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Sample records for brachytherapy zvysovani efektivity

  1. Brachytherapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... smaller area in less time than conventional external beam radiation therapy. Brachytherapy is used to treat cancers ... to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. External beam radiation therapy (EBRT) involves high-energy x-ray ...

  2. Dosimetric audit in brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, D A; Nisbet, A

    2014-01-01

    Dosimetric audit is required for the improvement of patient safety in radiotherapy and to aid optimization of treatment. The reassurance that treatment is being delivered in line with accepted standards, that delivered doses are as prescribed and that quality improvement is enabled is as essential for brachytherapy as it is for the more commonly audited external beam radiotherapy. Dose measurement in brachytherapy is challenging owing to steep dose gradients and small scales, especially in the context of an audit. Several different approaches have been taken for audit measurement to date: thimble and well-type ionization chambers, thermoluminescent detectors, optically stimulated luminescence detectors, radiochromic film and alanine. In this work, we review all of the dosimetric brachytherapy audits that have been conducted in recent years, look at current audits in progress and propose required directions for brachytherapy dosimetric audit in the future. The concern over accurate source strength measurement may be essentially resolved with modern equipment and calibration methods, but brachytherapy is a rapidly developing field and dosimetric audit must keep pace. PMID:24807068

  3. [Safety in brachytherapy].

    PubMed

    Marcié, S; Marinello, G; Peiffert, D; Lartigau, É

    2013-04-01

    No technique can now be used without previously considering the safety of patients, staff and public and risk management. This is the case for brachytherapy. The various aspects of brachytherapy are discussed for both the patient and the staff. For all, the risks must be minimized while achieving a treatment of quality. It is therefore necessary to establish a list as comprehensive as possible regardless of the type of brachytherapy (low, high, pulsed dose-rate). Then, their importance must be assessed with the help of their criticality. Radiation protection of personnel and public must take into account the many existing regulation texts. Four axes have been defined for the risk management for patients: organization, preparation, planning and implementation of treatment. For each axis, a review of risks is presented, as well as administrative, technical and medical dispositions for staff and the public. PMID:23465784

  4. [High dose rate brachytherapy].

    PubMed

    Aisen, S; Carvalho, H A; Chavantes, M C; Esteves, S C; Haddad, C M; Permonian, A C; Taier, M do C; Marinheiro, R C; Feriancic, C V

    1992-01-01

    The high dose rate brachytherapy uses a single source os 192Ir with 10Ci of nominal activity in a remote afterloading machine. This technique allows an outpatient treatment, without the inconveniences of the conventional low dose rate brachytherapy such as use of general anesthesia, rhachianesthesia, prolonged immobilization, and personal exposition to radiation. The radiotherapy department is now studying 5 basic treatment schemes concerning carcinomas of the uterine cervix, endometrium, lung, esophagus and central nervous system tumors. With the Micro Selectron HDR, 257 treatment sessions were done in 90 patients. Mostly were treated with weekly fractions, receiving a total of three to four treatments each. No complications were observed neither during nor after the procedure. Doses, fraction and ideal associations still have to be studied, so that a higher therapeutic ratio can be reached.

  5. Salvage Brachytherapy for Biochemically Recurrent Prostate Cancer following Primary Brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Lacy, John M.; Wilson, William A.; Bole, Raevti; Chen, Li; Meigooni, Ali S.; Rowland, Randall G.; Clair, William H. St.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. In this study, we evaluated our experience with salvage brachytherapy after discovery of biochemical recurrence after a prior brachytherapy procedure. Methods and Materials. From 2001 through 2012 twenty-one patients treated by brachytherapy within University of Kentucky or from outside centers developed biochemical failure and had no evidence of metastases. Computed tomography (CT) scans were evaluated; patients who had an underseeded portion of their prostate were considered for reimplantation. Results. The majority of the patients in this study (61.9%) were low risk and median presalvage PSA was 3.49 (range 17.41–1.68). Mean follow-up was 61 months. At last follow-up after reseeding, 11/21 (52.4%) were free of biochemical recurrence. There was a trend towards decreased freedom from biochemical recurrence in low risk patients (p = 0.12). International Prostate Symptom Scores (IPSS) increased at 3-month follow-up visits but decreased and were equivalent to baseline scores at 18 months. Conclusions. Salvage brachytherapy after primary brachytherapy is possible; however, in our experience the side-effect profile after the second brachytherapy procedure was higher than after the first brachytherapy procedure. In this cohort of patients we demonstrate that approximately 50% oncologic control, low risk patients appear to have better outcomes than others. PMID:27092279

  6. Recurrent abscess after MammoSite brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Lopchinsky, Richard A; Giles, Kristina A

    2004-01-01

    Recently a new catheter was introduced to facilitate brachytherapy in a lumpectomy cavity. Data are limited on the side effects of high-dose brachytherapy to the lumpectomy cavity with the MammoSite catheter. We present a case of recurrent abscesses over a 7-month period in the lumpectomy cavity after MammoSite brachytherapy.

  7. Brachytherapy in Gynecologic Cancers: Why Is It Underused?

    PubMed

    Han, Kathy; Viswanathan, Akila N

    2016-04-01

    Despite its established efficacy, brachytherapy is underused in the management of cervical and vaginal cancers in some parts of the world. Possible reasons for the underutilization of brachytherapy include the adoption of less invasive techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy; reimbursement policies favoring these techniques over brachytherapy; poor physician or patient access to brachytherapy; inadequate maintenance of brachytherapy skills among practicing radiation oncologists; transitioning to high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy with increased time requirements; and insufficient training of radiation oncology residents.

  8. Brachytherapy dosimeter with silicon photomultipliers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moutinho, L. M.; Castro, I. F. C.; Peralta, L.; Abreu, M. C.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.

    2015-07-01

    In-vivo and in-situ measurement of the radiation dose administered during brachytherapy faces several technical challenges, requiring a very compact, tissue-equivalent, linear and highly sensitive dosimeter, particularly in low-dose rate brachytherapy procedures, which use radioactive seeds with low energy and low dose deposition rate. In this work we present a scintillating optical fiber dosimeter composed of a flexible sensitive probe and a dedicated electronic readout system based on silicon photomultiplier photodetection, capable of operating both in pulse and current modes. The performance of the scintillating fiber optic dosimeter was evaluated in low energy regimes, using an X-ray tube operating at voltages of 40-50 kV and currents below 1 mA, to assess minimum dose response of the scintillating fiber. The dosimeter shows a linear response with dose and is capable of detecting mGy dose variations like an ionization chamber. Besides fulfilling all the requirements for a dosimeter in brachytherapy, the high sensitivity of this device makes it a suitable candidate for application in low-dose rate brachytherapy. According to Peralta and Rego [1], the BCF-10 and BCF-60 scintillating optical fibers used in dosimetry exhibit high variations in their sensitivity for photon beams in the 25-100 kVp energy range. Energy linearity for energies below 50 keV needs to be further investigated, using monochromatic X-ray photons.

  9. Feasibility of functional imaging for brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    This review summarizes the current understanding of the feasibility of functional imaging for brachytherapy. In following subsections the role of ultrasound, power doppler imaging, positron emission tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, dynamic dose calculation and targeted brachytherapy is analyzed. The combination of functional imaging with the new tools for intraoperative dose calculation and optimization opens new and exciting times in brachytherapy. New optimized protocols are needed and should be tested in controlled trials, to demonstrate an advantage of such a new paradigm.

  10. Image-based brachytherapy for cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Vargo, John A; Beriwal, Sushil

    2014-12-10

    Cervical cancer is the third most common cancer in women worldwide; definitive radiation therapy and concurrent chemotherapy is the accepted standard of care for patients with node positive or locally advanced tumors > 4 cm. Brachytherapy is an important part of definitive radiotherapy shown to improve overall survival. While results for two-dimensional X-ray based brachytherapy have been good in terms of local control especially for early stage disease, unexplained toxicities and treatment failures remain. Improvements in brachytherapy planning have more recently paved the way for three-dimensional image-based brachytherapy with volumetric optimization which increases tumor control, reduces toxicity, and helps predict outcomes. Advantages of image-based brachytherapy include: improved tumor coverage (especially for large volume disease), decreased dose to critical organs (especially for small cervix), confirmation of applicator placement, and accounting for sigmoid colon dose. A number of modalities for image-based brachytherapy have emerged including: magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), CT-MRI hybrid, and ultrasound with respective benefits and outcomes data. For practical application of image-based brachytherapy the Groupe Europeen de Curietherapie-European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology Working Group and American Brachytherapy Society working group guideline serve as invaluable tools, additionally here-in we outline our institutional clinical integration of these guidelines. While the body of literature supporting image-based brachytherapy continues to evolve a number of uncertainties and challenges remain including: applicator reconstruction, increasing resource/cost demands, mobile four-dimensional targets and organs-at-risk, and accurate contouring of "grey zones" to avoid marginal miss. Ongoing studies, including the prospective EMBRACE (an international study of MRI-guided brachytherapy in locally advanced cervical

  11. Afterloading: The Technique That Rescued Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Aronowitz, Jesse N.

    2015-07-01

    Although brachytherapy had been established as a highly effective modality for the treatment of cancer, its application was threatened by mid-20th century due to appreciation of the radiation hazard to health care workers. This review examines how the introduction of afterloading eliminated exposure and ushered in a brachytherapy renaissance.

  12. Testicular shielding in penile brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Bindal, Arpita; Tambe, Chandrashekhar M.; Ghadi, Yogesh; Murthy, Vedang; Shrivastava, Shyam Kishore

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Penile cancer, although rare, is one of the common genitourinary cancers in India affecting mostly aged uncircumcised males. For patients presenting with small superficial lesions < 3 cm restricted to glans, surgery, radical external radiation or brachytherapy may be offered, the latter being preferred as it allows organ and function preservation. In patients receiving brachytherapy, testicular morbidity is not commonly addressed. With an aim to minimize and document the doses to testis after adequate shielding during radical interstitial brachytherapy for penile cancers, we undertook this study in 2 patients undergoing brachytherapy and forms the basis of this report. Material and methods Two patients with early stage penile cancer limited to the glans were treated with radical high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy using interstitial implant. A total of 7-8 tubes were implanted in two planes, parallel to the penile shaft. A total dose of 44-48 Gy (55-60 Gy EQD2 doses with α/β = 10) was delivered in 11-12 fractions of 4 Gy each delivered twice daily. Lead sheets adding to 11 mm (4-5 half value layer) were interposed between the penile shaft and scrotum. The testicular dose was measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters. For each patient, dosimetry was done for 3 fractions and mean calculated. Results The cumulative testicular dose to left and right testis was 31.68 cGy and 42.79 cGy for patient A, and 21.96 cGy and 23.28 cGy for patient B. For the same patients, the mean cumulative dose measured at the posterior aspect of penile shaft was 722.15 cGy and 807.72 cGy, amounting to 16.4% and 16.8% of the prescribed dose. Hence, the application of lead shield 11 mm thick reduced testicular dose from 722-808 cGy to 21.96-42.57 cGy, an “absolute reduction” of 95.99 ± 1.5%. Conclusions With the use of a simple lead shield as described, we were able to effectively reduce testicular dose from “spermicidal” range to “oligospermic” range with possible

  13. Dynamic rotating-shield brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yunlong; Flynn, Ryan T.; Kim, Yusung; Yang, Wenjun; Wu, Xiaodong

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: To present dynamic rotating shield brachytherapy (D-RSBT), a novel form of high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) with electronic brachytherapy source, where the radiation shield is capable of changing emission angles during the radiation delivery process.Methods: A D-RSBT system uses two layers of independently rotating tungsten alloy shields, each with a 180° azimuthal emission angle. The D-RSBT planning is separated into two stages: anchor plan optimization and optimal sequencing. In the anchor plan optimization, anchor plans are generated by maximizing the D{sub 90} for the high-risk clinical-tumor-volume (HR-CTV) assuming a fixed azimuthal emission angle of 11.25°. In the optimal sequencing, treatment plans that most closely approximate the anchor plans under the delivery-time constraint will be efficiently computed. Treatment plans for five cervical cancer patients were generated for D-RSBT, single-shield RSBT (S-RSBT), and {sup 192}Ir-based intracavitary brachytherapy with supplementary interstitial brachytherapy (IS + ICBT) assuming five treatment fractions. External beam radiotherapy doses of 45 Gy in 25 fractions of 1.8 Gy each were accounted for. The high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) doses were escalated such that the D{sub 2cc} of the rectum, sigmoid colon, or bladder reached its tolerance equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2 with α/β= 3 Gy) of 75 Gy, 75 Gy, or 90 Gy, respectively.Results: For the patients considered, IS + ICBT had an average total dwell time of 5.7 minutes/fraction (min/fx) assuming a 10 Ci{sup 192}Ir source, and the average HR-CTV D{sub 90} was 78.9 Gy. In order to match the HR-CTV D{sub 90} of IS + ICBT, D-RSBT required an average of 10.1 min/fx more delivery time, and S-RSBT required 6.7 min/fx more. If an additional 20 min/fx of delivery time is allowed beyond that of the IS + ICBT case, D-RSBT and S-RSBT increased the HR-CTV D{sub 90} above IS + ICBT by an average of 16.3 Gy and 9.1 Gy, respectively

  14. High dose rate brachytherapy for oral cancer

    PubMed Central

    YamazakI, Hideya; Yoshida, Ken; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Shimizutani, Kimishige; Furukawa, Souhei; Koizumi, Masahiko; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Brachytherapy results in better dose distribution compared with other treatments because of steep dose reduction in the surrounding normal tissues. Excellent local control rates and acceptable side effects have been demonstrated with brachytherapy as a sole treatment modality, a postoperative method, and a method of reirradiation. Low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy has been employed worldwide for its superior outcome. With the advent of technology, high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy has enabled health care providers to avoid radiation exposure. This therapy has been used for treating many types of cancer such as gynecological cancer, breast cancer, and prostate cancer. However, LDR and pulsed-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapies have been mainstays for head and neck cancer. HDR brachytherapy has not become widely used in the radiotherapy community for treating head and neck cancer because of lack of experience and biological concerns. On the other hand, because HDR brachytherapy is less time-consuming, treatment can occasionally be administered on an outpatient basis. For the convenience and safety of patients and medical staff, HDR brachytherapy should be explored. To enhance the role of this therapy in treatment of head and neck lesions, we have reviewed its outcomes with oral cancer, including Phase I/II to Phase III studies, evaluating this technique in terms of safety and efficacy. In particular, our studies have shown that superficial tumors can be treated using a non-invasive mold technique on an outpatient basis without adverse reactions. The next generation of image-guided brachytherapy using HDR has been discussed. In conclusion, although concrete evidence is yet to be produced with a sophisticated study in a reproducible manner, HDR brachytherapy remains an important option for treatment of oral cancer. PMID:23179377

  15. Clinical implementation of a new electronic brachytherapy system for skin brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Pons-Llanas, Olga; Ballester-Sánchez, Rosa; Celada-Álvarez, Francisco Javier; Candela-Juan, Cristian; García-Martínez, Teresa; Llavador-Ros, Margarita; Botella-Estrada, Rafael; Barker, Christopher A; Ballesta, Antonio; Tormo-Micó, Alejandro; Rodríguez, Silvia; Perez-Calatayud, Jose

    2015-01-01

    Although surgery is usually the first-line treatment for nonmelanoma skin cancers, radiotherapy (RT) may be indicated in selected cases. Radiation therapy as primary therapy can result in excellent control rates, cosmetics, and quality of life. Brachytherapy is a radiation treatment modality that offers the most conformal option to patients. A new modality for skin brachytherapy is electronic brachytherapy. This involves the placement of a high dose rate X-ray source directly in a skin applicator close to the skin surface, and therefore combines the benefits of brachytherapy with those of low energy X-ray radiotherapy. The Esteya electronic brachytherapy system is specifically designed for skin surface brachytherapy procedures. The purpose of this manuscript is to describe the clinical implementation of the new Esteya electronic brachytherapy system, which may provide guidance for users of this system. The information covered includes patient selection, treatment planning (depth evaluation and margin determination), patient marking, and setup. The justification for the hypofractionated regimen is described and compared with others protocols in the literature. Quality assurance (QA) aspects including daily testing are also included. We emphasize that these are guidelines, and clinical judgment and experience must always prevail in the care of patients, as with any medical treatment. We conclude that clinical implementation of the Esteya brachytherapy system is simple for patients and providers, and should allow for precise and safe treatment of nonmelanoma skin cancers. PMID:25834587

  16. Dosimetric Characteristics for Brachytherapy Sources

    SciTech Connect

    DeWerd, Larry A.; Davis, Stephen D.

    2011-05-05

    Brachytherapy sources are characterized by the dosimetric parameters in a protocol such as the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group 43. The air-kerma strength is measured and traceable to a primary standard. Then the parameters such as dose-rate constant, radial dose function, and anisotropy function are measured and related back to the primary standard. This is normally accomplished with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). Since radial dose function and anisotropy function are relative parameters, some of the dosimetric corrections are negligible. For the dose-rate constant, parameters such as the energy dependence compared with a calibration beam such as {sup 60}Co need to be accounted for. A description of the primary standard measurements and TLD measurements will be discussed.

  17. In vivo dosimetry in brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Tanderup, Kari; Beddar, Sam; Andersen, Claus E.; Kertzscher, Gustavo; Cygler, Joanna E.

    2013-07-15

    In vivo dosimetry (IVD) has been used in brachytherapy (BT) for decades with a number of different detectors and measurement technologies. However, IVD in BT has been subject to certain difficulties and complexities, in particular due to challenges of the high-gradient BT dose distribution and the large range of dose and dose rate. Due to these challenges, the sensitivity and specificity toward error detection has been limited, and IVD has mainly been restricted to detection of gross errors. Given these factors, routine use of IVD is currently limited in many departments. Although the impact of potential errors may be detrimental since treatments are typically administered in large fractions and with high-gradient-dose-distributions, BT is usually delivered without independent verification of the treatment delivery. This Vision 20/20 paper encourages improvements within BT safety by developments of IVD into an effective method of independent treatment verification.

  18. Brachytherapy next generation: robotic systems

    PubMed Central

    Popescu, Tiberiu; Kacsó, Alex Cristian; Pisla, Doina

    2015-01-01

    In a field dominated by external beam radiation therapy (EBRT), both the therapeutic and technical possibilities of brachytherapy (BT) are underrated, shadowed by protons and intensity modulated radiotherapy. Decreasing expertise and indications, as well as increasing lack of specific BT training for radiation therapy (RT) residents led to the real need of shortening its learning curve and making it more popular. Developing robotic BT devices can be a way to mitigate the above issues. There are many teams working at custom-made robotic BT platforms to perfect and overcome the limitations of the existing systems. This paper provides a picture of the current state-of-the-art in robotic assisted BT, as it also conveys the author's solution to the problem, a parallel robot that uses CT-guidance. PMID:26816510

  19. 21 CFR 892.5730 - Radionuclide brachytherapy source.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Radionuclide brachytherapy source. 892.5730... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5730 Radionuclide brachytherapy source. (a) Identification. A radionuclide brachytherapy source is a device that consists of...

  20. 10 CFR 35.432 - Calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources. 35.432 Section 35.432 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Manual Brachytherapy § 35.432 Calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources. (a) Before the first medical use of...

  1. 21 CFR 892.5730 - Radionuclide brachytherapy source.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Radionuclide brachytherapy source. 892.5730... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5730 Radionuclide brachytherapy source. (a) Identification. A radionuclide brachytherapy source is a device that consists of...

  2. 10 CFR 35.432 - Calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources. 35.432 Section 35.432 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Manual Brachytherapy § 35.432 Calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources. (a) Before the first medical use of...

  3. 10 CFR 35.406 - Brachytherapy sources accountability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Brachytherapy sources accountability. 35.406 Section 35.406 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Manual Brachytherapy § 35.406 Brachytherapy sources accountability. (a) A licensee shall maintain accountability at all...

  4. 10 CFR 35.406 - Brachytherapy sources accountability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Brachytherapy sources accountability. 35.406 Section 35.406 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Manual Brachytherapy § 35.406 Brachytherapy sources accountability. (a) A licensee shall maintain accountability at all...

  5. 10 CFR 35.432 - Calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources. 35.432 Section 35.432 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Manual Brachytherapy § 35.432 Calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources. (a) Before the first medical use of...

  6. 10 CFR 35.432 - Calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources. 35.432 Section 35.432 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Manual Brachytherapy § 35.432 Calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources. (a) Before the first medical use of...

  7. 10 CFR 35.432 - Calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources. 35.432 Section 35.432 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Manual Brachytherapy § 35.432 Calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources. (a) Before the first medical use of...

  8. 10 CFR 35.406 - Brachytherapy sources accountability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Brachytherapy sources accountability. 35.406 Section 35.406 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Manual Brachytherapy § 35.406 Brachytherapy sources accountability. (a) A licensee shall maintain accountability at all...

  9. 10 CFR 35.406 - Brachytherapy sources accountability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Brachytherapy sources accountability. 35.406 Section 35.406 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Manual Brachytherapy § 35.406 Brachytherapy sources accountability. (a) A licensee shall maintain accountability at all...

  10. 21 CFR 892.5730 - Radionuclide brachytherapy source.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Radionuclide brachytherapy source. 892.5730... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5730 Radionuclide brachytherapy source. (a) Identification. A radionuclide brachytherapy source is a device that consists of...

  11. 10 CFR 35.406 - Brachytherapy sources accountability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Brachytherapy sources accountability. 35.406 Section 35.406 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Manual Brachytherapy § 35.406 Brachytherapy sources accountability. (a) A licensee shall maintain accountability at all...

  12. {sup 106}Ruthenium Brachytherapy for Retinoblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Abouzeid, Hana; Moeckli, Raphael; Gaillard, Marie-Claire; Beck-Popovic, Maja; Pica, Alessia; Zografos, Leonidas; Balmer, Aubin; Pampallona, Sandro; Munier, Francis L.

    2008-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of {sup 106}Ru plaque brachytherapy for the treatment of retinoblastoma. Methods and Materials: We reviewed a retrospective, noncomparative case series of 39 children with retinoblastoma treated with {sup 106}Ru plaques at the Jules-Gonin Eye Hospital between October 1992 and July 2006, with 12 months of follow-up. Results: A total of 63 tumors were treated with {sup 106}Ru brachytherapy in 41 eyes. The median patient age was 27 months. {sup 106}Ru brachytherapy was the first-line treatment for 3 tumors (4.8%), second-line treatment for 13 (20.6%), and salvage treatment for 47 tumors (74.6%) resistant to other treatment modalities. Overall tumor control was achieved in 73% at 1 year. Tumor recurrence at 12 months was observed in 2 (12.5%) of 16 tumors for which {sup 106}Ru brachytherapy was used as the first- or second-line treatment and in 15 (31.9%) of 47 tumors for which {sup 106}Ru brachytherapy was used as salvage treatment. Eye retention was achieved in 76% of cases (31 of 41 eyes). Univariate and multivariate analyses revealed no statistically significant risk factors for tumor recurrence. Radiation complications included retinal detachment in 7 (17.1%), proliferative retinopathy in 1 (2.4%), and subcapsular cataract in 4 (9.7%) of 41 eyes. Conclusion: {sup 106}Ru brachytherapy is an effective treatment for retinoblastoma, with few secondary complications. Local vitreous seeding can be successfully treated with {sup 106}Ru brachytherapy.

  13. Image guided Brachytherapy: The paradigm of Gynecologic and Partial Breast HDR Brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diamantopoulos, S.; Kantemiris, I.; Konidari, A.; Zaverdinos, P.

    2015-09-01

    High dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy uses high strength radioactive sources and temporary interstitial implants to conform the dose to target and minimize the treatment time. The advances of imaging technology enable accurate reconstruction of the implant and exact delineation of high-risk CTV and the surrounding critical structures. Furthermore, with sophisticated treatment planning systems, applicator devices and stepping source afterloaders, brachytherapy evolved to a more precise, safe and individualized treatment. At the Radiation Oncology Department of Metropolitan Hospital Athens, MRI guided HDR gynecologic (GYN) brachytherapy and accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) with brachytherapy are performed routinely. Contouring and treatment planning are based on the recommendations of the GEC - ESTRO Working group. The task of this presentation is to reveal the advantages of 3D image guided brachytherapy over 2D brachytherapy. Thus, two patients treated at our department (one GYN and one APBI) will be presented. The advantage of having adequate dose coverage of the high risk CTV and simultaneous low doses to the OARs when using 3D image- based brachytherapy will be presented. The treatment techniques, equipment issues, as well as implantation, imaging and treatment planning procedures will be described. Quality assurance checks will be treated separately.

  14. Early voiding dysfunction associated with prostate brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Wagner; Nag; Young; Bahnson

    2000-12-15

    Introduction: Transperineal prostate brachytherapy is gaining popularity as a treatment for clinically localized carcinoma of the prostate. Very little prospective data exists addressing the issue of complications associated with this procedure. We present an analysis of the early voiding dysfunction associated with prostate brachytherapy. Materials and Methods: Forty-six consecutive patients who underwent Palladium-103 (Pd-103) seed placement for clinically localized prostate carcinoma were evaluated prospectively for any morbidity associated with the procedure. Twenty-three patients completed an International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) questionnaire preoperatively, at their first postoperative visit, and at their second postoperative visit. The total IPSS, each of the seven individual components, and the "bother" score were evaluated separately for each visit, and statistical significance was determined. Results: Urinary retention occurred in 7/46 patients (15%). Of these, 5 were able to void spontaneously after catheter removal. One patient is maintained with a suprapubic tube, and one patient is currently on continuous intermittent catheterization. Baseline IPSS was 7.1 and this went to 20.0 at the first postoperative visit (p<0.001). By the second postoperative visit, the IPSS was 8.0. Conclusions: In our experience, prostate brachytherapy for localized carcinoma of the prostate is associated with a 15% catheterization rate and a significant increase in the IPSS (7.1 to 20.0). This increase in the IPSS seems to be self-limited. Patients need to be educated on these issues prior to prostate brachytherapy. PMID:11113369

  15. The American Brachytherapy Society Treatment Recommendations for Locally Advanced Carcinoma of the Cervix Part II: High Dose-Rate Brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, Akila N.; Beriwal, Sushil; De Los Santos, Jennifer; Demanes, D. Jeffrey; Gaffney, David; Hansen, Jorgen; Jones, Ellen; Kirisits, Christian; Thomadsen, Bruce; Erickson, Beth

    2012-01-01

    Purpose This report presents the 2011 update to the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy guidelines for locally advanced cervical cancer. Methods Members of the American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) with expertise in cervical cancer brachytherapy formulated updated guidelines for HDR brachytherapy using tandem and ring, ovoids, cylinder or interstitial applicators for locally advanced cervical cancer were revised based on medical evidence in the literature and input of clinical experts in gynecologic brachytherapy. Results The Cervical Cancer Committee for Guideline Development affirms the essential curative role of tandem-based brachytherapy in the management of locally advanced cervical cancer. Proper applicator selection, insertion, and imaging are fundamental aspects of the procedure. Three-dimensional imaging with magnetic resonance or computed tomography or radiographic imaging may be used for treatment planning. Dosimetry must be performed after each insertion prior to treatment delivery. Applicator placement, dose specification and dose fractionation must be documented, quality assurance measures must be performed, and follow-up information must be obtained. A variety of dose/fractionation schedules and methods for integrating brachytherapy with external-beam radiation exist. The recommended tumor dose in 2 Gray (Gy) per fraction radiobiologic equivalence (EQD2) is 80–90 Gy, depending on tumor size at the time of brachytherapy. Dose limits for normal tissues are discussed. Conclusion These guidelines update those of 2000 and provide a comprehensive description of HDR cervical cancer brachytherapy in 2011. PMID:22265437

  16. Automated intraoperative calibration for prostate cancer brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kuiran Chen, Thomas; Heffter, Tamas; Lasso, Andras; Pinter, Csaba; Abolmaesumi, Purang; Burdette, E. Clif; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Prostate cancer brachytherapy relies on an accurate spatial registration between the implant needles and the TRUS image, called ''calibration''. The authors propose a new device and a fast, automatic method to calibrate the brachytherapy system in the operating room, with instant error feedback. Methods: A device was CAD-designed and precision-engineered, which mechanically couples a calibration phantom with an exact replica of the standard brachytherapy template. From real-time TRUS images acquired from the calibration device and processed by the calibration system, the coordinate transformation between the brachytherapy template and the TRUS images was computed automatically. The system instantly generated a report of the target reconstruction accuracy based on the current calibration outcome. Results: Four types of validation tests were conducted. First, 50 independent, real-time calibration trials yielded an average of 0.57 {+-} 0.13 mm line reconstruction error (LRE) relative to ground truth. Second, the averaged LRE was 0.37 {+-} 0.25 mm relative to ground truth in tests with six different commercial TRUS scanners operating at similar imaging settings. Furthermore, testing with five different commercial stepper systems yielded an average of 0.29 {+-} 0.16 mm LRE relative to ground truth. Finally, the system achieved an average of 0.56 {+-} 0.27 mm target registration error (TRE) relative to ground truth in needle insertion tests through the template in a water tank. Conclusions: The proposed automatic, intraoperative calibration system for prostate cancer brachytherapy has achieved high accuracy, precision, and robustness.

  17. Brachytherapy in pelvic malignancies: a review for radiologists.

    PubMed

    Vicens, Rafael A; Rodriguez, Joshua; Sheplan, Lawrence; Mayo, Cody; Mayo, Lauren; Jensen, Corey

    2015-10-01

    Brachytherapy, also known as sealed source or internal radiation therapy, involves placement of a radioactive source immediately adjacent to or within tumor, thus enabling delivery of a localized high dose of radiation. Compared with external beam radiation which must first pass through non-target tissues, brachytherapy results in less radiation dose to normal tissues. In the past decade, brachytherapy use has markedly increased, thus radiologists are encountering brachytherapy devices and their associated post-treatment changes to increasing degree. This review will present a variety of brachytherapy devices that radiologists may encounter during diagnostic pelvic imaging with a focus on prostate and gynecologic malignancies. The reader will become familiar with the function, correct position, and potential complications of brachytherapy devices in an effort to improve diagnostic reporting and communication with clinicians.

  18. Modern head and neck brachytherapy: from radium towards intensity modulated interventional brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Intensity modulated brachytherapy (IMBT) is a modern development of classical interventional radiation therapy (brachytherapy), which allows the application of a high radiation dose sparing severe adverse events, thereby further improving the treatment outcome. Classical indications in head and neck (H&N) cancers are the face, the oral cavity, the naso- and oropharynx, the paranasal sinuses including base of skull, incomplete resections on important structures, and palliation. The application type can be curative, adjuvant or perioperative, as a boost to external beam radiation as well as without external beam radiation and with palliative intention. Due to the frequently used perioperative application method (intraoperative implantation of inactive applicators and postoperative performance of radiation), close interdisciplinary cooperation between surgical specialists (ENT-, dento-maxillary-facial-, neuro- and orbital surgeons), as well interventional radiotherapy (brachytherapy) experts are obligatory. Published results encourage the integration of IMBT into H&N therapy, thereby improving the prognosis and quality of life of patients. PMID:25834586

  19. 10 CFR 35.67 - Requirements for possession of sealed sources and brachytherapy sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... brachytherapy sources. 35.67 Section 35.67 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT... brachytherapy sources. (a) A licensee in possession of any sealed source or brachytherapy source shall follow... brachytherapy sources, except for gamma stereotactic radiosurgery sources, shall conduct a semi-annual...

  20. 10 CFR 35.400 - Use of sources for manual brachytherapy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Use of sources for manual brachytherapy. 35.400 Section 35.400 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Manual Brachytherapy § 35.400 Use of sources for manual brachytherapy. A licensee shall use only brachytherapy sources...

  1. 10 CFR 35.400 - Use of sources for manual brachytherapy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Use of sources for manual brachytherapy. 35.400 Section 35.400 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Manual Brachytherapy § 35.400 Use of sources for manual brachytherapy. A licensee shall use only brachytherapy sources...

  2. 10 CFR 35.67 - Requirements for possession of sealed sources and brachytherapy sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... brachytherapy sources. 35.67 Section 35.67 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT... brachytherapy sources. (a) A licensee in possession of any sealed source or brachytherapy source shall follow... brachytherapy sources, except for gamma stereotactic radiosurgery sources, shall conduct a semi-annual...

  3. 10 CFR 35.400 - Use of sources for manual brachytherapy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Use of sources for manual brachytherapy. 35.400 Section 35.400 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Manual Brachytherapy § 35.400 Use of sources for manual brachytherapy. A licensee shall use only brachytherapy sources...

  4. 10 CFR 35.67 - Requirements for possession of sealed sources and brachytherapy sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... brachytherapy sources. 35.67 Section 35.67 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT... brachytherapy sources. (a) A licensee in possession of any sealed source or brachytherapy source shall follow... brachytherapy sources, except for gamma stereotactic radiosurgery sources, shall conduct a semi-annual...

  5. 10 CFR 35.400 - Use of sources for manual brachytherapy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Use of sources for manual brachytherapy. 35.400 Section 35.400 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Manual Brachytherapy § 35.400 Use of sources for manual brachytherapy. A licensee shall use only brachytherapy sources...

  6. 10 CFR 35.67 - Requirements for possession of sealed sources and brachytherapy sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... brachytherapy sources. 35.67 Section 35.67 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT... brachytherapy sources. (a) A licensee in possession of any sealed source or brachytherapy source shall follow... brachytherapy sources, except for gamma stereotactic radiosurgery sources, shall conduct a semi-annual...

  7. 10 CFR 35.67 - Requirements for possession of sealed sources and brachytherapy sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... brachytherapy sources. 35.67 Section 35.67 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT... brachytherapy sources. (a) A licensee in possession of any sealed source or brachytherapy source shall follow... brachytherapy sources, except for gamma stereotactic radiosurgery sources, shall conduct a semi-annual...

  8. 10 CFR 35.400 - Use of sources for manual brachytherapy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Use of sources for manual brachytherapy. 35.400 Section 35.400 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Manual Brachytherapy § 35.400 Use of sources for manual brachytherapy. A licensee shall use only brachytherapy sources...

  9. The evolution of brachytherapy treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Rivard, Mark J; Venselaar, Jack L M; Beaulieu, Luc

    2009-06-01

    Brachytherapy is a mature treatment modality that has benefited from technological advances. Treatment planning has advanced from simple lookup tables to complex, computer-based dose-calculation algorithms. The current approach is based on the AAPM TG-43 formalism with recent advances in acquiring single-source dose distributions. However, this formalism has clinically relevant limitations for calculating patient dose. Dose-calculation algorithms are being developed based on Monte Carlo methods, collapsed cone, and solving the linear Boltzmann transport equation. In addition to improved dose-calculation tools, planning systems and brachytherapy treatment planning will account for material heterogeneities, scatter conditions, radiobiology, and image guidance. The AAPM, ESTRO, and other professional societies are working to coordinate clinical integration of these advancements. This Vision 20/20 article provides insight into these endeavors.

  10. Rotating-shield brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wenjun; Kim, Yusung; Wu, Xiaodong; Song, Qi; Liu, Yunlong; Bhatia, Sudershan K.; Sun, Wenqing; Flynn, Ryan T.

    2013-06-01

    In this treatment planning study, the potential benefits of a rotating shield brachytherapy (RSBT) technique based on a partially-shielded electronic brachytherapy source were assessed for treating cervical cancer. Conventional intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT), intracavitary plus supplementary interstitial (IS+ICBT), and RSBT treatment plans for azimuthal emission angles of 180° (RSBT-180) and 45° (RSBT-45) were generated for five patients. For each patient, high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2) (α/β = 10 Gy) was escalated until bladder, rectum, or sigmoid colon tolerance EQD2 values were reached. External beam radiotherapy dose (1.8 Gy × 25) was accounted for, and brachytherapy was assumed to have been delivered in 5 fractions. IS+ICBT provided a greater HR-CTV D90 (minimum EQD2 to the hottest 90%) than ICBT. D90 was greater for RSBT-45 than IS+ICBT for all five patients, and greater for RSBT-180 than IS+ICBT for two patients. When the RSBT-45/180 plan with the lowest HR-CTV D90 that was greater than the D90 the ICBT or IS+ICBT plan was selected, the average (range) of D90 increases for RSBT over ICBT and IS+ICBT were 16.2 (6.3-27.2)and 8.5 (0.03-20.16) Gy, respectively. The average (range) treatment time increase per fraction of RSBT was 34.56 (3.68-70.41) min over ICBT and 34.59 (3.57-70.13) min over IS+ICBT. RSBT can increase D90 over ICBT and IS+ICBT without compromising organ-at-risk sparing. The D90 and treatment time improvements from RSBT depend on the patient and shield emission angle.

  11. Erectile Function Durability Following Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Taira, Al V.; Merrick, Gregory S.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Butler, Wayne M.; Wallner, Kent E.; Kurko, Brian S.; Anderson, Richard; Lief, Jonathan H.

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate long-term changes in erectile function following prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: This study included 226 patients with prostate cancer and preimplant erectile function assessed by the International Index of Erectile Function-6 (IIEF-6) who underwent brachytherapy in two prospective randomized trials between February 2001 and January 2003. Median follow-up was 6.4 years. Pre- and postbrachytherapy potency was defined as IIEF-6 >= 13 without pharmacologic or mechanical support. The relationship among clinical, treatment, and dosimetric parameters and erectile function was examined. Results: The 7-year actuarial rate of potency preservation was 55.6% with median postimplant IIEF of 22 in potent patients. Potent patients were statistically younger (p = 0.014), had a higher preimplant IIEF (p < 0.001), were less likely to be diabetic (p = 0.002), and were more likely to report nocturnal erections (p = 0.008). Potency preservation in men with baseline IIEF scores of 29-30, 24-28, 18-23, and 13-17 were 75.5% vs. 73.6%, 51.7% vs. 44.8%, 48.0% vs. 40.0%, and 23.5% vs. 23.5% in 2004 vs. 2008. In multivariate Cox regression analysis, preimplant IIEF, hypertension, diabetes, prostate size, and brachytherapy dose to proximal penis strongly predicted for potency preservation. Impact of proximal penile dose was most pronounced for men with IIEF of 18-23 and aged 60-69. A significant minority of men who developed postimplant impotence ultimately regained erectile function. Conclusion: Potency preservation and median IIEF scores following brachytherapy are durable. Thoughtful dose sparing of proximal penile structures and early penile rehabilitation may further improve these results.

  12. Design and optimization of a brachytherapy robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meltsner, Michael A.

    Trans-rectal ultrasound guided (TRUS) low dose rate (LDR) interstitial brachytherapy has become a popular procedure for the treatment of prostate cancer, the most common type of non-skin cancer among men. The current TRUS technique of LDR implantation may result in less than ideal coverage of the tumor with increased risk of negative response such as rectal toxicity and urinary retention. This technique is limited by the skill of the physician performing the implant, the accuracy of needle localization, and the inherent weaknesses of the procedure itself. The treatment may require 100 or more sources and 25 needles, compounding the inaccuracy of the needle localization procedure. A robot designed for prostate brachytherapy may increase the accuracy of needle placement while minimizing the effect of physician technique in the TRUS procedure. Furthermore, a robot may improve associated toxicities by utilizing angled insertions and freeing implantations from constraints applied by the 0.5 cm-spaced template used in the TRUS method. Within our group, Lin et al. have designed a new type of LDR source. The "directional" source is a seed designed to be partially shielded. Thus, a directional, or anisotropic, source does not emit radiation in all directions. The source can be oriented to irradiate cancerous tissues while sparing normal ones. This type of source necessitates a new, highly accurate method for localization in 6 degrees of freedom. A robot is the best way to accomplish this task accurately. The following presentation of work describes the invention and optimization of a new prostate brachytherapy robot that fulfills these goals. Furthermore, some research has been dedicated to the use of the robot to perform needle insertion tasks (brachytherapy, biopsy, RF ablation, etc.) in nearly any other soft tissue in the body. This can be accomplished with the robot combined with automatic, magnetic tracking.

  13. Brachytherapy needle deflection evaluation and correction

    SciTech Connect

    Wan Gang; Wei Zhouping; Gardi, Lori; Downey, Donal B.; Fenster, Aaron

    2005-04-01

    In prostate brachytherapy, an 18-gauge needle is used to implant radioactive seeds. This thin needle can be deflected from the preplanned trajectory in the prostate, potentially resulting in a suboptimum dose pattern and at times requiring repeated needle insertion to achieve optimal dosimetry. In this paper, we report on the evaluation of brachytherapy needle deflection and bending in test phantoms and two approaches to overcome the problem. First we tested the relationship between needle deflection and insertion depth as well as whether needle bending occurred. Targeting accuracy was tested by inserting a brachytherapy needle to target 16 points in chicken tissue phantoms. By implanting dummy seeds into chicken tissue phantoms under 3D ultrasound guidance, the overall accuracy of seed implantation was determined. We evaluated methods to overcome brachytherapy needle deflection with three different insertion methods: constant orientation, constant rotation, and orientation reversal at half of the insertion depth. Our results showed that needle deflection is linear with needle insertion depth, and that no noticeable bending occurs with needle insertion into the tissue and agar phantoms. A 3D principal component analysis was performed to obtain the population distribution of needle tip and seed position relative to the target positions. Our results showed that with the constant orientation insertion method, the mean needle targeting error was 2.8 mm and the mean seed implantation error was 2.9 mm. Using the constant rotation and orientation reversal at half insertion depth methods, the deflection error was reduced. The mean needle targeting errors were 0.8 and 1.2 mm for the constant rotation and orientation reversal methods, respectively, and the seed implantation errors were 0.9 and 1.5 mm for constant rotation insertion and orientation reversal methods, respectively.

  14. Boost in radiotherapy: external beam sunset, brachytherapy sunrise

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Radiobiological limitations for dose escalation in external radiotherapy are presented. Biological and clinical concept of brachytherapy boost to increase treatment efficacy is discussed, and different methods are compared. Oncentra Prostate 3D conformal real-time ultrasound-guided brachytherapy is presented as a solution for boost or sole therapy.

  15. 10 CFR 35.2406 - Records of brachytherapy source accountability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Records of brachytherapy source accountability. 35.2406 Section 35.2406 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Records § 35.2406 Records of brachytherapy source accountability. (a) A licensee shall maintain a record of...

  16. 10 CFR 35.2406 - Records of brachytherapy source accountability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Records of brachytherapy source accountability. 35.2406 Section 35.2406 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Records § 35.2406 Records of brachytherapy source accountability. (a) A licensee shall maintain a record of...

  17. 10 CFR 35.2406 - Records of brachytherapy source accountability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Records of brachytherapy source accountability. 35.2406 Section 35.2406 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Records § 35.2406 Records of brachytherapy source accountability. (a) A licensee shall maintain a record of...

  18. 10 CFR 35.2406 - Records of brachytherapy source accountability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Records of brachytherapy source accountability. 35.2406 Section 35.2406 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Records § 35.2406 Records of brachytherapy source accountability. (a) A licensee shall maintain a record of...

  19. 10 CFR 35.2406 - Records of brachytherapy source accountability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Records of brachytherapy source accountability. 35.2406 Section 35.2406 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Records § 35.2406 Records of brachytherapy source accountability. (a) A licensee shall maintain a record of...

  20. Ultrasound use in gynecologic brachytherapy: Time to focus the beam.

    PubMed

    van Dyk, Sylvia; Schneider, Michal; Kondalsamy-Chennakesavan, Srinivas; Bernshaw, David; Narayan, Kailash

    2015-01-01

    There is wide disparity in the practice of brachytherapy for cervical cancer around the world. Although select well-resourced centers advocate use of MRI for all insertions, planar X-ray imaging remains the most commonly used imaging modality to assess intracavitary implants, particularly where the burden of cervical cancer is high. Incorporating soft tissue imaging into brachytherapy programs has been shown to improve the technical accuracy of implants, which in turn has led to improved local control and decreased toxicity. These improvements have a positive effect on the quality of life of patients undergoing brachytherapy for cervical cancer. Finding an accessible soft tissue imaging modality is essential to enable these improvements to be available to all patients. A modality that has good soft tissue imaging capabilities, is widely available, portable, and economical, is needed. Ultrasound fulfils these requirements and offers the potential of soft tissue image guidance to a much wider brachytherapy community. Although use of ultrasound is the standard of care in brachytherapy for prostate cancer, it only seems to have limited uptake in gynecologic brachytherapy. This article reviews the role of ultrasound in gynecologic brachytherapy and highlights the potential applications for use in brachytherapy for cervical cancer.

  1. Penile brachytherapy: Results for 49 patients

    SciTech Connect

    Crook, Juanita M. . E-mail: juanita.crook@rmp.uhn.on.ca; Jezioranski, John; Grimard, Laval; Esche, Bernd; Pond, G.

    2005-06-01

    Purpose: To report results for 49 men with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the penis treated with primary penile interstitial brachytherapy at one of two institutions: the Ottawa Regional Cancer Center, Ottawa, and the Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Methods and Materials: From September 1989 to September 2003, 49 men (mean age, 58 years; range, 22-93 years) had brachytherapy for penile SCC. Fifty-one percent of tumors were T1, 33% T2, and 8% T3; 4% were in situ and 4% Tx. Grade was well differentiated in 31%, moderate in 45%, and poor in 2%; grade was unspecified for 20%. One tumor was verrucous. All tumors in Toronto had pulsed dose rate (PDR) brachytherapy (n = 23), whereas those in Ottawa had either Iridium wire (n 22) or seeds (n = 4). Four patients had a single plane implant with a plastic tube technique, and all others had a volume implant with predrilled acrylic templates and two or three parallel planes of needles (median, six needles). Mean needle spacing was 13.5 mm (range, 10-18 mm), mean dose rate was 65 cGy/h (range, 33-160 cGy/h), and mean duration was 98.8 h (range, 36-188 h). Dose rates for PDR brachytherapy were 50-61.2 cGy/h, with no correction in total dose, which was 60 Gy in all cases. Results: Median follow-up was 33.4 months (range, 4-140 months). At 5 years, actuarial overall survival was 78.3% and cause-specific survival 90.0%. Four men died of penile cancer, and 6 died of other causes with no evidence of recurrence. The cumulative incidence rate for never having experienced any type of failure at 5 years was 64.4% and for local failure was 85.3%. All 5 patients with local failure were successfully salvaged by surgery; 2 other men required penectomy for necrosis. The soft tissue necrosis rate was 16% and the urethral stenosis rate 12%. Of 8 men with regional failure, 5 were salvaged by lymph node dissection with or without external radiation. All 4 men with distant failure died of disease. Of 49 men, 42 had an intact

  2. Three-Dimensional Imaging in Gynecologic Brachytherapy: A Survey of the American Brachytherapy Society

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, Akila N.; Erickson, Beth A.

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: To determine current practice patterns with regard to three-dimensional (3D) imaging for gynecologic brachytherapy among American Brachytherapy Society (ABS) members. Methods and Materials: Registered physician members of the ABS received a 19-item survey by e-mail in August 2007. This report excludes physicians not performing brachytherapy for cervical cancer. Results: Of the 256 surveys sent, we report results for 133 respondents who perform one or more implantations per year for locally advanced cervical cancer. Ultrasound aids 56% of physicians with applicator insertion. After insertion, 70% of physicians routinely obtain a computed tomography (CT) scan. The majority (55%) use CT rather than X-ray films (43%) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI; 2%) for dose specification to the cervix. However, 76% prescribe to Point A alone instead of using a 3D-derived tumor volume (14%), both Point A and tumor volume (7%), or mg/h (3%). Those using 3D imaging routinely contour the bladder and rectum (94%), sigmoid (45%), small bowel (38%), and/or urethra (8%) and calculate normal tissue dose-volume histogram (DVH) analysis parameters including the D2cc (49%), D1cc (36%), D0.1cc (19%), and/or D5cc (19%). Respondents most commonly modify the treatment plan based on International Commission on Radiation Units bladder and/or rectal point dose values (53%) compared with DVH values (45%) or both (2%). Conclusions: More ABS physician members use CT postimplantation imaging than plain films for visualizing the gynecologic brachytherapy apparatus. However, the majority prescribe to Point A rather than using 3D image based dosimetry. Use of 3D image-based treatment planning for gynecologic brachytherapy has the potential for significant growth in the United States.

  3. Caudal epidural anesthesia during intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Isoyama-Shirakawa, Yuko; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Abe, Madoka; Kunitake, Naonobu; Matsumoto, Keiji; Ohga, Saiji; Sasaki, Tomonari; Uehara, Satoru; Okushima, Kazuhiro; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Honda, Hiroshi

    2015-05-01

    It has been suggested that pain control during intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer is insufficient in most hospitals in Japan. Our hospital began using caudal epidural anesthesia during high-dose-rate (HDR) intracavitary brachytherapy in 2011. The purpose of the present study was to retrospectively investigate the effects of caudal epidural anesthesia during HDR intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer patients. Caudal epidural anesthesia for 34 cervical cancer patients was performed during HDR intracavitary brachytherapy between October 2011 and August 2013. We used the patients' self-reported Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) score at the first session of HDR intracavitary brachytherapy as a subjective evaluation of pain. We compared NRS scores of the patients with anesthesia with those of 30 patients who underwent HDR intracavitary brachytherapy without sacral epidural anesthesia at our hospital between May 2010 and August 2011. Caudal epidural anesthesia succeeded in 33 patients (97%), and the NRS score was recorded in 30 patients. The mean NRS score of the anesthesia group was 5.17 ± 2.97, significantly lower than that of the control group's 6.80 ± 2.59 (P = 0.035). The caudal epidural block resulted in no side-effects. Caudal epidural anesthesia is an effective and safe anesthesia option during HDR intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer.

  4. Recent developments and best practice in brachytherapy treatment planning

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Brachytherapy has evolved over many decades, but more recently, there have been significant changes in the way that brachytherapy is used for different treatment sites. This has been due to the development of new, technologically advanced computer planning systems and treatment delivery techniques. Modern, three-dimensional (3D) imaging modalities have been incorporated into treatment planning methods, allowing full 3D dose distributions to be computed. Treatment techniques involving online planning have emerged, allowing dose distributions to be calculated and updated in real time based on the actual clinical situation. In the case of early stage breast cancer treatment, for example, electronic brachytherapy treatment techniques are being used in which the radiation dose is delivered during the same procedure as the surgery. There have also been significant advances in treatment applicator design, which allow the use of modern 3D imaging techniques for planning, and manufacturers have begun to implement new dose calculation algorithms that will correct for applicator shielding and tissue inhomogeneities. This article aims to review the recent developments and best practice in brachytherapy techniques and treatments. It will look at how imaging developments have been incorporated into current brachytherapy treatment and how these developments have played an integral role in the modern brachytherapy era. The planning requirements for different treatments sites are reviewed as well as the future developments of brachytherapy in radiobiology and treatment planning dose calculation. PMID:24734939

  5. The dosimetry of brachytherapy-induced erectile dysfunction

    SciTech Connect

    Merrick, Gregory S.; Butler, Wayne M

    2003-12-31

    There is emerging evidence that brachytherapy-induced erectile dysfunction (ED) is technique-related and may be minimized by careful attention to source placement. Herein, we review the relationship between radiation doses to the prostate gland/surrounding structures and the development of brachytherapy-induced ED. The permanent prostate brachytherapy literature was reviewed using MEDLINE searches to ensure completeness. Although the site-specific structure associated with brachytherapy-induced ED remains unknown, there is an increasing body of data implicating the proximal penis. With day 0 CT-based dosimetry, the dose to 50% (D{sub 50}) and 25% (D{sub 25}) of the bulb of the penis should be maintained below 40% and 60% mPD, respectively, while the crura D{sub 50} should be maintained below 28% mPD to maximize post-brachytherapy potency. To date, there is no data to suggest that either radiation doses to the neurovascular bundles or choice of isotope is associated with brachytherapy-induced ED, while conflicting data has been reported regarding radiation dose to the prostate and the use of supplemental external beam radiation therapy. Although the etiology of brachytherapy-induced ED is likely multifactorial, the available data supports the proximal penis as an important site-specific structure. Refinements in implant technique, including preplanning and intraoperative seed placement, will result in lower radiation doses to the proximal penis with potential improvement in potency preservation.

  6. Multihelix rotating shield brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Dadkhah, Hossein; Kim, Yusung; Flynn, Ryan T.; Wu, Xiaodong

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: To present a novel brachytherapy technique, called multihelix rotating shield brachytherapy (H-RSBT), for the precise angular and linear positioning of a partial shield in a curved applicator. H-RSBT mechanically enables the dose delivery using only linear translational motion of the radiation source/shield combination. The previously proposed approach of serial rotating shield brachytherapy (S-RSBT), in which the partial shield is rotated to several angular positions at each source dwell position [W. Yang et al., “Rotating-shield brachytherapy for cervical cancer,” Phys. Med. Biol. 58, 3931–3941 (2013)], is mechanically challenging to implement in a curved applicator, and H-RSBT is proposed as a feasible solution. Methods: A Henschke-type applicator, designed for an electronic brachytherapy source (Xoft Axxent™) and a 0.5 mm thick tungsten partial shield with 180° or 45° azimuthal emission angles and 116° asymmetric zenith angle, is proposed. The interior wall of the applicator contains six evenly spaced helical keyways that rigidly define the emission direction of the partial radiation shield as a function of depth in the applicator. The shield contains three uniformly distributed protruding keys on its exterior wall and is attached to the source such that it rotates freely, thus longitudinal translational motion of the source is transferred to rotational motion of the shield. S-RSBT and H-RSBT treatment plans with 180° and 45° azimuthal emission angles were generated for five cervical cancer patients with a diverse range of high-risk target volume (HR-CTV) shapes and applicator positions. For each patient, the total number of emission angles was held nearly constant for S-RSBT and H-RSBT by using dwell positions separated by 5 and 1.7 mm, respectively, and emission directions separated by 22.5° and 60°, respectively. Treatment delivery time and tumor coverage (D{sub 90} of HR-CTV) were the two metrics used as the basis for evaluation and

  7. Brachytherapy in the treatment of cervical cancer: a review

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Robyn; Kamrava, Mitchell

    2014-01-01

    Dramatic advances have been made in brachytherapy for cervical cancer. Radiation treatment planning has evolved from two-dimensional to three-dimensional, incorporating magnetic resonance imaging and/or computed tomography into the treatment paradigm. This allows for better delineation and coverage of the tumor, as well as improved avoidance of surrounding organs. Consequently, advanced brachytherapy can achieve very high rates of local control with a reduction in morbidity, compared with historic approaches. This review provides an overview of state-of-the-art gynecologic brachytherapy, with a focus on recent advances and their implications for women with cervical cancer. PMID:24920937

  8. Dosimetric characterization and output verification for conical brachytherapy surface applicators. Part I. Electronic brachytherapy source

    SciTech Connect

    Fulkerson, Regina K. Micka, John A.; DeWerd, Larry A.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Historically, treatment of malignant surface lesions has been achieved with linear accelerator based electron beams or superficial x-ray beams. Recent developments in the field of brachytherapy now allow for the treatment of surface lesions with specialized conical applicators placed directly on the lesion. Applicators are available for use with high dose rate (HDR){sup 192}Ir sources, as well as electronic brachytherapy sources. Part I of this paper will discuss the applicators used with electronic brachytherapy sources; Part II will discuss those used with HDR {sup 192}Ir sources. Although the use of these applicators has gained in popularity, the dosimetric characteristics including depth dose and surface dose distributions have not been independently verified. Additionally, there is no recognized method of output verification for quality assurance procedures with applicators like these. Existing dosimetry protocols available from the AAPM bookend the cross-over characteristics of a traditional brachytherapy source (as described by Task Group 43) being implemented as a low-energy superficial x-ray beam (as described by Task Group 61) as observed with the surface applicators of interest. Methods: This work aims to create a cohesive method of output verification that can be used to determine the dose at the treatment surface as part of a quality assurance/commissioning process for surface applicators used with HDR electronic brachytherapy sources (Part I) and{sup 192}Ir sources (Part II). Air-kerma rate measurements for the electronic brachytherapy sources were completed with an Attix Free-Air Chamber, as well as several models of small-volume ionization chambers to obtain an air-kerma rate at the treatment surface for each applicator. Correction factors were calculated using MCNP5 and EGSnrc Monte Carlo codes in order to determine an applicator-specific absorbed dose to water at the treatment surface from the measured air-kerma rate. Additionally

  9. Improving photoacoustic imaging contrast of brachytherapy seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Leo; Baghani, Ali; Rohling, Robert; Abolmaesumi, Purang; Salcudean, Septimiu; Tang, Shuo

    2013-03-01

    Prostate brachytherapy is a form of radiotherapy for treating prostate cancer where the radiation sources are seeds inserted into the prostate. Accurate localization of seeds during prostate brachytherapy is essential to the success of intraoperative treatment planning. The current standard modality used in intraoperative seeds localization is transrectal ultrasound. Transrectal ultrasound, however, suffers in image quality due to several factors such speckle, shadowing, and off-axis seed orientation. Photoacoustic imaging, based on the photoacoustic phenomenon, is an emerging imaging modality. The contrast generating mechanism in photoacoustic imaging is optical absorption that is fundamentally different from conventional B-mode ultrasound which depicts changes in acoustic impedance. A photoacoustic imaging system is developed using a commercial ultrasound system. To improve imaging contrast and depth penetration, absorption enhancing coating is applied to the seeds. In comparison to bare seeds, approximately 18.5 dB increase in signal-to-noise ratio as well as a doubling of imaging depth are achieved. Our results demonstrate that the coating of the seeds can further improve the discernibility of the seeds.

  10. Coregistered photoacoustic-ultrasound imaging applied to brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Tyler; Zemp, Roger J.

    2011-08-01

    Brachytherapy is a form of radiation therapy commonly used in the treatment of prostate cancer wherein sustained radiation doses can be precisely targeted to the tumor area by the implantation of small radioactive seeds around the treatment area. Ultrasound is a popular imaging mode for seed implantation, but the seeds are difficult to distinguish from the tissue structure. In this work, we demonstrate the feasibility of photoacoustic imaging for identifying brachytherapy seeds in a tissue phantom, comparing the received intensity to endogenous contrast. We have found that photoacoustic imaging at 1064 nm can identify brachytherapy seeds uniquely at laser penetration depths of 5 cm in biological tissue at the ANSI limit for human exposure with a contrast-to-noise ratio of 26.5 dB. Our realtime combined photoacoustic-ultrasound imaging approach may be suitable for brachytherapy seed placement and post-placement verification, potentially allowing for realtime dosimetry assessment during implantation.

  11. Patient release criteria for low dose rate brachytherapy implants.

    PubMed

    Boyce, Dale E; Sheetz, Michael A

    2013-04-01

    A lack of consensus regarding a model governing the release of patients following sealed source brachytherapy has led to a set of patient release policies that vary from institution to institution. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has issued regulatory guidance on patient release in NUREG 1556, Volume 9, Rev. 2, Appendix U, which allows calculation of release limits following implant brachytherapy. While the formalism presented in NUREG is meaningful for the calculation of release limits in the context of relatively high energy gamma emitters, it does not estimate accurately the effective dose equivalent for the common low dose rate brachytherapy sources Cs, I, and Pd. NUREG 1556 states that patient release may be based on patient-specific calculations as long as the calculation is documented. This work is intended to provide a format for patient-specific calculations to be used for the consideration of patients' release following the implantation of certain low dose rate brachytherapy isotopes. PMID:23439145

  12. Image-Based Brachytherapy for the Treatment of Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Harkenrider, Matthew M. Alite, Fiori; Silva, Scott R.; Small, William

    2015-07-15

    Cervical cancer is a disease that requires considerable multidisciplinary coordination of care and labor in order to maximize tumor control and survival while minimizing treatment-related toxicity. As with external beam radiation therapy, the use of advanced imaging and 3-dimensional treatment planning has generated a paradigm shift in the delivery of brachytherapy for the treatment of cervical cancer. The use of image-based brachytherapy, most commonly with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), requires additional attention and effort by the treating physician to prescribe dose to the proper volume and account for adjacent organs at risk. This represents a dramatic change from the classic Manchester approach of orthogonal radiographic images and prescribing dose to point A. We reviewed the history and currently evolving data and recommendations for the clinical use of image-based brachytherapy with an emphasis on MRI-based brachytherapy.

  13. The evolution of computerized treatment planning for brachytherapy: American contributions

    PubMed Central

    Rivard, Mark J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To outline the evolution of computerized brachytherapy treatment planning in the United States through a review of technological developments and clinical practice refinements. Material and methods A literature review was performed and interviews were conducted with six participants in the development of computerized treatment planning for brachytherapy. Results Computerized brachytherapy treatment planning software was initially developed in the Physics Departments of New York's Memorial Hospital (by Nelson, Meurk and Balter), and Houston's M. D. Anderson Hospital (by Stovall and Shalek). These public-domain programs could be used by institutions with adequate computational resources; other clinics had access to them via Memorial's and Anderson's teletype-based computational services. Commercial brachytherapy treatment planning programs designed to run on smaller computers (Prowess, ROCS, MMS), were developed in the late 1980s and early 1990s. These systems brought interactive dosimetry into the clinic and surgical theatre. Conclusions Brachytherapy treatment planning has evolved from systems of rigid implant rules to individualized pre- and intra-operative treatment plans, and post-operative dosimetric assessments. Brachytherapy dose distributions were initially calculated on public domain programs on large regionally located computers. With the progression of computer miniaturization and increase in processor speeds, proprietary software was commercially developed for microcomputers that offered increased functionality and integration with clinical practice. PMID:25097560

  14. Predictors of Metastatic Disease After Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Forsythe, Kevin; Burri, Ryan; Stone, Nelson; Stock, Richard G.

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To identify predictors of metastatic disease after brachytherapy treatment for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: All patients who received either brachytherapy alone (implant) or brachytherapy in combination with external beam radiation therapy for treatment of localized prostate cancer at The Mount Sinai Hospital between June 1990 and March 2007 with a minimum follow-up of 2 years were included. Univariate and multivariable analyses were performed on the following variables: risk group, Gleason score (GS), clinical T stage, pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level, post-treatment prostate-specific antigen doubling time (PSA-DT), treatment type (implant vs. implant plus external beam radiation therapy), treatment era, total biological effective dose, use of androgen deprivation therapy, age at diagnosis, and race. PSA-DT was analyzed in the following ordinate groups: 0 to 90 days, 91 to 180 days, 180 to 360 days, and greater than 360 days. Results: We included 1,887 patients in this study. Metastases developed in 47 of these patients. The 10-year freedom from distant metastasis (FFDM) rate for the entire population was 95.1%. Median follow-up was 6 years (range, 2-15 years). The only two significant predictors of metastatic disease by multivariable analyses were GS and PSA-DT (p < 0.001 for both variables). Estimated 10-year FFDM rates for GS of 6 or less, GS of 7, and GS of 8 or greater were 97.9%, 94.3%, and 76.1%, respectively (p < 0.001). Estimated FFDM rates for PSA-DT of 0 to 90 days, 91 to 180 days, 181 to 360 days, and greater than 360 days were 17.5%, 67.9%, 74%, and 94.8%, respectively (p < 0.001). Estimated 10-year FFDM rates for the low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups were 98.6%, 96.2%, and 86.7%, respectively. A demographic shift to patients presenting with higher-grade disease in more recent years was observed. Conclusions: GS and post-treatment PSA-DT are both statistically significant independent predictors of metastatic

  15. A dynamic dosimetry system for prostate brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Nathanael; Dehghan, Ehsan; Deguet, Anton; Song, Danny Y.; Prince, Jerry L.; Lee, Junghoon

    2013-03-01

    The lack of dynamic dosimetry tools for permanent prostate brachytherapy causes otherwise avoidable problems in prostate cancer patient care. The goal of this work is to satisfy this need in a readily adoptable manner. Using the ubiquitous ultrasound scanner and mobile non-isocentric C-arm, we show that dynamic dosimetry is now possible with only the addition of an arbitrarily configured marker-based fiducial. Not only is the system easily configured from accessible hardware, but it is also simple and convenient, requiring little training from technicians. Furthermore, the proposed system is built upon robust algorithms of seed segmentation, fiducial detection, seed reconstruction, and image registration. All individual steps of the pipeline have been thoroughly tested, and the system as a whole has been validated on a study of 25 patients. The system has shown excellent results of accurately computing dose, and does so with minimal manual intervention, therefore showing promise for widespread adoption of dynamic dosimetry.

  16. Paddle-based rotating-shield brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yunlong; Xu, Weiyu; Flynn, Ryan T.; Kim, Yusung; Bhatia, Sudershan K.; Buatti, John M.; Dadkhah, Hossein; Wu, Xiaodong

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: The authors present a novel paddle-based rotating-shield brachytherapy (P-RSBT) method, whose radiation-attenuating shields are formed with a multileaf collimator (MLC), consisting of retractable paddles, to achieve intensity modulation in high-dose-rate brachytherapy. Methods: Five cervical cancer patients using an intrauterine tandem applicator were considered to assess the potential benefit of the P-RSBT method. The P-RSBT source used was a 50 kV electronic brachytherapy source (Xoft Axxent™). The paddles can be retracted independently to form multiple emission windows around the source for radiation delivery. The MLC was assumed to be rotatable. P-RSBT treatment plans were generated using the asymmetric dose–volume optimization with smoothness control method [Liu et al., Med. Phys. 41(11), 111709 (11pp.) (2014)] with a delivery time constraint, different paddle sizes, and different rotation strides. The number of treatment fractions (fx) was assumed to be five. As brachytherapy is delivered as a boost for cervical cancer, the dose distribution for each case includes the dose from external beam radiotherapy as well, which is 45 Gy in 25 fx. The high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) doses were escalated until the minimum dose to the hottest 2 cm{sup 3} (D{sub 2cm{sup 3}}) of either the rectum, sigmoid colon, or bladder reached their tolerance doses of 75, 75, and 90 Gy{sub 3}, respectively, expressed as equivalent doses in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2 with α/β = 3 Gy). Results: P-RSBT outperformed the two other RSBT delivery techniques, single-shield RSBT (S-RSBT) and dynamic-shield RSBT (D-RSBT), with a properly selected paddle size. If the paddle size was angled at 60°, the average D{sub 90} increases for the delivery plans by P-RSBT on the five cases, compared to S-RSBT, were 2.2, 8.3, 12.6, 11.9, and 9.1 Gy{sub 10}, respectively, with delivery times of 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 min/fx. The increases in HR-CTV D{sub 90}, compared to D-RSBT, were 16

  17. Automatic Brachytherapy Seed Placement Under MRI Guidance

    PubMed Central

    Patriciu, Alexandru; Petrisor, Doru; Muntener, Michael; Mazilu, Dumitru; Schär, Michael; Stoianovici, Dan

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents a robotic method of performing low dose rate prostate brachytherapy under magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guidance. The design and operation of a fully automated MR compatible seed injector is presented. This is used with the MrBot robot for transperineal percutaneous prostate access. A new image-registration marker and algorithms are also presented. The system is integrated and tested with a 3T MRI scanner. Tests compare three different registration methods, assess the precision of performing automated seed deployment, and use the seeds to assess the accuracy of needle targeting under image guidance. Under the ideal conditions of the in vitro experiments, results show outstanding image-guided needle and seed placement accuracy. PMID:17694871

  18. An overview of interstitial brachytherapy and hyperthermia

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, B.B.; Harney, J.

    1989-11-01

    Interstitial thermoradiotherapy, an experimental cancer treatment that combines interstitial radiation implants (brachytherapy) and interstitial hyperthermia, is in the early stages of investigation. In accordance with the procedure used in a current national trial protocol, a 60-minute hyperthermia treatment is administered after catheters are placed into the tumor area while the patient is under general anesthesia. This is immediately followed by loading of radioactive Iridium-192 seeds into the catheters for a defined period of time. Once the prescribed radiation dose is delivered, the radioactive sources are removed and a second, 60-minute hyperthermia treatment is administered. Clinical trials with hyperthermia in combination with radiation have increased in recent years. Nurses caring for these patients need to become more knowledgeable about this investigational therapy. This paper provides an overview of the biologic rationale for this therapy, as well as a description of the delivery method and clinical application. Specific related nursing interventions are defined in a nursing protocol.23 references.

  19. 10 CFR 35.2432 - Records of calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Records of calibration measurements of brachytherapy... Records § 35.2432 Records of calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources. (a) A licensee shall maintain a record of the calibrations of brachytherapy sources required by § 35.432 for 3 years after...

  20. 10 CFR 35.2432 - Records of calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Records of calibration measurements of brachytherapy... Records § 35.2432 Records of calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources. (a) A licensee shall maintain a record of the calibrations of brachytherapy sources required by § 35.432 for 3 years after...

  1. 10 CFR 35.2432 - Records of calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Records of calibration measurements of brachytherapy... Records § 35.2432 Records of calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources. (a) A licensee shall maintain a record of the calibrations of brachytherapy sources required by § 35.432 for 3 years after...

  2. 10 CFR 35.2432 - Records of calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Records of calibration measurements of brachytherapy... Records § 35.2432 Records of calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources. (a) A licensee shall maintain a record of the calibrations of brachytherapy sources required by § 35.432 for 3 years after...

  3. 10 CFR 35.2432 - Records of calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Records of calibration measurements of brachytherapy... Records § 35.2432 Records of calibration measurements of brachytherapy sources. (a) A licensee shall maintain a record of the calibrations of brachytherapy sources required by § 35.432 for 3 years after...

  4. Incorporating seed orientation in brachytherapy implant reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yu; Jain, Ameet K.; Chirikjian, Gregory S.; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2006-03-01

    Intra-operative quality assurance and dosimetry optimization in prostate brachytherapy critically depends on the ability of discerning the locations of implanted seeds. Various methods exist for seed matching and reconstruction from multiple segmented C-arm images. Unfortunately, using three or more images makes the problem NP-hard, i.e. no polynomial-time algorithm can provably compute the complete matching. Typically, a statistical analysis of performance is considered sufficient. Hence it is of utmost importance to exploit all the available information in order to minimize the matching and reconstruction errors. Current algorithms use only the information about seed centers, disregarding the information about the orientations and length of seeds. While the latter has little dosimetric impact, it can positively contribute to improving seed matching rate and 3D implant reconstruction accuracy. It can also become critical information when hidden and spuriously segmented seeds need to be matched, where reliable and generic methods are not yet available. Expecting orientation information to be useful in reconstructing large and dense implants, we have developed a method which incorporates seed orientation information into our previously proposed reconstruction algorithm (MARSHAL). Simulation study shows that under normal segmentation errors, when considering seed orientations, implants of 80 to 140 seeds with the density of 2.0- 3.0 seeds/cc give an average matching rate >97% using three-image matching. It is higher than the matching rate of about 96% when considering only seed positions. This means that the information of seed orientations appears to be a valuable additive to fluoroscopy-based brachytherapy implant reconstruction.

  5. A Novel Device for Intravaginal Electronic Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Frank Fuchs, Holger; Lorenz, Friedlieb; Steil, Volker; Ziglio, Francesco; Kraus-Tiefenbacher, Uta; Lohr, Frank; Wenz, Frederik

    2009-07-15

    Purpose: Postoperative intravaginal brachytherapy for endometrial carcinoma is usually performed with {sup 192}Ir high-dose rate (HDR) afterloading. A potential alternative is treatment with a broadband 50kV X-ray point source, the advantage being its low energy and the consequential steep dose gradient. The aim of this study was to create and evaluate a homogeneous cylindrical energy deposition around a newly designed vaginal applicator. Methods and Materials: To create constant isodose layers along the cylindrical plastic vaginal applicator, the source (INTRABEAM system) was moved in steps of 17-19.5 mm outward from the tip of the applicator. Irradiation for a predetermined time was performed at each position. The axial shift was established by a stepping mechanism that was mounted on a table support. The total dose/dose distribution was determined using film dosimetry (Gafchromic EBT) in a 'solid water' phantom. The films were evaluated with Mathematica 5.2 and OmniPro-I'mRT 1.6. The results (dose D0/D5/D10 in 0/5/10 mm tissue depth) were compared with an {sup 192}Ir HDR afterloading plan for multiple sampling points around the applicator. Results: Three different dose distributions with lengths of 3.9-7.3 cm were created. The irradiation time based on the delivery of 5/7 Gy to a 5 mm tissue depth was 19/26 min to 27/38 min. D0/D5/D10 was 150%/100%/67% for electronic brachytherapy and 140%/100%/74% for the afterloading technique. The deviation for repeated measurements in the phantom was <7%. Conclusions: It is possible to create a homogeneous cylindrical dose distribution, similar to {sup 192}Ir HDR afterloading, through the superimposition of multiple spherical dose distributions by stepping a kilovolt point source.

  6. Utilization and Outcomes of Breast Brachytherapy in Younger Women

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Grace L; Huo, Jinhai; Giordano, Sharon H.; Hunt, Kelly K.; Buchholz, Thomas A; Smith, Benjamin D

    2015-01-01

    Background Breast brachytherapy after lumpectomy is controversial in younger patients, as effectiveness is unclear and selection criteria are debated. Methods Using MarketScan® healthcare claims data, we identified 45,884 invasive breast cancer patients (ages 18–64), treated from 2003–2010 with lumpectomy, followed by brachytherapy (n=3,134) or whole breast irradiation (WBI) (n=42,750). We stratified patients into risk groups, based on age (Age<50 vs. Age≥50) and endocrine therapy status (Endocrine− vs. Endocrine+). “Endocrine+” patients filled an endocrine therapy prescription within 1 year after lumpectomy. Pathologic hormone receptor status was not available in this dataset. In brachytherapy vs. WBI patients, utilization trends and 5-year subsequent mastectomy risks were compared. Stratified, adjusted subsequent mastectomy risks were calculated using proportional hazards regression. Results Brachytherapy utilization increased from 2003 to 2010: In patients Age<50, from 0.6% to 4.9%; patients Age≥50 from 2.2% to 11.3%; Endocrine− patients, 1.3% to 9.4%; Endocrine+ patients, 1.9% to 9.7%. Age influenced treatment selection more than endocrine status: 17% of brachytherapy patients were Age<50 vs. 32% of WBI patients (P<0.001); while 41% of brachytherapy patients were Endocrine- vs. 44% of WBI patients (P=0.003). Highest absolute 5-year subsequent mastectomy risks occurred in Endocrine−/Age<50 patients (24.4% after brachytherapy vs. 9.0% after WBI (Hazard ratio[HR]=2.18, 1.37–3.47); intermediate risks in Endocrine−/Age≥50 patients (8.6% vs. 4.9%; HR=1.76, 1.26–2.46); and lowest risks in Endocrine+ patients of any age: Endocrine+/Age<50 (5.5% vs. 4.5%; HR=1.18, 0.61–2.31); Endocrine+/Age≥50 (4.2% vs. 2.4%; HR=1.71, 1.16–2.51). Conclusion In this younger cohort, endocrine status was a valuable discriminatory factor predicting subsequent mastectomy risk after brachytherapy vs. WBI and therefore may be useful for selecting appropriate

  7. Utilization and Outcomes of Breast Brachytherapy in Younger Women

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Grace L.; Huo, Jinhai; Giordano, Sharon H.; Hunt, Kelly K.; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Smith, Benjamin D.

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: To directly compare (1) radiation treatment utilization patterns; (2) risks of subsequent mastectomy; and (3) costs of radiation treatment in patients treated with brachytherapy versus whole-breast irradiation (WBI), in a national, contemporary cohort of women with incident breast cancer, aged 64 years and younger. Methods and Materials: Using MarketScan health care claims data, we identified 45,884 invasive breast cancer patients (aged 18-64 years), treated from 2003 to 2010 with lumpectomy, followed by brachytherapy (n=3134) or whole-breast irradiation (n=42,750). We stratified patients into risk groups according to age (Age<50 vs Age≥50) and endocrine therapy status (Endocrine− vs Endocrine+). “Endocrine+” patients filled an endocrine therapy prescription within 1 year after lumpectomy. Pathologic hormone receptor status was not available in this dataset. In brachytherapy versus WBI patients, utilization trends and 5-year subsequent mastectomy risks were compared. Stratified, adjusted subsequent mastectomy risks were calculated using proportional hazards regression. Results: Brachytherapy utilization increased from 2003 to 2010: in patients Age<50, from 0.6% to 4.9%; patients Age≥50 from 2.2% to 11.3%; Endocrine− patients, 1.3% to 9.4%; Endocrine+ patients, 1.9% to 9.7%. Age influenced treatment selection more than endocrine status: 17% of brachytherapy patients were Age<50 versus 32% of WBI patients (P<.001); whereas 41% of brachytherapy patients were Endocrine–versus 44% of WBI patients (P=.003). Highest absolute 5-year subsequent mastectomy risks occurred in Endocrine−/Age<50 patients (24.4% after brachytherapy vs 9.0% after WBI (hazard ratio [HR] 2.18, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.37-3.47); intermediate risks in Endocrine−/Age≥50 patients (8.6% vs 4.9%; HR 1.76, 95% CI 1.26-2.46); and lowest risks in Endocrine+ patients of any age: Endocrine+/Age<50 (5.5% vs 4.5%; HR 1.18, 95% CI 0.61-2.31); Endocrine+/Age≥50 (4.2% vs 2

  8. Prostate brachytherapy in patients with median lobe hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Wallner, K; Smathers, S; Sutlief, S; Corman, J; Ellis, W

    2000-06-20

    Our aim was to document the technical and clinical course of prostate brachytherapy patients with radiographic evidence of median lobe hyperplasia (MLH). Eight patients with MLH were identified during our routine brachytherapy practice, representing 9% of the 87 brachytherapy patients treated during a 6-month period. No effort was made to avoid brachytherapy in patients noted to have MLH on diagnostic work-up. Cystoscopic evaluation was not routinely performed. Postimplant axial computed tomographic (CT) images of the prostate were obtained at 0.5 cm intervals. Preimplant urinary obstructive symptoms were quantified by the criteria of the American Urologic Association (AUA). Each patient was contacted during the writing of this report to update postimplant morbidity information. There was no apparent association between the degree of MLH and preimplant prostate volume or AUA score. Intraoperatively, we were able to visualize MLH by transrectal ultrasound and did not notice any particular difficulty placing sources in the MLH tissue or migration of sources out of the tissue. The prescription isodose covered from 81% to 99% of the postimplant CT-defined target volume, achieving adequate dose to the median lobe tissue in all patients. Two of the eight patients developed acute, postimplant urinary retention. The first patient required intermittent self-catheterization for 3 months and then resumed spontaneous urination. MLH does not appear to be a strong contraindication to prostate brachytherapy, and prophylactic resection of hypertrophic tissue in such patients is probably not warranted. Int. J. Cancer (Radiat. Oncol. Invest.) 90, 152-156 (2000). PMID:10900427

  9. Interstitial rotating shield brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Quentin E. Xu, Jinghzu; Breitbach, Elizabeth K.; Li, Xing; Rockey, William R.; Kim, Yusung; Wu, Xiaodong; Flynn, Ryan T.; Enger, Shirin A.

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: To present a novel needle, catheter, and radiation source system for interstitial rotating shield brachytherapy (I-RSBT) of the prostate. I-RSBT is a promising technique for reducing urethra, rectum, and bladder dose relative to conventional interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT). Methods: A wire-mounted 62 GBq{sup 153}Gd source is proposed with an encapsulated diameter of 0.59 mm, active diameter of 0.44 mm, and active length of 10 mm. A concept model I-RSBT needle/catheter pair was constructed using concentric 50 and 75 μm thick nickel-titanium alloy (nitinol) tubes. The needle is 16-gauge (1.651 mm) in outer diameter and the catheter contains a 535 μm thick platinum shield. I-RSBT and conventional HDR-BT treatment plans for a prostate cancer patient were generated based on Monte Carlo dose calculations. In order to minimize urethral dose, urethral dose gradient volumes within 0–5 mm of the urethra surface were allowed to receive doses less than the prescribed dose of 100%. Results: The platinum shield reduced the dose rate on the shielded side of the source at 1 cm off-axis to 6.4% of the dose rate on the unshielded side. For the case considered, for the same minimum dose to the hottest 98% of the clinical target volume (D{sub 98%}), I-RSBT reduced urethral D{sub 0.1cc} below that of conventional HDR-BT by 29%, 33%, 38%, and 44% for urethral dose gradient volumes within 0, 1, 3, and 5 mm of the urethra surface, respectively. Percentages are expressed relative to the prescription dose of 100%. For the case considered, for the same urethral dose gradient volumes, rectum D{sub 1cc} was reduced by 7%, 6%, 6%, and 6%, respectively, and bladder D{sub 1cc} was reduced by 4%, 5%, 5%, and 6%, respectively. Treatment time to deliver 20 Gy with I-RSBT was 154 min with ten 62 GBq {sup 153}Gd sources. Conclusions: For the case considered, the proposed{sup 153}Gd-based I-RSBT system has the potential to lower the urethral dose relative to HDR-BT by 29

  10. Urethral toxicity after LDR brachytherapy: experience in Japan.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Nobumichi; Asakawa, Isao; Hasegawa, Masatoshi; Fujimoto, Kiyohide

    2015-01-01

    Urinary toxicity is common after low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy, and the resolution of urinary toxicity is a concern. In particular, urinary frequency is the most common adverse event among the urinary toxicities. We have previously reported that approximately 70% of patients experience urinary frequency during the first 6 months after seed implantation. Most urinary adverse events were classified as Grade 1, and Grade 2 or higher adverse events were rare. The incidence of urinary retention was approximately 2-4%. A high International Prostate Symptom Score before seed implantation was an independent predictor of acute urinary toxicity of Grade 2 or higher. Several previous reports from the United States also supported this trend. In Japan, LDR brachytherapy was legally approved in 2003. A nationwide prospective cohort study entitled Japanese Prostate Cancer Outcome Study of Permanent Iodine-125 Seed Implantation was initiated in July 2005. It is an important issue to limit urinary toxicities in patients who undergo LDR brachytherapy.

  11. Brachytherapy in the treatment of skin cancer: an overview.

    PubMed

    Skowronek, Janusz

    2015-10-01

    The incidence of skin cancer worldwide is constantly growing and it is the most frequently diagnosed tumor. Brachytherapy (BT) in particular localizations is a valuable tool of the exact radiation depot inside the tumor mass. In localizations such as the face, skull skin and inoperable tumors, relapses after surgery, radiotherapy are usually not suitable for primary or secondary invasive treatment. Brachytherapy is a safe procedure for organs at risk according to rapid fall of a dose outside the axis of the applicator with satisfactory dose localization inside the target. The complications rate is acceptable and treatment costs are low. In some tumors (great skin lesions in the scalp, near eyes or on the nose) BT allows for a great dose reduction in surrounding healthy tissues. Brachytherapy provides minimal dose delivery to surrounding healthy tissue, thus enabling good functional and cosmetic results. Treatment is possible almost in all cases on an outpatient basis. PMID:26759545

  12. Validation of GPUMCD for low-energy brachytherapy seed dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Hissoiny, Sami; Ozell, Benoit; Despres, Philippe; Carrier, Jean-Francois

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To validate GPUMCD, a new package for fast Monte Carlo dose calculations based on the GPU (graphics processing unit), as a tool for low-energy single seed brachytherapy dosimetry for specific seed models. As the currently accepted method of dose calculation in low-energy brachytherapy computations relies on severe approximations, a Monte Carlo based approach would result in more accurate dose calculations, taking in to consideration the patient anatomy as well as interseed attenuation. The first step is to evaluate the capability of GPUMCD to reproduce low-energy, single source, brachytherapy calculations which could ultimately result in fast and accurate, Monte Carlo based, brachytherapy dose calculations for routine planning. Methods: A mixed geometry engine was integrated to GPUMCD capable of handling parametric as well as voxelized geometries. In order to evaluate GPUMCD for brachytherapy calculations, several dosimetry parameters were computed and compared to values found in the literature. These parameters, defined by the AAPM Task-Group No. 43, are the radial dose function, the 2D anisotropy function, and the dose rate constant. These three parameters were computed for two different brachytherapy sources: the Amersham OncoSeed 6711 and the Imagyn IsoStar IS-12501. Results: GPUMCD was shown to yield dosimetric parameters similar to those found in the literature. It reproduces radial dose functions to within 1.25% for both sources in the 0.5< r <10 cm range. The 2D anisotropy function was found to be within 3% at r = 5 cm and within 4% at r = 1 cm. The dose rate constants obtained were within the range of other values reported in the literature.Conclusion: GPUMCD was shown to be able to reproduce various TG-43 parameters for two different low-energy brachytherapy sources found in the literature. The next step is to test GPUMCD as a fast clinical Monte Carlo brachytherapy dose calculations with multiple seeds and patient geometry, potentially providing

  13. Current state of the art brachytherapy treatment planning dosimetry algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Pantelis, E; Karaiskos, P

    2014-01-01

    Following literature contributions delineating the deficiencies introduced by the approximations of conventional brachytherapy dosimetry, different model-based dosimetry algorithms have been incorporated into commercial systems for 192Ir brachytherapy treatment planning. The calculation settings of these algorithms are pre-configured according to criteria established by their developers for optimizing computation speed vs accuracy. Their clinical use is hence straightforward. A basic understanding of these algorithms and their limitations is essential, however, for commissioning; detecting differences from conventional algorithms; explaining their origin; assessing their impact; and maintaining global uniformity of clinical practice. PMID:25027247

  14. Dosimetric characteristics of a new unit for electronic skin brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Martinez, Teresa; Chan, Jan-Pieter; Perez-Calatayud, Jose

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Brachytherapy with radioactive high dose rate (HDR) 192Ir source is applied to small skin cancer lesions, using surface applicators, i.e. Leipzig or Valencia type. New developments in the field of radiotherapy for skin cancer include electronic brachytherapy. This technique involves the placement of an HDR X-ray source close to the skin, therefore combining the benefits of brachytherapy with the reduced shielding requirements and targeted energy of low energy X-rays. Recently, the Esteya® Electronic Brachytherapy System (Esteya EBS, Elekta AB-Nucletron, Stockholm, Sweden) has been developed specifically for HDR brachytherapy treatment of surface lesions. The system provides radionuclide free HDR brachytherapy by means of a small 69.5 kV X-ray source. The purpose of this study is to obtain the dosimetric characterization required for clinical implementation, providing the detailed methodology to perform the commissioning. Material and methods Flatness, symmetry and penumbra, percentage of depth dose (PDD), kV stability, HVL, output, spectrum, linearity, and leakage have been evaluated for a set of applicators (from 10 mm to 30 mm in diameter). Results Flatness and symmetry resulted better than 5% with around 1 mm of penumbra. The depth dose gradient is about 7%/mm. A kV value of 68.4 ± 1.0 kV (k = 1) was obtained, in good agreement with manufacturer data (69.5 kV). HVL was 1.85 mm Al. Dose rate for a typical 6 Gy to 7 Gy prescription resulted about 3.3 Gy/min and the leakage value was < 100 µGy/min. Conclusions The new Esteya® Electronic Brachytherapy System presents excellent flatness and penumbra as with the Valencia applicator case, combined with an improved PDD, allowing treatment of lesions of up to a depth of 5 mm in combination with reduced treatment duration. The Esteya unit allows HDR brachytherapy superficial treatment within a minimally shielded environment due its low energy. PMID:24790622

  15. Imaging method for monitoring delivery of high dose rate brachytherapy

    DOEpatents

    Weisenberger, Andrew G; Majewski, Stanislaw

    2012-10-23

    A method for in-situ monitoring both the balloon/cavity and the radioactive source in brachytherapy treatment utilizing using at least one pair of miniature gamma cameras to acquire separate images of: 1) the radioactive source as it is moved in the tumor volume during brachytherapy; and 2) a relatively low intensity radiation source produced by either an injected radiopharmaceutical rendering cancerous tissue visible or from a radioactive solution filling a balloon surgically implanted into the cavity formed by the surgical resection of a tumor.

  16. Calibration of multiple LDR brachytherapy sources

    SciTech Connect

    DeWerd, Larry A.; Micka, John A.; Holmes, Shannon M.; Bohm, Tim D.

    2006-10-15

    A trend is underway toward the use of prepackaged low dose rate brachytherapy sources, which come in the form of strands, coiled line sources, preloaded needles, and sterile cartridge packs. Since the medical physicist is responsible for verification of source strength prior to patient treatment, development of prepackaged source strength verification methods is needed. Existing guidelines are reviewed to establish the situation that medical physicists find with respect to prepackaged sources. This investigation presents an experimental evaluation of the effect of some of these multiseed geometries on source strength measurements. Multiseed strands and coils, whether {sup 125}I, {sup 103}Pd, or {sup 192}Ir can be measured in a chamber with a long, sensitive axial length with a uniform response. Sterile seed cartridge packs can also be measured but require a correction factor to be applied. Sources in needles, however, cannot be measured in the needle since there is too great a variation in needle composition and needle tolerance thickness. Removing these seeds from the needle into a sterile measurement insert, which maintains sterility is a practical source strength verification method, similar to those done for multiple seed configurations in a well chamber with adequate axial uniformity. Values are compared with individual air kerma strength calibrations, and correction factors, are presented where needed. In each case, care must be taken to maintain sterility as multiple seeds are measured in well chamber inserts.

  17. Radiotherapy and brachytherapy for recurrent colorectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Nag, S. )

    1991-05-01

    Radical surgical excision of locoregional recurrence of colorectal carcinoma usually produces the best survival and should be attempted whenever possible. However, recurrences are often unresectable; hence palliative local therapy may be indicated. There are several options for the radiation therapy of local, unresectable, recurrent, or metastatic colorectal cancer. Whole pelvis irradiation of 4,000-5,000 cGy followed by a coned-down boost of 1,000-1,500 cGy generally provides good symptomatic palliation in 80-90% of patients, but long-term control or cure is rarely achieved. External beam irradiation of 2,000-3,000 cGy to the whole liver with or without concurrent chemotherapy may be used for palliation of metastatic disease to the liver. A combination of intraoperative radiation therapy applied directly to the tumor bed and external beam irradiation may improve local control and survival rates. Multiple options are available for the intraoperative use of brachytherapy which can deliver high radiation doses to the residual tumor, or tumor bed, sparing normal tissue.

  18. Initial application of digital tomosynthesis to improve brachytherapy treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baydush, Alan H.; Mirzaei McKee, Mahta; King, June; Godfrey, Devon J.

    2007-03-01

    We present preliminary investigations that examine the feasibility of incorporating volumetric images generated using digital tomosynthesis into brachytherapy treatment planning. The Integrated Brachytherapy Unit (IBU) at our facility consists of an L-arm, C-arm isocentric motion system with an x-ray tube and fluoroscopic imager attached. Clinically, this unit is used to generate oblique, anterior-posterior, and lateral images for simple treatment planning and dose prescriptions. Oncologists would strongly prefer to have volumetric data to better determine three dimensional dose distributions (dose-volume histograms) to the target area and organs at risk. Moving the patient back and forth to CT causes undo stress on the patient, allows extensive motion of organs and treatment applicators, and adds additional time to patient treatment. We propose to use the IBU imaging system with digital tomosynthesis to generate volumetric patient data, which can be used for improving treatment planning and overall reducing treatment time. Initial image data sets will be acquired over a limited arc of a human-like phantom composed of real bones and tissue equivalent material. A brachytherapy applicator will be incorporated into one of the phantoms for visualization purposes. Digital tomosynthesis will be used to generate a volumetric image of this phantom setup. This volumetric image set will be visually inspected to determine the feasibility of future incorporation of these types of images into brachytherapy treatment planning. We conclude that initial images using the tomosynthesis reconstruction technique show much promise and bode well for future work.

  19. Introduction of Transperineal Image-Guided Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Aronowitz, Jesse N.

    2014-07-15

    The modern prostate brachytherapy procedure is characterized by ultrasound guidance, template assistance, and a return to a “closed” transperineal approach. This review traces the introduction and evolution of these elements and charts the development of the procedure from the ashes of previous, failed efforts.

  20. Verification of Oncentra brachytherapy planning using independent calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safian, N. A. M.; Abdullah, N. H.; Abdullah, R.; Chiang, C. S.

    2016-03-01

    This study was done to investigate the verification technique of treatment plan quality assurance for brachytherapy. It is aimed to verify the point doses in 192Ir high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy between Oncentra Masterplan brachytherapy treatment planning system and independent calculation software at a region of rectum, bladder and prescription points for both pair ovoids and full catheter set ups. The Oncentra TPS output text files were automatically loaded into the verification programme that has been developed based on spreadsheets. The output consists of source coordinates, desired calculation point coordinates and the dwell time of a patient plan. The source strength and reference dates were entered into the programme and then dose point calculations were independently performed. The programme shows its results in a comparison of its calculated point doses with the corresponding Oncentra TPS outcome. From the total of 40 clinical cases that consisted of two fractions for 20 patients, the results that were given in term of percentage difference, it shows an agreement between TPS and independent calculation are in the range of 2%. This programme only takes a few minutes to be used is preferably recommended to be implemented as the verification technique in clinical brachytherapy dosimetry.

  1. Photoacoustic imaging of prostate brachytherapy seeds with transurethral light delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lediju Bell, Muyinatu A.; Guo, Xiaoyu; Song, Danny Y.; Boctor, Emad M.

    2014-03-01

    We present a novel approach to photoacoustic imaging of prostate brachytherapy seeds utilizing an existing urinary catheter for transurethral light delivery. Two canine prostates were surgically implanted with brachyther- apy seeds under transrectal ultrasound guidance. One prostate was excised shortly after euthanasia and fixed in gelatin. The second prostate was imaged in the native tissue environment shortly after euthanasia. A urinary catheter was inserted in the urethra of each prostate. A 1-mm core diameter optical fiber coupled to a 1064 nm Nd:YAG laser was inserted into the urinary catheter. Light from the fiber was either directed mostly parallel to the fiber axis (i.e. end-fire fire) or mostly 90° to the fiber axis (i.e. side-fire fiber). An Ultrasonix SonixTouch scanner, transrectal ultrasound probe with curvilinear (BPC8-4) and linear (BPL9-5) arrays, and DAQ unit were utilized for synchronized laser light emission and photoacoustic signal acquisition. The implanted brachytherapy seeds were visualized at radial distances of 6-16 mm from the catheter. Multiple brachytherapy seeds were si- multaneously visualized with each array of the transrectal probe using both delay-and-sum (DAS) and short-lag spatial coherence (SLSC) beamforming. This work is the first to demonstrate the feasibility of photoacoustic imaging of prostate brachytherapy seeds using a transurethral light delivery method.

  2. 21 CFR 892.5730 - Radionuclide brachytherapy source.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Radionuclide brachytherapy source. 892.5730 Section 892.5730 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... a source of nuclear radiation for therapy. (b) Classification. Class II....

  3. 21 CFR 892.5730 - Radionuclide brachytherapy source.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Radionuclide brachytherapy source. 892.5730 Section 892.5730 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... a source of nuclear radiation for therapy. (b) Classification. Class II....

  4. Photoacoustic imaging of prostate brachytherapy seeds in ex vivo prostate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Nathanael; Kang, Hyun Jae; DeJournett, Travis; Spicer, James; Boctor, Emad

    2011-03-01

    The localization of brachytherapy seeds in relation to the prostate is a key step in intraoperative treatment planning (ITP) for improving outcomes in prostate cancer patients treated with low dose rate prostate brachytherapy. Transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) has traditionally been the modality of choice to guide the prostate brachytherapy procedure due to its relatively low cost and apparent ease of use. However, TRUS is unable to visualize seeds well, precluding ITP and producing suboptimal results. While other modalities such as X-ray and magnetic resonance imaging have been investigated to localize seeds in relation to the prostate, photoacoustic imaging has become an emerging and promising modality to solve this challenge. Moreover, photoacoustic imaging may be more practical in the clinical setting compared to other methods since it adds little additional equipment to the ultrasound system already adopted in procedure today, reducing cost and simplifying engineering steps. In this paper, we demonstrate the latest efforts of localizing prostate brachytherapy seeds using photoacoustic imaging, including visualization of multiple seeds in actual prostate tissue. Although there are still several challenges to be met before photoacoustic imaging can be used in the operating room, we are pleased to present the current progress in this effort.

  5. Human factors evaluation of remote afterloading brachytherapy - an overview

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenfeld, I.

    1994-12-31

    This report presents information from a research project aimed at understanding the causes of human errors in remote afterloading brachytherapy. The analysis determined functions, tasks, equipment, and personnel involoved, as well as cognitive, perceptual, and motor skills needed to perform the tasks.

  6. Patient effective dose from endovascular brachytherapy with 192Ir sources.

    PubMed

    Perma, L; Bianchi, C; Nicolini, G; Novario, R; Tanzi, F; Conte, L

    2002-01-01

    The growing use of endovascular brachytherapy has been accompanied by the publication of a large number of studies in several fields, but few studies on patient dose have been found in the literature. Moreover, these studies were carried out on the basis of Monte Carlo simulation. The aim of the present study was to estimate the effective dose to the patient undergoing endovascular brachytherapy treatment with 112Ir sources, by means of experimental measurements. Two standard treatments were taken into account: an endovascular brachytherapy of the coronary artery corresponding to the activity x time product of 184 GBq.min and an endovascular brachytherapy of the renal artery (898 GBq.min). Experimental assessment was accomplished by thermoluminescence dosemeters positioned in more than 300 measurement points in a properly adapted Rqndo phantom. A method has been developed to estimate the mean organ doses for all tissues and organs concerned in order to calculate the effective dose associated with intravascular brachytherapy. The normalised organ doses resulting from cronary treatment were 2.4 x 10(-2) mSv.GBq(-1).min(-1) for lung, 0.9 x 10(-2) mSv.GBSq(-1).min(-1) for oesophagus and 0.48 x 10(-2) mS.GBq(-1).min(-1) for bone marrow. During brachytherapy of the renal artery, the corresponding normalised doses were 4.2 x 10(-2) mS.GBq(-1).min(-1) for colon, 7.8 x 10(-2) mSv.GBq(-1).min(-1) for stomach and 1.7 x 10(-2) mSv.GBq(-1).min(-1) for liver. Coronary treatment iJnvlled an efl'fective dose of (0.046 mSv.GBq(-1).min(-1), whereas the treatment of the renal artery resulted in an effective dose of 0.15 mSv.GBq(-1).min(-1); there were many similarities with data from former studies. Based on these results it can be concluded that the dose level of patients exposed during brachytherapy treatment is low.

  7. Gadolinium neutron capture brachytherapy (GdNCB), a new treatment method for intravascular brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Enger, Shirin A.; Rezaei, Arash; Munck af Rosenschoeld, Per; Lundqvist, Hans

    2006-01-15

    Restenosis is a major problem after balloon angioplasty and stent implantation. The aim of this study is to introduce gadolinium neutron capture brachytherapy (GdNCB) as a suitable modality for treatment of stenosis. The utility of GdNCB in intravascular brachytherapy (IVBT) of stent stenosis is investigated by using the GEANT4 and MCNP4B Monte Carlo radiation transport codes. To study capture rate, Kerma, absorbed dose and absorbed dose rate around a Gd-containing stent activated with neutrons, a 30 mm long, 5 mm diameter gadolinium foil is chosen. The input data is a neutron spectrum used for clinical neutron capture therapy in Studsvik, Sweden. Thermal neutron capture in gadolinium yields a spectrum of high-energy gamma photons, which due to the build-up effect gives an almost flat dose delivery pattern to the first 4 mm around the stent. The absorbed dose rate is 1.33 Gy/min, 0.25 mm from the stent surface while the dose to normal tissue is in order of 0.22 Gy/min, i.e., a factor of 6 lower. To spare normal tissue further fractionation of the dose is also possible. The capture rate is relatively high at both ends of the foil. The dose distribution from gamma and charge particle radiation at the edges and inside the stent contributes to a nonuniform dose distribution. This will lead to higher doses to the surrounding tissue and may prevent stent edge and in-stent restenosis. The position of the stent can be verified and corrected by the treatment plan prior to activation. Activation of the stent by an external neutron field can be performed days after catherization when the target cells start to proliferate and can be expected to be more radiation sensitive. Another advantage of the nonradioactive gadolinium stent is the possibility to avoid radiation hazard to personnel.

  8. Calculated and measured brachytherapy dosimetry parameters in water for the Xoft Axxent X-Ray Source: An electronic brachytherapy source

    SciTech Connect

    Rivard, Mark J.; Davis, Stephen D.; DeWerd, Larry A.; Rusch, Thomas W.; Axelrod, Steve

    2006-11-15

    A new x-ray source, the model S700 Axxent trade mark sign X-Ray Source (Source), has been developed by Xoft Inc. for electronic brachytherapy. Unlike brachytherapy sources containing radionuclides, this Source may be turned on and off at will and may be operated at variable currents and voltages to change the dose rate and penetration properties. The in-water dosimetry parameters for this electronic brachytherapy source have been determined from measurements and calculations at 40, 45, and 50 kV settings. Monte Carlo simulations of radiation transport utilized the MCNP5 code and the EPDL97-based mcplib04 cross-section library. Inter-tube consistency was assessed for 20 different Sources, measured with a PTW 34013 ionization chamber. As the Source is intended to be used for a maximum of ten treatment fractions, tube stability was also assessed. Photon spectra were measured using a high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector, and calculated using MCNP. Parameters used in the two-dimensional (2D) brachytherapy dosimetry formalism were determined. While the Source was characterized as a point due to the small anode size, <1 mm, use of the one-dimensional (1D) brachytherapy dosimetry formalism is not recommended due to polar anisotropy. Consequently, 1D brachytherapy dosimetry parameters were not sought. Calculated point-source model radial dose functions at g{sub P}(5) were 0.20, 0.24, and 0.29 for the 40, 45, and 50 kV voltage settings, respectively. For 1

  9. Improved dosimetry techniques for intravascular brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sehgal, Varun

    Coronary artery disease leads to the accumulation of atheromatous plaque leading to coronary stenosis. Coronary intervention techniques such as balloon angioplasty and atherectomy are used to address coronary stenosis and establish a stable lumen thus enhancing blood flow to the myocardium. Restenosis or re-blockage of the arteries is a major limitation of the above mentioned interventional techniques. Neointimal hyperplasia or proliferation of cells in response to the vascular injury as a result of coronary intervention is considered to be one of the major causes of restenosis. Recent studies indicated that irradiation of the coronary lesion site, with radiation doses ranging from 15 to 30 Gy, leads to diminishing neointimal hyperplasia with subsequent reduction in restenosis. The radiation dose is given by catheter-based radiation delivery systems using beta-emitters 90Sr/90Y, 32P and gamma-emitting 192Ir among others. However the dose schema used for dose prescription for these sources are relatively simplistic, and are based on calculations using uniform homogenous water or tissue media and simple cylinder geometry. Stenotic coronary vessels are invariably lined with atheromatous plaque of heterogeneous composition, the radiation dose distribution obtained from such dosimetry data can cause significant variations in the actual dose received by a given patient. Such discrepancies in dose calculation can introduce relatively large uncertainties in the limits of dose window for effective and safe application of intravascular brachytherapy, and consequently in the clinical evaluation of the efficacy of this modality. In this research study we investigated the effect of different geometrical and material heterogeneities, including residual plaque, catheter non-centering, lesion eccentricity and cardiac motion on the radiation dose delivered at the lesion site. Correction factors including dose perturbation factors and dose variation factors have been calculated

  10. Monte Carlo radiation dose simulations and dosimetric comparison of the model 6711 and 9011 {sup 125}I brachytherapy sources

    SciTech Connect

    Rivard, Mark J.

    2009-02-15

    Smaller diameter brachytherapy seeds for permanent interstitial implantation allow for use of smaller diameter implant needles. The use of smaller diameter needles may provide a lower incidence of healthy-tissue complications. This study determines the brachytherapy dosimetry parameters for the smaller diameter source (model 9011) and comments on the dosimetric comparison between this new source and the conventional brachytherapy seed (model 6711).

  11. Dosimetric analysis and comparison of IMRT and HDR brachytherapy in treatment of localized prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Murali, V; Kurup, P G G; Mahadev, P; Mahalakshmi, S

    2010-04-01

    Radical radiotherapy is one of the options for the management of prostate cancer. In external beam therapy, 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) are the options for delivery of increased radiation dose, as vital organs are very close to the prostate and a higher dose to these structures leads to an increased toxicity. In brachytherapy, low dose rate brachytherapy with permanent implant of radioactive seeds and high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR) with remote after loaders are available. A dosimetric analysis has been made on IMRT and HDR brachytherapy plans. Ten cases from each IMRT and HDR brachytherapy have been taken for the study. The analysis includes comparison of conformity and homogeneity indices, D100, D95, D90, D80, D50, D10 and D5 of the target. For the organs at risk (OAR), namely rectum and bladder, V100, V90 and V50 are compared. In HDR brachytherapy, the doses to 1 cc and 0.1 cc of urethra have also been studied. Since a very high dose surrounds the source, the 300% dose volumes in the target and within the catheters are also studied in two plans, to estimate the actual volume of target receiving dose over 300%. This study shows that the prescribed dose covers 93 and 92% of the target volume in IMRT and HDR brachytherapy respectively. HDR brachytherapy delivers a much lesser dose to OAR, compared to the IMRT. For rectum, the V50 in IMRT is 34.0cc whilst it is 7.5cc in HDR brachytherapy. With the graphic optimization tool in HDR brachytherapy planning, the dose to urethra could be kept within 120% of the target dose. Hence it is concluded that HDR brachytherapy may be the choice of treatment for cancer of prostate in the early stage.

  12. Trends in the Utilization of Brachytherapy in Cervical Cancer in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Kathy; Milosevic, Michael; Fyles, Anthony; Pintilie, Melania; Viswanathan, Akila N.

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To determine the trends in brachytherapy use in cervical cancer in the United States and to identify factors and survival benefits associated with brachytherapy treatment. Methods and Materials: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database, we identified 7359 patients with stages IB2-IVA cervical cancer treated with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) between 1988 and 2009. Propensity score matching was used to adjust for differences between patients who received brachytherapy and those who did not from 2000 onward (after the National Cancer Institute alert recommending concurrent chemotherapy). Results: Sixty-three percent of the 7359 women received brachytherapy in combination with EBRT, and 37% received EBRT alone. The brachytherapy utilization rate has decreased from 83% in 1988 to 58% in 2009 (P<.001), with a sharp decline of 23% in 2003 to 43%. Factors associated with higher odds of brachytherapy use include younger age, married (vs single) patients, earlier years of diagnosis, earlier stage and certain SEER regions. In the propensity score-matched cohort, brachytherapy treatment was associated with higher 4-year cause-specific survival (CSS; 64.3% vs 51.5%, P<.001) and overall survival (OS; 58.2% vs 46.2%, P<.001). Brachytherapy treatment was independently associated with better CSS (hazard ratio [HR], 0.64; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.57-0.71), and OS (HR 0.66; 95% CI, 0.60 to 0.74). Conclusions: This population-based analysis reveals a concerning decline in brachytherapy utilization and significant geographic disparities in the delivery of brachytherapy in the United States. Brachytherapy use is independently associated with significantly higher CSS and OS and should be implemented in all feasible cases.

  13. Dosimetric analysis and comparison of IMRT and HDR brachytherapy in treatment of localized prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Murali, V.; Kurup, P. G. G.; Mahadev, P.; Mahalakshmi, S.

    2010-01-01

    Radical radiotherapy is one of the options for the management of prostate cancer. In external beam therapy, 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) are the options for delivery of increased radiation dose, as vital organs are very close to the prostate and a higher dose to these structures leads to an increased toxicity. In brachytherapy, low dose rate brachytherapy with permanent implant of radioactive seeds and high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR) with remote after loaders are available. A dosimetric analysis has been made on IMRT and HDR brachytherapy plans. Ten cases from each IMRT and HDR brachytherapy have been taken for the study. The analysis includes comparison of conformity and homogeneity indices, D100, D95, D90, D80, D50, D10 and D5 of the target. For the organs at risk (OAR), namely rectum and bladder, V100, V90 and V50 are compared. In HDR brachytherapy, the doses to 1 cc and 0.1 cc of urethra have also been studied. Since a very high dose surrounds the source, the 300% dose volumes in the target and within the catheters are also studied in two plans, to estimate the actual volume of target receiving dose over 300%. This study shows that the prescribed dose covers 93 and 92% of the target volume in IMRT and HDR brachytherapy respectively. HDR brachytherapy delivers a much lesser dose to OAR, compared to the IMRT. For rectum, the V50 in IMRT is 34.0cc whilst it is 7.5cc in HDR brachytherapy. With the graphic optimization tool in HDR brachytherapy planning, the dose to urethra could be kept within 120% of the target dose. Hence it is concluded that HDR brachytherapy may be the choice of treatment for cancer of prostate in the early stage. PMID:20589121

  14. Review of advanced catheter technologies in radiation oncology brachytherapy procedures

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jun; Zamdborg, Leonid; Sebastian, Evelyn

    2015-01-01

    The development of new catheter and applicator technologies in recent years has significantly improved treatment accuracy, efficiency, and outcomes in brachytherapy. In this paper, we review these advances, focusing on the performance of catheter imaging and reconstruction techniques in brachytherapy procedures using magnetic resonance images and electromagnetic tracking. The accuracy of catheter reconstruction, imaging artifacts, and other notable properties of plastic and titanium applicators in gynecologic treatments are reviewed. The accuracy, noise performance, and limitations of electromagnetic tracking for catheter reconstruction are discussed. Several newly developed applicators for accelerated partial breast irradiation and gynecologic treatments are also reviewed. New hypofractionated high dose rate treatment schemes in prostate cancer and accelerated partial breast irradiation are presented. PMID:26203277

  15. Metal artefacts in MRI-guided brachytherapy of cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Owrangi, Amir; Ravi, Ananth; Song, William Y.

    2016-01-01

    The importance of assessing the metal-induced artefacts in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided brachytherapy is growing along with the increasing interest of integrating MRI into the treatment procedure of cervical cancer. Examples of metal objects in use include intracavitary cervical applicators and interstitial needles. The induced artefacts increase the uncertainties in the clinical workflow and can be a potential obstacle for the accurate delivery of the treatment. Overcoming this problem necessitates a good understanding of its originating sources. Several efforts are recorded in the literature to quantify the extent of such artefacts, in phantoms and in clinical practice. Here, we elaborate on the origin of metal-induced artefacts in the light of brachytherapy applications, while summarizing recent efforts that have been made to assess and overcome the induced distortions.

  16. Cataract extraction after brachytherapy for malignant melanoma of the choroid

    SciTech Connect

    Fish, G.E.; Jost, B.F.; Snyder, W.I.; Fuller, D.G.; Birch, D.G. )

    1991-05-01

    Thirteen eyes of 55 consecutive patients treated with brachytherapy for malignant melanoma of the choroid developed postirradiation cataracts. Cataract development was more common in older patients and in patients with larger and more anterior tumors. Eleven eyes had extracapsular cataract extraction and intraocular lens implantation. Initial visual improvement occurred in 91% of eyes, with an average improvement of 5.5 lines. Visual acuity was maintained at 20/60 or better in 55% of the eyes over an average period of follow-up of 24 months (range, 6 to 40 months). These data suggest that, visually, cataract extraction can be helpful in selected patients who develop a cataract after brachytherapy for malignant melanoma of the choroid.

  17. [Basic principles and results of brachytherapy in gynecological oncology].

    PubMed

    Kanaev, S V; Turkevich, V G; Baranov, S B; Savel'eva, V V

    2014-01-01

    The fundamental basics of contact radiation therapy (brachytherapy) for gynecological cancer are presented. During brachytherapy the principles of conformal radiotherapy should be implemented, the aim of which is to sum the maximum possible dose of radiation to the tumor and decrease the dose load in adjacent organs and tissues, which allows reducing the frequency of radiation damage at treatment of primary tumors. It is really feasible only on modern technological level, thanks to precision topometry preparation, optimal computer dosimetrical and radiobiological planning of each session and radiotherapy in general. Successful local and long-term results of the contact radiation therapy for cancer of cervix and endometrium are due to optimal anatomical and topometrical ratio of the tumor localization, radioactive sources, and also physical and radiobiological laws of distribution and effects of ionizing radiation, the dose load accounting rules.

  18. Distortions induced by radioactive seeds into interstitial brachytherapy dose distributions.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chuanyu; Inanc, Feyzi; Modrick, Joseph M

    2004-12-01

    In a previous article, we presented development and verification of an integral transport equation-based deterministic algorithm for computing three-dimensional brachytherapy dose distributions. Recently, we have included fluorescence radiation physics and parallel computation to the standing algorithms so that we can compute dose distributions for a large set of seeds without resorting to the superposition methods. The introduction of parallel computing capability provided a means to compute the dose distribution for multiple seeds in a simultaneous manner. This provided a way to study strong heterogeneity and shadow effects induced by the presence of multiple seeds in an interstitial brachytherapy implant. This article presents the algorithm for computing fluorescence radiation, algorithm for parallel computing, and display results for an 81-seed implant that has a perfect and imperfect lattice. The dosimetry data for a single model 6711 seeds is presented for verification and heterogeneity factor computations using simultaneous and superposition techniques are presented.

  19. Metal artefacts in MRI-guided brachytherapy of cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Abraam S; Owrangi, Amir; Ravi, Ananth; Song, William Y

    2016-08-01

    The importance of assessing the metal-induced artefacts in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided brachytherapy is growing along with the increasing interest of integrating MRI into the treatment procedure of cervical cancer. Examples of metal objects in use include intracavitary cervical applicators and interstitial needles. The induced artefacts increase the uncertainties in the clinical workflow and can be a potential obstacle for the accurate delivery of the treatment. Overcoming this problem necessitates a good understanding of its originating sources. Several efforts are recorded in the literature to quantify the extent of such artefacts, in phantoms and in clinical practice. Here, we elaborate on the origin of metal-induced artefacts in the light of brachytherapy applications, while summarizing recent efforts that have been made to assess and overcome the induced distortions. PMID:27648092

  20. Intraoperative interstitial microwave-induced hyperthermia and brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Coughlin, C T; Wong, T Z; Strohbehn, J W; Colacchio, T A; Sutton, J E; Belch, R Z; Douple, E B

    1985-09-01

    Intra-operative placement of 11-gauge nylon catheters into deep-seated unresectable tumors for interstitial brachytherapy permits localized heating of tumors (hyperthermia) using microwave (915 MHz) antennas which are inserted into these catheters. Four preliminary cases are described where epithelial tumors at various sites were implanted with an antenna array and heated for 1 hour, both before and after the iridium-192 brachytherapy. Temperatures were monitored in catheters required for the appropriate radiation dosimetry but not required for the interstitial microwave antenna array hyperthermia (IMAAH) system. Additional thermometry was obtained using nonperturbed fiberoptic thermometry probes inserted into the catheters' housing antennas. No significant complications, such as bleeding or infection, were observed. This approach to cancer therapy is shown to be feasible and it produces controlled, localized hyperthermia, with temperatures of 50 degrees C or more in tumors. This technique may offer a therapeutic option for pelvic, intra-abdominal and head and neck tumors.

  1. Metal artefacts in MRI-guided brachytherapy of cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Owrangi, Amir; Ravi, Ananth; Song, William Y.

    2016-01-01

    The importance of assessing the metal-induced artefacts in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided brachytherapy is growing along with the increasing interest of integrating MRI into the treatment procedure of cervical cancer. Examples of metal objects in use include intracavitary cervical applicators and interstitial needles. The induced artefacts increase the uncertainties in the clinical workflow and can be a potential obstacle for the accurate delivery of the treatment. Overcoming this problem necessitates a good understanding of its originating sources. Several efforts are recorded in the literature to quantify the extent of such artefacts, in phantoms and in clinical practice. Here, we elaborate on the origin of metal-induced artefacts in the light of brachytherapy applications, while summarizing recent efforts that have been made to assess and overcome the induced distortions. PMID:27648092

  2. Metal artefacts in MRI-guided brachytherapy of cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Abraam S; Owrangi, Amir; Ravi, Ananth; Song, William Y

    2016-08-01

    The importance of assessing the metal-induced artefacts in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided brachytherapy is growing along with the increasing interest of integrating MRI into the treatment procedure of cervical cancer. Examples of metal objects in use include intracavitary cervical applicators and interstitial needles. The induced artefacts increase the uncertainties in the clinical workflow and can be a potential obstacle for the accurate delivery of the treatment. Overcoming this problem necessitates a good understanding of its originating sources. Several efforts are recorded in the literature to quantify the extent of such artefacts, in phantoms and in clinical practice. Here, we elaborate on the origin of metal-induced artefacts in the light of brachytherapy applications, while summarizing recent efforts that have been made to assess and overcome the induced distortions.

  3. Compound dual radiation action theory for 252Cf brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, C K; Zhang, X

    2004-01-01

    The existing dosimetry protocol that uses the concept of RBE for 252Cf brachytherapy contains large uncertainties. A new formula has been developed to correlate the biological effect (i.e. cell survival fraction) resulting from a mixed n + gamma radiation field with two physical quantities and two biological quantities. The formula is based on a pathway model evolved from that of the compound-dual-radiation-action (CDRA) theory, previously proposed by Rossi and Zaider. The new model employs the recently published data on radiation-induced DNA lesions. The new formula is capable of predicting quantitatively the synergistic effect caused by the interactions between neutron events and gamma ray events, and it is intended to be included into a new dosimetry protocol for future 252Cf brachytherapy.

  4. High dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy quality assurance: a practical guide

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, DA

    2006-01-01

    The widespread adoption of high dose rate brachytherapy with its inherent dangers necessitates adoption of appropriate quality assurance measures to minimize risks to both patients and medical staff. This paper is aimed at assisting someone who is establishing a new program or revising one already in place into adhere to the recently issued Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USA) regulations and the guidelines from the American Association of Physicists in Medicine. PMID:21614233

  5. Brachytherapy in Lip Carcinoma: Long-Term Results

    SciTech Connect

    Guibert, Mireille; David, Isabelle; Vergez, Sebastien; Rives, Michel; Filleron, Thomas; Bonnet, Jacques; Delannes, Martine

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of low-dose-rate brachytherapy for local control and relapse-free survival in squamous cell and basal cell carcinomas of the lips. We compared two groups: one with tumors on the skin and the other with tumors on the lip. Patients and methods: All patients had been treated at Claudius Regaud Cancer Centre from 1990 to 2008 for squamous cell or basal cell carcinoma. Low-dose-rate brachytherapy was performed with iridium 192 wires according to the Paris system rules. On average, the dose delivered was 65 Gy. Results: 172 consecutive patients were included in our study; 69 had skin carcinoma (squamous cell or basal cell), and 92 had squamous cell mucosal carcinoma. The average follow-up time was 5.4 years. In the skin cancer group, there were five local recurrences and one lymph node recurrence. In the mucosal cancer group, there were ten local recurrences and five lymph node recurrences. The 8-year relapse-free survival for the entire population was 80%. The 8-year relapse-free survival was 85% for skin carcinoma 75% for mucosal carcinoma, with no significant difference between groups. The functional results were satisfactory for 99% of patients, and the cosmetic results were satisfactory for 92%. Maximal toxicity observed was Grade 2. Conclusions: Low-dose-rate brachytherapy can be used to treat lip carcinomas at Stages T1 and T2 as the only treatment with excellent results for local control and relapse-free survival. The benefits of brachytherapy are also cosmetic and functional, with 91% of patients having no side effects.

  6. Californium-252 brachytherapy for anal and ano-rectal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, B.; Maruyama, Y.; Proudfoot, W.; Malcolm, A.

    1986-01-01

    Surgery has historically been the standard treatment for anal, ano-rectal and rectal carcinoma but is prone to local or regional failure. Over the past 15 years there has been increasing interest in and success with radiation therapy and combined chemoradiotherapy for treatment of anal and ano-rectal cancers. Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with external beam teletherapy has been investigated for anal and ano-rectal lesions at the Univ. of Kentucky with encouraging results.

  7. Serum Testosterone Kinetics After Brachytherapy for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Taira, Al V.; Merrick, Gregory S.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Butler, Wayne M.; Lief, Jonathan H.; Allen, Zachariah A.; Wallner, Kent E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate temporal changes in testosterone after prostate brachytherapy and investigate the potential impact of these changes on response to treatment. Methods and Materials: Between January 2008 and March 2009, 221 consecutive patients underwent Pd-103 brachytherapy without androgen deprivation for clinically localized prostate cancer. Prebrachytherapy prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and serum testosterone were obtained for each patient. Repeat levels were obtained 3 months after brachytherapy and at least every 6 months thereafter. Multiple clinical, treatment, and dosimetric parameters were evaluated to determine an association with temporal testosterone changes. In addition, analysis was conducted to determine if there was an association between testosterone changes and treatment outcomes or the occurrence of a PSA spike. Results: There was no significant difference in serum testosterone over time after implant (p = 0.57). 29% of men experienced an increase {>=}25%, 23% of men experienced a decrease {>=}25%, and the remaining 48% of men had no notable change in testosterone over time. There was no difference in testosterone trends between men who received external beam radiotherapy and those who did not (p = 0.12). On multivariate analysis, preimplant testosterone was the only variable that consistently predicted for changes in testosterone over time. Men with higher than average testosterone tended to experience drop in testosterone (p < 0.001), whereas men with average or below average baseline testosterone had no significant change. There was no association between men who experienced PSA spike and testosterone temporal trends (p = 0.50) nor between initial PSA response and testosterone trends (p = 0.21). Conclusion: Prostate brachytherapy does not appear to impact serum testosterone over time. Changes in serum testosterone do not appear to be associated with PSA spike phenomena nor with initial PSA response to treatment; therefore, PSA response

  8. Cable attachment for a radioactive brachytherapy source capsule

    DOEpatents

    Gross, Ian G; Pierce, Larry A

    2006-07-18

    In cancer brachytherapy treatment, a small californium-252 neutron source capsule is attached to a guide cable using a modified crimping technique. The guide cable has a solid cylindrical end, and the attachment employs circumferential grooves micromachined in the solid cable end. The attachment was designed and tested, and hardware fabricated for use inside a radioactive hot cell. A welding step typically required in other cable attachments is avoided.

  9. Study of dose calculation on breast brachytherapy using prism TPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fendriani, Yoza; Haryanto, Freddy

    2015-09-01

    PRISM is one of non-commercial Treatment Planning System (TPS) and is developed at the University of Washington. In Indonesia, many cancer hospitals use expensive commercial TPS. This study aims to investigate Prism TPS which been applied to the dose distribution of brachytherapy by taking into account the effect of source position and inhomogeneities. The results will be applicable for clinical Treatment Planning System. Dose calculation has been implemented for water phantom and CT scan images of breast cancer using point source and line source. This study used point source and line source and divided into two cases. On the first case, Ir-192 seed source is located at the center of treatment volume. On the second case, the source position is gradually changed. The dose calculation of every case performed on a homogeneous and inhomogeneous phantom with dimension 20 × 20 × 20 cm3. The inhomogeneous phantom has inhomogeneities volume 2 × 2 × 2 cm3. The results of dose calculations using PRISM TPS were compared to literature data. From the calculation of PRISM TPS, dose rates show good agreement with Plato TPS and other study as published by Ramdhani. No deviations greater than ±4% for all case. Dose calculation in inhomogeneous and homogenous cases show similar result. This results indicate that Prism TPS is good in dose calculation of brachytherapy but not sensitive for inhomogeneities. Thus, the dose calculation parameters developed in this study were found to be applicable for clinical treatment planning of brachytherapy.

  10. Implicit active contours for automatic brachytherapy seed segmentation in fluoroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moult, Eric; Burdette, Clif; Song, Danny; Fichtinger, Gabor; Fallavollita, Pascal

    2012-02-01

    Motivation: In prostate brachytherapy, intra-operative dosimetry would be ideal to allow for rapid evaluation of the implant quality while the patient is still in the treatment position. Such a mechanism, however, requires 3-D visualization of the currently deposited seeds relative to the prostate. Thus, accurate, robust, and fully-automatic seed segmentation is of critical importance in achieving intra-operative dosimetry. Methodology: Implanted brachytherapy seeds are segmented by utilizing a region-based implicit active contour approach. Overlapping seed clusters are then resolved using a simple yet effective declustering technique. Results: Ground-truth seed coordinates were obtained via a published segmentation technique. A total of 248 clinical C-arm images from 16 patients were used to validate the proposed algorithm resulting in a 98.4% automatic detection rate with a corresponding 2.5% false-positive rate. The overall mean centroid error between the ground-truth and automatic segmentations was measured to be 0.42 pixels, while the mean centroid error for overlapping seed clusters alone was measured to be 0.67 pixels. Conclusion: Based on clinical data evaluation and validation, robust, accurate, and fully-automatic brachytherapy seed segmentation can be achieved through the implicit active contour framework and subsequent seed declustering method.

  11. Accelerated partial breast irradiation utilizing brachytherapy: patient selection and workflow.

    PubMed

    Shah, Chirag; Wobb, Jessica; Manyam, Bindu; Khan, Atif; Vicini, Frank

    2016-02-01

    Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) represents an evolving technique that is a standard of care option in appropriately selected woman following breast conserving surgery. While multiple techniques now exist to deliver APBI, interstitial brachytherapy represents the technique used in several randomized trials (National Institute of Oncology, GEC-ESTRO). More recently, many centers have adopted applicator-based brachytherapy to deliver APBI due to the technical complexities of interstitial brachytherapy. The purpose of this article is to review methods to evaluate and select patients for APBI, as well as to define potential workflow mechanisms that allow for the safe and effective delivery of APBI. Multiple consensus statements have been developed to guide clinicians on determining appropriate candidates for APBI. However, recent studies have demonstrated that these guidelines fail to stratify patients according to the risk of local recurrence, and updated guidelines are expected in the years to come. Critical elements of workflow to ensure safe and effective delivery of APBI include a multidisciplinary approach and evaluation, optimization of target coverage and adherence to normal tissue guideline constraints, and proper quality assurance methods. PMID:26985202

  12. A compilation of current regulations, standards and guidelines in remote afterloading brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Tortorelli, J.P.; Simion, G.P.; Kozlowski, S.D.

    1994-10-01

    Over a dozen government and professional organizations in the United States and Europe have issued regulations and guidance concerning quality management in the practice of remote afterloading brachytherapy. Information from the publications of these organizations was collected and collated for this report. This report provides the brachytherapy licensee access to a broad field of quality management information in a single, topically organized document.

  13. Report of a consensus meeting on focal low dose rate brachytherapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Langley, Stephen; Ahmed, Hashim U; Al-Qaisieh, Bashar; Bostwick, David; Dickinson, Louise; Veiga, Francisco Gomez; Grimm, Peter; Machtens, Stefan; Guedea, Ferran; Emberton, Mark

    2012-02-01

    What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? Whole gland brachytherapy has been used to successfully treat prostate cancer but the protocol for focal therapy has not previously been established. The consensus findings provide guidance on patient selection for focal brachytherapy as well as recommendations for conducting therapy and patient follow-up. Low dose rate prostate brachytherapy is an effective treatment for localized prostate cancer. Recently, it has been considered for use in a focused manner whereby treatment is targeted only to areas of prostate cancer. The objective of focal brachytherapy is to provide effective cancer control for low-risk disease but with reduced genitourinary and rectal side-effects in a cost-effective way. We report on the outputs of a consensus meeting of international experts in brachytherapy and focal therapy convened to consider the feasibility and potential development of focal brachytherapy. A number of factors were considered for focal brachytherapy including optimal patient selection, disease characterization and localization, treatment protocols and outcome measures. The consensus meeting also addressed the design of a clinical trial that would assess the oncological outcomes and side-effect profiles resulting from focal brachytherapy. PMID:22239224

  14. [Brachytherapy in France: current situation and economic outlook due to the unavailability of iridium wires].

    PubMed

    Le Vu, B; Boucher, S

    2014-10-01

    In 2013, about 6000 patients were treated with brachytherapy, the number diminishing by 2.6% per year since 2008. Prostate, breast and gynecological cancers are the most common types of cancers. Since 2008, the number of brachytherapy facilities has decreased by 18%. In medicoeconomic terms, brachytherapy faces many problems: the coding system is outdated; brachytherapy treatments cost as much as internal radiation; fees do not cover costs; since iridium wire has disappeared from the market, the technique will be transferred to more expensive high-speed or pulse dose rates. The French financing grid based on the national study of costs lags behind changes in such treatments and in the best of cases, hospitals resorting to alternatives such as in-hospital brachytherapy are funded at 46% of their additional costs. Brachytherapy is a reference technique. With intense pressure on hospital pricing, financing brachytherapy facilities will become even more problematic as a consequence of the disappearance of iridium 192 wires. The case of brachytherapy illustrates the limits of the French financing system and raises serious doubts as to its responsiveness. PMID:25195115

  15. Novel treatment options for nonmelanoma skin cancer: focus on electronic brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Michael E; Chaudhary, Ahmed A

    2015-01-01

    Nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is an increasing health care issue in the United States, significantly affecting quality of life and impacting health care costs. Radiotherapy has a long history in the treatment of NMSC. Shortly after the discovery of X-rays and (226)Radium, physicians cured patients with NMSC using these new treatments. Both X-ray therapy and brachytherapy have evolved over the years, ultimately delivering higher cure rates and lower toxicity. Electronic brachytherapy for NMSC is based on the technical and clinical data obtained from radionuclide skin surface brachytherapy and the small skin surface applicators developed over the past 25 years. The purpose of this review is to introduce electronic brachytherapy in the context of the history, data, and utilization of traditional radiotherapy and brachytherapy.

  16. Air kerma and absorbed dose standards for reference dosimetry in brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews recent developments in primary standards for the calibration of brachytherapy sources, with an emphasis on the currently most common photon-emitting radionuclides. The introduction discusses the need for reference dosimetry in brachytherapy in general. The following section focuses on the three main quantities, i.e. reference air kerma rate, air kerma strength and absorbed dose rate to water, which are currently used for the specification of brachytherapy photon sources and which can be realized with primary standards from first principles. An overview of different air kerma and absorbed dose standards, which have been independently developed by various national metrology institutes over the past two decades, is given in the next two sections. Other dosimetry techniques for brachytherapy will also be discussed. The review closes with an outlook on a possible transition from air kerma to absorbed dose to water-based calibrations for brachytherapy sources in the future. PMID:24814696

  17. Novel treatment options for nonmelanoma skin cancer: focus on electronic brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Michael E; Chaudhary, Ahmed A

    2015-01-01

    Nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is an increasing health care issue in the United States, significantly affecting quality of life and impacting health care costs. Radiotherapy has a long history in the treatment of NMSC. Shortly after the discovery of X-rays and (226)Radium, physicians cured patients with NMSC using these new treatments. Both X-ray therapy and brachytherapy have evolved over the years, ultimately delivering higher cure rates and lower toxicity. Electronic brachytherapy for NMSC is based on the technical and clinical data obtained from radionuclide skin surface brachytherapy and the small skin surface applicators developed over the past 25 years. The purpose of this review is to introduce electronic brachytherapy in the context of the history, data, and utilization of traditional radiotherapy and brachytherapy. PMID:26648763

  18. Novel treatment options for nonmelanoma skin cancer: focus on electronic brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kasper, Michael E; Chaudhary, Ahmed A

    2015-01-01

    Nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is an increasing health care issue in the United States, significantly affecting quality of life and impacting health care costs. Radiotherapy has a long history in the treatment of NMSC. Shortly after the discovery of X-rays and 226Radium, physicians cured patients with NMSC using these new treatments. Both X-ray therapy and brachytherapy have evolved over the years, ultimately delivering higher cure rates and lower toxicity. Electronic brachytherapy for NMSC is based on the technical and clinical data obtained from radionuclide skin surface brachytherapy and the small skin surface applicators developed over the past 25 years. The purpose of this review is to introduce electronic brachytherapy in the context of the history, data, and utilization of traditional radiotherapy and brachytherapy. PMID:26648763

  19. ALGEBRA: ALgorithm for the heterogeneous dosimetry based on GEANT4 for BRAchytherapy.

    PubMed

    Afsharpour, H; Landry, G; D'Amours, M; Enger, S; Reniers, B; Poon, E; Carrier, J-F; Verhaegen, F; Beaulieu, L

    2012-06-01

    Task group 43 (TG43)-based dosimetry algorithms are efficient for brachytherapy dose calculation in water. However, human tissues have chemical compositions and densities different than water. Moreover, the mutual shielding effect of seeds on each other (interseed attenuation) is neglected in the TG43-based dosimetry platforms. The scientific community has expressed the need for an accurate dosimetry platform in brachytherapy. The purpose of this paper is to present ALGEBRA, a Monte Carlo platform for dosimetry in brachytherapy which is sufficiently fast and accurate for clinical and research purposes. ALGEBRA is based on the GEANT4 Monte Carlo code and is capable of handling the DICOM RT standard to recreate a virtual model of the treated site. Here, the performance of ALGEBRA is presented for the special case of LDR brachytherapy in permanent prostate and breast seed implants. However, the algorithm is also capable of handling other treatments such as HDR brachytherapy.

  20. Dosimetry Modeling for Focal Low-Dose-Rate Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Qaisieh, Bashar; Mason, Josh; Bownes, Peter; Henry, Ann; Dickinson, Louise; Ahmed, Hashim U.; Emberton, Mark; Langley, Stephen

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Focal brachytherapy targeted to an individual lesion(s) within the prostate may reduce side effects experienced with whole-gland brachytherapy. The outcomes of a consensus meeting on focal prostate brachytherapy were used to investigate optimal dosimetry of focal low-dose-rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy targeted using multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mp-MRI) and transperineal template prostate mapping (TPM) biopsy, including the effects of random and systematic seed displacements and interseed attenuation (ISA). Methods and Materials: Nine patients were selected according to clinical characteristics and concordance of TPM and mp-MRI. Retrospectively, 3 treatment plans were analyzed for each case: whole-gland (WG), hemi-gland (hemi), and ultra-focal (UF) plans, with 145-Gy prescription dose and identical dose constraints for each plan. Plan robustness to seed displacement and ISA were assessed using Monte Carlo simulations. Results: WG plans used a mean 28 needles and 81 seeds, hemi plans used 17 needles and 56 seeds, and UF plans used 12 needles and 25 seeds. Mean D90 (minimum dose received by 90% of the target) and V100 (percentage of the target that receives 100% dose) values were 181.3 Gy and 99.8% for the prostate in WG plans, 195.7 Gy and 97.8% for the hemi-prostate in hemi plans, and 218.3 Gy and 99.8% for the focal target in UF plans. Mean urethra D10 was 205.9 Gy, 191.4 Gy, and 92.4 Gy in WG, hemi, and UF plans, respectively. Mean rectum D2 cm{sup 3} was 107.5 Gy, 77.0 Gy, and 42.7 Gy in WG, hemi, and UF plans, respectively. Focal plans were more sensitive to seed displacement errors: random shifts with a standard deviation of 4 mm reduced mean target D90 by 14.0%, 20.5%, and 32.0% for WG, hemi, and UF plans, respectively. ISA has a similar impact on dose-volume histogram parameters for all plan types. Conclusions: Treatment planning for focal LDR brachytherapy is feasible. Dose constraints are easily met with a notable

  1. Third-party brachytherapy source calibrations and physicist responsibilities: Report of the AAPM Low Energy Brachytherapy Source Calibration Working Group

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, Wayne M.; Bice, William S. Jr.; DeWerd, Larry A.; Hevezi, James M.; Huq, M. Saiful; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Palta, Jatinder R.; Rivard, Mark J.; Seuntjens, Jan P.; Thomadsen, Bruce R.

    2008-09-15

    The AAPM Low Energy Brachytherapy Source Calibration Working Group was formed to investigate and recommend quality control and quality assurance procedures for brachytherapy sources prior to clinical use. Compiling and clarifying recommendations established by previous AAPM Task Groups 40, 56, and 64 were among the working group's charges, which also included the role of third-party handlers to perform loading and assay of sources. This document presents the findings of the working group on the responsibilities of the institutional medical physicist and a clarification of the existing AAPM recommendations in the assay of brachytherapy sources. Responsibility for the performance and attestation of source assays rests with the institutional medical physicist, who must use calibration equipment appropriate for each source type used at the institution. Such equipment and calibration procedures shall ensure secondary traceability to a national standard. For each multi-source implant, 10% of the sources or ten sources, whichever is greater, are to be assayed. Procedures for presterilized source packaging are outlined. The mean source strength of the assayed sources must agree with the manufacturer's stated strength to within 3%, or action must be taken to resolve the difference. Third party assays do not absolve the institutional physicist from the responsibility to perform the institutional measurement and attest to the strength of the implanted sources. The AAPM leaves it to the discretion of the institutional medical physicist whether the manufacturer's or institutional physicist's measured value should be used in performing dosimetry calculations.

  2. Third-party brachytherapy source calibrations and physicist responsibilities: report of the AAPM Low Energy Brachytherapy Source Calibration Working Group.

    PubMed

    Butler, Wayne M; Bice, William S; DeWerd, Larry A; Hevezi, James M; Huq, M Saiful; Ibbott, Geoffrey S; Palta, Jatinder R; Rivard, Mark J; Seuntjens, Jan P; Thomadsen, Bruce R

    2008-09-01

    The AAPM Low Energy Brachytherapy Source Calibration Working Group was formed to investigate and recommend quality control and quality assurance procedures for brachytherapy sources prior to clinical use. Compiling and clarifying recommendations established by previous AAPM Task Groups 40, 56, and 64 were among the working group's charges, which also included the role of third-party handlers to perform loading and assay of sources. This document presents the findings of the working group on the responsibilities of the institutional medical physicist and a clarification of the existing AAPM recommendations in the assay of brachytherapy sources. Responsibility for the performance and attestation of source assays rests with the institutional medical physicist, who must use calibration equipment appropriate for each source type used at the institution. Such equipment and calibration procedures shall ensure secondary traceability to a national standard. For each multi-source implant, 10% of the sources or ten sources, whichever is greater, are to be assayed. Procedures for presterilized source packaging are outlined. The mean source strength of the assayed sources must agree with the manufacturer's stated strength to within 3%, or action must be taken to resolve the difference. Third party assays do not absolve the institutional physicist from the responsibility to perform the institutional measurement and attest to the strength of the implanted sources. The AAPM leaves it to the discretion of the institutional medical physicist whether the manufacturer's or institutional physicist's measured value should be used in performing dosimetry calculations. PMID:18841836

  3. WE-F-BRD-01: HDR Brachytherapy II: Integrating Imaging with HDR

    SciTech Connect

    Craciunescu, O; Todor, D; Leeuw, A de

    2014-06-15

    In recent years, with the advent of high/pulsed dose rate afterloading technology, advanced treatment planning systems, CT/MRI compatible applicators, and advanced imaging platforms, image-guided adaptive brachytherapy treatments (IGABT) have started to play an ever increasing role in modern radiation therapy. The most accurate way to approach IGABT treatment is to provide the infrastructure that combines in a single setting an appropriate imaging device, a treatment planning system, and a treatment unit. The Brachytherapy Suite is not a new concept, yet the modern suites are incorporating state-of-the-art imaging (MRI, CBCT equipped simulators, CT, and /or US) that require correct integration with each other and with the treatment planning and delivery systems. Arguably, an MRI-equipped Brachytherapy Suite is the ideal setup for real-time adaptive brachytherapy treatments. The main impediment to MRI-IGABT adoption is access to MRI scanners. Very few radiation oncology departments currently house MRI scanners, and even fewer in a dedicated Brachytherapy Suite. CBCT equipped simulators are increasingly offered by manufacturers as part of a Brachytherapy Suite installation. If optimized, images acquired can be used for treatment planning, or can be registered with other imaging modalities. This infrastructure is relevant for all forms of brachytherapy, especially those utilizing multi-fractionated courses of treatment such as prostate and cervix. Moreover, for prostate brachytherapy, US imaging systems can be part of the suite to allow for real-time HDR/LDR treatments. Learning Objectives: Understand the adaptive workflow of MR-based IGBT for cervical cancer. Familiarize with commissioning aspects of a CBCT equipped simulator with emphasis on brachytherapy applications Learn about the current status and future developments in US-based prostate brachytherapy.

  4. Ocular Response of Choroidal Melanoma With Monosomy 3 Versus Disomy 3 After Iodine-125 Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Marathe, Omkar S.; Wu, Jeffrey; Lee, Steve P.; Yu Fei; Burgess, Barry L.; Leu Min; Straatsma, Bradley R.; McCannel, Tara A.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To report the ocular response of choroidal melanoma with monosomy 3 vs. disomy 3 after {sup 125}I brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: We evaluated patients with ciliochoroidal melanoma managed with fine needle aspiration biopsy immediately before plaque application for {sup 125}I brachytherapy between January 1, 2005 and December 31, 2008. Patients with (1) cytopathologic diagnosis of melanoma, (2) melanoma chromosome 3 status identified by fluorescence in situ hybridization, and (3) 6 or more months of follow-up after brachytherapy were sorted by monosomy 3 vs. disomy 3 and compared by Kruskal-Wallis test. Results: Among 40 ciliochoroidal melanomas (40 patients), 15 had monosomy 3 and 25 had disomy 3. Monosomy 3 melanomas had a median greatest basal diameter of 12.00 mm and a median tumor thickness of 6.69 mm before brachytherapy; at a median of 1.75 years after brachytherapy, median thickness was 3.10 mm. Median percentage decrease in tumor thickness was 48.3%. Disomy 3 melanomas had a median greatest basal diameter of 10.00 mm and median tumor thickness of 3.19 mm before brachytherapy; at a median of 2.00 years after brachytherapy, median tumor thickness was 2.37 mm. The median percentage decrease in tumor thickness was 22.7%. Monosomy 3 melanomas were statistically greater in size than disomy 3 melanomas (p < 0.001) and showed a greater decrease in tumor thickness after brachytherapy (p = 0.006). Conclusion: In this study, ciliochoroidal melanomas with monosomy 3 were significantly greater in size than disomy 3 melanoma and showed a significantly greater decrease in thickness at a median of 1.75 years after brachytherapy. The greater decrease in monosomy 3 melanoma thickness after brachytherapy is consistent with other malignancies in which more aggressive pathology has been shown to be associated with a greater initial response to radiotherapy.

  5. Dynamic modulated brachytherapy (DMBT) and intensity modulated brachytherapy (IMBT) for the treatment of rectal and breast carcinomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Matthew Julian

    The ultimate goal of any treatment of cancer is to maximize the likelihood of killing the tumor while minimizing the chance of damaging healthy tissues. One of the most effective ways to accomplish this is through radiation therapy, which must be able to target the tumor volume with a high accuracy while minimizing the dose delivered to healthy tissues. A successful method of accomplishing this is brachytherapy which works by placing the radiation source in very close proximity to the tumor. However, most current applications of brachytherapy rely mostly on the geometric manipulation of isotropic sources, which limits the ability to specifically target the tumor. The purpose of this work is to introduce several types of shielded brachytherapy applicators which are capable of targeting tumors with much greater accuracy than existing technologies. These applicators rely on the modulation of the dose profile through a high-density tungsten alloy shields to create anisotropic dose distributions. Two classes of applicators have been developed in this work. The first relies on the active motion of the shield, to aim a highly directional radiation profile. This allows for very precise control of the dose distribution for treatment, achieving unparalleled dose coverage to the tumor while sparing healthy tissues. This technique has been given the moniker of Dynamic Modulated Brachytherapy (DMBT). The second class of applicators, designed to reduce treatment complexity uses static applicators. These applicators retain the use of the tungsten shield, but the shield is motionless during treatment. By intelligently designing the shield, significant improvements over current methods have been demonstrated. Although these static applicators fail to match the dosimetric quality of DMBT applicators the simplified setup and treatment procedure gives them significant appeal. The focus of this work has been to optimize these shield designs, specifically for the treatment of rectal and

  6. Conformal Brachytherapy Planning for Cervical Cancer Using Transabdominal Ultrasound

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dyk, Sylvia Narayan, Kailash; Fisher, Richard; Bernshaw, David

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: To determine if transabdominal ultrasound (US) can be used for conformal brachytherapy in cervical cancer patients. Materials and Methods: Seventy-one patients with locoregionally advanced cervix cancer treated with chemoradiation and brachytherapy were included in this study. The protocol consisted of US-assisted tandem insertion and conformal US-based planning. Orthogonal films for applicator reconstruction were also taken. A standard plan was modified to suit the US-based volume and treatment was delivered. The patient then underwent a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan with the applicators in situ. Retrospectively, individual standard (STD), US, and MRI plans were extrapolated for five fractions and superimposed onto the two-dimensional sagittal MRI images for comparison. Doses to Point A, target volume, International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) 38 bladder and rectal points, and individualized bowel points were calculated on original implant geometry on Plato for each planning method. Results: STD (high-dose-rate) plans reported higher doses to Point A, target volume, ICRU 38 bladder and rectal points, and individualized bowel point compared with US and MRI plans. There was a statistically significant difference between standard plans and image-based plans-STD vs. US, STD vs. MRI, and STD vs. Final-having consistent (p {<=} 0.001) respectively for target volume, Point A, ICRU 38 bladder, and bowel point. US plan assessed on two-dimensional MRI image was comparable for target volume (p = 0.11), rectal point (p = 0.8), and vaginal mucosa (p = 0.19). Local control was 90%. Late bowel morbidity (G3, G4) was <2%. Conclusions: Transabdominal ultrasound offers an accurate, quick, accessible, and cost-effective method of conformal brachytherapy planning.

  7. Prostate Brachytherapy in Men {>=}75 Years of Age

    SciTech Connect

    Merrick, Gregory S. Wallner, Kent E.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Butler, Wayne M.; Brammer, Sarah G.; Allen, Zachariah A.; Adamovich, Edward

    2008-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate cause-specific survival (CSS), biochemical progression-free survival (bPFS), and overall survival (OS) in prostate cancer patients aged {>=}75 years undergoing brachytherapy with or without supplemental therapies. Methods and Materials: Between April 1995 and August 2004, 145 consecutive patients aged {>=}75 years underwent permanent prostate brachytherapy. Median follow-up was 5.8 years. Biochemical progression-free survival was defined by a prostate-specific antigen level {<=}0.40 ng/mL after nadir. Patients with metastatic prostate cancer or hormone-refractory disease without obvious metastases who died of any cause were classified as dead of prostate cancer. All other deaths were attributed to the immediate cause of death. Multiple clinical, treatment, and dosimetric parameters were evaluated for impact on survival. Results: Nine-year CSS, bPFS, and OS rates for the entire cohort were 99.3%, 97.1%, and 64.5%, respectively. None of the evaluated parameters predicted for CSS, whereas bPFS was most closely predicted by percentage positive biopsies. Overall survival and non-cancer deaths were best predicted by tobacco status. Thirty-seven patients have died, with 83.8% of the deaths due to cardiovascular disease (22 patients) or second malignancies (9 patients). To date, only 1 patient (0.7%) has died of metastatic prostate cancer. Conclusions: After brachytherapy, high rates of CSS and bPFS are noted in elderly prostate cancer patients. Overall, approximately 65% of patients are alive at 9 years, with survival most closely related to tobacco status. We believe our results support an aggressive locoregional approach in appropriately selected elderly patients.

  8. Study of dose calculation on breast brachytherapy using prism TPS

    SciTech Connect

    Fendriani, Yoza; Haryanto, Freddy

    2015-09-30

    PRISM is one of non-commercial Treatment Planning System (TPS) and is developed at the University of Washington. In Indonesia, many cancer hospitals use expensive commercial TPS. This study aims to investigate Prism TPS which been applied to the dose distribution of brachytherapy by taking into account the effect of source position and inhomogeneities. The results will be applicable for clinical Treatment Planning System. Dose calculation has been implemented for water phantom and CT scan images of breast cancer using point source and line source. This study used point source and line source and divided into two cases. On the first case, Ir-192 seed source is located at the center of treatment volume. On the second case, the source position is gradually changed. The dose calculation of every case performed on a homogeneous and inhomogeneous phantom with dimension 20 × 20 × 20 cm{sup 3}. The inhomogeneous phantom has inhomogeneities volume 2 × 2 × 2 cm{sup 3}. The results of dose calculations using PRISM TPS were compared to literature data. From the calculation of PRISM TPS, dose rates show good agreement with Plato TPS and other study as published by Ramdhani. No deviations greater than ±4% for all case. Dose calculation in inhomogeneous and homogenous cases show similar result. This results indicate that Prism TPS is good in dose calculation of brachytherapy but not sensitive for inhomogeneities. Thus, the dose calculation parameters developed in this study were found to be applicable for clinical treatment planning of brachytherapy.

  9. Use of radiochromic dosimetry film for HDR brachytherapy quality assurance.

    PubMed

    Steidley, K D

    1998-01-01

    An important quality assurance (QA) procedure in high dose rate (HDR) remote afterloading brachytherapy is the verification of the system's control of the source by a direct test with dosimetry medium prior to the patient's first treatment. In this test radiochromic film is placed in direct contact with the applicator and the patient's proposed treatment is then run with their EPROM card. Examination of the film allows a quick appraisal of step size, number of steps, and offset. Advantages of this film include self-development so the image may be viewed immediately, insensitivity to normal room light, and archivability. The cost is about U.S. $2 per clinical case.

  10. Radiological response of ceramic and polymeric devices for breast brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Luciana Batista; de Campos, Tarcisio Passos Ribeiro

    2012-04-01

    In the present study, the radiological visibility of ceramic and polymeric devices implanted in breast phantom was investigated for future applications in brachytherapy. The main goal was to determine the radiological viability of ceramic and polymeric devices in vitro by performing simple radiological diagnostic methods such as conventional X-ray analysis and mammography due to its easy access to the population. The radiological response of ceramic and polymeric devices implanted in breast phantom was determined using conventional X-ray, mammography and CT analysis.

  11. [Endobronchial brachytherapy: state of the art in 2013].

    PubMed

    Derhem, N; Sabila, H; Mornex, F

    2013-04-01

    Endobronchial brachytherapy is an invasive technique, which allows localizing radioactive sources at the tumour contact. Therefore, high doses are administered to tumour while healthy tissues can be spared. Initially dedicated to a palliative setting, improvements helped reaching 60 to 88% symptoms alleviation and 30 to 100% of endoscopic macroscopic response. New diagnostic techniques and early diagnosis extended the indications to a curative intent: endoluminal primitive tumour, post radiation endobronchial recurrence, inoperable patients. CT-based dosimetry is a keypoint to optimize treatment quality and to minimize potential side effects, making this treatment a safe and efficient technique for specific indications. PMID:23465785

  12. Dosimetric Study of a Low-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Villafuerte, M.; Arzamendi, S.; Díaz-Perches, R.

    Carcinoma of the cervix is the most common malignancy - in terms of both incidence and mortality - in Mexican women. Low dose rate (LDR) intracavitary brachytherapy is normally prescribed for the treatment of this disease to the vast majority of patients attending public hospitals in our country. However, most treatment planning systems being used in these hospitals still rely on Sievert integral dose calculations. Moreover, experimental verification of dose distributions are hardly ever done. In this work we present a dosimetric characterisation of the Amersham CDCS-J 137Cs source, an LDR brachytherapy source commonly used in Mexican hospitals. To this end a Monte Carlo simulation was developed, that includes a realistic description of the internal structure of the source embedded in a scattering medium. The Monte Carlo results were compared to experimental measurements of dose distributions. A lucite phantom with the same geometric characteristics as the one used in the simulation was built. Dose measurements were performed using thermoluminescent dosimeters together with commercial RadioChromic dye film. A comparison between our Monte Carlo simulation, the experimental data, and results reported in the literature is presented.

  13. 2D/3D registration algorithm for lung brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zvonarev, P. S.; Farrell, T. J.; Hunter, R.; Wierzbicki, M.; Hayward, J. E.; Sur, R. K.

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: A 2D/3D registration algorithm is proposed for registering orthogonal x-ray images with a diagnostic CT volume for high dose rate (HDR) lung brachytherapy. Methods: The algorithm utilizes a rigid registration model based on a pixel/voxel intensity matching approach. To achieve accurate registration, a robust similarity measure combining normalized mutual information, image gradient, and intensity difference was developed. The algorithm was validated using a simple body and anthropomorphic phantoms. Transfer catheters were placed inside the phantoms to simulate the unique image features observed during treatment. The algorithm sensitivity to various degrees of initial misregistration and to the presence of foreign objects, such as ECG leads, was evaluated. Results: The mean registration error was 2.2 and 1.9 mm for the simple body and anthropomorphic phantoms, respectively. The error was comparable to the interoperator catheter digitization error of 1.6 mm. Preliminary analysis of data acquired from four patients indicated a mean registration error of 4.2 mm. Conclusions: Results obtained using the proposed algorithm are clinically acceptable especially considering the complications normally encountered when imaging during lung HDR brachytherapy.

  14. Observations on rotating needle insertions using a brachytherapy robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meltsner, M. A.; Ferrier, N. J.; Thomadsen, B. R.

    2007-09-01

    A robot designed for prostate brachytherapy implantations has the potential to greatly improve treatment success. Much of the research in robotic surgery focuses on measuring accuracy. However, there exist many factors that must be optimized before an analysis of needle placement accuracy can be determined. Some of these parameters include choice of the needle type, insertion velocity, usefulness of the rotating needle and rotation speed. These parameters may affect the force at which the needle interacts with the tissue. A reduction in force has been shown to decrease the compression of the prostate and potentially increase the accuracy of seed position. Rotating the needle as it is inserted may reduce frictional forces while increasing accuracy. However, needle rotations are considered to increase tissue damage due to the drilling nature of the insertion. We explore many of the factors involved in optimizing a brachytherapy robot, and the potential effects each parameter may have on the procedure. We also investigate the interaction of rotating needles in gel and suggest the rotate-cannula-only method of conical needle insertion to minimize any tissue damage while still maintaining the benefits of reduced force and increased accuracy.

  15. In vivo visualization of prostate brachytherapy seeds with photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lediju Bell, Muyinatu A.; Kuo, Nathanael P.; Song, Danny Y.; Kang, Jin U.; Boctor, Emad M.

    2014-12-01

    We conducted a canine study to investigate the in vivo feasibility of photoacoustic imaging for intraoperative updates to brachytherapy treatment plans. A fiber coupled to a 1064-nm Nd:YAG laser was inserted into high-dose-rate brachytherapy needles, which diffused light spherically. These needles were inserted through the perineum into the prostate for interstitial light delivery and the resulting acoustic waves were detected with a transrectal ultrasound probe. Postoperative computed tomography images and ex vivo photoacoustic images confirmed seed locations. Limitations with insufficient light delivery were mitigated with short-lag spatial coherence (SLSC) beamforming, providing a 10-20 dB contrast improvement over delay-and-sum (DAS) beamforming for pulse energies ranging from 6.8 to 10.5 mJ with a fiber-seed distance as large as 9.5 mm. For the same distance and the same range of energy densities, signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) were similar while the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was higher in SLSC compared to DAS images. Challenges included visualization of signals associated with the interstitial fiber tip and acoustic reverberations between seeds separated by ≤2 mm. Results provide insights into the potential for clinical translation to humans.

  16. A Brachytherapy Plan Evaluation Tool for Interstitial Applications

    PubMed Central

    Nambiraj, N. Arunai; Dayalan, Sridhar; Ganesh, Kalaivany; Anchineyan, Pichandi; Bilimagga, Ramesh S.

    2014-01-01

    Radiobiological metrics such as tumor control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) help in assessing the quality of brachytherapy plans. Application of such metrics in clinics as well as research is still inadequate. This study presents the implementation of two indigenously designed plan evaluation modules: Brachy_TCP and Brachy_NTCP. Evaluation tools were constructed to compute TCP and NTCP from dose volume histograms (DVHs) of any interstitial brachytherapy treatment plan. The computation module was employed to estimate probabilities of tumor control and normal tissue complications in ten cervical cancer patients based on biologically effective equivalent uniform dose (BEEUD). The tumor control and normal tissue morbidity were assessed with clinical followup and were scored. The acute toxicity was graded using common terminology criteria for adverse events (CTCAE) version 4.0. Outcome score was found to be correlated with the TCP/NTCP estimates. Thus, the predictive ability of the estimates was quantified with the clinical outcomes. Biologically effective equivalent uniform dose-based formalism was found to be effective in predicting the complexities and disease control. PMID:24665263

  17. Thermoluminescence dosimetry measurements of brachytherapy sources in liquid water

    SciTech Connect

    Tailor, Ramesh; Tolani, Naresh; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.

    2008-09-15

    Radiation therapy dose measurements are customarily performed in liquid water. The characterization of brachytherapy sources is, however, generally based on measurements made with thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs), for which contact with water may lead to erroneous readings. Consequently, most dosimetry parameters reported in the literature have been based on measurements in water-equivalent plastics, such as Solid Water. These previous reports employed a correction factor to transfer the dose measurements from a plastic phantom to liquid water. The correction factor most often was based on Monte Carlo calculations. The process of measuring in a water-equivalent plastic phantom whose exact composition may be different from published specifications, then correcting the results to a water medium leads to increased uncertainty in the results. A system has been designed to enable measurements with TLDs in liquid water. This system, which includes jigs to support water-tight capsules of lithium fluoride in configurations suitable for measuring several dosimetric parameters, was used to determine the correction factor from water-equivalent plastic to water. Measurements of several {sup 125}I and {sup 131}Cs prostate brachytherapy sources in liquid water and in a Solid Water phantom demonstrated a correction factor of 1.039{+-}0.005 at 1 cm distance. These measurements are in good agreement with a published value of this correction factor for an {sup 125}I source.

  18. Remote afterloading for intracavitary and interstitial brachytherapy with californium-252

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tačev, Tačo; Grigorov, Grigor; Papírek, Tomáš; Kolařík, Vladimír.

    2004-01-01

    The authors present their design concept of remote afterloading for 252Cf brachytherapy with respect to characteristic peculiarities of 252Cf and the current worldwide development of remote afterloading devices. The afterloading device has been designed as a stationary radiator comprising three mutually interconnected units: (1) a control and drive unit, consisting of a control computer and a motor-driven Bowden system carrying the 252Cf source; (2) a source housed in a watertight, concrete vessel, which is stored in a strong room situated well beneath the patient's bed and (3) an afterloading application module installed in the irradiation room. As 252Cf is a nuclide with low specific activity, it was necessary to produce two independent devices for high dose rate intracavitary treatment and for low dose rate intestinal treatment. The sources may be moved arbitrarily during the treatment with a position accuracy of 0.5-1.0 mm within a distance of 520 cm from the source storage position in the strong room to the application position. The technical concept of the present automatic afterloading device for neutron brachytherapy represents one possible option of a range of conceivable design variants, which, while minimizing the technical and economic requirements, provides operating personnel with optimum protection and work safety, thus extending the applicability of high-LET radiation-based treatment methods in clinical practice.

  19. Systematic Review of Focal Prostate Brachytherapy and the Future Implementation of Image-Guided Prostate HDR Brachytherapy Using MR-Ultrasound Fusion.

    PubMed

    Peach, M Sean; Trifiletti, Daniel M; Libby, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy found in North American and European men and the second most common cause of cancer related death. Since the practice of PSA screening has become common the disease is most often found early and can have a long indolent course. Current definitive therapy treats the whole gland but has considerable long-term side effects. Focal therapies may be able to target the cancer while decreasing dose to organs at risk. Our objective was to determine if focal prostate brachytherapy could meet target objectives while permitting a decrease in dose to organs at risk in a way that would allow future salvage treatments. Further, we wanted to determine if focal treatment results in less toxicity. Utilizing the Medline repository, dosimetric papers comparing whole gland to partial gland brachytherapy and clinical papers that reported toxicity of focal brachytherapy were selected. A total of 9 dosimetric and 6 clinical papers met these inclusion criteria. Together, these manuscripts suggest that focal brachytherapy may be employed to decrease dose to organs at risk with decreased toxicity. Of current technology, image-guided HDR brachytherapy using MRI registered to transrectal ultrasound offers the flexibility and efficiency to achieve such focal treatments. PMID:27293899

  20. Temporal relationship between prostate brachytherapy and the diagnosis of colorectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Gutman, Sarah A.; Merrick, Gregory S. . E-mail: gmerrick@urologicresearchinstitute.org; Butler, Wayne M.; Wallner, Kent E.; Allen, Zachariah A.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Adamovich, Edward

    2006-09-01

    Purpose: To identify the location of pretreatment and posttreatment colorectal malignancies and posttreatment colorectal polyps in patients with clinically localized prostate cancer managed with brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: From April 1995 through July 2004, 1,351 consecutive patients underwent brachytherapy for clinical stage T1b-T3a (American Joint Committee on Cancer, 2002) prostate cancer. Supplemental external beam radiotherapy (XRT) was administered to 699 patients. The median follow-up was 4.6 years. Operative and pathology reports were reviewed for all patients with pretreatment and posttreatment colorectal cancer and posttreatment colorectal polyps. Multiple parameters were evaluated for the development of colorectal cancer or colorectal polyps. Results: Colorectal cancer was diagnosed in 23 and 25 patients before and after prostate brachytherapy, respectively. No differences were identified in the distribution of colorectal cancers either before or after treatment (3 and 4 rectal cancers in the pre- and postbrachytherapy cohorts). Thirty-five of the 48 colorectal cancers (73%) were diagnosed within 5 years of brachytherapy with a peak incidence 1 year after brachytherapy. One hundred ninety-two colorectal polyps were diagnosed after brachytherapy, 160 (83%) occurred within 4 years of brachytherapy, and only 27 (14%) were located in the rectum. In multivariate Cox regression analysis, prostate D{sub 9} (minimum percentage of the dose covering 90% of the target volume) predicted for posttreatment colorectal cancer. Rectal polyps were most closely related to patient age and percent positive biopsies, whereas sigmoid/colon polyps were best predicted by patient age, planning volume, and supplemental XRT. Conclusions: Colorectal cancer was diagnosed with equal frequency before and after brachytherapy with comparable geographic distributions. In addition, the vast majority of postbrachytherapy colorectal polyps were located beyond the confines of the

  1. High Dose-Rate Versus Low Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for Lip Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ghadjar, Pirus; Bojaxhiu, Beat; Simcock, Mathew; Terribilini, Dario; Isaak, Bernhard; Gut, Philipp; Wolfensberger, Patrick; Broemme, Jens O.; Geretschlaeger, Andreas; Behrensmeier, Frank; Pica, Alessia; Aebersold, Daniel M.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To analyze the outcome after low-dose-rate (LDR) or high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for lip cancer. Methods and Materials: One hundred and three patients with newly diagnosed squamous cell carcinoma of the lip were treated between March 1985 and June 2009 either by HDR (n = 33) or LDR brachytherapy (n = 70). Sixty-eight patients received brachytherapy alone, and 35 received tumor excision followed by brachytherapy because of positive resection margins. Acute and late toxicity was assessed according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events 3.0. Results: Median follow-up was 3.1 years (range, 0.3-23 years). Clinical and pathological variables did not differ significantly between groups. At 5 years, local recurrence-free survival, regional recurrence-free survival, and overall survival rates were 93%, 90%, and 77%. There was no significant difference for these endpoints when HDR was compared with LDR brachytherapy. Forty-two of 103 patients (41%) experienced acute Grade 2 and 57 of 103 patients (55%) experienced acute Grade 3 toxicity. Late Grade 1 toxicity was experienced by 34 of 103 patients (33%), and 5 of 103 patients (5%) experienced late Grade 2 toxicity; no Grade 3 late toxicity was observed. Acute and late toxicity rates were not significantly different between HDR and LDR brachytherapy. Conclusions: As treatment for lip cancer, HDR and LDR brachytherapy have comparable locoregional control and acute and late toxicity rates. HDR brachytherapy for lip cancer seems to be an effective treatment with acceptable toxicity.

  2. Effect of brachytherapy technique and patient characteristics on cervical cancer implant dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Anker, Christopher J.; O'Donnell, Kristen; Boucher, Kenneth M.; Gaffney, David K.

    2013-01-01

    Our purpose was to evaluate the relationship between brachytherapy technique and patient characteristics on dose to organs-at-risk (OARs) in patients undergoing high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy for cervical cancer. From 1998 to 2008, 31 patients with cervical cancer with full dosimetric data were identified who received definitive external-beam radiation and HDR brachytherapy with tandem and ovoid applicators. Doses were recorded at point A, the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU)-38 rectal point, the ICRU-38 bladder point, the vaginal surface, and the pelvic sidewall. Generalized estimating equations were used to determine the significance of changes in OAR to point A dose ratios with differences in brachytherapy technique or patient characteristics. Patients underwent a median of 5 brachytherapy procedures (range, 3 to 5), with a total of 179 procedures for 31 patients. For all brachytherapy treatments, the average ratios between the doses for the rectal, bladder, vaginal surface, and pelvic sidewall reference points to those at point A were 0.49, 0.59, 1.15, and 0.17, respectively. In general, decreased OAR dose was associated with a lower stage, younger age, increased ovoid size, increased tandem length, and earlier implant number. Increased tandem curvature significantly increased bladder dose and decreased rectal dose. Intravenous anesthesia usage was not correlated with improved dosimetry. This study allowed identification of patient and procedure characteristics influencing OAR dosing. Although the advent of 3-dimensional (3D) image-guided brachytherapy will bring new advances in treatment optimization, the actual technique involved at the time of the brachytherapy implant procedure will remain important.

  3. Prostate Brachytherapy seed migration to the Bladder presenting with Gross Hematuria.

    PubMed

    Haroun, Reham R; Nance, John W; Fishman, Elliot K

    2016-01-01

    We present the radiologic findings in a case of prostate brachytherapy seed migration to the bladder presenting as gross hematuria. While prostate brachytherapy seed implantation is considered a relatively safe procedure, migration is not uncommon; however, it is usually clinically silent and the seeds most commonly migrate to the lungs through the venous circulation via the periprostatic venous plexus. Our case illustrates that local erosion is possible, can be symptomatic, and therefore must be considered when evaluating select patients. PMID:27200152

  4. Prostate Brachytherapy seed migration to the Bladder presenting with Gross Hematuria

    PubMed Central

    Haroun, Reham R; Nance, John W; Fishman, Elliot K

    2016-01-01

    We present the radiologic findings in a case of prostate brachytherapy seed migration to the bladder presenting as gross hematuria. While prostate brachytherapy seed implantation is considered a relatively safe procedure, migration is not uncommon; however, it is usually clinically silent and the seeds most commonly migrate to the lungs through the venous circulation via the periprostatic venous plexus. Our case illustrates that local erosion is possible, can be symptomatic, and therefore must be considered when evaluating select patients. PMID:27200152

  5. Adherence to Vaginal Dilation Following High Dose Rate Brachytherapy for Endometrial Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, Lois C.; Abdallah, Rita; Schluchter, Mark; Panneerselvam, Ashok; Kunos, Charles A.

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: We report demographic, clinical, and psychosocial factors associated with adherence to vaginal dilation and describe the sexual and marital or nonmarital dyadic functioning of women following high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy for endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively evaluated women aged 18 years or older in whom early-stage endometrial (IAgr3-IIB) cancers were treated by HDR intravaginal brachytherapy within the past 3.5 years. Women with or without a sexual partner were eligible. Patients completed questionnaires by mail or by telephone assessing demographic and clinical variables, adherence to vaginal dilation, dyadic satisfaction, sexual functioning, and health beliefs. Results: Seventy-eight of 89 (88%) eligible women with early-stage endometrial cancer treated with HDR brachytherapy completed questionnaires. Only 33% of patients were adherers, based on reporting having used a dilator more than two times per week in the first month following radiation. Nonadherers who reported a perceived change in vaginal dimension following radiation reported that their vaginas were subjectively smaller after brachytherapy (p = 0.013). Adherers reported more worry about their sex lives or lack thereof than nonadherers (p = 0.047). Patients reported considerable sexual dysfunction following completion of HDR brachytherapy. Conclusions: Adherence to recommendations for vaginal dilator use following HDR brachytherapy for endometrial cancer is poor. Interventions designed to educate women about dilator use benefit may increase adherence. Although sexual functioning was compromised, it is likely that this existed before having cancer for many women in our study.

  6. WE-E-BRD-01: HDR Brachytherapy I: Overview of Clinical Application and QA

    SciTech Connect

    Libby, B; Showalter, T

    2014-06-15

    With the increased usage of high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy and the introduction of dedicated image guided brachytherapy suites, it is necessary to review the processes and procedures associated with safely delivering these treatments in the expedited time scales that dedicated treatment suites afford. The speakers will present the clinical aspects of switching from LDR to HDR treatments, including guidelines for patient selection, and the clinical outcomes comparing LDR to HDR. The speakers will also discuss the HDR treatment process itself, because the shortened clinical timeline involved with a streamlined scan/plan/treat workflow can introduce other issues. Safety and QA aspects involved with the streamlined process, including increased personnel required for parallel tasks, and possible interfering tasks causing delays in patient treatments will also be discussed. Learning Objectives: To understand the clinical aspects of HDR Brachytherapy, including common clinical indications, patient selection, and the evolving evidence in support of this therapeutic modality To review the current prominent clinical trials for HDR brachytherapy To interpret the established guidelines for HDR brachytherapy quality assurance for implementation into practical clinical settings. To introduce the basic requirements for image guided brachytherapy.

  7. Dosimetric equivalence of nonstandard HDR brachytherapy catheter patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Cunha, J. A. M.; Hsu, I-C.; Pouliot, J.

    2009-01-15

    Purpose: To determine whether alternative high dose rate prostate brachytherapy catheter patterns can result in similar or improved dose distributions while providing better access and reducing trauma. Materials and Methods: Standard prostate cancer high dose rate brachytherapy uses a regular grid of parallel needle positions to guide the catheter insertion. This geometry does not easily allow the physician to avoid piercing the critical structures near the penile bulb nor does it provide position flexibility in the case of pubic arch interference. This study used CT datasets with 3 mm slice spacing from ten previously treated patients and digitized new catheters following three hypothetical catheter patterns: conical, bi-conical, and fireworks. The conical patterns were used to accommodate a robotic delivery using a single entry point. The bi-conical and fireworks patterns were specifically designed to avoid the critical structures near the penile bulb. For each catheter distribution, a plan was optimized with the inverse planning algorithm, IPSA, and compared with the plan used for treatment. Irrelevant of catheter geometry, a plan must fulfill the RTOG-0321 dose criteria for target dose coverage (V{sub 100}{sup Prostate}>90%) and organ-at-risk dose sparing (V{sub 75}{sup Bladder}<1 cc, V{sub 75}{sup Rectum}<1 cc, V{sub 125}{sup Urethra}<<1 cc). Results: The three nonstandard catheter patterns used 16 nonparallel, straight divergent catheters, with entry points in the perineum. Thirty plans from ten patients with prostate sizes ranging from 26 to 89 cc were optimized. All nonstandard patterns fulfilled the RTOG criteria when the clinical plan did. In some cases, the dose distribution was improved by better sparing the organs-at-risk. Conclusion: Alternative catheter patterns can provide the physician with additional ways to treat patients previously considered unsuited for brachytherapy treatment (pubic arch interference) and facilitate robotic guidance of

  8. Tissue modeling schemes in low energy breast brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Afsharpour, Hossein; Landry, Guillaume; Reniers, Brigitte; Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Beaulieu, Luc; Verhaegen, Frank

    2011-11-21

    Breast tissue is heterogeneous and is mainly composed of glandular (G) and adipose (A) tissues. The proportion of G versus A varies considerably among the population. The absorbed dose distributions in accelerated partial breast irradiation therapy with low energy photon brachytherapy sources are very sensitive to tissue heterogeneities. Current clinical algorithms use the recommendations of the AAPM TG43 report which approximates the human tissues by unit density water. The aim of this study is to investigate various breast tissue modeling schemes for low energy brachytherapy. A special case of breast permanent seed implant is considered here. Six modeling schemes are considered. Uniform and non-uniform water breast (UWB and NUWB) consider the density but neglect the effect of the composition of tissues. The uniform and the non-uniform G/A breast (UGAB and NUGAB) as well the age-dependent breast (ADB) models consider the effect of the composition. The segmented breast tissue (SBT) method uses a density threshold to distinguish between G and A tissues. The PTV D(90) metric is used for the analysis and is based on the dose to water (D(90(w,m))). D(90(m,m)) is also reported for comparison to D(90(w,m)). The two-month post-implant D(90(w,m)) averaged over 38 patients is smaller in NUWB than in UWB by about 4.6% on average (ranging from 5% to 13%). Large average differences of G/A breast models with TG43 (17% and 26% in UGAB and NUGAB, respectively) show that the effect of the chemical composition dominates the effect of the density on dose distributions. D(90(w,m)) is 12% larger in SBT than in TG43 when averaged. These differences can be as low as 4% or as high as 20% when the individual patients are considered. The high sensitivity of dosimetry on the modeling scheme argues in favor of an agreement on a standard tissue modeling approach to be used in low energy breast brachytherapy. SBT appears to generate the most geometrically reliable breast tissue models in this

  9. Primary Causes of Death After Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bittner, Nathan; Merrick, Gregory S. Galbreath, Robert W.; Butler, Wayne M.; Wallner, Kent E.; Allen, Zachariah A.; Brammer, Sarah G.; Moyad, Mark

    2008-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the primary causes of death in low-risk (low-risk), intermediate-risk (intermediate-risk), and high-risk (high-risk) patients undergoing permanent prostate brachytherapy with or without supplemental therapies. Methods and Materials: From April 1995 through November 2004, a total of 1,354 consecutive patients underwent prostate brachytherapy. All patients underwent brachytherapy >3 years before analysis. Of the patients, 532 (39.3%) received androgen deprivation therapy and 703 (51.9%) received supplemental radiation therapy. The median follow-up was 5.4 years. Multiple parameters were evaluated as predictors of cause-specific, biochemical progression-free, and overall survival. Results: The 10-year cause-specific survival was 97.0% (99.7%, 99.0%, and 90.1% for low-risk, intermediate-risk, and high-risk patients). Overall survival was 76.7% (82.5%, 78.3%, and 67.6% for low-, intermediate-, and high-risk patients, respectively). The cumulative death rate for cardiovascular disease was 11.5% (8.7%, 9.3%, and 19.8% for low-, intermediate-, and high-risk patients). The death rate from second malignancies (nonprostate cancer) was 7.2% and was not substantially different when stratified by risk group. Death from all other causes was 6.5% for the entire cohort but 1.3%, 5.0%, and 10.8% for low-, intermediate-, and high-risk patients. In multivariate analysis, death from prostate cancer was best predicted by Gleason score and risk group, whereas death from cardiovascular disease, nonprostate cancer, and all other causes were most closely related to patient age and tobacco use. Conclusions: Although cardiovascular mortality was the predominant cause of death, prostate cancer was responsible for approximately 10% of all deaths. In particular, overall survival was poorest in the high-risk group. Although high-risk patients were most likely to die of prostate cancer, the divergence in overall survival between high-risk and lower-risk patients primarily

  10. Critical Organ Preservation in Reirradiation Brachytherapy by Injectable Spacer

    SciTech Connect

    Kishi, Kazushi Sonomura, Tetsuo; Shirai, Shintaro; Sato, Morio; Tanaka, Kayo

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: This case series study evaluated the feasibility and effectiveness of an interstitial high-dose rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) procedure combined with an at-risk organ-sparing procedure. Methods and Materials: Thirty patients who were scheduled for reirradiation treatment for recurrent cancer after receiving a median dose of 60 Gy (range, 44-70 Gy) in 2-Gy fractions of previous external beam treatment were enrolled. Thirteen patients had lesions in the head and neck, and other lesions were located in the axilla, skeleton, breast, pelvis, and abdominal wall. Chief complaints included local masses (for 25) and refractory pain (for 21). After high-dose rate brachytherapy applicator needle implantation, an optimal CT-based three-dimensional brachytherapy plan was created with a virtual at-risk organ shift from the target. According to the plan, hyaluronic acid gel was injected to maintain the shift during irradiation. The prescribed dose was the result of an individualized tradeoff between target dose and at-risk organ dose, to avoid serious complications. A single-fraction dose of 18.0 Gy (median, equivalent to 75.6 Gy at an {alpha}/{beta} value of 3; range, 16-20 Gy) was applied to the tumor. Results: The at-risk organ dose decreased from 9.1 {+-} 0.9 Gy to 4.4 {+-} 0.4 Gy (mean {+-} standard deviation, p < 0.01), and the normal tissue complication probability decreased from 60.8% {+-} 12.6% to 16.1% {+-} 19.8% (p < 0.01). The shift effect lasted at least 4 hours and disappeared gradually. Distinct tumor shrinkage in 20 of 21 eligible patients, including tumor disappearance in 6 patients, pain reduction in 18 of 21 eligible patients, and no unexpected late toxicity greater than grade 2 were observed during the 19.5-month observation period. Conclusions: This at-risk organ-sparing preservation procedure may provide a safe and efficient reirradiation treatment.

  11. [Role of the technician in a brachytherapy department].

    PubMed

    Bélot-Cheval, V; Lemoine, L; Cuisinier, C; Gensse, M-C; Lasbareilles, O

    2013-04-01

    The role of the technician in a brachytherapy department is essential for the cohesion of the treatment team made up of the radiation oncologist, the physicist, and the technician. He/she collaborates in the different treatment steps such as taking care of the patients, training of the professionals and research studies in collaboration with the team. He participates in all steps of the treatment such as preparation, technician's consultation, catheters/templates and radioactives sources implant, dose distribution analysis and treatment. He looks after the management of planning, radioactive sources and chemist's equipments. He takes part in the training of the junior technician, and support doctors and physicists in different studies. The procedure writing and the presentation of professional practices are also part of the technician task.

  12. [Palliative locoregional therapy for hilar cholangiocarcinoma: photodynamic therapy and brachytherapy].

    PubMed

    Dumoulin, F L; Horst, E; Sauerbruch, T; Gerhardt, T

    2007-08-01

    In hilar cholangiocarcinoma, only 20-30% of the patients are candidates for curative surgical resection, leaving the majority with merely palliative treatment options. Since the natural history of hilar cholangiocarcinoma is dominated by local complications rather than metastatic disease, local palliative treatment seems a reasonable option. Here, endoluminal photodynamic therapy has emerged as a promising treatment with several prospective observational studies and 2 prospective randomised studies published which included nearly 200 patients. With low complication rate and morbidity, PDT achieves an increased median survival as well as an increased quality of life even in patients with reduced performance status. Radiotherapy is an alternative local treatment option applied as brachytherapy, external beam radiotherapy or combined modality treatment. To date, however, sufficient data from controlled clinical trials are lacking, thus palliative radiotherapy has to be considered an experimental treatment option.

  13. Evaluating the cost of therapy for restenosis: considerations for brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Weintraub, W S

    1996-11-01

    Costs have become increasingly important in medicine in recent years as demand for services has outstripped readily available resources. Clinical microeconomics offers an approach to understanding cost and outcomes in an environment of economic scarcity. In this article the types of costs and methods for determining cost are presented. In addition, methods for assessing outcome and outcome in relation to cost are developed. Restenosis after coronary angioplasty is a prime example of a clinical problem requiring economic evaluation. This is because it results in little serious morbidity except for recurrent chest pain, but it has serious economic consequences which occur some time after the original angioplasty. This makes the economic assessment of restenosis complicated. The application of health care microeconomic principles to brachytherapy for restenosis in the coronary arteries is presented. PMID:8960526

  14. Registration of structurally dissimilar images in MRI-based brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berendsen, F. F.; Kotte, A. N. T. J.; de Leeuw, A. A. C.; Jürgenliemk-Schulz, I. M.; Viergever, M. A.; Pluim, J. P. W.

    2014-08-01

    A serious challenge in image registration is the accurate alignment of two images in which a certain structure is present in only one of the two. Such topological changes are problematic for conventional non-rigid registration algorithms. We propose to incorporate in a conventional free-form registration framework a geometrical penalty term that minimizes the volume of the missing structure in one image. We demonstrate our method on cervical MR images for brachytherapy. The intrapatient registration problem involves one image in which a therapy applicator is present and one in which it is not. By including the penalty term, a substantial improvement in the surface distance to the gold standard anatomical position and the residual volume of the applicator void are obtained. Registration of neighboring structures, i.e. the rectum and the bladder is generally improved as well, albeit to a lesser degree.

  15. Apparatus and method for high dose rate brachytherapy radiation treatment

    DOEpatents

    Macey, Daniel J.; Majewski, Stanislaw; Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Smith, Mark Frederick; Kross, Brian James

    2005-01-25

    A method and apparatus for the in vivo location and tracking of a radioactive seed source during and after brachytherapy treatment. The method comprises obtaining multiple views of the seed source in a living organism using: 1) a single PSPMT detector that is exposed through a multiplicity of pinholes thereby obtaining a plurality of images from a single angle; 2) a single PSPMT detector that may obtain an image through a single pinhole or a plurality of pinholes from a plurality of angles through movement of the detector; or 3) a plurality of PSPMT detectors that obtain a plurality of views from different angles simultaneously or virtually simultaneously. The plurality of images obtained from these various techniques, through angular displacement of the various acquired images, provide the information required to generate the three dimensional images needed to define the location of the radioactive seed source within the body of the living organism.

  16. Radiobiological evaluation of low dose-rate prostate brachytherapy implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knaup, Courtney James

    Low dose-rate brachytherapy is a radiation therapy treatment for men with prostate cancer. While this treatment is common, the use of isotopes with varying dosimetric characteristics means that the prescription level and normal organ tolerances vary. Additionally, factors such as prostate edema, seed loss and seed migration may alter the dose distribution within the prostate. The goal of this work is to develop a radiobiological response tool based on spatial dose information which may be used to aid in treatment planning, post-implant evaluation and determination of the effects of prostate edema and seed migration. Aim 1: Evaluation of post-implant prostate edema and its dosimetric and biological effects. Aim 2: Incorporation of biological response to simplify post-implant evaluation. Aim 3: Incorporation of biological response to simplify treatment plan comparison. Aim 4: Radiobiologically based comparison of single and dual-isotope implants. Aim 5: Determine the dosimetric and radiobiological effects of seed disappearance and migration.

  17. Dose verification of eye plaque brachytherapy using spectroscopic dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Jarema, T; Cutajar, D; Weaver, M; Petasecca, M; Lerch, M; Kejda, A; Rosenfeld, A

    2016-09-01

    Eye plaque brachytherapy has been developed and refined for the last 80 years, demonstrating effective results in the treatment of ocular malignancies. Current dosimetry techniques for eye plaque brachytherapy (such as TLD- and film-based techniques) are time consuming and cannot be used prior to treatment in a sterile environment. The measurement of the expected dose distribution within the eye, prior to insertion within the clinical setting, would be advantageous, as any errors in source loading will lead to an erroneous dose distribution and inferior treatment outcomes. This study investigated the use of spectroscopic dosimetry techniques for real-time quality assurance of I-125 based eye plaques, immediately prior to insertion. A silicon detector based probe, operating in spectroscopy mode was constructed, containing a small (1 mm(3)) silicon detector, mounted within a ceramic holder, all encapsulated within a rubber sheath to prevent water infiltration of the electronics. Preliminary tests of the prototype demonstrated that the depth dose distribution through the central axis of an I-125 based eye plaque may be determined from AAPM Task Group 43 recommendations to a deviation of 6 % at 3 mm depth, 7 % at 5 mm depth, 1 % at 10 mm depth and 13 % at 20 mm depth, with the deviations attributed to the construction of the probe. A new probe design aims to reduce these discrepancies, however the concept of spectroscopic dosimetry shows great promise for use in eye plaque quality assurance in the clinical setting.

  18. Comparison of biochemical failure definitions for permanent prostate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kuban, Deborah A. . E-mail: dakuban@mdanderson.org; Levy, Larry B.; Potters, Louis; Beyer, David C.; Blasko, John C.; Moran, Brian J.; Ciezki, Jay P.; Zietman, Anthony L.; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Pisansky, Thomas M.; Elshaikh, Mohamed; Horwitz, Eric M.

    2006-08-01

    Purpose: To assess prostate-specific antigen (PSA) failure definitions for patients with Stage T1-T2 prostate cancer treated by permanent prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: A total of 2,693 patients treated with radioisotopic implant as solitary treatment for T1-T2 prostatic adenocarcinoma were studied. All patients had a pretreatment PSA, were treated at least 5 years before analysis, 1988 to 1998, and did not receive hormonal therapy before recurrence. Multiple PSA failure definitions were tested for their ability to predict clinical failure. Results: Definitions which determined failure by a certain increment of PSA rise above the lowest PSA level to date (nadir + x ng/mL) were more sensitive and specific than failure definitions based on PSA doubling time or a certain number of PSA rises. The sensitivity and specificity for the nadir + 2 definition were 72% and 83%, vs. 51% and 81% for 3 PSA rises. The surgical type definitions (PSA exceeding an absolute value) could match this sensitivity and specificity but only when failure was defined as exceeding a PSA level in the 1-3 ng/mL range and only when patients were allowed adequate time to nadir. When failure definitions were compared by time varying covariate regression analysis, nadir + 2 ng/mL retained the best fit. Conclusions: For patients treated by permanent radioisotopic implant for prostate cancer, the definition nadir + 2 ng/mL provides the best surrogate for failure throughout the entire follow-up period, similar to patients treated by external beam radiotherapy. Therefore, the same PSA failure definition could be used for both modalities. For brachytherapy patients with long-term follow-up, at least 6 years, defining failure as exceeding an absolute PSA level in the 0.5 ng/mL range may be reasonable.

  19. Dosimetry of the 198Au Source used in Interstitial Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dauffy, L; Braby, L; Berner, B

    2004-05-18

    The American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group 43 report, AAPM TG-43, provides an analytical model and a dosimetry protocol for brachytherapy dose calculations, as well as documentation and results for some sealed sources. The radionuclide {sup 198}Au (T{sub 1/2} = 2.70 days, E{gamma} = 412 keV) has been used in the form of seeds for brachytherapy treatments including brain, eye, and prostate tumors. However, the TG-43 report has no data for {sup 198}Au seeds, and none have previously been obtained. For that reason, and because of the conversion of most treatment planning systems to TG-43 based methods, both Monte Carlo calculations (MCNP 4C) and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) are used in this work to determine these data. The geometric variation in dose is measured using an array of TLDs in a solid water phantom, and the seed activity is determined using both a well ion chamber and a High Purity Germanium detector (HPGe). The results for air kerma strength, S{sub k}, per unit apparent activity, are 2.06 (MCNP) and 2.09 (measured) U mCi{sup -1}. The former is identical to what was published in 1991 in the AAPM Task Group 32 report. The dose rate constant results, {Lambda}, are 1.12 (MCNP) and 1.10 (measured), cGy h{sup -1} U{sup -1}. The radial dose function, g(r), anisotropy function, F(r,{theta}), and anisotropy factor, {psi}{sub an}(r), are given. The anisotropy constant values are 0.973 (MCNP) and 0.994 (measured) and are consistent with both source geometry and the emitted photon energy.

  20. Monte Carlo dosimetry of a new 90Y brachytherapy source

    PubMed Central

    Junxiang, Wu; Shihu, You; Jing, Huang; Fengxiang, Long; Chengkai, Wang; Zhangwen, Wu; Qing, Hou

    2015-01-01

    Purpose In this study, we attempted to obtain full dosimetric data for a new 90Y brachytherapy source developed by the College of Chemistry (Sichuan University) for use in high-dose-rate after-loading systems. Material and methods The dosimetric data for this new source were used as required by the dose calculation formalisms proposed by the AAPM Task Group 60 and Task Group 149. The active core length of the new 90Y source was increased to 4.7 mm compared to the value of 2.5 mm for the old 90Sr/90Y source. The Monte Carlo simulation toolkit Geant4 was used to calculate these parameters. The source was located in a 30-cm-radius theoretical sphere water phantom. Results The dosimetric data included the reference absorbed dose rate, the radial dose function in the range of 1.0 to 8.0 mm in the longitudinal axis, and the anisotropy function with a θ in the range of 0° to 90° at 5° intervals and an r in the range of 1.0 to 8.0 mm in 0.2-mm intervals. The reference absorbed dose rate for the new 90Y source was determined to be equal to 1.6608 ± 0.0008 cGy s–1 mCi–1, compared to the values of 0.9063 ± 0.0005 cGy s–1 mCi–1 that were calculated for the old 90Sr/90Y source. A polynomial function was also obtained for the radial dose function by curve fitting. Conclusions Dosimetric data are provided for the new 90Y brachytherapy source. These data are meant to be used commercially in after-loading system. PMID:26622247

  1. Prostate brachytherapy postimplant dosimetry: Automatic plan reconstruction of stranded implants

    SciTech Connect

    Chng, N.; Spadinger, I.; Morris, W. J.; Usmani, N.; Salcudean, S.

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: Plan reconstruction for permanent implant prostate brachytherapy is the process of determining the correspondence between planned and implanted seeds in postimplant analysis. Plan reconstruction informs many areas of brachytherapy quality assurance, including the verification of seed segmentation, misplacement and migration assessment, implant simulations, and the dosimetry of mixed-activity or mixed-species implants. Methods: An algorithm has been developed for stranded implants which uses the interseed spacing constraints imposed by the suture to improve the accuracy of reconstruction. Seventy randomly selected clinical cases with a mean of 23.6 (range 18-30) needles and mean density of 2.0 (range 1.6-2.6) 2.0 (range 1.6-2.6) seeds/cm{sup 3} were automatically reconstructed and the accuracy compared to manual reconstructions performed using a custom 3D graphical interface. Results: Using the automatic algorithm, the mean accuracy of the assignment relative to manual reconstruction was found to be 97.7{+-}0.5%. Fifty-two of the 70 cases (74%) were error-free; of seeds in the remaining cases, 96.7{+-}0.3% were found to be attributed to the correct strand and 97.0{+-}0.3% were correctly connected to their neighbors. Any necessary manual correction using the interface is usually straightforward. For the clinical data set tested, neither the number of seeds or needles, average density, nor the presence of clusters was found to have an effect on reconstruction accuracy using this method. Conclusions: Routine plan reconstruction of stranded implants can be performed with a high degree of accuracy to support postimplant dosimetry and quality analyses.

  2. Brachytherapy dosimetry parameters calculated for a {sup 131}Cs source

    SciTech Connect

    Rivard, Mark J.

    2007-02-15

    A comprehensive analysis of the IsoRay Medical model CS-1 Rev2 {sup 131}Cs brachytherapy source was performed. Dose distributions were simulated using Monte Carlo methods (MCNP5) in liquid water, Solid{sup TM}, and Virtual Water{sup TM} spherical phantoms. From these results, the in-water brachytherapy dosimetry parameters have been determined, and were compared with those of Murphy et al. [Med. Phys. 31, 1529-1538 (2004)] using measurements and simulations. Our results suggest that calculations obtained using erroneous cross-section libraries should be discarded as recommended by the 2004 AAPM TG-43U1 report. Our {sub MC}{lambda} value of 1.046{+-}0.019 cGy h{sup -1} U{sup -1} is within 1.3% of that measured by Chen et al. [Med. Phys. 32, 3279-3285 (2005)] using TLDs and the calculated results of Wittman and Fisher [Med. Phys. 34, 49-54 (2007)] using MCNP5. Using the discretized energy approach of Rivard [Appl. Radiat. Isot. 55, 775-782 (2001)] to ascertain the impact of individual {sup 131}Cs photons on radial dose function and anisotropy functions, there was virtual equivalence of results for 29.461{<=}E{sub {gamma}}{<=}34.419 keV and for a mono-energetic 30.384 keV photon source. Comparisons of radial dose function and 2D anisotropy function data are also included, and an analysis of material composition and cross-section libraries was performed.

  3. GGEMS-Brachy: GPU GEant4-based Monte Carlo simulation for brachytherapy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemaréchal, Yannick; Bert, Julien; Falconnet, Claire; Després, Philippe; Valeri, Antoine; Schick, Ulrike; Pradier, Olivier; Garcia, Marie-Paule; Boussion, Nicolas; Visvikis, Dimitris

    2015-07-01

    In brachytherapy, plans are routinely calculated using the AAPM TG43 formalism which considers the patient as a simple water object. An accurate modeling of the physical processes considering patient heterogeneity using Monte Carlo simulation (MCS) methods is currently too time-consuming and computationally demanding to be routinely used. In this work we implemented and evaluated an accurate and fast MCS on Graphics Processing Units (GPU) for brachytherapy low dose rate (LDR) applications. A previously proposed Geant4 based MCS framework implemented on GPU (GGEMS) was extended to include a hybrid GPU navigator, allowing navigation within voxelized patient specific images and analytically modeled 125I seeds used in LDR brachytherapy. In addition, dose scoring based on track length estimator including uncertainty calculations was incorporated. The implemented GGEMS-brachy platform was validated using a comparison with Geant4 simulations and reference datasets. Finally, a comparative dosimetry study based on the current clinical standard (TG43) and the proposed platform was performed on twelve prostate cancer patients undergoing LDR brachytherapy. Considering patient 3D CT volumes of 400  × 250  × 65 voxels and an average of 58 implanted seeds, the mean patient dosimetry study run time for a 2% dose uncertainty was 9.35 s (≈500 ms 10-6 simulated particles) and 2.5 s when using one and four GPUs, respectively. The performance of the proposed GGEMS-brachy platform allows envisaging the use of Monte Carlo simulation based dosimetry studies in brachytherapy compatible with clinical practice. Although the proposed platform was evaluated for prostate cancer, it is equally applicable to other LDR brachytherapy clinical applications. Future extensions will allow its application in high dose rate brachytherapy applications.

  4. Comparison of external beam radiation and brachytherapy to external beam radiation alone for unresectable extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Boothe, Dustin; Hopkins, Zachary; Frandsen, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Background Extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (EHC) is a rare malignancy with a relatively poor prognosis. There are no randomized, prospective data to help define the optimal method of radiation delivery for unresectable EHC. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the benefit of adding brachytherapy to external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) for unresectable EHC. Methods A retrospective review of 1,326 patients with unresectable EHC using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database was completed. Kaplan-Meier methods were used to analyze the primary endpoint, overall survival. Univariate and multivariate analysis was performed to identify and control for potential confounding variables, including age at diagnosis, sex, stage, grade, histology, race, year of diagnosis, and reason for no surgery. Results Of the 1,326 patients with unresectable EHC, 1,188 (92.9%) received EBRT only, while 91 (7.1%) received both EBRT and brachytherapy. Patients receiving combined modality radiation therapy were more likely to be treated prior to the year 2000. Median overall survival for patients receiving EBRT and EBRT plus brachytherapy was 9 and 11 months, respectively (P=0.04). Cause specific survival was 12 months for those receiving EBRT only, and 15 months for those who received EBRT + brachytherapy (P=0.10). Survival analysis performed on patients with locoregional disease only revealed a trend towards prolonged overall survival with those receiving EBRT + brachytherapy (P=0.08). Multivariate analysis revealed grade and stage of disease were correlated with both overall survival and cause specific survival (P≤0.05). Conclusions Among patients with unresectable EHC, the addition of brachytherapy to EBRT is associated with a prolonged median overall survival. However, the use of brachytherapy boost decreased in the last decade of the study. PMID:27563448

  5. Combined therapy: surgery and intraoperative HDR brachytherapy for locally advanced and recurrent rectal cancer. Practical experience of Brachytherapy Department in Warsaw

    PubMed Central

    Radziszewski, Jakub; Lyczek, Jaroslaw; Kawczynska, Maria; Kulik, Anna

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Patients with locally advanced and recurrent rectal cancer have a dismal prognosis. The aim of proposed combined therapy – surgery and intraoperative brachytherapy, is to improve results of already applied methods and to define optimal group of patients for this treatment. We introduce practical experience of Brachytherapy Department in Cancer Centre – Institute in Warsaw. Material and methods Patients with primary T4NxM0 rectal cancer and isolated local pelvic recurrence were qualified for therapy. Between January 2005 and September 2008, 13 patients were included: 4 with primary cancer and 9 with recurrence, median age of 56. After surgical resection intraoperative radiotherapy was delivered with boost of high dose rate brachytherapy of 20Gy dose to the tumor bed. Results Primary point of the study is to evaluate impact of applied therapy on local control (LC), overall survival (OS) and disease free survival (DFS). Median follow-up is 16 months. Four of the patients died and 3 survivors are disease-free. There was no case of perioperative mortality. Conclusions A multimodality approach, using surgical resection with intra operative brachytherapy improves local control as well as patients survival in comparison with historical treatment group. Combined therapy is related to high morbidity, but low mortality. The preliminary observations seem to correspond with other authors data.

  6. Utilization of prostate brachytherapy for low risk prostate cancer: Is the decline overstated?

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Andrew; Weiner, Joseph P.; Schwartz, David; Schreiber, David

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Several prior studies have suggested that brachytherapy utilization has markedly decreased, coinciding with the recent increased utilization of intensity modulated radiation therapy, as well as an increase in urologist-owned centers. We sought to investigate the brachytherapy utilization in a large, hospital-based registry. Material and methods Men with prostate cancer diagnosed between 2004-2012 and treated with either external beam radiation and/or prostate brachytherapy were abstracted from the National Cancer Database. In order to be included, men had to be clinically staged as T1c-T2aNx-0Mx-0, Gleason 6, PSA ≤ 10.0 ng/ml. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze brachytherapy utilization over time and were compared via χ2. Multivariate logistic regression was used to assess for covariables associated with increased brachytherapy usage. Results There were 89,413 men included in this study, of which 37,054 (41.6%) received only external beam radiation, and 52,089 (58.4%) received prostate brachytherapy. The use of brachytherapy declined over time from 62.9% in 2004 to 51.3% in 2012 (p < 0.001). This decline was noted in both academic facilities (60.8% in 2004 to 47.0% in 2012, p < 0.001) as well as in non-academic facilities (63.7% in 2004 to 53.0% in 2012, p < 0.001). The decline was more pronounced in patients who lived closer to treatment facilities than those who lived further. The use of intensity modulated radiation therapy increased during this same time period from 18.4% in 2004 to 38.2% in 2012 (p < 0.001). On multivariate analysis, treatment at an academic center, increasing age, decreasing distance from the treatment center, and years of diagnosis from 2006-2012 were significantly associated with reduced brachytherapy usage. Conclusions In this hospital-based registry, prostate brachytherapy usage has declined for low risk prostate cancer as intensity modulated radiation therapy usage has increased. However, it still remains the

  7. Utilization of prostate brachytherapy for low risk prostate cancer: Is the decline overstated?

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Andrew; Weiner, Joseph P.; Schwartz, David; Schreiber, David

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Several prior studies have suggested that brachytherapy utilization has markedly decreased, coinciding with the recent increased utilization of intensity modulated radiation therapy, as well as an increase in urologist-owned centers. We sought to investigate the brachytherapy utilization in a large, hospital-based registry. Material and methods Men with prostate cancer diagnosed between 2004-2012 and treated with either external beam radiation and/or prostate brachytherapy were abstracted from the National Cancer Database. In order to be included, men had to be clinically staged as T1c-T2aNx-0Mx-0, Gleason 6, PSA ≤ 10.0 ng/ml. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze brachytherapy utilization over time and were compared via χ2. Multivariate logistic regression was used to assess for covariables associated with increased brachytherapy usage. Results There were 89,413 men included in this study, of which 37,054 (41.6%) received only external beam radiation, and 52,089 (58.4%) received prostate brachytherapy. The use of brachytherapy declined over time from 62.9% in 2004 to 51.3% in 2012 (p < 0.001). This decline was noted in both academic facilities (60.8% in 2004 to 47.0% in 2012, p < 0.001) as well as in non-academic facilities (63.7% in 2004 to 53.0% in 2012, p < 0.001). The decline was more pronounced in patients who lived closer to treatment facilities than those who lived further. The use of intensity modulated radiation therapy increased during this same time period from 18.4% in 2004 to 38.2% in 2012 (p < 0.001). On multivariate analysis, treatment at an academic center, increasing age, decreasing distance from the treatment center, and years of diagnosis from 2006-2012 were significantly associated with reduced brachytherapy usage. Conclusions In this hospital-based registry, prostate brachytherapy usage has declined for low risk prostate cancer as intensity modulated radiation therapy usage has increased. However, it still remains the

  8. A comparison of the expected costs of high dose rate brachytherapy using 252Cf versus 192Ir.

    PubMed

    Rivard, Mark J; Kirk, Bernadette L; Stapleford, Liza J; Wazer, David E

    2004-12-01

    A cost analysis to compare high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy using either californium-252 (252Cf) or 192Ir was performed to determine the prospects of widespread clinical implementation of HDR 252Cf. Interest in the neutron-emitting 252Cf radioisotope as a radiotherapy nuclide has undergone a resurgence given recent efforts to fabricate HDR remotely afterloaded sources, and other efforts to create a miniature source for improved accessibility to a variety of anatomic sites. Therefore, HDR 252Cf brachytherapy may prove to be a potential rival to the use of HDR 192Ir remotely afterloaded brachytherapy--the current standard-of-care treatment modality using HDR brachytherapy. Considering the possible improvements in clinical efficacy using HDR 252Cf brachytherapy and the enormous costs of other high-LET radiation sources, the cost differences between 252Cf and 192Ir may be well-justified.

  9. Brachytherapy in Greater Poland Cancer Centre and in Poznan – the past and the presence

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this article is to describe the history of brachytherapy in Poznań from the beginning of 20th century. Among the most important medical and oncological institutions that were created in Poznań at the beginning of twentieth century were: Surgical Clinic of Poznań University (City Hospital, Poznań), Transfiguration of the Lord Hospital (Poznań) and Radiology Faculty of Poznań University (Poznań). After the World War II in 1953 at Garbary Street hospital three new departments were established: Surgery, Gynecology and General Departments. At that time, radium treatment was introduced to Gynecology and General Departments and it was applied in therapy till the early nineties, in spite of introducing LDR and HDR brachytherapy in seventies and eighties. The intense development of brachytherapy took place in late nineties, when brachytherapy treatment of non-gynecological tumors started. Today’s condition of brachytherapy at Greater Poland Cancer Centre (GCC) is presented in this article, too.

  10. Tolerance of the carotid-sheath contents to brachytherapy: an experimental study

    SciTech Connect

    Werber, J.L.; Sood, B.; Alfieri, A.; McCormick, S.A.; Vikram, B. )

    1991-06-01

    Tumor invasion of the carotid artery is a potential indication for brachytherapy, which delivers a high dose of irradiation to residual tumor while limiting the dose to adjacent healthy tissues. The tolerance of carotid-sheath contents to varying doses of brachytherapy, however, has not been clearly established. In order to evaluate brachytherapy effects on carotid-sheath contents, after-loading catheters were implanted bilaterally in 3 groups of 6 rabbits each (18 rabbits). Iridium 192 brachytherapy doses of either 5000 cGy (rad), 9000 cGy, or 13,000 cGy were delivered unilaterally, with the contralateral neck serving as a nonirradiated control in each animal. There were no carotid ruptures and wound healing was normal. Two animals from each group were killed at 6, 20, and 48 weeks. Even at the highest dose (13,000 cGy), nerve conduction studies performed on the vagus nerve prior to sacrifice revealed no increased latency, histologic changes were minimal, and carotid arteries were patent. These observations suggest that the carotid-sheath contents in healthy rabbits could tolerate high doses (up to 13,000 cGy) of low-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy without complications.

  11. Patient perception of local anesthesia for prostate brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Smathers, S; Wallner, K; Simpson, C; Roof, J

    2000-05-01

    Prostate brachytherapy is an increasingly popular treatment for early-stage prostate cancer. Until now, spinal or general anesthesia for the procedure has been the standard of care. For patient safety, patient convenience, and to limit use of operating facilities, the authors started performing implants routinely with local anesthesia. We present here an evaluation of patients' acceptance of prostate brachytherapy under local anesthesia. On arrival at our department on the morning of the procedure, the patient is brought into the simulator suite, an intravenous line is started, and a urinary catheter is inserted. With the patient in the lithotomy position, a 5-by-5-cm patch of perineal skin and subcutaneous tissue is anesthetized by local infiltration of 10 mL of 1% lidocaine, using a 25-gauge 5/8-inch needle. Immediately following injection into the subcutaneous tissues, the deeper tissues, including the pelvic floor and prostate apex, are anesthetized by injecting 15 mL lidocaine solution with approximately 8 passes of a 20-gauge 1-inch needle. Following subcutaneous and periapical lidocaine injections, the transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) probe is positioned to reproduce the planning images and a 3.5- or 6-inch, 22-gauge spinal needle is inserted into the peripheral planned needle tracks, monitored by TRUS. When the tips of the needles reach the prostatic base, about 1 mL of lidocaine solution is injected in the intraprostatic track, as the needle is slowly withdrawn. The lidocaine infiltration procedure takes approximately 10 to 15 minutes. Seed implantation is then performed as previously described. At the time of this report preparation, 58 of the 71 patients (81%) were interviewed, with a median follow-up of 6 months since the implant procedure. On a scale of 1 to 10, the median biopsy pain score was 4.5 compared with a median pain score with the implant procedure of 3.0. There was no clear correlation between the two scores (r = .26). There was no correlation

  12. Error Analysis of non-TLD HDR Brachytherapy Dosimetric Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amoush, Ahmad

    The American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group Report43 (AAPM-TG43) and its updated version TG-43U1 rely on the LiF TLD detector to determine the experimental absolute dose rate for brachytherapy. The recommended uncertainty estimates associated with TLD experimental dosimetry include 5% for statistical errors (Type A) and 7% for systematic errors (Type B). TG-43U1 protocol does not include recommendation for other experimental dosimetric techniques to calculate the absolute dose for brachytherapy. This research used two independent experimental methods and Monte Carlo simulations to investigate and analyze uncertainties and errors associated with absolute dosimetry of HDR brachytherapy for a Tandem applicator. An A16 MicroChamber* and one dose MOSFET detectors† were selected to meet the TG-43U1 recommendations for experimental dosimetry. Statistical and systematic uncertainty analyses associated with each experimental technique were analyzed quantitatively using MCNPX 2.6‡ to evaluate source positional error, Tandem positional error, the source spectrum, phantom size effect, reproducibility, temperature and pressure effects, volume averaging, stem and wall effects, and Tandem effect. Absolute dose calculations for clinical use are based on Treatment Planning System (TPS) with no corrections for the above uncertainties. Absolute dose and uncertainties along the transverse plane were predicted for the A16 microchamber. The generated overall uncertainties are 22%, 17%, 15%, 15%, 16%, 17%, and 19% at 1cm, 2cm, 3cm, 4cm, and 5cm, respectively. Predicting the dose beyond 5cm is complicated due to low signal-to-noise ratio, cable effect, and stem effect for the A16 microchamber. Since dose beyond 5cm adds no clinical information, it has been ignored in this study. The absolute dose was predicted for the MOSFET detector from 1cm to 7cm along the transverse plane. The generated overall uncertainties are 23%, 11%, 8%, 7%, 7%, 9%, and 8% at 1cm, 2cm, 3cm

  13. Plaque Brachytherapy for Uveal Melanoma: A Vision Prognostication Model

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Niloufer; Khan, Mohammad K.; Bena, James; Macklis, Roger; Singh, Arun D.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To generate a vision prognostication model after plaque brachytherapy for uveal melanoma. Methods and Materials: All patients with primary single ciliary body or choroidal melanoma treated with iodine-125 or ruthenium-106 plaque brachytherapy between January 1, 2005, and June 30, 2010, were included. The primary endpoint was loss of visual acuity. Only patients with initial visual acuity better than or equal to 20/50 were used to evaluate visual acuity worse than 20/50 at the end of the study, and only patients with initial visual acuity better than or equal to 20/200 were used to evaluate visual acuity worse than 20/200 at the end of the study. Factors analyzed were sex, age, cataracts, diabetes, tumor size (basal dimension and apical height), tumor location, and radiation dose to the tumor apex, fovea, and optic disc. Univariate and multivariable Cox proportional hazards were used to determine the influence of baseline patient factors on vision loss. Kaplan-Meier curves (log rank analysis) were used to estimate freedom from vision loss. Results: Of 189 patients, 92% (174) were alive as of February 1, 2011. At presentation, visual acuity was better than or equal to 20/50 and better than or equal to 20/200 in 108 and 173 patients, respectively. Of these patients, 44.4% (48) had post-treatment visual acuity of worse than 20/50 and 25.4% (44) had post-treatment visual acuity worse than 20/200. By multivariable analysis, increased age (hazard ratio [HR] of 1.01 [1.00-1.03], P=.05), increase in tumor height (HR of 1.35 [1.22-1.48], P<.001), and a greater total dose to the fovea (HR of 1.01 [1.00-1.01], P<.001) were predictive of vision loss. This information was used to develop a nomogram predictive of vision loss. Conclusions: By providing a means to predict vision loss at 3 years after treatment, our vision prognostication model can be an important tool for patient selection and treatment counseling.

  14. Water equivalent phantom materials for 192Ir brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenfeld, Andreas A.; Harder, Dietrich; Poppe, Björn; Chofor, Ndimofor

    2015-12-01

    Several solid phantom materials have been tested regarding their suitability as water substitutes for dosimetric measurements in brachytherapy with 192Ir as a typical high energy photon emitter. The radial variations of the spectral photon fluence, of the total, primary and scattered photon fluence and of the absorbed dose to water in the transversal plane of the tested cylindrical phantoms surrounding a centric and coaxially arranged Varian GammaMed afterloading 192Ir brachytherapy source were Monte-Carlo simulated in EGSnrc. The degree of water equivalence of a phantom material was evaluated by comparing the radial dose-to-water profile in the phantom material with that in water. The phantom size was varied over a large range since it influences the dose contribution by scattered photons with energies diminished by single and multiple Compton scattering. Phantom axis distances up to 10 cm were considered as clinically relevant. Scattered photons with energies reaching down into the 25 keV region dominate the photon fluence at source distances exceeding 3.5 cm. The tested phantom materials showed significant differences in the degree of water equivalence. In phantoms with radii up to 10 cm, RW1, RW3, Solid Water, HE Solid Water, Virtual Water, Plastic Water DT, and Plastic Water LR phantoms show excellent water equivalence with dose deviations from a water phantom not exceeding 0.8%, while Original Plastic Water (as of 2015), Plastic Water (1995), Blue Water, polyethylene, and polystyrene show deviations up to 2.6%. For larger phantom radii up to 30 cm, the deviations for RW1, RW3, Solid Water, HE Solid Water, Virtual Water, Plastic Water DT, and Plastic Water LR remain below 1.4%, while Original Plastic Water (as of 2015), Plastic Water (1995), Blue Water, polyethylene, and polystyrene produce deviations up to 8.1%. PMMA plays a separate role, with deviations up to 4.3% for radii not exceeding 10 cm, but below 1% for radii up to 30 cm. As suggested by

  15. Quantifying IOHDR brachytherapy underdosage resulting from an incomplete scatter environment

    SciTech Connect

    Raina, Sanjay; Avadhani, Jaiteerth S.; Oh, Moonseong; Malhotra, Harish K.; Jaggernauth, Wainwright; Kuettel, Michael R.; Podgorsak, Matthew B. . E-mail: matthew.podgorsak@roswellpark.org

    2005-04-01

    Purpose: Most brachytherapy planning systems are based on a dose calculation algorithm that assumes an infinite scatter environment surrounding the target volume and applicator. Dosimetric errors from this assumption are negligible. However, in intraoperative high-dose-rate brachytherapy (IOHDR) where treatment catheters are typically laid either directly on a tumor bed or within applicators that may have little or no scatter material above them, the lack of scatter from one side of the applicator can result in underdosage during treatment. This study was carried out to investigate the magnitude of this underdosage. Methods: IOHDR treatment geometries were simulated using a solid water phantom beneath an applicator with varying amounts of bolus material on the top and sides of the applicator to account for missing tissue. Treatment plans were developed for 3 different treatment surface areas (4 x 4, 7 x 7, 12 x 12 cm{sup 2}), each with prescription points located at 3 distances (0.5 cm, 1.0 cm, and 1.5 cm) from the source dwell positions. Ionization measurements were made with a liquid-filled ionization chamber linear array with a dedicated electrometer and data acquisition system. Results: Measurements showed that the magnitude of the underdosage varies from about 8% to 13% of the prescription dose as the prescription depth is increased from 0.5 cm to 1.5 cm. This treatment error was found to be independent of the irradiated area and strongly dependent on the prescription distance. Furthermore, for a given prescription depth, measurements in planes parallel to an applicator at distances up to 4.0 cm from the applicator plane showed that the dose delivery error is equal in magnitude throughout the target volume. Conclusion: This study demonstrates the magnitude of underdosage in IOHDR treatments delivered in a geometry that may not result in a full scatter environment around the applicator. This implies that the target volume and, specifically, the prescription

  16. Rapid emission angle selection for rotating-shield brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yunlong; Flynn, Ryan T.; Kim, Yusung; Bhatia, Sudershan K.; Sun, Wenqing; Yang Wenjun; Wu Xiaodong

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: The authors present a rapid emission angle selection (REAS) method that enables the efficient selection of the azimuthal shield angle for rotating shield brachytherapy (RSBT). The REAS method produces a Pareto curve from which a potential RSBT user can select a treatment plan that balances the tradeoff between delivery time and tumor dose conformity. Methods: Two cervical cancer patients were considered as test cases for the REAS method. The RSBT source considered was a Xoft Axxent{sup TM} electronic brachytherapy source, partially shielded with 0.5 mm of tungsten, which traveled inside a tandem intrauterine applicator. Three anchor RSBT plans were generated for each case using dose-volume optimization, with azimuthal shield emission angles of 90 Degree-Sign , 180 Degree-Sign , and 270 Degree-Sign . The REAS method converts the anchor plans to treatment plans for all possible emission angles by combining neighboring beamlets to form beamlets for larger emission angles. Treatment plans based on exhaustive dose-volume optimization (ERVO) and exhaustive surface optimization (ERSO) were also generated for both cases. Uniform dwell-time scaling was applied to all plans such that that high-risk clinical target volume D{sub 90} was maximized without violating the D{sub 2cc} tolerances of the rectum, bladder, and sigmoid colon. Results: By choosing three azimuthal emission angles out of 32 potential angles, the REAS method performs about 10 times faster than the ERVO method. By setting D{sub 90} to 85-100 Gy{sub 10}, the delivery times used by REAS generated plans are 21.0% and 19.5% less than exhaustive surface optimized plans used by the two clinical cases. By setting the delivery time budget to 5-25 and 10-30 min/fx, respectively, for two the cases, the D{sub 90} contributions for REAS are improved by 5.8% and 5.1% compared to the ERSO plans. The ranges used in this comparison were selected in order to keep both D{sub 90} and the delivery time within acceptable

  17. Brachytherapy structural shielding calculations using Monte Carlo generated, monoenergetic data

    SciTech Connect

    Zourari, K.; Peppa, V.; Papagiannis, P.; Ballester, Facundo; Siebert, Frank-André

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: To provide a method for calculating the transmission of any broad photon beam with a known energy spectrum in the range of 20–1090 keV, through concrete and lead, based on the superposition of corresponding monoenergetic data obtained from Monte Carlo simulation. Methods: MCNP5 was used to calculate broad photon beam transmission data through varying thickness of lead and concrete, for monoenergetic point sources of energy in the range pertinent to brachytherapy (20–1090 keV, in 10 keV intervals). The three parameter empirical model introduced byArcher et al. [“Diagnostic x-ray shielding design based on an empirical model of photon attenuation,” Health Phys. 44, 507–517 (1983)] was used to describe the transmission curve for each of the 216 energy-material combinations. These three parameters, and hence the transmission curve, for any polyenergetic spectrum can then be obtained by superposition along the lines of Kharrati et al. [“Monte Carlo simulation of x-ray buildup factors of lead and its applications in shielding of diagnostic x-ray facilities,” Med. Phys. 34, 1398–1404 (2007)]. A simple program, incorporating a graphical user interface, was developed to facilitate the superposition of monoenergetic data, the graphical and tabular display of broad photon beam transmission curves, and the calculation of material thickness required for a given transmission from these curves. Results: Polyenergetic broad photon beam transmission curves of this work, calculated from the superposition of monoenergetic data, are compared to corresponding results in the literature. A good agreement is observed with results in the literature obtained from Monte Carlo simulations for the photon spectra emitted from bare point sources of various radionuclides. Differences are observed with corresponding results in the literature for x-ray spectra at various tube potentials, mainly due to the different broad beam conditions or x-ray spectra assumed. Conclusions

  18. AAPM Task Group 128: Quality assurance tests for prostate brachytherapy ultrasound systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeiffer, Douglas; Sutlief, Steven; Feng Wenzheng; Pierce, Heather M.; Kofler, Jim

    2008-12-15

    While ultrasound guided prostate brachytherapy has gained wide acceptance as a primary treatment tool for prostate cancer, quality assurance of the ultrasound guidance system has received very little attention. Task Group 128 of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine was created to address quality assurance requirements specific to transrectal ultrasound used for guidance of prostate brachytherapy. Accurate imaging guidance and dosimetry calculation depend upon the quality and accuracy of the ultrasound image. Therefore, a robust quality assurance program for the ultrasound system is essential. A brief review of prostate brachytherapy and ultrasound physics is provided, followed by a recommendation for elements to be included in a comprehensive test phantom. Specific test recommendations are presented, covering grayscale visibility, depth of penetration, axial and lateral resolution, distance measurement, area measurement, volume measurement, needle template/electronic grid alignment, and geometric consistency with the treatment planning computer.

  19. Simulation of dose distribution for iridium-192 brachytherapy source type-H01 using MCNPX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purwaningsih, Anik

    2014-09-01

    Dosimetric data for a brachytherapy source should be known before it used for clinical treatment. Iridium-192 source type H01 was manufactured by PRR-BATAN aimed to brachytherapy is not yet known its dosimetric data. Radial dose function and anisotropic dose distribution are some primary keys in brachytherapy source. Dose distribution for Iridium-192 source type H01 was obtained from the dose calculation formalism recommended in the AAPM TG-43U1 report using MCNPX 2.6.0 Monte Carlo simulation code. To know the effect of cavity on Iridium-192 type H01 caused by manufacturing process, also calculated on Iridium-192 type H01 if without cavity. The result of calculation of radial dose function and anisotropic dose distribution for Iridium-192 source type H01 were compared with another model of Iridium-192 source.

  20. Simulation of dose distribution for iridium-192 brachytherapy source type-H01 using MCNPX

    SciTech Connect

    Purwaningsih, Anik

    2014-09-30

    Dosimetric data for a brachytherapy source should be known before it used for clinical treatment. Iridium-192 source type H01 was manufactured by PRR-BATAN aimed to brachytherapy is not yet known its dosimetric data. Radial dose function and anisotropic dose distribution are some primary keys in brachytherapy source. Dose distribution for Iridium-192 source type H01 was obtained from the dose calculation formalism recommended in the AAPM TG-43U1 report using MCNPX 2.6.0 Monte Carlo simulation code. To know the effect of cavity on Iridium-192 type H01 caused by manufacturing process, also calculated on Iridium-192 type H01 if without cavity. The result of calculation of radial dose function and anisotropic dose distribution for Iridium-192 source type H01 were compared with another model of Iridium-192 source.

  1. Rectal ulcer: Due to ketoprofen, argon plasma coagulation and prostatic brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Koessler, Thibaud; Servois, Vincent; Mariani, Pascale; Aubert, Emilie; Cacheux, Wulfran

    2014-12-01

    Prostatic brachytherapy with permanent seed implants is a recent and safe radiation therapy technique associated with radiation-induced digestive disease. Argon plasma coagulation procedure is a validated modality in the management of haemorrhagic radiation proctitis, which is known to occasionally induce chronic rectal ulcers. We report here an original case report of an acute painful rectal ulcer as a consequence of the combination of short-term therapy with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs therapy, prostatic brachytherapy with malposition of seed implants and argon plasma coagulation procedure in a patient with haemorrhagic radiation proctitis. The description of this clinical observation is essential to recommend the discontinuation of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs therapy and the control of the position of seed implants in case of prostatic brachytherapy before argon plasma coagulation for radiation-induced proctitis.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging-guided brachytherapy for cervical cancer: initiating a program

    PubMed Central

    Prisciandaro, Joann I.; Soliman, Abraam; Ravi, Ananth; Song, William Y.

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decade, the application of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has increased, and there is growing evidence to suggest that improvements in accuracy of target delineation in MRI-guided brachytherapy may improve clinical outcomes in cervical cancer. To implement a high quality image guided brachytherapy program, a multidisciplinary team is required with appropriate expertise as well as an adequate patient load to ensure a sustainable program. It is imperative to know that the most important source of uncertainty in the treatment process is related to target delineation and therefore, the necessity of training and expertise as well as quality assurance should be emphasized. A short review of concepts and techniques that have been developed for implementation and/or improvement of workflow of a MRI-guided brachytherapy program are provided in this document, so that institutions can use and optimize some of them based on their resources to minimize their procedure times. PMID:26622249

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging for planning intracavitary brachytherapy for the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Oñate Miranda, M; Pinho, D F; Wardak, Z; Albuquerque, K; Pedrosa, I

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the third most common gynecological cancer. Its treatment depends on tumor staging at the time of diagnosis, and a combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy is the treatment of choice in locally advanced cervical cancers. The combined use of external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy increases survival in these patients. Brachytherapy enables a larger dose of radiation to be delivered to the tumor with less toxicity for neighboring tissues with less toxicity for neighboring tissues compared to the use of external beam radiotherapy alone. For years, brachytherapy was planned exclusively using computed tomography (CT). The recent incorporation of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides essential information about the tumor and neighboring structures making possible to better define the target volumes. Nevertheless, MRI has limitations, some of which can be compensated for by fusing CT and MRI. Fusing the images from the two techniques ensures optimal planning by combining the advantages of each technique.

  4. Potential role of ultrasound imaging in interstitial image based cervical cancer brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In 2012, more than 500,000 cases of cervical cancer were diagnosed worldwide. Over three quarters of these cases occur in less developed countries [1]. Advancements in image-guided brachytherapy are resulting in improved outcomes and reduced morbidity for women with this disease, but its worldwide adoption is hampered by lack of accessibility to advanced imaging techniques. Ultrasound is emerging as a potential option for tumor visualization, brachytherapy catheter placement, and treatment planning. While additional work is needed, ultrasound can potentially serve as the sole imaging modality for catheter insertion and planning. This paper will review our current knowledge on the use of ultrasound in interstitial brachytherapy treatment for cervical cancer. PMID:25097565

  5. Brachytherapy for early oral tongue cancer: low dose rate to high dose rate.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Hideya; Inoue, Takehiro; Yoshida, Ken; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Furukawa, Souhei; Kakimoto, Naoya; Shimizutani, Kimishige; Inoue, Toshihiko

    2003-03-01

    To examine the compatibility of low dose rate (LDR) with high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy, we reviewed 399 patients with early oral tongue cancer (T1-2N0M0) treated solely by brachytherapy at Osaka University Hospital between 1967 and 1999. For patients in the LDR group (n = 341), the treatment sources consisted of Ir-192 pin for 227 patients (1973-1996; irradiated dose, 61-85 Gy; median, 70 Gy), Ra-226 needle for 113 patients (1967-1986; 55-93 Gy; median, 70 Gy). Ra-226 and Ir-192 were combined for one patient. Ir-192 HDR (microSelectron-HDR) was used for 58 patients in the HDR group (1991-present; 48-60 Gy; median, 60 Gy). LDR implantations were performed via oral and HDR via a submental/submandibular approach. The dose rates at the reference point for the LDR group were 0.30 to 0.8 Gy/h, and for the HDR group 1.0 to 3.4 Gy/min. The patients in the HDR group received a total dose of 48-60 Gy (8-10 fractions) during one week. Two fractions were administered per day (at least a 6-h interval). The 3- and 5-year local control rates for patients in the LDR group were 85% and 80%, respectively, and those in the HDR group were both 84%. HDR brachytherapy showed the same lymph-node control rate as did LDR brachytherapy (67% at 5 years). HDR brachytherapy achieved the same locoregional result as did LDR brachytherapy. A converting factor of 0.86 is applicable for HDR in the treatment of early oral tongue cancer.

  6. Brachytherapy in the therapy of prostate cancer – an interesting choice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Brachytherapy is a curative alternative to radical prostatectomy or external beam radiation [i.e. 3D conformal external beam radiation therapy (CRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT)] with comparable long-term survival and biochemical control and the most favorable toxicity. HDR brachytherapy (HDR-BT) in treatment of prostate cancer is most frequently used together with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) as a boost (increasing the treatment dose precisely to the tumor). In the early stages of the disease (low, sometimes intermediate risk group), HDR-BT is more often used as monotherapy. There are no significant differences in treatment results (overall survival rate – OS, local recurrence rate – LC) between radical prostatectomy, EBRT and HDR-BT. Low-dose-rate brachytherapy (LDR-BT) is a radiation method that has been known for several years in treatment of localized prostate cancer. The LDR-BT is applied as a monotherapy and also used along with EBRT as a boost. It is used as a sole radical treatment modality, but not as a palliative treatment. The use of brachytherapy as monotherapy in treatment of prostate cancer enables many patients to keep their sexual functions in order and causes a lower rate of urinary incontinence. Due to progress in medical and technical knowledge in brachytherapy (“real-time” computer planning systems, new radioisotopes and remote afterloading systems), it has been possible to make treatment time significantly shorter in comparison with other methods. This also enables better protection of healthy organs in the pelvis. The aim of this publication is to describe both brachytherapy methods. PMID:24596528

  7. Permanent prostate brachytherapy extracapsular radiation dose distributions: analysis of a multi-institutional database

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Wayne M.; Grimm, Peter; Morris, Mallory; Lief, Jonathan H.; Bennett, Abbey; Fiano, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Periprostatic brachytherapy doses impact biochemical control. In this study, we evaluate extracapsular volumetric dosimetry following permanent prostate brachytherapy in patients entered in a multi-institutional community database. Material and methods In the database, 4547 patients underwent brachytherapy (3094 – 125I, 1437 – 103Pd and 16 – 131Cs). Using the originally determined prostate volume, a 5 mm, 3-dimensional peri-prostatic anulus was constructed around the prostate (except for a 2 mm posterior margin), and evaluated in its entirety and in 90° segments. Prostate dosimetric parameters consisted of a V100 and D90 while the annular dosimetry was reported as a V100. Results The intraprostatic V100 and D90 for 103Pd, and 125I were statistically comparable when stratified by isotope and/or monotherapy vs. boost. The overall mean V100 for the periprostatic annulus was 62.8%. The mean V100 at the base (51.6%) was substantially less than the apex (73.5%) and midgland (65.9%). In addition, for all patients, the anterior V100 (45.7%) was less than the lateral (68.8%) and the posterior (75.0%). The geometric V100 annular differences were consistent when evaluated by isotope. Overall, the V100 was higher in the 125I cohort. Conclusions The optimal extracapsular brachytherapy dose and radial extent remains unknown, but will prove increasingly important with reductions and/or elimination of supplemental external beam radiation therapy. The large multi-institutional community database demonstrates periprostatic annular doses that are not as robust as those in selected high volume brachytherapy centers, and may be inadequate for optimal biochemical control following monotherapeutic brachytherapy, especially in higher risk patients. PMID:24143144

  8. Verification of computerized treatment planning for HDR 192Ir brachytherapy for gynaecological cancer.

    PubMed

    Buzdar, Saeed Ahmad; Gadhi, Muhammad Asghar; Rao, Muhammad Afzal; Laghari, Naeem Ahmad; Anees, Mohammad

    2009-02-01

    Treatment planning in both teletherapy and brachytherapy is time consuming practice but accurate determination of planning parameters is more important. This paper aims to verify the dose delivery time for the treatment of vaginal cancer, which is a vital parameter of High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatment planning. Treatment time has been calculated by the computerized treatment planning system (ABACUS 3.1), and then it has been compared with the manually calculated time. The results obtained are in good agreement. Independent verification of nominal time by two different protocols assures the quality of treatment. This should always be practiced to increase the accuracy of treatment.

  9. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy-guided transperineal prostate biopsy and brachytherapy for recurrent prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Agnieszka Szot; Haker, Steven J; Mulkern, Robert V; So, Minna; D'Amico, Anthony V; Tempany, Clare M

    2005-12-01

    Brachytherapy targeted to the peripheral zone with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guidance is a prostate cancer treatment option with potentially fewer complications than other treatments. Follow-up MRI when failure is suspected is, however, difficult because of radiation-induced changes. Furthermore, MR spectroscopy (MRS) is compromised by susceptibility artifacts from radioactive seeds in the peripheral zone. We report a case in which combined MRI/MRS was useful for the detection of prostate cancer in the transitional zone in patients previously treated with MR-guided brachytherapy. We propose that MRI/MRS can help detect recurrent prostate cancer, guide prostate biopsy, and help manage salvage treatment decisions. PMID:16360468

  10. Dose rate in brachytherapy using after-loading machine: pulsed or high-dose rate?

    PubMed

    Hannoun-Lévi, J-M; Peiffert, D

    2014-10-01

    Since February 2014, it is no longer possible to use low-dose rate 192 iridium wires due to the end of industrial production of IRF1 and IRF2 sources. The Brachytherapy Group of the French society of radiation oncology (GC-SFRO) has recommended switching from iridium wires to after-loading machines. Two types of after-loading machines are currently available, based on the dose rate used: pulsed-dose rate or high-dose rate. In this article, we propose a comparative analysis between pulsed-dose rate and high-dose rate brachytherapy, based on biological, technological, organizational and financial considerations.

  11. Salvage high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for recurrent head-and-neck cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hepel, Jaroslaw T.; Syed, A.M. Nisar . E-mail: bvigil@memnet.org; Puthawala, Ajmel; Sharma, Anil; Frankel, Paul

    2005-08-01

    Background: A significant portion of head-and-neck cancer patients will develop persistent or recurrent disease after definitive treatment. Radiation therapy is often used as definitive therapy or as an adjunct to surgery. Recurrent cancer of the head and neck in the previously irradiated field is, thus, a common occurrence and poses a therapeutic challenge. Some studies have evaluated low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy as a therapeutic option, including a large case series with long-term follow-up by our own institution. High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy offers therapeutic advantages over LDR brachytherapy. This study evaluates the local control and outcomes of patients with previously irradiated recurrent head-and-neck cancer treated with HDR interstitial brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Between 1997 and 2002, 30 patients who received prior radiation therapy for primary tumors of the head and neck were treated for biopsy-proven recurrent disease. All patients received previous radiation as definitive therapy alone or as adjunct to surgery. All patients were inoperable, refused surgery, or had gross residual disease after salvage surgery for their recurrent disease. Thirty-six sites on the 30 patients were implanted by application of high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy techniques with mean tumor dose of 34 Gy (18-48 Gy) in twice daily fractions of 300 to 400cGy per fraction. Results: At a minimum follow-up of 12 months, local tumor control was achieved in 69% of implanted sites. Disease-specific survival at 1 and 2 years was 54% and 45%, respectively. Overall survival at 1 and 2 years was 56% and 37%, respectively. Grade 3/4 late complications occurred in 16% of the patients. No fatal complications occurred. Conclusion: HDR brachytherapy can play an important role in the salvage treatment of previously irradiated recurrent head-and-neck cancer. This study shows that comparable results are obtained by HDR brachytherapy with fewer late complications than

  12. In vivo dosimetry: trends and prospects for brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Rosenfeld, A; Beddar, S; Tanderup, K; Cygler, J E

    2014-01-01

    The error types during brachytherapy (BT) treatments and their occurrence rates are not well known. The limited knowledge is partly attributed to the lack of independent verification systems of the treatment progression in the clinical workflow routine. Within the field of in vivo dosimetry (IVD), it is established that real-time IVD can provide efficient error detection and treatment verification. However, it is also recognized that widespread implementations are hampered by the lack of available high-accuracy IVD systems that are straightforward for the clinical staff to use. This article highlights the capabilities of the state-of-the-art IVD technology in the context of error detection and quality assurance (QA) and discusses related prospects of the latest developments within the field. The article emphasizes the main challenges responsible for the limited practice of IVD and provides descriptions on how they can be overcome. Finally, the article suggests a framework for collaborations between BT clinics that implemented IVD on a routine basis and postulates that such collaborations could improve BT QA measures and the knowledge about BT error types and their occurrence rates. PMID:25007037

  13. Optimization of intravascular brachytherapy treatment planning in peripheral arteries.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhengdong; Haigron, Pascal; Shu, Huazhong; Yu, Wenxue; Moisan, Cécile; Manens, Jean-Pierre; Lucas, Antoine; Luo, Limin

    2007-09-01

    This work deals with the treatment planning optimization for intravascular brachytherapy (IVB) in peripheral arteries. The objective is both to quantitatively study the validity of different hypotheses required for a reliable application of the treatment with current techniques, and to contribute to the definition and the specification of a new optimized procedure taking into account the actual patient's vessel geometry. The detection of vascular luminal surface was performed by an image analysis process, i.e., virtual active navigation, applied to standard CT data. Dose distribution was calculated according to the formalism proposed and recommended by the AAPM in TG43 and TG60. A method combining simulated annealing and BFGS algorithms was applied to optimize the parameters associated with the dwell points such as their number, positions, and dwell times. Dose-surface histogram (DSH) was used to evaluate the dose distribution results. Four levels of accuracy in target surface description were tested. The application of this optimization method to four different CT data sets including patient data, phantom and animal models showed that the treatment plan can be improved when the actual vessel geometry has been taken into account.

  14. Surface optimization technique for MammoSite breast brachytherapy applicator

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk, Michael . E-mail: Michael_C_Kirk@rush.edu; Hsi, W.C.; Dickler, Adam; Chu, James; Dowlatshahi, Kambiz; Francescatti, Darius; Nguyen, Cam

    2005-06-01

    Purpose: We present a technique to optimize the dwell times and positions of a high-dose-rate {sup 192}Ir source using the MammoSite breast brachytherapy applicator. The surface optimization method used multiple dwell positions and optimization points to conform the 100% isodose line to the surface of the planning target volume (PTV). Methods and materials: The study population consisted of 20 patients treated using the MammoSite device between October 2002 and February 2004. Treatment was delivered in 10 fractions of 3.4 Gy/fraction, twice daily, with a minimum of 6 h between fractions. The treatment of each patient was planned using three optimization techniques. The dosimetric characteristics of the single-point, six-point, and surface optimization techniques were compared. Results: The surface optimization technique increased the PTV coverage compared with the single- and six-point methods (mean percentage of PTV receiving 100% of the prescription dose was 94%, 85%, and 91%, respectively). The surface method, single-point, and six-point method had a mean dose homogeneity index of 0.62, 0.68, and 0.63 and a mean full width at half maximum value of 189, 190, and 192 cGy/fraction, respectively. Conclusion: The surface technique provided greater coverage of the PTV than did the single- and six-point methods. Using the FWHM method, the surface, single-, and six-point techniques resulted in equivalent dose homogeneity.

  15. Recommendations for Radioembolization of Hepatic Malignancies Using Yttrium-90 Microsphere Brachytherapy: A Consensus Panel Report from the Radioembolization Brachytherapy Oncology Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, Andrew; Nag, Subir . E-mail: subir.nag@kp.org; Salem, Riad; Murthy, Ravi; McEwan, Alexander J.; Nutting, Charles; Benson, Al; Espat, Joseph; Bilbao, Jose Ignacio; Sharma, Ricky A.; Thomas, James P.; Coldwell, Douglas

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: To standardize the indications, techniques, multimodality treatment approaches, and dosimetry to be used for yttrium-90 (Y90) microsphere hepatic brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Members of the Radioembolization Brachytherapy Oncology Consortium met as an independent group of experts in interventional radiology, radiation oncology, nuclear medicine, medical oncology, and surgical oncology to identify areas of consensus and controversy and to issue clinical guidelines for Y90 microsphere brachytherapy. Results: A total of 14 recommendations are made with category 2A consensus. Key findings include the following. Sufficient evidence exists to support the safety and effectiveness of Y90 microsphere therapy. A meticulous angiographic technique is required to prevent complications. Resin microsphere prescribed activity is best estimated by the body surface area method. By virtue of their training, certification, and contribution to Y90 microsphere treatment programs, the disciplines of radiation oncology, nuclear medicine, and interventional radiology are all qualified to use Y90 microspheres. The panel strongly advocates the creation of a treatment registry with uniform reporting criteria. Initiation of clinical trials is essential to further define the safety and role of Y90 microspheres in the context of currently available therapies. Conclusions: Yttrium-90 microsphere therapy is a complex procedure that requires multidisciplinary management for safety and success. Practitioners and cooperative groups are encouraged to use these guidelines to formulate their treatment and dose-reporting policies.

  16. {beta}-Ray brachytherapy with {sup 106}Ru plaques for retinoblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Schueler, Andreas O. . E-mail: andreas.schueler@uni-essen.de; Fluehs, Dirk; Anastassiou, Gerassimos; Jurklies, Christine; Neuhaeuser, Markus; Schilling, Harald; Bornfeld, Norbert; Sauerwein, Wolfgang

    2006-07-15

    Purpose: A retrospective analysis of 134 patients who received {sup 106}Ru brachytherapy for retinoblastomas (175 tumors in 140 eyes). Treatment and follow-up were analyzed with special emphasis on tumor control organ, preservation, and late complications. Results: Treated tumors had a mean height and diameter of 3.7 {+-} 1.4 mm and 5.0 {+-} 2.8 disk diameters, respectively. The radiation dose values were recalculated according to the calibration standard recently introduced by the National Institute of Standards and Technology. The recalculation revealed a mean applied dose of 419 Gy at the sclera (SD, 207 Gy) and 138 Gy (SD, 67 Gy) at the tumor apex. The 5-year tumor control rate was 94.4%. Tumor recurrence was more frequent in eyes with vitreous tumor cell seeding or fish-flesh regression. The estimated 5-year eye preservation rate was 86.5%. Previous treatment by brachytherapy or external beam radiotherapy, as well as a large tumor diameter, were significant factors for enucleation. The radiotherapy-induced complications after 5 years of follow-up were retinopathy (22%), optic neuropathy (21%), and cataract (17%). These complications were significantly more frequent after prior brachytherapy or external beam radiotherapy. Conclusion: Brachytherapy using {sup 106}Ru plaques is a highly efficient therapy with excellent local tumor control and an acceptable incidence of side effects.

  17. Clinical Practice and Quality Assurance Challenges in Modern Brachytherapy Sources and Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, Wayne M. Merrick, Gregory S.

    2008-05-01

    Modern brachytherapy has led to effective treatments through the establishment of broadly applicable dosimetric thresholds for maximizing survival with minimal morbidity. Proper implementation of recent dosimetric consensus statements and quality assurance procedures is necessary to maintain the established level of safety and efficacy. This review classifies issues as either 'systematic' or 'stochastic' in terms of their impact on large groups or individual patients, respectively. Systematic changes affecting large numbers of patients occur infrequently and include changes in source dosimetric parameters, prescribing practice, dose calculation formalism, and improvements in calculation algorithms. The physicist must be aware of how incipient changes accord with previous experience. Stochastic issues involve procedures that are applied to each patient individually. Although ample guidance for quality assurance of brachytherapy sources exists, some ambiguities remain. The latest American Association of Physicists in Medicine guidance clarifies what is meant by independent assay, changes source sampling recommendations, particularly for sources in sterile strands and sterile preassembled needles, and modifies action level thresholds. The changing environment of brachytherapy has not changed the fact that the prime responsibility for quality assurance in brachytherapy lies with the institutional medical physicist.

  18. Clinical practice and quality assurance challenges in modern brachytherapy sources and dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Butler, Wayne M; Merrick, Gregory S

    2008-01-01

    Modern brachytherapy has led to effective treatments through the establishment of broadly applicable dosimetric thresholds for maximizing survival with minimal morbidity. Proper implementation of recent dosimetric consensus statements and quality assurance procedures is necessary to maintain the established level of safety and efficacy. This review classifies issues as either "systematic" or "stochastic" in terms of their impact on large groups or individual patients, respectively. Systematic changes affecting large numbers of patients occur infrequently and include changes in source dosimetric parameters, prescribing practice, dose calculation formalism, and improvements in calculation algorithms. The physicist must be aware of how incipient changes accord with previous experience. Stochastic issues involve procedures that are applied to each patient individually. Although ample guidance for quality assurance of brachytherapy sources exists, some ambiguities remain. The latest American Association of Physicists in Medicine guidance clarifies what is meant by independent assay, changes source sampling recommendations, particularly for sources in sterile strands and sterile preassembled needles, and modifies action level thresholds. The changing environment of brachytherapy has not changed the fact that the prime responsibility for quality assurance in brachytherapy lies with the institutional medical physicist. PMID:18406914

  19. Effect of photon energy spectrum on dosimetric parameters of brachytherapy sources

    PubMed Central

    Ghorbani, Mahdi; Davenport, David

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aim The aim of this study is to quantify the influence of the photon energy spectrum of brachytherapy sources on task group No. 43 (TG-43) dosimetric parameters. Background Different photon spectra are used for a specific radionuclide in Monte Carlo simulations of brachytherapy sources. Materials and methods MCNPX code was used to simulate 125I, 103Pd, 169Yb, and 192Ir brachytherapy sources. Air kerma strength per activity, dose rate constant, radial dose function, and two dimensional (2D) anisotropy functions were calculated and isodose curves were plotted for three different photon energy spectra. The references for photon energy spectra were: published papers, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), and National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC). The data calculated by these photon energy spectra were compared. Results Dose rate constant values showed a maximum difference of 24.07% for 103Pd source with different photon energy spectra. Radial dose function values based on different spectra were relatively the same. 2D anisotropy function values showed minor differences in most of distances and angles. There was not any detectable difference between the isodose contours. Conclusions Dosimetric parameters obtained with different photon spectra were relatively the same, however it is suggested that more accurate and updated photon energy spectra be used in Monte Carlo simulations. This would allow for calculation of reliable dosimetric data for source modeling and calculation in brachytherapy treatment planning systems. PMID:27247558

  20. ``In Vivo'' Dosimetry in High Dose Rate Brachytherapy for Cervical Cancer Treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Azcorra, S. A.; Mota-García, A.; Poitevín-Chacón, M. A.; Santamaría-Torruco, B. J.; Rodríguez-Ponce, M.; Herrera-Martínez, F. P.; Gamboa de Buen, I.; Ruíz-Trejo, C.; Buenfil, A. E.

    2008-08-01

    In this prospective study, rectal dose was measured "in vivo" using TLD-100 crystals (3×3×1 mm3), and it has been compared to the prescribed dose. Measurements were performed in patients with cervical cancer classified in FIGO stages IB-IIIB and treated with high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR BT) at the Instituto Nacional de Cancerología (INCan).

  1. Novel Use of the Contura for High Dose Rate Cranial Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Scanderbeg, Daniel J.; Alksne, John F.; Lawson, Joshua D.; Murphy, Kevin T.

    2011-01-01

    A popular choice for treatment of recurrent gliomas was cranial brachytherapy using the GliaSite Radiation Therapy System. However, this device was taken off the market in late 2008, thus leaving a treatment void. This case study presents our experience treating a cranial lesion for the first time using a Contura multilumen, high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy balloon applicator. The patient was a 47-year-old male who was diagnosed with a recurrent right frontal anaplastic oligodendroglioma. Previous radiosurgery made him a good candidate for brachytherapy. An intracavitary HDR balloon brachytherapy device (Contura) was placed in the resection cavity and treated with a single fraction of 20 Gy. The implant, treatment, and removal of the device were all completed without incident. Dosimetry of the device was excellent because the dose conformed very well to the target. V90, V100, V150, and V200 were 98.9%, 95.7%, 27.2, and 8.8 cc, respectively. This patient was treated successfully using the Contura multilumen balloon. Contura was originally designed for deployment in a postlumpectomy breast for treatment by accelerated partial breast irradiation. Being an intracavitary balloon device, its similarity to the GliaSite system makes it a viable replacement candidate. Multiple lumens in the device also make it possible to shape the dose delivered to the target, something not possible before with the GliaSite applicator.

  2. Salvage/Adjuvant Brachytherapy After Ophthalmic Artery Chemosurgery for Intraocular Retinoblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, Jasmine H.; Barker, Christopher A.; Wolden, Suzanne L.; McCormick, Beryl; Segal, Kira; Cohen, Gil; Gobin, Y. Pierre; Marr, Brian P.; Brodie, Scott E.; Dunkel, Ira J.; Abramson, David H.

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of brachytherapy after ophthalmic artery chemosurgery (OAC) for retinoblastoma. Methods and Materials: This was a single-arm, retrospective study of 15 eyes in 15 patients treated with OAC followed by brachytherapy at (blinded institution) between May 1, 2006, and December 31, 2012, with a median 19 months' follow-up from plaque insertion. Outcome measurements included patient and ocular survival, visual function, and retinal toxicity measured by electroretinogram (ERG). Results: Brachytherapy was used as adjuvant treatment in 2 eyes and as salvage therapy in 13 eyes of which 12 had localized vitreous seeding. No patients developed metastasis or died of retinoblastoma. The Kaplan-Meier estimate of ocular survival was 79.4% (95% confidence interval 48.7%-92.8%) at 18 months. Three eyes were enucleated, and an additional 6 eyes developed out-of-target volume recurrences, which were controlled with additional treatments. Patients with an ocular complication had a mean interval between last OAC and plaque of 2.5 months (SD 2.3 months), which was statistically less (P=.045) than patients without ocular complication who had a mean interval between last OAC and plaque of 6.5 months (SD 4.4 months). ERG responses from pre- versus postplaque were unchanged or improved in more than half the eyes. Conclusions: Brachytherapy following OAC is effective, even in the presence of vitreous seeding; the majority of eyes maintained stable or improved retinal function following treatment, as assessed by ERG.

  3. Clinical practice and quality assurance challenges in modern brachytherapy sources and dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Butler, Wayne M; Merrick, Gregory S

    2008-01-01

    Modern brachytherapy has led to effective treatments through the establishment of broadly applicable dosimetric thresholds for maximizing survival with minimal morbidity. Proper implementation of recent dosimetric consensus statements and quality assurance procedures is necessary to maintain the established level of safety and efficacy. This review classifies issues as either "systematic" or "stochastic" in terms of their impact on large groups or individual patients, respectively. Systematic changes affecting large numbers of patients occur infrequently and include changes in source dosimetric parameters, prescribing practice, dose calculation formalism, and improvements in calculation algorithms. The physicist must be aware of how incipient changes accord with previous experience. Stochastic issues involve procedures that are applied to each patient individually. Although ample guidance for quality assurance of brachytherapy sources exists, some ambiguities remain. The latest American Association of Physicists in Medicine guidance clarifies what is meant by independent assay, changes source sampling recommendations, particularly for sources in sterile strands and sterile preassembled needles, and modifies action level thresholds. The changing environment of brachytherapy has not changed the fact that the prime responsibility for quality assurance in brachytherapy lies with the institutional medical physicist.

  4. Late rectal complications after prostate brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer: incidence and management.

    PubMed

    Phan, Jack; Swanson, David A; Levy, Lawrence B; Kudchadker, Rajat J; Bruno, Teresa L; Frank, Steven J

    2009-05-01

    This review of the literature on late rectal complications after prostate brachytherapy indicated that it is a highly effective treatment modality for patients with clinically localized prostate cancer but can cause chronic radiation proctitis. The most common manifestation of chronic radiation proctitis was anterior rectal wall bleeding, which often occurred within the first 2 years after brachytherapy. It is interesting to note that the rates of late rectal morbidity appear to have declined over time, which may reflect improvements in implantation techniques and imaging. Rectal biopsy as part of the workup to evaluate rectal bleeding can lead to rectal fistula and the need for colostomy, a rare but major complication. The authors recommend 1) screening colonoscopy before brachytherapy for patients who have not had a screening colonoscopy within the preceding 3 years to rule out colorectal malignancies and, thus, facilitate conservative management should rectal bleeding occur; 2) lifestyle modifications during treatment to limit exposure of the rectum to radiation; and 3) conservative management for rectal bleeding that occurs within 2 years after brachytherapy. Cancer 2009. (c) 2009 American Cancer Society.

  5. Validation of K-edge 125I brachytherapy enhancement with silver compounds.

    PubMed

    Young, L A; Phillips, M H; Nelson, J A

    1999-08-01

    Brachytherapy with radioactive seeds implanted within the tumour volume has demonstrated good success rates in treating certain cancers. In an effort to improve the curative rates in cancer patients, ongoing research is being conducted to enhance the amount of radiation dose that is absorbed within the tumour volume while minimizing the dose absorbed by the surrounding normal tissue. One method for enhancing tumour dose absorption with 125I brachytherapy seeds is to increase the number of photoelectric atomic interactions within the tumour volume by introducing small quantities of a silver compound, taking advantage of the K-edge effect. Because low-energy electrons and Auger electrons are the primary sources of brachytherapy dose enhancement, acquiring accurate experimental measurements of absorbed dose increases is a major challenge. To circumvent this problem, an x ray fluorescence excitation spectroscopy dosimetry technique supplemented with clinically accepted dosimetry calculations was developed to estimate relative absorbed dose increases in a water phantom containing up to 7.5 mM of silver. Excellent agreement was observed between theoretically derived Monte Carlo dosimetric predictions and experimental measurements. These results successfully demonstrated that K-edge enhanced 125I brachytherapy is indeed possible with future development of a non-toxic silver chelate.

  6. Intraluminal brachytherapy in oesophageal cancer: defining its role and introducing the technique

    PubMed Central

    Strnad, Vratislav

    2014-01-01

    Intraluminal brachytherapy plays an important role in the treatment of oesophageal tumours. This article aims to define this role in the curative as well as in the palliative treatment settings drawing on data from the literature, and also emphasizing its potential for harm when used inexpertly. It also provides a short introduction to practical aspects of the treatment procedure and treatment planning. PMID:25097567

  7. Modeling a Hypothetical {sup 170}Tm Source for Brachytherapy Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Enger, Shirin A.; D'Amours, Michel; Beaulieu, Luc

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: To perform absorbed dose calculations based on Monte Carlo simulations for a hypothetical {sup 170}Tm source and to investigate the influence of encapsulating material on the energy spectrum of the emitted electrons and photons. Methods: GEANT4 Monte Carlo code version 9.2 patch 2 was used to simulate the decay process of {sup 170}Tm and to calculate the absorbed dose distribution using the GEANT4 Penelope physics models. A hypothetical {sup 170}Tm source based on the Flexisource brachytherapy design with the active core set as a pure thulium cylinder (length 3.5 mm and diameter 0.6 mm) and different cylindrical source encapsulations (length 5 mm and thickness 0.125 mm) constructed of titanium, stainless-steel, gold, or platinum were simulated. The radial dose function for the line source approximation was calculated following the TG-43U1 formalism for the stainless-steel encapsulation. Results: For the titanium and stainless-steel encapsulation, 94% of the total bremsstrahlung is produced inside the core, 4.8 and 5.5% in titanium and stainless-steel capsules, respectively, and less than 1% in water. For the gold capsule, 85% is produced inside the core, 14.2% inside the gold capsule, and a negligible amount (<1%) in water. Platinum encapsulation resulted in bremsstrahlung effects similar to those with the gold encapsulation. The range of the beta particles decreases by 1.1 mm with the stainless-steel encapsulation compared to the bare source but the tissue will still receive dose from the beta particles several millimeters from the source capsule. The gold and platinum capsules not only absorb most of the electrons but also attenuate low energy photons. The mean energy of the photons escaping the core and the stainless-steel capsule is 113 keV while for the gold and platinum the mean energy is 160 keV and 165 keV, respectively. Conclusions: A {sup 170}Tm source is primarily a bremsstrahlung source, with the majority of bremsstrahlung photons being

  8. Brachytherapy Application With In Situ Dose Painting Administered by Gold Nanoparticle Eluters

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, Neeharika; Cifter, Gizem; Sajo, Erno; Kumar, Rajiv; Sridhar, Srinivas; Nguyen, Paul L.; Cormack, Robert A.; Makrigiorgos, G. Mike; Ngwa, Wilfred

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: Recent studies show promise that administering gold nanoparticles (GNP) to tumor cells during brachytherapy could significantly enhance radiation damage to the tumor. A new strategy proposed for sustained administration of the GNP in prostate tumors is to load them into routinely used brachytherapy spacers for customizable in situ release after implantation. This in silico study investigated the intratumor biodistribution and corresponding dose enhancement over time due to GNP released from such GNP-loaded brachytherapy spacers (GBS). Method and Materials: An experimentally determined intratumoral diffusion coefficient (D) for 10-nm nanoparticles was used to estimate D for other sizes by using the Stokes-Einstein equation. GNP concentration profiles, obtained using D, were then used to calculate the corresponding dose enhancement factor (DEF) for each tumor voxel, using dose painting-by-numbers approach, for times relevant to the considered brachytherapy sources' lifetimes. The investigation was carried out as a function of GNP size for the clinically applicable low-dose-rate brachytherapy sources iodine-125 (I-125), palladium-103 (Pd-103), and cesium-131 (Cs-131). Results: Results showed that dose enhancement to tumor voxels and subvolumes during brachytherapy can be customized by varying the size of GNP released or eluted from the GBS. For example, using a concentration of 7 mg/g GNP, significant DEF (>20%) could be achieved 5 mm from a GBS after 5, 12, 25, 46, 72, 120, and 195 days, respectively, for GNP sizes of 2, 5, 10, 20, 30, and 50 nm and for 80 nm when treating with I-125. Conclusions: Analyses showed that using Cs-131 provides the highest dose enhancement to tumor voxels. However, given its relatively longer half-life, I-125 presents the most flexibility for customizing the dose enhancement as a function of GNP size. These findings provide a useful reference for further work toward development of potential new brachytherapy application with

  9. Dosimetric Parameters in Partial Breast Irradiation Through Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Gloi, Aime McCourt, Steve; Buchanan, Robert; Goetller, Andrea; Zuge, Corrie; Balzoa, Paula; Cooley, Greg

    2009-10-01

    The objective of this work is to evaluate biological models and dose homogeneity in a new partial breast irradiation method, the MammoSite RTS. The study is based on 11 patients who received the therapy. For each patient, we determined the dose volume distribution delivered to the breast. Based on these data, we estimate some important biological parameters. Eleven patients with early-stage, invasive, ductal breast cancer were treated using MammoSite RTS brachytherapy, which delivers radiation through a balloon placed in the lumpectomy bed. The radiation was provided by an Iridium-192 source, and 340 cGy were delivered per fraction twice daily. We calculated some commonly used dosimetric parameters, and evaluated the biological parameters tumor control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). We also looked for correlations among these parameters. The average equivalent uniform dose (EUD), NTCP, and TCP were 43.66 Gy, 47.95%, and 91.78%, respectively. The coefficient of variation (CV) among the patients was very low for all 3 parameters. Two dose homogeneity indices (DHI and the S-index) are strongly correlated (r = -0.815). The area under the dose-volume histogram (DVH) and the treatment volume (TXV) also showed a strong correlation (r = 0.995, p < 0.0001). A simplified logit Poisson-EUD model is suitable for determining NTCP and TCP. Other factors such as the area under the DVH and dose homogeneity indices are also useful in planning radiotherapy treatments for early breast cancer.

  10. Localization of brachytherapy seeds in ultrasound by registration to fluoroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallavollita, P.; KarimAghaloo, Z.; Burdette, E. C.; Song, D. Y.; Abolmaesumi, P.; Fichtinger, G.

    2010-02-01

    Motivation: In prostate brachytherapy, transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) is used to visualize the anatomy, while implanted seeds can be seen in C-arm fluoroscopy or CT. Intra-operative dosimetry optimization requires localization of the implants in TRUS relative to the anatomy. This could be achieved by registration of TRUS images and the implants reconstructed from fluoroscopy or CT. Methods: TRUS images are filtered, compounded, and registered on the reconstructed implants by using an intensity-based metric based on a 3D point-to-volume registration scheme. A phantom was implanted with 48 seeds, imaged with TRUS and CT/X-ray. Ground-truth registration was established between the two. Seeds were reconstructed from CT/X-ray. Seven TRUS filtering techniques and two image similarity metrics were analyzed as well. Results: For point-to-volume registration, noise reduction combined with beam profile filter and mean squares metrics yielded the best result: an average of 0.38 +/- 0.19 mm seed localization error relative to the ground-truth. In human patient data C-arm fluoroscopy images showed 81 radioactive seeds implanted inside the prostate. A qualitative analysis showed clinically correct agreement between the seeds visible in TRUS and reconstructed from intra-operative fluoroscopy imaging. The measured registration error compared to the manually selected seed locations by the clinician was 2.86 +/- 1.26 mm. Conclusion: Fully automated seed localization in TRUS performed excellently on ground-truth phantom, adequate in clinical data and was time efficient having an average runtime of 90 seconds.

  11. SU-E-J-263: Dosimetric Analysis On Breast Brachytherapy Based On Deformable Image Registration

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, T; Nie, K; Narra, V; Zou, J; Zhang, M; Khan, A; Haffty, B; Yue, N

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To quantitatively compare and evaluate the dosimetry difference between breast brachytherapy protocols with different fractionation using deformable image registration. Methods: The accumulative dose distribution for multiple breast brachytherapy patients using four different applicators: Contura, Mammosite, Savi, and interstitial catheters, under two treatment protocols: 340cGy by 10 fractions in 5 days and 825cGy by 3 fractions in 2days has been reconstructed using a two stage deformable image registration approach. For all patients, daily CT was acquired with the same slice thickness (2.5mm). In the first stage, the daily CT images were rigidly registered to the initial planning CT using the registration module in Eclipse (Varian) to align the applicators. In the second stage, the tissues surrounding the applicator in the rigidly registered daily CT image were non-rigidly registered to the initial CT using a combination of image force and the local constraint that enforce zero normal motion on the surface of the applicator, using a software developed in house. We calculated the dose distribution in the daily CTs and deformed them using the final registration to convert into the image domain of the initial planning CT. The accumulative dose distributions were evaluated by dosimetry parameters including D90, V150 and V200, as well as DVH. Results: Dose reconstruction results showed that the two day treatment has a significant dosimetry improvement over the five day protocols. An average daily drop of D90 at 1.3% of the prescription dose has been observed on multiple brachytherapy patients. There is no significant difference on V150 and V200 between those two protocols. Conclusion: Brachytherapy with higher fractional dose and less fractions has an improved performance on being conformal to the dose distribution in the initial plan. Elongated brachytherapy treatments need to consider the dose uncertainty caused by the temporal changes of the soft tissue.

  12. Ejaculatory Function After Permanent {sup 125}I Prostate Brachytherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Huyghe, Eric Delannes, Martine; Wagner, Fabien M.; Delaunay, Boris; Nohra, Joe; Thoulouzan, Matthieu; Shut-Yee, J. Yeung; Plante, Pierre; Soulie, Michel; Thonneau, Patrick; Bachaud, Jean Marc

    2009-05-01

    Purpose: Ejaculatory function is an underreported aspect of male sexuality in men treated for prostate cancer. We conducted the first detailed analysis of ejaculatory function in patients treated with permanent {sup 125}I prostate brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer. Patients and Methods: Of 270 sexually active men with localized prostate cancer treated with permanent {sup 125}I prostate brachytherapy, 241 (89%), with a mean age of 65 years (range, 43-80), responded to a mailed questionnaire derived from the Male Sexual Health Questionnaire regarding ejaculatory function. Five aspects of ejaculatory function were examined: frequency, volume, dry ejaculation, pleasure, and pain. Results: Of the 241 sexually active men, 81.3% had conserved ejaculatory function after prostate brachytherapy; however, the number of patients with rare/absent ejaculatory function was double the pretreatment number (p < .0001). The latter finding was correlated with age (p < .001) and the preimplant International Index of Erectile Function score (p < .001). However, 84.9% of patients with maintained ejaculatory function after implantation reported a reduced volume of ejaculate compared with 26.9% before (p < .001), with dry ejaculation accounting for 18.7% of these cases. After treatment, 30.3% of the patients experienced painful ejaculation compared with 12.9% before (p = .0001), and this was associated with a greater number of implanted needles (p = .021) and the existence of painful ejaculation before implantation (p < .0001). After implantation, 10% of patients who continued to be sexually active experienced no orgasm compared with only 1% before treatment. in addition, more patients experienced late/difficult or weak orgasms (p = .001). Conclusion: Most men treated with brachytherapy have conserved ejaculatory function after prostate brachytherapy. However, most of these men experience a reduction in volume and a deterioration in orgasm.

  13. On the Development of a Miniature Neutron Generator for the Brachytherapy Treatment of Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forman, L.

    2009-03-01

    Brachytherapy refers to application of an irradiation source within a tumor. 252Cf needles used in brachytherapy have been successfully applied to treatment of some of the most virulent cancers but it is doubtful that it will be widely used because of difficulty in dealing with unwanted dose (source cannot be turned off) and in adhering to stringent NRC regulations that have been exacerbated in our post 911 environment. We have been working on the development of a miniature neutron generator with the reaction target placed at the end of a needle (tube) for brachytherapy applications. Orifice geometries are most amenable, e.g. rectum and cervix, but interstitial use is possible with microsurgery. This paper dicusses the results of a 30 watt DD neutron generator SBU project that demonstrates that sufficient hydrogen isotope current can be delivered down a small diameter needle required for a DT neutron treatment device, and, will summarize the progress of building a commercial device pursued by the All Russian Institute for Automatics (VNIIA) supported by the DOE's Industrial Proliferation Prevention Program (IPP). It is known that most of the fast neutron (FN) beam cancer treatment facilities have been closed down. It appears that the major limitation in the use of FN beams has been damage to healthy tissue, which is relatively insensitive to photons, but this problem is alleviated by brachytherapy. Moreover, recent clinical results indicate that fast neutrons in the boost mode are most highly effective in treating large, hypoxic, and rapidly repopulating diseases. It appears that early boost application of FN may halt angiogenesis (development and repair of tumor vascular system) and shrink the tumor resulting in lower hypoxia. The boost brachytherapy application of a small, low cost neutron generator holds promise of significant contribution to the treatment of cancer.

  14. High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for the treatment of benign obstructive endobronchial granulation tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Madu, Chika N. . E-mail: chikam@xrt.upenn.edu; Machuzak, Michael S.; Sterman, Daniel H.; Musani, Ali; Ahya, Vivek; McDonough, James; Metz, James M.

    2006-12-01

    Background: Severe airway obstruction can occur in the setting of benign granulation tissue forming at bronchial anastomotic sites after lung transplantation in up to 20% of patients. Many of these benign lesions respond to stent placement, laser ablation, or balloon bronchoplasty. However, in certain cases, proliferation of granulation tissue may persist despite all therapeutic attempts. This study describes a series of refractory patients treated with high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for benign proliferation of granulation tissue, causing airway compromise. Methods and Materials: Between April 2002 and June 2005, 5 patients with significant airway compromise from recurrent granulation tissue were treated with HDR brachytherapy. All patients had previously failed to maintain a patent airway despite multiple bronchoscopic interventions. Treatment was delivered using an HDR brachytherapy afterloader with {sup 192}Ir. Dose prescription was to a depth of 1 cm. All patients were treated weekly, with total doses ranging from 10 Gy to 21 Gy in two to three fractions. Results: The median follow-up was 12 months. All patients experienced a reduction in therapeutic bronchoscopic procedures after HDR brachytherapy compared with the pretreatment period. With the exception of possible radiation-induced bronchitis in 1 patient, there were no other treatment related complications. At the time of this report, 2 patients have died and the other 3 are alive with marked symptomatic improvement and reduced bronchoscopic procedures. Conclusion: High-dose-rate brachytherapy is an effective treatment for benign proliferation of granulation tissue causing airway obstruction. The early response to therapy is encouraging and further follow-up is necessary to determine long-term durability and late effects.

  15. EM-navigated catheter placement for gynecologic brachytherapy: an accuracy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrtash, Alireza; Damato, Antonio; Pernelle, Guillaume; Barber, Lauren; Farhat, Nabgha; Viswanathan, Akila; Cormack, Robert; Kapur, Tina

    2014-03-01

    Gynecologic malignancies, including cervical, endometrial, ovarian, vaginal and vulvar cancers, cause significant mortality in women worldwide. The standard care for many primary and recurrent gynecologic cancers consists of chemoradiation followed by brachytherapy. In high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy, intracavitary applicators and /or interstitial needles are placed directly inside the cancerous tissue so as to provide catheters to deliver high doses of radiation. Although technology for the navigation of catheters and needles is well developed for procedures such as prostate biopsy, brain biopsy, and cardiac ablation, it is notably lacking for gynecologic HDR brachytherapy. Using a benchtop study that closely mimics the clinical interstitial gynecologic brachytherapy procedure, we developed a method for evaluating the accuracy of image-guided catheter placement. Future bedside translation of this technology offers the potential benefit of maximizing tumor coverage during catheter placement while avoiding damage to the adjacent organs, for example bladder, rectum and bowel. In the study, two independent experiments were performed on a phantom model to evaluate the targeting accuracy of an electromagnetic (EM) tracking system. The procedure was carried out using a laptop computer (2.1GHz Intel Core i7 computer, 8GB RAM, Windows 7 64-bit), an EM Aurora tracking system with a 1.3mm diameter 6 DOF sensor, and 6F (2 mm) brachytherapy catheters inserted through a Syed-Neblett applicator. The 3D Slicer and PLUS open source software were used to develop the system. The mean of the targeting error was less than 2.9mm, which is comparable to the targeting errors in commercial clinical navigation systems.

  16. EM-Navigated Catheter Placement for Gynecologic Brachytherapy: An Accuracy Study

    PubMed Central

    Mehrtash, Alireza; Damato, Antonio; Pernelle, Guillaume; Barber, Lauren; Farhat, Nabgha; Viswanathan, Akila; Cormack, Robert; Kapur, Tina

    2014-01-01

    Gynecologic malignancies, including cervical, endometrial, ovarian, vaginal and vulvar cancers, cause significant mortality in women worldwide. The standard care for many primary and recurrent gynecologic cancers consists of chemoradiation followed by brachytherapy. In high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy, intracavitary applicators and/or interstitial needles are placed directly inside the cancerous tissue so as to provide catheters to deliver high doses of radiation. Although technology for the navigation of catheters and needles is well developed for procedures such as prostate biopsy, brain biopsy, and cardiac ablation, it is notably lacking for gynecologic HDR brachytherapy. Using a benchtop study that closely mimics the clinical interstitial gynecologic brachytherapy procedure, we developed a method for evaluating the accuracy of image-guided catheter placement. Future bedside translation of this technology offers the potential benefit of maximizing tumor coverage during catheter placement while avoiding damage to the adjacent organs, for example bladder, rectum and bowel. In the study, two independent experiments were performed on a phantom model to evaluate the targeting accuracy of an electromagnetic (EM) tracking system. The procedure was carried out using a laptop computer (2.1GHz Intel Core i7 computer, 8GB RAM, Windows 7 64-bit), an EM Aurora tracking system with a 1.3mm diameter 6 DOF sensor, and 6F (2 mm) brachytherapy catheters inserted through a Syed-Neblett applicator. The 3D Slicer and PLUS open source software were used to develop the system. The mean of the targeting error was less than 2.9mm, which is comparable to the targeting errors in commercial clinical navigation systems. PMID:25076828

  17. Chemoradiation and brachytherapy in biliary tract carcinoma: Long-term results

    SciTech Connect

    Deodato, Francesco . E-mail: fdeodato@rm.unicatt.it; Clemente, Gennaro; Mattiucci, Gian Carlo; Macchia, Gabriella; Costamagna, Guido; Giuliante, Felice; Smaniotto, Daniela; Luzi, Stefano; Valentini, Vincenzo; Mutignani, Massimiliano; Nuzzo, Gennaro; Cellini, Numa; Morganti, Alessio G.

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate long-term effects of chemoradiation and intraluminal brachytherapy in terms of local control, disease-free survival, overall survival, and symptom relief in patients with unresectable or residual extrahepatic biliary carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Twenty-two patients with unresectable (17 patients) or residual (5 patients) nonmetastatic extrahepatic bile tumors received external beam radiation therapy (39.6-50.4 Gy) between 1991 and 1997. In 21 patients, 5-fluorouracil (96-h continuous infusion, Days 1-4, 1,000 mg/m{sup 2}/day) was administered. Twelve patients received a boost of intraluminal brachytherapy with {sup 192}Ir wires (30-50 Gy) 1 cm from the source axis. Results: During external beam radiotherapy, 10 patients (45.4%) developed Grade 1 to 2 gastrointestinal toxicity. In patients with unresectable tumor who could be evaluated, the clinical response was 28.6% (4 of 14). Two patients showed complete response. In all 22 patients, median durations of local control, disease-free survival, and overall survival were 44.5 months, 16.3 months, and 23.0 months, respectively. Two patients who received external beam radiation therapy and intraluminal brachytherapy developed late duodenal ulceration. In patients with unresectable tumors, median survival was 13.0 months and 22.0 months in those treated with and without brachytherapy, with 16.7% and no 5-year survival, respectively (p = 0.607). Overall 5-year survival was 18.0%: 40% and 11.7% in patients treated with partial resection and in those with unresectable tumor, respectively (p = 0.135). Conclusion: This study confirmed the role of concurrent chemoradiation in advanced biliary carcinoma; the role of intraluminal brachytherapy boost remains to be further analyzed in larger clinical trials.

  18. Focal partial salvage low-dose-rate brachytherapy for local recurrent prostate cancer after permanent prostate brachytherapy with a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Wakumoto, Yoshiaki; Yamaguchi, Nanae; Horie, Shigeo; Sasai, Keisuke

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the treatment results for focal partial salvage re-implantation against local recurrence after permanent prostate brachytherapy. Material and methods Between January 2010 and September 2015, 12 patients were treated with focal partial salvage re-implantation for local recurrence after low-dose-rate brachytherapy using 125I seeds. The focal clinical target volume (F-CTV) was delineated on positive biopsy areas in a mapping biopsy, combining the cold spots on the post-implant dosimetry for initial brachytherapy. The F-CTV was expanded by 3 mm to create the planning target volume (PTV) as a margin to compensate for uncertainties in image registration and treatment delivery. The prescribed dose to the PTV was 145 Gy. The characteristics and biochemical disease-free survival (BdFS) rates were analyzed. Genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities were evaluated using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4. Results The median prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level at re-implantation was 4.09 ng/ml (range: 2.91-8.24 ng/ml). The median follow-up time was 56 months (range: 6-74 months). The median RD2cc and UD10 were 63 Gy and 159 Gy, respectively. The 4-year BdFS rate was 78%, which included non-responders. Biochemical recurrence occurred in two patients after 7 and 31 months, respectively. The former was treated with hormonal therapy after biochemical failure, and the latter underwent watchful waiting (PSA at the last follow-up of 53 months: 7.3 ng/ml) at the patient's request. No patients had grade 3 GU/GI toxicities or died after salvage re-implantation. Conclusions The partial salvage low-dose-rate brachytherapy used to treat local recurrence after permanent prostate brachytherapy is well-tolerated, with high biochemical response rates. This treatment can be not only a method to delay chemical castration but also a curative treatment option in cases of local recurrence of prostate carcinoma after seed implantation

  19. High Intensity Focused Ultrasound versus Brachytherapy for the Treatment of Localized Prostate Cancer: A Matched-Pair Analysis.

    PubMed

    Aoun, Fouad; Limani, Ksenija; Peltier, Alexandre; Marcelis, Quentin; Zanaty, Marc; Chamoun, Alexandre; Vanden Bossche, Marc; Roumeguère, Thierry; van Velthoven, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate postoperative morbidity and long term oncologic and functional outcomes of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) compared to brachytherapy for the treatment of localized prostate cancer. Material and Methods. Patients treated by brachytherapy were matched 1 : 1 with patients who underwent HIFU. Differences in postoperative complications across the two groups were assessed using Wilcoxon's rank-sum or χ (2) test. Kaplan-Meier curves, log-rank tests, and Cox regression models were constructed to assess differences in survival rates between the two groups. Results. Brachytherapy was significantly associated with lower voiding LUTS and less frequent acute urinary retention (p < 0.05). Median oncologic follow-up was 83 months (13-123 months) in the HIFU cohort and 44 months (13-89 months) in the brachytherapy cohort. Median time to achieve PSA nadir was statistically shorter in the HIFU. Biochemical recurrence-free survival rate was significantly higher in the brachytherapy cohort compared to HIFU cohort (68.5% versus 53%, p < 0.05). No statistically significant difference in metastasis-free, cancer specific, and overall survivals was observed between the two groups. Conclusion. HIFU and brachytherapy are safe with no significant difference in cancer specific survival on long term oncologic follow-up. Nonetheless, a randomized controlled trial is needed to confirm these results. PMID:26357511

  20. Technical Note: Contrast solution density and cross section errors in inhomogeneity-corrected dose calculation for breast balloon brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Leonard H.; Zhang Miao; Howell, Roger W.; Yue, Ning J.; Khan, Atif J.

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: Recent recommendations by the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group 186 emphasize the importance of understanding material properties and their effect on inhomogeneity-corrected dose calculation for brachytherapy. Radiographic contrast is normally injected into breast brachytherapy balloons. In this study, the authors independently estimate properties of contrast solution that were expected to be incorrectly specified in a commercial brachytherapy dose calculation algorithm. Methods: The mass density and atomic weight fractions of a clinical formulation of radiographic contrast solution were determined using manufacturers' data. The mass density was verified through measurement and compared with the density obtained by the treatment planning system's CT calibration. The atomic weight fractions were used to determine the photon interaction cross section of the contrast solution for a commercial high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy source and compared with that of muscle. Results: The density of contrast solution was 10% less than that obtained from the CT calibration. The cross section of the contrast solution for the HDR source was 1.2% greater than that of muscle. Both errors could be addressed by overriding the density of the contrast solution in the treatment planning system. Conclusions: The authors estimate the error in mass density and cross section parameters used by a commercial brachytherapy dose calculation algorithm for radiographic contrast used in a clinical breast brachytherapy practice. This approach is adaptable to other clinics seeking to evaluate dose calculation errors and determine appropriate density override values if desired.

  1. High Intensity Focused Ultrasound versus Brachytherapy for the Treatment of Localized Prostate Cancer: A Matched-Pair Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Aoun, Fouad; Limani, Ksenija; Peltier, Alexandre; Marcelis, Quentin; Zanaty, Marc; Chamoun, Alexandre; Vanden Bossche, Marc; Roumeguère, Thierry; van Velthoven, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate postoperative morbidity and long term oncologic and functional outcomes of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) compared to brachytherapy for the treatment of localized prostate cancer. Material and Methods. Patients treated by brachytherapy were matched 1 : 1 with patients who underwent HIFU. Differences in postoperative complications across the two groups were assessed using Wilcoxon's rank-sum or χ2 test. Kaplan-Meier curves, log-rank tests, and Cox regression models were constructed to assess differences in survival rates between the two groups. Results. Brachytherapy was significantly associated with lower voiding LUTS and less frequent acute urinary retention (p < 0.05). Median oncologic follow-up was 83 months (13–123 months) in the HIFU cohort and 44 months (13–89 months) in the brachytherapy cohort. Median time to achieve PSA nadir was statistically shorter in the HIFU. Biochemical recurrence-free survival rate was significantly higher in the brachytherapy cohort compared to HIFU cohort (68.5% versus 53%, p < 0.05). No statistically significant difference in metastasis-free, cancer specific, and overall survivals was observed between the two groups. Conclusion. HIFU and brachytherapy are safe with no significant difference in cancer specific survival on long term oncologic follow-up. Nonetheless, a randomized controlled trial is needed to confirm these results. PMID:26357511

  2. Source localisation and dose verification for a novel brachytherapy unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metaxas, Marinos G.

    A recent development in the field of radiotherapy has been the introduction of the PRS Intrabeam system (Carl Zeiss Surgical GmbH, Oberkochen, Germany). This is essentially a portable, miniaturised, electron-driven photon generator that allows high intensity, soft-energy x-rays (50 kVp) to be delivered directly to the tumour site in a single fraction. The system has been used for the interstitial radiation treatment of both brain and breast tumours. At present, a standardised in-vivo dose verification technique is not available for the PRS treatments. The isotropical distribution of photons about the tip of the PRS probe inserted in the tissue can effectively be viewed as a point source of radiation buried in the body. This work has looked into ways of localising the PRS source utilising its own radiation field. Moreover, the response of monoenergetic sources, mimicking realistic brachytherapy sources, has also been investigated. The purpose of this project was to attempt to localise the source as well as derive important dosimetric information from the resulting image. A detection system comprised of a well-collimated Germanium detector (HPGe) has been devised in a rotate-translate Emission Computed Tomography (ECT) modality. The superior energy resolving ability of the detection system allowed for energy selective reconstruction to be carried out in the case of the monoenergetic source (241Am). Results showed that the monoenergetic source can be localised to within 1 mm and the continuous PRS x-ray source to within 3mm. For the PRS dose map derivation, Monte Carlo studies have been employed in order to extract information on the dosimetric aspect of the resulting image. The final goal of this work was therefore to formulate a direct mathematical relation (Transform Map) between the image created by the escaping photons and the dose map as predicted by the theoretical model. The formation therefore of the in-vivo PRS image could allow for a real-time monitoring

  3. Determination of the prescription dose for biradionuclide permanent prostate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nuttens, V. E.; Lucas, S.

    2008-12-15

    A model based on the linear quadratic model that has been corrected for repopulation, sublethal cell damage repair, and RBE effect has been used to determine the prescription dose for prostate permanent brachytherapy using seeds loaded with a mixture of {sup 103}Pd and {sup 125}I or a mixture of {sup 103}Pd and {sup 131}Cs. The prescription dose was determined by comparing the tumor cell survival fractions between the considered biradionuclide seed implant and one monoradionuclide seed implant chosen from {sup 103}Pd, {sup 125}I, and {sup 131}Cs. Prostate edema is included in the model. The influence of the value of the radiobiological parameters and RBE were also investigated. Two mixtures of radionuclides were considered: {sup 103}Pd{sub 0.75}-{sup 125}I{sub 0.25} and {sup 103}Pd{sub 0.25}-{sup 131}Cs{sub 0.75}, where the subscripts indicate the fractions of total initial internal activity in the biradionuclide seed. These fractions were selected in order to obtain a dose distribution that lies between that of {sup 103}Pd and {sup 125}I/{sup 131}Cs. As expected, the computed prescription dose values are dependent on the model parameters (edema half-life and magnitude, radiobiogical parameters, and RBE). The radionuclide used as a benchmark also has a strong impact on the derived prescribed dose. The large uncertainties in the radiobiological parameters and RBE values produce big errors in the computed prescribed dose. Averaged over the range of all the parameters and depending on the radionuclide used as a benchmark (in subscript), the derived prescription dose for the first mixture (PdI) would be: D{sub Pd}{sup PdI}=142{sub -16}{sup +15} Gy and D{sub I}{sup PdI}=142{sub -8}{sup +6} Gy; and D{sub Pd}{sup PdCs}=128{sub -13}{sup +13} Gy and D{sub Cs}{sup PdCs}=115{sub -7}{sup +6} Gy for the PdCs mixture. The uncertainties could be reduced if the radiobiological parameters and RBE value were known more accurately. However, as edema characteristics are patient

  4. An investigation of a PRESAGE® in vivo dosimeter for brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidovic, A. K.; Juang, T.; Meltsner, S.; Adamovics, J.; Chino, J.; Steffey, B.; Craciunescu, O.; Oldham, M.

    2014-07-01

    Determining accurate in vivo dosimetry in brachytherapy treatment with high dose gradients is challenging. Here we introduce, investigate, and characterize a novel in vivo dosimeter and readout technique with the potential to address this problem. A cylindrical (4 mm × 20 mm) tissue equivalent radiochromic dosimeter PRESAGE® in vivo (PRESAGE®-IV) is investigated. Two readout methods of the radiation induced change in optical density (OD) were investigated: (i) volume-averaged readout by spectrophotometer, and (ii) a line profile readout by 2D projection imaging utilizing a high-resolution (50 micron) telecentric optical system. Method (i) is considered the gold standard when applied to PRESAGE® in optical cuvettes. The feasibility of both methods was evaluated by comparison to standard measurements on PRESAGE® in optical cuvettes via spectrophotometer. An end-to-end feasibility study was performed by a side-by-side comparison with TLDs in an 192Ir HDR delivery. 7 and 8 Gy was delivered to PRESAGE®-IV and TLDs attached to the surface of a vaginal cylinder. Known geometry enabled direct comparison of measured dose with a commissioned treatment planning system. A high-resolution readout study under a steep dose gradient region showed 98.9% (5%/1 mm) agreement between PRESAGE®-IV and Gafchromic® EBT2 Film. Spectrometer measurements exhibited a linear dose response between 0-15 Gy with sensitivity of 0.0133 ± 0.0007 ΔOD/(Gy ṡ cm) at the 95% confidence interval. Method (ii) yielded a linear response with sensitivity of 0.0132 ± 0.0006 (ΔOD/Gy), within 2% of method (i). Method (i) has poor spatial resolution due to volume averaging. Method (ii) has higher resolution (˜1 mm) without loss of sensitivity or increased noise. Both readout methods are shown to be feasible. The end-to-end comparison revealed a 2.5% agreement between PRESAGE®-IV and treatment plan in regions of uniform high dose. PRESAGE®-IV shows promise for in vivo dose verification

  5. Comparison of seed loading approaches in prostate brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Butler, W M; Merrick, G S; Lief, J H; Dorsey, A T

    2000-02-01

    Since uniform seed loading in prostate brachytherapy can produce an intolerably high dose along the urethra, some form of peripheral loading is commonly employed. We define three variants of peripheral loading and compare them in a small, medium, and large prostate in terms of coverage of the planning target volume (PTV), homogeneity, and ability to spare critical structures of excessive dose. Modified uniform loading has at least 2/3 of the seeds occupying sites on a 1 cm cubic grid keyed to the prostate base and the posterior border of the prostate. Nonuniform loading explicitly spares the urethra by using only basal and apical seeds in at least two centrally located needles. Peripheral loading uses higher activity seeds with the posterior implant plane 5 mm anterior to the posterior border of the prostate. The three prostate volumes (18.7, 40.7, and 60.2 cm3 by ultrasound) were expanded to planning volumes (32.9, 60.0, and 87.8 cm3, respectively). The planning volumes (PTVs) were loaded with a 125I seed distribution and activity sufficient to cover 99.7+/-0.3% of the PTV with the prescribed minimal peripheral dose (mPD) of 145 Gy. Activities used ranged from 0.32 to 0.37 mCi/seed (0.41-0.47 U/seed) for the first two approaches and from 0.57 to 0.66 mCi (0.72-0.84 U) for peripheral loading. Modified uniform loading produced the most uniform distribution based on dose-volume histograms and the volume receiving >150% of prescribed dose. All the approaches are capable of constraining the superior-inferior dose profile (the urethral path) to less than 150% of the mPD, but the nonuniform approach with explicit urethral sparing kept the urethral dose below 120% of the mPD. Dose profiles for the three approaches along the posterior-anterior midline axis are comparable near the urethra, but peripheral and nonuniform approaches have extended regions where the dose is >150% of mPD. These regions approach within 10 mm of the rectum or urethra, so these two approaches

  6. Radiation dosimetry of a conformal heat-brachytherapy applicator.

    PubMed

    Taschereau, Richard; Stauffer, Paul R; Hsu, I-Chow; Schlorff, Jaime L; Milligan, Andrew J; Pouliot, Jean

    2004-08-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report the radiation dosimetric characteristics of a new combination applicator for delivering heat and radiation simultaneously to large area superficial disease <1.5 cm deep. The applicator combines an array of brachytherapy catheters (for radiation delivery) with a conformal printed circuit board microwave antenna array (for heat generation), and a body-conforming 5-10 mm thick temperature-controlled water bolus. The rationale for applying both modalities simultaneously includes the potential for significantly higher response rate due to enhanced synergism of modalities, and lower peak toxicity due to temporal extension of heat and radiation induced toxicities. Treatment plans and radiation dosimetry are calculated with IPSA (an optimization tool developed at UCSF) for 15 x 15 cm(2) and 35 x 24 cm(2) applicators, lesion thicknesses of 5 to 15 mm, flat and curved surfaces, and catheter separation of 5 and 10 mm. The effect on skin dose of bolus thickness and presence of thin copper antenna structures between radiation source and tissue are also evaluated. Results demonstrate the ability of the applicator to provide conformal radiation dose coverage for up to 15 mm deep target volumes under the applicator. For clinically acceptable plans, tumor coverage is > 98%, homogeneity index > 0.95 and the percentage of normal tissue irradiated is < 20%. The dose gradient at the skin surface varies from 3 to 5 cGy/mm depending on bolus thickness and lesion depth. Attenuation of the photon beam by the printed circuit antenna array is of the order 0.25% and secondary electron emissions are absorbed completely within 5 mm of water bolus and plastic layers. Both phenomena can then be neglected in dose calculations allowing commercial software to be used for treatment planning. This novel applicator should prove useful for the treatment of diffuse chestwall disease located over contoured anatomy that may be difficult to treat with single field

  7. Radiation dosimetry of a conformal heat-brachytherapy applicator.

    PubMed

    Taschereau, Richard; Stauffer, Paul R; Hsu, I-Chow; Schlorff, Jaime L; Milligan, Andrew J; Pouliot, Jean

    2004-08-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report the radiation dosimetric characteristics of a new combination applicator for delivering heat and radiation simultaneously to large area superficial disease <1.5 cm deep. The applicator combines an array of brachytherapy catheters (for radiation delivery) with a conformal printed circuit board microwave antenna array (for heat generation), and a body-conforming 5-10 mm thick temperature-controlled water bolus. The rationale for applying both modalities simultaneously includes the potential for significantly higher response rate due to enhanced synergism of modalities, and lower peak toxicity due to temporal extension of heat and radiation induced toxicities. Treatment plans and radiation dosimetry are calculated with IPSA (an optimization tool developed at UCSF) for 15 x 15 cm(2) and 35 x 24 cm(2) applicators, lesion thicknesses of 5 to 15 mm, flat and curved surfaces, and catheter separation of 5 and 10 mm. The effect on skin dose of bolus thickness and presence of thin copper antenna structures between radiation source and tissue are also evaluated. Results demonstrate the ability of the applicator to provide conformal radiation dose coverage for up to 15 mm deep target volumes under the applicator. For clinically acceptable plans, tumor coverage is > 98%, homogeneity index > 0.95 and the percentage of normal tissue irradiated is < 20%. The dose gradient at the skin surface varies from 3 to 5 cGy/mm depending on bolus thickness and lesion depth. Attenuation of the photon beam by the printed circuit antenna array is of the order 0.25% and secondary electron emissions are absorbed completely within 5 mm of water bolus and plastic layers. Both phenomena can then be neglected in dose calculations allowing commercial software to be used for treatment planning. This novel applicator should prove useful for the treatment of diffuse chestwall disease located over contoured anatomy that may be difficult to treat with single field

  8. Resin {sup 90}Y microsphere activity measurements for liver brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dezarn, William A.; Kennedy, Andrew S.

    2007-06-15

    The measurement of the radioactivity administered to the patient is one of the major components of {sup 90}Y microsphere liver brachytherapy. The activity of {sup 90}Y microspheres in a glass delivery vial was measured in a dose calibrator. The calibration value to use for {sup 90}Y in the dose calibrator was verified using an activity calibration standard provided by the microsphere manufacturer. This method allowed for the determination of a consistent, reproducible local activity standard. Additional measurements were made to determine some of the factors that could affect activity measurement. The axial response of the dose calibrator was determined by the ratio of activity measurements at the bottom and center of the dose calibrator. The axial response was 0.964 for a glass shipping vial, 1.001 for a glass V-vial, and 0.988 for a polycarbonate V-vial. Comparisons between activity measurements in the dose calibrator and those using a radiation survey meter were found to agree within 10%. It was determined that the dose calibrator method was superior to the survey meter method because the former allowed better defined measurement geometry and traceability of the activity standard back to the manufacturer. Part of the preparation of resin {sup 90}Y microspheres for patient delivery is to draw out a predetermined activity from a shipping vial and place it into a V-vial for delivery to the patient. If the drawn activity was placed in a glass V-vial, the activity measured in the dose calibrator with a glass V-vial was 4% higher than the drawn activity from the shipping vial standard. If the drawn activity was placed in a polycarbonate V-vial, the activity measured in the dose calibrator with a polycarbonate V-vial activity was 20% higher than the drawn activity from the shipping vial standard. Careful characterization of the local activity measurement standard is recommended instead of simply accepting the calibration value of the dose calibrator manufacturer.

  9. International Brachytherapy Practice Patterns: A Survey of the Gynecologic Cancer Intergroup (GCIG)

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, Akila N.; Creutzberg, Carien L.; Craighead, Peter; McCormack, Mary; Toita, Takafumi; Narayan, Kailash; Reed, Nicholas; Long, Harry; Kim, Hak-Jae; Marth, Christian; Lindegaard, Jacob C.; Cerrotta, Annmarie; Small, William; Trimble, Edward

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine current practice patterns with regard to gynecologic high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy among international members of the Gynecologic Cancer Intergroup (GCIG) in Japan/Korea (Asia), Australia/New Zealand (ANZ), Europe (E), and North America (NAm). Methods and Materials: A 32-item survey was developed requesting information on brachytherapy practice patterns and standard management for Stage IB-IVA cervical cancer. The chair of each GCIG member cooperative group selected radiation oncology members to receive the survey. Results: A total of 72 responses were analyzed; 61 respondents (85%) used HDR. The three most common HDR brachytherapy fractionation regimens for Stage IB-IIA patients were 6 Gy for five fractions (18%), 6 Gy for four fractions (15%), and 7 Gy for three fractions (11%); for Stage IIB-IVA patients they were 6 Gy for five fractions (19%), 7 Gy for four fractions (8%), and 7 Gy for three fractions (8%). Overall, the mean combined external-beam and brachytherapy equivalent dose (EQD2) was 81.1 (standard deviation [SD] 10.16). The mean EQD2 recommended for Stage IB-IIA patients was 78.9 Gy (SD 10.7) and for Stage IIB-IVA was 83.3 Gy (SD 11.2) (p = 0.02). By region, the mean combined EQD2 was as follows: Asia, 71.2 Gy (SD 12.65); ANZ, 81.18 (SD 4.96); E, 83.24 (SD 10.75); and NAm, 81.66 (SD, 6.05; p = 0.02 for Asia vs. other regions).The ratio of brachytherapy to total prescribed dose was significantly higher for Japan (p = 0.0002). Conclusion: Although fractionation patterns may vary, the overall mean doses administered for cervical cancer are similar in Australia/New Zealand, Europe, and North America, with practitioners in Japan administering a significantly lower external-beam dose but higher brachytherapy dose to the cervix. Given common goals, standardization should be possible in future clinical trials.

  10. Effect of edema, relative biological effectiveness, and dose heterogeneity on prostate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jian Z.; Mayr, Nina A.; Nag, Subir; Montebello, Joseph; Gupta, Nilendu; Samsami, Nina; Kanellitsas, Christos

    2006-04-15

    Many factors influence response in low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy of prostate cancer. Among them, edema, relative biological effectiveness (RBE), and dose heterogeneity have not been fully modeled previously. In this work, the generalized linear-quadratic (LQ) model, extended to account for the effects of edema, RBE, and dose heterogeneity, was used to assess these factors and their combination effect. Published clinical data have shown that prostate edema after seed implant has a magnitude (ratio of post- to preimplant volume) of 1.3-2.0 and resolves exponentially with a half-life of 4-25 days over the duration of the implant dose delivery. Based on these parameters and a representative dose-volume histogram (DVH), we investigated the influence of edema on the implant dose distribution. The LQ parameters ({alpha}=0.15 Gy{sup -1} and {alpha}/{beta}=3.1 Gy) determined in earlier studies were used to calculate the equivalent uniform dose in 2 Gy fractions (EUD{sub 2}) with respect to three effects: edema, RBE, and dose heterogeneity for {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd implants. The EUD{sub 2} analysis shows a negative effect of edema and dose heterogeneity on tumor cell killing because the prostate edema degrades the dose coverage to tumor target. For the representative DVH, the V{sub 100} (volume covered by 100% of prescription dose) decreases from 93% to 91% and 86%, and the D{sub 90} (dose covering 90% of target volume) decrease from 107% to 102% and 94% of prescription dose for {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd implants, respectively. Conversely, the RBE effect of LDR brachytherapy [versus external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy] enhances dose effect on tumor cell kill. In order to balance the negative effects of edema and dose heterogeneity, the RBE of prostate brachytherapy was determined to be approximately 1.2-1.4 for {sup 125}I and 1.3-1.6 for {sup 103}Pd implants. These RBE values are consistent with the RBE data published in the

  11. Surgical resection with adjuvant brachytherapy in soft tissue sarcoma of the extremity – a case report

    PubMed Central

    Łyczek, Jarosław; Kowalik, Łukasz

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Surgery is the major therapeutic method in soft tissue sarcomas of the extremity (E-STS). Treatment of large high-grade tumours, which resection cannot be performed with a wide safe margin, should include complementary radiation and/or chemo-therapy. Hopefully, the use of adjuvant brachytherapy will improve the prognosis of E-STS. Case description After a long process of diagnosing a tumour in the medial compartment of the thigh, a 65-year-old woman with diagnosed synovial sarcoma underwent a surgery. Compartment resection was performed and the tumour was removed with a 10 mm safety margin of healthy tissue. Adjuvant brachytherapy was delivered with 192Ir (MicroSelectron, Nucletron Electa Group, Stockholm, Sweden®) with 10 Ci of nominal activity to a dose of 55 Gy in 16 days because of large tumour size (99 × 78 × 73 mm) and its proximity to the neurovascular bundle. No complications were reported. The patient was discharged from the hospital on the 28th day after the surgery. The wound healed without any complications and the outpatient follow-up is being continued. Discussion Adjuvant brachytherapy is rarely used after surgical treatment due to its limited accessibility in hospitals with surgical and orthopaedic departments. There are numerous publications proving positive influence of brachytherapy on local control and decreased number of recurrences. The recurrence-free survival time also increased significantly, however no direct impact on the number of distant metastases was found. Treatment is well tolerated and short. The complication rate varies between centres from 5 to 30%. The most common adverse effects include: peripheral neuropathy, skin necrosis and osteonecrosis of the long bones. Conclusions Treatment of large soft tissue sarcomas of the extremity (E-STS) should include combination of surgical intervention and external beam radiotherapy or brachytherapy. Adjuvant brachytherapy improves local control rate up to 78%, is well tolerated and

  12. Benefit of Adjuvant Brachytherapy Versus External Beam Radiation for Early Breast Cancer: Impact of Patient Stratification on Breast Preservation

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Grace L.; Jiang, Jing; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Xu, Ying; Hoffman, Karen E.; Giordano, Sharon H.; Hunt, Kelly K.; Smith, Benjamin D.

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: Brachytherapy after lumpectomy is an increasingly popular breast cancer treatment, but data concerning its effectiveness are conflicting. Recently proposed “suitability” criteria guiding patient selection for brachytherapy have never been empirically validated. Methods: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results–Medicare linked database, we compared women aged 66 years or older with invasive breast cancer (n=28,718) or ductal carcinoma in situ (n=7229) diagnosed from 2002 to 2007, treated with lumpectomy alone, brachytherapy, or external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). The likelihood of breast preservation, measured by subsequent mastectomy risk, was compared by use of multivariate proportional hazards, further stratified by American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) brachytherapy suitability groups. We compared 1-year postoperative complications using the χ{sup 2} test and 5-year local toxicities using the log-rank test. Results: For patients with invasive cancer, the 5-year subsequent mastectomy risk was 4.7% after lumpectomy alone (95% confidence interval [CI], 4.1%-5.4%), 2.8% after brachytherapy (95% CI, 1.8%-4.3%), and 1.3% after EBRT (95% CI, 1.1%-1.5%) (P<.001). Compared with lumpectomy alone, brachytherapy achieved a more modest reduction in adjusted risk (hazard ratio [HR], 0.61; 95% CI, 0.40-0.94) than achieved with EBRT (HR, 0.22; 95% CI, 0.18-0.28). Relative risks did not differ when stratified by ASTRO suitability group (P=.84 for interaction), although ASTRO “suitable” patients did show a low absolute subsequent mastectomy risk, with a minimal absolute difference in risk after brachytherapy (1.6%; 95% CI, 0.7%-3.5%) versus EBRT (0.8%; 95% CI, 0.6%-1.1%). For patients with ductal carcinoma in situ, EBRT maintained a reduced risk of subsequent mastectomy (HR, 0.40; 95% CI, 0.28-0.55; P<.001), whereas the small number of patients treated with brachytherapy (n=179) precluded definitive comparison with lumpectomy alone

  13. A novel approach to brachytherapy in hepatocellular carcinoma using a phosphorous{sup 32} ({sup 32}P) brachytherapy delivery device-a first-in-man study

    SciTech Connect

    Goh, Anthony Soon-Whatt; Chung, Alexander Yaw-Fui; Lo, Richard Houa-Gong; Lau, T.-N.; Yu, Sidney Wing-Kwong; Chng, May; Satchithanantham, Somanesan; Loong, Susan Li-Er; Ng, David Chee-Eng; Lim, Beng-Choo; Connor, Stephen; Chow, Pierce Kah-Hoe . E-mail: gsupc@singnet.com.sg

    2007-03-01

    Purpose: While potentially very useful, percutaneously delivered brachytherapy of inoperable intra-abdominal solid tumors faces significant technical challenges. This first-in-man study is designed to determine the safety profile and therapeutic efficacy of a novel phosphorous ({sup 32}P) brachytherapy device (BrachySil) in patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Patients received single percutaneous and transperitoneal implantations of BrachySil under local anesthesia directly into liver tumors under ultrasound or computed tomographic guidance, at an activity level of 4 MBq/cc of tumor. Toxicity was assessed by the nature, incidence, and severity of adverse events (Common Toxicity Criteria scores) and by hematology and clinical chemistry parameters. Target tumor response was assessed with computed tomographic scans at 12 and 24 weeks postimplantation using World Health Organization criteria. Results: Implantations were successfully carried out in 8 patients (13-74 MBq, mean 40 MBq per tumor) awake and under local anesthesia. Six of the 8 patients reported 19 adverse events, but no serious events were attributable to the study device. Changes in hematology and clinical chemistry were similarly minimal and reflected progressive underlying hepatic disease. All targeted tumors were responding at 12 weeks, with complete response (100% regression) in three lesions. At the end of the study, there were two complete responses, two partial responses, three stable diseases, and one progressive disease. Conclusion: Percutaneous implantation of this novel {sup 32}P brachytherapy device into hepatocellular carcinoma is safe and well tolerated. A significant degree of antitumor efficacy was demonstrated at this low dose that warrants further investigation.

  14. Broad-beam transmission data for new brachytherapy sources, Tm-170 and Yb-169.

    PubMed

    Granero, Domingo; Pérez-Calatayud, José; Ballester, Facundo; Bos, Adrie J J; Venselaar, Jack

    2006-01-01

    The characteristics of the radionuclides (170)Tm and (169)Yb are highly interesting for their use as high dose-rate brachytherapy sources. The introduction of brachytherapy equipment containing these sources will lead to smaller required thicknesses of the materials used in radiation protection barriers compared with the use of conventional sources such as (192)Ir and (137)Cs. The purpose of this study is to determine the required thicknesses of protection material for the design of the protecting walls. Using the Monte Carlo method, transmission data were derived for broad-beam geometries through lead and concrete barriers, from which the first half value layer and tenth value layer are obtained. In addition, the dose reduction in a simulated patient was studied to determine whether transmission in the patient is a relevant factor in radiation protection calculations. PMID:16030058

  15. Commissioning and periodic tests of the Esteya® electronic brachytherapy system

    PubMed Central

    Niatsetski, Yury; Ouhib, Zoubir; Ballester, Facundo; Vijande, Javier; Perez-Calatayud, Jose

    2015-01-01

    A new electronic brachytherapy unit from Elekta, called Esteya®, has recently been introduced to the market. As a part of the standards in radiation oncology, an acceptance testing and commissioning must be performed prior to treatment of the first patient. In addition, a quality assurance program should be implemented. A complete commissioning and periodic testing of the Esteya® device using the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), Groupe Européen de Curiethérapie and the European Society for Radiotherapy & Oncology (GEC-ESTRO) guidelines for linacs and brachytherapy units as well as our personal experience is described in this paper. In addition to the methodology, recommendations on equipment required for each test are provided, taking into consideration their availability and traceability of the detectors. Finally, tolerance levels for all the tests are provided, and a specific frequency for each test is suggested. PMID:26034501

  16. Commissioning and periodic tests of the Esteya(®) electronic brachytherapy system.

    PubMed

    Candela-Juan, Cristian; Niatsetski, Yury; Ouhib, Zoubir; Ballester, Facundo; Vijande, Javier; Perez-Calatayud, Jose

    2015-04-01

    A new electronic brachytherapy unit from Elekta, called Esteya(®), has recently been introduced to the market. As a part of the standards in radiation oncology, an acceptance testing and commissioning must be performed prior to treatment of the first patient. In addition, a quality assurance program should be implemented. A complete commissioning and periodic testing of the Esteya(®) device using the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), Groupe Européen de Curiethérapie and the European Society for Radiotherapy & Oncology (GEC-ESTRO) guidelines for linacs and brachytherapy units as well as our personal experience is described in this paper. In addition to the methodology, recommendations on equipment required for each test are provided, taking into consideration their availability and traceability of the detectors. Finally, tolerance levels for all the tests are provided, and a specific frequency for each test is suggested. PMID:26034501

  17. Dosimetric study of surface applicators of HDR brachytherapy GammaMed Plus equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Reyes-Rivera, E. E-mail: modesto@fisica.ugto.mx Sosa, M. E-mail: modesto@fisica.ugto.mx Reyes, U. E-mail: modesto@fisica.ugto.mx Jesús Bernal-Alvarado, José de E-mail: theo@fisica.ugto.mx Córdova, T. E-mail: theo@fisica.ugto.mx Gil-Villegas, A. E-mail: theo@fisica.ugto.mx; Monzón, E.

    2014-11-07

    The cone type surface applicators used in HDR brachytherapy for treatment of small skin lesions are an alternative to be used with both electron beams and orthovoltage X-ray equipment. For a good treatment planning is necessary to know the dose distribution of these applicators, which can be obtained by experimental measurement and Monte Carlo simulation as well. In this study the dose distribution of surface applicators of 3 and 3.5 cm diameter, respectively of HDR brachytherapy GammaMed Plus equipment has been estimated using the Monte Carlo method, MCNP code. The applicators simulated were placed on the surface of a water phantom of 20 × 20 × 20 cm and the dose was calculated at depths from 0 to 3 cm with increments of 0.25 mm. The dose profiles obtained at depth show the expected gradients for surface therapy.

  18. Accelerated partial breast irradiation with brachytherapy: patient selection and technique considerations

    PubMed Central

    Trifiletti, Daniel M; Romano, Kara D; Showalter, Shayna L; Reardon, Kelli A; Libby, Bruce; Showalter, Timothy N

    2015-01-01

    Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) through breast brachytherapy is a relatively recent development in breast radiotherapy that has gained international favor because of its reduction in treatment duration and normal tissue irradiation while maintaining favorable cancer-specific and cosmetic outcomes. Despite the fact that several large national trials have not reported final results yet, many providers are currently offering APBI to select patients and APBI is listed as a treatment option for selecting patients in the National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines. Multiple consensus guidelines exist in selecting patients for APBI, some with conflicting recommendations. In this review, the existing patient selection guidelines are reported, compared, and critiqued, grouping them in helpful subcategories. Unique patient and technical selection factors for APBI with brachytherapy are explored. PMID:26251627

  19. Plastic optical fibre sensor for in-vivo radiation monitoring during brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woulfe, P.; Sullivan, F. J.; Lewis, E.; O'Keeffe, S.

    2015-09-01

    An optical fibre sensor is presented for applications in real-time in-vivo monitoring of the radiation dose a cancer patient receives during seed implantation in Brachytherapy. The sensor is based on radioluminescence whereby radiation sensitive scintillation material is embedded in the core of a 1mm plastic optical fibre. Three scintillation materials are investigated: thallium-doped caesium iodide (CsI:Tl), terbium-doped gadolinium oxysulphide (Gd2O2S:Tb) and europium-doped lanthanum oxysulphide (La2O2S:Eu). Terbium-doped gadolinium oxysulphide was identified as being the most suitable scintillator and further testing demonstrates its measureable response to different activities of Iodine-125, the radio-active source commonly used in Brachytherapy for treating prostate cancer.

  20. Dosimetric study of surface applicators of HDR brachytherapy GammaMed Plus equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes-Rivera, E.; Sosa, M.; Reyes, U.; Monzón, E.; de Jesús Bernal-Alvarado, José; Córdova, T.; Gil-Villegas, A.

    2014-11-01

    The cone type surface applicators used in HDR brachytherapy for treatment of small skin lesions are an alternative to be used with both electron beams and orthovoltage X-ray equipment. For a good treatment planning is necessary to know the dose distribution of these applicators, which can be obtained by experimental measurement and Monte Carlo simulation as well. In this study the dose distribution of surface applicators of 3 and 3.5 cm diameter, respectively of HDR brachytherapy GammaMed Plus equipment has been estimated using the Monte Carlo method, MCNP code. The applicators simulated were placed on the surface of a water phantom of 20 × 20 × 20 cm and the dose was calculated at depths from 0 to 3 cm with increments of 0.25 mm. The dose profiles obtained at depth show the expected gradients for surface therapy.

  1. Dosimetric characterization of a {sup 131}Cs brachytherapy source by thermoluminescence dosimetry in liquid water

    SciTech Connect

    Tailor, Ramesh; Ibbott, Geoffrey; Lampe, Stephanie; Bivens Warren, Whitney; Tolani, Naresh

    2008-12-15

    Dosimetry measurements of a {sup 131}Cs brachytherapy source have been performed in liquid water employing thermoluminescence dosimeters. A search of the literature reveals that this is the first time a complete set of dosimetric parameters for a brachytherapy ''seed'' source has been measured in liquid water. This method avoids the medium correction uncertainties introduced by the use of water-equivalent plastic phantoms. To assure confidence in the results, four different sources were employed for each parameter measured, and measurements were performed multiple times. The measured dosimetric parameters presented here are based on the AAPM Task Group 43 formalism. The dose-rate constant measured in liquid water was (1.063{+-}0.023) cGy h{sup -1} U{sup -1} and was based on the air-kerma strength standard for this source established by the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Measured values for the 2D anisotropy function and the radial dose function are presented.

  2. Reduction in radiation exposure to nursing personnel with the use of remote afterloading brachytherapy devices

    SciTech Connect

    Grigsby, P.W.; Perez, C.A.; Eichling, J.; Purdy, J.; Slessinger, E. )

    1991-03-01

    The radiation exposure to nursing personnel from patients with brachytherapy implants on a large brachytherapy service were reviewed. Exposure to nurses, as determined by TLD monitors, indicates a 7-fold reduction in exposure after the implementation of the use of remote afterloading devices. Quarterly TLD monitor data for six quarters prior to the use of remote afterloading devices demonstrate an average projected annual dose equivalent to the nurses of 152 and 154 mrem (1.5 mSv). After the implementation of the remote afterloading devices, the quarterly TLD monitor data indicate an average dose equivalent per nurse of 23 and 19 mrem (0.2 mSv). This is an 87% reduction in exposure to nurses with the use of these devices (p less than 0.01).

  3. High-dose-rate pre-operative endorectal brachytherapy for patients with rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Devic, Slobodan

    2015-01-01

    High-dose-rate endorectal brachytherapy (HDREBT) is an image guided brachytherapy treatment for patients with rectal cancer. It is based on tumor imaging with magnetic resonance in particular, which is used to choose eligible patients and improve tumor visualization. Treatment planning is performed using 3D CT simulation and treatment planning. The treatment is given on an outpatient basis and requires minimal local anesthesia. The validation of the technique was carried out through a preoperative study and is now explored as part of a radical treatment for early rectal cancer or as a boost modality. We describe technical aspects of the HDREBT and we discuss the ongoing institutional review board approved studies exploring the clinical applications of this treatment modality for patients with rectal cancer: 1) as a neoadjuvant treatment for patients with operable rectal tumor; 2) as a option to improve local control in patients with newly diagnosed rectal cancer but with previous pelvic radiation. PMID:26034500

  4. European research projects for metrology in Brachytherapy and External Beam Cancer Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ankerhold, Ulrike; Toni, Maria Pia

    2012-10-01

    In 2008, within the framework of the European Metrology Research Programme (EMRP), two projects were launched with the central objective of providing reliable measuring techniques for the methods of modern cancer therapy using ionizing radiation—such as brachytherapy, intensity modulated radiation therapy and hadron therapy—and using high intensity therapeutic ultrasound. The two three-year projects are ‘Increasing cancer treatment efficacy using 3D brachytherapy’ (Brachytherapy) and ‘External Beam Cancer Therapy’ (EBCT). For these modern treatment methods there is an urgent requirement for establishing a sound metrological basis with regard to the radiation dose delivered and its spatial distribution. This paper gives a brief overview about the two projects' work, their goals and findings. The details of the projects' work and their outcomes are presented within these conference proceedings or in the cited publications.

  5. Secondary cancer-incidence risk estimates for external radiotherapy and high-dose-rate brachytherapy in cervical cancer: phantom study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Boram; Ahn, Sung Hwan; Kim, Hyeyoung; Son, Jaeman; Sung, Jiwon; Han, Youngyih; Huh, Seung Jae; Kim, Jin Sung; Kim, Dong Wook; Yoon, Myonggeun

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to estimate radiation-induced secondary cancer risks from high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy and external radiotherapy for patients with cervical cancer based on measurements of doses absorbed by various organs. Organ doses from HDR brachytherapy and external radiotherapy were measured using glass rod dosimeters. Doses to out-of-field organs were measured at various loca-tions inside an anthropomorphic phantom. Brachytherapy-associated organ doses were measured using a specialized phantom that enabled applicator insertion, with the pelvis portion of the existing anthropomorphic phantom replaced by this new phantom. Measured organ doses were used to calculate secondary cancer risk based on Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR) VII models. In both treatment modalities, organ doses per prescribed dose (PD) mostly depended on the distance between organs. The locations showing the highest and lowest doses were the right kidney (external radiotherapy: 215.2 mGy; brachytherapy: 655.17 mGy) and the brain (external radiotherapy: 15.82 mGy; brachytherapy: 2.49 mGy), respectively. Organ doses to nearby regions were higher for brachytherapy than for external beam therapy, whereas organ doses to distant regions were higher for external beam therapy. Organ doses to distant treatment regions in external radiotherapy were due primarily to out-of-field radiation resulting from scattering and leakage in the gantry head. For brachytherapy, the highest estimated lifetime attributable risk per 100,000 population was to the stomach (88.6), whereas the lowest risks were to the brain (0.4) and eye (0.4); for external radiotherapy, the highest and lowest risks were to the thyroid (305.1) and brain (2.4). These results may help provide a database on the impact of radiotherapy-induced secondary cancer incidence dur-ing cervical cancer treatment, as well as suggest further research on strategies to counteract the risks of radiotherapy-associated secondary

  6. SU-E-T-447: Electronic Brachytherapy (EBT) Treatment of Cervical Cancer - First Clinical Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D; Johnson, M; Thompson, J; Ahmad, S; Chan, L; Hausen, H

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To study the first trial patient in which an electronic brachytherapy (EBT) x-ray source is utilized for treatment of cervical cancer. Methods: During patient treatment, a miniaturized x-ray source was used in combination with a customized titanium tandem and ovoid applicator set. The semi-specialized source was modeled with formalisms outlined by AAMP Task Group 43. Multiple models were used to compensate for variable attenuation conditions as a function of source positions. Varian Brachyvision treatment planning software was utilized on CT data sets for dose calculations prior to treatment delivery. The dose was prescribed to “point A” as defined by American Brachytherapy society. Additional treatments plans were created from those clinically utilized in patient care and were recalculated for an existing Ir-192 source model. Dose volume histograms (DVH) and point dose calculations were compared between the modalities for the clinical condition present in patients treated with EBT. Results: Clinical treatment times, though longer than those typically experienced by Ir-192 users, were manageable. Instantaneous dose rates at personal positions within the treatment vault were lower than those measured during intra operative radiation therapy and breast EBT treatments. Due to lower average photon energy in EBT, dose gradients within the treatment plans were as expected steeper than those observed in Ir-192 based brachytherapy. DVH comparisons between Ir-192 and EBT treatments showed an expected decrease in the integral dose to normal tissues of interest for EBT. In comparing plans created for EBT delivery with those calculated for Ir-192, average dose values for EBT were more than 4%, 11%, and 9% lower at predefined bladder, rectum and “point B” positions, respectively. Conclusion: For the first time, we have demonstrated that the utilizing electronic brachytherapy system for tandem and ovoid based treatment of cancer of the cervix is feasible, and

  7. Improved targeting device and computer navigation for accurate placement of brachytherapy needles

    SciTech Connect

    Pappas, Ion P.I.; Ryan, Paul; Cossmann, Peter; Kowal, Jens; Borgeson, Blake; Caversaccio, Marco

    2005-06-15

    Successful treatment of skull base tumors with interstitial brachytherapy requires high targeting accuracy for the brachytherapy needles to avoid harming vital anatomical structures. To enable safe placement of the needles in this area, we developed an image-based planning and navigation system for brachytherapy, which includes a custom-made mechanical positioning arm that allows rough and fine adjustment of the needle position. The fine-adjustment mechanism consists of an XYZ microstage at the base of the arm and a needle holder with two fine-adjustable inclinations. The rotation axes of the inclinations cross at the tip of the needle so that the inclinational adjustments do not interfere with the translational adjustments. A vacuum cushion and a noninvasive fixation frame are used for the head immobilization. To avoid mechanical bending of the needles due to the weight of attached tracking markers, which would be detrimental for targeting accuracy, only a single LED marker on the tail of the needle is used. An experimental phantom-based targeting study with this setup demonstrated that a positioning accuracy of 1.4 mm (rms) can be achieved. The study showed that the proposed setup allows brachytherapy needles to be easily aligned and inserted with high targeting accuracy according to a preliminary plan. The achievable accuracy is higher than if the needles are inserted manually. The proposed system can be linked to a standard afterloader and standard dosimetry planning module. The associated additional effort is reasonable for the clinical practice and therefore the proposed procedure provides a promising tool for the safe treatment of tumors in the skull base area.

  8. IPIP: A new approach to inverse planning for HDR brachytherapy by directly optimizing dosimetric indices

    SciTech Connect

    Siauw, Timmy; Cunha, Adam; Atamtuerk, Alper; Hsu, I-Chow; Pouliot, Jean; Goldberg, Ken

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Many planning methods for high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy require an iterative approach. A set of computational parameters are hypothesized that will give a dose plan that meets dosimetric criteria. A dose plan is computed using these parameters, and if any dosimetric criteria are not met, the process is iterated until a suitable dose plan is found. In this way, the dose distribution is controlled by abstract parameters. The purpose of this study is to develop a new approach for HDR brachytherapy by directly optimizing the dose distribution based on dosimetric criteria. Methods: The authors developed inverse planning by integer program (IPIP), an optimization model for computing HDR brachytherapy dose plans and a fast heuristic for it. They used their heuristic to compute dose plans for 20 anonymized prostate cancer image data sets from patients previously treated at their clinic database. Dosimetry was evaluated and compared to dosimetric criteria. Results: Dose plans computed from IPIP satisfied all given dosimetric criteria for the target and healthy tissue after a single iteration. The average target coverage was 95%. The average computation time for IPIP was 30.1 s on an Intel(R) Core{sup TM}2 Duo CPU 1.67 GHz processor with 3 Gib RAM. Conclusions: IPIP is an HDR brachytherapy planning system that directly incorporates dosimetric criteria. The authors have demonstrated that IPIP has clinically acceptable performance for the prostate cases and dosimetric criteria used in this study, in both dosimetry and runtime. Further study is required to determine if IPIP performs well for a more general group of patients and dosimetric criteria, including other cancer sites such as GYN.

  9. Long-Term Outcome for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer Treated With Permanent Interstitial Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Taira, Al V.; Merrick, Gregory S.; Butler, Wayne M.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Lief, Jonathan; Adamovich, Edward; Wallner, Kent E.

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: To present the largest series of prostate cancer brachytherapy patients treated with modern brachytherapy techniques and postimplant day 0 dosimetric evaluation. Methods and Materials: Between April 1995 and July 2006, 1,656 consecutive patients were treated with permanent interstitial brachytherapy. Risk group stratification was carried out according to the Mt. Sinai guidelines. Median follow-up was 7.0 years. The median day 0 minimum dose covering at least 90% of the target volume was 118.8% of the prescription dose. Cause of death was determined for each deceased patient. Multiple clinical, treatment, and dosimetric parameters were evaluated for impact on the evaluated survival parameters. Results: At 12 years, biochemical progression-free survival (bPFS), cause-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS) for the entire cohort was 95.6%, 98.2%, and 72.6%, respectively. For low-, intermediate-, and high-risk patients, bPFS was 98.6%, 96.5%, and 90.5%; CSS was 99.8%, 99.3%, and 95.2%; and OS was 77.5%, 71.1%, and 69.2%, respectively. For biochemically controlled patients, the median posttreatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) concentration was 0.02 ng/ml. bPFS was most closely related to percent positive biopsy specimens and risk group, while Gleason score was the strongest predictor of CSS. OS was best predicted by patient age, hypertension, diabetes, and tobacco use. At 12 years, biochemical failure and cause-specific mortality were 1.8% and 0.2%, 5.1% and 2.1%, and 10.4% and 7.1% for Gleason scores 5 to 6 and 7 and {>=}8, respectively. Conclusions: Excellent long-term outcomes are achievable with high-quality brachytherapy for low-, intermediate-, and high-risk patients. These results compare favorably to alternative treatment modalities including radical prostatectomy.

  10. The Effects of Metallic Implants on Electroporation Therapies: Feasibility of Irreversible Electroporation for Brachytherapy Salvage

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, Robert E.; Smith, Ryan L.; Kavnoudias, Helen; Rosenfeldt, Franklin Ou, Ruchong; Mclean, Catriona A.; Davalos, Rafael V.; Thomson, Kenneth R.

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Electroporation-based therapies deliver brief electric pulses into a targeted volume to destabilize cellular membranes. Nonthermal irreversible electroporation (IRE) provides focal ablation with effects dependent on the electric field distribution, which changes in heterogeneous environments. It should be determined if highly conductive metallic implants in targeted regions, such as radiotherapy brachytherapy seeds in prostate tissue, will alter treatment outcomes. Theoretical and experimental models determine the impact of prostate brachytherapy seeds on IRE treatments. Materials and Methods: This study delivered IRE pulses in nonanimal, as well as in ex vivo and in vivo tissue, with and in the absence of expired radiotherapy seeds. Electrical current was measured and lesion dimensions were examined macroscopically and with magnetic resonance imaging. Finite-element treatment simulations predicted the effects of brachytherapy seeds in the targeted region on electrical current, electric field, and temperature distributions. Results: There was no significant difference in electrical behavior in tissue containing a grid of expired radiotherapy seeds relative to those without seeds for nonanimal, ex vivo, and in vivo experiments (all p > 0.1). Numerical simulations predict no significant alteration of electric field or thermal effects (all p > 0.1). Histology showed cellular necrosis in the region near the electrodes and seeds within the ablation region; however, there were no seeds beyond the ablation margins. Conclusion: This study suggests that electroporation therapies can be implemented in regions containing small metallic implants without significant changes to electrical and thermal effects relative to use in tissue without the implants. This supports the ability to use IRE as a salvage therapy option for brachytherapy.

  11. Workflow modeling and analysis of computer guided prostate brachytherapy under MR imaging control.

    PubMed

    Dickhaus, Christoph F; Burghart, Catherina; Tempany, Clare; D'Amico, Anthony; Haker, Steven; Kikinis, Ron; Woern, Heinz

    2004-01-01

    We demonstrate that classical Business Process Reengineering (BPR) methods can be successfully applied to Computer Aided Surgery while increasing safety and efficiency of the overall procedure through an integrated Workflow Management System. Computer guided Prostate Brachytherapy, as a sophisticated treatment by an interdisciplinary team, is perfectly suited to apply our method. Detailed suggestions for improvement of the whole procedure could be derived by our modified BPR method. PMID:15544246

  12. A fully actuated robotic assistant for MRI-guided prostate biopsy and brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gang; Su, Hao; Shang, Weijian; Tokuda, Junichi; Hata, Nobuhiko; Tempany, Clare M.; Fischer, Gregory S.

    2013-03-01

    Intra-operative medical imaging enables incorporation of human experience and intelligence in a controlled, closed-loop fashion. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an ideal modality for surgical guidance of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, with its ability to perform high resolution, real-time, high soft tissue contrast imaging without ionizing radiation. However, for most current image-guided approaches only static pre-operative images are accessible for guidance, which are unable to provide updated information during a surgical procedure. The high magnetic field, electrical interference, and limited access of closed-bore MRI render great challenges to developing robotic systems that can perform inside a diagnostic high-field MRI while obtaining interactively updated MR images. To overcome these limitations, we are developing a piezoelectrically actuated robotic assistant for actuated percutaneous prostate interventions under real-time MRI guidance. Utilizing a modular design, the system enables coherent and straight forward workflow for various percutaneous interventions, including prostate biopsy sampling and brachytherapy seed placement, using various needle driver configurations. The unified workflow compromises: 1) system hardware and software initialization, 2) fiducial frame registration, 3) target selection and motion planning, 4) moving to the target and performing the intervention (e.g. taking a biopsy sample) under live imaging, and 5) visualization and verification. Phantom experiments of prostate biopsy and brachytherapy were executed under MRI-guidance to evaluate the feasibility of the workflow. The robot successfully performed fully actuated biopsy sampling and delivery of simulated brachytherapy seeds under live MR imaging, as well as precise delivery of a prostate brachytherapy seed distribution with an RMS accuracy of 0.98mm.

  13. Effect of tissue composition on dose distribution in brachytherapy with various photon emitting sources

    PubMed Central

    Ghorbani, Mahdi; Salahshour, Fateme; Haghparast, Abbas; Knaup, Courtney

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study is to compare the dose in various soft tissues in brachytherapy with photon emitting sources. Material and methods 103Pd, 125I, 169Yb, 192Ir brachytherapy sources were simulated with MCNPX Monte Carlo code, and their dose rate constant and radial dose function were compared with the published data. A spherical phantom with 50 cm radius was simulated and the dose at various radial distances in adipose tissue, breast tissue, 4-component soft tissue, brain (grey/white matter), muscle (skeletal), lung tissue, blood (whole), 9-component soft tissue, and water were calculated. The absolute dose and relative dose difference with respect to 9-component soft tissue was obtained for various materials, sources, and distances. Results There was good agreement between the dosimetric parameters of the sources and the published data. Adipose tissue, breast tissue, 4-component soft tissue, and water showed the greatest difference in dose relative to the dose to the 9-component soft tissue. The other soft tissues showed lower dose differences. The dose difference was also higher for 103Pd source than for 125I, 169Yb, and 192Ir sources. Furthermore, greater distances from the source had higher relative dose differences and the effect can be justified due to the change in photon spectrum (softening or hardening) as photons traverse the phantom material. Conclusions The ignorance of soft tissue characteristics (density, composition, etc.) by treatment planning systems incorporates a significant error in dose delivery to the patient in brachytherapy with photon sources. The error depends on the type of soft tissue, brachytherapy source, as well as the distance from the source. PMID:24790623

  14. A real-time applicator position monitoring system for gynecologic intracavitary brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Junyi Waldron, Timothy; Kim, Yusung

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: To develop a real-time applicator position monitoring system (RAPS) for intracavitary brachytherapy using an infrared camera and reflective markers. Methods: 3D image-guided brachytherapy requires high accuracy of applicator localization; however, applicator displacement can happen during patient transfer for imaging and treatment delivery. No continuous applicator position monitoring system is currently available. The RAPS system was developed for real-time applicator position monitoring without additional radiation dose to patients. It includes an infrared camera, reflective markers, an infrared illuminator, and image processing software. After reflective markers are firmly attached to the applicator and the patient body, applicator displacement can be measured by computing the relative change in distance between the markers. The reflective markers are magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) compatible, which is suitable for MRI-guided HDR brachytherapy paradigm. In our prototype, a Microsoft Kinect sensor with a resolution of 640 by 480 pixels is used as an infrared camera. A phantom study was carried out to compare RAPS' measurements with known displacements ranging from −15 to +15 mm. A reproducibility test was also conducted. Results: The RAPS can achieve 4 frames/s using a laptop with Intel{sup ®} Core™2 Duo processor. When the pixel size is 0.95 mm, the difference between RAPS' measurements and known shift values varied from 0 to 0.8 mm with the mean value of 0.1 mm and a standard deviation of 0.44 mm. The system reproducibility was within 0.6 mm after ten reposition trials. Conclusions: This work demonstrates the feasibility of a real-time infrared camera based gynecologic intracavitary brachytherapy applicator monitoring system. Less than 1 mm accuracy is achieved when using an off-the-shelf infrared camera.

  15. Dose reduction in LDR brachytherapy by implanted prostate gold fiducial markers

    SciTech Connect

    Landry, Guillaume; Reniers, Brigitte; Lutgens, Ludy; Murrer, Lars; Afsharpour, Hossein; Haas-Kock, Danielle de; Visser, Peter; Gils, Francis van; Verhaegen, Frank

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: The dosimetric impact of gold fiducial markers (FM) implanted prior to external beam radiotherapy of prostate cancer on low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy seed implants performed in the context of combined therapy was investigated. Methods: A virtual water phantom was designed containing a single FM. Single and multi source scenarios were investigated by performing Monte Carlo dose calculations, along with the influence of varying orientation and distance of the FM with respect to the sources. Three prostate cancer patients treated with LDR brachytherapy for a recurrence following external beam radiotherapy with implanted FM were studied as surrogate cases to combined therapy. FM and brachytherapy seeds were identified on post implant CT scans and Monte Carlo dose calculations were performed with and without FM. The dosimetric impact of the FM was evaluated by quantifying the amplitude of dose shadows and the volume of cold spots. D{sub 90} was reported based on the post implant CT prostate contour. Results: Large shadows are observed in the single source-FM scenarios. As expected from geometric considerations, the shadows are dependent on source-FM distance and orientation. Large dose reductions are observed at the distal side of FM, while at the proximal side a dose enhancement is observed. In multisource scenarios, the importance of shadows appears mitigated, although FM at the periphery of the seed distribution caused underdosage (brachytherapy seed implant dose distributions. Therefore, reduced tumor control could be expected from FM implanted in tumors, although

  16. Salvage high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for locally recurrent rectal cancer*

    PubMed Central

    Pellizzon, Antônio Cássio Assis

    2016-01-01

    For tumors of the lower third of the rectum, the only safe surgical procedure is abdominal-perineal resection. High-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy is a promising treatment for local recurrence of previously irradiated lower rectal cancer, due to the extremely high concentrated dose delivered to the tumor and the sparing of normal tissue, when compared with a course of external beam radiation therapy. PMID:27403021

  17. SU-E-T-366: Clinical Implementation of MR-Guided Vaginal Cylinder Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Owrangi, A; Jolly, S; Balter, J; Cao, Y; Young, L; Zhu, T; Prisciandaro, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of MR-based vaginal brachytherapy source localization using an in-house MR-visible marker versus the alignment of an applicator model to MR images. Methods: Three consecutive patients undergoing vaginal HDR brachytherapy with a plastic cylinder were scanned with both CT and MRI (including T1- and T2- weighted images). An MR-visible source localization marker, consisting of a sealed thin catheter filled with either water (for T2 contrast) or Gd-doped water (for T1 contrast), was assembled shortly before scanning. Clinically, the applicator channel was digitized on CT with an x-ray marker. To evaluate the efficacy of MR-based applicator reconstruction, each MR image volume was aligned locally to the CT images based on the region containing the cylinder. Applicator digitization was performed on the MR images using (1) the MR visible marker and (2) alignment of an applicator surface model from Varian's Brachytherapy Planning software to the MRI images. Resulting source positions were compared with the original CT digitization. Results: Although the source path was visualized by the MR marker, the applicator tip proved difficult to identify due to challenges in achieving a watertight seal. This resulted in observed displacements of the catheter tip, at times >1cm. Deviations between the central source positions identified via aligning the applicator surface model to MR and using the xray marker on CT ranged from 0.07 – 0.19 cm and 0.07 – 0.20 cm on T1- weighted and T2-weighted images, respectively. Conclusion: Based on the current study, aligning the applicator model to MRI provides a practical, current approach to perform MR-based brachytherapy planning. Further study is needed to produce catheters with reliably and reproducibly identifiable tips. Attempts are being made to improve catheter seals, as well as to increase the viscosity of the contrast material to decrease fluid mobility inside the catheter.

  18. Detailed dose distribution prediction of Cf-252 brachytherapy source with boron loading dose enhancement.

    PubMed

    Ghassoun, J; Mostacci, D; Molinari, V; Jehouani, A

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate the dose rate distribution and to determine the boron effect on dose rate distribution for (252)Cf brachytherapy source. This study was carried out using a Monte Carlo simulation. To validate the Monte Carlo computer code, the dosimetric parameters were determined following the updated TG-43 formalism and compared with current literature data. The validated computer code was then applied to evaluate the neutron and photon dose distribution and to illustrate the boron loading effect.

  19. New National Air-Kerma Standard for Low-Energy Electronic Brachytherapy Sources

    PubMed Central

    Seltzer, Stephen M; O’Brien, Michelle; Mitch, Michael G

    2014-01-01

    The new primary standard for low-energy electronic brachytherapy sources for the United States is described. These miniature x-ray tubes are inserted in catheters for interstitial radiation therapy and operate at tube potentials of up to about 50 kV. The standard is based on the realization of the air kerma produced by the x-ray beam at a reference distance in air of 50 cm. PMID:26601044

  20. Absolute calorimetric calibration of low energy brachytherapy sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stump, Kurt E.

    In the past decade there has been a dramatic increase in the use of permanent radioactive source implants in the treatment of prostate cancer. A small radioactive source encapsulated in a titanium shell is used in this type of treatment. The radioisotopes used are generally 125I or 103Pd. Both of these isotopes have relatively short half-lives, 59.4 days and 16.99 days, respectively, and have low-energy emissions and a low dose rate. These factors make these sources well suited for this application, but the calibration of these sources poses significant metrological challenges. The current standard calibration technique involves the measurement of ionization in air to determine the source air-kerma strength. While this has proved to be an improvement over previous techniques, the method has been shown to be metrologically impure and may not be the ideal means of calbrating these sources. Calorimetric methods have long been viewed to be the most fundamental means of determining source strength for a radiation source. This is because calorimetry provides a direct measurement of source energy. However, due to the low energy and low power of the sources described above, current calorimetric methods are inadequate. This thesis presents work oriented toward developing novel methods to provide direct and absolute measurements of source power for low-energy low dose rate brachytherapy sources. The method is the first use of an actively temperature-controlled radiation absorber using the electrical substitution method to determine total contained source power of these sources. The instrument described operates at cryogenic temperatures. The method employed provides a direct measurement of source power. The work presented here is focused upon building a metrological foundation upon which to establish power-based calibrations of clinical-strength sources. To that end instrument performance has been assessed for these source strengths. The intent is to establish the limits of

  1. Effect of constipation on dosimetry after permanent seed brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dolado, M. Carmen; Núñez, Eduardo J.; Otón, Claudio A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose A major concern in prostate brachytherapy is rectal toxicity, which mainly depends on the dose and volume of rectum involved by radiation. We hypothesize that the rectal distension, as produced by constipation, influences the dosimetric parameters of the rectum and other pelvic organs. Material and methods An open, controlled, prospective, paired trial (pre-post test) was designed and conducted. Twenty-three patients treated with prostate brachytherapy were recruited, of which 21 were evaluated. All of them underwent two CT scans, the first one with empty rectum and the second with rectum distended by a catheter balloon. Target volumes and organs at risk were delineated, and dosimetric parameters were calculated and then compared for each patient between both CT. Results For rectum, D2cc increased 15.8% (p < 0.001) and D0.1cc 24.05% (p = 0.002) when the rectum was full. A significant difference was also found in dose distribution to prostate, when rectum is distended, a 1% decrease in V100 (p = 0.031) and a 3.25% in D90 (p = 0.033) was registered. Conclusions The status of rectal distension, as occurs in constipation, has a deleterious influence on prostate brachytherapy dosimetry. This situation increases the radiation to rectum and modifies dose distribution to prostate. We recommend prevention of constipation for at least two half lives of the radioactive seeds. PMID:26622226

  2. Perineural invasion on prostate needle biopsy does not predict biochemical failure following brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Weight, Christopher J.; Ciezki, Jay P.; Reddy, Chandana A.; Zhou Ming; Klein, Eric A.

    2006-06-01

    Purpose: To determine if the presence of perineural invasion (PNI) predicts biochemical recurrence in patients who underwent low-dose-rate brachytherapy for the treatment of localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A retrospective case control matching study was performed. The records of 651 patients treated with brachytherapy between 1996 and 2003 were reviewed. Sixty-three of these patients developed biochemical failure. These sixty-three patients were then matched in a one-to-one ratio to patients without biochemical failure, controlling for biopsy Gleason score, clinical stage, initial prostate-specific antigen, age, and the use of androgen deprivation. The pathology of the entire cohort was then reviewed for evidence of perineural invasion on initial prostate biopsy specimens. The biochemical relapse free survival rates for these two groups were compared. Results: Cases and controls were well matched, and there were no significant differences between the two groups in age, Gleason grade, clinical stage, initial prostate-specific antigen, and the use of androgen deprivation. PNI was found in 19 (17%) patients. There was no significant difference in the rates of PNI between cases and controls, 19.6% and 14.3% respectively (p 0.45). PNI did not correlate with biochemical relapse free survival (p 0.40). Conclusion: Perineural invasion is not a significant predictor of biochemical recurrence in patients undergoing brachytherapy for prostate cancer.

  3. Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy in Prostate Glands <20 cm{sup 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Mayadev, Jyoti; Merrick, Gregory S.; Reed, Joshua R.; Butler, Wayne M.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Allen, Zachariah A.; Wallner, Kent E.

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetry, treatment-related morbidity, and biochemical outcomes for brachytherapy in patients with prostate glands <20 cm{sup 3}. Methods and Materials: From November 1996 to October 2006, 104 patients with prostate glands <20 cm{sup 3} underwent brachytherapy. Multiple prostate, urethral, and rectal dosimetric parameters were evaluated. Treatment-related urinary and rectal morbidity were assessed from patient questionnaires. Cause-specific survival, biochemical progression-free survival, and overall survival were recorded. Results: The median patient age, follow up, and pre-treatment ultrasound volume was 64 years, 5.0 years and 17.6cm{sup 3}, respectively. Median day 0 dosimetry was significant for the following: V100 98.5%, D90 126.1% and R100 <0.5% of prescription dose. The mean urethral and maximum urethral doses were 119.6% and 133.8% of prescription. The median time to International Prostate Symptom Score resolution was 4 months. There were no RTOG grade III or IV rectal complications. The cause-specific survival, biochemical progression-free survival, and overall survival rates were 100%, 92.5%, and 77.8% at 9 years. For biochemically disease-free patients, the median most recent postbrachytherapy PSA value was 0.02 ng/mL. Conclusion: Our results demonstrate that brachytherapy for small prostate glands is highly effective, with an acceptable morbidity profile, excellent postimplant dosimetry, acceptable treatment-related morbidity, and favorable biochemical outcomes.

  4. Impact of using linear optimization models in dose planning for HDR brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Holm, Aasa; Larsson, Torbjoern; Carlsson Tedgren, Aasa

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: Dose plans generated with optimization models hitherto used in high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy have shown a tendency to yield longer dwell times than manually optimized plans. Concern has been raised for the corresponding undesired hot spots, and various methods to mitigate these have been developed. The hypotheses upon this work is based are (a) that one cause for the long dwell times is the use of objective functions comprising simple linear penalties and (b) that alternative penalties, as these are piecewise linear, would lead to reduced length of individual dwell times. Methods: The characteristics of the linear penalties and the piecewise linear penalties are analyzed mathematically. Experimental comparisons between the two types of penalties are carried out retrospectively for a set of prostate cancer patients. Results: When the two types of penalties are compared, significant changes can be seen in the dwell times, while most dose-volume parameters do not differ significantly. On average, total dwell times were reduced by 4.2%, with a reduction of maximum dwell times by 25%, when the alternative penalties were used. Conclusions: The use of linear penalties in optimization models for HDR brachytherapy is one cause for the undesired long dwell times that arise in mathematically optimized plans. By introducing alternative penalties, a significant reduction in dwell times can be achieved for HDR brachytherapy dose plans. Although various measures for mitigating the long dwell times are already available, the observation that linear penalties contribute to their appearance is of fundamental interest.

  5. The Application of Elliptic Cylindrical Phantom in Brachytherapy Dosimetric Study of HDR 192Ir Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Woo Sang; Park, Sung Ho; Jung, Sang Hoon; Choi, Wonsik; Do Ahn, Seung; Shin, Seong Soo

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the radial dose function of HDR 192Ir source based on Monte Carlo simulation using elliptic cylindrical phantom, similar to realistic shape of pelvis, in brachytherapy dosimetric study. The elliptic phantom size and shape was determined by analysis of dimensions of pelvis on CT images of 20 patients treated with brachytherapy for cervical cancer. The radial dose function obtained using the elliptic cylindrical water phantom was compared with radial dose functions for different spherical phantom sizes, including the Williamsion's data loaded into conventional planning system. The differences in the radial dose function for the different spherical water phantoms increase with radial distance, r, and the largest differences in the radial dose function appear for the smallest phantom size. The radial dose function of the elliptic cylindrical phantom significantly decreased with radial distance in the vertical direction due to different scatter condition in comparison with the Williamson's data. Considering doses to ICRU rectum and bladder points, doses to reference points can be underestimated up to 1-2% at the distance from 3 to 6 cm. The radial dose function in this study could be used as realistic data for calculating the brachytherapy dosimetry for cervical cancer.

  6. Variability of Marker-Based Rectal Dose Evaluation in HDR Cervical Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Zhou; Jaggernauth, Wainwright; Malhotra, Harish K.; Podgorsak, Matthew B.

    2010-01-01

    In film-based intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer, position of the rectal markers may not accurately represent the anterior rectal wall. This study was aimed at analyzing the variability of rectal dose estimation as a result of interfractional variation of marker placement. A cohort of five patients treated with multiple-fraction tandem and ovoid high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy was studied. The cervical os point and the orientation of the applicators were matched among all fractional plans for each patient. Rectal points obtained from all fractions were then input into each clinical treated plan. New fractional rectal doses were obtained and a new cumulative rectal dose for each patient was calculated. The maximum interfractional variation of distances between rectal dose points and the closest source positions was 1.1 cm. The corresponding maximum variability of fractional rectal dose was 65.5%. The percentage difference in cumulative rectal dose estimation for each patient was 5.4%, 19.6%, 34.6%, 23.4%, and 13.9%, respectively. In conclusion, care should be taken when using rectal markers as reference points for estimating rectal dose in HDR cervical brachytherapy. The best estimate of true rectal dose for each fraction should be determined by the most anterior point among all fractions.

  7. A self-checking fiber optic dosimeter for monitoring common errors in brachytherapy applications

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Y.; Lambert, J.; Yang, S.; McKenzie, D. R.; Jackson, M.; Suchowerska, N.

    2009-07-15

    Scintillation dosimetry with optical fiber readout [fiber optic dosimetry (FOD)] requires accurate measurement of light intensity. It is therefore vulnerable to loss of calibration if any changes occur in the efficiency of the optical pathway between the scintillator and the light detector. The authors show in this article that common types of errors that arise during clinical use for brachytherapy applications can be quantified using a light emitting diode to stimulate the scintillator, the so-called LED-FOD method, in an integrated and easy-to-use control unit that incorporates a compact peripheral component interconnect extension for instrumentation. Common sources of error include bending and mechanical compression of the fiber optic components and changes in the temperature of the scintillator. The authors show that the method can detect all the common errors studied in this work and that different types of errors can result in different correlations between the LED stimulated signal and the brachytherapy source signal. For a single-type error the LED-FOD can be used easily for system diagnosis and validation with the possibility to correct the dosimeter reading if the correlation between the LED stimulated signal and the brachytherapy source signal can be defined. For more complex errors, resulting from two or more errors occurring simultaneously, the LED-FOD method can also allow the clinician to make a judgment on the reliability of the dosimeter reading. This self-checking method can enhance the clinical robustness of the FOD for achieving accurate dose control.

  8. Automatic segmentation of radiographic fiducial and seeds from X-ray images in prostate brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Nathanael; Deguet, Anton; Song, Danny Y.; Burdette, Everette C.; Prince, Jerry L.; Lee, Junghoon

    2011-01-01

    Prostate brachytherapy guided by transrectal ultrasound is a common treatment option for early stage prostate cancer. Prostate cancer accounts for 28% of cancer cases and 11% of cancer deaths in men with 217,730 estimated new cases and 32,050 estimated deaths in 2010 in the United States alone. The major current limitation is the inability to reliably localize implanted radiation seeds spatially in relation to the prostate. Multimodality approaches that incorporate X-ray for seed localization have been proposed, but they require both accurate tracking of the imaging device and segmentation of the seeds. Some use image-based radiographic fiducials to track the X-ray device, but manual intervention is needed to select proper regions of interest for segmenting both the tracking fiducial and the seeds, to evaluate the segmentation results, and to correct the segmentations in the case of segmentation failure, thus requiring a significant amount of extra time in the operating room. In this paper, we present an automatic segmentation algorithm that simultaneously segments the tracking fiducial and brachytherapy seeds, thereby minimizing the need for manual intervention. In addition, through the innovative use of image processing techniques such as mathematical morphology, Hough transforms, and RANSAC, our method can detect and separate overlapping seeds that are common in brachytherapy implant images. Our algorithm was validated on 55 phantom and 206 patient images, successfully segmenting both the fiducial and seeds with a mean seed segmentation rate of 96% and sub-millimeter accuracy. PMID:21802975

  9. Radiation Therapy Photon Beams Dose Conformation According to Dose Distribution Around Intracavitary-Applied Brachytherapy Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Jurkovic, Slaven Zauhar, Gordana; Faj, Dario; Radojcic, Deni Smilovic; Svabic, Manda

    2010-04-01

    Intracavitary application of brachytherapy sources followed by external beam radiation is essential for the local treatment of carcinoma of the cervix. Due to very high doses to the central portion of the target volume delivered by brachytherapy sources, this part of the target volume must be shielded while being irradiated by photon beams. Several shielding techniques are available, from rectangular block and standard cervix wedge to more precise, customized step wedge filters. Because the calculation of a step wedge filter's shape was usually based on effective attenuation coefficient, an approach that accounts, in a more precise way, for the scattered radiation, is suggested. The method was verified under simulated clinical conditions using film dosimetry. Measured data for various compensators were compared to the numerically determined sum of the dose distribution around brachytherapy sources and one of compensated beam. Improvements in total dose distribution are demonstrated, using our method. Agreement between calculation and measurements were within 3%. Sensitivity of the method on sources displacement during treatment has also been investigated.

  10. Internal radiotherapy techniques using radiolanthanide praseodymium-142: a review of production routes, brachytherapy, unsealed source therapy.

    PubMed

    Bakht, Mohamadreza K; Sadeghi, Mahdi

    2011-10-01

    Radionuclides of rare earth elements are gaining importance as emerging therapeutic agents in nuclear medicine. β(-)-particle emitter 142Pr [T (1/2) = 19.12 h, E(-)β = 2.162 MeV (96.3%), Eγ = 1575 keV (3.7%)] is one of the praseodymium-141 (100% abundant) radioisotopes. Production routes and therapy aspects of 142Pr will be reviewed in this paper. However, 142Pr produces via 141Pr(n, γ) 142Pr reaction by irradiation in a low-fluence reactor; 142Pr cyclotron produced, could be achievable. 142Pr due to its high β(-)-emission and low specific gamma γ-emission could not only be a therapeutic radionuclide, but also a suitable radionuclide in order for biodistribution studies. Internal radiotherapy using 142Pr can be classified into two sub-categories: (1) unsealed source therapy (UST), (2) brachytherapy. UST via 142Pr-HA and 142Pr-DTPA in order for radiosynovectomy have been proposed. In addition, 142Pr Glass seeds and 142Pr microspheres have been utilized for interstitial brachytherapy of prostate cancer and intraarterial brachytherapy of arteriovenous malformation, respectively.

  11. Optical fibre luminescence sensor for real-time LDR brachytherapy dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woulfe, P.; Sullivan, F. J.; O'Keeffe, S.

    2016-05-01

    An optical fibre sensor for monitoring low dose radiation is presented. The sensor is based on a scintillation material embedded within the optical fibre core, which emits visible light when exposed to low level ionising radiation. The incident level of ionising radiation can be determined by analysing the optical emission. An optical fibre sensor is presented, based on radioluminescence whereby radiation sensitive scintillation material, terbium doped gadolinium oxysulphide (Gd2O2S:Tb), is embedded in a cavity of 250μm of a 500μm plastic optical fibre. The sensor is designed for in-vivo monitoring of the radiation dose during radio-active seed implantation for brachytherapy, in prostate cancer treatment, providing oncologists with real-time information of the radiation dose to the target area and/or nearby critical structures. The radiation from the brachytherapy seeds causes emission of visible light from the scintillation material through the process of radioluminescence, which penetrates the fibre, propagating along the optical fibre for remote detection using a multi-pixel photon counter. The sensor demonstrates a high sensitivity to Iodine-125, the radioactive source most commonly used in brachytherapy for treating prostate cancer.

  12. American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) Emerging Technology Committee report on electronic brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Park, Catherine C; Yom, Sue S; Podgorsak, Matthew B; Harris, Eleanor; Price, Robert A; Bevan, Alison; Pouliot, Jean; Konski, Andre A; Wallner, Paul E

    2010-03-15

    The development of novel technologies for the safe and effective delivery of radiation is critical to advancing the field of radiation oncology. The Emerging Technology Committee of the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology appointed a Task Group within its Evaluation Subcommittee to evaluate new electronic brachytherapy methods that are being developed for, or are already in, clinical use. The Task Group evaluated two devices, the Axxent Electronic Brachytherapy System by Xoft, Inc. (Fremont, CA), and the Intrabeam Photon Radiosurgery Device by Carl Zeiss Surgical (Oberkochen, Germany). These devices are designed to deliver electronically generated radiation, and because of their relatively low energy output, they do not fall under existing regulatory scrutiny of radioactive sources that are used for conventional radioisotope brachytherapy. This report provides a descriptive overview of the technologies, current and future projected applications, comparison of competing technologies, potential impact, and potential safety issues. The full Emerging Technology Committee report is available on the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology Web site.

  13. Precision grid and hand motion for accurate needle insertion in brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    McGill, Carl S.; Schwartz, Jonathon A.; Moore, Jason Z.; McLaughlin, Patrick W.; Shih, Albert J.

    2011-08-15

    Purpose: In prostate brachytherapy, a grid is used to guide a needle tip toward a preplanned location within the tissue. During insertion, the needle deflects en route resulting in target misplacement. In this paper, 18-gauge needle insertion experiments into phantom were performed to test effects of three parameters, which include the clearance between the grid hole and needle, the thickness of the grid, and the needle insertion speed. Measurement apparatus that consisted of two datum surfaces and digital depth gauge was developed to quantify needle deflections. Methods: The gauge repeatability and reproducibility (GR and R) test was performed on the measurement apparatus, and it proved to be capable of measuring a 2 mm tolerance from the target. Replicated experiments were performed on a 2{sup 3} factorial design (three parameters at two levels) and analysis included averages and standard deviation along with an analysis of variance (ANOVA) to find significant single and two-way interaction factors. Results: Results showed that grid with tight clearance hole and slow needle speed increased precision and accuracy of needle insertion. The tight grid was vital to enhance precision and accuracy of needle insertion for both slow and fast insertion speed; additionally, at slow speed the tight, thick grid improved needle precision and accuracy. Conclusions: In summary, the tight grid is important, regardless of speed. The grid design, which shows the capability to reduce the needle deflection in brachytherapy procedures, can potentially be implemented in the brachytherapy procedure.

  14. Tracking brachytherapy sources using emission imaging with one flat panel detector

    SciTech Connect

    Song Haijun; Bowsher, James; Das, Shiva; Yin Fangfang

    2009-04-15

    This work proposes to use the radiation from brachytherapy sources to track their dwell positions in three-dimensional (3D) space. The prototype device uses a single flat panel detector and a BB tray. The BBs are arranged in a defined pattern. The shadow of the BBs on the flat panel is analyzed to derive the 3D coordinates of the illumination source, i.e., the dwell position of the brachytherapy source. A kilovoltage x-ray source located 3.3 m away was used to align the center BB with the center pixel on the flat panel detector. For a test plan of 11 dwell positions, with an Ir-192 high dose rate unit, one projection was taken for each dwell point, and locations of the BB shadows were manually identified on the projection images. The 3D coordinates for the 11 dwell positions were reconstructed based on two BBs. The distances between dwell points were compared with the expected values. The average difference was 0.07 cm with a standard deviation of 0.15 cm. With automated BB shadow recognition in the future, this technique possesses the potential of tracking the 3D trajectory and the dwell times of a brachytherapy source in real time, enabling real time source position verification.

  15. Differential dose contributions on total dose distribution of (125)I brachytherapy source.

    PubMed

    Camgöz, B; Yeğin, G; Kumru, M N

    2010-01-01

    This work provides an improvement of the approach using Monte Carlo simulation for the Amersham Model 6711 (125)I brachytherapy seed source, which is well known by many theoretical and experimental studies. The source which has simple geometry was researched with respect to criteria of AAPM Tg-43 Report. The approach offered by this study involves determination of differential dose contributions that come from virtual partitions of a massive radioactive element of the studied source to a total dose at analytical calculation point. Some brachytherapy seeds contain multi-radioactive elements so the dose at any point is a total of separate doses from each element. It is momentous to know well the angular and radial dose distributions around the source that is located in cancerous tissue for clinical treatments. Interior geometry of a source is effective on dose characteristics of a distribution. Dose information of inner geometrical structure of a brachytherapy source cannot be acquired by experimental methods because of limits of physical material and geometry in the healthy tissue, so Monte Carlo simulation is a required approach of the study. EGSnrc Monte Carlo simulation software was used. In the design of a simulation, the radioactive source was divided into 10 rings, partitioned but not separate from each other. All differential sources were simulated for dose calculation, and the shape of dose distribution was determined comparatively distribution of a single-complete source. In this work anisotropy function was examined also mathematically.

  16. Long-term follow-up of patients of intrahepatic malignancies treated with Iodine-125 brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nag, Subir . E-mail: nag.1@osu.edu; DeHaan, Megan; Scruggs, Granger; Mayr, Nina; Martin, Edward W.

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: We investigated the role of intraoperative iodine-125 ({sup 125}I) brachytherapy as a treatment option for unresectable primary and metastatic liver tumors. Methods and Materials: Between 1989 and 2002, 64 patients with unresectable or residual disease after surgical resection for intrahepatic malignancies underwent 160-Gy permanent {sup 125}I brachytherapy. Results: The median length of follow-up was 13.2 years. The overall 1-year, 3-year, and 5-year actuarial intrahepatic local control rates were 44%, 22%, and 22%, respectively, with a median time to liver recurrence of 9 months (95% CI, 6-12 months). The 5-year actuarial intrahepatic control was higher for patients with solitary metastasis (38%) than for those with multiple metastases (6%, p = 0.04). The 1-year, 3-year, and 5-year actuarial overall survival rates were 73%, 23%, and 5%, respectively (median, 20 months; 95% CI, 16-24; longest survival, 7.5 years). Overall survival was higher for patients with smaller-volume implants (p = 0.003) and for patients without prior liver resection (p = 0.002). No mortality occurred. Radiation-related complications were minimal. Conclusions: For select patients with unresectable primary and metastatic liver tumors for whom curative surgical resection is not an option, {sup 125}I brachytherapy is a safe and effective alternative to other locally ablative techniques and can provide long-term local control and increased survival.

  17. Deformable anatomical templates for brachytherapy treatment planning in radiotherapy of cervical cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Gary E.; Williamson, Jeffrey F.; Chao, K. S. C.; Miller, Michael I.; So, F. B.; Vannier, Michael W.

    1997-10-01

    This paper describes a new method to register serial, volumetric x-ray computed tomography (CT) data sets for tracking soft-tissue deformation caused by insertion of intracavity brachytherapy applicators to treat cervical cancer. 3D CT scans collected from the same patient with and without a brachytherapy applicator are registered to aid in computation of the radiation dose to tumor and normal tissue. The 3D CT image volume of pelvic anatomy with the applicator. Initial registration is accomplished by rigid alignment of the pelvic bones and non-rigid alignment of gray scale CT data and hand segmentations of the vagina, cervix, bladder, and rectum. A viscous fluid transformation model is used for non-rigid registration to allow for local, non-linear registration of the vagina, cervix, bladder, and rectum without disturbing the rigid registration of the bony pelvis and adjacent structures. Results are presented in which two 3D CT data sets of the same patient - imaged with and without a brachytherapy applicator - are registered.

  18. Differential dose contributions on total dose distribution of (125)I brachytherapy source.

    PubMed

    Camgöz, B; Yeğin, G; Kumru, M N

    2010-01-01

    This work provides an improvement of the approach using Monte Carlo simulation for the Amersham Model 6711 (125)I brachytherapy seed source, which is well known by many theoretical and experimental studies. The source which has simple geometry was researched with respect to criteria of AAPM Tg-43 Report. The approach offered by this study involves determination of differential dose contributions that come from virtual partitions of a massive radioactive element of the studied source to a total dose at analytical calculation point. Some brachytherapy seeds contain multi-radioactive elements so the dose at any point is a total of separate doses from each element. It is momentous to know well the angular and radial dose distributions around the source that is located in cancerous tissue for clinical treatments. Interior geometry of a source is effective on dose characteristics of a distribution. Dose information of inner geometrical structure of a brachytherapy source cannot be acquired by experimental methods because of limits of physical material and geometry in the healthy tissue, so Monte Carlo simulation is a required approach of the study. EGSnrc Monte Carlo simulation software was used. In the design of a simulation, the radioactive source was divided into 10 rings, partitioned but not separate from each other. All differential sources were simulated for dose calculation, and the shape of dose distribution was determined comparatively distribution of a single-complete source. In this work anisotropy function was examined also mathematically. PMID:24376927

  19. [Risk factors of late complications after interstitial 192Ir brachytherapy in cancers of the oral cavity].

    PubMed

    Peiffert, D

    1997-01-01

    Brachytherapy has confirmed its prevailing role in conservative treatment of oral cavity carcinomas. To describe late toxicity in long-term surviving patients, comparisons with other series are necessary. Study of series of patients implanted for floor of the mouth or mobile tongue shows the need for more detailed data. Dental prophylaxy and lead protection of the mandibule, good indications and techniques of brachytherapy are necessary to avoid late complications. Some treatment factors have proved to be of good prognosis for late complications through multivariate analysis of large series treated with lr 192 wires, using the Paris system, eg, dose rate lower than 0.5 or 0.7 Gy/h, intersource spacing smaller than 1.2 or 1.5 cm, treated surface less than 12 cm2, lineic activity less than 1.5 mCi/cm, less than 1 cm diameter hyperdose, and use of mandibular lead protections. Tumor volume and location to the floor of mouth lead to higher risk of complications. Knowledge of treatment-related factors is important, with the development of new afterloading projectors allowing to control the dose rate and correct small inhomogeneities. High-dose rate exclusive brachytherapy is not recommended. More precise and reproducible classification should be used to report complications in series leading to publications in the future, thus allowing to compare results, reduce complication rates and improve the quality of life.

  20. Brachytherapy and Local Excision for Sphincter Preservation in T1 and T2 Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Grimard, Laval Stern, Hartley; Spaans, Johanna N. M.Sc.

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: To report long-term results of brachytherapy after local excision (LE) in the treatment of T1 and T2 rectal cancer at risk of recurrence due to residual subclinical disease. Methods and Materials: Between 1989 and 2007, 32 patients undergoing LE and brachytherapy were followed prospectively for a mean of 6.2 years. Estimates of local recurrence (LR), disease-specific survival (DSS), and overall survival (OS) were generated. Treatment-related toxicity and the effect of known prognostic factors were determined. Results: There were 8 LR (3 T1, 5 T2), of which 5 were salvaged surgically. Median time to the 8 LR was 14 months, and the 5-year rate of local control was 76%. Although there have been 9 deaths to date, only 5 were from disease. Five-year DSS and OS rates were 85% and 78%, respectively. There were 4 cases of Grade 2-3 radionecrosis and 1 case of mild stool incontinence. The sphincter was preserved in 27 of 32 patients. Conclusion: Local excision and adjuvant brachytherapy for T1 and T2 rectal cancer is an appealing treatment alternative to immediate radical resection, particularly in the frail and elderly who are unable to undergo major surgery, as well as for patients wanting to avoid a permanent colostomy.

  1. Postoperative High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy in the Prevention of Keloids

    SciTech Connect

    Veen, Ronald E. Kal, Henk B.

    2007-11-15

    Background: The aim of this study is to show the efficiency of keloidectomy and postoperative interstitial high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy in the prevention of keloids. Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2004, 35 patients with 54 keloids were treated postoperatively with HDR brachytherapy. The first HDR dose was applied within 6 hours after surgery, and two additional HDR doses were administered on the next day with a six-hour interval. The majority of patients received 6 Gy as the first dose postsurgery and two fractions of 4 Gy (38 keloids) on the next day. Seven keloids were treated postoperatively with three fractions of 6 Gy. The biologically effective dose (BED), derived from the linear quadratic concept, was applied to calculate the BED for the various radiation regimens. The keloid recurrence rates at specific BED values were compared with those derived for other fractionation schemes in the literature. Results: Four recurrences/nonsatisfactory results out of nine treated keloids were observed after treatments with 1 x 4 Gy + 2 x 3 Gy. Only one recurrence out of 38 was found after 1 x 6 Gy + 2 x 4 Gy and none after 3 x 6 Gy. Better cosmetic results were found at the higher-dose schemes. Conclusion: The results of this study prove the effectiveness of HDR brachytherapy after keloidectomy provided that the total HDR dose is sufficient. Currently our scheme is 3 x 6 Gy.

  2. Measured microdosimetric spectra and therapeutic potential of boron neutron capture enhancement of 252Cf brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Burmeister, J; Kota, C; Maughan, R L

    2005-09-01

    Californium-252 is a neutron-emitting radioisotope used as a brachytherapy source for radioresistant tumors. Presented here are microdosimetric spectra measured as a function of simulated site diameter and distance from applicator tube 252Cf sources. These spectra were measured using miniature tissue-equivalent proportional counters (TEPCs). An investigation of the clinical potential of boron neutron capture (BNC) enhancement of 252Cf brachytherapy is also provided. The absorbed dose from the BNC reaction was measured using a boron-loaded miniature TEPC. Measured neutron, photon and BNC absorbed dose components are provided as a function of distance from the source. In general, the absorbed dose results show good agreement with results from other measurement techniques. A concomitant boost to 252Cf brachytherapy may be provided through the use of the BNC reaction. The potential magnitude of this BNC enhancement increases with increasing distance from the source and is capable of providing a therapeutic gain greater than 30% at a distance of 5 cm from the source, assuming currently achievable boron concentrations.

  3. Characterization of Low-Energy Photon-Emitting Brachytherapy Sources with Modified Strengths for Applications in Focal Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Joshua L.

    Permanent implants of low-energy photon-emitting brachytherapy sources are used to treat a variety of cancers. Individual source models must be separately characterized due to their unique geometry, materials, and radionuclides, which all influence their dose distributions. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) are often used for dose measurements around low-energy photon-emitting brachytherapy sources. TLDs are typically calibrated with higher energy sources such as 60Co, which requires a correction for the change in the response of the TLDs as a function of photon energy. These corrections have historically been based on TLD response to x ray bremsstrahlung spectra instead of to brachytherapy sources themselves. This work determined the TLD intrinsic energy dependence for 125I and 103Pd sources relative to 60Co, which allows for correction of TLD measurements of brachytherapy sources with factors specific to their energy spectra. Traditional brachytherapy sources contain mobile internal components and large amounts of high-Z material such as radio-opaque markers and titanium encapsulations. These all contribute to perturbations and uncertainties in the dose distribution around the source. The CivaString is a new elongated 103Pd brachytherapy source with a fixed internal geometry, polymer encapsulation, and lengths ranging from 1 to 6 cm, which offers advantages over traditional source designs. This work characterized the CivaString source and the results facilitated the formal approval of this source for use in clinical treatments. Additionally, the accuracy of a superposition technique for dose calculation around the sources with lengths >1 cm was verified. Advances in diagnostic techniques are paving the way for focal brachytherapy in which the dose is intentionally modulated throughout the target volume to focus on subvolumes that contain cancer cells. Brachytherapy sources with variable longitudinal strength (VLS) are a promising candidate for use in focal

  4. American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) and American College of Radiology (ACR) practice guideline for the performance of high-dose-rate brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Beth A; Demanes, D Jeffrey; Ibbott, Geoffrey S; Hayes, John K; Hsu, I-Chow J; Morris, David E; Rabinovitch, Rachel A; Tward, Jonathan D; Rosenthal, Seth A

    2011-03-01

    High-Dose-Rate (HDR) brachytherapy is a safe and efficacious treatment option for patients with a variety of different malignancies. Careful adherence to established standards has been shown to improve the likelihood of procedural success and reduce the incidence of treatment-related morbidity. A collaborative effort of the American College of Radiology (ACR) and American Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) has produced a practice guideline for HDR brachytherapy. The guideline defines the qualifications and responsibilities of all the involved personnel, including the radiation oncologist, physicist and dosimetrists. Review of the leading indications for HDR brachytherapy in the management of gynecologic, thoracic, gastrointestinal, breast, urologic, head and neck, and soft tissue tumors is presented. Logistics with respect to the brachytherapy implant procedures and attention to radiation safety procedures and documentation are presented. Adherence to these practice guidelines can be part of ensuring quality and safety in a successful HDR brachytherapy program.

  5. American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) and American College of Radiology (ACR) practice guideline for the transperineal permanent brachytherapy of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Seth A; Bittner, Nathan H J; Beyer, David C; Demanes, D Jeffrey; Goldsmith, Brian J; Horwitz, Eric M; Ibbott, Geoffrey S; Lee, W Robert; Nag, Subir; Suh, W Warren; Potters, Louis

    2011-02-01

    Transperineal permanent prostate brachytherapy is a safe and efficacious treatment option for patients with organ-confined prostate cancer. Careful adherence to established brachytherapy standards has been shown to improve the likelihood of procedural success and reduce the incidence of treatment-related morbidity. A collaborative effort of the American College of Radiology (ACR) and American Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) has produced a practice guideline for permanent prostate brachytherapy. The guideline defines the qualifications and responsibilities of all the involved personnel, including the radiation oncologist, physicist and dosimetrist. Factors with respect to patient selection and appropriate use of supplemental treatment modalities such as external beam radiation and androgen suppression therapy are discussed. Logistics with respect to the brachytherapy implant procedure, the importance of dosimetric parameters, and attention to radiation safety procedures and documentation are presented. Adherence to these practice guidelines can be part of ensuring quality and safety in a successful prostate brachytherapy program.

  6. American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) and American College of Radiology (ACR) Practice Guideline for the Performance of High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, Beth A.; Demanes, D. Jeffrey; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Hayes, John K.; Hsu, I-Chow J.; Morris, David E.; Rabinovitch, Rachel A.; Tward, Jonathan D.; Rosenthal, Seth A.

    2011-03-01

    High-Dose-Rate (HDR) brachytherapy is a safe and efficacious treatment option for patients with a variety of different malignancies. Careful adherence to established standards has been shown to improve the likelihood of procedural success and reduce the incidence of treatment-related morbidity. A collaborative effort of the American College of Radiology (ACR) and American Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) has produced a practice guideline for HDR brachytherapy. The guideline defines the qualifications and responsibilities of all the involved personnel, including the radiation oncologist, physicist and dosimetrists. Review of the leading indications for HDR brachytherapy in the management of gynecologic, thoracic, gastrointestinal, breast, urologic, head and neck, and soft tissue tumors is presented. Logistics with respect to the brachytherapy implant procedures and attention to radiation safety procedures and documentation are presented. Adherence to these practice guidelines can be part of ensuring quality and safety in a successful HDR brachytherapy program.

  7. Enhancement of high intensity Iodine-125 brachytherapy by cis-platinum in a murine bladder tumor model

    SciTech Connect

    Nag, S.; Blatnik, A.; Soloway, M.

    1984-06-01

    The interaction of cis-platinum chemotherapy and high-intensity Iodine-125 brachytherapy was studied in C3H/He mice with MBT-2 tumors growing in the thigh. Brachytherapy was delivered by 3 Iodine-125 seeds of 10 mCi each implanted into the tumor. Ninety-six animals were randomly divided into 8 groups of 12 animals each. Each group was given either no treatment (control), cis-platinum alone or brachytherapy of 20, 40 or 50 Gy either alone or combined with cis-platinum. Cis-platinum 3 mg. per kg. was given every 5 days for 3 doses. The addition of cis-platinum enhanced the effects of Iodine-125 brachytherapy as shown by the end-points of tumor regrowth delay, local tumor control and median survival times. The sensitization enhancement ratio ranged from 1.2 to 1.9. Further experiments are to be conducted to study the normal tissue effect, therapeutic gain factor, effects of altering the time of administration of cis-platinum and the clinical use of high-intensity Iodine-125 for removable brachytherapy.

  8. Source position verification and dosimetry in HDR brachytherapy using an EPID

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R. L.; Taylor, M. L.; McDermott, L. N.; Franich, R. D.; Haworth, A.; Millar, J. L.

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Accurate treatment delivery in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy requires correct source dwell positions and dwell times to be administered relative to each other and to the surrounding anatomy. Treatment delivery inaccuracies predominantly occur for two reasons: (i) anatomical movement or (ii) as a result of human errors that are usually related to incorrect implementation of the planned treatment. Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) were originally developed for patient position verification in external beam radiotherapy and their application has been extended to provide dosimetric information. The authors have characterized the response of an EPID for use with an {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy source to demonstrate its use as a verification device, providing both source position and dosimetric information.Methods: Characterization of the EPID response using an {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy source included investigations of reproducibility, linearity with dose rate, photon energy dependence, and charge build-up effects associated with exposure time and image acquisition time. Source position resolution in three dimensions was determined. To illustrate treatment verification, a simple treatment plan was delivered to a phantom and the measured EPID dose distribution compared with the planned dose.Results: The mean absolute source position error in the plane parallel to the EPID, for dwells measured at 50, 100, and 150 mm source to detector distances (SDD), was determined to be 0.26 mm. The resolution of the z coordinate (perpendicular distance from detector plane) is SDD dependent with 95% confidence intervals of ±0.1, ±0.5, and ±2.0 mm at SDDs of 50, 100, and 150 mm, respectively. The response of the EPID is highly linear to dose rate. The EPID exhibits an over-response to low energy incident photons and this nonlinearity is incorporated into the dose calibration procedure. A distance (spectral) dependent dose rate calibration procedure has been

  9. Intensity Modulated Proton Beam Radiation for Brachytherapy in Patients With Cervical Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Clivio, Alessandro; Kluge, Anne; Cozzi, Luca; Köhler, Christhardt; Neumann, Oliver; Vanetti, Eugenio; Wlodarczyk, Waldemar; Marnitz, Simone

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) in patients with cervical cancer in terms of coverage, conformity, and dose–volume histogram (DVH) parameters correlated with recommendations from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Eleven patients with histologically proven cervical cancer underwent primary chemoradiation for the pelvic lymph nodes, the uterus, the cervix, and the parametric region, with a symmetric margin of 1 cm. The prescription was for 50.4 Gy, with 1.8 Gy per fraction. The prescribed dose to the parametria was 2.12 Gy up to 59.36 Gy in 28 fractions as a simultaneous boost. For several reasons, the patients were unable to undergo brachytherapy. As an alternative, IMPT was planned with 5 fractions of 6 Gy to the cervix, including the macroscopic tumor with an MRI-guided target definition, with an isotropic margin of 5 mm for planning target volume (PTV) definition. Groupe-Europeen de Curietherapie and European society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (GEC-ESTRO) criteria were used for DVH evaluation. Reference comparison plans were optimized for volumetric modulated rapid arc (VMAT) therapy with the RapidArc (RA). Results: The dose to the high-risk volume was calculated with α/β = 10 with 89.6 Gy. For IMPT, the clinical target volume showed a mean dose of 38.2 ± 5.0 Gy (35.0 ±1.8 Gy for RA). The D{sub 98%} was 31.9 ± 2.6 Gy (RA: 30.8 ± 1.0 Gy). With regard to the organs at risk, the 2Gy Equivalent Dose (EQD2) (α/β = 3) to 2 cm{sup 3} of the rectal wall, sigmoid wall, and bladder wall was 62.2 ± 6.4 Gy, 57.8 ± 6.1 Gy, and 80.6 ± 8.7 Gy (for RA: 75.3 ± 6.1 Gy, 66.9 ± 6.9 Gy, and 89.0 ± 7.2 Gy, respectively). For the IMPT boost plans in combination with external beam radiation therapy, all DVH parameters correlated with <5% risk for grades 2 to 4 late gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity. Conclusion: In patients who are not eligible for brachytherapy, IMPT as a boost

  10. SU-E-T-564: Multi-Helix Rotating Shield Brachytherapy for Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Dadkhah, H; Wu, X; Flynn, R; Kim, Y

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To present a novel and practical brachytherapy technique, called multi-helix rotating shield brachytherapy (H-RSBT), for the precise positioning of a partial shield in a curved applicator. H-RSBT enables RSBT delivery using only translational motion of the radiation source/shield combination. H-RSBT overcomes the challenges associated with previously proposed RSBT approaches based on a serial (S-RSBT) step-and-shoot delivery technique, which required independent translational and rotational motion. Methods: A Fletcher-type applicator, compatible with the combination of a Xoft Axxent™ electronic brachytherapy source and a 0.5 mm thick tungsten shield, is proposed. The wall of the applicator contains six evenly-spaced helical keyways that rigidly define the emission direction of the shield as a function of depth. The shield contains three protruding keys and is attached to the source such that it rotates freely. S-RSBT and H-RSBT treatment plans with 180° and 45° azimuthal emission angles were generated for five cervical cancer patients representative of a wide range of high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) shapes and applicator positions. The number of beamlets used in the treatment planning process was nearly constant for S-RSBT and H-RSBT by using dwell positions separated by 5 and 1.7 mm, respectively, and emission directions separated by 22.5° and 60°, respectively. For all the treatment plans the EQD2 of the HR-CTV was escalated until the EQD{sub 2cc} tolerance of either the bladder, rectum, or sigmoid colon was reached. Results: Treatment times for H-RSBT tended to be shorter than for S-RSBT, with changes of −38.47% to 1.12% with an average of −8.34%. The HR-CTV D{sub 90} changed by −8.81% to 2.08% with an average of −2.46%. Conclusion: H-RSBT is a mechanically feasible technique in the curved applicators needed for cervical cancer brachytherapy. S-RSBT and H-RSBT dose distributions were clinically equivalent for all patients

  11. Brachytherapy source characterization for improved dose calculations using primary and scatter dose separation

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Kellie R.; Carlsson Tedgren, Aasa K.; Ahnesjoe, Anders

    2005-09-15

    In brachytherapy, tissue heterogeneities, source shielding, and finite patient/phantom extensions affect both the primary and scatter dose distributions. The primary dose is, due to the short range of secondary electrons, dependent only on the distribution of material located on the ray line between the source and dose deposition site. The scatter dose depends on both the direct irradiation pattern and the distribution of material in a large volume surrounding the point of interest, i.e., a much larger volume must be included in calculations to integrate many small dose contributions. It is therefore of interest to consider different methods for the primary and the scatter dose calculation to improve calculation accuracy with limited computer resources. The algorithms in present clinical use ignore these effects causing systematic dose errors in brachytherapy treatment planning. In this work we review a primary and scatter dose separation formalism (PSS) for brachytherapy source characterization to support separate calculation of the primary and scatter dose contributions. We show how the resulting source characterization data can be used to drive more accurate dose calculations using collapsed cone superposition for scatter dose calculations. Two types of source characterization data paths are used: a direct Monte Carlo simulation in water phantoms with subsequent parameterization of the results, and an alternative data path built on processing of AAPM TG43 formatted data to provide similar parameter sets. The latter path is motivated of the large amounts of data already existing in the TG43 format. We demonstrate the PSS methods using both data paths for a clinical {sup 192}Ir source. Results are shown for two geometries: a finite but homogeneous water phantom, and a half-slab consisting of water and air. The dose distributions are compared to results from full Monte Carlo simulations and we show significant improvement in scatter dose calculations when the

  12. SU-E-T-397: Include Organ Deformation Into Dose Calculation of Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Y; Shen, D; Chen, R; Wang, A; Lian, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Prostate brachytherapy is an important curative treatment for patients with localized prostate cancer. In brachytherapy, rectal balloon is generally needed to adjust for unfavorable prostate position for seed placement. However, rectal balloon causes prostate deformation, which is not accounted for in dosimetric planning. Therefore, it is possible that brachytherapy dosimetry deviates significantly from initial plan when prostate returns to its non-deformed state (after procedure). The goal of this study is to develop a method to include prostate deformation into the treatment planning of brachytherapy dosimetry. Methods: We prospectively collected ultrasound images of prostate pre- and post- rectal balloon inflation from thirty five consecutive patients undergoing I-125 brachytherapy. Based on the cylinder coordinate systems, we learned the initial coordinate transformation parameters between the manual segmentations of both deformed and non-deformed prostates of each patient in training set. With the nearest-neighbor interpolation, we searched the best transformation between two coordinate systems to maximum the mutual information of deformed and non-deformed images. We then mapped the implanted seeds of five selected patients from the deformed prostate into non-deformed prostate. The seed position is marked on original pre-inflation US image and it is imported into VariSeed software for dose calculation. Results: The accuracy of image registration is 87.5% as quantified by Dice Index. The prostate coverage V100% dropped from 96.5±0.5% of prostate deformed plan to 91.9±2.6% (p<0.05) of non-deformed plan. The rectum V100% decreased from 0.44±0.26 cc to 0.10±0.18 cc (p<0.05). The dosimetry of the urethra showed mild change but not significant: V150% changed from 0.05±0.10 cc to 0.14±0.15 cc (p>0.05) and D1% changed from 212.9±37.3 Gy to 248.4±42.8 Gy (p>0.05). Conclusion: We have developed a deformable image registration method that allows

  13. Distant Metastases Following Permanent Interstitial Brachytherapy for Patients With Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Taira, Al V.; Merrick, Gregory S.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Butler, Wayne M.; Lief, Jonathan; Adamovich, Edward; Wallner, Kent E.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Recent publications have suggested high-risk patients undergoing radical prostatectomy have a lower risk of distant metastases and improved cause-specific survival (CSS) than patients receiving definitive external beam radiation therapy (XRT). To date, none of these studies has compared distant metastases and CSS in brachytherapy patients. In this study, we evaluate such parameters in a consecutive cohort of brachytherapy patients. Methods and Materials: From April 1995 to June 2007, 1,840 consecutive patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated with brachytherapy. Risk groups were stratified according to National Comprehensive Cancer Network ( (www.nccn.org)) guidelines. Subgroups of 658, 893, and 289 patients were assigned to low, intermediate, and high-risk categories. Median follow-up was 7.2 years. Along with brachytherapy implantation, 901 (49.0%) patients received supplemental XRT, and 670 (36.4%) patients received androgen deprivation therapy (median duration, 4 months). The mode of failure (biochemical, local, or distant) was determined for each patient for whom therapy failed. Cause of death was determined for each deceased patient. Multiple parameters were evaluated for impact on outcome. Results: For the entire cohort, metastases-free survival (MFS) and CSS at 12 years were 98.1% and 98.2%, respectively. When rates were stratified by low, intermediate, and high-risk groups, the 12-year MFS was 99.8%, 98.1%, and 93.8% (p < 0.001), respectively. CSS rates were 99.8%, 98.0%, and 95.3% (p < 0.001) for low, intermediate, and high-risk groups, respectively. Biochemical progression-free survival was 98.7%, 95.9% and 90.4% for low, intermediate, and high-risk patients, respectively (p < 0.001). In multivariate Cox-regression analysis, MFS was mostly closely related to Gleason score and year of treatment, whereas CSS was most closely associated with Gleason score. Conclusions: Excellent CSS and MFS rates are achievable with high

  14. Dose-reducing effect of Lipowitz metal-embedded spacers in interstitial brachytherapy for carcinoma of the mobile tongue.

    PubMed

    Fujita, M; Hirokawa, Y; Tamamoto, M; Kashiwado, K; Akagi, Y; Kashimoto, K; Wada, T

    1994-06-01

    Dose-reducing effects of spacers with and without a Lipowitz metal plate for the purpose of decreasing osteoradionecrosis after interstitial brachytherapy for tongue cancers were examined experimentally and clinically. The thicker the sample or spacer and the thicker the metal plate, the greater was the dose reduction achieved. A more marked dose reduction was achieved with iridium than with radium because of lower gamma ray energy of iridium. Iridium has been used widely as a radioactive source for interstitial brachytherapy. It was concluded therefore that a metal plate should be used as a shield into the spacer in interstitial brachytherapy both to reduce the radiation dose to surrounding normal tissues and to help prevent osteoradionecrosis. PMID:8065721

  15. Intravaginal brachytherapy alone for intermediate-risk endometrial cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Alektiar, Kaled M. . E-mail: alektiak@mskcc.org; Venkatraman, Ennapadam; Chi, Dennis S.; Barakat, Richard R.

    2005-05-01

    Purpose: Despite the results of the Gynecologic Oncology Group trial No. 99 (GOG no. 99), some unanswered questions still remain about the role of adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) for intermediate-risk endometrial cancer. First, can intravaginal brachytherapy (IVRT) alone substitute for external beam RT but without added morbidity? Second, is the high-risk (HR) definition from GOG no. 99 a useful tool to predict pelvic recurrence specifically? The purpose of this study was to try to answer these questions in a group of patients with Stage IB-IIB endometrial carcinoma treated with high-dose-rate (HDR) IVRT alone. Methods and Materials: Between November 1987 and December 2002, 382 patients with Stage IB-IIB endometrial carcinoma were treated with simple hysterectomy followed by HDR-IVRT alone at our institution. Comprehensive surgical staging (CSS), defined as pelvic washings and pelvic/paraaortic lymph node sampling, was performed in 20% of patients. The mean age was 60 years (range, 29-92 years). Lymphovascular invasion (LVI) was present in 14% of patients. The median HDR-IVRT dose was 21 Gy (range, 6-21 Gy), given in three fractions. Complications were assessed in terms of late Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (Grade 3 or worse) toxicity of the GI tract, genitourinary GU tract, and vagina. Results: With a median follow-up of 48 months, the 5-year vaginal/pelvic control rate was 95% (95% confidence interval [CI], 93-98%). On multivariate analysis, a poor vaginal/pelvic control rate correlated with age {>=}60 years old (relative risk [RR], 3, 95% CI, 1-12; p = 0.01), International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) Grade 3 (RR, 9, 95% CI, 2-35; p = 0.03), and LVI (RR, 4, 95% CI, 1-13; p = 0.051). The depth of myometrial invasion and CSS, however, were not significant. With regard to pelvic control specifically, the presence of GOG no. 99 HR features did not affect the pelvic control rate. The 5-year rate for HR patients was 96% (95% CI, 90-100%) vs. 96% (95

  16. SU-E-J-222: Evaluation of Deformable Registration of PET/CT Images for Cervical Cancer Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Y; Turian, J; Templeton, A; Kiel, K; Chu, J; Kadir, T

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: PET/CT provides important functional information for radiotherapy targeting of cervical cancer. However, repeated PET/CT procedures for external beam and subsequent brachytherapy expose patients to additional radiation and are not cost effective. Our goal is to investigate the possibility of propagating PET-active volumes for brachytherapy procedures through deformable image registration (DIR) of earlier PET/CT and ultimately to minimize the number of PET/CT image sessions required. Methods: Nine cervical cancer patients each received their brachytherapy preplanning PET/CT at the end of EBRT with a Syed template in place. The planning PET/CT was acquired on the day of brachytherapy treatment with the actual applicator (Syed or Tandem and Ring) and rigidly registered. The PET/CT images were then deformably registered creating a third (deformed) image set for target prediction. Regions of interest with standardized uptake values (SUV) greater than 65% of maximum SUV were contoured as target volumes in all three sets of PET images. The predictive value of the registered images was evaluated by comparing the preplanning and deformed PET volumes with the planning PET volume using Dice's coefficient (DC) and center-of-mass (COM) displacement. Results: The average DCs were 0.12±0.14 and 0.19±0.16 for rigid and deformable predicted target volumes, respectively. The average COM displacements were 1.9±0.9 cm and 1.7±0.7 cm for rigid and deformable registration, respectively. The DCs were improved by deformable registration, however, both were lower than published data for DIR in other modalities and clinical sites. Anatomical changes caused by different brachytherapy applicators could have posed a challenge to the DIR algorithm. The physiological change from interstitial needle placement may also contribute to lower DC. Conclusion: The clinical use of DIR in PET/CT for cervical cancer brachytherapy appears to be limited by applicator choice and requires further

  17. Radiobiological modelling of dose-gradient effects in low dose rate, high dose rate and pulsed brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armpilia, C.; Dale, R. G.; Sandilos, P.; Vlachos, L.

    2006-09-01

    This paper presents a generalization of a previously published methodology which quantified the radiobiological consequences of dose-gradient effects in brachytherapy applications. The methodology uses the linear-quadratic (LQ) formulation to identify an equivalent biologically effective dose (BEDeq) which, if applied uniformly to a specified tissue volume, would produce the same net cell survival as that achieved by a given non-uniform brachytherapy application. Multiplying factors (MFs), which enable the equivalent BED for an enclosed volume to be estimated from the BED calculated at the dose reference surface, have been calculated and tabulated for both spherical and cylindrical geometries. The main types of brachytherapy (high dose rate (HDR), low dose rate (LDR) and pulsed (PB)) have been examined for a range of radiobiological parameters/dimensions. Equivalent BEDs are consistently higher than the BEDs calculated at the reference surface by an amount which depends on the treatment prescription (magnitude of the prescribed dose) at the reference point. MFs are closely related to the numerical BED values, irrespective of how the original BED was attained (e.g., via HDR, LDR or PB). Thus, an average MF can be used for a given prescribed BED as it will be largely independent of the assumed radiobiological parameters (radiosensitivity and α/β) and standardized look-up tables may be applicable to all types of brachytherapy treatment. This analysis opens the way to more systematic approaches for correlating physical and biological effects in several types of brachytherapy and for the improved quantitative assessment and ranking of clinical treatments which involve a brachytherapy component.

  18. Image-guided high-dose-rate brachytherapy of malignancies in various inner organs – technique, indications, and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Bretschneider, Tina; Ricke, Jens; Gebauer, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    In the last few years, minimally invasive tumor ablation performed by interventional radiologists has gained increasing relevance in oncologic patient care. Limitations of thermal ablation techniques such as radiofrequency ablation (RFA), microwave ablation (MWA), and laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT), including large tumor size, cooling effects of adjacent vessels, and tumor location near thermosensitive structures, have led to the development of image-guided high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy, especially for the treatment of liver malignancies. This article reviews technical properties of image-guided brachytherapy, indications and its current clinical role in multimodal cancer treatment. Furthermore, perspectives of this novel therapy option will be discussed. PMID:27504135

  19. Salvage brachytherapy in combination with interstitial hyperthermia for locally recurrent prostate carcinoma following external beam radiation therapy: a prospective phase II study

    PubMed Central

    Strnad, Vratislav; Stauffer, Paul; Dąbrowski, Tomasz; Hetnał, Marcin; Nahajowski, Damian; Walasek, Tomasz; Brandys, Piotr; Matys, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Optimal treatment for patients with only local prostate cancer recurrence after external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) failure remains unclear. Possible curative treatments are radical prostatectomy, cryosurgery, and brachytherapy. Several single institution series proved that high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRBT) and pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy (PDRBT) are reasonable options for this group of patients with acceptable levels of genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity. A standard dose prescription and scheme have not been established yet, and the literature presents a wide range of fractionation protocols. Furthermore, hyperthermia has shown the potential to enhance the efficacy of re-irradiation. Consequently, a prospective trial is urgently needed to attain clear structured prospective data regarding the efficacy of salvage brachytherapy with adjuvant hyperthermia for locally recurrent prostate cancer. The purpose of this report is to introduce a new prospective phase II trial that would meet this need. The primary aim of this prospective phase II study combining Iridium-192 brachytherapy with interstitial hyperthermia (IHT) is to analyze toxicity of the combined treatment; a secondary aim is to define the efficacy (bNED, DFS, OS) of salvage brachytherapy. The dose prescribed to PTV will be 30 Gy in 3 fractions for HDRBT, and 60 Gy in 2 fractions for PDRBT. During IHT, the prostate will be heated to the range of 40–47°C for 60 minutes prior to brachytherapy dose delivery. The protocol plans for treatment of 77 patients. PMID:26207116

  20. Sensitivity of low energy brachytherapy Monte Carlo dose calculations to uncertainties in human tissue composition

    SciTech Connect

    Landry, Guillaume; Reniers, Brigitte; Murrer, Lars; Lutgens, Ludy; Bloemen-Van Gurp, Esther; Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Keller, Brian; Beaulieu, Luc; Verhaegen, Frank

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: The objective of this work is to assess the sensitivity of Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations to uncertainties in human tissue composition for a range of low photon energy brachytherapy sources: {sup 125}I, {sup 103}Pd, {sup 131}Cs, and an electronic brachytherapy source (EBS). The low energy photons emitted by these sources make the dosimetry sensitive to variations in tissue atomic number due to the dominance of the photoelectric effect. This work reports dose to a small mass of water in medium D{sub w,m} as opposed to dose to a small mass of medium in medium D{sub m,m}. Methods: Mean adipose, mammary gland, and breast tissues (as uniform mixture of the aforementioned tissues) are investigated as well as compositions corresponding to one standard deviation from the mean. Prostate mean compositions from three different literature sources are also investigated. Three sets of MC simulations are performed with the GEANT4 code: (1) Dose calculations for idealized TG-43-like spherical geometries using point sources. Radial dose profiles obtained in different media are compared to assess the influence of compositional uncertainties. (2) Dose calculations for four clinical prostate LDR brachytherapy permanent seed implants using {sup 125}I seeds (Model 2301, Best Medical, Springfield, VA). The effect of varying the prostate composition in the planning target volume (PTV) is investigated by comparing PTV D{sub 90} values. (3) Dose calculations for four clinical breast LDR brachytherapy permanent seed implants using {sup 103}Pd seeds (Model 2335, Best Medical). The effects of varying the adipose/gland ratio in the PTV and of varying the elemental composition of adipose and gland within one standard deviation of the assumed mean composition are investigated by comparing PTV D{sub 90} values. For (2) and (3), the influence of using the mass density from CT scans instead of unit mass density is also assessed. Results: Results from simulation (1) show that variations

  1. Evaluation of TG-43 recommended 2D-anisotropy function for elongated brachytherapy sources.

    PubMed

    Awan, Shahid B; Meigooni, Ali S; Mokhberiosgouei, Ramin; Hussain, Manzoor

    2006-11-01

    The original and updated protocols recommended by Task Group 43 from the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (i.e., TG-43 and TG-43U1, respectively), have been introduced to unify brachytherapy source dosimetry around the world. Both of these protocols are based on experiences with sources less than 1.0 cm in length. TG-43U1 recommends that for 103Pd sources, 2D anisotropy function F(r, theta), should be tabulated at a minimum for radial distances of 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, and 5.0 cm. Anisotropy functions defined in these protocols are only valid when the point of calculation does not fall on the active length of the source. However, for elongated brachytherapy sources (active length >1 cm), some of the calculation points with r < 1/2 active length and small theta may fall on the source itself and there is no clear recommendation to handle this situation. In addition, the linear interpolation technique recommended by TG-43U1 is found to be valid for seed types of sources as the difference between F(r, theta) for two consecutive radii is <10%. However, in the present investigations it has been found that values of F(r, 5 degrees) for a 5 cm long RadioCoil 103Pd source at radial distances of 2.5, 3.0, and 4.0 cm were 2.95, 1.74, and 1.19, respectively, with differences up to about a factor of 3. Therefore, the validity of the linear interpolation technique for an elongated brachytherapy source with such a large variation in F(r, theta) needs to be investigated. In this project, application of the TG-43U1 formalism for dose calculation around an elongated RadioCoil 103Pd brachytherapy source has been investigated. In addition, the linear interpolation techniques as described in TG-43U1 for seed type sources have been evaluated for a 5.0 cm long RadioCoil 103Pd brachytherapy source. Application of a polynomial fit to F(r, theta) has also been investigated as an alternate approach to the linear interpolation technique. The results of these investigations

  2. Human factors evaluation of remote afterloading brachytherapy: Human error and critical tasks in remote afterloading brachytherapy and approaches for improved system performance. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Callan, J.R.; Kelly, R.T.; Quinn, M.L.

    1995-05-01

    Remote Afterloading Brachytherapy (RAB) is a medical process used in the treatment of cancer. RAB uses a computer-controlled device to remotely insert and remove radioactive sources close to a target (or tumor) in the body. Some RAB problems affecting the radiation dose to the patient have been reported and attributed to human error. To determine the root cause of human error in the RAB system, a human factors team visited 23 RAB treatment sites in the US The team observed RAB treatment planning and delivery, interviewed RAB personnel, and performed walk-throughs, during which staff demonstrated the procedures and practices used in performing RAB tasks. Factors leading to human error in the RAB system were identified. The impact of those factors on the performance of RAB was then evaluated and prioritized in terms of safety significance. Finally, the project identified and evaluated alternative approaches for resolving the safety significant problems related to human error.

  3. High-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for liver metastases: first study from India

    PubMed Central

    Thulkar, Sanjay; Sharma, Seema; Gandhi, Ajeet Kumar; Haresh, Kunhi Parambath; Gupta, Subhash; Rath, Goura Kisor; Julka, Pramod Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To study the safety and efficacy of high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (HDRIBT) in patients with liver metastases (LM). Material and methods Between 2009 and 2011, 10 patients with 12 metastatic lesions in the liver were enrolled in this prospective trial. All patients had either refused surgery or found ineligible for surgery due to various factors. Under CT guidance, 16 gauze blind end stainless steel or rigid plastic brachytherapy needle was inserted in the center of lesion through the percutaneous route. Generally, a single interstitial brachytherapy (IBT) needle for lesions up to 3 cm and multiple needles for lesions more than 3 cm in diameter were inserted. Treatment was delivered with a single high-dose-rate (HDR) dose of 20 Gy prescribed to the target. The needles were removed immediately after the treatment. The endpoints of study were acute complications and local control of the disease. Results The median size of the lesion was 3.8 cm (2.7-7.0 cm). The average time for the entire IBT procedure was 65 minutes (50-105 minutes). Median follow up was 9 months (3-17 months). None of the patients had fatal complications. Minor complications like pain, nausea/vomiting, and asymptomatic pleural effusion were observed in 3, 2 and 1 patients, respectively. Local control rate at 12 months was 75%. The 1-year local progression free survival (LPFS) was 33%. Conclusion Although limited by small sample size, the results of our first study from India suggest that HDRIBT is a safe and effective non surgical option for LM. PMID:23878550

  4. Photoacoustic imaging of brachytherapy seeds using a channel-domain ultrasound array system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Tyler; Zemp, Roger J.

    2011-03-01

    Brachytherapy is a technique commonly used in the treatment of prostate cancer that relies on the precise placement of small radioactive seeds near the tumor location. The advantage of this technique over traditional radiation therapies is that treatment can be continuous and uniform, resulting in fewer clinic visits and a shorter treatment duration. Two important phases of this treatment are needle guidance for implantation, and post-placement verification for dosimetry. Ultrasound is a common imaging modality used for these purposes, but it can be difficult to distinguish the seeds from surrounding tissues, often requiring other imaging techniques such as MRI or CT. Photoacoustic imaging may offer a viable alternative. Using a photoacoustic system based on an L7- 4 array transducer and a realtime ultrasound array system capable of parallel channel data acquisition streamed to a multi-core computer via PCI-express, we have demonstrated imaging of these seeds at an ultrasound depth of 16 mm and laser penetration depths ranging up to 50 mm in chicken tissue with multiple optical wavelengths. Ultrasound and photoacoustic images are coregistered via an interlaced pulse sequence. Two laser pulses are used to form a photoacoustic image, and at these depths, the brachytherapy seeds are detected with a signal-to-noise ratio of over 26dB. To obtain this result, 1064nm light was used with a fluence of 100mJ/cm2, the ANSI limit for human skin exposure at this wavelength. This study demonstrates the potential for photoacoustic imaging as a candidate technology for brachytherapy seed placement guidance and verification.

  5. Segmental Urethral Dosimetry and Urinary Toxicity in Patients With No Urinary Symptoms Before Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, Carys; Keyes, Mira Liu, Mitchell; Moravan, Veronika

    2008-10-01

    Purpose: To determine whether segmental urethral dosimetry is predictive for the degree of urinary morbidity after prostate brachytherapy in patients with no urinary symptoms before prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Between May 2000 and November 2005, 1,107 patients underwent iodine-125 monotherapy with urethral sparing techniques. A total of 166 patients fulfilled the selection criteria: baseline (International Prostate Symptom Score) IPSS {<=}5, no androgen deprivation therapy, and prostate ultrasound planning volumes (PUTV) <45 mL. The median follow-up was 44 months. Urinary morbidity was defined by maximum increase in IPSS, time to IPSS resolution, maximum Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) score, time to RTOG resolution, and urinary retention. Surrogate deviated urethra was contoured and doses calculated at the base, mid-prostate, apex, and urogenital diaphragm. Univariate and multivariate analysis was used to evaluate urethral and prostate dosimetry, age, PUTV, and number of needles for their association with urinary morbidity. Results: Urethral dose was fairly constant in all urethra segments except prostate base, where the variation in does was large. On multivariate analysis, higher urethral base D50, V100, and larger PUTV were predictive for higher maximum increase in IPSS. Higher urethral base V100 and larger PUTV predicted for prolonged IPSS resolution. Higher urethral base D50 and larger needle number predicted for longer RTOG resolution. Higher urethral base V100 predicted for RTOG {>=}2 toxicity. Conclusions: Radiation dose to the urethral base, larger PUTV, and needle number, predicted for increased urinary toxicity after prostate brachytherapy. Correlation between urinary morbidity and urethral base dosimetry may reflect a large variation in urethral dose observed at the prostate base.

  6. CT-guided brachytherapy of prostate cancer: reduction of effective dose from X-ray examination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanin, Dmitriy B.; Biryukov, Vitaliy A.; Rusetskiy, Sergey S.; Sviridov, Pavel V.; Volodina, Tatiana V.

    2014-03-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is one of the most effective and informative diagnostic method. Though the number of CT scans among all radiographic procedures in the USA and European countries is 11% and 4% respectively, CT makes the highest contribution to the collective effective dose from all radiographic procedures, it is 67% in the USA and 40% in European countries [1-5]. Therefore it is necessary to understand the significance of dose value from CT imaging to a patient . Though CT dose from multiple scans and potential risk is of great concern in pediatric patients, this applies to adults as well. In this connection it is very important to develop optimal approaches to dose reduction and optimization of CT examination. International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in its publications recommends radiologists to be aware that often CT image quality is higher than it is necessary for diagnostic confidence[6], and there is a potential to reduce the dose which patient gets from CT examination [7]. In recent years many procedures, such as minimally invasive surgery, biopsy, brachytherapy and different types of ablation are carried out under guidance of computed tomography [6;7], and during a procedures multiple CT scans focusing on a specific anatomic region are performed. At the Clinics of MRRC different types of treatment for patients with prostate cancer are used, incuding conformal CT-guided brachytherapy, implantation of microsources of I into the gland under guidance of spiral CT [8]. So, the purpose of the study is to choose optimal method to reduce radiation dose from CT during CT-guided prostate brachytherapy and to obtain the image of desired quality.

  7. High-Dose-Rate 192Ir Brachytherapy Dose Verification: A Phantom Study

    PubMed Central

    Nikoofar, Alireza; Hoseinpour, Zohreh; Rabi Mahdavi, Seied; Hasanzadeh, Hadi; Rezaei Tavirani, Mostafa

    2015-01-01

    Background: The high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy might be an effective tool for palliation of dysphagia. Because of some concerns about adverse effects due to absorbed radiation dose, it is important to estimate absorbed dose in risky organs during this treatment. Objectives: This study aimed to measure the absorbed dose in the parotid, thyroid, and submandibular gland, eye, trachea, spinal cord, and manubrium of sternum in brachytherapy in an anthropomorphic phantom. Materials and Methods: To measure radiation dose, eye, parotid, thyroid, and submandibular gland, spine, and sternum, an anthropomorphic phantom was considered with applicators to set thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs). A specific target volume of about 23 cm3 in the upper thoracic esophagus was considered as target, and phantom planned computed tomography (CT) for HDR brachytherapy, then with a micro-Selectron HDR (192Ir) remote after-loading unit. Results: Absorbed doses were measured with calibrated TLDs and were expressed in centi-Gray (cGy). In regions far from target (≥ 16 cm) such as submandibular, parotid and thyroid glands, mean measured dose ranged from 1.65 to 5.5 cGy. In closer regions (≤ 16 cm), the absorbed dose might be as high as 113 cGy. Conclusions: Our study showed similar depth and surface doses; in closer regions, the surface and depth doses differed significantly due to the role of primary radiation that had imposed a high-dose gradient and difference between the plan and measurement, which was more severe because of simplifications in tissue inhomogeneity, considered in TPS relative to phantom. PMID:26413250

  8. Stratification of brachytherapy-treated intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients into favorable and unfavorable cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Wayne M.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Fiano, Ryan; Adamovich, Edward

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate biochemical failure (BF) and prostate cancer specific mortality (PCSM) in intermediate-risk (IR) brachytherapy patients stratified into favorable and unfavorable cohorts, and to compare those outcomes to patients with low (LR) and high-risk (HR) disease. Material and methods From March 1995 till February 2012, 2,502 consecutive patients underwent permanent interstitial brachytherapy for clinically localized prostate cancer. Patients were stratified into risk groups as per the NCCN guidelines with further stratification of the intermediate risk cohort into unfavorable (primary Gleason pattern 4, ≥ 50% positive biopsies or ≥ 2 IR features) and favorable cohorts. Median follow-up was 8.5 years. The brachytherapy prescription dose was prescribed to the prostate gland with generous periprostatic margins. Biochemical failure was defined as a PSA > 0.40 ng/ml after nadir. Patients with metastatic prostate cancer or non-metastatic castrate resistant disease who died of any cause were classified as dead of prostate cancer. Multiple parameters were evaluated for effect on outcomes. Results Fifteen year BF for LR, favorable IR, unfavorable IR, and HR were 1.4%, 2.2%, 7.1%, and 11.1% (p < 0.001), respectively. At 15 years, PCSM for LR, favorable IR, unfavorable IR, and HR was 0.3%, 0.6%, 2.2% and 4.6% (p < 0.001), respectively. In multivariate analysis, BF was best predicted by risk group, pre-implant PSA, percent positive biopsies, prostate volume, and ADT duration, while PCSM was most closely related to risk group, percent positive biopsies and prostate volume. Conclusions Patients with favorable IR disease have biochemical and PCSM outcomes comparable to those of patients with LR disease. Although unfavorable IR has greater than a 3-fold increased risk of BF and PCSM when compared to favorable IR, the outcomes remain superior to those men with HR disease. PMID:26816337

  9. Use of water-equivalent plastic scintillator for intravascular brachytherapy dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Geso, M; Robinson, N; Schumer, W; Williams, K

    2004-03-01

    Beta irradiation has recently been investigated as a possible technique for the prevention of restenosis in intravascular brachytherapy after balloon dilatation or stent implantation. Present methods of beta radiation dosimetry are primarily conducted using radiochromic film. These film dosimeters exhibit limited sensitivity and their characteristics differ from those of tissue, therefore the dose measurement readings require correction factors to be applied. In this work a novel, mini-size (2 mm diameter by 5 mm long) dosimeter element fabricated from Organic Plastic Scintillator (OPS) material was employed. Scintillation photon detection is accomplished using a precision photodiode and innovative signal amplification and processing techniques, rather than traditional photomultiplier tube methods. A significant improvement in signal to noise ratio, dynamic range and stability is achieved using this set-up. In addition, use of the non-saturating organic plastic scintillator material as the detector enables the dosimeter to measure beta radiation at very close distances to the source. In this work the plastic scintillators have been used to measure beta radiation dose at distances of less than 1 mm from an Sr-90 cardiovascular brachytherapy source having an activity of about 2.1 GBq beta radiation levels for both depth-distance and longitudinal profile of the source pellet chain, both in air and in liquid water, are measured using this system. The data obtained is compared with results from Monte Carlo simulation technique (MCNP 4B). Plastic scintillator dosimeter elements, when used in conjunction with photodiode detectors may prove to be useful dosimeters for cardiovascular brachytherapy beta sources, or other applications where precise near-source field dosimetry is required. The system described is particularly useful where measurement of actual dose rate in real time, a high level of stability and repeatability, portability, and immediate access to results are

  10. Novel tools for stepping source brachytherapy treatment planning: Enhanced geometrical optimization and interactive inverse planning

    SciTech Connect

    Dinkla, Anna M. Laarse, Rob van der; Koedooder, Kees; Petra Kok, H.; Wieringen, Niek van; Pieters, Bradley R.; Bel, Arjan

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: Dose optimization for stepping source brachytherapy can nowadays be performed using automated inverse algorithms. Although much quicker than graphical optimization, an experienced treatment planner is required for both methods. With automated inverse algorithms, the procedure to achieve the desired dose distribution is often based on trial-and-error. Methods: A new approach for stepping source prostate brachytherapy treatment planning was developed as a quick and user-friendly alternative. This approach consists of the combined use of two novel tools: Enhanced geometrical optimization (EGO) and interactive inverse planning (IIP). EGO is an extended version of the common geometrical optimization method and is applied to create a dose distribution as homogeneous as possible. With the second tool, IIP, this dose distribution is tailored to a specific patient anatomy by interactively changing the highest and lowest dose on the contours. Results: The combined use of EGO–IIP was evaluated on 24 prostate cancer patients, by having an inexperienced user create treatment plans, compliant to clinical dose objectives. This user was able to create dose plans of 24 patients in an average time of 4.4 min/patient. An experienced treatment planner without extensive training in EGO–IIP also created 24 plans. The resulting dose-volume histogram parameters were comparable to the clinical plans and showed high conformance to clinical standards. Conclusions: Even for an inexperienced user, treatment planning with EGO–IIP for stepping source prostate brachytherapy is feasible as an alternative to current optimization algorithms, offering speed, simplicity for the user, and local control of the dose levels.

  11. Pretreatment Nomogram to Predict the Risk of Acute Urinary Retention After I-125 Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Roeloffzen, Ellen M.; Vulpen, Marco van; Battermann, Jan J.; Roermund, Joep G. van; Saibishkumar, Elantholi P.; Monninkhof, Evelyn M.

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: Acute urinary retention (AUR) after iodine-125 (I-125) prostate brachytherapy negatively influences long-term quality of life and therefore should be prevented. We aimed to develop a nomogram to preoperatively predict the risk of AUR. Methods: Using the preoperative data of 714 consecutive patients who underwent I-125 prostate brachytherapy between 2005 and 2008 at our department, we modeled the probability of AUR. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to assess the predictive ability of a set of pretreatment predictors and the additional value of a new risk factor (the extent of prostate protrusion into the bladder). The performance of the final model was assessed with calibration and discrimination measures. Results: Of the 714 patients, 57 patients (8.0%) developed AUR after implantation. Multivariate analysis showed that the combination of prostate volume, IPSS score, neoadjuvant hormonal treatment and the extent of prostate protrusion contribute to the prediction of AUR. The discriminative value (receiver operator characteristic area, ROC) of the basic model (including prostate volume, International Prostate Symptom Score, and neoadjuvant hormonal treatment) to predict the development of AUR was 0.70. The addition of prostate protrusion significantly increased the discriminative power of the model (ROC 0.82). Calibration of this final model was good. The nomogram showed that among patients with a low sum score (<18 points), the risk of AUR was only 0%-5%. However, in patients with a high sum score (>35 points), the risk of AUR was more than 20%. Conclusion: This nomogram is a useful tool for physicians to predict the risk of AUR after I-125 prostate brachytherapy. The nomogram can aid in individualized treatment decision-making and patient counseling.

  12. Matching and reconstruction of brachytherapy seeds using the Hungarian algorithm (MARSHAL)

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Ameet Kumar; Zhou, Yu; Mustufa, Tabish; Clif Burdette, E.; Chirikjian, Gregory S.; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2005-11-15

    Intraoperative dosimetric quality assurance in prostate brachytherapy critically depends on discerning the three-dimensional (3D) locations of implanted seeds. The ability to reconstruct the implanted seeds intraoperatively will allow us to make immediate provisions for dosimetric deviations from the optimal implant plan. A method for seed reconstruction from segmented C-arm fluoroscopy images is proposed. The 3D coordinates of the implanted seeds can be calculated upon resolving the correspondence of seeds in multiple x-ray images. We formalize seed-matching as a combinatorial optimization problem, which has salient features: (a) extensively studied solutions by the computer science community; (b) proof for the nonexistence of any polynomial time exact algorithm; and (c) a practical pseudo-polynomial algorithm that mostly runs in O(N{sup 3}) time using any number of images. We prove that two images are insufficient to correctly match the seeds, while a third image renders the matching problem to be of nonpolynomial complexity. We utilize the special structure of the problem and propose a pseudopolynomial time algorithm. Using three presegmented images, matching and reconstruction of brachytherapy seeds using the Hungarian algorithm achieved complete matching in simulation experiments; and 98.5% in phantom experiments. 3D reconstruction error for correctly matched seeds has a mean of 0.63 mm, and 0.9 mm for incorrectly matched seeds. The maximum seed reconstruction error in each implant was typically around 1.32 mm. Both on synthetic data and in phantom experiments, matching rate and reconstruction error achieved using presegmented images was found to be sufficient for prostate brachytherapy. The algorithm is extendable to deal with arbitrary number of images without any loss in speed or accuracy. The algorithm is sufficiently generic to provide a practical solution to any correspondence problem, across different imaging modalities and features.

  13. Matching and reconstruction of brachytherapy seeds using the Hungarian algorithm (MARSHAL).

    PubMed

    Jain, Ameet Kumar; Zhou, Yu; Mustufa, Tabish; Burdette, E Clif; Chirikjian, Gregory S; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2005-11-01

    Intraoperative dosimetric quality assurance in prostate brachytherapy critically depends on discerning the three-dimensional (3D) locations of implanted seeds. The ability to reconstruct the implanted seeds intraoperatively will allow us to make immediate provisions for dosimetric deviations from the optimal implant plan. A method for seed reconstruction from segmented C-arm fluoroscopy images is proposed. The 3D coordinates of the implanted seeds can be calculated upon resolving the correspondence of seeds in multiple x-ray images. We formalize seed-matching as a combinatorial optimization problem, which has salient features: (a) extensively studied solutions by the computer science community; (b) proof for the nonexistence of any polynomial time exact algorithm; and (c) a practical pseudo-polynomial algorithm that mostly runs in O(N3) time using any number of images. We prove that two images are insufficient to correctly match the seeds, while a third image renders the matching problem to be of nonpolynomial complexity. We utilize the special structure of the problem and propose a pseudopolynomial time algorithm. Using three presegmented images, matching and reconstruction of brachytherapy seeds using the Hungarian algorithm achieved complete matching in simulation experiments; and 98.5% in phantom experiments. 3D reconstruction error for correctly matched seeds has a mean of 0.63 mm, and 0.9 mm for incorrectly matched seeds. The maximum seed reconstruction error in each implant was typically around 1.32 mm. Both on synthetic data and in phantom experiments, matching rate and reconstruction error achieved using presegmented images was found to be sufficient for prostate brachytherapy. The algorithm is extendable to deal with arbitrary number of images without any loss in speed or accuracy. The algorithm is sufficiently generic to provide a practical solution to any correspondence problem, across different imaging modalities and features. PMID:16372418

  14. A Phase III Randomized Trial of the Timing of Meloxicam With Iodine-125 Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Crook, Juanita; Patil, Nikhilesh; Wallace, Kris; Borg, Jette; Zhou, David; Ma, Clement; Pond, Greg

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medication is used to reduce prostate edema and urinary symptoms following prostate brachytherapy. We hypothesized that a cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor regimen started 1 week prior to seed implant might diminish the inflammatory response, thus reducing edema, retention rates, and symptom severity. Methods and Materials: From March 2004 to February 2008, 316 men consented to an institutional review board-approved randomized study of a 4-week course of meloxicam, 7.5 mg orally twice per day, starting either on the day of implant or 1 week prior to implant. Brachytherapy was performed using iodine-125 seeds and was preplanned and performed under transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) and fluoroscopic guidance. Prostate volume obtained by MR imaging at 1 month was compared to baseline prostate volume obtained by TRUS planimetry and expressed as an edema factor. The trial endpoints were prostate edema at 1 month, International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) questionnaire results at 1 and 3 months, and any need for catheterization. Results: Results for 300 men were analyzed. Median age was 61 (range, 45-79 years), and median TRUS prostate volume was 35.7 cc (range, 18.1-69.5 cc). Median IPSS at baseline was 5 (range, 0-24) and was 15 at 1 month, 16 at 3 months, and 10 at 6 months. Catheterization was required for 7% of patients (6.2% day 0 arm vs. 7.9% day -7 arm; p = 0.65). The median edema factor at 1 month was 1.02 (range, 0.73-1.7). 1.01 day 0 arm vs. 1.05 day -7 arm. Baseline prostate volume remained the primary predictor of postimplant urinary retention. Conclusions: Starting meloxicam 1 week prior to brachytherapy compared to starting immediately after the procedure did not reduce 1-month edema, improve IPSSs at 1 or 3 months, or reduce the need for catheterization.

  15. Interfraction patient motion and implant displacement in prostate high dose rate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, C. D.; Kron, T.; Leahy, M.; Duchesne, G.; Williams, S.; Tai, K. H.; Haworth, A.; Herschtal, A.; Foroudi, F.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To quantify movement of prostate cancer patients undergoing treatment, using an in-house developed motion sensor in order to determine a relationship between patient movement and high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy implant displacement. Methods: An electronic motion sensor was developed based on a three axis accelerometer. HDR brachytherapy treatment for prostate is delivered at this institution in two fractions 24 h apart and 22 patients were monitored for movement over the interval between fractions. The motion sensors functioned as inclinometers, monitoring inclination of both thighs, and the inclination and roll of the abdomen. The implanted HDR brachytherapy catheter set was assessed for displacement relative to fiducial markers in the prostate. Angle measurements and angle differences over a 2 s time base were binned, and the standard deviations of the resulting frequency distributions used as a metric for patient motion in each monitored axis. These parameters were correlated to measured catheter displacement using regression modeling. Results: The mean implant displacement was 12.6 mm in the caudal direction. A mean of 19.95 h data was recorded for the patient cohort. Patients generally moved through a limited range of angles with a mean of the exception of two patients who spent in excess of 2 h lying on their side. When tested for a relationship between movement in any of the four monitored axes and the implant displacement, none was significant. Conclusions: It is not likely that patient movement influences HDR prostate implant displacement. There may be benefits to patient comfort if nursing protocols were relaxed to allow patients greater freedom to move while the implant is in situ.

  16. The importance of three-dimensional brachytherapy treatment planning for nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Leung, T W; Wong, V Y; Tung, S Y; Lui, C M; Tsang, W W; Sze, W K; O, S K

    1997-01-01

    High dose rate (HDR) intracavitary brachytherapy is now more frequently incorporated into treatment programmes for patients with persistent and recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). However, many centres still employ two-dimensional (2-D) image reconstruction for applicators with a three-dimensional (3-D) orientation. In this study, we introduced the use of a mobile modified Nucletron reconstruction box inside the brachytherapy suite for image reconstruction and quality assurance. Three-dimensional reconstruction of the applicators' configurations proved possible and the dose distributions generated by the 2-D and 3-D image reconstructions could be compared. Thirty-one applications were included in this part of the analysis. The results showed that, based on the 2-D planning method, the reference doses were under-prescribed by 1%-10% in all except one patient, whose dose was over-prescribed by 3%. The evaluated doses to the floor of the sphenoid, which was shown to be significant for subsequent local control, was shown to be underestimated by up to 19% or overestimated by 18%, with an average of 5.9% dose underestimation. With this system, the reliability of the anchoring techniques was verified by posttherapy radiographs. Any catheter displacement of more than 1 mm was counted as a failure. Nine of the 43 verified applications were classified as failures, although six of nine catheter displacements measured < or = 2.5 mm. We recommend the routine use of a modified reconstruction box for 3-D image reconstruction for dose calculation and prescription in the treatment of NPC with HDR intracavitary brachytherapy. Quality assurance programmes should be included as an integral part of any HDR treatment; their importance cannot be overemphasized.

  17. Clinical implementation of multisequence MRI-based adaptive intracavitary brachytherapy for cervix cancer.

    PubMed

    Zoberi, Jacqueline E; Garcia-Ramirez, Jose; Hu, Yanle; Sun, Baozhou; Bertelsman, Carol G; Dyk, Pawel; Schwarz, Julie K; Grigsby, Perry W

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the clinical implementation of a magnetic resonance image (MRI)-based approach for adaptive intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) of cervix cancer patients. Patients were implanted with titanium tandem and colpostats. MR imaging was performed on a 1.5-T Philips scanner using T2-weighted (T2W), proton-density weighted (PDW), and diffusion-weighted (DW) imaging sequences. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps were generated from the DW images. All images were fused. T2W images were used for the definition of organs at risk (OARs) and dose points. ADC maps in conjunction with T2W images were used for target delineation. PDW images were used for applicator definition. Forward treatment planning was performed using standard source distribution rules normalized to Point A. Point doses and dose-volume parameters for the tumor and OARs were exported to an automated dose-tracking application. Brachytherapy doses were adapted for tumor shrinkage and OAR variations during the course of therapy. The MRI-based ICBT approach described here has been clinically implemented and is carried out for each brachytherapy fraction. Total procedure time from patient preparation to delivery of treatment is typically 2 hrs. Implementation of our tech-nique for structure delineation, applicator definition, dose tracking, and adaptation is demonstrated using treated patient examples. Based on published recommendations and our clinical experience in the radiation treatment of cervix cancer patients, we have refined our standard approach to ICBT by 1) incorporating a multisequence MRI technique for improved visualization of the target, OARs, and applicator, and by 2) implementing dose adaptation by use of automated dose tracking tools. PMID:26894342

  18. 125I Seed Implant Brachytherapy for Painful Bone Metastases After Failure of External Beam Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Shi; Wang, Li; Xiao, Zhang; Maharjan, Rakesh; Chuanxing, Li; Fujun, Zhang; Jinhua, Huang; Peihong, Wu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and therapeutic efficacy of computed tomography (CT)-guided 125I seed implant brachytherapy in patients with painful metastatic bone lesions after failure of external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). From August 2012 to July 2014, 26 patients with painful bone metastases after failure of EBRT were treated with CT-guided 125I seed implant brachytherapy. Patient pain and analgesic use were measured using the Brief Pain Inventory before treatment, weekly for 4 weeks, and every 4 weeks thereafter for a total of 24 weeks. Opioid analgesic medications and complications were monitored at the same follow-up intervals. Before 125I seed implantation, the mean score for worst pain in a 24-hour period was 7.3 out of 10. Following treatment, at weeks 1, 4, 8, 12, and 24, worst pain decreased to 5.0 (P < 0.0001), 3.0 (P < 0.0001), 2.8 (P < 0.0001), 2.6 (P < 0.0001), and 2.0 (P = 0.0001), respectively. Opioid usage significantly decreased at weeks 4, 8, and 12. Overall response rates of osseous metastases after 125I seed implantation at 1, 4, 8, 12, and 24 weeks were 58%, 79%, 81%, 82%, and 80%, respectively. Adverse events were seen in 4 patients, including Grade 1 myelosuppression and Grade 1 late skin toxicity. 125I seed brachytherapy is a safe and effective treatment for patients with painful bone metastases after failure of EBRT. PMID:26252288

  19. Single fraction multimodal image guided focal salvage high-dose-rate brachytherapy for recurrent prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rischke, Hans-Christian; Meyer, Philipp Tobias; Knobe, Sven; Volgeova-Neher, Natalja; Kollefrath, Michael; Jilg, Cordula Annette; Grosu, Anca Ligia; Baltas, Dimos; Kroenig, Malte

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We present a novel method for treatment of locally recurrent prostate cancer (PCa) following radiation therapy: focal, multimodal image guided high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Material and methods We treated two patients with recurrent PCa after primary (#1) or adjuvant (#2) external beam radiation therapy. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI), choline, positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography (PET/CT), or prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA)-PET combined with CT identified a single intraprostatic lesion. Positron emission tomography or magnetic resonance imaging – transrectal ultrasound (MRI-TRUS) fusion guided transperineal biopsy confirmed PCa within each target lesion. We defined a PET and mpMRI based gross tumor volume (GTV). A 5 mm isotropic margin was applied additionally to each lesion to generate a planning target volume (PTV), which accounts for technical fusion inaccuracies. A D90 of 18 Gy was intended in one fraction to each PTV using ultrasound guided HDR brachytherapy. Results Six month follow-up showed adequate prostate specific antygen (PSA) decline in both patients (ΔPSA 83% in patient 1 and ΔPSA 59.3% in patient 2). Follow-up 3-tesla MRI revealed regressive disease in both patients and PSMA-PET/CT showed no evidence of active disease in patient #1. No acute or late toxicities occurred. Conclusions Single fraction, focal, multimodal image guided salvage HDR brachytherapy for recurrent prostate cancer is a feasible therapy for selected patients with single lesions. This approach has to be evaluated in larger clinical trials. PMID:27504134

  20. Safety Aspects of Pulsed Dose Rate Brachytherapy: Analysis of Errors in 1,300 Treatment Sessions

    SciTech Connect

    Koedooder, Kees Wieringen, Niek van; Grient, Hans N.B. van der; Herten, Yvonne R.J. van; Pieters, Bradley R.; Blank, Leo

    2008-03-01

    Purpose: To determine the safety of pulsed-dose-rate (PDR) brachytherapy by analyzing errors and technical failures during treatment. Methods and Materials: More than 1,300 patients underwent treatment with PDR brachytherapy, using five PDR remote afterloaders. Most patients were treated with consecutive pulse schemes, also outside regular office hours. Tumors were located in the breast, esophagus, prostate, bladder, gynecology, anus/rectum, orbit, head/neck, with a miscellaneous group of small numbers, such as the lip, nose, and bile duct. Errors and technical failures were analyzed for 1,300 treatment sessions, for which nearly 20,000 pulses were delivered. For each tumor localization, the number and type of occurring errors were determined, as were which localizations were more error prone than others. Results: By routinely using the built-in dummy check source, only 0.2% of all pulses showed an error during the phase of the pulse when the active source was outside the afterloader. Localizations treated using flexible catheters had greater error frequencies than those treated with straight needles or rigid applicators. Disturbed pulse frequencies were in the range of 0.6% for the anus/rectum on a classic version 1 afterloader to 14.9% for orbital tumors using a version 2 afterloader. Exceeding the planned overall treatment time by >10% was observed in only 1% of all treatments. Patients received their dose as originally planned in 98% of all treatments. Conclusions: According to the experience in our institute with 1,300 PDR treatments, we found that PDR is a safe brachytherapy treatment modality, both during and outside of office hours.

  1. The use of tetrahedral mesh geometries in Monte Carlo simulation of applicator based brachytherapy dose distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paiva Fonseca, Gabriel; Landry, Guillaume; White, Shane; D'Amours, Michel; Yoriyaz, Hélio; Beaulieu, Luc; Reniers, Brigitte; Verhaegen, Frank

    2014-10-01

    Accounting for brachytherapy applicator attenuation is part of the recommendations from the recent report of AAPM Task Group 186. To do so, model based dose calculation algorithms require accurate modelling of the applicator geometry. This can be non-trivial in the case of irregularly shaped applicators such as the Fletcher Williamson gynaecological applicator or balloon applicators with possibly irregular shapes employed in accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) performed using electronic brachytherapy sources (EBS). While many of these applicators can be modelled using constructive solid geometry (CSG), the latter may be difficult and time-consuming. Alternatively, these complex geometries can be modelled using tessellated geometries such as tetrahedral meshes (mesh geometries (MG)). Recent versions of Monte Carlo (MC) codes Geant4 and MCNP6 allow for the use of MG. The goal of this work was to model a series of applicators relevant to brachytherapy using MG. Applicators designed for 192Ir sources and 50 kV EBS were studied; a shielded vaginal applicator, a shielded Fletcher Williamson applicator and an APBI balloon applicator. All applicators were modelled in Geant4 and MCNP6 using MG and CSG for dose calculations. CSG derived dose distributions were considered as reference and used to validate MG models by comparing dose distribution ratios. In general agreement within 1% for the dose calculations was observed for all applicators between MG and CSG and between codes when considering volumes inside the 25% isodose surface. When compared to CSG, MG required longer computation times by a factor of at least 2 for MC simulations using the same code. MCNP6 calculation times were more than ten times shorter than Geant4 in some cases. In conclusion we presented methods allowing for high fidelity modelling with results equivalent to CSG. To the best of our knowledge MG offers the most accurate representation of an irregular APBI balloon applicator.

  2. Resource utilization. High dose rate versus low dose rate brachytherapy for gynecologic cancer.

    PubMed

    Bastin, K; Buchler, D; Stitt, J; Shanahan, T; Pola, Y; Paliwal, B; Kinsella, T

    1993-06-01

    A comparative analysis of anesthesia use, perioperative morbidity and mortality, capital, and treatment cost of high dose rate versus low dose rate intracavitary brachytherapy for gynecologic malignancy is presented. To assess current anesthesia utilization, application location, and high dose rate afterloader availability for gynecologic brachytherapy in private and academic practices, a nine-question survey was sent to 150 radiotherapy centers in the United States, of which 95 (63%) responded. Of these 95 respondents, 95% used low dose rate brachytherapy, and 18% possessed high dose rate capability. General anesthesia was used in 95% of programs for tandem + ovoid and in 31% for ovoids-only placement. Differences among private and academic practice respondents were minimal. In our institution, a cost comparison for low dose rate therapy (two applications with 3 hospital days per application, operating and recovery room use, spinal anesthesia, radiotherapy) versus high dose rate treatment (five outpatient departmental applications, intravenous anesthesia without an anesthesiologist, radiotherapy) revealed a 244% higher overall charge for low dose rate treatment, primarily due to hospital and operating room expenses. In addition to its ability to save thousands of dollars per intracavitary patient, high dose rate therapy generated a "cost-shift," increasing radiotherapy departmental billings by 438%. More importantly, perioperative morbidity and mortality in our experience of 500+ high dose rate applications compared favorably with recently reported data using low dose rate intracavitary treatment. Capital investment, maintenance requirements, and depreciation costs for high dose rate capability are reviewed. Application of the defined "revenue-cost ratio" formula demonstrates the importance of high application numbers and consistent reimbursement for parity in high dose rate operation. Logically, inadequate third-party reimbursement (e.g., Medicare) reduces high

  3. Quality Assurance of Multifractionated Pelvic Interstitial Brachytherapy for Postoperative Recurrences of Cervical Cancers: A Prospective Study

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, Pragya; Chopra, Supriya; Engineer, Reena; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Paul, Siji Nojin; Phurailatpam, Reena; SV, Jamema; Shrivastava, Shyam K.

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate three-dimensional needle displacements during multifractionated interstitial brachytherapy (BT) for cervical cancers. Methods and Materials: Patients scheduled to undergo pelvic interstitial BT for postoperative and or postradiation vault recurrences were included from November 2009 to December 2010. All procedures were performed under spinal anesthesia. Postprocedure BT planning CT scans were obtained with patients in supine position with arms on the chest (interslice thickness of 3 mm). Thereafter, verification CT was repeated at every alternate fraction. Needle displacements were measured in reference to a relocatable bony point. The mean cranial, caudal, anteroposterior, and mediolateral displacements were recorded. Statistical significance of mean interfraction displacements was evaluated with Wilcoxon Test. Results: Twenty patients were included. Seventeen received boost BT (20 Gy/5 fractions/3 days) after external radiation, three received radical BT alone (36 Gy/9 fractions/5-8 days). An average of three scans (range, 2-3) were available per patient, and 357 needle displacements were analyzed. For the entire study cohort, the average of mean needle displacement was 2.5 mm (range, 0-7.4), 17.4 mm (range, 0-27.9), 1.7 mm (range, 0-6.7), 2.1 mm (range, 0-9.5), 1.7 mm (range, 0-9.3), and 0.6 mm (range, 0-7.8) in cranial, caudal, anterior, posterior, right, and left directions, respectively. The mean displacement in the caudal direction was higher between Days 1 and 2 than that between Days 2 and 3 (13.4 mm vs. 3.8 mm; p = 0.01). The average caudal displacements were no different between reirradiation and boost cohort (15.2 vs. 17.8 mm). Conclusions: Clinically significant caudal displacements occur during multifractionated pelvic brachytherapy. Optimal margins need to be incorporated while preplanning brachytherapy to account for interfraction displacements.

  4. Toxicity Associated With Bowel or Bladder Puncture During Gynecologic Interstitial Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Anand P.; Strauss, Jonathan B.; Gielda, Benjamin T.; Zusag, Thomas W.

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: Interstitial brachytherapy for gynecologic malignancies is associated with significant toxicity. Some reports have correlated this toxicity with needle puncture of the visceral organs. This study examined our experience with interstitial brachytherapy and investigated the relationship between the visceral puncture and toxicity. Methods and Materials: The outcomes of 36 patients treated with interstitial brachytherapy for gynecologic malignancies at a single institution between 2002 and 2007 were reviewed. Computed tomography was used to guide needle placement based solely on tumor coverage. No attempts were made to avoid visceral puncture; however, the source dwell times were minimized in these areas. Results: At a median follow-up of 21 months, the crude locoregional control rate was 78%. Bowel puncture was noted in 26 patients and bladder puncture in 19. The mean operating time was 50 min, and 86% of patients were discharged in <=3 days. The incidence of acute and late toxicity was similar between patients with and without visceral puncture according to the log-rank analysis of Kaplan-Meier curves. No patients with bowel puncture experienced Grade 2 or greater acute gastrointestinal toxicity and only 1 had Grade 3 or greater late gastrointestinal toxicity. No patients with bladder puncture experienced greater than Grade 2 acute genitourinary toxicity and only 2 had late Grade 3 or greater genitourinary toxicity. Conclusion: The operating time, length of hospital stay, and treatment-induced morbidity in this cohort compared favorably to series using techniques to avoid visceral puncture. Additionally, visceral puncture did not correlate with the occurrence of acute or late toxicity. These data suggest that visceral puncture in the absence of source loading carries a low risk of morbidity.

  5. Patterns of Failure After MammoSite Brachytherapy Partial Breast Irradiation: A Detailed Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Sea Dickler, Adam; Kirk, Michael; Shah, Anand; Jokich, Peter; Solmos, Gene; Strauss, Jonathan; Dowlatshahi, Kambiz; Nguyen, Cam; Griem, Katherine

    2007-09-01

    Purpose: To report the results of a detailed analysis of treatment failures after MammoSite breast brachytherapy for partial breast irradiation from our single-institution experience. Methods and Materials: Between October 14, 2002 and October 23, 2006, 78 patients with early-stage breast cancer were treated with breast-conserving surgery and accelerated partial breast irradiation using the MammoSite brachytherapy applicator. We identified five treatment failures in the 70 patients with >6 months' follow-up. Pathologic data, breast imaging, and radiation treatment plans were reviewed. For in-breast failures more than 2 cm away from the original surgical bed, the doses delivered to the areas of recurrence by partial breast irradiation were calculated. Results: At a median follow-up time of 26.1 months, five treatment failures were identified. There were three in-breast failures more than 2 cm away from the original surgical bed, one failure directly adjacent to the original surgical bed, and one failure in the axilla with synchronous distant metastases. The crude failure rate was 7.1% (5 of 70), and the crude local failure rate was 5.7% (4 of 70). Estimated progression-free survival at 48 months was 89.8% (standard error 4.5%). Conclusions: Our case series of 70 patients with >6 months' follow-up and a median follow-up of 26 months is the largest single-institution report to date with detailed failure analysis associated with MammoSite brachytherapy. Our failure data emphasize the importance of patient selection when offering partial breast irradiation.

  6. Dose mapping of the rectal wall during brachytherapy with an array of scintillation dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Cartwright, L. E.; Suchowerska, N.; Yin, Y.; Lambert, J.; Haque, M.; McKenzie, D. R.

    2010-05-15

    Purpose: In pelvic brachytherapy treatments, the rectum is an organ at risk. The authors have developed an array of scintillation dosimeters suitable for in vivo use that enables quality assurance of the treatment delivery and provides an alert to potential radiation accidents. Ultimately, this will provide evidence to direct treatment planning and dose escalation and correlate dose with the rectal response. Methods: An array of 16 scintillation dosimeters in an insertable applicator has been developed. The dosimeters were calibrated simultaneously in a custom designed circular jig before use. Each dosimeter is optically interfaced to a set of pixels on a CCD camera located outside the treatment bunker. A customized software converts pixel values into dose rate and accumulates dose for presentation during treatment delivery. The performance of the array is tested by simulating brachytherapy treatments in a water phantom. The treatment plans were designed to deliver a known dose distribution on the surface of the rectal applicator, assumed to represent the dose to the rectal wall. Results: The measured doses were compared to those predicted by the treatment plan and found to be in agreement to within the uncertainty in measurement, usually within 3%. The array was also used to track the progression of the source as it moved along the catheter. The measured position was found to agree with the position reported by the afterloader to within the measurement uncertainty, usually within 2 mm. Conclusions: This array is capable of measuring the actual dose received by each region of the rectal wall during brachytherapy treatments. It will provide real time monitoring of treatment delivery and raise an alert to a potential radiation accident. Real time dose mapping in the clinical environment will give the clinician additional confidence to carry out dose escalation to the tumor volume while avoiding rectal side effects.

  7. Seed Implant Retention Score Predicts the Risk of Prolonged Urinary Retention After Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hoon K.; Adams, Marc T.; Shi, Qiuhu; Basillote, Jay; LaMonica, Joanne; Miranda, Luis; Motta, Joseph

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To risk-stratify patients for urinary retention after prostate brachytherapy according to a novel seed implant retention score (SIRS). Patients and Methods: A total of 835 patients underwent transperineal prostate seed implant from March 1993 to January 2007; 197 patients had {sup 125}I and 638 patients had {sup 103}Pd brachytherapy. Four hundred ninety-four patients had supplemental external-beam radiation. The final downsized prostate volume was used for the 424 patients who had neoadjuvant hormone therapy. Retention was defined as reinsertion of a Foley catheter after the implant. Results: Retention developed in 7.4% of patients, with an average duration of 6.7 weeks. On univariate analysis, implant without supplemental external-beam radiation (10% vs. 5.6%; p = 0.02), neoadjuvant hormone therapy (9.4% vs. 5.4%; p = 0.02), baseline alpha-blocker use (12.5% vs. 6.3%; p = 0.008), and increased prostate volume (13.4% vs. 6.9% vs. 2.9%, >45 cm{sup 3}, 25-45 cm{sup 3}, <25 cm{sup 3}; p = 0.0008) were significantly correlated with increased rates of retention. On multivariate analysis, implant without supplemental external-beam radiation, neoadjuvant hormone therapy, baseline alpha-blocker use, and increased prostate volume were correlated with retention. A novel SIRS was modeled as the combined score of these factors, ranging from 0 to 5. There was a significant correlation between the SIRS and retention (p < 0.0001). The rates of retention were 0, 4%, 5.6%, 9%, 20.9%, and 36.4% for SIRS of 0 to 5, respectively. Conclusions: The SIRS may identify patients who are at high risk for prolonged retention after prostate brachytherapy. A prospective validation study of the SIRS is planned.

  8. Prognostic Importance of Small Prostate Size in Men Receiving Definitive Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Taira, Al V.; Merrick, Gregory S.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Butler, Wayne M.; Adamovich, Edward; Wallner, Kent E.

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To assess whether small prostate size is an adverse prognostic factor in men undergoing brachytherapy in the same manner in which it seems to be for men undergoing radical prostatectomy. Methods and Materials: From April 1995 to June 2008, 2024 patients underwent brachytherapy by a single brachytherapist. Median follow-up was 7.4 years. The role of small prostate size ({<=}20 cm{sup 3}) as a prognostic factor for biochemical progression-free survival, cause-specific survival, and all-cause mortality was investigated. The differences in survival between men with small and larger prostates were compared using Kaplan-Meier curves and log-rank tests. Results: Median prostate size for the entire cohort was 32.7 cm{sup 3}. For the 167 men with small prostates, median prostate size was 17.4 cm{sup 3}. There was no difference in biochemical progression-free survival (95.2% vs 96.2%, P=.603), cause-specific survival (97.7% vs 98.3%, P=.546), or all-cause mortality (78.0% vs 77.2%, P=.838) at 10 years for men with small prostates compared with men with larger prostates. On univariate and multivariate analysis, small prostate size was not associated with any of the primary outcome measures. Conclusion: Men with small prostates treated with brachytherapy have excellent outcomes and are at no higher risk of treatment failure than men with larger glands. High-quality implants with adequate margins seem sufficient to address the increased adverse risk factors associated with small prostate size.

  9. Design and dosimetric characteristics of a new endocavitary contact radiotherapy system using an electronic brachytherapy source

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, Susan; Garcia-Ramirez, Jose; Lu Wei; Myerson, Robert J.; Parikh, Parag

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To present design aspects and acceptance tests performed for clinical implementation of electronic brachytherapy treatment of early stage rectal adenocarcinoma. A dosimetric comparison is made between the historically used Philips RT-50 unit and the newly developed Axxent{sup Registered-Sign} Model S700 electronic brachytherapy source manufactured by Xoft (iCad, Inc.). Methods: Two proctoscope cones were manufactured by ElectroSurgical Instruments (ESI). Two custom surface applicators were manufactured by Xoft and were designed to fit and interlock with the proctoscope cones from ESI. Dose rates, half value layers (HVL), and percentage depth dose (PDD) measurements were made with the Xoft system and compared to historical RT-50 data. A description of the patient treatment approach and exposure rates during the procedure is also provided. Results: The electronic brachytherapy system has a lower surface dose rate than the RT-50. The dose rate to water on the surface from the Xoft system is approximately 2.1 Gy/min while the RT-50 is 10-12 Gy/min. However, treatment times with Xoft are still reasonable. The HVLs and PDDs between the two systems were comparable resulting in similar doses to the target and to regions beyond the target. The exposure rate levels around a patient treatment were acceptable. The standard uncertainty in the dose rate to water on the surface is approximately {+-}5.2%. Conclusions: The Philips RT-50 unit is an out-of-date radiotherapy machine that is no longer manufactured with limited replacement parts. The use of a custom-designed proctoscope and Xoft surface applicators allows delivery of a well-established treatment with the ease of a modern radiotherapy device. While the dose rate is lower with the use of Xoft, the treatment times are still reasonable. Additionally, personnel may stand farther away from the Xoft radiation source, thus potentially reducing radiation exposure to the operator and other personnel.

  10. Predictive Factors and Management of Rectal Bleeding Side Effects Following Prostate Cancer Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Jeremy G.; Stone, Nelson N.; Stock, Richard G.

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: To report on the incidence, nature, and management of rectal toxicities following individual or combination brachytherapy following treatment for prostate cancer over a 17-year period. We also report the patient and treatment factors predisposing to acute ≥grade 2 proctitis. Methods and Materials: A total of 2752 patients were treated for prostate cancer between October 1990 and April 2007 with either low-dose-rate brachytherapy alone or in combination with androgen depletion therapy (ADT) or external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and were followed for a median of 5.86 years (minimum 1.0 years; maximum 19.19 years). We investigated the 10-year incidence, nature, and treatment of acute and chronic rectal toxicities following BT. Using univariate, and multivariate analyses, we determined the treatment and comorbidity factors predisposing to rectal toxicities. We also outline the most common and effective management for these toxicities. Results: Actuarial risk of ≥grade 2 rectal bleeding was 6.4%, though notably only 0.9% of all patients required medical intervention to manage this toxicity. The majority of rectal bleeding episodes (72%) occurred within the first 3 years following placement of BT seeds. Of the 27 patients requiring management for their rectal bleeding, 18 underwent formalin treatment and nine underwent cauterization. Post-hoc univariate statistical analysis revealed that coronary artery disease (CAD), biologically effective dose, rectal volume receiving 100% of the prescription dose (RV100), and treatment modality predict the likelihood of grade ≥2 rectal bleeding. Only CAD, treatment type, and RV100 fit a Cox regression multivariate model. Conclusions: Low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy is very well tolerated and rectal bleeding toxicities are either self-resolving or effectively managed by medical intervention. Treatment planning incorporating adjuvant ADT while minimizing RV100 has yielded the best toxicity-free survival following

  11. HDR brachytherapy (HDR–BT) combined with stent placement in palliative treatment of esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Skowronek, Janusz; Kubaszewska, Magda; Chichel, Adam; Piotrowski, Tomasz

    2009-01-01

    Purpose In the study we present the initial results of palliative treatment using combined methods of HDR-BT and stent insertion in patients with advanced esophagus cancer. Material and methods Fifty patients were treated in the Great Poland Cancer Center using HDR-BT between June 2001 and December 2005 and they were enrolled into the study. All patients underwent endoscopic insertion of self-expanding, metal, endoesophageal stents owing to blockages in the lumen of the esophagus which excluded brachytherapy. The group included 41 men and 9 women, aged between 44 and 79 years (average 59.3 years). 36 of patients received 3 fractions of HDR once a week of 7.5 Gy, up to total dose of 22.5 Gy, 14 patients received 2 fractions of 7.5 Gy (15 Gy). Results The average patient observation period was 5.4 months. Complete remission (CR) was observed after 4 weeks in 2 cases (4%), partial remission (PR) in 31 (62%), no remission (NR) was seen in 6 patients (12%) and progression was noted in 11 cases (22%). Complications of brachytherapy for esophageal cancer were observed in 11 patients (22%), ulceration in 1 patient (2%), haemorrhage in 1 patient (2%) and bronchotracheal fistulas in 9 (18%) patients. The average observation period for patients with bronchotracheal fistulas was notably shorter than in remaining patients and amounted 3.5 months. Conclusions 1. Endoscopic implantation of stents to the lumen of the esophagus provides access to esophagus and, in many cases, allows application of HDR-BT. 2. HDR-BT for advanced esophageal cancer brought relief from dysphagia in most of patients. 3. The combination of the two methods of treatment represents an effective choice for palliative care of this group of patients, with a complication rate similar to observed one in the instance of brachytherapy alone.

  12. Postoperative Strontium-90 Brachytherapy in the Prevention of Keloids: Results and Prognostic Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Viani, Gustavo A. Stefano, Eduardo J.; Afonso, Sergio L.; De Fendi, Ligia I.

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the results of keloidectomy and strontium 90 brachytherapy in the prevention of keloid recurrence following excision and to identify outcome and the prognostic factors that predict keloid recurrence after irradiation. Methods and Materials: Data of 612 patients with 892 keloids treated between 1992 and 2006 were evaluated retrospectively. Brachytherapy was performed using a Sr-90Y surface applicator. Total dose was 20 Gy in 10 fractions. Results: With a median follow-up of 61 months, the overall recurrence-free response rate for all keloids was 87.6%. Multivariate analysis revealed the following prognostic factors for recurrence: keloid size > 5 cm (p < 0.0001), burn scars as the keloid etiology (p < 0.0001), and previous treatment (p < 0.0001). Outcome was not found to be significantly related to the interval between surgery and radiotherapy, sex, or age. Pruritus and skin reddening were the most common symptoms of keloids, but all signs and symptoms abated with time after treatment. Cosmetic results from the keloid treatment were considered good or excellent in 70.6% of the patients. Conclusion: Our study findings show that excision plus Sr-90 brachytherapy is effective in the eradication of keloids. Sr-90 radiotherapy (20 Gy in 10 fractions) achieved a similar local control rate, as have higher doses per fraction in other series. It also resulted in a good cosmetic rate and relief of symptoms. Our data further suggest that the initiation of postoperative irradiation within hours of surgical excision is not important to therapeutic outcome.

  13. SU-E-P-05: Electronic Brachytherapy: A Physics Perspective On Field Implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Pai, S; Ayyalasomayajula, S; Lee, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: We want to summarize our experience implementing a successful program of electronic brachytherapy at several dermatology clinics with the help of a cloud based software to help us define the key program parameters and capture physics QA aspects. Optimally developed software helps the physicist in peer review and qualify the physical parameters. Methods: Using the XOFT™ Axxent™ electronic brachytherapy system in conjunction with a cloud-based software, a process was setup to capture and record treatments. It was implemented initially at about 10 sites in California. For dosimetric purposes, the software facilitated storage of the physics parameters of surface applicators used in treatment and other source calibration parameters. In addition, the patient prescription, pathology and other setup considerations were input by radiation oncologist and the therapist. This facilitated physics planning of the treatment parameters and also independent check of the dwell time. From 2013–2014, nearly1500 such calculation were completed by a group of physicists. A total of 800 patients with multiple lesions have been treated successfully during this period. The treatment log files have been uploaded and documented in the software which facilitated physics peer review of treatments per the standards in place by AAPM and ACR. Results: The program model was implemented successfully at multiple sites. The cloud based software allowed for proper peer review and compliance of the program at 10 clinical sites. Dosimtery was done on 800 patients and executed in a timely fashion to suit the clinical needs. Accumulated physics data in the software from the clinics allows for robust analysis and future development. Conclusion: Electronic brachytherapy implementation experience from a quality assurance perspective was greatly enhanced by using a cloud based software. The comprehensive database will pave the way for future developments to yield superior physics outcomes.

  14. Brachytherapy as Part of the Multidisciplinary Treatment of Childhood Rhabdomyosarcomas of the Orbit

    SciTech Connect

    Blank, Leo; Koedooder, Kees; Grient, Hans van der; Wolffs, Nicole A.W.; Kar, Marlou van de

    2010-08-01

    Introduction: Rhabdomyosarcomas in the orbit form a major challenge in terms of cure without severe side effects in childhood cancer. Our specifically developed approach consists of applying brachytherapy to the tumor area using a mold. Analysis of its results for 20 patients was performed. Methods and Materials: Thirteen patients were referred for brachytherapy if complete remission was not reached after chemotherapy (Group I) and 7 in case of relapse (Group II). In total, 20 patients were treated between 1991 and 2007. Four were female and 16 male; their ages varied from 1.1 to 16.5 years, with an average of 8.5 years. After macroscopically radical tumor resection, molds with holes drilled to hold flexible catheters were placed into the orbit. The dose to the clinical target volume was 40-50 Gy. Results: Three patients of Group I and 1 patient of Group II developed local recurrence and underwent exenteration. The progression-free survival in Group I is 71.9% (95% CI 0.44-1.0), in Group II 85.7% (95% CI 0.60-1.0), the overall 5-year survival rate of the entire group is 92% (95% CI 0.76-1.0). During treatment, no serious side effects were observed. The late complications encountered in this series were cataract in 2 patients, 1 of whom also developed mild retinopathy. Two patients with ptosis needed surgical correction. No facial asymmetries or bone growth anomalies were observed. Conclusions: This entire procedure of brachytherapy with a mold offers a tailor-made treatment for orbital rhabdomyosarcomas with only few signs of late toxicity.

  15. Influence of trace elements in human tissue in low-energy photon brachytherapy dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Shane A.; Landry, Guillaume; van Gils, Francis; Verhaegen, Frank; Reniers, Brigitte

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to determine the dosimetric impact of trace elements in human tissues for low-energy photon sources used in brachytherapy. Monte Carlo dose calculations were used to investigate the dosimetric effect of trace elements present in normal or cancerous human tissues. The effect of individual traces (atomic number Z = 11-30) was studied in soft tissue irradiated by low-energy brachytherapy sources. Three other tissue types (prostate, adipose and mammary gland) were also simulated with varying trace concentrations to quantify the contribution of each trace to the dose distribution. The dose differences between cancerous and healthy prostate tissues were calculated in single- and multi-source geometries. The presence of traces in a tissue produces a difference in the dose distribution that is dependent on Z and the concentration of the trace. Low-Z traces (Na) have a negligible effect (<0.3%) in all tissues, while higher Z (K) had a larger effect (>3%). There is a potentially significant difference in the dose distribution between cancerous and healthy prostate tissues (4%) and even larger if compared to the trace-free composition (15%) in both single- and multi-sourced geometries. Trace elements have a non-negligible (up to 8% in prostate D90) effect on the dose in tissues irradiated with low-energy photon sources. This study underlines the need for further investigation into accurate determination of the trace composition of tissues associated with low-energy brachytherapy. Alternatively, trace elements could be incorporated as a source of uncertainty in dose calculations. This work was part of an invited presentation at the ‘International Workshop on Recent Advances in Monte Carlo Techniques for Radiation Therapy’, held in Montreal, June 8-10, 2011.

  16. Treatment Outcome of Medium-Dose-Rate Intracavitary Brachytherapy for Carcinoma of the Uterine Cervix: Comparison With Low-Dose-Rate Intracavitary Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kaneyasu, Yuko; Kita, Midori; Okawa, Tomohiko; Maebayashi, Katsuya; Kohno, Mari; Sonoda, Tatsuo; Hirabayashi, Hisae; Nagata, Yasushi; Mitsuhashi, Norio

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate and compare the efficacy of medium-dose-rate (MDR) and low-dose-rate (LDR) intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT) for uterine cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: We evaluated 419 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix who were treated by radical radiotherapy with curative intent at Tokyo Women's Medical University from 1969 to 1999. LDR was used from 1969 to 1986, and MDR has been used since July 1987. When compared with LDR, fraction dose was decreased and fraction size was increased (1 or 2 fractions) for MDR to make the total dose of MDR equal to that of LDR. In general, the patients received a total dose of 60 to 70 Gy at Point A with external beam radiotherapy combined with brachytherapy according to the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage. In the LDR group, 32 patients had Stage I disease, 81 had Stage II, 182 had Stage III, and 29 had Stage IVA; in the MDR group, 9 patients had Stage I disease, 19 had Stage II, 55 had Stage III, and 12 had Stage IVA. Results: The 5-year overall survival rates for Stages I, II, III, and IVA in the LDR group were 78%, 72%, 55%, and 34%, respectively. In the MDR group, the 5-year overall survival rates were 100%, 68%, 52%, and 42%, respectively. No significant statistical differences were seen between the two groups. The actuarial rates of late complications Grade 2 or greater at 5 years for the rectum, bladder, and small intestine in the LDR group were 11.1%, 5.8%, and 2.0%, respectively. The rates for the MDR group were 11.7%, 4.2%, and 2.6%, respectively, all of which were without statistical differences. Conclusion: These data suggest that MDR ICBT is effective, useful, and equally as good as LDR ICBT in daytime (about 5 hours) treatments of patients with cervical cancer.

  17. Comparison of Axxent-Xoft, 192Ir and 60Co high-dose-rate brachytherapy sources for image-guided brachytherapy treatment planning for cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Packianathan, S; He, R; Yang, C C

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the dosimetric differences and similarities between treatment plans generated with Axxent-Xoft electronic brachytherapy source (Xoft-EBS), 192Ir and 60Co for tandem and ovoids (T&O) applicators. Methods: In this retrospective study, we replanned 10 patients previously treated with 192Ir high-dose-rate brachytherapy. Prescription was 7 Gy × 4 fractions to Point A. For each original plan, we created two additional plans with Xoft-EBS and 60Co. The dose to each organ at risk (OAR) was evaluated in terms of V35% and V50%, the percentage volume receiving 35% and 50% of the prescription dose, respectively, and D2cc, highest dose to a 2 cm3 volume of an OAR. Results: There was no difference between plans generated by 192Ir and 60Co, but the plans generated using Xoft-EBS showed a reduction of up to 50% in V35%, V50% and D2cc. The volumes of the 200% and 150% isodose lines, however, were 74% and 34% greater than the comparable volumes generated with the 192Ir source. Point B dose was on average only 16% of the Point A dose for plans generated with Xoft-EBS compared with 30% for plans generated with 192Ir or 60Co. Conclusion: The Xoft-EBS can potentially replace either 192Ir or 60Co in T&O treatments. Xoft-EBS offers either better sparing of the OARs compared with 192Ir or 60Co or at least similar sparing. Xoft-EBS-generated plans had higher doses within the target volume than 192Ir- or 60Co-generated ones. Advances in knowledge: This work presents newer knowledge in dosimetric comparison between Xoft-EBS, 192Ir or 60Co sources for T&O implants. PMID:25996576

  18. Interstitial high-dose-rate brachytherapy in locally advanced and recurrent vulvar cancer

    PubMed Central

    Białas, Brygida; Fijałkowski, Marek; Wojcieszek, Piotr; Szlag, Marta; Cholewka, Agnieszka; Ślęczka, Maciej; Kołosza, Zofia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the study was to report our experience with high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy (HDR-ISBT) in locally advanced and recurrent vulvar cancer. Material and methods Between 2004 and 2014, fourteen women with locally advanced or recurrent vulvar cancer were treated using HDR-ISBT in our Centre. High-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy was performed as a separate treatment or in combination with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) (given prior to brachytherapy). Results Patients were divided into: group I (n = 6) with locally advanced tumors, stages III-IVA after an incisional biopsy only, and group II (n = 8) with recurrent vulvar cancer after previous radical surgery. In group I, median follow up was 12 months (range 7-18 months); 1-year overall survival (OS) was 83%. Transient arrest of cancer growth or tumor regression was noticed in all patients but 4/6 developed relapse. Median time to failure was 6.3 months (range 3-11 months). The 1-year progression-free survival (PFS) was 33%. In group II, median follow up was 28 months (range 13-90 months). The 1-year and 3-year OS was 100% and 80%, respectively. The arrest of cancer growth or tumor regression was achieved in all patients. In 4/8 patients neither clinical nor histological symptoms of relapse were observed but 4/8 women experienced relapse. Median time to failure was 31 months (range 13-76 months). The 1-year and 3-year PFS was 100% and 62.5%, respectively. Two patients (14.3%) in group II had severe late toxicity (G3). Conclusions High-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy is a well-tolerated treatment option in selected patients with advanced or recurrent vulvar cancer. It is a safe and effective treatment modality for advanced and recurrent vulvar cancer, yielding good local control with acceptable late treatment related side effects. In our study, patients with recurrent vulvar cancer had better results in HDR-ISBT treatment, probably because of the smaller tumor volume. This

  19. Dosimetric Consequences of Interobserver Variability in Delineating the Organs at Risk in Gynecologic Interstitial Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Damato, Antonio L.; Bair, Ryan J.; Cormack, Robert A.; Kovacs, Arpad; Lee, Larissa J.; Lewis, John H.; Viswanathan, Akila N.

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric variability associated with interobserver organ-at-risk delineation differences on computed tomography in patients undergoing gynecologic interstitial brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: The rectum, bladder, and sigmoid of 14 patients treated with gynecologic interstitial brachytherapy were retrospectively contoured by 13 physicians. Geometric variability was calculated using κ statistics, conformity index (CI{sub gen}), and coefficient of variation (CV) of volumes contoured across physicians. Dosimetric variability of the single-fraction D{sub 0.1cc} and D{sub 2cc} was assessed through CV across physicians, and the standard deviation of the total EQD2 (equivalent dose in 2 Gy per fraction) brachytherapy dose (SD{sup TOT}) was calculated. Results: The population mean ± 1 standard deviation of κ, CI{sub gen}, and volume CV were, respectively: 0.77 ± 0.06, 0.70 ± 0.08, and 20% ± 6% for bladder; 0.74 ± 06, 0.67 ± 0.08, and 20% ± 5% for rectum; and 0.33 ± 0.20, 0.26 ± 0.17, and 82% ± 42% for sigmoid. Dosimetric variability was as follows: for bladder, CV = 31% ± 19% (SD{sup TOT} = 72 ± 64 Gy) for D{sub 0.1cc} and CV = 16% ± 10% (SD{sup TOT} = 9 ± 6 Gy) for D{sub 2cc}; for rectum, CV = 11% ± 5% (SD{sup TOT} = 16 ± 17 Gy) for D{sub 0.1cc} and CV = 7% ± 2% (SD{sup TOT} = 4 ± 3 Gy) for D{sub 2cc}; for sigmoid, CV = 39% ± 28% (SD{sup TOT} = 12 ± 18 Gy) for D{sub 0.1cc} and CV = 34% ± 19% (SD{sup TOT} = 4 ± 4 Gy) for D{sub 2cc.} Conclusions: Delineation of bladder and rectum by 13 physicians demonstrated substantial geometric agreement and resulted in good dosimetric agreement for all dose-volume histogram parameters except bladder D{sub 0.1cc.} Small delineation differences in high-dose regions by the posterior bladder wall may explain these results. The delineation of sigmoid showed fair geometric agreement. The higher dosimetric variability for sigmoid compared with rectum and bladder did not correlate with

  20. Is there any place for LDR brachytherapy for head and neck carcinomas in HDR era?

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    In Poland, the classical LDR brachytherapy for head and neck carcinomas with Ir-192 wires or hairpins has completely disappeared some time ago after 30 years of successful clinical use. Can this technique be fully and safely replaced by HDR or PDR application? This option seems attractive because of new possibilities of 3D reconstruction and computer real-time treatment planning and optimization. However, in my opinion, long time is needed to get a clinical and scientific experience that has been accumulated for decades with the use of LDR technique.

  1. Decline in urinary retention incidence in 805 patients after prostate brachytherapy: The effect of learning curve?

    SciTech Connect

    Keyes, Mira . E-mail: mkeyes@bccancer.bc.ca; Schellenberg, Devin; Moravan, Veronika M.Sc.; McKenzie, Michael; Agranovich, Alexander; Pickles, Tom; Wu, Jonn; Liu, Mitchell; Bucci, Joseph M.B.B.S.; Morris, W. James

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the incidence and factors predictive of acute urinary retention (AUR) in 805 consecutive patients treated with prostate brachytherapy monotherapy and to examine the possible effect of a learning curve. Methods and Materials: Between July 1998 and November 2002, 805 patients were treated with prostate brachytherapy. Low-risk patients (Gleason Score (GS) {<=}6; prostate specific antigen (PSA) {<=}10, and {<=} T2b [UICC 1997]) received implant alone. Patients with prostate volume of 50 cc or more, GS = 7, or PSA = 10 to 15 received 6 months of androgen suppression (AS) with brachytherapy. Patient, treatment, and dosimetric factors examined include baseline prostate symptom score (IPSS), diabetes, vascular disease, PSA, Gleason score, clinical stage, AS, ultrasound planning target volume (PUTV), postimplant prostate volume (obtained with 'Day 30' postimplant CT), CT:PUTV ratio (surrogate for postimplant edema), number of seeds, number of needles, number of seeds per needle, dosimetric parameters (V100, V150, and D90), date of implant (learning curve), and implanting oncologists. Univariate and multivariate analyses were carried out. Results: Acute urinary retention in the first 200 patients was 17% vs. 6.3% in the most recently treated 200 patients (p = 0.002). Overall AUR was 12.7%, and prolonged urinary obstruction incidence (>20 days) was 5%. On multivariate analysis, factors predictive of any AUR include baseline IPSS (p = < 0.004), CT:PUTV ratio (p = < 0.001), PUTV (p = < 0.001), and implant order (learning curve) (p = 0.001). Factors predictive for 'prolonged' catheterization (>20 days) on multivariate analysis include IPSS (p < 0.01), number of needles (p < 0.001), diabetes mellitus (p = 0.048), and CT:PUTV ratio (p < 0.001) Conclusion: Over the years, our AUR rate has fallen significantly (from 17% to 6.3%). On multivariate analysis, highly significant factors include IPSS, PUTV, CT:PUTV ratio (i.e., degree of prostate edema), and order of

  2. Predictors of Toxicity After Image-guided High-dose-rate Interstitial Brachytherapy for Gynecologic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Larissa J.; Viswanathan, Akila N.

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To identify predictors of grade 3-4 complications and grade 2-4 rectal toxicity after three-dimensional image-guided high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy for gynecologic cancer. Methods and Materials: Records were reviewed for 51 women (22 with primary disease and 29 with recurrence) treated with HDR interstitial brachytherapy. A single interstitial insertion was performed with image guidance by computed tomography (n = 43) or magnetic resonance imaging (n = 8). The median delivered dose in equivalent 2-Gy fractions was 72.0 Gy (45 Gy for external-beam radiation therapy and 24 Gy for brachytherapy). Toxicity was reported according to the Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events. Actuarial toxicity estimates were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: At diagnosis, the median patient age was 62 years and the median tumor size was 3.8 cm. The median D90 and V100 were 71.4 Gy and 89.5%; the median D2cc for the bladder, rectum, and sigmoid were 64.6 Gy, 61.0 Gy, and 52.7 Gy, respectively. The actuarial rates of all grade 3-4 complications at 2 years were 20% gastrointestinal, 9% vaginal, 6% skin, 3% musculoskeletal, and 2% lymphatic. There were no grade 3-4 genitourinary complications and no grade 5 toxicities. Grade 2-4 rectal toxicity was observed in 10 patients, and grade 3-4 complications in 4; all cases were proctitis with the exception of 1 rectal fistula. D2cc for rectum was higher for patients with grade 2-4 (68 Gy vs 57 Gy for grade 0-1, P=.03) and grade 3-4 (73 Gy vs 58 Gy for grade 0-2, P=.02) rectal toxicity. The estimated dose that resulted in a 10% risk of grade 2-4 rectal toxicity was 61.8 Gy (95% confidence interval, 51.5-72.2 Gy). Discussion: Image-guided HDR interstitial brachytherapy results in acceptable toxicity for women with primary or recurrent gynecologic cancer. D2cc for the rectum is a reliable predictor of late rectal complications. Three-dimensional-based treatment planning should be performed to ensure

  3. Complications associated with preoperative radiation therapy and Iodine-125 brachytherapy for localized prostatic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Flanigan, R.C.; Patterson, J.; Mendiondo, O.A.; Gee, W.F.; Lucas, B.A.; McRoberts, J.W.

    1983-08-01

    Twenty-five consecutive patients with localized adenocarcinoma of the prostate treated with 1,050 rad preoperative radiation therapy and Iodine-125 seed brachytherapy are reviewed. Significant long-term postoperative complications included radiation cystitis (12%), radiation proctitis (4%), genital and leg edema (12%), stress incontinence (8%), total incontinence (4%), and impotence (26%). Complications occurred in 75 per cent of patients who received additional postoperative radiation. Improved staging with CT scan, lymphangiography, and Chiba needle biopsy of any possibly abnormal lymph nodes provided excellent preoperative staging with only 1 patient (6%) upstaged at surgery to Stage D1.

  4. Water calorimetry-based radiation dosimetry in iridium-192 brachytherapy and proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarfehnia, Arman

    The aim of this work is to develop and evaluate a primary standard for HDR 192Ir brachytherapy sources as well as for active spot scanning proton radiotherapy beams based on stagnant 4 °C water calorimetry. The measurements were performed using an in-house built water calorimeter and a parallel-plate calorimeter vessel. The dose measurement results of the McGill calorimeter were validated in high energy photon beams against Canada's national established primary standard at the NRC. The measurements in brachytherapy were performed with a spring-loaded catheter holder which allowed for the 192Ir source to come directly inside the water calorimeter. The COMSOL MULTIPHYSICS(TM) software was used to solve the heat transport equation numerically for a detailed geometrical model of our experimental setup. In brachytherapy, reference dosimetry protocols were also developed and used to measure the dose to water directly using thimble type ionization chambers and Gafchromic films with traceable 60Co (or higher energy photons) calibration factor. Based on water calorimetry standard, we measured an absolute dose rate to water of 361+/-7 microGy/(h·U) at 55 mm source-to-detector separation. The 1.9 % uncertainty on water calorimetry results is in contrast with the current recommended AAPM TG-43 protocol that achieves at best an uncertainty (k=1) of 2.5 % based on an indirect dose to water measurement technique. All measurement results from water calorimetry, ion chamber, film, and TG-43 agreed to within 0.83 %. We achieved an overall dose uncertainty of 0.4 % and 0.6 % for scattered and scanned proton radiation water calorimetry, respectively. The water calorimetry absorbed dose to water results agreed with those obtained through the currently recommended IAEA TRS-398 protocol (measurements made using an ionization chamber with a 60Co calibration factor) to better than 0.14 % and 0.32 % in scattered and scanned proton beams, respectively. In conclusion, this work forms the

  5. Body Mass Index and Prostate-Specific Antigen Failure Following Brachytherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Efstathiou, Jason A. Skowronski, Rafi Y.; Coen, John J.; Grocela, Joseph A.; Hirsch, Ariel E.; Zietman, Anthony L.

    2008-08-01

    Purpose: Increasing body mass index (BMI) is associated with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) failure after radical prostatectomy and external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). We investigated whether BMI is associated with PSA failure in men treated with brachytherapy for clinically localized prostate cancer. Patients and Methods: Retrospective analyses were conducted on 374 patients undergoing brachytherapy for stage T1c-T2cNXM0 prostate cancer from 1996-2001. Forty-nine patients (13%) received supplemental EBRT and 131 (35%) received androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Height and weight data were available for 353 (94%). Cox regression analyses were performed to evaluate the relationship between BMI and PSA failure (nadir + 2 ng/ml definition). Covariates included age, race, preimplantation PSA, Gleason score, T category, percent of prescription dose to 90% of the prostate, use of supplemental EBRT, and ADT. Results: Median age, PSA, and BMI were 66 years (range, 42-80 years), 5.7 ng/ml (range, 0.4-22.6 ng/ml), and 27.1 kg/m{sup 2} (range, 18.2-53.6 kg/m{sup 2}), respectively. After a median follow-up of 6.0 years (range, 3.0-10.2 years), there were 76 PSA recurrences. The BMI was not associated with PSA failure. Six-year PSA failure rates were 30.2% for men with BMI less than 25 kg/m{sup 2}, 19.5% for BMI of 25 or greater to less than 30 kg/m{sup 2}, and 14.4% for BMI of 30 kg/m{sup 2} or greater (p = 0.19). Results were similar when BMI was analyzed as a continuous variable, using alternative definitions of PSA failure, and excluding patients treated with EBRT and/or ADT. In multivariate analyses, only baseline PSA was significantly associated with shorter time to PSA failure (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.12; 95% confidence interval, 1.05-1.20; p 0.0006). Conclusions: Unlike after surgery or EBRT, BMI is not associated with PSA failure in men treated with brachytherapy for prostate cancer. This raises the possibility that brachytherapy may be a preferred treatment

  6. Dynamic dosimetry and edema detection in prostate brachytherapy: a complete system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, A.; Deguet, A.; Iordachita, I.; Chintalapani, G.; Blevins, J.; Le, Y.; Armour, E.; Burdette, C.; Song, D.; Fichtinger, G.

    2008-03-01

    Purpose: Brachytherapy (radioactive seed insertion) has emerged as one of the most effective treatment options for patients with prostate cancer, with the added benefit of a convenient outpatient procedure. The main limitation in contemporary brachytherapy is faulty seed placement, predominantly due to the presence of intra-operative edema (tissue expansion). Though currently not available, the capability to intra-operatively monitor the seed distribution, can make a significant improvement in cancer control. We present such a system here. Methods: Intra-operative measurement of edema in prostate brachytherapy requires localization of inserted radioactive seeds relative to the prostate. Seeds were reconstructed using a typical non-isocentric C-arm, and exported to a commercial brachytherapy delivery system. Technical obstacles for 3D reconstruction on a non-isocentric C-arm include pose-dependent C-arm calibration; distortion correction; pose estimation of C-arm images; seed reconstruction; and C-arm to TRUS registration. Results: In precision-machined hard phantoms with 40-100 seeds and soft tissue phantoms with 45-87 seeds, we correctly reconstructed the seed implant shape with an average 3D precision of 0.35 mm and 0.24 mm, respectively. In a DoD Phase-1 clinical trial on 6 patients with 48-82 planned seeds, we achieved intra-operative monitoring of seed distribution and dosimetry, correcting for dose inhomogeneities by inserting an average of 4.17 (1-9) additional seeds. Additionally, in each patient, the system automatically detected intra-operative seed migration induced due to edema (mean 3.84 mm, STD 2.13 mm, Max 16.19 mm). Conclusions: The proposed system is the first of a kind that makes intra-operative detection of edema (and subsequent re-optimization) possible on any typical non-isocentric C-arm, at negligible additional cost to the existing clinical installation. It achieves a significantly more homogeneous seed distribution, and has the potential to

  7. Effect of tissue inhomogeneities on dose distributions from Cf-252 brachytherapy source.

    PubMed

    Ghassoun, J

    2013-01-01

    The Monte Carlo method was used to determine the effect of tissue inhomogeneities on dose distribution from a Cf-252 brachytherapy source. Neutron and gamma-ray fluences, energy spectra and dose rate distributions were determined in both homogenous and inhomogeneous phantoms. Simulations were performed using the MCNP5 code. Obtained results were compared with experimentally measured values published in literature. Results showed a significant change in neutron dose rate distributions in presence of heterogeneities. However, their effect on gamma rays dose distribution is minimal.

  8. Technical considerations in brachytherapy boost for a case of squamous cell carcinoma of the external auditory canal based on our case.

    PubMed

    Ilangovan, Bhargavi; Stumpf, Janos; Murali, V; Sasikumar, Neetu; Devi, Rathna

    2015-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the external auditory canal is a rare entity. The patients present with ear discharge and otalgia. They are treated with radiotherapy and surgery. Surgery with oncological priorities is quite complex with substantial consequences. We are reporting a patient with squamous cell carcinoma of the external auditory canal, who was treated with limited surgery followed by radiotherapy. Radiotherapy was a combination of external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy. High dose rate brachytherapy was given using an ear speculum fixed with wax and a suction catheter. This article is to highlight the technique and dosimetry of the brachytherapy procedure. PMID:26458716

  9. In vivo dosimeters for HDR brachytherapy: A comparison of a diamond detector, MOSFET, TLD, and scintillation detector

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, Jamil; Nakano, Tatsuya; Law, Sue; Elsey, Justin; McKenzie, David R.; Suchowerska, Natalka

    2007-05-15

    The large dose gradients in brachytherapy necessitate a detector with a small active volume for accurate dosimetry. The dosimetric performance of a novel scintillation detector (BrachyFOD{sup TM}) is evaluated and compared to three commercially available detectors, a diamond detector, a MOSFET, and LiF TLDs. An {sup 192}Ir HDR brachytherapy source is used to measure the depth dependence, angular dependence, and temperature dependence of the detectors. Of the commercially available detectors, the diamond detector was found to be the most accurate, but has a large physical size. The TLDs cannot provide real time readings and have depth dependent sensitivity. The MOSFET used in this study was accurate to within 5% for distances of 20 to 50 mm from the {sup 192}Ir source in water but gave errors of 30%-40% for distances greater than 50 mm from the source. The BrachyFOD{sup TM} was found to be accurate to within 3% for distances of 10 to 100 mm from an HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy source in water. It has an angular dependence of less than 2% and the background signal created by Cerenkov radiation and fluorescence of the plastic optical fiber is insignificant compared to the signal generated in the scintillator. Of the four detectors compared in this study the BrachyFOD{sup TM} has the most favorable combination of characteristics for dosimetry in HDR brachytherapy.

  10. In vivo dosimeters for HDR brachytherapy: a comparison of a diamond detector, MOSFET, TLD, and scintillation detector.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Jamil; Nakano, Tatsuya; Law, Sue; Elsey, Justin; McKenzie, David R; Suchowerska, Natalka

    2007-05-01

    The large dose gradients in brachytherapy necessitate a detector with a small active volume for accurate dosimetry. The dosimetric performance of a novel scintillation detector (BrachyFOD) is evaluated and compared to three commercially available detectors, a diamond detector, a MOSFET, and LiF TLDs. An 192Ir HDR brachytherapy source is used to measure the depth dependence, angular dependence, and temperature dependence of the detectors. Of the commercially available detectors, the diamond detector was found to be the most accurate, but has a large physical size. The TLDs cannot provide real time readings and have depth dependent sensitivity. The MOSFET used in this study was accurate to within 5% for distances of 20 to 50 mm from the 192Ir source in water but gave errors of 30%-40% for distances greater than 50 mm from the source. The BrachyFOD was found to be accurate to within 3% for distances of 10 to 100 mm from an HDR 192Ir brachytherapy source in water. It has an angular dependence of less than 2% and the background signal created by Cerenkov radiation and fluorescence of the plastic optical fiber is insignificant compared to the signal generated in the scintillator. Of the four detectors compared in this study the BrachyFOD has the most favorable combination of characteristics for dosimetry in HDR brachytherapy.

  11. Real-time inverse high-dose-rate brachytherapy planning with catheter optimization by compressed sensing-inspired optimization strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guthier, C. V.; Aschenbrenner, K. P.; Müller, R.; Polster, L.; Cormack, R. A.; Hesser, J. W.

    2016-08-01

    This paper demonstrates that optimization strategies derived from the field of compressed sensing (CS) improve computational performance in inverse treatment planning (ITP) for high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Following an approach applied to low-dose-rate brachytherapy, we developed a reformulation of the ITP problem with the same mathematical structure as standard CS problems. Two greedy methods, derived from hard thresholding and subspace pursuit are presented and their performance is compared to state-of-the-art ITP solvers. Applied to clinical prostate brachytherapy plans speed-up by a factor of 56-350 compared to state-of-the-art methods. Based on a Wilcoxon signed rank-test the novel method statistically significantly decreases the final objective function value (p  <  0.01). The optimization times were below one second and thus planing can be considered as real-time capable. The novel CS inspired strategy enables real-time ITP for HDR brachytherapy including catheter optimization. The generated plans are either clinically equivalent or show a better performance with respect to dosimetric measures.

  12. Targeted radiotherapy enhancement during electronic brachytherapy of accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using controlled release of gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Cifter, G; Chin, J; Cifter, F; Altundal, Y; Sinha, N; Sajo, E; Ngwa, W

    2015-12-01

    Several studies have demonstrated low rates of local recurrence with brachytherapy-based accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). However, long-term outcomes on toxicity (e.g. telangiectasia) and cosmesis remain a major concern. The purpose of this study is to investigate the dosimetric feasibility of using targeted non-toxic radiosensitizing gold nanoparticles (GNPs) for localized dose enhancement to the planning target volume (PTV) during electronic brachytherapy APBI while reducing normal tissue toxicity. We propose to incorporate GNPs into a micrometer-thick polymer film on the surface of routinely used lumpectomy balloon applicators and provide subsequent treatment using a 50 kVp Xoft device. An experimentally determined diffusion coefficient was used to determine space-time customizable distribution of GNPs for feasible in-vivo concentrations of 7 mg/g and 43 mg/g. An analytical approach from previously published work was employed to estimate the dose enhancement due to GNPs as a function of distance up to 1 cm from the lumpectomy cavity surface. Clinically significant dose enhancement values of at least 1.2, due to 2 nm GNPs, were found at 1 cm away from the lumpectomy cavity wall when using electronic brachytherapy APBI. Higher customizable dose enhancement was also achieved at other distances as a function of nanoparticle size. Our preliminary results suggest that significant dose enhancement can be achieved to residual tumor cells targeted with GNPs during APBI with electronic brachytherapy.

  13. 10 CFR 35.2067 - Records of leaks tests and inventory of sealed sources and brachytherapy sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Records of leaks tests and inventory of sealed sources and... MATERIAL Records § 35.2067 Records of leaks tests and inventory of sealed sources and brachytherapy sources. (a) A licensee shall retain records of leak tests required by § 35.67(b) for 3 years. The...

  14. 10 CFR 35.2067 - Records of leaks tests and inventory of sealed sources and brachytherapy sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Records of leaks tests and inventory of sealed sources and... MATERIAL Records § 35.2067 Records of leaks tests and inventory of sealed sources and brachytherapy sources. (a) A licensee shall retain records of leak tests required by § 35.67(b) for 3 years. The...

  15. 10 CFR 35.2067 - Records of leaks tests and inventory of sealed sources and brachytherapy sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Records of leaks tests and inventory of sealed sources and... MATERIAL Records § 35.2067 Records of leaks tests and inventory of sealed sources and brachytherapy sources. (a) A licensee shall retain records of leak tests required by § 35.67(b) for 3 years. The...

  16. 10 CFR 35.2067 - Records of leaks tests and inventory of sealed sources and brachytherapy sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Records of leaks tests and inventory of sealed sources and... MATERIAL Records § 35.2067 Records of leaks tests and inventory of sealed sources and brachytherapy sources. (a) A licensee shall retain records of leak tests required by § 35.67(b) for 3 years. The...

  17. 10 CFR 35.2067 - Records of leaks tests and inventory of sealed sources and brachytherapy sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Records of leaks tests and inventory of sealed sources and... MATERIAL Records § 35.2067 Records of leaks tests and inventory of sealed sources and brachytherapy sources. (a) A licensee shall retain records of leak tests required by § 35.67(b) for 3 years. The...

  18. Exclusive low-dose-rate brachytherapy in 279 patients with T2N0 mobile tongue carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Bourgier, Celine; Coche-Dequeant, Bernard; Fournier, Charles; Castelain, Bernard; Prevost, Bernard; Lefebvre, Jean-Louis; Lartigau, Eric . E-mail: e-lartigau@o-lambret.fr

    2005-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the therapeutic results obtained with {sup 192}Ir low-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy in T2N0 mobile tongue carcinoma. Patients and Methods: Between December 1979 and January 1998, 279 patients with T2N0 mobile tongue carcinoma were treated by exclusive low-dose-rate brachytherapy, with or without neck dissection. {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy was performed according to the 'Paris system' with a median total dose of 60 Gy (median dose rate, 0.5 Gy/h). Results: Overall survival was 74.3% and 46.6% at 2 and 5 years. Local control was 79.1% at 2 years and regional control, respectively, 75.9% and 69.5% at 2 and 5 years (Kaplan-Meier method). Systematic dissection revealed 44.6% occult node metastases, and histologic lymph node involvement was identified as the main significant factor for survival. Complication rate was 16.5% (Grade 3, 2.9%). Half of the patients presented previous and/or successive malignant tumor (ear-nose-throat, esophagus, or bronchus). Conclusion: Exclusive low-dose-rate brachytherapy is an effective treatment for T2 tongue carcinoma. Regional control and survival are excellent in patients undergoing systematic neck dissection, which is mandatory in our experience because of a high rate of occult lymph node metastases.

  19. Low-dose-rate brachytherapy for patients with transurethral resection before implantation in prostate cancer. Long-term results

    PubMed Central

    Prada, Pedro J.; Anchuelo, Javier; Blanco, Ana García; Payá, Gema; Cardenal, Juan; Acuña, Enrique; Ferri, María; Vázquez, Andrés; Pacheco, Maite; Sanchez, Jesica

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives We analyzed the long-term oncologic outcome for patients with prostate cancer and transurethral resection who were treated using low-dose-rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials From January 2001 to December 2005, 57 consecutive patients were treated with clinically localized prostate cancer. No patients received external beam radiation. All of them underwent LDR prostate brachytherapy. Biochemical failure was defined according to the “Phoenix consensus”. Patients were stratified as low and intermediate risk based on The Memorial Sloan Kettering group definition. Results The median follow-up time for these 57 patients was 104 months. The overall survival according to Kaplan-Meier estimates was 88% (±6%) at 5 years and 77% (±6%) at 12 years. The 5 and 10 years for failure in tumour-free survival (TFS) was 96% and respectively (±2%), whereas for biochemical control was 94% and respectively (±3%) at 5 and 10 years, 98% (±1%) of patients being free of local recurrence. A patient reported incontinence after treatment (1.7%). The chronic genitourinary complains grade I were 7% and grade II, 10%. At six months 94% of patients reported no change in bowel function. Conclusions The excellent long-term results and low morbidity presented, as well as the many advantages of prostate brachytherapy over other treatments, demonstrates that brachytherapy is an effective treatment for patients with transurethral resection and clinical organ-confined prostate cancer. PMID:27136466

  20. DuraSeal as a spacer to reduce rectal doses in low-dose rate brachytherapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Heikkilä, Vesa-Pekka; Kärnä, Aarno; Vaarala, Markku H

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility of off-label use of DuraSeal polyethylene glycol (PEG) gel in low-dose rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy seed implantation to reduce rectal doses. Diluted DuraSeal was easy to use and, in spite of a clearance effect, useful in decreasing D₂cc rectal doses. PMID:25201125

  1. Implementation of image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT) for patients with uterine cervix cancer: a tumor volume kinetics approach

    PubMed Central

    Mendez, Lucas Castro; Stuart, Silvia Radwanski; Guimarães, Roger Guilherme Rodrigues; Ramos, Clarissa Cerchi Angotti; de Paula, Lucas Assad; de Sales, Camila Pessoa; Chen, André Tsin Chih; Blasbalg, Roberto; Baroni, Ronaldo Hueb

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate tumor shrinking kinetics in order to implement image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT) for the treatment of patients with cervix cancer. Material and methods This study has prospectively evaluated tumor shrinking kinetics of thirteen patients with uterine cervix cancer treated with combined chemoradiation. Four high dose rate brachytherapy fractions were delivered during the course of pelvic external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) exams were acquired at diagnosis (D), first (B1), and third (B3) brachytherapy fractions. Target volumes (GTV and HR-CTV) were calculated by both the ellipsoid formula (VE) and MRI contouring (VC), which were defined by a consensus between at least two radiation oncologists and a pelvic expert radiologist. Results Most enrolled patients had squamous cell carcinoma and FIGO stage IIB disease, and initiated brachytherapy after the third week of pelvic external beam radiation. Gross tumor volume volume reduction from diagnostic MRI to B1 represented 61.9% and 75.2% of the initial volume, when measured by VE and VC, respectively. Only a modest volume reduction (15-20%) was observed from B1 to B3. Conclusions The most expressive tumor shrinking occurred in the first three weeks of oncological treatment and was in accordance with gynecological examination. These findings may help in IGBT implementation. PMID:27648083

  2. Real-time inverse high-dose-rate brachytherapy planning with catheter optimization by compressed sensing-inspired optimization strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guthier, C. V.; Aschenbrenner, K. P.; Müller, R.; Polster, L.; Cormack, R. A.; Hesser, J. W.

    2016-08-01

    This paper demonstrates that optimization strategies derived from the field of compressed sensing (CS) improve computational performance in inverse treatment planning (ITP) for high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Following an approach applied to low-dose-rate brachytherapy, we developed a reformulation of the ITP problem with the same mathematical structure as standard CS problems. Two greedy methods, derived from hard thresholding and subspace pursuit are presented and their performance is compared to state-of-the-art ITP solvers. Applied to clinical prostate brachytherapy plans speed-up by a factor of 56–350 compared to state-of-the-art methods. Based on a Wilcoxon signed rank-test the novel method statistically significantly decreases the final objective function value (p  <  0.01). The optimization times were below one second and thus planing can be considered as real-time capable. The novel CS inspired strategy enables real-time ITP for HDR brachytherapy including catheter optimization. The generated plans are either clinically equivalent or show a better performance with respect to dosimetric measures.

  3. Implementation of image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT) for patients with uterine cervix cancer: a tumor volume kinetics approach

    PubMed Central

    Mendez, Lucas Castro; Stuart, Silvia Radwanski; Guimarães, Roger Guilherme Rodrigues; Ramos, Clarissa Cerchi Angotti; de Paula, Lucas Assad; de Sales, Camila Pessoa; Chen, André Tsin Chih; Blasbalg, Roberto; Baroni, Ronaldo Hueb

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate tumor shrinking kinetics in order to implement image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT) for the treatment of patients with cervix cancer. Material and methods This study has prospectively evaluated tumor shrinking kinetics of thirteen patients with uterine cervix cancer treated with combined chemoradiation. Four high dose rate brachytherapy fractions were delivered during the course of pelvic external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) exams were acquired at diagnosis (D), first (B1), and third (B3) brachytherapy fractions. Target volumes (GTV and HR-CTV) were calculated by both the ellipsoid formula (VE) and MRI contouring (VC), which were defined by a consensus between at least two radiation oncologists and a pelvic expert radiologist. Results Most enrolled patients had squamous cell carcinoma and FIGO stage IIB disease, and initiated brachytherapy after the third week of pelvic external beam radiation. Gross tumor volume volume reduction from diagnostic MRI to B1 represented 61.9% and 75.2% of the initial volume, when measured by VE and VC, respectively. Only a modest volume reduction (15-20%) was observed from B1 to B3. Conclusions The most expressive tumor shrinking occurred in the first three weeks of oncological treatment and was in accordance with gynecological examination. These findings may help in IGBT implementation.

  4. Real-time inverse high-dose-rate brachytherapy planning with catheter optimization by compressed sensing-inspired optimization strategies.

    PubMed

    Guthier, C V; Aschenbrenner, K P; Müller, R; Polster, L; Cormack, R A; Hesser, J W

    2016-08-21

    This paper demonstrates that optimization strategies derived from the field of compressed sensing (CS) improve computational performance in inverse treatment planning (ITP) for high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Following an approach applied to low-dose-rate brachytherapy, we developed a reformulation of the ITP problem with the same mathematical structure as standard CS problems. Two greedy methods, derived from hard thresholding and subspace pursuit are presented and their performance is compared to state-of-the-art ITP solvers. Applied to clinical prostate brachytherapy plans speed-up by a factor of 56-350 compared to state-of-the-art methods. Based on a Wilcoxon signed rank-test the novel method statistically significantly decreases the final objective function value (p  <  0.01). The optimization times were below one second and thus planing can be considered as real-time capable. The novel CS inspired strategy enables real-time ITP for HDR brachytherapy including catheter optimization. The generated plans are either clinically equivalent or show a better performance with respect to dosimetric measures. PMID:27435044

  5. Efficacy of phosphorus-32 brachytherapy without external-beam radiation for long-term tumor control in patients with craniopharyngioma.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Shaheryar F; Moore, Reilin J; Boaz, Joel C; Fulkerson, Daniel H

    2016-04-01

    OBJECT Radioactive phosphorus-32 (P32) has been used as brachytherapy for craniopharyngiomas with the hope of providing local control of enlarging tumor cysts. Brachytherapy has commonly been used as an adjunct to the standard treatment of surgery and external-beam radiation (EBR). Historically, multimodal treatment, including EBR, has shown tumor control rates as high as 70% at 10 years after treatment. However, EBR is associated with significant long-term risks, including visual deficits, endocrine dysfunction, and cognitive decline. Theoretically, brachytherapy may provide focused local radiation that controls or shrinks a symptomatic cyst without exposing the patient to the risks of EBR. For this study, the authors reviewed their experiences with craniopharyngioma patients treated with P32 brachytherapy as the primary treatment without EBR. The authors reviewed these patients' records to evaluate whether this strategy effectively controls tumor growth, thus avoiding the need for further surgery or EBR. METHODS The authors performed a retrospective review of pediatric patients treated for craniopharyngioma between 1997 and 2004. This was the time period during which the authors' institution had a relatively high use of P32 for treatment of cystic craniopharyngioma. All patients who had surgery and injection of P32 without EBR were identified. The patient records were analyzed for complications, cyst control, need for further surgery, and need for future EBR. RESULTS Thirty-eight patients were treated for craniopharyngioma during the study period. Nine patients (23.7%) were identified who had surgery (resection or biopsy) with P32 brachytherapy but without initial EBR. These 9 patients represented the study group. For 1 patient (11.1%), there was a complication with the brachytherapy procedure. Five patients (55.5%) required subsequent surgery. Seven patients (77.7%) required subsequent EBR for tumor growth. The mean time between the injection of P32 and

  6. AAPM and GEC-ESTRO guidelines for image-guided robotic brachytherapy: Report of Task Group 192

    SciTech Connect

    Podder, Tarun K.; Beaulieu, Luc; Caldwell, Barrett; Cormack, Robert A.; Crass, Jostin B.; Dicker, Adam P.; Yu, Yan; Fenster, Aaron; Fichtinger, Gabor; Meltsner, Michael A.; Moerland, Marinus A.; Nath, Ravinder; Rivard, Mark J.; Salcudean, Tim; Song, Danny Y.; Thomadsen, Bruce R.

    2014-10-15

    In the last decade, there have been significant developments into integration of robots and automation tools with brachytherapy delivery systems. These systems aim to improve the current paradigm by executing higher precision and accuracy in seed placement, improving calculation of optimal seed locations, minimizing surgical trauma, and reducing radiation exposure to medical staff. Most of the applications of this technology have been in the implantation of seeds in patients with early-stage prostate cancer. Nevertheless, the techniques apply to any clinical site where interstitial brachytherapy is appropriate. In consideration of the rapid developments in this area, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) commissioned Task Group 192 to review the state-of-the-art in the field of robotic interstitial brachytherapy. This is a joint Task Group with the Groupe Européen de Curiethérapie-European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (GEC-ESTRO). All developed and reported robotic brachytherapy systems were reviewed. Commissioning and quality assurance procedures for the safe and consistent use of these systems are also provided. Manual seed placement techniques with a rigid template have an estimated in vivo accuracy of 3–6 mm. In addition to the placement accuracy, factors such as tissue deformation, needle deviation, and edema may result in a delivered dose distribution that differs from the preimplant or intraoperative plan. However, real-time needle tracking and seed identification for dynamic updating of dosimetry may improve the quality of seed implantation. The AAPM and GEC-ESTRO recommend that robotic systems should demonstrate a spatial accuracy of seed placement ≤1.0 mm in a phantom. This recommendation is based on the current performance of existing robotic brachytherapy systems and propagation of uncertainties. During clinical commissioning, tests should be conducted to ensure that this level of accuracy is achieved. These tests

  7. AAPM and GEC-ESTRO guidelines for image-guided robotic brachytherapy: report of Task Group 192.

    PubMed

    Podder, Tarun K; Beaulieu, Luc; Caldwell, Barrett; Cormack, Robert A; Crass, Jostin B; Dicker, Adam P; Fenster, Aaron; Fichtinger, Gabor; Meltsner, Michael A; Moerland, Marinus A; Nath, Ravinder; Rivard, Mark J; Salcudean, Tim; Song, Danny Y; Thomadsen, Bruce R; Yu, Yan

    2014-10-01

    In the last decade, there have been significant developments into integration of robots and automation tools with brachytherapy delivery systems. These systems aim to improve the current paradigm by executing higher precision and accuracy in seed placement, improving calculation of optimal seed locations, minimizing surgical trauma, and reducing radiation exposure to medical staff. Most of the applications of this technology have been in the implantation of seeds in patients with early-stage prostate cancer. Nevertheless, the techniques apply to any clinical site where interstitial brachytherapy is appropriate. In consideration of the rapid developments in this area, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) commissioned Task Group 192 to review the state-of-the-art in the field of robotic interstitial brachytherapy. This is a joint Task Group with the Groupe Européen de Curiethérapie-European Society for Radiotherapy & Oncology (GEC-ESTRO). All developed and reported robotic brachytherapy systems were reviewed. Commissioning and quality assurance procedures for the safe and consistent use of these systems are also provided. Manual seed placement techniques with a rigid template have an estimated in vivo accuracy of 3-6 mm. In addition to the placement accuracy, factors such as tissue deformation, needle deviation, and edema may result in a delivered dose distribution that differs from the preimplant or intraoperative plan. However, real-time needle tracking and seed identification for dynamic updating of dosimetry may improve the quality of seed implantation. The AAPM and GEC-ESTRO recommend that robotic systems should demonstrate a spatial accuracy of seed placement ≤1.0 mm in a phantom. This recommendation is based on the current performance of existing robotic brachytherapy systems and propagation of uncertainties. During clinical commissioning, tests should be conducted to ensure that this level of accuracy is achieved. These tests should

  8. AAPM and GEC-ESTRO guidelines for image-guided robotic brachytherapy: report of Task Group 192.

    PubMed

    Podder, Tarun K; Beaulieu, Luc; Caldwell, Barrett; Cormack, Robert A; Crass, Jostin B; Dicker, Adam P; Fenster, Aaron; Fichtinger, Gabor; Meltsner, Michael A; Moerland, Marinus A; Nath, Ravinder; Rivard, Mark J; Salcudean, Tim; Song, Danny Y; Thomadsen, Bruce R; Yu, Yan

    2014-10-01

    In the last decade, there have been significant developments into integration of robots and automation tools with brachytherapy delivery systems. These systems aim to improve the current paradigm by executing higher precision and accuracy in seed placement, improving calculation of optimal seed locations, minimizing surgical trauma, and reducing radiation exposure to medical staff. Most of the applications of this technology have been in the implantation of seeds in patients with early-stage prostate cancer. Nevertheless, the techniques apply to any clinical site where interstitial brachytherapy is appropriate. In consideration of the rapid developments in this area, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) commissioned Task Group 192 to review the state-of-the-art in the field of robotic interstitial brachytherapy. This is a joint Task Group with the Groupe Européen de Curiethérapie-European Society for Radiotherapy & Oncology (GEC-ESTRO). All developed and reported robotic brachytherapy systems were reviewed. Commissioning and quality assurance procedures for the safe and consistent use of these systems are also provided. Manual seed placement techniques with a rigid template have an estimated in vivo accuracy of 3-6 mm. In addition to the placement accuracy, factors such as tissue deformation, needle deviation, and edema may result in a delivered dose distribution that differs from the preimplant or intraoperative plan. However, real-time needle tracking and seed identification for dynamic updating of dosimetry may improve the quality of seed implantation. The AAPM and GEC-ESTRO recommend that robotic systems should demonstrate a spatial accuracy of seed placement ≤1.0 mm in a phantom. This recommendation is based on the current performance of existing robotic brachytherapy systems and propagation of uncertainties. During clinical commissioning, tests should be conducted to ensure that this level of accuracy is achieved. These tests should

  9. Fast prostate segmentation for brachytherapy based on joint fusion of images and labels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouranian, Saman; Ramezani, Mahdi; Mahdavi, S. Sara; Spadinger, Ingrid; Morris, William J.; Salcudean, Septimiu E.; Abolmaesumi, Purang

    2014-03-01

    Brachytherapy as one of the treatment methods for prostate cancer takes place by implantation of radioactive seeds inside the gland. The standard of care for this treatment procedure is to acquire transrectal ultrasound images of the prostate which are segmented in order to plan the appropriate seed placement. The segmentation process is usually performed either manually or semi-automatically and is associated with subjective errors because the prostate visibility is limited in ultrasound images. The current segmentation process also limits the possibility of intra-operative delineation of the prostate to perform real-time dosimetry. In this paper, we propose a computationally inexpensive and fully automatic segmentation approach that takes advantage of previously segmented images to form a joint space of images and their segmentations. We utilize joint Independent Component Analysis method to generate a model which is further employed to produce a probability map of the target segmentation. We evaluate this approach on the transrectal ultrasound volume images of 60 patients using a leave-one-out cross-validation approach. The results are compared with the manually segmented prostate contours that were used by clinicians to plan brachytherapy procedures. We show that the proposed approach is fast with comparable accuracy and precision to those found in previous studies on TRUS segmentation.

  10. Multi-atlas-based automatic 3D segmentation for prostate brachytherapy in transrectal ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouranian, Saman; Mahdavi, S. Sara; Spadinger, Ingrid; Morris, William J.; Salcudean, S. E.; Abolmaesumi, P.

    2013-03-01

    One of the commonly used treatment methods for early-stage prostate cancer is brachytherapy. The standard of care for planning this procedure is segmentation of contours from transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images, which closely follow the prostate boundary. This process is currently performed either manually or using semi-automatic techniques. This paper introduces a fully automatic segmentation algorithm which uses a priori knowledge of contours in a reference data set of TRUS volumes. A non-parametric deformable registration method is employed to transform the atlas prostate contours to a target image coordinates. All atlas images are sorted based on their registration results and the highest ranked registration results are selected for decision fusion. A Simultaneous Truth and Performance Level Estimation algorithm is utilized to fuse labels from registered atlases and produce a segmented target volume. In this experiment, 50 patient TRUS volumes are obtained and a leave-one-out study on TRUS volumes is reported. We also compare our results with a state-of-the-art semi-automatic prostate segmentation method that has been clinically used for planning prostate brachytherapy procedures and we show comparable accuracy and precision within clinically acceptable runtime.

  11. Dose Distributions of an 192Ir Brachytherapy Source in Different Media

    PubMed Central

    Wu, C. H.; Liao, Y. J.; Liu, Y. W. Hsueh; Hung, S. K.; Lee, M. S.; Hsu, S. M.

    2014-01-01

    This study used MCNPX code to investigate the brachytherapy 192Ir dose distributions in water, bone, and lung tissue and performed radiophotoluminescent glass dosimeter measurements to verify the obtained MCNPX results. The results showed that the dose-rate constant, radial dose function, and anisotropy function in water were highly consistent with data in the literature. However, the lung dose near the source would be overestimated by up to 12%, if the lung tissue is assumed to be water, and, hence, if a tumor is located in the lung, the tumor dose will be overestimated, if the material density is not taken into consideration. In contrast, the lung dose far from the source would be underestimated by up to 30%. Radial dose functions were found to depend not only on the phantom size but also on the material density. The phantom size affects the radial dose function in bone more than those in the other tissues. On the other hand, the anisotropy function in lung tissue was not dependent on the radial distance. Our simulation results could represent valid clinical reference data and be used to improve the accuracy of the doses delivered during brachytherapy applied to patients with lung cancer. PMID:24804263

  12. International Standardization of the Clinical Dosimetry of Beta Radiation Brachytherapy Sources: Progress of an ISO Standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, Christopher

    2006-03-01

    In 2004 a new work item proposal (NWIP) was accepted by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) Technical Committee 85 (TC85 -- Nuclear Energy), Subcommittee 2 (Radiation Protection) for the development of a standard for the clinical dosimetry of beta radiation sources used for brachytherapy. To develop this standard, a new Working Group (WG 22 - Ionizing Radiation Dosimetry and Protocols in Medical Applications) was formed. The standard is based on the work of an ad-hoc working group initiated by the Dosimetry task group of the Deutsches Insitiut für Normung (DIN). Initially the work was geared mainly towards the needs of intravascular brachytherapy, but with the decline of this application, more focus has been placed on the challenges of accurate dosimetry for the concave eye plaques used to treat ocular melanoma. Guidance is given for dosimetry formalisms, reference data to be used, calibrations, measurement methods, modeling, uncertainty determinations, treatment planning and reporting, and clinical quality control. The document is currently undergoing review by the ISO member bodies for acceptance as a Committee Draft (CD) with publication of the final standard expected by 2007. There are opportunities for other ISO standards for medical dosimetry within the framework of WG22.

  13. Combined endoscopic laser therapy and brachytherapy for palliation of oesophageal carcinoma: a pilot study.

    PubMed Central

    Renwick, P; Whitton, V; Moghissi, K

    1992-01-01

    Palliative treatment for oesophageal malignancy aims to maximise symptom relief with minimal disturbance to the patient. Twenty one patients with oesophageal carcinoma were studied prospectively to assess the combined efficacy of laser and brachytherapy in the palliation of oesophageal carcinoma, 20 were unsuitable for resectional surgery because of tumour extent and one patient underwent the treatment protocol after myocardial infarction, for symptom relief before resection. Two patients died at hospital and the remaining 19 survived from 9 to 455 days (mean 140 days). All patients tolerated the procedure well and improvement in swallowing was noted in 19 who survived the procedure--an improvement that was maintained until their death. However, five patients required oesophageal dilatation after the initial treatment. Results were not affected by the histology of the tumour. In summary, combined endoscopic laser and brachytherapy is effective palliation for oesophageal carcinoma and may be particularly appropriate in those patients with cervical and upper thoracic tumours in whom intubation may be unsatisfactory. Images Figure 1 PMID:1374728

  14. Tumour and immune cell dynamics explain the PSA bounce after prostate cancer brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Yoichiro; Offord, Chetan P; Kimura, Go; Kuribayashi, Shigehiko; Takeda, Hayato; Tsuchiya, Shinichi; Shimojo, Hisashi; Kanno, Hiroyuki; Bozic, Ivana; Nowak, Martin A; Bajzer, Željko; Dingli, David

    2016-01-01

    Background: Interstitial brachytherapy for localised prostate cancer may be followed by transient increases in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) that resolve without therapy. Such PSA bounces may be associated with an improved outcome but often cause alarm in the patient and physician, and have defied explanation. Methods: We developed a mathematical model to capture the interactions between the tumour, radiation and anti-tumour immune response. The model was fitted to data from a large cohort of patients treated exclusively with interstitial brachytherapy. Immunohistological analysis for T-cell infiltration within the same tumours was also performed. Results: Our minimal model captures well the dynamics of the tumour after therapy, and suggests that a strong anti-tumour immune response coupled with the therapeutic effect of radiation on the tumour is responsible for the PSA bounce. Patients who experience a PSA bounce had a higher density of CD3 and CD8 cells within the tumour that likely contribute to the PSA bounce and the overall better outcomes observed. Conclusions: Our observations provide a novel and unifying explanation for the PSA bounce in patients with early prostate cancer and also have implications for the use of immune-based therapies in such patients to improve outcomes. PMID:27404586

  15. On the Sensitivity of α/β Prediction to Dose Calculation Methodology in Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Afsharpour, Hossein; Walsh, Sean; Collins Fekete, Charles-Antoine; Vigneault, Eric; Verhaegen, Frank; Beaulieu, Luc

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: To study the relationship between the accuracy of the dose calculation in brachytherapy and the estimations of the radiosensitivity parameter, α/β, for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: In this study, Monte Carlo methods and more specifically the code ALGEBRA was used to produce accurate dose calculations in the case of prostate brachytherapy. Equivalent uniform biologically effective dose was calculated for these dose distributions and was used in an iso-effectiveness relationship with external beam radiation therapy. Results: By considering different levels of detail in the calculations, the estimation for the α/β parameter varied from 1.9 to 6.3 Gy, compared with a value of 3.0 Gy suggested by the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group 137. Conclusions: Large variations of the α/β show the sensitivity of this parameter to dose calculation modality. The use of accurate dose calculation engines is critical for better evaluating the biological outcomes of treatments.

  16. Estimating the actual dose delivered by intravascular coronary brachytherapy using geometrically correct 3D modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahle, Andreas; Lopez, John J.; Pennington, Edward C.; Meeks, Sanford L.; Braddy, Kathleen C.; Fox, James M.; Brennan, Theresa M. H.; Buatti, John M.; Rossen, James D.; Sonka, Milan

    2003-05-01

    Intravascular brachytherapy has shown to reduce re-occurrence of in-stent restenosis in coronary arteries. For beta radiation, application time is determined from source activity and the angiographically estimated vessel diameter. Conventionally used dosing models assume a straight vessel with the catheter centered and a constant-diameter circular cross section. Aim of this study was to compare the actual dose delivered during in-vivo intravascular brachytherapy with the target range determined from the patient's prescribed dose. Furthermore, differences in dose distribution between a simplified tubular model (STM) and a geometrically correct 3-D model (GCM) obtained from fusion between biplane angiography and intravascular ultrasound were quantified. The tissue enclosed by the segmented lumen/plaque and media/adventitia borders was simulated using a structured finite-element mesh. The beta-radiation sources were modeled as 3-D objects in their angiographically determined locations. The accumulated dose was estimated using a fixed distance function based on the patient-specific radiation parameters. For visualization, the data was converted to VRML with the accumulated doses represented by color encoding. The statistical comparison between STM and GCM models in 8 patients showed that the STM significantly underestimates the dose delivered and its variability. The analysis revealed substantial deviations from the target dose range in curved vessels.

  17. Place of brachytherapy in the treatment of carcinoma of the tonsil with lingual extension

    SciTech Connect

    Leborgne, J.H.; Leborgne, F.; Barlocci, L.A.; Ortega, B.

    1986-10-01

    One hundred forty-four of 170 patients (85%) were seen with cancer of the tonsil and received radical irradiation between 1959 and 1980. A 39% crude 3-year disease-free survival rate and a 51% locoregional control rate were observed. Locoregional relapse related to T Stage was 6, 43, 58, and 64% for T1, T2, T3, and T4, respectively. Fifty-four of 144 patients (37%) showed tongue extension, 20% in T1-T2 stages and 50% in T3-T4 stages. Local relapse was 64% and the 3-year disease-free survival rate was 23% in 39 patients with tongue extension treated with external irradiation alone, versus 33 and 43% respectively for 90 patients with no tongue extension. The increase of lymph node metastases or neck recurrences was not related to tongue extension. In 15 patients with tongue extension, treated with external radiation plus brachytherapy, the local relapse was 40% and the 3-year survival rate 60%. External irradiation plus brachytherapy was significantly related to lower local relapse and increased survival rate compared to external irradiation alone in cancer of the tonsil with tongue extension. The combined modality was not associated with increased risk of radiation complications.

  18. Dose heterogeneity correction for low-energy brachytherapy sources using dual-energy CT images.

    PubMed

    Mashouf, S; Lechtman, E; Lai, P; Keller, B M; Karotki, A; Beachey, D J; Pignol, J P

    2014-09-21

    Permanent seed implant brachytherapy is currently used for adjuvant radiotherapy of early stage prostate and breast cancer patients. The current standard for calculation of dose around brachytherapy sources is based on the AAPM TG-43 formalism, which generates the dose in a homogeneous water medium. Recently, AAPM TG-186 emphasized the importance of accounting for tissue heterogeneities. We have previously reported on a methodology where the absorbed dose in tissue can be obtained by multiplying the dose, calculated by the TG-43 formalism, by an inhomogeneity correction factor (ICF). In this work we make use of dual energy CT (DECT) images to extract ICF parameters. The advantage of DECT over conventional CT is that it eliminates the need for tissue segmentation as well as assignment of population based atomic compositions. DECT images of a heterogeneous phantom were acquired and the dose was calculated using both TG-43 and TG-43 [Formula: see text] formalisms. The results were compared to experimental measurements using Gafchromic films in the mid-plane of the phantom. For a seed implant configuration of 8 seeds spaced 1.5 cm apart in a cubic structure, the gamma passing score for 2%/2 mm criteria improved from 40.8% to 90.5% when ICF was applied to TG-43 dose distributions.

  19. Heterogeneity-corrected vs -uncorrected critical structure maximum point doses in breast balloon brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Leonard; Narra, Venkat; Yue, Ning

    2013-07-01

    Recent studies have reported potentially clinically meaningful dose differences when heterogeneity correction is used in breast balloon brachytherapy. In this study, we report on the relationship between heterogeneity-corrected and -uncorrected doses for 2 commonly used plan evaluation metrics: maximum point dose to skin surface and maximum point dose to ribs. Maximum point doses to skin surface and ribs were calculated using TG-43 and Varian Acuros for 20 patients treated with breast balloon brachytherapy. The results were plotted against each other and fit with a zero-intercept line. Max skin dose (Acuros) = max skin dose (TG-43) ⁎ 0.930 (R{sup 2} = 0.995). The average magnitude of difference from this relationship was 1.1% (max 2.8%). Max rib dose (Acuros) = max rib dose (TG-43) ⁎ 0.955 (R{sup 2} = 0.9995). The average magnitude of difference from this relationship was 0.7% (max 1.6%). Heterogeneity-corrected maximum point doses to the skin surface and ribs were proportional to TG-43-calculated doses. The average deviation from proportionality was 1%. The proportional relationship suggests that a different metric other than maximum point dose may be needed to obtain a clinical advantage from heterogeneity correction. Alternatively, if maximum point dose continues to be used in recommended limits while incorporating heterogeneity correction, institutions without this capability may be able to accurately estimate these doses by use of a scaling factor.

  20. Automatic segmentation of seeds and fluoroscope tracking (FTRAC) fiducial in prostate brachytherapy x-ray images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Nathanael; Lee, Junghoon; Deguet, Anton; Song, Danny; Burdette, E. Clif; Prince, Jerry

    2010-02-01

    C-arm X-ray fluoroscopy-based radioactive seed localization for intraoperative dosimetry of prostate brachytherapy is an active area of research. The fluoroscopy tracking (FTRAC) fiducial is an image-based tracking device composed of radio-opaque BBs, lines, and ellipses that provides an effective means for pose estimation so that three-dimensional reconstruction of the implanted seeds from multiple X-ray images can be related to the ultrasound-computed prostate volume. Both the FTRAC features and the brachytherapy seeds must be segmented quickly and accurately during the surgery, but current segmentation algorithms are inhibitory in the operating room (OR). The first reason is that current algorithms require operators to manually select a region of interest (ROI), preventing automatic pipelining from image acquisition to seed reconstruction. Secondly, these algorithms fail often, requiring operators to manually correct the errors. We propose a fast and effective ROI-free automatic FTRAC and seed segmentation algorithm to minimize such human intervention. The proposed algorithm exploits recent image processing tools to make seed reconstruction as easy and convenient as possible. Preliminary results on 162 patient images show this algorithm to be fast, effective, and accurate for all features to be segmented. With near perfect success rates and subpixel differences to manual segmentation, our automatic FTRAC and seed segmentation algorithm shows promising results to save crucial time in the OR while reducing errors.

  1. A simplified analytical dose calculation algorithm accounting for tissue heterogeneity for low-energy brachytherapy sources.

    PubMed

    Mashouf, Shahram; Lechtman, Eli; Beaulieu, Luc; Verhaegen, Frank; Keller, Brian M; Ravi, Ananth; Pignol, Jean-Philippe

    2013-09-21

    The American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group No. 43 (AAPM TG-43) formalism is the standard for seeds brachytherapy dose calculation. But for breast seed implants, Monte Carlo simulations reveal large errors due to tissue heterogeneity. Since TG-43 includes several factors to account for source geometry, anisotropy and strength, we propose an additional correction factor, called the inhomogeneity correction factor (ICF), accounting for tissue heterogeneity for Pd-103 brachytherapy. This correction factor is calculated as a function of the media linear attenuation coefficient and mass energy absorption coefficient, and it is independent of the source internal structure. Ultimately the dose in heterogeneous media can be calculated as a product of dose in water as calculated by TG-43 protocol times the ICF. To validate the ICF methodology, dose absorbed in spherical phantoms with large tissue heterogeneities was compared using the TG-43 formalism corrected for heterogeneity versus Monte Carlo simulations. The agreement between Monte Carlo simulations and the ICF method remained within 5% in soft tissues up to several centimeters from a Pd-103 source. Compared to Monte Carlo, the ICF methods can easily be integrated into a clinical treatment planning system and it does not require the detailed internal structure of the source or the photon phase-space.

  2. BrachyView, a novel in-body imaging system for HDR prostate brachytherapy: Experimental evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Safavi-Naeini, M.; Han, Z.; Alnaghy, S.; Cutajar, D.; Petasecca, M.; Lerch, M. L. F.; Rosenfeld, A. B.; Franklin, D. R.; Bucci, J.; Carrara, M.; Zaider, M.

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: This paper presents initial experimental results from a prototype of high dose rate (HDR) BrachyView, a novel in-body source tracking system for HDR brachytherapy based on a multipinhole tungsten collimator and a high resolution pixellated silicon detector array. The probe and its associated position estimation algorithms are validated and a comprehensive evaluation of the accuracy of its position estimation capabilities is presented. Methods: The HDR brachytherapy source is moved through a sequence of positions in a prostate phantom, for various displacements in x, y, and z. For each position, multiple image acquisitions are performed, and source positions are reconstructed. Error estimates in each dimension are calculated at each source position and combined to calculate overall positioning errors. Gafchromic film is used to validate the accuracy of source placement within the phantom. Results: More than 90% of evaluated source positions were estimated with an error of less than one millimeter, with the worst-case error being 1.3 mm. Experimental results were in close agreement with previously published Monte Carlo simulation results. Conclusions: The prototype of HDR BrachyView demonstrates a satisfactory level of accuracy in its source position estimation, and additional improvements are achievable with further refinement of HDR BrachyView’s image processing algorithms.

  3. Migration of a strand of four seeds in low-dose-rate brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Dedic-Hagan, Jasmina; Teh, Amy Y M; Liang, Eisen; Collett, Nicholas; Woo, Henry H

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of stranded-seed migration (one strand of four seeds), via the prostatic venous plexus to the internal pudendal vein, in low-dose-rate (LDR) prostate brachytherapy. A 70-year-old man with low-risk prostate adenocarcinoma underwent transperineal permanent seed implantation. A total of 93 iodine-125 seeds were implanted (91 stranded seeds and 2 loose seeds). Immediate postimplantation fluoroscopic image and day 1 postimplantation CT scan indicated all implanted seeds to be within the vicinity of the prostate as planned. Day 30 pelvic X-ray and CT scan revealed migration of a strand of four seeds to the right pelvis (adjacent to ischial spine). At 2 years postimplantation, the patient continues to have good disease control with prostate specific antigen level of 0.69 μg/L, and asymptomatic. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of migration of an entire strand of seeds following LDR prostate brachytherapy. PMID:24879735

  4. Dose heterogeneity correction for low-energy brachytherapy sources using dual-energy CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashouf, S.; Lechtman, E.; Lai, P.; Keller, B. M.; Karotki, A.; Beachey, D. J.; Pignol, J. P.

    2014-09-01

    Permanent seed implant brachytherapy is currently used for adjuvant radiotherapy of early stage prostate and breast cancer patients. The current standard for calculation of dose around brachytherapy sources is based on the AAPM TG-43 formalism, which generates the dose in a homogeneous water medium. Recently, AAPM TG-186 emphasized the importance of accounting for tissue heterogeneities. We have previously reported on a methodology where the absorbed dose in tissue can be obtained by multiplying the dose, calculated by the TG-43 formalism, by an inhomogeneity correction factor (ICF). In this work we make use of dual energy CT (DECT) images to extract ICF parameters. The advantage of DECT over conventional CT is that it eliminates the need for tissue segmentation as well as assignment of population based atomic compositions. DECT images of a heterogeneous phantom were acquired and the dose was calculated using both TG-43 and TG-43 × \\text{ICF} formalisms. The results were compared to experimental measurements using Gafchromic films in the mid-plane of the phantom. For a seed implant configuration of 8 seeds spaced 1.5 cm apart in a cubic structure, the gamma passing score for 2%/2 mm criteria improved from 40.8% to 90.5% when ICF was applied to TG-43 dose distributions.

  5. Enhancement and validation of Geant4 Brachytherapy application on clinical HDR 192Ir source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ababneh, Eshraq; Dababneh, Saed; Qatarneh, Sharif; Wadi-Ramahi, Shada

    2014-10-01

    The Geant4 Monte Carlo MC associated Brachytherapy example was adapted, enhanced and several analysis techniques have been developed. The simulation studies the isodose distribution of the total, primary and scattered doses around a Nucletron microSelectron 192Ir source. Different phantom materials were used (water, tissue and bone) and the calculation was conducted at various depths and planes. The work provides an early estimate of the required number of primary events to ultimately achieve a given uncertainty at a given distance, in the otherwise CPU and time consuming clinical MC calculation. The adaptation of the Geant4 toolkit and the enhancements introduced to the code are all validated including the comprehensive decay of the 192Ir source, the materials used to build the geometry, the geometry itself and the calculated scatter to primary dose ratio. The simulation quantitatively illustrates that the scattered dose in the bone medium is larger than its value in water and tissue. As the distance away from the source increases, scatter contribution to dose becomes more significant as the primary dose decreases. The developed code could be viewed as a platform that contains detailed dose calculation model for clinical application of HDR 192Ir in Brachytherapy.

  6. Data fusion for planning target volume and isodose prediction in prostate brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouranian, Saman; Ramezani, Mahdi; Mahdavi, S. Sara; Spadinger, Ingrid; Morris, William J.; Salcudean, Septimiu E.; Abolmaesumi, Purang

    2015-03-01

    In low-dose prostate brachytherapy treatment, a large number of radioactive seeds is implanted in and adjacent to the prostate gland. Planning of this treatment involves the determination of a Planning Target Volume (PTV), followed by defining the optimal number of seeds, needles and their coordinates for implantation. The two major planning tasks, i.e. PTV determination and seed definition, are associated with inter- and intra-expert variability. Moreover, since these two steps are performed in sequence, the variability is accumulated in the overall treatment plan. In this paper, we introduce a model based on a data fusion technique that enables joint determination of PTV and the minimum Prescribed Isodose (mPD) map. The model captures the correlation between different information modalities consisting of transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) volumes, PTV and isodose contours. We take advantage of joint Independent Component Analysis (jICA) as a linear decomposition technique to obtain a set of joint components that optimally describe such correlation. We perform a component stability analysis to generate a model with stable parameters that predicts the PTV and isodose contours solely based on a new patient TRUS volume. We propose a framework for both modeling and prediction processes and evaluate it on a dataset of 60 brachytherapy treatment records. We show PTV prediction error of 10:02+/-4:5% and the V100 isodose overlap of 97+/-3:55% with respect to the clinical gold standard.

  7. Effects of insertion speed and trocar stiffness on the accuracy of needle position for brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    McGill, Carl S.; Schwartz, Jonathon A.; Moore, Jason Z.; McLaughlin, Patrick W.; Shih, Albert J.

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: In prostate brachytherapy, accurate positioning of the needle tip to place radioactive seeds at its target site is critical for successful radiation treatment. During the procedure, needle deflection leads to seed misplacement and suboptimal radiation dose to cancerous cells. In practice, radiation oncologists commonly use high-speed hand needle insertion to minimize displacement of the prostate as well as the needle deflection. Effects of speed during needle insertion and stiffness of trocar (a solid rod inside the hollow cannula) on needle deflection are studied. Methods: Needle insertion experiments into phantom were performed using a 2{sup 2} factorial design (2 parameters at 2 levels), with each condition having replicates. Analysis of the deflection data included calculating the average, standard deviation, and analysis of variance (ANOVA) to find significant single and two-way interaction factors. Results: The stiffer tungsten carbide trocar is effective in reducing the average and standard deviation of needle deflection. The fast insertion speed together with the stiffer trocar generated the smallest average and standard deviation for needle deflection for almost all cases. Conclusions: The combination of stiff tungsten carbide trocar and fast needle insertion speed are important to decreasing needle deflection. The knowledge gained from this study can be used to improve the accuracy of needle insertion during brachytherapy procedures.

  8. Stereotactic interstitial brachytherapy of malignant astrocytomas with remarks on postimplantation computed tomographic appearance

    SciTech Connect

    Willis, B.K.; Heilbrun, M.P.; Sapozink, M.D.; McDonald, P.R.

    1988-09-01

    Seventeen patients were treated with stereotactically implanted high activity iodine-125 seeds, 12 patients for recurrent malignant astrocytomas (Protocol I) and 5 patients for newly diagnosed glioblastomas (Protocol II). Total radiation dosage to the recurrent tumors in Protocol I, including prior external beam irradiation, averaged 13,500 cGy. In the follow-up period of 6 to 50 months, the survival rate was 93% at 6 months, 60% at 12 months, 50% at 18 months, and 38% at 24 months after implantation. In Protocol II, brachytherapy was used as an interstitial radiation boost to the conventional treatment of newly diagnosed glioblastomas. External beam therapy and interstitial brachytherapy provided 11,000 cGy to these tumors. In the follow-up period of 15 to 27 months, there was a 100% survival at 12 months, 75% at 18 months, and 25% at 24 months after implantation. Eight of our 17 patients required reoperation for persistent or recurrent mass lesions at 6 to 15 months postimplantation; 7 were found to harbor masses of radionecrosis containing nests of anaplastic astrocytes; 1 had frank tumor recurrence. Median survival in this group of patients requiring reoperation was 18.7 months postimplantation. In a review of postimplantation computed tomographic scans, significant mass effect and crossover of hypodensity or enhancement into the corpus callosum or opposite hemisphere were found to have prognostic significance; persistent areas of contrast enhancement and excessive peritumoral hypodensity did not.

  9. Addendum to brachytherapy dose-volume histogram commissioning with multiple planning systems.

    PubMed

    Gossman, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    The process for validating dose-volume histogram data in brachytherapy software is presented as a supplement to a previously published article. Included is the DVH accuracy evaluation of the Best NOMOS treatment planning system called "Best TPS VolumePlan." As done previously in other software, a rectangular cuboid was contoured in the treatment planning system. A single radioactive 125I source was positioned coplanar and concentric with one end. Calculations were performed to estimate dose deposition in partial volumes of the cuboid structure, using the brachytherapy dosimetry formalism defined in AAPM Task Group 43. Hand-calculated, dose-volume results were compared to TPS-generated, point-source-approximated dose-volume histogram data to establish acceptance. The required QA for commissioning was satisfied for the DVH as conducted previously for other software, using the criterion that the DVH %VolTPS "actual variance" calculations should differ by no more than 5% at any specific radial distance with respect to %VolTG-43, and the "average variance" DVH %VolTPS calculations should differ by no more than 2% over all radial distances with respect to %VolTG-43. The average disagreement observed between hand calculations and treatment planning system DVH was less than 0.5% on average for this treatment planning system and less than 1.1% maximally for 1 ≤ r ≤ 5 cm. PMID:27167288

  10. SU-E-P-08: Alarming Range of Seed Activities Ordered for I-125 Plaque Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Merz, B

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the variation in I-125 seed activities ordered by various clinics for their plaque brachytherapy cases under a standardized set of assumptions. Methods: A majority of the plaque programs in North America were contacted and a survey was designed to give a few standardized cases to allow inter-comparison of seed activities ordered. Tumor dose, treatment duration, number of seeds, plaque, and tumor apex were held constant in order to reveal differences in prescription point, seed type, and seed activity. Results: While the survey is presently underway, preliminary results show alarmingly wide variations between centers. Differences up to 45% have been found with 15% differences being common. Conclusion: Though knowledge of the TG-43 dose calculation formalism is common, a number of factors in the field of plaque brachytherapy lead to alarming differences in activity of I-125 seeds being ordered for a given tumor. Knowledge of the present reality of widely varying treatment activities, and thus doses to tumor and normal structures, should serve as motivation for centers involved in this modality to review their programs with others in the community and share their experiences.

  11. Brain tumour and infiltrations dosimetry of boron neutron capture therapy combined with 252Cf brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Sâmia F; Campos, Tarcísio P R

    2012-04-01

    This article presents a dosimetric investigation of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) combined with (252)Cf brachytherapy for brain tumour control. The study was conducted through computational simulation in MCNP5 code, using a precise and discrete voxel model of a human head, in which a hypothetical brain tumour was incorporated. A boron concentration ratio of 1:5 for healthy-tissue: tumour was considered. Absorbed and biologically weighted dose rates and neutron fluency in the voxel model were evaluated. The absorbed dose rate results were exported to SISCODES software, which generates the isodose surfaces on the brain. Analyses were performed to clarify the relevance of boron concentrations in occult infiltrations far from the target tumour, with boron concentration ratios of 1:1 up to 1:50 for healthy-tissue:infiltrations and healthy-tissue:tumour. The average biologically weighted dose rates at tumour area exceed up to 40 times the surrounding healthy tissue dose rates. In addition, the biologically weighted dose rates from boron have the main contribution at the infiltrations, especially far from primary tumour. In conclusion, BNCT combined with (252)Cf brachytherapy is an alternative technique for brain tumour treatment because it intensifies dose deposition at the tumour and at infiltrations, sparing healthy brain tissue.

  12. High dose rate endorectal brachytherapy as a neoadjuvant treatment for patients with resectable rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Vuong, T; Devic, S; Podgorsak, E

    2007-11-01

    In the era of total mesorectal surgery, the issue of radiation toxicity is raised. A novel endocavitary brachytherapy technique was tested as a neoadjuvant treatment for patients with resectable rectal cancer. The objectives of the study were to evaluate the treatment-related toxicity and effects on local recurrence. A dose of 26 Gy was prescribed to the gross tumour volume and intramesorectal deposits seen on magnetic resonance imaging and given over four daily treatments, using the high dose rate delivery system followed by surgery 6-8 weeks later. The study included 93 T3, four T4 and three T2 tumours. Acute proctitis of grade 2 was observed in all patients, but one required transfusion. At a median follow-up time of 60 months, the 5-year actual local recurrence rate was 5%, disease-free survival was 65%, and overall survival was 70%. High dose rate endorectal brachytherapy seems to prevent local recurrence and has a favourable toxicity pattern compared with external beam radiotherapy. PMID:17714925

  13. Exenteration and Custom Implant Brachytherapy as a Treatment for Recurrent Primary Extraskeletal Orbital Ewing Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Klufas, Michael A.; Wolden, Suzanne L.; Bohle, George C.; Wexler, Leonard H.; Abramson, David H.

    2016-01-01

    A 6-year-old boy initially presented to an outside hospital with a right orbital mass with biopsy positive for translocation involving EWS RNA-binding protein 1 gene and imaging consistent with primary extraskeletal Ewing sarcoma (ES). There was no evidence of metastatic disease. Patient underwent gross tumor resection and adjuvant chemotherapy (VAdriaC/IE) followed by postoperative 45-Gy proton beam radiation. After 19 months, a solitary infield local recurrence occurred, which was unsuccessfully surgically resected. Thereafter, treatment commenced with irinotecan and temozolomide, and the patient presented to the center of the authors. MRI showed locally recurrent disease without evidence of metastatic disease. Right orbital exenteration was performed, and an orbital mold was fashioned to deliver brachytherapy. There were no complications. The patient had no evidence of recurrent disease at 37-month follow up. This is the first report of orbital implant brachytherapy for recurrent primary ES of the orbit, and an additional report of primary extraskeletal ES of the orbit, which is a rare primary orbital tumor. PMID:24814278

  14. Performance and suitability assessment of a real-time 3D electromagnetic needle tracking system for interstitial brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Boutaleb, Samir; Fillion, Olivier; Bonillas, Antonio; Hautvast, Gilion; Binnekamp, Dirk; Beaulieu, Luc

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Accurate insertion and overall needle positioning are key requirements for effective brachytherapy treatments. This work aims at demonstrating the accuracy performance and the suitability of the Aurora® V1 Planar Field Generator (PFG) electromagnetic tracking system (EMTS) for real-time treatment assistance in interstitial brachytherapy procedures. Material and methods The system's performance was characterized in two distinct studies. First, in an environment free of EM disturbance, the boundaries of the detection volume of the EMTS were characterized and a tracking error analysis was performed. Secondly, a distortion analysis was conducted as a means of assessing the tracking accuracy performance of the system in the presence of potential EM disturbance generated by the proximity of standard brachytherapy components. Results The tracking accuracy experiments showed that positional errors were typically 2 ± 1 mm in a zone restricted to the first 30 cm of the detection volume. However, at the edges of the detection volume, sensor position errors of up to 16 mm were recorded. On the other hand, orientation errors remained low at ± 2° for most of the measurements. The EM distortion analysis showed that the presence of typical brachytherapy components in vicinity of the EMTS had little influence on tracking accuracy. Position errors of less than 1 mm were recorded with all components except with a metallic arm support, which induced a mean absolute error of approximately 1.4 mm when located 10 cm away from the needle sensor. Conclusions The Aurora® V1 PFG EMTS possesses a great potential for real-time treatment assistance in general interstitial brachytherapy. In view of our experimental results, we however recommend that the needle axis remains as parallel as possible to the generator surface during treatment and that the tracking zone be restricted to the first 30 cm from the generator surface. PMID:26622231

  15. Does the Entire Uterus Need to be Treated in Cancer of the Cervix? Role of Adaptive Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Anker, Christopher J.; Cachoeira, Charles V.; Boucher, Kenneth M.; Rankin, Jim M.S.; Gaffney, David K.

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate local control and toxicity by use of a method of adaptive cervical brachytherapy (ACB). Methods and Materials: From 1998 to 2008, we identified 65 cervical cancer patients with FIGO (International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics) Stage IB1-IVA disease who received definitive external beam radiation therapy and high-dose rate brachytherapy with tandem and ovoid applicators. As tumors regressed, 45 of 65 patients had the tandem source retracted from the uterine fundus at successive brachytherapy insertions, thus decreasing the number of {sup 192}Ir dwell positions. Tests of trend and Fisher's exact test were used to identify the effect of ACB on disease control and toxicity. Kaplan-Meier analyses were performed to evaluate disease control and late complications. Results: The median follow-up was 24.5 months. Of the patients, 92% received chemotherapy. The 3-year overall survival, 3-year disease-free survival, 3-year distant metastasis-free survival, and local control rates were 67%, 76%, 79%, and 97%, respectively. There was only 1 isolated local failure, and there were no local failures beyond 1 year. Distant failure was involved in 93% of recurrences. No significant trend was identified regarding the extent of retraction of the tandem source start position with either failure or toxicity. Acute and actuarial 3-year late Grade 3 toxicity or greater occurred in 24.6% and 17% of patients, respectively. Conclusions: ACB determined by clinical response yielded excellent local control rates. These data indicate that ACB may be useful in decreasing late toxicities from high-dose rate brachytherapy. With the advent of three-dimensional image-guided brachytherapy, additional methods to adapt treatment technique to changes in tumor volume warrant investigation.

  16. Sci—Fri PM: Topics — 08: The Role and Benefits of Electromagnetic Needle-Tracking Technologies in Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Beaulieu, L.; Racine, E.; Boutaleb, S.; Filion, O.; Poulin, E.; Hautvast, G.; Binnekamp, D.

    2014-08-15

    In modern brachytherapy, application of large doses of ionizing radiation in a limited number of fractions is frequent. Furthermore, as with any surgical procedures, brachytherapy is subject to learning curve effects. In this context, there could be advantages of integrating real-time tracking of needles/catheters to existing protocols given the recent prominent advances in tracking technologies. In this work, we review the use of an electromagnetic tracking system (EMTS) based on the second generation Aurora® Planar Field Generator (Northern Digital Inc) and custom design needles (Philips Healthcare) for brachytherapy applications. The position and orientation information is obtained from 5 degrees of freedom sensors. Basic system performance characterization is performed in well-controlled conditions to establish accuracy and reproducibility as well as potential interference from standard brachytherapy equipment. The results show that sensor locations can be tracked to within 0.04mm (la) when located within 26cm of the generator. Orientation accuracy of the needle remained within ±1° in the same region, but rose quickly at larger distances. The errors on position and orientation strongly dependent the sensor position in the characterization volume (500×500×500mm{sup 3}). The presence of an ultrasound probe was shown to have negligible effects on tracking accuracy. The use of EMTS for automatic catheter/applicator reconstruction was also explored. Reconstruction time was less than 10 sec/channel and tips identification was within 0.69±0.29mm of the reference values. Finally, we demonstrate that hollow needle designs with special EM adaptation also allow for real-time seed drop position estimation. In phantom experiments showed that drop positions were on average within 1.6±0.9mm of the reference position measured from μCT. Altogether, EMTS offer promising benefits in a wide range of brachytherapy applications.

  17. High-dose-rate brachytherapy delivered in two fractions as monotherapy for low-risk prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Alwers, Elizabeth; Cifuentes, Javier; Bobadilla, Ivan; Torres, Felipe; Arbelaez, Juan; Gaitan, Armando; Cortes, Helber; Acevedo, Yenny; Quintero, Paulo; Vasquez, Jaider

    2015-01-01

    Purpose High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy has been accepted as an effective and safe method to treat prostate cancer. The aim of this study was to describe acute toxicity following HDR brachytherapy to the prostate, and to examine the association between dosimetric parameters and urinary toxicity in low-risk prostate cancer patients. Material and methods Patients with low-risk prostate cancer were given HDR brachytherapy as monotherapy in two 12.5 Gy fractions. Planning objectives for the planning target volume (PTV) were V100% ≥ 90% and V150% ≤ 35%. Planning objectives for organs at risk were V75% ≤ 1 cc for the bladder, rectum and perineum, and V125% ≤ 1 cc for the urethra. Toxicity was assessed three months after treatment using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events. Results Seventy-three patients were included in the analysis. Thirty-three patients (45%) reported having any type of toxicity in the three months following HDR brachytherapy. Most toxicity cases (26%) were grade 1 urinary toxicity. Mean coverage index was 0.89 and mean V100 was 88.85. Doses administered to the urethra were associated with urinary toxicity. Patients who received more than 111.3% of the prescribed dose in 1 cc of the urethra were four times more likely to have urinary toxicity compared to patients receiving less than 111.3% (OR = 4.71, 95% CI: 1.43-15.6; p = 0.011). Conclusions High-dose-rate brachytherapy administered as monotherapy for prostate cancer proved to be a safe alternative treatment for patients with low-risk prostate cancer. Urinary toxicity was associated with the dose administered to 1 cc and 0.1 cc of the urethra and was remarkably inferior to the reported toxicity in similar studies. PMID:25829931

  18. BrachyGuide: a brachytherapy-dedicated DICOM RT viewer and interface to Monte Carlo simulation software.

    PubMed

    Pantelis, Evaggelos; Peppa, Vassiliki; Lahanas, Vasileios; Pappas, Eleftherios; Papagiannis, Panagiotis

    2015-01-08

    This work presents BrachyGuide, a brachytherapy-dedicated software tool for the automatic preparation of input files for Monte Carlo simulation from treatment plans exported in DICOM RT format, and results of calculations performed for its benchmarking. Three plans were prepared using two computational models, the image series of a water sphere and a multicatheter breast brachytherapy patient, for each of two commercially available treatment planning systems: BrachyVision and Oncentra Brachy. One plan involved a single source dwell position of an 192Ir HDR source (VS2000 or mHDR-v2) at the center of the water sphere using the TG43 algorithm, and the other two corresponded to the TG43 and advanced dose calculation algorithm for the multicatheter breast brachytherapy patient. Monte Carlo input files were prepared using BrachyGuide and simulations were performed with MCNP v.6.1. For the TG43 patient plans, the Monte Carlo computational model was manually edited in the prepared input files to resemble TG43 dosimetry assumptions. Hence all DICOM RT dose exports were equivalent to corresponding simulation results and their comparison was used for benchmarking the use of BrachyGuide. Monte Carlo simulation results and corresponding DICOM RT dose exports agree within type A uncertainties in the majority of points in the computational models. Treatment planning system, algorithm, and source specific differences greater than type A uncertainties were also observed, but these were explained by treatment planning system-related issues and other sources of type B uncertainty. These differences have to be taken into account in commissioning procedures of brachytherapy dosimetry algorithms. BrachyGuide is accurate and effective for use in the preparation of commissioning tests for new brachytherapy dosimetry algorithms as a user-oriented commissioning tool and the expedition of retrospective patient cohort studies of dosimetry planning.

  19. Ocular brachytherapy dosimetry for 103Pd and 125I in the presence of gold nanoparticles: a Monte Carlo study.

    PubMed

    Asadi, Somayeh; Vaez-Zadeh, Mehdi; Vahidian, Mohammad; Marghchouei, Mahdieh; Masoudi, S Farhad

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present Monte Carlo study is to evaluate the variation of energy deposition in healthy tissues in the human eye which is irradiated by brachytherapy sources in comparison with the resultant dose increase in the gold nanoparticle (GNP)-loaded choroidal melanoma. The effects of these nanoparticles on normal tissues are compared between 103Pd and 125I as two ophthalmic brachytherapy sources. Dose distribution in the tumor and healthy tissues has been taken into account for both brachytherapy sources. Also, in certain points of the eye, the ratio of the absorbed dose by the normal tissue in the presence of GNPs to the absorbed dose by the same point in the absence of GNPs has been calculated. In addition, differences of the absorbed dose in the tumor observed in the comparison of simple water phantom and actual simulated human eye in presence of GNPs are also a matter of interest that have been considered in the present work. The difference between the eye globe and the water phantom is more obvious for 125I than that of the 103Pd when the ophthalmic dosimetry is done in the presence of GNPs. Whenever these nanoparticles are utilized in enhancing the absorbed dose by the tumor, the use of 125I brachytherapy source will greatly amplify the amount of dose enhancement factor (DEF) in the tumor site without inflicting much dam-age to healthy organs, when compared to the 103Pd source. For instance, in the concentration of 30 mg GNPs, the difference amongst the calculated DEF for 125I between these phantoms is 5.3%, while it is 2.45% for 103Pd. Furthermore, in Monte Carlo studies of eye brachytherapy, more precise definition of the eye phantom instead of a water phantom will become increasingly important when we use 125I as opposed to 103Pd. PMID:27167265

  20. Second Primary Cancer After Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer-A SEER Analysis of Brachytherapy Versus External Beam Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Wahab, May Reis, Isildinha M.; Hamilton, Kara

    2008-09-01

    Purpose: To determine the incidence of second primary cancers (SPCs) and radiotherapy-induced SPCs (RTSPCs). Patients and Methods: The incidence of SPCs and RTSPCs was compared among four treatment groups with locoregional prostate adenocarcinoma in the 1973-2002 Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database. These groups were no radiotherapy (RT), no surgery (Group 1); external beam RT (EBRT) (Group 2); brachytherapy (Group 3); and a combination of EBRT and brachytherapy (Group 4). Results: The age-adjusted estimates of SPCs were greater with EBRT than with brachytherapy (2,178 vs. 1,901 SPCs/100,000; p = 0.025) or with the no RT, no surgery group (1,971 SPCs/100,000; p <0.0001). The age-adjusted rate of late SPC ({>=}5 years) for EBRT (2,425 SPCs/100,000) was only significantly greater (p <0.0001) than that for no RT, no surgery (1,950 SPCs/100,000). The hazard ratio adjusted for age, race/ethnicity, and grade was constant at 1.263 for EBRT compared with no RT, no surgery (p <0.0001) but varied with the length of follow-up in both the brachytherapy (0.721 at 5 years to 1.200 at 9 years) and combination (0.920 at 5 years to 1.317 at 9 years) groups. The incidence of RTSPCs was only significantly different between the no RT, no surgery group and the EBRT group, with an increase of 162 cases/100,000 or a 0.16% increased SPC risk (p = 0.023). No significant differences in the incidence of RTSPC were seen between the RT groups. Conclusion: No significant differences were seen in the incidence of RTSPCs between the RT groups. The initial smaller relative risk of overall SPCs in the brachytherapy group increased with time until the curves converged, suggesting that the effect had resulted from patient selection bias.

  1. Comparison of High-Dose Proton Radiotherapy and Brachytherapy in Localized Prostate Cancer: A Case-Matched Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Coen, John J.; Zietman, Anthony L.; Rossi, Carl J.; Grocela, Joseph A.; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Yan, Yan; Shipley, William U.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To report a case-matched analysis comparing high-dose external-beam radiation (EBRT) for prostate cancer delivered on Proton Radiation Oncology Group (PROG) 95-09, a randomized trial, with permanent prostate brachytherapy over the same era. Methods: From 1996 to 1999, 196 patients were accrued to the high-dose arm (79.2 Gray equivalent (GyE) using photons and protons) of PROG 95-09 at the Massachusetts General Hospital and Loma Linda University Medical Center. Entry criteria specified T1-2 and prostate-specific antigen {<=}15 ng/mL. When Gleason score >7 was excluded, 177 men were left for case matching. At Massachusetts General Hospital, 203 similar patients were treated by a single brachytherapist from 1997 to 2002. Minimum follow-up was 3 years. Case matching, based on T stage, Gleason score, prostate-specific antigen, and age resulted in 141 matches (282 patients). Median follow-up was 8.6 and 7.4 years for EBRT and brachytherapy, respectively. The primary endpoint was biochemical failure (BF). Results: Using the Phoenix definition, the 8-year BF rates were 7.7% and 16.1% for EBRT and brachytherapy, respectively (p = 0.42). A stratified analysis was performed by risk group. In the EBRT group, 113 and 28 patients were low and intermediate risk, respectively. In the brachytherapy group, 118 and 23 were. When stratified by risk group, the BF rates were similar by either technique. Conclusions: High-dose EBRT and brachytherapy result in similar BF rates for men with localized prostate cancer. Comparative quality-of-life and cost-effectiveness studies are warranted.

  2. Verification of the plan dosimetry for high dose rate brachytherapy using metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Qi Zhenyu; Deng Xiaowu; Huang Shaomin; Lu Jie; Lerch, Michael; Cutajar, Dean; Rosenfeld, Anatoly

    2007-06-15

    The feasibility of a recently designed metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimetry system for dose verification of high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatment planning was investigated. MOSFET detectors were calibrated with a 0.6 cm{sup 3} NE-2571 Farmer-type ionization chamber in water. Key characteristics of the MOSFET detectors, such as the energy dependence, that will affect phantom measurements with HDR {sup 192}Ir sources were measured. The MOSFET detector was then applied to verify the dosimetric accuracy of HDR brachytherapy treatments in a custom-made water phantom. Three MOSFET detectors were calibrated independently, with the calibration factors ranging from 0.187 to 0.215 cGy/mV. A distance dependent energy response was observed, significant within 2 cm from the source. The new MOSFET detector has a good reproducibility (<3%), small angular effect (<2%), and good dose linearity (R{sup 2}=1). It was observed that the MOSFET detectors had a linear response to dose until the threshold voltage reached approximately 24 V for {sup 192}Ir source measurements. Further comparison of phantom measurements using MOSFET detectors with dose calculations by a commercial treatment planning system for computed tomography-based brachytherapy treatment plans showed that the mean relative deviation was 2.2{+-}0.2% for dose points 1 cm away from the source and 2.0{+-}0.1% for dose points located 2 cm away. The percentage deviations between the measured doses and the planned doses were below 5% for all the measurements. The MOSFET detector, with its advantages of small physical size and ease of use, is a reliable tool for quality assurance of HDR brachytherapy. The phantom verification method described here is universal and can be applied to other HDR brachytherapy treatments.

  3. Concurrent versus sequential application of ferromagnetic hyperthermia and 125I brachytherapy of melanoma in an animal model.

    PubMed Central

    Mieler, W F

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the efficacy of concurrent versus sequential ferromagnetic hyperthermia (FMH), combined with Iodine-125 (125I) brachytherapy, in the treatment of uveal melanoma in a rabbit model. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A Greene melanoma cell line was implanted in rabbit eyes to establish a tumor model comparable to a uveal melanoma. Seventy-one tumor-containing rabbit eyes were treated with 125I brachytherapy at 20, 25, 35, 45, or 55 Gray (Gy)(38 eyes), and with either concurrent (15 eyes) or sequential (18 eyes) FMH, delivered at 48.2 degrees C for 1 hour. An additional 13 eyes were treated with FMH alone at 48.2 degrees C, either in a single heat application (5 eyes), or in a repetitive mode (8 eyes). The radiation and heat were delivered via an episcleral plaque. All tumors were followed with indirect ophthalmoscopy and echography. RESULTS: Tumors treated with 125I brachytherapy alone exhibited complete tumor regression in 50% of eyes at 42 Gy with none of the tumors responding to less than 35 Gy. FMH alone at 48.2 degrees C applied in one cycle limited tumor growth in 20% of eyes, while all eyes treated with repetitive heating exhibited complete tumor control. With concurrent application of FMH and 125I, the 50% tumor control rate occurred at 9.5 Gy, thus resulting in a thermal enhancement ratio (TER) of 4.4. With sequential treatment, the 50% tumor control rate was at 30 Gy, with a resultant TER of 1.4. No complications related to 125I brachytherapy were noted in any eyes, while transient retinal whitening was seen with the FMH. CONCLUSION: This study documents the enhanced synergistic interaction of concurrent FMH and 125I brachytherapy, compared to sequential treatment, in this rabbit melanoma model. PMID:9440189

  4. Adaptation of the CVT algorithm for catheter optimization in high dose rate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Poulin, Eric; Fekete, Charles-Antoine Collins; Beaulieu, Luc; Létourneau, Mélanie; Fenster, Aaron; Pouliot, Jean

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: An innovative, simple, and fast method to optimize the number and position of catheters is presented for prostate and breast high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy, both for arbitrary templates or template-free implants (such as robotic templates).Methods: Eight clinical cases were chosen randomly from a bank of patients, previously treated in our clinic to test our method. The 2D Centroidal Voronoi Tessellations (CVT) algorithm was adapted to distribute catheters uniformly in space, within the maximum external contour of the planning target volume. The catheters optimization procedure includes the inverse planning simulated annealing algorithm (IPSA). Complete treatment plans can then be generated from the algorithm for different number of catheters. The best plan is chosen from different dosimetry criteria and will automatically provide the number of catheters and their positions. After the CVT algorithm parameters were optimized for speed and dosimetric results, it was validated against prostate clinical cases, using clinically relevant dose parameters. The robustness to implantation error was also evaluated. Finally, the efficiency of the method was tested in breast interstitial HDR brachytherapy cases.Results: The effect of the number and locations of the catheters on prostate cancer patients was studied. Treatment plans with a better or equivalent dose distributions could be obtained with fewer catheters. A better or equal prostate V100 was obtained down to 12 catheters. Plans with nine or less catheters would not be clinically acceptable in terms of prostate V100 and D90. Implantation errors up to 3 mm were acceptable since no statistical difference was found when compared to 0 mm error (p > 0.05). No significant difference in dosimetric indices was observed for the different combination of parameters within the CVT algorithm. A linear relation was found between the number of random points and the optimization time of the CVT algorithm. Because the

  5. MRI assisted cervix cancer brachytherapy pre-planning, based on insertion of the applicator in para-cervical anaesthesia: preliminary results of a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Hudej, Robert; Music, Maja

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To report on preliminary results of a prospective study on MRI-assisted cervix cancer brachytherapy pre-planning. Material and methods In six locally advanced cervix cancer patients, five days before the first brachytherapy fraction, tandem & ring applicator was inserted under para-cervical anaesthesia, MRI performed and applicator removed. Procedure-time and patient-tolerability were recorded. High risk CTV and organs at risk were delineated, virtual needles placed and dose planning performed. At brachytherapy, insertion was carried out under subarachnoidal anaesthesia, according to pre-planned geometry. Pre-planned and actual needle positions and DVH parameters were compared. Results The procedure was well tolerated and short. All inserted needles were inside high risk CTV and outside organs at risk. Differences in pre-planned and actual DVH parameters and implant geometry were small. Conclusions The procedure was well tolerated and feasible. Pre-planned geometry could be reproduced thoroughly at brachytherapy application.

  6. Helical Tomotherapy Delivery of an IMRT Boost in Lieu of Interstitial Brachytherapy in the Setting of Gynecologic Malignancy: Feasibility and Dosimetric Comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Gielda, Benjamin T.; Shah, Anand P.; Marsh, James C.; Smart, Joseph P.; Bernard, Damian; Rotmensch, Jacob; Griem, Katherine L.

    2011-07-01

    Interstitial brachytherapy is an important means by which to improve local control in gynecologic malignancy when intracavitary brachytherapy is untenable. Patients unable to receive brachytherapy have traditionally received conventional external beam radiation alone with modest results. We investigated the ability of Tomotherapy (Tomotherapy Inc., Madison, WI) to replace interstitial brachytherapy. Six patients were selected. The planning CT of each patient was contoured with the planning target volume (PTV), bladder, rectum, femoral heads, and bowel. Identical contour sets were exported to Tomotherapy and Nucletron PLATO (Nucletron B.V., Veenendaal, The Netherlands). With Tomotherapy, the PTV was prescribed 31 Gy in 5 fractions to 90% of the volume. With PLATO, 600 cGy x 5 fractions was prescribed to the surface of the PTV. Dose delivered was normalized to 2 Gy fractions (EQD2) and added to a hypothetical homogenous 45-Gy pelvic dose. Tomotherapy achieved a D90 of 87 Gy EQD2 versus 86 Gy with brachytherapy. PTV dose was more homogeneous with tomotherapy. The dose to the most at-risk 2 mL of bladder and rectum with Tomotherapy was of 78 and 71 Gy EQD2 versus 81 and 75 Gy with brachytherapy. Tomotherapy delivered more dose to the femoral heads (mean 1.23 Gy per fraction) and bowel. Tomotherapy was capable of replicating the peripheral dose achieved with brachytherapy, without the PTV hotspots inherent to interstitial brachytherapy. Similar maximum doses to bowel and bladder were achieved with both methods. Excessive small bowel and femoral head toxicity may result if previous pelvic irradiation is not planned accordingly. Significant challenges related to interfraction and intrafraction motion must be overcome if treatment of this nature is to be contemplated.

  7. Determination of air-kerma strength for the {sup 192}Ir GammaMedplus iX pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy source

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, A. D.; Pike, T. L.; Micka, J. A.; Fulkerson, R. K.; DeWerd, L. A.

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: Pulsed-dose-rate (PDR) brachytherapy was originally proposed to combine the therapeutic advantages of high-dose-rate (HDR) and low-dose-rate brachytherapy. Though uncommon in the United States, several facilities employ pulsed-dose-rate brachytherapy in Europe and Canada. Currently, there is no air-kerma strength standard for PDR brachytherapy {sup 192}Ir sources traceable to the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Discrepancies in clinical measurements of the air-kerma strength of the PDR brachytherapy sources using HDR source-calibrated well chambers warrant further investigation.Methods: In this research, the air-kerma strength for an {sup 192}Ir PDR brachytherapy source was compared with the University of Wisconsin Accredited Dosimetry Calibration Laboratory transfer standard well chambers, the seven-distance technique [B. E. Rasmussen et al., 'The air-kerma strength standard for 192Ir HDR sources,' Med. Phys. 38, 6721-6729 (2011)], and the manufacturer's stated value. Radiochromic film and Monte Carlo techniques were also employed for comparison to the results of the measurements.Results: While the measurements using the seven-distance technique were within + 0.44% from the manufacturer's determination, there was a + 3.10% difference between the transfer standard well chamber measurements and the manufacturer's stated value. Results showed that the PDR brachytherapy source has geometric and thus radiological qualities that exhibit behaviors similar to a point source model in contrast to a conventional line source model.Conclusions: The resulting effect of the pointlike characteristics of the PDR brachytherapy source likely account for the differences observed between well chamber and in-air measurements.

  8. Overview on the dosimetric uncertainty analysis for photon-emitting brachytherapy sources, in the light of the AAPM Task Group No 138 and GEC-ESTRO report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeWerd, Larry A.; Venselaar, Jack L. M.; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Meigooni, Ali S.; Stump, Kurt E.; Thomadsen, Bruce R.; Rivard, Mark J.

    2012-10-01

    In 2011, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) and the Groupe Européen de Curiethérapie-European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (GEC-ESTRO) published a report pertaining to uncertainties in brachytherapy single-source dosimetry preceding clinical use. The International Organization for Standardization's Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement and Technical Note 1297 by the National Institute of Standards and Technology are taken as reference standards for uncertainty formalism. Uncertainties involved in measurements or Monte Carlo methods to estimate brachytherapy dose distributions are provided with discussion of the components intrinsic to the overall dosimetric assessment. The uncertainty propagation from the primary calibration standard through transfer to the clinic for air-kerma strength is given with uncertainties in each of the brachytherapy dosimetry parameters of the AAPM TG-43 dose-calculation formalism. For low-energy and high-energy brachytherapy sources of low dose-rate and high dose-rate, a combined dosimetric uncertainty <5% (k = 1) is estimated, which is consistent with prior literature estimates. Recommendations are provided for clinical medical physicists, dosimetry investigators, and manufacturers of brachytherapy sources and treatment planning systems. These recommendations reflect the guidance of the AAPM and GEC-ESTRO for their members, and may also be used as guidance to manufacturers and regulatory agencies in developing good manufacturing practices for conventional brachytherapy sources used in routine clinical treatments.

  9. In vivo measurements for high dose rate brachytherapy with optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Renu; Jursinic, Paul A.

    2013-07-15

    -rays if 6 MV x-rays were used for OSLD calibration. The limitations of the treatment planning algorithm must be understood, especially for surface dose measurements. Use of in vivo dosimetry for HDR brachytherapy treatments is feasible and has the potential to detect and prevent gross errors. In vivo HDR brachytherapy should be included as part of the QA for a HDR brachytherapy program.

  10. VMAT for the treatment of gynecologic malignancies for patients unable to receive HDR brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Merrow, Caitlin; deBoer, Steven; Podgorsak, Matthew B

    2014-09-08

    This investigation studies the use of volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) to deliver the following conceptual gynecological brachytherapy (BT) dose distributions: Type 1, traditional pear-shaped dose distribution with substantial dose gradients; Type 2, homogeneous dose distribution throughout PTV (BT prescription volume); and Type 3, increased dose to PTV without organ-at-risk (OAR) overdose. A tandem and ovoid BT treatment plan, with the prescription dose of 6 Gy to point A, was exported into the VMAT treatment planning system (TPS) and became the baseline for comparative analysis. The 200%, 150%, 130%, 100%, 75%, and 50% dose volumes were converted into structures for optimization and evaluation purposes. The 100% dose volume was chosen to be the PTV. Five VMAT plans (Type 1) were created to duplicate the Ir-192 tandem and ovoid inhomogeneous dose distribution. Another five VMAT plans (Type 2) were generated to deliver a homogeneous dose of 6 Gy to the PTV. An additional five VMAT plans (Type 3) were created to increase the dose to the PTV with a homogeneous dose distribution. In the first set of plans, the dose given to 99% of the 200%-100% dose volumes agreed within 2% of the BT plan on average. Additionally, it was found that the 75% dose volumes agreed within 5% of the BT plan and the 50% dose volumes agreed within 6.4% of the BT plan. In the second set of comparative analyses, the 100% dose volume was found to be within 1% of the original plan. Furthermore, the maximum increase of dose to the PTV in the last set of comparative analyses was 8 Gy with similar doses to OARs as the other VMAT plans. The maximum increase of dose was 2.50 Gy to the rectum and the maximum decrease of dose was 0.70 Gy to the bladder. Henceforth, VMAT was successful at reproducing brachytherapy dose distributions demonstrating that alternative dose distributions have the potential to be used in lieu of brachytherapy. It should also be noted that differences in radiobiology need

  11. Tolerance and efficacy of preoperative intracavitary HDR brachytherapy in IB and IIA cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bialas, Brygida; Fijalkowski, Marek; Raczek-Zwierzycka, Katarzyna

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this work is to analyze the efficacy and tolerance of preoperative intracavitary HDR brachytherapy (HDR-BT) in patients with IB and IIA cervical cancer. Material and methods 139 patients with cervical cancer IB-IIA with preoperative HDR-BT, out of which 60 patients with cervical cancer IB (43.2%) and 79 with IIA (56.8%) were treated since 1996 to 2002. In preoperative BT total dose to point A ranged from 30-45 Gy in 6-9 fractions twice a week. The fraction dose was 4-5 Gy at point A. Six weeks after BT all patients underwent radical Wertheim-Meigs hysterectomy. Patients with disadvantageous risk factors or with positive specimen histology had a complementary therapy: external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) given to the whole pelvic volume in daily fractions of 2 Gy up to total dose of 36-52 Gy (20 patients) or EBRT with cisplatin-based chemotherapy with the dose of 30-40 mg/m2 in 5-7 fractions given weekly (7 patients) or chemotherapy (6 patients). Acute and late radiation toxicity was evaluated according to EORTC/RTOG. Results In postoperative specimen histopathology the number of 114 women (82%) had tumor-free specimen within brachytherapy target (in cervix and cavity), 96 women (60.1%) had tumor-free specimen both in and outside brachytherapy target (lymph nodes, parametra, adnexis). The 5-year and 10-year DFS were 93.8% and 88% for IB and 89.7% and 64.7% for IIA respectively. 7.9% of patients developed acute toxicity both in rectum and bladder (only in I and II grade of EORTC/RTOG). Late severe complication occurred in rectum in 2.2% of patients and in bladder 1.4%. Conclusions 1. Preoperative HDR-BT in patients with IB and IIA cervical cancer is an effective and well tolerated therapy with acceptable rate of side effects. 2. Preoperative HDR-BT followed by surgery in a group without risk factors is a sufficient treatment option with no additional adjuvant therapy requirement.

  12. Impact of short course hormonal therapy on overall and cancer specific survival after permanent prostate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Beyer, David C. . E-mail: dbeyer@azoncology.com; McKeough, Timothy; Thomas, Theresa

    2005-04-01

    Purpose: To review the impact of prior hormonal therapy on 10-year overall and prostate cancer specific survival after primary brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was performed on the Arizona Oncology Services tumor registry for 2,378 consecutive permanent prostate brachytherapy cases from 1988 through 2001. Hormonal therapy was administered before the implant in 464 patients for downsizing of the prostate or at the discretion of the referring physician. All deceased patients with known clinical recurrence were considered to have died of prostate cancer, irrespective of the immediate cause of death. Risk groups were defined, with 1,135 favorable (prostate-specific antigen [PSA] < 10, Gleason < 7, Stage T1-T2a), 787 intermediate (single adverse feature), and 456 unfavorable (two or more adverse features) patients. Kaplan-Meier actuarial survival curves were generated for both overall and cause-specific survival from the time of treatment. Multivariate analysis was performed to assess the impact of hormonal intervention in comparison with known risk factors of grade, PSA, and age. Results: With follow-up ranging up to 12.6 years and a median of 4.1 year, a total of 474 patients died, with 67 recorded as due to prostate cancer. Overall and cause-specific 10-year survival rates are 43% and 88%, respectively. Overall survival is 44% for the hormone naive patients, compared with 20% for the hormone-treated cohort (p = 0.02). The cancer-specific survival is 89% vs. 81% for the same groups (p = 0.133). Multivariate analysis confirms the significance of age > 70 years (p = 0.0013), Gleason score {>=} 7 (p = 0.0005), and prior hormone use (p = 0.0065) on overall survival. Conclusions: At 10 years, in prostate cancer patients receiving brachytherapy, overall survival is worse in men receiving neoadjuvant hormonal therapy, compared with hormone naive patients. This does not appear to be due to other known risk factors for survival (i.e., stage, grade

  13. Influence of Dose on Risk of Acute Urinary Retention After Iodine-125 Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Roeloffzen, Ellen M.A.; Battermann, Jan J.; Deursen, Marijke J.H. van; Monninkhof, Evelyn M.; Visscher, Mareije I.; Moerland, Marinus A.; Vulpen, Marco van

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To assess the influence of dose on the risk of acute urinary retention (AUR) after iodine-125 prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Between January 2005 and December 2008, 714 consecutive patients with localized prostate cancer were treated with iodine-125 prostate brachytherapy at our department. All patients completed four imaging studies: magnetic resonance imaging before and 4 weeks after treatment and intraoperative three-dimensional transrectal ultrasonography before and after implantation. The development of AUR was prospectively recorded. The evaluated treatment and dosimetric parameters included prostate volume, number of needles and seeds used, intra- and postoperative prostate edema, percentage of prostate volume receiving 100%, 150%, and 200% of the prescribed dose to the prostate, minimal dose received by 90% of the prostate volume, and percentage of the urethra receiving 100%, 150%, and 200% of the prescribed dose. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine which factors were associated with AUR. Results: Of the 714 patients, 57 (8.0%) developed AUR. On univariate analysis, the following treatment and dosimetric factors were significantly associated with AUR: International Prostate Symptom Score (odds ratio [OR], 2.07, per 10-point increase), preimplant prostate volume (OR, 1.06), postimplant prostate volume (OR, 1.04), number of needles used (OR, 1.09), and number of seeds used (OR, 1.03). On multivariate analysis, the only independent predictive factors for AUR were pretreatment prostate volume (OR, 1.05) and International Prostate Symptom Score (OR, 1.76, per 10-point increase). Patients with a pretreatment prostate volume >35 cm{sup 3} had a 10.4% risk of developing AUR compared with 5.4% for those with a prostate volume of {<=}35 cm{sup 3}. No association was found between any of the dosimetric parameters and the development of AUR. Conclusion: The radiation dose, within the range studied, did not influence the risk of AUR

  14. Limitations of the TG-43 formalism for skin high-dose-rate brachytherapy dose calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Granero, Domingo; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Vijande, Javier; Ballester, Facundo; Rivard, Mark J.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: In skin high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy, sources are located outside, in contact with, or implanted at some depth below the skin surface. Most treatment planning systems use the TG-43 formalism, which is based on single-source dose superposition within an infinite water medium without accounting for the true geometry in which conditions for scattered radiation are altered by the presence of air. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the dosimetric limitations of the TG-43 formalism in HDR skin brachytherapy and the potential clinical impact. Methods: Dose rate distributions of typical configurations used in skin brachytherapy were obtained: a 5 cm × 5 cm superficial mould; a source inside a catheter located at the skin surface with and without backscatter bolus; and a typical interstitial implant consisting of an HDR source in a catheter located at a depth of 0.5 cm. Commercially available HDR{sup 60}Co and {sup 192}Ir sources and a hypothetical {sup 169}Yb source were considered. The Geant4 Monte Carlo radiation transport code was used to estimate dose rate distributions for the configurations considered. These results were then compared to those obtained with the TG-43 dose calculation formalism. In particular, the influence of adding bolus material over the implant was studied. Results: For a 5 cm × 5 cm{sup 192}Ir superficial mould and 0.5 cm prescription depth, dose differences in comparison to the TG-43 method were about −3%. When the source was positioned at the skin surface, dose differences were smaller than −1% for {sup 60}Co and {sup 192}Ir, yet −3% for {sup 169}Yb. For the interstitial implant, dose differences at the skin surface were −7% for {sup 60}Co, −0.6% for {sup 192}Ir, and −2.5% for {sup 169}Yb. Conclusions: This study indicates the following: (i) for the superficial mould, no bolus is needed; (ii) when the source is in contact with the skin surface, no bolus is needed for either {sup 60}Co and {sup 192}Ir. For

  15. Inverse Planned High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for Locoregionally Advanced Cervical Cancer: 4-Year Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Tinkle, Christopher L.; Weinberg, Vivian; Chen, Lee-May; Littell, Ramey; Cunha, J. Adam M.; Sethi, Rajni A.; Chan, John K.; Hsu, I-Chow

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: Evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of image guided brachytherapy using inverse planning simulated annealing (IPSA) high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRB) boost for locoregionally advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: From December 2003 through September 2009, 111 patients with primary cervical cancer were treated definitively with IPSA-planned HDRB boost (28 Gy in 4 fractions) after external radiation at our institution. We performed a retrospective review of our experience using image guided brachytherapy. Of the patients, 70% had a tumor size >4 cm, 38% had regional nodal disease, and 15% had clinically evident distant metastasis, including nonregional nodal disease, at the time of diagnosis. Surgical staging involving pelvic lymph node dissection was performed in 15% of patients, and 93% received concurrent cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Toxicities are reported according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0 guidelines. Results: With a median follow-up time of 42 months (range, 3-84 months), no acute or late toxicities of grade 4 or higher were observed, and grade 3 toxicities (both acute and late) developed in 8 patients (1 constitutional, 1 hematologic, 2 genitourinary, 4 gastrointestinal). The 4-year Kaplan-Meier estimate of late grade 3 toxicity was 8%. Local recurrence developed in 5 patients (4 to 9 months after HDRB), regional recurrence in 3 (6, 16, and 72 months after HDRB), and locoregional recurrence in 1 (4 months after HDR boost). The 4-year estimates of local, locoregional, and distant control of disease were 94.0%, 91.9%, and 69.1%, respectively. The overall and disease-free survival rates at 4 years were 64.3% (95% confidence interval [CI] of 54%-73%) and 61.0% (95% CI, 51%-70%), respectively. Conclusions: Definitive radiation by use of inverse planned HDRB boost for locoregionally advanced cervical cancer is well tolerated and achieves excellent local control of disease. However, overall

  16. Energy-based dosimetry of low-energy, photon-emitting brachytherapy sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malin, Martha J.

    Model-based dose calculation algorithms (MBDCAs) for low-energy, photon-emitting brachytherapy sources have advanced to the point where the algorithms may be used in clinical practice. Before these algorithms can be used, a methodology must be established to verify the accuracy of the source models used by the algorithms. Additionally, the source strength metric for these algorithms must be established. This work explored the feasibility of verifying the source models used by MBDCAs by measuring the differential photon fluence emitted from the encapsulation of the source. The measured fluence could be compared to that modeled by the algorithm to validate the source model. This work examined how the differential photon fluence varied with position and angle of emission from the source, and the resolution that these measurements would require for dose computations to be accurate to within 1.5%. Both the spatial and angular resolution requirements were determined. The techniques used to determine the resolution required for measurements of the differential photon fluence were applied to determine why dose-rate constants determined using a spectroscopic technique disagreed with those computed using Monte Carlo techniques. The discrepancy between the two techniques had been previously published, but the cause of the discrepancy was not known. This work determined the impact that some of the assumptions used by the spectroscopic technique had on the accuracy of the calculation. The assumption of isotropic emission was found to cause the largest discrepancy in the spectroscopic dose-rate constant. Finally, this work improved the instrumentation used to measure the rate at which energy leaves the encapsulation of a brachytherapy source. This quantity is called emitted power (EP), and is presented as a possible source strength metric for MBDCAs. A calorimeter that measured EP was designed and built. The theoretical framework that the calorimeter relied upon to measure EP

  17. SU-C-16A-03: Direction Modulated Brachytherapy for HDR Treatment of Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Han, D; Webster, M; Scanderbeg, D; Yashar, C; Choi, D; Song, B; Song, W; Devic, S; Ravi, A

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate a new Directional Modulated Brachytherapy (DMBT) intra-uterine tandem using various 192-Ir after-loaders. Methods: Dose distributions from the 192-Ir sources were modulated using a 6.3mm diameter tungsten shield (18.0g/cm3). The source moved along 6 longitudinal grooves, each 1.3mm in diameter, evenly spaced along periphery of the shield, The tungsten rod was enclosqed by 0.5mm thick Delrin (1.41g/cc). Monte Carlo N particle (MCNPX) was used to calculate dose distributions. 51million particles were calculated on 504 cores of a supercomputer. Fifteen different patients originally treated with a traditional tandem-and-ovoid applicator, with 5 fractions each, (15 patients X 5 fxs = 75 plans) were re-planned with the DMBT applicator combined with traditional ovoids, on an in-house developed HDR brachytherapy planning platform, which used intensity modulated planning capabilities using a constrained gradient optimization algorithm. For all plans the prescription dose was 6 Gy and they were normalized to match the clinical treated V100. Results: Generally, the DMBT plan quality was a remarkable improvement from conventional T and O plans because of the anisotropic dose distribution of DMBT. The largest difference was to the bladder which had a 0.59±0.87 Gy (8.5±28.7%) reduction in dose. This was because of the the horseshoe shape (U-shape) of the bladder. The dose reduction to rectum and sigmoid were 0.48±0.55 Gy (21.1±27.2%) and 0.10±0.38 Gy (40.6±214.9%), respectively. The D90 to the HRCTV was 6.55±0.96 Gy (conventional T and O) and 6.59±1.06 Gy (DMBT). Conclusion: For image guided adaptive brachytherapy, greater flexibility of radiation intensity is essential and DMBT can be the solution.

  18. Prostate-Specific Antigen Bounce After Permanent Iodine-125 Prostate Brachytherapy-An Australian Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zwahlen, Daniel R.; Smith, Ryan; Andrianopoulos, Nick; Matheson, Bronwyn; Royce, Peter; Millar, Jeremy L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To report on prostate-specific antigen (PSA) 'bounces' after {sup 125}I prostate brachytherapy to review the relationship to biochemical control and correlate both clinical and dosimetric variables. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 194 hormone-naive patients with a follow-up of {>=}3 years. Four bounce definitions were applied: an increase of {>=}0.2 ng/mL (definition I), {>=}0.4 ng/mL (definition II), {>=}15% (definition III), and {>=}35% (definition IV) of a previous value with spontaneous return to the prebounce level or lower. Results: Using definition I, II, III, and IV, a bounce was detected in 50%, 34%, 11%, and 9% of patients, respectively. The median time to onset was 14-16 months, the duration was 12-21.5 months, and the magnitude of the increase was 0.5-2 ng/mL. A magnitude of >2 ng/mL, fulfilling the criteria for biochemical failure (BF) according to the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology Phoenix definition, was detected in 11.3%, 16.9%, 47.6%, and 50% using definitions I, II, III, and IV, respectively; 11 patients (5.7%) had true BF. The PSA bounces occurred earlier than BF (p < 0.001). The prediction of BF remains controversial and is probably unrelated to biochemical control. The only statistically significant factor predictive of a PSA bounce was younger age (definitions I and II). Conclusion: PSA bounces are common after brachytherapy. All definitions resulted in a high number of false-positive calls for BF during the first 2 years. The definition of an increase of {>=}0.2 ng/mL should be preferred because of the lowest number of false-positive results for BF. Patients experiencing a PSA bounce during the first 2 years after brachytherapy should undergo surveillance every 3-6 months. Additional investigations are recommended for elevated postimplant PSA levels that have not corrected by 3 years of follow-up.

  19. Nanoparticle-Based Brachytherapy Spacers for Delivery of Localized Combined Chemoradiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Rajiv; Belz, Jodi; Markovic, Stacey; Jadhav, Tej; Fowle, William; Niedre, Mark; Cormack, Robert; Makrigiorgos, Mike G.; Sridhar, Srinivas

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: In radiation therapy (RT), brachytherapy-inert source spacers are commonly used in clinical practice to achieve high spatial accuracy. These implanted devices are critical technical components of precise radiation delivery but provide no direct therapeutic benefits. Methods and Materials: Here we have fabricated implantable nanoplatforms or chemoradiation therapy (INCeRT) spacers loaded with silica nanoparticles (SNPs) conjugated containing a drug, to act as a slow-release drug depot for simultaneous localized chemoradiation therapy. The spacers are made of poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) as matrix and are physically identical in size to the commercially available brachytherapy spacers (5 mm × 0.8 mm). The silica nanoparticles, 250 nm in diameter, were conjugated with near infrared fluorophore Cy7.5 as a model drug, and the INCeRT spacers were characterized in terms of size, morphology, and composition using different instrumentation techniques. The spacers were further doped with an anticancer drug, docetaxel. We evaluated the in vivo stability, biocompatibility, and biodegradation of these spacers in live mouse tissues. Results: The electron microscopy studies showed that nanoparticles were distributed throughout the spacers. These INCeRT spacers remained stable and can be tracked by the use of optical fluorescence. In vivo optical imaging studies showed a slow diffusion of nanoparticles from the spacer to the adjacent tissue in contrast to the control Cy7.5-PLGA spacer, which showed rapid disintegration in a few days with a burst release of Cy7.5. The docetaxel spacers showed suppression of tumor growth in contrast to control mice over 16 days. Conclusions: The imaging with the Cy7.5 spacer and therapeutic efficacy with docetaxel spacers supports the hypothesis that INCeRT spacers can be used for delivering the drugs in a slow, sustained manner in conjunction with brachytherapy, in contrast to the rapid clearance of the drugs when

  20. Nanoparticles based brachytherapy spacers for delivery of localized combined chemo-radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rajiv; Belz, Jodi; Markovic, Stacey; Jadhav, Tej; Fowle, William; Niedre, Mark; Cormack, Robert; Makrigiorgos, Mike G; Sridhar, Srinivas

    2015-01-01

    Purpose In radiation therapy (RT), brachytherapy inert source spacers are commonly used in clinical practice to achieve high spatial accuracy. These implanted devices are critical technical components of precise radiation delivery but provide no direct therapeutic benefits. Materials and Methods Here we have fabricated Implantable Nanoplatforms or Chemo-Radiation Therapy (INCeRT) spacers loaded with silica nanoparticles (SNPs) conjugated containing a drug, to act as a slow release drug depot for simultaneous localized chemo-radiation therapy. The spacers are made of poly(lactic-coglycolic) acid (PLGA) as matrix, were physically identical (size) to the commercially available brachytherapy spacers (5mm×0.8mm). The silica nanoparticles with diameter 250nm conjugated with near infrared fluorophore Cy7.5 as a model drug and the INCeRT spacers were characterized in terms of size, morphology and composition using different instrumentation techniques. The spacers were further doped with anticancer drug, docetaxel. We have evaluated the in vivo stability, biocompatibility and biodegradation of these spacers in live mouse tissues. Results The electron microscopy studies showed that nanoparticles were distributed throughout the spacers. These INCeRT spacers remained stable and can be tracked using optical fluorescence. In vivo optical imaging studies showed a slow diffusion of nanoparticles from the spacer to the adjacent tissue as opposed to the control Cy7.5-PLGA spacer which showed rapid disintegration in a few days with a burst release of Cy7.5. The docetaxel spacers showed suppression of tumor growth as opposed to control mice over 16 days. Conclusions The imaging with the Cy7.5-spacer and therapeutic efficacy with docetaxel-spacers supports the hypothesis that INCeRT spacers can be used for delivering the drugs in slow, sustained manner in conjunction with brachytherapy, as opposed to rapid clearance of the drugs when administered systemically. The results demonstrate

  1. The influence of isotope and prostate volume on urinary morbidity after prostate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Niehaus, Angela; Merrick, Gregory S. . E-mail: gmerrick@wheelinghospital.com; Butler, Wayne M.; Wallner, Kent E.; Allen, Zachariah A.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Adamovich, Edward

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the influence of isotope and prostate size on International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) normalization, catheter dependency, and the need for surgical intervention secondary to bladder outlet obstruction after prostate brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Between January 1998 and June 2003, 976 consecutive patients underwent brachytherapy for clinical stage T1b-T3a (2002 American Joint Committee on Cancer) prostate cancer. Seven hundred eighty-nine (80.8%) were implanted with {sup 103}Pd and 187 (19.2%) with {sup 125}I. The median follow-up was 41.2 months. Patients were stratified into size cohorts {<=}25 cm{sup 3}, 25.1-35 cm{sup 3}, 35.1-45 cm{sup 3}, and >45 cm{sup 3}. Four hundred eighteen patients (42.8%) received androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Four hundred eighty-six patients (49.7%) received supplemental external-beam radiation therapy (XRT). In all patients, an alpha blocker was initiated before implantation and continued at least until the IPSS returned to baseline. IPSS resolution was defined as a return to within one point of baseline. The median number of IPSS determinations per patient was 21. Clinical, treatment, and dosimetric parameters evaluated included patient age, pretreatment PSA, Gleason score, clinical T stage, percent positive biopsies, preimplant IPSS, ultrasound volume, planning volume, isotope, V{sub 100/150/20}, D{sub 9}, urethral dose (average and maximum), supplemental XRT, ADT, and the duration of ADT ({<=}6 months vs. >6 months). Catheter dependency and the need for postsurgical intervention were also evaluated. Results: For both isotopes and all prostate size cohorts, IPSS peaked 1 month after implantation and returned to baseline at a mean of 1.9 months. Stratification of prostate size cohorts by isotope demonstrated no significant differences in prolonged catheter dependency ({>=}5 days), IPSS resolution, or postimplant surgical intervention. In Cox regression analysis, IPSS normalization was best

  2. Automated planning volume definition in soft-tissue sarcoma adjuvant brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eva K; Fung, Albert Y C; Brooks, J Paul; Zaider, Marco

    2002-06-01

    In current practice, the planning volume for adjuvant brachytherapy treatment for soft-tissue sarcoma is either not determined a priori (in this case, seed locations are selected based on isodose curves conforming to a visual estimate of the planning volume), or it is derived via a tedious manual process. In either case, the process is subjective and time consuming, and is highly dependent on the human planner. The focus of the work described herein involves the development of an automated contouring algorithm to outline the planning volume. Such an automatic procedure will save time and provide a consistent and objective method for determining planning volumes. In addition, a definitive representation of the planning volume will allow for sophisticated brachytherapy treatment planning approaches to be applied when designing treatment plans, so as to maximize local tumour control and minimize normal tissue complications. An automated tumour volume contouring algorithm is developed utilizing computational geometry and numerical interpolation techniques in conjunction with an artificial intelligence method. The target volume is defined to be the slab of tissue r cm perpendicularly away from the curvilinear plane defined by the mesh of catheters. We assume that if adjacent catheters are over 2r cm apart, the tissue between the two catheters is part of the tumour bed. Input data consist of the digitized coordinates of the catheter positions in each of several cross-sectional slices of the tumour bed, and the estimated distance r from the catheters to the tumour surface. Mathematically, one can view the planning volume as the volume enclosed within a minimal smoothly-connected surface which contains a set of circles, each circle centred at a given catheter position in a given cross-sectional slice. The algorithm performs local interpolation on consecutive triplets of circles. The effectiveness of the algorithm is evaluated based on its performance on a collection of

  3. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emisson Tomography/Computed Tomography Guided Conformal Brachytherapy for Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Heerim; Huh, Seung Jae; Ju, Sang Gyu; Park, Won; Lee, Jeong Eun; Choi, Joon Young; Kim, Byung-Tae; Kim, Chan Kyo; Park, Byung Kwan

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT)-guided conformal brachytherapy treatment planning in patients with cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Pretreatment FDG-PET/CT was performed for 12 patients with cervical cancer. Brachytherapy simulation was performed after an external-beam radiation therapy median dose of 4140 cGy. Patients underwent FDG-PET/CT scans with placement of tandem and ovoid applicators. The gross tumor volume (GTV) was determined by adjusting the window and level to a reasonable value and outlining the edge of the enhancing area, which was done in consultation with a nuclear medicine physician. A standardized uptake value profile of the tumor margin was taken for each patient relative to the maximum uptake value of each tumor and analyzed. The plan was designed to deliver 400 cGy to point A (point A plan) or to cover the clinical target volume (CTV) (PET/CT plan). Results: The median dose that encompassed 95% of the target volume (D95) of the CTV was 323.0 cGy for the point A plan vs 399.0 cGy for the PET/CT plan (P=.001). The maximum standardized uptake values (SUV{sub max}) of the tumors were reduced by a median of 57% (range, 13%-80%). All but 1 patient presented with discernable residual uptake within the tumors. The median value of the thresholds of the tumors contoured by simple visual analysis was 41% (range, 23%-71%). Conclusions: In this study, the PET/CT plan was better than the conventional point A plan in terms of target coverage without increasing the dose to the normal tissue, making optimized 3-dimensional brachytherapy treatment planning possible. In comparison with the previously reported study with PET or CT alone, we found that visual target localization was facilitated by PET fusion on indeterminate CT masses. Further studies are needed to characterize the metabolic activity detected during radiation therapy for more reliable targeting.

  4. NPIP: A skew line needle configuration optimization system for HDR brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Siauw, Timmy; Cunha, Adam; Berenson, Dmitry; Atamtuerk, Alper; Hsu, I-Chow; Goldberg, Ken; Pouliot, Jean

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: In this study, the authors introduce skew line needle configurations for high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy and needle planning by integer program (NPIP), a computational method for generating these configurations. NPIP generates needle configurations that are specific to the anatomy of the patient, avoid critical structures near the penile bulb and other healthy structures, and avoid needle collisions inside the body. Methods: NPIP consisted of three major components: a method for generating a set of candidate needles, a needle selection component that chose a candidate needle subset to be inserted, and a dose planner for verifying that the final needle configuration could meet dose objectives. NPIP was used to compute needle configurations for prostate cancer data sets from patients previously treated at our clinic. NPIP took two user-parameters: a number of candidate needles, and needle coverage radius, {delta}. The candidate needle set consisted of 5000 needles, and a range of {delta} values was used to compute different needle configurations for each patient. Dose plans were computed for each needle configuration. The number of needles generated and dosimetry were analyzed and compared to the physician implant. Results: NPIP computed at least one needle configuration for every patient that met dose objectives, avoided healthy structures and needle collisions, and used as many or fewer needles than standard practice. These needle configurations corresponded to a narrow range of {delta} values, which could be used as default values if this system is used in practice. The average end-to-end runtime for this implementation of NPIP was 286 s, but there was a wide variation from case to case. Conclusions: The authors have shown that NPIP can automatically generate skew line needle configurations with the aforementioned properties, and that given the correct input parameters, NPIP can generate needle configurations which meet dose objectives and use as many

  5. Design and bioevaluation of a 32P-patch for brachytherapy of skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Salgueiro, M J; Durán, H; Palmieri, M; Pirchio, R; Nicolini, J; Ughetti, R; Papparella, M L; Casale, G; Zubillaga, M

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to design and evaluate a 32P patch for brachytherapy of skin diseases. We employed Phosphoric-32P-acid and Chromic 32P-phosphate in combination with natural rubber or silicone to produce the patches. Stability studies in vitro to evaluate the leakage of radioactivity, autoradiographic studies to evaluate homogeneity and shielding, as well as therapeutic efficacy in an animal model of skin cancer of the selected 32P patch were performed. The 32P-silicone-patch demonstrated its safety for external application. Tumor growth was arrest and complete regressions of tumors were seen in some other cases with 40 Gy applied in a single-dose scheme. In conclusion, the 32P-silicone-patch is easy to prepare and use in the treatment of skin diseases.

  6. The effects of variations in the density and composition of eye materials on ophthalmic brachytherapy dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Asadi, Somayeh; Masoudi, Seyed Farhad; Shahriari, Majid

    2012-04-01

    In ophthalmic brachytherapy dosimetry, it is common to consider the water phantom as human eye anatomy. However, for better clinical analysis, there is a need for the dose determination in different parts of the eye. In this work, a full human eye is simulated with MCNP-4C code by considering all parts of the eye, i.e., the lens, cornea, retina, choroid, sclera, anterior chamber, optic nerve, and bulk of the eye comprising vitreous body and tumor. The average dose in different parts of this full model of the human eye is determined and the results are compared with the dose calculated in water phantom. The central axes depth dose and the dose in whole of the tumor for these 2 simulated eye models are calculated as well, and the results are compared.

  7. Custom-designed mouthpiece for HDR brachytherapy of embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma of the soft palate.

    PubMed

    Ekwelundu, Emmanuel; Krasin, Matthew J; Farr, Jonathan B

    2014-10-01

    This paper describes the design and fabrication of the mouthpiece used for high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy of a cancerous lesion in the soft palate of a pediatric patient. A custom mouth guard made with Thermo-forming material (Clear - Mouthguard) similar to those used by athletes, with a bite section, alveolar sulcus, hard and soft palate sections was made. Markers were placed around the lesion using a color transfer applicator and the impression transferred to the mouthpiece. Ten catheters arranged in a plane were placed on the inferior side (concave part) of the mouthpiece, and held in place by stitching each to the mouthpiece. Two pieces of lead (Pb) sheets with total thickness of 5.7 mm were placed beneath the catheters. Wax was used to create additional distance between the tongue and the catheters, and the entire assembly was covered with wax. PMID:25337134

  8. Prevalence of Adverse Effects Post-Brachytherapy on Women with Uterine Cervix Cancer in Durango, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, Higmar; Yañez, Elvia; Deras, Diana C.; Reyes, Francianella

    2010-12-01

    This work aimed at determining the local prevalence of adverse effects on women with CaCu that recieved LDR brachytherapy treatment at CECAN. The data was extracted from the patient's and medical physics' departement records. Non Gaussian statistics was used due to dose distribution characteristics. A total of 103 patients were studied with average age of 55±13 years and Ia-IV FIGO clinical clasification. The observed prevalence is higher than that reported by other studies. It was observed that patients with proctitis were prescribed a slightly higher dose than those without adverse effects (90% confidence). Patients with proctitis also presented higher age (95% confidence) when compared with the mean of the studied population. The inverse applies to the group with other adverse effects, its average age is lower than the mean (90% confidence).

  9. Evaluation of an active magnetic resonance tracking system for interstitial brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei; Pan, Li; Tokuda, Junichi; Schmidt, Ehud J.; Seethamraju, Ravi T.; Dumoulin, Charles L.

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: In gynecologic cancers, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is the modality of choice for visualizing tumors and their surroundings because of superior soft-tissue contrast. Real-time MR guidance of catheter placement in interstitial brachytherapy facilitates target coverage, and would be further improved by providing intraprocedural estimates of dosimetric coverage. A major obstacle to intraprocedural dosimetry is the time needed for catheter trajectory reconstruction. Herein the authors evaluate an active MR tracking (MRTR) system which provides rapid catheter tip localization and trajectory reconstruction. The authors assess the reliability and spatial accuracy of the MRTR system in comparison to standard catheter digitization using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and CT. Methods: The MRTR system includes a stylet with microcoils mounted on its shaft, which can be inserted into brachytherapy catheters and tracked by a dedicated MRTR sequence. Catheter tip localization errors of the MRTR system and their dependence on catheter locations and orientation inside the MR scanner were quantified with a water phantom. The distances between the tracked tip positions of the MRTR stylet and the predefined ground-truth tip positions were calculated for measurements performed at seven locations and with nine orientations. To evaluate catheter trajectory reconstruction, fifteen brachytherapy catheters were placed into a gel phantom with an embedded catheter fixation framework, with parallel or crossed paths. The MRTR stylet was then inserted sequentially into each catheter. During the removal of the MRTR stylet from within each catheter, a MRTR measurement was performed at 40 Hz to acquire the instantaneous stylet tip position, resulting in a series of three-dimensional (3D) positions along the catheter’s trajectory. A 3D polynomial curve was fit to the tracked positions for each catheter, and equally spaced dwell points were then generated along the curve. High

  10. Custom-designed mouthpiece for HDR brachytherapy of embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma of the soft palate.

    PubMed

    Ekwelundu, Emmanuel; Krasin, Matthew J; Farr, Jonathan B

    2014-10-01

    This paper describes the design and fabrication of the mouthpiece used for high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy of a cancerous lesion in the soft palate of a pediatric patient. A custom mouth guard made with Thermo-forming material (Clear - Mouthguard) similar to those used by athletes, with a bite section, alveolar sulcus, hard and soft palate sections was made. Markers were placed around the lesion using a color transfer applicator and the impression transferred to the mouthpiece. Ten catheters arranged in a plane were placed on the inferior side (concave part) of the mouthpiece, and held in place by stitching each to the mouthpiece. Two pieces of lead (Pb) sheets with total thickness of 5.7 mm were placed beneath the catheters. Wax was used to create additional distance between the tongue and the catheters, and the entire assembly was covered with wax.

  11. Iridium-192 brachytherapy in the treatment of cancer of the prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, B.J.; Pedersen, J.E.; Porter, A.T.; McPhee, M.S. )

    1991-08-01

    Aggressive radiotherapy was used in 170 patients with advanced localized carcinoma of the prostate. After pelvic lymphadenectomy, 192Ir brachytherapy was used to deliver 3500 cGy to the prostate within 2 days. External-beam therapy (4500 cGy) was then given to a total of 8000 cGy. Random biopsies 18 months afterward were negative for residual cancer in 62 of 83 patients (75%), and 37 of 45 patients (82%) with pathologically proved localized disease remain without evidence of disease. Morbidity was significantly reduced in the most recent 70 patients by improvements in technique. The authors believe such therapy should be considered for patients with advanced stage B2 or C disease in particular.

  12. Evaluation of the MIM Symphony treatment planning system for low-dose-rate- prostate brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Dhanesar, Sandeep K; Lim, Tze Y; Du, Weiliang; Bruno, Teresa L; Frank, Steven J; Kudchadker, Rajat J

    2015-09-08

    MIM Symphony is a recently introduced low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy treatment planning system (TPS). We evaluated the dosimetric and planning accuracy of this new TPS compared to the universally used VariSeed TPS. For dosimetric evaluation of the MIM Symphony version 5.4 TPS, we compared dose calculations from the MIM Symphony TPS with the formalism recommended by the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group 43 report (TG-43) and those generated by the VariSeed version 8.0 TPS for iodine-125 (I-125; Models 6711 and IAI-125A), palladium-103 (Pd-103; Model 200), and cesium-131 (Cs-131; Model Cs-1). Validation was performed for both line source and point source approximations. As part of the treatment planning validation, first a QA phantom (CIRS Brachytherapy QA Phantom Model 045 SN#D7210-3) containing three ellipsoid objects with certified volumes was scanned in order to check the volume accuracy of the contoured structures in MIM Symphony. Then the DICOM data containing 100 patient plans from the VariSeed TPS were imported into the MIM Symphony TPS. The 100 plans included 25 each of I-125 pre-implant plans, Pd-103 pre-implant plans, I-125 Day 30 plans (i.e., from 1 month after implantation), and Pd-103 Day 30 plans. The dosimetric parameters (including prostate volume, prostate D90 values, and rectum V100 values) of the 100 plans were calculated independently on the two TPSs. Other TPS tests that were done included verification of source input and geometrical accuracy, data transfer between different planning systems, text printout, 2D dose plots, DVH printout, and template grid accuracy. According to the line source formalism, the dosimetric results between the MIM Symphony TPS and TG-43 were within 0.5% (0.02 Gy) for r > 1 cm. In the line source approximation validation, MIM Symphony TPS values agreed with VariSeed TPS values to within 0.5% (0.09 Gy) for r > 1 cm. Similarly, in point source approximation validation, the MIM Symphony values

  13. Metallofullerene-Nanoplatform-Delivered Interstitial Brachytherapy Improved Survival in a Murine Model of Glioblastoma Multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, John D.; Broaddus, William C.; Dorn, Harry C.; Fatouros, Panos P.; Chalfant, Charles E.; Shultz, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Fullerenes are used across scientific disciplines because of their diverse properties gained by altering encapsulated or surface bound components. In this study, the recently developed theranostic agent based on a radiolabeled functionalized metallofullerene (177Lu-DOTA-f-Gd3N@C80) was synthesized with high radiochemical yield and purity. The efficacy of this agent was demonstrated in two orthotopic xenograft brain tumor models of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). A dose-dependent improvement in survival was also shown. The in vivo stability of the agent was verified through dual label measurements of biological elimination from the tumor. Overall, these results provide evidence that nanomaterial platforms can be used to deliver effective interstitial brachytherapy. PMID:22881865

  14. Custom-designed mouthpiece for HDR brachytherapy of embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma of the soft palate

    PubMed Central

    Krasin, Matthew J.; Farr, Jonathan B.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the design and fabrication of the mouthpiece used for high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy of a cancerous lesion in the soft palate of a pediatric patient. A custom mouth guard made with Thermo-forming material (Clear – Mouthguard) similar to those used by athletes, with a bite section, alveolar sulcus, hard and soft palate sections was made. Markers were placed around the lesion using a color transfer applicator and the impression transferred to the mouthpiece. Ten catheters arranged in a plane were placed on the inferior side (concave part) of the mouthpiece, and held in place by stitching each to the mouthpiece. Two pieces of lead (Pb) sheets with total thickness of 5.7 mm were placed beneath the catheters. Wax was used to create additional distance between the tongue and the catheters, and the entire assembly was covered with wax. PMID:25337134

  15. Evaluation of the MIM Symphony treatment planning system for low-dose-rate- prostate brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Dhanesar, Sandeep K; Lim, Tze Y; Du, Weiliang; Bruno, Teresa L; Frank, Steven J; Kudchadker, Rajat J

    2015-01-01

    MIM Symphony is a recently introduced low-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy treatment planning system (TPS). We evaluated the dosimetric and planning accuracy of this new TPS compared to the universally used VariSeed TPS. For dosimetric evaluation of the MIM Symphony version 5.4 TPS, we compared dose calculations from the MIM Symphony TPS with the formalism recommended by the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group 43 report (TG-43) and those generated by the VariSeed version 8.0 TPS for iodine-125 (I-125; Models 6711 and IAI-125A), palladium-103 (Pd-103; Model 200), and cesium-131 (Cs-131; Model Cs-1). Validation was performed for both line source and point source approximations. As part of the treatment planning validation, first a QA phantom (CIRS Brachytherapy QA Phantom Model 045 SN#D7210-3) containing three ellipsoid objects with certified volumes was scanned in order to check the volume accuracy of the contoured structures in MIM Symphony. Then the DICOM data containing 100 patient plans from the VariSeed TPS were imported into the MIM Symphony TPS. The 100 plans included 25 each of I-125 pre-implant plans, Pd-103 pre-implant plans, I-125 Day 30 plans (i.e., from 1 month after implantation), and Pd-103 Day 30 plans. The dosimetric parameters (including prostate volume, prostate D90 values, and rectum V100 values) of the 100 plans were calculated independently on the two TPSs. Other TPS tests that were done included verification of source input and geometrical accuracy, data transfer between different planning systems, text printout, 2D dose plots, DVH printout, and template grid accuracy. According to the line source formalism, the dosimetric results between the MIM Symphony TPS and TG-43 were within 0.5% (0.02 Gy) for r > 1 cm. In the line source approximation validation, MIM Symphony TPS values agreed with VariSeed TPS values to within 0.5% (0.09 Gy) for r > 1 cm. Similarly, in point source approximation validation, the MIM Symphony values

  16. High-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy inverse planning on dose-volume criteria by simulated annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deist, T. M.; Gorissen, B. L.

    2016-02-01

    High-dose-rate brachytherapy is a tumor treatment method where a highly radioactive source is brought in close proximity to the tumor. In this paper we develop a simulated annealing algorithm to optimize the dwell times at preselected dwell positions to maximize tumor coverage under dose-volume constraints on the organs at risk. Compared to existing algorithms, our algorithm has advantages in terms of speed and objective value and does not require an expensive general purpose solver. Its success mainly depends on exploiting the efficiency of matrix multiplication and a careful selection of the neighboring states. In this paper we outline its details and make an in-depth comparison with existing methods using real patient data.

  17. A simple analytical method for heterogeneity corrections in low dose rate prostate brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hueso-González, Fernando; Vijande, Javier; Ballester, Facundo; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Siebert, Frank-André

    2015-07-01

    In low energy brachytherapy, the presence of tissue heterogeneities contributes significantly to the discrepancies observed between treatment plan and delivered dose. In this work, we present a simplified analytical dose calculation algorithm for heterogeneous tissue. We compare it with Monte Carlo computations and assess its suitability for integration in clinical treatment planning systems. The algorithm, named as RayStretch, is based on the classic equivalent path length method and TG-43 reference data. Analytical and Monte Carlo dose calculations using Penelope2008 are compared for a benchmark case: a prostate patient with calcifications. The results show a remarkable agreement between simulation and algorithm, the latter having, in addition, a high calculation speed. The proposed analytical model is compatible with clinical real-time treatment planning systems based on TG-43 consensus datasets for improving dose calculation and treatment quality in heterogeneous tissue. Moreover, the algorithm is applicable for any type of heterogeneities.

  18. Metronidazole in the treatment of cervical cancer using Cf-252 neutron brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Maruyama, Y.

    1986-01-01

    Metronidazole was tested for its possible use in the Cf-252 brachytherapy of cervical cancer as a radiosensitizer and to deal with anaerobic pelvic infection. 15 patients were treated by only 14 were evaluable. All stages from stage IB-IVB were treated and complete local tumor regression was noted in all cases although it could take place very slowly. 5/14 (36%) are 1.5-3 year survivors but only among the patients with stage I-II disease. No unusual radio-enhancing action was observed but metronidazole appeared to be useful to treat the vaginal, cervix and uterine infections often associated with high stage disease and bulky, ulcerative or necrotic tumors.

  19. High-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy inverse planning on dose-volume criteria by simulated annealing.

    PubMed

    Deist, T M; Gorissen, B L

    2016-02-01

    High-dose-rate brachytherapy is a tumor treatment method where a highly radioactive source is brought in close proximity to the tumor. In this paper we develop a simulated annealing algorithm to optimize the dwell times at preselected dwell positions to maximize tumor coverage under dose-volume constraints on the organs at risk. Compared to existing algorithms, our algorithm has advantages in terms of speed and objective value and does not require an expensive general purpose solver. Its success mainly depends on exploiting the efficiency of matrix multiplication and a careful selection of the neighboring states. In this paper we outline its details and make an in-depth comparison with existing methods using real patient data. PMID:26760757

  20. A standard graphite calorimeter for dosimetry in brachytherapy with high dose rate 192Ir sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, A. S.; Loreti, S.; Pimpinella, M.; Quini, M.; D'Arienzo, M.; Astefanoaei, I.; Caporali, C.; Bolzan, C.; Pagliari, M.

    2012-10-01

    Within the framework of the JRP06 European project ‘Increasing Cancer Treatment Efficacy Using 3D Brachytherapy’, a prototype of a graphite standard calorimeter for the measurement of the absorbed dose rate to water, \\dot {D}_w , for 192Ir sources used in high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy has been developed at the Italian National Institute of Ionizing Radiation Metrology (ENEA-INMRI). The calorimeter was tested at the Sant'Andrea Hospital in Rome, where \\dot {D}_w measurements were performed in the quasi-adiabatic mode of operation using an 192Ir MicroSelectron® HDR V2 source. The \\dot {D}_w measurements showed a reproducibility of about 1%, while the combined standard uncertainty on the \\dot {D}_w value at the distance of 1 cm from the source was estimated as 1.4%, lower than the uncertainty of \\dot {D}_w determined from the reference air-kerma rate.

  1. Neuro-oncology update: radiation safety and nursing care during interstitial brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Randall, T.M.; Drake, D.K.; Sewchand, W.

    1987-12-01

    Radiation control and safety are major considerations for nursing personnel during the care of patients receiving brachytherapy. Since the theory and practice of radiation applications are not part of the routine curriculum of nursing programs, the education of nurses and other health care professionals in radiation safety procedures is important. Regulatory agencies recommend that an annual safety course be given to all persons frequenting, using, or associated with patients containing radioactive materials. This article presents pertinent aspects of the principles and procedures of radiation safety, the role of personnel dose-monitoring devices, and the value of additional radiation control features, such as a lead cubicle, during interstitial brain implants. One institution's protocol and procedures for the care of high-intensity iridium-192 brain implants are discussed. Preoperative teaching guidelines and nursing interventions included in the protocol focus on radiation control principles.

  2. Improved reliability of repetitive RF interstitial heating in combination with brachytherapy: the effective use of water.

    PubMed

    Kasai, T; Kato, H; Uchida, N; Sugihara, M; Sugimura, K

    2001-01-01

    Interstitial heating and brachytherapy are often combined in the treatment of cancer. In such instances, a needle-type internal electrode is inserted into the RALS (remotely controlled afterloading system) catheter instead of a radioactive source. A problem with this approach, however, is that the temperature distribution pattern generated by the inserted electrode varies at any given target region in each heating treatment, which makes it difficult to accurately replicate the heating treatment protocol. This variation is suspected to be caused by non-uniformity in the small gap between the internal electrode and the inner surface of the surrounding catheter, causing electric currents to flow between the electrode and the heating material, which differs from procedure to procedure. To solve this problem, the gap was filled with water of high permittivity, and the temperature distribution was investigated using phantoms. With this method, a stable and reproducible temperature rise distribution was obtained in the phantom experiment.

  3. Monte Carol-Based Dosimetry of Beta-Emitters for Intravascular Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, C.K.

    2002-06-25

    Monte Carlo simulations for radiation dosimetry and the experimental verifications of the simulations have been developed for the treatment geometry of intravascular brachytherapy, a form of radionuclide therapy for occluded coronary disease (restenosis). Monte Carlo code, MCNP4C, has been used to calculate the radiation dose from the encapsulated array of B-emitting seeds (Sr/Y-source train). Solid water phantoms have been fabricated to measure the dose on the radiochromic films that were exposed to the beta source train for both linear and curved coronary vessel geometries. While the dose difference for the 5-degree curved vessel at the prescription point of f+2.0 mm is within the 10% guideline set by the AAPM, however, the difference increased dramatically to 16.85% for the 10-degree case which requires additional adjustment for the acceptable dosimetry planning. The experimental dose measurements agree well with the simulation results

  4. Ultrasonic Detection and Imaging of Brachytherapy Seeds Based on Singular Spectrum Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamou, J.; Feleppa, E. J.

    A commonly used, effective method of treating localized prostate cancer is implantation of small radioactive seeds. The standard imaging modality for treatment-planning dosimetry and for guiding and monitoring seed implantation is transrectal ultrasound (TRUS). However, movement of the prostate during seed insertion can cause seed misplacement, hemorrhage, and clutter from calcifications and other hyperechogenic scattering objects, and the specularity of seeds themselves make detecting seeds and verifying proper dosimetry difficult in an intraoperative time frame. Radiation oncologists would find a real-time imaging system that is capable of providing accurate, post-insertion, seed-location information to be very valuable because the information would enable timely feedback for intraoperatively correcting deficiencies in the radiation dose. Therefore, a remaining challenge for TRUS-guided brachytherapy of prostate cancer is accurate detection and localization of the seeds upon their insertion.

  5. Prevalence of Adverse Effects Post-Brachytherapy on Women with Uterine Cervix Cancer in Durango, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera, Higmar; Yanez, Elvia

    2010-12-07

    This work aimed at determining the local prevalence of adverse effects on women with CaCu that recieved LDR brachytherapy treatment at CECAN. The data was extracted from the patient's and medical physics' departement records. Non Gaussian statistics was used due to dose distribution characteristics. A total of 103 patients were studied with average age of 55{+-}13 years and Ia-IV FIGO clinical clasification. The observed prevalence is higher than that reported by other studies. It was observed that patients with proctitis were prescribed a slightly higher dose than those without adverse effects (90% confidence). Patients with proctitis also presented higher age (95% confidence) when compared with the mean of the studied population. The inverse applies to the group with other adverse effects, its average age is lower than the mean (90% confidence).

  6. History of dose specification in Brachytherapy: From Threshold Erythema Dose to Computational Dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Jeffrey F.

    2006-09-01

    This paper briefly reviews the evolution of brachytherapy dosimetry from 1900 to the present. Dosimetric practices in brachytherapy fall into three distinct eras: During the era of biological dosimetry (1900-1938), radium pioneers could only specify Ra-226 and Rn-222 implants in terms of the mass of radium encapsulated within the implanted sources. Due to the high energy of its emitted gamma rays and the long range of its secondary electrons in air, free-air chambers could not be used to quantify the output of Ra-226 sources in terms of exposure. Biological dosimetry, most prominently the threshold erythema dose, gained currency as a means of intercomparing radium treatments with exposure-calibrated orthovoltage x-ray units. The classical dosimetry era (1940-1980) began with successful exposure standardization of Ra-226 sources by Bragg-Gray cavity chambers. Classical dose-computation algorithms, based upon 1-D buildup factor measurements and point-source superposition computational algorithms, were able to accommodate artificial radionuclides such as Co-60, Ir-192, and Cs-137. The quantitative dosimetry era (1980- ) arose in response to the increasing utilization of low energy K-capture radionuclides such as I-125 and Pd-103 for which classical approaches could not be expected to estimate accurate correct doses. This led to intensive development of both experimental (largely TLD-100 dosimetry) and Monte Carlo dosimetry techniques along with more accurate air-kerma strength standards. As a result of extensive benchmarking and intercomparison of these different methods, single-seed low-energy radionuclide dose distributions are now known with a total uncertainty of 3%-5%.

  7. Comparison of the hypothetical 57Co brachytherapy source with the 192Ir source

    PubMed Central

    Toossi, Mohammad Taghi Bahreyni; Rostami, Atefeh; Khosroabadi, Mohsen; Khademi, Sara; Knaup, Courtney

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study The 57Co radioisotope has recently been proposed as a hypothetical brachytherapy source due to its high specific activity, appropriate half-life (272 days) and medium energy photons (114.17 keV on average). In this study, Task Group No. 43 dosimetric parameters were calculated and reported for a hypothetical 57Co source. Material and methods A hypothetical 57Co source was simulated in MCNPX, consisting of an active cylinder with 3.5 mm length and 0.6 mm radius encapsulated in a stainless steel capsule. Three photon energies were utilized (136 keV [10.68%], 122 keV [85.60%], 14 keV [9.16%]) for the 57Co source. Air kerma strength, dose rate constant, radial dose function, anisotropy function, and isodose curves for the source were calculated and compared to the corresponding data for a 192Ir source. Results The results are presented as tables and figures. Air kerma strength per 1 mCi activity for the 57Co source was 0.46 cGyh–1 cm 2 mCi–1. The dose rate constant for the 57Co source was determined to be 1.215 cGyh–1U–1. The radial dose function for the 57Co source has an increasing trend due to multiple scattering of low energy photons. The anisotropy function for the 57Co source at various distances from the source is more isotropic than the 192Ir source. Conclusions The 57Co source has advantages over 192Ir due to its lower energy photons, longer half-life, higher dose rate constant and more isotropic anisotropic function. However, the 192Ir source has a higher initial air kerma strength and more uniform radial dose function. These properties make 57Co a suitable source for use in brachytherapy applications.

  8. Monte Carlo dosimetry for {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd eye plaque brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, R. M.; Taylor, R. E. P.; Rogers, D. W. O.

    2008-12-15

    A Monte Carlo study of dosimetry for eye plaque brachytherapy is performed. BrachyDose, an EGSnrc user code which makes use of Yegin's multi-geometry package, is used to fully model {sup 125}I (model 6711) and {sup 103}Pd (model 200) brachytherapy seeds and the standardized plaques of the Collaborative Ocular Melanoma Study (COMS). Three-dimensional dose distributions in the eye region are obtained. In general, dose to water is scored; however, the implications of replacing water with eye tissues are explored. The effect of the gold alloy (Modulay) backing is investigated and the dose is found to be sensitive to the elemental composition of the backing. The presence of the silicone polymer (Silastic) seed carrier results in substantial dose decreases relative to water, particularly for {sup 103}Pd. For a 20 mm plaque with a Modulay backing and Silastic insert, fully loaded with 24 seeds, the dose decrease relative to water is of the order of 14% for {sup 125}I and 20% for {sup 103}Pd at a distance of 1 cm from the inner sclera along the plaque's central axis. For the configurations of seeds used in COMS plaques, interseed attenuation is a small effect within the eye region. The introduction of an air interface results in a dose reduction in its vicinity which depends on the plaque's position within the eye and the radionuclide. Introducing bone in the eye's vicinity also causes dose reductions. The dose distributions in the eye for the two different radionuclides are compared and, for the same prescription dose, {sup 103}Pd generally offers a lower dose to critical normal structures. BrachyDose is sufficiently fast to allow full Monte Carlo dose calculations for routine clinical treatment planning.

  9. Dwell time modulation restrictions do not necessarily improve treatment plan quality for prostate HDR brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balvert, Marleen; Gorissen, Bram L.; den Hertog, Dick; Hoffmann, Aswin L.

    2015-01-01

    Inverse planning algorithms for dwell time optimisation in interstitial high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy may produce solutions with large dwell time variations within catheters, which may result in undesirable selective high-dose subvolumes. Extending the dwell time optimisation model with a dwell time modulation restriction (DTMR) that limits dwell time differences between neighboring dwell positions has been suggested to eliminate this problem. DTMRs may additionally reduce the sensitivity for uncertainties in dwell positions that inevitably result from catheter reconstruction errors and afterloader source positioning inaccuracies. This study quantifies the reduction of high-dose subvolumes and the robustness against these uncertainties by applying a DTMR to template-based prostate HDR brachytherapy implants. Three different DTMRs were consecutively applied to a linear dose-based penalty model (LD) and a dose-volume based model (LDV), both obtained from literature. The models were solved with DTMR levels ranging from no restriction to uniform dwell times within catheters in discrete steps. Uncertainties were simulated on clinical cases using in-house developed software, and dose-volume metrics were calculated in each simulation. For the assessment of high-dose subvolumes, the dose homogeneity index (DHI) and the contiguous dose volume histogram were analysed. Robustness was measured by the improvement of the lowest D90% of the planning target volume (PTV) observed in the simulations. For (LD), a DTMR yields an increase in DHI of approximately 30% and reduces the size of the largest high-dose volume by 2-5 cc. However, this comes at a cost of a reduction in D90% of the PTV of 10%, which often implies that it drops below the desired minimum of 100%. For (LDV), none of the DTMRs were able to improve high-dose volume measures. DTMRs were not capable of improving robustness of PTV D90% against uncertainty in dwell positions for both models.

  10. High-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy for female peri-urethral cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Ajeet Kumar; Bhatla, Neerja; Kumar, Sunesh; Rath, Goura Kisor

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Peri-urethral cancer (PUC) in females is a rare malignancy. Surgery is not usually contemplated due to associated morbidity. Radiation therapy (RT) can be employed in the form of interstitial brachytherapy (IBT) alone for early lesions, and external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) with or without IBT for advanced lesions. We report our first experience in the literature to evaluate the role of high-dose-rate (HDR) IBT in female PUC. Material and methods Between 2008 and 2013, 10 female patients with PUC (5 primary and 5 recurrent) were treated with HDR-IBT with or without EBRT at our center. Size of the lesion ranged from 1.5 cm to 5.0 cm. A 2-3 plane free-hand implant was performed using plastic catheters. The prescribed dose of HDR-IBT was 42 Gy in 14 fractions for brachytherapy alone (5 patients), and 18-21 Gy for the boost along with EBRT (5 patients). Patients were followed up regularly for assessment of disease control and toxicity. Results At a median follow up of 25 months, six patients were disease free at their last follow up. Four patients developed recurrence: 2 at inguinal nodes, 1 at local site, and 1 at both local as well as inguinal nodes. Moist desquamation was the commonest acute toxicity observed in all 5 patients treated with IBT alone, which healed within 4 weeks’ time. Overall, grade II delayed complication rate was 30%. Conclusions Though small sample size, the results of our study have shown that HDR-IBT provides good loco-regional control with acceptable toxicity for female PUC. PMID:26985196

  11. Robustness of IPSA optimized high-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy treatment plans to catheter displacements

    PubMed Central

    Whitaker, May

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Inverse planning simulated annealing (IPSA) optimized brachytherapy treatment plans are characterized with large isolated dwell times at the first or last dwell position of each catheter. The potential of catheter shifts relative to the target and organs at risk in these plans may lead to a more significant change in delivered dose to the volumes of interest relative to plans with more uniform dwell times. Material and methods This study aims to determine if the Nucletron Oncentra dwell time deviation constraint (DTDC) parameter can be optimized to improve the robustness of high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy plans to catheter displacements. A set of 10 clinically acceptable prostate plans were re-optimized with a DTDC parameter of 0 and 0.4. For each plan, catheter displacements of 3, 7, and 14 mm were retrospectively applied and the change in dose volume histogram (DVH) indices and conformity indices analyzed. Results The robustness of clinically acceptable prostate plans to catheter displacements in the caudal direction was found to be dependent on the DTDC parameter. A DTDC value of 0 improves the robustness of planning target volume (PTV) coverage to catheter displacements, whereas a DTDC value of 0.4 improves the robustness of the plans to changes in hotspots. Conclusions The results indicate that if used in conjunction with a pre-treatment catheter displacement correction protocol and a tolerance of 3 mm, a DTDC value of 0.4 may produce clinically superior plans. However, the effect of the DTDC parameter in plan robustness was not observed to be as strong as initially suspected. PMID:27504129

  12. Seed-based transrectal ultrasound-fluoroscopy registration method for intraoperative dosimetry analysis of prostate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Tutar, Ismail B.; Gong Lixin; Narayanan, Sreeram; Pathak, Sayan D.; Cho, Paul S.; Wallner, Kent; Kim, Yongmin

    2008-03-15

    Prostate brachytherapy is an effective treatment option for early-stage prostate cancer. During a prostate brachytherapy procedure, transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) and fluoroscopy imaging modalities complement each other by providing good visualization of soft tissue and implanted seeds, respectively. Therefore, the registration of these two imaging modalities, which are readily available in the operating room, could facilitate intraoperative dosimetry, thus enabling physicians to implant additional seeds into the underdosed portions of the prostate while the patient is still on the operating table. It is desirable to register TRUS and fluoroscopy images by using the seeds as fiducial markers. Although the locations of all the implanted seeds can be reconstructed from three fluoroscopy images, only a fraction of these seeds can be located in TRUS images. It is challenging to register the TRUS and fluoroscopy images by using the identified seeds, since the correspondence between them is unknown. Furthermore, misdetection of nonseed structures as seeds can lead to the inclusion of spurious points in the data set. We developed a new method called iterative optimal assignment (IOA) to overcome these challenges in TRUS-fluoroscopy registration. By using the Hungarian method in an optimization framework, IOA computes a set of transformation parameters that yield the one-to-one correspondence with minimum cost. We have evaluated our registration method at varying noise levels, seed detection rates, and number of spurious points using data collected from 25 patients. We have found that IOA can perform registration with an average root mean square error of about 0.2 cm even when the seed detection rate is only 10%. We believe that IOA can offer a robust solution to seed-based TRUS-fluoroscopy registration, thus making intraoperative dosimetry possible.

  13. Matching and reconstruction of brachytherapy seeds using the Hungarian algorithm (MARSHAL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Ameet K.; Zhou, Yu; Mustufa, Tabish; Burdette, E. C.; Chirikjian, Gregory S.; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2005-04-01

    Purpose: Intraoperative dosimetric quality assurance in prostate brachytherapy critically depends on discerning the 3D locations of implanted seeds. The ability to reconstruct the implanted seeds intraoperatively will allow us to make immediate provisions for dosimetric deviations from the optimal implant plan. A method for seed reconstruction from segmented C-arm fluoroscopy images is proposed. Method: The 3D coordinates of the implanted seeds can be calculated upon resolving the correspondence of seeds in multiple X-ray images. We formalize seed-matching as a network flow problem, which has salient features: (a) extensively studied exact solutions, (b) performance claims on the space-time complexity, (c) optimality bounds on the final solution. A fast implementation is realized using the Hungarian algorithm. Results: We prove that two images can correctly match only about 67% of the seeds, and that a third image renders the matching problem to be of non-polynomial complexity. We utilize the special structure of the problem and propose a pseudo-polynomial time algorithm. Using three images, MARSHAL achieved 100% matching in simulation experiments; and 98.5% in phantom experiments. 3D reconstruction error for correctly matched seeds has a mean of 0:63 mm, and 0:91 mm for incorrectly matched seeds. Conclusion: Both on synthetic data and in phantom experiments, matching rate and reconstruction accuracy were found to be sufficient for prostate brachytherapy. The algorithm is extendable to deal with arbitrary number of images without loss in speed or accuracy. The algorithm is sufficiently generic to be used for establishing correspondences across any choice of features in different imaging modalities.

  14. Postlumpectomy Focal Brachytherapy for Simultaneous Treatment of Surgical Cavity and Draining Lymph Nodes

    SciTech Connect

    Hrycushko, Brian A.; Li Shihong; Shi Chengyu; Goins, Beth; Liu Yaxi; Phillips, William T.; Otto, Pamela M.; Bao, Ande

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: The primary objective was to investigate a novel focal brachytherapy technique using lipid nanoparticle (liposome)-carried {beta}-emitting radionuclides (rhenium-186 [{sup 186}Re]/rhenium-188 [{sup 188}Re]) to simultaneously treat the postlumpectomy surgical cavity and draining lymph nodes. Methods and Materials: Cumulative activity distributions in the lumpectomy cavity and lymph nodes were extrapolated from small animal imaging and human lymphoscintigraphy data. Absorbed dose calculations were performed for lumpectomy cavities with spherical and ellipsoidal shapes and lymph nodes within human subjects by use of the dose point kernel convolution method. Results: Dose calculations showed that therapeutic dose levels within the lumpectomy cavity wall can cover 2- and 5-mm depths for {sup 186}Re and {sup 188}Re liposomes, respectively. The absorbed doses at 1 cm sharply decreased to only 1.3% to 3.7% of the doses at 2 mm for {sup 186}Re liposomes and 5 mm for {sup 188}Re liposomes. Concurrently, the draining sentinel lymph nodes would receive a high focal therapeutic absorbed dose, whereas the average dose to 1 cm of surrounding tissue received less than 1% of that within the nodes. Conclusions: Focal brachytherapy by use of {sup 186}Re/{sup 188}Re liposomes was theoretically shown to be capable of simultaneously treating the lumpectomy cavity wall and draining sentinel lymph nodes with high absorbed doses while significantly lowering dose to surrounding healthy tissue. In turn, this allows for dose escalation to regions of higher probability of containing residual tumor cells after lumpectomy while reducing normal tissue complications.

  15. Rectal-wall dose dependence on postplan timing after permanent-seed prostate brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Taussky, Daniel; Yeung, Ivan; Williams, Theresa; Pearson, Shannon; McLean, Michael; Pond, Gregory; Crook, Juanita . E-mail: Juanita.crook@rmp.uhn.on.ca

    2006-06-01

    Purpose: Dose to rectal wall after permanent-seed prostate brachytherapy is dependent on distance between posterior prostatic seeds and anterior rectal wall and is influenced by postimplant periprostatic edema. We analyzed the effect of postplan timing on anterior rectal-wall dose. Methods and Materials: Twenty patients received permanent seed {sup 125}I brachytherapy as monotherapy (145 Gy). Implants were preplanned by use of transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) and carried out by use of preloaded needles. Postimplant dosimetry was calculated by use of magnetic resonance imaging-computed tomography fusion on Days 1, 8, and 30. The anterior rectal-wall dose is reported as the isodose enclosing 1.0 or 2.0 cc of rectal wall and as the RV100 in cc. Results: The dose to rectal wall increased progressively over time. The median increase in dose to 1.0 cc of rectal wall (RD [1 cc]) from Day 1 to 30 was 39.2 Gy (p < 0.001). RV100 increased from a median of 0.07 cc on Day 1 to 0.67 cc on Day 30. The most significant predictor of rectal-wall dose (RD [1 cc], RD [2 cc], or RV100) was the time of evaluation (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Although periprostatic edema cannot be quantified by postimplant imaging, the dose to the anterior rectal wall increases significantly over time as prostatic and periprostatic edema resolve. Critical-organ dose reporting and guidelines for minimizing toxicity must take into account the time of the assessment.

  16. SU-FF-T-390: In-Vivo Prostate Brachytherapy Absorbed Dose Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Gueye, Paul; Velasco, Carlos; Keppel, Cynthia; Murphy, B; Sinesi, C

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: In-vivo prostate brachytherapy absorbed dosimetrydetector using scintillating fibers. Method and Materials: Five pairs of 85.5 {+-} 0.05 cm long blue shifted scintillating fibers (model BCF-10) with 1 mm{sup 2} cross sectional area were placed in a mixture of gelatin (368.6 {+-} 0.5 grams) and water (3.78 {+-} 0.025 liters) to measured the absorbed dose delivered by a 12 Ci {sup 192}Ir HDR source. The fibers were held by a 7 x 7 cm{sup 2} template grid and optically connected to a 16-channel multianode photomultiplier tube (Hamamatsu, model H6568). Each pair consisted of one fiber 4 mm shorter than the other one to extract the dose by the subtraction method. A dose atlas was used for radiation delivered to the phantom. The plans followed delivered 5 and 7 Gy to a point located 2.0 centimeters away from the central dwelling positions. A total of 32 data points were acquired in a plan to assess the linearity and reproducibility of the measurements.Results: Reproducibility of the data was found to be within 5% and the overall accuracy of the system estimated to be {+-}5.5%. The linearity of the data for all 7 measureddose values (ranging from 0.6 to 7 Gy), gives a slope of 312 counts/Gy with a 1.4% relative deviation. Conclusion: This work indicates the possibility of measuring in real-time the dose effectively delivered to a biological system during prostate brachytherapy treatments. The availability of commercially thin (150 {micro}m) scintillating fibers opens the capability of using such system during clinical treatments (by embedding the fibers within the catheters) with the advantage of performing real-time adjustment of the dose delivery.

  17. SU-GG-T-49: Real Time Dose Verification for Novel Shielded Balloon Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Govindarajan, Nandakarthik; Nazaryan, Vahagn; Gueye, Paul; Keppel, Cynthia

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: The validation of a novel approach for reducing skindoses to an acceptable level during Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation (APBI) when the balloon-to-skin distance is inadequate (less than 7 mm) is reported. The study uses a real time dose verification method for a metallic shielded balloon applicator using scintillation fiber technology. Method and Materials: Partial shielding of the radiationdose to the skin using iron or other ferrous powder could enable the extension of APBI to some patients. With small external and pre-determined magnetic fields (Brachytherapy treatments with relatively weak magnetic fields. Additional measurements provided negligible corrections (< few %) on the saline water density from the suspended ironpowder.Conclusion: This project opens the possibility to increasing the survival expectancy and minimizing negative side effects during brachytherapy treatments, as well as improving cosmetic outcome for all APBI patients. The proposed method may also be used in other procedures for brain, heart, rectal, or vaginal cancers.

  18. Unified registration framework for cumulative dose assessment in cervical cancer across external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Sharmili; Totman, John J.; Choo, Bok A.

    2016-03-01

    Dose accumulation across External Beam Radiotherapy (EBRT) and Brachytherapy (BT) treatment fractions in cervical cancer is extremely challenging due to structural dissimilarities and large inter-fractional anatomic deformations between the EBRT and BT images. The brachytherapy applicator and the bladder balloon, present only in the BT images, introduce missing structural correspondences for the underlying registration problem. Complex anatomical deformations caused by the applicator and the balloon, different rectum and bladder filling and tumor shrinkage compound the registration difficulties. Conventional free-form registration methods struggle to handle such topological differences. In this paper, we propose a registration pipeline that first transforms the original images to their distance maps based on segmentations of critical organs and then performs non-linear registration of the distance maps. The resulting dense deformation field is then used to transform the original anatomical image. The registration accuracy is evaluated on 27 image pairs from stage 2B-4A cervical cancer patients. The algorithm reaches a Hausdorff distance of close to 0:5 mm for the uterus, 2:2 mm for the bladder and 1:7 mm for the rectum when applied to (EBRT,BT) pairs, taken at time points more than three months apart. This generalized model-free framework can be used to register any combination of EBRT and BT images as opposed to methods in the literature that are tuned for either only (BT,BT) pair, or only (EBRT,EBRT) pair or only (BT,EBRT) pair. A unified framework for 3D dose accumulation across multiple EBRT and BT fractions is proposed to facilitate adaptive personalized radiation therapy.

  19. Effect of post-implant edema on prostate brachytherapy treatment margins

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, Daniel R.; Wallner, Kent; Ford, Eric; Mueller, Amy; Merrick, Gregory; Maki, Jeffrey; Sutlief, Steven; Butler, Wayne

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: To determine if postimplant prostate brachytherapy treatment margins calculated on Day 0 differ substantially from those calculated on Day 30. Methods: Thirty patients with 1997 American Joint Commission on Cancer clinical stage T1-T2 prostatic carcinoma underwent prostate brachytherapy with I-125 prescribed to 144 Gy. Treatment planning methods included using loose seeds in a modified peripheral loading pattern and treatment margins (TMs) of 5-8 mm. Postimplant plain radiographs, computed tomography scans, and magnetic resonance scans were obtained 1-4 hours after implantation (Day 0). A second set of imaging studies was obtained at 30 days after implantation (Day 30) and similarly analyzed. Treatment margins were measured as the radial distance in millimeters from the prostate edge to the 100% isodose line. The TMs were measured and tabulated at 90{sup o} intervals around the prostate periphery at 0.6-cm intervals. Each direction was averaged to obtain the mean anterior, posterior, left, and right margins. Results: The mean overall TM increased from 2.6 mm ({+-}2.3) on Day 0 to 3.5 mm ({+-}2.4) on Day 30. The mean anterior margin increased from 1.2 mm on Day 0 to 1.8 mm on Day 30. The posterior margin increased from 1.2 mm on Day 0 to 2.8 mm on Day 30. The lateral treatment margins increased most over time, with mean right treatment margin increasing from 3.9 mm on Day 0 to 4.7 mm on Day 30. Conclusion: Treatment margins appear to be durable in the postimplant period, with a clinically insignificant increase from Day 0 to Day 30.

  20. [The first experience in interstitial brachytherapy for primary and metastatic tumors of the brain].

    PubMed

    Bentsion, D L; Gvozdev, P B; Sakovich, V P; Fialko, N V; Kolotvinov, V S; Baiankina, S N

    2006-01-01

    In 2001-2002, the authors performed a course of brachytherapy in 15 patients with inoperable primary, recurrent, and metastatic brain tumors. The histostructural distribution was as follows: low-grade astrocytoma (grade II according to the WHO classification) in 2 patients, anaplastic astrocytoma (AA) in 3, glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) in 5. Five patients had solid tumor deposits in the brain. Computer tomographic (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data were used to define a path for forthcoming biopsy and implantation at a "Stryker" navigation station, by taking into account the anatomy of the brain, vessels, and functionally significant areas. After having histological findings, plastic intrastats whose number had been determined by the volume of a target were implanted into a tumor by the predetermined path. Dosimetric planning was accomplished by using CT and MRI images on an "Abacus" system. The final stage involved irradiation on a "GammaMed plus" with a source of 192Ir. Irradiation was given, by hyperfractionating its dose (3-4 Gy twice daily at an interval of 4-5 hours) to the total focal dose (TFD) of 36-44 Gy. Patients with gliomas untreated with radiation also underwent external radiation in a TFD of 54-56 Gy and patients with brain metastases received total external irradiation of the brain in a TFD of 36-40 Gy. The tolerance of a course of irradiation was fair. In patients with AA and GBM, one-year survival was observed in 66 and 60%, respectively; in those having metastasis, it was in 20%. Six patients died from progressive disease. All patients with low-grade astrocytoma and one patient with anaplastic astrocytoma were alive at month 24 after treatment termination. The mean lifespan of patients with malignant gliomas and solid tumor metastasis was 11.5 and 5.8 months, respectively. Brachytherapy is a noninvasive and tolerable mode of radiotherapy that increases survival in some groups of patients with inoperable brain tumors.

  1. An image-guidance system for dynamic dose calculation in prostate brachytherapy using ultrasound and fluoroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, Nathanael Prince, Jerry L.; Dehghan, Ehsan; Deguet, Anton; Mian, Omar Y.; Le, Yi; Song, Danny Y.; Burdette, E. Clif; Fichtinger, Gabor; Lee, Junghoon

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: Brachytherapy is a standard option of care for prostate cancer patients but may be improved by dynamic dose calculation based on localized seed positions. The American Brachytherapy Society states that the major current limitation of intraoperative treatment planning is the inability to localize the seeds in relation to the prostate. An image-guidance system was therefore developed to localize seeds for dynamic dose calculation. Methods: The proposed system is based on transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) and mobile C-arm fluoroscopy, while using a simple fiducial with seed-like markers to compute pose from the nonencoded C-arm. Three or more fluoroscopic images and an ultrasound volume are acquired and processed by a pipeline of algorithms: (1) seed segmentation, (2) fiducial detection with pose estimation, (3) seed matching with reconstruction, and (4) fluoroscopy-to-TRUS registration. Results: The system was evaluated on ten phantom cases, resulting in an overall mean error of 1.3 mm. The system was also tested on 37 patients and each algorithm was evaluated. Seed segmentation resulted in a 1% false negative rate and 2% false positive rate. Fiducial detection with pose estimation resulted in a 98% detection rate. Seed matching with reconstruction had a mean error of 0.4 mm. Fluoroscopy-to-TRUS registration had a mean error of 1.3 mm. Moreover, a comparison of dose calculations between the authors’ intraoperative method and an independent postoperative method shows a small difference of 7% and 2% forD{sub 90} and V{sub 100}, respectively. Finally, the system demonstrated the ability to detect cold spots and required a total processing time of approximately 1 min. Conclusions: The proposed image-guidance system is the first practical approach to dynamic dose calculation, outperforming earlier solutions in terms of robustness, ease of use, and functional completeness.

  2. Novel simple templates for reproducible positioning of skin applicators in brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Calatayud, Maria Jose; Bautista, Juan Antonio; Carmona, Vicente; Celada, Francisco; Tormo, Alejandro; García-Martinez, Teresa; Richart, José; Ortega, Manuel Santos; Silla, Magda; Ballester, Facundo; Perez-Calatayud, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Esteya and Valencia surface applicators are designed to treat skin tumors using brachytherapy. In clinical practice, in order to avoid errors that may affect the treatment outcome, there are two issues that need to be carefully addressed. First, the selected applicator for the treatment should provide adequate margin for the target, and second, the applicator has to be precisely positioned before each treatment fraction. In this work, we describe the development and use of a new acrylic templates named Template La Fe-ITIC. They have been designed specifically to help the clinical user in the selection of the correct applicator, and to assist the medical staff in reproducing the positioning of the applicator. These templates are freely available upon request. Material and methods Templates that were developed by University and Polytechnic Hospital La Fe (La Fe) and Hospital Clínica Benidorm (ITIC) in cooperation with Elekta, consist of a thin sheet made of transparent acrylic. For each applicator, a crosshair and two different circles are drawn on these templates: the inner one corresponds to the useful beam, while the outer one represents the external perimeter of the applicator. The outer circle contains slits that facilitate to draw a circle on the skin of the patient for exact positioning of the applicator. In addition, there are two perpendicular rulers to define the adequate margin. For each applicator size, a specific template was developed. Results The templates have been used successfully in our institutions for more than 50 patients’ brachytherapy treatments. They are currently being used for Esteya and Valencia applicators. Conclusions The template La Fe-ITIC is simple and practical. It improves both the set-up time and reproducibility. It helps to establish the adequate margins, an essential point in the clinical outcome. PMID:27648089

  3. High Dose-Rate Intracavitary Brachytherapy for Cervical Carcinomas With Lower Vaginal Infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Kazumoto, Tomoko Kato, Shingo; Tabushi, Katsuyoshi; Kutsutani-Nakamura, Yuzuru; Mizuno, Hideyuki; Takahashi, Michiko; Shiromizu, Kenji; Saito, Yoshihiro

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: This report presents the clinical applications of an automated treatment-planning program of high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDR-ICBT) for advanced uterine cervical cancer infiltrating the parametrium and the lower vagina. Methods and Materials: We adopted HDR-ICBT under optimized dose distribution for 22 cervical cancer patients with tumor infiltration of the lower half of the vagina. All patients had squamous cell carcinoma with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics clinical stages IIB-IVA. After whole pelvic external beam irradiation with a median dose of 30.6 Gy, a conventional ICBT was applied as 'pear-shaped' isodose curve. Then 3-4 more sessions per week of this new method of ICBT were performed. With a simple determination of the treatment volume, the cervix-parametrium, and the lower vagina were covered automatically and simultaneously by this program, that was designated as 'utero-vaginal brachytherapy'. The mean follow-up period was 87.4 months (range, 51.8-147.9 months). Results: Isodose curve for this program was 'galaxy-shaped'. Five-year local-progression-free survival and overall survival rates were 90.7% and 81.8%, respectively. Among those patients with late complications higher than Grade 2 Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer morbidity score, only one (4.5%) developed severe proctitis. Conclusions: Because of the favorable treatment outcomes, this treatment-planning program with a simplified target-volume based dosimetry was proposed for cervical cancer with lower vaginal infiltration.

  4. SU-E-T-124: Dosimetric Comparison of HDR Brachytherapy and Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J; Wu, H; Das, I

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Brachytherapy is known to be able to deliver more radiation dose to tumor while minimizing radiation dose to surrounding normal tissues. Proton therapy also provides superior dose distribution due to Bragg peak. Since both HDR and Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy (IMPT) are beneficial for their quick dose drop off, our goal in this study is to compare the pace of dose gradient drop-off between HDR and IMPT plans based on the same CT image data-set. In addition, normal tissues sparing were also compared among HDR, IMPT and SBRT. Methods: Five cervical cancer cases treated with EBRT + HDR boost combination with Tandem and Ovoid applicator were used for comparison purpose. Original HDR plans with prescribed dose of 5.5 Gy x 5 fractions were generated and optimized. The 100% isodose line of HDR plans was converted to a dose volume, and treated as CTV for IMPT and SBRT planning. The same HDR CT scans were also used for IMPT plan and SBRT plan for direct comparison. The philosophy of the IMPT and SBRT planning was to create the same CTV coverage as HDR plans. All three modalities treatment plans were compared to each other with a set of predetermined criteria. Results: With similar target volume coverage in cervix cancer boost treatment, HDR provides a slightly sharper dose drop-off from 100% to 50% isodose line, averagely in all directions compared to IMPT. However, IMPT demonstrated more dose gradient drop-off at the junction of the target and normal tissues by providing more normal tissue sparing and superior capability to reduce integral dose. Conclusion: IMPT is capable of providing comparable dose drop-off as HDR. IMPT can be explored as replacement for HDR brachytherapy in various applications.

  5. Source geometry factors for HDR 192Ir brachytherapy secondary standard well-type ionization chamber calibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipley, D. R.; Sander, T.; Nutbrown, R. F.

    2015-03-01

    Well-type ionization chambers are used for measuring the source strength of radioactive brachytherapy sources before clinical use. Initially, the well chambers are calibrated against a suitable national standard. For high dose rate (HDR) 192Ir, this calibration is usually a two-step process. Firstly, the calibration source is traceably calibrated against an air kerma primary standard in terms of either reference air kerma rate or air kerma strength. The calibrated 192Ir source is then used to calibrate the secondary standard well-type ionization chamber. Calibration laboratories are usually only equipped with one type of HDR 192Ir source. If the clinical source type is different from that used for the calibration of the well chamber at the standards laboratory, a source geometry factor, ksg, is required to correct the calibration coefficient for any change of the well chamber response due to geometric differences between the sources. In this work we present source geometry factors for six different HDR 192Ir brachytherapy sources which have been determined using Monte Carlo techniques for a specific ionization chamber, the Standard Imaging HDR 1000 Plus well chamber with a type 70010 HDR iridium source holder. The calculated correction factors were normalized to the old and new type of calibration source used at the National Physical Laboratory. With the old Nucletron microSelectron-v1 (classic) HDR 192Ir calibration source, ksg was found to be in the range 0.983 to 0.999 and with the new Isodose Control HDR 192Ir Flexisource ksg was found to be in the range 0.987 to 1.004 with a relative uncertainty of 0.4% (k = 2). Source geometry factors for different combinations of calibration sources, clinical sources, well chambers and associated source holders, can be calculated with the formalism discussed in this paper.

  6. Radiation dose enhancement at tissue-tungsten interfaces in HDR brachytherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Z.; Safavi-Naeini, M.; Alnaghy, S.; Cutajar, DL; Guatelli, S.; Petasecca, M.; Franklin, DR; Malaroda, A.; Carrara, M.; Bucci, J.; Zaider, M.; Lerch, MLF; Rosenfeld, AB

    2014-11-01

    HDR BrachyView is a novel in-body dosimetric imaging system for real-time monitoring and verification of the source position in high dose rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy treatment. It is based on a high-resolution pixelated detector array with a semi-cylindrical multi-pinhole tungsten collimator and is designed to fit inside a compact rectal probe, and is able to resolve the 3D position of the source with a maximum error of 1.5 mm. This paper presents an evaluation of the additional dose that will be delivered to the patient as a result of backscatter radiation from the collimator. Monte Carlo simulations of planar and cylindrical collimators embedded in a tissue-equivalent phantom were performed using Geant4, with an 192Ir source placed at two different source-collimator distances. The planar configuration was replicated experimentally to validate the simulations, with a MOSkin dosimetry probe used to measure dose at three distances from the collimator. For the cylindrical collimator simulation, backscatter dose enhancement was calculated as a function of axial and azimuthal displacement, and dose distribution maps were generated at three distances from the collimator surface. Although significant backscatter dose enhancement was observed for both geometries immediately adjacent to the collimator, simulations and experiments indi