini, Marcello; Tononi, Giulio; Ferrarelli, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    Background We recently found marked deficits in sleep spindles, non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep oscillations that are generated within the thalamus and then amplified and sustained in the cortex, in patients with schizophrenia compared to both healthy and psychiatric controls. Here, we investigated the thalamic and cortical contributions to these sleep spindle deficits. Methods Anatomical Volume of Interest analysis (i.e., thalamic volumes) and electroencephalogram (EEG) source modeling (i.e., spindle-related cortical currents) were performed in patients with schizophrenia and healthy comparison subjects. Findings Schizophrenia patients had reduced mediodorsal (MD) thalamic volumes, especially on the left side, compared to healthy controls, whereas whole thalami and lateral geniculate nuclei did not differ between groups. Furthermore, left MD volumes were strongly correlated with the number of scalp-recorded spindles in an anterior frontal region, and cortical currents underlying these anterior frontal spindles were localized in the prefrontal cortex, in Brodmann Area (BA) 10. Finally, prefrontal currents at the peak of spindle activity were significantly reduced in schizophrenia patients and correlated with their performance in an abstraction/working memory task. Conclusion Altogether, these findings point to deficits in a specific thalamo-cortical circuitry in schizophrenia, which is associated with some cognitive deficits commonly reported in those patients. PMID:25139002

  15. Simulation of thalamic prosthetic vision: reading accuracy, speed, and acuity in sighted humans.

    PubMed

    Vurro, Milena; Crowell, Anne Marie; Pezaris, John S

    2014-01-01

    The psychophysics of reading with artificial sight has received increasing attention as visual prostheses are becoming a real possibility to restore useful function to the blind through the coarse, pseudo-pixelized vision they generate. Studies to date have focused on simulating retinal and cortical prostheses; here we extend that work to report on thalamic designs. This study examined the reading performance of normally sighted human subjects using a simulation of three thalamic visual prostheses that varied in phosphene count, to help understand the level of functional ability afforded by thalamic designs in a task of daily living. Reading accuracy, reading speed, and reading acuity of 20 subjects were measured as a function of letter size, using a task based on the MNREAD chart. Results showed that fluid reading was feasible with appropriate combinations of letter size and phosphene count, and performance degraded smoothly as font size was decreased, with an approximate doubling of phosphene count resulting in an increase of 0.2 logMAR in acuity. Results here were consistent with previous results from our laboratory. Results were also consistent with those from the literature, despite using naive subjects who were not trained on the simulator, in contrast to other reports.

  16. Multicentre European study of thalamic stimulation in parkinsonian and essential tremor

    PubMed Central

    Limousin, P; Speelman, J; Gielen, F; Janssens, M; study, c

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Thalamic stimulation has been proposed to treat disabling tremor. The aims of this multicentre study were to evaluate the efficacy and the morbidity of thalamic stimulation in a large number of patients with parkinsonian or essential tremor.
METHODS—One hundred and eleven patients were included in the study and 110 were implanted either unilaterally or bilaterally. Patients were evaluated with clinical scales, before and up to 12 months after surgery.
RESULTS—Upper and lower limb tremor scores were reduced in both groups. Eighty five per cent of the electrodes satisfied the arbitrary criteria of two point reduction in rest tremor reduction in the parkinsonian tremor group and 89% for postural tremor reduction in the essential tremor group. In the parkinsonian tremor group, limb akinesia and limb rigidity scores were moderately but significantly reduced. Axial scores were unchanged. In the essential tremor group, head tremor was significantly reduced only at 3 months and voice tremor was non-significantly reduced. Activities of daily living were improved in both groups. Changes in medication were moderate. Adverse effects related to the surgery were mild and reversible.
CONCLUSIONS—Thalamic stimulation was shown to be an effective and relatively safe treatment for disabling tremor. This procedure initially applied in a very limited number of centres has been successfully used in 13 participating centres.

 PMID:10084526

  17. Model-based iterative learning control of Parkinsonian state in thalamic relay neuron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chen; Wang, Jiang; Li, Huiyan; Xue, Zhiqin; Deng, Bin; Wei, Xile

    2014-09-01

    Although the beneficial effects of chronic deep brain stimulation on Parkinson's disease motor symptoms are now largely confirmed, the underlying mechanisms behind deep brain stimulation remain unclear and under debate. Hence, the selection of stimulation parameters is full of challenges. Additionally, due to the complexity of neural system, together with omnipresent noises, the accurate model of thalamic relay neuron is unknown. Thus, the iterative learning control of the thalamic relay neuron's Parkinsonian state based on various variables is presented. Combining the iterative learning control with typical proportional-integral control algorithm, a novel and efficient control strategy is proposed, which does not require any particular knowledge on the detailed physiological characteristics of cortico-basal ganglia-thalamocortical loop and can automatically adjust the stimulation parameters. Simulation results demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed control strategy to restore the fidelity of thalamic relay in the Parkinsonian condition. Furthermore, through changing the important parameter—the maximum ionic conductance densities of low-threshold calcium current, the dominant characteristic of the proposed method which is independent of the accurate model can be further verified.

  18. Effects of thalamic stimulation on tremor, balance, and step initiation: a single subject study.

    PubMed

    Burleigh, A L; Horak, F B; Burchiel, K J; Nutt, J G

    1993-10-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the clinically apparent balance improvements in a patient with Parkinson's disease who had stimulating electrodes surgically implanted to the VIM nucleus of the right thalamus for control of left-upper-extremity tremor. Experiments were conducted to determine if balance improved simply because the large-amplitude upper-extremity tremor was reduced or if the neural control of balance improved. Using EMGs and forceplate recordings, we quantified the effects of the thalamic stimulation on the contralateral upper-extremity tremor and on the lower-extremity postural muscle activations for quiet stance, step initiation, and equilibrium responses to surface displacements. The results demonstrated that, beside reducing the amplitude and destabilizing effects of the upper-extremity tremor, the thalamic stimulation was also effective in reducing tremor activity of the trunk and contralateral lower-extremity muscles. In addition, the contralateral lower-extremity muscle activation patterns, strengths, and durations for the balance tasks were enhanced during stimulation. These results suggest that thalamic stimulation improved this patient's balance by reducing tremor in the contralateral extremities and by increasing burst duration and magnitude of the tibialis anterior, which functions as the postural prime mover for the step initiation and balance tasks.

  19. NETL's JIC in a box

    ScienceCinema

    David Anna

    2016-07-12

    The National Energy Technology Laboratory developed the idea of a portable joint information center AKA JIC in-a-box. This video discribes some of the equipment in the portable JIC as well as some of the methodology that NETL developed as a result of this portable JIC concept.

  20. The Bird Box Survey Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    When high school students are asked what's the best part of science class, many will say it's the field trips. Students enjoy engaging in authentic, community-based science outside the classroom. To capitalize on this, Patrick Willis created the Bird Box Survey Project for his introductory field biology class. The project takes students…

  1. On the Dirichlet's Box Principle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poon, Kin-Keung; Shiu, Wai-Chee

    2008-01-01

    In this note, we will focus on several applications on the Dirichlet's box principle in Discrete Mathematics lesson and number theory lesson. In addition, the main result is an innovative game on a triangular board developed by the authors. The game has been used in teaching and learning mathematics in Discrete Mathematics and some high schools in…

  2. Expo-Box Contact Us

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA-Expo-Box is a toolbox for exposure assessors. Its purpose is to provide a compendium of exposure assessment and risk characterization tools that will present comprehensive step-by-step guidance and links to relevant exposure assessment data bases, mode

  3. Black Boxes in Workplace Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Julian; Wake, Geoff

    2007-01-01

    We ground Cultural-Historical Activity Theory (CHAT) in studies of workplace practices from a mathematical point of view. We draw on multiple case study visits by college students and teacher-researchers to workplaces. By asking questions that "open boxes", we "outsiders and boundary-crossers" sought to expose contradictions between College and…

  4. NETL's JIC in a box

    SciTech Connect

    David Anna

    2009-06-03

    The National Energy Technology Laboratory developed the idea of a portable joint information center AKA JIC in-a-box. This video discribes some of the equipment in the portable JIC as well as some of the methodology that NETL developed as a result of this portable JIC concept.

  5. Breaking Out of the Box.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spady, William G.

    2000-01-01

    Deplores inconsistencies between the realities of today's technologically driven, information-age world and the static, constraining boxes in which state-initiated, accountability- focused reforms hold American education. We must reconceptualize schooling, curriculum content, time, grade levels, and achievement to allow more informal,…

  6. The Bird Box Survey Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    When high school students are asked what's the best part of science class, many will say it's the field trips. Students enjoy engaging in authentic, community-based science outside the classroom. To capitalize on this, Patrick Willis created the Bird Box Survey Project for his introductory field biology class. The project takes students…

  7. Black Boxes in Workplace Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Julian; Wake, Geoff

    2007-01-01

    We ground Cultural-Historical Activity Theory (CHAT) in studies of workplace practices from a mathematical point of view. We draw on multiple case study visits by college students and teacher-researchers to workplaces. By asking questions that "open boxes", we "outsiders and boundary-crossers" sought to expose contradictions between College and…

  8. Looking into the Black Box

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shellman, Amy

    2011-01-01

    In these remarks, the author shares some comments that not only encapsulate the individual research presentations but also help provide some context with regard to the theme for the session titled "Into the Black Box: Linking Process and Outcomes in Experiential Education," and what these papers collectively contribute to experiential education…

  9. On the Dirichlet's Box Principle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poon, Kin-Keung; Shiu, Wai-Chee

    2008-01-01

    In this note, we will focus on several applications on the Dirichlet's box principle in Discrete Mathematics lesson and number theory lesson. In addition, the main result is an innovative game on a triangular board developed by the authors. The game has been used in teaching and learning mathematics in Discrete Mathematics and some high schools in…

  10. EPA-Expo-Box Terminology

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA-Expo-Box is a toolbox for exposure assessors. Its purpose is to provide a compendium of exposure assessment and risk characterization tools that will present comprehensive step-by-step guidance and links to relevant exposure assessment data bases,

  11. The Cereal Box Problem Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkins, Jesse L. M.

    1999-01-01

    Investigates the cereal box problem using both an experimental and theoretical framework, and Monte Carlo methods. Using empirical data, students can discover patterns and relationships that help them understand the origin of the theoretical solution to the problem. Contains 17 references. (Author/ASK)

  12. Evaluation of bike boxes at signalized intersections.

    PubMed

    Dill, Jennifer; Monsere, Christopher M; McNeil, Nathan

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a before-after study of bike boxes at 10 signalized intersections in Portland, Oregon. The bike boxes, also known as advanced stop lines or advanced stop boxes, were installed to increase visibility of cyclists and reduce conflicts between motor vehicles and cyclists, particularly in potential "right-hook" situations. Before and after video were analyzed for seven intersections with green bike boxes, three intersections with uncolored bike boxes, and two control intersections. User perceptions were measured through surveys of cyclists passing through five of the bike box intersections and of motorists working downtown, where the boxes were concentrated. Both the observations and survey of motorists found a high rate of compliance and understanding of the markings. Overall, 73% of the stopping motor vehicles did not encroach at all into the bike box. Both motor vehicle and bicycle encroachment in the pedestrian crosswalk fell significantly at the bike box locations compared to the control intersections. The bike boxes had mixed effects on the motorists' encroachment in the bicycle lane. The number of observed conflicts at the bike box locations decreased, while the total number of cyclists and motor vehicles turning right increased. Negative-binomial models based upon the data predict fewer conflicts with the boxes, particularly as right-turning motor vehicle volumes increase. Observations of yielding behavior at two bike box and one control intersection found an improvement in motorists yielding to cyclists at the bike box locations. Differences in the traffic volumes and location contexts make firm conclusions about the effects of green coloring of the boxes difficult. Higher shares of surveyed motorists felt that the bike boxes made driving safer rather than more dangerous, even when the sample was narrowed to respondents who were not also cyclists. Over three-quarters of the surveyed cyclists thought that the boxes made the intersection safer

  13. Thalamic cholinergic innervation and postural sensory integration function in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Müller, Martijn L T M; Albin, Roger L; Kotagal, Vikas; Koeppe, Robert A; Scott, Peter J H; Frey, Kirk A; Bohnen, Nicolaas I

    2013-11-01

    The pathophysiology of postural instability in Parkinson's disease remains poorly understood. Normal postural function depends in part on the ability of the postural control system to integrate visual, proprioceptive, and vestibular sensory information. Degeneration of cholinergic neurons in the brainstem pedunculopontine nucleus complex and their thalamic efferent terminals has been implicated in postural control deficits in Parkinson's disease. Our aim was to investigate the relationship of cholinergic terminal loss in thalamus and cortex, and nigrostriatal dopaminergic denervation, on postural sensory integration function in Parkinson's disease. We studied 124 subjects with Parkinson's disease (32 female/92 male; 65.5 ± 7.4 years old; 6.0 ± 4.2 years motor disease duration; modified Hoehn and Yahr mean stage 2.4 ± 0.5) and 25 control subjects (10 female/15 male, 66.8 ± 10.1 years old). All subjects underwent (11)C-dihydrotetrabenazine vesicular monoaminergic transporter type 2 and (11)C-methylpiperidin-4-yl propionate acetylcholinesterase positron emission tomography and the sensory organization test balance platform protocol. Measures of dopaminergic and cholinergic terminal integrity were obtained, i.e. striatal vesicular monoaminergic transporter type 2 binding (distribution volume ratio) and thalamic and cortical acetylcholinesterase hydrolysis rate per minute (k3), respectively. Total centre of pressure excursion (speed), a measure of total sway, and sway variability were determined for individual sensory organization test conditions. Based on normative data, principal component analysis was performed to reduce postural sensory organization functions to robust factors for regression analysis with the dopaminergic and cholinergic terminal data. Factor analysis demonstrated two factors with eigenvalues >2 that explained 52.2% of the variance, mainly reflecting postural sway during sensory organization test Conditions 1-3 and 5, respectively. Regression

  14. Increased brain dopamine and dopamine receptors in schizophrenia

    SciTech Connect

    Mackay, A.V.; Iversen, L.L.; Rossor, M.; Spokes, E.; Bird, E.; Arregui, A.; Creese, I.; Synder, S.H.

    1982-09-01

    In postmortem samples of caudate nucleus and nucleus accumbens from 48 schizophrenic patients, there were significant increases in both the maximum number of binding sites (Bmax) and the apparent dissociation constant (KD) for tritiated spiperone. The increase in apparent KD probably reflects the presence of residual neuroleptic drugs, but changes in Bmax for tritiated spiperone reflect genuine changes in receptor numbers. The increases in receptors were seen only in patients in whom neuroleptic medication had been maintained until the time of death, indicating that they may be entirely iatrogenic. Dopamine measurements for a larger series of schizophrenic and control cases (n greater than 60) show significantly increased concentrations in both the nucleus accumbens and caudate nucleus. The changes in dopamine were not obviously related to neuroleptic medication and, unlike the receptor changes, were most severe in younger patients.

  15. Antiferroptotic activity of non-oxidative dopamine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ding; Peng, Yingpeng; Xie, Yangchun; Zhou, Borong; Sun, Xiaofang; Kang, Rui; Tang, Daolin

    2016-11-25

    Dopamine is a neurotransmitter that has many functions in the nervous and immune systems. Ferroptosis is a non-apoptotic form of regulated cell death that is involved in cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. However, the role of dopamine in ferroptosis remains unidentified. Here, we show that the non-oxidative form of dopamine is a strong inhibitor of ferroptotic cell death. Dopamine dose-dependently blocked ferroptosis in cancer (PANC1 and HEY) and non-cancer (MEF and HEK293) cells following treatment with erastin, a small molecule ferroptosis inducer. Notably, dopamine reduced erastin-induced ferrous iron accumulation, glutathione depletion, and malondialdehyde production. Mechanically, dopamine increased the protein stability of glutathione peroxidase 4, a phospholipid hydroperoxidase that protects cells against membrane lipid peroxidation. Moreover, dopamine suppressed dopamine receptor D4 protein degradation and promoted dopamine receptor D5 gene expression. Thus, our findings uncover a novel function of dopamine in cell death and provide new insight into the regulation of iron metabolism and lipid peroxidation by neurotransmitters.

  16. Dopamine agonists for cocaine dependence.

    PubMed

    Soares, B G; Lima, M S; Reisser, A A; Farrell, M

    2001-01-01

    Cocaine is a major drug of abuse. Cocaine dependence is a common and serious condition, which has become nowadays a substantial public health problem. There is a wide and well documented range of consequences associated to chronic use of this drug, such as medical, psychological and social problems, including the spread of infectious diseases (e.g. AIDS, hepatitis and tuberculosis), crime, violence and neonatal drug exposure. Therapeutic management of the cocaine addicts includes an initial period of abstinence from the drug. During this phase the subjects may experience, besides the intense craving for cocaine, symptoms such as depression, fatigue, irritability, anorexia, and sleep disturbances. It was demonstrated that the acute use of cocaine may enhance dopamine transmission and chronically it decreases dopamine concentrations in the brain. Pharmacological treatment that affects dopamine could theoretically reduce these symptoms and contribute to a more successful therapeutic approach. To evaluate the efficacy and acceptability of dopamine agonists for treating cocaine dependence. We searched: The Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (Cochrane Library, issue 4, 2000), MEDLINE (from 1966 - 2000), EMBASE (from 1980 - 2000), LILACS (from 1982 - 2000), PsycLIT (from 1974 - 2000), Biological Abstracts (1982 to 2000). Reference searching; personal communication; conference abstracts; unpublished trials from pharmaceutical industry; book chapters on treatment of cocaine dependence. The inclusion criteria for all randomised controlled trials were that they should focus on the use of dopamine agonists on the treatment of cocaine dependence. Trials including patients with additional diagnosis such as opiate dependence were also eligible. The reviewers extracted the data independently and Relative Risks, weighted mean difference and number needed to treat were estimated. The reviewers assumed that people who died or dropped out had no improvement and tested the sensitivity

  17. Dopamine agonists for cocaine dependence.

    PubMed

    Soares, B G O; Lima, M S; Reisser, A A P; Farrell, M

    2003-01-01

    Cocaine dependence is a common and serious condition, which has become nowadays a substantial public health problem. There is a wide and well documented range of consequences associated to chronic use of this drug, such as medical, psychological and social problems, including the spread of infectious diseases (e.g. AIDS, hepatitis and tuberculosis), crime, violence and neonatal drug exposure. Therapeutic management of the cocaine addicts includes an initial period of abstinence from the drug. During this phase the subjects may experience, besides the intense craving for cocaine, symptoms such as depression, fatigue, irritability, anorexia, and sleep disturbances. It was demonstrated that the acute use of cocaine may enhance dopamine transmission and chronically it decreases dopamine concentrations in the brain. Pharmacological treatment that affects dopamine could theoretically reduce these symptoms and contribute to a more successful therapeutic approach. To evaluate the efficacy and acceptability of dopamine agonists for treating cocaine dependence. Electronic searches of Cochrane Library, EMBASE, MEDLINE, PsycLIT, Biological Abstracts and LILACS; reference searching; personal communication; conference abstracts; unpublished trials from pharmaceutical industry; book chapters on treatment of cocaine dependence, was performed for the primary version of this review in 2001. Another search of the electronic databases was done in December of 2002 for this update. The specialised register of trials of the Cochrane Group on Drugs and Alcohol was searched until February 2003. The inclusion criteria for all randomised controlled trials were that they should focus on the use of dopamine agonists on the treatment of cocaine dependence. The reviewers extracted the data independently and Relative Risks, weighted mean difference and number needed to treat were estimated. The reviewers assumed that people who died or dropped out had no improvement and tested the sensitivity of

  18. Thalamic haemorrhage vs internal capsule-basal ganglia haemorrhage: clinical profile and predictors of in-hospital mortality

    PubMed Central

    Arboix, Adrià; Rodríguez-Aguilar, Raquel; Oliveres, Montserrat; Comes, Emili; García-Eroles, Luis; Massons, Joan

    2007-01-01

    Background There is a paucity of clinical studies focused specifically on intracerebral haemorrhages of subcortical topography, a subject matter of interest to clinicians involved in stroke management. This single centre, retrospective study was conducted with the following objectives: a) to describe the aetiological, clinical and prognostic characteristics of patients with thalamic haemorrhage as compared with that of patients with internal capsule-basal ganglia haemorrhage, and b) to identify predictors of in-hospital mortality in patients with thalamic haemorrhage. Methods Forty-seven patients with thalamic haemorrhage were included in the "Sagrat Cor Hospital of Barcelona Stroke Registry" during a period of 17 years. Data from stroke patients are entered in the stroke registry following a standardized protocol with 161 items regarding demographics, risk factors, clinical features, laboratory and neuroimaging data, complications and outcome. The region of the intracranial haemorrhage was identified on computerized tomographic (CT) scans and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain. Results Thalamic haemorrhage accounted for 1.4% of all cases of stroke (n = 3420) and 13% of intracerebral haemorrhage (n = 364). Hypertension (53.2%), vascular malformations (6.4%), haematological conditions (4.3%) and anticoagulation (2.1%) were the main causes of thalamic haemorrhage. In-hospital mortality was 19% (n = 9). Sensory deficit, speech disturbances and lacunar syndrome were significantly associated with thalamic haemorrhage, whereas altered consciousness (odds ratio [OR] = 39.56), intraventricular involvement (OR = 24.74) and age (OR = 1.23), were independent predictors of in-hospital mortality. Conclusion One in 8 patients with acute intracerebral haemorrhage had a thalamic hematoma. Altered consciousness, intraventricular extension of the hematoma and advanced age were determinants of a poor early outcome. PMID:17919332

  19. Cortically-Controlled Population Stochastic Facilitation as a Plausible Substrate for Guiding Sensory Transfer across the Thalamic Gateway

    PubMed Central

    Béhuret, Sébastien; Deleuze, Charlotte; Gomez, Leonel; Frégnac, Yves; Bal, Thierry

    2013-01-01

    The thalamus is the primary gateway that relays sensory information to the cerebral cortex. While a single recipient cortical cell receives the convergence of many principal relay cells of the thalamus, each thalamic cell in turn integrates a dense and distributed synaptic feedback from the cortex. During sensory processing, the influence of this functional loop remains largely ignored. Using dynamic-clamp techniques in thalamic slices in vitro, we combined theoretical and experimental approaches to implement a realistic hybrid retino-thalamo-cortical pathway mixing biological cells and simulated circuits. The synaptic bombardment of cortical origin was mimicked through the injection of a stochastic mixture of excitatory and inhibitory conductances, resulting in a gradable correlation level of afferent activity shared by thalamic cells. The study of the impact of the simulated cortical input on the global retinocortical signal transfer efficiency revealed a novel control mechanism resulting from the collective resonance of all thalamic relay neurons. We show here that the transfer efficiency of sensory input transmission depends on three key features: i) the number of thalamocortical cells involved in the many-to-one convergence from thalamus to cortex, ii) the statistics of the corticothalamic synaptic bombardment and iii) the level of correlation imposed between converging thalamic relay cells. In particular, our results demonstrate counterintuitively that the retinocortical signal transfer efficiency increases when the level of correlation across thalamic cells decreases. This suggests that the transfer efficiency of relay cells could be selectively amplified when they become simultaneously desynchronized by the cortical feedback. When applied to the intact brain, this network regulation mechanism could direct an attentional focus to specific thalamic subassemblies and select the appropriate input lines to the cortex according to the descending influence of

  20. Glove box for water pit applications

    DOEpatents

    Mills, William C.; Rabe, Richard A.

    2005-01-18

    A glove box assembly that includes a glove box enclosure attached to a longitudinally extending hollow tube having an entranceway, wherein the portion of the tube is in a liquid environment. An elevator member is provided for raising an object that is introduced into the hollow tube from the liquid environment to a gas environment inside the glove box enclosure while maintaining total containment.

  1. The Guide to the Ecology Box.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ontario Inst. for Studies in Education, Toronto.

    Cooperating with the Canadian Commission for UNESCO, the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education has prepared boxes of experimental curriculum materials on the subject of ecology. This guide summarizes the design and contents of the boxes and provides instructions for those using the boxes--principals, teachers, parents, librarians, and…

  2. The Heuristic Interpretation of Box Plots

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lem, Stephanie; Onghena, Patrick; Verschaffel, Lieven; Van Dooren, Wim

    2013-01-01

    Box plots are frequently used, but are often misinterpreted by students. Especially the area of the box in box plots is often misinterpreted as representing number or proportion of observations, while it actually represents their density. In a first study, reaction time evidence was used to test whether heuristic reasoning underlies this…

  3. The Guide to the Ecology Box.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ontario Inst. for Studies in Education, Toronto.

    Cooperating with the Canadian Commission for UNESCO, the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education has prepared boxes of experimental curriculum materials on the subject of ecology. This guide summarizes the design and contents of the boxes and provides instructions for those using the boxes--principals, teachers, parents, librarians, and…

  4. The Heuristic Interpretation of Box Plots

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lem, Stephanie; Onghena, Patrick; Verschaffel, Lieven; Van Dooren, Wim

    2013-01-01

    Box plots are frequently used, but are often misinterpreted by students. Especially the area of the box in box plots is often misinterpreted as representing number or proportion of observations, while it actually represents their density. In a first study, reaction time evidence was used to test whether heuristic reasoning underlies this…

  5. PRESYNAPTIC DOPAMINE MODULATION BY STIMULANT SELF ADMINISTRATION

    PubMed Central

    España, Rodrigo A.; Jones, Sara R.

    2013-01-01

    The mesolimbic dopamine system is an essential participant in the initiation and modulation of various forms of goal-directed behavior, including drug reinforcement and addiction processes. Dopamine neurotransmission is increased by acute administration of all drugs of abuse, including the stimulants cocaine and amphetamine. Chronic exposure to these drugs via voluntary self-administration provides a model of stimulant abuse that is useful in evaluating potential behavioral and neurochemical adaptations that occur during addiction. This review describes commonly used methodologies to measure dopamine and baseline parameters of presynaptic dopamine regulation, including exocytotic release and reuptake through the dopamine transporter in the nucleus accumbens core, as well as dramatic adaptations in dopamine neurotransmission and drug sensitivity that occur with acute non-contingent and chronic, contingent self-administration of cocaine and amphetamine. PMID:23277050

  6. Illumination box and camera system

    DOEpatents

    Haas, Jeffrey S.; Kelly, Fredrick R.; Bushman, John F.; Wiefel, Michael H.; Jensen, Wayne A.; Klunder, Gregory L.

    2002-01-01

    A hand portable, field-deployable thin-layer chromatography (TLC) unit and a hand portable, battery-operated unit for development, illumination, and data acquisition of the TLC plates contain many miniaturized features that permit a large number of samples to be processed efficiently. The TLC unit includes a solvent tank, a holder for TLC plates, and a variety of tool chambers for storing TLC plates, solvent, and pipettes. After processing in the TLC unit, a TLC plate is positioned in a collapsible illumination box, where the box and a CCD camera are optically aligned for optimal pixel resolution of the CCD images of the TLC plate. The TLC system includes an improved development chamber for chemical development of TLC plates that prevents solvent overflow.

  7. MELFI-3 Cold Box inspection

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-03-13

    ISS043e000724 (03/13/2015) --- ESA (European Space Agency) astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti, Expedition 43 flight engineer works daily on science and maintenance duties on board the International Space Station. She is inspecting the Minus Eighty-degree Laboratory Freezer called by the shorter title "MELFI-3 Cold Box inspection". Astronauts are trained for long periods at the Johnson Space Center and in Russia before their missions in space begin so that they are fully trained for these complex duties.

  8. The H3.3 K27M mutation results in a poorer prognosis in brainstem gliomas than thalamic gliomas in adults.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jie; Hao, Shuyu; Pan, Changcun; Wang, Yu; Wu, Zhen; Zhang, Junting; Yan, Hai; Zhang, Liwei; Wan, Hong

    2015-11-01

    Brainstem and thalamic gliomas are rare, and they are poorly understood in adults. Genetic aberrations that occur in these tumors are still unknown. In this study, we investigated whether thalamic gliomas have different genetic aberrations and clinical outcomes compared with brainstem gliomas in adults. Forty-three glioma samples were selected, including 28 brainstem and 15 thalamic gliomas. The frequency of the K27M mutation in adult midline gliomas was 58.1%. High-grade gliomas in the thalamus were statistically significantly more numerous than brainstem gliomas. Patients with K27M mutant brainstem gliomas had a significantly shorter overall survival than patients with wild-type tumors (P = .020) by Cox regression after adjustment for other independent risk factors. However, there was no statistical tendency toward a poorer overall survival in thalamic gliomas containing the K27M mutation compared with wild-type tumors. The presence of the K27M mutation significantly corresponded with mutations in TP53 in thalamic gliomas. Interestingly, the K27M mutation was mutually exclusive with mutations in IDH1, which was detected only in brainstem gliomas. The microarray data identified 86 differentially expressed genes between brainstem and thalamic gliomas with the K27M mutation. The cyclin-dependent kinase 6 (CDK6) gene, which plays an important role in cancer pathways, was found to be differentially expressed between brainstem and thalamic gliomas with K27M mutations. Although the K27M mutation was frequently observed in adult brainstem and thalamic gliomas, this mutation tended to be associated with a poorer prognosis in brainstem gliomas but not in thalamic gliomas. Brainstem gliomas may present different genetic aberrations from thalamic gliomas. These differences may provide guidance for therapeutic decisions for the treatment of adult brainstem and thalamic gliomas, which may have different molecular targets.

  9. Methylphenidate elevates resting dopamine which lowers the impulse-triggered release of dopamine: a hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Seeman, Philip; Madras, Bertha

    2002-03-10

    How do 'stimulants' reduce hyperactivity in children and adults? How can drugs which raise extracellular dopamine result in psychomotor slowing of hyperactive children when dopamine is known to enhance motor activity, such as in Parkinson's disease? In summary, the hypothesis for the anti-hyperactivity effects of the stimulants is as follows: during normal nerve activity, extracellular dopamine levels transiently rise 60-fold. At low therapeutic doses (0.2-0.5 mg/kg) to treat attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, stimulant drugs such as methylphenidate and dextroamphetamine reduce locomotion in both humans and animals. The drugs raise resting extracellular levels of dopamine several-fold, but reduce the extent to which dopamine is released with nerve impulses, compared to the impulse-associated release in the absence of the drug. This relatively reduced amplitude of impulse-associated dopamine would result in less activation of post-synaptic dopamine receptors which drive psychomotor activity. At higher doses, stimulants produce generalized stimulation of the nervous system, as a result of the very high concentrations of extracellular dopamine at rest, and the markedly increased release of dopamine with nerve impulses. These high levels of resting and pulsatile dopamine cause widespread stimulation of post-synaptic dopamine receptors, overcoming any concomitant presynaptic inhibition of dopamine release.

  10. Automatic Measurement of Thalamic Diameter in 2-D Fetal Ultrasound Brain Images Using Shape Prior Constrained Regularized Level Sets.

    PubMed

    Sridar, Pradeeba; Kumar, Ashnil; Li, Changyang; Woo, Joyce; Quinton, Ann; Benzie, Ron; Peek, Michael J; Feng, Dagan; Kumar, R Krishna; Nanan, Ralph; Kim, Jinman

    2017-07-01

    We derived an automated algorithm for accurately measuring the thalamic diameter from 2-D fetal ultrasound (US) brain images. The algorithm overcomes the inherent limitations of the US image modality: nonuniform density; missing boundaries; and strong speckle noise. We introduced a "guitar" structure that represents the negative space surrounding the thalamic regions. The guitar acts as a landmark for deriving the widest points of the thalamus even when its boundaries are not identifiable. We augmented a generalized level-set framework with a shape prior and constraints derived from statistical shape models of the guitars; this framework was used to segment US images and measure the thalamic diameter. Our segmentation method achieved a higher mean Dice similarity coefficient, Hausdorff distance, specificity, and reduced contour leakage when compared to other well-established methods. The automatic thalamic diameter measurement had an interobserver variability of -0.56 ± 2.29 mm compared to manual measurement by an expert sonographer. Our method was capable of automatically estimating the thalamic diameter, with the measurement accuracy on par with clinical assessment. Our method can be used as part of computer-assisted screening tools that automatically measure the biometrics of the fetal thalamus; these biometrics are linked to neurodevelopmental outcomes.

  11. Dopamine receptors – IUPHAR Review 13

    PubMed Central

    Beaulieu, Jean-Martin; Espinoza, Stefano; Gainetdinov, Raul R

    2015-01-01

    The variety of physiological functions controlled by dopamine in the brain and periphery is mediated by the D1, D2, D3, D4 and D5 dopamine GPCRs. Drugs acting on dopamine receptors are significant tools for the management of several neuropsychiatric disorders including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression and Parkinson's disease. Recent investigations of dopamine receptor signalling have shown that dopamine receptors, apart from their canonical action on cAMP-mediated signalling, can regulate a myriad of cellular responses to fine-tune the expression of dopamine-associated behaviours and functions. Such signalling mechanisms may involve alternate G protein coupling or non-G protein mechanisms involving ion channels, receptor tyrosine kinases or proteins such as β-arrestins that are classically involved in GPCR desensitization. Another level of complexity is the growing appreciation of the physiological roles played by dopamine receptor heteromers. Applications of new in vivo techniques have significantly furthered the understanding of the physiological functions played by dopamine receptors. Here we provide an update of the current knowledge regarding the complex biology, signalling, physiology and pharmacology of dopamine receptors. PMID:25671228

  12. Grafted dopamine neurons: Morphology, neurochemistry, and electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Strömberg, Ingrid; Bickford, Paula; Gerhardt, Greg A

    2010-02-09

    Grafting of dopamine-rich tissue to counteract the symptoms in Parkinson's disease became a promising tool for future treatment. This article discusses how to improve the functional outcome with respect to graft outgrowth and functions of dopamine release and electrophysiological responses to graft implantation in the host brain striatal target. It has been documented that a subpopulation of the dopamine neurons innervates the host brain in a target-specific manner, while some of the grafted dopamine neurons never project to the host striatum. Neurochemical studies have demonstrated that the graft-induced outgrowth synthesize, store, metabolize and release dopamine and possibly other neurotransmitters such as 5-HT. Furthermore, the released dopamine affects the dopamine-depleted brain in areas that are larger than the graft-derived nerve fibers reach. While stem cells will most likely be the future source of cells to be used in grafting, it is important to find the guiding cues for how to reinnervate the dopamine-depleted striatum in a proper way with respect to the dopamine subpopulations of A9 and A10 to efficiently treat the motor abnormalities seen in Parkinson's disease.

  13. Mesolimbic Dopamine Signals the Value of Work

    PubMed Central

    Hamid, Arif A.; Pettibone, Jeffrey R.; Mabrouk, Omar S.; Hetrick, Vaughn L.; Schmidt, Robert; Vander Weele, Caitlin M.; Kennedy, Robert T.; Aragona, Brandon J.; Berke, Joshua D.

    2015-01-01

    Dopamine cell firing can encode errors in reward prediction, providing a learning signal to guide future behavior. Yet dopamine is also a key modulator of motivation, invigorating current behavior. Existing theories propose that fast (“phasic”) dopamine fluctuations support learning, while much slower (“tonic”) dopamine changes are involved in motivation. We examined dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens across multiple time scales, using complementary microdialysis and voltammetric methods during adaptive decision-making. We first show that minute-by-minute dopamine levels covary with reward rate and motivational vigor. We then show that second-by-second dopamine release encodes an estimate of temporally-discounted future reward (a value function). We demonstrate that changing dopamine immediately alters willingness to work, and reinforces preceding action choices by encoding temporal-difference reward prediction errors. Our results indicate that dopamine conveys a single, rapidly-evolving decision variable, the available reward for investment of effort, that is employed for both learning and motivational functions. PMID:26595651

  14. Gamma Knife surgery targeting the centromedian nucleus of the thalamus for the palliative management of thalamic pain: durable response in stroke-induced thalamic pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Keep, Marcus F; Mastrofrancesco, Lois; Craig, Arthur D; Ashby, Lynn S

    2006-12-01

    The authors report the neuroimaging features, treatment planning, and outcome in a case of radiosurgical thalamotomy targeting the centromedian nucleus (CMN) for stroke-induced thalamic pain. A 79-year-old man, with embolic occlusion of the left middle cerebral artery and large hemispheric infarction involving the thalamus, suffered a right hemiplegia and expressive aphasia. One year poststroke, severe right-sided facial, scalp, arm, and trunk pain developed and was exacerbated by any tactile contact. Medical treatment had failed. Medical illness, including mandatory anticoagulation therapy for atrial fibrillation, precluded surgical procedures. Minimally invasive radiosurgery was offered as an alternative. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography were used to localize the left CMN. A single shot of 140 Gy was delivered to the 100% isodose line by using the 4-mm collimator helmet. The patient was evaluated at regular intervals. By 12 weeks posttreatment, he had significant improvements in pain control and his ability to tolerate physical contact during activities of daily living. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated baseline encephalomalacia from his prior stroke, and signal changes in the left CMN consistent with gamma irradiation-based thalamotomy. Currently, nearly 7 years after radiosurgery, he continues to enjoy a marked reduction in pain without the need of analgesic medications. Thalamic pain syndrome is generally refractory to conventional treatment. Neurosurgical interventions provide modest benefit and carry associated risks of invasive surgery and anesthesia. The CMN is readily localized with neuroimaging and is an approximate target to reduce the suffering aspect of pain. In this case, radiosurgery was a safe and effective treatment, providing durable symptom control and improved quality of life.

  15. Invariant box-parameterization of neutrino oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Weiler, Thomas J.; Wagner, DJ

    1998-10-19

    The model-independent 'box' parameterization of neutrino oscillations is examined. The invariant boxes are the classical amplitudes of the individual oscillating terms. Being observables, the boxes are independent of the choice of parameterization of the mixing matrix. Emphasis is placed on the relations among the box parameters due to mixing-matrix unitarity, and on the reduction of the number of boxes to the minimum basis set. Using the box algebra, we show that CP-violation may be inferred from measurements of neutrino flavor mixing even when the oscillatory factors have averaged. General analyses of neutrino oscillations among n{>=}3 flavors can readily determine the boxes, which can then be manipulated to yield magnitudes of mixing matrix elements.

  16. A mathematical and biological plausible model of decision-execution regulation in "Go/No-Go" tasks: Focusing on the fronto-striatal-thalamic pathway.

    PubMed

    Baghdadi, Golnaz; Towhidkhah, Farzad; Rostami, Reza

    2017-07-01

    Discovering factors influencing the speed and accuracy of responses in tasks such as "Go/No-Go" is one of issues which have been raised in neurocognitive studies. Mathematical models are considered as tools to identify and to study decision making procedure from different aspects. In this paper, a mathematical model has been presented to show several factors can alter the output of decision making procedure before execution in a "Go/No-Go" task. The dynamic of this model has two stable fixed points, each of them corresponds to the "Press" and "Not-press" responses. This model that focuses on the fronto-striatal-thalamic direct and indirect pathways, receives planned decisions from frontal cortex and sends a regulated output to motor cortex for execution. The state-space analysis showed that several factors could affect the regulation procedure such as the input strength, noise value, initial condition, and the values of involved neurotransmitters. Some probable analytical reasons that may lead to changes in decision-execution regulation have been suggested as well. Bifurcation diagram analysis demonstrates that an optimal interaction between these factors can compensate the weaknesses of some others. It is predicted that abnormalities of response control in different brain disorders such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder may be resolved by providing treatment techniques that target the regulation of the interaction. The model also suggests a possible justification to show why so many studies insist on the important role of dopamine in some brain disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Thalamic Gap Junctions Control Local Neuronal Synchrony and Influence Macroscopic Oscillation Amplitude during EEG Alpha Rhythms

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Stuart W.; Lőrincz, Magor L.; Blethyn, Kate; Kékesi, Katalin A.; Juhász, Gábor; Turmaine, Mark; Parnavelas, John G.; Crunelli, Vincenzo

    2011-01-01

    Although EEG alpha (α; 8–13 Hz) rhythms are often considered to reflect an “idling” brain state, numerous studies indicate that they are also related to many aspects of perception. Recently, we outlined a potential cellular substrate by which such aspects of perception might be linked to basic α rhythm mechanisms. This scheme relies on a specialized subset of rhythmically bursting thalamocortical (TC) neurons (high-threshold bursting cells) in the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) which are interconnected by gap junctions (GJs). By engaging GABAergic interneurons, that in turn inhibit conventional relay-mode TC neurons, these cells can lead to an effective temporal framing of thalamic relay-mode output. Although the role of GJs is pivotal in this scheme, evidence for their involvement in thalamic α rhythms has thus far mainly derived from experiments in in vitro slice preparations. In addition, direct anatomical evidence of neuronal GJs in the LGN is currently lacking. To address the first of these issues we tested the effects of the GJ inhibitors, carbenoxolone (CBX), and 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid (18β-GA), given directly to the LGN via reverse microdialysis, on spontaneous LGN and EEG α rhythms in behaving cats. We also examined the effect of CBX on α rhythm-related LGN unit activity. Indicative of a role for thalamic GJs in these activities, 18β-GA and CBX reversibly suppressed both LGN and EEG α rhythms, with CBX also decreasing neuronal synchrony. To address the second point, we used electron microscopy to obtain definitive ultrastructural evidence for the presence of GJs between neurons in the cat LGN. As interneurons show no phenotypic evidence of GJ coupling (i.e., dye-coupling and spikelets) we conclude that these GJs must belong to TC neurons. The potential significance of these findings for relating macroscopic changes in α rhythms to basic cellular processes is discussed. PMID:22007176

  18. Seizure-related activity of intralaminar thalamic neurons in a genetic model of absence epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Gorji, Ali; Mittag, Christoph; Shahabi, Parviz; Seidenbecher, Thomas; Pape, Hans-Christian

    2011-07-01

    Absence seizures are characterized by bilateral spike-and-wave discharges (SWDs) in thalamo-cortical circuits. In view of clinical studies indicating a critical involvement of intralaminar thalamic nuclei, we thought it timely to characterize the specific role and activity patterns of the respective neurons. Electrocorticographic (ECoG), intracellular, and unit activity recordings were performed in vivo from intralaminar thalamic neurons of the centrolateral (CL) and the paracentral (PC) thalamic nucleus in an established genetic rat model of absence epilepsy (WAG/Rij). Neurons in PC are depolarized to produce tonic series of action potentials at seizure-free episodes, and are rhythmically silenced concomitant with SWDs in a spike-locked manner. Rebound from spike-locked inhibition is associated with a transient increase in action potential activity. Neurons in CL possess a relatively negative membrane potential with overall low electrogenic activity at seizure-free episodes and generate burst-like discharges during SWDs that are locked to the decaying phase of the spike component on the ECoG. The SWD-locked membrane responses reverse close to the presumed chloride equilibrium potential, indicating GABA(A) receptor-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs), with cell-type specific differences in polarity. In PC neurons, hyperpolarizing IPSPs result in spike-locked silencing of tonic firing and rebound burst discharges, while in CL neurons, IPSPs are depolarizing and trigger low-threshold burst firing likely mediated by a t-type Ca(2+) conductance. These data show a unique pattern of rhythmic SWD-locked IPSPs in PC and CL associated with paroxysms apt to impose a transient dysfunctional state to thalamo-striato-prefrontocortical networks during absence seizures. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Serotonergic fibers distribution in the midline and intralaminar thalamic nuclei in the rock cavy (Kerodon rupestris).

    PubMed

    Silva, Alane de Medeiros; de Santana, Melquisedec Abiaré Dantas; Morais, Paulo Leonardo Araújo de Góis; de Sousa, Twyla Barros; Engelberth, Rovena Clara Galvão Januário; Lucena, Eudes Euler de Souza; Campêlo, Clarissa Loureiro das Chagas; Cavalcante, Jeferson Sousa; Cavalcante, Judney Cley; Costa, Miriam Stela Maris de Oliveira; do Nascimento, Expedito Silva

    2014-10-24

    The thalamic midline/intralaminar complex is part of the higher-order thalamus, which receives little sensory input, and instead forms extensive cortico-thalamo-cortical pathways. The midline thalamic nuclei connect with the medial prefrontal cortex and the medial temporal lobe. On the other hand, the intralaminar nuclei connect with the fronto-parietal cortex. Taking into account this connectivity pattern, it is not surprising that the midline/intralaminar complex has been implicated in a broad variety of cognitive functions, including memory process, attention and orientation, and also reward-based behavior. Serotonin (5-HT) is a neurotransmitter that exerts different post-synaptic roles. Serotonergic neurons are almost entirely restricted to the raphe nuclei and the 5-HT fibers are distributed widely throughout the brain, including the midline/intralaminar complex. The present study comprises a detailed description of the morphologic features and semiquantitative analysis of 5-HT fibers distribution in the midline/intralaminar complex in the rock cavy, a typical rodent of the Northeast region of Brazil, which has been used by our group as an anatomical model to expand the comprehension about phylogeny on the nervous system. The 5-HT fibers in the midline/intralaminar nuclei of the rock cavy were classified into three distinct categories: (1) beaded fibers, which are relatively fine and endowed with large varicosities; (2) fine fibers, with thin axons and small varicosities uniformly distributed in whole axon; and (3) stem axons, showing thick non-varicose axons. Moreover, the density of 5-HT fibers is variable among the analyzed nuclei. On the basis of this diversity of the morphological fibers and the differential profile of optical density among the midline/intralaminar nuclei of the rock cavy, we conclude that the serotonergic system uses a diverse morphologic apparatus to exert a large functional repertory in the midline/intralaminar thalamic nuclei.

  20. Abnormal functional integration of thalamic low frequency oscillation in the BOLD signal after acute heroin treatment.

    PubMed

    Denier, Niklaus; Schmidt, André; Gerber, Hana; Vogel, Marc; Huber, Christian G; Lang, Undine E; Riecher-Rossler, Anita; Wiesbeck, Gerhard A; Radue, Ernst-Wilhelm; Walter, Marc; Borgwardt, Stefan

    2015-12-01

    Heroin addiction is a severe relapsing brain disorder associated with impaired cognitive control, including deficits in attention allocation. The thalamus has a high density of opiate receptors and is critically involved in orchestrating cortical activity during cognitive control. However, there have been no studies on how acute heroin treatment modulates thalamic activity. In a cross-over, double-blind, vehicle-controlled study, 29 heroin-maintained outpatients were studied after heroin and placebo administration, while 20 healthy controls were included for the placebo condition only. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to analyze functional integration of the thalamus by three different resting state analysis techniques. Thalamocortical functional connectivity (FC) was analyzed by seed-based correlation, while intrinsic thalamic oscillation was assessed by analysis of regional homogeneity (ReHo) and the fractional amplitude of low frequency fluctuations (fALFF). Relative to the placebo treatment and healthy controls, acute heroin administration reduced thalamocortical FC to cortical regions, including the frontal cortex, while the reductions in FC to the mediofrontal cortex, orbitofrontal cortex, and frontal pole were positively correlated with the plasma level of morphine, the main psychoactive metabolite of heroin. Furthermore, heroin treatment was associated with increased thalamic ReHo and fALFF values, whereas fALFF following heroin exposure correlated negatively with scores of attentional control. The heroin-associated increase in fALFF was mainly dominated by slow-4 (0.027-0.073 Hz) oscillations. Our findings show that there are acute effects of heroin within the thalamocortical system and may shed new light on the role of the thalamus in cognitive control in heroin addiction. Future research is needed to determine the underlying physiological mechanisms and their role in heroin addiction.

  1. Thalamic stimulation largely elicits orthodromic, rather than antidromic, cortical activation in an auditory thalamocortical slice.

    PubMed

    Rose, H J; Metherate, R

    2001-01-01

    Stimulation of the medial geniculate body in an auditory thalamocortical slice elicits a short-latency current sink in the middle cortical layers, as would be expected following activation of thalamocortical relay neurons. However, corticothalamic neurons can have axon collaterals that project to the middle layers, thus, a middle-layer current sink could also result from antidromic activation of corticothalamic neurons and their axon collaterals. The likelihood of thalamic stimulation activating corticothalamic neurons would be reduced substantially if the corticothalamic pathway was not well preserved in the slice, and/or if the threshold for antidromic activation was significantly higher than for orthodromic activation. To determine the prevalence and threshold of antidromic activation, we recorded intracellularly from day 14-17 mouse brain slices containing infragranular cortical neurons while stimulating the medial geniculate or thalamocortical pathway. Antidromic spikes were confirmed by spike collision and characterized according to spike latency "jitter" and the ability to follow a high-frequency (100 Hz) stimulus train. The ability to follow a 100-Hz tetanus was a reliable indicator of antidromic activation, but both antidromic and orthodromic spikes could have low jitter. Thalamic stimulation produced antidromic activation in two of 69 infragranular cortical neurons (<3%), indicating the presence of antidromic activity, but implying a limited corticothalamic connection in the slice. Antidromic spikes in 13 additional neurons were obtained by stimulating axons in the thalamocortical pathway. The antidromic threshold averaged 214+/-40.6 microA (range 6-475 microA), over seven times the orthodromic threshold for medial geniculate-evoked responses in layer IV extracellular (28+/-5.4 microA) or intracellular (27+/-5.6 microA) recordings. We conclude that medial geniculate stimulation activates relatively few corticothalamic neurons. Conversely, low

  2. Anatomical substrates for direct interactions between hippocampus, medial prefrontal cortex, and the thalamic nucleus reuniens

    PubMed Central

    Varela, C.; Kumar, S.; Yang, J. Y.; Wilson, M. A.

    2014-01-01

    The reuniens nucleus in the midline thalamus projects to the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and the hippocampus, and has been suggested to modulate interactions between these regions, such as spindle–ripple correlations during sleep and theta band coherence during exploratory behavior. Feedback from the hippocampus to the nucleus reuniens has received less attention but has the potential to influence thalamocortical networks as a function of hippocampal activation. We used the retrograde tracer cholera toxin B conjugated to two fluorophores to study thalamic projections to the dorsal and ventral hippocampus and to the prelimbic and infralimbic subregions of mPFC. We also examined the feedback connections from the hippocampus to reuniens. The goal was to evaluate the anatomical basis for direct coordination between reuniens, mPFC, and hippocampus by looking for double-labeled cells in reuniens and hippocampus. In confirmation of previous reports, the nucleus reuniens was the origin of most thalamic afferents to the dorsal hippocampus, whereas both reuniens and the lateral dorsal nucleus projected to ventral hippocampus. Feedback from hippocampus to reuniens originated primarily in the dorsal and ventral subiculum. Thalamic cells with collaterals to mPFC and hippocampus were found in reuniens, across its anteroposterior axis, and represented, on average, about 8 % of the labeled cells in reuniens. Hippocampal cells with collaterals to mPFC and reuniens were less common (~1 % of the labeled subicular cells), and located in the molecular layer of the subiculum. The results indicate that a subset of reuniens cells can directly coordinate activity in mPFC and hippocampus. Cells with collaterals in the hippocampus–reuniens–mPFC network may be important for the systems consolidation of memory traces and for theta synchronization during exploratory behavior. PMID:23571778

  3. Anatomical targeting of the optimal location for thalamic deep brain stimulation in patients with essential tremor.

    PubMed

    King, Nicolas K K; Krishna, Vibhor; Sammartino, Francesco; Bari, Ausaf; Reddy, Gaddum Duemani; Hodaie, Mojgan; Kalia, Suneil K; Fasano, Alfonso; Munhoz, Renato P; Lozano, Andres M; Hamani, Clement

    2017-07-31

    Thalamic deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an effective strategy for the treatment of essential tremor (ET). With limitations of imaging modalities, targeting largely relies on indirect methods. This study was designed to determine the optimal target for DBS in ET and construct a targeting method based on probabilistic maps. Patients with ET who had sustained tremor reduction at 1-year and optimal microelectrode recordings were selected. Stimulation volume was individually modeled in standard space and a final optimal region was derived for the whole population. A fornix (Fx) targeting method was developed to determine the location of the optimal stimulation site relative to the fornix and posterior commissure (PC) in the anteroposterior plane, the border between the thalamus and internal capsule in the mediolateral plane, and the anterior-posterior commissure (AC-PC) plane in the dorsalventral axis. Following comparative analyses with other standard indirect methods (25% of AC-PC, and PC+6mm), the Fx-method was studied in relation to diffusion tensor imaging. Using the Fx-method, we found that the optimal stimulation site was at the intersection of the 2/3 and 1/3 of the PC-Fx distance (mean of 28±1.5% AC-PC length), and 4mm medial to the lateral border of the thalamus. Compared to previously used methods, there was a significant reduction in variability of the optimal stimulation site with the Fx-method. The target defined using this strategy was found to be within the boundaries of the dentato-rubro-thalamic tract. The Fx-method may be an additional targeting strategy in patients undergoing thalamic surgery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Thalamic functional connectivity predicts seizure laterality in individual TLE patients: application of a biomarker development strategy.

    PubMed

    Barron, Daniel S; Fox, Peter T; Pardoe, Heath; Lancaster, Jack; Price, Larry R; Blackmon, Karen; Berry, Kristen; Cavazos, Jose E; Kuzniecky, Ruben; Devinsky, Orrin; Thesen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive markers of brain function could yield biomarkers in many neurological disorders. Disease models constrained by coordinate-based meta-analysis are likely to increase this yield. Here, we evaluate a thalamic model of temporal lobe epilepsy that we proposed in a coordinate-based meta-analysis and extended in a diffusion tractography study of an independent patient population. Specifically, we evaluated whether thalamic functional connectivity (resting-state fMRI-BOLD) with temporal lobe areas can predict seizure onset laterality, as established with intracranial EEG. Twenty-four lesional and non-lesional temporal lobe epilepsy patients were studied. No significant differences in functional connection strength in patient and control groups were observed with Mann-Whitney Tests (corrected for multiple comparisons). Notwithstanding the lack of group differences, individual patient difference scores (from control mean connection strength) successfully predicted seizure onset zone as shown in ROC curves: discriminant analysis (two-dimensional) predicted seizure onset zone with 85% sensitivity and 91% specificity; logistic regression (four-dimensional) achieved 86% sensitivity and 100% specificity. The strongest markers in both analyses were left thalamo-hippocampal and right thalamo-entorhinal cortex functional connection strength. Thus, this study shows that thalamic functional connections are sensitive and specific markers of seizure onset laterality in individual temporal lobe epilepsy patients. This study also advances an overall strategy for the programmatic development of neuroimaging biomarkers in clinical and genetic populations: a disease model informed by coordinate-based meta-analysis was used to anatomically constrain individual patient analyses.

  5. A computational relationship between thalamic sensory neural responses and contrast perception.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yaoguang; Purushothaman, Gopathy; Casagrande, Vivien A

    2015-01-01

    Uncovering the relationship between sensory neural responses and perceptual decisions remains a fundamental problem in neuroscience. Decades of experimental and modeling work in the sensory cortex have demonstrated that a perceptual decision pool is usually composed of tens to hundreds of neurons, the responses of which are significantly correlated not only with each other, but also with the behavioral choices of an animal. Few studies, however, have measured neural activity in the sensory thalamus of awake, behaving animals. Therefore, it remains unclear how many thalamic neurons are recruited and how the information from these neurons is pooled at subsequent cortical stages to form a perceptual decision. In a previous study we measured neural activity in the macaque lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) during a two alternative forced choice (2AFC) contrast detection task, and found that single LGN neurons were significantly correlated with the monkeys' behavioral choices, despite their relatively poor contrast sensitivity and a lack of overall interneuronal correlations. We have now computationally tested a number of specific hypotheses relating these measured LGN neural responses to the contrast detection behavior of the animals. We modeled the perceptual decisions with different numbers of neurons and using a variety of pooling/readout strategies, and found that the most successful model consisted of about 50-200 LGN neurons, with individual neurons weighted differentially according to their signal-to-noise ratios (quantified as d-primes). These results supported the hypothesis that in contrast detection the perceptual decision pool consists of multiple thalamic neurons, and that the response fluctuations in these neurons can influence contrast perception, with the more sensitive thalamic neurons likely to exert a greater influence.

  6. Evolution of mammalian sensorimotor cortex: thalamic projections to parietal cortical areas in Monodelphis domestica

    PubMed Central

    Dooley, James C.; Franca, João G.; Seelke, Adele M. H.; Cooke, Dylan F.; Krubitzer, Leah A.

    2015-01-01

    The current experiments build upon previous studies designed to reveal the network of parietal cortical areas present in the common mammalian ancestor. Understanding this ancestral network is essential for highlighting the basic somatosensory circuitry present in all mammals, and how this basic plan was modified to generate species specific behaviors. Our animal model, the short-tailed opossum (Monodelphis domestica), is a South American marsupial that has been proposed to have a similar ecological niche and morphology to the earliest common mammalian ancestor. In this investigation, we injected retrograde neuroanatomical tracers into the face and body representations of primary somatosensory cortex (S1), the rostral and caudal somatosensory fields (SR and SC), as well as a multimodal region (MM). Projections from different architectonically defined thalamic nuclei were then quantified. Our results provide further evidence to support the hypothesized basic mammalian plan of thalamic projections to S1, with the lateral and medial ventral posterior thalamic nuclei (VPl and VPm) projecting to S1 body and S1 face, respectively. Additional strong projections are from the medial division of posterior nucleus (Pom). SR receives projections from several midline nuclei, including the medial dorsal, ventral medial nucleus, and Pom. SC and MM show similar patterns of connectivity, with projections from the ventral anterior and ventral lateral nuclei, VPm and VPl, and the entire posterior nucleus (medial and lateral). Notably, MM is distinguished from SC by relatively dense projections from the dorsal division of the lateral geniculate nucleus and pulvinar. We discuss the finding that S1 of the short-tailed opossum has a similar pattern of projections as other marsupials and mammals, but also some distinct projections not present in other mammals. Further we provide additional support for a primitive posterior parietal cortex which receives input from multiple modalities. PMID

  7. Thalamic functional connectivity predicts seizure laterality in individual TLE patients: Application of a biomarker development strategy

    PubMed Central

    Barron, Daniel S.; Fox, Peter T.; Pardoe, Heath; Lancaster, Jack; Price, Larry R.; Blackmon, Karen; Berry, Kristen; Cavazos, Jose E.; Kuzniecky, Ruben; Devinsky, Orrin; Thesen, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Noninvasive markers of brain function could yield biomarkers in many neurological disorders. Disease models constrained by coordinate-based meta-analysis are likely to increase this yield. Here, we evaluate a thalamic model of temporal lobe epilepsy that we proposed in a coordinate-based meta-analysis and extended in a diffusion tractography study of an independent patient population. Specifically, we evaluated whether thalamic functional connectivity (resting-state fMRI-BOLD) with temporal lobe areas can predict seizure onset laterality, as established with intracranial EEG. Twenty-four lesional and non-lesional temporal lobe epilepsy patients were studied. No significant differences in functional connection strength in patient and control groups were observed with Mann-Whitney Tests (corrected for multiple comparisons). Notwithstanding the lack of group differences, individual patient difference scores (from control mean connection strength) successfully predicted seizure onset zone as shown in ROC curves: discriminant analysis (two-dimensional) predicted seizure onset zone with 85% sensitivity and 91% specificity; logistic regression (four-dimensional) achieved 86% sensitivity and 100% specificity. The strongest markers in both analyses were left thalamo-hippocampal and right thalamo-entorhinal cortex functional connection strength. Thus, this study shows that thalamic functional connections are sensitive and specific markers of seizure onset laterality in individual temporal lobe epilepsy patients. This study also advances an overall strategy for the programmatic development of neuroimaging biomarkers in clinical and genetic populations: a disease model informed by coordinate-based meta-analysis was used to anatomically constrain individual patient analyses. PMID:25610790

  8. Volatile anesthetic action in a computational model of the thalamic reticular nucleus.

    PubMed

    Gottschalk, Allan; Miotke, Sam A

    2009-05-01

    Although volatile anesthetics (VAs) modulate the activity of multiple ion channels, the process whereby one or more of these effects are integrated to produce components of the general anesthetic state remains enigmatic. Computer models offer the opportunity to examine systems level effects of VA action at one or more sites. Motivated by the role of the thalamus in consciousness and sensory processing, a computational model of the thalamic reticular nucleus was used to determine the collective impact on model behavior of VA action at multiple sites. A computational model of the thalamic reticular nucleus was modified to permit VA modulation of its ion channels. Isobolographic analysis was used to determine how multiple sites interact. VA modulation of either T-type Ca(2+) channels or gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptors led to increased network synchrony. VA modulation of both further increased network synchronization. VA-induced decrements in Ca(2+) current permitted greater impact of inhibitory currents on membrane potential, but at higher VA concentrations the decrease in Ca(2+) current led to a decreased number of spikes in the burst generating the inhibitory signal. MAC-awake (the minimum alveolar concentration at which 50% of subjects will recover consciousness) concentrations of both isoflurane and halothane led to similar levels of network synchrony in the model. Relatively modest VA effects at both T-type Ca(2+) channels and gamma-aminobutyric acid type A receptors can substantially alter network behavior in a computational model of a thalamic nucleus. The similarity of network behavior at MAC-awake concentrations of different VAs is consistent with a contribution of the thalamus to VA-induced unconsciousness through action at these channels.

  9. Comparison of numbers of interneurons in three thalamic nuclei of normal and epileptic rats.

    PubMed

    Cavdar, Safiye; Bay, Hüsniye Hacioğlu; Yildiz, Sercan D; Akakin, Dilek; Sirvanci, Serap; Onat, Filiz

    2014-06-01

    The inhibitory sources in the thalamic nuclei are local interneurons and neurons of the thalamic reticular nucleus. Studies of models of absence epilepsy have shown that the seizures are associated with an excess of inhibitory neurotransmission in the thalamus. In the present study, we used light-microscopic gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) immunocytochemistry to quantify the interneurons in the lateral geniculate (LGN), ventral posteromedial (VPM), and ventral posterolateral (VPL) thalamic nuclei, and compared the values from normal Wistar rats and genetic absence epilepsy rats from Strasbourg (GAERS). We found that in both Wistar rats and GAERS, the proportion of interneurons was significantly higher in the LGN than in the VPM and VPL. In the LGN of Wistar rats, 16.4% of the neurons were interneurons and in the GAERS, the value was 15.1%. In the VPM, the proportion of interneurons was 4.2% in Wistar and 14.9% in GAERS; in the VPL the values were 3.7% for Wistar and 11.1% for the GAERS. There was no significant difference between Wistar rats and the GAERS regarding the counts of interneurons in the LGN, whereas the VPM and VPL showed significantly higher counts in GAERS. Comparison of the mean areas of both relay cells and interneuronal profiles showed no significant differences between Wistar rats and GAERS. These findings show that in the VPL and the VPM there are relatively more GABAergic interneurons in GAERS than in Wistar rats. This may represent a compensatory response of the thalamocortical circuitry to the absence seizures or may be related to the production of absence seizures.

  10. Brainstem stimulation during sleep evokes abnormal rhythmic activity in thalamic neurons in feline penicillin epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Szymusiak, R; Shouse, M N; McGinty, D

    1996-03-25

    Some periods in the sleep-waking cycle are more seizure prone than others. In absence epilepsy, transition periods between nonrapid-eye-movement (nonREM) sleep and waking or REM sleep can be more seizure prone that stable states. One feature of transition periods that is hypothesized to promote seizure activity is the presence of coincident activity in ascending brainstem reticular formation (RF) arousal systems with synchronized thalamo-cortical activity. To evaluate this hypothesis we examined the state-dependent effects of low intensity RF stimulation on thalamic single unit activity in control conditions and following systemic penicillin-G administration to adult cats. In control conditions, RF stimulation during waking and REM sleep typically evoked a short-latency action potential in thalamic neurons. The same stimulation during nonREM sleep commonly evoked a high frequency burst of action potentials followed by a period of suppressed discharge. In 16/26 neurons, a second rebound burst of action potentials followed the period of discharge suppression. The average interval between the initial and rebound bursts was 75.1 +/- 6.0 ms, which was similar to the interburst interval recorded in these same cells during spontaneous EEG spindles. Following administration of penicillin-G, RF stimulation during nonREM sleep evoked high frequency burst firing, followed by 1-2 rebound bursts in 21/22 thalamic neurons. The average evoked interburst interval was 152.5 +/- 7.3 ms, a value comparable to the interburst interval displayed by these same cells during spontaneous spike-wave seizure activity (157.8 +/- 8.7 ms). RF-evoked rhythmic discharges were dependent upon the presence of thalamocortical synchronization, as responses evoked during waking and REM sleep in penicillin treated cats were similar to those observed in control conditions.

  11. Thalamic adenylyl cyclase 1 is required for barrel formation in the somatosensory cortex.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, A; Lee, L-J; Hayashi, Y; Muglia, L; Itohara, S; Erzurumlu, R S; Iwasato, T

    2015-04-02

    Cyclic AMP signaling is critical for activity-dependent refinement of neuronal circuits. Global disruption of adenylyl cyclase 1 (AC1), the major calcium/calmodulin-stimulated adenylyl cyclase in the brain, impairs formation of whisker-related discrete neural modules (the barrels) in cortical layer 4 in mice. Since AC1 is expressed both in the thalamus and the neocortex, the question of whether pre- or postsynaptic (or both) AC1 plays a role in barrel formation has emerged. Previously, we generated cortex-specific AC1 knockout (Cx-AC1KO) mice and found that these animals develop histologically normal barrels, suggesting a potentially more prominent role for thalamic AC1 in barrel formation. To determine this, we generated three new lines of mice: one in which AC1 is disrupted in nearly half of the thalamic ventrobasal nucleus cells in addition to the cortical excitatory neurons (Cx/pTh-AC1KO mouse), and another in which AC1 is disrupted in the thalamus but not in the cortex or brainstem nuclei of the somatosensory system (Th-AC1KO mouse). Cx/pTh-AC1KO mice show severe deficits in barrel formation. Th-AC1KO mice show even more severe disruption in barrel patterning. In these two lines, single thalamocortical (TC) axon labeling revealed a larger lateral extent of TC axons in layer 4 compared to controls. In the third line, all calcium-stimulated adenylyl cyclases (both AC1 and AC8) are deleted in cortical excitatory neurons. These mice have normal barrels. Taken together, these results indicate that thalamic AC1 plays a major role in patterning and refinement of the mouse TC circuitry.

  12. Visual Acuity of Simulated Thalamic Visual Prostheses in Normally Sighted Humans

    PubMed Central

    Jeffries, Ailsa; Pezaris, John S.

    2013-01-01

    Simulation in normally sighted individuals is a crucial tool to evaluate the performance of potential visual prosthesis designs prior to human implantation of a device. Here, we investigated the effects of electrode count on visual acuity, learning rate and response time in 16 normally sighted subjects using a simulated thalamic visual prosthesis, providing the first performance reports for thalamic designs. A new letter recognition paradigm using a multiple-optotype two-alternative forced choice task was adapted from the Snellen eye chart, and specifically devised to be readily communicated to both human and non-human primate subjects. Validation of the method against a standard Snellen acuity test in 21 human subjects showed no significant differences between the two tests. The novel task was then used to address three questions about simulations of the center-weighted phosphene patterns typical of thalamic designs: What are the expected Snellen acuities for devices with varying numbers of contacts, do subjects display rapid adaptation to the new visual modality, and can response time in the task provide clues to the mechanisms of perception in low-resolution artificial vision? Population performance (hit rate) was significantly above chance when viewing Snellen 20/200 optotypes (Log MAR 1.0) with 370 phosphenes in the central 10 degrees of vision, ranging to Snellen 20/800 (Log MAR 1.6) with 25 central phosphenes. Furthermore, subjects demonstrated learning within the 1–2 hours of task experience indicating the potential for an effective rehabilitation and possibly better visual performance after a longer period of training. Response time differences suggest that direct letter perception occurred when hit rate was above 75%, whereas a slower strategy like feature-based pattern matching was used in conditions of lower relative resolution. As pattern matching can substantially boost effective acuity, these results suggest post-implant therapy should specifically

  13. Multimodal 7T Imaging of Thalamic Nuclei for Preclinical Deep Brain Stimulation Applications

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, YiZi; Zitella, Laura M.; Duchin, Yuval; Teplitzky, Benjamin A.; Kastl, Daniel; Adriany, Gregor; Yacoub, Essa; Harel, Noam; Johnson, Matthew D.

    2016-01-01

    Precise neurosurgical targeting of electrode arrays within the brain is essential to the successful treatment of a range of brain disorders with deep brain stimulation (DBS) therapy. Here, we describe a set of computational tools to generate in vivo, subject-specific atlases of individual thalamic nuclei thus improving the ability to visualize thalamic targets for preclinical DBS applications on a subject-specific basis. A sequential nonlinear atlas warping technique and a Bayesian estimation technique for probabilistic crossing fiber tractography were applied to high field (7T) susceptibility-weighted and diffusion-weighted imaging, respectively, in seven rhesus macaques. Image contrast, including contrast within thalamus from the susceptibility-weighted images, informed the atlas warping process and guided the seed point placement for fiber tractography. The susceptibility-weighted imaging resulted in relative hyperintensity of the intralaminar nuclei and relative hypointensity in the medial dorsal nucleus, pulvinar, and the medial/ventral border of the ventral posterior nuclei, providing context to demarcate borders of the ventral nuclei of thalamus, which are often targeted for DBS applications. Additionally, ascending fiber tractography of the medial lemniscus, superior cerebellar peduncle, and pallidofugal pathways into thalamus provided structural demarcation of the ventral nuclei of thalamus. The thalamic substructure boundaries were validated through in vivo electrophysiological recordings and post-mortem blockface tissue sectioning. Together, these imaging tools for visualizing and segmenting thalamus have the potential to improve the neurosurgical targeting of DBS implants and enhance the selection of stimulation settings through more accurate computational models of DBS. PMID:27375422

  14. Thalamic GABA Predicts Fine Motor Performance in Manganese-Exposed Smelter Workers

    PubMed Central

    Long, Zaiyang; Li, Xiang-Rong; Xu, Jun; Edden, Richard A. E.; Qin, Wei-Ping; Long, Li-Ling; Murdoch, James B.; Zheng, Wei; Jiang, Yue-Ming; Dydak, Ulrike

    2014-01-01

    Overexposure to manganese (Mn) may lead to parkinsonian symptoms including motor deficits. The main inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is known to play a pivotal role in the regulation and performance of movement. Therefore this study was aimed at testing the hypothesis that an alteration of GABA following Mn exposure may be associated with fine motor performance in occupationally exposed workers and may underlie the mechanism of Mn-induced motor deficits. A cohort of nine Mn-exposed male smelter workers from an Mn-iron alloy factory and 23 gender- and age-matched controls were recruited and underwent neurological exams, magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) measurements, and Purdue pegboard motor testing. Short-echo-time MRS was used to measure N-Acetyl-aspartate (NAA) and myo-inositol (mI). GABA was detected with a MEGA-PRESS J-editing MRS sequence. The mean thalamic GABA level was significantly increased in smelter workers compared to controls (p = 0.009). Multiple linear regression analysis reveals (1) a significant association between the increase in GABA level and the duration of exposure (R2 = 0.660, p = 0.039), and (2) significant inverse associations between GABA levels and all Purdue pegboard test scores (for summation of all scores R2 = 0.902, p = 0.001) in the smelter workers. In addition, levels of mI were reduced significantly in the thalamus and PCC of smelter workers compared to controls (p = 0.030 and p = 0.009, respectively). In conclusion, our results show clear associations between thalamic GABA levels and fine motor performance. Thus in Mn-exposed subjects, increased thalamic GABA levels may serve as a biomarker for subtle deficits in motor control and may become valuable for early diagnosis of Mn poisoning. PMID:24505436

  15. Thalamic physiology of intentional essential tremor is more like cerebellar tremor than postural essential tremor.

    PubMed

    Zakaria, R; Lenz, F A; Hua, S; Avin, B H; Liu, C C; Mari, Z

    2013-09-05

    The neuronal physiological correlates of clinical heterogeneity in human essential tremor are unknown. We now test the hypothesis that thalamic neuronal and EMG activities during intention essential tremor are similar to those of the intention tremor which is characteristic of cerebellar lesions. Thalamic neuronal firing was studied in a cerebellar relay nucleus (ventral intermediate, Vim) and in a pallidal relay nucleus (ventral oral posterior, Vop) during stereotactic surgery for the treatment of tremor. Nine patients with essential tremor were divided clinically into two categories: one with a substantial component of tremor with intention (termed intention ET) and the other without (postural ET). These types of essential tremor were compared with patients having intention tremor plus other clinical signs of cerebellar disease (cerebellar tremor). Neurons in patients with either intention ET or cerebellar tremor had lower firing rates and lower spike×EMG coherence than those in patients with postural ET. Patients with intention ET had a lower spike×EMG phase lead than those with postural ET. Overall, thalamic activity measures of intention ET were different from postural ET but not apparently different from those of cerebellar tremor. One patient with the intention ET (number 4) had a good response to a left thalamotomy and then suffered a right cerebellar hemispheric infarct five years later. After the stroke the intention ET recurred, which is consistent with our hypothesis that intention ET is similar to that of the intention tremor which is characteristic of cerebellar lesions. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Evolution of mammalian sensorimotor cortex: thalamic projections to parietal cortical areas in Monodelphis domestica.

    PubMed

    Dooley, James C; Franca, João G; Seelke, Adele M H; Cooke, Dylan F; Krubitzer, Leah A

    2014-01-01

    The current experiments build upon previous studies designed to reveal the network of parietal cortical areas present in the common mammalian ancestor. Understanding this ancestral network is essential for highlighting the basic somatosensory circuitry present in all mammals, and how this basic plan was modified to generate species specific behaviors. Our animal model, the short-tailed opossum (Monodelphis domestica), is a South American marsupial that has been proposed to have a similar ecological niche and morphology to the earliest common mammalian ancestor. In this investigation, we injected retrograde neuroanatomical tracers into the face and body representations of primary somatosensory cortex (S1), the rostral and caudal somatosensory fields (SR and SC), as well as a multimodal region (MM). Projections from different architectonically defined thalamic nuclei were then quantified. Our results provide further evidence to support the hypothesized basic mammalian plan of thalamic projections to S1, with the lateral and medial ventral posterior thalamic nuclei (VPl and VPm) projecting to S1 body and S1 face, respectively. Additional strong projections are from the medial division of posterior nucleus (Pom). SR receives projections from several midline nuclei, including the medial dorsal, ventral medial nucleus, and Pom. SC and MM show similar patterns of connectivity, with projections from the ventral anterior and ventral lateral nuclei, VPm and VPl, and the entire posterior nucleus (medial and lateral). Notably, MM is distinguished from SC by relatively dense projections from the dorsal division of the lateral geniculate nucleus and pulvinar. We discuss the finding that S1 of the short-tailed opossum has a similar pattern of projections as other marsupials and mammals, but also some distinct projections not present in other mammals. Further we provide additional support for a primitive posterior parietal cortex which receives input from multiple modalities.

  17. Response of ventrobasal thalamic cells to hair displacement on the face of the waking monkey.

    PubMed Central

    Hayward, J N

    1975-01-01

    1. In the unanaesthetized, moving monkey, single cell firing patterns in the region of the ventrobasal complex (VB) of the thalamus that respond to facial hair displacement were the basis for a statistical analysis of the effects of tactile, thermal and behavioural stimuli. 2. There were facial hair responses throughout the dorsoventral extent of the ventralis posterior medialis (VPM) nucleus of the contralateral thalamus over a rostro-caudal distance of about 2 mm (Fr. 5.1 to Fr. 7.1). 3. The three different anatomical types of facial hairs that activated thalamic neurones were common facial hairs, circumoral vibrissae and facial whiskers. 4. Displacement of the intermediate length, soft, yellow-brown common facial hairs on the central and lateral face from fields of 1-9 cm2 produced a fast-adapting burst discharge in single thalamic cells in the upper half of the contralateral VPM. 5. Tactile stimuli applied to the short, stiff, white circumoral vibrissae in fields of 0-2-0-9 cm2 along the margins of the upper and lower lips resulted in fast-adapting phasic firing of units in the lower half of the contralateral VPM. Engagement or disengagement of the interlocking hairs of upper and lower lips resulted in increased or decreased, respectively, firing of these thalamic units. 6. Bending a single, long, stiff, black facial whisker extending out from the side of the face resulted in a sustained increased firing of contralateral VPM cells with directional sensitivity. 7. Cells in the ventrobasal thalamus relay mechanoreceptor input from three specialized hair types on the face of the monkey. These somatotopically organized hairy receptive fields are unique, registering response patterns from tactile, thermal and behavioural stimuli. Facial hairs must play an important part in primate feeding, drinking, and oral-exploration. Images Plate 1 PMID:809574

  18. Cingulate seizure-like activity reveals neuronal avalanche regulated by network excitability and thalamic inputs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cortical neurons display network-level dynamics with unique spatiotemporal patterns that construct the backbone of processing information signals and contribute to higher functions. Recent years have seen a wealth of research on the characteristics of neuronal networks that are sufficient conditions to activate or cease network functions. Local field potentials (LFPs) exhibit a scale-free and unique event size distribution (i.e., a neuronal avalanche) that has been proven in the cortex across species, including mice, rats, and humans, and may be used as an index of cortical excitability. In the present study, we induced seizure activity in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) with medial thalamic inputs and evaluated the impact of cortical excitability and thalamic inputs on network-level dynamics. We measured LFPs from multi-electrode recordings in mouse cortical slices and isoflurane-anesthetized rats. Results The ACC activity exhibited a neuronal avalanche with regard to avalanche size distribution, and the slope of the power-law distribution of the neuronal avalanche reflected network excitability in vitro and in vivo. We found that the slope of the neuronal avalanche in seizure-like activity significantly correlated with cortical excitability induced by γ-aminobutyric acid system manipulation. The thalamic inputs desynchronized cingulate seizures and affected the level of cortical excitability, the modulation of which could be determined by the slope of the avalanche size. Conclusions We propose that the neuronal avalanche may be a tool for analyzing cortical activity through LFPs to determine alterations in network dynamics. PMID:24387299

  19. Multimodal Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Thalamic Development and Aging across the Human Lifespan: Implications to Neurodegeneration in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Khader M.; Walimuni, Indika S.; Abid, Humaira; Frye, Richard E.; Ewing-Cobbs, Linda; Wolinsky, Jerry S.; Narayana, Ponnada A.

    2011-01-01

    The human brain thalami play essential roles in integrating cognitive, sensory and motor functions. In multiple sclerosis (MS), quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (qMRI) measurements of the thalami provide important biomarkers of disease progression, but late development and aging confound the interpretation of data collected from patients over a wide age range. Thalamic tissue volume loss due to natural aging and its interplay with lesion-driven pathology has not been investigated previously. In this work, we used standardized thalamic volumetry combined with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), T2 relaxometry and lesion mapping on large cohorts of controls (N = 255, age range = 6.2- 69.1 years) and MS patients (N=109, age range = 20.8–68.5 years) to demonstrate early age- and lesion-independent thalamic neurodegeneration. PMID:22090508

  20. Thalamic Massa Intermedia Duplication in a Dysmorphic 14 month-old Toddler

    PubMed Central

    Whitehead, Matthew T

    2015-01-01

    The massa intermedia is an inconstant parenchymal band connecting the medial thalami. It may be thickened in various disease processes such as Chiari II malformation or absent in other disease states. However, the massa intermedia may also be absent in up to 30% of normal human brains. To the best of my knowledge, detailed imaging findings of massa intermedia duplication have only been described in a single case report. An additional case of thalamic massa intermedia duplication discovered on a routine brain MR performed for dysmorphic facial features is reported herein. PMID:26622932

  1. Social cognitive and neurocognitive deficits in inpatients with unilateral thalamic lesions – pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Wilkos, Ewelina; Brown, Timothy JB; Slawinska, Ksenia; Kucharska, Katarzyna A

    2015-01-01

    Background The essential role of the thalamus in neurocognitive processes has been well documented. In contrast, relatively little is known about its involvement in social cognitive processes such as recognition of emotion, mentalizing, or empathy. The aim of the study This study was designed to compare the performance of eight patients (five males, three females, mean age ± SD: 63.7±7.9 years) at early stage of unilateral thalamic lesions and eleven healthy controls (six males, five females, 49.6±12.2 years) in neurocognitive tests (CogState Battery: Groton Maze Learning Test, GML; Groton Maze Learning Test-Delayed Recall, GML-DR; Detection Task, DT; Identification Task, IT; One Card Learning Task, OCLT; One Back Task, OBT; Two Back Task, TBT; Set-Shifting Task, S-ST) and other well-known tests (Benton Visual Retention Test, BVRT; California Verbal Learning Test, CVLT; The Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure Test, ROCF; Trail Making Test, TMT part A and B; Color – Word Stroop Task, CWST; Verbal Fluency Test, VFT), and social cognitive tasks (The Penn Emotion Recognition Test, ER40; Penn Emotion Discrimination Task, EmoDiff40; The Penn Emotional Acuity Test, PEAT40; Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test, revised version II; Toronto Alexithymia Scale, TAS-20). Methods Thalamic-damaged subjects were included if they experienced a single-episode ischemic stroke localized in right or left thalamus. The patients were examined at 3 weeks after the stroke onset. All were right handed. In addition, the following clinical scales were used: the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI II). An inclusion criteria was a minimum score of 23/30 in MMSE. Results Compared with the healthy controls, patients revealed significantly lower scores in CVLT, GML-DR, and VFT. Furthermore, compared to healthy controls, patients showed significantly delayed recognition of “happiness” in EmoDiff40 and significantly

  2. Visual input to the mouse lateral posterior and posterior thalamic nuclei: photoreceptive origins and retinotopic order

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Annette E.; Procyk, Christopher A.; Howarth, Michael; Walmsley, Lauren

    2016-01-01

    Key points The lateral posterior and posterior thalamic nuclei have been implicated in aspects of visually guided behaviour and reflex responses to light, including those dependent on melanopsin photoreception.Here we investigated the extent and basic properties of visually evoked activity across the mouse lateral posterior and posterior thalamus.We show that a subset of retinal projections to these regions derive from melanopsin‐expressing retinal ganglion cells and find many cells that exhibit melanopsin‐dependent changes in firing.We also show that subsets of cells across these regions integrate signals from both eyes in various ways and that, within the lateral posterior thalamus, visual responses are retinotopically ordered. Abstract In addition to the primary thalamocortical visual relay in the lateral geniculate nuclei, a number of other thalamic regions contribute to aspects of visual processing. Thus, the lateral posterior thalamic nuclei (LP/pulvinar) appear important for various functions including determining visual saliency, visually guided behaviours and, alongside dorsal portions of the posterior thalamic nuclei (Po), multisensory processing of information related to aversive stimuli. However, despite the growing importance of mice as a model for understanding visual system organisation, at present we know very little about the basic visual response properties of cells in the mouse LP or Po. Prompted by earlier suggestions that melanopsin photoreception might be important for certain functions of these nuclei, we first employ specific viral tracing to show that a subset of retinal projections to the LP derive from melanopsin‐expressing retinal ganglion cells. We next use multielectrode electrophysiology to demonstrate that LP and dorsal Po cells exhibit a variety of responses to simple visual stimuli including two distinct classes that express melanopsin‐dependent changes in firing (together comprising ∼25% of neurons we recorded). We also

  3. Thalamic GABA levels and occupational manganese neurotoxicity: Association with exposure levels and brain MRI.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ruoyun E; Ward, Eric J; Yeh, Chien-Lin; Snyder, Sandy; Long, Zaiyang; Gokalp Yavuz, Fulya; Zauber, S Elizabeth; Dydak, Ulrike

    2017-09-02

    Excessive occupational exposure to Manganese (Mn) has been associated with clinical symptoms resembling idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD), impairing cognitive and motor functions. Several studies point towards an involvement of the brain neurotransmitter system in Mn intoxication, which is hypothesized to be disturbed prior to onset of symptoms. Edited Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) offers the unique possibility to measure γ-amminobutyric acid (GABA) and other neurometabolites in vivo non-invasively in workers exposed to Mn. In addition, the property of Mn as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) contrast agent may be used to study Mn deposition in the human brain. In this study, using MRI, MRS, personal air sampling at the working place, work history questionnaires, and neurological assessment (UPDRS-III), the effects of chronic Mn exposure on the thalamic GABAergic system was studied in a group of welders (N=39) with exposure to Mn fumes in a typical occupational setting. Two subgroups of welders with different exposure levels (Low: N=26; mean air Mn=0.13±0.1mg/m(3); High: N=13; mean air Mn=0.23±0.18mg/m(3)), as well as unexposed control workers (N=22, mean air Mn=0.002±0.001mg/m(3)) were recruited. The group of welders with higher exposure showed a significant increase of thalamic GABA levels by 45% (p<0.01, F(1,33)=9.55), as well as significantly worse performance in general motor function (p<0.01, F(1,33)=11.35). However, welders with lower exposure did not differ from the controls in GABA levels or motor performance. Further, in welders the thalamic GABA levels were best predicted by past-12-months exposure levels and were influenced by the Mn deposition in the substantia nigra and globus pallidus. Importantly, both thalamic GABA levels and motor function displayed a non-linear pattern of response to Mn exposure, suggesting a threshold effect. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Visual input to the mouse lateral posterior and posterior thalamic nuclei: photoreceptive origins and retinotopic order.

    PubMed

    Allen, Annette E; Procyk, Christopher A; Howarth, Michael; Walmsley, Lauren; Brown, Timothy M

    2016-04-01

    The lateral posterior and posterior thalamic nuclei have been implicated in aspects of visually guided behaviour and reflex responses to light, including those dependent on melanopsin photoreception. Here we investigated the extent and basic properties of visually evoked activity across the mouse lateral posterior and posterior thalamus. We show that a subset of retinal projections to these regions derive from melanopsin-expressing retinal ganglion cells and find many cells that exhibit melanopsin-dependent changes in firing. We also show that subsets of cells across these regions integrate signals from both eyes in various ways and that, within the lateral posterior thalamus, visual responses are retinotopically ordered. In addition to the primary thalamocortical visual relay in the lateral geniculate nuclei, a number of other thalamic regions contribute to aspects of visual processing. Thus, the lateral posterior thalamic nuclei (LP/pulvinar) appear important for various functions including determining visual saliency, visually guided behaviours and, alongside dorsal portions of the posterior thalamic nuclei (Po), multisensory processing of information related to aversive stimuli. However, despite the growing importance of mice as a model for understanding visual system organisation, at present we know very little about the basic visual response properties of cells in the mouse LP or Po. Prompted by earlier suggestions that melanopsin photoreception might be important for certain functions of these nuclei, we first employ specific viral tracing to show that a subset of retinal projections to the LP derive from melanopsin-expressing retinal ganglion cells. We next use multielectrode electrophysiology to demonstrate that LP and dorsal Po cells exhibit a variety of responses to simple visual stimuli including two distinct classes that express melanopsin-dependent changes in firing (together comprising ∼25% of neurons we recorded). We also show that subgroups of LP

  5. Regional thalamic neuropathology in patients with hippocampal sclerosis and epilepsy: A postmortem study

    PubMed Central

    Sinjab, Barah; Martinian, Lillian; Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Thom, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Clinical, experimental, and neuroimaging data all indicate that the thalamus is involved in the network of changes associated with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), particularly in association with hippocampal sclerosis (HS), with potential roles in seizure initiation and propagation. Pathologic changes in the thalamus may be a result of an initial insult, ongoing seizures, or retrograde degeneration through reciprocal connections between thalamic and limbic regions. Our aim was to carry out a neuropathologic analysis of the thalamus in a postmortem (PM) epilepsy series, to assess the distribution, severity, and nature of pathologic changes and its association with HS. Methods Twenty-four epilepsy PM cases (age range 25–87 years) and eight controls (age range 38–85 years) were studied. HS was classified as unilateral (UHS, 11 cases), bilateral (BHS, 4 cases) or absent (No-HS, 9 cases). Samples from the left and right sides of the thalamus were stained with cresyl violet (CV), and for glial firbillary acidic protein (GFAP) and synaptophysin. Using image analysis, neuronal densities (NDs) or field fraction staining values (GFAP, synaptophysin) were measured in four thalamic nuclei: anteroventral nucleus (AV), lateral dorsal nucleus (LD), mediodorsal nucleus (MD), and ventrolateral nucleus (VL). The results were compared within and between cases. Key Findings The severity, nature, and distribution of thalamic pathology varied between cases. A pattern that emerged was a preferential involvement of the MD in UHS cases with a reduction in mean ND ipsilateral to the side of HS (p = 0.05). In UHS cases, greater field fraction values for GFAP and lower values for synaptophysin and ND were seen in the majority of cases in the MD ipsilateral to the side of sclerosis compared to other thalamic nuclei. In addition, differences in the mean ND between classical HS, atypical HS, and No-HS cases were noted in the ipsilateral MD (p < 0.05), with lower values observed in

  6. The irregular firing properties of thalamic head direction cells mediate turn-specific modulation of the directional tuning curve

    PubMed Central

    Tsanov, Marian; Chah, Ehsan; Noor, Muhammad S.; Egan, Catriona; Reilly, Richard B.; Aggleton, John P.; Erichsen, Jonathan T.; Vann, Seralynne D.

    2014-01-01

    Head direction cells encode an animal's heading in the horizontal plane. However, it is not clear why the directionality of a cell's mean firing rate differs for clockwise, compared with counterclockwise, head turns (this difference is known as the “separation angle”) in anterior thalamus. Here we investigated in freely behaving rats whether intrinsic neuronal firing properties are linked to this phenomenon. We found a positive correlation between the separation angle and the spiking variability of thalamic head direction cells. To test whether this link is driven by hyperpolarization-inducing currents, we investigated the effect of thalamic reticular inhibition during high-voltage spindles on directional spiking. While the selective directional firing of thalamic neurons was preserved, we found no evidence for entrainment of thalamic head direction cells by high-voltage spindle oscillations. We then examined the role of depolarization-inducing currents in the formation of separation angle. Using a single-compartment Hodgkin-Huxley model, we show that modeled neurons fire with higher frequencies during the ascending phase of sinusoidal current injection (mimicking the head direction tuning curve) when simulated with higher high-threshold calcium channel conductance. These findings demonstrate that the turn-specific encoding of directional signal strongly depends on the ability of thalamic neurons to fire irregularly in response to sinusoidal excitatory activation. Another crucial factor for inducing phase lead to sinusoidal current injection was the presence of spike-frequency adaptation current in the modeled neurons. Our data support a model in which intrinsic biophysical properties of thalamic neurons mediate the physiological encoding of directional information. PMID:25122712

  7. Selective behavioral responses to male song are affected by the dopamine agonist GBR-12909 in female European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Pawlisch, Benjamin A; Riters, Lauren V

    2010-09-24

    Female songbirds use attributes of male song to select mates. Different types of male song differ in incentive value (or the ability to attract females). Dopamine plays a role in incentive value and reward; however, little is known about its role in selective female behavioral responses to male courtship signals. We examined the effects of the indirect dopamine agonist (dopamine reuptake inhibitor) GBR-12909 on female songbird responses to male song stimuli. Female European starlings were played recordings of long starling song (presumed high incentive value), short starling song (presumed lower incentive value), or purple martin song (lowest incentive value). Vehicle-treated females investigated nest boxes playing starling song more than purple martin song. However, GBR-12909 disrupted preferential responses to the starling song stimuli. GBR-12909 also increased cFOS immunolabeling in the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (VMH) at the same dose that disrupted female selective responses to male starling song. The results suggest that dopamine receptors play an important role in female selective responses to biologically meaningful stimuli and that the VMH may be influenced by dopamine to alter female responses to male song. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Genome-wide characterisation of Foxa1 binding sites reveals several mechanisms for regulating neuronal differentiation in midbrain dopamine cells.

    PubMed

    Metzakopian, Emmanouil; Bouhali, Kamal; Alvarez-Saavedra, Matías; Whitsett, Jeffrey A; Picketts, David J; Ang, Siew-Lan

    2015-04-01

    Midbrain dopamine neuronal progenitors develop into heterogeneous subgroups of neurons, such as substantia nigra pars compacta, ventral tegmental area and retrorubal field, that regulate motor control, motivated and addictive behaviours. The development of midbrain dopamine neurons has been extensively studied, and these studies indicate that complex cross-regulatory interactions between extrinsic and intrinsic molecules regulate a precise temporal and spatial programme of neurogenesis in midbrain dopamine progenitors. To elucidate direct molecular interactions between multiple regulatory factors during neuronal differentiation in mice, we characterised genome-wide binding sites of the forkhead/winged helix transcription factor Foxa1, which functions redundantly with Foxa2 to regulate the differentiation of mDA neurons. Interestingly, our studies identified a rostral brain floor plate Neurog2 enhancer that requires direct input from Otx2, Foxa1, Foxa2 and an E-box transcription factor for its transcriptional activity. Furthermore, the chromatin remodelling factor Smarca1 was shown to function downstream of Foxa1 and Foxa2 to regulate differentiation from immature to mature midbrain dopaminergic neurons. Our genome-wide Foxa1-bound cis-regulatory sequences from ChIP-Seq and Foxa1/2 candidate target genes from RNA-Seq analyses of embryonic midbrain dopamine cells also provide an excellent resource for probing mechanistic insights into gene regulatory networks involved in the differentiation of midbrain dopamine neurons. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  9. New hot box solar cooker

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xiping; Hou Shuqin; Sha Yongling; Liu Zude

    1992-12-31

    At present, over 100,000 solar cookers are in service in China. Most of these are concentrating cookers, making use of reflectors to concentrate sunlight at the cooking area. These cookers offer higher efficiency, more power and shorter cooking times. Since 1975 the authors have researched solar energy applications and, specifically, solar cookers. The major work has been the development of design calculations, selection of structure and materials, and performance testing. This paper describes the testing of several collection surface structures and box structures.

  10. Voronoi Diagrams Without Bounding Boxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sang, E. T. K.

    2015-10-01

    We present a technique for presenting geographic data in Voronoi diagrams without having to specify a bounding box. The method restricts Voronoi cells to points within a user-defined distance of the data points. The mathematical foundation of the approach is presented as well. The cell clipping method is particularly useful for presenting geographic data that is spread in an irregular way over a map, as for example the Dutch dialect data displayed in Figure 2. The automatic generation of reasonable cell boundaries also makes redundant a frequently used solution to this problem that requires data owners to specify region boundaries, as in Goebl (2010) and Nerbonne et al (2011).

  11. Synapsins Differentially Control Dopamine and Serotonin Release

    PubMed Central

    Kile, Brian M.; Guillot, Thomas S.; Venton, B. Jill; Wetsel, William C.; Augustine, George J.; Wightman, R. Mark

    2010-01-01

    Synapsins are a family of synaptic vesicle proteins that are important for neurotransmitter release. Here we have used triple knockout (TKO) mice lacking all three synapsin genes to determine the roles of synapsins in the release of two monoamine neurotransmitters, dopamine and serotonin. Serotonin release evoked by electrical stimulation was identical in substantia nigra pars reticulata slices prepared from TKO and wild-type mice. In contrast, release of dopamine in response to electrical stimulation was approximately doubled in striatum of TKO mice, both in vivo and in striatal slices, in comparison to wild-type controls. This was due to loss of synapsin III, because deletion of synapsin III alone was sufficient to increase dopamine release. Deletion of synapsins also increased the sensitivity of dopamine release to extracellular calcium ions. Although cocaine did not affect the release of serotonin from nigral tissue, this drug did enhance dopamine release. Cocaine-induced facilitation of dopamine release was a function of external calcium, an effect that was reduced in TKO mice. We conclude that synapsins play different roles in the control of release of dopamine and serotonin, with release of dopamine being negatively regulated by synapsins, specifically synapsin III, while serotonin release appears to be relatively independent of synapsins. These results provide further support for the concept that synapsin function in presynaptic terminals varies according to the neurotransmitter being released. PMID:20660258

  12. Synapsins differentially control dopamine and serotonin release.

    PubMed

    Kile, Brian M; Guillot, Thomas S; Venton, B Jill; Wetsel, William C; Augustine, George J; Wightman, R Mark

    2010-07-21

    Synapsins are a family of synaptic vesicle proteins that are important for neurotransmitter release. Here we have used triple knock-out (TKO) mice lacking all three synapsin genes to determine the roles of synapsins in the release of two monoamine neurotransmitters, dopamine and serotonin. Serotonin release evoked by electrical stimulation was identical in substantia nigra pars reticulata slices prepared from TKO and wild-type mice. In contrast, release of dopamine in response to electrical stimulation was approximately doubled in striatum of TKO mice, both in vivo and in striatal slices, in comparison to wild-type controls. This was due to loss of synapsin III, because deletion of synapsin III alone was sufficient to increase dopamine release. Deletion of synapsins also increased the sensitivity of dopamine release to extracellular calcium ions. Although cocaine did not affect the release of serotonin from nigral tissue, this drug did enhance dopamine release. Cocaine-induced facilitation of dopamine release was a function of external calcium, an effect that was reduced in TKO mice. We conclude that synapsins play different roles in the control of release of dopamine and serotonin, with release of dopamine being negatively regulated by synapsins, specifically synapsin III, while serotonin release appears to be relatively independent of synapsins. These results provide further support for the concept that synapsin function in presynaptic terminals varies according to the neurotransmitter being released.

  13. Going for broke: dopamine influences risky choice.

    PubMed

    Moschak, Travis M; Carelli, Regina M

    2014-10-01

    Dopamine neurons track reward by increasing or decreasing their firing rate when a reward is present or absent. In this issue of Neuron, Stopper et al. (2014) demonstrate that artificially eliminating these dopamine bursts or dips can alter risky decision-making.

  14. Metabolism of dopamine by the nasal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Chemuturi, Nagendra V; Donovan, Maureen D

    2006-11-01

    The nasal route of administration offers several advantages over oral and intravenous administration, including the ability to avoid hepatic first pass metabolism. Dopamine deficiency has been associated with several neurological disorders; it has been shown to have good systemic bioavailability and significant uptake into the CNS following intranasal administration. The purpose of these studies was to investigate the limiting role of mucosal metabolism of dopamine during nasal absorption. In vitro transport and initial rate studies were carried out using nasal mucosal explants to study dopamine permeability and metabolism. Dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) was the only metabolite detected. Monoamine oxidase (MAO), the enzyme responsible for DOPAC formation, was localized to the submucosal region of the nasal explants. The amount of DOPAC formed during the transport studies was less than 0.5% of the initial amount of dopamine placed into the system. Iproniazid, an MAO inhibitor, blocked DOPAC formation but had no effect on dopamine transport. The limited extent of dopamine metabolism compared to its mucosal transport demonstrates that nasal dopamine transport is not significantly reduced by mucosal metabolism and suggests that the nasal route may be promising for the efficient delivery of dopamine to the CNS.

  15. Normative data of dopaminergic neurotransmission functions in substantia nigra measured with MRI and PET: Neuromelanin, dopamine synthesis, dopamine transporters, and dopamine D2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hiroshi; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Kodaka, Fumitoshi; Takuwa, Hiroyuki; Ikoma, Yoko; Shimada, Hitoshi; Kimura, Yasuyuki; Seki, Chie; Kubo, Hitoshi; Ishii, Shiro; Takano, Harumasa; Suhara, Tetsuya

    2017-09-01

    The central dopaminergic system is of major importance in the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia, and other neuropsychiatric disorders. In the present study, the normative data of dopaminergic neurotransmission functions in the midbrain, consisting of neuromelanin, dopamine synthesis, dopamine transporters and dopamine D2 receptors, were constructed using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and positron emission tomography (PET). PET studies with L-[β-(11)C]DOPA, [(18)F]FE-PE2I and [(11)C]FLB457 and MRI studies were performed on healthy young men. Neuromelanin accumulation measured by MRI was compared with dopaminergic functions, dopamine synthesis capacity, dopamine transporter binding and dopamine D2 receptor binding measured by PET in the substantia nigra. Although neuromelanin is synthesized from DOPA and dopamine in dopaminergic neurons, neuromelanin accumulation did not correlate with dopamine synthesis capacity in young healthy subjects. The role of dopamine transporters in the substantia nigra is considered to be the transport of dopamine into neurons, and therefore dopamine transporter binding might be related to neuromelanin accumulation; however, no significant correlation was observed between them. A positive correlation between dopamine D2 receptor binding and neuromelanin accumulation was observed, indicating a feedback mechanism by dopaminergic autoreceptors. Discrepancies in regional distribution between neuromelanin accumulation and dopamine synthesis capacity, dopamine transporter binding or dopamine D2 receptor binding were observed in the substantia nigra. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Dopamine transporter mutant animals: a translational perspective

    PubMed Central

    Efimova, Evgenia V.; Gainetdinov, Raul R.; Budygin, Evgeny A.; Sotnikova, Tatiana D.

    2016-01-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) plays an important homeostatic role in the control of both the extracellular and intraneuronal concentrations of dopamine, thereby providing effective control over activity of dopaminergic transmission. Since brain dopamine is known to be involved in numerous neuropsychiatric disorders, investigations using mice with genetically altered DAT function and thus intensity of dopamine-mediated signaling have provided numerous insights into the pathology of these disorders and highlight novel pathological mechanisms that could be targeted to provide new therapeutic approaches for these disorders. In this brief overview we discuss recent investigations involving animals with genetically altered DAT function, particularly focusing on translational studies providing new insights into pathology and pharmacology of dopamine-related disorders. Perspective applications of these and newly developed models of DAT dysfunction are also discussed. PMID:27276191

  17. THE MYSTERIOUS MOTIVATIONAL FUNCTIONS OF MESOLIMBIC DOPAMINE

    PubMed Central

    Salamone, John D.; Correa, Mercè

    2012-01-01

    Summary Nucleus accumbens dopamine is known to play a role in motivational processes, and dysfunctions of mesolimbic dopamine may contribute to motivational symptoms of depression and other disorders, as well as features of substance abuse. Although it has become traditional to label dopamine neurons as “reward” neurons, this is an over-generalization, and it is important to distinguish between aspects of motivation that are differentially affected by dopaminergic manipulations. For example, accumbens dopamine does not mediate primary food motivation or appetite, but is involved in appetitive and aversive motivational processes including behavioral activation, exertion of effort, approach behavior, sustained task engagement, Pavlovian processes and instrumental learning. In this review, we discuss the complex roles of dopamine in behavioral functions related to motivation. PMID:23141060

  18. Metabolic hormones, dopamine circuits, and feeding

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Nandakumar S.; Guarnieri, Douglas J.; DiLeone, Ralph J.

    2009-01-01

    Recent evidence has emerged demonstrating that metabolic hormones such as ghrelin and leptin can act on ventral tegmental area (VTA) midbrain dopamine neurons to influence feeding. The VTA is the origin of mesolimbic dopamine neurons that project to the nucleus accumbens (NAc) to influence behavior. While blockade of dopamine via systemic antagonists or targeted gene delete can impair food intake, local NAc dopamine manipulations have little effect on food intake. Notably, non-dopaminergic manipulations in the VTA and NAc produce more consistent effects on feeding and food choice. More recent genetic evidence supports a role for the substantia nigra-striatal dopamine pathways in food intake, while the VTA-NAc circuit is more likely involved in higher-order aspects of food acquisition, such as motivation and cue associations. This rich and complex literature should be considered in models of how peripheral hormones influence feeding behavior via action on the midbrain circuits. PMID:19836414

  19. The Lithium Vapor Box Divertor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldston, Robert; Hakim, Ammar; Hammett, Gregory; Jaworski, Michael; Myers, Rachel; Schwartz, Jacob

    2015-11-01

    Projections of scrape-off layer width to a demonstration power plant suggest an immense parallel heat flux, of order 12 GW/m2, which will necessitate nearly fully detached operation. Building on earlier work by Nagayama et al. and by Ono et al., we propose to use a series of differentially pumped boxes filled with lithium vapor to isolate the buffering vapor from the main plasma chamber, allowing stable detachment. This powerful differential pumping is only available for condensable vapors, not conventional gases. We demonstrate the properties of such a system through conservation laws for vapor mass and enthalpy, and then include plasma entrainment and ultimately an estimate of radiated power. We find that full detachment should be achievable with little leakage of lithium to the main plasma chamber. We also present progress towards solving the Navier-Stokes equation numerically for the chain of vapor boxes, including self-consistent wall boundary conditions and fully-developed shocks, as well as concepts for an initial experimental demonstration-of-concept. This work supported by DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  20. Deformity in the "Boxing Boys".

    PubMed

    Ferrence, Susan; Bendersky, Gordon

    2005-01-01

    The late Bronze Age wall painting the Boxing Boys (c. 17th-16th century BCE) was excavated in the ancient town of Akrotiri on the Greek island of Thera. This article considers a medical interpretation for the spinal-pelvic anomaly in the anatomy of one of the boys. The artist has depicted a combination of structural anatomical adjustments diagnostic of spondylolisthesis, a forward slippage of one of the lumbar vertebrae. The accurate portrayal of the surface appearance of this condition suggests that the artist painted directly from a live subject. Thus, the Boxing Boys mural may be the earliest visual record of a sports-induced injury. Although the meaning of the wall paintings is unclear, the wild goats (agrimia) on the adjoining walls simulate swayback as a reflection of the boy's torso deformity and share other features with the boxers, adding to the unifying characteristics of the room. The abnormal morphology appears to be the earliest achievement of transforming disease into aesthetic charm on a monumental scale.

  1. Language disturbances after non-thalamic subcortical stroke: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Bouvier, Liziane; Groulx, Bertrand; Martel-Sauvageau, Vincent; Monetta, Laura

    2017-06-01

    Language disorders following subcortical non-thalamic stroke show great variability across literature and a well-defined profile in these aphasic disturbances is yet to be established. The lack of recent and consistent literature on the subject complicates the management of subcortical aphasia. The aim of this study is to review the literature describing oral language disturbances following subcortical non-thalamic stoke affecting the basal ganglia and the surrounding white matter. A review of the literature of three databases (PubMed, PsycNet and LLBA), identifying research articles from 1997 to 2015, was completed. The quality of the selected studies was assessed using the Checklist for the assessment of methodological quality. Twenty-two articles met criteria for review and oral language assessment data were extracted for 114 subjects. The results suggest a predominance of deficits in more complex and demanding language levels (ex. discourse, syntax) and in language production (vs comprehension). Rapid recovery is expected, especially for lexical-semantic and receptive deficits. These findings show the importance of a complete oral language evaluation after subcortical stoke and provide recent data relative to expected deficits and recovery to guide clinicians in the management of these patients. They also suggest that a descriptive approach of the deficits may be more efficient and accurate than the use of a traditional classification of aphasia.

  2. Thalamic mechanisms underlying alpha-delta sleep with implications for fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Klerman, Elizabeth B.; Adler, Gail K.; Kopell, Nancy J.

    2015-01-01

    Alpha-delta sleep is the abnormal intrusion of alpha activity (8- to 13-Hz oscillations) into the delta activity (1- to 4-Hz oscillations) that defines slow-wave sleep. Alpha-delta sleep is especially prevalent in fibromyalgia patients, and there is evidence suggesting that the irregularities in the sleep of these patients may cause the muscle and tissue pain that characterizes the disorder. We constructed a biophysically realistic mathematical model of alpha-delta sleep. Imaging studies in fibromyalgia patients suggesting altered levels of activity in the thalamus motivated a thalamic model as the source of alpha activity. Since sodium oxybate helps to alleviate the symptoms of fibromyalgia and reduces the amount of alpha-delta sleep in fibromyalgia patients, we examined how changes in the molecular targets of sodium oxybate affected alpha-delta activity in our circuit. Our model shows how alterations in GABAB currents and two thalamic currents, Ih (a hyperpolarization-activated current) and a potassium leak current, transform a circuit that normally produces delta oscillations into one that produces alpha-delta activity. Our findings suggest that drugs that reduce Ih conductances and/or increase potassium conductances, without necessarily increasing GABAB conductances, might be sufficient to restore delta sleep. Furthermore, they suggest that delta sleep might be restored by drugs that preferentially target these currents in the thalamus; such drugs might have fewer side effects than drugs that act systemically. PMID:26245315

  3. The functional connectivity of intralaminar thalamic nuclei in the human basal ganglia.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Sabate, Clara; Llanos, Catalina; Morales, Ingrid; Garcia-Alvarez, Roberto; Sabate, Magdalena; Rodriguez, Manuel

    2015-04-01

    Projections of the centromedian-parafasicularis neurons of the intralaminar thalamus are major inputs of the striatum. Their functional role in the activity of human basal ganglia (BG) is not well known. The aim of this work was to study the functional connectivity of intralaminar thalamic nuclei with other BG by using the correlations of the BOLD signal recorded during "resting" and a motor task. Intralaminar nuclei showed a marked functional connectivity with all the tested BG, which was observed during "resting" and did not change with the motor task. As regards the intralaminar nuclei, BG connectivity was much lower for the medial dorsal nucleus (a thalamic nucleus bordering the intralaminar nuclei) and for the default mode network (although intralaminar nuclei showed a negative correlation with the default mode network). After the "regression" of intralaminar nuclei activity (partial correlation), the functional connectivity of the caudate and putamen nuclei with other BG decreased (but not with the primary sensorimotor cortex). Present data provide evidence that intralaminar nuclei are not only critical for striatal activity but also for the global performance of human BG, an action involving subcortical BG loops more than cortico-subcortical loops. The high correlation found between BG suggest that, similarly to that reported in other brain centers, the very-slow frequency fluctuations are relevant for the functional activity of these centers.

  4. Thalamic synaptic transmission of sensory information modulated by synergistic interaction of adenosine and serotonin.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ya-Chin; Hu, Chun-Chang; Huang, Chen-Syuan; Chou, Pei-Yu

    2014-03-01

    The thalamic synapses relay peripheral sensory information to the cortex, and constitute an important part of the thalamocortical network that generates oscillatory activities responsible for different vigilance (sleep and wakefulness) states. However, the modulation of thalamic synaptic transmission by potential sleep regulators, especially by combination of regulators in physiological scenarios, is not fully characterized. We found that somnogen adenosine itself acts similar to wake-promoting serotonin, both decreasing synaptic strength as well as short-term depression, at the retinothalamic synapse. We then combined the two modulators considering the coexistence of them in the hypnagogic (sleep-onset) state. Adenosine plus serotonin results in robust synergistic inhibition of synaptic strength and dramatic transformation of short-term synaptic depression to facilitation. These synaptic effects are not achievable with a single modulator, and are consistent with a high signal-to-noise ratio but a low level of signal transmission through the thalamus appropriate for slow-wave sleep. This study for the first time demonstrates that the sleep-regulatory modulators may work differently when present in combination than present singly in terms of shaping information flow in the thalamocortical network. The major synaptic characters such as the strength and short-term plasticity can be profoundly altered by combination of modulators based on physiological considerations.

  5. Thalamic Atrophy Contributes to Low Slow Wave Sleep in Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Su, Lei; Han, Yujuan; Xue, Rong; Wood, Kristofer; Shi, Fu-Dong; Liu, Yaou; Fu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Slow wave sleep abnormality has been reported in neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD), but mechanism for such abnormality is unknown. To determine the structural defects in the brain that account for the decrease of slow wave sleep in NMOSD patients. Thirty-three NMOSD patients and 18 matched healthy controls (HC) were enrolled. Polysomnography was used to monitor slow wave sleep and three-dimensional T1-weighted MRIs were obtained to assess the alterations of grey matter volume. The percentage of deep slow wave sleep decreased in 93% NMOSD patients. Compared to HC, a reduction of grey matter volume was found in the bilateral thalamus of patients with a lower percentage of slow wave sleep (FWE corrected at cluster-level, p < 0.05, cluster size > 400 voxels). Furthermore, the right thalamic fraction was positively correlated with the decrease in the percentage of slow wave sleep in NMOSD patients (p < 0.05, FDR corrected, cluster size > 200 voxels). Our study identified that thalamic atrophy is associated with the decrease of slow wave sleep in NMOSD patients. Further studies should evaluate whether neurotransmitters or hormones which stem from thalamus are involved in the decrease of slow wave sleep. PMID:28053819

  6. [Role of the human thalamic parafascicular (CM-Pf) complex in neuronal mechanisms of selective attention].

    PubMed

    Raeva, S N

    2005-03-01

    Responses of 93 single units of the human thalamic CM-Pf complex to relevant and irrelevant verbal (or sensory) stimuli were studied using microelectrode technique in alert diskinetic patients suffering from the tonic forms of spasmodic torticollis during 11 stereotaxic operations. The response patterns of two types units with irregular unitary (A-type) and low-threshold bursting Ca(2+)-dependent (B-type) spike activity were studied. Three main conclusions emerge from the studies: 1) high reactivity of both A- and B-units to presentation of relevant verbal stimuli with differences of their response patterns as determined by the type of constituent elements; 2) close functional connectivity of these neuronal changes with the level of selective attention; 3) at the moment of attention activation, the appearance of transient interneuronal interactions between adjacent A and B cells characterized by the local synchronization and stabilization of rhythmic oscillations. These data point to considerable contribution of the thalamic CM-Pf complex and its neuronal mechanisms into organization of the human selective attention and triggering verbal-related processing during performance of purposive speech-provoked voluntary acts.

  7. Persistence of disturbed thalamic glucose metabolism in a case of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fellgiebel, Andreas; Scheurich, Armin; Siessmeier, Thomas; Schmidt, Lutz G; Bartenstein, Peter

    2003-10-30

    We report the case of a 40-year-old alcoholic male patient, hospitalized with an acute ataxia of stance and gait, ocular muscle weakness with nystagmus and a global apathetic-confusional state. After admission, an amnestic syndrome with confabulation was also observed and diagnosis of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome was made. Under treatment with intravenous thiamine, the patient recovered completely from gaze weakness and ataxia, whereas a severe amnestic syndrome persisted. Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) showed bilateral thalamic and severe bilateral temporal-parietal hypometabolism resembling a pattern typical for Alzheimer's disease. Longitudinal assessment of the alcohol-abstinent and thiamine-substituted patient revealed improvements of clinical state and neuropsychological performance that were paralleled by recovered cerebral glucose metabolism. In contrast to metabolic rates that increased between 7.1% (anterior cingulate, left) and 23.5% (parietal, left) in cortical areas during a 9-month remission period, thalamic glucose metabolism remained severely disturbed over time (change: left +0.2%, right +0.3%).

  8. Retinal projections to the thalamic paraventricular nucleus in the rock cavy (Kerodon rupestris).

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Expedito S; Duarte, Renata B; Silva, Sebastião F; Engelberth, Rovena C G J; Toledo, Cláudio A B; Cavalcante, Jeferson S; Costa, Miriam S M O

    2008-11-19

    The thalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVT) receives afferents from numerous brain areas, including the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), considered to be the major circadian pacemaker. The PVT also sends projections to the SCN, limbic system centers and some nuclei involved in the control of the Sleep-Wake cycle. In this study, we report the identification of a hitherto not reported direct retinal projection to the PVT of the rock cavy, a typical rodent species of the northeast region of Brazil. After unilateral intravitreal injections of cholera toxin subunit B (CTb), anterogradely transported CTb-immunoreactive fibers and presumptive terminals were seen in the PVT. Some possible functional correlates of the present data are briefly discussed, including the role of the PVT in the modulation of the circadian rhythms by considering the reciprocal connections between the PVT and the SCN. The present work is the first to show a direct retinal projection to the PVT of a rodent and may contribute to elucidate the anatomical substrate of the functionally demonstrated involvement of this midline thalamic nucleus in the modulation of the circadian timing system.

  9. Striatum and globus pallidus control the electrical activity of reticular thalamic nuclei.

    PubMed

    Villalobos, Nelson; Oviedo-Chávez, Aldo; Alatorre, Alberto; Ríos, Alain; Barrientos, Rafael; Delgado, Alfonso; Querejeta, Enrique

    2016-08-01

    Through GABAergic fibers, globus pallidus (GP) coordinates basal ganglia global function. Electrical activity of GP neurons depends on their membrane properties and afferent fibers, including GABAergic fibers from striatum. In pathological conditions, abnormal electrical activity of GP neurons is associated with motor deficits. There is a GABAergic pathway from the GP to the reticular thalamic nucleus (RTn) whose contribution to RTn neurons electrical activity has received little attention. This fact called our attention because the RTn controls the overall information flow of thalamic nuclei to cerebral cortex. Here, we study the spontaneous electrical activity of RTn neurons recorded in vivo in anesthetized rats and under pharmacological activation or inhibition of the GP. We found that activation of GP predominantly diminishes the spontaneous RTn neurons firing rate and its inhibition increases their firing rate; however, both activation and inhibition of GP did not modified the burst index (BI) or the coefficient of variation (CV) of RTn neurons. Moreover, stimulation of striatum predominantly diminishes the spiking rate of GP cells and increases the spiking rate in RTn neurons without modifying the BI or CV in reticular neurons. Our data suggest a GP tight control over RTn spiking activity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Deafferentation in thalamic and pontine areas in severe traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Laouchedi, M; Galanaud, D; Delmaire, C; Fernandez-Vidal, S; Messé, A; Mesmoudi, S; Oulebsir Boumghar, F; Pélégrini-Issac, M; Puybasset, L; Benali, H; Perlbarg, V

    2015-07-01

    Severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) is characterized mainly by diffuse axonal injuries (DAI). The cortico-subcortical disconnections induced by such fiber disruption play a central role in consciousness recovery. We hypothesized that these cortico-subcortical deafferentations inferred from diffusion MRI data could differentiate between TBI patients with favorable or unfavorable (death, vegetative state, or minimally conscious state) outcome one year after injury. Cortico-subcortical fiber density maps were derived by using probabilistic tractography from diffusion tensor imaging data acquired in 24 severe TBI patients and 9 healthy controls. These maps were compared between patients and controls as well as between patients with favorable (FO) and unfavorable (UFO) 1-year outcome to identify the thalamo-cortical and ponto-thalamo-cortical pathways involved in the maintenance of consciousness. Thalamo-cortical and ponto-thalamo-cortical fiber density was significantly lower in TBI patients than in healthy controls. Comparing FO and UFO TBI patients showed thalamo-cortical deafferentation associated with unfavorable outcome for projections from ventral posterior and intermediate thalamic nuclei to the associative frontal, sensorimotor and associative temporal cortices. Specific ponto-thalamic deafferentation in projections from the upper dorsal pons (including the reticular formation) was also associated with unfavorable outcome. Fiber density of cortico-subcortical pathways as measured from diffusion MRI tractography is a relevant candidate biomarker for early prediction of one-year favorable outcome in severe TBI. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Dynamics of Action Potential Initiation in the GABAergic Thalamic Reticular Nucleus In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Fabián; Fuentealba, Pablo

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the neural mechanisms of action potential generation is critical to establish the way neural circuits generate and coordinate activity. Accordingly, we investigated the dynamics of action potential initiation in the GABAergic thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) using in vivo intracellular recordings in cats in order to preserve anatomically-intact axo-dendritic distributions and naturally-occurring spatiotemporal patterns of synaptic activity in this structure that regulates the thalamic relay to neocortex. We found a wide operational range of voltage thresholds for action potentials, mostly due to intrinsic voltage-gated conductances and not synaptic activity driven by network oscillations. Varying levels of synchronous synaptic inputs produced fast rates of membrane potential depolarization preceding the action potential onset that were associated with lower thresholds and increased excitability, consistent with TRN neurons performing as coincidence detectors. On the other hand the presence of action potentials preceding any given spike was associated with more depolarized thresholds. The phase-plane trajectory of the action potential showed somato-dendritic propagation, but no obvious axon initial segment component, prominent in other neuronal classes and allegedly responsible for the high onset speed. Overall, our results suggest that TRN neurons could flexibly integrate synaptic inputs to discharge action potentials over wide voltage ranges, and perform as coincidence detectors and temporal integrators, supported by a dynamic action potential threshold. PMID:22279567

  12. Dynamics of action potential initiation in the GABAergic thalamic reticular nucleus in vivo.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Fabián; Fuentealba, Pablo

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the neural mechanisms of action potential generation is critical to establish the way neural circuits generate and coordinate activity. Accordingly, we investigated the dynamics of action potential initiation in the GABAergic thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) using in vivo intracellular recordings in cats in order to preserve anatomically-intact axo-dendritic distributions and naturally-occurring spatiotemporal patterns of synaptic activity in this structure that regulates the thalamic relay to neocortex. We found a wide operational range of voltage thresholds for action potentials, mostly due to intrinsic voltage-gated conductances and not synaptic activity driven by network oscillations. Varying levels of synchronous synaptic inputs produced fast rates of membrane potential depolarization preceding the action potential onset that were associated with lower thresholds and increased excitability, consistent with TRN neurons performing as coincidence detectors. On the other hand the presence of action potentials preceding any given spike was associated with more depolarized thresholds. The phase-plane trajectory of the action potential showed somato-dendritic propagation, but no obvious axon initial segment component, prominent in other neuronal classes and allegedly responsible for the high onset speed. Overall, our results suggest that TRN neurons could flexibly integrate synaptic inputs to discharge action potentials over wide voltage ranges, and perform as coincidence detectors and temporal integrators, supported by a dynamic action potential threshold.

  13. Differential effects of petit mal anticonvulsants and convulsants on thalamic neurones: calcium current reduction.

    PubMed Central

    Coulter, D. A.; Huguenard, J. R.; Prince, D. A.

    1990-01-01

    1. Succinimide derivatives can be either convulsant (tetramethylsuccinimide (TMS)), or anticonvulsant (ethosuximide (ES); alpha-methyl-alpha-phenylsuccinimide (MPS)). ES, an anticonvulsant succinimide, has previously been shown to block calcium currents of thalamic neurones, while the convulsant succinimide TMS blocks gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) responses in a similar fashion to the convulsant pentylenetetrazol (PTZ). 2. Using voltage-clamp techniques, we analysed the effects of the anticonvulsant succinimides ES and MPS and the convulsants TMS and PTZ on calcium currents of acutely isolated thalamic relay neurones of the rat. 3. MPS and ES reduced low-threshold calcium current (LTCC) in a voltage-dependent manner, without affecting steady-state inactivation. MPS was less potent than ES (IC50 of 1100 vs 200 microM) but greater in efficacy (100% maximal reduction vs 40% for ES). 4. PTZ had no effect on calcium currents, and TMS only reduced LTCC at very high concentrations, and did not occlude MPS effects when applied concurrently. 5. These results, which demonstrate that anticonvulsant, but not convulsant, succinimides block LTCC, provide additional support for the hypothesis that LTCC reduction is a mechanism of action of the anticonvulsant succinimides related to their effects in petit mal epilepsy. PMID:2169941

  14. Functional convergence of thalamic and intrinsic projections to cortical layers 4 and 6

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Charles C.; Imaizumi, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    Ascending sensory information is conveyed from the thalamus to layers 4 and 6 of sensory cortical areas. Interestingly, receptive field properties of cortical layer 6 neurons are different from those in layer 4. Do such differences reflect distinct inheritance patterns from the thalamus or are they derived instead from local cortical circuits? To distinguish between these possibilities, we utilized in vitro slice preparations containing the thalamocortical pathways in the auditory and somatosensory systems. Responses from neurons in layers 4 and 6 that resided in the same column were recorded using whole-cell patch clamp. Laser-scanning photostimulation via uncaging of glutamate in the thalamus and cortex was used to map the functional topography of thalamocortical and intracortical inputs to each layer. In addition, we assessed the functional divergence of thalamocortical inputs by optical imaging of flavoprotein autofluorescence. We found that the thalamocortical inputs to layers 4 and 6 originated from the same thalamic domain, but the intracortical projections to the same neurons differed dramatically. Our results suggest that the intracortical projections, rather than the thalamic inputs, to each layer contribute more to the differences in their receptive field properties. PMID:24563558

  15. Extrasynaptic GABAA receptors in mediodorsal thalamic nucleus modulate fear extinction learning

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The gamma-amino-butyric acid (GABA) system is a critical mediator of fear extinction process. GABA can induce “phasic” or “tonic” inhibition in neurons through synaptic or extrasynaptic GABAA receptors, respectively. However, role of the thalamic “tonic GABA inhibition” in cognition has not been explored. We addressed this issue in extinction of conditioned fear in mice. Results Here, we show that GABAA receptors in the mediodorsal thalamic nucleus (MD) modulate fear extinction. Microinjection of gabazine, a GABAA receptor antagonist, into the MD decreased freezing behavior in response to the conditioned stimulus and thus facilitated fear extinction. Interestingly, microinjection of THIP (4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol), a preferential agonist for the δ-subunit of extrasynaptic GABAA receptors, into the MD attenuated fear extinction. In the opposite direction, an MD-specific knock-out of the extrasynaptic GABAA receptors facilitated fear extinction. Conclusions Our results suggest that “tonic GABA inhibition” mediated by extrasynaptic GABAA receptors in MD neurons, suppresses fear extinction learning. These results raise a possibility that pharmacological control of tonic mode of GABAA receptor activation may be a target for treatment of anxiety disorders like post-traumatic stress disorder. PMID:24886120

  16. Repetition reveals ups and downs of hippocampal, thalamic, and neocortical engagement during mnemonic decisions.

    PubMed

    Reagh, Zachariah M; Murray, Elizabeth A; Yassa, Michael A

    2017-02-01

    The extent to which current information is consistent with past experiences and our capacity to recognize or discriminate accordingly are key factors in flexible memory-guided behavior. Despite a wealth of evidence linking hippocampal and neocortical computations to these phenomena, many important factors remain poorly understood. One such factor is repeated encoding of learned information. In this experiment, participants completed a task in which study stimuli were incidentally encoded either once or three separate times during high-resolution fMRI scanning. We asked how repetition influenced recognition and discrimination memory judgments, and how this affects engagement of hippocampal and neocortical regions. Repetition revealed shifts in engagement in an anterior (ventral) CA1-thalamic-medial prefrontal network related to true and false recognition. Conversely, repetition revealed shifts in a posterior (dorsal) dentate/CA3-parahippocampal-restrosplenial network related to accurate discrimination. These differences in engagement were accompanied by task-related correlations in respective anterior and posterior networks. In particular, the anterior thalamic region observed during recognition judgments is functionally and anatomically consistent with nucleus reuniens in humans, and was found to mediate correlations between the anterior CA1 and medial prefrontal cortex. These findings offer new insights into how repeated experience affects memory and its neural substrates in hippocampal-neocortical networks. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Bilateral Thalamic Stimulation Induces Insomnia in Patients Treated for Intractable Tremor

    PubMed Central

    Bridoux, Agathe; Drouot, Xavier; Sangare, Aude; Al-ani, Tarik; Brignol, Arnaud; Charles-Nelson, Anais; Brugières, Pierre; Gouello, Gaëtane; Hosomi, Koichi; Lepetit, Hélène; Palfi, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: To explore the influence of acute bilateral ventral intermediate thalamic nucleus (VIM) stimulation on sleep. Design: Three consecutive full-night polysomnography recordings were made in the laboratory. After the habituation night, a random order for night ON-stim and OFF-stim was applied for the second and third nights. Setting: Sleep disorders unit of a university hospital. Patients: Eleven patients with bilateral stimulation of the ventral intermediate nucleus of the thalamus (VIM) for drug-resistant tremor. Measurements: Sleep measures on polysomnography. Results: Total sleep time was reduced during night ON-stim compared to OFF- stim, as well as rapid eye movement sleep percentage while the percentage of N2 increased. Wakefulness after sleep onset time was increased. Conclusion: Our results show that bilateral stimulation of the VIM nuclei reduces sleep and could be associated with insomnia. Citation: Bridoux A, Drouot X, Sangare A, Al-ani T, Brignol A, Charles-Nelson A, Brugières P, Gouello G, Hosomi K, Lepetit H, Palfi S. Bilateral thalamic stimulation induces insomnia in patients treated for intractable tremor. SLEEP 2015;38(3):473–478. PMID:25515098

  18. Thalamic Atrophy Contributes to Low Slow Wave Sleep in Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Su, Lei; Han, Yujuan; Xue, Rong; Wood, Kristofer; Shi, Fu-Dong; Liu, Yaou; Fu, Ying

    2016-12-01

    Slow wave sleep abnormality has been reported in neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD), but mechanism for such abnormality is unknown. To determine the structural defects in the brain that account for the decrease of slow wave sleep in NMOSD patients. Thirty-three NMOSD patients and 18 matched healthy controls (HC) were enrolled. Polysomnography was used to monitor slow wave sleep and three-dimensional T1-weighted MRIs were obtained to assess the alterations of grey matter volume. The percentage of deep slow wave sleep decreased in 93% NMOSD patients. Compared to HC, a reduction of grey matter volume was found in the bilateral thalamus of patients with a lower percentage of slow wave sleep (FWE corrected at cluster-level, p < 0.05, cluster size > 400 voxels). Furthermore, the right thalamic fraction was positively correlated with the decrease in the percentage of slow wave sleep in NMOSD patients (p < 0.05, FDR corrected, cluster size > 200 voxels). Our study identified that thalamic atrophy is associated with the decrease of slow wave sleep in NMOSD patients. Further studies should evaluate whether neurotransmitters or hormones which stem from thalamus are involved in the decrease of slow wave sleep.

  19. Pathways for emotions and attention converge on the thalamic reticular nucleus in primates.

    PubMed

    Zikopoulos, Basilis; Barbas, Helen

    2012-04-11

    How do emotional events readily capture our attention? To address this question we used neural tracers to label pathways linking areas involved in emotional and attentional processes in the primate brain (Macaca mulatta). We report that a novel pathway from the amygdala, the brain's emotional center, targets the inhibitory thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN), a key node in the brain's attentional network. The amygdalar pathway formed unusual synapses close to cell bodies of TRN neurons and had more large and efficient terminals than pathways from the orbitofrontal cortex and the thalamic mediodorsal nucleus, which similarly innervated extensive TRN sites. The robust amygdalar pathway provides a mechanism for rapid shifting of attention to emotional stimuli. Acting synergistically, pathways from the amygdala and orbitofrontal cortex provide a circuit for purposeful assessment of emotional stimuli. The different pathways to TRN suggest distinct mechanisms of attention to external and internal stimuli that may be differentially disrupted in anxiety and mood disorders and may be selectively targeted for therapeutic interventions.

  20. Post-Traumatic Tremor and Thalamic Deep Brain Stimulation: Evidence for Use of Diffusion Tensor Imaging.

    PubMed

    Boccard, Sandra G J; Rebelo, Pedro; Cheeran, Binith; Green, Alexander; FitzGerald, James J; Aziz, Tipu Z

    2016-12-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a well-established treatment to reduce tremor, notably in Parkinson disease. DBS may also be effective in post-traumatic tremor, one of the most common movement disorders caused by head injury. However, the cohorts of patients often have multiple lesions that may impact the outcome depending on which fiber tracts are affected. A 20-year-old man presented after road traffic accident with severe closed head injury and polytrauma. Computed tomography scan showed left frontal and basal ganglia hemorrhagic contusions and intraventricular hemorrhage. A disabling tremor evolved in step with motor recovery. Despite high-intensity signals in the intended thalamic target, a visual analysis of the preoperative diffusion tensor imaging revealed preservation of connectivity of the intended target, ventralis oralis posterior thalamic nucleus (VOP). This was confirmed by the postoperative tractography study presented here. DBS of the VOP/zona incerta was performed. Six months postimplant, marked improvement of action (postural, kinetic, and intention) tremor was achieved. We demonstrated a strong connectivity between the VOP and the superior frontal gyrus containing the premotor cortex and other central brain areas responsible for movement control. In spite of an existing lesion in the target, the preservation of these tracts may be relevant to the improvement of the patient's symptoms by DBS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Central thalamic deep brain stimulation for support of forebrain arousal regulation in the minimally conscious state.

    PubMed

    Schiff, Nicholas D

    2013-01-01

    This chapter considers the use of central thalamic deep brain stimulation (CT/DBS) to support arousal regulation mechanisms in the minimally conscious state (MCS). CT/DBS for selected patients in a MCS is first placed in the historical context of prior efforts to use thalamic electrical brain stimulation to treat the unconscious clinical conditions of coma and vegetative state. These previous studies and a proof of concept result from a single-subject study of a patient in a MCS are reviewed against the background of new population data providing benchmarks of the natural history of vegetative and MCSs. The conceptual foundations for CT/DBS in selected patients in a MCS are then presented with consideration of both circuit and cellular mechanisms underlying recovery of consciousness identified from empirical studies. Directions for developing future generalizable criteria for CT/DBS that focus on the integrity of necessary brain systems and behavioral profiles in patients in a MCS that may optimally response to support of arousal regulation mechanisms are proposed.

  2. Clinical, neuropsychological, and pre-stimulus dorsomedial thalamic nucleus electrophysiological data in deep brain stimulation patients.

    PubMed

    Sweeney-Reed, Catherine M; Zaehle, Tino; Voges, Jürgen; Schmitt, Friedhelm C; Buentjen, Lars; Kopitzki, Klaus; Richardson-Klavehn, Alan; Hinrichs, Hermann; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Knight, Robert T; Rugg, Michael D

    2016-09-01

    The data presented here comprise clinical, neuropsychological, and intrathalamic electrophysiological data from 7 patients with pharmacoresistant focal epilepsy and are related to the article "Pre-stimulus thalamic theta power predicts human memory formation" C.M. Sweeney-Reed, T. Zaehle, J. Voges, F.C. Schmitt, L. Buentjen, K. Kopitzki, et al. (2016) [1]. The patients participated in a memory paradigm after receiving electrodes implanted in the DMTN due to the surgical approach taken in electrode insertion for deep brain stimulation of the anterior thalamic nucleus. Epilepsy duration and pre-operative neuropsychological tests provide an indication of the profile of patients receiving intrathalamic electrode implantation and the memory capabilities in such a patient group. The electrophysiological data were recorded from the right DMTN preceding stimulus presentation during intentional memory encoding. The patients viewed a series of photographic scenes, which they judged as indoors or outdoors. The 900 ms epochs prior to stimulus presentation were labeled as preceding successful or unsuccessful subsequent memory formation according to a subsequent memory test for the items. The difference between theta power preceding successful versus unsuccessful subsequent memory formation is shown against time for each patient individually.

  3. Thalamic nuclei convey diverse contextual information to layer 1 of visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Roth, Morgane M; Dahmen, Johannes C; Muir, Dylan R; Imhof, Fabia; Martini, Francisco J; Hofer, Sonja B

    2016-02-01

    Sensory perception depends on the context in which a stimulus occurs. Prevailing models emphasize cortical feedback as the source of contextual modulation. However, higher order thalamic nuclei, such as the pulvinar, interconnect with many cortical and subcortical areas, suggesting a role for the thalamus in providing sensory and behavioral context. Yet the nature of the signals conveyed to cortex by higher order thalamus remains poorly understood. Here we use axonal calcium imaging to measure information provided to visual cortex by the pulvinar equivalent in mice, the lateral posterior nucleus (LP), as well as the dorsolateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN). We found that dLGN conveys retinotopically precise visual signals, while LP provides distributed information from the visual scene. Both LP and dLGN projections carry locomotion signals. However, while dLGN inputs often respond to positive combinations of running and visual flow speed, LP signals discrepancies between self-generated and external visual motion. This higher order thalamic nucleus therefore conveys diverse contextual signals that inform visual cortex about visual scene changes not predicted by the animal's own actions.

  4. T-type calcium channels consolidate tonic action potential output of thalamic neurons to neocortex.

    PubMed

    Deleuze, Charlotte; David, François; Béhuret, Sébastien; Sadoc, Gérard; Shin, Hee-Sup; Uebele, Victor N; Renger, John J; Lambert, Régis C; Leresche, Nathalie; Bal, Thierry

    2012-08-29

    The thalamic output during different behavioral states is strictly controlled by the firing modes of thalamocortical neurons. During sleep, their hyperpolarized membrane potential allows activation of the T-type calcium channels, promoting rhythmic high-frequency burst firing that reduces sensory information transfer. In contrast, in the waking state thalamic neurons mostly exhibit action potentials at low frequency (i.e., tonic firing), enabling the reliable transfer of incoming sensory inputs to cortex. Because of their nearly complete inactivation at the depolarized potentials that are experienced during the wake state, T-channels are not believed to modulate tonic action potential discharges. Here, we demonstrate using mice brain slices that activation of T-channels in thalamocortical neurons maintained in the depolarized/wake-like state is critical for the reliable expression of tonic firing, securing their excitability over changes in membrane potential that occur in the depolarized state. Our results establish a novel mechanism for the integration of sensory information by thalamocortical neurons and point to an unexpected role for T-channels in the early stage of information processing.

  5. Organization of projections of rat retrosplenial cortex to the anterior thalamic nuclei.

    PubMed

    Shibata, H

    1998-10-01

    The organization of the projections from the retrosplenial cortex (Brodmann's area 29) to the anterior thalamic nuclei was examined in the rat with retrograde transport of the cholera toxin B subunit and anterograde transport of biotinylated dextran amine. Areas 29a and 29b project mainly ipsilaterally to the rostral two-thirds of the anteroventral nucleus, with area 29a projecting more rostrodorsally than area 29b. Area 29c projects bilaterally to the ventromedial part of the anteroventral nucleus. The projections from area 29c are organized in a topographic pattern such that the rostral area 29c projects to the caudoventral part of the anteroventral nucleus, whereas the caudal area 29c projects to the more rostrodorsal parts. Caudal area 29d projects mainly ipsilaterally to the rostrodorsal part of the anteromedial nucleus, and the rostral and dorsal parts of the anteroventral nucleus, whereas rostral area 29d projects bilaterally to the caudodorsal part of the anteromedial nucleus and the caudolateral part of the anteroventral nucleus. All the areas of the retrosplenial cortex provide sparse projections, mainly ipsilateral, to the anterodorsal nucleus, with a crude topographic pattern such that the rostrocaudal axis of the retrosplenial cortex corresponds to the caudorostral axis of the anterodorsal nucleus. The results indicate that each area of the retrosplenial cortex has a distinct projection field within the anterior thalamic nuclei. This suggests that each of these projections transmits distinct information that is important for complex memory and learning functions, e.g. discriminative avoidance learning and spatial memory.

  6. Thalamic input to distal apical dendrites in neocortical layer 1 is massive and highly convergent.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Garrido, Pablo; Pérez-de-Manzo, Flor; Porrero, César; Galazo, Maria J; Clascá, Francisco

    2009-10-01

    Input to apical dendritic tufts is now deemed crucial for associative learning, attention, and similar "feedback" interactions in the cerebral cortex. Excitatory input to apical tufts in neocortical layer 1 has been traditionally assumed to be predominantly cortical, as thalamic pathways directed to this layer were regarded relatively scant and diffuse. However, the sensitive tracing methods used in the present study show that, throughout the rat neocortex, large numbers (mean approximately 4500/mm(2)) of thalamocortical neurons converge in layer 1 and that this convergence gives rise to a very high local density of thalamic terminals. Moreover, we show that the layer 1-projecting neurons are present in large numbers in most, but not all, motor, association, limbic, and sensory nuclei of the rodent thalamus. Some layer 1-projecting axons branch to innervate large swaths of the cerebral hemisphere, whereas others arborize within only a single cortical area. Present data imply that realistic modeling of cortical circuitry should factor in a dense axonal canopy carrying highly convergent thalamocortical input to pyramidal cell apical tufts. In addition, they are consistent with the notion that layer 1-projecting axons may be a robust anatomical substrate for extensive "feedback" interactions between cortical areas via the thalamus.

  7. Decoding temporally encoded sensory input by cortical oscillations and thalamic phase comparators.

    PubMed

    Ahissar, E; Haidarliu, S; Zacksenhouse, M

    1997-10-14

    The temporally encoded information obtained by vibrissal touch could be decoded "passively," involving only input-driven elements, or "actively," utilizing intrinsically driven oscillators. A previous study suggested that the trigeminal somatosensory system of rats does not obey the bottom-up order of activation predicted by passive decoding. Thus, we have tested whether this system obeys the predictions of active decoding. We have studied cortical single units in the somatosensory cortices of anesthetized rats and guinea pigs and found that about a quarter of them exhibit clear spontaneous oscillations, many of them around whisking frequencies ( approximately 10 Hz). The frequencies of these oscillations could be controlled locally by glutamate. These oscillations could be forced to track the frequency of induced rhythmic whisker movements at a stable, frequency-dependent, phase difference. During these stimulations, the response intensities of multiunits at the thalamic recipient layers of the cortex decreased, and their latencies increased, with increasing input frequency. These observations are consistent with thalamocortical loops implementing phase-locked loops, circuits that are most efficient in decoding temporally encoded information like that obtained by active vibrissal touch. According to this model, and consistent with our results, populations of thalamic "relay" neurons function as phase "comparators" that compare cortical timing expectations with the actual input timing and represent the difference by their population output rate.

  8. Unilateral thalamic deep brain stimulation in essential tremor demonstrates long-term ipsilateral effects.

    PubMed

    Peng-Chen, Zhongxing; Morishita, Takashi; Vaillancourt, David; Favilla, Chris; Foote, Kelly D; Okun, Michael S; Wagle Shukla, Aparna

    2013-12-01

    Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) of thalamus in essential tremor (ET) is effective for the treatment of contralateral tremors. Bilateral DBS controls tremors on both sides but is associated with increased morbidity and risks. We evaluated if unilateral surgery had ipsilateral benefits on tremors and thus could be a potentially safer alternative to bilateral DBS. Medication refractory ET patients undergoing unilateral thalamic DBS were included and longitudinally followed. Tremor rating scale was used to record total motor, arm tremor and activities of daily living (ADL) scores at baseline, six months and at last visit (three or more years after surgery). Postoperative scores were recorded with DBS turned OFF and ON. Twenty-two patients with a mean follow-up 3.4 ± 0.14 years were enrolled. When baseline scores were compared to scores with the DBS turned ON, significant improvements were noted in total tremor (40%), ADL (67%) and arm tremor scores both on the ipsilateral and the contralateral side at six months and at the last visit of follow-up (all p < 0.05). Ipsilateral arm tremor (∼56%) improvements were milder compared to the contralateral side (∼73%) tremors. Unilateral thalamic DBS in ET demonstrates significant long-term benefits for ipsilateral arm tremors and can be offered to higher risk and to select patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Fronto-thalamic volumetry markers of somatic delusions and hallucinations in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Spalletta, Gianfranco; Piras, Fabrizio; Alex Rubino, Ivo; Caltagirone, Carlo; Fagioli, Sabrina

    2013-04-30

    Although the psychotic phenomena of schizophrenia have been extensively investigated, somatic delusions and hallucinations have seldom been reported and their mechanisms are substantially unexplored. Here, we aimed to identify the brain structural correlates of somatic psychotic phenomena using combined volumetry and diffusivity structural neuroimaging techniques. Seventy-five individuals with a DSM-IV-TR diagnosis of schizophrenia and 75 healthy controls (HC) underwent a comprehensive clinical assessment, a high-resolution T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and a diffusion tensor imaging protocol using a 3T MRI scanner. Voxel-based volumetry and mean diffusivity (MD) of gray matter (GM) and fractional anisotropy (FA) of white matter (WM) of the whole brain were calculated for each subject. Reduced left fronto-insular GM volume was found in patients with somatic delusions compared with patients without somatic delusions and HC. Increased GM volume was found in the bilateral thalami, primarily in the right ventral-anterior thalamic nucleus projecting to the prefrontal-temporal cortices and the bilateral pars triangularis of the inferior frontal lobe, of patients with somatic hallucinations and HC compared with patients without somatic hallucinations. No differences emerged in GM MD and in WM FA between patients with and without psychotic somatic phenomena (i.e. delusions or hallucinations). These findings provide the first evidence that a frontal-thalamic structural perturbation mediates somatic psychotic phenomena in schizophrenia.

  10. Numbness in the tip of the tongue and lower lip caused by thalamic hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Shimohata, Mitsuteru; Watanabe, Yumiko; Tanaka, Hajime

    2014-03-01

    Although patients with isolated oral syndrome or facial sensory loss following stroke of thalamic ventroposteromedial (VPM) nucleus have been reported, there have been no reports of numbness in the tip of the tongue and lower lip. Furthermore, symptoms in the tip of the tongue caused by stroke are typically characterized as gustatory sensory disturbances. A 62-year-old hypertensive man experienced an acute onset of severe numbness in the left tip of the tongue and ipsilateral lower lip. Neurological examination revealed no other abnormalities except for the aforementioned numbness. Head computed tomography showed a small hematoma in the medial part of the right thalamus, most likely within the VPM nucleus. The somatosensory impulse of the tongue is conveyed via the lingual nerve, and it reaches the contralateral medial VPM proper via the trigeminal spinal nucleus. Therefore, thalamic stroke mainly involving the medial VPM proper has the potential to elicit numbness in the tip of the tongue. A major portion of the VPM nucleus is vascularized by the inferolateral arteries. The inferolateral arteries vary greatly in the number and position of the arteries and their tributaries, and small-vessel disease in this territory can present with diverse symptoms because of this complexity. These findings indicate that central neurological involvement should not be overlooked in the case of sensory disturbance restricted to the tip of the tongue and lip.

  11. Impaired brainstem and thalamic high-frequency oscillatory EEG activity in migraine between attacks.

    PubMed

    Porcaro, Camillo; Di Lorenzo, Giorgio; Seri, Stefano; Pierelli, Francesco; Tecchio, Franca; Coppola, Gianluca

    2017-09-01

    Introduction We investigated whether interictal thalamic dysfunction in migraine without aura (MO) patients is a primary determinant or the expression of its functional disconnection from proximal or distal areas along the somatosensory pathway. Methods Twenty MO patients and twenty healthy volunteers (HVs) underwent an electroencephalographic (EEG) recording during electrical stimulation of the median nerve at the wrist. We used the functional source separation algorithm to extract four functionally constrained nodes (brainstem, thalamus, primary sensory radial, and primary sensory motor tangential parietal sources) along the somatosensory pathway. Two digital filters (1-400 Hz and 450-750 Hz) were applied in order to extract low- (LFO) and high- frequency (HFO) oscillatory activity from the broadband signal. Results Compared to HVs, patients presented significantly lower brainstem (BS) and thalamic (Th) HFO activation bilaterally. No difference between the two cortical HFO as well as in LFO peak activations between the two groups was seen. The age of onset of the headache was positively correlated with HFO power in the right brainstem and thalamus. Conclusions This study provides evidence for complex dysfunction of brainstem and thalamocortical networks under the control of genetic factors that might act by modulating the severity of migraine phenotype.

  12. HIV, Tat and dopamine transmission.

    PubMed

    Gaskill, Peter J; Miller, Douglas R; Gamble-George, Joyonna; Yano, Hideaki; Khoshbouei, Habibeh

    2017-09-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) is a progressive infection that targets the immune system, affecting more than 37 million people around the world. While combinatorial antiretroviral therapy (cART) has lowered mortality rates and improved quality of life in infected individuals, the prevalence of HIV associated neurocognitive disorders is increasing and HIV associated cognitive decline remains prevalent. Recent research has suggested that HIV accessory proteins may be involved in this decline, and several studies have indicated that the HIV protein transactivator of transcription (Tat) can disrupt normal neuronal and glial function. Specifically, data indicate that Tat may directly impact dopaminergic neurotransmission, by modulating the function of the dopamine transporter and specifically damaging dopamine-rich regions of the CNS. HIV infection of the CNS has long been associated with dopaminergic dysfunction, but the mechanisms remain undefined. The specific effect(s) of Tat on dopaminergic neurotransmission may be, at least partially, a mechanism by which HIV infection directly or indirectly induces dopaminergic dysfunction. Therefore, precisely defining the specific effects of Tat on the dopaminergic system will help to elucidate the mechanisms by which HIV infection of the CNS induces neuropsychiatric, neurocognitive and neurological disorders that involve dopaminergic neurotransmission. Further, this will provide a discussion of the experiments needed to further these investigations, and may help to identify or develop new therapeutic approaches for the prevention or treatment of these disorders in HIV-infected individuals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Dopamine agonist therapy in hyperprolactinemia.

    PubMed

    Webster, J

    1999-12-01

    Introduction of the dopamine agonist bromocriptine heralded a major advance in the management of hyperprolactinemic disorders. Although its side effects of nausea, dizziness and headache and its short elimination half-life are limiting factors, its efficacy established it as a reference compound against the activity of which several dopamine agonists, like pergolide, lysuride, metergoline, terguride and dihydroergocristine, fell by the wayside. More recently, two new agents, cabergoline and quinagolide, have been introduced and appear to offer considerable advantages over bromocriptine. Cabergoline, an ergoline D2 agonist, has a long plasma half-life that enables once- or twice-weekly administration. Quinagolide, in contrast, is a nonergot D2 agonist with an elimination half-life intermediate between those of bromocriptine and cabergoline, allowing the drug to be administered once daily. Comparative studies indicate that cabergoline is clearly superior to bromocriptine in efficacy (prolactin suppression, restoration of gonadal function) and in tolerability. In similar studies, quinagolide appeared to have similar efficacy and superior tolerability to that of bromocriptine. Results of a small crossover study indicate that cabergoline is better tolerated, with a trend toward activity superior to that of quinagolide. In hyperprolactinemic men and in women not seeking to become pregnant, cabergoline may be regarded as the treatment of choice.

  14. Interchangeable breech lock for glove boxes

    SciTech Connect

    Lemonds, David Preston

    2015-11-24

    A breech lock for a glove box is provided that may be used to transfer one or more items into the glove box. The breech lock can be interchangeably installed in place of a plug, glove, or other device in a port or opening of a glove box. Features are provided to aid the removal of items from the breech lock by a gloved operator. The breech lock can be reused or, if needed, can be replaced with a plug, glove, or other device at the port or opening of the glove box.

  15. Repackaging SRS Black Box TRU Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Swale, D. J.; Stone, K.A.; Milner, T. N.

    2006-01-09

    Historically, large items of TRU Waste, which were too large to be packaged in drums for disposal have been packaged in various sizes of custom made plywood boxes at the Savannah River Site (SRS), for many years. These boxes were subsequently packaged into large steel ''Black Boxes'' for storage at SRS, pending availability of Characterization and Certification capability, to facilitate disposal of larger items of TRU Waste. There are approximately 107 Black Boxes in inventory at SRS, each measuring some 18' x 12' x 7', and weighing up to 45,000 lbs. These Black Boxes have been stored since the early 1980s. The project to repackage this waste into Standard Large Boxes (SLBs), Standard Waste Boxes (SWB) and Ten Drum Overpacks (TDOP), for subsequent characterization and WIPP disposal, commenced in FY04. To date, 10 Black Boxes have been repackaged, resulting in 40 SLB-2's, and 37 B25 overpack boxes, these B25's will be overpacked in SLB-2's prior to shipping to WIPP. This paper will describe experience to date from this project.

  16. Duplex unwinding with DEAD-box proteins.

    PubMed

    Jankowsky, Eckhard; Putnam, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    DEAD-box proteins, which comprise the largest helicase family, are involved in virtually all aspects of RNA metabolism. DEAD-box proteins catalyze diverse ATP-driven functions including the unwinding of RNA secondary structures. In contrast to many well-studied DNA and viral RNA helicases, DEAD-box proteins do not rely on translocation on one of the nucleic acid strands for duplex unwinding, but directly load onto helical regions and then locally pry the strands apart in an ATP-dependent fashion. In this chapter, we outline substrate design and unwinding protocols for DEAD-box proteins and focus on the quantitative evaluation of their unwinding activity.

  17. Sources and physiological significance of plasma dopamine sulfate.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, D S; Swoboda, K J; Miles, J M; Coppack, S W; Aneman, A; Holmes, C; Lamensdorf, I; Eisenhofer, G

    1999-07-01

    Dopamine in the circulation occurs mainly as dopamine sulfate, the sources and physiological significance of which have been obscure. In this study, plasma concentrations of dopamine sulfate were measured after a meal, after fasting for 4 days, and during i.v. L-DOPA, nitroprusside, or trimethaphan infusion in volunteers; after dopamine infusion in patients with L-aromatic-amino-acid decarboxylase deficiency; in arterial and portal venous plasma of gastrointestinal surgery patients; and in patients with sympathetic neurocirculatory failure. Meal ingestion increased plasma dopamine sulfate by more than 50-fold; however, prolonged fasting decreased plasma dopamine sulfate only slightly. L-DOPA infusion produced much larger increments in dopamine sulfate than in dopamine; the other drugs were without effect. Patients with L-aromatic amino acid decarboxylase deficiency had decreased dopamine sulfate levels, and patients with sympathetic neurocirculatory failure had normal levels. Decarboxylase-deficient patients undergoing dopamine infusion had a dopamine sulfate/dopamine ratio about 25 times less than that at baseline in volunteers. Surgery patients had large arterial-portal venous increments in plasma concentrations of dopamine sulfate, so that mesenteric dopamine sulfate production accounted for most of urinary dopamine sulfate excretion, a finding consistent with the localization of the dopamine sulfoconjugating enzyme to gastrointestinal tissues. The results indicate that plasma dopamine sulfate derives mainly from sulfoconjugation of dopamine synthesized from L-DOPA in the gastrointestinal tract. Both dietary and endogenous determinants affect plasma dopamine sulfate. The findings suggest an enzymatic gut-blood barrier for detoxifying exogenous dopamine and delimiting autocrine/paracrine effects of endogenous dopamine generated in a "third catecholamine system."

  18. Dopamine receptors in human gastrointestinal mucosa

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, D.E.; Mason, G.A.; Walker, C.H.; Valenzuela, J.E.

    1987-12-21

    Dopamine is a putative enteric neurotransmitter that has been implicated in exocrine secretory and motility functions of the gastrointestinal tract of several mammalian species including man. This study was designed to determine the presence of dopamine binding sites in human gastric and duodenal mucosa and to describe certain biochemical characteristics of these enteric receptor sites. The binding assay was performed in triplicate with tissue homogenates obtained from healthy volunteers of both sexes using /sup 3/H-dopamine as a ligand. The extent of nonspecific binding was determined in the presence of a 100-fold excess of unlabeled dopamine. Scatchard analysis performed with increasing concentrations of /sup 3/H-dopamine (20-500 nM) revealed a single class of saturable dopamine binding sites in gastric and duodenal mucosa. The results of this report demonstrate the presence of specific dopamine receptors in human gastric and duodenal mucosa. These biochemical data suggest that molecular abnormalities of these receptor sites may be operative in the pathogenesis of important gastrointestinal disorders. 33 references, 2 figures.

  19. Dopamine transporter: expression in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Uhl, G R; O'Hara, B; Shimada, S; Zaczek, R; DiGiorgianni, J; Nishimori, T

    1991-01-01

    Xenopus oocytes can express biologically relevant transport activity after injection of mRNAs encoding several carrier molecules. mRNA from PC12 cells, as well as transcripts from a rat ventral midbrain library, can be expressed in these oocytes and allow them to display pharmacologically specific dopamine uptake. mRNA-injected oocytes incubated with tritiated dopamine contain tritiated dopamine and metabolites; lower amounts of radiolabeled dopamine and more radiolabeled metabolites are found in oocytes co-incubated with cocaine or in water-injected oocytes. Tritiated dopamine uptake into mRNA-injected oocytes is time, sodium, and temperature dependent. It is blocked by cocaine and mazindol, but not by haloperidol. It is not found after injection of mRNA from other brain regions. A size-selected rat midbrain library constructed in the plasma vector pCDM8 yields mRNA transcripts whose injection into oocytes causes cocaine-blockable [3H]dopamine uptake. These findings provide an assay for purification of the dopamine transporter cDNA by sib selection techniques.

  20. Dopamine-Secreting Paraganglioma in the Retroperitoneum.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Yusuke; Kimura, Noriko; Yoshimoto, Takanobu; Sekiguchi, Yoshihiro; Tomoishi, Junzo; Kasahara, Ichiro; Hara, Yoshihito; Ogawa, Yoshihiro

    2017-03-01

    Pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas, which exclusively produce dopamine, are very rare. Herein, we report for the first time a Japanese case of an exclusively dopamine-producing paraganglioma accompanied by detailed immunohistochemical analyses. A 70-year-old Japanese woman was referred to our hospital for functional examination of her left retroperitoneal mass. Her adrenal functions were normal, except for excessive dopamine secretion. After the tumorectomy, her dopamine level normalized. The histopathological diagnosis of the tumor was paraganglioma; this was confirmed by positive immunostaining of chromogranin A (CgA), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH), and succinate dehydrogenase gene subunit B (SDHB). However, the immunostaining of CgA in the tumor cells showed peculiar dot-like staining located corresponding to Golgi complex in the perinuclear area, rather than the diffuse cytoplasmic staining usually observed in epinephrine- or norepinephrine-producing functional pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas. The immunohistochemical results suggested that the tumor cells had sparse neuroendocrine granules in the cytoplasm, resulting in inhibition of catecholamine synthesis from dopamine to norepinephrine in neurosecretory granules. This may be the mechanism responsible for exclusive dopamine secretion in the present case.