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Sample records for brachiaria brizantha pasture

  1. Roasted soybean supplements for finishing beef cattle on Brachiaria brizantha pasture.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, André Alves; Tilemahos Zervoudakis, Joanis; Hatamoto-Zervoudakis, Luciana Keiko; da Silva Cabral, Luciano; da Silva-Marques, Renata Pereira; Koscheck, Jeferson Fabiano Werner; Guedes de Carvalho, Daniel Marino; Benatti, João Marcos Beltrame; Alonso, Marcella Katherine

    2015-10-01

    Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the inclusion of 0, 14, 27.5 and 41 g/kg roasted soybean (RSB) in protein-energy supplements for the finishing of beef cattle on pastures of Brachiaria brizantha cv. Marandu in the rainy period. In experiment 1, for the evaluation of the nutritional parameters, five rumen-cannulated steers with an initial average body weight of 474.5 kg were utilised. In experiment 2, for the evaluation of performance, 25 intact male zebu cattle with an initial average body weight of 418 kg were utilised. Supply of RSB led to an increase in the intake of crude protein and non-fibre carbohydrates (P < 0.05). The concentrations of rumen ammonia nitrogen increased significantly (P < 0.05) 4 h after supplementation. The animals that received protein-energy supplements had superior (52 %) average daily gain in relation to those receiving mineral mixture. The supply of protein-energy supplements formulated with roasted soybean provided an increase in average daily weight gain and an improvement in the nutritional parameters of finishing beef cattle on pasture in the rainy period.

  2. Ingestive Behavior of Heifers Supplemented with Glycerin in Substitution of Corn on Brachiaria brizantha Pasture

    PubMed Central

    Facuri, L. M. A. M.; Silva, R. R.; da Silva, F. F.; de Carvalho, G. G. P.; Sampaio, C. B.; Mendes, F. B. L.; Lisboa, M. M.; Barroso, D. S.; Carvalho, V. M.; Pereira, M. M. S.

    2014-01-01

    The objective was to evaluate the ingestive behavior of crossbred heifers finished on a Brachiaria brizantha cv. Marandu pasture receiving four levels of glycerin in their supplementation. Thirty-six crossbred heifers with average initial weight of 264.83±3.83 kg and 20 months of age were distributed into a completely randomized design with four treatments and nine replications: control (0%), 4.82%, 10.12%, and 15.56% glycerin in the dry matter. The grazing time reduced linearly (p<0.05), whereas the time spent on activities like rumination, idleness, trough and total chewing time were quadratically affected (p<0.05). Bite rate and number of bites/day were quadratically influenced (p<0.05). The number of bites/swallowed cud and the number of bites/minute, however, increased linearly (p<0.05). Although the time spent on each cud and number of chews per cud were not affected (p>0.05). The number of rumination periods reduced linearly (p<0.05), whereas the number of grazing, idle and trough periods, and the times per grazing, idle, rumination and trough periods were quadratically affected (p<0.05). The feed and rumination efficiencies of the dry matter, non-fibrous carbohydrates, pasture dry matter and concentrate were quadratically affected (p>0.05) whereas the feed efficiency of neutral detergent fiber reduced linearly (p<0.05). Addition of glycerin in substitution of corn in supplements for animals managed on pastures does not influenced feed intake, but reduces the grazing time and increases the idle time. The supplementation also improves feed and rumination efficiencies. PMID:25358318

  3. Plant growth promoting bacteria in Brachiaria brizantha.

    PubMed

    Silva, Mylenne Calciolari Pinheiro; Figueiredo, Aline Fernandes; Andreote, Fernando Dini; Cardoso, Elke Jurandy Bran Nogueira

    2013-01-01

    Brachiaria brizantha is considered one of the preferred fodders among farmers for having high forage yield and large production of root mass. The association of beneficial bacteria with these grasses can be very valuable in the recovery of the pasture areas with nutritional deficiency. With the aim of studying this possibility, we carried out the sampling of soil and roots of B. brizantha in three areas (Nova Odessa-SP, São Carlos-SP and Campo Verde-MT, Brazil). Seventy-two bacterial strains were isolated and used in tests to evaluate their biotechnological potential. Almost all isolates presented at least one positive feature. Sixty-eight isolates produced analogues of indole-3-acetic acid, ten showed nitrogenase activity when subjected to the method of increasing the concentration of total nitrogen (total N) in the culture medium and sixty-five isolates showed nitrogenase activity when subjected to acetylene reduction technique. The partial sequencing of 16S rRNA of these isolates allowed the identification of seven main groups, with the prevalence of those affiliated to the genus Stenotrophomonas (69 %). At the end, this work elected the strains C4 (Pseudomonadaceae) and C7 (Rhodospirillaceae) as promising organisms for the development of inoculants due to their higher nitrogenase activity.

  4. Somatic Embryogenesis and Plant Regeneration of Brachiaria brizantha.

    PubMed

    Cabral, Glaucia B; Carneiro, Vera T C; Dusi, Diva M A; Martinelli, Adriana P

    2016-01-01

    The genus Brachiaria (Trin.) Griseb. belongs to the family Poaceae, order Poales, class Monocotyledonae. In Brachiaria brizantha (Hochst. ex A. Rich.) Stapf., embryogenic callus can be induced from seeds from apomictic plants, which results in high frequency somatic embryo development and plant regeneration. We report here a detailed protocol for callus induction from apomictic seed; followed by in vitro morphogenesis (somatic embryo and bud differentiation), plant regeneration, and acclimatization in the greenhouse. Important details regarding the positioning of seeds for callus induction and precautions to avoid endophytic contamination and the occurrence of albino plants are presented.

  5. Poisoning by Brachiaria brizantha in flocks of naïve and experienced sheep.

    PubMed

    Faccin, Tatiane C; Riet-Correa, Franklin; Rodrigues, Fernando S; Santos, Ariany C; Melo, Gleice K A; Silva, Jonilson A; Ferreira, Rubiane; Itavo, Camila C B F; Lemos, Ricardo A A

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this work was to study the effects of protodioscin ingestion in two different flocks of sheep: a flock of 23 crossbreed Mato Grosso do Sul Native sheep raised on Brachiaria spp. pastures from birth (experienced flock) in the state of Mato Grosso do Sul; and another flock (naïve flock) of 18 crossbred Dorper × Santa Inês sheep raised in the state of Paraná in Paspalum notatum and Lolium multiflorum pastures. The two flocks grazed together in a Brachiaria brizantha pasture during a 140-day period in the rainy season. At the beginning of the experiment and every 14 days thereafter, blood samples were collected for determination of serum activities of gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and for determination of the icterus index. On the same days, samples of young, mature and old B. brizantha leaves were collected for protodioscin quantification. Naïve sheep were more susceptible to poisoning by B. brizantha than experienced sheep. Six sheep in the naïve flock were poisoned, and two of these died. Two sheep in the experienced flock were poisoned, and one of them died. The mean activities of serum GGT and AST were significantly higher in the naïve flock, also evidencing a higher susceptibility to the poison. These results suggest that flocks of sheep include animals with different degrees of resistance to Brachiaria spp. poisoning and that culling the susceptible animals may considerably increase of the resistance of the flock. The clinical signs and the lesions were similar to those previously reported. However, in sheep with black coats, the main clinical sign was weight loss without photosensitization-mediated dermatitis. One sheep from the experienced flock presented cirrhosis, with clinical signs of exercise intolerance. The protodioscin concentration (% DM) ranged from 0.87% to 2.58% (mean ± SD: 1.64 ± 0.58) in young leaves, 1.16%-2.53% (1.67 ± 0.44) in mature leaves and 0.98%-2.07% (1.52 ± 0

  6. Meiotic behaviour in three interspecific three-way hybrids between Brachiaria ruziziensis and B. brizantha (Poaceae: Paniceae).

    PubMed

    Adamowski, Eleniza de Victor; Pagliarini, Maria Suely; do Valle, Cacilda Borges

    2008-04-01

    The meiotic behaviour of three three-way interspecific promising hybrids (H17, H27, and H34) was evaluated. These hybrids resulted from the crosses between B. ruziziensis X B. brizantha and crossed to another B. brizantha. Two half-sib hybrids (H27 and H34) presented an aneuploid chromosome number (2n = 4x = 33), whereas hybrid H17 was a tetraploid (2n = 4x = 36), as expected. Chromosome paired predominantly as multivalents suggesting that genetic recombination and introgression of specific target genes from B. brizantha into B. ruziziensis can be expected. Arrangement of parental genomes in distinct metaphase plates was observed in H27 and H34, which have different male genitors. Hybrids H17 and H34 have the same male genitor, but did not display this abnormality. In H17, abnormalities were more frequent from anaphase II, when many laggard chromosomes appeared, suggesting that each genome presented a different genetic control for meiotic phase timing. Despite the phylogenetic proximity among these two species, these three hybrids presented a high frequency of meiotic abnormalities, mainly those related to irregular chromosome segregation typical of polyploids, H34, 69.1%; H27, 56.1% and H17, 44.9%. From the accumulated results obtained through cytological studies in Brachiaria hybrids, it is evident that cytogenetical analysis is of prime importance in determining which genotypes can continue in the process of cultivar development and which can be successfully used in the breeding. Hybrids with high frequency of meiotic abnormalities can seriously compromise seed production, a key trait in assuring adoption of a new apomictic cultivar of Brachiaria for pasture formation.

  7. Phytotoxic substances with allelopathic activity may be central to the strong invasive potential of Brachiaria brizantha.

    PubMed

    Kato-Noguchi, Hisashi; Kobayashi, Ai; Ohno, Osamu; Kimura, Fukiko; Fujii, Yoshiharu; Suenaga, Kiyotake

    2014-04-15

    The grass Brachiaria brizantha, native to eastern Africa, becomes naturalized and dominant quickly in the non-native areas. It was hypothesized that phytotoxic chemical interaction between this plant and native plants may play an important role in the invasion of B. brizantha. However, no potent phytotoxic substance has been reported in this species. Therefore, we investigated possible allelopathic activity and searched for phytotoxic substances with allelopathic activity in B. brizantha. An aqueous methanol extract of B. brizantha inhibited the growth of roots and shoots of garden cress (Lepidium sativum), lettuce (Lactuca sativa), timothy (Phleum pratense) and ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum) seedlings. The extract was purified by several chromatographic runs and three allelopathically active substances were isolated and identified by spectral analysis as (6R,9R)-3-oxo-α-ionol, (6R,9S)-3-oxo-α-ionol and 4-ketopinoresinol. (6R,9R)-3-Oxo-α-ionol and (6R,9S)-3-oxo-α-ionol inhibited root and shoot growth of garden cress at concentrations greater than 30 and 10 μM, respectively. The activity of (6R,9S)-3-oxo-α-ionol was 5.3- to 6.2-fold that of (6R,9R)-3-oxo-α-ionol. The stereochemistry of the hydroxyl group at position C-9 may be important for the inhibitory activities of those compounds. 4-Ketopinoresinol inhibited root and shoot growth of garden cress at concentrations greater than 30 μM. The growth inhibitory activity of (6R,9S)-3-oxo-α-ionol was the greatest and followed by 4-ketopinoresinol and (6R,9R)-3-oxo-α-ionol. These results suggest that those phytotoxic substances may contribute to the allelopathic effect caused by B. brizantha and may be involved in the invasion of B. brizantha. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. Correspondence analysis evaluation of linear nutrient distribution in root tips of the tropical forage Brachiaria brizantha

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pineda-Vargas, C. A.; Prozesky, V. M.; Przybylowicz, W. J.; Mayer, J. E.

    2001-07-01

    The technique of correspondence analysis was applied to a set of data obtained from X-ray elemental analysis by nuclear microscopy. Hydroponic experiments simulating tropical acid soil conditions were carried out to determine possible mechanisms of Al-toxicity stress on specific varieties of the genus Brachiaria. In particular the species Brachiaria brizantha was tested for gradient variation along the central cylinder of selected root tips. Single-point irradiations by nuclear microscopy gave some indication of a possible trace element profile gradient along the root axis. To be able to extrapolate the possible correlation and trace elemental concentrations gradients to a more confident level, this nuclear microscopy data obtained was analysed by correspondence analysis. A clear gradient on the plot of the first two axes of the correspondence analysis was found. The correlation of Ca and Cu as well as that of K and Cl were established.

  9. Evidence for biological nitrification inhibition in Brachiaria pastures.

    PubMed

    Subbarao, G V; Nakahara, K; Hurtado, M P; Ono, H; Moreta, D E; Salcedo, A F; Yoshihashi, A T; Ishikawa, T; Ishitani, M; Ohnishi-Kameyama, M; Yoshida, M; Rondon, M; Rao, I M; Lascano, C E; Berry, W L; Ito, O

    2009-10-13

    Nitrification, a key process in the global nitrogen cycle that generates nitrate through microbial activity, may enhance losses of fertilizer nitrogen by leaching and denitrification. Certain plants can suppress soil-nitrification by releasing inhibitors from roots, a phenomenon termed biological nitrification inhibition (BNI). Here, we report the discovery of an effective nitrification inhibitor in the root-exudates of the tropical forage grass Brachiaria humidicola (Rendle) Schweick. Named "brachialactone," this inhibitor is a recently discovered cyclic diterpene with a unique 5-8-5-membered ring system and a gamma-lactone ring. It contributed 60-90% of the inhibitory activity released from the roots of this tropical grass. Unlike nitrapyrin (a synthetic nitrification inhibitor), which affects only the ammonia monooxygenase (AMO) pathway, brachialactone appears to block both AMO and hydroxylamine oxidoreductase enzymatic pathways in Nitrosomonas. Release of this inhibitor is a regulated plant function, triggered and sustained by the availability of ammonium (NH(4)(+)) in the root environment. Brachialactone release is restricted to those roots that are directly exposed to NH(4)(+). Within 3 years of establishment, Brachiaria pastures have suppressed soil nitrifier populations (determined as amoA genes; ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and ammonia-oxidizing archaea), along with nitrification and nitrous oxide emissions. These findings provide direct evidence for the existence and active regulation of a nitrification inhibitor (or inhibitors) release from tropical pasture root systems. Exploiting the BNI function could become a powerful strategy toward the development of low-nitrifying agronomic systems, benefiting both agriculture and the environment.

  10. Evidence for biological nitrification inhibition in Brachiaria pastures

    PubMed Central

    Subbarao, G. V.; Nakahara, K.; Hurtado, M. P.; Ono, H.; Moreta, D. E.; Salcedo, A. F.; Yoshihashi, A. T.; Ishikawa, T.; Ishitani, M.; Ohnishi-Kameyama, M.; Yoshida, M.; Rondon, M.; Rao, I. M.; Lascano, C. E.; Berry, W. L.; Ito, O.

    2009-01-01

    Nitrification, a key process in the global nitrogen cycle that generates nitrate through microbial activity, may enhance losses of fertilizer nitrogen by leaching and denitrification. Certain plants can suppress soil-nitrification by releasing inhibitors from roots, a phenomenon termed biological nitrification inhibition (BNI). Here, we report the discovery of an effective nitrification inhibitor in the root-exudates of the tropical forage grass Brachiaria humidicola (Rendle) Schweick. Named “brachialactone,” this inhibitor is a recently discovered cyclic diterpene with a unique 5-8-5-membered ring system and a γ-lactone ring. It contributed 60–90% of the inhibitory activity released from the roots of this tropical grass. Unlike nitrapyrin (a synthetic nitrification inhibitor), which affects only the ammonia monooxygenase (AMO) pathway, brachialactone appears to block both AMO and hydroxylamine oxidoreductase enzymatic pathways in Nitrosomonas. Release of this inhibitor is a regulated plant function, triggered and sustained by the availability of ammonium (NH4+) in the root environment. Brachialactone release is restricted to those roots that are directly exposed to NH4+. Within 3 years of establishment, Brachiaria pastures have suppressed soil nitrifier populations (determined as amoA genes; ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and ammonia-oxidizing archaea), along with nitrification and nitrous oxide emissions. These findings provide direct evidence for the existence and active regulation of a nitrification inhibitor (or inhibitors) release from tropical pasture root systems. Exploiting the BNI function could become a powerful strategy toward the development of low-nitrifying agronomic systems, benefiting both agriculture and the environment. PMID:19805171

  11. Indirect measurements of Brachiaria brizantha cv. Marandu fermentable cell wall sugars for second generation biofuels production.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Results of a study conducted to evaluate the possibility of using IVDMD values of B. brizantha cv. Marandu to predict cell wall sugars that would be available in a biorefinery for ethanol production are reported. The study was conducted based on the similarity between rumen enzymes and those used i...

  12. Expressed sequence-tag analysis of ovaries of Brachiaria brizantha reveals genes associated with the early steps of embryo sac differentiation of apomictic plants.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Erica Duarte; Guimarães, Larissa Arrais; de Alencar Dusi, Diva Maria; da Silva, Felipe Rodrigues; Martins, Natália Florencio; do Carmo Costa, Marcos Mota; Alves-Ferreira, Márcio; de Campos Carneiro, Vera Tavares

    2012-02-01

    In apomixis, asexual mode of plant reproduction through seeds, an unreduced megagametophyte is formed due to circumvented or altered meiosis. The embryo develops autonomously from the unreduced egg cell, independently of fertilization. Brachiaria is a genus of tropical forage grasses that reproduces sexually or by apomixis. A limited number of studies have reported the sequencing of apomixis-related genes and a few Brachiaria sequences have been deposited at genebank databases. This work shows sequencing and expression analyses of expressed sequence-tags (ESTs) of Brachiaria genus and points to transcripts from ovaries with preferential expression at megasporogenesis in apomictic plants. From the 11 differentially expressed sequences from immature ovaries of sexual and apomictic Brachiaria brizantha obtained from macroarray analysis, 9 were preferentially detected in ovaries of apomicts, as confirmed by RT-qPCR. A putative involvement in early steps of Panicum-type embryo sac differentiation of four sequences from B. brizantha ovaries: BbrizHelic, BbrizRan, BbrizSec13 and BbrizSti1 is suggested. Two of these, BbrizSti1 and BbrizHelic, with similarity to a gene coding to stress induced protein and a helicase, respectively, are preferentially expressed in the early stages of apomictic ovaries development, especially in the nucellus, in a stage previous to the differentiation of aposporous initials, as verified by in situ hybridization.

  13. Death of pastures syndrome: tissue changes in Urochloa hybrida cv. Mulato II and Urochloa brizantha cv. Marandu.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro-Júnior, N G; Ariano, A P R; Silva, I V

    2016-07-11

    The quality of forage production is a prerequisite to raising livestock. Therefore, income losses in this activity, primarily cattle raising, can result in the impossibility of economic activity. Through the qualitative and quantitative anatomical study of Urochloa hybrida cv. Mulato II and U. brizantha cv. Marandu, we searched for descriptions and compared changes in the individual vegetative body from populations with death syndrome pastures (DPS). Specimens were collected at different physiological stages from farms in northern Mato Grosso. After collection, the individuals were fixed in FAA50 and stored in 70% alcohol. Histological slides were prepared from the middle third of the sections of roots, rhizomes, and leaves, and the proportions and characteristics of tissues were evaluated in healthy, intermediate, and advanced stages of DPS. Changes were compared between cultivars. With the advancement of the syndrome, the following changes were observed: a more marked decrease in the length of roots in U. hybrida; disorganization of the cortical region of the roots and rhizome cultivars; fungal hyphae in roots and aerenchyma formation in U. hybrida; a decrease in sclerenchyma fiber proportions in roots and leaves; sclerification of the epidermis of U. brizantha rhizomes; and an increase in pericyclic fibers in U. hybrida. Furthermore, there was a decrease in the volume of epidermal cells of the abaxial face of the leaves of both cultivars, with a greater reduction in U. hybrida; a gradual decrease in thickness in the midrib of leaves similar to leaf mesophyll; conduction system obstructions; partial or total cell lysis in roots and rhizomes affected by the syndrome. Obstructions in sieve tube element and companion cells, and sometimes obstruction in xylem vessel elements. The evolution of DPS in cultivars was similar, but there were variations, arising probably from the physiological response to stress, such as aerenchyma formation in the root and increased

  14. Content of the Saponin Protodioscin in Brachiaria spp. from the Eastern Plains of Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Nhora M.

    2017-01-01

    Protodioscin is used as a marker of saponin content that could cause hepatotoxicity in ruminants. In Brachiaria spp. from two regions of the Colombian Eastern Plains (east mountain range of the Andean—“piedemonte” and Ariari River Valley) were determined this metabolite at 14 and 28 days post-cutting under different climatic conditions. No protodioscin was detected in B. dictyoneura or B. humidicola. In B. brizantha, B. decumbens and B. ruziziensis x B. decumbens x B. brizantha (hybrid), protodioscin content corresponded to an interaction between species, post-cutting time and season. Concentrations ≥1% (minimum toxic level) were recorded in B. decumbens and the hybrid, and to a lesser extent in B. brizantha. The concentration of protodioscin was higher at 28 days, when the pastures are suitable for consumption. B. brizantha accumulated the lowest saponin concentration, whereas the hybrid had the highest levels, particularly in the “piedemonte” and during drought (3.37%). Dry season favored the protodioscin concentration in B. decumbens (in river valley) and in the hybrid (in “piedemonte”). In the latter, there was a positive correlation with temperature and a negative with humidity, which are typical characteristics of dry periods. This is the first report of protodioscin content in the hybrid. PMID:28703748

  15. Content of the Saponin Protodioscin in Brachiaria spp. from the Eastern Plains of Colombia.

    PubMed

    Lozano, Maria C; Martinez, Nhora M; Diaz, Gonzalo J

    2017-07-13

    Protodioscin is used as a marker of saponin content that could cause hepatotoxicity in ruminants. In Brachiaria spp. from two regions of the Colombian Eastern Plains (east mountain range of the Andean-"piedemonte" and Ariari River Valley) were determined this metabolite at 14 and 28 days post-cutting under different climatic conditions. No protodioscin was detected in B. dictyoneura or B. humidicola. In B. brizantha, B. decumbens and B. ruziziensis x B. decumbens x B. brizantha (hybrid), protodioscin content corresponded to an interaction between species, post-cutting time and season. Concentrations ≥1% (minimum toxic level) were recorded in B. decumbens and the hybrid, and to a lesser extent in B. brizantha. The concentration of protodioscin was higher at 28 days, when the pastures are suitable for consumption. B. brizantha accumulated the lowest saponin concentration, whereas the hybrid had the highest levels, particularly in the "piedemonte" and during drought (3.37%). Dry season favored the protodioscin concentration in B. decumbens (in river valley) and in the hybrid (in "piedemonte"). In the latter, there was a positive correlation with temperature and a negative with humidity, which are typical characteristics of dry periods. This is the first report of protodioscin content in the hybrid.

  16. Mitotic behavior in root tips of Brachiaria genotypes with meiotic chromosome elimination during microsporogenesis.

    PubMed

    Felismino, M F; Silva, N; Pagliarini, M S; Valle, C B

    2008-04-15

    Three accessions of Brachiaria brizantha, three of B. humidicola, and two interspecific hybrids between B. ruziziensis and B. brizantha were analyzed with regard to their mitotic behavior in root tips. All these genotypes revealed chromosome elimination or lack of chromosome affinity in previous analyses of microsporogenesis. Analyses of root tips showed a normal mitotic division in all accessions and hybrids, reinforcing the notion that the genetic control of meiosis is totally independent of that of mitosis. The implications of these findings for the Brachiaria breeding program are discussed.

  17. Changes in nutrient dynamics throughout water transfers in a Tropical Forest and Pasture of Rondonia, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccolo, M. D.; Neill, C.; Krusche, A.; Laclau, J. P.; Cerri, C. C.

    2006-12-01

    The clearing of tropical forest in the Brazilian Amazon for cattle pasture since the 70s is a globally important land use change that has consequences for soil biogeochemical cycles. Generally, five to ten years after deforestation, pastures become degraded due to inadequate management practices. Development of strategies for restoration of low productivity pastures constitutes the main goal for Rondônia state. We analyzed the concentrations of the main nutrient of the biogeochemical cycles in three representative land uses at Fazenda Nova Vida, in central Rondônia (10o30'S, 62o30'W). The treatments were: (1) native forest; (2) pasture dominated by the forage grass Brachiaria brizantha but containing some weeds, under non- intensive management and; (3) a section of the same pasture that was subjected to tilling, replanting and fertilization (NPK + micronutrients) to eliminate weeds and improve grass productivity. Water samples from rain, throughfall, overland flow, tension lysimeter and zero-tension lysimeter (1.0 m soil depth), were collected during the rainy seasons from January to May of 2002 and 2003. The concentrations of C (DOC and DIC), inorganic-N (NH4+, NO3- and NO2-), Na+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+, SO42- and Cl- were measured in all treatments. Rain water was dominated by the nutrients (NH4+, Na+, K+, Ca2+ and Cl-) and DOC. Forest throughfall was enriched in most of the elements. Concentrations of elements in the overland flow showed higher variations in the pasture and in the plowed pasture, however samples were not collected in forest. Soil solution waters (tension lysimeter) and lysimeter waters (zero-tension lysimeter) too had higher variations for elements concentrations in all treatments. Forest clearing for pasture and pasture submitted to tillage practices profoundly influence soil properties and, consequently, the nutrient availability in soil profiles. The soil solution composition may be indicative of altered patterns of nutrient availability in this

  18. Genetic diversity and population structure analysis of the tropical pasture grass Brachiaria humidicola based on microsatellites, cytogenetics, morphological traits, and geographical origin.

    PubMed

    Jungmann, L; Vigna, B B Z; Boldrini, K R; Sousa, A C B; do Valle, C B; Resende, R M S; Pagliarini, M S; Zucchi, M I; de Souza, A P

    2010-09-01

    Brachiaria humidicola (Rendle) Schweick. is a warm-season grass commonly used as forage in the tropics. Accessions of this species were collected in eastern Africa and massively introduced into South America in the 1980s. Several of these accessions form a germplasm collection at the Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation. However, apomixis, ploidy, and limited knowledge of the genetic basis of this germplasm collection have constrained breeding activities. The objectives of this work were to identify genetic variability in the Brazilian B. humidicola germplasm collection using microsatellite markers and to compare the results with information on the following: (1) collection sites of the accessions; (2) reproductive mode and ploidy levels; and (3) genetic diversity revealed by morphological traits. The evaluated germplasm population is highly structured into four major groups. The sole sexual accession did not group with any of the clusters. Genetic dissimilarities did not correlate with either geographic distances or genetic distances inferred from morphological descriptors. Additionally, the genetic structure identified in this collection did not correspond to differences in ploidy level. Alleles exclusive to either sexual or apomictic accessions were identified, suggesting that further evaluation of the association of these loci with apospory should be carried out.

  19. Spatial Simulation of the Dynamics of Establishment of Secondary Forest in Abandoned Pasture in the Central Amazon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebel, K. T.; Riha, S. J.; Rondon, M. A.; Feldpausch, T. R.; Fernandes, E. C.

    2001-05-01

    In the Amazon, approximately 35 million hectares of primary forest that was converted to pasture is now being abandoned. This represents about 70% of all pastureland that was previously established. The dynamics of reconversion of this land to secondary forest is of interest because the length of time required for pasture to convert to secondary forest will impact net primary productivity and the amount of carbon being stored on abandoned pastures. In addition, the length of time required for pasture to convert to secondary forest may depend on the size of the pasture, whether it is surrounded by primary or secondary forest, and on pasture productivity at the time of abandonment. Pasture productivity at the time of abandonment will depend primarily on the age structure of the pasture grasses and on weediness, which are influenced by grazing and fire history. Also, an understanding of the dynamics of conversion of pastureland to forest can serve as the basis for management strategies to inhibit pasture conversion. A spatial, dynamic model of the conversion of pasture to secondary forest was developed using the PCRaster Dynamic Modeling Package. This software provides a computer language specially developed for modeling temporal and spatial processes in a GIS, and is well suited for the development of ecological, dynamic models. The model of pasture conversion is implemented for the central Amazon. We assume that succession involves only three plant types: pasture grass, weeds and woody plants. The pasture grass is parameterized for Brachiaria (brizantha, humidicola), the weeds for Borreria and Rolandra, and the woody plants for Vismia spp. The model uses a 1m x 1m grid and 2-month time step. Each initial plant and each surviving propagule is referred to as a plant and only occupies one grid cell. A number of values are calculated for each grid cell for each time-step. These include whether vegetation is present and, if so, which species, the age of the species, the

  20. Evaluation of solar exposure on the experimental intoxication by Brachiaria decumbens in sheep

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Twenty-six five-month-old lambs originated from flocks with no previous contact with Brachiaria spp. pastures were divided into three groups. Two groups (GS and GSB) were fed daily with fresh harvested Brachiaria decumbens ad libitum. GS was kept in an area with solar exposure and GSB was kept in st...

  1. Soil, water, and nutrient losses from management alternatives for degraded pasture in Brazilian Atlantic Rainforest biome.

    PubMed

    Rocha Junior, Paulo Roberto da; Andrade, Felipe Vaz; Mendonça, Eduardo de Sá; Donagemma, Guilherme Kangussú; Fernandes, Raphael Bragança Alves; Bhattharai, Rabin; Kalita, Prasanta Kumar

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate sediment, water and nutrient losses from different pasture managements in the Atlantic Rainforest biome. A field study was carried out in Alegre Espiríto Santo, Brazil, on a Xanthic Ferralsol cultivated with braquiaria (Brachiaria brizantha). The six pasture managements studied were: control (CON), chisel (CHI), fertilizer (FER), burned (BUR), plowing and harrowing (PH), and integrated crop-livestock (iCL). Runoff and sediment samples were collected and analyzed for calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg), potassium (K), phosphorus (P) and organic carbon contents. Soil physical attributes and above and below biomass were also evaluated. The results indicated that higher water loss was observed for iCL (129.90mm) and CON (123.25mm) managements, and the sediment losses were higher for CON (10.24tha(-1)) and BUR (5.20tha(-1)) managements when compared to the other managements. Majority of the nutrients losses occurred in dissolved fraction (99% of Ca, 99% of Mg, 96% of K, and 65% of P), whereas a significant fraction of organic carbon (80%) loss occurred in a particulate form. Except for P, other nutrients (Ca, Mg and K) and organic carbon losses were higher in coarse sediment compared to fine sediment. The greater losses of sediment, organic carbon, and nutrients were observed for CON followed by BUR management (p<0.05). Our findings indicated that the traditional pasture management adopted in the Atlantic Rainforest needs to be rethought and burned management should be avoided. Based on the water, soil, and nutrient losses from various practices, to reduce pasture degradation, farmers should adopt edaphic practices by applying lime and fertilize to improve pasture growth and soil cover, and reducing soil erosion in the hilly Brazilian Atlantic Rainforest biome.

  2. Karyotype analysis in Brachiaria (Poaceae) species.

    PubMed

    Bernini, C; Marin-Morales, M A

    2001-01-01

    This is the first karyotype characterization of Brachiaria species. Twelve accessions belonging to five species were analysed. The basic chromosome number was x = 9 and 7, the same reported for the tribe Paniceae. Variations in the chromosome number were observed in B. decumbens (2n = 18; 36) and B. humidicola (2n = 36; 42; 54). Chromosome numbers of 2n = 18 in B. ruziziensis and 2n = 36 in B. brizantha and B. jubata were recorded. Inter- and intraspecific karyotype differentiation of the accessions analysed was facilitated by variations in karyotypic symmetry. The karyotypes were generally considered symmetrical, with a tendency to asymmetry in the direction of the polyploids. It is suggested that addition, deletions and mainly polyploidy have been the most direct causes involved in the chromosome evolution of this genus.

  3. Lectin histochemistry of foam cells in tissues of cattle grazing Brachiaria spp.

    PubMed

    Gomar, M S; Driemeier, D; Colodel, E M; Gimeno, E J

    2005-02-01

    Brachiaria decumbens and B. brizantha (signal grass), which occupy millions of acres in Brazil, are an important source of fodder for ruminants. Sporadic outbreaks of photosensitization in ruminants grazing on signal grass have been reported. Intoxicated animals showed the presence of foamy cells in the liver, spleen, intestinal submucosa and lymph nodes. These foamy cells are macrophages. They are very difficult to distinguish with haematoxylin and eosin stain, especially in the case of isolated cells. The purpose of the present study was to detect specific carbohydrate residues of storage material in the foamy cells in tissues of cattle exposed to Brachiaria spp. The characterization of glycoconjugates provides clues to the pathogenesis of these cells. Besides, the lectin peanut agglutinin was found to be an excellent marker to differentiate and quantify the foam cells, and could be used as a specific marker.

  4. Study of the nutrient distribution in root tips of the tropical forage Brachiaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pineda, C. A.; Wenzl, P.; Mayer, J.; Mesjasz-Przybylowicz, J.; Przybylowicz, W. J.; Prozesky, V. M.

    1997-07-01

    A Brachiaria breeding project is being conducted at CIAT, Colombia to combine acid soil adaptation of B. decumbens with other favourable traits of Brachiaria species that are less adapted to acid soils. Micro-PIXE was applied to investigate nutrient uptake and distribution in root tips of different species grown in hydroponic culture under control and simulated acid soil stress conditions. Different sample measurement approaches were evaluated, including: (1) linear scans with single point measurements along the root axis; (2) mapping of whole root tips; and (3) mapping of root cross sections. Different tissue types could be distinguished on the base of differences in nutrient concentrations and/or Al stress. Al, if supplied under nutrient stress conditions, increased P accumulation in the central vascular tissue of the meristematic and elongation zone of B. decumbens and B. brizantha. Furthermore, a negative correlation was found between Al and Cl accumulation in the root cap of B. decumbens.

  5. Microsporogenesis analysis validates the use of artificially tetraploidized Brachiaria ruziziensis in breeding programs.

    PubMed

    Paula, C M P; Figueiredo, K G; Souza Sobrinho, F; Benites, F R G; Davide, L C; Techio, V H

    2016-09-19

    The genus Brachiaria contains species that have great economic importance in the Brazilian agricultural sector, as they enable cattle ranching on acid and poor soils with species that are resistant to spittlebugs and form crop-livestock-forest integration systems. The genus mainly consists of tetraploid (2n = 4x = 36) and apomictic species such as B. decumbens and B. brizantha. Sexuality is found in diploid species (2n = 2x = 18) such as B. ruziziensis. Interspecific hybridization between species of interest is possible by the artificial tetraploidization of B. ruziziensis and the subsequent hybridization with genotypes of B. brizantha and B. decumbens. Therefore, tetraploidized plants have to have normal meiosis or low rates of irregularities, as well as produce viable pollen grains. The objective of this study was to compare meiosis and pollen grain viability and morphology in artificially tetraploidized B. ruziziensis with that of descendants generated from crossing and selfing. The frequency of meiotic abnormalities ranged from 4.43 to 11%, and pollen viability ranged from 61 to 85%. Abnormalities were detected from prophase I to the tetrad stage with a variable frequency between the genotypes. The meiotic behavior of the artificially tetraploidized plants was little affected, and the pollen viability of the genotypes was high. Regarding pollen grain ultrastructure, there were no variations or morphological changes in the different genotypes. The genotypes have meiotic stability and high pollen viability, and can be incorporated into Brachiaria breeding programs.

  6. Meiotic behavior of Brachiaria decumbens hybrids.

    PubMed

    Souza, V F; Pagliarini, M S; Valle, C B; Bione, N C P; Menon, M U; Mendes-Bonato, A B

    2015-10-21

    Brachiaria decumbens is a forage grass of inestimable value for livestock in Brazil due to its production of good quality forage even when planted on acid and poor soils, although it is susceptible to pasture spittlebugs. Only one cultivar, cv. Basilisk, has been used as the pollen donor in crosses with Brachiaria ruziziensis since 1988 at Embrapa Gado de Corte Research Center. Breeding within the species only became possible from 2009 when sexual accessions were successfully tetraploidized using colchicine. Three sexual genotypes were obtained and hybridization within B. decumbens was finally achieved. Here, we evaluated microspore tetrads using conventional cytology and found meiotic indexes above 78% for all three female genitors (cD24-2, cD24-27, cD24-45), but a low meiotic index (<22%) in the natural apomictic genitor D62 (cv. Basilisk) and in 49 hybrids. Analysis of the relationship between abnormal tetrad frequency and non-viable pollen grains yielded a highly significant Pearson correlation coefficient. The t-test proved significant for the progeny of cD24-45 x D62, with lower abnormalities and pollen sterility when compared to the other two progenies resulting from cD24-2 and cD24-27 crossed to D62, but these two did not differ. Apomictic hybrids such as S036 and X030 with low pollen sterility have the potential for use in cultivar development, whereas the sexual hybrids T012, X072, and X078 might be of use as female genitors in polycross blocks if they display good agronomic traits.

  7. Chromosomal distribution and evolution of abundant retrotransposons in plants: gypsy elements in diploid and polyploid Brachiaria forage grasses.

    PubMed

    Santos, Fabíola Carvalho; Guyot, Romain; do Valle, Cacilda Borges; Chiari, Lucimara; Techio, Vânia Helena; Heslop-Harrison, Pat; Vanzela, André Luís Laforga

    2015-09-01

    Like other eukaryotes, the nuclear genome of plants consists of DNA with a small proportion of low-copy DNA (genes and regulatory sequences) and very abundant DNA sequence motifs that are repeated thousands up to millions of times in the genomes including transposable elements (TEs) and satellite DNA. Retrotransposons, one class of TEs, are sequences that amplify via an RNA intermediate and reinsert into the genome, are often the major fraction of a genome. Here, we put research on retrotransposons into the larger context of plant repetitive DNA and genome behaviour, showing features of genome evolution in a grass genus, Brachiaria, in relation to other plant species. We show the contrasting amplification of different retroelement fractions across the genome with characteristics for various families and domains. The genus Brachiaria includes both diploid and polyploid species, with similar chromosome types and chromosome basic numbers x = 6, 7, 8 and 9. The polyploids reproduce asexually and are apomictic, but there are also sexual species. Cytogenetic studies and flow cytometry indicate a large variation in DNA content (C-value), chromosome sizes and genome organization. In order to evaluate the role of transposable elements in the genome and karyotype organization of species of Brachiaria, we searched for sequences similar to conserved regions of TEs in RNAseq reads library produced in Brachiaria decumbens. Of the 9649 TE-like contigs, 4454 corresponded to LTR-retrotransposons, and of these, 79.5 % were similar to members of the gypsy superfamily. Sequences of conserved protein domains of gypsy were used to design primers for producing the probes. The probes were used in FISH against chromosomes of accesses of B. decumbens, Brachiaria brizantha, Brachiaria ruziziensis and Brachiaria humidicola. Probes showed hybridization signals predominantly in proximal regions, especially those for retrotransposons of the clades CRM and Athila, while elements of Del and Tat

  8. Effects of Different Treatments of Pasture Restoration on Soil Trace Gas Emissions in the Cerrados of Central Brazil

    EPA Science Inventory

    Planted pastures ( mainly Brachiaria spp) are the most extensive land use in the cerrado (savannas of central Brazil) with an area of approximately 50 x 10(6) ha. The objective of the study was to assess the effects of pasture restoration on the N dynamics ( net N mineralization/...

  9. Effects of Different Treatments of Pasture Restoration on Soil Trace Gas Emissions in the Cerrados of Central Brazil

    EPA Science Inventory

    Planted pastures ( mainly Brachiaria spp) are the most extensive land use in the cerrado (savannas of central Brazil) with an area of approximately 50 x 10(6) ha. The objective of the study was to assess the effects of pasture restoration on the N dynamics ( net N mineralization/...

  10. Chromosomal distribution of H3K4me2, H3K9me2 and 5-methylcytosine: variations associated with polyploidy and hybridization in Brachiaria (Poaceae).

    PubMed

    de Paula, Cristina Maria Pinto; Souza Sobrinho, Fausto; Techio, Vânia Helena

    2016-06-01

    Assessment of chromosomal distribution of modified histones and 5-methylcytosine shown that there are diversification of chromosomal types among species of Brachiaria and its interspecific hybrids. Histone post-translational modifications and DNA methylation are epigenetic processes that are involved in structural and functional organization of the genome. This study compared the chromosomal distribution of modified histones and 5-methylcytosine (5-mCyt) in species and interspecific hybrids of Brachiaria with different ploidy levels and reproduction modes. The relation between H3K9me2 and 5-mCyt was observed in the nucleolus organizer region, centromeric central domain and pericentromeric region. H3K4me2 was detected in euchromatic domains, mainly in the terminal chromosomal regions. Comparison of chromosomal distribution among species and hybrids showed greater variation of chromosomal types for the H3K9me2 in B. decumbens (tetraploid and apomictic species) and the 963 hybrid, while, for the H3K4me2, the variation was higher in B. brizantha and B. decumbens (tetraploid and apomictic species) and 963 hybrid. The chromosome distribution of 5-mCyt was similar between B. brizantha and B. decumbens, which differ from the distribution observed in B. ruziziensis (diploid and sexual species). Significant alterations in DNA methylation were observed in the artificially tetraploidized B. ruziziensis and in the interspecific hybrids, possibly as result of hybridization and polyploidization processes. The monitoring of histone modifications and DNA methylation allowed categorizing nuclear and chromosomal distribution of these epigenetic marks, thus contributing to the knowledge of composition and structure of the genome/epigenome of Brachiaria species and hybrids. These data can be useful for speciation and genome evolution studies in genus Brachiaria, and represent important markers to explore relationships between genomes.

  11. Meiotic behavior of a nonaploid accession endorses x = 6 for Brachiaria humidicola (Poaceae).

    PubMed

    Boldrini, K R; Pagliarini, M S; Valle, C B

    2009-12-01

    Brachiaria humidicola (Poaceae), originally from Africa, is an economically important pasture plant in tropical South America. An accession of B. humidicola (H038) collected from the wild African savanna (Mbeya, Tanzania) showed irregular microsporogenesis. This meiotic behavior was consistent with an allopolyploid origin. Multivalent chromosome association at diakinesis gave tri- to octavalents, associated with two nucleoli in some cells. Six non-congregated univalents in metaphase I and anaphase I, along with previous lines of evidence for x = 6 in B. humidicola, confirm H038 as a nonaploid accession, 2n = 9x = 54. Asynchrony in the genome during microsporogenesis also corroborated this assumption. Its putative origin could be a cross between two related species with different rhythms in meiosis. The meiotic behavior of this accession reinforces the hypothesis of the existence of a new basic chromosome number (x = 6) for Brachiaria. The use of this accession in the breeding of this important forage grass for the tropics is discussed.

  12. Genome elimination during microsporogenesis in two pentaploid accessions of Brachiaria decumbens (Poaceae).

    PubMed

    Ricci, G C L; Pagliarini, M S; Valle, C B

    2010-12-07

    Polyploidy is a prominent and significant force in plant evolution, taking place since ancient times and continuing until today. Recent cytogenetic studies in the genus Brachiaria using germplasm collected from wild African savannas in the 1980s revealed that most species and accessions within species are polyploid. Diploid, tetraploid, and pentaploid accessions have been found. We found asynchronous meiosis during microsporogenesis, followed by genome elimination, in two pentaploid (2n = 5x = 45) accessions (D53 and D71) of a hardy, invasive pasture grass, introduced from Africa to Brazil, Brachiaria decumbens. In these accessions, chromosomes paired as 18 bivalents and nine univalents during diakinesis, suggesting that these accessions resulted from a recent event of natural hybridization. The lack of chromosome associations in the genomes suggests that these accessions resulted from hybridization between two genotypes that are not closely related, with low genome affinity and with different meiotic rhythms. This supposition is reinforced by the meiotic behavior of the nine univalents, which were always laggard in relation to the other chromosomes and eliminated as micronuclei in microspores. The behavior of these accessions, which have an odd level of ploidy and confirmed genome elimination, supports the general assumption that a polyploid accession can undergo a new event of polyploidization by natural hybridization (neopolyploidyzation). This evidence for natural hybridization in Brachiaria shows that this is a wild genus in an ongoing evolutionary process.

  13. SOIL FLUXES OF CO2, CO, NO AND N2O FROM AN OLD-PASTURE AND FROM NATIVE SAVANNA IN BRAZIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    We compared fluxes of CO2, CO, NO and N2O, soil microbial biomass, and N-mineralization rates in a 20-year old Brachiaria pasture and a native cerrado area (savanna in Central Brazil). In order to assess the spatial variability of CO2 fluxes, we tested the relation between elect...

  14. SOIL FLUXES OF CO2, CO, NO AND N2O FROM AN OLD-PASTURE AND FROM NATIVE SAVANNA IN BRAZIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    We compared fluxes of CO2, CO, NO and N2O, soil microbial biomass, and N-mineralization rates in a 20-year old Brachiaria pasture and a native cerrado area (savanna in Central Brazil). In order to assess the spatial variability of CO2 fluxes, we tested the relation between elect...

  15. Pasture diversity and management

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Scientists at the USDA-ARS Pasture Systems and Watershed Management Research Unit have been collecting pasture plant biodiversity data for over ten years and across the northeastern United States. We have identified more than three hundred species of vascular plants. The average pasture in this regi...

  16. Desynapsis and precocious cytokinesis in Brachiaria humidicola (Poaceae) compromise meiotic division.

    PubMed

    Calisto, Vergílio; Fuzinatto, Veridiana Aparecida; Message, Hugo José; Mendes-Bonato, Andréa Beatriz; Boldrini, Kellen Regina; Pagliarini, Maria Suely; do Valle, Cacilda Borges

    2008-04-01

    The forage grass species Brachiaria humidicola is native to African savannas. Owing to its good adaptation to poorly drained and infertile acid soils, it has achieved wide utilization for pastures in Brazilian farms. Among the 55 accessions of B. humidicola analysed from the Embrapa Beef Cattle collection, one (H022), presented desynapsis and an abnormal pattern of cytokinesis in the first meiotic division. Among 28 inflorescences analysed in this accession, 12 were affected by the anomaly. In affected meiocytes, the first cytokinesis occurred in metaphase I and was generally perpendicular to a wide-metaphase plate, dividing the genome into two parts with an equal or unequal number of chromosomes. The normal cytokinesis after telophase I did not occur, and the meiocytes entered metaphase II, progressing to the end of meiosis with the occurrence of the second cytokinesis. As the first cytokinesis occurred precociously, whereas the second was normal, tetrads were formed but with unbalanced chromosome numbers in microspores. Abnormal cytokinesis occurred only in those meiocytes that underwent desynapsis after diakinesis. The implications of this abnormality in the Brachiaria breeding programme are discussed.

  17. Meiotic behavior in nonaploid accessions of Brachiaria humidicola (Poaceae) and implications for breeding.

    PubMed

    Boldrini, K R; Adamowski, E V; Silva, N; Pagliarini, M S; Valle, C B

    2011-02-01

    Brachiaria humidicola is a grass adapted to seasonally swampy grasslands in Africa; two cultivars, 'common' and Llanero, are widely used in Brazilian pastures. New cultivars are in great demand in order to diversify current production systems to achieve improved quality and yield. Cytological analyses of 55 accessions of this species available from the Embrapa Beef Cattle germplasm collection revealed that 27 are apomictic and have 2n = 54 chromosomes. Chromosome pairing as bi- to nonavalent associations at diakinesis indicated a basic chromosome number in this species of x = 6, as found in other closely related Brachiaria species. Thus, these 27 accessions are nonaploid (2n = 9x = 54). Abnormalities were found in the meiosis of these accessions, at variable frequencies. The most common abnormalities were those related to irregular chromosome segregation, which led to unbalanced gamete formation; but chromosome stickiness, cell fusion, and absence of cytokinesis were also recorded. Although some accessions have a low frequency of meiotic abnormalities, ensuring potentially good pollen viability, these cannot be used in hybridization due to a lack of sexual accessions with the same ploidy level.

  18. Nitrification Inhibitors from the root tissues of Brachiaria humidicola, a tropical grass.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishnan, Subramaniam; Subbarao, Guntur V; Nakahara, Kazuhiko; Yoshihashi, Tadashi; Ito, Osamu; Maeda, Ikuko; Ono, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Mitsuru

    2007-02-21

    Nitrification inhibitory activity was found in root tissue extracts of Brachiaria humidicola, a tropical pasture grass. Two active inhibitory compounds were isolated by activity-guided fractionation, using recombinant Nitrosomonas europaea containing luxAB genes derived from the bioluminescent marine gram-negative bacterium Vibrio harveyi. The compounds were identified as methyl-p-coumarate and methyl ferulate, respectively. Their nitrification inhibitory properties were confirmed in chemically synthesized preparations of each. The IC50 values of chemically synthesized preparations were 19.5 and 4.4 microM, respectively. The ethyl, propyl, and butyl esters of p-coumaric and ferulic acids inhibited nitrification, whereas the free acid forms did not show inhibitory activity.

  19. Hepatic photosensitization in buffaloes intoxicated by Brachiaria decumbens in Minas Gerais state, Brazil.

    PubMed

    De Oliveira, C H S; Barbosa, J D; Oliveira, C M C; Bastianetto, E; Melo, M M; Haraguchi, M; Freitas, L G L; Silva, M X; Leite, R C

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this paper is to report the study of hepatogenous photosensitization in buffaloes during two outbreaks provoked by ingestion of Brachiaria decumbens in Minas Gerais state, Brazil. Ten young buffaloes in outbreak 1 and seven buffaloes in outbreak 2 were intoxicated by B. decumbens. Nine clinically healthy buffaloes raised under the same conditions as the sick animals served as the control group. All animals were subjected to clinical examination, and serum was collected to measure gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), direct bilirubin (DB), indirect bilirubin (IB) and total bilirubin (TB) as indicators of liver function and urea and creatinine as indicators of renal function. Histopathology of liver fragments from five different animals was carried out. During the outbreaks and every two months for one year, samples of grass from paddocks where the animals got sick were collected for quantitative evaluation of the saponin protodioscin, combined with observations of pasture characteristics and daily rainfall. Clinical signs included apathy, weight loss, restlessness, scar retraction of the ears and intense itching at the skin lesions, mainly on the rump, the tail head, neck and hindlimbs, similar to the signs observed in other ruminants. Only the GGT enzyme presented significantly different (P < 0.01) serum levels between intoxicated animals (n = 17) and healthy animals (n = 9), indicating liver damage in buffaloes bred in B. decumbens pastures. Microscopy of the liver showed foamy macrophages and lesions of liver disease associated with the presence of crystals in the bile ducts, which have also been found in sheep and cattle poisoned by grasses of the genus Brachiaria. During the outbreaks, protodioscin levels were higher than 3%, and shortly after, these levels were reduced to less than 0.80%, suggesting a hepatic injury etiology. The outbreaks took place at the beginning of the rainy season, and there was a positive

  20. Priming and temperature limits for germination of dispersal units of Urochloa brizantha (Stapf) Webster cv. basilisk.

    PubMed

    Nakao, E A; Cardoso, V J M

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of priming treatments on the upper and lower thermal limits for germination of Urochloa brizantha cv. basilisk, and testing the hypothesis that pré-imbibition affect thermal parameters of the germination. Pre-imbibed seeds both in distilled water (0 MPa) and PEG 6000 solution (-0.5 MPa) were put to germinate in different temperatures. It is suggested that U. brizantha seeds have low response to priming when they were placed to germinate in medium where water is not limiting. The response of U. brizantha seeds to priming is dependent on the temperature and water potential conditions at which the seeds are pre-imbibed, as well as on the germination temperature. The optimum temperature for germination of U. brizantha shift toward warmer temperatures in primed seeds. Priming effect was more pronounced at temperatures closer to the upper and lower limit for germination, but probably that response cannot be accounted for changes in the thermal time constant (θT(g)) and ceiling temperature (Tc(g)). Otherwise, a decrease in the base temperature (Tb) was observed in primed seeds, suggesting that the Tb distribution in U. brizantha seeds is influenced by priming.

  1. Seasonal changes in northeastern pastures

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Understanding how pasture plant species abundance changes with seasons and sites can provide the background information needed to manage pasture composition to best match the site type and to extend the grazing season. We sampled pastures on five grazing farms (four dairy, one beef): two in New York...

  2. Pasture seed banks

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In our surveys of northeastern pastures, we found the equivalent of more than 8 million seeds per acre in the surface soil (the top four inches) from the seed bank study. These seeds came from 58 species of plants. The annual forbs (all broadleaf plants with the exception of legumes and trees) domin...

  3. Pasture monitoring with Landsat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    While Landsat data has been used to monitor primary production in range and pasture areas, such monitoring has generally been intended to track broad changes across multiple years. With an 8-day return time and 30m resolution, Landsat data can be used to assess intra-annual changes, even within rota...

  4. Phosphorus, carbon- and nitrogen interactions in productive and degraded tropical pastures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberson, A.; Hegglin, D. D.; Nesper, M.; Rao, I.; Fonte, S.; Ramirez, B.; Velasquez, J.; Tamburini, F.; Bünemann, E. K.; Frossard, E.

    2011-12-01

    Pastures are the main land use in deforested areas of tropical South America. The highly weathered soils of these regions usually have low total and available phosphorus (P) contents. Low P availability can strongly limit plant and animal productivity and other soil ecosystem functions. Most introduced pastures of Brachiaria spp. are grass-alone (GA) while some are grass-legume (GL) pastures. The majority of the introduced pastures, particularly the grass-alone are at some state of degradation (GD). Pasture degradation induces severe loss of plant biomass production, with drastic ecological and economic implications. Although the importance of P deficiency in pasture degradation has been recognized, the knowledge generated on stoichiometry of carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and P along pathways of the nutrient cycles of pastures, with different botanical composition and productivity, has been very limited. We will present results of a case study realized during 2010 to 2011 in the forest margins agro-ecosystem of the department of Caquetá, Colombia. Our objectives were to determine: i) whether P availability is lower in degraded compared to productive pastures, and ii) whether the introduction of legumes in the pasture increases P availability through enhanced biological P cycling through plant growth, plant litter decomposition and the soil microbial biomass; and iii) whether pasture types (GA vs GL) and the state of pasture degradation affect the C:N:P ratios in nutrient pools of the soil-plant system. An on-farm study was conducted on nine farms in the department of Caquetá, Colombia. On every farm three different pasture types were studied: degraded grass alone pastures (GD), productive grass-alone pastures (GA) and productive grass-legume pastures (GL). Basic soil characteristics and indicators on soil P status, microbial P cycling, plant biomass production, plant litter deposition and nutrient concentrations in plant tissue were determined. Analysis of P, C and N

  5. Carbon Isotope Discrimination in Forest and Pasture Ecosystems of the Amazon Basin, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehleringer, J. R.; Ometto, J.; Ometto, J.; Flanagan, L. B.; Martinelli, L. A.; Moreira, M. Z.; Higuchi, N.

    2001-12-01

    Our objective was to measure the stable carbon isotope composition of leaf tissue and CO2 released by respiration (\\deltaR), and to use this information as an estimate of changes in ecosystem isotopic discrimination that occur in response to seasonal and interannual changes in environmental conditions, and land-use change (forest-pasture conversion). We made measurements in primary forest and pastures in the Amazon Basin of Brazil. At the Santarem forest site \\deltaR values showed a seasonal cycle varying from less than -29\\permil to approximately -26\\permil. The observed seasonal change in \\deltaR was correlated with variation in the average monthly precipitation. In contrast there was no significant seasonal variation in \\deltaR at the Manaus forest site (average δ _{R} approximately -28‰ ), consistent with a narrower range of variation in monthly precipitation than occurred in Santarem. Despite substantial (9‰ ) vertical variation in leaf δ ^{13}C, the average δ _{R} values observed for both forest sites were similar to the δ ^{13}C values of the most exposed, sun foliage of the dominant tree species. This suggested that the major portion of recently respired carbon dioxide in these forests was metabolized carbohydrate fixed by the sun leaves at the top of the forest canopy. There was no significant seasonal variation observed in the δ ^{13}C values of leaf organic matter for the forest sites. We sampled in pastures dominated by the C_{4} grass, Brachiaria spp., which is planted after forest vegetation has been cleared. The carbon isotope ratio of respired CO_{2} in pastures was enriched in ^{13}C by approximately 10‰ compared to forest ecosystems. A significant temporal change occurred in δ _{R} after the Manaus pasture was burned. Burning removed much of the encroaching C_{3} shrub vegetation and so allowed an increased dominance of the C_{4} pasture grass, which resulted in higher δ _{R}$ values.

  6. Waterlogging-induced changes in root architecture of germplasm accessions of the tropical forage grass Brachiaria humidicola.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Juan Andrés; Jiménez, Juan de la Cruz; Rao, Idupulapati M

    2014-04-08

    Waterlogging is one of the major factors limiting the productivity of pastures in the humid tropics. Brachiaria humidicola is a forage grass commonly used in zones prone to temporary waterlogging. Brachiaria humidicola accessions adapt to waterlogging by increasing aerenchyma in nodal roots above constitutive levels to improve oxygenation of root tissues. In some accessions, waterlogging reduces the number of lateral roots developed from main root axes. Waterlogging-induced reduction of lateral roots could be of adaptive value as lateral roots consume oxygen supplied from above ground via their parent root. However, a reduction in lateral root development could also be detrimental by decreasing the surface area for nutrient and water absorption. To examine the impact of waterlogging on lateral root development, an outdoor study was conducted to test differences in vertical root distribution (in terms of dry mass and length) and the proportion of lateral roots to the total root system (sum of nodal and lateral roots) down the soil profile under drained or waterlogged soil conditions. Plant material consisted of 12 B. humidicola accessions from the gene bank of the International Center for Tropical Agriculture, Colombia. Rooting depth was restricted by 21 days of waterlogging and confined to the first 30 cm below the soil surface. Although waterlogging reduced the overall proportion of lateral roots, its proportion significantly increased in the top 10 cm of the soil. This suggests that soil flooding increases lateral root proliferation of B. humidicola in the upper soil layers. This may compensate for the reduction of root surface area brought about by the restriction of root growth at depths below 30 cm. Further work is needed to test the relative efficiency of nodal and lateral roots for nutrient and water uptake under waterlogged soil conditions.

  7. Waterlogging-induced changes in root architecture of germplasm accessions of the tropical forage grass Brachiaria humidicola

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Juan Andrés; Jiménez, Juan de la Cruz; Rao, Idupulapati M.

    2014-01-01

    Waterlogging is one of the major factors limiting the productivity of pastures in the humid tropics. Brachiaria humidicola is a forage grass commonly used in zones prone to temporary waterlogging. Brachiaria humidicola accessions adapt to waterlogging by increasing aerenchyma in nodal roots above constitutive levels to improve oxygenation of root tissues. In some accessions, waterlogging reduces the number of lateral roots developed from main root axes. Waterlogging-induced reduction of lateral roots could be of adaptive value as lateral roots consume oxygen supplied from above ground via their parent root. However, a reduction in lateral root development could also be detrimental by decreasing the surface area for nutrient and water absorption. To examine the impact of waterlogging on lateral root development, an outdoor study was conducted to test differences in vertical root distribution (in terms of dry mass and length) and the proportion of lateral roots to the total root system (sum of nodal and lateral roots) down the soil profile under drained or waterlogged soil conditions. Plant material consisted of 12 B. humidicola accessions from the gene bank of the International Center for Tropical Agriculture, Colombia. Rooting depth was restricted by 21 days of waterlogging and confined to the first 30 cm below the soil surface. Although waterlogging reduced the overall proportion of lateral roots, its proportion significantly increased in the top 10 cm of the soil. This suggests that soil flooding increases lateral root proliferation of B. humidicola in the upper soil layers. This may compensate for the reduction of root surface area brought about by the restriction of root growth at depths below 30 cm. Further work is needed to test the relative efficiency of nodal and lateral roots for nutrient and water uptake under waterlogged soil conditions. PMID:24876299

  8. Brachiaria Grasses (Brachiaria spp.) harbor a diverse bacterial community with multiple attributes beneficial to plant growth and development.

    PubMed

    Mutai, Collins; Njuguna, Joyce; Ghimire, Sita

    2017-06-21

    Endophytic and plant-associated bacteria were isolated from plants and rhizoplane soil of naturally grown Brachiaria grasses at International Livestock Research Institute in Nairobi, Kenya. Eighty-four bacterial strains were isolated from leaf tissues, root tissues, and rhizoplane soil on nutrient agar and 869 media. All bacterial strains were identified to the lowest possible taxonomic unit using 16S rDNA primers and were characterized for the production of Indole-3-acetic acid, hydrogen cyanide, and ACC deaminase; phosphate solubilization; siderophore production; antifungal properties; and plant biomass production. The 16S rDNA-based identification grouped these 84 bacterial strains into 3 phyla, 5 classes, 8 orders, 12 families, 16 genera, and 50 unique taxa. The four most frequently isolated genera were Pseudomonas (23), Pantoea (17), Acinetobacter (9), and Enterobacter (8). The functional characterization of these strains revealed that 41 of 84 strains had a minimum of three plant beneficial properties. Inoculation of maize seedlings with Acinetobacter spp., Microbacterium spp., Pectobacterium spp., Pseudomonas spp., and Enterobacter spp. showed positive effects on seedling biomass production. The ability of Brachiaria grasses to host genetically diverse bacteria, many of them with multiple plant growth-promoting attributes, might have contributed to high biomass production and adaptation of Brachiaria grasses to drought and low fertility soils. © 2017 International Livestock Research Institute. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. The effect of ensiling and haymaking on the concentrations of steroidal saponin in two Brachiaria grass species

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Brachiaria (signalgrass) is now the most widely used tropical grass genus in Central and South America. However, Brachiaria spp. can cause hepatogenous photosensitization in livestock. Steroidal saponins, specifically protodioscin, present in Brachiaria spp. may be responsible for liver injury and s...

  10. Sward characteristics and performance of dairy cows in organic grass-legume pastures shaded by tropical trees.

    PubMed

    Paciullo, D S C; Pires, M F A; Aroeira, L J M; Morenz, M J F; Maurício, R M; Gomide, C A M; Silveira, S R

    2014-08-01

    The silvopastoral system (SPS) has been suggested to ensure sustainability in animal production systems in tropical ecosystems. The objective of this study was to evaluate pasture characteristics, herbage intake, grazing activity and milk yield of Holstein×Zebu cows managed in two grazing systems (treatments): SPS dominated by a graminaceous forage (Brachiaria decumbens) intercropped with different leguminous herbaceous forages (Stylosanthes spp., Pueraria phaseoloides and Calopogonium mucunoides) and legume trees (Acacia mangium, Gliricidia sepium and Leucaena leucocephala), and open pasture (OP) of B. decumbens intercropped only with Stylosanthes spp. Pastures were managed according to the rules for organic cattle production. The study was carried out by following a switch back format with 12 cows, 6 for each treatment, over 3 experimental years. Herbage mass was similar (P>0.05) for both treatments, supporting an average stocking rate of 1.23 AU/ha. Daily dry matter intake did not vary (P>0.05) between treatments (average of 11.3±1.02 kg/cow per day, corresponding to 2.23±0.2% BW). Milk yield was higher (P0.05) in subsequent years. The highest (P0.05) milk yields. Low persistence of Stylosanthes guianensis was observed over the experimental period, indicating that the persistence of forage legumes under grazing could be improved using adapted cultivars that have higher annual seed production. The SPS and a diversified botanical composition of the pasture using legume species mixed with grasses are recommended for organic milk production.

  11. 75 FR 7153 - National Organic Program; Access to Pasture (Livestock)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-17

    ... Agriculture Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 205 National Organic Program; Access to Pasture... National Organic Program; Access to Pasture (Livestock) AGENCY: Agricultural Marketing Service, USDA... for pasture, incorporate the pasture management plan into their organic system plan (OSP), provide...

  12. Abnormal cytokinesis in microsporogenesis of Brachiaria humidicola (Poaceae: Paniceae).

    PubMed

    Adamowski, E V; Boldrini, K R; Pagliarini, M S; do Valle, C B

    2007-09-30

    Microsporogenesis was evaluated in the Brachiaria humidicola collection of the Embrapa Beef Cattle Center, represented by 60 accessions. One accession (H121) presented an abnormal pattern of cytokinesis that had never been reported in this genus. Among 900 meiocytes analyzed in the first division, 10.7% underwent precocious and multiple cytokinesis in metaphase I, fractionating the genome and the cytoplasm into two or more parts. The expected cytokinesis after telophase I did not occur. The abnormal meiocytes from the first division entered the second division but the second cytokinesis after telophase II was also abnormal. Among the 857 meiocytes analyzed in the second division, 10.9% presented abnormal, incomplete or total absence of cytokinesis. Dyads and binucleated microspores were recorded among the meiotic products. The use of this accession in the Embrapa breeding program is compromised.

  13. Non-destructive Phenotyping to Identify Brachiaria Hybrids Tolerant to Waterlogging Stress under Field Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, Juan de la Cruz; Cardoso, Juan A.; Leiva, Luisa F.; Gil, Juanita; Forero, Manuel G.; Worthington, Margaret L.; Miles, John W.; Rao, Idupulapati M.

    2017-01-01

    Brachiaria grasses are sown in tropical regions around the world, especially in the Neotropics, to improve livestock production. Waterlogging is a major constraint to the productivity and persistence of Brachiaria grasses during the rainy season. While some Brachiaria cultivars are moderately tolerant to seasonal waterlogging, none of the commercial cultivars combines superior yield potential and nutritional quality with a high level of waterlogging tolerance. The Brachiaria breeding program at the International Center for Tropical Agriculture, has been using recurrent selection for the past two decades to combine forage yield with resistance to biotic and abiotic stress factors. The main objective of this study was to test the suitability of normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and image-based phenotyping as non-destructive approaches to identify Brachiaria hybrids tolerant to waterlogging stress under field conditions. Nineteen promising hybrid selections from the breeding program and three commercial checks were evaluated for their tolerance to waterlogging under field conditions. The waterlogging treatment was imposed by applying and maintaining water to 3 cm above soil surface. Plant performance was determined non-destructively using proximal sensing and image-based phenotyping and also destructively via harvesting for comparison. Image analysis of projected green and dead areas, NDVI and shoot biomass were positively correlated (r ≥ 0.8). Our results indicate that image analysis and NDVI can serve as non-destructive screening approaches for the identification of Brachiaria hybrids tolerant to waterlogging stress. PMID:28243249

  14. Non-destructive Phenotyping to Identify Brachiaria Hybrids Tolerant to Waterlogging Stress under Field Conditions.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Juan de la Cruz; Cardoso, Juan A; Leiva, Luisa F; Gil, Juanita; Forero, Manuel G; Worthington, Margaret L; Miles, John W; Rao, Idupulapati M

    2017-01-01

    Brachiaria grasses are sown in tropical regions around the world, especially in the Neotropics, to improve livestock production. Waterlogging is a major constraint to the productivity and persistence of Brachiaria grasses during the rainy season. While some Brachiaria cultivars are moderately tolerant to seasonal waterlogging, none of the commercial cultivars combines superior yield potential and nutritional quality with a high level of waterlogging tolerance. The Brachiaria breeding program at the International Center for Tropical Agriculture, has been using recurrent selection for the past two decades to combine forage yield with resistance to biotic and abiotic stress factors. The main objective of this study was to test the suitability of normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and image-based phenotyping as non-destructive approaches to identify Brachiaria hybrids tolerant to waterlogging stress under field conditions. Nineteen promising hybrid selections from the breeding program and three commercial checks were evaluated for their tolerance to waterlogging under field conditions. The waterlogging treatment was imposed by applying and maintaining water to 3 cm above soil surface. Plant performance was determined non-destructively using proximal sensing and image-based phenotyping and also destructively via harvesting for comparison. Image analysis of projected green and dead areas, NDVI and shoot biomass were positively correlated (r ≥ 0.8). Our results indicate that image analysis and NDVI can serve as non-destructive screening approaches for the identification of Brachiaria hybrids tolerant to waterlogging stress.

  15. Pasture quality variation throughout the grazing season

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    It is important for dairy producers and their nutritionists to have an idea of the nutritional quality of the pasture they are providing to their cows. This article uses data gathered from several on-going pasture research projects to demonstrate how pasture quality varies during the grazing season,...

  16. Guide to Managing Pasture Water: Streamside Buffers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Properly managed pasture water not only provides high-quality water which promotes healthy and productive livestock, but also contributes to maintaining water quality downstream. Riparian (streamside) areas serve as a transition between upland pastures and waterways. In other words, they link pastur...

  17. Pasture Types and Echinococcus multilocularis, Tibetan Communities

    PubMed Central

    Vuitton, Dominique A.; Xiao, Yongfu; Budke, Christine M.; Campos-Ponce, Maiza; Schantz, Peter M.; Raoul, Francis; Yang, Wen; Craig, Philip S.; Giraudoux, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    Our study showed that open pastures had more small mammal burrows than fenced pastures in Tibetan pastoralist communities in 2003. This characteristic was linked to a higher prevalence of Echinococcus multilocularis in dogs and indicates that pasture type may affect E. multilocularis transmission. PMID:16707064

  18. Pasture nonstructural carbohydrates and equine laminitis.

    PubMed

    Longland, Annette C; Byrd, Bridgett M

    2006-07-01

    Fresh forages constitute a majority of the diet for many horses and ponies that graze on pastures during the growing season in many parts of the world. Grasses generally predominate in such pastures, with varying proportions of legumes. Nonstructural carbohydrates (NSC) (simple sugars, starch, and fructan) can induce laminitis experimentally, and NSC can accumulate to >400 g/kg of dry matter (DM) in pasture grasses. In this article we discuss the environmental factors affecting NSC accumulation in pastures and estimate the potential daily intakes of pasture NSC by grazing horses. We also discuss strategies for both reducing the NSC content of pastures and management practices that can help reduce intakes of pasture NSC by equines at risk of developing laminitis. This study reveals the importance of accurate forage analysis in the development of feeding regimens for equines at risk of laminitis.

  19. Carbon isotope discrimination in forest and pasture ecosystems of the Amazon Basin, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ometto, Jean P. H. B.; Flanagan, Lawrence B.; Martinelli, Luiz A.; Moreira, Marcelo Z.; Higuchi, Niro; Ehleringer, James R.

    2002-12-01

    Our objective was to measure the stable carbon isotope composition of leaf tissue and CO2 released by respiration (δr), and to use this information as an estimate of changes in ecosystem isotopic discrimination that occur in response to seasonal and interannual changes in environmental conditions, and land-use change (forest-pasture conversion). We made measurements in primary forest and pastures in the Amazon Basin of Brazil. At the Santarém forest site, δr values showed a seasonal cycle varying from less than -29‰ to approximately -26‰. The observed seasonal change in δr was correlated with variation in the observed monthly precipitation. In contrast, there was no significant seasonal variation in δr at the Manaus forest site (average δr approximately -28‰), consistent with a narrower range of variation in monthly precipitation than occurred in Santarém. Despite substantial (9‰) vertical variation in leaf δ13C, the average δr values observed for all forest sites were similar to the δ13C values of the most exposed sun foliage of the dominant tree species. This suggested that the major portion of recently respired carbon dioxide in these forests was metabolized carbohydrate fixed by the sun leaves at the top of the forest canopy. There was no significant seasonal variation observed in the δ13C values of leaf organic matter for the forest sites. We sampled in pastures dominated by the C4 grass, Brachiaria spp., which is planted after forest vegetation has been cleared. The carbon isotope ratio of respired CO2 in pastures was enriched in 13C by approximately 10‰ compared to forest ecosystems. A significant temporal change occurred in δr after the Manaus pasture was burned. Burning removed much of the encroaching C3 shrub vegetation and so allowed an increased dominance of the C4 pasture grass, which resulted in higher δr values.

  20. Pasture improvement in Spanish Dehesas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murillo Vilanova, M.; González López, F.

    2009-04-01

    In the south-west of the Iberian Peninsula, the dehesa is a widespread agro-silvo-pastoral land use system, characterized by a grassland with a disperse cover of oak trees and shrubs, where the main production is extensive livestock combined with agriculture and forestry. Many years of inappropriate management of dehesas (deforestation, overgrazing, excessive agricultural activities, etc.) has led to the degradation of vegetation and soils in extensive areas, causing reductions in biomass and biodiversity, affecting the permanence of plants and causing important losses of palatable species. As there is growing interest in these wooded rangeland ecosystems due to their economic importance and high environmental value, the recovery of the original pasture biodiversity and the increase of productivity, together with the conservation of the environment, are the main goals in these areas of low productive potential, degraded and subject to soil erosion. Soil and climate conditions have a great influence on grassland production, with rainfall producing strong seasonal and interannual variations. These natural pastures, mainly composed of summer withering annual species, reach maximum productions in spring and register low values in autumn, slowing down in winter. During the summer dry season, the wilting pastures can offer a good forage for animals. Autochthonous annual legumes play an important role because they are well adapted to local edaphic and climatic conditions and produce hard seeds which germinate in autumn. This helps them to survive the frequent droughts and offer a high quality forage, which is a valuable complement to other pasture plants with lower protein content. Therefore, for several decades, legume seeding combined with the application of phosphate fertilizer has been the most common strategy used to improve pastures in SW Spain, where dehesas cover an area of about four million hectares. This paper examines the whole process of pasture improvement

  1. Weather and plant age affect the levels of steroidal saponin and Pithomyces chartarum spores in Brachiaria grass

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Brachiaria species are cultivated worldwide in tropical and subtropical climates as the main forage source for ruminants. Numerous tropical and warm-season grasses cause hepatogenous photosensitization, among them several species of Brachiaria. Steroidal saponins present in these plants may be respo...

  2. Advantages of pasture-based milk products

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Recent research has focused on determining the biologically active compounds naturally occurring in milk from pasture-fed cows and evaluating the impact of processing on these compounds. This research addresses one of the critical goals of the Northeast Pasture Consortium to “summarize conjugated li...

  3. New Developments in Grasses for Pastures

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    New forage varieties with improved traits are an essential component of best management practices for livestock agriculture. This paper discusses new varieties of several cool-season forage grasses used for pasture production....

  4. Studies of pasture production in Extremadura (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murillo Vilanova, M.; González López, F.; Paredes Galán, J.; Prieto Macías, P. M.; Blanco, V. Maya

    2009-04-01

    The region of Extremadura covers more than four million hectares in the South West of Spain, with dehesas occupying almost 1.5 million hectares of its surface. This agro-silvo-pastoral land use system constitutes the most recommendable model for extensive exploitation in Mediterranean areas in which the semiarid climate and the poor, shallow soils are constraints on any other type of agricultural use. It is characterized by a grassland with a disperse cover of oak trees and shrubs, where the main production is extensive livestock combined with agriculture and forestry. The pastures are the basis for animal breeding in the dehesas being these ecosystems of great economic, social as well as environmental value in the southwestern Iberian Peninsula. These facts justify the investigation on pasture improvement and the study on spatial and temporal variations of pasture production in the whole region. Pasture production is quite variable, highly determined by soil and climate conditions. Rainfall variability produces large seasonal and annual variations, with the highest production in spring, low production in autumn and very scarce in winter. During summer, while pastures are wilting, hard seeds stay latent in the soil and gradually germinate in consecutive months. But variability of pasture production in such a heterogeneous ecosystem does not only depend on edaphic and climate conditions, but also on other factors, such as grazing management, improvement measures, fertilization, exploitation infrastructures, stocking rates, etc. The present study, carried out in the framework of the "Montado/Dehesa" INTERREG project, aimed to sample pasture production in Extremadura, in order to provide a large amount of real data for determining the influence of the different factors involved, which will constitute the basis for the developement of a production model. The latter will be integrated into a tool helping to decide on the best practice of dehesa management. Pastures were

  5. Linking pasture and animal processes Let’s allocate the pasture in the afternoon

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Research conducted in Argentina, US, Australia and Europe has shown significant variations in chemical composition of pasture throughout the day, which results in an increase in pasture digestibility and energy concentration as the day progresses. Cattle have adapted their grazing patterns during th...

  6. Salt stress response and proline accumulation in Brachiaria humidicola plants with and without mycorrhizal inoculation.

    PubMed

    Mergulhão, A C Do Espírito Santo; Burity, H A; Tabosa, J N; Figueiredo, M B Do Vale; Da Silva, M L R Bastos

    2002-01-01

    The work was carried out to investigate the effects of different concentrations of NaCl on Brachiaria humidicola Rendle in the presence and absence of Glomus etunicatum Becker and Gerdemann, as well as to evaluate some growth parameters and the accumulation of free proline in the plant leaves. The soil used was a Neosoil Fluvic Eutrophic with pH of 6.5, organic matter, 12.8 g kg-1 and soil texture, sandy loam, in which Brachiaria humidicola Rendle cv. 409 was grown. Five NaCl concentrations were tested 0; 0.22; 1.09; 1.96 and 2.84 g. kg-1 of soil, whose electrical conductivity (EC) were 2.22; 4.00; 8.13; 12.53 and 16.50 dS m-1, respectively. Brachiaria humidicola showed salt tolerance when submitted to an EC of 4 dS m-1. There was a reduction of leaf area, dry matter of shoots and roots for the soil treatments beyond EC at 8 dS m-1. Free proline content in the leaves increased together with the increase in soil salinity (EC at 8 dS m-1) demonstrating that plants submitted to EC of 2 and 4 dS m-1 were less affected by salt stress, and consequently accumulated less proline in the leaves. Root colonization was not affected by the increase of NaCl dosage in the soil.

  7. Carbon budgets for an irrigated intensively grazed dairy pasture and an unirrigated winter-grazed pasture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, John E.; Laubach, Johannes; Barthel, Matti; Fraser, Anitra; Phillips, Rebecca L.

    2016-05-01

    Intensification of pastoral agriculture is occurring rapidly across New Zealand, including increasing use of irrigation and fertiliser application in some regions. While this enables greater gross primary production (GPP) and livestock grazing intensity, the consequences for the net ecosystem carbon budget (NECB) of the pastures are poorly known. Here, we determined the NECB over one year for an irrigated, fertilised and rotationally grazed dairy pasture and a neighbouring unirrigated, unfertilised, winter-grazed pasture. Primary terms in the NECB calculation were: net ecosystem production (NEP), biomass carbon removed by grazing cows and carbon (C) input from their excreta. Annual NEP was measured using the eddy-covariance method. Carbon removal was estimated with plate-meter measurements calibrated against biomass collections, pre- and post-grazing. Excreta deposition was calculated from animal feed intake. The intensively managed pasture gained C (NECB = 103 ± 42 g C m-2 yr-1) but would have been subject to a non-significant C loss if cattle excreta had not been returned to the pasture. The unirrigated pasture was C-neutral (NECB = -13 ± 23 g C m-2 yr-1). While annual GPP of the former was almost twice that of the latter (2679 vs. 1372 g C m-2 yr-1), ecosystem respiration differed by only 68 % between the two pastures (2271 vs. 1352 g C m-2 yr-1). The ratio of GPP to the total annual water input of the irrigated pasture was 37 % greater than that of the unirrigated pasture, i.e. the former used the water input more efficiently than the latter to produce biomass. The NECB results agree qualitatively with those from many other eddy-covariance studies of grazed grasslands, but they seem to be at odds with long-term carbon-stock studies of other New Zealand pastures.

  8. 1. South approach to the horse pasture store, looking north; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. South approach to the horse pasture store, looking north; U.S. Highway 58 (toward Martinsville) is in the foreground - Horsepasture Store, U.S. Route 58 & State Route 687, Horse Pasture, Henry County, VA

  9. Pasture Condition Scoring at the Whole-Farm Scale

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Producers need monitoring and assessment tools to aid in pasture management. One such tool, the pasture condition score system, has been developed by the USDA-NRCS for use as a pasture monitoring and management tool. Ten key indicators (percent desirable plants, plant cover, plant diversity, plant r...

  10. Seasonal changes in plant diversity and abundance in Northeastern pastures

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The number and identity of plant species varies by season and location. We sampled pastures on five grazing farms (four dairy, one beef): two in New York, two in Pennsylvania, and one in Maryland. Pasture plant composition was measured on five to seven pastures in the spring (April-May), summer (Jul...

  11. Soil Organic Carbon Sequestration: What Happens after Pasture is Terminated?

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pastures are a major land use throughout the southeastern USA. In fact there is almost as much pasture land (48 million acres) as crop land (64 million acres) in the region. Soil under pastures accumulates organic matter (composed mostly of carbon), because (a) soil is not disturbed, (b) forages o...

  12. Nutrient management on pasture and haylands

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Nutrient management on pastures is a critical part of maintaining and improving their ability to provide key ecosystem services including forage and fuel production, clean air and water, and climate mitigation. Our objective was to determine the scientific underpinning for purported benefits of nutr...

  13. New pasture plants intensify invasive species risk.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, Don A; Catford, Jane A; Barney, Jacob N; Hulme, Philip E; Inderjit; Martin, Tara G; Pauchard, Aníbal; Pyšek, Petr; Richardson, David M; Riley, Sophie; Visser, Vernon

    2014-11-18

    Agricultural intensification is critical to meet global food demand, but intensification threatens native species and degrades ecosystems. Sustainable intensification (SI) is heralded as a new approach for enabling growth in agriculture while minimizing environmental impacts. However, the SI literature has overlooked a major environmental risk. Using data from eight countries on six continents, we show that few governments regulate conventionally bred pasture taxa to limit threats to natural areas, even though most agribusinesses promote taxa with substantial weed risk. New pasture taxa (including species, subspecies, varieties, cultivars, and plant-endophyte combinations) are bred with characteristics typical of invasive species and environmental weeds. By introducing novel genetic and endophyte variation, pasture taxa are imbued with additional capacity for invasion and environmental impact. New strategies to prevent future problems are urgently needed. We highlight opportunities for researchers, agribusiness, and consumers to reduce environmental risks associated with new pasture taxa. We also emphasize four main approaches that governments could consider as they build new policies to limit weed risks, including (i) national lists of taxa that are prohibited based on environmental risk; (ii) a weed risk assessment for all new taxa; (iii) a program to rapidly detect and control new taxa that invade natural areas; and (iv) the polluter-pays principle, so that if a taxon becomes an environmental weed, industry pays for its management. There is mounting pressure to increase livestock production. With foresight and planning, growth in agriculture can be achieved sustainably provided that the scope of SI expands to encompass environmental weed risks.

  14. Poultry litter application on pastures and hayfields

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Poultry litter is widely used on pastures and hayfields in Georgia. There are many benefits when it is used wisely. Producers should use nutrient management planning and recommended rates to ensure poultry litter is used in ways that maximize its benefits without harming the environment....

  15. Measuring Carbon Sequestration in Pasture Soils

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Conversion of croplands to pasture can greatly increase sequestration of carbon in soil organic matter, removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and helping to reduce the impacts of climate change. The measurement of soil carbon, and its limitations, could impact future carbon credit programs. ...

  16. Animal behavior and pasture depletion in a pasture-based automatic milking system.

    PubMed

    Lyons, N A; Kerrisk, K L; Dhand, N K; Scott, V E; Garcia, S C

    2014-09-01

    In pasture-based automatic milking systems (AMS), feed is the main incentive that can be managed to encourage reliable and consistent voluntary and distributed cow traffic. Modifying timing, placement and size of feed allocations is expected to have an effect on cow behavior that could avoid the occurrence of extended milking intervals, which have a negative effect on milk yield. Therefore, behavioral studies provide information on how cows modify their actions under different management regimes and can help explain the impact of those regimes. Behavioral observations were conducted in spring 2011 at the FutureDairy AMS research farm, as part of a study where a herd of 175 cows was split into two groups that received supplementary feed either before (PRE), or immediately after (POST) milking. In addition, all cows were offered access to two daily pasture allocations. Observations were conducted in the pasture allocation on 15 focal cows from each treatment group during four periods of 24 h to detect presence and behavior (grazing, ruminating, idling and other) every 15 min. In addition, bite rate and pasture biomass were measured every hour. Overall, despite the finding that more POST cows than PRE cows entered the pasture allocation during the first 8 h of active access, there was no difference in the total proportion of cows that had gained access by the end of the active access period (average 68% for both treatments). Cows in the PRE treatment started exiting the pasture allocation just 6 h after entering, compared with 8 h for POST cows, although their behaviors in the pasture allocation did not differ. Behaviors and bite rate were more dependent on pasture biomass than on supplementary feeding management.

  17. Feeding value of pastures for ruminants.

    PubMed

    Waghorn, G C; Clark, D A

    2004-12-01

    Perennial ryegrass is the primary forage component of ruminant diets in New Zealand. It is persistent and palatable, and immature ryegrass has a high nutritive value (NV). However, seedhead development substantially lowers its feeding value (FV) as fibre concentration increases, the rate and extent of digestibility decreases, and voluntary intake declines. Ryegrass pastures are susceptible to accumulation of endophytic and saprophytic fungi in dead material at the base of the sward, especially when mature and laxly grazed. Feeding forage legumes to ruminants grazing grass-dominant pastures will improve animal performance and lessen the reliance on a single species to meet all nutritional requirements. The FV of forage is a function of intake and NV, measured by chemical analyses and animal feeding trials. Performance of individual animals grazing forages is usually limited by energy intake because structural fibre can slow digestion and clearance from the rumen and because of competition between individuals for available feed. The use of metabolisable energy (ME) content of forage to signify FV can give a reasonable indication of animal performance, but it should be used in conjunction with chemical analyses to improve the accuracy of predictions. The relationship between FV, pasture production, animal performance and profitability is complex. The importance of skilled management to maintain pasture quality and optimise animal performance under inconsistent climatic conditions should not be underestimated. Acceptable animal performance with minimal veterinary intervention requires good nutrition, but the genetic potential of livestock in New Zealand cannot be met solely by grazing pasture, especially when a high utilisation of pasture is required to maintain quality and profitability. Producers are responding to industry demands to reduce the seasonality in supply of milk and meat by changing lambing and calving dates, and extending lactation length in dairy cows

  18. Origin of a polyploid accession of Brachiaria humidicola (Poaceae: Panicoideae: Paniceae).

    PubMed

    Boldrini, K R; Micheletti, P L; Gallo, P H; Mendes-Bonato, A B; Pagliarini, M S; Valle, C B

    2009-07-28

    Brachiaria humidicola, a species adapted to poorly drained and infertile acid soils, is widely used throughout the tropics. Cytological characterization of 54 accessions of B. humidicola for breeding purposes revealed 2n = 36, 42, and 54 chromosomes. One accession (H030), with 2n = 42 chromosomes, showed a different meiotic behavior. In most accessions from the genus Brachiaria previously studied, the basic chromosome number is x = 9, but the putative basic number in H030 appears to be x = 6. Since six univalent chromosomes were found in diakinesis and metaphase I, and these behaved as laggards in anaphase I, it was hypothesized that both genitors were derived from x = 6, and that this accession is a heptaploid 2n = 7x = 42. The parental genomes did not have the same meiotic behavior, particularly during anaphase, when one genome consisting of six univalents remained as laggards and underwent sister-chromatid segregation. At telophase, 18 segregated chromosomes were found at each pole. The laggard genome did not reach the poles at telophase I or II in time to be included in the nucleus and was eliminated as micronuclei.

  19. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of the endophytic fungus Acremonium implicatum associated with Brachiaria grasses.

    PubMed

    Abello, Javier; Kelemu, Segenet; García, Celsa

    2008-03-01

    Acremonium implicatum is a seed-transmitted endophytic fungus that forms symbiotic associations with the economically significant tropical forage grasses, Brachiaria species. To take advantage of the endophyte's plant protective properties, we developed an efficient Agrobacterium-mediated transformation system for Acremonium implicatum, using green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression and vector pSK1019 (trpC promoter) or pCAMBIA1300 (CaMV35S promoter). We found that transformation efficiency doubled for both mycelial and conidial transformation as the co-cultivation period for Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Acremonium implicatum was increased from 48 to 72h. Significantly, optimal results were obtained for either mycelial or conidial transformation with Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain AGL-1 and vector pSK1019 under the control of the trpC promoter. However, mycelial transformation consistently generated a significantly higher number of transformants than did conidial transformation. The mitotic stability of the transferred DNA was confirmed by growing ten transformants in liquid and agar media for six generations. In all cases, resistance to the selection pressure (hygromycin B) was maintained. Fluorescence emission was retained by the transformants and also expressed in Brachiaria tissues from plants inoculated with GFP-transformed A. implicatum. This technology will help in the transfer and expression of agronomically important genes in host plants.

  20. On-irrigator pasture soil moisture sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eng-Choon Tan, Adrian; Richards, Sean; Platt, Ian; Woodhead, Ian

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we presented the development of a proximal soil moisture sensor that measured the soil moisture content of dairy pasture directly from the boom of an irrigator. The proposed sensor was capable of soil moisture measurements at an accuracy of  ±5% volumetric moisture content, and at meter scale ground area resolutions. The sensor adopted techniques from the ultra-wideband radar to enable measurements of ground reflection at resolutions that are smaller than the antenna beamwidth of the sensor. An experimental prototype was developed for field measurements. Extensive field measurements using the developed prototype were conducted on grass pasture at different ground conditions to validate the accuracy of the sensor in performing soil moisture measurements.

  1. New pasture plants intensify invasive species risk

    PubMed Central

    Driscoll, Don A.; Catford, Jane A.; Barney, Jacob N.; Hulme, Philip E.; Inderjit; Martin, Tara G.; Pauchard, Aníbal; Pyšek, Petr; Richardson, David M.; Riley, Sophie; Visser, Vernon

    2014-01-01

    Agricultural intensification is critical to meet global food demand, but intensification threatens native species and degrades ecosystems. Sustainable intensification (SI) is heralded as a new approach for enabling growth in agriculture while minimizing environmental impacts. However, the SI literature has overlooked a major environmental risk. Using data from eight countries on six continents, we show that few governments regulate conventionally bred pasture taxa to limit threats to natural areas, even though most agribusinesses promote taxa with substantial weed risk. New pasture taxa (including species, subspecies, varieties, cultivars, and plant-endophyte combinations) are bred with characteristics typical of invasive species and environmental weeds. By introducing novel genetic and endophyte variation, pasture taxa are imbued with additional capacity for invasion and environmental impact. New strategies to prevent future problems are urgently needed. We highlight opportunities for researchers, agribusiness, and consumers to reduce environmental risks associated with new pasture taxa. We also emphasize four main approaches that governments could consider as they build new policies to limit weed risks, including (i) national lists of taxa that are prohibited based on environmental risk; (ii) a weed risk assessment for all new taxa; (iii) a program to rapidly detect and control new taxa that invade natural areas; and (iv) the polluter-pays principle, so that if a taxon becomes an environmental weed, industry pays for its management. There is mounting pressure to increase livestock production. With foresight and planning, growth in agriculture can be achieved sustainably provided that the scope of SI expands to encompass environmental weed risks. PMID:25368175

  2. Testing the Amazon savannization hypothesis: fire effects on invasion of a neotropical forest by native cerrado and exotic pasture grasses

    PubMed Central

    Silvério, Divino V.; Brando, Paulo M.; Balch, Jennifer K.; Putz, Francis E.; Nepstad, Daniel C.; Oliveira-Santos, Claudinei; Bustamante, Mercedes M. C.

    2013-01-01

    Changes in climate and land use that interact synergistically to increase fire frequencies and intensities in tropical regions are predicted to drive forests to new grass-dominated stable states. To reveal the mechanisms for such a transition, we established 50 ha plots in a transitional forest in the southwestern Brazilian Amazon to different fire treatments (unburned, burned annually (B1yr) or at 3-year intervals (B3yr)). Over an 8-year period since the commencement of these treatments, we documented: (i) the annual rate of pasture and native grass invasion in response to increasing fire frequency; (ii) the establishment of Brachiaria decumbens (an African C4 grass) as a function of decreasing canopy cover and (iii) the effects of grass fine fuel on fire intensity. Grasses invaded approximately 200 m from the edge into the interiors of burned plots (B1yr: 4.31 ha; B3yr: 4.96 ha) but invaded less than 10 m into the unburned plot (0.33 ha). The probability of B. decumbens establishment increased with seed availability and decreased with leaf area index. Fine fuel loads along the forest edge were more than three times higher in grass-dominated areas, which resulted in especially intense fires. Our results indicate that synergies between fires and invasive C4 grasses jeopardize the future of tropical forests. PMID:23610179

  3. Testing the Amazon savannization hypothesis: fire effects on invasion of a neotropical forest by native cerrado and exotic pasture grasses.

    PubMed

    Silvério, Divino V; Brando, Paulo M; Balch, Jennifer K; Putz, Francis E; Nepstad, Daniel C; Oliveira-Santos, Claudinei; Bustamante, Mercedes M C

    2013-06-05

    Changes in climate and land use that interact synergistically to increase fire frequencies and intensities in tropical regions are predicted to drive forests to new grass-dominated stable states. To reveal the mechanisms for such a transition, we established 50 ha plots in a transitional forest in the southwestern Brazilian Amazon to different fire treatments (unburned, burned annually (B1yr) or at 3-year intervals (B3yr)). Over an 8-year period since the commencement of these treatments, we documented: (i) the annual rate of pasture and native grass invasion in response to increasing fire frequency; (ii) the establishment of Brachiaria decumbens (an African C4 grass) as a function of decreasing canopy cover and (iii) the effects of grass fine fuel on fire intensity. Grasses invaded approximately 200 m from the edge into the interiors of burned plots (B1yr: 4.31 ha; B3yr: 4.96 ha) but invaded less than 10 m into the unburned plot (0.33 ha). The probability of B. decumbens establishment increased with seed availability and decreased with leaf area index. Fine fuel loads along the forest edge were more than three times higher in grass-dominated areas, which resulted in especially intense fires. Our results indicate that synergies between fires and invasive C4 grasses jeopardize the future of tropical forests.

  4. Influence of topography on density of grassland passerines in pastures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Renfrew, R.B.; Ribic, C.A.

    2002-01-01

    Pastures provide substantial habitat for grassland birds of management concern in the Driftless Area of southwestern Wisconsin. The rolling topography in this region is characterized by lowland valleys surrounded by relatively steep and often wooded slopes which are set apart from more expansive treeless uplands. We hypothesized that there would be lower densities of area sensitive grassland passerines in lowland grasslands compared to upland grasslands because of their preference for larger more open grasslands. To test this hypothesis and assess how well pasture area and vegetation structure predicted grassland passerine density compared to upland/lowland status, we conducted point counts of birds in 60 pastures in May-June 1997 and 1998. Upland pastures generally supported greater densities of grassland passerines than lowland pastures. Densities of Savannah sparrow (Passerculus sandwichensis) and bobolink (Dolichonyx oryzivorus) were significantly higher in upland pastures than in lowland pastures. Grasshopper sparrow (Ammodramus savannarum) density was significantly higher on uplands in one of the study years. The density of eastern meadowlark (Sturnella magna), western meadowlark (S. neglecta) and sedge wren (Cistothorus platensis) did not differ significandy between uplands and lowlands. Grassland passerine density was also predicted by pasture size and vegetation structure. Densities of bobolink and grasshopper sparrow were higher in larger pastures. Bobolink and Savannah sparrow occurred on pastures with greater vegetation height-density and less bare ground; bobolink also preferred shallower litter depths. Lowland pastures supported grassland bird species of management concern and should not be neglected. However, we recommend that pasture management for grassland passerines in areas of variable topography favor relatively large upland pastures that will contain higher densities of species of management concern.

  5. Insect habitat management in pasture systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, P. B.

    1983-01-01

    Two important habitat management strategies in pasture systems involve controlled burning and effective grazing manipulation schemes to maintain native climax grassland vegetation These climax grasslands have historically suffered less insect pest pressure than imported systems However, these types of grasslands are difficult to reestablish after relatively severe disruption by man Also, the proper diversity and stability is difficult to capture in developing imported systems. Imported pastures can exhibit substantial yields per land unit but are often composed of vegetation that rapidly mines nutrients stored by the native vegetation, and often need considerable inputs of fossil fuel, manufactured fertilizers and pesticides, because they are or become very susceptible to pestiferous insects. Habitat manipulation efforts can be effective in regulating forage pest populations below economic levels in imported pasture systems Such efforts include: 1) land use (coupled with plant diversity, grazing, and harvest manipulations), 2) sanitation (including controlled burning), 3) planting dates and harvest times (including grazing manipulations), 4) tillage methods, 5) fertilization, 6) trap crops, 7) water management, and 8) fire management for insect pest suppression and augmentation of natural enemies.

  6. [Coccidiosis causes diarrhea in calves in the pasture. Pasture coccidiosis caused by Eimeria alabamensis].

    PubMed

    Snoep, J J; Potters, J B

    2004-03-01

    A severe outbreak of diarrhoea in young (age 18-20 month) cattle 14 days after their first turnout is described. In the manure large numbers Eimeria alabamensis oocysts were found. This infection is considered as a case of coccidial diarrhoea in (older) calves at pasture.

  7. Seasonal dynamics of cyathostomin (Nematoda - Cyathostominae) infective larvae in Brachiaria humidicola grass in tropical southeast Brazil.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Claudia N; de Souza, Luciene S; Quinelato, Simone B; do Couto, Melissa C M; Pinheiro, Jairo; Rodrigues, M Lurdes de A

    2011-08-25

    The ecology of cyathostomin larvae was evaluated in different seasons, from July 2007 to June 2008, in the municipality of Seropédica, Rio de Janeiro state, southeastern Brazil. Samples of feces and grass were collected every 15 days at 8 AM and 5 PM and the infective larvae were recovered by the Baermann technique. Leaves of the grass Brachiaria humidicola were cut to 20 cm, which is the length containing most of the larvae. The highest number of larvae was recorded at 8 AM the winter (8300 L(3)kg(-1)dm) and spring (5300 L(3)kg(-1)dm). These results demonstrate that climate conditions can affect the recovery of larvae and that rain and temperature contributed to the migration and survival of the larvae, which were available throughout the year in the study area.

  8. Chromosome numbers and meiotic analysis in the pre-breeding of Brachiaria decumbens (Poaceae).

    PubMed

    Ricci, Gléia Cristina Laverde; De Souza-Kaneshima, Alice Maria; Felismino, Mariana Ferrari; Mendes-Bonato, Andrea Beatriz; Pagliarini, Maria Suely; Do Valle, Cacilda Borges

    2011-08-01

    A total of 44 accessions of Brachiaria decumbens were analysed for chromosome count and meiotic behaviour in order to identify potential progenitors for crosses. Among them, 15 accessions presented 2n = 18; 27 accessions, 2n = 36; and 2 accessions, 2n = 45 chromosomes. Among the diploid accessions, the rate of meiotic abnormalities was low, ranging from 0.82% to 7.93%. In the 27 tetraploid accessions, the rate of meiotic abnormalities ranged from 18.41% to 65.83%. The most common meiotic abnormalities were related to irregular chromosome segregation, but chromosome stickiness and abnormal cytokinesis were observed in low frequency. All abnormalities can compromise pollen viability by generating unbalanced gametes. Based on the chromosome number and meiotic stability, the present study indicates the apomictic tetraploid accessions that can act as male genitor to produce interspecific hybrids with B. ruziziensis or intraspecific hybrids with recently artificially tetraploidized accessions.

  9. Uele River, Cleared Pasture Lands, Zaire, Africa

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1992-05-16

    STS049-91-079 (7 - 16 May 1992) --- This 70mm frame, photographed from the Earth-orbiting Space Shuttle Endeavour, features a dendritic drainage pattern in Zaire. Cleared pasture land shows light green in this color photograph, in contrast to the dark, closed-canopy forest of Zaire. Remnant woodland along minor streams indicates the intricate drainage network of this hilly region. Scattered vegetation-free spots show the deep red, tropical soil of the region. The sediment-laden stream is the Vele River just west of the village of Niangara. A crew member used a 70mm handheld Hasselblad camera with a 250mm lens to record the image.

  10. A Parthenogenesis Gene Candidate and Evidence for Segmental Allopolyploidy in Apomictic Brachiaria decumbens.

    PubMed

    Worthington, Margaret; Heffelfinger, Christopher; Bernal, Diana; Quintero, Constanza; Zapata, Yeny Patricia; Perez, Juan Guillermo; De Vega, Jose; Miles, John; Dellaporta, Stephen; Tohme, Joe

    2016-07-01

    Apomixis, asexual reproduction through seed, enables breeders to identify and faithfully propagate superior heterozygous genotypes by seed without the disadvantages of vegetative propagation or the expense and complexity of hybrid seed production. The availability of new tools such as genotyping by sequencing and bioinformatics pipelines for species lacking reference genomes now makes the construction of dense maps possible in apomictic species, despite complications including polyploidy, multisomic inheritance, self-incompatibility, and high levels of heterozygosity. In this study, we developed saturated linkage maps for the maternal and paternal genomes of an interspecific Brachiaria ruziziensis (R. Germ. and C. M. Evrard) × B. decumbens Stapf. F1 mapping population in order to identify markers linked to apomixis. High-resolution molecular karyotyping and comparative genomics with Setaria italica (L.) P. Beauv provided conclusive evidence for segmental allopolyploidy in B. decumbens, with strong preferential pairing of homologs across the genome and multisomic segregation relatively more common in chromosome 8. The apospory-specific genomic region (ASGR) was mapped to a region of reduced recombination on B. decumbens chromosome 5. The Pennisetum squamulatum (L.) R.Br. PsASGR-BABY BOOM-like (psASGR-BBML)-specific primer pair p779/p780 was in perfect linkage with the ASGR in the F1 mapping population and diagnostic for reproductive mode in a diversity panel of known sexual and apomict Brachiaria (Trin.) Griseb. and P. maximum Jacq. germplasm accessions and cultivars. These findings indicate that ASGR-BBML gene sequences are highly conserved across the Paniceae and add further support for the postulation of the ASGR-BBML as candidate genes for the apomictic function of parthenogenesis. Copyright © 2016 by the Genetics Society of America.

  11. A Parthenogenesis Gene Candidate and Evidence for Segmental Allopolyploidy in Apomictic Brachiaria decumbens

    PubMed Central

    Worthington, Margaret; Heffelfinger, Christopher; Bernal, Diana; Quintero, Constanza; Zapata, Yeny Patricia; Perez, Juan Guillermo; De Vega, Jose; Miles, John; Dellaporta, Stephen; Tohme, Joe

    2016-01-01

    Apomixis, asexual reproduction through seed, enables breeders to identify and faithfully propagate superior heterozygous genotypes by seed without the disadvantages of vegetative propagation or the expense and complexity of hybrid seed production. The availability of new tools such as genotyping by sequencing and bioinformatics pipelines for species lacking reference genomes now makes the construction of dense maps possible in apomictic species, despite complications including polyploidy, multisomic inheritance, self-incompatibility, and high levels of heterozygosity. In this study, we developed saturated linkage maps for the maternal and paternal genomes of an interspecific Brachiaria ruziziensis (R. Germ. and C. M. Evrard) × B. decumbens Stapf. F1 mapping population in order to identify markers linked to apomixis. High-resolution molecular karyotyping and comparative genomics with Setaria italica (L.) P. Beauv provided conclusive evidence for segmental allopolyploidy in B. decumbens, with strong preferential pairing of homologs across the genome and multisomic segregation relatively more common in chromosome 8. The apospory-specific genomic region (ASGR) was mapped to a region of reduced recombination on B. decumbens chromosome 5. The Pennisetum squamulatum (L.) R.Br. PsASGR-BABY BOOM-like (psASGR–BBML)-specific primer pair p779/p780 was in perfect linkage with the ASGR in the F1 mapping population and diagnostic for reproductive mode in a diversity panel of known sexual and apomict Brachiaria (Trin.) Griseb. and P. maximum Jacq. germplasm accessions and cultivars. These findings indicate that ASGR–BBML gene sequences are highly conserved across the Paniceae and add further support for the postulation of the ASGR–BBML as candidate genes for the apomictic function of parthenogenesis. PMID:27206716

  12. Influence of transient flooding on methane fluxes from subtropical pastures

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Seasonally flooded subtropical pastures are major methane (CH4) sources, where transient flooding drives episodic and high-magnitude emissions from the underlying landscape. Understanding the mechanisms that drive these patterns is needed to better understand pasture CH4 emissions and their response...

  13. Pasture growth and decomposition under continuous and rotational grazing

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Past research has shown that grazing management can affect both pasture growth and litter decomposition. The objective of this study was to compare forage appearance (growth) and forage disappearance (decomposition) on both continuous and rotational grazed beef cattle pasture in Ohio. Data was colle...

  14. Effluent polishing via pasture irrigation in Harare, Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Nhapi, I; Mawere, M; Veenstra, S; Gijzen, H J

    2002-01-01

    Harare, the capital city of Zimbabwe, is experiencing eutrophication-related problems in its downstream potable water supply source of Lake Chivero. This is due mainly to poorly treated sewage effluent encroachment into upstream rivers, especially Marimba River. Crowborough Pasture Irrigation farm is in the Marimba sub-catchment area and has 305 hectares of irrigated pastures. Studies started from July 2000 to August 2001 focusing on the pasture's management of nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus) and their impact on Marimba River. Water and nutrient balances were developed. Reduction efficiencies for this pasture were found to be 84% for TN and 54% for TP. Both the Crowborough sewage treatment works and the pastures are overloaded. It was therefore concluded that the current system is no longer sustainable economically and environmentally. From the results of our study we recommend that additional treatment units be constructed at Crowborough sewage treatment works to meet current flows. Moreover, pasture management needs substantial improvement. Nutrient recovery should be enhanced by regular harvesting of pasture grass and converting cow dung into an economic commodity as manure for neighbouring residents. Maize cultivation is also recommended to replace pasture grass as it is a local staple crop and has high nutrient uptake rates.

  15. 2. Overall view of the horse pasture store from the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Overall view of the horse pasture store from the east; U.S. Highway 58 runs from left to right across the view, while Route 687 rices into the distance at the left - Horsepasture Store, U.S. Route 58 & State Route 687, Horse Pasture, Henry County, VA

  16. 5. East and north (rear) elevations of the horse pasture ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. East and north (rear) elevations of the horse pasture store, looking southwest; the store's two outbuildings can ben seen at the right of the view - Horsepasture Store, U.S. Route 58 & State Route 687, Horse Pasture, Henry County, VA

  17. 4. West and south elevations of the horse pasture store, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. West and south elevations of the horse pasture store, looking northeast; a "Greenhouse" structure can be seen extending to the west of the store at the left of the view - Horsepasture Store, U.S. Route 58 & State Route 687, Horse Pasture, Henry County, VA

  18. Productivity, botanical composition, and nutritive value of commercial pasture mixtures

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pastures in the northeastern USA often are planted to mixtures of grasses and legumes. There is limited public sector information on the performance of commercial forage mixtures. We evaluated a range of commercial pasture mixtures to determine if the number of species in a mixture affected yield an...

  19. Pasture Condition Score Indicators: Controls on Plant and Forage Diversity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The USDA-NRCS Pasture Condition Score (PCS) system was developed for evaluating pastures and making management recommendations. Four of the ten rating criteria relate to plant species diversity and composition: percent desirable plants, plant cover, plant diversity, and percent legume. Baseline data...

  20. Calving distributions of individual bulls in multiple-sire pastures

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this project was to quantify patterns in the calving rate of sires in multiple-sire pastures over seven years at a large-scale cow-calf operation. Data consisted of reproductive and genomic records from multiple-sire breeding pastures (n=33) at the United States Meat Animal Research...

  1. Development and validation of microsatellite markers for Brachiaria ruziziensis obtained by partial genome assembly of Illumina single-end reads

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Brachiaria ruziziensis is one of the most important forage species planted in the tropics. The application of genomic tools to aid the selection of superior genotypes can provide support to B. ruziziensis breeding programs. However, there is a complete lack of information about the B. ruziziensis genome. Also, the availability of genomic tools, such as molecular markers, to support B. ruziziensis breeding programs is rather limited. Recently, next-generation sequencing technologies have been applied to generate sequence data for the identification of microsatellite regions and primer design. In this study, we present a first validated set of SSR markers for Brachiaria ruziziensis, selected from a de novo partial genome assembly of single-end Illumina reads. Results A total of 85,567 perfect microsatellite loci were detected in contigs with a minimum 10X coverage. We selected a set of 500 microsatellite loci identified in contigs with minimum 100X coverage for primer design and synthesis, and tested a subset of 269 primer pairs, 198 of which were polymorphic on 11 representative B. ruziziensis accessions. Descriptive statistics for these primer pairs are presented, as well as estimates of marker transferability to other relevant brachiaria species. Finally, a set of 11 multiplex panels containing the 30 most informative markers was validated and proposed for B. ruziziensis genetic analysis. Conclusions We show that the detection and development of microsatellite markers from genome assembled Illumina single-end DNA sequences is highly efficient. The developed markers are readily suitable for genetic analysis and marker assisted selection of Brachiaria ruziziensis. The use of this approach for microsatellite marker development is promising for species with limited genomic information, whose breeding programs would benefit from the use of genomic tools. To our knowledge, this is the first set of microsatellite markers developed for this important species

  2. Crop and pasture response to climate change.

    PubMed

    Tubiello, Francesco N; Soussana, Jean-François; Howden, S Mark

    2007-12-11

    We review recent research of importance to understanding crop and pasture plant species response to climate change. Topics include plant response to elevated CO(2) concentration, interactions with climate change variables and air pollutants, impacts of increased climate variability and frequency of extreme events, the role of weeds and pests, disease and animal health, issues in biodiversity, and vulnerability of soil carbon pools. We critically analyze the links between fundamental knowledge at the plant and plot level and the additional socio-economic variables that determine actual production and trade of food at regional to global scales. We conclude by making recommendations for current and future research needs, with a focus on continued and improved integration of experimental and modeling efforts.

  3. Crop and pasture response to climate change

    PubMed Central

    Tubiello, Francesco N.; Soussana, Jean-François; Howden, S. Mark

    2007-01-01

    We review recent research of importance to understanding crop and pasture plant species response to climate change. Topics include plant response to elevated CO2 concentration, interactions with climate change variables and air pollutants, impacts of increased climate variability and frequency of extreme events, the role of weeds and pests, disease and animal health, issues in biodiversity, and vulnerability of soil carbon pools. We critically analyze the links between fundamental knowledge at the plant and plot level and the additional socio-economic variables that determine actual production and trade of food at regional to global scales. We conclude by making recommendations for current and future research needs, with a focus on continued and improved integration of experimental and modeling efforts. PMID:18077401

  4. Biodiversity on Swedish pastures: estimating biodiversity production costs.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Fredrik Olof Laurentius

    2009-01-01

    This paper estimates the costs of producing biological diversity on Swedish permanent grasslands. A simple model is introduced where biodiversity on pastures is produced using grazing animals. On the pastures, the grazing animals create a sufficient grazing pressure to lead to an environment that suits many rare and red-listed species. Two types of pastures are investigated: semi-natural and cultivated. Biological diversity produced on a pasture is estimated by combining a biodiversity indicator, which measures the quality of the land, with the size of the pasture. Biodiversity is, in this context, a quantitative measure where a given quantity can be produced either by small area with high quality or a larger area with lower quality. Two areas in different parts of Sweden are investigated. Box-Cox transformations, which provide flexible functional forms, are used in the empirical analysis and the results indicate that the biodiversity production costs differ between the regions. The major contribution of this paper is that it develops and tests a method of estimating biodiversity production costs on permanent pastures when biodiversity quality differs between pastures. If the method were to be used with cost data, that were more thoroughly collected and covered additional production areas, biodiversity cost functions could be estimated and used in applied policy work.

  5. Spectrometry of Pasture Condition and Biogeochemistry in the Central Amazon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asner, Gregory P.; Townsend, Alan R.; Bustamante, Mercedes M. C.

    1999-01-01

    Regional analyses of Amazon cattle pasture biogeochemistry are difficult due to the complexity of human, edaphic, biotic and climatic factors and persistent cloud cover in satellite observations. We developed a method to estimate key biophysical properties of Amazon pastures using hyperspectral reflectance data and photon transport inverse modeling. Remote estimates of live and senescent biomass were strongly correlated with plant-available forms of soil phosphorus and calcium. These results provide a basis for monitoring pasture condition and biogeochemistry in the Amazon Basin using spaceborne hyperspectral sensors.

  6. Spectrometry of Pasture Condition and Biogeochemistry in the Central Amazon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asner, Gregory P.; Townsend, Alan R.; Bustamante, Mercedes M. C.

    1999-01-01

    Regional analyses of Amazon cattle pasture biogeochemistry are difficult due to the complexity of human, edaphic, biotic and climatic factors and persistent cloud cover in satellite observations. We developed a method to estimate key biophysical properties of Amazon pastures using hyperspectral reflectance data and photon transport inverse modeling. Remote estimates of live and senescent biomass were strongly correlated with plant-available forms of soil phosphorus and calcium. These results provide a basis for monitoring pasture condition and biogeochemistry in the Amazon Basin using spaceborne hyperspectral sensors.

  7. [Hyperspectral Remote Sensing Estimation Models for Pasture Quality].

    PubMed

    Ma, Wei-wei; Gong, Cai-lan; Hu, Yong; Wei, Yong-lin; Li, Long; Liu, Feng-yi; Meng, Peng

    2015-10-01

    Crude protein (CP), crude fat (CFA) and crude fiber (CFI) are key indicators for evaluation of the quality and feeding value of pasture. Hence, identification of these biological contents is an essential practice for animal husbandry. As current approaches to pasture quality estimation are time-consuming and costly, and even generate hazardous waste, a real-time and non-destructive method is therefore developed in this study using pasture canopy hyperspectral data. A field campaign was carried out in August 2013 around Qinghai Lake in order to obtain field spectral properties of 19 types of natural pasture using the ASD Field Spec 3, a field spectrometer that works in the optical region (350-2 500 nm) of the electromagnetic spectrum. In additional to the spectral data, pasture samples were also collected from the field and examined in laboratory to measure the relative concentration of CP (%), CFA (%) and CFI (%). After spectral denoising and smoothing, the relationship of pasture quality parameters with the reflectance spectrum, the first derivatives of reflectance (FDR), band ratio and the wavelet coefficients (WCs) was analyzed respectively. The concentration of CP, CFA and CFI of pasture was found closely correlated with FDR with wavebands centered at 424, 1 668, and 918 nm as well as with the low-scale (scale = 2, 4) Morlet, Coiflets and Gassian WCs. Accordingly, the linear, exponential, and polynomial equations between each pasture variable and FDR or WCs were developed. Validation of the developed equations indicated that the polynomial model with an independent variable of Coiflets WCs (scale = 4, wavelength =1 209 nm), the polynomial model with an independent variable of FDR, and the exponential model with an independent variable of FDR were the optimal model for prediction of concentration of CP, CFA and CFI of pasture, respectively. The R2 of the pasture quality estimation models was between 0.646 and 0.762 at the 0.01 significance level. Results suggest

  8. Production potential of warm-season annual pastures in rotation with corn silage

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Warm-season grasses can provide a pasture resource and give relief to cool-season pastures during the hot summer months when cool-season pasture production declines. Increased pasture availability is especially important for organic producers because of the newly defined grazing requirement for org...

  9. Greenhouse gas emission from cattle urine deposition in pasture under tropical conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancebo Mazzetto, Andre; Simões Barneze, Arlete; Josefine Feigl, Brigitte; Clemente Cerri, Carlos; Willem van Groenigen, Jan

    2014-05-01

    Animal production systems are important sources of greenhouse gases (GHG), especially methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O). Brazilian beef production is almost exclusively (more than 90%) pasture-based, and most GHG emissions from this system originate from urine patches. GHG emissions from urine patches have been extensively studied in temperate climates, but not for tropical conditions. Here we examined the driving factors of N2O emission from urine patches (U treatment) in the tropics, as well as the role of the nitrification inhibitor DCD (dicyandiamide - U+DCD treatment) in mitigating emissions. We measured the emission of CH4 and N2O from beef cattle urine (360 kg N ha-1) in Rondônia state (Brazil, tropical climate), during two different seasons (winter and summer), with and without the application of DCD (10 kg ha-1). We hypothesized that the high temperature and periodical rainfall can decrease GHG emissions from urine patches through accelerating mineralization of urine-N. The cumulative emissions during winter were 10.8 and 39.2 mg N-N2O m-2 (U and U+DCD treatment, respectively), and 126.2 and 129.5 mg N-N2O m-2 during summer (U and U+DCD treatment, respectively). No effects of DCD were detected in summer, but DCD retarded the main peak of N2O emission. Otherwise, during winter U+DCD treatment had the higher cumulative N2O emission (p≤0.05). The emission factors determined were 0.08 and 0.13% (winter U and U+DCD, respectively) and 0.38 and 0.37% (summer U and U+DCD, respectively), significantly lower than the IPCC default value of 1%. We hypothesize that biological nitrification inhibition (BNI) is the main reason for such low emission factors, since Brachiaria grasses naturally inhibits the nitrification process. In this situation the use of DCD is not recommended. The fast decomposition of DCD in warmer climates leads to a short-term effect in nitrification inhibition. The excess of N due to DCD decomposition can trigger a priming-effect, increasing

  10. Inclusion of Tithonia diversifolia in multinutrient blocks for WestAfrican dwarf goats fed Brachiaria straw.

    PubMed

    Tendonkeng, Fernand; Fogang Zogang, Bienvenu; Sawa, Camara; Boukila, Benoît; Pamo, Etienne Tedonkeng

    2014-08-01

    Recent investigations suggest that the development of multinutrient feed blocks with inclusion of tree and shrub leaves could improve the nutritive value and digestibility of straw. In order to test these possibilities, three types of multinutrient blocks (MNB) namely: MNB0 (wheat bran = 100%; Tithonia diversifolia leaf = 0%), MNB50 (wheat bran = 50%; T. diversifolia leaf = 50%) and MNB100 (wheat bran = 0%; T. diversifolia leaf = 100%) were fed for 15 days in a 3 × 3 Latin square arrangement to West African dwarf goats consuming Brachiaria ruziziensis straw. The blocks presented a good cohesion and a good hardness. The inclusion of T. diversifolia improved levels of crude protein, mineral, feed unit for milk production (UFL) and feed unit for meat production (UFV), but decreased palatability. The effects on the digestibility of B. ruziziensis straw were evaluated in nine West African dwarf goats fed individually with MNB0 + straw, MNB50 + straw and MNB100 + straw. The dry matter, organic matter and crude fibre digestibility of B. ruziziensis straw increased slightly with increasing level of inclusion of T. diversifolia. The apparent digestibility of nitrogen was comparable for all diets independent of the level of inclusion of T. diversifolia. This study showed that the inclusion of T. diversifolia leaves in the MNBs can be recommended to improve the feeding of goats during periods of drought.

  11. Cyathostomin larvae: presence on Brachiaria humidicola grass during the rainy and dry seasons of Brazil.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Claudia Navarro; de Souza, Luciene Soares; Vieira, Vivian Suane de Freitas; Pinheiro, Jairo; Rodrigues, Maria de Lurdes de Azevedo

    2012-01-01

    The presence of cyathostomin larvae is directly associated to climatic conditions of each region. This study aimed to evaluate the ecology of infective larvae on Brachiaria humidicola during the dry and rainy seasons from October 2007 to September 2008 in a tropical region, Rio de Janeiro state, southeastern Brazil. Stools were collected from the rectum of horses naturally infected with cyathostomins at the beginning of the rainy season (October to March) and dry season (April to September). They were divided into four samples of 500 g and deposited on a grass patch of B. humidicola. Seven days later and every 15 days thereafter samples of feces and grass were collected and processed by the Baermann technique. The mean number of larvae recovered from the grass varied according to the season, with greater recovery of larvae during the peak of the dry season (14,700 L3.kg-¹ DM). There was a statistically significant difference between L3 recovered from feces and grass, but not between L3 recovered from the grass base and apex. These results show that the region's climate favors the development and survival of infective cyathostomin larvae throughout the year, with a greater number of larvae during the dry season.

  12. Effect of creep-fed supplement on the susceptibility of pasture-grazed suckling lambs to gastrointestinal helminths.

    PubMed

    de Melo, Gleice Kelli Ayardes; Ítavo, Camila Celeste Brandão Ferreira; Monteiro, Kedma Leonora Silva; da Silva, Jonilson Araújo; da Silva, Pâmila Carolini Gonçalves; Ítavo, Luís Carlos Vinhas; Borges, Dyego Gonçalves Lino; de Almeida Borges, Fernando

    2017-05-30

    This study evaluated the effect of creep feeding a protein supplement on the susceptibility of suckling lambs to infection with gastrointestinal helminths. Male and female lambs were grazed on Brachiaria spp. pastures next to their mothers. Animals were allocated to one of two treatments: creep feeding (261g/d) and control (no supplementation). The trial period was the suckling of lambs during two years of study: May-October 2013 and March-July 2014. Supplementary creep feeding of lambs improved animal performance (P<0.05). Creep-fed lambs reached 18kg body weight in 64 d, but unsupplemented lambs required 77 d to reach the same weight. Lambs were susceptible to helminth infection during lactation; lambs in both treatments had high fecal egg counts (FECs), with means >1000 eggs per gram, as early as 45days of age, when the daily grazing time per animal increased. Creep feeding reduced the FECs of suckling lambs >60days of age in infections dominated by Haemonchus contortus. Totals of 20 and 48 anthelmintic treatments were administered to the supplemented and unsupplemented animals, respectively. The effect of this variable, however, was significant (P<0.05) only after 60days, when nine and 28 treatments had been administered to the supplemented and unsupplemented lambs, respectively. The number of strongyloid larvae recovered from the paddock did not differ significantly (P >0.05) between the two treatments, indicating similar challenges by infective larvae to both groups. The supplementation of lambs by creep feeding can thus be a strategy for the sustainable control of helminth infection, because it reduces the dependence on anthelmintic treatment. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Pasture-scale measurement of methane emissions of grazing cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Quantifying methane emission of cattle grazing on southern Great Plains pastures using micrometeorology presents several challenges. Cattle are elevated, mobile point sources of methane, so that knowing their location in relation to atmospheric methane concentration measurements becomes critical. St...

  14. VIEW OF RIDING STABLE AND PASTURE FROM ENTRANCE ROAD, PART ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF RIDING STABLE AND PASTURE FROM ENTRANCE ROAD, PART TWO OF PANORAMA, FACING NORTHEAST - Overhills, Fort Bragg Military Reservation, Approximately 15 miles NW of Fayetteville, Overhills, Harnett County, NC

  15. 1. Distant view, showing bridge in context with agricultural (pastures ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Distant view, showing bridge in context with agricultural (pastures and cornfields) setting; looking southeast. - Eureka Bridge, Spanning Yellow River (Moved to City Park, Castalia), Frankville, Winneshiek County, IA

  16. Energy content of tropical grasses and legumes grown for bioenergy

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Biomass samples of the tropical grasses Brachiaria brizantha (Hochst. ex A. Rich.) Staph, Brachiaria humidicola (Rendle) Schweick, Brachiaria decumbens Staph, Panicum maximum Jacq., Pennistetum alopecuroides (L.) Spreng and three species of the tropical legume Stylosanthes grown in Mato Grosso do Su...

  17. Determination of pasture quality using airborne hyperspectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pullanagari, R. R.; Kereszturi, G.; Yule, Ian J.; Irwin, M. E.

    2015-10-01

    Pasture quality is a critical determinant which influences animal performance (live weight gain, milk and meat production) and animal health. Assessment of pasture quality is therefore required to assist farmers with grazing planning and management, benchmarking between seasons and years. Traditionally, pasture quality is determined by field sampling which is laborious, expensive and time consuming, and the information is not available in real-time. Hyperspectral remote sensing has potential to accurately quantify biochemical composition of pasture over wide areas in great spatial detail. In this study an airborne imaging spectrometer (AisaFENIX, Specim) was used with a spectral range of 380-2500 nm with 448 spectral bands. A case study of a 600 ha hill country farm in New Zealand is used to illustrate the use of the system. Radiometric and atmospheric corrections, along with automatized georectification of the imagery using Digital Elevation Model (DEM), were applied to the raw images to convert into geocoded reflectance images. Then a multivariate statistical method, partial least squares (PLS), was applied to estimate pasture quality such as crude protein (CP) and metabolisable energy (ME) from canopy reflectance. The results from this study revealed that estimates of CP and ME had a R2 of 0.77 and 0.79, and RMSECV of 2.97 and 0.81 respectively. By utilizing these regression models, spatial maps were created over the imaged area. These pasture quality maps can be used for adopting precision agriculture practices which improves farm profitability and environmental sustainability.

  18. Spatiotemporal moisture dynamics in a prairie pasture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Amber; Ireson, Andrew; Helgason, Warren

    2016-04-01

    For most practical applications, soil moisture estimates are needed at field scale, integrated over the root zone. We present here results from a field study in a pasture site in Saskatchewan, Canada. We combine observations of point scale soil moisture content from an array of neutron probes with continuous, field scale, shallow soil moisture content observations from the COSMOS instrument. The neutron probe data provide insights into the spatial variability of soil moisture processes, which is highly significant at this site. In particular, we find that the field comprises non-participating profiles, where infiltration, change in storage and drainage are minimal, and dynamic profiles, where these processes are highly dynamic. This strongly affects the relationship between the spatial mean vs standard deviation of moisture content, with important implications for upscaling of point scale observations to field scale. The COSMOS performs well, but only captures changes in water content to a depth of around 20 cm, meaning that upscaling with depth is required to produce a field scale, root zone integrated estimation of soil moisture content. We compare three upscaling approaches.

  19. CO2 balance of an intensively grazed temperate pasture during pasture renewal via cultivation or direct drilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutledge, Susanna; Mudge, Paul; Wall, Aaron; Campbell, Dave; Schipper, Louis

    2015-04-01

    The management practice of pasture renewal (PR, also referred to as 'restoration') of permanent pastures offers the opportunity to replace low producing pasture, remove weeds and pests, improve drainage, and introduce improved pasture varieties, thereby increasing pasture production. PR can consist of a range of practices including spraying existing pasture with herbicide, followed by direct drilling or full cultivation (ploughing). Although PR is common in some farming systems, little is known about the impact of PR of permanent pastures on soil C and CO2 dynamics. Here we report on the CO2 balance following four PR events of intensively grazed permanent pastures in temperate New Zealand. Three events of PR followed the same method which included two herbicide sprays and a full cultivation (CULT). PR events took place in either spring or autumn, which meant soil moisture conditions varied greatly between PR events. For the fourth PR event, pasture was sprayed only once, and was not cultivated but instead seeds were directly drilled (DD) into the sprayed-off pasture. Chambers and the eddy covariance technique were used to measure the CO2 exchange before, during and after PR. In addition to the direct loss of CO2 measured during the PR events, we also quantified the 'net impact of PR' which we defined as the difference between net CO2 exchange of the pasture that underwent PR and that of an undisturbed pasture which served as a control. This way, we also accounted for the temporary lack of photosynthetic carbon inputs when plants were absent during the PR events. Both the rate of direct CO2 respiratory losses and the 'net impact of PR' appeared highly dependent on soil moisture status, with the lowest rate of loss measured under severe drought conditions and the highest rate of loss measured in spring when ample moisture was present. Because the rate of CO2 loss did not decrease over time during PR, the longer the soil was bare, the more CO2 was lost. The duration

  20. Winter-annual pasture as a supplement for beef cows.

    PubMed

    Gunter, S A; Cassida, K A; Beck, P A; Phillips, J M

    2002-05-01

    In each of two experiments, 120 pregnant beef cows were stratified by body condition score, BW, breed, and age, randomly divided into six groups of 20, and assigned to one of six 5.1-ha bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon [L.] Pers.) pastures (two replicates/ treatment) in early January to evaluate the use of winter-annual pasture as a supplement. All cows in Exp. 1 and 2 had ad libitum access to bermudagrass/dallisgrass (Paspalum dilatatum Poir.) hay plus three treatments: 1) a concentrate-based supplement fed 3 d/wk, 2) limit grazing on winter-annual pasture 2 d/wk (7 hr/ d; 0.04 ha x cow(-1) x grazing d(-1)), or 3) limit grazing on winter-annual pasture 3 d/wk (7 hr/d; 0.04 ha x cow(-1) x grazing d(-1)) sod-seeded into a portion of the pasture until mid-May. The seeded portion of pastures in Exp. 1 was planted with a mixture of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and rye (Secale cereale L.), but annual ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam.) was added to the seed mixture in Exp. 2. In mid-May, cows were blocked by treatment and the previous sorting factors, randomly assigned to six new groups of 20, and placed on the six perennial pastures until calves were weaned. Groups of cows were exposed to a bull for 60 d beginning in mid-May. In Exp. 1 and 2, limit-grazing winter-annual pasture compared to the concentrate-based supplement or limit grazing 2 vs 3 d/wk did not affect (P > 0.15) cow BW. In Exp. 1, cows limit grazed on winter-annual pasture had a lower (P = 0.05) body condition score than cows fed the concentrate-based supplement in the early spring. However, in Exp. 2, cows limit grazed on winter-annual pasture had higher (P < or = 0.07) body condition score than cows fed the concentrate-based supplement. The conception rate of cows in Exp. 1 and 2 did not differ (P > 0.22) between cows fed concentrate-based supplements and cows limit grazed on winter-annual pasture. In Exp. 2, cows limit grazed 2 d/wk tended to have a greater (P = 0.10) conception rate than cows limit

  1. Comparison of the structural stability of pasture and cultivated soils.

    PubMed

    Barral, María Teresa; Buján, Eva; Devesa, Rosa; Iglesias, María Luz; Velasco-Molina, Marta

    2007-05-25

    The structural properties of two neighbouring soils from the NW of Spain were evaluated in order to elucidate the effect of management on the soil structural quality and soil organic carbon turnover. The two soils were developed on granite under a warm and humid climate, but differed in land use (pasture and cultivation). The pasture soil had more favourable structural properties than the cultivated soil, showing lower bulk density, higher porosity and water retention. Also, the pasture soil showed a higher mean aggregate diameter and aggregate stability against mechanical agitation in water, as well as lower soil loss under simulated rainfall. This increased structural stability of the pasture soil could be attributed to its higher soil organic matter (SOM) content. The effect of soil use and aggregate size on SOM mineralization was also investigated. Laboratory incubation experiments were conducted with 1-5 mm aggregates and disaggregated <1 mm soil. More C-CO(2) was released by SOM mineralization in the pasture soil than in the cultivated soil, thus indicating a higher microbial activity in the pasture soil. The respiratory quotient (C-CO(2)/Corg) was also higher in the pasture soil, which means that SOM in this soil is more accessible to microbial decomposition. Nevertheless no significant differences were observed between organic C mineralization in the disaggregated <1 mm soil and the undisturbed 5-1 mm aggregates. The overall results demonstrate the need to maintain adequate levels of OM by adding organic amendments or adopting lower impact cultivation practices such as reduced tillage.

  2. Improvement of natural pastures using liquid organic fertilizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghambashidze, Giorgi; Gabedava, Giorgi; Abuladze, Paata

    2016-04-01

    Nowadays natural pastures remains the main source to supply livestock with fresh feed material in Georgia. Due to that common pasturelands are under continues grazing pressure and normally no measures are taken in order to improve pasture productivity and to protect soil from erosion. Unregulated stocking rate leads to overutilization of natural pastures causing reduction in productivity and soil fertility. It is especially evident in arid regions, where bare soil after removal of vegetation dries out and is subject to wind erosion. In many areas even with regulated stocking rate plant available soil nutrient pool is already diminished and vegetation cannot be recovered easily after grazing. Therefore it is essential to improve soil fertility, which provide adequate amount of nutrients to plants to regenerate. Ongoing study aims to compare effect of different types of organic fertilizers on natural pastures in combination with pasture rotation scheme in order to maintain soil fertility and prepare the basis for its gradual improvement. Initial results shows positive impact of liquid organic fertilizers which increased aboveground biomass production by 200-300 kg per hectare.

  3. Performance of lactating dairy cows fed varying levels of total mixed ration and pasture.

    PubMed

    Vibart, Ronaldo E; Fellner, Vivek; Burns, Joseph C; Huntington, Gerald B; Green, James T

    2008-11-01

    Two, 8-week experiments, each using 30 lactating Holstein cows, were conducted to examine performance of animals offered combinations of total mixed ration (TMR) and high-quality pasture. Experiment 1 was initiated in mid October 2004 and Experiment 2 was initiated in late March 2005. Cows were assigned to either a 100% TMR diet (100:00, no access to pasture) or one of the following three formulated partial mixed rations (PMR) targeted at (1) 85% TMR and 15% pasture, (2) 70% TMR and 30% pasture and (3) 55% TMR and 45% pasture. Based on actual TMR and pasture intake, the dietary TMR and pasture proportions of the three PMR in Experiment 1 were 79% TMR and 21% pasture (79:21), 68% TMR and 32% pasture (68:32), and 59% TMR and 41% pasture (59:41), respectively. Corresponding proportions in Experiment 2 were 89% TMR and 11% pasture (89:11), 79% TMR and 21% pasture (79:21) and 65% TMR and 35% pasture (65:35), respectively. Reducing the proportion of TMR in the diets increased pasture consumption of cows on all PMR, but reduced total dry matter intake compared with cows on 100:00. An increase in forage from pasture increased the concentration of conjugated linoleic acids and decreased the concentration of saturated fatty acids in milk. Although milk and milk protein yields from cows grazing spring pastures (Experiment 2) increased with increasing intakes of TMR, a partial mixed ration that was composed of 41% pasture grazed in the fall (Experiment 1) resulted in a similar overall lactation performance with increased feed efficiency compared to an all-TMR ration.

  4. A new method for designing degenerate primers and its use in the identification of sequences in Brachiaria showing similarity to apomixis-associated genes.

    PubMed

    Gorrón, Eduardo; Rodríguez, Fausto; Bernal, Diana; Rodriguez-Rojas, Luis Miguel; Bernal, Adriana; Restrepo, Silvia; Tohme, Joe

    2010-08-15

    We developed a technique and a tool for degenerate primer design based on multiple local alignments employing the MEME algorithm supported with electronic PCR. The objective is to find adequate primers starting from sequences with poor global similarity. We show an example of its application in our laboratory to find sequences in Brachiaria with similarity to ESTs related to apomixis.

  5. Greener Pastures in Northern Queensland, Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    After a 19 month rainfall deficiency, heavy rainfall during January 2004 brought drought relief to much of northern Queensland. Local graziers hope for good long-term responses in pasture growth from the heavy rains. These images and maps from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) portray part of Australia's Mitchell Grasslands bioregion before summer rainfall, on October 18, 2003 (left) and afterwards, on February 7, 2004 (right).

    The top pair of images are natural color views from MISR's nadir camera. The green areas in the post-rainfall image highlight the growth of vegetation. The middle panels show the reflectivity of the surface over the photosynthetically active region (PAR) of visible light (400 - 700 nm), expressed as a directional-hemispherical reflectance (DHR-PAR), or albedo. That portion of the radiation that is not reflected back to the atmosphere or space is absorbed by either the vegetation or the soil. The fraction of PAR radiation absorbed by green vegetation, known as FPAR, is shown in the bottom panels. FPAR is one of the quantities that establishes the photosynthetic and carbon uptake efficiency of live vegetation. MISR's FPAR product makes use of aerosol retrievals to correct for atmospheric scattering and absorption effects, and uses plant canopy structural models to determine the partitioning of solar radiation. Both of these aspects are facilitated by the multiangular nature of the MISR measurements.

    The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer observes the daylit Earth continuously and every 9 days views the entire globe between 82 degrees north and 82 degrees south latitude. These data products were generated from a portion of the imagery acquired during Terra orbits 20397 and 22028. The panels cover an area of about 290 kilometers x 228 kilometers, and utilize data from blocks 106 to 108 within World Reference System-2 path 96.

    MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA

  6. Greener Pastures in Northern Queensland, Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    After a 19 month rainfall deficiency, heavy rainfall during January 2004 brought drought relief to much of northern Queensland. Local graziers hope for good long-term responses in pasture growth from the heavy rains. These images and maps from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) portray part of Australia's Mitchell Grasslands bioregion before summer rainfall, on October 18, 2003 (left) and afterwards, on February 7, 2004 (right).

    The top pair of images are natural color views from MISR's nadir camera. The green areas in the post-rainfall image highlight the growth of vegetation. The middle panels show the reflectivity of the surface over the photosynthetically active region (PAR) of visible light (400 - 700 nm), expressed as a directional-hemispherical reflectance (DHR-PAR), or albedo. That portion of the radiation that is not reflected back to the atmosphere or space is absorbed by either the vegetation or the soil. The fraction of PAR radiation absorbed by green vegetation, known as FPAR, is shown in the bottom panels. FPAR is one of the quantities that establishes the photosynthetic and carbon uptake efficiency of live vegetation. MISR's FPAR product makes use of aerosol retrievals to correct for atmospheric scattering and absorption effects, and uses plant canopy structural models to determine the partitioning of solar radiation. Both of these aspects are facilitated by the multiangular nature of the MISR measurements.

    The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer observes the daylit Earth continuously and every 9 days views the entire globe between 82 degrees north and 82 degrees south latitude. These data products were generated from a portion of the imagery acquired during Terra orbits 20397 and 22028. The panels cover an area of about 290 kilometers x 228 kilometers, and utilize data from blocks 106 to 108 within World Reference System-2 path 96.

    MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA

  7. Dryland pasture and crop conditions as seen by HCMM. [Oklahoma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenthal, W. D. (Principal Investigator); Harlan, J. C.; Blanchard, B. J.

    1978-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The soil moisture difference between the flight lines was partly due to water-holding capacity differences of the two soil types. Fields along the east flight line were in clay; while along the west flight line, the soil was sandy loam which holds less moisture. Due to differences in the amount of green material, the pastures were wetter than the wheat fields. Most of the pastures average from 40-80% green material, while wheat averages from 90-100% green material. A large amount of green material transpired more water and depleted the soil water content faster than dead vegetation. Visicorder data found temperature differences between the rangeland and winter wheat fields. Pasture had a larger percentage of dead material with different thermal properties than live vegetation, and surface temperature was primarily dependent on insolation. Dead material transpired less, but warms up faster than wheat fields.

  8. Rhombencephalitis caused by Listeria monocytogenes in a pastured bull.

    PubMed

    Matto, Carolina; Varela, Gustavo; Mota, María Inés; Gianneechini, Ruben; Rivero, Rodolfo

    2017-03-01

    A pastured 2-y-old cross-breed bull developed brainstem encephalitis (rhombencephalitis); Listeria monocytogenes was isolated from the brain. In the brainstem, there was perivascular cuffing, multiple microabscesses, and positive immunostaining for L. monocytogenes. Samples of bovine feces, water, feedstuffs, milking parlor soil, and bulk tank milk were collected from the dairy farm. Seven isolates of the genus Listeria were obtained, 6 of L. innocua and 1 of L. monocytogenes, which was found in the pasture where the bull grazed. Both isolates belonged to serotype 4b and were positive for internalins A, C, and J. According to the DNA fragment patterns of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, the isolates were closely related. The source of infection was the pasture, implying that listeriosis should not be discounted in cases with compatible clinical signs but the absence of silage feeding.

  9. Emissions of volatile organic compounds (primarily oxygenated species) from pasture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirstine, Wayne; Galbally, Ian; Ye, Yuerong; Hooper, Martin

    1998-05-01

    The volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from pasture at a site in southeastern Victoria, Australia, were monitored over a 2 year period using a static chamber technique. Fluxes up to 23,000 μg(C) m-2 h-1 were detected, with the higher fluxes originating from clover rather than from grass species. Gas Chromatographic analyses indicated that emissions from both grass and clover were high in oxygenated hydrocarbons including methanol, ethanol, propanone, butanone, and ethanal, and extremely low in isoprene and monoterpenes. In the case of clover, butanone made up 45-50% of the total emissions. When grass and clover were freshly mown, there were significantly enhanced emissions of VOCs. These enhanced emissions included both those oxygenates emitted from uncut pasture and also C6-oxygenates, including (Z)-3-hexenal, (E)-2-hexenal, (Z)-2-hexen-1-ol, (Z)-3-hexen-l-ol, and (Z)-3-hexenyl acetate. Emissions from the undisturbed pasture increased markedly with temperature and the intensity of solar radiation, peaking at midday and ceasing at night. The fluxes, when normalized to a temperature of 30°C and a light intensity of 1000 μE m-2 s-1 were, for grass and clover respectively, about one eighth and two fifths of the equivalent fluxes reported to occur from U.S. woodlands. The annual integrated emission from the pasture was approximately 1.9 g(C) m-2 or 1.3 mg(C) g-1 (dry matter). The large transient fluxes that occurred following physical damaging of the pasture, when integrated over time, could be of the same order as those emissions that were observed from undisturbed pasture. In the case of methanol, and perhaps ethanol, the emissions from grasslands may be significant global sources of these gases.

  10. Effects of pasture renovation on hydrology, nutrient runoff, and forage yield

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Proper pasture management is important in promoting optimal forage growth and reducing runoff and nutrient loss. Pasture renovation was performed prior to manure application (poultry litter or swine slurry) on different pasture soils and rainfall simulations were conducted to identify the effects o...

  11. Linking pasture and animal processes. Grazing few hours during the afternoon and evening

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cattle instinctively concentrate grazing during dusk, when pasture is more nutritive. Afternoon allocations of fresh pasture (PM) increase duration and intensity of dusk grazing bouts and consequently pasture intake at that time of day, which certainly has demonstrated to improve animal performance ...

  12. Feeding strategy and pasture quality relative to nutrient requirements of organic dairy cows

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    According to the recently revised National Organic Program “Pasture Rule”, certified organic dairy cows are required to obtain at least 30% of diet dry matter (DM) intake from pasture during the grazing season. Therefore, understanding the nutritive quality of pasture as a feed relative to requireme...

  13. Renovation and Management Effects on Pasture Productivity Under Rotational Grazing

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Adapted, perennial grasses with improved yield or persistence are available for pasture renovation, but grazers must consider how productive and persistent the new grass will be compared to their existing grasses under their current management. Our objective was to compare the productivity and pers...

  14. Renovation and Management Effects on Pasture Productivity Under Rotational Grazing

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Renovating permanent pasture to replace existing cool-season perennial grasses with improved varieties has potential risk and reward. Improved grasses may increase long-term productivity, but these increases should offset costs associated with replacing an existing stand. We eliminated existing pe...

  15. Reestablishing Chicory into Multi-Species Perennial Pastures

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Chicory (Cichorium intybus L.) has the potential to provide abundant, high quality forage during periods of drought stress, but poor persistence limits its usefulness in permanent pasture. This experiment compared the ability of three seeding methods to reestablish chicory into a grazed multi-specie...

  16. Polioencephalomalacia in adult sheep grazing pastures with prostrate pigweed

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Polioencephalomalacia was diagnosed in 2 animals from different farms. In apparently healthy animals from same farms, fecal thiaminase and a significant reduction in erythrocyte transketolase activity was observed. The presence of thiaminase in Amaranthus blitoides could have contributed to the development of polioencephalomalacia in sheep grazing on natural pastures. PMID:15759830

  17. Planning pastures: taking species attributes to the landscape

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Winter hardiness limits the use of the productive forage grass perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) in the northeastern United States. Both efforts to breed more cold-tolerant varieties and the changing climate increase the potential of this grass in pastures. Growth chamber studies of thirteen co...

  18. Distribution of cattle grazing in a northeastern Oregon riparian pasture

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Livestock grazing of a northeastern Oregon riparian pasture was monitored using high-frequency GPS tracking of cattle and high-resolution aerial photography. Tracking collars recorded positions, velocity, date, and time at 1-sec intervals. Areas where animals rested and moved were identified and re...

  19. Sediment carbon concentration and transport from small pastured watersheds

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    With the current emphasis on the role of carbon in the environment, agricultural systems and their impacts on the carbon cycle are important parts of the overall issue. Pasture systems and carbon that is transported attached to sediment has been addressed at the North Appalachian Experimental Waters...

  20. Canopy-Coverage Method Compares Pasture and Prairie

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jantzen, Paul G.

    1973-01-01

    Describes the procedures used by a high school biology class in an ecological study related to the degeneration of grasslands. The canopy-coverage method of vegetational analysis was used to compare a low-grade, over-grazed pasture with a nearby high-quality prairie. An interpretation of the results is also presented. (JR)

  1. Utilization of Pasture and Forages by Ruminants: A Historical Perspective

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pastures, forages and grasslands dominate the landscape across the United States and support a large ruminant population that supplies the nation with value-added animal products. An historical perspective is presented of the innovations as they occurred in the Journal of Animal Science over the pas...

  2. Using lake dredged material to enhance pasture establishment

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The cow-calf (Bos taurus) industry in subtropical United States and other parts of the world depends almost totally on grazed pastures. Establishment of complete, uniform stand of bahiagrass in a short time period is vital economically. Domestic wastewater sludge or sewage sludge, composted urban pl...

  3. Renovation and Management Effects on Pasture Productivity Under Rotational Grazing

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Adapted, perennial grasses with improved yield or persistence are available for pasture renovation, but grazers must consider how productive and persistent the new grass will be compared to their existing grasses under their current management. Our objective was to compare the productivity and pers...

  4. Canopy-Coverage Method Compares Pasture and Prairie

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jantzen, Paul G.

    1973-01-01

    Describes the procedures used by a high school biology class in an ecological study related to the degeneration of grasslands. The canopy-coverage method of vegetational analysis was used to compare a low-grade, over-grazed pasture with a nearby high-quality prairie. An interpretation of the results is also presented. (JR)

  5. Heifer growth performance from fall-oat pastures

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fall-grown oat has shown promise as an emergency fall forage option, or to extend the grazing season in Wisconsin. Our objectives for this project were: i) to assess the pasture productivity and forage characteristics of 2 fall-grown oat cultivars (Ogle and ForagePlus; OG and FP, respectively) using...

  6. Controlling Herbaceous Competition in Pasture Planted with Loblolly Pine Seedlings

    Treesearch

    James D. Haywood

    1995-01-01

    Three treatments designed to control herbaceous vegetation competing with loblolly pine(Pinus taeda L.) seedlings planted in grazed and ungrazed pasture were tested. Effects of the treatments on seedling survival and growth during the first 3 years after planting were determined. The treatments were directed application of herbicides (glyphosate in...

  7. Establishing Longleaf Pine Seedlings on Agricultural Fields and Pastures

    Treesearch

    Mark J. Hainds

    2004-01-01

    Acres planted to longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) increased annually through the 1990s until 2000 with peak plantings exceeding 110 million seedlings annually. Many of these longleaf seedlings were planted on agricultural crop fields and pastures. Agricultural areas have unique characteristics that can make them more challenging to successfully plant...

  8. Leveraging the beneficial compounds of organic and pasture milk

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Much discussion has arisen over the possible benefits of organic food, including milk. Organic milk comes from cows that are on pasture during the growing season, and would be expected to contain some compounds that are not found in animals receiving conventional feed, or at higher concentrations. ...

  9. Soil nitrogen and carbon impacts of raising chickens on pasture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryals, R.; Leach, A.; Tang, J.; Hastings, M. G.; Galloway, J. N.

    2014-12-01

    Chicken is the most consumed meat in the US, and production continues to intensify rapidly around the world. Chicken manure from confined feeding operations is typically applied in its raw form to nearby croplands, resulting in hotspots of soil nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions. Pasture-raised chicken is an alternative to industrial production and is growing in popularity with rising consumer demand for more humanely raised protein sources. In this agricultural model, manure is deposited directly onto grassland soils where it is thought to increase pools of soil carbon and nitrogen. The fate of manure nitrogen from pasture-raised chicken production remains poorly understood. We conducted a controlled, replicated experiment on a permaculture farm in Charlottesville, Virginia (Timbercreek Organics) in which small chicken coops (10 ft x 12 ft) were moved daily in a pasture. We measured manure deposition rates, soil inorganic nitrogen pools, soil moisture, and soil N2O and CO2 emissions. Measurements were made for the 28-day pasture life of three separate flocks of chickens in the spring, summer, and fall. Each flock consisted of approximately 200-300 chickens occupying three to five coops (~65 chickens/coop). Measurements were also made in paired ungrazed control plots. Manure deposition rates were similar across flocks and averaged 1.5 kgdrywt ha-1 during the spring grazing event and 4.0 kgdrywt ha-1 during the summer and fall grazing events. Manure deposition was relatively constant over the four weeks pasture-lifetime of the chickens. Compared to control plots, grazed areas exhibited higher soil N2O and CO2 fluxes. The magnitude of these fluxes diminished significantly over the four-week span. Soil gas fluxes significantly increased following rainfall events. For a given rainfall event, higher fluxes were observed from transects that were grazed more recently. Soil gaseous reactive nitrogen losses were less in this pasture system compared to cultivated field amended

  10. Irrigating grazed pasture decreases soil carbon and nitrogen stocks.

    PubMed

    Mudge, Paul L; Kelliher, Francis M; Knight, Trevor L; O'Connell, Denis; Fraser, Scott; Schipper, Louis A

    2017-02-01

    The sustainability of using irrigation to produce food depends not only on the availability of sufficient water, but also on the soil's 'response' to irrigation. Stocks of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) are key components of soil organic matter (SOM), which is important for sustainable agricultural production. While there is some information about the effects of irrigation on soil C stocks in cropping systems, there is a paucity of such studies in pastoral food production systems. For this study, we sampled soils from 34 paired, irrigated and unirrigated pasture sites across New Zealand (NZ) and analysed these for total C and N. On average, irrigated pastures had significantly (P < 0.05) less soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) than adjacent unirrigated pastures, with differences of 6.99 t C ha(-1) and 0.58 t N ha(-1) in the uppermost 0.3 m. Differences in C and N tended to occur throughout the soil profile, so the cumulative differences increased with depth, and the proportion of the soil C lost from deeper horizons was large. There were no relationships between differences in soil C and N stocks and the length of time under irrigation. This study suggests SOM will decrease when pastures under a temperate climate are irrigated. On this basis, increasing the area of temperate pasture land under irrigation would result in more CO2 in the atmosphere and may directly and indirectly increase N leaching to groundwater. Given the large and increasing area of land being irrigated both in NZ and on a global scale, there is an urgent need to determine whether the results found in this study are also applicable in other regions and under different land management systems (e.g. arable).

  11. Calving distributions of individual bulls in multiple-sire pastures.

    PubMed

    Abell, Kaitlynn M; Theurer, Miles E; Larson, Robert L; White, Brad J; Hardin, David K; Randle, Richard F; Cushman, Robert A

    2017-04-15

    The objective of this project was to quantify patterns in the calving rate of sires in multiple-sire pastures over seven years at a large-scale cow-calf operation. Data consisted of reproductive and genomic records from multiple-sire breeding pastures (n = 33) at the United States Meat Animal Research Center (USMARC) from 2007 to 2013. Calving intervals were analyzed in 21-day periods. A ranking system for each bull was developed based on the calving rate per pasture over the breeding season, with Rank 1 = the bull with greatest calving rate, Rank 3 = the bull with the least calving rate, and Rank 2 = all other bulls. A total of 179 bulls and 3703 calves were successfully genotyped over seven years. A uniform distribution described the expected percentage of calves sired per rank within pasture. Rank 1 bulls sired 113% greater calves than the expected pasture-average, Rank 2 bulls sired 6% less than expected, and Rank 3 bulls sired 81% less than expected. A rank by calving interval interaction effect was identified (P < 0.05). A Rank 1 bull in calving interval 1 produced a greater average percent of the total calf crop over the entire season, compared to a Rank 2 and Rank 3 bull. The calving rate for individual sires is not homogeneous and there is a large difference between bulls siring the greatest and least number of calves. More research is needed to determine how rank changes over multiple breeding years and its association with dominance, libido, and fertility. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Brachiaria ruziziensis Responses to Different Fertilization Doses and to the Attack of Mahanarva spectabilis (Hemiptera: Cercopidae) Nymphs and Adults

    PubMed Central

    Aguiar, Daniela de Melo; Auad, Alexander Machado; Fonseca, Marcy das Graças; Leite, Melissa Vieira

    2014-01-01

    Cropping practices are necessary in order to help reduce the population of pest insect, such as the induction of resistance through fertilization. Therefore, this study aimed to assess alterations on the production and quality of Brachiaria ruziziensis when receiving the fertilization composed by the macronutrients NPK and/or exposed to the attack of Mahanarva spectabilis nymphs and adults. B. ruziziensis plants were fertilized according to the recommendation (R), half of the recommended fertilization (H), or non-fertilization (C). They were also exposed to different M. spectabilis nymph and adult densities. The damage, regrowth, and bromatological components were evaluated. The fertilization treatment promoted a higher M. spectabilis nymph survival on B. ruziziensis; however, it reduced the damage caused by the forage exposed to nymphs and adults of pest insect, and it did not alter the quality of the signal grass. Moreover, the fertilization treatment enabled forage recovery, even when exposed to 5 nymphs or 10 spittlebug adults. PMID:24578645

  13. Infection of cattle with Border disease virus by sheep on communal alpine pastures.

    PubMed

    Braun, U; Bachofen, C; Büchi, R; Hässig, M; Peterhans, E

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether sheep grazing communal alpine pastures with cattle can transmit Border disease virus (BDV) to cattle. A total of 1170 sheep and 923 cattle were tested for BDV using RT-PCR (sheep) and for pestivirus antibodies using an ELISA (cattle), respectively, before being moved to one of 4 pastures (A, B, C and D). Eight sheep from pasture C were viraemic. 396 of 923 cattle examined before the pasture season were seronegative. The latter were re-examined after the pasture season and 99 were seropositive or indeterminate. Antibody specificity was determined in 25 of these using a serum neutralization test (SNT). BDV infection was confirmed in 10 cattle and was considered likely in 8 others. BVDV infection was confirmed in 4 cattle and considered likely in 3 after pasturing. The study has shown that the transmission of BDV from sheep to cattle is possible on communal alpine pastures.

  14. Controlling runoff from subtropical pastures has differential effects on nitrogen and phosphorus loads.

    PubMed

    Bohlen, Patrick J; Villapando, Odi R

    2011-01-01

    A 4-yr (2005-2008) study was conducted to evaluate the potential of pasture water management for controlling nutrient losses in surface runoff in the Northern Everglades. Two pasture water management treatments were investigated on Bahia grass ( Flüggé) pastures: reduced flow and unobstructed flow. The reduced flow treatment was applied to four of eight 20.23-ha pastures by installing water control structures in pasture drainage ditches with flashboards set at a predetermined height. Four other pastures received the unobstructed-flow treatment, in which surface runoff exited pastures unimpeded. Automated instruments measured runoff volume and collected surface water samples for nutrient analysis. In analyzing data for before-after treatment analysis, the 2005 results were removed because of structural failure in water control structures and the 2007 results were removed because of drought conditions. Pasture water retention significantly reduced annual total nitrogen (TN) loads, which were 11.28 kg ha and 6.28 kg ha, respectively, in pastures with unobstructed and reduced flow. Total phosphorus (TP) loads were 27% lower in pastures with reduced flow than in pastures with unobstructed flow, but this difference was not statistically significant. Concentrations of available soil P were significantly greater in pastures with reduced flow. Pasture water retention appears to be an effective approach for reducing runoff volume and TN loads from cattle pastures in the Northern Everglades, but the potential to reduce TP loads may be diminished if higher water table conditions cause increased P release from soils, which could result in higher P concentration in surface runoff.

  15. Epidemiology of bovine virus diarrhoea in cattle on communal alpine pastures in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Braun, U; Schönmann, M; Ehrensperger, F; Hilbe, M; Brunner, D; Stärk, K D; Giger, T

    1998-10-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the influence of communal pasturing on the spread of bovine virus diarrhoea (BVD). The investigation involved 990 Swiss Braunvieh cattle from 149 different owners on seven communal pastures in the Swiss Alps. Prior to pasturing, blood samples were collected from all animals for examination for BVD antigen and antibodies. Serological examinations were also performed during and after pasturing to determine possible increases in seroprevalence and to determine whether seroprevalence was different on pastures with and without persistently infected cattle. At the start of pasturing, nine (0.9%) animals were persistently viraemic. On three alpine pastures, no persistently viraemic animals were detected. The prevalence of persistently infected cattle on the remaining four pastures varied from 0.3 to 3.9%. Of the 990 animals tested at the start of pasturing, 632 (63.3%) were seropositive. Seroprevalence differed among pastures and varied from 21.8 to 85.9%. During the summer, seroprevalence increased on all pastures surveyed, and at the end of the pasture season, 778 (80.1%) of the 971 cattle that were examined twice were seropositive. The incidence of seroconversion was significantly higher on pastures with persistently infected cattle compared with those without; it ranged from 32.7 to 100.0% in the former and from 6.0 to 22.2 in the latter. The results of this study suggest that communal alpine pasturing does play a role in the spread of BVD. The extent of this role depends on the presence of persistently infected animals.

  16. Pasture Drought Insurance Based on NDVI and SAVI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escribano Rodríguez, J. A.; Tarquis, A. M.; Hernandez Díaz-Ambrona, C. G.

    2012-04-01

    Drought is a complex phenomenon, which is difficult to define. The term is used to refer to deficiency in rainfall, soil moisture, vegetation greenness, ecological conditions or socio economic conditions, and different drought types can be inferred. In this study, drought is considered as a period when the pasture growth is low in regard to long-term average conditions. The extensive livestock production is based on the natural resources available. The good management practices concurs the maximum livestock nutrition needs with the maximum pasture availability. Therefore, early drought detection and impact assessment on the amount of pasture biomass are important in several areas in Spain, whose economy strongly depends on livestock production. The use of remote sensing data presents a number of advantages when determining drought impact on vegetation. The information covers the whole of a territory and the repetition of images provides multi-temporal measurements. In addition, vegetation indexes, being NDVI (normalized difference vegetation index) and SAVI (soil-adjusted vegetation index) the most common ones, obtainedfrom satellite data allow areas affected by droughts to be identified. These indices are being used for estimation of vegetation photosynthesis activity and monitoring drought. The present study shows the application of these vegetation indices for pasture drought monitoring in three places in Spain and their correlation with several field measurements. During 2010 and 2011 three locations, El Cubo de Don Sancho (Salamanca), Trujillo (Cáceres) and Pozoblanco (Córdoba), were selected and a periodic pasture monitoring and botanic composition were achieved. Daily precipitation, temperature and monthly soil water content were measurement as well as fresh and dry pasture weight. At the same time, remote sensing images were capture by DEIMOS-1 of the chosen places.This satellite is based on the concept Microsat-100 from Surrey. It is conceived for

  17. Continuous soil carbon storage of old permanent pastures in Amazonia.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Clément; Fontaine, Sébastien; Klumpp, Katja; Picon-Cochard, Catherine; Grise, Marcia Mascarenhas; Dezécache, Camille; Ponchant, Lise; Freycon, Vincent; Blanc, Lilian; Bonal, Damien; Burban, Benoit; Soussana, Jean-François; Blanfort, Vincent

    2016-12-14

    Amazonian forests continuously accumulate carbon (C) in biomass and in soil, representing a carbon sink of 0.42-0.65 GtC yr(-1) . In recent decades, more than 15% of Amazonian forests have been converted into pastures, resulting in net C emissions (~200 tC ha(-1) ) due to biomass burning and litter mineralization in the first years after deforestation. However, little is known about the capacity of tropical pastures to restore a C sink. Our study shows in French Amazonia that the C storage observed in native forest can be partly restored in old (≥24 year) tropical pastures managed with a low stocking rate (±1 LSU ha(-1) ) and without the use of fire since their establishment. A unique combination of a large chronosequence study and eddy covariance measurements showed that pastures stored between -1.27 ± 0.37 and -5.31 ± 2.08 tC ha(-1)  yr(-1) while the nearby native forest stored -3.31 ± 0.44 tC ha(-1)  yr(-1) . This carbon is mainly sequestered in the humus of deep soil layers (20-100 cm), whereas no C storage was observed in the 0- to 20-cm layer. C storage in C4 tropical pasture is associated with the installation and development of C3 species, which increase either the input of N to the ecosystem or the C:N ratio of soil organic matter. Efforts to curb deforestation remain an obvious priority to preserve forest C stocks and biodiversity. However, our results show that if sustainable management is applied in tropical pastures coming from deforestation (avoiding fires and overgrazing, using a grazing rotation plan and a mixture of C3 and C4 species), they can ensure a continuous C storage, thereby adding to the current C sink of Amazonian forests.

  18. Effect of stocking rate on pasture production, milk production, and reproduction of dairy cows in pasture-based systems.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, K A; Penno, J W; Lancaster, J A S; Roche, J R

    2008-05-01

    Ninety-four cows were randomly allocated to 1 of 5 stocking rates (2.2, 2.7, 3.1, 3.7, and 4.3 cows/ha) in a completely randomized design for 3 years. Herds were seasonal calving, with only minor differences in grazing management to optimize the profitability of each stocking rate (SR). Pasture production and quality data, milk and milk component data, and reproduction data were collected, averaged for SR treatment, and linear and quadratic contrasts on SR were evaluated. In addition, the Wilmink exponential model (y(t) = a + b x e((-0.05t) )+ c x t) was fitted to milk yield within lactation, and the parameters were averaged by SR treatment and analyzed as above. The median variation explained by the function for individual lactations was 84%. The amount of pasture grown tended to increase, and the quality of the pasture on offer increased linearly with increasing SR, reducing some of the negative impact of SR on the availability of pasture per cow. Milk production per cow declined linearly with increasing SR, although there was a tendency for most production variables to decline quadratically, with the negative effect of SR declining with increasing SR. The effect on milk production per cow was primarily because of a lower peak milk yield and a greater post-peak decline (less persistent milk profile), although a decline in lactation length with increasing SR was responsible for 24% of the effect of SR on milk yield. Milk production per hectare increased linearly with increasing SR, and there was only a small difference (approximately 3%/cow per ha) in the efficiency of converting feed dry matter into milk energy. Stocking rate did not affect reproductive success. The data are consistent with the need for a more robust measure of SR than cows per hectare because farms will differ in the genetic merit of their cows and in the potential to produce pasture. We introduce the concept of a comparative SR, whereby the carrying capacity of the farm is defined by the BW of

  19. Pasture dry matter consumption in European wild boars (Sus scrofa L.) as affected by herbage allowance.

    PubMed

    Rivero, M J; López, I F; Hodgkinson, S M

    2013-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of herbage allowance on pasture DM consumption by growing European wild boar. An additional objective was to evaluate the influence of pasture consumption on supplemental diet intake and BW gain. A previously sown grass-clover pasture was managed by cutting to obtain an herbage mass equivalent to 1,500 kg/ha DM. Areas of pasture were limited by fencing to obtain 3 different herbage allowances whereas the pasture was removed in other areas. Forty-eight purebred European wild boars (initial age of 120 d and initial BW of 14.4 kg) were grouped in pairs and each pair was randomly allotted to 1 of 4 treatments (6 pairs per treatment): no pasture (4 m(2); pasture removed), low (5.33 m(2); 400 g/d pasture DM available/wild boar), medium (8 m(2); 600 g/d pasture DM available/wild boar), and high (16 m(2); 1,200 g/d pasture DM available/wild boar). The treatment areas were moved daily with a 7-d rotation. For a 28-d period, wild boars entered their treatment areas from 0830 to 1630 h, after which they had free access to a supplemental diet for 1 h. Pasture consumption was estimated daily by cutting pasture samples pre- and postgrazing. Supplemental diet consumption was determined daily (feed offered minus remaining feed). Animals were weighed weekly. Pasture consumption differed (P < 0.001) among wild boars receiving different treatments, with cumulative consumptions of 3.0 and 3.9 kg DM/wild boar over 28 d for low and medium herbage allowances, respectively (P < 0.09), and 6.4 kg DM/wild boar over 28 d for high herbage allowance, with the latter consumption being greater (P < 0.001) than the consumption recorded with the decreased herbage allowance treatments. The supplemental diet consumption tended (P = 0.16) to be less in wild boars with greater herbage allowance. European wild boars with access to pasture had greater (8.48 vs. 6.27 kg; P = 0.002) BW gain than those without access to pasture. In conclusion, pasture

  20. Influence of transient flooding on methane fluxes from subtropical pastures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamberlain, Samuel D.; Gomez-Casanovas, Nuria; Walter, M. Todd; Boughton, Elizabeth H.; Bernacchi, Carl J.; DeLucia, Evan H.; Groffman, Peter M.; Keel, Earl W.; Sparks, Jed P.

    2016-03-01

    Seasonally flooded subtropical pastures are major methane (CH4) sources, where transient flooding drives episodic and high-magnitude emissions from the underlying landscape. Understanding the mechanisms that drive these patterns is needed to better understand pasture CH4 emissions and their response to global change. We investigated belowground CH4 dynamics in relation to surface fluxes using laboratory water table manipulations and compared these results to field-based eddy covariance measurements to link within-soil CH4 dynamics to ecosystem fluxes. Ecosystem CH4 fluxes lag flooding events, and this dynamic was replicated in laboratory experiments. In both cases, peak emissions were observed during water table recession. Flooding of surface organic soils and precipitation driven oxygen pulses best explained the observed time lags. Precipitation oxygen pulses likely delay CH4 emissions until groundwater dissolved oxygen is consumed, and emissions were temporally linked to CH4 production in surface soil horizons. Methane accumulating in deep soils did not contribute to surface fluxes and is likely oxidized within the soil profile. Methane production rates in surface organic soils were also orders of magnitude higher than in deep mineral soils, suggesting that over longer flooding regimes CH4 produced in deep horizons is not a significant component of surface emissions. Our results demonstrate that distinct CH4 dynamics may be stratified by depth and flooding of surface organic soils drives CH4 fluxes from subtropical pastures. These results suggest that small changes in pasture water table dynamics can drive large changes in CH4 emissions if surface soils remain saturated over longer time scales.

  1. Soil fertility management on natural pastures in Eastern Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghambashidze, Giorgi; Jolokhava, Tamar; Kenchiashvili, Naira; Tarkhnishvili, Maia

    2015-04-01

    The development of livestock production in Georgia is mainly based on productivity of natural common pasturelands as it is the cheapest way to keep animals. Therefore it is crucial to manage those pastures in order to supply domestic animals with adequate amount of green grass during whole grazing season. The problems associated with poor grassland management is especially evident under limited rainfall conditions. Usually farmers do not consider suitability of existing stocking rates with pasture productivity leading to overutilization of pastureland causing reduction of palatable plant species and total grass cover stimulating soil erosion processes, which deflates soil nutrients and soil organic matter. Intensification of negative processes may result in loss of soil fertility and poor grass regrowth capacities. Current study aims to evaluate existing grazing system on a selected plots from common pasturelands in Eastern Georgia and to develop a proper soil fertility management plan accepted in organic agriculture taking into account local soil-climatic conditions, pasture vegetation stand and its richness with palatable plant species.

  2. [Morphological and molecular identification of Prosapia simulans (Walker) (Hemiptera: Cercopidae), and screening and mechanisms of resistance to this spittlebug in Brachiaria hybrids].

    PubMed

    Castro, Ulises; Cardona, Cesar; Vera-Graziano, Jorge; Miles, John; Garza-Garcia, Ramón

    2007-01-01

    Prosapia simulans (Walker) is an important spittlebug species that attacks forage grasses of the genus Brachiaria (Trin.) Griseb. from Mexico to Colombia. This, and several other species of spittlebugs, cause important economic losses to the livestock production industry. Development of resistant cultivars is regarded as the best method of control. In the present study we used taxonomic keys, dissection of male genitalia and RAPD-PCR patterns to reconfirm the identity of P. simulans specimens collected in Colombia and Mexico. We were able to reconfirm that P. simulans occurs as a pest of Brachiaria from Mexico to Colombia. We also studied the levels and mechanisms of resistance present in 34 Brachiaria hybrids developed by CIAT. Infestations were made with six eggs per plant. We used 10 replications (plants) per genotype in a completely randomized design. Seven hybrids were found to be susceptible, 16 showed intermediate resistance and 11 were resistant. Antibiosis was the mechanism of resistance expressed in resistant hybrids as well as in the resistant checks CIAT 6294 and CIAT 36062. Tolerance was absent. The genotypes BRX 4402 and CIAT 0606 were classified as highly susceptible.

  3. Transplantation of subalpine wood-pasture turfs along a natural climatic gradient reveals lower resistance of unwooded pastures to climate change compared to wooded ones.

    PubMed

    Gavazov, Konstantin; Spiegelberger, Thomas; Buttler, Alexandre

    2014-04-01

    Climate change could impact strongly on cold-adapted mountain ecosystems, but little is known about its interaction with traditional land-use practices. We used an altitudinal gradient to simulate a year-round warmer and drier climate for semi-natural subalpine grasslands across a landscape of contrasting land-use management. Turf mesocosms from three pasture-woodland land-use types-unwooded pasture, sparsely wooded pasture, and densely wooded pasture-spanning a gradient from high to low management intensity were transplanted downslope to test their resistance to two intensities of climate change. We found strong overall effects of intensive (+4 K) experimental climate change (i.e., warming and reduced precipitation) on plant community structure and function, while moderate (+2 K) climate change did not substantially affect the studied land-use types, thus indicating an ecosystem response threshold to moderate climate perturbation. The individual land-use types were affected differently under the +4 K scenario, with a 60% decrease in aboveground biomass (AGB) in unwooded pasture turfs, a 40% decrease in sparsely wooded pasture turfs, and none in densely wooded ones. Similarly, unwooded pasture turfs experienced a 30% loss of species, advanced (by 30 days) phenological development, and a mid-season senescence due to drought stress, while no such effects were recorded for the other land-use types. The observed contrasting effects of climate change across the pasture-woodland landscape have important implications for future decades. The reduced impact of climate change on wooded pastures as compared to unwooded ones should promote the sustainable land use of wooded pastures by maintaining low management intensity and a sparse forest canopy, which buffer the immediate impacts of climate change on herbaceous vegetation.

  4. Pasture Management Strategies for Sequestering Soil Carbon - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Franzluebbers, Alan J.

    2006-03-15

    Pasturelands account for 51 of the 212 Mha of privately held grazing land in the USA. Tall fescue is the most important cool-season perennial forage for many beef cattle producers in the humid region of the USA. A fungal endophyte, Neotyphodium coenophialum, infects the majority of tall fescue stands with a mutualistic association. Ergot alkaloids produced by the endophyte have negative impacts on cattle performance. However, there are indications that endophyte infection of tall fescue is a necessary component of productive and persistent pasture ecology. The objectives of this research were to characterize and quantify changes in soil organic carbon and associated soil properties under tall fescue pastures with and without endophyte infection of grass. Pastures with high endophyte infection had greater concentration of soil organic carbon, but lower concentration of biologically active soil carbon than pastures with low endophyte infection. A controlled experiment suggested that endophyte-infected leaf tissue may directly inhibit the activity of soil microorganisms. Carbon forms of soil organic matter were negatively affected and nitrogen forms were positively affected by endophyte addition to soil. The chemical compounds in endophyte-infected tall fescue (ergot alkaloids) that are responsible for animal health disorders were found in soil, suggesting that these chemicals might be persistent in the environment. Future research is needed to determine whether ergot alkaloids or some other chemicals are responsible for increases in soil organic matter. Scientists will be able to use this information to better understand the ecological impacts of animals grazing tall fescue, and possibly to identify and cultivate other similar associations for improving soil organic matter storage. Another experiment suggested that both dry matter production and soil microbial activity could be affected by the endophyte. Sampling of the cumulative effects of 20 years of tall fescue

  5. Carbon fluxes of Kobresia pygmaea pastures on the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babel, Wolfgang; Biermann, Tobias; Falge, Eva; Ingrisch, Johannes; Leonbacher, Jürgen; Schleuss, Per; Kuzyakov, Yakov; Ma, Yaoming; Miehe, Georg; Foken, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    With an approximate cover of 450,000 km² on the Tibetan Plateau (TP), the Cyperaceae Kobresia pygmaea forms he world's largest alpine ecosystem. This species, especially adapted to grazing pressure, grows to a height of only 2-6 cm and can be found in an altitudinal range of 4000 to 5960 m a.s.l. A special characteristic of this ecosystem is the stable turf layer, which is built up from roots and plays a significant role in protecting soil from erosion. This is of great importance since soils on the TP store 2.5 % of the global soil organic carbon stocks. The aim of the investigation was the study of the carbon storage and the impact of human-induced land use change on these Kobresia pygmaea pastures. We therefore applied eddy-covariance measurements and modelling as a long-term control of the fluxes between the atmosphere and the pastures and 13C labelling for the investigation of flux partitioning, and chamber measurements to investigate the degradation of the pastures. Combining CO2 budgets observed in 2010 with eddy-covariance measurements and relative partitioning of carbon fluxes estimated with 13C labelling enabled us to characterise the C turnover for the vegetation period with absolute fluxes within the plant-soil-atmosphere continuum. These results revealed that this ecosystem indeed stores a great amount of C in below-ground pools, especially in the root turf layer. To further investigate the importance of the root layer, the experiments in 2012 focused on flux measurements over the different surface types which make up the heterogeneity of the Kobresia pygmaea pastures and might result from degradation due to extensive grazing. The three surface types investigated with a LiCOR long-term monitoring chamber system include Kobresia pygmaea with intact turf layer (IRM), a surface type where the turf layer is still present but the vegetation is sparse and mainly consists of Cryptogam crusts (DRM) and finally areas without the turf layer (BS). According to

  6. Breeding objectives for sheep should be customised depending on variation in pasture growth across years.

    PubMed

    Rose, G; Mulder, H A; Thompson, A N; van der Werf, J H J; van Arendonk, J A M

    2015-08-01

    Breeding programmes for livestock require economic weights for traits that reflect the most profitable animal in a given production system, which affect the response in each trait after selection. The profitability of sheep production systems is affected by changes in pasture growth as well as grain, meat and wool prices between seasons and across years. Annual pasture growth varies between regions within Australia's Mediterranean climate zone from low growth with long periods of drought to high growth with shorter periods of drought. Therefore, the objective of this study was to assess whether breeding objectives need to be adapted for regions, depending on how reliable the pasture growth is across years. We modelled farms with Merino sheep bred for wool and meat in 10 regions in Western Australia. Across these 10 regions, mean annual pasture growth decreased, and the CV of annual pasture growth increased as pasture growth for regions became less reliable. We calculated economic values for nine traits, optimising management across 11 years, including variation for pasture growth and wool, meat and grain prices between and within years from 2002 to 2012. These economic values were used to calculate responses to selection for each trait for the 10 regions. We identified two potential breeding objectives, one for regions with low or high reliability and the other for regions with medium reliability of pasture growth. Breeding objectives for high or low pasture growth reliability had more emphasis on live weight traits and number of lambs weaned. Breeding objectives for medium reliability of pasture growth had more emphasis on decreasing fibre diameter. Relative economic weights for fleece weight did not change across the regions. Regions with low or high pasture reliability had similar breeding objectives and response to selection, because the relationship between the economic values and CV of pasture growth were not linear for live weight traits and the number of

  7. Grazing alters net ecosystem C fluxes and the global warming potential of a subtropical pasture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Casanovas, N.; DeLucia, N.; Bernacchi, C.; Boughton, E.; Chamberlain, S.; Sparks, J. P.; DeLucia, E. H.

    2016-12-01

    The impact of grazing on C fluxes from subtropical pastures and on the climate system is uncertain, although these systems account for a substantial portion of global C storage. We investigated how cattle grazing influences net ecosystem CO2 and CH4 exchange in temporarily flooded subtropical pastures using the eddy covariance technique. Measurements were made over several wet-dry seasonal cycles. Grazing increased soil wetness but did not affect soil temperature. By removing aboveground biomass, grazing decreased ecosystem respiration (Reco) and Gross Primary Productivity (GPP). As the decrease in Reco was larger than the reduction in GPP, grazing consistently increased the net CO2 sink strength of subtropical pastures (55, 219 and 187 more C m-2 in 2013, 2014 and 2015). Enteric ruminant fermentation and increased soil wetness due to grazers, increased total net ecosystem CH4 emissions in grazed relative to ungrazed pasture (27% - 80%). Unlike temperate, arid and semi-arid pastures where cattle are the major source of CH4, soil was a greater source of CH4 to the atmosphere than cattle in grazed subtropical pasture. Enhanced CH4 production from wetter soils caused by grazers was a major contributor of differences in CH4 emissions between grazed and ungrazed subtropical pastures. Although grazing increased total net ecosystem CH4 emissions, it decreased the global warming potential of subtropical pastures and, when differences could be detected, increased the net storage of C. Our results indicate that grazing of subtropical pastures can have a cooling effect on the climate.

  8. Evaluation of alternative algorithms used to simulate pasture intake in grazing dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Vazquez, O P; Smith, T R

    2001-04-01

    Four algorithms used to simulate pasture intake in grazing dairy cows in a dairy decision support system were proposed and evaluated with data from the literature. The algorithms proposed were: 1) an algorithm combining the approach used in a published model to determine dry matter intake based on neutral detergent fiber intake as a percentage of the BW, energy requirements, pasture availability and a standard supplementation (PIest), 2) the previous algorithm modified to consider the type and amount of supplementation (PIsup), 3) an algorithm which considers the effect of selection of pasture (PIsel), and 4) the combination of algorithms 2 and 3 (PIsupsel). Pasture intake data of 27 grazing experiments from the literature were used to evaluate those algorithms. Two methods of evaluation were used: 1) simple linear regression between reported and simulated values, and 2) analysis of variance for the difference between reported and simulated values considering pasture availability and type of supplementation. The R2 of the linear regression and average proportional bias between reported values and simulated values were 0.24 and 19% for PIest, 0.42, and 23% for PIsup, 0.45 and 2% for PIsel and 0.41 and 10% for PIsupsel. Those results showed that PIsel had the lower variability and the values closer to pasture intake. The algorithm PIsup had low variability but tended to underpredict pasture intake. The algorithm PIest values were closer to reported values for low pasture availability. The modeling results show the influence of pasture selection in grazing systems.

  9. Pasture infectivity with trichostrongylid larvae in the northern Guinea Savanna of Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ogunsusi, R A

    1979-05-01

    For the study of pasture infectivity in the northern Guinea Savanna of Nigeria, variable numbers of helminth-free tracer lambs grazing an unimproved pasture were slaughtered monthly throughout a period of 12 months. The numbers of worms recovered showed that large numbers of infective trichostrongyle larvae were ingested with the pasture from June till October. Infectivity started to decline from November until the end of January after which the pasture became completely free of parasitic nematode larvae and remained so until the end of May.

  10. Effects of biostimulation and nutritional supplementation on pubertal age and pregnancy rates of Nelore heifers (Bos indicus) in a tropical environment.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, C M G; Oliveira Filho, B D; Gambarini, M L; Viu, M A O; Lopes, D T; Sousa, A P F

    2009-07-01

    To determine effects of biostimulation (BIO) and dietary supplementation (BIO+S) on pubertal age and pregnancy rates, Nelore heifers (n=392) were randomly assigned to one of four treatment groups (n=98/group). All animals were in tropical environmental conditions, in the middle-west region of Brazil, grazing in pastures of Brachiaria brizantha, cv. Marandu; Panicum Maximum, cv. Tanzânia and Brachiaria humidícula. The heifers of the BIO group were kept in the presence of bulls while being maintained on pasture; the animals in the BIO+S group were kept in the presence of bulls while being managed on pasture and were fed a diet with greater energy and protein content to produce 0.49 kg of BW gain/day; the animals in control group (the NBIO) were kept away from bulls and under pasture conditions; and the animals in the NBIO+S group were kept away from bulls, were maintained on pasture, and were fed the same diet as the BIO+S group. Heifers were bred at 22-23 months of age, and pregnancy diagnosis was made 45 days after the end of the breeding season. There were differences (P<0.05) between groups regarding pubertal heifers up to 19 months (NPH), final body weight (FBW) and pregnancy rates (P<0.01), with an advantage for the animals in the BIO and BIO+S groups. Although the effect of a diet with greater protein and energy content was not clear in this experiment, the exposure of heifers to a male during the prepubertal period decreased age at the first breeding season, resulting in a significant reduction in age of first pregnancy in Nelore heifers kept under extensive management systems in a tropical environment.

  11. Meta-analysis of the effect of pregrazing pasture mass on pasture intake, milk production, and grazing behavior of dairy cows strip-grazing temperate grasslands.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Prieto, L A; Delagarde, R

    2012-09-01

    Grazing management is a key factor in pasture-based dairy systems, which can be improved given advanced knowledge of the effects of pregrazing pasture mass (PM) on the performance of dairy cows. The aim of this study was to quantify the effects of PM on the pasture intake, milk production, milk composition, and grazing behavior of strip- or rotational-grazing dairy cows, based on a meta-analysis of published research papers. A database was created that included experiments in which the effects of PM on pasture intake and milk production of dairy cows were studied. Papers were selected only if at least 2 PM were compared under similar experimental conditions, particularly the same pasture allowance (SPA). The final database included 15 papers with 27 PM comparisons. For analytical purposes, the database was subdivided into 3 subsets that varied according to the estimation height at which pasture allowance was determined; that is, where PM were compared at the SPA above ground level (SPA(0) subset), above 2 to 3 cm (SPA(3) subset), and above 4 to 5 cm (SPA(5) subset). Statistical analyses were conducted on the entire database (global analysis) and within each subset using linear model procedures. An interaction between PM and estimation height was found for pasture intake and milk production in the global analysis. On the basis of the predictive equations, pasture intake increased by 1.58 kg of dry matter/d per tonne increase in PM when PM were compared at SPA(0), was not affected by PM when PM were compared at SPA(3), and decreased by 0.65 kg of dry matter/d per tonne increase in PM when PM were compared at SPA(5). This is consistent with the effect of PM on milk production, which was positive and negative (1.04 and -0.79 kg/t of PM, respectively) when PM were compared at SPA(0) and SPA(5), respectively. Grazing time was only slightly affected by PM, irrespective of estimation height, because the effect of PM on pasture intake was mainly dependent on the variation

  12. Spatial and temporal variation in mined land pastures

    SciTech Connect

    Teutsch, C.D.; Collins, M.; Ditsch, D.C.; Johns, J.; Larson, B.; Turner, W.; Hamilton, T.; May, C.; Clay, L.

    1998-12-31

    Kentucky has large areas of reclaimed surface mined land that could provide grazing for livestock. Research is needed to define optimum stocking densities and to determine the sustainability of such grazing systems for this region. A long-term field study was initiated in 1997 on 151 ha of reclaimed land near Chavies, KY to assess spatial and temporal variation under grazing with stocking densities of 0, 0.28, 0.42, or 0.83 beef cow/calf pairs/ha. Global Positioning System and GIS technologies were employed to interpolate surface maps of the site using 11,000 points. Herbage and soil samples were collected around permanent markers systematically placed over the entire area at a density of 1 per 0.4 ha. Elevation ranged from 295 to 371 m and pasture slope ranged from 0 to 57{degree} with a mean of 13{degree}. Biomass density in late April ranged from 0 to 2500 kg/ha and was lowest at the highest stocking density, where grazing activity was highest. Spring-born calves averaged 240 kg at weaning. Cow weight and body condition score at the end of the grazing season was reduced at the highest stocking density and suggests that the highest stocking density may be excessive for mined land pastures in this region.

  13. Heavy metal levels of pasture grasses in metropolitan area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luilo, G. B.; Othman, O. C.

    2003-05-01

    Urban agriculture is becoming an important lucrative activity in Dar es Salaam City even though the city is subject to traffic and industrial pollution pressures. Poor planning has left only limited spaces, particularly road reserves, for cultivation and foraging animals. While there is increasing road traffic no study bas been conducted determine levels of trace metals in pasture grasses. This study, therefore, reports on the levels of cadmium, manganese, lead and zinc of cynodon grasses in road vicinity in the city. Results show that the trace metal levels (ppm ± SDE) in Cynodon grass species were: Cd (0.24 ± 0.06-2.58 ± 0.15), Mn (41.5 ± 13.6-345.0 ± 124.3), Pb (1.15 ± 0.64-25.53 ± 1.29) and Zn (25.97 ± 3.69-95.36 ± 19.61). The mean levels of lead and zinc varied exponentially with distance off the road up to 15 m distance. Lead and zinc levels correlated with average daily traffic in the roads while cadmium and manganese did not. This suggests that lead and zinc in grasses owe their sources from the passing motor vehicles in agreement with other reported studies. It is recommended that pasture grasses in road vicinities must not be used for foraging dairy cattle and goats for public health reasons.

  14. Spatial distribution of livestock concentration areas and soil nutrients in pastures

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Livestock congregate at feeders, shades, or other sites in pastures, which severely disturbs soil and vegetation leading to erosion and nutrient runoff. Our objective was to determine the extent and spatial distribution of soil nutrients in livestock concentration areas in pastures. We georeferenced...

  15. Spatial distribution of livestock concentration areas and soil nutrients in pastures

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Livestock frequently congregate at feeders, shades, or other sites on pastures, which severely disturbs soil and vegetation leading to erosion and nutrient runoff. Our objective was to determine the extent and spatial distribution of soil nutrients in livestock concentration areas on pastures and qu...

  16. Occurrence and distribution of livestock concentration areas on intensively managed pastures

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Livestock frequently congregate at feeders, shades, or other sites on pastures creating point sources of nutrient runoff. Our objective was to determine the spatial distribution of soil nutrients in livestock concentration areas on pastures and quantify the relationships among the soil nutrient grad...

  17. Assessing the land resource capacity for pasture-based dairy farming in the Northeast

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Research has demonstrated that pasture-based dairy farming can offer many potential benefits for farmer incomes, animal welfare, and environmental quality. However, a common criticism of pasture-based dairies is that relative to confinement production, they produce less milk per acre of farmland, so...

  18. Tall fescue management: Pasture and cattle responses to endophyte and fertilization

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Yearling heifers grazing tall fescue pastures had greatest performance in winter and spring on endophyte-free and novel endophyte associations, because of high forage quality and lack of ergot alkaloids produced by a common “wild” tall fescue-endophyte association. Pasture and cattle responses were...

  19. Monitoring runoff from cattle-grazed pastures for a phosphorus loss quantification tool

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) loss from agriculture persists as a water quality impairment issue. For dairy farms, nutrients can be lost from cropland, pastures, barnyards, and outdoor cattle lots. We monitored N and P loss in runoff from dairy and beef grazed pastures for two years in southwest W...

  20. Review: welfare of dairy cows in continuously housed and pasture-based production systems.

    PubMed

    Arnott, G; Ferris, C P; O'Connell, N E

    2017-02-01

    There is increasing interest in the use of continuous housing systems for dairy cows, with various reasons put forward to advocate such systems. However, the welfare of dairy cows is typically perceived to be better within pasture-based systems, although such judgements are often not scientifically based. The aim of this review was to interrogate the existing scientific literature to compare the welfare, including health, of dairy cows in continuously housed and pasture-based systems. Although summarising existing work, knowledge gaps and directions for future research are also identified. The scope of the review is broad, examining relevant topics under three main headings; health, behaviour and physiology. Regarding health, cows on pasture-based systems had lower levels of lameness, hoof pathologies, hock lesions, mastitis, uterine disease and mortality compared with cows on continuously housed systems. Pasture access also had benefits for dairy cow behaviour, in terms of grazing, improved lying/resting times and lower levels of aggression. Moreover, when given the choice between pasture and indoor housing, cows showed an overall preference for pasture, particularly at night. However, the review highlighted the need for a deeper understanding of cow preference and behaviour. Potential areas for concern within pasture-based systems included physiological indicators of more severe negative energy balance, and in some situations, the potential for compromised welfare with exposure to unpredictable weather conditions. In summary, the results from this review highlight that there remain considerable animal welfare benefits from incorporating pasture access into dairy production systems.

  1. Effects of buffer strips and grazing management on soil loss from pastures

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Intensive grazing pressure can cause soil erosion from pastures causing increased sediment loading to aquatic systems. The objectives of this work were to determine the long-term effects of grazing management and buffer strips on soil erosion from pastures fertilized with broiler litter. Field stud...

  2. Long-term effects of grazing management and buffer strips on soil erosion from pastures

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    High grazing pressure can lead to soil erosion in pastures by compacting soil and increasing runoff and sediment delivery to waterways. Limited information exists on the effects of grazing management and best management practices (BMPs), such as buffer strips, on soil erosion from pastures. The obje...

  3. Relationship between residual feed intake, performance, and carcass parameters of pasture finished cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In 2009 and 2010, Angus-crossbred steers (n = 39) were used to evaluate the relationship between residual feed intake (RFI), pasture-finishing performance and carcass parameters. During RFI determinations prior to pasture finishing initiation in mid-April, animals were fed an alfalfa hay cube diet....

  4. Soil seed bank community structure of pastures and hayfields on an organic farm

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Understanding the composition of seed banks in pasture soils would help farmers anticipate and manage for weed problems. We characterized the soil seed bank in eight pastures and hayfields [two alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) and two predominantly grass hayfields; two recently established and two perma...

  5. THE EFFECTS OF PASTURE FALLOWING ON THE SEED BANK AND FORAGE SPECIES COMPOSITION

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fallowing, the practice of leaving a pasture ungrazed during the growing season, is sometimes used as a tool for improving pasture quality by allowing grasses to reseed naturally. Fallowing has been shown to provide benefits in New Zealand, but has been adopted on rotationally-stocked farms in the n...

  6. Seed bank characterization of pastures and hayfields of the University of New Hampshire Organic Dairy

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Buried seed in pasture soils are often reservoirs of weedy plants. The seed bank was characterized in pastures and hayfields with different management histories at the University of New Hampshire Organic Research Dairy. Three hayfields [two of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) and one grass] and five pas...

  7. Seed banks and land-use history of pastures and hayfields on an organic dairy farm

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Knowing how land-use history affects the seed bank in pastures would be useful in anticipating potential weed management needs. We characterized the seed bank in pastures and hayfields with different management histories on an organic dairy farm in New Hampshire. Three hay fields [two alfalfa (Medic...

  8. Quantifying phosphorus levels in landscapes associated with Bahiagrass-based pastures and beef cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Relatively little information exists regarding possible magnitudes of P losses from grazed pastures. Whether or not P losses from grazed pastures are significantly greater than background losses and how these losses are affected by soil, forage management, or stocking density are not well understood...

  9. From the Lab Bench: The challenges of finishing cattle on pasture

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A column was written to discuss the challenges in Kentucky to finish beef calves on pasture. It might seem feasible to finish a calf in 24 months. This can be accomplished if the average daily weight gain is 1.0 pound per day, but the calves will spend almost half of those 24 months on pasture with ...

  10. Monitoring Pasture Production in Mamawatu, New Zealand, Using Proba-V Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuohy, Mike; Mansion, Valentin

    2015-12-01

    The Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) was calculated from Proba-V data over 18 months (S10) and 12 months (S5). These values were compared with pasture biomass as measured by weekly farm rides on a 4WD towing the Rapid Pasture Meter. Trends in the data were well matched, especially during the summer and after rain in autumn.

  11. Ticks on pastures and on two breeds of cattle in the Eastern Cape province, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Nyangiwe, Nkululeko; Goni, Sindisile; Hervé-Claude, Louis P; Ruddat, Inga; Horak, Ivan G

    2011-09-30

    Many studies on the population dynamics of questing ticks on pastures and of parasitic ticks on cattle have been conducted. Few, however, have attempted to link the two in a single study. This study aimed to assess the population dynamics of questing ixodid ticks on pastures and of adult ticks on two breeds of cattle with different levels of susceptibility to tick infestation on the same pastures. Between January 2005 and December 2009 questing ixodid ticks were collected monthly from natural pastures at the Döhne Agricultural Development Institute and at the adjacent Campagna Production System in the Amahlathi District, Eastern Cape province, South Africa. Between February 2007 and January 2010 adult ticks were collected monthly from Bonsmara and Nguni cattle grazing these pastures. Ten tick species were collected from the pastures and 12 from the cattle. Significantly more questing larvae of Rhipicephalus appendiculatus, Rhipicephalus decoloratus, Rhipicephalus evertsi evertsi and Rhipicephalus microplus were recovered from the pastures grazed by Bonsmara cattle than from those grazed by Nguni cattle (p ≤ 0.05). Significantly more adult Hyalomma rufipes, Rhipicephalus follis, R. appendiculatus, R. decoloratus, R. evertsi evertsi and R. microplus were collected from the Bonsmara cattle than from the Nguni cattle (p ≤ 0.05). The study showed that Nguni cattle are less susceptible to tick infestation than are Bonsmara cattle and fewer questing ticks are collected from pastures grazed by Nguni cattle than by Bonsmara cattle.

  12. Timing and rate of Chaparral treatment affects tall fescue seedhead development and pasture plant densities

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The herbicide Chaparral™ has been shown to suppress seedhead development in tall fescue (Neotyphodium coenophialum) pastures and reduce the symptoms of tall fescue toxicosis in cattle. However, little is known about the logistics of herbicide treatment on tall fescue pastures. The objective of thi...

  13. Cow weights and calf production for pasture 12-C Lehmann lovegrass grazing trials, 1982 to 1993

    Treesearch

    Phil R. Ogden; E. Lamar. Smith

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the grazing trials described in this paper was to provide information to aid in the development of grazing management strategies where Lehmann lovegrass has become a dominant species. Seven pastures were utilized from 1984 to 1987 for a comparison of four yearlong stocking rates to seasonal grazing rotated through three pastures. A second trial, 1988 to...

  14. How well does pasture meet the nutrient needs of dairy cows

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Little research has evaluated the nutritional content of pastures relative to nutrient needs of grazing dairy cows. We conducted a study to determine how frequently pastures in the northeastern U.S. met nutrient requirements of lactating dairy cows and to describe a sample of the feeding strategies ...

  15. Assessment of Prior Grazing Experiences on Adaption to Pasture and Performance of Dairy Heifers.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this study was to evaluate how previous grazing experience affects animal behavior on pasture. Animal behavior was monitored in 32 Holstein (n = 21) and Holstein-Jersey (n = 11) yearlings. Two heifer groups (n = 8 per group) had been exposed to pasture from August through October 20...

  16. Land use intensity trajectories on Amazonian pastures derived from Landsat time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rufin, Philippe; Müller, Hannes; Pflugmacher, Dirk; Hostert, Patrick

    2015-09-01

    Monitoring changes in land use intensity of grazing systems in the Amazon is an important prerequisite to study the complex political and socio-economic forces driving Amazonian deforestation. Remote sensing offers the potential to map pasture vegetation over large areas, but mapping pasture conditions consistently through time is not a trivial task because of seasonal changes associated with phenology and data gaps from clouds and cloud shadows. In this study, we tested spectral-temporal metrics derived from intra-annual Landsat time series to distinguish between grass-dominated and woody pastures. The abundance of woody vegetation on pastures is an indicator for management intensity, since the duration and intensity of land use steer secondary succession rates, apart from climate and soil conditions. We used the developed Landsat-based metrics to analyze pasture intensity trajectories between 1985 and 2012 in Novo Progresso, Brazil, finding that woody vegetation cover generally decreased after four to ten years of grazing activity. Pastures established in the 80s and early 90s showed a higher fraction of woody vegetation during their initial land use history than pastures established in the early 2000s. Historic intensity trajectories suggested a trend towards more intensive land use in the last decade, which aligns well with regional environmental policies and market dynamics. This study demonstrates the potential of dense Landsat time series to monitor land-use intensification on Amazonian pastures.

  17. Comparing pasture c sequestration estimates from eddy covariance and soil cores

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Temperate pastures in the northeast USA are highly productive and could act as significant sinks for soil organic carbon (SOC). However, soils under mature pastures are often considered to have reached equilibrium such that no further sequestration of SOC is expected. This study quantified changes i...

  18. Additional hosts of Balansia-infected grasses in tall fescue pastures

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In an effort to determine the host range of ergot alkaloid producing Balansia endophyte-infected weed grass species in pastures that might confound toxicity symptoms of cattle on tall fescue pastures during periods of drought and poor growing conditions of tall fescue. We report that two new weed g...

  19. Carbon fluxes of Kobresia pygmaea pastures on the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foken, T.; Biermann, T.; Babel, W.; Ma, Y.

    2013-12-01

    With an approximate cover of 450,000 km2 on the Tibetan Plateau (TP), the Cyperaceae Kobresia pygmaea forms he world's largest alpine ecosystem. This species, especially adapted to grazing pressure, grows to a height of only 2-6 cm and can be found in an altitudinal range of 4000 to 5960 m a.s.l. A special characteristic of this ecosystem is the stable turf layer, which is built up from roots and plays a significant role in protecting soil from erosion. This is of great importance since soils on the TP store 2.5 % of the global soil organic carbon stocks. The aim of the investigation was the study of the carbon storage and the impact of human-induced land use change on these Kobresia pygmaea pastures. We therefore applied eddy-covariance measurements and modelling as a long-term control of the fluxes between the atmosphere and the pastures and 13C labelling for the investigation of flux partitioning, and chamber measurements to investigate the degradation of the pastures. Combining CO2 budgets observed in 2010 with eddy-covariance measurements and relative partitioning of Carbon fluxes estimated with 13C labelling enabled us to characterise the C turnover for the vegetation period with absolute fluxes within the plant-soil-atmosphere continuum. These results revealed that this ecosystem indeed stores a great amount of C in below-ground pools, especially in the root turf layer. To further investigate the importance of the root layer, the experiments in 2012 focused on flux measurements over the different surface types which make up the heterogeneity of the Kobresia pygmaea pastures and might result from degradation due to extensive grazing. The three surface types investigated with a LiCOR long-term monitoring chamber system include Kobresia pygmaea with intact turf layer (IRM), a surface type where the turf layer is still present but the vegetation is sparse and mainly consists of Cryptogam crusts (DRM) and finally areas without the turf layer (BS). According to

  20. Nitrous oxide fluxes and nitrogen cycling along a pasture chronosequence in Central Amazonia, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wick, B.; Veldkamp, E.; de Mello, W. Z.; Keller, M.; Crill, P.

    2005-05-01

    We studied nitrous oxide (N2O) fluxes and soil nitrogen (N) cycling following forest conversion to pasture in the central Amazon near Santarém, Pará, Brazil. Two undisturbed forest sites and 27 pasture sites of 0.5 to 60 years were sampled once each during wet and dry seasons. In addition to soil-atmosphere fluxes of N2O we measured 27 soil chemical, soil microbiological and soil physical variables.

    Soil N2O fluxes were higher in the wet season than in the dry season. Fluxes of N2O from forest soils always exceeded fluxes from pasture soils and showed no consistent trend with pasture age. At our forest sites, nitrate was the dominant form of inorganic N both during wet and dry season. At our pasture sites nitrate generally dominated the inorganic N pools during the wet season and ammonium dominated during the dry season. Net mineralization and nitrification rates displayed large variations. During the dry season net immobilization of N was observed in some pastures. Compared to forest sites, young pasture sites (≤2 years) had low microbial biomass N and protease activities. Protease activity and microbial biomass N peaked in pastures of intermediate age (4 to 8 years) followed by consistently lower values in older pasture (10 to 60 years). The C/N ratio of litter was low at the forest sites (~25) and rapidly increased with pasture age reaching values of 60-70 at pastures of 15 years and older.

    Nitrous oxide emissions at our sites were controlled by C and N availability and soil aeration. Fluxes of N2O were negatively correlated to leaf litter C/N ratio, NH4+-N and the ratio of NO3--N to the sum of NO3--N + NH4+-N (indicators of N availability), and methane fluxes and bulk density (indicators of soil aeration status) during the wet season. During the dry season fluxes of N2O were positively correlated to microbial biomass N, β-glucosidase activity, total inorganic N stocks and NH4+-N. In our study

  1. Nitrous oxide fluxes and nitrogen cycling along a pasture chronosequence in Central Amazonia, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wick, B.; Veldkamp, E.; de Mello, W. Z.; Keller, M.; Crill, P.

    2005-08-01

    We studied nitrous oxide (N2O) fluxes and soil nitrogen (N) cycling following forest conversion to pasture in the central Amazon near Santarém, Pará, Brazil. Two undisturbed forest sites and 27 pasture sites of 0.5 to 60 years were sampled once each during wet and dry seasons. In addition to soil-atmosphere fluxes of N2O we measured 27 soil chemical, soil microbiological and soil physical variables.

    Soil N2O fluxes were higher in the wet season than in the dry season. Fluxes of N2O from forest soils always exceeded fluxes from pasture soils and showed no consistent trend with pasture age. At our forest sites, nitrate was the dominant form of inorganic N both during wet and dry season. At our pasture sites nitrate generally dominated the inorganic N pools during the wet season and ammonium dominated during the dry season. Net mineralization and nitrification rates displayed large variations. During the dry season net immobilization of N was observed in some pastures. Compared to forest sites, young pasture sites (≤2 years) had low microbial biomass N and protease activities. Protease activity and microbial biomass N peaked in pastures of intermediate age (4 to 8 years) followed by consistently lower values in older pasture (10 to 60 years). The C/N ratio of litter was low at the forest sites (~25) and rapidly increased with pasture age reaching values of 60-70 at pastures of 15 years and older.

    Nitrous oxide emissions at our sites were controlled by C and N availability and soil aeration. Fluxes of N2O were negatively correlated to leaf litter C/N ratio, NH4+-N and the ratio of NO3--N to the sum of NO3--N + NH4+-N (indicators of N availability), and methane fluxes and bulk density (indicators of soil aeration status) during the wet season. During the dry season fluxes of N2O were positively correlated to microbial biomass N, β-glucosidase activity, total inorganic N stocks and NH4+-N. In our study region, pastures of all age emitted

  2. Measuring larval nematode contamination on cattle pastures: Comparing two herbage sampling methods.

    PubMed

    Verschave, S H; Levecke, B; Duchateau, L; Vercruysse, J; Charlier, J

    2015-06-15

    Assessing levels of pasture larval contamination is frequently used to study the population dynamics of the free-living stages of parasitic nematodes of livestock. Direct quantification of infective larvae (L3) on herbage is the most applied method to measure pasture larval contamination. However, herbage collection remains labour intensive and there is a lack of studies addressing the variation induced by the sampling method and the required sample size. The aim of this study was (1) to compare two different sampling methods in terms of pasture larval count results and time required to sample, (2) to assess the amount of variation in larval counts at the level of sample plot, pasture and season, respectively and (3) to calculate the required sample size to assess pasture larval contamination with a predefined precision using random plots across pasture. Eight young stock pastures of different commercial dairy herds were sampled in three consecutive seasons during the grazing season (spring, summer and autumn). On each pasture, herbage samples were collected through both a double-crossed W-transect with samples taken every 10 steps (method 1) and four random located plots of 0.16 m(2) with collection of all herbage within the plot (method 2). The average (± standard deviation (SD)) pasture larval contamination using sampling methods 1 and 2 was 325 (± 479) and 305 (± 444)L3/kg dry herbage (DH), respectively. Large discrepancies in pasture larval counts of the same pasture and season were often seen between methods, but no significant difference (P = 0.38) in larval counts between methods was found. Less time was required to collect samples with method 2. This difference in collection time between methods was most pronounced for pastures with a surface area larger than 1 ha. The variation in pasture larval counts from samples generated by random plot sampling was mainly due to the repeated measurements on the same pasture in the same season (residual variance

  3. Grazing and abandonment determine different tree dynamics in wood-pastures.

    PubMed

    Oldén, Anna; Komonen, Atte; Tervonen, Kaisa; Halme, Panu

    2017-03-01

    Wood-pastures are threatened biotopes in which trees and livestock grazing maintain high conservation values. However, browsing may threaten tree regeneration, whereas abandonment leads to tree encroachment. We studied the regeneration of trees in a grazed and abandoned boreal wood-pastures. In grazed sites, the density of young spruces (Picea abies) was high, while the density of young birches (Betula spp.) was very low. Sprucification can be prevented only by removing spruces. The number of young birches and pines (Pinus sylvestris) was correlated with the number of junipers (Juniperus communis), probably because thorny junipers protect palatable seedlings from browsing. In abandoned sites, deciduous trees and spruces regenerated abundantly. In the long term, both grazing and abandonment lead to changes in tree species compositions and low diversity wood-pastures. Landscape scale planning and disturbance dynamics are needed for the creation of new wood-pastures and the maintenance of all pasture types within the landscape.

  4. The effectiveness of faecal removal methods of pasture management to control the cyathostomin burden of donkeys.

    PubMed

    Corbett, Christopher J; Love, Sandy; Moore, Anna; Burden, Faith A; Matthews, Jacqui B; Denwood, Matthew J

    2014-01-24

    The level of anthelmintic resistance within some cyathostomin parasite populations has increased to the level where sole reliance on anthelmintic-based control protocols is not possible. Management-based nematode control methods, including removal of faeces from pasture, are widely recommended for use in association with a reduction in anthelmintic use to reduce selection pressure for drug resistance; however, very little work has been performed to quantitatively assess the effectiveness of such methods. We analysed data obtained from 345 donkeys at The Donkey Sanctuary (Devon, UK), managed under three different pasture management techniques, to investigate the effectiveness of faeces removal in strongyle control in equids. The management groups were as follows: no removal of faeces from pasture, manual, twice-weekly removal of faeces from pasture and automatic, twice-weekly removal of faeces from pasture (using a mechanical pasture sweeper). From turn-out onto pasture in May, monthly faecal egg counts were obtained for each donkey and the dataset subjected to an auto regressive moving average model. There was little to no difference in faecal egg counts between the two methods of faecal removal; both resulted in significantly improved cyathostomin control compared to the results obtained from the donkeys that grazed pasture from which there was no faecal removal. This study represents a valuable and unique assessment of the effectiveness of the removal of equine faeces from pasture, and provides an evidence base from which to advocate twice-weekly removal of faeces from pasture as an adjunct for equid nematode control. Widespread adoption of this practice could substantially reduce anthelmintic usage, and hence reduce selection pressure for nematode resistance to the currently effective anthelmintic products.

  5. Spatio-temporal modelling of biomass of intensively grazed perennial dairy pastures using multispectral remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edirisinghe, Asoka; Clark, Dave; Waugh, Deanne

    2012-06-01

    Pasture biomass is a vital input for management of dairy systems in New Zealand. An accurate estimate of pasture biomass information is required for the calculation of feed budget, on which decisions are made for farm practices such as conservation, nitrogen use, rotational lengths and supplementary feeding leading to profitability and sustainable use of pasture resources. The traditional field based methods of measuring pasture biomass such as using rising plate metres (RPM) are largely inefficient in providing the timely information at the spatial extent and temporal frequency demanded by commercial environments. In recent times remote sensing has emerged as an alternative tool. In this paper we have examined the Normalised Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) derived from medium resolution imagery of SPOT-4 and SPOT-5 satellite sensors to predict pasture biomass of intensively grazed dairy pastures. In the space and time domain analysis we have found a significant dependency of time over the season and no dependency of space across the scene at a given time for the relationship between NDVI and field based pasture biomass. We have established a positive correlation (81%) between the two variables in a pixel scale analysis. The application of the model on 2 selected farms over 3 images and aggregation of the predicted biomass to paddock scale has produced paddock average pasture biomass values with a coefficient of determination of 0.71 and a standard error of 260 kg DM ha-1 in the field observed range between 1500 and 3500 kg DM ha-1. This result indicates a high potential for operational use of remotely sensed data to predict pasture biomass of intensively grazed dairy pastures.

  6. The effectiveness of faecal removal methods of pasture management to control the cyathostomin burden of donkeys

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The level of anthelmintic resistance within some cyathostomin parasite populations has increased to the level where sole reliance on anthelmintic-based control protocols is not possible. Management-based nematode control methods, including removal of faeces from pasture, are widely recommended for use in association with a reduction in anthelmintic use to reduce selection pressure for drug resistance; however, very little work has been performed to quantitatively assess the effectiveness of such methods. Methods We analysed data obtained from 345 donkeys at The Donkey Sanctuary (Devon, UK), managed under three different pasture management techniques, to investigate the effectiveness of faeces removal in strongyle control in equids. The management groups were as follows: no removal of faeces from pasture, manual, twice-weekly removal of faeces from pasture and automatic, twice-weekly removal of faeces from pasture (using a mechanical pasture sweeper). From turn-out onto pasture in May, monthly faecal egg counts were obtained for each donkey and the dataset subjected to an auto regressive moving average model. Results There was little to no difference in faecal egg counts between the two methods of faecal removal; both resulted in significantly improved cyathostomin control compared to the results obtained from the donkeys that grazed pasture from which there was no faecal removal. Conclusions This study represents a valuable and unique assessment of the effectiveness of the removal of equine faeces from pasture, and provides an evidence base from which to advocate twice-weekly removal of faeces from pasture as an adjunct for equid nematode control. Widespread adoption of this practice could substantially reduce anthelmintic usage, and hence reduce selection pressure for nematode resistance to the currently effective anthelmintic products. PMID:24460700

  7. Sustained functional composition of pollinators in restored pastures despite slow functional restoration of plants.

    PubMed

    Winsa, Marie; Öckinger, Erik; Bommarco, Riccardo; Lindborg, Regina; Roberts, Stuart P M; Wärnsberg, Johanna; Bartomeus, Ignasi

    2017-06-01

    Habitat restoration is a key measure to counteract negative impacts on biodiversity from habitat loss and fragmentation. To assess success in restoring not only biodiversity, but also functionality of communities, we should take into account the re-assembly of species trait composition across taxa. Attaining such functional restoration would depend on the landscape context, vegetation structure, and time since restoration. We assessed how trait composition of plant and pollinator (bee and hoverfly) communities differ between abandoned, restored (formerly abandoned) or continuously grazed (intact) semi-natural pastures. In restored pastures, we also explored trait composition in relation to landscape context, vegetation structure, and pasture management history. Abandoned pastures differed from intact and restored pastures in trait composition of plant communities, and as expected, had lower abundances of species with traits associated with grazing adaptations. Further, plant trait composition in restored pastures became increasingly similar to that in intact pastures with increasing time since restoration. On the contrary, the trait composition of pollinator communities in both abandoned and restored pastures remained similar to intact pastures. The trait composition for both bees and hoverflies was influenced by flower abundance and, for bees, by connectivity to other intact grasslands in the landscape. The divergent responses across organism groups appeared to be mainly related to the limited dispersal ability and long individual life span in plants, the high mobility of pollinators, and the dependency of semi-natural habitat for bees. Our results, encompassing restoration effects on trait composition for multiple taxa along a gradient in both time (time since restoration) and space (connectivity), reveal how interacting communities of plants and pollinators are shaped by different trait-environmental relationships. Complete functional restoration of pastures

  8. Prevalence and concentration of Salmonella and Campylobacter in the processing environment of small-scale pastured broiler farms

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A growing niche in the locally grown food movement is the small scale production of broiler chickens using the pasture-raised poultry production model. Little research exists that focuses on Salmonella and Campylobacter contamination in the environment associated with on-farm processing of pasture-r...

  9. [Statistical prediction of radioactive contamination impacts on agricultural pasture lands].

    PubMed

    Spiridonov, S I; Ivanov, V V

    2014-01-01

    Based on the literature data analysis, the rationale is given for the use of probabilistic approaches to solve the problems of estimation of a long-lived radionuclide uptake in animal products. Methods for statistical prediction of radioactive contamination consequences for agricultural pasture lands have been devised and implemented in the form of models and program modules. These offer the estimation of radionuclide transfer between the links of an agricultural chain, taking into account variability in the migration parameters, estimation of soil contamination limits based on the preset risk levels for the stuffs produced and statistical coordination of standards. An illustration is given of the application of the above methods using statistical characteristics of 137Cs migration parameters in the soil-plant-animal produce chain. Further trends have been formulated in the development of the risk concept as applied to the assessment of radioecological situations of radioactive contamination of the agricultural land.

  10. Protein and energy utilization by ruminants at pasture.

    PubMed

    Poppi, D P; McLennan, S R

    1995-01-01

    Low live weight gain of cattle in the wet season of tropical areas was identified as a major limitation to achieving annual growth rates from tropical pasture systems sufficient to meet new market specifications of young animals of high carcass weight. Both protein and energy are limiting nutrients for growth. Net transfer of feed protein to the intestines is often not complete, and losses occur with grasses and legumes when CP content exceeds 210 g of CP/kg of digestible OM. This protein loss is important because a collation of experimental data indicated that cattle consuming low- and high-quality pasture and silage-based diets all responded to extra protein. The response was less for the higher-quality forage. The role of legumes in supplying this protein was investigated and, unless legumes can increase total DMI by at least 30%, they will not supply sufficient intestinal protein to increase live weight gain by about 300 g/d. The problem with legumes and some grasses is the loss of protein from the rumen, and increasing energy supply to the rumen, either through improved digestibility or energy supplements, is a strategy that could be used to reduce this. Strategies to increase the proportion of escape protein would be successful, but incorporation of lowly degradable protein fractions into legumes may be more difficult because of the level of expression of these protein fractions required for a significant live weight gain response. Cattle entering the wet season usually exhibit compensatory growth and are exposed to high ambient temperatures and often to high humidity. Intestinal protein above that stipulated in feeding standards may be beneficial in these circumstances, and more emphasis should be placed on the ability of legumes to supply protein postruminally. At present the protein delivery capacity of agronomically competitive legumes seems to be inadequate for the higher growth rates required in production systems, and supplements of energy and protein

  11. Endotoxin concentrations within the breathing zone of horses are higher in stables than on pasture.

    PubMed

    Berndt, Annerose; Derksen, Frederik J; Edward Robinson, N

    2010-01-01

    Inflammatory airway disease is common in stabled horses, with a prevalence of 17.3% in Michigan pleasure horses. Stable dust is rich in endotoxin, which may induce neutrophilic airway inflammation. Climatological conditions (ambient temperature and relative humidity) may influence endotoxin concentrations in pastures. The aim of this project was to determine if endotoxin levels in the breathing zone of horses in stables were higher than of horses on pasture, and if the endotoxin on pasture was associated with climatological conditions. Endotoxin exposure of six horses that were stabled or on pasture was determined by a Limulus amebocyte lysate assay. Climatological data were obtained from the US National Climatic Data Center. Endotoxin exposure was significantly higher (about 8-fold) in stables than on pasture. On pasture, endotoxin varied widely, despite constant climatological conditions. It was concluded that stabled horses are exposed to higher endotoxin concentrations than horses on pastures. Local endotoxin concentrations may be more important than ambient climatological conditions in determining endotoxin exposure of individual horses. Copyright 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Assessing effects of climate change and adaptation strategies on irrigated pastures using DAISY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagimoto, Y.; Cuenca, R. H.

    2013-12-01

    The DAISY ecological model was applied for the flood-irrigated cool-season pastures in the Upper Klamath Basin, Oregon to study 1) the current condition of the pastures in the semi-arid environment, 2) effects of projected climate change, and 3) effects of introducing white clover and a sprinkler system as a potential adaptation strategy. The calibrated model indicated that productivity of the cool-season pastures was limited primarily by nitrogen (N) availability and temperature. The results of our scenario analysis indicated that the projected climate change would increase seasonal forage production (YF) and crop water use (AET) due to longer and warmer growing season. This study also found that introduction of white clover would significantly increase YF without changing AET by improving N availability due to increased nutrients deposition by cattle and increased symbiotic N fixation by white clover. In consequence, the mixed pasture could significantly improve water use efficiency (YF/AET) and, therefore the adaptability of the pasture in an area with high value water. Installing sprinkler system to the mixed pasture would increase YF by increasing net N input by increasing N mineralization and reducing denitrification. Furthermore, upgraded irrigation systems could increase water availability of the area during growing season by releasing significant amount of subsurface water to nearby surface water pools. This study demonstrated that ecological models such as DAISY can be a useful tool to model pasture systems and assess effects of projected climate changes and adaptation strategies.

  13. Reviving wood-pastures for biodiversity and people: A case study from western Estonia.

    PubMed

    Roellig, Marlene; Sutcliffe, Laura M E; Sammul, Marek; von Wehrden, Henrik; Newig, Jens; Fischer, Joern

    2016-03-01

    Wood-pastures are associated with high cultural and biodiversity values in Europe. However, due to their relatively low productivity, large areas of wood-pastures have been lost over the last century. In some areas, incentive schemes have been developed to revive wood-pastures. We investigated the effects of one such scheme in western Estonia. We compared the structure of grazed wood-pastures (old and restored) to those of abandoned wood-pastures and ungrazed forest stands to explore the effects of management, and conducted interviews with 24 farmers to investigate their motivations to carry out the management. We found a positive influence of active management on the semi-open structure of wood-pastures. Financial support was vital for management, but personal values related to tradition also played an important role. The interviewees differed widely in their range of motivations, suggesting that other strategies in addition to financial incentives would further improve the management of wood-pastures in the region.

  14. Conversion of Grazed Pastures to Energy Cane as a Biofuel Feedstock Alters Soil GHG Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Casanovas, N.; DeLucia, N.; Bernacchi, C.; DeLucia, E. H.

    2013-12-01

    Changes in land use profoundly affect climate through variations in soil Greenhouse Gas (GHG) exchange. The need for alternative energies is accelerating land use change as marginal land or managed ecosystems are being converted to highly productive second-generation bioenergy crops such as energy cane (Saccharum spp. L). Although the deployment of energy cane is a promising strategy to meet global bioenergy industry demands, few studies have investigated soil GHG fluxes in these crops and sub-tropical low-intensity grazing pasture (bahiagrass, Paspalum notatum L., as forage for cattle, Bos taurus L.) with which they are competing for land. Here, we showed that soil N2O fluxes in bioenergy crops were higher (>250%) than those observed in pastures following fertilization when soil moisture and temperature were high. In the absence of recent fertilization, the N2O source strength in energy cane and pasture sites was similar. Under drier and cooler soil conditions, both pastures and bioenergy crops were weak sources of N2O even when energy cane plots were recently fertilized. Soils on grazed pastures were sources of CH4 during the wet season but became sinks under drier, colder conditions. Energy cane plantations were weak sources of CH4 over a complete wet-dry seasonal cycle. The heterotrophic component of soil respiration was larger (139-155%) in pastures than in energy cane crops, suggesting lower decomposition of SOC in bioenergy crops. In terms of global warming potential, grazed pastures were stronger (120-150%) soil GHG emitters than energy cane crops over a complete wet-dry seasonal cycle. Moreover, pastures became a substantial source of GHG emitters when including estimates of CH4 flux from cattle. Our results suggest that the conversion of pasture to energy cane will be beneficial in relation to GHGs emitted from soils and cattle. Improved understanding of land use impact on soil GHG dynamics will provide valuable information for decision makers debating

  15. Cadmium concentrations in new zealand pastures: relationships to soil and climate variables.

    PubMed

    Reiser, René; Simmler, Michael; Portmann, Denise; Clucas, Lynne; Schulin, Rainer; Robinson, Brett

    2014-05-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a nonessential element that occurs at above-background concentrations in many New Zealand (NZ) soils. Most of this Cd is due to the historical application of single superphosphate that was made from Nauru phosphate rock containing between 400 and 600 mg Cd kg P. Pasture Cd uptake exacerbates the entry of Cd into animal products. We sought to determine the critical environmental factors affecting Cd uptake in NZ pastures and to calculate the likely Cd intake of sheep and cattle. We tested 69 pastures throughout NZ for a range of variables, including Cd. Soil Cd and pasture Cd were positively correlated with soil P and soil concentrations of other elements found in phosphate fertilizers. We found that no single environmental variable adequately predicted pasture Cd uptake. Nevertheless, pseudo-total soil Cd and Cd extracted using a 0.05 mol L Ca(NO) solution were positively correlated with pasture Cd. Although soil pH, soil Fe, and soil Cd provided an excellent predictor of the Ca(NO)-extractable soil Cd fraction, regression models explained just 38% of the variation of the Cd concentration in pasture grasses. Incorporating the effect of pasture species composition is a crucial next step in improving these models. A calculation of the likely exposure to Cd of sheep and cattle revealed that no pastures tested resulted in sheep and cattle ingesting Cd at a rate that would result in breaching muscle-tissue food standards. For offal products, which the NZ meat industry does not sell for human consumption, food safety standards exceedence was calculated in a few cases.

  16. More Stable Productivity of Semi Natural Grasslands than Sown Pastures in a Seasonally Dry Climate

    PubMed Central

    Ospina, Sonia; Rusch, Graciela M.; Pezo, Danilo; Casanoves, Fernando; Sinclair, Fergus L.

    2012-01-01

    In the Neotropics the predominant pathway to intensify productivity is generally thought to be to convert grasslands to sown pastures, mostly in monoculture. This article examines how above-ground net primary productivity (ANPP) in semi-natural grasslands and sown pastures in Central America respond to rainfall by: (i) assessing the relationships between ANPP and accumulated rainfall and indices of rainfall distribution, (ii) evaluating the variability of ANPP between and within seasons, and (iii) estimating the temporal stability of ANPP. We conducted sequential biomass harvests during 12 periods of 22 days and related those to rainfall. There were significant relationships between ANPP and cumulative rainfall in 22-day periods for both vegetation types and a model including a linear and quadratic term explained 74% of the variation in the data. There was also a significant correlation between ANPP and the number of rainfall events for both vegetation types. Sown pastures had higher ANPP increments per unit rainfall and higher ANPP at the peak of the rainy season than semi-natural grasslands. In contrast, semi-natural grasslands showed higher ANPP early in the dry season. The temporal stability of ANPP was higher in semi-natural grasslands than in the sown pastures in the dry season and over a whole annual cycle. Our results reveal that, contrary to conventional thinking amongst pasture scientists, there appears to be no increase in ANPP arising from replacing semi-natural grasslands with sown pastures under prevailing pasture management practices in seasonally dry climates, while the temporal distribution of ANPP is more even in semi-natural grasslands. Neither sown pastures nor semi-natural grasslands are productive towards the end of the dry season, indicating the potential importance of the widespread practice of retaining tree cover in pastures. PMID:22590506

  17. Influence of streambank fencing on the environmental quality of cattle-excluded pastures.

    PubMed

    Miller, J J; Chanasyk, D S; Curtis, T; Willms, W D

    2010-01-01

    Limited information exists on the effect of streambank fencing on riparian zone pastures. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that 4 to 6 yr of streambank fencing would improve the environmental quality of the cattle-excluded pasture compared with the grazed pasture and cause the fenced pasture to act as a buffer or filter strip. Rangeland health, vegetative and soil properties, and rainfall simulation runoff were measured in the cattle-excluded and adjacent grazed native pastures along the fenced reach of the Lower Little Bow River in southern Alberta, Canada, for 3 yr (2005-2007). Rangeland health was improved (health score increase from 55 to 72%); vegetation cover (13-21%) and standing litter (38-742%) were increased; and bare soil (72-93%) and soil bulk density (6-8%) were decreased under cattle exclusion, indicating an improvement in environmental quality from streambank fencing. In contrast, other vegetation (total and live basal area, fallen litter) and soil properties (soil water and soil C, N, and P) were not improved by cattle exclusion. Cattle exclusion significantly (P pasture, suggesting that this fenced pasture may act as a buffer for certain runoff variables. In contrast, other runoff variables (turbidity, electrical conductivity, pH, concentrations and loads of total suspended solids, and certain N and P fractions) in the cattle-excluded pasture were generally not improved by streambank fencing. Overall, streambank fencing improved the quality of certain environmental variables within the cattle-excluded pasture.

  18. Using remotely sensed vegetation indices to model ecological pasture conditions in Kara-Unkur watershed, Kyrgyzstan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masselink, Loes; Baartman, Jantiene; Verbesselt, Jan; Borchardt, Peter

    2017-04-01

    Kyrgyzstan has a long history of nomadic lifestyle in which pastures play an important role. However, currently the pastures are subject to severe grazing-induced degradation. Deteriorating levels of biomass, palatability and biodiversity reduce the pastures' productivity. To counter this and introduce sustainable pasture management, up-to-date information regarding the ecological conditions of the pastures is essential. This research aimed to investigate the potential of a remote sensing-based methodology to detect changing ecological pasture conditions in the Kara-Unkur watershed, Kyrgyzstan. The relations between Vegetation Indices (VIs) from Landsat ETM+ images and biomass, palatability and species richness field data were investigated. Both simple and multiple linear regression (MLR) analyses, including terrain attributes, were applied. Subsequently, trends of these three pasture conditions were mapped using time series analysis. The results show that biomass is most accurately estimated by a model including the Modified Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index (MSAVI) and a slope factor (R2 = 0.65, F = 0.0006). Regarding palatability, a model including the Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI), Northness Index, Near Infrared (NIR) and Red band was most accurate (R2 = 0.61, F = 0.0160). Species richness was most accurately estimated by a model including Topographic Wetness Index (TWI), Eastness Index and estimated biomass (R2 = 0.81, F = 0.0028). Subsequent trend analyses of all three estimated ecological pasture conditions presented very similar trend patterns. Despite the need for a more robust validation, this study confirms the high potential of a remote sensing based methodology to detect changing ecological pasture conditions.

  19. More stable productivity of semi natural grasslands than sown pastures in a seasonally dry climate.

    PubMed

    Ospina, Sonia; Rusch, Graciela M; Pezo, Danilo; Casanoves, Fernando; Sinclair, Fergus L

    2012-01-01

    In the Neotropics the predominant pathway to intensify productivity is generally thought to be to convert grasslands to sown pastures, mostly in monoculture. This article examines how above-ground net primary productivity (ANPP) in semi-natural grasslands and sown pastures in Central America respond to rainfall by: (i) assessing the relationships between ANPP and accumulated rainfall and indices of rainfall distribution, (ii) evaluating the variability of ANPP between and within seasons, and (iii) estimating the temporal stability of ANPP. We conducted sequential biomass harvests during 12 periods of 22 days and related those to rainfall. There were significant relationships between ANPP and cumulative rainfall in 22-day periods for both vegetation types and a model including a linear and quadratic term explained 74% of the variation in the data. There was also a significant correlation between ANPP and the number of rainfall events for both vegetation types. Sown pastures had higher ANPP increments per unit rainfall and higher ANPP at the peak of the rainy season than semi-natural grasslands. In contrast, semi-natural grasslands showed higher ANPP early in the dry season. The temporal stability of ANPP was higher in semi-natural grasslands than in the sown pastures in the dry season and over a whole annual cycle. Our results reveal that, contrary to conventional thinking amongst pasture scientists, there appears to be no increase in ANPP arising from replacing semi-natural grasslands with sown pastures under prevailing pasture management practices in seasonally dry climates, while the temporal distribution of ANPP is more even in semi-natural grasslands. Neither sown pastures nor semi-natural grasslands are productive towards the end of the dry season, indicating the potential importance of the widespread practice of retaining tree cover in pastures.

  20. Reduced deep soil water uptake through forest conversion to pasture in Amazonia

    SciTech Connect

    Jipp, P.H.; Nepstad, D.C. Woods Hole Research Center, MA )

    1993-06-01

    Forests of eastern Amazonia are being replaced by pastures and secondary forests. We measured soil water storage and flux in adjacent forest and pasture ecosystems using Time Domain Reflectometry sensors installed in the walls of deep (9-m) shafts. The forest withdrew 597+/-25 mm of soil water stored below 1 m depth during the 1991 dry season (Jun-Dec), 1.7 times more than the pasture. Uptake from the bottom of the forest soil profile continued even after rainfall resumed in early 1992. The hydrologic impacts of tropical deforestation may be most severe for evergreen forests with deep rooting zones in areas of seasonal drought.

  1. Effects of pasture management and off-stream water on temporal/spatial distribution of cattle and stream bank characteristics in cool-season grass pastures.

    PubMed

    Schwarte, K A; Russell, J R; Morrical, D G

    2011-10-01

    A 2-yr grazing experiment was conducted to assess the effects of grazing management on cattle distribution and pasture and stream bank characteristics. Six 12.1-ha cool-season grass pastures in central Iowa were allotted to 1 of 3 treatments: continuous stocking with unrestricted stream access (CSU), continuous stocking with stream access restricted to 4.9-m-wide stabilized crossings (CSR), or rotational stocking with stream access restricted to a riparian paddock (RP). Pastures were stocked with 15 fall-calving Angus cows (Bos taurus L.) from mid-May to mid-October for 153 d in 2008 and 2009. A global positioning system (GPS) collar recording cow position every 10 min was placed on at least 1 cow per pasture for 2 wk of each month from May through September. Off-stream water was provided to cattle in CSU and CSR treatments during the second of the 2 wk when GPS collars were on the cattle. A black globe temperature relative humidity index (BGTHI) was measured at 10-min intervals to match the time of the GPS measurements. Each month of the grazing season, forage characteristics (sward height, forage mass, and CP, IVDMD, and P concentrations) and bare and fecal-covered ground were measured. Stream bank erosion susceptibility was visually scored in May, August, and October (pre-, mid-, and post-stocking). Cattle in RP and CSR treatments spent less time (P < 0.10) within the stream zone (0 to 3 m from stream center) in June and August and in the streamside zone (0 to 33 m from stream zone) in May through August and May through September, respectively, than cattle in CSU pastures. However, off-stream water had no effect on cattle distribution. Compared with the CSU treatment, the CSR treatment reduced the probability (P < 0.10) that cattle were within the riparian zone (0 to 36 m from stream center) at BGTHI of 50 to 100. Bare ground was greater (P < 0.10) in pastures with the CSU than CSR and RP treatments in the stream and streamside zones in September and October and

  2. FORAGES AND PASTURES SYMPOSIUM: Improving efficiency of production in pasture- and range-based beef and dairy systems.

    PubMed

    Mulliniks, J T; Rius, A G; Edwards, M A; Edwards, S R; Hobbs, J D; Nave, R L G

    2015-06-01

    Despite overall increased production in the last century, it is critical that grazing production systems focus on improving beef and dairy efficiency to meet current and future global food demands. For livestock producers, production efficiency is essential to maintain long-term profitability and sustainability. This continued viability of production systems using pasture- and range-based grazing systems requires more rapid adoption of innovative management practices and selection tools that increase profitability by optimizing grazing management and increasing reproductive performance. Understanding the genetic variation in cow herds will provide the ability to select cows that require less energy for maintenance, which can potentially reduce total energy utilization or energy required for production, consequently improving production efficiency and profitability. In the United States, pasture- and range-based grazing systems vary tremendously across various unique environments that differ in climate, topography, and forage production. This variation in environmental conditions contributes to the challenges of developing or targeting specific genetic components and grazing systems that lead to increased production efficiency. However, across these various environments and grazing management systems, grazable forage remains the least expensive nutrient source to maintain productivity of the cow herd. Beef and dairy cattle can capitalize on their ability to utilize these feed resources that are not usable for other production industries. Therefore, lower-cost alternatives to feeding harvested and stored feedstuffs have the opportunity to provide to livestock producers a sustainable and efficient forage production system. However, increasing production efficiency within a given production environment would vary according to genetic potential (i.e., growth and milk potential), how that genetic potential fits the respective production environment, and how the grazing

  3. A Case Study of Behaviour and Performance of Confined or Pastured Cows During the Dry Period

    PubMed Central

    Black, Randi A.; Krawczel, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    Simple Summary Pasture and freestall systems offer benefits and consequences during lactation but have not been investigated during the dry period. The effect of pasture or confined systems during the dry period on behaviour and milk quality was investigated. Freestall housing resulted in more resting behaviour and less locomotor activity during the dry period compared to pastured cows. At calving, freestall housed cows performed fewer lying bouts and less locomotor activity compared to pastured cows. Pasture resulted in less aggression around feeding but high respiration rates during peak heat times. Pasture during the dry period altered lying behavior, reduced feed bunk aggression and increased heat stress behaviors. Abstract The objectives of this study were to determine the effect of the dry cow management system (pasture or confined) on: (1) lying behaviour and activity; (2) feeding and heat stress behaviours; (3) intramammary infections, postpartum. Non-lactating Holstein cows were assigned to either deep-bedded, sand freestalls (n = 14) or pasture (n = 14) using rolling enrollment. At dry-off, cows were equipped with an accelerometer to determine daily lying time (h/d), lying bouts (bouts/d), steps (steps/d) and divided into periods: far-off (60 to 15 d prepartum), close-up (14 to 1 d prepartum), calving (calving date) and postpartum (1 to 14 d postpartum). Respiration rates were recorded once weekly from dry off to calving from 1300 to 1500 h. Feeding displacements were defined as one cow successfully displacing another from the feed bunk and were recorded once per week during the 2 h period, immediately after feeding at 800 h. Pastured cows were fed a commercial dry cow pellet during far-off and total mixed ration during close-up, with free access to hay and grazing. Freestall housed cows were fed a total mixed ration at far-off and close-up. Cows housed in freestalls were moved to a maternity pen with a mattress at commencement of labour. Pastured cows

  4. C storage in Amazonia pastures, effects of age, climate and management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klumpp, Katja; Stahl, Clement; Blanfort, Vincent; Fontaine, Sebstien; Burban, Benoit; Darsonville, Olivier

    2016-04-01

    The Amazonian region is one of the major C storing areas, with 36-60% of ecosystem C being stored in forest soils. During last decades, more than 15% of Amazonian tropical forest has been converted to pastures. A number of studies provide evidence that soil C stocks of topsoil (0-20 cm) can be higher in grasslands than in native forests after more than 20 years after conversion (e.g. Don et al 2011). As for younger pastures (< 20 years old), results are less evident, showing either an increase or decrease of in topsoil C stock. The absence of a clear pattern was mostly explained due to conjoined changes following deforestation, such as climate conditions and pasture management. Accordingly, the question remains whether tropical permanent pastures can restore soil C stocks after deforestation and what is the capacity of tropical pastures to initiate a recurrent C storage. Pastures are largely affected by agricultural practices, influencing their carbon balance, in interaction with climate effect. In the past 10 years two major droughts (in 2005 and 2010 [2]) were reported for the Amazonian area. A better insight on effects of climatic variability and agricultural management on carbon storage is, thus, valuable to improve/maintain C storage of pastures in tropical regions. Here we like to assess whether tropical permanent pastures i) can restore soil C stocks after deforestation; ii) and to what extend and iii) which role play management practices with respect to climate variability to maintain a recurrent C storage. To establish reliable estimates of soil C storage in Amazonian region, the net C balance of pastures and native forests was quantified by two independent and complementary studies in French Guiana: a chronosequence study including a soil inventory of soil C stocks (0-100 cm depth) in 24 pastures of various ages (i.e. 0 to 42 yrs after deforestation) and 4 native forests, and 5 years of eddy covariance flux measurements (EC) for a young intensively used

  5. Afforestation or intense pasturing improve the ecological and economic value of abandoned tropical farmlands

    PubMed Central

    Knoke, Thomas; Bendix, Jörg; Pohle, Perdita; Hamer, Ute; Hildebrandt, Patrick; Roos, Kristin; Gerique, Andrés; Sandoval, María L.; Breuer, Lutz; Tischer, Alexander; Silva, Brenner; Calvas, Baltazar; Aguirre, Nikolay; Castro, Luz M.; Windhorst, David; Weber, Michael; Stimm, Bernd; Günter, Sven; Palomeque, Ximena; Mora, Julio; Mosandl, Reinhard; Beck, Erwin

    2014-01-01

    Increasing demands for livelihood resources in tropical rural areas have led to progressive clearing of biodiverse natural forests. Restoration of abandoned farmlands could counter this process. However, as aims and modes of restoration differ in their ecological and socio-economic value, the assessment of achievable ecosystem functions and benefits requires holistic investigation. Here we combine the results from multidisciplinary research for a unique assessment based on a normalization of 23 ecological, economic and social indicators for four restoration options in the tropical Andes of Ecuador. A comparison of the outcomes among afforestation with native alder or exotic pine, pasture restoration with either low-input or intense management and the abandoned status quo shows that both variants of afforestation and intense pasture use improve the ecological value, but low-input pasture does not. Economic indicators favour either afforestation or intense pasturing. Both Mestizo and indigenous Saraguro settlers are more inclined to opt for afforestation. PMID:25425182

  6. Stocker performance and production in mixed tall fescue-bermudagrass pastures of the Southern Piedmont USA

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Stocker performance and production from mixed cool- and warm-season perennial pastures are important determinants of agricultural sustainability that can be influenced by management. We evaluated the factorial combination of three sources of nutrient application (inorganic only, organic + inorganic...

  7. Forage dynamics in mixed tall fescue-bermudagras pastures of the Southern Piedmont USA

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Botanical composition and forage productivity of mixed cool- and warm-season perennial pastures are important determinants of agricultural sustainability that can be influenced by management. We evaluated the factorial combination of three sources of nutrient application (inorganic only, organic + ...

  8. Afforestation or intense pasturing improve the ecological and economic value of abandoned tropical farmlands.

    PubMed

    Knoke, Thomas; Bendix, Jörg; Pohle, Perdita; Hamer, Ute; Hildebrandt, Patrick; Roos, Kristin; Gerique, Andrés; Sandoval, María L; Breuer, Lutz; Tischer, Alexander; Silva, Brenner; Calvas, Baltazar; Aguirre, Nikolay; Castro, Luz M; Windhorst, David; Weber, Michael; Stimm, Bernd; Günter, Sven; Palomeque, Ximena; Mora, Julio; Mosandl, Reinhard; Beck, Erwin

    2014-11-26

    Increasing demands for livelihood resources in tropical rural areas have led to progressive clearing of biodiverse natural forests. Restoration of abandoned farmlands could counter this process. However, as aims and modes of restoration differ in their ecological and socio-economic value, the assessment of achievable ecosystem functions and benefits requires holistic investigation. Here we combine the results from multidisciplinary research for a unique assessment based on a normalization of 23 ecological, economic and social indicators for four restoration options in the tropical Andes of Ecuador. A comparison of the outcomes among afforestation with native alder or exotic pine, pasture restoration with either low-input or intense management and the abandoned status quo shows that both variants of afforestation and intense pasture use improve the ecological value, but low-input pasture does not. Economic indicators favour either afforestation or intense pasturing. Both Mestizo and indigenous Saraguro settlers are more inclined to opt for afforestation.

  9. Soil organic matter dynamics during 80 years of reforestation of tropical pastures

    Treesearch

    Erika Marin-Spiotta; Whendee L. Silver; Christopher W. Swanston; Rebecca. Ostertag

    2009-01-01

    Our research takes advantage of a historical trend in natural reforestation of abandoned tropical pastures to examine changes in soil carbon (C) during 80 years of secondary forest regrowth. We combined a chronosequence...

  10. Salinity tolerance of foxtail barley (Hordeum jubatum) and desirable pasture grasses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Greenhouse studies were conducted to determine the relative salinity tolerance of foxtail barley and seven desirable pasture grasses. Grass species were reed canarygrass, timothy, altai wildrye, tall fescue, tall wheatgrass, orchardgrass, creeping meadow foxtail, and foxtail barley. Grasses were e...

  11. Composition and aroma compounds of Ragusano cheese: native pasture and total mixed rations.

    PubMed

    Carpino, S; Mallia, S; La Terra, S; Melilli, C; Licitra, G; Acree, T E; Barbano, D M; Van Soest, P J

    2004-04-01

    Raw milk from 13 cows fed TMR supplemented with native pasture and from 13 cows fed only TMR on one farm was collected separately 4 times with an interval of 15 d between collections. Two blocks (14 kg each) of cheese were made from each milk. The objective was to determine the influence of consumption of native plants in Sicilian pastures on the aroma compounds present in Ragusano cheese. Milk from cows that consumed native pasture plants produced cheeses with more odor-active compounds. In 4-mo-old cheese made from milk of pasture-fed cows, 27 odor-active compounds were identified, whereas only 13 were detected in cheese made from milk of total mixed ration-fed cows. The pasture cheeses were much more rich in odor-active aldehyde, ester, and terpenoid compounds than cheeses from cows fed only total mixed ration. A total of 8 unique aroma-active compounds (i.e., not reported in other cheeses evaluated by gas chromatography olfactory) were detected in Ragusano cheese made from milk from cows consuming native Sicilian pasture plants. These compounds were 2 aldehydes ([E,E]-2,4-octadienal and dodecanal), 2 esters (geranyl acetate and [E]-methyl jasmonate), 1 sulfur compound (methionol), and 3 terpenoid compounds (1-carvone, L(-) carvone, and citronellol). Geranyl acetate and (E)-methyl jasmonate were particularly interesting because these compounds are released from fresh plants as they are being damaged and are part of a possible plant defense mechanism against damage from insects. Most of the odor-active compounds that were unique in Ragusano cheese from pasture-fed cows appeared to be compounds created by oxidation processes in the plants that may have occurred during foraging and ingestion by the cow. Some odor-active compounds were consistently present in pasture cheeses that were not detected in the total mixed ration cheeses or in the 14 species of pasture plants analyzed. Either these compounds were present in other plants not analyzed, created in the rumen

  12. Fire in the Brazilian Amazon 2. Biomass, nutrient pools and losses in cattle pastures.

    PubMed

    Boone Kauffman, J; Cummings, D L; Ward, D E

    1998-01-01

    Conversion to cattle pasture is the most common fate of the ≈426,000 km(2) of tropical forest that has been deforested in the Brazilian Amazon. Yet little is known about the biomass, C, nutrient pools, or their responses to the frequent fires occurring in these pastures. We sampled biomass, nutrient pools and their losses or transformation during fire in three Amazonian cattle pastures with typical, but different, land-use histories. Total aboveground biomass (TAGB) ranged from to 53 to 119 Mg ha(-1). Residual wood debris from the forests that formally occupied the sites composed the majority of TAGB (47-87%). Biomass of fine fuels, principally pasture grasses, was ≈16-29 Mg ha(-1). Grasses contained as much as 52% of the aboveground K pool and the grass and litter components combined composed as much as 88% of the aboveground P pool. Fires consumed 21-84% of the TAGB. Losses of C to the atmosphere ranged from 11 to 21 Mg ha(-1) and N losses ranged from 205 to 261 kg ha(-1). Losses of S, P, Ca, and K were <33 kg ha(-1). There were no changes in surface soil (0-10 cm) nutrient concentration in pastures compared to adjacent primary forests. Fires occur frequently in cattle pastures (i.e., about every 2 years) and pastures are now likely the most common type of land burned in Amazonia. The first 6 years of a pastures existence would likely include the primary forest slash fire and three pasture fires. Based upon our results, the cumulative losses of N from these fires would be 1935 kg ha(-1) (equivalent to 94% of the aboveground pool of primary forest). Postfire aboveground C pools in old pastures are as low as 3% of those in adjacent primary forest. The initial primary forest slash fire and the repeated fires occurring in the pastures result in the majority of aboveground C and nutrient pools being released via combustion processes rather than decomposition processes.

  13. Pasture intake and milk production of dairy cows rotationally grazing on multi-species swards.

    PubMed

    Roca-Fernández, A I; Peyraud, J L; Delaby, L; Delagarde, R

    2016-09-01

    Increasing plant species diversity has been proposed as a means for enhancing annual pasture productivity and decreasing seasonal variability of pasture production facing more frequent drought scenarios due to climate change. Few studies have examined how botanical complexity of sown swards affects cow performance. A 2-year experiment was conducted to determine how sward botanical complexity, from a monoculture of ryegrass to multi-species swards (MSS) (grasses-legumes-forb), affect pasture chemical composition and nutritive value, pasture dry matter (DM) intake, milk production and milk solids production of grazing dairy cows. Five sward species: perennial ryegrass (L as Lolium), white clover and red clover (both referred to as T as Trifolium because they were always sown together), chicory (C as Cichorium) and tall fescue (F as Festuca) were assigned to four grazing treatments by combining one (L), three (LT), four (LTC) or five (LTCF) species. Hereafter, the LT swards are called mixed swards as a single combination of ryegrass and clovers, whereas LTC and LTCF swards are called MSS as a combination of at least four species from three botanical families. The experimental area (8.7 ha) was divided into four block replicates with a mineral nitrogen fertilisation of 75 kg N/ha per year for each treatment. In total, 13 grazing rotations were carried out by applying the same grazing calendar and the same pasture allowance of 19 kg DM/cow per day above 4 cm for all treatments. Clover represented 20% of DM for mixed and MSS swards; chicory represented 30% of DM for MSS and tall fescue represented 10% of DM for LTCF swards. Higher milk production (+1.1 kg/day) and milk solids production (+0.08 kg/day) were observed for mixed swards than for ryegrass swards. Pasture nutritive value and pasture DM intake were unaffected by the inclusion of clover. Pasture DM, organic matter and NDF concentrations were lower for MSS than for mixed swards. Higher milk production (+0.8 kg

  14. Enhancing the profitability of pasture-based dairy production in the humid tropics through improved nutrition.

    PubMed

    van Houtert, M F; Sykes, A R

    1999-01-27

    Dairy production in the tropics represents a major challenge, especially when reliant on grazed forages, because of the conflicting factors of a high nutritional demand to sustain lactation on the one hand, and the relatively low quality of tropical grasses and a stressful environment, on the other. This paper focuses primarily on those tropical situations where grazed pasture is the cheapest feed resource. Effective management of the pasture as well as the animals that graze it is required in order to maximize economic viability of the farming enterprise. Feed planning helps to ensure that pasture use is maximized, either directly by grazing or, where profitable, indirectly by cutting for conservation. High rates of pasture utilization at each grazing minimize pasture senescence and decay and ensure that pasture remains in a vegetative state of the highest possible nutritional quality. Total annual feed requirements of the grazing herd must therefore be matched as closely as possible to the total annual pasture production on the farm. Stocking rate is critical in this regard, and is the single most important determinant of productivity in pastoral farming. Periods of pasture surplus or deficit will inevitably arise, but can be minimized by matching the monthly feed requirements of the herd as closely as possible to the monthly feed production on the farm. Herd requirements can be influenced, for example, through altering calving patterns and drying off dates. Even with good pasture management practices, it is highly likely that tropical pasture quality will be low for part of the year. Utilization of low-quality forages can be improved through the appropriate use of feed supplements, and the key principles are discussed. Firstly, conditions for optimum fermentative digestion in the rumen must be promoted through adequate provision of fermentable energy and nitrogen as well as essential minerals, such as phosphorus and sulfur. Further supplementation with

  15. Unexprected Changes in Soil Phosphorus Dynamics Following Tropical Deforestation to Cattle Pasture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Alan R.; Asner, Gregory P.; Cleveland, Cory C.; Lefer, Margaret E.; Bustamante, Mercedes M. C.

    2001-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) is widely believed to limit plant growth and organic matter storage in a large fraction of the world's lowland tropical rainforests. We investigated how the most common land use change in such forests, conversion to cattle pasture, affects soil P fractions along forest to pasture chronosequences in the central Brazilian Amazon and in southwestern Costa Rica. Our sites represent a broad range in rainfall, soil type, management strategies, and total soil P (45.2 - 1228.0 microng P / g soil), yet we found some unexpected and at times strikingly similar changes in soil P in all sites. In the Brazilian sites, where rainfall is relatively low and pasture management is more intense than in the Costa Rican sites, significant losses in total soil P and soil organic carbon (SOC) were seen with pasture age on both fine-textured oxisol and highly sandy entisol soils. However, P losses were largely from occluded, inorganic soil P fractions, while organic forms of soil P remained constant or increased with pasture age, despite the declines in SOC. In Costa Rica, SOC remained constant across the oxisol sites and increased from forest to pasture on the mollisols, while total soil P increased with pasture age in both sequences. The increases in total soil P were largely due to changes in organic P; occluded soil P increased only slightly in the mollisols, and remained unchanged in the older oxisols. We suggest that changes in the composition and/or the primary limiting resources of the soil microbial community may drive the changes in organic P. We also present a new conceptual model for changes in soil P following deforestation to cattle pasture.

  16. How to determine the GHG budget of a pasture field with grazing animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammann, Christof; Neftel, Albrecht; Felber, Raphael

    2016-04-01

    Up to now the scientific investigation and description of the agriculture related greenhouse gas (GHG) exchange has been largely separated into (i) direct animal related and (ii) ecosystem area related processes and measurement methods. An overlap of the two usually separated topics occurs for grazed pastures, where direct animal and pasture area emissions are relevant. In the present study eddy covariance (EC) flux measurements on the field scale were combined with a source location attribution (footprint) model and with GPS position measurements of the individual animals. The experiment was performed on a pasture field in Switzerland under a rotational full grazing regime with dairy cows. The exchange fluxes of CH4, CO2, and N2O were measured simultaneously over the entire year. The observed CH4 emission fluxes correlated well with the presence of cows in the flux footprint. When converted to average emission per cow, the results agreed with published values from respiration chamber experiments with similar cows. For CO2 a sophisticated partitioning algorithm was applied to separate the pasture and animal contributions, because both were in the same order of magnitude. The N2O exchange fully attributable to the pasture soil showed considerable and continuous emissions through the entire seasonal course mainly modulated by soil moisture and temperature. The resulting GHG budget shows that the largest GHG effect of the pasture system was due to enteric CH4 emissions followed by soil N2O emissions, but that the carbon storage change was affected by a much larger uncertainty. The results demonstrate that the EC technique in combination with animal position information allows to consistently quantify the exchange of all three GHG on the pasture and to adequately distinguish between direct animal and diffuse area sources (and sinks). Yet questions concerning a standardized attribution of animal related emissions to the pasture GHG budget still need to be resolved.

  17. Intrauterine infection with bovine virus diarrhoea virus on alpine communal pastures in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Braun, U; Schönmann, M; Ehrensperger, F; Hilbe, M; Strasser, M

    1999-02-01

    This study involved 13 calves, one to 50 days of age, born to first calf heifers that had been pastured on one of seven alpine communal pastures in the canton of St. Gallen during the summer of 1995. Of a total of 993 cattle pastured, 61 were pregnant heifers that were negative for bovine virus diarrhoea (BVD) antigen and for BVD antibodies at the start of pasturing. Seroconversion occurred in 26 of these pregnant heifers during the pasture period. Blood samples and skin biopsy specimens of calves born to 13 of these were examined for BVD antigen by antigen-ELISA and by an immunohistochemical technique, respectively. Blood samples were positive for BVD antigen in four calves, questionable in one calf, negative in seven and missing in one prematurely born calf. The four calves that were positive for BVD antigen in the blood were also positive in skin biopsies. Of the seven calves with a negative or missing blood test, six had positive and two had negative skin samples. Based on the combined results of blood and skin testing, 11 of 13 calves were positive for BVD antigen. Of the 11 infected calves, six were normal at birth, four were smaller than normal and one was premature and weak and was euthanized on humane grounds. Of the four small calves, two developed diarrhoea and died within the first month of life. The two calves that were negative for BVD antigen were clinically normal. The results of this study not only demonstrate the occurrence of in-utero infection with BVD virus, but also stress the importance of alpine communal pasturing in the spread of BVD virus. Because the prevention of infection with BVD virus on communal pastures does not seem feasible, it is recommended that all calves born to cows from such pastures be tested for BVD antigen.

  18. Tree water use and rainfall partitioning in a mature poplar-pasture system.

    PubMed

    Guevara-Escobar, A.; Edwards, W. R. N.; Morton, R. H.; Kemp, P. D.; Mackay, A. D.

    2000-01-01

    Traditionally, poplars (Populus) have been planted to control erosion on New Zealand's hill-slopes, because of their capacity to dry out and bind together the soil, by reducing effective rainfall and increasing evapotranspiration and soil strength. However, the effect of widely spaced poplars on the partitioning of soil water and rainfall has not been reported. This study determined rainfall partitioning for 18 mid-spring days in a mature P. deltoides (Bart. ex Marsh, Clone I78)-pasture association (37 stems per hectare, unevenly spaced at 16.4 +/- 0.4 m) and compared it with a traditional open pasture system in grazed areas of a hill environment. Tree transpiration was measured by the heat pulse technique. A time-driven mathematical model was used to set a zero offset, adjust anomalous values and describe simultaneous sap velocity time courses of trees. The model showed that daylight sap flow velocities can be represented with a nonlinear Beta function (R(2) > 0.98), and differences in the parameters representing the initiation, duration and conformation of the sap velocity can be tested statistically to discern tree transpiration differences during the day. Evapotranspiration was greater for the poplar-pasture association than for the open pasture (2.7-3.0 versus 2.2 mm day(-1)). The tree canopy alone contributed 0.92 mm day(-1) as transpiration and 1.37 mm day(-1) as interception, whereas evapotranspiration of the pasture understory was only 0.4-0.6 mm day(-1). Despite the higher water use of the poplar-pasture association, soil water in the 0-300 mm soil stratum was higher than, or similar to, that of the open pasture. Tree shading decreased evapotranspiration and pasture accumulation under the trees.

  19. Forest-to-pasture conversion influences on soil organic carbon dynamics in a tropical deciduous forest.

    PubMed

    García-Oliva, Felipe; Casar, Isabel; Morales, Pedro; Maass, José M

    1994-09-01

    On a global basis, nearly 42% of tropical land area is classified as tropical deciduous forest (TDF) (Murphy and Lugo 1986). Currently, this ecosystem has very high deforestation rates; and its conversion to cattle pasture may result in losses of soil organic matter, decreases in soil fertility, and increases in CO2 flux to the atmosphere. The soil organic matter turnover rate in a TDF after pasture conversion was estimated in Mexico by determining natural abundances of(13)C. Changes in these values would be induced by vegetation changes from the C3 (forest) to the C4 (pasture) photosynthetic pathway. The rate of loss of remnant forest-soil organic matter (fSOM) was 2.9 t ha(-1) year(-1) in 7-year-old pasture and decreased to 0.66 t ha(-1) year(-1) by year 11. For up to 3 years, net fSOM level increased in pastures; this increment can be attributed to decomposition of remnant forest roots. The sand-associated SOM fraction was the most and the silt-associated fraction the least depleted. TDF conversion to pasture results in extremely high rates of loss of remnant fSOM that are higher than any reported for any tropical forest.

  20. Meat quality of lamb: Pre-slaughter fattening on cultivated or mountain range pastures.

    PubMed

    Lind, Vibeke; Berg, Jan; Eik, Lars Olav; Mølmann, Jørgen; Haugland, Espen; Jørgensen, Marit; Hersleth, Margrethe

    2009-12-01

    Many consumers perceive lamb meat from mountain pastures to be of superior quality, a quality that may be altered if lambs are kept for a longer period on cultivated pastures before slaughtering. The objective of this experiment was to compare sensory profile and fatty acid composition in meat from lambs slaughtered directly from unimproved mountain pastures with meat from lambs raised on unimproved mountain pastures and fattened on biodiverse cultivated pastures for 26, 39 and 42days before slaughtering. The experiment was conducted at two different locations in Norway in 2006 and 2007, with a total of 124 Norwegian Crossbred Sheep lambs. Loin samples of M. Longissimus dorsi from lambs above a body weight of 40kg were selected and analysed for sensory attributes. Fatty acid composition was determined in the subcutaneous fat over the Longissimus dorsi. Small but significant differences were found in hardness, tenderness, fattiness, metallic and rancid flavour, and in polyunsaturated fatty acids. This indicates that to a small extent pre-slaughter fattening on cultivated pastures alters meat characteristics.

  1. Effect of afforestation and reforestation of pastures on the activity and population dynamics of methanotrophic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Singh, Brajesh K; Tate, Kevin R; Kolipaka, Gokul; Hedley, Carolyn B; Macdonald, Catriona A; Millard, Peter; Murrell, J Colin

    2007-08-01

    We investigated the effect of afforestation and reforestation of pastures on methane oxidation and the methanotrophic communities in soils from three different New Zealand sites. Methane oxidation was measured in soils from two pine (Pinus radiata) forests and one shrubland (mainly Kunzea ericoides var. ericoides) and three adjacent permanent pastures. The methane oxidation rate was consistently higher in the pine forest or shrubland soils than in the adjacent pasture soils. A combination of phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) and stable isotope probing (SIP) analyses of these soils revealed that different methanotrophic communities were active in soils under the different vegetations. The C18 PLFAs (signature of type II methanotrophs) predominated under pine and shrublands, and C16 PLFAs (type I methanotrophs) predominated under pastures. Analysis of the methanotrophs by molecular methods revealed further differences in methanotrophic community structure under the different vegetation types. Cloning and sequencing and terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the particulate methane oxygenase gene (pmoA) from different samples confirmed the PLFA-SIP results that methanotrophic bacteria related to type II methanotrophs were dominant in pine forest and shrubland, and type I methanotrophs (related to Methylococcus capsulatus) were dominant in all pasture soils. We report that afforestation and reforestation of pastures caused changes in methane oxidation by altering the community structure of methanotrophic bacteria in these soils.

  2. Effect of Afforestation and Reforestation of Pastures on the Activity and Population Dynamics of Methanotrophic Bacteria▿

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Brajesh K.; Tate, Kevin R.; Kolipaka, Gokul; Hedley, Carolyn B.; Macdonald, Catriona A.; Millard, Peter; Murrell, J. Colin

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the effect of afforestation and reforestation of pastures on methane oxidation and the methanotrophic communities in soils from three different New Zealand sites. Methane oxidation was measured in soils from two pine (Pinus radiata) forests and one shrubland (mainly Kunzea ericoides var. ericoides) and three adjacent permanent pastures. The methane oxidation rate was consistently higher in the pine forest or shrubland soils than in the adjacent pasture soils. A combination of phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) and stable isotope probing (SIP) analyses of these soils revealed that different methanotrophic communities were active in soils under the different vegetations. The C18 PLFAs (signature of type II methanotrophs) predominated under pine and shrublands, and C16 PLFAs (type I methanotrophs) predominated under pastures. Analysis of the methanotrophs by molecular methods revealed further differences in methanotrophic community structure under the different vegetation types. Cloning and sequencing and terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the particulate methane oxygenase gene (pmoA) from different samples confirmed the PLFA-SIP results that methanotrophic bacteria related to type II methanotrophs were dominant in pine forest and shrubland, and type I methanotrophs (related to Methylococcus capsulatus) were dominant in all pasture soils. We report that afforestation and reforestation of pastures caused changes in methane oxidation by altering the community structure of methanotrophic bacteria in these soils. PMID:17574997

  3. Effects of pasture renovation on hydrology, nutrient runoff, and forage yield.

    PubMed

    de Koff, J P; Moore, P A; Formica, J; Van Eps, M; DeLaune, P B

    2011-01-01

    Proper pasture management is important in promoting optimal forage growth and reducing runoff and nutrient loss. Pasture renovation is a management tool that improves aeration by mechanically creating holes or pockets within the soil. Pasture renovation was performed before manure application (poultry litter or swine slurry) on different pasture soils and rainfall simulations were conducted to identify the effects of pasture renovation on nutrient runoff and forage growth. Renovation of small plots resulted in significant and beneficial hydrological changes. During the first rainfall simulation, runoff volumes were 45 to 74% lower for seven out of eight renovated treatments, and infiltration rates increased by 3 to 87% for all renovated treatments as compared with nonrenovated treatments. Renovation of pasture soils fertilized with poultry litter led to significant reductions in dissolved reactive P (DRP) (74-87%), total P (TP) (76-85%), and total nitrogen (TN) (72-80%) loads in two of the three soils studied during the first rainfall simulation. Renovation did not result in any significant differences in forage yields. Overall, beneficial impacts of renovation lasted up to 3 mo, the most critical period for nutrient runoff following manure application. Therefore, renovation could be an important best management practice in these areas.

  4. Grazing alters the net C sink strength and the net global warming potential of a subtropical pasture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Casanovas, N.; DeLucia, N.; DeLucia, E. H.; Boughton, E. H.; Keel, E.; Bernacchi, C.

    2014-12-01

    Grazing profoundly affects climate by altering the exchange of greenhouse gases (GHG; CO2 and CH4) between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. Little is known about how this disturbance affects the GHG exchange from subtropical pastures although they account for a substantial portion of global grazing lands. Here, we investigated how cattle grazing affect net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) and CH4 emissions in subtropical semi-native pasture using the eddy covariance technique. Soil moisture was greater under grazed than ungrazed pastures but soil temperature was similar between treatments. By removing aboveground biomass, grazing reduced gross primary productivity (GPP, 16%). While ungrazed pastures had higher GPP than grazed pastures, they also had higher ecosystem respiration (Re, 20%) along with higher heterotrophic respiration. As a result, annual sums of NEE were similar in grazed and ungrazed pastures and both systems were net sinks for CO2 (-86 ± 5 gC m-2 yr-1 in grazed pasture, and -76 ± 6 gC m-2 yr-1 in ungrazed pasture). Including C removal by grazers in the C budget, grazing reduced the C sink strength (250%) and grazed pasture became a net source of C to the atmosphere. Increased soil wetness and CH4 production from enteric ruminant fermentation enhanced net ecosystem CH4 emissions (16%) in grazed than in ungrazed pastures. The net global warming potential (GWP) was higher (34%) in grazed than in ungrazed pastures, but both systems were net sources of GHGs when accounting for the radiative forcing of CH4. Our results suggest that grazing reduces the net C sink strength and increases the net GWP of subtropical pastures. Improved understanding of how grazing affects ecosystem GHG fluxes is essential to predicting the role of pastures on the global C cycle.

  5. Thermal radiation absorbed by dairy cows in pasture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, Roberto Gomes; Guilhermino, Magda Maria; de Morais, Débora Andréia E. Façanha

    2010-01-01

    The goal of the present paper was to assess a method for estimating the thermal radiation absorbed by dairy cows (0.875 Holstein-0.125 Guzerath) on pasture. A field test was conducted with 472 crossbred dairy cows in three locations of a tropical region. The following environmental data were collected: air temperature, partial vapour pressure, wind speed, black globe temperature, ground surface temperature and solar radiation. Average total radiation absorbed by animals was calculated as {R_{abs}} = 640.0 ± 3.1 W.{m^{ - 2}} . Absorbed short-wave radiation (solar direct, diffuse and reflected) averaged 297.9 ± 2.7 W m-2; long wave (from the sky and from terrestrial surfaces) averaged 342.1 ± 1.5 W m-2. It was suggested that a new environmental measurement, the effective radiant heat load (ERHL), could be used to assess the effective mean radiant temperature ( {T_{mr}^* } ) . Average T_{mr}^* was 101.4 ± 1.2°C, in contrast to the usual mean radiant temperature, {T_{mr}} = 65.1 ± 0.5° C . Estimates of T_{mr}^* were considered as more reliable than those of T mr in evaluating the thermal environment in the open field, because T mr is almost totally associated only with long wave radiation.

  6. Monitoring pasture damage in subarid conditions in south of Spain.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz, Felix; Saa-Requejo, Antonio; Martín-Sotoca, Juan J.; Dalezios, Nicolas; Tarquis, Ana M.

    2016-04-01

    This work analyzes four areas in Murcia region (Spain) to study the application of the indexed pastures insurances in arid and subarid conditions. For this purpose four zones of 2,5 km have been selected, all of them close to meteorological stations, with records covering the period since 2001 to 2012 and with compound MODIS images of 500 m x 500 m from eight days intervals on that period. In addition to obtain historical series of the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), other indices (NDWI, NDDI and NDWU) have been computed. The results of this study show that NDWU provides additional information to that in the NDVI. In fact, according to our results, NDDI does not provide accurate information for the regions analyzed in this particular case study. In an attempt to relate precipitancy indices and drought situations in the four areas selected, we have showed that Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) cannot be used accurately for drought intensity assessment. Then new indices have been formulated based on Markov chains: PI5mm and PI10mm.These indices can assess on isolated droughts which are missed by using indexed insurances. Nonetheless, it has also been observed that abnormal droppings in the NDWI index often coincide with drought lapses well established by indexed insurances. Acknowledgements First author acknowledges the Research Grant obtained from CEIGRAM in 2015

  7. Thermal radiation absorbed by dairy cows in pasture.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Roberto Gomes; Guilhermino, Magda Maria; de Morais, Débora Andréia E Façanha

    2010-01-01

    The goal of the present paper was to assess a method for estimating the thermal radiation absorbed by dairy cows (0.875 Holstein-0.125 Guzerath) on pasture. A field test was conducted with 472 crossbred dairy cows in three locations of a tropical region. The following environmental data were collected: air temperature, partial vapour pressure, wind speed, black globe temperature, ground surface temperature and solar radiation. Average total radiation absorbed by animals was calculated as R(abs) = 640.0 +/- 3.1 W .m(-2). Absorbed short-wave radiation (solar direct, diffuse and reflected) averaged 297.9 +/- 2.7 W m(-2); long wave (from the sky and from terrestrial surfaces) averaged 342.1 +/- 1.5 W m(-2). It was suggested that a new environmental measurement, the effective radiant heat load (ERHL), could be used to assess the effective mean radiant temperature (T*(mr)). Average T*(mr) was 101.4 +/- 1.2 degrees C, in contrast to the usual mean radiant temperature, T(mr) = 65.1 +/- 0.5 degrees C. Estimates of T*(mr) were considered as more reliable than those of T (mr) in evaluating the thermal environment in the open field, because T (mr) is almost totally associated only with long wave radiation.

  8. Fertility of pasture bred mares in synchronized oestrus.

    PubMed

    Bristol, F

    1987-01-01

    Oestrus was synchronized in 220, 300 and 272 mares in 1983, 1984 and 1985 respectively. Mares were given two injections of 250 micrograms fenprostalene 15 days apart except in 1983 and 1984 when 56 and 53 of the synchronized mares were given 1-10 daily injections of 150 mg progesterone and 10 mg oestradiol-17 beta to delay and synchronize post-partum oestrus. At 2 days after the second PG injection or 7 days after the last progesterone + oestradiol treatment, mares were divided into groups of 15-21, and each group was placed in a separate pasture with a stallion for 7 weeks. Pregnancy rates were 87.7, 93.7 and 97.1%, and foaling rates were 72.3, 89.7 and 94.1% in 1983, 1984 and 1985 respectively. The number of abortions occurring mainly between 3 and 6 months of gestation varied from 34 (17.8%) in 1983 to 12 (4.3%) in 1984 and 8 (3.0%) in 1985.

  9. Sedimentation in Goose Pasture Tarn, 1965-2005, Breckenridge, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, John G.; Char, Stephen J.; Linhart, Samuel M.; Stephens, V. Cory; O'Neill, Gregory B.

    2006-01-01

    Goose Pasture Tarn, a 771-acre-foot reservoir in Summit County, Colorado, is the principal domestic water-storage facility for the Town of Breckenridge and collects runoff from approximately 42 square miles of the upper Blue River watershed. In the 40 years since the reservoir was constructed, deltaic deposits have accumulated at the mouths of two perennial streams that provide most of the inflow and sediment to the reservoir. The Blue River is a low-gradient braided channel and transports gravel- to silt-size sediment. Indiana Creek is a steep-gradient channel that transports boulder- to silt-size sediment. Both deltas are composed predominantly of gravel, sand, and silt, but silt has been deposited throughout the reservoir. In 2004, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Town of Breckenridge, began a study to determine the volume of accumulated sediment in Goose Pasture Tarn, the long-term sedimentation rate for the reservoir, and the particle-size and chemical characteristics of the sediment. Exposed delta deposits occupied 0.91 acre and had an estimated volume of 0.6 acre-foot in 2005. Aerial photographic analysis indicated both the Blue River and Indiana Creek deltas grew rapidly during time intervals that included larger-than-average annual flood peaks on the Blue River. Sediment-transport relations could not be developed for the Blue River or Indiana Creek because of minimal streamflow and infrequently observed sediment transport during the study; however, suspended-sediment loads ranged from 0.02 to 1.60 tons per day in the Blue River and from 0.06 to 1.55 tons per day in Indiana Creek. Bedload as a percentage of total load ranged from 9 to 27 percent. New reservoir stage-area and stage-capacity relations were developed from bathymetric and topographic surveys of the reservoir bed. The original 1965 reservoir bed topography and the accumulated sediment thickness were estimated from a seismic survey and manual probing. The surface area of Goose

  10. Dental pathology in conventionally fed and pasture managed dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Fadden, A N; Poulsen, K P; Vanegas, J; Mecham, J; Bildfell, R; Stieger-Vanegas, S M

    2016-01-02

    Healthy teeth are important in the first stages of digestion for dairy cattle, yet little is known about bovine dental disease. This study aimed to investigate dental pathology of dairy cattle in two parts. First dairy cattle cadaver heads (n=11) were examined at the time of culling. Second, the authors performed oral exams in cattle fed a total mixed ration (TMR) (n=200) and pasture-based (n=71) grazing cattle. Cadaver heads were imaged using radiography and computed tomography before gross dissection to study dental anatomy and pathology. The most prevalent dental abnormalities were excessive transverse ridging of the occlusal surface, the presence of diastemas and third molar dental overgrowths (M3DO) in cadaver heads. Average thickness of subocclusal dentine ranged from 3.5 mm to 5.8 mm in cheek teeth but was >10 mm in maxillary teeth with M3DO. Radiographic findings were compared with oral examinations in live cattle. Prevalence of M3DO upon oral examination was 19 per cent and 28 per cent in herds of cattle fed a TMR diet and 0 per cent in a herd of grazing cattle. Dental abnormalities are prevalent in dairy cattle but due to thin subocclusal dentine in the cheek teeth, established equine dental treatment methodology is not appropriate for bovine cheek teeth with the exception of those that have developed M3DO. British Veterinary Association.

  11. [Soil microbial activity variation after land use changes in savannah, Llanos Orientales, Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Gómez, Yrma; Paolini, Jorge

    2011-03-01

    In West plains of Venezuela, the traditional land use of the Trachypogon savannah, has been the extensive grazing. The pressure over these savannahs to obtain a major animal productivity has stimulated the introduction of exotic forage plants, such as Brachiaria brizantha and Andropogon gayanus. In spite that great savannah extensions have been subject to this land use change, information about the effect that pastures and grazing activity have on microbial activity in these soils is scarce. So the objective of this study was to determine the impact that the extensive grazing and cover substitution have on microbial activity. The soil sampling was carried out during the dry and rainy seasons. The employed parameters to determine changes in soil microbial activity were the substrate induced respiration (SIR), basal respiration (BR), the dehydrogenase activity (DHS), the fluorescein diacetate hydrolysis (FDA) and the arginene ammonification (AA). The similarity of the structural soil characteristics studied allows us to infer, that the differences in the microbiological parameters are determined by climatic conditions and soil management. The results show that there is a low microbial activity in these soils. The rainy season caused an increase in all the microbiological parameters determined. B. brizantha made a greater contribution to soil carbon and promoted a greater heterotrophic activity. The extensive grazing and the low stocking rate in the West plain savannas did not affect the microbial activity in these soils.

  12. The impact of water management practices on subtropical pasture methane emissions and ecosystem service payments.

    PubMed

    Chamberlain, Samuel D; Groffman, Peter M; Boughton, Elizabeth H; Gomez-Casanovas, Nuria; DeLucia, Evan H; Bernacchi, Carl J; Sparks, Jed P

    2017-01-31

    Pastures are an extensive land cover type; however, patterns in pasture greenhouse gas (GHG) exchange vary widely depending on climate and land management. Understanding this variation is important, as pastures may be a net GHG source or sink depending on these factors. We quantified carbon dioxide (CO2 ) and methane (CH4 ) fluxes from subtropical pastures in south Florida for three wet-dry seasonal cycles using eddy covariance, and estimated two annual budgets of CO2 , CH4 , and GHG equivalent emissions. We also estimated the impact of water retention practices on pasture GHG emissions and assessed the impact of these emissions on stakeholder payments for water retention services in a carbon market framework. The pastures were net CO2 sinks sequestering up to 163 ± 54 g CO2 -C·m(-2) ·yr(-1) (mean ± 95% CI), but were also strong CH4 sources emitting up to 23.5 ± 2.1 g CH4 -C·m(-2) ·yr(-1) . Accounting for the increased global warming potential of CH4 , the pastures were strong net GHG sources emitting up to 584 ± 78 g CO2 -C eq.·m(-2) ·yr(-1) , and all CO2 uptake was offset by wet season CH4 emissions from the flooded landscape. Our analysis suggests that CH4 emissions due to increased flooding from water management practices is a small component of the pasture GHG budget, and water retention likely contributes 2-11% of net pasture GHG emissions. These emissions could reduce water retention payments by up to ~12% if stakeholders were required to pay for current GHG emissions in a carbon market. It would require at least 93.7 kg CH4 -C emissions per acre-foot water storage (1 acre-foot = 1233.48 m(3) ) for carbon market costs to exceed water retention payments, and this scenario is highly unlikely as we estimate current practices are responsible for 11.3 ± 7.2 kg CH4 -C emissions per acre-foot of water storage. Our results demonstrate that water retention practices aimed at reducing nutrient loading to the Everglades are likely only

  13. High intensity, short duration rotational grazing on reclaimed cool season tall fescue/legume pastures: II. Forage production, soil and plant tissue comparisons between grazed and ungrazed pastures

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, K.E.; Erickson, W.R.; Bonine, R.C.

    1995-09-01

    The Midway Mine is located 50 miles south of Kansas City, Kansas straddling the border of Kansas and Missouri. The Pittsburg & Midway Coal Mining Co. mined the area until 1989, when the mine was closed and reclaimed. Approximately 3,750 acres were topsoiled and revegetated with a cool season tall fescue/legume pasture. High intensity, short duration rotational grazing has become the preferred management practice on these pastures. This study evaluated soil and vegetation data collected on 1,250 acres of pasture which was grazed by about 550 cow/calf units. Ongoing monitoring programs are evaluating the effects of rotational grazing. Soil testing includes macro-nutrients, micro-nutrients and microbial activity. Plant tissue analyses monitor levels of principal macro-nutrients and micro-nutrients. Vegetation monitoring consists of measuring forage production. Results were contrasted between pregrazing and postgrazing, and grazed and ungrazed pasture. Agronomic data from the grazed versus ungrazed treatments documented the following results: (1) higher levels of plant tissue nitrate, phosphorus, potassium, calcium, magnesium, sodium and sulfur; (2) higher microbial activity; (3) similar levels of soil nitrate, phosphorus, potassium, calcium, magnesium, sodium and sulfur; and (4) increased biomass production.

  14. Monitoring pasture variability: optical OptRx(®) crop sensor versus Grassmaster II capacitance probe.

    PubMed

    Serrano, João M; Shahidian, Shakib; Marques da Silva, José Rafael

    2016-02-01

    Estimation of pasture productivity is an important step for the farmer in terms of planning animal stocking, organizing animal lots, and determining supplementary feeding needs throughout the year. The main objective of this work was to evaluate technologies which have potential for monitoring aspects related to spatial and temporal variability of pasture green and dry matter yield (respectively, GM and DM, in kg/ha) and support to decision making for the farmer. Two types of sensors were evaluated: an active optical sensor ("OptRx(®)," which measures the NDVI, "Normalized Difference Vegetation Index") and a capacitance probe ("GrassMaster II" which estimates plant mass). The results showed the potential of NDVI for monitoring the evolution of spatial and temporal patterns of vegetative growth of biodiverse pasture. Higher NDVI values were registered as pasture approached its greatest vegetative vigor, with a significant fall in the measured NDVI at the end of Spring, when the pasture began to dry due to the combination of higher temperatures and lower soil moisture content. This index was also effective for identifying different plant species (grasses/legumes) and variability in pasture yield. Furthermore, it was possible to develop calibration equations between the capacitance and the NDVI (R(2) = 0.757; p < 0.01), between capacitance and GM (R(2) = 0.799; p < 0.01), between capacitance and DM (R(2) =0.630; p < 0.01), between NDVI and GM (R(2) = 0.745; p < 0.01), and between capacitance and DM (R(2) = 0.524; p < 0.01). Finally, a direct relationship was obtained between NDVI and pasture moisture content (PMC, in %) and between capacitance and PMC (respectively, R(2) = 0.615; p < 0.01 and R(2) = 0.561; p < 0.01) in Alentejo dryland farming systems.

  15. Importance of molehill disturbances for invasion by Bunias orientalis in meadows and pastures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiełtyk, Piotr; Mirek, Zbigniew

    2015-04-01

    Small-scale soil disturbances by fossorial animals can change physical and biotic conditions in disturbed patches and influence spatial and temporal dynamics, and the composition of plant communities. They create regeneration niches and colonization openings for native plants and, according to the intermediate disturbance hypothesis, they are expected to increase plant community diversity. However, it also has been reported that increased disturbance resource availability and decreased competition with native species may result in the invasion of communities by alien plant species, as predicted by the fluctuating resources theory of invasibility. In this study, we investigated the importance of European mole disturbances for the invasion of semi-natural fresh meadows and pastures by the alien plant, Bunias orientalis, which has mainly spread throughout Central Europe on anthropogenically disturbed sites. We hypothesized that the invader, being particularly well adapted to anthropogenic disturbances, enters into dense vegetation of meadows and pastures mainly on mole mounds. To assess the seedling recruitment of B. orientalis in relation to disturbance, we counted the number of seedlings that emerged on molehills and control plots in meadows and pastures. The establishment of juvenile (0-1 year) rosette plants on and off molehills was surveyed on 5 × 5 m plots. In accordance with our hypothesis, mole disturbances were found to serve as a gateway for B. orientalis by which the invader may colonize semi-natural grasslands. The seedlings of the species emerged almost solely on molehills and the young rosettes were established predominantly on mole mounds. Although the seedling density did not differ significantly between the meadows and pastures, the number of established plants in the pastures was considerably higher. We suggest that the invasion by B. orientalis in pastures may be facilitated by vegetative regeneration following root fragmentation by sheep pasturing.

  16. Effects of type of carbohydrate supplementation to lush pasture on microbial fermentation in continuous culture.

    PubMed

    Bach, A; Yoon, I K; Stern, M D; Jung, H G; Chester-Jones, H

    1999-01-01

    Eight single-flow continuous culture fermenters were used to study the effects of the type of energy source on ruminal N utilization from high quality pasture. The four dietary treatments included high quality grass and legume pasture alone (50:50; wt/wt), pasture plus soybean hulls, pasture plus beet pulp, and pasture plus corn. Diets supplemented with additional sources of energy (soybean hulls, beet pulp, and corn) were isocaloric but differed in the type and rate of carbohydrate fermentation. Energy supplements constituted 45% of the total dietary dry matter and were fed twice daily at 12-h intervals in place of pasture, which is characteristic of grain feeding at milking when animals are in a grazing situation. Energy supplementation reduced pH, NH3 N flow, and NH3 N concentration and increased bacterial N flow (as a percentage of N intake). The supplementation of corn and soybean hulls resulted in the highest microbial N flow (as a percentage of N intake). Corn had a tendency to reduce fiber digestion because of excessively low NH3 N concentrations. Beet pulp was similar to corn in that it decreased NH3 N concentrations. Supplementation of soybean hulls resulted in a more synchronized fermentation, greater volatile fatty acid production, and greater fiber digestion. Nitrogen utilization by microbes was maximized by supplementation with soybean hulls or corn twice a day. With diets based on pasture, it may be more important to improve bacterial N flow and bacterial utilization of N than to maximize the efficiency of bacterial protein synthesis because better utilization of N by ruminal microorganisms results in higher bacterial N flow and higher fiber digestion.

  17. Mapping of macro and micro nutrients of mixed pastures using airborne AisaFENIX hyperspectral imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pullanagari, R. R.; Kereszturi, Gábor; Yule, I. J.

    2016-07-01

    On-farm assessment of mixed pasture nutrient concentrations is important for animal production and pasture management. Hyperspectral imaging is recognized as a potential tool to quantify the nutrient content of vegetation. However, it is a great challenge to estimate macro and micro nutrients in heterogeneous mixed pastures. In this study, canopy reflectance data was measured by using a high resolution airborne visible-to-shortwave infrared (Vis-SWIR) imaging spectrometer measuring in the wavelength region 380-2500 nm to predict nutrient concentrations, nitrogen (N) phosphorus (P), potassium (K), sulfur (S), zinc (Zn), sodium (Na), manganese (Mn) copper (Cu) and magnesium (Mg) in heterogeneous mixed pastures across a sheep and beef farm in hill country, within New Zealand. Prediction models were developed using four different methods which are included partial least squares regression (PLSR), kernel PLSR, support vector regression (SVR), random forest regression (RFR) algorithms and their performance compared using the test data. The results from the study revealed that RFR produced highest accuracy (0.55 ⩽ R2CV ⩽ 0.78; 6.68% ⩽ nRMSECV ⩽ 26.47%) compared to all other algorithms for the majority of nutrients (N, P, K, Zn, Na, Cu and Mg) described, and the remaining nutrients (S and Mn) were predicted with high accuracy (0.68 ⩽ R2CV ⩽ 0.86; 13.00% ⩽ nRMSECV ⩽ 14.64%) using SVR. The best training models were used to extrapolate over the whole farm with the purpose of predicting those pasture nutrients and expressed through pixel based spatial maps. These spatially registered nutrient maps demonstrate the range and geographical location of often large differences in pasture nutrient values which are normally not measured and therefore not included in decision making when considering more effective ways to utilized pasture.

  18. Effects of herbage intake on goat performance in the mediterranean type natural pastures.

    PubMed

    Hakyemez, Basri H; Gokkus, Ahmet; Savas, Turker; Yurtman, Ismail Y

    2009-02-01

    This study aimed at identifying changes in natural pastures during the grazing season and investigating the effects of these changes on pasture feeding potential for high yielding dairy goats. During the study, 12 dairy goats were grazed on a 1.5 ha natural pasture for three months from April to June in 2003, 2004 and 2005. The goats were fed 0.5 kg/day of concentrate as a supplement during the grazing season. Botanical composition, herbage production and intake, crude protein (CP), neutral detergent fiber (NDF) and acid detergent fiber (ADF) contents of the pasture were determined. Live weight, milk yield, milk dry matter (DM) and fat content of the goats were monitored. The data were analyzed using a linear model, which evaluated the effects of grazing seasons in each year. Based on the three-year average, 87% of pasture was herbaceous plants and the remaining was shrubs in DM basis with Cistus creticus, Quercus ithaburensis, Pistacia atlantica and Asparagus acutifolius being the major shrub species. The herbage yield in June was significantly lower than in other months in all years (P = 0.001). In all experimental years, the CP content of the pasture decreased but the structural carbohydrates increased as the grazing season proceeded. While live weight was not affected by grazing periods except for 2004 (P = 0.001), milk yield significantly decreased with advancing grazing period (P = 0.001). The results of the present study indicate that natural pasture has a supportive effect in April and May on the milk yield of lactating goats which are in mid-lactation, and suggested that supplementary feeding is required in consecutive grazing periods.

  19. Structure and function of the methanogenic microbial communities in Uruguayan soils shifted between pasture and irrigated rice fields.

    PubMed

    Scavino, Ana Fernandez; Ji, Yang; Pump, Judith; Klose, Melanie; Claus, Peter; Conrad, Ralf

    2013-09-01

    Irrigated rice fields in Uruguay are temporarily established on soils used as cattle pastures. Typically, 4 years of cattle pasture are alternated with 2 years of irrigated rice cultivation. Thus, oxic upland conditions are rotated with seasonally anoxic wetland conditions. Only the latter conditions are suitable for the production of CH4 from anaerobic degradation of organic matter. We studied soil from a permanent pasture as well as soils from different years of the pasture-rice rotation hypothesizing that activity and structure of the bacterial and archaeal communities involved in production of CH4 change systematically with the duration of either oxic or anoxic conditions. Soil samples were taken from drained fields, air-dried and used for the experiments. Indeed, methanogenic archaeal gene copy numbers (16S rRNA, mcrA) were lower in soil from the permanent pasture than from the pasture-rice alternation fields, but within the latter, there was no significant difference. Methane production started to accumulate after 16 days and 7 days of anoxic incubation in soil from the permanent pasture and the pasture-rice alternation fields respectively. Then, CH4 production rates were slightly higher in the soils used for pasture than for rice production. Analysis of δ(13) C in CH4, CO2 and acetate in the presence and absence of methyl fluoride, an inhibitor of aceticlastic methanogenesis, indicated that CH4 was mainly (58-75%) produced from acetate, except in the permanent pasture soil (42%). Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) of archaeal 16S rRNA genes showed no difference among the soils from the pasture-rice alternation fields with Methanocellaceae and Methanosarcinaceae as the main groups of methanogens, but in the permanent pasture soil, Methanocellaceae were relatively less abundant. T-RFLP analysis of bacterial 16S rRNA genes allowed the distinction of permanent pasture and fields from the pasture-rice rotation, but nevertheless with a

  20. The Challenges of Bottom-up Approach of Natural-Social Integration in China Highland Pasture Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Likun

    2017-04-01

    The pasture land covers two fifth of total Chinese land area, which is mainly distributed in western highland of Inner Mongolia, Xinjiang, Tibet, Qinghai, Gansu and Sichuan Provinces. China pasture land is not only in charge of providing food resource to regional people, but also plays important role in highland ecosystem services and biodiversity. Along with global warming and enhanced grazing activity, 90% of China pasture land is facing the threat of land degradation. From middle 1990's, Chinese government has released a series of pasture land conservation policies to prevent further environmental degradation. In the same time, lots of pasture ecosystem and environment change researches are supported by national and regional funding agencies. In this study, by monitoring and investigating this top-down approach of pasture land research and policy making processes, we would like to find out the gaps and problems of current research and policy making on China pasture land conservation, especially focusing on the possibility of establishing the bottom-up approach of natural-social sciences integration to support the pasture land conservation and sustainable pasture land management in highland China.

  1. Ecosystem services from converted land: the importance of tree cover in Amazonian pastures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barrett, Kirsten; Valentim, Judson; Turner, B. L.

    2013-01-01

    Deforestation is responsible for a substantial fraction of global carbon emissions and changes in surface energy budgets that affect climate. Deforestation losses include wildlife and human habitat, and myriad forest products on which rural and urban societies depend for food, fiber, fuel, fresh water, medicine, and recreation. Ecosystem services gained in the transition from forests to pasture and croplands, however, are often ignored in assessments of the impact of land cover change. The role of converted lands in tropical areas in terms of carbon uptake and storage is largely unknown. Pastures represent the fastest-growing form of converted land use in the tropics, even in some areas of rapid urban expansion. Tree biomass stored in these areas spans a broad range, depending on tree cover. Trees in pasture increase carbon storage, provide shade for cattle, and increase productivity of forage material. As a result, increasing fractional tree cover can provide benefits land managers as well as important ecosystem services such as reducing conversion pressure on forests adjacent to pastures. This study presents an estimation of fractional tree cover in pasture in a dynamic region on the verge of large-scale land use change. An appropriate sampling interval is established for similar studies, one that balances the need for independent samples of sufficient number to characterize a pasture in terms of fractional tree cover. This information represents a useful policy tool for government organizations and NGOs interested in encouraging ecosystem services on converted lands. Using high spatial resolution remotely sensed imagery, fractional tree cover in pasture is quantified for the municipality of Rio Branco, Brazil. A semivariogram and devolving spatial resolution are employed to determine the coarsest sampling interval that may be used, minimizing effects of spatial autocorrelation. The coarsest sampling interval that minimizes spatial dependence was about 22 m. The

  2. What attracts elk onto cattle pasture? Implications for inter-species disease transmission.

    PubMed

    Pruvot, M; Seidel, D; Boyce, M S; Musiani, M; Massolo, A; Kutz, S; Orsel, K

    2014-11-15

    In Southwest Alberta, beef cattle and wild elk (Cervus elaphus) have similar habitat preferences. Understanding their inter-species contact structure is important for assessing the risk of pathogen transmission between them. These spatio-temporal patterns of interactions are shaped, in part, by range management and environmental factors affecting elk distribution. In this study, resource selection modeling was used to identify factors influencing elk presence on cattle pasture and elk selection of foraging patches; furthermore, consequences for inter-species disease transmission were discussed. Data on pasture management practices and observations of elk were collected from 15 ranchers during interviews. Pasture use by elk was defined based on telemetry data (from GPS collars deployed on 168 elk in 7 herds) and rancher observations. At the patch scale, foraging patches used by elk were identified by spatio-temporal cluster analysis of telemetry data, whereas available patches were randomly generated outside the area delimited by used patches. For pastures and patches, landscape and human-managed features were characterized using remote sensing data and interviews, respectively. Attributes of available and used pastures (or patches) were compared using resource selection functions, on annual and seasonal (or annual and monthly) time scales. Additionally, intensity of pasture use was modeled using negative binomial regression. Cultivated hay land and mineral supplements were associated with elk presence on cattle pastures, whereas pastures with manure fertilization and higher traffic-weighted road densities were less likely to be used by elk. The effects of landscape (elevation, aspect, water access) and vegetation (forest cover, Normalized Difference Vegetation Index) characteristics on patch selection were consistent with typical elk habitat requirements. The presence of cattle and the traffic-weighted road density were negatively associated with patch selection

  3. Nitrous oxide emissions from forests and pastures of various ages in the Brazilian Amazon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melillo, J. M.; Steudler, P. A.; Feigl, B. J.; Neill, C.; Garcia, D.; Piccolo, M. C.; Cerri, C. C.; Tian, H.

    2001-12-01

    Nitrous oxide emissions from tropical forest soils are thought to account for 2.2-3.7 Tg N yr-1 of the total annual global production of 10-17 Tg N yr-1. Recent research suggests that clearing of tropical forest for pasture can increase N2O emissions but that the period of elevated emissions may be limited and fluxes from older pastures may be lower than from the original forest. Here we report N2O emissions from two land-use sequences in the Brazilian Amazon's state of Rondônia. Each sequence includes a forest and a set of pastures of different ages. One sequence contains a newly created pasture that we studied intensively through its first 2 years, including forest cutting, burning, and the planting of forage grasses. Emissions from the newly created pasture were about two and one half times the forest emissions during the first 2 years (5.0 kg N2O-N ha-1 yr-1 versus 1.9 kg N2O-N ha-1 yr-1). Nitrous oxide fluxes from pastures older than 3 years were on average about one third lower than fluxes from uncut forest (1.4 kg N2O-N ha-1 yr-1 versus 1.9 kg N2O-N ha-1 yr-1). The best predictor of N2O flux across the chronosequences was the magnitude of the NO3 pool in the upper 10 cm of soil measured at the time of gas sampling. Using a simple cohort model combined with deforestation rates estimated from satellite images by Brazil's Instituto de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE) for the period 1978 through 1997, we estimate that for the Brazilian Amazon the basin-wide flux of N2O-N from pasture soils was 0.06 Tg in 1997. This is ˜8% of the combined forest plus pasture flux of 0.78 Tg N2O-N we estimate for the Brazilian part of the basin in 1997. In the absence of any forest-to-pasture conversion in the Brazilian part of the basin, we estimate that the basin-wide flux of N2O-N would have been only slightly larger: 0.80 Tg in 1997. Through a second modeling analysis we estimate that for the whole of the Amazon Basin, including parts of the basin outside of Brazil, the N2O

  4. Dairy farm impacts of fencing riparian land: pasture production and farm productivity.

    PubMed

    Aarons, Sharon R; Melland, Alice R; Dorling, Lianne

    2013-11-30

    Dairy farmers are encouraged to restrict stock access by fencing riparian zones to reduce stream pollution and improve biodiversity. Many farmers are reluctant to create fenced riparian zones because of the perceived loss of productive pasture. Anecdotal reports indicate that pasture production in fenced areas is especially valued during summer months when water stress is likely to limit pasture growth in other areas of the farm. We measured pasture production, botanical composition, soil moisture, and fertility in Riparian (within 20 m of the riverbank), Flat (greater than 20 but less than 50 m from the riverbank), and Hill (elevated) areas on three commercial dairy farms from October 2006 to November 2007 in south eastern Australia. Riparian and Flat areas produced significantly more pasture, with on average approximately 25% more dry matter per ha grown in these areas compared with Hill paddocks. Percentage ryegrass was 14% lower on Hill slopes compared with Riparian and Flat areas and was compensated for by only a 5% increase in other grass species. Significant seasonal effects were observed with the difference in pasture production between Hill, and Riparian and Flat areas most pronounced in summer, due to soil moisture limitations on Hill paddocks. To examine potential productivity impacts of this lost pasture, we used a questionnaire-based survey to interview the farmers regarding their farm and riparian management activities. The additional pasture that would have been available if the riverbanks were not fenced to their current widths ranged from 6.2 to 27.2 t DM for the 2006/2007 year and would have been grown on 0.4-3.4% of their milking area. If this pasture was harvested instead of grazed, the farmers could have saved between $2000 and $8000 of their purchased fodder costs in that year. By fencing their riparian areas to 20 m for biodiversity benefits, between 2.2% and 9.8% of their milking area would be out of production amounting to about $16

  5. Combining multi-spectral proximal sensors and digital cameras for monitoring grazed tropical pastures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handcock, R. N.; Gobbett, D. L.; González, L. A.; Bishop-Hurley, G. J.; McGavin, S. L.

    2015-11-01

    Timely and accurate monitoring of pasture biomass and ground-cover is necessary in livestock production systems to ensure productive and sustainable management of forage for livestock. Interest in the use of proximal sensors for monitoring pasture status in grazing systems has increased, since such sensors can return data in near real-time, and have the potential to be deployed on large properties where remote sensing may not be suitable due to issues such as spatial scale or cloud cover. However, there are unresolved challenges in developing calibrations to convert raw sensor data to quantitative biophysical values, such as pasture biomass or vegetation ground-cover, to allow meaningful interpretation of sensor data by livestock producers. We assessed the use of multiple proximal sensors for monitoring tropical pastures with a pilot deployment of sensors at two sites on Lansdown Research Station near Townsville, Australia. Each site was monitored by a Skye SKR-four-band multi-spectral sensor (every 1 min), a digital camera (every 30 min), and a soil moisture sensor (every 1 min), each operated over 18 months. Raw data from each sensor were processed to calculate a number of multispectral vegetation indices. Visual observations of pasture characteristics, including above-ground standing biomass and ground cover, were made every 2 weeks. A methodology was developed to manage the sensor deployment and the quality control of the data collected. The data capture from the digital cameras was more reliable than the multi-spectral sensors, which had up to 63 % of data discarded after data cleaning and quality control. We found a strong relationship between sensor and pasture measurements during the wet season period of maximum pasture growth (January to April), especially when data from the multi-spectral sensors were combined with weather data. RatioNS34 (a simple band ratio between the near infrared (NIR) and lower shortwave infrared (SWIR) bands) and rainfall since 1

  6. Purple Prairie Clover (Dalea purpurea Vent) Reduces Fecal Shedding of Escherichia coli in Pastured Cattle.

    PubMed

    Jin, L; Wang, Y; Iwaasa, A D; Li, Y; Xu, Z; Schellenberg, M P; Liu, X L; McAllister, T A; Stanford, K

    2015-08-01

    A 3-year (2009 to 2011) grazing study was conducted to assess the effects of purple prairie clover (PPC; Dalea purpurea Vent) on fecal shedding of total Escherichia coli in cattle. Three pasture types were used in the experiment: bromegrass (Check), mixed cool season grasses with PPC (Simple), and mixed cool and warm grasses with PPC (Complex). Pastures were rotationally grazed during a summer and fall grazing period. PPC was grazed in summer at the vegetative or early flower stage and at the flower or early seed stage during the fall. Fecal samples were collected for enumeration of E. coli and chemical analyses. Forage samples were collected throughout grazing for analysis. Condensed tannins (CT) were only detected in Simple and Complex pastures that contained PPC, with higher concentrations found in the fall than in the summer. Fecal counts of E. coli in cattle grazing Simple and Complex pastures linearly decreased (P < 0.05) over summer to fall in all 3 years, an outcome not observed in cattle grazing the Check pasture. Across the three grazing seasons, fecal E. coli was lower (P < 0.05) in cattle grazing Simple and Complex pastures than in those grazing the Check pasture during the fall. During the fall, feces collected from cattle grazing the Check pasture had higher (P < 0.05) values for pH, N, NH3-N, total volatile fatty acids, and branched-chain volatile fatty acids, but a lower (P < 0.05) acetate:propionate ratio than feces collected from cattle grazing Simple or Complex pastures. In a second experiment, two strains of E. coli were cultured in M9 medium containing 25 to 200 μg/ml of PPC CT. Growth of E. coli was linearly (P < 0.01) reduced by increasing levels of PPC CT. Scanning electron micrographs showed electron-dense filamentous material associated with the outer membrane of E. coli cells exposed to CT. Incorporation of PPC into forage reduced the fecal shedding of E. coli from grazing cattle, likely due to the anti-E. coli properties of PPC CT.

  7. Permanent, biodiverse pastures in Montado ecosystems - biogeochemical and physiological implications for cork oak trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moura, C.; Dawson, T. E.; Santos Pereira, J.

    2012-12-01

    Sown biodiverse permanent pastures rich in legumes (SBPPRL) have been implemented in Portugal as a management tool to increase soil fertility, grassland productivity and animal carrying capacity and were later selected as a voluntary land-use change activity towards increased carbon sequestration within the context of the Kyoto protocol. SBPPRL are commonly found in the understory of Mediterranean-type agro-silvo-pastoral systems - Montados - with cork oak as a dominant tree species. However, little is known about the effects of these introduced pastures on co-occurring cork oak physiology and productivity. Understanding the impact of grassland conversion on carbon, water, and nutrient cycling - namely at the tree level - could be of great importance for future management and policy decisions. Cork oak trees growing in an LTER, flux-tower site in Southern Portugal have been selected among two types of understory land-use: natural grassland and sown biodiverse permanent pasture. A suite of leaf-based physiological and morphological parameters were measured in cork oak trees across both land-use scenarios and different seasons. Here we focus on the results from foliar 15δN and 13δC between spring and summer. 13δC ranged from-30.21 to -27.36, with an average value of -28.74 (± 0.12) and no significant differences found between pasture types (natural vs. improved) or time (spring vs. summer). Foliar 15δN on the other hand showed statistically significant differences between cork oaks in different pasture types (-2.96±0.09 natural vs. -2.21±0.17 improved pastures, t-test, p ≤ 0.05), but no differences across time points. Cork oak trees in the permanent pasture have a 15δN signature closer to zero, consistent with a higher percentage of legumes (and N2 fixation) in that system. Using a mixed-model approach we estimated these trees to be using ca. 25% of their nitrogen from legume-fixation in the pasture. Despite the clear signature influence of legume-fixed N

  8. Southeastern pasture-based dairy systems: housing, posilac, and supplemental silage effects on cow performance.

    PubMed

    Fike, J H; Staples, C R; Sollenberger, L E; Moore, J E; Head, H H

    2002-04-01

    This experiment tested performance and physiological responses to evaporative cooling, bovine somatotropin (bST), and supplemental silage of lactating cows grazing bermudagrass (Tifton 85; Cynodon dactylon x C. nlemfuensis cv.) pastures. Multiparous (n = 32) cows (196 d in milk) were assigned one of five treatments arranged in two replicates. Treatments were 1) cows maintained continuously on pasture with access to shade, 2) treatment 1 + bST, 3) night housing on pasture, then free-stall housing with fans and misters from 0730 to 1630 h, 4) treatment 3 + bST, and 5) treatment 4 + corn silage fed at 0.5% of body weight (dry matter basis) in the barn. A grain supplement was fed at a rate of 0.5 kg/kg of milk produced. Time spent grazing ranged from 4 to 7.2 h/d, with cows fed corn silage spending the least amount of time. Cows given bST grazed 45 min/d longer than controls, but intake of bermudagrass was unchanged. Intake of bermudagrass ranged from 7.4 to 9.5 kg/d of organic matter, with the lowest intake by cows fed corn silage. With the exception of cows fed corn silage, cows kept in a cooling barn during the day ate equivalent amounts of pasture as those given unlimited access to pasture. Production of 4% fat-corrected milk was greater by cows injected with bST (17.7 vs. 15.8 kg/d) compared with controls and tended to be greater for cows given daytime cooling compared with cows on pasture continuously (17.2 vs. 16.3 kg/d). Cows provided evaporative cooling did not lose weight compared with continually pastured cows (6.3 vs. -10.9 kg/24 d). Cows injected with bST compared with controls maintained their body weight better (2.5 vs. -7.1 kg/24 d). Cows given bST had increased concentration of plasma insulin-like growth factor-I (142 vs. 89 ng/ml), insulin (0.60 vs. 0.56 ng/ml), and nonesterified fatty acids (318 vs. 239 mEq/L). Cows given bST and those continually on pasture had greater diurnal body temperatures. Use of barn cooling systems and bST treatments as

  9. Steers performance in dwarf elephant grass pastures alone or mixed with Arachis pintoi.

    PubMed

    Crestani, Steben; Ribeiro Filho, Henrique Mendonça Nunes; Miguel, Marcolino Frederico; de Almeida, Edison Xavier; Santos, Flávio Augusto Portela

    2013-08-01

    The inclusion of legumes in pasture reduces the need for mineral nitrogen applications and the pollution of groundwater; however, the agronomic and animal husbandry advantages with tropical legumes are still little known. The objective of this study was to quantify the effect of the use of forage peanut (Arachis pintoi cv. Amarillo) in dwarf elephant grass pastures (Pennisetum purpureum cv. BRS Kurumi) on forage intake and animal performance. The experimental treatments were dwarf elephant grass fertilized with 200 kg N/ha, and dwarf elephant grass mixed with forage peanut without mineral fertilizers. The animals used for the experiment were 12 Charolais steers (body weight (BW) = 288 ± 5.2 kg) divided into four lots (two per treatment). Pastures were managed under intermittent stocking with an herbage allowance of 5.4 kg dry matter of green leaves/100 kg BW. Dry matter intake (mean = 2.44% BW), the average daily gain (mean = 0.76 kg), and the stocking rate (mean = 3.8 AU/ha) were similar between the studied pastures, but decreased drastically in last grazing cycle with the same herbage allowance. The presence of peanut in dwarf elephant grass pastures was enough to sustain the stocking rate, but did not allow increasing forage intake and animal performance.

  10. Fertility and acidity status of latossolos (oxisols) under pasture in the Brazilian Cerrado.

    PubMed

    Vendrame, Pedro R S; Brito, Osmar R; Guimarães, Maria F; Martins, Eder S; Becquer, Thierry

    2010-12-01

    The Cerrado region, with over 50 million hectares of cultivated pasture, provides 55% of Brazilian beef production. Previous investigations have shown that about 70-80% of this pasture is affected by some kind of degradation, leading to low productivity. However, until now, few surveys have been carried out on a regional scale. The aim of the present work is both to assess the fertility and acidity levels of Cerrado soils under pasture and compare the variability of the soils characteristics on a regional scale. Two soil depths were sampled in different places within the studied area: (1) a surface horizon (0.0-0.2 m) in order to evaluate its fertility and acidity status for pasture, and (2) a subsurface horizon (0.6-0.8 m), used for classification. Most of soils had levels of nutrients below the reference values for adequate pasture development. Whatever the texture, about 90% of soils had low or very low availability of phosphorus. Only 7 to 14% of soils had low pH, high exchangeable aluminum, and aluminum saturation above the critical acidity level. Except for nitrogen, no significant difference was found between Latossolos Vermelhos and Latossolos Vermelho-Amarelos.

  11. Trace gas responses of tropical forest and pasture soils to N and P fertilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steudler, Paul A.; Garcia-Montiel, Diana C.; Piccolo, Marisa C.; Neill, Christopher; Melillo, Jerry M.; Feigl, Brigitte J.; Cerri, Carlos C.

    2002-05-01

    We measured the responses of nitric oxide (NO), nitrous oxide (N2O) and carbon dioxide (CO2) to nitrogen (N) and/or phosphorus (P) fertilization in a mature moist tropical forest and an 11-year-old pasture in the Brazilian Amazon. Nitrogen was applied in two forms, ammonium (NH4+) and nitrate (NO3-). In the forest, NO emissions increased by 4 to 9 times the controls in the NH4+ amended plots. Nitrous oxide emissions showed a small response only in the NH4+ amended plots. In the pasture, NO emissions during the first 7 days after fertilization with either form of N were about twice those in the control plots. Nitrous oxide emissions increased more than 18 times the controls in the NO3- amended plots 1 day after fertilization. The estimated yields of total nitrogen oxide loss from the forest were between 0.2 and 1.6% of the applied nitrogen, predominately as NO. Pasture yields were greater, up to 2.8% of the applied nitrogen, predominately as N2O. In the context of Rondônia and other regions in the Amazon Basin, pasture management practices are changing to include increased use of fertilizer, particularly in older pastures that have lower NO and N2O emissions than the original intact forests. This may lead to large short-term releases of N2O and alter the future N2O emissions from the Basin.

  12. Trace gas responses of tropical forest and pasture soils to N and P fertilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steudler, Paul A.; Garcia-Montiel, Diana C.; Piccolo, Marisa C.; Neill, Christopher; Melillo, Jerry M.; Feigl, Brigitte J.; Cerri, Carlos C.

    2002-06-01

    We measured the responses of nitric oxide (NO), nitrous oxide (N2O) and carbon dioxide (CO2) to nitrogen (N) and/or phosphorus (P) fertilization in a mature moist tropical forest and an 11-year-old pasture in the Brazilian Amazon. Nitrogen was applied in two forms, ammonium (NH4+) and nitrate (NO3-). In the forest, NO emissions increased by 4 to 9 times the controls in the NH4+ amended plots. Nitrous oxide emissions showed a small response only in the NH4+ amended plots. In the pasture, NO emissions during the first 7 days after fertilization with either form of N were about twice those in the control plots. Nitrous oxide emissions increased more than 18 times the controls in the NO3- amended plots 1 day after fertilization. The estimated yields of total nitrogen oxide loss from the forest were between 0.2 and 1.6% of the applied nitrogen, predominately as NO. Pasture yields were greater, up to 2.8% of the applied nitrogen, predominately as N2O. In the context of Rondônia and other regions in the Amazon Basin, pasture management practices are changing to include increased use of fertilizer, particularly in older pastures that have lower NO and N2O emissions than the original intact forests. This may lead to large short-term releases of N2O and alter the future N2O emissions from the Basin.

  13. Dairy cows value access to pasture as highly as fresh feed

    PubMed Central

    von Keyserlingk, Marina A. G.; Amorim Cestari, Andressa; Franks, Becca; Fregonesi, Jose A.; Weary, Daniel M.

    2017-01-01

    Many dairy cows in the developed world are now housed exclusively indoors with fewer than 5% of the 10 million lactating cows in the United States having access to pasture during the grazing season. Indoor housing systems are designed to meet biological needs for food, water, hygiene, and shelter, but surveys of public and farmer opinion suggest that people think that pasture access is also important for the well-being of dairy cows. To determine if pasture access is important to the cows themselves, we investigated to what extent cows will work to access pasture (by pushing on a weighted gate), and compared it to the motivation to access fresh feed. Cows worked at least as hard to access pasture as they did to access the fresh feed and worked hardest for outdoor access in the evening hours. Echoing public views on what allows for a good life for cattle, these results show that cows are highly motivated for outdoor access. PMID:28332567

  14. Tropical rain forest conversion to pasture: Changes in vegetation and soil properties

    SciTech Connect

    Reiners, W.A. ); Bouwman, A.F. ); Parsons, W.F.J. Institute of Marine and Coastal Sciences, Rugers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ ); Keller, M. )

    1994-05-01

    The effect of converting lowland tropical rainforest to pasture, and of subsequent succession of pasture lands to secondary forest, were examined in the Atlantic Zone of Costa Rica. Three replicate sites of each of four land-use types representing this disturbance-recovery sequence were sampled for changes in vegetation, pedological properties, and potential nitrogen mineralization and nitrification. The four land-use types included primary forest, actively grazed pasture (10-36 yr old), abandoned pasture (abandoned 4-10 yr) and secondary forest (abandoned 10-20 yr). Conversion and succession had obvious and significant effects on canopy cover, canopy height, species composition, and species richness; it appeared that succession of secondary forests was proceeding toward a floristic composition like that of the primary forests. Significant changes in soil properties associated with conversion of forest to pasture included: (1) a decrease in acidity and increase in some base exchange properties, (2) and increase in bulk density and a concomitant decrease in porosity, (3) higher concentrations of NH[sub 4][sup +], (4) lower concentrations of NO[sub 3][sup [minus

  15. Seasonal development and survival of equine cyathostome larvae on pasture in south Louisiana.

    PubMed

    Baudena, M A; Chapman, M R; French, D D; Klei, T R

    2000-02-29

    Cyathostome development and survival on pasture in subtropical climates of the US have yet to be completely defined and available data on seasonal transmission are minimal. In an attempt to study this phenomenon, a group of pony mares and their foals was maintained on a naturally contaminated pasture in southern Louisiana. Fecal egg counts (FEC) and numbers of infective third stage larvae (L3) kg(-1) dry herbage were recorded biweekly during two time periods, from January 1986 through December 1988, and September 1996 through October 1997. A FEC rise occurred during the late summer-early autumn which preceded the peak of L3 on pasture during the winter season. The numbers of cyathostome L3 were reduced during the hottest months of the year due mainly to daily minimum temperatures above 18 degrees C, and in winter during short freezing spells when daily minimum temperatures dropped below 0 degrees C. Tilling of the pasture reduced the number of cyathostome L3 during the early winter months but this is an efficacious measure only if horses are given an effective anthelmintic treatment prior to being returned to pasture. The data collected suggest that parasite reduction in southern Louisiana is possible using a treatment program with treatment beginning at the end of September and continuing through the end of March.

  16. Pasture degradation modifies the water and carbon cycles of the Tibetan highlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babel, W.; Biermann, T.; Coners, H.; Falge, E.; Seeber, E.; Ingrisch, J.; Schleuß, P.-M.; Gerken, T.; Leonbacher, J.; Leipold, T.; Willinghöfer, S.; Schützenmeister, K.; Shibistova, O.; Becker, L.; Hafner, S.; Spielvogel, S.; Li, X.; Xu, X.; Sun, Y.; Zhang, L.; Yang, Y.; Ma, Y.; Wesche, K.; Graf, H.-F.; Leuschner, C.; Guggenberger, G.; Kuzyakov, Y.; Miehe, G.; Foken, T.

    2014-12-01

    The Tibetan Plateau has a significant role with regard to atmospheric circulation and the monsoon in particular. Changes between a closed plant cover and open bare soil are one of the striking effects of land use degradation observed with unsustainable range management or climate change, but experiments investigating changes of surface properties and processes together with atmospheric feedbacks are rare and have not been undertaken in the world's two largest alpine ecosystems, the alpine steppe and the Kobresia pygmaea pastures of the Tibetan Plateau. We connected measurements of micro-lysimeter, chamber, 13C labelling, and eddy covariance and combined the observations with land surface and atmospheric models, adapted to the highland conditions. This allowed us to analyse how three degradation stages affect the water and carbon cycle of pastures on the landscape scale within the core region of the Kobresia pygmaea ecosystem. The study revealed that increasing degradation of the Kobresia turf affects carbon allocation and strongly reduces the carbon uptake, compromising the function of Kobresia pastures as a carbon sink. Pasture degradation leads to a shift from transpiration to evaporation while a change in the sum of evapotranspiration over a longer period cannot be confirmed. The results show an earlier onset of convection and cloud generation, likely triggered by a shift in evapotranspiration timing when dominated by evaporation. Consequently, precipitation starts earlier and clouds decrease the incoming solar radiation. In summary, the changes in surface properties by pasture degradation found on the highland have a significant influence on larger scales.

  17. Pasture degradation modifies the water and carbon cycles of the Tibetan highlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babel, W.; Biermann, T.; Coners, H.; Falge, E.; Seeber, E.; Ingrisch, J.; Schleuß, P.-M.; Gerken, T.; Leonbacher, J.; Leipold, T.; Willinghöfer, S.; Schützenmeister, K.; Shibistova, O.; Becker, L.; Hafner, S.; Spielvogel, S.; Li, X.; Xu, X.; Sun, Y.; Zhang, L.; Yang, Y.; Ma, Y.; Wesche, K.; Graf, H.-F.; Leuschner, C.; Guggenberger, G.; Kuzyakov, Y.; Miehe, G.; Foken, T.

    2014-06-01

    The Tibetan Plateau has a significant role with regard to atmospheric circulation and the monsoon in particular. Changes between a closed plant cover and open bare soil are one of the striking effects of land use degradation observed with unsustainable range management or climate change, but experiments coupling changes of surface properties and processes with atmospheric feedbacks are rare and have not been undertaken in the world's two largest alpine ecosystems, the alpine steppe and the Kobresia pygmaea pastures of the Tibetan plateau. We coupled measurements of micro-lysimeter, chamber, 13C labeling, and eddy-covariance and combined the observations with land surface and atmospheric models, adapted to the highland conditions. This allowed us to analyze how three degradation stages affect the water and carbon cycle of pastures on the landscape scale within the core region of the Kobresia pygmaea ecosystem. The study revealed that increasing degradation of the Kobresia turf affects carbon allocation and strongly reduces the carbon uptake, compromising the function of Kobresia pastures as a carbon sink. Pasture degradation leads to a shift from transpiration to evaporation while the total sum of evapotranspiration remains unaffected. The results show an earlier onset of convection and cloud generation, likely triggered by enhanced evaporation. Consequently, precipitation starts earlier and clouds decrease the incoming solar radiation. In summary, the changes in surface properties by pasture degradation found on the highland have a~significant influence on larger scales.

  18. Fertility aspects in yearling beef bulls grazing endophyte-infected tall fescue pastures.

    PubMed

    Schuenemann, G M; Edwards, J L; Hopkins, F M; Rohrbach, N R; Adair, H S; Scenna, F N; Waller, J C; Oliver, J W; Saxton, A M; Schrick, F N

    2005-01-01

    During a 2-year study, yearling beef bulls were used to determine the effects of grazing on endophyte-infected tall fescue on endocrine profiles, semen quality and fertilisation potential. Bulls were allotted to graze tall fescue pastures infected with Neotyphodium coenophialum (E+; n = 20 per year) or Jesup/MaxQ (Pennington Seed, Atlanta, GA, USA; NTE; n = 10 per year). Bulls were grouped by scrotal circumference (SC), bodyweight (BW), breed composites and age to graze tall fescue pastures from mid-November until the end of June (within each year). Blood samples, BW, SC and rectal temperatures (RT) were collected every 14 days. Semen was collected from bulls every 60 days by electroejaculation and evaluated for motility and morphology. The developmental competence of oocytes fertilised in vitro with semen from respective treatments was determined. Bulls grazing E+ pastures had decreased BW gain (P < 0.01), increased overall RT (P < 0.01) and decreased prolactin (P < 0.01) compared with animals grazing NTE pastures. Neither percentage of normal sperm morphology nor motility differed between bulls grazed on the two pasture types. Semen from E+ bulls demonstrated decreased cleavage rates (P = 0.02) compared with semen from NTE bulls. However, development of cleaved embryos to the eight-cell and blastocyst stages did not differ between the two groups. In conclusion, semen from bulls grazing E+ tall fescue resulted in decreased cleavage rates in vitro, which may lower reproductive performance owing to reduced fertilisation ability.

  19. Community-based management: under what conditions do Sámi pastoralists manage pastures sustainably?

    PubMed

    Hausner, Vera H; Fauchald, Per; Jernsletten, Johnny-Leo

    2012-01-01

    Community-based management (CBM) has been implemented in socio-ecological systems (SES) worldwide. CBM has also been the prevailing policy in Sámi pastoral SES in Norway, but the outcomes tend to vary extensively among resource groups ("siidas"). We asked why do some siidas self-organize to manage common pool resources sustainably and others do not? To answer this question we used a mixed methods approach. First, in the statistical analyses we analyzed the relationship between sustainability indicators and structural variables. We found that small winter pastures that are shared by few siidas were managed more sustainably than larger pastures. Seasonal siida stability, i.e., a low turnover of pastoralists working together throughout the year, and equality among herders, also contributed to more sustainable outcomes. Second, interviews were conducted in the five largest pastures to explain the relationships between the structural variables and sustainability. The pastoralists expressed a high level of agreement with respect to sustainable policies, but reported a low level of trust and cooperation among the siidas. The pastoralists requested siida tenures or clear rules and sanctioning mechanisms by an impartial authority rather than flexible organization or more autonomy for the siidas. The lack of nestedness in self-organization for managing pastures on larger scales, combined with the past economic policies, could explain why CBM is less sustainable on the largest winter pastures. We conclude that the scale mis-match between self-organization and the formal governance is a key condition for sustainability.

  20. [Claw size of Scottish Highland Cows after pasture and housing periods].

    PubMed

    Nuss, K; Kolp, E; Braun, U; Weidmann, E; Hässig, M

    2014-09-01

    The claws of pastured Scottish Highland Cattle are large and this may raise the question if regular claw trimming is necessary. Therefore, the claws of the right thoracic and pelvic limbs were measured in 22 Scottish Highland cows 4 times 8 weeks apart. The cows were kept on various alpine pastures before the first measurement, on a two-hectare low-land pasture before the second measurement, in a welfare-compliant straw-bedded free stall before the third measurement and on alpine pasture before the fourth measurement. Housing conditions significantly affected claw dimensions. The claws were composed of dry, hard horn during pasture periods, and had prominent weight-bearing hoof-wall borders and soles with a natural axial slope. Long dorsal walls and heels and a greater symmetry were common. Claw lesions were absent. In contrast, free-stall housing was associated with shorter toes and steeper toe angles, but white line deterioration, heel horn erosion, wearing of the axial slope and hoof wall edges were common.

  1. Milk production and economic measures in confinement or pasture systems using seasonally calved Holstein and Jersey cows.

    PubMed

    White, S L; Benson, G A; Washburn, S P; Green, J T

    2002-01-01

    This 4-yr study examined total lactation performance of dairy cows in two feeding systems: pasture-based and confinement. Spring and fall calving herds were used and each seasonal herd had 36 cows on pasture and 36 cows in confinement with 282 Holstein and 222 Jersey cows included over seven seasonal replicates. Pasture-fed cows received variable amounts of grain and baled haylage depending upon pasture availability. Confinement cows received a total mixed ration with corn silage as the primary forage. Data were collected on milk production, feed costs, and other costs. Pasture-fed cows produced 11.1% less milk than confinement cows. Across treatments, Jerseys produced 23.3% less milk than Holsteins, but calving season and various interactions were not significant. Feed costs averaged $0.95/cow per day lower for pastured cows than confinement cows. Feed costs were lower for Jerseys than Holsteins and for cows calving in spring. Income over feed costs averaged $7.05 +/- 0.34 for confinement Holsteins, $6.89 +/- 0.34 for pastured Holsteins, $5.68 +/- 0.34 for confinement Jerseys, and $5.36 +/- 0.34 for pastured Jerseys; effects of breed were significant but treatment, season, and interactions were not. Economic factors such as labor for animal care, manure handling, forage management, and cow culling rates favored pastured cows. Higher fertility and lower mastitis among Jerseys partially offsets lower income over feed cost compared with Holsteins. Milk production was lower in this study for pasture-based systems but lower feed costs, lower culling costs, and other economic factors indicate that pasture-based systems can be competitive with confinement systems.

  2. Environmental determinants of the old oaks in wood-pastures from a changing traditional social-ecological system of Romania.

    PubMed

    Moga, Cosmin Ioan; Samoilă, Ciprian; Öllerer, Kinga; Băncilă, Raluca I; Réti, Kinga-Olga; Craioveanu, Cristina; Poszet, Szilárd; Rákosy, László; Hartel, Tibor

    2016-05-01

    Large, old trees are keystone ecological structures, their decline having disproportional ecological consequences. There is virtually no information available regarding the status and occurrence of old trees in traditional cultural landscapes from Eastern Europe. In this study, we explore the environmental determinants of the old oaks found in wood-pastures from a changing traditional rural landscape from Central Romania. Both the old oaks and the wood-pastures harboring them have exceptional cultural, historical, and ecological values, yet are vulnerable to land-use change. We surveyed 41 wood-pastures from Southern Transylvania and counted the old oaks in them. We then related the number of old oaks from these wood-pastures to a set of local and landscape level variables related to wood-pastures. We found 490 old oaks in 25 wood-pastures. The number of old oaks was positively related to the size of the wood-pasture and the amount of pasture and forest around it (500 m buffer), and negatively related to the proximity of the village. Furthermore, we found a significant interaction between the effects of sheepfolds in the wood-pasture and the size of the wood-pasture on the number of old trees, indicating a negative influence of sheepfolds on the number of old trees in smaller sized wood-pastures. There is an increasing risk for losing old trees in the traditional cultural landscapes due to the lack of formal recognition of these trees. Therefore, while presenting the positive example of local initiatives and citizen science, we argue for an urgent development and implementation of conservation policies along with education strategies targeting the old trees and rural communities from the changing traditional cultural landscapes of Eastern Europe.

  3. Evaporation rates of pasture-mesquite vegetation in central Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosa, E. G.; Escobar, A. G.

    2004-12-01

    from 1.1 to 2.0 mm d-1, maximum E was 4.3 mm d-1 on sunny days and the average E was 3.1 mm d-1. Average daily E increased during the measuring period at a rate of 0.05 mm d-1 (r2=0.2, p<0.05). Data suggest that evaporation from a pasture-mesquite vegetation is an important component in the water balance considering the limited rainfall occurring.

  4. Property rights and grassland degradation: a study of the Xilingol pasture, Inner Mongolia, China.

    PubMed

    Jun Li, Wen; Ali, Saleem H; Zhang, Qian

    2007-10-01

    The semi-private property rights arrangement called the Household Production Responsibility System (HPRS) was started in the early 1980s in Xilingol pasture of Inner Mongolia (China), and stimulated the development of stockbreeding. The grassland has been degrading severely with increasing numbers of livestock. Based on a historical review of property rights regimes in Inner Mongolia and empirical surveys in Xilingol pasture during 2001-2003, this paper assesses the implementation of HPRS and its impacts on incomes of households as well as the environmental impact on the grassland. It was found that HPRS does not mitigate the "Tragedy of the Commons", instead it has exacerbated the situation. It was also found that co-management of grassland and livestock among a few households presents a sustainable use of grassland to develop livestock breeding. We conclude with the recommendation that small-scale collective property rights systems should be encouraged in Xilingol pasture of Inner Mongolia.

  5. Increased risk of BVDV infection of calves from pregnant dams on communal Alpine pastures in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Siegwart, Nico; Hilbe, Monika; Hässig, Michael; Braun, Ueli

    2006-09-01

    Skin biopsies and blood samples from 117 calves, the offspring of dams that had been pastured on communal Alpine pastures while pregnant, were examined for bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) antigen. Immunohistochemical evaluation of skin biopsy samples revealed BVDV antigen in nine (7.7%) calves, and ELISA testing of serum samples was positive for BVDV antigen in six (5.1%). Three calves with positive skin biopsy samples and negative serum results were < 11 days old; it was assumed that maternal antibody interfered with the ELISA testing. Serum samples that were collected at a later date from two of the three calves were positive for BVDV antigen. These results were significantly different from those of a previous study in which the prevalence of persistently infected calves in an average Swiss cattle population was 0.64%. It was concluded that the risk of infection with BVDV is high in cattle sharing a communal Alpine pasture.

  6. Intensive cattle grazing affects pasture litter-fall: an unrecognized nitrous oxide source.

    PubMed

    Pal, Pranoy; Clough, Tim J; Kelliher, Francis M; van Koten, Chikako; Sherlock, Robert R

    2012-01-01

    The rationale for this study came from observing grazing dairy cattle dropping freshly harvested plant material onto the soil surface, hereafter called litter-fall. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) guidelines include NO emissions during pasture renewal but do not consider NO emissions that may result from litter-fall. The objectives of this study were to determine litter-fall rates and to assess indicative NO emission factors (EFs) for the dominant pasture species (perennial ryegrass [ L.] and white clover [ L.]). Herbage was vacuumed from intensively managed dairy pastures before and after 30 different grazing events when cows (84 cows ha) grazed for 24 h according to a rotational system; the interval between grazing events ranged from 21 to 30 d. A laboratory incubation study was performed to assess potential EF values for the pasture species at two soil moisture contents. Finely ground pasture material was incubated under controlled laboratory conditions with soil, and the NO emissions were measured until rates returned to control levels. On average, pre- and postgrazing dry matter yields per grazing event were 2516 ± 636 and 1167 ± 265 kg DM ha (±SD), respectively. Pregrazing litter was absent, whereas postgrazing fresh and senesced litter-fall rates were 53 ± 24 and 19 ± 18 kg DM ha, respectively. Annually, the rotational grazing system resulted in 12 grazing events where fresh litter-fall equaed to 16 kg N ha yr to the soil. Emission factors in the laboratory experiment indicated that the EF for perennial ryegrass and white clover ranged from 0.7 to 3.1%. If such EF values should also occur under field conditions, then we estimate that litter-fall induces an NO emission rate of 0.3 kg NO ha yr. Litter-fall as a source of NO in grazed pastures requires further assessment. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  7. Cool-season annual pastures with clovers to supplement wintering beef cows nursing calves

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In December of 3 years, 87 beef cows with nursing calves (594 ± 9.8 kg; calving season, September to November) at side were stratified by body condition score, body weight, cow age, and calf gender and divided randomly into 6 groups assigned to 1 of 6 cool-season annual pastures (0.45 ha/cow) that had been interseeded into a dormant common bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon [L.] Pers.)/bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum Flugge) sod. Pastures contained 1 of the following 3 seeding mixtures (2 pastures/mixture): 1) wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam., WRG), 2) wheat and ryegrass plus red clover (Trifolium pretense L., WRR), or 3) wheat and ryegrass plus white (Trifolium repens L.) and crimson clovers (Trifolium incarnatum L., WRW). All groups had ad libitum access to grass hay (12% crude protein; 58% total digestible nutrients). The second week in December, cow estrous cycles were synchronized and artificially inseminated. In late December, a bull was placed with each group for 60-d. Data were analyzed with an analysis of variance using a mixed model containing treatment as the fixed effect and year as the random effect. Body weight and condition scores did not differ (P ≥ 0.27) among cows between February and June. Calf birth weights or average daily gain did not differ (P ≥ 0.17) among treatments; however, calves grazing pastures with clovers did tend (P = 0.06) to weigh more than calves grazing grass only. Weaning weight per cow exposed to a bull was greater (P = 0.02) for WRR and WRW than WRG. Cows grazing winter-annual pastures containing clovers tended to wean more calf body weight per cow exposed to a bull than cows grazing the grass only pastures. PMID:22958279

  8. Cool-season annual pastures with clovers to supplement wintering beef cows nursing calves.

    PubMed

    Gunter, Stacey A; Whitworth, Whitney A; Montgomery, T Gregory; Beck, Paul A

    2012-07-24

    In December of 3 years, 87 beef cows with nursing calves (594 ± 9.8 kg; calving season, September to November) at side were stratified by body condition score, body weight, cow age, and calf gender and divided randomly into 6 groups assigned to 1 of 6 cool-season annual pastures (0.45 ha/cow) that had been interseeded into a dormant common bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon [L.] Pers.)/bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum Flugge) sod. Pastures contained 1 of the following 3 seeding mixtures (2 pastures/mixture): 1) wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam., WRG), 2) wheat and ryegrass plus red clover (Trifolium pretense L., WRR), or 3) wheat and ryegrass plus white (Trifolium repens L.) and crimson clovers (Trifolium incarnatum L., WRW). All groups had ad libitum access to grass hay (12% crude protein; 58% total digestible nutrients). The second week in December, cow estrous cycles were synchronized and artificially inseminated. In late December, a bull was placed with each group for 60-d. Data were analyzed with an analysis of variance using a mixed model containing treatment as the fixed effect and year as the random effect. Body weight and condition scores did not differ (P ≥ 0.27) among cows between February and June. Calf birth weights or average daily gain did not differ (P ≥ 0.17) among treatments; however, calves grazing pastures with clovers did tend (P = 0.06) to weigh more than calves grazing grass only. Weaning weight per cow exposed to a bull was greater (P = 0.02) for WRR and WRW than WRG. Cows grazing winter-annual pastures containing clovers tended to wean more calf body weight per cow exposed to a bull than cows grazing the grass only pastures.

  9. [Allelopathic effects of extracts from tuberous roots of Aconitum carmichaeli on three pasture grasses].

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yu-jie; Wang, Ya-qi; Yuan, Ling

    2015-11-01

    The tuberous roots of Aconitum carmichaeli are largely used in traditional Chinese medicine and widely grown in Jiangyou, Sichuan, China. During the growth process, this medicinal plant releases a large amount of allelochemicals into soil, which retard the growth and development of near and late crops. Therefore, a pure culture experiment was thus carried out by seed soaking to study the allelopathic effects of extracts from tuberous roots of A. carmichaeli (ETR) on the seed germination and young seedling growth of Lolium perenne, Trifolium repens, and Medicago sativa, the late pasture grasses after cultivation of A. carmichaeli. The results showed that three pasture grasses varied significantly in seed germination and young seedling growth in response to ETR concentrations. Seed germination of M. sativa was stimulated by low ERT concentration (0.01 x g(-1)), while all of pasture grass seeds germinated poorly in solution with 1.00 g x L(-1). Seed soaking with 1.00 g x L(-1) also inhibited significantly the growth of pasture young seedlings, with M. sativa showing the highest seedling height reduction of 42.05% in seeding height, followed by T. repens (40.21%) and L. perenne with about 11%. Cultivation of L. perenne could thus be beneficial to increase whole land productivity in A. carmichaeli-pasture grass cropping systems. In addition, hydrolysis of protein, starch, and inositol phosphates was blocked and free amino acids, soluble sugars and phosphorus were decreased in seeds by seed soaking with ETR, which could be one of the reason for the inhibition of seed germination. There was a significant reduction in root vigor, nitrate reductase, and chlorophyll after the seed treatment with ETR, indicating the suppression of nutrient uptake, nitrate assimilation, and photosynthesis by allelopathic chemicals in ETR, which could lead to the slow growth rate of pasture grass seedlings.

  10. Plant diversity in live fences and pastures, two examples from the Mexican humid tropics.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Guerra, Betsabé; Rosas, Noé Velázquez; López-Acosta, Juan Carlos

    2014-09-01

    This study analyzes the potential uses of live fences and pastures as reservoirs of plant diversity for two regions with different management histories, Los Tuxtlas (LT) and Uxpanapa (UX), Veracruz, México. We studied two habitats, live fences and pastures, analyzed their species richness, diversity, structure and plant composition and classified species according to plant regeneration modes (light-demanding and shade tolerant), seed dispersal syndrome and their local uses. We recorded 62 species of trees at LT and 48 at UX. Live fences were more diverse than pastures in both regions. The LT site showed to analyze the relationship a higher diversity of plants in regeneration stages than the one at UX. However, UX had higher diversity of adult plants in the pastures than LT. Composition and structure of live fences were different between regions, as well as within live fences and pastures, 53 % of species were light-demanding and 40 % were shade tolerant; 70 % of the species were dispersed by birds. Differences between sites are associated with the modifications in live fences structure, which changed according to managerial practices and the use of local species; this may influence plant regeneration modes as well as the visits of avian dispersal agents. In LT, all species found in live fences were useful to humans, whereas in UX, less than half were used by the local population. Our results underline the importance of live fences and isolated trees in pasture habitats as potential sites to host native and useful species from tropical rain forests in livestock landscapes.

  11. Plant Diversity in Live Fences and Pastures, Two Examples from the Mexican Humid Tropics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Guerra, Betsabé; Rosas, Noé Velázquez; López-Acosta, Juan Carlos

    2014-09-01

    This study analyzes the potential uses of live fences and pastures as reservoirs of plant diversity for two regions with different management histories, Los Tuxtlas (LT) and Uxpanapa (UX), Veracruz, México. We studied two habitats, live fences and pastures, analyzed their species richness, diversity, structure and plant composition and classified species according to plant regeneration modes (light-demanding and shade tolerant), seed dispersal syndrome and their local uses. We recorded 62 species of trees at LT and 48 at UX. Live fences were more diverse than pastures in both regions. The LT site showed to analyze the relationship a higher diversity of plants in regeneration stages than the one at UX. However, UX had higher diversity of adult plants in the pastures than LT. Composition and structure of live fences were different between regions, as well as within live fences and pastures, 53 % of species were light-demanding and 40 % were shade tolerant; 70 % of the species were dispersed by birds. Differences between sites are associated with the modifications in live fences structure, which changed according to managerial practices and the use of local species; this may influence plant regeneration modes as well as the visits of avian dispersal agents. In LT, all species found in live fences were useful to humans, whereas in UX, less than half were used by the local population. Our results underline the importance of live fences and isolated trees in pasture habitats as potential sites to host native and useful species from tropical rain forests in livestock landscapes.

  12. Methods for assessing the impact of avermectins on the decomposer community of sheep pastures.

    PubMed

    King, K L

    1993-06-01

    This paper outlines methods which can be used in the field assessment of potentially toxic chemicals such as the avermectins. The procedures focus on measuring the effects of the drug on decomposer organisms and the nutrient cycling process in pastures grazed by sheep. Measurements of decomposer activity are described along with methods for determining dry and organic matter loss and mineral loss from dung to the underlying soil. Sampling methods for both micro- and macro-invertebrates are discussed along with determination of the percentage infection of plant roots with vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. An integrated sampling unit for assessing the ecotoxicity of ivermectin in pastures grazed by sheep is presented.

  13. Factors associated with the financial performance of spring-calving, pasture-based dairy farms.

    PubMed

    Ramsbottom, G; Horan, B; Berry, D P; Roche, J R

    2015-05-01

    As land becomes a limiting resource for pasture-based dairy farming, the inclusion of purchased supplementary feeds to increase milk production per cow (through greater dry matter intake) and per hectare (through increased stocking rate) is often proposed as a strategy to increase profitability. Although a plausible proposition, virtually no analysis has been done on the effect of such intensification on the profitability of commercial pasture-based dairy farm businesses. The objective of this study was to characterize the average physical and financial performance of dairy systems differing in the proportion of the cow's diet coming from grazed pasture versus purchased supplementary feeds over 4 yr, while accounting for any interaction with geographic region. Physical, genetic, and financial performance data from 1,561 seasonal-calving, pasture-based dairy farms in Ireland were available between the years 2008 and 2011; data from some herds were available for more than 1 yr of the 4-yr study period, providing data from 2,759 dairy farm-years. The data set was divided into geographic regions, based on latitude, rainfall, and soil characteristics that relate to drainage; these factors influence the length of the pasture growth season and the timing of turnout to pasture in spring and rehousing in autumn. Farms were also categorized by the quantity of feed purchased; farms in which cows received <10, 11-20, 21-30, or >30% of their annual feed requirements from purchased feed were considered to be categories representative of increasing levels of system intensification. Geographic region was associated with differences in grazing days, pasture harvested per hectare, milk production per cow and per hectare, and farm profitability. Farms in regions with longer grazing seasons harvested a greater amount of pasture [an additional 19kg of dry matter (DM)/ha per grazing day per hectare], and greater pasture harvested was associated with increased milk component yield per

  14. The effects of protein supplement on leptin concentrations in lambs and meat goat kids grazing Bermudagrass pastures in Central Oklahoma

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Lambs and kids weaned and pastured on bermudagrass (BG; Cynodon dactylon) may not receive enough protein to reach maximal growth during mid to late summer when protein in BG pastures declines. As an indicator of physiological status, leptin is an adipocyte-derived hormone that increases as body cond...

  15. Runoff phosphorus in a small rotationally-grazed pasture in Georgia with no history of broiler litter application

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pastures are sources of phosphorus (P) into water sources and can contribute to eutrophication and impairment. Close to 4 million ha of land in the Southern Coastal Plain and the Southern Piedmont in eastern USA is used for pasture and hay production. We present an 11-yr (1999 to 2009) of dissolved ...

  16. Soil aggregates and their associated carbon and nitrogen content in winter annual pastures using different tillage management options

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Traditionally, winter annual pastures are established on grazing areas that are steeply sloping and not regarded as suitable for row-crop production. Using conventional (CT) tillage methods to prepare these fragile lands for winter annual pastures leads to increased erosion and rapid soil degradatio...

  17. From the Lab Bench: Do you manage pastures for maximum gain per animal or gain per acre?

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    An article was written to discuss managing cattle pastures to maximize either weight gain or milk output per acre or per animal. There is no or little change in output per animal over a certain range of light stocking rates that allows pasture growth to be greater than forage intake, and increasing...

  18. Feeding strategy and pasture quality relative to nutrient requirements of grazing dairy cows in the Northeastern U.S.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pasture samples (n = 229) collected during the grazing season from 14 organic dairy farms in 2012 (PA, ME, NY, NH, VT) and from 11 of the same farms in 2013 (PA, ME, NY, NH) were analyzed for nutritional composition. Frequency analysis was used to determine the proportions of pasture samples that me...

  19. Feeding strategy and pasture quality relative to nutrient requirements of dairy cows in the northeastern U.S.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pasture samples (n = 380) collected during the grazing season on 14 dairy farms from 2012 to 2014 were analyzed for nutritional composition to determine the frequency of pasture samples that met minimum net energy for lactation (NEl), crude protein (CP), and macro-mineral requirements according to t...

  20. Influence of Poultry Litter Application Methods on the Longevity of Nutrient and E. coli in Runoff from Tall Fescue Pasture

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Significant quantities of the broiler (chicken, Gallus gallus domesticus) litter produced in the U.S. are being applied to pasture lands. The traditional surface- broadcast application of animal manure onto permanent pasture, however, may lead to high concentration of nutrients and pathogenic micro...

  1. Seed banks and land-use history of pastures and hayfields at the University of New Hampshire Organic Dairy

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The seed bank in pasture soils sometimes contributes useful plant species after a disturbance; however, it is often a reservoir of weedy plants. Knowledge of how land-use history affects the seed bank in pastures would be useful in anticipating potential weed management needs. We characterized the s...

  2. Feeding strategy and pasture quality relative to nutrient requirements of grazing dairy cows in the Northeastern U.S.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pasture samples (n = 229) collected during the grazing season from 14 organic dairy farms in 2012 (PA, ME, NY, NH, VT) and from 11 of the same farms in 2013 (PA, ME, NY, NH) were analyzed for nutritional composition. Frequency analysis was used to determine the proportions of pasture samples that me...

  3. Characterization of soil microbial community dynamics related to C and P cycling along a forest to pasture gradient

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In the Appalachian Mountains region landscape fragmentation due to farming practices results in areas with gradual blending of forests and pastures ecosystems. Soil nutrient cycling in the open land-forest boundary may be significantly different than in the forest soil or in the pasture soil and th...

  4. Nitrous oxide emissions and herbage accumulation in smooth bromegrass pastures with nitrogen fertilizer and ruminant urine application

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Agricultural soils contribute significantly to nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions, but little data is available on N2O emissions from smooth bromegrass (Bromus inermis Leyss.) pastures. This study evaluated soil N2O emissions and herbage accumulation from smooth bromegrass pasture in eastern Nebraska, US...

  5. An application example of the LANDSAT data to the study of the relationship between the topography and pasture quality in areas of Paragominas. [Brazil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dejesusparada, N. (Principal Investigator); Dossantos, A. P.; Demoraesnovo, E. M. L.; Duarte, V.

    1980-01-01

    The relationship between pasture quality and geomorphology was verified by applying visual and automatic interpretation techniques to LANDSAT data. The results show that LANDSAT data is useful to point out better areas to settle pastures.

  6. The multi-year cumulative effects of alternative stocking rate and grazing management practices on pasture productivity and utilization efficiency.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, B; Delaby, L; Pierce, K M; McCarthy, J; Fleming, C; Brennan, A; Horan, B

    2016-05-01

    The production and utilization of increased quantities of high quality pasture is of paramount importance in pasture-based milk production systems. The objective of this study was to evaluate the cumulative effects of alternative integrated grazing strategies, incorporating alternative stocking rate (SR) and grazing severities, on pasture productivity and grazing efficiency over multiple years within farm systems using perennial ryegrass dominant pastures. Three whole-farm SR treatments were compared over 4 complete grazing seasons (2009 to 2012 inclusive): low (2.51 cows/ha; LSR), medium (2.92 cows/ha; MSR), and high (3.28 cows/ha; HSR). Each system had its own farmlet containing 18 paddocks and remained on the same treatment for the duration of the study. Stocking rate had a significant effect on all grazing variables with the exception of soil fertility status and sward density. Increased SR resulted in increased total annual net pasture accumulation, improved sward nutritive value, and increased grazed pasture utilization. Total annual net pasture accumulation was greatest in HSR [15,410kg of dry matter (DM)/ha], intermediate for MSR (14,992kg of DM/ha), and least for LSR (14,479kg of DM/ha) during the 4-yr study period. A linear effect of SR on net pasture accumulation was detected with an increase in net pasture accumulation of 1,164.4 (SE=432.7) kg of DM/ha for each 1 cow/ha increase in SR. Pregrazing pasture mass and height and postgrazing residual pasture mass and height were greatest for LSR, intermediate for the MSR, and lowest for the HSR. In comparison with the LSR, the imposition of a consistently increased grazing severity coupled with increased whole farm SR in MSR and HSR treatments arrested the decline in sward nutritive value, typically observed during mid-season. Incorporating the individual beneficial effects of SR on pasture accumulation, nutritive value, and utilization efficiency, total proportional energy (unité fourragère lait

  7. Case study of a commercial sheep flock under extensive mountain grazing: Pasture derived lipid compounds in milk and cheese.

    PubMed

    Valdivielso, I; Bustamante, M A; Aldezabal, A; Amores, G; Virto, M; Ruiz de Gordoa, J C; de Renobales, M; Barron, L J R

    2016-04-15

    Terpenoid, fat-soluble antioxidant and fatty acid (FA) composition of pasture as well as those of milk and cheese from a commercial sheep flock managed under extensive mountain grazing in the east region of the Cantabrian mountain (Northern Spain) was investigated. The grazing period lasted for 2 months and ewes were at late lactation stage. Plants, feces, bulk milk and cheese samples were collected on two sampling dates. The abundance of the dominating botanical families in the mountain pasture prevailed in the sheep diet of the commercial flock. Major terpenoids and tocols in the pasture appeared as major ones in milk and cheese, whereas C18 unsaturated FAs in milk and cheese were derived from the intake of C18 polyunsaturated FAs which were prevalent in the pasture. No carotene was detected in the dairy samples but retinol (free or esterified), derived from the intake of β-carotene present in pasture plants, was found in milk and cheese.

  8. Photographic estimation of wild boar damage to alpine grazing pastures in the Carpathian Mountains of central Romania.

    PubMed

    Engeman, Richard; Cattaruzza, Renate; Cattaruzza, Marco; Fischer, Justin

    2016-03-01

    Observations of wild boar damage to alpine grazing pastures in Romania's Carpathian Mountains were collected using photographs of the slopes from vantage points. We mapped the rooted areas and then used GIS software to estimate the relative proportions of the total grazing areas visible in the photographs that were damaged by wild boar. The amounts of damage from our two demonstration pastures were 11.2 and 13.5 %. Pastures are rented for summer grazing with grazing density monitored. Wild boar damage essentially decreases the economic benefit received for the cost of the grazing rights. This paper appears to be the first documentation of the very direct costs to livestock owners from significant wild boar rooting within rented pastures. The photographic method we present provides a quick and efficient means to quantify damage to alpine grazing pastures and may have broad application for mountainous areas where swine damage (or other disturbance) occurs and there is sufficient visibility of the damaged habitat.

  9. Meat goat kids finished on alfalfa, red clover, or orchardgrass pastures: Carcass merit and meat quality

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This experiment was conducted in 2005-2007 to evaluate carcass and meat quality parameters when meat goat kids were finished on alfalfa (Medicago sativa L; ALF); red clover (Trifolium pretense L.; RCG); or orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata L; OGR) pastures. Final shrunk body weights were similar whe...

  10. Nutritive Valve of Herbage of Five Semi-Irrigated Pasture Species Across an Irrigation Gradient

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    As water resources become limiting, the need to produce stable amounts of highly nutritional forage increases. An understanding of how levels of irrigation affect crude protein (CP), in vitro true digestibility (IVTD), and neutral detergent fiber (NDF) is critical in pasture forage management. Smo...

  11. Performance by Fall-Calving Cows Grazing Tall Fescue Pastures With Different Proportions Stockpiled

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Tall fescue [Lolium arundinaceum (Schreb.) S.J. Darbyshire.] is often stockpiled to reduce winter feed costs for cattle. Over two consecutive years, a total of 158 Gelbvieh × Angus fall-calving cows (1318 plus/minus 13.2 lb) were allocated randomly to one of eight 24-acre tall fescue pastures on 18 ...

  12. Performance by Fall-Calving Cows Grazing Tall Fescue Pastures with Different Proportions Stockpiled

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Tall fescue [Lolium arundinaceum (Schreb.) Darbysh.] is often stockpiled to reduce winter feed costs for cattle. Over two consecutive years, a total of 158 Gelbvieh × Angus fall-calving cows (599 ± 6.0 kg) were allocated randomly to one of eight 10-ha tall fescue pastures (subdivided into six 1.6-h...

  13. Feeding strategy and pasture quality relative to nutrient requirements of organic dairy cows

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pasture samples (n = 216) were collected during the grazing season from 14 certified northeastern organic dairy farms in 2012 and 2013 for nutritive composition (Dairy One). A Mixed model (SAS Inst., 1998) was used to test effect of year of sampling, month of sampling, and farm on crude protein (CP...

  14. Got Dung? Resource Selection by Dung Beetles in Neotropical Forest Fragments and Cattle Pastures.

    PubMed

    Bourg, A; Escobar, F; MacGregor-Fors, I; Moreno, C E

    2016-10-01

    Both the impact of habitat modification on the food preferences of species and its impact on ecosystem functioning are poorly understood. In this study, we analyzed food selection by dung beetles in 80 tropical forest fragments and their adjacent cattle pastures in the Los Tuxtlas Biosphere Reserve, Mexico. Ten pitfall traps were placed at each site, half baited with human dung and the other half with fish carrion. We assessed dung beetle food selection and classified any specialization in resource use quantitatively using a multinomial classification model. We collected 15,445 beetles belonging to 42 species, 8747 beetles (38 species) in forest fragments and 6698 beetles (29 species) in cattle pastures. Twenty-five species were present in both habitats. Of all the beetles captured, 76% were caught in dung traps (11,727 individuals) and 24% in carrion traps (3718 individuals). We found 21 species of dung specialists, 7 carrion specialists, 8 generalists, and 6 species too rare to classify. The bait most frequently selected by beetles in this study was dung in both forests and pastures. Specialists tended to remain specialists in both habitats, while generalists tended to change their selection of bait type depending on the habitat. In summary, our results show that replacing forests with cattle pastures modifies the patterns of resource selection by dung beetles and this could affect ecosystem functioning.

  15. Modeling biomass burning emissions for Amazon forest and pastures in Rondônia, Brazil.

    Treesearch

    Liane S. Guild; J. Boone Kauffman; Warren B. Cohen; Christine A. Hlavka; Darold E. Ward

    2004-01-01

    As a source of atmospheric carbon, biomass burning emissions associated with deforestation in the Amazon are globally significant. Once deforested, these lands continue to be sources of substantial burning emissions for many years due to frequent pasture burning. The objective of this research was to quantify biomass-burning emissions at a local scale. We estimated...

  16. Breed and winter nutrition effects on diet digestibility and intake of cows grazing bahiagrass pastures

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Winter feed comprises one of the largest costs for cattle production. This study was initiated to evaluate two winter nutrition programs for cows grazing bahiagrass (Paspalum nutatum) pastures in central Florida. Purebred Angus, Brahman, or Romosinuano cows (30/breed), aged 3 to 13 yrs, were assig...

  17. Belowground cycling of carbon in forests and pastures of eastern Amazonia

    SciTech Connect

    Trumbore, S.E.; Davidson, E.A.; Nepstad, D.C.

    1995-12-01

    Measurements of carbon stocks and fluxes in Amazon soils were used to model subsurface carbon cycling for the purpose of predicting carbon fluxes associated with deforestation and subsequent pasture management. Isotopic measurement of soil organic matter and soil carbon dioxide, measurements of aboveground and belowground carbon inputs, and estimates of carbon dioxide production as a function of soil depth were incorporated into a model describing turnover times of years, decades, and more than centuries. In degraded pastures, reduced carbon inputs to the soil were observed to cause a reduction in soil carbon inventory and delta carbon 14. Increases in carbon and carbon 14 were observed in managed pastures, which were fertilized and planted with productive grasses, over forest values. Predicted carbon losses from destruction of forest roots more than one meter deep in the soil partially offset carbon inventory increases in the upper meter of managed pasture soils. The major changes in soil carbon inventory after implementation of land management occur within the first 10 years. Due to this short turnover time, land management is an important factor in determining the effects of land use change on the global carbon budget. 54 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  18. Ammonia emissions from urea application to permanent pasture on a volcanic soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar, F.; Martínez-Lagos, J.; Alfaro, M.; Misselbrook, T.

    2012-12-01

    Agriculture is the largest source of ammonia (NH3) emission to the atmosphere, deriving mainly from livestock urine and manures, but fertilizer applications to pastures and crops also represent an important source. In Chile, where agriculture and cattle production are important activities (accounting for 4.5% of GDP along with the forestry sector), there are very few published data regarding NH3 emissions from pasture and crop fertilization. This study aimed to provide the first empirical field data for Chile on N losses due to NH3 volatilization following urea application to permanent pasture on a volcanic soil and to assess the influence of environmental conditions on emissions. Four field experiments were carried out on a volcanic acid soil using the micrometeorological integrated horizontal flux (IHF) mass balance method. Measurements were made in winter 2005 and 2007, and spring 2007 and 2008 following urea N fertilization to a permanent pasture at a rate equivalent to 100 kg N ha-1. Cumulative NH3 emissions over the measurement period were 1.4 and 7.7 kg N ha-1 for winter applications, and 12.2 and 26.7 kg N ha-1 for spring dressings. These N losses due to NH3 volatilization are within the range of emissions reported elsewhere. Consideration of urea application timing in Chile, with regards to weather and soil conditions, could have important consequences on minimising potential N losses via volatilization with associated financial benefits to farmers.

  19. Sewage sludge or cattle slurry as pasture fertilisers: comparative cysticercosis and trichostrongylosis risk for grazing cattle.

    PubMed

    Moussavou-Boussougou, Marie-Noelle; Geerts, Stanny; Madeline, Maryline; Ballandonne, Cèline; Barbier, Dominique; Cabaret, Jacques

    2005-08-01

    Sewage sludge and slurry are used as fertilisers on pastures grazed by ruminants. The former may be a source of Taenia saginata, which causes cysticercosis in cattle and taeniosis in man. The latter is a source of digestive tract-strongyles, a major helminth infection in cattle. The interest of application on pastures of these two biowastes is environmental (optimal recycling of biowastes) and agronomic (fertilisation). The parasitic risk and the fertilisation value of such applications on pastures were evaluated during one grazing season. Liquid sewage sludge did induce higher herbage biomass, which corresponded to higher liveweight gains during the first 2 months of grazing, compared to slurry spread pastures and calves grazing them. The sludge group of calves did not acquire live cysticerci and thus the risk was nil under the conditions of the study (delay of 6 weeks between application and grazing). The slurry group of calves did become lightly infected with digestive-tract strongyles, mostly Ostertagia ostertagi. Under the conditions of this experiment, a 6-week delay between application and grazing strongly reduced the risk of infection: it renders compatible the agronomic use and requirements of public or animal health.

  20. Economic and environmental issues associated with confinement and pasture-based dairy systems

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Milk is produced in a continuum of dairy systems from full confinement to full pasture grazing. Climate, available feeds, and milk price: feed cost ratio influence the preferred system. All dairy systems have an environmental impact and inputs to maximise profit may lead to pollution levels unacce...

  1. Chemical and mineral control of soil carbon turnover in abandoned tropical pastures.

    Treesearch

    Erika Marín-Spiotta; Christopher W. Swanston; Margaret S. Torn; Whendee L. Silver; Sarah D. Burton

    2007-01-01

    We investigated changes in soil carbon (C) cycling with reforestation across a long-term, replicated chronosequence of tropical secondary forests regrowing on abandoned pastures. We applied CP MAS 13C NMR spectroscopy and radiocarbon modeling to soil density fractions from the top 10 cm to track changes in C chemistry and turnover during secondary forest establishment...

  2. Chemical and mineral control of soil carbon turnover in abandoned tropical pastures

    Treesearch

    Erika Marin-Spiotta; Christopher W. Swanston; Margaret S. Torn; Whendee L. Silver; Sarah D. Burton

    2008-01-01

    We investigated changes in soil carbon (C) cycling with reforestation across a long-term, replicated chronosequence of tropical secondary forests regrowing on abandoned pastures. We applied CP MAS 13C NMR spectroscopy and radiocarbon modeling to soil density fractions from the top 10 cm to track changes in C chemistry and turnover during...

  3. CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND PLANT COMMUNITY DYNAMICS FOLLOWING REFORESTATION OF TROPICAL PASTURE.

    Treesearch

    WHENDEE L. SILVER; LARA M. KUEPPERS; ARIEL E. LUGO; REBECCA OSTERTAG; VIRGINIA MATZEK

    2004-01-01

    Conversion of abandoned cattle pastures to secondary forests and plantations in the tropics has been proposed as a means to increase rates of carbon (C) sequestration from the atmosphere and enhance local biodiversity. We used a long-term tropical reforestation project (55–61 yr) to estimate rates of above- and belowground C sequestration and to investigate the impact...

  4. Forest and pasture carbon pools and soil respiration in the southern Appalachian mountains

    Treesearch

    Paul V. Bolstad; James M. Vose

    2005-01-01

    Our ability to estimate the changes in carbon (C) pools and fluxes due to forest conversion is hampered by a lack of comparative studies. We measured above- and belowground C pools and soil respiration flux at four forested and four pasture sites in the southern Appalachian Mountains. Above- and belowground C pools were significantly larger (P

  5. Using NDVI to estimate carbon fluxes from small rotationally grazed pastures

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Satellite-based Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) data have been extensively used for estimating gross primary productivity (GPP) and yield of grazing lands throughout the world. However, the usefulness of satellite-based images for monitoring rotationally-grazed pastures in the northea...

  6. Salmonella enterica isolates from pasture-raised poultry exhibit antimicrobial resistance and class I integrons.

    PubMed

    Melendez, S N; Hanning, I; Han, J; Nayak, R; Clement, A R; Wooming, A; Hererra, P; Jones, F T; Foley, S L; Ricke, S C

    2010-12-01

    While considerable foodborne pathogen research has been conducted on conventionally produced broilers and turkeys, few studies have focused on free-range (organic) or pastured poultry. The current surveillance study was designed to isolate, identify and genetically characterize Salmonella from pastured poultry farm environment and from retail samples. In this study, 59 isolates were collected from two pastured poultry farms (n = 164; pens, feed, water and insect traps) and retail carcasses (n = 36) from a local natural foods store and a local processing plant. All isolates were serotyped and analysed phenotypically (antimicrobial resistance profiles) and genotypically (DNA fingerprints, plasmid profiles and integron analysis). Salmonella enterica was detected using standard microbiological methods. Salmonella Kentucky was the most prevalent serotype detected from the sampled sources (53%), followed by Salmonella Enteritidis (24%), Bareilly (10%), Mbandaka (7%), Montevideo (5%) or Newport (2%). All isolates were resistant to sulfisoxazole and novobiocin, and the majority (40/59) possessed class I integrons shown by PCR detection. Each Salmonella serotype elicited a distinct pulsed-field gel electrophoresis fingerprint profile, and unique differences were observed among the serotypes.  The findings of this study show that Salmonella serotypes isolated from pasture-raised poultry exhibit antimicrobial resistance and class I integrons.  This study demonstrates that despite the cessation of antibiotic usage in poultry production, antibiotic resistant Salmonella may still be recovered from the environment and poultry products. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2010 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  7. Tenderness of pasture versus grain fed beef aged 14 and 28 days

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Consumer interest in pasture versus grain fed beef has been on the rise in recent years. This interest could be sparked by the public’s concerns of beef management techniques and processing impacts on the nutrition and safety of their food, as well as the environmental impact of each management type...

  8. Potential of forage brassicas for use in pasture-based livestock systems

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Brassicas (Brassica spp.) are gaining popularity as high-quality forage for pasture-based livestock producers due to their use to extend the fall grazing season and during the summer forage slump. However, inclusion of brassicas in the diet can be limited by the presence of glucosinolates (a class o...

  9. CHANGES IN EARTHWORM DENSITY AND COMMUNITY STRUCTURE DURING SECONDARY SUCCESSION IN ABANDONED TROPICAL PASTURES

    Treesearch

    Xiaoming Zou; Grizelle Gonzalez

    1997-01-01

    Plant community succession alters the quantity and chemistry of organic inputs to soils. These differences in organic input may trigger changes in soil fertility and fauna1 activity. We examined earthworm density and community structure along a successional sequence of plant communities in abandoned tropical pastures in Puerto Rico. The chronological sequence of these...

  10. Riparian land-use and stream bank erosion within grazed pastures in southern Iowa, USA

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Riparian land-uses such as cropping and grazing are major agricultural practices that have impacts on stream bank erosion. The aim of this study is to assess the effects of riparian land use considered in both field and catchment scale on stream bank erosion within grazed riparian pasture sites in t...

  11. Steer and tall fescue pasture responses to grazing intensity and chemical seedhead suppression

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Tall fescue (Lolium arundinaceum) is the principal cool-season species within pastures of the southeastern USA and is known to have a mutualistic relationship with a fungal endophyte (Neotyphodium coenophialum) that produces the ergot alkaloids responsible for tall fescue toxicosis. Management of t...

  12. Sediment-bound and dissolved carbon concentration and transport from a small pastured watershed

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    With the current emphasis on the role of carbon in the environment, agricultural systems and their impacts on the carbon cycle are important parts of the overall issue. Pasture systems and organic carbon that is transported attached to sediment has been addressed at the North Appalachian Experimenta...

  13. Recirculating elutriator for extracting gastrointestinal nematode larvae from pasture herbage samples

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Gastrointestinal nematode parasites present an important limitation to ruminant production worldwide. Methods for quantifying infective larvae of GIN on pastures are generally tedious, time-consuming, and require bulky equipment set-ups. This limitation to expedient data collection is a bottleneck...

  14. Genome Sequence of "Pedosphaera parvula" Ellin514, an Aerobic Verrucomicrobial Isolate from Pasture Soil

    SciTech Connect

    Kant, Ravi; Van Passel, Mark W.J.; Palva, Airi; Lucas, Susan; Copeland, A; Lapidus, Alla L.; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Dalin, Eileen; Tice, Hope; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Chertkov, Olga; Larimer, Frank W; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Brettin, Thomas S; Detter, J. Chris; Han, Cliff; De Vos, Willem M.; Janssen, Peter H.; Smidt, Hauke

    2011-01-01

    Pedosphaera parvula Ellin514 is an aerobically grown verrucomicrobial isolate from pasture soil. In contrast to the high abundance of members of Verrucomicrobia subdivision 3 based on molecular surveys in terrestrial environments, Ellin514 is one of the few cultured representatives of this group.

  15. Streambank Erosion from Grazed Pastures, Grass Filters and Forest Buffers Over a Six-Year Period

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In agricultural landscapes, streambank erosion, as a source of non-point water pollution, is one of the major contributors to stream habitat degradation. Streambank erosion rates from riparian forest buffers, grass filters and grazed pastures (stocking rates ranged from 0.23 to 1.15 cow-days ha-1 m-...

  16. The Impact of Coffee and Pasture Agriculture on Predatory and Omnivorous Leaf-Litter Ants

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Nivia da Silva; Zanetti, Ronald; Santos, Mônica Silva; Peñaflor, Maria Fernanda Gomes Villalba; Broglio, Sônia Maria Forti; Delabie, Jacques Hubert Charles

    2013-01-01

    Ants are known to function as reliable biological indicators for habitat impact assessment. They play a wide range of ecological roles depending on their feeding and nesting habits. By clustering ants in guilds, it is possible both to assess how agriculture and forest fragmentation can disturb ant communities and to predict the ecological impacts due to losses of a specific guild. This study aimed at determining the impact of non-shaded coffee and pasture agriculture on predatory and omnivorous guilds of leaf-litter ants of Atlantic Forest fragments in Minas Gerais, Brazil. Both coffee and pasture agriculture influenced leaf-litter ant community, although coffee was more disruptive than pasture. Coffee agriculture not only disturbed the diversity of predatory ants, but also negatively affected the number of predatory and omnivorous ants when compared to forest fragments. In contrast, pasture agriculture only disrupted the abundance of predatory ants. Fragment edges skirting crops were negatively affected in terms of leaf-litter ant abundance, but not diversity. Cluster analysis showed that forest fragments were similar irrespective of the cultivation, but the borders were similar to the crop. The study assessed agriculture impact by surveying ant guilds, and revealed that the predatory guild is more susceptible than omnivorous ants. PMID:23902334

  17. Hydrocarbon and fatty acid composition of cheese as affected by the pasture vegetation type.

    PubMed

    Povolo, Milena; Pelizzola, Valeria; Lombardi, Giampiero; Tava, Aldo; Contarini, Giovanna

    2012-01-11

    The determination of the geographical origin of dairy products is an ongoing issue. In this paper the effects of botanical diversity of two pastures on the hydrocarbon and fatty acid composition of cheese fat were studied, over 2 years of experimentation. Two areas in the Italian southwestern Alpine region, dominated by Trifolium alpinum (T) and Festuca nigrescens (F) vegetation, respectively, were chosen, and milk obtained from cows grazing on these pastures was used to produce a semihard traditional cheese. Cheese samples showed a significantly different composition of most linear hydrocarbons, odd-chain (C15, C17, and C17:1) and unsaturated (trans-11,cis-15-C18:2, C18:3, C20:4n-6, C20:4n-3, and 20:5n-3) fatty acids, according to pasture type. The ratio between C(29) and C(27) linear hydrocarbons, unlike the absolute content of the single molecules, showed a good discriminating ability between the two pastures and was little affected by the natural variability due to the climatic and environmental factors.

  18. Forage production of grass-legume binary mixtures on Intermountain Western USA irrigated pastures

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A well-managed irrigated pasture is optimized for forage production with the use of N fertilizer which incurs extra expense. The objective was to determine which binary grass-legume mixture and mixture planting ratio of tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.) (TF), meadow brome (Bromus bieberstei...

  19. The effect of pasture fallowing on plant community cover and seed bank properties

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The practice of fallowing pastures in a rotational grazing dairy system is believed to increase plant diversity, increase organic matter and improve the soil. Fallowing is practiced in New Zealand, and delivers these benefits, but has been adopted in the northeastern United States with little quanti...

  20. Plant Species Diversity and Distribution in Pastures of the Northeastern USA

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Grazed pastures in the northeastern United contain far more than planted forage species. These species may contribute to forage production, but they may also detract from forage production or palatability. As the first step toward identifying the role of plant diversity in forage systems, we collect...

  1. APPLYING THE NRCS PASTURE CONDITION SCORE SYSTEM AT THE WHOLE-FARM SCALE

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Pasture Condition Score (PCS) system was developed by the USDA-NRCS as a monitoring and management tool. Ten key indicators (percent desirable plants, plant cover, plant diversity, plant residue, plant vigor, percent legume, uniformity of use, livestock concentration areas, soil compaction, and ...

  2. Phosphorus, iron, and aluminum losses in runoff from a rotationally-grazed pasture in Georgia, USA

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pastures can be a source of phosphorus (P) contributing to eutrophication and impairment of water resources. Phosphorus is tightly held in soils that are highly weathered, acidic, and with high iron (Fe) and aluminum (Al) content like the Ultisols of southeastern USA. We used 11-yr (1999-2009) of da...

  3. Topographic placement of management practices to reduce water quality impacts from pastures

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Best management practices (BMPs) such as streambank fencing and vegetative buffers lessen environmental impacts on streams from pasture-based agriculture by limiting livestock time in streams and intercepting sediment and nutrients in overland flow. Placing streamside BMPs at the closest point to th...

  4. Grazing management effects on stream bank erosion and phosphorus delivery to a pasture stream

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pasture lands may deliver significant sediment and phosphorus (P) to surface waters. To determine the effects of beef (Bos taurus) grazing practices on stream bank erosion and P losses, three treatments [rotational stocking (RS), continuous stocking with restricted stream access (CSR), and continuou...

  5. Least limiting water range of Udox soil under degraded pastures on different sun-exposed faces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passos, Renato Ribeiro; Marciano da Costa, Liovando; Rodrigues de Assis, Igor; Santos, Danilo Andrade; Ruiz, Hugo Alberto; Guimarães, Lorena Abdalla de Oliveira Prata; Andrade, Felipe Vaz

    2017-07-01

    The efficient use of water is increasingly important and proper soil management, within the specificities of each region of the country, allows achieving greater efficiency. The South and Caparaó regions of Espírito Santo, Brazil are characterized by relief of `hill seas' with differences in the degree of pasture degradation due to sun exposure. The objective of this study was to evaluate the least limiting water range in Udox soil under degraded pastures with two faces of exposure to the sun and three pedoenvironments. In each pedoenvironment, namely Alegre, Celina, and Café, two areas were selected, one with exposure on the North/West face and the other on the South/East face. In each of these areas, undisturbed soil samples were collected at 0-10 cm depth to determine the least limiting water range. The exposed face of the pasture that received the highest solar incidence (North/West) presented the lowest values in least limiting water range. The least limiting water range proved to be a physical quality indicator for Udox soil under degraded pastures.

  6. Using a Total Mixed Ration on a Pasture-Based Dairy

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A case study was conducted to collect information on the use of a total mixed ration (TMR) on thirteen pasture-based dairy farms in New York and Pennsylvania with the objectives of monitoring TMR ingredient and nutrient content and summarizing what and how decisions are being made in relation to TMR...

  7. A New Year 2000 Global Data set of Cropland and Pasture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evan, A.; Ramankutty, N.; Foley, J.

    2005-12-01

    Human activities have dramatically altered terrestrial ecosystems through the appropriation and conversion of natural ecosystems to cropland and pasture. To quantify the environmental consequences of these changes in land use, it is necessary to map the extent of cropland and pasture. We have developed a new data set for the Americas using a combination of year 2000 national and subnational agricultural census data, a global satellite-derived percent herbaceous cover data set, and two satellite-derived land cover classifications. The agricultural census data, which is of finer detail than previously used to create global cropland and pasture maps, is used to train the satellite land cover classifications. We also present a new technique for merging land cover data from two different satellite-based land cover classification data sets. By utilizing the agreement and disagreement between the Boston University's MODIS global land cover product and the GLC 2000 global land cover data set, we are able to better predict the spatial pattern of the agricultural land than by using either data set alone, particularly in the tropics. We present a new 5 min (~10km) resolution cropland and pasture dataset for the Americas that is of greater accuracy than previously developed. Additionally, a status report outlining current efforts to apply this methodology to the rest of the globe is included.

  8. The stunt nematode Sauertylenchus maximus in pastures of Bingol Province, Turkey

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The province of Bingol, a very mountainous area located in the eastern Anatolian region of Turkey, has limited agricultural land but large intermountain pastures supporting the main economic resource of the region, livestock production. The stunt nematode Sauertylenchus maximus was recovered from a ...

  9. Carbon sequestration potential of grazed pasture depends on prior management history

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Grazed pastures are often assumed to be net sinks for removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and thus, are promoted as a management practice that can help mitigate climate change. The ability to serve as a C sink is especially pronounced following a history of tillage and row crop production. I...

  10. Chemical properties and consumer perception of fluid milk from conventional and pasture-based production system

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Technical abstract: The continued popularity of organic and natural foods has generated interest in organic milk, and use of pasture for dairy cattle is a requirement for organic production. This process may improve the health benefits of fluid milk via increases in the unsaturated fatty acid cont...

  11. The impact of coffee and pasture agriculture on predatory and omnivorous leaf-litter ants.

    PubMed

    Dias, Nivia da Silva; Zanetti, Ronald; Santos, Mônica Silva; Peñaflor, Maria Fernanda Gomes Villalba; Broglio, Sônia Maria Forti; Delabie, Jacques Hubert Charles

    2013-01-01

    Ants are known to function as reliable biological indicators for habitat impact assessment. They play a wide range of ecological roles depending on their feeding and nesting habits. By clustering ants in guilds, it is possible both to assess how agriculture and forest fragmentation can disturb ant communities and to predict the ecological impacts due to losses of a specific guild. This study aimed at determining the impact of non-shaded coffee and pasture agriculture on predatory and omnivorous guilds of leaf-litter ants of Atlantic Forest fragments in Minas Gerais, Brazil. Both coffee and pasture agriculture influenced leaf-litter ant community, although coffee was more disruptive than pasture. Coffee agriculture not only disturbed the diversity of predatory ants, but also negatively affected the number of predatory and omnivorous ants when compared to forest fragments. In contrast, pasture agriculture only disrupted the abundance of predatory ants. Fragment edges skirting crops were negatively affected in terms of leaf-litter ant abundance, but not diversity. Cluster analysis showed that forest fragments were similar irrespective of the cultivation, but the borders were similar to the crop. The study assessed agriculture impact by surveying ant guilds, and revealed that the predatory guild is more susceptible than omnivorous ants.

  12. Computer program documentation for the pasture/range condition assessment processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcintyre, K. S.; Miller, T. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    The processor which drives for the RANGE software allows the user to analyze LANDSAT data containing pasture and rangeland. Analysis includes mapping, generating statistics, calculating vegetative indexes, and plotting vegetative indexes. Routines for using the processor are given. A flow diagram is included.

  13. Effects of buffers and grazing management on runoff and runoff water quality from pastures

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Abstract: Only limited data are available on the impacts of rotational grazing schemes and buffers on water quality of runoff, despite the fact that these practices are being advocated as means of decreasing nutrient losses from pastures. This report summarizes data from a long-term study near Boon...

  14. Stocking strategies as related to animal and pasture productivity of endophyte-free tall fescue

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Tall fescue [Festuca arundinacea Schreb.) is a well adapted perennial grass used for pasture across the north-south transition zone in the USA. This 3-yr trial evaluated three stocking strategies to utilize well-fertilized spring (April to July) growth of endophyte-free tall fescue for steer and pas...

  15. Deaths from copper toxicity of sheep at pasture and the use of fresh seaweed.

    PubMed

    Wiener, G; Field, A C; Smith, C

    1977-11-19

    A number of sheep of the Orkney breed died of suspected copper poisoning while at pasture under circumstances which left sheep of other breeds apparently unaffected. Fresh seaweed offered to sheep with symptoms of copper toxicity appeared to be therapeutic and to lead to a reduction in plasma Cu level.

  16. Steer responses to feeding soybean hulls and steroid hormone implantation on toxic tall fescue pasture

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Yearling steers were grazed on endophyte-infected ‘Kentucky-31’ tall fescue (Lolium arundinaceum) pastures for 77 days in 2007 and for 86 days in 2008 to evaluate effects of feeding pelleted soybean hulls (PSBH) and steroid hormone implants (SHI) on steer performance and physiology. Steers were str...

  17. Fatty acid composition in adipose tissue of pasture and feedlot-finished beef steers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Twenty-seven Angus crossbred steers were used to evaluate the effects of N fertilization on pasture- vs. feedlot-finishing beef steers on fatty acid (FA) composition in subcutaneous adipose tissue. A completely randomized design with repeated measures was used with steers arranged into 3 treatments...

  18. The carbon footprint of pasture-based milk production: can white clover make a difference?

    PubMed

    Yan, M-J; Humphreys, J; Holden, N M

    2013-02-01

    Carbon footprint (CF) calculated by life cycle assessment (LCA) was used to compare greenhouse gas emissions from pasture-based milk production relying mainly on (1) fertilizer N (FN), or (2) white clover (WC). Data were sourced from studies conducted at Solohead Research Farm in Ireland between 2001 and 2006. Ten FN pastures stocked between 2.0 and 2.5 livestock units (LU)/ha with fertilizer N input between 180 and 353 kg/ha were compared with 6 WC pastures stocked between 1.75 and 2.2 LU/ha with fertilizer N input between 80 and 99 kg/ha. The WC-based system had 11 to 23% lower CF compared with FN (average CF was 0.86 to 0.87 and 0.97 to 1.13 kg of CO(2)-eq/kg of energy-corrected milk, respectively, 91% economic allocation). Emissions of both N(2)O and CO(2) were lower in WC, whereas emissions of CH(4) (per kg of energy-corrected milk) were similar in both systems. Ratio sensitivity analysis indicated that the difference was not caused by error due to modeling assumptions. Replacing fertilizer N by biological nitrogen fixation could lower the CF of pasture-based milk production.

  19. Nutritive Value and Herbage Accumulation Rates of Pasture Sown to Grass, Legume, and Chicory

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Planting pastures to mixtures of forages may benefit herbage production; however, wide fluctuations in botanical composition could cause unstable nutritive value. A grazing study was conducted to examine how forage mixture complexity influenced nutritive value and accumulation rate during spring, su...

  20. Subsurface application of poultry litter in pasture and no-till soils.

    PubMed

    Pote, D H; Way, T R; Kleinman, P J A; Moore, P A; Meisinger, J J; Sistani, K R; Saporito, L S; Allen, A L; Feyereisen, G W

    2011-01-01

    Poultry litter provides a rich nutrient source for crops, but the usual practice of surface-applying litter can degrade water quality by allowing nutrients to be transported from fields in surface runoff while much of the ammonia (NH3)-N escapes into the atmosphere. Our goal was to improve on conventional titter application methods to decrease associated nutrient losses to air and water while increasing soil productivity. We developed and tested a knifing technique to directly apply dry poultry litter beneath the surface of pastures. Results showed that subsurface litter application decreased NH3-N volatilization and nutrient losses in runoff more than 90% (compared with surface-applied litter) to levels statistically as low as those from control (no litter) plots. Given this success, two advanced tractor-drawn prototypes were developed to subsurface apply poultry litter in field research. The two prototypes have been tested in pasture and no-till experiments and are both effective in improving nutrient-use efficiency compared with surface-applied litter, increasing crop yields (possibly by retaining more nitrogen in the soil), and decreasing nutrient losses, often to near background (control plot) levels. A paired-watershed study showed that cumulative phosphorus losses in runoff from continuously grazed perennial pastures were decreased by 55% over a 3-yr period if the annual poultry litter applications were subsurface applied rather than surface broadcast. Results highlight opportunities and challenges for commercial adoption of subsurface poultry litter application in pasture and no-till systems.

  1. Calibration and use of plate meter regressions for pasture mass estimation in an Appalachian silvopasture

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A standardized plate meter for measuring pasture mass was calibrated at the Agroforestry Research and Demonstration Site in Blacksburg, VA, using six ungrazed plots of established tall fescue (Festuca arundinaceae) overseeded with orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata). Each plot was interplanted with b...

  2. Distributional patterns of fall armyworm parasitoids in a corn field and pasture field in Florida

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    An assessment of parasitoids and their selective patterns among Spodoptera frugiperda corn and rice host strains was performed from August 2008-August 2010 in a corn crop and a grass pasture in northern Florida under different seasonal conditions (spring and fall). Sentinel larvae from our laborator...

  3. Yield and soil carbon sequestration in grazed pastures sown with two or five forage species

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Increasing plant species richness is often associated with an increase in productivity and associated ecosystem services such as soil C sequestration. In this paper we report on a nine-year experiment to evaluate the relative forage production and C sequestration potential of grazed pastures sown to...

  4. Effects of grazing intensity and chemical seedhead suppression on steers grazing tall fescue pastures

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Tall fescue (Lolium arundinaceum) is the principal cool-season species within pastures of the southeastern USA and is known to have a mutualistic relationship with a fungal endophyte (Neotyphodium coenophialum) that produces the ergot alkaloids responsible for tall fescue toxicosis. Management of t...

  5. Soil profile distribution of phosphorus and other nutrients following wetland conversion to beef cattle pasture.

    PubMed

    Sigua, Gilbert C; Kang, Woo-Jun; Coleman, Sam W

    2006-01-01

    Largely influenced by the passage of the Swamp Land Act of 1849, many wetlands were lost in the coastal plain region of the southeastern United States, primarily as a result of drainage for agricultural activities. To better understand the chemical response of soils during wetland conversion, soil core samples were collected from the converted beef cattle pastures and from the natural wetland at Plant City, FL in the summers of 2002 and 2003. Data collected from the natural wetland sites were used as reference data to detect potential changes in soil properties associated with the conversion of wetlands to improved beef cattle (Bos taurus) pastures from 1940 to 2003. The average concentration of total phosphorus (TP) in pasture soils (284 mg kg(-1)) was significantly (p pasture soils, 63 yr after being drained exhibited: (1) a decrease in TOC (-172 g kg(-1)), TN (-10 g kg(-1)), K (-0.7 mg kg(-1)), and Al (-130 mg kg(-1)); (2) an increase in soil pH (+1.8), Ca (+88 mg kg(-1)), Mg (+7.5 mg kg(-1)), Mn (+0.3 mg kg(-1)), and Fe (+6.9 mg kg(-1)); and (3) no significant change in Na, Zn, and Cu. Wetland soils had higher concentrations (mg kg(-1)) of Al-P (435), CaMg-P (42), FeMn-P (43), and Org-P (162) than those of 172, 11, 11, and 84 mg kg(-1), respectively, found in the pasture soils. The levels of water-soluble P and KCl-bound P were comparable between wetland and pasture soils in 2003. Results of this study therefore suggest that wetland conversion to beef cattle pastures did not function as a source of nutrients, especially P and N, even with manure and urine additions due to the presence of grazing cattle.

  6. Invited review: Genetic considerations for various pasture-based dairy systems.

    PubMed

    Washburn, S P; Mullen, K A E

    2014-10-01

    Pasture-based dairy systems use grazing to supply significant percentages of the dry matter intake of cows and heifers. Such systems vary from those for which pasture is used only as a supplemental feed for cows primarily fed a total mixed ration to those for which pasture is the primary source of dry matter for the herd. Cows that are optimal in a pasture system share many general characteristics with cows that are appropriate for a nonpasture system, including feed efficiency, maintenance of body condition, reproductive fitness, udder health, longevity, and the ability to adapt to various management systems. However, in such divergent feeding systems, the relative importance of various traits can differ. In pasture systems where cow nutrient demand intentionally coincides with seasonal forage availability, the focus of selection has emphasized fertility and other fitness traits, as well as yields of milk or milk components. Breeds or strains with higher yields of protein and fat typically have advantages in grazing systems that supply milk to solids-based or cheese markets. Holstein cows with high percentages of North American ancestry can work well in grazing systems that include supplemental concentrates or partial mixed rations, particularly if calving intervals are less restrictive. Crossbred cows can be selected for use in specific grazing systems as well as for specific milk markets, with the added advantage of heterosis. Breeds and crosses with high fertility are important for seasonal breeding and calving. The ability of cattle to both milk and maintain sufficient body condition for reproduction is important for any dairy production system but is critical in a seasonal system. Dairy farms that depend on pasture for most of dry matter for cows typically have lower production per cow than nongrazing dairies but have the potential to be economically competitive because of lower operating and overhead costs. Although the principles of selection are similar

  7. Simulating modern-day cropland and pasture burning in an Earth system model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabin, Sam; Malyshev, Sergey; Shevliakova, Elena; Magi, Brian; Pacala, Steve

    2015-04-01

    Throughout the Holocene, humans have extended our influence across a larger and larger fraction of ecosystems, even creating some new ones in the process. Herds of livestock grazing either native vegetation (rangeland) or specially planted species (pasture) have modified huge areas of land. We have even developed new plant species and cultivated them as crops. The extent of our ecosystem modification intensified dramatically with the advent of industrialized agriculture, to the point where cropland and pasture (which will henceforth encompass rangeland as well) now cover over a third of the Earth's land area. One way we have altered the terrestrial biosphere is by intentionally and unintentionally altering fire's frequency, intensity, and seasonal timing. This is especially true for agricultural ecosystems. Because their maintenance and use require a level of human control, cropland and pasture often experience fire regimes substantially different from those of the ecosystems they replaced or what would occur in the absence of active fire management. For example, farmers might burn to prepare land for planting or to dispose of crop residues, and pastoralists often use fire to prevent encroachment of unpalatable woody plants. Due to the vast global extent of agriculture, and considering the myriad ways fire affects the Earth system, it is critical that we understand (a) the ways people manage fire on cropland and pasture and (b) the effects of this management on the Earth system. Earth system models are an ideal tool for examining this kind of question. By simulating the processes within and interactions among the atmosphere, oceans, land, and terrestrial ecosystems, Earth system models allow phenomena such as fire to be examined in their global context. However, while the past fifteen years have seen great progress in the simulation of vegetation fire within Earth system models, the direct human influence via cropland and pasture management burning has been mostly

  8. Effect of supplements on growth and forage intake by stocker steers grazing wheat pasture.

    PubMed

    Lippke, H; Forbes, T D; Ellis, W C

    2000-06-01

    This experiment was conducted with stocker steers to determine the effects of supplementary fiber and grain on ruminal acid concentrations and OM intake following abrupt dietary change to lush, primary-growth wheat (Triticum aestivum) pasture and to measure the effects of those supplements on weight gain at different levels of herbage mass (HM). Each of four irrigated wheat pastures (2.4, 3.6, 4.9, and 6.1 ha) was stocked with nine Angus crossbred steers (mean = 189 kg). In each pasture, three steers were individually fed a daily supplement of 11.3 g of cottonseed hulls (CSH)/kg BW(.75), three steers were fed a supplement mixture of 11.3 g CSH/kg BW(.75) and 8.5 g corn grain/kg BW(.75), and three steers remained as controls. Body weight and HM changes were measured at 28-d intervals throughout the experiment. Ruminal samples for VFA determination were collected twice during the 1st wk on pasture. Organic matter intake calculations were based on fecal output and OM digestibility estimates made during the 2nd wk on pasture. Fecal outputs were estimated from nonlinear least squares analyses using a two-compartment rumen model of excretion patterns of Yb following a single oral dose. Digestibility of OM was estimated using indigestible NDF in feed and feces as an internal marker. Dietary supplements had no detectable effect on ruminal VFA characteristics. The magnitude of changes in ruminal acetate:propionate ratios between d 3 and 7 on pasture was significantly and negatively related to ADG during the first 28-d growth measurement period. Body condition scores taken on d 0 also had a significant, negative relationship to ADG. Average fecal output was greater for steers fed supplements (36 g/kg BW(.75)) than for control steers (30 g/kg BW(.75)) (P < .03). The supplements also significantly reduced estimates of total diet OM digestibility. However, supplements had no measurable effect on BW changes. Herbage mass up to 1,000 kg/ha had a significant and positive effect on

  9. Prepartum Lying Behavior of Holstein Dairy Cows Housed on Pasture through Parturition

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Christa A.; Eberhart, Nicole L.; Krawczel, Peter D.

    2017-01-01

    Simple Summary Dairy cows experience meaningful biological changes during gestation that impact cow comfort and alter behavior, particularly during late gestation and leading up to calving. The housing environment can also have a positive or negative effect on cow comfort. Pasture access allows cows the freedom of movement and an ability to express natural grazing and resting behaviors. After observing cows housed on pasture during the late gestation and calving periods, this study found that lying behaviors only differed on the day of calving and the day prior to calving. Additionally, the proportion of time spent lying per hour decreased in the hour prior to calving compared to 6 h prior to parturition. The altered lying behaviors and activity observed in the hours before calving may indicate a decrease in cow comfort experienced by the cow during parturition. However, discomfort is typical of parturition. These data suggest that cows were able to express natural behaviors associated with calving and pasture when provided an adequate environment for cows during the prepartum period. Abstract Utilizing pasture-based systems may increase cow comfort during late gestation and calving as it lacks the constraints of confinement housing. The objective of this study was to quantify lying behavior and activity of Holstein dairy cows housed on pasture during the 6 d before calving. Sixteen Holstein dairy cows were moved to pasture 3 weeks before their projected calving date. Data loggers were attached 14 d prior to projected calving date. Behavior was evaluated 6 d before calving for all cows (n = 16) and 6 h prior to calving for a subset of cows (n = 6) with known calving times. Data loggers recorded at 1-min intervals to determine lying time (h/d and %/h), lying bouts (n/d and n/h), lying bout duration (min/bout), and steps (n/d and n/h). A repeated measures analysis of variance with contrasts was performed to determine if lying behaviors and activity differed between

  10. Pasture management controls soil organic matter stocks, properties, and biochemical functioning in Tibetan grasslands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spielvogel, Sandra; Breidenbach, Andreas; de la Haye, Tilman; Schleuß, Per; Kuzyakov, Yakov; Guggenberger, Georg

    2016-04-01

    The Tibetan Plateau hosts the highest and largest pasture ecosystem worldwide, and provides tremendous sinks for carbon. Due to the sheer size of the of the Tibetan Plateau, feedback effects of soil organic carbon (OC) losses from inadequate grassland management are of undisputed relevance for ecosystem stability and future global change scenarios. Given the vital importance of the Tibetan steppes as global OC sinks, we combined data on OC stocks from own studies with an extensive literature review on soils developed under montane and alpine Kobresia pygmaea and Stipa grandis pastures. We calculated soil OC stocks at the Tibetan Plateau within the first 30 cm of the soil profile depending on pasture management and climate. Vertical gradients of δ13C values, neutral sugar, cutin and suberin contents, lignin phenol contents as well as microbial community composition (t-RFLP analysis, 16S rDNA und IST sequencing) and activities of six extracellular enzymes involved in the C, N, and P cycle were assessed. The depth gradients of these parameters reflected degradation processes from intact Kobresia pastures (stage 0) to pronounced degradation (bare soil; stage 5). Moderate husbandry is beneficial for the storage of OC, nitrogen (N) and other nutrients (e.g. phosphorus) for the majority of the montane grasslands of the Tibetan Plateau (i.e., Kobresia pygmaea pastures). However, Kobresia root mats originated from grazing are affected by desiccations and frost, which cause polygonal cracking and initiates soil erosion. This process is accelerated under high grazing pressure (overgrazing) that enhances root mat degradation. Increasing degradation caused by large herbivore densities resulted in an increased OC decomposition demonstrated by decreasing δ13C values. The δ13C shift towards more negative values reflects the relative enrichment of 13C depleted lignin components during OC decomposition in the strongly disturbed soil. Translocation of topsoil material into the

  11. Predicting Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Soil Carbon from Changing Pasture to an Energy Crop

    PubMed Central

    Duval, Benjamin D.; Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J.; Davis, Sarah C.; Keogh, Cindy; Long, Stephen P.; Parton, William J.; DeLucia, Evan H.

    2013-01-01

    Bioenergy related land use change would likely alter biogeochemical cycles and global greenhouse gas budgets. Energy cane (Saccharum officinarum L.) is a sugarcane variety and an emerging biofuel feedstock for cellulosic bio-ethanol production. It has potential for high yields and can be grown on marginal land, which minimizes competition with grain and vegetable production. The DayCent biogeochemical model was parameterized to infer potential yields of energy cane and how changing land from grazed pasture to energy cane would affect greenhouse gas (CO2, CH4 and N2O) fluxes and soil C pools. The model was used to simulate energy cane production on two soil types in central Florida, nutrient poor Spodosols and organic Histosols. Energy cane was productive on both soil types (yielding 46–76 Mg dry mass⋅ha−1). Yields were maintained through three annual cropping cycles on Histosols but declined with each harvest on Spodosols. Overall, converting pasture to energy cane created a sink for GHGs on Spodosols and reduced the size of the GHG source on Histosols. This change was driven on both soil types by eliminating CH4 emissions from cattle and by the large increase in C uptake by greater biomass production in energy cane relative to pasture. However, the change from pasture to energy cane caused Histosols to lose 4493 g CO2 eq⋅m−2 over 15 years of energy cane production. Cultivation of energy cane on former pasture on Spodosol soils in the southeast US has the potential for high biomass yield and the mitigation of GHG emissions. PMID:23991028

  12. Effect of tanniniferous food from Bauhinia pulchella on pasture contamination with gastrointestinal nematodes from goats.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Suzana G; Barros, Lilyan B G; Louvandini, Helder; Abdalla, Adibe L; Costa Junior, Livio M

    2016-02-24

    Tannin-rich plants have been examined as an alternative for controlling the gastrointestinal nematodes in ruminants. In vivo assays typically examine the anthelmintic activity in female fecundity and/or the adult worm burden, without considering other life-cycle stages or the impact on pasture contamination. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the anthelmintic activity of tanniniferous food from Bauhinia pulchella in goats and the potential impact on pasture contamination with the infective larval stage of gastrointestinal nematodes. Sixteen cross breed Boer goats that were naturally infected with gastrointestinal nematodes were fed tanniniferous concentrate from the leaves of B. pulchella and compared to a separate paddock of control animals without condensed tannin supplementation. A range of parasite characteristics were monitored throughout the 63 days of experimentation, including faecal egg count (FEC), egg hatching and relative numbers of hatched helminth larvae on herbage. Worm free tracer animals were used to assess the infective larval stage load of the contaminated pasture. The tanniniferous food did not reduce the combined FEC values, but egg hatching was significantly affected (p < 0.05). The pasture grazed by goats fed with tanniniferous food from B. pulchella showed reduced contamination through infective larval stages. Tracer goats maintained in paddocks grazed with animals fed with tanniniferous food had lower numbers of Trichostrongylus colubriformis than did those in the control group (86 % reduction). Condensed tannin from B. pulchella showed anthelmintic activity, affected egg viability and reduced pasture contamination, which led to the reduced infection of the animals by T. colubriformis.

  13. Evaluation of Filters for Envisat Asar Speckle Suppression in Pasture Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Ge, L.; Li, X.

    2012-07-01

    In order to quantify real time pasture biomass from SAR image, regression model between ground measurements of biomass and ENVISAT ASAR backscattering coefficient should be built up. An important prerequisite of valid and accurate regression model is accurate grass backscattering coefficient which, however, cannot be obtained when there is speckle. Speckle noise is the best known problem of SAR images because of the coherent nature of radar illumination imaging system. This study aims to choose better adaptive filter from NEST software to reduce speckle noise in homogeneous pasture area, with little regard to linear feature (e.g. edge between pasture and forest) or point feature (e.g. pond, tree) preservation. This paper presents the speckle suppression result of ENVISAT ASAR VV/VH images in pasture of Western Australia (WA) using four built-in adaptive filters of the NEST software: Frost, Gamma Map, Lee, and Refined Lee filter. Two indices are usually used for evaluation of speckle suppression ability: ENL (Equivalent Number of Looks) and SSI (Speckle Suppression Index). These two, however, are not reliable because sometimes they overestimate mean value. Therefore, apart from ENL and SSI, the authors also used a new index SMPI (Speckle Suppression and Mean Preservation Index). It was found that, Lee filter with window size 7×7 and Frost filter (damping factor = 2) with window size 5×5 gave the best performance for VV and VH polarization, respectively. The filtering, together with radiometric calibration and terrain correction, paves the way to extraction of accurate backscattering coefficient of grass in homogeneous pasture area in WA.

  14. Predicting greenhouse gas emissions and soil carbon from changing pasture to an energy crop.

    PubMed

    Duval, Benjamin D; Anderson-Teixeira, Kristina J; Davis, Sarah C; Keogh, Cindy; Long, Stephen P; Parton, William J; DeLucia, Evan H

    2013-01-01

    Bioenergy related land use change would likely alter biogeochemical cycles and global greenhouse gas budgets. Energy cane (Saccharum officinarum L.) is a sugarcane variety and an emerging biofuel feedstock for cellulosic bio-ethanol production. It has potential for high yields and can be grown on marginal land, which minimizes competition with grain and vegetable production. The DayCent biogeochemical model was parameterized to infer potential yields of energy cane and how changing land from grazed pasture to energy cane would affect greenhouse gas (CO2, CH4 and N2O) fluxes and soil C pools. The model was used to simulate energy cane production on two soil types in central Florida, nutrient poor Spodosols and organic Histosols. Energy cane was productive on both soil types (yielding 46-76 Mg dry mass · ha(-1)). Yields were maintained through three annual cropping cycles on Histosols but declined with each harvest on Spodosols. Overall, converting pasture to energy cane created a sink for GHGs on Spodosols and reduced the size of the GHG source on Histosols. This change was driven on both soil types by eliminating CH4 emissions from cattle and by the large increase in C uptake by greater biomass production in energy cane relative to pasture. However, the change from pasture to energy cane caused Histosols to lose 4493 g CO2 eq · m(-2) over 15 years of energy cane production. Cultivation of energy cane on former pasture on Spodosol soils in the southeast US has the potential for high biomass yield and the mitigation of GHG emissions.

  15. Underlying Ecosystem Methane Emissions Exceed Cattle-Derived Methane from Subtropical Lowland Pastures.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamberlain, S. D.; Sparks, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    Grazing cattle are a major methane (CH4) source from pasture ecosystems, however the underlying landscape is a potentially significant CH4 source that has received far less attention. Ecosystem surface emissions of CH4 are poorly quantified, vary widely across time and space, and are easily underestimated if emission hotspots or episodic fluxes are overlooked. We used static chambers, eddy covariance, and mobile cavity-ringdown spectrometry surveys to quantify spatially and temporally variable CH4 emissions from subtropical lowland pastures. We conclude emissions from soil and standing water are the dominant CH4 source, and cattle were responsible for only 13% of annual CH4emissions. The ecosystem emit 33.8 ± 2.2 g CH4 m-2 yr-1, however surface CH4 emissions were highly variable in both time and space. Seasonal flooding of pastures and low-lying landforms (canals, ditches, wetlands) drove high magnitude CH4 emissions. We observed large CH4 emissions from wetlands and, to a lesser extent, the entire landscape during the wet season. In contrast, during the dry season there was no appreciable CH4 accumulation in pastures when cattle were not present, and canals, which comprise 1.7% of the total land area, were responsible 97.7 % of dry season emissions. Ecosystem CH4 fluxes, measured by eddy covariance, varied seasonally and positively correlated to soil and air temperature, topsoil water content, and water table depth. Our work is the first to use mobile spectrometers to map biogenic CH4 emissions at the landscape scale, and demonstrates that soils and water are a strong pasture CH4 source that must be considered in addition to cattle emissions.

  16. Management practices for minimising nitrate leaching after ploughing temporary leguminous pastures in Canterbury, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, G. S.

    1995-12-01

    Winter leaching losses of nitrate following the ploughing of temporary leguminous pastures in late summer or early autumn are a major concern in mixed cropping rotations on the Canterbury Plains of New Zealand. Field experiments showed that pastures ploughed in early autumn (March) and left fallow accumulated 107-142 kg ha -1 N of mineral-N in the soil profile by the start of winter, with 72-106 kg ha -1 N lost through leaching in the first winter. Delaying the ploughing of pasture until late autumn (May) reduced the accumulation of mineral-N to 42-120 kg ha -1 N and the leaching loss to 8-52 kg ha -1 N. In situations where early cultivation cannot be avoided, growing winter cover crops or using the nitrification inhibitor dicyandiamide (DCD) both have the potential to reduce leaching compared with fallow soil. DCD increased the amount of mineral-N present in the soil as ammonium and reduced leaching losses by 25-50% without affecting the yield of the following spring wheat crop. Cover crops only reduced leaching losses (by up to 60%) when they were sown early in the autumn and they had taken up considerable amounts of soil mineral-N before drainage occurred. When cover crops were grazed before incorporation in spring, there was an increased risk of leaching from urine patch areas. If residues were incorporated without grazing, however, the yield of the following spring wheat crop was depressed by 20-30% due to extensive net N immobilization during decomposition of the residues. In Canterbury conditions, the most reliable way to minimise N leaching losses is to delay the ploughing of pasture for as long as possible in autumn or winter. Where pastures are ploughed early, the relative effectiveness of using DCD or growing winter cover crops varies mainly in relation to rainfall distribution.

  17. The GEOGLAM Rangelands and Pasture Productivity Activity: Recent Progress and Future Directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerschman, J. P.; Held, A. A.; Donohue, R. J.; Renzullo, L. J.; Sims, N.; Kerblat, F.; Grundy, M.

    2015-12-01

    Rangelands and pastures cover about a third of the world's land area and support livestock production which represents ~40% of global agricultural gross domestic product. The global consumption of animal protein shows a clear increasing trend, driven by both total population and per capita income increases, putting a growing pressure on the sustainability of grazing lands worldwide. Despite their relevance, rangelands have received less attention than croplands regarding global monitoring of the resource productivity and condition. The Rangelands and Pasture Productivity (RaPP) activity is a component within the Global Agricultural Monitoring initiative established under the Group on Earth Observations (GEOGLAM) in 2013. GEOGLAM RaPP is aimed at providing the global community with the means to monitor the world's rangelands and pastures on a routine basis, and the capacity to produce animal protein in real-time, at global, regional and national levels. Since its launch two years ago GEOGLAM RAPP has made progress in the four implementation elements. These include: 1- the establishment of community of practice; 2- the development of a global monitoring system for rangeland condition; 3- the establishment of pilot sites in main rangeland systems for satellite data products validation and model testing; and 4- integration with livestock production models. Three international workshops have been held building the community of practice. A prototype monitoring system that provides global visualisations and querying capability of vegetation cover data and anomalies has been established. Pilot sites, mostly in areas with long records of field measurements of rangeland condition and productivity have been proposed for nine countries. The link to global livestock models, including physical and economic components, have been established. Future challenges for GEOGLAM RaPP have also been identified and include: better representation of the areas occupied by rangelands

  18. Quantification of dead vegetation fraction in mixed pastures using AisaFENIX imaging spectroscopy data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pullanagari, R. R.; Kereszturi, G.; Yule, I. J.

    2017-06-01

    New Zealand farming relies heavily on grazed pasture for feeding livestock; therefore it is important to provide high quality palatable grass in order to maintain profitable and sustainable grassland management. The presence of non-photosynthetic vegetation (NPV) such as dead vegetation in pastures severely limits the quality and productivity of pastures. Quantifying the fraction of dead vegetation in mixed pastures is a great challenge even with remote sensing approaches. In this study, a high spatial resolution with pixel resolution of 1 m and spectral resolution of 3.5-5.6 nm imaging spectroscopy data from AisaFENIX (380-2500 nm) was used to assess the fraction of dead vegetation component in mixed pastures on a hill country farm in New Zealand. We used different methods to retrieve dead vegetation fraction from the spectra; narrow band vegetation indices, full spectrum based partial least squares (PLS) regression and feature selection based PLS regression. Among all approaches, feature selection based PLS model exhibited better performance in terms of prediction accuracy (R2CV = 0.73, RMSECV = 6.05, RPDCV = 2.25). The results were consistent with validation data, and also performed well on the external test data (R2 = 0.62, RMSE = 8.06, RPD = 2.06). In addition, statistical tests were conducted to ascertain the effect of topographical variables such as slope and aspect on the accumulation of the dead vegetation fraction. Steep slopes (>25°) had a significantly (p < 0.05) higher amount of dead vegetation. In contrast, aspect showed non-significant impact on dead vegetation accumulation. The results from the study indicate that AisaFENIX imaging spectroscopy data could be a useful tool for mapping the dead vegetation fraction accurately.

  19. Climate and topographic controls on pasture production in a semiarid Mediterranean watershed with scattered tree cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozano-Parra, J.; Maneta, M. P.; Schnabel, S.

    2013-12-01

    Natural grasses in semiarid rangelands constitute an effective protection against soil erosion and degradation, are a source of natural food for livestock and play a critical role in the hydrologic cycle by contributing to the uptake and transpiration of water. However, natural pastures are threatened by land abandonment and the consequent encroachment of shrubs and trees as well as by changing climatic conditions. In spite of their ecological and economic importance, the spatio-temporal variations of pasture production at the decadal to century scales over whole watersheds are poorly known. We used a physics-based, spatially-distributed ecohydrologic model applied to a 99.5 ha semiarid watershed in western Spain to investigate the sensitivity of pasture production to climate variability. The ecohydrologic model was run using a 300 yr long synthetic daily climate dataset generated using a stochastic weather generator. The data set reproduced the range of climatic variations observed under current climate. Results indicated that variation of pasture production largely depended on factors that also determined the availability of soil moisture such as the temporal distribution of precipitation, topography, and tree canopy cover. The latter is negatively related with production, reflecting the importance of rainfall and light interception, as well as water consumption by trees. Valley bottoms and flat areas in the lower parts of the catchment are characterized by higher pasture production. A quantitative assessment of the quality of the simulations showed that ecohydrologic models are a valuable tool to investigate long term (century scale) water and energy fluxes, as well as vegetation dynamics, in semiarid rangelands.

  20. Tropical forages: morphoanatomy of plants grown in areas with the death of pasture syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro-Júnior, N G; Fagundes, O S; Benevenuti, A S; Yamashita, O M; Rossi, A A B; Carvalho, M A C; Silva, I V

    2017-11-01

    Roots and leaves of Panicum maximum Tanzânia, Mombaça and Massai; Urochloa brizantha Piatã, Marandu and Xaraés; Urochloa humidicola Llanero; Urochloa ruziziensis Ruzizienses; Urochloa hybrida Mulato II and Cynodon nlemfuensis Estrela-roxa were analyzed, seeking to identify characters for better adaptation to the environment that may interfere with digestibility of tissue from the point of view of the rumen in cattle. Were planted ten cultivars in a completely randomized blocks with three repetitions. Was collected vegetative material, which histological slides were prepared from middle third of the sections of roots and leaves. Were observed differences (p>0.05) in the roots: higher volume of epidermal cells (28.62 µm) and overall diameter (1926.41 µm) of Llanero; thicker vascular cylinder (975.09 µm) and more protoxylem (42.25) in Estrela-roxa and occurrence of aerenchyma in cultivars Piatã, Mulato II, Xaraés, Massai, Llanero and Estrela-roxa; Were found higher proportions of bulliform cells in the leaves (121.07 µm) and thicker leaf mesophyll in U. humidicola Llanero (263.63 µm); higher proportion of sclerenchyma fibers in Xaraés and Marandu; lower results for amount of fibers in P. maximum Massai. We conclude that the cultivars Estrela-roxa, Llanero and Massai have greater adaptability to the environment and better nutritional quality.

  1. Superoxide anion radical scavenging activities of herbs and pastures in northern Japan determined using electron spin resonance spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Al-Mamun, Mohammad; Yamaki, Koji; Masumizu, Toshiki; Nakai, Yumi; Saito, Katsumi; Sano, Hiroaki; Tamura, Yoshifumi

    2007-07-30

    Free radicals are not only destructive to the living cells but also reduce the quality of animal products through oxidation. As a result the superoxide anion radical (O2-), one of the most destructive reactive oxygen species, is a matter of concern for the animal scientists as well as feed manufacturers to ensure the quality of product to reach consumers demand. The superoxide anion radical scavenging activities (SOSA) of water and MeOH extracts of 2 herbs and 9 pasture samples collected from lowland and highland swards were determined against a 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyroline-N-oxide-O2-spin adduct based on a hypoxanthine-xanthine oxidase reaction using electron spin resonance spectrometry. Both the water and MeOH extracted SOSA differed among the herbs and pastures. Species and altitudinal variations were observed between extraction methods. The herbs were higher in both water and MeOH extracted SOSA than the pastures except for water extracts of one pasture, white clover (Trifolium repens L.). Among the pastures, quackgrass (Agrophyron repens L.) showed higher SOSA in both the MeOH and water extracts, and timothy (Phleum pretense L.) showed higher MeOH extracted SOSA. It is apparent that the kind and amount of antioxidants differ among herbs and pastures. Animal health and quality of animal products could be improved by adequate selection and combining of herbs and pastures having higher SOSA.

  2. Superoxide Anion Radical Scavenging Activities of Herbs and Pastures in Northern Japan Determined Using Electron Spin Resonance Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mamun, Mohammad; Yamaki, Koji; Masumizu, Toshiki; Nakai, Yumi; Saito, Katsumi; Sano, Hiroaki; Tamura, Yoshifumi

    2007-01-01

    Free radicals are not only destructive to the living cells but also reduce the quality of animal products through oxidation. As a result the superoxide anion radical (O2・-), one of the most destructive reactive oxygen species, is a matter of concern for the animal scientists as well as feed manufacturers to ensure the quality of product to reach consumers demand. The superoxide anion radical scavenging activities (SOSA) of water and MeOH extracts of 2 herbs and 9 pasture samples collected from lowland and highland swards were determined against a 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyroline-N-oxide-O2・-spin adduct based on a hypoxanthine-xanthine oxidase reaction using electron spin resonance spectrometry. Both the water and MeOH extracted SOSA differed among the herbs and pastures. Species and altitudinal variations were observed between extraction methods. The herbs were higher in both water and MeOH extracted SOSA than the pastures except for water extracts of one pasture, white clover (Trifolium repens L.). Among the pastures, quackgrass (Agrophyron repens L.) showed higher SOSA in both the MeOH and water extracts, and timothy (Phleum pretense L.) showed higher MeOH extracted SOSA. It is apparent that the kind and amount of antioxidants differ among herbs and pastures. Animal health and quality of animal products could be improved by adequate selection and combining of herbs and pastures having higher SOSA. PMID:17713599

  3. Seeing the pasture through the trees: A household model explaining silvo-pastoral landscapes in the Ecuadorian Amazon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerner, A. M.; Rudel, T.; Schneider, L.; Burbano, D.; McGroddy, M.

    2012-12-01

    In the Amazon basin the destruction of old growth forests has meant, for the most part, the expansion of pastures for livestock and destruction of a global carbon sink. As these pastures have grown in extent and age, questions about what happens to the biodiversity and carbon sequestration in these pastoral landscapes has assumed more importance. In the research reported here, we offer a preliminary answer to these questions. Our study focuses on the southern Ecuadorian Amazon, where there have recently been trends of spontaneous silvo-pastoral landscapes. These landscapes are a result of land managers allowing trees to grow in cattle pastures, potentially leading to seed sources for native species regeneration and carbon sequestration. This paper discusses demographic, economic and cultural shifts, potentially in light of the expansion of urban areas and off-farm employment, which could impact pasture management in Morona Santiago, Ecuador. Tree cover in pastures is modeled against household demographic, economic and environmental variables that demonstrate which variables affect tree cover in managed landscapes. This analysis sheds light into current processes affecting pasture management in the Amazon, and in turn important landscape outcomes such as dual management systems that include pastures and tree regeneration.

  4. Altitude, pasture type, and sheep breed affect bone metabolism and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D in grazing lambs.

    PubMed

    Willems, Helen; Leiber, Florian; Kohler, Martina; Kreuzer, Michael; Liesegang, Annette

    2013-05-15

    This study aimed to investigate the bone development of two mountain sheep breeds during natural summer grazing either in the lowlands or on different characteristic alpine pastures. Pasture types differed in topographic slope, plant species composition, general nutritional feeding value, Ca and P content, and Ca:P ratio of herbage. Twenty-seven Engadine sheep (ES) lambs and 27 Valaisian Black Nose sheep (VS) lambs were divided into four groups of 6 to 7 animals per breed and allocated to three contrasting alpine pasture types and one lowland pasture type. The lambs were slaughtered after 9 wk of experimental grazing. The steep alpine pastures in combination with a high (4.8) to very high (13.6) Ca:P ratio in the forage decreased total bone mineral content as measured in the middle of the left metatarsus of the lambs from both breeds, and cortical bone mineral content and cortical bone mineral density of ES lambs. Breed × pasture type interactions occurred in the development of total and cortical bone mineral content, and in cortical thickness, indicating that bone metabolism of different genotypes obviously profited differently from the varying conditions. An altitude effect occurred for 25-hydroxyvitamin D with notably higher serum concentrations on the three alpine sites, and a breed effect led to higher concentrations for ES than VS. Despite a high variance, there were pasture-type effects on serum markers of bone formation and resorption.

  5. Pasture size effects on the ability of off-stream water or restricted stream access to alter the spatial/temporal distribution of grazing beef cows.

    PubMed

    Bisinger, J J; Russell, J R; Morrical, D G; Isenhart, T M

    2014-08-01

    For 2 grazing seasons, effects of pasture size, stream access, and off-stream water on cow distribution relative to a stream were evaluated in six 12.1-ha cool-season grass pastures. Two pasture sizes (small [4.0 ha] and large [12.1 ha]) with 3 management treatments (unrestricted stream access without off-stream water [U], unrestricted stream access with off-stream water [UW], and stream access restricted to a stabilized stream crossing [R]) were alternated between pasture sizes every 2 wk for 5 consecutive 4-wk intervals in each grazing season. Small and large pastures were stocked with 5 and 15 August-calving cows from mid May through mid October. At 10-min intervals, cow location was determined with Global Positioning System collars fitted on 2 to 3 cows in each pasture and identified when observed in the stream (0-10 m from the stream) or riparian (0-33 m from the stream) zones and ambient temperature was recorded with on-site weather stations. Over all intervals, cows were observed more (P ≤ 0.01) frequently in the stream and riparian zones of small than large pastures regardless of management treatment. Cows in R pastures had 24 and 8% less (P < 0.01) observations in the stream and riparian zones than U or UW pastures regardless of pasture size. Off-stream water had little effect on the presence of cows in or near pasture streams regardless of pasture size. In 2011, the probability of cow presence in the stream and riparian zones increased at greater (P < 0.04) rates as ambient temperature increased in U and UW pastures than in 2010. As ambient temperature increased, the probability of cow presence in the stream and riparian zones increased at greater (P < 0.01) rates in small than large pastures. Across pasture sizes, the probability of cow presence in the stream and riparian zone increased less (P < 0.01) with increasing ambient temperatures in R than U and UW pastures. Rates of increase in the probability of cow presence in shade (within 10 m of tree

  6. Effect of Sicilian pasture feeding management on content of α-tocopherol and β-carotene in cow milk.

    PubMed

    Marino, V M; Schadt, I; Carpino, S; Caccamo, M; La Terra, S; Guardiano, C; Licitra, G

    2014-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate α-tocopherol and β-carotene contents of pasture milk under ordinary Sicilian farming conditions. Fourteen dairy farms were allocated into 2 balanced groups on the basis of cultivated (CULT) or spontaneous (SPO) pasture type feeding. Bulk milk per farm was collected 4 times from February through April at 3-wk intervals. Pasture botanical and diet composition, diet nutritional quality, milk yield and composition were estimated each time. Pasture intake levels were calculated based on feed analyses, hay and concentrate amounts fed, and milk yield and chemical composition. According to pasture intake, the farms were split into low pasture intake (LPI; <29.5% of dry matter) and high pasture intake (HPI; >29.5% of dry matter) groups. Milk samples per farm were analyzed for α-tocopherol and β-carotene contents by HPLC. The SPO group had higher levels of α-tocopherol and β-carotene in milk (0.7 and 0.3 mg/L, respectively) and milk fat (19.0 and 7.5 mg/kg fat, respectively) compared with the CULT group in milk (0.5 and 0.2 mg/L, respectively) and milk fat (14.6 and 4.9 mg/kg, respectively). High pasture intake compared with LPI increased α-tocopherol in milk fat (18.0 and 16.0 mg/kg of fat, respectively). However, only in the SPO (not in CULT), HPI compared with LPI increased milk α-tocopherol (0.8 vs. 0.6 mg/L, respectively), milk β-carotene (0.3 vs. 0.2 mg/L, respectively), and milk fat β-carotene (8.4 vs. 6.6 mg/kg, respectively). Results may be related to the different botanical composition of the respective pasture types and pasture intake. Spontaneous pasture compared with CULT contained a higher mass proportion of Asteraceae, Fabaceae, Cruciferae, Euphorbiaceae, and Malvaceae plants. Milk and milk fat α-tocopherol levels were higher on test-days (TD)-1, TD-2, and TD-4 compared with TD-3. For HPI farms, milk fat β-carotene content was higher on the first 2 TD compared with the last 2 TD. These differences could be

  7. Relative contribution of cattle to contamination of pasture with Nematodirus battus under an alternate grazing system of husbandry.

    PubMed

    Coop, R L; Jackson, F; Jackson, E

    1991-03-01

    Calves, aged six months grazing on pasture on which lambs infected with Nematodirus battus had grazed the previous season, became infected and passed eggs of N battus. Transfer of these calves onto 'clean' pasture showed that their faecal contamination was sufficient to cause moderate infections of N battus in lambs grazing this area the following season. It was also shown that significant N battus contamination could survive on pasture for at least 18 to 24 months in the absence of further grazing by sheep. Under husbandry systems involving alternate grazing there is likely to be a combination of contamination by young susceptible calves, and a two year carry-over of infectivity.

  8. Grazing alters net ecosystem C fluxes and the net global warming potential of a subtropical pasture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Casanovas, N.; DeLucia, N.; DeLucia, E. H.; Boughton, E.; Garrett, J. C.; Keel, E.; Bernacchi, C.

    2015-12-01

    The impact of grazing on CO2 and CH4 fluxes from subtropical pastures and thus on the climate system is uncertain, although these systems account for a substantial portion of global carbon storage. We investigated how cattle grazing affects net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) and CH4 emissions in subtropical pastures using the eddy covariance technique over two complete wet-dry seasonal cycles. Grazing increased soil wetness but did not affect soil temperature. By removing aboveground biomass, grazing consistently decreased gross primary productivity (16% and 8 % in 2013-2014 and 2014-2015) and reduced ecosystem respiration (Re, 20% and 38% in 2013-2014 and 2014-2015). Lower Re in grazed (GP) than in ungrazed pasture (UP) was also explained by decreased soil and heterotrophic respiration and root biomass. Grazing increased the net CO2 sink strength of the pasture (-86 ± 5 gC m-2 yr-1 in GP vs. -76 ± 6 gC m-2 yr-1 in UP in 2013-2014; -118 ± 9 gC m-2 yr-1 in GP vs. +142 ± 6 gC m-2 yr-1 UP in 2014-2015). Over both wet-dry seasonal cycles, both ecosystems were net sources of CH4, and variations in fluxes without cattle present were driven by changes in soil wetness and temperature. The presence of cattle and greater soil moisture cased by the removal of aboveground biomass, caused greater total net ecosystem CH4 emissions from GP than from UP (16% and 8 % in 2013-2014 and 2014-2015). Wetter soils under GP were responsible for 21-56% of the difference in net CH4 emissions between pastures, suggesting that enhanced CH4 production from wetter soils due to cattle presence can be a major contributor to annual CH4 fluxes. Combining CO2 and CH4 to calculate a C budget revealed that grazing increased the net C sink strength of the pasture (-72 gC m-2 yr-1 in GP vs. -66 gC m-2 yr-1 in UP in 2013-2014; -114 gC m-2 yr-1 in GP vs. +144 gC m-2 yr-1 in UP in 2014-2015). Accounting for NEE and the radiative forcing of CH4, grazing increased the net global warming potential (GWP) of

  9. Pasture degradation in Tibet: Drivers, mechanisms and consequences for C stocks and ecosystem stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzyakov, Yakov; Schleuss, Per-Marten; Guggenberger, Georg; Miehe, Georg; Coners, Heinz; Foken, Thomas; Wesche, Karsten; Hafner, Silke; Biermann, Tobias; Babel, Wolfgang; Gerken, Tobias; Unteregelsbacher, Sebastian; Seeber, Elke; Spielvogel, Sandra; Ingrisch, Johannes; Li, Xiaogang; Yue, Sun; Li, Qianru; Xu, Xingliang

    2017-04-01

    Kobresia grasslands on Tibetan Plateau have accumulated tremendous organic carbon (C) stocks, are an important grazing ground for local herdsmen, host a major portion of the regional terrestrial biodiversity, and supply large areas of SE Asia with water. All these ecosystem functions are threatened by large-scale soil degradation on the Tibetan Plateau. Nonetheless, the patterns and mechanisms of Kobresia pasture degradation, visible across the entire Tibetan Plateau, remain unknown. In the K. pygmaea core area, we studied natural and anthropogenic drivers of pasture degradation to discover new mechanisms and associated processes of soil organic carbon (SOC) loss. We show that livestock overgrazing and trampling in recent decades have triggered grassland degradation by initiating plant death and reducing grassland recovery. Combined with the harsh climate, this destroys the protective Kobresia turf. Considering these processes as well as other anthropogenic and natural drivers, a novel pasture degradation concept was developed. Pasture soils corresponding to the fiwe degradation stages were sampled and analyzed for physical, chemical and biological properties. Soil drought and frost lead to polygonal cracking of the Kobresia turf, already weakened by overgrazing. This induces gradual erosion by wind and water, extends the cracks and removes the upper carbon-enriched soil. Erosion-derived SOC losses amount to 5 kg C m-2 and are aggravated by decreasing root C input and increased SOC mineralization (both ca. 2.5 kg C m-2). Mineralization-derived SOC loss was reflected by a negative δ13C shift of SOC going from intact to severely degraded stages, and was caused by a relative enrichment of 13C-depleted lignin. In sum, degradation has released tremendous amounts of carbon back into the atmosphere as CO2, or as increased sediment load in rivers, connected with declining water quality off-site. Affected by changed local water budget, the regional clouds' formation starts

  10. The influence of lime and nitrogen fertilisers on spore counts of Pithomyces chartarum in pasture.

    PubMed

    Cuttance, E L; Laven, R A; Mason, W A; Stevenson, M

    2016-11-01

    To determine whether the application of lime or nitrogen to pasture affected the spore counts of Pithomyces chartarum. The lime application studies were undertaken on a spring-calving, pasture-based, commercial dairy farm near Te Awamutu, New Zealand. On 6 November 2012, five randomly selected paddocks were split into three equal sections. In two of the sections, lime was applied at either 1.5 or 2.5 t/ha, and the central section was left as an untreated control. Each section was sampled for spore counting weekly from 16 January to 15 May 2013. Starting in January 2013, five other randomly selected paddocks were monitored for spore counts. On 20 March 2013 the average spore counts in three paddocks were >100,000 spores/g of pasture. These paddocks were then divided into three equal sections and lime was applied as described above. Spore counting in each section continued weekly until 15 May 2013. The nitrogen application study was carried out on three commercial dairy farms near Te Awamutu, New Zealand. Two randomly selected paddocks on each farm were divided into three equal sections and, on 20 December 2012, nitrogen in the form of urea was applied at either 50 or 80 kg urea/ha to two of the sections; the central section remained as an untreated control. Each section was sampled for spore counting weekly from 16 January to 15 May 2013. Following pre-summer lime application, treatment at 1.5 or 2.5 t/ha did not affect spore counts over time compared with the control section (p>0.26). Similarly following autumn lime application, treatment at 1.5 or 2.5 t/ha did not affect spore counts over time compared with the control section (p>0.11). Following nitrogen application median spore counts remained <20,000 spores/g pasture throughout the trial period and there was no effect of treatment on spore counts over time (p>0.49). This study found that application of lime before the risk period for facial eczema, in November, application of lime after a spore count

  11. Exchange of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polychlorinated naphthalenes (PCNs) between air and a mixed pasture sward.

    PubMed

    Barber, Jonathan L; Thomas, Gareth O; Bailey, Rebekah; Kerstiens, Gerhard; Jones, Kevin C

    2004-07-15

    To improve understanding of air-to-vegetation transfer of persistent organic pollutants (POPs), uptake and depuration of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polychlorinated naphthalenes (PCNs) between grass sward and air was investigated. Pasture swards were placed in fanned (2 m s(-1) wind speed) and unfanned conditions for a period of 20 days and sampled at intervals. Depuration was carried out after a short (4 days) and a long (14 days) exposure period. Prior to contamination, a mixed pasture sward at a semi-rural location contained sigmaPCN concentrations 15-20% of the sigmaPCB concentration. Uptake of both PCBs and PCNs was broadly linear in fanned and unfanned conditions over the 20-day period, i.e., the pasture did not reach equilibrium with the air. Uptake rates (fluxes) were greater under the fanned conditions. The difference in uptake rates between fanned and unfanned conditions increased with degree of chlorination for both PCBs and PCNs, ranging between a factor of 2 for tri-chlorinated PCBs and PCNs and a factor 5 for octa-chlorinated PCBs. Depuration results over the first hours were very scattered, showing an initial period of loss, followed by an increase in concentrations, possibly as a result of re-volatilization of PCBs from the soil in the trays, with consequent recapture by the overlying sward. Rapid clearance was observed over the following days, but depuration of PCBs and PCNs was still incomplete after 14 days, with 20% of the initial concentration of the sigmaPCBs and 10% of the sigmaPCNs retained by the sward. There was no difference in the proportion of POPs retained in the sward between the 4- and 14-day contamination treatments. POP-specific differences in the amount of compound "trapped" in leaves after contamination were observed. The results show that, although changes in the rate of air movement around a pasture have an effect on the uptake rate of POPs into the vegetation, plant-side resistance controls both the air-to-pasture and

  12. Economic analyses of feeding systems combining pasture and total mixed ration.

    PubMed

    Tozer, P R; Bargo, F; Muller, L D

    2003-03-01

    Partial budgeting was used to compare net incomes of high-yielding Holstein cows fed either a total mixed ration (TMR), a pasture-based diet, or a combination of both. Variables included in the analysis were milk income, feed, feeding, manure handling, fencing, and water system expenses (revenues and costs based on 2000 values). Base data were from 45 Holstein cows (109 days in milk), assigned to one of three dietary treatments: TMR (nongrazing with TMR ad libitum), pasture plus TMR (pTMR, with pasture in the day and TMR at night), or pasture plus concentrate (PC, pasture twice daily plus 1 kg of concentrate/4 kg milk). Data from those groups were projected to a case-study herd of 70 cows and subjected to sensitivity analysis at varying milk prices and feed and pasture costs. Although costs per kilogram of milk produced were lowest for PC cows, cows on TMR had the highest net income per cow per day (5.61 dollars) because of higher yields of milk (38.1 kg/d) and milk components (1.24 kg/d of fat, 1.13 kg/d of true protein), although expenses were highest among all systems (4.12 dollars). Cows on the PC had lower daily net income (5.31 dollars) due to lower yields of milk (28.5 kg/d) and milk components (0.89 kg/d of fat, 0.79 kg/d of true protein) even though expenses were also lowest (2.57 dollars). Cows fed the pTMR were intermediate in production (32.0 kg/d of milk, 1.06 kg/d of fat, 0.93 kg/d of true protein) but had similar daily net income per cow (5.28 dollars) to the PC cows but were lower than the TMR cows. Sensitivity analysis showed that the TMR system was more profitable than the pTMR and PC systems, with expenses considered, except at combinations of lower milk prices and higher feed costs. Differences between the pTMR and PC systems were less, with PC being more profitable in half of the scenarios, particularly at lower milk prices and higher feed costs.

  13. [Performance and parasitologic infestation of male dairy cattle supplemented with proteic salt containing or not homeopathic medicines].

    PubMed

    Signoretti, Ricardo D; Veríssimo, Cecília José; De Souza, Fernando Henrique M; Garcia, Tamires Da S; De Oliveira, Elisa Marcela; De Souza, Karen G; Mourão, Gerson Barreto

    2008-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance and parasitologic infection of male dairy cattle submitted to supplemental proteic salt with and without the use of homeopathic medicines. Were used crossbred Gir x Holstein castrated males calves, with 10 months of age and live weight of 150.75 kg, distributed in a completely randomized design with eight replicates per treatment, totaling 16 animals. The calves of each treatment remained in a pasture of Brachiaria brizantha cv. Marandu, managed in continuous grazing system for 8 months. The treatments employed were: supplementation with 300 g/animal/day of protein (40% of crude protein (CP) and 25% CP in the dry and rainy season, respectively) added or not with 5 g/animal/day of the homeopathic medicines FATOR PRO® and C & MC®. The addition of homeopathic medicines in the protein supplement did not affect (P > 0.05) the development of body male crossbred to pasture. The counting of the larvae and adults of ticks in scrapings were lower (P < 0.05) in animals that did not receive homeopathic medicines in the protein supplement. The females tick in the body anterior third (simplifying counting), nymphs in scrapings and the number of eggs per gram of helminths were not affected (P > 0.05) by the treatments. It was concluded that the use of homeopathic medicines did not affect the development of male crossbred Gir x Holstein dairy cattle neither their parasitic infection.

  14. Keratinophilic fungi isolated from soils of long-term fold-grazed, degraded pastures in national parks of Slovakia.

    PubMed

    Javoreková, Soňa; Labuda, Roman; Maková, Jana; Novák, Ján; Medo, Juraj; Majerčíková, Kamila

    2012-09-01

    A total of 939 isolates of 11 genera representing 15 species of keratinophilic fungi were isolated and identified from the soils of three long-term fold-grazed pastures in national parks of Slovakia (Pod Ploskou, Strungový príslop, and Pod Kečkou) and one non-fold-grazed pasture in sierra Stolicke vrchy (Diel) using the hair-baiting technique. Keratinophilic fungi were present in all soil samples with a prevalence of Trichophyton ajelloi and Paecilomyces lilacinus. These fungi were more abundant in soil from fold-grazed pasture (Strungový príslop) compared to non-fold-grazed pasture (Diel). The occurrence of the other keratinophilic fungi was substantially lower, likely because of low pH in some soils.

  15. Water quality effects and placement of pasture best management practices in the Spring Creek Watershed (Centre County, PA)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pasture-based best management practices (BMPs), including stream bank fencing, stream crossings, and bank stabilization, improved water quality ten years after installation by reducing sediment, but did not affect nitrogen concentration. Abundance and diversity of aquatic macroinvertebrates increas...

  16. Deep drainage and water use of forests and pastures grown on deep sands in a Mediterranean environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbon, B. A.; Roberts, F. J.; Farrington, P.; Beresford, J. D.

    1982-02-01

    The neutron scattering technique was used to measure soil-moisture storage beneath native hardwood forests, plantations of softwood forests, perennial pastures and winter annual pastures growing in deep sands of the southwest of Western Australia. The seasonal patterns of water use and of deep drainage to groundwater were calculated using measured soil-moisture characteristics. Fourteen-year-old Pinus pinaster (Ait.) plantations, containing ˜1200 trees per hectare, transpired more water than the native forest they replaced. The pines depleted the soil water faster, and to a greater degree. Deep drainage beyond 6 m was much less in the soil below the pine plantations, indicating a decrease in recharge of shallow groundwaters. The perennial pastures showed a pattern of water use, soil-water depletion and deep drainage similar to the native forests. The winter annual pastures, however, used less water than the native forest, and deep drainage was increased.

  17. Gastro-intestinal nematode infection in lambs — A model based on climatic indices for forecasting peak pasture larval contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paton, G.

    1987-06-01

    The parasite Ostertagia circumcincta is the primary cause of parasitic gastro-enteritis in lambs during their first season at grass. The life-cycle of this nematode parasite involves the development and survival of the free-living stages on pasture. Accordingly the pasture is the site of deposition, development and transmission of infection and meteorological factors affecting the pasture will affect the parasites. In this paper two empirical models for forecasting the timing of the “summer wave” of infective larvae on pasture are presented. These models are similar in form to that described by Starr and Thomas (1980) but involve different approaches to assessing the temperature and moisture components of the daily index value. Further, using the prediction model described by Paton, Thomas and Waller (1984) as an investigative tool, certain tentative suggestions are made as to a general fundamental weakness of empirical index methods.

  18. Does differential growth affect the distribution and recovery of Listeria spp. in pasture-raised broiler farm soils?

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Listeria spp. represent an important foodborne pathogen, but relatively little is known about its environmental prevalence on poultry farms. Considering the environmental exposure inherent with pasture-raised production systems, these types of alternative poultry management systems represent an idea...

  19. The impact of water management practices and associated methane emissions on subtropical pasture greenhouse gas budgets and ecosystem service payments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamberlain, S.; Groffman, P. M.; Boughton, E.; Gomez-Casanovas, N.; DeLucia, E. H.; Bernacchi, C.; Sparks, J. P.

    2016-12-01

    Pastures are an extensive land cover type, however patterns in pasture greenhouse gas (GHG) exchange vary widely depending on climate and land management. Understanding this variation is important, as pastures may be a net GHG source or sink depending on these factors. We quantified carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) fluxes from subtropical pastures in south Florida for three years using eddy covariance, and estimated annual budgets of CO2, CH4, and GHG equivalent emissions. We also explored the influence of water retention practices on pasture GHG budgets by combining data from a multi-year pasture water retention experiment with CH4 flux data from our eddy covariance tower to 1) estimate the influence of water retention on surface soil flooding, and 2) estimate the influence of extended surface soil flooding on CH4 emissions. These findings were then used to assess the impact of CH4 emissions on stakeholder payments for water retention services in a carbon market framework. The pastures were net CO2 sinks sequestering up to 163 ± 54 g CO2-C m-2 yr-1, but were also strong CH4 sources emitting up to 23.5 ± 2.1 g CH4-C m-2 yr-1. Accounting for the global warming potential of CH4, the pastures were strong GHG sources emitting up to 584 ± 78 g CO2 eq. m-2 yr-1. Our analysis suggests CH4 emissions due to increased flooding from water management practices is a small component of the pasture GHG budget, and water retention likely contributes 2-11% of pasture GHG emissions. These emissions could reduce water retention payments by up to 12% if stakeholders were required to pay for current GHG emissions in a carbon market. It would require at least 93.7 kg CH4-C emissions per acre-foot water storage for carbon market costs to exceed water retention payments, and this scenario is highly unlikely as we estimate current practices are responsible for 11.3 ± 7.2 kg CH4-C emissions per acre-foot of water storage. Our results demonstrate that water retention practices

  20. Spread of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis through soil and grass on a mouflon (Ovis aries) pasture.

    PubMed

    Kaevska, Marija; Lvoncik, S; Lamka, J; Pavlik, I; Slana, I

    2014-10-01

    The aims of this study were to describe spatial contamination of the environment on a mouflon pasture, as well as to assess the contamination of grass and roots after surface contamination and in depth contamination with feces and buried tissues from animals infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (M. a. paratuberculosis). Samples of soil, roots, and aerial parts of plants were collected from different locations inside the mouflon pasture, and one control sample site was chosen outside the area where the animals are living. M. a. paratuberculosis DNA was present in all the examined sites and was more often detected in roots than in soil. DNA was detected at up to 80 cm of depth and was spatially more widespread than the initial hypothesis of M. a. paratuberculosis leaching vertically into deeper layers of soil. This study broadens our knowledge of the spread and persistence of M. a. paratuberculosis in an environment with highly infected animals.

  1. Dryland pasture and crop conditions as seen by HCMM. [Washita River watershed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harlan, J. C. (Principal Investigator); Rosenthal, W. D.; Blanchard, B. J.

    1981-01-01

    The antecedent precipitation index (API) was related to surface temperatures as measured from the NASA C-130 and HCMM thermal data. Significant results from the aircraft flight in May 1978, include: (1) canopy temperature were measured accurately remotely; (2) pasture surface temperatures were related to pasture and wheat soil moisture conditions; (3) no relationship was developed with that data set between wheat yield and thermal infrared data due to a lack of moisture stress during the measurement period; and (4) lake surface temperatures were useful in normalizing the thermal IR data. Results from HCMM also suggested a relationship between thermal IR data and antecedent precipitation index. While HCMM was adequate in detecting relative soil moisture differences, the overpass timing was infrequent and prevented detailed analysis of the API/thermal relationship.

  2. Pasture practices, milk distribution, and consumption in the continental U. S. in the 1950s

    SciTech Connect

    Dreicer, M.; Bouville, A.; Wachholz, B.W. )

    1990-11-01

    Determining the consumption of milk contaminated with 131I, resulting from atmospheric nuclear weapons tests conducted at the Nevada Test Site, by the United States population during the 1950s constitutes one part of the methodology used by the National Cancer Institute to assess radiation exposures to Americans. In order to make these estimates for locations throughout the United States, it is necessary to determine the pasture intake by cows and the distribution of the milk produced for human consumption at times when the weapons were tested. Since the milk industry has undergone many changes during the past 35 y, historical records and information must be used. The methodology developed to estimate the intake of contaminated pasture by dairy cows, milk production, and milk distribution on a county basis for the continental U.S. during the 1950s is described in detail. The relevant data on milk consumption by humans are also discussed.

  3. Transfer of /sup 131/I and /sup 95m/Tc from pasture to goat milk

    SciTech Connect

    Bondietti, E.A.; Garten, C.T. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Field measurements were made in 1983 on the transfer of /sup 131/I and /sup 95m/Tc from spray-contaminated pasture to goat's milk. The transfer of /sup 131/I to milk was similar to that used for mathematical models in US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory Guide 1.109, which was derived from stall-feeding experiments using capsulized doses. Compared to /sup 131/I, the /sup 95m/Tc transferred to milk was about 5600 times less. The lower transfer resulted from both immobilization of technetium on pasture prior to ingestion as well as reduced gastrointestinal absorption. The results show that the food chain transfer of technetium to milk is much less than that previously expected based on inferences made from metabolism studies. 6 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  4. Dryland pasture and crop conditions as seen by HCMM. [Washita River watershed, Oklahoma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenthal, W. D.; Harlan, J. C.; Blanchard, B. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    Ground truth, aircraft, and satellite data were examined in order to: (1) assess the capability for determining wheat and pasture canopy temperatures in a dryland farming region from HCMM data; (2) assess the capability for determining soil moisture from HCMM data in dryland crops (winter wheat) from adjacent range lands; and (3) determine the relationship of HCMM-derived soil moisture and canopy temperature values with the condition of winter wheat and dryland farming areas during the principal growth stages. The IR data were screened to include areas having greater than 60% pasture and surface temperatures were recalculated using the atmospheric correction factor calculated by the modified RADTRA model, and the July 29, 1978 IR data were analyzed. Screening the IR data improved the relationship for July 24/July 13 and October 7/August 31 temperature/API relationship. However the coefficient of determination was not improved in the July 29/July 13 relationship.

  5. Dryland pasture and crop conditions as seen by HCMM. [Washita Watershed, Oklahoma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harlan, J. C. (Principal Investigator); Rosenthal, W. D.; Blanchard, B. J.

    1981-01-01

    Techniques developed from aircraft flights over the Washita watershed in central Oklahoma were applied to HCMM data analysis. Results show that (1) canopy temperatures were accurately measured remotely; (2) pasture surface temperature differences detected relative soil moisture differences; (3) pasture surface temperature differences were related to stress in nearby wheat fields; and (4) no relationship was developed between final yield differences, thermal infrared data, and soil moisture stress at critical growth stages due to a lack of satellite thermal data at critical growth stages. The HCMM thermal data proved to be quite adequate in detecting relative moisture differences; however, with a 16 day day/night overpass frequency, more frequent overpasses are required to analyze more cases within a 7 day period after the storm. Better normalization techniques are also required.

  6. Bioengineering and management for efficient phosphorus utilization in crops and pastures.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jiang; Wang, Xiurong; Tong, Yiping; Chen, Xinping; Liao, Hong

    2012-12-01

    Phosphorus (P) is one of the three macronutrients for plants. Because of its low mobility and high fixation in soils, low P availability is a worldwide constraint for crop productivity. Molecular biology provides great opportunities to improve P efficiency in plants. However, transgenic plants cannot be commercialized before integrating all the knowledge on bottlenecks for improving P efficiency of crops/pastures. This review intends to summarize the main strategies of bioengineering to improve P efficiency of crops/pastures, including conventional and molecular assisted breeding, identification and application of key genes for biotech plants. It highlights recent advances in the understanding of improving P efficiency through the integration of bioengineering with P fertilization and cultivation management. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. CO2 and Carbon Balance of an Intensively Grazed Temperate Pasture: Response to Cultivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutledge, S.; Mudge, P. L.; Wallace, D.; Campbell, D.; Wall, A.; Hosking, C. L.; Schipper, L. A.

    2012-12-01

    Recent soil resampling studies have shown that soils on flat land used for intensive dairy farming in New Zealand have lost large amounts of carbon (~1 t C ha-1y-1) over the past few decades, and the causes of these losses are poorly understood. One of the management practices potentially contributing to the C losses from these dairy soils is the periodic cultivation commonly associated with pasture renewal or the rotation through summer or winter crops. Here we report the results of three experiments aimed at quantifying the effect of cultivation as part of pasture renewal on the CO2 and C balances of permanent pastures. In the first experiment, the net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) of an intensively grazed dairy pasture was measured before, during and after cultivation using eddy covariance (EC) from 2008 to 2011 at a dairy farm in the Waikato region on the North Island of New Zealand. The net ecosystem carbon balance (NECB) was determined by combining NEE data with measurements and estimates of other C imports (feed) and C exports (milk, methane, silage and leaching). The other two experiments took place on the same farm and monitored two different cultivation events in 2008. We made chamber measurements of soil CO2 losses between spraying and seedling emergence. One of the cultivations took place in summer 2008 during a drought, whereas the other took place in spring 2008 when soil water was not limiting. For the first two years of experiment 1 the site was under permanent pasture and it was a sink for both CO2 (1.6 and 2.3 t C ha-1y-1 for 2008 and 2009, respectively) and C (0.59 and 0.90 t C ha-1y-1 for 2008 and 2009, respectively), despite a severe drought in summer 2008 which had led to a loss of approximately 1.1 t C ha-1 as CO2 over the three summer months. Pasture renewal took place in March 2010 and CO2 losses during this event were approximately 1.7 t C ha-1. However, the site seemed to recover quickly and was a sink of CO2 at an annual time scale of

  8. Field scale fluxes and uncertainties of CO2 and energy from a managed pasture in Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clement, Robert; Hill, Tim; Chocholek, Mel; Blei, Emanuel; Williams, Mat

    2016-04-01

    A field campaign of eddy covariance measurements was conducted to determine the field scale trace gas and energy exchanges of a representative managed pasture in south west Scotland. To better fit the parent projects goal of multi-scale uncertainty, multiply flux systems were deployed in an attempt to quantify temporal and spatial variability of fluxes from a quasi-uniform site. We briefly discuss the hurdles encountered when synthesizing multiple measurement systems into a coherent dataset and reflect on what this analysis would imply when interpreting singular flux datasets. Data from the campaign provide information on flux estimates with run specific uncertainties over a complete harvest cycle of the pasture. Initial estimates suggest a net uptake of 2 micromol m-2 sec-1 over the 6 week period between harvests. Uncertainties of this estimate and the environmental dependence of uncertainties of half hour estimates will also be presented.

  9. Grazing management effects on sediment, phosphorus, and pathogen loading of streams in cool-season grass pastures.

    PubMed

    Schwarte, Kirk A; Russell, James R; Kovar, John L; Morrical, Daniel G; Ensley, Steven M; Yoon, Kyoung-Jin; Cornick, Nancy A; Cho, Yong Il

    2011-01-01

    Erosion and runoff from pastures may lead to degradation of surface water. A 2-yr grazing study was conducted to quantify the effects of grazing management on sediment, phosphorus (P), and pathogen loading of streams in cool-season grass pastures. Six adjoining 12.1-ha pastures bisected by a stream in central Iowa were divided into three treatments: continuous stocking with unrestricted stream access (CSU), continuous stocking with restricted stream access (CSR), and rotational stocking (RS). Rainfall simulations on stream banks resulted in greater ( < 0.10) proportions of applied precipitation and amounts of sediment and P transported in runoff from bare sites than from vegetated sites across grazing treatments. Similar differences were observed comparing vegetated sites in CSU and RS pastures with vegetated sites in CSR pastures. Bovine enterovirus was shed by an average of 24.3% of cows during the study period and was collected in the runoff of 8.3 and 16.7% of runoff simulations on bare sites in CSU pastures in June and October of 2008, respectively, and from 8.3% of runoff simulations on vegetated sites in CSU pastures in April 2009. Fecal pathogens (bovine coronavirus [BCV], bovine rotavirus group A, and O157:H7) shed or detected in runoff were almost nonexistent; only BCV was detected in feces of one cow in August of 2008. Erosion of cut-banks was the greatest contributor of sediment and P loading to the stream; contributions from surface runoff and grazing animals were considerably less and were minimized by grazing management practices that reduced congregation of cattle by pasture streams. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  10. Use of a geographic information system to evaluate morphometric variations of rumen papillae related to diet and pasture vegetative cycle.

    PubMed

    Scocco, Paola; Ceccarelli, Piero; Gatti, Renata; Catorci, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    The morphometric variations of the rumen papillae due to different alimentary diets has been analysed using a geographic information system (GIS), as the preliminary stage of a wider study aimed at creating a geo-database to link environmental data (pasture structure and composition, pastoral value) with parameters measuring animal welfare (body condition score, volatile fatty acids concentration, haematochemical profile) both during a pasture vegetative cycle and in different conditions of animal load on pastures, with the ultimate goal of contributing to grassland management. A first step was to collect samples of rumen wall tissue from different groups of sheep (lambs to milky and mixed diet, and adult at the maximum of flowering and at the end of pasture vegetative cycle) to verify morphometric differences in rumen papillae due to different diets. Wall tissues of rumen samples were removed from the dorsal and ventral sac and preserved in a formalin solution. Twenty papillae from the dorsal and ventral sac were taken from each sample and their images were elaborated with ArcGISTM software. Results show that the morphometric variation of papillae is related with the pasture productivity trend: the maximum size of rumen papillae occurs immediately after the phytomass and flowering spike; in this phase the animals utilise a very nourishing and quantitatively abundant pasture. After this phase, a deterioration of pasture occurs and the surface of rumen papillae surface decreases rapidly. Results obtained further confirm the existence of a close relationship between quality and quantity of phytomass and the extent of rumen papillae absorptive surface, demonstrating the effects of this relationship during a pasture vegetative cycle.

  11. Volatile compounds and sensory properties of Montasio cheese made from the milk of Simmental cows grazing on alpine pastures.

    PubMed

    Bovolenta, S; Romanzin, A; Corazzin, M; Spanghero, M; Aprea, E; Gasperi, F; Piasentier, E

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the volatile compounds, physicochemical characteristics, and sensory properties of Montasio, a semicooked pressed cheese, produced from the milk of the dual-purpose Italian Simmental cows grazing on alpine pastures. A total of 72 cows grazing on 2 pastures, which differed in botanical composition (nutrient-rich pasture vs. nutrient-poor pasture), received 2 different levels of supplementation (3.0 vs 1.5 kg/head per day). The experimental cheeses were produced from whole, raw milk and ripened for 60 d. Sixty-one volatile compounds, including alcohols (11), aldehydes (6), ketones (10), lactones (2), esters (6), hydrocarbons (3), carboxylic acids (6), phenolic compounds (4), monoterpenes (7), sesquiterpenes (1), sulfur compounds (4), and amines (1), were detected. The main families in terms of relative weight appeared to be carboxylic acids, esters, and alcohols. A panel of trained assessors described the experimental cheeses as having an intense color; small and evenly distributed eyes; an intense odor and flavor of milk-sour, milk, and cow; and a tender and creamy texture. The pasture type affected the volatile fraction, particularly ketones, phenolic compounds, and terpenes, which are overall higher in nutrient-poor pastures. A slight effect on the sensory analyses, in particular the effect of the cow attribute on odor and flavor, was perceived by the panelists. The cheeses produced on nutrient-rich pasture had higher b* (yellowness) index. These results were consistent with the color evaluation of the sensory panel. In addition, the pasture affected some textural attributes (adhesivity, creaminess, and granules) as perceived by the panelists. Concentrate supplementation, which is required to meet the feeding requirements of grazing cows, had no clear effect on either the volatile compounds or the sensory properties of the cheeses. Thus, at least within levels of integration adopted, it is expected not to alter the organoleptic

  12. Analysis of farmers' willingness to participate in pasture grazing programs: Results from a discrete choice experiment with German dairy farmers.

    PubMed

    Danne, M; Musshoff, O

    2017-09-01

    Over the last decades, the usage of pasture for grazing of dairy cows has decreased considerably. Pasture grazing programs initiated by dairy companies try to counteract this trend. The present paper investigates farmers' willingness to participate in such grazing programs. A special aim was to quantify the price premiums farmers require for program participation and to identify determinants influencing the premium level. The empirical analysis is based on a discrete choice experiment with 293 German dairy farmers. Models are estimated in terms of willingness to accept. It was found that farmers have no substantial preference for whether the pasture grazing program is financed by the food industry, a governmental scheme, or the dairy company. However, an extension of the annual or daily grazing period results in a decreasing willingness of farmers to participate in a pasture grazing program. In addition, farmers decline the option of a feeding standard prescribing the use of only green fodder when offered an alternative program that merely reduces the amount of concentrated feed or maize silage in the diet. Farmers' with an aversion toward program participation have a significant higher price demand for fulfilling the program requirements. Furthermore, the required price premiums increase with growing milk yields and a greater number of cows kept on the farm. However, if the availability of pasture is high, farmers are more likely to participate. The estimated price premiums and factors influencing farmers' willingness to participate found by this study should be considered by dairies and policymakers to gain insights into the design of possible pasture grazing programs from the perspective of farmers. Thereby, paying price premiums to farmers may increase the attractiveness of pasture grazing, which could finally result in an extended usage of pasture grazing. Copyright © 2017 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Efficiency of feeding Duddingtonia flagrans chlamydospores to grazing ewes on reducing availability of parasitic nematode larvae on pasture.

    PubMed

    Fontenot, M E; Miller, J E; Peña, M T; Larsen, M; Gillespie, A

    2003-12-30

    Gastrointestinal nematodes are of concern in sheep production because of production and economic losses. Control of these nematodes is primarily based on the use of anthelmintic treatment and pasture management. The almost exclusive use of anthelmintic treatment has resulted in development of anthelmintic resistance which has led to the need for other parasite control options to be explored. The blood sucking abomasal parasitic nematode Haemonchus contortus causes severe losses in small ruminant production in the warm, humid sub-tropic and tropics. This study evaluated the effectiveness of a nematode trapping fungus, Duddingtonia flagrans, in reducing availability of parasitic nematode larvae, specifically H. contortus, on pasture. Chlamydospores of D. flagrans were mixed with a supplement feed which was fed daily to a group of crossbred ewes for the duration of the summer grazing season. A control group was fed the same supplement feed without chlamydospores. A reduction in infective larval numbers was observed in fecal cultures of the fungus-fed group. Herbage samples from the pasture grazed by the fungus-fed group also showed a reduction in infective larvae. There were no significant (P > 0.05) differences in overall fecal egg count, packed cell volume or animal weight between fungus-fed and control groups. Tracer animals were placed on the study pastures at the end of the study to assess pasture infectivity. Although tracer animals were only two per group, those that grazed with the fungus-fed group had substantially reduced (96.8%) nematode burdens as compared to those from the control group pasture. Results demonstrated that the fungus did have activity against nematode larvae in the feces which reduced pasture infectivity and subsequently nematode burdens in tracer animals. This study showed that D. flagrans, fed daily to grazing ewes, was an effective biological control agent in reducing a predominantly H. contortus larval population on pasture.

  14. Visible spectroscopy on carcass fat combined with chemometrics to distinguish pasture-fed, concentrate-fed and concentrate-finished pasture-fed lambs.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y; Andueza, D; de Oliveira, L; Zawadzki, F; Prache, S

    2015-03-01

    We used visible spectroscopy of fat to discriminate lambs that were pasture-fed (n=76), concentrate-fed (n=79) or concentrate-finished after pasture-feeding (n=69). The reflectance spectrum of perirenal and subcutaneous caudal fat was measured at slaughter and 24h post mortem. In Method 1 (W450-510), the optical data were used at wavelengths in the range of 450-510nm to calculate an index quantifying light absorption by carotenoids. In Method 2 (W400-700), the full set of data at wavelengths in the range of 400-700nm was used to differentiate carcasses using PLS-DA as a classification method. W400-700 proved more reliable than W450-510 (P<0.0001). The proportion of correctly classified lambs using W400-700 was 95.6% and 95.9% for measurements made on perirenal fat at slaughter and 24h post mortem. The intensity of light absorption by carotenoids decreased exponentially with live weight gain during the finishing period. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Discerning the cows from the pasture when determining annual NEE and carbon budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammann, Christof; Felber, Raphael; Neftel, Albrecht

    2015-04-01

    The CO2 exchange of ecosystems and the resulting annual net ecosystem exchange (NEE) and total carbon budget (soil carbon sequestration) is commonly investigated using the eddy covariance (EC) technique. For the carbon budget of managed ecosystems also the import and export of organic carbon has to be taken into account. Grazed pasture systems represent a special challenge because their respiration can considerably contribute to the measured CO2 flux, but this contribution depends on the spatial distribution of the cows relative to the footprint and thus is variable in time. This has implications for the gap filling of CO2 flux time series necessary to determine annual NEE. In few existing studies two procedures have been suggested to determine the NEE of grazed pasture: (a) discarding all cases with cows in the footprint and gap-filling the remaining dataset; (b) treating the cow respiration as part of total ecosystem respiration and gap fill the entire flux dataset including cow contributions. Both approaches rely on idealized assumptions and have limitations. In our study we evaluated and compared the two approaches (for the first time to our knowledge) for a grazed pasture in Switzerland. For this purpose, the grazing cows were equipped with GPS sensors to monitor their position relative to the flux footprint. We found that the resulting annual NEE strongly depends on the flux data selection (e.g. u* filtering) and the applied gap filling procedure. Using an optimized procedure, the annual NEE with approach (b) was several times larger than the result of approach (a), but the difference agreed fairly well with independent estimates of cow respiration. Necessary assumptions and requirements of the two approaches for the determination of the pasture carbon budget will be discussed.

  16. Barium selenate supplementation and its effect on intramammary infection in pasture-based dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Ceballos, A; Kruze, J; Barkema, H W; Dohoo, I R; Sanchez, J; Uribe, D; Wichtel, J J; Wittwer, F

    2010-04-01

    A significant proportion of cattle receive inadequate dietary Se because of its low content in soils and pastures of various regions of the world. Several economically important diseases in dairy cows, such as mastitis, have been associated with Se deficiency. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of a single injection of a long-acting form of Se at drying off on the risk and incidence rate of new intramammary infections and on milk somatic cell count in the subsequent lactation in pasture-based dairy cows. Forty-nine Chilean Holstein-Friesian cows were fed a diet containing <0.05 mg of Se/kg of ration dry matter. During the dry period, cows were allocated to 1 of 2 groups, a supplemented (n=24) group treated with a single subcutaneous injection of barium selenate 2 mo before calving and a control group (n=25) that remained unsupplemented. Duplicate foremilk samples were aseptically collected within 6 d after calving and every 2 wk until drying-off for bacteriological culture. Milk samples were also collected monthly for somatic cell count evaluation. Blood samples were collected before treatment and at 30, 90, 180, and 270 d after treatment for analysis of blood glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity. The activity of glutathione peroxidase was higher in supplemented cows 30 d after the injection until the end of the study. The risk and incidence rate of new intramammary infections was not affected by supplementation. A progressive increase in somatic cell count was observed throughout lactation, but there was no effect of supplementation. In conclusion, a one-time injection of barium selenate 2 mo before calving in these pasture-based dairy cows did not affect udder health in the subsequent lactation, indicating that Se basal intake was adequate for preventing subclinical mastitis in pasture-based cows in southern Chile.

  17. Using normalized difference vegetation index to estimate carbon fluxes from small rotationally grazed pastures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Skinner, R.H.; Wylie, B.K.; Gilmanov, T.G.

    2011-01-01

    Satellite-based normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) data have been extensively used for estimating gross primary productivity (GPP) and yield of grazing lands throughout the world. However, the usefulness of satellite-based images for monitoring rotationally-grazed pastures in the northeastern United States might be limited because paddock size is often smaller than the resolution limits of the satellite image. This research compared NDVI data from satellites with data obtained using a ground-based system capable of fine-scale (submeter) NDVI measurements. Gross primary productivity was measured by eddy covariance on two pastures in central Pennsylvania from 2003 to 2008. Weekly 250-m resolution satellite NDVI estimates were also obtained for each pasture from the moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor. Ground-based NDVI data were periodically collected in 2006, 2007, and 2008 from one of the two pastures. Multiple-regression and regression-tree estimates of GPP, based primarily on MODIS 7-d NDVI and on-site measurements of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), were generally able to predict growing-season GPP to within an average of 3% of measured values. The exception was drought years when estimated and measured GPP differed from each other by 11 to 13%. Ground-based measurements improved the ability of vegetation indices to capture short-term grazing management effects on GPP. However, the eMODIS product appeared to be adequate for regional GPP estimates where total growing-season GPP across a wide area would be of greater interest than short-term management-induced changes in GPP at individual sites.

  18. Effects of Grazing Management and Buffer Strips on Metal Runoff from Pastures Fertilized with Poultry Litter.

    PubMed

    Pilon, C; Moore, P A; Pote, D H; Martin, J W; DeLaune, P B

    2017-03-01

    Metal runoff from fields fertilized with poultry litter may pose a threat to aquatic systems. Buffer strips located adjacent to fields may reduce nutrients and solids in runoff. However, scant information exists on the long-term effects of buffer strips combined with grazing management on metal runoff from pastures. The objective of this study was to assess the 12-yr impact of grazing management and buffer strips on metal runoff from pastures receiving poultry litter. The research was conducted using 15 watersheds (25 m wide and 57 m long) with five treatments: hayed (H), continuously grazed (CG), rotationally grazed (R), rotationally grazed with a buffer strip (RB), and rotationally grazed with a fenced riparian buffer strip (RBR). Poultry litter was applied annually in spring at 5.6 Mg ha. Runoff samples were collected after every rainfall event. Aluminum (Al) and iron (Fe) concentrations were strongly and positively correlated with total suspended solids, indicating soil erosion was the primary source. Soluble Al and Fe were not related to total Al and Fe. However, there was a strong positive correlation between soluble and total copper (Cu) concentrations. The majority of total Cu and zinc was in water-soluble form. The CG treatment had the highest metal concentrations and loads of all treatments. The RBR and H treatments resulted in lower concentrations of total Al, Cu, Fe, potassium, manganese, and total organic carbon in the runoff. Rotational grazing with a fenced riparian buffer and converting pastures to hayfields appear to be effective management systems for decreasing concentrations and loads of metals in surface runoff from pastures fertilized with poultry litter. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  19. Long-term Effects of Grazing Management and Buffer Strips on Soil Erosion from Pastures.

    PubMed

    Pilon, C; Moore, P A; Pote, D H; Pennington, J H; Martin, J W; Brauer, D K; Raper, R L; Dabney, S M; Lee, J

    2017-03-01

    High grazing pressure can lead to soil erosion in pastures, causing increased sediment delivery to waterways. The objectives of this research were to evaluate the impact of grazing management and buffer strips on soil erosion by assessing soil physical properties, hydrology, and sediment loads from pastures fertilized with broiler litter. Field studies were conducted for 12 yr on 15 small watersheds. Five management strategies were evaluated: hayed (H), continuously grazed (CG), rotationally grazed (R), rotationally grazed with a buffer strip (RB), and rotationally grazed with a fenced riparian buffer (RBR). Broiler litter was applied every year at a rate of 5.6 Mg ha. Bulk density and penetration resistance were highest for CG watersheds. Runoff volumes, sediment concentrations, and loads were lowest for the H and RBR treatments and highest for CG. Average runoff amounts were 48, 84, 77, 60, and 81 mm yr for the H, R, RB, RBR, and CG treatments, respectively. Annual average sediment loads were 25, 30, 58, 71, and 110 kg ha for H, RBR, R, RB, and CG, respectively. The Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation, Version 2 was reasonably effective at predicting soil loss for the R, RB, and RBR treatments, but it greatly overpredicted soil loss from the CG and H treatments. Converting a pasture to a hay field or using rotational grazing in conjunction with a fenced riparian buffer appear to be effective options for reducing soil erosion and runoff to waterways from pasture soils. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  20. Spatial variation in spoil and vegetative characteristics of pastures on reclaimed surface mined land

    SciTech Connect

    Teutsch, C.D.; Collins, M.; Ditsch, D.C.

    1999-07-01

    Kentucky has large areas of reclaimed surface mined land that could provide grazing for livestock. Research is needed to determine optimal stocking densities and to evaluate the sustainability of such grazing systems for this region. A long-term grazing study was initiated in 1997 on 151 ha of reclaimed land near Chavies, KY to determine spatial and temporal variation with stocking densities of 0, 0.28, 0.42, or 0.83 beef cow-calf units/ha. Global Positioning System and GIS technologies were used to establish pasture boundaries, locate permanent sampling markers at a density of 1 per 0.4 ha, and interpolate maps of physical, spoil, and vegetable pasture characteristics. Herbage and spoil samples were collected around the permanent markers in May of 1997. Stepwise regression was used to determine factors affecting the vegetative characteristics of the sites. Biomass density ranged from 0 to 2500 kg/ha with a mean of 570 kg/ha. Factors affecting biomass included legume and weed proportions in the sward, grazing activity, soil potassium, elevation, and potential acidity, cumulatively accounting for 32% of the variation. Ground cover ranged from 10 to 100% with an average of 74%. Soil pH, potassium, and grass in the sward accounted for 14% of the variation in ground cover. Legumes made up 0 to 61% of the sward with a mean of 13% over the pasture area. Variables affecting the amount of legume in the sward included biomass density, slope, elevation, pH, and stocking density, together accounting for 21% of the variation. Spatial variation in the physical, spoil, and vegetative characteristics of the pastures was large. Overall, regression accounted for a limited amount of the variation in the vegetative characteristics of the site indicating that other important variables exist.

  1. Controlling herbaceous competition in pasture planted with loblolly pine seedlings. Forest Service research note

    SciTech Connect

    Haywood, J.D.

    1995-09-01

    Three treatments designed to control herbaceous vegetation competing with loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) seedlings planted in grazed and ungrazed pasture were tested. Effects of the treatments on seedling survival and growth during the first 3 years after planting were determined. The treatments were directed application of herbicides (glyphosate in the first 2 years and hexazinone in the third year), rotary mowing, and mulching with pine straw around individual pine seedlings.

  2. Impact of an invasive weed, Parthenium hysterophorus, on a pasture community in south east Queensland, Australia.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thi; Bajwa, Ali Ahsan; Belgeri, Amalia; Navie, Sheldon; O'Donnell, Chris; Adkins, Steve

    2017-09-30

    Parthenium weed is a highly invasive alien species in more than 40 countries around the world. Along with severe negative effects on human and animal health and crop production, it also causes harm to ecosystem functioning by reducing the native plant species biodiversity. However, its impacts on native plant species, especially in pasture communities, are less known. Given parthenium weed causes substantial losses to Australian pastures' productivity, it is crucial to estimate its impact on pasture communities. This study evaluates the impact of parthenium weed upon species diversity in a pasture community at Kilcoy, south east Queensland, Australia. Sub-sites containing three levels of parthenium weed density (i.e. high, low and zero) were chosen to quantify the above- and below-ground plant community structure. Species richness, diversity and evenness were all found to be significantly reduced as the density of parthenium weed increased; an effect was evident even when parthenium weed was present at relatively low densities (i.e. two plants m(-2)). This trend was observed in the summer season as well as in winter season when this annual weed was absent from the above-ground plant community. This demonstrates the strong impact that parthenium weed has upon the community composition and functioning throughout the year. It also shows the long-term impact of parthenium weed on the soil seed bank where it had displaced several native species. So, management options used for parthenium weed should also consider the reduction of parthenium weed seed bank along with controlling its above-ground populations.

  3. Survey of Ticks Collected from Tennessee Cattle and Their Pastures for Anaplasma and Ehrlichia Species.

    PubMed

    Pompo, K; Mays, S; Wesselman, C; Paulsen, D J; Fryxell, R T Trout

    2016-02-01

    Anaplasma marginale is the causative agent for bovine anaplasmosis (BA) and Ehrlichia ruminantium is the causative agent for heartwater, 2 devastating diseases of cattle. BA is common in the United States and frequently reported in western Tennessee cattle; however, cases of heartwater are not yet established in the continental United States. Because both pathogens are transmitted via the bites of infected ticks, the objective of this study was to survey cattle and pastures for ticks and for each pathogen. University of Tennessee AgResearch has 7 research and education centers (REC) located throughout the state at which they manage cattle. Ticks were collected from selected cattle (every fourth to sixth animal) and pastures (via dragging) associated with the herd from each REC during the summer of 2013. A total of 512 ticks were collected from cattle (n = 386) and pastures (n = 126) and were PCR-screened for Anaplasma and Ehrlichia using genus-specific primers. Collections consisted of 398 (77.7%) Amblyomma americanum, 84 (16.4%) Amblyomma maculatum, and 30 (5.9%) Dermacentor variabilis. Ticks were not recovered from pastures or cattle east of the Tennessee Plateau. The North American vectors for An. marginale and E. ruminantium were identified (D. variabilis and A. maculatum, respectively), but neither pathogen was recovered. A large proportion of ticks were collected from cattle and, of these, a majority were attached to their host (compared to questing on their host or engorged on the host). Four A. americanum were positive for Ehrlichia spp. (Ehrlichia ewingii, Ehrlichia chaffeensis, and Panola Mountain Ehrlichia), all in western Tennessee. With the identification of a few Ehrlichia infections in cattle-associated ticks and current A. marginale rates in Tennessee beef cattle nearing 11%, additional research is needed to establish baseline tick, Anaplasma, and Ehrlichia data for future management studies.

  4. Phosphorus fertilizer and grazing management effects on phosphorus in runoff from dairy pastures.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, Warwick J; Nicholls, Paul J; Milham, Paul J; Havilah, Euie J; Lawrie, Roy A

    2008-01-01

    Fertilizer phosphorus (P) and grazing-related factors can influence runoff P concentrations from grazed pastures. To investigate these effects, we monitored the concentrations of P in surface runoff from grazed dairy pasture plots (50 x 25 m) treated with four fertilizer P rates (0, 20, 40, and 80 kg ha(-1) yr(-1)) for 3.5 yr at Camden, New South Wales. Total P concentrations in runoff were high (0.86-11.13 mg L(-1)) even from the control plot (average 1.94 mg L(-1)). Phosphorus fertilizer significantly (P < 0.001) increased runoff P concentrations (average runoff P concentrations from the P(20), P(40), and P(80) treatments were 2.78, 3.32, and 5.57 mg L(-1), respectively). However, the magnitude of the effect of P fertilizer varied between runoff events (P < 0.01). Further analysis revealed the combined effects on runoff P concentration of P rate, P rate x number of applications (P < 0.001), P rate x time since fertilizer (P < 0.001), dung P (P < 0.001), time since grazing (P < 0.05), and pasture biomass (P < 0.001). A conceptual model of the sources of P in runoff comprising three components is proposed to explain the mobilization of P in runoff and to identify strategies to reduce runoff P concentrations. Our data suggest that the principal strategy for minimizing runoff P concentrations from grazed dairy pastures should be the maintenance of soil P at or near the agronomic optimum by the use of appropriate rates of P fertilizer.

  5. Blood plasma magnesium, potassium, glucose, and immunoreactive insulin changes in cows moved abruptly from barn feeding to early spring pasture

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.K.; Madsen, F.C.; Lentz, D.E.; Wong, W.O.; Ramsey, N.; Tysinger, C.E.; Hansard, S.L.

    1980-07-01

    Cations and immunoreactive insulin in plasma were measured in 35 lactating cows moved abruptly to early spring pasture. After change of cows from grass-clover hay to fescue-bluegrass pasture containing 22 to 31 g potassium/kg dry matter, immunoreactive insulin of 5 Holstein cows increased 30% in 5 days and averaged 45% above prepasture concentrations for 40 days. Magnesium averaged 44% below prepasture content of plasma during this period and was correlated negatively with potassium -.17 and immunoreactive insulin -.37. Thirty Hereford cows were changed from corn silage and grass-clover hay to wheat-rye pasture containing 3.06% potassium in the dry matter. Each day on pasture, 10 cows each were fed 2.3 kg cornmeal, 10 were given 30 g magnesium oxide by capsule, and 10 were given no supplement. After unsupplemented cows were moved to pasture, immunoreactive insulin rose 51% in 8 days and plasma magnesium fell 24%. Both supplements reduced immunoreactive insulin, but magnesium was maintained higher by magnesium oxide than by cornmeal. Injection of two Holstein cows with insulin (2 IU/kg body weight) reduced plasma concentrations of both potassium and mgnesium 20% below that of two cows injected with only physiological saline. Whether elevated plasma insulin may accelerate development of hypomagnesemia in cattle on spring pasture with relatively high potassium content has not been established.

  6. Potential Pasture Nitrogen Concentrations and Uptake from Autumn or Spring Applied Cow Urine and DCD under Field Conditions.

    PubMed

    Moir, Jim; Cameron, Keith; Di, Hong

    2016-06-13

    Nitrogen (N) cycling and losses in grazed grassland are strongly driven by urine N deposition by grazing ruminants. The objective of this study was to quantify pasture N concentrations, yield and N uptake following autumn and spring deposition of cow urine and the effects of fine particle suspension (FPS) dicyandiamide (DCD). A field plot study was conducted on the Lincoln University dairy farm, Canterbury, New Zealand from May 2003 to May 2005. FPS DCD was applied to grazed pasture plots at 10 kg·ha(-1) in autumn and spring in addition to applied cow urine at a N loading rate of 1000 kg·N·ha(-1), with non-urine control plots. Pasture N ranged between 1.9 and 4.8% with higher concentrations from urine. Results indicated that urine consistently increased N concentrations for around 220 days post deposition (mid December/early summer) at which point concentrations dropped to background levels. In urine patches, pasture yield and annual N uptake were dramatically increased on average by 51% for autumn and 28% for spring applied urine, in both years, when DCD was applied. This field experiment provides strong evidence that annual pasture N uptake is more strongly influenced by high urine N deposition than pasture N concentrations. FPS DCD has the potential to result in very high N uptake in urine patches, even when they are autumn deposited.

  7. A survey of the phosphorus content of pastures and the serum inorganic phosphorus content of dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Betteridge, K

    1986-03-01

    Serum inorganic phosphorus (Pi) concentration of 20 cows in each of ten factory supply dairy herds was assessed at monthly or two-monthly intervals during the 198243 lactation. Pasture on offer was ranked low, medium or high and the phosphorus (P) content assessed monthly on all farms from the two paddocks to be grazed next in the rotation. The mean serum Pi concentration was high (1.98 mmol/l) prior to calving but fell to low levels at peak lactation (1.28 mmol/l) and again during the drought (1.28-1.38 mmol/l) in January, February and March. Individual cows had Pi levels as low as 0.32 mmol/l. Herds on Northern Yellow-brown Earths had higher Pi levels than herds predominantly on Brown Granular Loams (P<0.01). There were differences between cows within herds (P<0.01) and Pi levels declined with cow age (P<0.01). Pasture P content was above minimum requirements for lactating cows (0.33% DM; with ad lib. feeding) from July through October but below requirements in most pastures from December through April, when pasture availability also limited production. The P content in pasture was unrelated to either its grass or legume content, but was higher in pastures given a medium or high DM ranking (P<0.05). The possibility of increasing dairy production with P supplementation in spring is discussed.

  8. Blood plasma magnesium, potassium, glucose, and immunoreactive insulin changes in cows moved abruptly from barn feeding to early spring pasture.

    PubMed

    Miller, J K; Madsen, F C; Lentz, D E; Wong, W O; Ramsey, N; Tysinger, C E; Hansard, S L

    1980-07-01

    Cations and immunoreactive insulin in plasma were measured in 35 lactating cows moved abruptly to early spring pasture. After change of cows from grass-clover hay to fescue-bluegrass pasture containing 22 to 31 g potassium/kg dry matter, immunoreactive insulin of 5 Holstein cows increased 30% in 5 days and averaged 45% above prepasture concentrations for 40 days. Magnesium averaged 44% below prepasture content of plasma during this period and was correlated negatively with potassium -.17 and immunoreactive insulin -.37. Thirty Herford cows were changed from corn silage and grass-clover hay to wheat-rye pasture containing 3.06% potassium in the dry matter. Each day on pasture, 10 cows each were fed 2.3 kg cornmeal, 10 were given 30 g magnesium oxide by capsule, and 10 were given no supplement. After unsupplemented cows were moved to pasture, immunoreactive insulin rose 51% in 8 days and plasma magnesium fell 24%. Both supplements reduced immunoreactive insulin, but magnesium was maintained higher by magnesium oxide than by cornmeal. Injection of two Holstein cows with insulin (2 IU/kg body weight) reduced plasma concentrations of both potassium and magnesium 20% below that of two cows injected with only physiological saline. Whether elevated plasma insulin may accelerate development of hypomagnesemia in cattle on spring pasture with relatively high potassium content has not been established.

  9. Potential Pasture Nitrogen Concentrations and Uptake from Autumn or Spring Applied Cow Urine and DCD under Field Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Moir, Jim; Cameron, Keith; Di, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) cycling and losses in grazed grassland are strongly driven by urine N deposition by grazing ruminants. The objective of this study was to quantify pasture N concentrations, yield and N uptake following autumn and spring deposition of cow urine and the effects of fine particle suspension (FPS) dicyandiamide (DCD). A field plot study was conducted on the Lincoln University dairy farm, Canterbury, New Zealand from May 2003 to May 2005. FPS DCD was applied to grazed pasture plots at 10 kg·ha−1 in autumn and spring in addition to applied cow urine at a N loading rate of 1000 kg·N·ha−1, with non-urine control plots. Pasture N ranged between 1.9 and 4.8% with higher concentrations from urine. Results indicated that urine consistently increased N concentrations for around 220 days post deposition (mid December/early summer) at which point concentrations dropped to background levels. In urine patches, pasture yield and annual N uptake were dramatically increased on average by 51% for autumn and 28% for spring applied urine, in both years, when DCD was applied. This field experiment provides strong evidence that annual pasture N uptake is more strongly influenced by high urine N deposition than pasture N concentrations. FPS DCD has the potential to result in very high N uptake in urine patches, even when they are autumn deposited. PMID:27304974

  10. A Global Assessment of Long-Term Greening and Browning Trends in Pasture Lands Using the GIMMS LAI3g Dataset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Benjamin I.; Pau, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    Pasture ecosystems may be particularly vulnerable to land degradation due to the high risk of human disturbance (e.g., overgrazing, burning, etc.), especially when compared with natural ecosystems (non-pasture, non-cultivated) where direct human impacts are minimal. Using maximum annual leaf area index (LAImax) as a proxy for standing biomass and peak annual aboveground productivity, we analyze greening and browning trends in pasture areas from 1982-2008. Inter-annual variability in pasture productivity is strongly controlled by precipitation (positive correlation) and, to a lesser extent, temperature (negative correlation). Linear temporal trends are significant in 23% of pasture cells, with the vast majority of these areas showing positive LAImax trends. Spatially extensive productivity declines are only found in a few regions, most notably central Asia, southwest North America, and southeast Australia. Statistically removing the influence of precipitation reduces LAImax trends by only 13%, suggesting that precipitation trends are only a minor contributor to long-term greening and browning of pasture lands. No significant global relationship was found between LAImax and pasture intensity, although the magnitude of trends did vary between cells classified as natural versus pasture. In the tropics and Southern Hemisphere, the median rate of greening in pasture cells is significantly higher than for cells dominated by natural vegetation. In the Northern Hemisphere extra-tropics, conversely, greening of natural areas is 2-4 times the magnitude of greening in pasture areas. This analysis presents one of the first global assessments of greening and browning trends in global pasture lands, including a comparison with vegetation trends in regions dominated by natural ecosystems. Our results suggest that degradation of pasture lands is not a globally widespread phenomenon and, consistent with much of the terrestrial biosphere, there have been widespread increases in

  11. Pasture characteristics in three different ecotypes at Khovd Aimag, Western Mongolia.

    PubMed

    Beher, Jutta

    2014-01-01

    The transition of nomadic pastoralism to more sessile forms of rangeland utilization and increased stocking rates can result in the degradation of pasture. After political changes in the 1990s in Mongolia, population growth and missing alternative livelihoods intensified the grazing pressure on pastures, and further decreased the condition of the fragile arid ecosystems. To learn more about the productivity and quality of pasture land in Khovd Aimag in the western region of Mongolia, standing biomass was measured in the alpine region, mountain steppe and semi-desert. Plant samples were analyzed for nitrogen and fiber contents by wet chemistry and Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS). Results show clear differences in distribution of biomass with reduced biomass in the vicinity of temporary settlements. From July to early September plant nitrogen contents decreased in the alpine region, remained unchanged in the mountain steppe and increased in the semi-desert. Nitrogen concentrations were elevated in vegetation close to temporary settlements. For fiber contents (ADF) no clear patterns were found. Neither biomass/m(2) nor vegetation cover were appropriate indicators for food quality.

  12. Horn fly larval survival in cattle dung is reduced by endophyte infection of tall fescue pasture.

    PubMed

    Parra, Leonardo; Mutis, Ana; Chacón, Manuel; Lizama, Marcelo; Rojas, Claudio; Catrileo, Adrián; Rubilar, Olga; Tortella, Gonzalo; Birkett, Michael A; Quiroz, Andrés

    2016-07-01

    The potential for using endophytic microorganisms in pest control has increased during the last 40 years. In this study, we investigated the impact of endophyte (Neotyphodium coenophialum) infection of cattle pasture upon the survival of the horn fly, Haematobia irritans, a major agricultural pest affecting livestock in many parts of the world. In laboratory assays, where cattle dung collected from endophyte-infected (E+) tall fescue cultivar K-31 was used as the oviposition substrate, larval development was significantly reduced compared with development on cattle dung from steers that grazed uninfected (E-) tall fescue. Furthermore, studies with cattle dung supplemented with the alkaloid fraction extracted from the endophytic fungi revealed significant larval mortality, and HPLC analysis identified two alkaloids, peramine and lolitrem B. The development of larvae was shown to be significantly reduced in field-collected cattle dung. These results suggest that part of the toxicity of alkaloids contained in endophytes is transferred to faecal matter, causing an increase in mortality of H. irritans. These data suggest that endophyte infection of cattle pasture, i.e. modified pasture management, can significantly affect horn fly development. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  13. Spatial occupancy patterns and activity of arid rangeland cattle grazing small riparian pastures.

    PubMed

    Larson, Larry; Johnson, Douglas E; Wilson, Marie; Wilson, Kerry; Louhaichi, Mounir; Williams, John

    2017-03-01

    The spatial occupancy patterns and activity of cattle grazing three riparian pastures was investigated in northeastern Oregon using Global Positioning System (GPS) collars logging at 1-sec intervals. Cattle consistently selected plant communities as grazing areas that had forage in sufficient volume to meet their requirements and favored communities as resting areas that were dry and open. Cattle were stationary for more than 50% of the time in each pasture and consistently rested between dark and 04:00 hours. Interaction with stream channels was found to be 1-2% of total occupancy time and occurred on less than 10% of channel length. Cattle were indifferent or avoided channel areas relative to their area and, when in this zone, they spent most of their time moving not resting. Cattle did not prefer the stream bank zone and spent only 2% of their time in that zone. When occupied, the stream bank zone was used as a travel corridor to gain access to water or cross the channel to access other pasture areas. These results are in contrast with the general belief that cattle are a primary occupant of the stream bank/channel area; additional research is needed to define factors influencing cattle occupancy. © 2016 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  14. Energy balance model applied to pasture experimental areas in São Paulo State, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayma-Silva, Gustavo; de Castro Teixeira, Antonio Heriberto; de Castro Victoria, Daniel; Furlan Nogueira, Sandra; Freitas Leivas, Janice; Coaguila, Daniel N.; Rodrigues Herling, Valdo

    2016-10-01

    The Simple Algorithm for Evapotranspiration Retrieving (SAFER) was used to estimate biophysical parameters and the energy balance components in two different pasture experimental areas, in the São Paulo state, Brazil. The experimental pastures consist in six rotational (RGS) and three continuous grazing systems (CGS) paddocks. Landsat-8 images from 2013 and 2015 dry and rainy seasons were used, as these presented similar hydrological cycle, with 1,600 mm and 1,613 mm of annual precipitation, resulting in 19 cloud-free images. Bands 1 to 7 and thermal bands 10 and 11 were used with weather data from a station located near the experimental area. NDVI, biomass, evapotranspiration and latent heat flux (λE) temporal values statistically differ CGS from RGS areas. Grazing systems influences the energy partition and these results indicate that RGS benefits biomass production, evapotranspiration and the microclimate, due higher LE values. SAFER is a feasible tool to estimate biophysical parameters and energy balance components in pasture and has potential to discriminate continuous and rotation grazing systems in a temporal analysis.

  15. Nutritional management to optimize fertility of dairy cows in pasture-based systems.

    PubMed

    Butler, S T

    2014-05-01

    The efficiency of milk production in pasture-based systems is heavily influenced by calving pattern, necessitating excellent reproductive performance in a short-breeding season. Where grazed pasture is the major component of the diet, cows are underfed relative to their intake potential. The cow responds by reducing milk output, but fertility is generally better than high intake confinement systems that achieve greater milk production per cow. A number of studies have identified body condition score (BCS) measurements that are related to likelihood of both submission and conception. Blood metabolites and metabolic hormones linked to fertility outcomes are now well characterized. In general, fertility variables have favourable associations with circulating concentrations of glucose, insulin and IGF-1 and unfavourable associations with non-esterified fatty acids, β-hydroxybutyrate and endogenous growth hormone. Nutritional strategies to impact these metabolic indicators have been utilized, but effects on herd fertility are inconsistent. Simply supplementing cows with additional energy in the form of standard concentrates does not appear to have a pronounced effect on fertility. Energy from additional concentrates fed during lactation is preferentially partitioned towards extra milk production rather than BCS repletion. The higher the genetic merit for milk production, the greater the partitioning of additional nutrients to the mammary gland. This review outlines the unique nutritional challenges of pasture-based systems, the role of specific metabolic hormones and metabolites in regulating reproductive function, and nutritional strategies to improve herd fertility.

  16. Eddy covariance methane flux measurements over a grazed pasture: effect of cows as moving point sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felber, R.; Münger, A.; Neftel, A.; Ammann, C.

    2015-06-01

    Methane (CH4) from ruminants contributes one-third of global agricultural greenhouse gas emissions. Eddy covariance (EC) technique has been extensively used at various flux sites to investigate carbon dioxide exchange of ecosystems. Since the development of fast CH4 analyzers, the instrumentation at many flux sites has been amended for these gases. However, the application of EC over pastures is challenging due to the spatially and temporally uneven distribution of CH4 point sources induced by the grazing animals. We applied EC measurements during one grazing season over a pasture with 20 dairy cows (mean milk yield: 22.7 kg d-1) managed in a rotational grazing system. Individual cow positions were recorded by GPS trackers to attribute fluxes to animal emissions using a footprint model. Methane fluxes with cows in the footprint were up to 2 orders of magnitude higher than ecosystem fluxes without cows. Mean cow emissions of 423 ± 24 g CH4 head-1 d-1 (best estimate from this study) correspond well to animal respiration chamber measurements reported in the literature. However, a systematic effect of the distance between source and EC tower on cow emissions was found, which is attributed to the analytical footprint model used. We show that the EC method allows one to determine CH4 emissions of cows on a pasture if the data evaluation is adjusted for this purpose and if some cow distribution information is available.

  17. Pasture Characteristics in Three Different Ecotypes at Khovd Aimag, Western Mongolia

    PubMed Central

    Beher, Jutta

    2014-01-01

    The transition of nomadic pastoralism to more sessile forms of rangeland utilization and increased stocking rates can result in the degradation of pasture. After political changes in the 1990s in Mongolia, population growth and missing alternative livelihoods intensified the grazing pressure on pastures, and further decreased the condition of the fragile arid ecosystems. To learn more about the productivity and quality of pasture land in Khovd Aimag in the western region of Mongolia, standing biomass was measured in the alpine region, mountain steppe and semi-desert. Plant samples were analyzed for nitrogen and fiber contents by wet chemistry and Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS). Results show clear differences in distribution of biomass with reduced biomass in the vicinity of temporary settlements. From July to early September plant nitrogen contents decreased in the alpine region, remained unchanged in the mountain steppe and increased in the semi-desert. Nitrogen concentrations were elevated in vegetation close to temporary settlements. For fiber contents (ADF) no clear patterns were found. Neither biomass/m2 nor vegetation cover were appropriate indicators for food quality. PMID:25058023

  18. Drought characteristics and prediction during pasture growing season in Xilingol grassland, northern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Qiyun; Zhang, Jiquan; Sun, Caiyun; Zhang, Feng; Wu, Rina; Wu, Lan

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, spatiotemporal variability of drought in Xilingol grassland during pasture growing season (from April to September) was investigated, using 52 years (1961-2012) of precipitation data recorded at 14 rain gauge stations in the study area. The Standardized Precipitation Index was used to compute the severity of drought. The Mann-Kendall test, the linear trend, and the sequential Mann-Kendall test were applied to standardized precipitation index (SPI) time series. The results indicate that drought has become increasingly serious on the region scale during pasture growing season, and the rate of SPI decreases ranged from -0.112 to -0.013 per decade. As for the MK test, most of the stations, the Z value range is from -1.081 to -0.005 and Kendall's τ varies from -0.104 to -0.024. Meanwhile, drought is increased obviously from the northwest to the southeast region. Meanwhile, the occurrence probability of each severity class, times for reaching different drought class from any drought severity state, and residence times in each drought class have been obtained with Markov chain. Furthermore, the drought severities during pasture growing season in 2013-2016 are predicted depending on the weighted Markov chain. The results may provide a scientific basis for preventing and mitigating drought disaster.

  19. Forest-to-pasture conversion increases the diversity of the phylum Verrucomicrobia in Amazon rainforest soils

    PubMed Central

    Ranjan, Kshitij; Paula, Fabiana S.; Mueller, Rebecca C.; Jesus, Ederson da C.; Cenciani, Karina; Bohannan, Brendan J. M.; Nüsslein, Klaus; Rodrigues, Jorge L. M.

    2015-01-01

    The Amazon rainforest is well known for its rich plant and animal diversity, but its bacterial diversity is virtually unexplored. Due to ongoing and widespread deforestation followed by conversion to agriculture, there is an urgent need to quantify the soil biological diversity within this tropical ecosystem. Given the abundance of the phylum Verrucomicrobia in soils, we targeted this group to examine its response to forest-to-pasture conversion. Both taxonomic and phylogenetic diversities were higher for pasture in comparison to primary and secondary forests. The community composition of Verrucomicrobia in pasture soils was significantly different from those of forests, with a 11.6% increase in the number of sequences belonging to subphylum 3 and a proportional decrease in sequences belonging to the class Spartobacteria. Based on 99% operational taxonomic unit identity, 40% of the sequences have not been detected in previous studies, underscoring the limited knowledge regarding the diversity of microorganisms in tropical ecosystems. The abundance of Verrucomicrobia, measured with quantitative PCR, was strongly correlated with soil C content (r = 0.80, P = 0.0016), indicating their importance in metabolizing plant-derived carbon compounds in soils. PMID:26284056

  20. Chronic copper poisoning in sheep grazing pastures fertilized with swine manure

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, L.A.; McGavin, H.D. )

    1991-01-01

    Several pregnant ewes developed an acute hemolytic crisis and died. Liver and kidney copper concentrations were high, confirming chronic copper poisoning as the cause of death. Feed and water samples that the affected ewes had been consuming did not contain excess copper. Because swine manure slurry had been applied to the pasture where the sheep had grazed, a copper analysis was conducted on soil and forage samples from this field. High copper concentrations were detected in the soil and forage samples from the slurry pasture. Most sheep producers are aware of the catastrophic consequences that result when feeds containing copper and insufficient amounts of molybdenum are fed to sheep. However, producers and veterinarians often are unaware of some of the subtle sources of copper. Most of the copper that is added to swine and poultry feeds as growth promotants passes through the gastrointestinal tract unabsorbed and remains in the waste material. Pastures that have copper-containing waste material, but no molybdenum applied, can produce the same fatal results as giving sheep feed supplemented with copper but containing no molybdenum.

  1. Deterioration of soil quality and pasture production linked to overgrazing in rangelands of Extremadura (SW Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulido-Fernández, Manuel; Schnabel, Susanne; Francisco Lavado Contador, Joaquín; Lozano-Parra, Javier; González López, Francisco

    2015-04-01

    Soil degradation phenomena include water erosion and physical and biological processes have been already reported in rangelands of southwestern Spain. The increasing of the number of domestic animals since 1986 has been highlighted as one of the key causes. The main goal of this work is to analyze the effects of the excessive number of animals on soil quality and pasture production in privately-owned farms dedicated to extensive ranching. Soil properties, soil surface cover, erosion features, pasture production and composition, rainfall and land management variables such as livestock density were analyzed during a period of 3 years (2008-2011). The study was carried out in 22 fenced units belonging to 10 farms distributed throughout the Spanish region of Extremadura. The occurrence of bare soil patches, and consequently water erosion processes, as well as an increasing in the mean values of bulk density from 5 to 10 cm in depth were observed in the fenced units with animal stocking rates exceeding 1 AU ha-1 (AU: animal cattle equivalent unit). Some indications which may serve to confirm the negative effect of increased bulk density on pasture production and quality were also found.

  2. Nutrient sufficiency in beef cows grazing on a dwarf bamboo-dominated forestland pasture in Japan.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Miwa; Yayota, Masato; Ohtani, Shigeru

    2015-07-01

    The nutritional status of cows grazing on a 120-ha public alpine forestland pasture dominated by the dwarf bamboo Sasa senanensis located in central Japan was evaluated over the course of 2 years. Data were collected during grazing seasons in three periods: early (June), mid- (August) and late (late September-early October) periods. During these periods, the number of experimental Japanese Black cows varied between three and six. With the exception of the dry matter (DM) intake in 2005 and the crude protein (CP) digestibility in 2006, the DM and CP intake and digestibility were lower in the mid- and late periods than in the early period for both years (P < 0.05). Metabolizable energy intake was slightly insufficient for the requirement of the cows in the late period of 2005; in the mid- and late periods of 2006, the metabolizable energy intake was 0.4 to 0.5 times the requirement. These results suggest that the energy intake of cows grazing on forestland pasture dominated by S. senanensis would not satisfy their requirements starting in the mid-period (August) grazing, even though the pasture had abundant herbage resources during these periods.

  3. Fluoride accumulation in pasture forages and soils following long-term applications of phosphorus fertilisers.

    PubMed

    Loganathan, P; Hedley, M J; Wallace, G C; Roberts, A H

    2001-01-01

    Ingestion of soils with high fluoride (F) concentration may cause chronic fluorosis in grazing animals. Analysis of New Zealand pasture soils with long-term phosphorus (P) fertilisation histories showed that total surface soil (0-75 mm depth) F concentration increased up to 217-454 mg kg-1 with P fertiliser application. One-third to two-thirds of F applied in fertilisers resides in the top 75 mm soil depth. Pasture forage accumulation of F was low, and therefore, F intake by grazing animals through pasture consumption is expected to be much lower than F intake by soil ingestion. Ten annual applications of single superphosphate (30 and 60 kg P ha-1 year-1) to a Pallic Soil (Aeric Fragiaqualf) significantly increased total F and labile F (0.01 M CaCl2 extract) concentrations to 200 and 120 mm depths, respectively, of the 300 mm depth investigated. The mobility of F in the soil profile was similar to two other elements, P and cadmium derived from the fertiliser.

  4. Forest-to-pasture conversion increases the diversity of the phylum Verrucomicrobia in Amazon rainforest soils.

    PubMed

    Ranjan, Kshitij; Paula, Fabiana S; Mueller, Rebecca C; Jesus, Ederson da C; Cenciani, Karina; Bohannan, Brendan J M; Nüsslein, Klaus; Rodrigues, Jorge L M

    2015-01-01

    The Amazon rainforest is well known for its rich plant and animal diversity, but its bacterial diversity is virtually unexplored. Due to ongoing and widespread deforestation followed by conversion to agriculture, there is an urgent need to quantify the soil biological diversity within this tropical ecosystem. Given the abundance of the phylum Verrucomicrobia in soils, we targeted this group to examine its response to forest-to-pasture conversion. Both taxonomic and phylogenetic diversities were higher for pasture in comparison to primary and secondary forests. The community composition of Verrucomicrobia in pasture soils was significantly different from those of forests, with a 11.6% increase in the number of sequences belonging to subphylum 3 and a proportional decrease in sequences belonging to the class Spartobacteria. Based on 99% operational taxonomic unit identity, 40% of the sequences have not been detected in previous studies, underscoring the limited knowledge regarding the diversity of microorganisms in tropical ecosystems. The abundance of Verrucomicrobia, measured with quantitative PCR, was strongly correlated with soil C content (r = 0.80, P = 0.0016), indicating their importance in metabolizing plant-derived carbon compounds in soils.

  5. Ingestive behavior of supplemented Nellore heifers grazing palisadegrass pastures managed with different sward heights.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Bruno Ramalho; Azenha, Mariana Vieira; Casagrande, Daniel Rume; Costa, Diogo Fleury Azevedo; Ruggieri, Ana Cláudia; Berchielli, Telma Teresinha; Reis, Ricardo Andrade

    2017-04-01

    Three sward heights (15, 25 and 35 cm) and three supplement types (energy, energy-protein, and a mineral mix supplement) were evaluated in a 3 × 3 factorial arrangement distributed in a completely randomized design to study changes in forage search patterns in Nellore heifers in a continuous grazing system. Pasture data were collected using two replicates (paddocks) per treatment over four periods during the rainy season. The behavior assessments were made in the first and fourth grazing seasons. It was hypothesized that supplements and pasture management would modify ingestive behavior, considering that animals would require less time grazing if they had energy requirements met through higher digestibility of better managed paddocks, or use of supplements high in energy. Total and green forage masses along with green : dead material ratio were greater in treatments managed with higher sward heights. Sward managed with 35 cm height resulted in lower leaf : stem ratio compared with 15 cm sward height treatments. The animals on the 15 cm pastures spent more time grazing overall and during each meal, but there were no differences observed in meal numbers in comparison to 35 cm treatments. Heifers fed protein and/or energy supplements spent less time grazing in the early afternoon, but overall grazing time was the same for all animals.

  6. Humic fractions of forest, pasture and maize crop soils resulting from microbial activity

    PubMed Central

    Tavares, Rose Luiza Moraes; Nahas, Ely

    2014-01-01

    Humic substances result from the degradation of biopolymers of organic residues in the soil due to microbial activity. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of three different ecosystems: forest, pasture and maize crop on the formation of soil humic substances relating to their biological and chemical attributes. Microbial biomass carbon (MBC), microbial respiratory activity, nitrification potential, total organic carbon, soluble carbon, humic and fulvic acid fractions and the rate and degree of humification were determined. Organic carbon and soluble carbon contents decreased in the order: forest > pasture > maize; humic and fulvic acids decreased in the order forest > pasture=maize. The MBC and respiratory activity were not influenced by the ecosystems; however, the nitrification potential was higher in the forest than in other soils. The rate and degree of humification were higher in maize soil indicating greater humification of organic matter in this system. All attributes studied decreased significantly with increasing soil depth, with the exception of the rate and degree of humification. Significant and positive correlations were found between humic and fulvic acids contents with MBC, microbial respiration and nitrification potential, suggesting the microbial influence on the differential formation of humic substances of the different ecosystems. PMID:25477932

  7. Humic fractions of forest, pasture and maize crop soils resulting from microbial activity.

    PubMed

    Tavares, Rose Luiza Moraes; Nahas, Ely

    2014-01-01

    Humic substances result from the degradation of biopolymers of organic residues in the soil due to microbial activity. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of three different ecosystems: forest, pasture and maize crop on the formation of soil humic substances relating to their biological and chemical attributes. Microbial biomass carbon (MBC), microbial respiratory activity, nitrification potential, total organic carbon, soluble carbon, humic and fulvic acid fractions and the rate and degree of humification were determined. Organic carbon and soluble carbon contents decreased in the order: forest > pasture > maize; humic and fulvic acids decreased in the order forest > pasture = maize. The MBC and respiratory activity were not influenced by the ecosystems; however, the nitrification potential was higher in the forest than in other soils. The rate and degree of humification were higher in maize soil indicating greater humification of organic matter in this system. All attributes studied decreased significantly with increasing soil depth, with the exception of the rate and degree of humification. Significant and positive correlations were found between humic and fulvic acids contents with MBC, microbial respiration and nitrification potential, suggesting the microbial influence on the differential formation of humic substances of the different ecosystems.

  8. Immunodetection of aquaporin 5 in sheep salivary glands related to pasture vegetative cycle.

    PubMed

    Scocco, Paola; Aralla, Marina; Catorci, Andrea; Belardinelli, Carlo; Arrighi, Silvana

    2011-01-01

    Mammalian aquaporins (AQPs) are a family of at least 13 integral membrane proteins expressed in various epithelia, where they function as channels to permeate water and small solutes. AQP5 is widely expressed in the exocrine gland where it is likely involved in providing an appropriate amount of fluid to be secreted with granular contents. As regards AQP5 expression in the salivary glands, literature is lacking concerning domestic animal species. This study was chiefly aimed at immunohistochemically investigating the presence and localization of AQP5 in sheep mandibular and parotid glands. In addition, AQP5 immunoreactivity was comparatively evaluated in animals fed with forage containing different amounts of water related to the pasture vegetative cycle, in order to shed light on the possible response of the gland to environmental modifications. Moderate AQP5-immunoreactivity was shown at the level of the lateral surface of mandibular serous demilune cells, not affected by the pasture vegetative cycle or water content. On the contrary, the parotid gland arcinar cells showed AQP5-immunoreactivity at the level of apical and lateral plasma membrane, which was slight to very strong, according to the pasture vegetative development and interannual climatic variations. AQP5 expression is likely due to its involvement in providing appropriate saliva fluidity. Indeed, the lowest AQP5 immunoreactivity was noticed when food water content increased.

  9. Improving the use of modelling for projections of climate change impacts on crops and pastures.

    PubMed

    Soussana, Jean-François; Graux, Anne-Isabelle; Tubiello, Francesco N

    2010-05-01

    Projections of climate change impacts on global food supply are largely based on crop and pasture modelling. The consistency of these models with experimental data and their ability to simulate the effects of elevated CO(2) and of increased climate variability has been debated. The effects of high temperatures, of increased climate variability and of several limiting factors which interact with elevated CO(2) such as soil nutrients, pests and weeds are neither fully understood nor well implemented in leading models. Targeted model developments will be required based on experimental data concerning: (i) the role of extreme climatic events, (ii) the interactions between abiotic factors and elevated CO(2), (iii) the genetic variability in plant CO(2) and temperature responses, (iv) the interactions with biotic factors, and (v) the effects on harvest quality. To help make better use of the available knowledge, it is envisioned that future crop and pasture modelling studies will need to use a risk assessment approach by combining an ensemble of greenhouse gas emission (or stabilization) scenarios, of regional climate models and of crop and pasture models, as well as an ensemble of adaptation options concerning both management practices and species/varieties.

  10. Validating a model that predicts daily growth and feed quality of New Zealand dairy pastures.

    PubMed

    Woodward, S J

    2001-09-01

    The Pasture Quality (PQ) model is a simple, mechanistic, dynamical system model that was designed to capture the essential biological processes in grazed grass-clover pasture, and to be optimised to derive improved grazing strategies for New Zealand dairy farms. While the individual processes represented in the model (photosynthesis, tissue growth, flowering, leaf death, decomposition, worms) were based on experimental data, this did not guarantee that the assembled model would accurately predict the behaviour of the system as a whole (i.e., pasture growth and quality). Validation of the whole model was thus a priority, since any strategy derived from the model could impact a farm business in the order of thousands of dollars per annum if adopted. This paper describes the process of defining performance criteria for the model, obtaining suitable data to test the model, and carrying out the validation analysis. The validation process highlighted a number of weaknesses in the model, which will lead to the model being improved. As a result, the model's utility will be enhanced. Furthermore, validation was found to have an unexpected additional benefit, in that despite the model's poor initial performance, support was generated for the model among field scientists involved in the wider project.

  11. Sorption, Leaching, and Surface Runoff of Beef Cattle Veterinary Pharmaceuticals under Simulated Irrigated Pasture Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Popova, Inna E.; Bair, Daniel A.; Tate, Kenneth W.; Parikh, Sanjai J.

    2014-01-01

    The use of veterinary pharmaceuticals in beef cattle has led to concerns associated with the development of antibiotic resistance in bacteria and endocrine disruption in aquatic organisms. Despite the potential negative consequences, data on the transport and mitigation of pharmaceuticals in grazed watersheds with irrigated pasture are scarce. The objective of this study was to assess the transport of common beef cattle pharmaceuticals (i.e., oxytetracycline, chlortetracycline, ivermectin) via surface runoff and leachate from manure amended to grass-vegetated soil boxes under irrigated pasture conditions. The transport of pharmaceuticals from animal manure in surface runoff and soil leachate was relatively low and appears to be limited by desorption and transport of pharmaceuticals entrained in the manure. In surface runoff, less than 4.2% of applied pharmaceuticals in manure (initial concentration: 0.2 mg kg−1 of manure) were detected after three weeks of irrigation. Concentrations of pharmaceuticals in surface runoff and leachate never exceeded 0.5 µg L−1. The major portion of pharmaceuticals (up to 99%) was retained in the manure or in the soil directly beneath the manure application site. Based on the minimal transport of oxytetracycline, chlortetracycline, and ivermectin, the risk of significant transport for these targeted beef cattle pharmaceuticals to surface water and groundwater from manure on irrigated pasture appears to be relatively low. PMID:24216368

  12. The effects of providing portable shade at pasture on dairy cow behavior and physiology.

    PubMed

    Palacio, S; Bergeron, R; Lachance, S; Vasseur, E

    2015-09-01

    Access to pasture has advantages for cows such as reduced lameness and improved udder health, but also may expose cows to stressors such as extreme heat. The objective of this study was to understand how portable shade affected physiological and behavioral responses of pastured dairy cows in a Canadian summer. Over 8wk, a total of 24 lactating Holstein cows were separated into 2 treatments, one with access to shade and a control without access to shade. The cows were pastured in groups of 4, with 3 field sections per treatment. Instantaneous scan sampling of behaviors (drinking, lying, grazing, other) performed in the shade or not were recorded every 5min for 3h/d during the hottest part of the day (peak hours: 1130-1530h) 3d/wk. Ambient temperature, humidity, and vaginal temperature were recorded at 10-min intervals. Daily milk production was also recorded. Differences between treatments by week were analyzed using the generalized linear mixed model with group as random effect and treatment as fixed effect. Cows with shade access were observed at the water trough up to 6.42 times less and lying down up to 1.75 times more. Cows with shade access grazed up to 1.5 times more but only when the temperature-humidity index was above their comfort threshold (≥72) during the hottest part of the day (wk 2). Cows sought shade when it was made available, but spent less than half of their time observed (%) in the shade (40.8±4.67) with the exception of wk 2 when most of the time was spent under the shade (74.3±4.77). Daily lying time was highest during peak hours for cows with shade access. However, no overall difference in total lying time between the 2 treatments was observed. No differences were found in vaginal temperature or milk production between treatments with the exception of wk 1 for daily milk production, which was higher for cows in the control treatment. In conclusion, cows sought shade when it was provided at pasture, whereas cows without access to shade

  13. Supplemental dietary protein for grazing dairy cows: effect on pasture intake and lactation performance.

    PubMed

    McCormick, M E; Ward, J D; Redfearn, D D; French, D D; Blouin, D C; Chapa, A M; Fernandez, J M

    2001-04-01

    One hundred twenty-four cows (92 multiparous and 32 primiparous) were used to evaluate the effect of grain supplements containing high crude protein [(22.8% CP, 5.3% rumen undegradable protein (RUP), dry matter basis], moderate CP (16.6% CP, 6.1% RUP), and moderate CP with supplemental RUP (16.2% CP, 10.8% RUP) on lactation performance of Holstein cows rotationally grazing annual ryegrass-oat pastures. Supplemental protein was provided by solvent extracted soybean meal in the high CP and moderate CP supplements and as a corn gluten meal-blood meal mixture (2.8:1) in the moderate CP, high RUP supplement. Cows were blocked according to previous mature milk equivalent production and calving date (partum group; 0 d in milk or postpartum group; 21 to 65 d in milk) and randomly assigned to dietary treatments. Grain was individually fed, at approximately a 1:3 grain to milk ratio, before a.m. and p.m milkings. The study was replicated during two grazing seasons that averaged 199 d. Cows had ad libitum access to bermudagrass hay while on pasture (dry matter intake = 1.3 kg/d). Protein supplementation had no effect on study long pasture dry matter (12.7 +/- 1.0 kg/d) or total dry matter (23.9 +/- 1.2 kg/d) consumption. Protein concentration did not affect actual milk yield of either calving group (high CP vs. moderate CP); however, postpartum group cows receiving high CP grain supplements maintained greater milk fat concentrations (3.34 vs. 3.11%), which led to higher fat-corrected milk (FCM) yields than control cows receiving moderate CP grain diets (30.3 vs. 28.9 kg/d). Crude protein concentration in milk of high CP-supplemented, postpartum group cows was also higher than moderate CP cows (3.42 vs. 3.27%). Additional RUP did not increase FCM yield above that generated by moderate CP grain diets for partum (34.3 vs. 32.9 kg/d) or postpartum-group cows (28.9 vs. 28.2 kg/d). Increasing CP concentration of grain supplement did not affect milk yield of Holstein cows grazing

  14. Changes in terpene content in milk from pasture-fed cows.

    PubMed

    Tornambé, G; Cornu, A; Pradel, P; Kondjoyan, N; Carnat, A P; Petit, M; Martin, B

    2006-06-01

    Changes of terpene content in milk from cows grazing natural diversified upland pasture were examined in this observational trial. A homogeneous plot divided into 2 subplots was used from May 31 to July 1, 2003 (first growth) and again from October 1 to October 7, 2003 (vegetative regrowth). Each subplot was grazed by 6 dairy cows in 2 ways: strip grazing (SG), with new allocations of pasture strips at 2-d intervals, and paddock grazing (PG). The PG subplot was divided into 3 paddocks and the cows were moved to a new paddock on June 13 and June 24, 2003. Milk from the 6 cows was collected twice a week, pooled, and used for terpene analyses by dynamic headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry system. Twenty mono- and 23 sesquiterpenes desorbing from the milk fat were separated. The most abundant monoterpenes were beta-pinene, alpha-pinene, gamma-terpinene, limonene, alpha-tujene, terpinolene, and alpha-phellandrene. The most abundant sesquiterpenes were beta-caryophyllene, alpha-copaene, beta-cedrene, transmuurola-4-(14)-5-diene, beta-bisabolene, and delta-cadinene. Both mono- and sesquiterpenes in SG milk increased across time with an 8-fold increase in total terpenes in milk from the beginning to the end of June. In parallel, dicotyledons, including the main terpene-rich plants, increased from 17 to 31% of total biomass of the vegetation and the development of Dactylis glomerata progressed from boot to ripening stage. The terpenes in PG milk were equivalent to those in SG milk for the first paddock at the beginning of June and remained constant or doubled for the sum of mono- and sesquiterpenes, respectively. The lower variability of the PG milk terpene content could be related to the opportunity that PG cows had to choose ingested herbage, whereas the SG cows had limited choice within the smaller allocated pasture strips. Milk from cows grazing regrowth pastures in October contained low levels of terpenes, and values were similar for PG and SG milks. Change

  15. Descriptive survey and Salmonella surveillance of pastured poultry layer farms in California.

    PubMed

    Dailey, Naomi; Niemeier, Deb; Elkhoraibi, Carine; Sentíes-Cué, C Gabriel; Pitesky, Maurice

    2017-04-01

    While pasture-raised poultry comprises a small portion of the commercial poultry industry in North America, these alternative rearing systems have become increasingly popular. As such, it is critical to improve our understanding of husbandry practices and prevalence of zoonotic and epizoonotic diseases in these systems. This research reviews the results of a survey sent to 82 commercial pastured poultry farms in California. While the survey response was low (13.4%), it was enhanced by detailed in-person interviews and farm visits. In addition, we conducted drag swabs for Salmonella Enteritidis. On average, farms utilized 12.3% of their total farmland for pastured poultry operations, which often coexisted with other livestock (45%), touch crops (27%), and non-touch crops (45%). While the mean (44.6 sq. ft./hen) and median (22.2 sq. ft./hen) pasture stocking densities were within auditing guidelines, the mean (1.2 sq. ft./hen) and median (0.5 sq. ft./hen) coop stocking densities were below the pending USDA (2016) guidelines recommended in 7 CFR Part 205. Drag swab results showed the presence of Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) in the environment of one of the 11 farms (9.1%). In addition, Salmonella Pullorum (SP) whole blood agglutination tests were used to understand the prevalence of Salmonella spp. in laying hens within the studied farms. Results showed the presence of antibodies in flocks at six of the seven non-SE vaccinated farms, with a mean on-farm prevalence of 25.6% in laying hens. Logistic regression was used to determine risk factors for Group D Salmonella exposure in non-vaccinated flocks, using the SP blood agglutination data as the dependent variable and the survey questions as the independent variables. Statistically significant (P < 0.05) risk factors included exposed wire floors and flock size. These results improve our understanding of Salmonella prevalence and husbandry practices on commercial pastured poultry farms in California. © 2016 Poultry

  16. Changes in soil characteristics and plant species composition along a moisture gradient in a Mediterranean pasture.

    PubMed

    Tzialla, C E; Veresoglou, D S; Papakosta, D; Mamolos, A P

    2006-07-01

    Soil physicochemical characteristics, total aboveground biomass, number of species and relative abundance of groups and individual species were measured along a moisture gradient in a pasture, flooded in part during winter through early summer, adjacent to Pamvotis lake in Ioannina, Greece. Soil and vegetation measurements were conducted in 39 quadrats arranged in four zones perpendicular to the moisture gradient. The zone closest to the lake, recently separated from the lake, became part of the pasture and its soil texture was quite different from that of the other zones with a substrate containing 91% sand. Except for pH, this zone had the lowest values in the other five soil physicochemical characteristics measured (organic matter, total and extracted inorganic nitrogen, Olsen extracted phosphorus and extractable potassium); in the other zones organic matter, total nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium tended to increase from the driest to the wettest zone. Total aboveground biomass, ranging from 280 to 840 gm-2, is high for herbaceous pastures in the conditions of Mediterranean climate and it was not related to distance from the lake's shoreline, although the highest values were measured at intermediate distances, or to any of the various soil characteristics measured. Also, the number of species/0.25 m2 was not related to any of the various soil characteristics, but it was highest at the intermediate distances from the lake's shoreline. Species composition varied along the moisture gradient. Forbs as well as annual grasses and legumes declined in abundance from the driest to the wettest places; the reverse was the case for sedges and perennial grasses and legumes. These results indicate that the soil moisture gradient was the principal factor affecting soil characteristics and plant species composition. Since most species were recorded in all the four zones of the pasture, indicating that these can tolerate all variations in abiotic conditions of pasture, the

  17. A pre-partum lift in ewe nutrition from a high-energy lick or maize or by grazing Lotus uliginosus pasture, increases colostrum production and lamb survival.

    PubMed

    Banchero, G E; Quintans, G; Lindsay, D R; Milton, J T B

    2009-08-01

    This experiment tested the hypothesis that a lift in the nutrition of ewes, before lambing, to increase colostrum production would enhance lamb survival. In all, 261 mature Corriedale ewes, each with a single fetus from a synchronised mating, grazed native pasture to day 130 after mating; at which point they were weighed, condition scored and allocated to graze either native pasture or a pasture dominant with Lotus uliginosus. Five days later (14 days before the expected start of lambing) the ewes were allocated to one of four treatments and fed: (i) native pasture alone, (ii) native pasture plus a commercial high-energy lick, (iii) L. uliginosus pasture alone or (iv) L. uliginosus pasture plus whole maize. The weight, viscosity and concentration of components and immunoglobulin G in the colostrum that had accumulated at parturition, were measured for 10 ewes in each treatment. The lambs that survived to 20 days of age from the 221 ewes that were not milked, were recorded. The ewes supplemented with the lick or maize grain and those that grazed the L. uliginosus pasture alone accumulated two to three times more colostrum at birth than the ewes that grazed native pasture alone (396, 635 and 662 g v. 206 g; P < 0.01). The colostrum from the ewes that grazed only native pasture was more viscous (lower score) than that from the ewes supplemented with the lick or maize grain or the ewes that grazed the L. uliginosus pasture alone (scores of 4.1 v. 6.2, 6.5 and 6.4, P < 0.001) and, not surprisingly, the concentration of lactose in the colostrum of the ewes fed only native pasture was also much lower (1.1% v. 3.0%, 2.8% and 2.6%; P < 0.001)he survival of lambs from the ewes fed only native pasture was less than that of the lambs from ewes fed native pasture plus the commercial lick (81.8% v. 95.5%; P < 0.05) or the L. uliginosus pasture alone (92.4%, P < 0.05), and also tended to be lower than that for lambs born to ewes fed L. uliginosus pasture plus maize (91.8%, P = 0

  18. Preference and behavior of lactating dairy cows given free access to pasture at two herbage masses and two distances.

    PubMed

    Motupalli, P R; Sinclair, L A; Charlton, G L; Bleach, E C; Rutter, S M

    2014-11-01

    A number of factors influence dairy cow preference to be indoors or at pasture. The study reported here investigated whether herbage mass and distance affects preference and if continuously housed cows exhibited behavioral and production differences compared to cows that had free access to pasture. Dairy cows (n = 16) were offered a free choice of being in cubicle housing (1.5 cubicles/cow) or at pasture with a high (3,000 ± 200 kg DM/ha) vs. low (1,800 ± 200 kg DM/ha) herbage mass. A control group (n = 16) was confined to cubicle housing for the duration of the study. Each herbage mass was offered at either a near (38 m) or far (254 m) distance in a 2 × 2 factorial crossover design to determine motivation to access pasture. Overall, dairy cows expressed a partial preference to be at pasture, spending 68.7% of their time at pasture. This was not affected (P > 0.05) by herbage mass. Both grass intake (P = 0.001) and grazing time (P = 0.039) was greater when cows were offered the high herbage mass. Neither total mixed ration intake (P > 0.05) nor milk yield (P > 0.05) was affected by herbage mass or distance. Additionally, no interaction existed between herbage mass and distance (P > 0.05). Distance affected preference: overall time on pasture was greater at the near distance (P = 0.002); however, nighttime use was not affected by distance (P = 0.184). Housed cows produced less milk than free-choice cows and this was potentially due to a combination of decreased lying time in housed cows (P < 0.001) and grass intake (1.22 kg/d) in free-choice cows. This study shows that herbage mass is not a major factor driving dairy cow preference for pasture, but distance does affect preference for pasture during the day. Additionally, there are clear production and welfare benefits for providing cows with a choice to be at pasture or cubicle housing over being continuously housed. Further research is necessary to quantify the effect of lying time on milk yields.

  19. A pilot project combining multispectral proximal sensors and digital cameras for monitoring tropical pastures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handcock, Rebecca N.; Gobbett, D. L.; González, Luciano A.; Bishop-Hurley, Greg J.; McGavin, Sharon L.

    2016-08-01

    Timely and accurate monitoring of pasture biomass and ground cover is necessary in livestock production systems to ensure productive and sustainable management. Interest in the use of proximal sensors for monitoring pasture status in grazing systems has increased, since data can be returned in near real time. Proximal sensors have the potential for deployment on large properties where remote sensing may not be suitable due to issues such as spatial scale or cloud cover. There are unresolved challenges in gathering reliable sensor data and in calibrating raw sensor data to values such as pasture biomass or vegetation ground cover, which allow meaningful interpretation of sensor data by livestock producers. Our goal was to assess whether a combination of proximal sensors could be reliably deployed to monitor tropical pasture status in an operational beef production system, as a precursor to designing a full sensor deployment. We use this pilot project to (1) illustrate practical issues around sensor deployment, (2) develop the methods necessary for the quality control of the sensor data, and (3) assess the strength of the relationships between vegetation indices derived from the proximal sensors and field observations across the wet and dry seasons. Proximal sensors were deployed at two sites in a tropical pasture on a beef production property near Townsville, Australia. Each site was monitored by a Skye SKR-four-band multispectral sensor (every 1 min), a digital camera (every 30 min), and a soil moisture sensor (every 1 min), each of which were operated over 18 months. Raw data from each sensor was processed to calculate multispectral vegetation indices. The data capture from the digital cameras was more reliable than the multispectral sensors, which had up to 67 % of data discarded after data cleaning and quality control for technical issues related to the sensor design, as well as environmental issues such as water incursion and insect infestations. We recommend

  20. Modelling Pasture-based Automatic Milking System Herds: The Impact of Large Herd on Milk Yield and Economics.

    PubMed

    Islam, M R; Clark, C E F; Garcia, S C; Kerrisk, K L

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this modelling study was to investigate the effect of large herd size (and land areas) on walking distances and milking interval (MI), and their impact on milk yield and economic penalties when 50% of the total diets were provided from home grown feed either as pasture or grazeable complementary forage rotation (CFR) in an automatic milking system (AMS). Twelve scenarios consisting of 3 AMS herds (400, 600, 800 cows), 2 levels of pasture utilisation (current AMS utilisation of 15.0 t dry matter [DM]/ha, termed as 'moderate'; optimum pasture utilisation of 19.7 t DM/ha, termed as 'high') and 2 rates of incorporation of grazeable complementary forage system (CFS: 0, 30%; CFS = 65% farm is CFR and 35% of farm is pasture) were investigated. Walking distances, energy loss due to walking, MI, reduction in milk yield and income loss were calculated for each treatment based on information available in the literature. With moderate pasture utilisation and 0% CFR, increasing the herd size from 400 to 800 cows resulted in an increase in total walking distances between the parlour and the paddock from 3.5 to 6.3 km. Consequently, MI increased from 15.2 to 16.4 h with increased herd size from 400 to 800 cows. High pasture utilisation (allowing for an increased stocking density) reduced the total walking distances up to 1 km, thus reduced the MI by up to 0.5 h compared to the moderate pasture, 800 cow herd combination. The high pasture utilisation combined with 30% of the farm in CFR in the farm reduced the total walking distances by up to 1.7 km and MI by up to 0.8 h compared to the moderate pasture and 800 cow herd combination. For moderate pasture utilisation, increasing the herd size from 400 to 800 cows resulted in more dramatic milk yield penalty as yield increasing from c.f. 2.6 and 5.1 kg/cow/d respectively, which incurred a loss of up to $AU 1.9/cow/d. Milk yield losses of 0.61 kg and 0.25 kg for every km increase in total walking distance (voluntary return

  1. Modelling Pasture-based Automatic Milking System Herds: The Impact of Large Herd on Milk Yield and Economics

    PubMed Central

    Islam, M. R.; Clark, C. E. F.; Garcia, S. C.; Kerrisk, K. L.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this modelling study was to investigate the effect of large herd size (and land areas) on walking distances and milking interval (MI), and their impact on milk yield and economic penalties when 50% of the total diets were provided from home grown feed either as pasture or grazeable complementary forage rotation (CFR) in an automatic milking system (AMS). Twelve scenarios consisting of 3 AMS herds (400, 600, 800 cows), 2 levels of pasture utilisation (current AMS utilisation of 15.0 t dry matter [DM]/ha, termed as ‘moderate’; optimum pasture utilisation of 19.7 t DM/ha, termed as ‘high’) and 2 rates of incorporation of grazeable complementary forage system (CFS: 0, 30%; CFS = 65% farm is CFR and 35% of farm is pasture) were investigated. Walking distances, energy loss due to walking, MI, reduction in milk yield and income loss were calculated for each treatment based on information available in the literature. With moderate pasture utilisation and 0% CFR, increasing the herd size from 400 to 800 cows resulted in an increase in total walking distances between the parlour and the paddock from 3.5 to 6.3 km. Consequently, MI increased from 15.2 to 16.4 h with increased herd size from 400 to 800 cows. High pasture utilisation (allowing for an increased stocking density) reduced the total walking distances up to 1 km, thus reduced the MI by up to 0.5 h compared to the moderate pasture, 800 cow herd combination. The high pasture utilisation combined with 30% of the farm in CFR in the farm reduced the total walking distances by up to 1.7 km and MI by up to 0.8 h compared to the moderate pasture and 800 cow herd combination. For moderate pasture utilisation, increasing the herd size from 400 to 800 cows resulted in more dramatic milk yield penalty as yield increasing from c.f. 2.6 and 5.1 kg/cow/d respectively, which incurred a loss of up to $AU 1.9/cow/d. Milk yield losses of 0.61 kg and 0.25 kg for every km increase in total walking distance (voluntary

  2. Reproduction, mastitis, and body condition of seasonally calved Holstein and Jersey cows in confinement or pasture systems.

    PubMed

    Washburn, S P; White, S L; Green, J T; Benson, G A

    2002-01-01

    Dairy cows in confinement and pasture-based feeding systems were compared across four spring-calving and three fall-calving replicates for differences in reproduction, mastitis, body weights, and body condition scores. Feeding systems and replicates included both Jersey and Holstein cows. Cows in confinement were fed a total mixed ration, and cows on pasture were supplemented with concentrates and provided baled hay or haylage when pasture supply was limiting. Breeding periods were for 75 d in spring or fall. Reproductive performance did not differ significantly due to feeding system or season. Jerseys had higher conception rates (59.6 vs. 49.5 +/- 3.3%) and higher percentages of cows pregnant in 75 d (78.1 vs. 57.9 +/- 3.9%) than Holsteins. Cows in confinement had 1.8 times more clinical mastitis and eight times the rate of culling for mastitis than did cows on pasture. Jerseys had half as many clinical cases of mastitis per cow as Holsteins. Only 41 +/- 5% of confinement Holsteins remained for a subsequent lactation, starting within the defined calving season compared with 51 +/- 5% of pastured Holsteins and 71 and 72 +/- 5% of Jerseys, respectively. Body weights and condition scores were generally higher for confinement cows than pastured cows, and Jerseys had higher condition scores and lower body weights than Holsteins. In summary, pastured cows had fewer clinical cases of mastitis, lower body condition scores, and lower body weights than confinement cows. Holsteins were less likely to rebreed, had more mastitis, higher culling rates, and lower body condition scores than Jerseys.

  3. Landscape dynamics in northwestern Amazonia: an assessment of pastures, fire and illicit crops as drivers of tropical deforestation.

    PubMed

    Armenteras, Dolors; Rodríguez, Nelly; Retana, Javier

    2013-01-01

    Many studies have identified drivers of deforestation throughout the tropics and, in most cases, have recognised differences in the level of threat. However, only a few have also looked at the temporal and spatial dynamics by which those drivers act, which is critical for assessing the conservation of biodiversity as well as for landscape planning. In this study, we analyse land cover change between 2000 and 2009 in north-western Colombian Amazonia to identify the interactions between the use of fire, cultivation of illicit crops and establishment of pastures, and their impacts on the loss of forest in the region. Yearly analyses were undertaken at randomly selected sample areas to quantify the average areas of transition of land cover types under different landscape compositions: forest-dominated mosaics, pasture mosaics, fire mosaics, and illicit crop mosaics. Our results indicate that despite the fact that forest areas were well-preserved, deforestation occurred at a low annual rate (0.06%). Conversion to pasture was the main factor responsible for forest loss (the area of pastures tripled within forest mosaics over 8 years), and this process was independent of the landscape matrix in which the forests were located. In fire mosaics, burning is a common tool for forest clearing and conversion to pasture. Thus, forests in fire mosaics were highly disturbed and frequently transformed from primary to secondary forests. The use of fire for illicit cropping was not detected, partly due to the small size of common illicit crops. Forest regeneration from pastures and secondary vegetation was observed in areas with large amounts of natural forest. Overall, assuming the continuation of the observed pasture conversion trend and the use of forest fire, we suggest that our results should be incorporated into a spatially explicit and integrated decision support tool to target and focus land-planning activities and policies.

  4. Landscape Dynamics in Northwestern Amazonia: An Assessment of Pastures, Fire and Illicit Crops as Drivers of Tropical Deforestation

    PubMed Central

    Armenteras, Dolors; Rodríguez, Nelly; Retana, Javier

    2013-01-01

    Many studies have identified drivers of deforestation throughout the tropics and, in most cases, have recognised differences in the level of threat. However, only a few have also looked at the temporal and spatial dynamics by which those drivers act, which is critical for assessing the conservation of biodiversity as well as for landscape planning. In this study, we analyse land cover change between 2000 and 2009 in north-western Colombian Amazonia to identify the interactions between the use of fire, cultivation of illicit crops and establishment of pastures, and their impacts on the loss of forest in the region. Yearly analyses were undertaken at randomly selected sample areas to quantify the average areas of transition of land cover types under different landscape compositions: forest-dominated mosaics, pasture mosaics, fire mosaics, and illicit crop mosaics. Our results indicate that despite the fact that forest areas were well-preserved, deforestation occurred at a low annual rate (0.06%). Conversion to pasture was the main factor responsible for forest loss (the area of pastures tripled within forest mosaics over 8 years), and this process was independent of the landscape matrix in which the forests were located. In fire mosaics, burning is a common tool for forest clearing and conversion to pasture. Thus, forests in fire mosaics were highly disturbed and frequently transformed from primary to secondary forests. The use of fire for illicit cropping was not detected, partly due to the small size of common illicit crops. Forest regeneration from pastures and secondary vegetation was observed in areas with large amounts of natural forest. Overall, assuming the continuation of the observed pasture conversion trend and the use of forest fire, we suggest that our results should be incorporated into a spatially explicit and integrated decision support tool to target and focus land-planning activities and policies. PMID:23382890

  5. Differential Response of Acidobacteria Subgroups to Forest-to-Pasture Conversion and Their Biogeographic Patterns in the Western Brazilian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Navarrete, Acacio A.; Venturini, Andressa M.; Meyer, Kyle M.; Klein, Ann M.; Tiedje, James M.; Bohannan, Brendan J. M.; Nüsslein, Klaus; Tsai, Siu M.; Rodrigues, Jorge L. M.

    2015-01-01

    Members of the phylum Acidobacteria are among the most abundant soil bacteria on Earth, but little is known about their response to environmental changes. We asked how the relative abundance and biogeographic patterning of this phylum and its subgroups responded to forest-to-pasture conversion in soils of the western Brazilian Amazon. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes was employed to assess the abundance and composition of the Acidobacteria community across 54 soil samples taken using a spatially nested sampling scheme at the landscape level. Numerically, Acidobacteria represented 20% of the total bacterial community in forest soils and 11% in pasture soils. Overall, 15 different Acidobacteria subgroups of the current 26 subgroups were detected, with Acidobacteria subgroups 1, 3, 5, and 6 accounting together for 87% of the total Acidobacteria community in forest soils and 75% in pasture soils. Concomitant with changes in soil chemistry after forest-to-pasture conversion—particularly an increase in properties linked to soil acidity and nutrient availability—we observed an increase in the relative abundances of Acidobacteria subgroups 4, 10, 17, and 18, and a decrease in the relative abundances of other Acidobacteria subgroups in pasture relative to forest soils. The composition of the total Acidobacteria community as well as the most abundant Acidobacteria subgroups (1, 3, 5, and 6) was significantly more similar in composition across space in pasture soils than in forest soils. These results suggest that preponderant responses of Acidobacteria subgroups, especially subgroups 1, 3, 4, 5, and 6, to forest-to-pasture conversion effects in soils could be used to define management-indicators of agricultural practices in the Amazon Basin. These acidobacterial responses are at least in part through alterations on acidity- and nutrient-related properties of the Amazon soils. PMID:26733981

  6. Quality characteristics, chemical composition, and sensory properties of butter from cows on pasture versus indoor feeding systems.

    PubMed

    O'Callaghan, Tom F; Faulkner, Hope; McAuliffe, Stephen; O'Sullivan, Maurice G; Hennessy, Deirdre; Dillon, Pat; Kilcawley, Kieran N; Stanton, Catherine; Ross, R Paul

    2016-12-01

    This study evaluated the effects of 3 widely practiced cow feeding systems in the United States, Europe, and Southern Hemisphere regions on the characteristics, quality, and consumer perception of sweet cream butter. Fifty-four multiparous and primiparous Friesian cows were divided into 3 groups (n=18) for an entire lactation. Group 1 was housed indoors and fed a total mixed ration diet (TMR) of grass silage, maize silage, and concentrates; group 2 was maintained outdoors on perennial ryegrass-only pasture (GRS); and group 3 was maintained outdoors on a perennial ryegrass/white clover pasture (CLV). Mid-lactation butter was manufactured in triplicate with milk from each group in June 2015 (137±7d in milk) and was analyzed over a 6-mo storage period at 5°C for textural and thermal properties, fatty acid composition, sensory properties, and volatile compounds. The nutritional value of butters was improved by pasture feeding, and butter from pasture-fed cows had significantly lower thrombogenicity index scores compared with butters from TMR-fed cows. In line with these results, pasture-derived milks (GRS and CLV) produced butter with significantly higher concentrations of conjugated linoleic acid (cis-9,trans-11) and trans-β-carotene than TMR butter. Alterations in the fatty acid composition of butter contributed to significant differences in textural and thermal properties of the butters. Total mixed ration-derived butters had significantly higher hardness scores at room temperature than those of GRS and CLV. Onset of crystallization for TMR butters also occurred at significantly higher temperatures compared with pasture butters. Volatile analysis of butter by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry identified 25 compounds present in each of the butters, 5 of which differed significantly based on feeding system, including acetone, 2-butanone, 1-pentenol, toluene, and β-pinene. Toluene was very significantly correlated with pasture-derived butter. Sensory analysis

  7. Labeling strategies to overcome the problem of niche markets for sustainable milk products: The example of pasture-raised milk.

    PubMed

    Kühl, S; Gassler, B; Spiller, A

    2017-06-01

    Pasture-raised milk is gaining in importance in some European countries and in the United States. The production of pasture-raised milk is linked to higher costs, as the milk is normally collected and processed separately from conventional barn milk. This could hinder the production of sustainable milk products. We discuss alternative labeling strategies that allow the mixing of pasture-raised (sustainable) and conventional milk to reduce costs and break free from the current niche market. The lower price would allow for more pasture-raised milk to be produced and enter the mainstream market. The aim of this study was to analyze consumers' willingness to pay for alternative labeling types using a discrete choice experiment with 1,065 German milk buyers. The 2 alternative labels, besides the classical labeling approach, are based on the mass balance approach (at least 50% pasture-raised milk in a package) and cause-related marketing (support of farmers who keep their cows on pasture). The discrete choice experiment was combined with a cluster analysis to get a deeper understanding of the buying behavior of the diverse consumer segments for milk. We found that all consumer groups prefer the classical label where products are segregated but also understand the benefits of cause-related marketing. The average consumer was willing to pay €0.50 more for pasture-raised milk certified with the classical label and €0.38 more for pasture-raised milk labeled with a cause-related marketing claim. However, differences between the clusters are strong: The smallest cluster of ethically involved consumers (15%) is willing to pay the highest premiums, especially for the classical label. Cause-related marketing is an interesting alternative for involved buyers under price pressure (41%), whereas the mass balance approach is little understood and thus less valued by consumers. From our results we concluded that cause-related marketing (in our case, the support of pasturing of

  8. Methane Emission and Milk Production of Dairy Cows Grazing Pastures Rich in Legumes or Rich in Grasses in Uruguay

    PubMed Central

    Dini, Yoana; Gere, José; Briano, Carolina; Manetti, Martin; Juliarena, Paula; Picasso, Valentin; Gratton, Roberto; Astigarraga, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Simple Summary GHGs emissions are relevant in evaluating environmental impact of farming systems. Methane (CH4) produced by enteric fermentation accounts for half of all anthropogenic emissions of GHGs in Uruguay, where ruminant production is based on year round grazing of forages. Here we compared milk production and CH4 emissions by dairy cows grazing two contrasting mixed pastures (rich in legumes or rich in grasses) using the SF6 tracer technique adapted to collect breath samples over 5-days periods. There were no differences in milk or CH4 production between the contrasting pastures, probably because of the high herbage allowance that enabled selective grazing by cows. Abstract Understanding the impact of changing pasture composition on reducing emissions of GHGs in dairy grazing systems is an important issue to mitigate climate change. The aim of this study was to estimate daily CH4 emissions of dairy cows grazing two mixed pastures with contrasting composition of grasses and legumes: L pasture with 60% legumes on Dry Matter (DM) basis and G pasture with 75% grasses on DM basis. Milk production and CH4 emissions were compared over two periods of two weeks during spring using eight lactating Holstein cows in a 2 × 2 Latin square design. Herbage organic matter intake (HOMI) was estimated by chromic oxide dilution and herbage organic matter digestibility (OMD) was estimated by faecal index. Methane emission was estimated by using the sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) tracer technique adapted to collect breath samples over 5-day periods. OMD (0.71) and HOMI (15.7 kg OM) were not affected by pasture composition. Milk production (20.3 kg/d), milk fat yield (742 g/d) and milk protein yield (667 g/d) were similar for both pastures. This may be explained by the high herbage allowance (30 kg DM above 5 cm/cow) which allowed the cows to graze selectively, in particular in grass sward. Similarly, methane emission expressed as absolute value (368 g/d or 516 L/d) or expressed as

  9. Carbohydrate supplements and their effects on pasture dry matter intake, feeding behavior, and blood factors associated with intake regulation.

    PubMed

    Sheahan, A J; Kay, J K; Roche, J R

    2013-01-01

    Supplementary feeds are offered to grazing dairy cows to increase dry matter (DM) and metabolizable energy (ME) intakes; however, offering feed supplements reduces pasture DM intake, a phenomenon known as substitution. The objective of the study was to investigate changes in blood factors associated with intake regulation in monogastric species in pasture-fed dairy cows supplemented with either a starch- or nonforage fiber-based concentrate. Fifteen multiparous Friesian × Jersey cross cows were assigned to 1 of 3 treatments at calving. Measurements were undertaken in wk 8 of lactation. Treatments were pasture only, pasture plus a starch-based concentrate (3.5 kg of DM/cow per day; STA), and pasture plus a nonforage fiber-based concentrate (4.4 kg of DM/cow per day). Pelleted concentrates were fed at an isoenergetic rate in 2 equal portions at a.m. and p.m. milkings. Measurements were undertaken to investigate differences in pasture DM intake, feeding behavior, and profiles of blood factors for 4h after a.m. and p.m. milkings, the periods of intensive feeding in grazing cows. Supplementing cows with STA concentrate reduced pasture DM intake to a greater extent than the fiber concentrate, although time spent eating did not differ between treatments. The blood factor response to feeding differed between the a.m. and p.m. feeding events. Blood factors associated with a preprandial or fasted state were elevated prefeeding in the a.m. and declined following feeding, whereas satiety factors increased. In comparison, the blood factor response to feeding in the p.m. differed, with responses to feeding delayed for most factors. Plasma ghrelin concentration increased during the p.m. feeding event, despite the consumption of feed and the positive energy state remaining from the previous a.m. feeding, indicating that environmental factors (e.g., sunset) supersede physiological cues in regulating feeding behavior. The greater reduction in pasture DM intake for the STA treatment

  10. Capturing urine while maintaining pasture intake, milk production, and animal welfare of dairy cows in early and late lactation.

    PubMed

    Clark, C E F; McLeod, K L M; Glassey, C B; Gregorini, P; Costall, D A; Betteridge, K; Jago, J G

    2010-05-01

    Capturing urine and spreading it evenly across a paddock reduces the risk of nitrogen loss to the environment. This study investigated the effect of 16h/d removal from pasture on the capture of urination events, milk production, pasture intake, and animal welfare from cows grazing fresh pasture in early and late lactation. Forty-eight Holstein-Friesian cows in early [470+/-47kg of body weight (BW); 35+/-9 days in milk] and late (498+/-43kg of BW; 225+/-23 days in milk) lactation were allocated to 3 treatment groups. Cows had access to pasture for either 4h after each milking (2 x 4), for 8h between morning and afternoon milkings (1 x 8), or for 24h, excluding milking times (control). When not grazing, the 2 x 4 and 1 x 8 groups were confined to a plastic-lined loafing area with a woodchip surface. In early lactation, the proportion of urinations on pasture and laneways was reduced from 89% (control) to 51% (1 x 8) and 54% (2 x 4) of total urinations. The 1 x 8 cows ate less pasture [10.9kg of dry matter (DM)/cow per day] than the control (13.6kg of DM/cow per day) and 2 x 4 (13.0kg of DM/cow per day) cows, which did not differ from each other. The 1 x 8 and 2 x 4 cows produced less milk (21 and 22kg of milk/cow per day, respectively) compared with control cows (24kg of milk/cow per day). There were no differences in BW or body condition score (BCS) change across treatment groups, with all groups gaining BW and BCS during the experimental period. In late lactation, there was no difference in pasture intake (mean=8.8kg of DM/cow per day), milk production (mean=10kg of milk/cow per day), and BW or BCS change (mean=3.7kg and -0.2U/cow per week, respectively) between treatment groups. As in early lactation, urinations on pasture and laneways were reduced from 85% (control) to 56% (1 x 8) and 50% (2 x 4) of total urinations. These findings highlight an opportunity to maintain performance and welfare of grazing cows in early and late lactation while capturing additional

  11. Pasture soils contaminated with fertilizer-derived cadmium and fluorine: livestock effects.

    PubMed

    Loganathan, Paripurnanda; Hedley, Mike J; Grace, Neville D

    2008-01-01

    Fertilizers are indispensable for ensuring sustainability of agricultural production, thereby achieving food and fiber security. Nitrogen, sulfur, and potassium fertilizers are relatively free of impurities, but phosphorus (P) fertilizers, the main fertilizer input for the economic production of legume-based pastures, contain several contaminants, of which F and Cd are considered to be of most concern because they have potentially harmful effects on soil quality, livestock health, and food safety. Incidences of fluorosis in grazing livestock, and accumulation of Cd in the edible offal products of livestock, above the maximum permissible concentration set by food authorities have been reported in many countries. The majority of Cd and F applied to pastures in many countries continues to accumulate in the biologically active topsoil due to strong adsorption to soil constituents. However, the rate of Cd accumulation in the last decade has slowed as a result of selective use of low-Cd fertilizers. Cd and F adsorption in soils increase with increased contents of iron and aluminium oxides, layer silicates and allophane in soils, and increased soil pH. Cadmium adsorption also increases with increased Mn oxides and organic matter in soil. However, some Cd will be released during decomposition of plant and animal remains and organic matter. In most pastoral soils the majority of Cd and F added in fertilizers remains in the topsoil and little moves below 20-30 cm, and therefore these are unlikely to contaminate groundwater. However, F may pose a risk to shallow groundwater in very acidic low-P-fixing soils, and Cd may pose a risk in very acidic soils containing low organic matter and clay contents, or in soils with high chloride concentrations. Research is required both to test whether groundwater beneath farms with long histories of P fertilizer use is contaminated by these elements and also to examine their mechanisms of movement. Cd intake by grazing livestock occurs

  12. High intensity, short duration rotational grazing on reclaimed cool season fescue/legume pastures: I. System development

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, W.R.; Carlson, K.E.

    1995-09-01

    The Pittsburg & Midway Coal Mining Co.`s ({open_quotes}P&M{close_quotes}) Midway Mine lies 50 miles south of Kansas City, Kansas, straddling the border of Kansas and Missouri. P&M actively mined the area until 1989, when the mine was closed and reclaimed. Approximately 3,750 acres of surface mined land were topsoiled and revegetated to cool season fescue/legume pasture. Various pasture management methods are being utilized to meet reclamation success standards and achieve final bond release. The effectiveness and costs of various cool season fescue/legume pasture management methods are evaluated and contrasted. These methods include sharecropping, bush hogging, burning and livestock grazing. It presents guidelines used to develop a site specific rotational livestock grazing programs with land owners or contractors, and local, state and federal agencies. Rotational grazing uses both cow/calf or feeder livestock operations. Key managerial elements used to control grazing activities, either by the landowner or a contractor, are reviewed. Methods used to determine stocking levels for successful rotational grazing on this type of pasture are presented. Rotational grazing of livestock has proven to be the most effective method for managing established cool season fescue/legume pastures at this site. Initial stocking rates of 1 A.U.M. per 5 acres have been modified to a current stocking rate of 1 A.U.M. per 2.5 acres. Supporting physical and chemical data are presented and discussed.

  13. Carcass quality and meat tenderness of Hawaii pasture-finished cattle and Hawaii-originated, mainland feedlot-finished cattle.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong Soo; Fukumoto, Glen Kazumi; Kim, Sunae

    2012-10-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the carcass quality and meat tenderness of Hawaii cattle finished on subtropical pasture with those of mainland US feedlot-finished cattle that were shipped from Hawaii after weaning. Rib-eye steak samples were collected from 30 feedlot-finished cattle harvested at a slaughter house in Washington State, USA and from 13 subtropical pasture-finished cattle harvested at a local slaughter house in Hawaii, then shipped to meat science laboratory at the University of Hawaii, Manoa. Samples were aged for 2 weeks at 4°C and frozen for later proximate analysis and meat tenderness measurement. Feedlot-finished cattle had significantly heavier carcass weight (353 vs 290 kg) and thicker backfat (13.5 vs 6.6 mm), but no significant difference was observed in rib-eye area between the two groups. Marbling score (Small) and United States Department of Agriculture quality grade (Choice) of the pasture-finished beef were not significantly (P < 0.05) different from those of feedlot-finished beef. The shear force value of pasture-finished beef (5.18 kg) was not statistically different (P < 0.05) from that of feedlot-finished beef (4.40 kg). In conclusion, results of this study suggest that Hawaii cattle finished on subtropical pasture produced as tender beef as mainland feedlot-finished cattle with less intramuscular fat.

  14. Soil Carbon and Nutrient Changes Associated with Deforestation for Pasture in Southern Costa Rica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huth, Timothy J.; Porder, Stephen; Chaves, Joaquin; Whiteside, Jessica H.

    2012-01-01

    We assessed the effects of deforestation on soil carbon (C) and nutrient stocks in the premontane landscape near Las Cruces Biological Station in southern Costa Rica, where forests were cleared for pasture in the mid-1960s. We excavated six soil pits to a depth of 1 m in both pasture and primary forest, and found that C stocks were 20 kg C per square meters in both settings. Nevertheless, soil delta C-13 suggests 50 percent of the forest-derived soil C above 40 cm depth has turned over since deforestation. Soil nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) stocks derived from the soil pits were not significantly different between land uses (P = 0.43 and 0.61, respectively). At a larger spatial scale, however, the ubiquity of ruts produced by cattle-induced erosion indicates that there are substantial soil effects of grazing in this steep landscape. Ruts averaged 13 cm deep and covered 45 percent of the landscape, and thus are evidence of the removal of 0.7 Mg C/ ha/yr, and 70, 9 and 40 kg/ha/yr of N, P and potassium (K), respectively. Subsoils in this region are 10 times less C- and N-rich, and 2 times less P- and K-rich than the topsoil. Thus, rapid topsoil loss may lead to a decline in pasture productivity in the coming decades. These data also suggest that the soil C footprint of deforestation in this landscape may be determined by the fate of soil C as it is transported downstream, rather than C turnover in situ.

  15. Selective coal mine overburden treatment with topsoil and compost to optimise pasture or native vegetation establishment.

    PubMed

    Spargo, A; Doley, D

    2016-11-01

    Overburden at a coal mine in the Hunter Valley, New South Wales, was stored in a flat-topped artificial mound with 14-degree side slopes. Topsoil was scarce, dispersive and readily eroded. A split-plot factorial experiment applied an enhanced municipal solid waste compost at 0, 60 or 100 t ha(-1) to untreated overburden or to overburden covered with 0.1 m of topsoil. Two seeding treatments, of trees and shrubs or of pasture species, were applied to two 0.5-ha replicates of each surface treatment. Substrate physical and chemical properties and vegetation attributes were assessed 2.5 years later. Compost application to both topsoil and overburden significantly increased total N, P, Cu and Zn, soluble K, Ca and Mg, and significantly reduced soluble Na and pH. Mean tree density, size and total canopy cover were significantly greater with compost applied at 60 t ha(-1) to overburden than with all other treatments, especially those on topsoil where tree growth was inhibited by undesired species. Compost application to overburden and topsoil at 100 t ha(-1) significantly increased biomass of desired pasture species and significantly reduced undesired species cover compared with unamended topsoil and the extent of bare ground compared with unamended overburden. Successful development of woody species on overburden and pastures on both overburden and topsoil treated with compost provides opportunities for new combinations of landscape design, surface preparation and plant species introductions to increase the stability of final landforms, the effectiveness of resource use, and the delivery of commercial and biodiversity benefits from mine site rehabilitation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Shifts in leaf litter breakdown along a forest-pasture-urban gradient in Andean streams.

    PubMed

    Iñiguez-Armijos, Carlos; Rausche, Sirkka; Cueva, Augusta; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Aminael; Espinosa, Carlos; Breuer, Lutz

    2016-07-01

    Tropical montane ecosystems of the Andes are critically threatened by a rapid land-use change which can potentially affect stream variables, aquatic communities, and ecosystem processes such as leaf litter breakdown. However, these effects have not been sufficiently investigated in the Andean region and at high altitude locations in general. Here, we studied the influence of land use (forest-pasture-urban) on stream physico-chemical variables (e.g., water temperature, nutrient concentration, and pH), aquatic communities (macroinvertebrates and aquatic fungi) and leaf litter breakdown rates in Andean streams (southern Ecuador), and how variation in those stream physico-chemical variables affect macroinvertebrates and fungi related to leaf litter breakdown. We found that pH, water temperature, and nutrient concentration increased along the land-use gradient. Macroinvertebrate communities were significantly different between land uses. Shredder richness and abundance were lower in pasture than forest sites and totally absent in urban sites, and fungal richness and biomass were higher in forest sites than in pasture and urban sites. Leaf litter breakdown rates became slower as riparian land use changed from natural to anthropogenically disturbed conditions and were largely determined by pH, water temperature, phosphate concentration, fungal activity, and single species of leaf-shredding invertebrates. Our findings provide evidence that leaf litter breakdown in Andean streams is sensitive to riparian land-use change, with urban streams being the most affected. In addition, this study highlights the role of fungal biomass and shredder species (Phylloicus; Trichoptera and Anchytarsus; Coleoptera) on leaf litter breakdown in Andean streams and the contribution of aquatic fungi in supporting this ecosystem process when shredders are absent or present low abundance in streams affected by urbanization. Finally, we summarize important implications in terms of managing of

  17. FORAGES AND PASTURES SYMPOSIUM: Improving soil health and productivity on grasslands using managed grazing of livestock.

    PubMed

    Russell, J R; Bisinger, J J

    2015-06-01

    Beyond grazing, managed grasslands provide ecological services that may offer economic incentives for multifunctional use. Increasing biodiversity of plant communities may maximize net primary production by optimizing utilization of available light, water, and nutrient resources; enhance production stability in response to climatic stress; reduce invasion of exotic species; increase soil OM; reduce nutrient leaching or loading in surface runoff; and provide wildlife habitat. Strategically managed grazing may increase biodiversity of cool-season pastures by creating disturbance in plant communities through herbivory, treading, nutrient cycling, and plant seed dispersal. Soil OM will increase carbon and nutrient sequestration and water-holding capacity of soils and is greater in grazed pastures than nongrazed grasslands or land used for row crop or hay production. However, results of studies evaluating the effects of different grazing management systems on soil OM are limited and inconsistent. Although roots and organic residues of pasture forages create soil macropores that reduce soil compaction, grazing has increased soil bulk density or penetration resistance regardless of stocking rates or systems. But the effects of the duration of grazing and rest periods on soil compaction need further evaluation. Because vegetative cover dissipates the energy of falling raindrops and plant stems and tillers reduce the rate of surface water flow, managing grazing to maintain adequate vegetative cover will minimize the effects of treading on water infiltration in both upland and riparian locations. Through increased diversity of the plant community with alterations of habitat structure, grazing systems can be developed that enhance habitat for wildlife and insect pollinators. Although grazing management may enhance the ecological services provided by grasslands, environmental responses are controlled by variations in climate, soil, landscape position, and plant community

  18. Assessing pasture quality and degradation status using hyperspectral imaging: a case study from western Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehnert, Lukas W.; Meyer, Hanna; Meyer, Nele; Reudenbach, Christoph; Bendix, Jörg

    2013-10-01

    Alpine grasslands on the Tibetan Plateau (TP) are suffering from pasture degradation induced by over-grazing, climate change and improper livestock management. Meanwhile, the status of pastures is largely unknown especially in poor accessible western parts on the TP. The aim of this case study was to assess the suitability of hyperspectral imaging to predict quality and amount of forage on the western TP. Therefore, 18 ground- based hyperspectral images taken along two transects on a winter pasture were used to estimate leaf chlorophyll content, photosynthetic-active vegetation cover (PV) and proportion of grasses. For calibration and validation purposes, chlorophyll content of 20 grass plants was measured in situ. From the images reference spectra of grass and non-grass species were collected. PV was assessed from similarity of images to mean vegetation spectra using spectral angle mapper and threshold classifications. A set of 48 previously published hyperspectral vegetation indices (VI) was used as predictors to estimate chlorophyll content and to discriminate grass and non-grass pixels. Separation into grass and non-grass species was performed using partial least squares (PLS) discriminant analysis and chlorophyll content was estimated with PLS regression. The accuracy of the models was assessed with leave-one-out cross validation and normalised root mean square errors (nRMSE) for chlorophyll and contingency matrices for grass classification and total PV separation. Highest error rates were observed for discrimination between vegetated and non-vegetated parts (Overall accuracy = 0.85), whilst accuracies of grass and non grass separation (Overall accuracy = 0.98) and chlorophyll estimation were higher (nRMSE = 10.7).

  19. Greenhouse gases fluxes and soil thermal properties in a pasture in central Missouri.

    PubMed

    Nkonglolo, Nsalambi Vakanda; Johnson, Shane; Schmidt, Kent; Eivazi, Frieda

    2010-01-01

    Fluctuations of greenhouse gases emissions and soil properties occur at short spatial and temporal scales, however, results are often reported for larger scales studies. We monitored CO2, CH4, and N2O fluxes and soil temperature (T), thermal conductivity (K), resistivity (R) and thermal diffusivity (D) from 2004 to 2006 in a pasture. Soil air samples for determination of CO2, CH4 and N20 concentrations were collected from static and vented chambers and analyzed within two hours of collection with a gas chromatograph. T, K, R and D were measured in-situ using a KD2 probe. Soil samples were also taken for measurements of soil chemical and physical properties. The pasture acted as a sink in 2004, a source in 2005 and again a sink of CH4 in 2006. CO2 and CH4 were highest, but N2O as well as T, K and D were lowest in 2004. Only K was correlated with CO2 in 2004 while T correlated with both N2O (r = 0.76, p = 0.0001) and CO2 (r = 0.88, p = 0.0001) in 2005. In 2006, all gases fluxes were significantly correlated with T, K and R when the data for the entire year were considered. However, an in-depth examination of the data revealed the existence of month-to-month shifts, lack of correlation and differing spatial structures. These results stress the need for further studies on the relationship between soil properties and gases fluxes. K and R offer a promise as potential controlling factors for greenhouse gases fluxes in this pasture.

  20. Soil phosphorus forms in hydrologically isolated wetlands and surrounding pasture uplands.

    PubMed

    Cheesman, Alexander W; Dunne, Ed J; Turner, Benjamin L; Reddy, K Ramesh

    2010-01-01

    Newly created and restored wetlands play an important role in sequestering excess nutrients at the landscape scale. In evaluating the long-term efficacy of nutrient management strategies to increase wetland capacity for sequestering P, information is needed on the forms of P found across the upland-wetland transition. To assess this, we studied soils (0-10 cm) from four wetlands within cow-calf pastures north of Lake Okeechobee, FL. Wetlands contained significantly (P < 0.05) greater concentrations of organic matter (219 g C kg(-1)), total P (371 mg P kg(-1)), and metals (Al, Fe) relative to surrounding pasture. When calculated on an aerial basis, wetland surface soils contained significantly greater amounts of total P (236 kg ha(-1)) compared with upland soils (114 kg ha(-1)), which was linked to the concomitant increase in organic matter with increasing hydroperiod. The concentration of P forms, determined by extraction with anion exchange membranes, 1 mol L(-1) HCl, and an alkaline extract (0.25 mol L(-1) NaOH and 50 mmol L(-1) ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid [EDTA]) showed significant differences between uplands and wetlands but did not alter as a proportion of total P. Speciation of NaOH-EDTA extracts by solution 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed that organic P was dominated by phosphomonoesters in both wetland and pasture soils but that myo-inositol hexakisphosphate was not detected in any sample. The tight coupling of total C and P in the sandy soils of the region suggests that the successful management of historically isolated wetlands for P sequestration depends on the long-term accumulation and stabilization of soil organic matter.

  1. Rainfall variability drives interannual variation in N₂O emissions from a humid, subtropical pasture.

    PubMed

    Rowlings, D W; Grace, P R; Scheer, C; Liu, S

    2015-04-15

    Variations in interannual rainfall totals can lead to large uncertainties in annual N2O emission budget estimates from short term field studies. The interannual variation in nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from a subtropical pasture in Queensland, Australia, was examined using continuous measurements of automated chambers over 2 consecutive years. Nitrous oxide emissions were highest during the summer months and were highly episodic, related more to the size and distribution of rain events than soil water content. Over 48% of the total N2O emitted was lost in just 16% of measurement days. Interannual variation in annual N2O estimates was high, with cumulative emissions increasing with decreasing rainfall. Cumulative emissions averaged 1826.7±199.9 g N2O-N ha(-1) yr(-1) over the two year period, though emissions from 2008 (2148±273 g N2O-N ha(-1) yr(-1)) were 42% higher than 2007 (1504±126 g N2O-N ha(-1) yr(-1)). This increase in annual emissions coincided with almost half of the summer precipitation from 2007 to 2008. Emissions dynamics were chiefly driven by the distribution and size of rain events which varied on a seasonal and annual basis. Sampling frequency effects on cumulative N2O flux estimation were assessed using a jackknife technique to inform future manual sampling campaigns. Test subsets of the daily measured data were generated for the pasture and two adjacent land-uses (rainforest and lychee orchard) by selecting measured flux values at regular time intervals ranging from 1 to 30 days. Errors associated with weekly sampling were up to 34% of the sub-daily mean and were highly biased towards overestimation if strategically sampled following rain events. Sampling time of day also played a critical role. Morning sampling best represented the 24 hour mean in the pasture, whereas sampling at noon proved the most accurate in the shaded rainforest and lychee orchard.

  2. Evaluation of pasture soil productivity in the semi-arid zone of Brazil by microbial analyses

    PubMed Central

    de Luna, Rômulo Gil; Coutinho, Henrique Douglas Melo; Grisi, Breno Machado

    2008-01-01

    The productivity of a pasture soil (caatinga) located in the region of São João do Cariri, PB, Brazil was evaluated based an the following microbiological parameters: biomass (measured by fumigation-incubation method), activity (estimated from basal respiration and cellulose decomposition rate), qCO2, and Cmic : Corg ratio. This analysis demonstrated that livestock management in the ‘caatinga’ is probably causing environment damage by affecting the soil properties, reducing the microbial biomass and soil respiration and increasing the qCO2, affecting the recovery of this ecosystem. PMID:24031238

  3. Temporal and spatial water use on irrigated and nonirrigated pasture-based dairy farms.

    PubMed

    Higham, C D; Horne, D; Singh, R; Kuhn-Sherlock, B; Scarsbrook, M R

    2017-08-01

    Robust information for water use on pasture-based dairy farms is critical to farmers' attempts to use water more efficiently and the improved allocation of freshwater resources to dairy farmers. To quantify the water requirements of dairy farms across regions in a practicable manner, it will be necessary to develop predictive models. The objectives of this study were to compare water use on a group of irrigated and nonirrigated farms, validate existing water use models using the data measured on the group of nonirrigated farms, and modify the model so that it can be used to predict water use on irrigated dairy farms. Water use data were collected on a group of irrigated dairy farms located in the Canterbury, New Zealand, region with the largest area under irrigation. The nonirrigated farms were located in the Manawatu region. The amount of water used for irrigation was almost 52-fold greater than the amount of all other forms of water use combined. There were large differences in measured milking parlor water use, stock drinking water, and leakage rates between the irrigated and nonirrigated farms. As expected, stock drinking water was lower on irrigated dairy farms. Irrigation lowers the dry matter percentage of pasture, ensuring that the amount of water ingested from pasture remains high throughout the year, thereby reducing the demand for drinking water. Leakage rates were different between the 2 groups of farms; 47% of stock drinking water was lost as leakage on nonirrigated farms, whereas leakage on the irrigated farms equated to only 13% of stock drinking water. These differences in leakage were thought to be related to regional differences rather than differences in irrigated versus nonirrigated farms. Existing models developed to predict milking parlor, corrected stock drinking water, and total water use on nonirrigated pasture-based dairy farms in a previous related study were tested on the data measured in the present research. As expected, these models

  4. Distribution of Singular Values of Random Band Matrices; Marchenko-Pastur Law and More

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, Indrajit; Soshnikov, Alexander

    2017-09-01

    We consider the limiting spectral distribution of matrices of the form 1/2b_{n+1} (R + X)(R + X)^{*}, where X is an n× n band matrix of bandwidth bn and R is a non random band matrix of bandwidth bn. We show that the Stieltjes transform of ESD of such matrices converges to the Stieltjes transform of a non-random measure. And the limiting Stieltjes transform satisfies an integral equation. For R=0, the integral equation yields the Stieltjes transform of the Marchenko-Pastur law.

  5. Soil water dynamics of lateritic catchments as affected by forest clearing for pasture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, M. L.; Barron, R. J. W.; Williamson, D. R.

    1987-10-01

    Aspects of soil water dynamics as affected by land use changes were examined over a period of five years (1974-1979) in two groups of adjacent catchments located in 1200 mm yr -1 and 800 mm yr -1 rainfall zones near Collie, Western Australia. In the summer of 1976/1977, after three years of calibration, 100% of one high rainfall catchment, Wights, and 53% of one lower rainfall catchment, Lemon, was cleared of native eucalyptus forest and replaced with pasture. The soil water storage down to 6m was measured in-situ using a neutron probe in fifteen access tubes located at five stratified sites in each catchment. Considerable spatial variability in soil water storage was encountered within a site, between sites within a catchment, and between paired catchments; the dominant variability being between sites. Comparisons between the pre- and postclearing states within a catchment and between the cleared and uncleared control catchments were used to evaluate the effect of change in land use on soil water dynamics. Within two years of the change from forest to pasture, a significant increase in soil water storage had occurred in the profiles in both cleared catchments. Concurrently, there was a small decrease in the uncleared control catchments. The increases following clearing were greater in the higher than in the lower rainfall catchment, more pronounced in the first year than in the second year, and occurred mostly at depths greater than 2m. In Wights catchment, the increase in summer minimum soil water storage in the first and second years amounted to 220 and 58 mm respectively, whilst for Lemon catchment the increase for the first year was < 50 mm. This increased soil water storage was due to a substantially lower evapotranspiration from the shallow-rooted, seasonally active pasture which extracts water from the top 1 m or so, compared with the perennial native eucalyptus forest which extracts water from depths down to 6 m and beyond. Due to the relatively low water

  6. Host Range Assessment of Helicotylenchus pseudorobustus (Tylenchida: Hoplolaimidae) on Pasture Species

    PubMed Central

    Davis, L. T.; Bell, N. L.; Watson, R.N.; Rohan, T. C.

    2004-01-01

    The host status of 15 commonly occurring pasture species for Helicotylenchus pseudorobustus was tested in a greenhouse trial. Only tall fescue, with and without Neotyphodium endophyte infection, was a good host (Pf/Pi = final/initial population > 1). Inoculation survival was tested in a second trial, which showed that only 10% of the H. pseudorobustus nematodes survived the first 7 days after inoculation. When the Pf/Pi was adjusted to account for a 10% survival, all of the grass and clover hosts tested had a Pf/Pi > 1. Both trials showed a positive correlation between increased numbers of H. pseudorobustus and free-living nematodes. PMID:19262829

  7. Grazing Behavior and Locomotion of Young Bulls Receiving Different Nutritional Plans in a Tropical Pasture

    PubMed Central

    Valente, E. E. L.; Paulino, M. F.; Detmann, E.; Valadares Filho, S. C.; Chizzotti, M. L.; Silva, A. G.; Maciel, I. F. S.

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to compare visual observation and an electronic grazing time method and to evaluate the effects of nutritional plans on intake, grazing behavior and horizontal and vertical locomotion of young bulls in a tropical pasture. Thirty-nine Nellore young bulls with an average body weight of 345±9.3 kg kept in pasture were used. The experimental treatments consisted of: restricted: animals kept in a plot with a low mass of forage receiving mineral mixture only; control: animals receiving mineral mixture only; HPHC: a high protein and high carbohydrate supplement; HPLC: a high protein and low carbohydrate supplement; LPHC: a low protein and high carbohydrate supplement; LPLC: a low protein and low carbohydrate supplement. GPS collars equipped with activity sensors were used. Information about head position, latitude, longitude and altitude were recorded. Daytime grazing behavioral patterns monitored by a continuous focal animal recording method was compared to behavior estimated by the activity sensor. Feed intake was estimated by a marker method. The Restricted group presented lower (p<0.05) intake of dry matter and TDN. However, difference in dry matter intake was not found (p>0.05) between non-supplemented and supplemented animals. Difference was not found (p>0.05) in daytime grazing time obtained by visual observation or the activity sensor method. The restricted group showed longer (p<0.05) grazing time (9.58 h/d) than other groups, but difference was not found (p>0.05) in the grazing time between Control (8.35 h/d) and supplemented animals (8.03 h/d). The Restricted group presented lower (p<0.05) horizontal locomotion distance (2,168 m/d) in comparison to other groups (2,580.6 m/d). It can be concluded that the use of activity sensor methods can be recommended due to their being similar to visual observation and able to record 24-h/d. While supplements with high carbohydrates reduce pasture intake, they do not change grazing behavior

  8. Low quality roughages for steers grazing wheat pasture. I. Effect on weight gains and bloat.

    PubMed

    Mader, T L; Horn, G W; Phillips, W A; McNew, R W

    1983-05-01

    The effect of feeding low quality roughages (LQR) on live and carcass weight gains and the incidence and severity of bloat of stocker cattle grazed on wheat pasture was evaluated in a 3 yr study. One hundred eighty-five steer calves (172 kg mean initial weight) grazed clean-tilled wheat pasture and were either fed no LQR or had ad libitum access to wheat straw (WS) or sorghum-Sudan hay (SS). Grazing periods were (I) fall grazing, (II) winter grazing, (III) period of lush spring growth of wheat forage and (IV) period of advancing forage maturity and declining quality. Mean dry matter (DM), crude protein and acid detergent fiber (ADF) content (percentage of DM) of wheat forage averaged across years ranged, respectively, from 23.8 to 33.0, 19.8 to 26.4 and 21.5 to 27.7. Mean daily consumption (kg DM/head) of WS and SS by steers ranged from .076 to .100 and .199 to .248, respectively. Live and carcass weight gains of steers during Periods I through III (i.e., the usual wheat pasture grazing period) were not influenced (P greater than .05) by treatments. Carcass weight gains were about 74% of live weight gains. Bloat was observed only during the last 2 wk of Period III of the first year. The incidence (steer days of bloat) and severity (bloat score) of control, WS- and SS-fed steers were 9.5 and 1.2, .5 and .5 and 2.0 and 1.0, and were not different (P greater than .05) among treatments. Intake of WS and SS [g/body weight (BW).75kg] during Periods I to III was, respectively, only about 5 and 12% of roughage intakes (i.e., 37.5 g/BW.75kg) reported in the literature to "effectively control" or aid the prevention of bloat. It seems unlikely that LQR consumed to amounts similar to those of this study would control bloat of stocker cattle on wheat pasture.

  9. Retrieval of Soil Moisture in Plateau Pasture Using RADARSAT-2 Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Xun; Shao, Yun; Zhang, Tingting; Gong, Huaze; Liu, Long; Xie, Kaixin

    2015-04-01

    The object of this paper is to investigate the estimation of volumetric soil moisture in vegetated areas of plateau pasture using fully polarimetric RADARSAT-2 SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) images at C-band. Experimental campaigns were conducted in September 2012 and May 2013 in Qinghai Lake watershed in northeastern Tibetan Plateau with simultaneously satellite overpass. Two algorithms for soil moisture retrieval were proposed based on water-cloud model, Chen model and Dubois model. Then the performance of models were tested and validated using simulated and experimental data. Validation results indicated that the developed Dubois model can satisfied the requirement of soil moisture inversion in study region.

  10. [Effectiveness and outlook for using attractants in controlling horseflies in pastures].

    PubMed

    Pavlova, R P

    1988-01-01

    The paper concerns the possibility of decreasing the number of tabanid flies on pastures by means of ball- and funnel-shaped traps (of the Manitoba type) with insecticides and expediency of using the above method for the cattle protection that prevents the milk productivity loss by 6.7 to 8.3%. In addition to the traps, a regular cattle dip with insecticides, which are most attracting for the whole complex of bloodsucking Diptera and zoophilous flies, offers promise in the control of tabanids.

  11. The role of livestock-poached pasture as a sediment source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwood, Philip; Walling, Desmond; Quine, Timothy

    2015-04-01

    Historically, the occurrence of sediment-laden runoff has almost exclusively been associated with cultivated hillslopes and particularly with arable land. This association was commonly accompanied by the presumption that, in comparison with cultivated slopes, erosion from intensively-managed lowland pasture was relatively low. Recent developments in sediment source tracing and fingerprinting techniques have, however, challenged these assumptions by demonstrating that soil loss from grasslands may be greater than previously assumed. In attempting to identify potential source areas within grassland environments, attention has frequently focused on areas of livestock poaching where herd animals tend to congregate. However, the role of poached grassland as a sediment-source remains uncertain. Reasons include the difficulties associated with accurately documenting the movement or redistribution of small quantities of fine sediment over relevant spatial and temporal scales. Motivated by an urgent need for such information, this communication presents preliminary results from a tracing study aimed at measuring sediment redistribution within areas of poached pasture over short (i.e. event-based) timescales using the artificial radionuclides, caesium-134 (134Cs) and cobalt-60 (60Co). The approach involved labelling six small areas (0.2 * 0.2 m) of poached soil, each with a contrasting gradient, with either 134Cs or 60Co, and then measuring changes in the radiometric inventory at predetermined points before and after periods of rainfall. Each labelled area of poached pasture was measured on three separate occasions over a 65 day period. At the end of the monitoring phase, the mean net soil redistribution depth (mm) was negative for all plots, with values ranging from -6.8 mm to -15.2 mm. This is interpreted as evidence of the removal, or erosion, of surface material. The findings indicate that areas of livestock-poached pasture can act as significant sediment sources. These

  12. Pasture forages, supplementation rate, and stocking rate effects on dairy cow performance.

    PubMed

    Fike, J H; Staples, C R; Sollenberger, L E; Macoon, B; Moore, J E

    2003-04-01

    Objectives were to evaluate effects of forage species, stocking rate, and supplementation rate on performance and physiology of grazing lactating Holstein cows under intensive rotational stocking management during summer. Eight treatments were arranged in a 2 x 2 x 2 factorial design. Animals (n = 62) grazed pastures of Tifton 85 bermudagrass or Florigraze rhizoma peanut, a tropical legume. Low and high stocking rates were 7.5 and 10.0 cows/ha for bermudagrass and 5.0 and 7.5 cows/ha for rhizoma peanut. Within each forage-stocking rate combination, cows were fed supplement at 0.33 or 0.5 kg of supplement (as-fed basis)/kg daily milk production. Cows grazing rhizoma peanut pastures produced more milk (16.9 vs. 15.4 kg/d) but had higher rectal temperatures (39.4 vs. 39.1 degrees C). Milk production per cow was improved at the higher stocking rate for bermudagrass but was reduced at the higher stocking rate for peanuts. Increasing supplementation rate boosted plasma glucose, milk production, and milk protein percent. Increased supplementation rate had a greater positive impact on milk production of cows grazing bermudagrass compared to rhizoma peanut (21.9 vs. 10.6% increase) due to a lower substitution of grain for forage intake. Organic matter intakes of forage, supplement, and total diet were greatest by cows grazing rhizoma peanut pastures and averaged 12.4, 6.1, and 18.5 kg/d compared to 9.2, 5.4, and 14.6 kg/d for cows grazing bermudagrass. Despite lower individual feed intake and performance, production per unit land area was 29% greater (112 vs. 90 kg of milk/ha per d) for cows grazing bermudagrass due to the greater stocking rate possible with that forage. Only cows supplemented at the high rate and kept at the high stocking rate on bermudagrass maintained body weight. Cows on other treatments lost body weight. Tifton 85 bermudagrass appears to be an excellent summer forage for dairy cows grazing in the southeastern U.S. given its nutritive value

  13. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 100-F-54 Animal Farm Pastures, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2008-015

    SciTech Connect

    J. M. Capron

    2008-04-17

    The 100-F-54 waste site, part of the 100-FR-2 Operable Unit, is the soil associated with the former pastures for holding domestic farm animals used in experimental toxicology studies. Evaluation of historical information resulted in identification of the experimental animal farm pastures as having potential residual soil contamination due to excrement from experimental animals. The 100-F-54 animal farm pastures confirmatory sampling results support a reclassification of this site to No Action. The current site conditions achieve the remedial action objectives and the corresponding remedial action goals established in the Remaining Sites ROD. The results of confirmatory sampling show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  14. Whole grains in the finishing of culled ewes in pasture or feedlot: Performance, carcass characteristics and meat quality.

    PubMed

    Fruet, Ana Paula Burin; Stefanello, Flávia Santi; Rosado Júnior, Adriano Garcia; Souza, Alexandre Nunes Motta de; Tonetto, Cléber José; Nörnberg, José Laerte

    2016-03-01

    In order to evaluate the performance, carcass characteristics and meat quality of culled ewes finished in pasture or exclusivelywith grain, 41 culled Polwarth ewes, were assigned to six treatments: RY (ryegrass pasture), RYGO (ryegrass and whole grain oats), RYGM (ryegrass and whole grain maize), GM (whole grain maize), GO (whole grain oats), GS (whole grain sorghum). The finishing systemof the ewes influenced weight gain,wherein the GM and GS treatments increased daily weight gain. The GO treatment decreased the dressing percentage. Nonetheless, a*, h*, pH, cooking loss and tenderness were similar across dietary treatments. Using principal component analysis, the variables C18:2n6, h*, n6/n3, TBARS, total lipids, L* and b* were assigned as characteristics of meat from the feedlot animals, while the pasture finishing system produced meat with higher CLA and n-3 fatty acids but lower TBARS values indicating lipid stability.

  15. Evapotranspiration estimation in pastures at the municipality of Campo Grande, Brazil, using SEBAL and remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, R. G.; Leivas, J. F.; Alvarez, I. A.; Vicente, L. E.; Nogueira, S. F.; Hott, M. C.; Takemura, C. M.; Gomes, D.

    2011-12-01

    The knowledge of the total water loss by evapotranspiration is essential for plant growth and development assessments. Studies show that the success of the Brazilian livestock is directly linked to the fact that bovine cattle is reared in pastures, which enables low cost beef production. However, many factors influence the productive capacity of pastures and, consequently, beef production. Among these, there are variations in precipitation, causing periods of water deficit even during rainy seasons, which makes evapotranspiration a major factor in the diagnosis of climatic and environmental conditions of pasture areas. Remote sensing information has been used by several models and algorithms for obtaining parameters of the Earth's surface. The Surface Energy Balance Algorithms for Land (SEBAL) is an algorithm for evapotranspiration estimation for large areas. It is processed by means of computational steps, which predict a full assessment of the solar radiation and energy on the Earth's surface. For that it uses data of sensors that collect wavelengths in the visible, reflective infrared and thermal bands. This study aimed at estimating actual daily evapotranspiration (ETdaily) in pasture areas at Embrapa Beef Cattle's Experimental Farm, located in the municipality of Campo Grande, Brazil, by means of the SEBAL algorithm and Landsat 5-TM images. For the scenes of May 9, June 28, July 7 and October 2, 2009, the ETdaily varied from 0.50 to 3.50 mm/day with an average of 1.85 mm/day for pasture areas. The application of the SEBAL algorithm proved itself adequate in extensive areas, and it is possible to use it for monitoring pasture conditions, thus contributing to making decisions that favor beef cattle production with environmental sustainability.

  16. Evapotranspiration estimation in pastures at the municipality of Campo Grande, Brazil, using SEBAL and remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, R. G.; Leivas, J. F.; Hott, M. C.; Alvarez, I. A.; Vicente, L. E.; Nogueira, S. F.; Takemura, C. M.

    2011-12-01

    The knowledge of the total water loss by evapotranspiration is essential for plant growth and development assessments. Studies show that the success of the Brazilian livestock is directly linked to the fact that bovine cattle is reared in pastures, which enables low cost beef production. However, many factors influence the productive capacity of pastures and, consequently, beef production. Among these, there are variations in precipitation, causing periods of water deficit even during rainy seasons, which makes evapotranspiration a major factor in the diagnosis of climatic and environmental conditions of pasture areas. Remote sensing information has been used by several models and algorithms for obtaining parameters of the Earth's surface. The Surface Energy Balance Algorithms for Land (SEBAL) is an algorithm for evapotranspiration estimation for large areas. It is processed by means of computational steps, which predict a full assessment of the solar radiation and energy on the Earth's surface. For that it uses data of sensors that collect wavelengths in the visible, reflective infrared and thermal bands. This study aimed at estimating actual daily evapotranspiration (ETdaily) in pasture areas at Embrapa Beef Cattle's Experimental Farm, located in the municipality of Campo Grande, Brazil, by means of the SEBAL algorithm and Landsat 5-TM images. For the scenes of May 9, June 28, July 7 and October 2, 2009, the ETdaily varied from 0.50 to 3.50 mm d-1 with an average of 1.85 mm d-1 for pasture areas. The application of the SEBAL algorithm proved itself adequate in extensive areas, and it is possible to use it for monitoring pasture conditions, thus contributing to making decisions that favor beef cattle production with environmental sustainability.

  17. Effect of dietary dehydrated pasture and citrus pulp on the performance and meat quality of broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Mourão, J L; Pinheiro, V M; Prates, J A M; Bessa, R J B; Ferreira, L M A; Fontes, C M G A; Ponte, P I P

    2008-04-01

    Some feedstuffs containing significant levels of fiber may be a good source of bioactive compounds that may contribute to improving broiler meat quality. However, high fiber level can have a negative impact on broiler performance. A study was undertaken to investigate the impact of incorporating citrus pulp (5 or 10%) or dehydrated pasture (5 or 10%) on the performance, carcass yield, and characteristics of broiler chickens. A diet containing neither citrus pulp nor dehydrated pasture was used as control. The results on growth performances showed that daily weight gain was reduced by 26% in birds of the 10% citrus pulp treatment (P<0.05). Compared with the control treatment, increases in feed intake occurred in birds consuming diets with 5 or 10% citrus pulp, which resulted in significantly higher feed conversion rates with the 10% level. Under the same incorporation rate, dehydrated pasture had effects less evident on the performances of broiler chicken. In addition, diets containing citrus pulp, displaying higher percentages of soluble nonstarch polysaccharides, increased small intestine relative length, and reduced carcass yield. Inclusion of 10% dehydrated pasture in diets resulted in improved breast skin yellowness (P<0.05). Finally, the results revealed that incorporation of the nonstarch polysaccharide-rich feedstuffs had a major impact on the fatty acid profile (affected 16 of 21 fatty acids) of broiler meat. Polyunsaturated fatty acids content in meat was higher in birds consuming the highest levels of both citrus pulp and dehydrated pasture, leading to increased ratios of polyunsaturated to saturated fatty acids. Together, the results suggest that incorporation of moderate levels of dehydrated pastures in poultry diets has a minor impact on broiler performance and can contribute significantly to improve breast skin yellowness and fatty acid composition of meat.

  18. Consequences of buffelgrass pasture development for primary productivity, perennial plant richness, and vegetation structure in the drylands of Sonora, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Kimberly; Molina-Freaner, Francisco

    2010-12-01

    In large parts of northern Mexico native plant communities are being converted to non-native buffelgrass (Pennisetum ciliare) pastures, and this conversion could fundamentally alter primary productivity and species richness. In Sonora, Mexico land conversion is occurring at a regional scale along a rainfall-driven gradient of primary productivity, across which native plant communities transition from desert scrub to thorn scrub. We used a paired sampling design to compare a satellite-derived index of primary productivity, richness of perennial plant species, and canopy-height profiles of native plant communities with buffelgrass pastures. We sampled species richness across a gradient of primary productivity in desert scrub and thorn scrub vegetation to examine the influence of site productivity on the outcomes of land conversion. We also examined the influence of pasture age on species richness of perennial plants. Index values of primary productivity were lower in buffelgrass pastures than in native vegetation, which suggests a reduction in primary productivity. Land conversion reduced species richness by approximately 50% at local and regional scales, reduced tree and shrub cover by 78%, and reduced canopy height. Land conversion disproportionately reduced shrub species richness, which reflects the common practice among Sonoran ranchers of conserving certain tree and cactus species. Site productivity did not affect the outcomes of land conversion. The age of a buffelgrass pasture was unrelated to species richness within the pasture, which suggests that passive recovery of species richness to preconversion levels is unlikely. Our findings demonstrate that land conversion can result in large losses of plant species richness at local and regional scales and in substantial changes to primary productivity and vegetation structure, which casts doubt on the feasibility of restoring native plant communities without active intervention on the part of land managers.

  19. Field study on the survival, migration and overwintering of infective larvae of horse strongyles on pasture in central Ukraine.

    PubMed

    Kuzmina, T A; Kuzmin, Y I; Kharchenko, V A

    2006-11-05

    Experimental studies on the survival of infective stage larvae of horse strongyles and their ability to overwinter on pasture were carried out in central Ukraine (Poltavska oblast). Faecal pats (1.5 kg each) of naturally infected horses were placed on pasture, and samples of faeces and surrounding vegetation (10 g each) were collected each month, excluding the winter months, from November 2002 until April 2004. The number of infective third stage larvae was calculated in each sample and compared with that from the control faecal samples cultivated in the laboratory. In the control samples, the ratio of infective third stage larvae to the initial number of eggs was from 54.7% in June up to 84.2% in November. This ratio depended on the presence of nematophagous fungi growing in the faeces. On pasture, the development of larvae to the infective third stage took approximately 4 weeks in the warm season, from April until September. In October, a percentage of the eggs (25% to EPG value) did not hatch. No larval development was observed in faeces in November. A minute quantity of larvae, about 0.03% of their initial number, was observed to survive on pasture for the 12 months. Migration of infective larvae from the faeces to vegetation was not intensive, between 71% and 89% of larvae remained in the faeces 4 weeks after deposition of the faecal pats, the percentage related to soil humidity in each month. The proportion of larvae successfully surviving during winter appeared to be maximal in faecal pats deposited on pasture in September of the previous year (up to 42.0% of the initial number of larvae). Some larvae were observed surviving winter in soil beneath the faecal pats. The results of the study demonstrated that horse pastures in the central part of Ukraine are never free from the infective third stage larvae of strongyles.

  20. Whole Farm Net Greenhouse Gas Abatement from Establishing Kikuyu-Based Perennial Pastures in South-Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Dean T; Sanderman, Jonathan; Eady, Sandra J; Masters, David G; Sanford, Paul

    2012-08-03

    On-farm activities that reduce GHG emissions or sequester carbon from the atmosphere to compensate for anthropogenic emissions are currently being evaluated by the Australian Government as carbon offset opportunities. The aim of this study was to examine the implications of establishing and grazing Kikuyu pastures, integrated as part of a mixed Merino sheep and cropping system, as a carbon offset mechanism. For the assessment of changes in net greenhouse gas emissions, results from a combination of whole farm economic and livestock models were used (MIDAS and GrassGro). Net GHG emissions were determined by deducting increased emissions from introducing this practice change (increased methane and nitrous oxide emissions due to higher stocking rates) from the soil carbon sequestered from growing the Kikuyu pasture. Our results indicate that livestock systems using perennial pastures may have substantially lower net GHG emissions, and reduced GHG intensity of production, compared with annual plant-based production systems. Soil carbon accumulation by converting 45% of arable land within a farm enterprise to Kikuyu-based pasture was determined to be 0.80 t CO₂-e farm ha(-1) yr(-1) and increased GHG emissions (leakage) was 0.19 t CO₂-e farm ha(-1) yr(-1). The net benefit of this practice change was 0.61 t CO₂-e farm ha(-1) yr(-1) while the rate of soil carbon accumulation remains constant. The use of perennial pastures improved the efficiency of animal production almost eight fold when expressed as carbon dioxide equivalent emissions per unit of animal product. The strategy of using perennial pasture to improve production levels and store additional carbon in the soil demonstrates how livestock should be considered in farming systems as both sources and sinks for GHG abatement.