Science.gov

Sample records for brachial artery

  1. Brachial Artery Access for Percutaneous Renal Artery Interventions

    SciTech Connect

    Kaukanen, Erkki T.; Manninen, Hannu I.; Matsi, Pekka J.; Soeder, Heini K.

    1997-09-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the suitability of transbrachial access for endovascular renal artery interventions. Methods: During 37 consecutive endovascular renal artery interventions, the transbrachial approach was used on nine patients (mean age 63 years; range 41-76 years) for 11 renal artery procedures on native kidneys and one percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) on a transplanted kidney. The reason for using transbrachial access was a steep aorta-renal angle in five, and severe aorta-iliac atherosclerosis in the remaining patients. In addition to the intervention catheter in the left brachial artery, an additional nonselective catheter for controlling the procedure was inserted transfemorally (six patients) or via the contralateral brachial artery. Results: Eleven interventions (six PTAs, five stents) were successfully completed. The one failure resulted from impenetrable subclavian artery stenosis. The only major complication was a brachial artery pseudoaneurysm requiring surgical treatment. Conclusion: Transbrachial access is an effective and relatively safe technique for renal artery interventions when transfemoral access is not possible.

  2. Morphology of brachial plexus and axillary artery in bonobo (Pan paniscus).

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Y; Oishi, M; Shimizu, D

    2011-02-01

    A left brachial plexus and axillary artery of bonobo (Pan paniscus) were examined, and the interrelation between the brachial plexus and the axillary artery was discussed. This is the first report of the brachial plexus and the axillary artery of bonobo. The bonobo brachial plexus formed very similar pattern to that of other ape species and human. On the other hand, the branches of the bonobo axillary artery had uncommon architecture in comparison with human case. The axillary artery did not penetrate the brachial plexus and passes through all way along anterior to the brachial plexus. Only 4.9% of human forelimbs have this pattern. Moreover, the brachial artery runs through superficially anterior to branches of the brachial plexus.

  3. Delayed rupture of a pseudoaneurysm in the brachial artery of a burn reconstruction patient

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A brachial artery pseudoaneurysm is a rare but serious condition that can be limb threatening. A number of reports have found that it may be the result of damage to the blood vessels around the brachial artery, either directly or indirectly, due to trauma or systemic diseases. We present our experience of delayed pseudoaneurysm rupture of the brachial artery in a rehabilitation patient with burns of the upper extremity who underwent fasciotomy and musculocutaneous flap coverage. We also provide a review of the brachial artery pseudoaneurysm. PMID:23758847

  4. Anatomical Variations of Brachial Artery - Its Morphology, Embryogenesis and Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    KS, Siddaraju; Venumadhav, Nelluri; Sharma, Ashish; Kumar, Neeraj

    2014-01-01

    Background: Accurate knowledge of variation pattern of the major arteries of upper limb is of considerable practical importance in the conduct of reparative surgery in the arm, forearm and hand however brachial artery and its terminal branches variations are less common. Aim: Accordingly the present study was designed to evaluate the anatomical variations of the brachial artery and its morphology, embryogenesis and clinical implications. Materials and Methods: In an anatomical study 140 upper limb specimens of 70 cadavers (35 males and 35 females) were used and anatomical variations of the brachial artery have been documented. Results: Accessory brachial artery was noted in eight female cadavers (11.43%). Out of eight cadavers in three cadavers (4.29%) an unusual bilateral accessory brachial artery arising from the axillary artery and it is continuing in the forearm as superficial accessory ulnar artery was noted. Rare unusual variant unilateral accessory brachial artery and its reunion with the main brachial artery in the cubital fossa and its variable course in relation to the musculocutaneous nerve and median nerve were also noted in five cadavers (7.14%). Conclusion: As per our knowledge such anatomical variations of brachial artery and its terminal branches with their relation to the surrounding structures are not reported in the modern medical literature. An awareness of such a presence is valuable for the surgeons and radiologists in evaluation of angiographic images, vascular and re-constructive surgery or appropriate treatment for compressive neuropathies. PMID:25653931

  5. Percutaneous Extraluminal (Subintimal) Recanalization of a Brachial Artery Occlusion Following Cardiac Catheterization

    SciTech Connect

    Bolia, Amman; Nasim, Akhtar; Bell, Peter R.F.

    1996-05-15

    A 47-year-old woman presented with disabling right arm claudication 10 weeks after Sones cardiac catheterization via a brachial artery cut-down. A technique of extraluminal recanalization of the brachial artery occlusion, used to treat this patient, is described.

  6. Unusual clinic presentation of polyarteritis nodosa: involvement of axillary and brachial artery.

    PubMed

    Kocyigit, Ismail; Koyuncu, Sumeyra; Mavili, Ertugrul; Unal, Aydin; Tokmak, Turgut Tursem; Cilan, Havva; Kavuncuoglu, Feridun; Oymak, Oktay; Utas, Cengiz

    2011-01-01

    Polyarteritis nodosa (PAN) is a necrotizing inflammatory vasculitis of small- and medium-sized muscular arteries. Multiple organs, especially the kidney, skin, peripheric nerves, striated muscles, and intestine, are affected. In this case report, a patient with renal and hepatic involvement and axillary and brachial artery aneurysm resulting in shoulder hematoma and pain due to underlying PAN is presented.

  7. Iatrogenic brachial artery injury during pinning of supracondylar fracture of humerus: A rare injury.

    PubMed

    Vishal, Kumar; Arjun, R H H; Sameer, Aggarwal; Rakesh, John; Rama, Kishan

    2015-01-01

    Complications following supracondylar fracture of humerus are well-known. Pre- and post-operative complications have been documented in the literature. Neurovascular injury due to fracture fragments following this type of fracture is described. Iatrogenic brachial artery during surgical treatment of this fracture is unknown to the literature. So we report a rare case of iatrogenic brachial artery injury during pinning of supracondylar fracture of humerus and try to create awareness to the surgeons that such injuries can occur with improper operative techniques. PMID:26777716

  8. Brachial Artery Aneurysm in a 7-Month-Old Infant: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Gangopadhyay, Noopur; Chong, Tae; Chhabra, Avneesh

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Congenital upper extremity aneurysms are very rare and can be challenging to diagnose and treat. Although they can present as an isolated finding, they are often associated with other systemic conditions. We present a rare case of brachial artery aneurysm in a 7-month-old boy. The patient was evaluated with ultrasound, magnetic resonance angiography, and vein mapping before surgical reconstruction. After excision of the aneurysm, the brachial artery was reconstructed with an interposition saphenous vein graft. Because of potentially associated diagnoses and the possibility of concurrent aneurysms, this condition requires multidisciplinary management. PMID:27014554

  9. The Association of Homocysteine and Related Factors to Brachial Artery Diameter and Flow-Mediated Dilation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (BAFMD) has been proposed as a measurement of the degree and severity of cardiovascular disease. The purpose of this study was to (1) evaluate the associations between BAFMD and homocysteine, folate, vitamin B12, vitamin B6, (2) examine the influence of 5,10-me...

  10. Surrogates of Large Artery versus Small Artery Stiffness and Ankle-Brachial Index

    PubMed Central

    Korhonen, Päivi; Syvänen, Kari; Aarnio, Pertti

    2011-01-01

    Peripheral artery tonometry (PAT) is a novel method for assessing arterial stiffness of small digital arteries. Pulse pressure can be regarded as a surrogate of large artery stiffness. When ankle-brachial index (ABI) is calculated using the higher of the two ankle systolic pressures as denominator (ABI-higher), leg perfusion can be reliably estimated. However, using the lower of the ankle pressures to calculate ABI (ABI-lower) identifies more patients with isolated peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in ankle arteries. We aimed to compare the ability of PAT, pulse pressure, and different calculations of ABI to detect atherosclerotic disease in lower extremities. We examined PAT, pulse pressure, and ABI in 66 cardiovascular risk subjects in whom borderline PAD (ABI 0.91 to 1.00) was diagnosed 4 years earlier. Using ABI-lower to diagnose PAD yielded 2-fold higher prevalence of PAD than using ABI-higher. Endothelial dysfunction was diagnosed in 15/66 subjects (23%). In a bivariate correlation analysis, pulse pressure was negatively correlated with ABI-higher (r = −0.347, p = 0.004) and with ABI-lower (r = −0.424, p < 0.001). PAT hyperemic response was not significantly correlated with either ABI-higher (r = −0.148, p = 0.24) or with ABI-lower (r = −0.208, p = 0.095). Measurement of ABI using the lower of the two ankle pressures is an efficient method to identify patients with clinical or subclinical atherosclerosis and worth performing on subjects with pulse pressure above 65 mm Hg. The usefulness of PAT measurement in detecting PAD is vague. PMID:22942632

  11. [Transradial percutaneous approach for cardiac catheterization in patients with previous brachial artery cutdown].

    PubMed

    Magariños, Eduardo; Solioz, Germán; Cermesoni, Gabriel; Koretzky, Martín; Carnevalini, Mariana; González, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The percutaneous punction of the radial artery for catheterization procedures has gained acceptance lately. This was a consequence of achieving results similar to the femoral approach, with the benefits of a lower rate of complications and increased comfort for the patients post procedure. Recently it has gained an additional impulse with the better prognosis obtained in acute coronary syndromes. In this trial we have evaluated if the feasibility, results and advantages related with the use of the radial artery percutaneous approach to perform catheterization procedures, continues when used in patients who have had a previous brachial artery cutdown. Out of a total of 1356 percutaneous radial accesses, 53 were in patients with previous brachial artery cutdown. Through this access 71 catheterization procedures were performed, achieving access success in 96.2% (51/53) of the punctions. Once the access success was obtained, 93.6% (44/47) of the diagnostic procedures and 100% (24/24) of the therapeutics procedures were successful. During hospitalization, in this group of patients, no major adverse cardiac events occurred and there was a 1.4% (1/71) rate of minor events. At seven days follow up, no new complications were recorded. Although this is a small group, we believe that it is enough to show that percutaneous punctions of the radial artery to perform catheterization procedures, in patients with previous brachial artery cutdown, are feasible, allowing high access and procedure success rates, with a low frequency of complications.

  12. Iatrogenic brachial artery injury during anterolateral plating of humeral shaft fracture.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vishal; Behera, Prateek; Aggarwal, Sameer; Meena, Umesh Kumar

    2013-01-01

    There are several well defined indications for surgical management of humeral shaft fractures. Operative procedures on the humerus are associated with their own complications. Iatrogenic brachial artery injury as a complication of humeral shaft plating has not been reported previously. We report a case of a 48 years old female, who received operation at a district hospital and was referred to us when the surgeon could not palpate the pulse. CT angiogram showed that there was segmental non-opacification of the brachial artery. There was distal reformation and the thrombosis was decided to be managed conservatively. We believe that the arterial injury was a result of improper surgical technique and the segmental block might be due to improper use of plate holding forceps. This case report makes us aware of a rare complication of operative management of humeral shaft fractures and that basic principles of surgery must be always followed to prevent such injuries. PMID:24295587

  13. Automated edge detection versus manual edge measurement in analysis of brachial artery reactivity: a comparison study.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Eric B; Bronas, Ulf G; Dengel, Donald R

    2008-09-01

    High resolution ultrasound, combined with computer imaging technology, is commonly used to measure changes in brachial artery diameter for the determination of endothelial-dependent vasodilation (EDD) and endothelial independent-vasodilation (EID). Currently, two methods of computerized edge-detection systems are in use to measure changes in artery diameter. One system involves the sonographer manually tracking the artery walls while the second system involves a computer automated edge-detection system that automatically tracks the artery wall. The purpose of this study was to compare the two types of computerized edge-detection systems for measuring vascular function and structure. One hundred fifty (female = 70, male = 80) participants agreed to participate. Baseline brachial diameter, carotid intima-medial thickness (cIMT), EDD and EID were measured by the two computerized edge-detection systems utilizing the same ultrasound B-mode image. Mean values (+/-standard error) for baseline diameter, cIMT, EDD and EID were 3.53 (+/-0.10) mm, 0.43 (+/-0.01) mm, 5.72 (+/-0.20)% and 22.17 (+/-0.60)%, respectively for the manual edge-detection software system. Mean values for baseline diameter, cIMT, EDD and EID were 3.59 (+/-0.10) mm, 0.44 (+/-0.01) mm, 7.33 (+/-0.30)% and 25.77 (+/-0.60)%, respectively for the automated edge-detection software system. Bland-Altman plots displayed large variations between the two edge-detection methods for assessing cIMT and changes in artery diameter following brachial EDD and EID. The results of the study demonstrate that manual and automated computerized edge-detection systems track dynamic changes in brachial artery diameter and cIMT measures differently. Therefore, caution should be used when comparing research utilizing different computerized edge-detection systems for measuring vascular function and structure.

  14. Discrepancy between simultaneous digital skin microvascular and brachial artery macrovascular post-occlusive hyperemia in systemic sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Roustit, Matthieu; Simmons, Grant H.; Baguet, Jean-Philippe; Carpentier, Patrick H.; Cracowski, Jean-Luc

    2008-01-01

    Objective Vascular impairment, a main feature of the pathogenesis of systemic sclerosis (SSc), involves both the macro- and the microvasculature. We compared and correlated simultaneously measured skin microvascular and brachial artery macrovascular post-occlusive hyperemia in 3 groups: patients with SSc, patients with primary Raynaud’s phenomenon (RP), and healthy volunteers. Methods Thirty-three healthy volunteers, 36 patients with primary RP, and 42 patients with SSc were enrolled. For each subject, brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) and cutaneous post-occlusive reactive hyperemia (PORH) were simultaneously recorded after 5-minute occlusion of the brachial artery. Local thermal hyperemia, nitroglycerin-mediated dilation (NMD), intima-media thickness (IMT), and pulse wave velocity (PWV) were also assessed. Results Digital cutaneous peak PORH was altered in patients with primary RP and SSc compared to healthy controls, whereas FMD was not significantly different among all groups. We observed a correlation between digital peak cutaneous vascular conductance and brachial FMD in healthy controls (r = 0.49; p = 0.004), but not in patients with primary RP or SSc. Thermal hyperemia was altered only in patients with SSc. Brachial NMD, IMT, and PWV were not different among all groups. Conclusion We observed a loss of the correlation between brachial FMD and digital cutaneous PORH in patients with SSc and primary RP. Microvascular function is impaired in SSc, whereas brachial artery endothelial function is normal. (J Rheumatol First Release June 15 2008) PMID:18597404

  15. Brachial artery injury due to closed posterior elbow dislocation: case report☆

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Alberto Naoki; Fregoneze, Marcelo; Santos, Pedro Doneux; do Val Sella, Guilherme; Checchia, Caio Santos; Checchia, Sergio Luiz

    2016-01-01

    An association between closed posterior elbow dislocation and traumatic brachial artery injury is rare. Absence of radial pulse on palpation is an important warning sign and arteriography is the gold-standard diagnostic test. Early diagnosis is essential for appropriate treatment to be provided. This consists of joint reduction and immobilization, along with urgent surgical restoration of arterial flow. Here, a case (novel to the Brazilian literature) of an association between these injuries (and the treatment implemented) in a 27-year-old male patient is reported. These injuries were sustained through physical assault. PMID:27069896

  16. Ankle Brachial Index: simple non-invasive estimation of peripheral artery disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pieniak, Marcin; Cieślicki, Krzysztof; Żyliński, Marek; Górski, Piotr; Murgrabia, Agnieszka; Cybulski, Gerard

    2014-11-01

    According to international guidelines, patients with Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) are burdened with high cardiovascular risk. One of the simplest, non-invasive methods for PAD detection is the ankle-brachial index (ABI) measurement. The ABI is calculated as the ratio of systolic blood pressure at the ankle (pressure in the posterior tibial artery or the dorsal artery) to the systolic pressure in the arm (in the brachial artery) when the body is in a horizontal position. The physiological value of the ABI is assumed to be between 1 and 1.3; however, these limits vary from study to study. A value less than 0.9 indicates PAD. Some authors propose also measuring the ABI on both sides of the body to highlight possible differences in blood pressure between the opposite arterial segments. The aim of this study was to perform a meta-analysis of the ABI diagnostic criteria used in different publications. Additionally, ABI measurements were performed on 19 healthy patients in age ranged from 20 to 63 years. The results showed a slight dependence between age and the differences between the values obtained from left and right sides of the body.

  17. Brachial artery vasomotion and transducer pressure effect on measurements by active contour segmentation on ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Cary, Theodore W.; Sultan, Laith R.; Sehgal, Chandra M.; Reamer, Courtney B.; Mohler, Emile R.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: To use feed-forward active contours (snakes) to track and measure brachial artery vasomotion on ultrasound images recorded in both transverse and longitudinal views; and to compare the algorithm's performance in each view. Methods: Longitudinal and transverse view ultrasound image sequences of 45 brachial arteries were segmented by feed-forward active contour (FFAC). The segmented regions were used to measure vasomotion artery diameter, cross-sectional area, and distention both as peak-to-peak diameter and as area. ECG waveforms were also simultaneously extracted frame-by-frame by thresholding a running finite-difference image between consecutive images. The arterial and ECG waveforms were compared as they traced each phase of the cardiac cycle. Results: FFAC successfully segmented arteries in longitudinal and transverse views in all 45 cases. The automated analysis took significantly less time than manual tracing, but produced superior, well-behaved arterial waveforms. Automated arterial measurements also had lower interobserver variability as measured by correlation, difference in mean values, and coefficient of variation. Although FFAC successfully segmented both the longitudinal and transverse images, transverse measurements were less variable. The cross-sectional area computed from the longitudinal images was 27% lower than the area measured from transverse images, possibly due to the compression of the artery along the image depth by transducer pressure. Conclusions: FFAC is a robust and sensitive vasomotion segmentation algorithm in both transverse and longitudinal views. Transverse imaging may offer advantages over longitudinal imaging: transverse measurements are more consistent, possibly because the method is less sensitive to variations in transducer pressure during imaging.

  18. Thrombin Injection for Treatment of Brachial Artery Pseudoaneurysm at the Site of a Hemodialysis Fistula: Report of Two Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Timothy W.I.; Abraham, Robert J.

    2000-09-15

    We report two patients with arteriovenous hemodialysis fistulas that were complicated by brachial artery pseudoaneurysms. Each pseudoanerysm was percutaneously thrombosed with an injection of thrombin, using techniques to prevent escape of thrombin into the native brachial artery. In one patient, an angioplasty balloon was inflated across the neck of the aneurysm during thrombin injection. In the second patient, thrombin was injected during ultrasound-guided compression of the neck of the pseudoaneurysm. Complete thrombosis of each pseudoaneurysm was achieved within 30 sec. No ischemic or embolic events occurred. This technique may be useful in treating pseudoaneurysms of smaller peripheral arteries.

  19. Morphological Assessment of Cadaveric Radial, Brachial and Subclavian Arteries: A Neurointerventional Approach

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Ali; Ozkul, Ayca; Shin, Dong Seong; Im, Soo-Bin; Yoon, Seok-Mann

    2015-01-01

    Objective The transradial catheterization (TRC) is becoming widespread, primarily for neurointerventions. Therefore, the evaluation of radial artery puncture in clinical practice and a better understanding of the anatomy are important to improve the safety of neuroendovascular surgery. Methods Ten formalin-fixed adult Korean cadavers were dissected to expose radial artery (RA), brachial artery (BrA) and subclvian artery (ScA), bilaterally. Vessel lengths and diameters were meaured using a caliper and distance between the specific point of vessels and the anatomical landmarks including the radial styloid process, the medial epicondyle of the humerus, the sternoclavicular joint, and the vertebral artery orifice were also measured. Results The average length between the radial (RAPS) and the BrA puncture sites (BrAPS) and between the vertebral artery orifice (VAO) and the BrA bifurcation (BrAB) did not differ between sides (p>0.05). The average length between the radial styloid process (RSP) and the RAPS was 13.41±2.19 mm, and the RSP was 26.85±2.47 mm from the median nerve (MN). The mean length between the medial epicondyle (ME) and the BrAPS as 44.23±5.47 mm, whereas the distance between the ME and the MN was 42.23±4.77 mm. The average VAO-ScA angle was 70.94±6.12°, and the length between the ScA junction (SCJ) and the VAO was 60.30±8.48 mm. Conclusion This study provides basic anatomical information about the radial artery and the brachial route and can help improving new techniques, selection of size and shape of catheters for TRC. This can help neurointerventionists who adopt a transradial neuroendovascular approach and offers comprehensive and safe care to their patients. PMID:26819682

  20. Brachial artery Doppler flux parameters before and after hot flush in Mexican postmenopausal women: preliminary report

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Karina Vázquez; Ortiz, Sergio Rosales

    2016-01-01

    Objective To analyse brachial artery flux parameters in postmenopausal women before and after hot flush. Material and methods Two groups of postmenopausal women were studied: Group I, without vasomotor symptoms (n = 10) and Group II, with vasomotor symptoms (n = 10). In all them a brachial artery Doppler ultrasound was done, measuring before and after hyperaemic stimulus of the arterial diameter (AD), the pulsatility index (PI), and the resistive index (RI). In Group I, measurements were done at baseline and five minutes after. In Group II, measurements were at baseline, and one and five minutes after the hot-flush. Comparison between the groups was done with Mann-Whitney U test, and within the groups with Wilcoxon test. Results No differences were found among the groups in Doppler parameters. When comparing each group separately, in Group I, at baseline and at five minutes measurements, the AD was greater after the hyperaemic stimulus than before it. In group II at baseline, the PI was significantly greater after the hyperaemic stimulus than before to it. At the first and fifth minute, the AD was significantly greater after the hyperaemic stimulus than before to it. Conclusions No differences were found between those who did not have and those who had hot flushes. PMID:27095957

  1. Brachial Artery Conductance During Reactive Hyperemia is Increased in Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Raja-Khan, Nazia; Shuja, Showieb A.; Kunselman, Allen R.; Hogeman, Cynthia S.; Demers, Laurence M.; Gnatuk, Carol L.; Legro, Richard S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To examine changes in brachial artery conductance (BAC) during reactive hyperemia in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) compared to controls. Study Design This is a pilot case-control study performed at a single academic medical center. Changes in BAC during reactive hyperemia were evaluated in 31 women with PCOS and 11 healthy control women. Fasting glucose, insulin, lipids and androgen levels were also determined. A mixed-effects model was used to compare the PCOS curve to the control curve for change in BAC from baseline during reactive hyperemia. Results Body mass index (BMI) and testosterone levels were significantly increased in the PCOS group compared to controls (P < 0.05). In addition, the PCOS group had higher total and LDL cholesterol levels (P = 0.05 and 0.09, respectively). Change in BAC from baseline during reactive hyperemia was significantly increased in the PCOS group compared to controls even after adjusting for age, BMI and LDL cholesterol levels (P < 0.0001). There were no significant differences between the two groups in age, blood pressure, or fasting glucose or insulin levels. Conclusions Brachial artery conductance during reactive hyperemia is significantly increased in women with PCOS compared to controls and may be a novel early indicator of increased cardiovascular risk in women with PCOS. PMID:21112136

  2. Characterizing Methods of Measuring Flow-Mediated Dilation in the Brachial Artery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callender, Ariane R.

    2010-01-01

    Regulation of vascular tone is one of the many important functions of the vascular endothelium. Endothelial dysfunction is a critical early event in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and occurs in the absence of angiographic disease. Flow-Mediated Dilation (FMD) is a noninvasive technique commonly used to evaluate endothelium-dependent vasodilation in humans and gauge the health of the cardiovascular system. Reductions in brachial artery FMD have been strongly correlated with disease progression and are predictive of future cardiac events. The flow stimulus for brachial artery FMD occurs as a result of the increased shear stress following deflation of an occlusion cuff around the upper arm. Using 2-dimensional ultrasound, changes in arterial diameter up to 5-minutes following cuff deflation are calculated from baseline image measurements. Along with pulsed Doppler measures of flow velocity through the artery, flow-mediated, endothelium-dependent vasodilation can be assessed. There is debate among investigators, however, about the proper positioning of the occlusion cuff during FMD testing. It is thought that placement of the cuff around the upper arm may not accurately reflect the impact of nitric oxide, a critically important molecule released as a result of the increased shear stress created by the FMD technique. Data suggest that the production of other endogenous metabolites may also contribute to FMD-related changes when positioning the cuff around the upper arm. To overcome the potential influence of such molecules, researchers now suggest that the occlusion cuff be placed below the elbow allowing a more precise estimate of nitric oxide mediated dilation. The purpose of this study is to compare the differences in FMD between the two methodologies of occlusion cuff placement. In addition, this study will determine the method that is easier for ultrasound technicians to perform and will produce a low coefficient of variance between technicians. Ultimately

  3. Brachial arterial temperature as an indicator of core temperature: proof of concept and potential applications.

    PubMed

    Pawley, Matthew D M; Martinsen, Paul; Mitchell, Simon J; Cheeseman, James F; Merry, Alan F; Willcox, Timothy; Grieve, Robert; Nand, Parma; Davies, Elaine; Warman, Guy R

    2013-06-01

    There is potential for heat loss and hypothermia during anesthesia and also for hyperthermia if heat conservation and active warming measures are not accurately titrated. Accurate temperature monitoring is particularly important in procedures in which the patient is actively cooled and then rewarmed such as during cardiopulmonary bypass surgery (CPB). We simultaneously measured core, nasopharyngeal, and brachial artery temperatures to investigate the last named as a potential peripheral temperature monitoring site. Ten patients undergoing hypothermic CPB were instrumented for simultaneous monitoring of temperatures in the pulmonary artery (PA), aortic arterial inflow (AI), nasopharynx (NP), and brachial artery (BA). Core temperature was defined as PA temperature before and after CPB and the AI temperature during CPB. Mean deviations of BA and NP temperatures from core temperature were calculated for three steady-state periods (before, during, and after CPB). Mean deviation of BA and NP temperatures from AI temperature was also calculated during active rewarming. A total of 1862 measurements were obtained and logged from eight patients. Mean BA and NP deviations from core temperature across the steady-state periods (before, during, and after CBP) were, respectively: .23 +/- .25, -.26 +/- .3, and -.09 +/- .05 degrees C (BA), and .11 +/- .19, -.1 +/- .47, and -.04 +/- .3 degrees C (NP). During steady-state periods, there was no evidence of a difference between the mean BA and NP deviation. During active rewarming, the mean difference between the BA and AI temperatures was .14 +/- .36 degrees C. During this period, NP temperature lagged behind AI and BA temperatures by up to 41 minutes and was up to 5.3 degres C lower than BA (mean difference between BA and NP temperatures was 1.22 +/- .58 degrees C). The BA temperature is an adequate surrogate for core temperature. It also accurately tracks the changing AI temperature during rewarming and is therefore potentially

  4. A correlation study between ankle brachial pressure index and the severity of coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Benyakorn, Thoetphum; Kuanprasert, Sarun; Rerkasem, Kittipan

    2012-06-01

    Previous studies have shown that there was a correlation between low ankle brachial pressure index (ABPI) and the presence of the coronary artery disease (CAD). However, few studies have investigated the correlation between ABPI and the severity of CAD by using a scoring system. The authors aimed to investigate this correlation by using ABPI and CAD diagnosed by coronary angiography (CAG). A total of 213 consecutive patients awaiting CAG in Maharaj Nakorn Chiang Mai Hospital from July 2009 to November 2009 were enrolled in this study. The ABPI was measured before CAG. The severity of CAD was graded on CAG by using SYNTAX scores. The authors found a significantly negative correlation between ABPI and SYNTAX scores (correlation coefficient = -.172, P = .01). The authors concluded that ABPI appeared to correlate negatively with the severity of CAD in the Thai population. PMID:22561522

  5. Endogenous testosterone and brachial artery endothelial function in middle-aged men with symptoms of late-onset hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    Mäkinen, Juuso I; Perheentupa, Antti; Irjala, Kerttu; Pöllänen, Pasi; Mäkinen, Juha; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo; Raitakari, Olli T

    2011-12-01

    In aging men, serum endogenous testosterone is inversely associated with common carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) and directly with beneficial plasma lipid levels; however, the relationship to endothelial function is poorly characterized. We examined the association between serum testosterone and endothelium-dependent brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) in middle-aged to elderly men. A group of 83 men aged 40?69 years (mean 55.9 ± 7.5 [SD]) with andropausal symptoms were studied. We measured their serum lipids, testosterone, luteinizing hormone, mean carotid IMT and brachial artery FMD by high resolution B-mode ultrasound. Brachial FMD correlated inversely with vessel diameter (r = -0.38, p = 0.0004), alcohol consumption (r = -0.22, p = 0.047) and serum testosterone (r = -0.27, p = 0.01), but not with luteinizing hormone. In multivariate analysis, FMD was explained by testosterone (β = -0.17, p = 0.0226), high density lipoprotein cholesterol (β = 4.17, p = 0.0312) and vessel diameter (β = -4.37, p < 0.0001) when adjusted for age, body mass index, triglycerides, blood pressure, carotid IMT, smoking, alcohol consumption, cardiovascular diseases and use of lipid lowering medication (HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors). In middle-aged to elderly men, there is an inverse correlation between serum testosterone and brachial FMD. These data suggest that testosterone may have an adverse effect on systemic endothelial function.

  6. Supracondylar process of the humerus causing brachial artery compression and digital embolization in a fast-pitch softball player. A case report.

    PubMed

    Thompson, J Keith; Edwards, John D

    2005-01-01

    The supracondylar process of the humerus is a rare abnormality found in 0.4-2.7% of the population. It has been documented to cause neurovascular compression in the upper extremity owing to its local impingement on the median nerve and brachial artery at its medial location on the humerus just proximal to the elbow. The authors report the first known case of digital ischemia from embolization of thrombus caused by local compression of the brachial artery attributed to a supracondylar process.

  7. [Solar phase effect on elasticity of the brachial artery and blood flow in humans].

    PubMed

    Mel'nikov, V N; Komliagina, T G; Rechkina, S Iu; Krivoshchekov, S G

    2010-01-01

    Single and double examinations of normal males and females in the course of 11-year solar cycle with the use of oscillovasometry and occlusive plethysmography established a direct correlation between the effective diastolic radius of the brachial artery and solar activity characteristics on the day of examination, i.e. number of solar spots and intensity of radiation with the 10.7 cm wavelength. Other blood flow parameters demonstrated opposite correlations with the factors in males and females. As solar activity increased, females displayed linear decrements of arterial elasticity and regional peripheral resistance and growth of the volumetric blood flow velocity equally at rest and at the peak of post-occlusion reactive hyperemia. In males, the correlations had the reversed sign. Besides, males were noted to reduce venous reserve and venous outflow from antebrachial muscles proportionally to the increase of Wolf number. It is inferred that elevated solar activity may be responsible for impairment of the feeling of well-being of people with reduced cardiovascular reserve, particularly in space tight or at high altitudes in the absence of or under weak protection of the geomagnetic field and ozone layer.

  8. Improved analysis of brachial artery ultrasound using a novel edge-detection software system.

    PubMed

    Woodman, R J; Playford, D A; Watts, G F; Cheetham, C; Reed, C; Taylor, R R; Puddey, I B; Beilin, L J; Burke, V; Mori, T A; Green, D

    2001-08-01

    Brachial artery ultrasound is commonly employed for noninvasive assessment of endothelial function. However, analysis is observer dependent and susceptible to errors. We describe studies on a computerized edge-detection and wall-tracking software program to allow more accurate and reproducible measurement. In study 1, three purpose-built Perspex phantom arteries, 3.00, 4.00, and 6.00 mm in diameter, were measured with the software. There was a mean bias of 11 microm (P < 0.001 at each level) between known and measured values; the mean resolving power of the software was estimated as 8.3 microm. In study 2, the mean intraobserver coefficient of variation of repeated measures of flow-mediated dilation (FMD) using the software (6.7%) was significantly lower than that for traditional manual measurements using the intima-lumen interfaces (24.8%, P < 0.05) and intima-media interfaces (32.5%, P < 0.05). In study 3, 24 healthy volunteers underwent repeat testing twice within 1 wk; the coefficients of variation for between-visit reproducibility of FMD and response to glyceryl trinitrate using the software were 14.7 and 17.6%, respectively. Assuming 80% power and an alpha of 0.05, eight subjects with matched controls would be required, in a parallel designed study, to detect an absolute 2.5% change in FMD. In summary, we have developed a semiautomated computerized vascular ultrasound analysis system that will improve the power of clinical intervention studies to detect small changes in arterial diameter.

  9. Non-invasive assessment of peripheral arterial disease: Automated ankle brachial index measurement and pulse volume analysis compared to duplex scan

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Jane EA; Williams, Paul; Davies, Jane H

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This cross-sectional study aimed to individually and cumulatively compare sensitivity and specificity of the (1) ankle brachial index and (2) pulse volume waveform analysis recorded by the same automated device, with the presence or absence of peripheral arterial disease being verified by ultrasound duplex scan. Methods: Patients (n=205) referred for lower limb arterial assessment underwent ankle brachial index measurement and pulse volume waveform recording using volume plethysmography, followed by ultrasound duplex scan. The presence of peripheral arterial disease was recorded if ankle brachial index <0.9; pulse volume waveform was graded as 2, 3 or 4; or if haemodynamically significant stenosis >50% was evident with ultrasound duplex scan. Outcome measure was agreement between the measured ankle brachial index and interpretation of pulse volume waveform for peripheral arterial disease diagnosis, using ultrasound duplex scan as the reference standard. Results: Sensitivity of ankle brachial index was 79%, specificity 91% and overall accuracy 88%. Pulse volume waveform sensitivity was 97%, specificity 81% and overall accuracy 85%. The combined sensitivity of ankle brachial index and pulse volume waveform was 100%, specificity 76% and overall accuracy 85%. Conclusion: Combining these two diagnostic modalities within one device provided a highly accurate method of ruling out peripheral arterial disease, which could be utilised in primary care to safely reduce unnecessary secondary care referrals. PMID:27493755

  10. Endoscopic Excision of Supracondylar Humeral Spur for Decompression of the Median Nerve and Brachial Artery

    PubMed Central

    Bain, Gregory; Gupta, Prince; Phadnis, Joideep; Singhi, Prahalad K.

    2016-01-01

    The humeral supracondylar process and Struthers ligament comprise a relatively rare but well-known anatomic variant. They are usually asymptomatic but may produce clinical symptoms related to compression of the median nerve or brachial artery below the ligament. Previously, surgery has been performed with an open ligament release and supracondylar process excision. This article reports on the use of endoscopic findings and the method of ligament release and process excision. Endoscopy is a minimally invasive technique that provides excellent visualization and enables the surgeon to perform dissection with magnification and precision. It allows the surgeon to introduce open surgical techniques into the depths of the wound in a controlled manner. Because of the dead space created, there is a risk of hematoma formation. Many of the concepts used in open surgery are now being used for endoscopic surgery, and vice versa. The barriers and differences among endoscopic, arthroscopic, and open procedures are being broken down. We report another endoscopic technique, which is part of the ongoing evolution of musculoskeletal surgery. PMID:27073779

  11. Endoscopic Excision of Supracondylar Humeral Spur for Decompression of the Median Nerve and Brachial Artery.

    PubMed

    Bain, Gregory; Gupta, Prince; Phadnis, Joideep; Singhi, Prahalad K

    2016-02-01

    The humeral supracondylar process and Struthers ligament comprise a relatively rare but well-known anatomic variant. They are usually asymptomatic but may produce clinical symptoms related to compression of the median nerve or brachial artery below the ligament. Previously, surgery has been performed with an open ligament release and supracondylar process excision. This article reports on the use of endoscopic findings and the method of ligament release and process excision. Endoscopy is a minimally invasive technique that provides excellent visualization and enables the surgeon to perform dissection with magnification and precision. It allows the surgeon to introduce open surgical techniques into the depths of the wound in a controlled manner. Because of the dead space created, there is a risk of hematoma formation. Many of the concepts used in open surgery are now being used for endoscopic surgery, and vice versa. The barriers and differences among endoscopic, arthroscopic, and open procedures are being broken down. We report another endoscopic technique, which is part of the ongoing evolution of musculoskeletal surgery.

  12. Endoscopic Excision of Supracondylar Humeral Spur for Decompression of the Median Nerve and Brachial Artery.

    PubMed

    Bain, Gregory; Gupta, Prince; Phadnis, Joideep; Singhi, Prahalad K

    2016-02-01

    The humeral supracondylar process and Struthers ligament comprise a relatively rare but well-known anatomic variant. They are usually asymptomatic but may produce clinical symptoms related to compression of the median nerve or brachial artery below the ligament. Previously, surgery has been performed with an open ligament release and supracondylar process excision. This article reports on the use of endoscopic findings and the method of ligament release and process excision. Endoscopy is a minimally invasive technique that provides excellent visualization and enables the surgeon to perform dissection with magnification and precision. It allows the surgeon to introduce open surgical techniques into the depths of the wound in a controlled manner. Because of the dead space created, there is a risk of hematoma formation. Many of the concepts used in open surgery are now being used for endoscopic surgery, and vice versa. The barriers and differences among endoscopic, arthroscopic, and open procedures are being broken down. We report another endoscopic technique, which is part of the ongoing evolution of musculoskeletal surgery. PMID:27073779

  13. Ultrasound Assessment of Endothelial-Dependent Flow-Mediated Vasodilation of the Brachial Artery in Clinical Research

    PubMed Central

    Alley, Hugh; Owens, Christopher D.; Gasper, Warren J.; Grenon, S. Marlene

    2014-01-01

    The vascular endothelium is a monolayer of cells that cover the interior of blood vessels and provide both structural and functional roles. The endothelium acts as a barrier, preventing leukocyte adhesion and aggregation, as well as controlling permeability to plasma components. Functionally, the endothelium affects vessel tone. Endothelial dysfunction is an imbalance between the chemical species which regulate vessel tone, thombroresistance, cellular proliferation and mitosis. It is the first step in atherosclerosis and is associated with coronary artery disease, peripheral artery disease, heart failure, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia. The first demonstration of endothelial dysfunction involved direct infusion of acetylcholine and quantitative coronary angiography. Acetylcholine binds to muscarinic receptors on the endothelial cell surface, leading to an increase of intracellular calcium and increased nitric oxide (NO) production. In subjects with an intact endothelium, vasodilation was observed while subjects with endothelial damage experienced paradoxical vasoconstriction. There exists a non-invasive, in vivo method for measuring endothelial function in peripheral arteries using high-resolution B-mode ultrasound. The endothelial function of peripheral arteries is closely related to coronary artery function. This technique measures the percent diameter change in the brachial artery during a period of reactive hyperemia following limb ischemia. This technique, known as endothelium-dependent, flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD) has value in clinical research settings. However, a number of physiological and technical issues can affect the accuracy of the results and appropriate guidelines for the technique have been published. Despite the guidelines, FMD remains heavily operator dependent and presents a steep learning curve. This article presents a standardized method for measuring FMD in the brachial artery on the upper arm and offers suggestions to reduce intra

  14. Relationship between brachial artery blood flow and total [hemoglobin+myoglobin] during post-occlusive reactive hyperemia.

    PubMed

    Bopp, Christopher M; Townsend, Dana K; Warren, Steve; Barstow, Thomas J

    2014-01-01

    The associations between macrovascular and microvascular responses reported previously during post-occlusive reactive hyperemia have been inconsistent. The purpose of this study was therefore to determine the temporal relationship between the reactive hyperemic responses within a conduit artery and the downstream microvessels. Conduit artery blood flow was measured in the brachial artery with pulsed Doppler ultrasound. A potential analog of microvascular flow, changes in skeletal muscle total[hemoglobin+myoglobin] (T[Hb+Mb]), was assessed with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). We found a high degree of correlation between these two measures (r=0.91). Cross-correlation analysis revealed two distinct response patterns. In 10 of our 15 subjects there was time displacement between peak brachial artery blood flow (BABF) and T[Hb+Mb] responses; in the remaining 5 the peaks were coincident. Granger causality testing suggested that reactive hyperemia in the macrovessel determined hyperemia in the downstream microvessels in all 15 study subjects. Time constants for the on (τ1) and off (τ2) kinetics of each response were calculated; our initial hypothesis was that τ1 and τ2 for T[Hb+Mb] would correlate with τ1 and τ2 for BABF, respectively. However, only for τ2 was this observed (r=0.52; p<0.05). No similar relationship was observed for τ1. Adipose tissue thickness did not influence either time constant for T[Hb+Mb]. Taken together, our results show that the temporal characteristics of the hyperemic response in the conduit artery are qualitatively reflected in the downstream microvasculature, but mechanisms for quantitative differences remain to be identified.

  15. Feed-forward active contour analysis for improved brachial artery reactivity testing.

    PubMed

    Pugliese, Daniel N; Sehgal, Chandra M; Sultan, Laith R; Reamer, Courtney B; Mohler, Emile R

    2016-08-01

    The object of this study was to utilize a novel feed-forward active contour (FFAC) algorithm to find a reproducible technique for analysis of brachial artery reactivity. Flow-mediated dilation (FMD) is an important marker of vascular endothelial function but has not been adopted for widespread clinical use given its technical limitations, including inter-observer variability and differences in technique across clinical sites. We developed a novel FFAC algorithm with the goal of validating a more reliable standard. Forty-six healthy volunteers underwent FMD measurement according to the standard technique. Ultrasound videos lasting 5-10 seconds each were obtained pre-cuff inflation and at minutes 1 through 5 post-cuff deflation in longitudinal and transverse views. Automated segmentation using the FFAC algorithm with initial boundary definition from three different observers was used to analyze the images to measure diameter/cross-sectional area over the cardiac cycle. The %FMD was calculated for average, minimum, and maximum diameters/areas. Using the FFAC algorithm, the population-specific coefficient of variation (CV) at end-diastole was 3.24% for transverse compared to 9.96% for longitudinal measurements; the subject-specific CV was 15.03% compared to 57.41%, respectively. For longitudinal measurements made via the conventional method, the population-specific CV was 4.77% and subject-specific CV was 117.79%. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for transverse measurements was 0.97 (95% CI: 0.95-0.98) compared to 0.90 (95% CI: 0.84-0.94) for longitudinal measurements with FFAC and 0.72 (95% CI: 0.51-0.84) for conventional measurements. In conclusion, transverse views using the novel FFAC method provide less inter-observer variability than traditional longitudinal views. Improved reproducibility may allow adoption of FMD testing in a clinical setting. The FFAC algorithm is a robust technique that should be evaluated further for its ability to replace the

  16. Feed-forward active contour analysis for improved brachial artery reactivity testing.

    PubMed

    Pugliese, Daniel N; Sehgal, Chandra M; Sultan, Laith R; Reamer, Courtney B; Mohler, Emile R

    2016-08-01

    The object of this study was to utilize a novel feed-forward active contour (FFAC) algorithm to find a reproducible technique for analysis of brachial artery reactivity. Flow-mediated dilation (FMD) is an important marker of vascular endothelial function but has not been adopted for widespread clinical use given its technical limitations, including inter-observer variability and differences in technique across clinical sites. We developed a novel FFAC algorithm with the goal of validating a more reliable standard. Forty-six healthy volunteers underwent FMD measurement according to the standard technique. Ultrasound videos lasting 5-10 seconds each were obtained pre-cuff inflation and at minutes 1 through 5 post-cuff deflation in longitudinal and transverse views. Automated segmentation using the FFAC algorithm with initial boundary definition from three different observers was used to analyze the images to measure diameter/cross-sectional area over the cardiac cycle. The %FMD was calculated for average, minimum, and maximum diameters/areas. Using the FFAC algorithm, the population-specific coefficient of variation (CV) at end-diastole was 3.24% for transverse compared to 9.96% for longitudinal measurements; the subject-specific CV was 15.03% compared to 57.41%, respectively. For longitudinal measurements made via the conventional method, the population-specific CV was 4.77% and subject-specific CV was 117.79%. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for transverse measurements was 0.97 (95% CI: 0.95-0.98) compared to 0.90 (95% CI: 0.84-0.94) for longitudinal measurements with FFAC and 0.72 (95% CI: 0.51-0.84) for conventional measurements. In conclusion, transverse views using the novel FFAC method provide less inter-observer variability than traditional longitudinal views. Improved reproducibility may allow adoption of FMD testing in a clinical setting. The FFAC algorithm is a robust technique that should be evaluated further for its ability to replace the

  17. User-guided automated segmentation of time-series ultrasound images for measuring vasoreactivity of the brachial artery induced by flow mediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sehgal, Chandra M.; Kao, Yen H.; Cary, Ted W.; Arger, Peter H.; Mohler, Emile R.

    2005-04-01

    Endothelial dysfunction in response to vasoactive stimuli is closely associated with diseases such as atherosclerosis, hypertension and congestive heart failure. The current method of using ultrasound to image the brachial artery along the longitudinal axis is insensitive for measuring the small vasodilatation that occurs in response to flow mediation. The goal of this study is to overcome this limitation by using cross-sectional imaging of the brachial artery in conjunction with the User-Guided Automated Boundary Detection (UGABD) algorithm for extracting arterial boundaries. High-resolution ultrasound imaging was performed on rigid plastic tubing, on elastic rubber tubing phantoms with steady and pulsatile flow, and on the brachial artery of a healthy volunteer undergoing reactive hyperemia. The area of cross section of time-series images was analyzed by UGABD by propagating the boundary from one frame to the next. The UGABD results were compared by linear correlation with those obtained by manual tracing. UGABD measured the cross-sectional area of the phantom tubing to within 5% of the true area. The algorithm correctly detected pulsatile vasomotion in phantoms and in the brachial artery. A comparison of area measurements made using UGABD with those made by manual tracings yielded a correlation of 0.9 and 0.8 for phantoms and arteries, respectively. The peak vasodilatation due to reactive hyperemia was two orders of magnitude greater in pixel count than that measured by longitudinal imaging. Cross-sectional imaging is more sensitive than longitudinal imaging for measuring flow-mediated dilatation of brachial artery, and thus may be more suitable for evaluating endothelial dysfunction.

  18. Relations of Arterial Stiffness and Brachial Flow-Mediated Dilation With New-Onset Atrial Fibrillation: The Framingham Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Amir Y; Wang, Na; Yin, Xiaoyan; Larson, Martin G; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Hamburg, Naomi M; Magnani, Jared W; Ellinor, Patrick T; Lubitz, Steven A; Mitchell, Gary F; Benjamin, Emelia J; McManus, David D

    2016-09-01

    The relations of measures of arterial stiffness, pulsatile hemodynamic load, and endothelial dysfunction to atrial fibrillation (AF) remain poorly understood. To better understand the pathophysiology of AF, we examined associations between noninvasive measures of vascular function and new-onset AF. The study sample included participants aged ≥45 years from the Framingham Heart Study offspring and third-generation cohorts. Using Cox proportional hazards regression models, we examined relations between incident AF and tonometry measures of arterial stiffness (carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity), wave reflection (augmentation index), pressure pulsatility (central pulse pressure), endothelial function (flow-mediated dilation), resting brachial arterial diameter, and hyperemic flow. AF developed in 407/5797 participants in the tonometry sample and 270/3921 participants in the endothelial function sample during follow-up (median 7.1 years, maximum 10 years). Higher augmentation index (hazard ratio, 1.16; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.32; P=0.02), baseline brachial artery diameter (hazard ratio, 1.20; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.43; P=0.04), and lower flow-mediated dilation (hazard ratio, 0.79; 95% confidence interval, 0.63-0.99; P=0.04) were associated with increased risk of incident AF. Central pulse pressure, when adjusted for age, sex, and hypertension (hazard ratio, 1.14; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.28; P=0.02) was associated with incident AF. Higher pulsatile load assessed by central pulse pressure and greater apparent wave reflection measured by augmentation index were associated with increased risk of incident AF. Vascular endothelial dysfunction may precede development of AF. These measures may be additional risk factors or markers of subclinical cardiovascular disease associated with increased risk of incident AF. PMID:27456517

  19. A young man with intimomedial mucoid degeneration of the brachial artery.

    PubMed

    Raber, Menno H; Meerwaldt, Robbert; van Det, Rob J

    2011-03-01

    Intimomedial mucoid degeneration is a rare disorder and has been described as a distinctly different entity from Erdheim's cystic medial necrosis. Most studies show a strong predominance in African American females with hypertension. In our case report, we describe the presence of a large brachial aneurysm in a young white male with intimomedial mucoid degeneration. PMID:21215586

  20. A young man with intimomedial mucoid degeneration of the brachial artery.

    PubMed

    Raber, Menno H; Meerwaldt, Robbert; van Det, Rob J

    2011-03-01

    Intimomedial mucoid degeneration is a rare disorder and has been described as a distinctly different entity from Erdheim's cystic medial necrosis. Most studies show a strong predominance in African American females with hypertension. In our case report, we describe the presence of a large brachial aneurysm in a young white male with intimomedial mucoid degeneration.

  1. Snare-assisted Trans-brachial Stenting for the Cervical Internal Carotid Artery Stenosis of Patient with Aorto-Iliac Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Oowaki, H.; Matsuura, N; Ishikawa, M.

    2006-01-01

    Summary We describe a case of endo-luminal stent placement with Snare-assist for a cervical internal carotid artery stenosis in which percutaneous access was obtained via the brachial artery. A 68-year-old man with known disease of the carotid, peripheral, and coronary arteries, with Human T-cell Lymphotrophic Virus type-1 (HTLV-1) Associated Myelopathy (HAM) presented for endoluminal revascularization of a severe, progressive right internal carotid artery stenosis, but with aorto-iliac occlusion. Transfemoral access was complicated by an aorto-iliac occlusion. A trans-brachial approach was successfully attempted, and a SMARTer stent (Cordis Endovascular, Miami Lakes, FL) was successfully placed through a 7-French Shuttle-SL guide sheath (Cook, Bloomington) under Snare-assist. The trans-brachial approach is becoming an increasingly viable alternative route for stent placement in patients with contra-indicated or complicated femoral access routes. As devices become increasingly more pliable and smaller, the trans-brachial route will be used with increasing frequency in the select patient population for stenting of both the cervical and intracranial circulation. PMID:20569637

  2. The Relation Between Ankle-Brachial Index (ABI) and Coronary Artery Disease Severity and Risk Factors: An Angiographic Study

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Masoumeh; Heidari, Ramin; Mostanfar, Baharak; Tavassoli, Aliakbar; Roghani, Farshad

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND The current study aims to determine the relation between ankle–brachial index (ABI) and angiographic findings and major cardiovascular risk factors in patients with suspected coronary artery diseases (CAD) in Isfahan. METHODS In this cross-sectional descriptive-analytic research, patients with suspected CAD were studied. Characteristics of studied subjects including demographics, familial history, past medical history and atherosclerotic risk factors such as diabetes mellitus, hypertension, hyperlipidemia and smoking were obtained using a standard questionnaire. ABI was measured in all studied patients. ABI≤0.9 (ABI+) was considered as peripheral vessel disease and ABI>0.9 (ABI-) was considered as normal. Then, all studied patients underwent coronary artery angiography. The results of the questionnaire and angiographic findings were compared in ABI+ and ABI- groups. Data were analyzed by SPSS 15 using ANOVA, t-test, Spearman's rank correlation coefficient, and discriminant analysis. RESULTS In this study, 125 patients were investigated. ABI≤0.9 was seen in 25 patients (20%). The prevalence of ABI+ among men and women was 25.9% and 7.5%, respectively (P=0.01). The prevalence of atherosclerotic risk factors was significantly higher in ABI+ patients than in ABI- ones (P<0.05). ABI+ patients had more significant stenosis than ABI- ones. The mean of occlusion was significantly higher in ABI+ patients with left main artery (LMA), right coronary artery (RCA), left anterior descending artery (LAD), diagonal artery 1 (D1) and left circumflex artery (LCX) involvements (P<0.05). CONCLUSION The findings of this research indicated that ABI could be a useful method in assessing both the atherosclerotic risk factors and the degree of coronary involvements in suspected patients. However, in order to make more accurate decisions for using this method in diagnosing and preventing CAD, we should plan further studies in large sample sizes of general population. PMID

  3. [Brachial artery endothelial function in teenagers with obesity depending on severity of clinical, trophological and metabolic disorders].

    PubMed

    Maskova, G S; Chernaia, N L; Nagornova, E Iu; Fomina, O V; Byteva, T A

    2014-01-01

    We carried out complex examination of 68 adolescents aged 11-17 years with primary obesity which in addition to assessment of clinical-anamnestic, laboratory data and functional parameters of cardiovascular system included registration of reaction of brachial artery endothelium to reactive hyperemia. Vascular endothelial dysfunction (VED) was found in 66% of obese teenagers. Obesity in adolescents with VED was characterized by aggravated course with higher fat mass index (36.8 +/- 4.39%) and prevalence of hypothalamic (42%) and metabolic (8.8%) syndromes. Stable arterial hypertension (AH) found in 37% of examined adolescents was 1.5 times more often registered in those with VED. We distinguished 4 groups of adolescents with various degree of risk of development of cardiovascular disorders: with stable AH and VED (group I), with stable AH and normal function of vascular endothelium (group II), with normal or labile arterial pressure with VED (group III), with normal or labile arterial pressure with normal function of vascular endothelium. It is expedient to supplement examination of obese adolescents with assessment of the state of vascular endothelium aiming at determination of degree of risk of development of atherosclerosis and/or stable AH.

  4. [Case of cerebellar and spinal cord infarction presenting with acute brachial diplegia due to right vertebral artery occlusion].

    PubMed

    Fujii, Takayuki; Santa, Yo; Akutagawa, Noriko; Nagano, Sukehisa; Yoshimura, Takeo

    2012-01-01

    A 73-year-old man was admitted for evaluation of sudden onset of dizziness, bilateral shoulder pain, and brachial diplegia. Neurological examination revealed severe bilateral weakness of the triceps brachii, wrist flexor, and wrist extensor muscles. There was no paresis of the lower limbs. His gait was ataxic. Pinprick and temperature sensations were diminished at the bilateral C6-C8 dermatomes. Vibration and position senses were intact. An MRI of the head revealed a right cerebellar infarction and occlusion of the right vertebral artery. An MRI of the cervical spine on T₂ weighted imaging (T₂WI) showed cord compression at the C3/4-C5/6 level secondary to spondylotic degeneration without any intramedullary signal changes of the cord. On the following day, however, high-signal lesions on T₂WI appeared in the C5-C6 spinal cord, suggesting cord infarction. Unilateral vertebral artery occlusion does not usually result in cervical cord infarction because of anastomosis of arteries. Because of the long-term mechanical compression in our case, it was likely that cervical cord ischemia was present before the onset of symptoms. On the basis of chronic cord compression, our case suggests that occlusion of a unilateral vertebral artery could cause cervical cord infarction.

  5. Associations and clinical relevance of aortic-brachial artery stiffness mismatch, aortic reservoir function, and central pressure augmentation.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Martin G; Hughes, Alun D; Davies, Justin E; Sharman, James E

    2015-10-01

    Central augmentation pressure (AP) and index (AIx) predict cardiovascular events and mortality, but underlying physiological mechanisms remain disputed. While traditionally believed to relate to wave reflections arising from proximal arterial impedance (and stiffness) mismatching, recent evidence suggests aortic reservoir function may be a more dominant contributor to AP and AIx. Our aim was therefore to determine relationships among aortic-brachial stiffness mismatching, AP, AIx, aortic reservoir function, and end-organ disease. Aortic (aPWV) and brachial (bPWV) pulse wave velocity were measured in 359 individuals (aged 61 ± 9, 49% male). Central AP, AIx, and aortic reservoir indexes were derived from radial tonometry. Participants were stratified by positive (bPWV > aPWV), negligible (bPWV ≈ aPWV), or negative stiffness mismatch (bPWV < aPWV). Left-ventricular mass index (LVMI) was measured by two-dimensional-echocardiography. Central AP and AIx were higher with negative stiffness mismatch vs. negligible or positive stiffness mismatch (11 ± 6 vs. 10 ± 6 vs. 8 ± 6 mmHg, P < 0.001 and 24 ± 10 vs. 24 ± 11 vs. 21 ± 13%, P = 0.042). Stiffness mismatch (bPWV-aPWV) was negatively associated with AP (r = -0.18, P = 0.001) but not AIx (r = -0.06, P = 0.27). Aortic reservoir pressure strongly correlated to AP (r = 0.81, P < 0.001) and AIx (r = 0.62, P < 0.001) independent of age, sex, heart rate, mean arterial pressure, and height (standardized β = 0.61 and 0.12, P ≤ 0.001). Aortic reservoir pressure independently predicted abnormal LVMI (β = 0.13, P = 0.024). Positive aortic-brachial stiffness mismatch does not result in higher AP or AIx. Aortic reservoir function, rather than discrete wave reflection from proximal arterial stiffness mismatching, provides a better model description of AP and AIx and also has clinical relevance as evidenced by an independent association of aortic reservoir pressure with LVMI.

  6. Children and Adolescent Obesity Associates with Pressure-Dependent and Age-Related Increase in Carotid and Femoral Arteries' Stiffness and Not in Brachial Artery, Indicative of Nonintrinsic Arterial Wall Alteration

    PubMed Central

    García-Espinosa, Victoria; Curcio, Santiago; Castro, Juan Manuel; Arana, Maite; Giachetto, Gustavo; Chiesa, Pedro; Zócalo, Yanina

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To analyze if childhood obesity associates with changes in elastic, transitional, and/or muscular arteries' stiffness. Methods. 221 subjects (4–15 years, 92 females) were assigned to normal weight (NW, n = 137) or obesity (OB, n = 84) groups, considering their body mass index z-score. Age groups were defined: 4–8; 8–12; 12–15 years old. Carotid, femoral, and brachial artery local stiffness was determined through systodiastolic pressure-diameter and stress-strain relationships. To this end, arterial diameter and peripheral and aortic blood pressure (BP) levels and waveforms were recorded. Carotid-femoral, femoropedal, and carotid-radial pulse wave velocities were determined to evaluate aortic, lower-limb, and upper-limb regional arterial stiffness, respectively. Correlation analysis between stiffness parameters and BP was done. Results. Compared to NW, OB subjects showed higher peripheral and central BP and carotid and femoral stiffness, reaching statistical significance in subjects aged 12 and older. Arterial stiffness differences disappeared when levels were normalized for BP. There were no differences in intrinsic arterial wall stiffness (elastic modulus), BP stiffness relationships, and regional stiffness parameters. Conclusion. OB associates with BP-dependent and age-related increase in carotid and femoral (but not brachial) stiffness. Stiffness changes would not be explained by intrinsic arterial wall alterations but could be associated with the higher BP levels observed in obese children. PMID:27066273

  7. Children and Adolescent Obesity Associates with Pressure-Dependent and Age-Related Increase in Carotid and Femoral Arteries' Stiffness and Not in Brachial Artery, Indicative of Nonintrinsic Arterial Wall Alteration.

    PubMed

    García-Espinosa, Victoria; Curcio, Santiago; Castro, Juan Manuel; Arana, Maite; Giachetto, Gustavo; Chiesa, Pedro; Zócalo, Yanina; Bia, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To analyze if childhood obesity associates with changes in elastic, transitional, and/or muscular arteries' stiffness. Methods. 221 subjects (4-15 years, 92 females) were assigned to normal weight (NW, n = 137) or obesity (OB, n = 84) groups, considering their body mass index z-score. Age groups were defined: 4-8; 8-12; 12-15 years old. Carotid, femoral, and brachial artery local stiffness was determined through systodiastolic pressure-diameter and stress-strain relationships. To this end, arterial diameter and peripheral and aortic blood pressure (BP) levels and waveforms were recorded. Carotid-femoral, femoropedal, and carotid-radial pulse wave velocities were determined to evaluate aortic, lower-limb, and upper-limb regional arterial stiffness, respectively. Correlation analysis between stiffness parameters and BP was done. Results. Compared to NW, OB subjects showed higher peripheral and central BP and carotid and femoral stiffness, reaching statistical significance in subjects aged 12 and older. Arterial stiffness differences disappeared when levels were normalized for BP. There were no differences in intrinsic arterial wall stiffness (elastic modulus), BP stiffness relationships, and regional stiffness parameters. Conclusion. OB associates with BP-dependent and age-related increase in carotid and femoral (but not brachial) stiffness. Stiffness changes would not be explained by intrinsic arterial wall alterations but could be associated with the higher BP levels observed in obese children.

  8. Change in Elasticity Caused by Flow-Mediated Dilation Measured Only for Intima-Media Region of Brachial Artery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Masataka; Hasegawa, Hideyuki; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2005-08-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is considered to be an initial step of arteriosclerosis [R. Ross: N. Engl. J. Med. 340 (2004) 115]. For the assessment of the endothelium function, brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) caused by increased blood flow has been evaluated with ultrasonic diagnostic equipment. In the case of conventional methods, the change in artery diameter caused by FMD is measured [M. Hashimoto et al.: Circulation 92 (1995) 3431]. Although the arterial wall has a layered structure (intima, media, and adventitia), such a structure is not taken into account in conventional methods because the change in diameter depends on the characteristic of the entire wall. However, smooth muscle present only in the media contributes to FMD, whereas the collagen-rich hard adventitia does not contribute. In this study, we measure the change in elasticity of only the intima-media region including smooth muscle using the phased tracking method [H. Kanai et al.: IEEE Trans. Ultrason. Ferroelectr. Freq. Control 43 (1996) 791]. From the change in elasticity, FMD measured only for the intima-media region by our proposed method was found to be more sensitive than that measured for the entire wall by the conventional method.

  9. Sex-specific effects of habitual aerobic exercise on brachial artery flow-mediated dilation in middle-aged and older adults.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Gary L; Eskurza, Iratxe; Walker, Ashley E; Fay, Tara N; Seals, Douglas R

    2011-01-01

    Brachial artery FMD (flow-mediated dilation) is impaired with aging and is associated with an increased risk of CVD (cardiovascular disease). In the present study, we determined whether regular aerobic exercise improves brachial artery FMD in MA/O (middle-aged/older) men and post-menopausal women. In sedentary MA/O adults (age, 55-79 years) without CVD, 8 weeks of brisk walking (6 days/week for approx. 50 min/day; randomized controlled design) increased treadmill time approx. 20% in both MA/O men (n=11) and post-menopausal women (n=15) (P<0.01), without altering body composition or circulating CVD risk factors. Brachial artery FMD increased >50% in the MA/O men (from 4.6±0.6 to 7.1±0.6%; P<0.01), but did not change in the post-menopausal women (5.1±0.8 compared with 5.4±0.7%; P=0.50). No changes occurred in the non-exercising controls. In a separate cross-sectional study (n=167), brachial artery FMD was approx. 50% greater in endurance-exercise-trained (6.4±0.4%; n=45) compared with sedentary (4.3±0.3%; n=60) MA/O men (P<0.001), whereas there were no differences between endurance-trained (5.3±0.7%, n=20) and sedentary (5.6±0.5%, n=42) post-menopausal women (P=0.70). Brachial artery lumen diameter, peak hyperaemic shear rate and endothelium-independent dilation did not differ with exercise intervention or in the endurance exercise compared with sedentary groups. In conclusion, regular aerobic exercise is consistently associated with enhanced brachial artery FMD in MA/O men, but not in post-menopausal women. Some post-menopausal women without CVD may be less responsive to habitual aerobic exercise than MA/O men.

  10. High dietary sodium reduces brachial artery flow-mediated dilation in humans with salt-sensitive and salt-resistant blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Evan L; Brian, Michael S; Ramick, Meghan G; Lennon-Edwards, Shannon; Edwards, David G; Farquhar, William B

    2015-06-15

    Recent studies demonstrate that high dietary sodium (HS) impairs endothelial function in those with salt-resistant (SR) blood pressure (BP). The effect of HS on endothelial function in those with salt-sensitive (SS) BP is not currently known. We hypothesized that HS would impair brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) to a greater extent in SS compared with SR adults. Ten SR (age 42 ± 5 yr, 5 men, 5 women) and 10 SS (age 39 ± 5 yr, 5 men, 5 women) healthy, normotensive participants were enrolled in a controlled feeding study consisting of a run-in diet followed by a 7-day low dietary sodium (LS) (20 mmol/day) and a 7-day HS (300 mmol/day) diet in random order. Brachial artery FMD and 24-h BP were assessed on the last day of each diet. SS BP was individually assessed and defined as a change in 24-h mean arterial pressure (MAP) of >5 mmHg between the LS and HS diets (ΔMAP: SR -0.6 ± 1.2, SS 7.7 ± 0.4 mmHg). Brachial artery FMD was lower in both SS and SR individuals during the HS diet (P < 0.001), and did not differ between groups (P > 0.05) (FMD: SR LS 10.6 ± 1.3%, SR HS 7.2 ± 1.5%, SS LS 12.5 ± 1.7%, SS HS 7.8 ± 1.4%). These data indicate that an HS diet impairs brachial artery FMD to a similar extent in adults with SS BP and SR BP.

  11. High dietary sodium reduces brachial artery flow-mediated dilation in humans with salt-sensitive and salt-resistant blood pressure

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Evan L.; Brian, Michael S.; Ramick, Meghan G.; Lennon-Edwards, Shannon; Edwards, David G.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies demonstrate that high dietary sodium (HS) impairs endothelial function in those with salt-resistant (SR) blood pressure (BP). The effect of HS on endothelial function in those with salt-sensitive (SS) BP is not currently known. We hypothesized that HS would impair brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) to a greater extent in SS compared with SR adults. Ten SR (age 42 ± 5 yr, 5 men, 5 women) and 10 SS (age 39 ± 5 yr, 5 men, 5 women) healthy, normotensive participants were enrolled in a controlled feeding study consisting of a run-in diet followed by a 7-day low dietary sodium (LS) (20 mmol/day) and a 7-day HS (300 mmol/day) diet in random order. Brachial artery FMD and 24-h BP were assessed on the last day of each diet. SS BP was individually assessed and defined as a change in 24-h mean arterial pressure (MAP) of >5 mmHg between the LS and HS diets (ΔMAP: SR −0.6 ± 1.2, SS 7.7 ± 0.4 mmHg). Brachial artery FMD was lower in both SS and SR individuals during the HS diet (P < 0.001), and did not differ between groups (P > 0.05) (FMD: SR LS 10.6 ± 1.3%, SR HS 7.2 ± 1.5%, SS LS 12.5 ± 1.7%, SS HS 7.8 ± 1.4%). These data indicate that an HS diet impairs brachial artery FMD to a similar extent in adults with SS BP and SR BP. PMID:26078434

  12. Correlation between Patient-Reported Symptoms and Ankle-Brachial Index after Revascularization for Peripheral Arterial Disease.

    PubMed

    Je, Hyung Gon; Kim, Bo Hyun; Cho, Kyoung Im; Jang, Jae Sik; Park, Yong Hyun; Spertus, John

    2015-05-18

    Improvement in quality of life (QoL) is a primary treatment goal for patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). The current study aimed to quantify improvement in the health status of PAD patients following peripheral revascularization using the peripheral artery questionnaire (PAQ) and ankle-brachial index (ABI), and to evaluate possible correlation between the two methods. The PAQ and ABI were assessed in 149 symptomatic PAD patients before, and three months after peripheral revascularization. Mean PAQ summary scores improved significantly three months after revascularization (+49.3 ± 15 points, p < 0.001). PAQ scores relating to patient symptoms showed the largest improvement following revascularization. The smallest increases were seen in reported treatment satisfaction (all p's < 0.001). As expected the ABI of treated limbs showed significant improvement post-revascularization (p < 0.001). ABI after revascularization correlated with patient-reported changes in the physical function and QoL domains of the PAQ. Twenty-two percent of PAD patients were identified as having a poor response to revascularization (increase in ABI < 0.15). Interestingly, poor responders reported improvement in symptoms on the PAQ, although this was less marked than in patients with an increase in ABI > 0.15 following revascularization. In conclusion, data from the current study suggest a significant correlation between improvement in patient-reported outcomes assessed by PAQ and ABI in symptomatic PAD patients undergoing peripheral revascularization.

  13. Axillary artery pseudoaneurysm resulting in brachial plexus injury in a patient taking new oral anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Monem, Mohammed; Iskandarani, Mohamad Khalid; Gokaraju, Kishan

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the case of an independent 80-year-old Caucasian woman, being treated with new oral anticoagulants for a previous deep vein thrombosis, who had fallen on her right shoulder. She made a delayed presentation to the emergency department with a wrist drop in her right dominant hand. She had right arm bruising with good distal pulses but had a global neurological deficit in the hand. Plain radiographs of the shoulder, humerus, elbow, forearm and wrist demonstrated no fractures. MRI showed a significant right axillary lesion distorting the surrounding soft tissues, including the brachial plexus, and CT with contrast confirmed this to be a large axillary pseudoaneurysm. This was treated with an endovascular stent resulting in slightly improved motor function, but the significant residual deficit required subsequent rehabilitation to improve right upper limb function. PMID:27535738

  14. Fenofibrate improves endothelial function in the brachial artery and forearm resistance arterioles of statin-treated Type 2 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Sandra J; Chew, Gerard T; Davis, Timothy M E; Watts, Gerald F

    2010-05-01

    Dyslipidaemia contributes to endothelial dysfunction and CVD (cardiovascular disease) in Type 2 diabetes mellitus. While statin therapy reduces CVD in these patients, residual risk remains high. Fenofibrate corrects atherogenic dyslipidaemia, but it is unclear whether adding fenofibrate to statin therapy lowers CVD risk. We investigated whether fenofibrate improves endothelial dysfunction in statin-treated Type 2 diabetic patients. In a cross-over study, 15 statin-treated Type 2 diabetic patients, with LDL (low-density lipoprotein)-cholesterol <2.6 mmol/l and endothelial dysfunction [brachial artery FMD (flow-mediated dilatation) <6.0%] were randomized, double-blind, to fenofibrate 145 mg/day or matching placebo for 12 weeks, with 4 weeks washout between treatment periods. Brachial artery FMD and endothelium-independent NMD (nitrate-mediated dilatation) were measured by ultrasonography at the start and end of each treatment period. PIFBF (post-ischaemic forearm blood flow), a measure of microcirculatory endothelial function, and serum lipids, lipoproteins and apo (apolipoprotein) concentrations were also measured. Compared with placebo, fenofibrate increased FMD (mean absolute 2.1+/-0.6 compared with -0.3+/-0.6%, P=0.04), but did not alter NMD (P=0.75). Fenofibrate also increased maximal PIFBF {median 3.5 [IQR (interquartile range) 5.8] compared with 0.3 (2.1) ml/100 ml/min, P=0.001} and flow debt repayment [median 1.0 (IQR 3.5) compared with -1.5 (3.0) ml/100 ml, P=0.01]. Fenofibrate lowered serum cholesterol, triacylgycerols (triglycerides), LDL-cholesterol, apoB-100 and apoC-III (P < or = 0.03), but did not alter HDL (high-density lipoprotein)-cholesterol or apoA-I. Improvement in FMD was inversely associated with on-treatment LDL-cholesterol (r=-0.61, P=0.02) and apoB-100 (r=-0.54, P=0.04) concentrations. Fenofibrate improves endothelial dysfunction in statin-treated Type 2 diabetic patients. This may relate partly to enhanced reduction in LDL-cholesterol and

  15. The combined influence of fat consumption and repeated mental stress on brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Poitras, Veronica J; Slattery, David J; Levac, Brendan M; Fergus, Stevenson; Gurd, Brendon J; Pyke, Kyra E

    2014-04-01

    Experienced separately, both acute mental stress and high-fat meal consumption can transiently impair endothelial function, and the purpose of the present study was to investigate their combined impact. On four separate days, 10 healthy men (23 years old) underwent brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) tests, before and hourly for 4 h post-consumption of a high-fat (HFM; 54 g fat) or low-fat meal (LFM; 0 g fat; each meal ∼ 1000 calories), with hourly mental stress (mental arithmetic, speech) or control (counting) tasks (conditions HFM+S, LFM+S, HFM and LFM). Data are presented as means ± SD. Plasma triglycerides increased and remained elevated after the high-fat but not the low-fat meal (P = 0.004) and were not affected by mental stress (P = 0.329). Indices of stress reactivity increased during mental stress tasks (mean arterial pressure, ∼ 20 mmHg; heart rate, ∼ 22 beats min(-1); salivary cortisol, ∼ 2.37 nmol l(-1); and plasma noradrenaline, ∼ 0.17 ng ml(-1)) and were not influenced by meal (P > 0.05). There was no effect of the type of meal on FMD (P = 0.562); however, FMD was 4.5 ± 0.5% in the control conditions and 5.8 ± 0.6% in the mental stress conditions (P = 0.087), and this difference was significant when normalized for the shear stress stimulus (FMD/area under the curve of shear stress, P = 0.045). Overall, these preliminary data suggest that postprandial FMD was augmented with mental stress irrespective of meal type. These results are contrary to previous reports of impaired endothelial function after mental stress or fat consumption independently and highlight the need to further investigate the mechanisms underlying the interactions between these factors. PMID:24465021

  16. Ascorbic acid improves brachial artery vasodilation during progressive handgrip exercise in the elderly through a nitric oxide-mediated mechanism.

    PubMed

    Trinity, Joel D; Wray, D Walter; Witman, Melissa A H; Layec, Gwenael; Barrett-O'Keefe, Zachary; Ives, Stephen J; Conklin, Jamie D; Reese, Van; Zhao, Jia; Richardson, Russell S

    2016-03-15

    The proposed mechanistic link between the age-related attenuation in vascular function and free radicals is an attractive hypothesis; however, direct evidence of free radical attenuation and a concomitant improvement in vascular function in the elderly is lacking. Therefore, this study sought to test the hypothesis that ascorbic acid (AA), administered intra-arterially during progressive handgrip exercise, improves brachial artery (BA) vasodilation in a nitric oxide (NO)-dependent manner, by mitigating free radical production. BA vasodilation (Doppler ultrasound) and free radical outflow [electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy] were measured in seven healthy older adults (69 ± 2 yr) during handgrip exercise at 3, 6, 9, and 12 kg (∼13-52% of maximal voluntary contraction) during the control condition and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibition via N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA), AA, and coinfusion of l-NMMA + AA. Baseline BA diameter was not altered by any of the treatments, while L-NMMA and L-NMMA + AA diminished baseline BA blood flow and shear rate. AA improved BA dilation compared with control at 9 kg (control: 6.5 ± 2.2%, AA: 10.9 ± 2.5%, P = 0.01) and 12 kg (control: 9.5 ± 2.7%, AA: 15.9 ± 3.7%, P < 0.01). NOS inhibition blunted BA vasodilation compared with control and when combined with AA eliminated the AA-induced improvement in BA vasodilation. Free radical outflow increased with exercise intensity but, interestingly, was not attenuated by AA. Collectively, these results indicate that AA improves BA vasodilation in the elderly during handgrip exercise through an NO-dependent mechanism; however, this improvement appears not to be the direct consequence of attenuated free radical outflow from the forearm.

  17. Comparison of lower limb arterial assessments using color-duplex ultrasound and ankle/brachial pressure index measurements.

    PubMed

    Allen, J; Oates, C P; Henderson, J; Jago, J; Whittingham, T A; Chamberlain, J; Jones, N A; Murray, A

    1996-03-01

    The strength of agreement between two noninvasive methods of assessing lower limb arterial disease and their relationship to patient symptoms following exercise have been investigated. Color-duplex ultrasound (CDU) and ankle/brachial pressure index (ABPI) (before and afer exercise) measurements were obtained from 200 consecutive patients referred to a vascular investigations laboratory. From these patients, 290 limbs were available for study, comprising limbs without previous vascular surgery, from patients without diabetes and who could attempt a walking exercise test. The overall level of agreement between CDU and resting ABPI measurements was 83% (Kappa 0.66). The ABPI technique identified the more serious disease; a resting ABPI of less than 0.6 gave 100% agreement with CDU. With higher resting ABPIs the level of agreement became poorer: 83% (0.6 < or = ABPI <0.9) and 76% (normal ABPI > or = 0.9). The addition of postexercise ABPI measurements in determining significant arterial disease increased the strength of relationship between the two techniques by only 2% (85%, Kappa 0.69). The exercise test was generally limited by the most symptomatic limb in each patient, and the agreement between CDU and postexercise ABPI measurements in these limbs was higher at 93% (Kappa 0.81). In comparison, agreement for the least symptomatic group of limbs was found to be poor (69%, Kappa 0.37). Compared with symptoms after exercise, overall agreements with CDU and ABPI were both 67% (Kappa 0.27). The agreement was better (91%) when the resting ABPI was less than 0.6. The ABPI is biased toward the detection of more severe disease and is more consistent with CDU when the most symptomatic limbs are compared. The relationship between either test and symptoms after exercise is strong only for limbs with major disease.

  18. Arterial pressure: agreement between a brachial cuff-based device and radial tonometry

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chloe M.; Korolkova, Olga; Davies, Justin E.; Parker, Kim H.; Siggers, Jennifer H.; March, Katherine; Tillin, Therese; Chaturvedi, Nish; Hughes, Alun D.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Aortic (central) blood pressure (BP) differs from brachial BP and may be a superior predictor of cardiovascular events. However, its measurement is currently restricted to research settings, owing to a moderate level of operator dependency. We tested a new noninvasive device in a large UK cohort. The device estimates central BP using measurements obtained with an upper arm cuff inflated to suprasystolic pressure. We compared these estimates with those obtained using radial tonometry as well as with invasively acquired measurements of aortic BP in a limited number of individuals. Methods: Consecutive cuff-based and tonometry-based estimates of the pressure waveform and the central BP were obtained from 1107 individuals (70 ± 6 years). Short-term and long-term reproducibility studies were performed on 28 individuals. Simultaneous cuff-based and invasively measured pressure traces were acquired and compared in an additional six individuals (65 ± 20 years). Results: Central systolic BP, as estimated by the cuff-based device, was found to be highly reproducible (coefficient of variation 4 and 8% for short and long-term reproducibility, respectively) and was comparable to that estimated by tonometry (average difference 3 ± 6 mmHg, intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.91). The cuff-based pressure waveforms were similar to those acquired invasively (cross-correlation coefficient 0.93), and the difference in the estimated central systolic BP was −5 ± 8 mmHg (P = 0.2). Conclusion: Cuff-based devices show promise to simplify the measurement of central BP, whilst maintaining a similar fidelity to tonometry. This could lead to improved adoption of estimates of central BP in clinical practice. PMID:24379000

  19. Impact of Weight Loss on Ankle-Brachial Index and Inter-Artery Blood Pressures in Overweight and Obese Adults with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Espeland, Mark A.; Lewis, Cora E.; Bahnson, Judy; Knowler, William C.; Regensteiner, Judith G.; Gaussoin, Sarah A.; Beavers, Daniel; Johnson, Karen C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess whether weight loss improves markers of peripheral artery disease and vascular stenosis. Design and Methods The Action for Health in Diabetes randomized clinical trial compared intensive lifestyle intervention (ILI) for weight loss to a control condition of diabetes support and education (DSE) in overweight or obese adults with type 2 diabetes. Annual ankle and brachial blood pressures over four years were used compute ankle-brachial indices (ABIs) and to assess inter-artery blood pressure differences in 5018 participants. Results ILI, compared to DSE, produced 7.8% (Year 1) to 3.6% (Year 4) greater weight losses. These did not affect prevalence of low (<0.90) ABI (3.60% in DSE versus 3.14% in ILI; p=0.20) or elevated (>1.40) ABI (7.52% in DSE versus 7.59% in ILI: p=0.90), but produced smaller mean (SE) maximum inter-artery systolic blood pressure differences among ankle sites [19.7 (0.2) mmHg for ILI versus 20.6 (0.2) mmHg for DSE (p<0.001)] and between arms [5.8 (0.1) mmHg for ILI versus 6.1 (0.1) mmHg for DSE (p=0.01)]. Conclusions Four years of intensive behavioral weight loss intervention did not significantly alter prevalence of abnormal ABI, however it did reduce differences in systolic blood pressures among arterial sites. PMID:24174392

  20. Characterization of endothelial function in the brachial artery via affine registration of ultrasonographic image sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamata, Pablo; Laclaustra, Martin; Frangi, Alejandro F.

    2003-05-01

    The assessment and characterization of the endothelial function is a current research topic as it may play an important role in the diagnosis of cardiovascular diseases. Flow mediated dilatation may be used to investigate endothelial function, and B-mode ultrasonography is a cheap and non-invasive way to assess the vasodilation response. Computerized analysis techniques are very desirable to give higher accuracy and objectivity to the measurements. A new method is presented that solves some limitations of existing methods, which in general depend on accurate edge detection of the arterial wall. This method is based on a global image analysis strategy. The arterial vasodilation between two frames is modeled by a superposition of a rigid motion model and a stretching perpendicular to the artery. Both transformation models are recovered using an image registration algorithm based on normalized mutual information and a multi-resolution search framework. Temporal continuity of in the variation of the registration parameters is enforced with a Kalman filter, since the dilation process is known to be a gradual and continuous physiological phenomenon. The proposed method presents a negligible bias when compared with manual assessment. It also eliminates artifacts introduced by patient and probe motion, thus improving the accuracy of the measurements. Finally, it is also robust to typical problems of ultrasound, like speckle noise and poor image quality.

  1. The Association of Brachial-Ankle Pulse Wave Velocity with Coronary Artery Disease Evaluated by Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Jae-Bin; Choi, Young Ho; Chung, Woo-Young; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Kim, Myung-A; Zo, Joo-Hee

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) is associated with the severity of coronary artery disease (CAD) assessed by coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA), and to evaluate baPWV as a predictor of obstructive CAD on CCTA. A total of 470 patients who underwent both baPWV and CCTA were included. We evaluated stenosis degree and plaque characteristics on CCTA. To estimate the severity of CAD, we calculated the number of segment with plaque (segment involvement score; SIS), stenosis degree-weighted plaque score (segment stenosis score; SSS), and coronary artery calcium score (CACS). The mean baPWV was 1,485 ± 315 cm/s (range, 935-3,175 cm/s). Non-obstructive (stenosis < 50%) and obstructive (stenosis ≥ 50%) CAD was found in 129 patients (27.4%) and 144 (30.6%), respectively. baPWV in patients with obstructive CAD was higher than that of patients with non-obstructive (1,680 ± 396 cm/s versus 1,477 ± 244 cm/s, P < 0.001) or no CAD (1,680 ± 396 cm/s versus ± 196 1,389 cm/s, P < 0.001). baPWV showed significant correlation with SSS (r = 0.429, P < 0.001), SIS (r = 0.395, P < 0.001), CACS (r 0.346, P < 0.001), and the number of segment with non-calcified plaque (r 0.092, P = 0.047), mixed plaque (r = 0.267, P < 0.001), and calcified plaque (r = 0.348, P < 0.001), respectively. The optimal baPWV cut-off value for the detection of obstructive CAD was 1,547 cm/s. baPWV ≥ 1,547 cm/s was independent predictor for the obstructive CAD. In conclusion, baPWV is well correlated with the severity of CAD evaluated by CCTA. baPWV has the potential to predict severity of coronary artery atherosclerosis. PMID:25875036

  2. Measurement of brachial artery endothelial function using a standard blood pressure cuff.

    PubMed

    Maltz, Jonathan S; Tison, Geoffrey H; Alley, Hugh F; Budinger, Thomas F; Owens, Christopher D; Olgin, Jeffrey

    2015-11-01

    The integrity of endothelial function in major arteries (EFMA) is a powerful independent predictor of heart attack and stroke. Existing ultrasound-based non-invasive assessment methods are technically challenging and suitable only for laboratory settings. EFMA, like blood pressure (BP), is both acutely and chronically affected by factors such as lifestyle and medication. Consequently, laboratory-based measurements cannot fully gauge the effects of medical interventions on EFMA. EFMA and BP have, arguably, comparable (but complementary) value in the assessment of cardiovascular health. Widespread deployment of EFMA assessment is thus a desirable clinical goal. To this end, we propose a device based on modifying the measurement protocol of a standard electronic sphygmomanometer. The protocol involves inflating the cuff to sub-diastolic levels to enable recording of the pulse waveform before and after vasodilatory stimulus. The mechanical unloading of the arterial wall provided by the cuff amplifies the distension that occurs with each pulse, which is measured as a pressure variation in the cuff. We show that the height of the rising edge of each pulse is proportional to the change in lumen area between diastole and systole. This allows the effect of vasodilatory stimuli on the artery to be measured with high sensitivity. We compare the proposed cuff flow-mediated dilation (cFMD) method to ultrasound flow-mediated dilation (uFMD). We find significant correlation (r = 0.55, p = 0.003, N = 27) between cFMD- and uFMD-based metrics obtained when the release of a 5 min cuff occlusion is employed to induce endothelial stimulus via reactive hyperemia. cFMD is approximately proportional to the square of uFMD, representing a typical increase in sensitivity to vasodilation of 300-600%. This study illustrates the potential for an individual to conveniently measure his/her EFMA by using a low-cost reprogrammed home sphygmomanometer. PMID:26393958

  3. Measurement of brachial artery endothelial function using a standard blood pressure cuff

    PubMed Central

    Maltz, Jonathan S; Tison, Geoffrey H; Alley, Hugh F; Budinger, Thomas F; Owens, Christopher D; Olgin, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    The integrity of endothelial function in major arteries (EFMA) is a powerful independent predictor of heart attack and stroke. Existing ultrasound-based non-invasive assessment methods are technically challenging and suitable only for laboratory settings. EFMA, like blood pressure (BP), is both acutely and chronically affected by factors such as lifestyle and medication. Consequently, lab-based measurements cannot fully gauge the effects of medical interventions on EFMA. EFMA and BP have, arguably, comparable (but complementary) value in the assessment of cardiovascular health. Widespread deployment of EFMA assessment is thus a desirable clinical goal. To this end, we propose a device based on modifying the measurement protocol of a standard electronic sphygmomanometer. Methods The protocol involves inflating the cuff to sub-diastolic levels to enable recording of the pulse waveform before and after vasodilatory stimulus. The mechanical unloading of the arterial wall provided by the cuff amplifies the distension that occurs with each pulse, which is measured as a pressure variation in the cuff. We show that the height of the rising edge of each pulse is proportional to the change in lumen area between diastole and systole. This allows the effect of vasodilatory stimuli on the artery to be measured with high sensitivity. We compare the proposed cuff flow-mediated dilation (cFMD) method to ultrasound FMD (uFMD). Results We find significant correlation (r=0.55, p = 0.003, N=27) between cFMD- and uFMD-based metrics obtained when the release of a 5-minute cuff occlusion is employed to induce endothelial stimulus via reactive hyperemia. cFMD is approximately proportional to the square of uFMD, representing a typical increase in sensitivity to vasodilation of 300–600%. Conclusion This study illustrates the potential for an individual to conveniently measure his/her EFMA by using a low-cost reprogrammed home sphygmomanometer. PMID:26393958

  4. Reproducibility of near-infrared spectroscopy parameters measured during brachial artery occlusion and reactive hyperemia in healthy men

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacroix, Sébastien; Gayda, Mathieu; Gremeaux, Vincent; Juneau, Martin; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Nigam, Anil

    2012-07-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is a noninvasive technique evaluating microvascular function. The aim of this study was to assess the reproducibility of NIRS parameters during reactive hyperemia induced by a 5 min brachial artery occlusion. Twenty-four healthy young males (mean 34+/-8 years old) had two microvascular function evaluations by NIRS over a 7 to 30-day period (mean 16+/-10 days). Intra-subject and inter-observer reproducibility were evaluated with intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), coefficient of variation (CV), and standard error of measurement (SEM%) for every parameter. Mean NIRS parameters did not differ between both evaluations. Reproducibility was greatest for muscle oxygen consumption (ICC: 0.84; CV: 6.51% SEM: 7.11%), time to basal O2Hb (ICC: 0.63, CV: 20.04%, SEM 27.22%), time to maximal O2Hb (ICC: 0.71; CV: 15.61% SEM: 19.27%), peak of O2Hb (ICC: 0.63, CV: 6.68%, SEM 8.53%), time to maximal tHb (ICC: 0.73, CV: 19,61%, SEM 24.56%) and area under the O2Hb and tHb curves (ICC: 0.68, CV: 16.15%, SEM 22.93% and ICC: 0.62, CV: 18.59%, SEM 26.64%, respectively). Moreover, inter-observer reproducibility ranged from excellent to perfect (ICC from 0.85 to 1.00) for every parameter. NIRS parameters during reactive hyperemia are highly reproducible which enables their repeated measurement to study microvascular function in healthy subjects.

  5. Effect of black tea consumption on brachial artery flow-mediated dilation and ischaemia-reperfusion in humans.

    PubMed

    Schreuder, Tim H A; Eijsvogels, Thijs M H; Greyling, Arno; Draijer, Richard; Hopman, Maria T E; Thijssen, Dick H J

    2014-02-01

    Tea consumption is associated with reduced cardiovascular risk. Previous studies found that tea flavonoids work through direct effects on the vasculature, leading to dose-dependent improvements in endothelial function. Cardioprotective effects of regular tea consumption may relate to the prevention of endothelial ischaemia-reperfusion (IR) injury. Therefore, we examined the effect of black tea consumption on endothelial function and the ability of tea to prevent IR injury. In a randomized, crossover study, 20 healthy subjects underwent 7 days of tea consumption (3 cups per day) or abstinence from tea. We examined brachial artery (BA) endothelial function via flow-mediated dilation (FMD), using high resolution echo-Doppler, before and 90 min after tea or hot water consumption. Subsequently, we followed a 20-min ischaemia and 20-min reperfusion protocol of the BA after which we measured FMD to examine the potential of tea consumption to protect against IR injury. Tea consumption resulted in an immediate increase in FMD% (pre-consumption: 5.8 ± 2.5; post-consumption: 7.2 ± 3.2; p < 0.01), whilst no such change occurred after ingestion of hot water. The IR protocol resulted in a significant decrease in FMD (p < 0.005), which was also present after tea consumption (p < 0.001). This decline was accompanied by an increase in the post-IR baseline diameter. In conclusion, these data indicate that tea ingestion improves BA FMD. However, the impact of the IR protocol on FMD was not influenced by tea consumption. Therefore, the cardioprotective association of tea ingestion relates to a direct effect of tea on the endothelium in humans in vivo.

  6. Comparison of Different Edge Detections and Noise Reduction on Ultrasound Images of Carotid and Brachial Arteries Using a Speckle Reducing Anisotropic Diffusion Filter

    PubMed Central

    Rafati, Mehravar; Arabfard, Masoud; Rafati-Rahimzadeh, Mehrdad

    2014-01-01

    Background: Common carotid artery (CCA) ultrasound with measurement of intima-media thickness (IMT) is a safe and noninvasive technique for assessing subclinical atherosclerosis and determining cardiovascular risks. Moreover, the pattern of wall thickening in the brachial artery (BA) is rather diffuse compared to the carotid artery and may be a more sensitive indicator of long-term systemic exposure to risk factors. Therefore noninvasive evaluation of mechanical parameters changes of both arteries has gained the attention of researchers. Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare different edge detection techniques with speckle reducing anisotropic diffusion (SRAD) de-noising filter in ultrasound images of both arteries. Patients and Methods: In a cross-sectional design, an examination was performed on ten men with mean age of 40 ± 5 years from September 2012 to March 2013 through random sampling. An ultrasonic examination of the left CCA and BA was performed. The program was designed in the MATLAB software to extract consecutive images in JPEG format from the AVI. Another program was designed in the MATLAB software to apply regions of interest (ROI) on the IMT of the posterior wall of common carotid and brachial arteries. Next, different edge detections and SRAD filter were applied to the ROI, separately. Finally, the program measured mean-squared error (MSE) and peak signal to noise ratio (PSNR). Results: The lowest values of MSE and highest values of PSNR were achieved by Canny edge detection with de-noising SRAD filter for IMT of left CCA and BA in 90 frames. Conclusions: Based on the result, by measuring the MSE and PSNR, this study showed Canny edge detection with SRAD filter is better than other edge detections in terms of speckle suppression and details preservation in CCA and BA ultrasound images. PMID:25593716

  7. Ankle-brachial pressure index estimated by laser Doppler in patients suffering from peripheral arterial obstructive disease.

    PubMed

    Ludyga, Tomasz; Kuczmik, Waclaw B; Kazibudzki, Marek; Nowakowski, Przemyslaw; Orawczyk, Tomasz; Glanowski, Michal; Kucharzewski, Marcin; Ziaja, Damion; Szaniewski, Krzysztof; Ziaja, Krzysztof

    2007-07-01

    Ankle-brachial index (ABI) measurements are widely used for evaluating the functional state of circulation in the lower limbs. However, there is some evidence that the value of ABI does not accurately reflect the degree of walking impairment in symptomatic patients with peripheral arterial obstructive disease (PAOD). We investigated the diagnostic value of ABI estimated by means of laser Doppler flowmetry (IT) for evaluating limb ischemia. We wanted to know whether laser Doppler could be more sensitive than the Doppler method in predicting walking capacity in patients with stable intermittent claudication. We analyzed a group of 30 patients with intermittent claudication (Fontain II, II/III) who were admitted for reconstructive treatment. There were 21 men and 9 women, aged 46-74 (mean 61) years. All patients underwent the treadmill test, and pain-free walking distances were measured. In each patient, we measured ABI using the two different methods: Doppler ultrasound device (ABI-Doppler) and laser Doppler (ABI-laser Doppler). The claudication distances were 25-200 m (mean 73 +/- 50.2 m). ABI-Doppler was 0.2-0.7 (0.582 +/- 0.195). ABI-laser Doppler measurements were 0.581 (+/-0.218). A correlation was found between ABI-Doppler and claudication distance (r = 0.46, P = 0.009). Also, ABI-laser Doppler values significantly correlated with claudication distances (r = 0.536, P = 0.002). The ABI evaluated by laser Doppler correlated well with claudication distances in patients with PAOD. Comparison of Doppler and laser Doppler measurements used for determining ABI showed that both methods have similar predictive power for walking capacity; however, higher correlation was observed between claudication distances and ABI measured by laser Doppler flowmetry. ABI-laser Doppler measurements are easier, are quicker, and seem to be better suited for noncompliant patients. Further investigation should be undertaken to determine whether laser Doppler is superior to the Doppler

  8. Abnormal peripheral circulation in type 2 diabetic patients with normal ankle-brachial index associates with coronary atherosclerosis, large artery stiffness, and peripheral vascular resistance.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Masanobu; Suzuki, Eiji; Egawa, Katsuya; Nishio, Yoshihiko; Maegawa, Hiroshi; Morikawa, Shigehiro; Inubushi, Toshiro; Kashiwagi, Atsunori

    2005-12-01

    We tested the hypothesis that impaired peripheral circulation in diabetes arises from different aspects of vascular abnormalities even when accompanied by a normal ankle-brachial index (ABI>0.9). One hundred fourteen type 2 diabetic patients with normal ABI and 33 age-matched non-diabetic subjects consecutively admitted to our hospital were enrolled. The Agatston coronary artery calcium score (CACS), as a marker of coronary atherosclerosis, was obtained using electron-beam computed tomography. An automatic device was used to measure brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) as an index of arterial distensibility. Total flow volume and resistive index (RI), as a marker of peripheral vascular resistance, at the popliteal artery were evaluated using gated two-dimensional cine-mode phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging. Diabetic patients had baPWV (P<0.001) and RI (P<0.001) higher than those in the non-diabetic subjects, indicating that those parameters are characteristically altered in diabetic patients. When diabetic patients were grouped into three subgroups according to their levels of total flow volume, those with the lowest range showed the highest log-transformed CACS (P<0.001), baPWV (P<0.001), and RI (P<0.001) among the groups. Total flow volume was negatively correlated with log-transformed CACS (P<0.001), baPWV (P<0.001), and RI (P<0.001). Waveform at the popliteal artery could be clearly separated into systolic and early and late diastolic blood flows, which were negatively correlated with log-transformed CACS (P<0.001), RI (P<0.001), and baPWV (P<0.001), respectively. These results suggest that impaired peripheral circulation in diabetes is attributable to coronary atherosclerosis, large artery stiffness, and peripheral vascular resistance even when ABI is normal.

  9. Correlation of preoperative ankle-brachial index and pulse volume recording with impaired saphenous vein incisional wound healing post coronary artery bypass surgery.

    PubMed

    Haraden, Jamie; Jaenicke, Connie

    2006-06-01

    Patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery have vascular disease and, subsequently, the risk for impaired healing of their saphenous vein graft site. The purpose of this study was to identify the correlation of the preoperative ankle-brachial index (ABI) and pulse volume recording (PVR) with impaired saphenous vein incisional wound healing post coronary artery bypass grafting. A prospective, correlational research design was used to study 271 male and female adults undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery in which the saphenous vein was used for grafting. Arterial insufficiency was assessed preoperatively using patient history, physical examination, ABI, and PVR. Wound status was assessed postoperatively using the validated ASEPSIS tool for inpatients. A modified ASEPSIS tool, the Wound Healing Self Score, was used for telephone follow-up post discharge. Abnormal ABI and PVR measurements were positively correlated with impaired saphenous vein incisional wound healing (r = 0.72, P < .0001). Both tests also independently predicted impaired healing. Incisional infection correlated with impaired healing (P < .0001). Other clinical variables, including diabetes, hypertension, venous disease, and alcohol and cigarette use, were not found to be statistically significant independent predictors of impaired healing. Routine histories and physical examinations alone are insufficient in predicting risk for impaired saphenous vein incisional wound healing. The addition of noninvasive screening for the presence of arterial insufficiency before coronary artery bypass grafting using ABI and PVR tests is one method of predicting the likelihood of impaired healing.

  10. Brachial plexus

    MedlinePlus

    The brachial plexus is a group of nerves that run from the lower neck through the upper shoulder area. These ... Damage to the brachial plexus nerves can cause muscle and sensation problems that are often associated with pain in the same area. Symptoms may ...

  11. What Is the Clinical Utility of the Ankle-Brachial Index in Patients With Diabetic Foot Ulcers and Radiographic Arterial Calcification?

    PubMed

    Álvaro-Afonso, Francisco Javier; Lázaro-Martínez, José Luis; Aragón-Sánchez, Javier; García-Morales, Esther; García-Álvarez, Yolanda; Molines-Barroso, Raúl Juan

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the influence of radiographic arterial calcification (RAC) on the clinical interpretation of ankle-brachial index (ABI) values in patients with diabetic foot ulcers. We analyzed a retrospective clinical database of 60 patients with diabetic foot ulcers from the Diabetic Foot Unit (Complutense University, Madrid, Spain) between January 2012 and March 2014. For each patient, anteroposterior XR-plains were evaluated, and the ABI and toe-brachial index (TBI) were assessed by an experienced clinician. To analyze the correlation among quantitative variables, we applied the Pearson correlation coefficient. Fifty percent (n = 9/18) of our patients with a normal ABI and RAC had a TBI < 0.7 associated with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). In patients with RAC, the prevalence of a normal ABI (72%, 18/25) was higher than in patients without RAC (52%, 11/21). The Pearson correlation coefficient among the ABI and TBI in patients with an ABI < 1.4 (n = 46) was lesser (r = .484, P = .001) than in patients with an ABI < 1.4 but without RAC (n = 21; r = .686, P = .001). ABI values between 0.9 and 1.4 would be falsely considered as normal and could underestimate the prevalence of PAD, especially in patients with neuropathy, diabetic foot ulcers, or RAC.

  12. Occluded Brescia-Cimino Hemodialysis Fistulas: Endovascular Treatment with Both Brachial Arterial and Venous Access Using the Pull-Through Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Miyayama, Shiro Matsui, Osamu; Taki, Keiichi; Minami, Tetsuya; Shinmura, Rieko; Ito, Chiharu; Takamatsu, Shigeyuki; Kobayashi, Miki; Ushiogi, Yashuyuki

    2005-12-15

    We retrospectively evaluated the usefulness of both arterial and venous access with the pull-through technique in endovascular treatment of totally occluded Brescia-Cimino fistulas. We treated 26 patients (17 men, 9 women; age range 43-82 years, mean age 66 years) with occluded Brescia-Cimino fistulas. First, the occluded segment was traversed from the antegrade brachial arterial access using a microcatheter-guidewire system. Second, the vein was retrogradely punctured after confirmation of all diseased segments, and a 0.014- or 0.016-inch guidewire was pulled through the venous access when the occluded segment was long. All interventions including thrombolysis, thromboaspiration, angioplasty, and stent placement were performed via the venous access. The occlusion was successfully crossed via the brachial arterial access in 23 patients (88%). In 2 patients it was done from the venous approach. In the remaining patient it was not possible to traverse the occluded segment. The pull-through technique was successful in all 19 attempts. Clinical success was achieved in 96%, the primary patency rates at 6, 12, and 18 months were 83%, 78%, and 69%, the primary assisted patency rates were 92%, 92%, and 72%, and the secondary patency rates were 92%, 92%, and 92%, respectively. Minor complications in 5 patients included venous perforation in 2 (8%), venous rupture in 1 (4%), and regional hematoma in 2 (8%). Our study suggests that endovascular treatments with both arterial and venous access using the pull-through technique are highly effective in restoring function in totally occluded Brescia-Cimino fistulas.

  13. Peripheral Arterial Disease and Ankle-Brachial Index Abnormalites in Young and Middle-Aged HIV-Positive Patients in Lower Silesia, Poland

    PubMed Central

    Kwiatkowska, Wiesława; Knysz, Brygida; Arczyńska, Katarzyna; Drelichowska, Justyna; Czarnecki, Marcin; Gąsiorowski, Jacek; Karczewski, Maciej; Witkiewicz, Wojciech

    2014-01-01

    Background Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a clinical manifestation of atherosclerosis and mainly refers to elderly patients, having a negative impact on their functionality and quality of life. The findings of previous studies in HIV-infected patients have shown that cardiovascular risk is higher and PAD occurs more frequently than in the general population. There are also contradictory observations. Much less is known about the ankle-brachial index (ABI) value in asymptomatic HIV-infected patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of PAD and ankle-brachial index abnormalities as well as to determine risk factors related to the disease in a group of Polish HIV–positive patients. Methods and Findings One hundred and eleven young to middle aged HIV–positive subjects and 40 noninfected subjects were enrolled into the study. Resting ABI measurements were performed and cardiovascular risk was analysed as well. Subgroups were created according to the ABI values: low (PAD), borderline, normal, high and altered ABI. Symptomatic PAD was observed in 2 HIV–positive patients, asymptomatic PAD was not diagnosed. The ABI value is lower and more varied, in 22.5% of the study group altered ABI values were found. Six subjects demonstrated borderline ABI, and 15 high ABI, including >1.4. In the control group no low or very high values were reported. A relation between low ABI and cardiovascular family history and between altered ABI and high–density–lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL–C) level was demonstrated. Conclusions In young and middle–aged HIV–positive patients, symptomatic PAD prevalence is comparable to that observed in the overall population. Among asymptomatic patients PAD is not reported. The ABI value in HIV–positive patients is more varied compared to the HIV–negative subjects; the altered ABI shows a strong relation with low HDL–C levels and metabolic syndrome. PMID:25503743

  14. Brachial Plexus Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Brachial Plexus Injuries Information Page Synonym(s): Erb's Palsy Table of Contents ( ... done? Clinical Trials Organizations What are Brachial Plexus Injuries? The brachial plexus is a network of nerves ...

  15. Combination of pulse volume recording (PVR) parameters and ankle-brachial index (ABI) improves diagnostic accuracy for peripheral arterial disease compared with ABI alone.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Tomoko; Ichihashi, Shigeo; Iwakoshi, Shinichi; Kichikawa, Kimihiko

    2016-06-01

    The ankle-brachial index (ABI) measurement is widely used as a screening tool to detect peripheral arterial disease (PAD). With the advent of the oscillometric ABI device incorporating a system for the measurement of pulse volume recording (PVR), not only ABI but also other parameters, such as the percentage of mean arterial pressure (%MAP) and the upstroke time (UT), can be obtained automatically. The purpose of the present study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy for PAD with ABI alone with that of a combination of ABI, %MAP and UT. This study included 108 consecutive patients on whom 216 limb measurements were performed. The sensitivity, specificity and positive and negative predictive values of ABI, %MAP, UT and their combination were evaluated and compared with CT angiography that was used as a gold standard for the detection of PAD. The diagnostic accuracy as well as the optimal cutoff values of %MAP and UT were evaluated using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. The combination of ABI, %MAP and UT achieved higher sensitivity, negative predictive value and accuracy than ABI alone, particularly for mild stenosis. The areas under the ROC curve for the detection of 50% stenosis with UT and %MAP were 0.798 and 0.916, respectively. The optimal UT and %MAP values to detect ≧50% stenosis artery were 183 ms and 45%, respectively. The combination of ABI, %MAP and UT contributed to the improvement of the diagnostic accuracy for PAD. Consideration of the values of %MAP and UT in addition to ABI may have a significant impact on the detection of early PAD lesions.

  16. Hemodynamic Changes in the Brachial Artery Induced by Acupuncture Stimulation on the Lower Limbs: A Single-Blind Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Masashi; Takayama, Shin; Hirano, Atsushi; Seki, Takashi; Yaegashi, Nobuo

    2012-01-01

    Acupuncture is commonly performed at acupoints. No comparisons of quantitative physiological alterations in the brachial artery (BA) induced by the stimulation of different acupoints in the lower limbs have been performed in humans. Therefore, we investigated changes in blood flow volume (BFV) in the BA as an indicator of the physiological effects induced by stimulation at 3 points. Seventy-five healthy participants aged 33 ± 9 years (mean ± SD) were enrolled and randomly assigned to 3 groups; they received stimulation at 3 different points located on the lower limbs: ST36, LR3, and a non-acupoint. Stimulation was performed bilaterally with manual rotation of the needles. Using ultrasonography, BFV was measured continuously from rest to 180 seconds after stimulation. LR3 stimulation significantly increased BFV compared to that before needle insertion. Meanwhile, stimulation at ST36 and the non-acupoint significantly decreased BFV compared to that before needle insertion. Stimulation at LR3 elicited a significant increase in BFV compared to that at ST36 and the non-acupoint. The results suggest that the stimulation of different points on the lower limbs causes distinct physiological effects on BFV in the BA. PMID:23304231

  17. Hemodynamic changes in the brachial artery induced by acupuncture stimulation on the lower limbs: a single-blind randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masashi; Takayama, Shin; Hirano, Atsushi; Seki, Takashi; Yaegashi, Nobuo

    2012-01-01

    Acupuncture is commonly performed at acupoints. No comparisons of quantitative physiological alterations in the brachial artery (BA) induced by the stimulation of different acupoints in the lower limbs have been performed in humans. Therefore, we investigated changes in blood flow volume (BFV) in the BA as an indicator of the physiological effects induced by stimulation at 3 points. Seventy-five healthy participants aged 33 ± 9 years (mean ± SD) were enrolled and randomly assigned to 3 groups; they received stimulation at 3 different points located on the lower limbs: ST36, LR3, and a non-acupoint. Stimulation was performed bilaterally with manual rotation of the needles. Using ultrasonography, BFV was measured continuously from rest to 180 seconds after stimulation. LR3 stimulation significantly increased BFV compared to that before needle insertion. Meanwhile, stimulation at ST36 and the non-acupoint significantly decreased BFV compared to that before needle insertion. Stimulation at LR3 elicited a significant increase in BFV compared to that at ST36 and the non-acupoint. The results suggest that the stimulation of different points on the lower limbs causes distinct physiological effects on BFV in the BA. PMID:23304231

  18. The Association Between Physical Activity and Both Incident Coronary Artery Calcification and Ankle Brachial Index Progression: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Delaney, Joseph A C; Jensky, Nicole E.; Criqui, Michael H.; Whitt-Glover, Melicia C.; Lima, João A. C.; Allison, Matthew A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Both coronary artery calcification (CAC) and the ankle brachial index (ABI) are measures of subclinical atherosclerotic disease. The influence of physical activity on the longitudinal change in these measures remains unclear. To assess this we examined the association between these measures and self-reported physical activity in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). Methods At baseline, the MESA participants were free of clinically evident cardiovascular disease. We included all participants with an ABI between 0.90 and 1.40 (n=5656). Predictor variables were based on self-reported measures with physical activity being assessed using the Typical Week Physical Activity Survey from which metabolic equivalent-minutes/week of activity were calculated. We focused on physical activity intensity, intentional exercise, sedentary behavior, and conditioning. Incident peripheral artery disease (PAD) was defined as the progression of ABI to values below 0.90 (given the baseline range of 0.90 to 1.40). Incident CAC was defined as a CAC score >0 Agatston units upon follow up with a baseline score of 0 Agatston units. Results Mean age was 61 years, 53% were female, and mean body mass index was 28 kg/m2. After adjusting for traditional cardiovascular risk factors and socioeconomic factors, intentional exercise was protective for incident peripheral artery disease (Relative Risk (RR)= 0.85, 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 0.74 to 0.98). After adjusting for traditional cardiovascular risk factors and socioeconomic factors, there was a significant association between vigorous PA and incident CAC (RR=0.97, 95% CI: 0.94 to 1.00). There was also a significant association between sedentary behavior and increased amount of CAC among participants with CAC at baseline (Δlog(Agatston Units +25)=0.027, 95% CI 0.002, 0.052). Conclusions These data suggest that there is an association between physical activity/sedentary behavior and the progression of two different measures

  19. Brachial artery diameter has a predictive value in the improvement of flow-mediated dilation after aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Takata, Munenori; Amiya, Eisuke; Watanabe, Masafumi; Ozeki, Atsuko; Watanabe, Aya; Kawarasaki, Shuichi; Nakao, Tomoko; Hosoya, Yumiko; Uno, Kansei; Saito, Aya; Murasawa, Takahide; Ono, Minoru; Nagai, Ryozo; Komuro, Issei

    2015-03-01

    Aortic stenosis (AS) is the most common valvular disease and aortic valve replacement (AVR) is one of its most effective interventions. AS affects not only the left ventricle, but also vascular function beyond the stenotic valve, which can lead to various types of vascular dysfunction. However, research evaluating the effect of AS on aortic vascular function is limited. In this study, we investigated clinical meaning to evaluate endothelial function in subjects with AS. From April 2011 to April 2012, 20 consecutive adult patients with degenerative AS (mean age, 74.7 ± 7.4 years; range 50-83 years) who underwent AVR at our institution were included in the study. We measured flow-mediated dilation (FMD) to evaluate the effect of AS on endothelial function. The difference between brachial artery diameter (BAD) before (4.0 ± 0.7 mm) and after AVR (3.9 ± 0.6 mm) was not significant (p = 0.043), but FMD significantly improved after AVR (from 3.1 ± 1.8 to 6.0 ± 2.7 %, p < 0.0001). We also analyzed FMD × BAD index, endogenous vasodilatory capability independent of BAD, resulting that it also significantly increased after AVR (12.3 ± 7.0-22.5 ± 9.3, p < 0.0001). We divided patients into two groups by pre- to post-AVR change in FMD (ΔFMD); large-ΔFMD group [ΔFMD >3.0 % (median value)] and small-ΔFMD group (ΔFMD <3.0 %). There were no significant changes in age, blood pressure, heart rate, B-type natriuretic peptide, or echocardiographic parameters in either group. In contrast, BAD was significantly larger in the small ΔFMD group (4.3 ± 0.7 mm) than in the large ΔFMD group (3.7 ± 0.7 mm) (p = 0.030). In addition, cardio-thoracic ratio was significantly greater in the small ΔFMD group (58.4 ± 7.1 %) than in the large ΔFMD group (53.7 ± 4.6 %) (p = 0.048). Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis of BAD to differentiate large and small ΔFMD demonstrated an area under the curve of 0.750 (p = 0.059) and that optimal cutoff for BAD was 4.28 mm (70

  20. Higher Levels of Adiponectin in Vascular Endothelial Cells are Associated with Greater Brachial Artery Flow-mediated Dilation in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Jeung-Ki; Hwang, Moon-Hyon; Luttrell, Meredith J.; Kim, Han-Kyul; Meade, Thomas H.; English, Mark; Segal, Mark S.; Christou, Demetra D.

    2015-01-01

    Adiponectin, an adipocyte-derived protein, exerts anti-atherosclerotic effects on the vascular endothelium. Recently adiponectin protein has been reported in murine vascular endothelial cells, however, whether adiponectin is present in human vascular endothelial cells remains unexplored. We sought to examine 1) adiponectin protein in vascular endothelial cells collected from older adults free of overt cardiovascular disease; 2) the relation between endothelial cell adiponectin and in vivo vascular endothelial function; and 3) the relation between endothelial cell adiponectin, circulating (plasma) adiponectin and related factors. We measured vascular endothelial function (brachial artery flow-mediated dilation using ultrasonography), vascular endothelial cell adiponectin (biopsy coupled with quantitative immunofluorescence) and circulating adiponectin (Mercodia, ELISA) in older, sedentary, non-smoking, men and women (55 – 79 years). We found that higher endothelial cell adiponectin was related with greater flow-mediated dilation (r=0.43, P<0.05) and greater flow-mediated dilation normalized for shear stress (r=0.56, P<0.01), but was not related with vascular smooth muscle responsiveness to nitric oxide (r=0.04, P=0.9). Vascular endothelial cell adiponectin was not related with circulating adiponectin (r=−0.14, P=0.6). Endothelial cell and circulating adiponectin were differentially associated with adiposity, metabolic and other factors, but both were inversely associated with renal function (r=0.44 to 0.62, P ≤ 0.04). In conclusion, higher endothelial cell adiponectin levels are associated with higher vascular endothelial function, independent of circulating adiponectin levels in older adults. PMID:25572013

  1. Brachial plexus injury in newborns

    MedlinePlus

    ... palsy; Obstetrical brachial plexus palsy; Birth-related brachial plexus palsy; Neonatal brachial plexus palsy; NBPP ... The nerves of the brachial plexus can be affected during a ... may be caused by: The infant's head and neck pulling toward the ...

  2. Brachial plexus (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The brachial plexus is a group of nerves that originate from the neck region and branch off to give rise ... movement in the upper limb. Injuries to the brachial plexus are common and can be debilitating. If the ...

  3. Brachial Plexus Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... to the shoulder, arm, and hand. Brachial plexus injuries are caused by damage to those nerves. Symptoms ... sensation in the arm or hand Brachial plexus injuries can occur as a result of shoulder trauma, ...

  4. [THE EFFECTIVENESS OF THE CORRECTION OF ENDOTHELIAL DYSFUNCTION AND REMODELING OF THE BRACHIAL ARTERY WITH CONCENTRIC AND ECCENTRIC LEFT VENTRICULAR HYPERTROPHY IN PATIENTS WITH UNSTABLE ANGINA WITH COMORBID HYPERTENSION].

    PubMed

    Denesiuk, E V

    2015-01-01

    The study involved patients with unstable angina (UA), comorbid hypertension (AH), myocardial infarction in 55.5% of cases. Systolic blood pressure was (163.2 ± 1.5) mm Hg. Art., diastolic blood pressure--(101.10 ± 0.67) mm Hg. Art., pulse pressure--(61.1 ± 17.0) mm Hg. Art. Examined patients underwent clinical studies, ECG in 12 conventional leads, echocardiography in M and B modes, Doppler ultrasonography of the brachial artery. To correct the detected change using standard combined therapy: perindopril 5-10 mg/day, bisoprolol--5-10 mg/day, atorvastatin--20 mg/day, acetylsalicylic acid--75-100 mg/day. Monitoring the treatment was carried out at 3; 6 and 12 months. Standard one-year comprehensive treatment of patients with UA with comorbid AH resulted in significant improvement of effective endothelial dysfunction in concentric and eccentric left ventricular hypertrophy in 3; 6 and 12 months, however, regression of hypertrophy brachial artery advancing much less mainly in concentric left ventricular hypertrophy. PMID:27089719

  5. Soluble P-selectin Predicts Lower Extremity Peripheral Artery Disease Incidence and Change in the Ankle Brachial Index: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA)

    PubMed Central

    Wassel, Christina L.; Berardi, Cecilia; Pankow, James S.; Larson, Nicholas B.; Decker, Paul A.; Hanson, Naomi Q.; Tsai, Michael Y.; Criqui, Michael H.; Allison, Matthew A.; Bielinski, Suzette J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the association of circulating P-selectin with prevalent and incident peripheral artery disease (PAD), the ankle brachial index (ABI), and change in the ABI. Methods The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) is a prospective population-based cohort study including 6814 European descent, African American, Hispanic and Chinese men and women aged 45–84 at baseline. Four clinical exams took place after the baseline exam. After excluding those with ABI>1.4, prevalent and incident PAD were defined as an ABI≤0.90. ABI progression was defined as progression from a normal ABI (0.91–1.4) to abnormal (≤0.90 or >1.4) at a later exam. Results In adjusted models, each SD (13 ng/mL) higher P-selectin was significantly associated with 0.007 lower ABI (95% CI ((−0.011, −0.004)), p<0.001), and an average change in the ABI of − 0.006 ((−0.010, −0.003, p<0.001). P-selectin was significantly associated with a 1.17-fold greater odds of prevalent PAD ((1.02, 1.33), p=0.03), and a 30% greater risk of incident PAD ((1.11, 1.53), p=0.001), as well as progression from a normal ABI to an ABI≤ 0.90 (p=0.003), but not to an ABI>1.4 (p=0.96). Addition of P-selectin to models containing traditional PAD risk factors and markers of inflammation/coagulation significantly improved the net reclassification for ABI progression (p=0.03), but was only marginally significant for incident PAD (p=0.06). Conclusions P-selectin is significantly associated with the development of PAD. However, further research is needed in population-based studies to confirm prospective associations of P-selectin with incident PAD and change in the ABI, as well as its potential predictive ability. PMID:25682040

  6. [Measurement ofthe ankle-brachial pressure index (ABPI)].

    PubMed

    Kulisić, Sandra Marinović

    2012-10-01

    Measurement of the ankle-brachial pressure index, also known as ankle-brachial index or ankle-arm index is a ratio of the ankle blood pressure and brachial blood pressure. It is easy to perform and allows for diagnosis and further definition of the severity of peripheral arterial disease with sensitivity 90% and specificity 98%. The test is not appropriate for mild arterial changes as in case of comorbidity. Its further objectives are to identify patients at an higher risk of cardiovascular events. PMID:23193828

  7. Validation of stroke volume and cardiac output by electrical interrogation of the brachial artery in normals: assessment of strengths, limitations, and sources of error.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Donald P; Henry, Isaac C; Lemmens, Harry J; Chaltas, Janell L; DeMaria, Anthony N; Moon, James B; Kahn, Andrew M

    2015-12-01

    The goal of this study is to validate a new, continuous, noninvasive stroke volume (SV) method, known as transbrachial electrical bioimpedance velocimetry (TBEV). TBEV SV was compared to SV obtained by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (cMRI) in normal humans devoid of clinically apparent heart disease. Thirty-two (32) volunteers were enrolled in the study. Each subject was evaluated by echocardiography to assure that no aortic or mitral valve disease was present. Subsequently, each subject underwent electrical interrogation of the brachial artery by means of a high frequency, low amplitude alternating current. A first TBEV SV estimate was obtained. Immediately after the initial TBEV study, subjects underwent cMRI, using steady-state precession imaging to obtain a volumetric estimate of SV. Following cMRI, the TBEV SV study was repeated. Comparing the cMRI-derived SV to that of TBEV, the two TBEV estimates were averaged and compared to the cMRI standard. CO was computed as the product of SV and heart rate. Statistical methods consisted of Bland-Altman and linear regression analysis. TBEV SV and CO estimates were obtained in 30 of the 32 subjects enrolled. Bland-Altman analysis of pre- and post-cMRI TBEV SV showed a mean bias of 2.87 % (2.05 mL), precision of 13.59% (11.99 mL) and 95% limits of agreement (LOA) of +29.51% (25.55 mL) and -23.77% (-21.45 mL). Regression analysis for pre- and post-cMRI TBEV SV values yielded y = 0.76x + 25.1 and r(2) = 0.71 (r = 0.84). Bland-Altman analysis comparing cMRI SV with averaged TBEV SV showed a mean bias of -1.56% (-1.53 mL), precision of 13.47% (12.84 mL), 95% LOA of +24.85% (+23.64 mL) and -27.97% (-26.7 mL) and percent error = 26.2 %. For correlation analysis, the regression equation was y = 0.82x + 19.1 and correlation coefficient r(2) = 0.61 (r = 0.78). Bland-Altman analysis of averaged pre- and post-cMRI TBEV CO versus cMRI CO yielded a mean bias of 5.01% (0.32 L min(-1)), precision of 12.85% (0.77 L min(-1)), 95% LOA

  8. Assessing the perceived quality of brachial artery Flow Mediated Dilation studies for inclusion in meta-analyses and systematic reviews: Description of data employed in the development of a scoring ;tool based on currently accepted guidelines.

    PubMed

    Greyling, Arno; van Mil, Anke C C M; Zock, Peter L; Green, Daniel J; Ghiadoni, Lorenzo; Thijssen, Dick H

    2016-09-01

    Brachial artery Flow Mediated Dilation (FMD) is widely used as a non-invasive measure of endothelial function. Adherence to expert consensus guidelines on FMD measurement has been found to be of vital importance to obtain reproducible data. This article lists the literature data which was considered in the development of a tool to aid in the objective judgement of the extent to which published studies adhered to expert guidelines for FMD measurement. Application of this tool in a systematic review of FMD studies (http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2016.03.011) (Greyling et al., 2016 [1]) indicated that adherence to expert consensus guidelines is strongly correlated to the reproducibility of FMD data.

  9. Assessing the perceived quality of brachial artery Flow Mediated Dilation studies for inclusion in meta-analyses and systematic reviews: Description of data employed in the development of a scoring ;tool based on currently accepted guidelines.

    PubMed

    Greyling, Arno; van Mil, Anke C C M; Zock, Peter L; Green, Daniel J; Ghiadoni, Lorenzo; Thijssen, Dick H

    2016-09-01

    Brachial artery Flow Mediated Dilation (FMD) is widely used as a non-invasive measure of endothelial function. Adherence to expert consensus guidelines on FMD measurement has been found to be of vital importance to obtain reproducible data. This article lists the literature data which was considered in the development of a tool to aid in the objective judgement of the extent to which published studies adhered to expert guidelines for FMD measurement. Application of this tool in a systematic review of FMD studies (http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2016.03.011) (Greyling et al., 2016 [1]) indicated that adherence to expert consensus guidelines is strongly correlated to the reproducibility of FMD data. PMID:27284565

  10. Ankle-brachial index and inter-artery blood pressure differences as predictors of cognitive function in overweight and obese older adults with diabetes: Results from the Action for Health in Diabetes Movement and Memory Study

    PubMed Central

    Espeland, Mark A; Beavers, Kristen M; Gibbs, Bethany Barone; Johnson, Karen C; Hughes, Timothy M; Baker, Laura D; Jakicic, John; Korytkowski, Mary; Miller, Marsha; Bray, George A

    2016-01-01

    Objective Ankle-brachial index (ABI) and inter-artery systolic blood pressure differences, as markers of vascular disease, are plausible risk factors for deficits in cognitive function among overweight and obese adults with type 2 diabetes. Methods ABI and maximum inter-artery differences (MIAD) in systolic blood pressures were assessed annually for five years among 479 participants assigned to the control condition in a randomized clinical trial of a behavioral weight loss intervention. A battery of standardized cognitive function tests was administered four to five years later. Analyses of covariance were used to assess relationships that ABI, MIAD, and progression of ABI and MIAD had with cognitive function. Results There was a curvilinear relationship between ABI and a composite index of cognitive function (p=0.03), with lower ABI being associated with poorer function. In graded fashions, both greater MIAD and increases in MIAD over time also had modest relationships with poorer verbal memory (both p≤0.05), processing speed (both p≤0.05), and composite cognitive function (both p≤0.04). These relationships were independent of each other and remained evident after extensive covariate adjustment. Conclusions In overweight and obese adults with type 2 diabetes, lower ABI and larger inter-artery systolic blood pressure differences have modest, independent, graded relationships with poorer cognitive function 4–5 year later. PMID:25546032

  11. Brachial plexus anesthesia: an analysis of options.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, D. L.

    1993-01-01

    There are multiple sites at which the brachial plexus block can be induced in selecting regional anesthesia for upper extremity surgical patients. The most frequently used blocks are axillary, infraclavicular, supraclavicular, and interscalene. One must understand brachial plexus anatomy to use these blocks effectively, as well as the practical clinical differences between the blocks. Axillary brachial plexus block is most effective for surgical procedures distal to the elbow. This block is induced at a distance from both the centroneuraxis and the lung; thus, complications in those areas are avoided. Infraclavicular block is often the most effective method of maintaining a continuous block of the brachial plexus, since the catheter is easily secured to the anterior chest. Supraclavicular block provides anesthesia of the entire upper extremity in the most consistent, time-efficient manner of any brachial plexus technique; however, the block needle is necessarily positioned near the lung during injection. Interscalene block is especially effective for surgical procedures involving the shoulder or upper arm because the roots of the brachial plexus are most easily blocked with this technique. The final needle tip position with this block is potentially near the centroneuraxis and arteries perfusing the brain, thus careful aspiration of the needle and incremental injection are important. In summary, when an understanding of branchial plexus anatomy is combined with proper block technique and a patient- and procedure-specific balancing of risk-benefit, our patients and colleagues will be coadvocates of our branchial plexus regional blocks. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:7825342

  12. Complex anatomic variation in the brachial region.

    PubMed

    Troupis, Th; Michalinos, A; Protogerou, V; Mazarakis, A; Skandalakis, P

    2015-01-01

    Authors describe a case of a complex anatomic variation discovered during dissection of the humeral region. On the right side, brachial artery followed a superficial course. Musculocutaneous nerve did not pierce coracobrachialis muscle but instead passed below the muscle before continuing in the forearm. On the left side, a communication between musculocutaneous and median nerve was dissected. Those variations are analytically presented with a brief review on their anatomic and clinical implications. Considerations on their embryological origin are attempted.

  13. Peripheral Arterial Disease in Older People with Intellectual Disability in The Netherlands Using the Ankle-Brachial Index: Results of the HA-ID Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Winter, C. F.; Bastiaanse, L. P.; Kranendonk, S. E.; Hilgenkamp, T. I. M.; Evenhuis, H. M.; Echteld, M. A.

    2013-01-01

    Older people with an intellectual disability (ID) have been shown to have similar to increased cardiovascular risks as compared to the general population. Peripheral arterial disease (PAD), atherosclerosis distal from the aortic bifurcation, is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The prevalence of PAD has not been…

  14. Evaluation of Arterial Stiffness in Patients with Behçet's Disease by Using Noninvasive Radiological Methods such as Intima-Media Thickness of the Carotid, Ankle-Brachial Pressure Index, Coronary Artery Calcium Scoring, and Their Relation to Serum Fetuin-A Levels: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Solak, Aynur; Genç, Berhan; Akyıldız, Muhittin; Şahin, Neslin; Uyar, İhsan Sami; Saklamaz, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background Behçet's disease (BD) is a chronic, recurrent inflammatory systemic vasculitis. Evidence for increased atherosclerosis in BD has been observed. The relation between cardiovascular risk factors and increased atherosclerosis in patients with BD is still controversial. Objective We performed this study to evaluate arterial stiffness in patients with BD by using noninvasive radiological methods such as carotid artery intima-media thickness (CIMT), ankle-brachial pressure index (ABPI), coronary artery calcium score (CACaS), and their relation to serum fetuin-A levels, which was recently found to be important in vascular calcification. Methods This prospective study included 26 patients with BD and 25 control subjects. In all patients, the CIMT, ABPI, CACaS, and serum fetuin-A levels were examined. Results The CIMT and CACaS were statistically higher and the ABPI was statistically lower in BD patients than in the control group. All p-values were <0.001. Positive correlations were found between the CACaS and CIMT, and negative correlations were found between the CACaS and ABPI. Although the values of fetuin-A were higher in BD, the difference was not statistically significant (p=0.064). However, the correlations found between fetuin-A levels and CIMT and between fetuin-A levels and CACaS were significant. Conclusion The CIMT, CACaS, and ABPI are all useful in detecting structural and functional vascular damage in BD. PMID:26719639

  15. Peripheral artery disease assessed by ankle-brachial index in patients with established cardiovascular disease or at least one risk factor for atherothrombosis - CAREFUL Study: A national, multi-center, cross-sectional observational study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To investigate the presence of peripheral artery disease (PAD) via the ankle brachial index (ABI) in patients with known cardiovascular and/or cerebrovascular diseases or with at least one risk factor for atherothrombosis. Methods Patients with a history of atherothrombotic events, or aged 50-69 years with at least one cardiovascular risk factor, or > = 70 years of age were included in this multicenter, cross-sectional, non-interventional study (DIREGL04074). Demographics, medical history, physical examination findings, and physician awareness of PAD were analyzed. The number of patients with low ABI (< = 0.90) was analyzed. Results A total of 530 patients (mean age, 63.4 ± 8.7 years; 50.2% female) were enrolled. Hypertension and dyslipidemia were present in 88.7% and 65.5% of patients, respectively. PAD-related symptoms were evident in about one-third of the patients, and at least one of the pedal pulses was negative in 6.5% of patients. The frequency of low ABI was 20.0% in the whole study population and 30% for patients older than 70 years. Older age, greater number of total risk factors, and presence of PAD-related physical findings were associated with increased likelihood of low ABI (p < 0.001). There was no gender difference in the prevalence of low ABI, PAD symptoms, or total number of risk factors. Exercise (33.6%) was the most common non-pharmacological option recommended by physicians, and acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) (45.4%) was the most frequently prescribed medication for PAD. Conclusion Our results indicate that advanced age, greater number of total risk factors and presence of PAD-related physical findings were associated with increased likelihood of low ABI. These findings are similar to those reported in similar studies of different populations, and document a fairly high prevalence of PAD in a Mediterranean country. PMID:21247449

  16. Relationship of levels of Vitamin D with flow-mediated dilatation of brachial artery in patients of myocardial infarction and healthy control: A case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Sarthak; Giri, Subhash; Madhu, S. V.; Rathi, Vinita; Banerjee, B. D.; Gupta, Nikhil

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) remain the leading cause of death worldwide. Vitamin D deficiency has been linked to increased risk of adverse CV events. Vitamin D deficiency may be responsible for endothelial dysfunction which in turn affects the onset and progression of coronary artery disease and its risk factors, directly or indirectly through various mechanisms. Materials and Methods: It was case–control study. A total of 50 cases of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) (aged 40–60 years), admitted to medicine emergency/CCU, were taken as per ACC/AHA 2007 guidelines. An equal number of age- and sex-matched controls were also taken. Risk factors of AMI, flow-mediated dilatation (FMD), and 25(OH)D levels were studied in all cases and controls. Correlation was also studied between FMD and 25(OH)D. Results: The mean values of FMD were 18.86 ± 5.39% and 10.35 ± 4.90% in controls and cases, respectively (P < 0.05). The endothelial dilatation after glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) was also studied and was found to be 26.175 ± 4.25% and 18.80 ± 5.72% in controls and cases, respectively (P < 0.05). The mean levels of 25(OH)D in controls and cases were 25.45 ± 12.17 and 14.53 ± 8.28 ng/ml, respectively. In this study, 56% of subjects were Vitamin D deficient, 25% were Vitamin D insufficient, and only 19% had Vitamin D in normal range. A positive correlation coefficient was found between FMD and 25(OH) Vitamin D levels (r = 0.841, P < 0.01). In this study, a positive correlation coefficient was also found between endothelial dilatation after GTN and 25(OH)D levels (r = 0.743, P < 0.01). Conclusion: In this study, it was found that FMD was markedly impaired in patients of AMI when compared to controls. It was also found that majority of the study population was Vitamin D deficient; however, the deficiency was more severe in patients of AMI. We also found out that FMD was positively correlated (r = 0.841) to the deficiency state of Vitamin D in all the study

  17. Digital infarction in a hemodialysis patient due to embolism from a thrombosed brachial arteriovenous fistula.

    PubMed

    Yj, Anupama

    2015-10-01

    Acute onset of digital ischemia and infarction is an unusual complication in patients undergoing hemodialysis. This is a report of a patient on regular hemodialysis who presented with acute distal extremity ischemia, progressing to digital infarction and on evaluation was found to have thrombosis of brachial arteriovenous fistula with embolization to the distal arteries causing digital artery occlusion.

  18. Ankle-Brachial Index, Toe-Brachial Index, and Pulse Volume Recording in Healthy Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Masaki, Hisao; Yunoki, Yasuhiro; Tabuchi, Atushi; Morita, Ichiro; Mohri, Satoshi; Tanemoto, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To clarify the characteristics of ankle-brachial index (ABI), toe-brachial index (TBI), and pulse volume recording (PVR) of the ankle with brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) in healthy young adults. Material and Methods: We analyzed ABI, TBI, baPWV, and PVR in the ankle of healthy adults aged 20 to 25 years (median, 20 years) using an automatic oscillometric device between 2002 and 2013. The ABI, baPWV, and PVR in 1282 legs of 641 subjects (301 men and 340 women) and the TBI in 474 toes of 237 subjects (117 men and 120 women) were evaluated. Results: The measured values showed no bilateral differences. ABI and baPWV were higher in men than in women, but TBI was similar in both sexes. ABI <1.0 was observed in 18.1% of the legs in men and in 25.6% in women. TBI <0.7 was observed in 16.2% of the toes in men and 19.1% in women. For ankle PVR, the % mean arterial pressure was higher in women than in men. The upstroke time was <180 ms in most subjects. Conclusions: For young people, ABI <1.0 or TBI <0.7 may not always indicate vascular abnormalities. When evaluating circulatory indexes, age and sex should be considered. PMID:26421072

  19. Ultrasound guided axillary brachial plexus block.

    PubMed

    Ranganath, Anil; Srinivasan, Karthikeyan Kallidaikurichi; Iohom, Gabriella

    2014-09-01

    The axillary brachial plexus block is the most widely performed upper limb block. It is relatively simple to perform and one of the safest approaches to brachial plexus block. With the advent of ultrasound technology, there is a marked improvement in the success rate of the axillary block. This review will focus on the technique of ultrasound guided axillary brachial plexus block. PMID:25110766

  20. Association of hemoglobin with ankle-brachial index in general population

    PubMed Central

    Chenglong, Zhang; Jing, Lei; Xia, Ke; Yang, Tianlun

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Previous studies have demonstrated that both low and high hemoglobin concentrations are predictive of adverse cardiovascular outcomes in various populations. However, an association of hemoglobin with the ankle-brachial index, which is widely used as a screening test for peripheral arterial disease, has not yet been identified. METHODS: We examined 786 subjects (236 women and 550 men) who received routine physical check-ups. The ankle-brachial index and several hematological parameters, including the hemoglobin level, hematocrit and red blood cell count and other demographic and biochemical characteristics were collected. Univariate and multivariate linear regression analyses were performed to assess the relationships between the ankle-brachial index and the independent determinants. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was conducted to calculate the cut-off level of hemoglobin for a relatively low ankle-brachial index (less than 20% of all subjects, which was 1.02). RESULTS: The hemoglobin level, hematocrit and red blood cell count were correlated with the ankle-brachial index in the males (r=-0.274, r=-0.224 and r=-0.273, respectively, p<0.001 for all), but these associations were not significant in the females. Multivariate linear regression analysis revealed that the independent determinants of the ankle-brachial index included age, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and the white blood cell count for the females and age, hypertension, total cholesterol and hemoglobin (β=-0.001, p<0.001) for the males after adjusting for confounding factors. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis revealed that the cut-off level of hemoglobin for predicting a low ankle-brachial index was 156.5 g/L in the males. CONCLUSIONS: A high hemoglobin concentration was independently correlated with a low ankle-brachial index in the healthy males, indicating that an elevation in this level may be associated with an increased

  1. Central blood pressure estimation by using N-point moving average method in the brachial pulse wave.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Rie; Horinaka, Shigeo; Yagi, Hiroshi; Ishimura, Kimihiko; Honda, Takeharu

    2015-05-01

    Recently, a method of estimating the central systolic blood pressure (C-SBP) using an N-point moving average method in the radial or brachial artery waveform has been reported. Then, we investigated the relationship between the C-SBP estimated from the brachial artery pressure waveform using the N-point moving average method and the C-SBP measured invasively using a catheter. C-SBP using a N/6 moving average method from the scaled right brachial artery pressure waveforms using VaSera VS-1500 was calculated. This estimated C-SBP was compared with the invasively measured C-SBP within a few minutes. In 41 patients who underwent cardiac catheterization (mean age: 65 years), invasively measured C-SBP was significantly lower than right cuff-based brachial BP (138.2 ± 26.3 vs 141.0 ± 24.9 mm Hg, difference -2.78 ± 1.36 mm Hg, P = 0.048). The cuff-based SBP was significantly higher than invasive measured C-SBP in subjects with younger than 60 years old. However, the estimated C-SBP using a N/6 moving average method from the scaled right brachial artery pressure waveforms and the invasively measured C-SBP did not significantly differ (137.8 ± 24.2 vs 138.2 ± 26.3 mm Hg, difference -0.49 ± 1.39, P = 0.73). N/6-point moving average method using the non-invasively acquired brachial artery waveform calibrated by the cuff-based brachial SBP was an accurate, convenient and useful method for estimating C-SBP. Thus, C-SBP can be estimated simply by applying a regular arm cuff, which is greatly feasible in the practical medicine.

  2. Torticollis associated with neonatal brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Hervey-Jumper, Shawn L; Justice, Denise; Vanaman, Monique M; Nelson, Virginia S; Yang, Lynda J-S

    2011-11-01

    We investigate the incidence of torticollis associated with neonatal brachial plexus palsy, whether the severity of brachial plexus palsy affects outcomes and the rate of recovery. We performed a retrospective review of 128 consecutive neonatal brachial plexus palsy patients evaluated at the University of Michigan from 2005-2009. Patients were followed for at least 3 months, with regular physical examinations and imaging. Forty-three percent presented concurrently with torticollis. Significant differences were evident in mean age at first brachial plexus examination, suggesting that patients with concurrent torticollis present earlier for clinical examination. Recovery from torticollis was evident in 62% of patients by 23 ± 12 weeks with conservative management. No statistically significant differences were evident between torticollis and nontorticollis groups after reviewing their severity of neonatal brachial plexus palsy (Narakas score), recovery from neonatal brachial plexus palsy (biceps function at 6 months), need for nerve repair or reconstructive procedures, or infant, maternal, or other factors associated with labor. Results suggest that although torticollis occurs with increased frequency in children with brachial plexus palsy, its presence is not related to severity and does not affect the probability of recovery from brachial plexus palsy. Conservative management for torticollis yields reasonable recovery.

  3. Brachial-Ankle Pulse Wave Velocity: Myths, Misconceptions, and Realities.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Jun; Tanaka, Hirofumi

    2015-09-01

    A variety of techniques to evaluate central arterial stiffness have been developed and introduced. None of these techniques, however, have been implemented widely in regular clinical settings, except for brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV). The most prominent procedural advantage of baPWV is its ease of use, since it only requires the wrapping of blood pressure cuffs on the 4 extremities. There is mounting evidence indicating the ability of baPWV to predict the risk of future cardiovascular events and total mortality. Additionally, the guidelines for the management of hypertension in Japan recommended the measurement of baPWV be included in the assessment of subclinical target organ damage. However, baPWV has not been fully accepted worldwide due to perceived theoretical and methodological issues. In this review, we address the most frequently mentioned questions and concerns regarding baPWV to shed some light on this simple and easy arterial stiffness measurement. PMID:26587459

  4. OCT/PS-OCT imaging of brachial plexus neurovascular structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raphael, David T.; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Yaoping; Chen, Zhongping; Miller, Carol; Zhou, Li

    2004-07-01

    Introduction: Optical coherence tomography (OCT) allows high-resolution imaging (less than 10 microns) of tissue structures. A pilot study with OCT and polarization-sensitive OCT (PS-OCT) was undertaken to image ex-vivo neurovascular structures (vessels, nerves) of the canine brachial plexus. Methods: OCT is an interferometry-based optical analog of B-mode ultrasound, which can image through non-transparent biological tissues. With approval of the USC Animal Care and Use Committee, segments of the supra- and infraclavicular brachial plexus were excised from euthanized adult dogs, and the ex-vivo specimens were placed in cold pH-buffered physiologic solution. An OCT beam, in micrometer translational steps, scanned the fixed-position bisected specimens in transverse and longitudinal views. Two-dimensional images were obtained from identified arteries and nerves, with specific sections of interest stained with hematoxylin-eosin for later imaging through a surgical microscope. Results: with the beam scan direction transverse to arteries, the resulting OCT images showed an identifiable arterial lumen and arterial wall tissue layers. By comparison, transverse beam OCT images of nerves revealed a multitude of smaller nerve bundles contained within larger circular-shaped fascicles. PS-OCT imaging was helpful in showing the characteristic birefringence exhibited by arrayed neural structures. Discussion: High-resolution OCT imaging may be useful in the optical identification of neurovascular structures during attempted regional nerve blockade. If incorporated into a needle-shaped catheter endoscope, such a technology could prevent intraneural and intravascular injections immediately prior to local anesthetic injection. The major limitation of OCT is that it can form a coherent image of tissue structures only to a depth of 1.5 - 2 mm.

  5. Bilateral transit time assessment of upper and lower limbs as a surrogate ankle brachial index marker.

    PubMed

    Foo, Jong Yong Abdiel

    2008-01-01

    Ankle brachial index is useful in monitoring the pathogenesis of peripheral arterial occlusive diseases. Sphygmomanometer is the standard instrument widely used but frequent prolonged monitoring can be less comfortable for patients. Pulse transit time is known to be inversely correlated with blood pressure and a ratio-based pulse transit time measurement has been proposed as a surrogate ankle brachial index marker. In this study, 17 normotensive adults (9 men; aged 25.4 +/- 3.9 years) were recruited. Two postural change test activities were performed to induce changes in the stiffness of the arterial wall of the moved periphery. Results showed that only readings from the limbs that adopted a new posture registered significant blood pressure and pulse transit time changes (P < .05). Furthermore, there was significant correlation between the ankle brachial index and pulse transit time ratio measure for both test activities (R(2) > or = 0.704). The findings herein suggest that pulse transit time ratio is a surrogate and accommodating ankle brachial index marker. PMID:18480079

  6. Neurinomas of the brachial plexus: case report.

    PubMed

    Forte, A; Gallinaro, L S; Bertagni, A; Montesano, G; Prece, V; Illuminati, G

    1999-01-01

    Neurinomas, also referred to as neurilemmomas and schwannomas, are rare benign tumours of the peripheral nerves, a low proportion of which arise from the brachial plexus. Authors report a case of an ancient schwannoma arising from the brachial plexus. The tumour, usually asymptomatic, may cause sensory radicular symptoms, or rarely motor deficits in the involved arm. Enucleation of the tumour from the nerve without damage to any of the fascicles is the correct treatment.

  7. Neurinomas of the brachial plexus: case report.

    PubMed

    Forte, A; Gallinaro, L S; Bertagni, A; Montesano, G; Prece, V; Illuminati, G

    1999-01-01

    Neurinomas, also referred to as neurilemmomas and schwannomas, are rare benign tumours of the peripheral nerves, a low proportion of which arise from the brachial plexus. Authors report a case of an ancient schwannoma arising from the brachial plexus. The tumour, usually asymptomatic, may cause sensory radicular symptoms, or rarely motor deficits in the involved arm. Enucleation of the tumour from the nerve without damage to any of the fascicles is the correct treatment. PMID:10710825

  8. Quantification of the Interrelationship between Brachial-Ankle and Carotid-Femoral Pulse Wave Velocity in a Workplace Population

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yi-Bang; Li, Yan; Sheng, Chang-Sheng; Huang, Qi-Fang; Wang, Ji-Guang

    2016-01-01

    Background Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (PWV) is increasingly used for the measurement of arterial stiffness. In the present study, we quantified the interrelationship between brachial-ankle and carotid-femoral PWV in a workplace population, and investigated the associations with cardiovascular risk factors and carotid intima-media thickness (IMT). Methods Brachial-ankle and carotid-femoral PWV were measured using the Omron-Colin VP1000 and SphygmoCor devices, respectively. We investigated the interrelationship by the Pearson's correlation analysis and Bland-Altman plot, and performed sensitivity and specificity analyses. Results The 954 participants (mean ± standard deviation age 42.6 ± 14.2 years) included 630 (66.0%) men and 203 (21.3%) hypertensive patients. Brachial-ankle (13.4 ± 2.7 m/s) and carotid-femoral PWV (7.3 ± 1.6 m/s) were significantly correlated in all subjects (r = 0.75) as well as in men (r = 0.72) and women (r = 0.80) separately. For arterial stiffness defined as a carotid-femoral PWV of 10 m/s or higher, the sensitivity and specificity of brachial-ankle PWV of 16.7 m/s or higher were 72 and 94%, respectively. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.953. In multiple stepwise regression, brachial-ankle and carotid-femoral PWV were significantly (p < 0.001) associated with age (partial r = 0.33 and 0.34, respectively) and systolic blood pressure (partial r = 0.71 and 0.66, respectively). In addition, brachial-ankle and carotid-femoral PWV were significantly (p < 0.001) associated with carotid IMT (r = 0.57 and 0.55, respectively) in unadjusted analysis, but not in analysis adjusted for cardiovascular risk factors (p ≥ 0.08). Conclusions Brachial-ankle and carotid-femoral PWV were closely correlated, and had similar determinants. Brachial-ankle PWV can behave as an ease-of-use alternative measure of arterial stiffness for assessing cardiovascular risk. PMID:27195246

  9. Resting Doppler ankle brachial pressure index measurement: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Sihlangu, Dorcus; Bliss, Julie

    2012-07-01

    Peripheral vascular disease (PVD) is under-diagnosed in primary and acute settings. The use of Doppler ankle brachial pressure index (ABPI) is effective in diagnosing PVD , aid in determining aetiology of leg ulcers and is cost efficient in reducing the effects of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular events. The aim of this literature review was to review practitioners' experience in using Doppler ABPI, different skills used to measure ABPI and to examine practitioners' confidence in ABPI. The findings identified variation in method for Doppler measurement: including position of the artery, arm measurement, resting period and type of equipment for measuring blood pressure, variations in practitioners' training and experience have demonstrated variability in ABPI results. Although limited in number, the studies have demonstrated knowledge gap, and the need for training among health professionals. PMID:22875182

  10. Ankle brachial pressure index of normal, healthy, younger adults.

    PubMed

    Niblo, Jane; Coull, Alison

    Doppler ultrasound and ankle brachial pressure index (ABPI) calculations are used in the assessment of lower limb vascularity, specifically to determine arterial deficiency. ABPI is important as it is used as an indicator when deciding management options for the treatment of leg ulceration. This study aimed to investigate the range of ABPI measurement, using Doppler ultrasound and sphygmomanometry in 36 young healthy adults aged 18-55 years. The findings show a mean ABPI in the left leg of 1.19 and a mean ABPI of 1.17 in the right leg which, while within the normal range, are consistently in the upper range and significantly higher than the acknowledged 'normal' midpoint of 1.0. It would appear that younger people will have ABPIs within the upper aspect of the normal range and well above the established norm of 1.0. PMID:24151719

  11. Clinical usefulness of ankle brachial index and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity in patients with ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyung-Suk; Lee, Hye Lim; Han, Ho-seong; Yeo, Minju; Kim, Ji Seon; Lee, Sung-Hyun; Lee, Sang-Soo; Shin, Dong-Ick

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Ankle brachial index (ABI) and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) are widely used noninvasive modalities to evaluate atherosclerosis. Recently, evidence has increased supporting the use of ABI and baPWV as markers of cerebrovascular disease. This study sought to examine the relationship between ABI and baPWV with ischemic stroke. This study also aimed to determine which pathogenic mechanism, large artery disease (LAD) or small vessel disease (SVD), is related to ABI or baPWV. Retrospectively, 121 patients with ischemic stroke and 38 subjects with no obvious ischemic stroke history were recruited. First, ABI and baPWV were compared between the groups. Then, within the stroke group, the relevance of ABI and baPWV with regard to SVD and LAD, which were classified by brain magnetic resonance image (MRI) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) or computed tomography angiography (CTA) findings, was assessed. The baPWV was higher in the stroke group than non-stroke group (1,944.18±416.6 cm/s vs. 1,749.76±669.6 cm/s, P<0.01). Regarding LAD, we found that mean ABI value was lower in the group with extracranial large artery stenosis (P<0.01), and there was an inverse linear correlation between ABI and the grade of extracranial large artery stenosis (P<0.01). For SVD, there was a significant correlation between SVD and baPWV (2,057.6±456.57 cm/s in the SVD (+) group vs. 1,491±271.62 cm/s in the SVD (-) group; P<0.01). However, the grade of abnormalities detected in SVD did not correlate linearly with baPWV. These findings show that baPWV is a reliable surrogate marker of ischemic stroke. Furthermore, baPWV and ABI can be used to indicate the presence of small vessel disease and large arterial disease, respectively. PMID:27533937

  12. Brachial approach to NOGA-guided procedures: electromechanical mapping and transendocardial stem-cell injections.

    PubMed

    Banovic, Marko; Ostojic, Miodrag C; Bartunek, Jozef; Nedeljkovic, Milan; Beleslin, Branko; Terzic, Andre

    2011-01-01

    Several methods are available for delivering stem cells to the heart. Recent studies have highlighted the advantages of injecting the cells directly into the myocardium in order to increase myocardial retention of cells. A particular focus has been on percutaneous transendocardial injection, facilitated by electromechanical mapping.The NOGA XP Cardiac Navigation System has a multicomponent catheter that is designed to guide and deliver transendocardial injections via a transfemoral approach, without a guidewire. However, this method may not be feasible in some patients who have peripheral vascular disease. Herein, we describe the case of a 68-year-old man whose tortuous, sharply angled iliac arteries precluded a femoral approach to transendocardial injection. To overcome the anatomic and mechanical challenges, we used a brachial approach. We believe that this is the 1st report of using the brachial route for transendocardial injection, and that it can be a viable alternative to the transfemoral approach in selected patients.

  13. Analysis of Arterial Mechanics During Head-Down-Tilt Bed Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, Morgan B.; Martin, David S.; Westby, Christian M.; Stenger, Michael B.; Platts, Steven H.

    2014-01-01

    Carotid, brachial, and tibial arteries reacted differently to HDTBR. Previous studies have not analyzed the mechanical properties of the human brachial or anterior tibial arteries. After slight variations during bed-rest, arterial mechanical properties and IMT returned to pre-bed rest values, with the exception of tibial stiffness and PSE, which continued to be reduced post-bed rest while the DC remained elevated. The tibial artery remodeling was probably due to decreased pressure and volume. Resulting implications for longer duration spaceflight are unclear. Arterial health may be affected by microgravity, as shown by increased thoracic aorta stiffness in other ground based simulations (Aubert).

  14. Measuring Arterial Blood Pressure. A Self-Contained Instructional Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Chris Ellen

    This self-contained instructional module is designed to help adult caregivers learn how to measure arterial blood pressure in the home. The module includes the following parts: objectives; pretest (with answers); four sections of instructional material covering (1) equipment, (2) cuff placement and locating the brachial artery, (3) measuring blood…

  15. What has changed in brachial plexus surgery?

    PubMed Central

    de Rezende, Marcelo Rosa; Silva, Gustavo Bersani; de Paula, Emygdio José Leomil; Junior, Rames Mattar; de Camargo, Olavo Pires

    2013-01-01

    Brachial plexus injuries, in all their severity and complexity, have been extensively studied. Although brachial plexus injuries are associated with serious and often definitive sequelae, many concepts have changed since the 1950s, when this pathological condition began to be treated more aggressively. Looking back over the last 20 years, it can be seen that the entire approach, from diagnosis to treatment, has changed significantly. Some concepts have become better established, while others have been introduced; thus, it can be said that currently, something can always be offered in terms of functional recovery, regardless of the degree of injury. Advances in microsurgical techniques have enabled improved results after neurolysis and have made it possible to perform neurotization, which has undoubtedly become the greatest differential in treating brachial plexus injuries. Improvements in imaging devices and electrical studies have allowed quick decisions that are reflected in better surgical outcomes. In this review, we intend to show the many developments in brachial plexus surgery that have significantly changed the results and have provided hope to the victims of this serious injury. PMID:23644864

  16. [Percutaneous brachial access: a few simple considerations].

    PubMed

    Marcy, P Y; Ianessi, A; Ben Taarit, I

    2009-01-01

    This letter is with regards to the recently published article by Vidal et al. in the Journal Français de Radiologie Médicale. A clarification of US and venographic techniques of brachial venous catheterization and related complications are presented. The main indications for PICC line and subcutaneous port placement are described.

  17. What has changed in brachial plexus surgery?

    PubMed

    Rezende, Marcelo Rosa de; Silva, Gustavo Bersani; Paula, Emygdio José Leomil de; Mattar Junior, Rames; Camargo, Olavo Pires de

    2013-01-01

    Brachial plexus injuries, in all their severity and complexity, have been extensively studied. Although brachial plexus injuries are associated with serious and often definitive sequelae, many concepts have changed since the 1950s, when this pathological condition began to be treated more aggressively. Looking back over the last 20 years, it can be seen that the entire approach, from diagnosis to treatment, has changed significantly. Some concepts have become better established, while others have been introduced; thus, it can be said that currently, something can always be offered in terms of functional recovery, regardless of the degree of injury. Advances in microsurgical techniques have enabled improved results after neurolysis and have made it possible to perform neurotization, which has undoubtedly become the greatest differential in treating brachial plexus injuries. Improvements in imaging devices and electrical studies have allowed quick decisions that are reflected in better surgical outcomes. In this review, we intend to show the many developments in brachial plexus surgery that have significantly changed the results and have provided hope to the victims of this serious injury.

  18. Endothelium-derived nitric oxide regulates arterial elasticity in human arteries in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kinlay, S; Creager, M A; Fukumoto, M; Hikita, H; Fang, J C; Selwyn, A P; Ganz, P

    2001-11-01

    Arterial elasticity is determined by structural characteristics of the artery wall and by vascular smooth muscle tone. The identity of endogenous vasoactive substances that regulate elasticity has not been defined in humans. We hypothesized that NO, a vasodilator released constitutively by the endothelium, augments arterial elasticity. Seven healthy young men were studied. A 20-MHz intravascular ultrasound catheter was introduced through an arterial sheath to measure brachial artery cross-sectional area, wall thickness, and intra-arterial pressure. After control was established, indices of elasticity (pressure-area relationship, instantaneous compliance, and stress-strain, pressure-incremental elastic modulus (E(inc)), and pressure-pulse wave velocity relationships) were examined over 0 to 100 mm Hg transmural pressure obtained by inflation of an external cuff. Thereafter, the basal production of endothelium-derived NO was inhibited by N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA) (4 and 8 mg/min). Finally, nitroglycerin (2.5 and 12.5 microgram/min), an exogenous donor of NO, was given to relax the vascular smooth muscle. Elasticity was measured under all of these conditions. L-NMMA (8 mg/min) decreased brachial artery area (P=0.016) and compliance (P<0.0001) and increased E(inc) (P<0.01) and pulse wave velocity (P<0.0001). Nitroglycerin (12.5 microgram/min) increased brachial artery area (P<0.001) and compliance (P<0.001) and decreased pulse wave velocity (P=0.02). NO, an endothelium-derived vasodilator, augments arterial elasticity in the human brachial artery. Loss of constitutively released NO associated with cardiovascular risk factors may adversely affect arterial elasticity in humans.

  19. The bicipital aponeurosis may be involved in the anatomical etiology of arterial compromise after swelling in supracondylar fracture.

    PubMed

    Clark, Damian; Astle, Lisa; Monsell, Fergal; Livingstone, James

    2009-01-01

    A 7-year-old girl presented with a Gartland grade III supracondylar fracture and no radial pulse. After open reduction, it was established that the brachial artery was free of the fracture site; the limb however remained nonviable. The brachial artery was then approached anteriorly and the bicipital aponeurosis was seen to kink the artery. Once the bicipital aponeurosis was released and the remaining spasm treated with arteriotomy and papaverine, a good pulse returned. Despite the fracture being reduced and the artery remaining free of it, there remained a structural impediment to flow in the brachial artery. If the pulse does not return after fixation of a supracondylar fracture, then exploration of the brachial artery is indicated. When a patient is taken to the operating room for fixation of a supracondylar fracture, the facilities and expertise to explore the brachial artery must be made available. In centers where an on-call vascular service is not available, we recommend that the orthopaedic training programs give consideration to including "exploration of the brachial artery" as a facet of orthopaedic surgical training. PMID:19858982

  20. Ankle brachial index values, leg symptoms, and functional performance among community-dwelling older men and women in the lifestyle interventions and independence for elders study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The prevalence and significance of low normal and abnormal ankle brachial index (ABI) values in a community dwelling population of sedentary, older individuals is unknown. We describe the prevalence of categories of definite peripheral artery disease (PAD), borderline ABI, low-normal ABI and no PAD...

  1. Persistent median artery in the carpal tunnel and anastomosis with superficial palmar arch.

    PubMed

    Bijannejad, Dariush; Azandeh, Saeed; Javadnia, Fatemeh; Gholami, Mohammad Reza; Gharravi, Anneh Mohammad; Zhaleh, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    Persistent median artery (PMA) in present cadaver originated from the brachial artery and anastomosed with the superficial palmar arch (SPA). As the PMA may be the cause of carpal tunnel syndrome and SPA is the main source of arterial supply, knowledge of which are important for the hand surgical interventions. PMID:27583265

  2. [Dextrocardia in situs inversus totalis with obstructive coronary disease. Its treatment by coronary angioplasty by the brachial approach].

    PubMed

    da Silva, M J; Arie, S; Garcia, D P; Bellotti, G; Pileggi, F

    1992-10-01

    Dextrocardia in "situs inversus totalis" with obstructive coronary disease is a rare clinical situation, with few cases treated by coronary angioplasty using the femoral approach being reported. In this report we describe the case of a 61-year-old male patient who underwent successful dilatation of two arteries by the brachial approach. We discuss technical aspects related to the procedure, which may be easily performed when proper equipment is available.

  3. [Ankle-brachial pressure index as a predictor of future cardiovascular outcomes].

    PubMed

    Topalusić, Iva; Valpotić, Ina; Marković, Asja Stipić

    2012-10-01

    Peripheral arterial occlusive disease is very common in the general population and it is mostly of atherosclerotic origin. About 50%-75% of patients are asymptomatic. Many studies have shown the ankle-brachial pressure index (ABPI) to be a simple and reliable test with high sensitivity (90%) and specificity (98%) in the diagnosis of hemodynamically relevant stenosis of an arterial segment and also in detection of asymptomatic patients. The values of ABPI < 0.90 suggest widespread atherosclerosis, while the ABPI > 1.40 is associated with arterial calcification and wall stiffening. This test is highly specific (92.7%) in predicting future cardiovascular and cerebrovascular risk and could provide a tool for more focused prevention strategies. PMID:23814974

  4. Does retraction of the sternum during median sternotomy result in brachial plexus injuries?

    PubMed

    Healey, Scott; O'Neill, Bridie; Bilal, Haris; Waterworth, Paul

    2013-07-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was 'does retraction of the sternum during median sternotomy result in brachial plexus injuries or peripheral neuropathies?' Altogether 58 papers were found using the reported search, of which 12 represented the best evidence to answer the question. The authors, date, journal and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers were tabulated. Caudal placement of the retractor or relieving the pressure superiorly by removing the upper blades of a retractor (P = 0.02) and use of a caudally placed symmetrical retractor has been shown to reduce neuropathy. Positioning of the patient with 'hands up' positioning showed significant reduction in the incidence of brachial plexus injuries. Furthermore, how wide the retractor is opened and use of an asymmetrical retractor for internal mammary artery (IMA) harvesting are also important factors in quantifying risk of postoperative neuropathy. Wider sternal retraction and longer bypass time did increase the risk of developing postoperative neuropathy. Three asymmetrical retractors were looked at that demonstrates the Delacroix-Chevalier to be the safest (P < 0.05). We conclude that median sternotomy risks brachial plexus injury and where possible the sternum should be opened as small a distance as possible with symmetrical retractor and using a caudally placed retractor.

  5. Role of Metals and Aspects of Socioeconomic Status (SES) in Peripheral Arterial Disease in the US Population

    EPA Science Inventory

    Atherosclerosis and atherothrombosis are serious pathological changes and are responsible for various disease conditions such as peripheral arterial disease (PAD). The prevalence of PAD, commonly assessed by Ankle–Brachial Index (ABI), is over 10% in the US population over...

  6. Shoulder pain and isolated brachial plexopathy.

    PubMed

    Kishan, Amar U; Syed, Sana; Fiorito-Torres, Franchesca; Thakore-James, Manisha

    2012-06-28

    Pancoast syndrome, classically considered as a constellation of (1) pain along the C8-T2 dermatomes, (2) weakness and atrophy of the hand and (3) Horner's syndrome, often presents a diagnostic challenge. In fact, it may manifest as a singular orthopaedic complaint, prompting a futile barrage of tests and referrals. The authors present the case of an elderly man who initially presented with severe shoulder pain. Due to progressive pain and weakness, he was referred to rheumatology and was treated with corticosteroid injections for a presumed musculoskeletal lesion. Ultimately, he manifested gross muscular atrophy and worsening pain, prompting a referral to neurology. An electromyogram (EMG) suggested a lower brachial plexopathy, and a follow-up brachial plexus MRI identified a large Pancoast tumour. Unfortunately, his disease was rapidly progressive, and he passed away within 2 months. While the MRI remains the gold standard for diagnosing Pancoast syndrome, an EMG can facilitate diagnosis in difficult cases such as this one.

  7. Noninvasive assessment of mechanical properties of peripheral arteries.

    PubMed

    Buntin, C M; Silver, F H

    1990-01-01

    An ultrasound examination was used to noninvasively determine the changes in mechanical properties associated with age for the common carotid, brachial, popliteal, femoral, and tibial arteries. Forty-two normal male subjects, ranging in age from 8 to 60 years of age, were examined. The subjects were placed in one of three age groups: less than 29 years of age, 29 to 38, and greater than 38. Mechanical properties including percentage variation in diameter, pressure-strain, and circumferential elastic modulus were determined from changes in wall thickness and pulse pressure. Percentage variation in diameter (PVD) was seen to decrease with age for all arteries except the brachial, which remained relatively constant. Pressure-strain (Ep) and circumferential elastic moduli (Eo) were seen to increase with age in all arteries except the brachial, which remained relatively constant. Values of Ep and Eo were normalized into a stiffness index by dividing by the value found for the brachial artery. Stiffness indexes for the common carotid and femoral arteries were observed to increase more rapidly with age than the indexes obtained for the popliteal and tibial arteries. It is proposed that the stiffness index and changes in this parameter that occur with age may be useful in noninvasively assessing the progression of atherosclerosis.

  8. Anatomical architecture of the brachial plexus in the common hippopotamus (Hippopotamus amphibius) with special reference to the derivation and course of its unique branches.

    PubMed

    Yoshitomi, S; Kawashima, T; Murakami, K; Takayanagi, M; Inoue, Y; Aoyagi, R; Sato, F

    2012-08-01

    The anatomy of the brachial plexus in the common hippopotamus (Hippopotamus amphibius), which has not been previously reported, was first examined bilaterally in a newborn hippopotamus. Our observations clarified the following: (1) the brachial plexus comprises the fifth cervical (C5) to first thoracic (T1) nerves. These formed two trunks, C5-C6 and C7-T1; in addition, the axillary artery passed in between C6 and C7, (2) unique branches to the brachialis muscle and those of the lateral cutaneous antebrachii nerves ramified from the median nerve, (3) nerve fibre analysis revealed that these unique nerve branches from the median nerve were closely related and structurally similar to the musculocutaneous (MC) nerve; however, they had changed course from the MC to the median nerve, and (4) this unique branching pattern is likely to be a common morphological feature of the brachial plexus in amphibians, reptiles and certain mammals.

  9. Anatomical architecture of the brachial plexus in the common hippopotamus (Hippopotamus amphibius) with special reference to the derivation and course of its unique branches.

    PubMed

    Yoshitomi, S; Kawashima, T; Murakami, K; Takayanagi, M; Inoue, Y; Aoyagi, R; Sato, F

    2012-08-01

    The anatomy of the brachial plexus in the common hippopotamus (Hippopotamus amphibius), which has not been previously reported, was first examined bilaterally in a newborn hippopotamus. Our observations clarified the following: (1) the brachial plexus comprises the fifth cervical (C5) to first thoracic (T1) nerves. These formed two trunks, C5-C6 and C7-T1; in addition, the axillary artery passed in between C6 and C7, (2) unique branches to the brachialis muscle and those of the lateral cutaneous antebrachii nerves ramified from the median nerve, (3) nerve fibre analysis revealed that these unique nerve branches from the median nerve were closely related and structurally similar to the musculocutaneous (MC) nerve; however, they had changed course from the MC to the median nerve, and (4) this unique branching pattern is likely to be a common morphological feature of the brachial plexus in amphibians, reptiles and certain mammals. PMID:22250889

  10. Post-Exercise Ankle-Brachial Pressure Index Demonstrates Altered Endothelial Function in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Shinji; Masami, Kozue; Otsuki, Shingo; Tanaka, Shiro; Nakayama, Noriko; Makita, Shigeru; Koshiyama, Hiroyuki; Nohara, Ryuji

    2011-01-01

    Background: The ankle-brachial pressure index (ABI), the ratio of the systolic blood pressure of the ankle to the systolic brachial pressure, is commonly measured at rest, but ABI values post-exercise enhance the sensitivity of the test and can be used to identify atherosclerotic vascular damage. However, it has not been established whether or not enhanced post-exercise ABI is also associated with endothelial dysfunction. We hypothesized that a decrease in post-exercise ABI is related to impaired endothelial function. Purpose: To investigate alterations in post-exercise ABI values and endothelial dysfunction in the elderly. Methods: The study population comprised 35 men and women aged 51–77 years (mean age: 66 years). Patients with peripheral arterial disease or a history of heart failure were excluded. The ABI was estimated at rest and immediately after exercise. The exercise protocol comprised 2.5 min of active pedal flexion exercises at a speed of 60 times/min. Endothelial function was assessed by measuring flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD) in the brachial artery using ultrasound imaging. Results: No correlation was found between FMD and the ABI at rest. However, a weak correlation was found between FMD and post-exercise ABI (r = 0.46, P = 0.06). A strong correlation was observed between FMD and a decrease in post-exercise ABI compared to baseline readings (r = −0.52, P = 0.01). Multiple linear regression analysis was used to generate a prediction equation for FMD using the percentage decrease in post-exercise ABI. Significant correlations were observed between the ultrasound imaging-measured FMD and the predicted FMD (R2 = 0.27, P = 0.001). Conclusions: Post-exercise ABI appears to be a simple surrogate marker for endothelial function in the elderly, although larger studies are required for validation. PMID:23885186

  11. Arterial endothelial function measurement method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Maltz, Jonathan S; Budinger, Thomas F

    2014-03-04

    A "relaxoscope" (100) detects the degree of arterial endothelial function. Impairment of arterial endothelial function is an early event in atherosclerosis and correlates with the major risk factors for cardiovascular disease. An artery (115), such as the brachial artery (BA) is measured for diameter before and after several minutes of either vasoconstriction or vasorelaxation. The change in arterial diameter is a measure of flow-mediated vasomodification (FMVM). The relaxoscope induces an artificial pulse (128) at a superficial radial artery (115) via a linear actuator (120). An ultrasonic Doppler stethoscope (130) detects this pulse 10-20 cm proximal to the point of pulse induction (125). The delay between pulse application and detection provides the pulse transit time (PTT). By measuring PTT before (160) and after arterial diameter change (170), FMVM may be measured based on the changes in PTT caused by changes in vessel caliber, smooth muscle tone and wall thickness.

  12. An anatomical study and ontogenetic explanation of 23 cases with variations in the main pattern of the human brachio-antebrachial arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Baeza, A; Nebot, J; Ferreira, B; Reina, F; Pérez, J; Sañudo, J R; Roig, M

    1995-01-01

    Twenty-three cases with variations in the brachio-antebrachial arterial pattern of the human upper limb are reported. According to the artery which showed a variation, 4 groups were recognised: (1) isolated persistence of the median artery; (2) high origin of the ulnar artery; (3) high origin of the radial artery; and (4) duplication of the brachial artery, either with or without anastomosis at the cubital fossa. In addition, in groups 2, 3 and 4 the median artery may have persisted. Based on these arterial variations an anatomical and embryological correlation was established from a morphogenetic pattern which is proposed as being normal. Thus the terminal branches of the superficial brachial artery take part in the development of the radial, ulnar and median arteries, joining with the trunks of deep origin of these arteries in the primitive axial artery. Regression of the superficial arterial segments located proximal to this anastomosis gives rise to the definitive arterial pattern. Either the total or partial persistence of the superficial arterial segments explains those cases of high origin of either the radial or ulnar arteries as well as the duplications of the brachial artery. We postulate that the persistence of the median artery is independent of the presence or absence of any other variation in the arterial pattern. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7592009

  13. Report of an unusual combination of arterial, venous and neural variations in a cadaveric upper limb.

    PubMed

    Troupis, Theodore G; Michalinos, Adamantios; Manou, Vasiliki; Vlastos, Dimitrios; Johnson, Elizabeth O; Demesticha, Theano; Skandalakis, Panayiotis

    2014-01-01

    In this study an unusual combination of arterial, venous and neural variations discovered during dissection of cervical, axillary and brachial area of a cadaver is described. Variations are thoroughly described and literature is briefly reviewed. Lateral cord of brachial plexus was not formed; Eight Cervical root divided into anterior and posterior division before uniting with First Thoracic root and Upper Trunk was unusually short. Axillary artery gave origin to a superficial brachial artery and then continued as deep brachial artery. Multiple variations in typical axillary artery branches were present including existence of inferior pectoral artery. Cephalic vein was absent. A variety of interventions, from relative simple as central venous catheter placement to most complicated as brachial plexus injury repair demand thorough knowledge of area's regional anatomy. Familiarity with anatomic variations allows more precise and careful interventions. Research on these variations is valuable for anatomists and embryologists but also for clinicians because it may provide useful information for non - typical cases but also helps in raising a high level of suspicion.

  14. Report of an unusual combination of arterial, venous and neural variations in a cadaveric upper limb

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this study an unusual combination of arterial, venous and neural variations discovered during dissection of cervical, axillary and brachial area of a cadaver is described. Variations are thoroughly described and literature is briefly reviewed. Lateral cord of brachial plexus was not formed; Eight Cervical root divided into anterior and posterior division before uniting with First Thoracic root and Upper Trunk was unusually short. Axillary artery gave origin to a superficial brachial artery and then continued as deep brachial artery. Multiple variations in typical axillary artery branches were present including existence of inferior pectoral artery. Cephalic vein was absent. A variety of interventions, from relative simple as central venous catheter placement to most complicated as brachial plexus injury repair demand thorough knowledge of area’s regional anatomy. Familiarity with anatomic variations allows more precise and careful interventions. Research on these variations is valuable for anatomists and embryologists but also for clinicians because it may provide useful information for non - typical cases but also helps in raising a high level of suspicion. PMID:24495850

  15. Noninvasive assessment of arterial compliance of human cerebral arteries with short inversion time arterial spin labeling.

    PubMed

    Warnert, Esther A H; Murphy, Kevin; Hall, Judith E; Wise, Richard G

    2015-03-01

    A noninvasive method of assessing cerebral arterial compliance (AC) is introduced in which arterial spin labeling (ASL) is used to measure changes in arterial blood volume (aBV) occurring within the cardiac cycle. Short inversion time pulsed ASL (PASL) was performed in healthy volunteers with inversion times ranging from 250 to 850 ms. A model of the arterial input function was used to obtain the cerebral aBV. Results indicate that aBV depends on the cardiac phase of the arteries in the imaging volume. Cerebral AC, estimated from aBV and brachial blood pressure measured noninvasively in systole and diastole, was assessed in the flow territories of the basal cerebral arteries originating from the circle of Willis: right and left middle cerebral arteries (RMCA and LMCA), right and left posterior cerebral arteries (RPCA and LPCA), and the anterior cerebral artery (ACA). Group average AC values calculated for the RMCA, LMCA, ACA, RPCA, and LPCA were 0.56%±0.2%, 0.50%±0.3%, 0.4%±0.2%, 1.1%±0.5%, and 1.1%±0.3% per mm Hg, respectively. The current experiment has shown the feasibility of measuring AC of cerebral arteries with short inversion time PASL.

  16. Brachiomedian artery (arteria brachiomediana) revisited: a comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Kachlik, David; Konarik, Marek; Riedlova, Jitka; Baca, Vaclav

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews in detail the superficial brachiomedian artery (arteria brachiomediana superficialis), a very rare variant of the main arterial trunks of the upper limb. It branches either from the axillary artery or the brachial artery, descends superficially in the arm (similar to the course of the superficial brachial artery) and continues across the cubital fossa, runs superficially in the forearm, approaches the median nerve and enters the carpal canal to reach the hand. It usually terminates in the superficial palmar arch. The first drawing was published, in 1830, and the first description was published, in 1844. Altogether, to our knowledge, only 31 cases of a true, superficial brachiomedian artery have been reported (Some cases are incorrectly reported as superficial brachioradiomedian artery or superficial brachioulnomedian artery). Based on a meta-analysis of known, available studies, the incidence is 0.23% in Caucasians and 1.48% in Mongolians. Knowing whether or not this arterial variant is present is important in clinical medicine and relevant for: The catheterization via the radial or ulnar artery; harvesting the vascular pedicle for a forearm flap based on the radial, ulnar or superficial brachiomedian arteries; the possible collateral circulation in cases of the arterial closure; and the surgical management of carpal tunnel syndrome. Its presence can elevate the danger of an injury to the superficially located variant artery or of an accidental injection. PMID:27131025

  17. Lightning strike-induced brachial plexopathy.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, Amita N; Kasundra, Gaurav M; Khichar, Subhakaran; Bhushan, Bharat S K

    2014-10-01

    We describe a patient who presented with a history of lightning strike injury. Following the injury, he sustained acute right upper limb weakness with pain. Clinically, the lesion was located to the upper and middle trunk of the right brachial plexus, and the same confirmed with electrophysiological studies. Nerve damage due to lightning injuries is considered very rare, and a plexus damage has been described infrequently, if ever. Thus, the proposed hypothesis that lightning rarely causes neuropathy, as against high-voltage electric current, due to its shorter duration of exposure not causing severe burns which lead to nerve damage, needs to be reconsidered. PMID:25288846

  18. Central Adaptation following Brachial Plexus Injury.

    PubMed

    Simon, Neil G; Franz, Colin K; Gupta, Nalin; Alden, Tord; Kliot, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Brachial plexus trauma (BPT) often affects young patients and may result in lasting functional deficits. Standard care following BPT involves monitoring for clinical and electrophysiological evidence of muscle reinnervation, with surgical treatment decisions based on the presence or absence of spontaneous recovery. Data are emerging to suggest that central and peripheral adaptation may play a role in recovery following BPT. The present review highlights adaptive and maladaptive mechanisms of central and peripheral nervous system changes following BPT that may contribute to functional outcomes. Rehabilitation and other treatment strategies that harness or modulate these intrinsic adaptive mechanisms may improve functional outcomes following BPT. PMID:26409073

  19. Lightning strike-induced brachial plexopathy.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, Amita N; Kasundra, Gaurav M; Khichar, Subhakaran; Bhushan, Bharat S K

    2014-10-01

    We describe a patient who presented with a history of lightning strike injury. Following the injury, he sustained acute right upper limb weakness with pain. Clinically, the lesion was located to the upper and middle trunk of the right brachial plexus, and the same confirmed with electrophysiological studies. Nerve damage due to lightning injuries is considered very rare, and a plexus damage has been described infrequently, if ever. Thus, the proposed hypothesis that lightning rarely causes neuropathy, as against high-voltage electric current, due to its shorter duration of exposure not causing severe burns which lead to nerve damage, needs to be reconsidered.

  20. Idiopathic brachial plexus neuritis after laparoscopic treatment of endometriosis: a complication that may mimic position-related brachial plexus injury.

    PubMed

    Minas, Vasileios; Aust, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    We report the case of a 37-year-old woman who developed idiopathic brachial plexus neuritis, also referred to as Parsonage-Turner syndrome, after laparoscopic excision of endometriosis. The differential diagnosis between this non-position-related neuritis and brachial plexus injury is discussed. The aim of this report was to raise awareness on this distressing postoperative complication. PMID:24183278

  1. Arterial stiffness as a risk factor for coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Liao, Josh; Farmer, John

    2014-02-01

    Hypertension is a major modifiable risk factor, and clinical trials have demonstrated that successful reduction of elevated blood pressure to target levels translates into decreased risk for the development of coronary artery disease, stroke, heart failure, and renal failure. The arterial system had previously been regarded as a passive conduit for the transportation of arterial blood to peripheral tissues. The physiologic role the arterial system was greatly expanded by the recognition of the central role of the endothelial function in a variety of physiologic processes. The role of arterial function and structure in cardiovascular physiology was expanded with the development of a variety of parameters that evaluate arterial stiffness. Markers of arterial stiffness have been correlated with cardiovascular outcomes, and have been classified as an emerging risk factor that provides prognostic information beyond standard stratification strategies involving hypertension, diabetes, obesity, dyslipidemia and smoking. Multiple epidemiologic studies have correlated markers of arterial stiffness such as pulse-wave velocity, augmentation index and pulse pressure with risk for the development of fatal and nonfatal cardiovascular events. Additionally, measurements of arterial stiffness had clarified the results of clinical trials that demonstrated differing impacts on clinical outcomes, despite similar reductions in blood pressure, as measured by brachial and sphygmomanometry.

  2. Platelet to Lymphocyte Percentage Ratio Is Associated With Brachial-Ankle Pulse Wave Velocity in Hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Szu-Chia; Lee, Mei-Yueh; Huang, Jiun-Chi; Tsai, Yi-Chun; Mai, Hsiu-Chin; Su, Ho-Ming; Chang, Jer-Ming; Chen, Hung-Chun

    2016-02-01

    Increased arterial stiffness in patients receiving hemodialysis (HD) is highly prevalent and is associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. In HD, inflammation is one of the major causes of increased arterial stiffness. Activation of platelets and decreased lymphocyte percentage (LYMPH%) may exhibit inflammation. The aim of this study is to examine the relationship between platelet to LYMPH% ratio and arterial stiffness in HD patients.A total of 220 patients receiving HD were enrolled in this study. The brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) was measured using an ankle-brachial index form device. Multivariate linear regression analysis was performed to investigate the relations of the platelet to LYMPH% ratio and baPWV. The value of the platelet to LYMPH% ratio was 59.2 ± 33.3 (10 cells/L/%). After multivariate stepwise analysis, diabetes (β: 163.973, P = 0.02), high systolic blood pressure (per 1 mm Hg, β: 9.010, P < 0.001), high platelet to LYMPH% ratio (per 10 cells/L/%, β: 3.334, P < 0.01), and low albumin (per 0.1 mg/dL, β: -55.912, P < 0.001) were independently associated with an increased baPWV. Furthermore, high white blood cells (per 10 cells/L, β: 3.941, P < 0.001), high neutrophil percentage (per 1%, β: 1.144, P < 0.001), and high CRP (per 1 mg/L, β: 9.161, P = 0.03) were independently associated with an increased platelet to LYMPH% ratio.An increased platelet to LYMPH% ratio is associated with an increased baPWV in HD patients. An easy and inexpensive laboratory measure of platelet to LYMPH% ratio may provide an important information regarding arterial stiffness in patients with HD. PMID:26871812

  3. Lateral approach for supraclavicular brachial plexus block

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, DK; Sahu, Anjana

    2010-01-01

    A lateral approach described by Volker Hempel and Dr. Dilip Kotharihas been further studied, evaluated and described in detail in the present study. The aim of this study was to evaluate lateral approach of supraclavicular brachial plexus block, mainly in terms of successes rate and complication rate. The study was conducted in secondary level hospital and tertiary level hospital from 2004 to 2008. It was a prospective nonrandomized open-level study. Eighty-two patients of both sexes, aged between 18 and 65 years with ASA Grade I and II scheduled to undergo elective major surgery of the upper limb below the midarm, were selected for this new lateral approach of brachial plexus block. The onset and duration of sensory and motor block, any complications and need for supplement anaesthesia were observed. Success and complication rate were calculated in percentage. Average onset and duration of sensory and motor block was calculated as mean ± SD and percentage. Out of 82 patients, 75 (92%) have got successful block with no significant complication in any case. PMID:20885867

  4. Shoulder pain and isolated brachial plexopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kishan, Amar U; Syed, Sana; Fiorito-Torres, Franchesca; Thakore-James, Manisha

    2012-01-01

    Pancoast syndrome, classically considered as a constellation of (1) pain along the C8–T2 dermatomes, (2) weakness and atrophy of the hand and (3) Horner's syndrome, often presents a diagnostic challenge. In fact, it may manifest as a singular orthopaedic complaint, prompting a futile barrage of tests and referrals. The authors present the case of an elderly man who initially presented with severe shoulder pain. Due to progressive pain and weakness, he was referred to rheumatology and was treated with corticosteroid injections for a presumed musculoskeletal lesion. Ultimately, he manifested gross muscular atrophy and worsening pain, prompting a referral to neurology. An electromyogram (EMG) suggested a lower brachial plexopathy, and a follow-up brachial plexus MRI identified a large Pancoast tumour. Unfortunately, his disease was rapidly progressive, and he passed away within 2 months. While the MRI remains the gold standard for diagnosing Pancoast syndrome, an EMG can facilitate diagnosis in difficult cases such as this one. PMID:22744250

  5. Cadmium Exposure and Incident Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tellez-Plaza, Maria; Guallar, Eliseo; Fabsitz, Richard R.; Howard, Barbara V.; Umans, Jason G.; Francesconi, Kevin A.; Goessler, Walter; Devereux, Richard B.; Navas-Acien, Ana

    2014-01-01

    Background Cadmium has been associated with peripheral arterial disease in cross-sectional studies but prospective evidence is lacking. Our goal was to evaluate the association of urine cadmium concentrations with incident peripheral arterial disease in a large population-based cohort. Methods and Results A prospective cohort study was performed with 2,864 adult American Indians 45-74 years old from Arizona, Oklahoma and North and South Dakota who participated in the Strong Heart Study in 1989-91 and were followed through two follow-up examination visits in 1993-1995 and 1997-1999. Participants were free of peripheral arterial disease, defined as an ankle brachial index <0.9 or >1.4, at baseline and had complete baseline information on urine cadmium, potential confounders and ankle brachial index determinations in the follow-up examinations. Urine cadmium was measured using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) and corrected for urinary dilution by normalization to urine creatinine.. Multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HR) were computed using Cox-proportional hazards models for interval-censored data. A total of 470 cases of incident peripheral arterial disease, defined as an ankle brachial index <0.9 or >1.4, were identified. After adjustment for cardiovascular disease risk factors including smoking status and pack-years, the hazard ratio comparing the 80th to the 20th percentile of urine cadmium concentrations was 1.41 (1.05, 1.81). The hazard ratio comparing the highest to the lowest tertile was 1.96 (1.32, 2.81). The associations persisted after excluding participants with ankle brachial index > 1.4 only as well as in subgroups defined by sex and smoking status. Conclusions Urine cadmium, a biomarker of long-term cadmium exposure, was independently associated with incident peripheral arterial disease, providing further support for cadmium as a cardiovascular disease risk factor. PMID:24255048

  6. Ozonized autohemotransfusion does not affect arterial vasodilation in patients with peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    Coppola, Antonino; Coppola, Ludovico; Luongo, Carlo; Arciello, Alessandro; Cacciapuoti, Federico; Lama, Diana; Luongo, Margherita; Ruggiero, Luigi; Pastore, Agostino; Gombos, Giorgio

    2007-01-01

    Ozonized autohemotransfusion has been used as a complementary therapy in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). To determine whether ozone therapy could acutely modify artery vasodilatory capacity, a flow-mediated dilation test was performed at the brachial artery level before and after an ozonized autohemotransfusion in 16 patients with PAD, mean (± SD) age 55±1.8 years, and 14 healthy volunteers matched for age, sex and body mass index. Before ozonized autohemotransfusion, the mean baseline diameter of the brachial artery was higher in PAD patients than in healthy subjects (4.6±0.54 mm versus 3.6±0.54 mm, P<0.001) while mean flow-mediated brachial artery dilation and percentage of increase in flow were significantly lower in PAD patients than in controls (6.3±6.1% versus 11.8±2.4%, P<0.02; 433±61% versus 580±46%, P<0.02, respectively). No significant changes were observed after ozonized autohemotransfusion, indicating that ozonized autohemotransfusion does not modify endothelium-dependent ischemia-induced vascular reactivity. PMID:22477241

  7. Angioplasty in stenosis of the innominate artery

    SciTech Connect

    Kobinia, G.S.; Bergmann, H. Jr.

    1983-06-01

    We describe a successful percutaneous transluminal dilatation (PTD) of an innominate artery stenosis in a 40-year-old patient with aortic arch syndrome. Five years earlier both a left central carotid artery occlusion and an innominate and left subclavian artery stenosis were treated by grafting from the aorta to the distal vessels. At recurrence of the neurological symptoms, reocclusion of the graft to the innominate artery and subtotal stenosis of the left carotid anastomosis were noted. To prevent the hazards of a reoperation, the innominate artery stenosis was dilated by means of PTD via the right brachial artery. Success of the procedure was demonstrated by Doppler sonography and angiography. It appears that PTD serves as an excellent method of treating stenoses of the aortic arch branches in aortic arch syndrome.

  8. Brachial plexus injuries in neonates: an osteopathic approach.

    PubMed

    Mason, David C; Ciervo, Carman A

    2009-02-01

    Neonates and infants with brachial plexus injuries are typically treated using splinting, range-of-motion exercise, and, in more severe cases, nerve reconstruction. However, myofascial release--a common osteopathic manipulative treatment technique that has been used to manage thoracic outlet syndrome in adults--may provide effective, noninvasive management of brachial plexus injuries in neonates and infants. While emphasizing the importance of good communication with parents of affected patients, the authors review brachial plexus anatomy, describe diagnostic examinations, and outline a comprehensive treatment strategy. PMID:19269939

  9. Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity as a predictor of mortality in elderly Chinese.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Chang-Sheng; Li, Yan; Li, Li-Hua; Huang, Qi-Fang; Zeng, Wei-Fang; Kang, Yuan-Yuan; Zhang, Lu; Liu, Ming; Wei, Fang-Fei; Li, Ge-Le; Song, Jie; Wang, Shuai; Wang, Ji-Guang

    2014-11-01

    Pulse wave velocity (PWV) is a measure of arterial stiffness and predicts cardiovascular events and mortality in the general population and various patient populations. In the present study, we investigated the predictive value of brachial-ankle PWV for mortality in an elderly Chinese population. Our study subjects were older (≥60 years) persons living in a suburban town of Shanghai. We measured brachial-ankle PWV using an automated cuff device at baseline and collected vital information till June 30, 2013, during follow-up. The 3876 participants (1713 [44.2%] men; mean [±SD] age, 68.1±7.3 years) included 2292 (59.1%) hypertensive patients. PWV was on average 17.8 (±4.0) m/s and was significantly (P<0.0001) associated with age (r=0.48) and in unadjusted analysis with all-cause (n=316), cardiovascular (n=148), stroke (n=46), and noncardiovascular mortality (n=168) during a median follow-up of 5.9 years. In further adjusted analysis, we studied the risk of mortality according to the decile distributions of PWV. Only the subjects in the top decile (23.3-39.3 m/s) had a significantly (P≤0.003) higher risk of all-cause mortality (hazard ratio relative to the whole study population, 1.56; 95% confidence interval, 1.16-2.08), especially in hypertensive patients (hazard ratio, 1.86; 95% confidence interval, 1.31-2.64; P=0.02 for the interaction between PWV and hypertension). Similar trends were observed for cardiovascular, stroke, and noncardiovascular mortality, although statistical significance was not reached (P≥0.08). In conclusion, brachial-ankle PWV predicts mortality in elderly Chinese on the conditions of markedly increased PWV and hypertension.

  10. Electrodiagnosis in traumatic brachial plexus injury.

    PubMed

    Mansukhani, K A

    2013-01-01

    Electrodiagnosis (EDX) is a useful test to accurately localize the site, determine the extent, identify the predominant pathophysiology, and objectively quantify the severity of brachial plexopathies. It can also be used to examine muscles not easily assessed clinically and recognize minimal defects. Post-operatively and on follow up studies, it is important for early detection of re-innervation. It can be used intra-operatively to assess conduction across a neuroma, which would help the surgeon to decide further course of action. Localization of the site of the lesion can be very challenging as there may be multiple sites of involvement and hence the electroneuromyographic evaluation must be adequate. The unaffected limb also needs to be examined for comparison. The final impression must be co-related with the type and severity of injury.

  11. Birth brachial plexus palsy: a race against time.

    PubMed

    Patra, Sambeet; Narayana Kurup, Jayakrishnan K; Acharya, Ashwath M; Bhat, Anil K

    2016-01-01

    A 5-year-old child presented to us with weakness of the left upper limb since birth. With the given history of obstetric trauma and limb examination, a diagnosis of birth brachial plexus palsy was made. Brachial plexus exploration along with microsurgery was performed at the same time which included extrinsic neurolysis of the roots and trunks and nerve transfer for better shoulder external rotation and elbow flexion. Both the movements were severely restricted previously due to co-contractures with the shoulder internal rotators and triceps. The problem of birth brachial plexus palsy is proving to be a global health burden both in developed countries and in developing countries such as India. The lack of awareness among the general public and primary healthcare providers and inadequate orthopaedic and neurosurgeons trained to treat the condition have worsened the prognosis. This case lays stress on the delayed complications in birth brachial palsy and its effective management. PMID:27402656

  12. [Myxoid/round cell liposarcoma of the brachial plexus].

    PubMed

    Giner, Javier; Isla, Alberto; Hernández, Borja; Nistal, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Myxoid/round cell liposarcoma is a soft tissue sarcoma that is extremely rare in the brachial plexus. We report a case of a myxoid/round cell liposarcoma originating in the brachial plexus that was surgically resected and evolved well, with no deficit or recurrence after 2 years of follow-up. To date, there has been no other case of this sarcoma in the literature. PMID:25126709

  13. How Is Peripheral Arterial Disease Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... of P.A.D. Diagnostic Tests Ankle-Brachial Index A simple test called an ankle-brachial index ( ... P.A.D. is getting worse. Ankle-Brachial Index The illustration shows the ankle-brachial index test. ...

  14. Topographic pattern of the brachial plexus at the axillary fossa through real-time ultrasonography in Koreans

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jin Hye; Kim, Jong Hak; Kim, Dong Yeon; Lee, Guie Yong; Kim, Chi Hyo

    2014-01-01

    Background The ability to explore the anatomy has improved our appreciation of the brachial anatomy and the quality of regional anesthesia. Using real-time ultrasonography, we investigated the cross-sectional anatomy of the brachial plexus and of vessels at the axillary fossa in Koreans. Methods One hundred and thirty-one patients scheduled to undergo surgery in the region below the elbow were enrolled after giving their informed written consent. Using the 5-12 MHz linear probe of an ultrasound system, we examined cross-sectional images of the brachial plexus in the supine position with the arm abducted by 90°, the shoulder externally rotated, and the forearm flexed by 90° at the axillary fossa. The results of the nerve positions were expressed on a 12-section pie chart and the numbers of arteries and veins were reported. Results Applying gentle pressure to prevent vein collapse, the positions of the nerves changed easily and showed a clockwise order around the axillary artery (AA). The most frequent positions were observed in the 10-11 section (79.2%) for the median, 1-2 section (79.3%) for the ulnar, 3-5 section (78.4%) for the radial, and 8-9 section (86.9%) for the musculocutaneous nerve. We also noted anatomical variations consisting of double arteries (9.2%) and multiple axillary veins (87%). Conclusions Using real-time ultrasonography, we found that the anatomical pattern of the major nerves in Koreans was about 80% of the frequent position of individual nerves, 90.8% of the single AA, and 87% of multiple veins around the AA. PMID:25473459

  15. Effects of age, sex and smoking on ankle-brachial index in a Finnish population at risk for cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Syvänen, Kari; Aarnio, Pertti; Jaatinen, Pekka; Korhonen, Päivi

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND Smoking is a well-known risk factor for peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Data regarding differences in the prevalence of PAD between sexes are somewhat controversial. In addition, most studies indicate that the prevalence of PAD increases with age in both sexes. In the present study, the effects of sex, age and smoking on the ankle-brachial index (ABI) in a Finnish cardiovascular risk population were investigated. OBJECTIVES To investigate the relationship between the ankle-brachial index, and age, sex and smoking in a Finnish population at risk for cardiovascular disease. METHODS All men and women between 45 and 70 years of age living in a rural town (Harjavalta, Finland; total population 7700) were invited to participate in a population survey (Harmonica study). Patients with previously diagnosed diabetes or vascular disease were excluded. In total, 2856 patients were invited to participate in the study. From these subjects, a cardiovascular risk population was screened. Complete data were available from 1028 persons. ABI (the ratio between the posterior tibial or dorsalis pedis artery and brachial artery pressures) was measured, and questionnaires were used to detect smoking status and relevant medical history. Only current smoking status was taken into account. RESULTS The mean ABI for the entire study population was 1.10 (range 0.56 to 1.64). Current smokers had a lower mean ABI (1.06; P<0.001). There was no statistically significant difference in ABI values among age groups, although the majority of patients with ABI values below 0.9 were older than 60 years of age. There was no statistically significant difference in ABI between sexes. CONCLUSION As previously reported, the present study shows the significant effect of smoking in the development of PAD. No statistically significant difference was found among age groups, but the tendency was toward lower ABIs in the oldest age groups. Sex had a minimal effect on the ABI. PMID:22477327

  16. Limb preference in children with obstetric brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lynda J-S; Anand, Praveen; Birch, Rolfe

    2005-07-01

    Brachial plexus palsy affects children differently than adults. In children with obstetric brachial plexus palsy, motor development must depend on nervous system adaptation. Previous studies report sensory plasticity in these children. This noninvasive study provides support for neural plasticity (the general ability of the brain to reorganize neural pathways based on new experiences) in children with obstetric brachial plexus palsy by considering upper limb preference. As in the general population, we expect that 90% of children would prefer their right upper limb. However, only 17% of children affected by right obstetric brachial plexus palsy prefer the right upper limb for overall movement; children with left obstetric brachial plexus palsy did not significantly differ from the general population in upper limb preference. This study also provides the first evidence of a significant correlation between actual task performance and select obstetric brachial plexus palsy outcome measurement systems, thereby justifying the routine use of these outcome measurement systems as a reflection of the practical utility of the affected limb to the patient. PMID:15876521

  17. Simple fast noninvasive technique for measuring brachial wall mechanics during flow mediated vasodilatation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, Ahmed M.; Stapleton, Phoebe A.; Frisbee, Jefferson C.; D'Audiffret, Alexandre; Mukdadi, Osama M.

    2009-02-01

    Measurement of flow-mediated vasodilatation (FMD) in brachial and other conduit arteries has become a common method to asses the status of endothelial function in vivo. In spite of the direct relationship between the arterial wall multi-component strains and FMD responses, direct measurement of wall strain tensor due to FMD has not yet been reported in the literature. In this work, a noninvasive direct ultrasound-based strain tensor measuring (STM) technique is presented to assess changes in the mechanical parameters of the vascular wall during FMD. The STM technique utilizes only sequences of B-mode ultrasound images, and starts with segmenting a region of interest within the artery and providing the acquisition parameters. Then a block matching technique is employed to measure the frame to frame local velocities. Displacements, diameter change, multi-component strain tensor and strain rates are then calculated by integrating or differentiating velocity components. The accuracy of the STM algorithm was assessed using a phantom study, and was further validated using in vivo data from human subjects. Results indicate the validity and versatility of the STM algorithm, and describe how parameters other than the diameter change are sensitive to pre- and post-occlusion, which can then be used for accurate assessment of atherosclerosis.

  18. Discordant effects of beta-blockade on central aortic systolic and brachial systolic blood pressure: considerations beyond the cuff.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Benjamin J; Anderson, Shawn

    2007-09-01

    The role of beta-blockers in uncomplicated hypertension has been challenged recently. Compared with other antihypertensives, beta-blockers are less effective for preventing cardiovascular events in patients with uncomplicated hypertension. Moreover, a recent meta-analysis of placebo-controlled clinical trials concluded that atenolol is not more efficacious than placebo for preventing cardiovascular events in patients with hypertension. Although these agents lower blood pressure measured conventionally over the brachial artery with a blood pressure cuff, they do not exert a commensurate effect on blood pressure in the central aorta. Central aortic blood pressure and aortic augmentation index are strong predictors of left ventricular hypertrophy, an independent risk factor for cardiovascular events. Emerging data are illuminating the antihypertensive paradox whereby antihypertensive agents may elicit discordant effects on central and peripheral blood pressure and hemodynamics. Vasodilatory antihypertensives, such as renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitors and calcium channel blockers, elicit reductions in central aortic blood pressure equal to or greater than that in the brachial artery. Conversely, beta-blockers lower central aortic blood pressure to a lesser degree even when blood pressure measured by sphygmomanometry is reduced substantially. Given the strong relationship between central aortic blood pressure and target organ damage, the effectiveness of beta-blockers may be overestimated in practice on the basis of conventional blood pressure measurements alone. Differences in central and peripheral blood pressure may account for the lack of cardiovascular protection afforded by beta-blockers in clinical trials and could account for a portion of the apparent "benefit beyond blood pressure" reduction with other classes of antihypertensive agents. Future studies should aim to better clarify the role of central aortic blood pressure in the treatment of

  19. Arterial Stiffness in Children: Pediatric Measurement and Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Savant, Jonathan D.; Furth, Susan L.; Meyers, Kevin E.C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Arterial stiffness is a natural consequence of aging, accelerated in certain chronic conditions, and predictive of cardiovascular events in adults. Emerging research suggests the importance of arterial stiffness in pediatric populations. Methods There are different indices of arterial stiffness. The present manuscript focuses on carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity and pulse wave analysis, although other methodologies are discussed. Also reviewed are specific measurement considerations for pediatric populations and the literature describing arterial stiffness in children with certain chronic conditions (primary hypertension, obesity, diabetes, chronic kidney disease, hypercholesterolemia, genetic syndromes involving vasculopathy, and solid organ transplant recipients). Conclusions The measurement of arterial stiffness in children is feasible and, under controlled conditions, can give accurate information about the underlying state of the arteries. This potentially adds valuable information about the functionality of the cardiovascular system in children with a variety of chronic diseases well beyond that of the brachial artery blood pressure. PMID:26587447

  20. Electroacupuncture attenuates neuropathic pain after brachial plexus injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shenyu; Tang, Hailiang; Zhou, Junming; Gu, Yudong

    2014-07-15

    Electroacupuncture has traditionally been used to treat pain, but its effect on pain following brachial plexus injury is still unknown. In this study, rat models of an avulsion injury to the left brachial plexus root (associated with upper-limb chronic neuropathic pain) were given electroacupuncture stimulation at bilateral Quchi (LI11), Hegu (LI04), Zusanli (ST36) and Yanglingquan (GB34). After electroacupuncture therapy, chronic neuropathic pain in the rats' upper limbs was significantly attenuated. Immunofluorescence staining showed that the expression of β-endorphins in the arcuate nucleus was significantly increased after therapy. Thus, experimental findings indicate that electroacupuncture can attenuate neuropathic pain after brachial plexus injury through upregulating β-endorphin expression. PMID:25221593

  1. Permanent upper trunk plexopathy after interscalene brachial plexus block.

    PubMed

    Avellanet, Merce; Sala-Blanch, Xavier; Rodrigo, Lidia; Gonzalez-Viejo, Miguel A

    2016-02-01

    Interscalene brachial plexus block (IBPB) has been widely used in shoulder surgical procedures. The incidence of postoperative neural injury has been estimated to be as high as 3 %. We report a long-term neurologic deficit after a nerve stimulator assisted brachial plexus block. A 55 year-old male, with right shoulder impingement syndrome was scheduled for elective surgery. The patient was given an oral dose of 10 mg of diazepam prior to the nerve stimulator assisted brachial plexus block. The patient immediately complained, as soon as the needle was placed in the interscalene area, of a sharp pain in his right arm and he was sedated further. Twenty-four hours later, the patient complained of severe shoulder and arm pain that required an increased dose of analgesics. Severe peri-scapular atrophy developed over the following days. Electromyography studies revealed an upper trunk plexus injury with severe denervation of the supraspinatus, infraspinatus and deltoid muscles together with a moderate denervation of the biceps brachii muscle. Chest X-rays showed a diaphragmatic palsy which was not present post operatively. Pulmonary function tests were also affected. Phrenic nerve paralysis was still present 18 months after the block as was dysfunction of the brachial plexus resulting in an inability to perform flexion, abduction and external rotation of the right shoulder. Severe brachial plexopathy was probably due to a local anesthetic having been administrated through the perineurium and into the nerve fascicles. Severe brachial plexopathy is an uncommon but catastrophic complication of IBPB. We propose a clinical algorithm using ultrasound guidance during nerve blocks as a safer technique of regional anesthesia. PMID:25744163

  2. Superficial Femoral Artery Plaque and Functional Performance in Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Mary M.; Liu, Kiang; Carroll, Timothy J.; Tian, Lu; Ferrucci, Luigi; Li, Debiao; Carr, James; Guralnik, Jack M.; Kibbe, Melina; Pearce, William H.; Yuan, Chun; McCarthy, Walter; Kramer, Christopher M.; Tao, Huimin; Liao, Yihua; Clark, Elizabeth Talley; Xu, Dongxiang; Berry, Jarett; Orozco, Jennifer; Sharma, Leena; Criqui, Michael H.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES We studied associations of magnetic resonance imaging measurements of plaque area and relative percent lumen reduction in the proximal superficial femoral artery with functional performance among participants with peripheral arterial disease. BACKGROUND The clinical significance of directly imaged plaque characteristics in lower extremity arteries is not well established. METHODS A total of 454 participants with an ankle brachial index <1.00 underwent magnetic resonance cross-sectional imaging of the proximal superficial femoral artery and completed a 6-min walk test, measurement of 4-m walking velocity at usual and fastest pace, and measurement of physical activity with a vertical accelerometer. RESULTS Adjusting for age, sex, race, body mass index, smoking, statin use, comorbidities, and other covariates, higher mean plaque area (1st quintile [least plaque]: 394 m, 2nd quintile: 360 m, 3rd quintile: 359 m, 4th quintile: 329 m, 5th quintile [greatest plaque]: 311 m; p trend <0.001) and smaller mean percent lumen area (1st quintile [greatest plaque]: 319 m, 2nd quintile: 330 m, 3rd quintile: 364 m, 4th quintile: 350 m, 5th quintile: 390 m; p trend <0.001) were associated with shorter distance achieved in the 6-min walk test. Greater mean plaque area was also associated with slower usual-paced walking velocity (p trend = 0.006) and slower fastest-paced 4-m walking velocity (p trend = 0.003). Associations of mean plaque area and mean lumen area with 6-min walk distance remained statistically significant even after additional adjustment for the ankle brachial index and leg symptoms. CONCLUSIONS Among participants with peripheral arterial disease, greater plaque burden and smaller lumen area in the proximal superficial femoral artery are associated independently with poorer functional performance, even after adjusting for the ankle brachial index and leg symptoms. PMID:21757163

  3. Electrodiagnosis of brachial plexopathies and proximal upper extremity neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Zachary

    2013-02-01

    This article describes the normal anatomy of the brachial plexus and its major terminal branches, as well as the major causes and clinical presentations of lesions of these structures. An approach to electrodiagnosis of brachial plexopathies and proximal upper extremity neuropathies is provided, with an emphasis on those nerve conduction studies and portions of the needle examination, which permit localization of lesions to specific trunks, cords, and terminal branches. The importance of specific sensory nerve conduction studies for differentiating plexopathies from radiculopathies and mononeuropathies is emphasized.

  4. Acute presentation of brachial plexus schwannoma secondary to infarction.

    PubMed

    Sidani, Charif; Saraf-Lavi, Efrat; Lyapichev, Kirill A; Nadji, Mehrdad; Levi, Allan D

    2015-06-01

    Schwannomas of the brachial plexus are rare and typically present as slowly growing masses. We describe a case of a 37-year-old female who presented with acute onset of severe left upper extremity pain. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a 2.3 × 2.1 cm peripherally enhancing centrally cystic lesion in the left axilla, along the cords of the left brachial plexus, with significant surrounding edema and enhancement. The mass was surgically removed. Pathology was consistent with a schwannoma with infarction. The pain completely resolved immediately after surgery.

  5. Pediatric Stinger Syndrome: Acute Brachial Plexopathy After Minor Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Quong, Whitney L.; Hynes, Sally L.

    2015-01-01

    Summary: The “stinger” or “burner” is a form of transient brachial plexopathy termed for its characteristic knife-like pain extending from the neck to the fingertips. Muscle weakness and paresthesia are oftentimes associated symptoms and are similarly temporary. Commonly observed in athletes of contact sports, the stinger results from high force trauma causing either traction/direct compression to the brachial plexus or extension/compression of the cervical nerve roots. We describe a pediatric case of a stinger in a 14-year-old boy, which was caused by a relatively low force trauma accident. Our management strategy and recommendations are discussed. PMID:26893985

  6. Pediatric blunt trauma resulting in major arterial injuries.

    PubMed

    Milas, Zvonimir L; Dodson, Thomas F; Ricketts, Richard R

    2004-05-01

    Ten children, aged 4 to 14 years, sustaining blunt arterial trauma from motor vehicle collisions (6), bicycle accidents (2), and falls (2) were identified over a 10-year period. The arteries injured included the common iliac (3), abdominal aorta (2), carotid (2), brachial (2), and the subclavian, renal, and femoral artery (1 each). One patient had three arterial injuries. Six patients had associated injuries including a pelvic and lumbar spine fracture, Horner's syndrome, liver laceration, skull fracture, open humerus fracture, small bowel serosal tear, and a brachial plexus injury. Definitive diagnosis was made using arteriography (6), computed tomography (CT) scan (2), and physical examination (2). The types of arterial injuries found included incomplete transection, complete transection with pseudo-aneurysm formation, traumatic arteriovenous (AV) fistulas, complete occlusion, and dissection. Repair was accomplished by hypogastric artery interposition or bypass grafting, synthetic grafting with polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), reverse saphenous vein grafting, or primary repair, depending on the circumstances. An AV fistula between the carotid artery and cavernous sinus was embolized. All grafts remained patent with exception of the aorto-renal bypass graft at follow-up ranging from 1 month to 3 years. The principles for repairing vascular injuries in children are slightly different than those in adults. Every effort should be made to use autogenous tissue such as the hypogastric artery or saphenous vein for repair if possible. If not, PTFE grafts can be used, although the long-term patency of these grafts in growing children is not known. PMID:15156954

  7. [The method of estimation of endothelium functional condition in patients with essential arterial hypertension in combination with diabetes mellitus type 2].

    PubMed

    Kochueva, M N; Radzishevska, Ia K; Linska, A V; Radzishevska, E B; Stepanets, E V

    2015-01-01

    The method of estimation of endothelium-dependent vasodilatation (EDVD) of the brachial artery has been elaborated to the patients with essential arterial hypertension stage II in combination with diabetes mellitus type 2 using the method of multivariate regression analysis as an alternative to the reactive hyperemia test using high-resolution ultrasound. The method allows estimating of EDVD of the brachial artery on the basis of five traditional parameters of ultrasound diagnostics without special equipment. This simplifies the diagnosis, significantly reduces its duration and might have widespread use in the primary diagnosis.

  8. Posterior subscapular dissection: An improved approach to the brachial plexus for human anatomy students.

    PubMed

    Hager, Shaun; Backus, Timothy Charles; Futterman, Bennett; Solounias, Nikos; Mihlbachler, Matthew C

    2014-05-01

    Students of human anatomy are required to understand the brachial plexus, from the proximal roots extending from spinal nerves C5 through T1, to the distal-most branches that innervate the shoulder and upper limb. However, in human cadaver dissection labs, students are often instructed to dissect the brachial plexus using an antero-axillary approach that incompletely exposes the brachial plexus. This approach readily exposes the distal segments of the brachial plexus but exposure of proximal and posterior segments require extensive dissection of neck and shoulder structures. Therefore, the proximal and posterior segments of the brachial plexus, including the roots, trunks, divisions, posterior cord and proximally branching peripheral nerves often remain unobserved during study of the cadaveric shoulder and brachial plexus. Here we introduce a subscapular approach that exposes the entire brachial plexus, with minimal amount of dissection or destruction of surrounding structures. Lateral retraction of the scapula reveals the entire length of the brachial plexus in the subscapular space, exposing the brachial plexus roots and other proximal segments. Combining the subscapular approach with the traditional antero-axillary approach allows students to observe the cadaveric brachial plexus in its entirety. Exposure of the brachial dissection in the subscapular space requires little time and is easily incorporated into a preexisting anatomy lab curriculum without scheduling additional time for dissection.

  9. An integrative model of the cardiovascular system coupling heart cellular mechanics with arterial network hemodynamics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Tae; Lee, Jeong Sang; Youn, Chan-Hyun; Choi, Jae-Sung; Shim, Eun Bo

    2013-08-01

    The current study proposes a model of the cardiovascular system that couples heart cell mechanics with arterial hemodynamics to examine the physiological role of arterial blood pressure (BP) in left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). We developed a comprehensive multiphysics and multiscale cardiovascular model of the cardiovascular system that simulates physiological events, from membrane excitation and the contraction of a cardiac cell to heart mechanics and arterial blood hemodynamics. Using this model, we delineated the relationship between arterial BP or pulse wave velocity and LVH. Computed results were compared with existing clinical and experimental observations. To investigate the relationship between arterial hemodynamics and LVH, we performed a parametric study based on arterial wall stiffness, which was obtained in the model. Peak cellular stress of the left ventricle and systolic blood pressure (SBP) in the brachial and central arteries also increased; however, further increases were limited for higher arterial stiffness values. Interestingly, when we doubled the value of arterial stiffness from the baseline value, the percentage increase of SBP in the central artery was about 6.7% whereas that of the brachial artery was about 3.4%. It is suggested that SBP in the central artery is more critical for predicting LVH as compared with other blood pressure measurements.

  10. Military diving training improved arterial compliance.

    PubMed

    Mourot, L; Golé, Y; Louge, P; Fontanari, P; Regnard, J; Boussuges, A

    2009-06-01

    This study was aimed at investigating whether repeated SCUBA diving might induce long term cardiovascular and autonomic modifications. In 11 military mine clearance diving students, arterial compliance (ultrasound scan study of brachial artery and ratio of stroke volume to pulse pressure: SV/PP), resting spectral analyses of heart rate and blood pressure variability, and a cold pressor test were performed before and after a 15-week military diving training course. After the diving training, arterial compliance was improved, as indicated by the significant increase in brachial arterial compliance (from 24+/-10 to 37+/-14 ml.mmHg (-1)) and SV/PP (from 1.7+/-0.2 to 1.9+/-0.2 ml.mmHg (-1)), and by the significant decrease in systolic, diastolic and pulse pressures (from 130+/-8 to 120+/-7; from 71+/-4 to 67+/-4; and from 58+/-8 to 53+/-5 mmHg, respectively). The peak oxygen uptake increased significantly from 54.3+/-2.0 to 56.8+/-4.0 mL.kg (-1).min (-1). Finally, the vasoconstrictive response during the cold pressor test increased (p<0.05). These findings point to a positive effect of a 15-week military diving training course on vascular function, and for a concomitant development of some peripheral vascular acclimatization to cold.

  11. Axillary Brachial Plexus Blockade for the Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ribbers, G. M.; Geurts, A. C. H.; Rijken, R. A. J.; Kerkkamp, H. E. M.

    1997-01-01

    Reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome (RSD) is a neurogenic pain syndrome characterized by pain, vasomotor and dystrophic changes, and often motor impairments. This study evaluated the effectiveness of brachial plexus blockade with local anaesthetic drugs as a treatment for this condition. Three patients responded well; three did not. (DB)

  12. The breathing hand: obstetric brachial plexopathy reinnervation from thoracic roots?

    PubMed

    Friedenberg, S M; Hermann, R C

    2004-01-01

    It has been found that in cases of obstetric brachial plexopathy, injured phrenic nerve or C3/4/5 roots may sprout into the adjacent injured upper and middle trunks of the brachial plexus. This aberrant regeneration produces co-contraction of the diaphragm and proximal upper limb muscles. This phenomenon, referred to as respiratory synkinesis or "the breathing arm", may not be limited to the upper cervical roots. We present two cases, identified through electromyographic investigations, of respiratory synkinesis selectively affecting intrinsic hand muscles, and propose that upper thoracic roots and their intercostal nerves may also produce respiratory synkinesis, resulting in a "breathing hand." This novel brand of synkinesis indicates that obstetric brachial plexus neuropathies can have quite proximal nerve injury in all trunks. The findings in our patients may not be entirely unique. The time required to develop distal muscle synkinesis and the subtle nature of our findings may suggest that with time and the assistance of EMG the breathing hand may be more common. When considering brachial plexus surgery, the significance of respiratory synkinesis should not be overlooked as its presence indicates injury at a root or proximal trunk level and may come from either nerves destined for the diaphragm or for the intercostal muscles.

  13. Arterial Stiffness and Renal Replacement Therapy: A Controversial Topic

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Edmundo Cabrera; Zócalo, Yanina; Galli, Cintia; Bia, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The increase of arterial stiffness has been to have a significant impact on predicting mortality in end-stage renal disease patients. Pulse wave velocity (PWV) is a noninvasive, reliable parameter of regional arterial stiffness that integrates the vascular geometry and arterial wall intrinsic elasticity and is capable of predicting cardiovascular mortality in this patient population. Nevertheless, reports on PWV in dialyzed patients are contradictory and sometimes inconsistent: some reports claim the arterial wall stiffness increases (i.e., PWV increase), others claim that it is reduced, and some even state that it augments in the aorta while it simultaneously decreases in the brachial artery pathway. The purpose of this study was to analyze the literature in which longitudinal or transversal studies were performed in hemodialysis and/or peritoneal dialysis patients, in order to characterize arterial stiffness and the responsiveness to renal replacement therapy. PMID:26064684

  14. Ischemia-modified albumin in type 2 diabetic patients with and without peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    Shao-gang; WEI, Chun-ling; HONG, Bing; YU, Wei-nan

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether there is an association between serum ischemia-modified albumin and the risk factor profile in type 2 diabetic patients with peripheral arterial disease and to identify the risk markers for peripheral arterial disease. METHODS: Participants included 290 patients (35.2% women) with type 2 diabetes. The ankle-brachial pressure index was measured using a standard protocol, and peripheral arterial disease was defined as an ankle-brachial index <0.90 or ≥1.3. The basal ischemia-modified albumin levels and clinical parameters were measured and analyzed. The risk factors for peripheral arterial disease were examined by multiple logistic analyses. RESULTS: Age, systolic blood pressure, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, urine albumin, homocysteine, and ischemia-modified albumin were significantly higher in patients with peripheral arterial disease than in disease-free patients (p<0.05), while ankle-brachial index was lower in the former group (p<0.05). Ischemia-modified albumin was positively associated with HbA1c and homocysteine levels (r = 0.220, p = 0.030; r = 0.446, p = 0.044, respectively), while no correlation was found with ankle-brachial index. Multiple logistic analyses indicated that HbA1c, systolic blood pressure, homocysteine and ischemia-modified albumin were independent risk factors for peripheral arterial disease in the diabetic subjects. CONCLUSION: The baseline ischemia-modified albumin levels were significantly higher and positively associated with HbA1c and homocysteine levels in type 2 diabetic patients with peripheral arterial disease. Ischemia-modified albumin was a risk marker for peripheral arterial disease. Taken together, these results might be helpful for monitoring diabetic peripheral arterial disease. PMID:22012037

  15. Anatomical variations in the brachial plexus roots: implications for diagnosis of neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome.

    PubMed

    Leonhard, Vanessa; Smith, Riley; Caldwell, Gregory; Smith, Heather F

    2016-07-01

    Neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome (NTOS) is the most common type of TOS. Typically it results from impingement of the neurovasculature as it passes between the anterior and middle scalene muscles; this classic anatomical relationship being the foundation of clinical diagnosis. Positional testing relies on vascular compromise occurring when the subclavian artery is compressed in this space. This study describes several anatomical variations observed in this relationship. Sixty-five cadavers (35m/30f) were assessed to determine the frequency and extent of brachial plexus branching variants. A total of thirty-one variations from "classic" anatomy were observed (47.7%). In two specimens (3.1%), the entire superior trunk coursed completely anterior to the anterior scalene in a position of relative vulnerability. In 27 instances, a portion of or the entire superior trunk pierced the anterior scalene muscle, and in two, the middle trunk also pierced the muscle belly. Interestingly, while two bilateral branching variations were observed, the majority occurred unilaterally, and almost exclusively on the left side. There were no sex differences in frequency. The high frequency of these variations and their potential to predispose patients to neurogenic TOS suggest that current diagnostic methods may be insufficient in clinical diagnosis. Due to lack of vascular compromise, patients with the piercing variant would not display positive signs on the traditional positional tests. The use of ultrasound to determine the route of the brachial plexus could determine whether this variation is present in patients who suffer from TOS symptoms but lack a diagnosis based on traditional positional testing. PMID:27133185

  16. Prevalence of an abnormal ankle-brachial index in patients with primary antiphospholipid syndrome: preliminary data

    PubMed Central

    Baron, M; Khamashta, M; Hughes, G; D'Cruz, D

    2005-01-01

    Methods: An 8 MHz Doppler probe was used in the arms and legs to assess the ABI in 43 patients with primary APS (mean (SD) age 40.2 (7.9) years) and 49 healthy subjects (aged 41.0 (11.7)) matched for age and sex. Data on traditional cardiovascular risk factors, such as hypertension, hypercholesterolaemia, presence of diabetes mellitus, nephrotic syndrome or renal failure, smoking, and other variables, were collected at that time for all subjects. A ratio of the highest blood pressure from the posterior tibial or pedal arteries of each leg to the highest blood pressure from the brachial arteries <1.00 was considered abnormal. Results: Abnormal ABIs were found in 8/43 (19%) patients with primary APS and 2/49 (4%) controls (p = 0.026). No correlation between abnormal ABI and traditional cardiovascular risk factors nor with the presence of aPL was found. Conclusion: Abnormal ABIs are more common in primary APS than in healthy controls, possibly indicating a subclinical atherosclerotic process in these patients. PMID:15608314

  17. Through-and-through wire technique for endovascular damage control in traumatic proximal axillary artery transection.

    PubMed

    Rohlffs, Fiona; Larena-Avellaneda, Axel Antonio; Petersen, Jan Philipp; Debus, Eike Sebastian; Kölbel, Tilo

    2015-02-01

    Repair of blunt shoulder trauma with transection of the subclavian or proximal axillary artery poses a surgical challenge, especially in instable patients. Endovascular treatment for initial damage control in arterial transection has evolved as a promising technique to improve outcome, but technical success can be limited in cases of complete transection as the lesion cannot be passed by a guidewire. This report describes an endovascular approach using a through-and-through brachial-femoral wire to control complete traumatic transection of the proximal axillary artery in a hemodynamically unstable patient. Endovascular therapy is used as a bridging method for open surgical repair three days later under optimized conditions with an interdisciplinary team. The brachial-femoral guidewire technique helps to overcome limitations in endovascular therapy in patients with blunt traumatic transection of thoracic outlet arteries.

  18. Blood pressure response to combined general anaesthesia/interscalene brachial plexus block for outpatient shoulder arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Shoulder surgery is often performed in the beach-chair position, a position associated with arterial hypotension and subsequent risk of cerebral ischaemia. It can be performed under general anaesthesia or with an interscalene brachial plexus block, each of which has specific advantages but also specific negative effects on blood pressure control. It would be worthwhile to combine the advantages of the two, but the effects of the combination on the circulation are not well investigated. We studied blood pressure, heart rate, and incidence of adverse circulatory events in patients undergoing shoulder surgery in general anaesthesia with or without an interscalene block. Methods Prospective, randomised, blinded study in outpatients (age 18 to 80 years) undergoing shoulder arthroscopy. General anaesthesia was with propofol/opioid, interscalene block with 40 ml 1% mepivacaine. Hypotension requiring treatment was defined as a mean arterial pressure <60 mmHg or a systolic pressure <80% of baseline; relevant bradycardia was a heart rate <50 bpm with a decrease in blood pressure. Results Forty-two patients had general anaesthesia alone, 41 had general anaesthesia plus interscalene block. The average systolic blood pressure under anaesthesia in the beach-chair position was 114 ± 7.3 vs. 116 ± 8.3 mmHg (p = 0.09; all comparisons General vs. General-Regional). The incidence of a mean arterial pressure under 60 mmHg or a decrease in systolic pressure of more than 20% from baseline was 64% vs. 76% (p = 0.45). The number of patients with a heart rate lower than 50 and a concomitant blood pressure decrease was 8 vs. 5 (p = 0.30). Conclusion One can safely combine interscalene block with general anaesthesia for surgery in the beach-chair position in ASA I and II patients. Clinical trial number DRKS00005295. PMID:25002832

  19. Perforator arteries of the medial upper arm: anatomical basis of a new flap donor site.

    PubMed

    Perignon, D; Havet, E; Sinna, R

    2013-01-01

    The development of perforator flaps' concept based on knowledge on vascular anatomy of the skin represents a major improvement in reconstructive surgery. Succeeding description about vascular territories and anatomical basics of the main donor sites, the study of hidden donor sites, such as medial upper arm, constitutes a new step and an additional refinement. 20 upper limbs of 10 fresh adult cadavers were studied with colored latex injections. The origin and distribution of the perforator arteries of the superior ulnar collateral artery and the brachial artery were investigated. We have noted constant perforator arteries and described the limits of vascular territories of the medial upper arm.

  20. MICROSURGICAL TRANSFER OF THE GRACILIS MUSCLE FOR ELBOW FLEXION IN BRACHIAL PLEXUS INJURY IN ADULTS: RETROSPECTIVE STUDY OF EIGHT CASES

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Luiz Koiti; do Nascimento, Alexandre Tadeu; Capócio, Roberto; Mattar, Rames; Rezende, Marcelo Rosa; Wei, Teng Hsiang; Torres, Luciano Ruiz; Moya, Fernando Munhoz

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Treating brachial plexus injuries is a major challenge, especially lesions that are presented late, with more than 12 months of evolution. We retrospectively analyzed patients who underwent one of the possibilities for attempting to restore the function of upper limbs affected under such conditions: microsurgical transfer of the gracilis muscle for elbow flexion. Methods: Eight patients were included, divided into two groups: one in which the procedure consisted of neurorrhaphy of the muscle flap with sural nerve grafting and anastomosis more distally; and the other, in which the neurorrhaphy was performed directly on the spinal accessory nerve, with anastomosis in thoracoacromial vessels. Results: We found a significant difference between the groups. A greater number of satisfactory results (75% M4) were found among patients who underwent direct neurorrhaphy, whereas the procedure using grafts for neurorrhaphy was less successful (25% M4). Conclusion: Patients who underwent microsurgical functional transfer of the gracilis muscle in which vascular anastomoses were performed in thoracoacromial vessels presented better functional outcomes than shown by those whose anastomoses were in the brachial artery with subsequent use of a nerve graft. PMID:27027050

  1. Recent advances in the management of brachial plexus injuries

    PubMed Central

    Bhandari, Prem Singh; Maurya, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    Management of brachial plexus injury is a demanding field of hand and upper extremity surgery. With currently available microsurgical techniques, functional gains are rewarding in upper plexus injuries. However, treatment options in the management of flail and anaesthetic limb are still evolving. Last three decades have witnessed significant developments in the management of these injuries, which include a better understanding of the anatomy, advances in the diagnostic modalities, incorporation of intra-operative nerve stimulation techniques, more liberal use of nerve grafts in bridging nerve gaps, and the addition of new nerve transfers, which selectively neurotise the target muscles close to the motor end plates. Newer research works on the use of nerve allografts and immune modulators (FK 506) are under evaluation in further improving the results in nerve reconstruction. Direct reimplantation of avulsed spinal nerve roots into the spinal cord is another area of research in brachial plexus reconstruction. PMID:25190913

  2. Une cause rare de plexopathie brachiale: une metastase d'un cancer du sein

    PubMed Central

    Maâroufi, Mustapha; Kamaoui, Imane; Boubbou, Meriem; Sqalli, Nadia; Tizniti, Siham

    2014-01-01

    Nous rapportons le cas d'une patiente de 50 ans ayant une histoire de cancer du sein et qui accuse une symptomatologie d'atteinte du plexus brachial. L'IRM montre une masse qui envahie le plexus brachial compatible avec une métastase. L'IRM est très utile pour le diagnostic et l'orientation thérapeutique des plexopathies brachiales chez les femmes présentant un cancer du sein PMID:25360196

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of traumatic and non-traumatic brachial plexopathies

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yiru Lorna; Othman, Mohamad Isham Bin; Dubey, Niraj; Peh, Wilfred CG

    2016-01-01

    Adult-onset brachial plexopathy can be classified into traumatic and non-traumatic aetiologies. Traumatic brachial plexopathies can affect the pre- or postganglionic segments of the plexus. Non-traumatic brachial plexopathies may be due to neoplasia, radiotherapy, thoracic outlet syndrome and idiopathic neuralgic amyotrophy. Conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is useful to localise the area of injury or disease, and identify the likely cause. This review discusses some of the common causes of adult-onset brachial plexopathy and their imaging features on MRI. We also present a series of cases to illustrate some of these causes and their MRI findings. PMID:27779278

  4. Novel Axillary Approach for Brachial Plexus in Robotic Surgery: A Cadaveric Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Tetik, Cihangir; Uzun, Metin

    2014-01-01

    Brachial plexus surgery using the da Vinci surgical robot is a new procedure. Although the supraclavicular approach is a well known described and used procedure for robotic surgery, axillary approach was unknown for brachial plexus surgery. A cadaveric study was planned to evaluate the robotic axillary approach for brachial plexus surgery. Our results showed that robotic surgery is a very useful method and should be used routinely for brachial plexus surgery and particularly for thoracic outlet syndrome. However, we emphasize that new instruments should be designed and further studies are needed to evaluate in vivo results. PMID:25140251

  5. Post-operative brachial plexus neuropraxia: A less recognised complication of combined plastic and laparoscopic surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Jimmy

    2014-01-01

    This presentation is to increase awareness of the potential for brachial plexus injury during prolonged combined plastic surgery procedures. A case of brachial plexus neuropraxia in a 26-year-old obese patient following a prolonged combined plastic surgery procedure was encountered. Nerve palsy due to faulty positioning on the operating table is commonly seen over the elbow and popliteal fossa. However, injury to the brachial plexus has been a recently reported phenomenon due to the increasing number of laparoscopic and robotic procedures. Brachial plexus injury needs to be recognised as a potential complication of prolonged combined plastic surgery. Preventive measures are discussed. PMID:25593443

  6. Primary non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of brachial plexus.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, M; Watanabe, T; Mogi, G

    1999-07-01

    We report the case of a 65-year-old man with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) not only in the brachial plexus but also in the central nervous system and parotid gland. He was referred to our hospital for evaluation of a right parotid mass. He also presented with bilateral facial palsy and paralysis of the left superior limb. Computed tomography scan and magnetic resonance imaging revealed mass lesions in the right parapharyngeal space, the deep lobe of the right parotid gland. and the left brachial plexus. A gallium-67 citrate scan demonstrated abnormal uptake in the left brachial plexus. These symptoms and lesions improved during steroid therapy. However, the symptoms worsened again after steroid therapy was discontinued. We performed a right parotidectomy to confirm the diagnosis. Histopathological study revealed NHL. He was treated with combination chemotherapy, and most of the lesions and symptoms, except bilateral facial palsy, improved. Despite follow-up treatment, a brain metastasis occured, and he died 16 months after the onset of symptoms. PMID:10419043

  7. Influence of detraining on temporal changes in arterial stiffness in endurance athletes: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Koshiba, Hiroya; Maeshima, Etsuko

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] We examined the effects of detraining on temporal changes in arterial stiffness in endurance athletes. [Subjects] Eighteen female university athletes requiring high endurance exercise capabilities were classified into 2 groups: 10 retired players (detraining group) and 8 active players (training group). [Methods] Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity, an index of arterial stiffness, was measured a total of 6 times: immediately before retirement of the detraining group and at 1, 2, 3, 6, and 12 months after retirement. [Results] Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity was measured in the training group at the same 6 points to allow comparison with the detraining group. The brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity in the detraining group increased significantly at 3 and 12 months as compared with that at 0 months and showed a significant increase at 12 months compared with that at 1 month. Moreover, the brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity in the detraining group was significantly higher at 3, 6, and 12 months than in the training group. [Conclusion] These results revealed that detraining may result in increased arterial stiffness from 3 months onward in endurance athletes. PMID:26834331

  8. Estimation of distributed arterial mechanical properties using a wave propagation model in a reverse way.

    PubMed

    Leguy, C A D; Bosboom, E M H; Gelderblom, H; Hoeks, A P G; van de Vosse, F N

    2010-11-01

    To estimate arterial stiffness, different methods based either on distensibility, pulse wave velocity or a pressure-velocity loop, have been proposed. These methods can be employed to determine the arterial mechanical properties either locally or globally, e.g. averaged over an entire arterial segment. The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of a new method that estimates distributed arterial mechanical properties non-invasively. This new method is based on a wave propagation model and several independent ultrasound and pressure measurements. Model parameters (including arterial mechanical properties) are obtained from a reverse method in which differences between modeling results and measurements are minimized using a fitting procedure based on local sensitivity indices. This study evaluates the differences between in vivo measured and simulated blood pressure and volume flow waveforms at the brachial, radial and ulnar arteries of 6 volunteers. The estimated arterial Young's modulus range from 1.0 to 6.0MPa with an average of (3.8±1.7)MPa at the brachial artery and from 1.2 to 7.8MPa with an average of (4.8±2.2)MPa at the radial artery. A good match between measured and simulated waveforms and the realistic stiffness parameters indicate a good in vivo suitability.

  9. Training to measure ankle-brachial index at the undergraduate level: can it be successful?

    PubMed

    Georgakarakos, Efstratios; Papadaki, Evaggelia; Vamvakerou, Vasileia; Lytras, Dimitrios; Tsiokani, Afroditi; Tsolakaki, Olympia; Chlimpou, Dimitra; Papanas, Nikolaos

    2013-06-01

    We examined the effectiveness of teaching ankle-brachial index (ABI) measurement to medical students. ABI was estimated in 28 lower limbs by an experienced vascular surgeon. After a 2-week training course, 5 fourth-year students repeated the estimations and their results were compared with that of the trainer's. There was no difference in ABI values between trainees and trainer for subjects with mild-to-moderate peripheral arterial disease (PAD; 0.77 ± 0.22 vs 0.77 ± 0.19, respectively, P = .95). In the 4 normal limbs, ABI was 1.37 ± 0.12 and 1.16 ± 0.11, as measured by the trainer and the trainees, respectively (P < .00001). In subjects with severe PAD, trainees tended to overestimate ABI (P = .0002) in the beginning of the educational process, but this was no longer the case at a later stage of the training with no difference in ABI values between the 2 examiner groups (P = .09). In conclusion, training of medical students in ABI measurement can be helpful toward accurate estimation of PAD and merits further practice. PMID:23667100

  10. Ankle-brachial index and bone turnover in patients on dialysis.

    PubMed

    London, Gérard M; Marchais, Sylvain J; Guérin, Alain P; de Vernejoul, Marie-Christine

    2015-02-01

    An association between atherosclerosis and osteoporosis has been reported in several studies. This association could result from local intraosseous atherosclerosis and ischemia, which is shown by limb osteoporosis in patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD), but also could result from bidirectional communication between the skeleton and blood vessels. Systemic bone disorders and PAD are frequent in ESRD. Here, we investigated the possible interaction of these disorders. For 65 prevalent nondiabetic patients on hemodialysis, we measured ankle-brachial pressure index (ABix) and evaluated mineral and bone disorders with bone histomorphometry. In prevalent patients on hemodialysis, PAD (ABix<0.9 or >1.4/incompressible) was associated with low bone turnover and pronounced osteoblast resistance to parathyroid hormone (PTH), which is indicated by decreased double-labeled surface and osteoblast surface (P<0.001). Higher osteoblast resistance to PTH in patients with PAD was characterized by weaker correlation coefficients (slopes) between serum PTH and double-labeled surface (P=0.02) or osteoblast surface (P=0.03). The correlations between osteoclast number or eroded surface and serum mineral parameters, including PTH, did not differ for subjects with normal ABix and PAD. Common vascular risk factors (dyslipidemia, smoking, and sex) were similar for normal, low, and incompressible ABix. Patients with PAD were older and had high C-reactive protein levels and longer hemodialysis vintage. These results indicate that, in prevalent nondiabetic patients with ESRD, PAD associates with low bone turnover and pronounced osteoblast resistance to PTH.

  11. Ankle-Brachial Index and Bone Turnover in Patients on Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Marchais, Sylvain J.; Guérin, Alain P.; de Vernejoul, Marie-Christine

    2015-01-01

    An association between atherosclerosis and osteoporosis has been reported in several studies. This association could result from local intraosseous atherosclerosis and ischemia, which is shown by limb osteoporosis in patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD), but also could result from bidirectional communication between the skeleton and blood vessels. Systemic bone disorders and PAD are frequent in ESRD. Here, we investigated the possible interaction of these disorders. For 65 prevalent nondiabetic patients on hemodialysis, we measured ankle-brachial pressure index (ABix) and evaluated mineral and bone disorders with bone histomorphometry. In prevalent patients on hemodialysis, PAD (ABix<0.9 or >1.4/incompressible) was associated with low bone turnover and pronounced osteoblast resistance to parathyroid hormone (PTH), which is indicated by decreased double-labeled surface and osteoblast surface (P<0.001). Higher osteoblast resistance to PTH in patients with PAD was characterized by weaker correlation coefficients (slopes) between serum PTH and double-labeled surface (P=0.02) or osteoblast surface (P=0.03). The correlations between osteoclast number or eroded surface and serum mineral parameters, including PTH, did not differ for subjects with normal ABix and PAD. Common vascular risk factors (dyslipidemia, smoking, and sex) were similar for normal, low, and incompressible ABix. Patients with PAD were older and had high C-reactive protein levels and longer hemodialysis vintage. These results indicate that, in prevalent nondiabetic patients with ESRD, PAD associates with low bone turnover and pronounced osteoblast resistance to PTH. PMID:25231881

  12. Arterial endofibrosis in professional cyclists

    PubMed Central

    VERALDI, G.F.; MACRÌ, M.; CRISCENTI, P.; SCORSONE, L.; ZINGARETTI, C.C.; GNONI, M.; MEZZETTO, L.

    2015-01-01

    External Iliac Artery Endofibrosis (EIAE) is an uncommon disease usually affecting young, otherwise healthy, patients. It usually involves cyclists but cases have been reported in other groups of endurance athletes. The external iliac artery is the most affected anatomical site but other locations are described too. The precise pathophysiology and long-term evolution of the disease still remain unknown. The diagnosis may be challenging and delayed as the patients usually present symptoms only in extreme conditions and physical and instrumental examinations may be normal at rest. We present two cases of young professional cyclists who suffered of exercise-induced leg pain which led them to reduce running. Both patients were firstly treated with balloon angioplasty that rapidly failed to improve their symptoms. The successive open surgery with endofibrosectomy and autologous saphenous vein closure patch completely resolved physical limitations. EIAE is a rare disease that can induce arterial stenosis, thrombosis, dissection and secondary atheroma. After-exercise ankle-brachial index represents a useful diagnostic criterion. Careful observation of angio-CT may strengthen the suspect. Knowledge of the these features allows a better pre-operative assessment and an early effective treatment. Surgical revascularization remains the gold standard approach. PMID:26888703

  13. Acute arterial occlusion - kidney

    MedlinePlus

    Acute renal arterial thrombosis; Renal artery embolism; Acute renal artery occlusion; Embolism - renal artery ... main artery to the kidney is called the renal artery. Reduced blood flow through the renal artery ...

  14. Association of Aortic Compliance and Brachial Endothelial Function with Cerebral Small Vessel Disease in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients: Assessment with High-Resolution MRI

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Yan; Zeng, Mengsu; Lin, Huandong; Yan, Hongmei

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To assess the possible association of aortic compliance and brachial endothelial function with cerebral small vessel disease in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) patients by using 3.0 T high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging. Methods. Sixty-two clinically confirmed DM2 patients (25 women and 37 men; mean age: 56.8 ± 7.5 years) were prospectively enrolled for noninvasive MR examinations of the aorta, brachial artery, and brain. Aortic arch pulse wave velocity (PWV), flow-mediated dilation (FMD) of brachial artery, lacunar brain infarcts, and periventricular and deep white matter hyperintensities (WMHs) were assessed. Pearson and Spearman correlation analysis were performed to analyze the association between PWV and FMD with clinical data and biochemical test results. Univariable logistic regression analyses were used to analyze the association between PWV and FMD with cerebral small vessel disease. Multiple logistic regression analyses were used to find out the independent predictive factors of cerebral small vessel disease. Results. Mean PWV was 6.73 ± 2.00 m/s and FMD was 16.67 ± 9.11%. After adjustment for compounding factors, PWV was found significantly associated with lacunar brain infarcts (OR = 2.00; 95% CI: 1.14–3.2; P < 0.05) and FMD was significantly associated with periventricular WMHs (OR = 0.82; 95% CI: 0.71–0.95; P < 0.05). Conclusions. Quantitative evaluation of aortic compliance and endothelial function by using high-resolution MRI may be potentially useful to stratify DM2 patients with risk of cerebral small vessel disease. PMID:27525261

  15. Association of Aortic Compliance and Brachial Endothelial Function with Cerebral Small Vessel Disease in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients: Assessment with High-Resolution MRI.

    PubMed

    Shan, Yan; Lin, Jiang; Xu, Pengju; Zeng, Mengsu; Lin, Huandong; Yan, Hongmei

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To assess the possible association of aortic compliance and brachial endothelial function with cerebral small vessel disease in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) patients by using 3.0 T high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging. Methods. Sixty-two clinically confirmed DM2 patients (25 women and 37 men; mean age: 56.8 ± 7.5 years) were prospectively enrolled for noninvasive MR examinations of the aorta, brachial artery, and brain. Aortic arch pulse wave velocity (PWV), flow-mediated dilation (FMD) of brachial artery, lacunar brain infarcts, and periventricular and deep white matter hyperintensities (WMHs) were assessed. Pearson and Spearman correlation analysis were performed to analyze the association between PWV and FMD with clinical data and biochemical test results. Univariable logistic regression analyses were used to analyze the association between PWV and FMD with cerebral small vessel disease. Multiple logistic regression analyses were used to find out the independent predictive factors of cerebral small vessel disease. Results. Mean PWV was 6.73 ± 2.00 m/s and FMD was 16.67 ± 9.11%. After adjustment for compounding factors, PWV was found significantly associated with lacunar brain infarcts (OR = 2.00; 95% CI: 1.14-3.2; P < 0.05) and FMD was significantly associated with periventricular WMHs (OR = 0.82; 95% CI: 0.71-0.95; P < 0.05). Conclusions. Quantitative evaluation of aortic compliance and endothelial function by using high-resolution MRI may be potentially useful to stratify DM2 patients with risk of cerebral small vessel disease. PMID:27525261

  16. Correlation between ultrasound imaging, cross-sectional anatomy, and histology of the brachial plexus: a review.

    PubMed

    van Geffen, Geert J; Moayeri, Nizar; Bruhn, Jörgen; Scheffer, Gert J; Chan, Vincent W; Groen, Gerbrand J

    2009-01-01

    The anatomy of the brachial plexus is complex. To facilitate the understanding of the ultrasound appearance of the brachial plexus, we present a review of important anatomic considerations. A detailed correlation of reconstructed, cross-sectional gross anatomy and histology with ultrasound sonoanatomy is provided.

  17. Penile erectile dysfunction after brachial plexus root avulsion injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Guo; Qin, Bengang; Jiang, Li; Huang, Xijun; Lu, Qinsen; Zhang, Dechun; Liu, Xiaolin; Zhu, Jiakai; Zheng, Jianwen; Li, Xuejia; Gu, Liqiang

    2014-01-01

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that some male patients suffering from brachial plexus injury, particularly brachial plexus root avulsion, show erectile dysfunction to varying degrees. However, the underlying mechanism remains poorly understood. In this study, we evaluated the erectile function after establishing brachial plexus root avulsion models with or without spinal cord injury in rats. After these models were established, we administered apomorphine (via a subcutaneous injection in the neck) to observe changes in erectile function. Rats subjected to simple brachial plexus root avulsion or those subjected to brachial plexus root avulsion combined with spinal cord injury had significantly fewer erections than those subjected to the sham operation. Expression of neuronal nitric oxide synthase did not change in brachial plexus root avulsion rats. However, neuronal nitric oxide synthase expression was significantly decreased in brachial plexus root avulsion + spinal cord injury rats. These findings suggest that a decrease in neuronal nitric oxide synthase expression in the penis may play a role in erectile dysfunction caused by the combination of brachial plexus root avulsion and spinal cord injury. PMID:25422647

  18. Association of Polymorphisms in NOS3 with the Ankle-Brachial Index in Hypertensive Adults

    PubMed Central

    Kullo, Iftikhar J.; Greene, M. Todd; Boerwinkle, Eric; Chu, Jian; Turner, Stephen T.; Kardia, Sharon L. R.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the association of 14 polymorphisms in the endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene (NOS3) with ankle brachial index (ABI) in non-Hispanic white hypertensives belonging to hypertensive sibships. Subjects (n = 659, mean age 61±9 y, 54% women) underwent measurement of ABI using a standard protocol, and the lowest of 4 ABI values was used in the analyses. Non-synonymous SNPs with a minor allele frequency > 0.02 and tag SNPs selected based on a measure of linkage disequilibrium (r2) were genotyped. We reduced the chance of false positives by testing for replication, randomly selecting 1 hypertensive sib from each sibship to create Subset 1 (n = 330) and Subset 2 (n = 329). Multivariable linear regression models were used to assess the associations of single NOS3 polymorphisms and haplotypes with ABI after adjustment for covariates (age, sex, body mass index, smoking, total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, and diabetes). Two specific SNPs in significant LD with each other (rs891512 and rs1808593) were significantly associated with ABI in both subsets. Based on a sliding window approach with a window size of 2, estimated haplotypes from 2 SNP pairs (rs2070744–rs3918226 & rs1808593–rs7830) were also significantly associated with ABI in both subsets. In conclusion, specific NOS3 SNPs and haplotypes were associated with inter-individual variation in ABI, a non-invasive marker of peripheral arterial disease, in replicate subsets of hypertensive subjects. These findings motivate further investigation of the role of NOS3 variants in determining susceptibility to peripheral arterial disease. PMID:17367796

  19. Association of polymorphisms in NOS3 with the ankle-brachial index in hypertensive adults.

    PubMed

    Kullo, Iftikhar J; Greene, M Todd; Boerwinkle, Eric; Chu, Jian; Turner, Stephen T; Kardia, Sharon L R

    2008-02-01

    We investigated the association of 14 polymorphisms in the endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene (NOS3) with ankle brachial index (ABI) in non-Hispanic white hypertensives belonging to hypertensive sibships. Subjects (n=659, mean age 61+/-9 years, 54% women) underwent measurement of ABI using a standard protocol, and the lowest of 4 ABI values was used in the analyses. Non-synonymous SNPs with a minor allele frequency >0.02 and tag SNPs selected based on a measure of linkage disequilibrium (r(2)) were genotyped. We reduced the chance of false positives by testing for replication, randomly selecting 1 hypertensive sib from each sibship to create Subset 1 (n=330) and Subset 2 (n=329). Multivariable linear regression models were used to assess the associations of single NOS3 polymorphisms and haplotypes with ABI after adjustment for covariates (age, sex, body mass index, smoking, total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, and diabetes). Two specific SNPs in significant LD with each other (rs891512 and rs1808593) were significantly associated with ABI in both subsets. Based on a sliding window approach with a window size of 2, estimated haplotypes from 2 SNP pairs (rs2070744-rs3918226 and rs1808593-rs7830) were also significantly associated with ABI in both subsets. In conclusion, specific NOS3 SNPs and haplotypes were associated with inter-individual variation in ABI, a non-invasive marker of peripheral arterial disease, in replicate subsets of hypertensive subjects. These findings motivate further investigation of the role of NOS3 variants in determining susceptibility to peripheral arterial disease.

  20. Endothelial function in a cardiovascular risk population with borderline ankle–brachial index

    PubMed Central

    Syvänen, Kari; Korhonen, Päivi; Partanen, Auli; Aarnio, Pertti

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The diagnosis of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) can be made by measuring the ankle–brachial index (ABI). Traditionally ABI values > 1.00–1.40 have been considered normal and ABI ≤ 0.90 defines PAD. Recent studies, however, have shown that individuals with ABI values between 0.90–1.00 are also at risk of cardiovascular events. We studied this cardiovascular risk population subgroup in order to determine their endothelial function using peripheral arterial tonometry (PAT). Methods: We selected 66 individuals with cardiovascular risk and borderline ABI. They all had hypertension, newly diagnosed glucose disorder, metabolic syndrome, obesity, or a ten year risk of cardiovascular disease death of 5% or more according to the Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation System (SCORE). Subjects with previously diagnosed diabetes or cardiovascular disease were excluded. Endothelial function was assessed by measuring the reactive hyperemia index (RHI) from fingertips using an Endo-PAT device. Results: The mean ABI was 0.95 and mean RHI 2.11. Endothelial dysfunction, defined as RHI < 1.67, was detected in 15/66 (23%) of the subjects. There were no statistically significant differences in RHI values between subjects with different cardiovascular risk factors. The only exception was that subjects with impaired fasting glucose (IFG) had slightly lower RHI values (mean RHI 1.91) than subjects without IFG (mean RHI 2.24) (P = 0.02). Conclusions: In a cardiovascular risk population with borderline ABI nearly every fourth subject had endothelial dysfunction, indicating an elevated risk of cardiovascular events. This might point out a subgroup of individuals in need of more aggressive treatment for their risk factors. PMID:21415923

  1. Penetrating arterial trauma to the limbs: outcome of a modified protocol

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Penetrating arterial injuries to the limbs are common injuries in high volume trauma centers. Their overall surgical results reported in the literature are satisfactory - apart of those of the popliteal artery that still may lead to a significant incidence in amputations. With the present study we assessed our outcome with penetrating arterial injuries to the limb as to see if the direct involvement of vascular surgeons in the management of popliteal artery injuries leads to an improved (lowered) amputation rate. Results were benchmarked with our published results from previous years. Methods All patients sustaining penetrating arterial injuries to the limbs admitted to the Chris Hani Baragwanath Academic Hospital during an 18- month period ending in September 2011 were included in this study. Axillary, brachial and femoral artery injuries were operated on by the trauma surgeons as in the past. All popliteal artery injuries were operated on by the vascular surgeons (new). Results There were a total of 113 patients with 116 injuries, as some patients had multiple vascular injuries: 10 axillary, 47 brachial, 34 femoral and 25 popliteal artery injuries. Outcome of axillary, brachial and femoral artery injury repair were excellent and not significantly different from our previous reported experience. Injury to the popliteal artery showed a diminished re-exploration rate from 34% down to 10% (p = 0,049) and a decrease of amputation rate from 16% to 11% which was statistically not significant (p = 0,8). Conclusion Penetrating arterial trauma to the axillary, brachial and femoral artery is followed by excellent results when operated by trauma surgeons. In the case of popliteal artery injury operated by the vascular surgeons, the results of this study do not show any statistically significant difference related to amputation rate from our previous reported studies when operated by trauma surgeons. Taking into consideration the diminished re

  2. High resolution neurography of the brachial plexus by 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Cejas, C; Rollán, C; Michelin, G; Nogués, M

    2016-01-01

    The study of the structures that make up the brachial plexus has benefited particularly from the high resolution images provided by 3T magnetic resonance scanners. The brachial plexus can have mononeuropathies or polyneuropathies. The mononeuropathies include traumatic injuries and trapping, such as occurs in thoracic outlet syndrome due to cervical ribs, prominent transverse apophyses, or tumors. The polyneuropathies include inflammatory processes, in particular chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, Parsonage-Turner syndrome, granulomatous diseases, and radiation neuropathy. Vascular processes affecting the brachial plexus include diabetic polyneuropathy and the vasculitides. This article reviews the anatomy of the brachial plexus and describes the technique for magnetic resonance neurography and the most common pathologic conditions that can affect the brachial plexus. PMID:26860655

  3. High resolution neurography of the brachial plexus by 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Cejas, C; Rollán, C; Michelin, G; Nogués, M

    2016-01-01

    The study of the structures that make up the brachial plexus has benefited particularly from the high resolution images provided by 3T magnetic resonance scanners. The brachial plexus can have mononeuropathies or polyneuropathies. The mononeuropathies include traumatic injuries and trapping, such as occurs in thoracic outlet syndrome due to cervical ribs, prominent transverse apophyses, or tumors. The polyneuropathies include inflammatory processes, in particular chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, Parsonage-Turner syndrome, granulomatous diseases, and radiation neuropathy. Vascular processes affecting the brachial plexus include diabetic polyneuropathy and the vasculitides. This article reviews the anatomy of the brachial plexus and describes the technique for magnetic resonance neurography and the most common pathologic conditions that can affect the brachial plexus.

  4. Intermittent hypoxia and arterial blood pressure control in humans: role of the peripheral vasculature and carotid baroreflex.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Joshua C; Boulet, Lindsey M; Tymko, Michael M; Foster, Glen E

    2016-09-01

    Intermittent hypoxia (IH) occurs in association with obstructive sleep apnea and likely contributes to the pathogenesis of hypertension. The purpose of this study was to examine the putative early adaptations at the level of the peripheral vasculature and carotid baroreflex (CBR) that may promote the development of hypertension. Ten healthy male participants (26 ± 1 yr, BMI = 24 ± 1 kg/m(2)) were exposed to 6 h of IH (1-min cycles of normoxia and hypoxia) and SHAM in a single-blinded, counterbalanced crossover study design. Ambulatory blood pressure was measured during each condition and the following night. Vascular strain of the carotid and femoral artery, a measure of localized arterial stiffness, and hemodynamic shear patterns in the brachial and femoral arteries were measured during each condition. Brachial artery reactive hyperemia flow-mediated vasodilation was assessed before and after each condition as a measure of endothelial function. CBR function and its control over leg vascular conductance (LVC) were measured after each condition with a variable-pressure neck chamber. Intermittent hypoxia 1) increased nighttime pulse pressure by 3.2 ± 1.3 mmHg, 2) altered femoral but not brachial artery hemodynamics, 3) did not affect brachial artery endothelial function, 4) reduced vascular strain in the carotid and possibly femoral artery, and 5) shifted CBR mean arterial pressure (MAP) to higher MAP while blunting LVC responses to CBR loading. These results suggest limb-specific vascular impairments, reduced vascular strain, and CBR resetting combined with blunted LVC responses are factors in the early pathogenesis of IH-induced development of hypertension. PMID:27402667

  5. Intermittent hypoxia and arterial blood pressure control in humans: role of the peripheral vasculature and carotid baroreflex.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Joshua C; Boulet, Lindsey M; Tymko, Michael M; Foster, Glen E

    2016-09-01

    Intermittent hypoxia (IH) occurs in association with obstructive sleep apnea and likely contributes to the pathogenesis of hypertension. The purpose of this study was to examine the putative early adaptations at the level of the peripheral vasculature and carotid baroreflex (CBR) that may promote the development of hypertension. Ten healthy male participants (26 ± 1 yr, BMI = 24 ± 1 kg/m(2)) were exposed to 6 h of IH (1-min cycles of normoxia and hypoxia) and SHAM in a single-blinded, counterbalanced crossover study design. Ambulatory blood pressure was measured during each condition and the following night. Vascular strain of the carotid and femoral artery, a measure of localized arterial stiffness, and hemodynamic shear patterns in the brachial and femoral arteries were measured during each condition. Brachial artery reactive hyperemia flow-mediated vasodilation was assessed before and after each condition as a measure of endothelial function. CBR function and its control over leg vascular conductance (LVC) were measured after each condition with a variable-pressure neck chamber. Intermittent hypoxia 1) increased nighttime pulse pressure by 3.2 ± 1.3 mmHg, 2) altered femoral but not brachial artery hemodynamics, 3) did not affect brachial artery endothelial function, 4) reduced vascular strain in the carotid and possibly femoral artery, and 5) shifted CBR mean arterial pressure (MAP) to higher MAP while blunting LVC responses to CBR loading. These results suggest limb-specific vascular impairments, reduced vascular strain, and CBR resetting combined with blunted LVC responses are factors in the early pathogenesis of IH-induced development of hypertension.

  6. Boston Children's Hospital approach to brachial plexus birth palsy.

    PubMed

    Vuillermin, Carley; Bauer, Andrea S

    2016-07-01

    The treatment of infants with brachial plexus birth palsy (BPBP) continues to be a focus at Boston Children's Hospital. Over the last 15 years, there have been many developments in the treatment of infants with BPBP. Some of the greatest changes have emerged through technical advances such as the advent of distal nerve transfers to allow targeted reinnervation as well as through research to understand the pathoanatomical changes that lead to glenohumeral dysplasia and how this dysplasia can be remodeled. This review will discuss our current practice of evaluation of the infant with BPBP, techniques for microsurgical reconstruction, and prevention and treatment of secondary glenohumeral dysplasia. PMID:27137763

  7. Obesity in children with brachial plexus birth palsy.

    PubMed

    Singh, Avreeta K; Mills, Janith; Bauer, Andrea S; Ezaki, Marybeth

    2015-11-01

    Fetal macrosomia is associated with a 14-fold increased risk of brachial plexus birth palsy (BPBP), and is a predictor of childhood obesity. The purpose of this study was to identify the relationships between BPBP, fetal macrosomia, and childhood obesity. We retrospectively reviewed 214 children with BPBP. The average age was 8 years and 53% had a Narakas 1 grade BPBP. Overall, 49% of children were normal weight, 22% overweight, and 29% obese. Of the children with a history of fetal macrosomia, 41% were obese; a statistically significant difference. Overall quality of life scores, however, were not correlated with obesity. PMID:26163865

  8. Obesity in children with brachial plexus birth palsy.

    PubMed

    Singh, Avreeta K; Mills, Janith; Bauer, Andrea S; Ezaki, Marybeth

    2015-11-01

    Fetal macrosomia is associated with a 14-fold increased risk of brachial plexus birth palsy (BPBP), and is a predictor of childhood obesity. The purpose of this study was to identify the relationships between BPBP, fetal macrosomia, and childhood obesity. We retrospectively reviewed 214 children with BPBP. The average age was 8 years and 53% had a Narakas 1 grade BPBP. Overall, 49% of children were normal weight, 22% overweight, and 29% obese. Of the children with a history of fetal macrosomia, 41% were obese; a statistically significant difference. Overall quality of life scores, however, were not correlated with obesity.

  9. Recurrent arterial aneurysm rupture of the upper extremity in a patient with vascular-type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Koji; Tajiri, Nobuhisa; Nakai, Mikizo; Shimizu, Shuji

    2014-10-01

    Arterial aneurysm rupture is one of the most critical complications in patients with vascular-type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (vEDS). Here, we report a case of recurrent aneurysm rupture successfully treated by endovascular embolization. A 38-year old woman who underwent brachial artery ligation for a ruptured aneurysm was diagnosed postoperatively with vEDS. Impending rupture of a collateral artery aneurysm was encountered 5 months after the initial open surgery. Endovascular embolization with a liquid embolic agent was successfully performed. Given that arterial rupture can occur repeatedly in patients with vEDS, careful life-long follow-up is necessary.

  10. Comparison between absorbable and nonabsorbable sutures in arterial anastomoses in growing dogs.

    PubMed

    Gersak, B

    1991-01-01

    Five dogs, 10 weeks old, underwent operation using ketamin-HCl anesthesia and end-to-end anastomoses of the femoral and brachial arteries were made using polyfilament nonabsorbable material (Ethibond), monofilament nonabsorbable material (Prolene), polyfilament absorbable material (Vicryl) and monofilament absorbable material (PDS). The arterial diameter using a micrometer and blood flow using an electromagnetic flow meter were determined. After six months another operation was performed and diameter and blood flow were measured again. No statistically significant differences were found between the different materials used with respect to growth related increases either in arterial diameter or blood flow.

  11. Injury mechanisms in supraclavicular stretch injuries of the brachial plexus.

    PubMed

    Soldado, Francisco; Ghizoni, Marcos F; Bertelli, Jayme

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the mechanisms involved in stretch injuries of the brachial plexus. One hundred and fifty consecutive patients with supraclavicular brachial plexus injuries (BPI) were asked about the mechanism of injury during the actual injury event, particularly about the type of trauma to their shoulder, shoulder girdle and head. Fifty-seven of the patients provided enough information about their accident to allow for analysis of the shoulder trauma. The injury mechanism for all patients having upper root or total palsy (n=46) was described as a direct vertical impact to the shoulder. In 44 of these patients, the trauma followed a motorcycle accident and, in most of them, the patient hit a fixed vertical structure before falling to the ground. The injury mechanism for the lower root palsy cases (n=11) was variable. The most frequent mechanism was forceful anterior shoulder compression by a car seat belt. We found that injury mechanisms differed significantly from the ones commonly discussed in published studies. PMID:27117025

  12. Rare case of a liposarcoma in the brachial plexus.

    PubMed

    Kosutic, D; Gajanan, K

    2016-09-01

    Introduction A liposarcoma is a rare cancer of connective tissues that resemble fat cells under light microscopy. Case History A 73-year old female patient presented to our tertiary cancer centre with an eight-year history of a large, slow-growing painless mass in the right axilla. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a lipomatous, well-circumscribed mass of dimension 30 × 16 × 10cm extending towards the right clavicle and causing deformation to the right chest wall and right breast. Surgery revealed a large tumour that had stretched all three cords of the brachial plexus. Histopathology was consistent with a diagnosis of a low-grade liposarcoma. After a period of neuropraxia, the patient returned to normal activities 4 months after surgery. Conclusions Although extremely rare, low-grade liposarcomas of the brachial plexus should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a slow-growing axillary mass. Referral to a tertiary sarcoma centre is essential for an appropriate diagnosis, adequate treatment, and long-term follow-up. PMID:27241607

  13. The Impact of Pediatric Brachial Plexus Injury on Families

    PubMed Central

    Allgier, Allison; Overton, Myra; Welge, Jeffrey; Mehlman, Charles T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the impact on families of children with brachial plexus injuries in order to best meet their clinical and social needs. Methods Our cross-sectional study included families with children between the ages of 1 and 18 with birth or non-neonatal brachial plexus injuries (BPI). The consenting parent or guardian completed a demographic questionnaire and the validated Impact on Family Scale during a single assessment. Total scores can range from 0-100, with the higher the score indicating a higher impact on the family. Factor analysis and item-total correlations were used to examine structure, individual items, and dimensions of family impact. Results One hundred two caregivers participated. Overall, families perceived various dimensions of impact on having a child with a BPI. Total family impact was 43. The 2 individual items correlating most strongly with the overall total score were from the financial dimension of the Impact on Family Scale. The strongest demographic relationship was traveling nationally for care and treatment of the BPI. Severity of injury was marginally correlated with impact on the family. Parent-child agreement about the severity of the illness was relatively high. Conclusion Caretakers of children with a BPI perceived impact on their families in the form of personal strain, family/social factors, financial stress, and mastery. A multidisciplinary clinical care team should address the various realms of impact on family throughout the course of treatment. Level of Evidence II Prognostic PMID:25936738

  14. A prospective randomized longitudinal study involving 6 months of endurance or resistance exercise. Conduit artery adaptation in humans

    PubMed Central

    Spence, Angela L; Carter, Howard H; Naylor, Louise H; Green, Daniel J

    2013-01-01

    This randomized trial evaluated the impact of different exercise training modalities on the function and size of conduit arteries in healthy volunteers. Young (27 ± 5 years) healthy male subjects were randomized to undertake 6 months of either endurance training (ET; n= 10) or resistance training (RT; n= 13). High-resolution ultrasound was used to determine brachial, femoral and carotid artery diameter and wall thickness (IMT) and femoral and brachial flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) and glyceryl trinitrate (GTN)-mediated dilatation. Improvements in peak oxygen uptake occurred with ET (from 3.6 ± 0.7 to 3.8 ± 0.6 l min−1, P= 0.024) but not RT. Upper body muscular strength increased following RT (from 57.8 ± 17.7 to 69.0 ± 19.5 kg, P < 0.001), but not ET. Both groups exhibited increases in lean body mass (ΔET, 1.4 ± 1.8 kg and ΔRT, 2.3 ± 1.3 kg, P < 0.05). Resistance training increased brachial artery resting diameter (from 3.8 ± 0.5 to 4.1 ± 0.4 mm, P < 0.05), peak FMD diameter (+0.2 ± 0.2 mm, P < 0.05) and GTN-mediated diameter (+0.3 ± 0.3 mm, P < 0.01), as well as brachial FMD (from 5.1 ± 2.2 to 7.0 ± 3.9%, P < 0.05). No improvements in any brachial parameters were observed following ET. Conversely, ET increased femoral artery resting diameter (from 6.2 ± 0.7 to 6.4 ± 0.6 mm, P < 0.05), peak FMD diameter (+0.4 ± 0.4 mm, P < 0.05) and GTN-induced diameter (+0.3 ± 0.3 mm, P < 0.05), as well as femoral FMD-to-GTN ratio (from 0.6 ± 0.3 to 1.1 ± 0.8, P < 0.05). Resistance training did not induce changes in femoral artery parameters. Carotid artery IMT decreased in response to both forms of training. These findings indicate that 6 months of supervised exercise training induced changes in brachial and femoral artery size and function and decreased carotid artery IMT. These impacts of both RT and ET would be expected to translate to decreased cardiovascular risk. PMID:23247114

  15. Arterial damages in acute elbow dislocations: which diagnostic tests are required?

    PubMed

    Lutter, Christoph; Pfefferkorn, Ronny; Schoeffl, Volker

    2016-07-19

    Blunt vessel injuries of peripheral arteries caused by a direct trauma are rare. Studies have described the frequency of arterial ruptures following closed elbow dislocations in 0.3-1.7% of all cases. However, arterial damage does not always necessarily appear as a complete rupture of the vessel with a loss of peripheral circulation and ischaemic symptoms; a relatively strong periarticular system of collaterals can maintain circulation. Furthermore, the traumatic dislocation can also cause intimal tears, arterial dissections and aneurysms or thrombosis. In all cases of vessel injury, including total disruption, a peripheral pulse might still be palpable. 3 weeks after an acute elbow dislocation, we have diagnosed a patient with a long-segment stenosis of the brachial artery and a thrombosis of the radial artery. Therefore, the close anatomic proximity to the neurovascular structures should always be considered in cases of elbow dislocations, even if peripheral pulses are traceable.

  16. Association of Brachial-Ankle Pulse Wave Velocity and Cardiomegaly With Aortic Arch Calcification in Patients on Hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Shin, Ming-Chen Paul; Lee, Mei-Yueh; Huang, Jiun-Chi; Tsai, Yi-Chun; Chen, Jui-Hsin; Chen, Szu-Chia; Chang, Jer-Ming; Chen, Hung-Chun

    2016-05-01

    Aortic arch calcification (AoAC) is associated with cardiovascular and all-cause mortality in end-stage renal disease population. AoAC can be simply estimated with an AoAC score using plain chest radiography. The objective of this study is to evaluate the association of AoAC with brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) and cardiomegaly in patients who have undergoing hemodialysis (HD).We retrospectively determined AoAC and cardiothoracic ratio (CTR) by chest x-ray in 220 HD patients who underwent the measurement of baPWV. The values of baPWV were measured by an ankle-brachial index-form device. Multiple stepwise logistic regression analysis was used to identify the factors associated with AoAC score >4.Compared patients with AoAC score ≦4, patients with AoAC score >4 had older age, higher prevalence of diabetes and cerebrovascular disease, lower diastolic blood pressure, higher baPWV, higher CTR, higher prevalence of CTR ≧50%, lower total cholesterol, and lower creatinine level. After the multivariate stepwise logistic analysis, old age, cerebrovascular disease, high baPWV (per 100 cm/s, odds ratio [OR] 1.065, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.003-1.129, P = 0.038), CTR (per 1%, OR 1.116, 95% CI 1.046-1.191, P = 0.001), and low total cholesterol level were independently associated with AoAC score >4.Our study demonstrated AoAC severity was associated with high baPWV and high CTR in patients with HD. Therefore, we suggest that evaluating AoAC on plain chest radiography may be a simple and inexpensive method for detecting arterial stiffness in HD patients. PMID:27175684

  17. Association of Brachial-Ankle Pulse Wave Velocity and Cardiomegaly With Aortic Arch Calcification in Patients on Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Ming-Chen Paul; Lee, Mei-Yueh; Huang, Jiun-Chi; Tsai, Yi-Chun; Chen, Jui-Hsin; Chen, Szu-Chia; Chang, Jer-Ming; Chen, Hung-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aortic arch calcification (AoAC) is associated with cardiovascular and all-cause mortality in end-stage renal disease population. AoAC can be simply estimated with an AoAC score using plain chest radiography. The objective of this study is to evaluate the association of AoAC with brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) and cardiomegaly in patients who have undergoing hemodialysis (HD). We retrospectively determined AoAC and cardiothoracic ratio (CTR) by chest x-ray in 220 HD patients who underwent the measurement of baPWV. The values of baPWV were measured by an ankle-brachial index-form device. Multiple stepwise logistic regression analysis was used to identify the factors associated with AoAC score >4. Compared patients with AoAC score ≦4, patients with AoAC score >4 had older age, higher prevalence of diabetes and cerebrovascular disease, lower diastolic blood pressure, higher baPWV, higher CTR, higher prevalence of CTR ≧50%, lower total cholesterol, and lower creatinine level. After the multivariate stepwise logistic analysis, old age, cerebrovascular disease, high baPWV (per 100 cm/s, odds ratio [OR] 1.065, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.003–1.129, P = 0.038), CTR (per 1%, OR 1.116, 95% CI 1.046–1.191, P = 0.001), and low total cholesterol level were independently associated with AoAC score >4. Our study demonstrated AoAC severity was associated with high baPWV and high CTR in patients with HD. Therefore, we suggest that evaluating AoAC on plain chest radiography may be a simple and inexpensive method for detecting arterial stiffness in HD patients. PMID:27175684

  18. Avulsion of the brachial plexus in a great horned owl (Bubo virginaus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, M.P.; Stauber, E.; Thomas, N.J.

    1989-01-01

    Avulsion of the brachial plexus was documented in a Great Horned Owl (Bubo virginianus). A fractured scapula was also present. Cause of these injuries was not known but was thought to be due to trauma. Differentiation of musculoskeletal injury from peripheral nerve damage can be difficult in raptors. Use of electromyography and motor nerve conduction velocity was helpful in demonstrating peripheral nerve involvement. A brachial plexus avulsion was suspected on the basis of clinical signs, presence of electromyographic abnormalities in all muscles supplied by the nerves of the brachial plexus and absence of median-ulnar motor nerve conduction velocities.

  19. [Ipsilateral brachial plexus C7 root transfer. Presentation of a case and a literature review].

    PubMed

    Vergara-Amador, Enrique; Ramírez, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    The C7 root in brachial plexus injuries has been used since 1986, since the first description by Gu at that time. This root can be used completely or partially in ipsilateral or contralateral lesions of the brachial plexus. A review of the literature and the case report of a 21-month-old girl with stab wounds to the neck and section of the C5 root of the right brachial plexus are presented. A transfer of the anterior fibres of the ipsilateral C7 root was performed. At 9 months there was complete recovery of abduction and external rotation of the shoulder. PMID:23474130

  20. Radial Artery Coursing Behind the Biceps Brachii Tendon: Significance for the Transradial Catheterization and a Clinically Oriented Classification of the Radial Artery Variations

    SciTech Connect

    Jelev, L. Surchev, L.

    2008-09-15

    In routine clinical practice the variations of the radial artery are the main reason for technical failure during transradial catheterization. If these variations are well documented, however, they do not represent a problem in the transradial approach. Therefore, we report here a rare case of the radial artery which is very strange but potentially valuable for the clinical practice: it arises at a right angle from the brachial artery and passes behind the biceps brachii tendon. Based on our findings and on an extensive literature review, we propose for the first time a clinically oriented classification of the variations of the radial artery. This classification is related to the catheterization success at the usual access site of the radial artery at the wrist.

  1. Arterial Catheterization

    MedlinePlus

    ... rial line can provide valuable information to adjust oxygen therapy or mechanical ventilator (respirator; breathing machine) settings. The blood oxygen pres- sure measures from an arterial line give ...

  2. Screening for Peripheral Artery Disease and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Assessment with Ankle Brachial Index in Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... volunteer group of national experts in prevention and evidence-based medicine. The Task Force works to improve the health of all Americans by making evidence-based recommendations about clinical preventive services such as screenings, ...

  3. Supraclavicular Brachial Plexus Block for Arteriovenous Hemodialysis Access Procedures.

    PubMed

    Hull, Jeffrey; Heath, Jean; Bishop, Wendy

    2016-05-01

    Ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block using 1% and 2% lidocaine in 21 procedures is reported. Average procedure time was 5.1 minutes (± 1.2 min; range, 2-8 min). Average time of onset and duration were 4.8 minutes (± 3.7 min; range, 0-10 min) and 77.9 minutes (± 26.7 min; range, 44-133 min), respectively, for sensory block and 8.4 minutes (± 5.7 min; range, 3-23 min) and 99 minutes (± 40.5 min; range, 45-171 min), respectively, for motor block. The pain scale assessment averaged 0.4 (± 1.1; range, 0-4). There were no complications. PMID:27106648

  4. Temporal pattern of pulse wave velocity during brachial hyperemia reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, S.; Valero, M. J.; Craiem, D.; Torrado, J.; Farro, I.; Zócalo, Y.; Valls, G.; Bía, D.; Armentano, R. L.

    2011-09-01

    Endothelial function can be assessed non-invasively with ultrasound, analyzing the change of brachial diameter in response to transient forearm ischemia. We propose a new technique based in the same principle, but analyzing a continuous recording of carotid-radial pulse wave velocity (PWV) instead of diameter. PWV was measured on 10 healthy subjects of 22±2 years before and after 5 minutes forearm occlusion. After 59 ± 31 seconds of cuff release PWV decreased 21 ± 9% compared to baseline, reestablishing the same after 533 ± 65 seconds. There were no significant changes observed in blood pressure. When repeating the study one hour later in 5 subjects, we obtained a coefficient of repeatability of 4.8%. In conclusion, through analysis of beat to beat carotid-radial PWV it was possible to characterize the temporal profiles and analyze the acute changes in response to a reactive hyperemia. The results show that the technique has a high sensitivity and repeatability.

  5. Impact of type A behavior on brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity in Japanese.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongjian; Saijo, Yoshifumi; Zhang, Xiumin; Shiraishi, Yasuyuki; Luo, Yun; Maruyama, Mitsuya; Higa, Masaru; Sekine, Kazumitsu; Yambe, Tomoyuki

    2006-05-01

    Pulse wave velocity (PWV) is the velocity of a pulse wave traveling a given distance between 2 sites in the arterial system, and is a well-known indicator of arteriosclerosis. Brachial-ankle PWV (baPWV) is a parameter more simple to obtain, compared with the conventional PWV, and is an easy and effective means of evaluating arteriosclerosis. BaPWV can be obtained by only wrapping the four extremities with blood pressure cuffs, and it can be easily used to screen a large number of subjects. Type A behavior has been confirmed as an independent risk factor for the development of coronary heart disease. To examine the relationship between Type A behavior and arteriosclerosis, 307 normal Japanese subjects were classified into either a Type A group (n = 90) or a non-Type A group (n = 217) by using Maeda's Type A Scale. BaPWV was evaluated using a PWV diagnosis device. The baPWV in the Type A group was significantly higher than that obtained in the non-Type A group. The baPWV showed a positive correlation with age both in the Type A group and in the non-Type A group; however, the straight-line regression slope of baPWV versus age in the Type A group was significantly larger than that in the non-Type A group. Therefore, our results suggest that arteriosclerosis might be promoted earlier in subjects expressing the Type A behavior pattern. Type A behavior pattern is confirmed as a risk factor for arteriosclerosis, and may increase the risk of the cardiovascular disease related to arteriosclerosis.

  6. Ankle brachial index screening for occult vascular disease is not useful in HIV-positive patients.

    PubMed

    Johns, Kevin; Saeedi, Ramesh; Mancini, G B John; Bondy, Greg

    2010-09-01

    Metabolic complications common to the HIV-positive population may increase the risk for cardiovascular disease. Asymptomatic peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is associated with increased cardiovascular risk. The ankle-brachial pressure index (ABI) is a screening tool commonly used for the detection of asymptomatic PAD. The prevalence of asymptomatic PAD based on ABI in HIV-positive patients is unknown. This study was cross-sectional in design and assessed PAD by measuring the systolic ABI as determined by a handheld 8-MHz Doppler probe with the patient at rest in a supine position. A brief medical history including pertinent risk factors was obtained. One hundred and sixty-seven HIV-positive patients were evaluated (97.6% male; mean age 52.0 years; 31.2% current smokers, 29.4% former smokers, 26.3% diabetes mellitus). Asymptomatic PAD (ABI < or = 0.9) was found in four patients (2.4%, 95% CI: 0.3-4.5%). Smoking was a significant predictor of PAD. Patients with a positive test for PAD had at least two major risk factors for the disease including smoking, a history of disease in another vascular bed, dyslipidemia, diabetes, and hypertension. All patients with a positive test for PAD had a high risk (>20%) for cardiovascular disease according to the Framingham risk score. Three of the four patients with positive tests had previously diagnosed vascular disease (CAD, stroke). Three patients presenting with PAD were evaluated and all had a positive ABI. The prevalence of PAD compared to previous studies on PAD in HIV was low and identified only those patients with high cardiovascular risk based on other features. ABI was not useful in detecting occult vascular disease in HIV-positive patients and offers no additional information to that derived from cardiovascular risk stratification.

  7. Neonatal brachial plexus palsy: incidence, prevalence, and temporal trends.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Suneet P; Blackwell, Sean B; Ananth, Cande V

    2014-06-01

    Epidemiological knowledge of the incidence, prevalence, and temporal changes of neonatal brachial plexuses palsy (NBPP) should assist the clinician, avert unnecessary interventions, and help formulate evidence-based health policies. A summary of 63 publications in the English language with over 17 million births and 24,000 NBPPs is notable for six things. First, the rate of NBPP in the US and other countries is comparable: 1.5 vs. 1.3 per 1000 total births, respectively. Second, the rate of NBPP may be decreasing: 0.9, 1.0 and 0.5 per 1,000 births for publications before 1990, 1990-2000, and after 2000, respectively. Third, the likelihood of not having concomitant shoulder dystocia with NBPP was 76% overall, though it varied by whether the publication was from the US (78%) vs. other countries (47%). Fourth, the likelihood of NBPP being permanent (lasting at least 12 months) was 10-18% in the US-based reports and 19-23% in other countries. Fifth, in studies from the US, the rate of permanent NBPP is 1.1-2.2 per 10,000 births and 2.9-3.7 per 10,000 births in other nations. Sixth, we estimate that approximately 5000 NBPPs occur every year in the US, of which over 580-1050 are permanent, and that since birth, 63,000 adults have been afflicted with persistent paresis of their brachial plexus. The exceedingly infrequent nature of permanent NBPP necessitates a multi-center study to improve our understanding of the antecedent factors and to abate the long-term sequela.

  8. Morphometric Atlas Selection for Automatic Brachial Plexus Segmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Van de Velde, Joris; Wouters, Johan; Vercauteren, Tom; De Gersem, Werner; Duprez, Fréderic; De Neve, Wilfried; Van Hoof, Tom

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of atlas selection based on different morphometric parameters, on the accuracy of automatic brachial plexus (BP) segmentation for radiation therapy planning. The segmentation accuracy was measured by comparing all of the generated automatic segmentations with anatomically validated gold standard atlases developed using cadavers. Methods and Materials: Twelve cadaver computed tomography (CT) atlases (3 males, 9 females; mean age: 73 years) were included in the study. One atlas was selected to serve as a patient, and the other 11 atlases were registered separately onto this “patient” using deformable image registration. This procedure was repeated for every atlas as a patient. Next, the Dice and Jaccard similarity indices and inclusion index were calculated for every registered BP with the original gold standard BP. In parallel, differences in several morphometric parameters that may influence the BP segmentation accuracy were measured for the different atlases. Specific brachial plexus-related CT-visible bony points were used to define the morphometric parameters. Subsequently, correlations between the similarity indices and morphometric parameters were calculated. Results: A clear negative correlation between difference in protraction-retraction distance and the similarity indices was observed (mean Pearson correlation coefficient = −0.546). All of the other investigated Pearson correlation coefficients were weak. Conclusions: Differences in the shoulder protraction-retraction position between the atlas and the patient during planning CT influence the BP autosegmentation accuracy. A greater difference in the protraction-retraction distance between the atlas and the patient reduces the accuracy of the BP automatic segmentation result.

  9. Does conduit artery diameter vary according to the anthropometric characteristics of children or men?

    PubMed

    Hopkins, N D; Green, D J; Tinken, T M; Sutton, L; McWhannell, N; Thijssen, D H J; Cable, N T; Stratton, G; George, K

    2009-12-01

    Arterial measurements are commonly undertaken to assess acute and chronic adaptations to exercise. Despite the widespread adoption of scaling practices in cardiac research, the relevance of scaling for body size and/or composition has not been addressed for arterial measures. We therefore investigated the relationships between brachial artery diameter and body composition in 129 children aged 9 to 10 yr (75 girls and 54 boys), and 50 men aged 16-49 yr. Body composition variables (total, lean, and fat mass in the whole body, arm, and forearm) were assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, and brachial artery diameter was measured using high-resolution ultrasound. Bivariate correlations were performed, and arterial diameter was then scaled using simple ratios (y/x) and allometric approaches after log-log least squares linear regression and production of allometric exponents (b) and construction of power function ratios (y/xb). Size independence was checked via bivariate correlations (x:y/x; x:y/xb). As a result, significant correlations existed between brachial artery diameter and measures of body mass and lean mass in both cohorts (r=0.21-0.48, P<0.05). There were no significant relationships between diameter and fat mass. All b exponents were significantly different from 1 (0.08-0.50), suggesting that simple ratio scaling approaches were likely to be flawed. This was confirmed when ratio scaling produced negative residual size correlations, whereas allometric scaling produced size-independent indexes (r=0.00 to 0.03, P>0.05). In conclusion, when between- or within-group comparisons are performed under circumstances where it is important to control for differences in body size or composition, allometric scaling of artery diameter should be adopted rather than ratio scaling. Our data also suggest that scaling for lean or total mass may be more appropriate than scaling for indexes of fat mass.

  10. Does conduit artery diameter vary according to the anthropometric characteristics of children or men?

    PubMed

    Hopkins, N D; Green, D J; Tinken, T M; Sutton, L; McWhannell, N; Thijssen, D H J; Cable, N T; Stratton, G; George, K

    2009-12-01

    Arterial measurements are commonly undertaken to assess acute and chronic adaptations to exercise. Despite the widespread adoption of scaling practices in cardiac research, the relevance of scaling for body size and/or composition has not been addressed for arterial measures. We therefore investigated the relationships between brachial artery diameter and body composition in 129 children aged 9 to 10 yr (75 girls and 54 boys), and 50 men aged 16-49 yr. Body composition variables (total, lean, and fat mass in the whole body, arm, and forearm) were assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, and brachial artery diameter was measured using high-resolution ultrasound. Bivariate correlations were performed, and arterial diameter was then scaled using simple ratios (y/x) and allometric approaches after log-log least squares linear regression and production of allometric exponents (b) and construction of power function ratios (y/xb). Size independence was checked via bivariate correlations (x:y/x; x:y/xb). As a result, significant correlations existed between brachial artery diameter and measures of body mass and lean mass in both cohorts (r=0.21-0.48, P<0.05). There were no significant relationships between diameter and fat mass. All b exponents were significantly different from 1 (0.08-0.50), suggesting that simple ratio scaling approaches were likely to be flawed. This was confirmed when ratio scaling produced negative residual size correlations, whereas allometric scaling produced size-independent indexes (r=0.00 to 0.03, P>0.05). In conclusion, when between- or within-group comparisons are performed under circumstances where it is important to control for differences in body size or composition, allometric scaling of artery diameter should be adopted rather than ratio scaling. Our data also suggest that scaling for lean or total mass may be more appropriate than scaling for indexes of fat mass. PMID:19837946

  11. Large cervicothoracic myxoinflammatory fibroblastic sarcoma with brachial plexus invasion: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Xiaotian; Yang, Jianyun; Chen, Lin; Yu, Cong

    2016-01-01

    Myxoinflammatory fibroblastic sarcoma is a rare sarcoma that develops in patients of all ages, which usually presents as a slow-growing painless mass in the distal extremities. To date, myxoinflammatory fibroblastic sarcoma with invasion of the brachial plexus has rarely been reported in the literature. In this study, a case of large cervicothoracic sarcoma, which invaded the brachial plexus, is presented. The patient reported no sensory disturbance or dyskinesia. The tumor was completely resected without injury of the brachial plexus. The postoperative histological diagnosis was myxoinflammatory fibroblastic sarcoma. Follow-up examination performed 24 months after surgery revealed no tumor recurrence and no sensory disturbance or dyskinesia was reported. This study presents a rare case of large myxoinflammatory fibroblastic sarcoma with brachial plexus invasion that was successfully managed by surgery. PMID:27588121

  12. Restoration and protection of brachial plexus injury: hot topics in the last decade

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kaizhi; Lv, Zheng; Liu, Jun; Zhu, He; Li, Rui

    2014-01-01

    Brachial plexus injury is frequently induced by injuries, accidents or birth trauma. Upper limb function may be partially or totally lost after injury, or left permanently disabled. With the development of various medical technologies, different types of interventions are used, but their effectiveness is wide ranging. Many repair methods have phasic characteristics, i.e., repairs are done in different phases. This study explored research progress and hot topic methods for protection after brachial plexus injury, by analyzing 1,797 articles concerning the repair of brachial plexus injuries, published between 2004 and 2013 and indexed by the Science Citation Index database. Results revealed that there are many methods used to repair brachial plexus injury, and their effects are varied. Intervention methods include nerve transfer surgery, electrical stimulation, cell transplantation, neurotrophic factor therapy and drug treatment. Therapeutic methods in this field change according to the hot topic of research. PMID:25374596

  13. Brachial Plexus Injury from CT-Guided RF Ablation Under General Anesthesia

    SciTech Connect

    Shankar, Sridhar Sonnenberg, Eric van; Silverman, Stuart G.; Tuncali, Kemal; Flanagan, Hugh L.; Whang, Edward E.

    2005-06-15

    Brachial plexus injury in a patient under general anesthesia (GA) is not uncommon, despite careful positioning and, particularly, awareness of the possibility. The mechanism of injury is stretching and compression of the brachial plexus over a prolonged period. Positioning the patient within the computed tomography (CT) gantry for abdominal or chest procedures can simulate a surgical procedure, particularly when GA is used. The potential for brachial plexus injury is increased if the case is prolonged and the patient's arms are raised above the head to avoid CT image degradation from streak artifacts. We report a case of profound brachial plexus palsy following a CT-guided radiofrequency ablation procedure under GA. Fortunately, the patient recovered completely. We emphasize the mechanism of injury and detail measures to combat this problem, such that radiologists are aware of this potentially serious complication.

  14. Contralateral Spinal Accessory Nerve Transfer: A New Technique in Panavulsive Brachial Plexus Palsy.

    PubMed

    Zermeño-Rivera, Jaime; Gutiérrez-Amavizca, Bianca Ethel

    2015-06-01

    Brachial plexus avulsion results from excessive stretching and can occur secondary to motor vehicle accidents, mainly in motorcyclists. In a 28-year-old man with panavulsive brachial plexus palsy, we describe an alternative technique to repair brachial plexus avulsion and to stabilize and preserve shoulder function by transferring the contralateral spinal accessory nerve to the suprascapular nerve. We observed positive clinical and electromyographic results in sternocleidomastoid, trapezius, supraspinatus, infraspinatus, pectoralis, triceps, and biceps, with good outcome and prognosis for shoulder function at 12 months after surgery. This technique provides a unique opportunity for patients suffering from severe brachial plexus injuries and lacking enough donor nerves to obtain shoulder stability and mobility while avoiding bone fusion and preserving functionality of the contralateral shoulder with favorable postoperative outcomes.

  15. Nerve Transfers in Birth Related Brachial Plexus Injuries: Where Do We Stand?

    PubMed

    Davidge, Kristen M; Clarke, Howard M; Borschel, Gregory H

    2016-05-01

    This article reviews the assessment and management of obstetrical brachial plexus palsy. The potential role of distal nerve transfers in the treatment of infants with Erb's palsy is discussed. Current evidence for motor outcomes after traditional reconstruction via interpositional nerve grafting and extraplexal nerve transfers is reviewed and compared with the recent literature on intraplexal distal nerve transfers in obstetrical brachial plexus injury. PMID:27094890

  16. Elevated C-Reactive Protein Levels and Enhanced High Frequency Vasomotion in Patients with Ischemic Heart Disease during Brachial Flow-Mediated Dilation

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Shogo; Amiya, Eisuke; Watanabe, Masafumi; Takata, Munenori; Ozeki, Atsuko; Watanabe, Aya; Kawarasaki, Shuichi; Nakao, Tomoko; Hosoya, Yumiko; Nagata, Kohzo; Nagai, Ryozo; Komuro, Issei

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The physiological role of vasomotion, rhythmic oscillations in vascular tone or diameter, and its underlying mechanisms are unknown. We investigated the characteristics of brachial artery vasomotion in patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD). Methods We performed a retrospective study of 37 patients with IHD. Endothelial function was assessed using flow-mediated dilation (FMD), and power spectral analysis of brachial artery diameter oscillations during FMD was performed. Frequency-domain components were calculated by integrating the power spectrums in three frequency bands (in ms2) using the MemCalc (GMS, Tokyo, Japan): very-low frequency (VLF), 0.003–0.04 Hz; low frequency (LF), 0.04–0.15 Hz; and high frequency (HF), 0.15–0.4 Hz. Total spectral power (TP) was calculated as the sum of all frequency bands, and each spectral component was normalized against TP. Results Data revealed that HF/TP closely correlated with FMD (r = −0.33, p = 0.04), whereas VLF/TP and LF/TP did not. We also explored the relationship between elevated C-reactive protein (CRP) levels and vasomotion. HF/TP was significantly increased in subjects with high CRP levels (CRP;>0.08 mg/dL) compared with subjects with low CRP levels (0.052±0.026 versus 0.035±0.022, p<0.05). The HF/TP value closely correlated with CRP (r = 0.24, p = 0.04), whereas the value of FMD did not (r = 0.023, p = 0.84). In addition, elevated CRP levels significantly increased the value of HF/TP after adjustment for FMD and blood pressure (β = 0.33, p<0.05). Conclusion The HF component of brachial artery diameter oscillation during FMD measurement correlated well with FMD and increased in the presence of elevated CRP levels in subjects with IHD. PMID:25299643

  17. Mesenteric artery ischemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... bowel - mesenteric; Dead gut - mesenteric; Atherosclerosis - mesenteric artery; Hardening of the arteries - mesenteric artery ... the aorta, the main artery from the heart. Hardening of the arteries occurs when fat, cholesterol, and ...

  18. [A Novel, Less Invasive Protection Method for Carotid Artery Stenting].

    PubMed

    Ohshima, Tomotaka; Goto, Shunsaku; Yamamoto, Taiki; Imai, Tasuku; Nishizawa, Toshihisa; Shimato, Shinji; Kato, Kyozo

    2016-07-01

    Purpose: We present a novel, less invasive protection method for carotid artery stenting. Case presentation: A 67-year-old man presented with symptomatic severe left carotid artery stenosis. A transfemoral approach was dangerous because of an abdominal aortic aneurysm. A 6Fr Axcelguide Simmonds catheter was inserted into the right brachial artery, and advanced into the left common carotid artery. Next, a 6Fr Optimo 100-cm catheter was coaxially navigated into the left common carotid artery. A PercuSurge GuardWire 300-cm was coaxially navigated into the left external carotid artery. Under flow reversal with the 2 balloons, another PercuSurge GuardWire 300-cm was navigated into the distal left internal carotid artery through the lesion. After both PercuSurge GuardWire balloons were inflated, the 6Fr Optimo was deflated and retrieved using a catheter exchange technique. Then, under distal double-balloon protection, routine stenting was performed. Conclusions: This technique is safer and less invasive than previous methods, especially in cases with difficult femoral access and vulnerable carotid plaque. PMID:27384116

  19. Relationship between radial and central arterial pulse wave and evaluation of central aortic pressure using the radial arterial pulse wave.

    PubMed

    Takazawa, Kenji; Kobayashi, Hideyuki; Shindo, Naohisa; Tanaka, Nobuhiro; Yamashina, Akira

    2007-03-01

    Since a decrease of central aortic pressure contributes to the prevention of cardiovascular events, simple measurement of not only brachial blood pressure but also central aortic pressure may be useful in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. In this study, we simultaneously measured radial artery pulse waves non-invasively and ascending aortic pressure invasively, before and after the administration of nicorandil. We then compared changes in central aortic pressure and radial arterial blood pressure calibrated with brachial blood pressure in addition to calculating the augmentation index (AI) at the aorta and radial artery. After nicorandil administration, the reduction in maximal systolic blood pressure in the aorta (Deltaa-SBP) was -14+/-15 mmHg, significantly larger than that in early systolic pressure in the radial artery (Deltar-SBP) (-9+/-12 mmHg). The reduction in late systolic blood pressure in the radial artery (Deltar-SBP2) was -15+/-14 mmHg, significantly larger than Deltar-SBP, but not significantly different from Deltaa-SBP. There were significant relationships between Deltaa-SBP and Deltar-SBP (r=0.81, p<0.001), and between Deltaa-SBP and Deltar-SBP2 (r=0.91, p<0.001). The slope of the correlation regression line with Deltar-SBP2 (0.83) was larger and closer to 1 than that with Deltar-SBP (0.63), showing that the relationship was close to 1:1. Significant correlations were obtained between aortic AI (a-AI) and radial AI (r-AI) (before nicorandil administration: r=0.91, p<0.001; after administration: r=0.70, p<0.001). These data suggest that the measurement of radial artery pulse wave and observation of changes in the late systolic blood pressure in the radial artery (r-SBP2) in addition to the ordinary measurement of brachial blood pressure may enable a more accurate evaluation of changes in maximal systolic blood pressure in the aorta (a-SBP).

  20. Impact of blood pressure perturbations on arterial stiffness.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jisok; Pearman, Miriam E; Park, Wonil; Alkatan, Mohammed; Machin, Daniel R; Tanaka, Hirofumi

    2015-12-15

    Although the associations between chronic levels of arterial stiffness and blood pressure (BP) have been fairly well studied, it is not clear whether and how much arterial stiffness is influenced by acute perturbations in BP. The primary aim of this study was to determine magnitudes of BP dependence of various measures of arterial stiffness during acute BP perturbation maneuvers. Fifty apparently healthy subjects, including 25 young (20-40 yr) and 25 older adults (60-80 yr), were studied. A variety of BP perturbations, including head-up tilt, head-down tilt, mental stress, isometric handgrip exercise, and cold pressor test, were used to encompass BP changes induced by physical, mental, and/or mechanical stimuli. When each index of arterial stiffness was plotted with mean BP, all arterial stiffness indices, including cardio-ankle vascular index or CAVI (r = 0.50), carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity or cfPWV (r = 0.51), brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity or baPWV (r = 0.61), arterial compliance (r = -0.42), elastic modulus (r = 0.52), arterial distensibility (r = -0.32), β-stiffness index (r = 0.19), and Young's modulus (r = 0.35) were related to mean BP (all P < 0.01). Changes in CAVI, cfPWV, baPWV, and elastic modulus were significantly associated with changes in mean BP in the pooled conditions, while changes in arterial compliance, arterial distensibility, β-stiffness index, and Young's modulus were not. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that BP changes in response to various forms of pressor stimuli were associated with the corresponding changes in arterial stiffness indices and that the strengths of associations with BP varied widely depending on what arterial stiffness indices were examined. PMID:26468262

  1. Lower limb arterial incompressibility and obstruction in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    del Rincon, I; Haas, R; Pogosian, S; Escalante, A

    2005-01-01

    Background: Despite increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in rheumatoid arthritis, the peripheral arteries remain understudied. Objective: To examine the lower limb arteries in age and sex matched, non-smoking subjects with and without rheumatoid arthritis. Methods: The ankle-brachial index (ABI) was measured at the posterior tibial and dorsal pedal arteries. Arteries were classified as obstructed with ABI ⩽0.9, normal with ABI >0.9 but ⩽1.3, and incompressible with ABI >1.3. Multinomial logistic regression was used to estimate differences in ABI between patients and controls, adjusting for cardiovascular risk factors, rheumatoid arthritis manifestations, inflammation markers, and glucocorticoid dose. Results: 234 patients with rheumatoid arthritis and 102 controls were studied. Among the rheumatoid patients, 66 of 931 arteries (7%) were incompressible and 30 (3%) were obstructed. Among the controls, three of 408 arteries (0.7%) were incompressible (p = 0.002) and four (1%) were obstructed (p = 0.06). At the person level, one or more abnormal arteries occurred among 45 rheumatoid patients (19%), v five controls (5%, p = 0.001). The greater frequency of arterial incompressibility and obstruction in rheumatoid arthritis was independent of age, sex, and cardiovascular risk factors. Adjustment for inflammation markers, joint damage, rheumatoid factor, and glucocorticoid use reduced rheumatoid arthritis v control differences. Most arterial impairments occurred in rheumatoid patients with 20 or more deformed joints. This subgroup had more incompressible (15%, p⩽0.001) and obstructed arteries (6%, p = 0.005) than the controls, independent of covariates. Conclusions: Peripheral arterial incompressibility and obstruction are increased in rheumatoid arthritis. Their propensity for patients with advanced joint damage suggests shared pathogenic mechanisms. PMID:15271772

  2. Axillary artery compression and thrombosis in throwing athletes.

    PubMed

    Rohrer, M J; Cardullo, P A; Pappas, A M; Phillips, D A; Wheeler, H B

    1990-06-01

    A 28-year-old major league baseball pitcher sustained an axillary artery thrombosis which was successfully treated with intraarterial urokinase. Subsequent angiography and duplex scanning with the arm elevated in the pitching position demonstrated inducible compression of the axillary artery by the humeral head as well as compression at the thoracic outlet. To determine the incidence of axillary and subclavian artery compression and to investigate the mechanism of injury, brachial artery blood pressures and duplex scans of the subclavian and axillary arteries were performed in both the neutral position and the throwing position in the 92 extremities of 19 major league baseball pitchers, 16 non-pitching major league players, and 11 nonathlete controls. A drop in blood pressure of greater than 20 mm Hg was noted in the position in 56% of extremities tested, with a loss of a detectable blood pressure in 13%. Compression of the axillary artery by the humeral head was documented in 83% of extremities, but in only 7.6% was a greater than 50% stenosis inducible. No statistical difference was found in the incidence of arterial compression between the three groups tested or between their dominant and nondominant extremities. Dissection of the axillary artery in two cadavers documented that abduction and external rotation of the arm causes compression of the axillary artery by the humeral head, which acts as a fulcrum. We conclude that the repetitive mechanical trauma of the throwing motion can cause intermittent compression and contusion of the axillary artery by the humeral head and predisposes the athlete who throws to thrombosis of the axillary artery.

  3. Impact of blood pressure perturbations on arterial stiffness.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jisok; Pearman, Miriam E; Park, Wonil; Alkatan, Mohammed; Machin, Daniel R; Tanaka, Hirofumi

    2015-12-15

    Although the associations between chronic levels of arterial stiffness and blood pressure (BP) have been fairly well studied, it is not clear whether and how much arterial stiffness is influenced by acute perturbations in BP. The primary aim of this study was to determine magnitudes of BP dependence of various measures of arterial stiffness during acute BP perturbation maneuvers. Fifty apparently healthy subjects, including 25 young (20-40 yr) and 25 older adults (60-80 yr), were studied. A variety of BP perturbations, including head-up tilt, head-down tilt, mental stress, isometric handgrip exercise, and cold pressor test, were used to encompass BP changes induced by physical, mental, and/or mechanical stimuli. When each index of arterial stiffness was plotted with mean BP, all arterial stiffness indices, including cardio-ankle vascular index or CAVI (r = 0.50), carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity or cfPWV (r = 0.51), brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity or baPWV (r = 0.61), arterial compliance (r = -0.42), elastic modulus (r = 0.52), arterial distensibility (r = -0.32), β-stiffness index (r = 0.19), and Young's modulus (r = 0.35) were related to mean BP (all P < 0.01). Changes in CAVI, cfPWV, baPWV, and elastic modulus were significantly associated with changes in mean BP in the pooled conditions, while changes in arterial compliance, arterial distensibility, β-stiffness index, and Young's modulus were not. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that BP changes in response to various forms of pressor stimuli were associated with the corresponding changes in arterial stiffness indices and that the strengths of associations with BP varied widely depending on what arterial stiffness indices were examined.

  4. Ultrasonic Measurement of Change in Elasticity due to Endothelium Dependent Relaxation Response by Accurate Detection of Artery-Wall Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Takuya; Hasegawa, Hideyuki; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2007-07-01

    Ross hypothesized that an endothelial dysfunction is considered to be an initial step in atherosclerosis. Endothelial cells, which release nitric oxide (NO) in response to shear stress from blood flow, have a function of relaxing smooth muscle in the media of the arterial wall. For the assessment of the endothelial function, there is a conventional method in which the change in the diameter of the brachial artery caused by flow-mediated dilation (FMD) is measured with ultrasound. However, despite the fact that the collagen-rich hard adventitia does not respond to NO, the conventional method measures the change in diameter depending on the mechanical property of the entire wall including the adventitia. Therefore, we developed a method of measuring the change in the thickness and the elasticity of the brachial artery during a cardiac cycle using the phased tracking method for the evaluation of the mechanical property of only the intima-media region. In this study, the initial positions of echoes from the lumen-intima and media-adventitia boundaries are determined using complex template matching to accurately estimate the minute change in the thickness and the elasticity of the brachial and radial arteries. The ambiguity in the determination of such boundaries was eliminated using complex template matching, and the change in elasticity measured by the proposed method was larger than the change in inner diameter obtained by the conventional method.

  5. Opposing effects of shear-mediated dilation and myogenic constriction on artery diameter in response to handgrip exercise in humans.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Ceri L; Carter, Howard H; Naylor, Louise H; Dawson, Ellen A; Marusic, Petra; Hering, Dagmara; Schlaich, Markus P; Thijssen, Dick H J; Green, Daniel J

    2015-10-15

    While the impact of changes in blood flow and shear stress on artery function are well documented, the acute effects of increases in arterial pressure are less well described in humans. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of 30 min of elevated blood pressure, in the absence of changes in shear stress or sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activation, on conduit artery diameter. Ten healthy male subjects undertook three sessions of 30 min unilateral handgrip exercise at 5, 10, and 15% of maximal voluntary contractile (MVC) strength. Brachial artery shear rate and blood flow profiles were measured simultaneously during exercise in the active and contralateral resting arms. Bilateral brachial artery diameter was simultaneously assessed before and immediately postexercise. In a second experiment, six subjects repeated the 15% MVC condition while continuous vascular measurements were collected during muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) assessment using peroneal microneurography. We found that unilateral handgrip exercise at 5, 10, and 15% MVC strength induced stepwise elevations in blood pressure (P < 0.01, Δmean arterial pressure: 7.06 ± 2.44, 8.50 ± 2.80, and 18.35 ± 3.52 mmHg, P < 0.01). Whereas stepwise increases were evident in shear rate in the exercising arm (P < 0.001), no changes were apparent in the nonexercising limb (P = 0.42). Brachial artery diameter increased in the exercising arm (P = 0.02), but significantly decreased in the nonexercising arm (P = 0.03). At 15% MVC, changes in diameter were significantly different between arms (interaction effect: P = 0.01), whereas this level of exertion produced no significant changes in MSNA. We conclude that acute increases in transmural pressure, independent of shear rate and changes in SNS activation, reduce arterial caliber in normotensive humans in vivo. These changes in diameter were mitigated by exercise-induced elevations in shear rate in the active limb.

  6. Opposing effects of shear-mediated dilation and myogenic constriction on artery diameter in response to handgrip exercise in humans.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Ceri L; Carter, Howard H; Naylor, Louise H; Dawson, Ellen A; Marusic, Petra; Hering, Dagmara; Schlaich, Markus P; Thijssen, Dick H J; Green, Daniel J

    2015-10-15

    While the impact of changes in blood flow and shear stress on artery function are well documented, the acute effects of increases in arterial pressure are less well described in humans. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of 30 min of elevated blood pressure, in the absence of changes in shear stress or sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activation, on conduit artery diameter. Ten healthy male subjects undertook three sessions of 30 min unilateral handgrip exercise at 5, 10, and 15% of maximal voluntary contractile (MVC) strength. Brachial artery shear rate and blood flow profiles were measured simultaneously during exercise in the active and contralateral resting arms. Bilateral brachial artery diameter was simultaneously assessed before and immediately postexercise. In a second experiment, six subjects repeated the 15% MVC condition while continuous vascular measurements were collected during muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) assessment using peroneal microneurography. We found that unilateral handgrip exercise at 5, 10, and 15% MVC strength induced stepwise elevations in blood pressure (P < 0.01, Δmean arterial pressure: 7.06 ± 2.44, 8.50 ± 2.80, and 18.35 ± 3.52 mmHg, P < 0.01). Whereas stepwise increases were evident in shear rate in the exercising arm (P < 0.001), no changes were apparent in the nonexercising limb (P = 0.42). Brachial artery diameter increased in the exercising arm (P = 0.02), but significantly decreased in the nonexercising arm (P = 0.03). At 15% MVC, changes in diameter were significantly different between arms (interaction effect: P = 0.01), whereas this level of exertion produced no significant changes in MSNA. We conclude that acute increases in transmural pressure, independent of shear rate and changes in SNS activation, reduce arterial caliber in normotensive humans in vivo. These changes in diameter were mitigated by exercise-induced elevations in shear rate in the active limb. PMID:26294751

  7. Brachial Plexus Block for Cancer-Related Pain: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Zinboonyahgoon, Nantthasorn; Vlassakov, Kamen; Abrecht, Christ R; Srinivasan, Suresh; Narang, Sanjeet

    2015-01-01

    Neoplastic brachial plexopathy (NBP) is caused by a cancerous infiltration into the brachial plexus, presenting often as severe pain in the affected upper extremity. Such pain can be resistant to medical treatment. Invasive interventions such as brachial plexus neurolysis with phenol or cordotomy may result in severe complications including permanent neurological damage and death. Continuous brachial plexus and paravertebral block with local anesthetic have been reported to successfully control pain from NBP, but these techniques are logistically challenging and frequently have catheter-related complications. We report a series of patients who received single-shot brachial plexus blocks with a mixture of local anesthetic and corticosteroid (bupivacaine 0.25% with methyl-prednisolone 20-120 mg) for the treatment of refractory cancer-related pain in the brachial plexus territory, mostly from NBP. Theoretically, such blocks could provide immediate analgesia from the local anesthetic and a longer-lasting analgesia from the slow-release steroids. Responders reported a sustained decrease in their pain (lasting from 2 weeks to 10 months), a significant decrease in their opioid and non-opioid (ketamine, gabapentin) consumption, overall satisfaction with the block, and unchanged or improved function of their limb. The ideal candidate for this procedure is a patient who has pain that is predominantly neuropathic from a lesion within the brachial plexus and with anatomy amenable to ultrasound-guided nerve block. Our case series suggests that, in the appropriately selected patient, this technique can safely and effectively alleviate pain from NBP. The procedure is simple, spares limb function, and can be diagnostic, predicting response to more complex procedures. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report using this technique for NBP.

  8. Postfixed Brachial Plexus Radiculopathy Due to Thoracic Disc Herniation in a Collegiate Wrestler: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kuzma, Scott A.; Doberstein, Scott T.; Rushlow, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To present the unique case of a collegiate wrestler with C7 neurologic symptoms due to T1–T2 disc herniation. Background: A 23-year-old male collegiate wrestler injured his neck in a wrestling tournament match and experienced pain, weakness, and numbness in his left upper extremity. He completed that match and 1 additional match that day with mild symptoms. Evaluation by a certified athletic trainer 6 days postinjury showed radiculopathy in the C7 distribution of his left upper extremity. He was evaluated further by the team physician, a primary care physician, and a neurosurgeon. Differential Diagnosis: Cervical spine injury, stinger/burner, peripheral nerve injury, spinal cord injury, thoracic outlet syndrome, brachial plexus radiculopathy. Treatment: The patient initially underwent nonoperative management with ice, heat, massage, electrical stimulation, shortwave diathermy, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs without symptom resolution. Cervical spine radiographs were negative for bony pathologic conditions. Magnetic resonance imaging showed evidence of T1–T2 disc herniation. The patient underwent surgery to resolve the symptoms and enable him to participate for the remainder of the wrestling season. Uniqueness: Whereas brachial plexus radiculopathy commonly is seen in collision sports, a postfixed brachial plexus in which the T2 nerve root has substantial contribution to the innervation of the upper extremity is a rare anatomic variation with which many health care providers are unfamiliar. Conclusions: The injury sustained by the wrestler appeared to be C7 radiculopathy due to a brachial plexus traction injury. However, it ultimately was diagnosed as radiculopathy due to a T1–T2 thoracic intervertebral disc herniation causing impingement of a postfixed brachial plexus and required surgical intervention. Athletic trainers and physicians need to be aware of the anatomic variations of the brachial plexus when evaluating and caring for

  9. Tetrahydrobiopterin improves endothelial function and decreases arterial stiffness in estrogen-deficient postmenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Meditz, Amie; Deane, Kevin D.; Kohrt, Wendy M.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms mediating arterial stiffening with aging and menopause are not completely understood. We determined whether administration of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), a critical cofactor for endothelial nitric oxide synthase to produce nitric oxide, would increase vascular endothelial-dependent vasodilatory tone and decrease arterial stiffness in estrogen-deficient postmenopausal women. Additionally, we examined whether the beneficial effects of estrogen on vascular function were possibly related to BH4. Arterial stiffness (carotid artery compliance) and endothelial-dependent vasodilation [brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD)] were measured in postmenopausal (n = 24; 57 ± 1 yr, mean ± SE) and eumenorrheic premenopausal (n = 9; 33 ± 2 yr) women before and 3 h after the oral administration of BH4. Subsequently, in postmenopausal women, vascular testing (before and after BH4) was repeated following randomization to either 2 days of transdermal estradiol or placebo. Baseline carotid artery compliance and brachial artery FMD were lower in postmenopausal than in premenopausal women (P < 0.0001). BH4 administration increased carotid artery compliance (0.61 ± 0.05 to 0.73 ± 0.04 mm2·mmHg−1·10−1 vs. baseline, P < 0.0001) and brachial artery FMD (P < 0.001) in postmenopausal women but had no effect in premenopausal women (P = 0.62). Carotid artery compliance (0.59 ± 0.05 to 0.78 ± 0.06 mm2·mmHg−1·10−1, P < 0.001) and FMD increased in postmenopausal women in response to estradiol (P = 0.02) but were not further improved with the coadministration of BH4, possibly because estrogen increased BH4 bioavailability. Carotid artery compliance and FMD increased with BH4 in the placebo group (P = 0.02). Although speculative, these results suggest that reduced vascular BH4 may be an important contributor to arterial stiffening in estrogen-deficient postmenopausal women, related in part to reduced endothelial-dependent vasodilatory tone. PMID:22245769

  10. Arterial Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Avolio, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Stiffness of large arteries has been long recognized as a significant determinant of pulse pressure. However, it is only in recent decades, with the accumulation of longitudinal data from large and varied epidemiological studies of morbidity and mortality associated with cardiovascular disease, that it has emerged as an independent predictor of cardiovascular risk. This has generated substantial interest in investigations related to intrinsic causative and associated factors responsible for the alteration of mechanical properties of the arterial wall, with the aim to uncover specific pathways that could be interrogated to prevent or reverse arterial stiffening. Much has been written on the haemodynamic relevance of arterial stiffness in terms of the quantification of pulsatile relationships of blood pressure and flow in conduit arteries. Indeed, much of this early work regarded blood vessels as passive elastic conduits, with the endothelial layer considered as an inactive lining of the lumen and as an interface to flowing blood. However, recent advances in molecular biology and increased technological sophistication for the detection of low concentrations of biochemical compounds have elucidated the highly important regulatory role of the endothelial cell affecting vascular function. These techniques have enabled research into the interaction of the underlying passive mechanical properties of the arterial wall with the active cellular and molecular processes that regulate the local environment of the load-bearing components. This review addresses these emerging concepts. PMID:26587425

  11. Endovascular repair of a ruptured subclavian artery aneurysm in a patient with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome using a sandwich technique.

    PubMed

    Desai, Sapan S; Codreanu, Maria; Charlton-Ouw, Kristofer M; Safi, Hazim; Azizzadeh, Ali

    2014-10-01

    We present the case of a type IV Ehlers-Danlos syndrome patient with a ruptured right subclavian artery aneurysm and associated arteriovenous fistula who underwent successful endovascular repair requiring simultaneous stent graft repair of the innominate artery using a sandwich technique. A 17-year-old man with known type IV Ehlers-Danlos syndrome developed right neck and shoulder swelling. CTA study demonstrated a 17 × 13-cm ruptured subclavian artery aneurysm with an associated internal jugular vein arteriovenous fistula. In the hybrid suite, a 7 mm × 15-cm stent graft (Viabahn, WL Gore & Associates, Flagstaff, AZ) was advanced from the right brachial approach into the innominate artery. A separate wire was placed into the right carotid artery via the right femoral approach (7 Fr), and a 7 mm × 10-cm stent graft (Viabahn) was advanced into the innominate artery. An additional 8 mm × 10-cm stent graft (Viabahn) was placed from the right brachial approach to obtain a distal-landing zone in the axillary artery. Complex vascular anatomy, in which graft seal creation may be challenging, does not exclude endovascular approaches as the sandwich technique can be utilized as a suitable alternative to open repair.

  12. Association of Ankle-Brachial Index and Aortic Arch Calcification with Overall and Cardiovascular Mortality in Hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Szu-Chia; Lee, Mei-Yueh; Huang, Jiun-Chi; Shih, Ming-Chen Paul; Chang, Jer-Ming; Chen, Hung-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral artery occlusive disease and vascular calcification are highly prevalent in hemodialysis (HD) patients, however the association of the combination of ankle-brachial index (ABI) and aortic arch calcification (AoAC) with clinical outcomes in patients undergoing HD is unknown. In this study, we investigated whether the combination of ABI and AoAC is independently associated with overall and cardiovascular mortality in HD patients. The median follow-up period was 5.7 years. Calcification of the aortic arch was assessed by chest X-ray. Forty-seven patients died including 24 due to cardiovascular causes during the follow-up period. The study patients were stratified into four groups according to an ABI < 0.95 or ≥0.95 and an AoAC score of >4 or ≤4 according to receiver operating characteristic curve. Those with an ABI < 0.95 and AoAC > 4 (vs. ABI ≥ 0.95 and AoAC score ≤ 4) were associated with overall (hazard ratio [HR], 4.913; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.932 to 12.497; p = 0.001) and cardiovascular (HR, 3.531; 95% CI, 1.070 to 11.652; p = 0.038) mortality in multivariable analysis. The combination of a low ABI and increased AoAC was associated with increased overall and cardiovascular mortality in patients undergoing HD. PMID:27608939

  13. Association of Ankle-Brachial Index and Aortic Arch Calcification with Overall and Cardiovascular Mortality in Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Szu-Chia; Lee, Mei-Yueh; Huang, Jiun-Chi; Shih, Ming-Chen Paul; Chang, Jer-Ming; Chen, Hung-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral artery occlusive disease and vascular calcification are highly prevalent in hemodialysis (HD) patients, however the association of the combination of ankle-brachial index (ABI) and aortic arch calcification (AoAC) with clinical outcomes in patients undergoing HD is unknown. In this study, we investigated whether the combination of ABI and AoAC is independently associated with overall and cardiovascular mortality in HD patients. The median follow-up period was 5.7 years. Calcification of the aortic arch was assessed by chest X-ray. Forty-seven patients died including 24 due to cardiovascular causes during the follow-up period. The study patients were stratified into four groups according to an ABI < 0.95 or ≥0.95 and an AoAC score of >4 or ≤4 according to receiver operating characteristic curve. Those with an ABI < 0.95 and AoAC > 4 (vs. ABI ≥ 0.95 and AoAC score ≤ 4) were associated with overall (hazard ratio [HR], 4.913; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.932 to 12.497; p = 0.001) and cardiovascular (HR, 3.531; 95% CI, 1.070 to 11.652; p = 0.038) mortality in multivariable analysis. The combination of a low ABI and increased AoAC was associated with increased overall and cardiovascular mortality in patients undergoing HD. PMID:27608939

  14. Measurement characteristics of the ankle–brachial index: results from the Action for Health in Diabetes study

    PubMed Central

    Espeland, Mark A; Regensteiner, Judith G; Jaramillo, Sarah A; Gregg, Edward; Knowler, William C; Wagenknecht, Lynne E; Bahnson, Judy; Haffner, Steven; Hill, James; Hiatt, William R

    2009-01-01

    Many protocols have been used in clinical and research settings for collecting systolic blood pressure (SBP) measurements to calculate the ankle–brachial index (ABI); however, it is not known how useful it is to replicate measurements and which measures best reflect cardiovascular risk. Standardized measurements of ankle and arm SBP from 5140 overweight or obese individuals with type 2 diabetes were used to estimate sources of variation. Measurement characteristics of leg-specific ABI, as calculated using a standard algorithm based on the highest SBP of the dorsalis pedis or posterior tibial arteries, were projected using simulations. Coefficients of variability ranged from 2% to 3% when single SBP measurements were used and ABI was overestimated by 2–3%. Taking two SBP measurements at each site reduced standard errors and bias each by 30–40%. The sensitivity of detecting low ABI ranges exceeded 90% for ABI within 0.05 of the 0.90 clinical cut-point. The average and the minimum of the two (i.e. right and left) leg-specific ABI values had similar U-shaped relationships with Framingham risk scores; however, the average leg ABI had slightly greater precision. Replicating SBP measurements reduces the error and bias of ABI. Averaging leg-specific values may increase power for characterizing cardiovascular disease risk. PMID:18687759

  15. A case of relapsing-remitting facial palsy and ipsilateral brachial plexopathy caused by HSV-1.

    PubMed

    Alstadhaug, Karl B; Kvarenes, Hanne W; Prytz, Jan; Vedeler, Christian

    2016-05-01

    The etiologies of Bell's palsy and brachial neuritis remain uncertain, and the conditions rarely co-occur or reoccur. Here we present a woman in her twenties who had several relapsing-remitting episodes with left-sided facial palsy and brachial neuropathy. The episodes always started with painful left-sided oral blisters. Repeat PCRs HSV-1 DNA from oral vesicular lesions were positive. Extensive screening did not reveal any other underlying cause. Findings on MRI T2-weighted brachial plexus STIR images, using a 3.0-Tesla scanner during an episode, were compatible with brachial plexus neuritis. Except a mannose-binding lectin deficiency, a congenital complement deficiency that is frequently found in the general Caucasian population, no other immunodeficiency was demonstrated in our patient. In vitro resistance to acyclovir was tested negative, but despite prophylactic treatment with the drug in high doses, relapses recurred. To our knowledge, this is the first ever reported documentation of relapsing-remitting facial and brachial plexus neuritis caused by HSV-1. PMID:26991053

  16. Above Elbow Amputation Under Brachial Plexus Block at Supraclavicular and Interscalene Levels

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Hassan; Yadagiri, Manjula; Macrosson, Duncan; Majeed, Amer

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The brachial plexus block is a commonly performed procedure in the anesthetic practice today. It is performed for analgesia as well as anesthesia for upper limb procedures. It has been used for amputation and replantation surgeries of the upper limb. Case presentation: We present the case of a 68-year-old gentleman who had brachial plexus block at supraclavicular and interscalene levels as the sole anesthetic for undergoing above elbow amputation. He was deemed to be very high risk for a general anesthetic as he suffered from severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and a very poor exercise tolerance (NYHA Class III). The supraclavicular brachial plexus block was supplemented with an interscalene brachial plexus block due to inadequate surgical anesthesia encountered with the former. The procedure was successfully completed under regional anesthesia. Conclusions: The brachial plexus block can be performed at different levels in the same patient to achieve desired results, while employing sound anatomical knowledge and adhering to the maximum safe dose limit of the local anesthetic. PMID:26705518

  17. Comparision of nerve stimulator and ultrasonography as the techniques applied for brachial plexus anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Brachial plexus block is useful for upper extremity surgery, and many techniques are available. The aim of our study was to compare the efficacy of axillary brachial plexus block using an ultrasound technique to the peripheral nerve stimulation technique. Methods 60 patients scheduled for surgery of the forearm or hand were randomly allocated into two groups (n = 30 per group). For Group 1; US, and for Group 2 PNS was applied. The quality and the onset of the sensorial and motor blockade were assessed. The sensorial blockade, motor blockade time and quality of blockade were compared among the cases. Results The time needed to perform the axillary brachial plexus block averaged is similar in both groups (p > 0.05). Although not significant statistically, it was observed that the sensory block had formed earlier in Group 1 (p > 0.05). But the degree of motor blockade was intenser in Group 1 than in Group 2 (p < 0.05). Conclusions Ultrasound offers a new possibility for identifiying the nerves of the brachial plexus for regional anesthesia. The ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block is a safe method with faster onset time and better quality of motor blockade compared to peripheral nerve stimulation technique. PMID:21255404

  18. Carotid artery surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Carotid endarterectomy; CAS surgery; Carotid artery stenosis - surgery; Endarterectomy - carotid artery ... through the catheter around the blocked area during surgery. Your carotid artery is opened. The surgeon removes ...

  19. Arterial Stiffening and Clinical Outcomes in Dialysis Patients.

    PubMed

    Kato, Akihiko

    2015-09-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in dialysis patients. Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) is more efficient to handily assess arteriosclerosis than aortic PWV. The cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI) is also a novel blood pressure-independent arterial stiffness parameter. In dialysis patients, both baPWV and CAVI are increased compared to general subjects. Several studies have demonstrated that increased baPWV is associated with carotid atherosclerosis and diastolic left ventricular dysfunction in hemodialysis (HD) patients. In addition, higher baPWV is related to all-cause and cardiovascular (CV) mortality. CAVI is similarly associated with CVD. However, baPWV is superior to CAVI as a predictor of CV outcomes in HD patients. Besides these outcomes, a close relationship exists between sarcopenia, abdominal visceral obesity and arterial stiffening. Reduction of thigh muscle mass is inversely correlated with baPWV and CAVI in males. Abdominal fatness is also associated with increased arterial stiffness in females. These observations provide further evidence of higher risk of CV events in HD patients with sarcopenic obesity. In addition, arterial stiffness is associated with cerebral small vessel disease and decreased cognitive function in the elderly. However, it is unknown whether arterial stiffness may be useful as an early indicator of cognitive decline in dialysis patients. Because dialysis patients are at risk of developing dementia, more studies are needed to elucidate the causal link between arterial stiffness and cognitive impairment. PMID:26587457

  20. Percutaneous Endovascular Treatment of Chronic Iliac Artery Occlusion

    SciTech Connect

    Carnevale, F. C. De Blas, Mariano; Merino, Santiago; Egana, Jose M.; Caldas, Jose G.M.P.

    2004-09-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical and radiological long-term results of recanalization of chronic occluded iliac arteries with balloon angioplasty and stent placement.Methods: Sixty-nine occluded iliac arteries (mean length 8.1 cm; range 4-16 cm) in 67 patients were treated by percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stent placement. Evaluations included clinical assesment according to Fontaine stages, Doppler examinations with ankle-brachial index (ABI) and bilateral lower extremity arteriograms. Wallstent and Cragg vascular stents were inserted for iliac artery recanalization under local anesthesia. Follow-up lasted 1-83 months (mean 29.5 months).Results: Technical success rate was 97.1% (67 of 69). The mean ABI increased from 0.46 to 0.85 within 30 days after treatment and was 0.83 at the most recent follow-up. Mean hospitalization time was 2 days and major complications included arterial thrombosis (3%), arterial rupture (3%) and distal embolization (1%). During follow-up 6% stenosis and 9% thrombosis of the stents were observed. Clinical improvement occurred in 92% of patients. Primary and secondary patency rates were 75% and 95%, respectively.Conclusion: The long-term patency rates and clinical benefits suggest that percutaneous endovascular revascularization with metallic stents is a safe and effective treatment for patients with chronic iliac artery occlusion.

  1. Hand Function in Children with an Upper Brachial Plexus Birth Injury: Results of the Nine-Hole Peg Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Immerman, Igor; Alfonso, Daniel T.; Ramos, Lorna E.; Grossman, Leslie A.; Alfonso, Israel; Ditaranto, Patricia; Grossman, John A. I.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate hand function in children with Erb upper brachial plexus palsy. Method: Hand function was evaluated in 25 children (eight males; 17 females) with a diagnosed upper (C5/C6) brachial plexus birth injury. Of these children, 22 had undergone primary nerve reconstruction and 13 of the 25 had undergone…

  2. Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy for Children with Obstetric Brachial Plexus Palsy: Two Single-Case Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buesch, Francisca Eugster

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this pilot study was to investigate the feasibility of constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) in children with obstetric brachial plexus palsy and receive preliminary information about functional improvements. Two patients (age 12 years) with obstetric brachial plexus palsy were included for a 126-h home-based CIMT…

  3. Characteristic features of hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy (HNPP) presenting with brachial plexopathy in soldiers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoung-Eun

    2014-11-15

    A brachial plexus lesion is not common in hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy (HNPP). We report the clinical and electrodiagnostic features of young soldiers with HNPP presenting with brachial plexopathy. By reviewing 2year medical records from Korean military hospitals, we identified soldiers with brachial plexus lesions. Among them, patients diagnosed with HNPP were determined and clinical and electrophysiological findings were compared between HNPP and non-HNPP patients with a brachial plexus lesion. Thirteen patients (6.8%) were diagnosed with HNPP among 189 patients with a brachial plexus lesion. Push-ups, as either a punishment or an exercise, was the most frequent preceding event in HNPP patients (76.9%), whereas it was rare in non-HNPP patients. The distal motor latency of the median nerve showed the highest sensitivity (90.9%) and specificity (100%) for HNPP in patients with a brachial plexus lesion. In conclusion, HNPP should be suspected in patients with brachial plexopathy if brachial plexopathy develops after push-ups or if the distal motor latency of median nerves is prolonged.

  4. Characteristic features of hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy (HNPP) presenting with brachial plexopathy in soldiers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoung-Eun

    2014-11-15

    A brachial plexus lesion is not common in hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsy (HNPP). We report the clinical and electrodiagnostic features of young soldiers with HNPP presenting with brachial plexopathy. By reviewing 2year medical records from Korean military hospitals, we identified soldiers with brachial plexus lesions. Among them, patients diagnosed with HNPP were determined and clinical and electrophysiological findings were compared between HNPP and non-HNPP patients with a brachial plexus lesion. Thirteen patients (6.8%) were diagnosed with HNPP among 189 patients with a brachial plexus lesion. Push-ups, as either a punishment or an exercise, was the most frequent preceding event in HNPP patients (76.9%), whereas it was rare in non-HNPP patients. The distal motor latency of the median nerve showed the highest sensitivity (90.9%) and specificity (100%) for HNPP in patients with a brachial plexus lesion. In conclusion, HNPP should be suspected in patients with brachial plexopathy if brachial plexopathy develops after push-ups or if the distal motor latency of median nerves is prolonged. PMID:25175852

  5. Abnormally Low or High Ankle-Brachial Index Is Associated with Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy in Type 2 Diabetic Mellitus Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Szu-Chia; Hsiao, Pi-Jung; Huang, Jiun-Chi; Lin, Kun-Der; Hsu, Wei-Hao; Lee, Yu-Li; Lee, Mei-Yueh; Chang, Jer-Ming; Shin, Shyi–Jang

    2015-01-01

    Although some studies have reported that low ankle-brachial index (ABI) is associated with diabetic retinopathy (DR) in diabetic patients, it remains controversial as to which stage of DR. The aim of this study is to assess whether peripheral artery disease (PAD), indicated by abnormally low or high ABI, is associated with different stages of DR in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM), and further evaluate the risk factors. A total of 2001 (858 men and 1143 women) patients with type 2 DM who underwent ABI measurement in an outpatient clinic were enrolled. PAD was defined as ABI < 0.9 or ≧ 1.3 in either leg. DR was classified as non-DR, nonproliferative DR and proliferative DR stages. The clinical data were analyzed and the risk factors for abnormal ABI were determined by multivariate logistic regression analysis. The prevalence of ABI < 0.9 or ≧ 1.3 was 3.0%. Multivariate forward logistic regression analysis identified proliferative DR (vs. non-DR) was associated with abnormal ABI (odds ratio, 1.718; 95% confidence interval, 1.152 to 2.562; p = 0.008), but nonproliferative DR was not. Furthermore, the presence of coronary artery disease, cerebrovascular disease, declining renal function and patients without diuretics use were associated with abnormal ABI in patients with proliferative DR. Our study in patients of type 2 DM demonstrated that PAD was associated with proliferative DR. We emphasize the recommendation of performing the ABI test in this population at risk. PMID:26230390

  6. Development of the arterial pattern in the upper limb of staged human embryos: normal development and anatomic variations

    PubMed Central

    RODRÍGUEZ-NIEDENFÜHR, M.; BURTON, G. J.; DEU, J.; SAÑUDO, J. R.

    2001-01-01

    A total of 112 human embryos (224 upper limbs) between stages 12 and 23 of development were examined. It was observed that formation of the arterial system in the upper limb takes place as a dual process. An initial capillary plexus appears from the dorsal aorta during stage 12 and develops at the same rate as the limb. At stage 13, the capillary plexus begins a maturation process involving the enlargement and differentiation of selected parts. This remodelling process starts in the aorta and continues in a proximal to distal sequence. By stage 15 the differentiation has reached the subclavian and axillary arteries, by stage 17 it has reached the brachial artery as far as the elbow, by stage 18 it has reached the forearm arteries except for the distal part of the radial, and finally by stage 21 the whole arterial pattern is present in its definitive morphology. This differentiation process parallels the development of the skeletal system chronologically. A number of arterial variations were observed, and classified as follows: superficial brachial (7.7%), accessory brachial (0.6%), brachioradial (14%), superficial brachioulnar (4.7%), superficial brachioulnoradial (0.7%), palmar pattern of the median (18.7%) and superficial brachiomedian (0.7%) arteries. They were observed in embryos belonging to stages 17–23 and were not related to a specific stage of development. Statistical comparison with the rates of variations reported in adults did not show significant differences. It is suggested that the variations arise through the persistence, enlargement and differentiation of parts of the initial network which would normally remain as capillaries or even regress. PMID:11693301

  7. Angioplasty and stent placement -- peripheral arteries

    MedlinePlus

    Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty - peripheral artery; PTA - peripheral artery; Angioplasty - peripheral arteries; Iliac artery -angioplasty; Femoral artery - angioplasty; Popliteal artery - angioplasty; Tibial artery - angioplasty; ...

  8. Reversal of phantom pain and hand-to-face remapping after brachial plexus avulsion.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Jack W; Finn, Sacha B; Miller, Matthew E

    2016-06-01

    Following left brachial plexus avulsion, a 20-year-old man had phantom limb pain and remapping of sensation from his paralyzed hand onto his face. Mirror therapy (15 min daily, 5 days/week) led immediately to good movement of the phantom limb with decreased pain. Within 2 weeks following nerve graft surgery, remapping of hand sensation onto the face disappeared along with resolution of phantom limb pain. Mirror therapy coupled with nerve grafting may relieve phantom limb pain due to brachial plexus avulsion and reverse hand-to-face remapping, suggesting that both peripheral and central mechanisms mediate development of phantom limb pain and cortical reorganization/neuroplasticity after brachial plexus avulsion. PMID:27547774

  9. A new rat model of neuropathic pain: complete brachial plexus avulsion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Le; Yuzhou, Liu; Yingjie, Zhou; Jie, Lao; Xin, Zhao

    2015-03-01

    Brachial plexus avulsion (BPA) is one of the major injuries in motor vehicle accidents and may result in neuropathic pain. Accumulating evidence suggests that 30-80% of BPA developed neuropathic pain in human. In our study, complete brachial plexus avulsion (C5-T1) rats model leads to the results that 37.5% of rats had long-lasting (up to 6 months) mechanical allodynia and cold allodynia. We observed the activation of astrocyte and microglial in cervical spinal cord after BPA. Complete brachial plexus avulsion mimics human nerve root traction injury following traffic accidents. The complete BPA rat model approach human injuries and can be used for further investigations. PMID:25596440

  10. Does C5 or C6 Radiculopathy Affect the Signal Intensity of the Brachial Plexus on Magnetic Resonance Neurography?

    PubMed

    Seo, Tae Gyu; Kim, Du Hwan; Kim, In-Soo; Son, Eun Seok

    2016-04-01

    Patients with C5 or C6 radiculopathy complain of shoulder area pain or shoulder girdle weakness. Typical idiopathic neuralgic amyotrophy (INA) is also characterized by severe shoulder pain, followed by paresis of shoulder girdle muscles. Recent studies have demonstrated that magnetic resonance neurography (MRN) of the brachial plexus and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the shoulder in patients with INA show high signal intensity (HSI) or thickening of the brachial plexus and changes in intramuscular denervation of the shoulder girdle. We evaluated the value of brachial plexus MRN and shoulder MRI in four patients with typical C5 or C6 radiculopathy. HSI of the brachial plexus was noted in all patients and intramuscular changes were observed in two patients who had symptoms over 4 weeks. Our results suggest that HSI or thickening of the brachial plexus and changes in intramuscular denervation of the shoulder girdle on MRN and MRI may not be specific for INA. PMID:27152289

  11. Does C5 or C6 Radiculopathy Affect the Signal Intensity of the Brachial Plexus on Magnetic Resonance Neurography?

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Tae Gyu; Kim, In-Soo; Son, Eun Seok

    2016-01-01

    Patients with C5 or C6 radiculopathy complain of shoulder area pain or shoulder girdle weakness. Typical idiopathic neuralgic amyotrophy (INA) is also characterized by severe shoulder pain, followed by paresis of shoulder girdle muscles. Recent studies have demonstrated that magnetic resonance neurography (MRN) of the brachial plexus and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the shoulder in patients with INA show high signal intensity (HSI) or thickening of the brachial plexus and changes in intramuscular denervation of the shoulder girdle. We evaluated the value of brachial plexus MRN and shoulder MRI in four patients with typical C5 or C6 radiculopathy. HSI of the brachial plexus was noted in all patients and intramuscular changes were observed in two patients who had symptoms over 4 weeks. Our results suggest that HSI or thickening of the brachial plexus and changes in intramuscular denervation of the shoulder girdle on MRN and MRI may not be specific for INA. PMID:27152289

  12. A cadaveric microanatomical study of the fascicular topography of the brachial plexus.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Sumit; Prasad, G Lakshmi; Lalwani, Sanjeev

    2016-08-01

    OBJECT Mapping of the fascicular anatomy of the brachial plexus could provide the nerve surgeon with knowledge of fascicular orientation in spinal nerves of the brachial plexus. This knowledge might improve the surgical outcome of nerve grafting in brachial plexus injuries by anastomosing related fascicles and avoiding possible axonal misrouting. The objective of this study was to map the fascicular topography in the spinal nerves of the brachial plexus. METHODS The entire right-sided brachial plexus of 25 adult male cadavers was dissected, including all 5 spinal nerves (C5-T1), from approximately 5 mm distal to their exit from the intervertebral foramina, to proximal 1 cm of distal branches. All spinal nerves were tagged on the cranial aspect of their circumference using 10-0 nylon suture for orientation. The fascicular dissection of the C5-T1 spinal nerves was performed under microscopic magnification. The area occupied by different nerve fascicles was then expressed as a percentage of the total cross-sectional area of a spinal nerve. RESULTS The localization of fascicular groups was fairly consistent in all spinal nerves. Overall, 4% of the plexus supplies the suprascapular nerve, 31% supplies the medial cord (comprising the ulnar nerve and medial root of the median nerve [MN]), 27.2% supplies the lateral cord (comprising the musculocutaneous nerve and lateral root of the MN), and 37.8% supplies the posterior cord (comprising the axillary and radial nerves). CONCLUSIONS The fascicular dissection and definitive anatomical localization of fascicular groups is feasible in plexal spinal nerves. The knowledge of exact fascicular location might be translatable to the operating room and can be used to anastomose related fascicles in brachial plexus surgery, thereby avoiding the possibility of axonal misrouting and improving the results of plexal reconstruction.

  13. Outcome in adolescence of brachial plexus birth palsy

    PubMed Central

    Hulleberg, Gunn; Elvrum, Ann-Kristin G; Brandal, Merethe; Vik, Torstein

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose — The frequency and severity of a permanent lesion after brachial plexus birth palsy (BPBP) and its impact on activities of daily living are not well documented. We therefore investigated the outcome of BPBP in adolescents, regarding arm function and consequences for activity and participation. Participants and methods — Of 30,574 babies born at St. Olavs University Hospital in 1991–2000, 91 had BPBP (prevalence 3 per 1,000), and 69 of these individuals were examined at a median age of 14 (10–20) years. The examination included the modified Mallet classification, range of motion, shoulder rotation and grip strength, Assisting Hand Assessment, and Canadian Occupational Performance Measure. Of the 22 subjects who were not examined, 3 could not be traced and 19 reported having no problems in the affected arm. Results — At follow-up, 17 adolescents had a permanent lesion (i.e. individual Mallet subscore below 4) with a median Mallet total score of 15 (9–19), while 52 had good or normal shoulder function (median Mallet total score 25 (23–25)). All participants with a permanent lesion had reduced active shoulder rotation (≤ 15°), 16 had elbow extension deficit, and 10 had subnormal grip strength. External rotation was considerably weaker in the affected shoulder. In addition, they had ineffective use of the affected arm in bimanual activities. Even so, all except 1 were independent in activities of daily living, although 15 experienced minor difficulties. Interpretation — Every fourth to fifth child with BPBP had a permanent lesion as an adolescent. External rotation was the most impaired movement. Despite ineffective use of the affected arm in bimanual activities, all of the participants except one were independent in activities of daily living. PMID:25238434

  14. Hereditary Neuropathy with Liability to Pressure Palsy Presenting as an Acute Brachial Plexopathy: A Lover's Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Wedderburn, Sarah; Pateria, Puraskar; Panegyres, Peter K.

    2014-01-01

    It is generally regarded that patients with hereditary neuropathy to pressure palsies, due to a deletion in the PMP22 gene, show recurrent pressure palsy and generalised peripheral neuropathy (pes cavus and hammer toes sometimes develop). Brachial plexopathy is rarely identified as a first presentation of hereditary neuropathy to pressure palsies. We describe a young man who developed a painless flail upper limb with a clinical diagnosis of a brachial plexopathy after his partner slept on his arm – a PMP22 deletion was found. His father, who had a symmetrical polyneuropathy without recurrent mononeuropathies, shared the PMP22 deletion. PMID:25685136

  15. Regional block anesthesia in a patient with factor V Leiden mutation and axillary artery occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Erkalp, Kerem; Comlekci, Mevlut; Inan, Bekir; Basaranoglu, Gokcen; Ozdemir, Haluk; Saidoglu, Leyla

    2011-01-01

    Anesthetic management of patients with coagulation disorders presents safety and technical challenges. This case describes a 58-year-old woman with factor V Leiden mutation who required distal saphenous vein harvest and axillo-brachial bypass to treat axillary artery occlusion. The patient underwent surgery with satisfactory anesthesia using infraclavicular brachial plexus block, thoracic paravertebral block, and unilateral subarachnoid block. These three regional anesthetic interventions were performed in lieu of general anesthesia to minimize risks of thrombotic events, pain, and to decrease recovery time. Despite higher failure rates of regional anesthesia, longer time required for procedures, and added discomforts during surgery, the benefits may outweigh risks for selected high-risk patients, including those with factor V Leiden mutations. PMID:22915885

  16. [Subclavian artery stenting using gadolinium contrast medium in a case with iodine allergy].

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Michiyuki; Asano, Takeshi; Osanai, Toshiya; Endo, Shogo; Nakayama, Naoki; Kuroda, Satoshi; Houkin, Kiyohiro

    2012-05-01

    The authors reported a subclavian artery stenting (SAS) using gadolinium contrast medium. The patient was a 65-year-old female who presented dizziness and right upper extremity pain with movement. Digital subtraction angiography revealed right subclavian artery occlusion with subclavian steal phenomenon. We tried to treat this lesion using SAS. However, iodinated contrast medium caused the allergy in this patient and the treatment was discontinued. Therefore, SAS was performed with gadolinium contrast medium. Using gadolinium contrast medium, it is possible to confirm large arteries like innominate artery and subclavian artery. The stenting procedure was performed without complication. The usage of gadolinium contrast medium has the limit and some strategies are important to reduce the usage of gadolinium contrast medium in SAS. First, PercuSurge GuardWire® was placed in the right internal carotid artery to confirm the anatomy, to decide working angle, and to treat the common carotid artery in case of dissection. Second, a "U" shaped guide wire was placed in the distal end from the brachial artery. Guide wire from femoral side was able to pass the lesion at midpoint of the "U" shaped one. SAS using gadolinium contrast medium may be an alternative treatment if a patient with subclavian artery stenosis or occlusion is allergic to iodinated contrast medium.

  17. Assessment of variation in depth of brachial plexus using ultrasound for supraclavicular brachial plexus block in patients undergoing elective upper limb surgery

    PubMed Central

    Mistry, Tuhin; Mangal, Vandana; Sharma, Gaurav; Agrawal, Aachu

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Supraclavicular approach to the brachial plexus may be associated with complications such as pneumothorax, inadvertent vascular puncture, inter-scalene block and neurovascular injuries. The present study was conceived to find out the variation in depth of brachial plexus to suggest the minimum length of needle required to effectively perform the block, thus preventing possible complications. Methods: After approval from our Institutional Ethical Committee, informed and written consent was obtained from each of the ninety American Society of Anesthesiologists Physical Status I and II patients recruited, of either sex in the age group of 20–50 years. Supraclavicular fossa was scanned using a high-frequency linear probe, and the distances (shortest distance [SD] from skin to the most superficial neural element and longest distance [LD] from skin to the most deep neural element) were measured using on-screen callipers on optimal frozen image. Pearson correlation was used to find out the relation between these two distances and demographic parameters. Results: Mean SD was 0.60 ± 0.262 cm, and mean LD was found to be 1.34 ± 0.385 cm. We observed significant correlation between these two distances with weight and body mass index (BMI). Conclusion: Significant correlation was observed between SD and LD with weight and BMI. We suggest that a needle with a shaft length of 3 cm will be sufficient to reach the sheath of the brachial plexus during performance of the block. PMID:27330200

  18. Arterial stiffness of lifelong Japanese female pearl divers.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hirofumi; Tomoto, Tsubasa; Kosaki, Keisei; Sugawara, Jun

    2016-05-15

    Japanese female pearl divers called Ama specialize in free diving in the cold sea for collecting foods and pearls in oysters. Exercising in the water combined with marked bradycardia and pressor responses provides a circulatory challenge to properly buffer or cushion elevated cardiac pulsations. Because Ama perform repeated free dives throughout their lives, it is possible that they may have adapted similar arterial structure and function to those seen in diving mammals. We compared arterial stiffness of lifelong Japanese pearl divers with age-matched physically inactive adults living in the same fishing villages. A total of 115 Japanese female pearl divers were studied. Additionally, 50 physically inactive adults as well as 33 physically active adults (participating in community fitness programs) living in the same coastal villages were also studied. There were no differences in age (∼65 yr), body mass index, and brachial blood pressure between the groups. Measures of arterial stiffness, cardio-ankle vascular index and β-stiffness index were lower (P < 0.05) in pearl divers and physically active adults than in their physically inactive peers. Augmentation pressure and augmentation index adjusted for the heart rate of 75 beats/min were lower (P < 0.05) in pearl divers than in other groups. These results indicate that lifelong Japanese pearl divers demonstrate reduced arterial stiffness and arterial wave reflection compared with age-matched physically inactive peers living in the same fishing villages. PMID:26984889

  19. rt-PA Thrombolysis in Acute Thromboembolic Upper-Extremity Arterial Occlusion

    SciTech Connect

    Cejna, Manfred; Salomonowitz, Erich; Wohlschlager, Helmut; Zwrtek, Karin; Boeck, Rudolf; Zwrtek, Ronald

    2001-07-15

    Purpose: Retrospective analysis of the results of rt-PA thrombolysis in the treatment of acute thromboembolic occlusion of the upper limb.Methods: Of 55 patients with demonstrated acute embolic arterial occlusion, rt-PA thrombolysis was performed on 40 occlusions in 38 patients (23 women with a mean age of 62 years, range 32-85 years; 15 men with a mean age of 65 years, range 32-92 years) according to the following design: 6 mg rt-PA/hr for 30 min, 3 mg rt-PA/hr for the next 30 min, 1 mg rt-PA/hr for 7 hr, and 0.4 mg rt-PA/hr until the end of lysis. Onset of symptoms varied from 1 to 14 days. Included were three isolated upper-arm occlusions, nine combined brachial and forearm occlusions, and 28 forearm and hand artery occlusions.Results: The overall success rate was 55%. The lysis results for isolated upper arm, combined brachial and forearm occlusions, and forearm and hand artery occlusions were 100%, 66%, and 46%, respectively. In eight patients surgical embolectomy had to be performed after failed thrombolysis. No amputation was required in the follow-up period. No lethal complications occurred.Conclusions: Interventional rt-PA treatment of proximal upper-extremity arterial occlusions may be performed with comparable success rates to surgical embolectomy and without severe complications. For distal occlusions the results are inferior to the success rates obtained with surgery.

  20. Endovascular management of isolated axillary artery aneurysm--a case report.

    PubMed

    Vijayvergiya, Rajesh; Kumar, Rohit Manoj; Ranjit, Arun; Grover, Anil

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report a case of axillary artery aneurysm, successfully treated by percutaneous transfemoral self-expandable polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) covered Wallgraft stent. A 20-year-old man presented with sudden-onset, severe aching pain of left upper limb that occurred while doing isometric exercise. He had feeble left brachial and radial pulses. Angiography revealed a 21 x 14 mm left axillary artery aneurysm with a 15 mm neck. There was an organized clot in the midpart of the left brachial artery. The aneurysm was successfully closed with a self-expandable 10 x 30 mm Wallgraft endoprosthesis PTFE graft stent, via the right femoral route. A check angiogram at 6 weeks of follow-up showed a patent stent with no endovascular leak. At 1 year of follow-up, the patient was asymptomatic with normal upper limbs pulsations. Axillary artery aneurysm may be treated with a stent graft, which is an effective, rapid, and definite treatment and is an acceptable alternative to standard open surgical repair.

  1. Radiation-induced brachial plexopathy: Neurological follow-up in 161 recurrence-free breast cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, N.K.; Pfeiffer, P.; Johannsen, L.; Schroder, H.; Rose, C. )

    1993-04-30

    The purpose was to assess the incidence and clinical manifestations of radiation-induced brachial plexopathy in breast cancer patients, treated according to the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group protocols. One hundred and sixty-one recurrence-free breast cancer patients were examined for radiation-induced brachial plexopathy after a median follow-up period of 50 months (13-99 months). After total mastectomy and axillary node sampling, high-risk patients were randomized to adjuvant therapy. One hundred twenty-eight patients were treated with postoperative radiotherapy with 50 Gy in 25 daily fractions over 5 weeks. In addition, 82 of these patients received cytotoxic therapy (cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, and 5-fluorouracil) and 46 received tamoxifen. Five percent and 9% of the patients receiving radiotherapy had disabling and mild radiation-induced brachial plexopathy, respectively. Radiation-induced brachial plexopathy was more frequent in patients receiving cytotoxic therapy (p = 0.04) and in younger patients (p = 0.04). The clinical manifestations were paraesthesia (100%), hypaesthesia (74%), weakness (58%), decreased muscle stretch reflexes (47%), and pain (47%). The brachial plexus is more vulnerable to large fraction size. Fractions of 2 Gy or less are advisable. Cytotoxic therapy adds to the damaging effect of radiotherapy. Peripheral nerves in younger patients seems more vulnerable. Radiation-induced brachial plexopathy occurs mainly as diffuse damage to the brachial plexus. 24 refs., 9 tabs.

  2. A Novel Approach to Brachial Plexus Catheter Management: A Brachial Plexus Test Dose for Phrenic Nerve Paralysis and Patient-Controlled, Demand-Only Dosing for a Patient With Extreme Obesity.

    PubMed

    Meier, Adam W; Lin, Shin-E; Hanson, Neil A; Auyong, David B

    2016-09-15

    A 53-year-old woman with extreme obesity (body mass index = 82 kg/m) presented for an open reduction and internal fixation of the proximal humerus. This report describes the novel management of her continuous brachial plexus catheter in the setting of her comorbidities. Phrenic nerve paralysis from brachial plexus blocks can cause clinically significant dyspnea in obese patients. Brachial plexus catheters can be used effectively for these patients with some modification to routine management. We detail our use of a short-acting chloroprocaine test dose for phrenic paralysis and demand-only dosing to provide effective analgesia while avoiding respiratory complications associated with these blocks. PMID:27464944

  3. Luxation de l’épaule compliquée de paralysie du plexus brachial

    PubMed Central

    Lukulunga, Loubet Unyendje; Moussa, Abdou Kadri; Mahfoud, Mustapha; EL Bardouni, Ahmed; Berrada, Mohamed Saleh; El Yaacoubi, Moradh

    2014-01-01

    Les auteurs rapportent l'observation d'une paralysie totale du plexus brachial survenue trois mois après un épisode de luxation antéro-interne sous coracoïdienne associée à une fracture du trochiter chez une patiente âgée de 88 ans. PMID:25426187

  4. Valproic acid protection against the brachial plexus root avulsion-induced death of motoneurons in rats.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dianxiu; Li, Qiang; Zhu, Xiaojuan; Wu, Guangzhi; Cui, Shusen

    2013-10-01

    In this study, the role of valproic acid (VPA) in protecting motoneuron after brachial plexus root avulsion was investigated in adult rats. Sixty rats were used in this study, and underwent the brachial plexus root avulsion injury, which was created by using a micro-hemostat forceps to pull out brachial plexus root from the intervertebral foramen. The animals were divided into two groups, VPA group administered with VPA dissolved in drinking water (300 mg/kg) daily, and control group had drinking water every day. The spinal cords (C5-T1) were harvested at day 1, 2, 3, 7, 14, and 28 for immunohistochemistry analysis, TUNEL staining, Nissl staining, and electron microscopy, respectively. The results showed that with VPA administration, the survival of motoneurons was promoted and the cell apoptosis was inhibited. The number of c-Jun and Bcl-2 positive motoneurons was increased immediately after avulsion both in control and VPA group, however, the percent of c-Jun positive motoneurons was decreased and the percent of Bcl-2 positive motoneurons was increased by VPA treatment significantly. Our results indicated that motoneurons were protected by VPA against cell death induced by brachial plexus root avulsion through c-Jun inhibition and Bcl-2 induction. PMID:23843283

  5. Brachial plexus injury management in military casualties: who, what, when, why, and how.

    PubMed

    Chambers, James A; Hiles, Claire L; Keene, Brian P

    2014-06-01

    The Global War on Terrorism has achieved an unprecedented 90% casualty survival rate because of far forward surgical support, rapid transport, and body armor. Despite the remarkable protection body armor affords, peripheral nerve injuries continue to occur. The brachial plexus in particular is still susceptible to penetrating trauma through the axilla as well as blunt mechanisms. We report 1,818 individuals with reported cases of peripheral nerve injury, 97 of which had brachial plexus injury incident from Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom. We suspect that true prevalence is higher as initial focus on vascular and orthopedic reconstruction in complex shoulder injuries may overlook brachial plexus lesions. Accordingly, emergency physicians, general and orthopedic trauma surgeons, and vascular surgeons should all consider the possibility of brachial plexus and other peripheral nerve injury for early and appropriate referral to surgeons (plastic, orthopedic, or neurosurgical) for further evaluation and reconstruction. The latter group should be familiar with appropriate modern diagnostic and initial as well as salvage therapeutic options.

  6. Cost analysis of brachial plexus injuries: variability of compensation by insurance companies before and after surgery.

    PubMed

    Felici, N; Zaami, S; Ciancolini, G; Marinelli, E; Tagliente, D; Cannatà, C

    2014-04-01

    Traumatic paralysis of the brachial plexus is an extremely disabling pathology. The type of trauma most frequently suffered by this group of patients is due to motorcycle injuries. It therefore affects a population of young patients. In the majority of cases, these patients receive compensation for permanent damage from insurance companies. Surgery of the brachial plexus enables various forms of functional recovery, depending on the number of roots of the brachial plexus involved in the injury. The aim of this study is to compare the functional deficit and the extent of the related compensation before and after surgical intervention, and to evaluate the saving in economic terms (understood as the cost of compensation paid by insurance companies) obtainable through surgical intervention. The authors analysed the functional recovery obtained through surgery in 134 patients divided into 4 groups on the basis of the number of injured roots. The levels of compensation payable to the patient before surgical intervention, and 3 years after, were then compared. The results showed that the saving obtainable through surgical treatment of brachial plexus injuries may exceed 65% of the economic value of the compensation that would have been attributable to the same patients if they had not undergone surgical treatment.

  7. Valproic acid protects neurons and promotes neuronal regeneration after brachial plexus avulsion

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiang; Wu, Dianxiu; Li, Rui; Zhu, Xiaojuan; Cui, Shusen

    2013-01-01

    Valproic acid has been shown to exert neuroprotective effects and promote neurite outgrowth in several peripheral nerve injury models. However, whether valproic acid can exert its beneficial effect on neurons after brachial plexus avulsion injury is currently unknown. In this study, brachial plexus root avulsion models, established in Wistar rats, were administered daily with valproic acid dissolved in drinking water (300 mg/kg) or normal water. On days 1, 2, 3, 7, 14 and 28 after avulsion injury, tissues of the C5–T1 spinal cord segments of the avulsion injured side were harvested to investigate the expression of Bcl-2, c-Jun and growth associated protein 43 by real-time PCR and western blot assay. Results showed that valproic acid significantly increased the expression of Bcl-2 and growth associated protein 43, and reduced the c-Jun expression after brachial plexus avulsion. Our findings indicate that valproic acid can protect neurons in the spinal cord and enhance neuronal regeneration following brachial plexus root avulsion. PMID:25206605

  8. Changes in Spinal Cord Architecture after Brachial Plexus Injury in the Newborn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korak, Klaus J.; Tam, Siu Lin; Gordon, Tessa; Frey, Manfred; Aszmann, Oskar C.

    2004-01-01

    Obstetric brachial plexus palsy is a devastating birth injury. While many children recover spontaneously, 20-25% are left with a permanent impairment of the affected limb. So far, concepts of pathology and recovery have focused on the injury of the peripheral nerve. Proximal nerve injury at birth, however, leads to massive injury-induced…

  9. Constraining the brachial plexus does not compromise regional control in oropharyngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Accumulating evidence suggests that brachial plexopathy following head and neck cancer radiotherapy may be underreported and that this toxicity is associated with a dose–response. Our purpose was to determine whether the dose to the brachial plexus (BP) can be constrained, without compromising regional control. Methods The radiation plans of 324 patients with oropharyngeal carcinoma (OPC) treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) were reviewed. We identified 42 patients (13%) with gross nodal disease <1 cm from the BP. Normal tissue constraints included a maximum dose of 66 Gy and a D05 of 60 Gy for the BP. These criteria took precedence over planning target volume (PTV) coverage of nodal disease near the BP. Results There was only one regional failure in the vicinity of the BP, salvaged with neck dissection (ND) and regional re-irradiation. There have been no reported episodes of brachial plexopathy to date. Conclusions In combined-modality therapy, including ND as salvage, regional control did not appear to be compromised by constraining the dose to the BP. This approach may improve the therapeutic ratio by reducing the long-term risk of brachial plexopathy. PMID:23835205

  10. Bilateral brachial plexus blocks in a patient of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy with hypertensive crisis.

    PubMed

    Pai, Rohini V Bhat; Hegde, Harihar V; Santhosh, McB; Roopa, S; Deshpande, Shrinivas S; Rao, P Raghavendra

    2013-01-01

    Hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM) is a challenge to anesthesiologists due to the complex pathophysiology involved and various perioperative complications associated with it. We present a 50-year-old man, a known case of HOCM, who successfully underwent emergency haemostasis, and debridement of the traumatically amputated right upper limb and the contused lacerated wound on the left forearm under bilateral brachial plexus blocks. His co-morbidities included hypertension (in hypertensive crisis) and diabetes mellitus. He was full stomach and also had an anticipated difficult airway. The management included invasive pressure monitoring and labetalol infusion for emergent control of blood pressure. The regional anaesthesia technique required careful consideration to the dosage of local anaesthetics and staggered performance of brachial plexus blocks on each of the upper limbs to avoid local anaesthetic toxicity. Even though bilateral brachial plexus blocks are rarely indicated, it seemed to be the most appropriate anaesthetic technique in our patient. With careful consideration of the local anaesthetic toxicity and meticulous technique, bilateral brachial plexus blocks can be successfully performed in those patients where general anaesthesia is deemed to be associated with higher risk.

  11. Atypical leg symptoms: does routine measurement of the ankle brachial pressure index (ABPI) in primary care benefit patients?

    PubMed Central

    Oesterling, Christine; Kalia, Amun; Chetcuti, Thomas; Walker, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Managing patients with atypical leg symptoms in primary care can be problematic. Determining the ankle brachial pressure index (ABPI) may be readily performed to help diagnose peripheral arterial disease, but is often omitted where signs and symptoms are unclear. Question : Does routine measurement of ABPI in patients with atypical leg symptoms aid management increase satisfaction and safely reduce hospital referral? Methodology : Patients with atypical leg symptoms but no skin changes or neurological symptoms underwent clinical review and Doppler ABPI measurement (suspicious finding ≤ 1.0). Testing was performed by the same doctor (study period: 30 months). Patient outcomes were determined from practice records, hospital letters and a telephone survey. Results: The study comprised 35 consecutive patients (males: N = 15), mean age 64 years (range: 39–88). Presentation included pain, cold feet, cramps, irritation and concerns regarding circulation. Prior to ABPI measurement, referral was considered necessary in 10, not required in 22 and unclear in 3. ABPI changed the referral decision in 10 (29%) and confirmed the decision in 25 (71%). During the study, 10 (29%) patients were referred (9 vascular, 1 neurology). Amongst the vascular referrals, significant peripheral arterial disease has been confirmed in six patients. A further two patients are under review and one did not attend. To date, lack of referral in patients with atypical leg symptoms but a normal ABPI has not increased morbidity. Current status was assessed by telephone review in 16/35 (46% contact rate; mean 18 months, range 2–28). Fifteen patients (94%) appreciated that their symptoms had been quickly and conveniently assessed, 8/11 (73%) with a normal ABPI were reassured by their result and in 8/11 symptoms have resolved. Discussion/Conclusion : APBI conveniently aids management of atypical leg symptoms by detecting unexpected peripheral arterial disease, avoids

  12. The specific role of gravitational accelerations for arterial adaptations.

    PubMed

    Weber, Tobias; Ducos, Michel; Mulder, Edwin; Herrera, Frankyn; Brüggemann, Gert-Peter; Bloch, Wilhelm; Rittweger, Jörn

    2013-02-01

    It is mostly agreed that arterial adaptations occur, among others, in response to changes in mechanical stimuli. Models like bed rest, spinal cord injury, or limb suspension have been applied to study vascular adaptations to unloading in humans. However, these models cannot distinguish the role of muscle contractions and the role of gravitational accelerations for arterial adaptation. The HEPHAISTOS orthosis allows normal ambulation, while it significantly reduces force generation in the lower leg muscles. Eleven subjects wore HEPHAISTOS unilaterally for 56 days and were followed up for another 4 wk. Arterial diameters, intima media thickness (IMT), flow-mediated dilation (FMD), and resting blood flow (BF(rest)) were measured using high-frequency ultrasonography. Arterial adaptations were investigated in the superficial femoral artery (SFA), the brachial artery (BA), and the carotid artery (CA). Mean SFA resting diameter was decreased from 6.57 mm (SD = 0.74 mm) at baseline to 5.77 mm (SD = 0.87 mm) at the end of the intervention (P < 0.001), whereas SFA wall-to-lumen ratio, SFA BF(rest), and SFA FMD remained unaffected throughout the study. The application of HEPHAISTOS had no effect on structure and function of the systemic control sites, the BA, and the CA. Our findings highlight the importance of muscular contractions for arterial diameter adaptations. Moreover, we propose that FMD and wall-to-lumen ratio are unaffected by ambulating with the HEPHAISTOS orthosis, which is suggestive of habitual acceleration profiles in the lower leg constituting an important stimulus for the maintenance of FMD and wall-to-lumen ratio.

  13. Combined Spinal Cord Stimulation and Peripheral Nerve Stimulation for Brachial Plexopathy: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ji Hye; Choi, Shu Chung; Kim, Dong Kyu; Sung, Choon Ho; Chon, Jin Young; Hong, Sung Jin; Lee, Ji Young; Moon, Ho Sik

    2016-03-01

    Brachial plexopathy usually results from an iatrogenic brachial plexus injury and can sometimes cause severe chronic pain and disability. There are a number of possible treatments for this condition, including medication, physical therapy, nerve blocks, and neuromodulation, but they are not always successful. Recently, combined spinal cord stimulation (SCS) and peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) have been tried for various chronic pain diseases because of their different mechanisms of action.Here, we describe the case of a 54-year-old man who was diagnosed with brachial plexopathy 8 years ago. He underwent video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery to remove a superior mediastinal mass. However, his brachial plexus was damaged during the surgery. Although he had received various treatments, the pain did not improve. For the management of intractable severe pain, he underwent SCS 2 years ago, which initially reduced his pain from numeric rating scale (NRS) 10/10 to NRS 4 - 5/10, but the pain then gradually increased, reaching NRS 8/10, 6 months ago. At that time, he was refractory to other treatments, and we therefore applied PNS in combination with SCS. The PNS electrode was positioned on the radial nerve under ultrasound guidance. After combined PNS and SCS, his background pain disappeared, although a breakthrough pain (NRS 3 - 4/10) was caused intermittently by light touch. Furthermore, the patient's need for analgesics decreased, and he was satisfied with the outcome of this combined treatment. We concluded that combined SCS and PNS is a very useful treatment modality, which can stimulate the target nerve both directly and indirectly, and hence, relieve pain from brachial plexopathy. PMID:27008302

  14. Influence of Postprandial Hyperglycemic Conditions on Arterial Stiffness in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Gordin, Daniel; Saraheimo, Markku; Tuomikangas, Jaana; Soro-Paavonen, Aino; Forsblom, Carol; Paavonen, Karri; Steckel-Hamann, Birgit; Vandenhende, Francois; Nicolaou, Loizos; Pavo, Imre; Koivisto, Veikko

    2016-01-01

    Context: Patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) are at an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Objective: The objective of the study was to determine whether postprandial hyperglycemia affects arterial function in T2D. Design: A single-center, open-label study of three groups of men were studied: 1) T2D patients with albuminuria (n = 22), 2) T2D patients without albuminuria (n = 24), and 3) nondiabetic controls (n = 25). Patients were randomized to a two-period crossover study schedule, ingesting breakfast, with or without insulin lispro (to induce low or high postprandial glycemia). Main Outcome Measures: Arterial stiffness was assessed by calculating pulse wave velocity (PWV) and augmentation index using applanation tonometry, and endothelial dysfunction was assessed using peripheral arterial tonometry, 30 minutes before breakfast and up to 240 minutes after breakfast. Results: At baseline, arterial stiffness was increased in patients. When adjusted for age and body mass index, in a combined group of patients with and without albuminuria, brachial PWV was higher during low (P = .032) and high (P = .038) postprandial glycemia vs controls. These differences were driven by the albuminuria group vs controls during low (P = .014) and high (P = .018) postprandial glycemia. No differences were observed in aortic PWV, augmentation index, or peripheral arterial tonometry ratio between patients and controls. Endothelin-1 and IL-6 were higher, and superoxide dismutase was lower, during postprandial hyperglycemia in T2D patients vs controls. Conclusions: In patients with T2D and albuminuria, brachial PWV was higher under postprandial hyperglycemic conditions, relative to controls. These data suggest that hyperglycemia induces an increase in stiffness of intermediate-sized arteries. We found no changes in other parts of the arterial bed. PMID:26731258

  15. Impact of acute caffeine ingestion on endothelial function in subjects with and without coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Shechter, Michael; Shalmon, Guy; Scheinowitz, Mickey; Koren-Morag, Nira; Feinberg, Micha S; Harats, Dror; Sela, Ben Ami; Sharabi, Yehonatan; Chouraqui, Pierre

    2011-05-01

    Although coffee is a widely used, pharmacologically active beverage, its impact on the cardiovascular system is controversial. To explore the effect of acute caffeine ingestion on brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) in subjects without coronary artery disease (CAD; controls) and patients with CAD, we prospectively assessed brachial artery FMD in 40 controls and 40 age- and gender-matched patients with documented stable CAD on 2 separate mornings 1 week to 2 weeks apart. After overnight fasting, discontinuation of all medications for ≥12 hours, and absence of caffeine for >48 hours, participants received capsules with caffeine 200 mg or placebo. One hour after drug ingestion, participants underwent brachial artery FMD and nitroglycerin-mediated dilation (NTG) using high-resolution ultrasound. As expected, patients with CAD were more often diabetic, hypertensive, obese, dyslipidemic, and smoked more than controls (p <0.01 for all comparisons). Aspirin, Clopidogrel, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, β blockers, and statins were significantly more common in patients with CAD than in controls (p <0.01 for all comparisons). At baseline, FMD, but not NTG, was significantly lower in patients with CAD compared to controls. Acute caffeine ingestion significantly increased FMD (patients with CAD 5.6 ± 5.0% vs 14.6 ± 5.0%, controls 8.4 ± 2.9% vs 18.6 ± 6.8%, p <0.001 for all comparisons) but not NTG (patients with CAD 13.0 ± 5.2% vs 13.8 ± 6.1%, controls 12.9 ± 3.9% vs 13.9 ± 5.8%, p = NS for all comparisons) and significantly decreased high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (patients with CAD 2.6 ± 1.4 vs 1.4 ± 1.2 mg/L, controls 3.4 ± 3.0 vs 1.2 ± 1.0 mg/L, p <0.001 for all comparisons) in the 2 groups compared to placebo. In conclusion, acute caffeine ingestion significantly improved endothelial function assessed by brachial artery FMD in subjects with and without CAD and was associated with lower plasma markers of inflammation.

  16. Imaging of vascular dynamics within the foot using dynamic diffuse optical tomography to diagnose peripheral arterial disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, M. A.; Kim, H. K.; Hoi, J. W.; Kim, I.; Dayal, R.; Shrikande, G.; Hielscher, A. H.

    2013-03-01

    Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD) is the narrowing of the functional area of the artery generally due to atherosclerosis. It affects between 8-12 million people in the United States and if untreated this can lead to ulceration, gangrene and ultimately amputation. The current diagnostic method for PAD is the ankle-brachial index (ABI). The ABI is a ratio of the patient's systolic blood pressure in the foot to that of the brachial artery in the arm, a ratio below 0.9 is indicative of affected vasculature. However, this method is ineffective in patients with calcified arteries (diabetic and end-stage renal failure patients), which falsely elevates the ABI recording resulting in a false negative reading. In this paper we present our results in a pilot study to deduce optical tomography's ability to detect poor blood perfusion in the foot. We performed an IRB approved 30 patient study, where we imaged the feet of the enrolled patients during a five stage dynamic imaging sequence. The patients were split up into three groups: 10 healthy subjects, 10 PAD patients and 10 PAD patients with diabetes and they were imaged while applying a pressure cuff to their thigh. Differences in the magnitude of blood pooling in the foot and rate at which the blood pools in the foot are all indicative of arterial disease.

  17. Diagnostic Value and Surgical Implications of the 3D DW-SSFP MRI On the Management of Patients with Brachial Plexus Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Ben-Gang; Yang, Jian-Tao; Yang, Yi; Wang, Hong-Gang; Fu, Guo; Gu, Li-Qiang; Li, Ping; Zhu, Qing-Tang; Liu, Xiao-Lin; Zhu, Jia-Kai

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional diffusion-weighted steady-state free precession (3D DW-SSFP) of high-resolution magnetic resonance has emerged as a promising method to visualize the peripheral nerves. In this study, the application value of 3D DW-SSFP brachial plexus imaging in the diagnosis of brachial plexus injury (BPI) was investigated. 33 patients with BPI were prospectively examined using 3D DW-SSFP MR neurography (MRN) of brachial plexus. Results of 3D DW-SSFP MRN were compared with intraoperative findings and measurements of electromyogram (EMG) or somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) for each injured nerve root. 3D DW-SSFP MRN of brachial plexus has enabled good visualization of the small components of the brachial plexus. The postganglionic section of the brachial plexus was clearly visible in 26 patients, while the preganglionic section of the brachial plexus was clearly visible in 22 patients. Pseudomeningoceles were commonly observed in 23 patients. Others finding of MRN of brachial plexus included spinal cord offset (in 16 patients) and spinal cord deformation (in 6 patients). As for the 3D DW-SSFP MRN diagnosis of preganglionic BPI, the sensitivity, the specificity and the accuracy were respectively 96.8%, 90.29%, and 94.18%. 3D DW-SSFP MRN of brachial plexus improve visualization of brachial plexus and benefit to determine the extent of injury. PMID:27782162

  18. Objectively measured physical activity and sedentary behaviour and ankle brachial index: Cross-sectional and longitudinal associations in older men

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Tessa J.; Sartini, Claudio; Ellins, Elizabeth A.; Halcox, Julian P.J.; Smith, Kirsten E.; Ash, Sarah; Lennon, Lucy T.; Wannamethee, S. Goya; Lee, I-Min; Whincup, Peter H.; Jefferis, Barbara J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Associations between bouts of physical activity (PA), sedentary behaviour (SB) and cardiovascular disease, and their mutual independence are not well defined. A low ankle brachial index (ABI ≤0.9) indicates peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and is predictive of cardiovascular events and functional impairment. We investigated the independence of PA and SB and the importance of bout duration in relation to ABI using objective measures. Methods 945 men from the British Regional Heart Study, mean age 78.4 y, had concurrent measurements of ABI (Vicorder) and physical activity (Actigraph GT3X accelerometer); 427 men also had accelerometer measurements one year previously and contributed data to longitudinal analyses. Results and conclusion In cross-sectional analyses, after adjusting for covariates each extra 10 min of moderate and vigorous PA per day was associated with an OR of 0.81 (95% CI 0.72, 0.91) for a low ABI, a stronger association than for light PA (OR 0.85, 95% CI 0.75, 0.98). Each extra 30 min of SB was associated with an OR of 1.19 (95% CI 1.07, 1.33) for a low ABI. Associations between moderate and vigorous PA and ABI persisted after adjustment for light PA or SB. Bout lengths for PA and SB were not associated with a low ABI. One year changes in PA or SB were not associated with low ABI. All physical activity and lower levels of SB, regardless of bout duration were inversely associated with ABI; more intense PA showed a stronger association. No associations between changes in PA and ABI were observed, but power may have been limited. PMID:26854973

  19. Association between functional performance and executive cognitive functions in an elderly population including patients with low ankle–brachial index

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Naomi Vidal; Cunha, Paulo Jannuzzi; da Costa, Danielle Irigoyen; dos Santos, Fernando; Costa, Fernando Oliveira; Consolim-Colombo, Fernanda; Irigoyen, Maria Cláudia

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Peripheral arterial disease, as measured by the ankle–brachial index (ABI), is prevalent among the elderly, and is associated with functional performance, assessed by the 6-minute walk test (6MWT). Executive cognitive function (ECF) impairments are also prevalent in this population, but no existing study has investigated the association between ECF and functional performance in an elderly population including individuals with low ABI. Aim To investigate the association between functional performance, as measured by the 6MWT, and loss in ECF, in an elderly sample including individuals with low ABI. Method The ABI group was formed by 26 elderly individuals with low ABI (mean ABI: 0.63±0.19), and the control group was formed by 40 elderly individuals with normal ABI (mean ABI: 1.08±0.07). We analyzed functional performance using the 6MWT, global cognition using the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), and ECF using the Digit Span for assessing attention span and working memory, the Stroop Color Word Test (SCWT) for assessing information processing speed and inhibitory control/impulsivity, and the Controlled Oral Word Association Test (COWAT) for assessing semantic verbal fluency and phonemic verbal fluency. We also used a factor analysis on all of the ECF tests (global ECF). Results Before adjustment, the ABI group performed worse on global cognition, attention span, working memory, inhibitory control/impulsivity, semantic verbal fluency, and phonemic verbal fluency. After adjustment, the ABI group performance remained worse for working memory and semantic verbal fluency. In a simple correlation analysis including all of the subjects, the 6MWT was associated with global cognition, attention span, working memory, information processing speed, inhibitory control/impulsivity, semantic verbal fluency, and global ECF. After adjustment, all the associations remained statistically significant. Conclusion This study found an independent association between

  20. New Technique for the Preservation of the Left Common Carotid Artery in Zone 2a Endovascular Repair of Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Juszkat, Robert Kulesza, Jerzy; Zarzecka, Anna; Jemielity, Marek; Staniszewski, Ryszard; Majewski, Waclaw

    2011-02-15

    To describe a technique for the preservation of the left common carotid artery (CCA) in zone 2 endovascular repair of thoracic aortic aneurysm. This technique involves the placement of a guide wire into the left CCA via the right brachial artery before stent graft deployment to enable precise visualization and protection of the left CCA during the whole procedure. Of the 107 patients with thoracic endovascular aortic repair in our study, 32 (30%) had the left subclavian artery intentionally covered (landing zone 2). Eight (25%) of those 32 had landing zone 2a-the segment distally the origin of the left CCA, halfway between the origin of the left CCA and the left subclavian artery. In all patients, a guide wire was positioned into the left CCA via the right brachial artery before stent graft deployment. It is a retrospective study in design. In seven patients, stent grafts were positioned precisely. In the remaining patient, the positioning was imprecise; the origin of the left CCA was partially covered by the graft. A stent was implanted into the left CCA to restore the flow into the vessel. All procedures were performed successfully. The technique of placing a guide wire into the left CCA via the right brachial artery before stent graft deployment is a safe and effective method that enables the precise visualization of the left CCA during the whole procedure. Moreover, in case of inadvertent complete or partial coverage of the origin of the left CCA, it supplies safe and quick access to the artery for stent implantation.

  1. Venous thrombosis in subclavian, axillary, brachial veins with extension to internal jugular vein, right sigmoid sinus and simultaneous pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Tamizifar, Babak; Beigi, Arash; Rismankarzadeh, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    We present a rare case of Venous Thrombosis in Subclavian, Axillary, Brachial Veins with extension to Internal Jugular vein, right sigmoid sinus and simultaneous Pulmonary embolism during the treatment with low molecular weight heparin. PMID:23901341

  2. Hardening of the arteries

    MedlinePlus

    Atherosclerosis; Arteriosclerosis; Plaque buildup - arteries; Hyperlipidemia - atherosclerosis; Cholesterol - atherosclerosis ... Hardening of the arteries often occurs with aging. As you grow older, ... narrows your arteries and makes them stiffer. These changes ...

  3. Peripheral arterial line (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A peripheral arterial line is a small, short plastic catheter placed through the skin into an artery of the arm or leg. The purpose of a peripheral arterial line is to allow continuous monitoring of ...

  4. Carotid Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... brain with blood. If you have carotid artery disease, the arteries become narrow, usually because of atherosclerosis. ... one of the causes of stroke. Carotid artery disease often does not cause symptoms, but there are ...

  5. Coronary artery disease

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    The coronary arteries supply blood to the heart muscle itself. Damage to or blockage of a coronary artery can result in injury to the heart. Normally, blood flows through a coronary artery unimpeded. However, a ...

  6. The impact of peripheral arterial disease: A proposal for a new classification.

    PubMed

    Vaquero Morillo, Fernando

    2016-05-01

    Clasically, intermittent claudication, an intermediate stage in peripheral arterial disease, has been considered as a benign condition when considering only the muscular pain on walking. In this paper our aim is to attract attention about the effects linked to ischemic pain and the oxidative injury resulting from episodes of ischemia/reperfusion. Throughout this process alterations in calcium homeostasis as well as uncontrolled generation of reactive oxygen species, in association with the mitochondrial dysfunction and inflammatory phenomena, could lead to accelerate atherosclerosis, with an increased cardiovascular risk stated by means of a reduced ankle-brachial index. Taking this idea into account we propose a possible new classification for the management of the peripheral arterial disease, combining the Fontaine and Rutherford classifications and thinking about the described systemic effects in order to change the traditional management of peripheral arterial disease.

  7. Peripheral arterial disease: implications beyond the peripheral circulation.

    PubMed

    Paraskevas, Kosmas I; Mukherjee, Debabrata; Whayne, Thomas F

    2013-11-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) affects a considerable percentage of the population. The manifestations of this disease are not always clinically overt. As a result, PAD remains underdiagnosed and undertreated. PAD is not just a disease of the peripheral arteries, but also an indication of generalized vascular atherosclerosis. PAD patients also have a high prevalence of other arterial diseases, such as coronary/carotid artery disease and abdominal aortic aneurysms. PAD is also a predictor of increased risk of lung and other cancers. The most often used examination for the establishment of the diagnosis of PAD, the ankle-brachial pressure index (ABPI), is also a predictor of generalized atherosclerosis, future cardiovascular events and cardiovascular mortality. Several markers that have been linked with PAD (e.g. C-reactive protein, serum bilirubin levels) may also have predictive value for other conditions besides PAD (e.g. kidney dysfunction). The management of PAD should therefore not be restricted to the peripheral circulation but should include measurements to manage and decrease the systemic atherosclerotic burden of the patient. PMID:23221278

  8. Stenting for Peripheral Artery Disease of the Lower Extremities

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    ), stroke and cardiovascular death. Annually, approximately 10% of ischemic cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events can be attributed to the progression of PAD. Compared with patients without PAD, the 10-year risk of all-cause mortality is 3-fold higher in patients with PAD with 4-5 times greater risk of dying from cardiovascular event. The risk of coronary heart disease is 6 times greater and increases 15-fold in patients with advanced or severe PAD. Among subjects with diabetes, the risk of PAD is often severe and associated with extensive arterial calcification. In these patients the risk of PAD increases two to four fold. The results of the Canadian public survey of knowledge of PAD demonstrated that Canadians are unaware of the morbidity and mortality associated with PAD. Despite its prevalence and cardiovascular risk implications, only 25% of PAD patients are undergoing treatment. The diagnosis of PAD is difficult as most patients remain asymptomatic for many years. Symptoms do not present until there is at least 50% narrowing of an artery. In the general population, only 10% of persons with PAD have classic symptoms of claudication, 40% do not complain of leg pain, while the remaining 50% have a variety of leg symptoms different from classic claudication. The severity of symptoms depends on the degree of stenosis. The need to intervene is more urgent in patients with limb threatening ischemia as manifested by night pain, rest pain, ischemic ulcers or gangrene. Without successful revascularization those with critical ischemia have a limb loss (amputation) rate of 80-90% in one year. Diagnosis of PAD is generally non-invasive and can be performed in the physician offices or on an outpatient basis in a hospital. Most common diagnostic procedure include: 1) Ankle Brachial Index (ABI), a ratio of the blood pressure readings between the highest ankle pressure and the highest brachial (arm) pressure; and 2) Doppler ultrasonography, a diagnostic imaging procedure that uses

  9. Effects of smoking cessation on central blood pressure and arterial stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Takami, Takeshi; Saito, Yoshihiko

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Smoking affects arterial stiffness, thus causing an elevation in central blood pressure (CBP). The present study was designed to examine whether smoking cessation treatment improved CBP and arterial stiffness. Patients and methods: We conducted an observational study of 70 patients receiving smoking cessation treatment. Before and 60 weeks after the start of a 12-week varenicline treatment, we measured brachial blood pressure, CBP, brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV), normalized radial augmentation index (rAIx@75), left ventricular weight, and left ventricular diastolic function of each patient. The data were compared between the patients who succeeded in quitting smoking (smoking cessation group; n = 37) and those who failed to quit smoking (smoking group; n = 33). Results: Baseline characteristics were similar in both groups. Brachial blood pressure remained unchanged in both groups. CBP, baPWV, and rAIx@75 decreased significantly in the smoking cessation group, while these parameters showed no significant change in the smoking group. Thus, CBP, baPWV, and rAIx@75 showed greater decrease in the smoking cessation group than in the smoking group (CBP, −7.1 ± 1.4 mmHg vs 1.2 ± 2.7 mmHg; P < 0.01; baPWV, −204 ± 64 cm/s vs −43 ± 72 cm/s; P < 0.01; rAIx@75, −6.4 ± 2.8% vs −1.0 ± 3.9%; P < 0.01). Left ventricular weight and left ventricular diastolic function remained unchanged in both groups. Conclusion: Patients in the smoking cessation group showed significant improvement in CBP, baPWV, and rAIx@75. These results indicate that smoking cessation can improve arterial stiffness and CBP. PMID:22102787

  10. Acute effects of firefighting on arterial stiffness and blood flow.

    PubMed

    Fahs, Christopher A; Yan, Huimin; Ranadive, Sushant; Rossow, Lindy M; Agiovlasitis, Stamatis; Echols, George; Smith, Denise; Horn, Gavin P; Rowland, Thomas; Lane, Abbi; Fernhall, Bo

    2011-04-01

    Sudden cardiac events are responsible for 40-50% of line-of-duty firefighter fatalities, yet the exact cause of these events is unknown. Likely, combinations of thermal, physical, and mental factors impair cardiovascular function and trigger such events. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the impact of firefighting activities on vascular function. Sixty-nine young (28 ± 1 years) male firefighters underwent 3 hours of firefighting activities. Carotid, aortic, and brachial blood pressures (BP), heart rate (HR), augmentation index (AIx), wave reflection timing (TR), aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV), forearm blood flow (FBF), and forearm reactive hyperemia (RH) were measured before and after firefighting activities. Paired samples t-tests revealed significant (p < 0.05) increases in aortic diastolic BP, HR, AIx, PWV, RH, and FBF, and significant decreases in brachial and aortic pulse pressure and TR following firefighting activities. In conclusion, these results suggest that 3 hours of firefighting activities increase both arterial stiffness and vasodilation.

  11. Modification over time of pulse wave velocity parallel to changes in aortic BP, as well as in 24-h ambulatory brachial BP.

    PubMed

    Oliveras, A; Segura, J; Suarez, C; García-Ortiz, L; Abad-Cardiel, M; Vigil, L; Gómez-Marcos, M A; Sans Atxer, L; Martell-Claros, N; Ruilope, L M; de la Sierra, A

    2016-03-01

    Arterial stiffness as assessed by carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV) is a marker of preclinical organ damage and a predictor of cardiovascular outcomes, independently of blood pressure (BP). However, limited evidence exists on the association between long-term variation (Δ) on aortic BP (aoBP) and ΔcfPWV. We aimed to evaluate the relationship of ΔBP with ΔcfPWV over time, as assessed by office and 24-h ambulatory peripheral BP, and aoBP. AoBP and cfPWV were evaluated in 209 hypertensive patients with either diabetes or metabolic syndrome by applanation tonometry (Sphygmocor) at baseline(b) and at 12 months of follow-up(fu). Peripheral BP was also determined by using validated oscillometric devices (office(o)-BP) and on an outpatient basis by using a validated (Spacelabs-90207) device (24-h ambulatory BP). ΔcfPWV over time was calculated as follows: ΔcfPWV=[(cfPWVfu-cfPWVb)/cfPWVb] × 100. ΔBP over time resulted from the same formula applied to BP values obtained with the three different measurement techniques. Correlations (Spearman 'Rho') between ΔBP and ΔcfPWV were calculated. Mean age was 62 years, 39% were female and 80% had type 2 diabetes. Baseline office brachial BP (mm Hg) was 143±20/82±12. Follow-up (12 months later) office brachial BP (mm Hg) was 136±20/79±12. ΔcfPWV correlated with ΔoSBP (Rho=0.212; P=0.002), Δ24-h SBP (Rho=0.254; P<0.001), Δdaytime SBP (Rho=0.232; P=0.001), Δnighttime SBP (Rho=0.320; P<0.001) and ΔaoSBP (Rho=0.320; P<0.001). A multiple linear regression analysis included the following independent variables: ΔoSBP, Δ24-h SBP, Δdaytime SBP, Δnighttime SBP and ΔaoSBP. ΔcfPWV was independently associated with Δ24-h SBP (β-coefficient=0.195; P=0.012) and ΔaoSBP (β-coefficient= 0.185; P=0.018). We conclude that changes in both 24-h SBP and aoSBP more accurately reflect changes in arterial stiffness than do office BP measurements. PMID:26108366

  12. Prolonged hemidiaphragmatic paresis following continuous interscalene brachial plexus block: A case report.

    PubMed

    Shinn, Helen Ki; Kim, Byung-Gun; Jung, Jong Kwon; Kwon, Hee Uk; Yang, Chunwoo; Won, Jonghun

    2016-06-01

    Interscalene brachial plexus block provides effective anesthesia and analgesia for shoulder surgery. One of the disadvantages of this technique is the risk of hemidiaphragmatic paresis, which can occur as a result of phrenic nerve block and can cause a decrease in the pulmonary function, limiting the use of the block in patients with reduced functional residual capacity or a preexisting pulmonary disease. However, it is generally transient and is resolved over the duration of the local anesthetic's action.We present a case of a patient who experienced prolonged hemidiaphragmatic paresis following a continuous interscalene brachial plexus block for the postoperative pain management of shoulder surgery, and suggest a mechanism that may have led to this adverse effect.Nerve injuries associated with peripheral nerve blocks may be caused by several mechanisms. Our findings suggest that perioperative nerve injuries can occur as a result of combined mechanical and chemical injuries. PMID:27310984

  13. Brachial vs. central systolic pressure and pulse wave transmission indicators: a critical analysis.

    PubMed

    Izzo, Joseph L

    2014-12-01

    This critique is intended to provide background for the reader to evaluate the relative clinical utilities of brachial cuff systolic blood pressure (SBP) and its derivatives, including pulse pressure, central systolic pressure, central augmentation index (AI), and pulse pressure amplification (PPA). The critical question is whether the newer indicators add sufficient information to justify replacing or augmenting brachial cuff blood pressure (BP) data in research and patient care. Historical context, pathophysiology of variations in pulse wave transmission and reflection, issues related to measurement and model errors, statistical limitations, and clinical correlations are presented, along with new comparative data. Based on this overview, there is no compelling scientific or practical reason to replace cuff SBP with any of the newer indicators in the vast majority of clinical situations. Supplemental value for central SBP may exist in defining patients with exaggerated PPA ("spurious systolic hypertension"), managing cardiac and aortic diseases, and in studies of cardiovascular drugs, but there are no current standards for these possibilities.

  14. Multiple unilateral variations in medial and lateral cords of brachial plexus and their branches

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Shivi; Kumar, Ashwani; Mehta, Vandana; Suri, Rajesh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    During routine dissection of the upper extremity of an adult male cadaver, multiple variations in branches of medial and lateral cords of brachial plexus were encountered. Three unique findings were observed. First, intercordal neural communications between the lateral and medial cords were observed. Second, two lateral pectoral nerves and one medial pectoral nerve were seen to arise from the lateral and medial cord respectively. The musculocutaneous nerve did not pierce the coracobrachialis. Finally, the ulnar nerve arose by two roots from the medial cord. Knowledge of such variations is of interest to anatomists, radiologists, neurologists, anesthesiologists, and surgeons. The aim of our study is to provide additional information about abnormal brachial plexus and its clinical implications. PMID:24693486

  15. Multiple unilateral variations in medial and lateral cords of brachial plexus and their branches.

    PubMed

    Goel, Shivi; Rustagi, Shaifaly Madan; Kumar, Ashwani; Mehta, Vandana; Suri, Rajesh Kumar

    2014-03-01

    During routine dissection of the upper extremity of an adult male cadaver, multiple variations in branches of medial and lateral cords of brachial plexus were encountered. Three unique findings were observed. First, intercordal neural communications between the lateral and medial cords were observed. Second, two lateral pectoral nerves and one medial pectoral nerve were seen to arise from the lateral and medial cord respectively. The musculocutaneous nerve did not pierce the coracobrachialis. Finally, the ulnar nerve arose by two roots from the medial cord. Knowledge of such variations is of interest to anatomists, radiologists, neurologists, anesthesiologists, and surgeons. The aim of our study is to provide additional information about abnormal brachial plexus and its clinical implications.

  16. Clinico-embryological perspective of a rare accessory brachial muscle with possible musculocutaneous nerve compression.

    PubMed

    Mehta, V; Yadav, Y; Arora, Jyoti; Kumar, H; Suri, R K; Rath, G

    2009-03-01

    Both brachialis and biceps brachii are primary flexors of the arm and elbow from the biomechanical perspective. Numerous reports exist in anatomical literature regarding accessory heads of biceps brachii, although such accessory bellies in relation to brachialis muscle are less frequently elucidated. We report a unilateral case of a rare accessory muscle interposed between the biceps brachii and brachialis, having the musculocutaneous nerve (MCN) entrapped between the two. Furthermore, the muscle divided into two slips, upper slip was attached to biceps brachii and the other gained insertion to the brachial fascia. Innervation to this accessory muscle was derived from MCN. The embryological basis for such supernumerary muscle is discussed. Additionally, the case is considered under surgical and clinical perspective, highlighting the importance of familiarity with such variations. Anatomical variations of the brachial musculature may cause diagnostic perplexities while interpreting MRI or CT scans.

  17. Brachial plexus injury with emphasis on axillary nerve paralysis after thoracoscopic sympathicotomy for axillary hyperhidrosis.

    PubMed

    Chon, Soon-Ho; Suk Choi, Matthew Seung

    2006-12-01

    Thoracic sympathicotomy for the treatment of axillary hyperhidrosis with the use of 2 mm thoracoscope and instruments is a simple and safe procedure. Nerve paralysis of any type after thoracic sympathicotomy is an extremely rare event. We report a 44-year-old woman who developed brachial plexus injury of her left arm after thoracoscopic sympathicotomy for axillary hyperhidrosis. The lesion involved the whole arm. All nerves of the brachial plexus except the axillary nerve recovered quickly. An axillary nerve type lesion was observed for 7 weeks, until the patient fully recovered all functions of her arm. The mechanism is believed not to be caused by the procedure itself, but by dorsal overextension of the abducted arm during the operation. PMID:17277662

  18. Growth hormone (GH) and atherosclerosis: changes in morphology and function of major arteries during GH treatment.

    PubMed

    Pfeifer, M; Verhovec, R; Zizek, B

    1999-04-01

    Patients with hypopituitarism have increased carotid artery intima-media thickness and reduced arterial distensibility. The effect of 2 years of growth hormone (GH) replacement therapy on these parameters was studied in 11 GH-deficient men (age range, 24-49 years) with hypopituitarism and compared with 12 healthy, age-matched men with no evidence of pituitary or vascular disease. Before treatment the intima-media of the common carotid arteries and the carotid bifurcations were significantly thicker in patients (P < 0.001) than in the control group. Treatment with GH normalized the intima-media thickness of the common carotid artery within 6 months and of the carotid bifurcation within 3 months. The changes in intima-media thickness of the carotid artery were negatively correlated with changes in serum levels of insulin-like growth factor I during treatment. There was a significant improvement in flow-mediated, endothelium-dependent dilation of the brachial artery at 3 months, which was sustained at 6, 18 and 24 months of GH treatment (P < 0.05). Thus, GH replacement therapy in GH-deficient men reverses early morphological and functional atherosclerotic changes in major arteries, and may reduce rates of vascular morbidity and mortality.

  19. Endovascular Treatment of Infected Brachial Pseudoaneurysm in an Intravenous Drug Abuser: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Boieru, Raluca; Georg, Yannick; Ramlugun, Dharmesh; Martinot, Martin; Camin, Amelie; Matysiak, Lucien; Kretz, Benjamin

    2015-10-01

    We report the case of a 36-year-old male, admitted in the emergency room with a nonruptured brachial pseudoaneurysm after buprenorphine injection, with no signs of distal acute ischemia. After endovascular treatment with a nitinol covered stent associated with adapted antibiotherapy and 35 days of hospitalizations, the patient was discharged with good short results but stent need to be removed at 6 months for thrombosis and partial exposure through the wound. PMID:26142880

  20. Perspectives on glenohumeral joint contractures and shoulder dysfunction in children with perinatal brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Gharbaoui, Idris S; Gogola, Gloria R; Aaron, Dorit H; Kozin, Scott H

    2015-01-01

    Shoulder joint deformities continue to be a challenging aspect of treating upper plexus lesions in children with perinatal brachial plexus palsy (PBPP). It is increasingly recognized that PBPP affects the glenohumeral joint specifically, and that abnormal scapulothoracic movements are a compensatory development. The pathophysiology and assessment of glenohumeral joint contractures, the progression of scapular dyskinesia and skeletal dysplasia, and current shoulder imaging techniques are reviewed. PMID:25835253

  1. Combined Intrauterine Vascular Insufficiency and Brachial Plexus Palsy: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, Catherine; Terkonda, Sarvam P.

    2007-01-01

    A unique case of combined intrauterine vascular insufficiency and complete brachial plexus palsy is described in a newborn delivered by cesarean section. Intrauterine vascular insufficiency resulted in a right below elbow amputation at 3 weeks of age. Amputation length was preserved after a pedicled thoracoabdominal flap. Function of the C5, C6, and C7 nerve roots returned to normal by 3 months of age. PMID:18780089

  2. Body vectoring technique with Radiesse® for tightening of the abdomen, thighs, and brachial zone

    PubMed Central

    Cogorno Wasylkowski, Valeria

    2015-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to investigate the efficacy, safety, and subject satisfaction of the calcium hydroxylapatite-based dermal filler Radiesse® in a novel body vectoring technique to correct skin flaccidity in the thighs, abdomen, and brachial zones. Methods Female subjects with self-evaluated flaccidity scores ≥3 on a 6-point scale (0, no flaccidity; 5, very severe flaccidity) in the zones of interest were included. Radiesse was injected according to predesigned vector maps (3 mL per thigh, 1.5 mL per hemiabdomen or brachial zone). Clinical assessments (skin density and thickness) were made by an independent reviewer at an exact position before and 5 weeks after treatment using a cutometer and an ultrascan. Subjects rated skin flaccidity before and 5 weeks after treatment on the 6-point scale and performed a pinch test to self-assess changes in skin thickness. All adverse events were recorded. Results Twenty females (aged 28–67 years) were enrolled, contributing 36 treatment zones. Across all zones, 78% of flaccidity measurements improved after treatment. Improvements in skin flaccidity were most common in the thighs (82% of cases). An improvement in skin density versus baseline was observed in the majority across all zones, most frequently in the abdomen (88% of cases). Skin thickness in each zone also improved versus baseline for the majority, most frequently in the thighs (88% of cases). Mean self-assessed flaccidity scores at baseline were 3.6 (thighs), 3.7 (abdomen), and 3.8 (brachial zone), and 2.6, 2.7, and 3.0, respectively, posttreatment. All subjects reported a positive pinch test. In total, 47.0% of subjects had bruising after treatment, which resolved within a week. No serious adverse events were reported. Conclusion Using this novel technique, Radiesse had notable results on skin flaccidity, density and thickness in the thighs, abdomen, and brachial zones, and was well tolerated. PMID:26056483

  3. Radiation-induced brachial plexopathy in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Ruying; Rong, Xiaoming; Wu, Rong; Cheng, Jinping; Huang, Xiaolong; Luo, Jinjun; Tang, Yamei

    2016-01-01

    Radiation-induced brachial plexopathy (RIBP) is one of the late complications in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients who received radiotherapy. We conducted a retrospective study to investigate its clinical characteristics and risk factors. Thirty-onepatients with RIBP after radiotherapy for NPC were enrolled. Clinical manifestations of RIBP, electrophysiologic data, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and the correlation between irradiation strategy and incidence of RIBP were evaluated. The mean latency at the onset of RIBP was 4.26 years. Of the symptoms, paraesthesia usually presented first (51.6%), followed by pain (22.6%) and weakness (22.6%). The major symptoms included paraesthesia (90.3%), pain (54.8%), weakness (48.4%), fasciculation (19.3%) and muscle atrophy (9.7%). Nerve conduction velocity (NCV) and electromyography (EMG) disclosed that pathological changes of brachial plexus involved predominantly in the upper and middle trunks in distribution. MRI of the brachial plexus showed hyper-intensity on T1, T2, post-contrast T1 and diffusion weighted whole body imaging with background body signal suppression (DWIBS) images in lower cervical nerves. Radiotherapy with Gross Tumor volume (GTVnd) and therapeutic dose (mean 66.8±2.8Gy) for patients with lower cervical lymph node metastasis was related to a significantly higher incidence of RIBP (P<0.001). Thus, RIBP is a severe and progressive complication of NPC after radiotherapy. The clinical symptoms are predominantly involved in upper and middle trunk of the brachial plexus in distribution. Lower cervical lymph node metastasis and corresponding radiotherapy might cause a significant increase of the RIBP incidence. PMID:26934119

  4. A Case of Suspected Breast Cancer Metastasis to Brachial Plexus Detected by Magnetic Resonance Neurography

    PubMed Central

    Mizuma, Atsushi; Kijima, Chikage; Nagata, Eiichiro; Takizawa, Shunya

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis of breast cancer is often detected through a long-term course and difficult to diagnose. We report a case of brachial plexopathy suspected to be the initial lesion of breast cancer metastasis, which was only detected by magnetic resonance (MR) neurography. A 61-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital within 2 years after operation for breast cancer because of progressive dysesthesia and motor weakness initially in the upper limb on the affected side and subsequently on the contralateral side. Enhanced computed tomography, axillary lymph node echo, gallium scintigraphy, and short tau inversion recovery MR images showed no abnormalities. MR neurography revealed a swollen region in the left brachial plexus. We suspected neuralgic amyotrophy and initiated treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin therapy and steroid therapy. However, there was no improvement, and the progression of motor weakness in the bilateral lower limbs appeared over 4 years. Concomitant elevation of carbohydrate antigen 15-3 level (58.9 U/ml) led us to suspect breast cancer metastasis, which was associated with the worsening of neurological findings, although gallium scintigraphy and bone scintigraphy showed no inflammatory and metastatic lesions. Swelling of the cauda equina in enhanced lumbar MR imaging and abnormal accumulation at the brachial plexus and cervical spinal cord in positron-emission tomography were newly detected contrary to the normal findings on the gallium scintigraphy, which suggested cerebrospinal fluid seeding. We suspected breast cancer metastasis about the initial brachial plexopathy based on the clinical course. MR neurography may be a helpful tool to detect metastatic lesion, especially in nerve roots. PMID:27721757

  5. Sensory Evaluation of the Hands in Children with Brachial Plexus Birth Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmgren, Tove; Peltonen, Jari; Linder, Tove; Rautakorpi, Sanna; Nietosvaara, Yrjana

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine sensory changes of the hand in brachial plexus birth injury (BPBI). Ninety-five patients (43 females, 52 males) comprising two age groups, 6 to 8 years (mean age 7y 6mo) and 12 to 14 years (mean age 13y 2mo), were included. Sixty-four had upper (cervical [C] 5-6), 19 upper and middle (C5-7), and 12 had total…

  6. Phrenic Nerve Transfer for Reconstruction of Elbow Extension in Severe Brachial Plexus Injuries.

    PubMed

    Flores, Leandro P; Socolovsky, Mariano

    2016-09-01

    Background Restoring elbow extension is an important objective to pursue when repairing the brachial plexus in patients with a flail arm. Based upon the good results obtained using the phrenic nerve to restore elbow flexion and shoulder stability, we hypothesized that this nerve could also be employed to reconstruct elbow extension in patients with severe brachial plexus injuries. Methods A retrospective study of 10 patients in which the phrenic nerve targeted the radial nerve (7 patients) or the branch to the long head of the triceps (3 patients) as a surgical strategy for reconstruction of the brachial plexus. Results The mean postoperative follow-up time was 34 months. At final follow-up, elbow extension graded as M4 was measured in three patients, Medical Research Council MRC M3 in five patients, and M2 in one patient, while one patient experienced no measurable recovery (M0). No patient complained or demonstrated any signs of respiratory insufficiency postoperatively. Conclusions The phrenic nerve is a reliable donor for reanimation of elbow extension in such cases, and the branch to the long head of the triceps should be considered as a better target for the nerve transfer. PMID:27144951

  7. Gross anatomy of the brachial plexus in the giant Anteater (Myrmecophaga tridactyla).

    PubMed

    Souza, P R; Cardoso, J R; Araujo, L B M; Moreira, P C; Cruz, V S; Araujo, E G

    2014-10-01

    Ten forelimbs of five Myrmecophaga tridactyla were examined to study the anatomy of the brachial plexus. The brachial plexuses of the M. tridactyla observed in the present study were formed by the ventral rami of the last four cervical spinal nerves, C5 through C8, and the first thoracic spinal nerve, T1. These primary roots joined to form two trunks: a cranial trunk comprising ventral rami from C5-C7 and a caudal trunk receiving ventral rami from C8-T1. The nerves originated from these trunks and their most constant arrangement were as follows: suprascapular (C5-C7), subscapular (C5-C7), cranial pectoral (C5-C8), caudal pectoral (C8-T1), axillary (C5-C7), musculocutaneous (C5-C7), radial (C5-T1), median (C5-T1), ulnar (C5-T1), thoracodorsal (C5-C8), lateral thoracic (C7-T1) and long thoracic (C6-C7). In general, the brachial plexus in the M. tridactyla is similar to the plexuses in mammals, but the number of rami contributing to the formation of each nerve in the M. tridactyla was found to be larger than those of most mammals. This feature may be related to the very distinctive anatomical specializations of the forelimb of the anteaters.

  8. Phrenic Nerve Transfer for Reconstruction of Elbow Extension in Severe Brachial Plexus Injuries.

    PubMed

    Flores, Leandro P; Socolovsky, Mariano

    2016-09-01

    Background Restoring elbow extension is an important objective to pursue when repairing the brachial plexus in patients with a flail arm. Based upon the good results obtained using the phrenic nerve to restore elbow flexion and shoulder stability, we hypothesized that this nerve could also be employed to reconstruct elbow extension in patients with severe brachial plexus injuries. Methods A retrospective study of 10 patients in which the phrenic nerve targeted the radial nerve (7 patients) or the branch to the long head of the triceps (3 patients) as a surgical strategy for reconstruction of the brachial plexus. Results The mean postoperative follow-up time was 34 months. At final follow-up, elbow extension graded as M4 was measured in three patients, Medical Research Council MRC M3 in five patients, and M2 in one patient, while one patient experienced no measurable recovery (M0). No patient complained or demonstrated any signs of respiratory insufficiency postoperatively. Conclusions The phrenic nerve is a reliable donor for reanimation of elbow extension in such cases, and the branch to the long head of the triceps should be considered as a better target for the nerve transfer.

  9. Long Sleep Duration Associated With a Higher Risk of Increased Arterial Stiffness in Males

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Tsai-Chen; Wu, Jin-Shang; Yang, Yi-Ching; Huang, Ying-Hsiang; Lu, Feng-Hwa; Chang, Chih-Jen

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: We aimed to examine the association between sleep duration and arterial stiffness among adults of different ages, because to date there has been only one study on this relationship, which was confined to middle-aged civil servants. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: A health examination center in National Cheng Kung University Hospital, Taiwan. Participants: A total of 3,508 subjects, age 20–87 y, were enrolled after excluding those with a history of cerebrovascular events, coronary artery disease, peripheral artery disease, and taking lipid-lowering drugs, antihypertensives, hypoglycemic agents, and anti-inflammatory drugs, from October 2006 to August 2009. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: Sleep duration was classified into three groups: short (< 6 h), normal (6–8 h) and long (> 8 h). Arterial stiffness was measured by brachial-ankle pulse-wave velocity (baPWV), and increased arterial stiffness was defined as baPWV ≥ 1400 cm/sec. The sleep duration was different for subjects with and without increased arterial stiffness in males, but not in females. In the multivariate analysis for males, long sleepers (odds ratio [OR] 1.75, P = 0.034) but not short sleepers (OR 0.98, P = 0.92) had a higher risk of increased arterial stiffness. In addition, age, estimated glomerular filtration rate, hypertension, diabetes, total cholesterol/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio, cigarette smoking, and exercise were also independently associated factors. However, in females, neither short nor long sleep duration was associated with increased arterial stiffness. Conclusions: Long sleep duration was associated with a higher risk of increased arterial stiffness in males. Short sleepers did not exhibit a significant risk of increased arterial stiffness in either sex. Citation: Tsai TC, Wu JS, Yang YC, Huang YH, Lu FH, Chang CJ. Long sleep duration associated with a higher risk of increased arterial stiffness in males. SLEEP 2014

  10. Preeclampsia Is Associated with Increased Central Aortic Pressure, Elastic Arteries Stiffness and Wave Reflections, and Resting and Recruitable Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Torrado, Juan; Farro, Ignacio; Zócalo, Yanina; Farro, Federico; Sosa, Claudio; Scasso, Santiago; Alonso, Justo; Bia, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. An altered endothelial function (EF) could be associated with preeclampsia (PE). However, more specific and complementary analyses are required to confirm this topic. Flow-mediated dilation (FMD), low-flow-mediated constriction (L-FMC), and hyperemic-related changes in carotid-radial pulse wave velocity (PWVcr) offer complementary information about “recruitability” of EF. Objectives. To evaluate, in healthy and hypertensive pregnant women (with and without PE), central arterial parameters in conjunction with “basal and recruitable” EF. Methods. Nonhypertensive (HP) and hypertensive pregnant women (gestational hypertension, GH; preeclampsia, PE) were included. Aortic blood pressure (BP), wave reflection parameters (AIx@75), aortic pulse wave velocity (PWVcf) and PWVcr, and brachial and common carotid stiffness and intima-media thickness were measured. Brachial FMD and L-FMC and hyperemic-related change in PWVcr were measured. Results. Aortic BP and AIx@75 were elevated in PE. PE showed stiffer elastic but not muscular arteries. After cuff deflation, PWVcr decreased in HP, while GH showed a blunted PWVcr response and PE showed a tendency to increase. Maximal FMD and L-FMC were observed in HP followed by GH; PE did not reach significant arterial constriction. Conclusion. Aortic BP and wave reflections as well as elastic arteries stiffness are increased in PE. PE showed both “resting and recruitable” endothelial dysfunctions. PMID:26351578

  11. Acute effects of supramaximal exercise on carotid artery compliance and pulse pressure in young men and women.

    PubMed

    Rossow, Lindy; Fahs, Christopher A; Guerra, Myriam; Jae, Sae Young; Heffernan, Kevin S; Fernhall, Bo

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the cumulative effects of repeated cycling sprints (Wingate tests) on carotid compliance and blood pressure (BP). Fourteen young, healthy men and women completed this study. Vascular and hemodynamic measurements were taken at rest, 5 min following a first Wingate test, 25 min following the first Wingate test, 5 min following a second Wingate test, and 25 min following the second Wingate test. At each time point, the measurements taken included brachial and carotid pulse pressure (PP), heart rate, carotid artery maximum and minimum diameters, and carotid compliance. Carotid BP was obtained with applanation tonometry. Carotid diameters were obtained using ultrasonography and compliance was calculated from carotid diameters and BP. Carotid and brachial PP increased significantly (P < 0.05) 5 min after each Wingate test and returned to near baseline 25 min after each Wingate test. No cumulative PP effects were seen. A cumulative effect was seen for carotid compliance: 5 min following the second sprint, carotid arterial compliance decreased significantly more than 5 min following the first sprint (P < 0.05). A single cycling sprint reduces carotid artery compliance immediately after exercise. Performance of a second identical cycling sprint further compounds this vascular change, reducing carotid artery compliance beyond levels seen following a single cycling sprint.

  12. Preeclampsia Is Associated with Increased Central Aortic Pressure, Elastic Arteries Stiffness and Wave Reflections, and Resting and Recruitable Endothelial Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Torrado, Juan; Farro, Ignacio; Zócalo, Yanina; Farro, Federico; Sosa, Claudio; Scasso, Santiago; Alonso, Justo; Bia, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. An altered endothelial function (EF) could be associated with preeclampsia (PE). However, more specific and complementary analyses are required to confirm this topic. Flow-mediated dilation (FMD), low-flow-mediated constriction (L-FMC), and hyperemic-related changes in carotid-radial pulse wave velocity (PWVcr) offer complementary information about "recruitability" of EF. Objectives. To evaluate, in healthy and hypertensive pregnant women (with and without PE), central arterial parameters in conjunction with "basal and recruitable" EF. Methods. Nonhypertensive (HP) and hypertensive pregnant women (gestational hypertension, GH; preeclampsia, PE) were included. Aortic blood pressure (BP), wave reflection parameters (AIx@75), aortic pulse wave velocity (PWVcf) and PWVcr, and brachial and common carotid stiffness and intima-media thickness were measured. Brachial FMD and L-FMC and hyperemic-related change in PWVcr were measured. Results. Aortic BP and AIx@75 were elevated in PE. PE showed stiffer elastic but not muscular arteries. After cuff deflation, PWVcr decreased in HP, while GH showed a blunted PWVcr response and PE showed a tendency to increase. Maximal FMD and L-FMC were observed in HP followed by GH; PE did not reach significant arterial constriction. Conclusion. Aortic BP and wave reflections as well as elastic arteries stiffness are increased in PE. PE showed both "resting and recruitable" endothelial dysfunctions.

  13. Vapor resistant arteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaubach, Robert M. (Inventor); Dussinger, Peter M. (Inventor); Buchko, Matthew T. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A vapor block resistant liquid artery structure for heat pipes. A solid tube artery with openings is encased in the sintered material of a heat pipe wick. The openings are limited to that side of the artery which is most remote from the heat source. The liquid in the artery can thus exit the artery through the openings and wet the sintered sheath, but vapor generated at the heat source is unlikely to move around the solid wall of the artery and reverse its direction in order to penetrate the artery through the openings. An alternate embodiment uses finer pore size wick material to resist vapor entry.

  14. Arterial stiffness, central hemodynamics, and cardiovascular risk in hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Palatini, Paolo; Casiglia, Edoardo; Gąsowski, Jerzy; Głuszek, Jerzy; Jankowski, Piotr; Narkiewicz, Krzysztof; Saladini, Francesca; Stolarz-Skrzypek, Katarzyna; Tikhonoff, Valérie; Van Bortel, Luc; Wojciechowska, Wiktoria; Kawecka-Jaszcz, Kalina

    2011-01-01

    This review summarizes several scientific contributions at the recent Satellite Symposium of the European Society of Hypertension, held in Milan, Italy. Arterial stiffening and its hemodynamic consequences can be easily and reliably measured using a range of noninvasive techniques. However, like blood pressure (BP) measurements, arterial stiffness should be measured carefully under standardized patient conditions. Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity has been proposed as the gold standard for arterial stiffness measurement and is a well recognized predictor of adverse cardiovascular outcome. Systolic BP and pulse pressure in the ascending aorta may be lower than pressures measured in the upper limb, especially in young individuals. A number of studies suggest closer correlation of end-organ damage with central BP than with peripheral BP, and central BP may provide additional prognostic information regarding cardiovascular risk. Moreover, BP-lowering drugs can have differential effects on central aortic pressures and hemodynamics compared with brachial BP. This may explain the greater beneficial effect provided by newer antihypertensive drugs beyond peripheral BP reduction. Although many methodological problems still hinder the wide clinical application of parameters of arterial stiffness, these will likely contribute to cardiovascular assessment and management in future clinical practice. Each of the abovementioned parameters reflects a different characteristic of the atherosclerotic process, involving functional and/or morphological changes in the vessel wall. Therefore, acquiring simultaneous measurements of different parameters of vascular function and structure could theoretically enhance the power to improve risk stratification. Continuous technological effort is necessary to refine our methods of investigation in order to detect early arterial abnormalities. Arterial stiffness and its consequences represent the great challenge of the twenty-first century for

  15. Arterial stiffness, central hemodynamics, and cardiovascular risk in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Palatini, Paolo; Casiglia, Edoardo; Gąsowski, Jerzy; Głuszek, Jerzy; Jankowski, Piotr; Narkiewicz, Krzysztof; Saladini, Francesca; Stolarz-Skrzypek, Katarzyna; Tikhonoff, Valérie; Van Bortel, Luc; Wojciechowska, Wiktoria; Kawecka-Jaszcz, Kalina

    2011-01-01

    This review summarizes several scientific contributions at the recent Satellite Symposium of the European Society of Hypertension, held in Milan, Italy. Arterial stiffening and its hemodynamic consequences can be easily and reliably measured using a range of noninvasive techniques. However, like blood pressure (BP) measurements, arterial stiffness should be measured carefully under standardized patient conditions. Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity has been proposed as the gold standard for arterial stiffness measurement and is a well recognized predictor of adverse cardiovascular outcome. Systolic BP and pulse pressure in the ascending aorta may be lower than pressures measured in the upper limb, especially in young individuals. A number of studies suggest closer correlation of end-organ damage with central BP than with peripheral BP, and central BP may provide additional prognostic information regarding cardiovascular risk. Moreover, BP-lowering drugs can have differential effects on central aortic pressures and hemodynamics compared with brachial BP. This may explain the greater beneficial effect provided by newer antihypertensive drugs beyond peripheral BP reduction. Although many methodological problems still hinder the wide clinical application of parameters of arterial stiffness, these will likely contribute to cardiovascular assessment and management in future clinical practice. Each of the abovementioned parameters reflects a different characteristic of the atherosclerotic process, involving functional and/or morphological changes in the vessel wall. Therefore, acquiring simultaneous measurements of different parameters of vascular function and structure could theoretically enhance the power to improve risk stratification. Continuous technological effort is necessary to refine our methods of investigation in order to detect early arterial abnormalities. Arterial stiffness and its consequences represent the great challenge of the twenty-first century for

  16. Contemporary evaluation and management of lower extremity peripheral artery disease.

    PubMed

    Foley, T Raymond; Armstrong, Ehrin J; Waldo, Stephen W

    2016-09-15

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD) includes atherosclerosis of the aorta and lower extremities. Affecting a large segment of the population, PAD is associated with impaired functional capacity and reduced quality of life as well as an increased risk of stroke, myocardial infarction and cardiovascular death. The evaluation of PAD begins with the physical examination, incorporating non-invasive testing such as ankle-brachial indices to confirm the diagnosis. Therapeutic interventions are aimed at alleviating symptoms while preserving limb integrity and reducing overall cardiovascular risk. With this in mind, risk factor modification with exercise and medical therapy are the mainstays of treatment for many patients with PAD. Persistent symptoms or non-healing wounds should prompt more aggressive therapies with endovascular or surgical revascularisation. The following manuscript provides a comprehensive review on the contemporary evaluation and management of PAD.

  17. CT Angiography Analysis of Axillary Artery Diameter versus Common Femoral Artery Diameter: Implications for Axillary Approach for Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Patients with Hostile Aortoiliac Segment and Advanced Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tayal, Rajiv; Iftikhar, Humayun; LeSar, Benjamin; Patel, Rahul; Tyagi, Naveen; Cohen, Marc; Wasty, Najam

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The use of the axillary artery as an access site has lost favor in percutaneous intervention due to the success of these procedures from a radial or brachial alternative. However, these distal access points are unable to safely accommodate anything larger than a 7-French sheath. To date no studies exist describing the size of the axillary artery in relation to the common femoral artery in a patient population. We hypothesized that the axillary artery is of comparable size to the CFA in most patients and less frequently diseased. Methods. We retrospectively reviewed 110 CT scans of the thoracic and abdominal aorta done at our institution to rule out aortic dissection in which the right axillary artery, right CFA, left axillary artery, and left CFA were visualized. Images were then reconstructed using commercially available TeraRecon software and comparative measurements made of the axillary and femoral arteries. Results. In 96 patients with complete data, the mean sizes of the right and left axillary artery were slightly smaller than the left and right CFA. A direct comparison of the sizes of the axillary artery and CFA in the same patient yielded a mean difference of 1.69 mm ± 1.74. In all patients combined, the mean difference between the axillary artery and CFA was 1.88 mm on the right and 1.68 mm on the left. In 19 patients (19.8%), the axillary artery was of the same caliber as the associated CFA. In 8 of 96 patients (8.3%), the axillary artery was larger compared to the CFA. Conclusions. Although typically smaller, the axillary artery is often of comparable size to the CFA, significantly less frequently calcified or diseased, and in almost all observed cases large enough to accommodate a sheath with up to 18 French. PMID:27110403

  18. Brachial plexus morphology and vascular supply in the wistar rat.

    PubMed

    Angélica-Almeida, Maria; Casal, Diogo; Mafra, Manuela; Mascarenhas-Lemos, Luís; Martins-Ferreira, José; Ferraz-Oliveira, Mário; Amarante, José; Goyri-O'Neill, João

    2013-01-01

    Introdução: O rato é provavelmente a espécie animal mais utilizada em estudos experimentais de reparação nervosa. Com este trabalho pretendeu-se aprofundar o conhecimento da morfologia e da vascularização do plexo braquial do rato.Material e Métodos: Trinta ratos adultos foram estudados relativamente à morfologia e vascularização do plexo braquial. As técnicas usadas foram a injecção intravascular e dissecção sob microscópio operatório, bem como técnicas de microscopia óptica e microscopia electrónica de varrimento.Resultados: Morfologicamente, o plexo braquial do rato é um pouco diferente do plexo braquial humano. O suprimento arterial e venoso do plexo braquial do rato deriva direta ou indiretamente dos vasos vizinhos. Estes vasos formam plexos vasculares densos e interconectados no epinervo, perinervo e endonervo. Vários componentes do plexo braquial do rato são acompanhados durante um trajecto relativamente longo por vasos sanguíneos relativamente calibrosos e constantes que fornecem o seu plexo epineural, tornando o seu levantamento como retalhos nervosos possível.Discussão: A vascularização do plexo braquial do rato não é muito diferente da reportada na espécie humana, tornando o rato um modelo animal útil para o estudo experimental da fisiopatologia e tratamento da patologia do nervo periférico.Conclusão: Os nossos resultados apoiam a homologia entre o rato e o Homem em termos de morfologia e vascularização do plexo braquial. Este trabalho sugere que vários componentes do plexo braquial do rato podem ser utilizados como retalhos nervosos, incluindo fibras predominantemente motoras, sensitivas ou fibras mistas.

  19. Association of Arterial Pressure Volume Index With the Presence of Significantly Stenosed Coronary Vessels

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Takashi; Miura, Shin-ichiro; Suematsu, Yasunori; Shiga, Yuhei; Kuwano, Takashi; Sugihara, Makoto; Ike, Amane; Iwata, Atsushi; Nishikawa, Hiroaki; Fujimi, Kanta; Saku, Keijiro

    2016-01-01

    Background A blood pressure (BP) monitoring system (PASESA®) can be used to easily analyze the characteristics of central and peripheral arteries during the measurement of brachial BP. Methods We enrolled 108 consecutive patients (M/F = 86/22, age 70 ± 10 years) who underwent coronary angiography (CAG) due to suspected coronary artery disease (CAD) in whom we could measure various parameters using PASESA® in addition to brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV). The patients were divided into two groups: patients who did not have significantly stenosed coronary vessel disease (n = 33, non-SVD group) and those who had at least one significantly stenosed coronary vessel (n = 75, SVD group). The characteristics of central and peripheral arteries (arterial velocity pulse index (AVI) and arterial pressure volume index (API), respectively) and baPWV were measured. Estimated central BP (eCBP) was calculated from the data obtained from PASESA®, and CBP was also measured simultaneously by invasive catheterization. Results API, but not AVI and baPWV, in the SVD group was significantly higher than that in the non-SVD group. Although eCBP was significantly associated with CBP, there was no difference in eCBP between the groups. There were significant associations among API, AVI and baPWV, albeit these associations were relatively weak. A multivariate logistic regression revealed that API and β-blocker were significant independent variables that were associated with the presence of significant coronary stenosis. The cut-off level of API that gave the greatest sensitivity and specificity for the presence of SVD was 24 units (sensitivity 0.636 and specificity 0.667). Conclusion In conclusion, API, but not AVI or baPWV, is associated with the presence of significant coronary stenosis. PMID:27429681

  20. [Abnormal popliteal arteries].

    PubMed

    Elbaz, C

    1975-01-01

    Arteriopathy restricted to the popliteal artery, except in cases of atheroma, must indicate three of four unusual diagnoses: the trapped popliteal artery and the dessicating haematoma are anatomo-clinical entities that have been identified only relatively recently. The popliteal artery may be trapped by the medial gastrocnomius muscle, round the tendon of which the artery passes (totally or partially). This results in compression of the artery and eventually in thrombosis. Clinically, intermittent claudication is seen that may deteriorate and lead to gangrene of the toes. Arteriography makes it possible to diagnose the condition as the condition as the artery is considerably displaced inwards. Surgical correction is simple: sectioning of the tendon and repositioning of the artery. Dessicating haematoma of the popliteal artery is due essentially to atheroma, associated with medianecrosis. A "egg-timer" stenosis is found by arteriography and this condition also progresses towards thrombosis. Arterial restoration is called for, usually by bridging. PMID:1230799

  1. Blockade of the brachial plexus abolishes activation of specific brain regions by electroacupuncture at LI4: a functional MRI study

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Weidong; Jiang, Wei; He, Jingwei; Liu, Songbin; Wang, Zhaoxin

    2015-01-01

    Objective Our aim was to test the hypothesis that electroacupuncture (EA) at acupuncture point LI4 activates specific brain regions by nerve stimulation that is mediatied through a pathway involving the brachial plexus. Methods Twelve acupuncture naive right-handed volunteers were allocated to receive three sessions of EA at LI4 in a random different order (crossover): (1) EA alone (EA); EA after injection of local anaesthetics into the deltoid muscle (EA+LA); and (3) EA after blockade of the brachial plexus (EA+NB). During each session, participants were imaged in a 3 T MRI scanner. Brain regions showing change in blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal (activation) were identified. Subjective acupuncture sensation was quantified after functional MRI scanning was completed. Results were compared between the three sessions for each individual, and averaged. Results Blockade of the brachial plexus inhibited acupuncture sensation during EA. EA and EA+LA activated the bilateral thalamus, basal ganglia, cerebellum and left putamen, whilst no significant activation was observed during EA+NB. The BOLD signal of the thalamus correlated significantly with acupuncture sensation score during EA. Conclusions Blockade of the brachial plexus completely abolishes patterns of brain activation induced by EA at LI4. The results suggest that EA activates specific brain regions through stimulation of the local nerves supplying the tissues at LI4, which transmit sensory information via the brachial plexus. Trial registration number ChiCTR-OO-13003389. PMID:26464415

  2. Association of Peripheral Arterial and Cardiovascular Diseases in Familial Hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Carolina; Miname, Marcio; Makdisse, Marcia; Kalil, Roberto; Santos, Raul D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is an autosomal dominant genetic disease characterized by an elevation in the serum levels of total cholesterol and of low-density lipoproteins (LDL- c). Known to be closely related to the atherosclerotic process, FH can determine the development of early obstructive lesions in different arterial beds. In this context, FH has also been proposed to be a risk factor for peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Objective This observational cross-sectional study assessed the association of PAD with other manifestations of cardiovascular disease (CVD), such as coronary artery and cerebrovascular disease, in patients with heterozygous FH. Methods The diagnosis of PAD was established by ankle-brachial index (ABI) values ≤ 0.90. This study assessed 202 patients (35% of men) with heterozygous FH (90.6% with LDL receptor mutations), mean age of 51 ± 14 years and total cholesterol levels of 342 ± 86 mg /dL. Results The prevalences of PAD and previous CVD were 17% and 28.2 %, respectively. On multivariate analysis, an independent association between CVD and the diagnosis of PAD was observed (OR = 2.50; 95% CI: 1.004 - 6.230; p = 0.049). Conclusion Systematic screening for PAD by use of ABI is feasible to assess patients with FH, and it might indicate an increased risk for CVD. However, further studies are required to determine the role of ABI as a tool to assess the cardiovascular risk of those patients. PMID:25029472

  3. Aortic augmentation index in patients with peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Catalano, Mariella; Scandale, Giovanni; Carzaniga, Gianni; Cinquini, Michela; Minola, Marzio; Antoniazzi, Valeria; Dimitrov, Gabriel; Carotta, Maria

    2014-11-01

    Aortic augmentation index (AIx) is used to investigate arterial stiffness. The authors tested the hypothesis that patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) demonstrate a higher AIx and also evaluated several related factors. In 97 patients with PAD, identified by ankle-brachial pressure index (ABPI ≤ 0.9), and 97 controls (ABPI ≥ 0.91< 1.4), AIx (%) was determined using tonometry of the radial artery. There was no significant difference between patients and controls in characteristics of age, sex, height, diastolic blood pressure, mean blood pressure, and heart rate. AIx was higher in patients with PAD (32 ± 9 vs 28 ± 9; P = .001). In multivariate regression analysis, AIx was independently associated with heart rate (β = -0.40, P = .0005). This study showed that AIx increased in patients with PAD and that heart rate is a determinant of AIx. Further studies are necessary to assess the pathophysiological and clinical importance of AIx in patients with PAD. PMID:25228305

  4. Relationship of Inflammatory Biomarkers with Severity of Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Toyofuku, Takahiro; Inoue, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The pentraxin family, including high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), serum amyloid P (SAP), and pentraxin 3 (PTX3), has been identified as playing a key role in inflammatory reactions such as in atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. In this study, we examined the relationship between peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and serum levels of pentraxins. Methods. This study was undertaken via a retrospective review of PAD patients with surgical intervention for lesions of the common femoral artery. We evaluated the preoperative patient conditions, hemodynamic status, such as ankle brachial index (ABI), and clinical ischemic conditions according to Rutherford classification. Preoperatively, we collected blood samples for determining the serum levels of hs-CRP, SAP, and PTX3. Results. Twelve PAD patients with common femoral arterial lesions were treated and examined. The hemodynamic severity of PAD was not negatively correlated with hs-CRP, SAP, or PTX3. The clinical severity evaluated by Rutherford classification was significantly positively correlated with the serum level of PTX3 (p = 0.019). Conclusion. We demonstrated that PTX3 might be a better marker of PAD than hs-CRP and SAP. Furthermore, PTX3 might be a prognostic marker to evaluate the severity of PAD. PMID:27559483

  5. Relationship of Inflammatory Biomarkers with Severity of Peripheral Arterial Disease.

    PubMed

    Igari, Kimihiro; Kudo, Toshifumi; Toyofuku, Takahiro; Inoue, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The pentraxin family, including high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), serum amyloid P (SAP), and pentraxin 3 (PTX3), has been identified as playing a key role in inflammatory reactions such as in atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. In this study, we examined the relationship between peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and serum levels of pentraxins. Methods. This study was undertaken via a retrospective review of PAD patients with surgical intervention for lesions of the common femoral artery. We evaluated the preoperative patient conditions, hemodynamic status, such as ankle brachial index (ABI), and clinical ischemic conditions according to Rutherford classification. Preoperatively, we collected blood samples for determining the serum levels of hs-CRP, SAP, and PTX3. Results. Twelve PAD patients with common femoral arterial lesions were treated and examined. The hemodynamic severity of PAD was not negatively correlated with hs-CRP, SAP, or PTX3. The clinical severity evaluated by Rutherford classification was significantly positively correlated with the serum level of PTX3 (p = 0.019). Conclusion. We demonstrated that PTX3 might be a better marker of PAD than hs-CRP and SAP. Furthermore, PTX3 might be a prognostic marker to evaluate the severity of PAD. PMID:27559483

  6. Cooled artery extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gernert, Nelson J. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    An artery vapor trap. A heat pipe artery is constructed with an extension protruding from the evaporator end of the heat pipe beyond the active area of the evaporator. The vapor migrates into the artery extension because of gravity or liquid displacement, and cooling the extension condenses the vapor to liquid, thus preventing vapor lock in the working portion of the artery by removing vapor from within the active artery. The condensed liquid is then transported back to the evaporator by the capillary action of the artery extension itself or by wick located within the extension.

  7. Physical exercise improves arterial stiffness after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Hubli, Michèle; Currie, Katharine D.; West, Christopher R.; Gee, Cameron M.; Krassioukov, Andrei V.

    2014-01-01

    Objective/background Aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV), the gold-standard assessment of central arterial stiffness, has prognostic value for cardiovascular disease risk in able-bodied individuals. The aim of this study was to compare aortic PWV in athletes and non-athletes with spinal cord injury (SCI). Design Cross-sectional comparison. Methods Aortic PWV was assessed in 20 individuals with motor-complete, chronic SCI (C2–T5; 18 ± 8 years post-injury) using applanation tonometry at the carotid and femoral arterial sites. Ten elite hand-cyclists were matched for sex to 10 non-athletes; age and time since injury were comparable between the groups. Heart rate and discrete brachial blood pressure measurements were collected throughout testing. Outcome measures Aortic PWV, blood pressure, heart rate. Results Aortic PWV was significantly lower in athletes vs. non-athletes (6.9 ± 1.0 vs. 8.7 ± 2.5 m/second, P = 0.044). There were no significant between-group differences in resting supine mean arterial blood pressure (91 ± 19 vs. 81 ± 10 mmHg) and heart rate (60 ± 10 vs. 58 ± 6 b.p.m.). Conclusion Athletes with SCI exhibited improved central arterial stiffness compared to non-athletes, which is in agreement with the previous able-bodied literature. This finding implies that chronic exercise training may improve arterial health and potentially lower cardiovascular disease risk in the SCI population. PMID:24976366

  8. Repair of Multiple Subclavian and Axillary Artery Aneurysms in a 58-Year-Old Man with Marfan Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Dolapoglu, Ahmet; Preventza, Ourania; Coselli, Joseph S.

    2016-01-01

    Dilation of the ascending aorta and aortic dissections are often seen in Marfan syndrome; however, true aneurysms of the subclavian and axillary arteries rarely seem to develop in patients who have this disease. We present the case of a 58-year-old man with Marfan syndrome who had undergone a Bentall procedure and thoracoabdominal aortic repair for an aortic dissection and who later developed multiple aneurysmal dilations of his right subclavian and axillary arteries. The aneurysms were successfully repaired by means of a surgical bypass technique in which a Dacron graft was placed between the carotid and brachial arteries. We also discuss our strategy for determining the optimal surgical approach in these patients. PMID:27777529

  9. Brachial plexus block using lidocaine/epinephrine or lidocaine/xylazine in fat-tailed sheep.

    PubMed

    Ghadirian, Safoura; Vesal, Nasser

    2013-01-01

    This blinded, randomized experimental study was designed to evaluate the analgesic effects of adding epinephrine or xylazine to lidocaine solution for brachial plexus block (BPB) in sheep. Nine healthy, fat-tailed female lambs (26.6 ± 1.5 kg) were randomly allocated into three groups: lidocaine 2%, 5 mg kg(-1) (LID, n = 6), lidocaine (5 mg kg(-1)) with epinephrine 5 µg mL(-1) (LIDEP, n = 6) or lidocaine (5 mg kg(-1)) with xylazine 0.05 mg kg(-1) (LIDXY, n = 6). Each animal was tested twice. The sheep received a total volume of 0.25 mL kg(-1) for BPB. A nerve stimulator was used to locate the nerves of the brachial plexus. Onset and duration of analgesia of the forelimb were evaluated using superficial and deep pin prick and pinching of skin with a hemostat clamp. Heart and respiratory rates, and rectal temperature were recorded before and at predetermined intervals following the completion of the block. Brachial administration of LID, LIDEP or LIDXY produced forelimb analgesia within 11.3, 11.0 and 7.0 minutes, respectively. The mean duration of analgesia was 100.0 min in LID and 133.2 min in LIDEP group. The mean duration of analgesia in LIDXY group (186.8 min) was significantly longer compared with LID group. In LIDEP group a significant increase in heart rate occurred 5 min after drug administration. Heart rate decreased from 35 to 80 min in sheep received LIDXY. In conclusion, the addition of xylazine to lidocaine solution for BBP provided a prolonged duration of action without any adverse effects in fat-tailed sheep. PMID:25653791

  10. Brachial plexus block using lidocaine/epinephrine or lidocaine/xylazine in fat-tailed sheep.

    PubMed

    Ghadirian, Safoura; Vesal, Nasser

    2013-01-01

    This blinded, randomized experimental study was designed to evaluate the analgesic effects of adding epinephrine or xylazine to lidocaine solution for brachial plexus block (BPB) in sheep. Nine healthy, fat-tailed female lambs (26.6 ± 1.5 kg) were randomly allocated into three groups: lidocaine 2%, 5 mg kg(-1) (LID, n = 6), lidocaine (5 mg kg(-1)) with epinephrine 5 µg mL(-1) (LIDEP, n = 6) or lidocaine (5 mg kg(-1)) with xylazine 0.05 mg kg(-1) (LIDXY, n = 6). Each animal was tested twice. The sheep received a total volume of 0.25 mL kg(-1) for BPB. A nerve stimulator was used to locate the nerves of the brachial plexus. Onset and duration of analgesia of the forelimb were evaluated using superficial and deep pin prick and pinching of skin with a hemostat clamp. Heart and respiratory rates, and rectal temperature were recorded before and at predetermined intervals following the completion of the block. Brachial administration of LID, LIDEP or LIDXY produced forelimb analgesia within 11.3, 11.0 and 7.0 minutes, respectively. The mean duration of analgesia was 100.0 min in LID and 133.2 min in LIDEP group. The mean duration of analgesia in LIDXY group (186.8 min) was significantly longer compared with LID group. In LIDEP group a significant increase in heart rate occurred 5 min after drug administration. Heart rate decreased from 35 to 80 min in sheep received LIDXY. In conclusion, the addition of xylazine to lidocaine solution for BBP provided a prolonged duration of action without any adverse effects in fat-tailed sheep.

  11. Range of motion and strength after surgery for brachial plexus birth palsy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There is little information about the range of motion (ROM) and strength of the affected upper limbs of patients with permanent brachial plexus birth palsy. Patients and methods 107 patients who had brachial plexus surgery in Finland between 1971 and 1998 were investigated in this population-based, cross-sectional, 12-year follow-up study. During the follow-up, 59 patients underwent secondary procedures. ROM and isometric strength of the shoulders, elbows, wrists, and thumbs were measured. Ratios for ROM and strength between the affected and unaffected sides were calculated. Results 61 patients (57%) had no active shoulder external rotation (median 0° (-75–90)). Median active abduction was 90° (1–170). Shoulder external rotation strength of the affected side was diminished (median ratio 28% (0–83)). Active elbow extension deficiency was recorded in 82 patients (median 25° (5–80)). Elbow flexion strength of the affected side was uniformly impaired (median ratio 43% (0–79)). Median active extension of the wrist was 55° (-70–90). The median ratio of grip strength for the affected side vs. the unaffected side was 68% (0–121). Patients with total injury had poorer ROM and strength than those with C5–6 injury. Incongruity of the radiohumeral joint and avulsion were associated with poor strength values. Interpretation ROM and strength of affected upper limbs of patients with surgically treated brachial plexus birth palsy were reduced. Patients with avulsion injuries and/or consequent joint deformities fared worst. PMID:21142823

  12. Axillary brachial plexus block--an underused technique in the accident and emergency department.

    PubMed Central

    Mackay, C A; Bowden, D F

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare axillary brachial plexus block and Bier's block as methods of providing upper limb anaesthesia. METHODS: Axillary brachial plexus or Bier's blocks were performed on all patients requiring upper limb anaesthesia in a three month period. For Bier's block, a single cuff tourniquet and 3 mg/kg 0.5% prilocaine were used. For axillary plexus block, 40 ml 1% lignocaine with adrenaline (1:200,000) were used, given by perivascular or transarterial technique. Prospective analysis was made of time to complete limb anaesthesia, type of procedure performed, and duration of limb anaesthesia. Patient perception of analgesia and satisfaction with the method of anaesthesia was assessed using a 10 point visual analogue scale. RESULTS: 75 patients underwent procedures requiring upper limb anaesthesia; 39 received axillary plexus block and 36 Bier's block. 72% of Bier's blocks and 77% of axillary plexus provided complete anaesthesia without the need for supplemental analgesia. The median time to onset of anaesthesia was 10 min for Bier's block and 32.5 min for axillary block (P < 0.001). The median duration of anaesthesia was 15 min for Bier's block and 240 min for axillary block (P < 0.001). Mean scores for analgesia were 9.7 for axillary blocks and 8.8 for Bier's block (P < 0.001). 87% of the axillary block group were completely satisfied with the method of anaesthesia, compared with 56% of the Bier's block group. CONCLUSIONS: Brachial plexus blocks are an alternative form of providing upper limb anaesthesia in the accident and emergency department. They are relatively simple to perform, well tolerated by patients, and have the advantage of providing prolonged analgesia without the need for additional medication. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9248910

  13. Décompression chirurgicale du syndrome de défilé thoraco-brachial

    PubMed Central

    Lukulunga, Loubet Unyendje; Moussa, Abdou Kadri; Mahfoud, Mustapha; Ismael, Farid; Berrada, Mohamed Saleh; El Yaacoubi, Moradh

    2014-01-01

    Le syndrome de défilé thoraco-brachial est une pathologie souvent méconnue à cause de diagnostic difficile par manque des signes pathognomoniques conduisant souvent à des errances. Les manifestations cliniques dépendent selon qu'il s'agit d'une compression nerveuse, vasculaire ou vasculo-nerveuse. Le but de cette étude est de décrire certains aspects cliniques particuliers et évaluer le résultat fonctionnel après la décompression chirurgicale du paquet vasculo-nerveux. Notre étude rétrospective a porté sur l'analyse des données cliniques, radiologiques, IRM et EMG sur les patients opérés entre janvier 2010 et juillet 2013 du syndrome de défilé thoraco-brachial dans le service de traumatologie orthopédie de l'hôpital Ibn Sina de Rabat. 15 cas ont été colligés: 12 cas post traumatiques (fracture de la clavicule) et 3 cas d'origines congénitales, dont l’âge moyen était 35 ans (20 à 50 ans) avec 9 femmes et 6 hommes. A la fin du traitement, le score de Dash est passé de 109 (46% Normal=0) à 70 (20%), et le stress test de Roos était de 70/100 à 80/100. Le résultat était excellent dans 12 cas soit (80%) et moins bon dans dans 3 cas (20%). En définitive, la résection de malformations osseuses, l'excision des brides et la neurolyse du plexus brachial suivie de la rééducation a donné une bonne évolution fonctionnelle. PMID:25709735

  14. Estimation of central aortic pressure waveform features derived from the brachial cuff volume displacement waveform.

    PubMed

    Butlin, Mark; Qasem, Ahmad; Avolio, Alberto P

    2012-01-01

    There is increasing interest in non-invasive estimation of central aortic waveform parameters in the clinical setting. However, controversy has arisen around radial tonometric based systems due to the requirement of a trained operator or lack of ease of use, especially in the clinical environment. A recently developed device utilizes a novel algorithm for brachial cuff based assessment of aortic pressure values and waveform (SphygmoCor XCEL, AtCor Medical). The cuff was inflated to 10 mmHg below an individual's diastolic blood pressure and the brachial volume displacement waveform recorded. The aortic waveform was derived using proprietary digital signal processing and transfer function applied to the recorded waveform. The aortic waveform was also estimated using a validated technique (radial tonometry based assessment, SphygmoCor, AtCor Medical). Measurements were taken in triplicate with each device in 30 people (17 female) aged 22 to 79 years of age. An average for each device for each individual was calculated, and the results from the two devices were compared using regression and Bland-Altman analysis. A high correlation was found between the devices for measures of aortic systolic (R(2)=0.99) and diastolic (R(2)=0.98) pressure. Augmentation index and subendocardial viability ratio both had a between device R(2) value of 0.82. The difference between devices for measured aortic systolic pressure was 0.5±1.8 mmHg, and for augmentation index, 1.8±7.0%. The brachial cuff based approach, with an individualized sub-diastolic cuff pressure, provides an operator independent method of assessing not only systolic pressure, but also aortic waveform features, comparable to existing validated tonometric-based methods.

  15. Arterial stiffness, endothelial function and microcirculatory reactivity in healthy young males.

    PubMed

    Wright, C I; Scholten, H J; Schilder, J C M; Elsen, B M; Hanselaar, W; Kroner, C I; Draijer, R; Kastelein, J J P; Stok, W; Karemaker, J; de Groot, E

    2008-09-01

    Large (C1) and small (C2) arterial stiffness has been suggested to parallel endothelial reactivity and has led researchers to suggest parameters of arterial stiffness may be alternative measures to brachial sonographic assessments of flow-mediated dilatation (FMD). However, past studies comparing these measures can be criticized. In addition to %FMD responses, we recorded concurrent hyperaemic responses of the microcirculation and both were compared with C1 and C2. Twenty-nine subjects 18-30 years of age were investigated. Radial blood pressure was recorded with a tonometer. Pulse waveform analysis was performed to calculate C1 and C2. These were compared with %FMD responses and responses of finger flux measured by laser Doppler fluxmetry (LDF); pulsatile finger volume measured by photoplethysmography (PPG); and palm skin temperature measured by infrared thermography (Tpalm) (i.e. microcirculatory responses). Responses were determined as % changes from control. We only found weak relationships between C1 and %FMD (r=0.4, P=0.04); C2 and %PPG (r=0.38, P=0.07); and C2 and %LDFdorsal (r=-0.38; P=0.04). Responses of %FMD weakly parallel those of C1. Neither C2 nor C1 are viable indicators of endothelial or microcirculatory reactivity (i.e. hyperaemic or venous constriction) in healthy, resting young males. These findings refute the claims that C1 and C2 are substitute measures to sonographic assessments of brachial FMD. PMID:18445071

  16. Coronary Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the most common type of heart disease. It is the leading cause of death ... both men and women. CAD happens when the arteries that supply blood to heart muscle become hardened ...

  17. Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... changes and medication . View an animation of atherosclerosis Atherosclerosis and PAD Atherosclerosis is a disease in which plaque builds up ... of an artery. PAD is usually caused by atherosclerosis in the peripheral arteries (or outer regions away ...

  18. Coronary artery fistula

    MedlinePlus

    Congenital heart defect - coronary artery fistula; Birth defect heart - coronary artery fistula ... attaches to one of the chambers of the heart (the atrium or ventricle) or another blood vessel ( ...

  19. Occlusive Peripheral Arterial Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... artery. Such people should seek medical care immediately. Did You Know... When people suddenly develop a painful, ... In This Article Animation 1 Peripheral Arterial Disease Did You Know 1 Did You Know... Figure 1 ...

  20. Brachial Plexopathy in Apical Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Definitive Radiation: Dosimetric Analysis and Clinical Implications

    SciTech Connect

    Eblan, Michael J.; Corradetti, Michael N.; Lukens, J. Nicholas; Xanthopoulos, Eric; Mitra, Nandita; Christodouleas, John P.; Grover, Surbhi; Fernandes, Annemarie T.; Langer, Corey J.; Evans, Tracey L.; Stevenson, James; Rengan, Ramesh; Apisarnthanarax, Smith

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Data are limited on the clinical significance of brachial plexopathy in patients with apical non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) treated with definitive radiation therapy. We report the rates of radiation-induced brachial plexopathy (RIBP) and tumor-related brachial plexopathy (TRBP) and associated dosimetric parameters in apical NSCLC patients. Methods and Materials: Charts of NSCLC patients with primary upper lobe or superiorly located nodal disease who received {>=}50 Gy of definitive conventionally fractionated radiation or chemoradiation were retrospectively reviewed for evidence of brachial plexopathy and categorized as RIBP, TRBP, or trauma-related. Dosimetric data were gathered on ipsilateral brachial plexuses (IBP) contoured according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group atlas guidelines. Results: Eighty patients were identified with a median follow-up and survival time of 17.2 and 17.7 months, respectively. The median prescribed dose was 66.6 Gy (range, 50.4-84.0), and 71% of patients received concurrent chemotherapy. RIBP occurred in 5 patients with an estimated 3-year rate of 12% when accounting for competing risk of death. Seven patients developed TRBP (estimated 3-year rate of 13%), comprising 24% of patients who developed locoregional failures. Grade 3 brachial plexopathy was more common in patients who experienced TRBP than RIBP (57% vs 20%). No patient who received {<=}78 Gy to the IBP developed RIBP. On multivariable competing risk analysis, IBP V76 receiving {>=}1 cc, and primary tumor failure had the highest hazard ratios for developing RIBP and TRBP, respectively. Conclusions: RIBP is a relatively uncommon complication in patients with apical NSCLC tumors receiving definitive doses of radiation, while patients who develop primary tumor failures are at high risk for developing morbid TRBP. These findings suggest that the importance of primary tumor control with adequate doses of radiation outweigh the risk of RIBP in this population of

  1. Accuracy of the ankle-brachial index using the SCVL®, an arm and ankle automated device with synchronized cuffs, in a population with increased cardiovascular risk

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbaum, David; Rodriguez-Carranza, Sandra; Laroche, Patrick; Bruckert, Eric; Giral, Philippe; Girerd, Xavier

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the accuracy of the ankle brachial index (ABI) measured with the SCVL® (“screening cardiovascular lab”; GenNov, Paris, France), an automated device with synchronized arm and ankle cuffs with an automatic ABI calculation. Methods Patients were consecutively included in a cardiovascular prevention unit if they presented with at least two cardiovascular risk factors. ABI measurements were made using the SCVL, following a synchronized assessment of brachial and ankle systolic pressure. These values were compared to the ABI obtained with the usual Doppler-assisted method. Results We included 157 patients. Mean age was 59.1 years, 56.8% had hypertension, 22.3% had diabetes mellitus, and 17.6% were current smokers. An abnormal ABI was observed in 17.2% with the SCVL and in 16.2% with the Doppler. The prevalence rates of an abnormal ABI by patient measured with each device, ie, 15.7% (confidence interval [CI] 0.95: [11.8; 20.4]) or 14.3% (CI 0.95: [10.7; 18.9]), did not differ. The coefficient of variation of Doppler and SCVL measures was 15.8% and 15.1%, respectively. The regression line between the two measurement methods was statistically significant. The value-to-value comparison also shows a difference of mean equal to 0.010 (CI 0.95: [−0.272; 0.291]) (r = −0.055). Reproducibility of ABI measurements with the SCVL showed a difference of mean equal to 0.009 (CI 0.95: [−0.203; 0.222]), without heteroscedasticity (r = −0.003). Conclusion The SCVL is a fast and easy to use automated oscillometric device for the determination of ABI. The use of this two-synchronized-cuff device correlates well with the gold standard Doppler ultrasound method and is reproducible. The SCVL may ease the screening for peripheral arterial disease in routine medical practice. PMID:22566745

  2. Humeral rotational osteotomy for shoulder deformity in obstetric brachial plexus palsy: which direction should I rotate?

    PubMed

    Abdelgawad, Amr A; Pirela-Cruz, Miguel A

    2014-01-01

    Shoulder internal rotation contracture is the most common deformity affecting the shoulder in patients with Obstetric Brachial Plexus Palsy. With progression of the deformity, the glenohumeral joint starts to subluxate and then dislocates. This is accompanied with bony changes of both the humerus and the glenoid. Two opposite direction humeral osteotomies have been proposed for this condition (internal rotation osteotomy (IRO) and external rotation osteotomy (ERO)). This fact of different direction osteotomies has not adequately been explained in the literature. Most orthopedic surgeons may not be able to fully differentiate between these two osteotomies regarding the indications, outcomes and effects on the joint. This review explains these differences in details.

  3. Dorsal root entry zone lesions (Nashold's procedure) for pain relief following brachial plexus avulsion.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, D G; Sheehy, J P

    1983-01-01

    Brachial plexus avulsion is an important cause of severe intractable pain, particularly in young motor cyclists. The pain usually develops soon after the injury. In a minority of cases severe pain persists and is refractory to management. Nineteen patients are reviewed in whom dorsal root entry zone lesions have been produced for pain relief. The operative technique is described. Early post-operative motor or sensory disturbance in the ipsilateral leg have been temporary side effects, with mild persisting deficits in a minority. Sixteen cases have had significant persisting pain relief. The maximum follow-up period is 2 1/2 years. Images PMID:6644316

  4. Arthroscopic Release of Adhesive Capsulitis of the Shoulder Complicated With Shoulder Dislocation and Brachial Plexus Injury.

    PubMed

    Nunez, Fiesky A; Papadonikolakis, Anastasios; Li, Zhongyu

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of brachial plexus injury after shoulder dislocation or arthroscopic shoulder surgery is low. Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is an uncommon but painful condition that can develop after nerve injury. Historically, CRPS has been difficult to treat and therapeutic efforts are sometimes limited to ameliorating symptoms. However, if a dystrophic focus can be identified, the condition can be addressed with surgical exploration for potential neurolysis or nerve repair. The present article reports on a case of type II CRPS that developed in the postoperative setting of arthroscopic shoulder surgery complicated with simple shoulder dislocation. PMID:27518297

  5. Arterial and venous embolization: Declotting of dialysis shunts by direct injection of streptokinase

    SciTech Connect

    Zeit, R.M.

    1986-06-01

    During the past 33 months, thrombolysis of 79 clotted hemodialysis shunts was attempted by injecting small quantities of dilute streptokinase solution directly into the clotted shunt, followed by massage of the clot. Embolization of clot fragments in six of 79 cases (7.6%) was demonstrated angiographically. In four of the six cases embolization involved the brachial artery or its branches. In one case embolization involved an arm vein, and in one case embolization involved both the bracial artery and axillary vein. All patients remained asymptomatic, and repeat angiographic study, usually performed the following day, showed resolution of the emboli in four of five cases. The incidence of embolization in direct-injection thrombolysis reported in this study appears to be comparable to that reported in studies using the streptokinase infusion technique.

  6. Detecting lower extremity vascular dynamics in patients with peripheral artery disease using diffuse optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, Michael A.; Kim, Hyun-Keol K.; Kim, In-Kyong; Dayal, Rajeev; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2011-02-01

    Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) affects over 10 million Americans and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. While in many cases the ankle-brachial index (ABI) can be used for diagnosing the disease, this parameter is not dependable in the diabetic and elderly population. These populations tend to have calcified arteries, which leads to elevated ABI values. Dynamic optical tomography (DDOT) promises to overcome the limitations of the current diagnostic techniques and has the potential to initiate a paradigm shift in the diagnosis of vascular disease. We have performed initial pilot studies involving 5 PAD patients and 3 healthy volunteers. The time traces and tomographic reconstruction obtained from measurements on the feet show significant differences between healthy and affected vasculatures. In addition, we found that DOT is capable of identifying PAD in diabetic patients, who are misdiagnosed by the traditional ABI screening.

  7. Cerebral Small Vessel Disease and Arterial Stiffness: Tsunami Effect in the Brain?

    PubMed Central

    Saji, Naoki; Toba, Kenji; Sakurai, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Background Cerebral small vessel diseases, including silent lacunar infarcts, white matter hyperintensities, and microbleeds, pose a risk for cerebrovascular disease, cognitive impairment, and the geriatric syndrome via effects on arterial stiffness. However, the vascular, physiological, and metabolic roles of arterial stiffness in cerebral small vessel diseases remain unclear. Summary Arterial stiffness can be assessed using various indicators such as the ankle-brachial index, pulse wave velocity, cardio-ankle vascular index, and augmentation index. Arterial stiffness is independently associated with all components of cerebral small vessel disease including silent lacunar infarcts, white matter hyperintensities, and microbleeds, although there are some methodological differences between the various surrogate markers. Evidence of arterial stiffness indicates microvessel arteriosclerosis presenting with vascular endothelial dysfunction. Further, vascular narrowing due to atherosclerosis and vascular stiffness due to lipohyalinosis can accelerate the pulse waves. This hemodynamic stress, pulsatile pressure, or blood pressure variability can cause a ‘tsunami effect’ towards the cerebral parenchyma and lead to cerebral small vessel disease. Previous studies have shown that silent lacunar infarcts and white matter hyperintensities are strongly associated with arterial stiffness. However, the association between microbleeds and arterial stiffness remains controversial, as there are two vessel mechanisms related to microbleeds: cerebral amyloid angiopathy and hypertensive small vessel disease. Key Messages Cerebral small vessel disease with associated arterial stiffness is a risk factor for silent cerebral lesions, stroke, and cognitive impairment. Improvement of the living environment, management of risk factors, and innovation and development of novel drugs that improve arterial stiffness may suppress the progression of cerebral small vessel disease, and may reduce

  8. Blunt trauma of thorax with subclavian and axillary artery lesion--case report.

    PubMed

    Fudurić, Jurica; Erdeljac, Željko; Frketić, Ivan; Miletić, Matija; Zadro, Ana Soštarić; Bacić, Ivan; Rašić, Zarko; Zadro, Zvonko; Martinac, Miran; Missoni, Eduard

    2014-09-01

    We report a rare case of blunt trauma of the axillary artery in a 20-year-old man who was injured as a motorcycle rider and received severe body injuries. Injuries included severe trauma of the left lower leg with contusion and extensive soft tissue and bone trauma of these regions with poor general condition and with the presence of clinical signs of traumatic shock. Upon arrival, we found that in addition to earlier clearly visible trauma to the leg, there was a hematoma of the medial side of the left supraclavicular region and the absence of the radial artery pulse with paralysis of the left arm. Given the clinical findings, emergency radiological examination was made to the patient (X-ray, US, CDFI, MSCT-angiography) and we found out that there was trauma of axillary artery with clear signs of thrombosis of extra thoracic part of subclavian artery due to its transition into the axillary artery. After hemodynamic stabilization, above knee amputation of the left leg was performed and emergency exploration of earlier mentioned arteries. Bypass of the damaged arteries with synthetic graft 6 mm in diameter was made. Control MSCT angiography showed normal flow in the arterial tree of the whole left hand and the MRI of the cervical spine and shoulder girdle did not found lesions of the brachial plexus. SSEP demonstrated the absence of pulses on the left hand. Patient on regular check-ups showed normal general condition, with adequate passable graft and pronounced paralysis on the left hand. In the process of rehabilitation physiotherapy was also included. Blunt trauma to the axillary artery is an extremely rare example of trauma of blood vessels which makes only 0.03% of all vascular injuries.

  9. Brachial blood pressure-independent relations between radial late systolic shoulder-derived aortic pressures and target organ changes.

    PubMed

    Norton, Gavin R; Majane, Olebogeng H I; Maseko, Muzi J; Libhaber, Carlos; Redelinghuys, Michelle; Kruger, Deirdre; Veller, Martin; Sareli, Pinhas; Woodiwiss, Angela J

    2012-04-01

    Central aortic blood pressure (BP; BPc) predicts outcomes beyond brachial BP. In this regard, the application of a generalized transfer function (GTF) to radial pulse waves for the derivation of BPc is an easy and reproducible measurement technique. However, the use of the GTF may not be appropriate in all circumstances. Although the peak of the second shoulder of the radial waveform (P2) is closely associated with BPc, and, hence, BPc may be assessed without the need for a GTF, whether P2-derived BPc is associated with adverse cardiovascular changes independent of brachial BP is uncertain. Thus, P2- and GTF-derived aortic BPs were assessed using applanation tonometry and SphygmoCor software. Left ventricular mass was indexed for height(1.7) (n=678) and carotid intima-media thickness (IMT; n=462) was determined using echocardiography and vascular ultrasound. With adjustments for nurse-derived brachial pulse pressure (PP), P2-derived central PP was independently associated with left ventricular mass indexed for height(1.7) (partial r=0.18; P<0.0001) and IMT (partial r=0.40; P<0.0001). These relations were similar to nurse-derived brachial PP-independent relations between GTF-derived central PP and target organ changes (left ventricular mass indexed for height(1.7): partial r=0.17, P<0.0001; IMT: partial r=0.37, P<0.0001). In contrast, with adjustments for central PP, nurse-derived brachial PP-target organ relations were eliminated (partial r=-0.21 to 0.05). Twenty-four-hour, day, and night PP-target organ relations did not survive adjustments for nurse-derived brachial BP. In conclusion, central PP derived from P2, which does not require a GTF, is associated with cardiovascular target organ changes independent of brachial BP. Thus, when assessing adverse cardiovascular effects of aortic BP independent of brachial BP, P2-derived measures may complement GTF-derived measures of aortic BP.

  10. Carotid Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... and efficacy continues to be studied in several medical centers. This procedure involves the placement of a small flexible tube (catheter) into an artery from the groin. The catheter is then directed to the neck to reach the carotid artery blockage. A balloon pushes open the artery wall and a stent ( ...

  11. Arterial stiffness after glucose ingestion in exercise-trained versus untrained men.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Ryota; Yoshida, Shou; Okamoto, Takanobu

    2015-11-01

    Postprandial hyperglycemia increases arterial stiffness. Arterial stiffness and insulin resistance are lower in exercise-trained humans than in untrained humans. However, the effect of exercise on arterial stiffness after glucose ingestion in young adults remains unknown. The present study investigates the effect of regular aerobic exercise on arterial stiffness after glucose ingestion in young males. Ten exercise-trained males (age, 20.8 ± 0.2 years; ETR) and 9 healthy untrained males (age, 22.2 ± 0.7 years; UTR) participated in this study. Carotid-femoral (aortic) pulse wave velocity (PWV), femoral-ankle (leg) PWV, carotid augmentation index (AIx) (applanation tonometry), brachial and ankle blood pressure (BP), heart rate (oscillometric device and electrocardiography), and blood glucose (glucose oxidase method) were measured at 30 min before (baseline) and 30, 60, and 120 min after a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test. Leg PWV at 30 min after glucose ingestion was significantly higher (P < 0.01) in the UTR group than in the ETR group. Ankle systolic BP at 30 min after glucose ingestion was also significantly higher in the UTR group than in the ETR group (P < 0.05). Blood glucose increased from baseline at 30 min (P < 0.01) and 60 min (P < 0.05) after glucose ingestion in both groups. Aortic PWV, carotid AIx, and brachial systolic BP did not change from baseline after glucose ingestion in both groups. The present findings indicate that leg PWV and ankle systolic BP after glucose ingestion were significantly lower in the ETR group than in the UTR group. PMID:26444929

  12. Impact of excess body weight on arterial structure, function, and blood pressure in firefighters.

    PubMed

    Fahs, Christopher A; Smith, Denise L; Horn, Gavin P; Agiovlasitis, Stamatis; Rossow, Lindy M; Echols, George; Heffernan, Kevin S; Fernhall, Bo

    2009-11-15

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death among firefighters. The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of excess body weight on arterial structure and function and blood pressure (BP) in relatively young, apparently healthy, firefighters. The body mass index, brachial BP, carotid BP, aortic BP, radial augmentation index, central pulse wave velocity, forearm blood flow, forearm vasodilatory capacity, carotid arterial compliance, carotid intima-media thickness, and brachial flow-mediated dilation were assessed in 110 firefighters (aged 29.7 +/- 8.0 years). The group was divided into equal tertiles according to the body mass index (<25.9, 25.9 to 29.4, and >or=29.5 kg/m(2)). Group differences in hemodynamics, anthropometrics, microvascular function, and macrovascular structure and function were tested using multivariate analysis of variance. The obese group was older, heavier, and had a larger waist circumference compared to the lean and overweight groups (p <0.05). The overweight group was also older, heavier, and had a larger waist circumference than the lean group (p <0.05). Compared to the lean group, the overweight and obese groups had a greater systolic BP (p <0.05). The obese group also had a significantly greater mean arterial BP and carotid systolic BP than the lean group (p <0.05). The obese group had greater beta stiffness and elastic modulus compared to the lean and overweight groups (p <0.05), but no group differences were found in endothelial function. In conclusion, in a population of relatively young firefighters, an increased body mass index was associated with elevated peripheral BP and arterial stiffness, with no apparent decrements in endothelial function.

  13. Arterial stiffness after glucose ingestion in exercise-trained versus untrained men.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Ryota; Yoshida, Shou; Okamoto, Takanobu

    2015-11-01

    Postprandial hyperglycemia increases arterial stiffness. Arterial stiffness and insulin resistance are lower in exercise-trained humans than in untrained humans. However, the effect of exercise on arterial stiffness after glucose ingestion in young adults remains unknown. The present study investigates the effect of regular aerobic exercise on arterial stiffness after glucose ingestion in young males. Ten exercise-trained males (age, 20.8 ± 0.2 years; ETR) and 9 healthy untrained males (age, 22.2 ± 0.7 years; UTR) participated in this study. Carotid-femoral (aortic) pulse wave velocity (PWV), femoral-ankle (leg) PWV, carotid augmentation index (AIx) (applanation tonometry), brachial and ankle blood pressure (BP), heart rate (oscillometric device and electrocardiography), and blood glucose (glucose oxidase method) were measured at 30 min before (baseline) and 30, 60, and 120 min after a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test. Leg PWV at 30 min after glucose ingestion was significantly higher (P < 0.01) in the UTR group than in the ETR group. Ankle systolic BP at 30 min after glucose ingestion was also significantly higher in the UTR group than in the ETR group (P < 0.05). Blood glucose increased from baseline at 30 min (P < 0.01) and 60 min (P < 0.05) after glucose ingestion in both groups. Aortic PWV, carotid AIx, and brachial systolic BP did not change from baseline after glucose ingestion in both groups. The present findings indicate that leg PWV and ankle systolic BP after glucose ingestion were significantly lower in the ETR group than in the UTR group.

  14. Contemporary medical management of peripheral arterial disease: a focus on risk reduction and symptom relief for intermittent claudication.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Kush; Eberhardt, Robert T

    2015-02-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is primarily caused by progressive systemic atherosclerosis manifesting in the lower extremities. This review addresses the epidemiology, clinical presentation and evaluation, and medical management of PAD, with a focus on intermittent claudication. Key advances in the recognition of cardiovascular risk in asymptomatic individuals with mildly abnormal ankle-brachial index, newer reflections on exercise therapy, and a review of established and investigational agents for the treatment of symptomatic PAD, such as cilostazol, statins, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, are highlighted.

  15. [Upper extremity arterial diseases].

    PubMed

    Becker, F

    2007-02-01

    Compared to lower limb arterial diseases, upper limb arterial diseases look rare, heterogeneous with various etiologies and a rather vague clinical picture, but with a negligible risk of amputation. Almost all types of arterial diseases can be present in the upper limb, but the anatomical and hemodynamic conditions particular to the upper limb often confuse the issue. Thus, atherosclerosis affects mainly the subclavian artery in its proximal segment where the potential of collateral pathway is high making the symptomatic forms not very frequent whereas the prevalence of subclavian artery stenosis or occlusion is relatively high. The clinical examination and the etiologies are discussed according to the clinical, anatomical and hemodynamic context.

  16. Jet pump assisted artery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A procedure for priming an arterial heat pump is reported; the procedure also has a means for maintaining the pump in a primed state. This concept utilizes a capillary driven jet pump to create the necessary suction to fill the artery. Basically, the jet pump consists of a venturi or nozzle-diffuser type constriction in the vapor passage. The throat of this venturi is connected to the artery. Thus vapor, gas, liquid, or a combination of the above is pumped continuously out of the artery. As a result, the artery is always filled with liquid and an adequate supply of working fluid is provided to the evaporator of the heat pipe.

  17. External artery heat pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gernert, Nelson J. (Inventor); Ernst, Donald M. (Inventor); Shaubach, Robert M. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    An improved heat pipe with an external artery. The longitudinal slot in the heat pipe wall which interconnects the heat pipe vapor space with the external artery is completely filled with sintered wick material and the wall of the external artery is also covered with sintered wick material. This added wick structure assures that the external artery will continue to feed liquid to the heat pipe evaporator even if a vapor bubble forms within and would otherwise block the liquid transport function of the external artery.

  18. Serum Sclerostin as an Independent Marker of Peripheral Arterial Stiffness in Renal Transplantation Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Bang-Gee; Liou, Hung-Hsiang; Lee, Chung-Jen; Chen, Yen-Cheng; Ho, Guan-Jin; Lee, Ming-Che

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway is thought to be implicated in the development of arterial stiffness and vascular calcification. As a Wnt signaling pathway inhibitor, it is interesting to investigate whether sclerostin or dickkopf-1 (DKK1) level is correlated with arterial stiffness in renal transplant (RT) recipients. Fasting blood samples were obtained for biochemical data, sclerostin, DKK1, and osteoprotegerin (OPG) determinations. In this study, we applied automatic pulse wave analyzer (VaSera VS-1000) to measure brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity and either sides of brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity value, which greater than 14.0 m/s was determined as high arterial stiffness. Among 68 RT recipients, 30 patients (44.1%) were in the high arterial stiffness group. Compared with patients in the low arterial stiffness group, patients in the high arterial stiffness group had higher prevalence of hypertension (P = 0.002), diabetes (P < 0.001), metabolic syndrome (P = 0.025), longer posttransplant duration (P = 0.005), higher systolic blood pressure (P < 0.001) and diastolic blood pressure (P = 0.018), and higher fasting glucose (P = 0.004), total cholesterol (P = 0.042), blood urea nitrogen (P = 0.020), phosphorus (P = 0.042), and sclerostin levels (P = 0.001). According to our multivariable forward stepwise linear regression analysis, age (β = 0.272, P = 0.014), phosphorus (β = 0.308, P = 0.007), and logarithmically-transformed OPG (log-OPG; β = 0.222, P = 0.046) were positively associated with sclerostin levels, and multivariate logistic regression analysis, sclerostin (odds ratio 1.052, 95% confidence interval 1.007–1.099, P = 0.024), and posttransplant duration (odds ratio 1.024, 95% confidence interval 1.004–1.045, P = 0.019) were the independent predictors of peripheral arterial stiffness in RT recipients. In this study, serum sclerostin level, but not DKK1, was

  19. Brachial plexus birth palsy: Management during the first year of life.

    PubMed

    Abid, A

    2016-02-01

    Brachial plexus birth palsy (BPBP) is defined as an injury to any nerve root of the brachial plexus during difficult delivery. BPBP is relatively rare; its incidence has remained constant over the last few decades, mostly due to unpredictable risk factors, such as shoulder dystocia. Both diagnosis and assessment of spontaneous recovery is based on clinical examination. Electromyography is difficult to interpret in the newborn and is therefore not meaningful. MRI of the cervical spine requires sedation or general anesthesia. Searching for a pre-ganglion tear prior to surgery is indicted. Prognosis depends on the level of the injury (pre- or post-ganglion), size and severity of the post-ganglion tears, speed of recovery, and quality of initial management. Although spontaneous recovery is frequent, some children suffer various degrees of sequelae, up to complete loss of function of the affected upper limb. Recent publications have improved general knowledge and indications for surgery. However, some aspects, such as indication and timing of nerve repair continue to be debated. PMID:26774906

  20. Occult rib fractures and brachial plexus injury following median sternotomy for open-heart operations.

    PubMed

    Baisden, C E; Greenwald, L V; Symbas, P N

    1984-09-01

    The incidence and the sites of rib fractures during open-heart operations through a median sternotomy incision were studied in 36 consecutive patients divided into two groups. In Group 1 (24 patients), a conventional Ankeney retractor was used to expose the heart, and in Group 2 (12 patients), a similar retractor was used but with its uppermost pair of blades removed. Thorough physical examinations and preoperative and postoperative chest roentgenograms were obtained, and postoperative bone scans were done in all patients. No rib fractures were detected on the routine chest roentgenograms in patients in either group. Bone scans, however, showed 44 rib fractures (15 of the first rib, 13 of the second rib, 4 of the third rib, 6 of the fourth rib, 3 of the fifth rib, and 3 of the sixth rib) in 16 patients in Group 1. Six patients in Group 2 had 9 rib fractures (2 of the first rib, 4 of the second rib, and 1 each of the third, fifth, and sixth ribs). None of the patients in Group 2 had brachial plexus injury and neither of the first rib fractures in this group were located posteriorly, whereas 3 patients in Group 1 had both brachial plexus injury and posterior first rib fractures.

  1. [Meningoencephalo-myeloradiculitis due to Flavivirus: bi-brachial paralysis and respiratory insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Kuntzer, T; de Marval, F; Ochsner, F; de Torrenté, A; Kuhn, M; Fitting, J W

    1995-04-01

    3 patients developed rapid onset of fever and nuchal stiffness. Paresis of brachial muscles occurred within 4 days and all patients had respiratory failure that needed mechanical ventilation. At the peak of the disease there were bilateral asymmetrical severe atrophy of brachial, shoulder and neck muscles, cranial nerve pareses and absent or weak deep reflexes in the upper extremities. CSF analyses showed sterile lymphocytic pleocytosis. In 2 cases the patients suffered a tick bite in Switzerland and the third was probably bitten by an insect while opening a package received from Indonesia. Patients had rapid defervescence and serological tests were found to be highly positive for IgM and then IgG ELISA FSME (Frühsommer-Meningoenzephalitis). The patients were ventilated for 2 to 5 weeks before a progressive improvement was seen. However, on follow-up at 12, 18 and 30 months respectively, proximal muscles were still atrophied and quite weak. Our cases underline that: (1) FSME-ELISA results may cross-react with the Japanese and Central European encephalitis virus species; (2) Flaviviruses do induce unusual and preferential long-term paralysis of the upper extremities simulating poliomyelitis; (3) in the 2 patients studied electrophysiologically, there were signs of axonal reinnervation not seen in lower motor neuron syndrome which were important for reinnervation to permit progressive, but late, motor improvement; (4) there is no evidence of extension of the endemic foci of tick-borne encephalitis in Switzerland. PMID:7709179

  2. An approach to the noninvasive periodic assessment of arterial elasticity in the young.

    PubMed

    Riley, W A; Barnes, R W; Schey, H M

    1984-03-01

    The detailed variation of the lumen diameter of common carotid arteries throughout the cardiac cycle was noninvasively measured using a pulse-echo ultrasonic technique in a population of 100 free-living, unrelated, human subjects between the ages of 6 and 25 years. The fractional diameter change (mean +/- SEM) during the cardiac cycle in the 50 male subjects (0.122 +/- 0.004) was found to be significantly (P less than 0.001) greater than the corresponding diameter change in the 50 female subjects (0.106 +/- 0.003). The pressure-strain elastic modulus, Ep, for the carotid arteries was also computed for these subjects by dividing the blood pulse pressure measured in the brachial artery by the fractional diameter change of the carotid. The male elastic modulus (67 +/- 3 kPa) was not significantly (P approximately 0.17) different from the female elastic modulus (62 +/- 2 kPa). Subject age and systolic blood pressure were able to explain approximately one-third of the variability in Ep. Reproductibility studies clearly demonstrated that only a small fraction of the remaining variability could be attributed to experimental technique or intrasubject variability. The results suggest that studies can now be safely performed on young human subjects to assess the effects of a variety of developmental, behavioral, and environmental factors on arterial elasticity. Such results could help to establish an important data base on arterial mechanics which might help in evaluating health promotion recommendations to societies.

  3. Lower Body vs. Upper Body Resistance Training and Arterial Stiffness in Young Men.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Bopp, M; Botta, F; Nussbaumer, M; Schäfer, J; Roth, R; Schmidt-Trucksäss, A; Hanssen, H

    2015-11-01

    Resistance training has been shown to increase arterial stiffness. The purpose of the present study was to examine and compare the systemic arterial stiffness responses to acute lower body (LRT) and upper body (URT) resistance training. 20 healthy young men [median age: 26 years (interquartile range 23, 32)] underwent LRT, URT and whole body resistance training (WRT). Before and immediately after, as well as 20, 40 and 60 min after each training session, we measured the cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI) and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) using VaSera VS-1500 N. We used mixed models for repeated measurements to estimate the post-exercise differences in CAVI and baPWV between the 3 resistance training modes. Immediately after exercise cessation, both CAVI and baPWV were lower for LRT compared with URT [CAVI: - 0.93 (95% confidence interval [CI] - 1.15, - 0.70); baPWV: - 2.08 m/s (95% CI - 2.48, - 1.67)]. Differences between LRT and URT gradually decreased during follow-up. Compared with WRT, LRT induced a decrease and URT an increase in arterial stiffness across all time points. In conclusion, LRT presents more favorable post-exercise arterial stiffness than URT. Our results suggest that LRT or WRT may be preferred over URT in individuals with impaired arterial stiffness. PMID:26212244

  4. Assessment of Arterial Stiffness Using the Cardio-Ankle Vascular Index

    PubMed Central

    Miyoshi, Toru; Ito, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Background Arterial stiffness is an independent predictor of outcomes for patients with cardiovascular disease. Although measurement of pulse wave velocity is a widely accepted, noninvasive approach for the assessment of arterial stiffness, its accuracy is affected by changes in blood pressure. Summary The cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI) is an index of the overall stiffness of the artery from the origin of the aorta to the ankle and is theoretically independent of blood pressure at the time of measurement. CAVI increases linearly with age and is elevated even in mild arteriosclerotic disease. It can identify differences in the degree of arteriosclerosis among patients with severe arteriosclerotic disease and better reflects the severity of disease of the coronary artery than does brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity. Patients with higher CAVI values show a poor prognosis compared with those with lower CAVI values. Furthermore, CAVI can be lowered by controlling diabetes mellitus and hypertension. Key Messages The primary aims of assessing arterial stiffness using CAVI are to assist in the early detection of arteriosclerosis, allowing timely treatment and lifestyle modification, and to quantitatively evaluate the progression of disease and the effectiveness of treatment. Whether CAVI-guided therapy can improve prognosis in high-risk patients needs to be further examined to confirm the clinical usefulness of this measure. PMID:27493899

  5. Biomechanics of Ergometric Stress Test: regional and local effects on elastic, transitional and muscular human arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valls, G.; Torrado, J.; Farro, I.; Bia, D.; Zócalo, Y.; Lluberas, S.; Craiem, D.; Armentano, Rl

    2011-09-01

    Ergometric exercise stress tests (EST) give important information about the cardiovascular (CV) response to increased demands. The expected EST-related changes in variables like blood pressure and heart rate are known, but those in the arterial biomechanics are controversial and incompletely characterized. In this context, this work aims were to characterize the regional and local arterial biomechanical behaviour in response to EST; to evaluate its temporal profile in the post-EST recovery phase; and to compare the biomechanical response of different to EST. Methods: In 16 non-trained healthy young subjects the carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity and the carotid, femoral and brachial arterial distensibility were non-invasively evaluated before (Rest) and after EST. Main results: The EST resulted in an early increase in the arterial stiffness, evidenced by both, regional and local parameters (pulse wave velocity increase and distensibility reduction). When analyzing conjunctly the different post-EST recovery stages there were quali-quantitative differences among the arterial local stiffness response to EST. The biomechanical changes could not be explained only by blood pressure variations.

  6. Pulse Waves in the Lower Extremities as a Diagnostic Tool of Peripheral Arterial Disease and Predictor of Mortality in Elderly Chinese.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Chang-Sheng; Li, Yan; Huang, Qi-Fang; Kang, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Fei-Ka; Wang, Ji-Guang

    2016-03-01

    Patients with peripheral arterial disease may have elongated upstroke time in pulse waves in the lower extremities. We investigated upstroke time as a diagnostic tool of peripheral arterial disease and predictor of mortality in an elderly (≥60 years) Chinese population. We recorded pulse waves at the left and right ankles by pneumoplethysmography and calculated the percentage of upstroke time per cardiac cycle. Diagnostic accuracy was compared with the conventional ankle-brachial index method (n=4055) and computed tomographic angiography (34 lower extremities in 17 subjects). Upstroke time per cardiac cycle at baseline (mean±SD, 16.4%±3.1%) was significantly (P<0.0001) associated with ankle-brachial index in men (n=1803; r=-0.44) and women (n=2252; r=-0.32) and had an overall sensitivity and specificity of 86% and 80%, respectively, for the diagnosis of peripheral arterial disease (upstroke time per cardiac cycle, ≥21.7%) in comparison with computed tomographic angiography. During 5.9 years (median) of follow-up, all-cause and cardiovascular deaths occurred in 366 and 183 subjects, respectively. In adjusted Cox regression analyses, an upstroke time per cardiac cycle ≥21.7% (n=219; 5.4%) significantly (P<0.0001) predicted total and cardiovascular mortality. The corresponding hazard ratios were 1.98 (95% confidence interval, 1.48-2.65) and 2.29 (1.58-3.32), respectively, when compared with that of 2.10 (1.48-3.00) and 2.44 (1.57-3.79), respectively, associated with an ankle-brachial index of ≤0.90 (n=115; 2.8%). In conclusion, pulse waves in the lower extremities may behave as an accurate and ease of use diagnostic tool of peripheral arterial disease and predictor of mortality in the elderly.

  7. Group A Streptococcal Suppurative Arthritis and Osteomyelitis of the Shoulder With Brachial Plexus Palsy in a Newborn.

    PubMed

    Dierig, Alexa; Ritz, Nicole; Tacke, Uta; Heininger, Ulrich

    2016-10-01

    Osteoarticular infections in the newborn period are rare. A serious complication is paralysis of the affected extremity resulting from either pain or direct involvement of the nerve. We report a newborn with combined osteomyelitis and suppurative arthritis caused by Streptococcus pyogenes presenting with right brachial plexus palsy. PMID:27622687

  8. [Self-mutilation of the hand in a girl with total, persistent obstetric brachial plexus palsy--case report].

    PubMed

    Sibiński, Marcin; Dorman, Tomsz; Synder, Marek

    2008-01-01

    A case of hand self-mutilation in six years old girl with totals persistent obstetric brachial plexus palsy was presented. Self-mutilation involved biting the tips of the digits what lead to removal of nail of IV finger and partial V finger distal phalanx amputation. Furthermore, possible etiology, mechanism, evaluation of this behavior and literature was discussed in the text. PMID:18847017

  9. Externalization of a stiff guide wire via the radial artery: a new technique to facilitate advancement of an Inoue balloon across the aortic valve in patients with aortic stenosis undergoing antegrade balloon aortic valvuloplasty.

    PubMed

    Kato, Hiroshi; Kubota, Shoichi; Goto, Takuya; Haba, Toshihiro; Yamamoto, Makoto

    2016-04-01

    An 84-year-old woman with aortic stenosis underwent antegrade balloon aortic valvuloplasty (BAV). After transseptal puncture, we introduced a 7-Fr wedge catheter into the left ventricle and across the aortic valve. We then inserted a 0.032-inch soft guide wire, and the tip of the guide wire was advanced into the brachial artery and exchanged for a stiff guide wire. We externalized the tip of the stiff guide wire from the radial artery. Finally, we advanced an Inoue balloon (Toray, Tokyo, Japan) across the aortic valve and inflated the balloon. Transradial externalization makes antegrade BAV an even less invasive procedure. PMID:25862651

  10. Bilateral accessory thoracodorsal artery.

    PubMed

    Natsis, Konstantinos; Totlis, Trifon; Tsikaras, Prokopios; Skandalakis, Panagiotis

    2006-09-01

    The subscapular artery arises from the third part of the axillary artery and gives off the circumflex scapular and the thoracodorsal arteries. Although anatomical variations of the axillary artery are very common, the existence of a unilateral accessory thoracodorsal artery has been described in the literature only once. There are no reports of bilateral accessory thoracodorsal artery, in the literature. In the present study, a bilateral accessory thoracodorsal artery, originating on either side of the third part of the axillary artery, is described in a 68-year-old female cadaver. All the other branches of the axillary artery had a typical origin, course, distribution and termination. This extremely rare anatomical variation apart from the anatomical importance also has clinical significance for surgeons in this area. Especially, during the dissection or mobilization of the latissimus dorsi that is partly used for coverage problems in many regions of the body and also in dynamic cardiomyoplasty, any iatrogenic injury of this accessory artery may result in ischemia and functional loss of the graft.

  11. Angioplasty and stent placement - peripheral arteries - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty - peripheral artery - discharge; PTA - peripheral artery - discharge; Angioplasty - peripheral artery - discharge; Balloon angioplasty - peripheral artery- discharge; PAD - PTA discharge; PVD - ...

  12. Different associations between beta-blockers and other antihypertensive medication combinations with brachial blood pressure and aortic waveform parameters

    PubMed Central

    Sluyter, John D.; Hughes, Alun D.; Lowe, Andrew; Parker, Kim H.; Camargo, Carlos A.; Hametner, Bernhard; Wassertheurer, Siegfried; Scragg, Robert K.R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Comparing the relationships of antihypertensive medications with brachial blood pressure (BP) and aortic waveform parameters may help clinicians to predict the effect on the latter in brachial BP-based antihypertensive therapy. We aimed to make such comparisons with new waveform measures and a wider range of antihypertensive regimens than examined previously. Methods Cross-sectional analysis of 2933 adults (61% male; aged 50–84 years): 1637 on antihypertensive treatment and 1296 untreated hypertensives. Sixteen medicine regimens of up to 4 combinations of drugs from 6 antihypertensive classes were analysed. Aortic systolic BP, augmentation index (AIx), excess pressure integral (EPI), backward pressure amplitude (Pb), reflection index (RI) and pulse wave velocity (PWV) were calculated from aortic pressure waveforms derived from suprasystolic brachial measurement. Results Forest plots of single-drug class comparisons across regimens with the same number of drugs (for between 1- and 3-drug regimens) revealed that AIx, Pb, RI and/or loge(EPI) were higher (maximum difference = 5.6%, 2.2 mm Hg, 0.0192 and 0.13 loge(mm Hg · s), respectively) with the use of a beta-blocker compared with vasodilators and diuretics, despite no brachial systolic and diastolic BP differences. These differences were reduced (by 34–57%) or eliminated after adjustment for heart rate, and similar effects occurred when controlling for systolic ejection period or diastolic duration. Conclusions Beta-blocker effects on brachial BP may overestimate effects on aortic waveform parameters. Compared to other antihypertensives, beta-blockers have weaker associations with wave reflection measures and EPI; this is predominantly due to influences on heart rate. PMID:27340919

  13. Comparison of the Supraclavicular, Infraclavicular and Axillary Approaches for Ultrasound-Guided Brachial Plexus Block for Surgical Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Stav, Anatoli; Reytman, Leonid; Stav, Michael-Yohay; Portnoy, Isaak; Kantarovsky, Alexander; Galili, Offer; Luboshitz, Shmuel; Sevi, Roger; Sternberg, Ahud

    2016-01-01

    Objective We hypothesized that ultrasound (US)-guided technique of the supra- and infraclavicular and axillary approaches of brachial plexus block (BPB) will produce a high quality of surgical anesthesia for operations below the shoulder independently of the approach and body mass index (BMI). Intercostobrachial and medial brachial cutaneous nerves will be blocked separately because they are not a part of the brachial plexus. Methods This is a prospective randomized observer-blinded study. The three approaches of the US-guided BPB without neurostimulation were compared for quality, performance time, and correlation between performance time and BMI. Intercostobrachial and medial brachial cutaneous nerve blocks were used in all patients. Results A total of 101 patients were randomized into three groups: SCL (supraclavicular), ICL (infraclavicular), and AX (axillary). Seven patients were excluded due to various factors. All three groups were similar in demographic data, M:F proportion, preoperative diagnosis and type of surgery, anesthesiologists who performed the block, and surgical staff that performed the surgical intervention. The time between the end of the block performance and the start of the operation was also similar. The quality of the surgical anesthesia and discomfort during the operation were identical following comparison between groups. No direct positive correlation was observed between BMI and the block performance time. The time for the axillary block was slightly longer than the time for the supra- and infraclavicular approaches, but it had no practical clinical significance. Transient Horner syndrome was observed in three patients in the SCL group. No other adverse effects or complications were observed. Conclusions All three approaches can be used for US-guided BPB with similar quality of surgical anesthesia for operations of below the shoulder. A block of the intercostobrachial and medial brachial cutaneous nerves is recommended. Obesity is not

  14. Brachial Plexus-Associated Neuropathy After High-Dose Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Allen M.; Hall, William H.; Li, Judy; Beckett, Laurel; Farwell, D. Gregory; Lau, Derick H.; Purdy, James A.

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To identify clinical and treatment-related predictors of brachial plexus-associated neuropathies after radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Three hundred thirty patients who had previously completed radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer were prospectively screened using a standardized instrument for symptoms of neuropathy thought to be related to brachial plexus injury. All patients were disease-free at the time of screening. The median time from completion of radiation therapy was 56 months (range, 6-135 months). One-hundred fifty-five patients (47%) were treated by definitive radiation therapy, and 175 (53%) were treated postoperatively. Radiation doses ranged from 50 to 74 Gy (median, 66 Gy). Intensity-modulated radiation therapy was used in 62% of cases, and 133 patients (40%) received concurrent chemotherapy. Results: Forty patients (12%) reported neuropathic symptoms, with the most common being ipsilateral pain (50%), numbness/tingling (40%), motor weakness, and/or muscle atrophy (25%). When patients with <5 years of follow-up were excluded, the rate of positive symptoms increased to 22%. On univariate analysis, the following factors were significantly associated with brachial plexus symptoms: prior neck dissection (p = 0.01), concurrent chemotherapy (p = 0.01), and radiation maximum dose (p < 0.001). Cox regression analysis confirmed that both neck dissection (p < 0.001) and radiation maximum dose (p < 0.001) were independently predictive of symptoms. Conclusion: The incidence of brachial plexus-associated neuropathies after radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer may be underreported. In view of the dose-response relationship identified, limiting radiation dose to the brachial plexus should be considered when possible.

  15. Midterm Outcome of Femoral Artery Stenting and Factors Affecting Patency

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jae Seoung; Park, Keun-Myoung; Jeon, Yong Sun; Cho, Soon Gu; Hong, Kee Chun; Shin, Woo Young; Choe, Yun-Mee; Shin, Seok-Hwan; Kim, Kyung Rae

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the early and midterm results of superficial femoral artery (SFA) stenting with self-expanding nitinol stents and to identify the factors affecting patency. Materials and Methods: SFA stenting was performed in 165 limbs of 117 patients from January 2009 to December 2013. Patients were followed-up for the first occurrence of occlusion or stenosis based on computed tomography and duplex scan results and a decrease in ankle brachial index of >15%. Results: During the follow-up period (mean, 15.3±3.2 months), no early thrombotic reocclusions occurred within 30 days, but in-stent restenosis developed in 78 limbs. The primary patency rates at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months were 78%, 66%, 42%, and 22%, respectively, and the secondary patency rates were 85%, 72%, 58%, and 58%, respectively. TASC II C or D lesions, stent length >8 cm, number of patent tibial arteries and diabetes were significantly associated with reintervention. Conclusion: The midterm results of stenting for SFA occlusive disease were disappointing because the primary and secondary patency rates at two years were 22% and 58%, respectively. Reintervention after SFA stenting remains a major problem, particularly in patients with diabetes mellitus or long TASC II C or D lesions. PMID:26719837

  16. Dexmedetomidine as an adjuvant to levobupivacaine in supraclavicular brachial plexus block: A novel anesthetic approach

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Arvinder Pal; Mahindra, Malika; Gupta, Ruchi; Bajwa, Sukhminder Jit Singh

    2016-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: Supplementation of dexmedetomidine produces a dose-dependent sedation, anxiolysis and analgesia without respiratory depression. This study was conducted to evaluate the possible effect of dexmedetomidine as an adjuvant to levobupivacaine for supraclavicular brachial plexus block in upper limb surgery. Settings and Design: Tertiary care institute, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, a placebo-controlled study. Materials and Methods: After obtaining Ethical Committee approval, a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was conducted on sixty American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I and II patients in the age group of 18–60 years, divided randomly into two groups, Group I received 30 ml of 0.5% levobupivacaine with 1 ml of isotonic sodium chloride solution and Group II received 30 ml of 0.5% levobupivacaine and 1 ml (100 mcg) of dexmedetomidine for supraclavicular brachial plexus block. The onset and duration of sensory and motor blockade, duration of analgesia (DOA) and any adverse effects were noted. At the end of the study, data were compiled and analyzed using appropriate statistical tests. The value of P < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: Demographic profile was comparable in both the groups. The time to onset of sensory and motor block was 10.54 ± 2.333 min and 12.21 ± 2.529 min in Group I while it was 3.24 ± 0.951 min and 2.83 ± 1.197 min in Group II, respectively. The duration of sensory and motor block was 7.79 ± 2.007 h and 9.18 ± 1.701 h in Group I, and it was 16.31 ± 2.606 h and 17.52 ± 2.098 h in Group II, respectively. The DOA was 678.68 ± 20.492 min in Group I and 1273.79 ± 83.139 min in Group II. On statistical comparison, these values were highly significant (P < 0.001). Side effects such as nausea, vomiting, hypoxemia, pruritis, or urinary retention were not observed in either of the groups. Conclusion: Dexmedetomidine shortens the onset time for sensory and motor block

  17. Outcome following spinal accessory to suprascapular (spinoscapular) nerve transfer in infants with brachial plexus birth injuries.

    PubMed

    Ruchelsman, David E; Ramos, Lorna E; Alfonso, Israel; Price, Andrew E; Grossman, Agatha; Grossman, John A I

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the value of distal spinal accessory nerve (SAN) transfer to the suprascapular nerve (SSN) in children with brachial plexus birth injuries in order to better define the application and outcome of this transfer in these infants. Over a 3-year period, 34 infants with brachial plexus injuries underwent transfer of the SAN to the SSN as part of the primary surgical reconstruction. Twenty-five patients (direct repair, n = 20; interposition graft, n = 5) achieved a minimum follow-up of 24 months. Fourteen children underwent plexus reconstruction with SAN-to-SSN transfer at less than 9 months of age, and 11 underwent surgical reconstruction at the age of 9 months or older. Mean age at the time of nerve transfer was 11.6 months (range, 5-30 months). At latest follow-up, active shoulder external rotation was measured in the arm abducted position and confirmed by review of videos. The Gilbert and Miami shoulder classification scores were utilized to report shoulder-specific functional outcomes. The effects of patient age at the time of nerve transfer and the use of interpositional nerve graft were analyzed. Overall mean active external rotation measured 69.6°; mean Gilbert score was 4.1 and the mean Miami score was 7.1, corresponding to overall good shoulder functional outcomes. Similar clinical and shoulder-specific functional outcomes were obtained in patients undergoing early (<9 months of age, n = 14) and late (>9 months of age, n = 11) SAN-to-SSN transfer and primary plexus reconstruction. Nine patients (27%) were lost to follow-up and are not included in the analysis. Optimum results were achieved following direct transfer (n = 20). Results following the use of an interpositional graft (n = 5) were rated satisfactory. No patient required a secondary shoulder procedure during the study period. There were no postoperative complications. Distal SAN-to-SSN (spinoscapular) nerve transfer is a reliable

  18. Superior mesenteric artery syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, A. R.; Taylor, I.

    1997-01-01

    Superior mesenteric artery syndrome is a rare and controversial form of upper intestinal obstruction in which the third part of the duodenum is compressed by the overlying superior mesenteric artery. Any disease process decreasing the angle between the superior mesenteric artery and the abdominal aorta can result in the external compression of the duodenum and subsequent intestinal obstruction. The aetiology, presentation, investigation and management of this unusual condition are discussed. PMID:9497945

  19. [Popliteal artery entrapment syndrome].

    PubMed

    Musumeci, S; Iuppa, A; Beneventano, G; Rinella, P; Mammano, M; Cinquegrani, E

    1986-12-15

    Trapped popliteal artery syndrome is relatively uncommon: the literature reports some 60 cases. The clinical picture is linked to compression of the popliteal artery by the gastrocnemius as it contracts, thus distorting the arterial route. The result is an interruption in the blood flow distally to the area involved due to stenosis of the blood vessel that is at first functional but becomes organic. PMID:3808379

  20. Peripheral artery disease in korean patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention: prevalence and association with coronary artery disease severity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Kyoung; Song, Pil Sang; Yang, Jeong Hoon; Song, Young Bin; Hahn, Joo-Yong; Choi, Jin-Ho; Gwon, Hyeon-Cheol; Lee, Sang Hoon; Hong, Kyung Pyo; Park, Jeong Euy; Kim, Duk-kyung; Choi, Seung-Hyuk

    2013-01-01

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is an important marker for the risk stratification of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). We investigated the prevalence of PAD in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with CAD and the relationship between ankle-brachial pressure index (ABPI) and CAD severity. A total of 711 patients undergoing PCI for CAD from August 2009 to August 2011 were enrolled. PAD diagnosis was made using the ABPI. The prevalence of PAD was 12.8%. In PAD patients, mean values of right and left ABPI were 0.71 ± 0.15 and 0.73 ± 0.15. Patients with PAD had a higher prevalence of left main coronary disease (14.3% vs 5.8%, P = 0.003), more frequently had multivessel lesions (74.9% vs 52.1%, P < 0.001) and had higher SYNTAX score (18.2 ± 12.3 vs 13.1 ± 8.26, P = 0.002). Using multivariate analysis, we determined that left main CAD (OR, 2.954; 95% CI, 1.418-6.152, P = 0.004) and multivessel CAD (OR, 2.321; 95% CI, 1.363-3.953, P = 0.002) were both independently associated with PAD. We recommend that ABPI-based PAD screening should be implemented in all patients undergoing PCI with CAD, especially in severe cases. PMID:23341717

  1. Buckling instability in arteries.

    PubMed

    Vandiver, Rebecca M

    2015-04-21

    Arteries can become tortuous in response to abnormal growth stimuli, genetic defects and aging. It is suggested that a buckling instability is a mechanism that might lead to artery tortuosity. Here, the buckling instability in arteries is studied by examining asymmetric modes of bifurcation of two-layer cylindrical structures that are residually stressed. These structures are loaded by an axial force, internal pressure and have nonlinear, anisotropic, hyperelastic responses to stresses. Strain-softening and reduced opening angle are shown to lower the critical internal pressure leading to buckling. In addition, the ratio of the media thickness to the adventitia thickness is shown to have a dramatic impact on arterial instability.

  2. The middle suprarenal artery arising from the superior mesenteric artery.

    PubMed

    Honma, Satoru; Kudo, Motoi

    2012-01-01

    We observed a rare case of the middle suprarenal artery branching out from the superior mesenteric artery in a 78-year-old male. This atypical artery enters the right suprarenal gland that was also supplied by the superior and the inferior suprarenal arteries as usual. In embryonic stages, vasculature of the vitelline system and the gonadal system is differentially organized. The superior mesenteric artery has been generally thought to be pure vitelline, since there has been no evidence that the superior mesenteric artery supplies other organs than digestive. We then speculate that the present middle suprarenal artery is a remnant of the embryonic gonadal artery from the superior mesenteric artery, whereas a stem artery to the testis disappeared. Surgeons should take notice of the middle suprarenal artery when operations are conducted around the superior mesenteric artery.

  3. Hydration Status Is Associated with Aortic Stiffness, but Not with Peripheral Arterial Stiffness, in Chronically Hemodialysed Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bia, Daniel; Galli, Cintia; Valtuille, Rodolfo; Zócalo, Yanina; Wray, Sandra A.; Armentano, Ricardo L.; Cabrera Fischer, Edmundo I.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Adequate fluid management could be essential to minimize high arterial stiffness observed in chronically hemodialyzed patients (CHP). Aim. To determine the association between body fluid status and central and peripheral arterial stiffness levels. Methods. Arterial stiffness was assessed in 65 CHP by measuring the pulse wave velocity (PWV) in a central arterial pathway (carotid-femoral) and in a peripheral pathway (carotid-brachial). A blood pressure-independent regional arterial stiffness index was calculated using PWV. Volume status was assessed by whole-body multiple-frequency bioimpedance. Patients were first observed as an entire group and then divided into three different fluid status-related groups: normal, overhydration, and dehydration groups. Results. Only carotid-femoral stiffness was positively associated (P < 0.05) with the hydration status evaluated through extracellular/intracellular fluid, extracellular/Total Body Fluid, and absolute and relative overhydration. Conclusion. Volume status and overload are associated with central, but not peripheral, arterial stiffness levels with independence of the blood pressure level, in CHP. PMID:26167301

  4. Brachial plexopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... include: Numbness of the shoulder, arm, or hand Shoulder pain Tingling, burning, pain, or abnormal sensations (location depends ... Call your health care provider if you experience pain, numbness, tingling, or weakness in the shoulder, arm, or hand.

  5. [Brachial plexus compression from supraclavicular encapsulated fat necrosis. A case report].

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Páez, Miguel; de Miguel-Pueyo, Luis; Marín-Salido, Esteban José; Carrasco-Brenes, Antonio; Martín-Gallego, Alvaro; Arráez-Sánchez, Miguel Ángel

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a 44-year-old male, lacking clinical history of previous illness, who had surgery at our hospital to treat a mass in the supraclavicular space. The patient presented with a 1-month progressive distal paresis of the left arm. The histo-pathological examination of the mass revealed an encapsulated fat necrosis. Fat necrosis is characterised by cystic architecture, encapsulation with fat necrosis within, and inflammatory infiltration of its walls. Neural structure compression secondary to this tumour mass is very rare. Fat necrosis is more frequent in the lower limbs, in areas exposed to trauma. This article is the first report of brachial plexus compression due to supraclavicular fat necrosis. PMID:24837841

  6. Brachial neuritis or Parsonage-Turner syndrome: A problem of liability. A presentation of 3 cases.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Hornillo, M; de la Riva, M C; Ojeda, R

    2016-01-01

    Neuralgic amyotrophy, brachial neuritis or Parsonage-Turner syndrome is a rare neuromuscular involvement of unknown aetiology. When it onsets in connection with a health care act, such as childbirth or surgery, a malpractice argument is often used as a cause of adverse outcome, usually due to an incorrect position of the patient on the operating table, a circumstance which directly involves the anesthesia area. Three cases are presented of Parsonage-Turner syndrome following very different surgery, with different results as regards prognosis. A review and discussion of bibliography is presented on the possibility that such circumstances are the subject of malpractice claims. Special emphasis is placed on the most currently accepted aetiopathogenic theories, and the relationship of this syndrome with the surgical act as a determining medico-legal aspect. Valuation parameters are proposed. PMID:26948383

  7. Brachial neuritis or Parsonage-Turner syndrome: A problem of liability. A presentation of 3 cases.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Hornillo, M; de la Riva, M C; Ojeda, R

    2016-01-01

    Neuralgic amyotrophy, brachial neuritis or Parsonage-Turner syndrome is a rare neuromuscular involvement of unknown aetiology. When it onsets in connection with a health care act, such as childbirth or surgery, a malpractice argument is often used as a cause of adverse outcome, usually due to an incorrect position of the patient on the operating table, a circumstance which directly involves the anesthesia area. Three cases are presented of Parsonage-Turner syndrome following very different surgery, with different results as regards prognosis. A review and discussion of bibliography is presented on the possibility that such circumstances are the subject of malpractice claims. Special emphasis is placed on the most currently accepted aetiopathogenic theories, and the relationship of this syndrome with the surgical act as a determining medico-legal aspect. Valuation parameters are proposed.

  8. The prognostic value of concurrent Horner syndrome in extended Erb obstetric brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    El-Sayed, Amel A F

    2014-10-01

    Horner syndrome may be seen in infants with extended Erb obstetric brachial plexus palsy. However, its prognostic value in these infants has not been previously investigated. A total of 220 infants with extended Erb palsy were included and divided into 2 groups: group I (n = 209) were infants with extended Erb palsy without Horner syndrome, and group II (n = 11) were infants with extended Erb palsy and concurrent Horner syndrome. The rate of good spontaneous recovery of elbow flexion was 59% in group I and 27% in group II, and the difference was significant (P = .038). The rate of good spontaneous recovery of wrist extension was 61% in group I and 0% in group II, and the difference as highly significant (P < .0001). Concurrent Horner syndrome in infants with extended Erb palsy may be considered as a poor prognostic sign for recovery of the sixth and seventh cervical roots.

  9. Asymptomatic Peripheral Arterial Disease Is Associated With More Adverse Lower Extremity Characteristics Than Intermittent Claudication

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Mary M.; Guralnik, Jack M.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Tian, Lu; Liu, Kiang; Liao, Yihua; Green, David; Sufit, Robert; Hoff, Frederick; Nishida, Takashi; Sharma, Leena; Pearce, William H.; Schneider, Joseph R.; Criqui, Michael H.

    2016-01-01

    Background This study assessed functional performance, calf muscle characteristics, peripheral nerve function, and quality of life in asymptomatic persons with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Methods and Results PAD participants (n=465) had an ankle brachial index <0.90. Non-PAD participants (n=292) had an ankle brachial index of 0.90 to 1.30. PAD participants were categorized into leg symptom groups including intermittent claudication (n=215) and always asymptomatic (participants who never experienced exertional leg pain, even during the 6-minute walk; n=72). Calf muscle was measured with computed tomography. Analyses were adjusted for age, sex, race, ankle brachial index, comorbidities, and other confounders. Compared with participants with intermittent claudication, always asymptomatic PAD participants had smaller calf muscle area (4935 versus 5592 mm2; P<0.001), higher calf muscle percent fat (16.10% versus 9.45%; P<0.001), poorer 6-minute walk performance (966 versus 1129 ft; P=0.0002), slower usual-paced walking speed (P=0.0019), slower fast-paced walking speed (P<0.001), and a poorer Short-Form 36 Physical Functioning score (P=0.016). Compared with an age-matched, sedentary, non-PAD cohort, always asymptomatic PAD participants had smaller calf muscle area (5061 versus 5895 mm2; P=0.009), poorer 6-minute walk performance (1126 versus 1452 ft; P<0.001), and poorer Walking Impairment Questionnaire speed scores (40.87 versus 57.78; P=0.001). Conclusions Persons with PAD who never experience exertional leg symptoms have poorer functional performance, poorer quality of life, and more adverse calf muscle characteristics compared with persons with intermittent claudication and a sedentary, asymptomatic, age-matched group of non-PAD persons. PMID:18458172

  10. Association of long-term blood pressure variability and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity: a retrospective study from the APAC cohort

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Yang, Yuling; Wang, Anxin; An, Shasha; Li, Zhifang; Zhang, Wenyan; Liu, Xuemei; Ruan, Chunyu; Liu, Xiaoxue; Guo, Xiuhua; Zhao, Xingquan; Wu, Shouling

    2016-01-01

    We investigated associations between long-term blood pressure variability (BPV) and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV). Within the Asymptomatic Polyvascular Abnormalities Community (APAC) study, we retrospectively collected long-term BPV and baPWV measures. Long-term BPV was calculated using the mean and standard deviation of systolic blood pressure (SBP) across 4 years based on annual values of SBP. In total, 3,994 subjects (2,284 men) were eligible for inclusion in this study. We stratified the study population into four SBP quartiles. Left and right baPWV was higher in participants with long-term SBPV in the fourth quartile compared with the first quartile (left: 1,725 ± 488 vs. 1,461 ± 340 [p < 0.001]; right: 1,722 ± 471 vs. 1,455 ± 341 [p < 0.001], respectively). We obtained the same result for total baPWV (fourth vs. first quartile: 1,772 ± 429 vs. 1,492 ± 350 [p < 0.001]). Furthermore, there was a trend for gradually increased baPWV (≥1,400 cm/s) with increased SBPV (p < 0.001). After multivariable adjustment, baPWV was positively correlated with long-term BPV (p < 0.001). In conclusion, long-term BPV is significantly associated with arterial stiffness as assessed by baPWV. PMID:26892486

  11. Association of long-term blood pressure variability and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity: a retrospective study from the APAC cohort.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Yang, Yuling; Wang, Anxin; An, Shasha; Li, Zhifang; Zhang, Wenyan; Liu, Xuemei; Ruan, Chunyu; Liu, Xiaoxue; Guo, Xiuhua; Zhao, Xingquan; Wu, Shouling

    2016-02-19

    We investigated associations between long-term blood pressure variability (BPV) and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV). Within the Asymptomatic Polyvascular Abnormalities Community (APAC) study, we retrospectively collected long-term BPV and baPWV measures. Long-term BPV was calculated using the mean and standard deviation of systolic blood pressure (SBP) across 4 years based on annual values of SBP. In total, 3,994 subjects (2,284 men) were eligible for inclusion in this study. We stratified the study population into four SBP quartiles. Left and right baPWV was higher in participants with long-term SBPV in the fourth quartile compared with the first quartile (left: 1,725 ± 488 vs. 1,461 ± 340 [p < 0.001]; right: 1,722 ± 471 vs. 1,455 ± 341 [p < 0.001], respectively). We obtained the same result for total baPWV (fourth vs. first quartile: 1,772 ± 429 vs. 1,492 ± 350 [p < 0.001]). Furthermore, there was a trend for gradually increased baPWV (≥1,400 cm/s) with increased SBPV (p < 0.001). After multivariable adjustment, baPWV was positively correlated with long-term BPV (p < 0.001). In conclusion, long-term BPV is significantly associated with arterial stiffness as assessed by baPWV.

  12. Extended Long-Term (5 Years) Outcomes of Triangle Tilt Surgery in Obstetric Brachial Plexus Injury

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Rahul K; Somasundaram, Chandra

    2013-01-01

    Objective: We evaluated the "extended" long-term (5 years) functional outcomes in obstetric brachial plexus injury (OBPI) patients, who underwent triangle tilt surgery between February 2005 and January 2008. Methods: Twenty two children (9 girls and 13 boys, mean age at surgery was 5.8 years; ranging 2.1-11.8 years old), who initially presented with medial rotation contracture and scapula deformity secondary to obstetric brachial plexus injury were included in this study. Functional movements were evaluated pre-operatively, and 5 years following triangle tilt surgery by modified Mallet scale. Results: Here, we report long-term (5 years) follow-up of triangle tilt surgery for 22 OBPI patients. Upper extremity functional movements such as, external rotation (2.5±0.6 to 4.1±0.8, p<0.0001), hand-to-spine (2.6±0.6 to 3.4±1.1, p<0.005), hand-to-neck (2.7±0.7 to 4.3±0.7, p<0.0001), hand-to-mouth (2.3±0.9 (92º±33) to 4.2±0.5 (21º±16), p<0.0001), and supination (2.6±1.1 (-8.2º ±51) to 4.1±0.7 (61±32)) were significantly improved (p<0.0001), and maintained over the extended long-term (5 years). Total modified Mallet functional score was also shown to improve from 14.1±2.7 to 20.3±2.5. Conclusions: The triangle tilt surgery improved all shoulder functions significantly, and maintained over the extended long-term (5 years) in these patients. PMID:23730369

  13. Comparative study of systemically and perineurally administered tramadol as an adjunct for supraclavicular brachial plexus block

    PubMed Central

    Nagpal, Vishal; Rana, Shelly; Singh, Jai; Chaudhary, Sudarshan Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: The study was designed to compare the effects of tramadol administered as an adjunct to bupivacaine in supraclavicular block to that of systemic administration, on postoperative analgesia and rescue analgesic requirement following upper limb surgeries. Material and Methods: A prospective, randomized, controlled, double-blind study was undertaken in patients scheduled for upper limb surgeries under supraclavicular block. All the three group patients received either of the following drugs mixtures: Group A — bupivacaine 0.5%-18 ml + normal saline-7 ml for block and normal saline-10 ml intravenously. Group B — bupivacaine 0.5%-18 ml + normal saline-7 ml mixture for block and tramadol (100 mg) diluted to 10 ml — intravenously. Group C — bupivacaine 0.5%-18 ml + tramadol (100 mg) + normal saline-5 ml mixture and normal saline 10 ml intravenously. The patients were observed for sensory, motor onset along with the duration of sensory and motor block. Patients were monitored for sedation and hemodynamic parameters during intra-operative and postoperative period. Pain-free period and demand for rescue analgesia was noted in all the patients. Results: The study demonstrates that the mixture of tramadol and bupivacaine injected perineurally for supraclavicular brachial plexus block hastens the onset of sensory block, motor block and provides a longer duration of motor blockade and demand for rescue analgesia as compared to other two groups. Conclusions: In conclusion, the addition of tramadol to bupivacaine mixtures as an adjunct for supraclavicular brachial plexus block provide better postoperative analgesia for orthopedic upper extremity surgery in comparison to control or systemic tramadol group without any side effects. PMID:25948899

  14. Brachial Neuritis With Phrenic Nerve Involvement in a Patient With a Possible Connective Tissue Disease

    PubMed Central

    Subash, Meera; Patel, Gaurav; Welker, John

    2014-01-01

    Background. Brachial neuritis (BN) is a rare inflammatory condition of peripheral nerves, usually involving the cervicobrachial plexus. These patients present with sudden onset of shoulder and arm pain that evolves into muscle weakness and atrophy.. Case Report. A 33-year-old woman presented with a 1-month history of diffuse pain in her thorax. She had no trauma or inciting incident prior to the onset of this pain and was initially treated for muscle spasms. The patient was seen in the emergency room multiple times and was treated with several courses of antibiotics for pneumonia on the basis of clinical symptoms and abnormal x-rays. The pleuritic chest pain persisted for at least 4 months, and the patient was eventually admitted for worsening pain and dyspnea. On physical examination, crackles were heard at both lung bases, and chest inspection revealed increased expansion in the upper thorax but poor expansion of the lower thorax and mild paradoxical respiration. “Sniff” test revealed no motion of the left hemidiaphragm and reduced motion on the right hemidiaphragm. Her computed tomography scan revealed bilateral atelectasis, more severe at the left base. She reported no symptoms involving her joints or skin or abdomen. Her presentation and clinical course are best explained by BN with a bilateral diaphragmatic weakness. However, she had a positive ANA, RF, anti-RNP antibody, and anti SS-A. Conclusion. Patients with BN can present with diffuse thoracic pain, pleuritic chest pain, and diaphragmatic weakness. Our patient may represent a case of connective tissue disease presenting with brachial plexus neuritis. PMID:26425609

  15. Measuring How Elastic Arteries Function.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMont, M. Edwin; MacGillivray, Patrick S.; Davison, Ian G.; McConnell, Colin J.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a procedure used to measure force and pressure in elastic arteries. Discusses the physics of the procedure and recommends the use of bovine arteries. Explains the preparation of the arteries for the procedure. (DDR)

  16. Screening for Carotid Artery Stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Task Force learned about the potential benefits and harms of screening for carotid artery stenosis: Health professionals ... blood flow through the arteries. Potential Benefits and Harms of Carotid Artery Stenosis Screening and Treatment The ...

  17. Metals in Urine and Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Navas-Acien, Ana; Silbergeld, Ellen K.; Sharrett, A. Richey; Calderon-Aranda, Emma; Selvin, Elizabeth; Guallar, Eliseo

    2005-01-01

    Exposure to metals may promote atherosclerosis. Blood cadmium and lead were associated with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in the 1999–2000 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). In the present study we evaluated the association between urinary levels of cadmium, lead, barium, cobalt, cesium, molybdenum, antimony, thallium, and tungsten with PAD in a cross-sectional analysis of 790 participants ≥40 years of age in NHANES 1999–2000. PAD was defined as a blood pressure ankle brachial index < 0.9 in at least one leg. Metals were measured in casual (spot) urine specimens by inductively coupled plasma–mass spectrometry. After multivariable adjustment, subjects with PAD had 36% higher levels of cadmium in urine and 49% higher levels of tungsten compared with noncases. The adjusted odds ratio for PAD comparing the 75th to the 25th percentile of the cadmium distribution was 3.05 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.97 to 9.58]; that for tungsten was 2.25 (95% CI, 0.97 to 5.24). PAD risk increased sharply at low levels of antimony and remained elevated beyond 0.1 μg/L. PAD was not associated with other metals. In conclusion, urinary cadmium, tungsten, and possibly antimony were associated with PAD in a representative sample of the U.S. population. For cadmium, these results strengthen previous findings using blood cadmium as a biomarker, and they support its role in atherosclerosis. For tungsten and antimony, these results need to be interpreted cautiously in the context of an exploratory analysis but deserve further study. Other metals in urine were not associated with PAD at the levels found in the general population. PMID:15687053

  18. Splenic Artery Syndrome After Orthotopic Liver Transplantation: Treatment With the Amplatzer Vascular Plug

    SciTech Connect

    Maurer, M. H.; Mogl, M. T.; Podrabsky, P.; Denecke, T.; Grieser, C.; Froeling, V.; Scheurig-Muenkler, C.; Guckelberger, O.; Kroencke, T. J.

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of the Amplatzer vascular plug (AVP) for embolization of the splenic artery in patients with hepatic hypoperfusion after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). Materials and Methods: Thirteen patients (9 men and 4 women) with a mean age of 56 years (range 22-70) who developed splenic artery syndrome after OLT with decreased liver perfusion and clinically relevant impairment of liver function (increased transaminase or serum bilirubin levels, thrombocytopenia, and/or therapy-refractory ascites) were treated by embolization of the proximal third of the splenic artery using the AVP. The plugs ranged in diameter from 6 to 16 mm, and they were introduced through femoral (n = 9), axillary (n = 3), or brachial (n = 1) access using a 5F or 8F guiding catheter. Results: The plugs were successfully placed, and complete occlusion of the splenic artery was achieved in all patients. Placement of two plugs was necessary for complete occlusion in 3 of the 13 patients. Occlusion took on average 10 min (range 4-35). There was no nontarget embolization or plug migration into more distal segments of the splenic artery. All patients showed improved arterial perfusion, including the liver periphery, on postinterventional angiogram. After embolization, liver function parameters (transaminase and bilirubin levels) improved with normalization of concomitant thrombocytopenia and a decrease in ascites volume. Conclusion: Our initial experience in a small patient population with SAS suggests that the AVP enables precise embolization of the proximal splenic artery, thus providing safe and effective treatment for poor liver perfusion after OLT due to SAS.

  19. Characterization and calibration of the central arterial pressure waveform obtained from vibrocardiographic signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casacanditella, L.; Cosoli, G.; Casaccia, S.; Rohrbaugh, J. W.; Scalise, L.; Tomasini, E. P.

    2016-06-01

    Laser Doppler Vibrometry (LDV) has been demonstrated to be a non-contact technique with high sensitivity, able to measure the skin vibrations related to cardiac activity. The obtainable mechanical signal (i.e. a velocity signal), VibroCardioGram (VCG), is able to provide significant physiological parameters, such as Heart Rate (HR). In this work, the authors aim to present a non-contact measurement method to obtain the arterial blood pressure signal from the mechanical vibrations assessed by LDV, in a central district of the arterial tree, such as carotid artery. In fact, in this way it is possible to indirectly assess Central Arterial Blood Pressure (CABP), which indicates the hemodynamic load on the heart, so that it is considered an important index predicting the cardiac risk of a subject. The measurement setup involves the use of an oscillometric cuff, to measure peripheral blood pressure at the radial artery level. Diastolic and Mean Arterial Pressure (MAP) at radial level were used to calibrate the integrated LDV signal (i.e. a displacement signal). As regard calibration, an exponential mathematical model was adopted to derive the pressure waveform from the displacement of the vessel detected by LDV. Results show an average difference of around 20% between systolic pressure measured at brachial level (i.e. peripheral pressure value) and systolic pressure derived from VCG signal measured over the carotid artery (i.e. central pressure). This is a physiological difference, consistent with the literature about the physiological increase of Systolic Blood Pressure (SBP) and Pressure Pulse (PP) at increased distances from the heart. However, this non-contact technique is affected by movement artifacts and by reflection phenomena not related to the studied vessel and so it is necessary to account of such issues in the results.

  20. Dose–Volume Modeling of Brachial Plexus-Associated Neuropathy After Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer: Findings From a Prospective Screening Protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Allen M.; Wang, Pin-Chieh; Daly, Megan E.; Cui, Jing; Hall, William H.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Phillips, Theodore L.; Farwell, D. Gregory; Purdy, James A.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Data from a prospective screening protocol administered for patients previously irradiated for head-and-neck cancer was analyzed to identify dosimetric predictors of brachial plexus-associated neuropathy. Methods and Materials: Three hundred fifty-two patients who had previously completed radiation therapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck were prospectively screened from August 2007 to April 2013 using a standardized self-administered instrument for symptoms of neuropathy thought to be related to brachial plexus injury. All patients were disease-free at the time of screening. The median time from radiation therapy was 40 months (range, 6-111 months). A total of 177 patients (50%) underwent neck dissection. Two hundred twenty-one patients (63%) received concurrent chemotherapy. Results: Fifty-one patients (14%) reported brachial plexus-related neuropathic symptoms with the most common being ipsilateral pain (50%), numbness/tingling (40%), and motor weakness and/or muscle atrophy (25%). The 3- and 5-year estimates of freedom from brachial plexus-associated neuropathy were 86% and 81%, respectively. Clinical/pathological N3 disease (P<.001) and maximum radiation dose to the ipsilateral brachial plexus (P=.01) were significantly associated with neuropathic symptoms. Cox regression analysis revealed significant dose–volume effects for brachial plexus-associated neuropathy. The volume of the ipsilateral brachial plexus receiving >70 Gy (V70) predicted for symptoms, with the incidence increasing with V70 >10% (P<.001). A correlation was also observed for the volume receiving >74 Gy (V74) among patients treated without neck dissection, with a cutoff of 4% predictive of symptoms (P=.038). Conclusions: Dose–volume guidelines were developed for radiation planning that may limit brachial plexus-related neuropathies.

  1. Diagnosis of Intracranial Artery Dissection

    PubMed Central

    KANOTO, Masafumi; HOSOYA, Takaaki

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral arterial dissection is defined as a hematoma in the wall of a cervical or an intracranial artery. Cerebral arterial dissection causes arterial stenosis, occlusion, and aneurysm, resulting in acute infarction and hemorrhage. Image analysis by such methods as conventional angiography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and so on plays an important role in diagnosing cerebral arterial dissection. In this study, we explore the methods and findings involved in the diagnosis of cerebral arterial dissection. PMID:27180630

  2. Coronary artery stent (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... with a balloon catheter and expands when the balloon is inflated. The stent is then left there to help keep the artery open. ... with a balloon catheter and expands when the balloon is inflated. The stent is then left there to help keep the artery open.

  3. Arterial Pressure Analog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heusner, A. A.; Tracy, M. L.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a simple hydraulic analog which allows students to explore some physical aspects of the cardiovascular system and provides them with a means to visualize and conceptualize these basic principles. Simulates the behavior of arterial pressure in response to changes in heart rate, stroke volume, arterial compliance, and peripheral…

  4. Coronary artery disease (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... through these arteries is critical for the heart. Coronary artery disease usually results from the build-up of fatty material and plaque, a condition called atherosclerosis. As the ... blood to the heart can slow or stop, causing chest pain (stable ...

  5. Effect of beta adrenoceptors and thyroid hormones on velocity and acceleration of peripheral arterial flow in hyperthyroidism.

    PubMed

    Chemla, D; Levenson, J; Valensi, P; LeCarpentier, Y; Pourny, J C; Pithois-Merli, I; Simon, A

    1990-02-15

    Brachial artery flow patterns were studied in 10 hyperthyroid and 10 normal subjects. Mean blood velocity and flow were evaluated by pulsed Doppler, and peak systolic acceleration was calculated by computer-assisted digitization of the instantaneous velocity curve. Compared to control subjects, hyperthyroid patients had higher velocity and flow (p less than 0.01, p less than 0.02) and higher peak systolic acceleration (p less than 0.01). In hyperthyroid patients, measurements were repeated after (1) mechanical exclusion of the hand from brachial circulation, (2) short-term beta-blocker treatment and (3) inducement of the euthyroid state. Exclusion of the hand reduced velocity and flow (p less than 0.001) but did not change peak systolic acceleration. Beta blockade induced disparate changes of velocity and flow but reduced peak systolic acceleration (p less than 0.05). In the euthyroid state, decreased blood velocity (p less than 0.01), flow (p less than 0.02) and acceleration (p less than 0.02) were observed. A hyperkinetic arterial circulation consisting of an increase in both velocity and acceleration is thus observable in hyperthyroidism. Hand exclusion showed that velocity seems to be influenced by peripheral factors while beta blockade suggests that acceleration is dependent of beta 1 adrenoceptors. Comparison between euthyroidism and hyperthyroidism indicates that both mean blood velocity and peak systolic acceleration are influenced by thyroid hormones. PMID:1968312

  6. Valve-Like and Protruding Calcified Intimal Flap Complicating Common Iliac Arteries Kissing Stenting.

    PubMed

    Georgiadis, George S; Georgakarakos, Efstratios I; Schoretsanitis, Nikolaos; Argyriou, Christos C; Antoniou, George A; Lazarides, Miltos K

    2015-01-01

    Endovascular therapy for iliac artery chronic total occlusions is nowadays associated with low rates of procedure-related complications and improved clinical outcomes, and it is predominantly used as first-line therapy prior to aortobifemoral bypass grafting. Herein, we describe the case of a patient presenting with an ischemic left foot digit ulcer and suffering complex aortoiliac lesions, who received common iliac arteries kissing stents, illustrating at final antegrade and retrograde angiograms the early recognition of a blood flow obstructing valve-like calcified intimal flap protruding through the stent struts, which was obstructing antegrade but not retrograde unilateral iliac arterial axis blood flow. The problem was resolved by reconstructing the aortic bifurcation at a more proximal level. Completion angiogram verified normal patency of aorta and iliac vessels. Additionally, a severe left femoral bifurcation stenosis was also corrected by endarterectomy-arterioplasty with a bovine patch. Postintervention ankle brachial pressure indices were significantly improved. At the 6-month and 2-year follow-up, normal peripheral pulses were still reported without intermittent claudication suggesting the durability of the procedure. Through stent-protruding calcified intimal flap, is a very rare, but existing source of antegrade blood flow obstruction after common iliac arteries kissing stents. PMID:26783493

  7. Valve-Like and Protruding Calcified Intimal Flap Complicating Common Iliac Arteries Kissing Stenting

    PubMed Central

    Georgiadis, George S.; Georgakarakos, Efstratios I.; Schoretsanitis, Nikolaos; Argyriou, Christos C.; Antoniou, George A.; Lazarides, Miltos K.

    2015-01-01

    Endovascular therapy for iliac artery chronic total occlusions is nowadays associated with low rates of procedure-related complications and improved clinical outcomes, and it is predominantly used as first-line therapy prior to aortobifemoral bypass grafting. Herein, we describe the case of a patient presenting with an ischemic left foot digit ulcer and suffering complex aortoiliac lesions, who received common iliac arteries kissing stents, illustrating at final antegrade and retrograde angiograms the early recognition of a blood flow obstructing valve-like calcified intimal flap protruding through the stent struts, which was obstructing antegrade but not retrograde unilateral iliac arterial axis blood flow. The problem was resolved by reconstructing the aortic bifurcation at a more proximal level. Completion angiogram verified normal patency of aorta and iliac vessels. Additionally, a severe left femoral bifurcation stenosis was also corrected by endarterectomy-arterioplasty with a bovine patch. Postintervention ankle brachial pressure indices were significantly improved. At the 6-month and 2-year follow-up, normal peripheral pulses were still reported without intermittent claudication suggesting the durability of the procedure. Through stent-protruding calcified intimal flap, is a very rare, but existing source of antegrade blood flow obstruction after common iliac arteries kissing stents. PMID:26783493

  8. Wall Morphology, Blood Flow and Wall Shear Stress: MR Findings in Patients with Peripheral Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Galizia, Mauricio S.; Barker, Alex; Liao, Yihua; Collins, Jeremy; Carr, James; McDermott, Mary; Markl, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the influence of atherosclerotic plaques on femoral haemodynamics assessed by 2D phase contrast (PC) MRI with three-directional velocity encoding. Methods: During one year, patients with peripheral artery disease and an ankle brachial index <1.00 were enrolled. After IRB approval and written informed consent, 44 patients (age=70±12 years) underwent common femoral artery MRI. Patients with contraindications for MRI were excluded. Sequences included 2D time-of-flight, proton-density, T1-, and T2-weighted MRI. ECG-gated 2D PC-MRI with 3D velocity encoding was acquired. A radiologist classified images in five categories. Blood flow, velocity, and WSS along the vessel circumference were quantified from the PC-MRI data. Results: The acquired images were of good quality for interpretation. There were no image quality problems related to poor ECG-gating or slice positioning. Velocities, oscillatory shear stress, and total flow were similar between patients with normal arteries and wall thickening/plaque. Patients with plaques demonstrated regionally increased peak systolic WSS and enhanced WSS eccentricity. Conclusions: Combined multi-contrast morphological imaging of the peripheral arterial wall with PC-MRI with 3 directional velocity encoding is a feasible technique. Further study is needed to determine whether flow is an appropriate marker for altered endothelial cell function, vascular remodelling, and plaque progression. PMID:24326757

  9. Traumatic subclavian arterial rupture: a case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Subclavian artery injuries represent an uncommon complication of blunt chest trauma, this structure being protected by subclavius muscle, the clavicle, the first rib, and the deep cervical fascia as well as the costo-coracoid ligament, a clavi-coraco-axillary fascia portion. Subclavian artery injury appears early after trauma, and arterial rupture may cause life-treatening haemorrages, pseudo-aneurysm formation and compression of brachial plexus. These clinical eveniences must be carefully worked out by accurate physical examination of the upper limb: skin color, temperature, sensation as well as radial pulse and hand motility represent the key points of physical examination in this setting. The presence of large hematomas and pulsatile palpable mass in supraclavicular region should raise the suspicion of serious vascular injury. Since the first reports of endovascular treatment for traumatic vascular injuries in the 90’s, an increasing number of vascular lesions have been treated this way. We report a case of traumatic subclavian arterial rupture after blunt chest trauma due to a 4 meters fall, treated by endovascular stent grafting, providing a complete review of the past twenty years’ literature. PMID:22710070

  10. Peripheral arterial disease, type 2 diabetes and postprandial lipidaemia: Is there a link?

    PubMed Central

    Valdivielso, Pedro; Ramírez-Bollero, José; Pérez-López, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease, manifested as intermittent claudication or critical ischaemia, or identified by an ankle/brachial index < 0.9, is present in at least one in every four patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Several reasons exist for peripheral arterial disease in diabetes. In addition to hyperglycaemia, smoking and hypertension, the dyslipidaemia that accompanies type 2 diabetes and is characterised by increased triglyceride levels and reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations also seems to contribute to this association. Recent years have witnessed an increased interest in postprandial lipidaemia, as a result of various prospective studies showing that non-fasting triglycerides predict the onset of arteriosclerotic cardiovascular disease better than fasting measurements do. Additionally, the use of certain specific postprandial particle markers, such as apolipoprotein B-48, makes it easier and more simple to approach the postprandial phenomenon. Despite this, only a few studies have evaluated the role of postprandial triglycerides in the development of peripheral arterial disease and type 2 diabetes. The purpose of this review is to examine the epidemiology and risk factors of peripheral arterial disease in type 2 diabetes, focusing on the role of postprandial triglycerides and particles. PMID:25317236

  11. Peripheral arterial disease, type 2 diabetes and postprandial lipidaemia: Is there a link?

    PubMed

    Valdivielso, Pedro; Ramírez-Bollero, José; Pérez-López, Carmen

    2014-10-15

    Peripheral arterial disease, manifested as intermittent claudication or critical ischaemia, or identified by an ankle/brachial index < 0.9, is present in at least one in every four patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Several reasons exist for peripheral arterial disease in diabetes. In addition to hyperglycaemia, smoking and hypertension, the dyslipidaemia that accompanies type 2 diabetes and is characterised by increased triglyceride levels and reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations also seems to contribute to this association. Recent years have witnessed an increased interest in postprandial lipidaemia, as a result of various prospective studies showing that non-fasting triglycerides predict the onset of arteriosclerotic cardiovascular disease better than fasting measurements do. Additionally, the use of certain specific postprandial particle markers, such as apolipoprotein B-48, makes it easier and more simple to approach the postprandial phenomenon. Despite this, only a few studies have evaluated the role of postprandial triglycerides in the development of peripheral arterial disease and type 2 diabetes. The purpose of this review is to examine the epidemiology and risk factors of peripheral arterial disease in type 2 diabetes, focusing on the role of postprandial triglycerides and particles. PMID:25317236

  12. [Transposition of Great Artery].

    PubMed

    Konuma, Takeshi; Shimpo, Hideto

    2015-07-01

    Transposition of the great artery is one of common congenital cardiac disease resulting cyanosis. Death occurs easily in untreated patients with transposition and intact ventricular septal defect (VSD) in infancy at a few days of age when posterior descending coronary artery (PDA) closed. Since there are 2 parallel circulations, flow from pulmonary to systemic circulation is necessary for systemic oxygenation, and Balloon atrial septostomy or prostaglandin infusion should be performed especially if patient do not have VSD. Although the advent of fetal echocardiography, it is difficult to diagnose the transposition of the great arteries (TGA) as abnormality of great vessels is relatively undistinguishable. The diagnosis of transposition is in itself an indication for surgery, and arterial switch procedure is performed in the case the left ventricle pressure remains more than 2/3 of systemic pressure. Preoperative diagnosis is important as associated anomalies and coronary artery branching patterns are important to decide the operative indication and timing of surgery.

  13. Role of Mineralocorticoid Receptors in Arterial Stiffness in Human Aging

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Moon-Hyon; Yoo, Jeung-Ki; Luttrell, Meredith; Kim, Han-Kyul; Meade, Thomas H.; English, Mark; Nichols, Wilmer W.; Christou, Demetra D.

    2013-01-01

    Arterial stiffness, an independent predictor of cardiovascular disease, is increased in aging, but the underlying mechanisms are not completely understood. Mineralocorticoid receptors (MR) may contribute to oxidative stress and arterial stiffness in healthy older adults. To test the hypothesis that short-term MR blockade may reduce oxidative stress and improve arterial stiffness, we conducted a randomized, double blind, crossover study using the selective MR blocker Eplerenone or placebo in 23 older adults (age, 64±1 years; mean±SE) free from overt cardiovascular and other clinical disease (e.g, diabetes, renal and liver disease). In response to MR blockade, brachial and carotid blood pressure decreased (P≤0.01). However, MR blockade had no effect on oxidative stress (oxidized LDL, 61.2±6.8 vs. 62.4±7.4 U/L, P=0.9; placebo vs. Eplerenone) and arterial stiffness (aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV), 9.17±1.19 vs. 8.92±1.19 m/sec, P=0.5; leg PWV, 13.45±0.45 vs. 12.81±0.47 m/sec, P=0.3; arm PWV, 11.43±0.62 vs. 11.73±0.68 m/sec, P=0.7; carotid artery compliance, 0.150±0.013 vs. 0.149±0.014 mm2/mmHg, P=0.8; distensibility, 23.1±1.8 vs. 23.3±1.7 10−3/kPa, P=0.8; β stiffness index, 3.5±0.3 vs. 3.6±0.3, P=0.6; and augmentation index, 16.0±2.2 vs. 15.6±2.8 %, P=0.8). These results provide the first evidence that MR do not appear to contribute to oxidative stress in human aging and that short-term MR blockade does not result in reduced oxidative stress and improved arterial stiffness. PMID:23707930

  14. Fracture and Collapse of Balloon-Expandable Stents in the Bilateral Common Iliac Arteries Due to Shiatsu Massage

    SciTech Connect

    Ichihashi, Shigeo Higashiura, Wataru; Itoh, Hirofumi; Sakaguchi, Shoji; Kichikawa, Kimihiko

    2012-12-15

    We report a case of stent fracture and collapse of balloon-expandable stents caused by shiatsu massage. A 76-year-old man presented with complaints of intermittent claudication of the right lower extremity. Stenoses of the bilateral common iliac arteries (CIAs) were detected. Balloon-expandable stents were deployed in both CIAs, resulting in resolution of symptoms. Five months later, pelvis x-ray showed collapse of both stents. Despite the stent collapse, the patient was asymptomatic, and his ankle brachial index values were within the normal range. Further history showed that the patient underwent daily shiatsu therapy in the umbilical region, which may have triggered collapse of the stent. Physicians should advise patients to avoid compression of the abdominal wall after implantation of a stent in the iliac artery.

  15. Peripheral communications of intercostobrachial nerve Peripheral communications of the intercostobrachial nerve in relation to the alar thoracic artery

    PubMed Central

    Rustagi, Shaifaly Madan; Sharma, Mona; Singh, Nidhi; Mehta, Vandana; Suri, Rajesh K; Rath, Gayatri

    2015-01-01

    The intercostobrachial nerve (ICBN) is often encountered during axillary dissection for axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) for diagnostic and therapeutic surgery for mastectomy. The present report is a case observed in the Department of Anatomy at Vardhman Mahavir Medical College, Delhi during routine dissection of the upper extremity of a male cadaver for first year undergraduate medical students. On the right side, the medial cord of brachial plexus gave two medial cutaneous nerves of arm. Both the nerves were seen communicating with the branches of the ICBN. The ICBN and one of its branches were surrounding the termination of an alar thoracic artery. These peripheral neural connections of the ICBN with the branches of the medial cord can be a cause of sensory impairment during axillary procedures done for mastectomy or exploration of long thoracic nerves. The alar thoracic artery found in relation to the ICBN could further be a cause of vascular complications during such procedures. PMID:25802820

  16. Peripheral communications of intercostobrachial nerve Peripheral communications of the intercostobrachial nerve in relation to the alar thoracic artery.

    PubMed

    Rustagi, Shaifaly Madan; Sharma, Mona; Singh, Nidhi; Mehta, Vandana; Suri, Rajesh K; Rath, Gayatri

    2015-01-01

    The intercostobrachial nerve (ICBN) is often encountered during axillary dissection for axillary lymph node dissection (ALND) for diagnostic and therapeutic surgery for mastectomy. The present report is a case observed in the Department of Anatomy at Vardhman Mahavir Medical College, Delhi during routine dissection of the upper extremity of a male cadaver for first year undergraduate medical students. On the right side, the medial cord of brachial plexus gave two medial cutaneous nerves of arm. Both the nerves were seen communicating with the branches of the ICBN. The ICBN and one of its branches were surrounding the termination of an alar thoracic artery. These peripheral neural connections of the ICBN with the branches of the medial cord can be a cause of sensory impairment during axillary procedures done for mastectomy or exploration of long thoracic nerves. The alar thoracic artery found in relation to the ICBN could further be a cause of vascular complications during such procedures.

  17. Estimated aortic blood pressure based on radial artery tonometry underestimates directly measured aortic blood pressure in patients with advancing chronic kidney disease staging and increasing arterial stiffness.

    PubMed

    Carlsen, Rasmus K; Peters, Christian D; Khatir, Dinah S; Laugesen, Esben; Bøtker, Hans Erik; Winther, Simon; Buus, Niels H

    2016-10-01

    Central blood pressure (BP) can be assessed noninvasively based on radial tonometry and may potentially be a better predictor of clinical outcome than brachial BP. However, the validity of noninvasively obtained estimates has never been examined in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Here we compared invasive aortic systolic BP (SBP) with estimated central SBP obtained by radial artery tonometry and examined the influence of renal function and arterial stiffness on this relationship. We evaluated 83 patients with stage 3 to 5 CKD (mean estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] 30 ml/min/1.73 m(2)) and 41 controls without renal disease undergoing scheduled coronary angiography. BP in the ascending aorta was measured through the angiography catheter and simultaneously estimated using radial tonometry. The mean difference between estimated central and aortic SBP was -13.2 (95% confidence interval -14.9 to -11.4) mm Hg. Arterial stiffness was evaluated by carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cf-PWV) and was significantly increased in CKD patients compared with (versus) control patients (mean 10.7 vs. 9.3 m/s). The difference in BP significantly increased 1.0 mm Hg for every 10 ml/min decrease in eGFR and by 1.6 mm Hg per 1 m/s increase in cfPWV. Using multivariate regression analysis including both eGFR and cfPWV, the difference between estimated central and invasive aortic SBP was significantly increased by 0.7 mm Hg. For the entire cohort brachial SBP significantly better reflected invasive SBP than estimated SBP. Thus, tonometry-based estimates of central BP progressively underestimate invasive central SBP with decreasing renal function and increasing arterial stiffness in CKD patients.

  18. Association Between Chromosome 9p21 Variants and the Ankle-Brachial Index Identified by a Meta-Analysis of 21 Genome-Wide Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Murabito, Joanne M.; White, Charles C.; Kavousi, Maryam; Sun, Yan V.; Feitosa, Mary F.; Nambi, Vijay; Lamina, Claudia; Schillert, Arne; Coassin, Stefan; Bis, Joshua C.; Broer, Linda; Crawford, Dana C.; Franceschini, Nora; Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth; Haun, Margot; Holewijn, Suzanne; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Kiechl, Stefan; Kollerits, Barbara; Montasser, May E.; Nolte, Ilja M.; Rudock, Megan E.; Senft, Andrea; Teumer, Alexander; van der Harst, Pim; Vitart, Veronique; Waite, Lindsay L.; Wood, Andrew R.; Wassel, Christina L.; Absher, Devin M.; Allison, Matthew A.; Amin, Najaf; Arnold, Alice; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Aulchenko, Yurii; Bandinelli, Stefania; Barbalic, Maja; Boban, Mladen; Brown-Gentry, Kristin; Couper, David J.; Criqui, Michael H.; Dehghan, Abbas; Heijer, Martin den; Dieplinger, Benjamin; Ding, Jingzhong; Dörr, Marcus; Espinola-Klein, Christine; Felix, Stephan B.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Folsom, Aaron R.; Fraedrich, Gustav; Gibson, Quince; Goodloe, Robert; Gunjaca, Grgo; Haltmayer, Meinhard; Heiss, Gerardo; Hofman, Albert; Kieback, Arne; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Kolcic, Ivana; Kullo, Iftikhar J.; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Lackner, Karl J.; Li, Xiaohui; Lieb, Wolfgang; Lohman, Kurt; Meisinger, Christa; Melzer, David; Mohler, Emile R; Mudnic, Ivana; Mueller, Thomas; Navis, Gerjan; Oberhollenzer, Friedrich; Olin, Jeffrey W.; O’Connell, Jeff; O’Donnell, Christopher J.; Palmas, Walter; Penninx, Brenda W.; Petersmann, Astrid; Polasek, Ozren; Psaty, Bruce M.; Rantner, Barbara; Rice, Ken; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rotter, Jerome I.; Seldenrijk, Adrie; Stadler, Marietta; Summerer, Monika; Tanaka, Toshiko; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; van Gilst, Wiek H.; Vermeulen, Sita H.; Wild, Sarah H.; Wild, Philipp S.; Willeit, Johann; Zeller, Tanja; Zemunik, Tatijana; Zgaga, Lina; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Blankenberg, Stefan; Boerwinkle, Eric; Campbell, Harry; Cooke, John P.; de Graaf, Jacqueline; Herrington, David; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Murray, Anna; Münzel, Thomas; Newman, Anne; Oostra, Ben A.; Rudan, Igor; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Snieder, Harold; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Völker, Uwe; Wright, Alan F.; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Wilson, James F.; Witteman, Jacqueline C.M.; Liu, Yongmei; Hayward, Caroline; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Ziegler, Andreas; North, Kari E.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Kronenberg, Florian

    2012-01-01

    Background Genetic determinants of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) remain largely unknown. To identify genetic variants associated with the ankle-brachial index (ABI), a noninvasive measure of PAD, we conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association study data from 21 population-based cohorts. Methods and Results Continuous ABI and PAD (ABI≤0.9) phenotypes adjusted for age and sex were examined. Each study conducted genotyping and imputed data to the ~2.5 million SNPs in HapMap. Linear and logistic regression models were used to test each SNP for association with ABI and PAD using additive genetic models. Study-specific data were combined using fixed-effects inverse variance weighted meta-analyses. There were a total of 41,692 participants of European ancestry (~60% women, mean ABI 1.02 to 1.19), including 3,409 participants with PAD and with GWAS data available. In the discovery meta-analysis, rs10757269 on chromosome 9 near CDKN2B had the strongest association with ABI (β= −0.006, p=2.46x10−8). We sought replication of the 6 strongest SNP associations in 5 population-based studies and 3 clinical samples (n=16,717). The association for rs10757269 strengthened in the combined discovery and replication analysis (p=2.65x10−9). No other SNP associations for ABI or PAD achieved genome-wide significance. However, two previously reported candidate genes for PAD and one SNP associated with coronary artery disease (CAD) were associated with ABI : DAB21P (rs13290547, p=3.6x10−5); CYBA (rs3794624, p=6.3x10−5); and rs1122608 (LDLR, p=0.0026). Conclusions GWAS in more than 40,000 individuals identified one genome-wide significant association on chromosome 9p21 with ABI. Two candidate genes for PAD and 1 SNP for CAD are associated with ABI. PMID:22199011

  19. Prevalence of peripheral arterial disease in patients with diabetes mellitus in a primary care setting.

    PubMed

    Rabia, K; Khoo, E M

    2007-06-01

    The aims of the study were to determine the prevalence of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in diabetic patients and in different ethnic groups at a primary care setting, and to evaluate risk factors associated with PAD in these diabetic patients. A cross sectional study of 200 diabetic patients over 18 years old who attended a primary care clinic at a teaching hospital in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia was carried out. Face-to-face interviews were conducted using structured questionnaires for demographic characteristics and risk factors evaluation. Blood pressure measurements, assessment of peripheral neuropathy and ankle brachial pressures were performed. PAD was diagnosed by an ankle brachial pressure index (ABPI) of <0.9 on either leg. The overall prevalence of PAD was 16% in this diabetic population. The prevalence of PAD was 5.8% in Malays, 19.4% in Chinese and 19.8% in Indians. The prevalence of peripheral neuropathy was 41%, foot ulcer 9.5%, and gangrene 3.0%. The presence of foot ulcer was weakly associated with PAD (P=0.052). No significant relationships were found between age, gender, smoking status, duration of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, dyslipidaemia, and PAD. PAD is common in the diabetic population of this study. PMID:18705445

  20. Arterial stiffness & Sri Lankan chronic kidney disease of unknown origin

    PubMed Central

    Gifford, Fiona; Kimmitt, Robert; Herath, Chula; Webb, David J; Melville, Vanessa; Siribaddana, Sisira; Eddleston, Michael; Dhaun, Neeraj

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is common and independently associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Arterial stiffness contributes to CVD risk in CKD. In many developing countries a considerable proportion of CKD remains unexplained, termed CKDu. We assessed arterial stiffness in subjects with Sri Lankan CKDu, in matched controls without CKD and in those with defined CKD. Aortic blood pressure (BP), pulse wave velocity (PWV) and augmentation index (AIx) were assessed in 130 subjects (50 with CKDu, 45 with CKD and 35 without CKD) using the validated TensioMed™ Arteriograph monitor. Brachial and aortic BP was lower in controls than in CKDu and CKD subjects but no different between CKDu and CKD. Controls had a lower PWV compared to subjects with CKDu and CKD. Despite equivalent BP and renal dysfunction, CKDu subjects had a lower PWV than those with CKD (8.7 ± 1.5 vs. 9.9 ± 2.2 m/s, p < 0.01). Excluding diabetes accentuated the differences in PWV seen between groups (controls vs. CKDu vs. CKD: 6.7 ± 0.9 vs. 8.7 ± 1.5 vs. 10.4 ± 1.5 m/s, p < 0.001 for all). Sri Lankan CKDu is associated with less arterial stiffening than defined causes of CKD. Whether this translates to lower cardiovascular morbidity and mortality long term is unclear and should be the focus of future studies. PMID:27586642

  1. Arterial stiffness & Sri Lankan chronic kidney disease of unknown origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gifford, Fiona; Kimmitt, Robert; Herath, Chula; Webb, David J.; Melville, Vanessa; Siribaddana, Sisira; Eddleston, Michael; Dhaun, Neeraj

    2016-09-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is common and independently associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Arterial stiffness contributes to CVD risk in CKD. In many developing countries a considerable proportion of CKD remains unexplained, termed CKDu. We assessed arterial stiffness in subjects with Sri Lankan CKDu, in matched controls without CKD and in those with defined CKD. Aortic blood pressure (BP), pulse wave velocity (PWV) and augmentation index (AIx) were assessed in 130 subjects (50 with CKDu, 45 with CKD and 35 without CKD) using the validated TensioMed™ Arteriograph monitor. Brachial and aortic BP was lower in controls than in CKDu and CKD subjects but no different between CKDu and CKD. Controls had a lower PWV compared to subjects with CKDu and CKD. Despite equivalent BP and renal dysfunction, CKDu subjects had a lower PWV than those with CKD (8.7 ± 1.5 vs. 9.9 ± 2.2 m/s, p < 0.01). Excluding diabetes accentuated the differences in PWV seen between groups (controls vs. CKDu vs. CKD: 6.7 ± 0.9 vs. 8.7 ± 1.5 vs. 10.4 ± 1.5 m/s, p < 0.001 for all). Sri Lankan CKDu is associated with less arterial stiffening than defined causes of CKD. Whether this translates to lower cardiovascular morbidity and mortality long term is unclear and should be the focus of future studies.

  2. Progression of asymptomatic peripheral artery disease over 1 year.

    PubMed

    Mohler, Emile R; Bundens, Warner; Denenberg, Julie; Medenilla, Elizabeth; Hiatt, William R; Criqui, Michael H

    2012-02-01

    The pathophysiology and time course of an individual converting from asymptomatic peripheral artery disease (PAD) to symptomatic claudication is unclear. The objectives of this study were: (1) to characterize the extent of atherosclerotic disease in individuals with an abnormal ankle-brachial index (ABI), but without claudication; and over 1 year of follow-up to (2) evaluate the progression of PAD using ultrasound imaging, (3) determine changes in the ABI and leg pain symptoms, and (4) correlate PAD progression with changes in the ABI and leg symptoms. We hypothesized that PAD progression would be associated with the development of claudication and changes in the ABI, 6-minute walk distance (6-MWD), and walking quality of life. Individuals with a reduced ABI but without typical intermittent claudication noted on community screening were invited to undergo baseline and 1-year follow-up assessment, including duplex ultrasound. The initial and repeat evaluations included measurement of the ABI, lower extremity duplex arterial mapping, and assessment of leg pain and functional status. Of the 50 people studied, 44 (88%) had significant atherosclerotic lesions in the lower extremity arteries, affecting 80 legs. A total of 33 of 50 individuals (66%) returned for the 1-year follow-up visit. On ultrasound examination, two of 18 normal legs developed PAD, and in 48 legs with PAD at baseline, 17 legs (35%) developed new or progressive lesions. Thirteen legs developed new claudication. Overall, there was no significant worsening in the ABI, 6-MWD, or the Walking Impairment Questionnaire (WIQ). However, legs with new lesions or lesion progression were significantly more likely to develop claudication, and the 13 legs (seven subjects) developing claudication showed a significant decline in the 6-MWD. In conclusion, these data indicate that a significant number of people with asymptomatic PAD show progression over 1 year, that such individuals are more likely to develop

  3. Arterial stiffness &Sri Lankan chronic kidney disease of unknown origin.

    PubMed

    Gifford, Fiona; Kimmitt, Robert; Herath, Chula; Webb, David J; Melville, Vanessa; Siribaddana, Sisira; Eddleston, Michael; Dhaun, Neeraj

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is common and independently associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Arterial stiffness contributes to CVD risk in CKD. In many developing countries a considerable proportion of CKD remains unexplained, termed CKDu. We assessed arterial stiffness in subjects with Sri Lankan CKDu, in matched controls without CKD and in those with defined CKD. Aortic blood pressure (BP), pulse wave velocity (PWV) and augmentation index (AIx) were assessed in 130 subjects (50 with CKDu, 45 with CKD and 35 without CKD) using the validated TensioMed™ Arteriograph monitor. Brachial and aortic BP was lower in controls than in CKDu and CKD subjects but no different between CKDu and CKD. Controls had a lower PWV compared to subjects with CKDu and CKD. Despite equivalent BP and renal dysfunction, CKDu subjects had a lower PWV than those with CKD (8.7 ± 1.5 vs. 9.9 ± 2.2 m/s, p < 0.01). Excluding diabetes accentuated the differences in PWV seen between groups (controls vs. CKDu vs. CKD: 6.7 ± 0.9 vs. 8.7 ± 1.5 vs. 10.4 ± 1.5 m/s, p < 0.001 for all). Sri Lankan CKDu is associated with less arterial stiffening than defined causes of CKD. Whether this translates to lower cardiovascular morbidity and mortality long term is unclear and should be the focus of future studies. PMID:27586642

  4. Relationship between endogenous concentrations of vasoactive substances and measures of peripheral vasodilator function in patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Casey, Darren P; Nichols, Wilmer W; Conti, C Richard; Braith, Randy W

    2010-01-01

    1. The aim of the present study was to determine the relationship between plasma concentrations of nitrite/nitrate (NO(x)) and endothelin (ET)-1 and non-invasive measures of peripheral vasodilator function in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). 2. Twenty-two patients with angiographic CAD underwent non-invasive measurement of peripheral vasodilator function in the brachial conduit artery (flow-mediated dilation (FMD) testing via ultrasound) and in the forearm resistance arteries (via venous occlusion plethysmography) during reactive hyperaemia after 5 min ischaemia. In addition, plasma NO(x) and ET-1 concentrations were determined. 3. The plasma concentration of NO(x) was related to the peak brachial FMD response when expressed as either the relative (%) or absolute (mm) change in diameter (r = 0.73, P < 0.001; and r = 0.64, P < 0.01, respectively). Moreover, plasma concentrations of NO(x) demonstrated a relationship with forearm vasodilation estimated by total forearm blood flow following 5 min ischaemia (r = 0.63, P < 0.01) and the flow debt repayment of the forearm (r = 0.54, P < 0.01). Finally, ET-1 concentrations were inversely related to FMD% (r = -0.45, P < 0.05). 4. The findings of the present study demonstrate a relationship between the plasma concentrations of NO(x) and measures of vascular reactivity in conduit and resistance arteries in patients with CAD. Therefore, measurement of plasma NO(x) may serve as a reliable marker for peripheral vasodilator dysfunction in patients with CAD. PMID:19515062

  5. Therapeutic application of electrical stimulation and constraint induced movement therapy in perinatal brachial plexus injury: A case report.

    PubMed

    Berggren, Jamie; Baker, Lucinda L

    2015-01-01

    Infants and children with perinatal brachial plexus injury (PBPI) have motion limitations in the shoulder, elbow, forearm and hand that are dependent on the level of injury and degree of recovery. The injury and subsequent recovery period occur during critical periods of central and spinal neural development placing infants and children at-risk for developmental disregard and disuse of the affected arm and hand. A case report outlines the therapy and surgical interventions provided in the first 2 years of life for a child with global PBPI and a positive Horner's sign. Electrical stimulation and constraint induced movement therapy provided sequentially were effective therapy interventions. Neurosurgery to repair the brachial plexus was performed at an optimal time period.(2) The Assisting Hand Assessment,(12) Modified Mallet(13) and Active Movement Scale(14) are effective outcome measures in PBPI and served as valuable guides for therapy intervention. Oxford Level of Evidence: 3b; Individual Case Control Study.

  6. The brachial plexus branches to the pectoral muscles in adult rats: morphological aspects and morphometric normative data

    PubMed Central

    Riva, Nilo; Domi, Teuta; Lopez, Ignazio Diego; Triolo, Daniela; Fossaghi, Andrea; Dina, Giorgia; Podini, Paola; Comi, Giancarlo; Quattrini, Angelo

    2012-01-01

    Animal models provide an important tool to investigate the pathogenesis of neuromuscular disorders. In the present study, we analyze fiber composition of the brachial plexus branches to the pectoral muscles: the medial anterior thoracic nerve (MATN) and the lateral anterior thoracic nerve (LATN). The morphological and morphometric characteristics and the percentage of motor fibers within each nerve are here reported, adding information to microscopic anatomy knowledge of the rat brachial plexus. As control, we employed the quadriceps nerve, commonly used for the evaluation of motor fibers at hindlimbs. We demonstrated that the MATN and the LATN are predominantly composed of large motor fibers and therefore could be employed to evaluate the peripheral nervous system (PNS) involvement at forelimbs in neurological diseases models, predominantly affecting the motor fiber compartment. PMID:23087618

  7. Endovascular repair of a right-sided descending thoracic aortic aneurysm associated with a right aortic arch and a left subclavian artery arising from a Kommerell's diverticulum.

    PubMed

    Klonaris, Chris; Avgerinos, Efthimios D; Katsargyris, Athanasios; Matthaiou, Alexandros; Georgopoulos, Sotirios; Psarros, Vasileios; Bastounis, Elias

    2009-07-01

    This case report describes the endovascular repair of a right-sided descending thoracic aortic aneurysm associated with a right aortic arch and an aberrant left subclavian artery. A 76-year-old male with multiple comorbidities was incidentally found to have a right-sided descending thoracic aortic aneurysm with a maximum diameter of 6.2 cm. Additionally, there was a right aortic arch with a retroesophageal segment and separate arch branches arising in the following order: left common carotid artery, right common carotid artery, right subclavian artery, and left subclavian artery that was aberrant, arising from a Kommerrell's diverticulum. The aneurysm was successfully excluded by deployment of a Zenith TX1 36 x 32 x 20-mm stent-graft using wire traction technique via the left femoral and right brachial arteries in order to deal with two severe aortic angulations. At 18-month follow-up the patient was doing well, with aneurysm sac shrinkage to 5.9 cm and no signs of endoleak or migration. Endovascular repair of right-sided descending thoracic aortic aneurysms with a right arch and aberrant left subclavian artery is feasible, safe, and effective. In such rare configurations, which demand considerably increased technical dexterity and center experience, endovascular repair emerges as an attractive therapeutic option.

  8. Endovascular Repair of a Right-Sided Descending Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Associated with a Right Aortic Arch and a Left Subclavian Artery Arising from a Kommerell's Diverticulum

    SciTech Connect

    Klonaris, Chris Avgerinos, Efthimios D.; Katsargyris, Athanasios; Matthaiou, Alexandros; Georgopoulos, Sotirios; Psarros, Vasileios; Bastounis, Elias

    2009-07-15

    This case report describes the endovascular repair of a right-sided descending thoracic aortic aneurysm associated with a right aortic arch and an aberrant left subclavian artery. A 76-year-old male with multiple comorbidities was incidentally found to have a right-sided descending thoracic aortic aneurysm with a maximum diameter of 6.2 cm. Additionally, there was a right aortic arch with a retroesophageal segment and separate arch branches arising in the following order: left common carotid artery, right common carotid artery, right subclavian artery, and left subclavian artery that was aberrant, arising from a Kommerrell's diverticulum. The aneurysm was successfully excluded by deployment of a Zenith TX1 36 x 32 x 20-mm stent-graft using wire traction technique via the left femoral and right brachial arteries in order to deal with two severe aortic angulations. At 18-month follow-up the patient was doing well, with aneurysm sac shrinkage to 5.9 cm and no signs of endoleak or migration. Endovascular repair of right-sided descending thoracic aortic aneurysms with a right arch and aberrant left subclavian artery is feasible, safe, and effective. In such rare configurations, which demand considerably increased technical dexterity and center experience, endovascular repair emerges as an attractive therapeutic option.

  9. Sensory disturbances and pain complaints after brachial plexus root injury: a prospective study involving 150 adult patients.

    PubMed

    Bertelli, Jayme Augusto; Ghizoni, Marcos Flávio; Loure Iro Chaves, Daniel Preissler

    2011-02-01

    After injury of the brachial plexus, sensory disturbance in the affected limb varies according to the extent of root involvement. The goal of this study was to match sensory assessments and pain complaints with findings on CT myelo scans and surgical observations. One hundred fifty patients with supraclavicular stretch injury of the brachial plexus were operated upon within an average of 5.4 months of trauma. Preoperatively, upper limb sensation was evaluated using Semmes-Weinstein monofilaments. Pain complaints were recorded for each patient. With lesions affecting the upper roots of the brachial plexus, hand sensation was largerly preserved. Sensory disturbances were identified over a longitudinal bundle on the lateral arm and forearm. In C8-T1 root injuries, diminished protective sensation was observed on the ulnar aspect of the hand. If the C7 root also was injured, sensation in the long finger was impaired. Eighty-four percent of our 64 patients with total palsy reported pain, versus just 47% of our 72 patients with upper type palsies. This rate dropped to 29% in the 14 patients with a lower-type palsy. C8 and T1, when injured, always were avulsed from the cord; when avulsion of these roots was the only nerve injury, pain was absent. Hand sensation was largely preserved in patients with partial injuries of the brachial plexus, particularly on the radial side. Even when T1 was the only preserved root, hand sensation was mostly spared. This indicates that overlapping of the dermatomal zones seems much more widespread than previously reported.

  10. Supraclavicular Brachial Plexus Block With or Without Dexamethasone as an Adjuvant to 0.5% Levobupivacaine: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Bhupal, Jatinder Paul Singh; Kumar, Parmod; Gandhi, Gurjit Singh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Brachial plexus block is an excellent method for attaining optimal operating conditions by producing complete muscular relaxation, maintaining stable intraoperative haemodynamics and the associated sympathetic block. In addition, they provide extended postoperative analgesia with minimal side effects. Different adjuvants have been described in literature to hasten the onset and prolong the duration of block. The present study was conducted to study the effect of adding dexamethasone to levobupivacaine in supraclavicular brachial plexus block. Aim To observe the effect of dexamethasone on onset and duration of anaesthesia, when used as an adjuvant to levobupivacaine in supraclavicular brachial plexus block. Materials and Methods A total of 60 patients in the age group of 18-65 years belonging to ASA physical status I or II were included in the study. They are randomly allocated in two groups and each group included 30 patients. In group 1, patients received 30ml of 0.5% isobaric levobupivacaine with 2ml of isotonic sodium chloride. In group 2 patients received 8mg (2ml) dexamethasone in addition to 30ml of 0.5% isobaric levobupivacaine. Results The results showed that the onset of sensory and motor block were faster in group 2(p<0.05). The duration of sensory and motor block were significantly longer in group 2 (p<0.05). VAS score at 12 hours were significantly lower in group 2 (p<0.05). None of the patients had bradycardia, hypotension or any other side effects. Conclusion Dexamethasone added to levobupivacaine for supraclavicular brachial plexus block reduces the time to onset of sensory and motor blockage and prolongs the duration of analgesia. PMID:27504384

  11. Unusual and Unique Variant Branches of Lateral Cord of Brachial Plexus and its Clinical Implications- A Cadaveric Study

    PubMed Central

    Padur, Ashwini Aithal; Shanthakumar, Swamy Ravindra; Shetty, Surekha Devadas; Prabhu, Gayathri Sharath; Patil, Jyothsna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Adequate knowledge on variant morphology of brachial plexus and its branches are important in clinical applications pertaining to trauma and surgical procedures of the upper extremity. Aim Current study was aimed to report variations of the branches of the lateral cord of brachial plexus in the axilla and their possible clinical complications. Materials and Methods Total number of 82 upper limbs from 41 formalin embalmed cadavers was dissected. Careful observation was made to note the formation and branching pattern of lateral cord. Meticulous inspection for absence of branches, presence of additional or variant branches and presence of abnormal communications between its branches or with branches of other cords was carried out. Results In the present study, we noted varied branching pattern of lateral cord in 6 out of 82 limbs (7%). In one of the limb, the median nerve was formed by three roots; two from lateral cord and one from medial cord. Two limbs had absence of lateral pectoral nerve supplemented by medial pectoral nerves. One of which had an atypical ansa pectoralis. In 2 upper limbs, musculocutaneous nerve was absent and in both cases it was supplemented by median nerve. In one of the limb, coracobrachialis had dual nerve supply by musculocutaneous nerve and by an additional branch from the lateral cord. Conclusion Variations of brachial plexus and its branches could pose both intraoperative and postoperative complications which eventually affect the normal sensory and motor functions of the upper limb. PMID:27190783

  12. Peripheral and central arterial pressure and its relationship to vascular target organ damage in carotid artery, retina and arterial stiffness. Development and validation of a tool. The Vaso risk study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) shows a better correlation to target organ damage and cardiovascular morbidity-mortality than office blood pressure. A loss of arterial elasticity and an increase in carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) has been associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity-mortality. Tools have been developed that allow estimation of the retinal arteriovenous index but not all studies coincide and there are contradictory results in relation to the evolution of the arteriosclerotic lesions and the caliber of the retinal vessels. The purpose of this study is to analyze the relationship between peripheral and central arterial pressure (clinic and ambulatory) and vascular structure and function as evaluated by the carotid artery intima-media thickness, retina arteriovenous index, pulse wave velocity (PWV) and ankle-brachial index in patients with and without type 2 diabetes. In turn, software is developed and validated for measuring retinal vessel thickness and automatically estimating the arteriovenous index. Methods/Design A cross-sectional study involving a control group will be made, with a posterior 4-year follow-up period in primary care. The study patients will be type 2 diabetics, with a control group of non-diabetic individuals. Consecutive sampling will be used to include 300 patients between 34-75 years of age and no previous cardiovascular disease, one-half being assigned to each group. Main measurements: age, gender, height, weight and abdominal circumference. Lipids, creatinine, microalbuminuria, blood glucose, HbA1c, blood insulin, high sensitivity C-reactive protein and endothelial dysfunction markers. Clinic and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. Carotid ultrasound to evaluate IMT, and retinography to evaluate the arteriovenous index. ECG to assess left ventricle hypertrophy, ankle-brachial index, and pulse wave analysis (PWA) and pulse wave velocity (PWV) with the Sphigmocor System. Discussion We

  13. The Use of Below-Knee Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty in Arterial Occlusive Disease Causing Chronic Critical Limb Ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Loefberg, Ann-Marie; Loerelius, Lars-Erik; Karacagil, Sadettin; Westman, Bo; Almgren, Bo; Berqgvist, David

    1996-09-15

    Purpose: To determine the efficacy, safety and long-term results of crural artery percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) in limbs with chronic critical limb ischemia (CLI). Methods: Patients undergoing crural artery PTA due to CLI were followed at regular clinic visits with ankle brachial pressure index (ABPI) measurements. PTA of the crural arteries was attempted either alone (n= 39) or in combination with PTA of the superficial and/or popliteal artery (n= 55) in 86 limbs (82 patients and 94 procedures) presenting with CLI. The ages of patients ranged from 37 to 94 years (mean 72 years). The indications for PTA were rest pain in 10 and ulcer/gangrene in 84 limbs.Results: A technically successful PTA with at least one crural level was achieved in 88% of cases (n= 83). Cumulative primary clinical success rates at 6, 12, 24, and 36 months were 55%, 51%, 36%, and 36%, respectively. Cumulative secondary clinical success and limb salvage rates at 36 months were 44% and 72%, respectively. Conclusion: PTA of the crural arteries might be considered the primary choice of treatment in patients with CLI and distal lesions with localized stenosis or segmental short occlusions.

  14. Use of a radial artery compression device for noninvasive, near-continuous blood pressure monitoring in the ED.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Stephen H; Winsor, Greg R; Pang, Peter S; Driscoll, Karen A; Parry, Blair A

    2004-10-01

    This study's goal was to test a novel device using continuous partial radial artery compression for mean arterial pressure (MAP) measurement. A prospective, nonblind, convenience-sample trial at a level I center (annual ED census 70,000) enrolled 15 adults with indwelling radial arterial catheters and accessible contralateral radial pulse. Subjects had MAPs measured simultaneously by test device (TEST assessments), oscillometric brachial artery cuff (OSC), and arterial line (ART). There was no difference between the three groups' MAP means (P = .98). R(2) values for ART/OSC and ART/TEST were 0.96 and 0.95, respectively (P <.001). TEST and OSC MAP readings were equally likely (P = 0.66) to be within 5 mm Hg of ART in both the overall set of 307 MAPs and in the subset of 120 cases in which ART MAPs were below 80 (P = .47). The TEST device performed at least as well as oscillometric assessment, offering advantages of noninvasive, near-continuous data.

  15. [Ultrasound imaging of coronary artery].

    PubMed

    Fuse, Shigeto

    2014-09-01

    Coronary arterial anatomy and the terminology were reviewed. There is a specific portion of coronary artery aneurysm in Kawasaki disease. To investigate coronary arterial lesion, ultrasound imaging is useful because of non-invasive, high special and time resolu tion method. I explained the patient posture, the approaching method to the coronary arter ies, ultrasound setting, measurement of coronary arterial diameter and diastolic measurement.

  16. Clinical aspects of patients with traumatic lesions of the brachial plexus following surgical treatment☆

    PubMed Central

    de Moraes, Frederico Barra; Kwae, Mário Yoshihide; da Silva, Ricardo Pereira; Porto, Celmo Celeno; Magalhães, Daniel de Paiva; Paulino, Matheus Veloso

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate sociodemographic and clinical aspects of patients undergoing operations due to traumatic lesions of the brachial plexus. Method This was a retrospective study in which the medical files of a convenience sample of 48 patients operated between 2000 and 2010 were reviewed. The following were evaluated: (1) range of motion (ROM) of the shoulder, elbow and wrist/hand, in degrees; (2) grade of strength of the shoulder, elbow and wrist/hand; (3) sensitivity; and (4) visual analogue scale (VAS) (from 0 to 10). The Student's t, chi-square, Friedman, Wilcoxon and Kruskal–Wallis tests were used (p < 0.05). Results The patients’ mean age was 30.6 years; 60.4% of them had suffered motorcycle accidents and 52.1%, multiple trauma. The mean length of time until surgery was 8.7 months (range: 2–48). Thirty-one patients (64.6%) presented complete rupture of the plexus. The frequent operation was neurosurgery in 39 cases (81.3%). The ROM achieved was ≥30° in 20 patients (41.6%), with a range from 30° to 90° and mean of 73° (p = 0.001). Thirteen (27.1%) already had shoulder strength ≥M3 (p = 0.001). Twenty-seven patients (56.2%) had elbow flexion ≥80°, with a range from 30° to 160° and mean of 80.6° (p < 0.001). Twenty-two had strength ≥M3 (p < 0.001). Twenty-two patients (45.8%) had wrist extension ≥30° starting from flexion of 45°, with a range from 30° to 90° and mean of 70° (p = 0.003). Twenty-seven (56.3%) presented wrist/hand extension strength ≥M3 (p = 0.002). Forty-five (93.8%) had hypoesthesia and three (6.2%) had anesthesia (p = 0.006). The initial VAS was 4.5 (range: 1.0–9.0) and the final VAS was 3.0 (range: 1.0–7.0) (p < 0.001). Conclusion Traumatic lesions of the brachial plexus were more prevalent among young adults (21–40 years), men, people living in urban areas, manual workers and motorcycle accidents, with multiple trauma and total rupture of the plexus. Neurosurgery, with a second

  17. Oral trehalose supplementation improves resistance artery endothelial function in healthy middle-aged and older adults

    PubMed Central

    Kaplon, Rachelle E.; Hill, Sierra D.; Bispham, Nina Z.; Santos-Parker, Jessica R.; Nowlan, Molly J.; Snyder, Laura L.; Chonchol, Michel; LaRocca, Thomas J.; McQueen, Matthew B.; Seals, Douglas R.

    2016-01-01

    We hypothesized that supplementation with trehalose, a disaccharide that reverses arterial aging in mice, would improve vascular function in middle-aged and older (MA/O) men and women. Thirty-two healthy adults aged 50-77 years consumed 100 g/day of trehalose (n=15) or maltose (n=17, isocaloric control) for 12 weeks (randomized, double-blind). In subjects with Δbody mass<2.3kg (5 lb.), resistance artery endothelial function, assessed by forearm blood flow to brachial artery infusion of acetylcholine (FBFACh), increased ∼30% with trehalose (13.3±1.0 vs. 10.5±1.1 AUC, P=0.02), but not maltose (P=0.40). This improvement in FBFACh was abolished when endothelial nitric oxide (NO) production was inhibited. Endothelium-independent dilation, assessed by FBF to sodium nitroprusside (FBFSNP), also increased ∼30% with trehalose (155±13 vs. 116±12 AUC, P=0.03) but not maltose (P=0.92). Changes in FBFACh and FBFSNP with trehalose were not significant when subjects with Δbody mass≥2.3kg were included. Trehalose supplementation had no effect on conduit artery endothelial function, large elastic artery stiffness or circulating markers of oxidative stress or inflammation (all P>0.1) independent of changes in body weight. Our findings demonstrate that oral trehalose improves resistance artery (microvascular) function, a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, in MA/O adults, possibly through increasing NO bioavailability and smooth muscle sensitivity to NO. PMID:27208415

  18. Oral trehalose supplementation improves resistance artery endothelial function in healthy middle-aged and older adults.

    PubMed

    Kaplon, Rachelle E; Hill, Sierra D; Bispham, Nina Z; Santos-Parker, Jessica R; Nowlan, Molly J; Snyder, Laura L; Chonchol, Michel; LaRocca, Thomas J; McQueen, Matthew B; Seals, Douglas R

    2016-06-01

    We hypothesized that supplementation with trehalose, a disaccharide that reverses arterial aging in mice, would improve vascular function in middle-aged and older (MA/O) men and women. Thirty-two healthy adults aged 50-77 years consumed 100 g/day of trehalose (n=15) or maltose (n=17, isocaloric control) for 12 weeks (randomized, double-blind). In subjects with Δbody mass less than 2.3kg (5 lb.), resistance artery endothelial function, assessed by forearm blood flow to brachial artery infusion of acetylcholine (FBFACh), increased ~30% with trehalose (13.3±1.0 vs. 10.5±1.1 AUC, P=0.02), but not maltose (P=0.40). This improvement in FBFACh was abolished when endothelial nitric oxide (NO) production was inhibited. Endothelium-independent dilation, assessed by FBF to sodium nitroprusside (FBFSNP), also increased ~30% with trehalose (155±13 vs. 116±12 AUC, P=0.03) but not maltose (P=0.92). Changes in FBFACh and FBFSNP with trehalose were not significant when subjects with Δbody mass ≥ 2.3kg were included. Trehalose supplementation had no effect on conduit artery endothelial function, large elastic artery stiffness or circulating markers of oxidative stress or inflammation (all P>0.1) independent of changes in body weight. Our findings demonstrate that oral trehalose improves resistance artery (microvascular) function, a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, in MA/O adults, possibly through increasing NO bioavailability and smooth muscle sensitivity to NO. PMID:27208415

  19. Peripheral artery disease - legs

    MedlinePlus

    ... legs; Arterial insufficiency of the legs; Recurrent leg pain and cramping; Calf pain with exercise ... The main symptoms of PAD are pain, achiness, fatigue, burning, or ... or thighs. These symptoms most often appear during walking or ...

  20. Peripheral Arterial Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention Living With Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Atherosclerosis Coronary Heart Disease Heart Attack Smoking and Your ... in the body's arteries, the condition is called atherosclerosis . Over time, plaque can harden and narrow the ...

  1. Coronary artery anomalies.

    PubMed

    Earls, James P

    2006-12-01

    Coronary artery anomalies are uncommon findings but can be of significant clinical importance in a small number of individuals. Clinical presentation depends on the specific anomaly. Most coronary artery anomalies are benign and clinically insignificant, however, some anomalies are potentially significant and can lead to heart failure and even death. Noninvasive imaging has emerged as the preferred way to image coronary anomalies. Both electron beam computed tomography (EBCT) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) are useful for the diagnosis of anomalous coronary arteries. Recently, MDCT has also proven to be very useful in the detection and characterization of anomalous coronary arteries. This chapter will review the appearance of the most commonly encountered coronary anomalies on MDCT. PMID:17709086

  2. Renal arteries (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A renal angiogram is a test used to examine the blood vessels of the kidneys. The test is performed ... main vessel of the pelvis, up to the renal artery that leads into the kidney. Contrast medium ...

  3. Peripheral Arterial Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) happens when there is a narrowing of the blood vessels outside of your heart. The cause of ... smoking. Other risk factors include older age and diseases like diabetes, high blood cholesterol, high blood pressure, ...

  4. Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... t help, you may need coronary artery bypass surgery. The surgery creates a new path for blood to flow ... more than one bypass. The results of the surgery usually are excellent. Many people remain symptom-free ...

  5. Retinal artery occlusion

    MedlinePlus

    ... eds. Textbook of Family Medicine . 9th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 17. Duker JS. Retinal arterial ... M, Duker JS, eds. Ophthalmology. 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2014:chap 6.18. Reiss GR, Sipperley ...

  6. Coronary Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... ve started to help the medicine work. Other Organizations American Heart Association Questions to Ask Your Doctor Am I at risk for coronary artery disease (CAD)? What lifestyle changes should I make to decrease my risk of ...

  7. Endothelial function, arterial stiffness, and adherence to the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans: a cross-sectional analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sauder, Katherine A.; Proctor, David N.; Chow, Mosuk; Troy, Lisa M.; Wang, Na; Vita, Joseph A.; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Mitchell, Gary F.; Jacques, Paul F.; Hamburg, Naomi M.; West, Sheila G.

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction and arterial stiffness are early predictors of cardiovascular disease. Intervention studies suggest that diet is related to vascular health, but most prior studies tested individual foods or nutrients and relied on small samples of younger adults. The purpose of this study was to examine relations between adherence to the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans and vascular health in a large, cross-sectional analysis. In 5887 adults in the Framingham Heart Study Offspring and Third Generation cohorts, diet quality was quantified with the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans Index (DGAI-2010). Endothelial function was assessed via brachial artery ultrasound and arterial stiffness via arterial tonometry. In age-, sex-, and cohort-adjusted analyses, higher DGAI-2010 score (greater adherence) was modestly associated with lower resting flow velocity, hyperemic response, mean arterial pressure, carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity, and augmentation index, but not associated with resting arterial diameter or flow-mediated dilation. In multivariable models adjusting for cardiovascular risk factors, only the association of higher DGAI-2010 with lower baseline flow and augmentation index persisted (β=−0.002, P=0.003 and β=−0.05 ± 0.02, P<0.001, respectively). Age-stratified multivariate-adjusted analyses suggested that the relation of higher DGAI-2010 scores with lower mean arterial pressure, pulse wave velocity, and augmentation index was more pronounced among adults younger than 50 years. Better adherence to the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, particularly in younger adults, is associated with lower peripheral blood flow velocity and arterial wave reflection but not flow-mediated dilation. Our results suggest a link between adherence to the Dietary Guidelines and favorable vascular health. PMID:25885520

  8. Women With Peripheral Arterial Disease Experience Faster Functional Decline Than Men With Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Mary M.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Liu, Kiang; Guralnik, Jack M.; Tian, Lu; Kibbe, Melina; Liao, Yihua; Tao, Huimin; Criqui, Michael H.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We hypothesized that women with lower extremity peripheral arterial disease (PAD) would have greater mobility loss and faster functional decline than men with PAD. Background Whether rates of mobility loss or functional decline differ between men and women with PAD is currently unknown. Methods Three hundred eighty men and women with PAD completed the 6-min walk, were assessed for mobility disability, and underwent measures of 4-m walking velocity at baseline and annually for up to 4 years. Computed tomography-assessed calf muscle characteristics were measured biannually. Outcomes included becoming unable to walk for 6 min continuously among participants who walked continuously for 6 min at baseline. Mobility loss was defined as becoming unable to walk for a quarter mile or to walk up and down 1 flight of stairs without assistance among those without baseline mobility disability. Results were adjusted for age, race, body mass index, physical activity, the ankle brachial index, comorbidities, and other confounders. Results At 4 years of follow-up, women were more likely to become unable to walk for 6 min continuously (hazard ratio: 2.30, 95% confidence interval: 1.30 to 4.06, p = 0.004), more likely to develop mobility disability (hazard ratio: 1.79, 95% confidence interval: 1.30 to 3.03, p = 0.030), and had faster declines in walking velocity (p = 0.022) and the distance achieved in the 6-min walk (p = 0.041) compared with men. Sex differences in functional decline were attenuated after additional adjustment for baseline sex differences in calf muscle area. Conclusions Women with PAD have faster functional decline and greater mobility loss than men with PAD. These sex differences may be attributable to smaller baseline calf muscle area among women with PAD. PMID:21292130

  9. Reduced functional connectivity within the primary motor cortex of patients with brachial plexus injury.

    PubMed

    Fraiman, D; Miranda, M F; Erthal, F; Buur, P F; Elschot, M; Souza, L; Rombouts, S A R B; Schimmelpenninck, C A; Norris, D G; Malessy, M J A; Galves, A; Vargas, C D

    2016-01-01

    This study aims at the effects of traumatic brachial plexus lesion with root avulsions (BPA) upon the organization of the primary motor cortex (M1). Nine right-handed patients with a right BPA in whom an intercostal to musculocutaneous (ICN-MC) nerve transfer was performed had post-operative resting state fMRI scanning. The analysis of empirical functional correlations between neighboring voxels revealed faster correlation decay as a function of distance in the M1 region corresponding to the arm in BPA patients as compared to the control group. No differences between the two groups were found in the face area. We also investigated whether such larger decay in patients could be attributed to a gray matter diminution in M1. Structural imaging analysis showed no difference in gray matter density between groups. Our findings suggest that the faster decay in neighboring functional correlations without significant gray matter diminution in BPA patients could be related to a reduced activity in intrinsic horizontal connections in M1 responsible for upper limb motor synergies. PMID:27547727

  10. Numerical validation of a suprasystolic brachial cuff-based method for estimating aortic pressure.

    PubMed

    Liang, Fuyou

    2014-01-01

    Central aortic pressures are better predictors of cardiovascular events than peripheral pressures. However, central aortic blood pressures cannot be measured noninvasively; for this reason, estimating aortic pressures from noninvasive measurements of peripheral pressures has been the subject of numerous studies. In the present study, a novel method was proposed to noninvasively estimate aortic pressures from the oscillometric wave of a suprasystolic brachial cuff. The errors of estimation were evaluated in relation to various cardiovascular properties using an integrated cardiovascular-cuff model. Obtained results demonstrated that the estimation errors are affected mainly by aortic stiffness. The estimation errors for aortic systolic pressure, diastolic pressure, pulse pressure and wave shape under the assumed cardiovascular conditions were 5.84 ± 1.58 mmHg, -0.28 ± 0.41 mmHg, 6.12 ± 1.42 mmHg and 1.72 ± 0.57 mmHg, respectively, all of which fell within the error ranges established by existing devices. Since the method is easy to be automated and bases the estimation fully on patient-specific information, its clinical application is promising, although further clinical studies are awaited to validate the method in vivo.

  11. [Percutaneous exclusion of traumatic abdominal aortic pseudoaneurysm from a brachial approach].

    PubMed

    Gamboa, Ricardo; Ríos-Méndez, Raúl E; Solernó, Raúl; Giachello, Federico; Videla-Lynch, Ángeles; Sarmiento, Ricardo A

    2012-01-01

    Abdominal aortic pseudoaneurysm (AAP) is a rare lesion, although traumatic aortic injury is described as one of the main causes; both the rupture as the surgical treatment of the defect has high morbidity and mortality. Therefore, endovascular treatment either by chemical embolization or exclusion of defect with devices has emerged as an alternative treatment. However, there are risks such as occlusion of visceral vessels near the neck of the defect, embolization material or aortic rupture. Therefore, the choice of material and method of approach should be planned carefully in each case. We report a patient who ten years after abdominal wound firearm was diagnosed with AAP 17 x 13 cm, with short neck originated close to the ostium of the celiac trunk at an acute angle with the aortic axis. We perform the exclusion of the defect with a device designed for closing atrial septal defect from the left brachial access due to the angulation of the neck defect. There were no complications. At 72 hours was granted discharge. A month later, CT scan control showed the false aneurysm of equal size and no residual flow. The monitoring to date is five months and the patient remained asymptomatic.

  12. Imaging assessment of glenohumeral dysplasia secondary to brachial plexus birth palsy*

    PubMed Central

    Chagas-Neto, Francisco Abaete; Dalto, Vitor Faeda; Crema, Michel Daoud; Waters, Peter M.; Gregio-Junior, Everaldo; Mazzer, Nilton; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello Henrique

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess imaging parameters related to the morphology of the glenohumeral joint in children with unilateral brachial plexus birth palsy (BPBP), in comparison with those obtained for healthy shoulders. Materials and Methods We conducted a retrospective search for cases of unilateral BPBP diagnosed at our facility. Only patients with a clinical diagnosis of unilateral BPBP were included, and the final study sample consisted of 10 consecutive patients who were assessed with cross-sectional imaging. The glenoid version, the translation of the humeral head, and the degrees of glenohumeral dysplasia were assessed. Results The mean diameter of the affected humeral heads was 1.93 cm, compared with 2.33 cm for those of the normal limbs. In two cases, there was no significant posterior displacement of the humeral head, five cases showed posterior subluxation of the humeral head, and the remaining three cases showed total luxation of the humeral head. The mean glenoid version angle of the affected limbs (90-α) was -9.6º, versus +1.6º for the normal, contralateral limbs. Conclusion The main deformities found in this study were BPBP-associated retroversion of the glenoid cavity, developmental delay of the humeral head, and posterior translation of the humeral head. PMID:27403013

  13. Human Rabies with Initial Manifestations that Mimic Acute Brachial Neuritis and Guillain-Barré Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mader, Edward C.; Maury, Joaquin S.; Santana-Gould, Lenay; Craver, Randall D.; El-Abassi, Rima; Segura-Palacios, Enrique; Sumner, Austin J.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Human rabies can be overlooked in places where this disease is now rare. Its diagnosis is further confused by a negative history of exposure (cryptogenic rabies), by a Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) type of presentation, or by symptoms indicating another diagnosis, eg, acute brachial neuritis (ABN). Case presentation A 19-year-old Mexican, with no past health problems, presented with a two-day history of left shoulder, arm, and chest pain. He arrived in Louisiana from Mexico five days prior to admission. Of particular importance is the absence of a history of rabies exposure and immunization. On admission, the patient had quadriparesis, areflexia, and elevated protein in the cerebrospinal fluid, prompting a diagnosis of GBS. However, emerging neurological deficits pointed towards acute encephalitis. Rabies was suspected on hospital day 11 after common causes of encephalitis (eg, arboviruses) have been excluded. The patient tested positive for rabies IgM and IgG. He died 17 days after admission. Negri bodies were detected in the patient’s brain and rabies virus antigen typing identified the vampire bat as the source of infection. Conclusion Rabies should be suspected in every patient with a rapidly evolving GBS-like illness—even if there is no history of exposure and no evidence of encephalitis on presentation. The patient’s ABN-like symptoms may be equivalent to the pain experienced by rabies victims near the inoculation site. PMID:22577299

  14. Perineural versus intravenous dexamethasone as adjuncts to local anaesthetic brachial plexus block for shoulder surgery.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, D M; Ivancic, M G; Hattrup, S J; Renfree, K J; Watkins, A R; Hentz, J G; Gorlin, A W; Spiro, J A; Trentman, T L

    2016-04-01

    This randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study compared the effect of perineural with intravenous dexamethasone, both administered concomitantly with interscalene brachial plexus block for shoulder surgery. Patients received 8 mg dexamethasone mixed with ropivacaine in the block injection (n = 42), 8 mg dexamethasone intravenously at the time of the block (n = 37), or intravenous saline (n = 41) at the time of the block. Perineural and intravenous dexamethasone resulted in prolonged mean (SD) duration of block to 16.9 (5.2) h and 18.2 (6.4) h, respectively, compared with 13.8 (3.8) h for saline (p = 0.001). Mean (SD) opioid consumption (morphine equivalents) during the first 24 h after postanaesthesia recovery arrival was 12.2 (9.3) mg in the perineural dexamethasone, 17.1 (15.9) mg in the intravenous dexamethasone and 24.1 (14.3) mg in the saline groups (p = 0.001). Dexamethasone via either route reduced anti-emetic use (p = 0.046). There was no effect on patient satisfaction. These results suggest that both perineural and intravenous dexamethasone are useful adjuncts to ropivacaine interscalene block, with the intravenous route preferred as this avoids the possibility of neural toxicity of dexamethasone. PMID:26899862

  15. Balance Impairments after Brachial Plexus Injury as Assessed through Clinical and Posturographic Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Lidiane; Lemos, Thiago; Silva, Débora C.; de Oliveira, José M.; Guedes Corrêa, José F.; Tavares, Paulo L.; Oliveira, Laura A.; Rodrigues, Erika C.; Vargas, Claudia D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether a sensorimotor deficit of the upper limb following a brachial plexus injury (BPI) affects the upright balance. Design: Eleven patients with a unilateral BPI and 11 healthy subjects were recruited. The balance assessment included the Berg Balance Scale (BBS), the number of feet touches on the ground while performing a 60 s single-leg stance and posturographic assessment (eyes open and feet placed hip-width apart during a single 60 s trial). The body weight distribution (BWD) between the legs was estimated from the center of pressure (COP) lateral position. The COP variability was quantified in the anterior-posterior and lateral directions. Results: BPI patients presented lower BBS scores (p = 0.048) and a higher frequency of feet touches during the single-leg stance (p = 0.042) compared with those of the healthy subjects. An asymmetric BWD toward the side opposite the affected arm was shown by 73% of BPI patients. Finally, higher COP variability was observed in BPI patients compared with healthy subjects for anterior-posterior (p = 0.020), but not for lateral direction (p = 0.818). Conclusions: This study demonstrates that upper limb sensorimotor deficits following BPI affect body balance, serving as a warning for the clinical community about the need to prevent and treat the secondary outcomes of this condition. PMID:26834610

  16. Reduced functional connectivity within the primary motor cortex of patients with brachial plexus injury.

    PubMed

    Fraiman, D; Miranda, M F; Erthal, F; Buur, P F; Elschot, M; Souza, L; Rombouts, S A R B; Schimmelpenninck, C A; Norris, D G; Malessy, M J A; Galves, A; Vargas, C D

    2016-01-01

    This study aims at the effects of traumatic brachial plexus lesion with root avulsions (BPA) upon the organization of the primary motor cortex (M1). Nine right-handed patients with a right BPA in whom an intercostal to musculocutaneous (ICN-MC) nerve transfer was performed had post-operative resting state fMRI scanning. The analysis of empirical functional correlations between neighboring voxels revealed faster correlation decay as a function of distance in the M1 region corresponding to the arm in BPA patients as compared to the control group. No differences between the two groups were found in the face area. We also investigated whether such larger decay in patients could be attributed to a gray matter diminution in M1. Structural imaging analysis showed no difference in gray matter density between groups. Our findings suggest that the faster decay in neighboring functional correlations without significant gray matter diminution in BPA patients could be related to a reduced activity in intrinsic horizontal connections in M1 responsible for upper limb motor synergies.

  17. Comprehensive multi-modality assessment of regional and global arterial structure and function in adults born preterm

    PubMed Central

    Boardman, Henry; Birse, Katherine; Davis, Esther F; Whitworth, Polly; Aggarwal, Veena; Lewandowski, Adam J; Leeson, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Preterm birth is associated with higher blood pressure, which could be because preterm birth alters early aortic elastin and collagen development to cause increased arterial stiffness. We measured central and conduit artery size and multiple indices of arterial stiffness to define the extent and severity of macrovascular changes in individuals born preterm. A total of 102 young adults born preterm and 102 controls who were born after an uncomplicated pregnancy underwent cardiovascular magnetic resonance on a Siemens 1.5 T scanner to measure the aortic cross-sectional area in multiple locations. Ultrasound imaging with a Philips CX50 and linear array probe was used to measure carotid and brachial artery diameters. Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity and the augmentation index were measured by SphygmoCor, brachial-femoral pulse wave velocity by Vicorder and aortic pulse wave velocity by cardiovascular magnetic resonance. The cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI) was used as a measurement of global stiffness, and ultrasound was used to assess peripheral vessel distensibility. Adults born preterm had 20% smaller thoracic and abdominal aortic lumens (2.19±0.44 vs. 2.69±0.60 cm2, P<0.001; 1.25±0.36 vs. 1.94±0.45 cm2, P<0.001, respectively) but similar carotid and brachial diameters to adults born at term. Pulse wave velocity was increased (5.82±0.80 vs. 5.47±0.59 m s−1, P<0.01, 9.06±1.25 vs. 8.33±1.28 m s−1, P=0.01, 5.23±1.19 vs. 4.75±0.91 m s−1, P<0.01) and carotid distensibility was decreased (4.75±1.31 vs. 5.60±1.48 mm Hg−1103, P<0.001) in this group compared with the group born at term. However, the global and peripheral arterial stiffness measured by CAVI and brachial ultrasound did not differ (5.95±0.72 vs. 5.98±0.60, P=0.80 and 1.07±0.48 vs. 1.19±0.54 mm Hg−1103, P=0.12, respectively). Adults who are born preterm have significant differences in their aortic structure from adults born at term, but they have

  18. Cryoplasty for Occlusive Disease of the Femoropopliteal Arteries: 1-Year Follow-Up

    SciTech Connect

    Korteweg, Mies A.; Gils, Marjon van; Hoedt, Marco T.; Valk, Pieter H. M. van der; Tutein Noltenius, Rudolf P.; Avontuur, Jurgen A.; Bronswijk-Monster, Krien F.; Elgersma, Otto E. H.

    2009-03-15

    Atherosclerosis of femoropopliteal arteries is an important cause of morbidity and mortality. Percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) has only limited success in treating these arteries, mainly because of the high rate of recurrent stenosis. Cryoplasty has been proposed as a technique which might improve treatment outcome. This study reports our single-center experience with cryoplasty. Thirty-two claudicants, 33 arteries, in whom conservative therapy failed, were consecutively included. Duplex ultrasound (US), angiography, and ankle-brachial index (ABI) measurement were performed before the procedure; ABI and duplex US, 2 weeks and 3, 6, and 12 months after the procedure. Patients' symptoms were categorized according to the Rutherford classification. Lesions were classified as TASC A, B, or C according to angiographic appearance. Differences in ABI before and after the procedure were defined as significant at p < 0.05 by paired t-test. Patency was evaluated using duplex US by determining the peak systolic velocity ratio. Sixteen TASC A lesions, 13 TASC B lesions, and 4 TASC C lesions were included. ABI improved significantly for TASC A lesions 2 weeks and 3 months postprocedure. Patency after 2 weeks, 6 months, and 12 months was 93%, 67%, and 64% for TASC A lesions, 83%, 31%, and 31% for TASC B lesions, and 100%, 50%, and 33% for TASC C lesions, respectively. In conclusion, cryoplasty has good immediate success rates and patency rates similar to the results of conventional PTA in the literature.

  19. Clinical Assessment of Patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Marc A.; Griffin, Kathryn J.; Scott, D. Julian A.

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) describes the clinical manifestations of atherosclerosis affecting the circulation in the legs. The severity of PAD is classified according to symptom severity, time course, and anatomical distribution. The signs and symptoms of PAD reflect the degree of circulatory compromise and whether there has been a gradual reduction in the circulation or an abrupt, uncompensated decrease. Accurate clinical assessment underpins decisions on management strategy and should objectively assess the severity of the ischemia and need for revascularization. Clinical history should discriminate symptoms of PAD from other conditions presenting with leg pain, elucidate cardiovascular risk factors and the effect of symptoms on the patient's quality of life. Clinical examination includes signs of general cardiovascular disease and associated conditions before assessing the circulation and viability of the limb. Palpation of peripheral pulses must be augmented by determination of the ankle brachial pressure index using hand held Doppler. A whole patient approach to management is required and must include modification of cardiovascular risk status as well as dealing with the local circulatory manifestation of PAD. PMID:25435653

  20. Clinical assessment of patients with peripheral arterial disease.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Marc A; Griffin, Kathryn J; Scott, D Julian A

    2014-12-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) describes the clinical manifestations of atherosclerosis affecting the circulation in the legs. The severity of PAD is classified according to symptom severity, time course, and anatomical distribution. The signs and symptoms of PAD reflect the degree of circulatory compromise and whether there has been a gradual reduction in the circulation or an abrupt, uncompensated decrease. Accurate clinical assessment underpins decisions on management strategy and should objectively assess the severity of the ischemia and need for revascularization. Clinical history should discriminate symptoms of PAD from other conditions presenting with leg pain, elucidate cardiovascular risk factors and the effect of symptoms on the patient's quality of life. Clinical examination includes signs of general cardiovascular disease and associated conditions before assessing the circulation and viability of the limb. Palpation of peripheral pulses must be augmented by determination of the ankle brachial pressure index using hand held Doppler. A whole patient approach to management is required and must include modification of cardiovascular risk status as well as dealing with the local circulatory manifestation of PAD. PMID:25435653

  1. Lifestyle and dietary risk factors for peripheral artery disease.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Canela, Miguel; Martínez-González, Miguel A

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD) usually refers to ischemia of the lower limb vessels. Currently, the estimated number of cases in the world is 202 million. PAD is the third leading cause of atherosclerotic cardiovascular morbidity. The measurement of the ankle-brachial index (ABI) is recommended as a first-line noninvasive test for screening and diagnosis of PAD. An ABI <0.90 is an independent predictor of cardiovascular events and this measurement is useful to identify patients at moderate to high risk of cardiovascular disease. However, there is insufficient evidence to assess the benefits and harms of screening for PAD with the ABI in asymptomatic adults. Lifestyle modifications, including smoking cessation, dietary changes and physical activity, are currently the most cost-effective interventions. Inverse associations with PAD have been reported for some subtypes of dietary fats, fiber, antioxidants (vitamins E and C), folate, vitamins B6, B12 and D, flavonoids, and fruits and vegetables. A possible inverse association between better adherence to the Mediterranean diet and the risk of symptomatic PAD has also been reported in a large randomized clinical trial. Therefore, a Mediterranean-style diet could be effective in the primary and secondary prevention of PAD, although further experimental studies are needed to better clarify this association.  (Circ J 2014; 78: 553-559).

  2. [Splenic artery aneurysms].

    PubMed

    Colović, R; Davidović, L; Bilanović, D; Krivokapić, Z; Grubor, N; Cvetković, S; Radak, V; Marković, M

    2006-01-01

    Although the third most frequent aneurysm in the abdomen, after aneurysms of the aorta and iliac arteries, and most frequent aneurisms of visceral arteries, splenic artery aneurysms are rare, but not very rare. Thanks to the new imaging techniques, first of all ultrasonography, they have been discovered with increasing frequency. We present a series of 9 splenic artery aneurysms. Seven patients were female and two male of average age 49 years (ranging from 28 to 75 years). The majority of afected women were multiparae, with average 3 children (ranging from 1 to 6). One patient had a subacute rupture, and 2 had ruptures into the splenic vein causing portal hypertension. The spleen was enlarged in 7 out of 9 patients. The average size of aneurysms was 3,2 cm (ranging from 2 to 8 cm). The preoperative diagnosis of splenic artery aneurysm was established in 6 patients while in 3 patients aneurism was accidentally found during other operations, during splenectomy in 2, and during the excision of a retroperitoneal tumour in 1 patient. Aneurysmectomy was carried out in 7 patients, while a ligation of the incoming and outcoming wessels was performed in 2 patients with arteriovenous fistula. Splenectomy was performed in 6 patients, while pancreatic tail resection, cholecystectomy and excision of the retroperitoneal tumor were performed in 3 patients. Additional resection of the abdominal aortic aneurysm with reconstruction of aortoiliac segment was performed in 2 patients. There were no mortality and the postoperative recovery was uneventful in all patients. PMID:16989145

  3. Blood Flow in Arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku, David N.

    Blood flow in arteries is dominated by unsteady flow phenomena. The cardiovascular system is an internal flow loop with multiple branches in which a complex liquid circulates. A nondimensional frequency parameter, the Womersley number, governs the relationship between the unsteady and viscous forces. Normal arterial flow is laminar with secondary flows generated at curves and branches. The arteries are living organs that can adapt to and change with the varying hemodynamic conditions. In certain circumstances, unusual hemodynamic conditions create an abnormal biological response. Velocity profile skewing can create pockets in which the direction of the wall shear stress oscillates. Atherosclerotic disease tends to be localized in these sites and results in a narrowing of the artery lumena stenosis. The stenosis can cause turbulence and reduce flow by means of viscous head losses and flow choking. Very high shear stresses near the throat of the stenosis can activate platelets and thereby induce thrombosis, which can totally block blood flow to the heart or brain. Detection and quantification of stenosis serve as the basis for surgical intervention. In the future, the study of arterial blood flow will lead to the prediction of individual hemodynamic flows in any patient, the development of diagnostic tools to quantify disease, and the design of devices that mimic or alter blood flow. This field is rich with challenging problems in fluid mechanics involving three-dimensional, pulsatile flows at the edge of turbulence.

  4. Coronary Artery Imaging in Children

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Coronary artery problems in children usually have a significant impact on both short-term and long-term outcomes. Early and accurate diagnosis, therefore, is crucial but technically challenging due to the small size of the coronary artery, high heart rates, and limited cooperation of children. Coronary artery visibility on CT and MRI in children is considerably improved with recent technical advancements. Consequently, CT and MRI are increasingly used for evaluating various congenital and acquired coronary artery abnormalities in children, such as coronary artery anomalies, aberrant coronary artery anatomy specific to congenital heart disease, Kawasaki disease, Williams syndrome, and cardiac allograft vasculopathy. PMID:25741188

  5. Metformin, but not glimepiride, improves carotid artery diameter and blood flow in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Helena Atroch; Vieira, Marcelo; Cunha, Maria Rosaria; Correia, Marcia Regina Soares; Fukui, Rosa Tsunechiro; dos Santos, Rosa Ferreira; Rocha, Dalva Marreiro; Wajchenberg, Bernardo Leo; Lage, Silvia G.; da Silva, Maria Elizabeth Rossi

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the effects of glimepiride and metformin on vascular reactivity, hemostatic factors and glucose and lipid profiles in patients with type 2 diabetes. METHODS: A prospective study was performed in 16 uncontrolled patients with diabetes previously treated with dietary intervention. The participants were randomized into metformin or glimepiride therapy groups. After four months, the patients were crossed over with no washout period to the alternative treatment for an additional four-month period on similar dosage schedules. The following variables were assessed before and after four months of each treatment: 1) fasting glycemia, insulin, catecholamines, lipid profiles and HbA1 levels; 2) t-PA and PAI-1 (antigen and activity), platelet aggregation and fibrinogen and plasminogen levels; and 3) the flow indices of the carotid and brachial arteries. In addition, at the end of each period, a 12-hour metabolic profile was obtained after fasting and every 2 hours thereafter. RESULTS: Both therapies resulted in similar decreases in fasting glucose, triglyceride and norepinephrine levels, and they increased the fibrinolytic factor plasminogen but decreased t-PA activity. Metformin caused lower insulin and pro-insulin levels and higher glucagon levels and increased systolic carotid diameter and blood flow. Neither metformin nor glimepiride affected endothelial-dependent or endothelial-independent vasodilation of the brachial artery. CONCLUSIONS: Glimepiride and metformin were effective in improving glucose and lipid profiles and norepinephrine levels. Metformin afforded more protection against macrovascular diabetes complications, increased systolic carotid artery diameter and total and systolic blood flow, and decreased insulin levels. As both therapies increased plasminogen levels but reduced t-PA activity, a coagulation process was likely still ongoing. PMID:22892913

  6. Effect of whole-body mild-cold exposure on arterial stiffness and central haemodynamics: a randomised, cross-over trial in healthy men and women.

    PubMed

    King, Sibella G; Ahuja, Kiran D K; Wass, Jezreel; Shing, Cecilia M; Adams, Murray J; Davies, Justin E; Sharman, James E; Williams, Andrew D

    2013-05-01

    Aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) and augmentation index (AIx) are independent predictors of cardiovascular risk and mortality, but little is known about the effect of air temperature changes on these variables. Our study investigated the effect of exposure to whole-body mild-cold on measures of arterial stiffness (aortic and brachial PWV), and on central haemodynamics [including augmented pressure (AP), AIx], and aortic reservoir components [including reservoir and excess pressures (P ex)]. Sixteen healthy volunteers (10 men, age 43 ± 19 years; mean ± SD) were randomised to be studied under conditions of 12 °C (mild-cold) and 21 °C (control) on separate days. Supine resting measures were taken at baseline (ambient temperature) and after 10, 30, and 60 min exposure to each experimental condition in a climate chamber. There was no significant change in brachial blood pressure between mild-cold and control conditions. However, compared to control, AP [+2 mmHg, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.36-4.36; p = 0.01] and AIx (+6 %, 95 % CI 1.24-10.1; p = 0.02) increased, and time to maximum P ex (a component of reservoir function related to timing of peak aortic in-flow) decreased (-7 ms, 95 % CI -15.4 to 2.03; p = 0.01) compared to control. Yet there was no significant change in aortic PWV (+0.04 m/s, 95 % CI -0.47 to 0.55; p = 0.87) or brachial PWV (+0.36 m/s; -0.41 to 1.12; p = 0.35) between conditions. We conclude that mild-cold exposure increases central haemodynamic stress and alters timing of peak aortic in-flow without differentially affecting arterial stiffness.

  7. Understanding Arteries | Coronary Artery Disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Coronary Artery Disease Understanding Arteries Past Issues / Fall 2010 Table of Contents Below: ... the arteries and veins are healthy. A Healthy Artery An artery is a muscular tube. It has ...

  8. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization for Spontaneous Rupture of the Omental Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Tomohiro; Yamagami, Takuji; Morishita, Hiroyuki; Iida, Shigeharu; Tazoe, Jun; Asai, Shunsuke; Masui, Koji; Ikeda, Jun; Nagata, Akihiro; Sato, Osamu; Nishimura, Tsunehiko

    2011-02-15

    We encountered a rare case of spontaneous rupture of the omental artery. A 25-year-old man without any episode of abdominal trauma or bleeding disorders came to the emergency unit with left upper abdominal pain. Hematoma with extravasation of the greater omentum and a hemoperitoneum was confirmed on abdominal contrast-enhanced computed tomography. Bleeding from the omental artery was suspected based on these findings. Transcatheter arterial embolization was successfully performed after extravasation of the omental artery, which arises from the left gastroepiploic artery, was confirmed on arteriography. Partial ometectomy was performed 10 days after transcatheter arterial embolization, revealing that the hematoma measured 10 cm in diameter in the greater omentum. Pathological examination showed rupture of the branch of an omental artery without abnormal findings, such as an aneurysm or neoplasm. Thus, we diagnosed him with spontaneous rupture of the omental artery. The patient recovered and was discharged from the hospital 10 days after the surgery, with a favorable postoperative course.

  9. Proximal Superficial Femoral Artery Occlusion, Collateral Vessels, and Walking Performance in Peripheral Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Mary M.; Carroll, Timothy J.; Kibbe, Melina; Kramer, Christopher M.; Liu, Kiang; Guralnik, Jack M.; Keeling, Aoife N.; Criqui, Michael H.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Yuan, Chun; Tian, Lu; Liao, Yihua; Berry, Jarrett; Zhao, Lihui; Carr, James

    2013-01-01

    Objective We studied associations of MRI-measured SFA occlusions with functional performance, leg symptoms, and collateral vessel number in PAD. We studied associations of collateral vessel number with functional performance in PAD. Background Associations of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-detected superficial femoral artery (SFA) occlusion and collateral vessel number with functional performance among individuals with peripheral artery disease (PAD) have not been reported. Methods 457 participants with an ankle brachial index (ABI) < 1.00 had MRI measurement of the proximal SFA with twelve consecutive 2.5 millimeter cross-sectional images. An occluded SFA was defined as an SFA in which at least one segment was occluded. A non-occluded SFA was defined as absence of any occluded slices. Collateral vessels were visualized with magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). Lower extremity functional performance was measured with the six-minute walk, four-meter walking velocity at usual and fastest pace, and the short physical performance battery (SPPB) (0-12 scale, 12=best). Results Adjusting for age, sex, race, comorbidities, and other confounders, the presence of an SFA occlusion was associated with poorer six-minute walk performance (1,031 vs. 1,169 feet, P=0.006), slower fast-paced walking velocity (1.15 vs. 1.22 meters/second, P =0.042), and lower SPPB score (9.07 vs. 9.75, P=0.038) compared to the absence of an SFA occlusion. More numerous collateral vessels were associated with better six-minute walk performance (0-3 collaterals-1,064 feet, 4-7 collaterals-1,165 feet, ≥ 8 collaterals-1,246 feet, P trend=0.007), faster usual-paced walking speed (0-3 collaterals-0.84 meters/second, 4-7 collaterals-0.88 meters/second, ≥ 8 collaterals-0.91 meters/second, P trend=0.029), and faster rapid-paced walking speed (0-3 collaterals-1.17 meters/second, 4-7 collaterals-1.22 meters/second, ≥ 8 collaterals-1.29 meters/second, P trend=0.002), adjusting for age, sex, race

  10. Arterial hypertension and cancer.

    PubMed

    Milan, Alberto; Puglisi, Elisabetta; Ferrari, Laura; Bruno, Giulia; Losano, Isabel; Veglio, Franco

    2014-05-15

    Arterial hypertension and cancer are two of the most important causes of mortality in the world; correlations between these two clinical entities are complex and various. Cancer therapy using old (e.g., mitotic spindle poisons) as well as new (e.g., monoclonal antibody) drugs may cause arterial hypertension through different mechanisms; sometimes the increase of blood pressure levels may be responsible for chemotherapy withdrawal. Among newer cancer therapies, drugs interacting with the VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factors) pathways are the most frequently involved in hypertension development. However, many retrospective studies have suggested a relationship between antihypertensive treatment and risk of cancer, raising vast public concern. The purposes of this brief review have then been to analyse the role of chemotherapy in the pathogenesis of hypertension, to summarize the general rules of arterial hypertension management in this field and finally to evaluate the effects of antihypertensive therapy on cancer disease.

  11. Prominent gastroduodenal artery: Endosonographic sign of celiac artery stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Gonen, Can; Sürmelioğlu, Ali; Tilki, Metin; Kiliçoğlu, Gamze

    2016-01-01

    Celiac artery (CA) stenosis is a relatively common finding in patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD). In the presence of CA stenosis, arterial blood supply to the celiac territory is usually sustained from the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) through well-developed collaterals. In this paper, the authors report endosonographically identified prominent gastroduodenal artery as the sign of CA stenosis for the first time. Uncovering previously unidentified vascular abnormality, endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has improved patient management. The patient had uneventful collateral preserving PD. PMID:27803908

  12. A Novel Echocardiographic Method for Assessing Arterial Stiffness in Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Akyol, Aytac; Cakmak, Huseyin Altug; Gunbatar, Hulya; Asker, Muntecep; Babat, Naci; Tosu, Aydin Rodi; Yaman, Mehmet; Gumrukcuoglu, Hasan Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is associated with increased arterial stiffness and cardiovascular complications. The objective of this study was to assess whether the color M-mode-derived propagation velocity of the descending thoracic aorta (aortic velocity propagation, AVP) was an echocardiographic marker for arterial stiffness in OSAS. Subjects and Methods The study population included 116 patients with OSAS and 90 age and gender-matched control subjects. The patients with OSAS were categorized according to their apnea hypopnea index (AHI) as follows: mild to moderate degree (AHI 5-30) and severe degree (AHI≥30). Aortofemoral pulse wave velocity (PWV), carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT), brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation (FMD), and AVP were measured to assess arterial stiffness. Results AVP and FMD were significantly decreased in patients with OSAS compared to controls (p<0.001). PWV and CIMT were increased in the OSAS group compared to controls (p<0.001). Moreover, AVP and FMD were significantly decreased in the severe OSAS group compared to the mild to moderate OSAS group (p<0.001). PWV and CIMT were significantly increased in the severe group compared to the mild to moderate group (p<0.001). AVP was significantly positively correlated with FMD (r=0.564, p<0.001). However, it was found to be significantly inversely related to PWV (r=-0.580, p<0.001) and CIMT (r=-0.251, p<0.001). Conclusion The measurement of AVP is a novel and practical echocardiographic method, which may be used to identify arterial stiffness in OSAS. PMID:26617653

  13. Serum Phospholipid Docosahexaenoic Acid Is Inversely Associated with Arterial Stiffness in Metabolically Healthy Men

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mi-Hyang; Kwon, Nayeon; Yoon, So Ra

    2016-01-01

    We hypothesized that lower proportion of serum phospholipid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is inversely associated with increased cardiovascular risk and vascular function in metabolically healthy men. To elucidate it, we first compared serum phospholipid free fatty acid (FA) compositions and cardiovascular risk parameters between healthy men (n = 499) and male patients with coronary artery disease (CAD, n = 111) (30-69 years) without metabolic syndrome, and then further-analyzed the association of serum phospholipid DHA composition with arterial stiffness expressed by brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (ba-PWV) in metabolically healthy men. Basic parameters, lipid profiles, fasting glycemic status, adiponectin, high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and LDL particle size, and serum phospholipid FA compositions were significantly different between the two subject groups. Serum phospholipid DHA was highly correlated with most of long-chain FAs. Metabolically healthy men were subdivided into tertile groups according to serum phospholipid DHA proportion: lower (< 2.061%), middle (2.061%-3.235%) and higher (> 3.235%). Fasting glucose, insulin resistance, hs-CRP and ba-PWVs were significantly higher and adiponectin and LDL particle size were significantly lower in the lower-DHA group than the higher-DHA group after adjusted for confounding factors. In metabolically healthy men, multiple stepwise regression analysis revealed that serum phospholipid DHA mainly contributed to arterial stiffness (β′-coefficients = -0.127, p = 0.006) together with age, systolic blood pressure, triglyceride (r = 0.548, p = 0.023). Lower proportion of serum phospholipid DHA was associated with increased cardiovascular risk and arterial stiffness in metabolically healthy men. It suggests that maintaining higher proportion of serum phospholipid DHA may be beneficial for reducing cardiovascular risk including arterial stiffness in metabolically healthy men. PMID:27482523

  14. L-2-Oxothiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid reverses endothelial dysfunction in patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed Central

    Vita, J A; Frei, B; Holbrook, M; Gokce, N; Leaf, C; Keaney, J F

    1998-01-01

    The effective action of endothelium-derived nitric oxide (EDNO) is impaired in patients with atherosclerosis. This impairment has been attributed in part to increased vascular oxidative stress. EDNO action is improved by administration of ascorbic acid, a water-soluble antioxidant. Ascorbic acid is a potent free-radical scavenger in plasma, and also regulates intracellular redox state in part by sparing cellular glutathione. We specifically investigated the role of intracellular redox state in EDNO action by examining the effect of L-2-oxo-4-thiazolidine carboxylate (OTC) on EDNO-dependent, flow-mediated dilation in a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study of patients with angiographically proven coronary artery disease. OTC augments intracellular glutathione by providing substrate cysteine for glutathione synthesis. Brachial artery flow-mediated dilation was examined with high-resolution ultrasound before and after oral administration of 4.5 g of OTC or placebo in 48 subjects with angiographically documented coronary artery disease. Placebo treatment produced no change in flow-mediated dilation (7.0+/-3.9% vs. 7.2+/-3.7%), whereas OTC treatment was associated with a significant improvement in flow-mediated dilation (6.6+/-4.4% vs. 11.0+/-6.3%; P = 0.005). OTC had no effect on arterial dilation to nitroglycerin, systemic blood pressure, heart rate, or reactive hyperemia. These data suggest that augmenting cellular glutathione levels improves EDNO action in human atherosclerosis. Cellular redox state may be an important regulator of EDNO action, and is a potential target for therapy in patients with coronary artery disease. PMID:9502783

  15. Vascular brachytherapy after percutaneous transluminal angioplasty of superficial femoral arteries--Polish pilot group

    SciTech Connect

    Walichiewicz, Piotr; Piecuch, Jerzy; Bialas, Brygida; Orkisz, Witold; Fijalkowski, Marek; Miszczyk, Leszek

    2002-03-01

    Purpose: The article presents the results of treatment with vascular brachytherapy (VBT) in superficial femoral arteries. This method aims to minimize frequency of restenosis after percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA). Method: Treatment was carried out in 20 cases. The patients with severe stenoses or total occlusions verified in angiography were selected. In the group of 19 patients, two were women (the average age of the patients was 58.7 years). VBT was performed immediately after PTA. A 15-Gy dose, with high dose rate, was applied. The dose was calculated based on individually chosen distance from the internal surface of the artery wall, which varied from 2 to 3 mm. The mean observation time after treatment was 8 months. The shortest time was 1 month and the longest 14 months. At the end of the observation time, the control DSA angiography was performed on every patient. Results: During the first 2 months, in three cases, an acute thrombosis in treated artery was observed. In the third month, one treated artery occluded. In the sixth month of observation, one case of acute thrombosis was observed. The rest of the patients were free of restenoses. Conclusions: (1) In superficial femoral arteries, a low value of ankle brachial pressure index (ABPI; below 0.4) is very probably responsible for acute thrombosis after PTA with or without stent implantation followed by VBT. (2) Diabetes, rest ischaemia before treatment, poor vessel status confirmed in angiography may also be responsible for acute thrombosis after VBT. (3) Anticoagulants or antiplatelet (ticlipidine) treatment must be ordered for 6 months after VBT in patients with implanted stents.

  16. Common Carotid Intima Media Thickness and Ankle-Brachial Pressure Index Correlate with Local but Not Global Atheroma Burden: A Cross Sectional Study Using Whole Body Magnetic Resonance Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Weir-McCall, Jonathan R.; Khan, Faisel; Lambert, Matthew A.; Adamson, Carly L.; Gardner, Michael; Gandy, Stephen J.; Ramkumar, Prasad Guntur; Belch, Jill J. F.; Struthers, Allan D.; Rauchhaus, Petra; Morris, Andrew D.; Houston, J. Graeme

    2014-01-01

    Background Common carotid intima media thickness (CIMT) and ankle brachial pressure index (ABPI) are used as surrogate marker of atherosclerosis, and have been shown to correlate with arterial stiffness, however their correlation with global atherosclerotic burden has not been previously assessed. We compare CIMT and ABPI with atheroma burden as measured by whole body magnetic resonance angiography (WB-MRA). Methods 50 patients with symptomatic peripheral arterial disease were recruited. CIMT was measured using ultrasound while rest and exercise ABPI were performed. WB-MRA was performed in a 1.5T MRI scanner using 4 volume acquisitions with a divided dose of intravenous gadolinium gadoterate meglumine (Dotarem, Guerbet, FR). The WB-MRA data was divided into 31 anatomical arterial segments with each scored according to degree of luminal narrowing: 0 = normal, 1 = <50%, 2 = 50–70%, 3 = 70–99%, 4 = vessel occlusion. The segment scores were summed and from this a standardized atheroma score was calculated. Results The atherosclerotic burden was high with a standardised atheroma score of 39.5±11. Common CIMT showed a positive correlation with the whole body atheroma score (β 0.32, p = 0.045), however this was due to its strong correlation with the neck and thoracic segments (β 0.42 p = 0.01) with no correlation with the rest of the body. ABPI correlated with the whole body atheroma score (β −0.39, p = 0.012), which was due to a strong correlation with the ilio-femoral vessels with no correlation with the thoracic or neck vessels. On multiple linear regression, no correlation between CIMT and global atheroma burden was present (β 0.13 p = 0.45), while the correlation between ABPI and atheroma burden persisted (β −0.45 p = 0.005). Conclusion ABPI but not CIMT correlates with global atheroma burden as measured by whole body contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography in a population with symptomatic peripheral

  17. Open Anterior Release of the Superior Transverse Scapular Ligament for Decompression of the Suprascapular Nerve During Brachial Plexus Surgery.

    PubMed

    Elzinga, Kate E; Curran, Matthew W T; Morhart, Michael J; Chan, K Ming; Olson, Jaret L

    2016-07-01

    Reconstruction of the suprascapular nerve (SSN) after brachial plexus injury often involves nerve grafting or a nerve transfer. To restore shoulder abduction and external rotation, a branch of the spinal accessory nerve is commonly transferred to the SSN. To allow reinnervation of the SSN, any potential compression points should be released to prevent a possible double crush syndrome. For that reason, the authors perform a release of the superior transverse scapular ligament at the suprascapular notch in all patients undergoing reconstruction of the upper trunk of the brachial plexus. Performing the release through a standard anterior open supraclavicular approach to the brachial plexus avoids the need for an additional posterior incision or arthroscopic procedure. PMID:27113908

  18. Harvesting the radial artery

    PubMed Central

    Osterday, Robert M.; Brodman, Richard F.

    2013-01-01

    The radial artery (RA) has emerged as an important arterial graft for coronary bypass surgery. With improving five-year patency rates and increasing uptake, great attention has been focused on the optimal conduit harvesting technique. We herein present our approach to RA harvesting. Prerequisites of a successful harvest include adherence to important anatomical landmarks, protection of the sensory innervation to the volar forearm, and meticulous handling of the RA branches. Regardless of the harvesting methodology chosen, adherence to a “no-touch” technique will optimize the patency and durability of the RA conduit. PMID:23977633

  19. Brachial-to-ankle pulse wave velocity as an independent prognostic factor for ovulatory response to clomiphene citrate in women with polycystic ovary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) has a risk for cardiovascular disease. Increased arterial stiffness has been observed in women with PCOS. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether the brachial-to-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) is a prognostic factor for ovulatory response to clomiphene citrate (CC) in women with PCOS. Methods This study was a retrospective cohort study of 62 women with PCOS conducted from January 2009 to December 2012 at the university hospital, Yamagata, Japan. We analyzed 62 infertile PCOS patients who received CC. Ovulation was induced by 100 mg CC for 5 days. CC non-responder was defined as failure to ovulate for at least 2 consecutive CC-treatment cycles. The endocrine, metabolic, and cardiovascular parameters between CC responder (38 patients) and non-responder (24 patients) groups were analyzed. Results In univariate analysis, waist-to-hip ratio, level of free testosterone, percentages of patients with dyslipidemia, impaired glucose tolerance, and diabetes mellitus, blood glucose and insulin levels at 60 min and 120 min, the area under the curve of glucose and insulin after 75-g oral glucose intolerance test, and baPWV were significantly higher in CC non-responders compared with responders. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, both waist-to-hip ratio (odds ratio, 1.77; 95% confidence interval, 2.2–14.1; P = 0.04) and baPWV (odds ratio, 1.71; 95% confidence interval, 1.1–2.8; P = 0.03) were independent predictors of ovulation induction by CC in PCOS patients. The predictive values of waist-to-hip ratio and baPWV for the CC resistance in PCOS patients were determined by the receiver operating characteristic curves. The area under the curves for waist-to-hip ratio and baPWV were 0.76 and 0.77, respectively. Setting the threshold at 0.83 for waist-to-hip ratio offered the best compromise between specificity (0.65) and sensitivity (0.84), while the setting the threshold at 1,182 cm/s for

  20. Predictive Value of Combining the Ankle-Brachial Index and SYNTAX Score for the Prediction of Outcome After Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (from the SHINANO Registry).

    PubMed

    Ueki, Yasushi; Miura, Takashi; Miyashita, Yusuke; Motoki, Hirohiko; Shimada, Kentaro; Kobayashi, Masanori; Nakajima, Hiroyuki; Kimura, Hikaru; Akanuma, Hiroshi; Mawatari, Eiichiro; Sato, Toshio; Hotta, Shoji; Kamiyoshi, Yuichi; Maruyama, Takuya; Watanabe, Noboru; Eisawa, Takayuki; Aso, Shinichi; Uchikawa, Shinichiro; Hashizume, Naoto; Sekimura, Noriyuki; Morita, Takehiro; Ebisawa, Soichiro; Izawa, Atsushi; Koyama, Jun; Ikeda, Uichi

    2016-01-15

    The Synergy Between PCI With TAXUS and Cardiac Surgery (SYNTAX) score is effective in predicting clinical outcome after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). However, its prediction ability is low because it reflects only the coronary characterization. We assessed the predictive value of combining the ankle-brachial index (ABI) and SYNTAX score to predict clinical outcomes after PCI. The ABI-SYNTAX score was calculated for 1,197 patients recruited from the Shinshu Prospective Multi-center Analysis for Elderly Patients with Coronary Artery Disease Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (SHINANO) registry, a prospective, observational, multicenter cohort study in Japan. The primary end points were major adverse cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events (MACE; all-cause death, myocardial infarction, and stroke) in the first year after PCI. The ABI-SYNTAX score was calculated by categorizing and summing up the ABI and SYNTAX scores. ABI ≤ 0.49 was defined as 4, 0.5 to 0.69 as 3, 0.7 to 0.89 as 2, 0.9 to 1.09 as 1, and 1.1 to 1.5 as 0; an SYNTAX score ≤ 22 was defined as 0, 23 to 32 as 1, and ≥ 33 as 2. Patients were divided into low (0), moderate (1 to 2), and high (3 to 6) groups. The MACE rate was significantly higher in the high ABI-SYNTAX score group than in the lower 2 groups (low: 4.6% vs moderate: 7.0% vs high: 13.9%, p = 0.002). Multivariate regression analysis found that ABI-SYNTAX score independently predicted MACE (hazards ratio 1.25, 95% confidence interval 1.02 to 1.52, p = 0.029). The respective C-statistic for the ABI-SYNTAX and SYNTAX score for 1-year MACE was 0.60 and 0.55, respectively. In conclusion, combining the ABI and SYNTAX scores improved the prediction of 1-year adverse ischemic events compared with the SYNTAX score alone.