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Sample records for brady scientist mentor

  1. Memories of John N. Brady: scientist, mentor and friend

    PubMed Central

    Pise-Masison, Cynthia A; Marriott, Susan J

    2009-01-01

    Friends and colleagues remember John N. Brady, Ph.D., Chief of the Virus Tumor Biology Section of the Laboratory of Cellular Oncology, who died much too young at the age of 57 on April 27, 2009 of colon cancer. John grew up in Illinois and received his Ph.D. with Dr. Richard Consigli at Kansas State University studying the molecular structure of polyomavirus. In 1984 John came to the National Institutes of Health as a Staff Fellow in the laboratory of Dr. Norman Salzman, Laboratory of Biology of Viruses NIAID, where he was among the first to analyze SV40 transcription using in vitro transcription systems and to analyze regulatory sequences for SV40 late transcription. He then trained with Dr. George Khoury in the Laboratory of Molecular Virology NCI, where he identified SV40 T-antigen as a transcriptional activator protein. His research interests grew to focus on the human retroviruses: human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), analyzing how interactions between these viruses and the host cell influence viral gene regulation, viral pathogenesis and viral transformation. His research also impacted the fields of eukaryotic gene regulation and tumor suppressor proteins. John is survived by his wife, Laraine, and two sons, Matt and Kevin. PMID:19454030

  2. Memories of John N. Brady: scientist, mentor and friend.

    PubMed

    Pise-Masison, Cynthia A; Marriott, Susan J

    2009-05-19

    Friends and colleagues remember John N. Brady, Ph.D., Chief of the Virus Tumor Biology Section of the Laboratory of Cellular Oncology, who died much too young at the age of 57 on April 27, 2009 of colon cancer. John grew up in Illinois and received his Ph.D. with Dr. Richard Consigli at Kansas State University studying the molecular structure of polyomavirus. In 1984 John came to the National Institutes of Health as a Staff Fellow in the laboratory of Dr. Norman Salzman, Laboratory of Biology of Viruses NIAID, where he was among the first to analyze SV40 transcription using in vitro transcription systems and to analyze regulatory sequences for SV40 late transcription. He then trained with Dr. George Khoury in the Laboratory of Molecular Virology NCI, where he identified SV40 T-antigen as a transcriptional activator protein. His research interests grew to focus on the human retroviruses: human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), analyzing how interactions between these viruses and the host cell influence viral gene regulation, viral pathogenesis and viral transformation. His research also impacted the fields of eukaryotic gene regulation and tumor suppressor proteins. John is survived by his wife, Laraine, and two sons, Matt and Kevin.

  3. Mentoring Among Scientists: Implications of Interpersonal Relationships within a Formal Mentoring Program

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan D. Maughan

    2006-11-01

    Mentoring is an established strategy for learning that has its root in antiquity. Most, if not all, successful scientists and engineers had an effective mentor at some point in their career. In the context of scientists and engineers, mentoring has been undefined. Reports addressing critical concerns regarding the future of science and engineering in the U.S. mention the practice of mentoring a priori, leaving organizations without guidance in its application. Preliminary results from this study imply that formal mentoring can be effective when properly defined and operationalized. Recognizing the uniqueness of the individual in a symbiotic mentor-protégé relationship significantly influences a protégé’s learning experience which carries repercussions into their career intentions. The mentor-protégé relationship is a key factor in succession planning and preserving and disseminating critical information and tacit knowledge essential to the development of leadership in the science and technological industry.

  4. Mentoring among scientists: Implications of interpersonal relationships within a formal mentoring program

    SciTech Connect

    Maughan, B. D.

    2006-07-01

    Mentoring is an established strategy for learning that has its root in antiquity. Most, if not all, successful scientists and engineers had an effective mentor at some point in their career. In the context of scientists and engineers, mentoring has been undefined. Reports addressing critical concerns regarding the future of science and engineering in the U.S. mention the practice of mentoring a priori, leaving organizations without guidance in its application. Preliminary results from this study imply that formal mentoring can be effective when properly defined and operationalized. Recognizing the uniqueness of the individual in a symbiotic mentor-protege relationship significantly influences a protege's learning experience which carries repercussions into their career intentions. The mentor-protege relationship is a key factor in succession planning and preserving and disseminating critical information and tacit knowledge essential to the development of leadership in the science and technological industry. (authors)

  5. CURE Scholar Spotlight - Dr. Brady

    Cancer.gov

    Donita C. Brady, a Research Associate Senior at the Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology at Duke University, is investigating the role that copper plays in cell growth and tumor biology. Inspired by her mentor Christopher Counter, a cancer biolog

  6. Mentors, networks, and resources for early career female atmospheric scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallar, A. G.; Avallone, L. M.; Edwards, L. M.; Thiry, H.; Ascent

    2011-12-01

    Atmospheric Science Collaborations and Enriching NeTworks (ASCENT) is a workshop series designed to bring together early career female scientists in the field of atmospheric science and related disciplines. ASCENT is a multi-faceted approach to retaining these junior scientists through the challenges in their research and teaching career paths. During the workshop, senior women scientists discuss their career and life paths. They also lead seminars on tools, resources and methods that can help early career scientists to be successful. Networking is a significant aspect of ASCENT, and many opportunities for both formal and informal interactions among the participants (of both personal and professional nature) are blended in the schedule. The workshops are held in Steamboat Springs, Colorado, home of a high-altitude atmospheric science laboratory - Storm Peak Laboratory, which also allows for nearby casual outings and a pleasant environment for participants. Near the conclusion of each workshop, junior and senior scientists are matched in mentee-mentor ratios of two junior scientists per senior scientist. An external evaluation of the three workshop cohorts concludes that the workshops have been successful in establishing and expanding personal and research-related networks, and that seminars have been useful in creating confidence and sharing resources for such things as preparing promotion and tenure packages, interviewing and negotiating job offers, and writing successful grant proposals.

  7. Thinking and Behaving Like Scientists: Perceptions of Undergraduate Science Interns and Their Faculty Mentors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kardash, CarolAnne M.; Edwards, Ordene V.

    2012-01-01

    We examined undergraduate research experiences (UREs) participants' and their faculty mentors' beliefs about the professional practices and dispositions of research scientists. In Study 1, 63 science interns and their mentors rated Merton's ("J Legal Political Sociol," 1:115-126, 1942) norms and Mitroff's ("Am Sociol Rev," 39 (August):579-595,…

  8. Successful Latina Scientists and Engineers: Their Lived Mentoring Experiences and Career Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    San Miguel, Anitza M.; Kim, Mikyong Minsun

    2015-01-01

    Utilizing a phenomenological perspective and method, this study aimed to reveal the lived career mentoring experiences of Latinas in science and engineering and to understand how selected Latina scientists and engineers achieved high-level positions. Our in-depth interviews revealed that (a) it is important to have multiple mentors for Latinas'…

  9. INTRODUCTION: David Sherrington as a mentor of young scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldbart, Paul M.

    2008-08-01

    How deeply honoured I am to have the opportunity to express my thoughts at this delightful celebration of David's achievements, so far, in his remarkable career. I have been asked to center my remarks on David's contributions to the mentoring and professional development of scientists early in their careers. This is a topic that I am more than happy to reflect on, because it gives me the opportunity to recall the exciting period I spent as one of David's postgraduate students at Imperial College in the early 1980s. It also gives me the chance to publicly express my gratitude to David for the opportunities he created for me at that time, as well as for the interest and care he has shown in my career and well-being ever since, as we have met up and exchanged news and ideas around the world: in New Mexico and Colorado, in Cancun, Paris and Trieste, at numerous March Meetings of the American Physical Society and, of course in London, Oxford, and my home town, Champaign-Urbana, location of the University of Illinois. I have been a member of David's circle for 25 years now, and I would like to tell you a little about how this came to be. Not because of what this says about me, but, rather, because of what it tells you about David and the rich generosity of his spirit and effort when it comes to supporting the underdog. I was indeed one such underdog—and that's putting it charitably—when I first met David in September of 1982, not long before the academic year was to begin. I had heard about the exciting circle of physical and mathematical ideas swirling around the spin glass question during the previous year, which I had spent at the University of California's Los Angeles campus, through an opportunity kindly arranged, as it happens, by Sam Edwards. But I was eager to return to the UK for postgraduate studies and to work on spin glasses, so I simply showed up at David's Imperial College office, unannounced (if I remember correctly). And with his characteristic

  10. INTRODUCTION: David Sherrington as a mentor of young scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldbart, Paul M.

    2008-08-01

    How deeply honoured I am to have the opportunity to express my thoughts at this delightful celebration of David's achievements, so far, in his remarkable career. I have been asked to center my remarks on David's contributions to the mentoring and professional development of scientists early in their careers. This is a topic that I am more than happy to reflect on, because it gives me the opportunity to recall the exciting period I spent as one of David's postgraduate students at Imperial College in the early 1980s. It also gives me the chance to publicly express my gratitude to David for the opportunities he created for me at that time, as well as for the interest and care he has shown in my career and well-being ever since, as we have met up and exchanged news and ideas around the world: in New Mexico and Colorado, in Cancun, Paris and Trieste, at numerous March Meetings of the American Physical Society and, of course in London, Oxford, and my home town, Champaign-Urbana, location of the University of Illinois. I have been a member of David's circle for 25 years now, and I would like to tell you a little about how this came to be. Not because of what this says about me, but, rather, because of what it tells you about David and the rich generosity of his spirit and effort when it comes to supporting the underdog. I was indeed one such underdog—and that's putting it charitably—when I first met David in September of 1982, not long before the academic year was to begin. I had heard about the exciting circle of physical and mathematical ideas swirling around the spin glass question during the previous year, which I had spent at the University of California's Los Angeles campus, through an opportunity kindly arranged, as it happens, by Sam Edwards. But I was eager to return to the UK for postgraduate studies and to work on spin glasses, so I simply showed up at David's Imperial College office, unannounced (if I remember correctly). And with his characteristic

  11. Lived Experiences and Perceptions on Mentoring among Latina Scientists and Engineers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    San Miguel, Anitza M.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to reveal the lived mentoring experiences of Latinas in science and engineering. The study also sought to understand how Latina scientists and engineers achieved high-level positions within their organizations and the impediments they encountered along their professional journey. The theoretical framework…

  12. The Role of Scientist Mentors on Teachers' Perceptions of the Community of Science during a Summer Research Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Roxanne; Molyneaux, Kristen; Dixon, Pat

    2012-01-01

    This study focuses on the mentor relationships between science teachers and their scientist mentors in a summer Research Experience for Teachers program at a United States national laboratory facility. Using mixed methods, the authors surveyed and interviewed (semi-structured) the eleven participating teachers before and after the program. The…

  13. Multicultural Mentoring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen-Sommerville, Lenola

    1994-01-01

    Describes the mentoring relationship between George Washington Carver and Henry Agard Wallace who later became a great scientist and Vice President of the United States. Explains what mentoring is and discusses classroom implications for mentoring. (PR)

  14. Measured and perceived effects of computerized scientist mentors on student learning and motivation in science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, Catherine Dodds Dunham

    Unease about declining U.S. science literacy and inquiry skills drives much innovation in science education, including the quest for authentic science experiences for students. One response is student-scientist partnerships (SSP), involving small numbers of students in scientific investigations with scientist mentors. Alternatively, science inquiry programs provide large numbers of students with opportunities to pursue their own investigations but without extensive access to experts, potentially limiting the possible cognitive and affective gains. This mixed methods study investigates whether it is possible to replicate some of SSPs' benefits on a larger scale through use of a computerized agent designed as a "virtual" scientist mentor. Middle school students (N=532) were randomly assigned to two versions of an agent (or to a control group) providing either content-only or content and interpersonal mentoring while they participated in a three-week curriculum. Results indicate that, on average, students gained in content knowledge but there was no statistically significant difference between the three conditions. In terms of motivation, students exhibited no change, on average, with no statistically significant difference between the three conditions. These data indicate that the treatment conditions neither facilitate nor inhibit student learning and motivation. Interviews with a subsample (n=70), however, suggest that students believe the agents facilitated their learning, eased the workload, provided a trusted source of information, and were enjoyable to use. Teachers reported that the agents provided alternative views of scientists and science, generated class discussion, and met the needs of high and low-achieving students. This difference between measured and perceived benefits may result from measures that were not sufficiently sensitive to capture differences. Alternatively, a more sophisticated agent might better replicate mentoring functions known to

  15. Steps towards equal gender representation: TANDEMplusIDEA - an international mentoring and personal development scheme for female scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefli, Bettina; Breuer, Elke

    2010-05-01

    TANDEMplusIDEA was a European mentoring programme conducted by the technical universities RWTH Aachen, Imperial College London, ETH Zurich and TU Delft between 2007 and 2010 to achieve more gender equality in science. Given the continuing underrepresentation of women in science and technology and the well-known structural and systematic disadvantages in male-dominated scientific cultures, the main goal of this programme was to promote excellent female scientists through a high-level professional and personal development programme. Based on the mentoring concept of the RWTH Aachen, TANDEMplusIDEA was the first mentoring programme for female scientists realized in international cooperation. As a pilot scheme funded by the 6th Framework Programme of the European Commission, the scientific evaluation was an essential part of the programme, in particular in view of the development of a best practice model for international mentoring. The participants of this programme were female scientists at an early stage of their academic career (postdoc or assistant professor) covering a wide range of science disciplines, including geosciences. This transdisciplinarity as well as the international dimension of the programme have been identified by the participants as one of the keys of success of the programme. In particular, the peer-mentoring across discipline boarders proved to have been an invaluable component of the development programme. This presentation will highlight some of the main findings of the scientific evaluation of the programme and focus on some additional personal insights from the participants.

  16. Collier Cobb and Allen D. Hole: Geologic mentors to early soil scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brevik, Eric C.

    Many influential individuals involved in the early US soil survey program were trained as geologists rather than as agronomists or soil scientists. Several geology departments served as pipelines for students interested in a career in soil survey. This paper looks at the professional history of two early mentors of these geologists turned soil surveyors and some of the students they sent on to the US soil survey and other soil science careers. Collier Cobb sent over 10 students to the soil survey starting in 1900 when US soil survey was in its infancy, including individuals of note such as Hugh H. Bennett, George N. Coffey, Williamson E. Hearn, and Thomas D. Rice. Allen D. Hole worked on soil surveys for the state of Indiana and sent over a dozen students on to US soil survey careers between 1911 and 1937, including Mark Baldwin and James Thorp. Francis Hole and Ralph McCracken, other students of Allen Hole, also went on to have distinguished soil science careers. These mentors and students clearly show the close ties that existed between soil science and geology in the United States during the early 1900s.

  17. Collier Cobb and Allen D. Hole: Geologic Mentors to Early American Soil Scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brevik, E. C.

    2012-04-01

    Many influential individuals involved in the early United States soil survey program were trained as geologists rather than as agronomists or soil scientists. Several geology departments served as pipelines for students interested in a career in soil survey. This presentation looks at the professional history of two early mentors of these geologists turned soil surveyors and some of the students they sent on to the U.S. soil survey and other soil science careers. Collier Cobb (University of North Carolina) sent over 10 students to the soil survey starting in 1900 when U.S. soil survey was in its infancy, including individuals of note such as Hugh H. Bennett, George N. Coffey, Williamson E. Hearn, and Thomas D. Rice. Allen D. Hole (Earlham College, Indiana) worked on soil surveys for the state of Indiana and sent over a dozen students on to U.S. soil survey careers between 1911 and 1937, including Mark Baldwin and James Thorp. Francis Hole and Ralph McCracken, other students of Allen Hole, also went on to have distinguished soil science careers. These mentors and students clearly show the close ties that existed between soil science and geology in the United States during the early 1900s.

  18. Persistence of African American Men in Science: Exploring the Influence of Scientist Identity, Mentoring, and Campus Climate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guy, Breonte Stephan

    2013-01-01

    The scant literature on persistence of African American males in science typically takes a deficits-based approach to encapsulate the myriad reasons this population is so often underrepresented. Scientist Identity, Mentoring, and Campus Climate have, individually, been found to be related to the persistence of African American students. However,…

  19. Geothermal vegetable dehydration at Brady`s Hot Springs, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, J.W.

    1994-07-01

    This article describes the utilization of the Brady`s Springs geothermal resource for heat generation used in the food dehydration process. This geothermal system is located in the Forty-Mile Desert area of Nevada. Geothermal Food Processors, Inc. of Reno, Nevada started construction of the geothermal vegetable dehydration plant in 1978, and the plant started operations in 1979. The industrial process of vegetable dehydration at the plant is described. In July of 1992, the Brady`s Springs geothermal system began being used for power generation by the Brady`s Hot Springs geothermal power plant, operated by Oxbow Power Services, Inc. As a result, the water levels in the food processing plant wells have dropped below usable levels and the geothermal brine is now being supplied by the Oxbow power plant.

  20. Persistence of African American Men in Science: Exploring the Influence of Scientist Identity, Mentoring, and Campus Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guy, Breonte Stephan

    The scant literature on persistence of African American males in science typically takes a deficits-based approach to encapsulate the myriad reasons this population is so often underrepresented. Scientist Identity, Mentoring, and Campus Climate have, individually, been found to be related to the persistence of African American students. However, the unified impact of these three variables on the persistence of African American students with science interests has not been evaluated, and the relationship between the variables, the students' gender, and markers of academic achievement have not been previously investigated. The current study takes a strengths-based approach to evaluating the relationship between Scientist Identity, Mentoring, and Campus climate with a population of African American students with science interests who were studying at six Minority Serving Institutions and Predominantly White Institutions in the Southern United States. Multiple regression analyses were conducted to determine the impact of Scientist Identity, Mentoring, and Campus Climate on Intention to Persist of African American males. The results indicate that Scientist Identity predicts Intention to Persist, and that gender, academic performance, and institution type moderate the relationship between Scientist Identity and Intention to Persist. These results lend credence to the emerging notion that, for African American men studying science, generating a greater depth and breadth of understanding of the factors that lead to persistence will aid in the development of best practices for supporting persistence among this perpetually underrepresented population.

  1. Rejoinder to Brady-Amoon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, James T.

    2012-01-01

    The author agrees with virtually all of Brady-Amoon's (2012) conclusions. However, Brady-Amoon and the author disagree about some of the theoretical points that lead to these shared conclusions. He overviews these disagreements and highlights their common vision for the future of the counseling profession.

  2. Global Science Share: Connecting young scientists from developing countries with science writing mentors to strengthen and widen the international science community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasenkopf, C. A.

    2012-12-01

    Collaborative science in which scientists are able to form research questions based on the current body of scientific knowledge and get feedback from colleagues on their ideas and work is essential for pushing science forward. However, not all scientists are able to fully participate in the international science community. Scientists from developing countries can face barriers to communicating with the international community due to, among other issues: fewer scientists in their home country, difficulty in getting language-specific science writing training, fewer established pre-existing international collaborations and networks, and sometimes geographic isolation. These barriers not only result in keeping individual scientists from contributing their ideas, but they also slow down the progress of the scientific enterprise for everyone. Global Science Share (http://globalscienceshare.org/) is a new project, entering its pilot phase in Fall 2012, which will work to reduce this disparity by connecting young scientists and engineers from developing countries seeking to improve their technical writing with other scientists and engineers around the world via online collaborations. Scientist-volunteers act as mentors and are paired up with mentees according to their academic field and writing needs. The mentors give feedback and constructive technical and editorial criticisms on mentees' submitted pieces of writing through a four-step email discussion. Mentees gain technical writing skills, as well as make international connections with other scientists and engineers in fields related to their own. Mentors also benefit by gaining new international scientific colleagues and honing their own writing skills through their critiques. The Global Science Share project will begin its pilot phase by first inviting Mongolian science students to apply as mentees this fall. This abstract will introduce the Global Science Share program, present a progress report from its first

  3. A Matrix Mentoring Model That Effectively Supports Clinical and Translational Scientists and Increases Inclusion in Biomedical Research: Lessons From the University of Utah.

    PubMed

    Byington, Carrie L; Keenan, Heather; Phillips, John D; Childs, Rebecca; Wachs, Erin; Berzins, Mary Anne; Clark, Kim; Torres, Maria K; Abramson, Jan; Lee, Vivian; Clark, Edward B

    2016-04-01

    Physician-scientists and scientists in all the health professions are vital members of the U.S. biomedical workforce, but their numbers at academic health centers are declining. Mentorship has been identified as a key component in retention of faculty members at academic health centers. Effective mentoring may promote the retention of clinician-scientists in the biomedical workforce. The authors describe a holistic institutional mentoring program to support junior faculty members engaged in clinical and translational science at the University of Utah. The clinical and translational scholars (CATS) program leverages the resources of the institution, including the Center for Clinical and Translational Science, to augment departmental resources to support junior faculty investigators and uses a multilevel mentoring matrix that includes self, senior, scientific, peer, and staff mentorship. Begun in the Department of Pediatrics, the program was expanded in 2013 to include all departments in the school of medicine and the health sciences. During the two-year program, scholars learn management essentials and have leadership training designed to develop principal investigators. Of the 86 program participants since fiscal year 2008, 92% have received extramural awards, 99% remain in academic medicine, and 95% remain at the University of Utah. The CATS program has also been associated with increased inclusion of women and underrepresented minorities in the institutional research enterprise. The CATS program manifests institutional collaboration and coordination of resources, which have benefited faculty members and the institution. The model can be applied to other academic health centers to support and sustain the biomedical workforce.

  4. The Navigator: Role of the Cultural Mentor in Ensuring the Evolution of Diverse STEM Scientists and Researchers in the 21st Century and Beyond.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolman, J. R.

    2012-12-01

    Have you ever been lost? Knowing where you want to go yet unsure how to get there? In today's contemporary society you deploy the use of a navigator or navigation system. This is also one role of the cultural mentor in ensuring diverse students complete with excellence and success their route to research and education. The responsibilities of the cultural mentor are broad and the opportunity to expand one's own personal and professional success in science and society is immense. There remains a critical need and challenge to increase the representation of underrepresented people in the sciences. To address this challenge a navigational mentoring approach was developed centered on the incorporation of traditional knowledge into modern research and education. The approach incorporates defining cultural/personal choices for a STEM vocation, developing science research with a "purpose", and refining leadership. The model incorporates a mentor's personal oral histories and experiences in education, research and life. The goal is to ensure the next generation of scientists and researchers are more diverse, highly educated, experienced and leadership orientated by the time they complete STEM programs - then by the time they are our age, have our level of education and experience.

  5. A Matrix Mentoring Model That Effectively Supports Clinical and Translational Scientists and Increases Inclusion in Biomedical Research: Lessons From the University of Utah.

    PubMed

    Byington, Carrie L; Keenan, Heather; Phillips, John D; Childs, Rebecca; Wachs, Erin; Berzins, Mary Anne; Clark, Kim; Torres, Maria K; Abramson, Jan; Lee, Vivian; Clark, Edward B

    2016-04-01

    Physician-scientists and scientists in all the health professions are vital members of the U.S. biomedical workforce, but their numbers at academic health centers are declining. Mentorship has been identified as a key component in retention of faculty members at academic health centers. Effective mentoring may promote the retention of clinician-scientists in the biomedical workforce. The authors describe a holistic institutional mentoring program to support junior faculty members engaged in clinical and translational science at the University of Utah. The clinical and translational scholars (CATS) program leverages the resources of the institution, including the Center for Clinical and Translational Science, to augment departmental resources to support junior faculty investigators and uses a multilevel mentoring matrix that includes self, senior, scientific, peer, and staff mentorship. Begun in the Department of Pediatrics, the program was expanded in 2013 to include all departments in the school of medicine and the health sciences. During the two-year program, scholars learn management essentials and have leadership training designed to develop principal investigators. Of the 86 program participants since fiscal year 2008, 92% have received extramural awards, 99% remain in academic medicine, and 95% remain at the University of Utah. The CATS program has also been associated with increased inclusion of women and underrepresented minorities in the institutional research enterprise. The CATS program manifests institutional collaboration and coordination of resources, which have benefited faculty members and the institution. The model can be applied to other academic health centers to support and sustain the biomedical workforce. PMID:26650676

  6. A Matrix Mentoring Model That Effectively Supports Clinical and Translational Scientists and Increases Inclusion in Biomedical Research: Lessons From the University of Utah

    PubMed Central

    Keenan, Heather; Phillips, John D.; Childs, Rebecca; Wachs, Erin; Berzins, Mary Anne; Clark, Kim; Torres, Maria K.; Abramson, Jan; Lee, Vivian; Clark, Edward B.

    2016-01-01

    Physician–scientists and scientists in all the health professions are vital members of the U.S. biomedical workforce, but their numbers at academic health centers are declining. Mentorship has been identified as a key component in retention of faculty members at academic health centers. Effective mentoring may promote the retention of clinician–scientists in the biomedical workforce. The authors describe a holistic institutional mentoring program to support junior faculty members engaged in clinical and translational science at the University of Utah. The clinical and translational scholars (CATS) program leverages the resources of the institution, including the Center for Clinical and Translational Science, to augment departmental resources to support junior faculty investigators and uses a multilevel mentoring matrix that includes self, senior, scientific, peer, and staff mentorship. Begun in the Department of Pediatrics, the program was expanded in 2013 to include all departments in the school of medicine and the health sciences. During the two-year program, scholars learn management essentials and have leadership training designed to develop principal investigators. Of the 86 program participants since fiscal year 2008, 92% have received extramural awards, 99% remain in academic medicine, and 95% remain at the University of Utah. The CATS program has also been associated with increased inclusion of women and underrepresented minorities in the institutional research enterprise. The CATS program manifests institutional collaboration and coordination of resources, which have benefited faculty members and the institution. The model can be applied to other academic health centers to support and sustain the biomedical workforce. PMID:26650676

  7. Training and Mentoring the Next Generation of Scientists and Engineers to Secure Continuity and Successes of the US DOE's Environmental Remediation Efforts - 13387

    SciTech Connect

    Lagos, L.

    2013-07-01

    The DOE Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) oversees one of the largest and most technically challenging cleanup programs in the world. The mission of DOE-EM is to complete the safe cleanup of the environmental legacy from five decades of nuclear weapons development and government-sponsored nuclear energy research. Since 1995, Florida International University's Applied Research Center (FIU-ARC) has supported the DOE-EM mission and provided unique research capabilities to address some of these highly technical and difficult challenges. This partnership has allowed FIU-ARC to create a unique infrastructure that is critical for the training and mentoring of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) students and has exposed many STEM students to 'hands-on' DOE-EM applied research, supervised by the scientists and engineers at ARC. As a result of this successful partnership between DOE and FIU, DOE requested FIU-ARC to create the DOE-FIU Science and Technology Workforce Development Initiative in 2007. This innovative program was established to create a 'pipeline' of minority STEM students trained and mentored to enter DOE's environmental cleanup workforce. The program was designed to help address DOE's future workforce needs by partnering with academic, government and private companies (DOE contractors) to mentor future minority scientists and engineers in the research, development, and deployment of new technologies and processes addressing DOE's environmental cleanup challenges. Since its inception in 2007, the program has trained and mentored 78 FIU STEM minority students. Although, the program has been in existence for only five years, a total of 75 internships have been conducted at DOE National Laboratories, DOE sites, DOE Headquarters and field offices, and DOE contractors. Over 85 DOE Fellows have participated in the Waste Management Symposia since 2008 with a total of 68 student posters and 7 oral presentations given at WM. The DOE Fellows

  8. A tribute to Dr Willem J. Kolff: innovative inventor, physician, scientist, bioengineer, mentor, and significant contributor to modern cardiovascular surgical and anesthetic practice.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Theodore H

    2013-06-01

    Dr Willem J. Kolff was surely one of the greatest inventors/physicians/scientists/bioengineers of the last few hundred years. He was knighted (Commander of the Order of Oranje-Nassau) in 1970 by Queen Juliana of the Netherlands. In 1990, Life magazine published a list of its own 100 most important figures of the 20th century. Kolff stood in 99th place as the Father of Artificial Organs. Dr Kolff forged a path of innovative thinking and creativity that has had a huge impact on the quality of human life. His contributions to the development of the artificial kidney and dialysis, the heart-lung machine, the membrane oxygenator, potassium arrest of the heart, the AH, mechanical cardiac assistance, and other artificial organs, and his support and mentoring of hundreds to thousands of anesthesiologists, surgeons, and bioengineers throughout the world, have had a significant impact on anesthesiology and the medical community.

  9. Citizen Scientists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Katherine

    2010-01-01

    The Harvard Forest Schoolyard Ecology Program provides teachers and students with the opportunity and materials to participate in regionally focused ecological studies under the guidance of a mentor scientist working on a similar study. The Harvard Forest is part of a national network of ecological research sites known as the Long Term Ecological…

  10. Joseph v. Brady: Synthesis Reunites What Analysis Has Divided

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Travis

    2012-01-01

    Joseph V. Brady (1922-2011) created behavior-analytic neuroscience and the analytic framework for understanding how the external and internal neurobiological environments and mechanisms interact. Brady's approach offered synthesis as well as analysis. He embraced Findley's approach to constructing multioperant behavioral repertoires that found…

  11. Distance Mentoring in the NASA/Kennedy Space Center Virtual Science Mentor Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckingham, Gregg

    This study examines the results of a three year video mentoring program, the NASA Virtual Science Mentor (VSM) program, which paired 56 NASA mentor engineers and scientists with 56 middle school science teachers in seven Southwest Florida counties. The study sought to determine the impact on students, mentors, and teachers participating in the…

  12. Mentoring, Mentors and Proteges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peper, John B.

    This paper reports on research into the concept of mentoring from many educational perspectives, based on six papers presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association in April 1994. The paper notes that mentoring is a slippery concept, without a precise operational definition; definitions used in the six papers are…

  13. Joseph V. Brady: Synthesis Reunites What Analysis Has Divided

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Travis

    2012-01-01

    Joseph V. Brady (1922–2011) created behavior-analytic neuroscience and the analytic framework for understanding how the external and internal neurobiological environments and mechanisms interact. Brady's approach offered synthesis as well as analysis. He embraced Findley's approach to constructing multioperant behavioral repertoires that found their way into designing environments for astronauts as well as studying drug effects on human social behavior in microenvironments. Brady created translational neurobehavioral science before such a concept existed. One of his most lasting contributions was developing a framework for ethical decision making to protect the rights of the people who participate in scientific research. PMID:23450040

  14. Creating More Effective Mentors: Mentoring the Mentor.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Monica; Johnson, Mallory

    2016-09-01

    Given the diversity of those affected by HIV, increasing diversity in the HIV biomedical research workforce is imperative. A growing body of empirical and experimental evidence supports the importance of strong mentorship in the development and success of trainees and early career investigators in academic research settings, especially for mentees of diversity. Often missing from this discussion is the need for robust mentoring training programs to ensure that mentors are trained in best practices on the tools and techniques of mentoring. Recent experimental evidence shows improvement in mentor and mentee perceptions of mentor competency after structured and formalized training on best practices in mentoring. We developed a 2-day "Mentoring the Mentors" workshop at UCSF to train mid-level and senior HIV researchers from around the country [recruited mainly from Centers for AIDS Research (CFARs)] on best practices, tools and techniques of effective mentoring. The workshop content was designed using principles of Social Cognitive Career Theory (SCCT) and included training specifically geared towards working with early career investigators from underrepresented groups, including sessions on unconscious bias, microaggressions, and diversity supplements. The workshop has been held three times (September 2012, October 2013 and May 2015) with plans for annual training. Mentoring competency was measured using a validated tool before and after each workshop. Mentoring competency skills in six domains of mentoring-specifically effective communication, aligning expectations, assessing understanding, fostering independence, addressing diversity and promoting development-all improved as assessed by a validated measurement tool for participants pre- and -post the "Mentoring the Mentors" training workshops. Qualitative assessments indicated a greater awareness of the micro-insults and unconscious bias experienced by mentees of diversity and a commitment to improve awareness and

  15. Creating More Effective Mentors: Mentoring the Mentor.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Monica; Johnson, Mallory

    2016-09-01

    Given the diversity of those affected by HIV, increasing diversity in the HIV biomedical research workforce is imperative. A growing body of empirical and experimental evidence supports the importance of strong mentorship in the development and success of trainees and early career investigators in academic research settings, especially for mentees of diversity. Often missing from this discussion is the need for robust mentoring training programs to ensure that mentors are trained in best practices on the tools and techniques of mentoring. Recent experimental evidence shows improvement in mentor and mentee perceptions of mentor competency after structured and formalized training on best practices in mentoring. We developed a 2-day "Mentoring the Mentors" workshop at UCSF to train mid-level and senior HIV researchers from around the country [recruited mainly from Centers for AIDS Research (CFARs)] on best practices, tools and techniques of effective mentoring. The workshop content was designed using principles of Social Cognitive Career Theory (SCCT) and included training specifically geared towards working with early career investigators from underrepresented groups, including sessions on unconscious bias, microaggressions, and diversity supplements. The workshop has been held three times (September 2012, October 2013 and May 2015) with plans for annual training. Mentoring competency was measured using a validated tool before and after each workshop. Mentoring competency skills in six domains of mentoring-specifically effective communication, aligning expectations, assessing understanding, fostering independence, addressing diversity and promoting development-all improved as assessed by a validated measurement tool for participants pre- and -post the "Mentoring the Mentors" training workshops. Qualitative assessments indicated a greater awareness of the micro-insults and unconscious bias experienced by mentees of diversity and a commitment to improve awareness and

  16. Mentoring in epidemiology and public health training.

    PubMed

    Davis, Faith G

    2013-08-01

    In the past, mentoring was the job of one senior researcher in which the mentor molded the mentee in his/her own image. With public health being a very multidisciplinary field, mentoring may need to evolve to facilitate the needs of emerging scientists-including epidemiologists. The mentoring relationship can begin at many education stages, including high school. Involving students at all education levels acts as a way to recruit and nurture interest in public health. On the basis of the experience in the medical sciences, mentoring programs also can be used to recruit and retain high-quality professionals in our discipline. Mentoring functions nurture a young mentee with the bonus of greater workplace satisfaction for the mentor. Nevertheless, more understanding of what constitutes successful mentoring and how to develop programs that create great mentors is needed.

  17. The Scientific Mentor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodia, Becky

    2004-01-01

    This article describes the Cornell Science Challenge, an annual science fair held at Olin Hall at Weill Medical College of Cornell University. This science fair features seventh graders from East Middle School in New York who have been mentored for three months by actual scientists (graduate students, faculty members, laboratory technicians, and…

  18. Mentor Connections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sciarappa, Kathleen

    2010-01-01

    Jargon associated with mentoring can be confusing. Is a new leader involved in induction, being mentored, or experiencing coaching? Induction is meant to familiarize a new employee with the details and scope of job responsibilities, while mentoring and coaching are directed at skill development. Elementary and secondary principals rate mentoring…

  19. Mutual Mentoring Makes Better Mentors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaha, Cindy; Bug, Amy; Cox, Anne; Fritz, Linda; Whitten, Barbara

    2011-03-01

    In this talk we discuss one of the impacts of an NSF ADVANCE sponsored horizontal, mutual mentoring alliance. Our cohort of five women physicists at liberal arts colleges has found that mutual mentoring has had a profound impact on many aspects of our professional lives. In this talk we will describe how our peer-to-peer mentoring has enabled us to become better mentors for our undergraduate students, for recent graduates beginning their careers and for colleagues at local and neighboring institutions.

  20. Lighting the fire with mentoring relationships.

    PubMed

    Hadidi, Niloufar Niakosari; Lindquist, Ruth; Buckwalter, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    Mentoring provides fuel to advance nursing science and ensure a growing cadre of career nurse scientists. With the demand for well-prepared nursing faculty in the area of academic geriatrics, mentoring by expert faculty provides an optimal opportunity for retention and growth of junior faculty. Reflecting on 2 years of a mentoring relationship in the Hartford Building Academic Geriatric Nursing Capacity (BAGNC) postdoctoral scholar program, the BAGNC Claire M. Fagin Fellowship, the authors describe the desired attributes of mentoring relationships that were beneficial to the career of the mentored junior faculty member and were satisfying to the mentors. From the perspective of mentors and mentee, the authors describe the stages of a mentoring relationship and the ingredients of this transforming experience, as well as barriers, challenges, rewards, and lessons learned.

  1. Pioneer in Behavioral Pharmacology: A Tribute to Joseph V. Brady

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, James E.

    2008-01-01

    The contributions of Joseph V. Brady to behavioral pharmacology span more than 50 years and range from early studies using the Estes-Skinner ("conditioned emotional response") procedure to examine drug effects and various physiological processes in experimental animals to the implementation of mobile methadone treatment services and to small group…

  2. 37. Photocopy of photograph (from Brady Handy Collection, Library of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    37. Photocopy of photograph (from Brady Handy Collection, Library of Congress, #BH 8234-48) Photographer unknown, ca. 1910 SOUTH FRONT FROM THE WEST (4 x 5 negative, 8 x 10 print) - Patent Office Building, Bounded by Seventh, Ninth, F & G Streets, Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  3. Principal Mentoring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malone, Robert

    2001-01-01

    Increasing evidence shows that school leaders, throughout all stages of their careers, can benefit from a mentoring system in which a seasoned leader helps the protege combine theory and practice with experience. This research roundup reviews works that provide support for principal mentoring and share strategies for establishing mentoring…

  4. [Mentoring program].

    PubMed

    Watanabe, N

    2001-11-01

    Due to drastic changes in the business environment and prolonged recession, stress management practices in business organizations have been encountering two kinds of problems: budget cuts and difficulties in the delivery of services. The feasibility of mentoring programs to cope with these two problems is discussed. Through an extensive review of the literature, it becomes clear that mentoring programs have the following features and advantages; (1) One to one relationship between elder mentor and younger protégé has a favorable effect on the both mentor and protégé's mental health. (2) Formal mentoring programs are widely used in the U.S. for the prevention of juvenile delinquency, professional education, and human resource development in business settings. (3) Mentoring programs, in general, are practiced with the cooperation of kindred volunteers and professionals who monitor the mentor-protégé relationships. (4) Since a mentoring program utilizes a wide range of human resources in work organizations, it is able to overcome the "budget and delivery" problems. Further discussions are about the comparison with listener programs as well as the relationship with the total human resource management system. PMID:11802451

  5. Mentoring Matters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Highsmith, Robert J.; Denes, Ronni; Pierre, Marie M.

    1998-01-01

    The National Action Council for Minorities in Engineering (NACME) mentors underrepresented students and encourages their significant achievements in science, mathematics, and engineering. NACME develops many of its mentoring strategies through its Corporate Scholars Program (CSP), a comprehensive scholarship program that links engineering…

  6. STS-78 Mission Specialist Charles E. Brady suits up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    STS-78 Mission Specialist Charles E. Brady Jr. is donning his launch/entry suit in the Operations and Checkout Building. A spaceflight rookie, Brady was selected by NASA to join the astronaut corps in March 1992; he is a medical doctor who also is a commander in the U.S. Navy. Along with six fellow crew members, he will depart the O&C in a short while and head for Launch Pad 39B, where the Space Shuttle Columbia awaits liftoff during a two-and-a-half hour launch window opening at 10:49 a.m. EDT, June 20. STS-78 will be an extended duration flight during which extensive research will be conducted in the Life and Microgravity Spacelab (LMS) located in the payload bay.

  7. Strengthening Self-efficacy through Supportive Mentoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haacker, R.

    2015-12-01

    The geosciences have had a chronic problem of underrepresentation of students from diverse ethnic, cultural, gender and socio-economic backgrounds. As a community we need to strengthen our support of young scientists from all backgrounds to sustain their enthusiasm and ensure their success in our field. Investing in mentoring programs that empower students and young professionals is one of the best ways to do so. The Significant Opportunities in Atmospheric Research and Science (SOARS) program, now entering its 20th year, has successfully developed and tested several mentoring models. The personalized, caring and consistent support is one of the key elements of the program's success; since its inception, 90% of SOARS participants have entered graduate school, research or science related careers after graduation. Many of our alumni who are now faculty apply the same mentoring strategies to build self-esteem and perseverance in their students. This presentation will cover the design and implementation of our four mentoring strategies, and provide insights on potential challenges, training aspects and impact assessment. The mentoring strategies include: 1) Multi-faceted, long-term mentoring of undergraduate and graduate students from diverse backgrounds. 2) Empowering advanced students to serve as peer mentors and role models. 3) Training faculty and professional scientists from all backgrounds to become mentors who are aware of diversity issues. 4) Providing mentor training for partner programs and laboratories. All four strategies have contributed to the creation of a mentoring culture in the geosciences.

  8. The structural history of the Brady Unit, Sweetwater County, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Folcik, J.L.; Mead, R.H.

    1995-06-01

    The Brady Unit is a 100MMBOE+, structural closure on the upthrown side of a large high-angle reverse fault on the east flank of the Rock Springs Uplift. It produces from seven different intervals ranging from the Upper Cretaceous Masaverde Group to the Pennsylvainian Weber Formation, at depths of 5000` to 14000`. The Weber Formation is a 900` thick package of dune and interdune sediments which is productive in its upper third. The south structure is filled close to it`s spill point with a retrograde condensate. Condensate gravity is approximately 51.5{degrees} and a typical initial GOR is 5000:1. The north structure has an unknown gas column with an initial GOR of 27,900:1. The Upper Jurassic Entrada Formation consists of eolian, interdune and shoreline sandstones. The enigmatic nature of the Entrada at Brady stews from the fact that it has a gas column of at least 180` in the lower north structure and it is porous and wet in the higher south structure. This difference becomes are curious when coupled with the fact that five other formations, both younger and older produce on both structures. A 3-D seismic survey was shot over Brady in 1993. Isochrons indicate that the north structure existed prior to Madison deposition. The south structure didn`t become significant until the Upper Cretaceous. The structural history as indicated by a series of isochrons is used to explain the differences in hydrocarbon content of the two structures.

  9. Klotho protein lowered in senile patients with brady sinus arrhythmia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Yang, Wei; Zheng, Ernv; Zhang, Wei; Su, Xianming

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To explore the correlationship between brady sinus arrhythmia and the levels of serum klotho protein in aged. Methods: 104 patients over 75 years old with brady sinus arrhythmia (experiment group) were enrolled, including 34 cases of sinus arrest, 43 cases of sinus bradycardia and 25 cases of atrioventricular block. 109 patients over 75 years old without brady sinus arrhymia were chosen as control group. All subjects were monitored by Holter. The levels of serum klotho protein were detected and compared among three groups. The correlation between the frequency of sinus arrest and the levels of serum klotho protein was analyzed simultaneously. Results: The levels of serum klotho protein in experiment group were lower than that in control group (P<0.01); the sinus arrest frequency was negatively correlated with the levels of serum klotho protien. The levels of serum klotho protein in patients with sinus arrest were lower than that with sinus bradycardia and atrioventricularblock (P<0.05). But there was no significant difference between sinus bradycardia group and atrioventricular block group. Conclusion: The levels of serum klotho protein may reflect the function of sinoatrial node and could be used as an index to estimate the function of sinoatrial node. PMID:26550342

  10. ARM Mentor Selection Process

    SciTech Connect

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2015-10-01

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program was created in 1989 with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to develop several highly instrumented ground stations to study cloud formation processes and their influence on radiative transfer. In 2003, the ARM Program became a national scientific user facility, known as the ARM Climate Research Facility. This scientific infrastructure provides for fixed sites, mobile facilities, an aerial facility, and a data archive available for use by scientists worldwide through the ARM Climate Research Facility—a scientific user facility. The ARM Climate Research Facility currently operates more than 300 instrument systems that provide ground-based observations of the atmospheric column. To keep ARM at the forefront of climate observations, the ARM infrastructure depends heavily on instrument scientists and engineers, also known as lead mentors. Lead mentors must have an excellent understanding of in situ and remote-sensing instrumentation theory and operation and have comprehensive knowledge of critical scale-dependent atmospheric processes. They must also possess the technical and analytical skills to develop new data retrievals that provide innovative approaches for creating research-quality data sets. The ARM Climate Research Facility is seeking the best overall qualified candidate who can fulfill lead mentor requirements in a timely manner.

  11. Youth Mentoring: Program and Mentor Best Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anastasia, Trena T.; Skinner, Rebecca L.; Mundhenk, Samantha E.

    2012-01-01

    Youth mentoring programs have been on the rise for the past few decades, yet little has been done to synthesize best practices, as identified in existing research, for programs or mentors to follow. In a review of the literature on mentoring, eight different types of mentoring relationships were identified along with four program best practices…

  12. ARM Lead Mentor Selection Process

    SciTech Connect

    Sisterson, DL

    2013-03-13

    The ARM Climate Research Facility currently operates more than 300 instrument systems that provide ground-based observations of the atmospheric column. To keep ARM at the forefront of climate observations, the ARM infrastructure depends heavily on instrument scientists and engineers, also known as Instrument Mentors. Instrument Mentors must have an excellent understanding of in situ and remote-sensing instrumentation theory and operation and have comprehensive knowledge of critical scale-dependent atmospheric processes. They also possess the technical and analytical skills to develop new data retrievals that provide innovative approaches for creating research-quality data sets.

  13. Online Mentoring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duff, Carole

    2000-01-01

    When Urseline Academy girls need career advice, academic guidance, or personal support, they e-mail their mentors--professional women in the Dallas area whose "real-world" knowledge helps the students make informed choices. The program is an outgrowth of a summer internship program stressing student-centered learning. (MLH)

  14. Mentoring Leadership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hibert, Kirsten Mikel

    2000-01-01

    An assistant principal describes longterm benefits from her mentoring relationship with the principal of Santa Monica (California) High School. Chagrined at her principal's close, hands-on supervisory style, the assistant principal gradually gained experience and confidence. She learned that leadership is about serving others, compassion, and…

  15. Mentoring Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spangler, Susan

    2010-01-01

    As the author demonstrates, whenever preservice or beginning teachers observe a veteran teacher in action, the veteran serves as a mentor, in the sense that the experienced teacher is modeling the practices that can influence the newcomer. In this article, the author reminds educators about the importance of formative assessments, not just of the…

  16. Online Mentors: Experimenting in Science Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neil, D. Kevin; Gomez, Louis M.

    1996-01-01

    Describes a Northwestern University project exploring how to orchestrate distant mentoring ("telementoring") relationships between science students and workplace scientists. The goal was to develop an audience of (volunteer) scientists to offer students ongoing advice and criticism. Challenges included finding appropriate volunteers, sustaining…

  17. The vascular surgeon-scientist: a 15-year report of the Society for Vascular Surgery Foundation/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute-mentored Career Development Award Program.

    PubMed

    Kibbe, Melina R; Dardik, Alan; Velazquez, Omaida C; Conte, Michael S

    2015-04-01

    The Society for Vascular Surgery (SVS) Foundation partnered with the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in 1999 to initiate a competitive career development program that provides a financial supplement to surgeon-scientists receiving NIH K08 or K23 career development awards. Because the program has been in existence for 15 years, a review of the program's success has been performed. Between 1999 and 2013, 41 faculty members applied to the SVS Foundation program, and 29 from 21 different institutions were selected as awardees, resulting in a 71% success rate. Three women (10%) were among the 29 awardees. Nine awardees (31%) were supported by prior NIH F32 or T32 training grants. Awardees received their K award at an average of 3.5 years from the start of their faculty position, at the average age of 39.8 years. Thirteen awardees (45%) have subsequently received NIH R01 awards and five (17%) have received Veterans Affairs Merit Awards. Awardees received their first R01 at an average of 5.8 years after the start of their K award at the average age of 45.2 years. The SVS Foundation committed $9,350,000 to the Career Development Award Program. Awardees subsequently secured $45,108,174 in NIH and Veterans Affairs funds, resulting in a 4.8-fold financial return on investment for the SVS Foundation program. Overall, 23 awardees (79%) were promoted from assistant to associate professor in an average of 5.9 years, and 10 (34%) were promoted from associate professor to professor in an average of 5.2 years. Six awardees (21%) hold endowed professorships and four (14%) have secured tenure. Many of the awardees hold positions of leadership, including 12 (41%) as division chief and two (7%) as vice chair within a department of surgery. Eight (28%) awardees have served as president of a regional or national society. Lastly, 47 postdoctoral trainees have been mentored by recipients of the SVS Foundation Career Development

  18. Mentoring and Its Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaston, Joy S.; Jackson, Jerlando F. L.

    This paper explores the topic of mentoring and its practical implications. Mentoring requirements have changed over time. Today's mentors are influential people who significantly help others reach major life goals. Mentoring has to address broad, dynamic goals in today's society. Benefits for mentors can include enhanced self-esteem, rejuvenated…

  19. Mentoring in Parallel Universes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Compton-Hall, Margaret

    2002-01-01

    Investigates the mentoring relationship the author established with students, and determines how her experiences and the mentoring she received from her professors influenced her mentoring practices with her own graduate students. Confirms the dynamic nature of the mentoring process, and notes how her mentors influenced her practices but also…

  20. John N. Brady (1952-2009): a Generous Spirit

    PubMed Central

    Enquist, Lynn W.

    2009-01-01

    John N. Brady, Chief of the Virus Tumor Biology Section of the Laboratory of Cellular Oncology, National Institutes of Health, died of cancer on 27 April 2009. John was a stellar member of the virology community. He was a longtime Journal of Virology reviewer and a member of the editorial board. He will be missed. Fatah Kashanchi of the George Washington University Medical Center has written John's memorial. Fatah worked with John at the NIH and published more than 30 papers with him. Fatah thanks all the people who contributed to John's obituary, including Kuan-Teh Jeang, Lou Laimins, Mary Loeken, Renaud Mehieux, Paul Lambert, Graziella Piras, Scott Gitlin, Paul Lindholm, Nadia Rosenthal, Sergi Nekhai, Brian Wigdahl, David Price, Susan J. Marriott, Cynthia Masison, Jurgen Dittmer, Eric Verdin, Bassel E. Sawaya, and John's longtime assistants Janet Duvall Grimm and Michael Radonovich, who gave immense support to all the individuals who went through John's lab. PMID:19474098

  1. Mentor awards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    The Association of Women in Science (AWIS) and the American Indian Science and Engineering Society (AISES) were two of 19 institutions and individuals that received presidential awards for excellence in science, mathematics, and engineering mentoring, on September 11.Neal Lane, Director of the National Science Foundation, says the awards, which include $10,000 grants, recognize “individuals and institutions working to heighten the participation of underrepresented groups in science, mathematics, and engineering.”

  2. Csaba Horvath - Scholar, Scientist, Mentor, Friend

    SciTech Connect

    Beaver, Lois; Guiochon, Georges A

    2005-09-01

    At Farbwerke Hoechst, Csaba did research and development work on the surface chemistry of organic pigment dyes and learned about the practical aspects of surface chemistry. During his doctoral research, Csaba invented and developed porous-layer open tubular columns which offers remarkable advantages over wall-coated OTC, e.g., a higher loadability and the ability to use all retention mechanisms afforded by adsorption. He also prepared surface-treated beads, an approach that he used later in the context of HPLC. Working with S.R. Lipsky on the development of analytical methodologies for lunar samples, searching for trace compounds which could show the presence of life on the moon in a distant past, he imagined applying to LC the same principles that he had used earlier in GC, and built the first instrument for high pressure liquid chromatography. Very early, he understood the potential of this new separation method to revolutionize biochemistry and molecular biology. Working for Picker-Nuclear, Csaba developed the first commercial instrument for HPLC, which was also the first instrument to use microbore HPLC columns (for ion-exchange separations of biological compounds). From the beginning, Csaba focused his interests on the separation of samples of biological origin, becoming the pioneer of modern bioanalytical chemistry. He devoted considerable attention to the development of the theory and applications of reversed-phase liquid chromatography, the most widely applied chromatographic method of analysis, pioneered the use of displacement chromatography for preparative HPLC, and innumerable applications of HPLC to the separation of samples of biological origin. He developed the solvophobic theory of retention in RPLC, the use of entropy-enthalpy compensation in the study of retention mechanisms, and the fundamentals of electrochromatography. The importance of his spearheading HPLC, RPLC, and their applications in the life sciences, fields in which these new methods are leading to countless breakthroughs, is such that his contributions will remain among the major scientific achievemetns of the 20th century.

  3. Mentors without Borders.

    PubMed

    Muenke, Maximilian

    2016-09-01

    Mentors without Borders is a proposed international mentoring network that allows trainee geneticists to identify mentors from a list of volunteers who are not at one's own institution. It is an experiment, a matchmaker between a junior and a senior professional. These mentors do not replace the mentors at the home institution but allow the mentee, if desired, to identify mentors outside of their own institution. We envision that different ways of communicating and/or different mentor-mentee relationships may prove beneficial to the trainee and the mentor. PMID:27652276

  4. Mentor Policy and the Quality of Mentoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polikoff, Morgan S.; Desimone, Laura M.; Porter, Andrew C.; Hochberg, Eric D.

    2015-01-01

    Mentoring is a common form of support for beginning teachers. State and district mentoring policies vary along a number of dimensions, yet policymakers have little evidence to draw on in designing effective mentoring programs. We use quantitative and qualitative data from a study of beginning middle school mathematics teachers in 10 districts to…

  5. Mapping Mentor Teachers' Roles in Mentoring Dialogues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hennissen, Paul; Crasborn, Frank; Brouwer, Niels; Korthagen, Fred; Bergen, Theo

    2008-01-01

    This literature study deals with the issue of how to conceptualize the supervisory behaviour of mentor teachers in mentoring dialogues by systematically examining empirical literature on key aspects of mentor teachers' behaviour during dialogues with prospective teachers. From the findings a model is derived which can be used to study mentor…

  6. Community Contexts for Mentoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Stephen F.; Hamilton, Mary Agnes; Hirsch, Barton J.; Hughes, Jan; King, Jacqueline; Maton, Kenneth

    2006-01-01

    Mentoring programs attempt to foster a relationship that is too often missing from the lives of disadvantaged children and youth. However, in view of both the power and the limitations of mentoring programs, it is important to understand how mentoring occurs naturally. Assuming an ecological perspective, we examine mentoring in four contexts:…

  7. Teachers as Mentors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Dawn; Parsons, Jim

    This paper describes the importance of teachers mentoring one another, exploring what mentorship means and reviewing literature that examines its different stages, benefits, and pitfalls. After presenting two teachers' stories of being mentored, the paper describes mentoring relationships, then highlights the stages of mentoring: invitation stage,…

  8. Mentoring. Beginnings Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scallan-Berl, Patricia; Moguil, Leslie; Nyman, Sessy I.; Mercado, Miriam Mercado

    2003-01-01

    This workshop presents information on mentoring relationships within child care settings. Articles are: (1) "Mentoring Teachers...A Partnership in Learning" (Patricia Scallan-Berl); (2) "The Potential Gains of Peer Mentoring among Children" (Leslie Moguil); (3) "Mentoring Advocates in the Context of Early Childhood Education" (Sessy Nyman); and…

  9. Mentoring Distance Learners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeeb, Patricia

    2000-01-01

    Defines mentoring, focusing on its use in distance education. Outlines categories of mentoring--traditional, peer, group or team, and online or virtual (telementoring). Discusses mentoring and technological change types of mentors in distance education classes; the role of computer-mediated communications; and decreasing attrition by pairing…

  10. The development, implementation, and assessment of an innovative faculty mentoring leadership program.

    PubMed

    Tsen, Lawrence C; Borus, Jonathan F; Nadelson, Carol C; Seely, Ellen W; Haas, Audrey; Fuhlbrigge, Anne L

    2012-12-01

    Effective mentoring is an important component of academic success. Few programs exist to both improve the effectiveness of established mentors and cultivate a multispecialty mentoring community. In 2008, in response to a faculty survey on mentoring, leaders at Brigham and Women's Hospital developed the Faculty Mentoring Leadership Program as a peer learning experience for midcareer and senior faculty physician and scientist mentors to enhance their skills and leadership in mentoring and create a supportive community of mentors. A planning group representing key administrative, educational, clinical, and research mentorship constituencies designed the nine-month course.Participants met monthly for an hour and a half during lunchtime. Two cofacilitators engaged the diverse group of 16 participants in interactive discussions about cases based on the participants' experiences. While the cofacilitators discussed with the participants the dyadic mentor-mentee relationship, they specifically emphasized the value of engaging multiple mentors and establishing mentoring networks. In response to postsession and postcourse (both immediately and after six months) self-assessments, participants reported substantive gains in their mentoring confidence and effectiveness, experienced a renewed sense of enthusiasm for mentoring, and took initial steps to build a diverse network of mentoring relationships.In this article, the authors describe the rationale, design, implementation, assessment, and ongoing impact of this innovative faculty mentoring leadership program. They also share lessons learned for other institutions that are contemplating developing a similar faculty mentoring program.

  11. "Biomedical Workforce Diversity: The Context for Mentoring to Develop Talents and Foster Success Within the 'Pipeline'".

    PubMed

    McGee, Richard

    2016-09-01

    Like all biomedical research fields, AIDS research needs the broadest diversity of experiences and perspectives among researchers in the field if creative advancements are to be achieved. Mentors and mentoring are the most important vehicles by which the talents of young scientists are developed. However, mentoring as a teaching and learning paradigm is very complex and idiosyncratic, and often inadvertently fails to provide the same quality and quantity of opportunity to aspiring scientists who are 'different' from those doing the mentoring. This article provides a theoretical and practical framework for understanding how differences of race, ethnicity, gender, skin color, social status and other identifiable characteristics can play into scientific development during mentoring 'within the pipeline'. It also serves as a foundation upon which mentoring in AIDS is considered by subsequent papers in this series. Finally, it goes beyond mentoring to propose systematic coaching as an effective complement to research mentoring to promote success, especially for individuals from underrepresented groups.

  12. "Biomedical Workforce Diversity: The Context for Mentoring to Develop Talents and Foster Success Within the 'Pipeline'".

    PubMed

    McGee, Richard

    2016-09-01

    Like all biomedical research fields, AIDS research needs the broadest diversity of experiences and perspectives among researchers in the field if creative advancements are to be achieved. Mentors and mentoring are the most important vehicles by which the talents of young scientists are developed. However, mentoring as a teaching and learning paradigm is very complex and idiosyncratic, and often inadvertently fails to provide the same quality and quantity of opportunity to aspiring scientists who are 'different' from those doing the mentoring. This article provides a theoretical and practical framework for understanding how differences of race, ethnicity, gender, skin color, social status and other identifiable characteristics can play into scientific development during mentoring 'within the pipeline'. It also serves as a foundation upon which mentoring in AIDS is considered by subsequent papers in this series. Finally, it goes beyond mentoring to propose systematic coaching as an effective complement to research mentoring to promote success, especially for individuals from underrepresented groups. PMID:27424004

  13. The Brady Bunch? New evidence for nominative determinism in patients’ health: retrospective, population based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Groarke, John D; Galvin, Zita; McGorrian, Catherine; McCann, Hugh A; Sugrue, Declan; Keelan, Edward; Galvin, Joseph; Blake, Gavin; Mahon, Niall G; O’Neill, James

    2013-01-01

    Objective To ascertain whether a name can influence a person’s health, by assessing whether people with the surname “Brady” have an increased prevalence of bradycardia. Design Retrospective, population based cohort study. Setting One university teaching hospital in Dublin, Ireland. Participants People with the surname “Brady” in Dublin, determined through use of an online telephone directory. Main outcome measure Prevalence of participants who had pacemakers inserted for bradycardia between 1 January 2007 and 28 February 2013. Results 579 (0.36%) of 161 967 people who were listed on the Dublin telephone listings had the surname “Brady.” The proportion of pacemaker recipients was significantly higher among Bradys (n=8, 1.38%) than among non-Bradys (n=991, 0.61%; P=0.03). The unadjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval) for pacemaker implantation among individuals with the surname Brady compared with individuals with other surnames was 2.27 (1.13 to 4.57). Conclusions Patients named Brady are at increased risk of needing pacemaker implantation compared with the general population. This finding shows a potential role for nominative determinism in health. PMID:24336304

  14. The Mentor Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vujovich, Lisa

    This document presents materials to assist individuals responsible for coordinating mentor programs at career academies and materials to assist mentors. Section 1, which is addressed to coordinators, contains guidelines pertaining to the following aspects of planning and implementing mentor programs: policies and procedures; budgeting and funding;…

  15. Writing with Mentors (DVD)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorfman, Lynne; Cappelli, Rose

    2010-01-01

    When learning how to write well, there is nothing more powerful than examining the work of the writers we admire. Real writers need mentors--those writers who inspire us and demonstrate through their style and craft how we, too, can be successful writers. In "Writing with Mentors", Lynne Dorfman and Rose Cappelli, authors of "Mentor Texts" and…

  16. Mentoring New Science Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shea, Kathleen; Greenwood, Anita

    2007-01-01

    Most experienced high school science teachers are asked at some point to serve as a mentor to a novice teacher. While mentor-training programs have been established in many states, they often only focus on how the mentor can help new science teachers understand and negotiate the school culture, such as how the school runs and where supplies are…

  17. The Good Mentor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowley, James B.

    1999-01-01

    There are six basic qualities of good mentoring: commitment to the mentoring role, acceptance of beginning teachers, proficiency at providing instructional support, interpersonal effectiveness, skill at modeling continuous learning, and ability to communicate hope and optimism. A sidebar explains the Mentoring Leadership and Resource network. (10…

  18. Creating Community through Mentoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, Deborah E.; Travick-Jackson, Cecelia

    2006-01-01

    This research studies a doctoral program that includes a cohort component. Candidates engage in active learning and in the skill of mentoring. Research on peer mentoring has shown to support graduate students as they progress in their study (Luna & Cullen, 1998). Analysis of the data found themes relating to mentoring and community: candidates…

  19. Mentoring Women Principals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arthur, Cheryl A.; Salsberry, Trudy A.

    2005-01-01

    This review of the literature focuses first on the common reasons for the need for mentoring (professional development, changing roles, principal shortage, under representation of women, and barriers) and continues with a definition and description of mentoring. Finally, the current status of mentoring is summarized followed by a discussion of the…

  20. Evaluating Mentoring Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IUME Briefs, 1992

    1992-01-01

    Mentoring has a mystique that only good can come from it, that at the worst, mentoring programs will not accomplish all that they could, but the youth served will at least be better for the experience. Both impact and process evaluations are needed to answer questions about the real benefits and any potential adverse effects of mentoring. The…

  1. Mentoring: A Representative Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norton, Cheryl S.

    This annotated bibliography provides a representative sample of the available literature on mentoring. It reviews both qualitative and quantitative research, and covers specific mentoring programs, program implementation, and testimonials to the benefits of mentoring. Materials covered include 40 journal articles, conference papers, books, and…

  2. The Mathew Brady Bunch: Civil War Newspapers. Learning Page Lesson Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donnelly, Amy; Ridgway, Elizabeth

    The Civil War was the first American war thoroughly caught on film. Mathew Brady and his crew of photographers captured many images of this divisive war, ranging from portraits to battle scenes. These photographs--over 1,000--are in the American Memory Collection's "Selected Civil War Photographs, 1861-1865." This lesson plan asks students to…

  3. Evaluating virtual STEM mentoring programs: The SAGANet.org experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Som, S. M.; Walker, S. I.; Miller, E.; Anbar, M.; Kacar, B.; Forrester, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    Many school districts within the United States continue to seek new ways of engaging students within Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) disciplines. SAGANet.org, a web-based 501c3 Astrobiology outreach initiative, works with a number of schools, partnering K-12 students and their families with professional scientist mentors from around the world to teach and inspire students using virtual technology platforms. Current programs include two mentoring partnerships: pairing scientist-mentors with at-risk youth at the Pittsburg Community School in Pittsburg CA, and pairing scientist-mentors with families from the Kyrene del Cielo Elementary School in Chandler AZ. These programs represent two very different models for utilizing the virtual media platform provided by SAGANet.org to engage K-12 students and their families in STEM. For the former, scientists mentor the students of the Pittsburg School as part of the formal in-class curriculum. For the latter, scientists work with K-5 students and their families through Cielo's Science & Engineering Discovery Room to develop a science project as part of an informal learning experience that is independent of the formal curriculum. In this presentation, we (1) discuss the challenges and successes of engaging these two distinct audiences through virtual media, (2) present the results of how these two very-different mentoring partnership impact K-12 students science self-efficacy, interest in science, and STEM career awareness, and (3) share the impact of the mentoring experience on the mentor's confidence and self-efficacy with communicating science to the public.

  4. Mentoring for retention and advancement in the multigenerational clinical laboratory.

    PubMed

    Laudicina, R J

    2001-01-01

    Retention of recent graduates and other laboratory practitioners in the workplace will play a key role in addressing current and projected shortages of clinical laboratory scientists (CLS) and technicians (CLT). In addition, with overrepresentation of the aging Baby Boomer generation in laboratory supervisory and management positions, it is crucial not only to retain younger practitioners, but to prepare them for assuming these important functions in the future. Mentoring, a practice commonly employed in other professions, is widely considered to be useful in employee retention and career advancement. Mentoring has probably been used in the clinical laboratory profession, but has not been well documented. In the clinical laboratory environment, potential mentors are in the Veteran and Baby Boomer generations, and new practitioners who could benefit from mentoring are in Generation X. Generational differences among these groups may present challenges to the use of mentoring. This article will attempt to provide a better understanding of generational differences and show how mentoring can be applied in the setting of the clinical laboratory in order to increase retention and promote career advancement of younger practitioners. A panel of five laboratory managers provided examples of mentoring strategies. Definitions, benefits, and examples of mentoring are addressed in the accompanying article, "Passing the Torch: Mentoring the Next Generation of Laboratory Professionals". PMID:15633495

  5. Mentoring for retention and advancement in the multigenerational clinical laboratory.

    PubMed

    Laudicina, R J

    2001-01-01

    Retention of recent graduates and other laboratory practitioners in the workplace will play a key role in addressing current and projected shortages of clinical laboratory scientists (CLS) and technicians (CLT). In addition, with overrepresentation of the aging Baby Boomer generation in laboratory supervisory and management positions, it is crucial not only to retain younger practitioners, but to prepare them for assuming these important functions in the future. Mentoring, a practice commonly employed in other professions, is widely considered to be useful in employee retention and career advancement. Mentoring has probably been used in the clinical laboratory profession, but has not been well documented. In the clinical laboratory environment, potential mentors are in the Veteran and Baby Boomer generations, and new practitioners who could benefit from mentoring are in Generation X. Generational differences among these groups may present challenges to the use of mentoring. This article will attempt to provide a better understanding of generational differences and show how mentoring can be applied in the setting of the clinical laboratory in order to increase retention and promote career advancement of younger practitioners. A panel of five laboratory managers provided examples of mentoring strategies. Definitions, benefits, and examples of mentoring are addressed in the accompanying article, "Passing the Torch: Mentoring the Next Generation of Laboratory Professionals".

  6. Mentoring for Protege Character Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moberg, Dennis J.

    2008-01-01

    As role models, mentors serve as moral exemplars to their proteges. Yet, since the mentoring literature gives scant attention to the mentor's role in protege moral education, mentors are largely unwitting participants in this process. Grounded in research from moral psychology and philosophy, this article provides guidance to mentors who want to…

  7. Helping early career research scientists ascend the professional ladder.

    PubMed

    King, Laina

    2013-08-01

    The Keystone Symposia Early Career Investigator Travel Award initiative is a unique successful research mentoring program tailored for 'end of the pipeline' life and biomedical scientists from academia and industry. Using targeted educational, mentoring, and networking activities, the program benefits early career scientists in solving a specific laboratory-based research question that is limiting their evolving research and could increase their ability to obtain new grants and improve their career progression. PMID:23889774

  8. Medical Scientists

    MedlinePlus

    ... scientists typically have a Ph.D., usually in biology or a related life science. Some medical scientists ... specialize in this field seek to understand the biology of aging and investigate ways to improve the ...

  9. Mentoring for new consultants.

    PubMed

    Ackroyd, R; Adamson, K A

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing evidence of the benefits of having a mentor during the early years as a consultant. Mentoring encourages and provides support to an individual in their professional development. Although there are different forms of mentoring there is recognition that developing a formal mentoring scheme can provide a consistent approach and support within a framework. The Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh has introduced a mentoring scheme for new consultants that provides a forum for supporting them in their ongoing professional wellbeing. There is potential that the process of mentoring can improve an individual's development, and motivate and encourage them to develop the skills needed to achieve their goals, thus having an impact on ultimately improving their ability to deliver an effective patient-centred service.

  10. The mentor commitment.

    PubMed

    Annand, F

    1997-06-01

    An active mentoring program can benefit an entire organization. The nurses being mentored always have a resource for questions and support. Orientation, inservice, and continuing education can be individualized, based on the needs of the nurse and the areas of work. Continuing education, so essential for professional development, can become an everyday occurrence, as it is an integral part of mentoring. Other benefits are those reaped by the mentors through the recognition and affirmation of their expertise. Difficult problems often require simple solutions. Using the expert ophthalmic nurse to mentor the novice can be one of these solutions. Through a mentor connection, job satisfaction, leadership, and professional empowerment can be a reality. In addition, achieving this will help us face a future in which the ophthalmic nurses' role will be at the forefront.

  11. Mentoring among Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fagan, M. Michael; Walter, Glen

    1982-01-01

    A study compared mentoring among teachers, nurses, and police officers. Results are compared to studies conducted in other professions, and suggestions for educators and administrators are offered. (FG)

  12. The role of mentoring in academic career progression: a cross-sectional survey of the Academy of Medical Sciences mentoring scheme.

    PubMed

    Iversen, Amy C; Eady, Nigel Aj; Wessely, Simon C

    2014-04-16

    Summary OBJECTIVES: To describe a successful mentoring scheme designed for mid-career clinician scientists and to examine factors associated with mentee report of positive career impact. PMID:24739382

  13. The ubiquitous ostracode Darwinula stevensoni (Brady and Robertson, 1870), redescription of the species and lectotype designation.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sohn, I.G.

    1987-01-01

    Darwinula stevensoni (Brady and Robertson 1870) is the type species of Darwinula, the ubiquitous living and fossil nonmarine nominate genus of the Darwinulidae and the Darwinulacea. To date, the additional families Darwinuloididae (fossil), Microdarwinulidae (living and fossil), Panxianidae (fossil), and Suchonellidae (fossil) have been referred to the Darwinulacea. A type specimen for D. stevensoni has not been previously designated. In order to stabilize the species, a lectotype is selected from the type series in the Brady collection at The Hancock Museum, Newcastle upon Tyne. The species is redescribed and reillustrated based on the study of the carapace of a paralectotype and also of valves and appendages of specimens from both England and the United States. Living species of Darwinula have a cosmopolitan distribution in fresh and brackish water. Fossil Darwinulacea, documented in the Carboniferous, serve as indicators of continental Paleozoic to Holocene deposits. - Author

  14. The Earth Science Women's Network: The Principles That Guide Our Mentoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, M. S.; Steiner, A. L.; Wiedinmyer, C.

    2015-12-01

    The Earth Science Women's Network (ESWN) began informally in 2002 as a way for six early career female atmospheric chemists to stay in contact and support each other. Twelve years later (2014), the ESWN formally became a non-profit organization with over 2000 members. The ESWN includes scientists from all disciplines of the geosciences with members located in over 50 countries. The ESWN is dedicated to career development, peer mentoring and community building for women in the geosciences. The mentoring philosophy of ESWN has evolved to include five main principles: 1.) Support community-driven mentoring, 2.) Encourage diverse mentoring approaches for diverse individuals, 3.) Facilitate mentoring across career phases, 4.) Promote combined personal and professional mentoring, 5.) Champion effective mentoring in a safe space. Surveys of ESWN members report gains in areas that are often considered barriers to career advancement, including recognition that they are not alone, new understanding of obstacles faced by women in science, and access to professional resources.

  15. A narrative inquiry into novice science mentor teachers' mentoring practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naseem, Samina

    Many teacher education programs hire new mentors every year to work with their student teacher population. The literature about teacher mentoring suggests the importance of relevant and ongoing professional development (PD) for teacher mentors at all levels. However, it is much more commonly the case that most teacher mentors volunteer and do not have access to PD. Past research about mentoring provides a descriptive sense of the practices of experienced mentors, especially within a PD context, but little is known about how novice mentors, who are mentoring for the first or the second time, with no prior PD related to mentoring articulate their work as mentors. Using the telling form of narrative inquiry, my study documented how four novice science mentors (NSMs) who had no prior mentoring-related PD articulated the work of mentoring through the stories they told about their past experiences as learners and teachers. The term learner included experiences that the NSMs had before school through K-12 and in their teacher education programs. The experiences as a teacher referred to NSMs' in-service experiences -- teaching, coaching, and mentoring (if any). Each NSM was interviewed once a month for a period of five months. The interviews captured experiences of the NSMs since their childhood to present day experiences as teachers to summarize the experiences that informed their current mentoring practices; to document salient mentoring practices they employed; to identify sources and factors that shaped those practices, and to understand mentoring from mentor teachers' perspectives. Clandinin and Connelly's (2000) three commonplaces (temporality- sociality- place ) framework was used for structuring interview questions and analyzing data. The NSMs employed number of practices discussed in the literature. The study found that the most influential life experiences were upbringing, student teaching, teaching, prior mentoring, and coaching. By taking temporality into

  16. Ms. Mentor Unmasked

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krebs, Paula

    2008-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Emily Toth, who writes the monthly "Ms. Mentor" academic advice column in the "Chronicle of Higher Education" and teaches in the English department at Louisiana State University, in Baton Rouge. She is the author of "Ms. Mentor's Impeccable Advice for Women in Academia" (1997), "Inside Peyton Place: The Life…

  17. Supporting Music Teacher Mentors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaffini, Erin Dineen

    2015-01-01

    While much discussion and research is focused on the importance of music teacher mentors for preservice teachers and novice in-service music educators, little discussion has been devoted to the topic of how we, as members of the music education profession, can support the role of music teacher mentors. This article explores some of the benefits…

  18. Principal Mentoring. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malone, Robert J.

    To help new principals succeed, school districts are capitalizing on senior administrators' expertise by adding mentor programs to the practical training programs for beginning principals. This digest examines the nature of mentorships and discusses how they can prepare principals for the next stage of their careers. Although mentoring has existed…

  19. Hopkins Mentor Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Janeen M.

    2002-01-01

    This article describes the Early Childhood Special Education Program at Johns Hopkins University with emphasis on the program's use of student-selected mentors to provide ongoing guidance and support to students. Outcomes include early development of a professional support network, development by mentors of additional sites for field experiences,…

  20. Organizationally Sponsored Mentoring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerr, Kenneth M.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Institutionally sponsored mentoring programs benefit organizations by aiding retention of employees or students. A successful program must have endorsement from top administration and a designated coordinator who is sensitive to organizational goals and objectives as well as the varied needs of mentors and proteges. (SK)

  1. Managing Mentoring Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IUME Briefs, 1992

    1992-01-01

    Some programs for helping at-risk youth achieve excellent results, while others do not. One reason for program success can be proper management. Mentoring is a promising strategy for helping at-risk youth. Planners who want to create effective mentoring programs should look at the implementation experiences of other youth programs. Evaluations…

  2. Inspiring the next generation of physician-scientists

    PubMed Central

    Lefkowitz, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    As academic physician-scientists, one of the most important things we do is mentor young trainee-scientists. There obviously is no one right way to mentor or a set of rules one can follow; it’s a very personal matter, and very much depends on one’s personality. For much of my career, I gave very little thought as to how I mentored my trainees or to whether I was any good at it. Like many investigators, perhaps, I was just too busy with the daily activities of research to consider how I was guiding my students. Here, I take a look back and reflect on my experiences as a mentor and the factors that I believe contribute to the success of trainees as independent scientists. PMID:26237039

  3. Inspiring the next generation of physician-scientists.

    PubMed

    Lefkowitz, Robert J

    2015-08-01

    As academic physician-scientists, one of the most important things we do is mentor young trainee-scientists. There obviously is no one right way to mentor or a set of rules one can follow; it's a very personal matter, and very much depends on one's personality. For much of my career, I gave very little thought as to how I mentored my trainees or to whether I was any good at it. Like many investigators, perhaps, I was just too busy with the daily activities of research to consider how I was guiding my students. Here, I take a look back and reflect on my experiences as a mentor and the factors that I believe contribute to the success of trainees as independent scientists.

  4. Developing Mentors: An Analysis of Shared Mentoring Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bower-Phipps, Laura; Klecka, Cari Van Senus; Sature, Amanda L.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how experienced teachers share and articulate effective mentoring practices can guide efforts to prepare quality mentors. This qualitative study focused on mentoring practices within a teacher-designed student-teaching program conceptualized while the mentor teachers within the program were students in a graduate-level mentoring…

  5. Capturing Mentor Teachers' Reflective Moments during Mentoring Dialogues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crasborn, Frank; Hennissen, Paul; Brouwer, Niels; Korthagen, Fred; Bergen, Theo

    2010-01-01

    The main goal of the current study is to capture differential frequencies of mentor teachers' reflective moments, as indicators of different levels of consciousness in mentor teachers' use and acquisition of supervisory skills during mentoring dialogues. For each of the 30 participants, two mentoring dialogues were analyzed: one before and one…

  6. E-Mentoring Interaction Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenear, Phoebe E.

    2007-01-01

    Little research has been conducted on electronic mentoring. Several traditional mentoring models exist; however, due to the novelty of the research area, no theoretical e-mentoring models appear in the literature. Using Moore's Theory of Transactional Distance as the theoretical framework, this research compared mentor-protege interaction,…

  7. Factors Affecting Willingness to Mentor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghislieri, Chiara; Gatti, Paola; Quaglino, Gian Piero

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents a survey among 300 employees in Northern Italy to assess the willingness to mentor and identify the factors that affect it. Men and respondents with previous mentoring experience indicate a higher willingness to be a mentor. Willingness is affected by personal characteristics that are perceived as necessary for a mentor and the…

  8. Research Methodology and Youth Mentoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DuBois, David L.; Doolittle, Fred; Yates, Brian T.; Silverthorn, Naida; Tebes, Jacob Kraemer

    2006-01-01

    Mentoring programs for youth have grown tremendously in popularity in recent years and in many important respects reflect core principles of community psychology. Mentoring of youth is a complex phenomenon, however, with a range of significant processes occurring at the levels of individual youth and their mentors, youth-mentor relationships and…

  9. Mentor/Protege Interactions and the Role of Mentor Training within a Novice Teacher Mentoring Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menegat, Gilan M.

    2010-01-01

    Many individuals transition into teaching positions without the benefit of effective professional mentoring. This study was conducted to better understand the interactions in which mentors and proteges engage and to inform future design of mentor support for novice teachers. The research examined mentor/protege interactions within a year long…

  10. A trait based approach to defining valued mentoring qualities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pendall, E.

    2012-12-01

    Graduate training in the sciences requires strong personal interactions among faculty, senior lab members and more junior members. Within the lab-group setting we learn to frame problems, to conduct research and to communicate findings. The result is that individual scientists are partly shaped by a few influential mentors. We have all been influenced by special relationships with mentors, and on reflection we may find that certain qualities have been especially influential in our career choices. In this presentation I will discuss favorable mentoring traits as determined from an informal survey of scientists in varying stages of careers and from diverse backgrounds. Respondents addressed questions about traits they value in their mentors in several categories: 1) personal qualities such as approachability, humor and encouragement; background including gender, ethnicity, and family status; 2) scientific qualities including discipline or specialization, perceived stature in discipline, seniority, breadth of perspective, and level of expectations; and 3) community-oriented qualities promoted by mentors, such as encouraging service contributions and peer-mentoring within the lab group. The results will be compared among respondents by gender, ethnicity, stage of career, type of work, and subdiscipline within the broadly defined Biogeoscience community. We hope to contribute to the growing discussion on building a diverse and balanced scientific workforce.

  11. One More Legacy of Paul F. Brandwein: Creating Scientists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fort, Deborah C.

    2011-01-01

    This paper studies the influence of Paul F. Brandwein, author, scientist, teacher and mentor, publisher, humanist, and environmentalist, on gifted youngsters who later became scientists, based primarily on information gathered from surveys completed by 25 of his students and one colleague. It also traces his profound interactions with science…

  12. Retaining STEM women with community-based mentoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozier, M.

    2011-12-01

    While women have been graduating from physical oceanography programs in increasing numbers for the past two decades, the number of women occupying senior positions in the field remains relatively low. Thus, the disparity between the percentages of women at various career stages seems to be related to the retention of those completing graduate school in physical oceanography, not in recruiting women to the field. Studies indicate that a positive mentoring experience is strongly correlated with success in science, and as such, MPOWIR (Mentoring Physical Oceanography Women to Increase Retention) provides this essential mentoring to physical oceanographers from late graduate school through their early careers. Our network includes over 400 scientists at 70 institutions participating in a variety of online and face-to-face mentoring opportunities. The MPOWIR website (www.mpowir.org) includes resources for junior scientists, ways to get involved, data and career profiles, and a blog with job postings and relevant information. In October 2011, we will hold the third Pattullo conference to bring mentors and mentees together. The 43 participants at this conference will share their research, attend professional development sessions, and openly discuss issues related to the retention of young scientists in the field.

  13. A Call for Training the Trainers: Focus on Mentoring to Enhance Diversity in Mental Health Research

    PubMed Central

    Twamley, Elizabeth W.; Cardenas, Veronica; Lebowitz, Barry; Reynolds, Charles F.

    2009-01-01

    There is a widening disparity between the proportion of ethnic minority Americans in the population and the number of researchers from these minority groups. One major obstacle in this arena relates to a dearth of mentors for such trainees. The present academic settings are not optimal for development and sustenance of research mentors, especially for mentees from underrepresented minority ethnic groups. Mentoring skills can and should be evaluated and enhanced. Universities, medical schools, and funding agencies need to join hands and implement national- and local-level programs to help develop and reward mentors of junior scientists from ethnic minority groups. PMID:19246662

  14. Mentoring for new graduates.

    PubMed

    Graham, Helen

    2016-10-01

    The School of Veterinary Medicine in Dublin (UCD) has introduced an alumni mentoring programme for new veterinary and veterinary nursing graduates. Helen Graham, clinical education support manager, explains how it works.

  15. Part 1: An Overview of Mentoring Practices and Mentoring Benefits.

    PubMed

    Jakubik, Louise D; Eliades, Aris B; Weese, Meghan M

    2016-01-01

    Mentoring has been proposed as a solution for retention and succession planning in nursing; however, there is a lack of information about "how to" mentor based on evidence. This seven-part leadership series will provide a deep dive into evidence-based mentoring practices and associated mentoring benefits for staff nurses and the organizations in which they work. Part 1 of this series provides an overview of the origins and evolution of mentoring, related definitions, and evidence-based mentoring practices and benefits.

  16. Passing the Torch: Mentoring and Developmental Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schatzberg-Smith, Kathleen

    1988-01-01

    Reviews the literature on the benefits of mentor relationships for both the protege and the mentor. Suggests that experienced developmental educators mentor colleagues new to the field and that developmental students be encouraged to find and cultivate mentoring relationships. (DMM)

  17. Mentoring in neurology: filling the residency gap in academic mentoring.

    PubMed

    Lee, Paul R; Marsh, Elisabeth B

    2014-03-11

    Effective academic mentoring significantly affects a physician's choice of career, academic productivity, and professional trajectory. The mentoring relationship is necessary for the continued success of medical training. It is critical to cultivate a climate in which mentoring can thrive. In order to improve the quality and outcomes of mentoring, we must adopt a comprehensive plan. There are interventions at every level of training that will ensure that the current cohort of neurologists receives the requisite expertise needed to flourish and inspire future trainees. Professional organizations must articulate a comprehensive vision of mentoring. Institutions must create an infrastructure to support mentors. Mentors should work in active partnerships with their mentees to forge sustained, productive relationships. Mentees must actively contribute to their own mentoring. Proper mentorship will ensure a bright future for academic neurology. PMID:24616198

  18. Mentoring in neurology: filling the residency gap in academic mentoring.

    PubMed

    Lee, Paul R; Marsh, Elisabeth B

    2014-03-11

    Effective academic mentoring significantly affects a physician's choice of career, academic productivity, and professional trajectory. The mentoring relationship is necessary for the continued success of medical training. It is critical to cultivate a climate in which mentoring can thrive. In order to improve the quality and outcomes of mentoring, we must adopt a comprehensive plan. There are interventions at every level of training that will ensure that the current cohort of neurologists receives the requisite expertise needed to flourish and inspire future trainees. Professional organizations must articulate a comprehensive vision of mentoring. Institutions must create an infrastructure to support mentors. Mentors should work in active partnerships with their mentees to forge sustained, productive relationships. Mentees must actively contribute to their own mentoring. Proper mentorship will ensure a bright future for academic neurology.

  19. Elements of an Effective Mentoring Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Susan

    2006-01-01

    There are certain elements that are common among effective mentoring programs. This article describes MENTOR, an organization that serves as a resource and advocate for youth mentoring. MENTOR developed its first mentoring Elements of Effective Practice in 1990 by working with a national panel of mentoring experts. "They are research- and…

  20. Mentors' Ethical Perceptions: Implications for Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapira-Lishchinsky, Orly

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This study attempts to describe mentors' perceptions of their ethical dilemmas, the derived mentor roles, and the ethical guidelines suggested by mentors, with reference to previous studies exploring the mentors' multifaceted roles. Design/methodology/approach: A total of 60 mentors participated in a two-phase study: the mentors were…

  1. Volunteer Mentor Training and Support: Three Perspectives Regarding the Knowledge and Abilities Needed for Effective Mentoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kepler, Leslie G.

    2013-01-01

    A key factor in mentoring effectiveness and satisfaction is ensuring that mentor preparation training and ongoing support address needed mentor knowledge and abilities (MKAs). Knowing how to mentor is different from knowing what mentoring involves or knowing mentoring policies and procedures. Ideally, mentor training incorporates both the…

  2. Campus Corps Therapeutic Mentoring: Making a Difference for Mentors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haddock, Shelly; Weiler, Lindsey; Krafchick, Jennifer; Zimmerman, Toni S.; McLure, Merinda; Rudisill, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    College student mentors are increasingly mentoring at-risk youth, yet little is known about the benefits that college students derive from their experience mentoring within the context of a service-learning course. This qualitative study used focus groups to examine college students' experiences as participants in a unique program, Campus…

  3. REFORMA/UCLA Mentor Program: A Mentoring Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tauler, Sandra

    Although mentoring dates back to Greek mythology, the concept continues to thrive in today's society. Mentoring is a strategy that successful people have known about for centuries. The REFORMA/UCLA Mentor Program has made use of this strategy since its inception in November 1985 at the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at the…

  4. Mentors' Perceptions on the Post Mentoring Relationships in Academic Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erdem, Ferda; Ömüris, Ece

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative study aims to reveal the new period of the relationships between the mentors and mentees who continue to work in the same academic organization after the mentoring relationship terminates. The findings of this study that was conducted in a small group of mentors who cultivated multiple mentees show that the separation phase did…

  5. Successful Mentoring for New Agents: Dedicated Mentors Make the Difference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmer, Bruce P.; Smith, Keith L.

    1992-01-01

    In a survey of 58 mentors and 57 proteges who participated in the mentoring system for the Ohio Extension Service to determine their satisfaction with the program, 90 percent of the mentors and 70 percent of the proteges indicated a successful experience. (JOW)

  6. Mentoring First Year Police Constables: Police Mentors' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyler, Mark A.; McKenzie, William E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Mentoring as a tool for the support and development of novices in many organisations has been considered a putative success. Nevertheless, the literature reveals a paucity of reporting of the mentoring strategies used within the policing profession within Australia. This paper aims to focus on what mentoring is and how it is deployed from…

  7. Mentoring Together: A Literature Review of Group Mentoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huizing, Russell L.

    2012-01-01

    Researchers have shown the benefits of mentoring in both personal and professional growth. It would seem that group mentoring would only enhance those benefits. This work represents a literature review of peer-reviewed articles and dissertations that contribute to the theory and research of group mentoring. This work reviews the articles that…

  8. How Mentor Principals Interpret the Mentoring Process Using Metaphors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schechter, Chen; Firuz, Florit

    2015-01-01

    The study focused on how principal mentors perceived the mentoring process by means of the metaphors they used to represent it. Semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted with 18 principal mentors. Findings were analysed qualitatively, generating themes as an inductive process, grounded in the various metaphors articulated by participants.…

  9. Effective Mentoring: A Case for Training Mentors for Novice Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gagen, Linda; Bowie, Sandra

    2005-01-01

    Mentoring has been used in many professional-development settings to support individuals new to a profession. In particular, mentors are used in education and nursing to support new professionals who must meet the demands of a new position while managing the stresses of a new environment. When a mentor is asked to support a new professional, the…

  10. Mentors' Perspectives on the Effectiveness of a Teacher Mentoring Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tant-Tierce, Tabatha

    2013-01-01

    Teacher retention is an issue in education, and the loss of teachers has a direct affect on student achievement. Schools are battling the attrition of beginning teachers by the use of mentoring programs. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of a mentoring program, according to teachers who have served as mentors,…

  11. Mentoring Two Student Teachers: Mentors' Perceptions of Peer Placements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardiner, Wendy

    2010-01-01

    Research on peer placements suggests that partnering two preservice teachers with a mentor provides a better, more supportive context for learning to teach. As extant research has focused more on student teachers' development, less is known about mentors' perceptions and experiences. This qualitative study focuses on seven mentor teachers who have…

  12. Rudderless as Mentors: The Challenge of Teachers as Mentors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardiner, Wendy

    2009-01-01

    Mentors are taking increasingly significant roles in preservice teachers' preparation. Because mentoring is complex and research is evolving and sometimes contradictory, the questions guiding this qualitative study were as follows: First, how do mentors gain their expertise? Second, what support do they need to promote their continued development?…

  13. Mentoring Human Performance - 12480

    SciTech Connect

    Geis, John A.; Haugen, Christian N.

    2012-07-01

    Although the positive effects of implementing a human performance approach to operations can be hard to quantify, many organizations and industry areas are finding tangible benefits to such a program. Recently, a unique mentoring program was established and implemented focusing on improving the performance of managers, supervisors, and work crews, using the principles of Human Performance Improvement (HPI). The goal of this mentoring was to affect behaviors and habits that reliably implement the principles of HPI to ensure continuous improvement in implementation of an Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) within a Conduct of Operations framework. Mentors engaged with personnel in a one-on-one, or one-on-many dialogue, which focused on what behaviors were observed, what factors underlie the behaviors, and what changes in behavior could prevent errors or events, and improve performance. A senior management sponsor was essential to gain broad management support. A clear charter and management plan describing the goals, objectives, methodology, and expected outcomes was established. Mentors were carefully selected with senior management endorsement. Mentors were assigned to projects and work teams based on the following three criteria: 1) knowledge of the work scope; 2) experience in similar project areas; and 3) perceived level of trust they would have with project management, supervision, and work teams. This program was restructured significantly when the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act (ARRA) and the associated funding came to an end. The program was restructured based on an understanding of the observations, attributed successes and identified shortfalls, and the consolidation of those lessons. Mentoring the application of proven methods for improving human performance was shown effective at increasing success in day-to-day activities and increasing confidence and level of skill of supervisors. While mentoring program effectiveness is difficult to

  14. Introduction: Lawrence Kohlberg as Mentor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyd, Dwight

    1988-01-01

    Recognizes Lawrence Kohlberg as the foremost contributor to moral education during the twentieth century. Analyzes the mentor-student relationship and discusses Kohlberg's mentor relationship with his students. (KO)

  15. Playing Scientist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Ashley

    2012-01-01

    Engaging students in the study of genetics is essential to building a deep understanding of heredity, a core idea in the life sciences (NRC 2012). By integrating into the curriculum the stories of famous scientists who studied genetics (e.g., Mendel, Franklin, Watson, and Crick), teachers remind their students that science is a human endeavor.…

  16. Mentoring matters: creating, connecting, empowering.

    PubMed

    McKinley, Mary G

    2004-01-01

    In the current chaotic healthcare environment, growth and development of nursing staff is essential to maintain quality outcomes. The purpose of this article is to highlight the concept of mentoring, explain the benefits of mentoring in fostering the development of novice nurses, and present a primer for how advanced practice nurses could implement a mentoring relationship. A three-step mentoring process of reflecting, reframing, and resolving is described with examples of implementation of these steps. PMID:15461037

  17. Unlocking Hidden Potential through Mentoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCluskey, Ken W.; Noller, Ruth B.; Lamoureux, Kevin; McCluskey, Andrea L. A.

    2004-01-01

    One of the many legacies left to us through ancient Greek literature is the concept of mentoring. The ideal mentoring relationship involves three key components: (1) Continuing to carry out other duties while assuming the care-giving role; (2) Serving as a conduit for the wisdom of others; and (3) Developing a long-term connection. Mentoring can…

  18. Mentoring and Tutoring by Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodlad, Sinclair, Ed.

    This book provides an international, current account of the developments of mentoring and tutoring by students in tertiary and secondary education. Included are research reviews, case studies of mature projects, and ideas for new uses of student tutoring and mentoring. Chapter titles are as follows: "Students as Tutors and Mentors" (Sinclair…

  19. Mentoring New Teachers. Updated Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Portner, Hal

    This book includes step-by-step instructions to help experienced teachers become just as skilled at mentoring beginning teachers as they are at teaching. It describes how teacher mentors can: relate to their proteges in ways that establish good working rapport; assess how the mentoring is progressing and make necessary adjustments; coach proteges…

  20. High School Teen Mentoring Handbook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Advanced Education and Technology, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Big Brothers Big Sisters Edmonton & Area, in partnership with Alberta Advanced Education and Technology, are providing the High School Teen Mentoring Program, a school-based mentoring program where mentor-mentee matches meet for one hour per week to engage in relationship-building activities at an elementary school. This initiative aims to provide…

  1. Selecting Mentors for Principalship Interns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geismar, Thomas J.; Morris, John D.; Lieberman, Mary G.

    2000-01-01

    An instrument for helping select mentors for principal interns was developed, using six clusters of basic, high- performing principal competencies and five clusters of mentoring traits. Based on a sample of 91 Broward County (Florida) principals, this method revealed important insights into identifying appropriate mentors for prospective…

  2. Virtual Mentoring of Preservice Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Jill

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to describe music teachers' perceptions of the benefits and challenges they experienced as virtual mentors of preservice music teachers. Each mentor was assigned a cohort of preservice teachers who were enrolled in an elementary general music methods course. Cohorts observed their mentor's teaching via Skype. Mentors…

  3. A Training Guide for Mentors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smink, Jay

    This guide, which is intended as a primer for program coordinators responsible for managing and implementing mentor programs, explains what content should be included in mentoring programs and how that content should be organized to maintain volunteers' interest in mentoring. Discussed in section 1 are the following topics: job description for…

  4. Statistical mentoring at early training and career stages

    DOE PAGES

    Anderson-Cook, Christine M.; Hamada, Michael S.; Moore, Leslie M.; Wendelberger, Joanne R.

    2016-06-27

    At Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), statistical scientists develop solutions for a variety of national security challenges through scientific excellence, typically as members of interdisciplinary teams. At LANL, mentoring is actively encouraged and practiced to develop statistical skills and positive career-building behaviors. Mentoring activities targeted at different career phases from student to junior staff are an important catalyst for both short and long term career development. This article discusses mentoring strategies for undergraduate and graduate students through internships as well as for postdoctoral research associates and junior staff. Topics addressed include project selection, progress, and outcome; intellectual and social activitiesmore » that complement the student internship experience; key skills/knowledge not typically obtained in academic training; and the impact of such internships on students’ careers. Experiences and strategies from a number of successful mentorships are presented. Feedback from former mentees obtained via a questionnaire is incorporated. As a result, these responses address some of the benefits the respondents received from mentoring, helpful contributions and advice from their mentors, key skills learned, and how mentoring impacted their later careers.« less

  5. Faculty members' perceptions of advising versus mentoring: does the name matter?

    PubMed

    Titus, Sandra L; Ballou, Janice M

    2013-09-01

    The recommendations, during the past 20 years, to improve PhD scientific training and graduate school success, have focused on the significance of mentoring. It is well established that PhD students with mentors have significantly more success in graduate school as demonstrated by publishing papers before they graduate and by making presentations. Have faculty and academic institutions embraced the mentoring role? This study explores the views of 3,500 scientists who have primary responsibilities to educate PhD and MD/PhD students. Faculty members report they are more likely to prefer being viewed as advisors (54 %) than mentors (38 %). Through an examination of perceptions about specific responsibilities of advisors and mentors, faculty members provide a description of their culture and the expectations they have about themselves and others. One would expect that because mentoring requires additional time and involvement that faculty would report differences between advising and mentoring. However, faculty members perceive few differences between advisors and mentors. We examine the implications of these findings. Future scientists need to be confident their education includes the opportunity to acquire the best possible research skills. To develop advisors who have the ability to provide this training, the process begins by defining role expectations and responsibilities and preparing advisors to interact with doctoral students in ways comparable to mentors. We expect faculty members to know how to teach and how to mentor; yet, we rarely discuss how to develop and shape the necessary skills of advisors so, that they more closely resemble those of mentors.

  6. Mentoring Emotionally Sensitive Individuals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaughnessy, Michael F.; Self, Elizabeth

    Mentoring individuals who are gifted, talented, and creative, but somewhat emotionally sensitive is a challenging and provocative arena. Several reasons individuals experience heightened sensitivity include: lack of nurturing, abuse, alcoholism in the family, low self-esteem, unrealistic parental expectations, and parental pressure to achieve.…

  7. Mentoring New Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tetzlaff, Judie A.; Wagstaff, Imelda

    1999-01-01

    Describes an approach to mentoring new teachers in California's Conejo Valley Unified School District that addresses five phases of new teacher development, explaining that, although it is not as structured nor comprehensive an approach as the California Formative Assessment and Support System for Teachers (CFASST), it has clearly demonstrated…

  8. The Rewards of Mentoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green-Powell, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    A growing body of knowledge exists which describes the rewards and importance of mentors in the professional development of young men and women, particularly with relation to their interactions in professional and organizational settings. Research in both educational settings and the workplace indicates that students and employees alike are more…

  9. Peer Mentoring Roles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashman, Marinda; Colvin, Janet

    2011-01-01

    Because students starting college are not always prepared to succeed, colleges and universities frequently offer courses designed to help students who need remediation in mathematics, reading, and writing. At Utah Valley University (UVU), peer mentors are integrated into the University Student Success course to help first-year students learn the…

  10. Principal Mentoring: An Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malone, Robert J.

    2002-01-01

    Never before has the need for effective mentoring programs for principals been more urgent. Record student enrollment, an anticipated retirement of about 40 percent of principals, and a shrinking pool of those who aspire to be principals have brought about a shortage of principals and an alarming lack of qualified applicants. This research roundup…

  11. Thoughts on Teacher Mentoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lataille, Louise M.

    2005-01-01

    Teacher mentoring programs have existed for only about a generation, but they are making a difference in the lives of young, not so young, and beginning or transitioning teachers. The prevailing financial crunch, increasing student enrollments, and escalating rates of teacher retirements are among current challenges facing all school systems.…

  12. Mentoring Special Youth Populations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Britner, Preston A.; Balcazar, Fabricio E.; Blechman, Elaine A.; Blinn-Pike, Lynn; Larose, Simon

    2006-01-01

    Whereas mentoring programs are well received as support services, very little empirical research has been conducted to assess the effectiveness of these programs to meet the diverse needs of different special populations of youth. Potentially useful theoretical orientations (attachment, parental acceptance-rejection, social support, adult…

  13. National CARES Mentoring Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Martin L.

    2013-01-01

    Harsh and cruel experiences have led many of our young to believe that they are alone in the world and that no one cares. In this article, Martin L Mitchell introduces us to the "National CARES Mentoring Movement" founded by Susan L.Taylor. This movement provides young people with role models who help shape their positive development.…

  14. Mentoring New Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Judy; DeRose, Joseph; Kleindienst, Gail

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the mentoring program at Ottawa Vocational Education (EHOVE) Career Center in Milan, Ohio. The program is designed to enhance the performance of all new teachers by facilitating their transfer of knowledge gained from their coursework and inservice training into appropriate teaching practice. In addition, it is also…

  15. Realize Your Mentoring Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koballa, Thomas, Jr.; Bradbury, Leslie; Deaton, Cynthia Minchew

    2008-01-01

    How successful will you be in guiding a new teacher's professional development? While your success will be influenced by how you and your mentee conceptualize teaching, learning, and the nature of science, research indicates that your success is also highly dependent on how you and your mentee conceptualize mentoring itself. This article describes…

  16. Mentoring K scholars: strategies to support research mentors.

    PubMed

    Burnham, Ellen L; Schiro, Stephanie; Fleming, Michael

    2011-06-01

    The goal of this paper is to present strategies utilized to support K scholar research mentors. K scholars are generally assistant professors who are close to developing independent research programs. Of all the various types of mentees, K scholars offer the greatest challenges, as well as the greatest rewards, for research mentors. To see one's mentee achieve independent PI status and become an established investigator is one of the great joys of being a research mentor. Research mentors for K scholars, however, may not directly benefit from their mentoring relationship, neither in terms of obtaining data to support their research program or laboratory, nor in assistance with grants or scientific papers. There is a pressing need for the research community to address the workload, institutional expectations, and reward system for research mentors. The dearth of research mentors and role models in clinical translational science parallels the decreasing number of physicians choosing careers in clinical research. While there is limited empirical information on the effectiveness of mentor support mechanisms, this white paper concludes that providing mentor support is critical to expanding the available pool of mentors, as well as providing training opportunities for K scholars.

  17. Sustainable Scientists

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, Evan

    2008-12-31

    Scientists are front and center in quantifying and solving environmental problems. Yet, as a spate of recent news articles in scientific journals point out, much can be done to enhance sustainability within the scientific enterprise itself, particularly by trimming the energy use associated with research facilities and the equipment therein (i,ii,iii, iv). Sponsors of research unwittingly spend on the order of $10 billion each year on energy in the U.S. alone, and the underlying inefficiencies drain funds from the research enterprise while causing 80 MT CO2-equivalent greenhouse-gas emissions (see Box). These are significant sums considering the opportunity costs in terms of the amount of additional research that could be funded and emissions that could be reduced if the underlying energy was used more efficiently. By following commercially proven best practices in facility design and operation, scientists--and the sponsors of science--can cost-effectively halve these costs, while doing their part to put society on alow-carbon diet.

  18. Teacher Mentoring as Professional Development. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huling, Leslie; Resta, Virginia

    Teacher mentoring programs have increased dramatically since the early 1980s as a vehicle to support and retain novice teachers. However, researchers and facilitators of mentoring programs are recognizing that mentors also derive substantial benefits from the mentoring experience. This digest examines research on how mentoring contributes to the…

  19. Girls' Success: Mentoring Guide for Life Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Academy for Educational Development, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Mentoring girls is a challenge. Girls will come to mentors with hard questions and great hope. Mentoring is about building trust over a long period of time. If a mentor cares about the girls and follows through with the promises that he or she makes to them, a mentor will be successful in helping them to improve their lives. This "Guide" serves as…

  20. Mentoring Scaffoldings: Do They Promote College Access?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Higher Education Policy Analysis, University of Southern California, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This paper summarizes what is known and what is not known about mentoring programs focused on youth and related to college-going. Several aspects of mentoring are reviewed so that the concept and some program variations--such as peer and adult mentors, informal and formal mentoring, compensated and uncompensated mentoring, one-to-one and group…

  1. Coaching the Mentor: Facilitating Reflection and Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Stephen P.; Brobeck, Sonja R.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the process of coaching a mentor of experienced teachers. In particular, we sought to determine if coaching would help a mentor to compare her espoused beliefs about mentoring to her mentoring behaviors and possibly resolve any dissonance. The mentor and coach (the co-researchers) participated in a platform…

  2. Multilevel approach to mentoring in the Research Experiences for Undergraduates programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonine, K. E.; Dontsova, K.; Pavao-Zuckerman, M.; Paavo, B.; Hogan, D.; Oberg, E.; Gay, J.

    2015-12-01

    This presentation focuses on different types of mentoring for students participating in Research Experiences for Undergraduates programs with examples, including some new approaches, from The Environmental and Earth Systems Research Experiences for Undergraduates Program at Biosphere 2. While traditional faculty mentors play essential role in students' development as researchers and professionals, other formal and informal mentoring can be important component of the REU program and student experiences. Students receive mentoring from program directors, coordinators, and on site undergraduate advisors. While working on their research projects, REU students receive essential support and mentoring from undergraduate and graduate students and postdoctoral scientists in the research groups of their primary mentors. Cohort living and group activities give multiple opportunities for peer mentoring where each student brings their own strengths and experiences to the group. Biosphere 2 REU program puts strong emphasis on teaching students to effectively communicate their research to public. In order to help REUs learn needed skills the outreach personnel at Biosphere 2 mentor and advise students both in groups and individually, in lecture format and by personal example, on best outreach approaches in general and on individual outreach projects students develop. To further enhance and strengthen outreach mentoring we used a novel approach of blending cohort of REU students with the Cal Poly STAR (STEM Teacher And Researcher) Program fellows, future K-12 STEM teachers who are gaining research experience at Biosphere 2. STAR fellows live together with the REU students and participate with them in professional development activities, as well as perform research side by side. Educational background and experiences gives these students a different view and better preparation and tools to effectively communicate and adapt science to lay audiences, a challenge commonly facing

  3. Pathways to URM Retention: IBP's Professional Development and Mentoring Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, A.; Williamson Whitney, V.; Ricciardi, L.; Detrick, L.; Siegfried, D.; Fauver, A.; Ithier-Guzman, W.; Thomas, S. H.; Valaitis, S.

    2013-05-01

    As a not for profit organization, the Institute for Broadening Participation (IBP) hosts a variety of initiatives designed to increase the retention of underrepresented minority (URM) students pursuing pathways in STEM. IBP also assists with formative program evaluation design and implementation to help strengthen URM recruitment and retention elements. Successful initiatives include virtual and face-to-face components that bring together URM students with established URM and other scientists in academia, government and industry. These connections provide URMs with mentoring, networking opportunities, and professional skill development contributing to an improved retention rate of URM students. IBP's initiatives include the NASA One Stop Shopping Initiative (NASA OSSI), Pathways to Ocean Science and Engineering, and the Minorities Striving and Pursuing Higher Degrees of Success (MS PHD'S) in Earth System Science (ESS) Professional Development Program. The NASA OSSI recruits and facilitates student engagement in NASA education and employment opportunities. Pathways to Ocean Science connects and supports URM students with Ocean Science REU programs and serves as a resource for REU program directors. Pathways to Engineering has synthesized mentoring resources into an online mentoring manual for URM students that has been extensively vetted by mentoring experts throughout the country. The mentoring manual, which is organized by roles, provides undergraduates, graduates, postdocs, faculty and project directors with valuable resources. MS PHD'S, one of IBP's longest running and most successful initiatives, focuses on increasing the retention rate of URM students receiving advanced degrees in ESS. The program addresses barriers to retention in ESS including isolation, lack of preparation and professional development, and lack of mentoring. Program activities center on peer-to-peer community building, professional development exercises, networking experiences, one

  4. Mentoring: dentistry's fountain of youth.

    PubMed

    Certosimo, Fred

    2014-01-01

    A mentor's principal purpose is to help develop the qualities that another individual (protégé or mentee) needs to attain his or her professional goals. Mentors provide their protege with knowledge, advice, counsel, support, and the opportunity to better position themselves to attain success in the dental profession. They help their mentee's "learn the ropes" and attain the wisdom only a seasoned veteran can pass along about the fundamental assumptions and values of a profession's culture. Mentoring is not a science, but an art-it is often important not merely knowing what to say, but how and when to say it. The mentor and the mentee have different professional goals, and to compound the relationship, both present with varied life experiences and in many cases, from diverse cultures. Wise mentors must be sensitive to the individuality of their protege and offer wisdom, judgment, resilience, and independence in a custom-tailored manner. Lastly, mentoring is not professional therapy and counseling. Mentors are different from role models. However, despite the many opportunities and potential setbacks, if done properly, the benefits of the mentoring relationship can last a lifetime for both the mentor and the mentee. PMID:25080671

  5. Mentoring: dentistry's fountain of youth.

    PubMed

    Certosimo, Fred

    2014-01-01

    A mentor's principal purpose is to help develop the qualities that another individual (protégé or mentee) needs to attain his or her professional goals. Mentors provide their protege with knowledge, advice, counsel, support, and the opportunity to better position themselves to attain success in the dental profession. They help their mentee's "learn the ropes" and attain the wisdom only a seasoned veteran can pass along about the fundamental assumptions and values of a profession's culture. Mentoring is not a science, but an art-it is often important not merely knowing what to say, but how and when to say it. The mentor and the mentee have different professional goals, and to compound the relationship, both present with varied life experiences and in many cases, from diverse cultures. Wise mentors must be sensitive to the individuality of their protege and offer wisdom, judgment, resilience, and independence in a custom-tailored manner. Lastly, mentoring is not professional therapy and counseling. Mentors are different from role models. However, despite the many opportunities and potential setbacks, if done properly, the benefits of the mentoring relationship can last a lifetime for both the mentor and the mentee.

  6. Mentoring: the ultimate professional relationship.

    PubMed

    Belcher, A E; Sibbald, R G

    1998-04-01

    Mentoring plays a significant role in business, industry, government, education, and healthcare. Mentoring relationships help promote the individual's professional growth and development. Such development involves knowledge and skill acquisition, which is facilitated by interaction with other, more experienced and proficient professionals. The Belcher-Sibbald Continuum of Learning describes the relationship among the concepts of role modeling, networking, preceptoring, and mentoring. Each concept is defined and described as a unique relationship which promotes professional growth and development. In addition, three mentoring/networking relationships in the context of the wound care community are presented to provide insight into this type of relationship.

  7. Youth Mentoring Relationships in Context: Mentor Perceptions of Youth, Environment, and the Mentor Role

    PubMed Central

    Lakind, Davielle; Atkins, Marc; Eddy, J. Mark

    2015-01-01

    Youth mentoring is primarily understood as a relationship between mentor and mentee, yet mentors often enter into home, school, and other community settings associated with youth they serve, and interact regularly with other people in mentees’ lives. Understanding how and why mentors negotiate their role as they do remains underexplored, especially in relation to these environmental elements. This qualitative study drew on structured interviews conducted with professional mentors (N = 9) serving youth at risk for adjustment problems to examine how mentors’ perceptions of their mentees and mentee environments informed their sense of how they fulfilled the mentoring role. Mentors commonly characterized problems youth displayed as byproducts of adverse environments, and individual-level strengths as existing “in spite of” environmental inputs. Perceptions of mentees and their environments informed mentors’ role conceptualizations, with some mentors seeing themselves as antidotes to environmental adversity. Mentors described putting significant time and effort into working closely with other key individuals as well as one-on-one with mentees because they identified considerable environmental need; however, extra-dyadic facets of their roles were far less clearly defined or supported. They described challenges associated with role overload and opaque role boundaries, feeling unsupported by other adults in mentees’ lives, and frustrated by the prevalence of risks. Community-based mentoring represents a unique opportunity to connect with families, but mentors must be supported around the elements of their roles that extend beyond mentor-mentee relationships in order to capitalize more fully on the promise of the intervention. PMID:25866427

  8. Mentoring Female Entrepreneurs: A Mentors' Training Intervention Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarri, Katerina K.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the effectiveness of a mentor training intervention for experienced entrepreneurs in order to support and advise new and early stage female entrepreneurs in an attempt to enrich the limited literature of empirical data in the area of mentor training intervention assessment.…

  9. Colorblind Mentoring? Exploring White Faculty Mentoring of Students of Color

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCoy, Dorian L.; Winkle-Wagner, Rachelle; Luedke, Courtney L.

    2015-01-01

    In this critical multisite case study we examined the concept of colorblind mentoring. Using Bonilla-Silva's Colorblind Racism Frames, we sought to understand White faculty members' perspectives on their mentoring of Students of Color. The findings revealed that White faculty members often engage with students from a "colorblind…

  10. Mentoring Prospective Principals: Determinants of Productive Mentor-Mentee Relationship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schechter, Chen

    2014-01-01

    Mentoring contributes to prospective principals' growth, easing their transition from the role of teacher to that of administrator. This article reports findings from a study aimed at examining the determinant factors affecting the mentor-mentee relationship in a uniquely designed principal preparation program in New York City. The study…

  11. Enhancing Mentoring Practices as a Framework for Effective Mentoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Marye Mathis

    2013-01-01

    Mentoring has been identified as an effective way to provide support for new teachers. As a strategy to support new teachers and to address teacher attrition, a rural high school in West Central Georgia sought to identify the concepts needed for an effective mentoring program. The purpose of this case study was to explore best practices in…

  12. Integrating Mentoring with Curriculum: Mentor Leadership Programs for Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsend, Wayne

    2015-01-01

    Student "Mentor" and "Leadership" Programs impact the climate and culture of schools. Students are capable of outstanding leadership when given the opportunities and constructs to be successful. The evidence is clear that those schools that embrace student leadership and mentor programs have more positive events, activities,…

  13. Mentoring as Professional Development: "Growth for Both" Mentor and Mentee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Teachers need professional development to keep current with teaching practices, although costs for extensive professional development can be prohibitive across an education system. Mentoring provides one way for embedding cost-effective professional development. This mixed-method study includes surveying mentor teachers ("n" = 101) on a…

  14. Becoming a More Effective Research Mentor for Your Trainees: Undergraduates to Post-docs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooper, Eric J.; Mathieu, R.; Pfund, C.; Branchaw, J.; UW-Madison Research Mentor Training Development Team

    2010-05-01

    How do you effectively mentor individuals at different stages of their careers? Can you learn to become a more effective mentor through training? Does one size fit all? Are you ready to address the NSF's new requirement about mentoring post-docs in your next proposal? For many academics, typical answers to these questions include, "I try to make adjustments based on the trainee, but I don't have a specific plan” "Yeah, I'd better start thinking about that” and "There's training?” Scientists often are not trained for their crucial role of mentoring the next generation. The University of Wisconsin-Madison has developed, field tested, and publicly released research mentor training materials for several STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) disciplines, including astronomy, to help fill this gap and improve the educational experience and ultimate success of research trainees at several career stages, from high school students to post-doctoral scholars. While initially aimed at the mentoring of undergraduate researchers at research extensive institutions, the topics are broad enough (e.g., expectations, communication, understanding, diversity, ethics, independence) to be applicable to mentoring in a wide range of project-based educational activities. Indeed, these materials have been modified, only modestly, to prepare graduate students and undergraduates to mentor high school students. In this session, we will describe the UW-Madison research mentor training seminar and illustrate how the training can be adapted and implemented. We will introduce an interactive "shopping cart” style website which allows users to obtain the materials and instructions on how to run the program at their institution. Most of the session will be devoted to an interactive implementation of elements of research mentor training using small discussion groups. Participants will experience the training seminar in practice, come face-to-face with some common mentoring

  15. Learning to Be a More Effective Research Mentor for Your Trainees: Undergraduates to Post-docs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooper, Eric; Mathieu, R.; Pfund, C.; Branchaw, J.; UW-Madison Research Mentor Training Development Team

    2010-01-01

    How do you effectively mentor individuals at different stages of their careers? Can you learn to become a more effective mentor through training? Does one size fit all? Are you ready to address the NSF's new requirement about mentoring post-docs in your next proposal? For many academics, typical answers to these questions include, "I try to make adjustments based on the trainee, but I don't have a specific plan” "Yeah, I'd better start thinking about that” and "There's training?” Scientists often are not trained for their crucial role of mentoring the next generation. The University of Wisconsin-Madison has developed, field tested, and publically released research mentor training materials for several STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) disciplines, including astronomy, to help fill this gap and improve the educational experience and ultimate success of research trainees at several career stages, from high school students to post-doctoral scholars. While initially aimed at the mentoring of undergraduate researchers at research extensive institutions, the topics are broad enough (e.g., expectations, communication, understanding, diversity, ethics, independence) to be applicable to mentoring in a wide range of project-based educational activities. Indeed, these materials have been modified, only modestly, to prepare graduate students and undergraduates to mentor high school students. In this session, we will describe the UW-Madison research mentor training seminar and illustrate how the training can be adapted and implemented. We will introduce an interactive "shopping cart” style website which allows users to obtain the materials and instructions on how to run the program at their institution. Most of the session will be devoted to an interactive implementation of elements of research mentor training using small discussion groups. Participants will experience the training seminar in practice, come face-to-face with some common mentoring

  16. Rejuvenating clinician-scientist training.

    PubMed

    Ambati, Balamurali K; Cahoon, Judd

    2014-03-28

    Clinician-scientists are becoming increasingly rare in medicine as a whole, but especially in ophthalmology. There is a structural gap between MD-PhD training and K-series awards where interested candidates go through residency and fellowship without any structured research exposure or involvement. Furthermore, the success rate of the MD-PhD and K awards leaves much to be desired. The authors propose a redeployment of training resources to reconfigure residency and fellowship training programs for interested candidates with sufficient additional time for a credible research project, augmented salary, and sound mentoring. Opportunities for research training in nontraditional pathways to diversify skill sets and build interdisciplinary teams also would be a prime objective of this novel "Learn-and-Earn" approach.

  17. Mentoring Program Practices and Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Amy W.; Sullivan, Judith A.

    1995-01-01

    Philadelphia's Sponsor-a-Scholar program pairs high school students with adults who guide them in preparing for the future. The program shows that there is little certainty about what constitutes best practice; that the complex task of mentoring requires a gamut of skills; and that support services for both mentors and proteges are essential. (SK)

  18. Rural Alaska Mentoring Project (RAMP)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cash, Terry

    2011-01-01

    For over two years the National Dropout Prevention Center (NDPC) at Clemson University has been supporting the Lower Kuskokwim School District (LKSD) in NW Alaska with their efforts to reduce high school dropout in 23 remote Yup'ik Eskimo villages. The Rural Alaska Mentoring Project (RAMP) provides school-based E-mentoring services to 164…

  19. PUENTE Project: The Mentor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maestas-Flores, Margarita; Chavez, Mauro

    This manual was developed for individuals serving as mentors in Evergreen Valley College's PUENTE Project, a program which integrates the skills of an English teacher, a Hispanic counselor, and Hispanic professionals/mentors into a team structure in an attempt to assist Hispanic students in making academic improvements, to build self-confidence,…

  20. Mentoring. Information Capsule. Volume 0603

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blazer, Christie

    2006-01-01

    Mentoring is a structured one-on-one relationship between an adult and youth that focuses on the needs of the youth, providing him or her with support, guidance, and assistance. This information capsule summarizes research findings on the impact of mentoring on factors such as academic achievement, social behaviors, attitudes, drug and alcohol…

  1. From Traditional to Virtual Mentoring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirk, James J.; Olinger, Jennifer

    The tradition of a mentoring relationship is embedded in a personal/business relationship between a wise teacher and someone who needs to learn a trade. Learning sessions have occurred over the years in many types of settings, including one-on-one mentoring, conferences, meetings, telephone, and fax. As society looks to technology as a vital…

  2. The Multiple Roles of Mentors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanchez, Sabrina R.; Roegman, Rachel; Goodwin, A. Lin

    2016-01-01

    Teaching Residents at Teachers College (TR@TC) is an 18-month program that prepares teachers for high-needs schools in New York City in two areas: teaching English to speakers of other languages (TESOL) and teaching students with disabilities. Student teachers, called residents, spend a year working with a mentor teacher. Mentors play three roles:…

  3. Strategies for Mentoring Pedagogical Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Fundamental for mentoring a preservice teacher is the mentor's articulation of pedagogical knowledge, which in this research draws upon specific practices, viz.: planning, timetabling lessons, preparation, teaching strategies, content knowledge, problem solving, questioning, classroom management, implementation, assessment and viewpoints for…

  4. Cross-Race Faculty Mentoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanley, Christine A.; Lincoln, Yvonna S.

    2005-01-01

    There are many synonyms for the word "mentor": coach, guide, role model, peer advisor, and sponsor, among others. The plethora of terms would suggest that we know something about this role, but most of the research on mentoring has been conducted in business and industry rather than in education. In fact, junior and senior faculty and…

  5. Mentor Program Provides STEM Options

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdul-alim, Jamaal

    2011-01-01

    The ACE Mentor Program provides early career exposure, mentoring, and scholarships to high school students in an attempt to encourage them to enter one of the three fields that make up the ACE acronym: (1) architecture; (2) construction; and (3) engineering. Founded in 1993 by longtime engineering consultant Charles Thornton, the program is…

  6. Mentoring: Contemporary Principles and Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bey, Theresa M., Ed.; Holmes, C. Thomas, Ed.

    In the spirit of educational reform efforts, an initiative exists to restructure the education of teachers through collaborative action, using mentoring to build alliances. This monograph, based on contemporary principles and issues of mentoring, presents ways to conceptualize the professional preparation and development of teachers. Following a…

  7. Re-Thinking Mentoring Relationships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kealy, William A.; Mullen, Carol A.

    In this paper, the authors view mentorship not as the traditional one-to-one relationship between mentor and mentee, but "from the next scale up" as a large systematic collection of mentor-mentee pairs. This concept, borrowed from the graphic arts and called "macro-mentorship," is adopted as a means for obtaining new insights about traditional…

  8. Gender, Mentoring, and Tacit Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horgan, Dianne D.; Simeon, Rebecca J.

    Practical or "tacit" knowledge has been argued to be critical for managerial success. Mentoring may be one way in which tacit knowledge is learned. This study examined the relationships of tacit knowledge, mentoring, gender, and competence. Subjects were managers (N=57) in a southern city. No significant gender differences were found on any of the…

  9. Developing Peer Mentoring through Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Ralph; Jaugietis, Zarni

    2011-01-01

    Peer mentoring programs are an important component in the strategy to enhance the first year undergraduate experience. The operation of these programs needs to be informed by evidence as to their effectiveness. In this article we report on a six-year study of the development of a peer mentoring program in which feedback is used to improve program…

  10. Mentoring in the Art Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Denise; Mitchell, Timothy; Taylor, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Mentoring in classrooms allows teachers the opportunity to be motivational tools in the lives of students while operating as role models. The current research shows that mentoring in the art classroom provides stimulation and the momentum to students who are less motivated with creative assignments. The first part of this study looks at the…

  11. Mentors Providing Challenge and Support: Integrating Concepts from Teacher Mentoring in Education and Organizational Mentoring in Business

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghosh, Rajashi

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews and critiques the literature on mentoring functions and roles in education and business to inform the use of mentoring as a developmental tool in both fields. Specifically, in an effort to expand the current notions of the different mentor roles, this review synthesizes studies exploring teacher mentoring in schools and…

  12. Connecting Theory and Practice in Mentor Preparation: Mentoring for the Improvement of Teaching and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Sylvia Yee Fan; Choi, Pik Lin

    2005-01-01

    This study examines the theory-and-practice connection model in mentor preparation in the context of two mentor preparation programmes in Hong Kong. The 30- and the 60-hour mentoring support development (MSD) programmes share a common conceptualization of mentoring--with the improvement of teaching and learning as the core of mentoring--yet they…

  13. Career Benefits Associated with Mentoring for Mentors: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghosh, Rajashi; Reio, Thomas G., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Mentoring has been studied extensively as it is linked to protege career development and growth. Recent mentoring research is beginning to acknowledge however that mentors also can accrue substantial benefits from mentoring. A meta-analysis was conducted where the provision of career, psychosocial and role modeling mentoring support were…

  14. Best Practices Mentoring New Full-Time Faculty: Reenergizing and Improving an Existing Formal Mentoring Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edman, Jayne

    2011-01-01

    Mentoring is often used in academic settings (deJanasz & Sullivan, 2004). There is though, a lack of evaluation of these mentoring programs (Savage, Karp & Logue, 2004). Hopkins and Grigoriu (2005) found that research on mentoring in community colleges focused more on the informal mentoring of college leadership and less on the formal mentoring of…

  15. College Student Mentors and Latino Youth: A Qualitative Study of the Mentoring Relationship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knoche, Lisa L.; Zamboanga, Byron L.

    2006-01-01

    This phenomenological study describes the meaning of mentoring relationships from the perspectives of six purposefully selected mentors involved in the Latino Achievement Mentoring Program (LAMP), and investigates underlying themes regarding the mentors' relationships. Clusters of themes pertaining to the mentors' relationship with the mentee, the…

  16. Looking for Professor Right: Mentee Selection of Mentors in a Formal Mentoring Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Amani; Treleaven, Lesley

    2011-01-01

    Finding a suitable mentor is crucial to the success of mentoring relationships. In the mentoring literature, however, there is conflicting evidence about the best ways to support the pairing process in organisational mentoring programs. This paper presents a detailed analysis of the pairing process in an academic mentoring program that has…

  17. Evidence of Mentor Learning and Development: An Analysis of New Zealand Mentor/Mentee Professional Conversations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langdon, Frances J.

    2014-01-01

    While studies have shown that mentoring is essential to the development of new teachers, fewer investigations have examined what mentors learn about themselves and about mentoring through this role. In this study, the conversations between 13 mentors and their mentees were analysed, along with mentor self-evaluations and focus group data, over two…

  18. Exploring a Two-Dimensional Model of Mentor Teacher Roles in Mentoring Dialogues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crasborn, Frank; Hennissen, Paul; Brouwer, Niels; Korthagen, Fred; Bergen, Theo

    2011-01-01

    In this study, a two-dimensional model of mentor teacher roles in mentoring dialogues, entitled MERID, is explored empirically. Data regarding five aspects of mentoring dialogues were collected, using a sample of 20 transcriptions of mentoring dialogues, in which 112 topics were discussed and 440 mentor teacher utterances emerged. Correlations…

  19. The quality of mentoring relationships and mentoring success.

    PubMed

    Goldner, Limor; Mayseless, Ofra

    2009-11-01

    The quality of the relationships that mentors forge with their protégés is assumed to significantly affect the success of mentoring interventions. Building on previous research, this study examined the association between relationship qualities and protégé functioning. Multiple reporters (e.g., mentors, protégés and teachers) were used in a prospective research design spanning eight months in Israel's largest mentoring program-Perach. The sample consisted of 84 protégés ranging in age from 8 to 13 years (M = 10.75). Qualities in the mentoring relationship such as closeness, dependency and unrealistic expectations for the continuation and deepening of the relationship, beyond the planned period, were positively associated with the children's social and academic adjustment, and contributed to perceived academic competence, social support and wellbeing. Generalization of positive mentoring experiences to other relationships (such as the mother-child relationship) and the role of unrealistic expectations and dependency as key elements are considered. Implications of the findings for research and mentoring intervention are discussed. PMID:19779810

  20. Electronic Mentoring: Issues To Advance Research and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Single, Peg Boyle; Muller, Carol B.

    E-mentoring is the merger of mentoring with electronic communications and has been termed telementoring, cybermentoring, or virtual mentoring. By leveraging the growth in information technology, electronic mentoring provides opportunities for mentoring prohibited by face-to-face mentoring programs. Yet, the ease with which e-mentoring programs can…

  1. Forming the Mentor-Mentee Relationship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Peter

    2016-01-01

    A positive mentor-mentee relationship is essential for the mentee's development of teaching practices. As mentors can hold the balance of power in the relationship with preservice teachers, how do mentors develop positive mentor-mentee relationships? This multi-case study involved: (a) written responses from over 200 teachers involved in a…

  2. Understanding E-Mentoring in Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Carol B.

    2009-01-01

    As new forms of electronic communication have emerged with increasing speed in recent years, opportunities for online learning, including mentoring, have taken on many new dimensions. Mentoring relationships now almost always extend beyond traditional face-to-face mentoring, and mentoring programs supported by technological advances have developed…

  3. Virtual Mentoring: Developing Global Leaders for Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohlson, Matthew; Froman, Russell

    2012-01-01

    CAMP (Collegiate Achievement Mentoring Program) Gator is a leadership-mentoring program in which collegiate student leaders serve as mentors to at-risk K-12 students. In addition, partnerships with Cisco and Franklin Covey Education have provided the program with the technology resources to conduct "virtual leadership mentoring" sessions with…

  4. Identifying Mentors' Observations for Providing Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Mentors' feedback can assist preservice teachers' development; yet feedback tends to be variable from one mentor to the next. What do mentors observe for providing feedback? In this study, 24 mentors observed a final-year preservice teacher through a professionally video-recorded lesson and provided written notes for feedback. They observed the…

  5. A Developmental Model of Research Mentoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Revelo, Renata A.; Loui, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    We studied mentoring relationships between undergraduate and graduate students in a summer undergraduate research program, over three years. Using a grounded theory approach, we created a model of research mentoring that describes how the roles of the mentor and the student can change. Whereas previous models of research mentoring ignored student…

  6. Diversity and Mentoring in Health Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts, Graham F.; Jones-McKyer, E. Lisako; Crocker, Leslie L.

    2003-01-01

    Examines potential issues related to diversity and the role of mentoring in Health Education and Promotion, focusing on: the history and definition of mentoring; the structure of mentoring programs; diversity issues related to students, Health Education and Promotion professionals, and their constituents in the context of mentoring; mentoring…

  7. Opening Doors: Mentoring on the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington Univ., Seattle.

    This brief paper describes the computerized mentoring program of Project DO-IT (Disabilities, Opportunities, Internetworking, and Technology) at the University of Washington. Introductory material notes the origins of the mentoring concept and the value of DO-IT mentors to their proteges. The program centers on providing mentoring via the Internet…

  8. Targeted Mentoring: Evaluation of a Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAllister, Carolyn A.; Harold, Rena D.; Ahmedani, Brian K.; Cramer, Elizabeth P.

    2009-01-01

    "Targeted mentoring" refers to mentoring aimed at a particular population. This article presents the evaluation of a mentoring program for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) persons in social work education. Forty-three mentors and proteges responded to a survey regarding their program experiences. The results highlight the need for…

  9. Seasonal growth and lipid storage of the circumglobal, subantarctic copepod, Neocalanus tonsus (Brady)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohman, Mark D.; Bradford, Janet M.; Jillett, John B.

    1989-09-01

    Neocalanus tonsus (Brady) was sampled between October 1984 and September 1985 in the upper 1000 m of the water column off southeastern New Zealand. The apparent spring growth increment of copepodid stage V (CV) differed depending upon the constituent considered: dry mass increased 208 μg, carbon 162 μg, wax esters 143 μg, but nitrogen only 5 μg. Sterols and phospholipids remained relatively constant over this interval. Wax esters were consistently the dominant lipid class present in CV's, increasing seasonally from 57 to 90% of total lipids. From spring to winter, total lipid content of CV's increased from 22 to 49% of dry mass. Nitrogen declined from 10.9 to 5.4% of CV dry mass as storage compounds (wax esters) increased in importance relative to structural compounds. Egg lipids were 66% phospholipids. Upon first appearance of males and females in deep water in winter, lipid content and composition did not differ from co-occuring CV's, confirming the importance of lipids rather than particulate food as an energy source for deep winter reproduction of this species. Despite contrasting life histories, N. tonsus and subarctic Pacific Neocalanus plumchrus CV's share high lipid content, a predominance of wax esters over triacylglycerols as storage lipids, and similar wax ester fatty acid and fatty alcohol composition.

  10. Physician mentoring and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Bauman, Randy R

    2007-01-01

    Maintaining a cohesive medical group requires more than partners who get along with one another. Physicians must share the same values and be willing to give (and graciously receive) honest feedback on issues such as quality of care, technical competence, patient- and staff relations, behavior, work ethic, and productivity. This article shows group leaders how to start this process by mentoring new physicians and how to then extend the process to include all physicians in the group. Medical practices that have evaluation systems in place enjoy benefits that include better communication, accountability, increased retention rates, and a more unified group. Many physician groups avoid the evaluation process because they are not comfortable "judging" their peers, they don't know how to approach the process, or they don't want to invest the time. This article presents alternative approaches to establishing a mentoring and evaluation process, shows group leaders how to identify which is right for them, and provides do's and don'ts for a smooth implementation ofthe process.

  11. Evaluating a nurse mentor preparation programme.

    PubMed

    Gray, Olivia; Brown, Donna

    Following the introduction of a regional nurse mentor preparation programme, research was undertaken within a health and social care trust to explore both the trainee mentors' and their supervisors' perception of this new programme. A qualitative study involving focus groups was undertaken. The focus groups comprised a total of twelve participants including five trainee mentors and seven supervisors (experienced mentors) who had recently completed a mentor preparation programme. Data were analysed using Braun and Clarke's thematic analysis. Three themes were identified from the data: personal investment (including the emotional impact of mentoring) contextual perceptions (environmental factors such as time) and intellectual facets (related to personal and professional growth). Comprehensive preparation for mentors appears to be effective in developing mentors with the ability to support nursing students in practice. However, further study is required to explore how to support mentors to balance the demands of the mentoring role with the delivery of patient care. PMID:26911167

  12. Importance of mentoring in Australian radiology training.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Alexander

    2013-10-01

    Mentoring is widely accepted as a fundamental component of a number of professions; however, mentoring is underutilized, and its practice is poorly instituted in most Australian radiology training programmes. This article highlights the benefits of mentoring within the radiology training context. Potential barriers to successful mentoring are elucidated, and future pathways for improved implementation and application of mentor programmes with radiology training programmes are presented.

  13. Twelve tips for developing effective mentors.

    PubMed

    Ramani, Subha; Gruppen, Larry; Kachur, Elizabeth Krajic

    2006-08-01

    Mentoring is often identified as a crucial step in achieving career success. However, not all medical trainees or educators recognize the value of a mentoring relationship. Since medical educators rarely receive training on the mentoring process, they are often ill equipped to face challenges when taking on major mentoring responsibilities. This article is based on half-day workshops presented at the 11th Ottawa International Conference on Medical Education in Barcelona on 5 July 2004 and the annual meeting of the Association of American Medical Colleges in Boston on 10 November 2004 as well as a review of literature. Thirteen medical faculty participated in the former and 30 in the latter. Most participants held leadership positions at their institutions and mentored trainees as well as supervised mentoring programs. The workshops reviewed skills of mentoring and strategies for designing effective mentoring programs. Participants engaged in brainstorming and interactive discussions to: (a) review different types of mentoring programs; (b) discuss measures of success and failure of mentoring relationships and programs; and (c) examine the influence of gender and cultural differences on mentoring. Participants were also asked to develop an implementation plan for a mentoring program for medical students and faculty. They had to identify student and faculty mentoring needs, and describe methods to recruit mentors as well as institutional reward systems to encourage and support mentoring. PMID:16973451

  14. Mentoring: leadership, learning, legacy.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Paula K

    2006-01-01

    As the dental profession develops over the next few decades, there will be identifiable changes in the demography of the profession. Enrollment trends reflect a growing number of women in dental schools and in the dental profession. There is an increasing number of dentists--men and women--from countries and cultures outside of the United States. The profession must be prepared to address the question of how to engage women--as well as minorities--in more active and visible roles in organized dentistry. The challenge is clear, and the outcome will provide an indicator to the strength of our professional associations in the future. Mentoring of women dentists is one effective way of creating a pathway to participation.

  15. The measurement properties of mentoring relationship quality scales for mentoring programs.

    PubMed

    Ferro, Annalise; Wells, Samantha; Speechley, Kathy Nixon; Lipman, Ellen; DeWit, David

    2014-10-01

    The measurement properties of two new scales designed to measure global and engagement mentoring relationship quality (Global Mentoring Relationship Quality Scale and Quality of Mentoring Relationship Engagement Scale) were examined among 272 mentors, 491 children, and 554 parents participating in Big Brothers Big Sisters community mentoring programs across Canada. Results demonstrated their unidimensionality, moderate convergent validity, good external validity, and weak-to-moderate reporter concordance. Longitudinal analyses demonstrated good predictive validity of mentor and parent mentoring relationship quality scales with respect to predicting mentoring relationship status.

  16. Mentoring for 2000 and beyond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guerra, K. M.; Farrance, M. A.

    1994-01-01

    Today, more than 40 percent of the United States workforce are women. However, only a small percentage of working women are employed in science or engineering fields. The numbers of women in engineering and math professions have actually decreased since 1984. Last year, a mentoring program was created at NASA Ames Research Center aimed at encouraging young girls to stay in school, increasing their self confidence and helping them perform better academically. Teachers at the Ronald McNair Intermediate School matched fifth through eighth grade students with women engineers at NASA Ames. Results from a year-end survey submitted by the mentees indicated that the program was successful in achieving its first-year goals; more than one student reported that she felt 'really special' because of her mentor's efforts. The NASA Ames Mentor program has continued into the 1992-93 academic year with both returning mentor/mentee pairs and new participants.

  17. Enhancing nursing students' education by coaching mentors.

    PubMed

    Huggins, David

    2016-04-01

    To address some of the recommendations of the Willis Commission ( Royal College of Nursing 2012 ), and in response to local evaluation of mentor and nursing student experiences, the University of East Anglia has implemented a project to teach mentors coaching skills. The aim is to enhance mentor support of nursing students during practice placements and improve student learning in practice. This article describes the project and discusses the similarities and differences between mentoring and coaching. It shows how coaching has reduced the 'burden' of mentoring by reducing mentors' workloads, and has helped students to take responsibility for identifying learning needs and delivering supervised patient care.

  18. Development of a monitoring protocol to enhance mentoring in the IRIS REU site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubenthal, M.; Brudzinski, M. R.; Colella, H.

    2013-12-01

    Research Experiences for Undergraduate (REU) sites pair interns with scientists expected to oversee and guide an intern's scientific research, and assist in the development of skills, knowledge, and connections that will enhance the intern's professional and personal growth. This aspect of REU sites is generally recognized as a powerful, yet complicated, component that has a strong influence on the overall success of the intern's experience. Evaluations indicate that the quality and consistency of mentoring in REU sites can be highly variable. Traditional strategies to influence mentorship generally include reading lists or short trainings at the beginning of the summer. The efficacy of these approaches is questionable. As a result many REU Site facilitators are deeply interested in the question 'How can REU programs challenge scientists to raise their participation to the level of (truly) mentoring?' The Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS) REU site is developing a 13-item rubric measuring research skills, and a protocol of training and intern-mentor meetings to discuss progress. The goal of the intervention is to both increase the extent to which the mentoring relationship is centered on the intern, and to enable interns and mentors to feel more effective monitoring interns' personal/professional growth. This intervention was piloted in 2011, refined, and fully implemented in 2012. During the initial week of the program, interns assess their skills, complete the rubric independently, and discuss the completed rubric with their mentor. Midway through the summer interns and mentors each review the rubric and assess the intern's skills. The intern-mentor pairs then meet to collaborate and complete the rubric together. Finally, in the last week of the program, interns and mentors independently assess the intern's skills and complete the rubric, and the pairs again meet to discuss and negotiate these independent assessments. Survey data from 2012

  19. Learning to Become a More Effective Research or Inquiry-based Project Mentor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooper, E. J.; Pfund, C.; Mathieu, R.; Branchaw, J.

    2010-08-01

    How effective of a mentor are you? Have you thought much about this question? Have you participated in training to become a better mentor? For many academics, the typical three answers are "pretty good, I think ... why wouldn't I be?!"; "I am right now while reading this;" "Uh, no." The University of Wisconsin-Madison has developed a program called Research Mentor Training to help train scientists in myriad STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) disciplines, including astronomy, for their crucial role of mentoring the next generation. Most of the field testing to date has focused on graduate students, post-docs, academic staff, and faculty mentoring undergraduate students who are participating in summer research experiences. The materials have proven quite effective in other areas as well, with only modest modifications. For example, several faculty cohorts concentrating on mentoring graduate students and post-docs have completed the training. In addition, the materials are used to prepare graduate students and undergraduates to mentor high school students. The preferred venue for the mentor training program is a seminar meeting one hour per week for 8 to 9 weeks, plus readings and outside activities, including mentoring a student. However, the structure is flexible, and some meaningful learning can occur in a single 90-minute interactive workshop like the one presented at the 2009 ASP annual meeting, "Science Education and Outreach: Forging a Path to the Future." All of the materials, including case studies, facilitator notes and guidelines, plus reading lists, are available online for no charge (http://researchmentortraining.org). Users can select pre-built curricula, or they can customize a package using a "shopping cart" interface.

  20. Key issues in mentoring in HIV prevention and mental health for new investigators from underrepresented racial/ethnic groups.

    PubMed

    Forsyth, Andrew D; Stoff, David M

    2009-04-01

    We examine the challenges and barriers to quality mentoring for new investigators from underrepresented racial/ethnic groups and propose solutions for establishing a robust pipeline of early-career scientists who are well equipped to conduct research on disparities in HIV and mental health. In addition, we review contributions to this special supplement on mentoring and advocate a multilevel strategy that targets funding agencies, academic and research institutions, mentors, and mentees to enhance the diversity of the nation's scientific workforce and ensure that the public health system benefits from innovations derived from the optimal use of existing human capital. PMID:19246661

  1. An overlooked source of physician-scientists.

    PubMed

    Puljak, Livia

    2007-12-01

    A shortage of physician-scientists in the United States is an ongoing problem. Various recommendations have been made to address this issue; however, none of them have ameliorated the situation. Foreign medical school graduates with postdoctoral training in the United States are an overlooked and untapped resource for combating the dearth of physician-scientists. Evaluation of the scientific staff at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center revealed that 11% of all postdoctoral fellows were international medical graduates. Interestingly, a survey taken by these individuals revealed a lack of institutional and/or mentor support for career development and preparation for becoming physician-scientists. Foreign postdoctoral fellows with medical degrees are not even eligible for physician-scientist grants and awards since they are not US citizens. Although physicians educated in the United States usually matriculate from medical school with high educational debt that prevents most of them from entering into scientific careers, doctors trained outside the United States generally have minimal, if any, debt. Furthermore, many of them have a keen interest in remaining in the United States once they complete their postdoctoral training. Thus, foreign-trained medical professionals who have pursued scientific training in the United States can be one of the solutions for the current dearth of physician-scientists. PMID:18163964

  2. Science mentor program at Mission Hill Junior High School

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlquist, K.

    1994-12-31

    Science graduate students from the University of California at Santa Cruz mentor a class of 7th graders from the Mission Hill Junior High School. The program`s purpose is: (1) to create a scientific learning community where scientists interact at different levels of the educational hierarchy; (2) to have fun in order to spark interest in science; and (3) to support girls and minority students in science. A total of seven mentors met with the students at least once a week after school for one quarter to tutor and assist with science fair projects. Other activities included a field trip to a university earth science lab, judging the science fair, and assisting during laboratory exercises. Graduate students run the program with minimal organization and funding, communicating by electronic mail. An informal evaluation of the program by the mentors has concluded that the most valuable and effective activities have been the field trip and assisting with labs. The actual {open_quotes}mentor meetings{close_quotes} after school did not work effectively because they had a vaguely defined purpose and the kids did not show up regularly to participate. Future directions include redefining ourselves as mentors for the entire school instead of just one class and better coordinating our activities with the teachers` curriculum. We will continue to assist with the labs and organize formal tutoring for students having problems with math and science. Finally, we will arrange more activities and field trips such as an amateur astronomy night. We will especially target girls who attended the {open_quotes}Expanding Your Horizons{trademark} in Science, Mathematics, and Engineering{close_quotes} career day for those activities.

  3. E-mentoring: Using Computer Mediated Communication To Enhance the Mentoring Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bierema, Laura L.; Merriam, Sharan B.

    2002-01-01

    Provides a definition of e-mentoring and an exploration of its potential for enhancing mentoring relationships from technical and social perspectives. Considers benefits of and barriers to e-mentoring and describes strategies for establishing an e-mentoring relationship. Includes Internet resources. (EV)

  4. Mentoring in Style: Using Style Information To Enhance Mentoring of Foreign Language Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leaver, Betty Lou; Oxford, Rebecca

    This paper presents a new perspective on mentoring foreign language teachers. It suggests that mentoring is an essential part of a program manager's responsibilities, but that it is important to individualize the process of mentoring if it is to be as effective as it can be. First, a definition of mentoring and issues surrounding it are discussed.…

  5. Mentoring highly aggressive children: pre-post changes in mentors' attitudes, personality, and attachment tendencies.

    PubMed

    Faith, Melissa A; Fiala, Samuel E; Cavell, Timothy A; Hughes, Jan N

    2011-12-01

    This study examined the degree to which mentoring highly aggressive children was associated with changes in mentors' attitudes, personality, and attachment tendencies. Participants were 102 college students who each mentored an aggressive, high-risk child across three academic semesters (spring, fall, spring). We examined pre- to post-mentoring changes in attitudes about mentoring efficacy and future parenting, Big Five personality characteristics, and attachment tendencies. Mentors also rated the impact of the mentoring relationship in their lives, and both mentors and mentees rated support of the mentoring relationship. Results indicated a statistically significant decrease over time in mentors' ratings of self-efficacy, openness, conscientiousness, extraversion, and agreeableness. These findings held even when controlling for ratings of relationship impact. However, mentors who rated the mentoring relationship as supportive tended to experience increased openness, conscientiousness, and agreeableness and less attachment-related avoidance over time. Child-rated support negatively predicted mentors' post-mentoring attitudes toward future parenting. Discussed are the potential costs of mentoring highly aggressive children and strategies that could help increase benefits to mentors.

  6. Initial Characteristics and Mentoring Satisfaction of College Women Mentoring Youth: Implications for Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foukal, Martha D.; Lawrence, Edith C.; Williams, Joanna L.

    2016-01-01

    Being a youth mentor is popular among college students, yet little is known about how their initial characteristics are related to mentoring satisfaction. Survey data from college women enrolled in a youth mentoring program (n = 158) and a comparison group (n = 136) were analyzed to determine how initial characteristics of youth mentors (a) differ…

  7. Adapting Mentoring to Individual Differences in Novice Teacher Learning: The Mentor's Viewpoint

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Ginkel, Gisbert; Oolbekkink, Helma; Meijer, Paulien C.; Verloop, Nico

    2016-01-01

    Being adaptive to the individual novice teacher is considered a condition for effective teacher mentoring. The aims of this study are therefore to explore (1) mentoring activities through which mentors intend to adapt to the individual novice teacher and (2) characteristics of adaptive mentors. Information was collected through on-site,…

  8. So You Want to Be a Mentor? An Analysis of Mentor Competencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyre, Dwuena C.; Gaudet, Cyndi H.; McNeese, Mary Nell

    2016-01-01

    As the need for mentors continues to expand in order to meet organizational and programmatic needs, so does the need for quality mentoring. Although sometimes an immediate need for quantity may foreshadow quality, this should not be the case when utilizing mentoring to achieve goals. Faculty mentor competencies are analyzed to demonstrate the…

  9. Development of a Technology Mentor Survey Instrument: Understanding Student Mentors' Benefits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pamuk, Sonmez; Thompson, Ann D.

    2009-01-01

    Agreement on the effectiveness of the technology mentoring approach in addressing educators' needs for learning different technologies has been growing. Literature on the concept of mentoring in general and technology mentoring specifically has indicated mentoring relationships in different settings provide benefits for the less experienced…

  10. Mentor Service Themes Emergent in a Holistic, Undergraduate Peer-Mentoring Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Elijah G.; Thomas, Earl E.; Disch, William B.

    2014-01-01

    Little research has focused carefully on the means by which peer mentors foster development in undergraduate protégés. Two faculty members developed a holistic, peer-mentoring project in which 26 upperclassmen mentored 74 underclassmen at a midsize, 4-year institution. Mentor journal notes, open-ended protégé responses, and participant…

  11. Mentor Principals' Perceptions about a Mentoring Program for Aspiring Principals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, Steven Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the perceptions of principals who serve as mentors for an internship program for aspiring principals at East Tennessee State University. Each mentor was interviewed to gather information about the internship program, the benefits of mentoring in the program, and what the mentors may have learned about their…

  12. The Effect of Mentor Intervention Style in Novice Entrepreneur Mentoring Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St-Jean, Etienne; Audet, Josee

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to determine whether mentor intervention styles influence benefits gained by novice entrepreneurs through their mentoring relationship. An empirical study conducted with 360 mentees who had received mentoring services shows that an intervention style which combines a maieutic approach with mentor involvement produced the…

  13. Differences of Mentoring Experiences across Grade Span among Principals, Mentors, and Mentees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frels, Rebecca K.; Zientek, Linda Reichwein; Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this mixed research study was to examine mentoring experiences specific to grade span through the perspective of principals, mentors, and mentees. An instrument containing items on demographics, administrative support, and mentoring program components was administered to first-year teachers (n = 998), mentors (n = 791), and…

  14. Professional Growth through Online Mentoring: A Study of Mathematics Mentor Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAleer, DeAnna; Bangert, Art

    2011-01-01

    This article explores how patterns of engagement and program design impact professional learning and development of mathematics mentor teachers as they participate in an asynchronous mentoring program, e-Mentoring for Student Success (eMSS). In specific, this study: 1) sought to determine if activity level was related to mentors' perceived…

  15. Demystifying Gender Differences in Mentoring: Theoretical Perspectives and Challenges for Future Research on Gender and Mentoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Angela M.; Cady, Steven; Foxon, Marguerite J.

    2006-01-01

    Issues of gender and mentoring are explored through several theoretical lenses--similarity-attraction paradigm, power dependence, social exchange, biological, and psychological theories--to provide a more comprehensive view of mentoring from a gender-based perspective. Issues related to gender and mentoring presented in past mentoring research and…

  16. Utilizing Peer Mentor Roles in Learning Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rieske, Laura Jo; Benjamin, Mimi

    2015-01-01

    For a number of learning community programs, peer mentors provide an additional layer of staffing support. This chapter highlights peer mentor roles from a sample of programs and suggests important components for the construction of these roles.

  17. Mentoring in Nursing: A Historical Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fields, Willa L.

    1991-01-01

    Nursing leaders such as Florence Nightingale, Linda Richards, Mary Adelaide Nutting, and Annie Goodrich were all encouraged by mentors to develop professionally. Most successful professionals have had at least one mentor. (SK)

  18. The speech-generating device (SGD) mentoring program: training adults who use an SGD to mentor.

    PubMed

    Ballin, Liora; Balandin, Susan; Stancliffe, Roger J

    2012-12-01

    Mentoring in speech-generating device (SGD) use by adults who use SGDs offers the potential to improve new device learners' linguistic competence. This paper forms part of a larger study of mentoring among people who use SGDs. This paper investigates the effects of training adults who use SGDs in interaction strategies to enable them to fulfil a mentoring role. Mentors were taught to use open-ended questions, expansions, and recast sentences. Three mentors, aged 23-, 31-, and 54-years-old; and three mentees, aged 13-, 14-, and 32-years-old, participated in this study. A nonconcurrent multiple-baseline-across-participants design was used to assess the outcomes. Following the interaction strategies training, an increase in the number of strategies used in mentoring sessions occurred across all three mentors. These results provide preliminary evidence of SGD mentor training success. The SGD mentors learned the strategies and used them in mentoring sessions.

  19. Mentoring Faculty: Results from National Science Foundation's ADVANCE Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Faculty mentoring programs are common components of National Science Foundation ADVANCE awards. The ADVANCE program aims to increase the number of women on the faculty in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) departments through grants to individuals and to entire institutions. These grants target a change in institutional culture so that faculty from non-majority groups will succeed and thrive. Mentoring programs are generally designed to fit the particular institution(s) or target population (e.g., meteorologists at the beginning of their careers). A successful mentoring program makes the implicit knowledge necessary for faculty success explicit: policies and practices are made transparent; routes for finding answers are clarified or generated with faculty input; faculty overcome a sense of isolation and develop a community. Mentoring programs may be formal, with assigned mentors and mentees, or informal, with opportunities for beginning, middle and advanced career STEM faculty to mingle, generally over food and sometimes with a formal speaker. The programs are formally evaluated; in general, attention to mentoring generates better outcomes for all faculty. Research indicates that most successful scientists have a network of mentors rather than relying on one person to help navigate department, institution, and profession. The University of Nebraska-Lincoln's (UNL) award, ADVANCE-Nebraska, offered opportunities for faculty to informally network over luncheons with women speakers, advanced in their careers. We also offered after-hours networking receptions. In response to faculty feedback, we shifted to a series of panel discussions entitled "Conversations". Most panels were conducted by successful UNL faculty; about one-third had an outside expert on a given topic. Topics were chosen based on faculty feedback and targeted specifically to beginning faculty (How to Start Up a Lab; How to Balance Teaching and Writing), mid-career faculty (Putting

  20. Minority students benefit from mentoring programs.

    PubMed

    Cullen, D L; Rodak, B; Fitzgerald, N; Baker, S

    1993-01-01

    Mentoring has been proposed as one strategy to attract minority students to the radiologic sciences profession. This case study describes a minority mentoring program conducted for pre-radiologic science students at a Midwestern university during the 1991-92 academic year. Ten minority radiologic science students enrolled in the mentoring program. The study showed that mentoring may be a viable option to serve the special needs of minorities for recruitment and retention.

  1. A facilitated mentoring process for engineers

    SciTech Connect

    Donald, L.; Clark, M.

    1993-11-01

    Mentoring has been occurring in organizations for many, many years through a natural pairing process of people wanting to help one another. The numerous benefits of mentoring to both the protege and the mentor are widely known. In this paper we describe a Facilitated Mentoring Pilot Program for engineers, successfully completed in June, 1993. This career development tool can help make ``Every Engineer a Leader.``

  2. CPD for mentors: creating a portfolio.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Louise

    It is a mandatory requirement for mentors to support and assess all pre-registration students in their practice areas. The role is time consuming and challenging, but can also be extremely rewarding. This article examines the roles and responsibilities of mentors and discusses the importance of continuing professional development for mentors. It also looks at how mentors can demonstrate they meet the standards required by the Nursing and Midwifery Council (2008b).

  3. Mentoring Disadvantaged Gifted Children and Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaughnessy, Michael F.

    In spite of increasing amounts of attention given to mentoring in recent years, it appears that the disadvantaged child is not being mentored, and that his or her educational needs are not being addressed. Some possible reasons why so little mentoring of minority students occurs, or reasons why so little is heard about what does occur, are…

  4. Evaluation of an Online Mentoring Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Sharon; Camilli, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the evaluation of an online mentoring program for preparing pre-service elementary teachers at a small liberal arts college is described. An intervention was created to investigate the effects of online mentoring with preservice teachers, where mentoring is defined as a reciprocal relationship formed between an experienced teacher…

  5. Mentoring: Contemporary Use of a Timeless Resource.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Windham, Thomas

    1999-01-01

    The role of mentor is inherent to traditional American Indian societies, and American Indian students benefit greatly from mentoring. Discusses a handbook and two programs that emphasize mentoring in helping American Indians, other minorities, and women pursue higher education leading to careers in science, mathematics, engineering, and…

  6. Amachi: Mentoring Children of Prisoners in Philadelphia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jucovy, Linda

    This report documents the work of Amachi, a mentoring program for children of incarcerated and formerly incarcerated parents in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Volunteers are recruited from inner-city congregations to provide one-to-one mentoring to the children. Beyond being the source of mentors, the congregations are a key part of the initiative.…

  7. Teacher Mentoring as a Community Effort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley-Levine, Jill; Lee, Jean Sangmin; Mosier, Gina

    2016-01-01

    This article presents the findings from a study of a mentoring program for novice mathematics and science teachers, which was provided by their teacher education program. This study reports the findings of interviews with novice math and science teachers, their mentors, and the mentoring program administrators to explore stakeholder perceptions of…

  8. Electronic Mentoring: Quantifying the Programmatic Effort.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Single, Peg Boyle; Muller, Carol B.

    This paper reports on experiences conducting and evaluating MentorNet, a nationwide structured electronic mentoring (ementoring) program that pairs women engineering students, related science students, and math students with industry professionals and provides support to aid the development of year-long ementoring relationships. MentorNet's goal…

  9. Intradepartmental Faculty Mentoring in Teaching Marketing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tahtinen, Jaana; Mainela, Tuija; Natti, Satu; Saraniemi, Saila

    2012-01-01

    This study focuses on the use of mentoring by a peer as a way to help teachers of marketing to develop their teaching skills. Using self-ethnography, we elaborate on the potential of intradepartmental faculty mentoring in teaching (FMIT) to enhance the quality of marketing education. The study describes FMIT, a novel type of mentoring, reviews its…

  10. The Truth about Mentoring Minorities: Race Matters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, David A.

    2001-01-01

    A 3-year study of mentoring patterns at 3 corporations reveals that whites and minorities follow distinct patterns of advancement and should be mentored in very different ways. Cross-race mentoring must acknowledge issues of negative stereotypes, role modeling, peer resentment, skepticism about intimacy, and network management. (JOW)

  11. Ensuring Quality in Online Career Mentoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hooley, Tristram; Hutchinson, Jo; Neary, Siobhan

    2016-01-01

    This article explores the issue of quality in online career mentoring. It builds on a previous evaluation of Brightside, an online mentoring system in the UK which is primarily aimed at supporting young people's transitions to further learning. The article notes that participants in Brightside's mentoring programmes reported satisfaction with…

  12. The Mentoring Effect: Young People's Perspectives on the Outcomes and Availability of Mentoring. A Report for Mentor: The National Mentoring Partnership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruce, Mary; Bridgeland, John

    2014-01-01

    This report shares the findings from the first nationally representative survey of young people's perspectives on mentoring. While mentoring is needed and wanted by young people to help them stay on the path to high school graduation, college success, and productive adulthood, a significant mentoring gap exists in America, especially for at-risk…

  13. A Review of Undergraduate Mentoring Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gershenfeld, Susan

    2014-01-01

    This review summarizes published studies on undergraduate mentoring programs from 2008 to 2012. Twenty studies met the inclusion criteria, which included empirical research on formal mentoring programs with undergraduate students as mentees or mentors. Each study was assessed based on limitations identified in two earlier reviews of the mentoring…

  14. Peer Mentors Can Improve Academic Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asgari, Shaki; Carter, Frederick, Jr.

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined the relationship between peer mentoring and academic performance. Students from two introductory psychology classes either received (n = 37) or did not receive (n = 36) peer mentoring. The data indicated a consistent improvement in the performance (i.e., grades on scheduled exams) of the mentored group. A similar pattern…

  15. Transition Mentoring in School Library Media Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baaden, Bea

    2008-01-01

    Mentoring is defined as a professional relationship between an experienced person and inexperienced person. When newly hired library media specialists enter their schools, they often become part of the district's mentoring program. Yet, mentoring these new professionals can be problematic for school districts. In addition, when a library media…

  16. Mentoring To Develop and Retain New Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monsour, Florence

    2003-01-01

    Suggests that mentoring shows great promise and proven results in supporting new teachers, describing the successful Beginning Teacher Assistance Program at the University of Wisconsin River Falls and examining: what makes mentoring work, the importance of commitment to the theory of mentoring, benefits for mentees, overcoming obstacles to…

  17. Community Mentoring: A Tool for Successful Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodge, Kathryn E.

    2015-01-01

    Mentoring occurs in an ad hoc and largely invisible manner in communities. This mentoring happens through modeling, storytelling, and asking open-ended questions. If Extension specialists and agents were more conscious and intentional about teaching community members and leaders about community mentoring, they would be more successful in resolving…

  18. Mentoring Field Directors: A National Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellison, Martha L.; Raskin, Miriam S.

    2014-01-01

    In social work field education, mentoring is underused and lacks research data. There is a paucity of research that examines the effect mentoring has on social work field directors who administer field programs at the undergraduate and/or graduate level. This exploratory study fills this void by examining the mentoring opportunities and…

  19. Mentoring Children in Foster Care: Impact on Graduate Student Mentors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taussig, Heather N.; Culhane, Sara E.; Raviv, Tali; Fitzpatrick, Leslie E. Schnoll; Hodas, Robyn Wertheimer

    2010-01-01

    Fostering Healthy Futures (FHF) is a randomized controlled trial of an intervention for preadolescent youth placed in foster care because of maltreatment. As part of the FHF program, graduate students spend sixteen to twenty hours per week mentoring two youths in foster care and receiving intensive training and supervision. During summer and fall…

  20. Assessing Mentoring in Organizations: An Evaluation of Commercial Mentoring Instruments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbreath, Brad; Rose, Gail L.; Dietrich, Kim E.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to inform readers about the types of instruments available for assessing and improving mentoring in organizations. Extensive review of the psychological, business and medical literature was conducted to identify commercially published, practitioner-oriented instruments. All of the instruments that were…

  1. What Teaching Teaches: Mentoring and the Performance Gains of Mentors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amaral, Katie E.; Vala, Martin

    2009-01-01

    A peer mentoring program was added to an introductory chemistry course at a large university. The introductory chemistry course prepares students with little or no previous chemistry background to enter the mainstream general chemistry sequence and is part lecture and part small-group problem-solving. Faculty instructors are responsible for the…

  2. Be a Mentor and Experience the Excitement of Rediscovery | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    You don’t really know something until you can teach it to someone. Raul Cachau said he believes this is not only true in academia, but in research laboratories as well. He said that being a mentor means rediscovering things long taken for granted. “It really forces you to rethink some of the things you do,” said Cachau, Ph.D., principal scientist, Advanced Biomedical Computing Center (ABCC). “It brings focus to many of the things that happen on a daily basis … There’s a positive impact to taking a fresh look at something.”

  3. Inspiring Future Scientists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Betteley, Pat; Lee, Richard E., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    In an integrated science/language arts/technology unit called "How Scientists Learn," students researched famous scientists from the past and cutting-edge modern-day scientists. Using biography trade books and the internet, students collected and recorded data on charts, summarized important information, and inferred meaning from text. Then they…

  4. Developing a mentoring program in clinical nutrition.

    PubMed

    Martindale, Robert G; McClave, Stephen; Heyland, Daren; August, David

    2010-01-01

    Mentoring programs in nutrition are essential to the survival of clinical nutrition as we know it today. The best method known to maintain an influx of talent to a discipline is by developing an active mentoring program. This paper describes 1 concept for development of a viable mentor program. Mentoring should be flexible and based on mentees' training background. Realistic goals should be set, with written and verbal feedback, to sustain a successful program. Programs should incorporate the Socratic Method whenever possible. Factors that leave doubt about the survival of nutrition as a viable area of focus for physicians include the inability to generate adequate funds to support oneself and limited numbers of mentors available with dedicated time to be a mentor. A healthy, sustainable mentoring program in clinical nutrition will ensure survival of physician-based nutrition programs.

  5. Targeted Mentoring: Evaluation of a Program

    PubMed Central

    McAllister, Carolyn A.; Harold, Rena D.; Ahmedani, Brian K.; Cramer, Elizabeth P.

    2009-01-01

    Targeted mentoring refers to mentoring aimed at a particular population. This article presents the evaluation of a mentoring program for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) persons in social work education. Forty-three mentors and protégés responded to a survey regarding their program experiences. The results highlight the need for targeted mentoring, although some disparities of experience for mentors and protégés in this program are apparent. In general, mentors felt positive about participating, giving back to the LGBT community, and were more satisfied with their experiences than were the protégés, who were looking for more specific types of instrumental and psychosocial support. PMID:20046917

  6. Models of Mentoring in Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buell, Cindy

    2004-01-01

    This study examined faculty and student conceptualizations and distinctively communicative practices of mentoring in the academy. The study included three phases: (1) open-ended surveys conducted with faculty and students via e-mail, (2) focus groups conducted with faculty and students to elaborate on findings from the e-mail interviews, and (3)…

  7. Faculty Mentoring: Shaping a Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faurer, Judson; Sutton, Cynthia; Worster, Larry

    2014-01-01

    A well developed mentoring program should not be just considered another faculty activity but rather a significant program that can define a preeminent academic institution. A Faculty Learning Community (FLC) at Metropolitan State University of Denver (MSU Denver) was charged with determining whether the needs of new faculty members and the…

  8. Family Mentoring: A Life Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitman, Brenda; Perrin, Kathy Riske; Knudson-Buresh, Alana

    2002-01-01

    Pre/posttest data from 84 nursing, occupational therapy, physical therapy, and social work students who were mentored by families of children with special needs indicated an increase in family-centered attitudes, understanding, and respect among these future service providers. (SK)

  9. Making the Most of Mentoring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horgan, Dianne D.; Simeon, Rebecca J.

    This study focused on participative decision making which is considered an important way of developing subordinates in mentoring relationships. Subjects were managers (N=73) from diverse organizations. Scores were obtained for overall participation and decision quality. Further, it was determined how different aspects of the situation interacted…

  10. Mentoring the Least of These

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reclaiming Children and Youth: The Journal of Strength-based Interventions, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This article features an interview of Duncan Campbell. He was raised in an impoverished urban environment and went on to become a lawyer and successful Portland, Oregon, businessman. He founded Friends of the Children, a faith-based program, to provide permanent paid mentors for the most disadvantaged children in a community. Unlike more casual…

  11. Scientists: Engage the Public!

    PubMed

    Shugart, Erika C; Racaniello, Vincent R

    2015-01-01

    Scientists must communicate about science with public audiences to promote an understanding of complex issues that we face in our technologically advanced society. Some scientists may be concerned about a social stigma or "Sagan effect" associated with participating in public communication. Recent research in the social sciences indicates that public communication by scientists is not a niche activity but is widely done and can be beneficial to a scientist's career. There are a variety of approaches that scientists can take to become active in science communication. PMID:26695633

  12. Scientists: Engage the Public!

    PubMed

    Shugart, Erika C; Racaniello, Vincent R

    2015-01-01

    Scientists must communicate about science with public audiences to promote an understanding of complex issues that we face in our technologically advanced society. Some scientists may be concerned about a social stigma or "Sagan effect" associated with participating in public communication. Recent research in the social sciences indicates that public communication by scientists is not a niche activity but is widely done and can be beneficial to a scientist's career. There are a variety of approaches that scientists can take to become active in science communication.

  13. PoroTomo Subtask 6.8 - Brady Well Coordinates and Observation Sensor Depths

    DOE Data Explorer

    David Lim

    2016-03-13

    Contains metadata associated with the wells used in the 2016 Spring Campaign led partially by UW - Madison, LBNL, and LLNL scientists. Included with the well coordinates are the depths to the pressure sensors used in observation and pumping wells. Read me files are included for each .csv file.

  14. Mentoring for New-Hire Success in Any Profession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Runyan, Charles K.

    2013-01-01

    The paper focuses on the need for trained mentors in developing new hires in any profession and outlines a developmental theoretical framework as a basis for mentor training. To illustrate the success of trained developmental mentoring, a unique mentoring program called the Kansas Early Career/Mentor Teacher Academy is reviewed. The paper shares…

  15. Quantity, Quality, and Satisfaction with Mentoring: What Matters Most?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Xiaohong; Payne, Stephanie C.

    2014-01-01

    According to Kram's mentor role theory, satisfaction with mentoring and mentorship quality are key indicators of effective and successful mentoring. We contribute to mentoring research by demonstrating the relative importance of mentorship quantity, mentorship quality, and satisfaction with mentoring to the prediction of job satisfaction,…

  16. Deconstructing Serendipity: Focus, Purpose, and Authorship in Lunch Buddy Mentoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavell, Timothy A.; Henrie, Joye L.

    2010-01-01

    Lunch buddy mentoring is a particular kind of school-based mentoring program: college student mentors meet twice weekly during school lunch with mentees, and a new mentor is provided each semester. The program is designed to benefit elementary school children who are highly aggressive or chronically bullied. Novel to lunch buddy mentoring is a…

  17. Mentoring Programs: An Opportunity to "Pay It Forward"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loy, Darcy

    2013-01-01

    Being a mentor to young professionals embodies the pay-it-forward concept. Think of the potential impact if one chose to mentor three people, and they then chose to mentor nine more people, and those went on to mentor 27 more people. The results could be prodigious. Successful mentoring programs have become valuable, organizational assets. In a…

  18. Cross-Age Peer Mentoring. Research in Action. Issue 7

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karcher, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Cross-age peer mentoring is a somewhat unique and different approach to mentoring than the better-known adult-with-youth mentoring model. In cross-age mentoring programs (CAMPs) the mentor is an older youth, typically high school-aged, who is paired or matched with an elementary or middle school-aged child. Meetings almost always take place in the…

  19. Critical Perspectives on Mentoring: Trends and Issues. Information Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansman, Catherine A., Ed.

    This document contains six papers exploring emerging viewpoints, issues, and trends related to mentoring and adult learning. "Mentoring: From Athena to the 21st Century" (Catherine A. Hansman) traces the definitions of the term "mentor" and mentoring practices that have evolved since antiquity. "Emerging Perspectives on Mentoring: Fostering Adult…

  20. Informal Mentoring and Young Adult Employment

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    This study explores the role of informal mentoring (i.e., developing an important relationship with a non-parental adult) in the transition to full time employment among young adults (age 23-28). Multivariate analysis of the Add Health data reveals that mentoring is positively related to the likelihood of full time employment, and the relationship involves both selection and causation processes. Entrance into the world of work facilitates the development of mentoring relationships, especially among youth who identify work-related mentors after adolescence. These relationships have the potential for promoting attachment to the labor force. Mentoring relationships that develop outside of work settings and during adolescence have a positive impact on the odds of full time employment. The receipt of guidance and advice from mentors, as well as access to weak-tied mentoring relationships, teacher mentors, and friend mentors all contribute to the increased odds of employment in young adulthood. However, adolescent mentoring may be less effective among young women than it is among young men. PMID:19050736

  1. Mentoring Children in Foster Care: Impact on Graduate Student Mentors

    PubMed Central

    Taussig, Heather N.; Culhane, Sara E.; Raviv, Tali; Fitzpatrick, Leslie E. Schnoll; Hodas, Robyn Wertheimer

    2011-01-01

    Fostering Healthy Futures (FHF) is a randomized controlled trial of an intervention for preadolescent youth placed in foster care as a result of maltreatment. As part of the FHF program, graduate students spend 16–20 hours per week mentoring two youth in foster care and receive intensive training and supervision. During the summer and fall of 2009, 50 of the 52 mentors who participated in the FHF program between the summers of 2002 and 2008 completed an online survey. Almost all reported that their participation in the FHF program was helpful or very helpful in training them to work with high-risk children and families, diverse communities, multiple systems, and other professionals. Qualitative analyses of mentors’ responses to open-ended questions yielded several salient themes. PMID:24839302

  2. In Classroom Mentor Teachers: An Addition to Mentor Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carney, Paul; Crilley, Elizabeth; Fala, John T.; Tully, Christopher; Strouse, Kathryn; Viviano, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    There have been numerous studies done on the impact that mentor teachers and new teacher induction plans have on the new teachers' success in the first couple of years. A lot of these studies were done in an attempt not only to determine how to attract good teachers, but to retain them. It is our hope in this article to also determine if by having…

  3. Program Support and Value of Training in Mentors' Satisfaction and Anticipated Continuation of School-Based Mentoring Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McQuillin, Samuel D.; Straight, Gerald G.; Saeki, Elina

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we tested a theoretical model of training practices in school-based mentoring by comparing the differences between two mentoring programs on mentor-reported program support, value of training, relationship satisfaction, and plans to continue mentoring. The two mentoring programs that we compared were conducted at the same school and…

  4. Has ADVANCE Affected Senior Compared to Junior Women Scientists Differently?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosser, Sue

    2015-01-01

    Substantial evidence exists to demonstrate that the NSF ADVANCE Inititiative has made a positive impact upon institutions. Since it began in 2001, ADVANCE has changed the conversation, policies, and practices in ways to remove obstacles and systemic barriers preventing success for academic women scientists and engineers. Results from ADVANCE projects on campuses have facilitated consensus nationally about policies and practices that institutions may implement to help to alleviate issues, particularly for junior women scientists.Although getting women into senior and leadership positions in STEM constituted an initial impetus for ADVANCE, less emphasis was placed upon the needs of senior women scientists. Surveys of academic women scientists indicate that the issues faced by junior and senior women scientists differ significantly. The focus of ADVANCE on junior women in many ways seemed appropriate--the senior cohort of women scinetists is fed by the junior cohort of scientists; senior women serve as mentors, role models, and leaders for the junior colleagues, while continuing to struggle to achieve full status in the profession. This presentation will center on the differences in issues faced by senior compared to junior women scientists to explore whether a next step for ADVANCE should be to address needs of senior academic women scientists.

  5. Mentoring during surgical training: consensus recommendations for mentoring programmes from the Association of Surgeons in Training.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, P; Fitzgerald, J E F; McDermott, F D; Derbyshire, L; Shalhoub, J

    2014-11-01

    Mentoring has been present within surgical training for many years, albeit in different forms. There is evidence that formal mentoring can improve patient outcomes and facilitate learning and personal growth in the mentee. The Association of Surgeons in Training (ASiT) is an independent educational charity working to promote excellence in surgical training. This document recommends the introduction of a structured mentoring programme, which is readily accessible to all surgical trainees. A review of the available evidence--including an ASiT-led survey of its membership--highlights the desire of surgical trainees to have a mentor, whilst the majority do not have access to one. There is also limited training for those in mentoring roles. In response, ASiT have implemented a pilot mentoring scheme, with surgical trainees acting both as mentors and mentees. Based on the existing literature, survey data and pilot experience, ASiT formalises in this document consensus recommendations for mentoring in surgical training.

  6. Moderating Factors of Natural Mentoring Relationships, Problem Behaviors, and Emotional Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitney, Stephen D.; Hendricker, Elise N.; Offutt, Cheryl A.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines naturally occurring mentors by the quality and presence of a mentor (no mentor, low quality, high quality), type of mentors (adult mentors vs. peer mentors), and mentor quality within mentor type. A sub-sample of adolescents from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent-Health is used. Results indicate the effect of…

  7. Scientists: Engage the Public!

    PubMed Central

    Shugart, Erika C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Scientists must communicate about science with public audiences to promote an understanding of complex issues that we face in our technologically advanced society. Some scientists may be concerned about a social stigma or “Sagan effect” associated with participating in public communication. Recent research in the social sciences indicates that public communication by scientists is not a niche activity but is widely done and can be beneficial to a scientist’s career. There are a variety of approaches that scientists can take to become active in science communication. PMID:26695633

  8. Computer networking for scientists.

    PubMed

    Jennings, D M; Landweber, L H; Fuchs, I H; Farber, D J; Adrion, W R

    1986-02-28

    Scientific research has always relied on communication for gathering and providing access to data; for exchanging information; for holding discussions, meetings, and seminars; for collaborating with widely dispersed researchers; and for disseminating results. The pace and complexity of modern research, especially collaborations of researchers in different institutions, has dramatically increased scientists' communications needs. Scientists now need immediate access to data and information, to colleagues and collaborators, and to advanced computing and information services. Furthermore, to be really useful, communication facilities must be integrated with the scientist's normal day-to-day working environment. Scientists depend on computing and communications tools and are handicapped without them. PMID:17740290

  9. Volunteer senior scientists wanted

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The American Association for the Advancement of Science plans to establish a nationwide program to involve older scientists as volunteers in public education, business, and government.The Senior Scientists and Engineers (SSE) program was originated by AAAS in response to projected shortages of experienced scientists in many fields, and to draw on the large and rapidly growing population of post-retirement professional scientists. SSE began in 1988 as a pilot program in the Washington D.C. area run in conjunction with the American Association of Retired Persons.

  10. Why you need a mentor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riendeau, Diane

    2014-10-01

    At the AAPT Summer Meeting in Minneapolis, I co-hosted the speed networking event with Sam Sampere (the current NY section representative). Before the event began, I met with Sam briefly to discuss how we anticipated the event running. One of the first things Sam did was show me a memorial flyer from John Fitzgibbons' (Fitz) funeral. Sam later became choked up as he shared with the group about how his mentor, Fitz, had changed his life professionally at Syracuse and as a member of the AAPT. Sam suggested to the new attendees that perhaps their mentor was in the room and they would meet him or her today. All "seasoned" teachers in the room were nodding their heads in agreement. They could relate because there was someone who nurtured them, someone who deserves half the credit for the people and teachers they became.

  11. Mentoring: A Means by which Teachers Become Staff Developers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krupp, Judy-Arin

    1987-01-01

    The mentoring relationship is examined in terms of the stages in the process and the benefits to mentor, protege, and the organization. A four-step procedure to effectively foster mentoring in schools is presented. (MT)

  12. The Organizational and Human Dimensions of Successful Mentoring Programs and Relationships. Perspectives in Mentoring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kochan, Frances K., Ed.

    This collection of papers examines mentoring in a variety of settings. The 17 papers are: (1) "The Organizational and Human Dimensions of Successful Mentoring Across Diverse Settings" (Frances K. Kochan); (2) "Parents Mentoring Parents for School Success" (Nathan T. Avani); (3) "Project Nia (Purpose): A University/School Partnership to Enhance…

  13. Adjunct Mentoring, a Vital Responsibility in a Changing Educational Climate: The Lesley University Adjunct Mentoring Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziegler, Carol A.; Reiff, Marianne

    2006-01-01

    Lesley University in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, has established an adjunct mentoring process in response to its growing number of adjunct faculty. Lesley's adjunct corps serves in Lesley programs offered both on and off campus. The primary goals of the mentoring program are to support excellence in teaching, and to engage in mentoring that…

  14. Effects of Online Mentoring in Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning Environments: Mentor Presence and Cognitive Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorner, Helga

    2012-01-01

    This study examines online mentor roles and effects with the online mentoring process in computer-supported collaborative learning environments in communities of in-service teachers. Interest in the online mentors' activity encompassed their participation in the online interactions, the influence of their activity on participants' patterns of…

  15. Changes in Mentor Efficacy and Perceptions Following Participation in a Youth Mentoring Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strapp, Chehalis M.; Gilles, Andrew W.; Spalding, Anne E.; Hughes, Caleb T.; Baldwin, Annika M.; Guy, Kendra L.; Feakin, Kenna R.; Lamb, Adam D.

    2014-01-01

    Although mentoring programs are increasing in popularity as a preventative intervention strategy for youth, little is known about the experience from the mentor's perspective. In this study, we describe a longitudinal assessment of 41 mentors, including 13 men and 28 women (M[subscript age]?=?21.93?years, SD?=?3.21) working with at-risk youth…

  16. Teachers' Perceptions of Interpersonal Mentoring Relationships in One Early Childhood Mentoring Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaunae, Cathrine

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to gain a greater understanding of the interpersonal relationships between mentors and mentees in one early childhood, teacher-initiated, mentoring program. The mentoring program was designed to facilitate the induction process of newly-employed teachers into the university-based early childhood center.…

  17. Feedback Provision in Mentoring Conversation--Differing Mentor and Student Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korver, Bettina; Tillema, Harm

    2014-01-01

    Diverging perceptions between a mentor and a mentee on the nature and content of feedback given in mentoring conversations may have a profound impact on the mentee's learning from conversation. This study gauges whether approaches to mentoring relate to establishing congruency in perceptions on provided feedback. The aim of this research is to…

  18. Mentoring early-career preventionists: current views from mentors and protégés.

    PubMed

    Véronneau, Marie-Hélène; Cance, Jessica Duncan; Ridenour, Ty A

    2012-10-01

    In prevention science, much of the training occurs outside of a formal graduate program and mentorship is invaluable to early-career individuals. A sample of the Society for Prevention Research (SPR) membership (N = 97) from a wide range of career levels completed an online questionnaire in spring 2010. Almost 20% identified as mentors, 32% as protégés, and 49% as both a mentor and a protégé. Most mentoring relationships were established in graduate school, but professional organizations such as SPR facilitated nearly one in five mentoring relationships. Qualitative results suggested that participants value their professional organization's support of mentoring and would support initiatives to increase mentoring relationships specifically among SPR members. Although all mentor functions and protégé responsibilities were rated as important, professional support was the highest ranked mentor function and taking initiative the highest ranked protégé responsibility. Additionally, the qualitative results revealed that interpersonal skills and commitment to the mentoring process were seen as key to positive mentoring relationships. We also found that formal documentation of mentoring agreements was rare and a slight preference for a match on gender or ethnicity was observed for protégés from nondominant groups. The discussion includes implications for individuals and implications for promoting high-quality mentoring within professional organizations.

  19. "Mentoring Is Sharing the Excitement of Discovery": Faculty Perceptions of Undergraduate Research Mentoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandermaas-Peeler, Maureen; Miller, Paul C.; Peeples, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Although an increasing number of studies have examined students' participation in undergraduate research (UR), little is known about faculty perceptions of mentoring in this context. The purpose of this exploratory study was to investigate four aspects of mentoring UR, including how faculty define high-quality UR mentoring and operationalize it in…

  20. Mentoring in an Urban Teacher Residency: Mentors' Perceptions of Yearlong Placements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardiner, Wendy

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative study explored 8 urban mentor teachers' experiences and perceptions of mentoring in a yearlong field placement in an Urban Teacher Residency program. Results indicate mentors' and preservice teachers' joint work provided a context conducive for professional learning and contributing to a larger social justice mission. However,…

  1. Mentoring Matters: Mentoring Preservice and Early-Career English Teachers in Online Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodesiler, Luke; Tripp, Lauren

    2012-01-01

    Working to match mentors with new teachers, one consideration was the physical proximity of the mentor to the newcomer. If the mentor occupied a room next door or across the hall, this position suggested that the new teacher had easy access to this important resource in times of urgency. Such arrangements are not always possible. In this article,…

  2. Mentoring Highly Aggressive Children: Pre-Post Changes in Mentors' Attitudes, Personality, and Attachment Tendencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faith, Melissa A.; Fiala, Samuel E.; Cavell, Timothy A.; Hughes, Jan N.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the degree to which mentoring highly aggressive children was associated with changes in mentors' attitudes, personality, and attachment tendencies. Participants were 102 college students who each mentored an aggressive, high-risk child across three academic semesters (spring, fall, spring). We examined pre- to post-mentoring…

  3. Peer Group Mentoring Programmes in Finnish Higher Education--Mentors' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skaniakos, Terhi; Penttinen, Leena; Lairio, Marjatta

    2014-01-01

    Peer mentoring is one of the most important guidance practices for first-year students entering higher education and academic life. We are interested in mentors' roles and apply the ideas of group counseling in order to increase the understanding of peer mentoring. Other aspects of guidance--content, methods, and collaboration--are approached…

  4. Mentoring as a Learning Tool: Enhancing the Effectiveness of an Undergraduate Business Mentoring Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Abate, Caroline P.; Eddy, Erik R.

    2008-01-01

    Mentoring can be used as a pedagogical alternative both to extend and augment the educational experience of business students. This article addresses a gap in the literature regarding the use and effectiveness of mentoring in undergraduate business education by examining improvements to an existing mentoring program. After reviewing the mentoring…

  5. Mentoring Principals: Frameworks, Agendas, Tips, and Case Stories for Mentors and Mentees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Paul G.; Sheets, Jeromey M.; Knight, Dustin D.

    2005-01-01

    Mentoring new principals is a professional gift that leaders can give to incoming colleagues to speed them on the path to full effectiveness. This guide will help jump start the process by providing an overview of the key components and phases of principal mentoring and adult learning. This book supplies the architecture for formal mentoring,…

  6. Cross Gender Mentoring in the Era of Globalization: Implications for Mentoring the Organizational Women of India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghosh, Rajashi; Haynes, Ray K.

    2008-01-01

    This paper addresses gender specific issues in mentoring through a focused review of mentoring literature. It highlights the relevance of cross gender mentoring in the context of women's career growth in Indian business organizations. The paper concludes by recommending relationship constellations as an innovative solution to the problems…

  7. Engagement Mentoring for "Disaffected" Youth: A New Model of Mentoring for Social Inclusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colley, Helen

    2003-01-01

    Presents a critical analysis of mentoring for social inclusion. Traces its dramatic international expansion as a tool of education policies in the 1990s; identifies a new model, engagement mentoring, which seeks to re-engage disaffected youth with the formal labor market. States mentors are treated as vehicles for these objectives. (BT)

  8. Participation in the Adoption Mentoring Partnership: Mentors' Experiences of Ethnic Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garber, Karin J.; French, Quade Y. S.; Grotevant, Harold D.

    2015-01-01

    The Adoption Mentoring Partnership (AMP) matches preadolescent adoptees with adopted college students, prioritizing matches of the same ethnic background. As part of AMP, participants actively discuss issues of ethnicity and adoption with a cohort of mentors over a period of 1 to 3 years in mentor group meetings (MGMs). This study focuses on…

  9. A comparison of well-peer mentored and non-peer mentored athletes' perceptions of satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Matt D; Loughead, Todd M

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare well-peer mentored and non-peer mentored athletes' perceptions of satisfaction. A total of 444 intercollegiate athletes (272 well-peer mentored and 172 non-peer mentored) from a variety of sport teams participated in the study. Athletes from both well-peer mentored and non-peer mentored groups reported their satisfaction levels using the Athlete Satisfaction Questionnaire. The results of a MANOVA and follow-up post hoc ANOVAs showed that well-peer mentored athletes were significantly more satisfied than their non-peer mentored counterparts in terms of individual performance, personal dedication, team task contribution, team social contribution, team integration, ethics, ability utilisation and training and instruction. Overall, the findings suggest that athletes who are well-peer mentored by a teammate perceive higher satisfaction levels with various aspects of their athletic experience than athletes who are not peer mentored by a teammate. Given these positive findings, practitioners (i.e., coaches, sport psychology consultants) should inform athletes on the benefits of peer-to-peer mentoring. The practical implications of the results and strategies to promote peer athlete mentoring relationships in sport are highlighted. PMID:26069999

  10. Educative Mentoring: How a Mentor Supported a Preservice Biology Teacher's Pedagogical Content Knowledge Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, Ellen; Friedrichsen, Patricia J.

    2015-01-01

    Research suggests discipline-specific, educative mentoring can help preservice teachers develop more sophisticated pedagogical content knowledge (PCK). However, there are few studies examining the nature of mentors' practice and "how" mentors influence preservice teacher's (PST) PCK. The purpose of this case study was to describe the…

  11. Experiences and Perceptions of Mentors in a Community Mentoring Program for At-Risk Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Belinda K.

    2013-01-01

    This phenomenological case study explored the perceptions and experiences of mentors who work for a community-based mentoring program that was created to provide at-risk minority students with male role models. Most studies from the past 20 years have assessed mainly the academic, social, and emotional outcomes of mentoring among at-risk minority…

  12. Long-Term Mentors' Perceptions of Building Mentoring Relationships with At-Risk Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Cindy Ann; Newman-Thomas, Cathy; Stormont, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    Youth mentoring, defined within this study, as the pairing of a youth at risk with a caring adult, is an intervention that is often used for youth at risk for academic and social failure. We sought to understand mentors' perspectives of the fundamental elements that foster positive mentor--mentee relationships that build resiliency and increase…

  13. Scientists Shaping the Discussion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, J. A.; Weymann, R.; Mandia, S. A.; Ashley, M.

    2011-12-01

    Scientific studies which directly impact the larger society require an engagement between the scientists and the larger public. With respect to research on climate change, many third-party groups report on scientific findings and thereby serve as an intermediary between the scientist and the public. In many cases, the third-party reporting misinterprets the findings and conveys inaccurate information to the media and the public. To remedy this, many scientists are now taking a more active role in conveying their work directly to interested parties. In addition, some scientists are taking the further step of engaging with the general public to answer basic questions related to climate change - even on sub-topics which are unrelated to scientists' own research. Nevertheless, many scientists are reluctant to engage the general public or the media. The reasons for scientific reticence are varied but most commonly are related to fear of public engagement, concern about the time required to properly engage the public, or concerns about the impact to their professional reputations. However, for those scientists who are successful, these engagement activities provide many benefits. Scientists can increase the impact of their work, and they can help society make informed choices on significant issues, such as mitigating global warming. Here we provide some concrete steps that scientists can take to ensure that their public engagement is successful. These steps include: (1) cultivating relationships with reporters, (2) crafting clear, easy to understand messages that summarize their work, (3) relating science to everyday experiences, and (4) constructing arguments which appeal to a wide-ranging audience. With these steps, we show that scientists can efficiently deal with concerns that would otherwise inhibit their public engagement. Various resources will be provided that allow scientists to continue work on these key steps.

  14. Future HIV Mentoring Programs to Enhance Diversity.

    PubMed

    Stoff, David M; Cargill, Victoria A

    2016-09-01

    This paper proposes a general template to guide future mentoring program development addressing: (i) considerations to ensure an adequate research workforce; (ii) key guidelines and principles of mentoring; and (iii) use of a logic model to develop program milestones, outcomes and evaluation. We focus on these areas to guide and inform the most effective mentoring program components, which we find to be more helpful than identifying specific features and ingredients. Although the focus is on the development of a new generation of investigators from diverse backgrounds, this template may also apply to mentoring programs for other investigators and for disciplines beyond HIV. PMID:27484059

  15. Creating a Pipeline for African American Computing Science Faculty: An Innovative Faculty/Research Mentoring Program Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charleston, LaVar J.; Gilbert, Juan E.; Escobar, Barbara; Jackson, Jerlando F. L.

    2014-01-01

    African Americans represent 1.3% of all computing sciences faculty in PhD-granting departments, underscoring the severe underrepresentation of Black/African American tenure-track faculty in computing (CRA, 2012). The Future Faculty/Research Scientist Mentoring (FFRM) program, funded by the National Science Foundation, was found to be an effective…

  16. Stories of Scientists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mascazine, John R.

    2001-01-01

    Presents three biographical sketches of scientists including John Wesley Powell (first to explore the geology of the Grand Canyon), Joseph von Fraunhofer (his work in optics led to the science of spectroscopy), and Gregor Mendel (of Mendelian genetics fame). Other scientists are mentioned along with sources for additional biographical information.…

  17. Scientist Examines Tornado Vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In this Quick Time movie, a scientist examines what appears to be a tornado vortex (blue) coming out of a thunderstorm. The scientist uses 3D glasses to be able to see in 3 dimensions the different flows going out into the vortex. Earth science and weather studies are an important ongoing function of NASA and its affiliates.

  18. Scientists as People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jungwirth, E.

    1973-01-01

    Describes the development of students' images of scientists from high school through college in Israel, and indicates the presence of significant discrepancies between the images held by college students and by scientists themselves as measured by the Test On Understanding Science (TOUS) form W. (CC)

  19. Misquoted Scientists Respond.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, John R.

    1981-01-01

    This paper points out that creationists have developed a skill unique to their trade, namely, that of misquotation and quotation out of context from the works of leading evolutionists. This tactic not only frustrates scientists but it misleads school board members, legislators, and the public. A representative sampling of scientists' responses to…

  20. Just like Real Scientists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Betteley, Pat

    2009-01-01

    How do you inspire students to keep records like scientists? Share the primary research of real scientists and explicitly teach students how to keep records--that's how! Therefore, a group of third-grade students and their teacher studied the work of famous primatologist Jane Goodall and her modern-day counterpart Ian Gilby. After learning about…

  1. Feasibility study for a 10 MM GPY fuel ethanol plant, Brady Hot Springs, Nevada. Volume II. Geothermal resource, agricultural feedstock, markets and economic viability

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    The issues of the geothermal resource at Brady's Hot Springs are dealt with: the prospective supply of feedstocks to the ethanol plant, the markets for the spent grain by-products of the plant, the storage, handling and transshipment requirements for the feedstocks and by-products from a rail siding facility at Fernley, the probable market for fuel ethanol in the region, and an assessment of the economic viability of the entire undertaking.

  2. Developmental mentoring match characteristics: correspondence between mentors' and mentees' assessments of relationship quality.

    PubMed

    Karcher, Michael J; Nakkula, Michael J; Harris, John

    2005-03-01

    Understanding the factors that contribute to high-quality mentoring relationships is critical to developing and sustaining effective mentoring programs. In study 1, sixty-three adolescent mentors, from two high schools, were surveyed four to six weeks after being matched with elementary-age mentees. Hierarchical regression models revealed that mentees' academic and behavioral risk status, parental involvement, and program quality all explained variance in mentor-perceived relationship quality, but none remained significant predictors after mentors' self-efficacy, motivations for self-enhancement, and assessments of their mentees' support seeking behaviors were accounted for. Study 2 cross-validates the regression model in study 1 and examines the concurrent validity and predictive validity of a measure of mentoring match characteristics using mid-year and end-of-year assessments from mentees and mentors. Editors' Strategic Implications: The focus on mentors' initial impressions of their mentees and the relationship represents a novel contribution to the study of relationship formation and persistence. The authors provide a promising strategy - and descriptions of specific measures - to help programs study relationships that endure or terminate. Coordinators will benefit from the knowledge that if mentors feel efficacious and if the mentoring relationship is strong, mentors are more likely to persist.

  3. Scientist - Educator Partnerships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devore, E.

    2003-12-01

    Science is the quest for knowledge about the natural world, and scientists are often characterized as driven by curiosity and the desire to discover, traits they share with children exploring the world through youthful eyes. In contrast, formal science education at the pre-college and college levels frequently distills the joy of scientific research and discovery into a body on known facts, laws, and disciplinary studies, loosing the excitement of doing science. When scientists partner with teachers and other educators, there is an opportunity for engaging students and the public with scientists and their research projects. Further, scientists provide expertise to create up-to-date and accurate materials for use in classrooms, science centers, and youth groups. Scientists also see engagement with teachers, students, and the public through science centers as a means of growing the next generation of scientists to continue the work. Often this process is facilitated by science education professionals who work at the interface between the worlds of scientific research and formal and informal education. The partnership between the research scientist and the science education professional can result in improved science education for a broad community of teachers, students and the public.

  4. A Framework for Successful Research Experiences in the Classroom: Combining the Power of Technology and Mentors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graff, P. V.; Stefanov, W. L.; Willis, K.; Runco, S.; McCollum, T.; Lindgren, C. F.; Baker, M.; Mailhot, M.

    2011-12-01

    Authentic research opportunities in the classroom are most impactful when they are student-driven and inquiry-based. These experiences are even more powerful when they involve technology and meaningful connections with scientists. In today's classrooms, activities are driven by state required skills, education standards, and state mandated testing. Therefore, programs that incorporate authentic research must address the needs of teachers. NASA's Expedition Earth and Beyond (EEAB) Program has developed a framework that addresses teacher needs and incorporates the use of technology and access to mentors to promote and enhance authentic research in the classroom. EEAB is a student involvement program that facilitates student investigations of Earth or planetary comparisons using NASA data. To promote student-led research, EEAB provides standards-aligned, inquiry-based curricular resources, an implementation structure to facilitate research, educator professional development, and ongoing support. This framework also provides teachers with the option to incorporate the use of technology and connect students with a mentor, both of which can enrich student research experiences. The framework is structured by a modeled 9-step process of science which helps students organize their research. With more schools gaining increased access to technology, EEAB has created an option to help schools take advantage of students' interest and comfort with technology by leveraging the use of available technologies to enhance student research. The use of technology not only allows students to collaborate and share their research, it also provides a mechanism for them to work with a mentor. This framework was tested during the 2010/2011 school year. Team workspaces hosted on Wikispaces for Educators allow students to initiate their research and refine their research question initially without external input. This allows teams to work independently and rely on the skills and interests of

  5. A Framework for Successful Research Experiences in the Classroom: Combining the Power of Technology and Mentors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graff, Paige Valderrama; Stefanov, William L.; Willis, Kim; Runco, Susan; McCollum, Tim; Lindgren, Charles F.; Baker, Marshalyn; Mailhot, Michele

    2011-01-01

    Authentic research opportunities in the classroom are most impactful when they are student-driven and inquiry-based. These experiences are even more powerful when they involve technology and meaningful connections with scientists. In today's classrooms, activities are driven by state required skills, education standards, and state mandated testing. Therefore, programs that incorporate authentic research must address the needs of teachers. NASA's Expedition Earth and Beyond (EEAB) Program has developed a framework that addresses teacher needs and incorporates the use of technology and access to mentors to promote and enhance authentic research in the classroom. EEAB is a student involvement program that facilitates student investigations of Earth or planetary comparisons using NASA data. To promote student-led research, EEAB provides standards-aligned, inquiry-based curricular resources, an implementation structure to facilitate research, educator professional development, and ongoing support. This framework also provides teachers with the option to incorporate the use of technology and connect students with a mentor, both of which can enrich student research experiences. The framework is structured by a modeled 9-step process of science which helps students organize their research. With more schools gaining increased access to technology, EEAB has created an option to help schools take advantage of students' interest and comfort with technology by leveraging the use of available technologies to enhance student research. The use of technology not only allows students to collaborate and share their research, it also provides a mechanism for them to work with a mentor. This framework was tested during the 2010/2011 school year. Team workspaces hosted on Wikispaces for Educators allow students to initiate their research and refine their research question initially without external input. This allows teams to work independently and rely on the skills and interests of

  6. Retaining Urban Teachers: The Impact of Mentoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saffold, Felicia

    2006-01-01

    This study explores urban teachers' perception of their mentoring experience in an alternative urban teacher education program. Fifteen teachers who had been teaching in urban schools for at least three years participated in focus groups. The findings support the need for continuing the development of new teachers through utilizing mentors in the…

  7. Mentoring: A Model for Leadership Development?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stead, Valerie

    2005-01-01

    There appears to be a paucity of research on mentoring senior leaders (Hobson & Sharp, 2005) and yet a growing interest in the development of leadership through experience (Abra "et al.," 2003; McCauley "et al.," 1998). This paper therefore presents and evaluates a case study of a pilot mentoring scheme and programme for Directors of Finance…

  8. Repositioning Professionalism: Teachers, Mentors, Policy and Praxis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingleby, Ewan; Tummons, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    This article reflects on the interplay between the recommended policy of providing mentors for PCET ITT (Post-Compulsory Education and Training Initial Teacher Training) students and the praxis or application of this policy. The findings are based on questionnaire data that has been gathered from 80 PCET ITT students and their mentors alongside…

  9. A cross-cultural mentoring program

    SciTech Connect

    Huang-Nissen, S.; Myers, R.Y.

    1995-04-01

    This report summarized the results of the pilot Cross-Cultural Mentoring Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, from the inception of the program idea through its implementation and assessment. It discusses the benefits of mentoring, the origins of the program, program design and implementation, program assessment, and conclusions and recommendations.

  10. Using the Scientific Method to Improve Mentoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGuire, Saundra Yancy

    2007-01-01

    Many students who enter colleges and universities seem to be focused on memorizing and regurgitating information rather than on developing critical thinking and problem solving skills. Mentoring is crucial to help these students transition from the current approach to one that will be successful in college. Successful mentoring requires a…

  11. Measuring the effectiveness of faculty mentoring relationships.

    PubMed

    Berk, Ronald A; Berg, Janet; Mortimer, Rosemary; Walton-Moss, Benita; Yeo, Theresa P

    2005-01-01

    "Mentor" is a term widely used in academic medicine but for which there is no consensus on an operational definition. Further, criteria are rarely reported for evaluating the effectiveness of mentoring. This article presents the work of an Ad Hoc Faculty Mentoring Committee whose tasks were to define "mentorship," specify concrete characteristics and responsibilities of mentors that are measurable, and develop new tools to evaluate the effectiveness of the mentoring relationship. The committee developed two tools: the Mentorship Profile Questionnaire, which describes the characteristics and outcome measures of the mentoring relationship from the perspective of the mentee, and the Mentorship Effectiveness Scale, a 12-item six-point agree-disagree-format Likert-type rating scale, which evaluates 12 behavioral characteristics of the mentor. These instruments are explained and copies are provided. Psychometric issues, including the importance of content-related validity evidence, response bias due to acquiescence and halo effects, and limitations on collecting reliability evidence, are examined in the context of the mentor-mentee relationship. Directions for future research are suggested. PMID:15618097

  12. 75 FR 1263 - National Mentoring Month, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-08

    ... Proclamation 8470--National Mentoring Month, 2010 Proclamation 8471--National Slavery and Human Trafficking... 8470 of January 4, 2010 National Mentoring Month, 2010 By the President of the United States of America..., THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested...

  13. Undergraduate Research Mentoring: Obstacles and Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, W. Brad; Behling, Laura L.; Miller, Paul; Vandermaas-Peeler, Maureen

    2015-01-01

    Researchers and policy-makers in higher education increasingly espouse the view that undergraduate students should have the opportunity to learn about scholarship and research in the context of faculty-mentored research experiences. There is mounting consensus that mentored undergraduate research should be standard pedagogical practice in all…

  14. Identifying Mentors for Student Employees on Campus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frock, David

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This exploratory research project aims to seek an effective process for identifying supervisors of part-time student employees who also serve in a mentoring capacity. Design/methodology/approach: This paper is based on a review of literature and an evaluation process focused on established traits and functions of mentoring as applied to…

  15. Mentoring: One of the Master's Tools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Brenda J.

    1999-01-01

    Critiques the mentoring paradigm in the hopes of enabling women to be more realistic about the dynamics of the power elements of mentoring. Proposes that this analysis will help create space for critiquing the norms, practices, and definitions of success that are at the heart of institutions. (GCP)

  16. Formal Mentoring Programs and Organizational Attraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Tammy D.; O'Brien, Kimberly E.

    2006-01-01

    This study was designed to test if formal mentoring programs enhance organizational attraction. Participants were 190 undergraduates looking for a job related to their major. Results indicated that participants were more attracted to an organization when it was depicted as having a formal mentoring program than when it was not so depicted. Drawing…

  17. Mentoring North Carolina Novice Teachers, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh.

    This introductory-level training program is designed to develop in classroom teachers the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary for functioning as successful mentors to novice North Carolina teachers. This includes background and perspectives for mentoring in North Carolina; Interstate New Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium (INTASC)…

  18. Empowering Untenured Faculty through Mosaic Mentoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanuka, Heather; Marini, Anthony

    2004-01-01

    Mentoring programs have consistently demonstrated their value in assisting new and early faculty members to make successful adjustments and productive contributions to the academy. Yet, mentoring programs have failed to be consistently implemented despite their efficacy and increasing levels of job dissatisfaction reported by new and early faculty…

  19. An Examination of New Counselor Mentor Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bass, Erin; Gardner, Lauren; Onwukaeme, Chika; Revere, Dawn; Shepherd, Denise; Parrish, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    An analysis of current new counselor mentor programs reveals the need for such programs, but information regarding established programs is limited. A review of the literature addresses program characteristics and data obtained from existing mentor program participants. An overview of four programs explaining the framework outlined for mentoring…

  20. 78 FR 853 - National Mentoring Month, 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-07

    .... (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2013-00105 Filed 1-4-13; 8:45 am] Billing code 3295-F3 ... Mentoring Month, 2013 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Our American family is... Mentoring Month, we pay special tribute to the men and women who enrich the lives of our young people...

  1. Improving Spatial Ability with Mentored Sketching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohler, James L.; Miller, Craig L.

    2008-01-01

    As the result of a qualitative investigation into spatial ability, a teaching technique called mentored sketching was found to be effective for teaching visualization skills to freshman engineering students. This contribution describes the technique, how it evolved, and comments made by students as to its effectiveness. While mentored sketching…

  2. Development of Mentor Teacher Role Inventory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koc, Ebru Melek

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to develop and investigate the validity and reliability of the Mentor Teacher Role Inventory (MTRI). A total of 1843 student teachers in the Distance English Teacher Training Program participated in the study. The 58 items of the Mentor Teacher Role Inventory underwent principal factor analysis, which revealed nine factors…

  3. Ten Ways to Make Mentoring Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breaux, Annette

    2016-01-01

    In her years of experience studying, working with, and writing about new teachers, induction programs, and mentoring, Annette Breaux has learned that successful mentoring boils down to 10 factors. In this article, Breaux highlights those features and provides actionable takeaways for school districts and educators. She recommends embedding…

  4. E-Mentoring in Three Voices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akin, Lynn; Hilbun, Janet

    2007-01-01

    This research shares the experiences of two colleagues who engaged in an e-mentoring relationship for a period of one academic term. Their candid and reflective comments are interspersed among the voices of the best practices literature. Mentoring is a traditional method of passing knowledge and skills on from an established professional to a…

  5. Mentoring Relationships and Adolescent Self-Esteem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Sarah E. O.; Lowe, Sarah R.; Rhodes, Jean E.

    2012-01-01

    An estimated three million American youth are in formal, one-to-one mentoring relationships, and countless more have meaningful, natural mentoring relationships with extended family members, teachers, neighbors, coaches and other caring, non-parental adults. The empirical literature generally indicates that close and enduring mentoring…

  6. National Service and Mentoring. Issue Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corporation for National and Community Service, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS) supports mentoring for children and youth from disadvantaged circumstances through several of their programs. CNCS believes that caring and capable adults can make a critical difference in the lives of children and youth in need. Mentoring is a proven method to ensure students complete…

  7. 48 CFR 519.7006 - Mentor firms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Mentor firms. 519.7006...: (1) A large business prime contractor that is currently performing under an approved subcontracting plan as required by FAR 19.7 - Small business mentors are exempted; or (2) A small business...

  8. Is Cross-Race Mentoring a Negative?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolan, Thomas G.

    2007-01-01

    The author discusses cross-race mentoring and examines whether this is necessarily a negative. Here, he presents the opinions of one African-American female Ph.D., two Hispanic female Ph.D.s, and one Hispanic male graduate student, who offer varied perspectives. Ten points are presented: (1) 1. Cross-race mentoring requires extra sensitivity; (2)…

  9. A Role for Imagery in Mentoring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Sarah

    2000-01-01

    Examples of imagery and visualization in medicine, sports, and preservice teaching explore the potential of these techniques in mentoring relationships. They help proteges develop a positive self-image in a new role, make mentors' experience more explicit, and depict possible selves toward which proteges can work. (SK)

  10. Mentoring--A New Mantra for Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sundli, Liv

    2007-01-01

    Mentoring has become an important part of teacher education, as an element in both the enhancement of reflective practice and the professional development of schools. Yet the concept remains confused. Problematic issues such as the elements of power and control, and the danger of dependence and intimacy are seldom heard when mentoring is…

  11. Personality Predictors of Participation as a Mentor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niehoff, Brian P.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to focus on the personality characteristics of mentors. Design/methodology/approach: The five factor model of personality was used to examine relationships between personality and participation as a mentor. A sample of 194 practicing veterinarians were surveyed on the five factor model of personality and a…

  12. Candidate Mentor Supervisor Model: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Kristine M.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to better understand affordances and constraints of the Candidate Mentor Supervisor Model (CMSM) as experienced by teacher candidates and their mentor supervisors. The results indicated perceived benefits to teacher candidates. Candidates participating in the CMSM reported a sense of nested support within their…

  13. Examining the Mentoring Experience of Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, John

    2012-01-01

    This descriptive research study examines the perceptions of former graduate students from Governors State University's Educational Administration Program regarding the quality and quantity of their mentoring experience and their suggestions for mentoring implementation. The research questions are: (1) What is the percentage of teachers who receive…

  14. Mentoring Transition-Age Youth with Blindness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Edward C.

    2012-01-01

    This article reports on a mentoring project designed for transition-age youth (ages 16-26) who are persons with legal blindness. Youth were matched with adult mentors who were also persons with blindness but who have achieved academic and career success. Results demonstrate that youth who participated in the project for 2 years had significant…

  15. Mentoring during Adolescence and Adult Resilience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jakacki, Pola Christina

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if there was a significant relationship between mentoring and adult resilience, specifically adults that were mentored as adolescents. The study sample comprised of 657 adults from various locations across the country. For this quantitative study, they completed a two-part questionnaire made up of the…

  16. The Case for Women Mentoring Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Block, Betty Ann; Tietjen-Smith, Tara

    2016-01-01

    The authors argue that there will be a critical mass of women in leadership positions in kinesiology and across higher education for substantial gender-based mentoring to take place in the 21st century. First, the current state of women in higher education leadership, trends in mentoring, and the reasons it is important for women who have…

  17. Youth Mentoring and Resilience: Implications for Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhodes, Jean; Lowe, Sarah Ryan

    2008-01-01

    Despite findings indicating the importance of non-parental adults in the lives of youth, there is little research on these relationships, including those that occur in the context of youth mentoring. Compounding this problem is a positive slant taken towards youth mentoring in the media, often unsubstantiated by empirical evidence. This article…

  18. Mentoring in Physical Education: Issues and Insights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mawer, Mick, Ed.

    These chapters describe partnerships and mentoring programs in the United Kingdom for initial teacher education. Part 1: The Context contains two chapters: "Partnerships in School-Based Training: The Implications for Physical Education" (Patricia Shenton and Elizabeth Murdoch); and "What Is Mentoring?" (Michael Taylor and Joan Stephenson). Part 2:…

  19. Israeli Teachers' Perceptions of Mentoring Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapira-Lishchinsky, Orly

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to identify Israeli teachers' perceptions about the relationships between mentoring styles and team culture and the effect of these relationships on mentoring effectiveness. Design/methodology/approach: The sample consisted of 169 Israeli teachers from 22 science and technology teams in junior high schools.…

  20. Scholarship and mentoring: an essential partnership?

    PubMed

    Turnbull, Beverley

    2010-12-01

    This paper discusses as study of mentoring and its relationship to nursing academics' scholarly productivity. A hermeneutic phenomenological approach was used to explore participants' experiences of mentoring and scholarship. Although all participants were well aware of the need to increase levels of scholarship, few had experienced the role modelling, guidance and leadership to assist them in meeting the expectations of the tertiary environment. While quality mentoring was viewed as a productive facilitator to improving levels of scholarly productivity, a supportive work environment with strong academic leadership was also considered an essential element in developing scholarship. Mentoring alone was considered unlikely to ameliorate any institutional issues, but rather, comprised one of a number of strategies. The picture that emerged from the study illustrates a discipline in transition in which a culture of mentoring is not well established, one that requires change not only within the discipline, but within tertiary institutions.

  1. Ask a Climate Scientist

    NASA Video Gallery

    Have a question that's always confounded you about Earth's climate? Wonder why it matters that the climate is changing now if it has changed before? Or how scientists know changes seen in recent de...

  2. Scientists and Human Rights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makdisi, Yousef

    2012-02-01

    The American Physical Society has a long history of involvement in defense of human rights. The Committee on International Freedom of Scientists was formed in the mid seventies as a subcommittee within the Panel On Public Affairs ``to deal with matters of an international nature that endangers the abilities of scientists to function as scientists'' and by 1980 it was established as an independent committee. In this presentation I will describe some aspects of the early history and the impetus that led to such an advocacy, the methods employed then and how they evolved to the present CIFS responsibility ``for monitoring concerns regarding human rights for scientists throughout the world''. I will also describe the current approach and some sample cases the committee has pursued recently, the interaction with other human rights organizations, and touch upon some venues through which the community can engage to help in this noble cause.

  3. Scientists as writers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yore, Larry D.; Hand, Brian M.; Prain, Vaughan

    2002-09-01

    This study attempted to establish an image of a science writer based on a synthesis of writing theory, models, and research literature on academic writing in science and other disciplines and to contrast this image with an actual prototypical image of scientists as writers of science. The synthesis was used to develop a questionnaire to assess scientists' writing habits, beliefs, strategies, and perceptions about print-based language. The questionnaire was administered to 17 scientists from science and applied science departments of a large Midwestern land grant university. Each respondent was interviewed following the completion of the questionnaire with a custom-designed semistructured protocol to elaborate, probe, and extend their written responses. These data were analyzed in a stepwise fashion using the questionnaire responses to establish tentative assertions about the three major foci (type of writing done, criteria of good science writing, writing strategies used) and the interview responses to verify these assertions. Two illustrative cases (a very experienced, male physical scientist and a less experienced, female applied biological scientist) were used to highlight diversity in the sample. Generally, these 17 scientists are driven by the academy's priority of publishing their research results in refereed, peer-reviewed journals. They write their research reports in isolation or as a member of a large research team, target their writing to a few journals that they also read regularly, use writing in their teaching and scholarship to inform and persuade science students and other scientists, but do little border crossing into other discourse communities. The prototypical science writer found in this study did not match the image based on a synthesis of the writing literature in that these scientists perceived writing as knowledge telling not knowledge building, their metacognition of written discourse was tacit, and they used a narrow array of genre

  4. A sustainable course in research mentoring.

    PubMed

    Martina, Camille Anne; Mutrie, Andria; Ward, Denham; Lewis, Vivian

    2014-10-01

    In this report, we describe a six-year experience (2007-2012) in a single CTSA awardee institution on the development, implementation and evaluation of a hybrid online mentoring curriculum that is applicable to CTSA trainees at various levels (graduate, medical students, and junior faculty) of career training. The curriculum offers convenience, engagement, and financial sustainability. Overall, we found high levels of satisfaction with the curriculum and mentoring experience among both protégés and mentors. Qualitative data showed remarkable consensus of 14 of the 15 domains of mentoring that form the framework of the mentoring curriculum: (1) accessibility, (2) selectivity, (3) engagement/support, (4) teaching/training, (5) clarity of performance/expectations, (6) sponsorship/sharing power judiciously, (7) demystifying the system (academia), (8) challenging/encouraging risk taking, (9) affirming, (10) providing exposure/visibility, (11) being an intentional role model, (12) protecting, (13) providing feedback, (14) self-disclosure, and lastly (15) counseling, with the fifteenth domain "counseling" being the most controversial. Quantitative survey data of both mentors and protégés indicated a high degree of overall satisfaction in their mentor-protégé dyad with 86% (59) of protégés and 86% (55) of mentors responding good or excellent to the "quality of time spent." Mentors and protégés were most satisfied in the area of research, with 93% (62) of protégés and 96% (57) of mentors finding discussions in research very to somewhat useful for their own career advancement. Along with wide acceptability, this format is a useful option for institutions where face-to-face time is limited and education budgets are lean.

  5. Cultivating a Global Pool of Future Geoscientists and Mentors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparrow, E. B.; Yule, S.; Murphy, A.; Fenzel, M.; Buali, S.; Bourgeault, J.; Tunkl, T.; Lawani, Y.; Elwan, M.; Ruairuen, W.; Altin, L.; Boonkhot, P.

    2015-12-01

    The Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE) program ( www.globe.gov) is an international science and education program in over 28,000 schools in 114 countries. GLOBE students conduct real science - ask questions, make observations, do measurements, analyze data, and participate in research collaborations with other students and Earth scientists. In the U.S., GLOBE operates through a GLOBE Implementation Office and partnerships with U.S. organizations that recruit schools, train teachers at professional development workshops, and mentor teachers and their students to engage in GLOBE learning and research activities. Internationally, GLOBE is implemented through bilateral agreements between the U.S. government and those of partner countries that provide the structure and funding to fulfill the responsibilities and functions of a GLOBE Partnership. GLOBE students have contributed more than 129 million measurements to ongoing science investigations. GLOBE, in its 20th year, has been successful in engaging students in Earth as a system and environmental science studies during K-12 schooling and beyond as students go into college and in their careers. GLOBE Alumni is a grassroots community of former GLOBE students committed to continue GLOBE activities at a higher level. They have worked with GLOBE in Estonia, Czech Republic, Benin, Thailand and Peru, to support teachers and students in student scientific research to better understand the Earth as a system and the environment. Survey results of participants at the 2014 GLOBE Learning Expedition indicate that 53% of GLOBE students would likely choose GLOBE involvement beyond secondary school, 80 % of teachers are likely to engage former GLOBE students as near-peer mentors to their students, 70% of GLOBE Partners are likely to use the assistance of former GLOBE students when training teachers and 100% of GLOBE Partners and teachers consider former GLOBE students who may be in college or

  6. Multiple Mentoring in Academe: Developing the Professorial Network

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Janasz, Suzanne C.; Sullivan, Sherry E.

    2004-01-01

    Previous studies in business organizations have shown that mentoring provides numerous benefits for both individuals and organizations. Most of this mentoring research has been based on traditional, hierarchical mentor-protege relationships in non-academic settings. We discuss why there is little empirical research on faculty mentoring and review…

  7. Mentoring Asian and Euro-American College Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liang, Belle; Tracy, Allison; Kauh, Tina; Taylor, Catherine; Williams, Linda M.

    2006-01-01

    This study examines differences in the mentoring relationships of Asian American and Euro-American college women. Findings showed that the groups view mentoring as equally important but that fewer Asians report having a mentor. However, those who have mentors find them to be just as valuable as do their Euro-American counterparts. (Contains 2…

  8. Doctoral Advising or Mentoring? Effects on Student Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunsford, Laura

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the extent to which doctoral advisors provided mentoring to their students and if mentor support influenced doctoral student outcomes. Survey results from 477 respondents, across disciplines at two universities, indicated that most students believed mentoring was important and over half of them received mentoring support…

  9. Evaluating a Psychology Graduate Student Peer Mentoring Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleck, Christina; Mullins, Morell E.

    2012-01-01

    Research on mentoring outcomes and characteristics of various types of mentoring programs in different settings is limited. The present study sampled 39 graduate students at a small Midwestern university to evaluate peer mentoring in a graduate school setting. Mentoring function and outcome relationships as well as program characteristics were…

  10. Reconceptualizing Faculty Mentoring within a Community of Practice Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Emily R.; Calderwood, Patricia E.; Dohm, Faith A.; Gill Lopez, Paula

    2013-01-01

    Despite the growing knowledge base on mentoring in academia, providing effective mentoring for faculty presents several complex dilemmas for academic units charged with facilitating mentoring. How do we institutionalize voluntary and spontaneous mentoring interaction? How do we support a collaborative climate in an inherently individual and…

  11. Mentoring for Professional Geropsychology within a Doctoral Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Bob G.

    2011-01-01

    Mentoring in doctoral programs in professional psychology has its roots in mentoring in science programs of all types. Professional psychology in general may suffer from conflating mentoring with clinical supervision. Using the Pikes Peak Model competencies as a framework, mentoring in attitudes, knowledge, and skills related to professional…

  12. Novice Teachers Learning from Others: Mentoring in Shanghai Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salleh, Hairon; Tan, Charlene

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores critically the practice of teacher mentoring in Shanghai schools. It begins with a review of the literature on teacher mentoring, which is followed by an introduction to education and teacher mentoring in the schools. The next section critiques teacher mentoring in Shanghai and we highlight three key characteristics and…

  13. Mentoring Graduate Students: The Good, Bad, and Gray

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballantine, Jeanne H.; Jolly-Ballantine, John-Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Good mentoring of graduate students influences their perseverance and success to completion, whereas bad mentoring can result in negative outcomes, including delayed degree completion or non-completion. What the authors refer to as the gray zone is that which falls between good and bad mentoring. Examples are partial mentoring or changes in…

  14. Teacher Induction, Mentoring, and Retention: A Summary of the Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strong, Michael

    2005-01-01

    This paper reviews the research literature on new teacher mentoring, focusing on issues of definition, why teachers quit, and the effects of mentoring on retention. Conclusions call for more scientific studies on the relationship between mentoring and retention, more research on the relation between mentoring and other educational outcomes, and a…

  15. Mentoring as a communication channel: Implications for innovation and productivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Avant, L.; Boozer, R. W.

    1985-01-01

    The impact of a formalized mentoring program as a communication channel for enhancing information distribution, innovation, and productivity is investigated. Formal and informal approaches to mentoring are discussed. Interviews with 11 members of formal mentor-protege teams indicate communications in the mentoring relationship can affect individual and organizational innovation and productivity.

  16. Evaluating the Outcomes of an eMentoring Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penny, Chris; Bolton, David

    2011-01-01

    While the term mentor can mean different things to different people, a true mentoring relationship is "characterized by a richness of interdependence between two people" (O'Neill, Wagner, & Gomez, 1996, p. 42). In the last 20 years, mentoring has become more popular in education. The increased interest in mentoring has resulted in part from the…

  17. Mentoring experience and its effects on medical interns

    PubMed Central

    Han, Eui-Ryoung; Chung, Eun-Kyung; Oh, Sun-A; Woo, Young-Jong; Hitchcock, Maurice A

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Effective mentoring helps interns in the early stages of their medical career to reach personal and professional goals. This study investigated the mentoring experience of Korean interns during medical internship and evaluated mentoring effects to facilitate the development of future mentoring programmes. METHODS Participants were interns being trained at Chonnam National University Hospital, South Korea, in 2011. Interns were asked to complete a questionnaire about their mentoring experiences and job satisfaction. RESULTS A total of 61 medical interns participated in the study, giving a response rate of 70.1%. Among these interns, 26 (42.6%) had mentoring experiences, with an average of 2.3 ± 1.9 mentors per mentee. Mentees usually discussed career planning and concerns regarding their personal and social lives with their mentors. Perceived quality of the mentor was significantly more important for male mentees than for female mentees. Female interns without a mentor made significantly less effort to seek a mentor than their male counterparts. Having and not having a mentor resulted in significant differences in the interns’ job satisfaction. CONCLUSION Fewer than half of the medical interns had mentoring experiences. Results suggest that the mentoring relationship may be less satisfying and more challenging for female interns. Effective mentoring may not only help interns plan their medical career, but also increase job satisfaction. Mentoring programmes during medical internship should be expanded and supported, as it is the initial step in a medical career. PMID:25631971

  18. Student Peer Mentoring in a Hospitality Management Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynn, Christine

    2010-01-01

    Mentoring programs are a well recognized means to quicken students' assimilation and increase retention, but not all mentoring programs are successful. It seems that for a peer student mentoring program to be effective, the program would need mandatory participation on both ends. Perhaps both mentors and mentees could voluntarily enroll in…

  19. Mentoring as a Career Enhancement Strategy for Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haring-Hidore, Marilyn

    1987-01-01

    Addresses the concept of mentoring as a career enhancement strategy for women. Discusses networking-mentoring, characterized by a series of contacts between people in which each plays the role of mentor and protege at different times and to different degrees; and grooming-mentoring, the special assistance provided by a more experienced…

  20. Mentoring Women Administrators: Breaking through the Glass Ceiling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scanlon, Karen Cameron

    1997-01-01

    Examines women's lack of access to the informal systems of career advancement used by men to reach the highest leadership positions in education. Explores mentoring as a way to assist female administrators, and discusses the mentor-protege relationship, the values and drawbacks of mentoring, and how to acquire mentors. (EMK)

  1. Mentoring and Coaching in Schools: Professional Learning through Collaborative Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burley, Suzanne; Pomphrey, Cathy

    2011-01-01

    Can mentoring and coaching really improve professional practice? How can research and inquiry improve mentoring and coaching practice? "Mentoring and Coaching in Schools" explores the ways in which mentoring and coaching can be used as a dynamic collaborative process for effective professional learning. It demonstrates how the use of practitioner…

  2. Passing the Torch: Retired Teachers as Mentors for New Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gold, Milton J.; Pepin, Bernadette

    Using retired teachers as mentors for beginning teachers in New York City has made real differences in the lives of the new teachers, their mentors, the students, and the supervisors in approximately 100 schools. In these schools more than 100 mentors have worked with 500 teachers over a three-year period. The New York City Mentor/New Teacher…

  3. Mentoring, Women in Engineering and Related Sciences, and MentorNet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dockter, J.; Muller, C.

    2003-12-01

    Mentoring is a frequently employed strategy for retention of women in engineering and science. The power of mentoring is sometimes poorly understood, and mentoring is not always effectively practiced, however. At its strongest, mentoring is understood as a powerful learning process, which assures the intergenerational transfer of knowledge and "know-how" on an ongoing basis throughout one's life. Mentoring helps make explicit the tacit knowledge of a discipline and its professional culture, which is especially important for underrepresented groups. MentorNet (www.MentorNet.net), the E-Mentoring Network for Women in Engineering and Science, is a nonprofit organization focused on furthering women's progress in scientific and technical fields through the use of a dynamic, technology-supported mentoring program. Since 1998, nearly 10,000 undergraduate and graduate women studying engineering and related sciences at more than 100 colleges and universities across the U.S., and in several other nations, have been matched in structured, one-on-one, email-based mentoring relationships with male and female scientific and technical professionals working in industry and government. This poster will describe the MentorNet program, and provide findings of annual program evaluations related to outcomes for participants with particular focus on women in the planetary and earth sciences. We also address the development of the partnership of approximately 100 organizations currently involved in MentorNet and the value each gains from its affiliation. MentorNet is an ongoing effort which supports the interests of all organizations and individuals working to advance women in engineering and related sciences.

  4. James F. Crow and the Art of Teaching and Mentoring

    PubMed Central

    Hartl, Daniel L.

    2011-01-01

    To honor James F. Crow on the occasion of his 95th birthday, GENETICS has commissioned a series of Perspectives and Reviews. For GENETICS to publish the honorifics is fitting, as from their birth Crow and GENETICS have been paired. Crow was scheduled to be born in January 1916, the same month that the first issue of GENETICS was scheduled to appear, and in the many years that Crow has made major contributions to the conceptual foundations of modern genetics, GENETICS has chronicled his and other major advances in the field. The commissioned Perspectives and Reviews summarize and celebrate Professor Crow’s contributions as a research scientist, administrator, colleague, community supporter, international leader, teacher, and mentor. In science, Professor Crow was the international leader of his generation in the application of genetics to populations of organisms and in uncovering the role of genetics in health and disease. In education, he was a superb undergraduate teacher whose inspiration changed the career paths of many students. His teaching skills are legendary, his lectures urbane and witty, rigorous and clear. He was also an extraordinary mentor to numerous graduate students and postdoctoral fellows, many of whom went on to establish successful careers of their own. In public service, Professor Crow served in key administrative positions at the University of Wisconsin, participated as a member of numerous national and international committees, and served as president of both the Genetics Society of America and the American Society for Human Genetics. This Perspective examines Professor Crow as teacher and mentor through the eyes and experiences of one student who was enrolled in his genetics course as an undergraduate and who later studied with him as a graduate student. PMID:22174181

  5. Mentoring college-age women: a relational approach.

    PubMed

    Liang, Belle; Tracy, Allison J; Taylor, Catherine A; Williams, Linda M

    2002-04-01

    Despite the popularity of mentoring programs, the relational dimension of mentoring has not been elucidated. Traditional conceptions of mentoring may exclude factors that are particularly important for women and girls, thus limiting the efficacy of mentoring programs for female adolescents. We suggest that the presence of relational qualities in the mentoring relationship (e.g., empathy, engagement, authenticity, and empowerment) strongly influences the success of mentoring in the lives of young women. In this study, we use a promising new measure of mentoring, the Relational Health Index - Mentor, to explore the impact of relational aspects of mentoring in female college students. We found that mentoring relationships high in relational qualities were associated with higher self-esteem and less loneliness

  6. Commentary: Mentoring the mentor: executive coaching for clinical departmental executive officers.

    PubMed

    Geist, Lois J; Cohen, Michael B

    2010-01-01

    Departmental executive officers (DEOs), department chairs, and department heads in medical schools are often hired on the basis of their accomplishments in research as well as their skills in administration, management, and leadership. These individuals are also expected to be expert in multiple areas, including negotiation, finance and budgeting, mentoring, and personnel management. At the same time, they are expected to maintain and perhaps even enhance their personal academic standing for the purposes of raising the level of departmental and institutional prestige and for recruiting the next generation of physicians and scientists. In the corporate world, employers understand the importance of training new leaders in requisite skill enhancement that will lead to success in their new positions. These individuals are often provided with extensive executive training to develop the necessary competencies to make them successful leaders. Among the tools employed for this purpose are the use of personal coaches or executive training courses. The authors propose that the use of executive coaching in academic medicine may be of benefit for new DEOs. Experience using an executive coach suggests that this was a valuable growth experience for new leaders in the institution. PMID:20042816

  7. Behavioral Criteria of Mentoring Effectiveness: An Empirical Study of Formal Mentoring Relationships within a Major UK Public Sector Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamlin, Robert G.; Sage, Lesley

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes an empirical study of mentor and mentee behaviors deemed critical for developing healthy mentoring relationships and effective mentoring during the "start up" and "on going" stages of a formal mentoring scheme within a major UK public sector organization. Several identified behavioral categories (criteria) of mentoring…

  8. High School Students as Mentors: Findings from the Big Brothers Big Sisters School-Based Mentoring Impact Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrera, Carla; Kauh, Tina J.; Cooney, Siobhan M.; Grossman, Jean Baldwin; McMaken, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    High schools have recently become a popular source of mentors for school-based mentoring (SBM) programs. The high school Bigs program of Big Brothers Big Sisters of America, for example, currently involves close to 50,000 high-school-aged mentors across the country. While the use of these young mentors has several potential advantages, their age…

  9. Informal mentoring between faculty and medical students.

    PubMed

    Rose, Gail L; Rukstalis, Margaret R; Schuckit, Marc A

    2005-04-01

    Mentoring skills are valuable assets for academic medicine faculty, who help shape the professionalism of the next generation of physicians. Mentors are role models who also act as guides for students' personal and professional development over time. Mentors can be instrumental in conveying explicit academic knowledge required to master curriculum content. Importantly, they can enhance implicit knowledge about the "hidden curriculum" of professionalism, ethics, values and the art of medicine not learned from texts. In many cases, mentors also provide emotional support and encouragement. The relationship benefits mentors as well, through greater productivity, career satisfaction, and personal gratification. Maximizing the satisfaction and productivity of such relationships entails self-awareness, focus, mutual respect, and explicit communication about the relationship. In this article, the authors describe the development of optimal mentoring relationships, emphasizing the importance of experience and flexibility in working with beginning to advanced students of different learning styles, genders, and races. Concrete advice for mentor "do's and don'ts"is offered, with case examples illustrating key concepts. PMID:15793017

  10. A Year of Mentoring in Academic Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Rabatin, Joseph S; Lipkin, Mack; Rubin, Alan S; Schachter, Allison; Nathan, Michael; Kalet, Adina

    2004-01-01

    We describe a specific mentoring approach in an academic general internal medicine setting by audiotaping and transcribing all mentoring sessions in the year. In advance, the mentor recorded his model. During the year, the mentee kept a process journal. Qualitative analysis revealed development of an intimate relationship based on empathy, trust, and honesty. The mentor's model was explicitly intended to develop independence, initiative, improved thinking, skills, and self-reflection. The mentor's methods included extensive and varied use of questioning, active listening, standard setting, and frequent feedback. During the mentoring, the mentee evolved as a teacher, enhanced the creativity in his teaching, and matured as a person. Specific accomplishments included a national workshop on professional writing, an innovative approach to inpatient attending, a new teaching skills curriculum for a residency program, and this study. A mentoring model stressing safety, intimacy, honesty, setting of high standards, praxis, and detailed planning and feedback was associated with mentee excitement, personal and professional growth and development, concrete accomplishments, and a commitment to teaching. PMID:15109327

  11. [MENTORING PROGRAM - ANOTHER FACET OF RESIDENT EDUCATION].

    PubMed

    Fishman, Ami; Kenet, Ron; Biron-Shental, Tal

    2015-08-01

    Medical residents are exposed to physical and emotional pressure and are required to cope with numerous demands during long working hours. Often, the intense workload leads to neglect of possible difficulties and professional and personal growth and empowerment. The Mentoring Program provides each resident with an attending physician mentor to help him or her adjust to the residency and to cope with its demands. The mentor guides the resident in career development and provides support in the event of difficulties. Attending physicians received professional guidance in the objectives and meaning of mentorship and were teamed with residents. The residents completed questionnaires regarding satisfaction and self-confidence before and a year after the mentoring program was established. The program significantly increased their feelings of support, confidence and satisfaction. As the program continued, the mentors' role in guiding the residents was expanded. The Mentoring Program has become an integral part of departmental teaching and team communication. It seems that the mentors, the residents and the department, all benefit from the program. PMID:26480614

  12. Engaging scientists in outreach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, M.; Richardson, A.; Jasnow, M.

    2003-04-01

    According to a survey reported by the National Science Foundation only 49 percent of high school graduates and 73 percent of those with advanced degrees can correctly answer the question, "How long does it take for the Earth to go around the Sun?" Science literacy in the United States and elsewhere has reached very low levels. In spite of spectacular advances in science and engineering over the past few decades, the wonder and excitement of scientific discovery is not reaching students in the classroom. Scientists can play a critical role in outreach efforts at their home institutions and other organizations, both public and private. NASA has a very clear mission to advance young people's scientific knowledge and, at the same time, "to inspire the next generation of explorers." Acknowledging that doing science is different from teaching science, outreach efforts support scientists who help convey the marvels of science to students, educators and the public. The scientific method raises fundamental questions that can engage students by establishing a baseline of inquiry. Planning and implementing experiments can tap into prior knowledge of students challenged with answering scientific questions. These are a few of the ways that the essential knowledge of scientists can be passed on to the next generation of scientists. Some of the specific roles of scientists can play in the outreach effort include classroom visits, public lectures, high school science curriculum development, media interviews, and web site content, to name only a few.

  13. Reconciling Scientists and Journalists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosner, H.

    2006-12-01

    The very nature of scientists' and journalists' jobs can put them at cross-purposes. Scientists work for years on one research project, slowly accumulating data, and are hesitant to draw sweeping conclusions without multiple rounds of hypothesis-testing. Journalists, meanwhile, are often looking for "news"—a discovery that was just made ("scientists have just discovered that...") or that defies conventional wisdom and is therefore about to turn society's thinking on its head. The very criteria that the mediamakers often use to determine newsworthiness can automatically preclude some scientific progress from making the news. There are other built-in problems in the relationship between journalists and scientists, some of which we can try to change and others of which we can learn to work around. Drawing on my personal experience as a journalist who has written for a wide variety of magazines, newspapers, and web sites, this talk will illustrate some of the inherent difficulties and offer some suggestions for how to move beyond them. It will provide a background on the way news decisions are made and how the journalist does her job, with an eye toward finding common ground and demonstrating how scientists can enjoy better relationships with journalists—relationships that can help educate the public on important scientific topics and avoid misrepresentation of scientific knowledge in the media.

  14. Characteristics [correction of charactersistics] of intercultural mentoring--a mentor perspective.

    PubMed

    Koskinen, Liisa; Tossavainen, Kerttu

    2003-05-01

    This article reports a study of Finnish preceptors' and British undergraduate nursing students' mentor-student relationship during international placement in Finland from the mentors' perspective. The study aimed to explore the characteristics of intercultural mentorship and the strategies used by the mentors to improve the students' intercultural competence. Altogether 23 mentors and five students participated in this study. The data consisted of mentoring session observations, group interviews and research diary notes. Intercultural mentorship was characterised by concern about the students' adjustment, pervasiveness of the relationship, sense of mutual learning, inadequate school-placement co-operation and concern about learning outcomes. The mentors used a variety of strategies to improve the students' intercultural competence. Mentorship was both a rewarding and a frustrating experience.

  15. Characteristics [correction of charactersistics] of intercultural mentoring--a mentor perspective.

    PubMed

    Koskinen, Liisa; Tossavainen, Kerttu

    2003-05-01

    This article reports a study of Finnish preceptors' and British undergraduate nursing students' mentor-student relationship during international placement in Finland from the mentors' perspective. The study aimed to explore the characteristics of intercultural mentorship and the strategies used by the mentors to improve the students' intercultural competence. Altogether 23 mentors and five students participated in this study. The data consisted of mentoring session observations, group interviews and research diary notes. Intercultural mentorship was characterised by concern about the students' adjustment, pervasiveness of the relationship, sense of mutual learning, inadequate school-placement co-operation and concern about learning outcomes. The mentors used a variety of strategies to improve the students' intercultural competence. Mentorship was both a rewarding and a frustrating experience. PMID:12727095

  16. An evaluation of face-to-face mentoring vs. electronic mentoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckingham, Gregg A.

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of a variety of mentoring methods on students' attitudes toward science, academic performance and retention of classroom science material. Subjects for the research were seventy-one biology students at Brevard Community College located in Cocoa, Florida. Two NASA mentors provided real world applications of academic concepts being learned in an introductory biology class. The mentors worked with one class via videoconferencing and with another class in a face-to-face mode. A third class served as a control group. The study took place in the fall, 2001. Results indicated students' attitudes toward science changed over time, with the mentored classes having the higher interest scores on four of five interest subscales. The electronically mentored class had the highest mean on three of the five interest subscales. Student performance was also positively affected in the mentored classes. No significant increased retention of assigned science material was found.

  17. Goddard Visiting Scientist Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Under this Indefinite Delivery Indefinite Quantity (IDIQ) contract, USRA was expected to provide short term (from I day up to I year) personnel as required to provide a Visiting Scientists Program to support the Earth Sciences Directorate (Code 900) at the Goddard Space Flight Center. The Contractor was to have a pool, or have access to a pool, of scientific talent, both domestic and international, at all levels (graduate student to senior scientist), that would support the technical requirements of the following laboratories and divisions within Code 900: 1) Global Change Data Center (902); 2) Laboratory for Atmospheres (Code 910); 3) Laboratory for Terrestrial Physics (Code 920); 4) Space Data and Computing Division (Code 930); 5) Laboratory for Hydrospheric Processes (Code 970). The research activities described below for each organization within Code 900 were intended to comprise the general scope of effort covered under the Visiting Scientist Program.

  18. Celebrating 25 Years of Student Mentoring | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Most employees of NCI at Frederick have heard of the Werner H. Kirsten Student Intern Program (WHK SIP). The reason is simple—it has been wildly successful. And on Friday, April 22, the program will celebrate 25 years of mentoring and learning at the WHK SIP 25th Anniversary Symposium and Awards Ceremony. During the morning session, several former interns will talk about the impact that the WHK program has had on their lives. The afternoon session will begin with a panel of current and former mentors who will answer questions from students interested in the program and staff members interested in becoming mentors. Read more...

  19. Overcoming the obstacles: Life stories of scientists with learning disabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Force, Crista Marie

    Scientific discovery is at the heart of solving many of the problems facing contemporary society. Scientists are retiring at rates that exceed the numbers of new scientists. Unfortunately, scientific careers still appear to be outside the reach of most individuals with learning disabilities. The purpose of this research was to better understand the methods by which successful learning disabled scientists have overcome the barriers and challenges associated with their learning disabilities in their preparation and performance as scientists. This narrative inquiry involved the researcher writing the life stories of four scientists. These life stories were generated from extensive interviews in which each of the scientists recounted their life histories. The researcher used narrative analysis to "make sense" of these learning disabled scientists' life stories. The narrative analysis required the researcher to identify and describe emergent themes characterizing each scientist's life. A cross-case analysis was then performed to uncover commonalities and differences in the lives of these four individuals. Results of the cross-case analysis revealed that all four scientists had a passion for science that emerged at an early age, which, with strong drive and determination, drove these individuals to succeed in spite of the many obstacles arising from their learning disabilities. The analysis also revealed that these scientists chose careers based on their strengths; they actively sought mentors to guide them in their preparation as scientists; and they developed coping techniques to overcome difficulties and succeed. The cross-case analysis also revealed differences in the degree to which each scientist accepted his or her learning disability. While some demonstrated inferior feelings about their successes as scientists, still other individuals revealed feelings of having superior abilities in areas such as visualization and working with people. These individuals revealed

  20. Mentoring overseas nurses: barriers to effective and non-discriminatory mentoring practices.

    PubMed

    Allan, Helen

    2010-09-01

    In this article it is argued that there are barriers to effective and non-discriminatory practice when mentoring overseas nurses within the National Health Service (NHS) and the care home sector. These include a lack of awareness about how cultural differences affect mentoring and learning for overseas nurses during their period of supervised practice prior to registration with the UK Nursing and Midwifery Council. These barriers may demonstrate a lack of effective teaching of ethical practice in the context of cultural diversity in health care. This argument is supported by empirical data from a national study. Interviews were undertaken with 93 overseas nurses and 24 national and 13 local managers and mentors from six research sites involving UK health care employers in the NHS and independent sectors in different regions of the UK. The data collected showed that overseas nurses are discriminated against in their learning by poor mentoring practices; equally, from these data, it appears that mentors are ill-equipped by existing mentor preparation programmes to mentor overseas-trained nurses from culturally diverse backgrounds. Recommendations are made for improving mentoring programmes to address mentors' ability to facilitate learning in a culturally diverse workplace and thereby improve overseas nurses' experiences of their supervised practice. PMID:20801962

  1. Mentoring by design: integrating medical professional competencies into bioengineering and medical physics graduate training.

    PubMed

    Woods, Kendra V; Peek, Kathryn E; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2014-12-01

    Many students in bioengineering and medical physics doctoral programs plan careers in translational research. However, while such students generally have strong quantitative abilities, they often lack experience with the culture, communication norms, and practice of bedside medicine. This may limit students' ability to function as members of multidisciplinary translational research teams. To improve students' preparation for careers in cancer translational research, we developed and implemented a mentoring program that is integrated with students' doctoral studies and aims to promote competencies in communication, biomedical ethics, teamwork, altruism, multiculturalism, and accountability. Throughout the program, patient-centered approaches and professional competencies are presented as foundational to optimal clinical care and integral to translational research. Mentoring is conducted by senior biomedical faculty and administrators and includes didactic teaching, online learning, laboratory mini-courses, clinical practicums, and multidisciplinary patient planning conferences (year 1); student development and facilitation of problem-based patient cases (year 2); and individualized mentoring based on research problems and progress toward degree completion (years 3-5). Each phase includes formative and summative evaluations. Nineteen students entered the program from 2009 through 2011. On periodic anonymous surveys, the most recent in September 2013, students indicated that the program substantially improved their knowledge of cancer biology, cancer medicine, and academic medicine; that the mentors were knowledgeable, good teachers, and dedicated to students; and that the program motivated them to become well-rounded scientists and scholars. We believe this program can be modified and disseminated to other graduate research and professional health care programs.

  2. Mentoring by design: integrating medical professional competencies into bioengineering and medical physics graduate training.

    PubMed

    Woods, Kendra V; Peek, Kathryn E; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2014-12-01

    Many students in bioengineering and medical physics doctoral programs plan careers in translational research. However, while such students generally have strong quantitative abilities, they often lack experience with the culture, communication norms, and practice of bedside medicine. This may limit students' ability to function as members of multidisciplinary translational research teams. To improve students' preparation for careers in cancer translational research, we developed and implemented a mentoring program that is integrated with students' doctoral studies and aims to promote competencies in communication, biomedical ethics, teamwork, altruism, multiculturalism, and accountability. Throughout the program, patient-centered approaches and professional competencies are presented as foundational to optimal clinical care and integral to translational research. Mentoring is conducted by senior biomedical faculty and administrators and includes didactic teaching, online learning, laboratory mini-courses, clinical practicums, and multidisciplinary patient planning conferences (year 1); student development and facilitation of problem-based patient cases (year 2); and individualized mentoring based on research problems and progress toward degree completion (years 3-5). Each phase includes formative and summative evaluations. Nineteen students entered the program from 2009 through 2011. On periodic anonymous surveys, the most recent in September 2013, students indicated that the program substantially improved their knowledge of cancer biology, cancer medicine, and academic medicine; that the mentors were knowledgeable, good teachers, and dedicated to students; and that the program motivated them to become well-rounded scientists and scholars. We believe this program can be modified and disseminated to other graduate research and professional health care programs. PMID:24585385

  3. From Atmospheric Scientist to Data Scientist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knuth, S. L.

    2015-12-01

    Most of my career has been spent analyzing data from research projects in the atmospheric sciences. I spent twelve years researching boundary layer interactions in the polar regions, which included five field seasons in the Antarctic. During this time, I got both a M.S. and Ph.D. in atmospheric science. I learned most of my data science and programming skills throughout this time as part of my research projects. When I graduated with my Ph.D., I was looking for a new and fresh opportunity to enhance the skills I already had while learning more advanced technical skills. I found a position at the University of Colorado Boulder as a Data Research Specialist with Research Computing, a group that provides cyber infrastructure services, including high-speed networking, large-scale data storage, and supercomputing, to university students and researchers. My position is the perfect merriment between advanced technical skills and "softer" skills, while at the same time understanding exactly what the busy scientist needs to understand about their data. I have had the opportunity to help shape our university's data education system, a development that is still evolving. This presentation will detail my career story, the lessons I have learned, my daily work in my new position, and some of the exciting opportunities that opened up in my new career.

  4. Scientists and Satisfaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hermanowicz, Joseph C.

    2003-01-01

    Presents results from in-depth interviews in which respondents at a range of U.S. universities provided detailed accounts of their experience in, and identification with, academe. Studies satisfaction from the angle of the self-doubts scientists have about their work and careers, and investigates how self-doubts may systematically differ across…

  5. Reading as Scientists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shanahan, Marie-Claire

    2010-01-01

    Using an adapted version of a recently published scientific article, a group of sixth graders worked together identifying conclusions, deciding on appropriate evidence, suggesting improvements for the study, and recommending further investigations for scientists. This experience provided opportunities for these students to use reading to decide on…

  6. Doctoral Scientists in Oceanography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences-National Research Council, Washington, DC. Assembly of Mathematical and Physical Sciences.

    The purpose of this report was to classify and count doctoral scientists in the United States trained in oceanography and/or working in oceanography. Existing data from three sources (National Research Council's "Survey of Earned Doctorates," and "Survey of Doctorate Recipients," and the Ocean Sciences Board's "U.S. Directory of Marine…

  7. Talk Like a Scientist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcum-Dietrich, Nanette

    2010-01-01

    In the scientific community, the symposium is one formal structure of conversation. Scientists routinely hold symposiums to gather and talk about a common topic. To model this method of communication in the classroom, the author designed an activity in which students conduct their own science symposiums. This article presents the science symposium…

  8. Nurturing the Child Scientist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodgers, Lisa; Basca, Belinda

    2011-01-01

    The natural world fascinates young children. Treasured leaves, shells, stones, and twigs always find their way into the kindergarten classroom. A kindergarten study of collections channels and deepens children's innate impulse to explore and collect. It also lays the foundation for understanding how scientists approach the study of objects in…

  9. Reading about Real Scientists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummins, Sunday

    2015-01-01

    Although students do need hands-on experiences to master key skills in science, technology, and engineering, Cummins asserts, K-12 teachers should also help students understand key STEM concepts by reading, writing, and talking about the work of professional scientists and engineers. Cummins lists high-quality texts that help young people…

  10. Early Primary Invasion Scientists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spellman, Katie V.; Villano, Christine P.

    2011-01-01

    "We really need to get the government involved," said one student, holding his graph up to USDA scientist Steve Seefeldt. Dr. Steve studies methods to control "invasive" plants, plants that have been introduced to an area by humans and have potential to spread rapidly and negatively affect ecosystems. The first grader and his classmates had become…

  11. Teaming Up with Scientists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreno, Nancy P.; Chang, Kimberly A.; Tharp, Barbara Z.; Denk, James P.; Roberts, J. Kyle; Cutler, Paula H.; Rahmati, Sonia

    2001-01-01

    Introduces the Science Education Leadership Fellows (SELF) program which is an innovative cooperation program between teachers and scientists. Engages teachers in subject areas such as microbiology, molecular biology, immunology, and other professional development activities. Presents an activity in which students observe bacteria cultures and…

  12. Becoming a Spider Scientist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patrick, Patricia; Getz, Angela

    2008-01-01

    In this integrated unit, third grade students become spider scientists as they observe spiders in their classroom to debunk some common misconceptions about these intimidating creatures. "Charlotte's Web" is used to capture students' interest. In addition to addressing philosophical topics such as growing-up, death, and friendship; E.B. White's…

  13. Bringing Scientists to Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey, Peter

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how he brings scientists to life when he visits schools. Having retired from teaching Drama and Theatre Studies in Liverpool for more than thirty years, the author set up his one-man Theatre-in-Education company, Blindseer Productions, and now takes his portrayals of Darwin, Galileo and Einstein to schools…

  14. Developing Scientists' "Soft" Skills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Wendy

    2014-02-01

    A great deal of professional advice directed at undergraduates, graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and even early-career scientists focuses on technical skills necessary to succeed in a complex work environment in which problems transcend disciplinary boundaries. Collaborative research approaches are emphasized, as are cross-training and gaining nonacademic experiences [Moslemi et al., 2009].

  15. Today's Authors, Tomorrow's Scientists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Diana

    2009-01-01

    Although not all teachers can invite scientists into classrooms on a regular basis, they can invite them into their students' worlds through literature. Here the author shares how she used the nonfiction selection, "Science to the Rescue" (Markle 1994), as an opportunity for students to investigate socially significant problems and empower them to…

  16. Women Scientists. American Profiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veglahn, Nancy, J.

    This book contains the life stories of 11 American female scientists who had outstanding achievements in their branch of science. The lives of the 11 women included in this book cover a combined time period of more than 120 years. This book argues against the belief that mathematics and science are not for girls and gives examples of very…

  17. Feasibility study for a 10-MM-GPY fuel ethanol plant, Brady Hot Springs, Nevada. Volume 1. Process and plant design

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    An investigation was performed to determine the technical and economic viability of constructing and operating a geothermally heated, biomass, motor fuel alcohol plant at Brady's Hot Springs. The results of the study are positive, showing that a plant of innovative, yet proven design can be built to adapt current commerical fermentation-distillation technology to the application of geothermal heat energy. The specific method of heat production from the Brady's Hot Spring wells has been successful for some time at an onion drying plant. Further development of the geothermal resource to add the capacity needed for an ethanol plant is found to be feasible for a plant sized to produce 10 million gallons of motor fuel grade ethanol per year. A very adequate supply of feedgrains is found to be available for use in the plant without impact on the local or regional feedgrain market. The effect of diverting supplies from the animal feedlots in Northern Nevada and California will be mitigated by the by-product output of high-protein feed supplements that the plant will produce. The plant will have a favorable impact on the local farming economies of Fallon, Lovelock, Winnemucca and Elko, Nevada. It will make a positive and significant socioeconomic contribution to Churchill County, providing direct employment for an additional 61 persons. Environmental impact will be negligible, involving mostly a moderate increase in local truck traffic and railroad siding activity. The report is presented in two volumes. Volume 1 deals with the technical design aspects of the plant. The second volume addresses the issue of expanded geothermal heat production at Brady's Hot Springs, goes into the details of feedstock supply economics, and looks at the markets for the plant's primary ethanol product, and the markets for its feed supplement by-products. The report concludes with an analysis of the economic viability of the proposed project.

  18. Nurses' perceptions and experiences of mentoring.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Valerie; Garrity, John; Shepherd, Kim; Brown, Lynn

    2016-04-01

    Pre-registration education programmes provide nursing students with the skills and knowledge to become safe and proficient practitioners. Assessment of students' competence is a fundamental part of these programmes and mentors play a crucial role. Mentors are registered nurses who have completed an appropriate mentorship programme in an approved higher education institution, and their main role includes teaching, supervising and assessing students' clinical competence. The role can be demanding and stressful, and mentors must maintain their workloads while supporting students. This article reports the results of the qualitative findings of a survey of mentorship practices ( Brown et al 2012 ). The findings suggest that mentors value support from link lecturers and practice education facilitators, especially when they experience difficulties with nursing students who do not have the required competencies to pass their placement.

  19. A Case Study of URM Retention through IBP's Professional Development and Mentoring Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, A.; Williamson Whitney, V.; Ricciardi, L.; Detrick, L.; Siegfried, D.; Fauver, A.; Ithier-Guzman, W.; Thomas, S. H.; Valaitis, S.

    2012-12-01

    As a free-standing not for profit organization, the Institute for Broadening Participation (IBP) hosts a variety of initiatives designed to increase the retention of underrepresented minority (URM) students pursuing pathways in STEM. Successful initiatives include virtual and face-to-face components that bring together URM students with established URM and other scientists in academia, government and industry. These connections provide URM students with supportive mentoring, networking opportunities, and professional skill development contributing to an overall improved retention rate of URM students majoring in STEM degrees. IBP's initiatives include the NASA One Stop Shopping Initiative (NASA OSSI), Pathways to Ocean Science, Pathways to Engineering, and the Minorities Striving and Pursuing Higher Degrees of Success (MS PHD'S) Professional Development program in Earth System Science (ESS). The NASA OSSI initiative recruits and facilitates student engagement in NASA student education and employment opportunities. Through IBP's virtual and person-to-person communications, students learn how to identify, apply to, and participate in NASA programs. Pathways to Ocean Science connects and supports URM students with REU programs in the Ocean Sciences while serving as a resource for REU program directors. As one of IBP's newest initiatives, Pathways to Engineering has synthesized mentoring resources into an online mentoring manual for URM STEM students that has been extensively vetted by mentoring experts throughout the country. The manual which is organized by user groups serves as an e-forum providing undergraduates, graduates, postdocs, faculty members and project directors with valuable resources to facilitate a positive REU experience. This mentoring initiative also provides a mechanism for submitting new resources and inviting feedback in mentoring best practices throughout the STEM community. MS PHD'S, one of IBP's longest running and most successful initiatives

  20. Mentoring, Type, and Coping with Change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairhurst, A.; Garcia, M.

    1994-01-01

    Formal mentoring programs can help meet organizational goals. A case study at JPL illustrates the dey elements of a successful mentoring program. In the full-day training session, interpretation of two tools (the Meyers-Brigg Type Indicator and Invest in Your Values) helps participants to understand and appreciate the wide range of human norms. Career training within the program helps individuals cope with change.

  1. Mentoring Junior Faculty in Geropsychology: the RESPECT model

    PubMed Central

    Lichtenberg, Peter A.

    2011-01-01

    Mentoring junior faculty in geropsychology is becoming more critical due to the paucity of geropsychologists and the financial and talent costs experienced by universities of faculty turnover. This paper presents the unique aspects of mentoring junior faculty as opposed to mentoring of graduate students or interns, and examines some of the author's personal core values in mentoring that have been applied to over 50 junior faculty members. The author presents the RESPECT model as away to view the important and varied tasks involved in successful mentoring of junior geropsychology faculty. The model identifies the mentee as the leader in the mentee-mentor faculty relationship and examines the types of empowerment, support, protection and planning that goes into mentoring. The model, in addition, discusses the personal and emotional relationship the mentee-mentor has and the role of mentor in handling disappointment and assisting the mentee in negotiating conflict. PMID:21566708

  2. AGU Joins MentorNet to Support Young Geoscientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cifuentes, Inés

    2009-11-01

    AGU has joined MentorNet as a partner in a mentoring network that encourages diversity in the engineering and science professions. MentorNet matches protégés and mentors and provides mentoring advice, suggestions, and gentle reminders to keep the exchange going. This partnership makes it possible for AGU to connect student members who would like a mentor in the geosciences with members who want to mentor. Mentoring is key to encouraging young people—particularly women, Latinos, and African Americans—to become involved and stay involved with the sciences. MentorNet partners with institutions of higher education, industry, government, and professional societies to provide online programs to serve science professionals and students.

  3. One More Legacy of Paul F. Brandwein: Creating Scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fort, Deborah C.

    2011-06-01

    This paper studies the influence of Paul F. Brandwein, author, scientist, teacher and mentor, publisher, humanist, and environmentalist, on gifted youngsters who later became scientists, based primarily on information gathered from surveys completed by 25 of his students and one colleague. It also traces his profound interactions with science educators. It illuminates the theories of Brandwein and his protégés and colleagues about the interaction of environment, schooling, and education and Brandwein's belief in having students do original research (that is, research whose results are unknown) on their way to discovering their future scientific paths. It tests Brandwein's 1955 hypothesis on the characteristics typical of the young who eventually become scientists, namely: Three factors are considered as being significant in the development of future scientists: a Genetic Factor with a primary base in heredity (general intelligence, numerical ability, and verbal ability); a Predisposing Factor, with a primary base in functions which are psychological in nature; an Activating Factor, with a primary base in the opportunities offered in school and in the special skills of the teacher. High intelligence alone does not make a youngster a scientist (p xix).

  4. Steltzer Receives 2013 Sulzman Award for Excellence in Education and Mentoring: Citation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weintraub, Michael N.

    2014-07-01

    Heidi Steltzer, an assistant professor at Fort Lewis College, received the 2013 Sulzman Award for Excellence in Education and Mentoring at the 2013 Fall Meeting. This award "recognizes women in AGU who have sustained an active research career in a field related to biogeosciences, while excelling in teaching and especially in mentoring young scientists." Awardees are to serve as critical role models for the next generation of female scientists by sharing their passion for the natural world. Those who know her best agree that Heidi's passion for teaching and training the next generation of researchers truly embodies the spirit of the Sulzman award. According to one nominator, "Heidi single-handedly pushed [her] department toward a more modern and integrated view of the biological sciences, revamping curricula in both majors' and non-majors' courses to include citizen science, cross-disciplinary investigation techniques, and thought-provoking forays into real-world/real-time problems." Another nominator commented that "Heidi has made an incredibly strong impact on the careers of countless students through both compassionate and enthusiastic mentoring, as well as leadership in institutional and programmatic efforts that foster student professional development and that provide research experiences. I think it is extraordinary that at this relatively early point in her career, she has already achieved a lasting legacy."

  5. Educating the Next Generation of Lunar Scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaner, A. J.; Shipp, S. S.; Allen, J. S.; Kring, D. A.

    2010-12-01

    The Center for Lunar Science and Exploration (CLSE), a collaboration between the Lunar and Planetary Institute (LPI) and NASA’s Johnson Space Center (JSC), is one of seven member teams of the NASA Lunar Science Institute (NLSI). In addition to research and exploration activities, the CLSE team is deeply invested in education and outreach. In support of NASA’s and NLSI’s objective to train the next generation of scientists, CLSE’s High School Lunar Research Project is a conduit through which high school students can actively participate in lunar science and learn about pathways into scientific careers. The High School Lunar Research Project engages teams of high school students in authentic lunar research that envelopes them in the process of science and supports the science goals of the CLSE. Most high school students’ lack of scientific research experience leaves them without an understanding of science as a process. Because of this, each team is paired with a lunar scientist mentor responsible for guiding students through the process of conducting a scientific investigation. Before beginning their research, students undertake “Moon 101,” designed to familiarize them with lunar geology and exploration. Students read articles covering various lunar geology topics and analyze images from past and current lunar missions to become familiar with available lunar data sets. At the end of “Moon 101”, students present a characterization of the geology and chronology of features surrounding the Apollo 11 landing site. To begin their research, teams choose a research subject from a pool of topics compiled by the CLSE staff. After choosing a topic, student teams ask their own research questions, within the context of the larger question, and design their own research approach to direct their investigation. At the conclusion of their research, teams present their results and, after receiving feedback, create and present a conference style poster to a panel of

  6. Opportunities for Scientists to Engage the Public & Inspire Students in Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, R. G.; Worssam, J.; Vaughan, A. F.

    2014-12-01

    Increasingly, research scientists are learning that communicating science to broad, non-specialist audiences, particularly students, is just as important as communicating science to their peers via peer-reviewed scientific publications. This presentation highlights opportunities that scientists in Flagstaff, AZ have to foster public support of science & inspire students to study STEM disciplines. The goal here is to share ideas, personal experiences, & the rewards, for both students & research professionals, of engaging in science education & public outreach. Flagstaff, AZ, "America's First STEM Community," has a uniquely rich community of organizations engaged in science & engineering research & innovation, including the Flagstaff Arboretum, Coconino Community College, Gore Industries, Lowell Observatory, Museum of Northern Arizona, National Weather Service, National Park Service, National Forest Service, Northern Arizona University, Northern Arizona Center for Entrepreneurship & Technology, US Geological Survey, US Naval Observatory, & Willow Bend Environmental Education Center. These organizations connect with the Northern Arizona community during the yearly Flagstaff Festival of Science - the third oldest science festival in the world - a 10 day long, free, science festival featuring daily public lectures, open houses, interactive science & technology exhibits, field trips, & in-school speaker programs. Many research scientists from these organizations participate in these activities, e.g., public lectures, open houses, & in-school speaker programs, & also volunteer as mentors for science & engineering themed clubs in local schools. An example of a novel, innovative program, developed by a local K-12 science teacher, is the "Scientists-in-the-Classroom" mentor program, which pairs all 7th & 8th grade students with a working research scientist for the entire school year. Led by the student & guided by the mentor, they develop a variety of science / technology

  7. Mentoring the Mentors of Underrepresented Racial/Ethnic Minorities Who are Conducting HIV Research: Beyond Cultural Competency.

    PubMed

    Walters, Karina L; Simoni, Jane M; Evans-Campbell, Teresa Tessa; Udell, Wadiya; Johnson-Jennings, Michelle; Pearson, Cynthia R; MacDonald, Meg M; Duran, Bonnie

    2016-09-01

    The majority of literature on mentoring focuses on mentee training needs, with significantly less guidance for the mentors. Moreover, many mentoring the mentor models assume generic (i.e. White) mentees with little attention to the concerns of underrepresented racial/ethnic minorities (UREM). This has led to calls for increased attention to diversity in research training programs, especially in the field of HIV where racial/ethnic disparities are striking. Diversity training tends to address the mentees' cultural competency in conducting research with diverse populations, and often neglects the training needs of mentors in working with diverse mentees. In this article, we critique the framing of diversity as the problem (rather than the lack of mentor consciousness and skills), highlight the need to extend mentor training beyond aspirations of cultural competency toward cultural humility and cultural safety, and consider challenges to effective mentoring of UREM, both for White and UREM mentors.

  8. Mentoring the Mentors of Underrepresented Racial/Ethnic Minorities Who are Conducting HIV Research: Beyond Cultural Competency.

    PubMed

    Walters, Karina L; Simoni, Jane M; Evans-Campbell, Teresa Tessa; Udell, Wadiya; Johnson-Jennings, Michelle; Pearson, Cynthia R; MacDonald, Meg M; Duran, Bonnie

    2016-09-01

    The majority of literature on mentoring focuses on mentee training needs, with significantly less guidance for the mentors. Moreover, many mentoring the mentor models assume generic (i.e. White) mentees with little attention to the concerns of underrepresented racial/ethnic minorities (UREM). This has led to calls for increased attention to diversity in research training programs, especially in the field of HIV where racial/ethnic disparities are striking. Diversity training tends to address the mentees' cultural competency in conducting research with diverse populations, and often neglects the training needs of mentors in working with diverse mentees. In this article, we critique the framing of diversity as the problem (rather than the lack of mentor consciousness and skills), highlight the need to extend mentor training beyond aspirations of cultural competency toward cultural humility and cultural safety, and consider challenges to effective mentoring of UREM, both for White and UREM mentors. PMID:27484060

  9. A mentor training program improves mentoring competency for researchers working with early-career investigators from underrepresented backgrounds.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Mallory O; Gandhi, Monica

    2015-08-01

    Mentoring is increasingly recognized as a critical element in supporting successful careers in academic research in medicine and related disciplines, particularly for trainees and early career investigators from underrepresented backgrounds. Mentoring is often executed ad hoc; there are limited programs to train faculty to become more effective mentors, and the few that exist have a dearth of empirical support of their impact. In 2013, we recruited 34 faculty from across the US engaged in HIV-related clinical research to participate in a 2-day Mentoring the Mentors workshop. The workshop included didactic and interactive content focused on a range of topics, such as mentor-mentee communication, leadership styles, emotional intelligence, understanding the impact of diversity (unconscious bias, microaggressions, discrimination, tokenism) for mentees, and specific tools and techniques for effective mentoring. Pre- and post-workshop online evaluations documented high rates of satisfaction with the program and statistically significant improvements in self-appraised mentoring skills (e.g. addressing diversity in mentoring, communication with mentees, aligning mentor-mentee expectations), as assessed via a validated mentoring competency tool. This is the first mentoring training program focused on enhancing mentors' abilities to nurture investigators of diversity, filling an important gap, and evaluation results offer support for its effectiveness. Results suggest a need for refinement and expansion of the program and for more comprehensive, long-term evaluation of distal mentoring outcomes for those who participate in the program. PMID:25274417

  10. A mentor training program improves mentoring competency for researchers working with early-career investigators from underrepresented backgrounds.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Mallory O; Gandhi, Monica

    2015-08-01

    Mentoring is increasingly recognized as a critical element in supporting successful careers in academic research in medicine and related disciplines, particularly for trainees and early career investigators from underrepresented backgrounds. Mentoring is often executed ad hoc; there are limited programs to train faculty to become more effective mentors, and the few that exist have a dearth of empirical support of their impact. In 2013, we recruited 34 faculty from across the US engaged in HIV-related clinical research to participate in a 2-day Mentoring the Mentors workshop. The workshop included didactic and interactive content focused on a range of topics, such as mentor-mentee communication, leadership styles, emotional intelligence, understanding the impact of diversity (unconscious bias, microaggressions, discrimination, tokenism) for mentees, and specific tools and techniques for effective mentoring. Pre- and post-workshop online evaluations documented high rates of satisfaction with the program and statistically significant improvements in self-appraised mentoring skills (e.g. addressing diversity in mentoring, communication with mentees, aligning mentor-mentee expectations), as assessed via a validated mentoring competency tool. This is the first mentoring training program focused on enhancing mentors' abilities to nurture investigators of diversity, filling an important gap, and evaluation results offer support for its effectiveness. Results suggest a need for refinement and expansion of the program and for more comprehensive, long-term evaluation of distal mentoring outcomes for those who participate in the program.

  11. Peer-Mentored Research Development Meeting: A Model for Successful Peer Mentoring among Junior Level Researchers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santucci, Aimee K.; Lingler, Jennifer H.; Schmidt, Karen L.; Nolan, Beth A. D.; Thatcher, Dawn; Polk, Deborah E.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: This report describes a model for the development, process, and tracking methods of a Peer-mentored Research Development Meeting (PRDM), an interdisciplinary peer mentoring program. The program was initiated in 2004 by a group of postdoctoral scholars and junior faculty from the Schools of the Health Sciences at the University of…

  12. The Experiences and Perceptions of Selected Mentors: The Dyadic Relationship in School-Based Mentoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frels, Rebecca Karen

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative, collective case study was to explore selected mentors' perceptions and experiences of the dyadic mentoring relationship in SBM. A second purpose was to build on the qualitative body of research (Spencer, 2004, 2007) for understanding roles, purposes, approaches, and experiences of the relationship process with…

  13. Mentoring for Inclusion: The Impact of Mentoring on Undergraduate Researchers in the Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haeger, Heather; Fresquez, Carla

    2016-01-01

    Increasing inclusion of underrepresented minority and first-generation students in mentored research experiences both increases diversity in the life sciences research community and prepares students for successful careers in these fields. However, analyses of the impact of mentoring approaches on specific student gains are limited. This study…

  14. Mentor Age and Youth Developmental Outcomes in School-Based Mentoring Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, NaYoung

    2015-01-01

    Mentoring programs that provide guidance and support for disadvantaged youth have expanded rapidly during the past decade in the United States. Research suggests that students with teenage mentors exhibit positive youth development, including enhanced academic self-esteem and connectedness. By contrast, some studies showed that programs that offer…

  15. The Impact of Mentoring Pre-Service Teachers on the Mentor Teacher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrea, Patti

    2010-01-01

    Since the early 1980s, policy makers and educational leaders have pinned high hopes on mentoring as a vehicle for reforming teaching and teacher education (Feiman-Nemser, 1996). A review of literature written throughout the evolution of mentoring illustrated that researchers focused most of their attention on a relatively narrow aspect of…

  16. Mentoring outside the Line: The Importance of Authenticity, Transparency, and Vulnerability in Effective Mentoring Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fries-Britt, Sharon; Snider, Jeanette

    2015-01-01

    Informed by the literature and professional practice, this chapter examines the unique mentoring challenges facing women and underrepresented minorities in higher education. Findings indicate that traditional mentoring approaches fall short in fully supporting the needs of underrepresented populations in higher education.

  17. Developing a Latino Mentoring Program: Project MALES (Mentoring to Achieve Latino Educational Success)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sáenz, Victor B.; Ponjuan, Luis; Segovia, Jorge, Jr.; Del Real Viramontes, José

    2015-01-01

    This chapter highlights the development of Project MALES (Mentoring to Achieve Latino Educational Success). At the center of Project MALES is a mentoring program that aims to cultivate an engaged support network for males of color at the University of Texas at Austin and across surrounding communities. Specifically, there is a discussion of the…

  18. Are You Ready to be a Mentor? Preparing Teachers for Mentoring Pre-Service Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ambrosetti, Angelina

    2014-01-01

    The use of mentoring has nowadays become a predominant practice for the professional placement component of pre-service teacher education programs. Research however has identified that being an effective teacher does not make you an effective mentor. The present research investigated the role of professional development in the preparation of…

  19. Youth Risk Factors and Educational Outcomes of Mentored and Non-Mentored Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castellanos-Brown, Karen

    2010-01-01

    As mentoring is receiving increasing attention as a method to improve youth educational outcomes, it is important to continue to examine the effects of mentoring on these youth outcomes. This study uses secondary data from Waves I and III of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health) and transcript data from the Adolescent…

  20. Mentoring for Inclusion: The Impact of Mentoring on Undergraduate Researchers in the Sciences.

    PubMed

    Haeger, Heather; Fresquez, Carla

    2016-01-01

    Increasing inclusion of underrepresented minority and first-generation students in mentored research experiences both increases diversity in the life sciences research community and prepares students for successful careers in these fields. However, analyses of the impact of mentoring approaches on specific student gains are limited. This study addresses the impact of mentoring strategies within research experiences on broadening access to the life sciences by examining both how these experiences impacted student success and how the quality of mentorship affected the development of research and academic skills for a diverse population of students at a public, minority-serving institution. Institutional data on student grades and graduation rates (n = 348) along with postresearch experience surveys (n = 138) found that students mentored in research had significantly higher cumulative grade point averages and similar graduation rates as a matched set of peers. Examination of the relationships between student-reported gains and mentoring strategies demonstrated that socioemotional and culturally relevant mentoring impacted student development during mentored research experiences. Additionally, extended engagement in research yielded significantly higher development of research-related skills and level of independence in research. Recommendations are provided for using mentoring to support traditionally underrepresented students in the sciences. PMID:27543635

  1. Protege--Mentor Agreement about the Provision of Psychosocial Support: The Mentoring Relationship, Personality, and Workload

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, Lea

    2004-01-01

    Protege--mentor agreement (PMA) about the provision of psychosocial support was examined in relation to job satisfaction, organizational commitment, and work self-esteem. One-hundred and sixty-six junior administrative and information technology (IT) staff at an Australian university and their matched mentors completed a questionnaire that…

  2. E-Mentoring: Technology, Trust, and Frequency in Corporate E-Mentoring Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godwin, Shannon G.

    2011-01-01

    Electronic mentoring through asynchronous methods using technologies such as e-mail or the Internet is used in the education industry whereby undergraduate and graduate students can be matched with either university professors or career professionals. However, corporate organizations with mentoring initiatives predominantly use traditional…

  3. The Portable Mentor: A Resource Guide for Entry-Year Principals and Mentors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindley, Frederick A.

    Intended for the beginning principal and the principal's mentor, this book explores the duties in the principal's first year on the job from the viewpoint of both the principal and the mentor. It emphasizes organization during the first-year principalship; tasks to be accomplished each month; leading versus managing and how both can benefit the…

  4. The Mentoring Relationship Challenges Scale: The Impact of Mentoring Stage, Type, and Gender

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ensher, Ellen A.; Murphy, Susan E.

    2011-01-01

    The current study investigated the role of relational challenges as reported by 309 proteges in various stages and types of mentoring relationships. The Mentoring Relationship Challenges Scale (MRCS) was newly constructed using the results of an earlier qualitative study (Ensher & Murphy, 2005). The scale measured three factors of relational…

  5. EnvironMentors: Mentoring At-Risk High School Students through University Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monk, Melissa H.; Baustian, Melissa M.; Saari, Courtney R.; Welsh, Susan; D'Elia, Christopher F.; Powers, Joseph E.; Gaston, Suzan; Francis, Pamela

    2014-01-01

    Informal place-based environmental education is a proven approach for increasing environmental awareness for students in urban cities. This article describes and qualitatively evaluates the first two academic years of the EnvironMentors program at Louisiana State University (LSU-EM), which is part of a national network of EnvironMentors programs.…

  6. Using Mentoring Enactment Theory to Explore the Doctoral Student-Advisor Mentoring Relationship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mansson, Daniel H.; Myers, Scott A.

    2012-01-01

    The purposes of this study were (a) to develop a new measure to assess doctoral advisees' use of relational maintenance behaviors with their advisors, and (b) to examine both advisees' (n = 636) and advisors' (n = 141) perceptions of their mentoring relationship using mentoring enactment theory (MET; Kalbfleisch, 2002). The results of…

  7. Mentoring for Inclusion: The Impact of Mentoring on Undergraduate Researchers in the Sciences

    PubMed Central

    Haeger, Heather; Fresquez, Carla

    2016-01-01

    Increasing inclusion of underrepresented minority and first-generation students in mentored research experiences both increases diversity in the life sciences research community and prepares students for successful careers in these fields. However, analyses of the impact of mentoring approaches on specific student gains are limited. This study addresses the impact of mentoring strategies within research experiences on broadening access to the life sciences by examining both how these experiences impacted student success and how the quality of mentorship affected the development of research and academic skills for a diverse population of students at a public, minority-serving institution. Institutional data on student grades and graduation rates (n = 348) along with postresearch experience surveys (n = 138) found that students mentored in research had significantly higher cumulative grade point averages and similar graduation rates as a matched set of peers. Examination of the relationships between student-reported gains and mentoring strategies demonstrated that socioemotional and culturally relevant mentoring impacted student development during mentored research experiences. Additionally, extended engagement in research yielded significantly higher development of research-related skills and level of independence in research. Recommendations are provided for using mentoring to support traditionally underrepresented students in the sciences. PMID:27543635

  8. Exploring Mentor and Mentee Perceptions of Mentoring Programs for At-Risk Students: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richard, Eric

    2012-01-01

    At-risk youth face many difficulties including higher dropout rates, lack of positive adult support, poor neighborhood conditions, exposure to violence, and a lack of parental support and family stability. Mentoring programs for at-risk youth may help mitigate these difficulties, but the quality of the mentor-mentee relationship is predictive of…

  9. The Tradition of Mentoring Part II: Leadership and Mentoring in the Culture of Healthcare

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabriele, Edward

    2010-01-01

    Leadership is a multifaceted construct. It requires mentoring as a lifelong experience. Leadership is not an isolated phenomenon, but an activity completely interrelated with those one leads. It can never be separated from its essential community or organizational context. This makes the experience of mentoring all the more critical. Adding yet to…

  10. The Great Scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meadows, Jack

    1989-11-01

    This lively history of the development of science and its relationship to society combines vivid biographies of twelve pivotal scientists, commentary on the social and historical events of their time, and over four hundred illustrations, including many in color. The biographies span from classical times to the Atomic Age, covering Aristotle, Galileo, Harvey, Newton, Lavoisier, Humboldt, Faraday, Darwin, Pasteur, Curie, Freud, and Einstein. Through the biographies and a wealth of other material, the volume reveals how social forces have influenced the course of science. Along with the highly informative color illustrations, it contains much archival material never before published, ranging from medieval woodcuts, etchings from Renaissance anatomy texts, and pages from Harvey's journal, to modern false-color x-rays and infrared photographs of solar flares. A beautifully-designed, fact-filled, stimulating work, The Great Scientists will fascinate anyone with an interest in science and how history can influence scientific discovery.

  11. Redefining Scientist-Educator Partnerships: Science in Service at Stanford

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, K.

    2005-05-01

    The Stanford Solar Observatories Group and Haas Center for Public Service have created an innovative model for scientist-educator partnerships in which science students are trained and mentored by public service education professionals to create outreach events for local communities. The program, Science in Service, is part of the EPO plan for the Solar Group's participation in NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory mission. Based on the principles of service learning, the Science in Service Program mentors college science students in best practices for communicating science and engages these students in public service projects that center on teaching solar science. The program goals are to - Enhance and expand the learning experiences that pre-college students, from underserved and underrepresented groups in particular, have in science and technology. - Promote leadership in community service in the area of science and engineering among the next generation of scientists and engineers, today's undergraduate students. - Encourage science and engineering faculty to think creatively about their outreach requirements and to create a community of faculty committed to quality outreach programs. This talk will describe the unique advantages and challenges of a research-public service partnership, explain the structure of Stanford's Science in Service Program, and present the experiences of the undergraduates and the outreach communities that have been involved in the program.

  12. Scientist in residence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiel, David

    1990-03-01

    In order to enthuse secondary school students about science, and physics in particular, the author spent two one-week periods taking classes in local secondary schools as a `scientist in residence'. Two different private schools were involved and classes were given to students in the last four years preceding tertiary entrance. This article relates some of the motivation, method and implementation of this novel idea and some tentative conclusions are presented.

  13. [The critical scientists' voice].

    PubMed

    Lewgoy, F

    2000-01-01

    The intricate debate over genetically modified organisms (GMOs) involves powerful economic interests, as well as ethical, legal, emotional and scientific aspects, some of which are dealt with in this paper.(It is possible to identify two main groups of scientists across the GMOs divide: the triumphalist and the critical group.) Scientists in the triumphalist group state that GMOs and their derivatives are safe for the environment and do not offer health hazards any more than similar, non-genetically modified, products. This view is disputed by the critical scientists, who are prompted by the scarcity of studies on the environmental impacts and toxicity of GMOs, and who point out flaws in tests performed by the same companies which hold the patents. They are also critical of the current state of the process of gene transference, lacking accuracy, a fact which, coupled with the scant knowledge available about 97% of the genome functions, may produce unforseeable effects with risks for the environment and public health yet to be assessed. Examples of such effects are: the transference of alien genes [??] to other species, the emergence of toxins, the creation of new viruses, the impacts on beneficial insects and on biodiversity in general.

  14. Mentoring. A quality assurance tool for dentists. Part 2: what are mentoring and coaching?

    PubMed

    Holt, Vernon P; Ladwa, Russ

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, the traditional model of mentoring is briefly explained. A description of the current technique, which has developed from the traditional model, is then presented and a distinction made between mentoring and coaching, followed by a brief explanation of how mentoring, coaching and counselling make up a triad of helping activities. The authors then provide information on the use and impact of mentoring and coaching in some areas of human activity, other than dentistry, before outlining the application potential of these approaches in general dental practice. The paper concludes that the modern approach to mentoring and counselling offers a person-centred approach that is much more likely than traditional approaches to produce personal change, personal growth and personal development. Further aspects of this important and exciting subject will be explored in subsequent papers in this series.

  15. Overlooked aspects in the education of science professionals: Mentoring, ethics, and professional responsibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, Stephanie J.

    1994-03-01

    Science as profession is generally defined narrowly as research. Science education as preparation for a profession in research is usually perceived as course work and laboratory training, even though the necessary knowledge and skills to pursue a research career are more extensive and diverse and are learned in one-on-one interaction with mentors. A complete education of science professionals includes the values, ethical standards and conventions of the discipline since they are fundamental to the profession. Mentoring and education in the responsible conduct and reporting of research and in the ethical dimensions of science are among the professional responsibilities of scientists and need to be discussed as part of science education. Moreover, science as an enterprise is much more than research and includes a number of other components, including science teaching, science journalism, and science policy. Each of these contributes to the nature of science and its role in society.

  16. Getting in Step to Improve the Quality of In-Service Teacher Learning through Mentoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, Edith

    2010-01-01

    Mentoring has been widely recognized as an important aspect of the professional preparation of beginning teachers. How mentoring is viewed bears important implications for how mentoring is to be practiced and experienced. This study investigated the views of mentoring held by mentors, mentored in-service teachers and university teachers in a…

  17. The truth about mentoring minorities. Race matters.

    PubMed

    Thomas, D A

    2001-04-01

    Diversity has become a top priority in corporate America. Despite corporations' best intentions, however, many have failed to achieve a racial mix at the top levels of management. Some have revolving doors for talented minorities, recruiting the best and brightest, only to see them leave, frustrated by their experiences. Others are able to retain high-potential professionals of color but find them mired in middle management. To understand the different career trajectories of whites and minorities, David Thomas studied the progression of racial minorities at three large U.S. corporations. Here, he explains the three career stages that all professionals advance through, and he discusses why promising white professionals tend to enter fast tracks early in their careers, whereas high-potential minorities typically take off after they have reached middle management. Thomas's research shows that minorities who advance the furthest share one characteristic: a strong network of mentors and corporate sponsors. He found that minorities who plateaued in middle management received mentoring that was basically instructional; it helped them to develop skills. By contrast, minorities who became executives enjoyed fuller developmental relationships with their mentors. Thomas explains the types of support mentors provide for their protégés and outlines the challenges of mentoring across racial lines. Specifically, he addresses negative stereotypes, public scrutiny, difficulty with role modeling, and peer resentment. Finally, Thomas challenges the notion that the job of mentors begins and ends with their one-on-one relationships with their protégés. He offers concrete advice on how mentors can support broader initiatives at their organizations to create and enhance conditions that foster the upward mobility of professionals of color.

  18. Increasing retention of early career female atmospheric scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, L. M.; Hallar, A. G.; Avallone, L. M.; Thiry, H.

    2010-12-01

    Atmospheric Science Collaborations and Enriching NeTworks (ASCENT) is a workshop series designed to bring together early career female scientists in the field of atmospheric science and related disciplines. ASCENT uses a multi-faceted approach to provide junior scientists with tools that will help them meet the challenges in their research and teaching career paths and will promote their retention in the field. During the workshop, senior women scientists discuss their career and life paths. They also lead seminars on tools, resources and methods that can help early career scientists to be successful and prepared to fill vacancies created by the “baby boomer” retirees. Networking is a significant aspect of ASCENT, and many opportunities for both formal and informal interactions among the participants (of both personal and professional nature) are blended in the schedule. The workshops are held in Steamboat Springs, Colorado, home of a high-altitude atmospheric science laboratory, Storm Peak Laboratory, which also allows for nearby casual outings and a pleasant environment for participants. Near the conclusion of each workshop, junior and senior scientists are matched in mentee-mentor ratios of two junior scientists per senior scientist. Post-workshop reunion events are held at national scientific meetings to maintain connectivity among each year’s participants, and for collaborating among participants of all workshops held to date. Evaluations of the two workshop cohorts thus far conclude that the workshops have been successful in achieving the goals of establishing and expanding personal and research-related networks, and that seminars have been useful in creating confidence and sharing resources for such things as preparing promotion and tenure packages, interviewing and negotiating job offers, and writing successful grant proposals.

  19. How mentors affect workers' interests and involvement at work

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fero, H. C.; Nakamura, J.

    2002-01-01

    Survey data about experience with mentors were collected from 95 workers at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The findings raise questions about reliance on formal mentorships unconnected to proteges' daily work experience and discouragement of supervisor-mentor relationships.

  20. Mentoring and Informal Learning as Continuing Professional Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansman, Catherine A.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter examines the role of mentoring in continuing professional education from a critical perspective, addressing informal and formal mentoring relationships while highlighting their potential to encourage critical reflection, learning, and coconstruction of knowledge.

  1. Mentoring in Medicine | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Mentoring In Medicine Past Issues / Summer 2013 Table of Contents Students ... got hands-on healthcare experience through Mentoring in Medicine (MIM). At front is Andrew Morrison, MIM vice ...

  2. Training the translational scientist.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Rebecca D; Gabriel, Sherine; Pariser, Anne; Feig, Peter

    2010-12-22

    A Clinical and Translational Science Awards Industry Forum titled "Promoting Efficient and Effective Collaborations Among Academia, Government, and Industry" was held in February 2010. A session at this forum was organized to address the training and skills needed to develop a biomedical scientific workforce that interfaces academia, government agencies, and industry to support the process of translating science into applicable means to improve health. By examining the requisite competencies and training resources for scientists in each of these sectors, opportunities for collaboration and adoption of new educational strategies were identified that could help to address barriers to translational research education and career development.

  3. Fewer scientists immigrating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    A recent decline in the number of scientists and engineers immigrating to the United States could indicate that a surge throughout the 1980s and early 1990s may have been temporary.The number of people with science and engineering degrees admitted to the United States on permanent visas with work certificates dropped 26% between 1993 and 1994—from 23,534 to 17,403—according to a new National Science Foundation (NSF) data brief that analyzes information from the Immigration and Naturalization Service. A lack of demand for employment-based admissions caused the decline, according to the INS.

  4. Soviet scientists speak out

    SciTech Connect

    Holloway, D. )

    1993-05-01

    In this article, Russian bomb designers answer the KGB's claim that espionage, not science, produced the Soviet bomb. Yuli Khariton and Yuri Smirnov wholly reject the argument that Soviet scientists can claim little credit for the first Soviet bomb. In a lecture delivered at the Kurchatov Institute, established in 1943 when Igor Kurchatov became the director of the Soviet nuclear weapons project, Khariton and Smironov point to the work done by Soviet nuclear physicists before 1941 and refute assertions that have been made in Western literature regarding the hydrogen bomb.

  5. Astronomer to Data Scientist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkpatrick, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    Jessica Kirkpatrick received her PhD in Astrophysics from Berkeley in 2012. After an exhaustive job search within academia and beyond, she accepted a job as a data scientist / analyst for the social network Yammer (acquired by Microsoft) and is now the Director of Data Science for Education Company InstaEDU. Now instead of spending her days finding patterns in the large scale structure of galaxies, she finds patterns in the behaviors of people. She'll talk about her transition from astrophysics to tech, compare and contrast the two fields, and give tips about how to land a tech job, and discuss useful tools which helped her with her transition.

  6. Sandia's mentoring program : an ongoing success.

    SciTech Connect

    Brewer, Soila

    2003-12-01

    This report summarizes the Mentoring Program at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), which has been an on-going success since its inception in 1995. The Mentoring Program provides a mechanism to develop a workforce able to respond to changing requirements and complex customer needs. The program objectives are to enhance employee contributions through increased knowledge of SNL culture, strategies, and programmatic direction. Mentoring is a proven mechanism for attracting new employees, retaining employees, and developing leadership. It helps to prevent the loss of corporate knowledge from attrition and retirement, and it increases the rate and level of contributions of new managers and employees, also spurring cross-organizational teaming. The Mentoring Program is structured as a one-year partnership between an experienced staff member or leader and a less experienced one. Mentors and mentees are paired according to mutual objectives and interests. Support is provided to the matched pairs from their management as well as division program coordinators in both New Mexico and California locations. In addition, bi-monthly large-group training sessions are held.

  7. Promoting Physical Understanding through Peer Mentoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nossal, S. M.; Huesmann, A.; Hooper, E.; Moore, C.; Watson, L.; Trestrail, A.; Weber, J.; Timbie, P.; Jacob, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Physics Learning Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison provides a supportive learning community for students studying introductory physics, as well as teaching and leadership experience for undergraduate Peer Mentor Tutors who receive extensive training and supervision. Many of our Peer Tutors were former Physics Learning Center participants. A central goal of the Physics Learning Center is to address achievement/equity gaps (e.g. race, gender, socio-economic status, disability, age, transfer status, etc.) for undergraduate students pursuing majors and coursework in STEM fields. Students meet twice a week in small learning teams of 3-8 students, facilitated by a trained Peer Mentor Tutor or staff member. These active learning teams focus on discussing core physical concepts and practicing problem-solving. The weekly training of the tutors addresses both teaching and mentoring issues in science education such as helping students to build confidence, strategies for assessing student understanding, and fostering a growth mindset. A second weekly training meeting addresses common misconceptions and strategies for teaching specific physics topics. For non-science majors we have a small Peer Mentor Tutor program for Physics in the Arts. We will discuss the Physics Learning Center's approaches to promoting inclusion, understanding, and confidence for both our participants and Peer Mentor Tutors, as well as examples from the geosciences that can be used to illustrate introductory physics concepts.

  8. Stephen C. Woods: a precocious scientist.

    PubMed

    Smith, Gerard P

    2011-04-18

    To investigate the early scientific development of Steve Woods, I reviewed his research during the first decade after he received his doctoral degree in 1970. The main parts of his research program were conditioned insulin secretion and hypoglycemia, Pavlovian conditioning of insulin secretion before a scheduled access to food, and basal insulin as a negative-feedback signal from fat mass to the brain. These topics were pursued with experimental ingenuity; the resulting publications were interesting, clear, and rhetorically effective. Although the theoretical framework for his experiments with insulin was homeostatic, by the end of the decade he suggested that classic negative-feedback homeostasis needed to be revised to include learning acquired by lifestyle. Thus, Woods functioned as a mature scientist from the beginning of his research-he was very precocious. This precocity also characterized his teaching and mentoring as recalled by two of his students during that time, Joseph Vasselli and Paul Kulkosky. The most unusual and exemplary aspect of his precocity is that the outstanding performance of his first decade was maintained during the subsequent 30years.

  9. Stephen C. Woods: a precocious scientist.

    PubMed

    Smith, Gerard P

    2011-04-18

    To investigate the early scientific development of Steve Woods, I reviewed his research during the first decade after he received his doctoral degree in 1970. The main parts of his research program were conditioned insulin secretion and hypoglycemia, Pavlovian conditioning of insulin secretion before a scheduled access to food, and basal insulin as a negative-feedback signal from fat mass to the brain. These topics were pursued with experimental ingenuity; the resulting publications were interesting, clear, and rhetorically effective. Although the theoretical framework for his experiments with insulin was homeostatic, by the end of the decade he suggested that classic negative-feedback homeostasis needed to be revised to include learning acquired by lifestyle. Thus, Woods functioned as a mature scientist from the beginning of his research-he was very precocious. This precocity also characterized his teaching and mentoring as recalled by two of his students during that time, Joseph Vasselli and Paul Kulkosky. The most unusual and exemplary aspect of his precocity is that the outstanding performance of his first decade was maintained during the subsequent 30years. PMID:21232549

  10. Scientists--Geeks and Nerds?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDuffie, Thomas E., Jr.

    2001-01-01

    Investigates teachers' impressions of stereotypes of scientists and science. Uses the Draw a Scientist Test (DAST) for nonverbal assessment and makes recommendations for strategies to build more realistic and positive images. (Contains 12 references.) (YDS)

  11. Trajectories of Mentors' Perceived Self-Efficacy during an Academic Mentoring Experience: What They Look Like and What Are Their Personal and Experimental Correlates?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larose, Simon

    2013-01-01

    In my study, mentors matched with college mentees evaluated their self-efficacy nine times, during their participation in an academic mentoring program. Three distinct groups emerged as follows: (a) mentors who perceived themselves as moderately efficient throughout the mentoring relationship (the moderate stable (MS) group), (b) mentors who…

  12. Continuing Education for Mentors and a Mentoring Program for RN-to-BSN Students.

    PubMed

    Cheek, Rita E; Walsh Dotson, Jo Ann; Ogilvie, LeAnn A

    2016-06-01

    Mentoring programs have been used effectively with graduate and undergraduate nursing students and newly licensed nurses. There are few publications about mentoring for the RN enrolled in a bachelor of science in nursing (RN-to-BSN) program. To address low graduation rates in the public RN-to-BSN nursing programs, the Montana Center to Advance Health Through Nursing designed a mentoring program to help these nurses achieve their BSN. This voluntary program was initiated at an RN-to-BSN program in a 4-year college with six RN students who were paired with a mentor. An interactive, continuing education workshop on mentoring also was developed to prepare experienced nurses for their role as a mentor. This workshop was held nine times across Montana, with a total of 156 attendees. Workshop evaluations were consistently positive. Participants identified time and personality issues as barriers to successful mentoring and recommended expansion of the workshop to a distance-learning format so more nurses could attend. J Contin Educ Nurs. 2016;47(6):272-277.

  13. Continuing Education for Mentors and a Mentoring Program for RN-to-BSN Students.

    PubMed

    Cheek, Rita E; Walsh Dotson, Jo Ann; Ogilvie, LeAnn A

    2016-06-01

    Mentoring programs have been used effectively with graduate and undergraduate nursing students and newly licensed nurses. There are few publications about mentoring for the RN enrolled in a bachelor of science in nursing (RN-to-BSN) program. To address low graduation rates in the public RN-to-BSN nursing programs, the Montana Center to Advance Health Through Nursing designed a mentoring program to help these nurses achieve their BSN. This voluntary program was initiated at an RN-to-BSN program in a 4-year college with six RN students who were paired with a mentor. An interactive, continuing education workshop on mentoring also was developed to prepare experienced nurses for their role as a mentor. This workshop was held nine times across Montana, with a total of 156 attendees. Workshop evaluations were consistently positive. Participants identified time and personality issues as barriers to successful mentoring and recommended expansion of the workshop to a distance-learning format so more nurses could attend. J Contin Educ Nurs. 2016;47(6):272-277. PMID:27232226

  14. Scientists need political literacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simarski, Lynn Teo

    Scientists need to sharpen their political literacy to promote public and congressional awareness of science policy issues. This was the message of a panel of politically savvy scientists at a recent workshop at the American Association for the Advancement of Science's annual meeting in Washington, D.C. Researchers can maximize their lobbying efforts by targeting critical points of the legislative and federal funding cycles, the panel said, and by understanding the differences between the science and policy processes.Drastic modifications to the federal budget process this year will influence how much funding flows to research and development. A new feature for FY 1991-1993 is caps on federal expenditure in three areas: defense, foreign aid, and domestic “discretionary” spending. (Most of the agencies that fund geophysics fall into the domestic category.) Money cannot now be transferred from one of these areas to another, said Michael L. Telson, analyst for the House Budget Committee, and loopholes will be “very tough to find.” What is more, non-defense discretionary spending has dropped over a decade from 24% of the budget to the present 15%. Another new requirement is the “pay-as-you-go” system. Under this, a bill that calls for an increase in “entitlement” or other mandatory spending must offset this by higher taxes or by a cut in other spending.

  15. Cherry Featured in NCI’s Spotlight on Scientists Video Series | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    James Cherry, Ph.D., learned at an early age that education is crucial to success. He credits his mentors, some of whom include his grandmother, Shepherd University professor Burton Lidgerding, Ph.D., David Munroe, Ph.D., Frederick National Lab, and Robert J. Hohman, Ph.D., National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, for guiding him to the career he has today. Cherry, scientific program director, Office of Scientific Operations (OSO), NCI at Frederick, is one of the scientists featured in NCI’s Spotlight on Scientists video series.

  16. Educative Mentoring: How a Mentor Supported a Preservice Biology Teacher's Pedagogical Content Knowledge Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnett, Ellen; Friedrichsen, Patricia J.

    2015-11-01

    Research suggests discipline-specific, educative mentoring can help preservice teachers develop more sophisticated pedagogical content knowledge (PCK). However, there are few studies examining the nature of mentors' practice and how mentors influence preservice teacher's (PST) PCK. The purpose of this case study was to describe the strategies used by a secondary biology mentor teacher to support the development of a PST's PCK. The primary data sources were the transcripts of audio-recorded, daily meetings between the mentor and the PST during two curriculum units: DNA/Protein Synthesis and Evolution. The mentor influenced the PST's teaching orientation by repeatedly comparing teacher- and student-centered approaches, asking him to consider how students learn, and asking him to self-assess whether his instruction aligned with his teaching beliefs. The mentor helped the PST develop topic-specific knowledge of instructional strategies by sharing strategies she used previously, modeling critical reflection, and inviting him to critically reflect on his own instructional strategies. Topic-specific knowledge of students' understanding of science was developed by discussing common student misconceptions revealed in students' conversations and by sharing the results of test-item analysis from previous unit tests. The mentor helped develop the PST's topic-specific knowledge of assessment by helping him critically analyze and revise previous examinations to better align with the current curriculum units. Topic-specific knowledge of curricula was developed by jointly grappling with decisions about concept sequencing within units. The study includes implications for research, science teacher education, and professional development for mentors.

  17. The Women in Emergency Medicine Mentoring Program: An Innovative Approach to Mentoring

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Julie L.; Jimenez, Heather L.; Walthall, Jennifer; Allen, Sheryl E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Women in medicine report many gender-specific barriers to their career success and satisfaction, including a lack of mentors and role models. The literature calls for innovative strategies to enhance mentorship for women in medicine. Objective To describe the content, perceived value, and ongoing achievements of a mentoring program for women in emergency medicine. Methods The program offered mentoring for female faculty and residents in an academic emergency medicine department. Volunteers participated in group mentoring sessions using a mosaic of vertical and peer mentoring. Sessions focused on topics specific to women in medicine. An anonymous, electronic survey was sent to women who participated during 2004–2010 to assess the perceived value of the program and to collect qualitative feedback. Preliminary achievements fulfilling the program's goals were tracked. Results A total of 46 women (64%) completed the survey. The results showed a positive perceived value of the program (average, 4.65 on a 5-point Likert scale) in providing mentors and role models (4.41), in offering a supportive environment (4.39), in providing discussions pertinent to both personal (4.22) and professional development (4.22), while expanding networking opportunities (4.07). Notable achievements included work on the creation of a family leave policy, establishing lactation space, collaboration on projects, awards, and academic advancement. Conclusion This innovative model for mentoring women is perceived as a valuable asset to the academic department and residency. It offers the unique combination of expanding a female mentor pool by recruiting alumni and using a mosaic of vertical and peer mentoring. PMID:23997883

  18. Developmental Potential among Creative Scientists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culross, Rita R.

    2008-01-01

    The world of creative scientists is dramatically different in the 21st century than it was during previous centuries. Whether biologists, chemists, physicists, engineers, mathematicians, or computer scientists, the livelihood of research scientists is dependent on their abilities of creative expression. The view of a solitary researcher who…

  19. Another Kind of Scientist Activism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marino, Lori

    2009-01-01

    In a well-cited 1996 editorial in "Science," "The Activist Scientist," Jaleh Daie calls for scientists to take an assertive role in educating politicians and the public about the importance of government support for research. She writes that most scientists are reluctant to become involved in political lobbying for a variety of reasons--time…

  20. WFIRST CGI Adjutant Scientist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasdin, N.

    One of the most exciting developments in exoplanet science is the inclusion of a coronagraph instrument on WFIRST. After more than 20 years of research and development on coronagraphy and wavefront control, the technology is ready for a demonstration in space and to be used for revolutionary science. Good progress has already been made at JPL and partner institutions on the coronagraph technology and instrument design and test. The next five years as we enter Phase A will be critical for raising the TRL of the coronagraph to the needed level for flight and for converging on a design that is robust, low risk, and meets the science requirements. In addition, there is growing excitement over the possibility of rendezvousing an occulter with WFIRST/AFTA as a separate mission; this would both demonstrate that important technology and potentially dramatically enhance the science reach, introducing the possibility of imaging Earth-like planets in the habitable zone of nearby stars. In this proposal I will be applying for the Coronagraph Adjutant Scientist (CAS) position. I bring to the position the background and skills needed to be an effective liaison between the project office, the instrument team, and the Science Investigation Team (SIT). My background in systems engineering before coming to Princeton (I was Chief Systems Engineer for the Gravity Probe-B mission) and my 15 years of working closely with NASA on both coronagraph and occulter technology make me well-suited to the role. I have been a lead coronagraph scientist for the WFIRST mission from the beginning, including as a member of the SDT. Together with JPL and NASA HQ, I helped organize the process for selecting the coronagraphs for the CGI, one of which, the shaped pupil, has been developed in my lab. All of the key algorithms for wavefront control (including EFC and Stroke Minimization) were originally developed by students or post-docs in my lab at Princeton. I am thus in a unique position to work with

  1. Mentor and Protege Goal Orientations as Predictors of Newcomer Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fullick, Julia M.; Smith-Jentsch, Kimberly A.; Yarbrough, Charyl Staci; Scielzo, Shannon A.

    2012-01-01

    Although many academic organizations offer formal mentoring programs, little is known about how individual characteristics of peer mentors and their proteges interact to reduce new-student stress. First-year college students participated in a peer-mentoring program designed to reduce stress. The results of this study demonstrated that proteges who…

  2. E-Mentoring in Physical Education: Promises and Pitfalls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cothran, Donetta; McCaughtry, Nate; Faust, Roberta; Garn, Alex; Kulinna, Pamela Hodges; Martin, Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    Mentoring can be a critical component of teachers' professional development and retention, yet logistical and fiscal challenges often limit the amount of contact a protege can have with a mentor teacher. This investigation explored a school district initiative to address this need for more mentor interaction by supplementing traditional…

  3. Mentoring At-Risk Students in a Remedial Mathematics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khazanov, Leonid

    2011-01-01

    A peer mentoring program has been implemented to support a group of at-risk students enrolled in two sections of an elementary algebra course at an urban community college. Peer mentors were recruited from advanced mathematics classes and trained to provide individualized tutoring and mentoring support to at-risk students. The results show that…

  4. Rocks, Paper, Scissors: Best Practices in Peer Mentoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowden, Shelly Hudson

    2014-01-01

    In this article, Shelly Hudson Bowden, a kindergarten teacher for 14 years, offers her observations of peer-to-peer mentoring relationships among her kindergarten students that they formed and maintained. These mentoring relationships supported students' learning as they mentored one another in both "social" and "academic"…

  5. Faculty Mentoring Programs: Reenvisioning Rather than Reinventing the Wheel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zellers, Darlene F.; Howard, Valerie M.; Barcic, Maureen A.

    2008-01-01

    In this review, the authors trace the evolution of mentoring programs in the United States in business and academe, provide insight on the challenges associated with the study of mentoring, and identify the limited research-based studies of faculty mentoring programs that currently inform our understanding of this professional development practice…

  6. Juvenile Mentoring Program: A Progress Review. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novotney, Laurence C.; Mertinko, Elizabeth; Lange, James; Baker, Tara Kelley

    The greatest support offered by the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention for youth mentoring has been through the Juvenile Mentoring Program (JUMP), which provides one-to-one mentoring for youth at risk of delinquency, gang involvement, educational failure, or dropping out of school. Information on JUMP has been collected through…

  7. Mentoring as an Educational Strategy in a Rapidly Changing Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gladstone, Mia S.

    A study examined mentoring in the educational context. The study was based on a qualitative approach that involved open-ended interviews, reports and transcripts of discussions from 9 mentoring workshops, and responses and comments from more than 300 questionnaires. Examined in the study were the role of mentors in society; the motivation for…

  8. Access to Academe: The Importance of Mentoring to Black Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Dannielle Joy

    2007-01-01

    An examination of the mentoring component of the Committee Summer Research Opportunity Program, designed to inspire racially diverse faculty to encourage Black students to enroll in graduate programs and to mentor them is described. The overall intent was to describe how mentoring affects the professional socialization and career paths of Black…

  9. Mentoring Beginning Teachers to Enact Discussion-Based Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanulis, Randi Nevins; Brondyk, Susan K.; Little, Sarah; Wibbens, Erin

    2014-01-01

    As interest in improving the quality of teaching has increased, so has an interest in how teachers can be mentored. We described the Practice of one mentor as she assisted three beginning teachers to shift their teaching practice to a more robust understanding of the high-leverage practice of discussion-based teaching. This mentor participated in…

  10. Mentoring Trainee Music Teachers: Beyond Apprenticeship or Reflection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cain, Tim

    2007-01-01

    This article explores the theoretical concepts of "apprenticeship" and "reflection" in Initial Teacher Education music mentoring. It presents two case studies of Secondary music mentoring and relates these to the theoretical concepts. The article argues that a more integrated view of music mentoring might be provided with…

  11. A Humanistic Approach to New Teacher Mentoring: A Counseling Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norman, Donald M.; Ganser, Tom

    2004-01-01

    The authors explore the current state of teacher mentoring, asking the question, Has teacher mentoring evolved into a product economy/managed care, "prove it" mind-set? Humanistic concepts gleaned from counseling are proffered, highlighting the interpersonal relationship that exists between teacher mentor and mentee. Suggestions are provided for…

  12. Mentoring during the Transition from Graduate Student to Faculty Member.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desjardins, Paul J.

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses the role of mentors and the mentoring process during transition between graduate school or specialty training and the first faculty position, including the potential benefits and risks of the process. Two sets of suggestions are presented in evaluating and participating in a mentoring relationship. (GLR)

  13. Weaving Authenticity and Legitimacy: Latina Faculty Peer Mentoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Núñez, Anne-Marie; Murakami, Elizabeth T.; Gonzales, Leslie D.

    2015-01-01

    As an alternative to typical top-down mentoring models, the authors advance a conception of peer mentoring that is based on research about collectivist strategies that Latina faculty employ to navigate the academy. The authors advance recommendations for institutional agents to support mentoring for faculty who are members of historically…

  14. Mentoring as an Induction Tool in Special Education Administration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Cynthia Sonderegger; Arsenault, Kimberly

    2014-01-01

    Mentoring is a widely used method of induction into a variety of professional roles, including educational leadership. However, little scholarly literature has focused on the role of mentoring in the career development of special education administrators. In this examination of 14 such mentoring relationships, the existence of career and…

  15. Interpersonal Tone within School-Based Youth Mentoring Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pryce, Julia M.; Keller, Thomas E.

    2013-01-01

    This prospective, mixed-method study presents an in-depth view of school-based youth mentoring relationships using qualitative data from direct observations, in-depth interviews, and open-ended questionnaires with mentors and students. The dimension of interpersonal tone, referring to the interaction style between adult mentor and student, was…

  16. Illuminating the Heart of Mentoring: Intrinsic Value in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Lee Hean

    2005-01-01

    Other than the fairly consistent and inspiring depiction of the origin of the word Mentor from Greek mythology, literature on mentoring surfaces a myriad of mentoring concepts, as variable as the individuals, pairs, groups or organizations involved. Despite the diversity, there exists an emphasis on learning and its associated dynamism. Beyond the…

  17. Mentoring Undergraduate Scholars: A Pathway to Interdisciplinary Research?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Shannon N.; Mahatmya, Duhita; Garner, Pamela W.; Jones, Rebecca M.

    2015-01-01

    Interdisciplinary research is a valuable approach to addressing complex real-world problems. However, undergraduate research mentoring is discussed as an activity that happens in disciplinary silos where the mentor and student scholar share a disciplinary background. By transcending traditional academic divisions, we argue that mentors can train a…

  18. Teacher Mentoring: An Analysis of Roles, Activities, and Conditions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wildman, Terry M.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Mentors' notes and comments were analyzed to determine their perceptions of roles, activities, and conditions influencing their work with beginning teachers. Mentors had many helping strategies that developed and shaped complex roles. A conceptual framework of eight categories of mentoring activities addressing five domains of beginning teachers'…

  19. Embracing New Realities: Professional Growth for New Principals and Mentors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Augustine-Shaw, Donna; Liang, Jia

    2016-01-01

    This paper highlights one state model providing mentoring and induction for new school leaders in the U.S.A. The importance of mentoring and induction as a continuation of leadership preparation is highlighted in program components and participant perceptions in The Kansas Educational Leadership Institute's (KELI) mentoring and induction program…

  20. Mentoring and Leadership: A Practical Application for One's Career Path

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laughlin, Kevin; Moore, Holly

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores mentoring and mentorship at the beginning and ending of one's career path and the role of mentoring in the process. It frames the mentoring and leadership discussion using the lens of a first year teacher in a LaSallian elementary school in Browning, Montana, on the Blackfeet Indian Reservation. Topics examined in this paper…