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Sample records for bracket base surface

  1. Orthodontic Molar Brackets: The Effect of Three Different Base Designs on Shear Bond Strength

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Athol P.; Grobler, Sias R.; Harris, Angela M. P.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the relative base designs of three different maxillary molar stainless steel brackets with reference to the shear bond strength of three different adhesive resins. The molar brackets used were Victory series (3M Unitek), Upper Molar (GAC) and Optimesh XRT (Ormco). The adhesives used were Transbond XT (3M Unitek), Enlight (Ormco) and Sure Ortho Light Bond (Sure Orthodontics). The human enamel specimens (144) were randomly divided into nine groups and each group (n=16) was allocated to a bracket/adhesive combination. The contact surface of each of the bracket bases was measured three dimensionally using a reflex microscope. The base designs were also subjected to further microscopic investigations. The brackets were bonded to the enamel, temperature cycled and the shear bond strength was measured. The size and design of each of the brackets was different. The base size, surface treatment, mesh strand diameter and aperture size of the bracket base mesh have a significant effect on the shear bond strength at the bracket/adhesive interface. The shear bond strengths of all three Ormco bracket/adhesive resin combinations (5.8-6.8 MPa) were significantly lower (p<0.05; Kruskal-Wallis) than the other six bracket/adhesive combinations (9.4-12.1 MPa). The different adhesive types (3 types) could not be mainly responsible for the low shear bond values found for the Ormco bracket. The 3M Unitek combination of the Victory series bracket and Transbond XT adhesive proved to have a high shear bond strength without enamel damage. PMID:23675217

  2. Effect of surface treatment of brackets and mechanical cycling on adhesion to enamel.

    PubMed

    Arrais, Fabiola Rossato; Degrazia, Felipe; Peres, Bernardo Urbanetto; Ferrazzo, Vilmar Antonio; Grehs, Renesio Armindo; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2014-01-01

    This in vitro study sought to evaluate how surface conditioning from bracket and mechanical cycling aging affected the bond strength between metallic brackets and bovine enamel, and to determine the adhesive remnant index. Eighty bovine incisors were embedded in acrylic resin using polyvinyl chloride rings and divided into 4 groups based on surface treatment (n = 20). Group 1 (control) received no surface treatment, Group 2 specimens were sandblasted with aluminum oxide particles, Group 3 specimens were sandblasted with silicon oxide and treated with a tribochemichemical silica coupling agent, and Group 4 specimens were primed with a multidomain protein-based agent. Half of the specimens were submitted to shear bond testing, while the others were subjected to mechanical cycling. ANOVA showed that mechanical cycling did not have a significant influence on bond strength (P = 0.9244), while surface conditioning of the brackets did (P = 0.0001). Tukey's test results were similar for mechanical cycling, and indicated that only Group 3 significantly improved the resin bond to the brackets; however, this group also demonstrated the highest percentage of enamel failure. PMID:24784526

  3. Effect of Four Methods of Surface Treatment on Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets to Zirconium

    PubMed Central

    Yassaei, Soghra; Aghili, Hossein Agha; Davari, Abdolrahim

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Providing reliable attachment between bracket base and zirconia surface is a prerequisite for exertion of orthodontic force. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of four zirconium surface treatment methods on shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets. Materials and Methods: One block of zirconium was trimmed into four zirconium surfaces, which served as our four study groups and each had 18 metal brackets bonded to them. Once the glazed layer was removed, the first group was etched with 9.6% hydrofluoric acid (HF), and the remaining three groups were prepared by means of sandblasting and 1W, and 2W Er: YAG laser, respectively. After application of silane, central incisor brackets were bonded to the zirconium surfaces. The SBS values were measured by a Dartec testing machine with a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s HSD for multiple comparisons. Results: The highest SBS was achieved in the sandblasted group (7.81±1.02 MPa) followed in a descending order by 2W laser group (6.95±0.87 MPa), 1W laser group (6.87±0.92 MPa) and HF acid etched group (5.84±0.78 MPa). The differences between the study groups were statistically significant except between the laser groups (P<0.05). Conclusion: In terms of higher bond strength and safety, sandblasting and Er: YAG laser irradiation with power output of 1W and 2W can be considered more appropriate alternatives to HF acid etching for zirconium surface treatment prior to bracket bonding. PMID:26622283

  4. Effect of bracket base design on shear bond strength to feldspathic porcelain

    PubMed Central

    Dalaie, Kazem; Mirfasihi, Armin; Eskandarion, Solmaz; Kabiri, Sattar

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study sought to assess the effect of bracket base design on the shear bond strength (SBS) of the bracket to feldspathic porcelain. Materials and Methods: This in vitro, experimental study was conducted on 40 porcelain-fused-to-metal restorations and four different bracket base designs were bonded to these specimens. The porcelain surfaces were etched, silanized, and bonded to brackets. Specimens were thermocycler, incubated for 24 h and were subjected to SBS. Data were analyzed using Shapiro–Wilk test, Levene's test, one-way ANOVA, and Tukey's honest significant difference test. Adhesive remnant index was calculated and compared using Fisher's exact test. Results: One-way ANOVA showed that the SBS values were significantly different among the four groups (P < 0.001). Groups 1, 2, and 4 were not significantly different, but group 3 had significantly lower SBS (P < 0.001). Fractures mostly occurred at the porcelain-adhesive interface in Groups 1 and 2 while in Groups 3 and 4, bracket-adhesive and mixed failures were more common. Conclusion: The bracket base design significantly affects the SBS to feldspathic porcelain. PMID:27403052

  5. Comparison surface characteristics and chemical composition of conventional metallic and nickel-free brackets.

    PubMed

    Shintcovsk, Ricardo Lima; Knop, Luegya Amorim Henriques; Gandini, Luiz Gonzaga; Martins, Lidia Parsekian; Pires, Aline Segatto

    2015-01-01

    This study aims at comparing conventional and nickel-free metal bracket surface characteristics with elemental composition by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), using energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The sample consisted of 40 lower incisor brackets divided into four groups: ABZ = conventional brackets, Kirium Abzil 3M® (n = 10); RL = conventional brackets, Roth Light Morelli® (n = 10); NF = nickel-free brackets, Nickel-Free Morelli® (n = 10); and RM = nickel-free brackets, Roth Max Morelli® (n = 10). Qualitative evaluation of the bracket surface was performed using SEM, whereby surface features were described and compared. The elemental composition was analyzed by EDS. According to surface analysis, groups ABZ and RL showed a homogeneous surface, with better finishing, whereas the surfaces in groups NF and RM were rougher. The chemical components with the highest percentage were Fe, Cr and C. Groups NF and MR showed no nickel in their composition. In conclusion, the bracket surface of the ABZ and RL groups was more homogeneous, with grooves and pores, whereas the surfaces in groups NF and RM showed numerous flaws, cracks, pores and grooves. The chemical composition analysis confirmed that the nickel-free brackets had no Ni in their composition, as confirmed by the manufacturer's specifications, and were therefore safe to use in patients with a medical history of allergy to this metal.

  6. Bond strength: a comparison between chemical coated and mechanical interlock bases of ceramic and metal brackets.

    PubMed

    Wang, W N; Meng, C L; Tarng, T H

    1997-04-01

    Two types of chemically coated bases, two types of mechanical interlock base polycrystalline ceramic brackets, as well as one type of mechanical interlock base metal bracket were selected for bonding with Concise orthodontic resin on 60 extracted premolars. Bond strength was measured with an Instron testing machine and the debonded interface and enamel detachment were examined with scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive x-ray spectrometer. The results showed the greater bond strength with a chemically coated base of ceramic brackets had a greater debonded interface between enamel and resin, and the weaker bond strength of mechanical interlock base of ceramic and metal brackets had a greater debonded interfaces between bracket and resin. There was no significant statistical difference in bond strengths with mechanically interlock bases between ceramic and metal brackets. The enamel detachment was found on only the stronger bond strength in which there was a chemically coated base on the ceramic bracket. Ceramic bracket fractures were not found during debonding in this specially designed specimen with 1 mm/min speed of crosshead. The mechanical interlock base of the ceramic bracket combines the strength, durability and retention of a metal bracket along with an aesthetic advantage and no enamel detachment after debonding. PMID:9109582

  7. The Influence of No-Primer Adhesives and Anchor Pylons Bracket Bases on Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets

    PubMed Central

    Sfondrini, Maria Francesca; Fraticelli, Danilo; Daina, Paola; Tamagnone, Alessandra; Gandini, Paola

    2013-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to compare the shear bond strength (SBS) and adhesive remnant index (ARI) scores of no-primer adhesives tested with two different bracket bases. Materials and Methods. 120 bovine permanent mandibular incisors were divided into 6 groups of 20 specimens. Two brackets (ODP) with different bracket bases (anchor pylons and 80-gauge mesh) were bonded to the teeth using a conventional adhesive (Transbond XT) and two different no-primer adhesive (Ortho Cem; Heliosit) systems. Groups were tested using an instron universal testing machine. SBS values were recorded. ARI scores were measured. SEM microphotographs were taken to evaluate the pattern of bracket bases. Statistical analysis was performed. ANOVA and Tukey tests were carried out for SBS values, whereas a chi-squared test was applied for ARI scores. Results. Highest bond strength values were reported with Transbond XT (with both pad designs), Ortho Cem bonded on anchor pylons and Heliosit on 80-gauge mesh. A higher frequency of ARI score of “3” was reported for Transbond XT groups. Other groups showed a higher frequency of ARI score “2” and “1.” Conclusion. Transbond XT showed the highest shear bond strength values with both pad designs. PMID:23984339

  8. Finite element study on modification of bracket base and its effects on bond strength

    PubMed Central

    Shyagali, Tarulatha R.; Bhayya, Deepak P.; Urs, Chandralekha B.; Subramaniam, Shashikala

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This article aims to analyze the difference in stresses generated in the bracket-cement-tooth system by means of a peel load in single and double-mesh bracket bases using a three-dimensional finite element computer model. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A three-dimensional finite element model of the bracket-cement-tooth system was constructed and consisted of 40,536 bonds and 49,201 finite elements using a commercial mesh generating programmer (ANSYS 7.0). Both single and double-mesh bracket bases were modified by varying the diameter from 100-400 µm progressively, and the spacing between the mesh wires was kept at 300 µm for each diameter of wire. A peel load was applied on the model to study the stresses generated in different layers. RESULTS: In case of double-mesh bracket base, there was reduction in stress generation at the enamel in comparison to single-mesh bracket base. There was no difference in stress generated at the bracket layer between single and double-mesh bracket bases. At the impregnated wire mesh (IWM), layer stresses increased as the wire diameter of the mesh increased. CONCLUSION: Results show that bracket design modification can improve bonding abilities and simultaneously reduce enamel damage while debonding. These facts may be used in bringing about the new innovative bracket designs for clinical use. PMID:25992991

  9. Influence of surface treatments on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets to porcelain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cong; Zeng, Jishan; Wang, Shaoan; Yang, Zheng; Huang, Qian; Chen, Pixiu; Zhou, Shujuan; Liu, Xiaoqing

    2008-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of various surface treatments after different storage time and thermocycling on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets to the feldspathic porcelain surfaces. 128 disc-shaped porcelain specimens were randomly assigned to the following surface treatments: 9.6% HFA, 9.6% HFA combined with silane, 50 μ aluminum trioxide sandblasting followed by silane and application of silane after 37% phosphoric acid. Metal or ceramic brackets were bonded onto each treated porcelain facet with light cured resin. The samples were stored in 37 °C water 1 day or 7 days, thermocycled 500 times from 5 to 55 °C. The shear bond strengths were measured (1 mm/min), and statistically analyzed. The bond failure sites were classified according to ARI system. The surface of the glazed, sandblasted, hydrofluoric and phosphoric acid etched porcelain were examined with SEM. All groups achieved reasonable bond strengths to withstand the application of orthodontic forces. Water storage for 7 days caused lower shear bond strength than that of 1 day. But there is no statistically significant difference between the two groups. The mean shear bond strength provided by ceramic bracket with mechanical retention had no statistical difference with that of metal bracket. Therefore, the optimal treatment for orthodontic brackets bonding to feldspathic porcelain was to apply phosphoric acid combined with silane.

  10. Occurrence and severity of enamel decalcification adjacent to bracket bases and sub-bracket lesions during orthodontic treatment with two different lingual appliances

    PubMed Central

    Klang, Elisabeth; Helms, Hans-Joachim; Wiechmann, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background: Using lingual enamel surfaces for bracket placement not only has esthetic advantages, but may also be suitable in terms of reducing frequencies of enamel decalcifications. Objective: To test the null-hypothesis that there is no significant difference in enamel decalcification or cavitation incidence adjacent to and beneath bracket bases between two lingual multi-bracket (MB) appliances that are different in terms of design, material composition, and manufacturing technology (group A: WIN, DW-LingualSystems; group B: Incognito, 3M-Unitek), taking into account patient- and treatment-related variables on white spot lesion (WSL) formation. Methods: Standardized, digital, top-view photographs of 630 consecutive subjects (16214 teeth; n Incognito = 237/6076 teeth; n WIN = 393/10138 teeth; mean age: 17.47±7.8; m/f 43.2/56.8%) with completed lingual MB treatment of the upper and lower permanent teeth 1–7 were screened for decalcification or cavitation adjacent to and beneath the bracket bases before and after treatment, scored from 0 to 7. Non-parametric ANOVA was used for main effects ‘appliance type’, ‘gender’, ‘treatment complexity’, ‘grouped age’ (≤16/>16 years), and ‘treatment duration’ as covariable, at an α-level of 5%. Results: About 2.57% [5.94%] of all teeth in group A [B] developed decalcifications. Subject-related incidence was 9.59% [16.17%] for upper incisors in group A [B], and 12.98% [25.74%] for all teeth 16–46. There were significant effects by gender, age, and treatment duration. Conclusion: The null-hypothesis was rejected: sub-bracket lesions were significantly less frequent in group A, while frequencies of WSL adjacent to brackets were not significantly affected by appliance type. In view of the overall low incidences of lingual post-orthodontic white-spot lesions, the use of lingual appliances is advocated as a valid strategy for a reduction of enamel decalcifications during orthodontic treatment. PMID

  11. Shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets to aged resin composite surfaces: effect of surface conditioning.

    PubMed

    Bayram, Mehmet; Yesilyurt, Cemal; Kusgöz, Adem; Ulker, Mustafa; Nur, Metin

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of surface conditioning protocols on the shear bond strength (SBS) of metal brackets to aged composite resin surfaces in vitro. Ninety composite resin discs, 6 mm in diameter and 2 mm in height, were prepared and treated with an ageing procedure. After ageing, the specimens were randomly assigned to one of the following groups: (1) control with no surface treatment, (2) 38 per cent phosphoric acid gel, (3) 9.6 per cent hydrofluoric acid gel, (4) airborne aluminium trioxide particle abrasion, (5) sodium bicarbonate particle abrasion, and (6) diamond bur. The metal brackets were bonded to composite surfaces by means of an orthodontic adhesive (Transbond XT). All specimens were stored in water for 1 week at 37°C and then thermocycled (1000 cycles, 5-55°C) prior to SBS testing. SBS values and residual adhesive on the composite surface were evaluated. Analysis of variance showed a significant difference (P = 0.000) between the groups. Group 6 had the highest mean SBS (10.61 MPa), followed by group 4 (10.29 MPa). The results of this study suggest that a clinically acceptable bond strength can be achieved by surface conditioning of aged resin composite via the application of hydrofluoric acid, aluminium trioxide particle abrasion, sodium bicarbonate particle abrasion, or a diamond bur. PMID:20660131

  12. Treatment of Enamel Surfaces After Bracket Debonding: Case Reports and Long-term Follow-ups.

    PubMed

    Sundfeld, R H; Franco, L M; Machado, L S; Pini, Nip; Salomao, F M; Anchieta, R B; Sundfeld, D

    2016-01-01

    After bracket debonding, residual bonded material may be observed on the enamel surface. When not properly removed, this residual material can interfere with the surface smoothness of the enamel, potentially resulting in staining at the resin/enamel interface and contributing to biofilm accumulation. Clinical case reports demonstrate clinical procedures to remove residual bonded material after bracket debonding. A water-cooled fine tapered 3195 FF diamond bur was used to remove the residual bonded material. Subsequently, the enamel surface was treated with Opalustre microabrasive compound. After one week, overnight dental bleaching was initiated using 10% carbamide peroxide in custom-formed trays for four weeks. The enamel microabrasion technique was found to be effective for polishing the enamel surface and for reestablishing the dental esthetics associated with dental bleaching. Longitudinal clinical controls of other clinical cases are presented. PMID:26266645

  13. Lens design based on lens form parameters using Gaussian brackets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xiangyu; Cheng, Xuemin

    2014-11-01

    The optical power distribution and the symmetry of the lens components are two important attributes that decide the ultimate lens performance and characteristics. Lens form parameters W and S are the key criteria describing the two attributes mentioned above. Lens components with smaller W and S will have a good nature of aberration balance and perform well in providing good image quality. Applying the Gaussian brackets, the two lens form parameters and the Seidel Aberration Coefficients are reconstructed. An initial lens structure can be analytically described by simultaneous equations of Seidel Aberration Coefficients and third-order aberration theory. Adding the constraints of parameters W and S in the solving process, a solution with a proper image quality and aberration distribution is achieved. The optical properties and image quality of the system based on the parameters W and S are also analyzed in this article. In the method, the aberration distribution can be controlled to some extent in the beginning of design, so that we can reduce some workload of optimization later.

  14. Static and kinetic friction force and surface roughness of different archwire-bracket sliding contacts.

    PubMed

    Carrion-Vilches, Francisco J; Bermudez, María-Dolores; Fructuoso, Paula

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the static and kinetic friction forces of the contact bracket-archwire with different dental material compositions in order to select those materials with lower resistance to sliding. We carried out sliding friction tests by means of a universal testing machine following an experimental procedure as described in ASTM D1894 standard. We determined the static and kinetic friction forces under dry and lubricating conditions using an artificial saliva solution at 36.5ºC. The bracket-archwire pairs studied were: stainless steel-stainless steel; stainless steel-glass fiber composite; stainless steel-Nitinol 60; sapphire-stainless steel; sapphire-glass fiber composite; and sapphire-Nitinol 60. The best performance is obtained for Nitinol 60 archwire sliding against a stainless steel bracket, both under dry and lubricated conditions. These results are in agreement with the low surface roughness of Nitinol 60 with respect to the glass fiber composite archwire. The results described here contribute to establishing selection criteria for materials for dental archwire-brackets.

  15. Debonding forces of three different customized bases of a lingual bracket system

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Jang-Won; Kwon, Tae-Yub

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate whether extension of the custom base is necessary for enhancement of bond strength, by comparing the debonding forces and residual adhesives of 3 different lingual bracket systems. Methods A total of 42 extracted upper premolars were randomly divided into 3 groups of 14 each for bonding with brackets having (1) a conventional limited resin custom base; (2) an extended gold alloy custom base: Incognito™; and (3) an extended resin custom base: KommonBase™. The bonding area was measured by scanning the bracket bases with a 3-dimensional digital scanner. The debonding force was measured with an Instron universal testing machine, which applied an occlusogingival shear force. Results The mean debonding forces were 60.83 N (standard deviation [SD] 10.12), 69.29 N (SD 9.59), and 104.35 N (SD17.84) for the limited resin custom base, extended gold alloy custom base, and extended resin custom base, respectively. The debonding force observed with the extended resin custom base was significantly different from that observed with the other bases. In addition, the adhesive remnant index was significantly higher with the extended gold alloy custom base. Conclusions All 3 custom-base lingual brackets can withstand occlusal and orthodontic forces. We conclude that effective bonding of lingual brackets can be obtained without extension of the custom base. PMID:24228238

  16. The effect of different surface treatments of demineralised enamel on microleakage under metal orthodontic brackets

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this investigation was to assess the effects of different treatments of demineralised enamel on microleakage under orthodontic brackets. Methods Seventy-five intact premolars were randomly assigned to five groups. The teeth in groups 2 through 5 were immersed in a demineralising solution for 16 weeks. In groups 1 (control) and 2 (demineralised/control), conventional acid etching was used. In group 3, sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) was applied on the enamel surface for 1 min after acid etching, and in group 4, Transbond Plus (3M Unitek, Monrovia, CA, USA) self-etching primer (SEP) was used. The teeth in group 5 were treated with 2% sodium fluoride (NaF) for 4 min before etching. After bracket bonding, the specimens were thermocycled, sealed with nail varnish, immersed in 0.5% basic fuchsine solution for 24 h and sectioned. Microleakage was measured under a stereomicroscope for the enamel-adhesive and adhesive-bracket interfaces of both occlusal and gingival sides. Results Demineralised teeth showed more microleakage at the enamel-adhesive interface on both occlusal and gingival sides compared to sound teeth, but the difference was not significant (P > 0.005). Treating the demineralised enamel with 5% NaOCl or Transbond Plus SEP was not effective in reducing microleakage. NaF treatment followed by acid etching of demineralised enamel resulted in significantly lower microleakage in most comparisons (P < 0.005). Conclusions The use of 2% NaF on hypomineralised enamel before the bracket bonding procedure is an effective way to decrease microleakage. PMID:24325863

  17. Bracket for photovoltaic modules

    SciTech Connect

    Ciasulli, John; Jones, Jason

    2014-06-24

    Brackets for photovoltaic ("PV") modules are described. In one embodiment, a saddle bracket has a mounting surface to support one or more PV modules over a tube, a gusset coupled to the mounting surface, and a mounting feature coupled to the gusset to couple to the tube. The gusset can have a first leg and a second leg extending at an angle relative to the mounting surface. Saddle brackets can be coupled to a torque tube at predetermined locations. PV modules can be coupled to the saddle brackets. The mounting feature can be coupled to the first gusset and configured to stand the one or more PV modules off the tube.

  18. Enamel surface evaluation after bracket debonding and different resin removal methods

    PubMed Central

    Vidor, Michele Machado; Felix, Rafael Perdomo; Marchioro, Ernani Menezes; Hahn, Luciane

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess enamel surface under scanning electron microscopy (SEM) after resin removal and enamel polishing procedures following brackets debonding, as well as compare the time required for these procedures. METHODS: A total of 180 deciduous bovine incisors were used. The enamel surface of each tooth was prepared and brackets were bonded with light cured Transbond XT composite resin. Brackets were removed in a testing machine. The samples were randomized and equally distributed into nine groups according to the resin removal and polishing technique: Group 1, 30-blade tungsten carbide bur in high speed; Group 2, 30-blade tungsten carbide bur in high speed followed by a sequence of 4 Sof-lex polishing discs (3M); Group 3, 30-blade tungsten carbide bur in high speed followed by Enhance tips (Dentsply). All groups were subdivided into (a) unpolished; (b) polished with aluminum oxide paste; and (c) polished with water slurry of fine pumice. Subsequently, the enamel surface was assessed and statistical analysis was carried out. RESULTS: There were statistically significant differences in enamel roughness and removal time among all groups. Groups 3a, 3b and 3c appeared to be the most efficient methods of removing resin with low damages to enamel. Groups 2a, 2b and 2c were the most time consuming procedures, and Group 2a caused more damages to enamel. CONCLUSION: The suggested protocol for resin removal is the 30-blade tungsten carbide bur in high speed followed by Enhance tips and polishing with aluminum oxide paste. This procedure seems to produce less damages and is less time consuming. PMID:25992989

  19. Influence of various surface-conditioning methods on the bond strength of metal brackets to ceramic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Schmage, Petra; Nergiz, Ibrahim; Herrmann, Wolfram; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2003-05-01

    With the increase in adult orthodontic treatment comes the need to find a reliable method for bonding orthodontic brackets onto metal or ceramic crowns and fixed partial dentures. In this study, shear bond strength and surface roughness tests were used to examine the effect of 4 different surface conditioning methods: fine diamond bur, sandblasting, 5% hydrofluoric acid, and silica coating for bonding metal brackets to ceramic surfaces of feldspathic porcelain. Sandblasting and hydrofluoric acid were further tested after silane application. A total of 120 ceramic disc samples were produced, and 50 were used for surface roughness measurements. The glazed ceramic surfaces were used as controls. Metal brackets were bonded to the ceramic substrates with a self-curing composite. The samples were stored in 0.9% NaCl solution for 24 hours and then thermocycled (5000 times, 5 degrees C to 55 degrees C, 30 seconds). Shear bond tests were performed with a universal testing device, and the results were statistically analyzed. Chemical surface conditioning with either hydrofluoric acid (4.3 microm) or silicatization (4.4 microm) resulted in significantly lower surface roughness than mechanical conditioning (9.3 microm, diamond bur; 9.7 microm, sandblasting) (P <.001). The surface roughness values reflect the mean peak-and-valley distances. The bond strengths of the brackets bonded to the ceramic surfaces treated by hydrofluoric acid with and without silane (12.2 and 14.7 MPa, respectively), silicatization (14.9 MPa), and sandblasting with silane (15.8 MPa) were significantly higher (P <.001) than those treated by mechanical roughening with fine diamond burs (1.6 MPa) or sandblasting (2.8 MPa). The highest bond strength values were obtained with sandblasting and silicatization with silane or hydrofluoric acid without silane; these fulfilled the required threshold. The use of silane after hydrofluoric acid etching did not increase the bond strength. Diamond roughening and

  20. Shear bond resistance and enamel surface comparison after the bonding and debonding of ceramic and metallic brackets

    PubMed Central

    da Rocha, José Maurício; Gravina, Marco Abdo; Campos, Marcio José da Silva; Quintão, Cátia Cardoso Abdo; Elias, Carlos Nelson; Vitral, Robert Willer Farinazzo

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate, in vitro, the shear bond strength presented by three brands of polycrystalline ceramic brackets and one brand of metallic bracket; verify the adhesive remnant index (ARI) after the tests, and analyze, through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) the enamel surface topography after debonding, detecting the release of mineral particles. Methods Sixty bovine lower incisors were used. Three ceramic brackets (Allure®, InVu®, and Clarity®) and one metallic bracket (Geneus®) were bonded with Transbond XT®. Kruskal-Wallis's test (significance level set at 5%) was applied to the results of share bond and ARI. Mann Whitney's test was performed to compare the pairs of brackets in relation to their ARI. Brown-Forsythe's test (significance level set at 5%) was applied to the results of enamel chemical composition. Comparisons between groups were made with Games-Howell's and the Post-hoc tests. Results No statistically significant difference was observed in relation to the shear bond strength loads. Clarity® brackets were the most affected in relation to the surface topography and to the release of mineral particles of enamel (calcium ions). Conclusion With regard to the ARI, there was a prevalence of score 4 (40.4%). As for enamel surface topography, the Geneus® bracket was the only one which did not show superficial tissue loss. The InVu® and Clarity® ones showed cohesive fractures in 33.3% and the Allure® in 50%, the latter being the one that presented most fractures during removal. PMID:24713563

  1. CO2 laser conditioning of porcelain surfaces for bonding metal orthodontic brackets.

    PubMed

    Ahrari, Farzaneh; Heravi, Farzin; Hosseini, Mohsen

    2013-07-01

    Bonding to porcelain remains to be a challenge in orthodontic treatments. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of CO2 laser conditioning of porcelain surfaces on shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets. Eighty feldspathic porcelain specimens were divided into four groups of 20. In each group, half of the porcelain surfaces were deglazed, while the others remained glazed. The specimens in groups 1 to 3 were treated with a fractional CO2 laser for 10 s using 10 mJ of energy, frequency of 200 Hz and powers of 10 W (group 1), 15 W (group 2) and 20 W (group 3). In group 4, a 9.6 % hydrofluoric (HF) acid gel was used for 2 min. A silane coupling agent was applied before bracket bonding, and the SBS was measured with a universal testing machine after 24 h. Deglazing caused significant increase in SBS of laser treated porcelain surfaces (p < 0.05), but had no significant effect on SBS when HF acid was used for etching (p = 0.137). ANOVA revealed no significant difference in SBS values of the study groups when glazed surfaces were compared (p = 0.269). However, a significant between group difference was found among the deglazed specimens (p < 0.001). Tukey test revealed that the bond strengths of 10 W and 15 W laser groups were significantly higher than that of the HF acid group (p < 0.05). Laser conditioning with a fractional CO2 laser can be recommended as a suitable alternative to hydrofluoric acid for deglazed feldspathic porcelain.

  2. An orthodontic bracket embedded in the medial pterygoid surface: a case report.

    PubMed

    Wilmott, Sheryl E; Ikeagwuani, Okechukwu; McLeod, Niall M H

    2016-03-01

    There is a potential risk that orthodontic brackets can become dislodged into the aerodigestive tract. This case illustrates the management of an orthodontic bracket, which became embedded in the deep tissues of the oropharynx. We aim to highlight the potential risk misplaced dental instruments and materials pose, including that they may become embedded in the soft tissues of the throat and suggest that that this possibility should be considered when they cannot be localized.

  3. The Effect of Four Surface Treatment Methods on the Shear Bond Strength of Metallic Brackets to the Fluorosed Enamel

    PubMed Central

    Zarif Najafi, Hooman; Moshkelgosha, Vahid; Khanchemehr, Atefeh; Alizade, Akram; Mokhtar, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Some studies have reported the bond strength to be significantly lower in fluorotic enamels than the non-fluorosed. Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond streongth of metallic brackets to non-fluorosed and fluorosed teeth after different enamel conditioning. Materials and Method A total of 176 freshly extracted human premolars (88 non-fluorosed and 88 fluorosed teeth) were used in this study for bonding the metallic brackets. Teeth with moderate fluorosis were used according to Thylstrup and Fejereskov index (TFI). Eighty non-fluorosed and 80 fluorosed teeth (TFI=4-6) were randomly divided into 8 equal groups of 20 teeth each. The remaining 16 teeth were used for scanning electron microscopy observation. The enamel surface was conditioned by 4 methods: acid etching  for 30 sec, acid etching for 120 sec, air abrasion followed by acid etching, and Er: YAG laser etching followed by acid etching. The morphology of etching patterns in different groups was studied under scanning electron microscope. Results The shear bond strength of fluorosed teeth to the brackets was significantly lower than non-fluorosed ones (p= 0.003). The shear bond strength of laser-acid groups in both non-fluorosed and fluorosed teeth was significantly lower than other groups (p< 0.001). Weibull analysis indicated that the chance of failure under the applied force was different between fluorosed and non-fluorosed group. The scanning electron microscope observations revealed that the fluorosed teeth treated with phosphoric acid had fewer irregularities compared to non-fluorosed teeth. The most irregularities were detected in the teeth conditioned with phosphoric acid for 120 seconds. Conclusion Fluorotic enamel adversely affects the bond strength of orthodontic brackets. None of the conditioning methods tested in this study could significantly improve shear bond strength of metallic brackets. Er: YAG laser conditioning followed by acid further

  4. Evaluation of the Effect of Four Surface Conditioning Methods on the Shear Bond Strength of Metal Bracket to Porcelain Surface

    PubMed Central

    Zarif Najafi, Hooman; Torkan, Sepideh; Yousefipour, Bahareh; Salehi, Raha

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective: This study evaluated the effect of superpulse CO2 laser irradiation and deglazing of porcelain surfaces on the shear bond strength (SBS) of metal orthodontic brackets, and compared it with two conventional etching techniques. Methods: Forty-eight Feldspathic porcelain fused to metal specimens embedded in cylindrical acrylic resin tubes were fabricated, and all the specimens were divided into four groups. In Group 1, the specimens were roughened with a diamond bur and etched with hydrofluoric acid (HFA) gel for 4 min. In Group 2, the specimens were roughened with a bur and irradiated by a CO2 laser with a 2 W power setting for 20 sec. In Group 3, the specimens were only irradiated by a CO2 laser. In Group 4, the porcelain surface was sandblasted with 50 μm aluminum oxide. Before bonding, the bracket silane was applied on the porcelain surfaces. SBS was evaluated by a Universal testing machine (Zwickroll, Germany). The remaining adhesive after the bond failure was evaluated using an adhesive remnant index (ARI). Statistical analysis was conducted by analysis of variance (ANOVA), Tukey, and Kruskal–Wallis tests. Results: ANOVA revealed significant differences in SBS among the four groups (p<0.001). Group 1 demonstrated significantly higher bond strength (13.13±2.47) when compared with the other groups. Group 2 showed higher bond strength (9.60±1.91) when compared with group 4 (6.40±1.67) (p=0.016). Group 1 displayed the highest ARI scores among the groups. Conclusions: Deglazing combined with HFA etching produced the highest bond strength, but CO2 laser irradiation provided adequate bond strength and allowed for elimination of the HFA step. Deglazing is not recommended as a preliminary step before CO2 laser conditioning. PMID:25455957

  5. Microleakage and shear bond strength of orthodontc brackets bonded to hypomineralized enamel following different surface preparations

    PubMed Central

    Shahabi, Mostafa; Mohamadipour, Hamideh; Moosavi, Horieh

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: This study investigated the effects of several conditioning methods on shear bond strength (SBS) and microleakage of orthodontic brackets bonded to demineralized enamel. Study Design: One hundred premolars were selected and immersed in a cariogenic solution for 12 weeks. The teeth were randomly assigned into 5 groups. In groups 1 and 2, the teeth underwent acid etching for 30 and 120 seconds, respectively. In group 3, a combination of laser and acid etching was employed. A self-etch primer (SEP) was applied in group 4 and in group 5, the teeth were exposed to acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) for 4 minutes before etching. After bracket bonding, the teeth were immersed in methylen blue for 12 hours and then were mounted in acrylic resin. SBS was determined with an Instron Universal Testing Machine and the amount of microleakage under the brackets was assessed under a stereomicroscope. Results: The lowest SBS was related to the SEP group and the highest one was observed in the specimens prepared by APF+acid etching. There was a significant difference in SBS (p=0.009), but not in microleakage (p=0.971) of the study groups. The SBS of the specimens treated with SEP was significantly Lower than the other groups, which were not significantly different from each other. The SEP group displayed a higher frequency of bond failure at the enamel-adhesive interface. Conclusions: Enamel preparation with SEP provided the lowest SBS among the groups. All groups showed some degree of microleakage. There was no significant correlation between SBS and microleakage. Key words:Bond strength, microleakage, bonding, self-etch primer, Er:YAG laser. PMID:24790708

  6. Biodegradation of the orthodontic bracket system.

    PubMed

    Maijer, R; Smith, D C

    1986-09-01

    Corrosion of the orthodontic appliance may occur in vivo with time. Electrochemical breakdown of corrosion-resistant high nickel and titanium wire can also occur. The use of recycled brackets could possibly accelerate the corrosion process. New and recycled brackets were evaluated in vitro in an artificial saliva system. The results indicated that different brands of new brackets have differences in corrosion behavior. In addition, recycling by the three commercial processes tested increased the liability of brackets to undergo corrosion. Superior behavior was noted for two types of bracket bases. Bracket corrosion may be assessed by a simple in vitro test. PMID:3463194

  7. Intraoral corrosion of self-ligating metallic brackets and archwires and the effect on friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tima, Lori Lynn

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how the frictional coefficient was affected due to intraoral use. A secondary aim of this study was to determine whether or not there was a relationship between corrosion of orthodontic alloys and friction via scanning electron microscopic qualitative analysis. Orthodontic brackets and 0.019 x 0.025 inch stainless steel archwires were collected and divided into three groups of n=10: used bracket and used wires (UBUW), used brackets and new wires (UBNW), and new brackets and new wires (NBNW). New materials were as-received from the manufacturer, and used materials were clinically used bracket and wires collected from patients following orthodontic treatment. Archwires were pulled through bracket slots at a rate of 0.5mm/min while friction forces were measured. Following a cleaning process, the surface topography of the bracket slots was examined under a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Based on a 1-factor MANOVA, there was no significant group effect (all p>0.05) on frictional forces. Partial eta squared values indicated that intraoral exposure had only a small effect on frictional forces (≤ 3%). Qualitative analysis of SEM images did not show an association between surface characteristics of the bracket slots and magnitude of frictional force. Results suggest that surface corrosion from intraoral use does not significantly affect friction at the bracket wire interface.

  8. A comparative study of frictional force in self-ligating brackets according to the bracket-archwire angulation, bracket material, and wire type

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Souk Min

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to compare the frictional force (FR) in self-ligating brackets among different bracket-archwire angles, bracket materials, and archwire types. Methods Passive and active metal self-ligating brackets and active ceramic self-ligating brackets were included as experimental groups, while conventional twin metal brackets served as a control group. All brackets were maxillary premolar brackets with 0.022 inch [in] slots and a -7° torque. The orthodontic wires used included 0.018 round and 0.019 × 0.025 in rectangular stainless steel wires. The FR was measured at 0°, 5°, and 10° angulations as the wire was drawn through the bracket slots after attaching brackets from each group to the universal testing machine. Static and kinetic FRs were also measured. Results The passive self-ligating brackets generated a lower FR than all the other brackets. Static and kinetic FRs generally increased with an increase in the bracket-archwire angulation, and the rectangular wire caused significantly higher static and kinetic FRs than the round wire (p < 0.001). The metal passive self-ligating brackets exhibited the lowest static FR at the 0° angulation and a lower increase in static and kinetic FRs with an increase in bracket-archwire angulation than the other brackets, while the conventional twin brackets showed a greater increase than all three experimental brackets. Conclusions The passive self-ligating brackets showed the lowest FR in this study. Self-ligating brackets can generate varying FRs in vitro according to the wire size, surface characteristics, and bracket-archwire angulation. PMID:25667913

  9. Effect of surface treatment with sandblasting and Er,Cr:YSGG laser on bonding of stainless steel orthodontic brackets to silver amalgam

    PubMed Central

    Kachoei, Mojgan; Rikhtegaran, Sahand; Fathalizadeh, Farzaneh; Navimipour, Elmira J.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Satisfactory bonding of orthodontic attachments to amalgam is a challenge for orthodontists. The aim of this in vitro study was to compare the shear bond strength of stainless steel orthodontic brackets to silver amalgam treated with sandblasting and Er,Cr:YSGG laser. Study Design: Fifty-four amalgam discs were prepared, polished and divided into three groups: In group 1 (the control group) the premolar brackets were bonded using Panavia F resin cement without any surface treatment; in groups 2 and 3, the specimens were subjected to sandblasting and Er,Cr:YSGG laser respectively, before bracket bonding. After immersing in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours, all the specimens were tested for shear bond strength. Bond failure sites were evaluated under a stereomicroscope. Data was analyzed using one-way ANOVA and a post hoc Tukey test. Results: The highest and lowest shear bond strength values were recorded in the laser and control groups, respectively. There were significant differences in mean shear bond strength values between the laser and the other two groups (p<0.05). However, there were no significant differences between the sandblast and control groups (p=0.5). Conclusions: Amalgam surface treatment with Er,Cr:YSGG laser increased shear bond strength of stainless steel orthodontic brackets. Key words: Amalgam, surface treatment, shear bond strength, sandblasting, Er,Cr:YSGG laser. PMID:22143706

  10. Load-deflection and surface properties of coated and conventional superelastic orthodontic archwires in conventional and metal-insert ceramic brackets

    PubMed Central

    Alavi, Shiva; Hosseini, Navid

    2012-01-01

    Background: Properties of coated archwires, which have been introduced for esthetic demands during orthodontic treatments, along with the use of tooth-colored brackets, are not clear. The aim of this study is to compare the load-deflection and surface properties of coated superelastic archwires with conventional superelastic archwires in conventional and metal-insert ceramic brackets. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 3 types of archwires including ultraesthetic polycoated, ultraesthetic epoxyresin coated and conventional (uncoated) superelastic nickel-titanium (NiTi) archwires were used in each of 2 types of brackets including conventional and metal-insert ceramic. To simulate oral environment, all specimens were incubated in artificial saliva using thermocycling model and then were tested in three-bracket bending test machine. Loading and unloading forces, plateau gap and end load deflection point (ELDP) were recorded. Archwires were investigated with a stereomicroscope before and after the experiment. Two-way ANOVA and Tukey tests were used at P<0.05. Results: Epoxyresin archwires produced lower forces (19 to 310 gr) compared to polycoated (61 to 359 gr) and NiTi (61 to 415 gr) (P<0.0001). The maximum ELDP (0.43 mm) was observed in epoxyresin archwires (P<0.001). Coatings of some epoxyresin wires were torn and of polycoated wires peeled off. Conventional ceramic bracket produced higher loading forces with polycoated and NiTi archwires and lower unloading forces with all 3 types of archwires compared to metal-insert type (P<0.05). Conclusion: Epoxyresin-coated archwire had the lowest force and highest ELDP. Coatings were not durable in these experimental conditions. Conventional ceramic bracket produced higher frictional force compared to metal-insert type. PMID:22623927

  11. Different corrosive effects on hydroxyapatite nanocrystals and amine fluoride-based mouthwashes on dental titanium brackets: a comparative in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Lelli, Marco; Marchisio, Olivia; Foltran, Ismaela; Genovesi, Annamaria; Montebugnoli, Giulia; Marcaccio, Massimo; Covani, Ugo; Roveri, Norberto

    2013-01-01

    Titanium plates treated in vitro with a mouthwash containing amine fluoride (100 ppm F−) and another containing zinc-substituted carbonate–hydroxyapatite have been analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy to evaluate the modification of the surface roughness induced by treatment with these two different mouthwashes. The treatment with F−-based mouthwash produces a roughness characterized by higher peaks and deeper valleys in the streaks on the titanium bracket surface compared with those observed in the reference polished titanium plates. This effect causes a mechanical weakness in the metallic dental implant causing bacterial growth and therefore promotes infection and prosthesis contamination. However, the in vitro treatment with a mouthwash containing zinc-substituted carbonate–hydroxyapatite reduced the surface roughness by filling the streaks with an apatitic phase. This treatment counteracts the surface oxidative process that can affect the mechanical behavior of the titanium dental implant, which inhibits the bacterial growth contaminating prostheses. PMID:23355777

  12. Bracketing mid-pliocene sea surface temperature: maximum and minimum possible warming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dowsett, Harry

    2004-01-01

    Estimates of sea surface temperature (SST) from ocean cores reveal a warm phase of the Pliocene between about 3.3 and 3.0 Mega-annums (Ma). Pollen records from land based cores and sections, although not as well dated, also show evidence for a warmer climate at about the same time. Increased greenhouse forcing and altered ocean heat transport is the leading candidates for the underlying cause of Pliocene global warmth. However, despite being a period of global warmth, there exists considerable variability within this interval. Two new SST reconstructions have been created to provide a climatological error bar for warm peak phases of the Pliocene. These data represent the maximum and minimum possible warming recorded within the 3.3 to 3.0 Ma interval.

  13. Comparison of multiple rebond shear strengths of debonded brackets after preparation with sandblasting and CO2 laser

    PubMed Central

    Kachoei, Mojgan; Mohammadi, Amir; Esmaili Moghaddam, Maziar; Rikhtegaran, Sahand; Pourghaznein, Mahmoud; Shirazi, Sajjad

    2016-01-01

    Background. Failure of orthodontic bracket bonds is a common occurrence during orthodontic treatment. Different techniques have been suggested in the literature to remove resin residues from the bracket bases and enamel surfaces to prepare the surfaces again after debonding. This study attempted to compare multiple rebond shear strengths (SBS) of debonded brackets following preparation with sandblasting and CO2 laser. Methods. The brackets were bonded on 30 human and bovine maxillary central incisors using self-curing composite resin. SBS was measured using Hounsfield testing machine. The brackets were rebonded for two other times after composite resin residues on their surfaces were removed, either with air abrasion or CO2 laser. The debonded brackets and enamel surfaces were also evaluated after each debonding procedure under a stereomicroscope in order to determine adhesive remnant index (ARI). SBS of debonded brackets after each step were compared between sandblast and CO2 laser groups. Results. We observed significant differences in SBS values between pre-recycling and first (P = 0.04), second (P = 0.007) and third recycling (P = 0.007) with laser. Recycling with sandblasting resulted in a decrease in SBS after the first and second recycling procedure; however, the SBS increased after the third recycling procedure, with no significant differences. Conclusion. SBS of brackets after recycling with sandblasting and laser beams was not significantly different, and both were at a favorable level. However, repeating the recycling procedure with sandblasting resulted in more favorable SBS compared to laser.

  14. Comparison of multiple rebond shear strengths of debonded brackets after preparation with sandblasting and CO2 laser.

    PubMed

    Kachoei, Mojgan; Mohammadi, Amir; Esmaili Moghaddam, Maziar; Rikhtegaran, Sahand; Pourghaznein, Mahmoud; Shirazi, Sajjad

    2016-01-01

    Background. Failure of orthodontic bracket bonds is a common occurrence during orthodontic treatment. Different techniques have been suggested in the literature to remove resin residues from the bracket bases and enamel surfaces to prepare the surfaces again after debonding. This study attempted to compare multiple rebond shear strengths (SBS) of debonded brackets following preparation with sandblasting and CO2 laser. Methods. The brackets were bonded on 30 human and bovine maxillary central incisors using self-curing composite resin. SBS was measured using Hounsfield testing machine. The brackets were rebonded for two other times after composite resin residues on their surfaces were removed, either with air abrasion or CO2 laser. The debonded brackets and enamel surfaces were also evaluated after each debonding procedure under a stereomicroscope in order to determine adhesive remnant index (ARI). SBS of debonded brackets after each step were compared between sandblast and CO2 laser groups. Results. We observed significant differences in SBS values between pre-recycling and first (P = 0.04), second (P = 0.007) and third recycling (P = 0.007) with laser. Recycling with sandblasting resulted in a decrease in SBS after the first and second recycling procedure; however, the SBS increased after the third recycling procedure, with no significant differences. Conclusion. SBS of brackets after recycling with sandblasting and laser beams was not significantly different, and both were at a favorable level. However, repeating the recycling procedure with sandblasting resulted in more favorable SBS compared to laser. PMID:27651880

  15. Comparison of multiple rebond shear strengths of debonded brackets after preparation with sandblasting and CO2 laser

    PubMed Central

    Kachoei, Mojgan; Mohammadi, Amir; Esmaili Moghaddam, Maziar; Rikhtegaran, Sahand; Pourghaznein, Mahmoud; Shirazi, Sajjad

    2016-01-01

    Background. Failure of orthodontic bracket bonds is a common occurrence during orthodontic treatment. Different techniques have been suggested in the literature to remove resin residues from the bracket bases and enamel surfaces to prepare the surfaces again after debonding. This study attempted to compare multiple rebond shear strengths (SBS) of debonded brackets following preparation with sandblasting and CO2 laser. Methods. The brackets were bonded on 30 human and bovine maxillary central incisors using self-curing composite resin. SBS was measured using Hounsfield testing machine. The brackets were rebonded for two other times after composite resin residues on their surfaces were removed, either with air abrasion or CO2 laser. The debonded brackets and enamel surfaces were also evaluated after each debonding procedure under a stereomicroscope in order to determine adhesive remnant index (ARI). SBS of debonded brackets after each step were compared between sandblast and CO2 laser groups. Results. We observed significant differences in SBS values between pre-recycling and first (P = 0.04), second (P = 0.007) and third recycling (P = 0.007) with laser. Recycling with sandblasting resulted in a decrease in SBS after the first and second recycling procedure; however, the SBS increased after the third recycling procedure, with no significant differences. Conclusion. SBS of brackets after recycling with sandblasting and laser beams was not significantly different, and both were at a favorable level. However, repeating the recycling procedure with sandblasting resulted in more favorable SBS compared to laser. PMID:27651880

  16. The Effect of an Acidic Food-Simulating Environment on the Shear Bond Strength of Self-Ligating Brackets with Different Base Designs

    PubMed Central

    Sheibaninia, Ahmad; Sepasi, Sepehr; Saghiri, Mohammad Ali; Sepasi, Setareh

    2014-01-01

    Aim. This study aims to evaluate the effect of acidic food simulant and (acetic acid 3%) on the shear bond strength (SBS) and adhesive remnant index (ARI) scores of one conventional and three different self-ligating brackets with different base designs. Materials and Methods. Freshly extracted first maxillary premolars (n = 160) were embedded in resin blocks. A conventional stainless steel bracket, Equilibrium 2, and three types of self-ligating brackets, Speed, In-Ovation R, and Damon 3MX, were bonded to teeth and exposed to distilled water (groups 1, 3, 5, and 7) or acetic acid 3% (groups 2, 4, 6, 8) for 12 weeks. SBS and ARI were calculated and statistical analysis was performed with the analysis of variance (SBS) or χ2 test (ARI) to compare values between the different groups. Results. Equilibrium 2 and In-Ovation R showed a significantly lower SBS in the acidic environment than in distilled water. Significant differences in ARI scores were found for Equilibrium 2 after immersion in an acidic environment, shifting from 0 in distilled water to 2 in an acidic environment. Conclusions. Equilibrium 2 and In-Ovation R brackets showed a significant decrease in SBS after a 12-week immersion in acetic acid 3%, although all groups showed clinically acceptable SBS. Equilibrium 2 showed significant differences in ARI scores when exposed to acetic acid 3%. PMID:25328524

  17. Evaluation of Micro-organism in Ligated Metal and Self-ligating Brackets using Scanning Electron Microscopy: An In Vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Sunil, P C; Michael, Tony; Raju, Aravind S; Paul, Renji K; Mamatha, J; Ebin, T M

    2015-01-01

    Background: The objective of the study was to determine the sites of plaque accumulation and to compare the plaque accumulated with metal and self-ligating orthodontic brackets in order to know which bracket type had a higher plaque retaining capacity. Materials and Methods: The study was done on 20 subjects who were scheduled for orthodontic treatment including extraction of four premolars and fixed orthodontic appliances. Mesh-backed edgewise metal brackets ligated with steel ligatures and self-ligating brackets were bonded to the premolars to be extracted using composite (Transbond XT, 3M). The subjects were told to continue their normal oral hygiene regimen. Teeth were extracted at 1, 2, and 3 weeks after bracket bonding. Plaque attached to the buccal surfaces was stained using plaque disclosing agent. The teeth were then immersed in fixative containing 4% formaldehyde and 1% glutaraldehyde in phosphate buffer for 24 h, followed by 0.1 M phosphate buffer for 12 h. The specimens were then mounted on aluminum stubs, and sputter coated with gold prior to Scanning electron microscopy examination. Results: The results showed that increased retention of plaque in metal brackets ligated with steel ligatures and comparatively less in self-ligating brackets at the base of the brackets. Conclusions: This study highlights that higher retention of plaque in metal brackets ligated with steel ligatures and comparatively less plaque retention in self-ligating brackets. Excess composite around the bracket base is the critical site of plaque accumulation associated with fixed appliances due to its rough surface texture. PMID:26229372

  18. Comparison of the frictional resistance between archwire and different bracket system: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Pillai, Ajith R.; Gangadharan, Anil; Kumar, Satheesh; Shah, Anwar

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the frictional resistance generated by conventional stainless steel, radiance ceramic bracket, self-ligating and composite brackets using a 0.019 × 0.025 stainless steel straight length wires in a 022 slot and to select brackets based on their frictional characteristic. Methodology: In order to conduct this study, four different types of bracket system were selected of the mclaughlin-bennet-trevesi (MBT) discipline. They are Group 1 - stainless steel, Group 2 - composite bracket Group 3 - (American Orthodontics) radiance ceramic bracket Group 4 - self-ligating bracket (SLB) (Empower). In this study, five maxillary brackets of an arch of each type were used. All brackets are 0.022 × 0.028 in preadjusted edgewise appliance which simulates the dental arch. Five brackets were bonded to a stainless steel bar of dimension 150 mm × 25 mm × 3 mm. The bracket-arch wire units were submitted to mechanical test with an Instron universal testing machine 3365. A testing apparatus or holding jig was designed to hold the bracket during the mechanical test. Each sample was pulled at a speed of 6 mm for 1 min. Descriptive statistical information including mean and standard deviation of maximum friction force was calculated for each bracket wire combination. Interpretation and Conclusion: The SLB has the least friction among the four groups. The ceramic bracket showed the highest friction followed by stainless steel bracket, composite bracket, and SLB. PMID:25210359

  19. [Brackets and friction in orthodontics: experimental study].

    PubMed

    Ben Rejeb Jdir, Saloua; Tobji, Samir; Turki, Wiem; Dallel, Ines; Khedher, Nedra; Ben Amor, Adel

    2015-09-01

    Many authors have been involved in developing brackets in order to improve the quality, stability, speed and efficiency of orthodontic treatment. In order to reduce friction between bracket and archwire, new therapeutic approaches have been devised based on novel technologies. Among these innovative techniques, self-ligating brackets are increasingly popular. SLBs can be classified into several categories according to their mode of action and their materials. We performed an experimental study to compare the friction forces generated during the sliding of orthodontic archwires made from various alloys through conventional and self-ligating brackets. Results show the favorable influence of SLBs, compared to conventional systems using elastomeric or metal ligatures, on the level of friction, particularly when shape-memory Ni-Ti archwires are used. PMID:26370596

  20. [Brackets and friction in orthodontics: experimental study].

    PubMed

    Ben Rejeb Jdir, Saloua; Tobji, Samir; Turki, Wiem; Dallel, Ines; Khedher, Nedra; Ben Amor, Adel

    2015-09-01

    Many authors have been involved in developing brackets in order to improve the quality, stability, speed and efficiency of orthodontic treatment. In order to reduce friction between bracket and archwire, new therapeutic approaches have been devised based on novel technologies. Among these innovative techniques, self-ligating brackets are increasingly popular. SLBs can be classified into several categories according to their mode of action and their materials. We performed an experimental study to compare the friction forces generated during the sliding of orthodontic archwires made from various alloys through conventional and self-ligating brackets. Results show the favorable influence of SLBs, compared to conventional systems using elastomeric or metal ligatures, on the level of friction, particularly when shape-memory Ni-Ti archwires are used.

  1. Metal ion release from new and recycled stainless steel brackets.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tsui-Hsien; Ding, Shinn-Jyh; Min, Yan; Kao, Chia-Tze

    2004-04-01

    As orthodontic appliances can corrode with time in the oral environment, the aim of this study was to compare the release of metal ions from new and recycled brackets immersed in buffers of different pH values over a 48 week period. To simulate commercial recycling, the stainless steel brackets were divided into two groups: new and recycled. The bases of the latter were coated with adhesive and the brackets were heat treated before being immersed in the test solution for 48 weeks. The release of nickel, chromium, iron, copper, cobalt and manganese ions was analysed by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Differences were compared using one-way analysis of variance. The results showed that recycled brackets released more ions than new brackets (P < 0.05). Brackets immersed in solutions of pH 4 released more ions than those immersed in solutions of pH 7, and the total amount of ions released increased with time over the 48 week period (P < 0.05). This study demonstrates that both new and recycled brackets will corrode in the oral environment. To avoid clinical side-effects, metal brackets should be made more resistant to corrosion, and recycled brackets should not be used. PMID:15130040

  2. A comparative study of shear bond strength of orthodontic bracket after acid-etched and Er:YAG treatment on enamel surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leão, Juliana C.; Mota, Cláudia C. B. O.; Cassimiro-silva, Patricia F.; Gomes, Anderson S. L.

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the shear bond strength (SBS) of teeth prepared for orthodontic bracket bonding with 37% phosphoric acid and Er:YAG laser. Forty bovine incisors were divided into two groups. In Group I, the teeth were conditioned with 37% phosphoric acid and brackets were bonded with Transbond XT; in Group II, the teeth were irradiated with Er:YAG and bonding with Transbond XT. After SBS test, the adhesive remnant index was determined. Adhesion to dental hard tissues after Er:YAG laser etching was inferior to that obtained after acid etching but exceeded what is believed to be clinically sufficient strength, and therefore can be used in patients.

  3. Friction between different wire bracket combinations in artificial saliva – an in vitro evaluation

    PubMed Central

    FIDALGO, Tatiana Kelly da Silva; PITHON, Matheus Melo; MACIEL, José Vinicius Bolognesi; BOLOGNESE, Ana Maria

    2011-01-01

    Objective The objective this work was to assess the friction coefficient between brackets and wires of different materials under conditions simulating the oral environment. Material and Methods Stainless steel (SS) and titanium-molybdenum alloy (TMA) wires of 0.019x0.025-in diameter (American Orthodontics) and polycarbonate bracket (American Orthodontics), ceramic bracket (American Orthodontics), and metal bracket (3M Unitek) with slots of 0.022x0.030-in were used. The friction coefficient was assessed by means of mechanical traction with the system immersed in artificial saliva. The mean roughness of both wire surface and bracket slots was evaluated by using a surface profilometer. Results The system using TMA wire and polycarbonate bracket had the highest roughness (p<0.05). SS wire with ceramic bracket had the highest friction coefficient, whereas the use of metallic bracket yielded the lowest (p<0.05). However, it was observed a statistically significant difference in the system using TMA wire and ceramic bracket compared to that using TMA wire and polycarbonate bracket (p=0.038). Conclusion Ceramic brackets in association with SS wire should be judiciously used, since this system showed a high friction coefficient. PMID:21437471

  4. Orthodontic Bracket Manufacturing Tolerances and Dimensional Differences between Select Self-Ligating Brackets

    PubMed Central

    Major, Thomas W.; Carey, Jason P.; Nobes, David S.; Major, Paul W.

    2010-01-01

    In all manufacturing processes there are tolerances; however, orthodontic bracket manufacturers seldom state the slot dimensional tolerances. This experiment develops a novel method of analyzing slot profile dimensions using photographs of the slot. Five points are selected along each wall, and lines are fitted to define a trapezoidal slot shape. This investigation measures slot height at the slot's top and bottom, angles between walls, slot taper, and the linearity of each wall. Slot dimensions for 30 upper right central incisor self-ligating stainless steel brackets from three manufacturers were evaluated. Speed brackets have a slot height 2% smaller than the nominal 0.559 mm size and have a slightly convergent taper. In-Ovation brackets have a divergent taper at an average angle of 1.47 degrees. In-Ovation is closest to the nominal value of slot height at the slot base and has the smallest manufacturing tolerances. Damon Q brackets are the most rectangular in shape, with nearly 90-degree corners between the slot bottom and walls. Damon slot height is on average 3% oversized. PMID:20981299

  5. On Goldman bracket for G 2 gauge group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, S. Hasibul Hassan

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we obtain an infinite dimensional Lie algebra of exotic gauge invariant observables that is closed under Goldman-type bracket associated with monodromy matrices of flat connections on a compact Riemann surface for G 2 gauge group. As a byproduct, we give an alternative derivation of known Goldman bracket for classical gauge groups GL ( n, ℝ), SL( n, ℝ), U( n), SU( n), Sp(2 n, ℝ) and SO( n).

  6. Detail view of bracket, arched window and eagle from building ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of bracket, arched window and eagle from building 18 section. Jet Lowe, Haer staff photographer, summer 1995 - Naval Base Philadelphia-Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, Machine Shops, League Island, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  7. Evaluation of mechanical properties of esthetic brackets

    PubMed Central

    Umezaki, Eisaku; Komazawa, Daigo; Otsuka, Yuichiro; Suda, Naoto

    2015-01-01

    Plastic brackets, as well as ceramic brackets, are used in various cases since they have excellent esthetics. However, their mechanical properties remain uncertain. The purpose of this study was to determine how deformation and stress distribution in esthetic brackets differ among materials under the same wire load. Using the digital image correlation method, we discovered the following: (1) the strain of the wings of plastic brackets is within 0.2% and that of ceramic and metal brackets is negligible, (2) polycarbonate brackets having a stainless steel slot show significantly smaller displacement than other plastic brackets, and (3) there is a significant difference between plastic brackets and ceramic and stainless steel brackets in terms of the displacement of the bracket wing. PMID:25755677

  8. Cleansing orthodontic brackets with air-powder polishing: effects on frictional force and degree of debris

    PubMed Central

    Leite, Brisa dos Santos; Fagundes, Nathalia Carolina Fernandes; Aragón, Mônica Lídia Castro; Dias, Carmen Gilda Barroso Tavares; Normando, David

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Debris buildup on the bracket-wire interface can influence friction. Cleansing brackets with air-powder polishing can affect this process. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the frictional force and amount of debris remaining on orthodontic brackets subjected to prophylaxis with air-powder polishing. Methods: Frictional force and debris buildup on the surface of 28 premolar brackets were evaluated after orthodontic treatment. In one hemiarch, each bracket was subjected to air-powder polishing (n = 14) for five seconds, while the contralateral hemiarch (n = 14) served as control. Mechanical friction tests were performed and images of the polished bracket surfaces and control surfaces were examined. Wilcoxon test was applied for comparative analysis between hemiarches at p < 0.05. Results: Brackets that had been cleaned with air-powder polishing showed lower friction (median = 1.27 N) when compared to the control surfaces (median = 4.52 N) (p < 0.01). Image analysis showed that the control group exhibited greater debris buildup (median = 2.0) compared with the group that received prophylaxis with air-powder polishing (median = 0.5) (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Cleansing orthodontic brackets with air-powder polishing significantly reduces debris buildup on the bracket surface while decreasing friction levels observed during sliding mechanics. PMID:27653265

  9. Corrosion behavior of self-ligating and conventional metal brackets

    PubMed Central

    Maia, Lúcio Henrique Esmeraldo Gurgel; Lopes Filho, Hibernon; Ruellas, Antônio Carlos de Oliveira; Araújo, Mônica Tirre de Souza; Vaitsman, Delmo Santiago

    2014-01-01

    Objective To test the null hypothesis that the aging process in self-ligating brackets is not higher than in conventional brackets. Methods Twenty-five conventional (GN-3M/Unitek; GE-GAC; VE-Aditek) and 25 self-ligating (SCs-3M/Unitek; INs-GAC; ECs-Aditek) metal brackets from three manufacturers (n = 150) were submitted to aging process in 0.9% NaCl solution at a constant temperature of 37 ± 1ºC for 21 days. The content of nickel, chromium and iron ions in the solution collected at intervals of 7, 14 and 21 days was quantified by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. After the aging process, the brackets were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) under 22X and 1,000X magnifications. Results Comparison of metal release in self-ligating and conventional brackets from the same manufacturer proved that the SCs group released more nickel (p < 0.05) than the GN group after 7 and 14 days, but less chromium (p < 0.05) after 14 days and less iron (p < 0.05) at the three experimental time intervals. The INs group released less iron (p < 0.05) than the GE group after 7 days and less nickel, chromium and iron (p < 0.05) after 14 and 21 days. The ECs group released more nickel, chromium and iron (p < 0.05) than the VE group after 14 days, but released less nickel and chromium (p < 0.05) after 7 days and less chromium and iron (p < 0.05) after 21 days. The SEM analysis revealed alterations on surface topography of conventional and self-ligating brackets. Conclusions The aging process in self-ligating brackets was not greater than in conventional brackets from the same manufacturer. The null hypothesis was accepted. PMID:24945521

  10. An in Vitro Evaluation of Remineralization Potential of Novamin® on Artificial Enamel Sub-Surface Lesions Around Orthodontic Brackets Using Energy Dispersive X-Ray Analysis (EDX)

    PubMed Central

    Padmanabhan, Sridevi; Chitharanjan, Arun B

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate and compare the Ca/P ratio of enamel samples around the orthodontic brackets for time periods of 0, 2 and 10 days in two groups (control group and study group). Materials and Methods: Forty extracted teeth were randomly divided into control group and study group. All samples were demineralized and incubated in artificial saliva at 37°C for a period of 10 days after demineralization. During this phase the enamel samples in the study group were treated with remineralizing paste (NuproNusolution containing Novamin®-Dentsply) for 10 days. At the end of the incubation period, Ca/P ratios were analyzed for both the groupsby EDX analysis. Data obtained was subjected to statistical analysis using student t-test for paired samples and Student t- test for individual samples (p ≤ 0.05). Results: It was found that the mean Ca/P ratio was significantly lower for the control group as compared to the study group (p-value < 0.05) after 10 d of incubation. Conclusion: Novamin® containing remineralization toothpaste showed significant remineralizing potential in inhibition of artificial enamel sub-surface lesion around bracket after 10 days of remineralization phase. EDX element analysis was found to be an efficient method to quantify the changes in mineral content of a sample during in vitro caries studies. PMID:25584326

  11. A comparative evaluation of the retention of metallic brackets bonded with resin-modified glass ionomer cement under different enamel preparations: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Padmaja; Valiathan, Ashima; Arora, Ankit; Agarwal, Sachin

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: For orthodontists, the ideal bonding material should be less moisture-sensitive and should release fluoride, thereby reducing unfavorable iatrogenic decalcification. Resin-Modified Glass Ionomer Cements (RMGICs), due to their ability to bond in the presence of saliva and blood can be a very good bonding agent for orthodontic attachments especially in the areas of mouth, which are difficult to access. Moreover, their fluoride releasing property makes them an ideal bonding agent for patients with poor oral hygiene. However, their immediate bond strength is said to be too low to immediately ligate the initial wire, which could increase the total number of appointments. The effect of sandblasting and the use of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCL) on the immediate bond failure of RMGIC clinically have not been reported in the literature until the date. This investigation intended to assess the effect of sandblasting (of the bracket base and enamel) and NaOCL on the rate of bond failure (with immediate ligation at 30 min) of Fuji Ortho LC and its comparison with that of conventional light cured composite resin over a period of 1 year. Materials and Methods: 400 sample teeth were further divided into 4 groups of 100 each and bonded as follows: (1) Group 1: Normal metallic brackets bonded with Fuji Ortho LC. (2) Group 2: Sandblasted bracket base and enamel surface, brackets bonded with Fuji Ortho LC. (3) Group 3: Deproteinized enamel surface using sodium hypochlorite and brackets bonded with Fuji Ortho LC. (4) Group 4: Normal metallic bracket bonded with Transbond XT after etching enamel with 37% phosphoric acid. This group served as control group. Results and Conclusion: Results showed that sandblasting the bracket base and enamel, can significantly reduce the bond failure rate of RMGIC. PMID:24014999

  12. Resin bonding of metal brackets to glazed zirconia with a porcelain primer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung-Hwan; Lee, Milim; Kim, Kyoung-Nam

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aims of this study were to compare the shear bond strength between orthodontic metal brackets and glazed zirconia using different types of primer before applying resin cement and to determine which primer was more effective. Methods Zirconia blocks were milled and embedded in acrylic resin and randomly assigned to one of four groups: nonglazed zirconia with sandblasting and zirconia primer (NZ); glazed zirconia with sandblasting, etching, and zirconia primer (GZ); glazed zirconia with sandblasting, etching, and porcelain primer (GP); and glazed zirconia with sandblasting, etching, zirconia primer, and porcelain primer (GZP). A stainless steel metal bracket was bonded to each target surface with resin cement, and all specimens underwent thermal cycling. The shear bond strength of the specimens was measured by a universal testing machine. A scanning electron microscope, three-dimensional optical surface-profiler, and stereoscopic microscope were used to image the zirconia surfaces. The data were analyzed with one-way analyses of variance and the Fisher exact test. Results Group GZ showed significantly lower shear bond strength than did the other groups. No statistically significant differences were found among groups NZ, GP, and GZP. All specimens in group GZ showed adhesive failure between the zirconia and resin cement. In groups NZ and GP, bonding failed at the interface between the resin cement and bracket base or showed complex adhesive and cohesive failure. Conclusions Porcelain primer is the more appropriate choice for bonding a metal bracket to the surface of a full-contour glazed zirconia crown with resin cement. PMID:26629476

  13. Structural support bracket for gas flow path

    DOEpatents

    None

    2016-08-02

    A structural support system is provided in a can annular gas turbine engine having an arrangement including a plurality of integrated exit pieces (IEPs) forming an annular chamber for delivering gases from a plurality of combustors to a first row of turbine blades. A bracket structure is connected between an IEP and an inner support structure on the engine. The bracket structure includes an axial bracket member attached to an IEP and extending axially in a forward direction. A transverse bracket member has an end attached to the inner support structure and extends circumferentially to a connection with a forward end of the axial bracket member. The transverse bracket member provides a fixed radial position for the forward end of the axial bracket member and is flexible in the axial direction to permit axial movement of the axial bracket member.

  14. Ceramic bracket debonding with Tm:fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirkan, İrem; Sarp, Ayşe Sena Kabaş; Gülsoy, Murat

    2016-06-01

    Lasers have the potential for reducing the required debonding force and can prevent the mechanical damage given to the enamel surface as a result of conventional debonding procedure. However, excessive thermal effects limit the use of lasers for debonding purposes. The aim of this study was to investigate the optimal parameters of 1940-nm Tm:fiber laser for debonding ceramic brackets. Pulling force and intrapulpal temperature measurements were done during laser irradiation simultaneously. A laser beam was delivered in two different modes: scanning the fiber tip on the bracket surface with a Z shape movement or direct application of the fiber tip at one point in the center of the bracket. Results showed that debonding force could be decreased significantly compared to the control samples, in which brackets were debonded by only mechanical force. Intrapulpal temperature was kept equal or under the 5.5°C threshold value of probable thermal damage to pulp. Scanning was found to have no extra contribution to the process. It was concluded that using 1940-nm Tm:fiber laser would facilitate the debonding of ceramic brackets and can be proposed as a promising debonding tool with all the advantageous aspects of fiber lasers.

  15. Evaluating the Type of Light Transmittance in Mono Crystalline, Poly Crystalline and Sapphire Brackets- An Invitro Spectrofluorometer Study

    PubMed Central

    Kommi, Pradeep Babu; Kumar, M Senthil; Hanumanth; Venkatesan; Aniruddh; Arvinth; Kumar, Arani Nanda

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Most of the patients seek orthodontic treatment to improve the smile, which improves the facial profile by means of fixed appliances i.e., brackets and wires. The brackets are of different types like stainless steel and ceramic. Ceramic brackets were considered as aesthetic appliance which was divided into mono-crystalline, polycrystalline and sapphire brackets. The light transmittance might influence the degree of curing adhesive material in mono crystalline, polycrystalline and sapphire brackets. Aim The aim of the present study was to evaluate the translucency and intensity of three different aesthetic brackets (mono crystalline, poly crystalline and sapphire ceramic brackets) and to determine their influence on shear bond strength of the brackets. The adhesive remnant index was also measured after debonding of the brackets from the tooth surface. Materials and Methods Twenty six samples each of monocrystalline, polycrystalline and sapphire brackets (total 78 ceramic brackets) were used for the study. The bracket samples were subjected to optical fluorescence test using spectrofluorometer to measure the intensity of the brackets. Seventy eight extracted premolar teeth were procured and divided into 3 groups. The brackets were then bonded to the tooth using Transbond XT (3M Unitek) light cure composite material and cured with new light cure unit (Light Emitting Diode) of wood pecker company (400-450nm) for 30 seconds, and these samples were subjected to shear bond strength test with Instron Universal Testing Machine (UNITEK-94100) with a load range between 0 to 100 KN with a maximum cross head speed of 0.5mm/min. ARI (Adhesive Remnant Index) scores were evaluated according to Artun and Bergland scoring system using stereomicroscope at 20x magnification. Results The light absorption values obtained from spectrofluorometeric study were 3300000–3500000 cps for group 1 (monocrystalline ceramic brackets), 6000000–6500000 cps for Group 2

  16. 21 CFR 872.3750 - Bracket adhesive resin and tooth conditioner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Bracket adhesive resin and tooth conditioner. 872... and tooth conditioner. (a) Identification. A bracket adhesive resin and tooth conditioner is a device... to a tooth surface. (b) Classification. Class II....

  17. 21 CFR 872.3750 - Bracket adhesive resin and tooth conditioner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Bracket adhesive resin and tooth conditioner. 872... and tooth conditioner. (a) Identification. A bracket adhesive resin and tooth conditioner is a device... to a tooth surface. (b) Classification. Class II....

  18. 21 CFR 872.3750 - Bracket adhesive resin and tooth conditioner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Bracket adhesive resin and tooth conditioner. 872... and tooth conditioner. (a) Identification. A bracket adhesive resin and tooth conditioner is a device... to a tooth surface. (b) Classification. Class II....

  19. ESF GROUND SUPPORT - PROPOSED JACKING BRACKET EVALUATION

    SciTech Connect

    Marvin D. Stine

    1996-03-28

    This calculation applies to the Constructor's design of the proposed jacking bracket for the W6 x 20 steel set. The specific features of the jacking bracket evaluated in this analysis are the shear on the bracket bolts, and the effects of the applied moment on the W6 x 20 steel set beam segment.

  20. Effects of two erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet lasers and conventional treatments as composite surface abrasives on the shear bond strength of metal brackets bonded to composite resins

    PubMed Central

    Sobouti, Farhad; Dadgar, Sepideh; Sanikhaatam, Zahra; Nateghian, Nazanin; Saravi, Mahdi Gholamrezaei

    2016-01-01

    Background: Bonding brackets to dental surfaces restored with composites are increasing. No studies to date have assessed the efficacy of laser irradiation in roughening of composite and the resulted shear bond strength (SBS) of the bonded bracket. We assessed, for the 1st time, the efficacy of two laser beams compared with conventional methods. Materials and Methods: Sixty-five discs of light-cured composite resin were stored in deionized distilled water for 7 days. They were divided into five groups of 12 plus a group of five for scanning electron microscopy (SEM): Bur-abrasion followed by phosphoric acid etching (bur-PA), hydrofluoric acid conditioning (HF), sandblasting, 3 W and 2 W erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser irradiation for 12 s. After bracket bonding, specimens were water-stored (24 h) and thermocycled (500 cycles), respectively. SBS was tested at 0.5 mm/min crosshead speed. The adhesive remnant index (ARI) was scored under ×10 magnification. SEM was carried out as well. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA), Kruskal–Wallis, Tukey, Dunn, one-sample t-test/Wilcoxon tests, and Weibull analysis (α =0.05). Results: The SBS values (megapascal) were bur-PA (11.07 ± 1.95), HF (19.70 ± 1.91), sandblasting (7.75 ± 1.10), laser 2 W (15.38 ± 1.38), and laser 3 W (20.74 ± 1.73) (compared to SBS = 6, all P = 0.000). These differed significantly (ANOVA P = 0.000) except HF versus 3 W laser (Tukey P > 0.05). ARI scores differed significantly (Kruskal–Wallis P = 0.000), with sandblasting and 2 W lasers having scores inclined to the higher end (safest debonding). Weibull analysis implied successful clinical outcome for all groups, except for sandblasting with borderline results. Conclusion: Considering its high efficacy and the lack of adverse effects bound with other methods, the 3 W laser irradiation is recommended for clinical usage. PMID:26998473

  1. Analysis of Shear Bond Strength and Morphology of Er:YAG Laser-Recycled Ceramic Orthodontic Brackets

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ruo-qiao; Ji, Ling-fei; Ling, Chen

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to compare the recycling of deboned ceramic brackets via an Er:YAG laser or via the traditional chairside processing methods of flaming and sandblasting; shear bond strength and morphological changes were evaluated in recycled brackets versus new brackets. Materials and Methods. 3M Clarity Self-Ligating Ceramic Brackets with a microcrystalline base were divided into groups subjected to flaming, sandblasting, or exposure to an Er:YAG laser. New ceramic brackets served as a control group. Shear bond strengths were determined with an Electroforce test machine and tested for statistical significance through analysis of variance. Morphological examinations of the recycled ceramic bracket bases were conducted with scanning electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Residue on the bracket base was analyzed with Raman spectroscopy. Results. Faded, dark adhesive was left on recycled bracket bases processed via flaming. Adhesive was thoroughly removed by both sandblasting and exposure to an Er:YAG laser. Compared with new brackets, shear bond strength was lower after sandblasting (p < 0.05), but not after exposure to an Er:YAG laser. The Er:YAG laser caused no damage to the bracket. Conclusion. Er:YAG lasers effectively remove adhesive from the bases of ceramic brackets without damaging them; thus, this method may be preferred over other recycling methods. PMID:27047964

  2. Evaluation of the Friction of Self-Ligating and Conventional Bracket Systems

    PubMed Central

    Tecco, Simona; Di Iorio, Donato; Nucera, Riccardo; Di Bisceglie, Beatrice; Cordasco, Giancarlo; Festa, Felice

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: This in vitro study evaluated the friction (F) generated by aligned stainless steel (SS) conventional brackets, self-ligating Damon MX© brackets (SDS Ormco, Glendora, California, USA), Time3© brackets (American Orthodontics, Sheboygan, Wisconsin, USA), Vision LP© brackets (American Orthodontics), and low-friction Slide© ligatures (Leone, Firenze, Italy) coupled with various SS, nickel-titanium (NiTi), and beta-titanium (TMA) archwires. Methods: All brackets had a 0.022-inch slot, and the orthodontic archwires were 0.014-inch, 0.016-inch, 0.014×0.025-inch, 0.018×0.025-inch, and 0.019×0.025-inch NiTi; 0.017×0.025-inch TMA; and 0.019×0.025-inch SS. Each bracket-archwire combination was tested 10 times. In the test, 10 brackets of the same group were mounted in alignment on a metal bar. The archwires moved through all the 10 brackets at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min (each run lasted approximately 5 min). The differences among 5 groups of brackets were analyzed through the Kruskal-Wallis test, and a Mann-Whitney test was calculated as post hoc analysis. The P value was set at 0.05. Results: Coupled with 0.014-inch NiTi and 0.016-inch NiTi, Victory Series© brackets generated the greatest F, while Damon MX© and Vision LP© brackets generated the lowest (P<.05); no significant differences were observed between Time3© brackets and Slide© ligatures. Coupled with all the rectangular archwires, Victory Series© brackets, Slide© ligatures, and Vision LP© self-ligating brackets generated significantly lower F than did Time3© and Damon MX© self-ligating brackets (P<.05). Conclusions: These findings suggest that self-ligating brackets are a family of brackets that, in vitro, can generate different levels of F when coupled with thin or thick, rectangular, or round archwires. Clinical conclusions based on our results are not possible due to the limitations of the experimental conditions. PMID:21769273

  3. Trial production of titanium orthodontic brackets fabricated by metal injection molding (MIM) with sintering.

    PubMed

    Deguchi, T; Ito, M; Obata, A; Koh, Y; Yamagishi, T; Oshida, Y

    1996-07-01

    Safety and esthetics are two indispensable factors to consider when fabricating orthodontic brackets. However, these factors are not easily achieved when conventional techniques (including forging and casting) are used in the mass production of titanium brackets, albeit the brackets exhibit excellent biocompatibility. In the present study, orthodontic brackets were manufactured by metal powder injection molding with sintering. Brackets with three different base designs were made and subjected to compression shear tests for evaluation of their bonding strength to enamel substrate. The shapes given to the dimple of the base were spherical, oval, and grooved. The maximum shear forces for each type were 11.1 kgf, 7.6 kgf, and 18.5 kgf, respectively. The bonding strengths of the titanium bracket were equivalent to those obtained with conventional stainless steel brackets. Moreover, uniform distribution of Vickers hardness values (average, 240 +/- 40 Hv) measured at three locations indicated that the titanium bracket was uniformly sintered. Accordingly, titanium brackets thus fabricated exhibit a potential for clinical application.

  4. Direct bond brackets: cotton roll versus rubber dam isolation.

    PubMed

    Heringer, M; Almeida, M A; Miguel, J A

    1993-01-01

    Forty-four brackets were bonded "in vivo" using cotton roll and rubber dam isolation. Maxillary and mandibular premolars, to be extracted for orthodontic reasons, were used in this study. After bonding, the teeth were retained in the mouth for at least 30 days. They were extracted using surgical elevators. After extraction, the teeth were secured in plastic rings using gypsum and kept in water for 7 days until debonding. A Universal Instron Machine was used to produce a shear force at a speed of 0.1 cm/min until each bracket was removed. No statistically significant differences for debonding strength were observed between the two types of isolation, nor between the buccal and palatal surfaces of the teeth. One hundred percent of the failures occurred at the bracket/composite interface.

  5. Physical and chemical properties of orthodontic brackets after 12 and 24 months: in situ study

    PubMed Central

    MENDES, Bernardo de Azevedo Bahia; FERREIRA, Ricardo Alberto Neto; PITHON, Matheus Melo; HORTA, Martinho Campolina Rebello; OLIVEIRA, Dauro Douglas

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this article was to assess how intraoral biodegradation influenced the surface characteristics and friction levels of metallic brackets used during 12 and 24 months of orthodontic treatment and also to compare the static friction generated in these brackets with four different methods of the ligation of orthodontic wires. Material and Methods Seventy premolar brackets as received from the manufacturer and 224 brackets that were used in previous orthodontic treatments were evaluated in this experiment. The surface morphology and the composition of the deposits found in the brackets were evaluated with rugosimetry, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Friction was analyzed by applying tensile tests simulating sliding mechanics with a 0.019x0.025" steel wire. The static friction levels produced by the following ligation methods were evaluated: loosely attached steel ligature around all four bracket wings, steel ligature attached to only two wings, conventional elastomeric ligation around all 4 bracket wings, and non-conventional Slide® elastomeric ligature. Results The results demonstrated the presence of biodegradation effects such as corrosion pits, plastic deformation, cracks, and material deposits. The main chemical elements found on these deposits were Carbon and Oxygen. The maximum friction produced by each ligation method changed according to the time of intraoral use. The steel ligature loosely attached to all four bracket wings produced the lowest friction levels in the new brackets. The conventional elastic ligatures generated the highest friction levels. The metallic brackets underwent significant degradation during orthodontic treatment, showing an increase in surface roughness and the deposit of chemical elements on the surface. Conclusion The levels of static friction decreased with use. The non-conventional elastic ligatures were the best alternative to reduce friction. PMID:25025560

  6. Effects of oil-based and oil-free enamel prophylactic agents on bracket failure--a prospective randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Magnius, Magdalena; Bazargani, Farhan

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluates and compares the effects of enamel prophylaxis using either oil-free pumice or oil-containing prophylaxis paste on the incidence of bracket failure in orthodontic patients. Forty-six orthodontic patients participated in this prospective clinical trial. A cross-mouth method was used in each patient, in which two diagonal quadrants (i.e. upper right and lower left or vice versa) were randomly assigned to the pumice group and the contralateral diagonal quadrants to the Prophy Paste group. A total of 836 teeth were bonded using Transbond XT (3M Unitek) and monitored for an average of 23 months for bond failure. Chi-square analysis was used to compare the number of bracket failures between the groups. Overall, 26 bond failures occurred by the end of the trial. Fifteen bracket failures were observed in the Prophy Paste group (3.6%) and 11 in the pumice group (2.6%). The failure rates were fairly evenly distributed between the upper and lower jaws. There were no statistically significant differences between the groups (P = 0.43). This study showed that enamel prophylaxis using either pumice or Prophy Paste before orthodontic bonding works equally well in a clinical setting.

  7. Effects of oil-based and oil-free enamel prophylactic agents on bracket failure--a prospective randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Magnius, Magdalena; Bazargani, Farhan

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluates and compares the effects of enamel prophylaxis using either oil-free pumice or oil-containing prophylaxis paste on the incidence of bracket failure in orthodontic patients. Forty-six orthodontic patients participated in this prospective clinical trial. A cross-mouth method was used in each patient, in which two diagonal quadrants (i.e. upper right and lower left or vice versa) were randomly assigned to the pumice group and the contralateral diagonal quadrants to the Prophy Paste group. A total of 836 teeth were bonded using Transbond XT (3M Unitek) and monitored for an average of 23 months for bond failure. Chi-square analysis was used to compare the number of bracket failures between the groups. Overall, 26 bond failures occurred by the end of the trial. Fifteen bracket failures were observed in the Prophy Paste group (3.6%) and 11 in the pumice group (2.6%). The failure rates were fairly evenly distributed between the upper and lower jaws. There were no statistically significant differences between the groups (P = 0.43). This study showed that enamel prophylaxis using either pumice or Prophy Paste before orthodontic bonding works equally well in a clinical setting. PMID:25102719

  8. Effect of delayed polymerization time and bracket manipulation on orthodontic bracket bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponikvar, Michael J.

    This study examined the effect of bracket manipulation in combination with delayed polymerization times on orthodontic bracket shear bond strength and degree of resin composite conversion. Orthodontics brackets were bonded to extracted third molars in a simulated oral environment after a set period of delayed polymerization time and bracket manipulation. After curing the bracket adhesive, each bracket underwent shear bond strength testing followed by micro-Raman spectroscopy analysis to measure the degree of conversion of the resin composite. Results demonstrated the shear bond strength and the degree of conversion of ceramic brackets did not vary over time. However, with stainless steel brackets there was a significant effect (p ≤ 0.05) of delay time on shear bond strength between the 0.5 min and 10 min bracket groups. In addition, stainless steel brackets showed significant differences related to degree of conversion over time between the 0.5 min and 5 min groups, in addition to the 0.5 min and 10 min groups. This investigation suggests that delaying bracket adhesive polymerization up to a period of 10 min then adjusting the orthodontic bracket may increase both shear bond strength and degree of conversion of stainless steel brackets while having no effect on ceramic brackets.

  9. Effect of fluoride on friction between bracket and wire

    PubMed Central

    Alavi, Shiva; Farahi, Ali

    2011-01-01

    Background: Friction is usually encountered during sliding technique for orthodontic space closure. This study aims to investigate the effect of fluoride on frictional resistance between stainless steel orthodontic brackets and steel and NiTi arch wires. Materials and Methods: A total of 144 standard 022 stainless steel brackets were used in this experimental study. 0.016 and 0.019 × 0.025 inch steel and NiTi arch wires were tested. The frictional resistance between wires and brackets immersed in the following three solutions were measured: Sultan fluoride gel containing 1.23% acidulated phosphate fluoride at pH 3.5 for 4 minutes, aquafresh mouth wash containing 0.05% sodium fluoride at pH of 5.1 for 1 minute twice a day for 8 weeks and physiologic serum (pH=7) as the control group. Static and dynamic frictional forces were measured using Testometric machine. Surface topography of wires and brackets was qualitatively assessed using electron microscopy. Three-way and two-way variance analysis and complementary Tuckey analysis were applied to compare the groups for any significant differences (P<0.05). Results: The average static and dynamic frictional forces for all bracket-wire combinations immersed in Sultan fluoride gel were higher than those immersed in NAF and control groups (P<0.001).The forces measured for rectangular wires were higher than round wires (P<0.001). Frictional resistance of 0.016 inch NiTi wire was more than that of the steel one but the difference between steel and NiTi 0.019 × 0.25 arch wires was not significant. Conclusion: Friction between steel brackets and nickel titanium and steel wires is affected by prophylactic agents containing high doses of fluoride and acidity. PMID:23372594

  10. Gingival response in orthodontic patients: Comparative study between self-ligating and conventional brackets.

    PubMed

    Folco, Alejandra A; Benítez-Rogé, Sandra C; Iglesias, Marina; Calabrese, Diana; Pelizardi, Cristina; Rosa, Alcira; Brusca, Marisa I; Hecht, Pedro; Mateu, María E

    2014-01-01

    Orthodontic brackets contribute to the accumulation of bacterial plaque on tooth surfaces because they hinder oral hygiene. In contrast to conventional brackets, self-ligating brackets do not require additional parts to support the arches, thus improving dental hygiene. The aim of this study was to compare the gingival response in orthodontic patients wearing self-ligating or conventional brackets. A sample of 22 patients aged 16 to 30 years was divided into two groups: Group A, treated with selfligating brackets (Damon system) and Group B, treated with conventional brackets (Roth technique). The following were assessed during the treatment: Plaque Index (PI), Gingival Index (GI) and Probing Depth (PD), and sub-gingival samples were taken from teeth 14/24 for microbiological observation. No statistically significant difference was found between Groups A and B; p>0.05 (sign-ranked) or between PI, GI and PD at the different times (Friedman's Analysis of Variance), even though the indices were found to increase at 14 days, particularly for self-ligating brackets. The quantity and quality of microorganisms present were compatible with health on days 0, 28 and 56. As from day 14 there is a predominance of microbiota compatible with gingivitis in both groups. In the samples studied, orthodontic treatment increases bacterial plaque and inflammatory gingival response, but gingival-periodontal health can be maintained with adequate basic therapy. Self-ligating and conventional brackets produced similar gingival response. PMID:25560690

  11. Thermal debracketing of single crystal sapphire brackets.

    PubMed

    Rueggeberg, F A; Lockwood, P E

    1992-01-01

    Because of their optical clarity, single crystal sapphire brackets provide an esthetic advantage over many other types of orthodontic brackets. However, debonding of these brackets has caused iatrogenic damage to enamel. Thermal debonding has been proposed for use in removing sapphire brackets without causing damage to teeth. This study determined the temperature required at the enamel/resin interface to thermally debond sapphire brackets from etched bovine enamel using 23 different commercially available orthodontic resins and one experimental product. The results indicate a wide range of debonding temperatures for the various resins. As a group, the powder-liquid materials had a statistically lower debonding temperature than the two-paste, the no-mix products, or the light-cured materials, for which the temperatures were all similar. This paper presents relative information a clinician can use in selecting an orthodontic bonding resin to minimize thermal damage to the teeth while debonding sapphire brackets.

  12. Evaluation of Static Friction of Polycrystalline Ceramic Brackets after Conditioning with Different Powers of Er:YAG Laser

    PubMed Central

    Arash, Valiollah; Javanmard, Saeed; Eftekhari, Zeinab; Rahmati-Kamel, Manouchehr; Bahadoram, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    This research aimed to reduce the friction between the wire and brackets by Er:YAG laser. To measure the friction between the wires and brackets in 0° and 10° of wire angulations, 40 polycrystalline ceramic brackets (Hubit, South Korea) were divided into 8 study groups and irradiated by 100, 200, and 300 mj/s of Er:YAG laser power. Two groups of brackets were not irradiated. The friction between the wires and brackets was measured with universal testing machine (SANTAM) with a segment of .019 × .025 SS wire pulled out of the slot of bracket. ANOVA and t-test were used for analyzing the results. To evaluate the effect of the laser on surface morphology of the bracket, SEM evaluations were carried out. The mean frictional resistances between the brackets and wires with 0° of angulation by increasing the laser power decreased compared with control group, but, in 10° of angulation, the friction increased regardless of the laser power and was comparable to the friction of nonirradiated brackets. Furthermore, with each laser power, frictional resistance of brackets in 10° of angulation was significantly higher than 0° of angulation. These results were explained by SEM images too. PMID:26491447

  13. Surface Plasmon Based Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wig, Andrew; Passian, Ali; Boudreaux, Philip; Ferrell, Tom

    2008-03-01

    A spectrometer that uses surface plasmon excitation in thin metal films to separate light into its component wavelengths is described. The use of surface plasmons as a dispersive medium sets this spectrometer apart from prism, grating, and interference based variants and allows for the miniaturization of this device. Theoretical and experimental results are presented for two different operation models. In the first case surface plasmon tunneling in the near field is used to provide transmission spectra of different broad band-pass, glass filters across the visible wavelength range with high stray-light rejection at low resolution as well as absorption spectra of chlorophyll extracted from a spinach leaf. The second model looks at the far field components of surface plasmon scattering.

  14. Three-dimensional deformation of orthodontic brackets

    PubMed Central

    Melenka, Garrett W; Nobes, David S; Major, Paul W

    2013-01-01

    Braces are used by orthodontists to correct the misalignment of teeth in the mouth. Archwire rotation is a particular procedure used to correct tooth inclination. Wire rotation can result in deformation to the orthodontic brackets, and an orthodontic torque simulator has been designed to examine this wire–bracket interaction. An optical technique has been employed to measure the deformation due to size and geometric constraints of the orthodontic brackets. Images of orthodontic brackets are collected using a stereo microscope and two charge-coupled device cameras, and deformation of orthodontic brackets is measured using a three-dimensional digital image correlation technique. The three-dimensional deformation of orthodontic brackets will be evaluated. The repeatability of the three-dimensional digital image correlation measurement method was evaluated by performing 30 archwire rotation tests using the same bracket and archwire. Finally, five Damon 3MX and five In-Ovation R self-ligating brackets will be compared using this technique to demonstrate the effect of archwire rotation on bracket design. PMID:23762201

  15. Orthodontic bracket bonding to glazed full-contour zirconia

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Ji-Young; Jung, Hyo-Kyung; Choi, Il-Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study evaluated the effects of different surface conditioning methods on the bond strength of orthodontic brackets to glazed full-zirconia surfaces. Materials and Methods Glazed zirconia (except for the control, Zirkonzahn Prettau) disc surfaces were pre-treated: PO (control), polishing; BR, bur roughening; PP, cleaning with a prophy cup and pumice; HF, hydrofluoric acid etching; AA, air abrasion with aluminum oxide; CJ, CoJet-Sand. The surfaces were examined using profilometry, scanning electron microscopy, and electron dispersive spectroscopy. A zirconia primer (Z-Prime Plus, Z) or a silane primer (Monobond-S, S) was then applied to the surfaces, yielding 7 groups (PO-Z, BR-Z, PP-S, HF-S, AA-S, AA-Z, and CJ-S). Metal bracket-bonded specimens were stored in water for 24 hr at 37℃, and thermocycled for 1,000 cycles. Their bond strengths were measured using the wire loop method (n = 10). Results Except for BR, the surface pre-treatments failed to expose the zirconia substructure. A significant difference in bond strengths was found between AA-Z (4.60 ± 1.08 MPa) and all other groups (13.38 ± 2.57 - 15.78 ± 2.39 MPa, p < 0.05). For AA-Z, most of the adhesive remained on the bracket. Conclusions For bracket bonding to glazed zirconia, a simple application of silane to the cleaned surface is recommended. A zirconia primer should be used only when the zirconia substructure is definitely exposed. PMID:27200278

  16. In vitro evaluation of frictional forces of two ceramic orthodontic brackets versus a stainless steel bracket in combination with two types of archwires

    PubMed Central

    Arash, Valiollah; Rabiee, Mahmoud; Rakhshan, Vahid; Khorasani, Sara; Sobouti, Farhad

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare frictional forces between monocrystalline alumina (MA), polycrystalline alumina (PA), and stainless steel (SS) brackets with two SS wires: Rectangular and round. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study, 60 0.022 brackets [20 PA (0° torque, Forestadent, Germany) and 20 MA (0° torque, Ormco, California, USA)] brackets plus 20 SS brackets (0° torque, Foretadent, Germany) and 60 SS archwires (30 rectangular 0.019 ×0.025 archwires and 30 round 0.018 archwires, Ortho Technology, USA) were used in subgroups of 10 from the combination of all brackets and all archwires. A universal testing machine (Instron, Model STM 250, Germany) was used to investigate the static frictional resistance. The angulation between the bracket and wire was 0°, and the wires were pulled through the slots at a crosshead speed of 10 mm/min. Two-way and one-way analyses of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey tests were used to analyze the data. Results: Mean (SD) static frictional force for each group was as follows: MA + round: 3.47 (0.38); MA + rectangular: 4.05 (0.47); PA + round: 4.14 (0.37); PA + rectangular: 4.45 (0.65); SS + round: 3.28 (0.22); and SS + rectangular: 4.22 (0.61). Significant effects of bracket types (P = 0.001) and archwire types (P = 0.000) on the friction force were detected using ANOVA. Tukey test indicated significant differences between PA brackets with both SS and MA brackets (P < 0.05), but not between SS and MA brackets. The two archwires as well had significantly different effects (Tukey P = 0.000). Conclusions: Based on the present in-vitro study, the PA brackets might create higher frictional forces compared to both SS and MA brackets. The rectangular 0.019 ×0.025 archwire might create greater forces than round 0.018 archwire. PMID:26020037

  17. Frictional resistance of self-ligating versus conventional brackets in different bracket-archwire-angle combinations

    PubMed Central

    MONTEIRO, Maria Regina Guerra; da SILVA, Licinio Esmeraldo; ELIAS, Carlos Nelson; VILELLA, Oswaldo de Vasconcellos

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the influence of archwire material (NiTi, beta-Ti and stainless steel) and brackets design (self-ligating and conventional) on the frictional force resistance. Material and Methods Two types of brackets (self-ligating brackets - Smartclip, 3M/Unitek - and conventional brackets - Gemini, 3M/Unitek) with three (0, 5, and 10 degrees) slot angulation attached with elastomeric ligatures (TP Orthodontics) were tested. All brackets were tested with archwire 0.019"x0.025" nickel-titanium, beta-titanium, and stainless steel (Unitek/3M). The mechanical testing was performed with a universal testing machine eMIC DL 10000 (eMIC Co, Brazil). The wires were pulled from the bracket slots at a cross-head speed of 3 mm/min until 2 mm displacement. Results Self-ligating brackets produced significantly lower friction values compared with those of conventional brackets. Frictional force resistance values were directly proportional to the increase in the bracket/ wire angulation. With regard to conventional brackets, stainless steel wires had the lowest friction force values, followed by nickel-titanium and beta-titanium ones. With regard to self-ligating brackets, the nickel-titanium wires had the lowest friction values, significantly lower than those of other materials. Conclusion even at different angulations, the self-ligating brackets showed significantly lower friction force values than the conventional brackets. Combined with nickel-titanium wires, the self-ligating brackets exhibit much lower friction, possibly due to the contact between nickel-titanium clips and wires of the same material. PMID:25025564

  18. Femtosecond laser etching of dental enamel for bracket bonding.

    PubMed

    Kabas, Ayse Sena; Ersoy, Tansu; Gülsoy, Murat; Akturk, Selcuk

    2013-09-01

    The aim is to investigate femtosecond laser ablation as an alternative method for enamel etching used before bonding orthodontic brackets. A focused laser beam is scanned over enamel within the area of bonding in a saw tooth pattern with a varying number of lines. After patterning, ceramic brackets are bonded and bonding quality of the proposed technique is measured by a universal testing machine. The results are compared to the conventional acid etching method. Results show that bonding strength is a function of laser average power and the density of the ablated lines. Intrapulpal temperature changes are also recorded and observed minimal effects are observed. Enamel surface of the samples is investigated microscopically and no signs of damage or cracking are observed. In conclusion, femtosecond laser exposure on enamel surface yields controllable patterns that provide efficient bonding strength with less removal of dental tissue than conventional acid-etching technique.

  19. Effect of pumice prophylaxis on the bond strength of orthodontic brackets.

    PubMed

    Lindauer, S J; Browning, H; Shroff, B; Marshall, F; Anderson, R H; Moon, P C

    1997-06-01

    Pumice prophylaxis has long been accepted as a prerequisite for achieving adequate enamel etching during orthodontic bonding procedures. Three methods were used in this study to examine the effects of pumice prophylaxis on the bond strength of orthodontic brackets: (1) shear bond strength of brackets that were bonded to extracted premolars after surface preparation procedures, which either included or did not include prior pumice prophylaxis, was evaluated; (2) scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to examine the surface characteristics of teeth that had been etched with and without prior pumice prophylaxis; and (3) rate of bracket failure in patients who had had brackets bonded with and without prior pumice prophylaxis was recorded during an average treatment time of 18 months. No significant differences were noted in bond strength, general etched enamel surface characteristics, or bracket retention rates. Some specific differences, however, were noted on SEM in localized areas of the etched enamel surfaces, although these did not appear to affect the bond strength or bracket retention rates ultimately attained.

  20. Classification and Casimir Invariants of Lie--Poisson Brackets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiffeault, Jean-Luc; Morrison, P. J.

    1997-11-01

    Several types of fluid and plasma systems admit a Hamiltonian formulation using Lie-Poisson brackets, including Euler's equation for fluids, reduced MHD for plasmas, and others. Lie-Poisson brackets, which are examples of noncanonical Poisson brackets, consist of an inner product, < , >, and the bracket, [ , ], of a Lie algebra which we call the inner bracket. The Lie-Poisson bracket is then lF,Gr = l<Ψ, l[F_Ψ , G_Ψr]r>. Here Ψ is a vector of field variables, and subscripts denote functional differentiation. The algebras corresponding to the inner brackets are algebras by extension: they are defined for multiple field variables from the bracket for a single variable. We derive a classification scheme for all such brackets using cohomology theory for Lie algebras. We then derive the Casimir invariants for the classes of Lie-Poisson brackets where the inner bracket is of canonical type.

  1. Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets and Disinclusion Buttons: Effect of Water and Saliva Contamination

    PubMed Central

    Sfondrini, Maria Francesca; Fraticelli, Danilo; Gandini, Paola

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of water and saliva contamination on the shear bond strength and failure site of orthodontic brackets and lingual buttons. Materials and Methods. 120 bovine permanent mandibular incisors were randomly divided into 6 groups of 20 specimens each. Both orthodontic brackets and disinclusion buttons were tested under three different enamel surface conditions: (a) dry, (b) water contamination, and (c) saliva contamination. Brackets and buttons were bonded to the teeth and subsequently tested using a Instron universal testing machine. Shear bond strength values and adhesive failure rate were recorded. Statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA and Tukey tests (strength values) and Chi squared test (ARI Scores). Results. Noncontaminated enamel surfaces showed the highest bond strengths for both brackets and buttons. Under water and saliva contamination orthodontic brackets groups showed significantly lower shear strengths than disinclusion buttons groups. Significant differences in debond locations were found among the groups under the various enamel surface conditions. Conclusions. Water and saliva contamination of enamel during the bonding procedure lowers bond strength values, more with orthodontic brackets than with disinclusion buttons. PMID:23762825

  2. Effects of chlorhexidine (gel) application on bacterial levels and orthodontic brackets during orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Al-Bazi, Samar M; Abbassy, Mona A; Bakry, Ahmed S; Merdad, Leena A; Hassan, Ali H

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effects of applying 0.50% chlorhexidine (CHX) gel using the dental drug delivery system (3DS) on salivary Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) and on the surface topography of metal and ceramic orthodontic brackets. The study involved 20 orthodontic patients with high levels of salivary S. mutans. The patients were treated with professional mechanical tooth cleaning followed by application of 0.50% CHX using individual trays (3DS). Salivary S. mutans levels were repeatedly measured 1, 2, 4, and 8 weeks post-treatment. In vitro study utilized forty ceramic and metallic brackets that were immersed in 0.50% CHX gel for 10 min, whereas another untreated forty brackets served as controls. The frictional resistances of stainless steel wires to the brackets before and after CHX treatment were recorded using a universal testing machine. Scanning electron microscopy was used to compare changes in the surface topography of brackets. Statistical analyses were used to determine the effect of CHX on bacterial count and to evaluate the effect of CHX on frictional resistance. According to the results of this study, S. mutans levels were reduced significantly (P < 0.05). There were no significant changes in the frictional resistance and surface topography of brackets before or after application of CHX. (J Oral Sci 58, 35-42, 2016). PMID:27021538

  3. Heat Exchanger Support Bracket Design Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, Russ; /Fermilab

    1995-01-12

    This engineering note documents the design of the heat exchanger support brackets. The heat exchanger is roughly 40 feet long, 22 inches in diameter and weighs 6750 pounds. It will be mounted on two identical support brackets that are anchored to a concrete wall. The design calculations were done for one bracket supporting the full weight of the heat exchanger, rounded up to 6800 pounds. The design follows the American Institute of Steel Construction (AISC) Manual of steel construction, Eighth edition. All calculated stresses and loads on welds were below allowables.

  4. Strength Analysis and Process Simulation of Subway Contact Rail Support Bracket of Composite Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedulov, Boris N.; Safonov, Alexander A.; Sergeichev, Ivan V.; Ushakov, Andrey E.; Klenin, Yuri G.; Makarenko, Irina V.

    2016-10-01

    An application of composites for construction of subway brackets is a very effective approach to extend their lifetime. However, this approach involves the necessity to prevent process-induced distortions of the bracket due to thermal deformation and chemical shrinkage. At present study, a process simulation has been carried out to support the design of the production tooling. The simulation was based on the application of viscoelastic model for the resin. Simulation results were verified by comparison with results of manufacturing experiments. To optimize the bracket structure the strength analysis was carried out as well.

  5. Strength Analysis and Process Simulation of Subway Contact Rail Support Bracket of Composite Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedulov, Boris N.; Safonov, Alexander A.; Sergeichev, Ivan V.; Ushakov, Andrey E.; Klenin, Yuri G.; Makarenko, Irina V.

    2016-05-01

    An application of composites for construction of subway brackets is a very effective approach to extend their lifetime. However, this approach involves the necessity to prevent process-induced distortions of the bracket due to thermal deformation and chemical shrinkage. At present study, a process simulation has been carried out to support the design of the production tooling. The simulation was based on the application of viscoelastic model for the resin. Simulation results were verified by comparison with results of manufacturing experiments. To optimize the bracket structure the strength analysis was carried out as well.

  6. The influence of bracket type on the force delivery of Ni-Ti archwires.

    PubMed

    Hemingway, R; Williams, R L; Hunt, J A; Rudge, S J

    2001-06-01

    This study investigated the force delivery of an 0.014 inch nickel-titanium (Ni-Ti) archwire used in combination with a range of commercially available bracket systems, and using a model based on an 'ideal' mandibular archform. The model aimed to replicate the clinical interbracket span. The force delivery was measured at four different sites on an archwire for one batch of 10 nickel titanium archwires from one manufacturer, using one bracket/archwire combination. The four sites represented the lateral incisor, canine, second premolar and first molar positions. Force delivery was also measured for a further four different bracket designs at four different sites on the archwire using five fresh wires of the same archwire type. The wires were loaded with an M5 Nene Universal testing machine. The results demonstrate that the peak and plateau force, both of which are clinically important, are dependent on several factors of the archwire/bracket combination. The results showed that 20 per cent of the batch of 10 wires behaved differently by delivering a higher peak force. There was a statistically significant difference (P < 0.05) between the four bracket/archwire combinations for the peak forces delivered, but there was very little difference between the four bracket/archwire unloading force delivery values. The wires delivered a predictable force on the unloading curves, but self-ligating brackets may not develop sufficient strain within the wire to take full advantage of the superelastic effect of Ni-Ti wires. PMID:11471266

  7. Laser brackets debonding: Tm:YAP and ClarityTM SL self-ligating appliance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dostálová, Tatjana; Jelínková, Helena; Šulc, Jan; Koranda, Petr; Němec, Michal; Jelínek, Michal; Fibrich, Martin; Michalik, Pavel; Miyagi, Mitsunobu

    2010-02-01

    The study demonstrates the possibility of using Tm:YAP laser radiation for the removing ceramic brackets. The amount of enamel loss and residual resin on teeth has been evaluated. A diode-pumped Tm:YAP microchip laser generating at wavelength 1.9 μm was used for the debonding process. The transmission and absorption measurement of the basic elements - bracket, adhesive resin, and enamel was analyzed to explain the source of the heat and bracket debonding. Quantitative measurements are made for visualizing enamel surface before and after a self-ligating bonding technique. Temperature rise observation during the debonding procedure - from 0.5 to 2 W power - has improved the accuracy of assessment. The results were evaluated by CCD camera and scanning electron microscope. From the measurements it is possible to conclude that continuously running small diode pumped Tm:YAP microchip laser having output power 1W can remove the ceramic bracket without enamel iatrogenic damage.

  8. Bihamiltonian Cohomology of KdV Brackets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlet, Guido; Posthuma, Hessel; Shadrin, Sergey

    2016-02-01

    Using spectral sequences techniques we compute the bihamiltonian cohomology groups of the pencil of Poisson brackets of dispersionless KdV hierarchy. In particular, this proves a conjecture of Liu and Zhang about the vanishing of such cohomology groups.

  9. In vitro tooth cleaning efficacy of electric toothbrushes around brackets.

    PubMed

    Schätzle, Marc; Sener, Beatrice; Schmidlin, Patrick R; Imfeld, Thomas; Attin, Thomas

    2010-10-01

    This in vitro study assessed the cleaning efficacy of different electric toothbrushes around upper incisor brackets. Standard and Mini Diamond brackets were fixed on black-stained teeth. The teeth were coated with white titanium oxide and brushed in a machine twice for 1 minute each. Twelve different brush heads with either a wiping or an oscillating-rotating action were tested. After brushing, the teeth were scanned, the black surfaces were assessed planimetrically and a modified plaque index for orthodontic patients (PIOP) was introduced. Tooth areas, which were black again after brushing indicated tooth surface contact of the filaments and were expressed as a percentage of total area. The remaining white areas around the brackets indicated 'plaque-retentive' niches. Analysis of variance was used for individual comparison of the brush types. Bonferroni/Dunn adjustment was applied for multiple testing. The Sonicare toothbrush handle with the brush head 'Compact ProResults' (81.7 per cent) and the brush head 'Standard ProResults' (80.8 per cent), as well as the sonic Waterpik toothbrush SR 800E with the standard brush head (78.2 per cent), showed statistically significantly better cleaning efficacy than all others. The poorest cleaning efficacy was observed for the oscillating-rotating Braun Oral-B Professional Care with the brush head 'Ortho' (less than 50 per cent). The planimetric findings were in correspondence with the results of the PIOP assessment. Cleaning efficacy of electric toothbrushes around brackets on upper incisors was different between the tested brushes. The PIOP was practicable, effective, and easy to use, although it has to be verified in a clinical study.

  10. The effect of ZnO nanoparticle coating on the frictional resistance between orthodontic wires and ceramic brackets.

    PubMed

    Behroozian, Ahmad; Kachoei, Mojgan; Khatamian, Masumeh; Divband, Baharak

    2016-01-01

    Background. Any decrease in friction between orthodontic wire and bracket can accelerate tooth movement in the sliding technique and result in better control of anchorage. This study was carried out to evaluate frictional forces by coating orthodontic wires and porcelain brackets with zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO). Methods . In this in vitro study, we evaluated a combination of 120 samples of 0.019×0.025 stainless steel (SS) orthodonticwires and 22 mil system edgewise porcelain brackets with and without spherical zinc oxide nanoparticles. Spherical ZnOnanoparticles were deposited on wires and brackets by immersing them in ethanol solution and SEM (scanning electronmicroscope) evaluation confirmed the presence of the ZnO coating. The frictional forces were calculated between the wiresand brackets in four groups: group ZZ (coated wire and bracket), group OO (uncoated wire and bracket), group ZO (coatedwire and uncoated bracket) and group OZ (uncoated wire and coated bracket). Kolmogorov-Smirnov, Mann-Whitney andKruskal-Wallis tests were used for data analysis. Results. The frictional force in ZZ (3.07±0.4 N) was the highest (P <0.05), and OZ (2.18±0.5 N) had the lowest amount of friction (P <0.05) among the groups. There was no significant difference in frictional forces between the ZO and OO groups (2.65±0.2 and 2.70±0.2 N, respectively). Conclusion . Coating of porcelain bracket surfaces with ZnO nanoparticles can decrease friction in the sliding technique,and wire coating combined with bracket coating is not recommended due to its effect on friction. PMID:27429727

  11. The effect of ZnO nanoparticle coating on the frictional resistance between orthodontic wires and ceramic brackets

    PubMed Central

    Behroozian, Ahmad; Kachoei, Mojgan; Khatamian, Masumeh; Divband, Baharak

    2016-01-01

    Background. Any decrease in friction between orthodontic wire and bracket can accelerate tooth movement in the sliding technique and result in better control of anchorage. This study was carried out to evaluate frictional forces by coating orthodontic wires and porcelain brackets with zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO). Methods. In this in vitro study, we evaluated a combination of 120 samples of 0.019×0.025 stainless steel (SS) orthodonticwires and 22 mil system edgewise porcelain brackets with and without spherical zinc oxide nanoparticles. Spherical ZnOnanoparticles were deposited on wires and brackets by immersing them in ethanol solution and SEM (scanning electronmicroscope) evaluation confirmed the presence of the ZnO coating. The frictional forces were calculated between the wiresand brackets in four groups: group ZZ (coated wire and bracket), group OO (uncoated wire and bracket), group ZO (coatedwire and uncoated bracket) and group OZ (uncoated wire and coated bracket). Kolmogorov-Smirnov, Mann-Whitney andKruskal-Wallis tests were used for data analysis. Results. The frictional force in ZZ (3.07±0.4 N) was the highest (P <0.05), and OZ (2.18±0.5 N) had the lowest amount of friction (P <0.05) among the groups. There was no significant difference in frictional forces between the ZO and OO groups (2.65±0.2 and 2.70±0.2 N, respectively). Conclusion. Coating of porcelain bracket surfaces with ZnO nanoparticles can decrease friction in the sliding technique,and wire coating combined with bracket coating is not recommended due to its effect on friction. PMID:27429727

  12. Poisson brackets for densities of functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickey, Leonid A.

    In the theory of integrable systems and in other field theories one usually deals with Poisson brackets between functionals. The latter are integrals of densities. Densities are defined up to divergence (boundary) terms. A question arises, is it possible to define a reasonable Poisson bracket for densities themselves? A general theory was suggested by Barnich, Fulp, Lada, Markl and Stasheff which has led them to the notion of a strong homotopy Lie group, (sh Lie). We are giving a few concrete examples.

  13. Applicative Characteristics of a New Zirconia Bracket with Multiple Slots

    PubMed Central

    Maki, Koutaro; Futaki, Katsuyoshi; Tanabe, Satoru; Takahashi, Mariko; Ichikawa, Yuta; Yamaguchi, Tetsutaro

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a new orthodontic bracket with three slots with lubricative properties on the working surfaces and proposed a new orthodontic treatment system employing 0.012−0.014-inch Ni-Ti arch wires. We recruited 54 patients, of which 27 received treatment with the new zirconia bracket with multiple slots system (M group), and the others received treatment with standard edge-wise appliances (control group [C group]). We compared the (1) tooth movement rate at the early stage of leveling; (2) changes in the dental arch morphology before and after leveling; and (3) pain caused by orthodontic treatment. Student's t-test was used in all assessments. The tooth movement rate in the maxillomandibular dentition was higher in the M group. The basal arch width, anterior length, and the intercanine width in the maxillary dentition were not significantly different in the two groups; however, the intercanine width in the mandibular dentition was higher in the C group. In assessments of treatment-related pain, the visual analogue pain score was 56.0 mm and 22.6 mm in the C and M groups, respectively. A new zirconia bracket with multiple slots system provided better outcomes with respect to tooth movement rate, treatment period, and postoperative pain, thus indicating its effectiveness over conventional orthodontic systems. PMID:27212948

  14. Generalized nonholonomic mechanics, servomechanisms and related brackets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cendra, H.; Grillo, S.

    2006-02-01

    It is well known that nonholonomic systems obeying D'Alembert's principle are described on the Hamiltonian side, after using the Legendre transformation, by the so-called almost-Poisson brackets. In this paper we define the Lagrangian and Hamiltonian sides of a class of generalized nonholonomic systems (GNHS), obeying a generalized version of D'Alembert's principle, such as rubber wheels (like some simplified models of pneumatic tires) and certain servomechanisms (like the controlled inverted pendulum), and show that corresponding equations of motion can also be described in terms of a bracket. We present essentially all possible brackets in terms of which the mentioned equations can be written down, which include the brackets that appear in the literature, and point out those (if any) that are naturally related to each system. In particular, we show there always exists a Leibniz bracket related to a GNHS, and conversely, that every Leibniz system is a GNHS. The control of the inverted pendulum on a cart is studied as an illustrative example.

  15. Process qualification and testing of LENS deposited AY1E0125 D-bottle brackets.

    SciTech Connect

    Atwood, Clinton J.; Smugeresky, John E. (Sandia National Labs, Livermore,CA); Jew, Michael (Sandia National Labs, Livermore,CA); Gill, David Dennis; Scheffel, Simon

    2006-11-01

    The LENS Qualification team had the goal of performing a process qualification for the Laser Engineered Net Shaping{trademark}(LENS{reg_sign}) process. Process Qualification requires that a part be selected for process demonstration. The AY1E0125 D-Bottle Bracket from the W80-3 was selected for this work. The repeatability of the LENS process was baselined to determine process parameters. Six D-Bottle brackets were deposited using LENS, machined to final dimensions, and tested in comparison to conventionally processed brackets. The tests, taken from ES1E0003, included a mass analysis and structural dynamic testing including free-free and assembly-level modal tests, and Haversine shock tests. The LENS brackets performed with very similar characteristics to the conventionally processed brackets. Based on the results of the testing, it was concluded that the performance of the brackets made them eligible for parallel path testing in subsystem level tests. The testing results and process rigor qualified the LENS process as detailed in EER200638525A.

  16. Frictional Resistance of Three Types of Ceramic Brackets

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Claire L

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives To investigate the static frictional resistance at the bracket/archwire interface in two recently introduced bracket systems and compare them to conventional ceramic and conventional metal bracket systems. Three variables were considered including the bracket system, archwire type and archwire angulation. Material and Methods Four bracket systems were tested in vitro: Self ligating ceramic, ceramic with metal slot and module, conventional ceramic with module and conventional metal with module. A specially constructed jig and an Instron testing machine were used to measure the static frictional resistance for 0.014 inches round and 0.018 x 0.025 inches rectangular stainless steel wires at 0° and 7° angulations. Main outcome measures: static frictional force at the bracket/archwire interface; recorded and measured in units of force (Newtons). Results Self ligating ceramic and metal slot ceramic bracket systems generated significantly less static frictional resistance than conventional ceramic bracket systems with the wire at both angulations (P < 0.05). Changing the wire from 0.014 round to 0.018 x 0.025 rectangular wire significantly increased frictional forces for metal slot ceramic and conventional metal bracket systems (P < 0.01). Increasing wire angulation significantly increased frictional resistance at the bracket/archwire interface for all four types of bracket systems tested (P < 0.001). Conclusions Compared to conventional ceramic, self ligating ceramic and metal slot ceramic bracket systems should give improved clinical performance, matching that of conventional metal brackets. PMID:24478913

  17. Translucency and color match with a shade guide of esthetic brackets with the aid of a spectroradiometer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yong-Keun; Bin, Yu

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: Since the color of esthetic brackets should match that of teeth, the aims of this study were to determine the color and translucency of esthetic brackets by means of the clinically relevant use of a spectroradiometer, and to compare the color of brackets with that of a commercial shade guide. Methods: The color of central and tie-wing regions of four plastic and four ceramic brackets was measured according to the CIE L*a*b* color scale over white and black backgrounds. Brackets were classified into five groups based on their composition. The color of Vitapan Classical Shade Guide tabs was also measured. Translucency parameter (TP) and contrast ratio (CR) were calculated to determine translucency. Results: Color differences between brackets and the shade guide tabs were 10.4 - 34.5 ∆E*ab units. TP and CR values for the central region were 16.4 - 27.7 and 0.38 - 0.58, whereas for the tie-wings they were 24.0 - 39.9 and 0.25 - 0.45, respectively. The color coordinates, TP and CR values were significantly influenced by bracket composition and brand (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Esthetic brackets investigated herein showed unacceptable color differences (∆E*ab > 5.5) compared with the shade guide tabs. Differences in the translucency of brackets by brand were within the visually perceptible range (∆CR > 0.07). Therefore, brackets showing the best matching performance for each case should be selected considering esthetic and functional demands. PMID:27275619

  18. Retrieval analysis of different orthodontic brackets: the applicability of electron microprobe techniques for determining material heterogeneities and corrosive potential

    PubMed Central

    HOLST, Alexandra Ioana; HOLST, Stefan; HIRSCHFELDER, Ursula; von SECKENDORFF, Volker

    2012-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to investigate the applicability of micro-analytical methods with high spatial resolution to the characterization of the composition and corrosion behavior of two bracket systems. Material and methods The surfaces of six nickel-free brackets and six nickel-containing brackets were examined for signs of corrosion and qualitative surface analysis using an electron probe microanalyzer (EPMA), prior to bonding to patient's tooth surfaces and four months after clinical use. The surfaces were characterized qualitatively by secondary electron (SE) images and back scattered electron (BSE) images in both compositional and topographical mode. Qualitative and quantitative wavelength-dispersive analyses were performed for different elements, and by utilizing qualitative analysis the relative concentration of selected elements was mapped two-dimensionally. The absolute concentration of the elements was determined in specially prepared brackets by quantitative analysis using pure element standards for calibration and calculating correction-factors (ZAF). Results Clear differences were observed between the different bracket types. The nickel-containing stainless steel brackets consist of two separate pieces joined by a brazing alloy. Compositional analysis revealed two different alloy compositions, and reaction zones on both sides of the brazing alloy. The nickel-free bracket was a single piece with only slight variation in element concentration, but had a significantly rougher surface. After clinical use, no corrosive phenomena were detectable with the methods applied. Traces of intraoral wear at the contact areas between the bracket slot and the arch wire were verified. Conclusion Electron probe microanalysis is a valuable tool for the characterization of element distribution and quantitative analysis for corrosion studies. PMID:23032212

  19. Reduction in static friction by deposition of a homogeneous diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating on orthodontic brackets.

    PubMed

    Akaike, Shun; Hayakawa, Tohru; Kobayashi, Daishiro; Aono, Yuko; Hirata, Atsushi; Hiratsuka, Masanori; Nakamura, Yoshiki

    2015-01-01

    In orthodontics, a reduction in static friction between the brackets and wire is important to enable easy tooth movement. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of a homogeneous diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating on the whole surfaces of slots in stainless steel orthodontic brackets on reducing the static friction between the brackets and the wire. The DLC coating was characterized using Raman spectroscopy, surface roughness and contact angle measurements, and SEM observations. Rectangular stainless steel and titanium-molybdenum alloy wires with two different sizes were employed, and the static friction between the brackets and wire was measured under dry and wet conditions. The DLC coating had a thickness of approximately 1.0 μm and an amorphous structure was identified. The results indicated that the DLC coating always led to a reduction in static friction. PMID:26632239

  20. Influence of lingual bracket position on microbial and periodontal parameters in vivo

    PubMed Central

    SFONDRINI, Maria Francesca; DEBIAGGI, Maurizia; ZARA, Francesca; BRERRA, Roberto; COMELLI, Mario; BIANCHI, Marco; POLLONE, Sara Ramella; SCRIBANTE, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Objective Lingual orthodontics is becoming more popular in dental practice. The purpose of the present investigation was to compare plaque formation on teeth bonded with the same bracket onto buccal or lingual surface, with non-bonded control teeth, via an in vivo growth experiment over a 30-day period. Material and Methods A randomized controlled trial with split-mouth design was set up enrolling 20 dental students. Within each subject sites with buccal and lingual brackets and control sites were followed. Clinical periodontal parameters (periodontal pocket depth: PPD; bleeding on probing: BOP) were recorded at baseline and on days 1, 7 and 30. Microbiological samples were taken from the brackets and the teeth on days 1, 7 and 30 to detect colony-forming units (CFU). Total CFU, streptococci CFU and anaerobe CFU were measured. Results No significant differences (P>0.05) were found between buccal and lingual brackets in terms of clinical periodontal parameters and microbiological values. Conclusion Bracket position does not have significant impact on bacterial load and on periodontal parameters. PMID:22858704

  1. Report: Discussion on the development of nano Ag/TiO2 coating bracket and its antibacterial property and biocompatibility in orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ronghe; Zhang, Weiwei; Bai, Xueyan; Song, Xiaotong; Wang, Chunyan; Gao, Xinxin; Tian, Xubiao; Liu, Fengzhen

    2015-03-01

    This paper aims to explore the antibacterial property of nano Ag/TiO2 coating bracket for the common bacteria in oral cavity, and discuss its biocompatibility. Micro morphology in the surface of nano Ag/TiO2 coating bracket was detected by scanning electron microscope (SEM), and surface roughness of ordinary mental bracket, nano TiO2 coating bracket and nano Ag/TiO2 coating bracket were measured. First, antibacterial property of nano Ag/TiO2 coating bracket on the common bacteria in oral cavity was studied by sticking membrane method. Secondly, bonding strength of nano TiO2 coating and nano Ag/TiO2 coating bracket in groups were detected by scratching test. The result showed that, the synthetic nano Ag/TiO2 coating was nanogranular films with rigorous organizational structure, presenting as smooth and clean surface, and antibacterial rate of nano Ag/TiO2 coating for the common bacteria in oral cavity for 20 min was more than 79% in the dark. All the findings suggested that, nano Ag/TiO2 coating bracket not only has antibacterial effect but also has good biocompatibility, therefore, it can satisfy the clinical request of orthodontic treatment.

  2. Doubled Field Theory, T-Duality and Courant-Brackets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwiebach, Barton

    In these lecture notes we give a simple introduction into double field theory. We show that the presence of momentum and winding excitations in toroidal backgrounds of closed string theory makes it natural to consider double field theories. A tool-kit is developed based on the Courant-bracket and generalized Lie derivatives. We construct a background independent action which represents a T-duality covariantization of the Einstein-Hilbert action for gravity coupled to an antisymmetric tensor field and a dilaton.

  3. A stainless steel bracket for orthodontic application.

    PubMed

    Oh, Keun-Taek; Choo, Sung-Uk; Kim, Kwang-Mahn; Kim, Kyoung-Nam

    2005-06-01

    Aesthetics has become an essential element when choosing orthodontic fixed appliances. Most metallic brackets used in orthodontic therapy are made from stainless steel (SS) with the appropriate physical properties and good corrosion resistance, and are available as types 304, 316 and 17-4 PH SS. However, localized corrosion of these materials can frequently occur in the oral environment. This study was undertaken to evaluate the accuracy of sizing, microstructure, hardness, corrosion resistance, frictional resistance and cytotoxicity of commercially available Mini-diamond (S17400), Archist (S30403) and experimentally manufactured SR-50A (S32050) brackets. The size accuracy of Mini-diamond was the highest at all locations except for the external horizontal width of the tie wing (P < 0.05). Micrographs of the Mini-diamond and Archist showed precipitates in the grains and around their boundaries. SR-50A showed the only austenitic phase and the highest polarization resistance of the tested samples. SR-50A also had the highest corrosion resistance [SR-50A, Mini-diamond and Archist were 0.9 x 10(-3), 3.7 x 10(-3), and 7.4 x 10(-3) mm per year (mpy), respectively], in the artificial saliva. The frictional force of SR-50A decreased over time, but that of Mini-diamond and Archist increased. Therefore, SR-50A is believed to have better frictional properties to orthodontic wire than Mini-diamond and Archist. Cytotoxic results showed that the response index of SR-50A was 0/1 (mild), Mini-diamond 1/1 (mild+), and Archist 1/2 (mild+). SR-50A showed greater biocompatibility than either Mini-diamond or Archist. It is concluded that the SR-50A bracket has good frictional property, corrosion resistance and biocompatibility with a lower probability of allergic reaction, compared with conventionally used SS brackets. PMID:15947222

  4. A stainless steel bracket for orthodontic application.

    PubMed

    Oh, Keun-Taek; Choo, Sung-Uk; Kim, Kwang-Mahn; Kim, Kyoung-Nam

    2005-06-01

    Aesthetics has become an essential element when choosing orthodontic fixed appliances. Most metallic brackets used in orthodontic therapy are made from stainless steel (SS) with the appropriate physical properties and good corrosion resistance, and are available as types 304, 316 and 17-4 PH SS. However, localized corrosion of these materials can frequently occur in the oral environment. This study was undertaken to evaluate the accuracy of sizing, microstructure, hardness, corrosion resistance, frictional resistance and cytotoxicity of commercially available Mini-diamond (S17400), Archist (S30403) and experimentally manufactured SR-50A (S32050) brackets. The size accuracy of Mini-diamond was the highest at all locations except for the external horizontal width of the tie wing (P < 0.05). Micrographs of the Mini-diamond and Archist showed precipitates in the grains and around their boundaries. SR-50A showed the only austenitic phase and the highest polarization resistance of the tested samples. SR-50A also had the highest corrosion resistance [SR-50A, Mini-diamond and Archist were 0.9 x 10(-3), 3.7 x 10(-3), and 7.4 x 10(-3) mm per year (mpy), respectively], in the artificial saliva. The frictional force of SR-50A decreased over time, but that of Mini-diamond and Archist increased. Therefore, SR-50A is believed to have better frictional properties to orthodontic wire than Mini-diamond and Archist. Cytotoxic results showed that the response index of SR-50A was 0/1 (mild), Mini-diamond 1/1 (mild+), and Archist 1/2 (mild+). SR-50A showed greater biocompatibility than either Mini-diamond or Archist. It is concluded that the SR-50A bracket has good frictional property, corrosion resistance and biocompatibility with a lower probability of allergic reaction, compared with conventionally used SS brackets.

  5. Conceptual design for PSP mounting bracket

    SciTech Connect

    Ransom, G.; Stein, R.

    1991-12-31

    Protective structural packages (PSP`s or overpacks) used to ship 2 1/2-ton UF{sub 6} product cylinders are bolted to truck trailers. All bolts penetrate two longitudinal rows of wooden planks. Removal and replacement is required at various intervals for maintenance and routine testing. A conceptual design is presented for mounting brackets which would securely attach PSP`s to trailer frames, reduce removal and replacement time, and minimize risk of personnel injury.

  6. In vitro torque-deformation characteristics of orthodontic polycarbonate brackets.

    PubMed

    Feldner, J C; Sarkar, N K; Sheridan, J J; Lancaster, D M

    1994-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the torque-deformation characteristics of the following four types of polycarbonate brackets: (1) pure polycarbonate, PPC (anterior Miura, RMO, Denver, Colo.), (2) ceramic reinforced polycarbonate, CRPC (Silkon bracket, American, Sheboygan, Wis.), (3) metal slot reinforced polycarbonate, MRPC (Plastic bracket, Tella Tech, Miami, Fla.), and (4) metal slot and ceramic reinforced polycarbonate, MCRPC (Spirit, Ormco, Glendora, Calif.). A stainless steel bracket, (Mini Diamond, Ormco, Glendora, Calif.), was used as a control. Ten brackets of each type were tested. Each bracket was bonded to a porcelain tooth and engaged in a torquemeter. The tooth-bracket assembly was made stationary by embedding it in die stone. Torsion was applied to the bracket at 4 degrees per minute and the resultant torque (grams.centimeters) and deformation (degree) were measured. For optimum labiolingual tooth movement for a maxillary incisor at 175 grams . centimeters, the amount of angular deflection necessary for the different polycarbonate brackets was the following: (a) 15 degrees for MRPC, (b) 17 degrees for MRPC, (c) 24 degrees for CRPC, and (d) > 30 degrees for PPC. The amount of deformation at this deflection was the least for MRCP followed by MCRPC, CRCP, and PPC. When compared with the stainless steel bracket, all polycarbonate brackets showed significantly (p < 0.0001) higher deformation and lower torque. Within the polycarbonate group, there was a significant difference (p < 0.0001) between each bracket for both measurements. The MRPC produced the highest torque and lowest deformation values followed by the MCRPC, CRCP, and PPC. It appears that only the metal slot reinforced brackets are clinically capable of torquing teeth sufficiently. PMID:8074091

  7. Microbial profile on metallic and ceramic bracket materials.

    PubMed

    Anhoury, Patrick; Nathanson, Dan; Hughes, Christopher V; Socransky, Sigmund; Feres, Magda; Chou, Laisheng Lee

    2002-08-01

    The placement of orthodontic appliances creates a favorable environment for the accumulation of a microbiota and food residues, which, in time, may cause caries or exacerbate any pre-existing periodontal disease. The purpose of the present study was to compare the total bacterial counts present on metallic and ceramic orthodontic brackets in order to clarify which bracket type has a higher plaque retaining capacity and to determine the levels of Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus spp on both types of brackets. Thirty-two metallic brackets and 24 ceramic brackets were collected from orthodontic patients at the day of debonding. Two brackets were collected from each patient; one from a maxillary central incisor and another from a maxillary second premolar. Sixteen patients who used metallic brackets and 12 patients who used ceramic brackets were sampled. Bacterial populations were studied using "checkerboard" DNA-DNA hybridization, which uses DNA probes to identify species in complex microbial samples. The significance of differences between groups was determined using the Mann-Whitney U-test. Results showed no significant differences between metallic and ceramic brackets with respect to the caries-inducing S mutans and L acidophilus spp counts. Mean counts of 8 of 35 additional species differed significantly between metallic and ceramic brackets with no obvious pattern favoring one bracket type over the other. This study showed higher mean counts of Treponema denticola, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Fusobacterium nucleatum ss vincentii, Streptococcus anginosus, and Eubacterium nodatum on metallic brackets while higher counts of Eikenella corrodens, Campylobacter showae, and Selenomonas noxia were found on ceramic brackets.

  8. Influence of ceramic and stainless steel brackets on the notching of archwires during clinical treatment.

    PubMed

    Articolo, L C; Kusy, K; Saunders, C R; Kusy, R P

    2000-08-01

    The surface topography of 100 clinically used archwires of stainless steel, beta-, or nickel-titanium were investigated that had contacted either ceramic or stainless steel brackets. One group consisted of two sets: 60 wires with no treatment records accessed to bias analyses, and 40 wires for which extensive clinical records were available, half of which were used with ceramic or stainless steel brackets. A control group consisted of two sets: 30 unused wires comprised of five round and rectangular wires of each alloy, and four wires that were ligated and immediately removed from patients' mouths. After ultrasonic cleaning, each wire was inspected under an optical and/or a scanning electron microscope. Notches were categorized with regard to frequency, patterns, and severity, and mapped as a function of wire aspect (lingual, facial, and occlusal/gingival) and anatomical regions (molar, premolar, canine, and incisor). From these data the average severity of notch patterns and a notching index were derived. Although no recognizable defect patterns were observed in the control group, seven basic patterns were recognized for each wire cross-sectional shape in the clinically used wires. These wires appeared most damaged on their lingual aspect and least damaged on their facial aspect. With regard to anatomical regions, notching was prevalent in the anterior regions and sparse in the molar regions. The notch activity and the severity were nearly three times greater from ceramic brackets than from stainless steel brackets. Over one-third of all notches documented in ceramic bracket cases had severity numbers of 3 and penetrated at least one-quarter of each wire's dimension, However, over two-thirds of all notches documented in stainless steel bracket cases had severity numbers of 1. From these tabulations a theory of notch formation was proposed in which vertical movement from tooth or wire during mastication caused fretting wear, and horizontal movement during

  9. Five-body Moshinsky brackets

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Shuyuan; Mu, Xueli; Deng, Zhixuan; Chen, Hong

    2015-04-15

    In variational calculations with harmonic oscillator wavefunctions as trial bases, the transformation coefficients that relate harmonic oscillator wavefunctions in two different sets of internal coordinates are convenient to the evaluation of some matrix elements. Here, we present the explicit expression of these transformation coefficients for five-body systems. These transformation coefficients can be collected in a matrix according to the quantum number N of harmonic oscillator shell and can be programmed for arbitrary N. .

  10. Comparison of frictional resistance between self-ligating and conventional brackets tied with elastomeric and metal ligature in orthodontic archwires

    PubMed Central

    Leite, Vanessa Vieira; Lopes, Murilo Baena; Gonini Júnior, Alcides; de Almeida, Marcio Rodrigues; Moura, Sandra Kiss; de Almeida, Renato Rodrigues

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the frictional resistance between self-ligating and conventional brackets tied to different types of wire. Material and Methods Abzil Kirium Capelozza (Pattern I) and Easy Clip (Roth prescription) incisor brackets were used. An elastomeric ligature or a ligating wire 0.10-in was used to ligate the wire to the Abzil bracket. Three types of orthodontic archwire alloys were assessed: 0.016-in NiTi wire, 0.016 x 0.021-in NiTi wire and 0.019 x 0.025-in steel wire. Ten observations were carried out for each bracket-archwire angulation combination. Brackets were mounted in a special appliance, positioned at 90 degrees in relation to the wire and tested in two angulations. Frictional test was performed in a Universal Testing Machine at 5 mm/min and 10 mm of displacement. The means (MPa) were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey's test set at 5% of significance. The surfaces of wires and brackets were observed at SEM. Results Steel-tied brackets (16.48 ± 8.31) showed higher means of frictional resistance than elastomeric-tied brackets (4.29 ± 2.16 ) and self-ligating brackets (1.66 ± 1.57) (P < 0.05), which also differed from each other (P < 0.05). As for the type of wire, 0.019 x 0.025-in steel wire (5.67 ± 3.97) showed lower means (P < 0.05) than 0.16-in NiTi wire (8.26 ± 10.92) and 0.016 x 0.021-in NiTi wire (8.51 ± 7.95), which did not differ from each other (P > 0.05). No statistical differences (P > 0.05) were found between zero (7.76 ± 8.46) and five-degree (7.19 ± 7.93) angulations. Conclusions Friction was influenced not only by the type of bracket, but also by the ligating systems. Different morphological aspects were observed for the brackets and wires studied PMID:25162575

  11. A quantum-classical bracket that satisfies the Jacobi identity

    SciTech Connect

    Prezhdo, Oleg V.

    2006-05-28

    A quantum-classical bracket is proposed and is shown to satisfy the Jacobi identity, in contrast to previous definitions that obey this property only up to higher order terms in the Planck constant ({Dirac_h}/2{pi}). The Jacobi identity is required of a true Lie bracket and ensures that the Lie bracket of constants of motion is also a constant of motion. An explicit calculation of the Jacobi identity highlights the difference between the proposed and traditional definitions. A further example illustrates that the proposed bracket generates a more consistent quantum-classical dynamics than the traditional bracket. The traditional quantum-classical dynamics in the Henon-Heiles system diverges due to higher order ({Dirac_h}/2{pi}) terms. The divergence is eliminated with the proposed bracket.

  12. In Vitro Evaluation of Microleakage Around Orthodontic Brackets Using Laser Etching and Acid Etching Methods

    PubMed Central

    Toodehzaeim, Mohammad Hossein; Yassaei, Sogra; Karandish, Maryam; Farzaneh, Sedigeh

    2014-01-01

    Objective: path of microleakage between the enamel and adhesive potentially allows microbial ingress that may consequently cause enamel decalcification. The aim of this study was to compare microleakage of brackets bonded either by laser or acid etching techniques. Materials and Method: The specimens were 33 extracted premolars that were divided into three groups as the acid etching group (group 1), laser etching with Er:YAG at 100 mJ and 15 Hz for 15s (group 2), and laser etching with Er:YAG at 140 mJ and 15 Hz for 15s (group 3). After photo polymerization, the teeth were subjected to 500 thermal cycles. Then the specimens were sealed with nail varnish, stained with 2% methylen blue for 24hs, sectioned, and examined under a stereomicroscope. They were scored for marginal microleakage that occurred between the adhesive-enamel and bracket-adhesive interfaces from the occlusal and gingival margins. Data were analyzed with the Kruskal- Wallis test. Results: For the adhesive-enamel and bracket-adhesive surfaces, significant differences were not observed between the three groups. Conclusion: According to this study, the Er:YAG laser with 1.5 and 2.1 watt settings may be used as an adjunctive for preparing the surface for orthodontic bracket bonding. PMID:25628661

  13. Effect of fluoride solutions on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets.

    PubMed

    Leódido, Gabriela da Rocha; Fernandes, Hianna Oliveira; Tonetto, Mateus Rodrigues; Presoto, Cristina Dupim; Bandéca, Matheus Coêlho; Firoozmand, Leily Macedo

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of brackets after pre-treatment with different fluoride solutions. This study used 48 freshly extracted sound bovine incisors that were randomly assigned to 4 experimental groups (n=12). CG: (control) without treatment; NF: 4 min application of neutral fluoride; APF: application of 1.23% acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) for 4 min; and SFV: application of 5% sodium fluoride varnish for 6 h. For each group, after surface treatment, prophylaxis of enamel and bracket bonding with Transbond XT composite resin (3M) were performed following the manufacturer's specifications. The shear bond strength was performed with a universal testing machine 24 h after fixing the brackets. The tooth surfaces were analyzed to verify the adhesive remnant index (ARI). Data were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). There was statistically significant difference among the groups (p<0.0001). CG and NF groups presented significantly higher bond strength than APF and SFV. There was no significant difference between CG and NF or between APF and SFV (p>0.05). The analysis of ARI scores revealed that most failures occurred at the enamel-resin interface. It may be concluded that the pre-treatment of enamel with 1.23% APF and 5% SFV prior to fixing orthodontic brackets reduces shear bond strength values.

  14. Orthodontic bracket designs and their impact on microbial profile and periodontal disease: A clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Moolya, Nikesh N; Shetty, Arvind; Gupta, Neha; Gupta, Anvesha; Jalan, Vivek; Sharma, Rashmi

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the present study was to compare the undisturbed plaque formation on teeth bonded with Preadjusted (Captain Ortho, Libral Traders, Mumbai, India) and Begg Brackets (Captain Ortho, Libral Traders, Mumbai, India) with nonbonded control sites via a de novo plaque growth over a period of 7 days. Materials and Methods: A clinical trial with the split-mouth design was set up enrolling 10 dental students. Within each subject sites with (Preadjusted) (P-site), Begg brackets (B-site) and control sites were followed. Plaque index and gingival index were recorded on days 3 and 7. Supra-gingival and sub-gingival plaque samples were taken from the brackets and the teeth on days 3 and 7, and were sent for aerobic and anaerobic culturing. The total number of bacterial colony forming units (CFU) was assessed for each sample using a colony counter. Tukeys and Dunnett test then statistically analyzed data. Results: The mean plaque index and gingival index increased on P-site and B-site on the third and 7th day. The shift from aerobic to anaerobic species was observed earlier in P-sites than in B-sites. The CFU were significantly higher for all sites on day 7 when compared with day 3. The aerobe/anaerobe CFU ratio was significantly lower in P-sites than in B-sites and then control showing an increase in the number of anaerobic species on the 3rd and 7th day (P < 0.05). Based on observed means, the mean difference was significant (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The present data suggest that Preadjusted brackets accumulated more plaque than Begg brackets. Bracket design can have a significant impact on bacterial load and on periodontal parameters. PMID:25426456

  15. Ceramic bracket debonding with ytterbium fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Sarp, Ayşe Sena Kabaş; Gülsoy, Murat

    2011-09-01

    Since the early 1990 s, lasers have been used experimentally for debonding ceramic brackets. Lasers reduce the required debonding force and risk of enamel damage. However, the thermal effect during the laser radiation on dental tissues can cause undesirable results. The aim of this study is to develop a laser debonding technique for ceramic brackets that is better than mechanical debonding and also to minimize the side-effects of laser applications. A new fiber laser (1,070-nm ytterbium fiber laser) was tested, debonding procedure was quantified with a universal testing machine, and intrapulpal temperature was monitored for limiting the injury or pain. Experiments were performed in two sections according to the type of lasing mode: continuous wave (CW) and modulated mode. In continuous wave (CW) mode, a laser was applied on samples with different constant power levels continuously. In the second set of experiments, brackets were irradiated in modulated mode, in which the laser energy was delivered with on-and-off cycles. Laser power and duty cycles were adjusted by controlling the current, which was set to 4.99 A of current for 18 W of emission. Debonding force, debonding time, and work done by a universal testing machine were all significantly decreased for both modalities of laser irradiation compared to the control group. When laser parameters were set to proper doses, a 50% of reduction in required load for debonding and a three-fold decrease in debonding time were observed. Intrapulpal temperature changes were below the accepted threshold value (5.5°C) until the level of 3.5 W of laser power in continuous wave mode. During debonding, the work done by the universal testing machine is decreased up to five times by irradiation. Parameters were compared for both modes of operations and it was concluded that modulated mode laser application (Group 300/900) provided faster and easier debonding with less temperature change.

  16. Comparative evaluation of efficacy of self-ligating interactive bracket with conventional preadjusted bracket: A clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Jayachandran, Balajee; Padmanabhan, Ratna; Vijayalakshmi, Devaki; Padmanabhan, Janardhanam

    2016-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: This clinical study was conducted to compare the interactive self-ligating twin brackets and the standard double width brackets for their efficiency in Rate of Retraction. Materials and Methods: A total of 20 patients with Angle's class I or class II or class III dento-alveolar malocclusions between the age group of 18-25 years were selected. 10 patients in each group both males and females were randomly selected for the study. Ten patients were bonded using conventional brackets (Group I) the other ten patients were bonded using Interactive self-ligating brackets (Group II). The Rate of retraction was quantified using the scanned models. Pretreatment and post treatment models were taken and scanned to measure the amount of Incisor movement and Anchor loss. Results: (1) Interactive Self-ligating brackets showed significant Rate of retraction when compared with conventional brackets on right and left quadrant. (Group I 0.545 ± .205: Group II 0.827 ± .208 P = .013*) (Group I 0.598 ± .160: Group II 0.804 ± .268 P = .071) (2) Interactive self-ligating brackets when compared with conventional brackets had significant amount of incisor movement on right and left quadrant. (Group I 3.51 ± .548: Group II 4.38 ± .1.06 P = .047*) and (Group I 3.66 ± .899: Group II 4.67 ± 1.02 P = .047*) (3) Conventional brackets showed significant Amount of Anchor loss when compared with that of Interactive self-ligating brackets on right and left quadrant. (Group I .948 ± .392: Group II 0.501 ± .229 P = .013*). In the left side (Group I 0.861 ± .464: Group II 0.498 ± .227 P = .060). Conclusion: The interactive self-ligating brackets show more efficiency in Rate of Retraction, Amount of Incisor movement and Amount of Anchor loss when compared with the conventional brackets. PMID:27307660

  17. Dentoalveolar mandibular changes with self-ligating versus conventional bracket systems: A CBCT and dental cast study

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Marcio Rodrigues; Futagami, Cristina; Conti, Ana Cláudia de Castro Ferreira; Oltramari-Navarro, Paula Vanessa Pedron; Navarro, Ricardo de Lima

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to compare dentoalveolar changes in mandibular arch, regarding transversal measures and buccal bone thickness, in patients undergoing the initial phase of orthodontic treatment with self-ligating or conventional bracket systems. METHODS: A sample of 25 patients requiring orthodontic treatment was assessed based on the bracket type. Group 1 comprised 13 patients bonded with 0.022-in self-ligating brackets (SLB). Group 2 included 12 patients bonded with 0.022-in conventional brackets (CLB). Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans and a 3D program (Dolphin) assessed changes in transversal width of buccal bone (TWBB) and buccal bone thickness (BBT) before (T1) and 7 months after treatment onset (T2). Measurements on dental casts were performed using a digital caliper. Differences between and within groups were analyzed by Student's t-test; Pearson correlation coefficient was also calculated. RESULTS: Significant mandibular expansion was observed for both groups; however, no significant differences were found between groups. There was significant decrease in mandibular buccal bone thickness and transversal width of buccal bone in both groups. There was no significant correlation between buccal bone thickness and dental arch expansion. CONCLUSIONS: There were no significant differences between self-ligating brackets and conventional brackets systems regarding mandibular arch expansion and changes in buccal bone thickness or transversal width of buccal bone. PMID:26154456

  18. Causal Poisson bracket via deformation quantization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berra-Montiel, Jasel; Molgado, Alberto; Palacios-García, César D.

    2016-06-01

    Starting with the well-defined product of quantum fields at two spacetime points, we explore an associated Poisson structure for classical field theories within the deformation quantization formalism. We realize that the induced star-product is naturally related to the standard Moyal product through an appropriate causal Green’s functions connecting points in the space of classical solutions to the equations of motion. Our results resemble the Peierls-DeWitt bracket that has been analyzed in the multisymplectic context. Once our star-product is defined, we are able to apply the Wigner-Weyl map in order to introduce a generalized version of Wick’s theorem. Finally, we include some examples to explicitly test our method: the real scalar field, the bosonic string and a physically motivated nonlinear particle model. For the field theoretic models, we have encountered causal generalizations of the creation/annihilation relations, and also a causal generalization of the Virasoro algebra for the bosonic string. For the nonlinear particle case, we use the approximate solution in terms of the Green’s function, in order to construct a well-behaved causal bracket.

  19. RSRM nozzle actuator bracket/lug fracture mechanics qualification test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, Peggy

    1993-01-01

    This is the final report for the actuator bracket/lug fracture mechanics qualification test. The test plan (CTP-0071) outlined a two-phase test program designed to answer questions about the fracture criticality of the redesigned solid rocket motor (RSRM) nozzle actuator bracket. An analysis conducted using the NASA/FLAGRO fracture mechanics computer program indicated that the actuator bracket might be a fracture critical component. In the NASA/FLAGRO analysis, a simple lug model was used to represent the actuator bracket. It was calculated that the bracket would fracture if subjected to an actuator stall load in the presence of a 0.10 in. corner crack at the actuator attachment hole. The 0.10 in. crack size corresponds to the nondestructive inspection detectability limit for the actuator bracket. The inspection method used is the dye penetrant method. The actuator stall load (103,424 lb) is the maximum load which the actuator bracket is required to withstand during motor operation. This testing was designed to establish the accuracy of the analytical model and to directly determine whether the actuator bracket is capable of meeting fracture mechanics safe-life requirements.

  20. Transparent magnesium aluminate spinel: a prospective biomaterial for esthetic orthodontic brackets.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Manu; Tiwari, Brijesh; Seema, Saraswathy; Kalra, Namitha; Biswas, Papiya; Rajeswari, Kotikalapudi; Suresh, Madireddy Buchi; Johnson, Roy; Gokhale, Nitin M; Iyer, Satish R; Londhe, Sanjay; Arora, Vimal; Tripathi, Rajendra P

    2014-11-01

    Adult orthodontics is recently gaining popularity due to its importance in esthetics, oral and general health. However, none of the currently available alumina or zirconia based ceramic orthodontic brackets meet the esthetic demands of adult patients. Inherent hexagonal lattice structure and associated birefringence limits the visible light transmission in polycrystalline alumina and make them appear white and non transparent. Hence focus of the present study was to assess the feasibility of using magnesium aluminate (MgAl2O4) spinel; a member of the transparent ceramic family for esthetic orthodontic brackets. Transparent spinel specimens were developed from commercially available white spinel powder through colloidal shaping followed by pressureless sintering and hot isostatic pressing at optimum conditions of temperature and pressure. Samples were characterized for chemical composition, phases, density, hardness, flexural strength, fracture toughness and optical transmission. Biocompatibility was evaluated with in-vitro cell line experiments for cytotoxicity, apoptosis and genotoxicity. Results showed that transparent spinel samples had requisite physico-chemical, mechanical, optical and excellent biocompatibility for fabricating orthodontic brackets. Transparent spinel developed through this method demonstrated its possibility as a prospective biomaterial for developing esthetic orthodontic brackets.

  1. Comparative Evaluation of Friction Resistance of Titanium, Stainless Steel, Ceramic and Ceramic with Metal Insert Brackets with Varying Dimensions of Stainless Steel Wire: An In vitro Multi-center Study

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, B Sunil; Miryala, Suresh; Kumar, K Kiran; Shameem, K; Regalla, Ravindra Reddy

    2014-01-01

    Background: The orthodontist seeks an archwire–bracket combination that has both good biocompatibility and low friction. Hence, the aim of this multicenter in vitro study was to evaluate and compare the frictional resistance generated between titanium (Ti), stainless steel (SS), ceramic and ceramic with metal insert (CMI) brackets with SS wires of varying dimensions in a specially designed apparatus. Materials and Methods: The material used in this study were Ti, SS, Ceramic and CMI with 0.018″ slot manufactured with zero degree tip and −7° torque premolar brackets (3M, Unitek) and SS wires of varying dimensions (0.016″ round, 0.016 × 0.016″ square, 0.016 × 0.022″ rectangular and 0.017 × 0.025″ rectangular) used. The frictional resistance was measured using Instron Universal testing machine (Model no. 4301). The specimen population in each center composed each of 160 brackets and wires. Differences among the all bracket/wire combinations were tested using (one-way) ANOVA, followed by the student Newman Keuls multiple comparisons of means ranking (at P < 0.05) for the determination of differences among the groups. Results: Ti bracket in combination with 0.017 × 0.025″ SS rectangular wire produced significant force levels for an optimum orthodontic movement with least frictional resistance. Conclusion: Ti brackets have least resistance and rectangular wires produced significant force. These can be used to avoid hazards of Nickel. SS brackets revealed higher static frictional force values as the wire dimension increased and showed lower static friction than Ti brackets for all wires except the thicker wire. Our study recommends the preclusion of brackets with rough surface texture (Ti brackets) with SS ligature wire for ligating bracket and archwire are better to reduce friction. PMID:25395796

  2. Ultrashort pulsed laser conditioning of human enamel: in vitro study of the influence of geometrical processing parameters on shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, M C; Portillo, M; Moreno, P; Montero, J; García, A; Santos-del Riego, S E; Albaladejo, A

    2015-02-01

    The surfaces of 63 extracted premolar teeth were processed with intense ultrashort laser pulses (λ = 795 nm; pulse duration, 120 fs; repetition rate, 1 kHz) to produce cross patterns with different pitches (s) in the micrometer range in order to evaluate the influence of such microstructures on the shear bond strengths of orthodontic brackets to enamel. The samples were classified in nine groups corresponding to the control group (raw samples) and eight different laser-processed groups (cross patterns with s increasing from 15 to 180 μm). Brackets were luted with Transbond(TM) XT adhesive resin to all the samples; after 72 h, they all were submitted to strength test in a universal testing machine. Additionally, a third of the samples underwent morphological analysis of the debonded surface by means of scanning electron microscope microscopy and an analysis of the failure mode based on the adhesive remnant index. The results showed that enamel microstructuring with ultrashort laser pulses remarkably increase the bond strength of brackets. Dense cross patterns (s < 90 μm) produce the highest increase of bond strengths as compared to control group whereas light ones (s > 90 μm) give rise to smaller improvements of the bond strength. A strong correlation of this behavior with the predominant failure mode in both scenarios was found. So far, the best compromise between suitable adhesive efficiency, processing time minimization, and enamel surface preservation suggests the performance of cross patterns with pitches in the order of 90 μm.

  3. Color stability of ceramic brackets immersed in potentially staining solutions

    PubMed Central

    Guignone, Bruna Coser; Silva, Ludimila Karsbergen; Soares, Rodrigo Villamarim; Akaki, Emilio; Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; Pithon, Matheus Melo; Oliveira, Dauro Douglas

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the color stability of five types of ceramic brackets after immersion in potentially staining solutions. METHODS: Ninety brackets were divided into 5 groups (n = 18) according to brackets commercial brands and the solutions in which they were immersed (coffee, red wine, coke and artificial saliva). The brackets assessed were Transcend (3M/Unitek, Monrovia, CA, USA), Radiance (American Orthodontics, Sheboygan, WI, USA), Mystique (GAC International Inc., Bohemia, NY, USA) and Luxi II (Rocky Mountain Orthodontics, Denver, CO, USA). Chromatic changes were analyzed with the aid of a reflectance spectrophotometer and by visual inspection at five specific time intervals. Assessment periods were as received from the manufacturer (T0), 24 hours (T1), 72 hours (T2), as well as 7 days (T3) and 14 days (T4) of immersion in the aforementioned solutions. Results were submitted to statistical analysis with ANOVA and Bonferroni correction, as well as to a multivariate profile analysis for independent and paired samples with significance level set at 5%. RESULTS: The duration of the immersion period influenced color alteration of all tested brackets, even though these changes could not always be visually observed. Different behaviors were observed for each immersion solution; however, brackets immersed in one solution progressed similarly despite minor variations. CONCLUSIONS: Staining became more intense over time and all brackets underwent color alterations when immersed in the aforementioned solutions. PMID:26352842

  4. Preparation and antimicrobial assay of ceramic brackets coated with TiO2 thin films

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Shuai; Wang, Ye; Cao, Lin; Wang, Yu; Lin, Bingpeng; Lan, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Objective Different methods have been utilized to prevent enamel demineralization and other complications during orthodontic treatment. However, none of these methods can offer long-lasting and effective prevention of orthodontic complications or interventions after complications occur. Considering the photocatalytic effect of TiO2 on organic compounds, we hoped to synthesize a novel bracket with a TiO2 thin film to develop a photocatalytic antimicrobial effect. Methods The sol-gel dip coating method was used to prepare TiO2 thin films on ceramic bracket surfaces. Twenty groups of samples were composed according to the experimental parameters. Crystalline structure and surface morphology were characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, respectively; film thickness was examined with a surface ellipsometer. The photocatalytic properties under ultraviolet (UV) light irradiation were analyzed by evaluating the degradation ratio of methylene blue (MB) at a certain time. Antibacterial activities of selected thin films were also tested against Lactobacillus acidophilus and Candida albicans. Results Films with 5 coating layers annealed at 700℃ showed the greatest photocatalytic activity in terms of MB decomposition under UV light irradiation. TiO2 thin films with 5 coating layers annealed at 700℃ exhibited the greatest antimicrobial activity under UV-A light irradiation. Conclusions These results provide promising guidance in prevention of demineralization by increasing antimicrobial activities of film coated brackets. PMID:27226960

  5. CO2 laser debonding of a ceramic bracket bonded with orthodontic adhesive containing thermal expansion microcapsules.

    PubMed

    Saito, Ayano; Namura, Yasuhiro; Isokawa, Keitaro; Shimizu, Noriyoshi

    2015-02-01

    We have been studying an easy bracket debonding method using heating of an orthodontic adhesive containing thermal expansion microcapsules. However, heating with a high-temperature heater brings obvious risks of burns around the oral cavity. Thus, we examined safer and more effective bracket debonding methods. The purpose of this in vitro study was to examine the reduction in debonding strength and the time taken using a bracket bonded with an orthodontic adhesive containing thermal expansion microcapsules and a CO2 laser as the heating method while maintaining safety. Ceramic brackets were bonded to bovine permanent mandibular incisors using bonding materials containing various microcapsule contents (0, 30, and 40 wt%), and the bond strengths were measured after laser irradiation for 4, 5, and 6 s and compared with nonlaser-treated groups. Subsequently, the temperature in the pulp chamber during laser irradiation was measured. After laser irradiation for 5 or 6 s, the bond strengths of the adhesive containing 40 wt% microcapsules were significantly decreased to ∼0.40 - 0.48-fold (4.6-5.5 MPa) compared with the nonlaser groups. The mean temperature rise of the pulp chamber was 4.3 °C with laser irradiation for 6 s, which was less than that required to induce pulp damage. Based on these results, we conclude that the combined use of a CO2 laser and an orthodontic adhesive containing thermal expansion microcapsules can be effective and safe for debonding ceramic brackets with less enamel damage or tooth pain. PMID:24220847

  6. Effect of bracket bonding with Er: YAG laser on nanomechanical properties of enamel

    PubMed Central

    Alavi, Shiva; Birang, Reza; Hajizadeh, Fatemeh; Banimostafaee, Hamed

    2014-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to compare the effects of conventional acid etching and laser etching on the nano-mechanical properties of the dental enamel using nano-indentation test. Materials and Methods: In this experimental in vitro study, buccal surfaces of 10 premolars were divided into three regions. One of the regions was etched with 37% phosphoric acid and another etched with Er:YAG laser, the third region was not etched. The brackets were bonded to both of etched regions. After thermocycling for 500 cycles, the brackets were removed and the teeth were decoronated from the bracket bonding area. Seven nano-indentations were applied at 1-31 μm depth from the enamel surface in each region. Mean values of the hardness and elastic modulus were analyzed with repeated measures analysis of variance and Tukey HSD tests, using the SPSS software (SPSS Inc., version16.0, Chicago, Il, USA). P < 0.05 was considered as significant. Results: The hardness up to 21 μm in depth and elastic modulus up to 6 μm in depth from the enamel surface for laser-etched enamel had significantly higher values than control enamel and the hardness up to 11 μm in depth and elastic modulus up to 6 μm in depth for acid-etched enamel had significantly lower values than the control enamel. Conclusion: The mechanical properties of the enamel were decreased after bracket bonding with conventional acid etching and increased after bonding with Er:YAG laser. PMID:24688560

  7. Effect of silica coating on bond strength between a gold alloy and metal bracket bonded with chemically cured resin

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Min-Ju; Lim, Sung-Hoon

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of three different surface conditioning methods on the shear bond strength (SBS) of metal brackets bonded directly to gold alloy with chemically cured resin. Methods Two hundred ten type III gold alloy specimens were randomly divided into six groups according to the combination of three different surface conditioning methods (aluminum oxide sandblasting only, application of a metal primer after aluminum oxide sandblasting, silica coating and silanation) and thermocycling (with thermocycling, without thermocycling). After performing surface conditioning of specimens in accordance with each experimental condition, metal brackets were bonded to all specimens using a chemically cured resin. The SBS was measured at the moment of bracket debonding, and the resin remnants on the specimen surface were evaluated using the adhesive remnant index. Results Application of metal primer after aluminum oxide sandblasting yielded a higher bond strength than that with aluminum oxide sandblasting alone (p < 0.001), and silica coating and silanation yielded a higher bond strength than that with metal primer after aluminum oxide sandblasting (p < 0.001). There was no significant change in SBS after thermocycling in all groups. Conclusions With silica coating and silanation, clinically satisfactory bond strength can be attained when metal brackets are directly bonded to gold alloys using a chemically cured resin. PMID:24892023

  8. Altered Passive Eruption Complicating Optimal Orthodontic Bracket Placement: A Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Chitra, Prasad

    2015-01-01

    An unusual case of altered passive eruption with gingival hyperpigmentation and a Class I malocclusion in a 12-year-old girl having no previous history of medication is presented. The patient reported with spacing in the upper arch, moderate crowding in the lower arch, anterior crossbite and excessive gingival tissue on the labial surfaces of teeth in both the arches. The inadequate crown lengths made placement of the orthodontic brackets difficult. Preadjusted orthodontic brackets have a very precise placement protocol which can affect tooth movement in all 3 planes of space if violated. The periodontal condition was diagnosed as altered passive eruption Type IA. Interdisciplinary treatment protocols including periodontal surgical and orthodontic procedures were used. The periodontal surgical procedures were carried out prior to orthodontic therapy and the results obtained were satisfactory. It is suggested that orthodontists should be aware of conditions like altered passive eruption and modalities of management. In most instances, orthodontic therapy is not hindered. PMID:26672498

  9. Altered Passive Eruption Complicating Optimal Orthodontic Bracket Placement: A Case Report and Review of Literature.

    PubMed

    Pulgaonkar, Rohan; Chitra, Prasad

    2015-11-01

    An unusual case of altered passive eruption with gingival hyperpigmentation and a Class I malocclusion in a 12-year-old girl having no previous history of medication is presented. The patient reported with spacing in the upper arch, moderate crowding in the lower arch, anterior crossbite and excessive gingival tissue on the labial surfaces of teeth in both the arches. The inadequate crown lengths made placement of the orthodontic brackets difficult. Preadjusted orthodontic brackets have a very precise placement protocol which can affect tooth movement in all 3 planes of space if violated. The periodontal condition was diagnosed as altered passive eruption Type IA. Interdisciplinary treatment protocols including periodontal surgical and orthodontic procedures were used. The periodontal surgical procedures were carried out prior to orthodontic therapy and the results obtained were satisfactory. It is suggested that orthodontists should be aware of conditions like altered passive eruption and modalities of management. In most instances, orthodontic therapy is not hindered. PMID:26672498

  10. Enamel resistance to demineralization following Er:YAG laser etching for bonding orthodontic brackets

    PubMed Central

    Ahrari, Farzaneh; Poosti, Maryam; Motahari, Pourya

    2012-01-01

    Background: Several studies have shown that laser-etching of enamel for bonding orthodontic brackets could be an appropriate alternative for acid conditioning, since a potential advantage of laser could or might be caries prevention. This study compared enamel resistance to demineralization following etching with acid phosphoric or Er:YAG laser for bonding orthodontic brackets. Materials and Methods: Fifty sound human premolars were divided into two equal groups. In the first group, enamel was etched with 37% phosphoric acid for 15 seconds. In the second group, Er:YAG laser (wavelength, 2 940 nm; 300 mJ/pulse, 10 pulses per second, 10 seconds) was used for tooth conditioning. The teeth were subjected to 4-day PH-cycling process to induce caries-like lesions. The teeth were then sectioned and the surface area of the lesion was calculated in each microphotographs and expressed in pixel. The total surface of each specimen was 196 608 pixels. Results: Mean lesion areas were 7 171 and 7532 pixels for Laser-etched and Acid-etched groups, respectively. The two sample t-test showed that there was no significant difference in lesion area between the two groups (P = 0.914). Conclusion: Although Er:YAG laser seems promising for etching enamel before bonding orthodontic brackets, it does not reduce enamel demineralization when exposed to acid challenge. PMID:23162591

  11. Bonding brackets on white spot lesions pretreated by means of two methods

    PubMed Central

    Vianna, Julia Sotero; Marquezan, Mariana; Lau, Thiago Chon Leon; Sant'Anna, Eduardo Franzotti

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength (SBS) of brackets bonded to demineralized enamel pretreated with low viscosity Icon Infiltrant resin (DMG) and glass ionomer cement (Clinpro XT Varnish, 3M Unitek) with and without aging. Methods: A total of 75 bovine enamel specimens were allocated into five groups (n = 15). Group 1 was the control group in which the enamel surface was not demineralized. In the other four groups, the surfaces were submitted to cariogenic challenge and white spot lesions were treated. Groups 2 and 3 were treated with Icon Infiltrant resin; Groups 4 and 5, with Clinpro XT Varnish. After treatment, Groups 3 and 5 were artificially aged. Brackets were bonded with Transbond XT adhesive system and SBS was evaluated by means of a universal testing machine. Statistical analysis was performed by one-way analysis of variance followed by Tukey post-hoc test. Results: All groups tested presented shear bond strengths similar to or higher than the control group. Specimens of Group 4 had significantly higher shear bond strength values (p < 0.05) than the others. Conclusion: Pretreatment of white spot lesions, with or without aging, did not decrease the SBS of brackets. PMID:27275613

  12. Ligand "Brackets" for Ga-Ga Bond.

    PubMed

    Fedushkin, Igor L; Skatova, Alexandra A; Dodonov, Vladimir A; Yang, Xiao-Juan; Chudakova, Valentina A; Piskunov, Alexander V; Demeshko, Serhiy; Baranov, Evgeny V

    2016-09-01

    The reactivity of digallane (dpp-Bian)Ga-Ga(dpp-Bian) (1) (dpp-Bian = 1,2-bis[(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)imino]acenaphthene) toward acenaphthenequinone (AcQ), sulfur dioxide, and azobenzene was investigated. The reaction of 1 with AcQ in 1:1 molar ratio proceeds via two-electron reduction of AcQ to give (dpp-Bian)Ga(μ2-AcQ)Ga(dpp-Bian) (2), in which diolate [AcQ](2-) acts as "bracket" for the Ga-Ga bond. The interaction of 1 with AcQ in 1:2 molar ratio proceeds with an oxidation of the both dpp-Bian ligands as well as of the Ga-Ga bond to give (dpp-Bian)Ga(μ2-AcQ)2Ga(dpp-Bian) (3). At 330 K in toluene complex 2 decomposes to give compounds 3 and 1. The reaction of complex 2 with atmospheric oxygen results in oxidation of a Ga-Ga bond and affords (dpp-Bian)Ga(μ2-AcQ)(μ2-O)Ga(dpp-Bian) (4). The reaction of digallane 1 with SO2 produces, depending on the ratio (1:2 or 1:4), dithionites (dpp-Bian)Ga(μ2-O2S-SO2)Ga(dpp-Bian) (5) and (dpp-Bian)Ga(μ2-O2S-SO2)2Ga(dpp-Bian) (6). In compound 5 the Ga-Ga bond is preserved and supported by dithionite dianionic bracket. In compound 6 the gallium centers are bridged by two dithionite ligands. Both 5 and 6 consist of dpp-Bian radical anionic ligands. Four-electron reduction of azobenzene with 1 mol equiv of digallane 1 leads to complex (dpp-Bian)Ga(μ2-NPh)2Ga(dpp-Bian) (7). Paramagnetic compounds 2-7 were characterized by electron spin resonance spectroscopy, and their molecular structures were established by single-crystal X-ray analysis. Magnetic behavior of compounds 2, 5, and 6 was investigated by superconducting quantum interference device technique in the range of 2-295 K. PMID:27548713

  13. Er:YAG laser metal and ceramic bracket debonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dostálová, Tat'jana; Remeš, Marek; Jelínková, Helena; Å ulc, Jan; Němec, Michal; Vyhlídal, David

    2016-02-01

    The goal of the study was investigation of Er:YAG radiation (wavelength 2.94 μm) interaction with various metal and ceramic brackets and adhesive materials. The source of radiation was a free-running Er: YAG laser generating pulses with energy 280 mJ, 250 μs long and repetition rate 6 Hz (mean power 1.7 W). During the treatment lasting 140 s, water cooling was implemented and only the brackets were irradiated. It has been observed that the brackets were removed easily after the Er:YAG laser irradiation, and temperature rise was limited also for metal brackets. SEM investigation has confirmed less damage of enamel in comparison with non-irradiated samples.

  14. Detail view to show the stylized "dragon" bracket feature that ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view to show the stylized "dragon" bracket feature that stands guard by the outside door to the kitchen (north elevation of the main house) - Death Valley Ranch, Main House, Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  15. DETAIL OF PLATFORM SUPPORT BRACKET, ALTITUDE CHAMBER L, FACING NORTHWEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF PLATFORM SUPPORT BRACKET, ALTITUDE CHAMBER L, FACING NORTHWEST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  16. 44. Detail, bridge land span outboard girder brackets carrying utility ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    44. Detail, bridge land span outboard girder brackets carrying utility conduit. Structure rests on granite blocks mounted on granite piers. - Broadway Bridge, Spanning Foundry Street, MBTA Yard, Fort Point Channel, & Lehigh Street, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  17. 12. View looking east, showing detail of sidewalk bracket and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. View looking east, showing detail of sidewalk bracket and rocket bearing on southeast abutment. - Manchester Street Bridge, Spanning Merrimack River at Manchester Street (U.S. Route 3), Concord, Merrimack County, NH

  18. 15. MACHINERY DETAILS: LATCH WHEEL BRACKET, LATCH POCKET, LOCK BAR, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. MACHINERY DETAILS: LATCH WHEEL BRACKET, LATCH POCKET, LOCK BAR, LATCH CRADLE, SPLIT COLLAR, ETC. - Niantic River Swing Bridge, Spanning Niantic River between East Lyme & Waterford, Old Lyme, New London County, CT

  19. Detail view of door surround, note bracket & ghost of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of door surround, note bracket & ghost of (former) arched opening in the brickwork beside it - Leonard Mackall House, 1686 Thirty-Fourth Street, Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  20. 24. PHOTOGRAPH OF FIRST FLOOR. NOTE BRACKETS ON CENTER COLUMN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. PHOTOGRAPH OF FIRST FLOOR. NOTE BRACKETS ON CENTER COLUMN WHERE BRASS STATUS GAGES WERE MOUNTED TO MONITOR STEAM AND WATER PRESSURES IN YARD MAINS. SEE PHOTO CA-2294-25. - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Firehouse, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  1. Oblique view of north side showing bracketed window awnings, main ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Oblique view of north side showing bracketed window awnings, main entry, and mission coping, facing southeast. - Albrook Air Force Station, Parachute & Armament Building, 200 feet north of Andrews Boulevard, Balboa, Former Panama Canal Zone, CZ

  2. Detail of southwest corner showing rear double door entry, bracketed ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of southwest corner showing rear double door entry, bracketed window awnings, and decorative parapet coping, facing northeast. - Albrook Air Force Station, Parachute & Armament Building, 200 feet north of Andrews Boulevard, Balboa, Former Panama Canal Zone, CZ

  3. Substructure view illustrating the continuous concrete Tbeams, piers, sidewalk brackets ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Substructure view illustrating the continuous concrete T-beams, piers, sidewalk brackets and arched longitudinal beams - A Canal Bridge, Spanning the A Canal on Wall Street, Klamath Falls, Klamath County, OR

  4. Detail of southwest corner eave with brackets, stringer, and rafters ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of southwest corner eave with brackets, stringer, and rafters supporting exposed roof decking and tile roof, facing northwest. - Marine Barracks, Panama Canal, Officers' Quarters, 800' West of Bruja Road, Balboa, Former Panama Canal Zone, CZ

  5. 21 CFR 872.5470 - Orthodontic plastic bracket.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) Identification. An orthodontic plastic bracket is a plastic device intended to be bonded to a tooth to apply pressure to a tooth from a flexible orthodontic wire to alter its position. (b) Classification. Class II....

  6. 21 CFR 872.5470 - Orthodontic plastic bracket.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) Identification. An orthodontic plastic bracket is a plastic device intended to be bonded to a tooth to apply pressure to a tooth from a flexible orthodontic wire to alter its position. (b) Classification. Class II....

  7. 21 CFR 872.5470 - Orthodontic plastic bracket.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) Identification. An orthodontic plastic bracket is a plastic device intended to be bonded to a tooth to apply pressure to a tooth from a flexible orthodontic wire to alter its position. (b) Classification. Class II....

  8. 21 CFR 872.5470 - Orthodontic plastic bracket.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) Identification. An orthodontic plastic bracket is a plastic device intended to be bonded to a tooth to apply pressure to a tooth from a flexible orthodontic wire to alter its position. (b) Classification. Class II....

  9. 21 CFR 872.5470 - Orthodontic plastic bracket.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) Identification. An orthodontic plastic bracket is a plastic device intended to be bonded to a tooth to apply pressure to a tooth from a flexible orthodontic wire to alter its position. (b) Classification. Class II....

  10. Photoelastic analysis of stress generated by wires when conventional and self-ligating brackets are used: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Sobral, Guilherme Caiado; Vedovello, Mário; Degan, Viviane Veroni; Santamaria, Milton

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: By means of a photoelastic model, this study analyzed the stress caused on conventional and self-ligating brackets with expanded arch wires. METHOD: Standard brackets were adhered to artificial teeth and a photoelastic model was prepared using the Interlandi 19/12 diagram as base. Successive activations were made with 0.014-in and 0.018-in rounded cross section Nickel-Titanium wires (NiTi) and 0.019 x 0.025-in rectangular stainless steel wires all of which made on 22/14 Interlandi diagram. The model was observed on a plane polariscope - in a dark field microscope configuration - and photographed at each exchange of wire. Then, they were replaced by self-ligating brackets and the process was repeated. Analysis was qualitative and observed stress location and pattern on both models analyzed. CONCLUSIONS: Results identified greater stress on the region of the apex of premolars in both analyzed models. Upon comparing the stress between models, a greater amount of stress was found in the model with conventional brackets in all of its wires. Therefore, the present pilot study revealed that alignment of wires in self-ligating brackets produced lower stress in periodontal tissues in expansive mechanics. PMID:25715719

  11. Clinical evaluation of the failure rates of metallic brackets

    PubMed Central

    ROMANO, Fábio Lourenço; CORRER, Américo Bortolazzo; CORRER-SOBRINHO, Lourenço; MAGNANI, Maria Beatriz Borges de Araújo; RUELLAS, Antônio Carlos de Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate in vivo the bonding of metallic orthodontic brackets with different adhesive systems. Material and Methods Twenty patients (10.5-15.1 years old) who had sought corrective orthodontic treatment at a University Orthodontic Clinic were evaluated. Brackets were bonded from the right second premolar to the left second premolar in the upper and lower arches using: Orthodontic Concise, conventional Transbond XT, Transbond XT without primer, and Transbond XT associated with Transbond Plus Self-etching Primer (TPSEP). The 4 adhesive systems were used in all patients using a split-mouth design; each adhesive system was used in one quadrant of each dental arch, so that each group of 5 patients received the same bonding sequence. Initial archwires were inserted 1 week after bracket bonding. The number of bracket failures for each adhesive system was quantified over a 6-month period. Results The number of debonded brackets was: 8- Orthodontic Concise, 2- conventional Transbond XT, 9- Transbond XT without primer, and 1- Transbond XT + TPSEP. By using the Kaplan-Meier methods, statistically significant differences were found between the materials (p=0.0198), and the Logrank test identified these differences. Conventional Transbond XT and Transbond XT + TPSEP adhesive systems were statistically superior to Orthodontic Concise and Transbond XT without primer (p<0.05). There was no statistically significant difference between the dental arches (upper and lower), between the dental arch sides (right and left), and among the quadrants. Conclusions The largest number of bracket failures occurred with Orthodontic Concise and Transbond XT without primer systems and few bracket failures occurred with conventional Transbond XT and Transbond XT+TPSEP. More bracket failures were observed in the posterior region compared with the anterior region. PMID:22666842

  12. Comparison of Frictional Forces Generated by a New Ceramic Bracket with the Conventional Brackets using Unconventional and Conventional Ligation System and the Self-ligating Brackets: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Pasha, Azam; Vishwakarma, Swati; Narayan, Anjali; Vinay, K; Shetty, Smitha V; Roy, Partha Pratim

    2015-01-01

    Background: Fixed orthodontic mechanotherapy is associated with friction between the bracket - wire - ligature interfaces during the sliding mechanics. A sound knowledge of the various factors affecting the magnitude of friction is of paramount importance. The present study was done to analyze and compare the frictional forces generated by a new ceramic (Clarity Advanced) bracket with the conventional, (metal and ceramic) brackets using unconventional and conventional ligation system, and the self-ligating (metal and ceramic) brackets in the dry condition. Materials and Methods: The various bracket wire ligation combinations were tested in dry condition. The brackets used were of 0.022″ × 0.028″ nominal slot dimension of MBT prescription: Stainless steel (SS) self-ligating bracket (SLB) of (SmartClip), SS Conventional bracket (CB) (Victory series), Ceramic SLB (Clarity SL), Conventional Ceramic bracket with metal slot (Clarity Bracket), Clarity Advanced Ceramic Brackets (Clarity™ ADVANCED, 3M Unitek). These brackets were used with two types of elastomeric ligatures: Conventional Elastomeric Ligatures (CEL) (Clear medium mini modules) and Unconventional Elastomeric Ligatures (UEL) (Clear medium slide ligatures, Leone orthodontic products). The aligning and the retraction wires were used, i.e., 0.014″ nickel titanium (NiTi) wires and 0.019″ × 0.025″ SS wires, respectively. A universal strength testing machine was used to measure the friction produced between the different bracket, archwires, and ligation combination. This was done with the use of a custom-made jig being in position. Results: Mean, standard deviation, and range were computed for the frictional values obtained. Results were subjected to statistical analysis through ANOVA. The frictional resistance observed in the new Clarity Advanced bracket with a conventional elastomeric ligature was almost similar with the Clarity metal slot bracket with a conventional elastomeric ligature. When using

  13. A subjective comparison of two lingual bracket systems.

    PubMed

    Stamm, Thomas; Hohoff, Ariane; Ehmer, Ulrike

    2005-08-01

    The purpose of this prospective, longitudinal study was to compare the influence of two lingual bracket systems on subjective oral comfort, speech, mastication and oral hygiene. Forty-two native speakers of standard German (32 females, 10 males; mean age 27.1 years, standard deviation 12.2) were enrolled and completed a standardized questionnaire directly before insertion of lingual brackets (T0), within 24 hours of bond-up (T1) and 3 months (+/- 1 week) later (T2). Eighteen of the patients were treated with prefabricated brackets (Ormco, seventh generation) (PB group) and 24 with customized brackets (Incognito) (CB group). While no significant intergroup differences were recorded at any of the times with respect to tongue position, conversation pattern, swallowing or oral hygiene, the CB group experienced significantly fewer tongue space restrictions, speech disturbances and impairments in chewing and biting than the PB group at T1 and T2. At T2, pressure sores, reddening or lesions to the tongue were recorded significantly less often in the CB group than in the PB group. This enhanced patient comfort in the CB group was attributed to the smaller dimensions of the customized brackets. This aspect could play a role in attracting more patients to lingual orthodontics in the future. Information given to the patient on the duration and extent of the restrictions associated with lingual orthodontics must be differentiated according to the bracket system used. PMID:16043479

  14. Bond strength of disinfected metal and ceramic brackets: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Speer, Cornelia; Zimny, Dorothee; Hopfenmueller, Werner; Holtgrave, Eva Andrea

    2005-09-01

    The aim of this in vitro investigation was to test whether disinfecting with Chlorhexamed fluid had an influence on the shear bond strength of metal and ceramic orthodontic brackets. Metal and ceramic brackets were fixed by the composite adhesives Transbond XT (light curing) and Concise (chemical curing) to 224 bovine permanent mandibular incisors. Bovine teeth were divided into eight groups of 28 each as group 1: metal bracket/Transbond XT, group 2: disinfected metal bracket/Transbond XT, group 3: metal bracket/Concise, group 4: disinfected metal bracket/Concise, group 5: ceramic bracket/Transbond XT, group 6: disinfected ceramic bracket/Transbond XT, group 7: ceramic bracket/Concise, and group 8: disinfected ceramic bracket/Concise. Adhesive bonding was done according to the manufacturers' instructions. As shown by group comparison (Kruskal-Wallis test, univariate analysis of variance, P < .001), the disinfection of metal brackets had no statistically relevant influence on shear bond strength (P = .454). However, disinfecting ceramic brackets with either adhesive led to a significant reduction in shear bond strength compared with the untreated ceramic bracket group (P < .001). The Fisher's exact test of the Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI) scores showed a significant difference within the metal group bonded with different adhesives (P = .0003). The ARI scores 1 and 2 were not reached by the ceramic bracket groups. The disinfection of the ceramic brackets is a suitable procedure for clinical use because the measured shear bond strength values were higher than 6-8 MPa required in orthodontics.

  15. Does the time interval after bleaching influence the adhesion of orthodontic brackets?

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, Glaucia Cristina Rodrigues; de Miranda, Cyndi Albuquerque; Machado, Sissy Maria Mendes; Brandão, Gustavo Antonio Martins; de Almeida, Haroldo Amorim

    2013-01-01

    Objective To test the null hypothesis that no difference exists between the effects of at-home bleaching and in-office bleaching on shear bond strength (SBS) with bracket bonding at 4 different time intervals after dental bleaching. Methods Ninety extracted human premolars were randomly divided into 9 groups (n = 10) according to the bleaching methods used (at-home bleaching and in-office bleaching) and the storage time in artificial saliva (30 min, 1 day, 2 weeks, and 3 weeks before bonding). The control group was stored in artificial saliva for 7 days. Brackets were bonded with the Transbond XT adhesive system, and SBS testing was performed. The adhesive remnant index (ARI) was used to assess the amount of resin remaining on the enamel surfaces after debonding. The SBS data were analyzed by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Tukey test. For the ARI, the Kruskal-Wallis test was performed. Significance for all statistical tests was predetermined to be p < 0.05. Results The SBS of the unbleached group was significantly higher (p < 0.05) than that of the bleached groups (except for the group bonded 30 min after at-home bleaching). Conclusions The null hypothesis was not totally rejected. All bleaching groups tested had decreased SBS of the brackets to the enamel, except for the group bonded 30 min after at-home bleaching. The SBS returned to values close to those of the unbleached enamel within 3 weeks following bleaching. PMID:24228239

  16. Comparative analysis of slot dimension in lingual bracket systems

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances requires - among others - the correct clinical expression of torque, which depends on the precise fitting of archwire and slot. Especially in the lingual technique torque problems become clinically more evident than in labial appliances also with respect to the vertical alignment of teeth due to different distances from the center of resistance. The purpose of the present study was to compare the preciseness of slot dimensions of different lingual bracket systems. Methods Three lingual bracket systems were included in the study (7th Generation and STb, Ormco, Glendora, CA, USA; Incognito, TOP-Service/3 M Unitek, Monrovia, CA, USA). Non destructive analysis of vertical slot dimensions was performed using precision pin gauges (Azurea, Belprahon, Switzerland) that were tapered in increments of 0.002 mm (0.00008 inch). The sizes of 240 incisor and canine brackets were measured per system (total: 720). Data were compared using one-way ANOVA. A p-value < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results Average slot dimensions were 0.467 mm ± 0.007 mm (0.0184 inch ± 0.0003 inch) for the 7th Generation bracket system, 0.466 mm ± 0.004 mm (0.0183 inch ± 0.0001) inch for the STb bracket system and 0.459 mm ± 0.004 mm (0.0181 inch ± 0.0001) inch for the Incognito bracket system. Differences between systems were statistically significant (p < 0.05). Conclusions The analyzed bracket systems for lingual treatment exhibited significant differences in slot dimension that will clinically result in torque play. These aspects must be considered in lingual orthodontic treatment. PMID:20003510

  17. Comparison of shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets using various zirconia primers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji-Yeon; Kim, Jin-Seok

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to compare the shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets bonded to zirconia surfaces using three different zirconia primers and one silane primer, and subjected to thermocycling. Methods We designed 10 experimental groups following the surface treatment and thermocycling. The surface was treated with one of the following method: no-primer (NP), Porcelain Conditioner (PC), Z-PRIME Plus (ZP), Monobond Plus (MP) and Zirconia Liner Premium (ZL) (n=20). Then each group was subdivided to non-thermocycled and thermocycled groups (NPT, PC, ZPT, MPT, ZLT) (n=10). Orthodontic brackets were bonded to the specimens using Transbond™ XT Paste and light cured for 15 s at 1,100 mW/cm2. The SBS was measured at a 1 mm/min crosshead speed. The failure mode was assessed by examination with a stereomicroscope and the amount of bonding resin remaining on the zirconia surface was scored using the modified adhesive remnant index (ARI). Results The SBS of all experimental groups decreased after thermocycling. Before thermocycling, the SBS was ZL, ZP ≥ MP ≥ PC > NP but after thermocycling, the SBS was ZLT ≥ MPT ≥ ZPT > PCT = NPT (p > 0.05). For the ARI score, both of the groups lacking primer (NP and NPT) displayed adhesive failure modes, but the groups with zirconia primers (ZP, ZPT, MP, MPT, ZL, and ZLT) were associated with mixed failure modes. Conclusions Surface treatment with a zirconia primer increases the SBS relative to no-primer or silane primer application between orthodontic brackets and zirconia prostheses. PMID:26258062

  18. HOTB: High precision parallel code for calculation of four-particle harmonic oscillator transformation brackets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepšys, A.; Mickevicius, S.; Germanas, D.; Kalinauskas, R. K.

    2014-11-01

    effective way, which allows us to calculate matrix of the brackets up to a few hundred times more rapidly and more accurate than in a previous version. Solution method: Using external parallelization libraries and mutable precision we created a pack of numerical codes based on the methods of compact expressions of the three and four-particle harmonics oscillator brackets 3HOB, 4HOB, presented in [3]. Restrictions: For double precision version calculations can be done up to harmonic oscillator (HO) energy quanta e=28. For quadruple precision mantissa is equal to approximately 34 decimal digits, therefore calculations can be done up to HO energy quanta to e=52. Running time: The running time depends on the harmonic oscillator energy quanta, cluster size and the precision of intermediate calculations. More information on Table 1 for 3HOB and Table 2 for 4HOB. Reasons for a new version: The new program version expands the limits of harmonic oscillator energy quanta and gives shorter calculation time. Extend the limits of calculation of HOB First version was able to produce harmonic oscillator transformation brackets for three and four particles if E≤HO energy quanta. With this version of our program, if quadruple or arbitrary precision functions are being used, it is possible to calculate three and four particle harmonic oscillator transformation brackets for greater values of energy and momenta, while sustaining tolerable margin of error. Calculation time As the code of previous version of program was redone using parallelism paradigma, it is now possible to reduce the calculation time of transformation matrices significantly, depending on the size of computing cluster, as the dimensions of matrices are growing very rapidly according to the energy and momenta values. subroutinematrix_4HOB_dimensionCalculates the dimension of 4HOB matrix. subroutinematrix_3HOB_dimensionCalculates the dimension of 3HOB matrix, subroutinematrix_3HOBCalculates the global state array which is

  19. Bonded Bracket Assmebly for Frameless Solar Panels

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, Todd; Jackson, Nick; Dupont, Luc; Moser, Jeff

    2013-01-30

    In February 2011 the US Department of Energy announced their new Sunshot Initiative. The Sunshot goal is to reduce the total cost of solar energy systems by about 75 percent before the end of the decade. The DOE estimated that a total installed cost of $$1 per watt for photovoltaic systems would be equivalent to 5-6¢/kilowatt hour (kWh) for energy available from the grid. The DOE also estimated that to meet the $1 per watt goal, PV module costs would need to be reduced to $ .50 per watt, balance of systems costs would need to be reduced to $.40 per watt, and power electronic costs would need to reach $.10 per watt. To address the BOS balance of systems cost component of the $1 per watt goal, the DOE announced a funding opportunity called (BOS-X) Extreme Balance of System Hardware Cost Reductions. The DOE identified eight areas within the total BOS costs: 1) installation labor, 2) installation materials, 3) installation overhead and profit, 4) tracker, 5) permitting and commissioning, 6) site preparation, 7) land acquisition, 8) sales tax. The BOS-X funding announcement requested applications in four specific topics;Topic 1: Transformational Building Integrated Photovoltaic (BIPV) Modules; Topic 2: Roof and Ground Mount Innovations; Topic 3: Transformational Photovoltaic System Designs; and Topic 4: Development of New Wind Load Codes for PV Systems.The application submitted by ARaymond Tinnerman reflected the requirements listed in Topic #2, Roof and Ground Mount Innovations. The goal of topic #2 was to develop technologies that would result in the extreme reduction of material and labor costs associated with applications that require physical connections and attachments to roof and ground mount structures. The topics researched in this project included component cost reduction, labor reduction, weight reduction, wiring innovations, and alternative material utilization. The project objectives included; 1) The development of an innovative quick snap bracket assembly

  20. Invitro Study of the Effect of Different Samples of Water Used for Washing the Etchant on Bracket Bond Strength

    PubMed Central

    Ganiger, Chanamallappa; Ahammed, Yusuf; Mane, Pratap

    2015-01-01

    Background Bonding is a very important step in the orthodontic treatment planning. Effective bonding enhances the treatment by reducing the bond failure and thereby reducing the treatment duration and also increases efficiency in orthodontic mechanics. The success of the bonded brackets is negatively affected by contamination with oral fluids such as blood and saliva. Aim The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of hardness of water used in removing the etchant on the bracket bond strength. Materials and Methods Seventy five extracted premolars were divided in three groups of 25 each. The teeth in all the three groups were etched with 35% phosphoric acid. The etchant in each of the group I, II and III was removed using distilled water (soft), corporation water (moderately hard) and hard water respectively. Stainless steel brackets were attached using light cure bonding agent (transbond XT, 3M UNITEK) and cured for 10sec with a light cure unit. The shear bond strength was evaluated by mechanical testing machine. Statistically significant differences were defined for p < 0.05. Result The results showed significant increase in bond strength in samples where in soft water was used for cleaning the etchant on the bonding surface. Conclusion Hardness of water used for washing the etchant affects the bracket bond strength. Shear bond strength of soft water is significantly increased compared to moderately hard and very hard water. PMID:26557617

  1. Bracketed morality revisited: how do athletes behave in two contexts?

    PubMed

    Kavussanu, Maria; Boardley, Ian D; Sagar, Sam S; Ring, Christopher

    2013-10-01

    The concept of bracketed morality has received empirical support in several sport studies (e.g., Bredemeier & Shields, 1986a, 1986b). However, these studies have focused on moral reasoning. In this research, we examined bracketed morality with respect to moral behavior in sport and university contexts, in two studies. Male and female participants (Study 1: N = 331; Study 2: N = 372) completed questionnaires assessing prosocial and antisocial behavior toward teammates and opponents in sport and toward other students at university. Study 2 participants also completed measures of moral disengagement and goal orientation in both contexts. In most cases, behavior in sport was highly correlated with behavior at university. In addition, participants reported higher prosocial behavior toward teammates and higher antisocial behavior toward opponents in sport than toward other students at university. The effects of context on antisocial behavior were partially mediated by moral disengagement and ego orientation. Our findings extend the bracketed morality concept to prosocial and antisocial behavior.

  2. Force loss in archwire-guided tooth movement of conventional and self-ligating brackets.

    PubMed

    Montasser, Mona A; El-Bialy, Tarek; Keilig, Ludger; Reimann, Susanne; Jäger, Andreas; Bourauel, Christoph

    2014-02-01

    This study aimed to investigate the differences in the force loss during simulated archwire-guided canine retraction between various conventional and self-ligating brackets. Three types of orthodontic brackets have been investigated experimentally using a biomechanical set-up: 1. conventional ligating brackets (Victory Series and Mini-Taurus), 2. self-ligating brackets (SmartClip: passive self-ligating bracket, and Time3 and SPEED: active self-ligating brackets), and 3. a conventional low-friction bracket (Synergy). All brackets had a nominal 0.022″ slot size. The brackets were combined with three rectangular 0.019×0.025″ archwires: 1. Remanium (stainless steel), 2. Nitinol SE (nickel-titanium alloy, NiTi), and 3. Beta III Titanium (titanium-molybdenum alloy). Stainless steel ligatures were used with the conventional brackets. Archwire-guided tooth movement was simulated over a retraction path of up to 4mm using a superelastic NiTi coil spring (force: 1 N). Force loss was lowest for the Victory Series and SmartClip brackets in combination with the steel guiding archwire (35 and 37.6 per cent, respectively) and highest for the SPEED and Mini-Taurus brackets in combination with the titanium wire (73.7 and 64.4 per cent, respectively). Force loss gradually increased by 10 per cent for each bracket type in combination with the different wires in the following sequence: stainless steel, Nitinol, and beta-titanium. Self-ligating brackets did not show improved performance compared with conventional brackets. There was no consistent pattern of force loss when comparing conventional and self-ligating brackets or passive and active self-ligating brackets. PMID:23382468

  3. Structural Analysis of the Redesigned Ice/Frost Ramp Bracket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, D. R.; Dawicke, D. S.; Gentz, S. J.; Roberts, P. W.; Raju, I. S.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the interim structural analysis of a redesigned Ice/Frost Ramp bracket for the Space Shuttle External Tank (ET). The proposed redesigned bracket consists of mounts for attachment to the ET wall, supports for the electronic/instrument cables and propellant repressurization lines that run along the ET, an upper plate, a lower plate, and complex bolted connections. The eight nominal bolted connections are considered critical in the summarized structural analysis. Each bolted connection contains a bolt, a nut, four washers, and a non-metallic spacer and block that are designed for thermal insulation. A three-dimensional (3D) finite element model of the bracket is developed using solid 10-node tetrahedral elements. The loading provided by the ET Project is used in the analysis. Because of the complexities associated with accurately modeling the bolted connections in the bracket, the analysis is performed using a global/local analysis procedure. The finite element analysis of the bracket identifies one of the eight bolted connections as having high stress concentrations. A local area of the bracket surrounding this bolted connection is extracted from the global model and used as a local model. Within the local model, the various components of the bolted connection are refined, and contact is introduced along the appropriate interfaces determined by the analysts. The deformations from the global model are applied as boundary conditions to the local model. The results from the global/local analysis show that while the stresses in the bolts are well within yield, the spacers fail due to compression. The primary objective of the interim structural analysis is to show concept viability for static thermal testing. The proposed design concept would undergo continued design optimization to address the identified analytical assumptions and concept shortcomings, assuming successful thermal testing.

  4. Hessian matrix, specific heats, Nambu brackets, and thermodynamic geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansoori, Seyed Ali Hosseini; Mirza, Behrouz; Fazel, Mohamadreza

    2015-04-01

    As an extension to our earlier work [1], we employ the Nambu brackets to prove that the divergences of heat capacities correspond to their counterparts in thermodynamic geometry. We also obtain a simple representation for the conformal transformations that connect different thermodynamics metrics to each other. Using our bracket approach, we obtain interesting exact relations between the Hessian matrix with any number of parameters and specific heat capacities. Finally, we employ this approach to investigate some thermodynamic properties of the Meyers-Perry black holes with three spins.

  5. Almost Poisson brackets for nonholonomic systems on Lie groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Naranjo, Luis Constantino

    We present a geometric construction of almost Poisson brackets for nonholonomic mechanical systems whose configuration space is a Lie group G. We study the so-called LL and LR systems where the kinetic energy defines a left invariant metric on G and the constraints are invariant with respect to left (respectively right) translation on G. For LL systems, the equations on the momentum phase space, T*G , can be left translated onto g *, the dual space of the Lie algebra g . We show that the reduced equations on g * can be cast in Poisson form with respect to an almost Poisson bracket that is obtained by projecting the standard Lie-Poisson bracket onto the constraint space. For LR systems we use ideas of semidirect product reduction to transfer the equations on T*G into the dual Lie algebra, s *, of a semidirect product. This provides a natural Lie algebraic setting for the equations of motion commonly found in the literature. We show that these equations can also be cast in Poisson form with respect to an almost Poisson bracket that is obtained by projecting the Lie-Poisson structure on s * onto a constraint submanifold. In both cases the constraint functions are Casimirs of the bracket and are satisfied automatically. Our construction is a natural generalization of the classical ideas of Lie-Poisson and semidirect product reduction to the nonholonomic case. It also sets a convenient stage for the study of Hamiltonization of certain nonholonomic systems. Our examples include the Suslov and the Veselova problems of constrained motion of a rigid body, and the Chaplygin sleigh. In addition we study the almost Poisson reduction of the Chaplygin sphere. We show that the bracket given by Borisov and Mamaev in [7] is obtained by reducing a nonstandard almost Poisson bracket that is obtained by projecting a non-canonical bivector onto the constraint submanifold using the Lagrange-D'Alembert principle. The examples that we treat show that it is possible to cast the reduced

  6. On classification of discrete, scalar-valued Poisson brackets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parodi, E.

    2012-10-01

    We address the problem of classifying discrete differential-geometric Poisson brackets (dDGPBs) of any fixed order on a target space of dimension 1. We prove that these Poisson brackets (PBs) are in one-to-one correspondence with the intersection points of certain projective hypersurfaces. In addition, they can be reduced to a cubic PB of the standard Volterra lattice by discrete Miura-type transformations. Finally, by improving a lattice consolidation procedure, we obtain new families of non-degenerate, vector-valued and first-order dDGPBs that can be considered in the framework of admissible Lie-Poisson group theory.

  7. Devices based on surface plasmon interference filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yu (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Devices based on surface plasmon filters having at least one metal-dielectric interface to support surface plasmon waves. A multi-layer-coupled surface plasmon notch filter is provided to have more than two symmetric metal-dielectric interfaces coupled with one another to produce a transmission spectral window with desired spectral profile and bandwidth. Such notch filters can form various color filtering devices for color flat panel displays.

  8. Nanoparticle Based Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Talley, C E; Huser, T R; Hollars, C W; Jusinski, L; Laurence, T; Lane, S M

    2005-01-03

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering is a powerful tool for the investigation of biological samples. Following a brief introduction to Raman and surface-enhanced Raman scattering, several examples of biophotonic applications of SERS are discussed. The concept of nanoparticle based sensors using SERS is introduced and the development of these sensors is discussed.

  9. Recodable surfaces based on switchable hydrogen bonds.

    PubMed

    Wedler-Jasinski, Nils; Delbosc, Nicolas; Virolleaud, Marie-Alice; Montarnal, Damien; Welle, Alexander; Barner, Leonie; Walther, Andreas; Bernard, Julien; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher

    2016-07-01

    We introduce recodable surfaces solely based on reversible artificial hydrogen bonding interactions. We show that a symmetrical oligoamide (SOA) attached to poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) can be repeatedly immobilized and cleaved off spatially defined surface domains photochemically functionalized with asymmetric oligoamides (AOAs). The spatially resolved recodability is imaged and quantified via ToF-SIMS. PMID:27339101

  10. 21 CFR 872.3750 - Bracket adhesive resin and tooth conditioner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bracket adhesive resin and tooth conditioner. 872... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3750 Bracket adhesive resin and tooth conditioner. (a) Identification. A bracket adhesive resin and tooth conditioner is a...

  11. A comparative assessment of forces and moments generated by lingual and conventional brackets.

    PubMed

    Sifakakis, Iosif; Pandis, Nikolaos; Makou, Margarita; Katsaros, Christos; Eliades, Theodore; Bourauel, Christoph

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of bracket type on the labiopalatal forces and moments generated in the sagittal plane. Incognito™ lingual brackets (3M Unitek), STb™ lingual brackets (Light Lingual System; ORMCO), and conventional 0.018 inch slot brackets (Gemini; 3M Unitek) were bonded on three identical maxillary acrylic resin models, with a palatally displaced right lateral incisor. The transfer trays for the indirect bonding of the lingual brackets were constructed in certified laboratories. Each model was mounted on the orthodontic measurement and simulation system and ten 0.013 inch CuNiTi wires were used for each bracket type. The wire was ligated with elastomerics and each measurement was repeated once after re-ligation. The labiopalatal forces and the moments in the sagittal plane were recorded on the right lateral incisor. One-way analysis of variance and post hoc Scheffe pairwise comparisons were used to assess the effect on bracket type on the generated forces and moments. The magnitude of forces ranged from 1.62, 1.27, and 1.81 N for the STb, conventional, and Incognito brackets, respectively; the corresponding moments were 2.01, 1.45, and 2.19 N mm, respectively. Bracket type was a significant predictor of the generated forces (P < 0.001) and moments (P < 0.001). The produced forces were different among all three bracket types, whereas the generated moments differed between conventional and lingual brackets but not between lingual brackets.

  12. Nonlaser-based 3D surface imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Shin-yee; Johnson, R.K.; Sherwood, R.J.

    1994-11-15

    3D surface imaging refers to methods that generate a 3D surface representation of objects of a scene under viewing. Laser-based 3D surface imaging systems are commonly used in manufacturing, robotics and biomedical research. Although laser-based systems provide satisfactory solutions for most applications, there are situations where non laser-based approaches are preferred. The issues that make alternative methods sometimes more attractive are: (1) real-time data capturing, (2) eye-safety, (3) portability, and (4) work distance. The focus of this presentation is on generating a 3D surface from multiple 2D projected images using CCD cameras, without a laser light source. Two methods are presented: stereo vision and depth-from-focus. Their applications are described.

  13. 26 CFR 31.3402(c)-1 - Wage bracket withholding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... percentage method with respect to any employee. The tax computed under the wage bracket method shall be in... employee is actually engaged in the performance of services during such payroll period. Example 1. On June... amount of wages for one day. Where the withholding is computed under the rules applicable to...

  14. 26 CFR 31.3402(c)-1 - Wage bracket withholding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... percentage method with respect to any employee. The tax computed under the wage bracket method shall be in... employee is actually engaged in the performance of services during such payroll period. Example 1. On June... amount of wages for one day. Where the withholding is computed under the rules applicable to...

  15. 26 CFR 31.3402(c)-1 - Wage bracket withholding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... percentage method with respect to any employee. The tax computed under the wage bracket method shall be in... employee is actually engaged in the performance of services during such payroll period. Example 1. On June... amount of wages for one day. Where the withholding is computed under the rules applicable to...

  16. Structure Sense in High School Algebra: The Effect of Brackets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoch, Maureen; Dreyfus, Tommy

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents an initial attempt to define structure sense for high school algebra and to test part of this definition. A questionnaire was distributed to 92 eleventh grade students in order to identify those who use structure sense. Presence and absence of brackets was examined to see how they affect use of structure sense. The overall use…

  17. Evaluation of bond strength of orthodontic brackets without enamel etching

    PubMed Central

    Boruziniat, Alireza; Motaghi, Shiva; Moghaddas, Mohmmadjavad

    2015-01-01

    Background To compare the shear bond strength of brackets with and without enamel etching. Material and Methods In this study, 60 sound premolars were randomly divided into four different groups: 1- TXE group: Enamel etching+Transbond XT adhesive+ Transbond XT composite. 2- TXS group: Transbond plus self-etch adhesive+ Transbond XT composite. 3- PQ1E group: Enamel etching+ PQ1 adhesive+ Transbond XT composite. 4- PQ1 group: PQ1 adhesive+ Transbond XT composite. The shear bond strengths of brackets were evaluated using universal testing machine at cross head speed of 0.5 mm/min. The Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI) was also measured. One-way ANOVA, Tukey’s post hoc, Kruskal-wallis and Mann-Witney U test were used for data analysis. Results There was a significant difference between etched and unetched groups respect to SBS and ARI (p<0.05), however; no significant difference was observed between unetched group and self-etch adhesive group (p>> 0.05). The shear bond strength of PQ1 group was the least but in acceptable range and its ARI was less than other groups. Conclusions PQ1 adhesive can be used for bracket bonding without enamel etching with adequate bond strength and minimal ARI. Key words:Bracket, shear bond strength, filled-adhesive, self-etch adhesive. PMID:26535100

  18. Laser Guided Automated Calibrating System for Accurate Bracket Placement

    PubMed Central

    Anitha, A; Kumar, AJ; Mascarenhas, R; Husain, A

    2015-01-01

    Background: The basic premise of preadjusted bracket system is accurate bracket positioning. It is widely recognized that accurate bracket placement is of critical importance in the efficient application of biomechanics and in realizing the full potential of a preadjusted edgewise appliance. Aim: The purpose of this study was to design a calibrating system to accurately detect a point on a plane as well as to determine the accuracy of the Laser Guided Automated Calibrating (LGAC) System. Materials and Methods: To the lowest order of approximation a plane having two parallel lines is used to verify the accuracy of the system. On prescribing the distance of a point from the line, images of the plane are analyzed from controlled angles, calibrated and the point is identified with a laser marker. Results: The image was captured and analyzed using MATLAB ver. 7 software (The MathWorks Inc.). Each pixel in the image corresponded to a distance of 1cm/413 (10 mm/413) = 0.0242 mm (L/P). This implies any variations in distance above 0.024 mm can be measured and acted upon, and sets the highest possible accuracy for this system. Conclusion: A new automated system is introduced having an accuracy of 0.024 mm for accurate bracket placement. PMID:25745575

  19. On covariant Poisson brackets in classical field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Forger, Michael; Salles, Mário O.

    2015-10-15

    How to give a natural geometric definition of a covariant Poisson bracket in classical field theory has for a long time been an open problem—as testified by the extensive literature on “multisymplectic Poisson brackets,” together with the fact that all these proposals suffer from serious defects. On the other hand, the functional approach does provide a good candidate which has come to be known as the Peierls–De Witt bracket and whose construction in a geometrical setting is now well understood. Here, we show how the basic “multisymplectic Poisson bracket” already proposed in the 1970s can be derived from the Peierls–De Witt bracket, applied to a special class of functionals. This relation allows to trace back most (if not all) of the problems encountered in the past to ambiguities (the relation between differential forms on multiphase space and the functionals they define is not one-to-one) and also to the fact that this class of functionals does not form a Poisson subalgebra.

  20. Interior, view of central hall staircase showing bracketed stair, square ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior, view of central hall staircase showing bracketed stair, square balusters and fluted newel post, camera facing southwest - Naval Training Station, Senior Officers' Quarters District, Quarters No. 4, Naval Station Treasure Island, 4 Whiting Way, Yerba Buena Island, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  1. 43. Detail view of pivoting bracket used to move heavy ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    43. Detail view of pivoting bracket used to move heavy iron plate that covered trough next to iron notch when No. 2 Furnace was tapped. - Sloss-Sheffield Steel & Iron, First Avenue North Viaduct at Thirty-second Street, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  2. Investigations in a Simplified Bracketed Grid Approach to Metrical Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Patrick Pei

    2010-01-01

    In this dissertation, I examine the fundamental mechanisms and assumptions of the Simplified Bracketed Grid Theory (Idsardi 1992) in two ways: first, by comparing it with Parametric Metrical Theory (Hayes 1995), and second, by implementing it in the analysis of several case studies in stress assignment and syllabification. Throughout these…

  3. Bond strength of disinfected metal and ceramic brackets: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Speer, Cornelia; Zimny, Dorothee; Hopfenmueller, Werner; Holtgrave, Eva Andrea

    2005-09-01

    The aim of this in vitro investigation was to test whether disinfecting with Chlorhexamed fluid had an influence on the shear bond strength of metal and ceramic orthodontic brackets. Metal and ceramic brackets were fixed by the composite adhesives Transbond XT (light curing) and Concise (chemical curing) to 224 bovine permanent mandibular incisors. Bovine teeth were divided into eight groups of 28 each as group 1: metal bracket/Transbond XT, group 2: disinfected metal bracket/Transbond XT, group 3: metal bracket/Concise, group 4: disinfected metal bracket/Concise, group 5: ceramic bracket/Transbond XT, group 6: disinfected ceramic bracket/Transbond XT, group 7: ceramic bracket/Concise, and group 8: disinfected ceramic bracket/Concise. Adhesive bonding was done according to the manufacturers' instructions. As shown by group comparison (Kruskal-Wallis test, univariate analysis of variance, P < .001), the disinfection of metal brackets had no statistically relevant influence on shear bond strength (P = .454). However, disinfecting ceramic brackets with either adhesive led to a significant reduction in shear bond strength compared with the untreated ceramic bracket group (P < .001). The Fisher's exact test of the Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI) scores showed a significant difference within the metal group bonded with different adhesives (P = .0003). The ARI scores 1 and 2 were not reached by the ceramic bracket groups. The disinfection of the ceramic brackets is a suitable procedure for clinical use because the measured shear bond strength values were higher than 6-8 MPa required in orthodontics. PMID:16279832

  4. A Computational Fluid Dynamic Analysis of Peri-Bracket Salivary Flow Influencing the Microbial and Periodontal Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ping; Lin, Han; Han, Yi; Lin, Yi; Xu, Yue; Zhang, Zhaoqiang

    2013-01-01

    Fixed vestibular appliances decrease the “self-cleansing” action of saliva and promote aggregation of dental plaque by disturbing the salivary flow field on tooth surfaces, leading to a higher prevalence of enamel demineralization and periodontal diseases. In the current study, we investigated the salivary dynamic characteristics of plaque retention and periodontal status around appliances during orthodontic treatment. By reconstructing lower central incisors and orthodontic appliances, we simulated saliva flow on the tooth surface and then characterized and quantified the salivary flow pattern surrounding the bracket and archwire. In parallel, we tested the total peri-bracket bacterial counts and periodontal status to assess interrelations. Our results demonstrate that orthodontic appliances disturb the salivary flow field on tooth surfaces and can lead to a decrease in salivary velocity and an increase in bacterial numbers. Local vortexes forming in the areas gingival to the bracket, together with the narrow space limitation, contributed to the periodontal inflammatory response. This study confirms that changes in salivary flow are an obvious predisposing factor for bacterial accumulation, and advances the ability to replicate, in vitro, the salivary characteristics of plaque retention and periodontal status around appliances during orthodontic treatment. PMID:23620815

  5. A computational fluid dynamic analysis of peri-bracket salivary flow influencing the microbial and periodontal parameters.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ping; Lin, Han; Han, Yi; Lin, Yi; Xu, Yue; Zhang, Zhaoqiang

    2013-01-01

    Fixed vestibular appliances decrease the "self-cleansing" action of saliva and promote aggregation of dental plaque by disturbing the salivary flow field on tooth surfaces, leading to a higher prevalence of enamel demineralization and periodontal diseases. In the current study, we investigated the salivary dynamic characteristics of plaque retention and periodontal status around appliances during orthodontic treatment. By reconstructing lower central incisors and orthodontic appliances, we simulated saliva flow on the tooth surface and then characterized and quantified the salivary flow pattern surrounding the bracket and archwire. In parallel, we tested the total peri-bracket bacterial counts and periodontal status to assess interrelations. Our results demonstrate that orthodontic appliances disturb the salivary flow field on tooth surfaces and can lead to a decrease in salivary velocity and an increase in bacterial numbers. Local vortexes forming in the areas gingival to the bracket, together with the narrow space limitation, contributed to the periodontal inflammatory response. This study confirms that changes in salivary flow are an obvious predisposing factor for bacterial accumulation, and advances the ability to replicate, in vitro, the salivary characteristics of plaque retention and periodontal status around appliances during orthodontic treatment. PMID:23620815

  6. Helical surface reconstruction based on CMM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Zhikang; Zhu, Lianqing; Chen, Qingshan; Guo, Yangkuan

    2011-05-01

    The reconstruction of helical surface plays an important role in many engineering and scientific applications. This paper tends to establish an effective processing scheme of surface reconstruction of scatter 3D points, and make an in-depth exploration for the preprocessing technology of scatter points set and the algorithm of three-dimension model surface reconstruction. This paper has three main aspects: data acquisition, data preprocess and surface reconstruction. First, by comparing several measuring equipments, the screw parts are scanned via CMM (Coordinate Measuring Machine). Initial 3D point clouds are obtained by setting the scanning route according to the shape of the targets. Second, Using "3σ" criteria point de-noising is applied to the initial data points. Then Heap Sort is used to sort these points, being convenient for saving data and reconstructing the surface. Third, this paper presents a surface reconstruction method based on triangulation algorithm. The triangular meshes are generated based on Delaunay triangulation technique in two dimensions. And Loop Subdivision is adopted in order to get manifold meshes. Finally the surface reconstruction of an involute worm and an Archimedes worm shows that this approach is feasible.

  7. Helical surface reconstruction based on CMM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Zhikang; Zhu, Lianqing; Chen, Qingshan; Guo, Yangkuan

    2010-12-01

    The reconstruction of helical surface plays an important role in many engineering and scientific applications. This paper tends to establish an effective processing scheme of surface reconstruction of scatter 3D points, and make an in-depth exploration for the preprocessing technology of scatter points set and the algorithm of three-dimension model surface reconstruction. This paper has three main aspects: data acquisition, data preprocess and surface reconstruction. First, by comparing several measuring equipments, the screw parts are scanned via CMM (Coordinate Measuring Machine). Initial 3D point clouds are obtained by setting the scanning route according to the shape of the targets. Second, Using "3σ" criteria point de-noising is applied to the initial data points. Then Heap Sort is used to sort these points, being convenient for saving data and reconstructing the surface. Third, this paper presents a surface reconstruction method based on triangulation algorithm. The triangular meshes are generated based on Delaunay triangulation technique in two dimensions. And Loop Subdivision is adopted in order to get manifold meshes. Finally the surface reconstruction of an involute worm and an Archimedes worm shows that this approach is feasible.

  8. An Investigation about the Influence of Bleaching on Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets and on Enamel Colour

    PubMed Central

    Immerz, Isabell; Proff, Peter; Roemer, Piero; Reicheneder, Claudia; Faltermeier, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of bleaching on the colouration of tooth enamel and shear bond strength of orthodontic ceramic brackets based upon current whitening practice. The bleaching and bonding techniques were performed on extracted bovine teeth for the investigation of their colorimetric spectrum and the adhesive bond strength on surface enamel. One group was designated as the control group with no pre-treatment. Another group was treated with a 45% hydrogen peroxide solution prior to bonding. The difference in colour was expressed as the Euclidian distance ΔE. The resulting shear bond strength was analyzed and evaluated by scores of Adhesion Remnant Index. Statistical analysis was performed using the Kruskall-Wallis and post-hoc test. The colorimetric analysis revealed statistically significant differences between original and bleached as well as bleached and debonded teeth setting off a blue colour shift. Furthermore, statistically there was no significant difference noted in bonding strength between non-treated surfaces and those treated with peroxide. It can be concluded that peroxide pre-treatment does result in colour differences of teeth. Bonding and debonding procedures seem to have no statistically significant influence on the enamel colour using current materials. PMID:22536518

  9. The effect of herbal teas on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets.

    PubMed

    Ulusoy, Cagri; Müjdeci, Arzu; Gökay, Osman

    2009-08-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the effects of some types of herbal tea on the shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets to enamel surfaces. The brackets were bonded with Transbond XT to 90 extracted human premolar teeth and divided equally into six groups, that is, black, mint-mate herbal, mint-lemon herbal, and rosehip fruit tea and two control groups, Coca-Cola and distilled water. All groups were conditioned for three 5-minute sessions with equal intervening intervals for 90 days. The initial pH, SBS, and adhesive remnant index (ARI) of the groups were evaluated and the data were analysed statistically by Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U-tests, one-way analysis of variance, and Duncan and Z-tests, respectively. Rosehip fruit tea (2.4 +/- 0.07) and Coca-Cola (2.5 +/- 0.05) had the lowest pH values. Coca-Cola (6.04 +/- 1.11 MPa) and rosehip fruit tea (7.26 +/- 1.11 MPa) significantly reduced the SBS to enamel (P < 0.001). The SBS results for the other groups were similar (P > 0.05). Except for the Coca-Cola group (ARI score = 0), fracture sites for all other groups were similar with the majority of bond failures at the enamel-adhesive interface (ARI score = 1). Although this experiment could not completely replicate the complex oral environment, it seems to confirm that Coca-Cola and rosehip fruit tea may be a causative factor in bracket-enamel bonding failure.

  10. Effectiveness of fluoride sealant in the prevention of carious lesions around orthodontic brackets: an OCT evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Pithon, Matheus Melo; Santos, Mariana de Jesus; de Souza, Camilla Andrade; Leão, Jorge César Borges; Braz, Ana Karla Souza; de Araujo, Renato Evangelista; Tanaka, Orlando Motohiro; Oliveira, Dauro Douglas

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: This article aimed to evaluate in vitro the efficiency of Pro Seal fluoride sealant application in the prevention of white spot lesions around orthodontic brackets. Material and Methods: Brackets were bonded to the buccal surface of bovine incisors, and five groups were formed (n = 15) according to the exposure of teeth to oral hygiene substances and the application of enamel sealant: G1 (control), only brushing was performed with 1.450 ppm fluoride; G2 (control) brushing associated with the use of mouthwash with 225 ppm fluoride; G3, only Pro Seal sealant application was performed with 1.000 ppm fluoride; G4 Pro Seal associated with brushing; G5 Pro Seal associated with brushing and mouthwash. Experimental groups alternated between pH cycling and the procedures described. All specimens were kept at a temperature of 37 °C throughout the entire experiment. Both brushing and immersion in solutions were performed within a time interval of one minute, followed by washing in deionized water three times a day for 28 days. Afterwards, an evaluation by Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) of the spectral type was performed. In each group, a scanning exam of the white spot lesion area (around the sites where brackets were bonded) and depth measurement of carious lesions were performed. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was applied to determine whether there were significant differences among groups. For post hoc analysis, Tukey test was used. Results: There was statistically significant difference between groups 1 and 2 (p = 0.003), 1 and 3 (p = 0.008), 1 and 4 (p = 0.000) and 1 and 5 (p = 0.000). The group in which only brushing was performed (Group 1) showed deeper enamel lesion. Conclusion: Pro Seal sealant alone or combined with brushing and/or brushing and the use of a mouthwash with fluoride was more effective in protecting enamel, in comparison to brushing alone. PMID:26691968

  11. Comparison of shear bond strength to clinically simulated debonding of orthodontic brackets: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Linjawi, Amal Ibrahim; Abbassy, Mona A

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To assess in vitro the quantitative and qualitative debonding behavior of the AEZ debonding plier, compared to shear debonding force, in debonding orthodontic metal brackets. Materials and Methods: Thirty-two extracted premolars bonded with metal brackets were randomly divided into two equal groups according to the type of simulated debonding method; compressive bond strength (CBS) group using AEZ debonding plier (Ormco Corporation, USA) attached to the Instron machine, and shear bond strength (SBS) group using regular Instron attachments. All teeth were subjected to debonding forces, and debonding strength was assessed. The buccal surfaces were then examined, under a stereomicroscope, and adhesive remnants were scored using adhesive remnant index (ARI). Debonding strengths comparison was performed using the independent sample t-test. ARI score comparison was performed using the Mann–Whitney U-test. Correlation between debonding strength and ARI scores was performed using the Spearman correlation. Results: There was no significant difference in mean debonding strength between the SBS (M = 6.17 ± 0.77 MPa) and CBS (M = 6.68 ± 1.67 MPa) groups (P > 0.05). The CBS group showed significantly less adhesive remnants than the SBS group (P < 0.05); 62.5% of CBS group had ARI score 1, whereas 68.8% of SBS group had ARI score 3. No significant correlation between ARI and debonding strength was found (P < 0.05). Conclusion: SBS was found to produce similar debonding strength to the AEZ debonding plier in vitro. However, the AEZ debonding plier resulted in less adhesive remnant which is of great advantage for reducing chair-time during cleanup after debonding brackets. PMID:26998474

  12. SIMPLE SURFACE PLASMON RESONANCE-BASED DOSEMETER.

    PubMed

    Urbonavičius, Benas Gabrielis; Adlienė, Diana

    2016-06-01

    The interest to application of various surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based sensors for the investigation of chemical and biological processes in thin layers deposited on the grating's surface/media is developing. Characterisation of processes as well as specimen's features might be performed analysing variations in optical properties (refraction index) of these thin layers. SPR sensors by default are characterised by high resolution and small uncertainties, and measurements might be performed in situ High-resolution, low-cost, SPR-based dosemeter concept has been proposed and realised depositing dose-sensitive nPAG gel layer onto diffraction grating's surface. The experimental set-up and method for information read out from the sensor were developed and implemented. Obtained results show a potential application of SPR-based dosemeter for dose measurements/mapping in steep gradient fields and/or large area fields. PMID:26535002

  13. Tensile strength of orthodontic brackets bonded directly to fluorotic and nonfluorotic teeth: an in vitro comparative study.

    PubMed

    Ng'ang'a, P M; Ogaard, B; Cruz, R; Chindia, M L; Aasrum, E

    1992-09-01

    Information related to bonding of orthodontic brackets to fluorotic teeth is scanty. The purpose of this study was to compare, in vitro, the tensile bond strength and the bond failure site of brackets bonded directly to fluorotic and nonfluorotic teeth. The etching patterns were also evaluated. The study involved 26 teeth classified as score 3 and 4, and 26 as score 0 with the Thylstrup and Fejerskov's (TF) fluorosis index. In addition to the clinical classification, difference in the concentration of fluoride in the teeth was verified by acid etching. Brackets were bonded with a composite resin after etching the enamel surface with 40% phosphoric acid for 60 seconds. Tensile bond strength was determined with an Instron testing machine. The bond failure site was assessed by the percentage of residue cement on the tooth surface after debonding and the etching pattern by SEM. The mean concentration of fluoride was 2888.5 ppm (SD 1081.7) in the fluorotic teeth and 1227.1 ppm (SD 526.3) in the nonfluorotic teeth. The mean bond strength was 7.8 N/mm2 (SD 1.47) for the fluorotic teeth and 8.6 N/mm2 (SD 2.19) for the nonfluorotic teeth. The difference between the means for bond strength was not statistically significant (p greater than 0.05). Bond failure site was primarily at the bracket-adhesive interface. The mean percentage of adhesive on the enamel surface after debonding was 70% (SD 25.90) for the fluorotic teeth and 75% (SD 24.66) for nonfluorotic teeth. The difference in the means was not statistically significant (p greater than 0.05).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. A comparison of self-ligating and conventional orthodontic bracket systems.

    PubMed

    Read-Ward, G E; Jones, S P; Davies, E H

    1997-11-01

    This ex-vivo study compared the static frictional resistance of three self-ligating brackets with a conventional steel-ligated Ultratrimm bracket. The effects of archwire size (0.020, 0.019 x 0.025 and 0.021 x 0.025-inch), bracket/archwire angulation (0, 5 and 10 degrees) and the presence of unstimulated human saliva were investigated. The study demonstrated that both increases in wire size and bracket/archwire angulation resulted in increased static frictional resistance for all bracket types tested, with the presence of saliva having an inconsistent effect. Mobil-Lock Variable-Slot had the least friction for all wires for 0 degree angulation. However, with the introduction of angulation, the values were comparable to those of the other brackets. Activa brackets had the second lowest frictional resistance, although high values were found with 0.019 x 0.025-inch wires. SPEED brackets demonstrated low forces with round wires, although with rectangular wires or in the presence of angulation, friction was greatly increased. Ultratrimm brackets produced large individual variation, confirming the difficulty in standardizing ligation force, although under certain conditions, significantly larger frictional forces were observed. In conclusion, self-ligating brackets showed reduced frictional resistance in comparison to steel ligated brackets only under certain conditions. PMID:9459030

  15. The Brackets Design and Stress Analysis of a Refinery's Hot Water Pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, San-Ping; He, Yan-Lin

    2016-05-01

    The reconstruction engineering which reconstructs the hot water pipeline from a power station to a heat exchange station requires the new hot water pipeline combine with old pipe racks. Taking the allowable span calculated based on GB50316 and the design philosophy of the pipeline supports into account, determine the types and locations of brackets. By analyzing the stresses of the pipeline in AutoPIPE, adjusting the supports at dangerous segments, recalculating in AutoPIPE, at last determine the types, locations and numbers of supports reasonably. Then the overall pipeline system will satisfy the requirement of the ASME B31.3.

  16. Interpreting sero-epidemiological studies for influenza in a context of non-bracketing sera

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, Tim K.; Fang, Vicky J.; Perera, Ranawaka A. P. M.; Ip, Dennis K. M.; Leung, Gabriel M.; Malik Peiris, J. S.; Cauchemez, Simon; Cowling, Benjamin J.

    2016-01-01

    Background In influenza epidemiology, analysis of paired sera collected from people before and after influenza seasons has been used for decades to study the cumulative incidence of influenza virus infections in populations. However, interpretation becomes challenging when sera are collected after the start or before the end of an epidemic, and do not neatly bracket the epidemic. Methods Serum samples were collected longitudinally in a community-based study. Most participants provided their first serum after the start of circulation of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus in 2009. We developed a Bayesian hierarchical model to correct for non-bracketing sera and estimate the cumulative incidence of infection from the serological data and surveillance data in Hong Kong. Results We analysed 4843 sera from 2097 unvaccinated participants in the study, collected from April 2009 through December 2010. After accounting for non-bracketing, we estimated that the cumulative incidence of H1N1pdm09 virus infection was 45.1% (95% credible interval, CI: 40.2%, 49.2%), 16.5% (95% CI: 13.0%, 19.7%) and 11.3% (95% CI: 5.9%, 17.5%) for children 0–18y, adults 19–50y and older adults >50y respectively. Including all available data substantially increased precision compared to a simpler analysis based only on sera collected at 6-month intervals in a subset of participants. Conclusions We developed a framework for the analysis of antibody titers that accounted for the timing of sera collection with respect to influenza activity and permitted robust estimation of the cumulative incidence of infection during an epidemic. PMID:26427725

  17. Surface modification of polypropylene based particle foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreier, P.; Trassl, C.; Altstädt, V.

    2014-05-01

    This paper deals with the modification of the surface properties of expanded polypropylene (EPP). EPP is a semi-hard to soft elastic thermoplastic foam. The characteristic surface of EPP shows process-related steam nozzle imprints and gussets. Therefore EPP does not satisfy the quality requirements for visible automotive applications. In order to meet these demands, plastic surfaces are usually enhanced with functional or decorative coatings, e.g. textiles, plastic films or paint. The coating of plastics with low surface energies such as PP often leads to adhesion problems by reason of the missing polar and functional groups. This paper gives an evaluation of activation and pre-treatment methods of EPP, with the aim to identify the most suitable pre-treatment method. For this purpose five typical surface treatment methods - flame treatment, corona, fluorination, atmospheric and low-pressure plasma - were performed on EPP samples. As a comparison criterion the maximum increase in the adhesion force between a polyurethane-based coating and the modified EPP substrate was selected. Moreover the influence of the selected pre-treatment method on the increase in the total surface energy and its polar component was investigated by the drop shape analysis method. The results showed that the contact angle measurement is a suitable method to determine the polar and disperse fractions of the surface tension of EPP. Furthermore, all performed methods increased the adhesion of EPP.

  18. An innovative approach for investigating the ceramic bracket-enamel interface - optical coherence tomography and confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romînu, Roxana Otilia; Sinescu, Cosmin; Romînu, Mihai; Negrutiu, Meda; Laissue, Philippe; Mihali, Sorin; Cuc, Lavinia; Hughes, Michael; Bradu, Adrian; Podoleanu, Adrian

    2008-09-01

    Bonding has become a routine procedure in several dental specialties - from prosthodontics to conservative dentistry and even orthodontics. In many of these fields it is important to be able to investigate the bonded interfaces to assess their quality. All currently employed investigative methods are invasive, meaning that samples are destroyed in the testing procedure and cannot be used again. We have investigated the interface between human enamel and bonded ceramic brackets non-invasively, introducing a combination of new investigative methods - optical coherence tomography (OCT) and confocal microscopy (CM). Brackets were conventionally bonded on conditioned buccal surfaces of teeth The bonding was assessed using these methods. Three dimensional reconstructions of the detected material defects were developed using manual and semi-automatic segmentation. The results clearly prove that OCT and CM are useful in orthodontic bonding investigations.

  19. Shear bond strength of metallic brackets photo-activated with light-emitting diode (LED) at different exposure times.

    PubMed

    Rêgo, Emanuel Braga; Romano, Fábio Lourenço

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the shear bond strength of orthodontic metallic brackets photo-activated with two different light-curing sources at different exposure times: halogen light (XL 1500, 3M ESPE) and LED light (Ortholux, 3M Unitek). Sixty bovine permanent lower incisors were inserted into PVC tubes containing plaster. The buccal surfaces were cleaned with pumice and water, and then etched with 37% phosphoric acid gel. The XT Primer bonding agent (3M Unitek) was applied to the enamel surfaces and the metallic pre-coated brackets (Transbond APC II system, 3M Unitek) were attached to upper central incisors. The teeth were randomly divided into four groups (n=15). In Group I (Control), halogen light was used for 40 seconds, while in Groups II, III, and IV were light-cured with LED light unit for 40, 10, and 5 seconds, respectively. The teeth were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours. The brackets were submitted to shear bond strength test in universal testing machine (Instron) at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/minute. Shear bond strength means (MPa) were 4.87 for Group I; 5.89 for Group II; 4.83 for Group III, and 4.39 for Group IV. Tukey's test detected no statistically significant differences among the groups regarding the shear bond strength (p>0.05). Neither of the types of light-curing sources or exposure times influenced the shear bond strength of metallic brackets. PMID:19089170

  20. SHEAR BOND STRENGTH OF METALLIC BRACKETS PHOTO-ACTIVATED WITH LIGHT-EMITTING DIODE (LED) AT DIFFERENT EXPOSURE TIMES

    PubMed Central

    Rêgo, Emanuel Braga; Romano, Fábio Lourenço

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the shear bond strength of orthodontic metallic brackets photo-activated with two different light-curing sources at different exposure times: halogen light (XL 1500, 3M ESPE) and LED light (Ortholux, 3M Unitek). Sixty bovine permanent lower incisors were inserted into PVC tubes containing plaster. The buccal surfaces were cleaned with pumice and water, and then etched with 37% phosphoric acid gel. The XT Primer bonding agent (3M Unitek) was applied to the enamel surfaces and the metallic pre-coated brackets (Transbond APC II system, 3M Unitek) were attached to upper central incisors. The teeth were randomly divided into four groups (n=15). In Group I (Control), halogen light was used for 40 seconds, while in Groups II, III, and IV were light-cured with LED light unit for 40, 10, and 5 seconds, respectively. The teeth were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours. The brackets were submitted to shear bond strength test in universal testing machine (Instron) at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/minute. Shear bond strength means (MPa) were 4.87 for Group I; 5.89 for Group II; 4.83 for Group III, and 4.39 for Group IV. Tukey's test detected no statistically significant differences among the groups regarding the shear bond strength (p>0.05). Neither of the types of light-curing sources or exposure times influenced the shear bond strength of metallic brackets. PMID:19089170

  1. Effect of Saliva Contamination on Microleakage Beneath Bonded Brackets: A Comparison Between Two Moisture-Tolerant Bonding Systems

    PubMed Central

    Toodehzaeim, Mohammad Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to evaluate the effects of saliva contamination on the metallic bracket microleakage bonded with two moisture-tolerant bonding systems. Materials and Methods: Ninety freshly extracted premolar teeth were randomly divided into six groups of 15 with the following treatments: G1 (control): After acid etching, Assure primer and Assure adhesive were applied to non-contaminated enamel surfaces. G2 (contaminated after etching): The etched enamel surface was exposed to saliva, then Assure primer and Assure adhesive were applied. G3 (contaminated after priming): Saliva contamination was done after application of Assure primer. The exact same procedures were applied to groups G4 to G6 except that TIMP primer and Transbond Plus adhesive system were used. To measure the microleakage score, the teeth were stained with 2% methylene blue for 24 hours, sectioned and examined under a stereomicroscope at ×16 magnification. Data analysis was performed using Fisher’s exact test. Results: In dry conditions, Assure and TMIP were not significantly different in terms of microleakage scores. All contaminated groups exhibited higher microleakage score at the enamel/adhesive interface compared to the bracket/adhesive interface (P< 0.01). In wet conditions, Assure groups showed higher microleakage at the enamel-adhesive interface compared to the TMIP groups (P<0.05). At the bracket-adhesive interface, the microleakage scores were not significantly different in saliva contaminated groups compared to the controls. Conclusion: Saliva contamination caused greater microleakage at the enamel-adhesive interface compared to the adhesive-bracket interface. PMID:27252758

  2. Comparative Evaluation of Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets on Pretreatment with CPPACP, Fluor Protector and Phosflur: An In-vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study is to evaluate bond strength, bracket tooth interface of Orthodontic brackets that are bonded for fixed Orthodontic treatment procedure on pretreatment with CPPACP, Fluor Protector and Phosflur. The goal is to assess the adhesive remnants following application of these remineralizing agents using Adhesive Remnant Index. Materials and Methods: Two hundred freshly extracted premolar teeth each divided into Control, CPP-ACP, Fluor Protector and Phosflur. Teeth were pretreated with these agents prior to bonding procedure. Shear Bond Strength was tested using a Universal Testing Machine. A jig was attached to upper jaw of the machine. The acrylic block containing the embedded teeth was secured in the lower jaw of the machine such that the bracket base of the teeth parallel the direction of the shear force at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/minute until bracket failure. The force required to dislodge the bracket was recorded. Results: Mean Shear bond strength value is highest for Phosflur (15.3658 ± 2.4546 ) followed by Fluor Protector , CPP-ACP and lowest for Control (7.0462 ± 0.8838 MPa). Conclusion: Phosflur, Fluor protector,CPP-ACP have comparable Shear bond strength values in comparison to control. PMID:24995233

  3. 12. FLOOR BEAMS, BRACKETS, STRINGERS. (Also includes a schedule of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. FLOOR BEAMS, BRACKETS, STRINGERS. (Also includes a schedule of parts.) American Bridge Company, Ambridge Plant No. 5, sheet no. 2, dated April 2, 1928 (revised 4-24-28), order no. F5073. For U.S. Steel Products Company, Pacific Coast Depot, order no. SF578. For Southern Pacific Company, order no. 8873-P-28746. Scale 1/4 inch to one foot. - Napa River Railroad Bridge, Spanning Napa River, east of Soscol Avenue, Napa, Napa County, CA

  4. Comparison of shear bond strengths of orthodontic brackets bonded with flowable composites.

    PubMed

    Turgut, Melek D; Attar, Nuray; Korkmaz, Yonca; Gokcelik, Aylin

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the shear bond strengths of orthodontic brackets bonded to human premolars using five different combinations of flowable composites and one-step self-etching adhesives (n=12): (1) Adper Easy Bond+Filtek Supreme XT Flow; (2) Futurabond NR+Grandio Flow; (3) Clearfil S3 Bond+Clearfil Majesty Flow; (4) AdheSE One+Tetric EvoFlow; and (5) Transbond Plus Self Etching Primer+Transbond XT Light Cure Adhesive. After shear bond strength testing, adhesive remnant index (ARI) scores were given according to the amount of adhesive and resin remaining on the brackets. On shear bond strength, there were no statistically significant differences between Groups 2 and 4 and between Groups 3 and 5 (p>0.05). On ARI scores, the predominant ARI scores in Groups 1, 2, 3, and 5 were 4, 2, 5, and 4 respectively; in Group 4, they were 0 and 4. Results showed that some combinations of flowable composites and self-etching adhesives might not be suitable for orthodontic use due to their low shear bond strengths and high ARI scores -with the latter signaling the risk of damaging the enamel surface during debonding. PMID:21282886

  5. Effect of adhesive remnant removal on enamel topography after bracket debonding

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Larissa Adrian Meira; Valdrighi, Heloísa Cristina; Vedovello, Mario; Correr, Américo Bortolazzo

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: At orthodontic treatment completion, knowledge about the effects of adhesive remnant removal on enamel is paramount. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed at assessing the effect of different adhesive remnant removal methods on enamel topography (ESI) and surface roughness (Ra) after bracket debonding and polishing. METHODS: A total of 50 human premolars were selected and divided into five groups according to the method used for adhesive remnant removal: high speed tungsten carbide bur (TCB), Sof-Lex discs (SL), adhesive removing plier (PL), ultrasound (US) and Fiberglass burs (FB). Metal brackets were bonded with Transbond XT, stored at 37oC for 24 hours before debonding with adhesive removing plier. Subsequently, removal methods were carried out followed by polishing with pumice paste. Qualitative and quantitative analyses were conducted with pre-bonding, post-debonding and post-polishing analyses. Results were submitted to statistical analysis with F test (ANOVA) and Tukey's (Ra) as well as with Kruskal-Wallis and Bonferroni tests (ESI) (P < 0.05). RESULTS: US Ra and ESI were significantly greater than TCB, SL, PL and FB. Polishing minimized Ra and ESI in the SL and FB groups. CONCLUSION: Adhesive remnant removal with SL and FB associated with polishing are recommended due to causing little damage to the enamel. PMID:25628087

  6. Evaluation of an alternative technique to optimize direct bonding of orthodontic brackets to temporary crowns

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Francilena Maria Campos Santos; Pinzan-Vercelino, Célia Regina Maio; Tavares, Rudys Rodolfo de Jesus; Gurgel, Júlio de Araújo; Bramante, Fausto Silva; Fialho, Melissa Nogueira Proença

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare shear bond strength of different direct bonding techniques of orthodontic brackets to acrylic resin surfaces. METHODS: The sample comprised 64 discs of chemically activated acrylic resin (CAAR) randomly divided into four groups: discs in group 1 were bonded by means of light-cured composite resin (conventional adhesive); discs in group 2 had surfaces roughened with a diamond bur followed by conventional direct bonding by means of light-cured composite resin; discs in group 3 were bonded by means of CAAR (alternative adhesive); and discs in group 4 had surfaces roughened with a diamond bur followed by direct bonding by means of CAAR. Shear bond strength values were determined after 24 hours by means of a universal testing machine at a speed of 0.5 mm/min, and compared by analysis of variance followed by post-hoc Tukey test. Adhesive remnant index (ARI) was measured and compared among groups by means of Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn tests. RESULTS: Groups 3 and 4 had significantly greater shear bond strength values in comparison to groups 1 and 2. Groups 3 and 4 yielded similar results. Group 2 showed better results when compared to group 1. In ARI analyses, groups 1 and 2 predominantly exhibited a score equal to 0, whereas groups 3 and 4 predominantly exhibited a score equal to 3. CONCLUSIONS: Direct bonding of brackets to acrylic resin surfaces using CAAR yielded better results than light-cured composite resin. Surface preparation with diamond bur only increased shear bond strength in group 2. PMID:26352846

  7. Dirac-bracket structure in multidimensional mode conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brizard, A. J.; Tracy, E. R.; Kaufman, A. N.; Johnston, D.; Zobin, N.

    2012-05-01

    The intersection of two (2 n - 1)-dimensional dispersion manifolds Da and Db in the 2 n-dimensional ray phase space P yields a (2 n - 2)-dimensional conversion manifold M≡Da∩Db that naturally possesses a Dirac-bracket structure that is inherited from the canonical Poisson bracket on ray phase space. The canonical symplectic two-form Ω ≡ Ω∥ + Ω⊥, defined on the 2 n-dimensional tangent plane TP≡TM⊕(TM)⊥, can thus be decomposed into the Dirac two-form Ω∥ on the (2 n - 2)-dimensional tangent plane TM at a conversion point z0∈M, and the symplectic two-form Ω⊥ on its orthogonal 2-dimensional complement (TM)⊥. These two symplectic two-forms are introduced in our analysis of multidimensional mode conversion, where their respective geometrical roles are defined. We note that since the Dirac-bracket structure Ω∥ vanishes identically when n = 1, it represents a new structure in multidimensional ( n > 1) mode conversion theory.

  8. Comparison of the frictional characteristics of aesthetic orthodontic brackets measured using a modified in vitro technique

    PubMed Central

    Arici, Nursel

    2015-01-01

    Objective The coefficients of friction (COFs) of aesthetic ceramic and stainless steel brackets used in conjunction with stainless steel archwires were investigated using a modified linear tribometer and special computer software, and the effects of the bracket slot size (0.018 inches [in] or 0.022 in) and materials (ceramic or metal) on the COF were determined. Methods Four types of ceramic (one with a stainless steel slot) and one conventional stainless steel bracket were tested with two types of archwire sizes: a 0.017 × 0.025-in wire in the 0.018-in slots and a 0.019 × 0.025-in wire in the 0.022-in slot brackets. For pairwise comparisons between the 0.018-in and 0.022-in slot sizes in the same bracket, an independent sample t-test was used. One-way and two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's post-hoc test at the 95% confidence level (α = 0.05) were also used for statistical analyses. Results There were significant differences between the 0.022-in and 0.018-in slot sizes for the same brand of bracket. ANOVA also showed that both slot size and bracket slot material had significant effects on COF values (p < 0.001). The ceramic bracket with a 0.022-in stainless steel slot showed the lowest mean COF (µ = 0.18), followed by the conventional stainless steel bracket with a 0.022-in slot (µ = 0.21). The monocrystalline alumina ceramic bracket with a 0.018-in slot had the highest COF (µ = 0.85). Conclusions Brackets with stainless steel slots exhibit lower COFs than ceramic slot brackets. All brackets show lower COFs as the slot size increases. PMID:25667915

  9. Coated Rectangular Composite Archwires: A Comparison Of Self-Ligating And Conventional Bracket Systems During Sliding Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, David Keith

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the resistance to sliding of coated rectangular fiber reinforced composite archwires using various brackets systems and second-order bracket angulations. Resistance to sliding was investigated for eight bracket systems: six self-ligating brackets (four passive and two passive-active) and two conventional brackets. A rectangular fiber reinforced composite archwire of 0.019 x 0.025-in dimension from BiomersRTM SimpliClear was drawn through a three-bracket model system at ten millimeters per minute for 2.5 millimeters. For each bracket, the resistance to sliding was measured at four bracket angulations (0°, 2.5°, 5°, and 10°) in a dry state at room temperature. The fiber reinforced composite archwire produced the lowest sliding resistance with the passive self-ligating bracket system (Damon DQ) at each bracket angulation tested. Overall, self-ligating bracket systems generated lower sliding resistance than conventionally ligated systems, and one passive/active self-ligating bracket system (In-Ovation-R). There was a significant increase in resistance to sliding as bracket angulation increased for all bracket systems tested. Microscopic analysis revealed increased perforation of the archwire coating material as bracket angulations were increased. Our findings show that the rectangular fiber reinforced composite archwire may be acceptable for sliding mechanics during the intermediate stages of orthodontic tooth movement, however more long-term studies are needed.

  10. A surface-stress-based microcantilever aptasensor.

    PubMed

    Lim, Yang Choon; Kouzani, Abbas Z; Duan, Wei; Dai, Xiujuan J; Kaynak, Akif; Mair, Douglas

    2014-02-01

    Biosensors based on microcantilevers convert biological recognition events into measurable mechanical displacements. They offer advantages such as small size, low sample volume, label-free detection, ease of integration, high-throughput analysis, and low development cost. The design and development of a microcantilever-based aptasensor employing SU-8 polymer as the fabrication material is presented in this paper. Aptamers are employed as bioreceptor elements because they exhibit superior specificity compared to antibodies due to their small size and physicochemical stability. To immobilise thrombin DNA aptamer on the bare SU-8 surface of the aptasensor, a combined plasma mode treatment method is implemented which modifies the surface of the aptasensor. Label-free detection of thrombin molecules using the fabricated aptasensor is successfully demonstrated. The measured deflection is one order of magnitude higher than that of a silicon nitride microcantilever biosensor. The developed aptasensor also demonstrates high specificity.

  11. HOTB: High precision parallel code for calculation of four-particle harmonic oscillator transformation brackets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepšys, A.; Mickevicius, S.; Germanas, D.; Kalinauskas, R. K.

    2014-11-01

    effective way, which allows us to calculate matrix of the brackets up to a few hundred times more rapidly and more accurate than in a previous version. Solution method: Using external parallelization libraries and mutable precision we created a pack of numerical codes based on the methods of compact expressions of the three and four-particle harmonics oscillator brackets 3HOB, 4HOB, presented in [3]. Restrictions: For double precision version calculations can be done up to harmonic oscillator (HO) energy quanta e=28. For quadruple precision mantissa is equal to approximately 34 decimal digits, therefore calculations can be done up to HO energy quanta to e=52. Running time: The running time depends on the harmonic oscillator energy quanta, cluster size and the precision of intermediate calculations. More information on Table 1 for 3HOB and Table 2 for 4HOB. Reasons for a new version: The new program version expands the limits of harmonic oscillator energy quanta and gives shorter calculation time. Extend the limits of calculation of HOB First version was able to produce harmonic oscillator transformation brackets for three and four particles if E≤HO energy quanta. With this version of our program, if quadruple or arbitrary precision functions are being used, it is possible to calculate three and four particle harmonic oscillator transformation brackets for greater values of energy and momenta, while sustaining tolerable margin of error. Calculation time As the code of previous version of program was redone using parallelism paradigma, it is now possible to reduce the calculation time of transformation matrices significantly, depending on the size of computing cluster, as the dimensions of matrices are growing very rapidly according to the energy and momenta values. subroutinematrix_4HOB_dimensionCalculates the dimension of 4HOB matrix. subroutinematrix_3HOB_dimensionCalculates the dimension of 3HOB matrix, subroutinematrix_3HOBCalculates the global state array which is

  12. Effect of laser-assisted bleaching with Nd:YAG and diode lasers on shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets.

    PubMed

    Mirhashemi, Amirhossein; Emadian Razavi, Elham Sadat; Behboodi, Sara; Chiniforush, Nasim

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of laser-assisted bleaching with neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) and diode lasers on shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets. One hundred and four extracted human premolars were randomly divided into four groups: group 1: No bleaching applied (control group); group 2: Teeth bleached with 40 % hydrogen peroxide; group 3: Teeth treated with 30 % hydrogen peroxide activated with Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm, 2.5 W, 25 Hz, pulse duration of 100 μs, 6 mm distance); and group 4: Teeth treated with 30 % hydrogen peroxide activated with diode laser (810 nm, 1 W, CW, 6 mm distance). Equal numbers of teeth in groups 2, 3, and 4 were bonded at start, 1 h, 24 h, and 1 week after bleaching. A universal testing machine measured the SBS of the samples 24 h after bonding. After bracket debonding, the amount of residual adhesive on the enamel surface was observed under a stereomicroscope to determine the adhesive remnant index (ARI) scores. The SBS in the unbleached group was significantly higher than that in the bleached groups bonded immediately and 1 h after laser-assisted bleaching (P < 0.05). In groups 3 and 4 at start and group 2 at start and 1 h after laser-assisted bleaching, the SBS was found to be significantly lower than that in the control group. Significant differences in the ARI scores existed among groups as well. The SBS of brackets seems to increase quickly within an hour after laser-assisted bleaching and 24 h after conventional bleaching. Thus, this protocol can be recommended if it is necessary to bond the brackets on the same day of bleaching.

  13. Should the orthodontic brackets always be removed prior to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)?

    PubMed Central

    Poorsattar-Bejeh Mir, Arash; Rahmati-Kamel, Manouchehr

    2015-01-01

    Request for temporary removal of orthodontic appliances due to medical conditions that require magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is not uncommon in daily practice in the field of orthodontics. This may be at the expense of time and cost. Metal Orthodontic appliances cause more signal loss and image distortion as compared to ceramic and titanium ones. Stainless steel and large brackets in addition to the oriented miniscrews in relation to the axis of magnetic field may cause severe signal loss and image distortion. Moreover, gradient echo and frequency-selective fat saturation MR protocols are more susceptible to metal artifacts. The spin echo and fat-suppression protocols, low magnetic field strength (e.g., 1.5 Tesla vs. 3 Tesla), small field of view, high-resolution matrix, thin slice, increased echo train length and increased receiver band width could be applied to lessen the metal artifacts in MR images. The larger the distance between an appliance and desired location to be imaged, the lower the distortion and signal loss. Decision to remove brackets should be made based on its composition and desired anatomic location. In this review, first the principles of MR imaging are introduced (Part-I) and then the interactions of orthodontic appliances and magnetic field are farther discussed (Part-II). PMID:27195213

  14. Should the orthodontic brackets always be removed prior to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)?

    PubMed

    Poorsattar-Bejeh Mir, Arash; Rahmati-Kamel, Manouchehr

    2016-01-01

    Request for temporary removal of orthodontic appliances due to medical conditions that require magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is not uncommon in daily practice in the field of orthodontics. This may be at the expense of time and cost. Metal Orthodontic appliances cause more signal loss and image distortion as compared to ceramic and titanium ones. Stainless steel and large brackets in addition to the oriented miniscrews in relation to the axis of magnetic field may cause severe signal loss and image distortion. Moreover, gradient echo and frequency-selective fat saturation MR protocols are more susceptible to metal artifacts. The spin echo and fat-suppression protocols, low magnetic field strength (e.g., 1.5 Tesla vs. 3 Tesla), small field of view, high-resolution matrix, thin slice, increased echo train length and increased receiver band width could be applied to lessen the metal artifacts in MR images. The larger the distance between an appliance and desired location to be imaged, the lower the distortion and signal loss. Decision to remove brackets should be made based on its composition and desired anatomic location. In this review, first the principles of MR imaging are introduced (Part-I) and then the interactions of orthodontic appliances and magnetic field are farther discussed (Part-II). PMID:27195213

  15. Comparison of Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets Bonded to Enamel Prepared By Er:YAG Laser and Conventional Acid-Etching

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, M.H.; Namvar, F.; Chalipa, J.; Saber, K.; Chiniforush, N.; Sarmadi, S.; Mirhashemi, A.H.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to compare shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets bonded to enamel prepared by Er:YAG laser with two different powers and conventional acid-etching. Materials and Methods: Forty-five human premolars extracted for orthodontic purposes were randomly assigned to three groups based on conditioning method: Group 1- conventional etching with 37% phosphoric acid; Group 2- irradiation with Er:YAG laser at 1 W; and Group 3- irradiation with Er:YAG laser at 1.5 W. Metal brackets were bonded on prepared enamel using a light-cured composite. All groups were subjected to thermocycling process. Then, the specimens mounted in auto-cure acryle and shear bond strength were measured using a universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm per second. After debonding, the amount of resin remaining on the teeth was determined using the adhesive remnant index (ARI) scored 1 to 5. One-way analysis of variance was used to compare shear bond strengths and the Kruskal-Wallis test was performed to evaluate differences in the ARI for different etching types. Results: The mean and standard deviation of conventional acid-etch group, 1W laser group and 1.5W laser group was 3.82 ± 1.16, 6.97 ± 3.64 and 6.93 ± 4.87, respectively. Conclusion: The mean SBS obtained with an Er:YAG laser operated at 1W or 1.5W is approximately similar to that of conventional etching. However, the high variability of values in bond strength of irradiated enamel should be considered to find the appropriate parameters for applying Er:YAG laser as a favorable alternative for surface conditioning. PMID:22924098

  16. A comparative study of conventional ligation and self-ligation bracket systems.

    PubMed

    Shivapuja, P K; Berger, J

    1994-11-01

    The increased use of self-ligating bracket systems frequently raises the question of how they compare with conventional ligation systems. An in vitro and clinical investigation was undertaken to evaluate and compare these distinctly different groups, by using five different brackets. The Activa ("A" Company, Johnson & Johnson, San Diego, Calif.), Edgelok (Ormco, Glendora, Calif.), and SPEED (Strite Industries Ltd., Cambridge, Ontario) self-ligating bracket systems displayed a significantly lower level of frictional resistance, dramatically less chairtime for arch wire removal and insertion, and promoted improved infection control, when compared with polyurethane elastomeric and stainless steel tie wire ligation for ceramic and metal twin brackets. PMID:7977187

  17. Evaluation of Friction in Orthodontics Using Various Brackets and Archwire Combinations-An in Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sujeet; Hamsa P.R, Rani; Ahmed, Sameer; Prasanthma; Bhatnagar, Apoorva; Sidhu, Manreet; Shetty, Pramod

    2014-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to compare frictional resistance which was produced between conventional brackets (0.022 slot Otho-Organiser) and self ligating brackets (active Forestadent and passive Damon III) by using various arch wire combinations (0.016 Niti, 0.018 Niti, 0.017 x 0.025 SS and 0.019 x 0.025 SS). Methods: An experimental model which consisted of 5 aligned stainless steel 0.022-in brackets was used to assess frictional forces which were produced by SLBs (self ligating brackets) and CELs (conventional elastomeric ligatures) with use of 0.016 nickel titanium, 0.018 nickel titanium, 0.017 X 0.025”stainless steel and 0.019 X 0.025”stainless steel wires. Statistical analysis: One way ANOVA test was used to study the effect of the bracket type, wire alloy and section on frictional resistance test . Results: Conventional brackets produced highest levels of friction for all bracket/archwire combinations. Both Damon III and Forestadent brackets were found to produce significantly lower levels of friction when they were compared with elastomerically tied conventional brackets. Conclusion: SLBs are valid alternatives for low friction during sliding mechanics. PMID:24995241

  18. Maslov indices, Poisson brackets, and singular differential forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esterlis, I.; Haggard, H. M.; Hedeman, A.; Littlejohn, R. G.

    2014-06-01

    Maslov indices are integers that appear in semiclassical wave functions and quantization conditions. They are often notoriously difficult to compute. We present methods of computing the Maslov index that rely only on typically elementary Poisson brackets and simple linear algebra. We also present a singular differential form, whose integral along a curve gives the Maslov index of that curve. The form is closed but not exact, and transforms by an exact differential under canonical transformations. We illustrate the method with the 6j-symbol, which is important in angular-momentum theory and in quantum gravity.

  19. An evaluation of the influence of orthodontic adhesive on the stresses generated in a bonded bracket finite element model.

    PubMed

    Knox, J; Kralj, B; Hübsch, P F; Middleton, J; Jones, M L

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the stresses generated in the bracket-cement-tooth continuum by a tensile load case when the physical and geometric properties of cement are varied. A 2-stage approach was used. In the first stage, a validated 3-dimensional finite element model of the bracket-cement-tooth system was constructed that consisted of 15,324 nodes and 2971 finite elements. Bracket base geometry was held constant; the physical properties (elastic modulus; Poisson's ratio) and geometry (lute thickness) of the cement varied. A simplified 2-dimensional model was then developed to investigate the localized effects of the cement lute thickness and the shape of the lute periphery on the stress distribution in the system. Small increases in stress were recorded under load within the cement as the rigidity of the cement increased. Similarly, Poisson's ratio values above 0.4 appeared to have a small influence on the major principal stresses in the impregnated wire mesh layer when a tensile force was applied. Variation in lute thickness was shown to have an influence on the distribution of major principal stresses within the cement lute. Increased stresses were recorded at the lute periphery as the lute dimensions increased. The morphologic features of the lute periphery also appeared to have had a significant effect on the performance of an orthodontic adhesive. Acute cement-enamel angles resulted in an increased chance of singularity development and attachment failure. The physical properties and thickness of the cement lute and the shape of the cement lute periphery contribute to the stress distribution within the bracket-cement-tooth continuum and, therefore, the quality of orthodontic attachment provided.

  20. Dental plaque associated with self-ligating brackets during the initial phase of orthodontic treatment: A 3-month preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Al-Anezi, Saud A

    2014-01-01

    Background: To compare changes in the amount and distribution of dental plaque associated with placement of elastomeric modules over a self-ligating bracket during orthodontic treatment and to relate these changes to the periodontal inflammation. Materials and Methods: A cross-arch randomization trial was carried out at Bristol Dental School, United Kingdom. Clinical measurements of periodontal inflammation and plaque accumulation and microbiological test were done on 24 patients aged 11-14 years [Mean (SD) age = 12.6 (1.01) years] wearing fixed appliances (Damon 2 brackets, Ormco, Orange, CA, USA) at the start and 3 months into fixed orthodontic treatment. Results: In the first 3 months of treatment there was no statistically significant difference in bleeding on probing between incisors with and without elastomeric modules (P = 0.125 and 0.508, respectively). The difference in plaque accumulation was not statistically significant (P = 0.78). The difference in probing depths between the incisors was not statistically significant (P = 0.84). The microbiological analysis showed no difference. Conclusions: Based on this preliminary 3 months study, elastomeric modules were not significantly associated with any increased risk during treatment when compared to self-ligating brackets. The longer term studies are needed to further confirm the findings of the present study. PMID:24987657

  1. A comparative study of qualitative and quantitative methods for the assessment of adhesive remnant after bracket debonding.

    PubMed

    Cehreli, S Burcak; Polat-Ozsoy, Omur; Sar, Cagla; Cubukcu, H Evren; Cehreli, Zafer C

    2012-04-01

    The amount of the residual adhesive after bracket debonding is frequently assessed in a qualitative manner, utilizing the adhesive remnant index (ARI). This study aimed to investigate whether quantitative assessment of the adhesive remnant yields more precise results compared to qualitative methods utilizing the 4- and 5-point ARI scales. Twenty debonded brackets were selected. Evaluation and scoring of the adhesive remnant on bracket bases were made consecutively using: 1. qualitative assessment (visual scoring) and 2. quantitative measurement (image analysis) on digital photographs. Image analysis was made on scanning electron micrographs (SEM) and high-precision elemental maps of the adhesive remnant as determined by energy dispersed X-ray spectrometry. Evaluations were made in accordance with the original 4-point and the modified 5-point ARI scales. Intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) were calculated, and the data were evaluated using Friedman test followed by Wilcoxon signed ranks test with Bonferroni correction. ICC statistics indicated high levels of agreement for qualitative visual scoring among examiners. The 4-point ARI scale was compliant with the SEM assessments but indicated significantly less adhesive remnant compared to the results of quantitative elemental mapping. When the 5-point scale was used, both quantitative techniques yielded similar results with those obtained qualitatively. These results indicate that qualitative visual scoring using the ARI is capable of generating similar results with those assessed by quantitative image analysis techniques. In particular, visual scoring with the 5-point ARI scale can yield similar results with both the SEM analysis and elemental mapping.

  2. Surface Functionalization of Graphene-based Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathkar, Akshay

    Graphene-based materials have generated tremendous interest in the past decade. Manipulating their characteristics using wet-chemistry methods holds distinctive value, as it provides a means towards scaling up, while not being limited by yield. The majority of this thesis focuses on the surface functionalization of graphene oxide (GO), which has drawn tremendous attention as a tunable precursor due to its readily chemically manipulable surface and richly functionalized basal plane. Firstly, a room-temperature based method is presented to reduce GO stepwise, with each organic moiety being removed sequentially. Characterization confirms the carbonyl group to be reduced first, while the tertiary alcohol is reduced last, as the optical gap decrease from 3.5 eV down to 1 eV. This provides greater control over GO, which is an inhomogeneous system, and is the first study to elucidate the order of removal of each functional group. In addition to organically manipulating GO, this thesis also reports a chemical methodology to inorganically functionalize GO and tune its wetting characteristics. A chemical method to covalently attach fluorine atoms in the form of tertiary alkyl fluorides is reported, and confirmed by MAS 13C NMR, as two forms of fluorinated graphene oxide (FGO) with varying C/F and C/O ratios are synthesized. Introducing C-F bonds decreases the overall surface free energy, which drastically reduces GO's wetting behavior, especially in its highly fluorinated form. Ease of solution processing leads to development of sprayable inks that are deposited on a range of porous and nonporous surfaces to impart amphiphobicity. This is the first report that tunes the wetting characteristics of GO. Lastly as a part of a collaboration with ConocoPhillips, another class of carbon nanomaterials - carbon nanotubes (CNTs), have been inorganically functionalized to repel 30 wt% MEA, a critical solvent in CO 2 recovery. In addition to improving the solution processability of CNTs

  3. A smart car for the surface shape measurement of large antenna based on laser tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Yonggang; Hu, Jing; Jin, Yi; Zhai, Chao

    2012-09-01

    The geometric accuracy of the surface shape of large antenna is an important indicator of antenna’s quality. Currently, high-precision measurement of large antenna surface shape can be performed in two ways: photogrammetry and laser tracker. Photogrammetry is a rapid method, but its accuracy is not enough good. Laser tracker can achieve high precision, but it is very inconvenient to move the reflector (target mirror) on the surface of the antenna by hand during the measurement. So, a smart car is designed to carry the reflector in this paper. The car, controlled by wireless, has a small weight and a strong ability for climbing, and there is a holding bracket gripping the reflector and controlling reflector rise up and drop down on the car. During the measurement of laser tracker, the laser beam between laser tracker and the reflector must not be interrupted, so two high-precision three-dimensional miniature electronic compasses, which can real-time monitor the relative angle between the holding bracket and the laser tracker’s head, are both equipped on the car and the head of laser tracker to achieve automatic alignment between reflector and laser beam. With the aid of the smart car, the measurement of laser tracker has the advantages of high precision and rapidity.

  4. Hand gesture recognition based on surface electromyography.

    PubMed

    Samadani, Ali-Akbar; Kulic, Dana

    2014-01-01

    Human hands are the most dexterous of human limbs and hand gestures play an important role in non-verbal communication. Underlying electromyograms associated with hand gestures provide a wealth of information based on which varying hand gestures can be recognized. This paper develops an inter-individual hand gesture recognition model based on Hidden Markov models that receives surface electromyography (sEMG) signals as inputs and predicts a corresponding hand gesture. The developed recognition model is tested with a dataset of 10 various hand gestures performed by 25 subjects in a leave-one-subject-out cross validation and an inter-individual recognition rate of 79% was achieved. The promising recognition rate demonstrates the efficacy of the proposed approach for discriminating between gesture-specific sEMG signals and could inform the design of sEMG-controlled prostheses and assistive devices. PMID:25570917

  5. A study of the frictional characteristics of four commercially available self-ligating bracket systems.

    PubMed

    Budd, Steven; Daskalogiannakis, John; Tompson, Bryan D

    2008-12-01

    The objective of this investigation was to assess and compare the in vitro tribological behaviour of four commercially available self-ligating bracket systems. The frictional characteristics of the Damon3, Speed, In-Ovation R, and Time2 bracket systems were studied using a jig that mimics the three-dimensional movements that occur during sliding mechanics. Each bracket system was tested on the following stainless steel archwires: 0.016 x 0.022, 0.019 x 0.025, 0.020 round, and 0.021 x 0.021 inch Speed D-wire. An Instron testing machine with a 50 N load cell was used to measure the frictional resistance for each bracket/tooth assembly. The crosshead speed was set at a constant rate of 1 mm/minute, and each typodont tooth was moved along a fixed wire segment for a distance of 8 mm. Descriptive statistical analysis for each bracket/archwire combination with regard to frictional resistance was performed with a two-way, balanced analysis of variance for bracket type and wire size. The Damon3 bracket consistently demonstrated the lowest frictional resistance to sliding, while the Speed bracket produced significantly (P < 0.001) more frictional resistance than the other brackets tested for any given archwire. The self-ligation design (passive versus active) appears to be the primary variable responsible for the frictional resistance generated by self-ligating brackets during translation. Passively ligated brackets produce less frictional resistance; however, this decreased friction may result in decreased control compared with actively ligated systems. PMID:18974067

  6. Spectrophotometric evaluation of dental bleaching under orthodontic bracket in enamel and dentin

    PubMed Central

    Correr, Americo-Bortolazzo; Rastelli, Alessandra-Nara-Souza; Lima, Débora-Alves-Nunes-Leite; Consani, Rafael-Leonardo-Xediek

    2014-01-01

    Aware of the diffusion capacity of bleaching in the dental tissues, many orthodontists are subjecting their patients to dental bleaching during orthodontic treatment for esthetic purposes or to anticipate the exchange of esthetic restorations after the orthodontic treatment. For this purpose specific products have been developed in pre-loaded whitening trays designed to fit over and around brackets and wires, with clinical efficacy proven. Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate, through spectrophotometric reflectance, the effectiveness of dental bleaching under orthodontic bracket. Material and Methods: Thirty-two bovine incisors crown blocks of 8 mm x 8 mm height lengths were used. Staining of tooth blocks with black tea was performed for six days. They were distributed randomly into 4 groups (1-home bleaching with bracket, 2- home bleaching without bracket, 3- office bleaching with bracket, 4 office bleaching without bracket). The color evaluation was performed (CIE L * a * b *) using color reflectance spectrophotometer. Metal brackets were bonded in groups 1 and 3. The groups 1 and 2 samples were subjected to the carbamide peroxide at 15%, 4 hours daily for 21 days. Groups 3 and 4 were subjected to 3 in-office bleaching treatment sessions, hydrogen peroxide 38%. After removal of the brackets, the second color evaluation was performed in tooth block, difference between the area under the bracket and around it, and after 7 days to verified color stability. Data analysis was performed using the paired t-test and two-way variance analysis and Tukey’s. Results: The home bleaching technique proved to be more effective compared to the office bleaching. There was a significant difference between the margin and center color values of the specimens that were subjected to bracket bonding. Conclusions: The bracket bond presence affected the effectiveness of both the home and office bleaching treatments. Key words:Tooth bleaching, spectrophotometry

  7. Electrical servo actuator bracket. [fuel control valves on jet engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawyer, R. V. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    An electrical servo actuator is mounted on a support arm which is allowed to pivot on a bolt through a fixed mounting bracket. The actuator is pivotally connected to the end of the support arm by a bolt which has an extension allowed to pass through a slot in the fixed mounting bracket. An actuator rod extends from the servo actuator to a crank arm which turns a control shaft. A short linear thrust of the rod pivots the crank arm through about 90 for full-on control with the rod contracted into the servo actuator, and full-off control when the rod is extended from the actuator. A spring moves the servo actuator and actuator rod toward the control crank arm once the actuator rod is fully extended in the full-off position. This assures the turning of the control shaft to a full-off position. A stop bolt and slot are provided to limit pivot motion. Once fully extended, the spring pivots the motion.

  8. Brackets, epitopes and flash memory cards: a futuristic view of clinical orthodontics.

    PubMed

    Sims, M R

    1999-11-01

    Orthodontics continues to be a profession anchored in traditional technology using appliances that cause inflammatory periodontal ligament (PDL) responses. Existing concepts of biological tooth movement based largely on histological tissue observations and the application of physical principles require major reassessment. In the next millennium, the genome revolution and knowledge of protein production and control could lead to the genetic correction of dentofacial anomalies and pain-free, biomolecular methods of malocclusion correction and long-term stability. A fundamental change is likely to be the abolition of bracket systems and their replacement with preprogrammed microchips driven by computers, and the control of PDL blood vessels and cells by pharmacological targeting. Future survival of the profession will depend on a radically different specialist who will be educated with a postgraduate curriculum based on molecular biology and computer engineering. PMID:10806932

  9. 21 CFR 872.3750 - Bracket adhesive resin and tooth conditioner.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Bracket adhesive resin and tooth conditioner. 872.3750 Section 872.3750 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3750 Bracket adhesive...

  10. The effect of bracket type and ligation method upon forces exerted by orthodontic archwires.

    PubMed

    Rock, W P; Wilson, H J

    1989-08-01

    The effects of bracket type and ligation method upon the forces exerted at 1.5-mm deflection by three archwire materials were measured in a simulated clinical situation. Significant force differences were found when archwires were used in standard edgewise or straightwire brackets, respectively, and also when Alastik modules were used for ligation instead of steel ligatures.

  11. Comparison of static friction with self-ligating, modified slot design and conventional brackets

    PubMed Central

    CASTRO, Raquel Morais; SMITH NETO, Perrin; HORTA, Martinho Campolina Rebello; PITHON, Matheus Melo; OLIVEIRA, Dauro Douglas

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare the static frictional forces generated at the bracket/wire interface of stainless steel brackets with different geometries and angulations, combined with orthodontic wires of different diameters. Material and Methods The frictional forces were evaluated with three different types of metal brackets: a passive self-ligating (SmartClipTM, 3M/Unitek, Monrovia, USA), with a modified slot design (Mini Uni TwinTM, 3M/Unitek, Monrovia, USA) and conventional (Kirium, Abzil, São José do Rio Preto, Brazil). The samples were mounted in a testing device with three different angulations and tested with 0.014" and 0.018" stainless steel wires (American Orthodontics, Sheboygan, USA). The static frictional force was measured using a universal testing machine (DL 500, EMIC®, São José dos Pinhais, Brazil) with a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Statistical analysis was performed by two-way ANOVA followed by Bonferroni's post hoc test. Results There was a significant difference (p<0.05) in static friction when the three types of brackets were tested with the same wire size. The wire diameter influenced friction only when the brackets had a 10º angulation (p<0.05). The angulation influenced friction (p<0.05) when the brackets were associated with a 0.018" wire. Conclusion Brackets with a modified slot design showed intermediate static frictional force values between the conventional and self-ligating brackets tested. PMID:24037069

  12. Comparative evaluation of nickel discharge from brackets in artificial saliva at different time intervals

    PubMed Central

    Jithesh, C.; Venkataramana, V.; Penumatsa, Narendravarma; Reddy, S. N.; Poornima, K. Y.; Rajasigamani, K.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine and compare the potential difference of nickel release from three different orthodontic brackets, in different artificial pH, in different time intervals. Materials and Methods: Twenty-seven samples of three different orthodontic brackets were selected and grouped as 1, 2, and 3. Each group was divided into three subgroups depending on the type of orthodontic brackets, salivary pH and the time interval. The Nickel release from each subgroup were analyzed by using inductively coupled plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrophotometer (Perkin Elmer, Optima 2100 DV, USA) model. Quantitative analysis of nickel was performed three times, and the mean value was used as result. ANOVA (F-test) was used to test the significant difference among the groups at 0.05 level of significance (P < 0.05). The descriptive method of statistics was used to calculate the mean, standard deviation, minimum and maximum. SPSS 18 software ((SPSS.Ltd, Quarry bay, Hong Kong, PASW-statistics 18) was used to analyze the study. Result: The analysis shows a significant difference between three groups. The study shows that the nickel releases from the recycled stainless steel brackets have the highest at all 4.2 pH except in 120 h. Conclusion: The study result shows that the nickel release from the recycled stainless steel brackets is highest. Metal slot ceramic bracket release significantly less nickel. So, recycled stainless steel brackets should not be used for nickel allergic patients. Metal slot ceramic brackets are advisable. PMID:26538924

  13. Friction Forces during Sliding of Various Brackets for Malaligned Teeth: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Crincoli, Vito; Di Bisceglie, Maria Beatrice; Balsamo, Antonio; Serpico, Vitaliano; Chiatante, Francesco; Pappalettere, Carmine; Boccaccio, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Aims. To measure the friction force generated during sliding mechanics with conventional, self-ligating (Damon 3 mx, Smart Clip, and Time 3) and low-friction (Synergy) brackets using different archwire diameters and ligating systems in the presence of apical and buccal malalignments of the canine. Methods. An experimental setup reproducing the right buccal segment of the maxillary arch was designed to measure the friction force generated at the bracket/wire and wire/ligature interfaces of different brackets. A complete factorial plan was drawn up and a three-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was carried out to investigate whether the following factors affect the values of friction force: (i) degree of malalignment, (ii) diameter of the orthodontic wire, and (iii) bracket/ligature combination. Tukey post hoc test was also conducted to evaluate any statistically significant differences between the bracket/ligature combinations analyzed. Results. ANOVA showed that all the above factors affect the friction force values. The friction force released during sliding mechanics with conventional brackets is about 5-6times higher than that released with the other investigated brackets. A quasilinear increase of the frictional forces was observed for increasing amounts of apical and buccal malalignments. Conclusion. The Synergy bracket with silicone ligature placed around the inner tie-wings appears to yield the best performance. PMID:23533364

  14. Revised calculation of four-particle harmonic-oscillator transformation brackets matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickevičius, S.; Germanas, D.; Kalinauskas, R. K.

    2013-02-01

    In this article we present a new, considerably enhanced and more rapid method for calculation of the matrix of four-particle harmonic-oscillator transformation brackets (4HOB). The new method is an improved version of 4HOB matrix calculations which facilitates the matrix calculation by finding the eigenvectors of the 4HOB matrix explicitly. Using this idea the new Fortran code for fast and 4HOB matrix calculation is presented. The calculation time decreases more than a few hundred times for large matrices. As many problems of nuclear and hadron physics structure are modeled on the harmonic oscillator (HO) basis our presented method can be useful for large-scale nuclear structure and many-particle identical fermion systems calculations. Program summaryTitle of program: HOTB_M Catalogue identifier: AEFQ_v3_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEFQ_v3_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License version 3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 2149 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 17576 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 90. Computer: Any computer with Fortran 90 compiler. Operating system: Windows, Linux, FreeBSD, True64 Unix. RAM: Up to a few Gigabytes (see Tables 1 and 2 included in the distribution package) Classification: 17.16, 17.17. Catalogue identifier of previous version: AEFQ_v2_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 182(2011)1377 Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Nature of problem: Calculation of the matrix of the 4HOB in a more effective way, which allows us to calculate the matrix of the brackets up to a few hundred times more rapidly than in a previous version. Solution method: The method is based on compact expressions of 4HOB, presented in [1] and its simplifications presented in this paper. Reasons for new version

  15. Effects of green tea on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets after in-office vital bleaching.

    PubMed

    Berger, Sandrine Bittencourt; Guiraldo, Ricardo Danil; Lopes, Murilo Baena; Oltramari-Navarro, Paula Vanessa; Fernandes, Thais Maria; Schwertner, Renata de Castro Alves; Ursi, Wagner José Silva

    2016-01-01

    The application of bleaching agents before placement of resin-bonded fixed appliances significantly, but temporarily, reduces bond strength to tooth structure. Antioxidants have been studied as a means to remove residual oxygen that compromises bonding to bleached enamel. This in vitro study evaluated whether green tea (GT) could restore the shear bond strength between bonded orthodontic brackets and bleached enamel. Six experimental groups were compared: group 1, no bleaching plus bracket bonding (positive control); group 2, bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP) plus bracket bonding (negative control); group 3, 35% HP plus 10% sodium ascorbate (SA) plus bracket bonding; group 4, 35% HP plus 10% GT plus bracket bonding; group 5, no bleaching plus 10% SA plus bracket bonding; group 6, no bleaching plus 10% GT plus bracket bonding. Results suggested that GT, like SA, may be beneficial for bracket bonding immediately after bleaching. PMID:27148662

  16. Comparisons of surface roughnesses and sliding resistances of 6 titanium-based or TMA-type archwires.

    PubMed

    Kusy, Robert P; Whitley, John Q; de Araújo Gurgel, Júlio

    2004-11-01

    Six titanium-based or TMA-type archwires (Beta III, Resolve, CNA, TMA, low-friction ion-implanted TMA or TMAL, and TiMolium) were studied as functions of composition, morphology, surface roughness, and sliding mechanics by using a scanning electron microscope, an x-ray energy dispersive wavelength analyser, a laser specular reflectometer, and a frictional testing machine. In the last instrument, all wires were coupled with 0.022-in stainless steel brackets in which normal forces were applied by 0.010-in stainless steel ligatures. With regard to composition, 5 wires were true beta-titanium alloys having nominal compositions of 80% titanium, 10% molybdenum, 6% zirconium, and 4% tin, and 1 was an alpha-beta alloy having a nominal composition of 90% titanium, 6% aluminum, 3% vanadium, and 1% other. Morphologies varied from surfaces with striations, scale, or layers of drawn material that suggested surface steps or fissures. Specular reflectance and optical roughness measurements divided the archwires into 2 groups of 3: Beta III, Resolve, and CNA had an overall mean value of 0.148 microm; and TMA, TMAL, and TiMolium had a mean overall value of 0.195 microm. These roughness measurements and their accompanying details of the compositional analyses suggested that there could be as few as 2 vendors manufacturing the 5 beta-titanium products. For 6 different values of angulation that embraced the passive and active regions of sliding, the coefficients of friction varied rather narrowly from 0.17 to 0.27 and were independent of surface roughnesses. Although these contemporary products are better than their predecessors of over a decade ago, other issues might be more important than surface finishes or frictional resistances because all products appear fairly comparable. PMID:15520692

  17. Effects of different black mediators on the shear strength of orthodontic bracket to the enamel treated with Nd-Yag laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shun-Te; Lin, I.-Shueng; Tsai, Chi-Cheng

    1995-04-01

    The Nd:YAG laser has ablation, crack, and crater effects on the dental enamel through black mediators which are very similar to the acid etching effects of phosphoric acid. This study was designed for searching how the different black mediators influence the shear strengths of the brackets bound to the enamel surfaces which were treated with the Nd:YAG laser. 90 bovine enamels divided into 5 groups were painted with 5 kinds of black mediators including Chinese ink, oil ink, black ball pen, water ink and black transfer paper. The enamel surfaces painted with black mediators were then radiated by Nd:YAG laser (ADL; American Dental Laser 300dl, power: 20 pps, 87.5 mj). Orthodontic brackets were bonded to the radiated surfaces. Then the shear strengths of the brackets to the enamels were measured by Instron. The results showed that the Chinese ink group and oil ink group has the strongest shear strength, ball pen group and water ink group showed the second strength, and the transfer paper group has the lowest shear strength. In addition, scanning electronic microscope also was used to observe the topographic changes of the enamel surfaces induced by the laser ablation.

  18. Evaluation of Self-Etching Adhesive and Er:YAG Laser Conditioning on the Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets

    PubMed Central

    Contreras-Bulnes, Rosalía; Scougall-Vilchis, Rogelio J.; Rodríguez-Vilchis, Laura E.; Centeno-Pedraza, Claudia; Olea-Mejía, Oscar F.; Alcántara-Galena, María del Carmen Z.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength, the adhesive remnant index scores, and etch surface of teeth prepared for orthodontic bracket bonding with self-etching primer and Er:YAG laser conditioning. One hundred and twenty bovine incisors were randomly divided into four groups. In Group I (Control), the teeth were conditioned with 35% phosphoric acid for 15 seconds. In Group II the teeth were conditioned with Transbond Plus SEP (5 sec); III and IV were irradiated with the Er:YAG 150 mJ (11.0 J/cm2), 150 mJ (19.1 J/cm2), respectively, at 7–12 Hz with water spray. After surface preparation, upper central incisor stainless steel brackets were bonded with Transbond Plus Color Change Adhesive. The teeth were stored in water at 37°C for 24 hours and shear bond strengths were measured, and adhesive remnant index (ARI) was determined. The conditioned surface was observed under a scanning electron microscope. One-way ANOVA and chi-square test were used. Group I showed the significantly highest values of bond strength with a mean value of 8.2 megapascals (MPa). The lesser amount of adhesive remnant was found in Group III. The results of this study suggest that Er:YAG laser irradiation could not be an option for enamel conditioning. PMID:24228014

  19. Correction of palatally displaced maxillary lateral incisors without brackets

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kyung-Hee; Lee, Yoonjung; Kim, Minji

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the orthodontic treatment of a 25-year-old Korean female patient with anterior crowding, including palatally displaced lateral incisors. Her facial profile was satisfactory, but 3.5 mm of maxillary anterior crowding was observed. To correct this crowding, we decided to minimize the use of the conventional fixed orthodontic appliances and employed a less bulky and more aesthetic appliance for applying light continuous force. We determined the final positions of the maxillary teeth via a working model for diagnostic set up and achieved space gaining and alignment with simple Ni-Ti spring and stainless steel round tubes. Tooth alignment was achieved efficiently and aesthetically without the conventional brackets. PMID:24015390

  20. Comparison of frictional resistance of esthetic and semi-esthetic self-ligating brackets

    PubMed Central

    Kannan, M. S.; Murali, R. V.; Kishorekumar, S.; Gnanashanmugam, K.; Jayanth, V.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The frictional resistance encountered during sliding mechanics has been well established in the orthodontic literature, and it consists of complex interactions between the bracket, archwire, and method of ligation the claim of reduced friction with self-ligating brackets is often cited as a primary advantage over conventional brackets. This study was done to compare and evaluate the frictional forces generated between fully esthetic brackets and semi-aesthetic self-ligating brackets, which are of passive form and SEM (scanning electron microscope) study of the Brackets after Frictional evaluation. Materials and Methods: Two types of self-ligating esthetic brackets, Damon clear (Ormco) made of fully ceramic and Opal (Ultradent Products, USA) and, Two types of self-ligating semi-esthetic brackets, Clarity SL (3M Unitek) and Damon 3 (Ormco) both of which are made of ceramic with metal slot. Arch wires with different dimensions and quality 17 × 25, 19 × 25 Titanium Molybdenum Alloy (TMA) and 17 × 25, 19 × 25 stainless steel that came from plain strands of wire were used for frictional comparison test. The brackets used in this study had 0.022 × 0.028 inch slot. Results: The statistical tests showed significantly smaller amount of kinetic frictional forces is generated by Damon 3 (semi-esthetic self-ligating brackets). For each wire used, Damon 3 displayed significantly lower frictional forces (P ≤ 0.05) than any of the self-ligating system, followed by Opal (fully esthetic self-ligating brackets) which generated smaller amount of frictional forces but relatively on the higher side when compared with Damon 3. Damon clear (fully esthetic self-ligating brackets) generated the maximum amount of kinetic forces with all types of wire dimensions and properties when compared to the other three types of self-ligating system. Clarity SL (semi-esthetic self-ligating brackets) generated smaller amount of frictional forces when compared with Damon clear and relatively

  1. Options for a lunar base surface architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Barney B.

    1992-02-01

    The Planet Surface Systems Office at the NASA Johnson Space Center has participated in an analysis of the Space Exploration Initiative architectures described in the Synthesis Group report. This effort involves a Systems Engineering and Integration effort to define point designs for evolving lunar and Mars bases that support substantial science, exploration, and resource production objectives. The analysis addresses systems-level designs; element requirements and conceptual designs; assessments of precursor and technology needs; and overall programmatics and schedules. This paper focuses on the results of the study of the Space Resource Utilization Architecture. This architecture develops the capability to extract useful materials from the indigenous resources of the Moon and Mars. On the Moon, a substantial infrastructure is emplaced which can support a crew of up to twelve. Two major process lines are developed: one produces oxygen, ceramics, and metals; the other produces hydrogen, helium, and other volatiles. The Moon is also used for a simulation of a Mars mission. Significant science capabilities are established in conjunction with resource development. Exploration includes remote global surveys and piloted sorties of local and regional areas. Science accommodations include planetary science, astronomy, and biomedical research. Greenhouses are established to provide a substantial amount of food needs.

  2. Options for a lunar base surface architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Barney B.

    1992-01-01

    The Planet Surface Systems Office at the NASA Johnson Space Center has participated in an analysis of the Space Exploration Initiative architectures described in the Synthesis Group report. This effort involves a Systems Engineering and Integration effort to define point designs for evolving lunar and Mars bases that support substantial science, exploration, and resource production objectives. The analysis addresses systems-level designs; element requirements and conceptual designs; assessments of precursor and technology needs; and overall programmatics and schedules. This paper focuses on the results of the study of the Space Resource Utilization Architecture. This architecture develops the capability to extract useful materials from the indigenous resources of the Moon and Mars. On the Moon, a substantial infrastructure is emplaced which can support a crew of up to twelve. Two major process lines are developed: one produces oxygen, ceramics, and metals; the other produces hydrogen, helium, and other volatiles. The Moon is also used for a simulation of a Mars mission. Significant science capabilities are established in conjunction with resource development. Exploration includes remote global surveys and piloted sorties of local and regional areas. Science accommodations include planetary science, astronomy, and biomedical research. Greenhouses are established to provide a substantial amount of food needs.

  3. Evaluation of shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded with Er-YAG laser etching

    PubMed Central

    Raji, S. Hamid; Birang, Reza; Majdzade, Fateme; Ghorbanipour, Reza

    2012-01-01

    Background: Based on contradictory findings concerning the use of lasers for enamel etching, the purpose of this study was to investigate the shear bond strength of teeth prepared for bonding with Er-YAG laser etching and compare them with phosphoric acid etching. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study forty – eight premolars, extracted for orthodontic purposes were randomly divided in to three groups. Thirty-two teeth were exposed to laser energy for 25 s: 16 teeth at 100 mj setting and 16 teeth at 150 mj setting. Sixteen teeth were etched with 37% phosphoric acid. The shear bond strength of bonded brackets with the Transbond XT adhesive system was measured with the Zwick testing machine. Descriptive statistics, Kolmogorov–Smirnov test, of homogeneity of variances, one- way analysis of variances and Tukey's test and Kruskal Wallis were used to analyze the data. Results: The mean shear bond strength of the teeth lased with 150 mj was 12.26 ± 4.76 MPa, which was not significantly different from the group with acid etching (15.26 ± 4.16 MPa). Irradiation with 100 mj resulted in mean bond strengths of 9.05 ± 3.16 MPa, which was significantly different from that of acid etching (P < 0.001). Conclusions: laser etching at 150 and 100 mj was adequate for bond strength but the failure pattern of brackets bonded with laser etching is dominantly at adhesive – enamel interface and is not safe for enamel during debonding. PMID:23087733

  4. Comparative study of torque expression among active and passive self-ligating and conventional brackets

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Érika Mendonça Fernandes; Valarelli, Fabrício Pinelli; Fernandes, João Batista; Cançado, Rodrigo Hermont; de Freitas, Karina Maria Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The aim of this study was to compare torque expression in active and passive self-ligating and conventional brackets. Methods: A total of 300 segments of stainless steel wire 0.019 x 0.025-in and six different brands of brackets (Damon 3MX, Portia, In-Ovation R, Bioquick, Roth SLI and Roth Max) were used. Torque moments were measured at 12°, 24°, 36° and 48°, using a wire torsion device associated with a universal testing machine. The data obtained were compared by analysis of variance followed by Tukey test for multiple comparisons. Regression analysis was performed by the least-squares method to generate the mathematical equation of the optimal curve for each brand of bracket. Results: Statistically significant differences were observed in the expression of torque among all evaluated bracket brands in all evaluated torsions (p < 0.05). It was found that Bioquick presented the lowest torque expression in all tested torsions; in contrast, Damon 3MX bracket presented the highest torque expression up to 36° torsion. Conclusions: The connection system between wire/bracket (active, passive self-ligating or conventional with elastic ligature) seems not to interfere in the final torque expression, the latter being probably dependent on the interaction between the wire and the bracket chosen for orthodontic mechanics. PMID:26691972

  5. Comparative assessment of forces generated during simulated alignment with self-ligating and conventional brackets.

    PubMed

    Pandis, Nikolaos; Eliades, Theodore; Bourauel, Christoph

    2009-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to comparatively assess the magnitude and direction of forces and moments generated from different bracket systems, during the initial levelling and alignment stage of orthodontic treatment. Three types of brackets were used: Orthos2 (Ormco), Damon2 (Ormco), and In-Ovation R (GAC). The brackets were bonded on resin replicas models of a patient's crowded mandibular arch, and a 0.014 inch Damon archform CuNiTi (Ormco) wire was inserted. The model was mounted on the Orthodontic Measurement and Simulation System (OMSS) and six static measurements were taken at the initial crowded state per bracket for the lateral incisor, canine, and first premolar. A total of 10 repetitions were performed for each measurement, with new brackets and archwires used for each trial. The forces and moments generated were registered directly on the OMSS software and were statistically analyzed using a one-way analysis of variance separately for each dental arch location and force component. Group differences were further analyzed with Tukey's post hoc comparisons test at the 0.05 significance level. The lingually inclined, crowded lateral incisor presented an extrusive and buccal movement and showed the lowest force in the vertical direction, whereas the self-ligating group of brackets generated the highest force in the buccolingual direction. The moments applied by the three bracket systems followed the general trend shown for forces; in the vertical axis, the self-ligating brackets exerted lower forces than their conventional counterpart. This was modified in the buccolingual direction where, in most instances, the self-ligating appliances applied higher moments compared with the conventional bracket. In most cases, the magnitude of forces and moments ranged between 30-70 cN and 2-6 N mm, respectively. However, maximum forces and moments developed at the lateral incisor were almost four times higher than the average. PMID:19349418

  6. In vitro assessment of competency for different lingual brackets in sliding mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Lalithapriya, S; Kumaran, N Kurunji; Rajasigamani, K

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To determine the static frictional resistance of different lingual brackets at different second order angulations when coupled with stainless steel (SS) archwire in dry and wet conditions. Materials and Methods: Using a modified jig, frictional resistance was evaluated under different conditions for a total of 270 upper premolar lingual brackets (0.018″ × 0.025″ - conventional - 7th generation and STb, self-ligating – evolution) with no in-built tip or torque together with 0.016″ × 0.022″ straight length SS archwires. For conventional brackets, the archwire was secured with 0.008″ preformed SS short ligature ties. Statistical Analysis: One way analysis of variance with Tukey HSD as post-hoc test was applied for degree wise and bracket wise comparison within dry condition and wet condition. For pair wise comparison Student's t-test was used. Results: Under both conditions the static frictional resistance is significantly higher for self-ligating brackets at 0°, while at 5° and 10° it is higher for 7th generation brackets. Statistically, significant difference does not exist at 0° between conventional brackets and the same was found at 5° and 10° between STb and self-ligating brackets. With an increase in second order angulations, all the evaluated samples exhibited an increased frictional value. Wet condition samples obtained a higher value than their corresponding dry condition. Conclusion: The self-ligating bracket evaluated in this in vitro study is not beneficial in reducing friction during en-mass retraction due to its interactive clip type. PMID:25657988

  7. Shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets after acid-etched and erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser-etched

    PubMed Central

    Alavi, Shiva; Birang, Reza; Hajizadeh, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Laser ablation has been suggested as an alternative method to acid etching; however, previous studies have obtained contrasting results. The purpose of this study was to compare the shear bond strength (SBS) and fracture mode of orthodontic brackets that are bonded to enamel etched with acid and erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Er:YAG) laser. Materials and Methods: In this experimental in vitro study, buccal surfaces of 15 non-carious human premolars were divided into mesial and distal regions. Randomly, one of the regions was etched with 37% phosphoric acid for 15 s and another region irradiated with Er:YAG laser at 100 mJ energy and 20 Hz frequency for 20 s. Stainless steel brackets were then bonded using Transbond XT, following which all the samples were stored in distilled water for 24 h and then subjected to 500 thermal cycles. SBS was tested by a chisel edge, mounted on the crosshead of universal testing machine. After debonding, the teeth were examined under ×10 magnification and adhesive remnant index (ARI) score determined. SBS and ARI scores of the two groups were then compared using t-test and Mann-Whitney U test. Significant level was set at P < 0.05. Results: The mean SBS of the laser group (16.61 ± 7.7 MPa) was not significantly different from that of the acid-etched group (18.86 ± 6.09 MPa) (P = 0.41). There was no significant difference in the ARI scores between two groups (P = 0.08). However, in the laser group, more adhesive remained on the brackets, which is not suitable for orthodontic purposes. Conclusion: Laser etching at 100 mJ energy produced bond strength similar to acid etching. Therefore, Er:YAG laser may be an alternative method for conventional acid-etching. PMID:25097641

  8. Mesogondolella and Jinogondolella (Conodonta): Multielement definition of the taxa that bracket the basal Guadalupian (Middle Permian Series) GSSP

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lambert, L.L.; Wardlaw, B.R.; Henderson, C.M.

    2007-01-01

    Multielement definitions are presented here for Mesogondolella and Jinogondolella based on species that bracket the basal Guadalupian (Middle Permian Series) GSSP. Distinctive apparatus characters that appear with the first Jinogondolella include several details of P2 element dimorphism and process bifurcation in S3 elements. The sequential expression of these multielement characters is traced through M. idahoensis, M. lamberti, and J. nankingensis. The resulting multielement definition of Jinogondolella serves to distinguish it from all other closely related genera. Mesogondolella lamberti is recognized as a distinct species, and J. serrata is formally designated a junior synonym of J. nankingensis. ?? 2007 Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology, CAS.

  9. Experience With Bayesian Image Based Surface Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stutz, John C.

    2005-01-01

    Bayesian surface modeling from images requires modeling both the surface and the image generation process, in order to optimize the models by comparing actual and generated images. Thus it differs greatly, both conceptually and in computational difficulty, from conventional stereo surface recovery techniques. But it offers the possibility of using any number of images, taken under quite different conditions, and by different instruments that provide independent and often complementary information, to generate a single surface model that fuses all available information. I describe an implemented system, with a brief introduction to the underlying mathematical models and the compromises made for computational efficiency. I describe successes and failures achieved on actual imagery, where we went wrong and what we did right, and how our approach could be improved. Lastly I discuss how the same approach can be extended to distinct types of instruments, to achieve true sensor fusion.

  10. Resistance to Sliding in Clear and Metallic Damon 3 and Conventional Edgewise Brackets: an In vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Karim Soltani, Mohammad; Golfeshan, Farzaneh; Alizadeh, Yoones; Mehrzad, Jabraiel

    2015-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Frictional forces are considered as important counterforce to orthodontic tooth movement. It is claimed that self-ligating brackets reduce the frictional forces. Purpose The aim of this study was to compare the resistance to sliding in metallic and clear Damon brackets with the conventional brackets in a wet condition. Materials and Method The samples included 4 types of brackets; metallic and clear Damon brackets and metallic and clear conventional brackets (10 brackets in each group). In this study, stainless steel wires sized 0.019×0.025 were employed and the operator’s saliva was used to simulate the conditions of oral cavity. The tidy-modified design was used for simulation of sliding movement. The resistance to sliding and static frictional forces was measured by employing Testometric machine and load cell. Results The mean (±SD) of resistance to sliding was 194.88 (±26.65) and 226.62 (±39.9) g in the esthetic and metallic Damon brackets, while these values were 187.81(±27.84) and 191.17(±66.68) g for the clear and metallic conventional brackets, respectively. Static frictional forces were 206.4(±42.45) and 210.38(±15.89) g in the esthetic and metallic Damon brackets and 220.63(±49.29) and 215.13(±62.38) g in the clear and metallic conventional brackets. According to two-way ANOVA, no significant difference was observed between the two bracket materials (clear and metal) and the two types of bracket (self-ligating versus conventional) regarding resistance to sliding (p= 0.17 and p= 0.23, respectively) and static frictional forces (p= 0.55 and p= 0.96, respectively). Conclusion Neither the type of bracket materials nor their type of ligation made difference in resistance to sliding and static friction. PMID:26106630

  11. Covariant Lie derivatives and Frölicher-Nijenhuis bracket on Lie algebroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Nicola, Antonio; Yudin, Ivan

    2015-08-01

    We define covariant Lie derivatives acting on vector-valued forms on Lie algebroids and study their properties. This allows us to obtain a concise formula for the Frölicher-Nijenhuis bracket on Lie algebroids.

  12. Determination of Load Bearing Capacity for Spatial Joint with Steel Angle Brackets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sejkot, P.; Ormarsson, S.; Vessby, J.; Kuklík, P.

    2015-11-01

    The design of spatial connections in load bearing timber structures with steel angle brackets has insufficient support in the existing design standards. Therefore, research has been necessary to improve this state of the art. In the current paper an experimental study on two designs of angle brackets is presented and the results from full-scale experiments are compared to numerical and analytical computational models.

  13. Surface characterization based on optical phase shifting interferometry

    DOEpatents

    Mello, Michael , Rosakis; Ares J.

    2011-08-02

    Apparatus, techniques and systems for implementing an optical interferometer to measure surfaces, including mapping of instantaneous curvature or in-plane and out-of-plane displacement field gradients of a sample surface based on obtaining and processing four optical interferograms from a common optical reflected beam from the sample surface that are relatively separated in phase by .pi./2.

  14. APPLICATION OF HYDROPHILIC STARCH-BASED COATINGS TO POLYETHYLNE SURFACES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methods for imparting hydrophilic surface properties to hydrophobic plastics are of interest because of their ability to retard the build-up of static electricity, to alter friction and adhesion properties between surfaces, to allow surfaces to be printed with water-based dyes and inks, and to impro...

  15. Properties of composite materials used for bracket bonding.

    PubMed

    Gama, Ana Caroline Silva; Moraes, André Guaraci de Vito; Yamasaki, Lilyan Cardoso; Loguercio, Alessandro Dourado; Carvalho, Ceci Nunes; Bauer, José

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate in vitro the shear bond strength to enamel, flexural strength, flexural modulus, and contraction stress of one orthodontic composite and two flowable composites. Orthodontic brackets were bonded to 45 human maxillary premolars with the composites Transbond XT, Filtek Z-350 flow and Opallis flow and tested for shear bond strength. For measurement of flexural strength and flexural modulus, specimens were fabricated and tested under flexion. For the contraction stress test, cylindrical specimens were tested and an extensometer determined the height of the specimens. The data were subjected to one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). The shear bond strength values were significantly lower (p<0.05) for the flowable composites compared with the orthodontic composite. For the flexural strength, no statistically significant difference was found among the composites (p>0.05) while the flexural modulus was significantly higher (p<0.05) for Transbond XT than for Filtek Z-350 flow and Opallis flow. The orthodontic composite presented significantly lower contraction stress values than the flowable composites (p<0.05). The light-activated orthodontic composite material presented higher flexural modulus and shear bond strength and lower contraction stress than both flowable composites. PMID:23969920

  16. Properties of composite materials used for bracket bonding.

    PubMed

    Gama, Ana Caroline Silva; Moraes, André Guaraci de Vito; Yamasaki, Lilyan Cardoso; Loguercio, Alessandro Dourado; Carvalho, Ceci Nunes; Bauer, José

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate in vitro the shear bond strength to enamel, flexural strength, flexural modulus, and contraction stress of one orthodontic composite and two flowable composites. Orthodontic brackets were bonded to 45 human maxillary premolars with the composites Transbond XT, Filtek Z-350 flow and Opallis flow and tested for shear bond strength. For measurement of flexural strength and flexural modulus, specimens were fabricated and tested under flexion. For the contraction stress test, cylindrical specimens were tested and an extensometer determined the height of the specimens. The data were subjected to one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). The shear bond strength values were significantly lower (p<0.05) for the flowable composites compared with the orthodontic composite. For the flexural strength, no statistically significant difference was found among the composites (p>0.05) while the flexural modulus was significantly higher (p<0.05) for Transbond XT than for Filtek Z-350 flow and Opallis flow. The orthodontic composite presented significantly lower contraction stress values than the flowable composites (p<0.05). The light-activated orthodontic composite material presented higher flexural modulus and shear bond strength and lower contraction stress than both flowable composites.

  17. Ion Beam Analysis Of Silicon-Based Surfaces And Correlation With Surface Energy Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Qian; Herbots, N.; Hart, M.; Bradley, J. D.; Wilkens, B. J.; Sell, D. A.; Sell, Clive H.; Kwong, Henry Mark; Culbertson, R. J.; Whaley, S. D.

    2011-06-01

    The water affinity of Si-based surfaces is quantified by contact angle measurement and surface free energy to explain hydrophobic or hydrophilic behavior of silicone, silicates, and silicon surfaces. Surface defects such as dangling bonds, surface free energy including Lewis acid-base and Lifshitz-van der Waals components are discussed. Water nucleation and condensation is further explained by surface topography. Tapping mode atomic force microscopy (TMAFM) provides statistical analysis of the topography of these Si-based surfaces. The correlation of the above two characteristics describes the behavior of water condensation at Si-based surfaces. Surface root mean square roughness increasing from several Å to several nm is found to provide nucleation sites that expedite water condensation visibly for silica and silicone. Hydrophilic surfaces have a condensation pattern that forms puddles of water while hydrophobic surfaces form water beads. Polymer adsorption on these surfaces alters the water affinity as well as the surface topography, and therefore controls condensation on Si-based surfaces including silicone intraocular lens (IOL). The polymer film is characterized by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) in conjunction with 4.265 MeV 12C(α, α)12C, 3.045 MeV 16O(α,α)16O nuclear resonance scattering (NRS), and 2.8 MeV elastic recoil detection (ERD) of hydrogen for high resolution composition and areal density measurements. The areal density of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) film ranges from 1018 atom/cm2 to 1019 atom/cm2 gives the silica or silicone surface a roughness of several Å and a wavelength of 0.16±0.02 μm, and prevents fogging by forming a complete wetting layer during water condensation.

  18. Ion Beam Analysis Of Silicon-Based Surfaces And Correlation With Surface Energy Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Xing Qian; Herbots, N.; Hart, M.; Bradley, J. D.; Wilkens, B. J.; Sell, D. A.; Culbertson, R. J.; Whaley, S. D.; Sell, Clive H.; Kwong, Henry Mark Jr.

    2011-06-01

    The water affinity of Si-based surfaces is quantified by contact angle measurement and surface free energy to explain hydrophobic or hydrophilic behavior of silicone, silicates, and silicon surfaces. Surface defects such as dangling bonds, surface free energy including Lewis acid-base and Lifshitz-van der Waals components are discussed. Water nucleation and condensation is further explained by surface topography. Tapping mode atomic force microscopy (TMAFM) provides statistical analysis of the topography of these Si-based surfaces. The correlation of the above two characteristics describes the behavior of water condensation at Si-based surfaces. Surface root mean square roughness increasing from several A ring to several nm is found to provide nucleation sites that expedite water condensation visibly for silica and silicone. Hydrophilic surfaces have a condensation pattern that forms puddles of water while hydrophobic surfaces form water beads. Polymer adsorption on these surfaces alters the water affinity as well as the surface topography, and therefore controls condensation on Si-based surfaces including silicone intraocular lens (IOL). The polymer film is characterized by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) in conjunction with 4.265 MeV {sup 12}C({alpha}, {alpha}){sup 12}C, 3.045 MeV {sup 16}O({alpha},{alpha}){sup 16}O nuclear resonance scattering (NRS), and 2.8 MeV elastic recoil detection (ERD) of hydrogen for high resolution composition and areal density measurements. The areal density of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) film ranges from 10{sup 18} atom/cm{sup 2} to 10{sup 19} atom/cm{sup 2} gives the silica or silicone surface a roughness of several A ring and a wavelength of 0.16{+-}0.02 {mu}m, and prevents fogging by forming a complete wetting layer during water condensation.

  19. Comparative Evaluation of Shear Bond Strength of Recycled Brackets using Different Methods: An In vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Mukesh; Maheshwari, Amit; Lall, Rajeev; Navit, Pragati; Singh, Rajeshwar; Navit, S

    2014-01-01

    Background: Debonding of brackets commonly occurs during orthodontic treatment. Due to increase in costs replacement of a damaged bracket is not liked by the dentist. This study is done to assess the shear bond strength of recycled brackets using different methods. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted using five groups of orthodontic brackets (0.022” × 0.028”, MBT prescription) bonded on the premolars mounted in cubes. Other materials required were cubical trays, bonding material, light cure unit, universal testing machine, digital camera and sandblasting unit. Results: From the result of ANOVA test we observed the test is significant (F = 20.79, P < 0.01) and the test is rejected. When the Tukey’s t-test result was applied it was seen that the mean shear bond strength of all groups of brackets is as follows: Group I (5.31 Megapascals [Mpa]) < Group II (7.37 Mpa) < Group III (8.96 Mpa) < Group IV (5.56 Mpa) < Control group (9.24 Mpa). Alternatively we can say that shear bond strength of following bracket groups can be arranged as Group I < Group IV < Group II < Group III. Conclusion: From this study we conclude that Group III, which was recycled with an ultrasonic cleaner with electropolisher and silane coupling agent in place of primer, showed the highest shear bond strength. PMID:25395785

  20. Bond strengths of three resin systems used with brackets and embedded wire attachments.

    PubMed

    Schulz, R P; Mayhew, R B; Oesterle, L J; Pierson, W P

    1985-01-01

    Orthodontic wire bonded directly to teeth with a resin adhesive system has been used to establish anchor units for procedures in orthodontics as well as for splinting teeth in other disciplines. This procedure can save the cost and time of placing a bracket. In addition, several different resin systems have been used for this procedure as well as for placing brackets. The purpose of this study was to determine the strength of three adhesive systems used to bond orthodontic wires directly to teeth and to compare these values with those found for directly bonded orthodontic brackets. Equal sample sizes of brackets or wires were attached to 240 human teeth with either Concise, Miradept, or Endur in a standardized area of etched enamel. Shear and tensile strengths were measured at 30 minutes and at 48 hours. At 30 minutes brackets were significantly stronger than embedded wires, and Concise was significantly stronger than either of the other resins. However, all significant differences between any of the three resin systems using either bonded brackets or wires disappeared at 48 hours. Whether or not this initial strength difference is clinically significant remains speculative.

  1. Comparison of shear bond strengths of ceramic brackets after different time lags between lasing and debonding.

    PubMed

    Tozlu, Murat; Oztoprak, Mehmet Oguz; Arun, Tülin

    2012-11-01

    Laser use is effective in the debonding of ceramic brackets. However, a standardization of the laser debonding techniques used has not yet been implemented. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of the time lag elapsed between lasing and shearing on debonding of ceramic brackets. One hundred polycrystalline ceramic brackets were placed on human premolar teeth, which were randomly divided into five groups of 20. One group was assigned as the control. The Er-YAG laser was applied on each bracket in four experimental groups at 5 W for 6 s with the scanning method. Debonding was performed 1 s, 18 s, 30 s, or 60 s after laser exposure. Shear bond strengths and adhesive remnant index scores were measured. Statistically significant difference was observed between the control and experimental groups when the data for the shear bond strengths was considered (p < 0.05). Adhesive remnant index scores of the groups were not statistically different (p > 0.05). Debonding ceramic brackets after 18 s when lased 6 s using an Er-YAG laser with the scanning method is safe and also suitable for clinical use since three brackets can be debonded at a time in succession. PMID:22076589

  2. Evaluation of Antibacterial Effects of Silver-Coated Stainless Steel Orthodontic Brackets

    PubMed Central

    Arash, Valiollah; Keikhaee, Fatemeh; Rajabnia, Ramazan; Khafri, Soraya; Tavanafar, Saeid

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: White spots and enamel demineralization around orthodontic brackets are among the most important complications resulting from orthodontic treatments. Since the antibacterial properties of metals and metallic particles have been well documented, the aim of this study was to assess the antibacterial effect of stainless steel orthodontic brackets coated with silver (Ag) particles. Materials and Methods: In this study, 40 standard metal brackets were divided into two groups of 20 cases and 20 controls. The brackets in the case group were coated with Ag particles using an electroplating method. Atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to assess the adequacy of the coating process. In addition, antibacterial tests, i.e., disk diffusion and direct contact tests were performed at three, six, 24, and 48 hours, and 15 and 30 days using a Streptococcus mutans strain. The results were analyzed using Student’s t-test and repeated measures ANOVA. Results: Analyses via SEM and AFM confirmed that excellent coatings were obtained by using an electroplating method. The groups exhibited similar behavior when subjected to the disk diffusion test in the agar medium. However, the bacterial counts of the Ag-coated brackets were, in general, significantly lower (P<0.001) than those of their non-coated counterparts. Conclusions: Brackets coated with Ag, via an electroplating method, exhibited antibacterial properties when placed in direct contact with Streptococcus mutans. This antibacterial effect persisted for 30 days after contact with the bacteria. PMID:27536328

  3. Bond strengths of three resin systems used with brackets and embedded wire attachments.

    PubMed

    Schulz, R P; Mayhew, R B; Oesterle, L J; Pierson, W P

    1985-01-01

    Orthodontic wire bonded directly to teeth with a resin adhesive system has been used to establish anchor units for procedures in orthodontics as well as for splinting teeth in other disciplines. This procedure can save the cost and time of placing a bracket. In addition, several different resin systems have been used for this procedure as well as for placing brackets. The purpose of this study was to determine the strength of three adhesive systems used to bond orthodontic wires directly to teeth and to compare these values with those found for directly bonded orthodontic brackets. Equal sample sizes of brackets or wires were attached to 240 human teeth with either Concise, Miradept, or Endur in a standardized area of etched enamel. Shear and tensile strengths were measured at 30 minutes and at 48 hours. At 30 minutes brackets were significantly stronger than embedded wires, and Concise was significantly stronger than either of the other resins. However, all significant differences between any of the three resin systems using either bonded brackets or wires disappeared at 48 hours. Whether or not this initial strength difference is clinically significant remains speculative. PMID:3155593

  4. Influence of ligation method on friction resistance of lingual brackets with different second-order angulations: an in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Graziane Olímpio; Gimenez, Carla Maria Melleiro; Prieto, Lucas; Prieto, Marcos Gabriel do Lago; Basting, Roberta Tarkany

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate stainless steel archwire static friction in active and passive self-ligating lingual and conventional brackets with second-order angulations. Methods: Two conventional lingual brackets for canines (STb light/Ormco; PSWb/Tecnident), and two self-ligating brackets, one active (In-Ovation L/GAC) and the other passive (3D/ Forestadent), were evaluated. A stainless steel archwire was used at 0°, 3° and 5° angulations. Metal ligatures, conventional elastic ligatures, and low friction elastic ligatures were also tested. A universal testing machine applied friction between brackets and wires, simulating sliding mechanics, to produce 2-mm sliding at 3 mm/minute speed. Results: Two-way analysis of variance demonstrated a significant effect of the interaction between brackets and angulations (p < 0.001). Tukey test indicated that the highest frictional resistance values were observed at 5° angulation for In-Ovation L, PSWb bracket with non conventional ligature, and STb bracket with metal ligature. As for 3D, PSWb with conventional or metal ligatures, and STb brackets with non conventional ligature, showed significantly lower static frictional resistance with 0° angulation. At 0° angulation, STb brackets with metal ties, In-Ovation L brackets and 3D brackets had the lowest frictional resistance. Conclusions: As the angulation increased from 0° to 3°, static friction resistance increased. When angulation increased from 3° to 5°, static friction resistance increased or remained the same. Self-ligating 3D and In-Ovation L brackets, as well as conventional STb brackets, seem to be the best option when sliding mechanics is used to perform lingual orthodontic treatment. PMID:27653262

  5. Ferroelectric based catalysis: Switchable surface chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakekhani, Arvin; Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab

    2015-03-01

    We describe a new class of catalysts that uses an epitaxial monolayer of a transition metal oxide on a ferroelectric substrate. The ferroelectric polarization switches the surface chemistry between strongly adsorptive and strongly desorptive regimes, circumventing difficulties encountered on non-switchable catalytic surfaces where the Sabatier principle dictates a moderate surface-molecule interaction strength. This method is general and can, in principle, be applied to many reactions, and for each case the choice of the transition oxide monolayer can be optimized. Here, as a specific example, we show how simultaneous NOx direct decomposition (into N2 and O2) and CO oxidation can be achieved efficiently on CrO2 terminated PbTiO3, while circumventing oxygen (and sulfur) poisoning issues. One should note that NOx direct decomposition has been an open challenge in automotive emission control industry. Our method can expand the range of catalytically active elements to those which are not conventionally considered for catalysis and which are more economical, e.g., Cr (for NOx direct decomposition and CO oxidation) instead of canonical precious metal catalysts. Primary support from Toyota Motor Engineering and Manufacturing, North America, Inc.

  6. Nanoparticle-based etching of silicon surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Branz, Howard; Duda, Anna; Ginley, David S.; Yost, Vernon; Meier, Daniel; Ward, James S.

    2011-12-13

    A method (300) of texturing silicon surfaces (116) such to reduce reflectivity of a silicon wafer (110) for use in solar cells. The method (300) includes filling (330, 340) a vessel (122) with a volume of an etching solution (124) so as to cover the silicon surface 116) of a wafer or substrate (112). The etching solution (124) is made up of a catalytic nanomaterial (140) and an oxidant-etchant solution (146). The catalytic nanomaterial (140) may include gold or silver nanoparticles or noble metal nanoparticles, each of which may be a colloidal solution. The oxidant-etchant solution (146) includes an etching agent (142), such as hydrofluoric acid, and an oxidizing agent (144), such as hydrogen peroxide. Etching (350) is performed for a period of time including agitating or stirring the etching solution (124). The etch time may be selected such that the etched silicon surface (116) has a reflectivity of less than about 15 percent such as 1 to 10 percent in a 350 to 1000 nanometer wavelength range.

  7. Effect of moisture, saliva, and blood contamination on the shear bond strength of brackets bonded with a conventional bonding system and self-etched bonding system

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Mandava; Mohamed, Shamil; Nayak, Krishna; Shetty, Sharath Kumar; Talapaneni, Ashok Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Background: The success of bonding brackets to enamel with resin bonding systems is negatively affected by contamination with oral fluids such as blood and saliva. The new self-etch primer systems combine conditioning and priming agents into a single application, making the procedure more cost effective. Objective: The purpose of the study was to investigate the effect of moisture, saliva and blood contamination on shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded with conventional bonding system and self-etch bonding system. Materials and Methods: Each system was examined under four enamel surface conditions (dry, water, saliva, and blood), and 80 human teeth were divided into two groups with four subgroups each of 10 according to enamel surface condition. Group 1 used conventional bonding system and Group 2 used self-etched bonding system. Subgroups 1a and 2a under dry enamel surface conditions; Subgroups 1b and 2b under moist enamel surface condition; Subgroups 3a and 3b under saliva enamel surface condition and Subgroup 4a and 4b under blood enamel surface condition. Brackets were bonded, and all the samples were then submitted to a shear bond test with a universal testing machine with a cross head speed of 1mm/sec. Results: The results showed that the contamination reduced the shear bond strength of all groups. In self-etch bonding system water and saliva had significantly higher bond strength when compared to other groups. Conclusion: It was concluded that the blood contamination showed lowest bond strength from both bonding systems. Self-etch bonding system resulted in higher bond strength than conventional bonding system under all conditions except the dry enamel surface. PMID:24678210

  8. Global mean sea surface based upon SEASAT altimeter data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, J. G.

    1984-01-01

    A global mean sea surface based upon the SEASAT altimeter data was derived. A combination of crossing arc techniques, accurate SEASAT reference orbits, and a previously computed GOES-3/SEASAT mean sea surface were used in the computation process. This mean sea surface provides a basis for the determination of global ocean circulation patterns and for detailed analysis of the Earth's internal structure. A contour map of the global mean sea surface is presented.

  9. Efficiency of different protocols for enamel clean-up after bracket debonding: an in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Sigilião, Lara Carvalho Freitas; Marquezan, Mariana; Elias, Carlos Nelson; Ruellas, Antônio Carlos; Sant'Anna, Eduardo Franzotti

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to assess the efficiency of six protocols for cleaning-up tooth enamel after bracket debonding. Methods: A total of 60 premolars were divided into six groups, according to the tools used for clean-up: 12-blade bur at low speed (G12L), 12-blade bur at high speed (G12H), 30-blade bur at low speed (G30L), DU10CO ORTHO polisher (GDU), Renew System (GR) and Diagloss polisher (GD). Mean roughness (Ra) and mean roughness depth (Rz) of enamel surface were analyzed with a profilometer. Paired t-test was used to assess Ra and Rz before and after enamel clean-up. ANOVA/Tukey tests were used for intergroup comparison. The duration of removal procedures was recorded. The association between time and variation in enamel roughness (∆Ra, ∆Rz) were evaluated by Pearson's correlation test. Enamel topography was assessed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results: In Groups G12L and G12H, original enamel roughness did not change significantly. In Groups G30L, GDU, GR and GD, a smoother surface (p < 0.05) was found after clean-up. In Groups G30L and GD, the protocols used were more time-consuming than those used in the other groups. Negative and moderate correlation was observed between time and (∆Ra, ∆Rz); Ra and (∆Ra, ∆Rz); Rz (r = - 0.445, r = - 0.475, p < 0.01). Conclusion: All enamel clean-up protocols were efficient because they did not result in increased surface roughness. The longer the time spent performing the protocol, the lower the surface roughness. PMID:26560825

  10. The influence of accelerating the setting rate by ultrasound or heat on the bond strength of glass ionomers used as orthodontic bracket cements.

    PubMed

    Algera, T J; Kleverlaan, C J; de Gee, A J; Prahl-Andersen, B; Feilzer, A J

    2005-10-01

    Conventional glass ionomer cements (GICs) may be a viable option for bracket bonding when the major disadvantages of these materials, such as the slow setting reaction and the weak initial bond strength, are solved. The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the influence of ultrasound and heat application on the setting reaction of GICs, and to determine the tensile force to debond the brackets from the enamel. A conventional fast-setting GIC, Fuji IX Fast, and two resin-modified glass ionomer cements (RMGICs), Fuji Ortho LC and Fuji Plus, were investigated. Three modes of curing were performed (n = 10): (1) according to the manufacturer's prescription, (2) with 60 seconds application of heat, or (3) with 60 seconds application of ultrasound. The tensile force required to debond the brackets was determined as the tension 15 minutes after the start of the bonding procedure. The mode of failure was scored according to the Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI) to establish the relative amount of cement remnants on the enamel surface. Curing with heat and ultrasound shortened the setting reaction and significantly (P < 0.05) increased the bond strength to enamel. The ARI scores showed an increase for all materials after heat and ultrasound compared with the standard curing method, most notably after heat application.

  11. Removal of methylene blue from aqueous solution by Artist's Bracket fungi: kinetic and equilibrium studies.

    PubMed

    Naghipour, Daryush; Taghavi, Kamran; Moslemzadeh, Mehrdad

    2016-01-01

    In this study, adsorption of methylene blue (MB) dye onto Artist's Bracket (AB) fungi was investigated in aqueous solution. Fourier transform infrared and scanning electron microscopy were used to investigate surface characteristic of AB fungi. Influence of operational parameters such as pH, contact time, biosorbent dosage, dye concentration, inorganic salts and temperature was studied on dye removal efficiency. With the increase of pH from 3 to 9, removal efficiency increased from 74.0% to 90.4%. Also, it reduced from 99.8% to 81.8% with increasing initial MB concentration from 25 mg L(-1) to 100 mg L(-1), whereas it increased from 54.7% to 98.7% and from 98.5% to 99.9% with increasing biosorbent dosage from 0.5 g L(-1) to 2 g L(-1) and with increasing temperature from 25 °C to 50 °C, respectively. Isotherm studies have shown adsorption of MB dye over the AB fungi had a better coefficient of determination (R(2)) of 0.98 for Langmuir isotherm. In addition, the maximum monolayer adsorption capacity (qm) was 100 mg g(-1). Also, the MB dye adsorption process followed pseudo-second-order kinetic. In general, AB fungi particles can be favorable for removal of MB dye from dye aqueous solution with natural pH and high temperature. PMID:27232421

  12. The Effects of In-Office Reconditioning on the Slot Dimensions and Static Frictional Resistance of Stainless Steel Brackets

    PubMed Central

    Nellore, Chaitanya; Karnati, Praveen Kumar Reddy; Thalapaneni, Ashok Kumar; Myla, Vijay Bhaskar; Ramyasree, Konda; Prasad, Mandava

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Orthodontists are commonly faced with the decision of what to do with loose brackets, and with inaccurately located brackets that need repositioning during treatment. One solution is to recycle the brackets. The potential effects of reconditioning a bracket are dependent upon many factors which may result in physical changes like alteration in slot tolerance, which may influence sliding mechanics by affecting frictional resistance. Aim To study and compare the dimensional changes in the bracket slot width and depth in reconditioned brackets from unused brackets under scanning electronic microscope and to study and compare any consequent effects on the static frictional resistance of stainless steel brackets after reconditioning and in unused brackets. Materials and Methods Dentarum manufactured 90 stainless steel central incisors edgewise brackets of size 0.22 X 0.030″ inch and 0° tip and 0°angulation were taken. 60 samples for measuring frictional resistance and 30 samples for measuring slot dimensions. Ortho organizers manufactured stainless steel arch wires 0.019 X 0.025″ straight lengths 60 in number were considered for measuring static frictional resistance. Results The mean slot width and depth of new brackets were 0.0251″ and 0.0471″, which exceeded the manufacturers reported nominal size of 0.022″ X 0.030″, by 0.003″ and 0.017″. The reconditioned brackets demonstrated a further increase in mean slot width and depth to 0.028″ and 0.0518″ that is by 0.0035″ and 0.0047″ which is statistically significant (p=0.001, 0.002). The mean static frictional forces of the reconditioned brackets was nearly similar to that of new brackets that is 0.3167N for reconditioned brackets and 0.2613 N for new brackets. Conclusion Although the reconditioning process results in physical changes to bracket structure this does not appear to result in significant effect on ex-vivo static frictional resistance. PMID:26894182

  13. SEM-EDS-Based Elemental Identification on the Enamel Surface after the Completion of Orthodontic Treatment: In Vitro Studies

    PubMed Central

    Seeliger, Julia; Lipski, Mariusz; Wójcicka, Anna; Gedrange, Tomasz; Woźniak, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Braces as foreign bodies in the mouth carry a risk of side effects and toxicity to the human body. This article presents the results indicating the possible toxic effects of tools used for cleaning the enamel after the completion of orthodontic treatment. The studies were carried out in vitro. The procedure of enamel etching, bonding orthodontic metal brackets, and enamel cleaning after their removal was performed under laboratory conditions. The enamel microstructure and elements present on its surface were evaluated using the scanning electron microscope (SEM). Silicon and aluminium were found in addition to the tooth building elements. PMID:27766265

  14. The Effect of Two Soft Drinks on Bracket Bond Strength and on Intact and Sealed Enamel: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Pasha, Azam; Sindhu, D; Nayak, Rabindra S; Mamatha, J; Chaitra, K R; Vishwakarma, Swati

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of two soft drinks, Coca-Cola and Mirinda orange on bracket bond strength, on adhesive remnant on teeth after debonding the bracket, and to observe by means of scanning electron microscope (SEM) the effect of these drinks on intact and sealed enamel. Methods: 120 non-carious maxillary premolar teeth already extracted for Orthodontic purposes were taken and divided into three groups, i.e., Coca-Cola drink, Mirinda orange, and control (artificial saliva) group. Brackets were bonded using conventional methods. Teeth were kept in soft drinks for 15 days, for 15 min, 3 times a day, separated by intervals of 2 h. At other times, they were kept in artificial saliva. The samples, thus obtained were evaluated for shear bond strength using the universal testing machine and subsequently subjected for adhesive remnant index (ARI) scores. SEM study on all the three groups was done for evaluating enamel surface of the intact and sealed enamel. Results: The lowest mean resistance to shearing forces was shown by Mirinda orange group (5.30 ± 2.74 Mpa) followed by Coca-Cola group (6.24 ± 1.59 Mpa) and highest resistance to shearing forces by control group (7.33 ± 1.72 Mpa). The ARI scores revealed a cohesive failure in control samples and an adhesive failure in Mirinda and cola samples. SEM results showed areas of defect due to erosion caused by acidic soft drinks on intact and sealed enamel surface. Conclusion: Mirinda group showed the lowest resistance to shearing forces, followed by Coca-Cola group and with the highest resistance to shearing forces by the control group. There were significant differences between the control group and the study groups. Areas of defects, which were caused by erosion related to acidic soft drinks on the enamel surface around the adhesive, were seen. Areas of defects caused by Coca-Cola were more extensive when compared to Mirinda orange drink. PMID:26668477

  15. Surface-scribed transparency-based microplates.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin Ye; Cheong, Brandon Huey-Ping; Somers, Anthony; Liew, Oi Wah; Ng, Tuck Wah

    2013-01-15

    Transparency sheets, which are normally associated with use on overhead projectors, offer lowered costs and high amenability for optical diagnostics in microplate instrumentation. An alternative microplate design in which circles are scribed on the surface of the transparency to create the boundaries to hold the drop in place is investigated here. The 3D profile of the scribed regions obtained optically showed strong likelihood of affecting three-phase contact line interactions. During dispensation, the contact angle (≈95°) was larger than the drop advancing state (≈80°) due to a period of nonadhesion, where the contact angle later reduced to the drop advancing state followed by increase in the liquid area coverage on the substrate. It was established that 50 μL was needed to fill the well fully, and the maximum volume retainable before breaching was 190 μL. While the tilt angle needed for displacement reduced significantly from 50 to 95 μL, this was markedly better than nonscribed surfaces, where tilt angles always had to be kept to within 30°. It was found that there was greater ability to fill the well with smaller volumes with dispensation at the center. This was attributed to the growing contact line not meeting the scribed edge in parallel if liquid was dispensed closer to it, wherein pinning reduction in some directions permitted liquid travel along the scribed edge to undergo contact angle hysteresis. Fluorescence measurements conducted showed no performance compromise when using scribed transparency microplates over standard microplates. PMID:23215012

  16. In vitro study of color stability of polycrystalline and monocrystalline ceramic brackets

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Cibele Braga; Maia, Luiz Guilherme Martins; Santos-Pinto, Ary; Gandini Júnior, Luiz Gonzaga

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this in vitro study was to analyze color stability of monocrystalline and polycrystalline ceramic brackets after immersion in dye solutions. Methods Seven ceramic brackets of four commercial brands were tested: Two monocrystalline and two polycrystalline. The brackets were immersed in four dye solutions (coffee, red wine, Coke and black tea) and in artificial saliva for the following times: 24 hours, 7, 14 and 21 days, respectively. Color changes were measured by a spectrophotometer. Data were assessed by Multivariate Profile Analysis, Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and Multiple Comparison Tests of means. Results There was a perceptible change of color in all ceramic brackets immersed in coffee (ΔE* Allure = 7.61, Inspire Ice = 6.09, Radiance = 6.69, Transcend = 7.44), black tea (ΔE* Allure = 6.24, Inspire Ice = 5.21, Radiance = 6.51, Transcend = 6.14) and red wine (ΔE* Allure = 6.49, Inspire Ice = 4.76, Radiance = 5.19, Transcend = 5.64), but no change was noticed in Coke and artificial saliva (ΔE < 3.7). Conclusion Ceramic brackets undergo color change when exposed to solutions of coffee, black tea and red wine. However, the same crystalline structure, either monocrystalline or polycrystalline, do not follow the same or a similar pattern in color change, varying according to the bracket fabrication, which shows a lack of standardization in the manufacturing process. Coffee dye produced the most marked color changes after 21 days of immersion for most ceramic brackets evaluated. PMID:25279530

  17. Galvanic Corrosion of and Ion Release from Various Orthodontic Brackets and Wires in a Fluoride-containing Mouthwash

    PubMed Central

    Tahmasbi, Soodeh; Ghorbani, Mohammad; Masudrad, Mahdis

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. This study compared the galvanic corrosion of orthodontic wires and brackets from various manufacturers following exposure to a fluoride mouthwash. Materials and methods. This study was conducted on 24 lower central incisor 0.022" Roth brackets of four different commercially available brands (Dentaurum, American Orthodontics, ORJ, Shinye). These brackets along with stainless steel (SS) or nickel-titanium (NiTi) orthodontic wires (0.016", round) were immersed in Oral-B mouthwash containing 0.05% sodium fluoride for 28 days. The electric potential (EP) difference of each bracket-wire couple was measured with a Saturated Calomel Reference Electrode (Ag/AgCl saturated with KCl) via a voltmeter. The ions released in the electrolyte weremeasured with an atomic absorption spectrometer. All the specimens were assessed under a stereomicroscope and specimens with corrosion were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Data were analyzed using ANOVA. Results. The copper ions released from specimens with NiTi wire were greater than those of samples containing SS wire. ORJ brackets released more Cu ions than other samples. The Ni ions released from Shinye brackets were significantly more than those of other specimens (P < 0.05). Corrosion rate of brackets coupled with NiTi wires was higher than that of brackets coupled with SS wires. Light and electron microscopic observations showed greater corrosion of ORJ brackets. Conclusion. In fluoride mouthwash, Shinye and ORJ brackets exhibited greater corrosion than Dentaurum and American Orthodontics brackets. Stainless steel brackets used with NiTi wires showed greater corrosion and thus caution is recommended when using them. PMID:26697148

  18. Virtual walls based on oil-repellent surfaces for low-surface-tension liquids.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Riberet; Kwon, Jae Wan

    2013-01-29

    Manipulating and controlling water-based aqueous solutions with the use of virtual walls is relatively simple compared to that of nonaqueous low-surface-tension liquids, which pose greater challenges to microfluidic devices. This letter reports a novel technique to form a virtual wall for various low-surface-tension liquids. A microfluidic channel with virtual walls has been made to guide low-surface-tension liquids by using a specially designed oil-repellent surface. Unlike generic superoleophobic surfaces, our oil-repellent surface exhibited strong repellency to the lateral flow of low-surface-tension liquids such as hexadecane and dodecane. A plasma-assisted surface micromachining process has been utilized to form the oil-repellent surface. The use of combined features of re-entrant geometries on the surface played an important role in promoting its repellence to the lateral flow of low-surface-tension liquids. We have successfully demonstrated how low-surface-tension liquids can be well confined by the virtual walls.

  19. Evaluation of stiffness and plastic deformation of active ceramic self-ligating bracket clips after repetitive opening and closure movements

    PubMed Central

    Carneiro, Grace Kelly Martins; Roque, Juliano Alves; Segundo, Aguinaldo Silva Garcez; Suzuki, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to assess whether repetitive opening and closure of self-ligating bracket clips can cause plastic deformation of the clip. METHODS: Three types of active/interactive ceramic self-ligating brackets (n = 20) were tested: In-Ovation C, Quicklear and WOW. A standardized controlled device performed 500 cycles of opening and closure movements of the bracket clip with proper instruments and techniques adapted as recommended by the manufacturer of each bracket type. Two tensile tests, one before and one after the repetitive cycles, were performed to assess the stiffness of the clips. To this end, a custom-made stainless steel 0.40 x 0.40 mm wire was inserted into the bracket slot and adapted to the universal testing machine (EMIC DL2000), after which measurements were recorded. On the loading portion of the loading-unloading curve of clips, the slope fitted a first-degree equation curve to determine the stiffness/deflection rate of the clip. RESULTS: The results of plastic deformation showed no significant difference among bracket types before and after the 500 cycles of opening and closure (p = 0.811). There were significant differences on stiffness among the three types of brackets (p = 0.005). The WOW bracket had higher mean values, whereas Quicklear bracket had lower values, regardless of the opening/closure cycle. CONCLUSION: Repetitive controlled opening and closure movements of the clip did not alter stiffness or cause plastic deformation. PMID:26352844

  20. Novel spirometry based on optical surface imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Guang Huang, Hailiang; Li, Diana G.; Chen, Qing; Gaebler, Carl P.; Mechalakos, James; Wei, Jie; Sullivan, James; Zatcky, Joan; Rimner, Andreas

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of using optical surface imaging (OSI) to measure the dynamic tidal volume (TV) of the human torso during free breathing. Methods: We performed experiments to measure volume or volume change in geometric and deformable phantoms as well as human subjects using OSI. To assess the accuracy of OSI in volume determination, we performed experiments using five geometric phantoms and two deformable body phantoms and compared the values with those derived from geometric calculations and computed tomography (CT) measurements, respectively. To apply this technique to human subjects, an institutional review board protocol was established and three healthy volunteers were studied. In the human experiment, a high-speed image capture mode of OSI was applied to acquire torso images at 4–5 frames per second, which was synchronized with conventional spirometric measurements at 5 Hz. An in-house MATLAB program was developed to interactively define the volume of interest (VOI), separate the thorax and abdomen, and automatically calculate the thoracic and abdominal volumes within the VOIs. The torso volume change (TV C = ΔV{sub torso} = ΔV{sub thorax} + ΔV{sub abdomen}) was automatically calculated using full-exhalation phase as the reference. The volumetric breathing pattern (BP{sub v} = ΔV{sub thorax}/ΔV{sub torso}) quantifying thoracic and abdominal volume variations was also calculated. Under quiet breathing, TVC should equal the tidal volume measured concurrently by a spirometer with a conversion factor (1.08) accounting for internal and external differences of temperature and moisture. Another MATLAB program was implemented to control the conventional spirometer that was used as the standard. Results: The volumes measured from the OSI imaging of geometric phantoms agreed with the calculated volumes with a discrepancy of 0.0% ± 1.6% (range −1.9% to 2.5%). In measurements from the deformable torso/thorax phantoms, the volume

  1. Novel spirometry based on optical surface imaging

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guang; Huang, Hailiang; Li, Diana G.; Chen, Qing; Gaebler, Carl P.; Sullivan, James; Zatcky, Joan; Rimner, Andreas; Mechalakos, James

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of using optical surface imaging (OSI) to measure the dynamic tidal volume (TV) of the human torso during free breathing. Methods: We performed experiments to measure volume or volume change in geometric and deformable phantoms as well as human subjects using OSI. To assess the accuracy of OSI in volume determination, we performed experiments using five geometric phantoms and two deformable body phantoms and compared the values with those derived from geometric calculations and computed tomography (CT) measurements, respectively. To apply this technique to human subjects, an institutional review board protocol was established and three healthy volunteers were studied. In the human experiment, a high-speed image capture mode of OSI was applied to acquire torso images at 4–5 frames per second, which was synchronized with conventional spirometric measurements at 5 Hz. An in-house matlab program was developed to interactively define the volume of interest (VOI), separate the thorax and abdomen, and automatically calculate the thoracic and abdominal volumes within the VOIs. The torso volume change (TV C = ΔVtorso = ΔVthorax + ΔVabdomen) was automatically calculated using full-exhalation phase as the reference. The volumetric breathing pattern (BPv = ΔVthorax/ΔVtorso) quantifying thoracic and abdominal volume variations was also calculated. Under quiet breathing, TVC should equal the tidal volume measured concurrently by a spirometer with a conversion factor (1.08) accounting for internal and external differences of temperature and moisture. Another matlab program was implemented to control the conventional spirometer that was used as the standard. Results: The volumes measured from the OSI imaging of geometric phantoms agreed with the calculated volumes with a discrepancy of 0.0% ± 1.6% (range −1.9% to 2.5%). In measurements from the deformable torso/thorax phantoms, the volume differences measured using OSI imaging and CT

  2. Surface classification and detection of latent fingerprints based on 3D surface texture parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruhn, Stefan; Fischer, Robert; Vielhauer, Claus

    2012-06-01

    In the field of latent fingerprint detection in crime scene forensics the classification of surfaces has importance. A new method for the scientific analysis of image based information for forensic science was investigated in the last years. Our image acquisition based on a sensor using Chromatic White Light (CWL) with a lateral resolution up to 2 μm. The used FRT-MicroProf 200 CWL 600 measurement device is able to capture high-resolution intensity and topography images in an optical and contact-less way. In prior work, we have suggested to use 2D surface texture parameters to classify various materials, which was a novel approach in the field of criminalistic forensic using knowledge from surface appearance and a chromatic white light sensor. A meaningful and useful classification of different crime scene specific surfaces is not existent. In this work, we want to extend such considerations by the usage of fourteen 3D surface parameters, called 'Birmingham 14'. In our experiment we define these surface texture parameters and use them to classify ten different materials in this test set-up and create specific material classes. Further it is shown in first experiments, that some surface texture parameters are sensitive to separate fingerprints from carrier surfaces. So far, the use of surface roughness is mainly known within the framework of material quality control. The analysis and classification of the captured 3D-topography images from crime scenes is important for the adaptive preprocessing depending on the surface texture. The adaptive preprocessing in dependency of surface classification is necessary for precise detection because of the wide variety of surface textures. We perform a preliminary study in usage of these 3D surface texture parameters as feature for the fingerprint detection. In combination with a reference sample we show that surface texture parameters can be an indication for a fingerprint and can be a feature in latent fingerprint detection.

  3. Breast surface estimation for radar-based breast imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Williams, Trevor C; Sill, Jeff M; Fear, Elise C

    2008-06-01

    Radar-based microwave breast-imaging techniques typically require the antennas to be placed at a certain distance from or on the breast surface. This requires prior knowledge of the breast location, shape, and size. The method proposed in this paper for obtaining this information is based on a modified tissue sensing adaptive radar algorithm. First, a breast surface detection scan is performed. Data from this scan are used to localize the breast by creating an estimate of the breast surface. If required, the antennas may then be placed at specified distances from the breast surface for a second tumor-sensing scan. This paper introduces the breast surface estimation and antenna placement algorithms. Surface estimation and antenna placement results are demonstrated on three-dimensional breast models derived from magnetic resonance images.

  4. Factors Affecting the Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets - a Review of In Vitro Studies.

    PubMed

    Bakhadher, Waleed; Halawany, Hassan; Talic, Nabeel; Abraham, Nimmi; Jacob, Vimal

    2015-01-01

    The adhesive material used to bond orthodontic brackets to teeth should neither fail during the treatment period, resulting in treatment delays, untoward expenses or patient inconvenience nor should it damage the enamel on debonding at the end of the treatment. Although the effectiveness of a bonding system and any unfavorable effects on the enamel may be studied by conducting in-vivo studies, it is nearly impossible to independently analyze different variables that influence a specific bonding system in the oral environment. In-vitro studies, on the other hand, may utilize more standardized protocols for testing different bonding systems and materials available. Thus, the present review focused attention on in-vitro studies and made an attempt to discuss material-related, teeth-related (fluorotic vs non-fluorotic teeth) and other miscellaneous factors that influences the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets. Within the limitations of this review, using conventional acid-etch technique, ceramic brackets and bonding to non-fluorotic teeth was reported to have a positive influence on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets, but higher shear bond strength found on using ceramic brackets can be dangerous for the enamel. PMID:26455565

  5. The effect of enamel bleaching on the shear bond strengths of metal and ceramic brackets.

    PubMed

    Oztaş, E; Bağdelen, G; Kiliçoğlu, H; Ulukapi, H; Aydin, I

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of bleaching and delayed bonding on the shear bond strengths of metal and ceramic brackets bonded with light and chemically cure composite resin to human enamel. One hundred and twenty extracted human premolar teeth were randomly divided into three groups of 40 each. The first two groups were bleached with 20 per cent carbamide peroxide (CP) at-home bleaching agent. No bleaching procedures were applied to the third group and served as control. The first two and control groups were divided into equal subgroups according to different adhesive-bracket combinations. Specimens in group 1 (n = 40) were bonded 24 hours after bleaching process was completed while the specimens in group 2 (n = 40) were bonded 14 days after. The specimens in all groups were debonded with a Universal testing machine while the modified adhesive remnant index was used to evaluate fracture properties. No statistically significant differences were found between the shear bond strengths of metal and ceramic brackets bonded to bleached enamel after 24 hours, 14 days, and unbleached enamel with light or chemical cure adhesives (P > 0.05). The mode of failure was mostly at the bracket/adhesive interface and cohesive failures within the resin were also observed. Our findings indicated that at-home bleaching agents that contain 20 per cent CP did not significantly affect the shear bond strength of metal and ceramic orthodontic brackets to enamel when bonding is performed 24 hours or 14 days after bleaching.

  6. The Effect on Final Bond Strength of Bracket Manipulation Subsequent To Initial Positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beebe, David A.

    The shear bond strength of light activated orthodontic adhesives varies according to the composition of the material, placement protocol, and time prior to light curing. Manipulating brackets after their initial placement on a tooth can disrupt the adhesive's polymerization and compromise final bond strength. No previous research has investigated how a specific degree of manipulation, and the amount of time elapsed prior to curing, under specific lighting conditions, affects the orthodontic adhesives shear bond strength. Victory SeriesRTM, MBT prescription, premolar (3M Unitek, Monrovia, CA) orthodontic brackets were bonded using three different adhesives to sixty (60) bicuspids and varying the time after bracket manipulation before curing. The shear bond strength was calculated for each specimen. The brackets were debonded and the same teeth were rebonded with new, identical brackets, using the same protocol and under the same conditions. The results showed a statistically significant difference between the shear bond strength of Transbond XT and Grengloo, with Transbond XT having the highest strength. There was also a statistically significance difference in bond strength between the group cured 30 seconds after manipulation and the groups manipulated at different intervals prior to curing, with the 30 second group having the highest bond strength. This study confirms that various orthodontic adhesives have different bond strengths depending on manipulation and varying times prior to curing each adhesive.

  7. Influence of Adhesives and Methods of Enamel Pretreatment on the Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets

    PubMed Central

    Jurišić, Sanja; Jurišić, Gordan

    2015-01-01

    Aim The objective of present study was to examine influence of adhesives and methods of enamel pretreatment on the shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets. The adhesives used were resin-reinforced glass ionomer cements-GIC (Fuji Ortho LC) and composite resin (Transbond XT). Material and Methods The experimental sample consisted of 80 extracted human first premolars. The sample was divided into four equal groups, and the metal brackets were bonded with different enamel pretreatments by using two adhesives: group A-10% polyacrylic acid; Fuji Ortho LC, group B–37% phosphoric acid; Fuji Ortho LC, group C–self etching primer; Transbond XT, group D–37% phosphoric acid, primer; Transbond XT. SBS of brackets was measured. After debonding of brackets, the adhesive remnant index (ARI) was evaluated. Results After the statistical analysis of the collected data was performed (ANOVA; Sheffe post-hoc test), the results showed that significantly lower SBS of the group B was found in relation to the groups C (p=0.031) and D (p=0.026). The results of ARI were similar in all testing groups and it was not possible to determine any statistically significant difference of the ARI (Chi- square test) between all four experimental groups. Conclusion The conclusion is that the use of composite resins material with appropriate enamel pretreatment according to manufacturer’s recommendation is the “gold standard” for brackets bonding for fixed orthodontic appliances. PMID:27688410

  8. Influence of Adhesives and Methods of Enamel Pretreatment on the Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets

    PubMed Central

    Jurišić, Sanja; Jurišić, Gordan

    2015-01-01

    Aim The objective of present study was to examine influence of adhesives and methods of enamel pretreatment on the shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets. The adhesives used were resin-reinforced glass ionomer cements-GIC (Fuji Ortho LC) and composite resin (Transbond XT). Material and Methods The experimental sample consisted of 80 extracted human first premolars. The sample was divided into four equal groups, and the metal brackets were bonded with different enamel pretreatments by using two adhesives: group A-10% polyacrylic acid; Fuji Ortho LC, group B–37% phosphoric acid; Fuji Ortho LC, group C–self etching primer; Transbond XT, group D–37% phosphoric acid, primer; Transbond XT. SBS of brackets was measured. After debonding of brackets, the adhesive remnant index (ARI) was evaluated. Results After the statistical analysis of the collected data was performed (ANOVA; Sheffe post-hoc test), the results showed that significantly lower SBS of the group B was found in relation to the groups C (p=0.031) and D (p=0.026). The results of ARI were similar in all testing groups and it was not possible to determine any statistically significant difference of the ARI (Chi- square test) between all four experimental groups. Conclusion The conclusion is that the use of composite resins material with appropriate enamel pretreatment according to manufacturer’s recommendation is the “gold standard” for brackets bonding for fixed orthodontic appliances.

  9. Rough surface scattering based on facet model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khamsi, H. R.; Fung, A. K.; Ulaby, F. T.

    1974-01-01

    A model for the radar return from bare ground was developed to calculate the radar cross section of bare ground and the effect of the frequency averaging on the reduction of the variance of the return. It is shown that, by assuming that the distribution of the slope to be Gaussian and that the distribution of the length of the facet to be in the form of the positive side of a Gaussian distribution, the results are in good agreement with experimental data collected by an 8- to 18-GHz radar spectrometer system. It is also shown that information on the exact correlation length of the small structure on the ground is not necessary; an effective correlation length may be calculated based on the facet model and the wavelength of the incident wave.

  10. Cell Surface-based Sensing with Metallic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ziwen; Rotello, Vincent M.

    2015-01-01

    Metallic nanoparticles provide versatile scaffolds for biosensing applications. In this review, we focus on the use of metallic nanoparticles for cell surface sensings. Examples of the use of both specific recognition and array-based “chemical nose” approaches to cell surface sensing will be discussed. PMID:25853985

  11. Randomized controlled clinical trial of oral health-related quality of life in patients wearing conventional and self-ligating brackets

    PubMed Central

    Mansor, Noorhanizar; Saub, Roslan

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this randomized controlled clinical trial was to compare oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) of patients treated with conventional, active self-ligating (ASL), and passive self-ligating (PSL) brackets in different therapeutic phases. Methods Sixty patients (mean age 18.3 years; 29 males and 31 females) requiring orthodontic treatment were randomly and equally assigned to receive conventional (Victory Series), ASL (In-Ovation R), or PSL (Damon 3MX) brackets. OHRQoL was measured with a self-administered modified 16-item Malaysian version of the Oral Health Impact Profile for immediate (soon after the visit) and late (just before the subsequent visit) assessments of the bonding and activation phases. Data were analyzed with the Kruskal-Wallis and chi-square tests. Results The PSL and ASL groups showed more immediate and late impacts in the bonding phase, respectively; the conventional group was affected in both the assessments. The first activation phase had similar impacts in the groups. After the second activation, the conventional group showed more immediate impacts, whereas the PSL and ASL groups had more late impacts. The commonly affected domains were "physical disability," "functional limitation," "physical pain," and "psychological discomfort." No significant differences in the prevalence and severity of immediate and late impacts on OHRQoL of the patients were noted in any therapeutic phase. Conclusions No bracket system seems to ensure superior OHRQoL. This information could be useful for explaining the therapeutic phases, especially the initial one, and selecting the optimal bracket system based on the patient's preference. PMID:25133131

  12. Comparison of Galvanic Currents Generated Between Different Combinations of Orthodontic Brackets and Archwires Using Potentiostat: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Rabindra S; Shafiuddin, Bareera; Pasha, Azam; Vinay, K; Narayan, Anjali; Shetty, Smitha V

    2015-01-01

    Background: Technological advances in wire selection and bracket design have led to improved treatment efficiency and allowed longer time intervals between appliance adjustments. The wires remain in the mouth for a longer duration and are subjected to electrochemical reactions, mechanical forces of mastication and generalized wear. These cause different types of corrosion. This study was done to compare the galvanic currents generated between different combinations of brackets and archwires commonly used in orthodontic practices. Materials and Methods: The materials used for the study included different commercially available orthodontic archwires and brackets. The galvanic current generated by individual materials and different combinations of these materials was tested and compared. The orthodontic archwires used were 0.019″ × 0.025″ heat-activated nickel-titanium (3M Unitek), 0.019″ × 0.025″ beta-titanium (3M Unitek) and 0.019″ × 0.025″ stainless steel (3M Unitek). The orthodontic brackets used were 0.022″ MBT laser-cut (Victory Series, 3M Unitek) and metal-injection molded (Leone Company) maxillary central incisor brackets respectively. The ligature wire used for ligation was 0.009″ stainless steel ligature (HP Company). The galvanic current for individual archwires, brackets, and the different bracket-archwire-ligature combinations was measured by using a Potentiostat machine. The data were generated using the Linear Sweep Voltammetry and OriginPro 8.5 Graphing and Data Analysis Softwares. The study was conducted in two phases. Phase I comprised of five groups for open circuit potential (OCP) and galvanic current (I), whereas Phase II comprised of six groups for galvanic current alone. Results: Mean, standard deviation and range were computed for the OCP and galvanic current (I) values obtained. Results were subjected to statistical analysis through ANOVA. In Phase I, higher mean OCP was recorded in stainless steel archwire, followed by beta

  13. Multiresolution parameterization of meshes for improved surface-based registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaume, Sylvain; Ferrant, Matthieu; Warfield, Simon K.; Macq, Benoit M. M.

    2001-07-01

    Common problems in medical image analysis involve surface-based registration. The applications range from atlas matching to tracking an object's boundary in an image sequence, or segmenting anatomical structures out of images. Most proposed solutions are based on deformable surface algorithms. The main problem of such methods is that the local accuracy of the matching must often be traded off against global smoothness of the surface in order to reach global convergence of the deformation process. Our contribution is to first build a Multi-Resolution (M-R) surface from a reference segmented image, and then match this surface onto the target image in an M-R fashion using a deformable surface-like algorithm. As we proceed from lower to higher resolution, the smoothing effect of the deformable surface is more and more localized, and the surface gets closer and closer to the target boundary. We present initial results of our algorithm for atlas registration onto brain MRI showing improved convergence and accuracy over classical deformable surface methods.

  14. Deformation-based surface morphometry applied to gray matter deformation.

    PubMed

    Chung, Moo K; Worsley, Keith J; Robbins, Steve; Paus, Tomás; Taylor, Jonathan; Giedd, Jay N; Rapoport, Judith L; Evans, Alan C

    2003-02-01

    We present a unified statistical approach to deformation-based morphometry applied to the cortical surface. The cerebral cortex has the topology of a 2D highly convoluted sheet. As the brain develops over time, the cortical surface area, thickness, curvature, and total gray matter volume change. It is highly likely that such age-related surface changes are not uniform. By measuring how such surface metrics change over time, the regions of the most rapid structural changes can be localized. We avoided using surface flattening, which distorts the inherent geometry of the cortex in our analysis and it is only used in visualization. To increase the signal to noise ratio, diffusion smoothing, which generalizes Gaussian kernel smoothing to an arbitrary curved cortical surface, has been developed and applied to surface data. Afterward, statistical inference on the cortical surface will be performed via random fields theory. As an illustration, we demonstrate how this new surface-based morphometry can be applied in localizing the cortical regions of the gray matter tissue growth and loss in the brain images longitudinally collected in the group of children and adolescents. PMID:12595176

  15. A surface-acoustic-wave-based cantilever bio-sensor.

    PubMed

    De Simoni, Giorgio; Signore, Giovanni; Agostini, Matteo; Beltram, Fabio; Piazza, Vincenzo

    2015-06-15

    A scalable surface-acoustic-wave- (SAW-) based cantilevered device for portable bio-chemical sensing applications is presented. Even in the current, proof-of-principle implementation this architecture is shown to outperform commercial quartz-crystal microbalances in terms of sensitivity. Adhesion of analytes on a functionalized surface of the cantilever shifts the resonant frequency of a SAW-generating transducer due to the stress-induced variation of the speed of surface acoustic modes. We discuss the relevance of this approach for diagnostics applications based on miniaturized devices.

  16. A conductive liquid-based surface acoustic wave device.

    PubMed

    Nam, Jeonghun; Lim, Chae Seung

    2016-10-01

    Surface acoustic wave-based microfluidic devices are popular for fluid and particle manipulation because of their noninvasiveness, low energy consumption, and easy integration with other systems. However, they have been limited by the use of patterned metal electrodes on a piezoelectric substrate, which requires expensive and complicated fabrication processes. Herein, we show a simpler and more cost-effective method for generating surface acoustic waves using eutectic gallium indium as a conductive liquid which can replace conventional patterned metal electrodes. We also demonstrate the comparable performance for acoustic streaming and mixing using conductive liquid-based surface acoustic wave devices. PMID:27528442

  17. Engineered surface Bloch waves in graphene-based hyperbolic metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Yuanjiang; Guo, Jun; Dai, Xiaoyu; Wen, Shuangchun; Tang, Dingyuan

    2014-02-10

    A kind of tunable hyperbolic metamaterial (HMM) based on the graphene-dielectric layered structure at near-infrared frequencies is presented, and the engineered surface Bloch waves between graphene-based HMM and isotropic medium are investigated. Our calculations demonstrate that the frequency and frequency range of surface Bloch waves existence can be tuned by varying the Fermi energy of graphene sheets via electrostatic biasing. Moreover, we show that the frequency range of surface Bloch waves existence can be broadened by decreasing the thickness of the dielectric in the graphene-dielectric layered structure or by increasing the layer number of graphene sheets. PMID:24663596

  18. A conductive liquid-based surface acoustic wave device.

    PubMed

    Nam, Jeonghun; Lim, Chae Seung

    2016-10-01

    Surface acoustic wave-based microfluidic devices are popular for fluid and particle manipulation because of their noninvasiveness, low energy consumption, and easy integration with other systems. However, they have been limited by the use of patterned metal electrodes on a piezoelectric substrate, which requires expensive and complicated fabrication processes. Herein, we show a simpler and more cost-effective method for generating surface acoustic waves using eutectic gallium indium as a conductive liquid which can replace conventional patterned metal electrodes. We also demonstrate the comparable performance for acoustic streaming and mixing using conductive liquid-based surface acoustic wave devices.

  19. Canonical brackets of a toy model for the Hodge theory without its canonical conjugate momenta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, D.; Bhanja, T.; Malik, R. P.

    2015-07-01

    We consider the toy model of a rigid rotor as an example of the Hodge theory within the framework of Becchi-Rouet-Stora-Tyutin (BRST) formalism and show that the internal symmetries of this theory lead to the derivation of canonical brackets amongst the creation and annihilation operators of the dynamical variables where the definition of the canonical conjugate momenta is not required. We invoke only the spin-statistics theorem, normal ordering and basic concepts of continuous symmetries (and their generators) to derive the canonical brackets for the model of a one (0 + 1)-dimensional (1D) rigid rotor without using the definition of the canonical conjugate momenta anywhere. Our present method of derivation of the basic brackets is conjectured to be true for a class of theories that provide a set of tractable physical examples for the Hodge theory.

  20. Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets to Tooth Enamel After Treatment With Different Tooth Bleaching Methods

    PubMed Central

    Vahid Dastjerdi, Elahe; Khaloo, Negar; Mojahedi, Seyed Masoud; Azarsina, Mohadese

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bleaching treatments decrease shear bond strength between orthodontic brackets and teeth; although definite results have not been reported in this regard. Objectives: This study determined the effects of different bleaching protocols on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets to teeth. Materials and Methods: This experimental study was performed in Iran. Forty-eight extracted human premolars were randomly assigned into four groups. In the control group, no bleaching treatment was performed. In groups 2 - 4, the bleaching procedures were performed using carbamide peroxide 45%, carbamide peroxide 20% and diode laser, respectively. Two weeks later, brackets were bonded to teeth and thermocycled. The shear bond strengths of the brackets to the teeth were measured. Data was analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Dunnett post-hoc test. Results: Shear bond strength of the brackets to the teeth were 10.54 ± 1.51, 6.37 ± 0.92, 7.67 ± 1.01 and 7.49 ± 1.19 MPa, in groups 1 - 4, respectively. Significant differences were found between control group and all other groups (P < 0.001); and also between groups 2 and 3 (P < 0.05). No significant differences were found between the other groups. Conclusions: The bleaching procedures using 20% carbamide peroxide and 45% carbamide peroxide and diode laser significantly decreased shear bond strength of brackets to the teeth. 45% carbamide peroxide had a more significant effect on bond strength compared to 20% carbamide peroxide. The difference in bond strength was not significant between laser group and either carbamide peroxide groups. PMID:26734481

  1. Surface-based prostate registration with biomechanical regularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Ven, Wendy J. M.; Hu, Yipeng; Barentsz, Jelle O.; Karssemeijer, Nico; Barratt, Dean; Huisman, Henkjan J.

    2013-03-01

    Adding MR-derived information to standard transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images for guiding prostate biopsy is of substantial clinical interest. A tumor visible on MR images can be projected on ultrasound by using MRUS registration. A common approach is to use surface-based registration. We hypothesize that biomechanical modeling will better control deformation inside the prostate than a regular surface-based registration method. We developed a novel method by extending a surface-based registration with finite element (FE) simulation to better predict internal deformation of the prostate. For each of six patients, a tetrahedral mesh was constructed from the manual prostate segmentation. Next, the internal prostate deformation was simulated using the derived radial surface displacement as boundary condition. The deformation field within the gland was calculated using the predicted FE node displacements and thin-plate spline interpolation. We tested our method on MR guided MR biopsy imaging data, as landmarks can easily be identified on MR images. For evaluation of the registration accuracy we used 45 anatomical landmarks located in all regions of the prostate. Our results show that the median target registration error of a surface-based registration with biomechanical regularization is 1.88 mm, which is significantly different from 2.61 mm without biomechanical regularization. We can conclude that biomechanical FE modeling has the potential to improve the accuracy of multimodal prostate registration when comparing it to regular surface-based registration.

  2. The noncommutative Poisson bracket and the deformation of the family algebras

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Zhaoting

    2015-07-15

    The family algebras are introduced by Kirillov in 2000. In this paper, we study the noncommutative Poisson bracket P on the classical family algebra C{sub τ}(g). We show that P controls the first-order 1-parameter formal deformation from C{sub τ}(g) to Q{sub τ}(g) where the latter is the quantum family algebra. Moreover, we will prove that the noncommutative Poisson bracket is in fact a Hochschild 2-coboundary, and therefore, the deformation is infinitesimally trivial. In the last part of this paper, we discuss the relation between Mackey’s analogue and the quantization problem of the family algebras.

  3. Does It Help to Use Mathematically Superfluous Brackets When Teaching the Rules for the Order of Operations?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunnarsson, Robert; Sönnerhed, Wang Wei; Hernell, Bernt

    2016-01-01

    The hypothesis that mathematically superfluous brackets can be useful when teaching the rules for the order of operations is challenged. The idea of the hypothesis is that with brackets it is possible to emphasize the order priority of one operation over another. An experiment was conducted where expressions with mixed operations were studied,…

  4. Surface versus Edge-Based Determinants of Visual Recognition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biederman, Irving; Ju, Ginny

    1988-01-01

    The latency at which objects could be identified by 126 subjects was compared through line drawings (edge-based) or color photography (surface depiction). The line drawing was identified about as quickly as the photograph; primal access to a mental representation of an object can be modeled from an edge-based description. (SLD)

  5. A comparison of the forces required to produce tooth movement in vitro using two self-ligating brackets and a pre-adjusted bracket employing two types of ligation.

    PubMed

    Sims, A P; Waters, N E; Birnie, D J; Pethybridge, R J

    1993-10-01

    Friction in fixed appliance systems has received considerable attention in the recent literature, although that attributable to the type of ligation used has not been fully investigated. This in vitro study of 0.022 x 0.028 inch slot Minitwin, Activa ('A' Company, San Diego, California, USA), and SPEED brackets (Strite Industries Ltd., Cambridge, Ontario, Canada), investigates friction in two forms of self-ligating brackets and in two methods of ligating Minitwin straight wire brackets with polyurethane elastomeric ligatures. The resistance to sliding of rectangular archwires through the ligated brackets was measured on a vertically mounted Instron testing machine. The stainless steel archwires used were straight lengths of 0.016" x 0.022", 0.017" x 0.025", 0.018" x 0.025", and 0.019" x 0.025" Nubryte Gold (GAC International Inc., Central Islip, New York, USA). The results showed a significant reduction (P < 0.01) in frictional resistance in the Activa brackets compared with SPEED brackets by a factor of approximately 15. When the SPEED brackets were compared to Minitwin brackets, the reduction in friction was by 50-70 per cent (P < 0.01). The placing of 'figure-of-eight' elastomeric ties increased friction by a factor of 70-220 per cent compared to conventional elastomeric ties (P < 0.01) except for 0.016" x 0.022" archwires. The results indicate that self-ligating brackets require less force to produce tooth movement because they apply less frictional contact to the archwire than conventionally tied siamese brackets. PMID:8223972

  6. Surface-Area-Based Attribute Filtering in 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiwanuka, Fred N.; Ouzounis, Georgios K.; Wilkinson, Michael H. F.

    In this paper we describe a rotation-invariant attribute filter based on estimating the sphericity or roundness of objects by efficiently computing surface area and volume of connected components. The method is based on an efficient algorithm to compute all iso-surfaces of all nodes in a Max-Tree. With similar properties to moment-based attributes like sparseness, non-compactness, and elongation, our sphericity attribute can supplement these in finding blood-vessels in time-of-flight MR angiograms. We compare the method to a discrete surface area method based on adjacency, which has been used for urinary stone detection. Though the latter is faster, it is less accurate, and lacks rotation invariance.

  7. High Resolution Optical Surface Investigation based on Heterodyne Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spannagel, Ruven; Schuldt, Thilo; Braxmaier, Claus

    2012-07-01

    We present results on high precision optical profilometry for investigating reflecting surfaces with respect to surface properties such as structure, roughness, and waviness. Our metrology system is based on a highly symmetric heterodyne interferometer with a potential sensitivity at the picometer level. The profilometer is capable of scanning surfaces by actuating either the device under test (DUT), or the measurement laser beam of the interferometer. The current setup with DUT-actuation has a sensitivity of about 1 nm/ ? , and achives a measurement accuracy better than 5 nm at a measurement range of 100 μm with a lateral resolution of approximately 15 μm. Different profiles of various surfaces were measured and the reproducibility of the results have been demonstrated by measuring a reference surface.

  8. Contour-Based Surface Reconstruction using MPU Implicit Models.

    PubMed

    Braude, Ilya; Marker, Jeffrey; Museth, Ken; Nissanov, Jonathan; Breen, David

    2007-03-01

    This paper presents a technique for creating a smooth, closed surface from a set of 2D contours, which have been extracted from a 3D scan. The technique interprets the pixels that make up the contours as points in ℝ(3) and employs Multi-level Partition of Unity (MPU) implicit models to create a surface that approximately fits to the 3D points. Since MPU implicit models additionally require surface normal information at each point, an algorithm that estimates normals from the contour data is also described. Contour data frequently contains noise from the scanning and delineation process. MPU implicit models provide a superior approach to the problem of contour-based surface reconstruction, especially in the presence of noise, because they are based on adaptive implicit functions that locally approximate the points within a controllable error bound. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our technique with a number of example datasets, providing images and error statistics generated from our results.

  9. Chemical monitors based on Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS)

    SciTech Connect

    Vo-Dinh, T.; Alarie, J.P.; Sutherland, W.S.; Stokes, D.L.; Miller, G.H.

    1992-12-31

    This paper presents an overview of the development of chemical monitors using the Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) technique. The SERS effect is based on recent experimental observations, which have indicated enhancement of the Raman scattering efficiency by factors up to 10{sup 8} when a compound is adsorbed on rough metallic surfaces having submicron protrusions. The focus of our research efforts is on the development of SERS-active sensors and instrumentation capable of field analysis and remote sensing.

  10. Clinical Evaluation of Proclination of Lower Anterior Teeth during Alignment using a Single Width Bracket-A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Farhan, Azeem; Issar, Rashmi; Subramanian, Shashikala; Muniyappa, Manju Prasad; Ranjan, Shashi; Singh, Priyankar; Singh, Kumar Tathagat

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The pre-adjusted brackets are available in various prescriptions and sizes; nevertheless there are still many controversies as to which pre-adjusted edgewise bracket offers the maximum clinical efficiency. Aim This study was conducted to determine and compare the amount of lower incisor proclination during de-crowding if any of the Mini-Uni Twin Brackets with that of the standard double width brackets. Materials and Methods A total of 20 patients i.e., 10 patients in each group both males and females were randomly selected for the study from subjects seeking treatment, the selected samples were grouped as follows. Group I – Double Width Brackets (3M Unitek Gemini Series) 0.018” slot with Roth prescription. Group II – Mini Uni-Twin Bracket (3M Unitek) 0.018” slot with Roth prescription. Results The Mini-Uni Twin Brackets had statistically significant (p = 0.01) amount of proclination of the lower anteriors (0.8o± 0.3o) after de-crowding as compared to the standard Double Width Brackets and since the mean change in the Incisor Mandibular Plane Angle (IMPA) was lesser than 1o, its clinical significance could be questionable. Conclusion The Mini Uni Twin brackets are comparatively efficient in the lower anterior decrowding but further comparative clinical studies need to be performed on these Mini Uni Twin brackets, with an increase in the sample size and also the number of parameters to prove its total clinical efficiency. PMID:27504401

  11. A Mathematica program for the calculation of five-body Moshinsky brackets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Shuyuan; Mu, Xueli; Liu, Tingting; Chen, Hong

    2016-06-01

    Five-body Moshinsky brackets that relate harmonic oscillator wavefunctions in two different sets of Jacobi coordinates make it straightforward to calculate some matrix elements in the variational calculations of five-body systems. The analytical expression of these transformation coefficients and the computer code written in the Mathematica language are presented here for accurate calculations.

  12. Bond strength of a fluoride-releasing bracket adhesive. Experimental study.

    PubMed

    Graf, I; Breier, M; Huck, L; Schwarze, C W

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine a new fluoride-releasing light-cured filling composite for its bonding and debonding qualities when used as a bracket adhesive. The material investigated was a hybrid composite containing a chemically modified fluoride apatite, which is claimed to provide the enamel with phosphate, calcium, and fluoride ions in the presence of an acid pH, recharging its resources of these ions through fluoride-containing toothpastes used in daily oral hygiene. Concurrently suitability as an enamel conditioner was tested in a new self-etching primer, which does not require water rinsing but is gently air dried instead. For comparison a conventional light-cure single-component adhesive was used together with 37% orthophosphoric acid. After application of the respective conditioners, mesh-backed metal brackets were bonded to 20 human premolars in each of the 2 adhesive groups and subjected to a shear test. Bond failure location was evaluated using the Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI). Average bond strength of the experimental bracket adhesive and the conventional etchant was 8.96 MPa. Conditioning with the self-etching primer led to a decrease of mean shear bond strength values to 6.55 MPa. Highest bond strength was determined in the control group (12.19 MPa). The bond strength results obtained in the shear test recommend the new material as a bracket adhesive to be used with orthophosphoric acid for etching. PMID:10028788

  13. AdaptiviTree: adaptive tree visualization for tournament-style brackets.

    PubMed

    Tan, Desney; Smith, Greg; Lee, Bongshin; Robertson, George

    2007-01-01

    Online pick'em games, such as the recent NCAA college basketball March Madness tournament, form a large and rapidly growing industry. In these games, players make predictions on a tournament bracket that defines which competitors play each other and how they proceed toward a single champion. Throughout the course of the tournament, players monitor the brackets to track progress and to compare predictions made by multiple players. This is often a complex sensemaking task. The classic bracket visualization was designed for use on paper and utilizes an incrementally additive system in which the winner of each match-up is rewritten in the next round as the tournament progresses. Unfortunately, this representation requires a significant amount of space and makes it relatively difficult to get a quick overview of the tournament state since competitors take arbitrary paths through the static bracket. In this paper, we present AdaptiviTree, a novel visualization that adaptively deforms the representation of the tree and uses its shape to convey outcome information. AdaptiviTree not only provides a more compact and understandable representation, but also allows overlays that display predictions as well as other statistics. We describe results from a lab study we conducted to explore the efficacy of AdaptiviTree, as well as from a deployment of the system in a recent real-world sports tournament.

  14. Effect of Enamel Preparation and Light Curing Methods on Microleakage under Orthodontic Brackets

    PubMed Central

    Pakshir, Hamidreza

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to compare the microleakage beneath metallic brackets following two different methods of enamel preparation and light curing. Materials and Methods: A total of 120 bovine deciduous lower incisors were randomly divided into four groups of 30 teeth. The preparations were as follows: Group I: Acid etching + Transbond XT primer + direct illumination, group II: acid etching + Transbond XT primer + transillumination, group III: Transbond XT self-etching primer + direct illumination and Group IV: Transbond XT self-etching primer + transillumination. Dye penetration was used as the method of microleakage evaluation. Sections made at the enamel-adhesive and adhesive-bracket interfaces were evaluated under a stereomicroscope. The Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests were used for statistical analysis. The level of significance was set at P<0.05. Results: All groups showed greater microleakage at the gingival in comparison to the incisal margin and the differences were significant among groups with transillumination (P<0.001). No significant differences were observed in the microleakage scores at the gingival and incisal margins in any of the interfaces (P>0.05). Mesiodistal margins of the self-etching group with direct illumination showed significantly lower scores in comparison with acid etched group (P<0.05). Conclusion: Use of self-etching primers for bonding of orthodontic brackets yields acceptable results if all bracket margins are cured directly. PMID:26884778

  15. A combined voxel and surface based method for topology correction of brain surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gris, Florence; Favreau, Jean-Marie; Acosta, Oscar; Barra, Vincent; Salvado, Olivier

    2010-03-01

    Brain surfaces provide a reliable representation for cortical mapping. The construction of correct surfaces from magnetic resonance images (MRI) segmentation is a challenging task, especially when genus zero surfaces are required for further processing such as parameterization, partial inflation and registration. The generation of such surfaces has been approached either by correcting a binary image as part of the segmentation pipeline or by modifying the mesh representing the surface. During this task, the preservation of the structure may be compromised because of the convoluted nature of the brain and noisy/imperfect segmentations. In this paper, we propose a combined, voxel and surfacebased, topology correction method which preserves the structure of the brain while yielding genus zero surfaces. The topology of the binary segmentation is first corrected using a set of topology preserving operators applied sequentially. This results in a white matter/gray matter binary set with correct sulci delineation, homotopic to a filled sphere. Using the corrected segmentation, a marching cubes mesh is then generated and the tunnels and handles resulting from the meshing are finally removed with an algorithm based on the detection of nonseparating loops. The approach was validated using 20 young individuals MRI from the OASIS database, acquired at two different time-points. Reproducibility and robustness were evaluated using global and local criteria such as surface area, curvature and point to point distance. Results demonstrated the method capability to produce genus zero meshes while preserving geometry, two fundamental properties for reliable and accurate cortical mapping and further clinical studies.

  16. Response mechanism for surface acoustic wave gas sensors based on surface-adsorption.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiansheng; Lu, Yanyan

    2014-04-16

    A theoretical model is established to describe the response mechanism of surface acoustic wave (SAW) gas sensors based on physical adsorption on the detector surface. Wohljent's method is utilized to describe the relationship of sensor output (frequency shift of SAW oscillator) and the mass loaded on the detector surface. The Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) formula and its improved form are introduced to depict the adsorption behavior of gas on the detector surface. By combining the two methods, we obtain a theoretical model for the response mechanism of SAW gas sensors. By using a commercial SAW gas chromatography (GC) analyzer, an experiment is performed to measure the frequency shifts caused by different concentration of dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP). The parameters in the model are given by fitting the experimental results and the theoretical curve agrees well with the experimental data.

  17. Preparation and surface properties of transparent UV-resistant "petal effect" superhydrophobic surface based on polybenzoxazine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Juan; Lu, Xin; Xin, Zhong; Zhou, Changlu

    2015-10-01

    The rose petal shows super water repellence together with high adhesion of water, which was named as "pinned effect" or "petal effect". In this work, the "petal effect" superhydrophobic surface based on polybenzoxazine was prepared by one-step thermal curing method. The highest water CA was 161.5°. The droplets could be pinned to the surface and could not roll off, even when it was turned upside down. The morphological characterization of the samples was characterized by SEM, which exhibited that the surface had micro- and nano- structures. Meanwhile, it also possessed excellent surface properties, such as good UV-resistance, transparent property, thermal stability and strong adhesion to substrate which made it possible to apply in academic research and industrial applications.

  18. Division of Icy Bodies into Groups Based on Surface Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Bradley E.; Rabinowitz, D. L.; Tourtellottte, S. W.

    2008-09-01

    We propose the division of the icy bodies in the outer Solar System into five groups based on their surface properties. This division can be equivalently made by three definitions involving: size/orbit/color; measured surface properties; the physical mechanisms that reprocess the surfaces. Our first group is the Small/Red bodies (including the red Centaurs, Kuiper Belt Objects, and Scattered Disk Objects) which are 1.5 mag. These surfaces all have albedo <16; percent, and have lost their volatile ices by Jeans escape with cosmic rays reddening the remaining ices. Our second group is the Small/Gray bodies (including the gray Centaurs, Scattered Disk Objects, and Trojans) which are <800; km in diameter and with B-R<1.5 mag. These surfaces all have very low albedo (<6; percent) because their surface ices have been lost due to heating by the Sun at some time in their past orbital history leaving only their original rocky material to cover the surface. Our third group is the Intermediate bodies (Quaoar, Orcus, and Charon) with diameters 800-1400 km. Their surfaces have lost some of the volatile ices (methane and nitrogen in particular) to Jeans escape, while the remaining ices contain ammonia and crystalline water ice with some cryovolcanism. Our fourth group is the Large bodies (Pluto, Eris, Sedna, Triton, and 2005 FY9) with diameters >1400; km. These bodies are large enough to support active cryovolcanism plus seasonal frost formation/sublimation and are large enough so that the methane and nitrogen ices dominate because they have not been lost to Jeans escape. Our fifth group is the Collisional bodies (including the 2003 EL61 collisional family) which all have similar orbits. Their surfaces all have very neutral colors, low opposition surges, and relatively high albedos, because the volatile ices were all lost during the collision leaving a young surface with only water ice.

  19. Surface segregations in platinum-based alloy nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamakawa, Shunsuke; Asahi, Ryoji; Koyama, Toshiyuki

    2014-04-01

    A phase-field model that describes the radial distributions of the ordered-disordered phase and surface segregation in a single-alloy nanoparticle is introduced to clarify the overall behavior of surface segregation of various Pt-based alloy nanoparticles. One of the obstacles to apply a platinum-transition metal alloy as a cathode electro-catalyst of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell is the need to ensure the retention of the designed surface composition in an alloy nanoparticle against the alloy combinations, a particle size, and heat treatment. From the results of calculations for CrPt, FePt, CoPt, NiPt, CuPt, PdPt, IrPt, and AuPt binary nanoparticles with diameters below 10 nm at 973.15 K, the compositional variation within a single particle was found to depend on the balance between the atomic interaction within particles and the surface free energy. In addition, the obtained specific steady-state composition of the surface varied significantly with alloy combination and particle diameter. Based on the general tendencies of a binary system to exhibit segregation, attempts to control the amount of platinum segregation on the surface using a ternary-alloy system were examined.

  20. Mandibular dental arch changes associated with treatment of crowding using self-ligating and conventional brackets.

    PubMed

    Pandis, Nicholas; Polychronopoulou, Argy; Makou, Margarita; Eliades, Theodore

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of treatment of mandibular crowding with self-ligating and conventional brackets on dental arch variables. Fifty-six patients were selected from a pool of subjects satisfying the following inclusion criteria: non-extraction treatment in the mandibular or maxillary arches, eruption of all mandibular teeth, no spaces and an irregularity index greater than 2 mm in the mandibular arch, and no adjunct treatment such as etxra- or intraoral appliances. The patients were assigned to two groups: one group received treatment with the self-ligating bracket and the other with a conventional edgewise appliance, both with a 0.022 inch slot. Lateral cephalometric radiographs obtained at the beginning (T1) and end (T2) of treatment were used to assess the alteration in mandibular incisor inclination, and measurements of intercanine and intermolar widths were made on dental casts to investigate changes associated with the correction. The results were analysed with bivariate and multivariate linear regression analysis in order to examine the effect of the bracket systems on arch width or lower incisor inclination, adjusting for the confounding effect of demographic and clinical characteristics. An alignment-induced increase in the proclination of the mandibular incisors was observed for both groups; no difference was identified between self-ligating and conventional brackets with respect to this parameter. Likewise, an increase in intercanine and intermolar widths was noted for both bracket groups; the self-ligating group showed a higher intermolar width increase than the conventional group, whereas the amount of crowding and Angle classification were not significant predictors of post-treatment intermolar width. PMID:19959610

  1. Effect of multiple debonding sequences on shear bond strength of new stainless steel brackets

    PubMed Central

    Eslamian, Ladan; Borzabadi-Farahani, Ali; Tavakol, Pegah; Tavakol, Ali; Amini, Nazila; Lynch, Edward

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This in-vitro study aimed at evaluating the effect of three debonding sequences on the shear bond strength (SBS) of new stainless steel (SS) brackets. Materials and Methods: Stainless steel twin brackets (0.022-inch, American Orthodontics, Sheboygan, WI, USA) were bonded with light cure adhesive (Transbond XT, 3M Unitek, St. Paul, MN, USA) to 80 newly extracted human premolars after acid etching with 37% phosphoric acid (30 s). Brackets were debonded with a universal testing machine, and new brackets were bonded to teeth using the same adhesive and same manner. This process was repeated twice, and brackets were debonded within 24 h after bonding. The longitudinal changes of average SBS were assessed with the repeated measures ANOVA. Post-hoc tests using the Bonferroni correction were also used to compare the average SBS at three debonding sequences. Result: The mean SBS decreased significantly after each debonding sequence (P < 0.01). The corresponding mean values (standard deviation, 95% CI) after the first, second, and third debonding sequences were 22.88 MPa (4.08, 21.97-22.79), 19.36 MPa (4.54, 18.62-20.64), and 16.67 MPa (4.27, 15.72-17.62), respectively. There was no significant difference among the adhesive remnant index (ARI) scores of three debonding sequences (χ2= 5.067, df = 6, P = 0.53). Conclusion: Average SBS after three debonding sequences was significantly decreased, but was above the recommended 5.9-7.8 MPa. In-vivo studies are required to validate the finding of this study. PMID:26020036

  2. Evaluation of enamel damages following orthodontic bracket debonding in fluorosed teeth bonded with adhesion promoter

    PubMed Central

    Baherimoghadam, Tahreh; Akbarian, Sahar; Rasouli, Reza; Naseri, Navid

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate shear bond strength (SBS) of the orthodontic brackets bonded to fluorosed and nonfluorosed teeth using Light Bond with and without adhesion promoters and compare their enamel damages following debonding. Materials and Methods: In this study, 30 fluorosed (Thylstrup and Fejerskov Index = 4–5) and 30 nonfluorosed teeth were randomly distributed between two subgroups according to the bonding materials: Group 1, fluorosed teeth bonded with Light Bond; Group 2, fluorosed teeth bonded with adhesion promoters and Light Bond; Group 3, nonfluorosed teeth bonded with Light Bond; Group 4, nonfluorosed bonded with adhesion promoters and Light Bond. After bonding, the SBS of the brackets was tested with a universal testing machine. Stereomicroscopic evaluation was performed by unbiased stereology in all teeth to determine the amount of adhesive remnants and the number and length of enamel cracks before bonding and after debonding. The data were analyzed using two-way analysis of variance, Kruskal–Wallis, Wilcoxon Signed Rank, and Mann–Whitney test. Results: While fluorosis reduced the SBS of orthodontic bracket (P = 0.017), Enhance Locus Ceruleus LC significantly increased the SBS of the orthodontic bracket in fluorosed and nonfluorosed teeth (P = 0.039). Significant increasing in the number and length of enamel crack after debonding was found in all four groups. There were no significant differences in the length of enamel crack increased after debonding among four groups (P = 0.768) while increasing in the number of enamel cracks after debonding was significantly different among the four groups (P = 0.023). Teeth in Group 2 showed the highest enamel damages among four groups following debonding. Conclusion: Adhesion promoters could improve the bond strength of orthodontic brackets, but conservative debonding methods for decreasing enamel damages would be necessary. PMID:27095895

  3. Chemical sensors based on surface-confined dendrimers

    SciTech Connect

    Tokuhisa, Hideo; Crooks, R.M.; Ricco, A.J.; Osbourn, G.C.

    1997-10-01

    The use of dendrimers for preparing chemically sensitive interfaces for detecting volatile organic compounds (VOCs) using surface acoustic wave (SAW) device transducers is described. Specifically, the synthesis of the dendrimers and the means by which they are affixed to SAW devices is discussed, followed by a detailed spectroscopic analysis of the surface-confined dendrimers and a discussion of their interaction with different VOCs. Most of these preliminary experiments focus on dendrimer surface modification using benzoylchloride, which leads to phenyl terminal groups linked to the dendrimer via amide groups. The results of this study lead us to conclude that dendrimers: (1) provide general specificity towards classes of functional groups and are therefore suitable for array-based sensing schemes; (2) are intermediate in structure between monolayers and polymers and exhibit the desirable properties of both; (3) can be straightforwardly attached to the surfaces of acoustic wave devices.

  4. Controllable adhesive superhydrophobic surfaces based on PDMS microwell arrays.

    PubMed

    Yong, Jiale; Chen, Feng; Yang, Qing; Zhang, Dongshi; Bian, Hao; Du, Guangqing; Si, Jinhai; Meng, Xiangwei; Hou, Xun

    2013-03-12

    This paper presents a one-step method to fabricate superhydrophobic surfaces with extremely controllable adhesion based on PDMS microwell arrays. The microwell array structures are rapidly produced on PDMS films by a point-by-point femtosecond laser scanning process. The as-prepared superhydrophobic surfaces show water controllable adhesion that ranges from ultrahigh to ultralow by adjusting the extent of overlap of the adjacent microwells, on which the sliding angle can be controlled from 180° (a water droplet can not slide down even when the as-prepared surface is turned upside down) to 3°. A "micro-airbag effect" is introduced to explain the adhesion transition phenomenon of the microwell array structures. This work provides a facile and promising strategy to fabricate superhydrophobic surfaces with controllable adhesion.

  5. Evaluation of the force generated by gradual deflection of orthodontic wires in conventional metallic, esthetic, and self-ligating brackets

    PubMed Central

    Francisconi, Manoela Fávaro; Janson, Guilherme; Henriques, José Fernando Castanha; de Freitas, Karina Maria Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the deflection forces of Nitinol orthodontic wires placed in different types of brackets: metallic, reinforced polycarbonate with metallic slots, sapphire, passive and active self-ligating, by assessing strength values variation according to gradual increase in wire diameter and deflection and comparing different combinations in the different deflections. Material and Methods: Specimens were set in a clinical simulation model and evaluated in a Universal Testing Machine (INSTRON 3342), using the ISO 15841 protocol. Data were subjected to One-way ANOVA, followed by Tukey tests (p<0.05). Results: Self-ligating brackets presented the most similar behavior to each other. For conventional brackets there was no consistent behavior for any of the deflections studied. Conclusions: Self-ligating brackets presented the most consistent and predictable results while conventional brackets, as esthetic brackets, showed very different patterns of forces. Self-ligating brackets showed higher strength in all deflections when compared with the others, in 0.020-inch wires.

  6. Comparison of Antibacterial Effects of ZnO and CuO Nanoparticles Coated Brackets against Streptococcus Mutans

    PubMed Central

    Ramazanzadeh, Baratali; Jahanbin, Arezoo; Yaghoubi, Masoud; Shahtahmassbi, Nasser; Ghazvini, Kiarash; Shakeri, Mohammadtaghi; Shafaee, Hooman

    2015-01-01

    Statement of the Problem During the orthodontic treatment, microbial plaques may accumulate around the brackets and cause caries, especially in high-risk patients. Finding ways to eliminate this microbial plaque seems to be essential. Purpose The aim of this study was to compare the antibacterial effects of nano copper oxide (CuO) and nano zinc oxide (ZnO) coated brackets against Streptococcus mutans (S.mutans) in order to decrease the risk of caries around the orthodontic brackets during the treatment. Materials and Method Sixty brackets were coated with nanoparticles of ZnO (n=20), CuO (n=20) and CuO-ZnO (n=20). Twelve uncoated brackets constituted the control group. The brackets were bonded to the crowns of extracted premolars, sterilized and prepared for antimicrobial tests (S.mutans ATCC35668). The samples taken after 0, 2, 4, 6 and 24 hours were cultured on agar plates. Colonies were counted 24 hours after incubation. One-way ANOVA and Tukey tests were used for statistical analysis. Results In CuO and CuO-ZnO coated brackets, no colony growth was seen after two hours. Between 0-6 hours, the mean colony counts were not significantly different between the ZnO and the control group (p>0.05). During 6-24 hours, the growth of S.mutans was significantly reduced by ZnO nanoparticles in comparison with the control group (p< 0.001). However, these bacteria were not totally eliminated. Conclusion CuO and ZnO-CuO nanoparticles coated brackets have better antimicrobial effect on S.mutans than ZnO coated brackets. PMID:26331150

  7. Spectrometers for particle measurements in space based on surface reflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barabash, S.; Wieser, M.; Wurz, P.

    2012-04-01

    This is a review talk on space particle spectrometers based on the surface reflection technique. We sum up the experience in development and operation of such instruments accumulated for the last 15 years at the Swedish Institute of space Physics, Kiruna, Sweden in close cooperation with University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland. The technique is relatively new and used in space for measurements of few eV - few keV particles. It was first introduced for neutral atom detection in the GAS instrument onboard the ESA/NASA Ulysses mission (Witte et al., 1992) and later for ion measurements (Barabash et al., 2007) onboard Indian Chandrayaan-1. When a particle hit a surface, secondary electrons release and the particle is either absorbed by the surface or get scattered or reflected. The charge state of the reflected particles normally does not depend on the initial charge state and is neutral but also includes a fraction of negative and positive ions. These charged particles can be analyzed by conventional ion optics. The secondary electrons can be used for triggering a time-of-flight system. The surface reflection technique is close to the usage of foils/ulta-thin foils for particle detections but has a number of advantages. First, it does not require high pre-acceleration potentials and thus allows making more compact and light weight instruments. Secondly, it permits detection of neutral atoms down to 10 eV. Despite the interaction with the surface modifies the original particle velocity, the proper design of the following analyzer section and ion optics can mitigate this effect. We shortly introduce main characteristics of the particle - surface interactions important for this application, describe designs of the instruments flown in space, and show performances of the surface reflection based ENA and ion spectrometers developed for Mars / Venus Express, Chandrayaan-1, BepiColombo, Phobos-Grunt, and Swedish PRISMA.

  8. A physically based model of global freshwater surface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beek, Ludovicus P. H.; Eikelboom, Tessa; Vliet, Michelle T. H.; Bierkens, Marc F. P.

    2012-09-01

    Temperature determines a range of physical properties of water and exerts a strong control on surface water biogeochemistry. Thus, in freshwater ecosystems the thermal regime directly affects the geographical distribution of aquatic species through their growth and metabolism and indirectly through their tolerance to parasites and diseases. Models used to predict surface water temperature range between physically based deterministic models and statistical approaches. Here we present the initial results of a physically based deterministic model of global freshwater surface temperature. The model adds a surface water energy balance to river discharge modeled by the global hydrological model PCR-GLOBWB. In addition to advection of energy from direct precipitation, runoff, and lateral exchange along the drainage network, energy is exchanged between the water body and the atmosphere by shortwave and longwave radiation and sensible and latent heat fluxes. Also included are ice formation and its effect on heat storage and river hydraulics. We use the coupled surface water and energy balance model to simulate global freshwater surface temperature at daily time steps with a spatial resolution of 0.5° on a regular grid for the period 1976-2000. We opt to parameterize the model with globally available data and apply it without calibration in order to preserve its physical basis with the outlook of evaluating the effects of atmospheric warming on freshwater surface temperature. We validate our simulation results with daily temperature data from rivers and lakes (U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), limited to the USA) and compare mean monthly temperatures with those recorded in the Global Environment Monitoring System (GEMS) data set. Results show that the model is able to capture the mean monthly surface temperature for the majority of the GEMS stations, while the interannual variability as derived from the USGS and NOAA data was captured reasonably well. Results are poorest for

  9. Laser-Based Transient Surface Acceleration of Thermoelastic Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    CETINKAYA, CETIN; WU, CUNLI; LI, CHEN

    2000-03-01

    The removal of particles from elastic substrates has been an important practical problem in the electronics industry especially as the sizes of electronic units shrink. In recent years, there has been an interest in removingsubmicron level particles from surfaces. The use of traditional surface cleaning methods, such as ultrasonically induced fluid flow, vibrational methods, centrifugal techniques, is limited to particles that require surface acceleration lower than 107m/s2. For the effective removal of submicron particles, a higher level surface acceleration is needed since the adhesion forces (mainly van der Waals force for dry surfaces) are related to the particle size and increase approximately linearly as the characteristic radius of small particles that are to be removed decreases. In current work, based on the generalized dynamic theory of thermoelasticity reported, a transfer matrix formulation including the second sound effect is developed for a thermoelastic layer. The transfer matrix for axisymmetric wave propagation in a thermoelastic layer is obtained by adopting a double integral transform approach. The second sound effect is included to eliminate the thermal wave travelling with infinite velocity as predicted by the diffusion heat transfer model, and, consequently, the immediate arrival of waves. Using the current formulation and the periodic systems framework, a transfer function formulation for calculating the accelerations is developed for transient analysis. A double integral transform inversion method is used for transient response calculations. Acceleration levels, sufficient for submicron particle removal, are reported. Various processes such as thermoelastic stresses, surface evaporation, and optical breakdown may be responsible for surface acceleration components and particle removal. In current work, only the surface acceleration due to transient thermoelastic wave propagation is under investigation.

  10. Photonic crystal biosensor based on optical surface waves.

    PubMed

    Konopsky, Valery N; Karakouz, Tanya; Alieva, Elena V; Vicario, Chiara; Sekatskii, Sergey K; Dietler, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    A label-free biosensor device based on registration of photonic crystal surface waves is described. Angular interrogation of the optical surface wave resonance is used to detect changes in the thickness of an adsorbed layer, while an additional simultaneous detection of the critical angle of total internal reflection provides independent data of the liquid refractive index. The abilities of the device are demonstrated by measuring of biotin molecule binding to a streptavidin monolayer, and by measuring association and dissociation kinetics of immunoglobulin G proteins. Additionally, deposition of PSS / PAH polyelectrolytes is recorded in situ resulting calculation of PSS and PAH monolayer thicknesses separately. PMID:23429517

  11. Advances in surface plasmon resonance-based high throughput biochips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, San-Jun; Berguiga, Lotfi; Elezgaray, Juan; Hugo, Nicolas; Li, Wen-Xue; Roland, Thibault; Zeng, He-Ping; Argoul, Francoise

    2009-12-01

    This article reviews our recent advances in surface plasmon resonance (SPR) based biochips. It includes four issues, which are the preparation and characterization of high quality gold film, the preparation and characterization of self-assembled monolayer (SAM), dynamics of DNA adsorption on SAMs, and SPR-based microscopies. Numerous topics related to SPR, such as, the modeling of SPR by transmission matrix, effective medium theory, applications of SPR in biology, and SPR-based novel microscopies, are discussed. A novel electrochemical technique, which is extremely useful for the preparation and characterization of high quality SAMs, is also discussed.

  12. Surface Coverage in Wireless Sensor Networks Based on Delaunay Tetrahedralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, M. G.; Neves, L. A.; Pinto, A. R.; Nascimento, M. Z.; Zafalon, G. F. D.; Valêncio, C.

    2015-01-01

    In this work is presented a new method for sensor deployment on 3D surfaces. The method was structured on different steps. The first one aimed discretizes the relief of interest with Delaunay algorithm. The tetrahedra and relative values (spatial coordinates of each vertex and faces) were input to construction of 3D Voronoi diagram. Each circumcenter was calculated as a candidate position for a sensor node: the corresponding circular coverage area was calculated based on a radius r. The r value can be adjusted to simulate different kinds of sensors. The Dijkstra algorithm and a selection method were applied to eliminate candidate positions with overlapped coverage areas or beyond of surface of interest. Performance evaluations measures were defined using coverage area and communication as criteria. The results were relevant, once the mean coverage rate achieved on three different surfaces were among 91% and 100%.

  13. Surface-based determination of the pelvic coordinate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fieten, Lorenz; Eschweiler, Jörg; Heger, Stefan; Kabir, Koroush; Gravius, Sascha; de la Fuente, Matías; Radermacher, Klaus

    2009-02-01

    In total hip replacement (THR) one technical factor influencing the risk of dislocation is cup orientation. Computer-assisted surgery systems allow for cup navigation in anatomy-based reference frames. The pelvic coordinate system most used for cup navigation in THR is based on the mid-sagittal plane (MSP) and the anterior pelvic plane (APP). From a geometrical point of view, the MSP can be considered as a mirror plane, whereas the APP can be considered as a tangent plane comprising the anterior superior iliac spines (ASIS) and the pubic tubercles. In most systems relying on the pelvic coordinate system, the most anterior points of the ASIS and the pubic tubercles are selected manually. As manual selection of landmark points is a tedious, time-consuming and error-prone task, a surface-based approach for combined MSP and APP computation is presented in this paper: Homologous points defining the MSP and the landmark points defining the APP are selected automatically from surface patches. It is investigated how MSP computation can benefit from APP computation and vice versa, and clinical perspectives of combined MSP and APP computation are discussed. Experimental results on computed tomography data show that the surface-based approach can improve accuracy.

  14. Influence of stainless steel inserts on the resistance to sliding of esthetic brackets with second-order angulation in the dry and wet states.

    PubMed

    Thorstenson, Glenys; Kusy, Robert

    2003-04-01

    Stainless steel (SS) inserts have been added to plastic, ceramic, and composite brackets to improve their frictional characteristics while preserving their esthetic appeal. When coupled with SS archwires, the resistances to sliding of esthetic brackets with and without SS inserts were compared with control brackets of SS. The resistances to sliding were measured in both the dry and wet (saliva) states at 32 second-order angles between -12 and + 12 degrees. When clearances existed between the walls of the brackets and the archwires, the resistances to sliding for the esthetic brackets without inserts were between 38 cN in the dry state and 73 cN in the wet state; those of the esthetic brackets with inserts ranged from 42 cN in the dry state to 65 cN in both states. The resistances to sliding of the SS brackets equaled 38 and 52 cN in the dry and wet states, respectively. When clearances no longer existed, the resistances to sliding for the esthetic brackets with and without inserts generally increased with angulation at a rate equal to or greater than that of the SS brackets--except for the polycarbonate (PC) brackets in the dry state. Because PC brackets without inserts elastically deformed, they had lower resistances to sliding when deformation occurred. For the polycrystalline alumina brackets without inserts, the resistances to sliding increased rapidly and nonlinearly as angulation increased above 4.8 degrees. Upon examination, the presence of scratches on the archwires and SS debris on the brackets was observed. The addition of these particular SS inserts did not considerably improve the resistance to sliding over those esthetic brackets without inserts.

  15. Roughness-Based Superhydrophobic Surfaces: Fundamentals and Future Directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patankar, Neelesh

    2011-11-01

    Superhydrophobicity of rough surfaces has attracted global interest through the past decade. There are naturally occurring instances of such surfaces, e.g., lotus leaves, which led to the popular term ``lotus effect.'' Numerous applications in wide ranging areas such as drag reduction, self-cleaning, heat exchangers, energy conversion, condensation, anti-icing, textile, desalination, etc., are being explored by researchers worldwide. The signature configuration for superhydrophobicity has been ``bead-like'' drops on rough surfaces that roll-off easily. This becomes possible if the liquid does not impale the roughness grooves, and if the contact angle hysteresis is low. Finding appropriate surface roughness is therefore necessary. A thermodynamic framework to enable analysis of this problem will be presented. It will be noted that the success of rough superhydrophobic substrates relies on the presence of gas pockets in the roughness grooves underneath the liquid. These gas pockets could be those of air from the surrounding environment. Current design strategies rely on the availability of air. However, if the rough substrates are fully submerged in the liquid then the trapped air in the roughness grooves may not be sustained. A design approach based on sustaining a vapor phase of the liquid itself in the roughness grooves, instead of relying on the presence of air, will be presented. The resulting surfaces, referred to as vapor stabilizing substrates, are deemed to be robust against wetting transition even if no air is present. Applications of this approach include low drag surfaces, nucleate boiling at dramatically low superheats, among others. The concept can be generalized to other transitions on the phase diagram, thus enabling the design of rough surfaces for phase manipulation in general.

  16. Modeling graphene based surface plasmon waveguides and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pond, J.; Duque-Gomez, F.; Alam, A.; Armenta, R.; Niegemann, J.; McGuire, D.; Reid, A.

    2016-02-01

    Graphene is different from most optical materials in that it is a thin material layer with a thickness as small as one atom. Graphene layers can be incorporated into optical simulations using either a surface conductivity material model or a volumetric permittivity material model; however, introducing graphene through a volumetric permittivity is computationally inefficient because it requires very fine discretization grids. We have recently developed a more efficient approach that enables the use of comparatively coarse grids by formulating a discretization of Maxwell's equations (in the time or frequency domains) that combines a surface conductivity description of graphene layers with a volumetric permittivity description of other optical materials. This approach includes the full dispersion characteristics of graphene as specified by the Kubo formula. This paper demonstrates how the combined material description approach can be used to efficiently model state-of-the-art devices that take advantage of the energy confinement provided by surface plasmons. We show how to efficiently model TE and TM polarized surface plasmons, a surface plasmon waveguide switch, and an electro-optical modulator. This last example also includes electrical simulations of graphene and demonstrates how both optical and electrical simulations can be combined to produce a complete model of a graphene based device. For each example, we compare with previously published results, including experimental results.

  17. Modeling apple surface temperature dynamics based on weather data.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Peters, Troy; Zhang, Qin; Zhang, Jingjin; Huang, Danfeng

    2014-01-01

    The exposure of fruit surfaces to direct sunlight during the summer months can result in sunburn damage. Losses due to sunburn damage are a major economic problem when marketing fresh apples. The objective of this study was to develop and validate a model for simulating fruit surface temperature (FST) dynamics based on energy balance and measured weather data. A series of weather data (air temperature, humidity, solar radiation, and wind speed) was recorded for seven hours between 11:00-18:00 for two months at fifteen minute intervals. To validate the model, the FSTs of "Fuji" apples were monitored using an infrared camera in a natural orchard environment. The FST dynamics were measured using a series of thermal images. For the apples that were completely exposed to the sun, the RMSE of the model for estimating FST was less than 2.0 °C. A sensitivity analysis of the emissivity of the apple surface and the conductance of the fruit surface to water vapour showed that accurate estimations of the apple surface emissivity were important for the model. The validation results showed that the model was capable of accurately describing the thermal performances of apples under different solar radiation intensities. Thus, this model could be used to more accurately estimate the FST relative to estimates that only consider the air temperature. In addition, this model provides useful information for sunburn protection management. PMID:25350507

  18. Incorporation of surface-based deformations for updating images intraoperatively

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miga, Michael I.; Fitzpatrick, J. Michael; Galloway, Robert L., Jr.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2001-05-01

    Patient-to-image misalignment becomes exacerbated by common surgical events such as brain sag, drug interactions, retraction, and resection. One strategy to remedy this mis- registration is to employ computational models in conjunction with low-cost intraoperatively-acquired data (e.g. surface tracking, and co-registered ultrasound) to deform preoperative imaging data to account for OR actions. In this paper, we present preliminary data from a cortical surface scanning system and study the impact of surface- based information on model-updates. Preliminary data is presented using a 3D laser scanning technology in conjunction with an iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm to register and track phantom and ex vivo data. Simulations are presented to analyze the direct use of displacement data versus modeling the underlying physical load in a clinical example of gravity-induced deformation. Results demonstrate dramatic differences in subsurface deformation fields highlighting that the nature of the surgical load (i.e. surface or body force) must be thoughtfully discriminated to accurately update images. Furthermore, the results suggest that the application of surface displacements to update image volumes must be consistent with the physical origin of deformation rather than applied in a direct interpolative sense.

  19. Modeling apple surface temperature dynamics based on weather data.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Peters, Troy; Zhang, Qin; Zhang, Jingjin; Huang, Danfeng

    2014-01-01

    The exposure of fruit surfaces to direct sunlight during the summer months can result in sunburn damage. Losses due to sunburn damage are a major economic problem when marketing fresh apples. The objective of this study was to develop and validate a model for simulating fruit surface temperature (FST) dynamics based on energy balance and measured weather data. A series of weather data (air temperature, humidity, solar radiation, and wind speed) was recorded for seven hours between 11:00-18:00 for two months at fifteen minute intervals. To validate the model, the FSTs of "Fuji" apples were monitored using an infrared camera in a natural orchard environment. The FST dynamics were measured using a series of thermal images. For the apples that were completely exposed to the sun, the RMSE of the model for estimating FST was less than 2.0 °C. A sensitivity analysis of the emissivity of the apple surface and the conductance of the fruit surface to water vapour showed that accurate estimations of the apple surface emissivity were important for the model. The validation results showed that the model was capable of accurately describing the thermal performances of apples under different solar radiation intensities. Thus, this model could be used to more accurately estimate the FST relative to estimates that only consider the air temperature. In addition, this model provides useful information for sunburn protection management.

  20. Fiber-Optic Surface Temperature Sensor Based on Modal Interference.

    PubMed

    Musin, Frédéric; Mégret, Patrice; Wuilpart, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Spatially-integrated surface temperature sensing is highly useful when it comes to controlling processes, detecting hazardous conditions or monitoring the health and safety of equipment and people. Fiber-optic sensing based on modal interference has shown great sensitivity to temperature variation, by means of cost-effective image-processing of few-mode interference patterns. New developments in the field of sensor configuration, as described in this paper, include an innovative cooling and heating phase discrimination functionality and more precise measurements, based entirely on the image processing of interference patterns. The proposed technique was applied to the measurement of the integrated surface temperature of a hollow cylinder and compared with a conventional measurement system, consisting of an infrared camera and precision temperature probe. As a result, the optical technique is in line with the reference system. Compared with conventional surface temperature probes, the optical technique has the following advantages: low heat capacity temperature measurement errors, easier spatial deployment, and replacement of multiple angle infrared camera shooting and the continuous monitoring of surfaces that are not visually accessible. PMID:27483271

  1. Optical triangulation-based microtopographic inspection of surfaces.

    PubMed

    Costa, Manuel F M

    2012-01-01

    The non-invasive inspection of surfaces is a major issue in a wide variety of industries and research laboratories. The vast and increasing range of surface types, tolerance requirements and measurement constraints demanded during the last decades represents a major research effort in the development of new methods, systems and metrological strategies. The discreet dimensional evaluation the rugometric characterization and the profilometric inspection seem to be insufficient in many instances. The full microtopographic inspection has became a common requirement. Among the different systems developed, optical methods have the most important role and among those triangulation-based ones have gained a major status thanks to their flexibility, reliability and robustness. In this communication we will provide a brief historical review on the development of optical triangulation application to the dimensional inspection of objects and surfaces and on the work done at the Microtopography Laboratory of the Physics Department of the University of Minho, Portugal, in the development of methods and systems of optical triangulation-based microtopographic inspection of surfaces.

  2. A block-based landslide model using smooth surface reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsen, Katharina; Tinti, Stefano

    2014-05-01

    The present work is combining the block-based landslide-model developed by Tinti and Bertolucci (2000) with different smooth surface reconstruction methods. This enables us to directly solve the underlying ODE-system, that is describing the blocks motion, numerically. The numerical model is based on the idea that the sliding mass can be discretized by a certain number of quadrilateral blocks of finite volume, where the movement of the single blocks is described using a Lagrangian approach. Within this approach, the underlying equations of motion require for each time-step the computation of the acceleration of each of the blocks from their position on the sliding surface, where information on its curvature is needed in order to compute the centripetal component. To come up to this, different methods were used to interpolate smooth, two times differentiable, surface reconstructions from a given number of points that are describing the real sliding surface. The numerical solution of the model in time is obtained using higher-order explicit and implicit time-integration methods The results of the simulations are evaluated especially with respect to the arrival times and final velocities of the sliding mass and therefore a possible tsunamigenic impact.

  3. Fiber-Optic Surface Temperature Sensor Based on Modal Interference

    PubMed Central

    Musin, Frédéric; Mégret, Patrice; Wuilpart, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Spatially-integrated surface temperature sensing is highly useful when it comes to controlling processes, detecting hazardous conditions or monitoring the health and safety of equipment and people. Fiber-optic sensing based on modal interference has shown great sensitivity to temperature variation, by means of cost-effective image-processing of few-mode interference patterns. New developments in the field of sensor configuration, as described in this paper, include an innovative cooling and heating phase discrimination functionality and more precise measurements, based entirely on the image processing of interference patterns. The proposed technique was applied to the measurement of the integrated surface temperature of a hollow cylinder and compared with a conventional measurement system, consisting of an infrared camera and precision temperature probe. As a result, the optical technique is in line with the reference system. Compared with conventional surface temperature probes, the optical technique has the following advantages: low heat capacity temperature measurement errors, easier spatial deployment, and replacement of multiple angle infrared camera shooting and the continuous monitoring of surfaces that are not visually accessible. PMID:27483271

  4. Standing surface acoustic wave (SSAW)-based cell washing

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sixing; Ding, Xiaoyun; Mao, Zhangming; Chen, Yuchao; Nama, Nitesh; Guo, Feng; Li, Peng; Wang, Lin; Cameron, Craig E.; Huang, Tony Jun

    2014-01-01

    Cell/bead washing is an indispensable sample preparation procedure used in various cell studies and analytical processes. In this article, we report a standing surface acoustic wave (SSAW)-based microfluidic device for cell and bead washing in a continuous flow. In our approach, the acoustic radiation force generated in a SSAW field is utilized to actively extract cells or beads from their original medium. A unique configuration of tilted-angle standing surface acoustic wave (taSSAW) is employed in our device, enabling us to wash beads with >98% recovery rate and >97% washing efficiency. We also demonstrate the functionality of our device by preparing high-purity (>97%) white blood cells from lysed blood samples through cell washing. Our SSAW-based cell/bead washing device has the advantages of label-free manipulation, simplicity, high biocompatibility, high recovery rate, and high washing efficiency. It can be useful for many lab-on-a-chip applications. PMID:25372273

  5. Comparison of surface and hydrogel-based protein microchips.

    PubMed

    Zubtsov, D A; Savvateeva, E N; Rubina, A Yu; Pan'kov, S V; Konovalova, E V; Moiseeva, O V; Chechetkin, V R; Zasedatelev, A S

    2007-09-15

    Protein microchips are designed for high-throughput evaluation of the concentrations and activities of various proteins. The rapid advance in microchip technology and a wide variety of existing techniques pose the problem of unified approach to the assessment and comparison of different platforms. Here we compare the characteristics of protein microchips developed for quantitative immunoassay with those of antibodies immobilized on glass surfaces and in hemispherical gel pads. Spotting concentrations of antibodies used for manufacturing of microchips of both types and concentrations of antigen in analyte solution were identical. We compared the efficiency of antibody immobilization, the intensity of fluorescence signals for both direct and sandwich-type immunoassays, and the reaction-diffusion kinetics of the formation of antibody-antigen complexes for surface and gel-based microchips. Our results demonstrate higher capacity and sensitivity for the hydrogel-based protein microchips, while fluorescence saturation kinetics for the two types of microarrays was comparable.

  6. Reconstructions of the axial muscle insertions in the occipital region of dinosaurs: evaluations of past hypotheses on marginocephalia and tyrannosauridae using the extant phylogenetic bracket approach.

    PubMed

    Tsuihiji, Takanobu

    2010-08-01

    The insertions of the cervical axial musculature on the occiput in marginocephalian and tyrannosaurid dinosaurs have been reconstructed in several studies with a view to their functional implications. Most of the past reconstructions on marginocephalians, however, relied on the anatomy of just one clade of reptiles, Lepidosauria, and lack phylogenetic justification. In this study, these past reconstructions were evaluated using the Extant Phylogenetic Bracket approach based on the anatomy of various extant diapsids. Many muscle insertions reconstructed in this study were substantially different from those in the past studies, demonstrating the importance of phylogenetically justified inferences based on the conditions of Aves and Crocodylia for reconstructing the anatomy of non-avian dinosaurs. The present reconstructions show that axial muscle insertions were generally enlarged in derived marginocephalians, apparently correlated with expansion of their parietosquamosal shelf/frill. Several muscle insertions on the occiput in tyrannosaurids reconstructed in this study using the Extant Phylogenetic Bracket approach were also rather different from recent reconstructions based on the same, phylogenetic and parsimony-based method. Such differences are mainly due to differences in initial identifications of muscle insertion areas or different hypotheses on muscle homologies in extant diapsids. This result emphasizes the importance of accurate and detailed observations on the anatomy of extant animals as the basis for paleobiological inferences such as anatomical reconstructions and functional analyses.

  7. Microprocessor-based simulator of surface ECG signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, A. E.; Rossi, E.; Siri, L. Nicola

    2007-11-01

    In this work, a simulator of surface electrocardiogram recorded signals (ECG) is presented. The device, based on a microcontroller and commanded by a personal computer, produces an analog signal resembling actual ECGs, not only in time course and voltage levels, but also in source impedance. The simulator is a useful tool for electrocardiograph calibration and monitoring, to incorporate as well in educational tasks and in clinical environments for early detection of faulty behaviour.

  8. Advanced construction management for lunar base construction - Surface operations planner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kehoe, Robert P.

    1992-01-01

    The study proposes a conceptual solution and lays the framework for developing a new, sophisticated and intelligent tool for a lunar base construction crew to use. This concept integrates expert systems for critical decision making, virtual reality for training, logistics and laydown optimization, automated productivity measurements, and an advanced scheduling tool to form a unique new planning tool. The concept features extensive use of computers and expert systems software to support the actual work, while allowing the crew to control the project from the lunar surface. Consideration is given to a logistics data base, laydown area management, flexible critical progress scheduler, video simulation of assembly tasks, and assembly information and tracking documentation.

  9. Surface-based registration of liver in ultrasound and CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehghan, Ehsan; Lu, Kongkuo; Yan, Pingkun; Tahmasebi, Amir; Xu, Sheng; Wood, Bradford J.; Abi-Jaoudeh, Nadine; Venkatesan, Aradhana; Kruecker, Jochen

    2015-03-01

    Ultrasound imaging is an attractive modality for real-time image-guided interventions. Fusion of US imaging with a diagnostic imaging modality such as CT shows great potential in minimally invasive applications such as liver biopsy and ablation. However, significantly different representation of liver in US and CT turns this image fusion into a challenging task, in particular if some of the CT scans may be obtained without contrast agents. The liver surface, including the diaphragm immediately adjacent to it, typically appears as a hyper-echoic region in the ultrasound image if the proper imaging window and depth setting are used. The liver surface is also well visualized in both contrast and non-contrast CT scans, thus making the diaphragm or liver surface one of the few attractive common features for registration of US and non-contrast CT. We propose a fusion method based on point-to-volume registration of liver surface segmented in CT to a processed electromagnetically (EM) tracked US volume. In this approach, first, the US image is pre-processed in order to enhance the liver surface features. In addition, non-imaging information from the EM-tracking system is used to initialize and constrain the registration process. We tested our algorithm in comparison with a manually corrected vessel-based registration method using 8 pairs of tracked US and contrast CT volumes. The registration method was able to achieve an average deviation of 12.8mm from the ground truth measured as the root mean square Euclidean distance for control points distributed throughout the US volume. Our results show that if the US image acquisition is optimized for imaging of the diaphragm, high registration success rates are achievable.

  10. Patterning Surfaces on Azo-Based Multilayer Films via Surface Wrinkling Combined with Visible Light Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Zong, Chuanyong; Zhao, Yan; Ji, Haipeng; Xie, Jixun; Han, Xue; Wang, Juanjuan; Cao, Yanping; Lu, Conghua; Li, Hongfei; Jiang, Shichun

    2016-08-01

    Here, a simple combined strategy of surface wrinkling with visible light irradiation to fabricate well tunable hierarchical surface patterns on azo-containing multilayer films is reported. The key to tailor surface patterns is to introduce a photosensitive poly(disperse orange 3) intermediate layer into the film/substrate wrinkling system, in which the modulus decrease is induced by the reversible photoisomerization. The existence of a photoinert top layer prevents the photoisomerization-induced stress release in the intermediate layer to some extent. Consequently, the as-formed wrinkling patterns can be modulated over a large area by light irradiation. Interestingly, in the case of selective exposure, the wrinkle wavelength in the exposed region decreases, while the wrinkles in the unexposed region are evolved into highly oriented wrinkles with the orientation perpendicular to the exposed/unexposed boundary. Compared with traditional single layer-based film/substrate systems, the multilayer system consisting of the photosensitive intermediate layer offers unprecedented advantages in the patterning controllability/universality. As demonstrated here, this simple and versatile strategy can be conveniently extended to functional multilayer systems for the creation of prescribed hierarchical surface patterns with optically tailored microstructures. PMID:27336189

  11. Diversity of Polypore Bracket Mushrooms, Polyporales (Agaricomycetes), Recorded in Armenia and Their Medicinal Properties.

    PubMed

    Badalyan, Susanna M; Gharibyan, Narine G

    2016-01-01

    The list of polypore bracket mushrooms (Polyporales) recorded in Armenia is presented. The order Polyporales in Armenia is currently represented by 87 species (4 varieties) belonging to 47 genera. Information regarding the study of the medicinal properties (e.g., antifungal, antibacterial, mitogenic, regenerative, antioxidant, proteolytic) of genetically identified mycelial collections of several polypore species-mainly from the genera Daedalea, Fomes, Fomitopsis, Ganoderma, Laetiporus, Piptoporus, Polyporus, and Trametes-is reported, as well. PMID:27481301

  12. Are self-ligating brackets related to less formation of Streptococcus mutans colonies? A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    do Nascimento, Leonard Euler Andrade Gomes; de Souza, Margareth Maria Gomes; Azevedo, Angela Rita Pontes; Maia, Lucianne Cople

    2014-01-01

    Objective To verify, by means of a systematic review, whether the design of brackets (conventional or self-ligating) influences adhesion and formation of Streptococcus mutans colonies. Methods Search strategy: four databases (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Ovid ALL EMB Reviews, PubMed and BIREME) were selected to search relevant articles covering the period from January 1965 to December 2012. Selection Criteria: in first consensus by reading the title and abstract. The full text was obtained from publications that met the inclusion criteria. Data collection and analysis: Two reviewers independently extracted data using the keywords: conventional, self-ligating, biofilm, Streptococcus mutans, and systematic review; and independently evaluated the quality of the studies. In case of divergence, the technique of consensus was adopted. Results The search strategy resulted in 1,401 articles. The classification of scientific relevance revealed the high quality of the 6 eligible articles of which outcomes were not unanimous in reporting not only the influence of the design of the brackets (conventional or self-ligating) over adhesion and formation of colonies of Streptococcus mutans, but also that other factors such as the quality of the bracket type, the level of individual oral hygiene, bonding and age may have greater influence. Statistical analysis was not feasible because of the heterogeneous methodological design. Conclusions Within the limitations of this study, it was concluded that there is no evidence for a possible influence of the design of the brackets (conventional or self-ligating) over colony formation and adhesion of Streptococcus mutans. PMID:24713561

  13. Comparison of frictional forces between aesthetic orthodontic coated wires and self-ligation brackets

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yunmi; Cha, Jung-Yul; Hwang, Chung-Ju; Tahk, Seon Gun

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical efficacy of polymer- and rhodium-coated wires compared to uncoated wires by measuring the frictional forces using self-ligation brackets. Methods 0.016-inch nickel titanium (NiTi) wires and 0.017 × 0.025-inch stainless steel (SS) wires were used, and the angulations between the brackets and wires were set to 0°, 5°, and 10°. Upper maxillary premolar brackets (Clippy-C®) with a 0.022-inch slot were selected for the study and a tensile test was performed with a crosshead speed of 5 mm/min. The maximum static frictional forces and kinetic frictional forces were recorded and compared. Results The maximum static frictional forces and the kinetic frictional forces of coated wires were equal to or higher than those of the uncoated wires (p < 0.05). The maximum static frictional forces of rhodium-coated wires were significantly higher than those of polymer-coated wires when the angulations between the brackets and wires were set to (i) 5° in the 0.016-inch NiTi wires and (ii) all angulations in the 0.017 × 0.025-inch SS wires (p < 0.05). The kinetic frictional forces of rhodium-coated wires were higher than those of polymer-coated wires, except when the angulations were set to 0° in the 0.016-inch NiTi wires (p < 0.05). Conclusions Although the frictional forces of the coated wires with regards to aesthetics were equal to or greater than those of the uncoated wires, a study under similar conditions regarding the oral cavity is needed in order to establish the clinical implications. PMID:25133130

  14. Comparison of clinical bracket point registration with 3D laser scanner and coordinate measuring machine

    PubMed Central

    Nouri, Mahtab; Farzan, Arash; Baghban, Ali Reza Akbarzadeh; Massudi, Reza

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to assess the diagnostic value of a laser scanner developed to determine the coordinates of clinical bracket points and to compare with the results of a coordinate measuring machine (CMM). METHODS: This diagnostic experimental study was conducted on maxillary and mandibular orthodontic study casts of 18 adults with normal Class I occlusion. First, the coordinates of the bracket points were measured on all casts by a CMM. Then, the three-dimensional coordinates (X, Y, Z) of the bracket points were measured on the same casts by a 3D laser scanner designed at Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran, Iran. The validity and reliability of each system were assessed by means of intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and Dahlberg's formula. RESULTS: The difference between the mean dimension and the actual value for the CMM was 0.0066 mm. (95% CI: 69.98340, 69.99140). The mean difference for the laser scanner was 0.107 ± 0.133 mm (95% CI: -0.002, 0.24). In each method, differences were not significant. The ICC comparing the two methods was 0.998 for the X coordinate, and 0.996 for the Y coordinate; the mean difference for coordinates recorded in the entire arch and for each tooth was 0.616 mm. CONCLUSION: The accuracy of clinical bracket point coordinates measured by the laser scanner was equal to that of CMM. The mean difference in measurements was within the range of operator errors. PMID:25741826

  15. Comparison of friction produced by two types of orthodontic bracket protectors

    PubMed Central

    Mendonça, Steyner de Lima; Praxedes Neto, Otávio José; de Oliveira, Patricia Teixeira; dos Santos, Patricia Bittencourt Dutra; Pinheiro, Fábio Henrique de Sá Leitão

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Fixed orthodontic appliances have been regarded as a common causative factor of oral lesions. To manage soft tissue discomfort, most orthodontists recommend using a small amount of utility wax over the brackets in order to alleviate trauma. This in vitro study aimed at evaluating friction generated by two types of bracket protectors (customized acetate protector [CAP] and temporary resin protector [TRP]) during the initial stages of orthodontic treatment. Methods An experimental model (test unit) was used to assess friction. In order to measure the friction produced in each test, the model was attached to a mechanical testing machine which simulated maxillary canines alignment. Intergroup comparison was carried out by one-way ANOVA with level of significance set at 5%. Results The friction presented by the TRP group was statistically higher than that of the control group at 6 mm. It was also higher than in the control and CAP groups in terms of maximum friction. Conclusion The customized acetate protector (CAP) demonstrated not to interfere in friction between the wire and the orthodontic bracket slot. PMID:24713564

  16. Effect of brushing with sonic and counterrotational toothbrushes on the bond strength of orthodontic brackets.

    PubMed

    Hansen, P A; Killoy, W; Masterson, K

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of brushing with both a sonic and mechanical counter rotary power toothbrush on the bond strength of orthodontic brackets. Forty-five extracted teeth were divided into three random groups and had orthodontic brackets bonded to them. One group was brushed with a counterrotational toothbrush, the Interplak, one group with a sonic toothbrush, the Sonicare, and a third group was not brushed and was held as a control. After the equivalent of 2 years brushing, the teeth were placed in an Instron machine and the shear force to remove the brackets was recorded. Group 1, the counter rotary power brush, had a mean of 107.5 kg/cm2, the second group, the sonic brush, had a mean of 79.7 kg/cm2, and the control group had a mean of 125. 4 kg/cm2. Single factor analysis of variance followed by the Fisher-Hayter Multiple Comparison Procedure showed a statistically significant difference between the sonic power brush and the control (P <.01), but no significant difference between the counter rotary and the control (P >.05). There was no significant difference between the two power brushes (P >.05).

  17. A new idea and method of tooth movement using a ratchet bracket.

    PubMed

    Noda, Koji; Nakamura, Yoshiki; Oikawa, Takashi; Shimpo, Satoshi; Kogure, Kyotaro; Hirashita, Ayao

    2007-06-01

    Since ideally effective tooth movement in orthodontics should occur without causing damage to the periodontal ligament (PDL), a new bracket with a ratchet-locking system, the 'Ratchet Bracket', was designed to produce tooth movement while maintaining blood circulation. To define the mechanism of the appliance, a histological study was carried out on four Beagle dogs (9 months old) and a clinical study on five female patients (11 years to 38 years 10 months of age). Five upper canines in the dogs were moved 1.82 mm per month. On light microscopic observations, vascular forms showed a round-oval shape, without undermining bone resorption. No root resorption was observed in the compressed PDL at days 1, 14, and 35 of the experimental period. On fluorescent images at day 46, distinctive bone formation was apparent at the tension side. In the clinical investigation, nine upper canines in the five female patients were moved 1.92 mm per month. A wide and long alveolar hard line was seen only on the tension side of the canines on dental radiographs, indicating bodily tooth movement, without obvious signs of root resorption in all subjects. Neither spontaneous pain nor pain during biting were reported. The findings indicate that use of the ratchet bracket could result in rapid and pain-free tooth movement with vascular clarity to maintain blood circulation in the PDL.

  18. Evaluation of Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets Bonded with Nano-Filled Composites

    PubMed Central

    Chalipa, Javad; Akhondi, Mohammad Sadegh Ahmad; Arab, Sepideh; Kharrazifard, Mohammad Javad; Ahmadyar, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets bonded with two types of nano-composites in comparison to a conventional orthodontic composite. Materials and Methods: Sixty extracted human first premolars were randomly divided into 3 groups each containing 20 teeth. In group I, a conventional orthodontic composite (Transbond XT) was used to bond the brackets, while two nano-composites (Filtek TM Supreme XT and AELITE Aesthetic Enamel) were used in groups II and III respectively. The teeth were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours, thermocycled in distilled water and debonded with a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The adhesive remnant index (ARI) was also evaluated using a stereomicroscope. Results: AELITE Aesthetic Enamel nano-composite revealed a SBS value of 8.44±2.09 MPa, which was higher than Transbond XT (6.91±2.13) and Filtek TM Supreme XT (6.04±2.01). Statistical analysis revealed a significant difference between groups II and III (P < 0.05). No significant difference was found between groups I and III, and between groups I and II (P > 0.05). Evaluation of ARI showed that Transbond XT left fewer adhesive remains on teeth after debonding. Conclusion: Results of this study indicate that the aforementioned nano-composites can be successfully used for bonding orthodontic brackets. PMID:24910655

  19. Lunar base surface mission operations. Lunar Base Systems Study (LBSS) task 4.1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The purpose was to perform an analysis of the surface operations associated with a human-tended lunar base. Specifically, the study defined surface elements and developed mission manifests for a selected base scenario, determined the nature of surface operations associated with this scenario, generated a preliminary crew extravehicular and intravehicular activity (EVA/IVA) time resource schedule for conducting the missions, and proposed concepts for utilizing remotely operated equipment to perform repetitious or hazardous surface tasks. The operations analysis was performed on a 6 year period of human-tended lunar base operation prior to permanent occupancy. The baseline scenario was derived from a modified version of the civil needs database (CNDB) scenario. This scenario emphasizes achievement of a limited set of science and exploration objectives while emplacing the minimum habitability elements required for a permanent base.

  20. Alterations in plaque accumulation and gingival inflammation promoted by treatment with self-ligating and conventional orthodontic brackets

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Mauricio de Almeida; Saraiva, Patrícia Pinto; Maltagliati, Liliana Ávila; Rhoden, Fernando Kleinübing; Costa, Carla Cristina Alvarenga; Normando, David; Capelozza, Leopoldino

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to evaluate, comparatively, the periodontal response during orthodontic treatment performed with self-ligating and conventional brackets. METHODS: Sixteen Caucasian individuals of both sexes, aged between 12 and 16 years old and in permanent dentition were selected. Eight individuals were treated with conventional brackets installed on the lower dental arch and self-ligating brackets on the upper arch. Another eight individuals received self-ligating brackets in the lower arch and conventional brackets in the upper arch. The subjects received material and instructions for oral hygiene. Visible plaque index (VPI), gingival bleeding index (GBI) and clinical attachment level (CAL) were evaluated just after installation of orthodontic appliances, and 30, 60 and 180 days later. Mann-Whitney test was used to compare differences between groups (self-ligating and conventional), two-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's test was used to assess CAL at each site of each tooth. Significance level was set at 5%. RESULTS: No significant changes were found with regard to the assessed parameters (VPI, GBI and CAL) in either one of the systems. CONCLUSION: No significant changes were found with regard to the periodontal response to orthodontic treatment for the variables assessed and between subjects receiving passive self-ligating and conventional brackets. All individuals had received oral hygiene instructions and had their periodontal conditions monitored. PMID:25992985

  1. Ellipsometric characterization of surface freezing in Ga-based alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartel, K.; Nattland, D.; Kumar, A.; Dogel, S.; Freyland, W.

    2006-04-01

    We present results on surface freezing of Ga-based alloys, GaBi, GaPb and GaTl, above the liquidus line between the Ga-rich eutectic and the monotectic point. Spectroscopic ellipsometry (0.8 eV <=hν<=4.2 eV) and kinetic single wavelength ellipsometry (2.75 eV) have been employed to probe the changes of the interfacial electronic structures on surface freezing. To minimize thermal gradients across the sample a heatable cap that covers the sample and crucible was developed. The surface freezing temperature, TSF, for the spontaneous formation of a solid-like film on top of the Ga-rich liquid on cooling the sample from the homogeneous phase region was found to be independent of the temperature difference between the upper and lower furnace (ΔT: +10 to -10 K) and only weakly dependent on the cooling rate (\\partial T/\\partial t : 2.5-20 K h-1). In the case of GaPb the solid film consists of solid Pb with a thickness h>=400 Å. Comparing with GaBi we draw analogous conclusions for GaPb and GaTl and suggest that the surface freezing transition precedes the bulk phase transition along the liquidus line as the alloy is cooled.

  2. Virtual environment assessment for laser-based vision surface profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ElSoussi, Adnane; Al Alami, Abed ElRahman; Abu-Nabah, Bassam A.

    2015-03-01

    Oil and gas businesses have been raising the demand from original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) to implement a reliable metrology method in assessing surface profiles of welds before and after grinding. This certainly mandates the deviation from the commonly used surface measurement gauges, which are not only operator dependent, but also limited to discrete measurements along the weld. Due to its potential accuracy and speed, the use of laser-based vision surface profiling systems have been progressively rising as part of manufacturing quality control. This effort presents a virtual environment that lends itself for developing and evaluating existing laser vision sensor (LVS) calibration and measurement techniques. A combination of two known calibration techniques is implemented to deliver a calibrated LVS system. System calibration is implemented virtually and experimentally to scan simulated and 3D printed features of known profiles, respectively. Scanned data is inverted and compared with the input profiles to validate the virtual environment capability for LVS surface profiling and preliminary assess the measurement technique for weld profiling applications. Moreover, this effort brings 3D scanning capability a step closer towards robust quality control applications in a manufacturing environment.

  3. Biosensing based on surface plasmon resonance and living cells.

    PubMed

    Chabot, Vincent; Cuerrier, Charles M; Escher, Emanuel; Aimez, Vincent; Grandbois, Michel; Charette, Paul G

    2009-02-15

    We propose the combination of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) with living cells as a biosensing method. Our detection scheme is based on the premise that cellular activity induced by external agents is often associated with changes in cellular morphology, which in turn should lead to a variation of the effective refractive index at the interface between the cell membrane and the metal layer. We monitored surface plasmon resonance signals originating from a gold surface coated with cells on a custom apparatus after injection of various agents known to influence cellular activity and morphology. Specifically, we evaluated three types of stimulation: response to an endotoxin (lipopolysaccharides), a chemical toxin (sodium azide) and a physiological agonist (thrombin). A comparison with phase contrast microscopy reveals that SPR signal variations are associated with the induction of cell death for lipopolysaccharides treatment and a contraction of the cell body for sodium azide. Thrombin-induced cellular response shows a rapid decrease of the measured laser reflectance over 5min followed by a return to the original value. For this treatment, phase contrast micrographs relate the first phase of the SPR variation to cell contraction and increase of the intercellular gaps, whereas the recovery phase can be associated with a spreading of the cell on the sensing surface. Hence, the SPR signal is very consistent with the cellular response normally observed for these treatments. This confirms the validity of the biosensing method, which could be applied to a large variety of cellular responses involving shape remodeling induced by external agents. PMID:18845432

  4. Development and validation of satellite based estimates of surface visibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, J.; Pierce, R. B.; Lenzen, A.

    2015-10-01

    A satellite based surface visibility retrieval has been developed using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) measurements as a proxy for Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) data from the next generation of Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES-R). The retrieval uses a multiple linear regression approach to relate satellite aerosol optical depth, fog/low cloud probability and thickness retrievals, and meteorological variables from numerical weather prediction forecasts to National Weather Service Automated Surface Observing System (ASOS) surface visibility measurements. Validation using independent ASOS measurements shows that the GOES-R ABI surface visibility retrieval (V) has an overall success rate of 64.5% for classifying Clear (V ≥ 30 km), Moderate (10 km ≤ V < 30 km), Low (2 km ≤ V < 10 km) and Poor (V < 2 km) visibilities and shows the most skill during June through September, when Heidke skill scores are between 0.2 and 0.4. We demonstrate that the aerosol (clear sky) component of the GOES-R ABI visibility retrieval can be used to augment measurements from the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and National Park Service (NPS) Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) network, and provide useful information to the regional planning offices responsible for developing mitigation strategies required under the EPA's Regional Haze Rule, particularly during regional haze events associated with smoke from wildfires.

  5. Development of surface-plasmon-resonance-based immunoassay for cephalexin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dillon, Paul P.; Daly, Stephen J.; Browne, Johnathan; Manning, Bernadette M.; O'Kennedy, Richard; van Amerongen, Aart

    2003-03-01

    The public concern surrounding antibiotic contamination in food and food products has made it imperative to develop analytical methods for their detection. Polyclonal antibodies and protein-hapten conjugates to cephalexin were used in the development of a surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based inhibition immunoassay to cephalexin. A conjugate consisting of cephalexin-bovine serum albumin (BSA) was immobilised on the dextran gel surface. Dissociation between the antibody and antigen was easily achieved with 10 mmol l-1 NaOH and was very reproducible. Standards of free hapten were prepared and premixed with antibody and, after a suitable incubation time, passed over the surface of the chip with the protein-hapten conjugate immobilised. The hapten in solution inhibited the binding of antibody to the surface resulting in higher response units of antibody bound at lower concentrations of free drug. Model inhibition immunoassays to cephalexin were developed in PBS and spiked milk samples. These assays had detection ranges between 4.88 to 2,500 ng ml-1 and 244 to 3,900 ng ml-1, respectively, with reproducible results.

  6. Standing surface acoustic wave (SSAW)-based microfluidic cytometer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuchao; Nawaz, Ahmad Ahsan; Zhao, Yanhui; Huang, Po-Hsun; McCoy, J. Phillip; Levine, Stewart; Wang, Lin; Huang, Tony Jun

    2014-01-01

    The development of microfluidic chip-based cytometers has become an important area due to their advantages of compact size and low cost. Herein, we demonstrate a sheathless microfluidic cytometer which integrates a standing surface acoustic wave (SSAW)-based microdevice capable of 3D particle/cell focusing with a laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection system. Using SSAW, our microfluidic cytometer was able to continuously focus microparticles/cells at the pressure node inside a microchannel. Flow cytometry was successfully demonstrated using this system with a coefficient of variation (CV) of less than 10% at a throughput of ~1000 events/s when calibration beads were used. We also demonstrated that fluorescently labeled human promyelocytic leukemia cells (HL-60) could be effectively focused and detected with our SSAW-based system. This SSAW-based microfluidic cytometer did not require any sheath flows or complex structures, and it allowed for simple operation over a wide range of sample flow rates. Moreover, with the gentle, bio-compatible nature of low-power surface acoustic waves, this technique is expected to be able to preserve the integrity of cells and other bioparticles. PMID:24406848

  7. Evanescent Field Based Photoacoustics: Optical Property Evaluation at Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Goldschmidt, Benjamin S; Rudy, Anna M; Nowak, Charissa A; Tsay, Yowting; Whiteside, Paul J D; Hunt, Heather K

    2016-01-01

    Here, we present a protocol to estimate material and surface optical properties using the photoacoustic effect combined with total internal reflection. Optical property evaluation of thin films and the surfaces of bulk materials is an important step in understanding new optical material systems and their applications. The method presented can estimate thickness, refractive index, and use absorptive properties of materials for detection. This metrology system uses evanescent field-based photoacoustics (EFPA), a field of research based upon the interaction of an evanescent field with the photoacoustic effect. This interaction and its resulting family of techniques allow the technique to probe optical properties within a few hundred nanometers of the sample surface. This optical near field allows for the highly accurate estimation of material properties on the same scale as the field itself such as refractive index and film thickness. With the use of EFPA and its sub techniques such as total internal reflection photoacoustic spectroscopy (TIRPAS) and optical tunneling photoacoustic spectroscopy (OTPAS), it is possible to evaluate a material at the nanoscale in a consolidated instrument without the need for many instruments and experiments that may be cost prohibitive. PMID:27500652

  8. Gallium arsenide based surface plasmon resonance for glucose monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Harshada; Sane, Vani; Sriram, G.; Indumathi, T. S; Sharan, Preeta

    2015-07-01

    The recent trends in the semiconductor and microwave industries has enabled the development of scalable microfabrication technology which produces a superior set of performance as against its counterparts. Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) based biosensors are a special class of optical sensors that become affected by electromagnetic waves. It is found that bio-molecular recognition element immobilized on the SPR sensor surface layer reveals a characteristic interaction with various sample solutions during the passage of light. The present work revolves around developing painless glucose monitoring systems using fluids containing glucose like saliva, urine, sweat or tears instead of blood samples. Non-invasive glucose monitoring has long been simulated using label free detection mechanisms and the same concept is adapted. In label-free detection, target molecules are not labeled or altered, and are detected in their natural forms. Label-free detection mechanisms involves the measurement of refractive index (RI) change induced by molecular interactions. These interactions relates the sample concentration or surface density, instead of total sample mass. After simulation it has been observed that the result obtained is highly accurate and sensitive. The structure used here is SPR sensor based on channel waveguide. The tools used for simulation are RSOFT FULLWAVE, MEEP and MATLAB etc.

  9. Shear bond strength and debonding characteristics of metal and ceramic brackets bonded with conventional acid-etch and self-etch primer systems: An in-vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Mirzakouchaki, Behnam; Sharghi, Reza; Shirazi, Samaneh; Moghimi, Mahsan; Shahrbaf, Shirin

    2016-01-01

    Background Different in-vitro studies have reported various results regarding shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets when SEP technique is compared to conventional system. This in-vivo study was designed to compare the effect of conventional acid-etching and self-etching primer adhesive (SEP) systems on SBS and debonding characteristics of metal and ceramic orthodontic brackets. Material and Methods 120 intact first maxillary and mandibular premolars of 30 orthodontic patients were selected and bonded with metal and ceramic brackets using conventional acid-etch or self-etch primer system. The bonded brackets were incorporated into the wire during the study period to simulate the real orthodontic treatment condition. The teeth were extracted and debonded after 30 days. The SBS, debonding characteristics and adhesive remnant indices (ARI) were determined in all groups. Results The mean SBS of metal brackets was 10.63±1.42 MPa in conventional and 9.38±1.53 MPa in SEP system, (P=0.004). No statistically significant difference was noted between conventional and SEP systems in ceramic brackets. The frequency of 1, 2 and 3 ARI scores and debonding within the adhesive were the most common among all groups. No statistically significant difference was observed regarding ARI or failure mode of debonded specimens in different brackets or bonding systems. Conclusions The SBS of metal brackets bonded using conventional system was significantly higher than SEP system, although the SBS of SEP system was clinically acceptable. No significant difference was found between conventional and SEP systems used with ceramic brackets. Total SBS of metal brackets was significantly higher than ceramic brackets. Due to adequate SBS of SEP system in bonding the metal brackets, it can be used as an alternative for conventional system. Key words:Shear bond strength, Orthodontic brackets, Adhesive remnant index, self-etch. PMID:26855704

  10. High-Contrast Gratings based Spoof Surface Plasmons

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhuo; Liu, Liangliang; Xu, Bingzheng; Ning, Pingping; Chen, Chen; Xu, Jia; Chen, Xinlei; Gu, Changqing; Qing, Quan

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we explore the existence of spoof surface plasmons (SSPs) supported by deep-subwavelength high-contrast gratings (HCGs) on a perfect electric conductor plane. The dispersion relation of the HCGs-based SSPs is derived analyt- ically by combining multimode network theory with rigorous mode matching method, which has nearly the same form with and can be degenerated into that of the SSPs arising from deep-subwavelength metallic gratings (MGs). Numerical simula- tions validate the analytical dispersion relation and an effective medium approximation is also presented to obtain the same analytical dispersion formula. This work sets up a unified theoretical framework for SSPs and opens up new vistas in surface plasmon optics. PMID:26879637

  11. High-Contrast Gratings based Spoof Surface Plasmons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhuo; Liu, Liangliang; Xu, Bingzheng; Ning, Pingping; Chen, Chen; Xu, Jia; Chen, Xinlei; Gu, Changqing; Qing, Quan

    2016-02-01

    In this work, we explore the existence of spoof surface plasmons (SSPs) supported by deep-subwavelength high-contrast gratings (HCGs) on a perfect electric conductor plane. The dispersion relation of the HCGs-based SSPs is derived analyt- ically by combining multimode network theory with rigorous mode matching method, which has nearly the same form with and can be degenerated into that of the SSPs arising from deep-subwavelength metallic gratings (MGs). Numerical simula- tions validate the analytical dispersion relation and an effective medium approximation is also presented to obtain the same analytical dispersion formula. This work sets up a unified theoretical framework for SSPs and opens up new vistas in surface plasmon optics.

  12. Surface skeleton generation based on 360-degree profile scan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lujie; Sass, Lawrence; Sung, Woong Ki; Noel, Vernelle

    2013-05-01

    A rapid prototyping method is invented, which works on a specific data structure produced by an optical metrology technique: 360-degree surface profile scanning. A computer algorithm takes an object profile data, restructure the format, generate horizontal and vertical ribs, lay out the ribs on a 2D canvas and output the geometries to a file format compatible with laser cutters. A laser cutting machine is subsequently used to cut all the ribs from sheet materials. Then, the ribs are manually assembled based on computer-generated assembly codes. Through this process, the original object's 3D surface can be prototyped rapidly at an arbitrary scale, which may well exceed the working dimension of the laser cutter.

  13. Subpixel measurement of image features based on paraboloid surface fit

    SciTech Connect

    Gleason, S.S.; Hunt, M.A.; Jatko, W.B.

    1990-01-01

    A digital image processing inspection system is under development at Oak Ridge National Laboratory that will locate image features on printed material and measure distances between them to accuracies of 0.001 in. An algorithm has been developed for this system that can locate unique image features to subpixel accuracies. It is based on a least-squares fit of a paraboloid function to the surface generated by correlating a reference image feature against a test image search area. normalizing the correlation surface makes the algorithm robust in the presence of illumination variations and local flaws. Subpixel accuracies better than 1/16 of a pixel have been achieved using a variety of different reference image features. 5 refs., 6 figs.

  14. Surface engineering of graphene-based nanomaterials for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Shi, Sixiang; Chen, Feng; Ehlerding, Emily B; Cai, Weibo

    2014-09-17

    Graphene-based nanomaterials have attracted tremendous interest over the past decade due to their unique electronic, optical, mechanical, and chemical properties. However, the biomedical applications of these intriguing nanomaterials are still limited due to their suboptimal solubility/biocompatibility, potential toxicity, and difficulties in achieving active tumor targeting, just to name a few. In this Topical Review, we will discuss in detail the important role of surface engineering (i.e., bioconjugation) in improving the in vitro/in vivo stability and enriching the functionality of graphene-based nanomaterials, which can enable single/multimodality imaging (e.g., optical imaging, positron emission tomography, magnetic resonance imaging) and therapy (e.g., photothermal therapy, photodynamic therapy, and drug/gene delivery) of cancer. Current challenges and future research directions are also discussed and we believe that graphene-based nanomaterials are attractive nanoplatforms for a broad array of future biomedical applications.

  15. Surface Engineering of Graphene-Based Nanomaterials for Biomedical Applications

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Graphene-based nanomaterials have attracted tremendous interest over the past decade due to their unique electronic, optical, mechanical, and chemical properties. However, the biomedical applications of these intriguing nanomaterials are still limited due to their suboptimal solubility/biocompatibility, potential toxicity, and difficulties in achieving active tumor targeting, just to name a few. In this Topical Review, we will discuss in detail the important role of surface engineering (i.e., bioconjugation) in improving the in vitro/in vivo stability and enriching the functionality of graphene-based nanomaterials, which can enable single/multimodality imaging (e.g., optical imaging, positron emission tomography, magnetic resonance imaging) and therapy (e.g., photothermal therapy, photodynamic therapy, and drug/gene delivery) of cancer. Current challenges and future research directions are also discussed and we believe that graphene-based nanomaterials are attractive nanoplatforms for a broad array of future biomedical applications. PMID:25117569

  16. Shear bond strength of metal brackets to feldspathic porcelain treated by Nd:YAG laser and hydrofluoric acid.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Mohammad Hashem; Sobouti, Farhad; Etemadi, Ardavan; Chiniforush, Nasim; Shariati, Mahsa

    2015-02-01

    Adult orthodontic treatment requires bonding orthodontic attachment to dental restorations. Ceramics are commonly used as esthetic restorative materials for the crowns and bridges. The present study evaluated the shear bond strength of metal orthodontic brackets to the feldspathic porcelain surfaces following conditioning by different powers of neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser and hydrofluoric acid as a conventional method. Seventy-two glazed porcelain samples were prepared and randomly attributed to six equal groups of 12. In the conventional hydrofluoric (HF) group, the specimens were etched by 9.6% hydrofluoric acid for 4 min. In laser groups, samples were conditioned by 0.75-, 1-, 1.25-, 1.5-, and 2-W Nd:YAG laser for 10 s. Metal brackets were bonded to porcelain samples and after being stored in distilled water for 24 h, they were subjected to thermocycling for 500 cycles. The debonding was carried out by a Zwick testing machine. The data were statistically analyzed by ANOVA and Tamhane multiple comparisons tests. The mean ± SD of the shear bond strength in the laser group 0.75, 1, 1.25, 1.5, and 2 W and HF group was 2.2 ± 0.9, 4.2 ± 1.1, 4.9 ± 2.4, 7 ± 1.7, 9.6 ± 2.7, and 9.4 ± 2.5, respectively. Together with the increased power of laser, the mean shear bond strength was increased continuously and no significant differences were found between the HF group and the laser groups with power of 1.5 or 2 W. Also, there was no significant difference between all test groups in ARI scores. There was no significant difference between bond strength of laser groups with power of 1.5 and 2 W and HF-etched group. So, Nd:YAG laser with appropriate parameters can be used as an alternative method for porcelain etching.

  17. A Granulation "Flicker"-based Measure of Stellar Surface Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastien, Fabienne A.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Basri, Gibor; Pepper, Joshua

    2016-02-01

    In our previous work we found that high-quality light curves, such as those obtained by Kepler, may be used to measure stellar surface gravity via granulation-driven light curve “flicker” (F8). Here, we update and extend the relation originally presented by Bastien et al. in 2013 after calibrating F8 against a more robust set of asteroseismically derived surface gravities. We describe in detail how we extract the F8 signal from the light curves, including how we treat phenomena, such as exoplanet transits and shot noise, that adversely affect the measurement of F8. We examine the limitations of the technique, and, as a result, we now provide an updated treatment of the F8-based {log} g error. We briefly highlight further applications of the technique, such as astrodensity profiling or its use in other types of stars with convective outer layers. We discuss potential uses in current and upcoming space-based photometric missions. Finally, we supply F8-based {log} g values, and their uncertainties, for 27,628 Kepler stars not identified as hosts of transiting planets, with 4500 K < Teff < 7150 K, 2.5 < {log}\\g < 4.6, Kp ≤ 13.5, and overall photometric amplitudes <10 parts per thousand.

  18. An Ab Initio Based Potential Energy Surface for Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partridge, Harry; Schwenke, David W.; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    We report a new determination of the water potential energy surface. A high quality ab initio potential energy surface (PES) and dipole moment function of water have been computed. This PES is empirically adjusted to improve the agreement between the computed line positions and those from the HITRAN 92 data base. The adjustment is small, nonetheless including an estimate of core (oxygen 1s) electron correlation greatly improves the agreement with experiment. Of the 27,245 assigned transitions in the HITRAN 92 data base for H2(O-16), the overall root mean square (rms) deviation between the computed and observed line positions is 0.125/cm. However the deviations do not correspond to a normal distribution: 69% of the lines have errors less than 0.05/cm. Overall, the agreement between the line intensities computed in the present work and those contained in the data base is quite good, however there are a significant number of line strengths which differ greatly.

  19. Novel localized surface plasmon resonance based optical fiber sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muri, Harald Ian D. I.; Hjelme, Dag R.

    2016-03-01

    Over the last decade various optical fiber sensing schemes have been proposed based on local surface plasmon resonance (LSPR). LSPR are interacting with the evanescent field from light propagating in the fiber core or by interacting with the light at the fiber end face. Sensor designs utilizing the fiber end face is strongly preferred from a manufacturing point of view. However, the different techniques available to immobilize metallic nanostructures on the fiber end face for LSPR sensing is limited to essentially a monolayer, either by photolithographic structuring of metal film, thermal nucleation of metal film, or by random immobilization of nanoparticles (NP). In this paper, we report on a novel LSPR based optical fiber sensor architecture. The sensor is prepared by immobilizing gold NP's in a hydrogel droplet polymerized on the fiber end face. This design has several advantages over earlier designs. It dramatically increase the number of NP's available for sensing, it offers precise control over the NP density, and the NPs are position in a true 3D aqueous environment. The sensor design is also compatible with low cost manufacturing. The sensor design can measure volumetric changes in a stimuli-responsive hydrogel or measure binding to receptors on the NP surface. It can also be used as a two-parameter sensor by utilizing both effects. We present results from proof-of-concept experiments demonstrating a pH sensor based on LSPR sensing in a poly(acrylamide-co-acrylic acid) hydrogel embedding gold nanoparticles.

  20. Silicon nanohybrid-based surface-enhanced Raman scattering sensors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Houyu; Jiang, Xiangxu; Lee, Shuit-Tong; He, Yao

    2014-11-01

    Nanomaterial-based surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) sensors are highly promising analytical tools, capable of ultrasensitive, multiplex, and nondestructive detection of chemical and biological species. Extensive efforts have been made to design various silicon nanohybrid-based SERS substrates such as gold/silver nanoparticle (NP)-decorated silicon nanowires, Au/Ag NP-decorated silicon wafers (AuNP@Si), and so forth. In comparison to free AuNP- and AgNP-based SERS sensors, the silicon nanohybrid-based SERS sensors feature higher enhancement factors (EFs) and excellent reproducibility, since SERS hot spots are efficiently coupled and stabilized through interconnection to the semiconducting silicon substrates. Consequently, in the past decade, giant advancements in the development of silicon nanohybrid-based SERS sensors have been witnessed for myriad sensing applications. In this review, the representative achievements related to the design of high-performance silicon nanohybrid-based SERS sensors and their use for chemical and biological analysis are reviewed in a detailed way. Furthermore, the major opportunities and challenges in this field are discussed from a broad perspective and possible future directions.

  1. Design of panoramic lens based on ogive and aspheric surface.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junhua; Liang, Yuechao; Xu, Min

    2015-07-27

    A new method improving the design of panoramic lens with a long focal length based on ogive and aspheric surface is proposed. In this design, we use a special conjugation between "annular entrance pupil" and aperture stop to correct the chromatic transverse aberrations. Moreover, we use a new imaging relationship to increase the Effective Focal Length (EFL) of the panoramic lens and the CCD utilization. We realize a panoramic lens with a 360° × (45°~85°)field of view (FOV) and a 10.375mm EFL, which is 1.54 times than the conventional imaging relationship.

  2. 3D face recognition based on matching of facial surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echeagaray-Patrón, Beatriz A.; Kober, Vitaly

    2015-09-01

    Face recognition is an important task in pattern recognition and computer vision. In this work a method for 3D face recognition in the presence of facial expression and poses variations is proposed. The method uses 3D shape data without color or texture information. A new matching algorithm based on conformal mapping of original facial surfaces onto a Riemannian manifold followed by comparison of conformal and isometric invariants computed in the manifold is suggested. Experimental results are presented using common 3D face databases that contain significant amount of expression and pose variations.

  3. Design of panoramic lens based on ogive and aspheric surface.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junhua; Liang, Yuechao; Xu, Min

    2015-07-27

    A new method improving the design of panoramic lens with a long focal length based on ogive and aspheric surface is proposed. In this design, we use a special conjugation between "annular entrance pupil" and aperture stop to correct the chromatic transverse aberrations. Moreover, we use a new imaging relationship to increase the Effective Focal Length (EFL) of the panoramic lens and the CCD utilization. We realize a panoramic lens with a 360° × (45°~85°)field of view (FOV) and a 10.375mm EFL, which is 1.54 times than the conventional imaging relationship. PMID:26367607

  4. Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets Fixed with Remineralizing Adhesive Systems after Simulating One Year of Orthodontic Treatment.

    PubMed

    Bezerra, Gisele Lima; Torres, Carlos Rocha Gomes; Tonetto, Mateus Rodrigues; Borges, Alvaro Henrique; Kuga, Milton Carlos; Bandeca, Matheus Coelho; Firoozmand, Leily Macedo

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to assess, in vitro, the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets fixed with remineralizing adhesive systems submitted to thermomechanical cycling, simulating one year of orthodontic treatment. Sixty-four bovine incisor teeth were randomly divided into 4 experimental groups (n = 16): XT: Transbond XT, QC: Quick Cure, OL: Ortholite Color, and SEP: Transbond Plus Self-Etching Primer. The samples were submitted to thermomechanical cycling simulating one year of orthodontic treatment. Shear bond strength tests were carried out using a universal testing machine with a load cell of 50 KgF at 0.5 mm/minute. The samples were examined with a stereomicroscope and a scanning electron microscope (SEM) in order to analyze enamel surface and Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI). Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney (with Bonferroni correction) tests showed a significant difference between the studied groups (p < 0.05). Groups XT, QC, and SEP presented the highest values of adhesive resistance and no statistical differences were found between them. The highest frequency of failures between enamel and adhesive was observed in groups XT, QC, and OL. Quick Cure (QC) remineralizing adhesive system presented average adhesive resistance values similar to conventional (XT) and self-etching (SEP) adhesives, while remineralizing system (OL) provided the lowest values of adhesive resistance. PMID:26380371

  5. The Cbf5-Nop10 Complex is a Molecular Bracket that Organizes Box H/ACA RNPs

    SciTech Connect

    Hamma, Tomoko; Reichow, Steve L.; Varani, Gabriele; Ferre-D'Amare, Adrian R.

    2005-12-01

    Box H/ACA ribonucleoprotein particles (RNPs) catalyze RNA pseudouridylation and direct processing of ribosomal RNA, and are essential architectural components of vertebrate telomerases. H/ACA RNPs comprise four proteins and a multihelical RNA. Two proteins, Cbf5 and Nop10, suffice for basal enzymatic activity in an archaeal in vitro system. We now report their cocrystal structure at 1.95-A resolution. We find that archaeal Cbf5 can assemble with yeast Nop10 and with human telomerase RNA, consistent with the high sequence identity of the RNP componenets between archaea and eukarya. Thus, the Cbf5-Nop10 architecture is phylogenetically conserved. The structure shows how Nop10 buttresses the active site of Cbf5, and it reveals two basic troughs that bidirectionally extend the active site cleft. Mutagenesis results implicate an adjacent basic patch in RNA binding. This tripartite RNA-binding surface may function as a molecular bracket that organizes the multihelical H/ACA and telomerase RNAs.

  6. Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets Fixed with Remineralizing Adhesive Systems after Simulating One Year of Orthodontic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bezerra, Gisele Lima; Torres, Carlos Rocha Gomes; Tonetto, Mateus Rodrigues; Borges, Alvaro Henrique; Kuga, Milton Carlos; Bandeca, Matheus Coelho; Firoozmand, Leily Macedo

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to assess, in vitro, the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets fixed with remineralizing adhesive systems submitted to thermomechanical cycling, simulating one year of orthodontic treatment. Sixty-four bovine incisor teeth were randomly divided into 4 experimental groups (n = 16): XT: Transbond XT, QC: Quick Cure, OL: Ortholite Color, and SEP: Transbond Plus Self-Etching Primer. The samples were submitted to thermomechanical cycling simulating one year of orthodontic treatment. Shear bond strength tests were carried out using a universal testing machine with a load cell of 50 KgF at 0.5 mm/minute. The samples were examined with a stereomicroscope and a scanning electron microscope (SEM) in order to analyze enamel surface and Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI). Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney (with Bonferroni correction) tests showed a significant difference between the studied groups (p < 0.05). Groups XT, QC, and SEP presented the highest values of adhesive resistance and no statistical differences were found between them. The highest frequency of failures between enamel and adhesive was observed in groups XT, QC, and OL. Quick Cure (QC) remineralizing adhesive system presented average adhesive resistance values similar to conventional (XT) and self-etching (SEP) adhesives, while remineralizing system (OL) provided the lowest values of adhesive resistance. PMID:26380371

  7. Gold and aluminum based surface plasmon resonance biosensors: sensitivity enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biednov, Mykola; Lebyedyeva, Tetyana; Shpylovyy, Pavlo

    2015-05-01

    In this work we considered Gold and Aluminum thin films coated with additional dielectric layers as sensing platforms. Operation of these sensors is based on measuring shift in the position of the reflectivity dip in angular reflectivity spectrum of the sample. Shift can be caused by changes in the refraction index of either liquid that interacts with sensors surface (refractometric measurements) or thin adjacent biolayer on top of the sensor due to immobilization of the target molecules (biosensing). Calculations based on Fresnel equations and transfer matrix formalism allowed us to make comprehensive analysis of the angular sensitivity, shape of the reflectivity dip and dynamic range of the sensors with different dielectric coatings. Calculations were performed for both cases of bio and refractometric sensing. Results showed different dependence of the sensitivity of Au an Al based sensors upon refraction index of the dielectric coating. For Au-based surface Plasmon resonance sensor up to two times increased sensitivity can be achieved using dielectric coating with high refraction index 2.3 of proper thickness. For sensors based on aluminum we were able to achieve 50% increased angular sensitivity. At the same time width of the reflectivity dip increased proportionally to the optical thickness of the dielectric coating. For estimating sensors quality we analyzed ratio of the angular sensitivity to the width of the reflectivity dip. This ratio decreased with increase in optical thickness of the dielectric, however angular sensitivity of the sensor increased significantly. Deposition of the additional dielectric layer with high refraction index such as Niobium Oxide can also improve chemical and mechanical stability of the sensor.

  8. Small reactor power systems for manned planetary surface bases

    SciTech Connect

    Bloomfield, H.S.

    1987-12-01

    A preliminary feasibility study of the potential application of small nuclear reactor space power systems to manned planetary surface base missions was conducted. The purpose of the study was to identify and assess the technology, performance, and safety issues associated with integration of reactor power systems with an evolutionary manned planetary surface exploration scenario. The requirements and characteristics of a variety of human-rated modular reactor power system configurations selected for a range of power levels from 25 kWe to hundreds of kilowatts is described. Trade-off analyses for reactor power systems utilizing both man-made and indigenous shielding materials are provided to examine performance, installation and operational safety feasibility issues. The results of this study have confirmed the preliminary feasibility of a wide variety of small reactor power plant configurations for growth oriented manned planetary surface exploration missions. The capability for power level growth with increasing manned presence, while maintaining safe radiation levels, was favorably assessed for nominal 25 to 100 kWe modular configurations. No feasibility limitations or technical barriers were identified and the use of both distance and indigenous planetary soil material for human rated radiation shielding were shown to be viable and attractive options.

  9. Small reactor power systems for manned planetary surface bases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomfield, Harvey S.

    1987-01-01

    A preliminary feasibility study of the potential application of small nuclear reactor space power systems to manned planetary surface base missions was conducted. The purpose of the study was to identify and assess the technology, performance, and safety issues associated with integration of reactor power systems with an evolutionary manned planetary surface exploration scenario. The requirements and characteristics of a variety of human-rated modular reactor power system configurations selected for a range of power levels from 25 kWe to hundreds of kilowatts is described. Trade-off analyses for reactor power systems utilizing both man-made and indigenous shielding materials are provided to examine performance, installation and operational safety feasibility issues. The results of this study have confirmed the preliminary feasibility of a wide variety of small reactor power plant configurations for growth oriented manned planetary surface exploration missions. The capability for power level growth with increasing manned presence, while maintaining safe radiation levels, was favorably assessed for nominal 25 to 100 kWe modular configurations. No feasibility limitations or technical barriers were identified and the use of both distance and indigenous planetary soil material for human rated radiation shielding were shown to be viable and attractive options.

  10. Continuous integrable systems with multi-Poisson brackets

    SciTech Connect

    Okubo, S. )

    1992-06-01

    For discrete finite systems, it is known that the zero Nijenhuis tensor condition can be used to explicitly construct conserved quantities in involution. Although the same method is not directly generalizable for continuous systems because of the divergence problem, the difficulty can be overcome with some minor modifications. In this way, various cases of KdV, nonlocal KdV, continuous Toda lattice, Kac--Moody hierarchy, and a model based upon a {ital W}{sub 3}-algebra systematically by the same technique can be discussed.

  11. The influence of the SPEED bracket's self-ligating design on force levels in tooth movement: a comparative in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Berger, J L

    1990-03-01

    In the SPEED bracket system the arch wire is retained in the arch wire slot by means of a built-in, escape-proof, flexible spring clip. Unlike the traditional edgewise bracket, it requires no ligature tie, thus ostensibly reducing the frictional force generated by the more-established elastomeric or steel-tie ligature systems. An in vitro study was designed to compare the level of force required to move four distinct arch wires a similar distance, on six occasions, through four ligated bracket systems and the self-ligated SPEED bracket. The results consistently demonstrated a significant decrease in the force level required for the SPEED bracket with all four arch wires when compared with elastomeric and steel-tie ligation in both metal and plastic bracket systems. PMID:2309669

  12. Topological Superconductivity on the Surface of Fe-Based Superconductors.

    PubMed

    Xu, Gang; Lian, Biao; Tang, Peizhe; Qi, Xiao-Liang; Zhang, Shou-Cheng

    2016-07-22

    As one of the simplest systems for realizing Majorana fermions, the topological superconductor plays an important role in both condensed matter physics and quantum computations. Based on ab initio calculations and the analysis of an effective 8-band model with superconducting pairing, we demonstrate that the three-dimensional extended s-wave Fe-based superconductors such as Fe_{1+y}Se_{0.5}Te_{0.5} have a metallic topologically nontrivial band structure, and exhibit a normal-topological-normal superconductivity phase transition on the (001) surface by tuning the bulk carrier doping level. In the topological superconductivity (TSC) phase, a Majorana zero mode is trapped at the end of a magnetic vortex line. We further show that the surface TSC phase only exists up to a certain bulk pairing gap, and there is a normal-topological phase transition driven by the temperature, which has not been discussed before. These results pave an effective way to realize the TSC and Majorana fermions in a large class of superconductors. PMID:27494494

  13. Surface modification of nickel based alloys for improved oxidation resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Jablonski, Paul D.; Alman, David E.

    2005-02-01

    The present research is aimed at the evaluation of a surface modification treatment to enhance the high temperature stability of nickel-base superalloys. A low Coefficient Thermal Expansion (CTE ~12.5x10-6/°C) alloy based on the composition (in weight %) of Ni-22Mo-12.5Cr was produced by Vacuum Induction Melting and Vacuum Arc Melting and reduced to sheet by conventional thermal-mechanical processing. A surface treatment was devised to enhance the oxidation resistance of the alloys at high temperature. Oxidation tests (in dry and wet air; treated and untreated) were conducted 800°C to evaluate the oxidation resistance of the alloys. The results were compared to the behavior of Haynes 230 (Ni-22Cr) in the treated and untreated conditions. The treatment was not very effective for Haynes 230, as this alloy had similar oxidation behavior in both the treated and untreated conditions. However, the treatment had a significant effect on the behavior of the low CTE alloy. At 800°C, the untreated Ni-12.5Cr alloy was 5 times less oxidation resistant than Haynes 230. However, in the treated condition, the Ni-12.5Cr alloy had comparable oxidation resistance to the Haynes 230 alloy.

  14. Topological Superconductivity on the Surface of Fe-Based Superconductors.

    PubMed

    Xu, Gang; Lian, Biao; Tang, Peizhe; Qi, Xiao-Liang; Zhang, Shou-Cheng

    2016-07-22

    As one of the simplest systems for realizing Majorana fermions, the topological superconductor plays an important role in both condensed matter physics and quantum computations. Based on ab initio calculations and the analysis of an effective 8-band model with superconducting pairing, we demonstrate that the three-dimensional extended s-wave Fe-based superconductors such as Fe_{1+y}Se_{0.5}Te_{0.5} have a metallic topologically nontrivial band structure, and exhibit a normal-topological-normal superconductivity phase transition on the (001) surface by tuning the bulk carrier doping level. In the topological superconductivity (TSC) phase, a Majorana zero mode is trapped at the end of a magnetic vortex line. We further show that the surface TSC phase only exists up to a certain bulk pairing gap, and there is a normal-topological phase transition driven by the temperature, which has not been discussed before. These results pave an effective way to realize the TSC and Majorana fermions in a large class of superconductors.

  15. Topological Superconductivity on the Surface of Fe-Based Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Gang; Lian, Biao; Tang, Peizhe; Qi, Xiao-Liang; Zhang, Shou-Cheng

    2016-07-01

    As one of the simplest systems for realizing Majorana fermions, the topological superconductor plays an important role in both condensed matter physics and quantum computations. Based on ab initio calculations and the analysis of an effective 8-band model with superconducting pairing, we demonstrate that the three-dimensional extended s -wave Fe-based superconductors such as Fe1 +ySe0.5 Te0.5 have a metallic topologically nontrivial band structure, and exhibit a normal-topological-normal superconductivity phase transition on the (001) surface by tuning the bulk carrier doping level. In the topological superconductivity (TSC) phase, a Majorana zero mode is trapped at the end of a magnetic vortex line. We further show that the surface TSC phase only exists up to a certain bulk pairing gap, and there is a normal-topological phase transition driven by the temperature, which has not been discussed before. These results pave an effective way to realize the TSC and Majorana fermions in a large class of superconductors.

  16. Polymer-based chips for surface plasmon resonance sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obreja, Paula; Cristea, Dana; Kusko, Mihai; Dinescu, Adrian

    2008-06-01

    This paper presents a design and low-cost techniques for polymer-based chips for surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensors. To obtain a polymer chip with a prism, microchannels and a chamber at microscale dimensions, replication techniques in polymers with controlled refractive index have been developed. Photoresist, polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and epoxy resin were used. Silicon dioxide/silicon-based molds have been obtained by anisotropic etching of silicon, and glass prisms were used as masters for replication. The photoresist molds were obtained by optical lithography and were used to obtain the microchannels and the chamber. A liquid prepolymer (PDMS, Sylgard 184) with curing agent at a ratio of 10:1 was used, and a special technique was developed in order to fabricate the components of the structure at the same time. For the deposition and direct patterning of the metallic layers onto the polymer surface, different methods were experimented with, including sputtering. The materials and techniques used to achieve SPR sensors are presented, and the possibilities and limitations of the technology are discussed.

  17. The effect of perturbations on resistance to sliding in second-order moments comparing two different bracket types

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Justin K; Romanyk, Dan L; Toogood, Roger W; Heo, Giseon; Carey, Jason P

    2014-01-01

    Orthodontic literature has shown all ligation methods to behave similarly in the clinical situation; however, the reasoning behind this still requires further investigation. A novel frictional device able to measure forces at the level of the bracket along with a custom perturbation device was used to investigate the effect of perturbations on resistance to sliding (RS) using conventional and passive ligated brackets. 150 3M Victory Series twins (0.022 slot) and 150 Damon Q brackets (0.022 slot) were tested using an 0.018 x 0.025 stainless steel wire for RS. There were 5 test groups consisting of equal numbers (n=30) representing combinations of high and low amplitude and frequency of perturbations along with a control. Second order angulation tested ranged from 0 to 6 degrees. Results for conventional brackets in the presence of perturbations at 0 degrees showed there was a statistically significant reduction (P<0.001) in RS when compared to controls. At 6 degrees, this difference (P<0.001) was seen in both high perturbation groups and one of the low perturbation groups. For passive ligated brackets, no statistically significant difference between groups was seen at 0 degrees. However, at 6 degrees high perturbation groups both resulted in statistically significant (P<0.001) reductions in RS when compared to controls. From this study it was concluded that passive ligated brackets have a lower RS when compared to conventional ligated brackets under all test conditions and angulations. Also, amplitude of perturbations has a larger role than frequency in reduction of RS values. PMID:25395993

  18. Symbolic algorithms for the computation of Moshinsky brackets and nuclear matrix elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ursescu, D.; Tomaselli, M.; Kuehl, T.; Fritzsche, S.

    2005-12-01

    To facilitate the use of the extended nuclear shell model (NSM), a FERMI module for calculating some of its basic quantities in the framework of MAPLE is provided. The Moshinsky brackets, the matrix elements for several central and non-central interactions between nuclear two-particle states as well as their expansion in terms of Talmi integrals are easily given within a symbolic formulation. All of these quantities are available for interactive work. Program summaryTitle of program:Fermi Catalogue identifier:ADVO Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADVO Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions:None Computer for which the program is designed and others on which is has been tested:All computers with a licence for the computer algebra package MAPLE [Maple is a registered trademark of Waterloo Maple Inc., produced by MapleSoft division of Waterloo Maple Inc.] Instalations:GSI-Darmstadt; University of Kassel (Germany) Operating systems or monitors under which the program has beentested: WindowsXP, Linux 2.4 Programming language used:MAPLE 8 and 9.5 from MapleSoft division of Waterloo Maple Inc. Memory required to execute with typical data:30 MB No. of lines in distributed program including test data etc.:5742 No. of bytes in distributed program including test data etc.:288 939 Distribution program:tar.gz Nature of the physical problem:In order to perform calculations within the nuclear shell model (NSM), a quick and reliable access to the nuclear matrix elements is required. These matrix elements, which arise from various types of forces among the nucleons, can be calculated using Moshinsky's transformation brackets between relative and center-of-mass coordinates [T.A. Brody, M. Moshinsky, Tables of Transformation Brackets, Monografias del Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, 1960] and by the proper use of the nuclear states in different coupling notations

  19. Lunar surface base propulsion system study, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The efficiency, capability, and evolution of a lunar base will be largely dependent on the transportation system that supports it. Beyond Space Station in low Earth orbit (LEO), a Lunar-derived propellant supply could provide the most important resource for the transportation infrastructure. The key to an efficient Lunar base propulsion system is the degree of Lunar self-sufficiency (from Earth supply) and reasonable propulsion system performance. Lunar surface propellant production requirements must be accounted in the measurement of efficiency of the entire space transportation system. Of all chemical propellant/propulsion systems considered, hydrogen/oxygen (H/O) OTVs appear most desirable, while both H/O and aluminum/oxygen propulsion systems may be considered for the lander. Aluminized-hydrogen/oxygen and Silane/oxygen propulsion systems are also promising candidates. Lunar propellant availability and processing techniques, chemical propulsion/vehicle design characteristics, and the associated performance of the total transportation infrastructure are reviewed, conceptual propulsion system designs and vehicle/basing concepts, and technology requirements are assessed in context of a Lunar Base mission scenario.

  20. Biomimetic surface modification of polypropylene by surface chain transfer reaction based on mussel-inspired adhesion technology and thiol chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Zhijun; Zhao, Yang; Sun, Wei; Shi, Suqing; Gong, Yongkuan

    2016-11-01

    Biomimetic surface modification of polypropylene (PP) is conducted by surface chain transfer reaction based on the mussel-inspired versatile adhesion technology and thiol chemistry, using 2-methacryloyloxyethylphosphorylcholine (MPC) as a hydrophilic monomer mimicking the cell outer membrane structure and 2,2-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as initiator in ethanol. A layer of polydopamine (PDA) is firstly deposited onto PP surface, which not only offers good interfacial adhesion with PP, but also supplies secondary reaction sites (-NH2) to covalently anchor thiol groups onto PP surface. Then the radical chain transfer to surface-bonded thiol groups and surface re-initiated polymerization of MPC lead to the formation of a thin layer of polymer brush (PMPC) with cell outer membrane mimetic structure on PP surface. X-ray photoelectron spectrophotometer (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and water contact angle measurements are used to characterize the PP surfaces before and after modification. The protein adsorption and platelet adhesion experiments are also employed to evaluate the interactions of PP surface with biomolecules. The results show that PMPC is successfully grafted onto PP surface. In comparison with bare PP, the resultant PP-PMPC surface exhibits greatly improved protein and platelet resistance performance, which is the contribution of both increased surface hydrophilicity and zwitterionic structure. More importantly, the residue thiol groups on PP-PMPC surface create a new pathway to further functionalize such zwitterion modified PP surface.

  1. Characterizing a New Surface-Based Shortwave Cloud Retrieval Technique, Based on Transmitted Radiance for Soil and Vegetated Surface Types

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coddington, Odele; Pilewskie, Peter; Schmidt, K. Sebastian; McBride, Patrick J.; Vukicevic, Tomislava

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an approach using the GEneralized Nonlinear Retrieval Analysis (GENRA) tool and general inverse theory diagnostics including the maximum likelihood solution and the Shannon information content to investigate the performance of a new spectral technique for the retrieval of cloud optical properties from surface based transmittance measurements. The cumulative retrieval information over broad ranges in cloud optical thickness (tau), droplet effective radius (r(sub e)), and overhead sun angles is quantified under two conditions known to impact transmitted radiation; the variability in land surface albedo and atmospheric water vapor content. Our conclusions are: (1) the retrieved cloud properties are more sensitive to the natural variability in land surface albedo than to water vapor content; (2) the new spectral technique is more accurate (but still imprecise) than a standard approach, in particular for tau between 5 and 60 and r(sub e) less than approximately 20 nm; and (3) the retrieved cloud properties are dependent on sun angle for clouds of tau from 5 to 10 and r(sub e) less than 10 nm, with maximum sensitivity obtained for an overhead sun.

  2. Detecting Nasal Vowels in Speech Interfaces Based on Surface Electromyography

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, João; Teixeira, António; Silva, Samuel; Oliveira, Catarina; Dias, Miguel Sales

    2015-01-01

    Nasality is a very important characteristic of several languages, European Portuguese being one of them. This paper addresses the challenge of nasality detection in surface electromyography (EMG) based speech interfaces. We explore the existence of useful information about the velum movement and also assess if muscles deeper down in the face and neck region can be measured using surface electrodes, and the best electrode location to do so. The procedure we adopted uses Real-Time Magnetic Resonance Imaging (RT-MRI), collected from a set of speakers, providing a method to interpret EMG data. By ensuring compatible data recording conditions, and proper time alignment between the EMG and the RT-MRI data, we are able to accurately estimate the time when the velum moves and the type of movement when a nasal vowel occurs. The combination of these two sources revealed interesting and distinct characteristics in the EMG signal when a nasal vowel is uttered, which motivated a classification experiment. Overall results of this experiment provide evidence that it is possible to detect velum movement using sensors positioned below the ear, between mastoid process and the mandible, in the upper neck region. In a frame-based classification scenario, error rates as low as 32.5% for all speakers and 23.4% for the best speaker have been achieved, for nasal vowel detection. This outcome stands as an encouraging result, fostering the grounds for deeper exploration of the proposed approach as a promising route to the development of an EMG-based speech interface for languages with strong nasal characteristics. PMID:26069968

  3. Detecting Nasal Vowels in Speech Interfaces Based on Surface Electromyography.

    PubMed

    Freitas, João; Teixeira, António; Silva, Samuel; Oliveira, Catarina; Dias, Miguel Sales

    2015-01-01

    Nasality is a very important characteristic of several languages, European Portuguese being one of them. This paper addresses the challenge of nasality detection in surface electromyography (EMG) based speech interfaces. We explore the existence of useful information about the velum movement and also assess if muscles deeper down in the face and neck region can be measured using surface electrodes, and the best electrode location to do so. The procedure we adopted uses Real-Time Magnetic Resonance Imaging (RT-MRI), collected from a set of speakers, providing a method to interpret EMG data. By ensuring compatible data recording conditions, and proper time alignment between the EMG and the RT-MRI data, we are able to accurately estimate the time when the velum moves and the type of movement when a nasal vowel occurs. The combination of these two sources revealed interesting and distinct characteristics in the EMG signal when a nasal vowel is uttered, which motivated a classification experiment. Overall results of this experiment provide evidence that it is possible to detect velum movement using sensors positioned below the ear, between mastoid process and the mandible, in the upper neck region. In a frame-based classification scenario, error rates as low as 32.5% for all speakers and 23.4% for the best speaker have been achieved, for nasal vowel detection. This outcome stands as an encouraging result, fostering the grounds for deeper exploration of the proposed approach as a promising route to the development of an EMG-based speech interface for languages with strong nasal characteristics.

  4. A comparison of the forces required to produce tooth movement ex vivo through three types of pre-adjusted brackets when subjected to determined tip or torque values.

    PubMed

    Sims, A P; Waters, N E; Birnie, D J

    1994-11-01

    Friction in fixed appliance systems has received considerable attention in recent literature, although that attributable to varying second order (tip) and third order (torque) adjustments in either the bracket or the archwire has not been fully investigated. The ex vivo study of 0.022 x 0.028-inch slot Minitwin, Activa, and Standard Straight Wire brackets investigates friction when known values of tip or torque were applied to 0.018 x 0.025-inch stainless steel wires. The resistance to sliding of the wire through the ligated brackets was measured on a vertically-mounted Instron testing machine. The results showed that the self-ligating Activa brackets consistently produced less friction than the other conventionally tied brackets. Minitwin brackets were slightly more resistant to movement than the Standard brackets during torquing, but the converse was found when tip was applied. Increasing tip and torque (ranges tested 0-6 degrees and 0-25 degrees, respectively) produced almost linear increases in friction for all brackets, although increasing tip had the more profound effect on friction, particularly in Activa brackets. PMID:7857896

  5. Micro-and nanostructured silicon-based superomniphobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thi Phuong Nhung; Boukherroub, Rabah; Thomy, Vincent; Coffinier, Yannick

    2014-02-15

    We report on the fabrication of silicon nanostructured superhydrophobic and superoleophobic surfaces also called "superomniphobic" surfaces. For this purpose, silicon interfaces with different surface morphologies, single or double scale structuration, were investigated. These structured surfaces were chemically treated with perfluorodecyltrichlorosilane (PFTS), a low surface energy molecule. The morphology of the resulting surfaces was characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Their wetting properties: static contact angle (CA) and contact angle hysteresis (CAH) were investigated using liquids of various surface tensions. Despite that we found that all the different morphologies display a superhydrophobic character (CA>150° for water) and superoleophobic behavior (CA ≈ 140° for hexadecane), values of hysteresis are strongly dependent on the liquid surface tension and surface morphology. The best surface described in this study was composed of a dual scale texturation i.e. silicon micropillars covered by silicon nanowires. Indeed, this surface displayed high static contact angles and low hysteresis for all tested liquids.

  6. Fluoride-Releasing Materials to Prevent White Spot Lesions around Orthodontic Brackets: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Patrícia Layane de Menezes Macêdo; Fernandes, Micaelle Tenório Guedes; Figueiredo, Fabricio Eneas Diniz de; Faria-E-Silva, André Luis

    2016-01-01

    The relation between orthodontic fixed appliances use and enamel demineralization is well established. Different preventive approaches have been suggested to this problem, but controversy remains about which is the best. The aim of this study was to perform a systematic review of clinical trials that investigated the effectiveness of materials containing fluorides to lute brackets or cover the bonding interface in order to inhibit the development and progression of white spot lesions. The null hypothesis was that fluoride materials do not affect the incidence of white spot lesions around brackets. A MEDLINE search was conducted for randomized clinical trials evaluating the development of white spot lesions in patients using fixed orthodontic appliances, followed by meta-analysis comparing the results for patients for whom dental materials containing fluorides were used (experimental group) to those for whom these materials were not used (control group). The pooled relative risk of developing white spot lesions for the experimental group was 0.42 (95% confidence interval: 0.25 to 0.72); hence, when fluoride-releasing materials are used, the patient has 58% less risk of white spot lesion development. Regarding white spot lesion extent, the pooled mean difference between the experimental and control groups was not statistically significant (-0.12; 95% confidence interval: -0.29 to 0.04). In conclusion, the results of the present systematic review suggest that fluoride-releasing materials can reduce the risk of white spot lesions around brackets. However, when white spot lesions had already occurred, there is no evidence that fluoride-releasing materials reduce the extent of these lesions. PMID:27007355

  7. Influence of bleaching and desensitizing gel on bond strength of orthodontic brackets

    PubMed Central

    Britto, Fernanda Alves Rodrigues; Lucato, Adriana Simoni; Valdrighi, Heloisa Cristina; Vedovello, Sílvia Amélia Scudeler

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to assess, in vitro, the influence of bleaching gel and the use of desensitizing agent over bond strength of ceramic brackets bonded to bovine enamel. METHODS: One hundred bovine incisors were selected and randomly divided into five groups (n = 20): Group 1, control group (without bleaching); Group 2, bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide; Group 3, bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide (three applications, 15 minutes each) and desensitizing agent applied for 10 minutes; Group 4, bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide for 40 minutes; Group 5, bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide for 40 minutes with desensitizing agent applied for 10 minutes. Brackets were bonded 7 days after bleaching and submitted to shear bond strength test after 24 hours at a compression rate of 1 mm/minute. After fracture, the adhesive remnant index (ARI) was assessed under stereoscopic at 40 x magnification. Shear strength data (MPa) were submitted to one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test with significance level set at 5%. RESULTS: Group 5 (29.33 MPa) showed significantly higher bond strength than Group 1 (19.19 MPa), Group 2 (20.59 MPa) and Group 4 (23.25 MPa), but with no difference in comparison to Group 3. There was no significant difference among the other groups. The adhesive remnant index showed predominance of score 3, that is, all resin remained adhered to enamel for all groups. CONCLUSION: Bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide with calcium associated with desensitizing agent application produced higher bond strength values of brackets bonded to bovine enamel. PMID:25992987

  8. Comparison of self- and conventional-ligating brackets in the alignment stage.

    PubMed

    Wahab, Rohaya Megat Abdul; Idris, Hartini; Yacob, Habibah; Ariffin, Shahrul Hisham Zainal

    2012-04-01

    This prospective study investigated the difference in clinical efficiency between Damon™ 3 self-ligating brackets (SLB) compared with Mini Diamond conventional ligating brackets (CLBs) during tooth alignment in straightwire fixed appliance therapy. Twenty-nine patients (10 males and 19 females), aged between 14 and 30 years, were randomly divided into two groups: 14 patients received the SLB and 15 received the CLB. Upper arch impressions were taken for pre-treatment records (T(0)). A transpalatal arch was soldered to both maxillary first molar bands prior to extraction of the maxillary first premolars, followed by straightwire fixed appliances (0.022 × 0.028 inch). A 0.014 inch nickel titanium (NiTi) wire was used as the levelling and aligning archwire. Four monthly reviews were undertaken and impressions of the upper arch were taken at each appointment (T(1), T(2), T(3), and T(4)). Displacements of the teeth were determined using Little's irregularity index (LII). Data were analysed using the Mann-Whitney U-test. In the aligning stage, the CLB group showed significantly faster alignment of the teeth compared with the SLB group at the T(1)-T(2) interval (P < 0.05). However, there were no differences at T(2)-T(3), and T(3)-T(4) for either group (P > 0.05). The CLB group showed 98 per cent crowding alleviation compared with 67 per cent for the SLB after 4 months of alignment and levelling. Mini Diamond brackets aligned the teeth faster than Damon™ 3 but only during the first month. There was no difference in efficacy between the two groups in the later 3 weeks. Alleviation of crowding was faster with CLB than with SLB.

  9. CO2 laser as auxiliary in the debonding of ceramic brackets.

    PubMed

    Macri, Rodrigo Teixeira; de Lima, Fabrício Augusto; Bachmann, Luciano; Galo, Rodrigo; Romano, Fábio Lourenço; Borsatto, Maria Cristina; Matsumoto, Mírian Aiko Nakane

    2015-09-01

    This study evaluated the temperature in the bonding composite and in the pulp chamber, the shear bond strength after the irradiation of CO2 lasers, and the Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI) after debonding of ceramic bracket. A hundred and five premolars were used: 30 to evaluate the temperature and 75 to test the resistance to shear and the ARI. To assess the temperature, different irradiation times (3 and 5 s), pulse duration (0.001 and 0.003 s), and output power (5, 8, and 10 W) were tested (total of 12 groups). During all the irradiation, specimens were immersed in thermal bath water at 37 °C. In the test and ARI evaluation, premolars were divided into five groups (n = 15) and were submitted to the following regimens of CO2 laser irradiation: I (5 W, pulse duration = 0.01 s, application time = 3 s), II (5 W, 0.03 s, 3 s), III (8 W, 0.01 s, 3 s), and IV (1 0 W, 0.01 s, 3 s). Group C (control) was not subjected to irradiation. ARI was measured after debonding of the bracket. Following irradiation of the lasers, the pulpal temperature was not higher than 5.5 °C in four of the study groups. Results were submitted to the ANOVA and Duncan's test. CO2 laser irradiation regimen IV was one in which the strength of debonding is 7.33 MPa. Therefore, CO2 laser may aid removal of ceramic brackets; it decreased the bond strength without increasing the excessive temperature excessively. PMID:25410302

  10. Hippocampal shape analysis: surface-based representation and classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Li; Ford, James; Makedon, Fillia; Saykin, Andrew

    2003-05-01

    Surface-based representation and classification techniques are studied for hippocampal shape analysis. The goal is twofold: (1) develop a new framework of salient feature extraction and accurate classification for 3D shape data; (2) detect hippocampal abnormalities in schizophrenia using this technique. A fine-scale spherical harmonic expansion is employed to describe a closed 3D surface object. The expansion can then easily be transformed to extract only shape information (i.e., excluding translation, rotation, and scaling) and create a shape descriptor comparable across different individuals. This representation captures shape features and is flexible enough to do shape modeling, identify statistical group differences, and generate similar synthetic shapes. Principal component analysis is used to extract a small number of independent features from high dimensional shape descriptors, and Fisher's linear discriminant is applied for pattern classification. This framework is shown to be able to perform well in distinguishing clear group differences as well as small and noisy group differences using simulated shape data. In addition, the application of this technique to real data indicates that group shape differences exist in hippocampi between healthy controls and schizophrenic patients.

  11. Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensor Based on Smart Phone Platforms.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yun; Liu, Qiang; Chen, Shimeng; Cheng, Fang; Wang, Hanqi; Peng, Wei

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a fiber optic surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor based on smart phone platforms. The light-weight optical components and sensing element are connected by optical fibers on a phone case. This SPR adaptor can be conveniently installed or removed from smart phones. The measurement, control and reference channels are illuminated by the light entering the lead-in fibers from the phone's LED flash, while the light from the end faces of the lead-out fibers is detected by the phone's camera. The SPR-sensing element is fabricated by a light-guiding silica capillary that is stripped off its cladding and coated with 50-nm gold film. Utilizing a smart application to extract the light intensity information from the camera images, the light intensities of each channel are recorded every 0.5 s with refractive index (RI) changes. The performance of the smart phone-based SPR platform for accurate and repeatable measurements was evaluated by detecting different concentrations of antibody binding to a functionalized sensing element, and the experiment results were validated through contrast experiments with a commercial SPR instrument. This cost-effective and portable SPR biosensor based on smart phones has many applications, such as medicine, health and environmental monitoring. PMID:26255778

  12. Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensor Based on Smart Phone Platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yun; Liu, Qiang; Chen, Shimeng; Cheng, Fang; Wang, Hanqi; Peng, Wei

    2015-08-01

    We demonstrate a fiber optic surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor based on smart phone platforms. The light-weight optical components and sensing element are connected by optical fibers on a phone case. This SPR adaptor can be conveniently installed or removed from smart phones. The measurement, control and reference channels are illuminated by the light entering the lead-in fibers from the phone’s LED flash, while the light from the end faces of the lead-out fibers is detected by the phone’s camera. The SPR-sensing element is fabricated by a light-guiding silica capillary that is stripped off its cladding and coated with 50-nm gold film. Utilizing a smart application to extract the light intensity information from the camera images, the light intensities of each channel are recorded every 0.5 s with refractive index (RI) changes. The performance of the smart phone-based SPR platform for accurate and repeatable measurements was evaluated by detecting different concentrations of antibody binding to a functionalized sensing element, and the experiment results were validated through contrast experiments with a commercial SPR instrument. This cost-effective and portable SPR biosensor based on smart phones has many applications, such as medicine, health and environmental monitoring.

  13. Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensor Based on Smart Phone Platforms

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yun; Liu, Qiang; Chen, Shimeng; Cheng, Fang; Wang, Hanqi; Peng, Wei

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a fiber optic surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor based on smart phone platforms. The light-weight optical components and sensing element are connected by optical fibers on a phone case. This SPR adaptor can be conveniently installed or removed from smart phones. The measurement, control and reference channels are illuminated by the light entering the lead-in fibers from the phone’s LED flash, while the light from the end faces of the lead-out fibers is detected by the phone’s camera. The SPR-sensing element is fabricated by a light-guiding silica capillary that is stripped off its cladding and coated with 50-nm gold film. Utilizing a smart application to extract the light intensity information from the camera images, the light intensities of each channel are recorded every 0.5 s with refractive index (RI) changes. The performance of the smart phone-based SPR platform for accurate and repeatable measurements was evaluated by detecting different concentrations of antibody binding to a functionalized sensing element, and the experiment results were validated through contrast experiments with a commercial SPR instrument. This cost-effective and portable SPR biosensor based on smart phones has many applications, such as medicine, health and environmental monitoring. PMID:26255778

  14. Station-based Surface Data Value-Added Product

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Q.; Xie, S.

    2015-07-01

    This report describes the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Best Estimate (ARMBE) station-based surface data (ARMBESTNS) value-added product. It is a twin data product of the ARMBE 2-Dimensional gridded (ARMBE2DGRID) data set. Unlike the ARMBE2DGRID data set, ARMBESTNS data are reported at the original site locations and show the original information (except for the interpolation over time). Therefore, the users have the flexibility to process the data with the approach more suitable for their applications. This document provides information about the input data, quality control (QC) method, and output format of this data set. As much of the information is identical to that of the ARMBE2DGRID data, this document will emphasize more on the different aspects of these two data sets.

  15. Surface Acoustic Wave Tag-Based Coherence Multiplexing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngquist, Robert C. (Inventor); Malocha, Donald (Inventor); Saldanha, Nancy (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A surface acoustic wave (SAW)-based coherence multiplexing system includes SAW tags each including a SAW transducer, a first SAW reflector positioned a first distance from the SAW transducer and a second SAW reflector positioned a second distance from the SAW transducer. A transceiver including a wireless transmitter has a signal source providing a source signal and circuitry for transmitting interrogation pulses including a first and a second interrogation pulse toward the SAW tags, and a wireless receiver for receiving and processing response signals from the SAW tags. The receiver receives scrambled signals including a convolution of the wideband interrogation pulses with response signals from the SAW tags and includes a computing device which implements an algorithm that correlates the interrogation pulses or the source signal before transmitting against the scrambled signals to generate tag responses for each of the SAW tags.

  16. Infrared transparent frequency selective surface based on metallic meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Miao; Xu, Nianxi; Liu, Hai; Gao, Jinsong

    2014-02-15

    This paper presents an infrared transparent frequency selective surface (ITFSS) based on metallic meshes. In this ITFSS structure, periodic cross-slot units are integrated on square metallic meshes empowered by coating and UV-lithography. A matching condition is proposed to avoid the distortion of units. Experimental results show that this ITFSS possesses a good transmittance of 80% in the infrared band of 3–5 μm, and also a stable band-pass behavior at the resonance frequency of 36.4 GHz with transmittance of −0.56 dB. Theoretical simulations about the ITFSS diffractive characteristics and frequency responses are also investigated. The novel ITFSS will attract renewed interest and be exploited for applications in various fields.

  17. Detection of explosives based on surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wackerbarth, Hainer; Salb, Christian; Gundrum, Lars; Niederkrüger, Matthias; Christou, Konstantin; Beushausen, Volker; Viöl, Wolfgang

    2010-08-10

    In this study we present a device based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for the detection of airborne explosives. The explosives are resublimated on a cooled nanostructured gold substrate. The explosives trinitrotoluene (TNT) and triacetone triperoxide (TATP) are used. The SERS spectrum of the explosives is analyzed. Thus, TNT is deposited from an acetonitrile solution on the gold substrate. In the case of TATP, first the bulk TATP Raman spectrum was recorded and compared with the SERS spectrum, generated by deposition out of the gas phase. The frequencies of the SERS spectrum are hardly shifted compared to the spectrum of bulk TATP. The influence of the nanostructured gold substrate temperature on the signals of TATP was studied. A decrease in temperature up to 200 K increased the intensities of the TATP bands in the SERS spectrum; below 200 K, the TATP fingerprint disappeared. PMID:20697437

  18. Multilayer-graphene-based amplifier of surface acoustic waves

    SciTech Connect

    Yurchenko, Stanislav O. Komarov, Kirill A.; Pustovoit, Vladislav I.

    2015-05-15

    The amplification of surface acoustic waves (SAWs) by a multilayer graphene (MLG)-based amplifier is studied. The conductivity of massless carriers (electrons or holes) in graphene in an external drift electric field is calculated using Boltzmann’s equation. At some carrier drift velocities, the real part of the variable conductivity becomes negative and MLG can be employed in SAW amplifiers. Amplification of Blustein’s and Rayleigh’s SAWs in CdS, a piezoelectric hexagonal crystal of the symmetry group C{sub 6v}, is considered. The corresponding equations for SAW propagation in the device are derived and can be applied to other substrate crystals of the same symmetry. The results of the paper indicate that MLG can be considered as a perspective material for SAW amplification and related applications.

  19. Optimization of Surface Acoustic Wave-Based Rate Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Fangqian; Wang, Wen; Shao, Xiuting; Liu, Xinlu; Liang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    The optimization of an surface acoustic wave (SAW)-based rate sensor incorporating metallic dot arrays was performed by using the approach of partial-wave analysis in layered media. The optimal sensor chip designs, including the material choice of piezoelectric crystals and metallic dots, dot thickness, and sensor operation frequency were determined theoretically. The theoretical predictions were confirmed experimentally by using the developed SAW sensor composed of differential delay line-oscillators and a metallic dot array deposited along the acoustic wave propagation path of the SAW delay lines. A significant improvement in sensor sensitivity was achieved in the case of 128° YX LiNbO3, and a thicker Au dot array, and low operation frequency were used to structure the sensor. PMID:26473865

  20. Detection of explosives based on surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wackerbarth, Hainer; Salb, Christian; Gundrum, Lars; Niederkrüger, Matthias; Christou, Konstantin; Beushausen, Volker; Viöl, Wolfgang

    2010-08-10

    In this study we present a device based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for the detection of airborne explosives. The explosives are resublimated on a cooled nanostructured gold substrate. The explosives trinitrotoluene (TNT) and triacetone triperoxide (TATP) are used. The SERS spectrum of the explosives is analyzed. Thus, TNT is deposited from an acetonitrile solution on the gold substrate. In the case of TATP, first the bulk TATP Raman spectrum was recorded and compared with the SERS spectrum, generated by deposition out of the gas phase. The frequencies of the SERS spectrum are hardly shifted compared to the spectrum of bulk TATP. The influence of the nanostructured gold substrate temperature on the signals of TATP was studied. A decrease in temperature up to 200 K increased the intensities of the TATP bands in the SERS spectrum; below 200 K, the TATP fingerprint disappeared.

  1. Surface plasmon resonance based fiber optic glucose biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Sachin K.; Verma, Roli; Gupta, Banshi D.

    2012-02-01

    A surface plasmon resonance (SPR) based fiber optic biosensor has been fabricated and characterized for the detection of blood glucose. Optical fiber sensor was fabricated by first coating a 50 nm thick gold film on the bare core of optical fiber and then immobilizing glucose oxidase (GOx) over it. Aqueous glucose solutions of different concentrations were prepared. To mimic the blood glucose levels, the concentration of glucose solutions were kept equal to that in human blood. The refractive indices of these sample solutions were equal to that of water up to third decimal place. SPR spectra for the sensor were recorded for these glucose solutions. When the glucose comes in contact to glucose oxidase, chemical reactions take place and as a result, the refractive index of the immobilized GOx film changes, giving rise to a shift in the resonance wavelength. Unlike electrochemical sensors, the present sensor is based on optics and can be miniaturized because of optical fiber. The present study provides a different approach for blood glucose sensing and may be commercialized after optimization of certain parameters.

  2. A silicon-based electrical source of surface plasmon polaritons.

    PubMed

    Walters, R J; van Loon, R V A; Brunets, I; Schmitz, J; Polman, A

    2010-01-01

    After decades of process scaling driven by Moore's law, the silicon microelectronics world is now defined by length scales that are many times smaller than the dimensions of typical micro-optical components. This size mismatch poses an important challenge for those working to integrate photonics with complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) electronics technology. One promising solution is to fabricate optical systems at metal/dielectric interfaces, where electromagnetic modes called surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) offer unique opportunities to confine and control light at length scales below 100 nm (refs 1, 2). Research groups working in the rapidly developing field of plasmonics have now demonstrated many passive components that suggest the potential of SPPs for applications in sensing and optical communication. Recently, active plasmonic devices based on III-V materials and organic materials have been reported. An electrical source of SPPs was recently demonstrated using organic semiconductors by Koller and colleagues. Here we show that a silicon-based electrical source for SPPs can be fabricated using established low-temperature microtechnology processes that are compatible with back-end CMOS technology.

  3. Image-based monitoring of structural damage: concrete surface cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, ZhiQiang; Chang, Barbara; Hutchinson, Tara C.

    2008-03-01

    Nondestructive imaging has been a widely used approach for detection of local structural damage in the engineering community. By combining image analysis methods, quantities describing the type, severity and extent of damage can be extracted within the spatial domain of images. However, the current practice of structural health monitoring requires a temporal characterization of structural damage, or some correlation of structural damage with response data. To accomplish this, one needs to consider the time scale in using any of the nondestructive imaging techniques, which in turn demands the use of spatial-temporal image analysis. In this paper, we address the temporal occurrence of cracks on the surface of concrete structural members, and attempt to monitor cracks, including their inception and propagation, using temporal image data. We assume under some conditions for objects in a pair of temporal images that only planar rigid-body motion takes place in the image domain, while cracks are treated as a type of local anomaly. The unknown motion parameters are estimated by means of a manifold-based optimization procedure, and the obtained manifold distance (MD) measure is used as a motion-invariant feature to describe the temporal occurrence of concrete cracks. Numerical analyses are conducted with the use of video clips from two laboratory experiments. It is concluded in this paper that the MD-based spatial-temporal image analysis can be an effective means for monitoring local damage of structural components that occurs and is accompanied by structural motion induced by loading.

  4. ERT inversion with the incorporation of surface-based GPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hetrick, H. F.; Marshall, H.; Bradford, J. H.; Mead, J.

    2013-12-01

    The inversion of resistivity data produces smoothed results due to regularization. This potentially adds difficulty into interpretations if regions within the subsurface are separated by sharp boundaries. This problem is improved by incorporating prior information into the inversion. Prior information applied to such inversions have recently been obtained from other geophysical datasets, such as seismic, well-logs, or borehole-based GPR. I propose to incorporate data obtained from land-based GPR. This approach will achieve higher spatial resolutions, improved accuracy resistivity values, and more realistic models, and will be especially useful for near-surface geophysical investigations. The Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site (BHRS) located in Boise, Idaho, is a well known area due to several previous studies at the site, and will be used to test the performance of this inversion method. An application study will also be conducted at a research site near the Bogus Basin recreational ski resort, located just outside of Boise, Idaho, where the inverted results will be used to estimate lateral variations in soil moisture of a hill slope during melt events of an overlying snowpack.

  5. Surface plasmon resonance sensor based on spectral interferometry: numerical analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunfang; Li, Hui; Duan, Jingyuan; Shi, Ancun; Liu, Yuliang

    2013-05-10

    In this paper, we introduce a numerical simulation of a phase detecting surface plasmon resonance (SPR) scheme based on spectral interference. Based on the simulation, we propose a method to optimize various aspects of SPR sensors, which enables better performance in both measurement range (MR) and sensitivity. In the simulation, four parameters including the spectrum of the broadband light source, incident angle, Au film thickness, and refractive index of the prism coupler are analyzed. The results show that it is a good solution for better performance to use a warm white broadband (625-800 nm) light source, a divergence angle of the collimated incident light less than 0.02°, and an optimized 48 nm thick Au film when a visible broadband light source is used. If a near-IR light source is used, however, the Au film thickness should be somewhat thinner according the specific spectrum. In addition, a wider MR could be obtained if a prism coupler with higher refractive index is used. With all the parameters appropriately set, the SPR MR could be extended to 0.55 refractive index units while keeping the sensitivity at a level of 10(-8). PMID:23669838

  6. A silicon-based electrical source of surface plasmon polaritons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walters, R. J.; van Loon, R. V. A.; Brunets, I.; Schmitz, J.; Polman, A.

    2010-01-01

    After decades of process scaling driven by Moore's law, the silicon microelectronics world is now defined by length scales that are many times smaller than the dimensions of typical micro-optical components. This size mismatch poses an important challenge for those working to integrate photonics with complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) electronics technology. One promising solution is to fabricate optical systems at metal/dielectric interfaces, where electromagnetic modes called surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) offer unique opportunities to confine and control light at length scales below 100nm (refs 1, 2). Research groups working in the rapidly developing field of plasmonics have now demonstrated many passive components that suggest the potential of SPPs for applications in sensing and optical communication. Recently, active plasmonic devices based on III-V materials and organic materials have been reported. An electrical source of SPPs was recently demonstrated using organic semiconductors by Koller and colleagues. Here we show that a silicon-based electrical source for SPPs can be fabricated using established low-temperature microtechnology processes that are compatible with back-end CMOS technology.

  7. Process-based upscaling of surface-atmosphere exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keenan, T. F.; Prentice, I. C.; Canadell, J.; Williams, C. A.; Wang, H.; Raupach, M. R.; Collatz, G. J.; Davis, T.; Stocker, B.; Evans, B. J.

    2015-12-01

    Empirical upscaling techniques such as machine learning and data-mining have proven invaluable tools for the global scaling of disparate observations of surface-atmosphere exchange, but are not based on a theoretical understanding of the key processes involved. This makes spatial and temporal extrapolation outside of the training domain difficult at best. There is therefore a clear need for the incorporation of knowledge of ecosystem function, in combination with the strength of data mining. Here, we present such an approach. We describe a novel diagnostic process-based model of global photosynthesis and ecosystem respiration, which is directly informed by a variety of global datasets relevant to ecosystem state and function. We use the model framework to estimate global carbon cycling both spatially and temporally, with a specific focus on the mechanisms responsible for long-term change. Our results show the importance of incorporating process knowledge into upscaling approaches, and highlight the effect of key processes on the terrestrial carbon cycle.

  8. Comparative study of friction between metallic and conventional interactive self-ligating brackets in different alignment conditions

    PubMed Central

    Jakob, Sérgio Ricardo; Matheus, Davison; Jimenez-Pellegrin, Maria Cristina; Turssi, Cecília Pedroso; do Amaral, Flávia Lucisano Botelho

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to compare the friction between three bracket models: conventional stainless steel (Ovation, Dentsply GAC), self-ligating ceramic (In-Ovation, Denstply GAC) and self-ligating stainless steel brackets (In-Ovation R, Dentsply GAC). Methods Five brackets were used for each model. They were bonded to an aluminum prototype that allowed the simulation of four misalignment situations (n = 10). Three of these situations occurred at the initial phase (in which a 0.016-in nickel-titanium wire was used): 1. horizontal; 2. vertical; and 3. simultaneous horizontal/vertical. One of the situations occurred at the final treatment phase: 4. no misalignment (in which a 0.019 x 0.025-inch stainless steel rectangular wire was used). The wires slipped through the brackets and friction was measured by a Universal Testing Machine. Results Analysis of variance followed by Tukey's Test for multiple comparisons (α = 0.05) were applied to assess the results. Significant interaction (p < 0.01) among groups was found. For the tests that simulated initial alignment, Ovation® bracket produced the highest friction. The two self-ligating models resulted in lower and similar values, except for the horizontal situation, in which In-Ovation C® showed lower friction, which was similar to the In-Ovation R® metallic model. For the no misalignment situation, the same results were observed. Conclusion The self-ligating system was superior to the conventional one due to producing less friction. With regard to the material used for manufacturing the brackets, the In-Ovation C® ceramic model showed less friction than the metallic ones. PMID:25162570

  9. Combustion-based power source for Venus surface missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Timothy F.; Paul, Michael V.; Oleson, Steven R.

    2016-10-01

    The National Research Council has identified in situ exploration of Venus as an important mission for the coming decade of NASA's exploration of our solar system (Squyers, 2013 [1]). Heavy cloud cover makes the use of solar photovoltaics extremely problematic for power generation for Venus surface missions. In this paper, we propose a class of planetary exploration missions (for use on Venus and elsewhere) in solar-deprived situations where photovoltaics cannot be used, batteries do not provide sufficient specific energy and mission duration, and nuclear systems may be too costly or complex to justify or simply unavailable. Metal-fueled, combustion-based powerplants have been demonstrated for application in the terrestrial undersea environment. Modified or extended versions of the undersea-based systems may be appropriate for these sunless missions. We describe systems carrying lithium fuel and sulfur-hexafluoride oxidizer that have the potential for many days of operation in the sunless craters of the moon. On Venus a system level specific energy of 240 to 370 We-hr/kg should be possible if the oxidizer is brought from earth. By using either lithium or a magnesium-based alloy fuel, it may be possible to operate a similar system with CO2 derived directly from the Venus atmosphere, thus providing an estimated system specific energy of 1100 We+PV-hr/kg (the subscript refers to both electrical and mechanical power), thereby providing mission durations that enable useful scientific investigation. The results of an analysis performed by the NASA Glenn COMPASS team describe a mission operating at 2.3 kWe+PV for 5 days (120 h), with less than 260 kg power/energy system mass total. This lander would be of a size and cost suitable for a New Frontiers class of mission.

  10. Production of A357 motor mount bracket by the metal compression forming process

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, S.; Brinkman, C.R.; Porter, W.D.; Purgert, R.M.

    1997-09-01

    The use of aluminum alloy castings for safety critical structural components such as engine mount brackets, steering knuckles, and control arms, offers significant opportunities for achieving weight reduction in automobiles, since they are typically about half the weight of the steel, cast iron, or ductile iron component that they replace. Metal Compression Forming (MCF) is a variant of the squeeze casting process, in which molten metal is allowed to solidify under pressure in order to close porosity and form a sound part. However, the MCF process applies pressure on the entire mold face, thereby directing pressure on all regions of the casting and producing a uniformly sound part. The process is capable of producing parts with properties close to those of forgings, while retaining the near net shape, complexity in geometry, and relatively low cost of the casting process. The paper describes the casting process development involved in the production of an aluminum A357 alloy motor mount bracket, including the use of a filling and solidification model to design the gating and determine process parameters. Tensile properties of the component are presented and correlated with those of forged components. Limited fatigue properties obtained by fully reversed strain controlled testing are also presented.

  11. 𝒩 = 2 supersymmetric harmonic oscillator: Basic brackets without canonical conjugate momenta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivas, N.; Shukla, A.; Malik, R. P.

    2015-09-01

    We exploit the ideas of spin-statistics theorem, normal-ordering and the key concepts behind the symmetry principles to derive the canonical (anti)commutators for the case of a one (0 + 1)-dimensional (1D) 𝒩 = 2 supersymmetric (SUSY) harmonic oscillator (HO) without taking the help of the mathematical definition of canonical conjugate momenta with respect to the bosonic and fermionic variables of this toy model for the Hodge theory (where the continuous and discrete symmetries of the theory provide the physical realizations of the de Rham cohomological operators of differential geometry). In our present endeavor, it is the full set of continuous symmetries and their corresponding generators that lead to the derivation of basic (anti)commutators amongst the creation and annihilation operators that appear in the normal mode expansions of the dynamical fermionic and bosonic variables of our present 𝒩 = 2 SUSY theory of a HO. These basic brackets are in complete agreement with such kind of brackets that are derived from the standard canonical method of quantization scheme.

  12. Basic Brackets of a 2D Model for the Hodge Theory Without its Canonical Conjugate Momenta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, R.; Gupta, S.; Malik, R. P.

    2016-06-01

    We deduce the canonical brackets for a two (1+1)-dimensional (2D) free Abelian 1-form gauge theory by exploiting the beauty and strength of the continuous symmetries of a Becchi-Rouet-Stora-Tyutin (BRST) invariant Lagrangian density that respects, in totality, six continuous symmetries. These symmetries entail upon this model to become a field theoretic example of Hodge theory. Taken together, these symmetries enforce the existence of exactly the same canonical brackets amongst the creation and annihilation operators that are found to exist within the standard canonical quantization scheme. These creation and annihilation operators appear in the normal mode expansion of the basic fields of this theory. In other words, we provide an alternative to the canonical method of quantization for our present model of Hodge theory where the continuous internal symmetries play a decisive role. We conjecture that our method of quantization is valid for a class of field theories that are tractable physical examples for the Hodge theory. This statement is true in any arbitrary dimension of spacetime.

  13. Microcantilever-based sensors: effect of morphology, adhesion, and cleanliness of the sensing surface on surface stress.

    PubMed

    Tabard-Cossa, Vincent; Godin, Michel; Burgess, Ian J; Monga, Tanya; Lennox, R Bruce; Grütter, Peter

    2007-11-01

    The surface stress response of micromechanical cantilever-based sensors was studied as a function of the morphology, adhesion, and cleanliness of the gold sensing surface. Two model systems were investigated: the adsorption of alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers at the gas-solid interface and the potential-controlled adsorption of anions at the liquid-solid interface. The potential-induced surface stress, on a smooth and continuous polycrystalline Au(111)-textured microcantilever in 0.1 M HClO4, is in excellent agreement with macroscopic Au(111) single-crystal electrode results. It is shown that ambient contaminants on the sensing surface dramatically alter the surface stress-potential response. This observation can be misinterpreted as evidence that for polycrystalline Au(111) microcantilever electrodes, surface stress is dominated by surface energy change. Results for anions adsorption on gold are in contrast to the gas-phase model system. We demonstrate that the average grain size of the gold sensing surface strongly influences the magnitude of the surface stress change induced by the adsorption of octanethiol. A 25-fold amplification of the change in surface stress is observed on increasing the average gold grain size of the sensing surface from 90 to 500 nm.

  14. The comparison of frictional resistance in titanium, self-ligating stainless steel, and stainless steel brackets using stainless steel and TMA archwires: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Khalid, Syed Altaf; Kumar, Vadivel; Jayaram, Prithviraj

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the study was to compare the frictional resistance of titanium, self-ligating stainless steel, and conventional stainless steel brackets, using stainless steel and titanium molybdenum alloy (TMA) archwires. Materials and Methods: We compared the frictional resistance in 0.018 slot and 0.022 slot of the three brackets – titanium, self-ligating stainless steel, and conventional stainless steel – using stainless steel archwires and TMA archwires. An in vitro study of simulated canine retraction was undertaken to evaluate the difference in frictional resistance between titanium, self-ligating stainless steel, and stainless steel brackets, using stainless steel and TMA archwires. Results and Conclusion: We compared the frictional resistance of titanium, self-ligating stainless steel, and conventional stainless steel brackets, using stainless steel and TMA archwires, with the help of Instron Universal Testing Machine. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), Student's “t” test, and post hoc multiple range test at level of <0.05 showed statistically significant difference in the mean values of all groups. Results demonstrated that the titanium, self-ligating stainless steel, and stainless steel brackets of 0.018-inch and 0.022-inch slot had no significant variations in frictional résistance. The self-ligating bracket with TMA archwires showed relatively less frictional resistance compared with the other groups. The titanium bracket with TMA archwires showed relatively less frictional resistance compared with the stainless steel brackets. PMID:23066253

  15. Global surface-based cloud observation for ISCCP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Visual observations of cloud cover are hindered at night due to inadequate illumination of the clouds. This usually leads to an underestimation of the average cloud cover at night, especially for the amounts of middle and high clouds, in climatologies on surface observations. The diurnal cycles of cloud amounts, if based on all the surface observations, are therefore in error, but they can be obtained more accurately if the nighttime observations are screened to select those made under sufficient moonlight. Ten years of nighttime weather observations from the northern hemisphere in December were classified according to the illuminance of moonlight or twilight on the cloud tops, and a threshold level of illuminance was determined, above which the clouds are apparently detected adequately. This threshold corresponds to light from a full moon at an elevation angle of 6 degrees or from a partial moon at higher elevation, or twilight from the sun less than 9 degrees below the horizon. It permits the use of about 38% of the observations made with the sun below the horizon. The computed diurnal cycles of total cloud cover are altered considerably when this moonlight criterion is imposed. Maximum cloud cover over much of the ocean is now found to be at night or in the morning, whereas computations obtained without benefit of the moonlight criterion, as in our published atlases, showed the time of maximum to be noon or early afternoon in many regions. Cloud cover is greater at night than during the day over the open oceans far from the continents, particularly in summer. However, near noon maxima are still evident in the coastal regions, so that the global annual average oceanic cloud cover is still slightly greater during the day than at night, by 0.3%. Over land, where daytime maxima are still obtained but with reduced amplitude, average cloud cover is 3.3% greater during the daytime. The diurnal cycles of total cloud cover we obtain are compared with those of ISCCP for a

  16. Surface modification and chemistry of hematite-based catalysts for water oxidation: Model surfaces, nanomaterials, and thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Peng

    Hematite-based electrocatalysts are widely used for water oxidation, but these catalysts suffer from its low reaction kinetics. To help elucidate detailed reaction mechanisms associated with water oxidation, water chemisorption and reaction as well as structural changes induced by Ni incorporation into the alpha-Fe2O3(0001) surface was studied. Incorporation of Ni into the near-surface region of hematite changes the structure of the (0001) surface by the formation of FeO-like domains on the topmost layer. Electrochemical measurements demonstrated that Ni incorporation leads to higher current density and lower onset potential than the unmodified alpha-Fe 2O3 surface. To extend the surface science study to real catalysts, hematite nanocrystals were synthesized with continuous tuning of the aspect-ratio and fine control of the surface area ratio (from 98% to 30%) of the (0001) facet with respect to other surfaces. Ni doping forms a uniformly doped NixFe 2-xO3 surface overlayer that improves the electrocatalytic activity of water oxidation. The enhancement of water oxidation activity by Ni-doping increased as the surface area ratio of the (0001) facet of hematite nanocrystals increased, consistent with the theoretical predictions and surface science studies. Then, a composite oxide film photoelectrode comprised of alpha-Fe 2O3 and WO3 were prepared, and exhibited a water oxidation photocurrent onset potential as low as 0.43 V vs. RHE. This result represents one of the lowest onset potentials measured for hematite-based PEC water oxidation systems. The composition of the films differs between the surfaces and bulk, with tungsten found to be concentrated in the surface region. Post-reaction Raman spectroscopy characterization demonstrates that water interacts with surface WO3 crystals, an event that is associated with the formation of a hydrated form of the oxide. Lastly, the surface chemistry of H2O on hematite nanoplates is investigated by studying water adsorption and

  17. A Slow Retrieval Algorithm for Satellite and Surface Based Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, C.; Flittner, D.

    2007-01-01

    We present results of a retrieval algorithm for satellite and ground based instruments using the Arizona radiative transfer code. A state vector describing the atmospheric and surface condition is iteratively modified until the calculated radiances match the observed values. Elements of the state vector include: aerosol concentrations, radius, optical properties, mass-weighted altitudes, chlorophyll concentration and wind speed. While computationally expensive, many assumptions used in other retrieval algorithms are not invoked. We present co-located retrievals for MODIS, SEAWIFS and nearby AERONET sites. MODIS AQUA and SEA WIFS: Ten MODIS (.412 - 2.110 microns) and eight SEA WIFS (.412-.865 microns) radiances (.412-.865 microns) include channels where aerosols absorb and reflect radiation. We focus on retrieving bio-mass burning aerosols that are advected over open ocean. Since chlorophyll absorbs at frequencies where black carbon absorbs, our retrieval algorithm accounts for chlorophyll absorption by simultaneously retrieving both aerosol and chlorophyll amount. Our retrieved chlorophyll concentrations are similar to those from the Ocean Color Group. AERONET: Both Almucantar and Principle plane radiances are used to retrieve the state of the atmosphere and ocean conditions. Our retrieved aerosol size distributions and optical properties are consistent with the aerosol inversions from the AERONET group.

  18. Assessing the antimicrobial activity of polyisoprene based surfaces.

    PubMed

    Badawy, Hope; Brunellière, Jérôme; Veryaskina, Marina; Brotons, Guillaume; Sablé, Sophie; Lanneluc, Isabelle; Lambert, Kelly; Marmey, Pascal; Milsted, Amy; Cutright, Teresa; Nourry, Arnaud; Mouget, Jean-Luc; Pasetto, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    There has been an intense research effort in the last decades in the field of biofouling prevention as it concerns many aspects of everyday life and causes problems to devices, the environment, and human health. Many different antifouling and antimicrobial materials have been developed to struggle against bacteria and other micro- and macro-organism attachment to different surfaces. However the "miracle solution" has still to be found. The research presented here concerns the synthesis of bio-based polymeric materials and the biological tests that showed their antifouling and, at the same time, antibacterial activity. The raw material used for the coating synthesis was natural rubber. The polyisoprene chains were fragmented to obtain oligomers, which had reactive chemical groups at their chain ends, therefore they could be modified to insert polymerizable and biocidal groups. Films were obtained by radical photopolymerization of the natural rubber derived oligomers and their structure was altered, in order to understand the mechanism of attachment inhibition and to increase the efficiency of the anti-biofouling action. The adhesion of three species of pathogenic bacteria and six strains of marine bacteria was studied. The coatings were able to inhibit bacterial attachment by contact, as it was verified that no detectable leaching of toxic molecules occurred. PMID:25706513

  19. Surface characterization of hemodialysis membranes based on streaming potential measurements.

    PubMed

    Werner, C; Jacobasch, H J; Reichelt, G

    1995-01-01

    Hemodialysis membranes made from cellulose (CUPROPHAN, HEMOPHAN) and sulfonated polyethersulfone (SPES) were characterized using the streaming potential technique to determine the zeta potential at their interfaces against well-defined aqueous solutions of varied pH and potassium chloride concentrations. Streaming potential measurements enable distinction between different membrane materials. In addition to parameters of the electrochemical double layer at membrane interfaces, thermodynamic characteristics of adsorption of different solved species were evaluated. For that aim a description of double layer formation as suggested by Börner and Jacobasch (in: Electrokinetic Phenomena, p. 231. Institut für Technologie der Polymere, Dresden (1989)) was applied which is based on the generally accepted model of the electrochemical double layer according to Stern (Z. Elektrochemie 30, 508 (1924)) and Grahame (Chem. Rev. 41, 441 (1947)). The membranes investigated show different surface acidic/basic and polar/nonpolar behavior. Furthermore, alterations of membrane interfaces through adsorption processes of components of biologically relevant solutions were shown to be detectable by streaming potential measurements.

  20. Graphene-based active slow surface plasmon polaritons

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hua; Zeng, Chao; Zhang, Qiming; Liu, Xueming; Hossain, Md Muntasir; Reineck, Philipp; Gu, Min

    2015-01-01

    Finding new ways to control and slow down the group velocity of light in media remains a major challenge in the field of optics. For the design of plasmonic slow light structures, graphene represents an attractive alternative to metals due to its strong field confinement, comparably low ohmic loss and versatile tunability. Here we propose a novel nanostructure consisting of a monolayer graphene on a silicon based graded grating structure. An external gate voltage is applied to graphene and silicon, which are separated by a spacer layer of silica. Theoretical and numerical results demonstrate that the structure exhibits an ultra-high slowdown factor above 450 for the propagation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) excited in graphene, which also enables the spatially resolved trapping of light. Slowdown and trapping occur in the mid-infrared wavelength region within a bandwidth of ~2.1 μm and on a length scale less than 1/6 of the operating wavelength. The slowdown factor can be precisely tuned simply by adjusting the external gate voltage, offering a dynamic pathway for the release of trapped SPPs at room temperature. The presented results will enable the development of highly tunable optoelectronic devices such as plasmonic switches and buffers. PMID:25676462

  1. Assessing the Antimicrobial Activity of Polyisoprene Based Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Badawy, Hope; Brunellière, Jérôme; Veryaskina, Marina; Brotons, Guillaume; Sablé, Sophie; Lanneluc, Isabelle; Lambert, Kelly; Marmey, Pascal; Milsted, Amy; Cutright, Teresa; Nourry, Arnaud; Mouget, Jean-Luc; Pasetto, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    There has been an intense research effort in the last decades in the field of biofouling prevention as it concerns many aspects of everyday life and causes problems to devices, the environment, and human health. Many different antifouling and antimicrobial materials have been developed to struggle against bacteria and other micro- and macro-organism attachment to different surfaces. However the “miracle solution” has still to be found. The research presented here concerns the synthesis of bio-based polymeric materials and the biological tests that showed their antifouling and, at the same time, antibacterial activity. The raw material used for the coating synthesis was natural rubber. The polyisoprene chains were fragmented to obtain oligomers, which had reactive chemical groups at their chain ends, therefore they could be modified to insert polymerizable and biocidal groups. Films were obtained by radical photopolymerization of the natural rubber derived oligomers and their structure was altered, in order to understand the mechanism of attachment inhibition and to increase the efficiency of the anti-biofouling action. The adhesion of three species of pathogenic bacteria and six strains of marine bacteria was studied. The coatings were able to inhibit bacterial attachment by contact, as it was verified that no detectable leaching of toxic molecules occurred. PMID:25706513

  2. Safely Conducting Airport Surface Trajectory-Based Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Denise R.; Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Bailey, Randall E.; Arthur, Jarvis J., III; Barnes, James R.

    2014-01-01

    A piloted simulation study was conducted at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center (LaRC) to evaluate the ability to safely conduct surface trajectory-based operations (STBO) by assessing the impact of providing traffic intent information, conflict detection and resolution (CD&R) system capability, and the display of STBO guidance to the flight crew on both head-down and head-up displays (HUD). Nominal and off-nominal conflict scenarios were conducted using 12 airline crews operating in a simulated Memphis International Airport terminal environment. The flight crews met their required time-of-arrival at route end within 10 seconds on 98 percent of the trials, well within the acceptable performance bounds of 15 seconds. Traffic intent information was found to be useful in determining the intent of conflict traffic, with graphical presentation preferred. The CD&R system was only minimally effective during STBO because the prevailing visibility was sufficient for visual detection of incurring traffic. Overall, the pilots indicated STBO increased general situation awareness but also negatively impacted workload, reduced the ability to watch for other traffic, and increased head-down time.

  3. Gis-Based Surface Analysis of Archaeological Finds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovács, K.; Hanke, K.; Moser, M.

    2011-09-01

    The international research project HiMAT (History of Mining Activities in the Tyrol and adjacent areas) is dedicated to the study of mining history in the Eastern Alps by various scientific disciplines. The aim of this program is the analysis of the mining activities' impacts on environment and human societies. Unfortunately, there is only a limited number of specific regions (e.g. Mitterberg) to offer possibilities to investigate the former mining expansions. Within this multidisciplinary project, the archaeological sites and finds are analyzed by the Surveying and Geoinformation Unit at the University of Innsbruck. This paper shows data fusion of different surveying and post-processing methods to achieve a photo-realistic digital 3D model of one of these most important finds, the Bronze Age sluice box from the Mitterberg. The applied workflow consists of four steps: 1. Point cloud processing, 2. Meshing of the point clouds and editing of the models, 3. Image orientation, bundle and image adjustment, 4. Model texturing. In addition, a short range laser scanning survey was organized before the conservation process of this wooden find. More accurate research opportunities were offered after this detailed documentation of the sluice box, for example the reconstruction of the broken parts and the surface analysis of this archaeological object were implemented using these high-resolution datasets. In conclusion, various unperceived patterns of the wooden boards were visualized by the GIS-based tool marks investigation.

  4. Detection of tonic epileptic seizures based on surface electromyography.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Sigge N; Conradsen, Isa; Beniczky, Sandor; Sorensen, Helge B D

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to design an algorithm for detection of tonic seizures based on surface electromyography signals from the deltoids. A successful algorithm has a future prospect of being implemented in a wearable device as part of an alarm system. This has already been done for generalized tonic-clonic seizures, and the hypothesis was that some of the same characteristics could be found for tonic seizures. The signals were pre-processed by a high-pass filter to remove low frequency noise such as movement artifacts. Several different features were investigated, including kurtosis, median frequency, zero crossing rate and approximate entropy. These features were used as input in the random forest classifier to decide if a data segment was from a seizure or not. The goal was to develop a generic algorithm for all tonic seizures, but better results were achieved when certain parameters were adapted specifically for each patient. With patient specific parameters the algorithm obtained a sensitivity of 100% for four of six patients with false detection rates between 0.08 and 7.90 per hour. PMID:25570115

  5. Acid base properties of cyanobacterial surfaces. II: Silica as a chemical stressor influencing cell surface reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalonde, S. V.; Smith, D. S.; Owttrim, G. W.; Konhauser, K. O.

    2008-03-01

    Bacteria grow in complex solutions where the adsorption of aqueous species and nucleation of mineral phases on the cell surface may interfere with membrane-dependent homeostatic functions. While previous investigations have provided evidence that bacteria may alter their surface chemical properties in response to environmental stimuli, to our knowledge no effort has been made to evaluate surface compositional changes resulting from non-nutritional chemical stresses within a quantitative framework applicable to surface complexation modeling. We consider here the influence of exposure to silica on cyanobacterial surface chemistry, particularly in light of the propensity for cyanobacteria to become silicified in geothermal environments. Using data modeled from over 50 potentiometric titrations of the unsheathed cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120, we find that both abiotic geochemical and biotic biochemical-assimilatory factors have important and different effects on cell surface chemistry. Changes in functional group distribution that resulted from growth by different nitrogen assimilation pathways were greatest in the absence of dissolved silica and less important in its presence. Furthermore, out of the three nitrogen assimilation pathways investigated, in terms of surface functional group distribution, nitrate-reducing cultures were least sensitive, and ammonium-assimilating cultures were most sensitive, to changes in media silica concentration. When functional group distributions were plotted as a function of silica concentration, it appears that, with higher silica concentrations, basic groups (p Ka > 7) increase in concentration relative to acidic groups (p Ka < 7), and the total ligand densities (on a per-weight basis) decreased. The results imply a decrease in both the magnitude and density of surface charge as the net result of growth at high silica concentrations. Thus, Anabaena sp. appears to actively respond to growth in silicifying solutions by

  6. Measurement of Orthodontic Bracket Tie Wing Elastic and Plastic Deformation by Arch Wire Torque Expression Utilizing an Optical Image Correlation Technique

    PubMed Central

    Lacoursiere, Ryan A.; Nobes, David S.; Homeniuk, Darren L. N.; Carey, Jason P.; Badawi, Hisham H.; Major, Paul W.

    2010-01-01

    Orthodontic lingual root movement (torque) is an important aspect of treatment biomechanics and is typically achieved by torsion of a rectangular wire within the orthodontic bracket slot which introduces a force couple. The magnitude of the force moment achieved by wire torsion may be influenced by deformation of the orthodontic bracket. A device utilizing an optical image correlation technique has been developed to accurately quantify bracket slot dimensional changes during application of wire torsion. Simultaneous torque moment magnitude, degrees of wire twist, and bracket slot dimension data can be gathered. Bracket tie wing elastic deformation when loaded was demonstrated and plastic deformation was also observed with a single rotation of the wire. PMID:20948571

  7. Deep subwavelength waveguiding and focusing based on designer surface plasmons.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wangshi; Eldaiki, Omar M; Yang, Ruoxi; Lu, Zhaolin

    2010-09-27

    We experimentally demonstrate focusing and guiding electromagnetic (EM) waves in a designer surface plasmonic waveguide with deep subwavelength mode cross section. Our experiments show that a metal grating with suitable parameters, functioning as a designer surface plasmonic waveguide, can support deep subwavelength surface modes and the width of the modes can be squeezed also into deep subwavelength by tapering the width of the waveguide. The results provide a new insight into deep subwavelength waveguiding and focusing.

  8. An integrated software suite for surface-based analyses of cerebral cortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Essen, D. C.; Drury, H. A.; Dickson, J.; Harwell, J.; Hanlon, D.; Anderson, C. H.

    2001-01-01

    The authors describe and illustrate an integrated trio of software programs for carrying out surface-based analyses of cerebral cortex. The first component of this trio, SureFit (Surface Reconstruction by Filtering and Intensity Transformations), is used primarily for cortical segmentation, volume visualization, surface generation, and the mapping of functional neuroimaging data onto surfaces. The second component, Caret (Computerized Anatomical Reconstruction and Editing Tool Kit), provides a wide range of surface visualization and analysis options as well as capabilities for surface flattening, surface-based deformation, and other surface manipulations. The third component, SuMS (Surface Management System), is a database and associated user interface for surface-related data. It provides for efficient insertion, searching, and extraction of surface and volume data from the database.

  9. Reproducibility of UAV-based earth surface topography based on structure-from-motion algorithms.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clapuyt, François; Vanacker, Veerle; Van Oost, Kristof

    2014-05-01

    A representation of the earth surface at very high spatial resolution is crucial to accurately map small geomorphic landforms with high precision. Very high resolution digital surface models (DSM) can then be used to quantify changes in earth surface topography over time, based on differencing of DSMs taken at various moments in time. However, it is compulsory to have both high accuracy for each topographic representation and consistency between measurements over time, as DSM differencing automatically leads to error propagation. This study investigates the reproducibility of reconstructions of earth surface topography based on structure-from-motion (SFM) algorithms. To this end, we equipped an eight-propeller drone with a standard reflex camera. This equipment can easily be deployed in the field, as it is a lightweight, low-cost system in comparison with classic aerial photo surveys and terrestrial or airborne LiDAR scanning. Four sets of aerial photographs were created for one test field. The sets of airphotos differ in focal length, and viewing angles, i.e. nadir view and ground-level view. In addition, the importance of the accuracy of ground control points for the construction of a georeferenced point cloud was assessed using two different GPS devices with horizontal accuracy at resp. the sub-meter and sub-decimeter level. Airphoto datasets were processed with SFM algorithm and the resulting point clouds were georeferenced. Then, the surface representations were compared with each other to assess the reproducibility of the earth surface topography. Finally, consistency between independent datasets is discussed.

  10. Analysis of surface asperity flattening based on two different methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hejie; Öchsner, Andreas; Ni, Guowei; Wei, Dongbin; Jiang, Zhengyi

    2016-11-01

    The stress state is an important parameter in metal forming processes, which significantly influences the strain state and microstructure of products, affecting their surface qualities. In order to make the metal products have a good surface quality, the surface stress state must be optimised. In this study, two classical methods, the upper bound method and the crystal plasticity finite element method, were investigated. The differences between the two methods were discussed in regard to the model, the velocity field, and the strain field. Then the related surface roughness is deduced.

  11. Automatic vertebral identification using surface-based registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herring, Jeannette L.; Dawant, Benoit M.

    2000-06-01

    This work introduces an enhancement to currently existing methods of intra-operative vertebral registration by allowing the portion of the spinal column surface that correctly matches a set of physical vertebral points to be automatically selected from several possible choices. Automatic selection is made possible by the shape variations that exist among lumbar vertebrae. In our experiments, we register vertebral points representing physical space to spinal column surfaces extracted from computed tomography images. The vertebral points are taken from the posterior elements of a single vertebra to represent the region of surgical interest. The surface is extracted using an improved version of the fully automatic marching cubes algorithm, which results in a triangulated surface that contains multiple vertebrae. We find the correct portion of the surface by registering the set of physical points to multiple surface areas, including all vertebral surfaces that potentially match the physical point set. We then compute the standard deviation of the surface error for the set of points registered to each vertebral surface that is a possible match, and the registration that corresponds to the lowest standard deviation designates the correct match. We have performed our current experiments on two plastic spine phantoms and one patient.

  12. Corrosion protection of aluminum by silane-based surface treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jun

    The possibility of using silane coupling agents as replacements for chromate treatments was investigated for aluminum substrates. In order to understand the influence of deposition parameters on silane film formation, pure Al substrates were used to study the interaction between silane coupling agents and aluminum surfaces. The silane films formed on pure A1 substrates from aqueous solutions were characterized by ellipsometry, contact angle measurements, reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Time-of Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry. The deposition parameters studied include solution concentration, solution dipping time and pH value of the applied solution. It appears that silane film formation involved a true equilibrium of hydrolysis and condensation in aqueous solution. It has been found that the silane film thickness obtained depends primarily on the solution concentration and is independent of the solution dipping time. The molecular orientation of the applied silane film is determined by the pH value of the applied silane solution and the isoelectic point of the metal substrates. The deposition window in terms of pH value for A1 substrates is between 4 and 7. The total surface energy of silane-coated A1 substrate decreases with film aging time, the decreased rate, however, is determined by the nature of silane coupling agents. Based on the results obtained above, a pretreatment, which involved two-step bis-(triethoxysilyl) ethane and gamma-aminopropyltriethoxysilane, was developed for Al substrates with commercial polyester and polyurethane paints. The results of salt spray testing, cyclic corrosion testing, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy showed that this treatment provided the same level of corrosion performance as the treatment of phosphating plus a final chromate rinse. The likely reasons for excellent performance are discussed in terms of the physical and chemical characteristics of the

  13. Venus surface investigation based on VIRTIS measurements on Venus Express

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Gabriele; Haus, Rainer; Döhler, Wolfgang; Kappel, David; Piccioni, Giuseppe; Drossart, Pierre

    The dense atmosphere of Venus prevented systematic studies of its surface at optical wavelengths in the past. The discovery of near infrared nightside atmospheric windows has opened a new challenge for detailed surface studies. The Visible and Infrared Thermal Imaging Spectrometer (VIRTIS) on Venus Express is the first experiment collecting continuously nightside surface emission data from the planet. The observed high variability of measured signatures is mainly due to spatial variations of cloud optical depth and surface elevation. The investigation of surface properties requires a convergent approach of radiative transfer simulations and VIR- TIS data analyses. Therefore, a selection of orbits with well calibrated data over the northern hemisphere was performed for footprints that cover a maximum range of surface elevation variations. Radiative transfer calculations demonstrate that the conservative character of cloud multiple scattering below 2 µm and a strong dependence of radiance ratios on surface elevation in this spectral region allow the mapping of surface topography and a retrieval of the surface temperature. To the first order, the surface temperature is a function of ground elevation. Small deviations from this first order dependence have been identified that are possibly due to different surface materials. 1 Institut f¨r Planetologie, Westf¨lische Wilhelms-Universit¨t M¨nster, Wilhelm-Klemm-Str.10, u a a u 48129 M¨nster, Germany u 2 German PlaceNameAerospace PlaceTypeCenter (DLR), Remote Sensing Technology Institute, Dpt. Marine Remote Sensing, Rutherfordstrasse 2, 12489 CityplaceBerlin, countryregionGermany 3 German PlaceNameAerospace PlaceTypeCenter (DLR), Institute for Planetary Research, Rutherfordstrasse 2, 12489 CityplaceBerlin, country-regionGermany 4 LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, UPMC, Université Paris-Diderot, 5 place Jules Janssen, e 92195 Meudon, France 5 INAF-IASF (Instituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica), via

  14. Modeling description and spectroscopic evidence of surface acid-base properties of natural illites.

    PubMed

    Liu, W

    2001-12-01

    The acid-base properties of natural illites from different areas were studied by potentiometric titrations. The acidimetric supernatant was regarded as the system blank to calculate the surface site concentration due to consideration of substrate dissolution during the prolonged acidic titration. The following surface complexation model could give a good interpretation of the surface acid-base reactions of the aqueous illites:

  15. Flow condensation on copper-based nanotextured superhydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Torresin, Daniele; Tiwari, Manish K; Del Col, Davide; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2013-01-15

    Superhydrophobic surfaces have shown excellent ability to promote dropwise condensation with high droplet mobility, leading to enhanced surface thermal transport. To date, however, it is unclear how superhydrophobic surfaces would perform under the stringent flow condensation conditions of saturated vapor at high temperature, which can affect superhydrophobicity. Here, we investigate this issue employing "all-copper" superhydrophobic surfaces with controlled nanostructuring for minimal thermal resistance. Flow condensation tests performed with saturated vapor at a high temperature (110 °C) showed the condensing drops penetrate the surface texture (i.e., attain the Wenzel state with lower droplet mobility). At the same time, the vapor shear helped ameliorate the mobility and enhanced the thermal transport. At the high end of the examined vapor velocity range, a heat flux of ~600 kW m(-2) was measured at 10 K subcooling and 18 m s(-1) vapor velocity. This clearly highlights the excellent potential of a nanostructured superhydrophobic surface in flow condensation applications. The surfaces sustained dropwise condensation and vapor shear for five days, following which mechanical degradation caused a transition to filmwise condensation. Overall, our results underscore the need to investigate superhydrophobic surfaces under stringent and realistic flow condensation conditions before drawing conclusions regarding their performance in practically relevant condensation applications.

  16. Surface Reactions Studied by Synchrotron Based Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hrbek, J.

    1998-11-03

    The goal of this article is to illustrate the use of synchrotron radiation for investigating surface chemical reactions by photoelectron spectroscopy. A brief introduction and background information is followed by examples of layer resolved spectroscopy, oxidation and sulfidation of metallic, semiconducting and oxide surfaces.

  17. Acid base properties of cyanobacterial surfaces I: Influences of growth phase and nitrogen metabolism on cell surface reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalonde, S. V.; Smith, D. S.; Owttrim, G. W.; Konhauser, K. O.

    2008-03-01

    Significant efforts have been made to elucidate the chemical properties of bacterial surfaces for the purposes of refining surface complexation models that can account for their metal sorptive behavior under diverse conditions. However, the influence of culturing conditions on surface chemical parameters that are modeled from the potentiometric titration of bacterial surfaces has received little regard. While culture age and metabolic pathway have been considered as factors potentially influencing cell surface reactivity, statistical treatments have been incomplete and variability has remained unconfirmed. In this study, we employ potentiometric titrations to evaluate variations in bacterial surface ligand distributions using live cells of the sheathless cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120, grown under a variety of batch culture conditions. We evaluate the ability for a single set of modeled parameters, describing acid-base surface properties averaged over all culture conditions tested, to accurately account for the ligand distributions modeled for each individual culture condition. In addition to considering growth phase, we assess the role of the various assimilatory nitrogen metabolisms available to this organism as potential determinants of surface reactivity. We observe statistically significant variability in site distribution between the majority of conditions assessed. By employing post hoc Tukey-Kramer analysis for all possible pair-wise condition comparisons, we conclude that the average parameters are inadequate for the accurate chemical description of this cyanobacterial surface. It was determined that for this Gram-negative bacterium in batch culture, ligand distributions were influenced to a greater extent by nitrogen assimilation pathway than by growth phase.

  18. Surface effect vehicles and surface effect: General studies. Citations from the NTIS data base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habercom, G. E., Jr.

    1980-08-01

    The bibliography contains 180 citations in which the design of surface effect vehicles, their utilization, and their aerodynamic characteristics are investigated. Vehicles or ships in marine environments are not included.

  19. Higher-order syzygies for the bracket algebra and for the ring of coordinates of the Grassmanian.

    PubMed Central

    Anick, D; Rota, G C

    1991-01-01

    A Poincaré resolution is given for the supersymmetric ring of brackets over a signed alphabet. As a consequence, a resolution is found for the ring of coordinates of the Grassmanian variety in projective space over any infinite field. PMID:11607210

  20. In vitro evaluation of resistance to sliding in self-ligating and conventional bracket systems during dental alignment

    PubMed Central

    Cordasco, Giancarlo; Lo Giudice, Antonino; Militi, Angela; Nucera, Riccardo; Triolo, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the resistance to sliding (RS) in self-ligating and conventional ligation bracket systems at 5 different second-order bracket angulations by using low-stiffness alignment wires in a 3-bracket experimental model and to verify the performance of the main RS components in both systems when these wires are used. Methods Interactive self-ligating brackets with closed and open slides were used for the self-ligating (SL) and conventional ligation (CL) groups, respectively; elastomeric ligatures (1 mm inner diameter) were used in the latter system. The alignment wire used was 0.014 inch heat-activated NiTi (austenitic finish temperature set at 36℃ by the manufacturer). A custom-made testing machine was used to measure frictional resistance. Tests were repeated 5 times at every angulation simulated. All data were analyzed statistically. Results The RS increased significantly with increasing angulation in both SL and CL groups (p < 0.0001). However, the RS values were significantly higher at every angulation (p < 0.0001) in the CL group. Conclusions Despite the relevance of the binding phenomenon, ligation forces predominantly affect the RS when low-stiffness alignment wires are used. PMID:23112953

  1. Formulation of singular theories in a partial Hamiltonian formalism using a new bracket and multi-time dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duplij, Steven

    2015-09-01

    A formulation of singular classical theories (determined by degenerate Lagrangians) without constraints is presented. A partial Hamiltonian formalism in the phase space having an initially arbitrary number of momenta (which can be smaller than the number of velocities) is proposed. The equations of motion become first-order differential equations, and they coincide with those of multi-time dynamics, if a certain condition is imposed. In a singular theory, this condition is fulfilled in the case of the coincidence of the number of generalized momenta with the rank of the Hessian matrix. The noncanonical generalized velocities satisfy a system of linear algebraic equations, which allows an appropriate classification of singular theories (gauge and nongauge). A new antisymmetric bracket (similar to the Poisson bracket) is introduced, which describes the time evolution of physical quantities in a singular theory. The origin of constraints is shown to be a consequence of the (unneeded in our formulation) extension of the phase space, when the new bracket transforms into the Dirac bracket. Quantization is briefly discussed.

  2. Moire based optical surface profiler for the minting industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oreb, Bozenko F.; Larkin, Kieran G.; Fairman, Philip S.; Ghaffari, M.

    1992-12-01

    An Optical Surface Profiler (OSP130) has been developed for the metrology of master tooling used in the coin stamping process. The OSP130 measure, in a non-contacting manner, the surface relief of tools ranging in diameter from 10 mm to 300 mm. Rapid measurements are performed simultaneously on a large grid of equispaced points across the surface of the tool. From the relief data, many parameters such as the location of high and low features, volume of impression, background curvatures and various diameters can be quickly evaluated. The technique used is phase-shifting moire profilometry. A white light projector illuminates a periodic transmission grating which is then imaged onto the object surface. The light pattern on the object is viewed by a high resolution TV camera connected to a computer. The grating is shifted under computer control to a number of positions and corresponding intensity images of the deformed pattern on the object surface are stored in the computer. From the intensity images a phase map, representing the deformation of the periodic grating by the surface relief, is evaluated and compared with an undeformed pattern. This results in an accurate contour map of the surface relief with an uncertainty less than 1% of the relief excursion on the object. Details of the instrument and its use at the Royal Australian Mint are presented.

  3. Modeling the acid-base surface chemistry of montmorillonite.

    PubMed

    Bourg, Ian C; Sposito, Garrison; Bourg, Alain C M

    2007-08-15

    Proton uptake on montmorillonite edge surfaces can control pore water pH, solute adsorption, dissolution kinetics and clay colloid behavior in engineered clay barriers and natural weathering environments. Knowledge of proton uptake reactions, however, is currently limited by strong discrepancies between reported montmorillonite titration data sets and by conflicting estimates of edge structure, reactivity and electrostatics. In the present study, we show that the apparent discrepancy between titration data sets results in large part from the widespread use of an erroneous assumption of zero specific net proton surface charge at the onset of titration. Using a novel simulation scheme involving a surface chemistry model to simulate both pretreatment and titration, we find that montmorillonite edge surface chemistry models that account for the "spillover" of electrostatic potential from basal onto edge surfaces and for the stabilization of deprotonated Al-Si bridging sites through bond-length relaxation at the edge surface can reproduce key features of the best available experimental titration data (the influence of pretreatment conditions on experimental results, the absence of a point of zero salt effect, buffer capacity in the acidic pH range). However, no combination of current models of edge surface structure, reactivity and electrostatics can quantitatively predict, without fitted parameters, the experimental titration data over the entire range of pH (4.5 to 9) and ionic strength (0.001 to 0.5 mol dm(-3)) covered by available data.

  4. Ground-based measurement of surface temperature and thermal emissivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owe, M.; Van De Griend, A. A.

    1994-01-01

    Motorized cable systems for transporting infrared thermometers have been used successfully during several international field campaigns. Systems may be configured with as many as four thermal sensors up to 9 m above the surface, and traverse a 30 m transect. Ground and canopy temperatures are important for solving the surface energy balance. The spatial variability of surface temperature is often great, so that averaged point measurements result in highly inaccurate areal estimates. The cable systems are ideal for quantifying both temporal and spatial variabilities. Thermal emissivity is also necessary for deriving the absolute physical temperature, and measurements may be made with a portable measuring box.

  5. Root resorption, treatment time and extraction rate during orthodontic treatment with self-ligating and conventional brackets

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction This study determined the amount and severity of EARR (external apical root resorption) after orthodontic treatment with self-ligating (SL) and conventional (Non-SL) brackets. Differences regarding rate of extraction cases, appointments and treatment time were evaluated. Material and methods 213 patients with a mean age of 12.4 ± 2.2 years were evaluated retrospectively. The treatments were performed with SL brackets (n = 139, Smartclip, 3 M Unitek, USA) or Non-SL brackets (n = 74, Victory Series, 3 M Unitek, USA). Measurements of the crown and root length of the incisors were taken using panoramic radiographs. Three-factor analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed for an appliance effect. Results There was no difference between patients treated with Non-SL or SL brackets regarding the amount (in percentage) of EARR (Non-SL: 4.5 ± 6.6 vs. SL: 3.0 ± 5.6). Occurrence of severe EARR (sEARR) did also not differ between the two groups (Non-SL 0.5 vs. SL: 0.3). The percentage of patients with need of tooth extraction for treatment (Non SL: 8.1 vs. SL: 6.9) and the number of appointments (Non-SL: 12.4 ± 3.4 vs. SL: 13.9 ± 3.3) did not show any differences. The treatment time was shorter with Non-SL brackets (Non-SL: 18.1 ± 5.3 vs. SL: 20.7 ± 4.9 months). Conclusions This is the largest study showing that there is no difference in the amount of EARR, number of appointments and extraction rate between conventional and self-ligating brackets. For the first time we could demonstrate that occurrence of sEARR does not differ between the two types of brackets. PMID:24456620

  6. An Interacting Gauge Field Theoretic Model for Hodge Theory: Basic Canonical Brackets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    R., Kumar; Gupta, S.; R. P., Malik

    2014-06-01

    We derive the basic canonical brackets amongst the creation and annihilation operators for a two (1 + 1)-dimensional (2D) gauge held theoretic model of an interacting Hodge theory where a U(1) gauge field (Aμ) is coupled with the fermionic Dirac fields (ψ and bar psi). In this derivation, we exploit the spin-statistics theorem, normal ordering and the strength of the underlying six infinitesimal continuous symmetries (and the concept of their generators) that are present in the theory. We do not use the definition of the canonical conjugate momenta (corresponding to the basic fields of the theory) anywhere in our whole discussion. Thus, we conjecture that our present approach provides an alternative to the canonical method of quantization for a class of gauge field theories that are physical examples of Hodge theory where the continuous symmetries (and corresponding generators) provide the physical realizations of the de Rham cohomological operators of differential geometry at the algebraic level.

  7. Esthetic dentistry for multiple gingival recession cases: Coronally advanced flap with bracket application

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Minkle; Saini, Ashish; Anand, Vishal; Govila, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of gingival recession is essential to rectify the esthetic and functional deficiencies of the patient and to combat further periodontal destruction. However, treating multiple recession cases is quite challenging, and therefore requires constant modifications of the prevalent treatment strategies as per the severity of the condition. The objective of this case report was to evaluate the effectiveness of coronally advanced flap (CAF) technique without vertical incisions using CAF brackets (CAF+B) for treating a patient presenting with class II gingival recession defects in relation to maxillary anteriors. Complete root coverage was observed, and the results were consistent even after 6 months. The current case report demonstrates good outcomes of the CAF + B technique without the use of any additional soft tissue grafts or vertical incisions, therefore, endorsing the promising potential of the CAF + B technique in multiple gingival recession cases. PMID:27143837

  8. Esthetic dentistry for multiple gingival recession cases: Coronally advanced flap with bracket application.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Minkle; Saini, Ashish; Anand, Vishal; Govila, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of gingival recession is essential to rectify the esthetic and functional deficiencies of the patient and to combat further periodontal destruction. However, treating multiple recession cases is quite challenging, and therefore requires constant modifications of the prevalent treatment strategies as per the severity of the condition. The objective of this case report was to evaluate the effectiveness of coronally advanced flap (CAF) technique without vertical incisions using CAF brackets (CAF+B) for treating a patient presenting with class II gingival recession defects in relation to maxillary anteriors. Complete root coverage was observed, and the results were consistent even after 6 months. The current case report demonstrates good outcomes of the CAF + B technique without the use of any additional soft tissue grafts or vertical incisions, therefore, endorsing the promising potential of the CAF + B technique in multiple gingival recession cases. PMID:27143837

  9. An efficient physically based parameterization to derive surface solar irradiance based on satellite atmospheric products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Jun; Tang, Wenjun; Yang, Kun; Lu, Ning; Niu, Xiaolei; Liang, Shunlin

    2015-05-01

    Surface solar irradiance (SSI) is required in a wide range of scientific researches and practical applications. Many parameterization schemes are developed to estimate it using routinely measured meteorological variables, since SSI is directly measured at a very limited number of stations. Even so, meteorological stations are still sparse, especially in remote areas. Remote sensing can be used to map spatiotemporally continuous SSI. Considering the huge amount of satellite data, coarse-resolution SSI has been estimated for reducing the computational burden when the estimation is based on a complex radiative transfer model. On the other hand, many empirical relationships are used to enhance the retrieval efficiency, but the accuracy cannot be guaranteed out of regions where they are locally calibrated. In this study, an efficient physically based parameterization is proposed to balance computational efficiency and retrieval accuracy for SSI estimation. In this parameterization, the transmittances for gases, aerosols, and clouds are all handled in full band form and the multiple reflections between the atmosphere and surface are explicitly taken into account. The newly proposed parameterization is applied to estimate SSI with both Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) atmospheric and land products as inputs. These retrievals are validated against in situ measurements at the Surface Radiation Budget Network and at the North China Plain on an instantaneous basis, and moreover, they are validated and compared with Global Energy and Water Exchanges-Surface Radiation Budget and International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project-flux data SSI estimates at radiation stations of China Meteorological Administration on a daily mean basis. The estimation results indicates that the newly proposed SSI estimation scheme can effectively retrieve SSI based on MODIS products with mean root-mean-square errors of about 100 Wm- 1 and 35 Wm- 1 on an instantaneous and daily

  10. A local technique based on vectorized surfaces for craniofacial reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Tilotta, Françoise M; Glaunès, Joan A; Richard, Frédéric J P; Rozenholc, Yves

    2010-07-15

    In this paper, we focus on the automation of facial reconstruction. Since they consider the whole head as the object of interest, usual reconstruction techniques are global and involve a large number of parameters to be estimated. We present a local technique which aims at reaching a good trade-off between bias and variance following the paradigm of non-parametric statistics. The estimation is localized on patches delimited by surface geodesics between anatomical points of the skull. The technique relies on a continuous representation of the individual surfaces embedded in the vectorial space of extended normal vector fields. This allows to compute deformations and averages of surfaces. It consists in estimating the soft-tissue surface over patches. Using a homogeneous database described in [31], we obtain results on the chin and nasal regions with an average error below 1mm, outperforming the global reconstruction techniques.

  11. Surface Roughness Parameter Uncertainties on Radar Based Soil Moisture Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joseph, A. T.; vanderVelde, R.; O'Neill, P. E.; Lang, R.; Su, Z.; Gish, T.

    2012-01-01

    Surface roughness variations are often assumed to be negligible for the retrieval of sol moisture. Although previous investigations have suggested that this assumption is reasonable for natural vegetation covers (i.e. Moran et al. 2002), in-situ measurements over plowed agricultural fields (i.e. Callens et al. 2006) have shown that the soil surface roughness can change considerably due to weathering induced by rain.

  12. RTM-based Teleseismic Reflection Tomography with Free Surface Multiples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdick, S. A.; De Hoop, M. V.; van der Hilst, R. D.

    2013-12-01

    Receiver function analysis of teleseismic converted and free surface reflected phases has long been a cornerstone of lithospheric studies. Discontinuities in elastic properties are revealed by deconvolving the incident wavefield from scattered phases and projecting the time differences to depth to form an image. The accuracy of the image is determined to a large extent by the accuracy of the method and background velocity model used, but popular approaches for projecting receiver functions to depth commonly rely on simplifying assumptions of a 1D velocity and planar discontinuities. In tectonically complex regions like subduction zones and rift systems, strong heterogeneity can create an ambiguous tradeoff between the background velocity and the depth of the discontinuities. Furthermore, such structures are apt to create caustics at high frequencies, rendering ray-based methods inadequate. In order to better constrain the background velocity and correctly place the discontinuities at depth, we employ a novel reverse-time migration (RTM) based reflection tomography method. We adapt our reflection tomography from exploration seismology for use with teleseismic phases. Active source methods for exploration have focused on the annihilation of extended images - image gathers formed with different subsurface angle or offset information - as a means of judging the accuracy of the model. Applying these approaches to teleseismic data is untenable because 1) the sparse and uneven distribution of earthquake sources leads to the incomplete construction of extended image, 2) the imperfect separation and source deconvolution of the scattered wavefield render previous error measurements unreliable, and 3) the planar geometry of incoming arrivals makes measures of subsurface offset insensitive to perturbations in the model. To overcome these obstacles, we have developed a flexible approach based on pairwise single-source image correlations. We determine the success of the RTM and

  13. Multifractal characterization of water soluble copper phthalocyanine based films surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ţălu, Ştefan; Stach, Sebastian; Mahajan, Aman; Pathak, Dinesh; Wagner, Tomas; Kumar, Anshul; Bedi, R. K.; Ţălu, Mihai

    2014-07-01

    This paper presents a multifractal approach to characterize the structural complexity of 3D surface roughness of CuTsPc films on the glass and quartz substrate, obtained with atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis. CuTsPc films prepared by drop cast method were investigated. CuTsPc films surface roughness was studied by AFM in tapping-mode™, in an aqueous environment, on square areas of 100 μm2 and 2500 μm2. A detailed methodology for CuTsPc films surface multifractal characterization, which may be applied for AFM data, was also presented. Analysis of surface roughness revealed that CuTsPc films have a multifractal geometry at various magnifications. The generalized dimension D q and the singularity spectrum f( α) provided quantitative values that characterize the local scale properties of CuTsPc films surface morphology at nanometer scale. Multifractal analysis provides different yet complementary information to that offered by traditional surface statistical parameters.

  14. Effects of long-term repeated topical fluoride applications and adhesion promoter on shear bond strengths of orthodontic brackets

    PubMed Central

    Endo, Toshiya; Ishida, Rieko; Komatsuzaki, Akira; Sanpei, Shinya; Tanaka, Satoshi; Sekimoto, Tsuneo

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of long-term repeated topical application of fluoride before bonding and an adhesion promoter on the bond strength of orthodontic brackets. Materials and Methods: A total of 76 bovine incisors were collected and divided equally into four groups. In group 1, the brackets were bonded without topical fluoride application or adhesion promoter. In group 2, before bonding, the adhesion promoter was applied to nonfluoridated enamel. In group 3, the brackets were bonded without the application of the adhesion promoter to enamel, which had undergone long-term repeated topical fluoride treatments. Teeth in group 4 received the long-term repeated topical applications of fluoride, and the brackets were bonded using the adhesion promoter. All the brackets were bonded using BeautyOrtho Bond self-etching adhesive. The shear bond strength was measured and the bond failure modes were evaluated with the use of the adhesive remnant index (ARI) after debonding. Results: The mean shear bond strength was significantly lower in group 3 than in groups 1, 2, and 4, and there were no significant differences between the groups except for group 3. There were significant differences in the distribution of ARI scores between groups 2 and 3, and between groups 3 and 4. Conclusions: The adhesion promoter can recover the bond strength reduced by the long-term repeated topical applications of fluoride to the prefluoridation level and had a significantly great amount of adhesives left on either fluoridated or nonfluoridated enamel. PMID:25512720

  15. Roth versus MBT: does bracket prescription have an effect on the subjective outcome of pre-adjusted edgewise treatment?

    PubMed

    Moesi, Bopelo; Dyer, Fiona; Benson, Philip E

    2013-04-01

    The aim was to determine if bracket prescription has any effect on the subjective outcome of pre-adjusted edgewise treatment as judged by professionals. This retrospective observational assessment study was undertaken in the Orthodontic Department of the Charles Clifford Dental Hospital, Sheffield, UK. Forty sets of post-treatment study models from patients treated using a pre-adjusted edgewise appliance (20 Roth and 20 MBT) were selected. The models were masked and shown in a random order to nine experienced orthodontic clinicians, who were asked to assess the quality of the outcome, using a pre-piloted questionnaire. The principal outcome measure was the Incisor and Canine Aesthetic Torque and Tip (ICATT) score for each of the 40 post-treatment models carried out by the nine judges. A two-way analysis of variance was undertaken with the dependent variable, total ICATT score and independent variables, Bracket prescription (Roth or MBT) and Assessor. There were statistically significant differences between the subjective assessments of the nine judges (P<0.001), but there was no statistically significant difference between the two bracket prescriptions (P = 0.900). The best agreement between a clinician's judgment of prescription used and the actual prescription was fair (kappa statistic 0.25; CI -0.05 to 0.55). The ability to determine which bracket prescription was used was no better than chance for the majority of clinicians. Bracket prescription had no effect on the subjective aesthetic judgments of post-treatment study models made by nine experienced orthodontists.

  16. Investigation of possibility of surface rupture derived from PFDHA and calculation of surface displacement based on dislocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, N.; Kitada, N.; Irikura, K.

    2013-12-01

    A probability of surface rupture is important to configure the seismic source, such as area sources or fault models, for a seismic hazard evaluation. In Japan, Takemura (1998) estimated the probability based on the historical earthquake data. Kagawa et al. (2004) evaluated the probability based on a numerical simulation of surface displacements. The estimated probability indicates a sigmoid curve and increases between Mj (the local magnitude defined and calculated by Japan Meteorological Agency) =6.5 and Mj=7.0. The probability of surface rupture is also used in a probabilistic fault displacement analysis (PFDHA). The probability is determined from the collected earthquake catalog, which were classified into two categories: with surface rupture or without surface rupture. The logistic regression is performed for the classified earthquake data. Youngs et al. (2003), Ross and Moss (2011) and Petersen et al. (2011) indicate the logistic curves of the probability of surface rupture by normal, reverse and strike-slip faults, respectively. Takao et al. (2013) shows the logistic curve derived from only Japanese earthquake data. The Japanese probability curve shows the sharply increasing in narrow magnitude range by comparison with other curves. In this study, we estimated the probability of surface rupture applying the logistic analysis to the surface displacement derived from a surface displacement calculation. A source fault was defined in according to the procedure of Kagawa et al. (2004), which determined a seismic moment from a magnitude and estimated the area size of the asperity and the amount of slip. Strike slip and reverse faults were considered as source faults. We applied Wang et al. (2003) for calculations. The surface displacements with defined source faults were calculated by varying the depth of the fault. A threshold value as 5cm of surface displacement was used to evaluate whether a surface rupture reach or do not reach to the surface. We carried out the

  17. Influence of surface properties of resin-based composites on in vitro Streptococcus mutans biofilm development.

    PubMed

    Ionescu, Andrei; Wutscher, Elisabeth; Brambilla, Eugenio; Schneider-Feyrer, Sibylle; Giessibl, Franz J; Hahnel, Sebastian

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of physicochemical surface properties of resin-based composites on Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation. Specimens were prepared from each of four resin-based composites by polymerization against Mylar strips. Half of the number of specimens received no further surface treatment, whereas the other half were subjected to a polishing treatment. Surface roughness (SR) and topography were assessed using profilometry and atomic force microscopy. Surface free-energy (SFE) was determined, and the chemical surface composition was analysed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). S. mutans biofilms were formed on the surface of the resin-based composite specimens for either 48 or 96 h using an artificial mouth system (AMS). Polishing caused a significant decrease in SFE, and XPS analysis indicated an increase of surface silicon and a decrease of surface carbon. Only for Grandio was a significant increase in SR identified after polishing, which was probably related to the higher concentration of filler particles on its surface. Significantly less S. mutans biofilm formation was observed on polished resin-based composites than on unpolished resin-based composites. These results indicate that the proportions of resin matrix and filler particles on the surface of resin-based composites strongly influence S. mutans biofilm formation in vitro, suggesting that minimization of resin matrix exposure might be useful to reduce biofilm formation on the surface of resin-based composites. PMID:22985005

  18. Operational Satellite-based Surface Oil Analyses (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streett, D.; Warren, C.

    2010-12-01

    During the Deepwater Horizon spill, NOAA imagery analysts in the Satellite Analysis Branch (SAB) issued more than 300 near-real-time satellite-based oil spill analyses. These analyses were used by the oil spill response community for planning, issuing surface oil trajectories and tasking assets (e.g., oil containment booms, skimmers, overflights). SAB analysts used both Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) and high resolution visible/near IR multispectral satellite imagery as well as a variety of ancillary datasets. Satellite imagery used included ENVISAT ASAR (ESA), TerraSAR-X (DLR), Cosmo-Skymed (ASI), ALOS (JAXA), Radarsat (MDA), ENVISAT MERIS (ESA), SPOT (SPOT Image Corp.), Aster (NASA), MODIS (NASA), and AVHRR (NOAA). Ancillary datasets included ocean current information, wind information, location of natural oil seeps and a variety of in situ oil observations. The analyses were available as jpegs, pdfs, shapefiles and through Google, KML files and also available on a variety of websites including Geoplatform and ERMA. From the very first analysis issued just 5 hours after the rig sank through the final analysis issued in August, the complete archive is still publicly available on the NOAA/NESDIS website http://www.ssd.noaa.gov/PS/MPS/deepwater.html SAB personnel also served as the Deepwater Horizon International Disaster Charter Project Manager (at the official request of the USGS). The Project Manager’s primary responsibility was to acquire and oversee the processing and dissemination of satellite data generously donated by numerous private companies and nations in support of the oil spill response including some of the imagery described above. SAB has begun to address a number of goals that will improve our routine oil spill response as well as help assure that we are ready for the next spill of national significance. We hope to (1) secure a steady, abundant and timely stream of suitable satellite imagery even in the absence of large-scale emergencies such as

  19. Superomniphobic, transparent, and antireflection surfaces based on hierarchical nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Mazumder, Prantik; Jiang, Yongdong; Baker, David; Carrilero, Albert; Tulli, Domenico; Infante, Daniel; Hunt, Andrew T; Pruneri, Valerio

    2014-08-13

    Optical surfaces that can repel both water and oil have much potential for applications in a diverse array of technologies including self-cleaning solar panels, anti-icing windows and windshields for automobiles and aircrafts, low-drag surfaces, and antismudge touch screens. By exploiting a hierarchical geometry made of two-tier nanostructures, primary nanopillars of length scale ∼ 100-200 nm superposed with secondary branching nanostructures made of nanoparticles of length scale ∼ 10-30 nm, we have achieved static contact angles of more than 170° and 160° for water and oil, respectively, while the sliding angles were lower than 4°. At the same time, with respect to the initial flat bare glass, the nanotextured surface presented significantly reduced reflection (<0.5%), increased transmission (93.8% average over the 400 to 700 nm wavelength range), and very low scattering values (about 1% haze). To the authors' knowledge, these are the highest optical performances in conjunction with superomniphobicity reported to date in the literature. The primary nanopillars are monolithically integrated in the glass surface using lithography-free metal dewetting followed by reactive ion etching,1 while the smaller and higher surface area branching structure made of secondary nanoparticles are deposited by the NanoSpray2 combustion chemical vapor deposition (CCVD).

  20. Superomniphobic, transparent, and antireflection surfaces based on hierarchical nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Mazumder, Prantik; Jiang, Yongdong; Baker, David; Carrilero, Albert; Tulli, Domenico; Infante, Daniel; Hunt, Andrew T; Pruneri, Valerio

    2014-08-13

    Optical surfaces that can repel both water and oil have much potential for applications in a diverse array of technologies including self-cleaning solar panels, anti-icing windows and windshields for automobiles and aircrafts, low-drag surfaces, and antismudge touch screens. By exploiting a hierarchical geometry made of two-tier nanostructures, primary nanopillars of length scale ∼ 100-200 nm superposed with secondary branching nanostructures made of nanoparticles of length scale ∼ 10-30 nm, we have achieved static contact angles of more than 170° and 160° for water and oil, respectively, while the sliding angles were lower than 4°. At the same time, with respect to the initial flat bare glass, the nanotextured surface presented significantly reduced reflection (<0.5%), increased transmission (93.8% average over the 400 to 700 nm wavelength range), and very low scattering values (about 1% haze). To the authors' knowledge, these are the highest optical performances in conjunction with superomniphobicity reported to date in the literature. The primary nanopillars are monolithically integrated in the glass surface using lithography-free metal dewetting followed by reactive ion etching,1 while the smaller and higher surface area branching structure made of secondary nanoparticles are deposited by the NanoSpray2 combustion chemical vapor deposition (CCVD). PMID:24988148

  1. Sound scattering from rough bubbly ocean surface based on modified sea surface acoustic simulator and consideration of various incident angles and sub-surface bubbles' radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolghasi, Alireza; Ghadimi, Parviz; Chekab, Mohammad A. Feizi

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the present study is to improve the capabilities and precision of a recently introduced Sea Surface Acoustic Simulator (SSAS) developed based on optimization of the Helmholtz-Kirchhoff-Fresnel (HKF) method. The improved acoustic simulator, hereby known as the Modified SSAS (MSSAS), is capable of determining sound scattering from the sea surface and includes an extended Hall-Novarini model and optimized HKF method. The extended Hall-Novarini model is used for considering the effects of sub-surface bubbles over a wider range of radii of sub-surface bubbles compared to the previous SSAS version. Furthermore, MSSAS has the capability of making a three-dimensional simulation of scattered sound from the rough bubbly sea surface with less error than that of the Critical Sea Tests (CST) experiments. Also, it presents scattered pressure levels from the rough bubbly sea surface based on various incident angles of sound. Wind speed, frequency, incident angle, and pressure level of the sound source are considered as input data, and scattered pressure levels and scattering coefficients are provided. Finally, different parametric studies were conducted on wind speeds, frequencies, and incident angles to indicate that MSSAS is quite capable of simulating sound scattering from the rough bubbly sea surface, according to the scattering mechanisms determined by Ogden and Erskine. Therefore, it is concluded that MSSAS is valid for both scattering mechanisms and the transition region between them that are defined by Ogden and Erskine.

  2. Sound scattering from rough bubbly ocean surface based on modified sea surface acoustic simulator and consideration of various incident angles and sub-surface bubbles' radii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolghasi, Alireza; Ghadimi, Parviz; Chekab, Mohammad A. Feizi

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the present study is to improve the capabilities and precision of a recently introduced Sea Surface Acoustic Simulator (SSAS) developed based on optimization of the Helmholtz-Kirchhoff-Fresnel (HKF) method. The improved acoustic simulator, hereby known as the Modified SSAS (MSSAS), is capable of determining sound scattering from the sea surface and includes an extended Hall-Novarini model and optimized HKF method. The extended Hall-Novarini model is used for considering the effects of sub-surface bubbles over a wider range of radii of sub-surface bubbles compared to the previous SSAS version. Furthermore, MSSAS has the capability of making a three-dimensional simulation of scattered sound from the rough bubbly sea surface with less error than that of the Critical Sea Tests (CST) experiments. Also, it presents scattered pressure levels from the rough bubbly sea surface based on various incident angles of sound. Wind speed, frequency, incident angle, and pressure level of the sound source are considered as input data, and scattered pressure levels and scattering coefficients are provided. Finally, different parametric studies were conducted on wind speeds, frequencies, and incident angles to indicate that MSSAS is quite capable of simulating sound scattering from the rough bubbly sea surface, according to the scattering mechanisms determined by Ogden and Erskine. Therefore, it is concluded that MSSAS is valid for both scattering mechanisms and the transition region between them that are defined by Ogden and Erskine.

  3. A Comparison of Shear Bond Strengths of Metal and Ceramic Brackets using Conventional Acid Etching Technique and Er:YAG Laser Etching

    PubMed Central

    Yassaei, Sogra; Fekrazad, Reza; Shahraki, Neda; Goldani Moghadam, Mahdjoube

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. The aim of this study was to compare shear bond strength (SBS) of metal and ceramic brackets bonded to enamel using acid versus Er:YAG laser etching. Materials and methods. Eighty premolars were divided into 4 groups: AM (acid etching/ metal brackets), AC (acid etching/ ceramic brackets), LM (laser etching/ metal brackets) and LC (laser etching/ ceramic brackets). Enamel condition-ing was done using acid in AC and AM and Er:YAG laser in LC and LM. Brackets were debonded with a Dartec machine and the SBSs were determined. Adhesive remnant index was evaluated under a stereomicroscope. Two additional teeth were conditioned with acid and laser for scanning electron microscopy examination. Comparisons of SBS value were done by ANOVA test. Results. statistical analyses showed that SBSs of acid groups were significantly higher than that of laser groups, but dif-ferences between SBS values of AC/ AM and LC/LM were not significant. SEM examination revealed different etching pattern. Conclusion. Low power Er:YAG laser etching offers clinically acceptable SBS which besides its other superiorities to acid etching can be an appropriate alternative for bonding of ceramic brackets. PMID:25024836

  4. Laser-based nanoengineering of surface topographies for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlie, Sabrina; Fadeeva, Elena; Koroleva, Anastasia; Ovsianikov, Aleksandr; Koch, Jürgen; Ngezahayo, Anaclet; Chichkov, Boris. N.

    2011-04-01

    In this study femtosecond laser systems were used for nanoengineering of special surface topographies in silicon and titanium. Besides the control of feature sizes, we demonstrated that laser structuring caused changes in material wettability due to a reduced surface contact area. These laser-engineered topographies were tested for their capability to control cellular behavior of human fibroblasts, SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, and MG-63 osteoblasts. We found that fibroblasts reduced cell growth on the structures, while the other cell types proliferated at the same rate. These findings make laser-surface structuring very attractive for biomedical applications. Finally, to explain the results the correlation between topography and the biophysics of cellular adhesion, which is the key step of selective cell control, is discussed.

  5. Ship-based measurements of sea surface topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, J. H.; Carter, G. S.; Merrifield, M. A.

    2009-06-01

    By equipping the research vessel Kilo Moana with a geodetic GPS receiver and a radar water level gauge, and using a kinematic GPS processing package, accurate 1 Hz estimates of the sea surface height were obtained. Geodetic positioning of ocean-platforms using only the GPS system cannot account for changes in the draft of the platform. This is especially problematic for ships, where changes in the load, speed and/or ocean density can change the ship's draft by 10s of centimeters. By installing a radar gauge this noise source can be removed from the estimates of the sea surface height. We envision that this technology could routinely provide high resolution information on the geoid, or the variation of the sea surface height, including sea-state, from an existing reference geoid.

  6. Magnesium-based composites with improved in vitro surface biocompatibility

    PubMed Central

    Huan, Zhiguang; Duszczyk, Jurek

    2010-01-01

    In this study, bioactive glass (BG, 45S5) particles were added to a biodegradable magnesium alloy (ZK30) through a semi-solid high-pressure casting process in order to improve the surface biocompatibility of the biomaterial and potentially its bioactivity. The observation of the as-cast microstructures of ZK30-BG composites indicated homogeneous dispersion of BG particles in the matrix. SEM, EDX and EPMA showed the retention of the morphological characteristics and composition of BG particles in the as-cast composite materials. In vitro tests in a cell culture medium confirmed that the composites indeed possessed an enhanced ability to induce the deposition of a bone-like apatite layer on the surface, indicating an improved surface biocompatibility as compared with the matrix alloy. PMID:20922559

  7. Magnesium-based composites with improved in vitro surface biocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Huan, Zhiguang; Leeflang, Sander; Zhou, Jie; Duszczyk, Jurek

    2010-12-01

    In this study, bioactive glass (BG, 45S5) particles were added to a biodegradable magnesium alloy (ZK30) through a semi-solid high-pressure casting process in order to improve the surface biocompatibility of the biomaterial and potentially its bioactivity. The observation of the as-cast microstructures of ZK30-BG composites indicated homogeneous dispersion of BG particles in the matrix. SEM, EDX and EPMA showed the retention of the morphological characteristics and composition of BG particles in the as-cast composite materials. In vitro tests in a cell culture medium confirmed that the composites indeed possessed an enhanced ability to induce the deposition of a bone-like apatite layer on the surface, indicating an improved surface biocompatibility as compared with the matrix alloy. PMID:20922559

  8. Surface microstructure profilometry based on laser confocal feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weiping; Zhang, Shulian; Li, Yan

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate a surface microstructure profile measurement method, which utilizes the positioning ability of confocal technology and the high sensitivity of frequency-shift feedback of a microchip laser. The surface profile is measured by combination of the amplitude and phase information of the feedback light reflected by the sample. The amplitude information is used for coarse measurement and to determine the integral number of half lasing wavelengths contained in the sample profile variation. The phase information is used for fine measurement and to determine the fractional number. The measurement realizes both a large axial measuring range of tens of microns and a high axial resolution of ˜2 nm. Meanwhile, a heterodyne phase measurement approach is introduced to compensate for environmental disturbance and to realize high axial resolution measurement under common room conditions. The surface profile of a grating is measured and proves the feasibility of the method.

  9. Characterization and Applications of Affinity Based Surface Modification of Polypyrrole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nickels, Jonathan D.

    I present the characterization and applications of a technique to modify the surface of the conducting polymer, polypyrrole, via a novel, 12-amino acid peptide, THRTSTLDYFVI (T59). This peptide non-covalently binds to the chlorine-doped conducting polymer polypyrrole, allowing it to be used in tethering molecules to polypyrrole for uses such as a scaffold for the treatment of peripheral nerve injury or in surface coatings of neural recording electrodes. I have quantified the binding of this peptide as well as investigating the mechanism of the binding. The equilibrium constant of the binding interaction of PPyCl and the T59 peptide was found through a binding assay to be 92.6 nM, and the off rate was found to be approximately 2.49 s-1, via AFM force spectroscopy. The maximum observed surface density of the peptide was 1.27 +/- 0.42 femtomoles/cm2. Furthermore, my studies suggest that the eighth residue, aspartic acid, is the main contributor of the binding, by interacting with the partially positive charge on the backbone of polypyrrole. I have demonstrated practical applications of the technique in the successful modification of a PPyCl surface with the laminin fragment IKVAV, as well as the so-called stealth molecule poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). A subcutaneous implant study was performed to confirm that the T59 peptide did not induce any significant reaction in vivo. Significantly, the conductivity of a PPyCl surface was unaffected by this surface modification technique.

  10. Dental Surface Texture Characterization Based on Erosive Tooth Wear Processes.

    PubMed

    Hara, A T; Livengood, S V; Lippert, F; Eckert, G J; Ungar, P S

    2016-05-01

    The differential diagnosis of dental wear lesions affects their clinical management. We hypothesized that surface texture parameters can differentiate simulated erosion, abrasion, and erosion-abrasion lesions on human enamel and dentin. This in vitro study comprised 2 parts (both factorial 4 × 2), with 4 lesion types (erosion, abrasion, erosion-abrasion, and sound [no lesion; control]) and 2 substrates (enamel and dentin). Flattened/polished dental specimens were used in part 1, whereas natural dental surfaces were used in part 2. Testing surfaces were evaluated in blind conditions, using average surface roughness (Sa) and the following scale-sensitive fractal analysis parameters: area-scale fractal complexity (Asfc), exact proportion length-scale anisotropy of relief (eplsar), scale of maximum complexity (Smc), and textural fill volume (Tfv). Two-way analyses of variance, followed by Fisher's protected least significant difference tests (α = 0.05), were used to evaluate the effects of lesion and substrate. Classification trees were constructed to verify the strength of potential associations of the tested parameters. In part 1,Asfc, Sa, and Tfv were able to differentiate erosion and erosion-abrasion lesions from the sound (no lesion) control in both substrates; only Asfc differentiated erosion and erosion-abrasion enamel lesions (allP< 0.05). The best association of parameters correctly classified up to 84% and 94% of the lesions on enamel and dentin, respectively. In part 2, only Asfc differentiated erosion and erosion-abrasion lesions from the sound (no lesion) control in both substrates, whereas eplsar was able to differentiate erosion from erosion-abrasion (allP< 0.05). The association of parameters correctly classified up to 81% and 91% of the lesions in enamel and dentin, respectively.Asfc, Sa, and Tfv were able to differentiate erosion and erosion-abrasion lesions, despite their complicated surface textures. The association of parameters improved the

  11. Optical lightpipe sensor based on surface plasmon resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Shuai; Johnston, Kyle S.; Yee, Sinclair S.

    1996-08-01

    In this paper, a novel optical sensor using surface plasmon resonance in a symmetrical planar lightpipe is introduced. The new design utilizes a microscope slide with beveled ends as the sensor substrate. Collimated TM polarized white light is used to interrogate the sensing surface at a single angle. Preliminary experimental results for glycerol solutions from 0.6%wt to 16%wt demonstrate a concentration sensitivity of 3.4 multiplied by 10-4 by weight. The corresponding refractive index sensitivity is estimated as 4 by 10-5.

  12. Polyurethane-based polymer surface modifiers with alkyl ammonium copolyoxetane soft segments: Reaction engineering, surface morphology and antimicrobial behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunson, Kennard Marcellus, Jr.

    Concentrating quaternary (positive) charge at polymer surfaces is important for applications including layer-by-layer polyelectrolyte deposition and antimicrobial coatings. Prior techniques to introduce quaternary charge to the surface involve grafting of quaternary ammonium moieties to a substrate or using polyurethanes with modified hard segments however there are impracticalities involved with these techniques. In the case of the materials discussed, the quaternary charge is introduced via polyurethane based polymer surface modifiers (PSMs) with quaternized soft segments. The particular advantage to this method is that it utilizes the intrinsic phase separation between the hard and soft segments of polyurethanes. This phase separation results in the surface concentration of the soft segments. Another advantage is that unlike grafting, where modification has to take place after device fabrication, these PSMs can be incorporated with the matrix material during device fabrication. The soft segments of these quaternized polyurethanes are produced via ring opening co-polymerization of oxetane monomers which possess either a trifluoroethoxy (3FOx) side chains or a quaternary ammonium side chain (C12). These soft segments are subsequently reacted with 4,4'-(methylene bis (p-cyclohexyl isocyanate)), HMDI and butanediol (BD) to form the PSM. It was initially intended to increase the concentration of quaternary ammonium charge by increasing PSM soft segment molecular weight. Unexpectedly, produced blends with surface microscale phase separation. This observation prompted further investigation of the effect of PSM soft segment molecular weight on phase separation in PSM-base polyurethane blends and the subsequent effects of this phase separation on the biocidal activity. Analysis of the surface morphology via tapping mode atomic force microscopy (TM-AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed varying complexities in surface morphology as a function of the PSM soft

  13. Surface Electromyographic Onset Detection Based On Statistics and Information Content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, Natalia M.; Orosco, Eugenio; di Sciascio, Fernando

    2011-12-01

    The correct detection of the onset of muscular contraction is a diagnostic tool to neuromuscular diseases and an action trigger to control myoelectric devices. In this work, entropy and information content concepts were applied in algorithmic methods to automatic detection in surface electromyographic signals.

  14. Micro mixer based on surface acoustic wave driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guan; Li, Yigui; Zhang, Junfeng; Yang, Chunshen; Liu, Jingquan

    2010-08-01

    A resonance frequency of 8.9MHz copper Interdigital Transducer (IDT) is fabricated on a 127.8°YX type LiNbO3 substrate by lift-off process and the rapid droplet mixing is experimentally realized using the surface acoustic wave(SAW). The droplet mixing principle and the manufacturing process of the mixer are illustrated in detail. The droplet generates one swirl when only portion of the droplet is located on the saw propagating surface. The droplet generates two swirls when the whole of droplet is located on the saw propagating surface. The mixing between red particles with an average diameter of 1.5μm and a droplet with a volume of 3 μl is successfully implemented. No matter the droplet covers whole or just partly the saw propagating surface, the mixing process can be completed in one second when the applied driving power is 9W. The applications of SAW micro fluidics should be greatly enhanced using the rapid mixing process proposed in this paper.

  15. Surface-based morphometry reveals distinct cortical thickness and surface area profiles in Williams syndrome.

    PubMed

    Green, Tamar; Fierro, Kyle C; Raman, Mira M; Saggar, Manish; Sheau, Kristen E; Reiss, Allan L

    2016-04-01

    Morphometric investigations of brain volumes in Williams syndrome (WS) consistently show significant reductions in gray matter volume compared to controls. Cortical thickness (CT) and surface area (SA) are two constituent parts of cortical gray matter volume that are considered genetically distinguishable features of brain morphology. Yet, little is known about the independent contribution of cortical CT and SA to these volumetric differences in WS. Thus, our objectives were: (i) to evaluate whether the microdeletion in chromosome 7 associated with WS has a distinct effect on CT and SA, and (ii) to evaluate age-related variations in CT and SA within WS. We compared CT and SA values in 44 individuals with WS to 49 age- and sex-matched typically developing controls. Between-group differences in CT and SA were evaluated across two age groups: young (age range 6.6-18.9 years), and adults (age range 20.2-51.5 years). Overall, we found contrasting effects of WS on cortical thickness (increases) and surface area (decreases). With respect to brain topography, the between-group pattern of CT differences showed a scattered pattern while the between-group surface area pattern was widely distributed throughout the brain. In the adult subgroup, we observed a cluster of increases in cortical thickness in WS across the brain that was not observed in the young subgroup. Our findings suggest that extensive early reductions in surface area are the driving force for the overall reduction in brain volume in WS. The age-related cortical thickness findings might reflect delayed or even arrested development of specific brain regions in WS.

  16. Optical Sensing and Trapping Based on Localized Surface Plasmons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Zhiwen

    This project involves the study of novel plasmonic nanodevices that provide unique functionality in optical sensing, surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), and optical trapping. The first design is based on a coupling system involving double-layered metal nano-strips arrays. This system has the advantages of simple geometry and direct integration with microfluidic chips. The intense optical localization due to field coupling within the system can enhance detection sensitivity of target molecules, especially by virtue of the optical trapping of plasmonic nanoparticles. The optical resonant condition is obtained theoretically through analyzing the SPs modes. Numerical modeling based on two-dimensional (2D) finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) is consistent with the theoretical analysis and demonstrates the feasibility of using this system for optical sensing and trapping. In the second design, a gold nano-ring structure is demonstrated to be an effective approach for plasmonic nano-optical tweezers (PNOTs) for trapping metallic nanoparticles. In our demonstration example, we have optimized a device for SERS operation at the wavelength of 785 nm. Three-dimensional (3D) FDTD techniques have been employed to calculate the optical response, and the optical force distribution have been derived using the Maxwell stress tensor (MST) method. Simulation results indicate that the nano-ring produces a maximum trapping potential well of ~32 kBT on a 20 nm gold nanoparticle. The existence of multiple potential well results in a very large active trapping volume of ~106 nm3 for the target particles. Furthermore, the trapped gold nanoparticles further lead to the formation of nano-gaps that offer a near-field enhancement of ~160 times, resulting in an achievable EF of 108 for SERS. In the third design, we propose a concept of all-optical nano-manipulation. We show that target molecules, after being trapped, can be transferred between the trapping sites within a linear array of

  17. Bionanohybrid based on bioplastic and surface-functionalized carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ravina; Ray, Suprakas Sinha

    2010-12-01

    A bionanohybrid consisting of biodegradable/biocompatible poly(butylene succinate) (PBS) and surface-oxidized carbon nanotubes (o-CNTs) was prepared via melt-mixing method. The inherent properties of PBS were concurrently improved by the incorporation of a small amount of o-CNTs. For example, at room temperature, elongation at break increased from approximately 21.2% for pure PBS to approximately 55.1% for the nanohybrid and an increase of about approximately 150% in the value of toughness with moderate improvement in tensile modulus and strength. The dynamic mechanical properties of PBS also increased significantly after nanocomposite formation with o-CNTs. Electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy were used to investigate the mechanical properties and improvement mechanism of surface-functionalized o-CNTs containing PBS nanohybr