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Sample records for brain cancer patients

  1. Corticosteroids in brain cancer patients: benefits and pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Jörg; Rao, Krithika; Pastorino, Sandra; Kesari, Santosh

    2011-01-01

    Glucocorticoids have been used for decades in the treatment of brain tumor patients and belong to the most powerful class of agents in reducing tumor-associated edema and minimizing side effects and the risk of encephalopathy in patients undergoing radiation therapy. Unfortunately, corticosteroids are associated with numerous and well-characterized adverse effects, constituting a major challenge in patients requiring long-term application of corticosteroids. Novel anti-angiogenic agents, such as bevacizumab (Avastin®), which have been increasingly used in cancer patients, are associated with significant steroid-sparing effects, allowing neuro-oncologists to reduce the overall use of corticosteroids in patients with progressive malignant brain tumors. Recent experimental studies have revealed novel insights into the mechanisms and effects of corticosteroids in cancer patients, including modulation of tumor biology, angiogenesis and steroid-associated neurotoxicity. This article summarizes current concepts of using corticosteroids in brain cancer patients and highlights potential pitfalls in their effects on both tumor and neural progenitor cells. PMID:21666852

  2. Experiencing brain cancer: what physicians should know about patients

    PubMed Central

    Lucchiari, Claudio; Botturi, Andrea; Manzini, Laura; Masiero, Marianna; Pravettoni, Gabriella

    2015-01-01

    During the last 20 years, numerous studies have highlighted the need to consider Quality of Life (QoL) issues in the treatment of brain cancer. However, gaps in scientific knowledge are still present as we have poor data surrounding the whole experience in patients and regarding their needs. The present study was aimed at evaluating QoL in brain cancer patients and correlated aspects. In particular, we aimed to assess QoL, mood state, and emotional issues in order to describe the patients’ experience to find out the critical aspects involved. Methods We obtained data from 85 patients during chemotherapy treatment at the National Neurological Institute ‘C. Besta’ of Milan, Italy. We used standardised questionnaires to assess different aspects of patients’ QoL. In particular, the functional assessment of cancer therapy-brain (FACT-Br) and the Hamilton scale were used. We also performed a semi-structured ad hoc interview in order to collect ­narrative data about patients’ experience. Results Our data depict a difficult adjustment process to the illness, even though positive elements emerged. Indeed, patients reported a satisfying self-perceived QoL, although specific concerns are still present. Further, even if many patients report depressive symptoms, only a minority have a severe condition. Conclusion Brain cancer may heavily affect patients’ QoL and well being. However, some element of the context may improve the ­adjustment to the disease. In particular, we found that most patients found psychosocial resources to cope with cancer and that spiritual well being also seems to play a key role. These issues deserve further studies in order to obtain significant clinical recommendations. PMID:26635895

  3. Whole brain radiotherapy 'has no effect' in patients whose lung cancer has spread.

    PubMed

    2016-09-28

    Whole brain radiotherapy makes little or no difference to survival rates or quality of life in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) that has spread to the brain, say researchers. PMID:27682542

  4. Factors Predictive of Improved Survival in Patients With Brain Metastases From Gynecologic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gressel, Gregory M.; Lundsberg, Lisbet S.; Altwerger, Gary; Katchi, Tasleem; Azodi, Masoud; Schwartz, Peter E.; Ratner, Elena S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The reported incidence of brain metastasis from epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), endometrial cancer (EC), and cervical cancer (CC) is exceedingly rare. As the long-term survival for patients with gynecologic cancer increases, there has been a corresponding increase in the number of diagnosed intracranial metastases. We seek to report our experience with managing brain metastatic disease (BMD) in patients with gynecologic cancer. Methods A retrospective review of all patients with EOC, EC, and CC at our institution revealed 47 patients with concurrent BMD between 2000 and 2013. Demographic data, risk factors, treatment modalities, progression-free data, and overall survival data were collected. Results Median survival time in patients with brain metastasis from EOC, EC, and CC was 9.0, 4.5, and 3.0 months, respectively. Two-year overall survival rates were 31.6%, 13.6%, and 0%, respectively. Patients received surgery, radiation therapy alone, palliative care, or radiation plus surgery. Radiation combined with surgical resection resulted in a significant hazards ratio of 0.36 (95% confidence interval, 0.15–0.86), compared with radiation alone. Conclusions Our report provides a large single-institution experience of brain metastases from gynecologic cancer. Patients with BMD have poor prognoses; however, treatment with multimodal therapy including surgical resection and radiation may prolong overall survival. PMID:26332394

  5. New Breast Cancer Recursive Partitioning Analysis Prognostic Index in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Niwinska, Anna; Murawska, Magdalena

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: The aim of the study was to present a new breast cancer recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) prognostic index for patients with newly diagnosed brain metastases as a guide in clinical decision making. Methods and Materials: A prospectively collected group of 441 consecutive patients with breast cancer and brain metastases treated between the years 2003 and 2009 was assessed. Prognostic factors significant for univariate analysis were included into RPA. Results: Three prognostic classes of a new breast cancer RPA prognostic index were selected. The median survival of patients within prognostic Classes I, II, and III was 29, 9, and 2.4 months, respectively (p < 0.0001). Class I included patients with one or two brain metastases, without extracranial disease or with controlled extracranial disease, and with Karnofsky performance status (KPS) of 100. Class III included patients with multiple brain metastases with KPS of {<=}60. Class II included all other cases. Conclusions: The breast cancer RPA prognostic index is an easy and valuable tool for use in clinical practice. It can select patients who require aggressive treatment and those in whom whole-brain radiotherapy or symptomatic therapy is the most reasonable option. An individual approach is required for patients from prognostic Class II.

  6. Preliminary Results of Whole Brain Radiotherapy With Concurrent Trastuzumab for Treatment of Brain Metastases in Breast Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Chargari, Cyrus; Idrissi, Hind Riahi; Pierga, Jean-Yves; Bollet, Marc A.; Dieras, Veronique; Campana, Francois; Cottu, Paul; Fourquet, Alain; Kirova, Youlia M.

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To assess the use of trastuzumab concurrently with whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) for patients with brain metastases from human epidermal growth factor receptor-2-positive breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Between April 2001 and April 2007, 31 patients with brain metastases from human epidermal growth factor receptor-2-positive breast cancer were referred for WBRT with concurrent trastuzumab. At brain progression, the median age was 55 years (range, 38-73), and all patients had a performance status of 0-2. The patients received trastuzumab 2 mg/kg weekly (n = 17) or 6 mg/kg repeated every 21 days (n = 14). In 26 patients, concurrent WBRT delivered 30 Gy in 10 daily fractions. In 6 patients, other fractionations were chosen because of either poor performance status or patient convenience. Results: After WBRT, radiologic responses were observed in 23 patients (74.2%), including 6 (19.4%) with a complete radiologic response and 17 (54.8%) with a partial radiologic response. Clinical responses were observed in 27 patients (87.1%). The median survival time from the start of WBRT was 18 months (range, 2-65). The median interval to brain progression was 10.5 months (range, 2-27). No Grade 2 or greater acute toxicity was observed. Conclusion: The low toxicity of trastuzumab concurrently with WBRT should probably not justify delays. Although promising, these preliminary data warrant additional validation of trastuzumab as a potential radiosensitizer for WBRT in brain metastases from breast cancer in the setting of a clinical trial.

  7. Radiological Patterns of Brain Metastases in Breast Cancer Patients: A Subproject of the German Brain Metastases in Breast Cancer (BMBC) Registry.

    PubMed

    Laakmann, Elena; Witzel, Isabell; Scriba, Verena; Grzyska, Ulrich; Zu Eulenburg, Christine; Burchardi, Nicole; Hesse, Tobias; Würschmidt, Florian; Fehm, Tanja; Möbus, Volker; von Minckwitz, Gunter; Loibl, Sibylle; Park-Simon, Tjoung-Won; Mueller, Volkmar

    2016-01-01

    Evidence about distribution patterns of brain metastases with regard to breast cancer subtypes and its influence on the prognosis of patients is insufficient. Clinical data, cranial computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of 300 breast cancer patients with brain metastases (BMs) were collected retrospectively in four centers participating in the Brain Metastases in Breast Cancer Registry (BMBC) in Germany. Patients with positive estrogen (ER), progesterone (PR), or human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) statuses, had a significantly lower number of BMs at diagnosis. Concerning the treatment mode, HER2-positive patients treated with trastuzumab before the diagnosis of BMs showed a lower number of intracranial metastases (p < 0.001). Patients with a HER2-positive tumor-subtype developed cerebellar metastases more often compared with HER2-negative patients (59.8% vs. 44.5%, p = 0.021), whereas patients with triple-negative primary tumors had leptomeningeal disease more often (31.4% vs. 18.3%, p = 0.038). The localization of Brain metastases (BMs) was associated with prognosis: patients with leptomeningeal disease had shorter survival compared with patients without signs of leptomeningeal disease (median survival 3 vs. 5 months, p = 0.025). A shorter survival could also be observed in the patients with metastases in the occipital lobe (median survival 3 vs. 5 months, p = 0.012). Our findings suggest a different tumor cell homing to different brain regions depending on subtype and treatment. PMID:27669228

  8. Radiological Patterns of Brain Metastases in Breast Cancer Patients: A Subproject of the German Brain Metastases in Breast Cancer (BMBC) Registry.

    PubMed

    Laakmann, Elena; Witzel, Isabell; Scriba, Verena; Grzyska, Ulrich; Zu Eulenburg, Christine; Burchardi, Nicole; Hesse, Tobias; Würschmidt, Florian; Fehm, Tanja; Möbus, Volker; von Minckwitz, Gunter; Loibl, Sibylle; Park-Simon, Tjoung-Won; Mueller, Volkmar

    2016-01-01

    Evidence about distribution patterns of brain metastases with regard to breast cancer subtypes and its influence on the prognosis of patients is insufficient. Clinical data, cranial computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of 300 breast cancer patients with brain metastases (BMs) were collected retrospectively in four centers participating in the Brain Metastases in Breast Cancer Registry (BMBC) in Germany. Patients with positive estrogen (ER), progesterone (PR), or human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) statuses, had a significantly lower number of BMs at diagnosis. Concerning the treatment mode, HER2-positive patients treated with trastuzumab before the diagnosis of BMs showed a lower number of intracranial metastases (p < 0.001). Patients with a HER2-positive tumor-subtype developed cerebellar metastases more often compared with HER2-negative patients (59.8% vs. 44.5%, p = 0.021), whereas patients with triple-negative primary tumors had leptomeningeal disease more often (31.4% vs. 18.3%, p = 0.038). The localization of Brain metastases (BMs) was associated with prognosis: patients with leptomeningeal disease had shorter survival compared with patients without signs of leptomeningeal disease (median survival 3 vs. 5 months, p = 0.025). A shorter survival could also be observed in the patients with metastases in the occipital lobe (median survival 3 vs. 5 months, p = 0.012). Our findings suggest a different tumor cell homing to different brain regions depending on subtype and treatment.

  9. Radiological Patterns of Brain Metastases in Breast Cancer Patients: A Subproject of the German Brain Metastases in Breast Cancer (BMBC) Registry

    PubMed Central

    Laakmann, Elena; Witzel, Isabell; Scriba, Verena; Grzyska, Ulrich; zu Eulenburg, Christine; Burchardi, Nicole; Hesse, Tobias; Würschmidt, Florian; Fehm, Tanja; Möbus, Volker; von Minckwitz, Gunter; Loibl, Sibylle; Park-Simon, Tjoung-Won; Mueller, Volkmar

    2016-01-01

    Evidence about distribution patterns of brain metastases with regard to breast cancer subtypes and its influence on the prognosis of patients is insufficient. Clinical data, cranial computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans of 300 breast cancer patients with brain metastases (BMs) were collected retrospectively in four centers participating in the Brain Metastases in Breast Cancer Registry (BMBC) in Germany. Patients with positive estrogen (ER), progesterone (PR), or human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) statuses, had a significantly lower number of BMs at diagnosis. Concerning the treatment mode, HER2-positive patients treated with trastuzumab before the diagnosis of BMs showed a lower number of intracranial metastases (p < 0.001). Patients with a HER2-positive tumor-subtype developed cerebellar metastases more often compared with HER2-negative patients (59.8% vs. 44.5%, p = 0.021), whereas patients with triple-negative primary tumors had leptomeningeal disease more often (31.4% vs. 18.3%, p = 0.038). The localization of Brain metastases (BMs) was associated with prognosis: patients with leptomeningeal disease had shorter survival compared with patients without signs of leptomeningeal disease (median survival 3 vs. 5 months, p = 0.025). A shorter survival could also be observed in the patients with metastases in the occipital lobe (median survival 3 vs. 5 months, p = 0.012). Our findings suggest a different tumor cell homing to different brain regions depending on subtype and treatment. PMID:27669228

  10. Cediranib Maleate and Whole Brain Radiation Therapy in Patients With Brain Metastases From Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-03-07

    Male Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Melanoma; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer; Tumors Metastatic to Brain

  11. Lung Cancer Brain Metastases.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Sarah B; Contessa, Joseph N; Omay, Sacit B; Chiang, Veronica

    2015-01-01

    Brain metastases are common among patients with lung cancer and have been associated with significant morbidity and limited survival. However, the treatment of brain metastases has evolved as the field has advanced in terms of central nervous system imaging, surgical technique, and radiotherapy technology. This has allowed patients to receive improved treatment with less toxicity and more durable benefit. In addition, there have been significant advances in systemic therapy for lung cancer in recent years, and several treatments including chemotherapy, targeted therapy, and immunotherapy exhibit activity in the central nervous system. Utilizing systemic therapy for treating brain metastases can avoid or delay local therapy and often allows patients to receive effective treatment for both intracranial and extracranial disease. Determining the appropriate treatment for patients with lung cancer brain metastases therefore requires a clear understanding of intracranial disease burden, tumor histology, molecular characteristics, and overall cancer prognosis. This review provides updates on the current state of surgery and radiotherapy for the treatment of brain metastases, as well as an overview of systemic therapy options that may be effective in select patients with intracranial metastases from lung cancer.

  12. RO4929097 and Whole-Brain Radiation Therapy or Stereotactic Radiosurgery in Treating Patients With Brain Metastases From Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-01-22

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Melanoma; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Tumors Metastatic to Brain; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  13. Response of brain metastasis from lung cancer patients to an oral nutraceutical product containing silibinin

    PubMed Central

    Bosch-Barrera, Joaquim; Sais, Elia; Cañete, Noemí; Marruecos, Jordi; Cuyàs, Elisabet; Izquierdo, Angel; Porta, Rut; Haro, Manel; Brunet, Joan; Pedraza, Salvador; Menendez, Javier A.

    2016-01-01

    Despite multimodal treatment approaches, the prognosis of brain metastases (BM) from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remains poor. Untreated patients with BM have a median survival of about 1 month, with almost all patients dying from neurological causes. We herein present the first report describing the response of BM from NSCLC patients to an oral nutraceutical product containing silibinin, a flavonoid extracted from the seeds of the milk thistle. We present evidence of how the use of the silibinin-based nutraceutical Legasil® resulted in significant clinical and radiological improvement of BM from NSCLC patients with poor performance status that progressed after whole brain radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The suppressive effects of silibinin on progressive BM, which involved a marked reduction of the peritumoral brain edema, occurred without affecting the primary lung tumor outgrowth in NSCLC patients. Because BM patients have an impaired survival prognosis and are in need for an immediate tumor control, the combination of brain radiotherapy with silibinin-based nutraceuticals might not only alleviate BM edema but also prove local control and time for either classical chemotherapeutics with immunostimulatory effects or new immunotherapeutic agents such as checkpoint blockers to reveal their full therapeutic potential in NSCLC BM patients. New studies aimed to illuminate the mechanistic aspects underlying the regulatory effects of silibinin on the cellular and molecular pathobiology of BM might expedite the entry of new formulations of silibinin into clinical testing for progressive BM from lung cancer patients. PMID:26959886

  14. Insights into brain metastasis in patients with ALK+ lung cancer: is the brain truly a sanctuary?

    PubMed

    Toyokawa, Gouji; Seto, Takashi; Takenoyama, Mitsuhiro; Ichinose, Yukito

    2015-12-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) has been identified to exert a potent transforming activity through its rearrangement in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and patients (pts) with ALK rearrangement can be treated more successfully with ALK inhibitors, such as crizotinib, alectinib, and ceritinib, than with chemotherapy. Despite the excellent efficacy of ALK inhibitors, resistance to these drugs is inevitably encountered in most ALK-rearranged pts. Cases of resistance are subtyped into three groups, i.e., systemic, oligo, and central nervous system (CNS) types, with the CNS being used to be considered a sanctuary. With regard to the management of CNS lesions in pts with ALK+ NSCLC, a growing body of evidence has gradually demonstrated the intracranial (IC) efficacy of ALK inhibitor (ALKi) in ALK+ NSCLC pts with brain metastases (BMs). Although the efficacy of crizotinib for the CNS lesions remains controversial, a recent retrospective investigation of ALK+ pts with BM enrolled in PROFILE 1005 and PROFILE 1007 demonstrated that crizotinib is associated with a high disease control rate for BM. However, BM comprises the most common site of progressive disease in pts with or without baseline BMs, which is a serious problem for crizotinib. Furthermore, alectinib can be used to achieve strong and long-lasting inhibitory effects on BM. In addition to alectinib, the IC efficacy of other next-generation ALK inhibitors, such as ceritinib, AP26113 and PF-06463922, has been demonstrated. In this article, we review the latest evidence regarding the BM and IC efficacy of ALK inhibitors in pts with ALK+ NSCLC.

  15. Delayed leukoencephalopathy of non-small cell lung cancer patients with brain metastases underwent whole brain radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xiaoling; Huang, Biao; Feng, Jieying; Yang, Wanqun; Liu, Hongjun

    2015-10-01

    To explore the incidence, MR imaging findings, dynamic developing process of delayed leukoencephalopathy (DLE) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with brain metastases patients who undergone whole brain radiation (WBRT) therapy, we retrospectively reviewed 48 NSCLC patients who underwent WBRT for brain metastases from January 2010 through June 2015 and had evaluable magnetic resonance imaging after treatment. The DLE were graded using a scale to evaluate T2-FLAIR (fluid attenuated image recovery) images: grade 1 = little or no white matter hyperintensity, grade 2 = limited periventricular hyperintensity and grade 3 = diffuse white matter hyperintensity. 48 NSCLC patients with brain metastases were enrolled. The median age of these patients was 55.7 years (range 33-75 years). The median follow-up was 12 months. The characteristic MR imaging of DLE in those patients was bilaterally diffuse white matter T2 hyperintensity around the periventricular areas without enhancement, sparing from U-fiber, callosum and gray matter structure. The incidence of DLE developed 6.25% (3/48), 30.00% (12/40), 48.39% (15/31), 61.90% (13/21), 85.71% (6/7), 100% (3/3) in those patients who were followed up for 3, 6, 9, 12, 24, 36 months, respectively. Through increased understanding of it, it may be possible to help clinicians develop further therapeutic strategies to maximize benefit while limiting potential long term toxicities. These data supplement existing reports regarding the late effects of WBRT in NSCLC patients with brain metastasis.

  16. Some Brain Cancer Patients Have Radiation Options: Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... The report was published July 26 in the Journal of the American Medical Association . In the past, whole brain radiation was ... New Hyde Park, N.Y.; July 26, 2016, Journal of the American Medical Association HealthDay Copyright (c) 2016 HealthDay . All rights ...

  17. Comparative analysis of survival, treatment, cost and resource use among patients newly diagnosed with brain metastasis by initial primary cancer.

    PubMed

    Ray, Saurabh; Dacosta-Byfield, Stacey; Ganguli, Arijit; Bonthapally, Vijayveer; Teitelbaum, April

    2013-08-01

    Brain metastases are a frequent complication of many systemic cancers and portend a poor prognosis. This retrospective analysis of health claims data compared survival, treatment and health care utilization and costs in patients with brain metastasis by primary tumor site. Adult commercial and Medicare Advantage enrollees newly diagnosed with brain metastasis in 01 Jan 2004 through 30 Apr 2010 were identified. Inclusion required at least 2 claims that identified the same primary cancer site prior to diagnosis of brain metastasis and no evidence of primary brain tumors. Health care utilization rates and costs were calculated at the patient level for each month of follow-up. Differences among primary cancer site cohorts were assessed by ANOVA (continuous variables), Chi square test (proportions) and the Poisson distribution (utilization rates). The primary cancer cohorts comprised 1,031 lung cancer, 93 melanoma and 395 female breast cancer patients. During the 6 months prior to brain metastasis diagnosis, 59 % of lung cancer patients had no evidence of lymph node involvement or other metastatic disease compared to 55 and 42 % of melanoma and breast cancer patients (P < 0.001). Survival after brain metastasis diagnosis was less than 3 months for 52, 43 and 39 % for lung cancer, breast cancer and melanoma, respectively (P < 0.001). Melanoma patients had the highest rate of inpatient stays and outpatient visits (P ≤ 0.003). Total monthly all-cause costs were: melanoma, $23,426; breast cancer $19,708; lung cancer, $17,007 (P = 0.003). Health care utilization and costs after brain metastasis diagnosis were substantial and differed by primary tumor site.

  18. Impact of Triple-Negative Phenotype on Prognosis of Patients With Breast Cancer Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Zhiyuan; Schlesinger, David; Toulmin, Sushila; Rich, Tyvin; Sheehan, Jason

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To elucidate survival times and identify potential prognostic factors in patients with triple-negative (TN) phenotype who harbored brain metastases arising from breast cancer and who underwent stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods and Materials: A total of 103 breast cancer patients with brain metastases were treated with SRS and then studied retrospectively. Twenty-four patients (23.3%) were TN. Survival times were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method, with a log-rank test computing the survival time difference between groups. Univariate and multivariate analyses to predict potential prognostic factors were performed using a Cox proportional hazard regression model. Results: The presence of TN phenotype was associated with worse survival times, including overall survival after the diagnosis of primary breast cancer (43 months vs. 82 months), neurologic survival after the diagnosis of intracranial metastases, and radiosurgical survival after SRS, with median survival times being 13 months vs. 25 months and 6 months vs. 16 months, respectively (p < 0.002 in all three comparisons). On multivariate analysis, radiosurgical survival benefit was associated with non-TN status and lower recursive partitioning analysis class at the initial SRS. Conclusion: The TN phenotype represents a significant adverse prognostic factor with respect to overall survival, neurologic survival, and radiosurgical survival in breast cancer patients with intracranial metastasis. Recursive partitioning analysis class also served as an important and independent prognostic factor.

  19. Deciphering the Finger Prints of Brain Cancer Glioblastoma Multiforme from Four Different Patients by Using Near Infrared Raman Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Hirendra Nath; Banerji, Arnold; Banerjee, Arunendra Nath; Riddick, Eilena; Petis, Jenae; Evans, Shavonda; Patel, Megha; Parson, Carl; Smith, Valerie; Gwebu, E.; Voisin, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    To explore the effectiveness of Raman spectra to diagnose brain cancer glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), we investigated the Raman spectra of single cell from four different GBM cell lines developed from four different patients and analyzed the spectra. The Raman spectra of brain cancer (GBM) cells were similar in all these cell lines. The results indicate that Raman spectra can offer the experimental basis for the cancer diagnosis and treatment. PMID:25937869

  20. Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Patients With Brain Metastases From Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wegner, Rodney E.; Olson, Adam C.; Kondziolka, Douglas; Niranjan, Ajay; Lundsford, L. Dade; Flickinger, John C.

    2011-11-01

    Background: Patients with small-cell lung cancer have a high likelihood of developing brain metastases. Many of these patients will have prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) or eventually undergo whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT). Despite these treatments, a large number of these patients will have progression of their intracranial disease and require additional local therapy. Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is an important treatment option for such patients. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 44 patients with brain metastases from small-cell lung cancer treated with gamma knife SRS. Multivariate analysis was used to determine significant prognostic factors influencing survival. Results: The median follow-up from SRS in this patient population was 9 months (1-49 months). The median overall survival (OS) was 9 months after SRS. Karnofsky performance status (KPS) and combined treatment involving WBRT and SRS within 4 weeks were the two factors identified as being significant predictors of increased OS (p = 0.033 and 0.040, respectively). When comparing all patients, patients treated with a combined approach had a median OS of 14 months compared to 6 months if SRS was delivered alone. We also compared the OS times from the first definitive radiation: WBRT, WBRT and SRS if combined therapy was used, and SRS if the patient never received WBRT. The median survival for those groups was 12, 14, and 13 months, respectively, p = 0.19. Seventy percent of patients had follow-up magnetic resonance imaging available for review. Actuarial local control at 6 months and 12 months was 90% and 86%, respectively. Only 1 patient (2.2%) had symptomatic intracranial swelling related to treatment, which responded to a short course of steroids. New brain metastases outside of the treated area developed in 61% of patients at a median time of 7 months; 81% of these patients had received previous WBRT. Conclusions: Stereotactic radiosurgery for small-cell lung carcinoma

  1. The activity of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) isoenzymes and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) in the sera of patients with brain cancer.

    PubMed

    Jelski, Wojciech; Laniewska-Dunaj, Magdalena; Orywal, Karolina; Kochanowicz, Jan; Rutkowski, Robert; Szmitkowski, Maciej

    2014-12-01

    Human brain tissue contains various alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) isoenzymes and possess also aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity. In our last experiments we have shown that ADH and ALDH are present also in the brain tumour cells. Moreover the activities of total ADH and class I isoenzymes were significantly higher in cancer tissue than healthy cells. It can suggests that these changes may be reflected by enzyme activity in the serum of patients with brain cancer. Serum samples were taken for routine biochemical investigation from 62 patients suffering from brain cancer (36 glioblastoma, 26 meningioma). For the measurement of the activity of class I and II ADH isoenzymes and ALDH activity, the fluorometric methods were used. The total ADH activity and activity of class III and IV isoenzymes were measured by the photometric method. A statistically significant increase of class I alcohol dehydrogenase isoenzymes was found in the sera of patients with brain cancer. The median activity of this class isoenzyme in the patients group increased about 24 % in the comparison to the control level. The total alcohol dehydrogenase activity was also significantly higher (26 %) among patients with brain tumour than healthy ones. The activities of other tested ADH isoenzymes and total ALDH were unchanged. The increase of the activity of total ADH and class I alcohol dehydrogenase isoenzyme in the sera of patients with brain cancer seems to be caused by the release of this isoenzyme from tumour's cells.

  2. Prognostic factors and survival of patients with brain metastasis from breast cancer who underwent craniotomy.

    PubMed

    Leone, José Pablo; Lee, Adrian V; Brufsky, Adam M

    2015-07-01

    Brain metastasis (BM) in patients with breast cancer is a catastrophic event that results in poor prognosis. Identification of prognostic factors associated with breast cancer brain metastases (BCBM) could help to identify patients at risk. The aim of this study was to assess clinical characteristics, prognostic factors, and survival of patients with BCBM who had craniotomy and resection in a series of patients treated with modern multimodality therapy. We analyzed 42 patients with BCBM who underwent resection. Patients were diagnosed with breast cancer between April 1994 and May 2010. Cox proportional hazards regression was selected to describe factors associated with time to BM, survival from the date of first recurrence, and overall survival (OS). Median age was 51 years (range 24-74). Median follow-up was 4.2 years (range 0.6-18.5). The proportion of the biological subtypes of breast cancer was ER+/HER2- 25%, ER+/HER2+ 15%, ER-/HER2+ 30%, and ER-/HER2- 30%. Median OS from the date of primary diagnosis was 5.74 years. Median survival after diagnosis of BM was 1.33 years. In multivariate Cox regression analyses, stage was the only factor associated with shorter time to the development of BM (P = 0.033), whereas age was the only factor associated with survival from the date of recurrence (P = 0.027) and with OS (P = 0.037). Stage at primary diagnosis correlated with shorter time to the development of BM, while age at diagnosis was associated with shorter survival in BCBM. None of the other clinical factors had influence on survival.

  3. Postoperative Structural Brain Changes and Cognitive Dysfunction in Patients with Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Masaaki; Kotozaki, Yuka; Nouchi, Rui; Tada, Hiroshi; Takeuchi, Hikaru; Ishida, Takanori; Taki, Yasuyuki; Kawashima, Ryuta; Ohuchi, Noriaki

    2015-01-01

    Objective The primary purpose of this study was to clarify the influence of the early response to surgery on brain structure and cognitive function in patients with breast cancer. It was hypothesized that the structure of the thalamus would change during the early response after surgery due to the effects of anesthesia and would represent one aspect of an intermediate phenotype of postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD). Methods We examined 32 postmenopausal females with breast cancer and 20 age-matched controls. We assessed their cognitive function (attention, memory, and executive function), and performed brain structural MRI 1.5 ± 0.5 days before and 5.6 ± 1.2 days after surgery. Results We found a significant interaction between regional grey matter volume (rGMV) in the thalamus (P < 0.05, familywise error (FWE), small volume correction (SVC)) and one attention domain subtest (P = 0.001, Bonferroni correction) after surgery in the patient group compared with the control group. Furthermore, the changes in attention were significantly associated with sevoflurane anesthetic dose (r2 = 0.247, β = ‒0.471, P = 0.032) and marginally associated with rGMV changes in the thalamus (P = 0.07, FWE, SVC) in the Pt group. Conclusion Our findings suggest that alterations in brain structure, particularly in the thalamus, may occur shortly after surgery and may be associated with attentional dysfunction. This early postoperative response to anesthesia may represent an intermediate phenotype of POCD. It was assumed that patients experiencing other risk factors of POCD, such as the severity of surgery, the occurrence of complications, and pre-existing cognitive impairments, would develop clinical POCD with broad and multiple types of cognitive dysfunction. PMID:26536672

  4. Development of a Patient-Derived Xenograft Model Using Brain Tumor Stem Cell Systems to Study Cancer.

    PubMed

    Chokshi, Chirayu; Dhillon, Manvir; McFarlane, Nicole; Venugopal, Chitra; Singh, Sheila K

    2016-01-01

    Patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models provide an excellent platform to understand cancer initiation and development in vivo. In the context of brain tumor initiating cells (BTICs), PDX models allow for characterization of tumor formation, growth, and recurrence, in a clinically relevant in vivo system. Here, we detail procedures to harvest, culture, characterize, and orthotopically inject human BTICs derived from patient samples.

  5. Cancer-related multiple brain infarctions caused by Trousseau syndrome in a patient with metastatic colon cancer: a case report.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Takahiko; Miyamoto, Yuji; Sakamoto, Yasuo; Tokunaga, Ryuma; Kosumi, Keisuke; Shigaki, Hironobu; Kurashige, Junji; Iwatsuki, Masaaki; Baba, Yoshifumi; Yoshida, Naoya; Baba, Hideo

    2016-12-01

    Thromboembolism that occurs in association with a malignant tumor is known as Trousseau syndrome. We herein present a case of Trousseau syndrome during systemic chemotherapy for metastatic colon cancer. A 65-year-old man with multiple liver metastases underwent primary tumor resection and systemic chemotherapy. Multiple brain infarctions were detected by magnetic resonance imaging immediately after first-line chemotherapy, which was deemed ineffective. There was no evidence of cardioembolic stroke or carotid atherosclerosis. Although the patient was initially asymptomatic, he subsequently developed paralysis. Despite anticoagulant treatment, he developed repeated recurrences of the infarction, and the area of the infarction spread as the liver metastases progressed. The patient's condition showed no response to an alternative treatment regimen for advanced colon carcinoma. He died approximately 11 months after tumor discovery. PMID:27595586

  6. The combination of weekly trastuzumab plus vinorelbine may be preferable regimen in HER-2 positive breast cancer patients with brain metastasis.

    PubMed

    Mutlu, Hasan; Büyükçelik, Abdullah

    2015-08-01

    Brain metastasis is one of the most important life-threatening conditions in patients with metastatic HER-2 positive breast cancer. A lot of conventional chemotherapeutic and antibody-based regimens used routinely in treatment of the patients with breast cancer are not effective due to blood-brain barrier. In our cases, we reported on three HER-2 positive breast cancer patients with brain metastasis who were offered a combination of weekly trastuzumab plus vinorelbine after brain metastasis. In our cases, the progression-free survival were 12, 16 and 9 months for Case 1, Case 2 and Case 3, respectively. In Case 1, there was no progression in the brain. In Case 3, we did not detect any progress but the patient died due to cerebrovascular embolic events. After local treatment, the combination of weekly trastuzumab plus vinorelbine may be an effective alternative regimen in HER-2 positive breast cancer patients with brain metastases.

  7. Extended Survival and Prognostic Factors for Patients With ALK-Rearranged Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer and Brain Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Johung, Kimberly L.; Yeh, Norman; Desai, Neil B.; Williams, Terence M.; Lautenschlaeger, Tim; Arvold, Nils D.; Ning, Matthew S.; Attia, Albert; Lovly, Christine M.; Goldberg, Sarah; Beal, Kathryn; Yu, James B.; Kavanagh, Brian D.; Chiang, Veronica L.; Camidge, D. Ross

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We performed a multi-institutional study to identify prognostic factors and determine outcomes for patients with ALK-rearranged non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and brain metastasis. Patients and Methods A total of 90 patients with brain metastases from ALK-rearranged NSCLC were identified from six institutions; 84 of 90 patients received radiotherapy to the brain (stereotactic radiosurgery [SRS] or whole-brain radiotherapy [WBRT]), and 86 of 90 received tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy. Estimates for overall (OS) and intracranial progression-free survival were determined and clinical prognostic factors were identified by Cox proportional hazards modeling. Results Median OS after development of brain metastases was 49.5 months (95% CI, 29.0 months to not reached), and median intracranial progression-free survival was 11.9 months (95% CI, 10.1 to 18.2 months). Forty-five percent of patients with follow-up had progressive brain metastases at death, and repeated interventions for brain metastases were common. Absence of extracranial metastases, Karnofsky performance score ≥ 90, and no history of TKIs before development of brain metastases were associated with improved survival (P = .003, < .001, and < .001, respectively), whereas a single brain metastasis or initial treatment with SRS versus WBRT were not (P = .633 and .666, respectively). Prognostic factors significant by multivariable analysis were used to describe four patient groups with 2-year OS estimates of 33%, 59%, 76%, and 100%, respectively (P < .001). Conclusion Patients with brain metastases from ALK-rearranged NSCLC treated with radiotherapy (SRS and/or WBRT) and TKIs have prolonged survival, suggesting that interventions to control intracranial disease are critical. The refinement of prognosis for this molecular subtype of NSCLC identifies a population of patients likely to benefit from first-line SRS, close CNS observation, and treatment of emergent CNS disease. PMID:26438117

  8. Exploring the Support Needs of Family Caregivers of Patients with Brain Cancer Using the CSNAT: A Comparative Study with Other Cancer Groups.

    PubMed

    Aoun, Samar M; Deas, Kathleen; Howting, Denise; Lee, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    A substantial burden is placed on family caregivers of patients diagnosed with brain cancers. Despite this, the support needs of the caregivers are often under-recognised and not addressed adequately in current routine and patient centred clinical care. The Carer Support Needs Assessment Tool (CSNAT) is a validated instrument designed to systematically identify and address caregiver needs [corrected]. It has been trialled in an Australian palliative care community setting using a stepped wedge cluster design involving 322 family carers of terminally ill patients. The current article reports on a subset from this trial, 29 caregivers of patients with primary brain cancer, and compares their profile and outcomes to those of other cancer groups. Caregiver strain was assessed using the Family Appraisal of Caregiving Questionnaire, caregiver physical and mental wellbeing using SF12 and caregiver workload using a questionnaire on support with activities of daily living (ADL). In comparison to caregivers of patients with all other cancers, the primary brain cancer group had significantly higher levels of caregiver strain, lower levels of mental wellbeing and a higher level of ADL workload. Their physical wellness also deteriorated significantly over time. An action plan approach led to practical solutions for addressing highlighted concerns. Four themes evolved from the family caregivers' feedback interviews: The extremely challenging caregiver experience with brain cancer; the systematic and practical approach of the CSNAT during rapid changes; connection with health professionals, feeling acknowledged and empowered; and timely advice and assurance of support during the caregiving journey. This preliminary study has demonstrated that the CSNAT provides a practical and useful tool for assessing the support needs of family caregivers of patients with brain cancer and has provided the basis for a larger scale, longitudinal study that allows a more detailed characterisation

  9. Exploring the Support Needs of Family Caregivers of Patients with Brain Cancer Using the CSNAT: A Comparative Study with Other Cancer Groups

    PubMed Central

    Aoun, Samar M.; Deas, Kathleen; Howting, Denise; Lee, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    A substantial burden is placed on family caregivers of patients diagnosed with brain cancers. Despite this, the support needs of the caregivers are often under-recognised and not addressed adequately in current routine and patient centred clinical care. The Care Support Needs Assessment Tool (CSNAT) is a validated instrument designed to systematically identify and address caregiver needs. It has been trialled in an Australian palliative care community setting using a stepped wedge cluster design involving 322 family carers of terminally ill patients. The current article reports on a subset from this trial, 29 caregivers of patients with primary brain cancer, and compares their profile and outcomes to those of other cancer groups. Caregiver strain was assessed using the Family Appraisal of Caregiving Questionnaire, caregiver physical and mental wellbeing using SF12 and caregiver workload using a questionnaire on support with activities of daily living (ADL). In comparison to caregivers of patients with all other cancers, the primary brain cancer group had significantly higher levels of caregiver strain, lower levels of mental wellbeing and a higher level of ADL workload. Their physical wellness also deteriorated significantly over time. An action plan approach led to practical solutions for addressing highlighted concerns. Four themes evolved from the family caregivers’ feedback interviews: The extremely challenging caregiver experience with brain cancer; the systematic and practical approach of the CSNAT during rapid changes; connection with health professionals, feeling acknowledged and empowered; and timely advice and assurance of support during the caregiving journey. This preliminary study has demonstrated that the CSNAT provides a practical and useful tool for assessing the support needs of family caregivers of patients with brain cancer and has provided the basis for a larger scale, longitudinal study that allows a more detailed characterisation of the

  10. Exploring the Support Needs of Family Caregivers of Patients with Brain Cancer Using the CSNAT: A Comparative Study with Other Cancer Groups.

    PubMed

    Aoun, Samar M; Deas, Kathleen; Howting, Denise; Lee, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    A substantial burden is placed on family caregivers of patients diagnosed with brain cancers. Despite this, the support needs of the caregivers are often under-recognised and not addressed adequately in current routine and patient centred clinical care. The Carer Support Needs Assessment Tool (CSNAT) is a validated instrument designed to systematically identify and address caregiver needs [corrected]. It has been trialled in an Australian palliative care community setting using a stepped wedge cluster design involving 322 family carers of terminally ill patients. The current article reports on a subset from this trial, 29 caregivers of patients with primary brain cancer, and compares their profile and outcomes to those of other cancer groups. Caregiver strain was assessed using the Family Appraisal of Caregiving Questionnaire, caregiver physical and mental wellbeing using SF12 and caregiver workload using a questionnaire on support with activities of daily living (ADL). In comparison to caregivers of patients with all other cancers, the primary brain cancer group had significantly higher levels of caregiver strain, lower levels of mental wellbeing and a higher level of ADL workload. Their physical wellness also deteriorated significantly over time. An action plan approach led to practical solutions for addressing highlighted concerns. Four themes evolved from the family caregivers' feedback interviews: The extremely challenging caregiver experience with brain cancer; the systematic and practical approach of the CSNAT during rapid changes; connection with health professionals, feeling acknowledged and empowered; and timely advice and assurance of support during the caregiving journey. This preliminary study has demonstrated that the CSNAT provides a practical and useful tool for assessing the support needs of family caregivers of patients with brain cancer and has provided the basis for a larger scale, longitudinal study that allows a more detailed characterisation

  11. White matter changes in breast cancer brain metastases patients who undergo radiosurgery alone compared to whole brain radiation therapy plus radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Timothy B; Niranjan, Ajay; Kano, Hideyuki; Choi, Phillip A; Kondziolka, Douglas; Dade Lunsford, L; Monaco, Edward A

    2015-02-01

    Delayed toxicity after whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) is of increasing concern in patients who survive more than one year with brain metastases from breast cancer. Radiation-related white matter toxicity is detected by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and has been correlated with neurocognitive dysfunction. This study assessed the risk of developing white matter changes (WMC) in breast cancer patients who underwent either WBRT plus stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) or SRS alone. We retrospectively compared 35 patients with breast cancer brain metastases who received WBRT and SRS to 30 patients who only received SRS. All patients had evaluable imaging at a median of one year after their initial management. The development of white matter T2 prolongation as detected by T2 or FLAIR imaging was graded: grade 1 = little or no white matter T2 hyperintensity; grade 2 = limited periventricular hyperintensity; and grade 3 = diffuse white matter hyperintensity. After WBRT plus SRS, patients demonstrated a significantly higher incidence of WMC (p < 0.0001). After one year, 71.5 % of patients whose treatment included WBRT demonstrated WMC (42.9 % grade 2; 28.6 % grade 3). Only one patient receiving only SRS developed WMC. In long-term survivors of breast cancer, the risk of WMC was significantly reduced when SRS alone was used for management. Further prospective studies are necessary to determine how these findings correlate with neurocognitive toxicity. WBRT usage as initial management of limited brain disease should be replaced by SRS alone to reduce the risk of delayed white matter toxicity.

  12. The concentration of erlotinib in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with brain metastasis from non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    DENG, YANMING; FENG, WEINENG; WU, JING; CHEN, ZECHENG; TANG, YICONG; ZHANG, HUA; LIANG, JIANMIAO; XIAN, HAIBING; ZHANG, SHUNDA

    2014-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that erlotinib is effective in treating patients with brain metastasis from non-small-cell lung cancer. However, the number of studies determining the erlotinib concentration in these patients is limited. The purpose of this study was to measure the concentration of erlotinib in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with brain metastasis from non-small-cell lung carcinoma. Six patients were treated with the standard recommended daily dose of erlotinib (150 mg) for 4 weeks. All the patients had previously received chemotherapy, but no brain radiotherapy. At the end of the treatment period, blood plasma and cerebrospinal fluid samples were collected and the erlotinib concentration was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS). The average erlotinib concentration in the blood plasma and the cerebrospinal fluid was 717.7±459.7 and 23.7±13.4 ng/ml, respectively. The blood-brain barrier permeation rate of erlotinib was found to be 4.4±3.2%. In patients with partial response (PR), stable disease (SD) and progressive disease (PD), the average concentrations of erlotinib in the cerebrospinal fluid were 35.5±19.0, 19.1±8.7 and 16.4±5.9 ng/ml, respectively. In addition, the efficacy rate of erlotinib for metastatic brain lesions was 33.3%, increasing to 50% in patients with EGFR mutations. However, erlotinib appeared to be ineffective in cases with wild-type EGFR. In conclusion, a relatively high concentration of erlotinib was detected in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with brain metastases from non-small-cell lung cancer. Thus, erlotinib may be considered as a treatment option for this patient population. PMID:24649318

  13. Low Expression of Slit2 and Robo1 is Associated with Poor Prognosis and Brain-specific Metastasis of Breast Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Qin, Fengxia; Zhang, Huikun; Ma, Li; Liu, Xiaoli; Dai, Kun; Li, Wenliang; Gu, Feng; Fu, Li; Ma, Yongjie

    2015-09-24

    Brain metastasis is a significant unmet clinical problem in breast cancer treatment. It is always associated with poor prognosis and high morbidity. Recently, Slit2/Robo1 pathway has been demonstrated to be involved in the progression of breast carcinoma. However, until present, there are no convincing reports that suggest whether the Slit2/Robo1 axis has any role in brain metastasis of breast cancer. In this study, we investigated the correlation between Slit2/Robo1 signaling and breast cancer brain metastasis for the first time. Our results demonstrated that (1) Invasive ductal carcinoma patients with low expression of Slit2 or Robo1 exhibited worse prognosis and brain-specific metastasis, but not liver, bone or lung. (2) Lower expression of Slit2 and Robo1 were observed in patients with brain metastasis, especially in their brain metastasis tumors, compared with patients without brain metastasis. (3) The interval from diagnosis of breast cancer to brain metastasis and brain metastasis to death were both much shorter in patients with low expression of Slit2 or Robo1 compared with the high expression group. Overall, our findings indicated that Slit2/Robo1 axis possibly be regarded as a significant clinical parameter for predicting brain metastasis in breast cancer patients.

  14. Importance of Extracranial Disease Status and Tumor Subtype for Patients Undergoing Radiosurgery for Breast Cancer Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Dyer, Michael A.; Kelly, Paul J.; Chen, Yu-Hui; Pinnell, Nancy E.; Lee, Eudocia Q.; Arvold, Nils D.; Lin, Nancy U.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: In this retrospective study, we report on outcomes and prognostic factors for patients treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for breast cancer brain metastases. Methods and Materials: We identified 132 consecutive patients with breast cancer who were treated with SRS for brain metastases from January 2000 through June 2010. We retrospectively reviewed records of the 51 patients with adequate follow-up data who received SRS as part of the initial management of their brain metastases. Overall survival (OS) and time to central nervous system (CNS) progression from the date of SRS were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Prognostic factors were evaluated using the Cox proportional hazards model. Results: Triple negative subtype was associated with CNS progression on univariate analysis (hazard ratio [HR] = 5.0, p = 0.008). On multivariate analysis, triple negative subtype (HR = 8.6, p = 0.001), Luminal B subtype (HR = 4.3, p = 0.03), and omission of whole-brain radiation therapy (HR = 3.7, p = 0.02) were associated with CNS progression. With respect to OS, Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) {<=} 80% (HR = 2.0, p = 0.04) and progressive extracranial disease (HR = 3.1, p = 0.002) were significant on univariate analysis; KPS {<=} 80% (HR = 4.1, p = 0.0004), progressive extracranial disease (HR = 6.4, p < 0.0001), and triple negative subtype (HR = 2.9, p = 0.04) were significant on multivariate analysis. Although median survival times were consistent with those predicted by the breast cancer-specific Graded Prognostic Assessment (Breast-GPA) score, the addition of extracranial disease status further separated patient outcomes. Conclusions: Tumor subtype is associated with risk of CNS progression after SRS for breast cancer brain metastases. In addition to tumor subtype and KPS, which are incorporated into the Breast-GPA, progressive extracranial disease may be an important prognostic factor for OS.

  15. Symptoms and Quality of Life in Cancer Patients With Brain Metastases Following Palliative Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Jennifer; Hird, Amanda; Zhang Liying; Tsao, May; Sinclair, Emily; Barnes, Elizabeth; Danjoux, Cyril; Chow, Edward

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: To examine prospectively patient self-rated symptoms and quality of life (QOL) indicators in patients with brain metastases following whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT). Methods and Materials: Consecutive patients with brain metastases referred for WBRT were approached for this study. Patients were asked to rate their symptoms and QOL using the Spitzer Quality of Life Index questionnaire. Follow-up was at 1, 2, and 3 months following WBRT. Linear regression analysis was used to determine the change in symptom severity over time. Results: Between August 2005 to October 2007, 129 patients with brain metastases were enrolled. The majority of patients (88%) received 20 Gy in five fractions. Median age was 64 years, and median Karnofsky Performance Status at baseline was 70. The most commonly experienced symptoms at baseline were headaches, weakness, balance problems, and fatigue. Thirty-five percent of patients rated neurological functional (NF) status as 1, indicating moderate neurological symptoms and need for assistance. Forty-three percent of patients had stable or decreased fatigue, and 47% had a stable or improved NF status over time (p = 0.0040). Although certain QOL domains improved over time, all other QOL domains and symptom items did not change significantly following WBRT. Conclusion: WBRT may have contributed to symptom stabilization in our study. An alternative goal of WBRT may be the prevention of symptom progression and QOL deterioration. Further research is required to select the most appropriate group of patients with brain metastases who would benefit most from WBRT.

  16. Erlotinib plus concurrent whole-brain radiation therapy for non-small cell lung cancers patients with multiple brain metastases

    PubMed Central

    Ulahannan, Danny

    2016-01-01

    Sequencing of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene to identify mutations in lung adenocarcinomas is routine in clinical practice. The use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) has transformed the management of patients with brain metastases harboring EGFR mutations, with improved response rates (RR) and survival. We evaluate the role of concurrent TKI therapy and radiotherapy in this group of patients, considering this data in the context of emerging concepts in this advancing field. PMID:27186518

  17. Predictive Risk of Radiation Induced Cerebral Necrosis in Pediatric Brain Cancer Patients after VMAT Versus Proton Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Freund, Derek; Zhang, Rui; Sanders, Mary; Newhauser, Wayne

    2015-01-01

    Cancer of the brain and central nervous system (CNS) is the second most common of all pediatric cancers. Treatment of many of these cancers includes radiation therapy of which radiation induced cerebral necrosis (RICN) can be a severe and potentially devastating side effect. Risk factors for RICN include brain volume irradiated, the dose given per fraction and total dose. Thirteen pediatric patients were selected for this study to determine the difference in predicted risk of RICN when treating with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) compared to passively scattered proton therapy (PSPT) and intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT). Plans were compared on the basis of dosimetric endpoints in the planned treatment volume (PTV) and brain and a radiobiological endpoint of RICN calculated using the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman probit model. Uncertainty tests were performed to determine if the predicted risk of necrosis was sensitive to positional errors, proton range errors and selection of risk models. Both PSPT and IMPT plans resulted in a significant increase in the maximum dose to the brain, a significant reduction in the total brain volume irradiated to low doses, and a significant lower predicted risk of necrosis compared with the VMAT plans. The findings of this study were upheld by the uncertainty analysis. PMID:25866999

  18. Validity of Three Recently Proposed Prognostic Grading Indexes for Breast Cancer Patients With Radiosurgically Treated Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Masaaki; Kawabe, Takuya; Higuchi, Yoshinori; Sato, Yasunori; Barfod, Bierta E.; Kasuya, Hidetoshi; Urakawa, Yoichi

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: We tested the validity of 3 recently proposed prognostic indexes for breast cancer patients with brain metastases (METs) treated radiosurgically. The 3 indexes are Diagnosis-Specific Graded Prognostic Assessment (DS-GPA), New Breast Cancer (NBC)-Recursive Partitioning Analysis (RPA), and our index, sub-classification of RPA class II patients into 3 sub-classes (RPA class II-a, II-b and II-c) based on Karnofsky performance status, tumor number, original tumor status, and non-brain METs. Methods and Materials: This was an institutional review board-approved, retrospective cohort study using our database of 269 consecutive female breast cancer patients (mean age, 55 years; range, 26-86 years) who underwent Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) alone, without whole-brain radiation therapy, for brain METs during the 15-year period between 1996 and 2011. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate the absolute risk of each event. Results: Kaplan-Meier plots of our patient series showed statistically significant survival differences among patients stratified into 3, 4, or 5 groups based on the 3 systems (P<.001). However, the mean survival time (MST) differences between some pairs of groups failed to reach statistical significance with all 3 systems. Thus, we attempted to regrade our 269 breast cancer patients into 3 groups by modifying our aforementioned index along with the original RPA class I and III, (ie, RPA I+II-a, II-b, and II-c+III). There were statistically significant MST differences among these 3 groups without overlap of 95% confidence intervals (CIs) between any 2 pairs of groups: 18.4 (95% CI = 14.0-29.5) months in I+II-a, 9.2 in II-b (95% CI = 6.8-12.9, P<.001 vs I+II-a) and 5.0 in II-c+III (95% CI = 4.2-6.8, P<.001 vs II-b). Conclusions: As none of the new grading systems, DS-GPS, BC-RPA and our system, was applicable to our set of radiosurgically treated patients for comparing survivals after GKRS, we slightly modified our system for breast cancer

  19. Brain metastases of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Palmieri, Diane; Smith, Quentin R; Lockman, Paul R; Bronder, Julie; Gril, Brunilde; Chambers, Ann F; Weil, Robert J; Steeg, Patricia S

    Central nervous system or brain metastases traditionally occur in 10-16% of metastatic breast cancer patients and are associated with a dismal prognosis. The development of brain metastases has been associated with young age, and tumors that are estrogen receptor negative, Her-2+ or of the basal phenotype. Treatment typically includes whole brain irradiation, or either stereotactic radiosurgery or surgery with whole brain radiation, resulting in an approximately 20% one year survival. The blood-brain barrier is a formidable obstacle to the delivery of chemotherapeutics to the brain. Mouse experimental metastasis model systems have been developed for brain metastasis using selected sublines of human MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma cells. Using micron sized iron particles and MRI imaging, the fate of MDA-MB-231BR cells has been mapped: Approximately 2% of injected cells form larger macroscopic metastases, while 5% of cells remain as dormant cells in the brain. New therapies with permeability for the blood-brain barrier are needed to counteract both types of tumor cells. PMID:17473372

  20. A phase I study of lapatinib with whole brain radiotherapy in patients with Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 (HER2)-positive breast cancer brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Lin, Nancy U; Freedman, Rachel A; Ramakrishna, Naren; Younger, Jerry; Storniolo, Anna Maria; Bellon, Jennifer R; Come, Steven E; Gelman, Rebecca S; Harris, Gordon J; Henderson, Mark A; Macdonald, Shannon M; Mahadevan, Anand; Eisenberg, Emily; Ligibel, Jennifer A; Mayer, Erica L; Moy, Beverly; Eichler, April F; Winer, Eric P

    2013-11-01

    Brain metastases are common in patients with advanced, Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 (HER2)-positive breast cancer. We evaluated the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and feasibility of lapatinib given concurrently with whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT). Eligible patients had (HER2)-positive breast cancer and ≥1 brain metastasis. Patients received lapatinib 750 mg twice on day one followed by 1000, 1250, or 1500 mg once daily. WBRT (37.5 Gy, 15 fractions) began 1-8 days after starting lapatinib. Lapatinib was continued through WBRT. Following WBRT, patients received trastuzumab 2 mg/kg weekly and lapatinib 1000 mg once daily. The regimen would be considered feasible if <3/27 pts treated at the MTD experienced a dose-limiting toxicity (DLT). Thirty-five patients were enrolled; 17 % had central nervous disease (CNS) only. During dose escalation, no patients receiving 1,000 or 1,250 mg and two of five patients receiving 1,500 mg experienced DLTs (grade 3 mucositis and rash). Overall, 7/27 patients at 1,250 mg (MTD) had DLTs: grade 3 rash (n = 2), diarrhea (n = 2), hypoxia (n = 1), and grade 4 pulmonary embolus (n = 2). Among 28 evaluable patients, the CNS objective response rate (ORR) was 79 % [95% confidence interval (CI) 59-92 %] by pre-specified volumetric criteria; 46 % remained progression-free (CNS or non-CNS) at 6 months. The study did not meet the pre-defined criteria for feasibility because of toxicity, although the relationship between study treatment and some DLTs was uncertain. Given the high ORR, concurrent lapatinib-WBRT could still be considered for future study with careful safety monitoring.

  1. Durable Clinical Benefit of Pertuzumab in a Young Patient with BRCA2 Mutation and HER2-Overexpressing Breast Cancer Involving the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Koumarianou, Anna; Kontopoulou, Christina; Kouloulias, Vassilis; Tsionou, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Patients with HER2-positive breast cancer and brain metastases have limited treatment options, and, as a result of their poor performance status and worse prognosis, they are underrepresented in clinical trials. Not surprisingly, these patients may not be fit enough to receive any active treatment and are offered supportive therapy. BRCA2 mutations are reported to be rarely associated with HER2-overexpressing advanced breast cancer and even more rarely with brain metastases at diagnosis. We report on a BRCA2-positive breast cancer patient with metastatic disease in multiple sites, including the brain, and poor performance status who exhibited an extraordinary clinical and imaging response to the novel anti-HER2 therapy pertuzumab after multiple lines of therapy including anti-HER2 targeting. To our knowledge, the clinicopathologic and therapeutic characteristics of this patient point to a unique case and an urgent need for further investigation of pertuzumab in patients with brain metastases. PMID:27195161

  2. The Effect of Early Detection of Occult Brain Metastases in HER2-Positive Breast Cancer Patients on Survival and Cause of Death

    SciTech Connect

    Niwinska, Anna; Tacikowska, Malgorzata; Murawska, Magdalena

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: The aim of the study is to evaluate disease-free survival, survival from the detection of brain metastases, overall survival, and cause of death in patients with occult brain metastases (Group I) vs. patients with symptomatic brain metastases (Group II). Methods and Materials: In 80 HER2-positive breast cancer patients, treated with trastuzumab and cytostatic agents for metastatic disease, magnetic resonance imaging screening of the brain was performed, and in 29 patients (36%) occult brain metastasis was detected (Group I). Whole-brain radiotherapy was delivered to Group I. This first group was compared with 52 patients who had symptomatic brain metastases (Group II) and was treated the same way, at the same clinic, during the same time period. Results: Median disease-free survival was 17 months in Group I and 19.9 months in Group II (p = 0.58). The median time interval between the dissemination of the disease and the detection of occult or symptomatic brain metastases was 9 and 15 months, respectively (p = 0.11). When the brain metastases were detected, the median survival was 9 and 8.78 months, respectively (p = 0.80). The median overall survival was 53 and 51 months, respectively (p = 0.94). In the group with occult brain metastases (Group I) 16% of patients died because of progression within the brain. In the group with symptomatic brain metastases (Group II) the rate of cerebral death was 48% (p = 0.009). Conclusions: Whole-brain radiotherapy of occult brain metastases in HER2-positive breast cancer patients with visceral dissemination produces a three-fold decrease in cerebral deaths but does not prolong survival.

  3. Effect of Tumor Subtype on Survival and the Graded Prognostic Assessment for Patients With Breast Cancer and Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Sperduto, Paul W.; Kased, Norbert; Roberge, David; Xu Zhiyuan; Shanley, Ryan; Luo, Xianghua; Sneed, Penny K.; Chao, Samuel T.; Weil, Robert J.; Suh, John; Bhatt, Amit; Jensen, Ashley W.; Brown, Paul D.; Shih, Helen A.; Kirkpatrick, John; Gaspar, Laurie E.; Fiveash, John B.; and others

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: The diagnosis-specific Graded Prognostic Assessment (GPA) was published to clarify prognosis for patients with brain metastases. This study refines the existing Breast-GPA by analyzing a larger cohort and tumor subtype. Methods and Materials: A multi-institutional retrospective database of 400 breast cancer patients treated for newly diagnosed brain metastases was generated. Prognostic factors significant for survival were analyzed by multivariate Cox regression and recursive partitioning analysis (RPA). Factors were weighted by the magnitude of their regression coefficients to define the GPA index. Results: Significant prognostic factors by multivariate Cox regression and RPA were Karnofsky performance status (KPS), HER2, ER/PR status, and the interaction between ER/PR and HER2. RPA showed age was significant for patients with KPS 60 to 80. The median survival time (MST) overall was 13.8 months, and for GPA scores of 0 to 1.0, 1.5 to 2.0, 2.5 to 3.0, and 3.5 to 4.0 were 3.4 (n = 23), 7.7 (n = 104), 15.1 (n = 140), and 25.3 (n = 133) months, respectively (p < 0.0001). Among HER2-negative patients, being ER/PR positive improved MST from 6.4 to 9.7 months, whereas in HER2-positive patients, being ER/PR positive improved MST from 17.9 to 20.7 months. The log-rank statistic (predictive power) was 110 for the Breast-GPA vs. 55 for tumor subtype. Conclusions: The Breast-GPA documents wide variation in prognosis and shows clear separation between subgroups of patients with breast cancer and brain metastases. This tool will aid clinical decision making and stratification in clinical trials. These data confirm the effect of tumor subtype on survival and show the Breast-GPA offers significantly more predictive power than the tumor subtype alone.

  4. SU-E-J-90: MRI-Based Treatment Simulation and Patient Setup for Radiation Therapy of Brain Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Y; Cao, M; Han, F; Santhanam, A; Neylon, J; Gomez, C; Kaprealian, T; Sheng, K; Agazaryan, N; Low, D; Hu, P

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Traditional radiation therapy of cancer is heavily dependent on CT. CT provides excellent depiction of the bones but lacks good soft tissue contrast, which makes contouring difficult. Often, MRIs are fused with CT to take advantage of its superior soft tissue contrast. Such an approach has drawbacks. It is desirable to perform treatment simulation entirely based on MRI. To achieve MR-based simulation for radiation therapy, bone imaging is an important challenge because of the low MR signal intensity from bone due to its ultra-short T2 and T1, which presents difficulty for both dose calculation and patient setup in terms of digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) generation. Current solutions will either require manual bone contouring or multiple MR scans. We present a technique to generate DRR using MRI with an Ultra Short Echo Time (UTE) sequence which is applicable to both OBI and ExacTrac 2D patient setup. Methods: Seven brain cancer patients were scanned at 1.5 Tesla using a radial UTE sequence. The sequence acquires two images at two different echo times. The two images were processed using in-house software. The resultant bone images were subsequently loaded into commercial systems to generate DRRs. Simulation and patient clinical on-board images were used to evaluate 2D patient setup with MRI-DRRs. Results: The majority bones are well visualized in all patients. The fused image of patient CT with the MR bone image demonstrates the accuracy of automatic bone identification using our technique. The generated DRR is of good quality. Accuracy of 2D patient setup by using MRI-DRR is comparable to CT-based 2D patient setup. Conclusion: This study shows the potential of DRR generation with single MR sequence. Further work will be needed on MR sequence development and post-processing procedure to achieve robust MR bone imaging for other human sites in addition to brain.

  5. A Chaplain-led Spiritual Life Review Pilot Study for Patients with Brain Cancers and Other Degenerative Neurologic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Piderman, Katherine M.; Breitkopf, Carmen Radecki; Jenkins, Sarah M.; Euerle, Terin T.; Lovejoy, Laura A.; Kwete, Gracia M.; Jatoi, Aminah

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This pilot study was designed to describe changes in spiritual well-being (SWB), spiritual coping, and quality of life (QOL) in patients with brain cancer or other neurodegenerative diseases participating in a chaplain-led spiritual life review interview and development of a spiritual legacy document (SLD). Methods: Eligible participants were enrolled and completed baseline questionnaires. They were interviewed by a board-certified chaplain about spiritual influences, beliefs, practices, values, and spiritual struggles. An SLD was prepared for each participant, and one month follow-up questionnaires were completed. Two cases are summarized, and spiritual development themes are illustrated within a spiritual development framework. Results: A total of 27 patients completed baseline questionnaires and the interview; 24 completed the SLD, and 15 completed the follow-up questionnaire. Increases in SWB, religious coping, and QOL were detected. The majority maintained the highest (best) scores of negative religious coping, demonstrating minimal spiritual struggle. Conclusions: Despite the challenges of brain cancers and other neurodegenerative diseases, participants demonstrated improvements in SWB, positive religious coping, and QOL. Patient comments indicate that benefit is related to the opportunity to reflect on and integrate spiritual experiences and to preserve them for others. Research with a larger, more diverse sample is needed, as well as clinical applications for those too vulnerable to participate in longitudinal follow-up. PMID:25973267

  6. Therapeutic nanomedicine for brain cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tzeng, Stephany Y; Green, Jordan J

    2013-01-01

    Malignant brain cancer treatment is limited by a number of barriers, including the blood–brain barrier, transport within the brain interstitium, difficulties in delivering therapeutics specifically to tumor cells, the highly invasive quality of gliomas and drug resistance. As a result, the prognosis for patients with high-grade gliomas is poor and has improved little in recent years. Nanomedicine approaches have been developed in the laboratory, with some technologies being translated to the clinic, in order to address these needs. This review discusses the obstacles to effective treatment that are currently faced in the field, as well as various nanomedicine techniques that have been used or are being explored to overcome them, with a focus on liposomal and polymeric nanoparticles. PMID:23738667

  7. Immunotherapy of Brain Cancer.

    PubMed

    Roth, Patrick; Preusser, Matthias; Weller, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The brain has long been considered an immune-privileged site precluding potent immune responses. Nevertheless, because of the failure of conventional anti-cancer treatments to achieve sustained control of intracranial neoplasms, immunotherapy has been considered as a promising strategy for decades. However, several efforts aimed at exploiting the immune system as a therapeutic weapon were largely unsuccessful. The situation only changed with the introduction of the checkpoint inhibitors, which target immune cell receptors that interfere with the activation of immune effector cells. Following the observation of striking effects of drugs that target CTLA-4 or PD-1 against melanoma and other tumor entities, it was recognized that these drugs may also be active against metastatic tumor lesions in the brain. Their therapeutic activity against primary brain tumors is currently being investigated within clinical trials. In parallel, other immunotherapeutics such as peptide vaccines are at an advanced stage of clinical development. Further immunotherapeutic strategies currently under investigation comprise adoptive immune cell transfer as well as inhibitors of metabolic pathways involved in the local immunosuppression frequently found in brain tumors. Thus, the ongoing implementation of immunotherapeutic concepts into clinical routine may represent a powerful addition to the therapeutic arsenal against various brain tumors. PMID:27260656

  8. Microwave beamforming for non-invasive patient-specific hyperthermia treatment of pediatric brain cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burfeindt, Matthew J.; Zastrow, Earl; Hagness, Susan C.; Van Veen, Barry D.; Medow, Joshua E.

    2011-05-01

    We present a numerical study of an array-based microwave beamforming approach for non-invasive hyperthermia treatment of pediatric brain tumors. The transmit beamformer is designed to achieve localized heating—that is, to achieve constructive interference and selective absorption of the transmitted electromagnetic waves at the desired focus location in the brain while achieving destructive interference elsewhere. The design process takes into account patient-specific and target-specific propagation characteristics at 1 GHz. We evaluate the effectiveness of the beamforming approach using finite-difference time-domain simulations of two MRI-derived child head models from the Virtual Family (IT'IS Foundation). Microwave power deposition and the resulting steady-state thermal distribution are calculated for each of several randomly chosen focus locations. We also explore the robustness of the design to mismatch between the assumed and actual dielectric properties of the patient. Lastly, we demonstrate the ability of the beamformer to suppress hot spots caused by pockets of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the brain. Our results show that microwave beamforming has the potential to create localized heating zones in the head models for focus locations that are not surrounded by large amounts of CSF. These promising results suggest that the technique warrants further investigation and development.

  9. EGFR mutations are associated with favorable intracranial response and progression-free survival following brain irradiation in non-small cell lung cancer patients with brain metastases

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The presence of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is associated with increased radiosensitivity in vitro. However, the results from clinical studies regarding the radiosensitivity in NSCLC with mutant EGFR are inconclusive. We retrospectively analyzed our NSCLC patients who had been regularly followed up by imaging studies after irradiation for brain metastases, and investigated the impact of EGFR mutations on radiotherapy (RT). Methods Forty-three patients with brain metastases treated with RT, together with EGFR mutation status, demographics, smoking history, performance status, recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class, tumor characteristics, and treatment modalities, were included. Radiological images were taken at 1 to 3 months after RT, and 3 to 6 months thereafter. Radiographic response was evaluated by RECIST criteria version 1.1 according to the intracranial images before and after RT. Log-rank test and Cox regression model were used to correlate EGFR mutation status and other clinical features with intracranial radiological progression-free survival (RPFS) and overall survival (OS). Results The median follow-up duration was 15 months. Patients with mutant EGFR had higher response rates to brain RT than those with wild-type EGFR (80% vs. 46%; p = 0.037). Logistic regression analysis showed that EGFR mutation status is the only predictor for treatment response (p = 0.032). The median intracranial RPFS was 18 months (95% CI = 8.33-27.68 months). In Cox regression analysis, mutant EGFR (p = 0.025) and lower RPA class (p = 0.026) were associated with longer intracranial RPFS. EGFR mutation status (p = 0.061) and performance status (p = 0.076) had a trend to predict OS. Conclusions Mutant EGFR in NSCLC patients is an independent prognostic factor for better treatment response and longer intracranial RPFS following RT for brain metastases. PMID:23110940

  10. Changes of Brain Glucose Metabolism in the Pretreatment Patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Retrospective PET/CT Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weishan; Ning, Ning; Li, Xianjun; Niu, Gang; Bai, Lijun; Guo, Youmin; Yang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Objective The tumor-to-brain communication has been emphasized by recent converging evidences. This study aimed to compare the difference of brain glucose metabolism between patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and control subjects. Methods NSCLC patients prior to oncotherapy and control subjects without malignancy confirmed by 6 months follow-up were collected and underwent the resting state 18F-fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) PET/CT. Normalized FDG metabolism was calculated by a signal intensity ratio of each brain region to whole brain. Brain glucose metabolism was compared between NSCLC patients and control group using two samples t-test and multivariate test by statistical parametric maps (SPM) software. Results Compared with the control subjects (n = 76), both brain glucose hyper- and hypometabolism regions with significant statistical differences (P<0.01) were found in the NSCLC patients (n = 83). The hypermetabolism regions (bilateral insula, putamen, pallidum, thalamus, hippocampus and amygdala, the right side of cerebellum, orbital part of right inferior frontal gyrus and vermis) were component parts of visceral to brain signal transduction pathways, and the hypometabolism regions (the left superior parietal lobule, bilateral inferior parietal lobule and left fusiform gyrus) lied in dorsal attention network and visuospatial function areas. Conclusions The changes of brain glucose metabolism exist in NSCLC patients prior to oncotherapy, which might be attributed to lung-cancer related visceral sympathetic activation and decrease of dorsal attention network function. PMID:27529342

  11. Using the theory of planned behavior to understand the determinants of exercise intention in patients diagnosed with primary brain cancer.

    PubMed

    Jones, Lee W; Guill, Bebe; Keir, Stephen T; Carter, Karen; Friedman, Henry S; Bigner, Darell D; Reardon, David A

    2007-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the demographic, medical, and social cognitive determinants of exercise intentions in a institution-based cohort of primary brain tumor patients. Using a cross-sectional survey, 100 primary brain tumor patients completed a mailed survey that assessed medical and demographic characteristics, past exercise behavior using the Godin Leisure Time Exercise Questionnaire (GLTEQ), and social cognitive beliefs towards exercise using Aizen's theory of planned behavior (TPB; i.e. intention, perceived behavioral control, subjective norm, affective and instrumental attitude). Descriptive statistics indicated that participants had positive social cognitive beliefs towards exercise. In support of the tenets of the TPB, we found moderate to large (>0.40) positive correlations between the majority of TPB constructs. Moreover, the TPB constructs combined to explain 32% of the variance in exercise intentions with affective attitude (beta = 0.24; p = 0.020) and perceived behavioral control (beta = 0.36; p<0.001) being the most important determinants. Except past exercise behavior, medical and demographic variables were not consistently correlated with any TPB constructs. Finally, participant's gender and body mass index influenced the association between instrumental attitude and exercise intention with male and overweight/obese patients (> or =25 kg/m(2)) considering the health benefits of exercise to be more important than their female and normal weight (<25 kg/m(2)) counterparts. Information gained from this study suggests that the TPB is a useful framework to design and implement theoretically based interventions to promote exercise in primary brain cancer patients.

  12. Palbociclib in Treating Patients With Metastatic HER-2 Positive or Triple-Negative Breast Cancer With Brain Metastasis

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-26

    Breast Carcinoma Metastatic in the Brain; Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; HER2/Neu Positive; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  13. [Nutrition and cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Katsuramaki, T; Hirata, K; Isobe, M

    1998-03-01

    Nutritional therapy for cancer patients includes various objectives such as improvement of cachexia, elucidation of the mechanism of malnutrition, development of therapy for anorexia, nutrition support during chemotherapy or radiotherapy, and inhibition of tumor growth under controlled caloric intake. This review describes recent remarkable developments in nutritional therapy for cancer patients. Cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor which induce proteolysis and lipolysis are involved in the cause of malnutrition and cachexia in cancer patients. IL-1 also plays a significant role in the development of cancer anorexia via direct action in the brain. For anorexia therapy, progestogens have been shown to improve appetite and food intake in cancer patients. Moreover, glutamine supplementation improves the host protein metabolism without enhancement of tumor growth during chemotherapy. Among the effects of caloric intake on anticancer therapy, AO-90, a methionine-free intravenous amino acid solution, has been shown to increase the antitumor effect of 5-fluorouracil in clinical studies. From these observations, recent progress in nutritional therapy for cancer patients has been remarkable. Further study of nutritional therapy is required in order to maintain or improve the quality of life of cancer patients in the future.

  14. Incidental 11C-choline PET/CT brain uptake due to meningioma in a patient studied for prostate cancer: correlation with MRI and imaging fusion.

    PubMed

    Bertagna, Francesco; Bosio, Giovanni; Pinelli, Lorenzo; Treglia, Giorgio; Giubbini, Raffaele

    2013-11-01

    We report a case of a 75-year-old male patient treated with radiotherapy in 1999 for prostate cancer. Due to a rise in prostate-specific antigen, he underwent (11)C-choline PET/CT. The study was negative for secondary lesions but revealed an incidental pathologic focal brain uptake. A subsequent magnetic resonance examination confirmed the presence of a brain lesion typical for meningioma.

  15. Serum Biomarkers Associated with Clinical Outcomes Fail to Predict Brain Metastases in Patients with Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bob T.; Lou, Emil; Hsu, Meier; Yu, Helena A.; Naidoo, Jarushka; Zauderer, Marjorie G.; Sima, Camelia; Johnson, Melissa L.; Daras, Mariza; DeAngelis, Lisa M.; Fleisher, Martin; Kris, Mark G.; Azzoli, Christopher G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Lung cancers account for the majority of brain metastases which pose major therapeutic challenges. Biomarkers prognosticating for the development of brain metastases in patients with non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) may improve personalized care. Six serum proteomic biomarkers were previously investigated at Memorial Sloan Kettering but their associations with brain metastases were unknown. Methods Serum NSE, CYFRA 21–1, ProGRP, SCC-Ag, TIMP1, and HE4 by ELISA-based proteomic assays were prospectively collected from consecutive patients with stage IV NSCLC. Pre-treatment serum biomarker levels as well as age, histology, and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation status were evaluated for association with the baseline presence of brain metastases using logistic regression and multivariable analysis. For patients without brain metastases at baseline, the cumulative incidence of subsequent brain metastases were compared according to baseline biomarkers and clinical factors using Gray’s test. Results A total of 118 patients were enrolled, 31 (26%; 95% CI 0.19–0.35) had brain metastases at baseline and a further 26 (22%; 95% CI 0.15–0.30) developed brain metastases subsequently. Pre-treatment serum biomarker levels were available in 104 patients. There was no significant association between the six serum biomarkers and the baseline presence or subsequent development of brain metastases. Age younger than 65 years was the only clinical factor significantly associated with brain metastasis at baseline (OR 3.00; 95% CI 1.22–7.34, P = 0.02) by multivariable analysis. A trend toward increased cumulative incidence of subsequent brain metastases was observed in patients with EGFR mutation (p = 0.2), but this was not statistically significant possibly due to small sample size. Conclusions Serum NSE, CYFRA 21–1, Pro-GRP, SCC-Ag, TIMP1, and HE4 are not significantly associated with brain metastases. Our methods taking into account follow-up time

  16. Gamma Knife Stereotactic Radiosurgery as Salvage Therapy After Failure of Whole-Brain Radiotherapy in Patients With Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Sunit; Chan, Michael D.; Lovato, James F.; Ellis, Thomas L.; Tatter, Stephen B.; Bourland, J. Daniel; Munley, Michael T.; Guzman, Allan F. de; Shaw, Edward G.; Urbanic, James J.; McMullen, Kevin P.

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Radiosurgery has been successfully used in selected cases to avoid repeat whole-brain irradiation (WBI) in patients with multiple brain metastases of most solid tumor histological findings. Few data are available for the use of radiosurgery for small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). Methods and Materials: Between November 1999 and June 2009, 51 patients with SCLC and previous WBI and new brain metastases were treated with GammaKnife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKSRS). A median dose of 18 Gy (range, 10-24 Gy) was prescribed to the margin of each metastasis. Patients were followed with serial imaging. Patient electronic records were reviewed to determine disease-related factors and clinical outcomes after GKSRS. Local and distant brain failure rates, overall survival, and likelihood of neurologic death were determined based on imaging results. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to determine survival and local and distant brain control. Cox proportional hazard regression was performed to determine strength of association between disease-related factors and survival. Results: Median survival time for the entire cohort was 5.9 months. Local control rates at 1 and 2 years were 57% and 34%, respectively. Distant brain failure rates at 1 and 2 years were 58% and 75%, respectively. Fifty-three percent of patients ultimately died of neurologic death. On multivariate analysis, patients with stable (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.89) or progressive (HR = 6.98) extracranial disease (ECD) had worse overall survival than patients without evidence of ECD (p = 0.00002). Concurrent chemotherapy improved local control (HR = 89; p = 0.006). Conclusions: GKSRS represents a feasible salvage option in patients with SCLC and brain metastases for whom previous WBI has failed. The status of patients' ECD is a dominant factor predictive of overall survival. Local control may be inferior to that seen with other cancer histological results, although the use of concurrent chemotherapy may help to improve

  17. Intraoperative brain cancer detection with Raman spectroscopy in humans.

    PubMed

    Jermyn, Michael; Mok, Kelvin; Mercier, Jeanne; Desroches, Joannie; Pichette, Julien; Saint-Arnaud, Karl; Bernstein, Liane; Guiot, Marie-Christine; Petrecca, Kevin; Leblond, Frederic

    2015-02-11

    Cancers are often impossible to visually distinguish from normal tissue. This is critical for brain cancer where residual invasive cancer cells frequently remain after surgery, leading to disease recurrence and a negative impact on overall survival. No preoperative or intraoperative technology exists to identify all cancer cells that have invaded normal brain. To address this problem, we developed a handheld contact Raman spectroscopy probe technique for live, local detection of cancer cells in the human brain. Using this probe intraoperatively, we were able to accurately differentiate normal brain from dense cancer and normal brain invaded by cancer cells, with a sensitivity of 93% and a specificity of 91%. This Raman-based probe enabled detection of the previously undetectable diffusely invasive brain cancer cells at cellular resolution in patients with grade 2 to 4 gliomas. This intraoperative technology may therefore be able to classify cell populations in real time, making it an ideal guide for surgical resection and decision-making.

  18. Quality of life in patients with primary and metastatic brain cancer as reported in the literature using the EORTC QLQ-BN20 and QLQ-C30.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Leonard; Chiu, Nicholas; Zeng, Liang; Zhang, Liying; Popovic, Marko; Chow, Ronald; Lam, Henry; Poon, Michael; Chow, Edward

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this study is to compare the differences in quality of life (QoL) as assessed by the QLQ-BN20 and QLQ-C30 in patients with primary and metastatic brain neoplasms. A systematic literature search was conducted over the OvidSP platform in MEDLINE (1980-2012) and EMBASE (1980-2012). Studies in which the QLQ-BN20 was used as a QoL assessment for patients with malignant brain tumors (either metastatic or primary) were included in the study. Articles were included if they reported scores of at least one subscale of the QLQ-C30 or QLQ-BN20. The weighted means of the QLQ-BN20 and QLQ-C30 subscales were calculated based on sample size for included studies. Weighted analysis of variance was conducted to compare these scores in primary and metastatic brain patients. A p-value of < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. A total of 14 studies (16 arms: three brain metastases and 13 primary brain tumors) were identified and included in the data analysis. Fifteen of the 16 arms included QLQ-C30 scores along with QLQ-BN20 scores. Performance status of patients in both cohorts was similar. Patients with primary brain tumors and brain metastases had the following findings: physical functioning (weighted mean: 79.18 vs 74.93), global QoL (61.88 vs 59.44), role functioning (67.37 vs 75.00) and emotional functioning (70.44 vs 71.86); but none of them were statistically significantly different. Only cognitive functioning from the QLQ-C30 was significantly worse in patients with primary brain tumors (p-value = 0.0199). Despite cognitive function being significantly worse in patients with primary brain tumors, patients with metastatic brain tumors and patients with primary brain tumors have very similar QoL profiles. The study is limited by the large discrepancy in cohort sizes (1260 patients with primary brain cancer vs 183 patients with brain metastases) and the lack of clinical data.

  19. Unexpected detection of brain metastases by 18F-NaF PET/CT in a patient with lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiang; Zhu, Hong; Ji, Hengshan

    2013-11-01

    In recent years, the inconsistent supply of (99m)Tc and the increasingly widespread use of PET/CT have led to a renewed interest in PET/CT bone scans using (18)F-NaF. Recently, a 64-year-old man with biopsy-proven lung cancer underwent an (18)F-NaF PET/CT bone scan due to a shortage of (99m)Tc. Unexpectedly, multiple nodular foci of increased tracer uptake were present in the brain, whereas there were no definitive bone metastases detected. Subsequently, brain MRI confirmed the presence of brain metastases.

  20. Gender, Race, and Survival: A Study in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Brain Metastases Patients Utilizing the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Recursive Partitioning Analysis Classification

    SciTech Connect

    Videtic, Gregory M.M.; Reddy, Chandana A.; Chao, Samuel T.; Rice, Thomas W.; Adelstein, David J.; Barnett, Gene H.; Mekhail, Tarek M.; Vogelbaum, Michael A.; Suh, John H.

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: To explore whether gender and race influence survival in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in patients with brain metastases, using our large single-institution brain tumor database and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) brain metastases classification. Methods and materials: A retrospective review of a single-institution brain metastasis database for the interval January 1982 to September 2004 yielded 835 NSCLC patients with brain metastases for analysis. Patient subsets based on combinations of gender, race, and RPA class were then analyzed for survival differences. Results: Median follow-up was 5.4 months (range, 0-122.9 months). There were 485 male patients (M) (58.4%) and 346 female patients (F) (41.6%). Of the 828 evaluable patients (99%), 143 (17%) were black/African American (B) and 685 (83%) were white/Caucasian (W). Median survival time (MST) from time of brain metastasis diagnosis for all patients was 5.8 months. Median survival time by gender (F vs. M) and race (W vs. B) was 6.3 months vs. 5.5 months (p = 0.013) and 6.0 months vs. 5.2 months (p = 0.08), respectively. For patients stratified by RPA class, gender, and race, MST significantly favored BFs over BMs in Class II: 11.2 months vs. 4.6 months (p = 0.021). On multivariable analysis, significant variables were gender (p = 0.041, relative risk [RR] 0.83) and RPA class (p < 0.0001, RR 0.28 for I vs. III; p < 0.0001, RR 0.51 for II vs. III) but not race. Conclusions: Gender significantly influences NSCLC brain metastasis survival. Race trended to significance in overall survival but was not significant on multivariable analysis. Multivariable analysis identified gender and RPA classification as significant variables with respect to survival.

  1. Brain metastases from breast cancer during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ashish; Nguyen, Ha Son; Lozen, Andrew; Sharma, Abhishiek; Mueller, Wade

    2016-01-01

    Background: Brain metastasis during pregnancy is a rare occurrence. In particular, there have only been three prior cases regarding breast cancer metastasis. We report a patient with breast cancer metastasis to the brain during pregnancy and review the literature. Case Description: The patient was a 35-year-old female with a history of breast cancer (estrogen receptor/progesterone receptor negative, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2/neu positive, status post-neoadjuvant docetaxel/carboplatin/trastuzumab/pertuzumab therapy, status post-bilateral mastectomies), and prior right frontal brain metastases (status post-resection, capecitabine/lapatinib/temozolomide therapy, and cyberknife treatment). Patient was found to be pregnant at 9 weeks’ gestation while on chemotherapy; the patient elected to continue with the pregnancy and chemotherapy was discontinued. At 14 weeks’ gestation, she returned with recurrent right frontal disease. She was taken for a craniotomy at 16 weeks’ gestation, which confirmed metastases. Six weeks later, patient returned with worsening headaches and fatigue, with more recurrent right frontal disease. She was started on decadron and chemotherapy (5-fluorouracil, adriamycin, and cyclophosphamide). Serial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated enlarging right frontal lesions. She underwent a craniotomy at 27 weeks’ gestation, and chemotherapy was discontinued promptly. Starting at 30 weeks’ gestation, she received whole brain radiation for 2 weeks. Subsequently, she delivered a baby girl via cesarean section at 32 weeks’ gestation. At 6 weeks follow-up, an MRI brain demonstrated no new intracranial disease, with stable postoperative findings. Conclusion: There is a lack of guidelines and clinical consensus on medical and surgical treatment for breast cancer metastases in pregnant patients. Treatment usually varies based upon underlying tumor burden, location, gestational age of the fetus, and patient's preference and

  2. Role of the neural niche in brain metastatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Termini, John; Neman, Josh; Jandial, Rahul

    2014-08-01

    Metastasis is the relentless pursuit of cancer to escape its primary site and colonize distant organs. This malignant evolutionary process is biologically heterogeneous, yet one unifying element is the critical role of the microenvironment for arriving metastatic cells. Historically, brain metastases were rarely investigated because patients with advanced cancer were considered terminal. Fortunately, advances in molecular therapies have led to patients living longer with metastatic cancer. However, one site remains recalcitrant to our treatment efforts, the brain. The central nervous system is the most complex biologic system, which poses unique obstacles but also harbors opportunities for discovery. Much of what we know about the brain microenvironment comes from neuroscience. We suggest that the interrelated cellular responses in traumatic brain injury may guide us toward new perspectives in understanding brain metastases. In this view, brain metastases may be conceptualized as progressive oncologic injury to the nervous system. This review discusses our evolving understanding of bidirectional interactions between the brain milieu and metastatic cancer.

  3. Motexafin Gadolinium Combined With Prompt Whole Brain Radiotherapy Prolongs Time to Neurologic Progression in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Patients With Brain Metastases: Results of a Phase III Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, Minesh P. Shapiro, William R.; Phan, See C.; Gervais, Radj; Carrie, Christian; Chabot, Pierre; Patchell, Roy A.; Glantz, Michael J.; Recht, Lawrence; Langer, Corey; Sur, Ranjan K.; Roa, Wilson H.; Mahe, Marc A.; Fortin, Andre; Nieder, Carsten; Meyers, Christina A.; Smith, Jennifer A.; Miller, Richard A.; Renschler, Markus F.

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: To determine the efficacy of motexafin gadolinium (MGd) in combination with whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) for the treatment of brain metastases from non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: In an international, randomized, Phase III study, patients with brain metastases from non-small-cell lung cancer were randomized to WBRT with or without MGd. The primary endpoint was the interval to neurologic progression, determined by a centralized Events Review Committee who was unaware of the treatment the patients had received. Results: Of 554 patients, 275 were randomized to WBRT and 279 to WBRT+MGd. Treatment with MGd was well tolerated, and 92% of the intended doses were administered. The most common MGd-related Grade 3+ adverse events included liver function abnormalities (5.5%), asthenia (4.0%), and hypertension (4%). MGd improved the interval to neurologic progression compared with WBRT alone (15 vs. 10 months; p = 0.12, hazard ratio [HR] = 0.78) and the interval to neurocognitive progression (p = 0.057, HR = 0.78). The WBRT patients required more salvage brain surgery or radiosurgery than did the WBRT+MGd patients (54 vs. 25 salvage procedures, p < 0.001). A statistically significant interaction between the geographic region and MGd treatment effect (which was in the prespecified analysis plan) and between treatment delay and MGd treatment effect was found. In North American patients, where treatment was more prompt, a statistically significant prolongation of the interval to neurologic progression, from 8.8 months for WBRT to 24.2 months for WBRT+MGd (p = 0.004, HR = 0.53), and the interval to neurocognitive progression (p = 0.06, HR = 0.73) were observed. Conclusion: In the intent-to-treat analysis, MGd exhibited a favorable trend in neurologic outcomes. MGd significantly prolonged the interval to neurologic progression in non-small-cell lung cancer patients with brain metastases receiving prompt WBRT. The toxicity was acceptable.

  4. Long-Term Survival in Patients With Synchronous, Solitary Brain Metastasis From Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Flannery, Todd W.; Suntharalingam, Mohan; Regine, William F.; Chin, Lawrence S.; Krasna, Mark J.; Shehata, Michael K.; Edelman, Martin J.; Kremer, Marnie; Patchell, Roy A.; Kwok, Young

    2008-09-01

    Purpose: To report the outcome of patients with synchronous, solitary brain metastasis from non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKSRS). Patients and Methods: Forty-two patients diagnosed with synchronous, solitary brain metastasis from NSCLC were treated with GKSRS between 1993 and 2006. The median Karnofsky performance status (KPS) was 90. Patients had thoracic Stage I-III disease (American Joint Committee on Cancer 2002 guidelines). Definitive thoracic therapy was delivered to 26/42 (62%) patients; 9 patients underwent chemotherapy and radiation, 12 patients had surgical resection, and 5 patients underwent preoperative chemoradiation and surgical resection. Results: The median overall survival (OS) was 18 months. The 1-, 2-, and 5-year actuarial OS rates were 71.3%, 34.1%, and 21%, respectively. For patients who underwent definitive thoracic therapy, the median OS was 26.4 months compared with 13.1 months for those who had nondefinitive therapy, and the 5-year actuarial OS was 34.6% vs. 0% (p < 0.0001). Median OS was significantly longer for patients with a KPS {>=}90 vs. KPS < 90 (27.8 months vs. 13.1 months, p < 0.0001). The prognostic factors significant on multivariate analysis were definitive thoracic therapy (p = 0.020) and KPS (p = 0.001). Conclusions: This is one of the largest series of patients diagnosed with synchronous, solitary brain metastasis from NSCLC treated with GKSRS. Definitive thoracic therapy and KPS significantly impacted OS. The 5-year OS of 21% demonstrates the potential for long-term survival in patients treated with GKSRS; therefore, patients with good KPS should be considered for definitive thoracic therapy.

  5. Adding Chemotherapy to Radiation Improves Survival for Some Patients with Rare Brain Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Long-term results from two clinical trials confirm that certain patients with anaplastic oligodendrogliomas live substantially longer if they are treated with a combination of chemotherapy and radiation therapy rather than radiatiation alone.

  6. Prophylactic cranial irradiation for preventing brain metastases in patients undergoing radical treatment for non-small-cell lung cancer: A Cochrane Review

    SciTech Connect

    Lester, Jason Francis . E-mail: jason.lester@velindre-tr.wales.nhs.uk; MacBeth, Fergus R.; Coles, Bernadette

    2005-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) has a role in the management of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with curative intent. Methods and Materials: A search strategy was designed to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing PCI with no PCI in NSCLC patients treated with curative intent. The electronic databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, and Cancerlit were searched, along with relevant journals, books, and review articles to identify potentially eligible trials. Four RCTs were identified and reviewed. A total of 951 patients were randomized in these RCTs, of whom 833 were evaluable and reported. Forty-two patients with small-cell lung cancer were excluded, leaving 791 patients in total. Because of the small patient numbers and trial heterogeneity, no meta-analysis was attempted. Results: Prophylactic cranial irradiation did significantly reduce the incidence of brain metastases in three trials. No trial reported a survival advantage with PCI over observation. Toxicity data were poorly collected and no quality of life assessments were carried out in any trial. Conclusion: Prophylactic cranial irradiation may reduce the incidence of brain metastases, but there is no evidence of a survival benefit. It was not possible to evaluate whether any radiotherapy regimen is superior, and the effect of PCI on quality of life is not known. There is insufficient evidence to support the use of PCI in clinical practice. Where possible, patients should be offered entry into a clinical trial.

  7. Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Brain Metastases From Primary Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kased, Norbert; Binder, Devin K.; McDermott, Michael W.; Nakamura, Jean L.; Huang, Kim; Berger, Mitchel S.; Wara, William M.; Sneed, Penny K.

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: The relative roles of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) vs. whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) in the treatment of patients with brain metastases from breast cancer remain undefined. In this study, we reviewed our experience with these patients. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed all patients treated between 1991 and 2005 with Gamma Knife SRS for brain metastases from breast cancer. The actuarial survival and freedom from progression endpoints were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Between 1991 and 2005, 176 patients underwent SRS for brain metastases from breast cancer. The median survival time was 16.0 months for 95 newly diagnosed patients and 11.7 months for 81 patients with recurrent brain metastases. In the newly diagnosed patients, omission of upfront WBRT did not significantly affect the MST (p = .20), brain freedom from progression (p = .75), or freedom from new brain metastases (p = .83). Longer survival was associated with age <50 years, Karnofsky performance score >=70, primary tumor control, estrogen receptor positivity, and Her2/neu overexpression. No association was found between the number of treated brain metastases and the survival time. Conclusion: We have described prognostic factors for breast cancer patients treated with SRS for newly diagnosed or recurrent brain metastases. Most patient subsets had a median survival time of >=11 months. Unexpectedly, upfront WBRT did not appear to improve brain freedom from progression, and a larger number of brain metastases was not associated with a shorter survival time. Breast cancer might be distinct from other primary sites in terms of prognostic factors and the roles of WBRT and SRS for brain metastases.

  8. Irradiation of the potential cancer stem cell niches in the adult brain improves progression-free survival of patients with malignant glioma

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Glioblastoma is the most common brain tumor in adults. The mechanisms leading to glioblastoma are not well understood but animal studies support that inactivation of tumor suppressor genes in neural stem cells (NSC) is required and sufficient to induce glial cancers. This suggests that the NSC niches in the brain may harbor cancer stem cells (CSCs), Thus providing novel therapy targets. We hypothesize that higher radiation doses to these NSC niches improve patient survival by eradicating CSCs. Methods 55 adult patients with Grade 3 or Grade 4 glial cancer treated with radiotherapy at UCLA between February of 2003 and May of 2009 were included in this retrospective study. Using radiation planning software and patient radiological records, the SVZ and SGL were reconstructed for each of these patients and dosimetry data for these structures was calculated. Results Using Kaplan-Meier analysis we show that patients whose bilateral subventricular zone (SVZ) received greater than the median SVZ dose (= 43 Gy) had a significant improvement in progression-free survival if compared to patients who received less than the median dose (15.0 vs 7.2 months PFS; P = 0.028). Furthermore, a mean dose >43 Gy to the bilateral SVZ yielded a hazard ratio of 0.73 (P = 0.019). Importantly, similarly analyzing total prescription dose failed to illustrate a statistically significant impact. Conclusions Our study leads us to hypothesize that in glioma targeted radiotherapy of the stem cell niches in the adult brain could yield significant benefits over radiotherapy of the primary tumor mass alone and that damage caused by smaller fractions of radiation maybe less efficiently detected by the DNA repair mechanisms in CSCs. PMID:20663133

  9. The impact of brain metastasis on quality of life, resource utilization and survival in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Peters, Solange; Bexelius, Christin; Munk, Veronica; Leighl, Natasha

    2016-04-01

    This systematic review aims to improve understanding of the burden of disease associated with brain metastases from non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in terms of survival, quality of life (QoL) and economic impact. PubMed/MEDLINE, Cochrane collaboration and EMBASE databases were searched for articles published in English from 2000 to 2014. Of 3288 abstracts retrieved, 3156 were eliminated without a full-text review. Of the 132 articles that received a full-text review, a final set of 93 articles was included in an initial literature analysis. In order to homogenize the patient populations evaluated, we included entries that were either entirely composed of NSCLC patients or that had >50% of NSCLC patients in the total study population. From the studies identified in this systematic review, median OS and PFS varied based on the type of treatment received, although whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) was associated with the shortest OS and PFS durations. Regimens incorporating targeted therapy in molecularly selected patients were associated with the longest OS and PFS durations. QoL findings varied among studies, generally WBRT resulted in stable or worsening QoL scores rather than improvements. Healthcare costs were increased following diagnosis of brain metastases regardless of treatment. The findings from this review highlight the need for more effective treatments of brain metastases from NSCLC that improve survival function, QoL and potentially decrease costs. PMID:27019457

  10. The impact of brain metastasis on quality of life, resource utilization and survival in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Peters, Solange; Bexelius, Christin; Munk, Veronica; Leighl, Natasha

    2016-04-01

    This systematic review aims to improve understanding of the burden of disease associated with brain metastases from non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in terms of survival, quality of life (QoL) and economic impact. PubMed/MEDLINE, Cochrane collaboration and EMBASE databases were searched for articles published in English from 2000 to 2014. Of 3288 abstracts retrieved, 3156 were eliminated without a full-text review. Of the 132 articles that received a full-text review, a final set of 93 articles was included in an initial literature analysis. In order to homogenize the patient populations evaluated, we included entries that were either entirely composed of NSCLC patients or that had >50% of NSCLC patients in the total study population. From the studies identified in this systematic review, median OS and PFS varied based on the type of treatment received, although whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) was associated with the shortest OS and PFS durations. Regimens incorporating targeted therapy in molecularly selected patients were associated with the longest OS and PFS durations. QoL findings varied among studies, generally WBRT resulted in stable or worsening QoL scores rather than improvements. Healthcare costs were increased following diagnosis of brain metastases regardless of treatment. The findings from this review highlight the need for more effective treatments of brain metastases from NSCLC that improve survival function, QoL and potentially decrease costs.

  11. N-Terminal Pro-Brain Natriuretic Peptide Is Associated with a Future Diagnosis of Cancer in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tarín, Nieves; Cristóbal, Carmen; Lorenzo, Óscar; Blanco-Colio, Luis; Martín-Ventura, José Luis; Huelmos, Ana; Alonso, Joaquín; Aceña, Álvaro; Pello, Ana; Carda, Rocío; Asensio, Dolores; Mahíllo-Fernández, Ignacio; López Bescós, Lorenzo; Egido, Jesús; Farré, Jerónimo

    2015-01-01

    Objective Several papers have reported elevated plasma levels of natriuretic peptides in patients with a previous diagnosis of cancer. We have explored whether N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) plasma levels predict a future diagnosis of cancer in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Methods We studied 699 patients with CAD free of cancer. At baseline, NT-proBNP, galectin-3, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, soluble tumor necrosis factor-like weak inducer of apoptosis, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and high-sensitivity cardiac troponin I plasma levels were assessed. The primary outcome was new cancer diagnosis. The secondary outcome was cancer diagnosis, heart failure requiring hospitalization, or death. Results After 2.15±0.98 years of follow-up, 24 patients developed cancer. They were older (68.5 [61.5, 75.8] vs 60.0 [52.0, 72.0] years; p=0.011), had higher NT-proBNP (302.0 [134.8, 919.8] vs 165.5 [87.4, 407.5] pg/ml; p=0.040) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (3.27 [1.33, 5.94] vs 1.92 [0.83, 4.00] mg/L; p=0.030), and lower triglyceride (92.5 [70.5, 132.8] vs 112.0 [82.0, 157.0] mg/dl; p=0.044) plasma levels than those without cancer. NT-proBNP (Hazard Ratio [HR]=1.030; 95% Confidence Interval [CI]=1.008-1.053; p=0.007) and triglyceride levels (HR=0.987; 95%CI=0.975-0.998; p=0.024) were independent predictors of a new cancer diagnosis (multivariate Cox regression analysis). When patients in whom the suspicion of cancer appeared in the first one-hundred days after blood extraction were excluded, NT-proBNP was the only predictor of cancer (HR=1.061; 95%CI=1.034-1.088; p<0.001). NT-proBNP was an independent predictor of cancer, heart failure, or death (HR=1.038; 95%CI=1.023-1.052; p<0.001) along with age, and use of insulin and acenocumarol. Conclusions NT-proBNP is an independent predictor of malignancies in patients with CAD. New studies in large populations are needed to confirm these findings. PMID:26046344

  12. A technique to re-establish dose distributions for previously treated brain cancer patients in external beam radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yue, Ning J.; Knisely, Jonathan; Studholme, Colin; Chen Zhe; Bond, James E.; Nath, Ravinder

    2004-03-31

    Tumor recurrences or new tumors may develop after irradiation of local lesion(s) in the brain, and additional radiotherapy treatments are often needed for previously treated patients. It is critical to re-establish the dose distributions delivered during the previous treatment in the current patient geometry, so that the previous dose distributions can be accurately taken into consideration in the design of the current treatment plan. The difficulty in re-establishing the previous treatment dose distributions in the current patient geometry arises from the fact that the patient position at the time of reirradiation is different from that at the previous treatment session. Simple re-entry of the previous isocenter coordinates, gantry, and couch and collimator angles into the new treatment plan would result in incorrect beam orientations relative to the new patient anatomy, and therefore incorrect display of the previous dose distributions on the current patient anatomy. To address this issue, a method has been developed so that the previous dose distributions can be accurately re-established in the framework of the current brain treatment. The method involves 3 matrix transformations: (1) transformation of beams from machine coordinate system to patient coordinate system in the previous treatment; (2) transformation of beams from patient coordinate system in the previous treatment to patient coordinate system in the current treatment; and (3) transformation of beams from patient coordinate system in the current treatment to machine coordinate system. The transformation matrices used in the second transformation are determined by registration using a mutual information-based algorithm with which the old and new computed tomography (CT) scan sets are registered automatically without human interpretation. A series of transformation matrices are derived to calculate the isocenter coordinates, the gantry, couch, and collimator angles of the beams for the previous

  13. Delayed Development of Brain Abscesses Following Stent-Graft Placement in a Head and Neck Cancer Patient Presenting with Carotid Blowout Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Oweis, Yaseen; Gemmete, Joseph J. Chaudhary, Neeraj; Pandey, Aditya; Ansari, Sameer

    2011-02-15

    We describe the delayed development of intracranial abscesses following emergent treatment with a covered stent-graft for carotid blowout syndrome (CBS) in a patient with head and neck cancer. The patient presented with hemoptysis and frank arterial bleeding through the tracheostomy site. A self-expandable stent-graft was deployed across a small pseudoaneurysm arising from the right common carotid artery (RCCA) and resulted in immediate hemostasis. Three months later, the patient suffered a recurrent hemorrhage. CT of the neck demonstrated periluminal fluid around the caudal aspect of the stent-graft with intraluminal thrombus and a small pseudoaneurysm. Subsequently, the patient underwent a balloon test occlusion study and endovascular sacrifice of the RCCA and right internal carotid artery. MRI of the brain demonstrated at least four ring-enhancing lesions within the right cerebral hemisphere consistent with intracranial abscesses that resolved with broad-spectrum antibiotic coverage.

  14. Computational systems biology in cancer brain metastasis.

    PubMed

    Peng, Huiming; Tan, Hua; Zhao, Weiling; Jin, Guangxu; Sharma, Sambad; Xing, Fei; Watabe, Kounosuke; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2016-01-01

    Brain metastases occur in 20-40% of patients with advanced malignancies. A better understanding of the mechanism of this disease will help us to identify novel therapeutic strategies. In this review, we will discuss the systems biology approaches used in this area, including bioinformatics and mathematical modeling. Bioinformatics has been used for identifying the molecular mechanisms driving brain metastasis and mathematical modeling methods for analyzing dynamics of a system and predicting optimal therapeutic strategies. We will illustrate the strategies, procedures, and computational techniques used for studying systems biology in cancer brain metastases. We will give examples on how to use a systems biology approach to analyze a complex disease. Some of the approaches used to identify relevant networks, pathways, and possibly biomarkers in metastasis will be reviewed into details. Finally, certain challenges and possible future directions in this area will also be discussed.

  15. A Melanoma Brain Metastasis with a Donor-Patient Hybrid Genome following Bone Marrow Transplantation: First Evidence for Fusion in Human Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Duvall, Eric; Spoelstra, Nicole; Klump, Vincent; Sznol, Mario; Cooper, Dennis; Spritz, Richard A.; Chang, Joseph T.; Pawelek, John M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Tumor cell fusion with motile bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs) has long been posited as a mechanism for cancer metastasis. While there is much support for this from cell culture and animal studies, it has yet to be confirmed in human cancer, as tumor and marrow-derived cells from the same patient cannot be easily distinguished genetically. Methods We carried out genotyping of a metastatic melanoma to the brain that arose following allogeneic bone-marrow transplantation (BMT), using forensic short tandem repeat (STR) length-polymorphisms to distinguish donor and patient genomes. Tumor cells were isolated free of leucocytes by laser microdissection, and tumor and pre-transplant blood lymphocyte DNAs were analyzed for donor and patient alleles at 14 autosomal STR loci and the sex chromosomes. Results All alleles in the donor and patient pre-BMT lymphocytes were found in tumor cells. The alleles showed disproportionate relative abundances in similar patterns throughout the tumor, indicating the tumor was initiated by a clonal fusion event. Conclusions Our results strongly support fusion between a BMDC and a tumor cell playing a role in the origin of this metastasis. Depending on the frequency of such events, the findings could have important implications for understanding the generation of metastases, including the origins of tumor initiating cells and the cancer epigenome. PMID:23840523

  16. Stacking denoising auto-encoders in a deep network to segment the brainstem on MRI in brain cancer patients: A clinical study.

    PubMed

    Dolz, Jose; Betrouni, Nacim; Quidet, Mathilde; Kharroubi, Dris; Leroy, Henri A; Reyns, Nicolas; Massoptier, Laurent; Vermandel, Maximilien

    2016-09-01

    Delineation of organs at risk (OARs) is a crucial step in surgical and treatment planning in brain cancer, where precise OARs volume delineation is required. However, this task is still often manually performed, which is time-consuming and prone to observer variability. To tackle these issues a deep learning approach based on stacking denoising auto-encoders has been proposed to segment the brainstem on magnetic resonance images in brain cancer context. Additionally to classical features used in machine learning to segment brain structures, two new features are suggested. Four experts participated in this study by segmenting the brainstem on 9 patients who underwent radiosurgery. Analysis of variance on shape and volume similarity metrics indicated that there were significant differences (p<0.05) between the groups of manual annotations and automatic segmentations. Experimental evaluation also showed an overlapping higher than 90% with respect to the ground truth. These results are comparable, and often higher, to those of the state of the art segmentation methods but with a considerably reduction of the segmentation time. PMID:27236370

  17. Feasibility of Non-invasive Brain Modulation for Management of Pain Related to Chemoradiotherapy in Patients with Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiao-Su; Fisher, Clayton A.; Munz, Stephanie M.; Toback, Rebecca L.; Nascimento, Thiago D.; Bellile, Emily L.; Rozek, Laura; Eisbruch, Avraham; Worden, Francis P.; Danciu, Theodora E.; DaSilva, Alexandre F.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with head and neck cancer often experience a significant decrease in their quality of life during chemoradiotherapy (CRT) due to treatment-related pain, which is frequently classified as severe. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a method of non-invasive brain stimulation that has been frequently used in experimental and clinical pain studies. In this pilot study, we investigated the clinical impact and central mechanisms of twenty primary motor cortex (M1) stimulation sessions with tDCS during 7 weeks of CRT for head and neck cancer. From 48 patients screened, seven met the inclusion criteria and were enrolled. Electroencephalography (EEG) data were recorded before and after tDCS stimulation as well as across the trial to monitor short and long-term impact on brain function. The compliance rate during the long trial was extremely high (98.4%), and patients mostly reported mild side effects in line with the literature (e.g., tingling). Compared to a large standard of care study from our institution, our initial results indicate that M1-tDCS stimulation has a pain relief effect during the CRT that resulted in a significant attenuation of weight reduction and dysphagia normally observed in these patients. These results translated to our patient cohort not needing feeding tubes or IV fluids. Power spectra analysis of EEG data indicated significant changes in α, β, and γ bands immediately after tDCS stimulation and, in addition, α, δ, and θ bands over the long term in the seventh stimulation week (p < 0.05). The independent component EEG clustering analysis showed estimated functional brain regions including precuneus and superior frontal gyrus (SFG) in the seventh week of tDCS stimulation. These areas colocalize with our previous positron emission tomography (PET) study where there was activation in the endogenous μ-opioid system during M1-tDCS. This study provides preliminary evidence demonstrating the feasibility and safety of M1-t

  18. Breast cancer brain metastases: new directions in systemic therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Nancy U

    2013-01-01

    The management of patients with brain metastases from breast cancer continues to be a major clinical challenge. The standard initial therapeutic approach depends upon the size, location, and number of metastatic lesions and includes consideration of surgical resection, whole-brain radiotherapy, and stereotactic radiosurgery. As systemic therapies for control of extracranial disease improve, patients are surviving long enough to experience subsequent progression events in the brain. Therefore, there is an increasing need to identify both more effective initial treatments as well as to develop multiple lines of salvage treatments for patients with breast cancer brain metastases. This review summarises the clinical experience to date with respect to cytotoxic and targeted systemic therapies for the treatment of brain metastases, highlights ongoing and planned trials of novel approaches and identifies potential targets for future investigation. PMID:23662165

  19. Brain metastasis from ovarian cancer: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Pakneshan, Shabnam; Safarpour, Damoun; Tavassoli, Fattaneh; Jabbari, Bahman

    2014-08-01

    To review the existing literature on brain metastasis (BM) from ovarian cancer and to assess the frequency, anatomical, clinical and paraclinical information and factors associated with prognosis. Ovarian cancer is a rare cause of brain metastasis with a recently reported increasing prevalence. Progressive neurologic disability and poor prognosis is common. A comprehensive review on this subject has not been published previously. This systematic literature search used the Pubmed and Yale library. A total of 66 publications were found, 57 of which were used representing 591 patients with BM from ovarian cancer. The median age of the patients was 54.3 years (range 20-81). A majority of patients (57.3 %) had multiple brain lesions. The location of the lesion was cerebellar (30 %), frontal (20 %), parietal (18 %) and occipital (11 %). Extracranial metastasis was present in 49.8 % of cases involving liver (20.7 %), lung (20.4 %), lymph nodes (12.6 %), bones (6.6 %) and pelvic organs (4.3 %). The most common symptoms were weakness (16 %), seizures (11 %), altered mentality (11 %) visual disturbances (9 %) and dizziness (8 %). The interval from diagnosis of breast cancer to BM ranged from 0 to 133 months (median 24 months) and median survival was 8.2 months. Local radiation, surgical resection, stereotactic radiosurgery and medical therapy were used. Factors that significantly increased the survival were younger age at the time of ovarian cancer diagnosis and brain metastasis diagnosis, lower grade of the primary tumor, higher KPS score and multimodality treatment for the brain metastases. Ovarian cancer is a rare cause of brain metastasis. Development of brain metastasis among older patients and lower KPS score correlate with less favorable prognosis. The more prolonged survival after using multimodality treatment for brain metastasis is important due to potential impact on management of brain metastasis in future.

  20. Bevacizumab in Reducing CNS Side Effects in Patients Who Have Undergone Radiation Therapy to the Brain for Primary Brain Tumor, Meningioma, or Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-21

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Meningioma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumor; Adult Choroid Plexus Tumor; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Ependymoma; Adult Grade II Meningioma; Adult Grade III Meningioma; Adult Malignant Hemangiopericytoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Papillary Meningioma; Adult Pineocytoma; Malignant Neoplasm; Meningeal Melanocytoma; Radiation Toxicity; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage I Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage I Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage I Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage I Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage I Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  1. Brain metastases free survival differs between breast cancer subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Berghoff, A; Bago-Horvath, Z; De Vries, C; Dubsky, P; Pluschnig, U; Rudas, M; Rottenfusser, A; Knauer, M; Eiter, H; Fitzal, F; Dieckmann, K; Mader, R M; Gnant, M; Zielinski, C C; Steger, G G; Preusser, M; Bartsch, R

    2012-01-01

    Background: Brain metastases (BM) are frequently diagnosed in patients with HER-2-positive metastatic breast cancer; in addition, an increasing incidence was reported for triple-negative tumours. We aimed to compare brain metastases free survival (BMFS) of breast cancer subtypes in patients treated between 1996 until 2010. Methods: Brain metastases free survival was measured as the interval from diagnosis of extracranial breast cancer metastases until diagnosis of BM. HER-2 status was analysed by immunohistochemistry and reanalysed by fluorescent in situ hybridisation if a score of 2+ was gained. Oestrogen-receptor (ER) and progesterone-receptor (PgR) status was analysed by immunohistochemistry. Brain metastases free survival curves were estimated with the Kaplan–Meier method and compared with the log-rank test. Results: Data of 213 patients (46 luminal/124 HER-2/43 triple-negative subtype) with BM from breast cancer were available for the analysis. Brain metastases free survival differed significantly between breast cancer subtypes. Median BMFS in triple-negative tumours was 14 months (95% CI: 11.34–16.66) compared with 18 months (95% CI: 14.46–21.54) in HER-2-positive tumours (P=0.001) and 34 months (95% CI: 23.71–44.29) in luminal tumours (P=0.001), respectively. In HER-2-positive patients, co-positivity for ER and HER-2 prolonged BMFS (26 vs 15 m; P=0.033); in luminal tumours, co-expression of ER and PgR was not significantly associated with BMFS. Brain metastases free survival in patients with lung metastases was significantly shorter (17 vs 21 months; P=0.014). Conclusion: Brain metastases free survival in triple-negative breast cancer, as well as in HER-2-positive/ER-negative, is significantly shorter compared with HER-2/ER co-positive or luminal tumours, mirroring the aggressiveness of these breast cancer subtypes. PMID:22233926

  2. Translational Breast Cancer Research Consortium (TBCRC) 022: A Phase II Trial of Neratinib for Patients With Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2–Positive Breast Cancer and Brain Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Gelman, Rebecca S.; Wefel, Jeffrey S.; Melisko, Michelle E.; Hess, Kenneth R.; Connolly, Roisin M.; Van Poznak, Catherine H.; Niravath, Polly A.; Puhalla, Shannon L.; Ibrahim, Nuhad; Blackwell, Kimberly L.; Moy, Beverly; Herold, Christina; Liu, Minetta C.; Lowe, Alarice; Agar, Nathalie Y.R.; Ryabin, Nicole; Farooq, Sarah; Lawler, Elizabeth; Rimawi, Mothaffar F.; Krop, Ian E.; Wolff, Antonio C.; Winer, Eric P.; Lin, Nancy U.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Evidence-based treatments for metastatic, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)–positive breast cancer in the CNS are limited. Neratinib is an irreversible inhibitor of erbB1, HER2, and erbB4, with promising activity in HER2-positive breast cancer; however, its activity in the CNS is unknown. We evaluated the efficacy of treatment with neratinib in patients with HER2-positive breast cancer brain metastases in a multicenter, phase II open-label trial. Patients and Methods Eligible patients were those with HER2-positive brain metastases (≥ 1 cm in longest dimension) who experienced progression in the CNS after one or more line of CNS-directed therapy, such as whole-brain radiotherapy, stereotactic radiosurgery, and/or surgical resection. Patients received neratinib 240 mg orally once per day, and tumors were assessed every two cycles. The primary endpoint was composite CNS objective response rate (ORR), requiring all of the following: ≥50% reduction in volumetric sum of target CNS lesions and no progression of non-target lesions, new lesions, escalating corticosteroids, progressive neurologic signs/symptoms, or non-CNS progression—the threshold for success was five of 40 responders. Results Forty patients were enrolled between February 2012 and June 2013; 78% of patients had previous whole-brain radiotherapy. Three women achieved a partial response (CNS objective response rate, 8%; 95% CI, 2% to 22%). The median number of cycles received was two (range, one to seven cycles), with a median progression-free survival of 1.9 months. Five women received six or more cycles. The most common grade ≥ 3 event was diarrhea (occurring in 21% of patients taking prespecified loperamide prophylaxis and 28% of those without prophylaxis). Patients in the study experienced a decreased quality of life over time. Conclusion Although neratinib had low activity and did not meet our threshold for success, 12.5% of patients received six or more cycles. Studies

  3. Solitary brain metastasis of an occult and stable small-cell lung cancer in a schizophrenic patient: a 3-year control.

    PubMed

    Jesien-Lewandowicz, Emilia; Spych, Michal; Fijuth, Jacek; Kordek, Radzislaw

    2010-08-01

    Small-cell lung cancer is a highly aggressive carcinoma, with poorer prognosis in patients with brain metastases. We present the case of a 49-year-old woman diagnosed with a cerebellar tumour which, following surgery, was revealed to be a metastatic small-cell lung carcinoma. Subsequent CT and PET scanning showed a small, isolated 8 mm nodule in the upper lobe of the right lung. The patient was suffering from schizophrenia and has been treated with clozapine for 17 years. Because of the unusual presentation, there was no therapy given for the primary tumour at the time, and systemic therapy or surgery was discussed. However, 18 months later, the nodule was slightly larger (14 mm), and surgery was performed. On pathology examination, the tumour was presented as a typical small-cell carcinoma. Standard chest irradiation with systemic chemotherapy was given. At the time of writing, 39 months after diagnosis of metastatic small-cell carcinoma, the patient is disease free. However, this case is unusual in that a long-term observation of a small stable primary tumour in the lung took place without any therapy being given. This case strongly supports the thesis that small-cell lung cancer may comprise a heterogeneous group of tumours with different biological properties. The proapoptotic effect of clozapine may be also taken into account.

  4. Definitive Chemoradiation Therapy Following Surgical Resection or Radiosurgery Plus Whole-Brain Radiation Therapy in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients With Synchronous Solitary Brain Metastasis: A Curative Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Parlak, Cem; Mertsoylu, Hüseyin; Güler, Ozan Cem; Onal, Cem; Topkan, Erkan

    2014-03-15

    Purpose/Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of definitive thoracic chemoradiation therapy following surgery or stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) on the outcomes of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with synchronous solitary brain metastasis (SSBM). Methods and Materials: A total of 63 NSCLC patients with SSBM were retrospectively evaluated. Patients were staged using positron emission tomography-computed tomography in addition to conventional staging tools. Thoracic radiation therapy (TRT) with a total dose of 66 Gy in 2 Gy fractions was delivered along with 2 cycles of cisplatin-based chemotherapy following either surgery plus 30 Gy of WBRT (n=33) or SRS plus 30 Gy of WBRT (n=30) for BM. Results: Overall, the treatment was well tolerated. All patients received planned TRT, and 57 patients (90.5%) were also able to receive 2 cycles of chemotherapy. At a median follow-up of 25.3 months (7.1-52.1 months), the median months of overall, locoregional progression-free, neurological progression-free, and progression-free survival were 28.6, 17.7, 26.4, and 14.6, respectively. Both univariate and multivariate analyses revealed that patients with a T1-T2 thoracic disease burden (P=.001), a nodal stage of N0-N1 (P=.003), and no weight loss (P=.008) exhibited superior survival. Conclusions: In the present series, surgical and radiosurgical treatments directed toward SSBM in NSCLC patients were equally effective. The similarities between the present survival outcomes and those reported in other studies for locally advanced NSCLC patients indicate the potentially curative role of definitive chemoradiation therapy for highly selected patients with SSBM.

  5. Nearly Complete Response of Brain Metastases from HER2 Overexpressing Breast Cancer with Lapatinib and Capecitabine after Whole Brain Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Oktay, Esin; Yersal, Özlem; Meydan, Nezih; Sağıroğlu, Mehmet; Uyanık, Ömer; Barutca, Sabri

    2013-01-01

    Trastuzumab treatment does not prevent intracranial seeding and is largely ineffective for established central nervous system metastasis in HER2 overexpressing breast cancer patients. Combination therapy of lapatinib and capecitabine may be an effective treatment option for brain metastasis of HER2-positive breast cancer. We report a patient with breast cancer overexpressing HER-2 where brain metastases were successfully treated with radiation and a combination of lapatinib and capecitabine. PMID:24191208

  6. Anxiety in cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Stark, D P H; House, A

    2000-01-01

    Anxiety is common in cancer patient populations, and must often initially be recognized and managed by cancer care professionals. This article reviews the recent oncology and mental health literature on anxiety. The aim is to help those involved in cancer patient care who are not specialists in mental health to understand the nature of anxiety, and discriminate morbid from normal anxiety. We review recent research into the association of anxiety with events during diagnosis and management of cancer, highlighting the importance of the meaning of events to an individual as an important factor in making people anxious. Lastly we review management strategies which might be used by cancer care professionals, in particular the importance of an awareness of specific patterns of communication which may alleviate or maintain anxiety for some cancer patients. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:11044347

  7. Assessing the radiation-induced second cancer risk in proton therapy for pediatric brain tumors: the impact of employing a patient-specific aperture in pencil beam scanning.

    PubMed

    Geng, Changran; Moteabbed, Maryam; Xie, Yunhe; Schuemann, Jan; Yock, Torunn; Paganetti, Harald

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the radiation-induced second cancer risks for in-field and out-of-field organs and tissues for pencil beam scanning (PBS) and passive scattering proton therapy (PPT) and assess the impact of adding patient-specific apertures to sharpen the penumbra in pencil beam scanning for pediatric brain tumor patients. Five proton therapy plans were created for each of three pediatric patients using PPT as well as PBS with two spot sizes (average sigma of ~17 mm and ~8 mm at isocenter) and choice of patient-specific apertures. The lifetime attributable second malignancy risks for both in-field and out-of-field tissues and organs were compared among five delivery techniques. The risk for in-field tissues was calculated using the organ equivalent dose, which is determined by the dose volume histogram. For out-of-field organs, the organ-specific dose equivalent from secondary neutrons was calculated using Monte Carlo and anthropomorphic pediatric phantoms. We find that either for small spot size PBS or for large spot size PBS, a patient-specific aperture reduces the in-field cancer risk to values lower than that for PPT. The reduction for large spot sizes (on average 43%) is larger than for small spot sizes (on average 21%). For out-of-field organs, the risk varies only marginally by employing a patient-specific aperture (on average from  -2% to 16% with increasing distance from the tumor), but is still one to two orders of magnitude lower than that for PPT. In conclusion, when pencil beam spot sizes are large, the addition of apertures to sharpen the penumbra decreases the in-field radiation-induced secondary cancer risk. There is a slight increase in out-of-field cancer risk as a result of neutron scatter from the aperture, but this risk is by far outweighed by the in-field risk benefit from using an aperture with a large PBS spot size. In general, the risk for developing a second malignancy in out-of-field organs for PBS remains

  8. Assessing the radiation-induced second cancer risk in proton therapy for pediatric brain tumors: the impact of employing a patient-specific aperture in pencil beam scanning.

    PubMed

    Geng, Changran; Moteabbed, Maryam; Xie, Yunhe; Schuemann, Jan; Yock, Torunn; Paganetti, Harald

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the radiation-induced second cancer risks for in-field and out-of-field organs and tissues for pencil beam scanning (PBS) and passive scattering proton therapy (PPT) and assess the impact of adding patient-specific apertures to sharpen the penumbra in pencil beam scanning for pediatric brain tumor patients. Five proton therapy plans were created for each of three pediatric patients using PPT as well as PBS with two spot sizes (average sigma of ~17 mm and ~8 mm at isocenter) and choice of patient-specific apertures. The lifetime attributable second malignancy risks for both in-field and out-of-field tissues and organs were compared among five delivery techniques. The risk for in-field tissues was calculated using the organ equivalent dose, which is determined by the dose volume histogram. For out-of-field organs, the organ-specific dose equivalent from secondary neutrons was calculated using Monte Carlo and anthropomorphic pediatric phantoms. We find that either for small spot size PBS or for large spot size PBS, a patient-specific aperture reduces the in-field cancer risk to values lower than that for PPT. The reduction for large spot sizes (on average 43%) is larger than for small spot sizes (on average 21%). For out-of-field organs, the risk varies only marginally by employing a patient-specific aperture (on average from  -2% to 16% with increasing distance from the tumor), but is still one to two orders of magnitude lower than that for PPT. In conclusion, when pencil beam spot sizes are large, the addition of apertures to sharpen the penumbra decreases the in-field radiation-induced secondary cancer risk. There is a slight increase in out-of-field cancer risk as a result of neutron scatter from the aperture, but this risk is by far outweighed by the in-field risk benefit from using an aperture with a large PBS spot size. In general, the risk for developing a second malignancy in out-of-field organs for PBS remains

  9. Assessing the radiation-induced second cancer risk in proton therapy for pediatric brain tumors: the impact of employing a patient-specific aperture in pencil beam scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Changran; Moteabbed, Maryam; Xie, Yunhe; Schuemann, Jan; Yock, Torunn; Paganetti, Harald

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the radiation-induced second cancer risks for in-field and out-of-field organs and tissues for pencil beam scanning (PBS) and passive scattering proton therapy (PPT) and assess the impact of adding patient-specific apertures to sharpen the penumbra in pencil beam scanning for pediatric brain tumor patients. Five proton therapy plans were created for each of three pediatric patients using PPT as well as PBS with two spot sizes (average sigma of ~17 mm and ~8 mm at isocenter) and choice of patient-specific apertures. The lifetime attributable second malignancy risks for both in-field and out-of-field tissues and organs were compared among five delivery techniques. The risk for in-field tissues was calculated using the organ equivalent dose, which is determined by the dose volume histogram. For out-of-field organs, the organ-specific dose equivalent from secondary neutrons was calculated using Monte Carlo and anthropomorphic pediatric phantoms. We find that either for small spot size PBS or for large spot size PBS, a patient-specific aperture reduces the in-field cancer risk to values lower than that for PPT. The reduction for large spot sizes (on average 43%) is larger than for small spot sizes (on average 21%). For out-of-field organs, the risk varies only marginally by employing a patient-specific aperture (on average from  -2% to 16% with increasing distance from the tumor), but is still one to two orders of magnitude lower than that for PPT. In conclusion, when pencil beam spot sizes are large, the addition of apertures to sharpen the penumbra decreases the in-field radiation-induced secondary cancer risk. There is a slight increase in out-of-field cancer risk as a result of neutron scatter from the aperture, but this risk is by far outweighed by the in-field risk benefit from using an aperture with a large PBS spot size. In general, the risk for developing a second malignancy in out-of-field organs for PBS remains

  10. Targeted Therapies for Brain Metastases from Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Venur, Vyshak Alva; Leone, José Pablo

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of various driver pathways and targeted small molecule agents/antibodies have revolutionized the management of metastatic breast cancer. Currently, the major targets of clinical utility in breast cancer include the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor, mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, and the cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 (CDK-4/6) pathway. Brain metastasis, however, remains a thorn in the flesh, leading to morbidity, neuro-cognitive decline, and interruptions in the management of systemic disease. Approximately 20%-30% of patients with metastatic breast cancer develop brain metastases. Surgery, whole brain radiation therapy, and stereotactic radiosurgery are the traditional treatment options for patients with brain metastases. The therapeutic paradigm is changing due to better understanding of the blood brain barrier and the advent of tyrosine kinase inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies. Several of these agents are in clinical practice and several others are in early stage clinical trials. In this article, we will review the common targetable pathways in the management of breast cancer patients with brain metastases, and the current state of the clinical development of drugs against these pathways.

  11. Targeted Therapies for Brain Metastases from Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Venur, Vyshak Alva; Leone, José Pablo

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of various driver pathways and targeted small molecule agents/antibodies have revolutionized the management of metastatic breast cancer. Currently, the major targets of clinical utility in breast cancer include the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor, mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, and the cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 (CDK-4/6) pathway. Brain metastasis, however, remains a thorn in the flesh, leading to morbidity, neuro-cognitive decline, and interruptions in the management of systemic disease. Approximately 20%–30% of patients with metastatic breast cancer develop brain metastases. Surgery, whole brain radiation therapy, and stereotactic radiosurgery are the traditional treatment options for patients with brain metastases. The therapeutic paradigm is changing due to better understanding of the blood brain barrier and the advent of tyrosine kinase inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies. Several of these agents are in clinical practice and several others are in early stage clinical trials. In this article, we will review the common targetable pathways in the management of breast cancer patients with brain metastases, and the current state of the clinical development of drugs against these pathways. PMID:27649142

  12. Targeted Therapies for Brain Metastases from Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Venur, Vyshak Alva; Leone, José Pablo

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of various driver pathways and targeted small molecule agents/antibodies have revolutionized the management of metastatic breast cancer. Currently, the major targets of clinical utility in breast cancer include the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor, mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, and the cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 (CDK-4/6) pathway. Brain metastasis, however, remains a thorn in the flesh, leading to morbidity, neuro-cognitive decline, and interruptions in the management of systemic disease. Approximately 20%-30% of patients with metastatic breast cancer develop brain metastases. Surgery, whole brain radiation therapy, and stereotactic radiosurgery are the traditional treatment options for patients with brain metastases. The therapeutic paradigm is changing due to better understanding of the blood brain barrier and the advent of tyrosine kinase inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies. Several of these agents are in clinical practice and several others are in early stage clinical trials. In this article, we will review the common targetable pathways in the management of breast cancer patients with brain metastases, and the current state of the clinical development of drugs against these pathways. PMID:27649142

  13. Nanoparticles for imaging and treating brain cancer

    PubMed Central

    Meyers, Joseph D; Doane, Tennyson; Burda, Clemens; Basilion, James P

    2013-01-01

    Brain cancer tumors cause disruption of the selective properties of vascular endothelia, even causing disruptions in the very selective blood–brain barrier, which are collectively referred to as the blood–brain–tumor barrier. Nanoparticles (NPs) have previously shown great promise in taking advantage of this increased vascular permeability in other cancers, which results in increased accumulation in these cancers over time due to the accompanying loss of an effective lymph system. NPs have therefore attracted increased attention for treating brain cancer. While this research is just beginning, there have been many successes demonstrated thus far in both the laboratory and clinical setting. This review serves to present the reader with an overview of NPs for treating brain cancer and to provide an outlook on what may come in the future. For NPs, just like the blood–brain–tumor barrier, the future is wide open. PMID:23256496

  14. Outcomes in patients with brain metastasis from esophageal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kothari, Nishi; Mellon, Eric; Hoffe, Sarah E.; Frakes, Jessica; Shridhar, Ravi; Pimiento, Jose; Meredith, Ken; Tran, Nam D.; Saeed, Nadia

    2016-01-01

    Background Brain metastases from esophageal carcinoma have historically been rare and associated with poor prognosis. With improvements in systemic disease control, the incidence of brain metastases is expected to rise. To better inform management decisions, we sought to identify factors associated with survival in patients with brain metastasis from esophageal cancer. Methods We retrospectively identified 49 patients with brain metastasis from stage I–IV primary esophageal cancer treated with surgery, radiation, or a combination of modalities at our tertiary referral center between 1998 and 2015. Medical records were reviewed to collect demographic and clinical information. Results Median age at diagnosis of the primary esophageal cancer was 60 years. Forty-one (84%) patients were male and forty patients (82%) had adenocarcinoma. Median overall survival (MS) following esophageal cancer diagnosis was 24 months (range, 3–71 months), and median survival after the identification of brain metastases was 5 months (range, 1–52 months). On univariate analysis, only patients with poor Karnofsky performance status (KPS <70), recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) classification (III), or 3 or more brain metastases were found to have worsened survival after the diagnosis of brain metastases (all P<0.01). Factors not associated with survival were age, gender, histology (adenocarcinoma vs. other), palliative-intent treatment of the primary tumor, time to diagnosis of brain metastases from initial diagnosis, uncontrolled primary tumor at time of brain metastasis diagnosis, or extracranial metastases. On multivariate analysis (MVA, KPS excluded), patients with RPA class I (MS, 14.6 months) or II (MS, 5.0 months) disease had significantly improved overall survival compared to class III disease (MS, 1.6 months, P<0.01). Also on MVA, patients with 1 (MS, 10.7 months) or 2 (MS, 4.7 months) brain metastases had significantly improved overall survival compared to patients with 3

  15. Gain of glucose-independent growth upon metastasis of breast cancer cells to the brain.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinyu; Lee, Ho-Jeong; Wu, Xuefeng; Huo, Lei; Kim, Sun-Jin; Xu, Lei; Wang, Yan; He, Junqing; Bollu, Lakshmi R; Gao, Guang; Su, Fei; Briggs, James; Liu, Xiaojing; Melman, Tamar; Asara, John M; Fidler, Isaiah J; Cantley, Lewis C; Locasale, Jason W; Weihua, Zhang

    2015-02-01

    Breast cancer brain metastasis is resistant to therapy and a particularly poor prognostic feature in patient survival. Altered metabolism is a common feature of cancer cells, but little is known as to what metabolic changes benefit breast cancer brain metastases. We found that brain metastatic breast cancer cells evolved the ability to survive and proliferate independent of glucose due to enhanced gluconeogenesis and oxidations of glutamine and branched chain amino acids, which together sustain the nonoxidative pentose pathway for purine synthesis. Silencing expression of fructose-1,6-bisphosphatases (FBP) in brain metastatic cells reduced their viability and improved the survival of metastasis-bearing immunocompetent hosts. Clinically, we showed that brain metastases from human breast cancer patients expressed higher levels of FBP and glycogen than the corresponding primary tumors. Together, our findings identify a critical metabolic condition required to sustain brain metastasis and suggest that targeting gluconeogenesis may help eradicate this deadly feature in advanced breast cancer patients.

  16. A join point survival model for brain tumor patients.

    PubMed

    Vovoras, Dimitris; Vrionis, Frank D; Tsokos, Chris P; Prokhel, Keshav

    2011-12-01

    To investigate the relationship between medical improvements and the survival experienced by the patient population, it would be useful to find out when and how much the cancer treatment breakthroughs and early diagnosis have significantly improved the prognosis of brain cancer patients. A join point model facilitates the identification of trends with significant change-points in survival; the main goal of such a model would be to find out when cancer survival starts exhibiting a pattern of improvement. The model will be applied to grouped relative survival data for major cancer sites from the 'Surveillance, epidemiology and end results' program of the National Cancer Institute.

  17. Breast cancer brain metastases: biology and new clinical perspectives.

    PubMed

    Witzel, Isabell; Oliveira-Ferrer, Leticia; Pantel, Klaus; Müller, Volkmar; Wikman, Harriet

    2016-01-19

    Because of improvements in the treatment of patients with metastatic breast cancer, the development of brain metastases (BM) has become a major limitation of life expectancy and quality of life for many breast cancer patients. The improvement of management strategies for BM is thus an important clinical challenge, especially among high-risk patients such as human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive and triple-negative patients. However, the formation of BM as a multistep process is thus far poorly understood. To grow in the brain, single tumor cells must pass through the tight blood-brain barrier (BBB). The BBB represents an obstacle for circulating tumor cells entering the brain, but it also plays a protective role against immune cell and toxic agents once metastatic cells have colonized the cerebral compartment. Furthermore, animal studies have shown that, after passing the BBB, the tumor cells not only require close contact with endothelial cells but also interact closely with many different brain residential cells. Thus, in addition to a genetic predisposition of the tumor cells, cellular adaptation processes within the new microenvironment may also determine the ability of a tumor cell to metastasize. In this review, we summarize the biology of breast cancer that has spread into the brain and discuss the implications for current and potential future treatment strategies.

  18. [Advances in Bevacizumab Therapy for Non-small Cell Lung Cancer 
with Brain Metastases].

    PubMed

    Qu, Liyan; Geng, Rui; Song, Xia

    2016-08-20

    Brain metastases are frequently encountered in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. Antiangiogenesis therapy plays a major role in the management of brain metastases in lung cancer. Bevacizumab have become the novel method for the treatment of lung cancer with brain metastases beyond the whole brain radiation therapy, stereotactic radiosurgery and chemotherapy. Recently, more and more studies and trials laid emphasis on the bevacizumab for NSCLC with brain metastases treatment. The key point is the efficacy and safety. In this review, bevacizumab therapy of NSCLC with brain metastases were summarized. PMID:27561800

  19. American brain tumor patients treated with BNCT in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Laramore, G.E.; Griffin, B.R.; Spence, A.

    1995-11-01

    The purpose of this work is to establish and maintain a database for patients from the United States who have received BNCT in Japan for malignant gliomas of the brain. This database will serve as a resource for the DOE to aid in decisions relating to BNCT research in the United States, as well as assisting the design and implementation of clinical trials of BNCT for brain cancer patients in this country. The database will also serve as an information resource for patients with brain tumors and their families who are considering this form of therapy.

  20. Sarcopenia in Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Chindapasirt, Jarin

    2015-01-01

    Sarcopenia, characterized by a decline of skeletal muscle plus low muscle strength and/or physical performance, has emerged to be an important prognostic factor for advanced cancer patients. It is associated with poor performance status, toxicity from chemotherapy, and shorter time of tumor control. There is limited data about sarcopenia in cancer patients and associated factors. Moreover, the knowledge about the changes of muscle mass during chemotherapy and its impact to response and toxicity to chemotherapy is still lacking. This review aimed to provide understanding about sarcopenia and to emphasize its importance to cancer treatment.

  1. Brain Metastasis in Patients With Adrenocortical Carcinoma: A Clinical Series

    PubMed Central

    Tageja, Nishant; Rosenberg, Avi; Mahalingam, Sowmya; Quezado, Martha; Velarde, Margarita; Edgerly, Maureen; Fojo, Tito

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a heterogeneous and rare disease. At presentation or at the time of a recurrence, the disease commonly spreads to the liver, lungs, lymph nodes, and bones. The brain has only rarely been reported as a site of metastases. Objective: The aims of this report were to describe the clinical characteristics of patients with ACC who developed brain metastasis and were evaluated at the National Cancer Institute. Methods: We describe the history and clinical presentation of six patients with ACC and metastatic disease in the brain. Images of the six patients and pathology slides were reviewed when available. Results: The median age at the time of the diagnosis of ACC was 42 years. The median time from the initial diagnosis until the presentation of brain metastasis was 43 months. As a group the patients had previously received multiples lines of chemotherapy (median of three), and they presented with one to three metastatic brain lesions. Four patients underwent metastasectomy, one had radiosurgery, and one had both modalities. Two patients are still alive, three died, between 2 and 14 months after the diagnosis of brain metastases, and one was lost to follow-up. Conclusion: Patients with advanced ACC can rarely present with metastasis to the brain, most often long after the initial diagnosis. Timely diagnosis of brain metastasis with appropriate intervention after discussion in a multidisciplinary meeting can improve the prognosis in this particular scenario. PMID:25412413

  2. Brain Metastases in Gastrointestinal Cancers: Is there a Role for Surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Lemke, Johannes; Scheele, Jan; Kapapa, Thomas; von Karstedt, Silvia; Wirtz, Christian Rainer; Henne-Bruns, Doris; Kornmann, Marko

    2014-01-01

    About 10% of all cancer patients will develop brain metastases during advanced disease progression. Interestingly, the vast majority of brain metastases occur in only three types of cancer: Melanoma, lung and breast cancer. In this review, we focus on summarizing the prognosis and impact of surgical resection of brain metastases originating from gastrointestinal cancers such as esophageal, gastric, pancreatic and colorectal cancer. The incidence of brain metastases is <1% in pancreatic and gastric cancer and <4% in esophageal and colorectal cancer. Overall, prognosis of these patients is very poor with a median survival in the range of only months. Interestingly, a substantial number of patients who had received surgical resection of brain metastases showed prolonged survival. However, it should be taken into account that all these studies were not randomized and it is likely that patients selected for surgical treatment presented with other important prognostic factors such as solitary brain metastases and exclusion of extra-cranial disease. Nevertheless, other reports have demonstrated long-term survival of patients upon resection of brain metastases originating from gastrointestinal cancers. Thus, it appears to be justified to consider aggressive surgical approaches for these patients. PMID:25247579

  3. [Physiotherapy of cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Gomez, Izabella; Szekanecz, Éva; Szekanecz, Zoltán; Bender, Tamás

    2016-07-01

    Physiotherapy of cancer patients is one of the most controversial issues in our country. Malignant diseases are firstly mentioned as a contraindication of physiotherapy. Until now, physiotherapy was not suggested (or only in limited accessibility) for those patients who had malignant disease in medical history. International medical practice was less restrictive in managing this topic. The development of imaging techniques put this question in a new light. On the basis of evidence, the majority of articles have reported beneficial effects of physiotherapy in cancer patients, and only few articles mentioned it as harmful. Of course, each patient requires an individual assessment, however, if we exclude the possibility of tumor recurrence and metastasis, most of physiotherapy procedures can be used safely. One of the aims of this review is to support the physicians' decisions when to prescribe treatments, in such a way, that more patients could receive physiotherapy. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(31), 1224-1231.

  4. [Physiotherapy of cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Gomez, Izabella; Szekanecz, Éva; Szekanecz, Zoltán; Bender, Tamás

    2016-07-01

    Physiotherapy of cancer patients is one of the most controversial issues in our country. Malignant diseases are firstly mentioned as a contraindication of physiotherapy. Until now, physiotherapy was not suggested (or only in limited accessibility) for those patients who had malignant disease in medical history. International medical practice was less restrictive in managing this topic. The development of imaging techniques put this question in a new light. On the basis of evidence, the majority of articles have reported beneficial effects of physiotherapy in cancer patients, and only few articles mentioned it as harmful. Of course, each patient requires an individual assessment, however, if we exclude the possibility of tumor recurrence and metastasis, most of physiotherapy procedures can be used safely. One of the aims of this review is to support the physicians' decisions when to prescribe treatments, in such a way, that more patients could receive physiotherapy. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(31), 1224-1231. PMID:27476518

  5. Treating venous thromboembolism in patients with cancer

    PubMed Central

    Piatek, Caroline; O’Connell, Casey L; Liebman, Howard A

    2015-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality among patients with cancer. Although much is known about the factors that contribute to VTE risk, pre-emptive therapy in high-risk populations is clearly indicated in only a few clinical situations. Low-molecular-weight heparin is still the recommended class of anticoagulants for cancer-associated VTE. Management of VTE in patients with renal failure, hemorrhagic brain metastases, thrombocytopenia and coagulopathy remains challenging with few safe and effective alternatives. Novel oral agents are currently being investigated and may play a role in the future in the treatment of cancer-associated VTE. PMID:22475288

  6. Integrated Genomic and Epigenomic Analysis of Breast Cancer Brain Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Salhia, Bodour; Kiefer, Jeff; Ross, Julianna T. D.; Metapally, Raghu; Martinez, Rae Anne; Johnson, Kyle N.; DiPerna, Danielle M.; Paquette, Kimberly M.; Jung, Sungwon; Nasser, Sara; Wallstrom, Garrick; Tembe, Waibhav; Baker, Angela; Carpten, John; Resau, Jim; Ryken, Timothy; Sibenaller, Zita; Petricoin, Emanuel F.; Liotta, Lance A.; Ramanathan, Ramesh K.; Berens, Michael E.; Tran, Nhan L.

    2014-01-01

    The brain is a common site of metastatic disease in patients with breast cancer, which has few therapeutic options and dismal outcomes. The purpose of our study was to identify common and rare events that underlie breast cancer brain metastasis. We performed deep genomic profiling, which integrated gene copy number, gene expression and DNA methylation datasets on a collection of breast brain metastases. We identified frequent large chromosomal gains in 1q, 5p, 8q, 11q, and 20q and frequent broad-level deletions involving 8p, 17p, 21p and Xq. Frequently amplified and overexpressed genes included ATAD2, BRAF, DERL1, DNMTRB and NEK2A. The ATM, CRYAB and HSPB2 genes were commonly deleted and underexpressed. Knowledge mining revealed enrichment in cell cycle and G2/M transition pathways, which contained AURKA, AURKB and FOXM1. Using the PAM50 breast cancer intrinsic classifier, Luminal B, Her2+/ER negative, and basal-like tumors were identified as the most commonly represented breast cancer subtypes in our brain metastasis cohort. While overall methylation levels were increased in breast cancer brain metastasis, basal-like brain metastases were associated with significantly lower levels of methylation. Integrating DNA methylation data with gene expression revealed defects in cell migration and adhesion due to hypermethylation and downregulation of PENK, EDN3, and ITGAM. Hypomethylation and upregulation of KRT8 likely affects adhesion and permeability. Genomic and epigenomic profiling of breast brain metastasis has provided insight into the somatic events underlying this disease, which have potential in forming the basis of future therapeutic strategies. PMID:24489661

  7. Memory Function Before and After Whole Brain Radiotherapy in Patients With and Without Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Welzel, Grit Fleckenstein, Katharina; Schaefer, Joerg; Hermann, Brigitte; Kraus-Tiefenbacher, Uta; Mai, Sabine K.; Wenz, Frederik

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: To prospectively compare the effect of prophylactic and therapeutic whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) on memory function in patients with and without brain metastases. Methods and Materials: Adult patients with and without brain metastases (n = 44) were prospectively evaluated with serial cognitive testing, before RT (T0), after starting RT (T1), at the end of RT (T2), and 6-8 weeks (T3) after RT completion. Data were obtained from small-cell lung cancer patients treated with prophylactic cranial irradiation, patients with brain metastases treated with therapeutic cranial irradiation (TCI), and breast cancer patients treated with RT to the breast. Results: Before therapy, prophylactic cranial irradiation patients performed worse than TCI patients or than controls on most test scores. During and after WBRT, verbal memory function was influenced by pretreatment cognitive status (p < 0.001) and to a lesser extent by WBRT. Acute (T1) radiation effects on verbal memory function were only observed in TCI patients (p = 0.031). Subacute (T3) radiation effects on verbal memory function were observed in both TCI and prophylactic cranial irradiation patients (p = 0.006). These effects were more pronounced in patients with above-average performance at baseline. Visual memory and attention were not influenced by WBRT. Conclusions: The results of our study have shown that WBRT causes cognitive dysfunction immediately after the beginning of RT in patients with brain metastases only. At 6-8 weeks after the end of WBRT, cognitive dysfunction was seen in patients with and without brain metastases. Because cognitive dysfunction after WBRT is restricted to verbal memory, patients should not avoid WBRT because of a fear of neurocognitive side effects.

  8. EGFR and HER2 signaling in breast cancer brain metastasis.

    PubMed

    Sirkisoon, Sherona R; Carpenter, Richard L; Rimkus, Tadas; Miller, Lance; Metheny-Barlow, Linda; Lo, Hui-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer occurs in approximately 1 in 8 women and 1 in 37 women with breast cancer succumbed to the disease. Over the past decades, new diagnostic tools and treatments have substantially improved the prognosis of women with local diseases. However, women with metastatic disease still have a dismal prognosis without effective treatments. Among different molecular subtypes of breast cancer, the HER2-enriched and basal-like subtypes typically have higher rates of metastasis to the brain. Basal-like metastatic breast tumors frequently express EGFR. Consequently, HER2- and EGFR-targeted therapies are being used in the clinic and/or evaluated in clinical trials for treating breast cancer patients with brain metastases. In this review, we will first provide an overview of the HER2 and EGFR signaling pathways. The roles that EGFR and HER2 play in breast cancer metastasis to the brain will then be discussed. Finally, we will summarize the preclinical and clinical effects of EGFR- and HER2-targeted therapies on breast cancer metastasis.

  9. Phase II Etirinotecan Pegol in Refractory Brain Metastases & Advanced Lung Cancer / Metastatic Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-18

    Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Tumors Metastatic to Brain; Metastatic Breast Cancer

  10. Statins are Associated With a Reduced Risk of Brain Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Brian K.; Chiu, Hui-Fen; Yang, Chun-Yuh

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to investigate whether statin utilization is associated with brain cancer risk. A population-based case–control study was conducted using nationally representative claims data from the National Health Insurance Bureau in Taiwan. Cases included all patients 50 years and older who received an index diagnosis of brain cancer between 2004 and 2011. Our controls were matched by age, sex, and index date. We estimated adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using multiple logistic regression. We examined 213 brain cancer cases and 852 controls. The unadjusted ORs for any statin prescription was 0.77 (95% CI = 0.50–1.18) and the adjusted OR was 0.59 (95% CI = 0.37–0.96). Compared with no use of statins, the adjusted ORs were 0.68 (95% CI = 0.38–1.24) for the group having been prescribed with statins with cumulative defined daily dose (DDD) below 144.67 DDDs and 0.50 (95% CI = 0.28–0.97) for the group with the cumulative statin use of 144.67 DDDs or more. The results of this study suggest that statins may reduce the risk of brain cancer. PMID:27124024

  11. [Th17 cells and IL-17 are increased in patients with brain metastases from the primary lung cancer].

    PubMed

    He, Gaiping; Zhang, Bin; Zhang, Baowen; Qiao, Liangjie; Tian, Zhonglan; Zhai, Guoyan; Xin, Xianwei; Yang, Chun; Liu, Peigang; Zhang, Yong; Xu, Lingling

    2013-09-01

    背景与目的 Th17细胞是一种重要的辅助性T细胞,其主要分泌IL-17等细胞因子,在感染免疫、自身免疫性疾病和肿瘤免疫中均有重要意义。本研究旨在探讨Th17细胞和IL-17在肺癌脑转移患者外周血中的表达及IL-17在肺癌脑转移患者脑脊液中的表达和意义。 方法 流式细胞术检测22例肺癌脑转移患者和20名正常对照外周血Th17(CD3+CD4+IL-23R+)细胞的百分率,ELISA方法检测22例肺癌脑转移患者和20名正常对照血浆IL-17水平,ELISA方法检测19例肺癌脑转移患者和16例无脑转移肺癌患者脑脊液IL-17水平。结果 肺癌脑转移患者外周血Th17细胞百分率(4.65%±0.72%)明显高于正常对照(2.71%±0.54%, P=0.04);其中非小细胞肺癌(non-small cell lung cancer, NSCLC)患者和小细胞肺癌(small cell lung cancer, SCLC)患者没有差异。肺癌脑转移患者血浆IL-17水平明显高于正常对照(117.4±16.43 pg/mL和72.55±8.19 pg/mL, P=0.02);其中NSCLC患者和SCLC患者没有差异。肺癌脑转移患者脑脊液IL-17水平明显高于无脑转移的肺癌患者(73.21±7.52 pg/mL和50.25±8.04 pg/mL, P=0.04)。结论 肺癌脑转移患者外周血Th17细胞数量增多,血浆IL-17和脑脊液IL-17水平升高,Th17细胞和IL-17可能参与了肺癌脑转移的发生和发展。

  12. Ruta 6 selectively induces cell death in brain cancer cells but proliferation in normal peripheral blood lymphocytes: A novel treatment for human brain cancer.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Sen; Multani, Asha S; Banerji, Pratip; Banerji, Prasanta

    2003-10-01

    Although conventional chemotherapies are used to treat patients with malignancies, damage to normal cells is problematic. Blood-forming bone marrow cells are the most adversely affected. It is therefore necessary to find alternative agents that can kill cancer cells but have minimal effects on normal cells. We investigated the brain cancer cell-killing activity of a homeopathic medicine, Ruta, isolated from a plant, Ruta graveolens. We treated human brain cancer and HL-60 leukemia cells, normal B-lymphoid cells, and murine melanoma cells in vitro with different concentrations of Ruta in combination with Ca3(PO4)2. Fifteen patients diagnosed with intracranial tumors were treated with Ruta 6 and Ca3(PO4)2. Of these 15 patients, 6 of the 7 glioma patients showed complete regression of tumors. Normal human blood lymphocytes, B-lymphoid cells, and brain cancer cells treated with Ruta in vitro were examined for telomere dynamics, mitotic catastrophe, and apoptosis to understand the possible mechanism of cell-killing, using conventional and molecular cytogenetic techniques. Both in vivo and in vitro results showed induction of survival-signaling pathways in normal lymphocytes and induction of death-signaling pathways in brain cancer cells. Cancer cell death was initiated by telomere erosion and completed through mitotic catastrophe events. We propose that Ruta in combination with Ca3(PO4)2 could be used for effective treatment of brain cancers, particularly glioma.

  13. Dye-Enhanced Multimodal Confocal Imaging of Brain Cancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirth, Dennis; Snuderl, Matija; Sheth, Sameer; Curry, William; Yaroslavsky, Anna

    2011-04-01

    Background and Significance: Accurate high resolution intraoperative detection of brain tumors may result in improved patient survival and better quality of life. The goal of this study was to evaluate dye enhanced multimodal confocal imaging for discriminating normal and cancerous brain tissue. Materials and Methods: Fresh thick brain specimens were obtained from the surgeries. Normal and cancer tissues were investigated. Samples were stained in methylene blue and imaged. Reflectance and fluorescence signals were excited at 658nm. Fluorescence emission and polarization were registered from 670 nm to 710 nm. The system provided lateral resolution of 0.6 μm and axial resolution of 7 μm. Normal and cancer specimens exhibited distinctively different characteristics. H&E histopathology was processed from each imaged sample. Results and Conclusions: The analysis of normal and cancerous tissues indicated clear differences in appearance in both the reflectance and fluorescence responses. These results confirm the feasibility of multimodal confocal imaging for intraoperative detection of small cancer nests and cells.

  14. βIII-Tubulin Regulates Breast Cancer Metastases to the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Kanojia, Deepak; Morshed, Ramin A.; Zhang, Lingjiao; Miska, Jason M.; Qiao, Jian; Kim, Julius W.; Pytel, Peter; Balyasnikova, Irina V.; Lesniak, Maciej S.; Ahmed, Atique U.

    2015-01-01

    Brain metastases occur in about 10–30% of breast cancer patients, which culminates in a poor prognosis. It is therefore critical to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying brain metastatic processes to identify relevant targets. We hypothesized that breast cancer cells must express brain-associated markers that would enable their invasion and survival in the brain microenvironment. We assessed a panel of brain-predominant markers and found an elevation of several neuronal markers (βIII tubulin, Nestin and AchE) in brain metastatic breast cancer cells. Among these neuronal predominant markers, in silico analysis revealed overexpression of βIII tubulin (TUBB3) in breast cancer brain metastases (BCBM) and its expression was significantly associated with distant metastases. TUBB3 knockdown studies were conducted in breast cancer models (MDA-Br, GLIM2 and MDA-MB-468) which revealed significant reduction in their invasive capabilities. MDA-Br cells with suppressed TUBB3 also demonstrated loss of key signaling molecules such as β3 integrin, pFAK, and pSrc in vitro. Furthermore, TUBB3 knockdown in a brain metastatic breast cancer cell line compromised its metastatic ability in vivo, and significantly improved survival in a brain metastasis model. These results implicate a critical role of TUBB3 in conferring brain metastatic potential to breast cancer cells. PMID:25724666

  15. βIII-Tubulin Regulates Breast Cancer Metastases to the Brain.

    PubMed

    Kanojia, Deepak; Morshed, Ramin A; Zhang, Lingjiao; Miska, Jason M; Qiao, Jian; Kim, Julius W; Pytel, Peter; Balyasnikova, Irina V; Lesniak, Maciej S; Ahmed, Atique U

    2015-05-01

    Brain metastases occur in about 10% to 30% of breast cancer patients, which culminates in a poor prognosis. It is, therefore, critical to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying brain metastatic processes to identify relevant targets. We hypothesized that breast cancer cells must express brain-associated markers that would enable their invasion and survival in the brain microenvironment. We assessed a panel of brain-predominant markers and found an elevation of several neuronal markers (βIII-tubulin, Nestin, and AchE) in brain metastatic breast cancer cells. Among these neuronal predominant markers, in silico analysis revealed overexpression of βIII-tubulin (TUBB3) in breast cancer brain metastases (BCBM) and its expression was significantly associated with distant metastases. TUBB3 knockdown studies were conducted in breast cancer models (MDA-Br, GLIM2, and MDA-MB-468), which revealed significant reduction in their invasive capabilities. MDA-Br cells with suppressed TUBB3 also demonstrated loss of key signaling molecules such as β3 integrin, pFAK, and pSrc in vitro. Furthermore, TUBB3 knockdown in a brain metastatic breast cancer cell line compromised its metastatic ability in vivo, and significantly improved survival in a brain metastasis model. These results implicate a critical role of TUBB3 in conferring brain metastatic potential to breast cancer cells.

  16. ROS1 rearranged non-small cell lung cancer brain metastases respond to low dose radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lukas, Rimas V; Hasan, Yasmin; Nicholas, Martin K; Salgia, Ravi

    2015-12-01

    We present a young woman with ROS1 gene rearranged non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with brain metastases. ROS is a proto-oncogene tyrosine protein kinase. The patient received a partial course of whole brain radiation therapy and experienced a sustained partial response in the brain. We hypothesize that ROS1 rearranged NSCLC brain metastases may be particularly sensitive to radiation therapy.

  17. Compromised quality of life in adult patients who have received a radiation dose towards the basal part of the brain. A case-control study in long-term survivors from cancer in the head and neck region

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Adult patients with hypothalamic-pituitary disorders have compromised quality of life (QoL). Whether this is due to their endocrine consequences (hypopituitarism), their underlying hypothalamic-pituitary disorder or both is still under debate. The aim of this trial was to measure quality of life (QoL) in long-term cancer survivors who have received a radiation dose to the basal part of the brain and the pituitary. Methods Consecutive patients (n=101) treated for oropharyngeal or epipharyngeal cancer with radiotherapy followed free of cancer for a period of 4 to10 years were identified. Fifteen patients (median age 56 years) with no concomitant illness and no hypopituitarism after careful endocrine evaluation were included in a case-control study with matched healthy controls. Doses to the hypothalamic-pituitary region were calculated. QoL was assessed using the Symptom check list (SCL)-90, Nottingham Health Profile (NHP), and Psychological Well Being (PGWB) questionnaires. Level of physical activity was assessed using the Baecke questionnaire. Results The median accumulated dose was 1.9 Gy (1.5–2.2 Gy) to the hypothalamus and 2.4 Gy (1.8–3.3 Gy) to the pituitary gland in patients with oropharyngeal cancer and 6.0–9.3 Gy and 33.5–46.1 Gy, respectively in patients with epipharyngeal cancer (n=2). The patients showed significantly more anxiety and depressiveness, and lower vitality, than their matched controls. Conclusion In a group of long time survivors of head and neck cancer who hade received a low radiation dose to the hypothalamic-pituitary region and who had no endocrine consequences of disease or its treatment QoL was compromised as compared with well matched healthy controls. PMID:23101561

  18. Proteoglycans and their roles in brain cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wade, Anna; Robinson, Aaron E.; Engler, Jane R.; Petritsch, Claudia; James, C. David; Phillips, Joanna J.

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM), a malignant brain cancer, is characterized by abnormal activation of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling pathways and poor prognosis. Extracellular proteoglycans, including heparan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate, play critical roles in the regulation of cell signaling and migration via interactions with extracellular ligands, growth factor receptors, extracellular matrix components, and intracellular enzymes and structural proteins. In cancer, proteoglycans help drive multiple oncogenic pathways in tumor cells and promote critical tumor-microenvironment interactions. In this review, we summarize the evidence for proteoglycan function in gliomagenesis and we examine the expression of proteoglycans and their modifying enzymes in human GBM using data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Furthermore, we demonstrate an association between specific proteoglycan alterations and changes in RTKs. Based on these data we propose a model in which proteoglycans and their modifying enzymes promote RTK signaling and progression in GBM, and we suggest cancer associated proteoglycans are promising biomarkers for disease and therapeutic targets. PMID:23281850

  19. Pain in the cancer patient.

    PubMed

    Ho, R C

    1994-01-01

    In summary, the ACS has acknowledged the magnitude and severity of the cancer pain problem nationally and recognized that cancer pain can be relieved. It has identified cancer pain control as a priority and has devised programs that emphasize the importance of pain assessment, recognize the availability of pain relief programs, and encourage treatment to achieve optimum pain relief for the cancer patient.

  20. Brain microvascular endothelium induced-annexin A1 secretion contributes to small cell lung cancer brain metastasis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Liu, Yong-Shuo; Wu, Peng-Fei; Li, Qiang; Dai, Wu-Min; Yuan, Shuai; Xu, Zhi-Hua; Liu, Ting-Ting; Miao, Zi-Wei; Fang, Wen-Gang; Chen, Yu-Hua; Li, Bo

    2015-09-01

    Small cell lung cancer is the most aggressive histologic subtype of lung cancer, with a strong predilection for metastasizing to brain early. However, the cellular and molecular basis is poorly known. Here, we provided evidence to reveal the role of annexin A1 in small cell lung cancer metastasis to brain. Firstly, the elevated annexin A1 serum levels in small cell lung cancer patients were associated with brain metastasis. The levels of annexin A1 were also upregulated in NCI-H446 cells, a small cell lung cancer cell line, upon migration into the mice brain. More interestingly, annexin A1 was secreted by NCI-H446 cells in a time-dependent manner when co-culturing with human brain microvascular endothelial cells, which was identified with the detections of annexin A1 in the co-cultured cellular supernatants by ELISA and western blot. Further results showed that blockage of annexin A1 in the co-cultured cellular supernatants using a neutralized antibody significantly inhibited NCI-H446 cells adhesion to brain endothelium and its transendothelial migration. Conversely, the addition of Ac2-26, an annexin A1 mimic peptide, enhanced these effects. Furthermore, knockdown of annexin A1 in NCI-H446 cells prevented its transendothelial migration in vitro and metastasis to mice brain in vivo. Our data showed that small cell lung cancer cell in brain microvasculature microenvironment could express much more annexin A1 and release it outside, which facilitated small cell lung cancer cell to gain malignant properties of entry into brain. These findings provided a potential target for the management of SCLC brain metastasis. PMID:26135980

  1. Brain microvascular endothelium induced-annexin A1 secretion contributes to small cell lung cancer brain metastasis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Liu, Yong-Shuo; Wu, Peng-Fei; Li, Qiang; Dai, Wu-Min; Yuan, Shuai; Xu, Zhi-Hua; Liu, Ting-Ting; Miao, Zi-Wei; Fang, Wen-Gang; Chen, Yu-Hua; Li, Bo

    2015-09-01

    Small cell lung cancer is the most aggressive histologic subtype of lung cancer, with a strong predilection for metastasizing to brain early. However, the cellular and molecular basis is poorly known. Here, we provided evidence to reveal the role of annexin A1 in small cell lung cancer metastasis to brain. Firstly, the elevated annexin A1 serum levels in small cell lung cancer patients were associated with brain metastasis. The levels of annexin A1 were also upregulated in NCI-H446 cells, a small cell lung cancer cell line, upon migration into the mice brain. More interestingly, annexin A1 was secreted by NCI-H446 cells in a time-dependent manner when co-culturing with human brain microvascular endothelial cells, which was identified with the detections of annexin A1 in the co-cultured cellular supernatants by ELISA and western blot. Further results showed that blockage of annexin A1 in the co-cultured cellular supernatants using a neutralized antibody significantly inhibited NCI-H446 cells adhesion to brain endothelium and its transendothelial migration. Conversely, the addition of Ac2-26, an annexin A1 mimic peptide, enhanced these effects. Furthermore, knockdown of annexin A1 in NCI-H446 cells prevented its transendothelial migration in vitro and metastasis to mice brain in vivo. Our data showed that small cell lung cancer cell in brain microvasculature microenvironment could express much more annexin A1 and release it outside, which facilitated small cell lung cancer cell to gain malignant properties of entry into brain. These findings provided a potential target for the management of SCLC brain metastasis.

  2. Cancer patients caregivers comfort.

    PubMed

    de Araújo Lamino, Daniela; Turrini, Ruth Natalia Teresa; Kolcaba, Katharine

    2014-04-01

    Cross-sectional study, carried out at the outpatient clinic of an oncology hospital. Data were collected from 88 caregivers of cancer patients using the Caregiver General Comfort Questionnaire (GCQ) to assess the caregivers' comfort. The caregivers' GCQ score mean was 203.9; better comfort scores was associated with age, care time and current occupation; positive aspects of comfort were related to the fact that caregivers felt loved, to patients' physical and environmental comfort and to caregivers' spirituality. 203.9; better comfort scores were associated with age of the caregiver and current occupation; positive aspects of comfort were related to the fact that caregivers felt loved, to patients' physical and environmental comfort and to caregivers' spirituality. Caregivers, who didn't have a paid job or leisure's activities showed a worse GCQ. The GCQ scale can help to identify factors that interfere in caregivers' comfort, as well as needs that can be modified through health professionals' interventions.

  3. Gene Expression Profiling of Breast Cancer Brain Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Yun; Park, Kyunghee; Lee, Eunjin; Ahn, TaeJin; Jung, Hae Hyun; Lim, Sung Hee; Hong, Mineui; Do, In-Gu; Cho, Eun Yoon; Kim, Duk-Hwan; Kim, Ji-Yeon; Ahn, Jin Seok; Im, Young-Hyuck; Park, Yeon Hee

    2016-01-01

    The biology of breast cancer brain metastasis (BCBM) is poorly understood. We aimed to explore genes that are implicated in the process of brain metastasis of primary breast cancer (BC). NanoString nCounter Analysis covering 252 target genes was used for comparison of gene expression levels between 20 primary BCs that relapsed to brain and 41 BCBM samples. PAM50-based intrinsic subtypes such as HER2-enriched and basal-like were clearly over-represented in BCBM. A panel of 22 genes was found to be significantly differentially expressed between primary BC and BCBM. Five of these genes, CXCL12, MMP2, MMP11, VCAM1, and MME, which have previously been associated with tumor progression, angiogenesis, and metastasis, clearly discriminated between primary BC and BCBM. Notably, the five genes were significantly upregulated in primary BC compared to BCBM. Conversely, SOX2 and OLIG2 genes were upregulated in BCBM. These genes may participate in metastatic colonization but not in primary tumor development. Among patient-matched paired samples (n = 17), a PAM50 molecular subtype conversion was observed in eight cases (47.1%), with a trend toward unfavorable subtypes in patients with the distinct gene expression. Our findings, although not conclusive, reveal differentially expressed genes that might mediate the brain metastasis process. PMID:27340107

  4. Signaling the Unfolded Protein Response in primary brain cancers.

    PubMed

    Le Reste, Pierre-Jean; Avril, Tony; Quillien, Véronique; Morandi, Xavier; Chevet, Eric

    2016-07-01

    The Unfolded Protein Response (UPR) is an adaptive cellular program used by eukaryotic cells to cope with protein misfolding stress in the Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER). During tumor development, cancer cells are facing intrinsic (oncogene activation) and extrinsic (limiting nutrient or oxygen supply; exposure to chemotherapies) challenges, with which they must cope to survive. Primary brain tumors are relatively rare but deadly and present a significant challenge in the determination of risk factors in the population. These tumors are inherently difficult to cure because of their protected location in the brain. As such surgery, radiation and chemotherapy options carry potentially lasting patient morbidity and incomplete tumor cure. Some of these tumors, such as glioblastoma, were reported to present features of ER stress and to depend on UPR activation to sustain growth, but to date there is no clear general representation of the ER stress status in primary brain tumors. In this review, we describe the key molecular mechanisms controlling the UPR and their implication in cancers. Then we extensively review the literature reporting the status of ER stress in various primary brain tumors and discuss the potential impact of such observation on patient stratification and on the possibility of developing appropriate targeted therapies using the UPR as therapeutic target. PMID:27016056

  5. HFE polymorphisms affect survival of brain tumor patients.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Y; Slagle-Webb, Becky; Sheehan, Jonas M; Zhu, Junjia; Muscat, Joshua E; Glantz, Michael; Connor, James R

    2015-03-01

    The HFE (high iron) protein plays a key role in the regulation of body iron. HFE polymorphisms (H63D and C282Y) are the common genetic variants in Caucasians. Based on frequency data, both HFE polymorphisms have been associated with increased risk in a number of cancers. The prevalence of the two major HFE polymorphisms in a human brain tumor patient populations and the impact of HFE polymorphisms on survival have not been studied. In the present study, there is no overall difference in survival by HFE genotype. However, male GBM patients with H63D HFE (H63D) have poorer overall survival than wild type HFE (WT) male GBM (p = 0.03). In GBM patients with the C282Y HFE polymorphism (C282Y), female patients have poorer survival than male patients (p = 0.05). In addition, female metastatic brain tumor patients with C282Y have shorter survival times post diagnosis than WT patients (p = 0.02) or male metastatic brain tumor patients with C282Y (p = 0.02). There is a tendency toward a lower proportion of H63D genotype in GBM patients than a non-tumor control group (p = 0.09) or other subtypes of brain tumors. In conclusion, our study suggests that HFE genotype impacts survival of brain tumor patients in a gender specific manner. We previously reported that glioma and neuroblastoma cell lines with HFE polymorphisms show greater resistance to chemo and radiotherapy. Taken together, these data suggest HFE genotype is an important consideration for evaluating and planning therapeutic strategies in brain tumor patients.

  6. [Targeted Therapy and Immunotherapy for Non-small Cell Lung Cancer 
with Brain Metastasis].

    PubMed

    Song, Qi; Jiao, Shunchang; Li, Fang

    2016-08-20

    Brain metastasis, a common complication of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with an incidence rate of 30%-50%, significantly affects the patients' quality of life. The prognosis of patients of NSCLC with brain metastasis is extremely poor, the average median survival is only 1 m-2 m without treatment. The targeted therapy based on lung cancer driven gene is a new treatment. Besides, the immunotherapy which can enhance the effect of anti-cancer by simulating the immune system is a new approach. The combination of targeted therapy and immunotherapy can greatly benefit patients in clinical work. PMID:27561803

  7. Neural networks improve brain cancer detection with Raman spectroscopy in the presence of light artifacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jermyn, Michael; Desroches, Joannie; Mercier, Jeanne; St-Arnaud, Karl; Guiot, Marie-Christine; Petrecca, Kevin; Leblond, Frederic

    2016-03-01

    It is often difficult to identify cancer tissue during brain cancer (glioma) surgery. Gliomas invade into areas of normal brain, and this cancer invasion is frequently not detected using standard preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This results in enduring invasive cancer following surgery and leads to recurrence. A hand-held Raman spectroscopy is able to rapidly detect cancer invasion in patients with grade 2-4 gliomas. However, ambient light sources can produce spectral artifacts which inhibit the ability to distinguish between cancer and normal tissue using the spectral information available. To address this issue, we have demonstrated that artificial neural networks (ANN) can accurately classify invasive cancer versus normal brain tissue, even when including measurements with significant spectral artifacts from external light sources. The non-parametric and adaptive model used by ANN makes it suitable for detecting complex non-linear spectral characteristics associated with different tissues and the confounding presence of light artifacts. The use of ANN for brain cancer detection with Raman spectroscopy, in the presence of light artifacts, improves the robustness and clinical translation potential for intraoperative use. Integration with the neurosurgical workflow is facilitated by accounting for the effect of light artifacts which may occur, due to operating room lights, neuronavigation systems, windows, or other light sources. The ability to rapidly detect invasive brain cancer under these conditions may reduce residual cancer remaining after surgery, and thereby improve patient survival.

  8. Second, Unrelated Cancers Strike 1 in 12 Cancer Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... said. Chamie's team found that patients diagnosed with bladder cancer were the most at risk for developing a second cancer. Thirty-four percent of bladder cancer patients were diagnosed with a second cancer during ...

  9. Extensive Surgery Best for an Aggressive Brain Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_159415.html Extensive Surgery Best for an Aggressive Brain Cancer: Study Although larger procedure carries more ... News) -- When it comes to battling a particularly aggressive form of brain tumor, more extensive surgeries may ...

  10. Pertuzumab, trastuzumab and docetaxel reduced the recurrence of brain metastasis from breast cancer: a case report.

    PubMed

    Senda, Noriko; Yamaguchi, Ayane; Nishimura, Hideaki; Shiozaki, Toshiki; Tsuyuki, Shigeru

    2016-03-01

    The CLEOPATRA trial reported the survival benefit of pertuzumab with trastuzumab plus docetaxel in HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer patients. However, there are a few case reports concerning the effects of a pertuzumab-containing regimen on brain metastases. A 55-year-old woman, who underwent curative surgery for breast cancer after neoadjuvant chemotherapy 5 years previously, developed repeated solitary brain metastasis in her right occipital lobe. Whole brain radiation therapy, stereotactic radiosurgery and 3 times of surgical resection were performed. Lapatinib and capecitabine plus tamoxifen were administered. The metastasis recurred in the stump of the previous surgery. Pertuzumab with trastuzumab plus docetaxel was initiated as second-line chemotherapy. A complete response of the brain metastasis was achieved, which persisted for 5 months. Pertuzumab with trastuzumab plus docetaxel was effective in reducing the brain metastases from breast cancer. Further studies are warranted to confirm the effect of this regimen on brain metastases.

  11. Radiosurgery for Brain Metastases From Unknown Primary Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Niranjan, Ajay; Kano, Hideyuki; Khan, Aftab; Kim, In-Young; Kondziolka, Douglas; Flickinger, John C.; Lunsford, L. Dade

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: We evaluated the role of Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery in the multidisciplinary management of brain metastases from an undiagnosed primary cancer. Methods and Materials: Twenty-nine patients who had solitary or multiple brain metastases without a detectable primary site underwent stereotactic radiosurgery between January 1990 and March 2007 at the University of Pittsburgh. The median patient age was 61.7 years (range, 37.9-78.7 years). The median target volume was 1.0 cc (range, 0.02-23.6 cc), and the median margin radiosurgical dose was 16 Gy (range, 20-70 Gy). Results: After radiosurgery, the local tumor control rate was 88.5%. Twenty four patients died and 5 patients were living at the time of this analysis. The overall median survival was 12 months. Actuarial survival rates from stereotactic radiosurgery at 1 and 2 years were 57.2% and 36.8%, respectively. Factors associated with poor progression-free survival included large tumor volume (3 cc or more) and brainstem tumor location. Conclusions: Radiosurgery is an effective and safe minimally invasive option for patients with brain metastases from an unknown primary site.

  12. Metabolic therapy: a new paradigm for managing malignant brain cancer.

    PubMed

    Seyfried, Thomas N; Flores, Roberto; Poff, Angela M; D'Agostino, Dominic P; Mukherjee, Purna

    2015-01-28

    Little progress has been made in the long-term management of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), considered among the most lethal of brain cancers. Cytotoxic chemotherapy, steroids, and high-dose radiation are generally used as the standard of care for GBM. These procedures can create a tumor microenvironment rich in glucose and glutamine. Glucose and glutamine are suggested to facilitate tumor progression. Recent evidence suggests that many GBMs are infected with cytomegalovirus, which could further enhance glucose and glutamine metabolism in the tumor cells. Emerging evidence also suggests that neoplastic macrophages/microglia, arising through possible fusion hybridization, can comprise an invasive cell subpopulation within GBM. Glucose and glutamine are major fuels for myeloid cells, as well as for the more rapidly proliferating cancer stem cells. Therapies that increase inflammation and energy metabolites in the GBM microenvironment can enhance tumor progression. In contrast to current GBM therapies, metabolic therapy is designed to target the metabolic malady common to all tumor cells (aerobic fermentation), while enhancing the health and vitality of normal brain cells and the entire body. The calorie restricted ketogenic diet (KD-R) is an anti-angiogenic, anti-inflammatory and pro-apoptotic metabolic therapy that also reduces fermentable fuels in the tumor microenvironment. Metabolic therapy, as an alternative to the standard of care, has the potential to improve outcome for patients with GBM and other malignant brain cancers. PMID:25069036

  13. Cancer Patients and Fungal Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... mould-related diseases in immunocompromised patients. Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy 2011;66:i5-i14. Ribaud P. Fungal ... al. Clinical Practice Guideline for the Use of Antimicrobial Agents in Neutropenic Patients with Cancer: 2010 Update ...

  14. Shorter-Course Whole-Brain Radiotherapy for Brain Metastases in Elderly Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Rades, Dirk; Evers, Jasmin N.; Veninga, Theo; Stalpers, Lukas J.A.; Lohynska, Radka; Schild, Steven E.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Many patients with brain metastases receive whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) alone. Using 10 Multiplication-Sign 3 Gy in 2 weeks is the standard regimen in most centers. Regarding the extraordinarily poor survival prognosis of elderly patients with multiple brain metastases, a shorter WBRT regimen would be preferable. This study compared 10 Multiplication-Sign 3 Gy with 5 Multiplication-Sign 4 Gy in elderly patients ({>=}65 years). Methods and Materials: Data from 455 elderly patients who received WBRT alone for brain metastases were retrospectively analyzed. Survival and local (= intracerebral) control of 293 patients receiving 10 Multiplication-Sign 3 Gy were compared with 162 patients receiving 5 Multiplication-Sign 4 Gy. Eight additional potential prognostic factors were investigated including age, gender, Karnofsky performance score (KPS), primary tumor, number of brain metastases, interval from tumor diagnosis to WBRT, extracerebral metastases, and recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class. Results: The 6-month overall survival rates were 29% after 5 Multiplication-Sign 4 Gy and 21% after 10 Multiplication-Sign 3 Gy (p = 0.020). The 6-month local control rates were 12% and 10%, respectively (p = 0.32). On multivariate analysis, improved overall survival was associated with KPS {>=} 70 (p < 0.001), only one to three brain metastases (p = 0.029), no extracerebral metastasis (p = 0.012), and lower RPA class (p < 0.001). Improved local control was associated with KPS {>=} 70 (p < 0.001), breast cancer (p = 0.029), and lower RPA class (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Shorter-course WBRT with 5 Multiplication-Sign 4 Gy was not inferior to 10 Multiplication-Sign 3 Gy with respect to overall survival or local control in elderly patients. 5 Multiplication-Sign 4 Gy appears preferable for the majority of these patients.

  15. Breast cancer brain metastases: evidence for neuronal-like adaptation in a ‘breast-to-brain’ transition?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Brain metastases remain a significant challenge in the treatment of breast cancer patients due to the unique environment posed by the central nervous system. A better understanding of the biology of breast cancer cells that have metastasized to the brain is required to develop improved therapies. A recent Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences article demonstrates that breast cancer cells in the brain microenvironment express γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-related genes, enabling them to utilize GABA as an oncometabolite, thus gaining a proliferative advantage. In this viewpoint, we highlight these findings and their potential impact on the treatment of breast cancer brain metastases. PMID:25679873

  16. Gain of glucose-independent growth upon metastasis of breast cancer cells to the brain

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jinyu; Lee, Ho-Jeong; Wu, Xuefeng; Huo, Lei; Kim, Sun-Jin; Xu, Lei; Wang, Yan; He, Junqing; Bollu, Lakshmi Reddy; Gao, Guang; Su, Fei; Briggs, James; Liu, Xiaojing; Melman, Tamar; Asara, John M.; Fidler, Isaiah J.; Cantley, Lewis C.; Locasale, Jason W.; Weihua, Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer brain metastasis is resistant to therapy and a particularly poor prognostic feature in patient survival. Altered metabolism is a common feature of cancer cells but little is known as to what metabolic changes benefit breast cancer brain metastases. We found that brain-metastatic breast cancer cells evolved the ability to survive and proliferate independent of glucose due to enhanced gluconeogenesis and oxidations of glutamine and branched chain amino acids, which together sustain the non-oxidative pentose pathway for purine synthesis. Silencing expression of fructose-1,6-bisphosphatases (FBPs) in brain metastatic cells reduced their viability and improved the survival of metastasis-bearing immunocompetent hosts. Clinically, we showed that brain metastases from human breast cancer patients expressed higher levels of FBP and glycogen than the corresponding primary tumors. Together, our findings identify a critical metabolic condition required to sustain brain metastasis, and suggest that targeting gluconeogenesis may help eradicate this deadly feature in advanced breast cancer patients. PMID:25511375

  17. Identifying radiotherapy target volumes in brain cancer by image analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Kun; Montgomery, Dean; Feng, Yang; Steel, Robin; Liao, Hanqing; McLaren, Duncan B.; Erridge, Sara C.; McLaughlin, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    To establish the optimal radiotherapy fields for treating brain cancer patients, the tumour volume is often outlined on magnetic resonance (MR) images, where the tumour is clearly visible, and mapped onto computerised tomography images used for radiotherapy planning. This process requires considerable clinical experience and is time consuming, which will continue to increase as more complex image sequences are used in this process. Here, the potential of image analysis techniques for automatically identifying the radiation target volume on MR images, and thereby assisting clinicians with this difficult task, was investigated. A gradient-based level set approach was applied on the MR images of five patients with grades II, III and IV malignant cerebral glioma. The relationship between the target volumes produced by image analysis and those produced by a radiation oncologist was also investigated. The contours produced by image analysis were compared with the contours produced by an oncologist and used for treatment. In 93% of cases, the Dice similarity coefficient was found to be between 60 and 80%. This feasibility study demonstrates that image analysis has the potential for automatic outlining in the management of brain cancer patients, however, more testing and validation on a much larger patient cohort is required. PMID:26609418

  18. Communicating with terminal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Anderson, J L

    Communication between doctors and terminal cancer patients has been identified as a problem area in medical care. There have been attempts to overcome this problem by establishing new teaching programs; however, the most effective teaching methods are costly. A model is described that requires minimal staff involvement in teaching about communicating with terminal cancer patients.

  19. Nutritional Considerations for Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Angela

    1985-01-01

    Although weight loss is a frequent, though not invariable, component of the cancer syndrome, the associated malnutrition is a poor prognostic sign among both children and adults. This article describes the possible mechanisms of cancer cachexia; reviews the present state of nutritional support in cancer patients; identifies nutritional problems and workable approaches during the pre- and post-treatment periods; discusses the unconventional nutritional practices commonly encountered and lists resource materials for patients and families. PMID:21274086

  20. Cytogenomic profiling of breast cancer brain metastases reveals potential for repurposing targeted therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Bollig-Fischer, Aliccia; Michelhaugh, Sharon K; Wijesinghe, Priyanga; Dyson, Greg; Kruger, Adele; Palanisamy, Nallasivam; Choi, Lydia; Alosh, Baraa; Ali-Fehmi, Rouba; Mittal, Sandeep

    2015-06-10

    Breast cancer brain metastases remain a significant clinical problem. Chemotherapy is ineffective and a lack of treatment options result in poor patient outcomes. Targeted therapeutics have proven to be highly effective in primary breast cancer, but lack of molecular genomic characterization of metastatic brain tumors is hindering the development of new treatment regimens. Here we contribute to fill this void by reporting on gene copy number variation (CNV) in 10 breast cancer metastatic brain tumors, assayed by array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). Results were compared to a list of cancer genes verified by others to influence cancer. Cancer gene aberrations were identified in all specimens and pathway-level analysis was applied to aggregate data, which identified stem cell pluripotency pathway enrichment and highlighted recurring, significant amplification of SOX2, PIK3CA, NTRK1, GNAS, CTNNB1, and FGFR1. For a subset of the metastatic brain tumor samples (n = 4) we compared patient-matched primary breast cancer specimens. The results of our CGH analysis and validation by alternative methods indicate that oncogenic signals driving growth of metastatic tumors exist in the original cancer. This report contributes support for more rapid development of new treatments of metastatic brain tumors, the use of genomic-based diagnostic tools and repurposed drug treatments.

  1. Cost trajectories for cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Wodchis, W.P.; Arthurs, E.; Khan, A.I.; Gandhi, S.; MacKinnon, M.; Sussman, J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Health care spending is known to be highly skewed, with a small subset of the population consuming a disproportionate amount of health care resources. Patients with cancer are high-cost users because of high incremental health care costs for treatment and the growing prevalence of cancer. The objectives of the present study included characterizing cancer-patient trajectories by cost, and identifying the patient and health system characteristics associated with high health system costs after cancer treatment. Methods This retrospective cohort study identified Ontario adults newly diagnosed with cancer between 1 April 2009 and 30 September 2010. Costs of health care use before, during, and after cancer episodes were used to develop trajectories of care. Descriptive analyses examined differences between the trajectories in terms of clinical and health system characteristics, and a logistic regression approach identified predictors of being a high-cost user after a cancer episode. Results Ten trajectories were developed based on whether patients were high- or low-cost users before and after their cancer episode. The most common trajectory represented patients who were low-cost in the year before cancer, survived treatment, and continued to be low-cost in the year after cancer (31.4%); stage ii cancer of the male genital system was the most common diagnosis within that trajectory. Regression analyses identified increases in age and in multimorbidity and low continuity of care as the strongest predictors of high-cost status after cancer. Conclusions Findings highlight an opportunity to proactively identify patients who might transition to high-cost status after cancer treatment and to remediate that transition. PMID:26985150

  2. Changes in Brain Function in Patients With Stage I, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Ovarian, Primary Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer Who Are Receiving Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-26

    Cognitive Side Effects of Cancer Therapy; Malignant Ovarian Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Brenner Tumor; Ovarian Carcinosarcoma; Ovarian Choriocarcinoma; Ovarian Clear Cell Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Dysgerminoma; Ovarian Embryonal Carcinoma; Ovarian Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Ovarian Mixed Germ Cell Tumor; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Polyembryoma; Ovarian Sarcoma; Ovarian Seromucinous Carcinoma; Ovarian Serous Cystadenocarcinoma; Ovarian Teratoma; Ovarian Yolk Sac Tumor; Stage I Ovarian Cancer; Stage IA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage II Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIC Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Stage IV Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Primary Peritoneal Cancer; Undifferentiated Ovarian Carcinoma

  3. Circulating Tumor Cells in Breast Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Hall, Carolyn; Valad, Lily; Lucci, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among women, resulting in an estimated 40,000 deaths in 2014.1 Metastasis, a complex, multi-step process, remains the primary cause of death for these patients. Although the mechanisms involved in metastasis have not been fully elucidated, considerable evidence suggests that metastatic spread is mediated by rare cells within the heterogeneous primary tumor that acquire the ability to invade into the bloodstream. In the bloodstream, they can travel to distant sites, sometimes remaining undetected and in a quiescent state for an extended period of time before they establish distant metastases in the bone, lung, liver, or brain. These occult micrometastatic cells (circulating tumor cells, CTCs) are rare, yet their prognostic significance has been demonstrated in both metastatic and non-metastatic breast cancer patients. Because repeated tumor tissue collection is typically not feasible and peripheral blood draws are minimally invasive, serial CTC enumeration might provide "real-time liquid biopsy" snapshots that could be used to identify early-stage breast cancer patients with micrometastatic disease who are at risk for disease progression and monitor treatment response in patients with advanced disease. In addition, characterizing CTCs might aid in the development of novel, personalized therapies aimed at eliminating micrometastases. This review describes current CTC isolation, detection, and characterization strategies in operable breast cancer. PMID:27481009

  4. Survival of Sami cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Soininen, Leena; Pokhrel, Arun; Dyba, Tadek; Pukkala, Eero; Hakulinen, Timo

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The incidence of cancer among the indigenous Sami people of Northern Finland is lower than among the Finnish general population. The survival of Sami cancer patients is not known, and therefore it is the object of this study. Study design The cohort consisted of 2,091 Sami and 4,161 non-Sami who lived on 31 December 1978 in the two Sami municipalities of Inari and Utsjoki, which are located in Northern Finland and are 300–500 km away from the nearest central hospital. The survival experience of Sami and non-Sami cancer patients diagnosed in this cohort during 1979–2009 was compared with that of the Finnish patients outside the cohort. Methods The Sami and non-Sami cancer patients were matched to other Finnish cancer patients for gender, age and year of diagnosis and for the site of cancer. An additional matching was done for the stage at diagnosis. Cancer-specific survival analyses were made using the Kaplan–Meier method and Cox regression modelling. Results There were 204 Sami and 391 non-Sami cancer cases in the cohort, 20,181 matched controls without matching with stage, and 7,874 stage-matched controls. In the cancer-specific analysis without stage variable, the hazard ratio for Sami was 1.05 (95% confidence interval 0.85–1.30) and for non-Sami 1.02 (0.86–1.20), indicating no difference between the survival of those groups and other patients in Finland. Likewise, when the same was done by also matching the stage, there was no difference in cancer survival. Conclusion Long distances to medical care or Sami ethnicity have no influence on the cancer patient survival in Northern Finland. PMID:22765936

  5. Clinical study and numerical simulation of brain cancer dynamics under radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawrocki, S.; Zubik-Kowal, B.

    2015-05-01

    We perform a clinical and numerical study of the progression of brain cancer tumor growth dynamics coupled with the effects of radiotherapy. We obtained clinical data from a sample of brain cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy and compare it to our numerical simulations to a mathematical model of brain tumor cell population growth influenced by radiation treatment. We model how the body biologically receives a physically delivered dose of radiation to the affected tumorous area in the form of a generalized LQ model, modified to account for the conversion process of sublethal lesions into lethal lesions at high radiation doses. We obtain good agreement between our clinical data and our numerical simulations of brain cancer progression given by the mathematical model, which couples tumor growth dynamics and the effect of irradiation. The correlation, spanning a wide dataset, demonstrates the potential of the mathematical model to describe the dynamics of brain tumor growth influenced by radiotherapy.

  6. Clinical applications of modern imaging technology: stereo image formation and location of brain cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dezong; Wang, Jinxiang

    1994-05-01

    It is very important to locate the tumor for a patient, who has cancer in his brain. If he only gets X-CT or MRI pictures, the doctor does not know the size, shape location of the tumor and the relation between the tumor and other organs. This paper presents the formation of stereo images of cancer. On the basis of color code and color 3D reconstruction. The stereo images of tumor, brain and encephalic truncus are formed. The stereo image of cancer can be round on X, Y, Z-coordinates to show the shape from different directions. In order to show the location of tumor, stereo image of tumor and encephalic truncus are provided on different angles. The cross section pictures are also offered to indicate the relation of brain, tumor and encephalic truncus on cross sections. In this paper the calculating of areas, volume and the space between cancer and the side of the brain are also described.

  7. Tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R arrests growth of breast-cancer brain metastasis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Miwa, Shinji; Zhang, Nan; Hoffman, Robert M; Zhao, Ming

    2015-02-20

    Brain metastasis is a morbid, treatment-resistant, end-stage frequent occurrence in breast cancer patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R on breast cancer brain metastases. High brain-metastatic variants of murine 4T1 breast cancer cells expressing red fluorescent protein (RFP) were injected orthotopically in the mammary fat pad in non-transgenic nude mice or in the left ventricle of non-transgenic nude mice and transgenic nude mice expressing nestin-driven green fluorescent protein (ND-GFP). ND-GFP mice express GFP in nascent blood vessels. In the orthotopically-injected mice, the primary tumor was surgically-resected in order to allow brain metastasis to develop. At various time points, the tumors and vasculature in the brain were imaged by confocal and stereo fluorescence microscopy. Some of the breast cancer cells that reached the brain extravasated and grew perivascularly and some of the cells proliferated within the vasculature. S. typhimurium A1-R significantly inhibited brain metastasis in both metastatic models and increased survival of the orthotopically-transplanted, primary-tumor-resected mice (p<0.05). The results of the present study suggest the clinical potential of bacterial therapy of breast cancer brain metastasis.

  8. Novel Nanotechnologies for Brain Cancer Therapeutics and Imaging.

    PubMed

    Ferroni, Letizia; Gardin, Chiara; Della Puppa, Alessandro; Sivolella, Stefano; Brunello, Giulia; Scienza, Renato; Bressan, Eriberto; D'Avella, Domenico; Zavan, Barbara

    2015-11-01

    Despite progress in surgery, radiotherapy, and in chemotherapy, an effective curative treatment of brain cancer, specifically malignant gliomas, does not yet exist. The efficacy of current anti-cancer strategies in brain tumors is limited by the lack of specific therapies against malignant cells. Besides, the delivery of the drugs to brain tumors is limited by the presence of the blood-brain barrier. Nanotechnology today offers a unique opportunity to develop more effective brain cancer imaging and therapeutics. In particular, the development of nanocarriers that can be conjugated with several functional molecules including tumor-specific ligands, anticancer drugs, and imaging probes, can provide new devices which are able to overcome the difficulties of the classical strategies. Nanotechnology-based approaches hold great promise for revolutionizing brain cancer medical treatments, imaging, and diagnosis.

  9. MicroRNAs Linked to Trastuzumab Resistance, Brain Metastases | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers have tied increased levels of a microRNA (miRNA) to resistance to the targeted therapy trastuzumab (Herceptin) in women with HER2-positive breast cancer. Another research team has discovered a “signature” of miRNAs in brain metastases in patients with melanoma—a signature that is also present in the primary tumor and could identify melanoma patients at increased risk of brain metastases. |

  10. [Sexy cancer--sexuality for cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Peleg-Nesher, Sharon; Yachini, Brurya; Inbar, Moshe

    2009-09-01

    Sexuality is a basic need for every human being as long as he or she is alive, irrespective of age or health status. Approximately 23,500 individuals are diagnosed with cancer each year in Israel and join the 120,000 cancer patients currently living in Israel. The results of cancer treatments are traditionally assessed and based on the outcome regarding mortality versus survival. An equally important aspect to be addressed in this assessment must relate to quality of life. One of the more painful insults to the quality of life of cancer patients relates to the deleterious effects on sexuality. This article aims to present physicians with the spectrum of sexuality-related issues which are encountered by cancer patients and their partners, starting from the moment of diagnosis, throughout the various stages of treatment and to provide basic knowledge. Many individuals contracting cancer have difficulty dealing with the issue of sexuality. They are typically embarrassed and feel uneasy when asking health care providers about such a non-life threatening issue. Partners similarly feel both shame and guilt. In many cases sexuality, intimacy and emotional attachment are important aspects and may be essential for survival. Addressing these issues during treatment can provide patients with a sense of security, avoiding embarrassment and further exacerbation of such problems. Unfortunately, little has been done to develop an optimal interventional program, although standard sexual treatments have often been applied. Prospective clinical research and outcomes are missing. The physician can use the well-known PLISSIT model (1978): to provide sexuality involvement on different levels. The very new BETTER model (2004) can help emphasize that cancer treatment and the disease have an influence on intimacy and sexuality.

  11. [Sexy cancer--sexuality for cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Peleg-Nesher, Sharon; Yachini, Brurya; Inbar, Moshe

    2009-09-01

    Sexuality is a basic need for every human being as long as he or she is alive, irrespective of age or health status. Approximately 23,500 individuals are diagnosed with cancer each year in Israel and join the 120,000 cancer patients currently living in Israel. The results of cancer treatments are traditionally assessed and based on the outcome regarding mortality versus survival. An equally important aspect to be addressed in this assessment must relate to quality of life. One of the more painful insults to the quality of life of cancer patients relates to the deleterious effects on sexuality. This article aims to present physicians with the spectrum of sexuality-related issues which are encountered by cancer patients and their partners, starting from the moment of diagnosis, throughout the various stages of treatment and to provide basic knowledge. Many individuals contracting cancer have difficulty dealing with the issue of sexuality. They are typically embarrassed and feel uneasy when asking health care providers about such a non-life threatening issue. Partners similarly feel both shame and guilt. In many cases sexuality, intimacy and emotional attachment are important aspects and may be essential for survival. Addressing these issues during treatment can provide patients with a sense of security, avoiding embarrassment and further exacerbation of such problems. Unfortunately, little has been done to develop an optimal interventional program, although standard sexual treatments have often been applied. Prospective clinical research and outcomes are missing. The physician can use the well-known PLISSIT model (1978): to provide sexuality involvement on different levels. The very new BETTER model (2004) can help emphasize that cancer treatment and the disease have an influence on intimacy and sexuality. PMID:20070056

  12. Whole-brain radiotherapy and high-dose methylprednisolone for elderly patients with primary central nervous system lymphoma: Results of North Central Cancer Treatment Group (NCCTG) 96-73-51

    SciTech Connect

    Laack, Nadia N.; Ballman, Karla V.; Brown, Paul B.; O'Neill, Brian Patrick . E-mail: boneill@mayo.edu

    2006-08-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy, toxicity, and survival of whole-brain radiotherapy-treated (WBRT) and high-dose methylprednisolone (HDMP)-treated in elderly patients with primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL). Methods and Materials: Patients with PCNSL who were 70 years and older received 1 g of methylprednisolone daily for 5 days, 30 days after WBRT. Patients then received 1 g of methylprednisolone every 28 days until progression. The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS) at 6 months. Results were compared with those in patients on the previous North Central Cancer Treatment Group (NCCTG) trial who received pre-WBRT cytoxan, adriamycin, vincristine, prednisone (CHOP) and high-dose cytarabine (CHOP-WBRT). A planned interim analysis was performed. The current regimen would be considered inactive if survival was not improved from patients treated with CHOP-WBRT. Results: Nineteen patients were accrued between 1998 and 2003. Median age was 76 years. Interim analysis revealed a 6-month survival of 33%, resulting in closure of the trial. Toxicity, OS, and event-free survival (EFS) were similar to those in patients more than 70 years of age who received CHOP-WBRT. The subgroup of patients who received HDMP had longer OS (12.1 vs. 7.0 months, p = 0.76) and EFS (11.7 vs. 4.0 months, p = 0.04) compared with the CHOP-WBRT patients alive 60 days after the start of treatment. Conclusions: Patients on-study long enough to receive HDMP had prolongation of OS and EFS compared to patients receiving CHOP-WBRT. Although the numbers of patients are too small for statistical conclusions, the HDMP regimen deserves further study.

  13. Systemic treatments for brain metastases from breast cancer, non-small cell lung cancer, melanoma and renal cell carcinoma: an overview of the literature.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, Giuseppe; Di Stefano, Anna Luisa; Farina, Patrizia; Zagonel, Vittorina; Tabouret, Emeline

    2014-09-01

    The frequency of metastatic brain tumors has increased over recent years; the primary tumors most involved are breast cancer, lung cancer, melanoma and renal cell carcinoma. While radiation therapy and surgery remain the mainstay treatment in selected patients, new molecular drugs have been developed for brain metastases. Studies so far report interesting results. This review focuses on systemic cytotoxic drugs and, in particular, on new targeted therapies and their clinically relevant activities in brain metastases from solid tumors in adults.

  14. [Neurological complications in cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Hundsberger, Thomas; Roth, Patrick; Roelcke, Ulrich

    2014-08-20

    Neurological symptoms in cancer patients have a great impact on quality of life and need an interdisciplinary approach. They lead to significant impairment in activities of daily living (gait disorders, dizziness), a loss of patients independency (vegetative disturbances, wheel-chair dependency) and interfere with social activities (ban of driving in case of epilepsy). In this article we describe three main and serious neurological problems in the context of oncological patients. These are chemotherapy-induced polyneuropathy, malignant spinal cord compression and epileptic seizures. Our aim is to increase the awareness of neurological complications in cancer patients to improve patients care.

  15. Radiation-induced dementia in patients cured of brain metastases

    SciTech Connect

    DeAngelis, L.M.; Delattre, J.Y.; Posner, J.B.

    1989-06-01

    When a patient with cancer develops a brain metastasis, death is usually imminent, but aggressive treatment in some patients with limited or no systemic disease yields long-term survival. In such patients, delayed deleterious effects of therapy are particularly tragic. We report 12 patients who developed delayed complications of whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) given as sole treatment (4 patients) or in combination with surgical resection (8 patients). Within 5 to 36 months (median, 14) all patients developed progressive dementia, ataxia, and urinary incontinence causing severe disability in all and leading to death in 7. No patient had tumor recurrence when neurologic symptoms began. Cortical atrophy and hypodense white matter were identified by CT in all. Contrast-enhancing lesions were seen in 3 patients; 2 of the lesions yielded radionecrosis on biopsy. Autopsies on 2 patients revealed diffuse chronic edema of the hemispheric white matter in the absence of tumor recurrence. Corticosteroids and ventriculoperitoneal shunt offered significant but incomplete improvement in some patients. The total dose of WBRT was only 2,500 to 3,900 cGy, but daily fractions of 300 to 600 cGy were employed. We believe that these fractionation schedules, several of which are used commonly, predispose to delayed neurologic toxicity, and that more protracted schedules should be employed for the safe and efficacious treatment of good-risk patients with brain metastases. The incidence of WBRT-induced dementia was only 1.9 to 5.1% in the 2 populations reviewed here; however, this underestimates the incidence because only severely affected patients could be identified from chart review.

  16. Brain metastases as site of first and isolated recurrence of breast cancer: the role of systemic therapy after local treatment.

    PubMed

    Niwińska, Anna

    2016-10-01

    The role of systemic treatment was assessed after local therapy for breast cancer patients who developed central nervous system (CNS) metastases as a first and isolated recurrence. Subjects were 128 breast cancer patients with brain metastases as the first and isolated site of recurrence that were selected from 673 consecutive breast cancer patients with brain metastases treated at the same institution. Median survival from brain metastases in patients with and without systemic treatment after local therapy was respectively 15 and 4 months (p < 0.001). In patients with a Karnofsky Performance Status ≥70 and those <70, survival was respectively 16 and 5.5 months (p < 0.001). The median survival from brain metastasis in patients with solitary brain metastasis, with and without systemic treatment after local therapy, was respectively 22 and 7 months (p = 0.003). Cox multivariate analysis demonstrated that good performance status, solitary brain metastasis and systemic therapy undertaken after local treatment were factors which prolonged survival. However patient survival was adversely affected by those having leptomeningeal metastasis associated with brain parenchymal lesions. Systemic therapy, undertaken after local treatment improved survival in those patients with breast cancer and brain metastases as the site of first and isolated recurrence. Further study is required in order to fully establish the role of systemic treatment for this patient group.

  17. Brain damage following prophylactic cranial irradiation in lung cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Simó, Marta; Vaquero, Lucía; Ripollés, Pablo; Jové, Josep; Fuentes, Rafael; Cardenal, Felipe; Rodríguez-Fornells, Antoni; Bruna, Jordi

    2016-03-01

    Long-term toxic effects of prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) on cognition in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) patients have not yet been well-established. The aim of our study was to examine the cognitive toxic effects together with brain structural changes in a group of long-term SCLC survivors treated with PCI. Eleven SCLC patients, who underwent PCI ≥ 2 years before, were compared with an age and education matched healthy control group. Both groups were evaluated using a neuropsychological battery and multimodal structural magnetic resonance imaging. Voxel-based morphometry and Tract-based Spatial Statistics were used to study gray matter density (GMD) and white matter (WM) microstructural changes. Cognitive deterioration was correlated with GMD and Fractional Anisotropy (FA). Finally, we carried out a single-subject analysis in order to evaluate individual structural brain changes. Nearly half of the SCLC met criteria for cognitive impairment, all exhibiting a global worsening of cognitive functioning. Patients showed significant decreases of GMD in basal ganglia bilaterally (putamen and caudate), bilateral thalamus and right insula, together with WM microstructural changes of the entire corpus callosum. Cognitive deterioration scores correlated positively with mean FA values in the corpus callosum. Single-subject analysis revealed that GMD and WM changes were consistently observed in nearly all patients. This study showed neuropsychological deficits together with brain-specific structural differences in long-term SCLC survivors. Our results suggest that PCI therapy, possibly together with platinum-based chemotherapy, was associated to permanent long-term cognitive and structural brain effects in a SCLC population.

  18. A case report of gastric cancer with brain metastasis: Rare peripheral nervous system symptoms

    PubMed Central

    YANG, GE-LIANG; LUO, TIAN-HANG; ZHANG, HUI-QING; LING, CHANG-QUAN; LI, BAI

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer with brain metastasis is rare. The present study reports a case of gastric cancer with isolated brain metastasis 1 year after gastrectomy. To the best of our knowledge, there have been no prior reports of solitary brain metastasis from gastric cancer with peripheral nervous system symptoms. A distal gastrectomy was performed on a 60-year-old male patient with gastric cancer in November 2012. Postoperative pathological analysis revealed a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma with tumor invasion into the serosa and metastasis to one dissected lymph node. No abnormalities were found at follow-up examination. However, a tumor representing metastasis to the brain was recognized by a cranial enhanced magnetic resonance imaging examination 1 year after gastrectomy, which was performed when the patient exhibited numbness and thigmesthesia. The patient was administered 30 Gy of stereotactic radiotherapy, delivered in 5 fractions. The patient succumbed to disease 10 months subsequent to undergoing radiotherapy. This case report suggests that gastric cancer may re-present as brain metastasis with peripheral nervous system symptoms. PMID:27073571

  19. Outcomes After Whole Brain Reirradiation in Patients With Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Son, Christina H.; Jimenez, Rachel; Niemierko, Andrzej; Loeffler, Jay S.; Oh, Kevin S.; Shih, Helen A.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Patients with brain metastases are often treated with whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) for purposes of palliation. The treatment of those who experience subsequent intracranial disease progression can include a second course of WBRT, although there is controversy surrounding its safety and efficacy. This study examines the outcomes in patients at Massachusetts General Hospital who underwent reirradiation. Patients and Methods: We examined the medical records of 17 patients at Massachusetts General Hospital with brain metastases who were initially treated with WBRT between 2002 and 2008 and were subsequently retreated with a second course of WBRT. The median dose for the first course of WBRT was 35 Gy (range, 28-40 Gy), with a fraction size of 2 to 3 Gy (median, 2.5 Gy). The median dose at reirradiation was 21.6 Gy (range, 14-30 Gy), with a fraction size of 1.5 to 2 Gy (median, 1.8 Gy). Results: The second course of WBRT was administered upon radiographic disease progression in all patients. Of 10 patients with complete follow-up data, 8 patients experienced complete or partial symptom resolution, and 2 did not show clinical improvement. The time to radiographic progression was 5.2 months. The median overall survival for all patients after diagnosis of metastases was 24.7 months. The median survival time after initiation of reirradiation was 5.2 months (95% CI, 1.3-8.7). In 6 patients with stable extracranial disease, the median survival time after retreatment was 19.8 months (95% CI, 2.7-{infinity}), compared with 2.5 months (95% CI, 0.8-5.5) for those with extracranial disease progression (p = 0.05). Acute adverse reactions occurred in 70.5% of patients but were mild to moderate in severity. Conclusion: In select patients and especially those with stable extracranial disease, reirradiation may be an appropriate and effective intervention to provide symptomatic relief and slow intracranial disease progression. Side effects were minimal and did not

  20. [Whole Brain Irradiation and Hypo-fractionation Radiotherapy for the Metastases in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer].

    PubMed

    Gu, Xingting; Zhao, Yaqin; Xu, Feng

    2016-04-20

    Up to 40% non-small cell lung cancer patients developed brain metastasis during progression. Multiple brain metastases are common in non-small cell lung cancer. The prognosis of brain metastasis is poor with median survival of less than 1 year. Radio therapy for brain metastases has gradually developed from whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) to various radiation strategies. WBRT, surgery+WBRT, stereotactic radiotherapy+WBRT or WBRT with simultaneous integrated boost (SIB), etc. have better overall survival than those untreated patients. The damage of the cognitive function from WBRT has been realized recently, however, options of radiation strategies for long expected survival patients remain controversial. This paper will discuss different WBRT strategies and treatment side effects of non-small cell lung cancer with brain metastases. PMID:27118651

  1. Cancer of the Brain and Other Nervous System

    MedlinePlus

    ... at a Glance Show More At a Glance Estimated New Cases in 2016 23,770 % of All New Cancer Cases 1.4% Estimated Deaths in 2016 16,050 % of All Cancer ... of This Cancer : In 2013, there were an estimated 152,751 people living with brain and other ...

  2. Second cancer following cutaneous melanoma and cancers of the brain, thyroid, connective tissue, bone, and eye in Connecticut, 1935-82.

    PubMed

    Tucker, M A; Boice, J D; Hoffman, D A

    1985-12-01

    The risk of second primary cancers developing was evaluated in individuals with 6 rare tumors in Connecticut between 1935 and 1982. Small but significant excesses of all second cancers occurred in patients with cutaneous melanoma (42%), and cancers of the brain (59%), thyroid (49%), connective tissue (23%), bone (66%), and eye (40%). In individuals with cutaneous melanoma, the highest risks were for subsequent cutaneous melanomas [relative risk (RR) = 8.5] that persisted throughout all intervals of observation. The risk for second melanomas was higher in persons under age 40, consistent with a heritable component. Connective tissue tumors and breast cancers also occurred in excess. Among patients with brain cancer, an increase of melanoma was observed that may represent an underlying neural crest abnormality, although no excess of brain cancer was seen after melanoma. Reciprocal increases of bone cancer after connective tissue cancer and connective tissue cancer after bone cancer point to shared risk factors, such as high dose radiotherapy or genetic susceptibility states. An anticipated high risk of osteogenic sarcoma following Ewing's sarcoma was not seen. An excess of breast cancer (RR = 1.9) after thyroid cancer indicates common etiologic factors. Expected excesses of bilateral retinoblastoma and bone cancer after retinoblastoma were seen. Tumors commonly treated with alkylating agents or nitrosoureas (melanoma, brain, connective tissue) showed slightly elevated risks of acute nonlymphocytic leukemia. Prostate cancer was frequently found to be in excess, but this is likely an artifact due to ascertainment bias.

  3. Perioperative nutrition in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Daly, J M; Redmond, H P; Gallagher, H

    1992-01-01

    Cancer patients have the highest incidence of protein-calorie malnutrition seen in hospitalized patients, with significant malnutrition occurring in more than 30% of cancer patients undergoing major upper gastrointestinal procedures. Clinically significant malnutrition occurs as a result of diminished nutrient intake, increased nutrient losses, and tumor-induced derangements in host metabolism. In the absence of adequate exogenous nutrients, the body utilizes endogenous substrates to satisfy the ongoing requirements of both host and tumor for energy and protein. In those patients with malignant obstruction of the gastrointestinal tract, the tumor itself may induce diminished nutrient intake. Present day treatment modalities including gastrointestinal resection, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy compound these metabolic derangements, further increasing the risk of postoperative morbidity and death. The presence of malnutrition in cancer patients has prognostic importance. In a review of more than 3000 cancer patients, DeWys and colleagues identified significantly improved survival in those patients without weight loss compared with those had lost 6% of their body weight (Am J Med 69:491-497, 1980). Other investigators have noted increased postoperative morbidity and mortality associated with malnutrition. Early hypotheses suggested that reversal of weight loss would improve survival. The development and refinements of enteral and parenteral nutrition have provided the opportunity for studying the relationship between nutritional supplementation and postoperative prognosis. Nutrition support is therefore often instituted to improve nutritional status and thereby reduce the risks of postoperative complications. This article addresses the beneficial role of preoperative nutrition therapy in cancer patients.

  4. The risk of radiation-induced second cancers in the high to medium dose region: a comparison between passive and scanned proton therapy, IMRT and VMAT for pediatric patients with brain tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moteabbed, Maryam; Yock, Torunn I.; Paganetti, Harald

    2014-06-01

    The incidence of second malignant tumors is a clinically observed adverse late effect of radiation therapy, especially in organs close to the treatment site, receiving medium to high doses (>2.5 Gy). For pediatric patients, choosing the least toxic radiation modality is of utmost importance, due to their high radiosensitivity and small size. This study aims to evaluate the risk of second cancer incidence in the vicinity of the primary radiation field, for pediatric patients with brain/head and neck tumors and compare four treatment modalities: passive scattering and pencil beam scanning proton therapy (PPT and PBS), intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). For a cohort of six pediatric patients originally treated with PPT, additional PBS, IMRT and VMAT plans were created. Dose distributions from these plans were used to calculate the excess absolute risk (EAR) and lifetime attributable risk (LAR) for developing a second tumor in soft tissue and skull. A widely used risk assessment formalism was employed and compared with a linear model based on recent clinical findings. In general, LAR was found to range between 0.01%-2.8% for PPT/PBS and 0.04%-4.9% for IMRT/VMAT. PBS was associated with the lowest risk for most patients using carcinoma and sarcoma models, whereas IMRT and VMAT risks were comparable and the highest among all modalities. The LAR for IMRT/VMAT relative to PPT ranged from 1.3-4.6 for soft tissue and from 3.5-9.5 for skull. Larger absolute LAR was observed for younger patients and using linear risk models. The number of fields used in proton therapy and IMRT had minimal effect on the risk. When planning treatments and deciding on the treatment modality, the probability of second cancer incidence should be carefully examined and weighed against the possibility of developing acute side effects for each patient individually.

  5. The risk of radiation-induced second cancers in the high to medium dose region: a comparison between passive and scanned proton therapy, IMRT and VMAT for pediatric patients with brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Moteabbed, Maryam; Yock, Torunn I; Paganetti, Harald

    2014-06-21

    The incidence of second malignant tumors is a clinically observed adverse late effect of radiation therapy, especially in organs close to the treatment site, receiving medium to high doses (>2.5 Gy). For pediatric patients, choosing the least toxic radiation modality is of utmost importance, due to their high radiosensitivity and small size. This study aims to evaluate the risk of second cancer incidence in the vicinity of the primary radiation field, for pediatric patients with brain/head and neck tumors and compare four treatment modalities: passive scattering and pencil beam scanning proton therapy (PPT and PBS), intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). For a cohort of six pediatric patients originally treated with PPT, additional PBS, IMRT and VMAT plans were created. Dose distributions from these plans were used to calculate the excess absolute risk (EAR) and lifetime attributable risk (LAR) for developing a second tumor in soft tissue and skull. A widely used risk assessment formalism was employed and compared with a linear model based on recent clinical findings. In general, LAR was found to range between 0.01%-2.8% for PPT/PBS and 0.04%-4.9% for IMRT/VMAT. PBS was associated with the lowest risk for most patients using carcinoma and sarcoma models, whereas IMRT and VMAT risks were comparable and the highest among all modalities. The LAR for IMRT/VMAT relative to PPT ranged from 1.3-4.6 for soft tissue and from 3.5-9.5 for skull. Larger absolute LAR was observed for younger patients and using linear risk models. The number of fields used in proton therapy and IMRT had minimal effect on the risk. When planning treatments and deciding on the treatment modality, the probability of second cancer incidence should be carefully examined and weighed against the possibility of developing acute side effects for each patient individually. PMID:24828559

  6. Brain cancer mortality at a manufacturer of aerospace electromechanical systems.

    PubMed

    Park, R M; Silverstein, M A; Green, M A; Mirer, F E

    1990-01-01

    Standardized proportional mortality ratios and mortality odds ratios were calculated for 583 deaths between 1950 and 1986 among employees who had worked for at least 10 years at a facility manufacturing missile and aircraft guidance systems. There was a statistically significant excess of brain cancer proportional mortality (PMR = 16/3.8 = 4.2, p = .0001). Among hourly employees, 12 brain cancer deaths occurred for 2.7 expected (PMR = 4.4, p = .00005). The PMR for brain cancer increased from 1.8 (p = .45) among hourly workers with less than 20 years to 8.7 (p = .000003) in those with more than 20 years employment. Work in "clean rooms," where gyroscopes were assembled, was associated with the brain cancer excess but did not fully account for it. Among 105 deceased hourly women, all three brain cancer deaths occurred among gyro assemblers working in clean rooms, and the risk increased with duration in clean rooms. Although the proportion of brain cancer deaths among hourly men with clean-room experience was similar to that for women, only three of the seven male brain cancer deaths occurred in this group. The suspect agents include gyro fluids and chlorofluorocarbon solvents.

  7. Symptom control in the pregnant cancer patient.

    PubMed

    MacDougall, M K; LeGrand, S B; Walsh, D

    2000-12-01

    While much attention has been devoted to cytotoxic drugs and radiation therapy in the pregnant cancer patient, the drugs used for management of symptoms and complications related to cancer during pregnancy have been overlooked. There is substantial overlap between the symptoms of cancer and cancer management and the symptoms related to pregnancy. The mainstay of symptom management is drug therapy and the potential for a drug to be embryotoxic or teratogenic depends on when it is given. In general, drugs not proven safe in pregnancy should be withheld, especially during the first trimester. The few drugs that have been proven to be teratogenic are alcohol, thalidomide, the folic acid antagonists (which includes methotrexate), diethylstilbestrol, and the vitamin A isomers, but there is a good deal of uncertainty about many other therapeutic agents. Placental transport of drugs from mother to fetus must be taken into consideration from the fifth week of gestation to parturition. Although the first trimester is the time of most organ development in the fetus, the brain continues to develop throughout pregnancy and may be damaged later in pregnancy, resulting in diminished intelligence or behavioral problems. This review will focus on the treatment of the most common symptoms of cancer in a pregnant patient and the potential for fetal damage. PMID:11130478

  8. Endogenous lipoid pneumonia in a cachectic patient after brain injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ji; Mu, Jiao; Lin, Wei; Dong, Hongmei

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous lipoid pneumonia (EnLP) is an uncommon non-life-threatening inflammatory lung disease that usually occurs in patients with conditions such as lung cancers, primary sclerosing cholangitis, and undifferentiated connective tissue disease. Here we report a case of EnLP in a paralytic and cachectic patient with bronchopneumonia after brain injury. A 40-year-old man experienced a severe brain injury in an automobile accident. He was treated for 1 month and his status plateaued. However, he became paralyzed and developed cachexia and ultimately died 145 days after the accident. Macroscopically, multifocal yellowish firm nodules were visible on scattered gross lesions throughout the lungs. Histologically, many foam cells had accumulated within the alveoli and alveolar walls accompanied by a surrounding interstitial infiltration of lymphocytes. The findings were in accordance with a diagnosis of EnLP. Bronchopneumonia was also noted. To our knowledge, there have been few reports of EnLP associated with bronchopneumonia and cachexia after brain injury. This uncommon pathogenesis should be well recognized by clinicians and forensic pathologists. The case reported here should prompt medical staff to increase the nutritional status and fight pulmonary infections in patients with brain injury to prevent the development of EnLP. PMID:26097618

  9. Cancer Screening in Older Patients.

    PubMed

    Salzman, Brooke; Beldowski, Kathryn; de la Paz, Amanda

    2016-04-15

    Although cancer is the second leading cause of death among persons 65 years and older, there is a paucity of clinical trial data about the effectiveness and harms of cancer screening in this population. Given the heterogeneous nature of the older population, cancer screening in these patients should not be based on age alone. Studies suggest that a life expectancy of at least 10 years is necessary to derive a survival benefit from screening for breast and colorectal cancers; therefore, screening for these cancers is not recommended in those with a life expectancy of less than 10 years. Prostate cancer screening, if performed at all, should not be performed after 69 years of age. Cervical cancer screening may be stopped after 65 years of age if the patient has an adequate history of negative screening results. An individualized approach to cancer screening decisions involves estimating life expectancy, determining the potential benefits and harms of screenings, and weighing those benefits and harms in relation to the patient's values and preferences.

  10. A clinical analysis of brain metastasis in gynecologic cancer: a retrospective multi-institute analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Zoon; Kwon, Jae Hyun; Lim, Soyi

    2015-01-01

    This study analyzes the clinical characteristics of the brain metastasis (BM) of gynecologic cancer based on the type of cancer. In addition, the study examines the factors influencing the survival. Total 61 BM patients of gynecologic cancer were analyzed retrospectively from January 2000 to December 2012 in terms of clinical and radiological characteristics by using medical and radiological records from three university hospitals. There were 19 (31.1%) uterine cancers, 32 (52.5%) ovarian cancers, and 10 (16.4%) cervical cancers. The mean interval to BM was 25.4 months (21.6 months in ovarian cancer, 27.8 months in uterine cancer, and 33.1 months in cervical cancer). The mean survival from BM was 16.7 months (14.1 months in ovarian cancer, 23.3 months in uterine cancer, and 8.8 months in cervical cancer). According to a multivariate analysis of factors influencing survival, type of primary cancer, Karnofsky performance score, status of primary cancer, recursive partitioning analysis class, and treatment modality, particularly combined therapies, were significantly related to the overall survival. These results suggest that, in addition to traditional prognostic factors in BM, multiple treatment methods such as neurosurgery and combined chemoradiotherapy may play an important role in prolonging the survival for BM patients of gynecologic cancer.

  11. Informal caregiving for cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Romito, Francesca; Goldzweig, Gil; Cormio, Claudia; Hagedoorn, Mariët; Andersen, Barbara L

    2013-06-01

    According to the recent worldwide estimation by the GLOBOCAN project, in total, 12.7 million new cancer cases and 7.6 million cancer deaths occurred in 2008. The worldwide number of cancer survivors within 5 years of diagnosis has been estimated at be almost 28.8 million. Informal caregivers, such as family members and close friends, provide essential support to cancer patients. The authors of this report provide an overview of issues in the study of informal caregivers for cancer patients and long-term survivors in the United States and Europe, characterizing the caregivers commonly studied; the resources currently available to them; and their unmet needs, their psychosocial outcomes, and the psychosocial interventions tailored to their special circumstances. A broad overview of the state of research and knowledge, both in Europe and the United States, and observations on the directions for future research are provided.

  12. Informal Caregiving for Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Romito, Francesca; Goldzweig, Gil; Cormio, Claudia; Hagedoorn, Mariët; Andersen, Barbara L.

    2013-01-01

    According to the recent worldwide estimation by the GLOBOCAN project, in total, 12.7 million new cancer cases and 7.6 million cancer deaths occurred in 2008. The worldwide number of cancer survivors within 5 years of diagnosis has been estimated at be almost 28.8 million. Informal caregivers, such as family members and close friends, provide essential support to cancer patients. The authors of this report provide an overview of issues in the study of informal caregivers for cancer patients and long-term survivors in the United States and Europe, characterizing the caregivers commonly studied; the resources currently available to them; and their unmet needs, their psychosocial outcomes, and the psychosocial interventions tailored to their special circumstances. A broad overview of the state of research and knowledge, both in Europe and the United States, and observations on the directions for future research are provided. PMID:23695928

  13. Post-sampling mortality and non-response patterns in the English Cancer Patient Experience Survey: Implications for epidemiological studies based on surveys of cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Abel, Gary A.; Saunders, Catherine L.; Lyratzopoulos, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    Background Surveys of the experience of cancer patients are increasingly being introduced in different countries and used in cancer epidemiology research. Sampling processes, post-sampling mortality and survey non-response can influence the representativeness of cancer patient surveys. Methods We examined predictors of post-sampling mortality and non-response among patients initially included in the sampling frame of the English Cancer Patient Experience Survey. We also compared the respondents’ diagnostic case-mix to other relevant populations of cancer patients, including incident and prevalent cases. Results Of 109,477 initially sampled cancer patients, 6273 (5.7%) died between sampling and survey mail-out. Older age and diagnosis of brain, lung and pancreatic cancer were associated with higher risk of post-sampling mortality. The overall response rate was 67% (67,713 respondents), being >70% for the most affluent patients and those diagnosed with colon or breast cancer and <50% for Asian or Black patients, those under 35 and those diagnosed with brain cancer. The diagnostic case-mix of respondents varied substantially from incident or prevalent cancer cases. Conclusions Respondents to the English Cancer Patient Experience Survey represent a population of recently treated cancer survivors. Although patient survey data can provide unique insights for improving cancer care quality, features of survey populations need to be acknowledged when analysing and interpreting findings from studies using such data. PMID:26797675

  14. Brain Metastases in Patients With Germ Cell Tumors: Prognostic Factors and Treatment Options—An Analysis From the Global Germ Cell Cancer Group

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Darren R.; Lorch, Anja; Kramar, Andrew; Albany, Costantine; Einhorn, Lawrence H.; Giannatempo, Patrizia; Necchi, Andrea; Flechon, Aude; Boyle, Helen; Chung, Peter; Huddart, Robert A.; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Tryakin, Alexey; Sava, Teodoro; Winquist, Eric William; De Giorgi, Ugo; Aparicio, Jorge; Sweeney, Christopher J.; Cohn Cedermark, Gabriella; Powles, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To define characteristics, treatment response, and outcomes of men with brain metastases (BM) from germ cell tumors (GCT). Patients and Methods Data from 523 men with BM from GCT were collected retrospectively from 46 centers in 13 countries by using standardized questionnaires. Clinical features were correlated with overall survival (OS) as the primary end point. Results BM were present at initial diagnosis in 228 men (group A) and at relapse in 295 men (group B). OS at 3 years (3-year OS) was superior in group A versus group B (48% v 27%; P < .001). Multiple BM and the presence of liver or bone metastasis were independent adverse prognostic factors in both groups; primary mediastinal nonseminoma (group A) and elevations of α-fetoprotein of 100 ng/mL or greater or of human chorionic gonadotropin of 5,000 U/L or greater (group B) were additional independent adverse prognostic factors. Depending on these factors, the 3-year OS ranged from 0% to 70% in group A and from 6% to 52% in group B. In group A, 99% of patients received chemotherapy; multimodality treatment or high-dose chemotherapy was not associated with statistically improved survival in multivariable analysis. In group B, only 54% of patients received chemotherapy; multimodality treatment was associated with improved survival compared with single-modality therapy (hazard ratio, 0.51; 95% CI, 0.36 to 0.73; P < .001), as was high-dose compared with conventional-dose chemotherapy (hazard ratio, 0.41; 95% CI, 0.24 to 0.70; P = .001). Conclusion Men with BM from GCT have poor OS, particularly if additional risk factors are present. High-dose chemotherapy and multimodality treatment seemed to improve survival probabilities in men with BM at relapse. PMID:26460295

  15. Altered resting brain connectivity in persistent cancer related fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Hampson, Johnson P.; Zick, Suzanna M.; Khabir, Tohfa; Wright, Benjamin D.; Harris, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    There is an estimated 3 million women in the US living as breast cancer survivors and persistent cancer related fatigue (PCRF) disrupts the lives of an estimated 30% of these women. PCRF is associated with decreased quality of life, decreased sleep quality, impaired cognition and depression. The mechanisms of cancer related fatigue are not well understood; however, preliminary findings indicate dysfunctional activity in the brain as a potential factor. Here we investigate the relationship between PCRF on intrinsic resting state connectivity in this population. Twenty-three age matched breast cancer survivors (15 fatigued and 8 non-fatigued) who completed all cancer-related treatments at least 12 weeks prior to the study, were recruited to undergo functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (fcMRI). Intrinsic resting state networks were examined with both seed based and independent component analysis methods. Comparisons of brain connectivity patterns between groups as well as correlations with self-reported fatigue symptoms were performed. Fatigued patients displayed greater left inferior parietal lobule to superior frontal gyrus connectivity as compared to non-fatigued patients (P < 0.05 FDR corrected). This enhanced connectivity was associated with increased physical fatigue (P = 0.04, r = 0.52) and poor sleep quality (P = 0.04, r = 0.52) in the fatigued group. In contrast greater connectivity in the non-fatigued group was found between the right precuneus to the periaqueductal gray as well as the left IPL to subgenual cortex (P < 0.05 FDR corrected). Mental fatigue scores were associated with greater default mode network (DMN) connectivity to the superior frontal gyrus (P = 0.05 FDR corrected) among fatigued subjects (r = 0.82) and less connectivity in the non-fatigued group (r = −0.88). These findings indicate that there is enhanced intrinsic DMN connectivity to the frontal gyrus in breast cancer survivors with persistent fatigue. As

  16. Altered resting brain connectivity in persistent cancer related fatigue.

    PubMed

    Hampson, Johnson P; Zick, Suzanna M; Khabir, Tohfa; Wright, Benjamin D; Harris, Richard E

    2015-01-01

    There is an estimated 3 million women in the US living as breast cancer survivors and persistent cancer related fatigue (PCRF) disrupts the lives of an estimated 30% of these women. PCRF is associated with decreased quality of life, decreased sleep quality, impaired cognition and depression. The mechanisms of cancer related fatigue are not well understood; however, preliminary findings indicate dysfunctional activity in the brain as a potential factor. Here we investigate the relationship between PCRF on intrinsic resting state connectivity in this population. Twenty-three age matched breast cancer survivors (15 fatigued and 8 non-fatigued) who completed all cancer-related treatments at least 12 weeks prior to the study, were recruited to undergo functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (fcMRI). Intrinsic resting state networks were examined with both seed based and independent component analysis methods. Comparisons of brain connectivity patterns between groups as well as correlations with self-reported fatigue symptoms were performed. Fatigued patients displayed greater left inferior parietal lobule to superior frontal gyrus connectivity as compared to non-fatigued patients (P < 0.05 FDR corrected). This enhanced connectivity was associated with increased physical fatigue (P = 0.04, r = 0.52) and poor sleep quality (P = 0.04, r = 0.52) in the fatigued group. In contrast greater connectivity in the non-fatigued group was found between the right precuneus to the periaqueductal gray as well as the left IPL to subgenual cortex (P < 0.05 FDR corrected). Mental fatigue scores were associated with greater default mode network (DMN) connectivity to the superior frontal gyrus (P = 0.05 FDR corrected) among fatigued subjects (r = 0.82) and less connectivity in the non-fatigued group (r = -0.88). These findings indicate that there is enhanced intrinsic DMN connectivity to the frontal gyrus in breast cancer survivors with persistent fatigue. As

  17. Her-2 overexpression increases the metastatic outgrowth of breast cancer cells in the brain.

    PubMed

    Palmieri, Diane; Bronder, Julie L; Herring, Jeanne M; Yoneda, Toshiyuki; Weil, Robert J; Stark, Andreas M; Kurek, Raffael; Vega-Valle, Eleazar; Feigenbaum, Lionel; Halverson, Douglas; Vortmeyer, Alexander O; Steinberg, Seth M; Aldape, Kenneth; Steeg, Patricia S

    2007-05-01

    Retrospective studies of breast cancer patients suggest that primary tumor Her-2 overexpression or trastuzumab therapy is associated with a devastating complication: the development of central nervous system (brain) metastases. Herein, we present Her-2 expression trends from resected human brain metastases and data from an experimental brain metastasis assay, both indicative of a functional contribution of Her-2 to brain metastatic colonization. Of 124 archival resected brain metastases from breast cancer patients, 36.2% overexpressed Her-2, indicating an enrichment in the frequency of tumor Her-2 overexpression at this metastatic site. Using quantitative real-time PCR of laser capture microdissected epithelial cells, Her-2 and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mRNA levels in a cohort of 12 frozen brain metastases were increased up to 5- and 9-fold, respectively, over those of Her-2-amplified primary tumors. Co-overexpression of Her-2 and EGFR was also observed in a subset of brain metastases. We then tested the hypothesis that overexpression of Her-2 increases the colonization of breast cancer cells in the brain in vivo. A subclone of MDA-MB-231 human breast carcinoma cells that selectively metastasizes to brain (231-BR) overexpressed EGFR; 231-BR cells were transfected with low (4- to 8-fold) or high (22- to 28-fold) levels of Her-2. In vivo, in a model of brain metastasis, low or high Her-2-overexpressing 231-BR clones produced comparable numbers of micrometastases in the brain as control transfectants; however, the Her-2 transfectants yielded 3-fold greater large metastases (>50 microm(2); P < 0.001). Our data indicate that Her-2 overexpression increases the outgrowth of metastatic tumor cells in the brain in this model system. PMID:17483330

  18. Non-coding RNAs in cancer brain metastasis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kerui; Sharma, Sambad; Venkat, Suresh; Liu, Keqin; Zhou, Xiaobo; Watabe, Kounosuke

    2016-01-01

    More than 90% of cancer death is attributed to metastatic disease, and the brain is one of the major metastatic sites of melanoma, colon, renal, lung and breast cancers. Despite the recent advancement of targeted therapy for cancer, the incidence of brain metastasis is increasing. One reason is that most therapeutic drugs can't penetrate blood-brain-barrier and tumor cells find the brain as sanctuary site. In this review, we describe the pathophysiology of brain metastases to introduce the latest understandings of metastatic brain malignancies. This review also particularly focuses on non-coding RNAs and their roles in cancer brain metastasis. Furthermore, we discuss the roles of the extracellular vesicles as they are known to transport information between cells to initiate cancer cell-microenvironment communication. The potential clinical translation of non-coding RNAs as a tool for diagnosis and for treatment is also discussed in this review. At the end, the computational aspects of non-coding RNA detection, the sequence and structure calculation and epigenetic regulation of non-coding RNA in brain metastasis are discussed.

  19. Isolated brain metastases as first site of recurrence in prostate cancer: case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Craig, J.; Woulfe, J.; Sinclair, J.; Malone, S.

    2015-01-01

    Fewer than 2% of patients with metastatic prostate cancer (pca) develop brain metastases. Autopsy series have confirmed the rarity of brain metastases. When present, brain metastases occur in end stage, once the pca is castrate-resistant and spread to other sites is extensive. Here, we present a rare case of a patient with pca who developed a solitary parenchymal brain metastasis as first site of relapse 9 years after radical therapy. The patient underwent craniotomy and excision of the tumour. A second recurrence was also isolated to the brain. In the literature, pca patients with brain metastases have a poor mean survival of 1–7.6 months. The patient in our case report experienced a relatively favourable outcome, surviving 19 months after his initial brain relapse. PMID:26715888

  20. S100B and S100B autoantibody as biomarkers for early detection of brain metastases in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Puvenna, Vikram; Brennan, Chanda; Mahmoud, Shamseldeen; Wang, Xiao-Feng; Phillips, Michael; Janigro, Damir; Mazzone, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background S100B is an astrocytic protein that enters the blood stream when there is disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Over time, antibodies against S100B develop in the sera of patients who experience persistent or repeated BBB disruptions. We explored the use of serum S100B protein and S100B autoantibodies for the detection of brain metastasis in patients with lung cancer. Methods One hundred and twenty eight untreated patients with lung cancer who had brain imaging performed as part of their routine evaluation, participated. Serum S100B protein levels were measured by direct ELISA and S100B autoantibody levels by reverse ELISA. These levels in patients with brain metastases were compared alone and in combination to those without brain metastases. Results Eighteen (14%) patients had brain metastasis at the time of lung cancer diagnosis. An S100B cutoff of 0.058 ng/mL had a sensitivity of 89% and specificity of 43% for brain metastasis. When an autoantibody threshold of <2.00 absorbance units was used in conjunction with S100B, the sensitivity remained at 89%, and the specificity increased to 58%. The overall accuracy was 51% with S100B alone, improving to 62.5% when combined with autoantibodies. Conclusions Serum S100B and S100B autoantibody levels may help to identify which lung cancer patients have brain metastases. PMID:27652205

  1. S100B and S100B autoantibody as biomarkers for early detection of brain metastases in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Puvenna, Vikram; Brennan, Chanda; Mahmoud, Shamseldeen; Wang, Xiao-Feng; Phillips, Michael; Janigro, Damir; Mazzone, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background S100B is an astrocytic protein that enters the blood stream when there is disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Over time, antibodies against S100B develop in the sera of patients who experience persistent or repeated BBB disruptions. We explored the use of serum S100B protein and S100B autoantibodies for the detection of brain metastasis in patients with lung cancer. Methods One hundred and twenty eight untreated patients with lung cancer who had brain imaging performed as part of their routine evaluation, participated. Serum S100B protein levels were measured by direct ELISA and S100B autoantibody levels by reverse ELISA. These levels in patients with brain metastases were compared alone and in combination to those without brain metastases. Results Eighteen (14%) patients had brain metastasis at the time of lung cancer diagnosis. An S100B cutoff of 0.058 ng/mL had a sensitivity of 89% and specificity of 43% for brain metastasis. When an autoantibody threshold of <2.00 absorbance units was used in conjunction with S100B, the sensitivity remained at 89%, and the specificity increased to 58%. The overall accuracy was 51% with S100B alone, improving to 62.5% when combined with autoantibodies. Conclusions Serum S100B and S100B autoantibody levels may help to identify which lung cancer patients have brain metastases.

  2. Brain metastasis in lung cancer: Building a molecular and systems-level understanding to improve outcomes.

    PubMed

    Ebben, Johnathan D; You, Ming

    2016-09-01

    Lung cancer is a clinically difficult disease with rising disease burden around the world. Unfortunately, most lung cancers present at a clinically advanced stage. Of these cancers, many also present with brain metastasis which complicates the clinical picture. This review summarizes current knowledge on the molecular basis of lung cancer brain metastases. We start from the clinical perspective, aiming to provide a clinical context for a significant problem that requires much deeper scientific investigation. We review new research governing the metastatic process, including tumor cell signaling, establishment of a receptive tumor niches in the brain and evaluate potential new therapeutic options that take advantage of these new scientific advances. Lung cancer remains the largest single cause of cancer mortality in the United States (Siegel et al., 2015). This continues to be the clinical picture despite significant advances in therapy, including the advent of targeted molecular therapies and newly adopted immunotherapies for certain subtypes of lung cancer. In the vast majority of cases, lung cancer presents as advanced disease; in many instances, this advanced disease state is intimately associated with micro and macrometastatic disease (Goldberg et al., 2015). For both non-small cell lung cancer and small cell lung cancer patients, the predominant metastatic site is the brain, with up to 68% of patients with mediastinal lymph node metastasis eventually demonstrating brain metastasis (Wang et al., 2009).The frequency (incidence) of brain metastasis is highest in lung cancers, relative to other common epithelial malignancies (Schouten et al., 2002). Other studies have attempted to predict the risk of brain metastasis in the setting of previously non-metastatic disease. One of the largest studies to do this, analyzing historical data from 1973 to 2011 using the SEER database revealed a 9% risk of patients with previously non-metastatic NSCLC developing brain

  3. Brain Morphometry using MRI in Schizophrenia Patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abanshina, I.; Pirogov, Yu.; Kupriyanov, D.; Orlova, V.

    2010-01-01

    Schizophrenia has been the focus of intense neuroimaging research. Although its fundamental pathobiology remains elusive, neuroimaging studies provide evidence of abnormalities of cerebral structure and function in patients with schizophrenia. We used morphometry as a quantitative method for estimation of volume of brain structures. Seventy eight right-handed subjects aged 18-45 years were exposed to MRI-examination. Patients were divided into 3 groups: patients with schizophrenia, their relatives and healthy controls. The volumes of interested structures (caudate nucleus, putamen, ventricles, frontal and temporal lobe) were measured using T2-weighted MR-images. Correlations between structural differences and functional deficit were evaluated.

  4. Thromboembolism in Patients with Cancer.

    PubMed

    Büyükçelik, Abdullah; Akbulut, Hakan

    2004-03-01

    One hundred and forty years ago, Armand Trousseau described phlegmasia alba dolens as a sign of internal malignancy. Nowadays, it is commonly believed that the presence malignant tumaor increases the risk of venous thromboembolism (i.e deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism) However, cancer is usually associated with other factors such as old age, extensive surgery,immobility, etc., which may predispose to thromboembolism. The majority of thrombotic events occur in the venous system; the incidence of arterial thrombosis is much lower.Recurrent thromboembolism in cancer patients frequently and diminishes the quality of life of the patients.Furthermore, if the thromboembolism is massive, destipte of early and aggressive treatment, it may result in death. In this article, we review thromboembolic complications in cancer patients.

  5. Hypertension in Patients with Cancer

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Vinicius Barbosa; Silva, Eduardo Nani; Ribeiro, Mario Luiz; Martins, Wolney de Andrade

    2015-01-01

    There is a known association between chemotherapy and radiotherapy for treatment of cancer patients and development or worsening of hypertension. The aim of this article is to review this association. A literature search was conducted for articles reporting this association on the databases PubMed, SciELO and LILACS between 1993 and 2013. There was a high coprevalence of hypertension and cancer, since both diseases share the same risk factors, such as sedentary lifestyle, obesity, smoking, unhealthy diet and alcohol abuse. The use of chemotherapy and adjuvant drugs effective in the treatment of cancer increased the survival rate of these patients and, consequently, increased the incidence of hypertension. We described the association between the use of angiogenesis inhibitors (bevacizumab, sorafenib and sunitinib), corticosteroids, erythropoietin and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with the development of hypertension. We also described the relationship between hypertension and carotid baroreceptor injury secondary to cervical radiotherapy. Morbidity and mortality increased in patients with cancer and hypertension without proper antihypertensive treatment. We concluded that there is need for early diagnosis, effective monitoring and treatment strategies for hypertension in cancer patients in order to reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. PMID:25742420

  6. Mycobacterium arupense in Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Al Hamal, Zainab; Jordan, Mary; Hachem, Ray Y.; Alawami, Hussain M.; Alburki, Abdussalam M.; Yousif, Ammar; Deshmukh, Poonam; Jiang, Ying; Chaftari, Ann-Marie; Raad, Issam I.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Mycobacterium arupense is a slow-growing, nonchromogenic, acid-fast bacillus. Its clinical spectrum, epidemiology, and frequency of colonization versus true infection remain unknown. We evaluated the clinical significance of M arupense and positive cultures from cancer patients. We retrospectively reviewed records of all cancer patients treated at our institution between 2007 and 2014 to identify those who had positive cultures for M arupense. Mycobacterium arupense was identified by sequencing the 16S rRNA and hsp65 genes. A total of 53patients had positive cultures, 100% of which were isolated from respiratory specimens. Of these, 7 patients met the American Thoracic Society/Infectious Diseases Society of America criteria for a definitive diagnosis of M arupense infection, 14 cases were considered to be probable infections, and 29 cases were considered to be possible infections. Of the included patients, 13 received therapy for M arupense infection and 40 did not. The outcomes of treated and untreated patients did not differ significantly. No relapses of M arupense infection. In addition, there were no M arupense-related deaths in either group. In cancer patients, M arupense appears to be mostly a commensal organism rather than a pathogen. Patients who did or did not receive treatment had similar outcomes. Validation of these findings in a larger prospective trial is warranted. PMID:27057825

  7. [Weight loss in cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Lordick, Florian; Hacker, Ulrich

    2016-02-01

    Cancer patients are regularly affected by malnutrition which often leads to a worsened quality of life and activity in daily living, more side effects and complications during anticancer treatment and shorter survival times. The early diagnosis and treatment of malnutrition are therefore relevant components of oncological treatment. The assessment of the nutritional status and determination of the body-mass-index should be done in every patient with cancer. The clinical examination delivers important findings and indications for malnutrition. Bioimpedance analysis can deliver additional objective information. The treatment of malnutrition should start early and follows a step-wise escalation reaching from nutritional counseling to enteral nutritional support to parenteral nutrition.

  8. Immunotherapy of Brain Cancers: The Past, the Present, and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Lisheng; Hoa, Neil; Bota, Daniela A.; Natividad, Josephine; Howat, Andrew; Jadus, Martin R.

    2010-01-01

    Treatment of brain cancers, especially high grade gliomas (WHO stage III and IV) is slowly making progress, but not as fast as medical researchers and the patients would like. Immunotherapy offers the opportunity to allow the patient's own immune system a chance to help eliminate the cancer. Immunotherapy's strength is that it efficiently treats relatively small tumors in experimental animal models. For some patients, immunotherapy has worked for them while not showing long-term toxicity. In this paper, we will trace the history of immunotherapy for brain cancers. We will also highlight some of the possible directions that this field may be taking in the immediate future for improving this therapeutic option. PMID:21437175

  9. CAVEOLIN-1 expression in brain metastasis from lung cancer predicts worse outcome and radioresistance, irrespective of tumor histotype.

    PubMed

    Duregon, Eleonora; Senetta, Rebecca; Pittaro, Alessandra; Verdun di Cantogno, Ludovica; Stella, Giulia; De Blasi, Pierpaolo; Zorzetto, Michele; Mantovani, Cristina; Papotti, Mauro; Cassoni, Paola

    2015-10-01

    Brain metastases develop in one-third of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer and are associated with a dismal prognosis, irrespective of surgery or chemo-radiotherapy. Pathological markers for predicting outcomes after surgical resection and radiotherapy responsiveness are still lacking. Caveolin 1 has been associated with chemo- and radioresistance in various tumors, including non-small-cell lung cancer. Here, caveolin 1 expression was assessed in a series of 69 brain metastases from non-small-cell lung cancer and matched primary tumors to determine its role in predicting survival and radiotherapy responsiveness. Only caveolin 1 expression in brain metastasis was associated with poor prognosis and an increased risk of death (log rank test, p = 0.015). Moreover, in the younger patients (median age of <54 years), caveolin 1 expression neutralized the favorable effect of young age on survival compared with the older patients. Among the radiotherapy-treated patients, an increased risk of death was detected in the group with caveolin 1-positive brain metastasis (14 out of 22 patients, HR=6.839, 95% CI 1.849 to 25.301, Wald test p = 0.004). Overall, caveolin 1 expression in brain metastasis from non-small-cell lung cancer is independently predictive of worse outcome and radioresistance and could become an additional tool for personalized therapy in the critical subset of brain-metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer patients.

  10. Radio-frequency radiation exposure from AM radio transmitters and childhood leukemia and brain cancer.

    PubMed

    Ha, Mina; Im, Hyoungjune; Lee, Mihye; Kim, Hyun Joo; Kim, Byung-Chan; Gimm, Yoon-Myoung; Pack, Jeong-Ki

    2007-08-01

    Leukemia and brain cancer patients under age 15 years, along with controls with respiratory illnesses who were matched to cases on age, sex, and year of diagnosis (1993-1999), were selected from 14 South Korean hospitals using the South Korean Medical Insurance Data System. Diagnoses were confirmed through the South Korean National Cancer Registry. Residential addresses were obtained from medical records. A newly developed prediction program incorporating a geographic information system that was modified by the results of actual measurements was used to estimate radio-frequency radiation (RFR) exposure from 31 amplitude modulation (AM) radio transmitters with a power of 20 kW or more. A total of 1,928 leukemia patients, 956 brain cancer patients, and 3,082 controls were analyzed. Cancer risks were estimated using conditional logistic regression adjusted for residential area, socioeconomic status, and community population density. The odds ratio for all types of leukemia was 2.15 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.00, 4.67) among children who resided within 2 km of the nearest AM radio transmitter as compared with those resided more than 20 km from it. For total RFR exposure from all transmitters, odds ratios for lymphocytic leukemia were 1.39 (95% CI: 1.04, 1.86) and 1.59 (95% CI: 1.19, 2.11) for children in the second and third quartiles, respectively, versus the lowest quartile. Brain cancer and infantile cancer were not associated with AM RFR.

  11. Self-Reported Cognitive Outcomes in Patients With Brain Metastases Before and After Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, Ansa Maer; Scherwath, Angela; Ernst, Gundula; Lanfermann, Heinrich; Bremer, Michael; Steinmann, Diana

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Patients with brain metastases may experience treatment-related cognitive deficits. In this study, we prospectively assessed the self-reported cognitive abilities of patients with brain metastases from any solid primary cancer before and after irradiation of the brain. Methods and Materials: The treatment group (TG) consisted of adult patients (n=50) with brain metastases who received whole or partial irradiation of the brain without having received prior radiation therapy (RT). The control group (CG) consisted of breast cancer patients (n=27) without cranial involvement who were treated with adjuvant RT. Patients were recruited between May 2008 and December 2010. Self-reported cognitive abilities were acquired before RT and 6 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months after irradiation. The information regarding the neurocognitive status was collected by use of the German questionnaires for self-perceived deficits in attention (FEDA) and subjectively experienced everyday memory performance (FEAG). Results: The baseline data showed a high proportion of self-perceived neurocognitive deficits in both groups. A comparison between the TG and the CG regarding the course of self-reported outcomes after RT showed significant between-group differences for the FEDA scales 2 and 3: fatigue and retardation of daily living activities (P=.002) and decrease in motivation (P=.032) with an increase of attention deficits in the TG, but not in the CG. There was a trend towards significance in FEDA scale 1: distractibility and retardation of mental processes (P=.059) between the TG and the CG. The FEAG assessment presented no significant differences. An additional subgroup analysis within the TG was carried out. FEDA scale 3 showed significant differences in the time-related progress between patients with whole-brain RT and those receiving hypofractionated stereotactic RT (P=.025), with less decrease in motivation in the latter group. Conclusion: Self-reported attention declined in

  12. A Multidisciplinary Breast Cancer Brain Metastases Clinic: The University of North Carolina Experience

    PubMed Central

    McKee, Megan J.; Keith, Kevin; Deal, Allison M.; Garrett, Amy L.; Wheless, Amy A.; Green, Rebecca L.; Benbow, Julie M.; Dees, E. Claire; Carey, Lisa A.; Ewend, Matthew G.; Zagar, Timothy M.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Breast cancer brain metastasis (BCBM) confers a poor prognosis and is unusual in requiring multidisciplinary care in the metastatic setting. The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC-CH) has created a BCBM clinic to provide medical and radiation oncology, neurosurgical, and supportive services to this complex patient population. We describe organization and design of the clinic as well as characteristics, treatments, and outcomes of the patients seen in its first 3 years. Methods. Clinical and demographic data were collected from patients in a prospectively maintained database. Descriptive statistics are reported as percentages and means. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate time-to-event outcomes. Results. Sixty-five patients were seen between January 2012 and January 2015. At the time of presentation to the BCBM clinic, most patients (74%) had multiple (≥2) brain metastases and had received prior systemic (77%) and whole-brain radiation therapy and/or central nervous system stereotactic radiosurgery (65%) in the metastatic setting. Seventy-eight percent returned for a follow-up visit; 32% were enrolled in a clinical trial. Median time from diagnosis of brain metastasis to death was 2.11 years (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.31–2.47) for all patients, 1.15 years (95% CI 0.4–2.43) for triple-negative breast cancer, 1.31 years (95% CI 0.51–2.52) for hormone receptor-positive/HER2− breast cancer, and 3.03 years (95% CI lower limit 1.94, upper limit not estimable) for HER2+ breast cancer (p = .0037). Conclusion. Patients with BCBM have unique and complex needs that require input from several oncologic disciplines. The development of the UNC-CH multidisciplinary BCBM clinic is a model that can be adapted at other centers to provide coordinated care for patients with a challenging and complex disease. Implications for Practice: Patients with breast cancer brain metastases often require unique multidisciplinary care to meet the

  13. [Optimization of medical-diagnostic process in patients with traumatic brain injury during early rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Cherednichenko, T V; Popov, A V

    2012-01-01

    The problem of cardiovascular disease and cancer, the effects of traumatic brain injury is now one of the major health and social problems. Every year in Ukraine registered 200 thousand cases of the victims of traumatic brain injury. Of these, 30% of people then have persistent signs of disability that results in a disability, sometimes painful existence the patient and his relatives. Therefore, in order to bring man back into society after a traumatic brain injury, to the rehabilitation phase of treatment, immediately after the stabilization of the patient.

  14. Limited value of CT brain scans in the staging of small cell lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.H.; Windham, W.W.; Allen, J.H.; Greco, F.A.

    1983-01-01

    Computed tomography of the brain was performed as part of the initial staging evaluation of 84 patients with small cell lung cancer. Brain scans indicative of metastatic disease were obtained in 12 (14%) patients, two of whom had no neurologic signs or symptoms. One of these had no other extrathoracic disease. Brainscans without evidence of metastatic disease were obtained in 72 patients, 58 (80.5%) of whom had no signs or symptoms suggestive of metastatic intracranial disease. In the 14 patients with neurologic symptoms but negative computed tomographic scans, other explanations than brain metastases were found. It was concluded that head scanning is a sensitive and accurate method of detecting central nervous system metastases in patients with small cell lung cancer. However, head computed tomography should not be included as part of the initial staging evaluation of the neurologically asymptomatic patients. In only one of 60 such patients did the brain scan change the initial clinical staging, which included chest films, liver and bone scans, and bone marrow biopsy.

  15. Brain metastatic cancer cells release microRNA-181c-containing extracellular vesicles capable of destructing blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Tominaga, Naoomi; Kosaka, Nobuyoshi; Ono, Makiko; Katsuda, Takeshi; Yoshioka, Yusuke; Tamura, Kenji; Lötvall, Jan; Nakagama, Hitoshi; Ochiya, Takahiro

    2015-04-01

    Brain metastasis is an important cause of mortality in breast cancer patients. A key event during brain metastasis is the migration of cancer cells through blood-brain barrier (BBB). However, the molecular mechanism behind the passage through this natural barrier remains unclear. Here we show that cancer-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs), mediators of cell-cell communication via delivery of proteins and microRNAs (miRNAs), trigger the breakdown of BBB. Importantly, miR-181c promotes the destruction of BBB through the abnormal localization of actin via the downregulation of its target gene, PDPK1. PDPK1 degradation by miR-181c leads to the downregulation of phosphorylated cofilin and the resultant activated cofilin-induced modulation of actin dynamics. Furthermore, we demonstrate that systemic injection of brain metastatic cancer cell-derived EVs promoted brain metastasis of breast cancer cell lines and are preferentially incorporated into the brain in vivo. Taken together, these results indicate a novel mechanism of brain metastasis mediated by EVs that triggers the destruction of BBB.

  16. Fever of unknown origin in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Loizidou, A; Aoun, M; Klastersky, J

    2016-05-01

    Fever of unknown origin (FUO) remains a challenging clinical problem, namely in patients with cancer. In cancer patients, FUO may be due to the cancer itself, as it is the case of hematological malignancies; digestive tumors (colon cancer, liver metastases) are significantly associated with FUO and infection can be demonstrated in some cases. Prevention with G-CSF and empirical antimicrobial therapy are essential approaches for the management of FUO in cancer patients. New diagnostic approaches, such as PET imaging, should be further evaluated in cancer patients with FUO. PMID:26995082

  17. Molecular advances to treat cancer of the brain.

    PubMed

    Fathallah-Shaykh, H M; Zhao, L J; Mickey, B; Kafrouni, A I

    2000-06-01

    Malignant primary and metastatic brain tumours continue to be associated with poor prognosis. Nevertheless, recent advances in molecular medicine, specifically in the strategies of gene therapy, targeting tumour cells, anti-angiogenesis and immunotherapy, have created novel tools that may be of therapeutic value. To date, gene therapy trials have not yet demonstrated clinical efficacy because of inherent defects in vector design. Despite this, advances in adenoviral technology, namely the helper-dependent adenoviral constructs (gutless) and the uncovering of brain parenchymal cells as effective and necessary targets for antitumour benefits of adenoviral-mediated gene transfer, suggest that developments in vector design may be approaching the point of clinical utility. Targeting tumour cells refers to strategies that destroy malignant but spare normal cells. A new assortment of oncolytic viruses have emerged, capable of specific lysis of cancer tissue while sparing normal cells and propagating until they reach the tumour borders. Furthermore, peptides have been transformed into bullets that specifically seek and destroy cancer cells. The concept of tumour angiogenesis has been challenged by new but still very controversial findings that tumour cells themselves may form blood channels. These results may lead to the redirecting of the molecular targets toward anti-angiogenesis in some tumours including glioblastoma multiform. Unfortunately, our knowledge regarding the immunological ignorance of the tumour is still limited. Even so, newly discovered molecules have shed light on novel pathways leading to the escape of the tumour from the immune system. Finally, significant limitations in our current experimental tumour models may soon be overcome by firstly, the development of models of reproducible organ-specific tumours in non-inbred animals and secondly applying genomics to individualize therapy for a particular tumour in a specific patient.

  18. Pesticides and brain cancer linked in orchard farmers of Kashmir

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Abdul Rashid; Wani, Muhammed Afzal; Kirmani, A. R.; Raina, T. H.

    2010-01-01

    were unrelated to pesticides. Out of 389 patients, 71.7% (279 out of 389) were males and 28.3% (110 out of 389) including 7 members of three families, 6 were females and 1 male. Conclusion: All orchard-related 389 patients had high grade tumors as compared to the non-pesticide tumors. Mortality in pesticide exposed tumors was 12%. Higher levels of SCE were found in 31.9% (124 out of 389) patients and decreased levels in only 45.3% (176 out of 389) orchard-related patients. The significantcase/control odds ratio (OR) of 0.28, hospital control SCE OR of 1.1 and family control SCE OR of 1.5, points the finger of suspicion toward the link between pesticides and brain cancer. PMID:21584215

  19. It is time to reevaluate the management of patients with brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Kondziolka, Douglas; Kalkanis, Steven N; Mehta, Minesh P; Ahluwalia, Manmeet; Loeffler, Jay S

    2014-07-01

    There are many elements to the science that drives the clinical care of patients with brain metastases. Although part of an understanding that continues to evolve, a number of key historical misconceptions remain that commonly drive physicians' and researchers' attitudes and approaches. By understanding how these relate to current practice, we can better comprehend our available science to provide both better research and care. These past misconceptions include: Misconception 1: Once a primary cancer spreads to the brain, the histology of that primary tumor does not have much impact on response to chemotherapy, sensitivity to radiation, risk of further brain relapse, development of additional metastatic lesions, or survival. All tumor primary histologies are the same once they spread to the brain. They are the same in terms of the number of tumors, radiosensitivity, chemoresponsiveness, risk of further brain relapse, and survival. Misconception 2: The number of brain metastases matters. This number matters in terms of subsequent brain relapse, survival, and cognitive dysfunction; the precise number of metastases can also be used as a limit in determining which patients might be eligible for a particular treatment option. Misconception 3: Cancer in the brain is always a diffuse problem due to the presence of micrometastases. Misconception 4: Whole-brain radiation therapy invariably causes disabling cognitive dysfunction if a patient lives long enough. Misconception 5: Most brain metastases are symptomatic. Thus, it is not worth screening patients for brain metastases, especially because the impact on survival is minimal. The conduct and findings of past clinical research have led to conceptions that affect clinical care yet appear limiting. PMID:24662510

  20. [Interest of biological documentation on brain metastatic disease in breast cancer: A case report].

    PubMed

    Boissonneau, S; Faguer, R; Joubert, C; Fuentes, S; Metellus, P

    2015-08-01

    Breast cancer, after lung cancer, is the second major cause of brain metastases. In breast cancer, the prognosis is closely linked to the molecular subtype of the primary tumor. Targeted therapies, with or without cytotoxic treatment, have significantly modified overall survival in these patients. We report, the case of a patient suffering from breast cancer with brain metastasis in whom the biological documentation of the metastatic disease permitted to tailor the systemic treatment. Analysis of the surgical specimen revealed an immunohistochemical HER2 positive staining, which was not found in the primary tumor and therefore warranted trastuzumab administration. Another interesting insight based on this case report was to underline the phenotypic heterogeneity of the metastatic disease and its potential dynamic course as illustrated by the dissociated response to trastuzumab on body TEP-TDM in this particular patient. This case report also highlights the new place of the neurosurgeon in brain metastases management, not only as a participant in local treatment but also as a physician who is in fact involved in the delineation of the global oncological strategy in these patients as well as medical oncologists and radiation oncologists.

  1. Mutational profiling of brain metastasis from breast cancer: matched pair analysis of targeted sequencing between brain metastasis and primary breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Yun; Park, Kyunghee; Lim, Sung Hee; Kim, Hae Su; Yoo, Kwai Han; Jung, Ki Sun; Song, Haa-Na; Hong, Mineui; Do, In-Gu; Ahn, TaeJin; Lee, Se Kyung; Bae, Soo Youn; Kim, Seok Won; Lee, Jeong Eon; Nam, Seok Jin; Kim, Duk-Hwan; Jung, Hae Hyun; Kim, Ji-Yeon; Ahn, Jin Seok; Im, Young-Hyuck; Park, Yeon Hee

    2015-12-22

    Although breast cancer is the second most common cause of brain metastasis with a notable increase of incidence, genes that mediate breast cancer brain metastasis (BCBM) are not fully understood. To study the molecular nature of brain metastasis, we performed gene expression profiling of brain metastasis and matched primary breast cancer (BC). We used the Ion AmpliSeq Cancer Panel v2 covering 2,855 mutations from 50 cancer genes to analyze 18 primary BC and 42 BCBM including 15 matched pairs. The most common BCBM subtypes were triple-negative (42.9%) and basal-like (36.6%). In a total of 42 BCBM samples, 32 (76.2%) harbored at least one mutation (median 1, range 0-7 mutations). Frequently detected somatic mutations included TP53 (59.5%), MLH1 (14.3%), PIK3CA (14.3%), and KIT (7.1%). We compared BCBM with patient-matched primary BC specimens. There were no significant differences in mutation profiles between the two groups. Notably, gene expression in BCBM such as TP53, PIK3CA, KIT, MLH1, and RB1 also seemed to be present in primary breast cancers. The TP53 mutation frequency was higher in BCBM than in primary BC (59.5% vs 38.9%, respectively). In conclusion, we found actionable gene alterations in BCBM that were maintained in primary BC. Further studies with functional testing and a delineation of the role of these genes in specific steps of the metastatic process should lead to a better understanding of the biology of metastasis and its susceptibility to treatment.

  2. Chemotherapy Altered Brain Functional Connectivity in Women with Breast Cancer: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Dumas, Julie A.; Makarewicz, Jenna; Schaubhut, Geoffrey J.; Devins, Robert; Albert, Kimberly; Dittus, Kim; Newhouse, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Adjuvant chemotherapy is associated with improvements in long-term cancer survival. However, reports of cognitive impairment following treatment emphasize the importance of understanding the long-term effects of chemotherapy on brain functioning. Cognitive deficits found in chemotherapy patients suggest a change in brain functioning that affects specific cognitive domains such as attentional processing and executive functioning. This study examined the processes potentially underlying these changes in cognition by examining brain functional connectivity pre- and post-chemotherapy in women with breast cancer. Functional connectivity examines the temporal correlation between spatially remote brain regions in an effort to understand how brain networks support specific cognitive functions. Nine women diagnosed with breast cancer completed a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) session before chemotherapy, one month after, and one year after the completion of chemotherapy. Seed-based functional connectivity analyses were completed using seeds in the intraparietal sulcus (IPS) to examine connectivity in the dorsal anterior attention network and in the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) to examine connectivity in the default mode network. Results showed decreased functional connectivity one month after chemotherapy that partially returned to baseline at one year in the dorsal attention network. Decreased connectivity was seen in the default mode network at one month and one year following chemotherapy. In addition, increased subjective memory complaints were noted at one month and one year post-chemotherapy. These findings suggest a detrimental effect of chemotherapy on brain functional connectivity that is potentially related to subjective cognitive assessment. PMID:23852814

  3. Oral complications in cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Carl, W.

    1983-02-01

    Ionizing radiation used in treating the head and neck area produces oral side effects such as mucositis, salivary changes, trismus and radiation caries. Sequelae of cancer chemotherapy often include oral stomatitis, myelosuppression and immunosuppression. Infections of dental origin in compromised patients are potentially lethal. Specific programs to eliminate dental pathology before radiation and chemotherapy, and to maintain oral hygiene during and after therapy, will minimize these complications.

  4. Exercise Improves Physical Function and Mental Health of Brain Cancer Survivors: Two Exploratory Case Studies.

    PubMed

    Levin, Gregory T; Greenwood, Kenneth M; Singh, Favil; Tsoi, Daphne; Newton, Robert U

    2016-06-01

    Background Malignant brain tumors are unpredictable and incurable, with 5-year survival rates less than 30%. The poor prognosis combined with intensive treatment necessitates the inclusion of complementary and supportive therapies that optimize quality of life and reduce treatment-related declines in health. Exercise therapy has been shown to be beneficial in other cancer populations, but no evidence is available for brain cancer survivors. Therefore, we report results from 2 preliminary cases. Methods Two female patients diagnosed with glioblastoma multiforme and oligodendroglioma participated in a structured and supervised 12-week exercise program. The program consisted of two 1-hour resistance and aerobic exercise sessions per week and additional self-managed aerobic sessions. Outcome measures of strength, cardiovascular fitness, and several psychological indicators (depression, anxiety, and quality of life) were recorded at baseline, after 6 weeks and at the conclusion of the intervention. Results Exercise was well tolerated; both participants completed all 24 sessions and the home-based component with no adverse effects. Objective outcome measures displayed positive responses relating to reduced morbidity. Similar positive responses were found for psychological outcomes. Scores on the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale showed clinically meaningful improvements in depression and total distress. Conclusion These findings provide initial evidence that, despite the difficulties associated with brain cancer treatment and survivorship, exercise may be safe and beneficial and should be considered in the overall management of patients with brain cancer.

  5. Exosome Delivered Anticancer Drugs Across the Blood-Brain Barrier for Brain Cancer Therapy in Danio Rerio

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tianzhi; Martin, Paige; Fogarty, Brittany; Brown, Alison; Schurman, Kayla; Phipps, Roger; Yin, Viravuth P.; Lockman, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The blood–brain barrier (BBB) essentially restricts therapeutic drugs from entering into the brain. This study tests the hypothesis that brain endothelial cell derived exosomes can deliver anticancer drug across the BBB for the treatment of brain cancer in a zebrafish (Danio rerio) model. Materials and Methods Four types of exosomes were isolated from brain cell culture media and characterized by particle size, morphology, total protein, and transmembrane protein markers. Transport mechanism, cell uptake, and cytotoxicity of optimized exosome delivery system were tested. Brain distribution of exosome delivered anticancer drugs was evaluated using transgenic zebrafish TG (fli1: GFP) embryos and efficacies of optimized formations were examined in a xenotransplanted zebrafish model of brain cancer model. Results Four exosomes in 30–100 diameters showed different morphologies and exosomes derived from brain endothelial cells expressed more CD63 tetraspanins transmembrane proteins. Optimized exosomes increased the uptake of fluorescent marker via receptor mediated endocytosis and cytotoxicity of anticancer drugs in cancer cells. Images of the zebrafish showed exosome delivered anticancer drugs crossed the BBB and entered into the brain. In the brain cancer model, exosome delivered anticancer drugs significantly decreased fluorescent intensity of xenotransplanted cancer cells and tumor growth marker. Conclusions Brain endothelial cell derived exosomes could be potentially used as a carrier for brain delivery of anticancer drug for the treatment of brain cancer. PMID:25609010

  6. Afatinib in Treatment-Naive Patients With EGFR-Mutated Lung Adenocarcinoma With Brain Metastasis: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Li, Shih-Hong; Hsieh, Meng-Heng; Fang, Yueh-Fu

    2015-10-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) were previously the standard first-line treatments for lung cancers with activating EGFR mutations. The first-generation reversible EGFR TKIs, gefitinib and erlotinib, demonstrated substantial efficacy in the treatment of brain metastases from EGFR-mutated lung adenocarcinoma. However, the efficacy of afatinib, the second-generation irreversible EGFR TKI, as the first-line treatment in lung adenocarcinoma patients with brain metastasis has yet to be evaluated.Here, we report cases of 3 patients who received afatinib alone as the first-line treatment in combination with whole-brain radiotherapy or following surgical resection of brain metastases. All 3 patients had EGFR L858R mutation. The first patient had lung adenocarcinoma with brain metastasis and no neurologic symptoms. After consultation, she received afatinib as a first-line treatment. Chest computed tomography and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed partial response. The second patient had lung adenocarcinoma accompanied with a metastatic brain lesion associated with seizures. This patient received whole-brain radiotherapy and afatinib treatment following brain MRI and subsequently showed significant regression of the brain metastasis. The third patient had strabismus of the right eye, and brain MRI showed a single tumor at the cerebellar pontine angle. This patient underwent surgical resection of the tumor followed by afatinib treatment. He refused adjuvant radiotherapy after surgery for brain metastasis. The brain MRI showed no recurrent brain metastasis, and the patient had relatively less neurologic deficiency.This series of 3 cases indicate that afatinib may be an appropriate first-line treatment alternative in patients having lung adenocarcinoma with EGFR mutations. Further retrospective analyses and prospective clinical trials are required to substantiate the efficacy of afatinib in the treatment of brain

  7. Computed tomography of the brain, chest, and abdomen in the preoperative assessment of non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Grant, D; Edwards, D; Goldstraw, P

    1988-01-01

    The benefit to be gained from carrying out computed tomography of brain and abdomen in addition to the chest has been evaluated retrospectively in 114 consecutive patients with non-small cell lung cancer who, on the basis of history, clinical examination, chest radiography, and bronchoscopy had been considered potentially operable. Computed tomography of the chest showed potentially inoperable tumour in 37 patients, of whom 25 had tumour confined to the chest. Three patients were shown to have malignant disease within the mediastinum and abdomen; five within the mediastinum and brain; and four within the mediastinum, abdomen, and brain. Computed tomography of the abdomen disclosed deposits in nine patients, but in only two were the abnormalities restricted to the abdomen. Computed tomography of the brain showed metastases in 10 patients, of whom only one had metastatic disease confined to the brain. Thus three patients had isolated deposits in the abdomen and brain. In 12 patients the identification of metastases in the abdomen and brain removed the need for mediastinoscopy. Preoperative computed tomography of the abdomen and brain detected occult metastases in 15 patients (13%) in this study. In three patients the extrathoracic abnormality proved the only contraindication to surgery, but in the other 12 it provided valuable corroborative evidence of incurability and facilitated the assessment of the mediastinal abnormality. PMID:2851880

  8. Depression in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Cvetković, Jovana; Nenadović, Milutin

    2016-06-30

    Breast cancer is the third most common illness in the world and the most frequent malignant disease with women. Cytotoxic therapy is connected to significant psychiatric adverse effects, and the appearance of depressive symptoms is the most common. The main goal is determining the degree of depression with breast cancer patients in the oncology ward of the University Clinical Hospital in Niš and its connection to their marital status, age, level of education, economic status and the number of therapy cycles. This research is a prospective study. The statistical data analysis included measures of descriptive and analytical statistics. The presence of depressive symptoms of different intensity was showed in 76.00% of the interviewees in group I, and the second included 77.4%. The frequency distributions show that 27.084% interviewees from the first group showed signs of depressive symptoms, while the second included 25%. The intensity of these symptoms categorizes them into the group of moderate to significantly expressed depressive states, so they require therapeutic treatment. Depression is significantly more often recorded with cancer patients receiving cytotoxic therapy; mild depression is the most common, followed by moderate and severe depression. PMID:27138829

  9. Breast cancer brain metastases responding to lapatinib plus capecitabine as second-line primary systemic therapy.

    PubMed

    Bergen, Elisabeth S; Berghoff, Anna S; Rudas, Margaretha; Preusser, Matthias; Bartsch, Rupert

    2015-06-01

    Brain metastases (BM) are diagnosed in up to 40% of HER2-positive breast cancer patients. Standard treatment includes local approaches such as whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT), radiosurgery, and neurosurgery. The landscape trial established primary systemic therapy as an effective and safe alternative to WBRT in selected patients with Her2-positive BM. We aim to further focus on the role of systemic therapy in oligosymptomatic patients by presenting this case report. We report on a 50-year-old patient diagnosed with multiple BM 5 years after early breast cancer diagnosis. As the patient was asymptomatic and had a favorable diagnosis-specific GPA score, she received primary systemic treatment with T-DM1. She achieved partial remission within the brain for eight treatment cycles and then progressed despite stable extracranial disease. As the patient remained asymptomatic and refused WBRT, we decided upon trastuzumab, lapatinib plus capecitabine as second-line therapy. Another partial remission of BM was observed; to date, she has received 11 treatment cycles without any sign of disease progression. In this case, WBRT was delayed by at least 14 months, again indicating the activity of systemic treatment in BM. Apparently, in selected patients, BM can be controlled with multiple lines of systemic therapy similar to extracranial disease. Further investigation of systemic treatment approaches is therefore warranted.

  10. SU-E-J-70: Feasibility Study of Dynamic Arc and IMRT Treatment Plans Utilizing Vero Treatment Unit and IPlan Planning Computer for SRS/FSRT Brain Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Huh, S; Lee, S; Dagan, R; Malyapa, R; Mendenhall, N; Mendenhall, W; Ho, M; Hough, D; Yam, M; Li, Z

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of utilizing Dynamic Arc (DA) and IMRT with 5mm MLC leaf of VERO treatment unit for SRS/FSRT brain cancer patients with non-invasive stereotactic treatments. The DA and IMRT plans using the VERO unit (BrainLab Inc, USA) are compared with cone-based planning and proton plans to evaluate their dosimetric advantages. Methods: The Vero treatment has unique features like no rotational or translational movements of the table during treatments, Dynamic Arc/IMRT, tracking of IR markers, limitation of Ring rotation. Accuracies of the image fusions using CBCT, orthogonal x-rays, and CT are evaluated less than ∼ 0.7mm with a custom-made target phantom with 18 hidden targets. 1mm margin is given to GTV to determine PTV for planning constraints considering all the uncertainties of planning computer and mechanical uncertainties of the treatment unit. Also, double-scattering proton plans with 6F to 9F beams and typical clinical parameters, multiple isocenter plans with 6 to 21 isocenters, and DA/IMRT plans are evaluated to investigate the dosimetric advantages of the DA/IMRT for complex shape of targets. Results: 3 Groups of the patients are divided: (1) Group A (complex target shape), CI's are same for IMRT, and DGI of the proton plan are better by 9.5% than that of the IMRT, (2) Group B, CI of the DA plans (1.91+/−0.4) are better than cone-based plan, while DGI of the DA plan is 4.60+/−1.1 is better than cone-based plan (5.32+/−1.4), (3) Group C (small spherical targets), CI of the DA and cone-based plans are almost the same. Conclusion: For small spherical targets, cone-based plans are superior to other 2 plans: DS proton and DA plans. For complex or irregular plans, dynamic and IMRT plans are comparable to cone-based and proton plans for complex targets.

  11. MRI of brain disease in veterinary patients part 1: Basic principles and congenital brain disorders.

    PubMed

    Hecht, Silke; Adams, William H

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is increasingly being used in the diagnosis of central nervous system disorders in veterinary patients and is quickly becoming the imaging modality of choice in evaluation of brain and intracranial disease. This article provides an overview of the basic principles of MRI, a description of sequences and their applications in brain imaging, and an approach to interpretation of brain MRI. A detailed discussion of imaging findings in general intracranial disorders including hydrocephalus, vasogenic edema, brain herniation, and seizure-associated changes, and the MR diagnosis of congenital brain disorders is provided. MRI evaluation of acquired brain disorders is described in a second companion article.

  12. Irinotecan and Whole-Brain Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Brain Metastases From Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2010-03-15

    Brain and Central Nervous System Tumors; Cognitive/Functional Effects; Long-term Effects Secondary to Cancer Therapy in Adults; Long-term Effects Secondary to Cancer Therapy in Children; Poor Performance Status; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  13. Brain cancer probed by native fluorescence and stokes shift spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yan; Liu, Cheng-hui; He, Yong; Pu, Yang; Li, Qingbo; Wang, Wei; Alfano, Robert R.

    2012-12-01

    Optical biopsy spectroscopy was applied to diagnosis human brain cancer in vitro. The spectra of native fluorescence, Stokes shift and excitation spectra were obtained from malignant meningioma, benign, normal meningeal tissues and acoustic neuroma benign tissues. The wide excitation wavelength ranges were used to establish the criterion for distinguishing brain diseases. The alteration of fluorescence spectra between normal and abnormal brain tissues were identified by the characteristic fluorophores under the excitation with UV to visible wavelength range. It was found that the ratios of the peak intensities and peak position in both spectra of fluorescence and Stokes shift may be used to diagnose human brain meninges diseases. The preliminary analysis of fluorescence spectral data from cancer and normal meningeal tissues by basic biochemical component analysis model (BBCA) and Bayes classification model based on statistical methods revealed the changes of components, and classified the difference between cancer and normal human brain meningeal tissues in a predictions accuracy rate is 0.93 in comparison with histopathology and immunohistochemistry reports (gold standard).

  14. Hemodynamic findings in patients with brain stroke

    PubMed Central

    Siebert, Janusz; Molisz, Andrzej; Trzeciak, Bartosz; Nyka, Walenty

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Standard procedures carried out at a stroke department in patients after a cerebral event may prove insufficient for monitoring hemodynamic indices. Impedance cardiography enables hemodynamic changes to be monitored non-invasively. The aim of the work was to describe hemodynamic parameters in patients with acute phase of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke and to analyse the correlation between the type of hemodynamic response and long-term prognosis. Material and methods The 45 consecutive subjects with ischemic stroke and 16 with a hemorrhagic stroke were examined additionally with impedance cardiography during the first day of hospitalization. The heart contractility, pump performance, afterload and preload indices were recorded and calculated automatically and the data analyzed in terms of 6-month mortality. Results We found a significant association between the systemic vascular resistance index, Heather index, stroke index, heart rate, systolic and diastolic and mean arterial blood pressure and mortality in patients with ischemic stroke (p = 0.002, p = 0.008, p = 0.012, p = 0.005, p = 0.007, p = 0.009, p = 0.002 respectively). Logistic regression analysis identified the thoracic fluid content as the most significant variable correlating with the non-survival of the patients with ischemic stroke and in the whole group (ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke). The significant parameters were also mean arterial pressure and stroke index in ischemic stroke (the correct answer ratio was 86.67%) and heart rate in the whole group (the correct answer ratio was 80.33%). There were no significant associations in hemorrhagic stroke. Conclusions The hemodynamic parameters correlate with long term prognosis in patients with ischemic brain stroke. PMID:22662014

  15. Access to Cancer Services for Rural Colorectal Cancer Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Laura-Mae; Cai, Yong; Larson, Eric H.; Dobie, Sharon A.; Wright, George E.; Goodman, David C.; Matthews, Barbara; Hart, L. Gary

    2008-01-01

    Context: Cancer care requires specialty surgical and medical resources that are less likely to be found in rural areas. Purpose: To examine the travel patterns and distances of rural and urban colorectal cancer (CRC) patients to 3 types of specialty cancer care services--surgery, medical oncology consultation, and radiation oncology consultation.…

  16. Serpins promote cancer cell survival and vascular co-option in brain metastasis.

    PubMed

    Valiente, Manuel; Obenauf, Anna C; Jin, Xin; Chen, Qing; Zhang, Xiang H-F; Lee, Derek J; Chaft, Jamie E; Kris, Mark G; Huse, Jason T; Brogi, Edi; Massagué, Joan

    2014-02-27

    Brain metastasis is an ominous complication of cancer, yet most cancer cells that infiltrate the brain die of unknown causes. Here, we identify plasmin from the reactive brain stroma as a defense against metastatic invasion, and plasminogen activator (PA) inhibitory serpins in cancer cells as a shield against this defense. Plasmin suppresses brain metastasis in two ways: by converting membrane-bound astrocytic FasL into a paracrine death signal for cancer cells, and by inactivating the axon pathfinding molecule L1CAM, which metastatic cells express for spreading along brain capillaries and for metastatic outgrowth. Brain metastatic cells from lung cancer and breast cancer express high levels of anti-PA serpins, including neuroserpin and serpin B2, to prevent plasmin generation and its metastasis-suppressive effects. By protecting cancer cells from death signals and fostering vascular co-option, anti-PA serpins provide a unifying mechanism for the initiation of brain metastasis in lung and breast cancers.

  17. Ethereal embodiment of cancer patients.

    PubMed

    van der Riet, P

    1999-10-01

    Ethereal embodiment is the attending and focusing on the body through discourses such as meditation, visualisation and massage, and the experiencing a new sense of the embodied being as balanced, connected, centred and of being made whole. This paper continues a previous article titled 'Massaged embodiment of cancer patients'. Data from my doctoral studies are analysed utilising crucial concepts of poststructuralism such as subjectivity, discourse, power and history to examine ethereal embodiment. This paper will address the advantages of visualisation and discusses the link between spirituality, embodiment, and memory.

  18. Brain Metastases from Breast Cancer and Response to Treatment with Eribulin: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Chang, Alex Y; Ying, Xu Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Brain metastases are common in patients with advanced breast cancer (BC), causing considerable morbidity and mortality. Eribulin is a microtubule dynamics inhibitor approved for treating certain patients with metastatic BC, previously treated with an anthracycline and a taxane. In the 301 phase 3 study in 1102 women with advanced BC, eribulin and capecitabine treatments did not differ for co-primary endpoints (overall survival [OS]: 15.9 vs 14.5 months, P = 0.056; progression-free survival [PFS]: 4.1 vs 4.2 months, P = 0.30). Here, we report outcomes for six patients (eribulin, n = 3; capecitabine, n = 3) who had received treatment for brain metastases from BC (BCBM) at baseline. All eribulin-treated patients experienced brain lesion shrinkage at some point during treatment, compared with one capecitabine-treated patient. Fewer patients in study 301 developed new BCBM with eribulin (13/544, 2.4%) compared with capecitabine (25/546, 4.6%). Eribulin does not cross the healthy blood-brain barrier (BBB), but could have the potential to do so after cranial radiation therapy. Capecitabine may cross the BBB and has demonstrated activity in BCBM. Data from these patients and previous cases suggest that further investigation of eribulin for BCBM may be warranted. PMID:26052228

  19. Second primary cancers in patients with urothelial cancers

    PubMed Central

    Altok, Muammer; Akdeniz, Fırat; Yıldız, Güner; Divrik, Rauf Taner

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the second primary cancers (SPCs) in patients with urothelial cancer (UC). Materials and Methods The records of 2,339 patients whose UC was diagnosed between January 1974 and December 2012 were reviewed. All data about characteristics of patients, of UC and, of SPC was, recorded digitally. We investigated the prevalence and the type of second or higher order cancers, and the factors associated with SPC. Results Total 260 patients (11.1%) had SPC, 14 had a third primary cancer and one had a fourth primary cancer. The most common SPC with UC was lung cancer (29.6%). Of all 260 with SPC, 64 (24.6%) had synchronous (within the 6 months) SPC, 120 (46.2%) had subsequent SPC and, 76 (29.2%) had antecedent SPC. The mean duration of SPC was 56 months in patients with subsequent SPC and 75.8 months in patients with antecedent SPC. The mean age at the time of diagnosis of UC was higher in patients with SPC. The ratio of male gender, body mass index, blood type, status of smoking and, occupational risk was similar in both groups. Total amount of smoking and the mean follow-up were higher in patients with SPC. Conclusions The majority of the patients with UC have long life expectancy. In patients with UC, the risk of having another cancer is quite higher than normal population. The physicians managing patients with UC should look for SPC. PMID:27617314

  20. Second primary cancers in patients with urothelial cancers

    PubMed Central

    Altok, Muammer; Akdeniz, Fırat; Yıldız, Güner; Divrik, Rauf Taner

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the second primary cancers (SPCs) in patients with urothelial cancer (UC). Materials and Methods The records of 2,339 patients whose UC was diagnosed between January 1974 and December 2012 were reviewed. All data about characteristics of patients, of UC and, of SPC was, recorded digitally. We investigated the prevalence and the type of second or higher order cancers, and the factors associated with SPC. Results Total 260 patients (11.1%) had SPC, 14 had a third primary cancer and one had a fourth primary cancer. The most common SPC with UC was lung cancer (29.6%). Of all 260 with SPC, 64 (24.6%) had synchronous (within the 6 months) SPC, 120 (46.2%) had subsequent SPC and, 76 (29.2%) had antecedent SPC. The mean duration of SPC was 56 months in patients with subsequent SPC and 75.8 months in patients with antecedent SPC. The mean age at the time of diagnosis of UC was higher in patients with SPC. The ratio of male gender, body mass index, blood type, status of smoking and, occupational risk was similar in both groups. Total amount of smoking and the mean follow-up were higher in patients with SPC. Conclusions The majority of the patients with UC have long life expectancy. In patients with UC, the risk of having another cancer is quite higher than normal population. The physicians managing patients with UC should look for SPC.

  1. Environmental effects on molecular biomarkers expression in pancreatic and brain cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mensah, Lawrence; Mallidi, Srivalleesha; Massodi, Iqbal; Anbil, Sriram; Mai, Zhiming; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2013-03-01

    A complete understanding of the biological mechanisms regulating devastating disease such as cancer remains elusive. Pancreatic and brain cancers are primary among the cancer types with poor prognosis. Molecular biomarkers have emerged as group of proteins that are preferentially overexpressed in cancers and with a key role in driving disease progression and resistance to chemotherapy. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a cell proliferative biomarker is particularly highly expressed in most cancers including brain and pancreatic cancers. The ability of EGFR to sustain prolong cell proliferation is augmented by biomarkers such as Bax, Bcl-XL and Bcl-2, proteins regulating the apoptotic process. To better understand the role and effect of the microenvironment on these biomarkers in pancreatic cancer (PaCa); we analysed two pancreatic tumor lines (AsPc-1 and MiaPaCa-2) in 2D, 3D in-vitro cultures and in orthotopic tumors at different growth stages. We also investigated in patient derived glioblastoma (GBM) tumor cultures, the ability to utilize the EGFR expression to specifically deliver photosensitizer to the cells for photodynamic therapy. Overall, our results suggest that (1) microenvironment changes affect biomarker expression; thereby it is critical to understand these effects prior to designing combination therapies and (2) EGFR expression in tumor cells indeed could serve as a reliable and a robust biomarker that could be used to design targeted and image-guided photodynamic therapy.

  2. miR-509 suppresses brain metastasis of breast cancer cells by modulating RhoC and TNF-α.

    PubMed

    Xing, F; Sharma, S; Liu, Y; Mo, Y-Y; Wu, K; Zhang, Y-Y; Pochampally, R; Martinez, L A; Lo, H-W; Watabe, K

    2015-09-10

    The median survival time of breast cancer patients with brain metastasis is less than 6 months, and even a small metastatic lesion often causes severe neurological disabilities. Because of the location of metastatic lesions, a surgical approach is limited and most chemotherapeutic drugs are ineffective owing to the blood brain barrier (BBB). Despite this clinical importance, the molecular basis of the brain metastasis is poorly understood. In this study, we have isolated RNA from samples obtained from primary breast tumors and also from brain metastatic lesions followed by microRNA profiling analysis. Our results revealed that the miR-509 is highly expressed in the primary tumors, whereas the expression of this microRNA is significantly decreased in the brain metastatic lesions. MicroRNA target prediction and the analysis of cytokine array for the cells ectopically expressed with miR-509 demonstrated that this microRNA was capable of modulating the two genes essential for brain invasion, RhoC and TNF-α that affect the invasion of cancer cells and permeability of BBB, respectively. Importantly, high levels of TNF-α and RhoC-induced MMP9 were significantly correlated with brain metastasis-free survival of breast cancer patients. Furthermore, the results of our in vivo experiments indicate that miR-509 significantly suppressed the ability of cancer cells to metastasize to the brain. These findings suggest that miR-509 has a critical role in brain metastasis of breast cancer by modulating the RhoC-TNF-α network and that this miR-509 axis may represent a potential therapeutic target or serve as a prognostic tool for brain metastasis.

  3. Familial cancer among consecutive uterine cancer patients in Sweden

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Uterine cancer (UC) represents 5.1% of all female malignancies in Sweden. Accumulation of UC in families occurs in around 5% of cases. We wanted to identify any familial association between UC and other selected cancers and to study the frequency of Lynch,Cowden and cancer syndromes among consecutive UC patients in Sweden. Methods 481 UC patients were included. Information on the cancer diagnoses of their relatives (first- (FDRs) and second-degree (SDRs) relatives and first cousins) was obtained. The relative frequencies of different cancers among relatives were compared to those in the Swedish general cancer population in 1970 and 2010. Families that fulfilled the criteria for hereditary cancer syndromes were tested for mutations in the causative genes. Families with at least one case of UC in addition to the index patient were compared to families with no additional cases to investigate possible characteristics of putative hereditary cancer syndromes. Results There was an increased prevalence of UC in our study population compared to the Swedish general cancer population in 1970 and 2010 (6% vs. 4% and 3%, respectively). Seven families had Lynch Syndrome according to the Amsterdam II criteria. No families fulfilled the criteria for Cowden syndrome. In total 13% of index patients had at least one relative with UC and these families tended to have more cases of early onset cancer among family members. In addition, 16% of index patients were diagnosed with at least one other cancer. No families fulfilled the criteria for Cowden syndrome. Conclusion We showed a familial clustering of UC among relatives of our index patients. Of the seven families with mutation-verified Lynch Syndrome, only one had been previously diagnosed, highlighting the need to increase gynecologists’ awareness of the importance of taking family history. Our data on multiple cancers and young age of onset in families with uterine cancer is compatible with the existence of additional

  4. Diagnosis of Brain Metastases from Lung Cancer Using a Modified Electromagnetism like Mechanism Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kun-Huang; Wang, Kung-Jeng; Adrian, Angelia Melani; Wang, Kung-Min; Teng, Nai-Chia

    2016-01-01

    Brain metastases are commonly found in patients that are diagnosed with primary malignancy on their lung. Lung cancer patients with brain metastasis tend to have a poor survivability, which is less than 6 months in median. Therefore, an early and effective detection system for such disease is needed to help prolong the patients' survivability and improved their quality of life. A modified electromagnetism-like mechanism (EM) algorithm, MEM-SVM, is proposed by combining EM algorithm with support vector machine (SVM) as the classifier and opposite sign test (OST) as the local search technique. The proposed method is applied to 44 UCI and IDA datasets, and 5 cancers microarray datasets as preliminary experiment. In addition, this method is tested on 4 lung cancer microarray public dataset. Further, we tested our method on a nationwide dataset of brain metastasis from lung cancer (BMLC) in Taiwan. Since the nature of real medical dataset to be highly imbalanced, the synthetic minority over-sampling technique (SMOTE) is utilized to handle this problem. The proposed method is compared against another 8 popular benchmark classifiers and feature selection methods. The performance evaluation is based on the accuracy and Kappa index. For the 44 UCI and IDA datasets and 5 cancer microarray datasets, a non-parametric statistical test confirmed that MEM-SVM outperformed the other methods. For the 4 lung cancer public microarray datasets, MEM-SVM still achieved the highest mean value for accuracy and Kappa index. Due to the imbalanced property on the real case of BMLC dataset, all methods achieve good accuracy without significance difference among the methods. However, on the balanced BMLC dataset, MEM-SVM appears to be the best method with higher accuracy and Kappa index. We successfully developed MEM-SVM to predict the occurrence of brain metastasis from lung cancer with the combination of SMOTE technique to handle the class imbalance properties. The results confirmed that MEM

  5. A Study Evaluating INIPARIB in Combination With Chemotherapy to Treat Triple Negative Breast Cancer Brain Metastasis

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-17

    Estrogen Receptor Negative (ER-Negative) Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor Negative (PR-Negative) Breast Cancer; Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 Negative (HER2-Negative) Breast Cancer; Brain Metastases

  6. No increase in brain cancer rates during period of expanding cell phone use

    Cancer.gov

    In a new examination of United States cancer incidence data, investigators at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) reported that incidence trends have remained roughly constant for glioma, the main type of brain cancer hypothesized to be related to cell ph

  7. Indium In 111 Pentetreotide in Treating Patients With Refractory Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-01

    Brain and Central Nervous System Tumors; Childhood Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis; Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Head and Neck Cancer; Intraocular Melanoma; Islet Cell Tumor; Kidney Cancer; Lung Cancer; Melanoma (Skin); Neoplastic Syndrome; Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Skin; Pheochromocytoma

  8. How Placebos Change the Patient's Brain

    PubMed Central

    Benedetti, Fabrizio; Carlino, Elisa; Pollo, Antonella

    2011-01-01

    Although placebos have long been considered a nuisance in clinical research, today they represent an active and productive field of research and, because of the involvement of many mechanisms, the study of the placebo effect can actually be viewed as a melting pot of concepts and ideas for neuroscience. Indeed, there exists not a single but many placebo effects, with different mechanisms and in different systems, medical conditions, and therapeutic interventions. For example, brain mechanisms of expectation, anxiety, and reward are all involved, as well as a variety of learning phenomena, such as Pavlovian conditioning, cognitive, and social learning. There is also some experimental evidence of different genetic variants in placebo responsiveness. The most productive models to better understand the neurobiology of the placebo effect are pain and Parkinson's disease. In these medical conditions, the neural networks that are involved have been identified: that is, the opioidergic–cholecystokinergic–dopaminergic modulatory network in pain and part of the basal ganglia circuitry in Parkinson's disease. Important clinical implications emerge from these recent advances in placebo research. First, as the placebo effect is basically a psychosocial context effect, these data indicate that different social stimuli, such as words and rituals of the therapeutic act, may change the chemistry and circuitry of the patient's brain. Second, the mechanisms that are activated by placebos are the same as those activated by drugs, which suggests a cognitive/affective interference with drug action. Third, if prefrontal functioning is impaired, placebo responses are reduced or totally lacking, as occurs in dementia of the Alzheimer's type. PMID:20592717

  9. Cancer-associated fibroblast promote transmigration through endothelial brain cells in three-dimensional in vitro models.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yoon Pyo; Lee, Joo Hyun; Gao, Ming-Qing; Kim, Baek Gil; Kang, Suki; Kim, Se Hoon; Cho, Nam Hoon

    2014-11-01

    Brain metastases are associated with high morbidity as well as with poor prognosis and survival in breast cancer patients. Despite its clinical importance, metastasis of breast cancer cells through the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is poorly understood. The objective of our study was to investigate whether cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) play crucial roles in breast cancer brain metastasis. Using a cell adhesion assays, in vitro BBB permeability and transmigration assays and soft agar colony formation assays, we investigated the physical roles of CAFs in breast cancer brain metastasis. We also performed immunofluorescence, flow cytometric analysis, Droplet Digital PCR and Simon™ Simple Western System to confirm changes in expression levels. We established two novel three-dimensional (3D) culture systems using a perpendicular slide chamber and applying 3D embedded culture method to reflect brain metastasis conditions. With a newly developed device, CAFs was proven to promote cell adhesion to human brain microvascular endothelial cells, in vitro BBB permeability and transmigration and colony formation of breast cancer cells. Furthermore, CAFs enhanced the invasive migration of breast cancer cells in two kinds of 3D cultures. These 3D models also reliably recapitulate the initial steps of BBB transmigration, micro-metastasis and colonization. Expression of integrin α5β1 and αvβ3, c-MET and α2,6-siayltransferase was increased in breast cancer cells that migrated through the BBB. In conclusion, based on our in vitro BBB and co-culture models, our data suggest that CAFs may play a role in breast cancer brain metastasis.

  10. Brain magnetic resonance imaging screening is not useful for HIV-1-infected patients without neurological symptoms.

    PubMed

    Nishijima, Takeshi; Gatanaga, Hiroyuki; Teruya, Katsuji; Tajima, Tsuyoshi; Kikuchi, Yoshimi; Hasuo, Kanehiro; Oka, Shinichi

    2014-10-01

    We investigated the diagnostic usefulness of brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) screening in HIV-1-infected patients without neurological symptoms in detecting intracranial diseases at early stages. In this retrospective analysis, the study patients were HIV-1-infected patients who underwent brain MRI scan in clinical practice between 2001 and 2013. We excluded patients with MRI for (1) follow-up examination for prediagnosed intracranial diseases, (2) cancer staging, (3) screening mycobacterium/bacteria/fungi disease proliferation in the brain, and (4) evaluation for meningitis/encephalitis. The study patients (n=485) were classified into two groups: those who underwent brain MRI scan without any neurological symptoms/signs (asymptomatic patients, n=158) and those who underwent MRI due to such symptoms (symptomatic patients, n=327). Asymptomatic patients had lower CD4 counts than symptomatic patients (median 78 versus 241/μl). Intracranial diseases were detected in three (2%) of the asymptomatic patients [two toxoplasmosis and one progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML)] compared to 58 (19%) of the symptomatic patients (the χ(2) test, p<0.01). The latter included toxoplasmosis (n=10), PML (n=7), cytomegalovirus encephalitis (n=3), primary central nervous system lymphoma (n=3), cryptococcoma/meningitis (n=3), and HIV-associated dementia (n=17). Among symptomatic patients, intracranial diseases were common in those with slurred speech (3/6, 50%), seizure (4/10, 40%), eyesight/vision abnormality (5/16, 31%), altered mental status (8/31, 26%), and hemiplegia/numbness (13/50, 26%). For patients with CD4 count <200/μl, intracranial diseases were detected in only 3 (3%) of 144 asymptomatic patients, compared with 46 (32%) of 113 symptomatic patients (p<0.01). Brain MRI screening for HIV-1-infected patients without neurological symptoms is of little value.

  11. Thromboprophylaxis in non-surgical cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Alexander T; Gurwith, Meredith M P; Dobromirski, Mark

    2012-04-01

    Acutely ill medical patients with cancer and cancer patients requiring non-surgical therapy are considered as non-surgical cancer patients and are at moderate to high risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE): approximately 10-30% of these patients may develop asymptomatic or symptomatic deep-vein thrombosis (DVT) or pulmonary embolism (PE), and the latter is a leading contributor to deaths in hospital. Other medical conditions associated with a high risk of VTE include cardiac disease, respiratory disease, inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatological and infectious diseases. Pre-disposing risk factors in non-surgical cancer patients include a history of VTE, immobilisation, history of metastatic malignancy, complicating infections, increasing age, obesity hormonal or antiangiogenic therapies, thalidomide and lenalidomide therapy. Heparins, both unfractionated (UFH) and low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) and fondaparinux have been shown to be effective agents in prevention of VTE in the medical setting with patients having a history of cancer. UFH and LMWH along with semuloparin also have a role in outpatients with cancer receiving chemotherapy. However, it has not yet been possible to demonstrate a significant effect on mortality rates in this population. UFH has a higher rate of bleeding complications than LMWH. Thromboprophylaxis has been shown to be effective in medical patients with cancer and may have an effect on cancer outcomes. Thromboprophylaxis in patients receiving chemotherapy remains controversial and requires further investigation. There is no evidence for the use of aspirin, warfarin or mechanical methods. We recommend either LMWH, or fondaparinux for the prevention of VTE in cancer patients with acute medical illnesses and UFH for those with significant severe renal impairment. For ambulatory cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy we recommend LMWH or semuloparin. These are safe and effective agents in the thromboprophylaxis of non-surgical cancer

  12. Relationship Between Neurocognitive Function and Quality of Life After Whole-Brain Radiotherapy in Patients With Brain Metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Li Jing; Bentzen, Soren M.; Li Jialiang; Renschler, Markus; Mehta, Minesh P.

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: To examine the relationship between neurocognitive function (NCF) and quality of life (QOL) in patients with brain metastases after whole-brain radiotherapy. Patients and Methods: A total of 208 patients from the whole-brain radiotherapy arm of a Phase III trial (PCI-P120-9801), who underwent regular NCF and QOL (ADL [activities of daily living] and FACT-Br [Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Brain-specific]) testing, were analyzed. Spearman's rank correlation was calculated between NCF and QOL, using each patient's own data, at each time point. To test the hypothesis that NCF declines before QOL changes, the predictive effect of NCF from previous visits on QOL was studied with a linear mixed-effects model. Neurocognitive function or QOL deterioration was defined relative to each patient's own baseline. Lead or lag time, defined as NCF deterioration before or after the date of QOL decline, respectively, was computed. Results: At baseline, all NCF tests showed statistically significant correlations with ADL, which became stronger at 4 months. A similar observation was made with FACT-Br. Neurocognitive function scores from previous visits predicted ADL (p < 0.05 for seven of eight tests) or FACT-Br. Scores on all eight NCF tests deteriorated before ADL decline (net lead time 9-153 days); and scores on six of eight NCF tests deteriorated before FACT-Br (net lead time 9-82 days). Conclusions: Neurocognitive function and QOL are correlated. Neurocognitive function scores from previous visits are predictive of QOL. Neurocognitive function deterioration precedes QOL decline. The sequential association between NCF and QOL decline suggests that delaying NCF deterioration is a worthwhile treatment goal in brain metastases patients.

  13. Histogram analysis of ADC in brain tumor patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Debrup; Wang, Jihong; Li, Jiang

    2011-03-01

    At various stage of progression, most brain tumors are not homogenous. In this presentation, we retrospectively studied the distribution of ADC values inside tumor volume during the course of tumor treatment and progression for a selective group of patients who underwent an anti-VEGF trial. Complete MRI studies were obtained for this selected group of patients including pre- and multiple follow-up, post-treatment imaging studies. In each MRI imaging study, multiple scan series were obtained as a standard protocol which includes T1, T2, T1-post contrast, FLAIR and DTI derived images (ADC, FA etc.) for each visit. All scan series (T1, T2, FLAIR, post-contrast T1) were registered to the corresponding DTI scan at patient's first visit. Conventionally, hyper-intensity regions on T1-post contrast images are believed to represent the core tumor region while regions highlighted by FLAIR may overestimate tumor size. Thus we annotated tumor regions on the T1-post contrast scans and ADC intensity values for pixels were extracted inside tumor regions as defined on T1-post scans. We fit a mixture Gaussian (MG) model for the extracted pixels using the Expectation-Maximization (EM) algorithm, which produced a set of parameters (mean, various and mixture coefficients) for the MG model. This procedure was performed for each visits resulting in a series of GM parameters. We studied the parameters fitted for ADC and see if they can be used as indicators for tumor progression. Additionally, we studied the ADC characteristics in the peri-tumoral region as identified by hyper-intensity on FLAIR scans. The results show that ADC histogram analysis of the tumor region supports the two compartment model that suggests the low ADC value subregion corresponding to densely packed cancer cell while the higher ADC value region corresponding to a mixture of viable and necrotic cells with superimposed edema. Careful studies of the composition and relative volume of the two compartments in tumor

  14. Nanomechanical analysis of cells from cancer patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Sarah E.; Jin, Yu-Sheng; Rao, Jianyu; Gimzewski, James K.

    2007-12-01

    Change in cell stiffness is a new characteristic of cancer cells that affects the way they spread. Despite several studies on architectural changes in cultured cell lines, no ex vivo mechanical analyses of cancer cells obtained from patients have been reported. Using atomic force microscopy, we report the stiffness of live metastatic cancer cells taken from the body (pleural) fluids of patients with suspected lung, breast and pancreas cancer. Within the same sample, we find that the cell stiffness of metastatic cancer cells is more than 70% softer, with a standard deviation over five times narrower, than the benign cells that line the body cavity. Different cancer types were found to display a common stiffness. Our work shows that mechanical analysis can distinguish cancerous cells from normal ones even when they show similar shapes. These results show that nanomechanical analysis correlates well with immunohistochemical testing currently used for detecting cancer.

  15. Using lithium as a neuroprotective agent in patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Khasraw, Mustafa; Ashley, David; Wheeler, Greg; Berk, Michael

    2012-11-02

    Neurocognitive impairment is being increasingly recognized as an important issue in patients with cancer who develop cognitive difficulties either as part of direct or indirect involvement of the nervous system or as a consequence of either chemotherapy-related or radiotherapy-related complications. Brain radiotherapy in particular can lead to significant cognitive defects. Neurocognitive decline adversely affects quality of life, meaningful employment, and even simple daily activities. Neuroprotection may be a viable and realistic goal in preventing neurocognitive sequelae in these patients, especially in the setting of cranial irradiation. Lithium is an agent that has been in use for psychiatric disorders for decades, but recently there has been emerging evidence that it can have a neuroprotective effect.This review discusses neurocognitive impairment in patients with cancer and the potential for investigating the use of lithium as a neuroprotectant in such patients.

  16. Brain-targeted delivery of docetaxel by glutathione-coated nanoparticles for brain cancer.

    PubMed

    Grover, Aditya; Hirani, Anjali; Pathak, Yashwant; Sutariya, Vijaykumar

    2014-12-01

    Gliomas are some of the most aggressive types of cancers but the blood-brain barrier acts as an obstacle to therapeutic intervention in brain-related diseases. The blood-brain barrier blocks the permeation of potentially toxic compounds into neural tissue through the interactions of brain endothelial cells with glial cells (astrocytes and pericytes) which induce the formation of tight junctions in endothelial cells lining the blood capillaries. In the present study, we characterize a glutathione-coated docetaxel-loaded PEG-PLGA nanoparticle, show its in vitro drug release data along with cytotoxicity data in C6 and RG2 cells, and investigate its trans-blood-brain barrier permeation through the establishment of a Transwell cellular co-culture. We show that the docetaxel-loaded nanoparticle's size enables its trans-blood-brain barrier permeation; the nanoparticle exhibits a steady, sustained release of docetaxel; the drug is able to induce cell death in glioma models; and the glutathione-coated nanoparticle is able to permeate through the Transwell in vitro blood-brain barrier model.

  17. Cancer Risk among Patients with Myotonic Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Gadalla, Shahinaz M; Lund, Marie; Pfeiffer, Ruth M; Gørtz, Sanne; Mueller, Christine M; Moxley, Richard T; Kristinsson, Sigurdur Y; Björkholm, Magnus; Shebl, Fatma M; Hilbert, James E; Landgren, Ola; Wohlfahrt, Jan; Melbye, Mads; Greene, Mark H

    2012-01-01

    Context Myotonic muscular dystrophy (MMD) is an autosomal dominant multisystem neuromuscular disorder characterized by unstable nucleotide repeat expansions. Case reports have suggested that MMD patients may be at increased risk of malignancy, putative risks which have never been quantified. Objective To quantitatively evaluate cancer risk in patients with MMD, overall, and by sex and age. Design, Setting, and Participants We identified 1,658 patients with an MMD discharge diagnosis in the Swedish Inpatient Hospital or Danish Patient Discharge Registries between 1977 and 2008. We linked these patients to their corresponding cancer registry. Patients were followed from date of first MMD-related inpatient or outpatient contact, to first cancer diagnosis, death, emigration, or completion of cancer registration. Main Outcome Measures Risks of all cancers combined, and by anatomic site, stratified by sex and age. Results 104 patients with an inpatient or outpatient discharge diagnosis of MMD developed cancer during post-discharge follow-up. This corresponds to an observed cancer rate of 73.4/10,000 person-years in MMD versus an expected rate of 36.9/10,000 in the general Swedish and Danish populations combined (SIR =2.0, 95% CI =1.6–2.4). Specifically, we observed significant excess risks of cancers of the endometrium (observed rate=16.1/10,000 person-years: SIR=7.6, 95%CI=4.0–13.2), brain (observed rate=4.9/10,000 person-years: SIR=5.3, 95%CI=2.3–10.4), ovary (observed rate=10.3/10,000 person-years: SIR=5.2, 95% CI=2.3–10.2), and colon (observed rate=7.1/10,000 person-years: SIR=2.9, 95%CI=1.5–5.1). Cancer risks were similar in females and males after excluding genital organ tumors (SIR=1.9, 95% CI=1.4–2.5 vs. 1.8, 95% CI=1.3–2.5, respectively, p-heterogeneity=0.81; observed rates=64.5 and 47.7/10,000 person-years in women and men, respectively), The same pattern of cancer excess was observed first in the Swedish, and then in the Danish cohorts, which

  18. Stat3 orchestrates interaction between endothelial and tumor cells and inhibition of Stat3 suppresses brain metastasis of breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hsueh-Te; Xue, Jianfei; Chou, Ping-Chieh; Zhou, Aidong; Yang, Phillip; Conrad, Charles A; Aldape, Kenneth D; Priebe, Waldemar; Patterson, Cam; Sawaya, Raymond; Xie, Keping; Huang, Suyun

    2015-04-30

    Brain metastasis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with breast cancer. Our previous studies indicated that Stat3 plays an important role in brain metastasis. Here, we present evidence that Stat3 functions at the level of the microenvironment of brain metastases. Stat3 controlled constitutive and inducible VEGFR2 expression in tumor-associated brain endothelial cells. Furthermore, inhibition of Stat3 by WP1066 decreased the incidence of brain metastases and increased survival in a preclinical model of breast cancer brain metastasis. WP1066 inhibited Stat3 activation in tumor-associated endothelial cells, reducing their infiltration and angiogenesis. WP1066 also inhibited breast cancer cell invasion. Our results indicate that WP1066 can inhibit tumor angiogenesis and brain metastasis mediated by Stat3 in endothelial and tumor cells.

  19. [The frequency of seizures in patients with primary brain tumors or cerebral metastases. An evaluation from the Ludwig Boltzmann Institute of Neuro-Oncology and the Department of Neurology, Kaiser Franz Josef Hospital, Vienna].

    PubMed

    Oberndorfer, Stefan; Schmal, Thomas; Lahrmann, Heinz; Urbanits, Sabine; Lindner, Klaus; Grisold, Wolfgang

    2002-11-30

    Epileptic seizures are common in patients with cerebral metastases as well as in patients with primary brain tumors. In cancer patients without primary brain tumors or brain metastasis, epileptic seizures may occur due to metabolic or toxic causes, or due to infections. We performed a retrospective analysis from our neurooncological database concerning the occurrence of seizures in patients with primary brain tumors, patients with cerebral metastases and in cancer patients without brain tumors. Patients with low grade gliomas, such as astrocytoma WHO I + II (69%), oligodendroglioma WHO II (50%), and mixed glioma WHO II-III (56%) were more likely to have seizures than patients with anaplastic glioma WHO III (44%), glioblastoma WHO IV (48%) or meningeoma (45%). In patients with brain metastasis, melanoma (67%), cancer of the lung (29%), and gastrointestinal tumors (21%) were the primaries with the highest frequency of seizures. In cancer patients without brain metastases or primary brain tumors, seizures occurred in 4%. In conclusion, the occurrence of epileptic seizures in patients suffering from primary brain tumors, as well as in patients with cerebral metastases, varied within the tumor entity. Therefore, especially in brain tumors where a higher probability of epileptic seizures is expected, they should be taken into account in the care of cancer patients.

  20. Control of the blood-brain barrier function in cancer cell metastasis.

    PubMed

    Blecharz, Kinga G; Colla, Ruben; Rohde, Veit; Vajkoczy, Peter

    2015-10-01

    Cerebral metastases are the most common brain neoplasms seen clinically in the adults and comprise more than half of all brain tumours. Actual treatment options for brain metastases that include surgical resection, radiotherapy and chemotherapy are rarely curative, although palliative treatment improves survival and life quality of patients carrying brain-metastatic tumours. Chemotherapy in particular has also shown limited or no activity in brain metastasis of most tumour types. Many chemotherapeutic agents used systemically do not cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB), whereas others may transiently weaken the BBB and allow extravasation of tumour cells from the circulation into the brain parenchyma. Increasing evidence points out that the interaction between the BBB and tumour cells plays a key role for implantation and growth of brain metastases in the central nervous system. The BBB, as the tightest endothelial barrier, prevents both early detection and treatment by creating a privileged microenvironment. Therefore, as observed in several in vivo studies, precise targetting the BBB by a specific transient opening of the structure making it permeable for therapeutic compounds, might potentially help to overcome this difficult clinical problem. Moreover, a better understanding of the molecular features of the BBB, its interrelation with metastatic tumour cells and the elucidation of cellular mechanisms responsible for establishing cerebral metastasis must be clearly outlined in order to promote treatment modalities that particularly involve chemotherapy. This in turn would substantially expand the survival and quality of life of patients with brain metastasis, and potentially increase the remission rate. Therefore, the focus of this review is to summarise the current knowledge on the role and function of the BBB in cancer metastasis.

  1. High performance nanobio photocatalyst for targeted brain cancer therapy.

    SciTech Connect

    Rozhkova, E.; Ulasov, I.; Dimitrijevic, N. M.; Lesniak, M.; Rajh, T.; Lai, B.; Center for Nanoscale Materials

    2009-09-01

    We report pronounced and specific antiglioblastoma cell phototoxicity of 5 nm TiO{sub 2} particles covalently tethered to an antibody via a dihydroxybenzene bivalent linker. The linker application enables absorption of a visible part of the solar spectrum by the nanobio hybrid. The phototoxicity is mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) that initiate programmed death of the cancer cell. Synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) was applied for direct visualization of the nanobioconjugate distribution through a single brain cancer cell at the submicrometer scale.

  2. Analysis of radiation therapy in a model of triple-negative breast cancer brain metastasis.

    PubMed

    Smart, DeeDee; Garcia-Glaessner, Alejandra; Palmieri, Diane; Wong-Goodrich, Sarah J; Kramp, Tamalee; Gril, Brunilde; Shukla, Sudhanshu; Lyle, Tiffany; Hua, Emily; Cameron, Heather A; Camphausen, Kevin; Steeg, Patricia S

    2015-10-01

    Most cancer patients with brain metastases are treated with radiation therapy, yet this modality has not yet been meaningfully incorporated into preclinical experimental brain metastasis models. We applied two forms of whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) to the brain-tropic 231-BR experimental brain metastasis model of triple-negative breast cancer. When compared to sham controls, WBRT as 3 Gy × 10 fractions (3 × 10) reduced the number of micrometastases and large metastases by 87.7 and 54.5 %, respectively (both p < 0.01); whereas a single radiation dose of 15 Gy × 1 (15 × 1) was less effective, reducing metastases by 58.4 % (p < 0.01) and 47.1 % (p = 0.41), respectively. Neuroinflammation in the adjacent brain parenchyma was due solely to a reaction from metastases, and not radiotherapy, while adult neurogenesis in brains was adversely affected following both radiation regimens. The nature of radiation resistance was investigated by ex vivo culture of tumor cells that survived initial WBRT ("Surviving" cultures). The Surviving cultures surprisingly demonstrated increased radiosensitivity ex vivo. In contrast, re-injection of Surviving cultures and re-treatment with a 3 × 10 WBRT regimen significantly reduced the number of large and micrometastases that developed in vivo, suggesting a role for the microenvironment. Micrometastases derived from tumor cells surviving initial 3 × 10 WBRT demonstrated a trend toward radioresistance upon repeat treatment (p = 0.09). The data confirm the potency of a fractionated 3 × 10 WBRT regimen and identify the brain microenvironment as a potential determinant of radiation efficacy. The data also nominate the Surviving cultures as a potential new translational model for radiotherapy.

  3. Toxoplasma gondii infection in cancer patients: prevalence, risk factors, genotypes and association with clinical diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Cong, Wei; Liu, Guo-Hua; Meng, Qing-Feng; Dong, Wei; Qin, Si-Yuan; Zhang, Fu-Kai; Zhang, Xiang-Yan; Wang, Xiang-Yang; Qian, Ai-Dong; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2015-04-10

    Prevalence of human infection with Toxoplasma gondii has been increasing in China due to the increasing number of cats. However, little is known of the epidemiology of T. gondii infection in different cancer patient groups. Thus, a case-control study of 900 cancer patients and 900 controls was conducted to detect anti-T. gondii antibodies by ELISA in China. Genomic DNA was extracted from the diseased tissues of 510 patients and the T. gondii B1 gene was amplified using a semi-nested PCR. DNA samples giving positive B1 amplification were then genetically characterized using multi-locus PCR-RFLP. The prevalence of anti-T. gondii IgG in cancer patients (35.56%) was significantly higher than that in controls (17.44%). The highest T. gondii seroprevalence was detected in lung cancer patients (60.94%), followed by cervical cancer patients (50%), brain cancer patients (42.31%) and endometrial cancer patients (41.67%). Exposure with soil and consumption of raw/undercooked meat were significantly associated with T. gondii infection in cancer patients. Three T. gondii genotypes (ToxoDB#9, ToxoDB#10 and Type I variant) were identified. In conclusion, T. gondii infection is a severe problem in cancer patients and it is imperative that improved integrated measures should be conducted to prevent and control T. gondii infection in cancer patients.

  4. Angiopoietin-2 mediates blood-brain barrier impairment and colonization of triple-negative breast cancer cells in brain.

    PubMed

    Avraham, Hava Karsenty; Jiang, Shuxian; Fu, Yigong; Nakshatri, Harikrishna; Ovadia, Haim; Avraham, Shalom

    2014-02-01

    Although the incidence of breast cancer metastasis (BCM) in brain has increased significantly in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), the mechanisms remain elusive. Using in vivo mouse models for BCM in brain, we observed that TNBC cells crossed the blood-brain barrier (BBB), lodged in the brain microvasculature and remained adjacent to brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs). Breaching of the BBB in vivo by TNBCs resulted in increased BBB permeability and changes in ZO-1 and claudin-5 tight junction (TJ) protein structures. Angiopoietin-2 expression was elevated in BMECs and was correlated with BBB disruption. Secreted Ang-2 impaired TJ structures and increased BBB permeability. Treatment of mice with the neutralizing Ang-2 peptibody trebananib prevented changes in the BBB integrity and BMEC destabilization, resulting in inhibition of TNBC colonization in brain. Thus, Ang-2 is involved in initial steps of brain metastasis cascade, and inhibitors for Ang-2 may serve as potential therapeutics for brain metastasis.

  5. Radiation therapy options for management of the brain tumor patient.

    PubMed

    Lamb, S A

    1995-03-01

    Radiation therapy rarely cures malignant brain tumors; however, it is the best treatment available at present. Refinement of radiation delivery systems must continue in order to minimize normal tissue injury and to maximize the quality of life. Multimodal therapy designed to attack cancer at its genetic makeup holds great promise. Radiation therapy will always remain one of the forms of therapy used to treat malignant brain tumors.

  6. Donepezil in Treating Young Patients With Primary Brain Tumors Previously Treated With Radiation Therapy to the Brain

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-26

    Brain and Central Nervous System Tumors; Cognitive/Functional Effects; Long-term Effects Secondary to Cancer Therapy in Children; Neurotoxicity; Psychosocial Effects of Cancer and Its Treatment; Radiation Toxicity

  7. Decoding brain cancer dynamics: a quantitative histogram-based approach using temporal MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Mu; Hall, Lawrence O.; Goldgof, Dmitry B.; Russo, Robin; Gillies, Robert J.; Gatenby, Robert A.

    2015-03-01

    Brain tumor heterogeneity remains a challenge for probing brain cancer evolutionary dynamics. In light of evolution, it is a priority to inspect the cancer system from a time-domain perspective since it explicitly tracks the dynamics of cancer variations. In this paper, we study the problem of exploring brain tumor heterogeneity from temporal clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data. Our goal is to discover evidence-based knowledge from such temporal imaging data, where multiple clinical MRI scans from Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients are generated during therapy. In particular, we propose a quantitative histogram-based approach that builds a prediction model to measure the difference in histograms obtained from pre- and post-treatment. The study could significantly assist radiologists by providing a metric to identify distinctive patterns within each tumor, which is crucial for the goal of providing patient-specific treatments. We examine the proposed approach for a practical application - clinical survival group prediction. Experimental results show that our approach achieved 90.91% accuracy.

  8. Serum sodium disorders in patients with traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Paiva, Wellingson Silva; Bezerra, Douglas Alexandre França; Amorim, Robson Luis Oliveira; Figueiredo, Eberval Gadelha; Tavares, Wagner Malago; De Andrade, Almir Ferreira; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen

    2011-01-01

    Sodium disorders are the most common and most poorly understood electrolyte disorders in neurological patients. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of sodium disorders and its association with different traumatic brain injuries. This prospective study was conducted in 80 patients diagnosed with moderate and severe traumatic brain injuries. All patients underwent cerebral computed tomography. Incidence of sodium disorders, presence of injuries in the first computed tomography after traumatic brain injury, and level of consciousness were analyzed. Patients that presented other potential causes of sodium disorders and systemic trauma were excluded from the study. The incidence of sodium disturbances was 45%: 20 patients presented hypernatremia and 16 hyponatremia. Refers to all patients with sodium disturbances 53% were detected in the first sample. We recorded at least one measurement <125 mEq/L in 50% of the patients with hyponatremia. A greater incidence of sodium disorders was found in patients with subdural, intracerebral hematoma and with diffuse axonal injury. The incidence of sodium disorders among the patients with diffuse lesions was greater than in the group of patients with brain contusion (P = 0.022). The incidence of sodium disorders is higher in patients with diffuse traumatic brain injuries. No association was found between focal lesions and proportion of sodium disorders. PMID:21941440

  9. Memoirs of an amnesiac--two years with brain cancer, or the outer space of living with brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Dor-Ner, A D

    1991-11-01

    Alexandra Dane Dor-Ner ("Ali" to friends) was a photographer, writer, and a producer of programs on child development. In February 1989, at the age of 41, she was diagnosed with malignant brain cancer. During the following months she underwent brain surgery, radiation, and implant radiation. Throughout her treatment, she continued to work on a novel and write stores and literary criticism. A volunteer in hospitals before her illness, she now became very active in a support group of brain tumor patients and often served as a first resource and contact for others diagnosed with brain cancer. All was very accomplished; her award-winning photographs have been exhibited in the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, and her articles and pictures were published in books, periodicals, and newspapers around the world. A native of Boston, Ali lived for 17 years in Israel, where she joined a group of photographers documenting disappearing neighborhoods in Jerusalem. She was awarded first prize in the "Israel Through the Camera's Eye" competition in 1977. She also taught English and photography in Israeli high schools. Ali traveled extensively on photographic assignments. Early in their 22-year marriage, she and her husband circumnavigated the globe on a freighter, producing a documentary film of the voyage. "Memoirs of an Amnesiac" was written while Ali was a student at the Warren Wilson College Writers' Program in North Carolina; she intended to explore the compensatory aspects of her disease. In February 1991, within days of completing the piece, Ali had a third brain operation to remove a regrowth of cancerous tumor cells, as well as necrotic tissue. Two days later, she was again operated on to remove blood clots resulting from the previous surgery. For the next 12 weeks she fought to regain her ability to walk, talk, and write. In May, she underwent a fifth operation to relieve pressure in the brain. She was still in the hospital when she learned, to her great pleasure

  10. Memoirs of an amnesiac--two years with brain cancer, or the outer space of living with brain tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Dor-Ner, A. D.

    1991-01-01

    Alexandra Dane Dor-Ner ("Ali" to friends) was a photographer, writer, and a producer of programs on child development. In February 1989, at the age of 41, she was diagnosed with malignant brain cancer. During the following months she underwent brain surgery, radiation, and implant radiation. Throughout her treatment, she continued to work on a novel and write stores and literary criticism. A volunteer in hospitals before her illness, she now became very active in a support group of brain tumor patients and often served as a first resource and contact for others diagnosed with brain cancer. All was very accomplished; her award-winning photographs have been exhibited in the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, and her articles and pictures were published in books, periodicals, and newspapers around the world. A native of Boston, Ali lived for 17 years in Israel, where she joined a group of photographers documenting disappearing neighborhoods in Jerusalem. She was awarded first prize in the "Israel Through the Camera's Eye" competition in 1977. She also taught English and photography in Israeli high schools. Ali traveled extensively on photographic assignments. Early in their 22-year marriage, she and her husband circumnavigated the globe on a freighter, producing a documentary film of the voyage. "Memoirs of an Amnesiac" was written while Ali was a student at the Warren Wilson College Writers' Program in North Carolina; she intended to explore the compensatory aspects of her disease. In February 1991, within days of completing the piece, Ali had a third brain operation to remove a regrowth of cancerous tumor cells, as well as necrotic tissue. Two days later, she was again operated on to remove blood clots resulting from the previous surgery. For the next 12 weeks she fought to regain her ability to walk, talk, and write. In May, she underwent a fifth operation to relieve pressure in the brain. She was still in the hospital when she learned, to her great pleasure

  11. Patients With Brain Tumors: Who Receives Postacute Occupational Therapy Services?

    PubMed

    Chan, Vincy; Xiong, Chen; Colantonio, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Data on the utilization of occupational therapy among patients with brain tumors have been limited to those with malignant tumors and small samples of patients outside North America in specialized palliative care settings. We built on this research by examining the characteristics of patients with brain tumors who received postacute occupational therapy services in Ontario, Canada, using health care administrative data. Between fiscal years 2004-2005 and 2008-2009, 3,199 patients with brain tumors received occupational therapy services in the home care setting after hospital discharge; 12.4% had benign brain tumors, 78.2% had malignant brain tumors, and 9.4% had unspecified brain tumors. However, patients with benign brain tumors were older (mean age=63.3 yr), and a higher percentage were female (65.2%). More than 90% of patients received in-home occupational therapy services. Additional research is needed to examine the significance of these differences and to identify factors that influence access to occupational therapy services in the home care setting.

  12. Chemotherapy altered brain functional connectivity in women with breast cancer: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Dumas, Julie A; Makarewicz, Jenna; Schaubhut, Geoffrey J; Devins, Robert; Albert, Kimberly; Dittus, Kim; Newhouse, Paul A

    2013-12-01

    Adjuvant chemotherapy is associated with improvements in long-term cancer survival. However, reports of cognitive impairment following treatment emphasize the importance of understanding the long-term effects of chemotherapy on brain functioning. Cognitive deficits found in chemotherapy patients suggest a change in brain functioning that affects specific cognitive domains such as attentional processing and executive functioning. This study examined the processes potentially underlying these changes in cognition by examining brain functional connectivity pre- and post-chemotherapy in women with breast cancer. Functional connectivity examines the temporal correlation between spatially remote brain regions in an effort to understand how brain networks support specific cognitive functions. Nine women diagnosed with breast cancer completed a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) session before chemotherapy, 1 month after, and 1 year after the completion of chemotherapy. Seed-based functional connectivity analyses were completed using seeds in the intraparietal sulcus (IPS) to examine connectivity in the dorsal anterior attention network and in the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) to examine connectivity in the default mode network. Results showed decreased functional connectivity 1 month after chemotherapy that partially returned to baseline at 1 year in the dorsal attention network. Decreased connectivity was seen in the default mode network at 1 month and 1 year following chemotherapy. In addition, increased subjective memory complaints were noted at 1 month and 1 year post-chemotherapy. These findings suggest a detrimental effect of chemotherapy on brain functional connectivity that is potentially related to subjective cognitive assessment.

  13. Review of hematological indices of cancer patients receiving combined chemotherapy & radiotherapy or receiving radiotherapy alone.

    PubMed

    Shahid, Saman

    2016-09-01

    We observed the outcomes of chemotherapy with radiotherapy (CR) or radiotherapy (RT) alone for cancer patients of larynx, breast, blood and brain origins through complete blood count (CBC). Following were more depressed in CR patients: mean corpuscular hemoglobin-MCH & lymphocytes-LYM, hematocrit, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration-MCHC, hemoglobin-HB and red blood cells-RBC. In RT patients, following were more depressed: LYM, MCH and MCHC. Overall, in all cancer patients, the lymphocytes were depressed 52%. There existed a significant difference between white blood cells and RBC in both CR and RT patients. A significant moderate negative correlation is found in HB with the dose range 30-78 (Gray) given to the CR cancer patients. More number of CBC parameters affected in patients treated with CR and RT; but in less percentage as compared to patients who treated with RT alone. The cancer patients suffered from anemia along with immune modulations from the treatments. PMID:27423975

  14. Cancer surveillance of patients from familial pancreatic cancer kindreds.

    PubMed

    Brentnall, T A

    2000-05-01

    The family history can be used to determine which family members warrant surveillance and when to start it. Surveillance should be started at least 1 decade before the earliest age of pancreatic cancer in the family. EUS is the basic, least-invasive surveillance tool; however, findings are similar to those seen in chronic pancreatitis. All patients who have a positive EUS or who have symptoms warrant ERCP. Changes on ERCP of ductal stricturing and clubbed or saccular side branches are suggestive of patients who may need pancreatectomy in the setting of hereditary pancreatic cancer. The goal for surveillance of familial pancreatic cancer patients is to diagnose them before the development of cancer, when they have dysplasia or carcinoma in situ, and to perform a complete pancreatectomy. Timing is crucial for determining when a patient warrants surgery; if performed too early, the patient is put at risk for the morbidity and mortality of a total pancreatectomy, which is not inconsequential. If the patient survives the operation, he or she is often left a brittle diabetic. The alternative of diagnosing too late is more worrisome because the patient dies of pancreatic cancer. An essential ingredient to a good patient outcome is a team approach to these patients, using gastroenterologists, surgeons, and pathologists who have expertise and interest in pancreatic disease.

  15. Psychiatric aspects of pain in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Ozkan, Sedat

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this review is to discuss the psychiatric aspects of pain in cancer patients from a biopsychosocial approach. Pain in cancer patients is considered as a complex reaction causing severe suffering and involves many psychological aspects. It has many dimensions such as personality, affect, cognition and social relations. The pain experience may also be influenced by some psychological factors such as anxiety, depression and the meaning of pain. Therefore, a successful management of cancer pain requires a multidisciplinary approach. Since cancer pain is generally treated medically, the psychological impact of pain is often underestimated. However, cancer pain is usually related to high levels of psychological distress. Culture, as an important factor affecting cancer pain, will also be discussed during this review. It is crucial to understand cultural diversity in the treatment of cancer patients with pain. Research shows that a minority patients of various ethnicities have less control of their pain because of the miscommunication problem within the medical setting. By paying attention to patients' cultural diversities, problems such as miscommunication causing inadequate control of pain can be eliminated. In order to manage pain in cancer patients, cognitive-behavioral interventions may be integrated with pharmacotherapy. The main goal of these strategies is to provide a sense of control and better coping skills to deal with cancer. Patients' maladaptive thoughts or behaviors may cause physical and emotional stress. Main behavioral strategies include biofeedback, relaxation training, and hypnosis. Cognitive strategies include guided imagery, distraction, thought monitoring and problem solving. By discussing all of these aspects of cancer pain, the multidimensional characteristic of pain and the relation between cancer pain and psychiatric factors will be clarified. PMID:20590361

  16. Comparison of computed tomography and radionuclide scanning for detection of brain metastases in small cell lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Crane, J.M.; Nelson, M.J.; Ihde, D.C.; Makuch, R.W.; Glatstein, E.; Zabell, A.; Johnston-Early, A.; Bates, H.R.; Saini, N.; Cohen, M.H.

    1984-09-01

    Neurologic history and examination, radionuclide brain scans (RN), and computed tomographic brain scans (CT) were performed at diagnosis and sequentially in 153 consecutive patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC) to assess the sensitivity and accuracy of these screening methods and to determine whether the early detection of brain metastases influences survival. CT scans (sensitivity, 98%; positive predictive accuracy, 98%) were superior to RN scans (sensitivity, 71%; positive predictive accuracy, 86%) in patients with or without neurologic signs or symptoms. However, CT scans were positive in only 6% of asymptomatic patients at diagnosis and 13% of asymptomatic patients after systemic therapy. Brain metastases detected by CT scan were the sole site of extensive-stage disease in 6% of patients at diagnosis. Despite the enhanced ability of CT scans to detect asymptomatic lesions, survival after therapeutic cranial irradiation was similar for asymptomatic and symptomatic patients. The results suggest that CT brain scans should be used routinely in SCLC patients with neurologic signs or symptoms, at diagnosis (when treatment decisions are based on stage), and at six-month intervals in patients with prior brain metastases and in whom erratic follow-up is likely.

  17. Primary brain tumors, neural stem cell, and brain tumor cancer cells: where is the link?

    PubMed Central

    Germano, Isabelle; Swiss, Victoria; Casaccia, Patrizia

    2010-01-01

    The discovery of brain tumor-derived cells (BTSC) with the properties of stem cells has led to the formulation of the hypothesis that neural stem cells could be the cell of origin of primary brain tumors (PBT). In this review we present the most common molecular changes in PBT, define the criteria of identification of BTSC and discuss the similarities between the characteristics of these cells and those of the endogenous population of neural stem cells (NPCs) residing in germinal areas of the adult brain. Finally, we propose possible mechanisms of cancer initiation and progression and suggest a model of tumor initiation that includes intrinsic changes of resident NSC and potential changes in the microenvironment defining the niche where the NSC reside. PMID:20045420

  18. Pre-Adult MRI of Brain Cancer and Neurological Injury: Multivariate Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Levman, Jacob; Takahashi, Emi

    2016-01-01

    Brain cancer and neurological injuries, such as stroke, are life-threatening conditions for which further research is needed to overcome the many challenges associated with providing optimal patient care. Multivariate analysis (MVA) is a class of pattern recognition technique involving the processing of data that contains multiple measurements per sample. MVA can be used to address a wide variety of neuroimaging challenges, including identifying variables associated with patient outcomes; understanding an injury’s etiology, development, and progression; creating diagnostic tests; assisting in treatment monitoring; and more. Compared to adults, imaging of the developing brain has attracted less attention from MVA researchers, however, remarkable MVA growth has occurred in recent years. This paper presents the results of a systematic review of the literature focusing on MVA technologies applied to brain injury and cancer in neurological fetal, neonatal, and pediatric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). With a wide variety of MRI modalities providing physiologically meaningful biomarkers and new biomarker measurements constantly under development, MVA techniques hold enormous potential toward combining available measurements toward improving basic research and the creation of technologies that contribute to improving patient care. PMID:27446888

  19. Pre-Adult MRI of Brain Cancer and Neurological Injury: Multivariate Analyses.

    PubMed

    Levman, Jacob; Takahashi, Emi

    2016-01-01

    Brain cancer and neurological injuries, such as stroke, are life-threatening conditions for which further research is needed to overcome the many challenges associated with providing optimal patient care. Multivariate analysis (MVA) is a class of pattern recognition technique involving the processing of data that contains multiple measurements per sample. MVA can be used to address a wide variety of neuroimaging challenges, including identifying variables associated with patient outcomes; understanding an injury's etiology, development, and progression; creating diagnostic tests; assisting in treatment monitoring; and more. Compared to adults, imaging of the developing brain has attracted less attention from MVA researchers, however, remarkable MVA growth has occurred in recent years. This paper presents the results of a systematic review of the literature focusing on MVA technologies applied to brain injury and cancer in neurological fetal, neonatal, and pediatric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). With a wide variety of MRI modalities providing physiologically meaningful biomarkers and new biomarker measurements constantly under development, MVA techniques hold enormous potential toward combining available measurements toward improving basic research and the creation of technologies that contribute to improving patient care. PMID:27446888

  20. Brain atrophy in chronic alcoholic patients: a quantitative pathological study.

    PubMed Central

    Harper, C; Kril, J

    1985-01-01

    There are essentially no objective neuropathological data on brain atrophy in chronic alcoholic patients despite numerous neuroradiological studies which show a high incidence of shrinkage or atrophy. Therefore measurements were made of the intracranial volume (ICV) and brain volume (BV) in a necropsy study of 25 chronic alcoholic patients and 44 controls. The pericerebral space (PICS) was calculated according to the formula (formula; see text) The PICS will increase in patients with brain atrophy since the ICV remains constant throughout life. The mean PICS value was 8.3% in controls, 11.3% in the alcoholic group, 14.7% in alcoholics with superimposed Wernicke's encephalopathy (thiamine deficiency) and 16.2% in those alcoholics with associated liver disease. Thus there was a statistically significant loss of brain tissue in chronic alcoholic patients which appeared to be more severe in those with associated nutritional vitamin deficiencies or alcoholic liver disease. Images PMID:3981189

  1. Researching the experience of kidney cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Taylor, K

    2002-09-01

    The author's personal experience as a kidney cancer patient, researcher and founder of a kidney cancer support group forms the basis for consideration of the challenges involved in researching patients' experiences. The researcher needs to understand the variability of those experiences in both clinical and psychological-emotional terms, and in relation to the personal, familial and social contexts of the patient. It is also essential to define the purpose of the research and to show how an understanding of personal experiences of cancer can be used to enhance the quality of care for cancer patients. The research encounter with a patient is also in some respects a therapeutic encounter requiring a considerable degree of sensitivity on the part of the researcher. The person-centred approach of Carl Rogers is of value in supporting such an encounter.

  2. Researching the experience of kidney cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Taylor, K

    2002-09-01

    The author's personal experience as a kidney cancer patient, researcher and founder of a kidney cancer support group forms the basis for consideration of the challenges involved in researching patients' experiences. The researcher needs to understand the variability of those experiences in both clinical and psychological-emotional terms, and in relation to the personal, familial and social contexts of the patient. It is also essential to define the purpose of the research and to show how an understanding of personal experiences of cancer can be used to enhance the quality of care for cancer patients. The research encounter with a patient is also in some respects a therapeutic encounter requiring a considerable degree of sensitivity on the part of the researcher. The person-centred approach of Carl Rogers is of value in supporting such an encounter. PMID:12296838

  3. Relationship Between HER2 Status and Prognosis in Women With Brain Metastases From Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Zhiyuan; Marko, Nicholas F.; Chao, Sam T.; Angelov, Lilyana; Vogelbaum, Michael A.; Suh, John H.; Barnett, Gene H.; Weil, Robert J.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To analyze factors affecting outcomes in breast cancer patients with brain metastases (BM) and characterize the role of HER2 status. Methods and Materials: We identified 264 breast cancer patients treated between 1999 and 2008 for BM. HER2 status was known definitively for 172 patients and was used to define cohorts in which survival and risk factors were analyzed. Results: Kaplan-Meier survival analysis demonstrated improved mean overall survival (105.7 vs. 74.3 months, p < 0.02), survival after diagnosis of BM (neurologic survival, NS) (32.2 vs. 18.9 months, p < 0.01), and survival after treatment with stereotactic radiosurgery (RS) (31.3 vs. 14.1, p < 0.01) in HER2+ patients relative to those with HER2- breast cancer. HER2+ status was an independent, positive prognostic factor for survival on univariate and multivariate hazard analysis (hazard ratio: overall survival = 0.66, 0.18; NS = 0.50, 0.34). Additionally, subgroup analysis suggests that stereotactic radiosurgery may be of particular benefit in patients with HER2+ tumors. Conclusions: Overall survival, NS, and RS are improved in patients with HER2+ tumors, relative to those with HER2- lesions, and HER2 amplification is independently associated with increased survival in patients with BM from breast cancer. Our findings suggest that the prognosis of HER2+ patients may be better than that of otherwise similar patients who are HER2- and that stereotactic radiosurgery may be beneficial for some patients with HER2+ lesions.

  4. Cancer in Patients With Gabapentin (GPRD)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-02-02

    Pain, Neuropathic; Epilepsy; Renal Pelvis Cancer; Pancreatic Cancer; Breast Cancer; Nervous System Cancer; Chronic Pancreatitis; Stomach Cancer; Renal Cell Carcinoma; Diabetes; Bladder Cancer; Bone and Joint Cancer; Penis Cancer; Anal Cancer; Cancer; Renal Cancer

  5. Brain MRI volumetry in a single patient with mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Ross, David E; Castelvecchi, Cody; Ochs, Alfred L

    2013-01-01

    This letter to the editor describes the case of a 42 year old man with mild traumatic brain injury and multiple neuropsychiatric symptoms which persisted for a few years after the injury. Initial CT scans and MRI scans of the brain showed no signs of atrophy. Brain volume was measured using NeuroQuant®, an FDA-approved, commercially available software method. Volumetric cross-sectional (one point in time) analysis also showed no atrophy. However, volumetric longitudinal (two points in time) analysis showed progressive atrophy in several brain regions. This case illustrated in a single patient the principle discovered in multiple previous group studies, namely that the longitudinal design is more powerful than the cross-sectional design for finding atrophy in patients with traumatic brain injury.

  6. Ongoing transitions: the impact of a malignant brain tumour on patient and family.

    PubMed

    Khalili, Yasmin

    2007-01-01

    Although primary malignant brain tumours represent only 1.4% of all cancers, it is considered one of the most devastating types of cancers in adults. From the time of diagnosis, the patient and family embark on a "roller coaster" ride of uncertainty, fear and hope. Despite improved medical outcomes, patients often experience severe functional impairment, as well as behavioural and cognitive dysfunction. Subsequently, they suffer from greater dependency and hopelessness than other cancer patients. The family caregivers are faced with multiple demands such as taking on new roles within the family and caring for their loved one while grieving the loss of the person they knew. The role of the nurse is to support the patient and the family throughout the illness trajectory, identify and promote their strengths and mobilize the necessary resources to facilitate patient and family coping. The purpose of this paper is to present, via a detailed case study, the impact of a malignant brain tumour on the patient and the family. The nursing strategies used to help them make the necessary transitions throughout the illness trajectory are discussed. PMID:17682686

  7. [Pharmacotherapeutic Treatment of Elderly Cancer Patients].

    PubMed

    Yokode, Masayuki

    2016-08-01

    Age-specific analyses of mortality rates in Japan show that cancer was the leading cause of death for the age group 40-89 years in the year 2013. Although the crude mortality rate from cancer has recently increased, the age-adjusted cancer mortality rate has shown a decreasing trend. This suggests that the increases in the crude mortality rate may have been caused by the aging of the population. Cancer patients who are old present many comorbidities and newly diagnosed geriatric problems. Several tools provide determinants of survival in cancer patients who are old (including the comprehensive geriatric assessment [CGA]) in order to improve the quality of cancer care in this population. PMID:27539034

  8. Understanding Fertility in Young Female Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Waimey, Kate E.; Smith, Brigid M.; Confino, Rafael; Jeruss, Jacqueline S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Young women diagnosed with cancer today have a greater chance of long-term survival than ever before. Successful survivorship for this group of patients includes maintaining a high quality of life after a cancer diagnosis and treatment; however, lifesaving treatments such as chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery can impact survivors by impairing reproductive and endocrine health. Studies demonstrate that future fertility is a concern for many women diagnosed with cancer, but physician knowledge and attitudinal barriers can still prevent females from receiving care. Today, fertility preservation is an option for girls and women facing a cancer diagnosis, and emerging research is providing clinicians with an increasing number of reproductive and hormonal management tools. Physicians can play an important role in fertility by working closely with oncologists, providing patients with information about fertility preservation options prior to the start of cancer treatment, monitoring reproductive capacity after treatment, and working with cancer survivors to explore potential avenues to parenthood. PMID:26075731

  9. Alterations in brain structure related to breast cancer and its treatment: Chemotherapy and other considerations

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Brenna C.; Saykin, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive effects of cancer and its treatment have been a topic of increasing investigation over the past ∼30 years. Recent studies have focused on better understanding the neural correlates of these effects, with an emphasis on post-chemotherapy effects in breast cancer patients. Structural MRI studies have utilized both automated and manual approaches to quantify gray and white matter characteristics (e.g., regional volume and density) in breast cancer patients treated with chemotherapy relative to patients who did not receive chemotherapy and/or healthy controls. While most work to date has been retrospective, a small number of baseline (pre-systemic therapy) and prospective longitudinal studies have been conducted. Data have consistently shown lower gray and white matter volume and density in patients treated with chemotherapy, particularly in frontal and temporal brain regions. Host factors and/or the cancer disease process and other therapies (e.g., antiestrogen treatment) also seem likely to contribute to the observed differences, though the relative contributions of these effects have not yet been investigated in detail. These structural abnormalities have been shown to relate to subjective and objective cognitive functioning, as well as to biological factors that may help to elucidate the underlying mechanism(s). This review examines the currently available published observations and discusses the major themes and promising directions for future studies. PMID:23996156

  10. Cancer Risk in Patients With Empyema

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Chung-Jen; Hu, Yu-Wen; Yeh, Chiu-Mei; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Liu, Chia-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to evaluate cancer risk and possible risk factors in patients diagnosed with empyema. A total of 31,636 patients with newly diagnosed empyema between January 1, 1999 and December 31, 2010 were included in this study. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated to compare the cancer incidence in these empyema patients to that in the general population. Adjusted hazard ratios were also calculated to investigate whether characteristics increased cancer risk. During the 12-year study period, 2,654 cancers occurred in 31,636 patients with empyema, yielding an SIR of 2.67 (95% confidence interval [CI] 2.57–2.78). We excluded cancer that occurred within 1 year to avoid surveillance bias. The cancer risk remained significantly increased (SIR 1.50, 95% CI 1.41–1.58). Specifically, patients with empyema had higher SIR of cancers of the head and neck (1.50, 95% CI 1.41–1.58), esophagus (2.56, 95% CI 1.92–3.33), stomach (1.49, 95% CI 1.16–1.89), liver and biliary tract (2.18, 95% CI 1.93–2.45), and lung and mediastinum (1.62, 95% CI 1.39–1.86). Age ≥ 60, male sex, diabetes mellitus, and liver cirrhosis were independent risk factors for cancer development. Our study demonstrates an increased incidence of cancer development in patients with empyema, and patients’ age ≥ 60, men, and those with diabetes mellitus and liver cirrhosis showed a higher incidence of developing cancer compared to the general population. The association between such kind of infection and secondary malignancy may be elucidated by further study. PMID:26945399

  11. Travelling for radiation cancer treatment: patient satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Fitch, Margaret I; Gray, Ross E; Mcgowan, Tom; Brunskill, Ian; Steggles, Shawn; Sellick, Scott; Bezjak, Andrea; McLeese, Donna

    2005-01-01

    This study was conducted for the purpose of describing cancer patients' satisfaction with their care when they had to travel unexpectedly away from home for treatment. Ontario initiated a rereferral program for cancer patients who needed radiation therapy when the waiting lists in southern Ontario became lengthy. Patients travelled to the United States or northern Ontario for their care. A standardized survey containing 25 items with five-point Likert scale responses was mailed to all patients who participated in the rereferral program, following completion of their treatment. Items covered patient experiences before leaving home, in preparing for travel, and staying at the cancer facilities away from home. A total of 466 (55.8%) patients returned the survey. Overall, patients were satisfied with their care. However, there were a number of areas identified by patients where improvements could be made. These areas included access to support prior to leaving home, access to information about supportive care services while away from home, and sensitivity to personal needs in making arrangements for travel. Provision of information and support are important to cancer patients having to travel for cancer treatment. PMID:15969333

  12. Parental Exposure to Pesticides and Childhood Brain Cancer: U.S. Atlantic Coast Childhood Brain Cancer Study

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Youn K.; Mlynarek, Steven P.; van Wijngaarden, Edwin

    2009-01-01

    Background The etiology of childhood brain cancer remains largely unknown. However, previous studies have yielded suggestive associations with parental pesticide use. Objectives We aimed to evaluate parental exposure to pesticides at home and on the job in relation to the occurrence of brain cancer in children. Methods We included 526 one-to-one–matched case–control pairs. Brain cancer cases were diagnosed at < 10 years of age, and were identified from statewide cancer registries of four U.S. Atlantic Coast states. We selected controls by random digit dialing. We conducted computer-assisted telephone interviews with mothers. Using information on residential pesticide use and jobs held by fathers during the 2-year period before the child’s birth, we assessed potential exposure to insecticides, herbicides, and fungicides. For each job, two raters independently classified the probability and intensity of exposure; 421 pairs were available for final analysis. We calculated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using conditional logistic regression, after adjustment for maternal education. Results A significant risk of astrocytoma was associated with exposures to herbicides from residential use (OR = 1.9; 95% CI, 1.2–3.0). Combining parental exposures to herbicides from both residential and occupational sources, the elevated risk remained significant (OR = 1.8; 95% CI, 1.1–3.1). We observed little association with primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNET) for any of the pesticide classes or exposure sources considered. Conclusions Our observation is consistent with a previous literature reporting suggestive associations between parental exposure to pesticides and risk of astrocytoma in offspring but not PNET. However, these findings should be viewed in light of limitations in exposure assessment and effective sample size. PMID:19590697

  13. Brain-computer interfaces for communication with nonresponsive patients.

    PubMed

    Naci, Lorina; Monti, Martin M; Cruse, Damian; Kübler, Andrea; Sorger, Bettina; Goebel, Rainer; Kotchoubey, Boris; Owen, Adrian M

    2012-09-01

    A substantial number of patients who survive severe brain injury progress to a nonresponsive state of wakeful unawareness, referred to as a vegetative state (VS). They appear to be awake, but show no signs of awareness of themselves, or of their environment in repeated clinical examinations. However, recent neuroimaging research demonstrates that some VS patients can respond to commands by willfully modulating their brain activity according to instruction. Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) may allow such patients to circumvent the barriers imposed by their behavioral limitations and communicate with the outside world. However, although such devices would undoubtedly improve the quality of life for some patients and their families, developing BCI systems for behaviorally nonresponsive patients presents substantial technical and clinical challenges. Here we review the state of the art of BCI research across noninvasive neuroimaging technologies, and propose how such systems should be developed further to provide fully fledged communication systems for behaviorally nonresponsive populations.

  14. Alteration of spontaneous brain activity in COPD patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiaxing; Chen, Ji; Yu, Qian; Fan, Cunxiu; Zhang, Ran; Lin, Jianzhong; Yang, Tianhe; Fan, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background and objective Airflow limitation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) results in a decrease in oxygen transport to the brain. The aim of the present study was to explore the alteration of spontaneous brain activity induced by hypoxia in patients with COPD. Patients and methods Twenty-five stable patients with COPD and 25 matching healthy volunteers were investigated. Amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF) of blood oxygenation level-dependent signal at resting state in the brain was analyzed using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Results Whole-brain analysis using functional magnetic resonance imaging revealed significant decreases in ALFF in the bilateral posterior cingulate gyri and right lingual gyrus and an increase in ALFF in the left postcentral gyrus of patients with COPD. After controlling for SaO2, patients with COPD only showed an increase in ALFF in the left postcentral gyrus. Region of interest analysis showed a decrease in ALFF in the left precentral gyrus and an increase in ALFF in the left caudate nucleus of patients with COPD. In all subjects, ALFF in the bilateral posterior cingulate gyri and right lingual gyrus showed positive correlations with visual reproduction. Conclusion We demonstrated abnormal spontaneous brain activity of patients with COPD, which may have a pathophysiologic meaning. PMID:27555761

  15. Long-term Toxicity of Cancer Treatment in Older Patients.

    PubMed

    Shahrokni, Armin; Wu, Abraham J; Carter, Jeanne; Lichtman, Stuart M

    2016-02-01

    With earlier cancer diagnosis among older patients with cancer, the possibility of curing cancer increases. However, cancer treatment may have a long-lasting impact on older cancer survivors. It is vital to screen, diagnose, and properly manage the long-term toxicities of cancer treatment in order to maintain the quality of life of older cancer survivors. PMID:26614861

  16. Utilizing Data from Cancer Patient & Survivor Studies

    Cancer.gov

    Utilizing Data from Cancer Patient & Survivor Studies and Understanding the Current State of Knowledge and Developing Future Research Priorities, a 2011 workshop sponsored by the Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program.

  17. Brain Injury After Proton Therapy or Carbon Ion Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer and Skull Base Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Miyawaki, Daisuke Murakami, Masao; Demizu, Yusuke; Sasaki, Ryohei; Niwa, Yasue; Terashima, Kazuki; Nishimura, Hideki; Hishikawa, Yoshio; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: To assess the incidence of early delayed or late morbidity of Brain after particle therapy for skull base tumors and head-and-neck cancers. Methods and Materials: Between May 2001 and December 2005, 59 patients with cancerous invasion of the skull base were treated with proton or carbon ion therapy at the Hyogo Ion Beam Medical Center. Adverse events were assessed according to the magnetic resonance imaging findings (late effects of normal tissue-subjective, objective, management, analytic [LENT-SOMA]) and symptoms (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events [CTCAE], version 3.0). Dose-volume histograms were used to analyze the relationship between the dose and volume of the irradiated brain and the occurrence of brain injury. The median follow-up time was 33 months. Results: Of the 48 patients treated with proton therapy and 11 patients treated with carbon ion radiotherapy, 8 (17%) and 7 (64%), respectively, developed radiation-induced brain changes (RIBCs) on magnetic resonance imaging (LENT-SOMA Grade 1-3). Four patients (7%) had some clinical symptoms, such as vertigo and headache (CTCAE Grade 2) or epilepsy (CTCAE Grade 3). The actuarial occurrence rate of RIBCs at 2 and 3 years was 20% and 39%, respectively, with a significant difference in the incidence between the proton and carbon ion radiotherapy groups. The dose-volume histogram analyses revealed significant differences between Brain lobes with and without RIBCs in the actuarial volume of brain lobes receiving high doses. Conclusion: Particle therapies produced minimal symptomatic brain toxicities, but sequential evaluation with magnetic resonance imaging detected a greater incidence of RIBCs. Significant differences were observed in the irradiated brain volume between Brain lobes with and without RIBCs.

  18. Bone marrow-derived stem cell therapy for metastatic brain cancers.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Yuji; Tajiri, Naoki; Staples, Meaghan; Reyes, Stephanny; Lozano, Diego; Sanberg, Paul R; Freeman, Thomas B; van Loveren, Harry; Kim, Seung U; Borlongan, Cesar V

    2015-01-01

    We propose that stem cell therapy may be a potent treatment for metastatic melanoma in the brain. Here we discuss the key role of a leaky blood-brain barrier (BBB) that accompanies the development of brain metastases. We review the need to characterize the immunological and inflammatory responses associated with tumor-derived BBB damage in order to reveal the contribution of this brain pathological alteration to the formation and growth of brain metastatic cancers. Next, we discuss the potential repair of the BBB and attenuation of brain metastasis through transplantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells with the endothelial progenitor cell phenotype. In particular, we review the need for evaluation of the efficacy of stem cell therapy in repairing a disrupted BBB in an effort to reduce neuroinflammation, eventually attenuating brain metastatic cancers. The demonstration of BBB repair through augmented angiogenesis and vasculogenesis will be critical to establishing the potential of stem cell therapy for the treatment/prevention of metastatic brain tumors. The overarching hypothesis we advanced here is that BBB breakdown is closely associated with brain metastatic cancers of melanoma, exacerbating the inflammatory response of the brain during metastasis, and ultimately worsening the outcome of metastatic brain cancers. Abrogating this leaky BBB-mediated inflammation via stem cell therapy represents a paradigm-shifting approach to treating brain cancer. This review article discusses the pros and cons of cell therapy for melanoma brain metastases.

  19. More Breast Cancer Patients Should Consider Radiation, New Guidelines Say

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_161083.html More Breast Cancer Patients Should Consider Radiation, New Guidelines Say Mastectomy ... by three leading cancer organizations suggest that more breast cancer patients should consider radiation therapy after a mastectomy. ...

  20. Ovarian stimulation in patients with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Elkin; González, Naira; Muñoz, Luis; Aguilar, Jesús; Velasco, Juan A García

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most prevalent malignancy among women under 50. Improvements in diagnosis and treatment have yielded an important decrease in mortality in the last 20 years. In many cases, chemotherapy and radiotherapy develop side effects on the reproductive function. Therefore, before the anti-cancer treatment impairs fertility, clinicians should offer some techniques for fertility preservation for women planning motherhood in the future. In order to obtain more available oocytes for IVF, the ovary must be stimulated. New protocols which prevent exposure to increased estrogen during gonadotropin stimulation, measurements to avoid the delay in starting anti-cancer treatment or the outcome of ovarian stimulation have been addressed in this review. There is no evidence of association between ovarian stimulation and breast cancer. It seems that there are more relevant other confluent factors than ovarian stimulation. Factors that can modify the risk of breast cancer include: parity, age at full-term birth, age of menarche, and family history. There is an association between breast cancer and exogenous estrogen. Therefore, specific protocols to stimulate patients with breast cancer include anti-estrogen agents such as letrozole. By using letrozole plus recombinant follicular stimulating hormone, patients develop a multifollicular growth with only a mild increase in estradiol serum levels. Controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) takes around 10 days, and we discuss new strategies to start COS as soon as possible. Protocols starting during the luteal phase or after inducing the menses currently prevent a delay in starting ovarian stimulation. Patients with breast cancer have a poorer response to COS compared with patients without cancer who are stimulated with conventional protocols of gonadotropins. Although many centres offer fertility preservation and many patients undergo ovarian stimulation, there are not enough studies to evaluate the recurrence, breast cancer

  1. Regional brain glucose metabolism in patients with brain tumors before and after radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G.J.; Volkow, N.D.; Lau, Y.H.

    1994-05-01

    This study was performed to measure regional glucose metabolism in nonaffected brain regions of patients with primary or metastatic brain tumors. Seven female and four male patients (mean age 51.5{plus_minus}14.0 years old) were compared with eleven age and sex matched normal subjects. None of the patients had hydrocephalus and/or increased intracranial pressure. Brain glucose metabolism was measured using FDG-PET scan. Five of the patients were reevaluated one week after receiving radiation treatment (RT) to the brain. Patients were on Decadron and/or Dilantin at the time of both scan. PET images were analyzed with a template of 115 nonoverlapping regions of interest and then grouped into eight gray matter regions on each hemisphere. Brain regions with tumors and edema shown in MR imaging were excluded. Z scores were used to compare individual patients` regional values with those of normal subjects. The number of regional values with Z scores of less than - 3.0 were considered abnormal and were quantified. The mean global glucose metabolic rate (mean of all regions) in nonaffected brain regions of patients was significantly lower than that of normal controls (32.1{plus_minus}9.0 versus 44.8{plus_minus}6.3 {mu}mol/100g/min, p<0.001). Analyses of individual subjects revealed that none of the controls and 8 of the 11 patients had at least one abnormal region. In these 8 patients the regions which were abnormal were most frequently localized in right (n=5) and left occipital (n=6) and right orbital frontal cortex (n=7) whereas the basal ganglia was not affected. Five of the patients who had repeated scans following RT showed decrements in tumor metabolism (41{plus_minus}20.5%) and a significant increase in whole brain metabolism (8.6{plus_minus}5.3%, p<0.001). The improvement in whole brain metabolism after RT suggests that the brain metabolic decrements in the patients were related to the presence of tumoral tissue and not just a medication effect.

  2. High Toxoplasma gondii Seropositivity among Brain Tumor Patients in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Bong-Kwang; Song, Hyemi; Kim, Min-Jae; Cho, Jaeeun; Shin, Eun-Hee; Chai, Jong-Yil

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an intracellular protozoan that can modulate the environment of the infected host. An unfavorable environment modulated by T. gondii in the brain includes tumor microenvironment. Literature has suggested that T. gondii infection is associated with development of brain tumors. However, in Korea, epidemiological data regarding this correlation have been scarce. In this study, in order to investigate the relationship between T. gondii infection and brain tumor development, we investigated the seroprevalence of T. gondii among 93 confirmed brain tumor patients (various histological types, including meningioma and astrocytoma) in Korea using ELISA. The results revealed that T. gondii seropositivity among brain tumor patients (18.3%) was significantly (P<0.05) higher compared with that of healthy controls (8.6%). The seropositivity of brain tumor patients showed a significant age-tendency, i.e., higher in younger age group, compared with age-matched healthy controls (P<0.05). In conclusion, this study supports the close relationship between T. gondii infection and incidence of brain tumors. PMID:27180580

  3. Expression of high affinity folate receptor in breast cancer brain metastasis.

    PubMed

    Leone, José Pablo; Bhargava, Rohit; Theisen, Brian K; Hamilton, Ronald L; Lee, Adrian V; Brufsky, Adam M

    2015-10-01

    High affinity folate receptor (HFR) can be overexpressed in breast cancer and is associated with poor prognosis, however the expression in breast cancer brain metastases (BCBM) is unknown. The aim of this study was to analyze the rate of HFR expression in BCBM and its role in the prognosis of this high-risk cohort. We analyzed 19 brain metastasis (BM) and 13 primary tumors (PT) from a total of 25 patients. HFR status was assessed by immunohistochemistry. Median follow-up was 4.2 years (range 0.6-18.5). HFR was positive in 4/19 BM (21.1%) and in 1/13 PT (7.7%). Positive samples had low H-scores (range 1-50). 56% of patients had apocrine differentiation. OS was similar between patients with positive HFR (median OS 48 months) and negative HFR (median OS 69 months) (P = 0.25); and between patients with apocrine differentiation (median OS 63 months) and those without apocrine differentiation (median OS 69 months) (P = 0.49). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first analysis of HFR expression in BCBM. While previous studies associated the presence of HFR with worse prognosis; in our cohort HFR was positive in only 21.1% of BM with low levels of positivity. Neither HFR nor apocrine features had impact in OS.

  4. Triheptanoin improves brain energy metabolism in patients with Huntington disease

    PubMed Central

    Adanyeguh, Isaac Mawusi; Rinaldi, Daisy; Henry, Pierre-Gilles; Caillet, Samantha; Valabregue, Romain; Durr, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Based on our previous work in Huntington disease (HD) showing improved energy metabolism in muscle by providing substrates to the Krebs cycle, we wished to obtain a proof-of-concept of the therapeutic benefit of triheptanoin using a functional biomarker of brain energy metabolism validated in HD. Methods: We performed an open-label study using 31P brain magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) to measure the levels of phosphocreatine (PCr) and inorganic phosphate (Pi) before (rest), during (activation), and after (recovery) a visual stimulus. We performed 31P brain MRS in 10 patients at an early stage of HD and 13 controls. Patients with HD were then treated for 1 month with triheptanoin after which they returned for follow-up including 31P brain MRS scan. Results: At baseline, we confirmed an increase in Pi/PCr ratio during brain activation in controls—reflecting increased adenosine triphosphate synthesis—followed by a return to baseline levels during recovery (p = 0.013). In patients with HD, we validated the existence of an abnormal brain energy profile as previously reported. After 1 month, this profile remained abnormal in patients with HD who did not receive treatment. Conversely, the MRS profile was improved in patients with HD treated with triheptanoin for 1 month with the restoration of an increased Pi/PCr ratio during visual stimulation (p = 0.005). Conclusion: This study suggests that triheptanoin is able to correct the bioenergetic profile in the brain of patients with HD at an early stage of the disease. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class III evidence that, for patients with HD, treatment with triheptanoin for 1 month restores an increased MRS Pi/PCr ratio during visual stimulation. PMID:25568297

  5. Association of brain cancer with dental x-rays and occupation in Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    Neuberger, J.S.; Brownson, R.C.; Morantz, R.A.; Chin, T.D. )

    1991-01-01

    This investigation of a brain cancer cluster in Missouri used two approaches to investigate associations with potential risk factors. In a case-control study in a rural town, we interviewed surrogates of cases and controls about potential risk factors. We found a statistically significant positive association of brain cancer with reported exposure to dental x-rays. Occupation was not associated with the cluster in the rural town. In a standardized proportional mortality study for the state of Missouri, we calculated the observed and expected proportion of brain cancers by occupation and industry in Missouri decedents. We found that motor vehicle manufacturers, beauty shop workers, managers and administrators, elementary school teachers, and hairdressers and cosmetologists had significantly elevated proportions of brain cancer. Brain tumors are inconsistently associated with occupation in the literature. Further study of brain cancer etiology with respect to dental x-ray exposures seems warranted.

  6. Adolescent and young adult patients with cancer: a milieu of unique features.

    PubMed

    Sender, Leonard; Zabokrtsky, Keri B

    2015-08-01

    Adolescent and young adult (AYA) patients with cancer are a unique category of patients who, depending on age at time of diagnosis, might receive treatment from oncologists specializing either in the treatment of children or adults. In the USA, AYA oncology generally encompasses patients 15-39 years of age. AYA patients with cancer typically present with diseases that span the spectrum from 'paediatric' cancers (such as acute lymphoblastic leukaemia [ALL] and brain tumours) to 'adult' tumours (such as breast cancer and melanoma), as well as cancers that are largely unique to their age group (such as testicular cancer and bone tumours). Research indicates that outcomes of AYA patients with cancer are influenced not only by the treatment provided, but also by factors related to 'host' biology. In addition to the potential biological and cancer-specific differences between AYAs and other patients with cancer, AYA patients also often have disparate access to clinical trials and suffer from a lack of age-appropriate psychosocial support services and health services, which might influence survival as well as overall quality of life. In this Review, these issues are discussed, with a focus on two types of AYA cancer--ALL and melanoma--highlighting findings arising from the use of emerging technologies, such as whole-genome sequencing. PMID:26011488

  7. Brain network alterations and vulnerability to simulated neurodegeneration in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kesler, Shelli R; Watson, Christa L; Blayney, Douglas W

    2015-08-01

    Breast cancer and its treatments are associated with mild cognitive impairment and brain changes that could indicate an altered or accelerated brain aging process. We applied diffusion tensor imaging and graph theory to measure white matter organization and connectivity in 34 breast cancer survivors compared with 36 matched healthy female controls. We also investigated how brain networks (connectomes) in each group responded to simulated neurodegeneration based on network attack analysis. Compared with controls, the breast cancer group demonstrated significantly lower fractional anisotropy, altered small-world connectome properties, lower brain network tolerance to systematic region (node), and connection (edge) attacks and significant cognitive impairment. Lower tolerance to network attack was associated with cognitive impairment in the breast cancer group. These findings provide further evidence of diffuse white matter pathology after breast cancer and extend the literature in this area with unique data demonstrating increased vulnerability of the post-breast cancer brain network to future neurodegenerative processes.

  8. Metastatic brain cancer: prediction of response to whole-brain helical tomotherapy with simultaneous intralesional boost for metastatic disease using quantitative MR imaging features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Harish; Bauman, Glenn; Rodrigues, George; Bartha, Robert; Ward, Aaron

    2014-03-01

    The sequential application of whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) and more targeted stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is frequently used to treat metastatic brain tumors. However, SRS has side effects related to necrosis and edema, and requires separate and relatively invasive localization procedures. Helical tomotherapy (HT) allows for a SRS-type simultaneous infield boost (SIB) of multiple brain metastases, synchronously with WBRT and without separate stereotactic procedures. However, some patients' tumors may not respond to HT+SIB, and would be more appropriately treated with radiosurgery or conventional surgery despite the additional risks and side effects. As a first step toward a broader objective of developing a means for response prediction to HT+SIB, the goal of this study was to investigate whether quantitative measurements of tumor size and appearance (including first- and second-order texture features) on a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan acquired prior to treatment could be used to differentiate responder and nonresponder patient groups after HT+SIB treatment of metastatic disease of the brain. Our results demonstrated that smaller lesions may respond better to this form of therapy; measures of appearance provided limited added value over measures of size for response prediction. With further validation on a larger data set, this approach may lead to a means for prediction of individual patient response based on pre-treatment MRI, supporting appropriate therapy selection for patients with metastatic brain cancer.

  9. Human brain cancer studied by resonance Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yan; Liu, Cheng-Hui; Sun, Yi; Pu, Yang; Boydston-White, Susie; Liu, Yulong; Alfano, Robert R.

    2012-11-01

    The resonance Raman (RR) spectra of six types of human brain tissues are examined using a confocal micro-Raman system with 532-nm excitation in vitro. Forty-three RR spectra from seven subjects are investigated. The spectral peaks from malignant meningioma, stage III (cancer), benign meningioma (benign), normal meningeal tissues (normal), glioblastoma multiforme grade IV (cancer), acoustic neuroma (benign), and pituitary adenoma (benign) are analyzed. Using a 532-nm excitation, the resonance-enhanced peak at 1548 cm-1 (amide II) is observed in all of the tissue specimens, but is not observed in the spectra collected using the nonresonance Raman system. An increase in the intensity ratio of 1587 to 1605 cm-1 is observed in the RR spectra collected from meningeal cancer tissue as compared with the spectra collected from the benign and normal meningeal tissue. The peak around 1732 cm-1 attributed to fatty acids (lipids) are diminished in the spectra collected from the meningeal cancer tumors as compared with the spectra from normal and benign tissues. The characteristic band of spectral peaks observed between 2800 and 3100 cm-1 are attributed to the vibrations of methyl (-CH3) and methylene (-CH2-) groups. The ratio of the intensities of the spectral peaks of 2935 to 2880 cm-1 from the meningeal cancer tissues is found to be lower in comparison with that of the spectral peaks from normal, and benign tissues, which may be used as a distinct marker for distinguishing cancerous tissues from normal meningeal tissues. The statistical methods of principal component analysis and the support vector machine are used to analyze the RR spectral data collected from meningeal tissues, yielding a diagnostic sensitivity of 90.9% and specificity of 100% when two principal components are used.

  10. [Neuropsychology and forensic assessment in brain injured patients].

    PubMed

    Mazaux, J-M; Ricbourg, B

    2006-09-01

    Neuropsychology, which deals with the relationships between upper mental functions and brain structures is directly involved with psychiatric and psychological disorders and thus constitutes one of the major domains of cognitive sciences. The impairment of upper mental functions is evident after severe brain injuries causing significant motor deficits. However, it is becoming increasingly evident that even mild or moderate brain injuries can cause sequelae which are difficult to analyze and quantify clinically. These sequelae constitute an "invisible handicap" which may greatly interfere with the patient's professional, relational and social life. The neuropsychological evaluation must be systematic and complete and has to be carried out with a sufficient hindsight (two to three years after the trauma) using neuropsychological and behavioural deficiency evaluation scales. Psychometric tests are also necessary. The data obtained from this evaluation must be correctly interpreted and constitutes the main exhibit in the forensic examination of the brain injured patient.

  11. Dysphagia outcomes in patients with brain tumors undergoing inpatient rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Wesling, Michele; Brady, Susan; Jensen, Mary; Nickell, Melissa; Statkus, Donna; Escobar, Nelson

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to compare functional dysphagia outcomes following inpatient rehabilitation for patients with brain tumors with that of patients following a stroke. Group 1 (n = 24) consisted of consecutive admissions to the brain injury program with the diagnosis of brain tumor and dysphagia. Group 2 (n = 24) consisted of matched, consecutive admissions, with the diagnosis of acute stroke and dysphagia. Group 2 was matched for age, site of lesion, and initial composite cognitive FIM score. The main outcome measures for this study included the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) National Outcome Measurement System (NOMS) swallowing scale, length of stay, hospital charges, and medical complications. Results showed that swallowing gains made by both groups as evaluated by the admission and discharge ASHA NOMS levels were considered to be statistically significant. The differences for length of stay, total hospital charges, and speech charges between the two groups were not considered to be statistically significant. Three patients in the brain tumor group (12.5%) demonstrated dysphagia complications of either dehydration or pneumonia during their treatment course as compared to 0% in the stroke group. This study confirms that functional dysphagia gains can be achieved for patients with brain tumors undergoing inpatient rehabilitation and that they should be afforded the same type and intensity of rehabilitation for their swallowing that is provided to patients following a stroke.

  12. Brain MRI Findings in Neurological Complications of Cancer Treatment.

    PubMed

    Cabaj, Astra; Bekiesińska-Figatowska, Monika; Duczkowska, Agnieszka; Duczkowski, Marek

    2016-01-01

    The amount of people living with cancer is increasing; they live longer and have thus a higher risk of developing neurological complications. Magnetic resonance as a diagnostic procedure of choice in detecting the reasons of neurological/psychiatric symptoms in oncological patients is nowadays relatively easily accessible. Early diagnosis established by radiologists familiar with neurological entities that may follow cancer treatment allow clinicians to provide proper treatment, even if the diagnosis seems unbelievable. The review of MR images of acute and chronic neurological complications of cancer treatment from the authors' own archive is the focus of this report. Neurological complications of cancer can be metastatic and non-metastatic; the first cannot be considered as a treatment complication, the latter can be chemoor radiotherapy-induced, acute, chronic and delayed. In our material we dealt with complications with dramatic course (stroke, PRES, acute leukoencephalopathy, Wernicke's encephalopathy) and with cases with milder and/or longer course (neuro-infections, chronic leukoencephalopathy, telangiectasias and/or cavernous hemangiomas, second tumors: glioma and meningioma after irradiation). The central nervous system is very susceptible to complications of systemic cancer and its treatment. Even though the first thought of clinicians and radiologists after a patient's first neurological/psychiatric symptoms appears concerns the metastatic spread of the disease, they need to have an understanding that there are a number of other causes of such symptoms. The knowledge of entities which can be expected and diagnostic experience prevent clinicians from making wrong diagnosis. PMID:27629856

  13. Using Ferumoxytol-Enhanced MRI to Measure Inflammation in Patients With Brain Tumors or Other Conditions of the CNS

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-08

    Brain Injury; Central Nervous System Degenerative Disorder; Central Nervous System Infectious Disorder; Central Nervous System Vascular Malformation; Hemorrhagic Cerebrovascular Accident; Ischemic Cerebrovascular Accident; Primary Brain Neoplasm; Brain Cancer; Brain Tumors

  14. Focal brain atrophy in gastric bypass patients with cognitive complaints.

    PubMed

    Graff-Radford, Jonathan; Whitwell, Jennifer L; Trenerry, Max R; Ahlskog, J Eric; Jensen, Michael D; Jack, Clifford R; Josephs, Keith A

    2011-12-01

    Recently, we have identified a series of patients presenting with cognitive complaints after gastric bypass, without any identifiable etiology. We aimed to determine if focal brain atrophy could account for the complaints. A retrospective case series was performed to identify patients with cognitive complaints following gastric bypass who had a volumetric MRI. Voxel-based morphometry was used to assess patterns of grey matter loss in all 10 patients identified, compared to 10 age and gender-matched controls. All patients had undergone Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery at a median age of 54 (range: 46-64). Cognitive complaints developed at a median age of 57 (52-69). Formal neuropsychometric testing revealed only minor deficits. No nutritional abnormalities were identified. Voxel-based morphometry demonstrated focal thalamic atrophy in the gastric bypass patients when compared to controls. Patients with cognitive complaints after gastric bypass surgery may have focal thalamic brain atrophy that could result in cognitive impairment.

  15. Porphyromonas gingivalis causing brain abscess in patient with recurrent periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Rae Yoo, Jeong; Taek Heo, Sang; Kim, Miyeon; Lee, Chang Sub; Kim, Young Ree

    2016-06-01

    We report an extremely rare case of Porphyromonas gingivalis causing brain abscess in a patient with recurrent periodontitis. The patient presented with right-sided homonymous hemianopsia and right hemiparesis. Emergent surgical drainage was performed and antibiotics were administered. P. gingivalis was identified from the anaerobic culture of the abscess. The clinical course of the patient improved with full recovery of the neurologic deficit. PMID:27085200

  16. Does cancer survival differ for older patients?

    PubMed

    Kant, A K; Glover, C; Horm, J; Schatzkin, A; Harris, T B

    1992-12-01

    The relation of age to 5-year relative survival rates was examined for leading sites of cancer resulting in death among 127,554 patients; data from 1978 to 1982 were studied for four areas of the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results program of the National Cancer Institute. Overall and stage-stratified relative survival rates declined with advancing patient age for cancer of the lung, prostate, pancreas, bladder, oral cavity, uterus, cervix, ovary, and large bowel (women only). In men, this trend was not explained by age differences in stage of diagnosis, whereas, among women, age was associated with more advanced disease for most sites examined. Although overall survival rates were lower in black patients compared with white patients, the age-survival and age-stage trends were similar in the two racial groups.

  17. Nutritional status assessment in colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Joana Pedro; de Castro Cardoso Pereira, Paula Manuela; dos Reis Baltazar Vicente, Ana Filipa; Bernardo, Alexandra; de Mesquita, María Fernanda

    2013-01-01

    The present study intended to evaluate the nutritional status of Portuguese colorectal patients and associated it with surgery type as well as quality of life outcomes. Malnutrition can affect up to 85% of cancer patients and specifically 30-60% in colorectal cancer and can significantly influence health outcomes. A sample of 50 colorectal cancer patients was evaluated in what refers to several anthropometric measures, food intake, clinical history, complications rate before and after surgery procedure. The sample was divided between convention and fast-track procedures. Most of the individuals were overweight or obese but had lost weight on the past six months. Despite mild, there were signs of malnutrition in this sample with high losses of fat free mass, weight and also fat mass during the hospitalization period. These results reinforce the importance of malnutrition assessment in colorectal patients as well as consider weight loss on the past months and body composition in order to complement nutritional status evaluation.

  18. Myofacial Trigger Points in Advanced Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hasuo, Hideaki; Ishihara, Tatsuhiko; Kanbara, Kenji; Fukunaga, Mikihiko

    2016-01-01

    Myofascial pain syndrome is started to be recognized as one of important factors of pain in cancer patients. However, no reports on features of myofascial trigger points were found in terminally-ill cancer populations. This time, we encountered 5 patients with myofascial pain syndrome and terminal cancer in whom delirium developed due to increased doses of opioid without a diagnosis of myofascial pain syndrome on initial presentation. The delirium subsided with dose reductions of opioid and treatment of myofascial pain syndrome. The common reason for a delayed diagnosis among the patients included an incomplete palpation of the painful sites, which led to unsuccessful myofascial trigger points identification. The features of myofascial trigger points included single onset in the cancer pain management site with opioid and the contralateral abdominal side muscles of the non-common sites. Withdrawal reflexes associated with cancer pain in the supine position, which are increasingly seen in the terminal cancer patients, were considered to have contributed to this siuation. We consider that careful palpation of the painful site is important, in order to obtain greater knowledge and understanding of the features of myofascial trigger points. PMID:26962285

  19. Delirium Common in Cancer Patients Seen in ER

    MedlinePlus

    ... often missed, in advanced cancer patients who visit emergency departments, a new study says. Delirium is a serious ... in 243 advanced cancer patients seen at an emergency department. The patients were between the ages of 19 ...

  20. Treatment of brain metastases of lung cancer in the era of precision medicine.

    PubMed

    Haughton, Michael E; Chan, Michael D; Watabe, Kounosuke; Bonomi, Marcelo; Debinski, Waldemar; Lesser, Glenn J; Ruiz, Jimmy

    2016-01-01

    Common and deadly complications of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are brain metastases (BM). BM portends a poorer prognosis with limited effective treatment options and current management strategies present several challenges from iatrogenic complications of supportive medications, optimal delivery of drug across the blood-brain barrier, and preservation of neurocognitive function. Long term side effects and survivorship issues have become more evident in the era of targeted therapy where a systemic disease is much better controlled. Targeted therapies and immunotherapy are beginning to provide improvements in responses and survival rates. With further advancements and experience, our knowledge in this era of precision medicine will likely lead to strides in improving the quality of life and overall survival of patients with BM from NSCLC. In this review, we present the most recent updates in treatment of BM in NSCLC in regards to targeted and immunotherapy. PMID:26709658

  1. Frontiers of X-ray spectromicroscopy in biology and medicine: Gadolinium in brain cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Stasio, Gelsomina; Gilbert, B.; Perfetti, P.; Margaritondo, G.; Mercanti, D.; Ciotti, M. T.; Casalbore, P.; Larocca, L. M.; Rinelli, A.; Pallini, R.

    2000-02-01

    We present the first feasibility test of spectromicroscopy on the microlocalization of gadolinium in brain cancer tissue. A gadolinium compound was injected to the patients before the brain tumor was extracted with surgery, and we looked for Gd in the tumor tissue. The goal of the experiment was to understand if Gd Neutron Capture Therapy (GdNCT) is viable for clinical tests, i.e. if there is enough Gd, and it is localized near the nuclei of tumor cells. The experiments were performed using the MEPHISTO X-ray PhotoElectron Emission Microscope (X-PEEM) at the Wisconsin Synchrotron Radiation Center. The present results demonstrate the feasibility of the experiment, and suggest how to improve the sample preparation and data acquisition to achieve the goal.

  2. Parenteral nutrition in esophageal cancer patients.

    PubMed Central

    Daly, J M; Massar, E; Giacco, G; Frazier, O H; Mountain, C F; Dudrick, S J; Copeland, E M

    1982-01-01

    A review of operative therapy in 244 patients with esophageal cancer from 1960 to 1980 was done to evaluate the impact of TPN in 72 patients treated from 1973 to 1980 with 43 non-TPN patients treated during the same period and to 129 patients operated upon before 1973. Mean age, sex distribution, site, stage, and treatment of the disease were similar for the two study groups. The TPN group lost less weight during treatment (3 lbs vs. 11 lbs) and had fewer overall complications postoperatively (24% vs. 41%). Significant reductions in major wound, infectious, and postoperative complications were noted in these patients who received at least 5 days of preoperative TPN compared with postoperative TPN or the non-TPN groups (4% vs. 24% and 23%). Malnourished esophageal cancer patients can more safely undergo aggressive operative therapy and radiation treatment when adequate perioperative nutritional support is added to the treatment armamentarium. PMID:6807225

  3. [Guidelines for psychosocial care of cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Caminiti, Caterina

    2013-01-01

    Guidelines for psychosocial care of cancer patients. The Italian Association of Medical Oncologists published in 2013 the update of the first edition of the Psychosocial Guidelines for the care of cancer patients. The guidelines, produced by a multidisciplinary group (medical doctors, nurses, oncologists, psychologists and patients) aim at recognizing the importance of psychosocial care in helping the patients and their relatives to overcome the effects of the diagnosis and the treatments on mental health and emotional wellbeing. In some cases the evidences available are not as hard as those supporting drug treatments: many outcomes such as the effectiveness of educational interventions, the patients' wellbeing, thrust, perception of support, for their nature and complexity require both quantitative and qualitative measurements. Lack of robust evidences such as those obtained from clinical trials, does not necessarily correspond to lack of effectiveness of the intervention nor should make us forget that patients' rights (to good care, information and support) should be guaranteed. PMID:24441468

  4. [Palliative Care for Non-cancer Patients].

    PubMed

    Ikegaki, Junichi

    2016-03-01

    Although palliative care has been developed and implemented as care for cancer pain, it is holistic care for suffering that includes physical, psychosocial and spiritual pain of life-threatening illness. It turned out that non-cancer patients in the end-stage are also suffering from various pain that should be treated as cancer patients. Trajectories of illness in non-cancer patients are with more gradual decline than those of cancer patients with steady progression and it is often difficult to make decision about end-of-life. The purpose of advance care planning was originally to help describe legal documents. This process is proved to contribute to improving QOL of patients and their families to discuss preference, hope, economic problems, spiritual question as well as medical treatment In Japan guideline of decision making process in end-of-life stage has been established. A program of communication training in end-of-life discussion has been made. Under current situation some comments on the role of anesthesiologists are also mentioned. PMID:27097506

  5. Brain-computer interfaces for patients with disorders of consciousness.

    PubMed

    Gibson, R M; Owen, A M; Cruse, D

    2016-01-01

    The disorders of consciousness refer to clinical conditions that follow a severe head injury. Patients diagnosed as in a vegetative state lack awareness, while patients diagnosed as in a minimally conscious state retain fluctuating awareness. However, it is a challenge to accurately diagnose these disorders with clinical assessments of behavior. To improve diagnostic accuracy, neuroimaging-based approaches have been developed to detect the presence or absence of awareness in patients who lack overt responsiveness. For the small subset of patients who retain awareness, brain-computer interfaces could serve as tools for communication and environmental control. Here we review the existing literature concerning the sensory and cognitive abilities of patients with disorders of consciousness with respect to existing brain-computer interface designs. We highlight the challenges of device development for this special population and address some of the most promising approaches for future investigations. PMID:27590972

  6. Brain-computer interfaces for patients with disorders of consciousness.

    PubMed

    Gibson, R M; Owen, A M; Cruse, D

    2016-01-01

    The disorders of consciousness refer to clinical conditions that follow a severe head injury. Patients diagnosed as in a vegetative state lack awareness, while patients diagnosed as in a minimally conscious state retain fluctuating awareness. However, it is a challenge to accurately diagnose these disorders with clinical assessments of behavior. To improve diagnostic accuracy, neuroimaging-based approaches have been developed to detect the presence or absence of awareness in patients who lack overt responsiveness. For the small subset of patients who retain awareness, brain-computer interfaces could serve as tools for communication and environmental control. Here we review the existing literature concerning the sensory and cognitive abilities of patients with disorders of consciousness with respect to existing brain-computer interface designs. We highlight the challenges of device development for this special population and address some of the most promising approaches for future investigations.

  7. Reduplicative paramnesia in patients with focal brain damage.

    PubMed

    Murai, T; Toichi, M; Sengoku, A; Miyoshi, K; Morimune, S

    1997-07-01

    Reduplicative paramnesia (RP) has drawn attention as a distinct behavioral syndrome caused by focal brain damage. To elucidate the pathogenesis of RP, we assessed its prevalence among patients with focal brain damage and followed those patients with typical RP. Seventy-seven patients with focal brain damage (47 with left hemispheric, 21 with right hemispheric, and 9 with bilateral damage) were assessed for the presence of RP using a questionnaire intended to elucidate this condition. Two patients showed typical RP for place, and four patients showed atypical RP (three for place and one for person); altogether, these six patients constituted 7.8% of the sample. In three patients, the lesions were situated in the right hemisphere; in two, the lesions were bilateral (right dominant); and in one, the lesions were in the left hemisphere, indicating the relative importance of right hemispheric damage and a possible contributory role of additional left hemispheric damage in RP. The case studies of patients with typical RP suggest the heterogeneity of the underlying cognitive factors in RP.

  8. Combination Chemotherapy Plus Amifostine in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2009-02-06

    Bladder Cancer; Brain and Central Nervous System Tumors; Carcinoma of Unknown Primary; Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumor; Head and Neck Cancer; Kidney Cancer; Lung Cancer; Ovarian Cancer; Sarcoma; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  9. Gadolinium uptake by brain cancer cells: Quantitative analysis with X-PEEM spectromicroscopy for cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Stasio, Gelsomina; Gilbert, B.; Perfetti, P.; Margaritondo, G.; Mercanti, D.; Ciotti, M. T.; Casalbore, P.; Larocca, L. M.; Rinelli, A.; Pallini, R.

    2000-05-01

    We present the first X-PEEM spectromicroscopy semi-quantitative data, acquired on Gd in glioblastoma cell cultures from human brain cancer. The cells were treated with a Gd compound for the optimization of GdNCT (Gadolinium Neutron Capture Therapy). We analyzed the kinetics of Gd uptake as a function of exposure time, and verified that a quantitative analytical technique gives the same results as our MEPHISTO X-PEEM, demonstrating the feasibility of semi-quantitative spectromicroscopy.

  10. Serpins promote cancer cell survival and vascular co-option in brain metastasis.

    PubMed

    Valiente, Manuel; Obenauf, Anna C; Jin, Xin; Chen, Qing; Zhang, Xiang H-F; Lee, Derek J; Chaft, Jamie E; Kris, Mark G; Huse, Jason T; Brogi, Edi; Massagué, Joan

    2014-02-27

    Brain metastasis is an ominous complication of cancer, yet most cancer cells that infiltrate the brain die of unknown causes. Here, we identify plasmin from the reactive brain stroma as a defense against metastatic invasion, and plasminogen activator (PA) inhibitory serpins in cancer cells as a shield against this defense. Plasmin suppresses brain metastasis in two ways: by converting membrane-bound astrocytic FasL into a paracrine death signal for cancer cells, and by inactivating the axon pathfinding molecule L1CAM, which metastatic cells express for spreading along brain capillaries and for metastatic outgrowth. Brain metastatic cells from lung cancer and breast cancer express high levels of anti-PA serpins, including neuroserpin and serpin B2, to prevent plasmin generation and its metastasis-suppressive effects. By protecting cancer cells from death signals and fostering vascular co-option, anti-PA serpins provide a unifying mechanism for the initiation of brain metastasis in lung and breast cancers. PMID:24581498

  11. Coping with cancer: what do patients do.

    PubMed

    Zaza, Christine; Sellick, Scott M; Hillier, Loretta M

    2005-01-01

    Although psychosocial coping techniques and supportive care services have been shown to improve cancer patients' quality of life, there is evidence that many of these strategies have not been widely integrated into the routine care of cancer patients. This study examined: (1) the extent to which cancer patients use certain coping strategies; (2) reasons for non-use; (3) perceived effectiveness of the coping strategies; (4) participants' interest in trying the strategies; and (5) if the strategies were recommended to participants. At the Northwestern Ontario Regional Cancer Centre in Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada, 292 outpatients (98% response rate) completed an in-person interview with a research assistant concerning seven individual coping strategies (music, breathing exercises, meditation, prayer, muscle relaxation, visualization/imagery, hypnosis/self-hypnosis) and four coping strategies offered through supportive care services (individual counselling, family counselling, support groups, religious support). Of all the coping strategies presented, prayer was used by the highest number (n = 186) of participants (64%). Music was the next most commonly used strategy, used by 43% (n = 124) of participants, and all other strategies were used by less than 30%of participants. The individualized approaches that are used for disseminating disease and treatment information to cancer patients should also be used to provide them with information on effective coping strategies.

  12. [Cancer treatment for patients with dementia].

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Asao

    2014-09-01

    Cancer is a disease associated with aging. In Japan, the rate of aging is estimated to be over 25%. Further, the prevalence of dementia also increases with age, and cancer patients with dementia are becoming more common. Dementia is a progressive condition characterized by impairment in memory and at least one other cognitive domain(language, praxis, gnosis, or executive function), as well as a compromised ability to perform daily functions. Impairment of short-term memory and executive function in particular are associated with an increased risk for functional decline and mortality. Assessment of cognitive function is necessary to ensure that cancer patients can provide informed consent and understand the risks, benefits, and alternatives of therapeutic treatment. The health care team needs to ascertain whether patients have the mental capacity for cancer treatment, will comply with the treatment schedule, and will understand when to seek help. Elderly cancer patients undergoing treatment need to be assessed for vulnerability with the comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA). PMID:25248886

  13. Dementia Risk in Irradiated Patients With Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jin-Hua; Yen, Yu-Chun; Liu, Shing-Hwa; Lee, Fei-Peng; Lin, Kuan-Chou; Lai, Ming-Tang; Wu, Chia-Che; Chen, Tsung-Ming; Yuan, Sheng-Po; Chang, Chia-Lun; Wu, Szu-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Patients with head and neck cancer are treated through surgery, radiotherapy (RT), and chemotherapy (CT). Carotid artery damage and neurotoxicity were previously observed in these patients. This study estimated the dementia risk associated with different treatment modalities in a head and neck cancer population with long-term follow-up. Taiwan's National Health Insurance claims database and a cancer registry database from the Collaboration Center of Health Information Application were linked for the present analysis. Patients with head and neck cancer, treated from January 1, 2002 to December 31, 2010, were included in the study. The follow-up duration was the period from the index date to December 31, 2012. Inclusion criteria were head and neck cancer; an age >20 years; and having undergone surgery, CT, concurrent CT, or surgery with adjuvant treatment. Exclusion criteria were another cancer diagnosed before the head and neck cancer, death or being diagnosed with dementia within 2 years after the treatment of the head and neck cancer, stroke before the index date, distant metastasis, in situ carcinoma, sarcoma, head and neck cancer recurrence, an unknown sex, and an age <20 years. In total, 20,135 patients were included. In patient groups that underwent surgery alone, surgery and adjuvant chemoradiotherapy, and chemoradiotherapy alone, the dementia incidence per 1000 person-years was 1.44, 1.04, and 1.98, respectively. The crude hazard ratio (HR) of dementia was 1.84 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.21–2.81) in the RT with or without CT group. After adjustment for age, sex, clinical stage, and comorbidity, the HR was 1.92 (95% CI 1.14–3.24). Examining the dementia risk in patients who received different treatment modalities according to the Cox proportional-hazard model revealed that an age >65 years and having undergone RT with or without CT were risk factors (P < 0.001 and P = 0.015; and HRs of 16.5 and 1.92, respectively). The dementia risk

  14. Tumor marker analyses in patients with brain metastases: patterns of practice and implications for survival prediction research.

    PubMed

    Nieder, Carsten; Dalhaug, Astrid; Haukland, Ellinor; Mannsåker, Bård; Pawinski, Adam

    2015-08-01

    This study aims to explore patterns of practice of tumor marker analyses and potential prognostic impact of abnormal markers in patients with brain metastases from solid tumors. Previously, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and albumin were identified as relevant biomarkers. We performed a retrospective analysis of 120 patients with known LDH and albumin treated with whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) in two different situations: (1) brain metastases detected at initial cancer diagnosis (n = 46) and (2) brain metastases at later time points (n = 74, median interval 13 months). Twenty-six patients (57 %) from group 1 had at least one tumor marker analyzed, and 11 patients (24 %) had abnormal results. Twenty-two patients (30 %) from group 2 had at least one tumor marker analyzed, and 16 patients (22 %) had abnormal results. When assuming that LDH and albumin would be standard tests before WBRT, additional potential biomarkers were found in 36 % of patients with normal LDH and albumin. Marker positivity rates were for example 80 % for carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in colorectal cancer and 79 % for CA 15-3 in breast cancer. Abnormal markers were associated with presence of liver metastases. CA 15-3 values above median predicted shorter survival in patients with breast cancer (median 1.9 vs. 13.8 months, p = 0.1). Comparable trends were not observed for various markers in other tumor types. In conclusion, only a minority of patients had undergone tumor marker analyses. Final group sizes were too small to perform multivariate analyses or draw definitive conclusions. We hypothesize that CA 15-3 could be a promising biomarker that should be studied further.

  15. Brain Tumor Database, a free relational database for collection and analysis of brain tumor patient information.

    PubMed

    Bergamino, Maurizio; Hamilton, David J; Castelletti, Lara; Barletta, Laura; Castellan, Lucio

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we describe the development and utilization of a relational database designed to manage the clinical and radiological data of patients with brain tumors. The Brain Tumor Database was implemented using MySQL v.5.0, while the graphical user interface was created using PHP and HTML, thus making it easily accessible through a web browser. This web-based approach allows for multiple institutions to potentially access the database. The BT Database can record brain tumor patient information (e.g. clinical features, anatomical attributes, and radiological characteristics) and be used for clinical and research purposes. Analytic tools to automatically generate statistics and different plots are provided. The BT Database is a free and powerful user-friendly tool with a wide range of possible clinical and research applications in neurology and neurosurgery. The BT Database graphical user interface source code and manual are freely available at http://tumorsdatabase.altervista.org.

  16. Primary mediastinal choriocarcinoma with brain metastasis in a female patient.

    PubMed

    Kuno, I; Matsumoto, Y; Kasai, M; Fukuda, T; Hashiguchi, Y; Ichimura, T; Yasui, T; Sumi, T

    2016-01-01

    Nongestational choriocarcinoma is very rare and carries a poor prognosis in female patients. In this report, the authors present a case of nongestational choriocarcinoma with brain metastasis in a female. A 58-year-old female with intermittent back pain was referred to a private hospital. On examination, a mediastinal tumor and a pancreatic tumor were detected. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy of the tumor was performed for histological evaluation. Pathological diagnosis was difficult because only a small amount of tissue was collected. Head MRI showed multiple metastatic tumors in the brain. The patient was diagnosed with primary mediastinal choriocarcinoma with brain metastasis. She was treated with one course of an etoposide, methotrexate, dactinomycin, cyclophosphamide, and vincristine regimen, but her general condition gradually deteriorated, and she died on day 41. Nongestational choriocarcinoma is drug resistant, whereas gestational choriocarcinoma has better chemotherapeutic sensitivity. PMID:27172760

  17. Associated brain abnormalities in patients with corpus callosum anomalies.

    PubMed

    Tekgül, H; Dizdarer, G; Yalman, O; Sener, N; Yünten, N; Tütüncüoğlu, S

    1999-01-01

    Forty-nine patients with corpus callosum (CC) anomalies were evaluated in terms of the clinical features and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. CC anomalies were classified as CC agenesis: 6 (12%), CC hypogenesis: 5 (10%), and CC hypoplasia: 38 (78%). In the CC hypoplasia group the mean value of the genu thickness of the CC was 0.29 +/- 0.1 cm, which was less than the normal value of the age-matched normal children (normal range: 0.6-1.2 cm). The associated brain abnormalities were in five distinct groups: gray matter abnormalities, white matter abnormalities, midline brain structure defects, cortical atrophy, and encephalomalacia. There was no uniformity for the clinical spectrum of CC anomalies. Microcephaly, developmental delay and seizures were the prominent findings in patients. The clinical features were more severe in cases with associated brain anomalies.

  18. Gamma-N activation of cancer patients

    SciTech Connect

    Wielopolski, L.; Meek, A.G.; Moskowitz, M.; Cohn, S.H.

    1986-01-01

    High energy gamma radiation (8 to 30 MeV) is gaining acceptance for radiation therapy of patients with deep cancers. This radiation is of sufficient energy to induce photonuclear activation of the elements in the human body. Our results of measurements of nitrogen and phosphorus in an anthropomorphic phantom, a cadaver, and a cancer patient with bremsstrahlung radiation from 15 MeV electrons demonstrate the feasibility of a method to monitor these two elements in the human body in vivo by measuring the radioactivity induced in these targets by photonuclear reactions. 14 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. ["Mercy lie" for the patient with cancer].

    PubMed

    Chacon, J P; Kobata, C M; Liberman, S P

    1995-01-01

    The authors discussed the problem of whether or not to be completely frank with cancer patients about their diagnosis. They analysed the results of a survey of 79 doctors (Phase 1) in which they tried to find out how the doctors behaved towards the patients, their families and with themselves in the different situations caused by the illness. In the second stage (Phase 2), they also put the following question to 118 adults: If it was diagnosed that you had cancer would you like your doctor to tell you? PMID:8731608

  20. [Actual questions about the prevention of venous thromboembolism in cancer patients receiving chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Losonczy, Hajna; Nagy, Ágnes; Tar, Attila

    2016-02-01

    Cancer patients have a 2-7 fold increased risk of venous thromboembolism compared with the general population and, since 1990, this is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. This review summarizes the current knowledge on venous thromboembolism and cancer. Notably, the risk of venous thromboembolism varies depending on the type and stage of cancer. For instance, pancreatic and brain cancer patients have a higher risk of venous thromboembolism than breast and prostate cancer patients. Moreover, patients with metastatic disease have a higher risk than those with localized tumors. Tumor-derived procoagulant factors, cytokines and growth factors may directly and indirectly enhance venous thromboembolism. Chemotherapy produces ~6,5 fold increase in venous thromboembolism incidence in cancer patients compared to the general population. Prevention of this complication is challenging. The authors review the development of guidelines concerning venous thromboembolism prevention in hospitalized and also in ambulatory cancer patients treated with chemotherapy. Current guidelines recommend the use of low-molecular-weight heparin. Understanding the underlying mechanisms may allow the development of new therapies to safely prevent venous thromboembolism in cancer patients. PMID:27120721

  1. Assessment of cancer care in Indian elderly cancer patients: A single center study

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Anindya; Shahi, UP

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: This prospective study aimed to assess the profiles of elderly cancer patient to optimize cancer care in Indian setup. The profiles have been compared with that of younger patients in terms of epidemiological, clinical data, co-morbidity, treatment, toxicity, clinical outcome, and survival pattern. Materials and Methods: The study comprised cancer patients attending radiotherapy outdoor (November 2005 to June 2006). There were 104 patients of age ≥60 years (elderly group) and 121 patients of 45-59 years (younger group). Results: Elderly group had median age 65 years (60-88 years) with M:F = 1:1. The younger group had median age 50 years (45-59 years) with M:F = 1:2. Elderly had higher proportion of gastrointestinal and genito-urinary tract malignancies. Younger group had higher proportion of breast, lymphoma, and brain tumor. 13% had co-morbidity, 50% received treatment, 27% were treated with radiotherapy with or without surgery, and two-third of these cases belong to elderly group. Majority tolerated treatment well. 10% had significant grade of toxicity. 57% of elderly patients did not accept and one-fourth of all cases did not complete the prescribed treatment. 88% cases were responders of which 70% showed complete response. There were no differences between two groups. At 12 months 35% of treated patients came for follow-up. At first 12 months, 60-70% were alive without disease. Conclusion: There were differences between two groups in terms of performance status, treatment acceptance, and treatment modality prescribed. Elderly patients deserve same opportunity as younger patients for treatment and survival options from the oncologist. PMID:24455630

  2. Volumetric brain abnormalities in polysubstance use disorder patients

    PubMed Central

    Noyan, Cemal Onur; Kose, Samet; Nurmedov, Serdar; Metin, Baris; Darcin, Aslı Enez; Dilbaz, Nesrin

    2016-01-01

    Aim Polysubstance users represent the largest group of patients seeking treatment at addiction and rehabilitation clinics in Turkey. There is little knowledge about the structural brain abnormalities seen in polysubstance users. This study was conducted to examine the structural brain differences between polysubstance use disorder patients and healthy control subjects using voxel-based morphometry. Methods Forty-six male polysubstance use disorder patients in the early abstinence period and 30 healthy male controls underwent structural magnetic resonance imaging scans. Voxel-based morphometry analysis was performed to examine gray matter (GM) abnormality differences. Results Polysubstance use disorder patients displayed significantly smaller GM volume in the thalamus, temporal pole, superior frontal gyrus, cerebellum, gyrus rectus, occipital lobe, anterior cingulate cortex, superior temporal gyrus, and postcentral gyrus. Conclusion A widespread and smaller GM volume has been found at different regions of the frontal, temporal, occipital, and parietal lobes, cerebellum, and anterior cingulate cortex in polysubstance users. PMID:27358566

  3. [Lung-brain interaction in the mechanically ventilated patient].

    PubMed

    López-Aguilar, J; Fernández-Gonzalo, M S; Turon, M; Quílez, M E; Gómez-Simón, V; Jódar, M M; Blanch, L

    2013-10-01

    Patients with acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) admitted to the ICU present neuropsychological alterations, which in most cases extend beyond the acute phase and have an important adverse effect upon quality of life. The aim of this review is to deepen in the analysis of the complex interaction between lung and brain in critically ill patients subjected to mechanical ventilation. This update first describes the neuropsychological alterations occurring both during the acute phase of ICU stay and at discharge, followed by an analysis of lung-brain interactions during mechanical ventilation, and finally explores the etiology and mechanisms leading to the neurological disorders observed in these patients. The management of critical patients requires an integral approach focused on minimizing the deleterious effects over the short, middle or long term.

  4. [Lung-brain interaction in the mechanically ventilated patient].

    PubMed

    López-Aguilar, J; Fernández-Gonzalo, M S; Turon, M; Quílez, M E; Gómez-Simón, V; Jódar, M M; Blanch, L

    2013-10-01

    Patients with acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) admitted to the ICU present neuropsychological alterations, which in most cases extend beyond the acute phase and have an important adverse effect upon quality of life. The aim of this review is to deepen in the analysis of the complex interaction between lung and brain in critically ill patients subjected to mechanical ventilation. This update first describes the neuropsychological alterations occurring both during the acute phase of ICU stay and at discharge, followed by an analysis of lung-brain interactions during mechanical ventilation, and finally explores the etiology and mechanisms leading to the neurological disorders observed in these patients. The management of critical patients requires an integral approach focused on minimizing the deleterious effects over the short, middle or long term. PMID:23260265

  5. αB-crystallin Expression in Breast Cancer is Associated with Brain Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Voduc, K. David; Nielsen, Torsten O.; Perou, Charles M.; Harrell, J. Chuck.; Fan, Cheng; Kennecke, Hagen; Minn, Andy J.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objectives The molecular chaperone αB-crystallin is expressed in estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 “triple-negative” breast carcinomas and promotes brain and lung metastasis. We examined αB-crystallin expression in primary breast carcinomas with metastatic data to evaluate its association with prognosis and site-specific metastases. Methods αB-crystallin gene (CRYAB) expression was examined using publically available global-gene expression data (n=855 breast tumors) with first site of distant metastasis information (“855Met”). αB-crystallin protein expression was determined by immunohistochemistry using the clinically annotated tissue microarray (n=3987 breast tumors) from British Columbia Cancer Agency (BCCA). Kaplan-Meier and multivariable Cox regression analyses were used to evaluate the prognostic value of αB-crystallin. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate risks of αB-crystallin and other markers for site of metastasis. Results In the 855Met dataset, αB-crystallin gene (CRYAB) expression was an independent predictor of brain as the first distant site of relapse (HR = 1.2, (95% CI 1.0-1.4), P = 0.021). In the BCCA series, αB-crystallin protein expression was an independent prognostic marker of poor breast cancer specific survival (HR = 1.3, (95% CI 1.1-1.6), P = 0.014). Among patients with metastases, αB-crystallin was the strongest independent predictor of brain metastasis (OR = 2.99 (95% CI 1.83-4.89), P < 0.0001) and the only independent predictor of brain as the first site of distant metastasis (OR = 3.15 (95% CI1.43-6.95), P = 0.005). αB-crystallin was also associated with worse survival (3.0 versus 4.7 months, P = 0.007). Conclusions αB-crystallin is a promising biomarker to identify breast cancer patients at high risk for early relapse in the brain, independent of ER and HER2 status.

  6. Fertility counseling of young breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Anserini, Paola; Levaggi, Alessia; Poggio, Francesca; Del Mastro, Lucia

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 6% of women with breast cancer are diagnosed before the age of 40. Young age is an independent predictor of adverse outcome and most young breast cancer patients receive systemic treatment with chemotherapy, hormonal therapy or both. The loss or impairment of fertility is a potential side effect of antineoplastic treatments. Due to the rising trend to delaying pregnancy in life, an increasing proportion of young cancer patients who are yet to have a pregnancy will face the problem of iatrogenic menopause in the future. The incidence of anticancer-treatment-related ovarian failure depends on the type of chemotherapy regimen administered, the use of tamoxifen and the age of patients. It rises with increasing age, in the range of 22-61% and 61-97% in women aged <40 years and >40 years respectively. Although there is a clear trend to increasing incidence of ovarian failure with the rise in aging, there may be a small proportion of patients who became amenorrhoeic despite the very young age, thus indicating that also individual factors still unknown may affect the probability of treatment-related ovarian failure. A prompt referral of patients to reproductive counseling and a multidisciplinary team including Oncology and Reproductive Units are essential to face the management of fertility issues in cancer patients. Fertility counseling should include a detailed description of all the available techniques to preserve fertility. The main available fertility preservation techniques, standard and experimental, for young breast cancer patients include: temporary ovarian suppression during chemotherapy with gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogues, embryo cryopreservation, cryopreservation of oocytes and cryopreservation of ovarian tissue. Research efforts are still necessary to improve the efficacy and safety of the available fertility preservation strategies as well as an efficient collaboration between oncologists and gynecologists is necessary to improve

  7. Physicians' influence on breast cancer patient compliance.

    PubMed

    Kostev, Karel; Waehlert, Lilia; Jockwig, Achim; Jockwig, Barbara; Hadji, Peyman

    2014-01-01

    In recent years there have been major advances in the treatment of breast cancer. However, taking the prescribed medication for a sufficient period of time is crucial to the success of any therapy. Thus far, no database-based studies have been published in German-speaking countries empirically examining the influence of the physician on the compliance of patients. The aim of this study is to investigate, quantify, and critically discuss the effect treating physicians have on the compliance of their breast cancer patients. Patients with a confirmed breast cancer diagnosis who started therapy (tamoxifen or aromatase inhibitors) between January 2001 and December 2011 were selected from the representative IMS Disease Analyzer database and analyzed with regard to their compliance. Practices were grouped into two categories concerning the compliance of all treated patients. A regression model showed that a breast cancer patient who is treated in a practice with a trend toward poor compliance has a nearly 60% higher risk for treatment discontinuation than would be the case in a practice with good compliance. It shows how important it is to motivate physicians to strive toward good compliance rates.

  8. Cachexia in patients with oesophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Anandavadivelan, Poorna; Lagergren, Pernilla

    2016-03-01

    Oesophageal cancer is a debilitating disease with a poor prognosis, and weight loss owing to malnutrition prevails in the majority of patients. Cachexia, a multifactorial syndrome characterized by the loss of fat and skeletal muscle mass and systemic inflammation arising from complex host-tumour interactions is a major contributor to malnutrition, which is a determinant of tolerance to treatment and survival. In patients with oesophageal cancer, cachexia is further compounded by eating difficulties owing to the stage and location of the tumour, and the effects of neoadjuvant therapy. Treatment with curative intent involves exceptionally extensive and invasive surgery, and the subsequent anatomical changes often lead to eating difficulties and severe postoperative malnutrition. Thus, screening for cachexia by means of percentage weight loss and BMI during the cancer trajectory and survivorship periods is imperative. Additionally, markers of inflammation (such as C-reactive protein), dysphagia and appetite loss should be assessed at diagnosis. Routine assessments of body composition are also necessary in patients with oesophageal cancer to enable assessment of skeletal muscle loss, which might be masked by sarcopenic obesity in these patients. A need exists for clinical trials examining the effectiveness of therapeutic and physical-activity-based interventions in mitigating muscle loss and counteracting cachexia in these patients. PMID:26573424

  9. Renal cancer in kidney transplanted patients.

    PubMed

    Frascà, Giovanni M; Sandrini, Silvio; Cosmai, Laura; Porta, Camillo; Asch, William; Santoni, Matteo; Salviani, Chiara; D'Errico, Antonia; Malvi, Deborah; Balestra, Emilio; Gallieni, Maurizio

    2015-12-01

    Renal cancer occurs more frequently in renal transplanted patients than in the general population, affecting native kidneys in 90% of cases and the graft in 10 %. In addition to general risk factors, malignancy susceptibility may be influenced by immunosuppressive therapy, the use of calcineurin inhibitors (CNI) as compared with mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors, and the length of dialysis treatment. Acquired cystic kidney disease may increase the risk for renal cancer after transplantation, while autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease does not seem to predispose to cancer development. Annual ultrasound evaluation seems appropriate in patients with congenital or acquired cystic disease or even a single cyst in native kidneys, and every 2 years in patients older than 60 years if they were on dialysis for more than 5 years before transplantation. Immunosuppression should be lowered in patients who develop renal cancer, by reduction or withdrawal of CNI. Although more evidence is still needed, it seems reasonable to shift patients from CNI to everolimus or sirolimus if not already treated with one of these drugs, with due caution in subjects with chronic allograft nephropathy.

  10. Smog May Shorten Lives of Lung Cancer Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... 5, 2016 FRIDAY, Aug. 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Air pollution may shorten the lives of lung cancer patients, ... the International Agency for Research on Cancer classifies air pollution as a cancer-causing agent. "This study, along ...

  11. [Telling the patient the diagnosis of cancer].

    PubMed

    Doi, T

    1989-04-01

    Four cases are presented for discussion. In the first case, the patient believed the doctor for a while when his suspicion of cancer was forcibly denied. But when radiotherapy followed the operation, he became convinced that he had been deceived and confronted the doctor aggressively to force him into a confession. In the second case, the patient, a resident of the U.S. for many years, was told on completion of tests the true diagnosis even before his American wife learned of it. He became very depressed, while his wife kept urging him to fight the cancer. In the third case, the doctor thought better of the earlier decision by another doctor not to tell the truth. The doctor called the patient's relatives to discuss the advisability of telling the truth and when he secured their confidence, he visited the patient with them and told him the true diagnosis. The patient recovered from the initial shock and lived peacefully for several months enjoying the new union he felt with his wife. In the fourth case, it is as if there were a kind of silent conspiracy between the doctor and the patient's relatives who kept her in the dark about her condition. When her illness went downhill, she became completely withdrawn, though she accepted religious ministering to the end. It is cruel to deceive the patient with false hopes. But to tell the patient the truth needs tact. The doctor in the third case gives a very good model of it. First, he assesses the patient's personality. Second, he convinces the patient's relatives of the advisability of truth-telling. Third, he assures the patient that he is in charge no matter what happens to him. Perhaps it was easier to tell the patient the diagnosis of cancer or its poor prognosis in bygone days than nowadays, when the wonders of modern medicine are too much publicized. PMID:2730005

  12. Anemia, tumor hypoxemia, and the cancer patient

    SciTech Connect

    Varlotto, John . E-mail: jvarlott@bidmc.harvard.edu; Stevenson, Mary Ann

    2005-09-01

    Purpose: To review the impact of anemia/tumor hypoxemia on the quality of life and survival in cancer patients, and to assess the problems associated with the correction of this difficulty. Methods: MEDLINE searches were performed to find relevant literature regarding anemia and/or tumor hypoxia in cancer patients. Articles were evaluated in order to assess the epidemiology, adverse patient effects, anemia correction guidelines, and mechanisms of hypoxia-induced cancer cell growth and/or therapeutic resistance. Past and current clinical studies of radiosensitization via tumor oxygenation/hypoxic cell sensitization were reviewed. All clinical studies using multi-variate analysis were analyzed to show whether or not anemia and/or tumor hypoxemia affected tumor control and patient survival. Articles dealing with the correction of anemia via transfusion and/or erythropoietin were reviewed in order to show the impact of the rectification on the quality of life and survival of cancer patients. Results: Approximately 40-64% of patients presenting for cancer therapy are anemic. The rate of anemia rises with the use of chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and hormonal therapy for prostate cancer. Anemia is associated with reductions both in quality of life and survival. Tumor hypoxemia has been hypothesized to lead to tumor growth and resistance to therapy because it leads to angiogenesis, genetic mutations, resistance to apoptosis, and a resistance to free radicals from chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Nineteen clinical studies of anemia and eight clinical studies of tumor hypoxemia were found that used multi-variate analysis to determine the effect of these conditions on the local control and/or survival of cancer patients. Despite differing definitions of anemia and hypoxemia, all studies have shown a correlation between low hemoglobin levels and/or higher amounts of tumor hypoxia with poorer prognosis. Radiosensitization through improvements in tumor oxygenation/hypoxic cell

  13. Activity of T-DM1 in Her2-positive breast cancer brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Bartsch, Rupert; Berghoff, Anna S; Vogl, Ursula; Rudas, Margaretha; Bergen, Elisabeth; Dubsky, Peter; Dieckmann, Karin; Pinker, Katja; Bago-Horvath, Zsuzsanna; Galid, Arik; Oehler, Leopold; Zielinski, Christoph C; Gnant, Michael; Steger, Guenther G; Preusser, Matthias

    2015-10-01

    Brain metastases (BM) are frequently diagnosed in metastatic Her2-positive breast cancer. Local treatment remains the standard of care but lapatinib plus capecitabine was recently established as systemic therapy option. Due to a disruption of the blood-brain/tumour-barrier at metastatic sites, even large molecules may penetrate into the central nervous system (CNS). Here, we report on the activity of T-DM1 in Her2-positive breast cancer BM. T-DM1 was administered at a dose of 3.6 mg once every 3 weeks as primary systemic therapy for BM or upon documented CNS progression after initial local treatment. Thus, this study allowed for the appraisal of T-DM1 activity in BM. Restaging was conducted every 12 weeks with MRI or whenever symptoms of disease progression occurred. Ten patients were included; in two asymptomatic subjects, T-DM1 was administered as primary therapy, while eight had progressive BM. All patients had received prior treatment with trastuzumab, six had already received lapatinib, and three pertuzumab as well. Three patients had partial remission of BM, and two patient had stable disease lasting for ≥6 months; two further patients had stable disease for <6 months while three progressed despite treatment. At 8.5 months median follow-up, intracranial PFS was 5 months, and median OS from initiation of T-DM1 was not reached. Local treatment of BM remains the standard of care; lapatinib plus capecitabine is currently the best established systemic therapy option. Still, T-DM1 apparently offers relevant clinical activity in BM and further investigation is warranted.

  14. Brain cancer mortality rates increase with Toxoplasma gondii seroprevalence in France

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vittecoq, Marion; Elguero, Eric; Lafferty, Kevin D.; Roche, Benjamin; Brodeur, Jacques; Gauthier-Clerc, Michel; Missé, Dorothée; Thomas, Frédéric

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of adult brain cancer was previously shown to be higher in countries where the parasite Toxoplasma gondii is common, suggesting that this brain protozoan could potentially increase the risk of tumor formation. Using countries as replicates has, however, several potential confounding factors, particularly because detection rates vary with country wealth. Using an independent dataset entirely within France, we further establish the significance of the association between T. gondii and brain cancer and find additional demographic resolution. In adult age classes 55 years and older, regional mortality rates due to brain cancer correlated positively with the local seroprevalence of T. gondii. This effect was particularly strong for men. While this novel evidence of a significant statistical association between T. gondii infection and brain cancer does not demonstrate causation, these results suggest that investigations at the scale of the individual are merited.

  15. Filming the family: a documentary film to educate clinicians about family caregivers of patients with brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Rabow, Michael W; Goodman, Steffanie; Chang, Susan; Berger, Mitchel; Folkman, Susan

    2010-06-01

    The objective of this paper is to evaluate the educational value of a documentary film about family caregiving for patients with brain tumors. The method used in this study is a pre-post survey among neurosurgeons, neuro-oncologist, and other clinician viewers. Viewers evaluated the film highly and reported an intention to change their practice as a result of watching the film. Following viewing, participants felt more strongly that "all families of patients with brain cancers should meet with a social worker" (P = 0.01) and that "family caregivers greatly impact the health of patients" (P = 0.002), and they were less likely to believe that "supporting family caregivers is primarily someone else's job" (P = 0.009). A documentary film about family caregiving is an effective educational tool to increase awareness among neurosurgery/neuro-oncology clinicians about the importance and needs of family caregivers of patients with brain tumors.

  16. Biothermal Model of Patient and Automatic Control System of Brain Temperature for Brain Hypothermia Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakamatsu, Hidetoshi; Gaohua, Lu

    Various surface-cooling apparatus such as the cooling cap, muffler and blankets have been commonly used for the cooling of the brain to provide hypothermic neuro-protection for patients of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. The present paper is aimed at the brain temperature regulation from the viewpoint of automatic system control, in order to help clinicians decide an optimal temperature of the cooling fluid provided for these three types of apparatus. At first, a biothermal model characterized by dynamic ambient temperatures is constructed for adult patient, especially on account of the clinical practice of hypothermia and anesthesia in the brain hypothermia treatment. Secondly, the model is represented by the state equation as a lumped parameter linear dynamic system. The biothermal model is justified from their various responses corresponding to clinical phenomena and treatment. Finally, the optimal regulator is tentatively designed to give clinicians some suggestions on the optimal temperature regulation of the patient’s brain. It suggests the patient’s brain temperature could be optimally controlled to follow-up the temperature process prescribed by the clinicians. This study benefits us a great clinical possibility for the automatic hypothermia treatment.

  17. Travelling for radiation cancer treatment: patient perspectives.

    PubMed

    Fitch, Margaret I; Gray, Ross E; McGowan, Tom; Brunskill, Ian; Steggles, Shawn; Sellick, Scott; Bezjak, Andrea; McLeese, Donna

    2003-01-01

    Radiation treatment for cancer requires patients to receive frequent administrations and attend the treatment facility on a daily basis for several weeks. Travelling for radiation treatment has the potential to add to the distress an individual may be feeling. This study utilized in-depth interviews to capture 118 patients' perspectives about travelling for cancer treatment. Four themes emerged during the analysis of the data: (1) waiting was the most difficult part of the experience; (2) the idea of travelling for treatment was distressing; (3) travelling for treatment was tiring and posed difficulties for patients; and (4) being away from home had both benefits and drawbacks. Given the inevitability of travelling for radiation treatment, and the issues that arises for patients, supportive strategies need to be designed and implemented. PMID:14502591

  18. Lung cancer in HIV-infected patients

    PubMed Central

    Palacios, R; Lebrón, J; Guerrero-León, M; Del Arco, A; Colmenero, J; Márquez, M; Santos, J

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Several studies have shown that HIV patients are at higher risk of lung cancer. Our aim is to analyse the prevalence and features of lung cancer in HIV-infected patients. Methods The clinical charts of 4,721 HIV-infected patients seen in three hospitals of southeast Spain (study period 1992–2012) were reviewed, and all patients with a lung cancer were analysed. Results There were 61 lung cancers, giving a prevalence of 1.2%. There was a predominance of men (82.0%), and smokers (96.6%; mean pack-years 35.2), with a median age of 48.0 (41.7–52.9) years, and their distribution according to risk group for HIV was: intravenous drug use 58.3%, homosexual 20.0%, and heterosexual 16.7%. Thirty-four (56.7%) patients were Aids cases, and 29 (47.5%) had prior pulmonar events: tuberculosis 16, bacterial pneumonia 9, and P. jiroveci pneumonia 4. The median nadir CD4 count was 149/mm3 (42–232), the median CD4 count at the time of diagnosis of the lung cancer was 237/mm3 (85–397), and 66.1%<350/mm3. 66.7% were on ART, and 70% of them had undetectable HIV viral load. The most common histological types of lung cancer were adenocarcinoma and epidermoid, with 24 (40.0%) and 23 (38.3%) cases, respectively. There were 49 (80.3%) cases with advanced stages (III and IV) at diagnosis. The distribution of treatments was: only palliative 23 (39.7%), chemotherapy 14 (24.1%), surgery and chemotherapy 8 (13.8%), radiotherapy 7 (12.1%), surgery 4 (6.9%), and other combined treatments 2 (3.4%). Forty-six (76.7%) patients died, with a median survival time of 3 months. The Kaplan-Meier survival rate at 6 months was 42.7% (at 12 months 28.5%). Conclusions The prevalence of lung cancer in this cohort of HIV-patients is high. People affected are mainly men, smokers, with transmission of HIV by intravenous drug use, and around half of them with prior opportunistic pulmonary events. Most patients had low nadir CD4 count, and were immunosuppressed at the time of diagnosis. Adenocarcinoma

  19. Energy expenditure in malnourished cancer patients.

    PubMed Central

    Knox, L S; Crosby, L O; Feurer, I D; Buzby, G P; Miller, C L; Mullen, J L

    1983-01-01

    It is widely believed that the presence of a malignancy causes increased energy expenditure in the cancer patient. To test this hypothesis, resting energy expenditure (REE) was measured by bedside indirect calorimetry in 200 heterogeneous hospitalized cancer patients. Measured resting energy expenditure (REE-M) was compared with expected energy expenditure (REE-P) as defined by the Harris-Benedict formula. The study population consisted of 77 males and 123 females with a variety of tumor types: 44% with gastrointestinal malignancy, 29% with gynecologic malignancy, and 19% with a malignancy of genitourinary origin. Patients were classified as hypometabolic (REE less than 90% of predicted), normometabolic (90-110% of predicted) or hypermetabolic (greater than 110% of predicted). Fifty-nine per cent of patients exhibited aberrant energy expenditure outside the normal range. Thirty-three per cent were hypometabolic (79.2% REE-P), 41% were normometabolic (99.5% REE-P), and 26% were hypermetabolic (121.9% REE-P) (p less than 0.001). Aberrations in REE were not due to age, height, weight, sex, nutritional status (% weight loss, visceral protein status), tumor burden (no gross tumor, local, or disseminated disease), or presence of liver metastasis. Hypermetabolic patients had significantly longer duration of disease (p less than 0.04) than normometabolic patients (32.8 vs. 12.8 months), indicating that the duration of a malignancy may have a major impact upon energy metabolism. Cancer patients exhibit major aberrations in energy metabolism, but are not uniformly hypermetabolic. Energy expenditure cannot be accurately predicted in cancer patients using standard predictive formulae. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:6824369

  20. [A Case of Brain Metastasis from Rectal Cancer with Synchronous Liver and Lung Metastases after Multimodality Treatment--A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Udagawa, Masaru; Tominaga, Ben; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Ishikawa, Yuuya; Watanabe, Shuuichi; Adikrisna, Rama; Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Yabata, Eiichi

    2015-11-01

    We report a case of brain metastasis from rectal cancer a long time after the initial resection. A 62-year-old woman, diagnosed with lower rectal cancer with multiple synchronous liver and lung metastases, underwent abdominoperineal resection after preoperative radiochemotherapy (40 Gy at the pelvis, using the de Gramont regimen FL therapy: 1 kur). The histological diagnosis was a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma. Various regimens of chemotherapy for unresectable and metastatic colorectal cancer were administered, and a partial response was obtained; thereby, the metastatic lesions became resectable. The patient underwent partial resection of the liver and lung metastases. Pathological findings confirmed that both the liver and lung lesions were metastases from the rectal cancer. A disease-free period occurred for several months; however, there were recurrences of the lung metastases, so we started another round of chemotherapy. After 8 months, she complained of vertigo and dizziness. A left cerebellar tumor about 3 cm in diameter was revealed by MRI and neurosurgical excision was performed. Pathological findings confirmed a cerebellar metastasis from the rectal cancer. Twenty months after resection of the brain tumor, the patient complained of a severe headache. A brain MRI showed hydrocephalia, and carcinomatous meningitis from rectal cancer was diagnosed by a spinal fluid cytology test. A ventriculo-peritoneal shunt was inserted, but the cerebrospinal pressure did not decreased and she died 20 months after the first surgery. Although brain metastasis from colorectal cancer is rare, the number of patients with brain metastasis is thought to increase in the near future. Chemotherapy for colorectal cancer is effective enough to prolong the survival period even if multiple metastases have occurred. However, after a long survival period with lung metastases such as in our case, there is a high probability of developing brain metastases.

  1. Inhibition of β2-adrenergic receptor reduces triple-negative breast cancer brain metastases: The potential benefit of perioperative β-blockade.

    PubMed

    Choy, Cecilia; Raytis, John L; Smith, David D; Duenas, Matthew; Neman, Josh; Jandial, Rahul; Lew, Michael W

    2016-06-01

    In response to recent studies, we investigated an association between perioperative β-blockade and breast cancer metastases. First, a retrospective study examining perioperative β-blocker use and cancer recurrence and metastases was conducted on 1,029 patients who underwent breast cancer surgery at the City of Hope Cancer Center between 2000 and 2010. We followed the clinical study and examined proliferation, migration, and invasion in vitro of primary and brain-metastatic breast cancer cells in response to β2-activation and inhibition. We also investigated in vivo the metastatic potential of propranolol-treated metastatic cells. For stage II breast cancer patients, perioperative β-blockade was associated with decreased cancer recurrence using Cox regression analysis (hazard's ratio =0.51; 95% CI: 0.23-0.97; p=0.041). Triple-negative (TN) brain-metastatic cells were found to have increased β2-adrenergic receptor mRNA and protein expression relative to TN primary cells. In response to β2-adrenergic receptor activation, TN brain-metastatic cells also exhibited increased cell proliferation and migration relative to the control. These effects were abrogated by propranolol. Propranolol decreased β2-adrenergic receptor-activated invasion. In vivo, propranolol treatment of TN brain-metastatic cells decreased establishment of brain metastases. Our results suggest that stress and corresponding β2-activation may promote the establishment of brain metastases of TN breast cancer cells. In addition, our data suggest a benefit to perioperative β-blockade during surgery-induced stress with respect to breast cancer recurrence and metastases.

  2. Palliative care in patients with lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Farbicka, Paulina

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer accounts for 12% of all cancers and has the highest annual rate of mortality in men and women. The overall aim is cure or prolongation of life without evidence of disease. Almost 60% of patients at the moment of diagnosis are not eligible for radical treatment. Therefore soothing and supportive treatment is the only treatment of choice. Patients with lung cancer who have symptoms of dyspnea, chronic cough, severe pain, exhaustion and cachexia syndrome, fear and depression and significantly reduced physical and intellectual activities are qualified for inpatient or home palliative care. Knowledge about various methods used in palliative treatment allows one to alleviate symptoms that occur in an advanced stage of disease with an expected short survival period. Methods of oncological treatment that are often used in patients with advanced lung cancer include radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Drawing attention to the earlier implementation of palliative care is an objective of research carried out during recent years. Advances in surgical and conservative treatment of these patients have contributed to better outcomes and longer survival time. PMID:24596508

  3. Use of complementary and alternative medical therapy by patients with primary brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Terri S; Gilbert, Mark R

    2008-05-01

    The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is increasing. CAM includes mind-body interventions, biologically based therapies, energy therapies, and body-based methods. Primary brain tumors arise within the brain and have a poor prognosis when malignant. Even patients with benign tumors suffer neurologic and systemic symptoms as a result of the tumor or its treatment. CAM is used by 30% of brain tumor patients, who often do not report its use to their physician. Herbal medicines may affect the metabolism of prescribed medications or produce adverse effects that may be attributed to other causes. In patients with systemic cancer, mind-body modalities such as meditation and relaxation therapy have been shown to be helpful in reducing anxiety and pain; acupuncture and hypnotherapy may also reduce both pain and nausea. Recent preclinical studies have reported that ginseng, Scutellaria baicalensis, and Angelica sinensis may promote apoptosis of tumor cells or exercise antiangiogenic effects. Further studies are needed to evaluate the impact of CAM on symptom control or tumor growth in this vulnerable patient population.

  4. Rehabilitation of the head and neck cancer patient: Psychosocial aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Blitzer, A.; Baredes, S.; Kutscher, A.; Seeland, I.B.; Barrett, V.W.; Mossman, K.L.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 42 chapters divided among six sections. Some of the chapter titles are: The Challenge of Cancer; Communicaton Needs of Head and Neck Cancer Patients; Normal Tissue Effects of the Radiotherapy of Head and Neck Cancer; Chemotherapy in the Treatment of Head and Neck Cancer; and Thyroid Cancer.

  5. Role of prophylactic brain irradiation in limited stage small cell lung cancer: clinical, neuropsychologic, and CT sequelae

    SciTech Connect

    Laukkanen, E.; Klonoff, H.; Allan, B.; Graeb, D.; Murray, N.

    1988-06-01

    Ninety-four patients with limited stage small cell lung cancer treated between 1981 and 1985 with a regimen including prophylactic brain irradiation (PBI) after combination chemotherapy were assessed for compliance with PBI, brain relapse, and neurologic morbidity. Seventy-seven percent of patients had PBI and of these, 22% developed brain metastases after a median time of 11 months post treatment. The brain was the apparent unique initial site of relapse in 10% of PBI cases but more commonly brain relapse was preceded or accompanied by failure at other sites, especially the chest. Brain metastases were the greatest cause of morbidity in 50% of PBI failures. Twelve of 14 PBI patients alive 2 years after treatment had oncologic, neurologic, and neuropsychological evaluation, and brain CT. All long-term survivors were capable of self care and none fulfilled diagnostic criteria for dementia, with three borderline cases. One third had pretreatment neurologic dysfunction and two thirds post treatment neurologic symptoms, most commonly recent memory loss. Fifty percent had subtle motor findings. Intellectual functioning was at the 38th percentile with most patients having an unskilled occupational history. Neuropsychologic impairment ratings were borderline in three cases and definitely impaired in seven cases. CT scans showed brain atrophy in all cases with mild progression in those having a pre-treatment baseline. Periventricular and subcortical low density lesions identical to the CT appearance of subcortical arteriosclerotic encephalopathy were seen in 82% of posttreatment CT studies, and lacunar infarcts in 54%. Neuropsychologic impairment scores and the extent of CT periventricular low density lesions were strongly associated.

  6. Communication in Cancer Care (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Cancer.gov

    Expert-reviewed information summary about communicating with the cancer patient and his or her family, including unique aspects of communication with cancer patients, factors affecting communication, and training in communication skills.

  7. Highlights of Children with Cancer UK’s Workshop on Drug Delivery in Paediatric Brain Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Nailor, Audrey; Walker, David A; Jacques, Thomas S; Warren, Kathy E; Brem, Henry; Kearns, Pamela R; Greenwood, John; Penny, Jeffrey I; Pilkington, Geoffrey J; Carcaboso, Angel M; Fleischhack, Gudrun; Macarthur, Donald; Slavc, Irene; Meijer, Lisethe; Gill, Steven; Lowis, Stephen; van Vuurden, Dannis G; Pearl, Monica S; Clifford, Steven C; Morrissy, Sorana; Ivanov, Delyan P; Beccaria, Kévin; Gilbertson, Richard J; Straathof, Karin; Green, Jordan J; Smith, Stuart; Rahman, Ruman; Kilday, John-Paul

    2016-01-01

    The first Workshop on Drug Delivery in Paediatric Brain Tumours was hosted in London by the charity Children with Cancer UK. The goals of the workshop were to break down the barriers to treating central nervous system (CNS) tumours in children, leading to new collaborations and further innovations in this under-represented and emotive field. These barriers include the physical delivery challenges presented by the blood–brain barrier, the underpinning reasons for the intractability of CNS cancers, and the practical difficulties of delivering cancer treatment to the brains of children. Novel techniques for overcoming these problems were discussed, new models brought forth, and experiences compared. PMID:27110286

  8. Identifying the needs of brain tumor patients and their caregivers.

    PubMed

    Parvataneni, Rupa; Polley, Mei-Yin; Freeman, Teresa; Lamborn, Kathleen; Prados, Michael; Butowski, Nicholas; Liu, Raymond; Clarke, Jennifer; Page, Margaretta; Rabbitt, Jane; Fedoroff, Anne; Clow, Emelia; Hsieh, Emily; Kivett, Valerie; Deboer, Rebecca; Chang, Susan

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify the needs of brain tumor patients and their caregivers to provide improved health services to these populations. Two different questionnaires were designed for patients and caregivers. Both questionnaires contained questions pertaining to three realms: disease symptoms/treatment, health care provider, daily living/finances. The caregivers' questionnaires contained an additional domain on emotional needs. Each question was evaluated for the degree of importance and satisfaction. Exploratory analyses determined whether baseline characteristics affect responder importance or satisfaction. Also, areas of high agreement/disagreement in satisfaction between the participating patient-caregiver pairs were identified. Questions for which >50% of the patients and caregivers thought were "very important" but >30% were dissatisfied include: understanding the cause of brain tumors, dealing with patients' lower energy, identifying healthful foods and activities for patients, telephone access to health care providers, information on medical insurance coverage, and support from their employer. In the emotional realm, caregivers identified 9 out of 10 items as important but need further improvement. Areas of high disagreement in satisfaction between participating patient-caregiver pairs include: getting help with household chores (P value = 0.006) and finding time for personal needs (P value < 0.001). This study provides insights into areas to improve services for brain tumor patients and their caregivers. The caregivers' highest amount of burden is placed on their emotional needs, emphasizing the importance of providing appropriate medical and psychosocial support for caregivers to cope with emotional difficulties they face during the patients' treatment process.

  9. Roles of the cyclooxygenase 2 matrix metalloproteinase 1 pathway in brain metastasis of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kerui; Fukuda, Koji; Xing, Fei; Zhang, Yingyu; Sharma, Sambad; Liu, Yin; Chan, Michael D; Zhou, Xiaobo; Qasem, Shadi A; Pochampally, Radhika; Mo, Yin-Yuan; Watabe, Kounosuke

    2015-04-10

    Brain is one of the major sites of metastasis in breast cancer; however, the pathological mechanism of brain metastasis is poorly understood. One of the critical rate-limiting steps of brain metastasis is the breaching of blood-brain barrier, which acts as a selective interface between the circulation and the central nervous system, and this process is considered to involve tumor-secreted proteinases. We analyzed clinical significance of 21 matrix metalloproteinases on brain metastasis-free survival of breast cancer followed by verification in brain metastatic cell lines and found that only matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MMP1) is significantly correlated with brain metastasis. We have shown that MMP1 is highly expressed in brain metastatic cells and is capable of degrading Claudin and Occludin but not Zo-1, which are key components of blood-brain barrier. Knockdown of MMP1 in brain metastatic cells significantly suppressed their ability of brain metastasis in vivo, whereas ectopic expression of MMP1 significantly increased the brain metastatic ability of the cells that are not brain metastatic. We also found that COX2 was highly up-regulated in brain metastatic cells and that COX2-induced prostaglandins were directly able to promote the expression of MMP1 followed by augmenting brain metastasis. Furthermore, we found that COX2 and prostaglandin were able to activate astrocytes to release chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 7 (CCL7), which in turn promoted self-renewal of tumor-initiating cells in the brain and that knockdown of COX2 significantly reduced the brain metastatic ability of tumor cells. Our results suggest the COX2-MMP1/CCL7 axis as a novel therapeutic target for brain metastasis.

  10. Factors affecting intellectual outcome in pediatric brain tumor patients

    SciTech Connect

    Ellenberg, L.; McComb, J.G.; Siegel, S.E.; Stowe, S.

    1987-11-01

    A prospective study utilizing repeated intellectual testing was undertaken in 73 children with brain tumors consecutively admitted to Childrens Hospital of Los Angeles over a 3-year period to determine the effect of tumor location, extent of surgical resection, hydrocephalus, age of the child, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy on cognitive outcome. Forty-three patients were followed for at least two sequential intellectual assessments and provide the data for this study. Children with hemispheric tumors had the most general cognitive impairment. The degree of tumor resection, adequately treated hydrocephalus, and chemotherapy had no bearing on intellectual outcome. Age of the child affected outcome mainly as it related to radiation. Whole brain radiation therapy was associated with cognitive decline. This was especially true in children below 7 years of age, who experienced a very significant loss of function after whole brain radiation therapy.

  11. Fertility preservation in young patients with cancer

    PubMed Central

    Suhag, Virender; Sunita, B. S.; Sarin, Arti; Singh, A. K.; Dashottar, S.

    2015-01-01

    Infertility can arise as a consequence of treatment of oncological conditions. The parallel and continued improvement in both the management of oncology and fertility cases in recent times has brought to the forefront the potential for fertility preservation in patients being treated for cancer. Many survivors will maintain their reproductive potential after the successful completion of treatment for cancer. However total body irradiation, radiation to the gonads, and certain high dose chemotherapy regimens can place women at risk for acute ovarian failure or premature menopause and men at risk for temporary or permanent azoospermia. Providing information about risk of infertility and possible interventions to maintain reproductive potential are critical for the adolescent and young adult population at the time of diagnosis. There are established means of preserving fertility before cancer treatment; specifically, sperm cryopreservation for men and in vitro fertilization and embryo cryopreservation for women. Several innovative techniques are being actively investigated, including oocyte and ovarian follicle cryopreservation, ovarian tissue transplantation, and in vitro follicle maturation, which may expand the number of fertility preservation choices for young cancer patients. Fertility preservation may also require some modification of cancer therapy; thus, patients’ wishes regarding future fertility and available fertility preservation alternatives should be discussed before initiation of therapy. PMID:26942145

  12. Circulating tumor cells in colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Torino, Francesco; Bonmassar, Enzo; Bonmassar, Laura; De Vecchis, Liana; Barnabei, Agnese; Zuppi, Cecilia; Capoluongo, Ettore; Aquino, Angelo

    2013-11-01

    The availability of sensitive methods has allowed the detailed study of circulating tumor cells only recently. Evolving evidence support the prognostic and predictive role of these cells in patients affected by several solid tumors, including colorectal cancer. Ongoing studies are aimed at confirming that the molecular characterization of circulating tumor cells in peripheral blood and in bone marrow of patients is a powerful tool to improve the patient risk-stratification, to monitor activity of the drugs, to develop more appropriate targeted therapies and tailored treatments. In parallel, results from these correlative studies promise to gain a better biological understanding of the metastatic process. The clinical utility of the detection of circulating tumor cells in patients affected by colorectal cancer is still hampered by a number of specific hurdles. Improvement in sensitivity and specificity of the available methods of detection, standardization of these methods and functional characterization of circulating tumor cells in well designed and statistically well powered studies are the key steps to reach these ambitious objectives in colorectal cancer patients as well.

  13. Informational needs of recently diagnosed cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Derdiarian, A K

    1986-01-01

    Informational needs of 60 recently diagnosed cancer patients were assessed in relation to their disease, personal, family, and social concerns. The theoretical framework underlying the study was constructed from theories of coping, appraisal, information seeking, needs, and hierarchy of needs. Categories of analysis were derived from these theories and from findings of previous research. The Derdiarian Informational Needs Assessment was used to gather data. Patients' informational needs were described in relation to harms, threats, and resources and to their importance values associated with the major categories of disease, personal, family, and social concerns. Comparisons of informational needs and their importance values among patients stratified by person- or situation-related variables indicated few differences by gender, age, and stage of cancer. The findings imply that informational needs may be universal and warrant research on their relationship to these variables. PMID:3638607

  14. Cancer patient education in Iran: a descriptive study.

    PubMed

    Montazeri, Ali; Vahdani, Mariam; Haji-Mahmoodi, Mehregan; Jarvandi, Soghra; Ebrahimi, Mandana

    2002-03-01

    Abstract. This study was carried out to examine the status of cancer patient education in Iran. Using the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer's (MASCC) patient education questionnaire, 310 individuals - a sample of heterogeneous cancer patients ( n=167) and their relatives ( n=143) - were enrolled in the study. The pooled results indicated that only 15% of respondents believed more than 80% of cancer patients were told of their diagnosis. In contrast, 30% of respondents thought less than 20% of patients knew their cancer diagnosis. When asked, "Were you given written materials about (i) cancer, (ii) treatment, and (iii) symptom management", the vast majority of respondents said "No" (91%, 87%, and 87%, respectively). When respondents were asked, "Would you like to learn more about cancer and treatments", 97% said "Yes". Most respondents indicated the need for information on the treatments available (27%) and general information about cancer (20%); most had sought information from health professionals (31%), other cancer patients and friends (29%), and television (22%). Finally, it was found that concern about patients' depression (17%), lack of printed materials (13%), the idea that it was better for patients not to know (12%), and families' requests not to tell the patient (11%) were the most frequently stated barriers to or reasons for restricted cancer patient education. The findings of the study suggest that cancer patient education in Iran is very poor and there is an urgent need to develop policy guidelines on disclosure of cancer diagnoses and patient education.

  15. Risk of Developing Second Cancer From Neutron Dose in Proton Therapy as Function of Field Characteristics, Organ, and Patient Age

    SciTech Connect

    Zacharatou Jarlskog, Christina; Paganetti, Harald

    2008-09-01

    Purpose: To estimate the risk of a second malignancy after treatment of a primary brain cancer using passive scattered proton beam therapy. The focus was on the cancer risk caused by neutrons outside the treatment volume and the dependency on the patient's age. Methods and Materials: Organ-specific neutron-equivalent doses previously calculated for eight different proton therapy brain fields were considered. Organ-specific models were applied to assess the risk of developing solid cancers and leukemia. Results: The main contributors (>80%) to the neutron-induced risk are neutrons generated in the treatment head. Treatment volume can influence the risk by up to a factor of {approx}2. Young patients are subject to significantly greater risks than are adult patients because of the geometric differences and age dependency of the risk models. Breast cancer should be the main concern for females. For males, the risks of lung cancer, leukemia, and thyroid cancer were significant for pediatric patients. In contrast, leukemia was the leading risk for an adult. Most lifetime risks were <1% (70-Gy treatment). The only exceptions were breast, thyroid, and lung cancer for females. For female thyroid cancer, the treatment risk can exceed the baseline risk. Conclusion: The risk of developing a second malignancy from neutrons from proton beam therapy of a brain lesion is small (i.e., presumably outweighed by the therapeutic benefit) but not negligible (i.e., potentially greater than the baseline risk). The patient's age at treatment plays a major role.

  16. Control of pain in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Belgrade, M J

    1989-03-01

    Almost three quarters of patients with cancer have severe pain, from invasion of the cancer itself, from effects of therapy, or from causes unrelated to the cancer (but often exacerbated by it). With the proper pain-management strategy, however, pain can be controlled in most patients. The analgesic ladder for pain control, promoted by the World Health Organization, begins with a nonnarcotic agent, progresses to a weak narcotic plus a nonnarcotic, and finally reaches a strong narcotic. Adjuvant agents, which increase the analgesic potency of the drug being used, may be added at any level. The most common reasons for inadequate pain control in cancer patients are incorrect narcotic dosing and incorrect switching from one narcotic to another and from one route of administration to another. Factors that influence pain management (eg, fear, anxiety, sleep disturbance) should be treated as well with appropriate medications, behavioral therapy, counseling, hypnosis, and other supportive techniques. These points are illustrated in the case report (see box, page 328).

  17. Brain changes in diabetes mellitus patients with gastrointestinal symptoms.

    PubMed

    Drewes, Anne M; Søfteland, Eirik; Dimcevski, Georg; Farmer, Adam D; Brock, Christina; Frøkjær, Jens B; Krogh, Klaus; Drewes, Asbjørn M

    2016-01-25

    Diabetes mellitus is a common disease and its prevalence is increasing worldwide. In various studies up to 30%-70% of patients present dysfunction and complications related to the gut. To date several clinical studies have demonstrated that autonomic nervous system neuropathy and generalized neuropathy of the central nervous system (CNS) may play a major role. This systematic review provides an overview of the neurodegenerative changes that occur as a consequence of diabetes with a focus on the CNS changes and gastrointestinal (GI) dysfunction. Animal models where diabetes was induced experimentally support that the disease induces changes in CNS. Recent investigations with electroencephalography and functional brain imaging in patients with diabetes confirm these structural and functional brain changes. Encephalographic studies demonstrated that altered insular processing of sensory stimuli seems to be a key player in symptom generation. In fact one study indicated that the more GI symptoms the patients experienced, the deeper the insular electrical source was located. The electroencephalography was often used in combination with quantitative sensory testing mainly showing hyposensitivity to stimulation of GI organs. Imaging studies on patients with diabetes and GI symptoms mainly showed microstructural changes, especially in brain areas involved in visceral sensory processing. As the electrophysiological and imaging changes were associated with GI and autonomic symptoms they may represent a future therapeutic target for treating diabetics either pharmacologically or with neuromodulation.

  18. Brain changes in diabetes mellitus patients with gastrointestinal symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Drewes, Anne M; Søfteland, Eirik; Dimcevski, Georg; Farmer, Adam D; Brock, Christina; Frøkjær, Jens B; Krogh, Klaus; Drewes, Asbjørn M

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a common disease and its prevalence is increasing worldwide. In various studies up to 30%-70% of patients present dysfunction and complications related to the gut. To date several clinical studies have demonstrated that autonomic nervous system neuropathy and generalized neuropathy of the central nervous system (CNS) may play a major role. This systematic review provides an overview of the neurodegenerative changes that occur as a consequence of diabetes with a focus on the CNS changes and gastrointestinal (GI) dysfunction. Animal models where diabetes was induced experimentally support that the disease induces changes in CNS. Recent investigations with electroencephalography and functional brain imaging in patients with diabetes confirm these structural and functional brain changes. Encephalographic studies demonstrated that altered insular processing of sensory stimuli seems to be a key player in symptom generation. In fact one study indicated that the more GI symptoms the patients experienced, the deeper the insular electrical source was located. The electroencephalography was often used in combination with quantitative sensory testing mainly showing hyposensitivity to stimulation of GI organs. Imaging studies on patients with diabetes and GI symptoms mainly showed microstructural changes, especially in brain areas involved in visceral sensory processing. As the electrophysiological and imaging changes were associated with GI and autonomic symptoms they may represent a future therapeutic target for treating diabetics either pharmacologically or with neuromodulation. PMID:26839652

  19. Estimating progression-free survival in paediatric brain tumour patients when some progression statuses are unknown

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Ying; Thall, Peter F.; Wolff, Johannes E.

    2012-01-01

    Summary In oncology, progression-free survival time, which is defined as the minimum of the times to disease progression or death, often is used to characterize treatment and covariate effects. We are motivated by the desire to estimate the progression time distribution on the basis of data from 780 paediatric patients with choroid plexus tumours, which are a rare brain cancer where disease progression always precedes death. In retrospective data on 674 patients, the times to death or censoring were recorded but progression times were missing. In a prospective study of 106 patients, both times were recorded but there were only 20 non-censored progression times and 10 non-censored survival times. Consequently, estimating the progression time distribution is complicated by the problems that, for most of the patients, either the survival time is known but the progression time is not known, or the survival time is right censored and it is not known whether the patient’s disease progressed before censoring. For data with these missingness structures, we formulate a family of Bayesian parametric likelihoods and present methods for estimating the progression time distribution. The underlying idea is that estimating the association between the time to progression and subsequent survival time from patients having complete data provides a basis for utilizing covariates and partial event time data of other patients to infer their missing progression times. We illustrate the methodology by analysing the brain tumour data, and we also present a simulation study. PMID:22408277

  20. Disrupted Brain Functional Network Architecture in Chronic Tinnitus Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Chen; Feng, Yuan; Xu, Jin-Jing; Mao, Cun-Nan; Xia, Wenqing; Ren, Jun; Yin, Xindao

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have demonstrated the disruptions of multiple brain networks in tinnitus patients. Nonetheless, several studies found no differences in network processing between tinnitus patients and healthy controls (HCs). Its neural bases are poorly understood. To identify aberrant brain network architecture involved in chronic tinnitus, we compared the resting-state fMRI (rs-fMRI) patterns of tinnitus patients and HCs. Materials and Methods: Chronic tinnitus patients (n = 24) with normal hearing thresholds and age-, sex-, education- and hearing threshold-matched HCs (n = 22) participated in the current study and underwent the rs-fMRI scanning. We used degree centrality (DC) to investigate functional connectivity (FC) strength of the whole-brain network and Granger causality to analyze effective connectivity in order to explore directional aspects involved in tinnitus. Results: Compared to HCs, we found significantly increased network centrality in bilateral superior frontal gyrus (SFG). Unidirectionally, the left SFG revealed increased effective connectivity to the left middle orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), left posterior lobe of cerebellum (PLC), left postcentral gyrus, and right middle occipital gyrus (MOG) while the right SFG exhibited enhanced effective connectivity to the right supplementary motor area (SMA). In addition, the effective connectivity from the bilateral SFG to the OFC and SMA showed positive correlations with tinnitus distress. Conclusions: Rs-fMRI provides a new and novel method for identifying aberrant brain network architecture. Chronic tinnitus patients have disrupted FC strength and causal connectivity mostly in non-auditory regions, especially the prefrontal cortex (PFC). The current findings will provide a new perspective for understanding the neuropathophysiological mechanisms in chronic tinnitus. PMID:27458377

  1. Agnosias: recognition disorders in patients with brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Gainotti, Guido

    2012-06-01

    Two main varieties of recognition disorders are distinguished in neuropsychology: agnosias and semantic disorders. The term agnosias is generally used to denote recognition defects limited to a single perceptual modality (which is itself apparently intact), whereas the term semantic disorders is used to denote recognition defects involving all the sensory modalities in a roughly similar manner. Brain tumors can be one of the aetiologies underlying agnosias and semantic disorders. However, due to the heterogeneity and the rarity of recognition disorders, their investigation can be useful only to suggest or exclude the oncological nature of a brain lesion, but not to systematically monitor the clinical outcome in tumor patients. Furthermore, the relevance of recognition disorders as a hint toward a diagnosis of brain tumor varies according to the type of agnosia and of semantic disorder and the localization of the underlying brain pathology. The hypothesis that a variety of agnosia (or of semantic disorder) may be due to a neoplastic lesion can, therefore, be advanced if it is consistent with our knowledge about the usual localization and the growing patterns of different types of brain tumors.

  2. Brain Regions Associated With Internalizing and Externalizing Psychiatric Symptoms in Patients With Penetrating Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Huey, Edward D; Lee, Seonjoo; Lieberman, Jeffrey A; Devanand, D P; Brickman, Adam M; Raymont, Vanessa; Krueger, Frank; Grafman, Jordan

    2016-01-01

    A factor structure underlying DSM-IV diagnoses has been previously reported in neurologically intact patients. The authors determined the brain regions associated with factors underlying DSM-IV diagnoses and compared the ability of DSM-IV diagnoses, factor scores, and self-report measures to account for the neuroanatomical findings in patients with penetrating brain injuries. This prospective cohort study included 254 Vietnam War veterans: 199 with penetrating brain injuries and 55 matched control participants. Measures include DSM-IV diagnoses (from a Structured Clinical Interview for DSM), self-report measures of depression and anxiety, and CT scans. Factors underlying DSM-IV diagnoses were determined using an exploratory factor analysis and correlated with percent of brain regions affected. The ability of the factor scores, DSM-IV diagnoses, and the self-report psychiatric measures to account for the anatomical variance was compared with multiple regressions. Internalizing and externalizing factors were identified in these brain-injured patients. Damage to the left amygdala and bilateral basal ganglia was associated with lower internalizing factor scores, and damage to the left medial orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) with higher, and bilateral hippocampi with lower, externalizing factor scores. Factor scores best predicted left amygdala and bilateral hippocampal involvement, whereas DSM-IV diagnoses best predicted bilateral basal ganglia and left OFC involvement. Damage to the limbic areas involved in the processing of emotional and reward information, including structures involved in the National Institute of Mental Health's Research Domain Criteria Negative Valence Domain, influences the development of internalizing and externalizing psychiatric symptoms. Self-report measures underperformed DSM-IV and factor scores in predicting neuroanatomical findings.

  3. Brain Regions Associated With Internalizing and Externalizing Psychiatric Symptoms in Patients With Penetrating Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Huey, Edward D; Lee, Seonjoo; Lieberman, Jeffrey A; Devanand, D P; Brickman, Adam M; Raymont, Vanessa; Krueger, Frank; Grafman, Jordan

    2016-01-01

    A factor structure underlying DSM-IV diagnoses has been previously reported in neurologically intact patients. The authors determined the brain regions associated with factors underlying DSM-IV diagnoses and compared the ability of DSM-IV diagnoses, factor scores, and self-report measures to account for the neuroanatomical findings in patients with penetrating brain injuries. This prospective cohort study included 254 Vietnam War veterans: 199 with penetrating brain injuries and 55 matched control participants. Measures include DSM-IV diagnoses (from a Structured Clinical Interview for DSM), self-report measures of depression and anxiety, and CT scans. Factors underlying DSM-IV diagnoses were determined using an exploratory factor analysis and correlated with percent of brain regions affected. The ability of the factor scores, DSM-IV diagnoses, and the self-report psychiatric measures to account for the anatomical variance was compared with multiple regressions. Internalizing and externalizing factors were identified in these brain-injured patients. Damage to the left amygdala and bilateral basal ganglia was associated with lower internalizing factor scores, and damage to the left medial orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) with higher, and bilateral hippocampi with lower, externalizing factor scores. Factor scores best predicted left amygdala and bilateral hippocampal involvement, whereas DSM-IV diagnoses best predicted bilateral basal ganglia and left OFC involvement. Damage to the limbic areas involved in the processing of emotional and reward information, including structures involved in the National Institute of Mental Health's Research Domain Criteria Negative Valence Domain, influences the development of internalizing and externalizing psychiatric symptoms. Self-report measures underperformed DSM-IV and factor scores in predicting neuroanatomical findings. PMID:26715034

  4. Metastatic breast cancer in patients with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    MEYER, AARON A.; HWANG, M.; FARASATPOUR, M.; JANARDHAN, R.; MARGENTHALER, J.A.; VIRGO, K.S.; JOHNSON, FRANK E.

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is a major health problem worldwide. The median survival duration for patients with metastatic breast cancer is two to three years. Approximately 1% of populations worldwide have schizophrenia. The manner in which schizophrenic patients fare when diagnosed with metastatic breast carcinoma (MBC) was evaluated. We queried the National Department of Veterans Affairs (DVA) datasets using computer codes for a pre-existing diagnosis of schizophrenia and a later diagnosis of breast carcinoma. Chart-based data concerning the identified subjects were then requested. Previously determined inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied to select evaluable patients from the medical records, prior to extracting demographic details and data concerning the treatment course in each subject. Ten patients had distant metastases at initial diagnosis, while seven developed MBC following prior curative-intent treatment. Two patients refused therapy. Ten did not comply with recommended management. Five harmed or threatened physicians, other caregivers or themselves. Schizophrenic patients with MBC often fail to understand the nature of their illnesses. Often they do not accept palliative treatment, while a number of them do not comply with therapy, once initiated. They often exhibit behaviors that are detrimental to themselves or others. Formal psychiatric consultation is therefore necessary in patients. Several detrimental behaviors may be predicted reliably by history alone. PMID:24649175

  5. Impaired Gut-Liver-Brain Axis in Patients with Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Ahluwalia, Vishwadeep; Betrapally, Naga S; Hylemon, Phillip B; White, Melanie B; Gillevet, Patrick M; Unser, Ariel B; Fagan, Andrew; Daita, Kalyani; Heuman, Douglas M; Zhou, Huiping; Sikaroodi, Masoumeh; Bajaj, Jasmohan S

    2016-01-01

    Cirrhosis is associated with brain dysfunction known as hepatic encephalopathy (HE). The mechanisms behind HE are unclear although hyperammonemia and systemic inflammation through gut dysbiosis have been proposed. We aimed to define the individual contribution of specific gut bacterial taxa towards astrocytic and neuronal changes in brain function using multi-modal MRI in patients with cirrhosis. 187 subjects (40 controls, 147 cirrhotic; 87 with HE) underwent systemic inflammatory assessment, cognitive testing, stool microbiota analysis and brain MRI analysis. MR spectroscopy (MRS) changes of increased Glutamate/glutamine, reduced myo-inositol and choline are hyperammonemia-associated astrocytic changes, while diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) demonstrates changes in neuronal integrity and edema. Linkages between cognition, MRI parameters and gut microbiota were compared between groups. We found that HE patients had a significantly worse cognitive performance, systemic inflammation, dysbiosis and hyperammonemia compared to controls and cirrhotics without HE. Specific microbial families (autochthonous taxa negatively and Enterobacteriaceae positively) correlated with MR spectroscopy and hyperammonemia-associated astrocytic changes. On the other hand Porphyromonadaceae, were only correlated with neuronal changes on DTI without linkages with ammonia. We conclude that specific gut microbial taxa are related to neuronal and astrocytic consequences of cirrhosis-associated brain dysfunction. PMID:27225869

  6. Impaired Gut-Liver-Brain Axis in Patients with Cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Ahluwalia, Vishwadeep; Betrapally, Naga S; Hylemon, Phillip B; White, Melanie B; Gillevet, Patrick M; Unser, Ariel B; Fagan, Andrew; Daita, Kalyani; Heuman, Douglas M; Zhou, Huiping; Sikaroodi, Masoumeh; Bajaj, Jasmohan S

    2016-01-01

    Cirrhosis is associated with brain dysfunction known as hepatic encephalopathy (HE). The mechanisms behind HE are unclear although hyperammonemia and systemic inflammation through gut dysbiosis have been proposed. We aimed to define the individual contribution of specific gut bacterial taxa towards astrocytic and neuronal changes in brain function using multi-modal MRI in patients with cirrhosis. 187 subjects (40 controls, 147 cirrhotic; 87 with HE) underwent systemic inflammatory assessment, cognitive testing, stool microbiota analysis and brain MRI analysis. MR spectroscopy (MRS) changes of increased Glutamate/glutamine, reduced myo-inositol and choline are hyperammonemia-associated astrocytic changes, while diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) demonstrates changes in neuronal integrity and edema. Linkages between cognition, MRI parameters and gut microbiota were compared between groups. We found that HE patients had a significantly worse cognitive performance, systemic inflammation, dysbiosis and hyperammonemia compared to controls and cirrhotics without HE. Specific microbial families (autochthonous taxa negatively and Enterobacteriaceae positively) correlated with MR spectroscopy and hyperammonemia-associated astrocytic changes. On the other hand Porphyromonadaceae, were only correlated with neuronal changes on DTI without linkages with ammonia. We conclude that specific gut microbial taxa are related to neuronal and astrocytic consequences of cirrhosis-associated brain dysfunction. PMID:27225869

  7. Chemotherapy in Elderly Patients with Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyeong Su; Kim, Jung Han; Kim, Ji Won; Kim, Byung Chun

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is one of the most frequent malignant diseases in the elderly. Systemic chemotherapy showed an improvement of quality of life and survival benefit compared to supportive care alone in patients with advanced GC. Because comorbidities or age-related changes in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics may lead to higher toxicity, however, many oncologists hesitate to recommend elderly patients to receive chemotherapy. Available data suggest that elderly patients with GC are able to tolerate and benefit from systemic chemotherapy to the same extent as younger patients. The age alone should not be the only criteria to preclude effective chemotherapy. However, proper patient selection is extremely important to deliver effective treatment safely. A comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) is a useful method to assess life expectancy and risk of morbidity in older patients and to guide providing optimal treatment. Treatment should be personalized based on the nature of the disease, the life expectancy, the risk of complication, and the patient's preference. Combination chemotherapy can be considered for older patients with metastatic GC who are classified as non-frail patients by CGA. For frail or vulnerable patients, however, monotherapy or only symptomatic treatment may be desirable. Targeted agents seem to be promising treatment options for elderly patients with GC considering their better efficacy and less toxicity. PMID:26722364

  8. Clinicopathological significance of N-cadherin and VEGF in advanced gastric cancer brain metastasis and the effects of metformin in preclinical models.

    PubMed

    Jun, Kyong-Hwa; Lee, Jung Eun; Kim, Se Hoon; Jung, Ji-Han; Choi, Hyun-Joo; Kim, Young Il; Chin, Hyung-Min; Yang, Seung-Ho

    2015-10-01

    Gastric cancer is the second most common cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Although brain metastasis is a rare complication of gastric cancer, no standard therapy for gastric cancer brain metastasis has been established. We attempted to identify biological markers that predict brain metastasis, and investigated how to modulate such markers. A case-control study of patients newly diagnosed with gastric cancer who had developed brain metastasis during follow-up, was conducted. These patients were compared with patients who had advanced gastric cancer but no evidence of brain metastasis. Immunohistochemistry was used to analyze the expression of E-cadherin, N-cadherin, MSS1, claudin-3, claudin-4, Glut1, clusterin, ITGB4, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and p53. The expression of VEGF tended to be higher in the case group (33.3 vs. 0%, p=0.055). Median survival was significantly correlated with vascular invasion (12 vs. 33 months, p=0.008) and N-cadherin expression (36 vs. 12 months, p=0.027). We also investigated the effects of metformin in tumor-bearing mouse models. VEGF expression was decreased and E-cadherin increased in the metformin‑treated group when compared with the control group. The expression of the mesenchymal marker MMP9 was decreased in the metformin-treated group. Brain metastasis of advanced gastric cancer was associated with the expression of VEGF. Metformin treatment may be useful for modulating the metastatic capacity by reducing VEGF expression and blocking epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition.

  9. Ultrasound Imaging-guided Intracardiac Injection to Develop a Mouse Model of Breast Cancer Brain Metastases Followed by Longitudinal MRI

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Heling; Zhao, Dawen

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer brain metastasis, occurring in 30% of breast cancer patients at stage IV, is associated with high mortality. The median survival is only 6 months. It is critical to have suitable animal models to mimic the hemodynamic spread of the metastatic cells in the clinical scenario. Here, we are introducing the use of small animal ultrasound imaging to guide an accurate injection of brain tropical breast cancer cells into the left ventricle of athymic nude mice. Longitudinal MRI is used to assessing intracranial initiation and growth of brain metastases. Ultrasound-guided intracardiac injection ensures not only an accurate injection and hereby a higher successful rate but also significantly decreased mortality rate, as compared to our previous manual procedure. In vivo high resolution MRI allows the visualization of hyperintense multifocal lesions, as small as 310 µm in diameter on T2-weighted images at 3 weeks post injection. Follow-up MRI reveals intracranial tumor growth and increased number of metastases that distribute throughout the whole brain. PMID:24637963

  10. [Stereotaxic brain biopsy in AIDS patients with neurological manifestations].

    PubMed

    Nasser, J A; Confort, C I; Ferraz, A; Esperança, J C; Duarte, F

    1998-06-01

    Prospective series showing the importance of computerized stereotactic brain biopsy in the management of AIDS patients neurologically symptomatic and confirmed by images. Patients undergone an algorithm step by step done by their own doctors and referred to us for stereotactic biopsy. Our protocol was opened in August 1995 and closed in December 1996. Twenty patients were biopsied. This protocol is similar to the Levy's one (Chicago IL, USA). We have got diagnosis in all cases. Lymphoma was predominant and followed by toxoplasmosis, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy and HIV encephalopathy. We included one patient with diploic giant cells lymphoma. Our mortality and morbidity was zero. By these results we conclude that stereotactic biopsy in AIDS patients is safe and effective.

  11. [Stereotaxic brain biopsy in AIDS patients with neurological manifestations].

    PubMed

    Nasser, J A; Confort, C I; Ferraz, A; Esperança, J C; Duarte, F

    1998-06-01

    Prospective series showing the importance of computerized stereotactic brain biopsy in the management of AIDS patients neurologically symptomatic and confirmed by images. Patients undergone an algorithm step by step done by their own doctors and referred to us for stereotactic biopsy. Our protocol was opened in August 1995 and closed in December 1996. Twenty patients were biopsied. This protocol is similar to the Levy's one (Chicago IL, USA). We have got diagnosis in all cases. Lymphoma was predominant and followed by toxoplasmosis, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy and HIV encephalopathy. We included one patient with diploic giant cells lymphoma. Our mortality and morbidity was zero. By these results we conclude that stereotactic biopsy in AIDS patients is safe and effective. PMID:9698730

  12. Histopathological Features of Brain Arteriovenous Malformations in Japanese Patients

    PubMed Central

    HERMANTO, Yulius; TAKAGI, Yasushi; YOSHIDA, Kazumichi; ISHII, Akira; KIKUCHI, Takayuki; FUNAKI, Takeshi; MINEHARU, Yohei; MIYAMOTO, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    Clinical features of high risk brain arteriovenous malformations (BAVMs) are well characterized. However, pathological evidences about the differences that are possessed by high risk patients are still lacking. We reviewed archived routine hematoxylin-eosin specimens from a total of 54 surgical treated BAVMs. The histopathological features in nidus were semi-quantitatively analyzed. We obtained the pathological differences of BAVMs nidus between several clinical features. Among the analyzed pathological features, the significant differences were observed in degree of venous enlargement and intimal hyperplasia. Juvenile, female, diffuse nidus, high Spetzler-Martin grade, and low flow patients had a lesser degree of those parameters compared to adult, male, compact nidus, low Spetzler-Martin grade and high flow patients. High risk profiles of BAVMs patients were well-reflected in the nidus pathology. Therefore, juvenile, female, diffuse nidus, and low flow in Japanese BAVMs patients might have different vascular remodeling process that predispose to higher tendency of hemorrhage. PMID:27053330

  13. FDG PET/CT imaging in canine cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Anders E; McEvoy, Fintan; Engelholm, Svend A; Law, Ian; Kristensen, Annemarie T

    2011-01-01

    2-Deoxy-2-[¹⁸F]fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) is becoming increasingly available as an imaging modality in veterinary medicine. The purpose of this study was to report semiquantitative standard uptake values (SUV) of malignant and nonmalignant tissues and organs in canine cancer patients. FDG PET/CT was performed in 14 dogs including, nine mesenchymal tumors, four carcinomas, and one incompletely excised mast cell tumor. A generally higher FDG uptake was observed in carcinomas relative to sarcomas. Maximum SUV of carcinomas ranged from 7.6 to 27.0, and for sarcomas from 2.0 to 10.6. The FDG SUV of several organs and tissues, including regional brain uptake is reported, to serve as a reference for future FDG PET studies in canine cancer patients. Several potential pitfalls have been recognized in interpretation of FDG PET images of human patients, a number of these were also observed in this study.

  14. Prostate cancer in the elderly patient.

    PubMed

    Fung, Chunkit; Dale, William; Mohile, Supriya Gupta

    2014-08-20

    Treatment for prostate cancer (PCa) has evolved significantly over the last decade. PCa is the most prevalent non-skin cancer and the second leading cause of cancer death in men, and it has an increased incidence and prevalence in older men. As a result, physicians and patients are faced with the challenge of identifying optimal treatment strategies for localized, biochemical recurrent, and advanced PCa in the older population. When older patients are appropriately selected, treatment for PCa results in survival benefits and toxicity profiles similar to those experienced in younger patients. However, underlying health status and age-related changes can have an impact on tolerance of hormonal therapy and chemotherapy in men with advanced disease. Therefore, the heterogeneity of the elderly population necessitates a multidimensional assessment to maximize the benefit of medical and/or surgical options. Providing clinicians with the requisite health status data on which to base treatment decisions would help ensure that older patients with PCa receive optimal therapy if it will benefit them and/or active surveillance or best supportive care if it will not. We provide a review of the existing evidence to date on the management of PCa in the older population. PMID:25071137

  15. Bladder Cancer Patient Advocacy: A Global Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Quale, Diane Zipursky; Bangs, Rick; Smith, Monica; Guttman, David; Northam, Tammy; Winterbottom, Andrew; Necchi, Andrea; Fiorini, Edoardo; Demkiw, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Over the past 20 years, cancer patient advocacy groups have demonstrated that patient engagement in cancer care is essential to improving patient quality of life and outcomes. Bladder cancer patient advocacy only began 10 years ago in the United States, but is now expanding around the globe with non-profit organizations established in Canada, the United Kingdom and Italy, and efforts underway in Australia. These organizations, at different levels of maturity, are raising awareness of bladder cancer and providing essential information and resources to bladder cancer patients and their families. The patient advocacy organizations are also helping to advance research efforts by funding research proposals and facilitating research collaborations. Strong partnerships between these patient advocates and the bladder cancer medical community are essential to ensuringsustainability for these advocacy organizations, increasing funding to support advances in bladder cancer treatment, and improving patient outcomes. PMID:27398397

  16. Focal brain atrophy in gastric bypass patients with cognitive complaints

    PubMed Central

    Graff-Radford, Jonathan; Whitwell, Jennifer L.; Trenerry, Max R.; Ahlskog, J. Eric; Jensen, Michael D.; Jack, Clifford R.; Josephs, Keith A.

    2012-01-01

    Recently, we have noticed a series of patients presenting for cognitive complaints after gastric bypass, without any identifiable etiology. We set out to determine whether any focal brain atrophy could account for the complaints. A retrospective case series was performed to identify patients with cognitive complaints following gastric bypass that had a volumetric MRI. Voxel-based morphometry was used to assess patterns of grey matter loss in all 10 patients identified, compared to ten age and gender-matched controls. All patients had undergone Roux-en-Y gastric bypass at a median age of 54 (range: 46–64). Cognitive complaints began at a median age of 57 (52–69). Formal neuropsychometric testing revealed only minor deficits. No nutritional abnormalities were identified. Voxel-based morphometry demonstrated focal thalamic atrophy in the gastric bypass patients when compared to controls. Patients with cognitive complaints after gastric bypass surgery have focal thalamic brain atrophy that could account for the cognitive impairment. PMID:22088949

  17. Factors Affecting the Risk of Brain Metastasis in Small Cell Lung Cancer With Surgery: Is Prophylactic Cranial Irradiation Necessary for Stage I-III Disease?

    SciTech Connect

    Gong Linlin; Wang, Q.I.; Zhao Lujun; Yuan Zhiyong; Li Ruijian; Wang Ping

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The use of prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) with surgical resection has not been fully identified. This study undertook to assess the factors affecting the risk of brain metastases in patients with stage I-III SCLC after surgical resection. The implications of PCI treatment for these patients are discussed. Methods and Materials: One hundred twenty-six patients treated with surgical resection for stage I-III SCLC from January 1998-December 2009 were retrospectively analyzed to elucidate the risk factors of brain metastases. Log-rank test and Cox regression model were used to determine the risk factors of brain metastases. Results: The median survival time for this patient population was 34 months, and the 5-year overall survival rate was 34.9%. For the whole group, 23.0% (29/126) of the patients had evidence of metastases to brain. Pathologic stage not only correlated with overall survival but also significantly affected the risk of brain metastases. The 5-year survival rates for patients with pathologic stages I, II, and III were 54.8%, 35.6%, and 14.1%, respectively (P=.001). The frequency of brain metastases in patients with pathologic stages I, II, and III were 6.25% (2/32), 28.2% (11/39), and 29.1% (16/55) (P=.026), respectively. A significant difference in brain metastases between patients with complete resection and incomplete resection was also observed (20.5% vs 42.9%, P=.028). The frequency of brain metastases was not found to be correlated with age, sex, pathologic type, induction chemotherapy, adjuvant chemotherapy, or adjuvant radiation therapy. Conclusions: Stage I SCLC patients with complete resection had a low incidence of brain metastases and a favorable survival rate. Stage II-III disease had a higher incidence of brain metastases. Thus, PCI might have a role for stage II-III disease but not for stage I disease.

  18. Brain metastases detectability of routine whole body (18)F-FDG PET and low dose CT scanning in 2502 asymptomatic patients with solid extracranial tumors.

    PubMed

    Bochev, Pavel; Klisarova, Aneliya; Kaprelyan, Ara; Chaushev, Borislav; Dancheva, Zhivka

    2012-01-01

    As fluorine-18-fluorodesoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ( (18)F-FDG PET/CT) is gaining wider availability, more and more patients with malignancies undergo whole body PET/CT, mostly to assess tumor spread in the rest of the body, but not in the brain. Brain is a common site of metastatic spread in patients with solid extracranial tumors. Gold standard in the diagnosis of brain metastases remains magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However MRI is not routinely indicated and is not available for all cancer patients. Fluorine-18-FDG PET is considered as having poor sensitivity in detecting brain metastases, but this may not be true for PET/CT. The aim of our study was to assess the value of (18)F-FDG PET/CT in the detection of brain metastases found by whole body scan including the brain, in patients with solid extracranial neoplasms. A total of 2502 patients with solid extracranial neoplasms were studied. All patients underwent a routine whole body (18)F-FDG PET/CT scan with the whole brain included in the scanned field. Patients with known or suspected brain metastases were preliminary excluded from the study. Hypermetabolic and ring-like brain lesions on the PET scan were considered as metastases. Lesions with CT characteristics of brain metastases were regarded as such irrespective of their metabolic pattern. Lesions in doubt were verified by MRI during first testing or on follow-up or by operation. Our results showed that brain lesions, indicative of and verified to be metastases were detected in 25 out of the 2502 patients (1%), with lung cancer being the most common primary. Twenty three out of these 25 patients had no neurological symptoms by the time of the scan. The detection rate of brain metastases was relatively low, but information was obtained with a minimum increase of radiation burden. In conclusion, whole body (18)F-FDG PET/CT detected brain metastases in 1% of the patients if brain was included in the scanned field. Brain

  19. Pathogenesis of Breast Cancer Metastasis to Brain: a Comprehensive Approach to the Signaling Network.

    PubMed

    Tayyeb, Bahrami; Parvin, Mehdipour

    2016-01-01

    There is a general consensus that breast cancer is a rising trend disease in the world. It is one of the most common cancer types and is the leading cause of death among women's cancers. There are several reasons for this high rate of mortality including metastasis which is responsible for about 90 % of cancer-related mortality. Therefore, recognition and understanding of metastatic process is important, and by considering the key role of pathophysiological route in metastasis as a multistep cascade of "invasion-metastasis," it might modify and improve our insight toward this complex phenomenon. Moreover, it can provide novel approaches for designing advanced targeted therapies. The present work aimed to review the published papers regarding molecular basis of metastatic process of breast cancer to brain metastasis, especially related genes and signaling network. Furthermore, the use of molecular aspects of metastatic breast cancer to brain was discussed in horizon of future treatment of breast cancer.

  20. Metformin and Ara-a Effectively Suppress Brain Cancer by Targeting Cancer Stem/Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mouhieddine, Tarek H.; Nokkari, Amaly; Itani, Muhieddine M.; Chamaa, Farah; Bahmad, Hisham; Monzer, Alissar; El-Merahbi, Rabih; Daoud, Georges; Eid, Assaad; Kobeissy, Firas H.; Abou-Kheir, Wassim

    2015-01-01

    Background: Gliomas and neuroblastomas pose a great health burden worldwide with a poor and moderate prognosis, respectively. Many studies have tried to find effective treatments for these primary malignant brain tumors. Of interest, the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) pathway was found to be associated with tumorigenesis and tumor survival, leading to many studies on AMPK drugs, especially Metformin, and their potential role as anti-cancer treatments. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a small population of slowly-dividing, treatment-resistant, undifferentiated cancer cells that are being discovered in a multitude of cancers. They are thought to be responsible for replenishing the tumor with highly proliferative cells and increasing the risk of recurrence. Methods: Metformin and 9-β-d-Arabinofuranosyl Adenine (Ara-a) were used to study the role of the AMPK pathway in vitro on U251 (glioblastoma) and SH-SY5Y (neuroblastoma) cell lines. Results: We found that both drugs are able to decrease the survival of U251 and SH-SY5Y cell lines in a 2D as well as a 3D culture model. Metformin and Ara-a significantly decreased the invasive ability of these cancer cell lines. Treatment with these drugs decreased the sphere-forming units (SFU) of U251 cells, with Ara-a being more efficient, signifying the extinction of the CSC population. However, if treatment is withdrawn before all SFUs are extinguished, the CSCs regain some of their sphere-forming capabilities in the case of Metformin but not Ara-a treatment. Conclusion: Metformin and Ara-a have proved to be effective in the treatment of glioblastomas and neuroblastomas, in vitro, by targeting their cancer stem/progenitor cell population, which prevents recurrence. PMID:26635517

  1. The activity of class I, II, III and IV of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) isoenzymes and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) in brain cancer.

    PubMed

    Laniewska-Dunaj, Magdalena; Jelski, Wojciech; Orywal, Karolina; Kochanowicz, Jan; Rutkowski, Robert; Szmitkowski, Maciej

    2013-07-01

    The brain being highly sensitive to the action of alcohol is potentially susceptible to its carcinogenic effects. Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) are the main enzymes involved in ethanol metabolism, which leads to the generation of carcinogenic acetaldehyde. Human brain tissue contains various ADH isoenzymes and possess also ALDH activity. The purpose of this study was to compare the capacity for ethanol metabolism measured by ADH isoenzymes and ALDH activity in cancer tissues and healthy brain cells. The samples were taken from 62 brain cancer patients (36 glioblastoma, 26 meningioma). For the measurement of the activity of class I and II ADH isoenzymes and ALDH activity, the fluorometric methods were used. The total ADH activity and activity of class III and IV isoenzymes were measured by the photometric method. The total activity of ADH, and activity of class I ADH were significantly higher in cancer cells than in healthy tissues. The other tested classes of ADH and ALDH did not show statistically significant differences of activity in cancer and in normal cells. Analysis of the enzymes activity did not show significant differences depending on the location of the tumor. The differences in the activity of total alcohol dehydrogenase, and class I isoenzyme between cancer tissues and healthy brain cells might be a factor for metabolic changes and disturbances in low mature cancer cells and additionally might be a reason for higher level of acetaldehyde which can intensify the carcinogenesis.

  2. Chemotherapy-related cognitive impairment in older patients with cancer

    PubMed Central

    Loh, Kah Poh; Janelsins, Michelle C.; Mohile, Supriya G.; Holmes, Holly M.; Hsu, Tina; Inouye, Sharon K.; Karuturi, Meghan S.; Kimmick, Gretchen G.; Lichtman, Stuart M.; Magnuson, Allison; Whitehead, Mary I.; Wong, Melisa L.; Ahles, Tim A.

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy-related cognitive impairment (CRCI) can occur during or after chemotherapy and represents a concern for many patients with cancer. Among older patients with cancer, in whom there is little clinical trial evidence examining side effects like CRCI, many unanswered questions remain regarding risk for and resulting adverse outcomes from CRCI. Given the rising incidence of cancer with age, CRCI is of particular concern for older patients with cancer who receive treatment. Therefore, research related to CRCI in older patients with cancers is a high priority. In this manuscript, we discuss current gaps in research highlighting the lack of clinical studies of CRCI in older adults, the complex mechanisms of CRCI, and the challenges in measuring cognitive impairment in older patients with cancer. Although we focus on CRCI, we also discuss cognitive impairment related to cancer itself and other treatment modalities. We highlight several research priorities to improve the study of CRCI in older patients with cancer. PMID:27197918

  3. Brain morphological alternation in chronic pain patients with neuropathic characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Sugimine, Satomi; Kawamichi, Hiroaki; Obata, Hideaki; Saito, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    Background Neuropathic characteristics are highly involved in the development of chronic pain both physically and psychologically. However, little is known about the relationship between neuropathic characteristics and brain morphological alteration. Objectives The aim of this study is to investigate the mechanisms of chronic pain development by examining the above-mentioned relationships by voxel-based morphometry in patients with chronic pain. Methods First, we assessed neuropathic characteristics using the painDETECT Questionnaire in 12 chronic pain patients. Second, to assess the gray matter volume changes by voxel-based morphometry, we conducted magnetic resonance imaging of the brain. We applied multiregression analysis of these two assessment methods. Results There were significant positive correlations between painDETECT Questionnaire scores and the gray matter volume in the bilateral anterior cingulate cortex and right posterior cingulate cortex. Conclusions Our findings suggest that neuropathic characteristics strongly affect the brain regions related to modulation of pain in patients with chronic pain and, therefore, contribute to the severity of chronic pain. PMID:27284013

  4. [Lung cancer in elderly patients: lung cancer and lung function].

    PubMed

    Tanita, Tatsuo

    2005-07-01

    The incidence of bronchogenic carcinoma is increasing as life expectancy rises. With increase in the aged population in Japan, the number of patients suffering from lung cancer and candidates for lung resections are increasing. In this paper, the author lists up indispensable procedures for diagnosis, namely, lung function tests, unilateral pulmonary arterial occlusion test and exercise tolerance test. The cut-offs for identifying candidates for elderly patients for lung resections can be applied the same cut-offs for younger patients. Also the author indicates the importance of postoperative management for lung lobe resections. In order to prevent postoperative problems such as congestive heart failure that might be a fetal complication, the most useful check values after the lung surgery for elderly patients are rate of transfusion and urine volume. In conclusion, when elderly patients assert their rights to undergo lung surgery, we, the thoracic surgeons, should reply their requests under the equal quality of safe surgery as that for younger patients. Besides, it is desirable that even elderly patients, over 80 years old, who undergo lung surgery should guarantee their quality of daily life after surgery.

  5. A pilot case-cohort study of brain cancer in poultry and control workers.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, S; Felini, M J; Ndetan, H; Cardarelli, K; Jadhav, S; Faramawi, M; Johnson, E S

    2014-01-01

    We conducted an exploratory study to investigate which exposures (including poultry oncogenic viruses) are associated with brain cancer in poultry workers. A total of 46,819 workers in poultry and nonpoultry plants from the same union were initially followed for mortality. Brain cancer was observed to be in excess among poultry workers. Here we report on a pilot case-cohort study with cases consisting of 26 (55%) of the 47 brain cancer deaths recorded in the cohort, and controls consisting of a random sample of the cohort (n = 124). Exposure information was obtained from telephone interviews, and brain cancer mortality risk estimated by odds ratios. Increased risk of brain cancer was associated with killing chickens, odds ratio (OR) = 5.8 (95% confidence interval, 1.2-28.3); working in a shell-fish farm, OR = 13.0 (95% CI, 1.9-84.2); and eating uncooked fish, OR = 8.2 (95% CI, 1.8-37.0). Decreased risks were observed for chicken pox illness, OR = 0.2 (95% CI, 0.1-0.6), and measles vaccination, OR = 0.2 (95% CI, 0.1-0.6). Killing chickens, an activity associated with the highest occupational exposure to poultry oncogenic viruses, was associated with brain cancer mortality, as were occupational and dietary shellfish exposures. These findings are novel.

  6. Risk of Leptomeningeal Disease in Patients Treated With Stereotactic Radiosurgery Targeting the Postoperative Resection Cavity for Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Atalar, Banu; Modlin, Leslie A.; Choi, Clara Y.H.; Adler, John R.; Gibbs, Iris C.; Chang, Steven D.; Harsh, Griffith R.; Li, Gordon; Nagpal, Seema; Hanlon, Alexandra; Soltys, Scott G.

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: We sought to determine the risk of leptomeningeal disease (LMD) in patients treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) targeting the postsurgical resection cavity of a brain metastasis, deferring whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) in all patients. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 175 brain metastasis resection cavities in 165 patients treated from 1998 to 2011 with postoperative SRS. The cumulative incidence rates, with death as a competing risk, of LMD, local failure (LF), and distant brain parenchymal failure (DF) were estimated. Variables associated with LMD were evaluated, including LF, DF, posterior fossa location, resection type (en-bloc vs piecemeal or unknown), and histology (lung, colon, breast, melanoma, gynecologic, other). Results: With a median follow-up of 12 months (range, 1-157 months), median overall survival was 17 months. Twenty-one of 165 patients (13%) developed LMD at a median of 5 months (range, 2-33 months) following SRS. The 1-year cumulative incidence rates, with death as a competing risk, were 10% (95% confidence interval [CI], 6%-15%) for developing LF, 54% (95% CI, 46%-61%) for DF, and 11% (95% CI, 7%-17%) for LMD. On univariate analysis, only breast cancer histology (hazard ratio, 2.96) was associated with an increased risk of LMD. The 1-year cumulative incidence of LMD was 24% (95% CI, 9%-41%) for breast cancer compared to 9% (95% CI, 5%-14%) for non-breast histology (P=.004). Conclusions: In patients treated with SRS targeting the postoperative cavity following resection, those with breast cancer histology were at higher risk of LMD. It is unknown whether the inclusion of whole-brain irradiation or novel strategies such as preresection SRS would improve this risk or if the rate of LMD is inherently higher with breast histology.

  7. Fertility preservation in young patients' with cancer.

    PubMed

    Dudani, Sharmila; Gupta, Apurva

    2014-10-01

    Preservation of fertility is an important issue in the management of young cancer patients. Though embryo cryostorage is a well-established procedure, it can only be availed by couples. Recent studies have indicated increasing success rates with mature and immature oocyte cryopreservation. Cryostorage induces injuries on the human oocytes which can be minimized by slow freezing and vitrification. Selection of candiidates is crucial so that the most suitable technique can be offered without any delay in initiation of cancer therapy. Factors affecting suitability are age of patient, assessment of ovarian reserve, hormonal status and type and stage of neoplastic disease. Encouraging results have been obtained with oocyte in vitro maturation (IVM) followed by vitrification for cryostorage. Data on the use of vitrified eggs in routine in vitro fertilization (IVF) show that pregnancy rates can be comparable to those achieved with fresh oocytes. PMID:25540565

  8. Why Breast Cancer Patients Seek Traditional Healers

    PubMed Central

    Muhamad, Mazanah; Merriam, Sharan; Suhami, Norhasmilia

    2012-01-01

    Traditional healing is a common practice in low and middle income countries such as Malaysia. Eighty percent of Malaysians consult traditional healers or “bomoh” at some time in their life for health-related issues. The purpose of our study was to explore why breast cancer patients visit traditional healers. This is a qualitative study utilizing in-depth interviews with 11 cancer survivors who sought both traditional and Western medicine. The findings revealed the following reasons for which patients seek traditional healers: (1) recommendation from family and friends, (2) sanction from family, (3) perceived benefit and compatibility, (4) healer credibility, and (5) reservation with Western medicine and system delay. These factors work together and are strongly influenced by the Malaysian cultural context. The issue with the Western health system is common in a developing country with limited health facilities. PMID:22295249

  9. Dose-dense temozolomide regimen for the treatment of brain metastases from melanoma, breast cancer, or lung cancer not amenable to surgery or radiosurgery: a multicenter phase II study

    PubMed Central

    Siena, S.; Crinò, L.; Danova, M.; Del Prete, S.; Cascinu, S.; Salvagni, S.; Schiavetto, I.; Vitali, M.; Bajetta, E.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Brain metastases reduce survival because therapeutic options are limited. This phase II study evaluated the efficacy of single-agent therapy with alternating weekly, dose-dense temozolomide in pretreated patients with brain metastases prospectively stratified by primary tumor type. Methods: Eligible patients had bidimensionally measurable brain metastases from histologically/cytologically confirmed melanoma, breast cancer (BC), or non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Prior chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) were allowed. Patients received temozolomide 150 mg/m2/day (days 1–7 and 15–21 every 28- or 35-day cycle). Results: In the intent-to-treat population (N = 157; 53 melanoma, 51 BC, and 53 NSCLC), one patient had complete response, nine (6%) had partial responses, and 31 (20%) had stable disease in the brain. Median progression-free survival was 56, 58, and 66 days for melanoma, BC, and NSCLC, respectively. Median overall survival was 100 days for melanoma, 172 days for NSCLC, and not evaluable in the BC group. Thrombocytopenia was the most common adverse event causing dose modification or treatment discontinuation. Grade 4 toxic effects were rare. Conclusions: This alternating weekly, dose-dense temozolomide regimen was well tolerated and clinically active in heavily pretreated patients with brain metastases, particularly in patients with melanoma. Combining temozolomide with WBRT or other agents may improve clinical outcomes. PMID:19767314

  10. Electrical conductivity changes during irreversible electroporation treatment of brain cancer.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Paulo A; Rossmeisl, John H; Davalos, Rafael V

    2011-01-01

    Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is a new minimally invasive technique to kill tumors and other undesirable tissue in a non-thermal manner. During an IRE treatment, a series of short and intense electric pulses are delivered to the region of interest to destabilize the cell membranes in the tissue and achieve spontaneous cell death. The alteration of the cellular membrane results in a dramatic increase in electrical conductivity during IRE as in other electroporation-based-therapies. In this study, we performed the planning and execution of an IRE brain cancer treatment using MRI reconstructions of the tumor and a multichannel array that served as a stereotactic fiducial and electrode guide. Using the tumor reconstructions within our numerical simulations, we developed equations relating the increase in tumor conductivity to calculated currents and volumes of tumor treated with IRE. We also correlated the experimental current measured during the procedure to an increase in tumor conductivity ranging between 3.42-3.67 times the baseline conductivity, confirming the physical phenomenon that has been detected in other tissues undergoing similar electroporation-based treatments. PMID:22254416

  11. Total parenteral nutrition in the cancer patient.

    PubMed

    Mahaffey, S M; Copeland, E M

    1987-01-01

    Malnutrition is a common accompaniment of malignant disease and clearly places the cancer patient at increased risk. Adequate nutritional rehabilitation of the malnourished cancer patient can correct abnormal nutritional indices. In the surgical patient, this has been shown to decrease perioperative morbidity and mortality. Nutritionally repleted patients undergoing radiation or chemotherapy may be more tolerant and, therefore, more likely to respond to treatment although, thus far, a favorable effect on outcome has not been demonstrated conclusively. Patients who are to receive multimodal treatment with chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and surgery are at a particularly high risk for the development of malnutrition, and the institution of one treatment may be predicated on recovery from the previous therapy. When a major abdominal surgical procedure is part of the treatment plan, TPN may be required to prevent malnutrition in an otherwise nutritionally intact patient at the outset of therapy. For patients in whom TPN is indicated, adequate nutritional restoration is of paramount importance. Calories and nitrogen in excess of amounts predicted for noncancer patients may be required. Sequential nutritional assessment is a must to assure the adequacy of nutritional repletion. Considerations of cost and simplicity make the enteral route the preferred avenue for nutritional repletion if the gut is available for use. Certainly, when indicated, however, the risk and expense of parenteral nutrition is justified, particularly in the surgical patient. At present there are no data to justify the use of one particular amino acid formulation or energy source over another. A balanced amino acid solution with glucose as the primary energy source seems equally as efficacious as specialized amino acid formulas and lipid as the primary calorie source.

  12. Nonlinear analysis of brain activity in magnetic influenced Parkinson patients.

    PubMed

    Anninos, P A; Adamopoulos, A V; Kotini, A; Tsagas, N

    2000-01-01

    Magnetoencephalogram (MEG) recordings were obtained from the brain of patients suffering from Parkinson's disease (PD) using the Superconductive Quantum Interference Device (SQUID). For each patient the magnetic activity was recorded from a total of 64 points of the skull (32 points from each temporal lobe) as defined by a recording reference system, which is based on the 10-20 Electrode Placement System. Some of the recorded points were observed to exhibit abnormal rhythmic activity, characterized by high amplitudes and low frequencies. External magnetic stimulation (EMS) with intensity 1-7.5pT, and frequency the alpha-rhythm of the patient (8-13 Hz) was applied in the left-right temporal, frontal-occipital and vertex (2 minutes over each of the above regions) and the brain magnetic activity was recorded again. The application of the EMS resulted in rapid attenuation of the MEG activity of PD patients. Furthermore, chaotic dynamic methods were used, in order to estimate the correlation dimension D of the reconstructed phase spaces. The estimated values of D, in conjunction with the results derived from the other data analysis methods, strongly support the existence of low dimension chaotic structures in the dynamics of cortical activity of PD patients. In addition, the increased values of D of the MEG after the application of EMS when compared with the corresponding ones obtained from the MEGs prior to the EMS, suggest that the neural dynamics are strongly influenced by the application of EMS. PMID:11154103

  13. Hazard function for cancer patients and cancer cell dynamics.

    PubMed

    Horová, Ivana; Pospísil, Zdenek; Zelinka, Jirí

    2009-06-01

    The aim of the paper is to develop a procedure for an estimate of an analytical form of a hazard function for cancer patients. Although a deterministic approach based on cancer cell population dynamics yields the analytical expression, it depends on several parameters which should be estimated. On the other hand, a kernel estimate is an effective nonparametric method for estimating hazard functions. This method provides the pointwise estimate of the hazard function. Our procedure consists of two steps: in the first step we find the kernel estimate of the hazard function and in the second step the parameters in the deterministic model are obtained by the least squares method. A simulation study with different types of censorship is carried out and the developed procedure is applied to real data. PMID:18634801

  14. Hazard function for cancer patients and cancer cell dynamics.

    PubMed

    Horová, Ivana; Pospísil, Zdenek; Zelinka, Jirí

    2009-06-01

    The aim of the paper is to develop a procedure for an estimate of an analytical form of a hazard function for cancer patients. Although a deterministic approach based on cancer cell population dynamics yields the analytical expression, it depends on several parameters which should be estimated. On the other hand, a kernel estimate is an effective nonparametric method for estimating hazard functions. This method provides the pointwise estimate of the hazard function. Our procedure consists of two steps: in the first step we find the kernel estimate of the hazard function and in the second step the parameters in the deterministic model are obtained by the least squares method. A simulation study with different types of censorship is carried out and the developed procedure is applied to real data.

  15. Religion benefiting brain tumour patients: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Ravishankar, Nidhi; Bernstein, Mark

    2014-12-01

    As the focus on modern neurosurgery has shifted to the realm of technological advancement, some patients and their loved ones still hold a strong faith in their religion to guide them through the process. This study aimed to determine whether religion as a coping mechanism was beneficial for patients before, during and after craniotomy. Qualitative case study methodology was used. Interviews were conducted with randomly selected 36 adult patients who underwent surgery for a benign or malignant brain tumour. Interviews were audio recorded and transcribed, and the data subjected to thematic analysis. Four overarching themes emerged from the data: (1) religion significantly benefited neurosurgical patients; (2) neurosurgical patients did not require a dedicated religious room in the hospital; (3) neurosurgical patients required religious resources such as leaders and/or groups; and (4) patients were not in favour of their physician engaging in the religious ritual. Most patients found religion to be an effective coping mechanism, offering them strength, comfort, and hope through the surgery. The findings from this study emphasize the need for including a "religious time-out" before and after surgery and the inclusion of religious leaders/groups for those in favour to ensure quality care and patient satisfaction.

  16. [Breast cancer: patient care, rehabilitation, psychooncology].

    PubMed

    Kahán, Zsuzsanna; Szántó, István; Molnár, Mária; Rohánszky, Magda; Koncz, Zsuzsa; Mailáth, Mónika; Kapitány, Zsuzsanna; Dudás, Rita

    2016-09-01

    The development of a recommendation was intended for the follow-up of breast cancer patients treated with curative intent in Hungary. Follow-up includes the permanent contact with and health education of the patient, the surveillance and control of the adverse effects of oncological therapies or radiotherapy, the screening of metachron cancers, and the comprehensive (physical, psychological and social) rehabilitation of the patient. The early detection of local/regional tumor relapse is essential with careful follow-up, but there is no need for screening of distant metastases by means of imaging studies or tumor marker tests. If adjuvant endocrine therapy is needed, optimal adherence should be ensured with supportive therapy. In rare cases, special issues such as breast cancer risk/genetic mutation, pregnancy are raised, which should be thoughtfully discussed in view of recent advances in oncology. Follow-up is generally practised by the oncologist, however, in some cases the social worker, the physiotherapist, the psychooncologist, or in special cases, the lymphoedema expert is to be involved. The follow-up approach should be comprehensive and holistic. PMID:27579724

  17. Prognostic Value of MR Imaging Texture Analysis in Brain Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Oligo-Metastases Undergoing Stereotactic Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Tini, Paolo; Biondi, Michelangelo; Sebaste, Lucio; Vanzi, Eleonora; De Otto, Gianmarco; Rubino, Giovanni; Carfagno, Tommaso; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Pastina, Pierpaolo; Cerase, Alfonso; Mazzoni, Lorenzo Nicola; Banci Buonamici, Fabrizio; Pirtoli, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Background  Stereotactic irradiation is widely used in brain oligo-metastases treatment. The aim of this study is to evaluate the prognostic value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) texture analysis (TA) of brain metastases (BM) of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Materials and methods  This study included thirty-eight consecutive patients undergoing stereotactic irradiation, that is, stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy (SRT) or radiosurgery (SRS), from January 2011 to December 2014 for 1-2 brain BM from NSCLC. Whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) was not delivered. The diagnostic MRI DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine) images were collected and analyzed with a homemade ImageJ macro, and typical TA parameters (mean, standard deviation, skewness, kurtosis, entropy, and uniformity) were evaluated for: brain progression-free survival; modality of brain metastatic progression (local progression or/and new metastases); and overall survival, after SRT/SRS. Results After SRT/SRS 14 patients (36.8%) experienced recurrence in the brain, with a recurrence in the irradiated site (five patients, 13.2%), new metastases (11 patients, 28.9%), local recurrence and new metastases (two patients, 5.25%). Nineteen patients (50%) died of tumor progression or other causes. Entropy and uniformity were significantly associated with local progression, whereas kurtosis was significantly associated with both local progression and new brain metastases. Conclusions  These results appear promising, since the knowledge of factors correlated with the modality of brain progression after stereotactic irradiation of brain oligo-metastatic foci of NSCLC might help in driving the best treatment in these patients (association of SRT/SRS with WBRT? Increase of SRT/SRS dose?). Our preliminary data needs confirmation in large patient series. PMID:27226944

  18. Temporal Change in Brain Natriuretic Peptide After Radiotherapy for Thoracic Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jingu, Keiichi Nemoto, Kenji; Kaneta, Tomohiro; Oikawa, Minako; Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Ariga, Hisanori; Takeda, Ken; Sakayauchi, Toru; Fujimoto, Keisuke; Narazaki, Kakutaro; Takai, Yoshihiro; Nakata, Eiko; Fukuda, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Shoki; Yamada, Shogo

    2007-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate the relationships of plasma levels of brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) with abnormal {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) accumulation in the myocardium corresponding to irradiated fields and temporal changes in BNP, which is used as an index of heart remodeling, after radiotherapy for the mediastinum. Materials and Methods: Brain natriuretic peptide concentrations were measured before and after radiotherapy for thoracic esophageal cancer, and the change in BNP concentration after radiotherapy was investigated. Moreover, FDG accumulation in the myocardium was investigated in patients who had undergone FDG positron emission tomography less than 14 days before or after measurement of BNP concentration, and the Mann-Whitney U test was used to detect significant difference between BNP concentrations in patients with and without abnormal FDG accumulation corresponding to the irradiated field. Results: There was significant difference between the levels of BNP in patients without abnormal FDG accumulation in the irradiated myocardium and in patients with abnormal FDG accumulation (p < 0.001). The levels of BNP in the 9-24 months after radiotherapy group and in the >24 months after radiotherapy group were significantly higher than the levels in the before radiotherapy group, immediately after radiotherapy group, 1-2 months after radiotherapy group, and control group. Conclusions: The level of BNP was significantly increased more than 9 months after the start of radiotherapy and was significantly higher in patients who had high FDG accumulation corresponding to the irradiated field. The results of this study indicate that BNP concentration might be an early indicator of radiation-induced myocardial damage.

  19. Appropriateness of Parenteral Nutrition Usage in Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yu-Lin; Lee, Chun-Sung; Chiu, Chong-Chi; Chao, Chien-Ming; Lai, Chih-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    This study is to investigate the indication appropriateness of parenteral nutrition (PN) administration in cancer patients. Between December 2013 and August 2014, all cancer patients who received PN (including total PN and Kabiven) in a regional hospital of Southern Taiwan were included in this retrospective study. A total of 107 cancer patients received PN. Among them, colorectal cancer was the most common type of cancer (n = 45, 42.1%), followed by gastric cancer, head and neck cancer, and esophageal cancer. After evaluation of the appropriateness of PN administration, 88 (82.2%) PN episodes were considered appropriate and unavoidable, 4 (3.7%) as appropriate and avoidable but 15 (14.1%) as inappropriate. In conclusion, PN could be inappropriately used by some oncologic physicians. Physicians and nutrition support team specialists should carefully evaluate the indication of PN administration for cancer patients to obey the generally acknowledged usage rule.

  20. Evidence for brain glial activation in chronic pain patients.

    PubMed

    Loggia, Marco L; Chonde, Daniel B; Akeju, Oluwaseun; Arabasz, Grae; Catana, Ciprian; Edwards, Robert R; Hill, Elena; Hsu, Shirley; Izquierdo-Garcia, David; Ji, Ru-Rong; Riley, Misha; Wasan, Ajay D; Zürcher, Nicole R; Albrecht, Daniel S; Vangel, Mark G; Rosen, Bruce R; Napadow, Vitaly; Hooker, Jacob M

    2015-03-01

    Although substantial evidence has established that microglia and astrocytes play a key role in the establishment and maintenance of persistent pain in animal models, the role of glial cells in human pain disorders remains unknown. Here, using the novel technology of integrated positron emission tomography-magnetic resonance imaging and the recently developed radioligand (11)C-PBR28, we show increased brain levels of the translocator protein (TSPO), a marker of glial activation, in patients with chronic low back pain. As the Ala147Thr polymorphism in the TSPO gene affects binding affinity for (11)C-PBR28, nine patient-control pairs were identified from a larger sample of subjects screened and genotyped, and compared in a matched-pairs design, in which each patient was matched to a TSPO polymorphism-, age- and sex-matched control subject (seven Ala/Ala and two Ala/Thr, five males and four females in each group; median age difference: 1 year; age range: 29-63 for patients and 28-65 for controls). Standardized uptake values normalized to whole brain were significantly higher in patients than controls in multiple brain regions, including thalamus and the putative somatosensory representations of the lumbar spine and leg. The thalamic levels of TSPO were negatively correlated with clinical pain and circulating levels of the proinflammatory citokine interleukin-6, suggesting that TSPO expression exerts pain-protective/anti-inflammatory effects in humans, as predicted by animal studies. Given the putative role of activated glia in the establishment and or maintenance of persistent pain, the present findings offer clinical implications that may serve to guide future studies of the pathophysiology and management of a variety of persistent pain conditions.

  1. Study of Genes and Environment in Patients With Cancer in East Anglia, Trent, or West Midlands Regions of the United Kingdom

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-08-23

    Bladder Cancer; Brain and Central Nervous System Tumors; Esophageal Cancer; Intraocular Melanoma; Kidney Cancer; Lymphoma; Melanoma (Skin); Pancreatic Cancer; Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter

  2. Icotinib combined whole brain radiotherapy for patients with brain metastasis from lung adenocarcinoma harboring epidermal growth factor receptor mutation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jin-Rui; Zhang, Ye

    2016-01-01

    Background The brain is a metastatic organ that is most prone to lung adenocarcinoma (LAC). However, the prognosis of patients with brain metastasis remains very poor. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of icotinib plus whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) for treating patients with brain metastasis from epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mutated LAC. Methods All patients received standard WBRT administered to the whole brain in 30 Gy in 10 daily fractions. Each patient was also instructed to take 125 mg icotinib thrice per day beginning from the first day of the WBRT. After completing the WBRT, maintenance icotinib was administered until the disease progressed or intolerable adverse effects were observed. Cranial progression-free survival (CPFS) and overall survival (OS) times were the primary endpoints. Results A total of 43 patients were enrolled in this study. Two patients (4.7%) presented a complete response (CR), whereas 20 patients (46.5%) presented a partial response (PR). The median CPFS and OS times were 11.0 and 15.0 months, respectively. The one-year CPFS rate was 40.0% for the patients harboring EGFR exon 19 deletion and 16.7% for the patients with EGFR exon 21 L858R (P=0.027). Conclusions The concurrent administration of icotinib and WBRT exhibited favorable effects on the patients with brain metastasis. EGFR exon 19 deletion was predictive of a long CPFS following icotinib plus WBRT. PMID:27499937

  3. Survival of breast cancer patients. Our experience.

    PubMed

    Marrazzoa, Antonio; Taormina, Pietra; David, Massimo; Riili, Ignazio; Casà, Luigi; Catalano, Filippo; Lo Gerfo, Domenico; Noto, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    Life expectancy for patients with breast carcinoma has changed in Europe over the last two decades. In Italy, the overall survival rate is about 77% at 5 years. When considering the situation in Sicily, the EUROCARE 2 study examined survival data from the Ragusa Cancer Registry, showing that the curves are worse than in other regions of Italy. Starting from these considerations we decide to evaluate whether these data from the Ragusa Cancer Registry corresponded to Palermo data. So we analysed data from 575 consecutive patients with breast cancer, treated in our Breast Unit from 1990 to 2003 according to the St. Gallen Recommendations and followed for a median period of 5 years. The prognostic role of age, tumour size, nodal status, TNM, stage, grading and hormonal receptors (OR, PR) were analysed and survival curves at 5 and 10 years were produced using the actuarial survival methods. All causes of death were considered. The median follow-up was 33 months. The Log rank test and univariate cox proportional model were used to demonstrate the association between prognostic factors and outcome. When considering T and N status, the curves showed an inverse correlation between survival and increases in these parameters. Overall survival was 92.9% at 5 years and 81.4% at 10 years for T1, 78.4% at 5 years and 61.4% at 10 years for T2 and 40.8% for T3-T4 at 5 and 10 years. Overall survival for NO was 92.1% and 78.2%, respectively, at 5 and 10 years, but decreased to 72.0% and 59.9% at 5 and 10 years for N1. In N2 patients we found that only about 50% of patients were still alive at 5 and 10 years, while for N3 patients the figures were 57.2% and 40%, respectively. PMID:17663369

  4. Tracheal decannulation protocol in patients affected by traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Zanata, Isabel de Lima; Santos, Rosane Sampaio; Hirata, Gisela Carmona

    2014-04-01

    Introduction The frequency of tracheostomy in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) contrasts with the lack of objective criteria for its management. The study arose from the need for a protocol in the decision to remove the tracheal tube. Objective To evaluate the applicability of a protocol for tracheal decannulation. Methods A prospective study with 20 patients, ranging between 21 and 85 years of age (average 33.55), 4 of whom were women (20%) and 16 were men (80%). All patients had been diagnosed by a neurologist as having TBI, and the anatomical region of the lesion was known. Patients were evaluated following criteria for tracheal decannulation through a clinical evaluation protocol developed by the authors. Results Decannulation was performed in 12 (60%) patients. Fourteen (70%) had a score greater than 8 on the Glasgow Coma Scale and only 2 (14%) of these were not able to undergo decannulation. Twelve (60%) patients maintained the breathing pattern with occlusion of the tube and were successfully decannulated. Of the 20 patients evaluated, 11 (55%) showed no signs suggestive of tracheal aspiration, and of these, 9 (82%) began training on occlusion of the cannula. The protocol was relevant to establish the beginning of the decannulation process. The clinical assessment should focus on the patient's condition to achieve early tracheal decannulation. Conclusion This study allowed, with the protocol, to establish six criteria for tracheal decannulation: level of consciousness, respiration, tracheal secretion, phonation, swallowing, and coughing. PMID:25992074

  5. Tracheal Decannulation Protocol in Patients Affected by Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zanata, Isabel de Lima; Santos, Rosane Sampaio; Hirata, Gisela Carmona

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The frequency of tracheostomy in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) contrasts with the lack of objective criteria for its management. The study arose from the need for a protocol in the decision to remove the tracheal tube. Objective To evaluate the applicability of a protocol for tracheal decannulation. Methods A prospective study with 20 patients, ranging between 21 and 85 years of age (average 33.55), 4 of whom were women (20%) and 16 were men (80%). All patients had been diagnosed by a neurologist as having TBI, and the anatomical region of the lesion was known. Patients were evaluated following criteria for tracheal decannulation through a clinical evaluation protocol developed by the authors. Results Decannulation was performed in 12 (60%) patients. Fourteen (70%) had a score greater than 8 on the Glasgow Coma Scale and only 2 (14%) of these were not able to undergo decannulation. Twelve (60%) patients maintained the breathing pattern with occlusion of the tube and were successfully decannulated. Of the 20 patients evaluated, 11 (55%) showed no signs suggestive of tracheal aspiration, and of these, 9 (82%) began training on occlusion of the cannula. The protocol was relevant to establish the beginning of the decannulation process. The clinical assessment should focus on the patient's condition to achieve early tracheal decannulation. Conclusion This study allowed, with the protocol, to establish six criteria for tracheal decannulation: level of consciousness, respiration, tracheal secretion, phonation, swallowing, and coughing. PMID:25992074

  6. Proposal for a Group Counseling Experience for Cancer Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Linda S.

    A model for using group counseling with cancer patients is proposed in this document. The literature on the psychological effects of cancer and the effects of social support are summarized. It is concluded that the literature shows cancer patients are subjected to intense psychological distress and that at the same time their social supports may…

  7. Acupressure and Anxiety in Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Beikmoradi, Ali; Najafi, Fatemeh; Roshanaei, Ghodratallah; Pour Esmaeil, Zahra; Khatibian, Mahnaz; Ahmadi, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Anxiety has negative effects on mental and physical performance, quality of life, duration of hospitalization, and even on the treatment of patients with cancer. Objectives: Today acupressure is widely used to treat anxiety. Thus, the present study aimed to investigate the effects of acupressure on anxiety in patients with cancer. Patients and Methods: A double-blind randomized clinical trial was conducted on 85 patients hospitalized with 3 groups including acupressure group (n = 27), sham group (n = 28), and control group (n = 30) in the hematologic ward of Shahid Beheshti Hospital of Hamadan, Iran, in 2013. The sampling permuted-block randomization with triple block was used. The anxiety of the patients in the experimental, sham, and control groups were measured with Spielberger’s State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). Then, real acupressure was performed in the experimental group and fake acupressure in the sham group, and only routine care was provided for the control group. Anxiety of the patients was also assessed at 5 and 10 days after the intervention. Statistical analysis of the data was performed by SPSS software using repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post hoc least significant difference (LSD) test. Results: According to the findings, the mean level of anxiety before the intervention between groups were matched (P > 0.05). Acupressure had a significant influence on the anxiety in the experimental group at 5 (45.30 ± 7.14) and 10 days (43.48 ± 6.82) after the intervention (P < 0.05). However, it did not have a significant impact on their covert anxiety (45.48 ± 7.92 at 5th day vs 45.63 ± 8.08 at 10th day, P > 0.05). No significant differences were observed in the fake points regarding overt and covert anxiety of patients in the sham group (overt anxiety; 47.57 ± 7.85 at 5th day vs. 46.71 ± 7.32 at 10th day, P > 0.05) (covert anxiety; 47.96 ± 6.33 at 5th day vs. 46.89 ± 6.94 at 10th day, P > 0.05). Moreover, the

  8. Significant predictors of patients' uncertainty in primary brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lin; Chien, Lung-Chang; Acquaye, Alvina A; Vera-Bolanos, Elizabeth; Gilbert, Mark R; Armstrong, Terri S

    2015-05-01

    Patients with primary brain tumors (PBT) face uncertainty related to prognosis, symptoms and treatment response and toxicity. Uncertainty is correlated to negative mood states and symptom severity and interference. This study identified predictors of uncertainty during different treatment stages (newly-diagnosed, on treatment, followed-up without active treatment). One hundred eighty six patients with PBT were accrued at various points in the illness trajectory. Data collection tools included: a clinical checklist/a demographic data sheet/the Mishel Uncertainty in Illness Scale-Brain Tumor Form. The structured additive regression model was used to identify significant demographic and clinical predictors of illness-related uncertainty. Participants were primarily white (80 %) males (53 %). They ranged in age from 19-80 (mean = 44.2 ± 12.6). Thirty-two of the 186 patients were newly-diagnosed, 64 were on treatment at the time of clinical visit with MRI evaluation, 21 were without MRI, and 69 were not on active treatment. Three subscales (ambiguity/inconsistency; unpredictability-disease prognoses; unpredictability-symptoms and other triggers) were different amongst the treatment groups (P < .01). However, patients' uncertainty during active treatment was as high as in newly-diagnosed period. Other than treatment stages, change of employment status due to the illness was the most significant predictor of illness-related uncertainty. The illness trajectory of PBT remains ambiguous, complex, and unpredictable, leading to a high incidence of uncertainty. There was variation in the subscales of uncertainty depending on treatment status. Although patients who are newly diagnosed reported the highest scores on most of the subscales, patients on treatment felt more uncertain about unpredictability of symptoms than other groups. Due to the complexity and impact of the disease, associated symptoms, and interference with functional status, comprehensive assessment of patients

  9. Fatigue is the Most Important Symptom for Advanced Cancer Patients Who Have Had Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Butt, Zeeshan; Rosenbloom, Sarah K.; Abernethy, Amy P.; Beaumont, Jennifer L.; Paul, Diane; Hampton, Debra; Jacobsen, Paul B.; Syrjala, Karen L.; Von Roenn, Jamie H.; Cella, David

    2016-01-01

    Cancer fatigue has been defined and described as an important problem. However, few studies have assessed the relative importance of fatigue compared with other patient symptoms and concerns. To explore this issue, the authors surveyed 534 patients and 91 physician experts from 5 NCCN member institutions and community support agencies. Specifically, they asked patients with advanced bladder, brain, breast, colorectal, head and neck, hepatobiliary/pancreatic, kidney, lung, ovarian, or prostate cancer or lymphoma about their “most important symptoms or concerns to monitor.” Across the entire sample, and individually for patients with 9 cancer types, fatigue emerged as the top-ranked symptom. Fatigue was also ranked most important among patients with 10 of 11 cancer types when asked to rank lists of common concerns. Patient fatigue ratings were most strongly associated with malaise (r = 0.50) and difficulties with activities of daily living, pain, and quality of life. Expert ratings of how much fatigue is attributable to disease versus treatment mostly suggested that both play an important role, with disease-related factors predominant in hepatobiliary and lung cancer, and treatment-related factors playing a stronger role in head and neck cancer. PMID:18492460

  10. Predictors of Hypopituitarism in Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Silva, Paula P B; Bhatnagar, Saurabha; Herman, Seth D; Zafonte, Ross; Klibanski, Anne; Miller, Karen K; Tritos, Nicholas A

    2015-11-15

    Hypopituitarism may often occur in association with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Identification of reliable predictors of pituitary dysfunction is of importance in order to establish a rational testing approach. We searched the records of patients with TBI, who underwent neuroendocrine evaluation in our institution between 2007 and 2013. One hundred sixty-six adults (70% men) with TBI (median age: 41.6 years; range: 18-76) were evaluated at a median interval of 40.4 months (0.2-430.4).Of these, 31% had ≥1 pituitary deficiency, including 29% of patients with mild TBI and 35% with moderate/severe TBI. Growth hormone deficiency was the most common deficiency (21%); when body mass index (BMI)-dependent cutpoints were used, this was reduced to 15%. Central hypoadrenalism occurred in10%, who were more likely to have suffered a motor vehicle accident (MVA, p = 0.04), experienced post-traumatic seizures (p = 0.04), demonstrated any intracranial hemorrhage (p = 0.05), petechial brain hemorrhages (p = 0.017), or focal cortical parenchymal contusions (p = 0.02). Central hypothyroidism occurred in 8% and central hypogonadism in 12%; the latter subgroup had higher BMI (p = 0.03), were less likely to be working after TBI (p = 0.002), and had lower Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) scores (p = 0.03). Central diabetes insipidus (DI) occurred in 6%, who were more likely to have experienced MVA (p < 0.001) or sustained moderate/severe TBI (p < 0.001). Patients with MVA and those with post-traumatic seizures, intracranial hemorrhage, petechial brain hemorrhages, and/or focal cortical contusions are at particular risk for serious pituitary dysfunction, including adrenal insufficiency and DI, and should be referred for neuroendocrine testing. However, a substantial proportion of patients without these risk factors also developed hypopituitarism. PMID:26413767

  11. Challenges in providing culturally-competent care to patients with metastatic brain tumours and their families.

    PubMed

    Longo, Lianne; Slater, Serena

    2014-01-01

    Being diagnosed with a metastatic brain tumour can be devastating as it is characterized by very low cure rates, as well as significant morbidity and mortality. Given the poor life expectancy and progressive disability that ensues, patients and family members experience much turmoil, which includes losses that bring about changes to family roles, routines and relationships. Crisis and conflict are common during such major disruptions to a family system, as individual members attempt to make sense of the illness experience based on cultural and spiritual beliefs, past experiences and personal philosophies. It is imperative health care providers strive towards increased awareness and knowledge of how culture affects the overall experience of illness and death in order to help create a mutually satisfactory care plan. Providing culturally-competent care entails the use of proper communication skills to facilitate the exploration of patient and family perspectives and allows for mutual decision making. A case study will illustrate the challenges encountered in providing culturally-competent care to a woman with brain cancer and her family. As the patient's health declined, the family entered into a state of crisis where communication between family members and health care professionals was strained; leading to conflict and sub-optimal outcomes. This paper will address the ethical dilemma of providing culturally-competent care when a patient's safety is at risk, and the nursing implications of upholding best practices in the context of differing beliefs and priorities.

  12. Differentiation of cancerous and normal brain tissue using label free fluorescence and Stokes shift spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yan; Wang, Leana; Liu, Cheng-hui; He, Yong; Yu, Xinguang; Cheng, Gangge; Wang, Peng; Shu, Cheng; Alfano, Robert R.

    2016-03-01

    In this report, optical biopsy was applied to diagnose human brain cancer in vitro for the identification of brain cancer from normal tissues by native fluorescence and Stokes shift spectra (SSS). 77 brain specimens including three types of human brain tissues (normal, glioma and brain metastasis of lung cancers) were studied. In order to observe spectral changes of fluorophores via fluorescence, the selected excitation wavelength of UV at 300 and 340 nm for emission spectra and a different Stokes Shift spectra with intervals Δλ = 40 nm were measured. The fluorescence spectra and SSS from multiple key native molecular markers, such as tryptophan, collagen, NADH, alanine, ceroid and lipofuscin were observed in normal and diseased brain tissues. Two diagnostic criteria were established based on the ratios of the peak intensities and peak position in both fluorescence and SSS spectra. It was observed that the ratio of the spectral peak intensity of tryptophan (340 nm) to NADH (440 nm) increased in glioma, meningioma (benign), malignant meninges tumor, and brain metastasis of lung cancer tissues in comparison with normal tissues. The ratio of the SS spectral peak (Δλ = 40 nm) intensities from 292 nm to 366 nm had risen similarly in all grades of tumors.

  13. Comparison of Clinical Outcomes of Surgery Followed by Local Brain Radiotherapy and Surgery Followed by Whole Brain Radiotherapy in Patients With Single Brain Metastasis: Single-Center Retrospective Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Kenji; Narita, Yoshitaka; Miyakita, Yasuji; Ohno, Makoto; Sumi, Minako; Mayahara, Hiroshi; Kayama, Takamasa; Shibui, Soichiro

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Data comparing the clinical outcomes of local brain radiotherapy (LBRT) and whole brain RT (WBRT) in patients with a single brain metastasis after tumor removal are limited. Patients and Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed to compare the patterns of treatment failure, cause of death, progression-free survival, median survival time, and Karnofsky performance status for long-term survivors among patients who underwent surgery followed by either LBRT or WBRT between 1990 and 2008 at the National Cancer Center Hospital. Results: A total of 130 consecutive patients were identified. The median progression-free survival period among the patients who received postoperative LBRT (n = 64) and WBRT (n = 66) was 9.7 and 11.5 months, respectively (p = .75). The local recurrence rates (LBRT, 9.4% vs. WBRT, 12.1%) and intracranial new metastasis rate (LBRT, 42.2% vs. WBRT, 33.3%) were similar in each arm. The incidence of leptomeningeal metastasis was also equivalent (LBRT, 9.4% vs. WBRT, 10.6%). The median survival time for the LBRT and WBRT patients was 13.9 and 16.7 months, respectively (p = .88). A neurologic cause of death was noted in 35.6% of the patients in the LBRT group and 36.7% of the WBRT group (p = .99). The Karnofsky performance status at 2 years was comparable between the two groups. Conclusions: The clinical outcomes of LBRT and WBRT were similar. A prospective evaluation is warranted.

  14. Prevalence of pulmonary embolism at necropsy in patients with cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Svendsen, E; Karwinski, B

    1989-01-01

    The series studied comprised 6197 patients who had died of or who had cancer at death and represents all patients with cancer from 21,530 necropsies performed at this department from 1960-84. Pulmonary embolism was significantly more common among cancer patients than in those with non-neoplastic diseases. Among those palliatively treated, patients with ovarian cancer, cancer of the extrahepatic bile duct system, and cancer of the stomach had the highest prevalence of pulmonary embolism (34.6%, 31.7%, and 15.2%, respectively). Necropsy patients with cancer of the oesophagus and larynx, together with leukaemia, myelomatosis, and malignant lymphoma had the lowest prevalence (0-5.6%). Palliatively treated cancers in organs of the peritoneal cavity had a significantly higher incidence than all other cancers combined. Cancer of the peritoneal cavity may impede venous drainage from the lower limbs and thus be an important factor in the onset of deep calf vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. It is concluded that cancer represents an increased risk factor for onset of pulmonary embolism, in particular in patients with ovarian cancer and cancer of the extrahepatic bile duct system. PMID:2475526

  15. Diagnosis, disease stage, and distress of Chinese cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Boyan; Chen, Huiping; Deng, Yaotiao; Yi, Tingwu; Wang, Yuqing

    2016-01-01

    Background The objective is to assess how cancer patients know about their diagnosis what they know about their real stage, and the relationship between cancer stage and psychological distress. Methods A questionnaire including the Distress Thermometer was delivered to 422 cancer inpatients. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results Most of patients (68.7%) knew the bad news immediately after diagnosis. Half of patients knew their diagnosis directly from medical reports. Nearly one third of patients were informed by doctors. Cancer stages, which patients believed, differed significantly from their real disease stages (P<0.001). Over half of patients did not know their real disease stages. Patients with stage I–III cancer were more likely to know their real disease stage than patients with stage IV cancer (P<0.001). Distress scores of cancer patients were determined by the real cancer stage (P=0.012), not the stage which patients believed. Conclusions Although most of participants knew the bad news immediately after diagnosis, less than half of them knew their real disease stage. Patient with stage I–III cancer was more likely to know the real disease stage and had a DT score <4 than patient with stage IV disease. PMID:27004220

  16. DNA Double-Strand Break Repair Genes and Oxidative Damage in Brain Metastasis of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Lynda; Duchnowska, Renata; Reed, L. Tiffany; Palmieri, Diane; Qian, Yongzhen; Badve, Sunil; Sledge, George; Gril, Brunilde; Aladjem, Mirit I.; Fu, Haiqing; Flores, Natasha M.; Gökmen-Polar, Yesim; Biernat, Wojciech; Szutowicz-Zielińska, Ewa; Mandat, Tomasz; Trojanowski, Tomasz; Och, Waldemar; Czartoryska-Arlukowicz, Bogumiła; Jassem, Jacek; Mitchell, James B.

    2014-01-01

    Background Breast cancer frequently metastasizes to the brain, colonizing a neuro-inflammatory microenvironment. The molecular pathways facilitating this colonization remain poorly understood. Methods Expression profiling of 23 matched sets of human resected brain metastases and primary breast tumors by two-sided paired t test was performed to identify brain metastasis–specific genes. The implicated DNA repair genes BARD1 and RAD51 were modulated in human (MDA-MB-231-BR) and murine (4T1-BR) brain-tropic breast cancer cell lines by lentiviral transduction of cDNA or short hairpin RNA (shRNA) coding sequences. Their functional contribution to brain metastasis development was evaluated in mouse xenograft models (n = 10 mice per group). Results Human brain metastases overexpressed BARD1 and RAD51 compared with either matched primary tumors (1.74-fold, P < .001; 1.46-fold, P < .001, respectively) or unlinked systemic metastases (1.49-fold, P = .01; 1.44-fold, P = .008, respectively). Overexpression of either gene in MDA-MB-231-BR cells increased brain metastases by threefold to fourfold after intracardiac injections, but not lung metastases upon tail-vein injections. In 4T1-BR cells, shRNA-mediated RAD51 knockdown reduced brain metastases by 2.5-fold without affecting lung metastasis development. In vitro, BARD1- and RAD51-overexpressing cells showed reduced genomic instability but only exhibited growth and colonization phenotypes upon DNA damage induction. Reactive oxygen species were present in tumor cells and elevated in the metastatic neuro-inflammatory microenvironment and could provide an endogenous source of genotoxic stress. Tempol, a brain-permeable oxygen radical scavenger suppressed brain metastasis promotion induced by BARD1 and RAD51 overexpression. Conclusions BARD1 and RAD51 are frequently overexpressed in brain metastases from breast cancer and may constitute a mechanism to overcome reactive oxygen species–mediated genotoxic stress in the metastatic

  17. Cancer survivorship: cardiotoxic therapy in the adult cancer patient; cardiac outcomes with recommendations for patient management.

    PubMed

    Steingart, Richard M; Yadav, Nandini; Manrique, Carlos; Carver, Joseph R; Liu, Jennifer

    2013-12-01

    Many types of cancer are now curable or, if not cured, becoming a chronic illness. In 2012, it was estimated that there were more than 13,500,000 cancer survivors in the United States. Late outcomes of these survivors are increasingly related to cardiovascular disease, either as a consequence of the direct effects of cancer therapy or its adverse effects on traditional cardiac risk factors (eg, obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and diabetes mellitus). This article describes the therapies that have led to advances in cancer survival and the acute and chronic cardiovascular toxicities associated with these therapies. Recommendations are made for the surveillance and management of cancer survivors. Published guidelines on the subject of cardio-oncology are reviewed in light of clinical experience caring for these patients. To supplement this cancer-related knowledge base, appropriateness criteria and guidelines for cardiac care in the general population were extrapolated to cancer survivors. The result is a series of recommendations for surveillance and management of cardiovascular disease in cancer survivors. PMID:24331191

  18. Stereotactic radiosurgery for brain metastasis in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Won, Yong Kyun; Lee, Ja Young; Kang, Young Nam; Jang, Ji Sun; Kang, Jin-Hyoung; Jung, So-Lyoung; Sung, Soo Yoon; Jo, In Young; Park, Hee Hyun; Lee, Dong-Soo; Chang, Ji Hyun; Lee, Yun Hee

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) has been introduced for small-sized single and oligo-metastases in the brain. The aim of this study is to assess treatment outcome, efficacy, and prognostic variables associated with survival and intracranial recurrence. Materials and Methods This study retrospectively reviewed 123 targets in 64 patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with SRS between January 2006 and December 2012. Treatment responses were evaluated using magnetic resonance imaging. Overall survival (OS) and intracranial progression-free survival (IPFS) were determined. Results The median follow-up was 13.9 months. The median OS and IPFS were 14.1 and 8.9 months, respectively. Fifty-seven patients died during the follow-up period. The 5-year local control rate was achieved in 85% of 108 evaluated targets. The 1- and 2-year OS rates were 55% and 28%, respectively. On univariate analysis, primary disease control (p < 0.001), the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status (0-1 vs. 2; p = 0.002), recursive partitioning analysis class (1 vs. 2; p = 0.001), and age (<65 vs. ≥65 years; p = 0.036) were significant predictive factors for OS. Primary disease control (p = 0.041) and ECOG status (p = 0.017) were the significant prognostic factors for IPFS. Four patients experienced radiation necrosis. Conclusion SRS is a safe and effective local treatment for brain metastases in patients with NSCLC. Uncontrolled primary lung disease and ECOG status were significant predictors of OS and intracranial failure. SRS might be a tailored treatment option along with careful follow-up of the intracranial and primary lung disease status. PMID:26484304

  19. [Psychological aspects of cancer Information dedicated to patients and relatives].

    PubMed

    Machavoine, Jean-Luc; Bonnet, Valérie; Leichtnam-Dugarin, Line; Dolbeault, Sylvie; Marx, Eliane; Dauchy, Sarah; Flahault, Cécile; Bendrihen, Nicolas; Pelicier, Nicole; Syp, Laurence; Pérennec, Marie-Estelle; Dilhuydy, Jean-Marie; Marx, Gilles; Chaussumier, Caroline; Brusco, Sylvie; Carretier, Julien; Delavigne, Valérie; Fervers, Béatrice; Philip, Thierry

    2007-02-01

    In response to the evolution of the information-seeking behaviour of patients and concerns from health professionals regarding cancer patient information, the French National Federation of Comprehensive Cancer Centres (FNCLCC) introduced, in 1998, an information and education program dedicated to patients and relatives, the SOR SAVOIR PATIENT program (SSP). The methodology of this program adheres to established quality criteria regarding the elaboration of patient information. Cancer patient information, developed in this program, is based on clinical practice guidelines produced by the FNCLCC and the twenty French cancer centres, the National League against Cancer, The National Cancer Institute, the French Hospital Federation, the National Oncology Federation of Regional and University Hospitals, the French Oncology Federation of General Hospitals, many learned societies, as well as an active participation of patients, former patients and caregivers. The information and dialogue handbook SOR SAVOIR PATIENT Vivre pendant et après un cancer reporting on the psychological aspects of cancer was worked out and published on the Web in 2005. The guide aims to provide cancer patients with support and advice about the psychological impact of the disease. It provides information on the possible personal consequences of the disease and treatments, in every domain: psychological, emotional, interpersonal, familial or professional. Patients are also advised of the emotional challenges associated with cancer, of the support they may expect at every stage of the disease, from diagnosis to treatment, and of psychological outcome after the disease is over. The document also provides healthcare professionals with a valuable, concise source of validated information on the psychological aspects of cancer, thus facilitating communication between carers and patients. Information provided in the present article has been selected from the information and dialogue handbook SOR SAVOIR

  20. Management of bleeding complications in patients with cancer on DOACs.

    PubMed

    Schulman, Sam; Shrum, Jeffrey; Majeed, Ammar

    2016-04-01

    There has been a concern that major bleeding events (MBE) on direct-acting oral anticoagulants (DOACs) will be more difficult to manage than on vitamin K antagonists. Patients with cancer and DOAC-associated bleeding may be even more of a challenge to manage. We therefore reviewed the literature on bleeding in patients with cancer on DOACs. In addition, we performed an analysis of individual patient data from 5 phase III trials on treatment with dabigatran with focus on those with cancer. In 6 randomized trials the risk of MBE in patients with cancer was similar on treatment with DOACs compared to vitamin K antagonists. Bleeding was in the majority of patients managed with supportive therapy alone. In the individual patient data analysis there were no significant differences in use of hemostatic products, transfusion of red cells, effectiveness of management, bleeding-related mortality or 30-day all-cause mortality between patients with cancer treated with dabigatran or with warfarin. Local hemostatic therapy, including resection of the cancer site was more common in patients with gastrointestinal bleeding with cancer than among those without cancer. We conclude that management of bleeding in patients with cancer and on a DOAC does not pose a greater challenge than management of bleeding in patients without cancer. PMID:27067968

  1. Cancer procoagulant in patients with adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Kaźmierczak, Maciej; Lewandowski, Krzysztof; Wojtukiewicz, Marek Z; Turowiecka, Zofia; Kołacz, Edyta; Lojko, Anna; Skrzydlewska, Elzbieta; Zawilska, Krystyna; Komarnicki, Mieczysław

    2005-11-01

    Cancer procoagulant (CP) is a cysteine proteinase that may be produced by malignant and foetal tissue. The possible role of CP in the pathogenesis of cancer-related thrombosis has been suggested recently. The purpose of the study was to evaluate coagulation prothrombotic markers and their relation to CP concentration in the blood of patients with gastrointestinal adenocarcinomas (GIAC). The study group consisted of 45 patients with confirmed diagnosis of adenocarcinoma (stomach, 18 patients; colon, 27 patients) and without evident metastatic disease. In 24 patients further observation showed metastases. The control group for CP was composed of 10 healthy subjects. Blood samples were drawn on the admission day, before any treatment. Among 45 patients with GIAC, deep venous thrombosis was observed in two (4.4%). In all patients the CP activity in the serum was found, and the mean CP activity shortened the coagulation time almost three times compared with the healthy control group. Also, the mean thrombin-antithrombin complex concentration was above the normal range. A significant elevation of the mean prothrombin fragment 1+2 plasma content in this group of patients was noticed. Despite these observations, CP remained within the normal range and did not correlate with thrombin-antithrombin complex or prothrombin fragment 1+2 plasma concentrations. A positive correlation was observed between serum CP and fibrinogen concentration, and a negative correlation between CP and free protein S plasma content (P = 0.04 and P = 0.025, respectively). A negative correlation between activated protein C resistance ratio and protein C activity in the plasma was confirmed. Protein C activity in the plasma showed a correlation with free protein S plasma content. Analysis of factors influencing the activated partial thromboplastin time revealed the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies in seven persons from the study group (in three cases of IgG and in four cases of IgM class). Our

  2. Selection of a Relevant In Vitro Blood-Brain Barrier Model to Investigate Pro-Metastatic Features of Human Breast Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Drolez, Aurore; Vandenhaute, Elodie; Julien, Sylvain; Gosselet, Fabien; Burchell, Joy; Cecchelli, Roméo; Delannoy, Philippe; Dehouck, Marie-Pierre; Mysiorek, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Around 7–17% of metastatic breast cancer patients will develop brain metastases, associated with a poor prognosis. To reach the brain parenchyma, cancer cells need to cross the highly restrictive endothelium of the Blood-Brain Barrier (BBB). As treatments for brain metastases are mostly inefficient, preventing cancer cells to reach the brain could provide a relevant and important strategy. For that purpose an in vitro approach is required to identify cellular and molecular interaction mechanisms between breast cancer cells and BBB endothelium, notably at the early steps of the interaction. However, while numerous studies are performed with in vitro models, the heterogeneity and the quality of BBB models used is a limitation to the extrapolation of the obtained results to in vivo context, showing that the choice of a model that fulfills the biological BBB characteristics is essential. Therefore, we compared pre-established and currently used in vitro models from different origins (bovine, mice, human) in order to define the most appropriate tool to study interactions between breast cancer cells and the BBB. On each model, the BBB properties and the adhesion capacities of breast cancer cell lines were evaluated. As endothelial cells represent the physical restriction site of the BBB, all the models consisted of endothelial cells from animal or human origins. Among these models, only the in vitro BBB model derived from human stem cells both displayed BBB properties and allowed measurement of meaningful different interaction capacities of the cancer cell lines. Importantly, the measured adhesion and transmigration were found to be in accordance with the cancer cell lines molecular subtypes. In addition, at a molecular level, the inhibition of ganglioside biosynthesis highlights the potential role of glycosylation in breast cancer cells adhesion capacities. PMID:26958843

  3. Selection of a Relevant In Vitro Blood-Brain Barrier Model to Investigate Pro-Metastatic Features of Human Breast Cancer Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Drolez, Aurore; Vandenhaute, Elodie; Julien, Sylvain; Gosselet, Fabien; Burchell, Joy; Cecchelli, Roméo; Delannoy, Philippe; Dehouck, Marie-Pierre; Mysiorek, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Around 7-17% of metastatic breast cancer patients will develop brain metastases, associated with a poor prognosis. To reach the brain parenchyma, cancer cells need to cross the highly restrictive endothelium of the Blood-Brain Barrier (BBB). As treatments for brain metastases are mostly inefficient, preventing cancer cells to reach the brain could provide a relevant and important strategy. For that purpose an in vitro approach is required to identify cellular and molecular interaction mechanisms between breast cancer cells and BBB endothelium, notably at the early steps of the interaction. However, while numerous studies are performed with in vitro models, the heterogeneity and the quality of BBB models used is a limitation to the extrapolation of the obtained results to in vivo context, showing that the choice of a model that fulfills the biological BBB characteristics is essential. Therefore, we compared pre-established and currently used in vitro models from different origins (bovine, mice, human) in order to define the most appropriate tool to study interactions between breast cancer cells and the BBB. On each model, the BBB properties and the adhesion capacities of breast cancer cell lines were evaluated. As endothelial cells represent the physical restriction site of the BBB, all the models consisted of endothelial cells from animal or human origins. Among these models, only the in vitro BBB model derived from human stem cells both displayed BBB properties and allowed measurement of meaningful different interaction capacities of the cancer cell lines. Importantly, the measured adhesion and transmigration were found to be in accordance with the cancer cell lines molecular subtypes. In addition, at a molecular level, the inhibition of ganglioside biosynthesis highlights the potential role of glycosylation in breast cancer cells adhesion capacities.

  4. Tamoxifen OK for Breast Cancer Patients without Uterine Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_161118.html Tamoxifen OK for Breast Cancer Patients Without Uterine Abnormalities: Study Pretreatment ultrasounds may ... 2016 (HealthDay News) -- For most women, taking the breast cancer drug tamoxifen doesn't increase their risk of ...

  5. Rational Suicide and the Terminally Ill Cancer Patient.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Karolynn; Tuckel, Peter

    1985-01-01

    Reviews research concerning the nature of the relationship between cancer and suicide and considers its implications on the rational suicide movement. Findings do not indicate a higher incidence of suicide among cancer patients, questioning the rational suicide position. (JAC)

  6. Chemotherapy Regimen Extends Survival in Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Patients

    Cancer.gov

    A four-drug chemotherapy regimen has produced the longest improvement in survival ever seen in a phase III clinical trial of patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer, one of the deadliest types of cancer.

  7. Facilitating the Pediatric Cancer Patient's Return to School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Judith W.; Scarvalone, Susan A.

    1982-01-01

    Describes the educational needs of the pediatric cancer patient in returning to school. Discusses attitudes of parents and school personnel. Presents a seminar for teachers and school nurses of elementary pupils treated at a cancer center. (RC)

  8. Lymphedema After Surgery in Patients With Endometrial Cancer, Cervical Cancer, or Vulvar Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-23

    Lymphedema; Stage IA Cervical Cancer; Stage IA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IB Vulvar Cancer; Stage II Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage II Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIB Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIC Vulvar Cancer; Stage IVB Vulvar Cancer

  9. Nononcologic Disease in Patients with Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lowitz, Barry B.; Benjamin, Robert S.

    1977-01-01

    Nononcologic medical problems are common in patients with cancer. Failure to evaluate and treat these problems leads to considerable morbidity and mortality in people who often have potential for both comfortable and productive lives. While a physician is sometimes powerless to prevent the progression of underlying cancer, he must not allow a diagnostic category to color his approach. By seeing only an end point which is inevitable for all people, one could be inclined not to treat what is treatable. With clinical judgment, information and the eternal question of diagnosticians, “What else could this be?”, a physician can focus not on the inevitability of death but on the quality of life. PMID:878475

  10. The evolution of brain surgery on awake patients.

    PubMed

    Surbeck, Werner; Hildebrandt, Gerhard; Duffau, Hugues

    2015-01-01

    In the early days of modern neurological surgery, the inconveniences and potential dangers of general anesthesia by chloroform and ether using the so-called "open-drop technique" led to the quest for alternative methods of anesthesia. Besides preventing the feared side effects, the introduction of regional anesthesia revealed another decisive advantage over general anesthesia in neurosurgery: While intraoperative direct cortical stimulation under general anesthesia could only delineate the motor area (by evocation of contralateral muscular contraction), now, the awake patients were able to report sensations elicited by this method. These properties advanced regional anesthesia to the regimen of choice for cranial surgeries in the first half of the 20th century. While technical advances and new drugs led to a progressive return to general anesthesia for neurosurgical procedures, the use of regional anesthesia for epilepsy surgery has only decreased in recent decades. Meanwhile, awake craniotomies regained popularity in oncologically motivated surgeries, especially in craniotomies for diffuse low-grade gliomas. Intraoperative mapping of brain functions using electrical stimulation in awake patients enables not only for increased tumor removal while preserving the functional status of the patients but also opens a window to cognitive neuroscience. Observations during such interventions and their correlation with both pre - and postoperative neuropsychological examinations and functional neuroimaging is progressively leading to new insights into the complex functional anatomy of the human brain. Furthermore, it broadens our knowledge on cerebral network reorganization in the presence of disease-with implications for all disciplines of clinical neuroscience.

  11. Kilovoltage Imaging Doses in the Radiotherapy of Pediatric Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Jun; Chen Zhe; Roberts, Kenneth B.; Nath, Ravinder

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate doses induced by kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography (kVCBCT) to pediatric cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy, as well as strategies for dose reduction. Methods and Materials: An EGS4 Monte Carlo code was used to calculate three-dimensional dose deposition due to kVCBCT on 4 pediatric cancer patients. Absorbed doses to various organs were analyzed for both half-fan and full-fan modes. Clinical conditions, such as distance from organ at risk (OAR) to CBCT field border, kV peak energy, and testicular shielding, were studied. Results: The mean doses induced by one CBCT scan operated at 125 kV in half-fan mode to testes, liver, kidneys, femoral heads, spinal cord, brain, eyes, lens, and optical nerves were 2.9, 4.7, 7.7, 10.5, 8.8, 7.6, 7.7, 7.8, and 7.2 cGy, respectively. Increasing the distances from OARs to CBCT field border greatly reduced the doses to OARs, ranging from 33% reduction for spinal cord to 2300% reduction for testes. As photon beam energy increased from 60 to 125 kV, the dose increase due to kVCBCT ranged from 170% for lens to 460% for brain and spinal cord. A testicular shielding made of 1-cm cerrobend could reduce CBCT doses down to 31%, 51%, 68%, and 82%, respectively, for 60, 80, 100, and 125 kV when the testes lay within the CBCT field. Conclusions: Generally speaking, kVCBCT deposits much larger doses to critical structures in children than in adults, usually by a factor of 2 to 3. Increasing the distances from OARs to CBCT field border greatly reduces doses to OARs. Depending on OARs, kVCBCT-induced doses increase linearly or exponentially with photon beam energy. Testicular shielding works more efficiently at lower kV energies. On the basis of our study, it is essential to choose an appropriate scanning protocol when kVCBCT is applied to pediatric cancer patients routinely.

  12. Time-Frequency Analysis of Peptide Microarray Data: Application to Brain Cancer Immunosignatures

    PubMed Central

    O’Donnell, Brian; Maurer, Alexander; Papandreou-Suppappola, Antonia; Stafford, Phillip

    2015-01-01

    One of the gravest dangers facing cancer patients is an extended symptom-free lull between tumor initiation and the first diagnosis. Detection of tumors is critical for effective intervention. Using the body’s immune system to detect and amplify tumor-specific signals may enable detection of cancer using an inexpensive immunoassay. Immunosignatures are one such assay: they provide a map of antibody interactions with random-sequence peptides. They enable detection of disease-specific patterns using classic train/test methods. However, to date, very little effort has gone into extracting information from the sequence of peptides that interact with disease-specific antibodies. Because it is difficult to represent all possible antigen peptides in a microarray format, we chose to synthesize only 330,000 peptides on a single immunosignature microarray. The 330,000 random-sequence peptides on the microarray represent 83% of all tetramers and 27% of all pentamers, creating an unbiased but substantial gap in the coverage of total sequence space. We therefore chose to examine many relatively short motifs from these random-sequence peptides. Time-variant analysis of recurrent subsequences provided a means to dissect amino acid sequences from the peptides while simultaneously retaining the antibody–peptide binding intensities. We first used a simple experiment in which monoclonal antibodies with known linear epitopes were exposed to these random-sequence peptides, and their binding intensities were used to create our algorithm. We then demonstrated the performance of the proposed algorithm by examining immunosignatures from patients with Glioblastoma multiformae (GBM), an aggressive form of brain cancer. Eight different frameshift targets were identified from the random-sequence peptides using this technique. If immune-reactive antigens can be identified using a relatively simple immune assay, it might enable a diagnostic test with sufficient sensitivity to detect tumors

  13. Qualitative analysis of cancer patients' experiences using donated human milk.

    PubMed

    Rough, Susanne M; Sakamoto, Pauline; Fee, Caroline H; Hollenbeck, Clarie B

    2009-05-01

    This represents the first published account from the patient's perspective of the use of human milk as cancer therapy. Purposive sampling was used to select a sample of 10 participants. Five were patients and 5 were family proxies. Individual interviews were conducted using confirmatory interviewing technique to obtain individual perspectives on the motivation for cancer patients to take donated human milk. Human milk therapy improved the quality of life (QOL) measures in the physical, psychological, and spiritual domains for most patients interviewed. The patients continued their use of human milk despite cost, taste, and discouragement from the conventional medical community. The study results support the theory that QOL may be more important to cancer patients than cancer outcomes and may improve patient medical care overall. These interviews offer information to cancer patients, their practitioners, and donor milk banks on outcomes and symptom relief from this therapy.

  14. Use of Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Brain Metastases From Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Halasz, Lia M.; Weeks, Jane C.; Neville, Bridget A.; Taback, Nathan; Punglia, Rinaa S.

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: The indications for treatment of brain metastases from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) remain controversial. We studied patterns, predictors, and cost of SRS use in elderly patients with NSCLC. Methods and Materials: Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare (SEER-Medicare) database, we identified patients with NSCLC who were diagnosed with brain metastases between 2000 and 2007. Our cohort included patients treated with radiation therapy and not surgical resection as initial treatment for brain metastases. Results: We identified 7684 patients treated with radiation therapy within 2 months after brain metastases diagnosis, of whom 469 (6.1%) cases had billing codes for SRS. Annual SRS use increased from 3.0% in 2000 to 8.2% in 2005 and varied from 3.4% to 12.5% by specific SEER registry site. After controlling for clinical and sociodemographic characteristics, we found SRS use was significantly associated with increasing year of diagnosis, specific SEER registry, higher socioeconomic status, admission to a teaching hospital, no history of participation in low-income state buy-in programs (a proxy for Medicaid eligibility), no extracranial metastases, and longer intervals from NSCLC diagnosis. The average cost per patient associated with radiation therapy was 2.19 times greater for those who received SRS than for those who did not. Conclusions: The use of SRS in patients with metastatic NSCLC increased almost 3-fold from 2000 to 2005. In addition, we found significant variations in SRS use across SEER registries and socioeconomic quartiles. National practice patterns in this study suggested both a lack of consensus and an overall limited use of the approach among elderly patients before 2008.

  15. Recall in Older Cancer Patients: Measuring Memory for Medical Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jansen, Jesse; van Weert, Julia; van der Meulen, Nienke; van Dulmen, Sandra; Heeren, Thea; Bensing, Jozien

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Remembering medical treatment information may be particularly taxing for older cancer patients, but to our knowledge this ability has never been assessed in this specific age group only. Our purpose in this study was to investigate older cancer patients' recall of information after patient education preceding chemotherapy. Design and…

  16. [COMORBIDITIES IN PATIENTS WITH ONCOGYNECOLOGICAL CANCER].

    PubMed

    Tzoneva, K; Chakalova, G

    2016-01-01

    Comorbidities may directly affect the prognosis of the disease of interest or may indirectly affect the prognosis by affecting the choice of treatment. The aim of this study is to determine comorbidities in pacients with gynecological cancer. The study included 100 consecutive pacients for the period 01.01.2014-08.-5.2014 in Gynecological department of Specialized Hospital for ActivTratament in Oncology. The most common disease are arterial hipertony diabetes and obesity. In most patients, establish one or more accompanying illnesses that increase with age. PMID:27514167

  17. Imbalanced learning for clinical survival group prediction of brain tumor patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Mu; Hall, Lawrence O.; Goldgof, Dmitry B.; Gillies, Robert J.; Gatenby, Robert A.

    2015-03-01

    Accurate computer-aided prediction of survival time for brain tumor patients requires a thorough understanding of clinical data, since it provides useful prior knowledge for learning models. However, to simplify the learning process, traditional settings often assume datasets with equally distributed classes, which clearly does not reflect a typical distribution. In this paper, we investigate the problem of mining knowledge from an imbalanced dataset (i.e., a skewed distribution) to predict survival time. In particular, we propose an algorithmic framework to predict survival groups of brain tumor patients using multi-modality MRI data. Both an imbalanced distribution and classifier design are jointly considered: 1) We used the Synthetic Minority Over-sampling Technique to compensate for the imbalanced distribution; 2) A predictive linear regression model was adopted to learn a pair of class-specific dictionaries, which were derived from reformulated balanced data. We tested the proposed framework using a dataset of 42 patients with Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) tumors whose scans were obtained from the cancer genome atlas (TCGA). Experimental results showed that the proposed method achieved 95.24% accuracy.

  18. Dystrophic Serotonin Axons in Postmortem Brains from Young Autism Patients

    PubMed Central

    Azmitia, Efrain C.; Singh, Jorawer S.; Hou, Xiao P.; Wiegel, Jerzy

    2014-01-01

    Autism causes neuropathological changes in varied anatomical loci. A coherent neural mechanism to explain the spectrum of autistic symptomatology has not been proposed because most anatomical researchers focus on point-to-point functional neural systems (e.g. auditory, social networks) rather than considering global chemical neural systems. Serotonergic neurons have a global innervation pattern. Their cell bodies are found in the midbrain but they project their axons throughout the neural axis beginning in the fetal brain. This global system is implicated in autism by animal models and by biochemical, imaging, pharmacological, and genetics studies. However, no anatomical studies of the 5-HT innervation of autistic donors have been reported. Our review presents immunocytochemical evidence of an increase in 5-HT axons in post-mortem brain tissue from autism donors aged 2.8 to 29 years relative to controls. This increase is observed in the principle ascending fiber bundles of the medial and lateral forebrain bundles, and in the innervation density of the amygdala and the piriform, superior temporal, and parahippocampal cortices. In autistic donors eight years of age and up, several types of dystrophic 5-HT axons were seen in the termination fields. One class of these dystrophic axons, the thick heavily stained axons, was not seen in the brains of patients with neurodegenerative diseases. These findings provide morphological evidence for the involvement of serotonin neurons in the early etiology of autism, and suggest a diet therapy may be effective to blunt serotonin’s trophic actions during early brain development in children. PMID:21901837

  19. Phase I Trial of Simultaneous In-Field Boost With Helical Tomotherapy for Patients With One to Three Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, George; Yartsev, Slav; Yaremko, Brian; Perera, Francisco; Dar, A. Rashid; Hammond, Alex; Lock, Michael; Yu, Edward; Ash, Robert; Caudrelier, Jean-Michelle; Khuntia, Deepak; Bailey, Laura; Bauman, Glenn

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Stereotactic radiosurgery is an alternative to surgical resection for selected intracranial lesions. Integrated image-guided intensity-modulated-capable radiotherapy platforms such as helical tomotherapy (HT) could potentially replace traditional radiosurgery apparatus. The present study's objective was to determine the maximally tolerated dose of a simultaneous in-field boost integrated with whole brain radiotherapy for palliative treatment of patients with one to three brain metastases using HT. Methods and Materials: The inclusion/exclusion criteria and endpoints were consistent with the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9508 radiosurgery trial. The cohorts were constructed with a 3 + 3 design; however, additional patients were enrolled in the lower dose tolerable cohorts during the toxicity assessment periods. Whole brain radiotherapy (30 Gy in 10 fractions) was delivered with a 5-30-Gy (total lesion dose of 35-60 Gy in 10 fractions) simultaneous in-field boost delivered to the brain metastases. The maximally tolerated dose was determined by the frequency of neurologic Grade 3-5 National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria, version 3.0, dose-limiting toxicity events within each Phase I cohort. Results: A total of 48 patients received treatment in the 35-Gy (n = 3), 40-Gy (n = 16), 50-Gy (n = 15), 55-Gy (n = 8), and 60-Gy (n = 6) cohorts. No patients experienced dose-limiting toxicity events in any of the trial cohorts. The 3-month RECIST assessments available for 32 of the 48 patients demonstrated a complete response in 2, a partial response in 16, stable disease in 6, and progressive disease in 8 patients. Conclusion: The delivery of 60 Gy in 10 fractions to one to three brain metastases synchronously with 30 Gy whole brain radiotherapy was achieved without dose-limiting central nervous system toxicity as assessed 3 months after treatment. This approach is being tested in a Phase II efficacy trial.

  20. Neuroendocrine abnormalities in patients with traumatic brain injury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, X. Q.; Wade, C. E.

    1991-01-01

    This article provides an overview of hypothalamic and pituitary alterations in brain trauma, including the incidence of hypothalamic-pituitary damage, injury mechanisms, features of the hypothalamic-pituitary defects, and major hypothalamic-pituitary disturbances in brain trauma. While hypothalamic-pituitary lesions have been commonly described at postmortem examination, only a limited number of clinical cases of traumatic hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction have been reported, probably because head injury of sufficient severity to cause hypothalamic and pituitary damage usually leads to early death. With the improvement in rescue measures, an increasing number of severely head-injured patients with hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction will survive to be seen by clinicians. Patterns of endocrine abnormalities following brain trauma vary depending on whether the injury site is in the hypothalamus, the anterior or posterior pituitary, or the upper or lower portion of the pituitary stalk. Injury predominantly to the hypothalamus can produce dissociated ACTH-cortisol levels with no response to insulin-induced hypoglycemia and a limited or failed metopirone test, hypothyroxinemia with a preserved thyroid-stimulating hormone response to thyrotropin-releasing hormone, low gonadotropin levels with a normal response to gonadotropin-releasing hormone, a variable growth hormone (GH) level with a paradoxical rise in GH after glucose loading, hyperprolactinemia, the syndrome of inappropriate ADH secretion (SIADH), temporary or permanent diabetes insipidus (DI), disturbed glucose metabolism, and loss of body temperature control. Severe damage to the lower pituitary stalk or anterior lobe can cause low basal levels of all anterior pituitary hormones and eliminate responses to their releasing factors. Only a few cases showed typical features of hypothalamic or pituitary dysfunction. Most severe injuries are sufficient to damage both structures and produce a mixed endocrine picture

  1. Patient preferences in early glottic cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    McNeil, Michael L; Wilke, Derek R; Taylor, S Mark

    2016-07-01

    Patients with early-stage glottic cancer are primarily treated with one of three options: endoscopic laser excision, external-beam radiation, or open conservation surgery. We sought to determine patient preferences for treatment when presented with a choice between CO2 laser resection and radiation (open conservation surgery was not offered because the endoscopic approach is preferred at our institution). This prospective cohort study was conducted at the Dalhousie University Faculty of Medicine in Halifax, Canada. Our patient population was made up of 54 men and 10 women, aged 30 to 84 years (mean: 65.0 ± 11.2). Their disease were staged as follows: carcinoma in situ, n = 11; T1a = 21; T1b = 6; and T2 = 26. Patients were quoted identical cure rates for the two treatment modalities. The controversial issue of voice outcomes was discussed, but no leading information was given to the study cohort. All 64 patients chose CO2 laser resection as opposed to radiation therapy for definitive treatment. PMID:27434477

  2. Functional brain substrate of quality of life in patients with schizophrenia: A brain SPECT multidimensional analysis.

    PubMed

    Faget-Agius, Catherine; Boyer, Laurent; Richieri, Raphaëlle; Auquier, Pascal; Lançon, Christophe; Guedj, Eric

    2016-03-30

    The aim of this study was to investigate the functional brain substrate of quality of life (QoL) in patients with schizophrenia. Participants comprised 130 right-handed patients with schizophrenia who underwent whole-brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with (99m)Tc-labeled ethylcysteinate dimer ((99m)Tc-ECD) for exploring correlations of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) with the eight dimensions score of the Schizophrenia Quality of Life questionnaire (S-QoL 18). A significant positive correlation was found between the global index of the S-QoL 18 and rCBF in the right superior temporal sulcus and between psychological well-being dimension and rCBF in Brodmann area (BA)6, BA8, BA9, and BA10 and between self-esteem dimension and rCBF in striatum and between family relationship dimension and rCBF in BA1, BA2, BA3, BA4, BA8, BA22, BA40, BA42 and BA44 and between relationship with friends dimension and rCBF in BA44 and between physical well-being dimension and rCBF in parahippocampal gyrus, and finally between autonomy dimension and rCBF in cuneus and precuneus. A significant negative correlation was found between resilience dimension and rCBF in precuneus and between sentimental life dimension and rCBF in BA10. Our findings provide neural correlates of QoL. Brain regions involved in cognitions, emotional information processing and social cognition underlie the different QoL dimensions.

  3. Functional brain substrate of quality of life in patients with schizophrenia: A brain SPECT multidimensional analysis.

    PubMed

    Faget-Agius, Catherine; Boyer, Laurent; Richieri, Raphaëlle; Auquier, Pascal; Lançon, Christophe; Guedj, Eric

    2016-03-30

    The aim of this study was to investigate the functional brain substrate of quality of life (QoL) in patients with schizophrenia. Participants comprised 130 right-handed patients with schizophrenia who underwent whole-brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with (99m)Tc-labeled ethylcysteinate dimer ((99m)Tc-ECD) for exploring correlations of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) with the eight dimensions score of the Schizophrenia Quality of Life questionnaire (S-QoL 18). A significant positive correlation was found between the global index of the S-QoL 18 and rCBF in the right superior temporal sulcus and between psychological well-being dimension and rCBF in Brodmann area (BA)6, BA8, BA9, and BA10 and between self-esteem dimension and rCBF in striatum and between family relationship dimension and rCBF in BA1, BA2, BA3, BA4, BA8, BA22, BA40, BA42 and BA44 and between relationship with friends dimension and rCBF in BA44 and between physical well-being dimension and rCBF in parahippocampal gyrus, and finally between autonomy dimension and rCBF in cuneus and precuneus. A significant negative correlation was found between resilience dimension and rCBF in precuneus and between sentimental life dimension and rCBF in BA10. Our findings provide neural correlates of QoL. Brain regions involved in cognitions, emotional information processing and social cognition underlie the different QoL dimensions. PMID:27000309

  4. [The brain structures functional activity and aggression patients' multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Reznikova, T N; Seliverstova, N A; Kataeva, G V; Aroev, R A; Il'ves, A G; Kuznetsova, A K

    2015-01-01

    The article is devoted to investigation of unconscious aggression in patients with multiple sclerosis. We carried out comparison of the relative assessments of metabolism speed of glucose (according to positron emission tomography) and indicators of unconscious aggression (in the Hand test). It is shown that an increased tendency to open aggression (unconscious aggression) in patients with multiple sclerosis, is mainly linked with a reduction in the functioning of different departments of the frontal lobes of the brain on the left and with changes of the metabolism speed of glucose in the structures of the limbic system of the left and right hemisphere. With increasing of unconscious aggression we observed decrease of glucose metabolism speed in certain areas of the lower and middle frontal gyrus.

  5. Point localisation in patients with unilateral brain damage.

    PubMed Central

    Tartaglione, A; Benton, A L; Cocito, L; Bino, G; Favale, E

    1981-01-01

    The ability to reproduce the position of points in a plane was examined by a copying test in a control group and in unilaterally brain damaged patients. The procedure was designed to minimise the influence of visual field defects and of spatial hemi-inattention on performance. Accuracy of of localisation and direction of errors were studied in each half of the plane. Analysis showed a greater impairment of localisation ability in the patients with right hemisphere disease; however, the performance of both hemispheric groups was characterised by a reduction of accuracy in half of the plane contralateral to the side of the lesion. Both hemispheric groups showed an abnormal direction of errors in the left half of the plane, but the two groups presented a different pattern of errors. PMID:7310411

  6. Presurgical Rehearsals for Patients Considering "Awake" Deep Brain Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Falconer, Ramsey A; Rogers, Sean L; Brewer, Cristie M; Piscitani, Franco; Shenai, Mahesh B

    2016-01-01

    Simulated surgical environments are rapidly gaining adoption in training students, residents, and members of specialized surgical teams. However, minimal attention has been given to the use of simulated surgical environments to educate patients on surgical processes, particularly procedures that require the active participation of the patient. "Awake" neurosurgery provides a unique situation in which patients openly participate in their operation. We describe a case report, in which a 62-year-old male was referred for "awake" deep brain stimulation implantation, in relation to medically refractory Parkinson's disease. The patient had significant concerns regarding anxiety and claustrophobia, and toleration of the "awake" procedure. Consequently, we designed a simulated OR environment and process, to recreate the physical experience of the procedure, with minimal cost or risk. This experience was crucial in determining the care plan, as after this experience, the patient opted for an "asleep" alternative. Thus, in certain settings, presurgical rehearsals may have a dramatic impact in the overall course of care. PMID:27532036

  7. Extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (EMF) and brain cancer in adults and children: review and comment.

    PubMed Central

    Gurney, J. G.; van Wijngaarden, E.

    1999-01-01

    Epidemiologic and experimental research on the potential carcinogenic effects of extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (EMF) has now been conducted for over two decades. Cancer epidemiology studies in relation to EMF have focused primarily on brain cancer and leukemia, both from residential sources of exposure in children and adults and from occupational exposure in adult men. Because genotoxic effects of EMF have not been shown, most recent laboratory research has attempted to show biological effects that could be related to cancer promotion. In this report, we briefly review residential and occupational EMF studies on brain cancer. We also provide a general review of experimental studies as they relate both to the biological plausibility of an EMF-brain cancer relation and to the insufficiency of such research to help guide exposure assessment in epidemiologic studies. We conclude from our review that no recent research, either epidemiologic or experimental, has emerged to provide reasonable support for a causal role of EMF on brain cancer. PMID:11550314

  8. Inhibition of checkpoint kinase 1 sensitizes lung cancer brain metastases to radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Heekyoung; Yoon, Su Jin; Jin, Juyoun; Choi, Seung Ho; Seol, Ho Jun; Lee, Jung-Il; and others

    2011-03-04

    Research highlights: {yields} The most important therapeutic tool in brain metastasis is radiation therapy. {yields} Radiosensitivity of cancer cells was enhanced with treatment of Chk1 inhibitor. {yields} Depletion of Chk1 in cancer cells showed an enhancement of sensitivity to radiation. {yields} Chk1 can be a good target for enhancement of radiosensitivity. -- Abstract: The most important therapeutic tool in brain metastasis is radiation therapy. However, resistance to radiation is a possible cause of recurrence or treatment failure. Recently, signal pathways about DNA damage checkpoints after irradiation have been noticed. We investigated the radiosensitivity can be enhanced with treatment of Chk1 inhibitor, AZD7762 in lung cancer cell lines and xenograft models of lung cancer brain metastasis. Clonogenic survival assays showed enhancement of radiosensitivity with AZD7762 after irradiation of various doses. AZD7762 increased ATR/ATM-mediated Chk1 phosphorylation and stabilized Cdc25A, suppressed cyclin A expression in lung cancer cell lines. In xenograft models of lung cancer (PC14PE6) brain metastasis, AZD7762 significantly prolonged the median survival time in response to radiation. Depletion of Chk1 using shRNA also showed an enhancement of sensitivity to radiation in PC14PE6 cells. The results of this study support that Chk1 can be a good target for enhancement of radiosensitivity.

  9. Brain Structure Network Analysis in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yun-gang; Wang, Defeng; Liu, Kai; Weng, Jian; Guan, Yuefeng; Chan, Kate C. C.; Chu, Winnie C. W.; Shi, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Childhood obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a sleeping disorder commonly affecting school-aged children and is characterized by repeated episodes of blockage of the upper airway during sleep. In this study, we performed a graph theoretical analysis on the brain morphometric correlation network in 25 OSA patients (OSA group; 5 female; mean age, 10.1 ± 1.8 years) and investigated the topological alterations in global and regional properties compared with 20 healthy control individuals (CON group; 6 females; mean age, 10.4 ± 1.8 years). A structural correlation network based on regional gray matter volume was constructed respectively for each group. Our results revealed a significantly decreased mean local efficiency in the OSA group over the density range of 0.32–0.44 (p < 0.05). Regionally, the OSAs showed a tendency of decreased betweenness centrality in the left angular gyrus, and a tendency of decreased degree in the right lingual and inferior frontal (orbital part) gyrus (p < 0.005, uncorrected). We also found that the network hubs in OSA and controls were distributed differently. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study that characterizes the brain structure network in OSA patients and invests the alteration of topological properties of gray matter volume structural network. This study may help to provide new evidence for understanding the neuropathophysiology of OSA from a topological perspective. PMID:26413809

  10. Can we deconstruct cancer, one patient at a time?

    PubMed Central

    Blau, C. Anthony; Liakopoulou, Effie

    2014-01-01

    Patients with cancer face an ever-widening gap between the exponential rate at which technology improves and the linear rate at which these advances are translated into clinical practice. Closing this gap will require the establishment of learning loops that intimately link lab and clinic and enable the immediate transfer of knowledge, thereby engaging highly motivated patients with cancer as true partners in research. Here, we discuss the goal of creating a distributed network that aims to place world-class resources at the disposal of select patients with cancer and their oncologists, and then use these intensively monitored individual patient experiences to improve collective understanding of how cancer works. PMID:23102584

  11. Peculiarities of Anxiety Score Distribution in Adult Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Blank, Mikhail; Blank, Olga; Myasnikova, Ekaterina; Denisova, Daria

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the present research is to investigate and analyze possible peculiarities of the psychological state of cancer patients undergoing treatment. Scores characterizing the trait and state anxiety were acquired using the Integrative Anxiety Test from four groups: adults with no appreciable disease, pregnant women, cancer patients examined during the specific antitumor treatment, and cancer patients brought into lasting clinical remission. Statistical analysis of the testing results revealed the bimodal type of the distribution of scores. The only statistically significant exception was the distribution of the state anxiety scores in cancer patients undergoing treatment that was clearly unimodal. PMID:26176239

  12. Molecular Genetics Techniques to Develop New Treatments for Brain Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, Jacob; Fathallan-Shaykh, Hassan

    2006-09-22

    The objectives of this report are: (1) to devise novel molecular gene therapies for malignant brain tumors, (2) advance our understanding of the immune system in the central nervous system; and (3) apply genomics to find molecular probes to diagnose brain tumors, predict prognosis, biological behavior and their response to treatment.

  13. Brain

    MedlinePlus

    ... will return after updating. Resources Archived Modules Updates Brain Cerebrum The cerebrum is the part of the ... the outside of the brain and spinal cord. Brain Stem The brain stem is the part of ...

  14. Parkinsonism in a Recurrent Cervical Cancer Patient: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Sarraf, Zahra

    2013-01-01

    A 49 year old woman diagnosed as a cervical cancer patient, after receiving appropriate treatment experienced metastasis in her abdominopelvic cavity. After aggressive management, she was well for a while. However, she developed to a poor condition consisting of urologic, gastroenterological, hematologic and neurologic problems just in a short time. In the course of hospital she presented one sided passive bradykinesia, resting tremor, cogwheel rigidity with controlateral suspicious CT scan of brain. She passed away soon after that. PMID:24971125

  15. Fertility preservation options in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kasum, Miro; von Wolff, Michael; Franulić, Daniela; Čehić, Ermin; Klepac-Pulanić, Tajana; Orešković, Slavko; Juras, Josip

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to analyse current options for fertility preservation in young women with breast cancer (BC). Considering an increasing number of BC survivors, owing to improvements in cancer treatment and delaying of childbearing, fertility preservation appears to be an important issue. Current fertility preservation options in BC survivors range from well-established standard techniques to experimental or investigational interventions. Among the standard options, random-start ovarian stimulation protocol represe