Science.gov

Sample records for brain drug delivery

  1. Nanoparticles for Brain Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Masserini, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    The central nervous system, one of the most delicate microenvironments of the body, is protected by the blood-brain barrier (BBB) regulating its homeostasis. BBB is a highly complex structure that tightly regulates the movement of ions of a limited number of small molecules and of an even more restricted number of macromolecules from the blood to the brain, protecting it from injuries and diseases. However, the BBB also significantly precludes the delivery of drugs to the brain, thus, preventing the therapy of a number of neurological disorders. As a consequence, several strategies are currently being sought after to enhance the delivery of drugs across the BBB. Within this review, the recently born strategy of brain drug delivery based on the use of nanoparticles, multifunctional drug delivery systems with size in the order of one-billionth of meters, is described. The review also includes a brief description of the structural and physiological features of the barrier and of the most utilized nanoparticles for medical use. Finally, the potential neurotoxicity of nanoparticles is discussed, and future technological approaches are described. The strong efforts to allow the translation from preclinical to concrete clinical applications are worth the economic investments. PMID:25937958

  2. Drug delivery systems from nose to brain.

    PubMed

    Misra, Ambikanandan; Kher, Gitanjali

    2012-09-01

    The treatment of brain disorders is particularly challenging due to the presence of a variety of formidable obstacles to deliver drugs selectively and effectively to the brain. Blood-brain-barrier (BBB) constitutes the major obstacle to the uptake of drugs into the brain following systemic administration. Intranasal delivery offers a non-invasive and convenient method to bypass the BBB and delivery of therapeutics directly to the brain. The review discusses the potential of intranasal route to deliver drugs to the brain, the mechanisms and pathways of direct nose to brain drug transport, the various factors influencing transnasal drug absorption, the conventional and novel intranasal drug delivery systems, the various intranasal drug delivery techniques and devices, and examples of brain drug transport that have been feasible in treating various brain disorders. Moreover, products on the market, investigational drugs, and the author's perceptions about the prospect of intranasal delivery for treating brain disorders are also been discussed.

  3. Colloidal polymeric nanoparticles and brain drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Najeh Maissar; Mainardes, Rubiana Mara

    2009-07-01

    The blood brain barrier protects the brain from harmful substances in the blood stream and has stopped the development of many powerful and interesting drugs candidates for central nervous system due to the low poor distribution and by efflux mechanisms. Many different approaches have been developed in order to overcome this barrier and the drug gain access to the brain. The polymeric nanoparticles are efficient colloidal systems that have been investigated to the brain drug delivery. This review will focus on the current strategies for brain drug delivery emphasizing the properties and characteristics of polymeric nanoparticles for this purpose.

  4. Drug delivery systems for brain tumor therapy.

    PubMed

    Rautioa, Jarkko; Chikhale, Prashant J

    2004-01-01

    Brain tumors are one of the most lethal forms of cancer. They are extremely difficult to treat. Although, the rate of brain tumor incidence is relatively low, the field clearly lacks therapeutic strategies capable of overcoming barriers for effective delivery of drugs to brain tumors. Clinical failure of many potentially effective therapeutics for the treatment of brain tumors is usually not due to a lack of drug potency, but rather can be attributed to shortcomings in the methods by which a drug is delivered to the brain and into brain tumors. In response to the lack of efficacy of conventional drug delivery methods, extensive efforts have been made to develop novel strategies to overcome the obstacles for brain tumor drug delivery. The challenge is to design therapeutic strategies that deliver drugs to brain tumors in a safe and effective manner. This review provides some insight into several potential techniques that have been developed to improve drug delivery to brain tumors, and it should be helpful to clinicians and research scientists as well.

  5. Brain drug delivery systems for neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Garbayo, E; Ansorena, E; Blanco-Prieto, M J

    2012-09-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders (NDs) are rapidly increasing as population ages. However, successful treatments for NDs have so far been limited and drug delivery to the brain remains one of the major challenges to overcome. There has recently been growing interest in the development of drug delivery systems (DDS) for local or systemic brain administration. DDS are able to improve the pharmacological and therapeutic properties of conventional drugs and reduce their side effects. The present review provides a concise overview of the recent advances made in the field of brain drug delivery for treating neurodegenerative disorders. Examples include polymeric micro and nanoparticles, lipidic nanoparticles, pegylated liposomes, microemulsions and nanogels that have been tested in experimental models of Parkinson's, Alzheimer's and Huntington's disease. Overall, the results reviewed here show that DDS have great potential for NDs treatment.

  6. Drug Delivery to the Ischemic Brain

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Brandon J.; Ronaldson, Patrick T.

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia occurs when blood flow to the brain is insufficient to meet metabolic demand. This can result from cerebral artery occlusion that interrupts blood flow, limits CNS supply of oxygen and glucose, and causes an infarction/ischemic stroke. Ischemia initiates a cascade of molecular events inneurons and cerebrovascular endothelial cells including energy depletion, dissipation of ion gradients, calcium overload, excitotoxicity, oxidative stress, and accumulation of ions and fluid. Blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption is associated with cerebral ischemia and leads to vasogenic edema, a primary cause of stroke-associated mortality. To date, only a single drug has received US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval for acute ischemic stroke treatment, recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA). While rt-PA therapy restores perfusion to ischemic brain, considerable tissue damage occurs when cerebral blood flow is re-established. Therefore, there is a critical need for novel therapeutic approaches that can “rescue” salvageable brain tissue and/or protect BBB integrity during ischemic stroke. One class of drugs that may enable neural cell rescue following cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury is the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (i.e., statins). Understanding potential CNS drug delivery pathways for statins is critical to their utility in ischemic stroke. Here, we review molecular pathways associated with cerebral ischemia and novel approaches for delivering drugs to treat ischemic disease. Specifically, we discuss utility of endogenous BBB drug uptake transporters such as organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATPs/Oatps) and nanotechnology-based carriers for optimization of CNS drug delivery. Overall, this chapter highlights state-of-the-art technologies that may improve pharmacotherapy of cerebral ischemia. PMID:25307217

  7. Brain Mitochondrial Drug Delivery: Influence of Drug Physicochemical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Durazo, Shelley A.; Kadam, Rajendra S.; Drechsel, Derek; Patel, Manisha

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To determine the influence of drug physicochemical properties on brain mitochondrial delivery of 20 drugs at physiological pH. Methods The delivery of 8 cationic drugs (beta-blockers), 6 neutral drugs (corticosteroids), and 6 anionic drugs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, NSAIDs) to isolated rat brain mitochondria was determined with and without membrane depolarization. Multiple linear regression was used to determine whether lipophilicity (Log D), charge, polarizability, polar surface area (PSA), and molecular weight influence mitochondrial delivery. Results The Log D for beta-blockers, corticosteroids, and NSAIDs was in the range of −1.41 to 1.37, 0.72 to 2.97, and −0.98 to 2, respectively. The % mitochondrial uptake increased exponentially with an increase in Log D for each class of drugs, with the uptake at a given lipophilicity obeying the rank order cationic>anionic>neutral. Valinomycin reduced membrane potential and the delivery of positively charged propranolol and betaxolol. The best equation for the combined data set was Log % Uptake=0.333 Log D+ 0.157 Charge – 0.887 Log PSA+2.032 (R2=0.738). Conclusions Drug lipopohilicity, charge, and polar surface area and membrane potential influence mitochondrial drug delivery, with the uptake of positively charged, lipophilic molecules being the most efficient. PMID:21796482

  8. Brain mitochondrial drug delivery: influence of drug physicochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Durazo, Shelley A; Kadam, Rajendra S; Drechsel, Derek; Patel, Manisha; Kompella, Uday B

    2011-11-01

    To determine the influence of drug physicochemical properties on brain mitochondrial delivery of 20 drugs at physiological pH. The delivery of 8 cationic drugs (beta-blockers), 6 neutral drugs (corticosteroids), and 6 anionic drugs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, NSAIDs) to isolated rat brain mitochondria was determined with and without membrane depolarization. Multiple linear regression was used to determine whether lipophilicity (Log D), charge, polarizability, polar surface area (PSA), and molecular weight influence mitochondrial delivery. The Log D for beta-blockers, corticosteroids, and NSAIDs was in the range of -1.41 to 1.37, 0.72 to 2.97, and -0.98 to 2, respectively. The % mitochondrial uptake increased exponentially with an increase in Log D for each class of drugs, with the uptake at a given lipophilicity obeying the rank order cationic>anionic>neutral. Valinomycin reduced membrane potential and the delivery of positively charged propranolol and betaxolol. The best equation for the combined data set was Log % Uptake = 0.333 Log D + 0.157 Charge - 0.887 Log PSA + 2.032 (R(2) = 0.738). Drug lipopohilicity, charge, and polar surface area and membrane potential influence mitochondrial drug delivery, with the uptake of positively charged, lipophilic molecules being the most efficient.

  9. A new brain drug delivery strategy: focused ultrasound-enhanced intranasal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong; Chen, Cherry C; Acosta, Camilo; Wu, Shih-Ying; Sun, Tao; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2014-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) diseases are difficult to treat because of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which prevents most drugs from entering into the brain. Intranasal (i.n.) administration is a promising approach for drug delivery to the brain, bypassing the BBB; however, its application has been restricted to particularly potent substances and it does not offer localized delivery to specific brain sites. Focused ultrasound (FUS) in combination with microbubbles can deliver drugs to the brain at targeted locations. The present study proposed to combine these two different platform techniques (FUS+i.n.) for enhancing the delivery efficiency of intranasally administered drugs at a targeted location. After i.n. administration of 40 kDa fluorescently-labeled dextran as the model drug, FUS targeted at one region within the caudate putamen of mouse brains was applied in the presence of systemically administered microbubbles. To compare with the conventional FUS technique, in which intravenous (i.v.) drug injection is employed, FUS was also applied after i.v. injection of the same amount of dextran in another group of mice. Dextran delivery outcomes were evaluated using fluorescence imaging of brain slices. The results showed that FUS+i.n. enhanced drug delivery within the targeted region compared with that achieved by i.n. only. Despite the fact that the i.n. route has limited drug absorption across the nasal mucosa, the delivery efficiency of FUS+i.n. was not significantly different from that of FUS+i.v.. As a new drug delivery platform, the FUS+i.n. technique is potentially useful for treating CNS diseases.

  10. A New Brain Drug Delivery Strategy: Focused Ultrasound-Enhanced Intranasal Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hong; Chen, Cherry C.; Acosta, Camilo; Wu, Shih-Ying; Sun, Tao; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2014-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) diseases are difficult to treat because of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which prevents most drugs from entering into the brain. Intranasal (IN) administration is a promising approach for drug delivery to the brain, bypassing the BBB; however, its application has been restricted to particularly potent substances and it does not offer localized delivery to specific brain sites. Focused ultrasound (FUS) in combination with microbubbles can deliver drugs to the brain at targeted locations. The present study proposed to combine these two different platform techniques (FUS+IN) for enhancing the delivery efficiency of intranasally administered drugs at a targeted location. After IN administration of 40 kDa fluorescently-labeled dextran as the model drug, FUS targeted at one region within the caudate putamen of mouse brains was applied in the presence of systemically administered microbubbles. To compare with the conventional FUS technique, in which intravenous (IV) drug injection is employed, FUS was also applied after IV injection of the same amount of dextran in another group of mice. Dextran delivery outcomes were evaluated using fluorescence imaging of brain slices. The results showed that FUS+IN enhanced drug delivery within the targeted region compared with that achieved by IN only. Despite the fact that the IN route has limited drug absorption across the nasal mucosa, the delivery efficiency of FUS+IN was not significantly different from that of FUS+IV. As a new drug delivery platform, the FUS+IN technique is potentially useful for treating CNS diseases. PMID:25279463

  11. Progress in brain targeting drug delivery system by nasal route.

    PubMed

    Khan, Abdur Rauf; Liu, Mengrui; Khan, Muhammad Wasim; Zhai, Guangxi

    2017-09-05

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) restricts the transport of potential therapeutic moieties to the brain. Direct targeting the brain via olfactory and trigeminal neural pathways by passing the BBB has gained an important consideration for delivery of wide range of therapeutics to brain. Intranasal route of transportation directly delivers the drugs to brain without systemic absorption, thus avoiding the side effects and enhancing the efficacy of neurotherapeutics. Over the last several decades, different drug delivery systems (DDSs) have been studied for targeting the brain by the nasal route. Novel DDSs such as nanoparticles (NPs), liposomes and polymeric micelles have gained potential as useful tools for targeting the brain without toxicity in nasal mucosa and central nervous system (CNS). Complex geometry of the nasal cavity presented a big challenge to effective delivery of drugs beyond the nasal valve. Recently, pharmaceutical firms utilized latest and emerging nasal drug delivery technologies to overcome these barriers. This review aims to describe the latest development of brain targeted DDSs via nasal administration. Carbopol 934p (PubChem CID: 6581) Carboxy methylcellulose (PubChem CID: 24748) Penetratin (PubChem CID: 101111470) Poly lactic-co-glycolic acid (PubChem CID: 23111554) Tween 80 (PubChem CID: 5284448). Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Nanoparticles for direct nose-to-brain delivery of drugs.

    PubMed

    Mistry, Alpesh; Stolnik, Snjezana; Illum, Lisbeth

    2009-09-08

    This review aims to evaluate the evidence for the existence of a direct nose-to-brain delivery route for nanoparticles administered to the nasal cavity and transported via the olfactory epithelium and/or via the trigeminal nerves directly to the CNS. This is relevant in the field of drug delivery as well as for new developments in nanotechnology. Experiments in animal models have shown that nano-sized drug delivery systems can enhance nose-to-brain delivery of drugs compared to equivalent drug solutions formulations. Protection of the drug from degradation and/or efflux back into the nasal cavity may partly be the reason for this effect of nanoparticles. It is uncertain, however, whether drug from the nanoparticles is being released in the nasal cavity or the nanoparticles carrying the drug are transported via the olfactory system or the trigeminal nerves into the CNS where the drug is released. Furthermore, toxicity of nanoparticulate drug delivery systems in the nasal cavity and/or in the CNS has not been extensively studied and needs to be considered carefully.

  13. Drug Delivery Systems, CNS Protection, and the Blood Brain Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Ravi Kant

    2014-01-01

    Present review highlights various drug delivery systems used for delivery of pharmaceutical agents mainly antibiotics, antineoplastic agents, neuropeptides, and other therapeutic substances through the endothelial capillaries (BBB) for CNS therapeutics. In addition, the use of ultrasound in delivery of therapeutic agents/biomolecules such as proline rich peptides, prodrugs, radiopharmaceuticals, proteins, immunoglobulins, and chimeric peptides to the target sites in deep tissue locations inside tumor sites of brain has been explained. In addition, therapeutic applications of various types of nanoparticles such as chitosan based nanomers, dendrimers, carbon nanotubes, niosomes, beta cyclodextrin carriers, cholesterol mediated cationic solid lipid nanoparticles, colloidal drug carriers, liposomes, and micelles have been discussed with their recent advancements. Emphasis has been given on the need of physiological and therapeutic optimization of existing drug delivery methods and their carriers to deliver therapeutic amount of drug into the brain for treatment of various neurological diseases and disorders. Further, strong recommendations are being made to develop nanosized drug carriers/vehicles and noninvasive therapeutic alternatives of conventional methods for better therapeutics of CNS related diseases. Hence, there is an urgent need to design nontoxic biocompatible drugs and develop noninvasive delivery methods to check posttreatment clinical fatalities in neuropatients which occur due to existing highly toxic invasive drugs and treatment methods. PMID:25136634

  14. Diffusion of macromolecules in the brain: implications for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Wolak, Daniel J; Thorne, Robert G

    2013-05-06

    Therapeutics must diffuse through the brain extracellular space (ECS) in order to distribute within the central nervous system (CNS) compartment; this requirement holds both for drugs that are directly placed within the CNS (i.e., central input) and for drugs that cross the barriers separating blood and brain following systemic administration. The diffusion of any substance within the CNS may be affected by a number of properties associated with the brain microenvironment, e.g., the volume fraction, geometry, width, and local viscosity of the ECS, as well as interactions with cell surfaces, the extracellular matrix, and components of the interstitial fluid. Here, we discuss ECS properties important in governing the distribution of macromolecules (e.g., antibodies and other protein therapeutics), nanoparticles and viral vectors within the CNS. We also provide an introduction to some of the methods commonly applied to measure diffusion of molecules in the brain ECS, with a particular emphasis on those used for determining the diffusion properties of macromolecules. Finally, we discuss how quantitative diffusion measurements can be used to better understand and potentially even improve upon CNS drug delivery by modeling delivery within and across species, screening drugs and drug conjugates, evaluating methods for altering drug distribution, and appreciating important changes in drug distribution that may occur with CNS disease or injury.

  15. Diffusion of Macromolecules in the Brain: Implications for Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Wolak, Daniel J.; Thorne, Robert G.

    2013-01-01

    Therapeutics must diffuse through the brain extracellular space (ECS) in order to distribute within the central nervous system (CNS) compartment; this requirement holds both for drugs that are directly placed within the CNS (i.e. central input) and for drugs that cross the barriers separating blood and brain following systemic administration. The diffusion of any substance within the CNS may be affected by a number of properties associated with the brain microenvironment, e.g. the volume fraction, geometry, width, and local viscosity of the ECS, as well as interactions with cell surfaces, the extracellular matrix, and components of the interstitial fluid. Here, we discuss ECS properties important in governing the distribution of macromolecules (e.g. antibodies and other protein therapeutics), nanoparticles and viral vectors within the CNS. We also provide an introduction to some of the methods commonly applied to measure diffusion of molecules in the brain ECS, with a particular emphasis on those used for determining the diffusion properties of macromolecules. Finally, we discuss how quantitative diffusion measurements can be used to better understand and potentially even improve upon CNS drug delivery by modeling delivery within and across species, screening drugs and drug conjugates, evaluating methods for altering drug distribution, and appreciating important changes in drug distribution that may occur with CNS disease or injury. PMID:23298378

  16. Photoacoustic imaging for transvascular drug delivery to the rat brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Ryota; Sato, Shunichi; Tsunoi, Yasuyuki; Kawauchi, Satoko; Takemura, Toshiya; Terakawa, Mitsuhiro

    2015-03-01

    Transvascular drug delivery to the brain is difficult due to the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Thus, various methods for safely opening the BBB have been investigated, for which real-time imaging methods are desired both for the blood vessels and distribution of a drug. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging, which enables depth-resolved visualization of chromophores in tissue, would be useful for this purpose. In this study, we performed in vivo PA imaging of the blood vessels and distribution of a drug in the rat brain by using an originally developed compact PA imaging system with fiber-based illumination. As a test drug, Evans blue (EB) was injected to the tail vein, and a photomechanical wave was applied to the targeted brain tissue to increase the permeability of the blood vessel walls. For PA imaging of blood vessels and EB distribution, nanosecond pulses at 532 nm and 670 nm were used, respectively. We clearly visualized blood vessels with diameters larger than 50 μm and the distribution of EB in the brain, showing spatiotemporal characteristics of EB that was transvascularly delivered to the target tissue in the brain.

  17. Nanoscale drug delivery systems and the blood–brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    Alyautdin, Renad; Khalin, Igor; Nafeeza, Mohd Ismail; Haron, Muhammad Huzaimi; Kuznetsov, Dmitry

    2014-01-01

    The protective properties of the blood–brain barrier (BBB) are conferred by the intricate architecture of its endothelium coupled with multiple specific transport systems expressed on the surface of endothelial cells (ECs) in the brain’s vasculature. When the stringent control of the BBB is disrupted, such as following EC damage, substances that are safe for peripheral tissues but toxic to neurons have easier access to the central nervous system (CNS). As a consequence, CNS disorders, including degenerative diseases, can occur independently of an individual’s age. Although the BBB is crucial in regulating the biochemical environment that is essential for maintaining neuronal integrity, it limits drug delivery to the CNS. This makes it difficult to deliver beneficial drugs across the BBB while preventing the passage of potential neurotoxins. Available options include transport of drugs across the ECs through traversing occludins and claudins in the tight junctions or by attaching drugs to one of the existing transport systems. Either way, access must specifically allow only the passage of a particular drug. In general, the BBB allows small molecules to enter the CNS; however, most drugs with the potential to treat neurological disorders other than infections have large structures. Several mechanisms, such as modifications of the built-in pumping-out system of drugs and utilization of nanocarriers and liposomes, are among the drug-delivery systems that have been tested; however, each has its limitations and constraints. This review comprehensively discusses the functional morphology of the BBB and the challenges that must be overcome by drug-delivery systems and elaborates on the potential targets, mechanisms, and formulations to improve drug delivery to the CNS. PMID:24550672

  18. Evolving Drug Delivery Strategies to Overcome the Blood Brain Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Hersh, David S.; Wadajkar, Aniket S.; Roberts, Nathan B.; Perez, Jimena G.; Connolly, Nina P.; Frenkel, Victor; Winkles, Jeffrey A.; Woodworth, Graeme F.; Kim, Anthony J.

    2016-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) poses a unique challenge for drug delivery to the central nervous system (CNS). The BBB consists of a continuous layer of specialized endothelial cells linked together by tight junctions, pericytes, nonfenestrated basal lamina, and astrocytic foot processes. This complex barrier controls and limits the systemic delivery of therapeutics to the CNS. Several innovative strategies have been explored to enhance the transport of therapeutics across the BBB, each with individual advantages and disadvantages. Ongoing advances in delivery approaches that overcome the BBB are enabling more effective therapies for CNS diseases. In this review, we discuss: (1) the physiological properties of the BBB, (2) conventional strategies to enhance paracellular and transcellular transport through the BBB, (3) emerging concepts to overcome the BBB, and (4) alternative CNS drug delivery strategies that bypass the BBB entirely. Based on these exciting advances, we anticipate that in the near future, drug delivery research efforts will lead to more effective therapeutic interventions for diseases of the CNS.

  19. Role of Monocarboxylate Transporters in Drug Delivery to the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Vijay, Nisha; Morris, Marilyn E.

    2014-01-01

    Monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) are known to mediate the transport of short chain monocarboxylates such as lactate, pyruvate and butyrate. Currently, fourteen members of this transporter family have been identified by sequence homology, of which only the first four members (MCT1- MCT4) have been shown to mediate the proton-linked transport of monocarboxylates. Another transporter family involved in the transport of endogenous monocarboxylates is the sodium coupled MCTs (SMCTs). These act as a symporter and are dependent on a sodium gradient for their functional activity. MCT1 is the predominant transporter among the MCT isoforms and is present in almost all tissues including kidney, intestine, liver, heart, skeletal muscle and brain. The various isoforms differ in terms of their substrate specificity and tissue localization. Due to the expression of these transporters in the kidney, intestine, and brain, they may play an important role in influencing drug disposition. Apart from endogenous short chain monocarboxylates, they also mediate the transport of exogenous drugs such as salicylic acid, valproic acid, and simvastatin acid. The influence of MCTs on drug pharmacokinetics has been extensively studied for γ-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) including distribution of this drug of abuse into the brain and the results will be summarized in this review. The physiological role of these transporters in the brain and their specific cellular localization within the brain will also be discussed. This review will also focus on utilization of MCTs as potential targets for drug delivery into the brain including their role in the treatment of malignant brain tumors. PMID:23789956

  20. Which drug or drug delivery system can change clinical practice for brain tumor therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Siegal, Tali

    2013-01-01

    The prognosis and treatment outcome for primary brain tumors have remained unchanged despite advances in anticancer drug discovery and development. In clinical trials, the majority of promising experimental agents for brain tumors have had limited impact on survival or time to recurrence. These disappointing results are partially explained by the inadequacy of effective drug delivery to the CNS. The impediments posed by the various specialized physiological barriers and active efflux mechanisms lead to drug failure because of inability to reach the desired target at a sufficient concentration. This perspective reviews the leading strategies that aim to improve drug delivery to brain tumors and their likelihood to change clinical practice. The English literature was searched for defined search items. Strategies that use systemic delivery and those that use local delivery are critically reviewed. In addition, challenges posed for drug delivery by combined treatment with anti-angiogenic therapy are outlined. To impact clinical practice and to achieve more than just a limited local control, new drugs and delivery systems must adhere to basic clinical expectations. These include, in addition to an antitumor effect, a verified favorable adverse effects profile, easy introduction into clinical practice, feasibility of repeated or continuous administration, and compatibility of the drug or delivery system with any tumor size and brain location. PMID:23502426

  1. Quantitative analysis of drug delivery to the brain via nasal route.

    PubMed

    Kozlovskaya, Luba; Abou-Kaoud, Mohammed; Stepensky, David

    2014-09-10

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) prevents drugs' permeability into the brain and limits the management of brain diseases. Intranasal delivery is a convenient route of drug administration that can bypass the BBB and lead to a direct delivery of the drug to the brain. Indeed, drug accumulation in the brain following intranasal application of a drug solution, or of a drug encapsulated in specialized delivery systems (DDSs), has been reported in numerous scientific publications. We aimed to analyze the available quantitative data on drug delivery to the brain via the nasal route and to reveal the efficiency of brain drug delivery and targeting by different types of nasally-administered DDSs. We searched for scientific publications published in 1970-2014 that reported delivery of drugs or model compounds to the brain via intranasal and parenteral routes, and contained quantitative data that were sufficient for calculation of brain targeting efficiency. We identified 73 publications (that reported data on 82 compounds) that matched the search criteria and analyzed their experimental settings, formulation types, analytical methods, and the claimed efficiencies of drug brain targeting: drug targeting efficiency (%DTE) and nose-to-brain direct transport (%DTP). Outcomes of this analysis indicate that efficiency of brain delivery by the nasal route differs widely between the studies, and does not correlate with the drug's physicochemical properties. Particle- and gel-based DDSs offer limited advantage for brain drug delivery in comparison to the intranasal administration of drug solution. Nevertheless, incorporation of specialized reagents (e.g., absorption enhancers, mucoadhesive compounds, targeting residues) can increase the efficiency of drug delivery to the brain via the nasal route. More elaborate and detailed methodological and analytical characterizations and standardized reporting of the experimental outcomes are required for reliable quantification of drug targeting

  2. Nose-to-brain drug delivery by nanoparticles in the treatment of neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Ong, Wei-Yi; Shalini, Suku-Maran; Costantino, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Many potential drugs for the treatment of neurological diseases are unable to reach the brain in sufficient enough concentrations to be therapeutic because of the blood brain barrier. On the other hand, direct delivery of drugs to the brain provides the possibility of a greater therapeutic-toxic ratio than with systemic drug delivery. The use of intranasal delivery of therapeutic agents to the brain provides a means of bypassing the blood brain barrier in a non-invasive manner. In this respect, nanosized drug carriers were shown to enhance the delivery of drugs to CNS compared to equivalent drug solution formulations. Neurological conditions that have been studied in animal models that could benefit from nose-to-brain delivery of nanotherapeutics include pain, epilepsy, neurodegenerative disease and infectious diseases. The delivery of drugs to the brain via the nose-to-brain route holds great promise, on the basis of preclinical research by means of drug delivery systems such as polymeric nanoparticles and clinical data related to intranasal delivery to CNS of large molecular weight biologics administered in solution, but safety issues about toxicity on nasal mucosa, Np transport into the brain, delivery only to specific brain regions and variability in the adsorbed dose still represent research topics that need to be considered, with a view of clinical translation of these delivery systems.

  3. Quantitative analysis of the brain-targeted delivery of drugs and model compounds using nano-delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Kozlovskaya, Luba; Stepensky, David

    2013-10-10

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) prevents drugs' permeability into the brain and limits management of brain diseases. Specialized drug delivery systems (DDSs) are utterly required to overcome this barrier and to achieve efficient delivery of therapeutic agents to the brain. For this purpose, drug-encapsulating nanoparticles or vesicles, drug conjugates and other types of DDSs are being developed by many research groups worldwide. However, efficiency of the brain drug/DDS delivery and targeting is usually presented in indirect and vague form and it is hard to quantitatively estimate it based on the reported data. We searched for the scientific papers that were published in 1970-2012 that reported delivery of drugs or model compounds to the brain following systemic administration of DDSs via parenteral routes and contained quantitative data on brain drug/DDS delivery and targeting efficiency. We identified 123 publications that matched the search criteria and analyzed their experimental settings, formulation types, analytical methods, and the claimed efficiencies of drug/DDS brain targeting (brain/plasma or brain/tissue concentration ratios) and brain accumulation (% of the administered dose that accumulated in the brain). Based on the outcomes of this analysis, we describe the major research trends, discuss the efficiencies of the different drug/DDS brain targeting approaches, and provide recommendations for quantitative assessment of brain-targeting DDSs in the appropriately designed studies. © 2013.

  4. Crossing the Blood-Brain Barrier: Recent Advances in Drug Delivery to the Brain.

    PubMed

    Patel, Mayur M; Patel, Bhoomika M

    2017-02-01

    CNS disorders are on the rise despite advancements in our understanding of their pathophysiological mechanisms. A major hurdle to the treatment of these disorders is the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which serves as an arduous janitor to protect the brain. Many drugs are being discovered for CNS disorders, which, however fail to enter the market because of their inability to cross the BBB. This is a pronounced challenge for the pharmaceutical fraternity. Hence, in addition to the discovery of novel entities and drug candidates, scientists are also developing new formulations of existing drugs for brain targeting. Several approaches have been investigated to allow therapeutics to cross the BBB. As the molecular structure of the BBB is better elucidated, several key approaches for brain targeting include physiological transport mechanisms such as adsorptive-mediated transcytosis, inhibition of active efflux pumps, receptor-mediated transport, cell-mediated endocytosis, and the use of peptide vectors. Drug-delivery approaches comprise delivery from microspheres, biodegradable wafers, and colloidal drug-carrier systems (e.g., liposomes, nanoparticles, nanogels, dendrimers, micelles, nanoemulsions, polymersomes, exosomes, and quantum dots). The current review discusses the latest advancements in these approaches, with a major focus on articles published in 2015 and 2016. In addition, we also cover the alternative delivery routes, such as intranasal and convection-enhanced diffusion methods, and disruption of the BBB for brain targeting.

  5. Microemulsion-based drug delivery system for transnasal delivery of Carbamazepine: preliminary brain-targeting study.

    PubMed

    Patel, Rashmin Bharatbhai; Patel, Mrunali Rashmin; Bhatt, Kashyap K; Patel, Bharat G; Gaikwad, Rajiv V

    2016-01-01

    This study reports the development and evaluation of Carbamazepine (CMP)-loaded microemulsions (CMPME) for intranasal delivery in the treatment of epilepsy. The CMPME was prepared by the spontaneous emulsification method and characterized for physicochemical parameters. All formulations were radiolabeled with (99m)Tc (technetium) and biodistribution of CMP in the brain was investigated using Swiss albino rats. Brain scintigraphy imaging in rats was also performed to determine the uptake of the CMP into the brain. CMPME were found crystal clear and stable with average globule size of 34.11 ± 1.41 nm. (99m)Tc-labeled CMP solution (CMPS)/CMPME/CMP mucoadhesive microemulsion (CMPMME) were found to be stable and suitable for in vivo studies. Brain/blood ratio at all sampling points up to 8 h following intranasal administration of CMPMME compared to intravenous CMPME was found to be 2- to 3-fold higher signifying larger extent of distribution of the CMP in brain. Drug targeting efficiency and direct drug transport were found to be highest for CMPMME post-intranasal administration compared to intravenous CMP. Rat brain scintigraphy also demonstrated higher intranasal uptake of the CMP into the brain. This investigation demonstrates a prompt and larger extent of transport of CMP into the brain through intranasal CMPMME, which may prove beneficial for treatment of epilepsy.

  6. Nanoparticle-mediated brain drug delivery: Overcoming blood-brain barrier to treat neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Saraiva, Cláudia; Praça, Catarina; Ferreira, Raquel; Santos, Tiago; Ferreira, Lino; Bernardino, Liliana

    2016-08-10

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a vital boundary between neural tissue and circulating blood. The BBB's unique and protective features control brain homeostasis as well as ion and molecule movement. Failure in maintaining any of these components results in the breakdown of this specialized multicellular structure and consequently promotes neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration. In several high incidence pathologies such as stroke, Alzheimer's (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD) the BBB is impaired. However, even a damaged and more permeable BBB can pose serious challenges to drug delivery into the brain. The use of nanoparticle (NP) formulations able to encapsulate molecules with therapeutic value, while targeting specific transport processes in the brain vasculature, may enhance drug transport through the BBB in neurodegenerative/ischemic disorders and target relevant regions in the brain for regenerative processes. In this review, we will discuss BBB composition and characteristics and how these features are altered in pathology, namely in stroke, AD and PD. Additionally, factors influencing an efficient intravenous delivery of polymeric and inorganic NPs into the brain as well as NP-related delivery systems with the most promising functional outcomes will also be discussed.

  7. Phage display: development of nanocarriers for targeted drug delivery to the brain

    PubMed Central

    Bakhshinejad, Babak; Karimi, Marzieh; Khalaj-Kondori, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    The blood brain barrier represents a formidable obstacle for the transport of most systematically administered neurodiagnostics and neurotherapeutics to the brain. Phage display is a high throughput screening strategy that can be used for the construction of nanomaterial peptide libraries. These libraries can be screened for finding brain targeting peptide ligands. Surface functionalization of a variety of nanocarriers with these brain homing peptides is a sophisticated way to develop nanobiotechnology-based drug delivery platforms that are able to cross the blood brain barrier. These efficient drug delivery systems raise our hopes for the diagnosis and treatment of various brain disorders in the future. PMID:26199590

  8. Smuggling Drugs into the Brain: An Overview of Ligands Targeting Transcytosis for Drug Delivery across the Blood–Brain Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Georgieva, Julia V.; Hoekstra, Dick; Zuhorn, Inge S.

    2014-01-01

    The blood–brain barrier acts as a physical barrier that prevents free entry of blood-derived substances, including those intended for therapeutic applications. The development of molecular Trojan horses is a promising drug targeting technology that allows for non-invasive delivery of therapeutics into the brain. This concept relies on the application of natural or genetically engineered proteins or small peptides, capable of specifically ferrying a drug-payload that is either directly coupled or encapsulated in an appropriate nanocarrier, across the blood–brain barrier via receptor-mediated transcytosis. Specifically, in this process the nanocarrier–drug system (“Trojan horse complex”) is transported transcellularly across the brain endothelium, from the blood to the brain interface, essentially trailed by a native receptor. Naturally, only certain properties would favor a receptor to serve as a transporter for nanocarriers, coated with appropriate ligands. Here we briefly discuss brain microvascular endothelial receptors that have been explored until now, highlighting molecular features that govern the efficiency of nanocarrier-mediated drug delivery into the brain. PMID:25407801

  9. From blood-brain barrier to blood-brain interface: new opportunities for CNS drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Banks, William A

    2016-04-01

    One of the biggest challenges in the development of therapeutics for central nervous system (CNS) disorders is achieving sufficient blood-brain barrier (BBB) penetration. Research in the past few decades has revealed that the BBB is not only a substantial barrier for drug delivery to the CNS but also a complex, dynamic interface that adapts to the needs of the CNS, responds to physiological changes, and is affected by and can even promote disease. This complexity confounds simple strategies for drug delivery to the CNS, but provides a wealth of opportunities and approaches for drug development. Here, I review some of the most important areas that have recently redefined the BBB and discuss how they can be applied to the development of CNS therapeutics.

  10. Nanosized Drug Delivery Systems for Direct Nose to Brain Targeting: A Review.

    PubMed

    Phukan, Kunjan; Nandy, Marika; Sharma, Rupanjali B; Sharma, Hemanta K

    2016-01-01

    Drug targeting to brain has always been problematic due to Blood-Brain Barrier (BBB), which, does not allow most of the drugs to pass through it as they are hydrophilic and macromolecular drugs. So, in order to bypass the BBB, alternative modes of administration were searched and nasal to brain delivery route was tried by many workers. Such studies yielded patented nano-formulations with the ability to cross blood brain barrier. Nanoparticles being smaller in size and large surface area help in increasing the rate of drug permeation to the brain. In this review work, emphasis has been laid on discussion on various works done in the field of nasal delivery of drugs to brain over the last decade. The works that are discussed in this paper show better drug targeting of brain when given through nasal route as nanoparticles. Experiments performed in animal models have clearly exhibited that nano-sized formulations are able to facilitate the delivery of drugs to brain through nose in comparison to tantamount drug solutions. However, it is not yet confirmed whether the drug is freed from the formulation in the nasal cavity and then absorbed or the nanoparticles themselves are absorbed and then the drug is released in the CNS. Furthermore, the toxicity studies were not carried out extensively in suitably designed model, which should be considered before going for further studies and application.

  11. Targeted blood-to-brain drug delivery --10 key development criteria.

    PubMed

    Gaillard, Pieter J; Visser, Corine C; Appeldoorn, Chantal C M; Rip, Jaap

    2012-09-01

    Drug delivery to the brain remains challenging due to the presence of the blood-brain barrier. In this review, 10 key development criteria are presented that are important for successful drug development to treat CNS diseases by targeted drug delivery systems. Although several routes of delivery are being investigated, such as intranasal delivery, direct injections into the brain or CSF, and transient opening of the blood-brain barrier, the focus of this review is on physiological strategies aiming to target endogenous transport mechanisms. Examples from literature, focusing on targeted drug delivery systems that are being commercially developed, will be discussed to illustrate the 10 key development criteria. The first four criteria apply to the targeting of the blood-brain barrier: (1) a proven inherently safe receptor biology, (2) a safe and human applicable ligand, (3) receptor specific binding, and (4) applicable for acute and chronic indications. Next to an efficient and safe targeting strategy, as captured in key criteria 1 to 4, a favorable pharmacokinetic profile is also important (key criterion 5). With regard to the drug carriers, two criteria are important: (6) no modification of active ingredient and (7) able to carry various classes of molecules. The final three criteria apply to the development of a drug from lab to clinic: (8) low costs and straightforward manufacturing, (9) activity in all animal models, and (10) strong intellectual property (IP) protection. Adhering to these 10 key development criteria will allow for a successful brain drug development.

  12. Ultrasound for drug and gene delivery to the brain.

    PubMed

    Hynynen, Kullervo

    2008-06-30

    Noninvasive, transient, and local image-guided blood-brain barrier disruption (BBBD) has been demonstrated with focused ultrasound exposure in animal models. Most studies have combined low pressure amplitude and low time average acoustic power burst sonications with intravascular injection of pre-formed micro-bubbles to produce BBBD without damage to the neurons. The BBB has been shown to be healed within a few hours after the exposure. The combination of focused ultrasound beams with MR image guidance allows precise anatomical targeting as demonstrated by the delivery of several marker molecules in different animal models. This method may in the future have a significant impact on the diagnosis and treatment of central nervous system (CNS) disorders. Most notably, the delivery of the chemotherapy agents (liposomal Doxorubicin and Herceptin) has been shown in a rat model.

  13. Strategies to improve delivery of anticancer drugs across the blood–brain barrier to treat glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Oberoi, Rajneet K.; Parrish, Karen E.; Sio, Terence T.; Mittapalli, Rajendar K.; Elmquist, William F.; Sarkaria, Jann N.

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a lethal and aggressive brain tumor that is resistant to conventional radiation and cytotoxic chemotherapies. Molecularly targeted agents hold great promise in treating these genetically heterogeneous tumors, yet have produced disappointing results. One reason for the clinical failure of these novel therapies can be the inability of the drugs to achieve effective concentrations in the invasive regions beyond the bulk tumor. In this review, we describe the influence of the blood–brain barrier on the distribution of anticancer drugs to both the tumor core and infiltrative regions of GBM. We further describe potential strategies to overcome these drug delivery limitations. Understanding the key factors that limit drug delivery into brain tumors will guide future development of approaches for enhanced delivery of effective drugs to GBM. PMID:26359209

  14. Nanocarriers for brain specific delivery of anti-retro viral drugs: challenges and achievements.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Nila Mary; Senthil, Venkatachalam; Saxena, Shailendra K

    2017-09-18

    HIV/AIDS is a global pandemic and the deleterious effects of human immunodeficiency virus in the brain cannot be overlooked. Though the current anti-retro viral therapy is able to reduce the virus load in the peripheral tissues of the body, the inability of the anti-retro viral drugs to cross the blood brain barrier, as such, limits its therapeutic effect in the brain. The development of newer, successful nanoparticulate drug delivery systems to enhance the feasibility of the anti-retro viral drugs to the brain, offers a novel strategy to treat the AIDS-related neuronal degradation. This review summarised the neuropathogenesis of neuroAIDS, the challenges and achievements made in the delivery of therapeutics across the BBB and the use of nanocarriers as a safe and effective way for delivering anti-retro viral drugs to the brain.

  15. Focused ultrasound-mediated drug delivery through the blood-brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Alison; Shah, Kairavi; Hough, Olivia; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent advances in blood-brain barrier (BBB) research, it remains a significant hurdle for the pharmaceutical treatment of brain diseases. Focused ultrasound (FUS) is one method to transiently increase permeability of the BBB to promote drug delivery to specific brain regions. An introduction to the BBB and a brief overview of the methods which can be used to circumvent the BBB to promote drug delivery is provided. In particular, we discuss the advantages and limitations of FUS technology and the efficacy of FUS-mediated drug delivery in models of disease. MRI for targeting and evaluating FUS treatments, combined with administration of microbubbles, allows for transient, reproducible BBB opening. The integration of a real-time acoustic feedback controller has improved treatment safety. Successful clinical translation of FUS has the potential to transform the treatment of brain disease worldwide without requiring the development of new pharmaceutical agents. PMID:25936845

  16. Focused ultrasound-mediated drug delivery through the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Alison; Shah, Kairavi; Hough, Olivia; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2015-05-01

    Despite recent advances in blood-brain barrier (BBB) research, it remains a significant hurdle for the pharmaceutical treatment of brain diseases. Focused ultrasound (FUS) is one method to transiently increase permeability of the BBB to promote drug delivery to specific brain regions. An introduction to the BBB and a brief overview of the methods, which can be used to circumvent the BBB to promote drug delivery, is provided. In particular, we discuss the advantages and limitations of FUS technology and the efficacy of FUS-mediated drug delivery in models of disease. MRI for targeting and evaluating FUS treatments, combined with administration of microbubbles, allows for transient, reproducible BBB opening. The integration of a real-time acoustic feedback controller has improved treatment safety. Successful clinical translation of FUS has the potential to transform the treatment of brain disease worldwide without requiring the development of new pharmaceutical agents.

  17. Ultrasound enhanced drug delivery to the brain and central nervous system.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, Meaghan A; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2012-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in the use of ultrasound to enhance drug delivery to the brain and central nervous system. Disorders of the brain and CNS historically have had poor response to drug therapy due to the presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Techniques for circumventing the BBB are typically highly invasive or involve disrupting large portions of the BBB, exposing the brain to pathogens. Ultrasound can be non-invasively delivered to the brain through the intact skull. When combined with preformed microbubbles, ultrasound can safely induce transient, localised and reversible disruption of the BBB, allowing therapeutics to be delivered. Investigations to date have shown positive response to ultrasound BBB disruption combined with therapeutic agent delivery in rodent models of primary and metastatic brain cancer and Alzheimer's disease. Recent work in non-human primates has demonstrated that the technique is feasible for use in humans. This review examines the current status of drug delivery to the brain and CNS both by disruption of the BBB, and by ultrasound enhancement of drug delivery through the already compromised BBB. Cellular and physical mechanisms of disruption are discussed, as well as treatment technique, safety and monitoring.

  18. Glutamate-Mediated Blood–Brain Barrier Opening: Implications for Neuroprotection and Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Vazana, Udi; Veksler, Ronel; Pell, Gaby S.; Prager, Ofer; Fassler, Michael; Chassidim, Yoash; Roth, Yiftach; Shahar, Hamutal; Zangen, Abraham; Raccah, Ruggero; Onesti, Emanuela; Ceccanti, Marco; Colonnese, Claudio; Santoro, Antonio; Salvati, Maurizio; D'Elia, Alessandro; Nucciarelli, Valter; Inghilleri, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    The blood–brain barrier is a highly selective anatomical and functional interface allowing a unique environment for neuro-glia networks. Blood–brain barrier dysfunction is common in most brain disorders and is associated with disease course and delayed complications. However, the mechanisms underlying blood–brain barrier opening are poorly understood. Here we demonstrate the role of the neurotransmitter glutamate in modulating early barrier permeability in vivo. Using intravital microscopy, we show that recurrent seizures and the associated excessive glutamate release lead to increased vascular permeability in the rat cerebral cortex, through activation of NMDA receptors. NMDA receptor antagonists reduce barrier permeability in the peri-ischemic brain, whereas neuronal activation using high-intensity magnetic stimulation increases barrier permeability and facilitates drug delivery. Finally, we conducted a double-blind clinical trial in patients with malignant glial tumors, using contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging to quantitatively assess blood–brain barrier permeability. We demonstrate the safety of stimulation that efficiently increased blood–brain barrier permeability in 10 of 15 patients with malignant glial tumors. We suggest a novel mechanism for the bidirectional modulation of brain vascular permeability toward increased drug delivery and prevention of delayed complications in brain disorders. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In this study, we reveal a new mechanism that governs blood–brain barrier (BBB) function in the rat cerebral cortex, and, by using the discovered mechanism, we demonstrate bidirectional control over brain endothelial permeability. Obviously, the clinical potential of manipulating BBB permeability for neuroprotection and drug delivery is immense, as we show in preclinical and proof-of-concept clinical studies. This study addresses an unmet need to induce transient BBB opening for drug delivery in patients with malignant brain

  19. Nano-enabled drug delivery systems for brain cancer and Alzheimer's disease: research patterns and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jing; Porter, Alan L; Aminabhavi, Tejraj M; Zhu, Donghua

    2015-10-01

    "Tech mining" applies bibliometric and text analytic methods to scientific literature of a target field. In this study, we compare the evolution of nano-enabled drug delivery (NEDD) systems for two different applications - viz., brain cancer (BC) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) - using this approach. In this process, we derive research intelligence from papers indexed in MEDLINE. Review by domain specialists helps understand the macro-level disease problems and pathologies to identify commonalities and differences between BC and AD. Results provide a fresh perspective on the developmental pathways for NEDD approaches that have been used in the treatment of BC and AD. Results also point toward finding future solutions to drug delivery issues that are critical to medical practitioners and pharmaceutical scientists addressing the brain. Drug delivery to brain cells has been very challenging due to the presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Suitable and effective nano-enabled drug delivery (NEDD) system is urgently needed. In this study, the authors utilized "tech-mining" tools to describe and compare various choices of delivery system available for the diagnosis, as well as treatment, of brain cancer and Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Nanowired Drug Delivery Across the Blood-Brain Barrier in Central Nervous System Injury and Repair.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Aruna; Menon, Preeti; Muresanu, Dafin F; Ozkizilcik, Asya; Tian, Z Ryan; Lafuente, José V; Sharma, Hari S

    2016-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a physiological regulator of transport of essential items from blood to brain for the maintenance of homeostasis of the central nervous system (CNS) within narrow limits. The BBB is also responsible for export of harmful or metabolic products from brain to blood to keep the CNS fluid microenvironment healthy. However, noxious insults to the brain caused by trauma, ischemia or environmental/chemical toxins alter the BBB function to small as well as large molecules e.g., proteins. When proteins enter the CNS fluid microenvironment, development of brain edema occurs due to altered osmotic balance between blood and brain. On the other hand, almost all neurodegenerative diseases and traumatic insults to the CNS and subsequent BBB dysfunction lead to edema formation and cell injury. To treat these brain disorders suitable drug therapy reaching their brain targets is needed. However, due to edema formation or only a focal disruption of the BBB e.g., around brain tumors, many drugs are unable to reach their CNS targets in sufficient quantity. This results in poor therapeutic outcome. Thus, new technology such as nanodelivery is needed for drugs to reach their CNS targets and be effective. In this review, use of nanowires as a possible novel tool to enhance drug delivery into the CNS in various disease models is discussed based on our investigations. These data show that nanowired delivery of drugs may have superior neuroprotective ability to treat several CNS diseases effectively indicating their role in future therapeutic strategies.

  1. Lactoferrin bioconjugated solid lipid nanoparticles: a new drug delivery system for potential brain targeting.

    PubMed

    Singh, Indu; Swami, Rajan; Pooja, Deep; Jeengar, Manish Kumar; Khan, Wahid; Sistla, Ramakrishna

    2016-01-01

    Delivery of drugs to brain is a subtle task in the therapy of many severe neurological disorders. Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) easily diffuse the blood-brain barrier (BBB) due to their lipophilic nature. Furthermore, ligand conjugation on SLN surface enhances the targeting efficiency. Lactoferin (Lf) conjugated SLN system is first time attempted for effective brain targeting in this study. Preparation of Lf-modified docetaxel (DTX)-loaded SLN for proficient delivery of DTX to brain. DTX-loaded SLN were prepared using emulsification and solvent evaporation method and conjugation of Lf on SLN surface (C-SLN) was attained through carbodiimide chemistry. These lipidic nanoparticles were evaluated by DLS, AFM, FTIR, XRD techniques and in vitro release studies. Colloidal stability study was performed in biologically simulated environment (normal saline and serum). These lipidic nanoparticles were further evaluated for its targeting mechanism for uptake in brain tumour cells and brain via receptor saturation studies and distribution studies in brain, respectively. Particle size of lipidic nanoparticles was found to be optimum. Surface morphology (zeta potential, AFM) and surface chemistry (FTIR) confirmed conjugation of Lf on SLN surface. Cytotoxicity studies revealed augmented apoptotic activity of C-SLN than SLN and DTX. Enhanced cytotoxicity was demonstrated by receptor saturation and uptake studies. Brain concentration of DTX was elevated significantly with C-SLN than marketed formulation. It is evident from the cytotoxicity, uptake that SLN has potential to deliver drug to brain than marketed formulation but conjugating Lf on SLN surface (C-SLN) further increased the targeting potential for brain tumour. Moreover, brain distribution studies corroborated the use of C-SLN as a viable vehicle to target drug to brain. Hence, C-SLN was demonstrated to be a promising DTX delivery system to brain as it possessed remarkable biocompatibility, stability and efficacy than

  2. Drug delivery across the blood-brain barrier using focused ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Alison; Hynynen, Kullervo H.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a significant impediment to the delivery of therapeutic agents to the brain for treatment of brain diseases. Focused ultrasound (FUS) has been developed as a non-invasive method for transiently increasing the permeability of the BBB to promote drug delivery to targeted regions of the brain. Areas Covered The present review briefly compares the methods used to promote drug delivery to the brain and describes the benefits and limitations of FUS technology. We summarize the experimental data which shows that FUS, combined with intravascular microbubbles, increases therapeutic agent delivery into the brain leading to significant reductions in pathology in preclinical models of disease. The potential for translation of this technology to the clinic is also discussed. Expert Opinion The introduction of MRI guidance and intravascular administration of microbubbles to FUS treatments permits the consistent, transient, and targeted opening of the BBB. The development of feedback systems and real-time monitoring techniques improve the safety of BBB opening. Successful clinical translation of FUS has the potential to revolutionize the treatment of brain disease resulting in effective, less-invasive treatments without the need for expensive drug development. PMID:24650132

  3. Noninvasive and targeted drug delivery to the brain using focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Alison; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2013-04-17

    Brain diseases are notoriously difficult to treat due to the presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Here, we review the development of focused ultrasound (FUS) as a noninvasive method for BBB disruption, aiding in drug delivery to the brain. FUS can be applied through the skull to a targeted region in the brain. When combined with microbubbles, FUS causes localized and reversible disruption of the BBB. The cellular mechanisms of BBB disruption are presented. Several therapeutic agents have been delivered to the brain resulting in significant improvements in pathology in models of glioblastoma and Alzheimer's disease. The requirements for clinical translation of FUS will be discussed.

  4. Highlights of Children with Cancer UK’s Workshop on Drug Delivery in Paediatric Brain Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Nailor, Audrey; Walker, David A; Jacques, Thomas S; Warren, Kathy E; Brem, Henry; Kearns, Pamela R; Greenwood, John; Penny, Jeffrey I; Pilkington, Geoffrey J; Carcaboso, Angel M; Fleischhack, Gudrun; Macarthur, Donald; Slavc, Irene; Meijer, Lisethe; Gill, Steven; Lowis, Stephen; van Vuurden, Dannis G; Pearl, Monica S; Clifford, Steven C; Morrissy, Sorana; Ivanov, Delyan P; Beccaria, Kévin; Gilbertson, Richard J; Straathof, Karin; Green, Jordan J; Smith, Stuart; Rahman, Ruman; Kilday, John-Paul

    2016-01-01

    The first Workshop on Drug Delivery in Paediatric Brain Tumours was hosted in London by the charity Children with Cancer UK. The goals of the workshop were to break down the barriers to treating central nervous system (CNS) tumours in children, leading to new collaborations and further innovations in this under-represented and emotive field. These barriers include the physical delivery challenges presented by the blood–brain barrier, the underpinning reasons for the intractability of CNS cancers, and the practical difficulties of delivering cancer treatment to the brains of children. Novel techniques for overcoming these problems were discussed, new models brought forth, and experiences compared. PMID:27110286

  5. Olfactory targeting through intranasal delivery of biopharmaceutical drugs to the brain: current development.

    PubMed

    Wen, Ming Ming

    2011-06-01

    Many therapeutic drugs are difficult to reach the central nervous system (CNS) from the systemic blood circulation because the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB) form a very effective barrier which prevents most molecules from passing through. To bypass BBB, drugs can be delivered through olfactory region for nose-to-brain targeting. Peptide and protein drugs have been developed for the treatment of various neurodegenerative diseases. Drug delivery of these therapeutic proteins is facing several challenges because of the instability, high enzymatic metabolism, low gastrointestinal absorption, rapid renal elimination, and potential immunogenicity. New genetically engineered biotechnology products, such as recombinant human nerve growth factor, human VEGF, and interferons, are now possible to be delivered into the brain from the non-invasive intranasal route. For gene therapy, intranasal route is also a promising alternative method to deliver plasmid DNA to the brain. This review provides an overview of strategies to improve the drug delivery to the brain and the latest development of protein, peptide, and gene intranasal delivery for brain targeting.

  6. The exciting potential of nanotherapy in brain-tumor targeted drug delivery approaches

    PubMed Central

    Agrahari, Vivek

    2017-01-01

    Delivering therapeutics to the central nervous system (CNS) and brain-tumor has been a major challenge. The current standard treatment approaches for the brain-tumor comprise of surgical resection followed by immunotherapy, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. However, the current treatments are limited in providing significant benefits to the patients and despite recent technological advancements; brain-tumor is still challenging to treat. Brain-tumor therapy is limited by the lack of effective and targeted strategies to deliver chemotherapeutic agents across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The BBB is the main obstacle that must be overcome to allow compounds to reach their targets in the brain. Recent advances have boosted the nanotherapeutic approaches in providing an attractive strategy in improving the drug delivery across the BBB and into the CNS. Compared to conventional formulations, nanoformulations offer significant advantages in CNS drug delivery approaches. Considering the above facts, in this review, the physiological/anatomical features of the brain-tumor and the BBB are briefly discussed. The drug transport mechanisms at the BBB are outlined. The approaches to deliver chemotherapeutic drugs across the CNS into the brain-tumor using nanocarriers are summarized. In addition, the challenges that need to be addressed in nanotherapeutic approaches for their enhanced clinical application in brain-tumor therapy are discussed. PMID:28400793

  7. Glucose Transporters at the Blood-Brain Barrier: Function, Regulation and Gateways for Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Patching, Simon G

    2017-03-01

    Glucose transporters (GLUTs) at the blood-brain barrier maintain the continuous high glucose and energy demands of the brain. They also act as therapeutic targets and provide routes of entry for drug delivery to the brain and central nervous system for treatment of neurological and neurovascular conditions and brain tumours. This article first describes the distribution, function and regulation of glucose transporters at the blood-brain barrier, the major ones being the sodium-independent facilitative transporters GLUT1 and GLUT3. Other GLUTs and sodium-dependent transporters (SGLTs) have also been identified at lower levels and under various physiological conditions. It then considers the effects on glucose transporter expression and distribution of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia associated with diabetes and oxygen/glucose deprivation associated with cerebral ischemia. A reduction in glucose transporters at the blood-brain barrier that occurs before the onset of the main pathophysiological changes and symptoms of Alzheimer's disease is a potential causative effect in the vascular hypothesis of the disease. Mutations in glucose transporters, notably those identified in GLUT1 deficiency syndrome, and some recreational drug compounds also alter the expression and/or activity of glucose transporters at the blood-brain barrier. Approaches for drug delivery across the blood-brain barrier include the pro-drug strategy whereby drug molecules are conjugated to glucose transporter substrates or encapsulated in nano-enabled delivery systems (e.g. liposomes, micelles, nanoparticles) that are functionalised to target glucose transporters. Finally, the continuous development of blood-brain barrier in vitro models is important for studying glucose transporter function, effects of disease conditions and interactions with drugs and xenobiotics.

  8. Nanoparticles as Alternative Strategies for Drug Delivery to the Alzheimer Brain: Electron Microscopy Ultrastructural Analysis.

    PubMed

    Aliev, Gjumrakch; Daza, Jesús; Herrera, Arturo Solís; del Carmen Arias Esparza, María; Morales, Ludis; Echeverria, Valentina; Bachurin, Sergey Olegovich; Barreto, George Emilio

    2015-01-01

    One of the biggest problems and challenges for the development of new drugs and treatment strategies against Alzheimer Disease (AD) is the crossing of target drugs into the blood brain barrier. The use of nanoparticles in drug delivery therapy holds much promise in targeting remote tissues, and as a result many studies have attempted to study the ultrastructural localization of nanoparticles in various tissues. However, there are currently no in vivo studies demonstrating the ultrastructural distribution of nanoparticles in the brain. The aim of this study was to address how intraperitoneal injection of silver nanoparticles in the brain leads to leaking on the inter-endothelial contact and luminal plasma membrane, thus elucidating the possibility of penetrating into the most affected areas in the Alzheimer brain (vascular endothelium, perivascular, neuronal and glial cells). Our results show that the silver nanoparticles reached the brain and were found in hippocampal areas, indicating that they can be conjugated and used to deliver the drugs into the cell cytoplasm of the damaged brain cells. The present study can be useful for the development of novel drug delivering therapy and useful in understanding the delivery, distribution and effects of silver nanoparticles in AD brain tissue at cellular and subcellular level.

  9. Nanotechnology applications for improved delivery of antiretroviral drugs to the brain.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ho Lun; Chattopadhyay, Niladri; Wu, Xiao Yu; Bendayan, Reina

    2010-03-18

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) can gain access to the central nervous system during the early course of primary infection. Once in the brain compartment the virus actively replicates to form an independent viral reservoir, resulting in debilitating neurological complications, latent infection and drug resistance. Current antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) often fail to effectively reduce the HIV viral load in the brain. This, in part, is due to the poor transport of many ARVs, in particular protease inhibitors, across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSBF). Studies have shown that nanocarriers including polymeric nanoparticles, liposomes, solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) and micelles can increase the local drug concentration gradients, facilitate drug transport into the brain via endocytotic pathways and inhibit the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters expressed at the barrier sites. By delivering ARVs with nanocarriers, significant increase in the drug bioavailability to the brain is expected to be achieved. Recent studies show that the specificity and efficiency of ARVs delivery can be further enhanced by using nanocarriers with specific brain targeting, cell penetrating ligands or ABC-transporters inhibitors. Future research should focus on achieving brain delivery of ARVs in a safe, efficient, and yet cost-effective manner. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Targeting blood–brain barrier changes during inflammatory pain: an opportunity for optimizing CNS drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Ronaldson, Patrick T; Davis, Thomas P

    2012-01-01

    The blood–brain barrier (BBB) is the most significant obstacle to effective CNS drug delivery. It possesses structural and biochemical features (i.e., tight-junction protein complexes and, influx and efflux transporters) that restrict xenobiotic permeation. Pathophysiological stressors (i.e., peripheral inflammatory pain) can alter BBB tight junctions and transporters, which leads to drug-permeation changes. This is especially critical for opioids, which require precise CNS concentrations to be safe and effective analgesics. Recent studies have identified molecular targets (i.e., endogenous transporters and intracellular signaling systems) that can be exploited for optimization of CNS drug delivery. This article summarizes current knowledge in this area and emphasizes those targets that present the greatest opportunity for controlling drug permeation and/or drug transport across the BBB in an effort to achieve optimal CNS opioid delivery. PMID:22468221

  11. Nanotechnology-mediated nose to brain drug delivery for Parkinson's disease: a mini review.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Abhijeet D; Vanjari, Yogesh H; Sancheti, Karan H; Belgamwar, Veena S; Surana, Sanjay J; Pardeshi, Chandrakantsing V

    2015-01-01

    Nose to brain delivery of neurotherapeutics have been tried by several researchers to explore the virtues of this route viz. circumvention of BBB, avoidance of hepatic metabolism, practicality, safety, ease of administration and non-invasiveness. Nanoparticle (NP) therapeutics is an emerging modality for the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD) as it offers targeted delivery and enhances the therapeutic efficacy and/or bioavailability of neurotherapeutics. This review presents a concise incursion into the nanomedicines suitable for PD therapy delivered via naso-brain transport. Clinical signs of PD, its pathophysiology, specific genetic determinants, diagnosis and therapy involved have been hashed out. Properties of brain-targeting NPs, transport efficacy and various nanocarriers developed so far also been furnished. In our opinion, nanotechnology-enabled naso-brain drug delivery is an excellent means of delivering neurotherapeutics and is a promising avenue for researchers to develop new formulations for the effective management of PD.

  12. Spatial mapping of drug delivery to brain tissue using hyperspectral spatial frequency-domain imaging

    PubMed Central

    Singh-Moon, Rajinder P.; Roblyer, Darren M.; Bigio, Irving J.; Joshi, Shailendra

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. We present an application of spatial frequency-domain imaging (SFDI) to the wide-field imaging of drug delivery to brain tissue. Measurements were compared with values obtained by a previously validated variation of diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, the method of optical pharmacokinetics (OP). We demonstrate a cross-correlation between the two methods for absorption extraction and drug concentration determination in both experimental tissue phantoms and freshly extracted rodent brain tissue. These methods were first used to assess intra-arterial (IA) delivery of cationic liposomes to brain tissue in Sprague Dawley rats under transient cerebral hypoperfusion. Results were found to be in agreement with previously published experimental data and pharmacokinetic models of IA drug delivery. We then applied the same scheme to evaluate IA mitoxantrone delivery to glioma-bearing rats. Good correlation was seen between OP and SFDI determined concentrations taken from normal and tumor averaged sites. This study shows the feasibility of mapping drug/tracer distributions and encourages the use of SFDI for spatial imaging of tissues for drug/tracer-tagged carrier deposition and pharmacokinetic studies. PMID:25199058

  13. Spatial mapping of drug delivery to brain tissue using hyperspectral spatial frequency-domain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh-Moon, Rajinder P.; Roblyer, Darren M.; Bigio, Irving J.; Joshi, Shailendra

    2014-09-01

    We present an application of spatial frequency-domain imaging (SFDI) to the wide-field imaging of drug delivery to brain tissue. Measurements were compared with values obtained by a previously validated variation of diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, the method of optical pharmacokinetics (OP). We demonstrate a cross-correlation between the two methods for absorption extraction and drug concentration determination in both experimental tissue phantoms and freshly extracted rodent brain tissue. These methods were first used to assess intra-arterial (IA) delivery of cationic liposomes to brain tissue in Sprague Dawley rats under transient cerebral hypoperfusion. Results were found to be in agreement with previously published experimental data and pharmacokinetic models of IA drug delivery. We then applied the same scheme to evaluate IA mitoxantrone delivery to glioma-bearing rats. Good correlation was seen between OP and SFDI determined concentrations taken from normal and tumor averaged sites. This study shows the feasibility of mapping drug/tracer distributions and encourages the use of SFDI for spatial imaging of tissues for drug/tracer-tagged carrier deposition and pharmacokinetic studies.

  14. Polymeric nanoparticles assembled with microfluidics for drug delivery across the blood-brain barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavares, M. R.; de Menezes, L. R.; do Nascimento, D. F.; Souza, D. H. S.; Reynaud, F.; Marques, M. F. V.; Tavares, M. I. B.

    2016-07-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a challenge in the treatment of some diseases, since it prevents many drugs from reaching therapeutic concentrations in the brain. In this context, there is a growing interest in nanoparticles for drug delivery, since they are able to cross this barrier and target the brain. The use of polymeric materials in the development of these nanoparticles has been extensively studied. It has already been demonstrated that these nanosystems have the ability to cross the BBB, which allows effective drug release into the brain. Biodegradable polymers provide a great advantage in the development of nanosystems, but modifications of the nanoparticles' surface is essential. The traditional batch methods lack precise control over the processes of nucleation and growth, resulting in poor control over final properties of the nanoparticles. Therefore, microfluidics could be used to achieve a better production environment for the fabrication of nano- structured drug delivery systems. This study provides a brief review of: the BBB, the polymeric nanoparticles with the ability to overcome the barrier, the properties of the most used polymeric matrices, and the nanostructured drug delivery systems assembled with microfluidics.

  15. Pathways and Progress in Improving Drug Delivery through the Intestinal Mucosa and Blood-Brain Barriers

    PubMed Central

    Laksitorini, Marlyn; Prasasty, Vivitri D.; Kiptoo, Paul K.; Siahaan, Teruna J.

    2015-01-01

    One of the major hurdles in developing therapeutic agents is the difficulty in delivering drugs through the intestinal mucosa and blood-brain barriers (BBB). The goal here is to describe the general structures of the biological barriers and the strategies to enhance drug delivery across these barriers. Prodrug methods used to improve drug penetration via the transcellular pathway have been successfully developed, and some prodrugs have been used to treat patients. The use of transporters to improve absorption of some drugs (e.g., antiviral agents) has also been successful in treating patients. Other methods, including (a) blocking the efflux pumps to improve transcellular delivery and (b) modulation of cell-cell adhesion in the intercellular junctions to improve paracellular delivery across biological barriers are still in the investigational stage. PMID:25418271

  16. Macrophages with cellular backpacks for targeted drug delivery to the brain.

    PubMed

    Klyachko, Natalia L; Polak, Roberta; Haney, Matthew J; Zhao, Yuling; Gomes Neto, Reginaldo J; Hill, Michael C; Kabanov, Alexander V; Cohen, Robert E; Rubner, Michael F; Batrakova, Elena V

    2017-09-01

    Most potent therapeutics are unable to cross the blood-brain barrier following systemic administration, which necessitates the development of unconventional, clinically applicable drug delivery systems. With the given challenges, biologically active vehicles are crucial to accomplishing this task. We now report a new method for drug delivery that utilizes living cells as vehicles for drug carriage across the blood brain barrier. Cellular backpacks, 7-10 μm diameter polymer patches of a few hundred nanometers in thickness, are a potentially interesting approach, because they can act as drug depots that travel with the cell-carrier, without being phagocytized. Backpacks loaded with a potent antioxidant, catalase, were attached to autologous macrophages and systemically administered into mice with brain inflammation. Using inflammatory response cells enabled targeted drug transport to the inflamed brain. Furthermore, catalase-loaded backpacks demonstrated potent therapeutic effects deactivating free radicals released by activated microglia in vitro. This approach for drug carriage and release can accelerate the development of new drug formulations for all the neurodegenerative disorders. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Nanoemulsion-based intranasal drug delivery system of saquinavir mesylate for brain targeting.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Hitendra S; Mahajan, Milind S; Nerkar, Pankaj P; Agrawal, Anshuman

    2014-03-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) is an immunological privileged sanctuary site-providing reservoir for HIV-1 virus. Current anti-HIV drugs, although effective in reducing plasma viral levels, cannot eradicate the virus completely from the body. The low permeability of anti-HIV drugs across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) leads to insufficient delivery. Therefore, developing a novel approaches enhancing the CNS delivery of anti-HIV drugs are required for the treatment of neuro-AIDS. The aim of this study was to develop intranasal nanoemulsion (NE) for enhanced bioavailability and CNS targeting of saquinavir mesylate (SQVM). SQVM is a protease inhibitor which is a poorly soluble drug widely used as antiretroviral drug, with oral bioavailability is about 4%. The spontaneous emulsification method was used to prepare drug-loaded o/w nanoemulsion, which was characterized by droplet size, zeta potential, pH, drug content. Moreover, ex-vivo permeation studies were performed using sheep nasal mucosa. The optimized NE showed a significant increase in drug permeation rate compared to the plain drug suspension (PDS). Cilia toxicity study on sheep nasal mucosa showed no significant adverse effect of SQVM-loaded NE. Results of in vivo biodistribution studies show higher drug concentration in brain after intranasal administration of NE than intravenous delivered PDS. The higher percentage of drug targeting efficiency (% DTE) and nose-to-brain drug direct transport percentage (% DTP) for optimized NE indicated effective CNS targeting of SQVM via intranasal route. Gamma scintigraphy imaging of the rat brain conclusively demonstrated transport of drug in the CNS at larger extent after intranasal administration as NE.

  18. Targeted Drug Delivery via Folate Receptors for the Treatment of Brain Cancer: Can the Promise Deliver?

    PubMed

    Guo, Jianfeng; Schlich, Michele; Cryan, John F; O'Driscoll, Caitriona M

    2017-08-24

    Brain cancers are among the most lethal tumors due to their rapid development and poor prognosis. Despite the existing potential of novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of brain cancer, the major remaining challenge associated with clinical translation is the lack of effective and safe delivery strategies to ensure drug transport to tumor tissues following systemic administration. Folate receptors, known to overexpress on different types of cancer cells, have been used to develop targeted delivery of therapeutic agents for cancer therapy. In this review, the potential of exploiting the folate receptor to achieve targeted cell-specific delivery of nanoparticles containing brain cancer therapeutics will be discussed in tandem with an analysis of the possible reasons for the current lack of clinical translation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Current strategies for targeted delivery of bio-active drug molecules in the treatment of brain tumor.

    PubMed

    Garg, Tarun; Bhandari, Saurav; Rath, Goutam; Goyal, Amit K

    2015-12-01

    Brain tumor is one of the most challenging diseases to treat. The major obstacle in the specific drug delivery to brain is blood-brain barrier (BBB). Mostly available anti-cancer drugs are large hydrophobic molecules which have limited permeability via BBB. Therefore, it is clear that the protective barriers confining the passage of the foreign particles into the brain are the main impediment for the brain drug delivery. Hence, the major challenge in drug development and delivery for the neurological diseases is to design non-invasive nanocarrier systems that can assist controlled and targeted drug delivery to the specific regions of the brain. In this review article, our major focus to treat brain tumor by study numerous strategies includes intracerebral implants, BBB disruption, intraventricular infusion, convection-enhanced delivery, intra-arterial drug delivery, intrathecal drug delivery, injection, catheters, pumps, microdialysis, RNA interference, antisense therapy, gene therapy, monoclonal/cationic antibodies conjugate, endogenous transporters, lipophilic analogues, prodrugs, efflux transporters, direct conjugation of antitumor drugs, direct targeting of liposomes, nanoparticles, solid-lipid nanoparticles, polymeric micelles, dendrimers and albumin-based drug carriers.

  20. Nanoparticle-mediated Brain-Specific Drug Delivery, Imaging, and Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hu

    2010-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) diseases represent the largest and fastest growing area of unmet medical need. Nanotechnology plays a unique instrumental role in the revolutionary development of brain-specific drug delivery, imaging, and diagnosis. With the aid of nanoparticles of high specificity and multifunctionality, such as dendrimers and quantum dots, therapeutics, imaging agents, and diagnostic molecules can be delivered to the brain across the blood-brain barrier (BBB), enabling considerable progress in the understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of CNS diseases. Nanoparticles used in the CNS for drug delivery, imaging, and diagnosis are reviewed, as well as their administration routes, toxicity, and routes to cross the BBB. Future directions and major challenges are outlined. PMID:20593303

  1. Convection-enhanced drug delivery to the brain: therapeutic potential and neuropathological considerations.

    PubMed

    Barua, Neil U; Gill, Steven S; Love, Seth

    2014-03-01

    Convection-enhanced delivery (CED) describes a direct method of drug delivery to the brain through intraparenchymal microcatheters. By establishing a pressure gradient at the tip of the infusion catheter in order to exploit bulk flow through the interstitial spaces of the brain, CED offers a number of advantages over conventional drug delivery methods-bypass of the blood-brain barrier, targeted distribution through large brain volumes and minimization of systemic side effects. Despite showing early promise, CED is yet to fulfill its potential as a mainstream strategy for the treatment of neurological disease. Substantial research effort has been dedicated to optimize the technology for CED and identify the parameters, which govern successful drug distribution. It seems likely that successful clinical translation of CED will depend on suitable catheter technology being used in combination with drugs with optimal physicochemical characteristics, and on neuropathological analysis in appropriate preclinical models. In this review, we consider the factors most likely to influence the success or failure of CED, and review its application to the treatment of high-grade glioma, Parkinson's disease (PD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD).

  2. Quetiapine Nanoemulsion for Intranasal Drug Delivery: Evaluation of Brain-Targeting Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Boche, Mithila; Pokharkar, Varsha

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the possibility of improved drug delivery of quetiapine fumarate (QTP), a nanoemulsion system was developed for intranasal delivery. Effects of different HLBs of Emalex LWIS 10, PEG 400 and Transcutol P, as co-surfactants, were studied on isotropic region of pseudoternary-phase diagrams of nanoemulsion system composed of capmul MCM (CPM) as oil phase, Tween 80 as surfactant and water. Phase behaviour, globule size, transmission electron microscope (TEM) photographs and brain-targeting efficiency of quetiapine nanoemulsion were investigated. In vitro dissolution study of optimised nanoemulsion formulation, with mean diameter 144 ± 0.5 nm, showed more than twofold increase in drug release as compared with pure drug. According to results of in vivo tissue distribution study in Wistar rats, intranasal administration of QTP-loaded nanoemulsion had shorter T max compared with that of intravenous administration. Higher drug transport efficiency (DTE%) and direct nose-to-brain drug transport (DTP%) was achieved by nanoemulsion. The nanoemulsion system may be a promising strategy for brain-targeted delivery of QTP.

  3. Getting into the brain: liposome-based strategies for effective drug delivery across the blood–brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Débora B; Gamarra, Lionel F

    2016-01-01

    This review summarizes articles that have been reported in literature on liposome-based strategies for effective drug delivery across the blood–brain barrier. Due to their unique physicochemical characteristics, liposomes have been widely investigated for their application in drug delivery and in vivo bioimaging for the treatment and/or diagnosis of neurological diseases, such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, stroke, and glioma. Several strategies have been used to deliver drug and/or imaging agents to the brain. Covalent ligation of such macromolecules as peptides, antibodies, and RNA aptamers is an effective method for receptor-targeting liposomes, which allows their blood–brain barrier penetration and/or the delivery of their therapeutic molecule specifically to the disease site. Additionally, methods have been employed for the development of liposomes that can respond to external stimuli. It can be concluded that the development of liposomes for brain delivery is still in its infancy, although these systems have the potential to revolutionize the ways in which medicine is administered. PMID:27799765

  4. Getting into the brain: liposome-based strategies for effective drug delivery across the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Débora B; Gamarra, Lionel F

    This review summarizes articles that have been reported in literature on liposome-based strategies for effective drug delivery across the blood-brain barrier. Due to their unique physicochemical characteristics, liposomes have been widely investigated for their application in drug delivery and in vivo bioimaging for the treatment and/or diagnosis of neurological diseases, such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, stroke, and glioma. Several strategies have been used to deliver drug and/or imaging agents to the brain. Covalent ligation of such macromolecules as peptides, antibodies, and RNA aptamers is an effective method for receptor-targeting liposomes, which allows their blood-brain barrier penetration and/or the delivery of their therapeutic molecule specifically to the disease site. Additionally, methods have been employed for the development of liposomes that can respond to external stimuli. It can be concluded that the development of liposomes for brain delivery is still in its infancy, although these systems have the potential to revolutionize the ways in which medicine is administered.

  5. Potential approaches for drug delivery to the brain: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Soni, V; Jain, A; Khare, P; Gulbake, A; Jain, S K

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this article is to provide the reader with an update on some research highlights from the past to the present, as well as future possibilities to achieve improved delivery of drugs across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). In the past, dye studies confirmed the presence of the BBB and blood-cerebrospinal fluid barriers, which seem to play a major role in transporting drug molecules for the treatment of life-threatening diseases such as brain cancer and Alzheimer's. Presently, transportation mechanisms such as simple diffusion, carrier-mediated, absorptive-mediated, and receptor-mediated transcytosis are extensively used for BBB uptake of drug molecules. The spectrum of future neuropharmaceuticals falling into these categories ranges from peptides to nucleotide-based drugs as well as gene and stem cell delivery agents, and is increasing at a rapid rate with promising results. There has also been considerable progress in the development of quantitative methods to examine BBB permeability in humans and animals. Currently, intravenous administration and in situ brain perfusion techniques are the most versatile and sensitive methods to measure transport into the brain. This article also reviews the various methodologies available for assessing the transfer of drug molecules undergoing significant uptake through the BBB in vivo.

  6. The Role of Cell-Penetrating Peptide and Transferrin on Enhanced Delivery of Drug to Brain

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Gitanjali; Lakkadwala, Sushant; Modgil, Amit; Singh, Jagdish

    2016-01-01

    The challenge of effectively delivering therapeutic agents to brain has led to an entire field of active research devoted to overcome the blood brain barrier (BBB) and efficiently deliver drugs to brain. This review focusses on exploring the facets of a novel platform designed for the delivery of drugs to brain. The platform was constructed based on the hypothesis that a combination of receptor-targeting agent, like transferrin protein, and a cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) will enhance the delivery of associated therapeutic cargo across the BBB. The combination of these two agents in a delivery vehicle has shown significantly improved (p < 0.05) translocation of small molecules and genes into brain as compared to the vehicle with only receptor-targeting agents. The comprehensive details of the uptake mechanisms and properties of various CPPs are illustrated here. The application of this technology, in conjunction with nanotechnology, can potentially open new horizons for the treatment of central nervous system disorders. PMID:27231900

  7. Experimental methods and transport models for drug delivery across the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Fu, Bingmei M

    2012-06-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a dynamic barrier essential for maintaining the micro-environment of the brain. Although the special anatomical features of the BBB determine its protective role for the central nervous system (CNS) from blood-born neurotoxins, however, the BBB extremely limits the therapeutic efficacy of drugs into the CNS, which greatly hinders the treatment of major brain diseases. This review summarized the unique structures of the BBB, described a variety of in vivo and in vitro experimental methods for determining the transport properties of the BBB, e.g., the permeability of the BBB to water, ions, and solutes including nutrients, therapeutic agents and drug carriers, and presented newly developed mathematical models which quantitatively correlate the anatomical structures of the BBB with its barrier functions. Finally, on the basis of the experimental observations and the quantitative models, several strategies for drug delivery through the BBB were proposed.

  8. Experimental Methods and Transport Models for Drug Delivery across the Blood-Brain Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Bingmei M

    2017-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a dynamic barrier essential for maintaining the micro-environment of the brain. Although the special anatomical features of the BBB determine its protective role for the central nervous system (CNS) from blood-born neurotoxins, however, the BBB extremely limits the therapeutic efficacy of drugs into the CNS, which greatly hinders the treatment of major brain diseases. This review summarized the unique structures of the BBB, described a variety of in vivo and in vitro experimental methods for determining the transport properties of the BBB, e.g., the permeability of the BBB to water, ions, and solutes including nutrients, therapeutic agents and drug carriers, and presented newly developed mathematical models which quantitatively correlate the anatomical structures of the BBB with its barrier functions. Finally, on the basis of the experimental observations and the quantitative models, several strategies for drug delivery through the BBB were proposed. PMID:22201587

  9. Nanotech revolution for the anti-cancer drug delivery through blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Caraglia, M; De Rosa, G; Salzano, G; Santini, D; Lamberti, M; Sperlongano, P; Lombardi, A; Abbruzzese, A; Addeo, R

    2012-03-01

    Nanotechnology-based drug delivery was born as a chance for pharmaceutical weapons to be delivered in the body sites where drug action is required. Specifically, the incorporation of anti-cancer agents in nanodevices of 100-300 nm allows their delivery in tissues that have a fenestrated vasculature and a reduced lymphatic drainage. These two features are typical of neoplastic tissues and, therefore, allow the accumulation of nanostructured devices in tumours. An important issue of anti-cancer pharmacological strategies is the overcoming of anatomical barriers such as the bloodbrain- barrier (BBB) that protects brain from toxicological injuries but, at the same time, makes impossible for most of the pharmacological agents with anti-cancer activity to reach tumour cells placed in the brain and derived from either primary tumours or metastases. In fact, only highly lipophilic molecules can passively diffuse through BBB to reach central nervous system (CNS). Another possibility is to use nanotechnological approaches as powerful tools to across BBB, by both prolonging the plasma half-life of the drugs and crossing fenestrations of BBB damaged by brain metastases. Moreover, modifications of nanocarrier surface with specific endogenous or exogenous ligands can promote the crossing of intact BBB as in the case of primary brain tumours. This aim can be achieved through the binding of the nanodevices to carriers or receptors expressed by the endothelial cells of BBB and that can favour the internalization of the nanostructured devices delivering anti-cancer drugs. This review summarizes the most meaningful advances in the field of nanotechnologies for brain delivery of drugs.

  10. Time-reversal acoustics and ultrasound-assisted convection-enhanced drug delivery to the brain.

    PubMed

    Olbricht, William; Sistla, Manjari; Ghandi, Gaurav; Lewis, George; Sarvazyan, Armen

    2013-08-01

    Time-reversal acoustics is an effective way of focusing ultrasound deep inside heterogeneous media such as biological tissues. Convection-enhanced delivery is a method of delivering drugs into the brain by infusing them directly into the brain interstitium. These two technologies are combined in a focusing system that uses a "smart needle" to simultaneously infuse fluid into the brain and provide the necessary feedback for focusing ultrasound using time-reversal acoustics. The effects of time-reversal acoustics-focused ultrasound on the spatial distribution of infused low- and high-molecular weight tracer molecules are examined in live, anesthetized rats. Results show that exposing the rat brain to focused ultrasound significantly increases the penetration of infused compounds into the brain. The addition of stabilized microbubbles enhances the effect of ultrasound exposure.

  11. Time-reversal acoustics and ultrasound-assisted convection-enhanced drug delivery to the brain

    PubMed Central

    Olbricht, William; Sistla, Manjari; Ghandi, Gaurav; Lewis, George; Sarvazyan, Armen

    2013-01-01

    Time-reversal acoustics is an effective way of focusing ultrasound deep inside heterogeneous media such as biological tissues. Convection-enhanced delivery is a method of delivering drugs into the brain by infusing them directly into the brain interstitium. These two technologies are combined in a focusing system that uses a “smart needle” to simultaneously infuse fluid into the brain and provide the necessary feedback for focusing ultrasound using time-reversal acoustics. The effects of time-reversal acoustics-focused ultrasound on the spatial distribution of infused low- and high-molecular weight tracer molecules are examined in live, anesthetized rats. Results show that exposing the rat brain to focused ultrasound significantly increases the penetration of infused compounds into the brain. The addition of stabilized microbubbles enhances the effect of ultrasound exposure. PMID:23927197

  12. Current approaches to enhance CNS delivery of drugs across the brain barriers

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Cui-Tao; Zhao, Ying-Zheng; Wong, Ho Lun; Cai, Jun; Peng, Lei; Tian, Xin-Qiao

    2014-01-01

    Although many agents have therapeutic potentials for central nervous system (CNS) diseases, few of these agents have been clinically used because of the brain barriers. As the protective barrier of the CNS, the blood–brain barrier and the blood–cerebrospinal fluid barrier maintain the brain microenvironment, neuronal activity, and proper functioning of the CNS. Different strategies for efficient CNS delivery have been studied. This article reviews the current approaches to open or facilitate penetration across these barriers for enhanced drug delivery to the CNS. These approaches are summarized into three broad categories: noninvasive, invasive, and miscellaneous techniques. The progresses made using these approaches are reviewed, and the associated mechanisms and problems are discussed. PMID:24872687

  13. Phytochemical-loaded mesoporous silica nanoparticles for nose-to-brain olfactory drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Lungare, Shital; Hallam, Keith; Badhan, Raj K S

    2016-11-20

    Central nervous system (CNS) drug delivery is often hampered due to the insidious nature of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Nose-to-brain delivery via olfactory pathways have become a target of attention for drug delivery due to bypassing of the BBB. The antioxidant properties of phytochemicals make them promising as CNS active agents but possess poor water solubility and limited BBB penetration. The primary aim of this study was the development of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) loaded with the poorly water-soluble phytochemicals curcumin and chrysin which could be utilised for nose-to-brain delivery. We formulated spherical MSNP using a templating approach resulting in ∼220nm particles with a high surface porosity. Curcumin and chrysin were successfully loaded into MSNP and confirmed through Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and HPLC approaches with a loading of 11-14% for curcumin and chrysin. Release was pH dependant with curcumin demonstrating increased chemical stability at a lower pH (5.5) with a release of 53.2%±2.2% over 24h and 9.4±0.6% for chrysin. MSNP were demonstrated to be non-toxic to olfactory neuroblastoma cells OBGF400, with chrysin (100μM) demonstrating a decrease in cell viability to 58.2±8.5% and curcumin an IC50 of 33±0.18μM. Furthermore confocal microscopy demonstrated nanoparticles of <500nm were able to accumulate within cells with FITC-loaded MSNP showing membrane localised and cytoplasmic accumulation following a 2h incubation. MSNP are useful carriers for poorly soluble phytochemicals and provide a novel vehicle to target and deliver drugs into the CNS and bypass the BBB through olfactory drug delivery.

  14. Mustard-inspired delivery shuttle for enhanced blood-brain barrier penetration and effective drug delivery in glioma therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Nan; Sun, Pei; Lv, Mingming; Tong, Gangsheng; Jin, Xin; Zhu, Xinyuan

    2017-04-05

    Effective penetration through the blood-brain barrier (BBB) remains a challenge for the treatment of many brain diseases. In this study, a small molecule, sinapic acid (SA), extracted from mustard, was selected as a novel bioinspired BBB-permeable ligand for efficient drug delivery in glioma treatment. SA was conjugated on the surface of zwitterionic polymer poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine) (PMPC)-encapsulated bovine serum albumin (BSA)-based nanoparticles, yielding nBSA-SA. The PMPC shell serves as a protective layer to prolong the in vivo blood circulation time with a better chance to cross the BBB. Furthermore, temozolomide (TMZ), which can be loaded onto the nanoparticles via electrostatic interactions with acrylic acid (AA) to generate AA-nBSA-SA-TMZ, was applied as an excellent chemotherapeutic drug for glioma therapy. The obtained nanoparticles with a distinct size show great BBB permeability. Through the mechanism study, it was found that the cell internalization of the SA-conjugated nanoparticles is an energy-dependent process with only transient disruption of the BBB. The biological evaluation results unambiguously suggest that drug-loaded nanoparticles can lead to strong apoptosis on the tumor site and increase the median survival time of glioma-bearing mice. Overall, this novel BBB-permeable ligand SA paves the way for the delivery of cargo into the brain and provides a powerful nanoplatform for glioma therapy via intravenous administration.

  15. Ultrasound-mediated Drug Delivery to the Brain: Principles, Progress and Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Dasgupta, Anshuman; Liu, Mengjiao; Ojha, Tarun; Storm, Gert; Kiessling, Fabian; Lammers, Twan

    2016-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) limits drug delivery to the central nervous system. When combined with microbubbles, ultrasound can transiently permeate blood vessels in the brain. This approach, which can be referred to as sonoporation or sonopermeabilization, holds significant promise for shuttling large therapeutic molecules, such as antibodies, growth factors and nanomedicine formulations, across the BBB. We here describe the basic principles of BBB permeation using ultrasound and microbubbles, and we summarize several (pre-) clinical studies showing the potential of BBB opening for improving the treatment of cancer and neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:27986222

  16. Design of Drug Delivery Methods for the Brain and Central Nervous System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lueshen, Eric

    Due to the impermeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to macromolecules delivered systemically, drug delivery to the brain and central nervous system (CNS) is quite difficult and has become an area of intense research. Techniques such as convection-enhanced intraparenchymal delivery and intrathecal magnetic drug targeting offer a means of circumventing the blood-brain barrier for targeted delivery of therapeutics. This dissertation focuses on three aspects of drug delivery: pharmacokinetics, convection-enhanced delivery, and intrathecal magnetic drug targeting. Classical pharmacokinetics mainly uses black-box curve fitting techniques without biochemical or biological basis. This dissertation advances the state-of-the-art of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics by incorporating first principles and biochemical/biotransport mechanisms in the prediction of drug fate in vivo. A whole body physiologically-based pharmacokinetics (PBPK) modeling framework is engineered which creates multiscale mathematical models for entire organisms composed of organs, tissues, and a detailed vasculature network to predict drug bioaccumulation and to rigorously determine kinetic parameters. These models can be specialized to account for species, weight, gender, age, and pathology. Systematic individual therapy design using the proposed mechanistic PBPK modeling framework is also a possibility. Biochemical, anatomical, and physiological scaling laws are also developed to accurately project drug kinetics in humans from small animal experiments. Our promising results demonstrate that the whole-body mechanistic PBPK modeling approach not only elucidates drug mechanisms from a biochemical standpoint, but offers better scaling precision. Better models can substantially accelerate the introduction of drug leads to clinical trials and eventually to the market by offering more understanding of the drug mechanisms, aiding in therapy design, and serving as an accurate dosing tool. Convection

  17. Drug-loaded bubbles with matched focused ultrasound excitation for concurrent blood-brain barrier opening and brain-tumor drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ching-Hsiang; Ting, Chien-Yu; Chang, Yuan-Chih; Wei, Kuo-Chen; Liu, Hao-Li; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2015-03-01

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) with microbubbles has been used to achieve local blood-brain barrier opening (BBB opening) and increase the penetration of therapeutic drugs into brain tumors. However, inertial cavitation of microbubbles during FUS-induced BBB opening causes intracerebral hemorrhaging (ICH), leading to acute and chronic brain injury and limiting the efficiency of drug delivery. Here we investigated whether induction of drug (1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea, BCNU)-loaded bubbles (BCNU bubbles) to oscillate at their resonant frequency would reduce inertial cavitation during BBB opening, thereby eliminating ICH and enhancing drug delivery in a rat brain model. FUS was tested at 1 and 10 MHz, over a wide range of pressure (mechanical index ranging from 0.16 to 1.42) in the presence of BCNU bubbles. Excitation of BCNU bubbles by resonance frequency-matched FUS (10 MHz) resulted in predominantly stable cavitation and significantly reduced the occurrence of potential hazards of exposure to biological tissues during the BBB opening process. In addition, the drug release process could be monitored by acoustic emission obtained from ultrasound imaging. In tumor-bearing animals, BCNU bubbles with FUS showed significant control of tumor progression and improved maximum survival from 26 to 35 days. This study provides useful advancements toward the goal of successfully translating FUS theranostic bubble-enhanced brain drug delivery into clinical use.

  18. Low molecular weight protamine-functionalized nanoparticles for drug delivery to the brain after intranasal administration.

    PubMed

    Xia, Huimin; Gao, Xiaoling; Gu, Guangzhi; Liu, Zhongyang; Zeng, Ni; Hu, Quanyin; Song, Qingxiang; Yao, Lei; Pang, Zhiqing; Jiang, Xinguo; Chen, Jun; Chen, Hongzhuan

    2011-12-01

    The development of new strategies for enhancing drug delivery to the brain is of great importance in diagnostics and therapeutics of central nervous diseases. Low-molecular-weight protamine (LMWP) as a cell-penetrating peptide possesses distinct advantages including high cell translocation potency, absence of toxicity of peptide itself, and the feasibility as an efficient carrier for delivering therapeutics. Therefore, it was hypothesized that brain delivery of nanoparticles conjugated with LMWP should be efficiently enhanced following intranasal administration. LMWP was functionalized to the surface of PEG-PLA nanoparticles (NP) via a maleimide-mediated covalent binding procedure. Important parameters such as particle size distribution, zeta potential and surface content were determined, which confirmed the conjugation of LMWP to the surface of nanoparticle. Using 16HBE14o- cells as the cell model, LMWP-NP was found to exhibit significantly enhanced cellular accumulation than that of unmodified NP via both lipid raft-mediated endocytosis and direct translocation processes without causing observable cytotoxic effects. Following intranasal administration of coumarin-6-loaded LMWP-NP, the AUC(0-8 h) of the fluorescent probe detected in the rat cerebrum, cerebellum, olfactory tract and olfactory bulb was found to be 2.03, 2.55, 2.68 and 2.82 folds, respectively, compared to that of coumarin carried by NP. Brain distribution analysis suggested LMWP-NP after intranasal administration could be delivered to the central nervous system along both the olfactory and trigeminal nerves pathways. The findings clearly indicated that the brain delivery of nanoparticles could be greatly facilitated by LMWP and the LMWP-functionalized nanoparticles appears as a effective and safe carrier for nose-to-brain drug delivery in potential diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Nanoparticles for brain-specific drug and genetic material delivery, imaging and diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Posadas, Inmaculada; Monteagudo, Silvia; Ceña, Valentín

    2016-04-01

    The poor access of therapeutic drugs and genetic material into the central nervous system due to the presence of the blood-brain barrier often limits the development of effective noninvasive treatments and diagnoses of neurological disorders. Moreover, the delivery of genetic material into neuronal cells remains a challenge because of the intrinsic difficulty in transfecting this cell type. Nanotechnology has arisen as a promising tool to provide solutions for this problem. This review will cover the different approaches that have been developed to deliver drugs and genetic material efficiently to the central nervous system as well as the main nanomaterials used to image the central nervous system and diagnose its disorders.

  20. Potential use of polymeric nanoparticles for drug delivery across the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Tosi, G; Bortot, B; Ruozi, B; Dolcetta, D; Vandelli, M A; Forni, F; Severini, G M

    2013-01-01

    Nanomedicine is certainly one of the scientific and technological challenges of the coming years. In particular, biodegradable nanoparticles formulated from poly (D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) have been extensively investigated for sustained and targeted delivery of different agents, including recombinant proteins, plasmid DNA, and low molecular weight compounds. PLGA NPs present some very attractive properties such as biodegradability and biocompatibility, protection of drug from degradation, possibility of sustained release, and the possibility to modify surface properties to target nanoparticles to specific organs or cells. Moreover, PLGA NPs have received the FDA and European Medicine Agency approval in drug delivery systems for parenteral administration, thus reducing the time for human clinical applications. This review in particular deals on surface modification of PLGA NPs and their possibility of clinical applications, including treatment for brain pathologies such as brain tumors and Lysosomal Storage Disorders with neurological involvement. Since a great number of pharmacologically active molecules are not able to cross the Blood-Brain Barrier (BBB) and reach the Central Nervous System (CNS), new brain targeted polymeric PLGA NPs modified with glycopeptides (g7- NPs) have been recently produced. In this review several in vivo biodistribution studies and pharmacological proof-of evidence of brain delivery of model drugs are reported, demonstrating the ability of g7-NPs to create BBB interaction and trigger an efficacious BBB crossing. Moreover, another relevant development of NPs surface engineering was achieved by conjugating to the surface of g7-NPs, some specific and selective antibodies to drive NPs directly to a specific cell type once inside the CNS parenchyma.

  1. Implant compositions for the unidirectional delivery of drugs to the brain.

    PubMed

    McGinity, Michael; Floyd, John R; McGinity, James; Zhang, Feng

    2017-09-01

    The overall objective of this study was to design and characterize the properties of a bioadhesive trilayer sustained-release implant device for the unidirectional local delivery of anticancer compounds to the brain following the removal of glioblastoma multiforme tumors. Using acetaminophen as a model drug compound, we compressed trilayer wafers that contained (i) a bioadhesive layer, (ii) a drug layer that contained a lipid and a pore-forming hydrophilic polymer, and (iii) a third layer comprising a lipid substance. To maintain a unidirectional pathway of drug release from these trilayer wafers, the edges and the surface lipophilic layer were coated with molten wax followed by cooling of the wafer. These wafers were subsequently heat cured to promote interlayer adhesion in the device. Polyethylene oxide was utilized both as the bioadhesive layer and the pore-forming hydrophilic polymer. Glyceryl behenate was employed as the lipid. The drug release properties of the trilayer wafer were a function of (i) the molecular weight and concentration of polyethylene oxide in the drug-containing lipid layer, (ii) the presence of the bioadhesive layer on the wafer, and (iii) the lipid coating applied to the top and sides of the delivery system. The unidirectional release of the drug occurred from the device through the bioadhesive layer, and zero-order release kinetics resulted over a 10-day period after a 3-day lag time. During this period, <10% of the drug had been released from the wafer. All of the drug was released by 21 days.

  2. Drug delivery in overcoming the blood–brain barrier: role of nasal mucosal grafting

    PubMed Central

    Marianecci, Carlotta; Rinaldi, Federica; Hanieh, Patrizia Nadia; Di Marzio, Luisa; Paolino, Donatella; Carafa, Maria

    2017-01-01

    The blood–brain barrier (BBB) plays a fundamental role in protecting and maintaining the homeostasis of the brain. For this reason, drug delivery to the brain is much more difficult than that to other compartments of the body. In order to bypass or cross the BBB, many strategies have been developed: invasive techniques, such as temporary disruption of the BBB or direct intraventricular and intracerebral administration of the drug, as well as noninvasive techniques. Preliminary results, reported in the large number of studies on the potential strategies for brain delivery, are encouraging, but it is far too early to draw any conclusion about the actual use of these therapeutic approaches. Among the most recent, but still pioneering, approaches related to the nasal mucosa properties, the permeabilization of the BBB via nasal mucosal engrafting can offer new potential opportunities. It should be emphasized that this surgical procedure is quite invasive, but the implication for patient outcome needs to be compared to the gold standard of direct intracranial injection, and evaluated whilst keeping in mind that central nervous system diseases and lysosomal storage diseases are chronic and severely debilitating and that up to now no therapy seems to be completely successful. PMID:28184152

  3. Drug delivery in overcoming the blood-brain barrier: role of nasal mucosal grafting.

    PubMed

    Marianecci, Carlotta; Rinaldi, Federica; Hanieh, Patrizia Nadia; Di Marzio, Luisa; Paolino, Donatella; Carafa, Maria

    2017-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) plays a fundamental role in protecting and maintaining the homeostasis of the brain. For this reason, drug delivery to the brain is much more difficult than that to other compartments of the body. In order to bypass or cross the BBB, many strategies have been developed: invasive techniques, such as temporary disruption of the BBB or direct intraventricular and intracerebral administration of the drug, as well as noninvasive techniques. Preliminary results, reported in the large number of studies on the potential strategies for brain delivery, are encouraging, but it is far too early to draw any conclusion about the actual use of these therapeutic approaches. Among the most recent, but still pioneering, approaches related to the nasal mucosa properties, the permeabilization of the BBB via nasal mucosal engrafting can offer new potential opportunities. It should be emphasized that this surgical procedure is quite invasive, but the implication for patient outcome needs to be compared to the gold standard of direct intracranial injection, and evaluated whilst keeping in mind that central nervous system diseases and lysosomal storage diseases are chronic and severely debilitating and that up to now no therapy seems to be completely successful.

  4. Effect of administration method, animal weight and age on the intranasal delivery of drugs to the brain.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Jishnu K S; Arun, Peethambaran; Chembukave, Bhadra; Appu, Abhilash P; Vijayakumar, Nivetha; Moffett, John R; Puthillathu, Narayanan; Namboodiri, Aryan M A

    2017-07-15

    The intranasal route of administration has proven to be an effective method for bypassing the blood brain barrier and avoiding first pass hepatic metabolism when targeting drugs to the brain. Most small molecules gain rapid access to CNS parenchyma when administered intranasally. However, bioavailability is affected by various factors ranging from the molecular weight of the drug to the mode of intranasal delivery. We examined the effects of animal posture, intranasal application method and animal weight and age on the delivery of radiolabeled pralidoxime ((3)H-2-PAM) to the brain of rats. We found that using upright vs. supine posture did not significantly affect (3)H-2-PAM concentrations in different brain regions. Older animals with higher weights required increased doses to achieve the same drug concentration throughout the brain when compared to young animals with lower body weights. The use of an intranasal aerosol propelled delivery device mainly increased bioavailability in the olfactory bulbs, but did not reliably increase delivery of the drug to various other brain regions, and in some regions of the brain delivered less of the drug than simple pipette administration. In view of the emerging interest in the use of intranasal delivery of drugs to combat cognitive decline in old age, we tested effectiveness in very old rats and found the method to be as effective in the older rats. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Pharmacoscintigraphic evaluation of potential of lipid nanocarriers for nose-to-brain delivery of antidepressant drug.

    PubMed

    Alam, M Intakhab; Baboota, Sanjula; Ahuja, Alka; Ali, Mushir; Ali, Javed; Sahni, Jasjeet K; Bhatnagar, Aseem

    2014-08-15

    Efficacy of antidepressants relies upon their continued presence at the site of action (brain) over a prolonged period of time. The BBB restricts the access of antidepressants to the brain on oral as well as intravenous administration. Direct delivery (by-passing the BBB) of antidepressant drugs can increase the CSF concentration with concomitant reduction in dose and side effects. Intranasal administration of nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC) containing antidepressant drug circumvent the BBB and maintain the prolonged release at the site of action. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the enhancement in brain uptake of NLC containing duloxetine (DLX) after intranasal administration. Duloxetine loaded NLC (DLX-NLC) was evaluated pharmacoscintigraphically for drug targeting potential (DTP), drug targeting efficiency (DTE) and biodistribution studies in different organs including brain. The radiolabeling efficiency of DLX and DLX-NLC was found to be 98.41 ± 0.96 and 98.87 ± 0.82 after 30 min, respectively. The biodistribution studies exhibited higher percentage of radioactivity/g for DLX-NLC formulations in brain as compared with the DLX. The higher DTP (86.80%) and DTE (757.74%) suggested that DLX-NLC formulation has a better brain targeting efficiency than DLX solution (DTP=65.12%; DTE=287.34%) when administered intranasally. Moreover, the intranasal administration exhibited about 8-times higher concentration of DLX in brain when compared with the intravenous administration of DLX solution. The intranasal NLC containing DLX can be employed as an effective method for the treatment of depression. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Drug delivery to melanoma brain metastases: Can current challenges lead to new opportunities?

    PubMed

    Gampa, Gautham; Vaidhyanathan, Shruthi; Sarkaria, Jann N; Elmquist, William F

    2017-09-01

    Melanoma has a high propensity to metastasize to the brain, and patients with melanoma brain metastases (MBM) have an extremely poor prognosis. The recent approval of several molecularly-targeted agents (e.g., BRAF, MEK inhibitors) and biologics (anti-CTLA-4, anti-PD-1 and anti-PD-L1 antibodies) has brought new hope to patients suffering from this formerly untreatable and lethal disease. Importantly, there have been recent reports of success in some clinical studies examining the efficacy of both targeted agents and immunotherapies that show similar response rates in both brain metastases and extracranial disease. While these studies are encouraging, there remains significant room for improvement in the treatment of MBM, given the lack of durable response and the development of resistance to current therapies. Critical questions remain regarding mechanisms that lead to this lack of durable response and development of resistance, and how those mechanisms may differ in systemic sites versus brain metastases. One issue that may not be fully appreciated is that the delivery of several small molecule molecularly-targeted therapies to the brain is often restricted due to active efflux at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) interface. Inadequate local drug concentrations may be partially responsible for the development of unique patterns of resistance at metastatic sites in the brain. It is clear that there can be local, heterogeneous BBB breakdown in MBM, as exemplified by contrast-enhancement on T1-weighted MR imaging. However, it is possible that the successful treatment of MBM with small molecule targeted therapies will depend, in part, on the ability of these therapies to penetrate an intact BBB and reach the protected micro-metastases (so called "sub-clinical" disease) that escape early detection by contrast-enhanced MRI, as well as regions of tumor within MRI-detectable metastases that may have a less compromised BBB. The emergence of resistance in MBM may be related to

  7. Targeted drug delivery across the blood–brain barrier using ultrasound technique

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Cheri X

    2011-01-01

    Effective delivery of therapeutic agents into the brain can greatly improve the treatments of neurological and neurodegenerative diseases. Application of focused ultrasound facilitated by microbubbles has shown the potential to deliver drugs across the blood–brain barrier into targeted sites within the brain noninvasively. This review provides a summary of the technological background and principle, highlights of recent significant developments and research progress, as well as a critical commentary on the challenges and future directions in the field. This review also outlines and discusses the tasks that researchers face in order to successfully translate the technology into a clinical reality, including obtaining improved understanding of the mechanisms, demonstration of therapeutic efficacy and safety for specific applications, and development of methodology for rational design to achieve optimized and consistent outcome. PMID:21785679

  8. Mucoadhesive nanoemulsion-based intranasal drug delivery system of olanzapine for brain targeting.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Mukesh; Misra, Ambikanandan; Mishra, A K; Mishra, Pushpa; Pathak, Kamla

    2008-12-01

    The objective of the present study was to optimize olanzapine nanoemulsion (ONE), for nose-to-brain delivery. The nanoemulsions and olanzapine mucoadhesive nanoemulsions (OMNEs) were prepared using water titration method and characterized for technical and electrokinetic properties. Biodistribution of nanoemulsions and olanzapine solution (OS) in the brain and blood of rats following intranasal (intranasal) and intravenous (intravenous) administrations were examined using optimized technetium-labeled ((99m)Tc-labeled) olanzapine formulations. The brain/blood uptake ratios of 0.45, 0.88, 0.80, and 0.04 of OS (intranasal), ONE (intranasal), OMNE (intranasal), ONE (intravenous), respectively, at 0.5 h are indicative of direct nose-to-brain transport (DTP). Higher % drug targeting efficiency (%DTE) and %DTP for mucoadhesive nanoemulsions indicated effective brain targeting of olanzapine among the prepared nanoemulsions. Gamma scintigraphy imaging of the rat brain conclusively demonstrated rapid and larger extent of transport of olanzapine by OMNE (intranasal), when compared with OS (intranasal), ONE (intranasal), and ONE (intravenous), into the rat brain.

  9. Body distributioin of RGD-mediated liposome in brain-targeting drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jing; Chen, DaWei; Hu, Haiyang; Qiao, MingXi; Zhao, XiuLi; Chen, Baoyu

    2007-09-01

    RGD conjugation liposomes (RGD-liposomes) were evaluated for brain-targeting drug delivery. The flow cytometric in vitro study demonstrated that RGD-liposomes could bind to monocytes and neutrophils effectively. Ferulic acid (4-hydroxy-3-methoxycinnamic, FA) was loaded into liposomes. Rats were subjected to intrastriatal microinjections of 100 units of human recombinant IL-1beta to produce brain inflammation and caudal vein injection of three formulations (FA solution, FA liposome and RGD-coated FA liposome). Animals were sacrificed 15, 30, 60 and 120 min after administration to study the body distribution of the FA in the three formulations. HPLC was used to determine the concentration of FA in vivo with salicylic acid as internal standard. The results of body distribution indicated that RGD-coated liposomes could be mediated into the brain with a 6-fold FA concentration compared to FA solution and 3-fold in comparison to uncoated liposome. Brain targeted delivery was achieved and a reduction in dosage might be allowed.

  10. Nanomedicine as a non-invasive strategy for drug delivery across the blood brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Tam, Vivienne H; Sosa, Chris; Liu, Rui; Yao, Nan; Priestley, Rodney D

    2016-12-30

    The blood brain barrier (BBB) is a major obstacle to drug delivery for diseases of the central nervous system (CNS). This brief review highlights the current invasive and non-invasive technologies available to address this problem. In particular, nanomedicine has shown much promise as a non-invasive strategy due to its drug loading capabilities, ease of targeting to the BBB, and small size. The versatility of this technology in terms of type of drug and imaging agent, carrier material, and targeting mechanism is highlighted in this review. The recent inclusion of imaging agents in the nanocarriers has important consequences for the field of theranostics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Recent advances in medicinal chemistry and pharmaceutical technology--strategies for drug delivery to the brain.

    PubMed

    Denora, Nunzio; Trapani, Adriana; Laquintana, Valentino; Lopedota, Angela; Trapani, Giuseppe

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides a mini-review of some recent approaches for the treatment of brain pathologies examining both medicinal chemistry and pharmaceutical technology contributions. Medicinal chemistry-based strategies are essentially aimed at the chemical modification of low molecular weight drugs in order to increase their lipophilicity or the design of appropriate prodrugs, although this review will focus primarily on the use of prodrugs and not analog development. Recently, interest has been focused on the design and evaluation of prodrugs that are capable of exploiting one or more of the various endogenous transport systems at the level of the blood brain barrier (BBB). The technological strategies are essentially non-invasive methods of drug delivery to malignancies of the central nervous system (CNS) and are based on the use of nanosystems (colloidal carriers) such as liposomes, polymeric nanoparticles, solid lipid nanoparticles, polymeric micelles and dendrimers. The biodistribution of these nanocarriers can be manipulated by modifying their surface physico-chemical properties or by coating them with surfactants and polyethylene-glycols (PEGs). Liposomes, surfactant coated polymeric nanoparticles, and solid lipid nanoparticles are promising systems for delivery of drugs to tumors of the CNS. This mini-review discusses issues concerning the scope and limitations of both the medicinal chemistry and technological approaches. Based on the current findings, it can be concluded that crossing of the BBB and drug delivery to CNS is extremely complex and requires a multidisciplinary approach such as a close collaboration and common efforts among researchers of several scientific areas, particularly medicinal chemists, biologists and pharmaceutical technologists.

  12. Drug delivery to the brain in Alzheimer's disease: consideration of the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Banks, William A

    2012-05-15

    The successful treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD) will require drugs that can negotiate the blood-brain barrier (BBB). However, the BBB is not simply a physical barrier, but a complex interface that is in intimate communication with the rest of the central nervous system (CNS) and influenced by peripheral tissues. This review examines three aspects of the BBB in AD. First, it considers how the BBB may be contributing to the onset and progression of AD. In this regard, the BBB itself is a therapeutic target in the treatment of AD. Second, it examines how the BBB restricts drugs that might otherwise be useful in the treatment of AD and examines strategies being developed to deliver drugs to the CNS for the treatment of AD. Third, it considers how drug penetration across the AD BBB may differ from the BBB of normal aging. In this case, those differences can complicate the treatment of CNS diseases such as depression, delirium, psychoses, and pain control in the AD population.

  13. Iron Oxide Nanoparticles as a Drug Delivery Vehicle for MRI Monitored Magnetic Targeting of Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Chertok, Beata; Moffat, Bradford A.; David, Allan E.; Yu, Faquan; Bergemann, Christian; Ross, Brian D.; Yang, Victor C.

    2009-01-01

    This study explored the possibility of utilizing iron oxide nanoparticles as a drug delivery vehicle for minimally invasive, MRI-monitored magnetic targeting of brain tumors. In vitro determined hydrodynamic diameter of ~100nm, saturation magnetization of 94 emu/g Fe and T2 relaxivity of 43 s−1mM−1 of the nanoparticles suggested their applicability for this purpose. In vivo effect of magnetic targeting on the extent and selectivity of nanoparticle accumulation in tumors of rats harboring orthotopic 9L-gliosarcomas was quantified with MRI. Animals were intravenously injected with nanoparticles (12 mg Fe/kg) under a magnetic field density of 0 T (control) or 0.4 T (experimental) applied for 30 minutes. MR images were acquired prior to administration of nanoparticles and immediately after magnetic targeting at 1 hour intervals for 4 hours. Image analysis revealed that magnetic targeting induced a 5-fold increase in the total glioma exposure to magnetic nanoparticles over non-targeted tumors (p=0.005) and a 3.6-fold enhancement in the target selectivity index of nanoparticle accumulation in glioma over the normal brain (p=0.025). In conclusion, accumulation of iron oxide nanoparticles in gliosarcomas can be significantly enhanced by magnetic targeting and successfully quantified by MR imaging. Hence, these nanoparticles appear to be a promising vehicle for glioma-targeted drug delivery. PMID:17964647

  14. Lipid microbubbles as a vehicle for targeted drug delivery using focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening.

    PubMed

    Sierra, Carlos; Acosta, Camilo; Chen, Cherry; Wu, Shih-Ying; Karakatsani, Maria E; Bernal, Manuel; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2017-04-01

    Focused ultrasound in conjunction with lipid microbubbles has fully demonstrated its ability to induce non-invasive, transient, and reversible blood-brain barrier opening. This study was aimed at testing the feasibility of our lipid-coated microbubbles as a vector for targeted drug delivery in the treatment of central nervous system diseases. These microbubbles were labeled with the fluorophore 5-dodecanoylaminfluorescein. Focused ultrasound targeted mouse brains in vivo in the presence of these microbubbles for trans-blood-brain barrier delivery of 5-dodecanoylaminfluorescein. This new approach, compared to previously studies of our group, where fluorescently labeled dextrans and microbubbles were co-administered, represents an appreciable improvement in safety outcome and targeted drug delivery. This novel technique allows the delivery of 5-dodecanoylaminfluorescein at the region of interest unlike the alternative of systemic exposure. 5-dodecanoylaminfluorescein delivery was assessed by ex vivo fluorescence imaging and by in vivo transcranial passive cavitation detection. Stable and inertial cavitation doses were quantified. The cavitation dose thresholds for estimating, a priori, successful targeted drug delivery were, for the first time, identified with inertial cavitation were concluded to be necessary for successful delivery. The findings presented herein indicate the feasibility and safety of the proposed microbubble-based targeted drug delivery and that, if successful, can be predicted by cavitation detection in vivo.

  15. Therapeutic strategies to improve drug delivery across the blood-brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    Azad, Tej D.; Pan, James; Connolly, Ian D.; Remington, Austin; Wilson, Christy M.; Grant, Gerald A.

    2015-01-01

    Resection of brain tumors is followed by chemotherapy and radiation to ablate remaining malignant cell populations. Targeting these populations stands to reduce tumor recurrence and offer the promise of more complete therapy. Thus, improving access to the tumor, while leaving normal brain tissue unscathed, is a critical pursuit. A central challenge in this endeavor lies in the limited delivery of therapeutics to the tumor itself. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is responsible for much of this difficulty but also provides an essential separation from systemic circulation. Due to the BBB’s physical and chemical constraints, many current therapies, from cytotoxic drugs to antibody-based proteins, cannot gain access to the tumor. This review describes the characteristics of the BBB and associated changes wrought by the presence of a tumor. Current strategies for enhancing the delivery of therapies across the BBB to the tumor will be discussed, with a distinction made between strategies that seek to disrupt the BBB and those that aim to circumvent it. PMID:25727231

  16. The blood-brain and blood-tumor barriers: a review of strategies for increasing drug delivery.

    PubMed Central

    Groothuis, D. R.

    2000-01-01

    Drug delivery to brain tumors has been a controversial subject. Some believe the blood-brain barrier is not important, while others believe it is the major obstacle in treatment and have devised innovative approaches to circumvent it. These approaches can be divided into two categories: those that attempt to increase drug delivery of intravascularly administered drugs by manipulating either the drugs or capillary permeability, and those that attempt to increase drug delivery by local administration. Several strategies have been developed to increase the fraction of intravascular drug reaching the tumor, including intra-arterial administration, barrier disruption, new ways of packaging drugs, and, most recently, inhibiting drug efflux from tumor. When given intravascularly, all drugs have a common drawback: the body acts as a sink, and, even in the best situations, only a small fraction of administered drug actually reaches the tumor. A consequence is that systemic toxicity is usually the dose-limiting factor. When given locally, such as into the cerebrospinal fluid or directly into the tumor, 100% of an administered dose is delivered to the target site. However, local delivery is associated with variable and unpredictable spatial distribution and variation in drug concentration. The major dose-limiting factor of most local delivery methods will be neurotoxicity. The relative advantages and disadvantages of the different methods of circumventing the blood-brain barrier are presented in this review, and special attention is given to convection-enhanced delivery, which has particular promise for the local delivery of large therapeutic agents such as monoclonal antibodies, antisense oligonucleotides, or viral vectors. PMID:11302254

  17. Nanoengineered drug-releasing Ti wires as an alternative for local delivery of chemotherapeutics in the brain.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Karan; Aw, Moom Sinn; Losic, Dusan

    2012-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) blocks the passage of active molecules from the blood which makes drug delivery to the brain a challenging problem. Oral drug delivery using chemically modified drugs to enhance their transport properties or remove the blocking of drug transport across the BBB is explored as a common approach to address these problems, but with limited success. Local delivery of drugs directly to the brain interstitium using implants such as polymeric wafers, gels, and catheters has been recognized as a promising alternative particularly for the treatment of brain cancer (glioma) and neurodegenerative disorders. The aim of this study was to introduce a new solution by engineering a drug-releasing implant for local drug delivery in the brain, based on titanium (Ti) wires with titania nanotube (TNT) arrays on their surfaces. Drug loading and drug release characteristics of this system were explored using two drugs commonly used in oral brain therapy: dopamine (DOPA), a neurotransmitter agent; and doxorubicin (DOXO), an anticancer drug. Results showed that TNT/Ti wires could provide a considerable amount of drugs (>170 μg to 1000 μg) with desirable release kinetics and controllable release time (1 to several weeks) and proved their feasibility for use as drug-releasing implants for local drug delivery in the brain. In this report, a new drug-releasing platform in the form of nanoengineered Ti wires with TNT arrays is proposed as an alternative for local delivery of chemotherapeutics in the brain to bypass the BBB. To prove this concept, drug loading and release characteristics of two drugs important for brain therapy (the neurotransmitter DOPA and the anticancer drug DOXO) were explored. Titania nanotube arrays on the surface of Ti wires (TNT/Ti) were fabricated using a simple anodization process, followed by separate loading of two drugs (DOPA and DOXO) inside the nanotube structures. The loading and in vitro release characteristics of prepared TNT

  18. Nanotechnology approaches to crossing the blood-brain barrier and drug delivery to the CNS.

    PubMed

    Silva, Gabriel A

    2008-12-10

    Nanotechnologies are materials and devices that have a functional organization in at least one dimension on the nanometer (one billionth of a meter) scale, ranging from a few to about 100 nanometers. Nanoengineered materials and devices aimed at biologic applications and medicine in general, and neuroscience in particular, are designed fundamentally to interface and interact with cells and their tissues at the molecular level. One particularly important area of nanotechnology application to the central nervous system (CNS) is the development of technologies and approaches for delivering drugs and other small molecules such as genes, oligonucleotides, and contrast agents across the blood brain barrier (BBB). The BBB protects and isolates CNS structures (i.e. the brain and spinal cord) from the rest of the body, and creates a unique biochemical and immunological environment. Clinically, there are a number of scenarios where drugs or other small molecules need to gain access to the CNS following systemic administration, which necessitates being able to cross the BBB. Nanotechnologies can potentially be designed to carry out multiple specific functions at once or in a predefined sequence, an important requirement for the clinically successful delivery and use of drugs and other molecules to the CNS, and as such have a unique advantage over other complimentary technologies and methods. This brief review introduces emerging work in this area and summarizes a number of example applications to CNS cancers, gene therapy, and analgesia.

  19. Ultrasound-mediated blood-brain barrier disruption for targeted drug delivery in the central nervous system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDannold, Nathan; Zhang, Yongzhi; Power, Chanikarn; Arvanitis, Costas D.; Vykhodtseva, Natalia; Livingstone, Margaret

    2015-05-01

    The physiology of the vasculature in the central nervous system (CNS), which includes the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and other factors, complicates the delivery of most drugs to the brain. Different methods have been used to bypass the BBB, but they have limitations such as being invasive, non-targeted or requiring the formulation of new drugs. Focused ultrasound (FUS), when combined with circulating microbubbles, is a noninvasive method to locally and transiently disrupt the BBB at discrete targets. The method presents new opportunities for the use of drugs and for the study of the brain.

  20. Permeabilization of the blood-brain barrier via mucosal engrafting: implications for drug delivery to the brain.

    PubMed

    Bleier, Benjamin S; Kohman, Richie E; Feldman, Rachel E; Ramanlal, Shreshtha; Han, Xue

    2013-01-01

    Utilization of neuropharmaceuticals for central nervous system(CNS) disease is highly limited due to the blood-brain barrier(BBB) which restricts molecules larger than 500Da from reaching the CNS. The development of a reliable method to bypass the BBB would represent an enormous advance in neuropharmacology enabling the use of many potential disease modifying therapies. Previous attempts such as transcranial catheter implantation have proven to be temporary and associated with multiple complications. Here we describe a novel method of creating a semipermeable window in the BBB using purely autologous tissues to allow for high molecular weight(HMW) drug delivery to the CNS. This approach is inspired by recent advances in human endoscopic transnasal skull base surgical techniques and involves engrafting semipermeable nasal mucosa within a surgical defect in the BBB. The mucosal graft thereby creates a permanent transmucosal conduit for drugs to access the CNS. The main objective of this study was to develop a murine model of this technique and use it to evaluate transmucosal permeability for the purpose of direct drug delivery to the brain. Using this model we demonstrate that mucosal grafts allow for the transport of molecules up to 500 kDa directly to the brain in both a time and molecular weight dependent fashion. Markers up to 40 kDa were found within the striatum suggesting a potential role for this technique in the treatment of Parkinson's disease. This proof of principle study demonstrates that mucosal engrafting represents the first permanent and stable method of bypassing the BBB thereby providing a pathway for HMW therapeutics directly into the CNS.

  1. Glutathione conjugation dose-dependently increases brain-specific liposomal drug delivery in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Maussang, David; Rip, Jaap; van Kregten, Joan; van den Heuvel, Angelique; van der Pol, Susanne; van der Boom, Burt; Reijerkerk, Arie; Chen, Linda; de Boer, Marco; Gaillard, Pieter; de Vries, Helga

    2016-06-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) represents a major obstacle for the delivery and development of drugs curing brain pathologies. However, this biological barrier presents numerous endogenous specialized transport systems that can be exploited by engineered nanoparticles to enable drug delivery to the brain. In particular, conjugation of glutathione (GSH) onto PEGylated liposomes (G-Technology(®)) showed to safely enhance delivery of encapsulated drugs to the brain. Yet, understanding of the mechanism of action remains limited and full mechanistic understanding will aid in the further optimization of the technology. In order to elucidate the mechanism of brain targeting by GSH-PEG liposomes, we here demonstrate that the in vivo delivery of liposomal ribavirin is increased in brain extracellular fluid according to the extent of GSH conjugation onto the liposomes. In vitro, using the hCMEC/D3 human cerebral microvascular endothelial (CMEC) cell line, as well as primary bovine and porcine CMEC (and in contrast to non-brain derived endothelial and epithelial cells), we show that liposomal uptake occurs through the process of endocytosis and that the brain-specific uptake is also glutathione conjugation-dependent. Interestingly, the uptake mechanism is an active process that is temperature-, time- and dose-dependent. Finally, early endocytosis events rely on cytoskeleton remodeling, as well as dynamin- and clathrin-dependent endocytosis pathways. Overall, our data demonstrate that the glutathione-dependent uptake mechanism of the G-Technology involves a specific endocytosis pathway indicative of a receptor-mediated mechanism, and supports the benefit of this drug delivery technology for the treatment of devastating brain diseases.

  2. Ultrasound-mediated blood-brain barrier disruption for targeted drug delivery in the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Aryal, Muna; Arvanitis, Costas D.; Alexander, Phillip M.; McDannold, Nathan

    2014-01-01

    The physiology of the vasculature in the central nervous system (CNS), which includes the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and other factors, complicates the delivery of most drugs to the brain. Different methods have been used to bypass the BBB, but they have limitations such as being invasive, non-targeted or requiring the formulation of new drugs. Focused ultrasound (FUS), when combined with circulating microbubbles, is a noninvasive method to locally and transiently disrupt the BBB at discrete targets. This review provides insight on the current status of this unique drug delivery technique, experience in preclinical models, and potential for clinical translation. If translated to humans, this method would offer a flexible means to target therapeutics to desired points or volumes in the brain, and enable the whole arsenal of drugs in the CNS that are currently prevented by the BBB. PMID:24462453

  3. Single compartment drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Cima, Michael J.; Lee, Heejin; Daniel, Karen; Tanenbaum, Laura M.; Mantzavinou, Aikaterini; Spencer, Kevin C.; Ong, Qunya; Sy, Jay C.; Santini, John; Schoellhammer, Carl M.; Blankschtein, Daniel; Langer, Robert S.

    2014-01-01

    Drug design is built on the concept that key molecular targets of disease are isolated in the diseased tissue. Systemic drug administration would be sufficient for targeting in such a case. It is, however, common for enzymes or receptors that are integral to disease to be structurally similar or identical to those that play important biological roles in normal tissues of the body. Additionally, systemic administration may not lead to local drug concentrations high enough to yield disease modification because of rapid systemic metabolism or lack of sufficient partitioning into the diseased tissue compartment. This review focuses on drug delivery methods that physically target drugs to individual compartments of the body. Compartments such as the bladder, peritoneum, brain, eye and skin are often sites of disease and can sometimes be viewed as “privileged,” since they intrinsically hinder partitioning of systemically administered agents. These compartments have become the focus of a wide array of procedures and devices for direct administration of drugs. We discuss the rationale behind single compartment drug delivery for each of these compartments, and give an overview of examples at different development stages, from the lab bench to phase III clinical trials to clinical practice. We approach single compartment drug delivery from both a translational and a technological perspective. PMID:24798478

  4. Delivery of a peptide-drug conjugate targeting the blood brain barrier improved the efficacy of paclitaxel against glioma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ying; Zheng, Xuemin; Gong, Min; Zhang, Jianning

    2016-01-01

    The challenge of effectively delivering therapeutic agents to the brain has created an entire field of active research devoted to overcoming the blood brain barrier (BBB) and efficiently delivering drugs to the brain. Angiopep-2 can trigger transcytosis and traverse the BBB by recognizing low-density lipoprotein related protein-1 (LRP-1) expressed on the brain capillary endothelial cells. Here, we designed a novel strategy for the delivery of drugs to the brain. The novel drug delivery system was a combination of a receptor-targeting ligand, such as low-density lipoprotein related protein 1, and a cell-penetrating peptide (CPP). It was hypothesized that this conjugate will enhance the delivery of associated therapeutic cargo across the BBB and increase the permeability of a solid tumor. Our findings indicate that the combination of these two agents in a delivery vehicle significantly improved translocation of small molecules (paclitaxel) into the brain compared to the vehicle treatment, which contained only receptor-targeting ligand. The application of this strategy could potentially expand the horizons for the treatment of central nervous system disorders. PMID:27765902

  5. In situ nasal gel drug delivery: A novel approach for brain targeting through the mucosal membrane.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Prabhjot; Garg, Tarun; Rath, Goutam; Goyal, Amit K

    2016-06-01

    Recently, sustained and controlled drug delivery has become the demand, and research has been undertaken in achieving much better drug product effectiveness, reliability and safety. The in situ polymeric system has gained much attention, to develop a controlled release system. It has been used as a vehicle for local and systemic drug delivery. Nowadays, it has created much interest, because of its characteristics of high vascularization, high permeability, rapid onset of action, low enzymatic degradation, and avoidance of hepatic first pass metabolism. The main aim of this review is to provide knowledge of different mechanisms of nasal absorption and approaches for nasal drug delivery.

  6. Intranasal delivery of antipsychotic drugs.

    PubMed

    Katare, Yogesh K; Piazza, Justin E; Bhandari, Jayant; Daya, Ritesh P; Akilan, Kosalan; Simpson, Madeline J; Hoare, Todd; Mishra, Ram K

    2016-11-29

    Antipsychotic drugs are used to treat psychotic disorders that afflict millions globally and cause tremendous emotional, economic and healthcare burdens. However, the potential of intranasal delivery to improve brain-specific targeting remains unrealized. In this article, we review the mechanisms and methods used for brain targeting via the intranasal (IN) route as well as the potential advantages of improving this type of delivery. We extensively review experimental studies relevant to intranasal delivery of therapeutic agents for the treatment of psychosis and mental illnesses. We also review clinical studies in which intranasal delivery of peptides, like oxytocin (7 studies) and desmopressin (1), were used as an adjuvant to antipsychotic treatment with promising results. Experimental animal studies (17) investigating intranasal delivery of mainstream antipsychotic drugs have revealed successful targeting to the brain as suggested by pharmacokinetic parameters and behavioral effects. To improve delivery to the brain, nanotechnology-based carriers like nanoparticles and nanoemulsions have been used in several studies. However, human studies assessing intranasal delivery of mainstream antipsychotic drugs are lacking, and the potential toxicity of nanoformulations used in animal studies has not been explored. A brief discussion of future directions anticipates that if limitations of low aqueous solubility of antipsychotic drugs can be overcome and non-toxic formulations used, IN delivery (particularly targeting specific tissues within the brain) will gain more importance moving forward given the inherent benefits of IN delivery in comparison to other methods.

  7. Blood brain barrier: An overview on strategies in drug delivery, realistic in vitro modeling and in vivo live tracking

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Pawan Kumar; Sharma, Ashok Kumar; Gupta, Umesh

    2016-01-01

    Blood brain barrier (BBB) is a group of astrocytes, neurons and endothelial cells, which makes restricted passage of various biological or chemical entities to the brain tissue. It gives protection to brain at one hand, but at the other hand it has very selective permeability for bio-actives and other foreign materials and is one of the major challenges for the drug delivery. Nanocarriers are promising to cross BBB utilizing alternative route of administration such as intranasal and intra-carotid drug delivery which bypasses BBB. In future more optimized drug delivery system can be achieved by compiling the best routes with the best carriers. Single photon emission tomography (SPECT) and different brain-on-a-chip in vitro models are being very reliable to study live in vivo tracking of BBB and its pathophysiology, respectively. In the current review we have tried to exploit mechanistically all these to understand and manage the various BBB disruptions in diseased condition along with crossing the hurdles occurring in drug or gene delivery across BBB. PMID:27141418

  8. Ultrasound/Magnetic Targeting with SPIO-DOX-Microbubble Complex for Image-Guided Drug Delivery in Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Ching-Hsiang; Cheng, Yu-Hang; Ting, Chien-Yu; Ho, Yi-Ju; Hsu, Po-Hung; Liu, Hao-Li; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2016-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges in the deployment of chemotherapeutic drugs against brain tumors is ensuring that sufficient drug concentrations reach the tumor, while minimizing drug accumulation at undesired sites. Recently, injection of therapeutic agents following blood-brain barrier (BBB) opening by focused ultrasound (FUS) with microbubbles (MBs) has been shown to enhance drug delivery in targeted brain regions. Nevertheless, the distribution and quantitative deposition of agents delivered to the brain are still hard to estimate. Based on our previous work on superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO)-loaded MBs, we present a novel theranostic complex of SPIO-Doxorubicin (DOX)-conjugated MB (SD-MB) for drug delivery to the brain. Magnetic labeling of the drug enables direct visualization via magnetic resonance imaging, and also facilitates magnetic targeting (MT) to actively enhance targeted deposition of the drug. In a rat glioma model, we demonstrated that FUS sonication can be used with SD-MBs to simultaneously facilitate BBB opening and allow dual ultrasound/magnetic targeting of chemotherapeutic agent (DOX) delivery. The accumulation of SD complex within brain tumors can be significantly enhanced by MT (25.7 fold of DOX, 7.6 fold of SPIO). The change in relaxation rate R2 (1/T2) within tumors was highly correlated with SD deposition as quantified by high performance liquid chromatography (R2 = 0.93) and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (R2 = 0.94), demonstrating real-time monitoring of DOX distribution. Our results suggest that SD-MBs can serve as multifunction agents to achieve advanced molecular theranostics. PMID:27446489

  9. Analyzing collaboration networks and developmental patterns of nano-enabled drug delivery (NEDD) for brain cancer.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying; Ma, Jing; Porter, Alan L; Kwon, Seokbeom; Zhu, Donghua

    2015-01-01

    The rapid development of new and emerging science & technologies (NESTs) brings unprecedented challenges, but also opportunities. In this paper, we use bibliometric and social network analyses, at country, institution, and individual levels, to explore the patterns of scientific networking for a key nano area - nano-enabled drug delivery (NEDD). NEDD has successfully been used clinically to modulate drug release and to target particular diseased tissues. The data for this research come from a global compilation of research publication information on NEDD directed at brain cancer. We derive a family of indicators that address multiple facets of research collaboration and knowledge transfer patterns. Results show that: (1) international cooperation is increasing, but networking characteristics change over time; (2) highly productive institutions also lead in influence, as measured by citation to their work, with American institutes leading; (3) research collaboration is dominated by local relationships, with interesting information available from authorship patterns that go well beyond journal impact factors. Results offer useful technical intelligence to help researchers identify potential collaborators and to help inform R&D management and science & innovation policy for such nanotechnologies.

  10. Pyrilamine-sensitive proton-coupled organic cation (H(+)/OC) antiporter for brain-specific drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinyi; Qi, Bowen; Su, Huifang; Li, Jianbo; Sun, Xun; He, Qin; Fu, Yao; Zhang, Zhirong

    2017-03-27

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) represents the greatest challenge that hampers therapeutic molecules entering the brain. Here, we described a novel brain-specific delivery strategy targeting to pyrilamine-sensitive H(+)/OC antiporter to facilitate therapeutic molecules cross the BBB and penetrate into the brain. In this study, four cyclic tertiary amines were selected as the brain-targeting moieties to modify naproxen (NP), a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug. The obtained NP conjugates displayed cell uptake efficiencies over 144-fold higher than that of unmodified NP in endothelial cells. The cell uptake process of the conjugates was primarily driven by pyrilamine-sensitive H(+)/OC antiporter in a pH-dependent, Na(+)-independent, and membrane potential-independent pathway, which could be further inhibited by pyrilamine, propranolol, and imipramine. Moreover, the NP conjugates showed significantly higher AUC0-t and Cmax in the brain compared with unmodified NP, and significantly higher accumulation than NP in the in situ brain perfusion study. Also, the conjugates showed superior neuroprotective effect in vitro and in vivo. Thus, the chemical modification of therapeutics with a cyclic tertiary amine moiety represents a promising and efficient strategy for brain-specific drug delivery via pyrilamine-sensitive H(+)/OC antiporter.

  11. Blood-brain barrier models and their relevance for a successful development of CNS drug delivery systems: a review.

    PubMed

    Bicker, Joana; Alves, Gilberto; Fortuna, Ana; Falcão, Amílcar

    2014-08-01

    During the research and development of new drugs directed at the central nervous system, there is a considerable attrition rate caused by their hampered access to the brain by the blood-brain barrier. Throughout the years, several in vitro models have been developed in an attempt to mimic critical functionalities of the blood-brain barrier and reliably predict the permeability of drug candidates. However, the current challenge lies in developing a model that retains fundamental blood-brain barrier characteristics and simultaneously remains compatible with the high throughput demands of pharmaceutical industries. This review firstly describes the roles of all elements of the neurovascular unit and their influence on drug brain penetration. In vitro models, including non-cell based and cell-based models, and in vivo models are herein presented, with a particular emphasis on their methodological aspects. Lastly, their contribution to the improvement of brain drug delivery strategies and drug transport across the blood-brain barrier is also discussed.

  12. Noninvasive, localized, and transient brain drug delivery using focused ultrasound and microbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, James J.

    In the United States, Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and brain cancer caused 72,432, 19,566 and 12,886 deaths in 2006, respectively. Whereas the number of deaths due to major disorders such as heart disease, stroke, and prostate cancer have decreased since 2006, deaths attributed to AD, PD, and brain cancer have not. Treatment options for patients with CNS disorders remain limited despite significant advances in knowledge of CNS disease pathways and development of neurologically potent agents. One of the major obstacles is that the cerebral microvasculature is lined by a specialized and highly regulated blood-brain barrier (BBB) that prevents large agents from entering the brain extracellular space. The purpose of this dissertation is to design a noninvasive, localized, and transient BBB opening system using focused ultrasound (FUS) and determine ultrasound and microbubble conditions that can effectively and safely deliver large pharmacologically-relevant-sized agents to the brain. To meet this end, an in vivo mouse brain drug delivery system using a stereotactic-based targeting method was developed. FUS was applied noninvasively through the intact skin and skull, which allowed for long-term and high-throughput studies. With this system, more than 150 mice were exposed to one of 31 distinct acoustic and microbubble conditions. The feasibility of delivering a large MRI contrast agent was first demonstrated in vivo in both wild-type and transgenic Alzheimer's disease model (APP/PS1) mice. A wide range of acoustic and microbubble conditions were then evaluated for their ability to deliver agents to a target region. Interestingly, the possible design space of parameters was found to be vast and different conditions resulted in distinct spatial distributions and doses delivered. In particular, BBB opening was shown to be dependent on the microbubble diameter, acoustic pressure, pulse repetition frequency (PRF), and pulse length (PL). Each set of

  13. Brain targeting by intranasal drug delivery (INDD): a combined effect of trans-neural and para-neuronal pathway.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Gulam; Alrohaimi, Abdulmohsen H; Bhatnagar, Aseem; Baboota, Sanjula; Ali, Javed; Ahuja, Alka

    2016-01-01

    The effectiveness of intranasal drug delivery for brain targeting has emerged as a hope of remedy for various CNS disorders. The nose to brain absorption of therapeutic molecules claims two effective pathways, which include trans-neuronal for immediate action and para-neuronal for delayed action. To evaluate the contribution of both the pathways in absorption of therapeutic molecules and nanocarriers, lidocaine, a nerve-blocking agent, was used to impair the action potential of olfactory nerve. An anti-Parkinson drug ropinirole was covalently complexes with (99m)Tc in presence of SnCl2 using in-house developed reduction technology. The radiolabeled formulations were administered intranasally in lidocaine challenged rabbit and rat. The qualitative and quantitative outcomes of neural and non-neural pathways were estimated using gamma scintigraphy and UHPLC-MS/MS, respectively. The results showed a significant (p ≤ 0.005) increase in radioactivity counts and drug concentration in the brain of rabbit and rat compared to the animal groups challenged with lidocaine. This concludes the significant contribution (p ≤ 0.005) of trans-neuronal and para-neuronal pathway in nose to brain drug delivery. Therefore, results proved that it is an art of a formulator scientist to make the drug carriers to exploit the choice of absorption pathway for their instant and extent of action.

  14. Nanoagonist-mediated endothelial tight junction opening: A strategy for safely increasing brain drug delivery in mice.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xihui; Wang, Yuan-Cheng; Liu, Yikang; Yue, Qi; Liu, Zining; Ke, Mengjing; Zhao, Shengyuan; Li, Cong

    2017-04-01

    Even though opening endothelial tight junctions is an efficient way to up-regulate brain drug delivery, the extravasation of blood-borne components from the compromised tight junctions can result in adverse consequences such as edema and neuronal injuries. In this work, we developed a nanoagonist that temporarily opened tight junctions by signaling adenosine 2A receptor, a type of G protein-coupled receptor expressed on brain capillary endothelial cells. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated remarkable blood-brain barrier permeability enhancements and significantly increased brain uptakes of both small molecular and macromolecular paramagnetic agents after nanoagonist administration. Gamma ray imaging and transmission electron microscope observed tight junction opening followed by spontaneous recovery after nanoagonist treatment. Immunofluorescence staining showed the unspoiled basal membrane, pericytes and astrocyte endfeet that enwrapped the vascular endothelium. Importantly, edema, apoptosis and neuronal injuries observed after hypertonic agent mediated tight junction-opening were not observed after nanoagonist intervention. The uncompromised neurovascular units may prevent the leakage of blood-borne constituents into brain parenchyma and accelerate tight junction recovery. Considering blood-brain barrier impermeability is a major obstacle in the treatment of central nervous system diseases, nanoagonist-mediated tight junction opening provides a promising strategy to enhance brain drug delivery with minimized adverse effects.

  15. Cell-Mediated Drugs Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Batrakova, Elena V.; Gendelman, Howard E.; Kabanov, Alexander V.

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Drug targeting to sites of tissue injury, tumor or infection with limited toxicity is the goal for successful pharmaceutics. Immunocytes (including mononuclear phagocytes (dendritic cells, monocytes and macrophages), neutrophils, and lymphocytes) are highly mobile; they can migrate across impermeable barriers and release their drug cargo at sites of infection or tissue injury. Thus immune cells can be exploited as trojan horses for drug delivery. AREAS COVERED IN THIS REVIEW This paper reviews how immunocytes laden with drugs can cross the blood brain or blood tumor barriers, to facilitate treatments for infectious diseases, injury, cancer, or inflammatory diseases. The promises and perils of cell-mediated drug delivery are reviewed, with examples of how immunocytes can be harnessed to improve therapeutic end points. EXPERT OPINION Using cells as delivery vehicles enables targeted drug transport, and prolonged circulation times, along with reductions in cell and tissue toxicities. Such systems for drug carriage and targeted release represent a novel disease combating strategy being applied to a spectrum of human disorders. The design of nanocarriers for cell-mediated drug delivery may differ from those used for conventional drug delivery systems; nevertheless, engaging different defense mechanisms into drug delivery may open new perspectives for the active delivery of drugs. PMID:21348773

  16. Multifunctional Nanocarriers for diagnostics, drug delivery and targeted treatment across blood-brain barrier: perspectives on tracking and neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Bhaskar, Sonu; Tian, Furong; Stoeger, Tobias; Kreyling, Wolfgang; de la Fuente, Jesús M; Grazú, Valeria; Borm, Paul; Estrada, Giovani; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Razansky, Daniel

    2010-03-03

    Nanotechnology has brought a variety of new possibilities into biological discovery and clinical practice. In particular, nano-scaled carriers have revolutionalized drug delivery, allowing for therapeutic agents to be selectively targeted on an organ, tissue and cell specific level, also minimizing exposure of healthy tissue to drugs. In this review we discuss and analyze three issues, which are considered to be at the core of nano-scaled drug delivery systems, namely functionalization of nanocarriers, delivery to target organs and in vivo imaging. The latest developments on highly specific conjugation strategies that are used to attach biomolecules to the surface of nanoparticles (NP) are first reviewed. Besides drug carrying capabilities, the functionalization of nanocarriers also facilitate their transport to primary target organs. We highlight the leading advantage of nanocarriers, i.e. their ability to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB), a tightly packed layer of endothelial cells surrounding the brain that prevents high-molecular weight molecules from entering the brain. The BBB has several transport molecules such as growth factors, insulin and transferrin that can potentially increase the efficiency and kinetics of brain-targeting nanocarriers. Potential treatments for common neurological disorders, such as stroke, tumours and Alzheimer's, are therefore a much sought-after application of nanomedicine. Likewise any other drug delivery system, a number of parameters need to be registered once functionalized NPs are administered, for instance their efficiency in organ-selective targeting, bioaccumulation and excretion. Finally, direct in vivo imaging of nanomaterials is an exciting recent field that can provide real-time tracking of those nanocarriers. We review a range of systems suitable for in vivo imaging and monitoring of drug delivery, with an emphasis on most recently introduced molecular imaging modalities based on optical and hybrid contrast, such as

  17. Multifunctional Nanocarriers for diagnostics, drug delivery and targeted treatment across blood-brain barrier: perspectives on tracking and neuroimaging

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Nanotechnology has brought a variety of new possibilities into biological discovery and clinical practice. In particular, nano-scaled carriers have revolutionalized drug delivery, allowing for therapeutic agents to be selectively targeted on an organ, tissue and cell specific level, also minimizing exposure of healthy tissue to drugs. In this review we discuss and analyze three issues, which are considered to be at the core of nano-scaled drug delivery systems, namely functionalization of nanocarriers, delivery to target organs and in vivo imaging. The latest developments on highly specific conjugation strategies that are used to attach biomolecules to the surface of nanoparticles (NP) are first reviewed. Besides drug carrying capabilities, the functionalization of nanocarriers also facilitate their transport to primary target organs. We highlight the leading advantage of nanocarriers, i.e. their ability to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB), a tightly packed layer of endothelial cells surrounding the brain that prevents high-molecular weight molecules from entering the brain. The BBB has several transport molecules such as growth factors, insulin and transferrin that can potentially increase the efficiency and kinetics of brain-targeting nanocarriers. Potential treatments for common neurological disorders, such as stroke, tumours and Alzheimer's, are therefore a much sought-after application of nanomedicine. Likewise any other drug delivery system, a number of parameters need to be registered once functionalized NPs are administered, for instance their efficiency in organ-selective targeting, bioaccumulation and excretion. Finally, direct in vivo imaging of nanomaterials is an exciting recent field that can provide real-time tracking of those nanocarriers. We review a range of systems suitable for in vivo imaging and monitoring of drug delivery, with an emphasis on most recently introduced molecular imaging modalities based on optical and hybrid contrast, such as

  18. Focused ultrasound induced blood-brain barrier disruption to enhance chemotherapeutic drugs (BCNU) delivery for glioblastoma treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hao-Li; Hua, Mu-Yi; Chen, Pin-Yuan; Huang, Chiung-Yin; Wang, Jiun-Jie; Wei, Kuo-Chen

    2010-03-01

    Focused ultrasound has been recently found to capable of temporally and reversibly disrupt local blood-brain barrier (BBB) and opens new frontier in delivering varies type of drugs into brain for central nerve system (CNS) disorder treatment. In this study, we aim to investigate the feasibility of delivering 1, 3-bits (2-chloroethyl) -1-nitrosourea (BCNU) to treat glioblastoma in animal models and evaluate whether this approach would gain treatment efficacy. Under the presence of microbubbles administration, a 400-kHz focused ultrasound was employed to deliver burst-tone ultrasonic energy stimulation to disrupt BBB in animal brains transcranially, and in-vivo monitored by magnetic-resonance imaging (MRI). C6-glioma cells were cultured and implanted into Sprague-Dawley rats as the brain-tumor model. BCNU deposited in brain was quantified by using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and brain tissues were examined histologically. MRI was employed to longitudinal evaluate the brain tumor treatment including the analysis of tumor progression and animal survival. We confirmed that the focused ultrasound, under the secure ultrasonic energy level, can significantly enhance the BCNU penetration through BBB over 300% than control without cause hemorrhage. Apparent improvement of treatment efficacy achieved by combining focused ultrasound with BCNU delivery, including significant suppression of tumor growth and a prolonged animal survival. This study highly support that this treatment strategy could be clinically-relevant and may help to provide another potential strategy in increasing local chemotherapeutic drugs for brain-tumor treatment.

  19. Paliperidone microemulsion for nose-to-brain targeted drug delivery system: pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Patel, Mrunali R; Patel, Rashmin B; Bhatt, Kashyap K; Patel, Bharat G; Gaikwad, Rajiv V

    2016-01-01

    The objective of present study was to develop and evaluate paliperidone (PALI) loaded microemulsion (PALI-ME) for intranasal delivery in the treatment of schizophrenia. The PALI-ME was formulated by the spontaneous microemulsification method and characterized for physicochemical parameters. Pharmacodynamic assessments (apomorphine-induced compulsive behavior and spontaneous motor activity) were performed using mice. All formulations were tagged with (99m)Tc (technetium). Pharmacokinetic evaluation of PALI in the brain was investigated using Swiss albino rats. Brain scintigraphy imaging was performed in rabbits. PALI-ME was found stable with average droplet size of 20.01 ± 1.28 nm. In pharmacodynamic studies, significant (p < 0.05) deference in parameters estimated, were found between the treated and control groups. (99m)Tc-tagged PALI solution (PALI-SOL)/PALI-ME/PALI muco-adhesive ME (PALI-MME) was found to be stable and suitable for in vivo studies. Brain-to-blood ratio at all sampling points up to 8 h following intranasal administration of PALI-MME compared to intravenous PALI-ME was found to be 6-8 times higher signifying greater extent of distribution of the PALI in brain. Rabbit brain scintigraphy demonstrated higher intranasal uptake of the PALI into the brain. This investigation demonstrates a prompt and larger extent of transport of PALI into the brain through intranasal PALI-MME, which may prove beneficial for treatment of schizophrenia.

  20. Characterizing Focused-Ultrasound Mediated Drug Delivery to the Heterogeneous Primate Brain In Vivo with Acoustic Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shih-Ying; Sanchez, Carlos Sierra; Samiotaki, Gesthimani; Buch, Amanda; Ferrera, Vincent P.; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2016-11-01

    Focused ultrasound with microbubbles has been used to noninvasively and selectively deliver pharmacological agents across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) for treating brain diseases. Acoustic cavitation monitoring could serve as an on-line tool to assess and control the treatment. While it demonstrated a strong correlation in small animals, its translation to primates remains in question due to the anatomically different and highly heterogeneous brain structures with gray and white matteras well as dense vasculature. In addition, the drug delivery efficiency and the BBB opening volume have never been shown to be predictable through cavitation monitoring in primates. This study aimed at determining how cavitation activity is correlated with the amount and concentration of gadolinium delivered through the BBB and its associated delivery efficiency as well as the BBB opening volume in non-human primates. Another important finding entails the effect of heterogeneous brain anatomy and vasculature of a primate brain, i.e., presence of large cerebral vessels, gray and white matter that will also affect the cavitation activity associated with variation of BBB opening in different tissue types, which is not typically observed in small animals. Both these new findings are critical in the primate brain and provide essential information for clinical applications.

  1. Characterizing Focused-Ultrasound Mediated Drug Delivery to the Heterogeneous Primate Brain In Vivo with Acoustic Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shih-Ying; Sanchez, Carlos Sierra; Samiotaki, Gesthimani; Buch, Amanda; Ferrera, Vincent P.; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2016-01-01

    Focused ultrasound with microbubbles has been used to noninvasively and selectively deliver pharmacological agents across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) for treating brain diseases. Acoustic cavitation monitoring could serve as an on-line tool to assess and control the treatment. While it demonstrated a strong correlation in small animals, its translation to primates remains in question due to the anatomically different and highly heterogeneous brain structures with gray and white matteras well as dense vasculature. In addition, the drug delivery efficiency and the BBB opening volume have never been shown to be predictable through cavitation monitoring in primates. This study aimed at determining how cavitation activity is correlated with the amount and concentration of gadolinium delivered through the BBB and its associated delivery efficiency as well as the BBB opening volume in non-human primates. Another important finding entails the effect of heterogeneous brain anatomy and vasculature of a primate brain, i.e., presence of large cerebral vessels, gray and white matter that will also affect the cavitation activity associated with variation of BBB opening in different tissue types, which is not typically observed in small animals. Both these new findings are critical in the primate brain and provide essential information for clinical applications. PMID:27853267

  2. Revisiting intra-arterial drug delivery for treating brain diseases or is it “déjà-vu, all over again”?

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Shailendra; Ellis, Jason A.; Emala, Charles W.

    2014-01-01

    For over six decades intra-arterial (IA) drugs have been sporadically used for the treatment of lethal brain diseases. In recent years considerable advance has been made in the IA treatment of retinoblastomas, liver and locally invasive breast cancers, but relatively little progress has been made in the treatment of brain cancers. High resting blood flow and the presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), makes IA delivery to the brain tissue far more challenging, compared to other organs. The lack of advance in the field is also partly due to the inability to understand the complex pharmacokinetics of IA drugs as it is difficult to track drug concentrations in sub-second time frame by conventional chemical methods. The advances in optical imaging now provide unprecedented insights into the pharmacokinetics of IA drug and optical tracer delivery. Novel delivery methods, improved IA drug formulations, and optical pharmacokinetics, present us with untested paradigms in pharmacology that could lead to new therapeutic interventions for brain cancers and stroke. The object of this review is to bring into focus the current practice, problems, and the potential of IA drug delivery for treating brain diseases. A concerted effort is needed at basic sciences (pharmacology and drug imaging), and translational (drug delivery techniques and protocol development) levels by the interventional neuroradiology community to advance the field. PMID:25478580

  3. Revisiting intra-arterial drug delivery for treating brain diseases or is it "déjà-vu, all over again"?

    PubMed

    Joshi, Shailendra; Ellis, Jason A; Emala, Charles W

    2014-05-01

    For over six decades intra-arterial (IA) drugs have been sporadically used for the treatment of lethal brain diseases. In recent years considerable advance has been made in the IA treatment of retinoblastomas, liver and locally invasive breast cancers, but relatively little progress has been made in the treatment of brain cancers. High resting blood flow and the presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), makes IA delivery to the brain tissue far more challenging, compared to other organs. The lack of advance in the field is also partly due to the inability to understand the complex pharmacokinetics of IA drugs as it is difficult to track drug concentrations in sub-second time frame by conventional chemical methods. The advances in optical imaging now provide unprecedented insights into the pharmacokinetics of IA drug and optical tracer delivery. Novel delivery methods, improved IA drug formulations, and optical pharmacokinetics, present us with untested paradigms in pharmacology that could lead to new therapeutic interventions for brain cancers and stroke. The object of this review is to bring into focus the current practice, problems, and the potential of IA drug delivery for treating brain diseases. A concerted effort is needed at basic sciences (pharmacology and drug imaging), and translational (drug delivery techniques and protocol development) levels by the interventional neuroradiology community to advance the field.

  4. Delivery of antihuman African trypanosomiasis drugs across the blood-brain and blood-CSF barriers.

    PubMed

    Sekhar, Gayathri N; Watson, Christopher P; Fidanboylu, Mehmet; Sanderson, Lisa; Thomas, Sarah A

    2014-01-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT or sleeping sickness) is a potentially fatal disease caused by the parasite, Trypanosoma brucei sp. The parasites are transmitted by the bite of insect vectors belonging to the genus Glossina (tsetse flies) and display a life cycle strategy that is equally spread between human and insect hosts. T.b. gambiense is found in western and central Africa whereas, T.b. rhodesiense is found in eastern and southern Africa. The disease has two clinical stages: a blood stage after the bite of an infected tsetse fly, followed by a central nervous system (CNS) stage where the parasite penetrates the brain; causing death if left untreated. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) makes the CNS stage difficult to treat because it prevents 98% of all known compounds from entering the brain, including some anti-HAT drugs. Those that do enter the brain are toxic compounds in their own right and have serious side effects. There are only a few drugs available to treat HAT and those that do are stage specific. This review summarizes the incidence, diagnosis, and treatment of HAT and provides a close examination of the BBB transport of anti-HAT drugs and an overview of the latest drugs in development.

  5. Blood-brain barrier drug delivery of IgG fusion proteins with a transferrin receptor monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Pardridge, William M

    2015-02-01

    Biologic drugs are large molecules that do not cross the blood- brain barrier (BBB). Brain penetration is possible following the re-engineering of the biologic drug as an IgG fusion protein. The IgG domain is a MAb against an endogenous BBB receptor such as the transferrin receptor (TfR). The TfRMAb acts as a molecular Trojan horse to ferry the fused biologic drug into the brain via receptor-mediated transport on the endogenous BBB TfR. This review discusses TfR isoforms, models of BBB transport of transferrin and TfRMAbs, and the genetic engineering of TfRMAb fusion proteins, including BBB penetrating IgG-neurotrophins, IgG-decoy receptors, IgG-lysosomal enzyme therapeutics and IgG-avidin fusion proteins, as well as BBB transport of bispecific antibodies formed by fusion of a therapeutic antibody to a TfRMAb targeting antibody. Also discussed are quantitative aspects of the plasma pharmacokinetics and brain uptake of TfRMAb fusion proteins, as compared to the brain uptake of small molecules, and therapeutic applications of TfRMAb fusion proteins in mouse models of neural disease, including Parkinson's disease, stroke, Alzheimer's disease and lysosomal storage disorders. The review covers the engineering of TfRMAb-avidin fusion proteins for BBB targeted delivery of biotinylated peptide radiopharmaceuticals, low-affinity TfRMAb Trojan horses and the safety pharmacology of chronic administration of TfRMAb fusion proteins. The BBB delivery of biologic drugs is possible following re-engineering as a fusion protein with a molecular Trojan horse such as a TfRMAb. The efficacy of this technology will be determined by the outcome of future clinical trials.

  6. Principles of strategic drug delivery to the brain (SDDB): Development of anorectic and orexigenic analogs of leptin

    PubMed Central

    Banks, W.A.; Gertler, A.; Solomon, G.; Niv-Spector, L.; Shpilman, M.; Yi, X.; Batrakova, E.; Vinogradov, S.; Kabanov, A.V.

    2012-01-01

    The blood–brain barrier (BBB) presents a tremendous challenge for the delivery of drugs to the central nervous system (CNS). This includes drugs that target brain receptors for the treatment of obesity and anorexia. Strategic drug delivery to brain (SDDB) is an approach that considers in depth the relations among the BBB, the candidate therapeutic, the CNS target, and the disease state to be treated. Here, we illustrate principles of SDDB with two different approaches to developing drugs based on leptin. In normal body weight humans and in non-obese rodents, leptin is readily transported across the BBB and into the CNS where it inhibits feeding and enhances thermogenesis. However, in obesity, the transport of leptin across the BBB is impaired, resulting in a resistance to leptin. As a result, it is difficult to treat obesity with leptin or its analogs that depend on the leptin transporter for access to the CNS. To treat obesity, we developed a leptin agonist modified by the addition of pluronic block copolymers (P85-leptin). P85-leptin retains biological activity and is capable of crossing the BBB by a mechanism that is not dependent on the leptin transporter. As such, P85-leptin is able to cross the BBB of obese mice at a rate similar to that of native leptin in lean mice. To treat anorexia, we developed a leptin antagonist modified by pegylation (PEG-MLA) that acts primarily by blocking the BBB transporter for endogenous, circulating leptin. This prevents blood-borne, endogenous leptin from entering the CNS, essentially mimicking the leptin resistance seen in obesity, and resulting in a significant increase in adiposity. These examples illustrate two strategies in which an understanding of the interactions among the BBB, CNS targets, and candidate therapeutics under physiologic and diseased conditions can be used to develop drugs effective for the treatment of brain disease. PMID:21669216

  7. Solid lipid nanoparticles for nose to brain delivery of haloperidol: in vitro drug release and pharmacokinetics evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Yasir, Mohd; Sara, Udai Vir Singh

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, haloperidol (HP)-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) were prepared to enhance the uptake of HP to brain via intranasal (i.n.) delivery. SLNs were prepared by a modified emulsification–diffusion technique and evaluated for particle size, zeta potential, drug entrapment efficiency, in vitro drug release, and stability. All parameters were found to be in an acceptable range. In vitro drug release was found to be 94.16±4.78% after 24 h and was fitted to the Higuchi model with a very high correlation coefficient (R2=0.9941). Pharmacokinetics studies were performed on albino Wistar rats and the concentration of HP in brain and blood was measured by high performance liquid chromatography. The brain/blood ratio at 0.5 h for HP-SLNs i.n., HP sol. i.n. and HP sol. i.v. was 1.61, 0.17 and 0.031, respectively, indicating direct nose-to-brain transport, bypassing the blood–brain barrier. The maximum concentration (Cmax) in brain achieved from i.n. administration of HP-SLNs (329.17±20.89 ng/mL, Tmax 2 h) was significantly higher than that achieved after i.v. (76.95±7.62 ng/mL, Tmax 1 h), and i.n. (90.13±6.28 ng/mL, Tmax 2 h) administration of HP sol. The highest drug-targeting efficiency (2362.43%) and direct transport percentage (95.77%) was found with HP-SLNs as compared to the other formulations. Higher DTE (%) and DTP (%) suggest that HP-SLNs have better brain targeting efficiency as compared to other formulations. PMID:26579417

  8. Solid lipid nanoparticles for nose to brain delivery of haloperidol: in vitro drug release and pharmacokinetics evaluation.

    PubMed

    Yasir, Mohd; Sara, Udai Vir Singh

    2014-12-01

    In the present study, haloperidol (HP)-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) were prepared to enhance the uptake of HP to brain via intranasal (i.n.) delivery. SLNs were prepared by a modified emulsification-diffusion technique and evaluated for particle size, zeta potential, drug entrapment efficiency, in vitro drug release, and stability. All parameters were found to be in an acceptable range. In vitro drug release was found to be 94.16±4.78% after 24 h and was fitted to the Higuchi model with a very high correlation coefficient (R (2)=0.9941). Pharmacokinetics studies were performed on albino Wistar rats and the concentration of HP in brain and blood was measured by high performance liquid chromatography. The brain/blood ratio at 0.5 h for HP-SLNs i.n., HP sol. i.n. and HP sol. i.v. was 1.61, 0.17 and 0.031, respectively, indicating direct nose-to-brain transport, bypassing the blood-brain barrier. The maximum concentration (C max) in brain achieved from i.n. administration of HP-SLNs (329.17±20.89 ng/mL, T max 2 h) was significantly higher than that achieved after i.v. (76.95±7.62 ng/mL, T max 1 h), and i.n. (90.13±6.28 ng/mL, T max 2 h) administration of HP sol. The highest drug-targeting efficiency (2362.43%) and direct transport percentage (95.77%) was found with HP-SLNs as compared to the other formulations. Higher DTE (%) and DTP (%) suggest that HP-SLNs have better brain targeting efficiency as compared to other formulations.

  9. Potential Use of Nanomedicine for Drug Delivery Across the Blood-Brain Barrier in Healthy and Diseased Brain.

    PubMed

    Ruozi, Barbara; Belletti, Daniela; Pederzoli, Francesca; Forni, Flavio; Vandelli, Maria Angela; Tosi, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    The research of efficacious non-invasive therapies for the treatment of brain diseases represents a huge challenge, as people affected by disorders of the central nervous system (CNS) will significantly increase. Moreover, the blood-brain barrier is a key factor in hampering a number of effective drugs to reach the CNS. This review is therefore focusing on possible interventions of nanomedicine-based approaches in selected diseases affecting the CNS. A wide overview of the most outstanding results on preclinical evaluations of the potential of nanomedicine in brain diseases (i.e. brain tumor, Alzheimer, Parkinson, epilepsy and others) is given, with highlights on the data with relevant interest and real possibility in translation from bench-to-bedside. Moreover, a critical evaluation on the rationale in planning nanosystems to target specific brain pathologies is described, opening the path to a more structured and pathology-tailored design of nanocarriers.

  10. Brain targeted nanoparticulate drug delivery system of rasagiline via intranasal route.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Deepti; Md, Shadab; Hasan, Quamrul; Fazil, Mohammad; Ali, Asgar; Baboota, Sanjula; Ali, Javed

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to prepare and evaluate a rasagiline-loaded chitosan glutamate nanoparticles (RAS-CG-NPs) by ionic gelation of CG with tripolyphosphate anions (TPP). RAS-loaded CG-NPs were characterized for particle size, size distribution, encapsulation efficiency and in vitro drug release. The mean particles size, polydispersity index (PDI) and encapsulation efficiency was found to be 151.1 ± 10.31, 0.380 ± 0.01 and 96.43 ± 4.23, respectively. Biodistribution of RAS formulations in the brain and blood of mice following intranasal (i.n.) and intravenous (i.v.) administration was performed using HPLC analytical method. The drug concentrations in brain following the i.n. of CG-NPs were found to be significantly higher at all the time points compared to both drug (i.n.) and drug CG-NPs (i.v.). The Cmax (999.25 ng/ml) and AUC (2086.60 ng h/ml) of formulation CG-NPs (i.n) were found to be significantly higher than CG-NPs (i.v.) and RAS solution (i.n.). The direct transport percentage (DTP%) values of RAS-loaded CG-NPs (i.n.) as compared to drug solution (i.n.) increased from 66.27 ± 1.8 to 69.27 ± 2.1%. The results showed significant enhancement of bioavailability in brain, after administration of the RAS-loaded CG-NPs which could be a substantial achievement of direct nose to brain targeting in Parkinson's disease therapy.

  11. Carbohydrate Nanoparticles for Brain Delivery.

    PubMed

    Lalatsa, A; Barbu, E

    2016-01-01

    Many brain tumors and neurological diseases can greatly benefit from the use of emerging nanotechnologies based on targeted nanomedicines that are able to noninvasively transport highly potent and specific pharmaceuticals across the blood-brain barrier. Carbohydrates have received considerable interest as materials for drug carriers due to their natural origin and inherent biodegradability and biocompatibility, as well as due to their hydrophilic character and ease of chemical modification combined with low cost and the possibility for large-scale manufacturing. This chapter provides an overview of the latest research involving the use of carbohydrate-based nanoparticles for drug delivery to the central nervous system. After reviewing the challenges posed by delivering drugs into the brain, the current state-of-the-art approaches for delivery of actives across the blood-brain barrier, including invasive and noninvasive strategies, are presented. A particular focus has been placed on chitosan polymers as they are among the most promising carbohydrate nanocarriers for the preparation and testing of chitosan-based nanomedicines that led, in preclinical proof-of-concept studies, to enhanced brain drug levels and increased pharmacodynamics responses after intravenous, nasal, and oral administration. While chitosan nanoparticles are to date among the most studied and most promising carriers, approaches based on other polysaccharides such as dextran, pullulan, and cellulose warrant further research in the attempt to advance the existing technologies for overcoming the blood-brain barrier. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Polyethyleneimine-modified iron oxide nanoparticles for brain tumor drug delivery using magnetic targeting and intra-carotid administration.

    PubMed

    Chertok, Beata; David, Allan E; Yang, Victor C

    2010-08-01

    This study aimed to examine the applicability of polyethyleneimine (PEI)-modified magnetic nanoparticles (GPEI) as a potential vascular drug/gene carrier to brain tumors. In vitro, GPEI exhibited high cell association and low cell toxicity--properties which are highly desirable for intracellular drug/gene delivery. In addition, a high saturation magnetization of 93 emu/g Fe was expected to facilitate magnetic targeting of GPEI to brain tumor lesions. However, following intravenous administration, GPEI could not be magnetically accumulated in tumors of rats harboring orthotopic 9L-gliosarcomas due to its poor pharmacokinetic properties, reflected by a negligibly low plasma AUC of 12 +/- 3 microg Fe/ml min. To improve "passive" GPEI presentation to brain tumor vasculature for subsequent "active" magnetic capture, we examined the intra-carotid route as an alternative for nanoparticle administration. Intra-carotid administration in conjunction with magnetic targeting resulted in 30-fold (p=0.002) increase in tumor entrapment of GPEI compared to that seen with intravenous administration. In addition, magnetic accumulation of cationic GPEI (zeta-potential = + 37.2 mV) in tumor lesions was 5.2-fold higher (p=0.004) than that achieved with slightly anionic G100 (zeta-potential= -12 mV) following intra-carotid administration, while no significant accumulation difference was detected between the two types of nanoparticles in the contra-lateral brain (p=0.187). These promising results warrant further investigation of GPEI as a potential cell-permeable, magnetically-responsive platform for brain tumor delivery of drugs and genes. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Polyethyleneimine-modified iron oxide nanoparticles for brain tumor drug delivery using magnetic targeting and intra-carotid administration

    PubMed Central

    Chertok, Beata; David, Allan E.; Yang, Victor C.

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the applicability of polyethyleneimine (PEI)-modified magnetic nanoparticles (GPEI) as a potential vascular drug/gene carrier to brain tumors. In vitro, GPEI exhibited high cell association and low cell toxicity – properties which are highly desirable for intracellular drug/gene delivery. In addition, a high saturation magnetization of 93 emu/g Fe was expected to facilitate magnetic targeting of GPEI to brain tumor lesions. However, following intravenous administration, GPEI could not be magnetically accumulated in tumors of rats harboring orthotopic 9L-gliosarcomas due to its poor pharmacokinetic properties, reflected by a negligibly low plasma AUC of 12 ± 3 μg Fe/ml*min. To improve “passive” GPEI presentation to brain tumor vasculature for subsequent “active” magnetic capture, we examined the intra-carotid route as an alternative for nanoparticle administration. Intra-carotid administration in conjunction with magnetic targeting resulted in 30-fold (p = 0.002) increase in tumor entrapment of GPEI compared to that seen with intravenous administration. In addition, magnetic accumulation of cationic GPEI (ζ-potential = + 37.2 mV) in tumor lesions was 5.2-fold higher (p = 0.004) than that achieved with slightly anionic G100 (ζ-potential = −12 mV) following intra-carotid administration, while no significant accumulation difference was detected between the two types of nanoparticles in the contra-lateral brain (p = 0.187). These promising results warrant further investigation of GPEI as a potential cell-permeable, magnetically-responsive platform for brain tumor delivery of drugs and genes. PMID:20494439

  14. Near-infrared fluorescence heptamethine carbocyanine dyes mediate imaging and targeted drug delivery for human brain tumor

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jason Boyang; Shi, Changhong; Chu, Gina Chia-Yi; Xu, Qijin; Zhang, Yi; Li, Qinlong; Yu, John S.; Zhau, Haiyen E.; Chung, Leland W.K.

    2016-01-01

    Brain tumors and brain metastases are among the deadliest malignancies of all human cancers, largely due to the cellular blood-brain and blood-tumor barriers that limit the delivery of imaging and therapeutic agents from the systemic circulation to tumors. Thus, improved strategies for brain tumor visualization and targeted treatment are critically needed. Here we identified and synthesized a group of near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) heptamethine carbocyanine dyes and derivative NIRF dye-drug conjugates for effective imaging and therapeutic targeting of brain tumors of either primary or metastatic origin in mice, which is mechanistically mediated by tumor hypoxia and organic aniontransporting polypeptide genes. We also demonstrate that these dyes, when conjugated to chemotherapeutic agents such as gemcitabine, significantly restricted the growth of both intracranial glioma xenografts and prostate tumor brain metastases and prolonged survival in mice. These results show promise in the application of NIRF dyes as novel theranostic agents for the detection and treatment of brain tumors. PMID:26197410

  15. Near-infrared fluorescence heptamethine carbocyanine dyes mediate imaging and targeted drug delivery for human brain tumor.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jason Boyang; Shi, Changhong; Chu, Gina Chia-Yi; Xu, Qijin; Zhang, Yi; Li, Qinlong; Yu, John S; Zhau, Haiyen E; Chung, Leland W K

    2015-10-01

    Brain tumors and brain metastases are among the deadliest malignancies of all human cancers, largely due to the cellular blood-brain and blood-tumor barriers that limit the delivery of imaging and therapeutic agents from the systemic circulation to tumors. Thus, improved strategies for brain tumor visualization and targeted treatment are critically needed. Here we identified and synthesized a group of near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) heptamethine carbocyanine dyes and derivative NIRF dye-drug conjugates for effective imaging and therapeutic targeting of brain tumors of either primary or metastatic origin in mice, which is mechanistically mediated by tumor hypoxia and organic anion-transporting polypeptide genes. We also demonstrate that these dyes, when conjugated to chemotherapeutic agents such as gemcitabine, significantly restricted the growth of both intracranial glioma xenografts and prostate tumor brain metastases and prolonged survival in mice. These results show promise in the application of NIRF dyes as novel theranostic agents for the detection and treatment of brain tumors.

  16. Buccal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Smart, John D

    2005-05-01

    Buccal formulations have been developed to allow prolonged localised therapy and enhanced systemic delivery. The buccal mucosa, however, while avoiding first-pass effects, is a formidable barrier to drug absorption, especially for biopharmaceutical products (proteins and oligonucleotides) arising from the recent advances in genomics and proteomics. The buccal route is typically used for extended drug delivery, so formulations that can be attached to the buccal mucosa are favoured. The bioadhesive polymers used in buccal drug delivery to retain a formulation are typically hydrophilic macro-molecules containing numerous hydrogen bonding groups. Newer second-generation bioadhesives have been developed and these include modified or new polymers that allow enhanced adhesion and/or drug delivery, in addition to site-specific ligands such as lectins. Over the last 20 years a wide range of formulations has been developed for buccal drug delivery (tablet, patch, liquids and semisolids) but comparatively few have found their way onto the market. Currently, this route is restricted to the delivery of a limited number of small lipophilic molecules that readily cross the buccal mucosa. However, this route could become a significant means for the delivery of a range of active agents in the coming years, if the barriers to buccal drug delivery are overcome. In particular, patient acceptability and the successful systemic delivery of large molecules (proteins, oligonucleotides and polysaccharides) via this route remains both a significant opportunity and challenge, and new/improved technologies may be required to address these.

  17. Targeted Delivery of Drugs to Brain Tumors (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema

    Forte, Trudy

    2016-07-12

    Summer Lecture Series 2007: Trudy Forte of Berkeley Lab's Life Sciences Division will discuss her work developing nano-sized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles that can be used as a safe and effective means of delivering anticancer drugs to brain tumors, particularly glioblastoma multiforme. This is the most common malignant brain tumor in adults and one of the deadliest forms of cancer. Her research team found that the synthetic LDL particles can target and kill such tumors cells in vitro. The nanoparticles are composed of a lipid core surrounded by a peptide. The peptide contains an amino acid sequence that recognizes the LDL receptor, and the lipid core has the ability to accumulate anti-cancer drugs.

  18. Targeted Delivery of Drugs to Brain Tumors (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    SciTech Connect

    Forte, Trudy

    2007-06-27

    Summer Lecture Series 2007: Trudy Forte of Berkeley Lab's Life Sciences Division will discuss her work developing nano-sized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles that can be used as a safe and effective means of delivering anticancer drugs to brain tumors, particularly glioblastoma multiforme. This is the most common malignant brain tumor in adults and one of the deadliest forms of cancer. Her research team found that the synthetic LDL particles can target and kill such tumors cells in vitro. The nanoparticles are composed of a lipid core surrounded by a peptide. The peptide contains an amino acid sequence that recognizes the LDL receptor, and the lipid core has the ability to accumulate anti-cancer drugs.

  19. Drug and gene delivery across the blood-brain barrier with focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Timbie, Kelsie F; Mead, Brian P; Price, Richard J

    2015-12-10

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) remains one of the most significant limitations to treatments of central nervous system (CNS) disorders including brain tumors, neurodegenerative diseases and psychiatric disorders. It is now well-established that focused ultrasound (FUS) in conjunction with contrast agent microbubbles may be used to non-invasively and temporarily disrupt the BBB, allowing localized delivery of systemically administered therapeutic agents as large as 100nm in size to the CNS. Importantly, recent technological advances now permit FUS application through the intact human skull, obviating the need for invasive and risky surgical procedures. When used in combination with magnetic resonance imaging, FUS may be applied precisely to pre-selected CNS targets. Indeed, FUS devices capable of sub-millimeter precision are currently in several clinical trials. FUS mediated BBB disruption has the potential to fundamentally change how CNS diseases are treated, unlocking potential for combinatorial treatments with nanotechnology, markedly increasing the efficacy of existing therapeutics that otherwise do not cross the BBB effectively, and permitting safe repeated treatments. This article comprehensively reviews recent studies on the targeted delivery of therapeutics into the CNS with FUS and offers perspectives on the future of this technology.

  20. Intracochlear Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Borenstein, Jeffrey T.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Advances in molecular biology and in the basic understanding of the mechanisms associated with sensorineural hearing loss and other diseases of the inner ear, are paving the way towards new approaches for treatments for millions of patients. However, the cochlea is a particularly challenging target for drug therapy, and new technologies will be required to provide safe and efficacious delivery of these compounds. Emerging delivery systems based on microfluidic technologies are showing promise as a means for direct intracochlear delivery. Ultimately, these systems may serve as a means for extended delivery of regenerative compounds to restore hearing in patients suffering from a host of auditory diseases. Areas covered in this review Recent progress in the development of drug delivery systems capable of direct intracochlear delivery is reviewed, including passive systems such as osmotic pumps, active microfluidic devices, and systems combined with currently available devices such as cochlear implants. The aim of this article is to provide a concise review of intracochlear drug delivery systems currently under development, and ultimately capable of being combined with emerging therapeutic compounds for the treatment of inner ear diseases. Expert Opinion Safe and efficacious treatment of auditory diseases will require the development of microscale delivery devices, capable of extended operation and direct application to the inner ear. These advances will require miniaturization and integration of multiple functions, including drug storage, delivery, power management and sensing, ultimately enabling closed-loop control and timed-sequence delivery devices for treatment of these diseases. PMID:21615213

  1. Novel central nervous system drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Stockwell, Jocelyn; Abdi, Nabiha; Lu, Xiaofan; Maheshwari, Oshin; Taghibiglou, Changiz

    2014-05-01

    For decades, biomedical and pharmaceutical researchers have worked to devise new and more effective therapeutics to treat diseases affecting the central nervous system. The blood-brain barrier effectively protects the brain, but poses a profound challenge to drug delivery across this barrier. Many traditional drugs cannot cross the blood-brain barrier in appreciable concentrations, with less than 1% of most drugs reaching the central nervous system, leading to a lack of available treatments for many central nervous system diseases, such as stroke, neurodegenerative disorders, and brain tumors. Due to the ineffective nature of most treatments for central nervous system disorders, the development of novel drug delivery systems is an area of great interest and active research. Multiple novel strategies show promise for effective central nervous system drug delivery, giving potential for more effective and safer therapies in the future. This review outlines several novel drug delivery techniques, including intranasal drug delivery, nanoparticles, drug modifications, convection-enhanced infusion, and ultrasound-mediated drug delivery. It also assesses possible clinical applications, limitations, and examples of current clinical and preclinical research for each of these drug delivery approaches. Improved central nervous system drug delivery is extremely important and will allow for improved treatment of central nervous system diseases, causing improved therapies for those who are affected by central nervous system diseases.

  2. Intranasal administration as a route for drug delivery to the brain: evidence for a unique pathway for albumin.

    PubMed

    Falcone, Joseph A; Salameh, Therese S; Yi, Xiang; Cordy, Benjamin J; Mortell, William G; Kabanov, Alexander V; Banks, William A

    2014-10-01

    A variety of compounds will distribute into the brain when placed at the cribriform plate by intranasal (i.n.) administration. In this study, we investigated the ability of albumin, a protein that can act as a drug carrier but is excluded from brain by the blood-brain barrier, to distribute into the brain after i.n. administration. We labeled bovine serum albumin with [(125)I] ([(125)I]Alb) and studied its uptake into 11 brain regions and its entry into the blood from 5 minutes to 6 hours after i.n. administration. [(125)I]Alb was present throughout the brain at 5 minutes. Several regions showed distinct peaks in uptake that ranged from 5 minutes (parietal cortex) to 60 minutes (midbrain). About 2-4% of the i.n. [(125)I]Alb entered the bloodstream. The highest levels occurred in the olfactory bulb and striatum. Distribution was dose-dependent, with less taken up by whole brain, cortex, and blood at the higher dose of albumin. Uptake was selectively increased into the olfactory bulb and cortex by the fluid-phase stimulator PMA (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate), but inhibitors to receptor-mediated transcytosis, caveolae, and phosphoinositide 3-kinase were without effect. Albumin altered the distribution of radioactive leptin given by i.n. administration, decreasing uptake into the blood and by the cerebellum and increasing uptake by the hypothalamus. We conclude that [(125)I]Alb administered i.n. reaches all parts of the brain through a dose-dependent mechanism that may involve fluid-phase transcytosis and, as illustrated by leptin, can affect the delivery of other substances to the brain after their i.n. administration.

  3. Intranasal Administration as a Route for Drug Delivery to the Brain: Evidence for a Unique Pathway for Albumin

    PubMed Central

    Falcone, Joseph A.; Salameh, Therese S.; Yi, Xiang; Cordy, Benjamin J.; Mortell, William G.; Kabanov, Alexander V.

    2014-01-01

    A variety of compounds will distribute into the brain when placed at the cribriform plate by intranasal (i.n.) administration. In this study, we investigated the ability of albumin, a protein that can act as a drug carrier but is excluded from brain by the blood-brain barrier, to distribute into the brain after i.n. administration. We labeled bovine serum albumin with [125I] ([125I]Alb) and studied its uptake into 11 brain regions and its entry into the blood from 5 minutes to 6 hours after i.n. administration. [125I]Alb was present throughout the brain at 5 minutes. Several regions showed distinct peaks in uptake that ranged from 5 minutes (parietal cortex) to 60 minutes (midbrain). About 2–4% of the i.n. [125I]Alb entered the bloodstream. The highest levels occurred in the olfactory bulb and striatum. Distribution was dose-dependent, with less taken up by whole brain, cortex, and blood at the higher dose of albumin. Uptake was selectively increased into the olfactory bulb and cortex by the fluid-phase stimulator PMA (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate), but inhibitors to receptor-mediated transcytosis, caveolae, and phosphoinositide 3-kinase were without effect. Albumin altered the distribution of radioactive leptin given by i.n. administration, decreasing uptake into the blood and by the cerebellum and increasing uptake by the hypothalamus. We conclude that [125I]Alb administered i.n. reaches all parts of the brain through a dose-dependent mechanism that may involve fluid-phase transcytosis and, as illustrated by leptin, can affect the delivery of other substances to the brain after their i.n. administration. PMID:25027317

  4. Solid lipid nanoparticles as a vehicle for brain-targeted drug delivery: two new strategies of functionalization with apolipoprotein E

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rute Neves, Ana; Fontes Queiroz, Joana; Weksler, Babette; Romero, Ignacio A.; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Reis, Salette

    2015-12-01

    Nanotechnology can be an important tool to improve the permeability of some drugs for the blood-brain barrier. In this work we created a new system to enter the brain by functionalizing solid lipid nanoparticles with apolipoprotein E, aiming to enhance their binding to low-density lipoprotein receptors on the blood-brain barrier endothelial cells. Solid lipid nanoparticles were successfully functionalized with apolipoprotein E using two distinct strategies that took advantage of the strong interaction between biotin and avidin. Transmission electron microscopy images revealed spherical nanoparticles, and dynamic light scattering gave a Z-average under 200 nm, a polydispersity index below 0.2, and a zeta potential between -10 mV and -15 mV. The functionalization of solid lipid nanoparticles with apolipoprotein E was demonstrated by infrared spectroscopy and fluorimetric assays. In vitro cytotoxic effects were evaluated by MTT and LDH assays in the human cerebral microvascular endothelial cells (hCMEC/D3) cell line, a human blood-brain barrier model, and revealed no toxicity up to 1.5 mg ml-1 over 4 h of incubation. The brain permeability was evaluated in transwell devices with hCMEC/D3 monolayers, and a 1.5-fold increment in barrier transit was verified for functionalized nanoparticles when compared with non-functionalized ones. The results suggested that these novel apolipoprotein E-functionalized nanoparticles resulted in dynamic stable systems capable of being used for an improved and specialized brain delivery of drugs through the blood-brain barrier.

  5. Nose to brain microemulsion-based drug delivery system of rivastigmine: formulation and ex-vivo characterization.

    PubMed

    Shah, Brijesh M; Misra, Manju; Shishoo, Chamanlal J; Padh, Harish

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder leading to irreversible loss of neurons, cognition and formation of abnormal protein aggregates. Rivastigmine, a reversible cholinesterase inhibitor used for the treatment of AD, undergoes extensive first-pass metabolism, thus limiting its absolute bioavailability to only 36% after 3-mg dose. Due to extreme aqueous solubility, rivastigmine shows poor penetration and lesser concentration in the brain thus requiring frequent oral dosing. This investigation was aimed to formulate microemulsion (ME) and mucoadhesive microemulsions (MMEs) of rivastigmine for nose to brain delivery and to compare percentage drug diffused for both systems using in-vitro and ex-vivo study. Rivastigmine-loaded ME and MMEs were prepared by titration method and characterized for drug content, globule size distribution, zeta potential, pH, viscosity and nasal ciliotoxicity study. Rivastigmine-loaded ME system containing 8% w/w Capmul MCM EP, 44% w/w Labrasol:Transcutol-P (1:1) and 48% w/w distilled water was formulated, whereas 0.3% w/w chitosan (CH) and cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (as mucoadhesive agents) were used to formulate MMEs, respectively. ME and MMEs formulations were transparent with drug content, globule size and zeta potential in the range of 98.59% to 99.43%, 53.8 nm to 55.4 nm and -2.73 mV to 6.52 mV, respectively. MME containing 0.3% w/w CH followed Higuchi model (r(2) = 0.9773) and showed highest diffusion coefficient. It was free from nasal ciliotoxicity and stable for three months. However, the potential of developed CH-based MME for nose to brain delivery of rivastigmine can only be established after in-vivo and biodistribution study.

  6. Sublingual drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Tarun; Jasti, Bhaskara; Li, Xiaoling

    2008-01-01

    The sublingual route is one of the early modes of administration for systemic drug delivery. This route avoids first-pass metabolism and affords quick drug entry into the systemic circulation. Attempts have been made to deliver various pharmacologically active agents, such as cardiovascular drugs, analgesics, and peptides, across the sublingual mucosa. In this review, the anatomical structure, blood supply, biochemical composition, transport pathways, permeation enhancement strategies, in vitro/in vivo models, and clinical investigations for the sublingual route of drug delivery is discussed.

  7. Pharmacodynamic analysis of magnetic resonance imaging-monitored focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening for drug delivery to brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Chu, Po-Chun; Chai, Wen-Yen; Hsieh, Han-Yi; Wang, Jiun-Jie; Wey, Shiaw-Pyng; Huang, Chiung-Yin; Wei, Kuo-Chen; Liu, Hao-Li

    2013-01-01

    Microbubble-enhanced focused ultrasound (FUS) can enhance the delivery of therapeutic agents into the brain for brain tumor treatment. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of brain tumor conditions on the distribution and dynamics of small molecule leakage into targeted regions of the brain after FUS-BBB opening. A total of 34 animals were used, and the process was monitored by 7T-MRI. Evans blue (EB) dye as well as Gd-DTPA served as small molecule substitutes for evaluation of drug behavior. EB was quantified spectrophotometrically. Spin-spin (R1) relaxometry and area under curve (AUC) were measured by MRI to quantify Gd-DTPA. We found that FUS-BBB opening provided a more significant increase in permeability with small tumors. In contrast, accumulation was much higher in large tumors, independent of FUS. The AUC values of Gd-DTPA were well correlated with EB delivery, suggesting that Gd-DTPA was a good indicator of total small-molecule accumulation in the target region. The peripheral regions of large tumors exhibited similar dynamics of small-molecule leakage after FUS-BBB opening as small tumors, suggesting that FUS-BBB opening may have the most significant permeability-enhancing effect on tumor peripheral. This study provides useful information toward designing an optimized FUS-BBB opening strategy to deliver small-molecule therapeutic agents into brain tumors.

  8. Microfabrication for Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Brendan; Rubino, Ilaria; Quan, Fu-Shi; Yoo, Bongyoung; Choi, Hyo-Jick

    2016-01-01

    This review is devoted to discussing the application of microfabrication technologies to target challenges encountered in life processes by the development of drug delivery systems. Recently, microfabrication has been largely applied to solve health and pharmaceutical science issues. In particular, fabrication methods along with compatible materials have been successfully designed to produce multifunctional, highly effective drug delivery systems. Microfabrication offers unique tools that can tackle problems in this field, such as ease of mass production with high quality control and low cost, complexity of architecture design and a broad range of materials. Presented is an overview of silicon- and polymer-based fabrication methods that are key in the production of microfabricated drug delivery systems. Moreover, the efforts focused on studying the biocompatibility of materials used in microfabrication are analyzed. Finally, this review discusses representative ways microfabrication has been employed to develop systems delivering drugs through the transdermal and oral route, and to improve drug eluting implants. Additionally, microfabricated vaccine delivery systems are presented due to the great impact they can have in obtaining a cold chain-free vaccine, with long-term stability. Microfabrication will continue to offer new, alternative solutions for the development of smart, advanced drug delivery systems. PMID:28773770

  9. d-Retroenantiomer of Quorum-Sensing Peptide-Modified Polymeric Micelles for Brain Tumor-Targeted Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Ran, Danni; Mao, Jiani; Zhan, Changyou; Xie, Cao; Ruan, Huitong; Ying, Man; Zhou, Jianfen; Lu, Wan-Liang; Lu, Weiyue

    2017-08-09

    Compared to that of other tumors, various barriers, such as the blood-brain barrier (BBB), enzymatic barriers, and the blood-brain tumor barrier, severely impede the successful treatment of gliomas. Peptide ligands were frequently used as targeting moieties to mediate brain tumor-targeted drug delivery. (L)WSW (SYPGWSW) is a recently reported quorum-sensing (QS) peptide that is able to efficiently cross the BBB. Even though linear (L)WSW traverses the BBB in vitro, its in vivo targeting ability has been greatly impaired due to proteolysis. Here, we developed a stable peptide, (D)WSW ((D)W(D)S(D)W(D)G(D)P(D)Y(D)S), using the retro-inverso isomerization technique to achieve an enhanced antiglioma effect. In vitro studies have demonstrated that both the (L)WSW and (D)WSW peptides possessed excellent tumor-homing properties and barrier-penetration abilities, whereas (D)WSW exhibited exceptional stability in serum and maintained its targeting ability after serum preincubation. In vivo, (D)WSW-modified probes and micelles accumulated more efficiently in the glioma region in comparison with (L)WSW-modified probes and micelles because of full resistance to proteolysis in blood circulation. As expected, (D)WSW-modified paclitaxel (PTX)-loaded micelles ((D)WSW Micelle/PTX) exhibited the longest median survival time among glioma-bearing nude mice. Our results suggested that the QS peptide appears to be a promising targeting moiety, with potential applications in glioma-targeted drug delivery.

  10. Metrology for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Peter; Klein, Stephan

    2015-08-01

    In various recently published studies, it is argued that there are underestimated risks with infusion technology, i.e., adverse incidents believed to be caused by inadequate administration of the drugs. This is particularly the case for applications involving very low-flow rates, i.e., <1 ml/h and applications involving drug delivery by means of multiple pumps. The risks in infusing are caused by a lack of awareness, incompletely understood properties of the complete drug delivery system and a lack of a proper metrological infrastructure for low-flow rates. Technical challenges such as these were the reason a European research project "Metrology for Drug Delivery" was started in 2011. In this special issue of Biomedical Engineering, the results of that project are discussed.

  11. Drug Delivery to the Brain in Alzheimer’s Disease: Consideration of the Blood-brain Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Banks, William A.

    2012-01-01

    The successful treatment of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) will require drugs that can negotiate the blood-brain barrier (BBB). However, the BBB is not simply a physical barrier, but a complex interface that is in intimate communication with the rest of the central nervous system (CNS) and influenced by peripheral tissues. This review examines three aspects of the BBB in AD. First, it considers how the BBB may be contributing to the onset and progression of AD. In this regard, the BBB itself is a therapeutic target in the treatment of AD. Second, it examines how the BBB restricts drugs that might otherwise be useful in the treatment of AD and examines strategies being developed to deliver drugs to the CNS for the treatment of AD. Third, it considers how drug penetration across the AD BBB may differ from the BBB of normal aging. In this case, those differences can complicate the treatment of CNS diseases such as depression, delirium, psychoses, and pain control in the AD population. PMID:22202501

  12. Enhancing drug delivery for boron neutron capture therapy of brain tumors with focused ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Alkins, Ryan D.; Brodersen, Peter M.; Sodhi, Rana N. S.; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2013-01-01

    Background Glioblastoma is a notoriously difficult tumor to treat because of its relative sanctuary in the brain and infiltrative behavior. Therapies need to penetrate the CNS but avoid collateral tissue injury. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a treatment whereby a 10B-containing drug preferentially accumulates in malignant cells and causes highly localized damage when exposed to epithermal neutron irradiation. Studies have suggested that 10B-enriched L-4-boronophenylalanine-fructose (BPA-f) complex uptake can be improved by enhancing the permeability of the cerebrovasculature with osmotic agents. We investigated the use of MRI-guided focused ultrasound, in combination with injectable microbubbles, to noninvasively and focally augment the uptake of BPA-f. Methods With the use of a 9L gliosarcoma tumor model in Fisher 344 rats, the blood-brain and blood-tumor barriers were disrupted with pulsed ultrasound using a 558 kHz transducer and Definity microbubbles, and BPA-f (250 mg/kg) was delivered intravenously over 2 h. 10B concentrations were estimated with imaging mass spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. Results The tumor to brain ratio of 10B was 6.7 ± 0.5 with focused ultrasound and only 4.1 ± 0.4 in the control group (P < .01), corresponding to a mean tumor [10B] of 123 ± 25 ppm and 85 ± 29 ppm, respectively. 10B uptake in infiltrating clusters treated with ultrasound was 0.86 ± 0.10 times the main tumor concentration, compared with only 0.29 ± 0.08 in controls. Conclusions Ultrasound increases the accumulation of 10B in the main tumor and infiltrating cells. These findings, in combination with the expanding clinical use of focused ultrasound, may offer improvements in BNCT and the treatment of glioblastoma. PMID:23640533

  13. Submicron-bubble-enhanced focused ultrasound for blood-brain barrier disruption and improved CNS drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ching-Hsiang; Liu, Hao-Li; Ting, Chien-Yu; Lee, Ya-Hsuan; Huang, Chih-Ying; Ma, Yan-Jung; Wei, Kuo-Chen; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2014-01-01

    The use of focused ultrasound (FUS) with microbubbles has been proven to induce transient blood-brain barrier opening (BBB-opening). However, FUS-induced inertial cavitation of microbubbles can also result in erythrocyte extravasations. Here we investigated whether induction of submicron bubbles to oscillate at their resonant frequency would reduce inertial cavitation during BBB-opening and thereby eliminate erythrocyte extravasations in a rat brain model. FUS was delivered with acoustic pressures of 0.1-4.5 MPa using either in-house manufactured submicron bubbles or standard SonoVue microbubbles. Wideband and subharmonic emissions from bubbles were used to quantify inertial and stable cavitation, respectively. Erythrocyte extravasations were evaluated by in vivo post-treatment magnetic resonance susceptibility-weighted imaging, and finally by histological confirmation. We found that excitation of submicron bubbles with resonant frequency-matched FUS (10 MHz) can greatly limit inertial cavitation while enhancing stable cavitation. The BBB-opening was mainly caused by stable cavitation, whereas the erythrocyte extravasation was closely correlated with inertial cavitation. Our technique allows extensive reduction of inertial cavitation to induce safe BBB-opening. Furthermore, the safety issue of BBB-opening was not compromised by prolonging FUS exposure time, and the local drug concentrations in the brain tissues were significantly improved to 60 times (BCNU; 18.6 µg versus 0.3 µg) by using chemotherapeutic agent-loaded submicron bubbles with FUS. This study provides important information towards the goal of successfully translating FUS brain drug delivery into clinical use.

  14. Submicron-Bubble-Enhanced Focused Ultrasound for Blood–Brain Barrier Disruption and Improved CNS Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Ting, Chien-Yu; Lee, Ya-Hsuan; Huang, Chih-Ying; Ma, Yan-Jung; Wei, Kuo-Chen; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2014-01-01

    The use of focused ultrasound (FUS) with microbubbles has been proven to induce transient blood–brain barrier opening (BBB-opening). However, FUS-induced inertial cavitation of microbubbles can also result in erythrocyte extravasations. Here we investigated whether induction of submicron bubbles to oscillate at their resonant frequency would reduce inertial cavitation during BBB-opening and thereby eliminate erythrocyte extravasations in a rat brain model. FUS was delivered with acoustic pressures of 0.1–4.5 MPa using either in-house manufactured submicron bubbles or standard SonoVue microbubbles. Wideband and subharmonic emissions from bubbles were used to quantify inertial and stable cavitation, respectively. Erythrocyte extravasations were evaluated by in vivo post-treatment magnetic resonance susceptibility-weighted imaging, and finally by histological confirmation. We found that excitation of submicron bubbles with resonant frequency-matched FUS (10 MHz) can greatly limit inertial cavitation while enhancing stable cavitation. The BBB-opening was mainly caused by stable cavitation, whereas the erythrocyte extravasation was closely correlated with inertial cavitation. Our technique allows extensive reduction of inertial cavitation to induce safe BBB-opening. Furthermore, the safety issue of BBB-opening was not compromised by prolonging FUS exposure time, and the local drug concentrations in the brain tissues were significantly improved to 60 times (BCNU; 18.6 µg versus 0.3 µg) by using chemotherapeutic agent-loaded submicron bubbles with FUS. This study provides important information towards the goal of successfully translating FUS brain drug delivery into clinical use. PMID:24788566

  15. Permeability of Endothelial and Astrocyte Cocultures: In Vitro Blood–Brain Barrier Models for Drug Delivery Studies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guanglei; Simon, Melissa J.; Cancel, Limary M.; Shi, Zhong-Dong; Ji, Xinying; Tarbell, John M.; Morrison, Barclay; Fu, Bingmei M.

    2014-01-01

    The blood–brain barrier (BBB) is a major obstacle for drug delivery to the brain. To seek for in vitro BBB models that are more accessible than animals for investigating drug transport across the BBB, we compared four in vitro cultured cell models: endothelial monoculture (bEnd3 cell line), coculture of bEnd3 and primary rat astrocytes (coculture), coculture with collagen type I and IV mixture, and coculture with Matrigel. The expression of the BBB tight junction proteins in these in vitro models was assessed using RT-PCR and immunofluorescence. We also quantified the hydraulic conductivity (Lp), transendothelial electrical resistance (TER) and diffusive solute permeability (P) of these models to three solutes: TAMRA, Dextran 10K and Dextran 70K. Our results show that Lp and P of the endothelial monoculture and coculture models are not different from each other. Compared with in vivo permeability data from rat pial microvessels, P of the endothelial monoculture and coculture models are not significantly different from in vivo data for Dextran 70K, but they are 2–4 times higher for TAMRA and Dextran 10K. This suggests that the endothelial monoculture and all of the coculture models are fairly good models for studying the transport of relatively large solutes across the BBB. PMID:20361260

  16. Permeability of endothelial and astrocyte cocultures: in vitro blood-brain barrier models for drug delivery studies.

    PubMed

    Li, Guanglei; Simon, Melissa J; Cancel, Limary M; Shi, Zhong-Dong; Ji, Xinying; Tarbell, John M; Morrison, Barclay; Fu, Bingmei M

    2010-08-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a major obstacle for drug delivery to the brain. To seek for in vitro BBB models that are more accessible than animals for investigating drug transport across the BBB, we compared four in vitro cultured cell models: endothelial monoculture (bEnd3 cell line), coculture of bEnd3 and primary rat astrocytes (coculture), coculture with collagen type I and IV mixture, and coculture with Matrigel. The expression of the BBB tight junction proteins in these in vitro models was assessed using RT-PCR and immunofluorescence. We also quantified the hydraulic conductivity (L (p)), transendothelial electrical resistance (TER) and diffusive solute permeability (P) of these models to three solutes: TAMRA, Dextran 10K and Dextran 70K. Our results show that L (p) and P of the endothelial monoculture and coculture models are not different from each other. Compared with in vivo permeability data from rat pial microvessels, P of the endothelial monoculture and coculture models are not significantly different from in vivo data for Dextran 70K, but they are 2-4 times higher for TAMRA and Dextran 10K. This suggests that the endothelial monoculture and all of the coculture models are fairly good models for studying the transport of relatively large solutes across the BBB.

  17. Transient disruption of vascular barriers using focused ultrasound and microbubbles for targeted drug delivery in the brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aryal, Muna

    The physiology of the vasculature in the central nervous system (CNS) which includes the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) and other factors, prevents the transport of most anticancer agents to the brain and restricts delivery to infiltrating brain tumors. The heterogeneous vascular permeability in tumor vessels (blood-tumor barrier; BTB), along with several other factors, creates additional hurdles for drug treatment of brain tumors. Different methods have been used to bypass the BBB/BTB, but they have their own limitations such as being invasive, non-targeted or requiring the formulation of new drugs. Magnetic Resonance Imaging guided Focused Ultrasound (MRIgFUS), when combined with circulating microbubbles, is an emerging noninvasive method to temporarily permeabilize the BBB and BTB. The purpose of this thesis was to use this alternative approach to deliver chemotherapeutic agents through the BBB/BTB for brain tumor treatment in a rodent model to overcome the hinderances encountered in prior approaches tested for drug delivery in the CNS. The results presented in thesis demonstrate that MRIgFUS can be used to achieve consistent and reproducible BBB/BTB disruption in rats. It enabled us to achieve clinically-relevant concentrations of doxorubicin (~ 4.8+/-0.5 microg/g) delivered to the brain with the sonication parameters (0.69 MHz; 0.55 MPa; 10 ms bursts; 1 Hz PRF; 60 s duration), microbubble concentration (Definity, 10 microl/kg), and liposomoal doxorubicin (Lipo-DOX) dose (5.67 mg/kg) used. The resulting doxorubicin concentration was reduced by 32% when the agent was injected 10 minute after the last sonication. Three weekly sessions of FUS and Lipo-DOX appeared to be safe in the rat brain, despite some minor tissue damage. Importantly, the severe neurotoxicity seen in earlier works using other approaches does not appear to occur with delivery via FUS-BBB disruption. The resuls from three weekly treatments of FUS and Lipo-DOX in a rat glioma model are highly

  18. 1-Malonyl-1,4-dihydropyridine as a novel carrier for specific delivery of drugs to the brain.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Heba A; Abdel-Aziz, Mohamed; Abuo-Rahma, Gamal El-Din A A; Farag, Hassan H

    2009-02-15

    A group of 1-malonyl-1,4-dihydropyridine derivatives were synthesized as novel carrier systems for site-specific and sustained drug delivery to the brain. Such carriers are expected to be stable against air oxidation due to the presence of the carbonyl group close to nitrogen of the dihydropyridine. These carrier systems were attached to a group of different aldehydes to afford novel quaternary pyridinium derivatives 9a-e, 11a-d, 13 and 18a-b. Reduction of the prepared quaternary pyridinium derivatives with sodium dithionite afforded a novel group of 1-malonyl-1,4-dihydropyridine chemical delivery systems (CDSs) 10a-e, 12a-d, 14 and 19a-b. The synthesized 1-malonyl-1,4-dihydropyridine CDSs were subjected to various chemical and biological investigations to evaluate their ability to cross the blood-brain barrier, and to be oxidized biologically into their corresponding quaternary derivatives. The in vitro oxidation studies showed that most of the 1-malonyl-1,4-dihydropyridine CDSs could be oxidized into their corresponding quaternary derivatives at an adequate rate. The in vivo studies showed that compounds 10c and 14 were able to cross the blood-brain barrier at detectable concentrations. Moreover, the pyridinium quaternary intermediates 9a, 9c, 13, 18a and their corresponding dihydro derivatives 10a, 10c, 14 and 19a were screened for their antidepressant activity using tail suspension behavioral despair test compared to imipramine as a reference at a dose level of 10mg/kg. The results indicated that compounds 13, 14 and 19a induced remarkable antidepressant activity comparable to imipramine. Compounds 10a, 10c and 18a exhibited good antidepressant activity, their activities nearly equal to 92.8%, 86.7% and 90.20% of the activity of imipramine, respectively. The other derivatives 9a and 9c exhibited moderate antidepressant activity compared with imipramine.

  19. Mucoadhesive drug delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Rahamatullah; Raj Singh, Thakur Raghu; Garland, Martin James; Woolfson, A David; Donnelly, Ryan F.

    2011-01-01

    Mucoadhesion is commonly defined as the adhesion between two materials, at least one of which is a mucosal surface. Over the past few decades, mucosal drug delivery has received a great deal of attention. Mucoadhesive dosage forms may be designed to enable prolonged retention at the site of application, providing a controlled rate of drug release for improved therapeutic outcome. Application of dosage forms to mucosal surfaces may be of benefit to drug molecules not amenable to the oral route, such as those that undergo acid degradation or extensive first-pass metabolism. The mucoadhesive ability of a dosage form is dependent upon a variety of factors, including the nature of the mucosal tissue and the physicochemical properties of the polymeric formulation. This review article aims to provide an overview of the various aspects of mucoadhesion, mucoadhesive materials, factors affecting mucoadhesion, evaluating methods, and finally various mucoadhesive drug delivery systems (buccal, nasal, ocular, gastro, vaginal, and rectal). PMID:21430958

  20. Design and experimental evaluation of a 256-channel dual-frequency ultrasound phased-array system for transcranial blood-brain barrier opening and brain drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao-Li; Jan, Chen-Kai; Chu, Po-Chun; Hong, Jhong-Cing; Lee, Pei-Yun; Hsu, Jyh-Duen; Lin, Chung-Chih; Huang, Chiung-Ying; Chen, Pin-Yuan; Wei, Kuo-Chen

    2014-04-01

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) in the presence of microbubbles can bring about transcranial and local opening of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) for potential noninvasive delivery of drugs to the brain. A phased-array ultrasound system is essential for FUS-BBB opening to enable electronic steering and correction of the focal beam which is distorted by cranial bone. Here, we demonstrate our prototype design of a 256-channel ultrasound phased-array system for large-region transcranial BBB opening in the brains of large animals. One of the unique features of this system is the capability of generating concurrent dual-frequency ultrasound signals from the driving system for potential enhancement of BBB opening. A wide range of signal frequencies can be generated (frequency = 0.2-1.2 MHz) with controllable driving burst patterns. Precise output power can be controlled for individual channels via 8-bit duty-cycle control of transistor-transistor logic signals and the 8-bit microcontroller-controlled buck converter power supply output voltage. The prototype system was found to be in compliance with the electromagnetic compatibility standard. Moreover, large animal experiments confirmed the phase switching effectiveness of this system, and induction of either a precise spot or large region of BBB opening through fast focal-beam switching. We also demonstrated the capability of dual-frequency exposure to potentially enhance the BBB-opening effect. This study contributes to the design of ultrasound phased arrays for future clinical applications, and provides a new direction toward optimizing FUS brain drug delivery.

  1. Magnetic-resonance imaging for kinetic analysis of permeability changes during focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening and brain drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Chai, Wen-Yen; Chu, Po-Chun; Tsai, Meng-Yen; Lin, Yu-Chun; Wang, Jiun-Jie; Wei, Kuo-Chen; Wai, Yau-Yau; Liu, Hao-Li

    2014-10-28

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) with the presence of microbubbles has been shown to induce transient and local opening of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) for the delivery of therapeutic molecules which normally cannot penetrate into the brain. The success of FUS brain-drug delivery relies on its integration with in-vivo imaging to monitor kinetic change of therapeutic molecules into the brain. In this study, we developed a dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) technique for kinetic analysis of delivered molecules during FUS-BBB opening. Three kinetic parameters (Ktrans, Ve, Kep) were characterized dynamically to describe BBB-permeability at two FUS exposure conditions (0.4 or 0.8MPa) over 24h. Ktrans, defined as the influx volume transfer constant from plasma to EES, and Ve, the EES volume fraction, were both found to be pressure-dependent. Ktrans and Ve showed a peak increase of 0.0086-0.0131min(-1) (for 0.4-0.8MPa pressure), and 0.0431-0.0692, respectively, immediately after FUS exposure. Both parameters subsequently decreased exponentially as a function of time, with estimated half-lives of decay of 2.89-5.3 and 2.2-4.93h, respectively. The kinetics of Kep, defined as the efflux rate constant from the extracellular extravascular space (EES) to the plasma, were complementary to Ktrans, with an initial decrease from 0.2010 to 0.1901min(-1) followed by a significantly longer recovery time (half-life of 17.39-99.92h). Our observations strongly supported the existence of imbalanced and mismatched kinetics of influx (Ktrans) and efflux (Kep) between the plasma and EES, indicating the existence of directional permeability during FUS-BBB opening. We further showed that kinetic change determined by DCE-MRI correlated well with the concentration of Evans Blue (EB)-albumin (coefficient of 0.74-0.89). These findings suggest that MRI kinetic monitoring may serve as an alternative method for in-vivo monitoring of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics (PK

  2. L-type amino acid transporter 1 utilizing prodrugs: How to achieve effective brain delivery and low systemic exposure of drugs.

    PubMed

    Puris, Elena; Gynther, Mikko; Huttunen, Johanna; Petsalo, Aleksanteri; Huttunen, Kristiina M

    2017-09-10

    L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1) is selectively expressed in the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and brain parenchyma. This transporter can facilitate brain delivery of neuroprotective agents and additionally give opportunity to minimize systemic exposure. Here, we investigated structure-pharmacokinetics relationship of five newly synthesized LAT1-utilizing prodrugs of the cyclooxygenase inhibitor, ketoprofen, in order to identify beneficial structural features of prodrugs to achieve both targeted brain delivery and low peripheral distribution of the parent drug. Besides, we studied whether pharmacokinetics and bioconversion of LAT1-utilizing prodrugs in vivo can be predicted in early stage experiments. To achieve these goals, we compared the in vitro brain uptake mechanism of prodrugs, rate of BBB permeation of compounds using in situ perfusion technique, their systemic pharmacokinetics and release of parent drug in brain, plasma and liver of mice. The results revealed that both excellent LAT1-binding ability and transporter utilization in vitro can be achieved by conjugating the parent drug to aromatic amino acids such as phenylalanine in comparison to prodrugs with an aliphatic promoiety. The presence of an aromatic promoiety directly conjugated in meta- or para-position to ketoprofen led to LAT1-utilizing prodrugs capable of delivering the parent drug into the brain with higher unbound brain to plasma ratio and reduced liver exposure than with ketoprofen itself. In contrast, the prodrugs with aliphatic promoieties and with an additional carbon attached between the parent drug and phenylalanine aromatic ring did not enhance brain delivery of ketoprofen. Furthermore, we have devised a screening strategy to pinpoint successful candidates at an early stage of development of LAT1-utilizing prodrugs. The screening approach demonstrated that early stage experiments could not replace pharmacokinetic studies in vivo due to the lack of prediction of the intra-brain

  3. Biodegradable Drug-Eluting Poly[lactic-co-glycol acid] Nanofibers for the Sustainable Delivery of Vancomycin to Brain Tissue: In Vitro and in Vivo Studies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Successful treatment of a brain infection requires aspiration of the pus or excision of the abscess, followed by long-term (usually 4–8 weeks) parenteral antibiotic treatment. Local antibiotic delivery using biodegradable drug-impregnated carriers is effective in treating postoperative infections, thereby reducing the toxicity associated with parenteral antibiotic treatment and the expense involved with long-term hospitalization. We have developed vancomycin-loaded, biodegradable poly[lactic-co-glycol acid] nanofibrous membranes for the sustainable delivery of vancomycin to the brain tissue of rats by using the electrospinning technique. A high-performance liquid chromatography assay was employed to characterize the in vitro and in vivo release behaviors of pharmaceuticals from the membranes. The experimental results suggested that the biodegradable nanofibers can release high concentrations of vancomycin for more than 8 weeks in the cerebral cavity of rats. Furthermore, the membranes can cover the wall of the cavity after the removal of abscess more completely and achieve better drug delivery without inducing adverse mass effects in the brain. Histological examination also showed no inflammation reaction of the brain tissues. By adopting the biodegradable, nanofibrous drug-eluting membranes, we will be able to achieve long-term deliveries of various antibiotics in the cerebral cavity to enhance the therapeutic efficacy of cerebral infections. PMID:23815098

  4. Cocktail-Dosing Microdialysis Study to Simultaneously Assess Delivery of Multiple Organic-Cationic Drugs to the Brain.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Atsushi; Okura, Takashi; Higuchi, Kei; Deguchi, Yoshiharu

    2016-02-01

    Brain microdialysis is a powerful tool to estimate brain-to-plasma unbound concentration ratio at the steady state (Kp,uu) of compounds by direct measurement of the unbound concentration in brain interstitial fluid. Here, we evaluated a method to estimate Kp,uu values of multiple organic-cationic drugs simultaneously, by means of brain microdialysis combined with cocktail dosing. Five cationic drugs (diphenhydramine, memantine, oxycodone, pyrilamine, and tramadol), substrates of the proton-coupled organic cation antiport system, were selected as model drugs, and compared under single-dosing and cocktail-dosing conditions. We selected doses of the drugs at which no significant drug-drug interaction occurs at the proton-coupled organic cation antiport system in the blood-brain barrier (BBB). This was confirmed by uptake studies in hCMEC/D3 cells, an in vitro BBB model. The Kp,uu values after cocktail administration were in the range of 1.8-5.2, and were in good agreement with those after single administration. These results suggest that the microdialysis method with cocktail dosing is suitable to estimate Kp,uu values of several cationic drugs simultaneously, if there is no drug-drug interaction during BBB transport. The method could be useful for evaluating drug candidates with high Kp,uu values at an early stage in the development of central nervous system-acting drugs. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Activating PKC-β1 at the blood-brain barrier reverses induction of P-glycoprotein activity by dioxin and restores drug delivery to the CNS.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xueqian; Hawkins, Brian T; Miller, David S

    2011-06-01

    Upregulation of blood-brain barrier (BBB) P-glycoprotein expression causes central nervous system (CNS) pharmacoresistance. However, activation of BBB protein kinase C-β1 (PKC-β1) rapidly reduces basal P-glycoprotein transport activity. We tested whether PKC-β1 activation would reverse CNS drug resistance caused by dioxin acting through aryl hydrocarbon receptor. A selective PKC-β1 agonist abolished the increase in P-glycoprotein activity induced by dioxin in isolated rat brain capillaries and reversed the effect of dioxin on brain uptake of verapamil in dioxin-dosed rats. Thus, targeting BBB PKC-β1 may be an effective strategy to improve drug delivery to the brain, even in drug-resistant individuals.

  6. Photomechanical drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doukas, Apostolos G.; Lee, Shun

    2000-05-01

    Photomechanical waves (PW) are generated by Q-switched or mode-locked lasers. Ablation is a reliable method for generating PWs with consistent characteristics. Depending on the laser wavelength and target material, PWs with different parameters can be generated which allows the investigation of PWs with cells and tissue. PWs have been shown to permeabilize the stratum corneum (SC) in vivo and facilitate the transport of drugs into the skin. Once a drug has diffused into the dermis it can enter the vasculature, thus producing a systemic effect. Fluorescence microscopy of biopsies show that 40-kDa molecules can be delivered to a depth of > 300 micrometers into the viable skin of rats. Many important drugs such as insulin, and erythropoietin are smaller or comparable in size, making the PWs attractive for transdermal drug delivery. There are three possible pathways through the SC: Transappendageal via hair follicles or other appendages, transcellular through the corneocytes, and intercellular via the extracellular matrix. The intracellular route appears to be the most likely pathway of drug delivery through the SC.

  7. Drugs and the Brain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Institutes of Health (DHHS), Bethesda, MD.

    This booklet explores various aspects of drug addiction, with a special focus on drugs' effects on the brain. A brief introduction presents information on the rampant use of drugs in society and elaborates the distinction between drug abuse and drug addiction. Next, a detailed analysis of the brain and its functions is given. Drugs target the more…

  8. Surface modification of RGD-liposomes for selective drug delivery to monocytes/neutrophils in brain.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jing; Chen, DaWei; Hu, HaiYang; Cui, Qiao; Qiao, MingXi; Chen, BaoYu

    2007-08-01

    In the present study, RGD peptide was coupled with ferulic acid (FA) liposomes for binding to monocytes and neutrophils in peripheral blood for brain targeting in response to leukocyte recruitment. Cholesterol (Ch) was esterified with succinic anhydride to introduce a carboxylic end group (Ch-COOH). Soybean phosphatidylcholine, cholesterol and Ch-COOH were in a molar ratio of 1 : 0.23 : 0.05. FA was loaded into liposomes with 80.2+/-5.2% entrapment efficiency (EE) using a calcium acetate gradient method since it was difficult to load FA by other methods. RGD peptide was a novel compound coupled with Ch-COOH via carbodiimide and N-hydroxysulfosuccinimide. The results of the in vitro flow cytometric study showed that RGD conjugation liposomes (RGD-liposomes) could bind to monocytes/neutrophils efficiently. The rats were subjected to intrastriatal microinjections of 100 microl of human recombinant IL-1beta to produce brain inflammation and subsequently sacrificed after 15, 30, 60 and 120 min of administration of three formulations (FA solution, FA liposome, RGD-coated FA liposome). The body distribution results showed that RGD-liposomes could be directed to the target site, i.e. the brain, by cell selectivity in case of an inflammatory response. For RGD coated liposomes, the concentration of FA in brain was 6-fold higher than that of FA solution and 3-fold higher than that of uncoated liposomes. MTT assay and flow cytometry were used in the pharmacodynamic studies where it was found that FA liposomes exhibited greater antioxidant activity to FA solution on U937 cell.

  9. A facile approach to functionalizing cell membrane-coated nanoparticles with neurotoxin-derived peptide for brain-targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Chai, Zhilan; Hu, Xuefeng; Wei, Xiaoli; Zhan, Changyou; Lu, Linwei; Jiang, Kuan; Su, Bingxia; Ruan, Huitong; Ran, Danni; Fang, Ronnie H; Zhang, Liangfang; Lu, Weiyue

    2017-08-24

    The blood brain barrier separates the circulating blood from the extracellular fluid in the central nervous system and thus presents an essential obstacle to brain transport of therapeutics. Herein, we report on an effective brain-targeted drug delivery system that combines a robust red blood cell membrane-coated nanoparticle (RBCNP) with a unique neurotoxin-derived targeting moiety. The RBCNPs retain the complex biological functions of natural cell membranes while exhibiting physicochemical properties that are suitable for effective drug delivery. CDX peptide is derived from candoxin and shows high binding affinity with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) expressed on the surface of brain endothelial cells. Through a facile yet robust approach, we successfully incorporate (D)CDX peptides onto the surface of RBCNPs without compromising the peptide's brain targeting ability. The resulting (D)CDX-RBCNPs show promising brain targeting efficiency both in vitro and in vivo. Using a glioma mouse model, we demonstrate that doxorubicin-loaded (D)CDX-RBCNPs have superior therapeutic efficacy and markedly reduced toxicity as compared to the nontargeted drug formulations. While RBCNPs are used as a model system to evaluate the surface modification approach, the reported method can be readily generalized to various types of cell membrane-derived nanocarriers for broad medical applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Nanomaterials for Drugs Delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Márquez, Francisco; Morant, Carmen

    2014-07-01

    Nanotechnology has revolutionized engineering, biology, chemistry, physics and medicine of today. These disciplines are evolving thanks to the ongoing development of new materials and applications. Nanomedicine, as application of nanotechnology in the field of health care, has undergone unprecedented development. Some of these changes have real applications as, for example, the use of nanoparticles in MRI imaging, in hyperthermia, in immunotherapy, or to improve the bioavailability of drugs, among others. Furthermore, when a drug is administered to a patient, the blood distributes it throughout the body. In the case of very localized diseases (i.e. tumors), only a small fraction of the drug reaches the target. Chemotherapy is one of the most aggressive treatment options used in some types of cancer, and is usually administered intravenously. The drug circulates throughout the body, reaching and destroying healthy and cancerous tissues, producing side effects throughout the body, sometimes with serious consequences for the health of the patient (nephrotoxicity, cardiotoxicity, peripheral neuropathy, anemia, etc.) in this type of therapy. Among the many applications of nanotechnology, the fabrication of nanostructures capable of safely transporting these drugs is seen as a strategy for reducing these side effects. Nanoparticles are able to carry and release the drug in the right place and with the required dose, greatly reducing the problems associated with direct treatment with these drugs. In recent years, there have been continuous improvements in the design and development of new tailor-made drug delivery systems, including hollow magnetic nanoparticles, liposomal structures, dendrimers, nanoporous silicon, etc. These structures can be obtained with different molecular weights (in the case of polymers), structures, shapes, and even with the appropriate functional groups for interaction at the desired positions. But, a great effort is still required to solve many

  11. Nanomaterials for Drugs Delivery

    DOE PAGES

    Márquez, Francisco; Morant, Carmen

    2014-07-01

    Nanotechnology has revolutionized engineering, biology, chemistry, physics and medicine of today. These disciplines are evolving thanks to the ongoing development of new materials and applications. Nanomedicine, as application of nanotechnology in the field of health care, has undergone unprecedented development. Some of these changes have real applications as, for example, the use of nanoparticles in MRI imaging, in hyperthermia, in immunotherapy, or to improve the bioavailability of drugs, among others. Furthermore, when a drug is administered to a patient, the blood distributes it throughout the body. In the case of very localized diseases (i.e. tumors), only a small fraction ofmore » the drug reaches the target. Chemotherapy is one of the most aggressive treatment options used in some types of cancer, and is usually administered intravenously. The drug circulates throughout the body, reaching and destroying healthy and cancerous tissues, producing side effects throughout the body, sometimes with serious consequences for the health of the patient (nephrotoxicity, cardiotoxicity, peripheral neuropathy, anemia, etc.) in this type of therapy. Among the many applications of nanotechnology, the fabrication of nanostructures capable of safely transporting these drugs is seen as a strategy for reducing these side effects. Nanoparticles are able to carry and release the drug in the right place and with the required dose, greatly reducing the problems associated with direct treatment with these drugs. In recent years, there have been continuous improvements in the design and development of new tailor-made drug delivery systems, including hollow magnetic nanoparticles, liposomal structures, dendrimers, nanoporous silicon, etc. These structures can be obtained with different molecular weights (in the case of polymers), structures, shapes, and even with the appropriate functional groups for interaction at the desired positions. But, a great effort is still required to

  12. What is the best treatment for fluctuating Parkinson's disease: continuous drug delivery or deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus?

    PubMed

    Hilker, Rüdiger; Antonini, Angelo; Odin, Per

    2011-06-01

    Motor complications impair quality of life and cause severe disability in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). Since they are often refractory to medical therapy, interventional therapies have been developed, which can provide a considerable reduction of daily off-time and dopaminergic dyskinesias. Continuous dopaminergic drug delivery (CDD) is based on the steady stimulation of striatal dopamine receptors by subcutaneous apomorphine or duodenal L: -DOPA infusions via portable minipumps. Advances in the understanding of basal ganglia functioning and in neurosurgical, electrophysiological and neuroimaging techniques have led to a renaissance of neurosurgery for advanced PD. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) is the most invasive procedure promising great benefit and the highest level of independency for suitable patients, but is definitely associated with surgical risks and DBS-related side effects. Each of these more or less invasive therapy options has its own profile, and a thorough consideration of its advantages and drawbacks for the individual situation is mandatory. In this paper, we summarize relevant facts for this decision and provide some guidelines for a responsible counseling of eligible patients.

  13. Brain Delivery of Drug and MRI Contrast Agent: Detection and Quantitative Determination of Brain Deposition of CPT-Glu Using LC-MS/MS and Gd-DTPA Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Tabanor, Kayann; Lee, Phil; Kiptoo, Paul; Choi, In-Young; Sherry, Erica B.; Eagle, Cheyenne Sun; Williams, Todd D.; Siahaan, Teruna J.

    2015-01-01

    Successful treatment and diagnosis of neurological diseases depend on reliable delivery of molecules across the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which restricts penetration of pharmaceutical drugs and diagnostic agents into the brain. Thus, developing new non-invasive strategies to improve drug delivery across the BBB is critically needed. This study was aimed at evaluating the activity of HAV6 peptide (Ac-SHAVSS-NH2) in improving brain delivery of camptothecin-glutamate (CPT-Glu) conjugate and gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetate (Gd-DTPA) contrast agent in Sprague-Dawley rats. Brain delivery of both CPT-Glu and Gd-DTPA was evaluated in an in situ rat brain perfusion model in the presence and absence of HAV6 peptide (1.0 mM). Gd-DTPA (0.6 mmol/kg) was intravenously (i.v.) administered with and without HAV6 peptide (0.019 mmol/kg) in rats. The detection and quantification of CPT-Glu and Gd-DTPA in the brain were carried out by LC-MS/MS and quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), respectively. Rats perfused with CPT-Glu in combination with HAV6 had significantly higher deposition of drug in the brain compared to CPT-Glu alone. MRI results also showed that administration of Gd-DTPA in the presence of HAV6 peptide led to significant accumulation of Gd-DTPA in various regions of the brain in both the in situ rat brain perfusion and in vivo studies. All observations taken together indicate that HAV6 peptide can disrupt the BBB and enhance delivery of small molecules into the brain. PMID:26705088

  14. Brain Delivery of Drug and MRI Contrast Agent: Detection and Quantitative Determination of Brain Deposition of CPT-Glu Using LC-MS/MS and Gd-DTPA Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Tabanor, Kayann; Lee, Phil; Kiptoo, Paul; Choi, In-Young; Sherry, Erica B; Eagle, Cheyenne Sun; Williams, Todd D; Siahaan, Teruna J

    2016-02-01

    Successful treatment and diagnosis of neurological diseases depend on reliable delivery of molecules across the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which restricts penetration of pharmaceutical drugs and diagnostic agents into the brain. Thus, developing new noninvasive strategies to improve drug delivery across the BBB is critically needed. This study was aimed at evaluating the activity of HAV6 peptide (Ac-SHAVSS-NH2) in improving brain delivery of camptothecin-glutamate (CPT-Glu) conjugate and gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetate (Gd-DTPA) contrast agent in Sprague-Dawley rats. Brain delivery of both CPT-Glu and Gd-DTPA was evaluated in an in situ rat brain perfusion model in the presence and absence of HAV6 peptide (1.0 mM). Gd-DTPA (0.6 mmol/kg) was intravenously (iv) administered with and without HAV6 peptide (0.019 mmol/kg) in rats. The detection and quantification of CPT-Glu and Gd-DTPA in the brain were carried out by LC-MS/MS and quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), respectively. Rats perfused with CPT-Glu in combination with HAV6 had significantly higher deposition of drug in the brain compared to CPT-Glu alone. MRI results also showed that administration of Gd-DTPA in the presence of HAV6 peptide led to significant accumulation of Gd-DTPA in various regions of the brain in both the in situ rat brain perfusion and in vivo studies. All observations taken together indicate that HAV6 peptide can disrupt the BBB and enhance delivery of small molecules into the brain.

  15. p-Hydroxy benzoic acid-conjugated dendrimer nanotherapeutics as potential carriers for targeted drug delivery to brain: an in vitro and in vivo evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swami, Rajan; Singh, Indu; Kulhari, Hitesh; Jeengar, Manish Kumar; Khan, Wahid; Sistla, Ramakrishna

    2015-06-01

    Dendrimers which are discrete nanostructures/nanoparticles are emerging as promising candidates for many nanomedicine applications. Ligand-conjugated dendrimer facilitate the delivery of therapeutics in a targeted manner. Small molecules such as p-hydroxyl benzoic acid (pHBA) were found to have high affinity for sigma receptors which are prominent in most parts of central nervous system and tumors. The aim of this study was to synthesize pHBA-dendrimer conjugates as colloidal carrier for site-specific delivery of practically water insoluble drug, docetaxel (DTX) to brain tumors and to determine its targeting efficiency. pHBA, a small molecule ligand was coupled to the surface amine groups of generation 4-PAMAM dendrimer via a carbodiimide reaction and loaded with DTX. The conjugation was confirmed by 1HNMR and FT-IR spectroscopy. In vitro release of drug from DTX-loaded pHBA-conjugated dendrimer was found to be less as compared to unconjugated dendrimers. The prepared drug delivery system exhibited good physico-chemical stability and decrease in hemolytic toxicity. Cell viability and cell uptake studies were performed against U87MG human glioblastoma cells and formulations exerted considerable anticancer effect than plain drug. Conjugation of dendrimer with pHBA significantly enhanced the brain uptake of DTX which was shown by the recovery of a higher percentage of the dose from the brain following administration of pHBA-conjugated dendrimers compared with unconjugated dendrimer or formulation in clinical use (Taxotere®). Therefore, pHBA conjugated dendrimers could be an efficient delivery vehicle for the targeting of anticancer drugs to brain tumors.

  16. Investigation of Functionalized Poly(N,N-dimethylacrylamide)-block-polystyrene Nanoparticles As Novel Drug Delivery System to Overcome the Blood-Brain Barrier In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Gregori, Maria; Bertani, Daniela; Cazzaniga, Emanuela; Orlando, Antonina; Mauri, Michele; Bianchi, Alberto; Re, Francesca; Sesana, Silvia; Minniti, Stefania; Francolini, Maura; Cagnotto, Alfredo; Salmona, Mario; Nardo, Luca; Salerno, Domenico; Mantegazza, Francesco; Masserini, Massimo; Simonutti, Roberto

    2015-12-01

    In the search of new drug delivery carriers for the brain, self-assembled nanoparticles (NP) were prepared from poly(N,N-dimethylacrylamide)-block-polystyrene polymer. NP displayed biocompatibility on cultured endothelial cells, macrophages and differentiated SH-SY5Y neuronal-like cells. The surface-functionalization of NP with a modified fragment of human Apolipoprotein E (mApoE) enhanced the uptake of NP by cultured human brain capillary endothelial cells, as assessed by confocal microscopy, and their permeability through a Transwell Blood Brain Barrier model made with the same cells, as assessed by fluorescence. Finally, mApoE-NP embedding doxorubicin displayed an enhanced release of drug at low pH, suggesting the potential use of these NP for the treatment of brain tumors. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Polymers for Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Liechty, William B.; Kryscio, David R.; Slaughter, Brandon V.; Peppas, Nicholas A.

    2012-01-01

    Polymers have played an integral role in the advancement of drug delivery technology by providing controlled release of therapeutic agents in constant doses over long periods, cyclic dosage, and tunable release of both hydrophilic and hydrophobic drugs. From early beginnings using off-the-shelf materials, the field has grown tremendously, driven in part by the innovations of chemical engineers. Modern advances in drug delivery are now predicated upon the rational design of polymers tailored for specific cargo and engineered to exert distinct biological functions. In this review, we highlight the fundamental drug delivery systems and their mathematical foundations and discuss the physiological barriers to drug delivery. We review the origins and applications of stimuli-responsive polymer systems and polymer therapeutics such as polymer-protein and polymer-drug conjugates. The latest developments in polymers capable of molecular recognition or directing intracellular delivery are surveyed to illustrate areas of research advancing the frontiers of drug delivery. PMID:22432577

  18. Intracarotid Delivery of Drugs: The Potential and the Pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Shailendra; Meyers, Phillip M.; Ornstein, Eugene

    2014-01-01

    The major efforts to selectively deliver drugs to the brain in the last decade have relied on smart molecular techniques to penetrate the blood brain barrier while intraarterial drug delivery has drawn relatively little attention. In the last decade there have been rapid advances in endovascular techniques. Modern endovascular procedures can permit highly targeted drug delivery by intracarotid route. Intracarotid drug delivery can be the primary route of drug delivery or it could be used to facilitate the delivery of smart-neuropharmaceuticals. There have been few attempts to systematically understand the kinetics of intracarotid drugs. Anecdotal data suggests that intracarotid drug delivery is effective in the treatment of cerebral vasospasm, thromboembolic strokes, and neoplasms. Neuroanesthesiologists are frequently involved in the care of such high-risk patients. Therefore, it is necessary to understand the applications of intracarotid drug delivery and the unusual kinetics of intracarotid drugs. PMID:18719453

  19. A silk platform that enables electrophysiology and targeted drug delivery in brain astroglial cells

    PubMed Central

    Benfenati, Valentina; Toffanin, Stefano; Capelli, Raffaella; Camassa, Laura M. A.; Ferroni, Stefano; Kaplan, David L.; Omenetto, Fiorenzo G.; Muccini, Michele; Zamboni, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    Astroglial cell survival and ion channel activity are relevant molecular targets for the mechanistic study of neural cell interactions with biomaterials and/or electronic interfaces. Astrogliosis is the most typical reaction to in-vivo brain implants and needs to be avoided by developing biomaterials that preserve astroglial cell physiological function. This cellular phenomenon is characterized by a proliferative state and altered expression of astroglial potassium (K+) channels. Silk is a natural polymer with potential for new biomedical applications due to its ability to support in vitro growth and differentiation of many cell types. We report on silk interactions with cultured neocortical astroglial cells. Astrocytes survival is similar when plated on silk-coated glass and on poly-D-lysine (PDL), a well-known polyionic substrate used to promote astroglial cell adhesion to glass surfaces. Comparative analyses of whole-cell and single-cell patch-clamp experiments reveal that silk- and PDL-coated cells display depolarized resting membrane potentials (∼ -40 mV), very high input resistance, and low specific conductance, with values similar to those of undifferentiated glial cells. Analysis of K+ channel conductance reveals that silk-astrocytes express large outwardly delayed rectifying K+ current (KDR). The magnitude of KDR in PDL- and silk-coated astrocytes is similar, indicating that silk does not alter the resting K+ current. We also demonstrate that guanosine-(GUO) embedded silk enables the direct modulation of astroglial K+ conductance in vitro. Astrocytes plated on GUO-embedded silk are more hyperpolarized and express inward rectifying K+ conductance (Kir). The K+ inward current increase and this is paralleled by upregulation and membrane-polarization of Kir4.1 protein signal. Collectively these results indicate that silk is a suitable biomaterial platform for the in vitro studies of astroglial ion channel responses and related physiology. PMID:20688390

  20. GDNF fusion protein for targeted-drug delivery across the human blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Boado, Ruben J; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Yufeng; Wang, Yuntao; Pardridge, William M

    2008-06-01

    Glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is a neurotrophin that could be developed as a neurotherapeutic for Parkinson's disease, stroke, and motor neuron disease. However, GDNF does not cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Human GDNF was re-engineered by fusion of the mature GDNF protein to the carboxyl terminus of the chimeric monoclonal antibody (MAb) to the human insulin receptor (HIR). The HIRMAb-GDNF fusion protein is bi-functional, and both binds the HIR, to trigger receptor-mediated transport across the BBB, and binds the GDNF receptor (GFR)-alpha1, to activate GDNF neuroprotection pathways behind the BBB. COS cells were dual transfected with the heavy chain (HC) and light chain fusion protein expression plasmids, and the HC of the fusion protein was immunoreactive with antibodies to both human IgG and GDNF. The HIRMAb-GDNF fusion protein bound with high affinity to the extracellular domain of both the HIR, ED(50) = 0.87 +/- 0.13 nM, and the GFRalpha1, ED(50) = 1.68 +/- 0.17 nM. The HIRMAb-GDNF fusion protein activated luciferase gene expression in human neural SK-N-MC cells dual transfected with the c-ret kinase and a luciferase reporter gene under the influence of the rat tyrosine hydroxylase promoter, and the ED(50), 1.68 +/- 0.45 nM, was identical to the ED(50) in the GFRalpha1 binding assay. The fusion protein was active in vivo in a rat middle cerebral artery occlusion model, where the stroke volume was reduced 77% (P < 0.001). In conclusion, these studies describe the re-engineering of GDNF, to make this neurotrophin transportable across the human BBB.

  1. Optimizing drugs for local delivery.

    PubMed

    Collingwood, S; Lock, R; Searcey, M

    2009-12-01

    An international panel of speakers together with approximately 70 delegates were brought together by The Society for Medicines Research's symposium on Optimising Drugs for Local Delivery, held on June 11, 2009 at the Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research, Horsham, UK. The focus of the conference was on the delivery of drugs direct to the site of action and the consequences of this delivery route on delivery technologies, formulation science and molecular design.

  2. Microprocessor controlled transdermal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Subramony, J Anand; Sharma, Ashutosh; Phipps, J B

    2006-07-06

    Transdermal drug delivery via iontophoresis is reviewed with special focus on the delivery of lidocaine for local anesthesia and fentanyl for patient controlled acute therapy such as postoperative pain. The role of the microprocessor controller in achieving dosimetry, alternating/reverse polarity, pre-programmed, and sensor-based delivery is highlighted. Unique features such as the use of tactile signaling, telemetry control, and pulsatile waveforms in iontophoretic drug delivery are described briefly.

  3. Controlled Drug Delivery Using Microdevices

    PubMed Central

    Sanjay, Sharma T.; Dou, Maowei; Fu, Guanglei; Xu, Feng; Li, XiuJun

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic drugs administered systematically are evenly distributed to the whole body through blood circulation and have to cross many biological barriers before reaching the pathological site. Conventional drug delivery may make drugs inactive or reduce their potency as they may be hydrolyzed or degraded enzymatically and are rapidly excreted through the urinary system resulting in suboptimal concentration of drugs at the desired site. Controlled drug delivery aims to localize the pharmacological activity of the drug to the desired site at desired release rates. The advances made by micro/nanofluidic technologies have provided new opportunities for better-controlled drug delivery. Various components of a drug delivery system can be integrated within a single tiny micro/nanofluidic chip. This article reviews recent advances of controlled drug delivery made by microfluidic/nanofluidic technologies. We first discuss microreservoir-based drug delivery systems. Then we highlight different kinds of microneedles used for controlled drug delivery, followed with a brief discussion about the current limitations and the future prospects of controlled drug delivery systems. PMID:26813304

  4. Sonophoresis in transdermal drug deliverys.

    PubMed

    Park, Donghee; Park, Hyunjin; Seo, Jongbum; Lee, Seunghun

    2014-01-01

    Transdermal drug delivery (TDD) has several significant advantages compared to oral drug delivery, including elimination of pain and sustained drug release. However, the use of TDD is limited by low skin permeability due to the stratum corneum (SC), the outermost layer of the skin. Sonophoresis is a technique that temporarily increases skin permeability such that various medications can be delivered noninvasively. For the past several decades, various studies of sonophoresis in TDD have been performed focusing on parameter optimization, delivery mechanism, transport pathway, or delivery of several drug categories including hydrophilic and high molecular weight compounds. Based on these various studies, several possible mechanisms of sonophoresis have been suggested. For example, cavitation is believed to be the predominant mechanism responsible for drug delivery in sonophoresis. This review presents details of various studies on sonophoresis including the latest trends, delivery of various therapeutic drugs, sonophoresis pathways and mechanisms, and outlook of future studies.

  5. MRI in ocular drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Li, S Kevin; Lizak, Martin J; Jeong, Eun-Kee

    2008-11-01

    Conventional pharmacokinetic methods for studying ocular drug delivery are invasive and cannot be conveniently applied to humans. The advancement of MRI technology has provided new opportunities in ocular drug-delivery research. MRI provides a means to non-invasively and continuously monitor ocular drug-delivery systems with a contrast agent or compound labeled with a contrast agent. It is a useful technique in pharmacokinetic studies, evaluation of drug-delivery methods, and drug-delivery device testing. Although the current status of the technology presents some major challenges to pharmaceutical research using MRI, it has a lot of potential. In the past decade, MRI has been used to examine ocular drug delivery via the subconjunctival route, intravitreal injection, intrascleral injection to the suprachoroidal space, episcleral and intravitreal implants, periocular injections, and ocular iontophoresis. In this review, the advantages and limitations of MRI in the study of ocular drug delivery are discussed. Different MR contrast agents and MRI techniques for ocular drug-delivery research are compared. Ocular drug-delivery studies using MRI are reviewed.

  6. MRI in ocular drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Li, S. Kevin; Lizak, Martin J.; Jeong, Eun-Kee

    2008-01-01

    Conventional pharmacokinetic methods for studying ocular drug delivery are invasive and cannot be conveniently applied to humans. The advancement of MRI technology has provided new opportunities in ocular drug-delivery research. MRI provides a means to non-invasively and continuously monitor ocular drug-delivery systems with a contrast agent or compound labeled with a contrast agent. It is a useful technique in pharmacokinetic studies, evaluation of drug-delivery methods, and drug-delivery device testing. Although the current status of the technology presents some major challenges to pharmaceutical research using MRI, it has a lot of potential. In the past decade, MRI has been used to examine ocular drug delivery via the subconjunctival route, intravitreal injection, intrascleral injection to the suprachoroidal space, episcleral and intravitreal implants, periocular injections, and ocular iontophoresis. In this review, the advantages and limitations of MRI in the study of ocular drug delivery are discussed. Different MR contrast agents and MRI techniques for ocular drug-delivery research are compared. Ocular drug-delivery studies using MRI are reviewed. PMID:18186077

  7. Inner Ear Drug Delivery for Auditory Applications

    PubMed Central

    Swan, Erin E. Leary; Mescher, Mark J.; Sewell, William F.; Tao, Sarah L.; Borenstein, Jeffrey T.

    2008-01-01

    Many inner ear disorders cannot be adequately treated by systemic drug delivery. A blood-cochlear barrier exists, similar physiologically to the blood-brain barrier, which limits the concentration and size of molecules able to leave the circulation and gain access to the cells of the inner ear. However, research in novel therapeutics and delivery systems has led to significant progress in the development of local methods of drug delivery to the inner ear. Intratympanic approaches, which deliver therapeutics to the middle ear, rely on permeation through tissue for access to the structures of the inner ear, whereas intracochlear methods are able to directly insert drugs into the inner ear. Innovative drug delivery systems to treat various inner ear ailments such as ototoxicity, sudden sensorineural hearing loss, autoimmune inner ear disease, and for preserving neurons and regenerating sensory cells are being explored. PMID:18848590

  8. Perspectives on Dual Targeting Delivery Systems for Brain Tumors.

    PubMed

    Gao, Huile

    2017-03-01

    Brain tumor remains one of the most serious threats to human beings. Different from peripheral tumors, drug delivery to brain tumor is largely restricted by the blood brain barrier (BBB). To fully conquer this barrier and specifically deliver drugs to brain tumor, dual targeting delivery systems were explored, which are functionalized with two active targeting ligands: one to the BBB and the other to the brain tumor. The development of dual targeting delivery system is still in its early stage, and attentions need to be paid to issues and concerns that remain unresolved in future studies.

  9. Ultrasound mediated transdermal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Azagury, Aharon; Khoury, Luai; Enden, Giora; Kost, Joseph

    2014-06-01

    Transdermal drug delivery offers an attractive alternative to the conventional drug delivery methods of oral administration and injections. However, the stratum corneum serves as a barrier that limits the penetration of substances to the skin. Application of ultrasound (US) irradiation to the skin increases its permeability (sonophoresis) and enables the delivery of various substances into and through the skin. This review presents the main findings in the field of sonophoresis in transdermal drug delivery as well as transdermal monitoring and the mathematical models associated with this field. Particular attention is paid to the proposed enhancement mechanisms and future trends in the fields of cutaneous vaccination and gene therapy.

  10. The association of statins plus LDL receptor-targeted liposome-encapsulated doxorubicin increases in vitro drug delivery across blood–brain barrier cells

    PubMed Central

    Pinzón-Daza, ML; Garzón, R; Couraud, PO; Romero, IA; Weksler, B; Ghigo, D; Bosia, A; Riganti, C

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The passage of drugs across the blood–brain barrier (BBB) limits the efficacy of chemotherapy in brain tumours. For instance, the anticancer drug doxorubicin, which is effective against glioblastoma in vitro, has poor efficacy in vivo, because it is extruded by P-glycoprotein (Pgp/ABCB1), multidrug resistance-related proteins and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) in BBB cells. The aim of this study was to convert poorly permeant drugs like doxorubicin into drugs able to cross the BBB. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Experiments were performed on primary human cerebral microvascular endothelial hCMEC/D3 cells, alone and co-cultured with human brain and epithelial tumour cells. KEY RESULTS Statins reduced the efflux activity of Pgp/ABCB1 and BCRP/ABCG2 in hCMEC/D3 cells by increasing the synthesis of NO, which elicits the nitration of critical tyrosine residues on these transporters. Statins also increased the number of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors exposed on the surface of BBB cells, as well as on tumour cells like human glioblastoma. We showed that the association of statins plus drug-loaded nanoparticles engineered as LDLs was effective as a vehicle for non-permeant drugs like doxorubicin to cross the BBB, allowing its delivery into primary and metastatic brain tumour cells and to achieve significant anti-tumour cytotoxicity. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS We suggest that our ‘Trojan horse’ approach, based on the administration of statins plus a LDL receptor-targeted liposomal drug, might have potential applications in the pharmacological therapy of different brain diseases for which the BBB represents an obstacle. PMID:22788770

  11. Applications of dendrimers for brain delivery and cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Somani, Sukrut; Dufès, Christine

    2014-10-01

    Dendrimers are emerging as potential nonviral vectors for the efficient delivery of drugs and nucleic acids to the brain and cancer cells. These polymers are highly branched, 3D macromolecules with modifiable surface functionalities and available internal cavities that make them attractive as delivery systems for drug and gene delivery applications. This article highlights the recent therapeutic advances resulting from the use of dendrimers for brain targeting and cancer treatment.

  12. Magnetic core-shell nanocapsules with dual-targeting capabilities and co-delivery of multiple drugs to treat brain gliomas.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jen-Hung; Lai, Yen-Ho; Chiu, Tsung-Lang; Chen, You-Yin; Hu, Shang-Hsiu; Chen, San-Yuan

    2014-08-01

    Lactoferrin (Lf)-tethered magnetic double emulsion nanocapsules (Lf-MDCs) are assembled from polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), polyacrylic acid (PAA), and iron oxide (IO) nanoparticles. The core-shell nanostructure of the Lf-MDCs (particle diameters from 100 to 150 nm) can simultaneously accommodate a hydrophilic drug, doxorubicin (Dox), and a hydrophobic drug, curcumin (Cur), in the core and shell, respectively, of the nanocapsules for an efficient drug delivery system. The release patterns of the two drugs can be regulated by manipulating the surface charges and drug-loading ratios, providing the capability for a stepwise adjuvant release to treat cancer cells. The results demonstrate that the dual (Dox+Cur)-drug-loaded nanocapsule can be effectively delivered into RG2 glioma cells to enhance the cytotoxicity against the cells through a synergistic effect. The combined targeting, i.e., magnetic guidance and incorporation of Lf ligands, of these Lf-MDCs results in significantly elevated cellular uptake in the RG2 cells that overexpress the Lf receptor. Interestingly, an intravenous injection of the co-delivered chemotherapeutics follows by magnetic targeting in brain tumor-bearing mice not only achieve high accumulation at the targeted site but also more efficiently suppress cancer growth in vivo than does the delivery of either drug alone. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Preparation of surface multiple-coated polylactide acid drug-loaded nanoparticles for intranasal delivery and evaluation on its brain-targeting efficiency.

    PubMed

    Bian, Junjie; Yuan, Zhixiang; Chen, Xiaoliang; Gao, Yuan; Xu, Chaoqun; Shi, Jianyou

    2016-01-01

    To prepare a mixture of multiple-coated aniracetam nasal polylactic-acid nanoparticles (M-C-PLA-NP) and evaluate its stability preliminarily in vitro and its brain-targeting efficiency in vivo. The solvent diffusion-evaporation combined with magnetic stirring method has been chosen for the entrapment of aniracetam. The M-C-PLA-NP was characterized with respect to its morphology, particle size, size distribution and aniracetam entrapment efficiency. The in vivo distribution was studied in male SD rats after an intranasal administration. In vitro release of M-C-PLA-NP showed two components with an initial rapid release due to the surface-associated drug and followed by a slower exponential release of aniracetam, which was dissolved in the core. The AUC0 → 30 min of M-C-PLA-NP in brain tissues resulted in a 5.19-fold increase compared with aniracetam solution. The ratios of AUC in brain to that in other tissues obtained after nasal application of M-C-PLA-NP were significantly higher than those of aniracetam solution. Therefore, it can be concluded that M-C-PLA-NP demonstrated its potential on increasing the brain-targeting efficiency of drugs and will be used as novel brain-targeting agent for nasal drug delivery.

  14. Delivery of Dual Drug Loaded Lipid Based Nanoparticles across the Blood-Brain Barrier Impart Enhanced Neuroprotection in a Rotenone Induced Mouse Model of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Paromita; Das, Manasi; Tripathy, Kalpalata; Sahoo, Sanjeeb K

    2016-12-21

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the most widespread form of dementia where there is an age related degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra region of the brain. Accumulation of α-synuclein (αS) protein aggregate, mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, and neuronal cell death are the pathological hallmarks of PD. In this context, amalgamation of curcumin and piperine having profound cognitive properties, and antioxidant activity seems beneficial. However, the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is the major impediment for delivery of neurotherapeutics to the brain. The present study involves formulation of curcumin and piperine coloaded glyceryl monooleate (GMO) nanoparticles coated with various surfactants with a view to enhance the bioavailability of curcumin and penetration of both drugs to the brain tissue crossing the BBB and to enhance the anti-parkinsonism effect of both drugs in a single platform. In vitro results demonstrated augmented inhibition of αS protein into oligomers and fibrils, reduced rotenone induced toxicity, oxidative stress, and apoptosis, and activation of autophagic pathway by dual drug loaded NPs compared to native counterpart. Further, in vivo studies revealed that our formulated dual drug loaded NPs were able to cross BBB, rescued the rotenone induced motor coordination impairment, and restrained dopaminergic neuronal degeneration in a PD mouse model.

  15. Novel biodegradable nanocarriers for enhanced drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Gagliardi, Mariacristina

    2016-12-01

    With the refinement of functional properties, the interest around biodegradable materials, in biorelated applications and, in particular, in their use as controlled drug-delivery systems, increased in the last decades. Biodegradable materials are an ideal platform to obtain nanoparticles for spatiotemporal controlled drug delivery for the in vivo administration, thanks to their biocompatibility, functionalizability, the control exerted on delivery rates and the complete degradation. Their application in systems for cancer treatment, brain and cardiovascular diseases is already a consolidated practice in research, while the bench-to-bedside translation is still late. This review aims at summarizing reported applications of biodegradable materials to obtain drug-delivery nanoparticles in the last few years, giving a complete overview of pros and cons related to degradable nanomedicaments.

  16. Blood-brain barrier delivery.

    PubMed

    Pardridge, William M

    2007-01-01

    Neuropharmaceutics is the largest potential growth sector of the pharmaceutical industry. However, this growth is blocked by the problem of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Essentially 100% of large-molecule drugs and >98% of small-molecule drugs do not cross the BBB. The BBB can be traversed because there are multiple endogenous transporters within this barrier. Therefore, brain drug development programs of the future need to be re-configured so that drugs are formulated to enable transport into the brain via endogenous BBB transporters.

  17. Function of the Blood-Brain Barrier and Restriction of Drug Delivery to Invasive Glioma Cells: Findings in an Orthotopic Rat Xenograft Model of Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Sagar; Manchanda, Pooja; Vogelbaum, Michael A.; Ohlfest, John R.

    2013-01-01

    Despite aggressive treatment with radiation and chemotherapy, recurrence of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is inevitable. The objective of this study was to show that the blood-brain barrier (BBB), through a combination of tight junctions and active efflux transporters in the brain microvasculature, can significantly restrict delivery of molecularly targeted agents to invasive glioma cells. Transgenic mice lacking P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp) were used to study efflux of erlotinib at the BBB. A U87 rat xenograft model of GBM was used to investigate the regional distribution of erlotinib to the tumor, and brain regions surrounding the tumor. The effect of concurrent administration of elacridar on regional tumor distribution of erlotinib was evaluated. We show that erlotinib transport across an intact BBB is significantly restricted due to P-gp- and Bcrp-mediated efflux transport. We then show that the BBB is sufficiently intact in areas of brain adjacent to the tumor core to significantly restrict erlotinib delivery. Inhibition of P-gp and Bcrp by the dual inhibitor elacridar dramatically increased erlotinib delivery to the tumor core, rim, and normal brain. These results provide conclusive evidence of the impact that active efflux at the BBB has on the delivery of molecularly targeted therapy to different tumor regions in glioma. These data also support the possibility that the repeated failure of clinical trials of new drugs for gliomas may be in part due to a failure to achieve effective concentrations in invasive tumor cells that reside behind an intact BBB. PMID:23014761

  18. Drug delivery to the ear.

    PubMed

    Hoskison, E; Daniel, M; Al-Zahid, S; Shakesheff, K M; Bayston, R; Birchall, J P

    2013-01-01

    Drug delivery to the ear is used to treat conditions of the middle and inner ear such as acute and chronic otitis media, Ménière's disease, sensorineural hearing loss and tinnitus. Drugs used include antibiotics, antifungals, steroids, local anesthetics and neuroprotective agents. A literature review was conducted searching Medline (1966-2012), Embase (1988-2012), the Cochrane Library and Ovid (1966-2012), using search terms 'drug delivery', 'middle ear', 'inner ear' and 'transtympanic'. There are numerous methods of drug delivery to the middle ear, which can be categorized as topical, systemic (intravenous), transtympanic and via the Eustachian tube. Localized treatments to the ear have the advantages of targeted drug delivery allowing higher therapeutic doses and minimizing systemic side effects. The ideal scenario would be a carrier system that could cross the intact tympanic membrane loaded with drugs or biochemical agents for the treatment of middle and inner ear conditions.

  19. Transmucosal macromolecular drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Prego, C; García, M; Torres, D; Alonso, M J

    2005-01-03

    Mucosal surfaces are the most common and convenient routes for delivering drugs to the body. However, macromolecular drugs such as peptides and proteins are unable to overcome the mucosal barriers and/or are degraded before reaching the blood stream. Among the approaches explored so far in order to optimize the transport of these macromolecules across mucosal barriers, the use of nanoparticulate carriers represents a challenging but promising strategy. The present paper aims to compare the characteristics and potential of nanostructures based on the mucoadhesive polysaccharide chitosan (CS). These are CS nanoparticles, CS-coated oil nanodroplets (nanocapsules) and CS-coated lipid nanoparticles. The characteristics and behavior of CS nanoparticles and CS-coated lipid nanoparticles already reported [A. Vila, A. Sanchez, M. Tobio, P. Calvo, M.J. Alonso, Design of biodegradable particles for protein delivery, J. Control. Rel. 78 (2002) 15-24; R. Fernandez-Urrusuno, P. Calvo, C. Remunan-Lopez, J.L. Vila-Jato, M.J. Alonso, Enhancement of nasal absorption of insulin using chitosan nanoparticles, Pharm. Res. 16 (1999) 1576-1581; M. Garcia-Fuentes, D. Torres, M.J. Alonso, New surface-modified lipid nanoparticles as delivery vehicles for salmon calcitonin (submitted for publication).] are compared with those of CS nanocapsules originally reported here. The three types of systems have a size in the nanometer range and a positive zeta potential that was attributed to the presence of CS on their surface. They showed an important capacity for the association of peptides such as insulin, salmon calcitonin and proteins, such as tetanus toxoid. Their mechanism of interaction with epithelia was investigated using the Caco-2 model cell line. The results showed that CS-coated systems caused a concentration-dependent reduction in the transepithelial resistance of the cell monolayer. Moreover, within the range of concentrations investigated, these systems were internalized in the

  20. The biological significance of brain barrier mechanisms: help or hindrance in drug delivery to the central nervous system?

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Norman R.; Habgood, Mark D.; Møllgård, Kjeld; Dziegielewska, Katarzyna M.

    2016-01-01

    provide an important component of the barrier functions by either preventing entry of or expelling numerous molecules including toxins, drugs, and other xenobiotics. In this review, we summarize these influx and efflux mechanisms in normal developing and adult brain, as well as indicating their likely involvement in a wide range of neuropathologies. There have been extensive attempts to overcome the barrier mechanisms that prevent the entry of many drugs of therapeutic potential into the brain. We outline those that have been tried and discuss why they may so far have been largely unsuccessful. Currently, a promising approach appears to be focal, reversible disruption of the blood-brain barrier using focused ultrasound, but more work is required to evaluate the method before it can be tried in patients. Overall, our view is that much more fundamental knowledge of barrier mechanisms and development of new experimental methods will be required before drug targeting to the brain is likely to be a successful endeavor. In addition, such studies, if applied to brain pathologies such as stroke, trauma, or multiple sclerosis, will aid in defining the contribution of brain barrier pathology to these conditions, either causative or secondary. PMID:26998242

  1. Nanoencapsulation for drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Avnesh; Singla, Rubbel; Guliani, Anika; Yadav, Sudesh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Nanoencapsulation of drug/small molecules in nanocarriers (NCs) is a very promising approach for development of nanomedicine. Modern drug encapsulation methods allow efficient loading of drug molecules inside the NCs thereby reducing systemic toxicity associated with drugs. Targeting of NCs can enhance the accumulation of nanonencapsulated drug at the diseased site. This article focussed on the synthesis methods, drug loading, drug release mechanism and cellular response of nanoencapsulated drugs on liposomes, micelles, carbon nanotubes, dendrimers, and magnetic NCs. Also the uses of these various NCs have been highlighted in the field of nanotechnology. PMID:26417260

  2. Development of Systems for Delivery of Antiviral Drugs.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-10-31

    synthesis of CNS-targeted prodrug esters of ribavirin and selenazole, pharmacokinetic studies of drug distribution and sustained delivery of drug in the brain...The scope of the research program involves the synthesis of CNS-targeted prodrug esters of ribavirin and selenazole, pharmaco- kinetic, studies of...blood-brain barrier. Our initial efforts have been directed toward the synthesis of ribavirin prodrugs. Based upon the brain-specific delivery of, for

  3. Nanoneurotherapeutics approach intended for direct nose to brain delivery.

    PubMed

    Md, Shadab; Mustafa, Gulam; Baboota, Sanjula; Ali, Javed

    2015-01-01

    Brain disorders remain the world's leading cause of disability, and account for more hospitalizations and prolonged care than almost all other diseases combined. The majority of drugs, proteins and peptides do not readily permeate into brain due to the presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), thus impeding treatment of these conditions. Attention has turned to developing novel and effective delivery systems to provide good bioavailability in the brain. Intranasal administration is a non-invasive method of drug delivery that may bypass the BBB, allowing therapeutic substances direct access to the brain. However, intranasal administration produces quite low drug concentrations in the brain due limited nasal mucosal permeability and the harsh nasal cavity environment. Pre-clinical studies using encapsulation of drugs in nanoparticulate systems improved the nose to brain targeting and bioavailability in brain. However, the toxic effects of nanoparticles on brain function are unknown. This review highlights the understanding of several brain diseases and the important pathophysiological mechanisms involved. The review discusses the role of nanotherapeutics in treating brain disorders via nose to brain delivery, the mechanisms of drug absorption across nasal mucosa to the brain, strategies to overcome the blood brain barrier, nanoformulation strategies for enhanced brain targeting via nasal route and neurotoxicity issues of nanoparticles.

  4. Two-photon microscopy for real-time monitoring of focused ultrasound-mediated drug delivery to the brain in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, Alison; Eterman, Naomi; Aubert, Isabelle; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2013-02-01

    There is substantial evidence that focused ultrasound (FUS) in combination with microbubble contrast agent can cause disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to aid in drug delivery to the brain. We have previously demonstrated that FUS efficiently delivers antibodies against amyloid-β peptides (Aβ) through the BBB, leading to a reduction in amyloid pathology at 4 days in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease. In the current study, we used two-photon microscopy to characterize the effect of FUS in real time on amyloid pathology in the mouse brain. Mice were anesthetized and a cranial window was made in the skull. A custom-built ultrasound transducer was fixed to a coverslip and attached to the skull, covering the cranial window. Methoxy-X04 [2-5mg/kg] delivered intravenously 1 hr prior to the experiment clearly labelled the Aβ surrounding the vessels and the amyloid plaques in the cortex. Dextran conjugated Texas Red (70kDa) administered intravenously, confirmed BBB disruption. BBB disruption occurred in transgenic and non-transgenic animals at similar ultrasound pressures tested. However, the time required for BBB closure following FUS was longer in the Tg mice. We have conjugated Aβ antibodies to the fluorescent molecule FITC for real time monitoring of the antibody distribution in the brain. Our current experiments are aimed at optimizing the parameters to achieve maximal fluorescent intensity of the BAM10 antibody at the plaque surface. Two-photon microscopy has proven to be a valuable tool for evaluating the efficacy of FUS mediated drug delivery, including antibodies, to the Alzheimer brain.

  5. Drug Delivery Systems for Platinum Drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynh, Vien T.; Scarano, Wei; Stenzel, Martina H.

    2013-09-01

    Since the discovery of cisplatin, drugs based on platinum, have made a significant impact on the treatment of various cancers. The administration of platinum drugs is however accompanied by significant side effects. This chapter discusses the types of drug delivery systems that have been developed in order to enable the targeted delivery while maintaining controlled temporal supply of the drug. The sizes of carriers range from nanometer to micrometer sized particles. The most common types of drug carriers are micelles, liposomes, nanoparticles, and dendrimers, but also a few microspheres have been developed. Most striking aspect of the delivery of platinum drugs is the possibility of physical encapsulation but also the binding of the drug to the polymer carrier coordinate covalent bond. Since platinum drugs have typically two permanent and two leaving ligands, the polymer can be part of either ligand. As the leaving ligand, the platinum drug is released often as cisplatin. If the polymer provides the functionality for the permanent ligand, a new macromolecular drug has been formed. In addition to the attachment of pt(II) drugs, recent offorts are devoted to the conjugation via the Pt((IV) prodrug.

  6. Photoresponsive nanoparticles for drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Rwei, Alina Y.; Wang, Weiping; Kohane, Daniel S.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Externally triggerable drug delivery systems provide a strategy for the delivery of therapeutic agents preferentially to a target site, presenting the ability to enhance therapeutic efficacy while reducing side effects. Light is a versatile and easily tuned external stimulus that can provide spatiotemporal control. Here we will review the use of nanoparticles in which light triggers drug release or induces particle binding to tissues (phototargeting). PMID:26644797

  7. Modulation of brain metabolism by very low concentrations of the commonly used drug delivery vehicle dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO).

    PubMed

    Nasrallah, Fatima A; Garner, Brett; Ball, Graham E; Rae, Caroline

    2008-01-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) has long been used in studies as a vehicle to enhance the solubility and transport of ligands in biological systems. The effects of this drug on the outcomes of such studies are still unclear, with concentrations of DMSO reported as "safe" varying considerably. In the present work, we investigated the effects of very low concentrations of DMSO on the brain metabolism of [3-(13)C]pyruvate and D-[1-(13)C]glucose using (1)H/(13)C NMR spectroscopy and a guinea pig cortical brain slice model. Our results show that DMSO is accumulated by brain slices. DMSO at all concentrations [0.000025%-0.25% (v/v)] increased the metabolic rate when [3-(13)C]pyruvate was used as a substrate and also in the presence of D-[1-(13)C]glucose (0.00025%-0.1% DMSO). These results are consistent with DMSO stimulating respiration, which it may do through altering the kinetics of ATP-requiring reactions. Our results also emphasize that there is no practical concentration of DMSO that can be used in metabolic experiments without effect. Therefore, care should be taken when evaluating the actions of drugs administered in combination with DMSO.

  8. Evaluation of permeability, doxorubicin delivery, and drug retention in a rat brain tumor model after ultrasound-induced blood-tumor barrier disruption.

    PubMed

    Park, Juyoung; Aryal, Muna; Vykhodtseva, Natalia; Zhang, Yong-Zhi; McDannold, Nathan

    2017-03-28

    Drug delivery in brain tumors is challenging because of the presence of blood-brain barrier (BBB) and the blood-tumor barrier (BTB). Focused ultrasound (FUS) combined with microbubbles can enhance the permeability of the BTB in brain tumors, as well as disrupting the BBB in the surrounding tissue. In this study, dynamic contrast-enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DCE-MRI) was used to characterize FUS-induced permeability changes in a rat glioma model and in the normal brain and to investigate the relationship between these changes and the resulting concentration of the chemotherapy agent doxorubicin (DOX). 9L gliosarcoma cells were implanted in both hemispheres in male rats. At day 10-12 after implantation, FUS-induced BTB disruption using 690kHz ultrasound and Definity microbubbles was performed in one of the tumors and in a normal brain region in each animal. After FUS, DOX was administered at a dose of 5.67mg/kg. The resulting DOX concentration was measured via fluorometry at 1 or 24h after FUS. The transfer coefficient Ktrans describing extravasation of the MRI contrast agent Gd-DTPA was significantly increased in both the sonicated tumors and in the normal brain tissue (P<0.001) between the two DCE-MRI acquisitions obtained before and after FUS, while no significant difference was found in the controls (non-sonicated tumor/normal brain tissue). DOX concentrations were also significantly larger than controls in both the sonicated tumors and in the normal tissue volumes at 1 and 24h after sonication. The DOX concentrations were significantly larger (P<0.01) in the control tumors harvested 1h after FUS than in those harvested at 24h, when the tumor concentrations were not significantly different than in the non-sonicated normal brain. In contrast, there was no significant difference in the DOX concentrations between the tumors harvested at 1 and 24h after FUS or in the concentrations measured in the brain at these time points. The transfer coefficient Ktrans

  9. Brain delivery of intranasal in situ gel of nanoparticulated polymeric carriers containing antidepressant drug: behavioral and biochemical assessment.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Prabhjot; Garg, Tarun; Vaidya, Bhuvaneshwar; Prakash, Atish; Rath, Goutam; Goyal, Amit K

    2015-04-01

    This study was aimed for brain delivery of Tramadol HCl (centrally acting synthetic opioid) following intranasal administration for treatment of depression. Chitosan nanoparticles (NPs) were prepared by ionic gelation method followed by the addition of developed NPs with in the Pluronic and HPMC-based mucoadhesive thermo-reversible gel. Developed formulation optimized based on the various parameters such as particle size, entrapment efficiency, in vitro release study. Depression induction was done by forced swim test and evaluated by various behavioral and biochemical parameters. Furthermore, results showed significantly increased in locomotors activity, body weight as compared to control group. It also showed alteration in biochemical parameters such glutathione level and catalase levels significantly increased other than lipid peroxidation and nitrite level was found to be decreased after intranasal administration of formulation. Thus, intranasal TRM HCl NP-loaded in situ gel was found to be a promising formulation for the treatment of depression.

  10. Targeted concurrent and sequential delivery of chemotherapeutic and antiangiogenic agents to the brain by using drug-loaded nanofibrous membranes

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Yuan-Yun; Yang, Tao-Chieh; Wang, Yi-Chuan; Lee, Wei-Hwa; Chang, Tzu-Min; Kau, Yi-Chuan; Liu, Shih-Jung

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most frequent and devastating primary brain tumor. Surgery followed by radiotherapy with concomitant and adjuvant chemotherapy is the standard of care for patients with glioblastoma. Chemotherapy is ineffective, because of the low therapeutic levels of pharmaceuticals in tumor tissues and the well-known tumor-cell resistance to chemotherapy. Therefore, we developed bilayered poly(d,l)-lactide-co-glycolide nanofibrous membranes that enabled the sequential and sustained release of chemotherapeutic and antiangiogenic agents by employing an electrospinning technique. The release characteristics of embedded drugs were determined by employing an in vitro elution technique and high-performance liquid chromatography. The experimental results showed that the fabricated nanofibers showed a sequential drug-eluting behavior, with the release of high drug levels of chemotherapeutic carmustine, irinotecan, and cisplatin from day 3, followed by the release of high concentrations of the antiangiogenic combretastatin from day 21. Biodegradable multidrug-eluting nanofibrous membranes were then dispersed into the cerebral cavity of rats by craniectomy, and the in vivo release characteristics of the pharmaceuticals from the membranes were investigated. The results suggested that the nanofibrous membranes released high concentrations of pharmaceuticals for more than 8 weeks in the cerebral parenchyma of rats. The result of histological analysis demonstrated developmental atrophy of brains with no inflammation. Biodegradable nanofibrous membranes can be manufactured for long-term sequential transport of different chemotherapeutic and anti-angiogenic agents in the brain, which can potentially improve the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme and prevent toxic effects due to systemic administration. PMID:28243088

  11. Phototriggered multifunctional drug delivery device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Härtner, S.; Kim, H.-C.; Hampp, N.

    2006-02-01

    Although phototriggered cleavage of chemical bonds induced by single-photon or two-photon-absorption provides attractive tools for controlled drug delivery, the choice of drugs is still limited by the linker system to which the therapeutic molecules need to be bound covalently. The use of a multifunctional linker system suitable for coupling a broad spectrum of drugs to the polymeric carrier will open a new field for drug delivery. We have developed a novel photocleavable multifunctional linker system based on coumarin dimers, whose unique photochemical behavior are well characterized. As a first example, an acrylic polymer-drug conjugate with antimetabolites is explored. The cleavage of the link between the drug and the polymer backbone is triggered by both single- as well as two-photon absorption. The release of the drug is investigated. It is possible to manufacture a polymeric drug delivery device with several drugs in different areas. In particular the two-photon-absorption induced process offers the possibility to address the drug of interest owing to the superior spatial resolution. The key to such devices is a versatile linker-system which can be adopted to work with various drug compounds.

  12. Innovative in vitro method to predict rate and extent of drug delivery to the brain across the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Mangas-Sanjuan, Victor; González-Álvarez, Isabel; González-Álvarez, Marta; Casabó, Vicente G; Bermejo, Marival

    2013-10-07

    The relevant parameters for predicting rate and extent of access across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) are fu,plasma (unbound fraction in plasma), Vu,brain (distribution volume in brain) and Kp,uu,brain (ratio of free concentrations in plasma and brain). Their estimation still requires animal studies and in vitro low throughput experiments which make difficult the screening of new CNS candidates. The aim of the present work was to develop a new whole in vitro high throughput method to predict drug rate and extent of access across the BBB. The system permits estimation of fu,plasma, Vu,brain and Kp,uu,brain in a single experimental system, using in vitro cell monolayers in different conditions. From the ratios of the apparent permeability values (Papp) with the adequate mathematical analysis the relevant parameters can be estimated. Papp of ten model compounds has been obtained in MDCKII and MDCK-Mdr1cell monolayers in the absence and presence of albumin and brain homogenate. The ratio of Papp in the absence and presence of albumin allows estimation of in vitro fu,plasma. Papp in the presence of brain homogenate is used to estimate fu,brain and Vu,brain. Kp,uu,brain is estimated from the apical to basal versus basal to apical clearances. The BBB parameters obtained with the new method were predictive of the in vivo behavior of candidates. In vitro fu,plasma, Kp,uu,brain and Vu,brain (calculated with Papp from MDCKII cell line) presented a good correlation with in vivo fu,plasma, Kp,uu,CSF and Vu,brain published values (r=0.92; r=0.85; and r=0.99 respectively). Despite its simplicity the predictive performance is fairly good considering the reduced number of tested compounds with different physicochemical and transport properties. Further experimental modifications could be checked to optimize the method, but the present data support its feasibility. As other in vitro cell culture models, the system is suitable for miniaturization and robotization to allow high

  13. Potential new methods for antiepileptic drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Robert S; Ho, Jet

    2002-01-01

    Use of novel drug delivery methods could enhance the efficacy and reduce the toxicity of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Slow-release oral forms of medication or depot drugs such as skin patches might improve compliance and therefore seizure control. In emergency situations, administration via rectal, nasal or buccal mucosa can deliver the drug more quickly than can oral administration. Slow-release oral forms and rectal forms of AEDs are already approved for use, nasal and buccal administration is currently off-label and skin patches for AEDs are an attractive but currently hypothetical option. Therapies under development may result in the delivery of AEDs directly to the regions of the brain involved in seizures. Experimental protocols are underway to allow continuous infusion of potent excitatory amino acid antagonists into the CSF. In experiments with animal models of epilepsy, AEDs have been delivered successfully to seizure foci in the brain by programmed infusion pumps, acting in response to computerised EEG seizure detection. Inactive prodrugs can be given systemically and activated at the site of the seizure focus by locally released compounds. One such drug under development is DP-VPA (or DP16), which is cleaved to valproic acid (sodium valproate) by phospholipases at the seizure focus. Liposomes and nanoparticles are engineered micro-reservoirs of a drug, with attached antibodies or receptor-specific binding agents designed to target the particles to a specific region of the body. Liposomes in theory could deliver a high concentration of an AED to a seizure focus. Penetration of the blood-brain barrier can be accomplished by linking large particles to iron transferrin or biological toxins that can cross the barrier. In the near future, it is likely that cell transplants that generate neurotransmitters and neuromodulators will accomplish renewable endogenous drug delivery. However, the survival and viability of transplanted cells have yet to be demonstrated

  14. Intracranial drug delivery for subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, Robert Loch; Leung, Ming; Tice, Tom

    2012-01-01

    Tice and colleagues pioneered site-specific, sustained-release drug delivery to the brain almost 30 years ago. Currently there is one drug approved for use in this manner. Clinical trials in subarachnoid hemorrhage have led to approval of nimodipine for oral and intravenous use, but other drugs, such as clazosentan, hydroxymethylglutaryl CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) and magnesium, have not shown consistent clinical efficacy. We propose that intracranial delivery of drugs such as nimodipine, formulated in sustained-release preparations, are good candidates for improving outcome after subarachnoid hemorrhage because they can be administered to patients that are already undergoing surgery and who have a self-limited condition from which full recovery is possible.

  15. Effect of anesthetics on microglial activation and nanoparticle uptake: Implications for drug delivery in traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Kannan, Gokul; Kambhampati, Siva P; Kudchadkar, Sapna R

    2017-03-21

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a serious public health problem, often with devastating consequences for patients and their families. Affordable and timely therapies can have a substantial impact on outcomes in severe TBI. Despite the common use of sedatives and anesthetics in the acute phase of TBI management, their effect on glial cells is not well understood. We investigated the effect of a commonly used sedative, pentobarbital, on glial cells and their uptake of nanoparticles. First, we studied how pentobarbital affects BV2 mouse microglial cells in culture. The cell morphology was imaged by confocal microscopy and analyzed. Our results suggest that microglia change to a more swollen, 'activated' shape with pentobarbital (cell area increased by approximately 20%, p<0.001). Such glial activation may have negative implications for the ability of the injured brain to clear edema. Second, we investigated how pentobarbital treatment affected nanoparticle uptake. BV-2 mouse microglial cells in the presence and absence of pentobarbital were treated with fluorescently-labeled, hydroxyl-functionalized poly(amidoamine) dendrimer nanoparticles (Dendrimer-Cy5). We demonstrated that the presence of pentobarbital increased the dendrimer nanoparticle uptake significantly (~2-fold both 2 and 6h following treatment). This semi-quantitative fluorescence assessment was broadly consistent among confocal image analysis, flow cytometry, and fluorescence quantification of cell-extracted dendrimer-Cy5. Although anesthetics appear to activate microglia, the increased uptake of dendrimer nanoparticles in their presence can be exploited to deliver drug-loaded nanoparticles directly to microglia after TBI. These drugs could restore glial and glymphatic function, enabling efficient drainage of waste and fluid from the brain and effectively improving recovery after TBI. A key future direction is to validate these findings in TBI models.

  16. NanoART, neuroAIDS and CNS drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Nowacek, Ari; Gendelman, Howard E

    2009-01-01

    A broad range of nanomedicines is being developed to improve drug delivery for CNS disorders. The structure of the blood–brain barrier (BBB), the presence of efflux pumps and the expression of metabolic enzymes pose hurdles for drug-brain entry. Nanoformulations can circumvent the BBB to improve CNS-directed drug delivery by affecting such pumps and enzymes. Alternatively, they can be optimized to affect their size, shape, and protein and lipid coatings to facilitate drug uptake, release and ingress across the barrier. This is important as the brain is a sanctuary for a broad range of pathogens including HIV-1. Improved drug delivery to the CNS would affect pharmacokinetic and drug biodistribution properties. This article focuses on how nanotechnology can serve to improve the delivery of antiretroviral medicines, termed nanoART, across the BBB and affect the biodistribution and clinical benefit for HIV-1 disease. PMID:19572821

  17. Mathematical modeling of drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Siepmann, J; Siepmann, F

    2008-12-08

    Due to the significant advances in information technology mathematical modeling of drug delivery is a field of steadily increasing academic and industrial importance with an enormous future potential. The in silico optimization of novel drug delivery systems can be expected to significantly increase in accuracy and easiness of application. Analogous to other scientific disciplines, computer simulations are likely to become an integral part of future research and development in pharmaceutical technology. Mathematical programs can be expected to be routinely used to help optimizing the design of novel dosage forms. Good estimates for the required composition, geometry, dimensions and preparation procedure of various types of delivery systems will be available, taking into account the desired administration route, drug dose and release profile. Thus, the number of required experimental studies during product development can be significantly reduced, saving time and reducing costs. In addition, the quantitative analysis of the physical, chemical and potentially biological phenomena, which are involved in the control of drug release, offers another fundamental advantage: The underlying drug release mechanisms can be elucidated, which is not only of academic interest, but a pre-requisite for an efficient improvement of the safety of the pharmaco-treatments and for effective trouble-shooting during production. This article gives an overview on the current state of the art of mathematical modeling of drug delivery, including empirical/semi-empirical and mechanistic realistic models. Analytical as well as numerical solutions are described and various practical examples are given. One of the major challenges to be addressed in the future is the combination of mechanistic theories describing drug release out of the delivery systems with mathematical models quantifying the subsequent drug transport within the human body in a realistic way. Ideally, the effects of the design

  18. Transferrin receptor antibody-modified α-cobrotoxin-loaded nanoparticles enable drug delivery across the blood-brain barrier by intranasal administration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lin; Zhang, Xiangyi; Li, Wuchao; Sun, Haozhen; Lou, Yan; Zhang, Xingguo; Li, Fanzhu

    2013-11-01

    A novel drug carrier for brain delivery, maleimide-poly(ethyleneglycol)-poly(lactide) (maleimide-PEG-PLA) nanoparticles (NPs) conjugated with mouse-anti-rat monoclonal antibody OX26 (OX26-NPs), was developed and its brain delivery property was evaluated. The diblock copolymers of maleimide-PEG-PLA were synthesized and applied to α-cobrotoxin (αCT)-loaded NPs which were characterized by transmission electron micrograph imaging, Fourier-transform IR, and X-ray diffraction. The NPs encapsulating αCT had a round and vesicle-like shape with a mean diameter around 100 nm, and the OX26 had covalently conjugated to the surface of NPs. MTT studies in brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMEC) revealed a moderate decrease in the cell viability of αCT, when incorporated in OX26-NPs compared to free αCT in solution. A higher affinity of the OX26-αCT-NPs to the BMEC was shown in comparison to αCT-NPs. Then, OX26-αCT-NPs were intranasally (i.n.) administered to rats, and αCT in the periaqueductal gray was monitored for up to 480 min using microdialysis technique in free-moving rats, with i.n. αCT-NPs, i.n. OX26-αCT-NPs, intramuscular injection (i.m.) αCT-NPs, and i.m. OX26-αCT-NPs. The brain transport results showed that the corresponding absolute bioavailability ( F abs) of i.n. OX26-αCT-NPs were about 125 and 155 % with i.n. αCT-NPs and i.m. OX26-αCT-NPs, respectively, and it was found that both the C max and AUC of the four groups were as follows: i.n. OX26-αCT-NPs > i.n. αCT-NPs > i.m. OX26-αCT-NPs > i.m. αCT-NPs, while αCT solution, as control groups, could hardly enter the brain. These results indicated that OX26-NPs are promising carriers for peptide brain delivery.

  19. An LC/MS quantitative and microdialysis method for cyclovirobuxine D pharmacokinetics in rat plasma and brain: The pharmacokinetic comparison of three different drug delivery routes.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jia-bao; Lai, Qiao; Shumyak, Stepan P; Xu, Lan-fang; Zhang, Chen-xue; Ling, Jia-jun; Yu, Yang

    2015-10-01

    To explore the brain-targeting of cyclovirobuxine D(CVB-D) after administered intranasally, the pharmacokinetics of CVB-D via three different drug delivery routes: intragastric (i.g.), intranasal (i.n.), and intravenous (i.v.) in rat brain and blood was compared. Firstly, an in vivo microdialysis method for sampling CVB-D in both plasma and brain of the rat was established. Secondly, a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method has been developed and validated for determination of CVB-D in microdialysis samples. For plasma and brain microdialysis samples, liquid-liquid extraction was used and donepezil was chosen as internal standard. Both were followed by HPLC separation and positive electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry detection (ESI-MS/MS). Chromatographic separation was achieved on a agilent C18 column with a mobile phase of methanol-water (50:50, v/v) (pH 3.2) containing 0.1% formic acid and 5mM ammonium acetate. Mass spectrometric detection in the positive ion mode was carried out by selected reaction monitoring (MRM) of the transitions at m/z 403.4→372.3 for CVB-D and m/z 380.2→243.1 for donepezil (IS). Good linearities were obtained in the range of 10-4000ng/mL in rat microdialysates for CVB-D. The lowest limit of quantitation was 5ng/mL, with an extraction recovery >75%, and no significant matrix effects. Intra- and inter-day precisions were all <15% with accuracies of 97.26-116.20%. All of which proved that the established method was successfully applied to the pharmacokinetic study of CVB-D. Simultaneously, brain uptake and pharmacokinetic studies were performed by determination of CVB-D concentration in blood and brain respectively for CVB-D i.g., i.n. and i.v.. Results showed that the intranasal CVB-D could improve brain targeting and had advantages for direct nose to brain transport of CVB-D when compared with injection and oral delivery routes, which indicates that intranasal administration of CVB-D could be a promising

  20. Focused ultrasound-enhanced intranasal brain delivery of brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong; Yang, Georgiana Zong Xin; Getachew, Hoheteberhan; Acosta, Camilo; Sierra Sánchez, Carlos; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2016-06-27

    The objective of this study was to unveil the potential mechanism of focused ultrasound (FUS)-enhanced intranasal (IN) brain drug delivery and assess its feasibility in the delivery of therapeutic molecules. Delivery outcomes of fluorescently-labeled dextrans to mouse brains by IN administration either before or after FUS sonication were compared to evaluate whether FUS enhances IN delivery by active pumping or passive diffusion. Fluorescence imaging of brain slices found that IN administration followed by FUS sonication achieved significantly higher delivery than IN administration only, while pre-treatment by FUS sonication followed by IN administration was not significantly different from IN administration only. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a promising neurotrophic factor for the treatment of many central nervous system diseases, was delivered by IN followed by FUS to demonstrate the feasibility of this technique and compared with the established FUS technique where drugs are injected intravenously. Immunohistochemistry staining of BDNF revealed that FUS-enhanced IN delivery achieved similar locally enhanced delivery as the established FUS technique. This study suggested that FUS enhances IN brain drug delivery by FUS-induced active pumping of the drug and demonstrated that FUS-enhanced IN delivery is a promising technique for noninvasive and localized delivery of therapeutic molecules to the brain.

  1. Focused ultrasound-enhanced intranasal brain delivery of brain-derived neurotrophic factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hong; Yang, Georgiana Zong Xin; Getachew, Hoheteberhan; Acosta, Camilo; Sierra Sánchez, Carlos; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to unveil the potential mechanism of focused ultrasound (FUS)-enhanced intranasal (IN) brain drug delivery and assess its feasibility in the delivery of therapeutic molecules. Delivery outcomes of fluorescently-labeled dextrans to mouse brains by IN administration either before or after FUS sonication were compared to evaluate whether FUS enhances IN delivery by active pumping or passive diffusion. Fluorescence imaging of brain slices found that IN administration followed by FUS sonication achieved significantly higher delivery than IN administration only, while pre-treatment by FUS sonication followed by IN administration was not significantly different from IN administration only. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a promising neurotrophic factor for the treatment of many central nervous system diseases, was delivered by IN followed by FUS to demonstrate the feasibility of this technique and compared with the established FUS technique where drugs are injected intravenously. Immunohistochemistry staining of BDNF revealed that FUS-enhanced IN delivery achieved similar locally enhanced delivery as the established FUS technique. This study suggested that FUS enhances IN brain drug delivery by FUS-induced active pumping of the drug and demonstrated that FUS-enhanced IN delivery is a promising technique for noninvasive and localized delivery of therapeutic molecules to the brain.

  2. Implantable drug-delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Blackshear, P J

    1979-12-01

    Implantable drug-delivery systems are being developed to release drugs to the bloodstream continuously as well as free patients from being hospitalized to receive intravenous infusions or frequent injections. One technique is implantation of a pellet in the subcutaneous tissue so the pellet may be released by erosion. Drugs are also diffused through silicone rubber capsules but only polyacrylamide is able to release large molecules. Contraceptive rings containing progesterone and placed in the uterus or vagina and implanted silicone-rubber capsules use these principles. Disadvantages to the subcutaneous delivery of drugs include: 1) release of the drug in subcutaneous tissue rather than in the bloodstream directly; 2) entry into the circulatory system is controlled by surrounding blood supplies which vary with fat; 3) diffusion may be difficult due to dense layers of fibrous tissue; and 4) drug amounts cannot be readily regulated. The Ommaya reservoir uses a container with a self-sealing membrane implanted in the scalp and connected to a cerebral ventricle to treat forms of leukemia and fungal meningitis. Another development is an implantable disk-shaped infusion pump with 2 compartments, the outer one containing a propellant and the inner chamber containing the drug, holds 45 milliliters and releases about 1 milliliter/day. In the future these systems may release drugs in response to biochemical feedback or deliver a drug to 1 specific area.

  3. Drug Delivery to CNS: Challenges and Opportunities with Emphasis on Biomaterials Based Drug Delivery Strategies.

    PubMed

    Khambhla, Ekta; Shah, Viral; Baviskar, Kalpesh

    2016-01-01

    The current epoch has witnessed a lifestyle impregnated with stress, which is a major cause of several neurological disorders. High morbidity and mortality rate due to neurological diseases and disorders have generated a huge social impact. Despite voluminous research, patients suffering from fatal and/or debilitating CNS diseases such as brain tumors, HIV, encephalopathy, Alzheimer's, epilepsy, Parkinson's, migraine and multiple sclerosis outnumbered those suffering from systemic cancer or heart diseases. The brain being a highly sensitive neuronal organ, has evolved with vasculature barriers, which regulates the efflux and influx of substances to CNS. Treatment of CNS diseases/disorders is challenging because of physiologic, metabolic and biochemical obstacles created by these barriers which comprise mainly of BBB and BCFB. The inability of achieving therapeutically active concentration has become the bottleneck level difficulty, hampering the therapeutic efficiency of several promising drug candidates for CNS related disorders. Parallel maturation of an effective CNS drug delivery strategy with CNS drug discovery is the need of the hour. Recently, the focus of the pharmaceutical community has aggravated in the direction of developing novel and more efficient drug delivery systems, giving the potential of more effective and safer CNS therapies. The present review outlines several hurdles in drug delivery to the CNS along with ideal physicochemical properties desired in drug substance/formulation for CNS delivery. The review also focuses on different conventional and novel strategies for drug delivery to the CNS. The article also assesses and emphasizes on possible benefits of biomaterial based formulations for drug delivery to the CNS.

  4. Drugs Approved for Brain Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Brain Tumors This page lists cancer drugs approved by ... that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Brain Tumors Afinitor (Everolimus) Afinitor Disperz (Everolimus) Avastin (Bevacizumab) ...

  5. Ultrasound Molecular Imaging and Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Caskey, Charles F

    2017-03-02

    Ultrasound is a rapidly advancing field with many emerging diagnostic and therapeutic applications. For diagnostics, new vascular targets are routinely identified and mature technologies are being translated to humans, while other recent innovations may bring about the creation of acoustic reporter genes and micron-scale resolution with ultrasound. As a cancer therapy, ultrasound is being explored as an adjuvant to immune therapies and to deliver acoustically or thermally active drugs to tumor regions. Ultrasound-enhanced delivery across the blood brain barrier (BBB) could potentially be very impactful for brain cancers and neurodegenerative diseases where the BBB often impedes the delivery of therapeutic molecules. In this minireview, we provide an overview of these topics in the field of ultrasound that are especially relevant to the interests of World Molecular Imaging Society.

  6. Drug delivery by lipid cochleates.

    PubMed

    Zarif, Leila

    2005-01-01

    Drug delivery technology has brought additional benefits to pharmaceuticals such as reduction in dosing frequency and side effects, as well as the extension of patient life. To address this need, cochleates, a precipitate obtained as a result of the interaction between phosphatidylserine and calcium, have been developed and proved to have potential in encapsulating and delivering small molecule drugs. This chapter discusses the molecules that can be encapsulated in a cochleate system and describes in detail the methodology that can be used to encapsulate and characterize hydrophobic drugs such as amphotericin B, a potent antifungal agent. Some efficacy data in animal models infected with candidiasis or aspergillosis are described as well.

  7. Potential of nanoparticulate drug delivery systems by intranasal administration.

    PubMed

    Ali, Javed; Ali, Mushir; Baboota, Sanjula; Sahani, Jasjeet Kaur; Ramassamy, Charles; Dao, Lé; Bhavna

    2010-05-01

    Due to number of problems related with oral, parenteral, rectal and other routes of drug administration, the interest of pharmaceutical scientists has increased towards exploring the possibilities of intranasal delivery of various drugs. Nasal drug delivery system is commonly known for the treatment of local ailments like cold, cough, rhinitis, etc. Efforts have been made to deliver various drugs, especially peptides and proteins, through nasal route for systemic use; utilizing the principles and concepts of various nanoparticulate drug delivery systems using various polymers and absorption promoters. The incorporation of drugs into nanoparticles might be a promising approach, since colloidal formulations have been shown to protect them from the degrading milieu in the nasal cavity and facilitate their transport across the mucosal barriers. The use of nanoparticles for vaccine delivery provides beneficial effect, by achieving good immune responses. This could be due to the fact that small particles can be transported preferentially by the lymphoid tissue of the nasal cavity (NALT). The brain gets benefited through the intranasal delivery as direct olfactory transport bypasses the blood brain barrier and nanoparticles are taken up and conveyed along cell processes of olfactory neurons through the cribriform plate to synaptic junctions with neurons of the olfactory bulb. The intranasal delivery is aimed at optimizing drug bioavailability for systemic drugs, as absorption decreases with increasing molecular weight, and for drugs, which are susceptible to enzymatic degradation such as proteins and polypeptides. This review discusses the potential benefits of using nanoparticles for nasal delivery of drugs and vaccines for brain, systemic and topical delivery. The article aims at giving an insight into nasal cavity, consideration of factors affecting and strategies to improve drug absorption through nasal route, pharmaceutical dosage forms and delivery systems with

  8. Mucoadhesive vaginal drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Acartürk, Füsun

    2009-11-01

    Vaginal delivery is an important route of drug administration for both local and systemic diseases. The vaginal route has some advantages due to its large surface area, rich blood supply, avoidance of the first-pass effect, relatively high permeability to many drugs and self-insertion. The traditional commercial preparations, such as creams, foams, gels, irrigations and tablets, are known to reside in the vaginal cavity for a relatively short period of time owing to the self-cleaning action of the vaginal tract, and often require multiple daily doses to ensure the desired therapeutic effect. The vaginal route appears to be highly appropriate for bioadhesive drug delivery systems in order to retain drugs for treating largely local conditions, or for use in contraception. In particular, protection against sexually-transmitted diseases is critical. To prolong the residence time in the vaginal cavity, bioadhesive therapeutic systems have been developed in the form of semi-solid and solid dosage forms. The most commonly used mucoadhesive polymers that are capable of forming hydrogels are synthetic polyacrylates, polycarbophil, chitosan, cellulose derivatives (hydroxyethycellulose, hydroxy-propylcellulose and hydroxypropylmethylcellulose), hyaluronic acid derivatives, pectin, tragacanth, carrageenan and sodium alginate. The present article is a comprehensive review of the patents related to mucoadhesive vaginal drug delivery systems.

  9. Microfabricated injectable drug delivery system

    DOEpatents

    Krulevitch, Peter A.; Wang, Amy W.

    2002-01-01

    A microfabricated, fully integrated drug delivery system capable of secreting controlled dosages of multiple drugs over long periods of time (up to a year). The device includes a long and narrow shaped implant with a sharp leading edge for implantation under the skin of a human in a manner analogous to a sliver. The implant includes: 1) one or more micromachined, integrated, zero power, high and constant pressure generating osmotic engine; 2) low power addressable one-shot shape memory polymer (SMP) valves for switching on the osmotic engine, and for opening drug outlet ports; 3) microfabricated polymer pistons for isolating the pressure source from drug-filled microchannels; 4) multiple drug/multiple dosage capacity, and 5) anisotropically-etched, atomically-sharp silicon leading edge for penetrating the skin during implantation. The device includes an externally mounted controller for controlling on-board electronics which activates the SMP microvalves, etc. of the implant.

  10. Protease-mediated drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickson, Eva F.; Goyan, Rebecca L.; Kennedy, James C.; Mackay, M.; Mendes, M. A. K.; Pottier, Roy H.

    2003-12-01

    Drugs used in disease treatment can cause damage to both malignant and normal tissue. This toxicity limits the maximum therapeutic dose. Drug targeting is of high interest to increase the therapeutic efficacy of the drug without increasing systemic toxicity. Certain tissue abnormalities, disease processes, cancers, and infections are characterized by high levels of activity of specific extracellular and/or intracellular proteases. Abnormally high activity levels of specific proteases are present at sites of physical or chemical trauma, blood clots, malignant tumors, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, gingival disease, glomerulonerphritis, and acute pancreatitis. Abnormal protease activity is suspected in development of liver thrombosis, pulmonary emphysema, atherosclerosis, and muscular dystrophy. Inactiviating disease-associated proteases by the administration of appropriate protease inhibitors has had limited success. Instead, one could use such proteases to target drugs to treat the condition. Protease mediated drug delivery offers such a possibility. Solubilizing groups are attached to insoluble drugs via a polypeptide chain which is specifically cleavable by certian proteases. When the solubilized drug enounters the protease, the solubilizing moieties are cleaved, and the drug precipitates at the disease location. Thus, a smaller systemic dosage could result in a therapeutic drug concentration at the treatment site with less systemic toxicity.

  11. Ultrasound mediated nanoparticle drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullin, Lee B.

    Ultrasound is not only a powerful diagnostic tool, but also a promising therapeutic technology that can be used to improve localized drug delivery. Microbubble contrast agents are micron sized encapsulated gas filled bubbles that are administered intravenously. Originally developed to enhance ultrasound images, microbubbles are highly echogenic due to the gas core that provides a detectable impedance difference from the surrounding medium. The core also allows for controlled response of the microbubbles to ultrasound pulses. Microbubbles can be pushed using acoustic radiation force and ruptured using high pressures. Destruction of microbubbles can increase permeability at the cellular and vascular level, which can be advantageous for drug delivery. Advances in drug delivery methods have been seen with the introduction of nanoparticles, nanometer sized objects often carrying a drug payload. In chemotherapy, nanoparticles can deliver drugs to tumors while limiting systemic exposure due to abnormalities in tumor vasculature such large gaps between endothelial cells that allow nanoparticles to enter into the interstitial space; this is referred to as the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. However, this effect may be overestimated in many tumors. Additionally, only a small percentage of the injected dose accumulates in the tumor, which most the nanoparticles accumulating in the liver and spleen. It is hypothesized that combining the acoustic activity of an ultrasound contrast agent with the high payload and extravasation ability of a nanoparticle, localized delivery to the tumor with reduced systemic toxicity can be achieved. This method can be accomplished by either loading nanoparticles onto the shell of the microbubble or through a coadministration method of both nanoparticles and microbubbles. The work presented in this dissertation utilizes novel and commercial nanoparticle formulations, combined with microbubbles and a variety of ultrasound systems

  12. Food, physiology and drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Varum, F J O; Hatton, G B; Basit, A W

    2013-12-05

    Gastrointestinal physiology is dynamic and complex at the best of times, and a multitude of known variables can affect the overall bioavailability of drugs delivered via the oral route. Yet while the influences of food and beverage intake as just two of these variables on oral drug delivery have been extensively documented in the wider literature, specific information on their effects remains sporadic, and is not so much contextually reviewed. Food co-ingestion with oral dosage forms can mediate several changes to drug bioavailability, yet the precise mechanisms underlying this have yet to be fully elucidated. Likewise, the often detrimental effects of alcohol (ethanol) on dosage form performance have been widely observed experimentally, but knowledge of which has only moderately impacted on clinical practice. Here, we attempt to piece together the available subject matter relating to the influences of both solid and liquid foodstuffs on the gastrointestinal milieu and the implications for oral drug delivery, with particular emphasis on the behaviour of modified-release dosage forms, formulation robustness and drug absorption. Providing better insight into these influences, and exemplifying cases where formulations have been developed or modified to circumvent their associated problems, can help to appropriately direct the design of future in vitro digestive modelling systems as well as oral dosage forms resilient to these effects. Moreover, this will help to better our understanding of the impact of food and alcohol intake on normal gut behaviour and function.

  13. Drug delivery approaches for the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Fakhoury, Marc

    2016-09-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is by far the most common and aggressive form of glial tumor. It is characterized by a highly proliferative population of cells that invade surrounding tissue and that frequently recur after surgical resection and chemotherapy. Over the last decades, a number of promising novel pharmacological approaches have been investigated, but most of them have failed clinical trials due to some side-effects such as toxicity and poor drug delivery to the brain. The major obstacle in the treatment of GBM is the presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Due to their relatively high molecular weight, most therapeutic drugs fail to cross the BBB from the blood circulation. This paper sheds light on the characteristics of GBM and the challenges of current pharmacological treatments. A closer look is given to the role of nanotechnology in the field of drug delivery, and its application in the treatment of brain tumors such as GBM. For this purpose, effort was made to select the most recent studies using predefined search criteria that included at least one of the following keywords in the PubMed and Medline databases: glioblastoma, drug delivery, blood-brain barrier, nanotechnology, and nanoparticle. Breakthrough in nanotechnology offers promising applications in cancer therapy and targeted drug delivery. However, more efforts need to be devoted to the development of novel therapeutic strategies that enable the delivery of drugs to desired areas of the brain with limited side-effects and higher therapeutic efficiency.

  14. A dual-mediated liposomal drug delivery system targeting the brain: rational construction, integrity evaluation across the blood–brain barrier, and the transporting mechanism to glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chang; Liu, Xiao-Na; Wang, Gui-Ling; Hei, Yu; Meng, Shuai; Yang, Ling-Fei; Yuan, Lan; Xie, Ying

    2017-01-01

    As the global population ages, cancer rates increase worldwide, and degenerative diseases of the central nervous system (CNS), brain tumors, and inflammation threaten human health more frequently. We designed a dual-mediated (receptor-mediated and adsorption-mediated) liposome, named transferrin–cell penetrating peptide–sterically stabilized liposome (TF-CPP-SSL), to improve therapy for gliomas through combining molecular recognition of transferrin receptors (TF-Rs) on the blood–brain barrier (BBB) and glioma cells with the internalization and lysosomal escaping ability of CPP. Based on the systematic investigation of structure–activity relations on the cellular level, we constructed TF-CPP-SSL rationally by conjugating TF and CPP moieties to the liposomes via PEG3.4K and PEG2.0K, respectively, and found the optimum densities of TF and CPP were 1.8% and 4%, respectively. These liposomes had the highest targeting efficacy for brain microvascular endothelial cell and C6 cell uptake but avoided capture by normal cells. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer technology and coculture models of BBB and glioma C6 cells indicated that TF-CPP-SSL was transported across the BBB without drug leakage, liposome breakup, or cleavage of ligand. TF-CPP-SSL offered advantages for crossing the BBB and entering into glioma C6 cells. Real-time confocal viewing revealed that TF-CPP-SSL was entrapped in endosomes of glioma C6 cells and then escaped from lysosomes successfully to release the liposomal contents into the cytosol. Entrapped contents, such as doxorubicin, could then enter the nucleus to exert pharmacological effects. PMID:28405164

  15. Strategies for Enhanced Drug Delivery to the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Dwibhashyam, V. S. N. M.; Nagappa, A. N.

    2008-01-01

    Treating central nervous system diseases is very challenging because of the presence of a variety of formidable obstacles that impede drug delivery. Physiological barriers like the blood-brain barrier and blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier as well as various efflux transporter proteins make the entry of drugs into the central nervous system very difficult. The present review provides a brief account of the blood brain barrier, the P-glycoprotein efflux and various strategies for enhancing drug delivery to the central nervous system. PMID:20046703

  16. Superhydrophobic materials for drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yohe, Stefan Thomas

    Superhydrophobicity is a property of material surfaces reflecting the ability to maintain air at the solid-liquid interface when in contact with water. These surfaces have characteristically high apparent contact angles, by definition exceeding 150°, as a result of the composite material-air surface formed under an applied water droplet. Superhydrophobic surfaces were first discovered on naturally occurring substrates, and have subsequently been fabricated in the last several decades to harness these favorable surface properties for a number of emerging applications, including their use in biomedical settings. This work describes fabrication and characterization of superhydrophobic 3D materials, as well as their use as drug delivery devices. Superhydrophobic 3D materials are distinct from 2D superhydrophobic surfaces in that air is maintained not just at the surface of the material, but also within the bulk. When the superhydrophobic 3D materials are submerged in water, water infiltrates slowly and continuously as a new water-air-material interface is formed with controlled displacement of air. Electrospinning and electrospraying are used to fabricate superhydrophobic 3D materials utilizing blends of the biocompatible polymers poly(epsilon-caprolactone) and poly(caprolactone-co-glycerol monostearate) (PGC-C18). PGC-C18 is significantly more hydrophobic than PCL (contact angle of 116° versus 83° for flat materials), and further additions of PGC-C18 into electrospun meshes and electrosprayed coatings affords increased stability of the entrapped air layer. For example, PCL meshes alone (500 mum thick) take 10 days to fully wet, and with 10% or 30% PGC-C18 addition wetting rates are dramatically slowed to 60% wetted by 77 days and 4% by 75 days, respectively. Stability of the superhydrophobic materials can be further probed with a variety of physio-chemical techniques, including pressure, surfactant containing solutions, and solvents of varying surface tension

  17. Thermosensitive polymers for drug delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Gutowska, A.; Kim, Sung Wan

    1996-12-31

    Thermosensitive polymers (TSP) demonstrating temperature-dependent temperature-dependent swelling in water have been extensively studied in recent years. Their molecular and physical properties have been tailored for a variety of biomedical and engineering uses. This presentation will discuss TSP based on poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) and its crosslinked networks modified with hydrophobic or hydrophilic components by copolymerization blending and formation of interpenetrating polymer networks (IPNs). TSP designed for three different areas of drug delivery will be presented. First, heparin releasing temperature-sensitive polymers for the prevention of surface induced thrombosis will be presented as an example of a local macromolecular delivery from a surface of a medical device. Second, a new oral delivery device based on a novel mechanical squeezing concept, utilizing specific swelling-deswelling characteristics of temperature- and temperature/pH-sensitive hydrogels will be described. These hydrogels were synthesized to exhibit a controlled swelling-deswelling kinetics, hence a variety of release profiles may be generated: a delayed, a zero-order or an {open_quotes}on-off{close_quotes} release profile. Finally, thermally reversible polymeric gels as an extracellular matrix for the entrapment of pancreatic islet cells in biohybrid artificial pancreas for insulin delivery will be discussed.

  18. Drug delivery systems for the treatment of ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Rhim, Taiyoun; Lee, Dong Yun; Lee, Minhyung

    2013-10-01

    Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the United States. Reduced cerebral blood flow causes acute damage to the brain due to excitotoxicity, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and ischemia. Currently, the main treatment for stroke is to revive the blood flow by using thrombolytic agents. Reviving blood flow also causes ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) damage. I/R damage results from inflammation and apoptosis and can persist for days to weeks, increasing the infarct size. Drugs can be applied to stroke to intervene in the sub-acute and chronic phases. Chemical, peptide, and genetic therapies have been evaluated to reduce delayed damage to the brain. These drugs have different characteristics, requiring that delivery carriers be developed based on these characteristics. The delivery route is another important factor affecting the efficiency of drug delivery. Various delivery routes have been developed, such as intravenous injection, intranasal administration, and local direct injection to overcome the blood-brain-barrier (BBB). In this review, the delivery carriers and delivery routes for peptide and gene therapies are discussed and examples are provided. Combined with new drugs, drug delivery systems will eventually provide useful treatments for ischemic stroke.

  19. Multifunctional Hybrid Nanoparticles for Traceable Drug Delivery and Intracellular Microenvironment-Controlled Multistage Drug-Release in Neurons.

    PubMed

    Shi, Bingyang; Du, Xin; Chen, Jian; Fu, Libing; Morsch, Marco; Lee, Albert; Liu, Yong; Cole, Nicholas; Chung, Roger

    2017-03-31

    Innovative nanoparticles hold promising potential for disease therapy as drug delivery systems. For brain-disease therapy, a drug delivery system that can sustainably control drug-release and monitor fluorescence of the drug cargos is highly desirable. In this study, a light-traceable and intracellular microenvironment-responsive drug delivery system was developed based on the combination of glutathione-responsive autoflurescent nanogel, dendrimer-like mesoporous silica nanoparticles, and gold nanoparticles. The resulting hybrid nanoparticles represent a new class of delivery system that can efficiently load, transport, and control multistage-release of sulfydryl-containing drugs into neurons, with light-traceable monitoring for future brain-disease therapy.

  20. Clinical Considerations of Focal Drug Delivery In Cancer Treatment.

    PubMed

    Harris, Jamie; Chiu, Bill

    2017-02-24

    According to the US Center for Disease Control, cancer deaths are the second most common cause of mortality in both adults and children. Definitive treatment of solid tumors involves surgical resection with or without systemic chemotherapy and radiation. The advent of local drug delivery presents a unique treatment modality that can offer substantial benefits in cancer management. Local drug delivery offers targeted drug delivery to cancer tissues while minimizing side effects of the medications. Three main phases in solid tumor management exist for the treating physician: initial diagnosis with tissue biopsy, surgical resection with or without chemotherapy, and management of metastatic disease. Image guided studies, using modalities such as MRI, computerized tomography, and ultrasound to sample tumors have been described. The initial diagnosis phase offers a treatment window for local drug delivery with the aid of image guidance. After the diagnosis of malignancy is made, surgical resection can become an important part of tumor management. Currently, FDA approved local drug delivery systems are being used in concert with resection for intracranial glioma. Many other applications of implantation of local drug delivery at the time of surgery in other tumors, including breast and neuroblastoma, are being investigated. Finally, for patients who present with or progress to single sites of metastatic disease, such as brain or liver metastasis, studies have shown potential applications for local drug delivery as well. This review will discuss the current state of local drug delivery in the treatment of solid tumors and possible future directions.

  1. Microspheres and Nanotechnology for Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Jóhannesson, Gauti; Stefánsson, Einar; Loftsson, Thorsteinn

    2016-01-01

    Ocular drug delivery to the posterior segment of the eye can be accomplished by invasive drug injections into different tissues of the eye and noninvasive topical treatment. Invasive treatment involves the risks of surgical trauma and infection, and conventional topical treatments are ineffective in delivering drugs to the posterior segment of the eye. In recent years, nanotechnology has become an ever-increasing part of ocular drug delivery. In the following, we briefly review microspheres and nanotechnology for drug delivery to the eye, including different forms of nanotechnology such as nanoparticles, microparticles, liposomes, microemulsions and micromachines. The permeation barriers and anatomical considerations linked to ocular drug delivery are discussed and a theoretical overview on drug delivery through biological membranes is given. Finally, in vitro, in vivo and human studies of x03B3;-cyclodextrin nanoparticle eyedrop suspensions are discussed as an example of nanotechnology used for drug delivery to the eye.

  2. IgG-Paraoxonase-1 Fusion Protein for Targeted Drug Delivery Across the Human Blood-Brain Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Boado, Ruben J.; Zhang, Yun; Zhang, Yufeng; Wang, Yuntao; Pardridge, William M.

    2009-01-01

    Paraoxonase (PON)-1 is the most potent human protein with organophosphatase activity against organophosphate (OP) toxins. OP compounds readily cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB), and have lethal mechanisms of action within the brain. The production of a brain penetrating form of human PON1, which crosses the BBB, is possible with the re-engineering of the enzyme as a fusion protein with a monoclonal antibody (MAb) against the human insulin receptor (HIR). The HIRMAb crosses the BBB via the endogenous insulin receptor, and acts as a molecular Trojan horse to ferry the PON1 into brain. The human PON1 was fused to the carboxyl terminus of the heavy chain of the chimeric HIRMAb. COS cells were dual transfected with the heavy chain gene and the light chain gene, and the HIRMAb-PON1 fusion protein was affinity purified with protein A chromatography. Western blotting with antibodies to human IgG or human PON1 showed the heavy chain of the HIRMAb-PON1 fusion protein was 40 kDa larger than the heavy chain of the chimeric HIRMAb. The ED50 of binding to the HIR extracellular domain was 0.55 ± 0.07 nM and 1.1 ±0.1 nM, respectively, for the chimeric HIRMAb and the HIRMAb-PON1 fusion protein. The PON1 enzyme activity of the fusion protein was approximately 25% of the enzyme activity in human plasma, based on a fluorometric enzymatic assay. In conclusion, human PON1 has been re-engineered as an IgG-organophosphatase fusion protein that penetrates the human BBB. PMID:19434854

  3. Ocular drug delivery systems: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ashaben; Cholkar, Kishore; Agrahari, Vibhuti; Mitra, Ashim K

    2014-01-01

    The major challenge faced by today’s pharmacologist and formulation scientist is ocular drug delivery. Topical eye drop is the most convenient and patient compliant route of drug administration, especially for the treatment of anterior segment diseases. Delivery of drugs to the targeted ocular tissues is restricted by various precorneal, dynamic and static ocular barriers. Also, therapeutic drug levels are not maintained for longer duration in target tissues. In the past two decades, ocular drug delivery research acceleratedly advanced towards developing a novel, safe and patient compliant formulation and drug delivery devices/techniques, which may surpass these barriers and maintain drug levels in tissues. Anterior segment drug delivery advances are witnessed by modulation of conventional topical solutions with permeation and viscosity enhancers. Also, it includes development of conventional topical formulations such as suspensions, emulsions and ointments. Various nanoformulations have also been introduced for anterior segment ocular drug delivery. On the other hand, for posterior ocular delivery, research has been immensely focused towards development of drug releasing devices and nanoformulations for treating chronic vitreoretinal diseases. These novel devices and/or formulations may help to surpass ocular barriers and associated side effects with conventional topical drops. Also, these novel devices and/or formulations are easy to formulate, no/negligibly irritating, possess high precorneal residence time, sustain the drug release, and enhance ocular bioavailability of therapeutics. An update of current research advancement in ocular drug delivery necessitates and helps drug delivery scientists to modulate their think process and develop novel and safe drug delivery strategies. Current review intends to summarize the existing conventional formulations for ocular delivery and their advancements followed by current nanotechnology based formulation developments

  4. Device-assisted transdermal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyunjae; Song, Changyeong; Baik, Seungmin; Kim, Dokyoon; Hyeon, Taeghwan; Kim, Dae-Hyeong

    2017-09-01

    Transdermal drug delivery is a prospective drug delivery strategy to complement the limitations of conventional drug delivery systems including oral and injectable methods. This delivery route allows both convenient and painless drug delivery and a sustained release profile with reduced side effects. However, physiological barriers in the skin undermine the delivery efficiency of conventional patches, limiting drug candidates to small-molecules and lipophilic drugs. Recently, transdermal drug delivery technology has advanced from unsophisticated methods simply relying on natural diffusion to drug releasing systems that dynamically respond to external stimuli. Furthermore, physical barriers in the skin have been overcome using microneedles, and controlled delivery by wearable biosensors has been enabled ultimately. In this review, we classify the evolution of advanced drug delivery strategies based on generations and provide a comprehensive overview. Finally, the recent progress in advanced diagnosis and therapy through customized drug delivery systems based on real-time analysis of physiological cues is highlighted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Colloidal drug delivery systems in vaccine delivery.

    PubMed

    Beg, Sarwar; Samad, Abdus; Nazish, Iram; Sultana, Ruksar; Rahman, Mahfoozur; Ahmad, Md Zaki; Akbar, Md

    2013-01-01

    Vaccines play a vital role in the field of community medicine to combat against several diseases of human existence. Vaccines primarily trigger the acquired immune system to develop long-lasting immunity against pathogens. Conventional approaches for vaccine delivery lacks potential to target a particular antigen to develop acquired immunity by specific antibodies. Recent advancements in vaccine delivery showed that inclusion of adjuvants in vaccine formulations or delivery of them in a carrier helps in achieving desired targeting ability, reducing the immunogenicity and significant augmentation in the immune response. Colloidal carriers (liposomes, niosomes, microspheres, proteosomes, virosomes and virus like particles (VLPs), antigen cochleates, dendrimers and carbon nanotubes) have been widely explored for vaccine delivery. Further, surface engineering of these carriers with ligands, functional moieties and monoclonal antibodies tend to enhance the immune recognition potential of vaccines by differentiation of antigen specific memory T-cells. The current review, therefore, provides an updated account on the recent advancements in various colloidal delivery systems in vaccine delivery, outlining the mechanism of immune response initiated by them along with potential applications and marketed instances in an explicit manner.

  6. Integrated microsystems for controlled drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Razzacki, S Zafar; Thwar, Prasanna K; Yang, Ming; Ugaz, Victor M; Burns, Mark A

    2004-02-10

    Efficient drug delivery and administration are needed to realize the full potential of molecular therapeutics. Integrated microsystems that incorporate extremely fast sensory and actuation capabilities can fulfill this need for efficient drug delivery tools. Photolithographic technologies borrowed from the semiconductor industry enable mass production of such microsystems. Rapid prototyping allows for the quick development of customized devices that would accommodate for diverse therapeutic requirements. This paper reviews the capabilities of existing microfabrication and their applications in controlled drug delivery microsystems. The next generation of drug delivery systems--fully integrated and self-regulating--would not only improve drug administration, but also revolutionize the health-care industry.

  7. Silk and PEG as means to stiffen a parylene probe for insertion in the brain: toward a double time-scale tool for local drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecomte, A.; Castagnola, V.; Descamps, E.; Dahan, L.; Blatché, M. C.; Dinis, T. M.; Leclerc, E.; Egles, C.; Bergaud, C.

    2015-12-01

    The use of soft materials as substrate for neural probes aims at achieving better compliance with the surrounding neurons while maintaining minimal rejection. Many strategies have emerged to enable such probes to penetrate the cortex, among which the use of resorbable polymers. We performed several tests involving two resorbable polymers considered most promising: polyethylene glycol (PEG) and silk fibroin (SF) from Bombyx Mori silkworms. Our coating method provides a repeatable, uniform structure optimized for a stress-reduced insertion of a parylene-C neural probe. Standard compression tests as well as in vitro and in vivo insertion assessments show that both SF and PEG-coated probes are stiff enough to avoid the buckling effect during insertion in the cortex. However, with a buckling force of 300 mN and a mechanical holding in vitro of tens of minutes, we assess silk fibroin to be more reliable for practical handling. In vivo first try-outs in mouse brain showed neither buckling issues of the probe nor undesired alteration of the signal recording. Moreover, we evidenced two distinct time scales in the bioresorption of our polymer coatings: silk fibroin degrades itself in a matter of weeks and PEG dissolves itself within seconds in the presence of water. We then present a hybrid PEG and SF coating that could be used as a drug delivery system with different time scales to reduce both the acute and the chronic body reaction.

  8. Ungual and transungual drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Shivakumar, H N; Juluri, Abhishek; Desai, B G; Murthy, S Narasimha

    2012-08-01

    Topical therapy is desirable in treatment of nail diseases like onychomycosis (fungal infection of nail) and psoriasis. The topical treatment avoids the adverse effects associated with systemic therapy, thereby enhancing the patient compliance and reducing the treatment cost. However the effectiveness of the topical therapies has been limited due to the poor permeability of the nail plate to topically applied therapeutic agents. Research over the past one decade has been focused on improving the transungual permeability by means of chemical treatment, penetration enhancers, mechanical and physical methods. The present review is an attempt to discuss the different physical and chemical methods employed to increase the permeability of the nail plate. Minimally invasive electrically mediated techniques such as iontophoresis have gained success in facilitating the transungual delivery of actives. In addition drug transport across the nail plate has been improved by filing the dorsal surface of the nail plate prior to application of topical formulation. But attempts to improve the trans-nail permeation using transdermal chemical enhancers have failed so far. Attempts are on to search suitable physical enhancement techniques and chemical transungual enhancers in view to maximize the drug delivery across the nail plate.

  9. Nanoparticles of alkylglyceryl-dextran-graft-poly(lactic acid) for drug delivery to the brain: Preparation and in vitro investigation.

    PubMed

    Toman, Petr; Lien, Chun-Fu; Ahmad, Zeeshan; Dietrich, Susanne; Smith, James R; An, Qian; Molnár, Éva; Pilkington, Geoffrey J; Górecki, Darek C; Tsibouklis, John; Barbu, Eugen

    2015-09-01

    Poly(lactic acid), which has an inherent tendency to form colloidal systems of low polydispersity, and alkylglyceryl-modified dextran - a material designed to combine the non-immunogenic and stabilising properties of dextran with the demonstrated permeation enhancing ability of alkylglycerols - have been combined for the development of nanoparticulate, blood-brain barrier-permeating, non-viral vectors. To this end, dextran, that had been functionalised via treatment with epoxide precursors of alkylglycerol, was covalently linked to poly(lactic acid) using a carbodiimide cross-linker to form alkylglyceryl-modified dextran-graft-poly(lactic acid). Solvent displacement and electrospray methods allowed the formulation of these materials into nanoparticles having a unimodal size distribution profile of about 100-200nm and good stability at physiologically relevant pH (7.4). The nanoparticles were characterised in terms of hydrodynamic size (by Dynamic Light Scattering and Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis), morphology (by Scanning Electron Microscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy) and zeta potential, and their toxicity was evaluated using MTT and PrestoBlue assays. Cellular uptake was evidenced by confocal microscopy employing nanoparticles that had been loaded with the easy-to-detect Rhodamine B fluorescent marker. Transwell-model experiments employing mouse (bEnd3) and human (hCMEC/D3) brain endothelial cells revealed enhanced permeation (statistically significant for hCMEC/D3) of the fluorescent markers in the presence of the nanoparticles. Results of studies using Electric Cell Substrate Impedance Sensing suggested a transient decrease of the barrier function in an in vitro blood-brain barrier model following incubation with these nanoformulations. An in ovo study using 3-day chicken embryos indicated the absence of whole-organism acute toxicity effects. The collective in vitro data suggest that these alkylglyceryl-modified dextran-graft-poly(lactic acid) nanoparticles

  10. Controlled release for local delivery of drugs: barriers and models.

    PubMed

    Weiser, Jennifer R; Saltzman, W Mark

    2014-09-28

    Controlled release systems are an effective means for local drug delivery. In local drug delivery, the major goal is to supply therapeutic levels of a drug agent at a physical site in the body for a prolonged period. A second goal is to reduce systemic toxicities, by avoiding the delivery of agents to non-target tissues remote from the site. Understanding the dynamics of drug transport in the vicinity of a local drug delivery device is helpful in achieving both of these goals. Here, we provide an overview of controlled release systems for local delivery and we review mathematical models of drug transport in tissue, which describe the local penetration of drugs into tissue and illustrate the factors - such as diffusion, convection, and elimination - that control drug dispersion and its ultimate fate. This review highlights the important role of controlled release science in development of reliable methods for local delivery, as well as the barriers to accomplishing effective delivery in the brain, blood vessels, mucosal epithelia, and the skin.

  11. Polymeric conjugates for drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Nate; Ghandehari, Hamidreza

    2012-01-01

    The field of polymer therapeutics has evolved over the past decade and has resulted in the development of polymer-drug conjugates with a wide variety of architectures and chemical properties. Whereas traditional non-degradable polymeric carriers such as poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and N-(2-hydroxypropyl methacrylamide) (HPMA) copolymers have been translated to use in the clinic, functionalized polymer-drug conjugates are increasingly being utilized to obtain biodegradable, stimuli-sensitive, and targeted systems in an attempt to further enhance localized drug delivery and ease of elimination. In addition, the study of conjugates bearing both therapeutic and diagnostic agents has resulted in multifunctional carriers with the potential to both “see and treat” patients. In this paper, the rational design of polymer-drug conjugates will be discussed followed by a review of different classes of conjugates currently under investigation. The design and chemistry used for the synthesis of various conjugates will be presented with additional comments on their potential applications and current developmental status. PMID:22707853

  12. Ligand-Targeted Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Srinivasarao, Madduri; Low, Philip S

    2017-09-12

    Safety and efficacy constitute the major criteria governing regulatory approval of any new drug. The best method to maximize safety and efficacy is to deliver a proven therapeutic agent with a targeting ligand that exhibits little affinity for healthy cells but high affinity for pathologic cells. The probability of regulatory approval can conceivably be further enhanced by exploiting the same targeting ligand, conjugated to an imaging agent, to select patients whose diseased tissues display sufficient targeted receptors for therapeutic efficacy. The focus of this Review is to summarize criteria that must be met during design of ligand-targeted drugs (LTDs) to achieve the required therapeutic potency with minimal toxicity. Because most LTDs are composed of a targeting ligand (e.g., organic molecule, aptamer, protein scaffold, or antibody), spacer, cleavable linker, and therapeutic warhead, criteria for successful design of each component will be described. Moreover, because obstacles to successful drug design can differ among human pathologies, limitations to drug delivery imposed by the unique characteristics of different diseases will be considered. With the explosion of genomic and transcriptomic data providing an ever-expanding selection of disease-specific targets, and with tools for high-throughput chemistry offering an escalating diversity of warheads, opportunities for innovating safe and effective LTDs has never been greater.

  13. Targeted Drug Delivery to Treat Pain and Cerebral Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Thomas P.

    2013-01-01

    Limited drug penetration is an obstacle that is often encountered in treatment of central nervous system (CNS) diseases including pain and cerebral hypoxia. Over the past several years, biochemical characteristics of the brain (i.e., tight junction protein complexes at brain barrier sites, expression of influx and efflux transporters) have been shown to be directly involved in determining CNS permeation of therapeutic agents; however, the vast majority of these studies have focused on understanding those mechanisms that prevent drugs from entering the CNS. Recently, this paradigm has shifted toward identifying and characterizing brain targets that facilitate CNS drug delivery. Such targets include the organic anion–transporting polypeptides (OATPs in humans; Oatps in rodents), a family of sodium-independent transporters that are endogenously expressed in the brain and are involved in drug uptake. OATP/Oatp substrates include drugs that are efficacious in treatment of pain and/or cerebral hypoxia (i.e., opioid analgesic peptides, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors). This clearly suggests that OATP/Oatp isoforms are viable transporter targets that can be exploited for optimization of drug delivery to the brain and, therefore, improved treatment of CNS diseases. This review summarizes recent knowledge in this area and emphasizes the potential that therapeutic targeting of OATP/Oatp isoforms may have in facilitating CNS drug delivery and distribution. Additionally, information presented in this review will point to novel strategies that can be used for treatment of pain and cerebral hypoxia. PMID:23343976

  14. In vitro and in vivo testing of a novel recessed-step catheter for reflux-free convection-enhanced drug delivery to the brain.

    PubMed

    Gill, T; Barua, N U; Woolley, M; Bienemann, A S; Johnson, D E; S O'Sullivan; Murray, G; Fennelly, C; Lewis, O; Irving, C; Wyatt, M J; Moore, P; Gill, S S

    2013-09-30

    The optimisation of convection-enhanced drug delivery (CED) to the brain is fundamentally reliant on minimising drug reflux. The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of a novel reflux-resistant CED catheter incorporating a recessed-step and to compare its performance to previously described stepped catheters. The in vitro performance of the recessed-step catheter was compared to a conventional "one-step" catheter with a single transition in outer diameter (OD) at the catheter tip, and a "two-step" design comprising two distal transitions in OD. The volumes of distribution and reflux were compared by performing infusions of Trypan blue into agarose gels. The in vivo performance of the recessed-step catheter was then analysed in a large animal model by performing infusions of 0.2% Gadolinium-DTPA in Large White/Landrace pigs. The recessed-step catheter demonstrated significantly higher volumes of distribution than the one-step and two-step catheters (p=0.0001, one-way ANOVA). No reflux was detected until more than 100 ul had been delivered via the recessed-step catheter, whilst reflux was detected after infusion of only 25 ul via the 2 non-recessed catheters. The recessed-step design also showed superior reflux resistance to a conventational one-step catheter in vivo. Reflux-free infusions were achieved in the thalamus, putamen and white matter at a maximum infusion rate of 5 ul/min using the recessed-step design. The novel recessed-step catheter described in this study shows significant potential for the achievement of predictable high volume, high flow rate infusions whilst minimising the risk of reflux. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Drug Delivery Systems for Imaging and Therapy of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gunay, Mine Silindir; Ozer, A. Yekta; Chalon, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although a variety of therapeutic approaches are available for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease, challenges limit effective therapy. Among these challenges are delivery of drugs through the blood brain barier to the target brain tissue and the side effects observed during long term administration of antiparkinsonian drugs. The use of drug delivery systems such as liposomes, niosomes, micelles, nanoparticles, nanocapsules, gold nanoparticles, microspheres, microcapsules, nanobubbles, microbubbles and dendrimers is being investigated for diagnosis and therapy. Methods: This review focuses on formulation, development and advantages of nanosized drug delivery systems which can penetrate the central nervous system for the therapy and/or diagnosis of PD, and highlights future nanotechnological approaches. Results: It is esential to deliver a sufficient amount of either therapeutic or radiocontrast agents to the brain in order to provide the best possible efficacy or imaging without undesired degradation of the agent. Current treatments focus on motor symptoms, but these treatments generally do not deal with modifying the course of Parkinson’s disease. Beyond pharmacological therapy, the identification of abnormal proteins such as α-synuclein, parkin or leucine-rich repeat serine/threonine protein kinase 2 could represent promising alternative targets for molecular imaging and therapy of Parkinson's disease. Conclusion: Nanotechnology and nanosized drug delivery systems are being investigated intensely and could have potential effect for Parkinson’s disease. The improvement of drug delivery systems could dramatically enhance the effectiveness of Parkinson’s Disease therapy and reduce its side effects. PMID:26714584

  16. Intelligent hydrogels for drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    He, Liumin; Zuo, Qinhua; Xie, Shasha; Huang, Yuexin; Xue, Wei

    2011-09-01

    Intelligent hydrogel, also known as smart hydrogels, are materials with great potential for development in drug delivery system. Intelligent hydrogel also has the ability to perceive as a signal structure change and stimulation. The review introduces the temperature-, pH-, electric signal-, biochemical molecule-, light- and pressure- sensitive hydrogels. Finally, we described the application of intelligent hydrogel in drug delivery system and the recent patents involved for hydrogel in drug delivery.

  17. Breathable Medicine: Pulmonary Mode of Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Gandhimathi, Chinnasamy; Venugopal, Jayarama Reddy; Sundarrajan, Subramanian; Sridhar, Radhakrishnan; Tay, Samuel Sam Wah; Ramakrishna, Seeram; Kumar, Srinivasan Dinesh

    2015-04-01

    Pharmaceutically active compounds require different modes of drug delivery systems to accomplish therapeutic activity without loss of its activity and lead to exhibit no adverse effects. Originating from ancient days, pulmonary mode of drug delivery is gaining much importance compared to other modes of drug delivery systems with respect to specific diseases. Pulmonary drug delivery is a non-invasive route for local and systemic therapies together with more patient convenience, compliance and is a needleless system. In this review, we addressed the vaccine delivery via non- or minimally invasive routes. Polymeric nanoparticles are preferred for use in the pulmonary delivery devices owing to a prolonged retention in lungs. Small site for absorption, mucociliary clearance, short residence time and low bioavailability are some of the limitations in pulmonary drug delivery have been resolved by generating micro- and nano-sized aerosol particles. We have classified the breathable medicine on the basis of available devices for inhalation and also prominent diseases treated through pulmonary mode of drug delivery. Owing to increasing toxicity of pharmacological drugs, the use of natural medicines has been rapidly gaining importance recently. The review article describes breathability of medicines or the pulmonary mode of drug delivery system and their drug release profile, absorption, distribution and efficacy to cure asthma and diabetes.

  18. Magnetic Resonance-Guided Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Mikhail, Andrew S; Partanen, Ari; Yarmolenko, Pavel; Venkatesan, Aradhana M; Wood, Bradford J

    2015-11-01

    The use of clinical imaging modalities for the guidance of targeted drug delivery systems, known as image-guided drug delivery (IGDD), has emerged as a promising strategy for enhancing antitumor efficacy. MR imaging is particularly well suited for IGDD applications because of its ability to acquire images and quantitative measurements with high spatiotemporal resolution. The goal of IGDD strategies is to improve treatment outcomes by facilitating planning, real-time guidance, and personalization of pharmacologic interventions. This article reviews basic principles of targeted drug delivery and highlights the current status, emerging applications, and future paradigms of MR-guided drug delivery.

  19. Collagen macromolecular drug delivery systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, D.L.

    1988-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine collagen for use as a macromolecular drug delivery system by determining the mechanism of release through a matrix. Collagen membranes varying in porosity, crosslinking density, structure and crosslinker were fabricated. Collagen characterized by infrared spectroscopy and solution viscosity was determined to be pure and native. The collagen membranes were determined to possess native vs. non-native quaternary structure and porous vs. dense aggregate membranes by electron microscopy. Collagen monolithic devices containing a model macromolecule (inulin) were fabricated. In vitro release rates were found to be linear with respect to t{sup {1/2}} and were affected by crosslinking density, crosslinker and structure. The biodegradation of the collagen matrix was also examined. In vivo biocompatibility, degradation and {sup 14}C-inulin release rates were evaluated subcutaneously in rats.

  20. Drug delivery systems: An updated review

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Gaurav; Tiwari, Ruchi; Sriwastawa, Birendra; Bhati, L; Pandey, S; Pandey, P; Bannerjee, Saurabh K

    2012-01-01

    Drug delivery is the method or process of administering a pharmaceutical compound to achieve a therapeutic effect in humans or animals. For the treatment of human diseases, nasal and pulmonary routes of drug delivery are gaining increasing importance. These routes provide promising alternatives to parenteral drug delivery particularly for peptide and protein therapeutics. For this purpose, several drug delivery systems have been formulated and are being investigated for nasal and pulmonary delivery. These include liposomes, proliposomes, microspheres, gels, prodrugs, cyclodextrins, among others. Nanoparticles composed of biodegradable polymers show assurance in fulfilling the stringent requirements placed on these delivery systems, such as ability to be transferred into an aerosol, stability against forces generated during aerosolization, biocompatibility, targeting of specific sites or cell populations in the lung, release of the drug in a predetermined manner, and degradation within an acceptable period of time. PMID:23071954

  1. Site-Specific, Sustained Release of Drugs to the Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodor, Nicholas; Farag, Hassan H.; Brewster, Marcus E.

    1981-12-01

    A dihydropyridine-pyridinium salt type of redox system is used in a general and flexible method for site-specific or sustained delivery (or both) of drugs to the brain. A biologically active compound linked to a lipoidal dihydropyridine carrier easily penetrates the blood-brain barrier. Oxidation of the carrier part in vivo to the ionic pyridinium salt prevents its elimination from the brain, while elimination from the general circulation is accelerated. Subsequent cleavage of the quaternary carrier-drug species results in sustained delivery of the drug in the brain and facile elimination of the carrier part.

  2. Optimal stent design for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Campbell D K

    2004-01-01

    The efficacy and safety of drug-eluting coronary stents might differ depending on the pharmacologic agents and stent delivery systems used. Recent research has focused on the various constituents of drug-delivery stents, including the stent backbone, materials used as drug-delivery vehicles, and the physicochemical properties of the pharmacotherapeutic agents themselves. Metal stents coated with an outer layer of polymer (bioabsorbable or non-bioabsorbable) can be drug-loaded, thus providing more controlled and sustained drug delivery and allowing more optimal drug-tissue interactions. Among the next generation of drug-eluting stents will be a stent that uses the non-bioabsorbable polymer phosphorylcholine to release the sirolimus analogue ABT-578; another stent will use a highly deliverable cobalt-chromium metal alloy stent platform and, for the first time, a bioabsorbable polymeric coating (thin-film polylactic acid) for drug encapsulation and release.

  3. Refilling drug delivery depots through the blood.

    PubMed

    Brudno, Yevgeny; Silva, Eduardo A; Kearney, Cathal J; Lewin, Sarah A; Miller, Alex; Martinick, Kathleen D; Aizenberg, Michael; Mooney, David J

    2014-09-02

    Local drug delivery depots have significant clinical utility, but there is currently no noninvasive technique to refill these systems once their payload is exhausted. Inspired by the ability of nanotherapeutics to target specific tissues, we hypothesized that blood-borne drug payloads could be modified to home to and refill hydrogel drug delivery systems. To address this possibility, hydrogels were modified with oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) that provide a target for drug payloads in the form of free alginate strands carrying complementary ODNs. Coupling ODNs to alginate strands led to specific binding to complementary-ODN-carrying alginate gels in vitro and to injected gels in vivo. When coupled to a drug payload, sequence-targeted refilling of a delivery depot consisting of intratumor hydrogels completely abrogated tumor growth. These results suggest a new paradigm for nanotherapeutic drug delivery, and this concept is expected to have applications in refilling drug depots in cancer therapy, wound healing, and drug-eluting vascular grafts and stents.

  4. Implantable Devices for Sustained, Intravesical Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In clinical settings, intravesical instillation of a drug bolus is often performed for the treatment of bladder diseases. However, it requires repeated instillations to extend drug efficacy, which may result in poor patient compliance. To alleviate this challenge, implantable devices have been developed for the purpose of sustained, intravesical drug delivery. In this review, we briefly summarize the current trend in the development of intravesical drug-delivery devices. We also introduce the most recently developed devices with strong potential for intravesical drug-delivery applications. PMID:27377941

  5. Convection-enhanced drug delivery for gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Healy, Andrew T.; Vogelbaum, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    In spite of aggressive multi-modality treatments, patients diagnosed with anaplastic astrocytoma and glioblastoma continue to display poor median survival. The success of our current conventional and targeted chemotherapies are largely hindered by systemic- and neurotoxicity, as well as poor central nervous system (CNS) penetration. Interstitial drug administration via convection-enhanced delivery (CED) is an alternative that potentially overcomes systemic toxicities and CNS delivery issues by directly bypassing the blood–brain barrier (BBB). This novel approach not only allows for directed administration, but also allows for newer, tumor-selective agents, which would normally be excluded from the CNS due to molecular size alone. To date, randomized trials of CED therapy have yet to definitely show survival advantage as compared with today's standard of care, however, early studies appear to have been limited by “first generation” delivery techniques. Taking into consideration lessons learned from early trials along with decades of research, newer CED technologies and therapeutic agents are emerging, which are reviewed herein. PMID:25722934

  6. Permeation enhancer strategies in transdermal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Marwah, Harneet; Garg, Tarun; Goyal, Amit K; Rath, Goutam

    2016-01-01

    Today, ∼74% of drugs are taken orally and are not found to be as effective as desired. To improve such characteristics, transdermal drug delivery was brought to existence. This delivery system is capable of transporting the drug or macromolecules painlessly through skin into the blood circulation at fixed rate. Topical administration of therapeutic agents offers many advantages over conventional oral and invasive techniques of drug delivery. Several important advantages of transdermal drug delivery are prevention from hepatic first pass metabolism, enhancement of therapeutic efficiency and maintenance of steady plasma level of the drug. Human skin surface, as a site of drug application for both local and systemic effects, is the most eligible candidate available. New controlled transdermal drug delivery systems (TDDS) technologies (electrically-based, structure-based and velocity-based) have been developed and commercialized for the transdermal delivery of troublesome drugs. This review article covers most of the new active transport technologies involved in enhancing the transdermal permeation via effective drug delivery system.

  7. Prodrug Strategies in Ocular Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Barot, Megha; Bagui, Mahuya; Gokulgandhi, Mitan R.; Mitra, Ashim K.

    2015-01-01

    Poor bioavailability of topically instilled drug is the major concern in the field of ocular drug delivery. Efflux transporters, static and dynamic ocular barriers often possess rate limiting factors for ocular drug therapy. Different formulation strategies like suspension, ointment, gels, nanoparticles, implants, dendrimers and liposomes have been employed in order to improve drug permeation and retention by evading rate limiting factors at the site of absorption. Chemical modification such as prodrug targeting various nutrient transporters (amino acids, peptide and vitamin) has evolved a great deal ofintereSt to improve ocular drug delivery. In this review, we have discussed various prodrug strategies which have been widely applied for enhancing therapeutic efficacy of ophthalmic drugs. The purpose of this review is to provide an update on the utilization of prodrug concept in ocular drug delivery. In addition, this review will highlight ongoing academic and industrial research and development in terms of ocular prodrug design and delivery. PMID:22530907

  8. Nanoparticles for intracellular-targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulo, Cristiana S. O.; Pires das Neves, Ricardo; Ferreira, Lino S.

    2011-12-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are very promising for the intracellular delivery of anticancer and immunomodulatory drugs, stem cell differentiation biomolecules and cell activity modulators. Although initial studies in the area of intracellular drug delivery have been performed in the delivery of DNA, there is an increasing interest in the use of other molecules to modulate cell activity. Herein, we review the latest advances in the intracellular-targeted delivery of short interference RNA, proteins and small molecules using NPs. In most cases, the drugs act at different cellular organelles and therefore the drug-containing NPs should be directed to precise locations within the cell. This will lead to the desired magnitude and duration of the drug effects. The spatial control in the intracellular delivery might open new avenues to modulate cell activity while avoiding side-effects.

  9. Microneedles: an emerging transdermal drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Bariya, Shital H; Gohel, Mukesh C; Mehta, Tejal A; Sharma, Om Prakash

    2012-01-01

    One of the thrust areas in drug delivery research is transdermal drug delivery systems (TDDS) due to their characteristic advantages over oral and parenteral drug delivery systems. Researchers have focused their attention on the use of microneedles to overcome the barrier of the stratum corneum. Microneedles deliver the drug into the epidermis without disruption of nerve endings. Recent advances in the development of microneedles are discussed in this review for the benefit of young scientists and to promote research in the area. Microneedles are fabricated using a microelectromechanical system employing silicon, metals, polymers or polysaccharides. Solid coated microneedles can be used to pierce the superficial skin layer followed by delivery of the drug. Advances in microneedle research led to development of dissolvable/degradable and hollow microneedles to deliver drugs at a higher dose and to engineer drug release. Iontophoresis, sonophoresis and electrophoresis can be used to modify drug delivery when used in concern with hollow microneedles. Microneedles can be used to deliver macromolecules such as insulin, growth hormones, immunobiologicals, proteins and peptides. Microneedles containing 'cosmeceuticals' are currently available to treat acne, pigmentation, scars and wrinkles, as well as for skin tone improvement. Literature survey and patents filled revealed that microneedle-based drug delivery system can be explored as a potential tool for the delivery of a variety of macromolecules that are not effectively delivered by conventional transdermal techniques. © 2011 The Authors. JPP © 2011 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  10. [Site-specific drug delivery systems. I. Colon targeted delivery].

    PubMed

    Szente, Virág; Zelkó, Romána

    2007-01-01

    Colon specific drug delivery has gained increased importance not just for the delivery of the drugs for the treatment of local diseases associated with the colon like Chron's disease, ulcerative colitis, irritable bowel syndrome, cancer or infections, but also for the potential it holds for the systemic delivery of proteins (e.g. insulin) and therapeutic peptides. These systems enable the protection of healthy tissues from the side effects of drugs and the drug intake of targeted cells, as well. The formulation of colon specific drug delivery systems is of great impact in the case of diseases having circadian rhythm (midnight gerd). Such circadian rhythm release drug delivery systems are designed to provide a plasma concentration--time profile, which varies according to physiological need at different times during the dosing period, i.e., mimicking the circadian rhythm and severity/manifestation of gastric acid secretion (and/or midnight gerd). In general four primary approaches have been proposed for colon targeted delivery namely pH-dependent systems, time dependent systems, colonic microflora activated systems and prodrugs.

  11. Mechanisms Underlying Drug Delivery to Peripheral Arteries.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Tzafriri, Rami; Patel, Sandeep M; Parikh, Sahil A

    2017-04-01

    Delivery of drugs onto arterial targets via endovascular devices commands several principles: dissolution, diffusion, convection, drug binding, barriers to absorption, and interaction between the drug, delivery vehicle, and accepting arterial wall. The understanding of drug delivery in the coronary vasculature is vast; there is ongoing work needed in the peripheral arteries. There are differences that account for some failures of application of coronary technology into the peripheral vascular space. Breakthroughs in peripheral vascular interventional techniques building on current technologies require investigators willing to acknowledge the similarities and differences between these different vascular territories, while developing technologies adapted for peripheral arteries.

  12. Kinetics of reciprocating drug delivery to the inner ear.

    PubMed

    Pararas, Erin E Leary; Chen, Zhiqiang; Fiering, Jason; Mescher, Mark J; Kim, Ernest S; McKenna, Michael J; Kujawa, Sharon G; Borenstein, Jeffrey T; Sewell, William F

    2011-06-10

    Reciprocating drug delivery is a means of delivering soluble drugs directly to closed fluid spaces in the body via a single cannula without an accompanying fluid volume change. It is ideally suited for drug delivery into small, sensitive and unique fluid spaces such as the cochlea. We characterized the pharmacokinetics of reciprocating drug delivery to the scala tympani within the cochlea by measuring the effects of changes in flow parameters on the distribution of drug throughout the length of the cochlea. Distribution was assessed by monitoring the effects of DNQX, a reversible glutamate receptor blocker, delivered directly to the inner ear of guinea pigs using reciprocating flow profiles. We then modeled the effects of those parameters on distribution using both an iterative curve-fitting approach and a computational fluid dynamic model. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that reciprocating delivery distributes the drug into a volume in the base of the cochlea, and suggest that the primary determinant of distribution throughout more distal regions of the cochlea is diffusion. Increases in flow rate distributed the drug into a larger volume that extended more apically. Over short time courses (less than 2h), the apical extension, though small, significantly enhanced apically directed delivery of drug. Over longer time courses (>5h) or greater distances (>3mm), maintenance of drug concentration in the basal scala tympani may prove more advantageous for extending apical delivery than increases in flow rate. These observations demonstrate that this reciprocating technology is capable of providing controlled delivery kinetics to the closed fluid space in the cochlea, and may be suitable for other applications such as localized brain and retinal delivery. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Kinetics of Reciprocating Drug Delivery to the Inner Ear

    PubMed Central

    Leary Pararas, Erin E.; Chen, Zhiqiang; Fiering, Jason; Mescher, Mark J.; Kim, Ernest S.; McKenna, Michael J.; Kujawa, Sharon G.; Borenstein, Jeffrey T.; Sewell, William F.

    2011-01-01

    Reciprocating drug delivery is a means of delivering soluble drugs directly to closed fluid spaces in the body via a single cannula without an accompanying fluid volume change. It is ideally suited for drug delivery into small, sensitive and unique fluid spaces such as the cochlea. We characterized the pharmacokinetics of reciprocating drug delivery to the scala tympani within the cochlea by measuring the effects of changes in flow parameters on the distribution of drug throughout the length of the cochlea. Distribution was assessed by monitoring the effects of DNQX, a reversible glutamate receptor blocker, delivered directly to the inner ear of guinea pigs using reciprocating flow profiles. We then modeled the effects of those parameters on distribution using both an iterative curve-fitting approach and a computational fluid dynamic model. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that reciprocating delivery distributes the drug into a volume in the base of the cochlea, and suggest that the primary determinant of distribution throughout more distal regions of the cochlea is diffusion. Increases in flow rate distributed the drug into a larger volume that extended more apically. Over short time courses (less than 2 h), the apical extension, though small, significantly enhanced apically directed delivery of drug. Over longer time courses (>5 h) or greater distances (>3 mm), maintenance of drug concentration in the basal scala tympani may prove more advantageous for extending apical delivery than increases in flow rate. These observations demonstrate that this reciprocating technology is capable of providing controlled delivery kinetics to the closed fluid space in the cochlea, and may be suitable for other applications such as localized brain and retinal delivery. PMID:21385596

  14. Polysaccharides in colon-specific drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Sinha, V R; Kumria, R

    2001-08-14

    Natural polysaccharides are now extensively used for the development of solid dosage forms for delivery of drug to the colon. The rationale for the development of a polysaccharide based delivery system for colon is the presence of large amounts of polysaccharidases in the human colon as the colon is inhabited by a large number and variety of bacteria which secrete many enzymes e.g. beta-D-glucosidase, beta-D-galactosidase, amylase, pectinase, xylanase, beta-D-xylosidase, dextranase, etc. Various major approaches utilizing polysaccharides for colon-specific delivery are fermentable coating of the drug core, embedding of the drug in biodegradable matrix, formulation of drug-saccharide conjugate (prodrugs). A large number of polysaccharides have already been studied for their potential as colon-specific drug carrier systems, such as chitosan, pectin, chondroitin sulphate, cyclodextrin, dextrans, guar gum, inulin, amylose and locust bean gum. Recent efforts and approaches exploiting these polysaccharides in colon-specific drug delivery are discussed.

  15. Colloidal microgels in drug delivery applications

    PubMed Central

    Vinogradov, Serguei V.

    2005-01-01

    Colloidal microgels have recently received attention as environmentally responsive systems and now are increasingly used in applications as carriers for therapeutic drugs and diagnostic agents. Synthetic microgels consist of a crosslinked polymer network that provides a depot for loaded drugs, protection against environmental hazards and template for post-synthetic modification or vectorization of the drug carriers. The aim of this manuscript is to review recent attempts to develop new microgel formulations for oral drug delivery, to design metal-containing microgels for diagnostic and therapeutic applications, and to advance approaches including the systemic administration of microgels. Novel nanogel drug delivery systems developed in the authors’ laboratory are discussed in details including aspects of their synthesis, vectorization and recent applications for encapsulation of low molecular weight drugs or formulation of biological macromolecules. The findings reviewed here are encouraging for further development of the nanogels as intelligent drug carriers with such features as targeted delivery and triggered drug release. PMID:17168773

  16. Intravenous drug delivery in neonates: lessons learnt.

    PubMed

    Sherwin, Catherine M T; Medlicott, Natalie J; Reith, David M; Broadbent, Roland S

    2014-06-01

    Intravenous drug administration presents a series of challenges that relate to the pathophysiology of the neonate and intravenous infusion systems in neonates. These challenges arise from slow intravenous flow rates, small drug volume, dead space volume and limitations on the flush volume in neonates. While there is a reasonable understanding of newborn pharmacokinetics, an appreciation of the substantial delay and variability in the rate of drug delivery from the intravenous line is often lacking. This can lead to difficulties in accurately determining the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic relationship of drugs in the smallest patients. The physical variables that affect the passage of drugs through neonatal lines need to be further explored in order to improve our understanding of their impact on the delivery of drugs by this route in neonates. Through careful investigation, the underlying causes of delayed drug delivery may be identified and administration protocols can then be modified to ensure predictable, appropriate drug input kinetics.

  17. Nanomedicine and drug delivery: a mini review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirza, Agha Zeeshan; Siddiqui, Farhan Ahmed

    2014-02-01

    The field of nanotechnology now has pivotal roles in electronics, biology and medicine. Its application can be appraised, as it involves the materials to be designed at atomic and molecular level. Due to the advantage of their size, nanospheres have been shown to be robust drug delivery systems and may be useful for encapsulating drugs and enabling more precise targeting with a controlled release. In this review specifically, we highlight the recent advances of this technology for medicine and drug delivery systems.

  18. Magnetic nanoparticles for gene and drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    McBain, Stuart C; Yiu, Humphrey HP; Dobson, Jon

    2008-01-01

    Investigations of magnetic micro- and nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery began over 30 years ago. Since that time, major progress has been made in particle design and synthesis techniques, however, very few clinical trials have taken place. Here we review advances in magnetic nanoparticle design, in vitro and animal experiments with magnetic nanoparticle-based drug and gene delivery, and clinical trials of drug targeting. PMID:18686777

  19. Synthetic Lipoproteins as Carriers for Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Huang, Gangliang; Liu, Yang; Huang, Hualiang

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic lipoprotein is an effective carrier of targeted delivery for drugs. It has the very small size, good biocompatibility, suitable half-life, and specific lipoprotein receptorbinding capacity. Compared with the traditional natural lipoprotein, synthetic lipoprotein not only retains the original biological characteristics and functions, but also exhibits the excellent characteristics in drug delivery. Herein, the advantages, development, applications, and prospect of synthetic lipoproteins as drug carriers were summarized.

  20. Smart Polymers in Nasal Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Chonkar, Ankita; Nayak, Usha; Udupa, N.

    2015-01-01

    Nasal drug delivery has now been recognized as a promising route for drug delivery due to its capability of transporting a drug to systemic circulation and central nervous system. Though nasal mucosa offers improved bioavailability and quick onset of action of the drug, main disadvantage associated with nasal drug delivery is mucocilliary clearance due to which drug particles get cleared from the nose before complete absorption through nasal mucosa. Therefore, mucoadhesive polymeric approach can be successfully used to enhance the retention of the drug on nasal mucosal surface. Here, some of the aspects of the stimuli responsive polymers have been discussed which possess liquid state at the room temperature and in response to nasal temperature, pH and ions present in mucous, can undergo in situ gelation in nasal cavity. In this review, several temperature responsive, pH responsive and ion responsive polymers used in nasal delivery, their gelling mechanisms have been discussed. Smart polymers not only able to enhance the retention of the drug in nasal cavity but also provide controlled release, ease of administration, enhanced permeation of the drug and protection of the drug from mucosal enzymes. Thus smart polymeric approach can be effectively used for nasal delivery of peptide drugs, central nervous system dugs and hormones. PMID:26664051

  1. Nasal delivery of P-gp substrates to the brain through the nose-brain pathway.

    PubMed

    Shingaki, Tomotaka; Hidalgo, Ismael J; Furubayashi, Tomoyuki; Sakane, Toshiyasu; Katsumi, Hidemasa; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamashita, Shinji

    2011-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate in rats the potential utility of the nasal route to enhance central nervous system (CNS) delivery of drugs recognized by P-glycoprotein (P-gp). Well-known P-gp substrates verapamil and talinolol were perfused nasally or infused intravenously, and when plasma concentrations following intravenous infusion and nasal perfusion showed similar profiles. The concentration of verapamil in the brain after nasal perfusion was twice that after intravenous infusion. Although talinolol in the brain and the cerebrospinal fluid after i.v. infusion were below the detection limit, it was detected after nasal perfusion. When rats were treated with cyclosporin A, brain concentrations of verapamil after both administration modes were increased significantly, while those of talinolol were not significantly changed. Since the permeability of talinolol is low, talinolol in the brain which was transported directly from the nasal cavity has little chance of transport by P-gp localized in the apical membrane of cerebral microvessel endothelial cells. The potential for drug delivery utilizing the nose-CNS route was confirmed for P-gp substrates. The advantage of nasal delivery over i.v. delivery of talinolol to the brain was more significant than that of verapamil, suggesting that nasal administration is more useful strategy for the brain delivery of low-permeability P-gp substrates than the use of P-gp inhibitors.

  2. Thiolated polymers as mucoadhesive drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Duggan, Sarah; Cummins, Wayne; O' Donovan, Orla; Hughes, Helen; Owens, Eleanor

    2017-03-30

    Mucoadhesion is the process of binding a material to the mucosal layer of the body. Utilising both natural and synthetic polymers, mucoadhesive drug delivery is a method of controlled drug release which allows for intimate contact between the polymer and a target tissue. It has the potential to increase bioavailability, decrease potential side effects and offer protection to more sensitive drugs such as proteins and peptide based drugs. The thiolation of polymers has, in the last number of years, come to the fore of mucoadhesive drug delivery, markedly improving mucoadhesion due to the introduction of free thiol groups onto the polymer backbone while also offering a more cohesive polymeric matrix for the slower and more controlled release of drug. This review explores the concept of mucoadhesion and the recent advances in both the polymers and the methods of thiolation used in the synthesis of mucoadhesive drug delivery devices.

  3. Inorganic Nanomaterials as Carriers for Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shizhu; Hao, Xiaohong; Liang, Xingjie; Zhang, Qun; Zhang, Cuimiao; Zhou, Guoqiang; Shen, Shigang; Jia, Guang; Zhang, Jinchao

    2016-01-01

    For safe and effective therapy, drugs must be delivered efficiently and with minimal systemic side effects. Nanostructured drug carriers enable the delivery of small-molecule drugs as well as nucleic acids and proteins. Inorganic nanomaterials are ideal for drug delivery platforms due to their unique physicochemical properties, such as facile preparation, good storage stability and biocompatibility. Many inorganic nanostructure-based drug delivery platforms have been prepared. Although there are still many obstacles to overcome, significant advances have been made in recent years. This review focuses on the status and development of inorganic nanostructures, including silica, quantum dots, gold, carbon-based and magnetic iron oxide-based nanostructures, as carriers for chemical and biological drugs. We specifically highlight the extensive use of these inorganic drug carriers for cancer therapy. Finally, we discuss the most important areas in the field that urgently require further study.

  4. Mucosal drug delivery: membranes, methodologies, and applications.

    PubMed

    Song, Yifan; Wang, Yiping; Thakur, Rashmi; Meidan, Victor M; Michniak, Bozena

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, extensive research into novel forms of drug delivery has suggested that mucosal approaches offer a promising therapeutic alternative, especially for systemically acting drugs. Transmucosal drug delivery offers many benefits, including noninvasive administration, convenience, rapid onset, as well as elimination of hepatic first-pass metabolism. The investigated absorptive surfaces consist of the nasal, buccal, ocular, vaginal, and rectal mucosae. Among these, the nasal and buccal routes have proved the most promising to date. The bioavailability achieved mainly depends upon the pathophysiological state of the mucosa and the properties of both the drug and delivery systems. Various agents can increase the efficacy of transmucosal drug delivery. These include cyclodextrins, bile salts, surfactants, fusidic acid derivatives, microspheres, liposomes, and bioadhesive agents. The mechanisms of action, effectiveness, and toxicity profiles of these enhancers have been investigated extensively in both animal and human models.

  5. Radiation sterilization of new drug delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Abuhanoğlu, Gürhan

    2014-01-01

    Radiation sterilization has now become a commonly used method for sterilization of several active ingredients in drugs or drug delivery systems containing these substances. In this context, many applications have been performed on the human products that are required to be sterile, as well as on pharmaceutical products prepared to be developed. The new drug delivery systems designed to deliver the medication to the target tissue or organ, such as microspheres, nanospheres, microemulsion, and liposomal systems, have been sterilized by gamma (γ) and beta (β) rays, and more recently, by e-beam sterilization. In this review, the sterilization of new drug delivery systems was discussed other than conventional drug delivery systems by γ irradiation. PMID:24936306

  6. Radiation sterilization of new drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Abuhanoğlu, Gürhan; Ozer, A Yekta

    2014-06-01

    Radiation sterilization has now become a commonly used method for sterilization of several active ingredients in drugs or drug delivery systems containing these substances. In this context, many applications have been performed on the human products that are required to be sterile, as well as on pharmaceutical products prepared to be developed. The new drug delivery systems designed to deliver the medication to the target tissue or organ, such as microspheres, nanospheres, microemulsion, and liposomal systems, have been sterilized by gamma (γ) and beta (β) rays, and more recently, by e-beam sterilization. In this review, the sterilization of new drug delivery systems was discussed other than conventional drug delivery systems by γ irradiation.

  7. Macrophages as drug delivery vehicles for photochemical internalization (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, Steen J.; Gonzalez, Jonathan; Molina, Stephanie; Kumar Nair, Rohit; Hirschberg, Henry

    2017-02-01

    Targeted delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs to tumor sites is a major challenge in cancer chemotherapy. Cell-based vectorization of therapeutic agents has great potential for cancer therapy in that it can target and maintain an elevated concentration of therapeutic agents at the tumor site and prevent their spread into healthy tissue. The use of circulating cells such as monocytes/macrophages (Ma) offers several advantages compared to nanoparticles as targeted drug delivery vehicles. Ma can be easily obtained from the patient, loaded in vitro with drugs and reinjected into the blood stream. Ma can selectively cross the partially compromised blood-brain barrier surrounding brain tumors and are known to actively migrate to tumors, drawn by chemotactic factors, including hypoxic regions where conventional chemo and radiation therapy are least effective. The utility of Ma as targeted drug delivery vehicles for photochemical internalization (PCI) of tumors was investigated in this study. In vitro studies were conducted using a mixture of F98 rat glioma cells and rat macrophages loaded with a variety of chemotherapeutic agents including bleomycin and 5-fluorouracil. Preliminary data show that macrophages are resistant to both chemotherapeutics while significant toxicity is observed for F98 cells exposed to both drugs. Co-incubation of F98 cells with loaded Ma results in significant F98 toxicity suggesting that Ma are releasing the drugs and, hence providing the rationale for their use as delivery vectors for cancer therapies such as PCI.

  8. SLN approach for nose-to-brain delivery of alprazolam.

    PubMed

    Singh, Alok Pratap; Saraf, Shailendra K; Saraf, Shubhini A

    2012-12-01

    In the present study, alprazolam-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles were prepared and characterized. They were evaluated for their efficiency in nose-to-brain targeting and biodistribution in a suitable animal model after intranasal delivery. Solid lipid nanoparticles may offer an improvement to nose-to-brain drug delivery since they are able to protect the encapsulated drug from biological and/or chemical degradation. The distribution of the drug to different organs was recorded through biodistribution studies in male Wistar rats and gamma scintigraphy imaging in New Zealand rabbits by tagging the formulation with radioactive substance (99m)Tc. The radioactivity count of various organs was taken as a function of the drug concentration. The study reveals that alprazolam can be rapidly transferred to the brain via intranasal route, bypassing the blood-brain barrier and a direct nose-to-brain transfer. The enhanced rate and extent of transport may help in reducing the dose and dosing frequency, thereby providing ease for ambulatory patients.

  9. Polypeptides and polyaminoacids in drug delivery.

    PubMed

    González-Aramundiz, José Vicente; Lozano, María Victoria; Sousa-Herves, Ana; Fernandez-Megia, Eduardo; Csaba, Noemi

    2012-02-01

    Advances achieved over the last few years in drug delivery have provided novel and versatile possibilities for the treatment of various diseases. Among the biomaterials applied in this field, it is worth highlighting the increasing importance of polyaminoacids and polypeptides. The appealing properties of these polymers are very promising for the design of novel compositions in a variety of drug delivery applications. This review provides an overview on the general characteristics of polyaminoacids and polypeptides and briefly discusses different synthetic pathways for their production. This is followed by a detailed description of different drug delivery applications of these polymers, emphasizing those examples that already reached advanced preclinical development or have entered clinical trials. Polyaminoacids and polypeptides are gaining much attention in drug delivery due to their exceptional properties. Their application as polymers for drug delivery purposes has been sped up by the significant achievements related to their synthesis. Certainly, cancer therapy has benefited the most from these advances, although other fields such as vaccine delivery and alternative administration routes are also being successfully explored. The design of new entities based on polyaminoacids and polypeptides and the improved insight gained in drug delivery guarantee exciting findings in the near future.

  10. Protein-Based Drug-Delivery Materials

    PubMed Central

    Jao, Dave; Xue, Ye; Medina, Jethro; Hu, Xiao

    2017-01-01

    There is a pressing need for long-term, controlled drug release for sustained treatment of chronic or persistent medical conditions and diseases. Guided drug delivery is difficult because therapeutic compounds need to survive numerous transport barriers and binding targets throughout the body. Nanoscale protein-based polymers are increasingly used for drug and vaccine delivery to cross these biological barriers and through blood circulation to their molecular site of action. Protein-based polymers compared to synthetic polymers have the advantages of good biocompatibility, biodegradability, environmental sustainability, cost effectiveness and availability. This review addresses the sources of protein-based polymers, compares the similarity and differences, and highlights characteristic properties and functionality of these protein materials for sustained and controlled drug release. Targeted drug delivery using highly functional multicomponent protein composites to guide active drugs to the site of interest will also be discussed. A systematical elucidation of drug-delivery efficiency in the case of molecular weight, particle size, shape, morphology, and porosity of materials will then be demonstrated to achieve increased drug absorption. Finally, several important biomedical applications of protein-based materials with drug-delivery function—including bone healing, antibiotic release, wound healing, and corneal regeneration, as well as diabetes, neuroinflammation and cancer treatments—are summarized at the end of this review. PMID:28772877

  11. Perspectives on transdermal ultrasound mediated drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Nadine Barrie

    2007-01-01

    The use of needles for multiple injection of drugs, such as insulin for diabetes, can be painful. As a result, prescribed drug noncompliance can result in severe medical complications. Several noninvasive methods exist for transdermal drug delivery. These include chemical mediation using liposomes and chemical enhancers or physical mechanisms such as microneedles, iontophoresis, electroporation, and ultrasound. Ultrasound enhanced transdermal drug delivery offers advantages over traditional drug delivery methods which are often invasive and painful. A broad review of the transdermal ultrasound drug delivery literature has shown that this technology offers promising potential for noninvasive drug administration. From a clinical perspective, few drugs, proteins or peptides have been successfully administered transdermally because of the low skin permeability to these relatively large molecules, although much work is underway to resolve this problem. The proposed mechanism of ultrasound has been suggested to be the result of cavitation, which is discussed along with the bioeffects from therapeutic ultrasound. For low frequencies, potential transducers which can be used for drug delivery are discussed, along with cautions regarding ultrasound safety versus efficacy. PMID:18203426

  12. Nanoparticle-mediated drug delivery to high-grade gliomas.

    PubMed

    Frosina, Guido

    2016-05-01

    High grade gliomas (HGGs) are fatal brain tumors due to their infiltration capacity and the presence of resistant cell populations. Further, the brain is naturally protected from many exogenous molecules by the brain blood barrier (BBB), which limits or cancels passage of cytotoxic drugs to the tumor sites. In order to cope with the latter problem, nanoparticle (NP)-based carriers are intensively investigated, due to multiple possibilities to drive them across the BBB to the tumor sites and drop cytotoxic molecules there. The current status of research on NP for drug delivery to HGGs has been analyzed. The results indicate gold, lipids and proteins as three main materials featuring NP formulations for HGG treatment. Albeit specific drug targeting to HGG cells may have not been so far significantly improved, NP may help drugs crossing the BBB and enter the brain thus potentially fixing at least one part of the problem. High grade gliomas (HGG) are very aggressive tumours and current therapy remains unsatisfactory. The advance in nanomedicine has allowed the development of novel treatment modalities. In this review article, the authors outlined the current status in using nanoparticle (NP)-based carriers for drug delivery to HGG. This should help readers to understand and develop ideas for further drug carrier designs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Recent advances in ophthalmic drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kompella, Uday B; Kadam, Rajendra S; Lee, Vincent HL

    2011-01-01

    Topical ocular drug bioavailability is notoriously poor, in the order of 5% or less. This is a consequence of effective multiple barriers to drug entry, comprising nasolacrimal drainage, epithelial drug transport barriers and clearance from the vasculature in the conjunctiva. While sustained drug delivery to the back of the eye is now feasible with intravitreal implants such as Vitrasert™ (~6 months), Retisert™ (~3 years) and Iluvien™ (~3 years), currently there are no marketed delivery systems for long-term drug delivery to the anterior segment of the eye. The purpose of this article is to summarize the resurgence in interest to prolong and improve drug entry from topical administration. These approaches include mucoadhesives, viscous polymer vehicles, transporter-targeted prodrug design, receptor-targeted functionalized nanoparticles, iontophoresis, punctal plug and contact lens delivery systems. A few of these delivery systems might be useful in treating diseases affecting the back of the eye. Their effectiveness will be compared against intravitreal implants (upper bound of effectiveness) and trans-scleral systems (lower bound of effectiveness). Refining the animal model by incorporating the latest advances in microdialysis and imaging technology is key to expanding the knowledge central to the design, testing and evaluation of the next generation of innovative ocular drug delivery systems. PMID:21399724

  14. Liposomal Conjugates for Drug Delivery to the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Helm, Frieder; Fricker, Gert

    2015-01-01

    Treatments of central nervous system (CNS) diseases often fail due to the blood–brain barrier. Circumvention of this obstacle is crucial for any systemic treatment of such diseases to be effective. One approach to transfer drugs into the brain is the use of colloidal carrier systems—amongst others, liposomes. A prerequisite for successful drug delivery by colloidal carriers to the brain is the modification of their surface, making them invisible to the reticuloendothelial system (RES) and to target them to specific surface epitopes at the blood–brain barrier. This study characterizes liposomes conjugated with cationized bovine serum albumin (cBSA) as transport vectors in vitro in porcine brain capillary endothelial cells (PBCEC) and in vivo in rats using fluorescently labelled liposomes. Experiments with PBCEC showed that sterically stabilized (PEGylated) liposomes without protein as well as liposomes conjugated to native bovine serum albumin (BSA) were not taken up. In contrast, cBSA-liposomes were taken up and appeared to be concentrated in intracellular vesicles. Uptake occurred in a concentration and time dependent manner. Free BSA and free cBSA inhibited uptake. After intravenous application of cBSA-liposomes, confocal fluorescence microscopy of brain cryosections from male Wistar rats showed fluorescence associated with liposomes in brain capillary surrounding tissue after 3, 6 and 24 h, for liposomes with a diameter between 120 and 150 nm, suggesting successful brain delivery of cationized-albumin coupled liposomes. PMID:25835091

  15. Antiepileptic drugs and brain development.

    PubMed

    Ikonomidou, Chrysanthy; Turski, Lechoslaw

    2010-01-01

    Epilepsy, the most common neurological disorder in young humans, has its highest incidence during the first year of life. Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) which are used to treat seizures in infants, children and pregnant women target ion channels, neurotransmitters and second messenger systems in the brain. The same targets regulate brain processes essential both for propagation of seizures and for brain development, learning, memory and emotional behavior. Here we review adverse effects of AEDs in the developing mammalian brain. In addition, we discuss mechanisms explaining adverse effects of AEDs in the developing mammalian brain including interference with cell proliferation and migration, neurogenesis, axonal arborization, synaptogenesis, synaptic plasticity and physiological apoptotic cell death.

  16. Chitosan Microspheres in Novel Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Analava; Dey, Baishakhi

    2011-01-01

    The main aim in the drug therapy of any disease is to attain the desired therapeutic concentration of the drug in plasma or at the site of action and maintain it for the entire duration of treatment. A drug on being used in conventional dosage forms leads to unavoidable fluctuations in the drug concentration leading to under medication or overmedication and increased frequency of dose administration as well as poor patient compliance. To minimize drug degradation and loss, to prevent harmful side effects and to increase drug bioavailability various drug delivery and drug targeting systems are currently under development. Handling the treatment of severe disease conditions has necessitated the development of innovative ideas to modify drug delivery techniques. Drug targeting means delivery of the drug-loaded system to the site of interest. Drug carrier systems include polymers, micelles, microcapsules, liposomes and lipoproteins to name some. Different polymer carriers exert different effects on drug delivery. Synthetic polymers are usually non-biocompatible, non-biodegradable and expensive. Natural polymers such as chitin and chitosan are devoid of such problems. Chitosan comes from the deacetylation of chitin, a natural biopolymer originating from crustacean shells. Chitosan is a biocompatible, biodegradable, and nontoxic natural polymer with excellent film-forming ability. Being of cationic character, chitosan is able to react with polyanions giving rise to polyelectrolyte complexes. Hence chitosan has become a promising natural polymer for the preparation of microspheres/nanospheres and microcapsules. The techniques employed to microencapsulate with chitosan include ionotropic gelation, spray drying, emulsion phase separation, simple and complex coacervation. This review focuses on the preparation, characterization of chitosan microspheres and their role in novel drug delivery systems. PMID:22707817

  17. Transpapillary drug delivery to the breast.

    PubMed

    Dave, Kaushalkumar; Averineni, Ranjith; Sahdev, Preety; Perumal, Omathanu

    2014-01-01

    The study was aimed at investigating localized topical drug delivery to the breast via mammary papilla (nipple). 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and estradiol (EST) were used as model hydrophilic and hydrophobic compounds respectively. Porcine and human nipple were used for in-vitro penetration studies. The removal of keratin plug enhanced the drug transport through the nipple. The drug penetration was significantly higher through the nipple compared to breast skin. The drug's lipophilicity had a significant influence on drug penetration through nipple. The ducts in the nipple served as a major transport pathway to the underlying breast tissue. Results showed that porcine nipple could be a potential model for human nipple. The topical application of 5-FU on the rat nipple resulted in high drug concentration in the breast and minimal drug levels in plasma and other organs. Overall, the findings from this study demonstrate the feasibility of localized drug delivery to the breast through nipple.

  18. Vesicular carriers for dermal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Sinico, Chiara; Fadda, Anna Maria

    2009-08-01

    The skin can offer several advantages as a route of drug administration although its barrier nature makes it difficult for most drugs to penetrate into and permeate through it. During the past decades there has been a lot of interest in lipid vesicles as a tool to improve drug topical delivery. Vesicular systems such as liposomes, niosomes, ethosomes and elastic, deformable vesicles provide an alternative for improved skin drug delivery. The function of vesicles as topical delivery systems is controversial with variable effects being reported in relation to the type of vesicles and their composition. In fact, vesicles can act as drug carriers controlling active release; they can provide a localized depot in the skin for dermally active compounds and enhance transdermal drug delivery. A wide variety of lipids and surfactants can be used to prepare vesicles, which are commonly composed of phospholipids (liposomes) or non-ionic surfactants (niosomes). Vesicle composition and preparation method influence their physicochemical properties (size, charge, lamellarity, thermodynamic state, deformability) and therefore their efficacy as drug delivery systems. A review of vesicle value in localizing drugs within the skin at the site of action will be provided with emphasis on their potential mechanism of action.

  19. Adolescent Brain Development and Drugs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winters, Ken C.; Arria, Amelia

    2011-01-01

    Research now suggests that the human brain is still maturing during adolescence. The developing brain may help explain why adolescents sometimes make decisions that are risky and can lead to safety or health concerns, including unique vulnerabilities to drug abuse. This article explores how this new science may be put to use in our prevention and…

  20. Adolescent Brain Development and Drugs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winters, Ken C.; Arria, Amelia

    2011-01-01

    Research now suggests that the human brain is still maturing during adolescence. The developing brain may help explain why adolescents sometimes make decisions that are risky and can lead to safety or health concerns, including unique vulnerabilities to drug abuse. This article explores how this new science may be put to use in our prevention and…

  1. Therapeutic Ultrasound Enhancement of Drug Delivery to Soft Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, George; Wang, Peng; Lewis, George; Olbricht, William

    2009-04-01

    Effects of exposure to 1.58 MHz focused ultrasound on transport of Evans Blue Dye (EBD) in soft tissues are investigated when an external pressure gradient is applied to induce convective flow through the tissue. The magnitude of the external pressure gradient is chosen to simulate conditions in brain parenchyma during convection-enhanced drug delivery (CED) to the brain. EBD uptake and transport are measured in equine brain, avian muscle and agarose brain-mimicking phantoms. Results show that ultrasound enhances EBD uptake and transport, and the greatest enhancement occurs when the external pressure gradient is applied. The results suggest that exposure of the brain parenchyma to ultrasound could enhance penetration of material infused into the brain during CED therapy.

  2. Nuclear drug delivery for cancer chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Sui, Meihua; Liu, Wenwen; Shen, Youqing

    2011-10-30

    Nanosystems with unique physical and biological properties have been extensively explored for cancer targeted intracellular delivery of small-molecular chemotherapeutic drugs to increase their therapeutic efficacies and to minimize their side effects. A large number of anticancer drugs are DNA-toxins that bind nuclear DNA or its associated enzymes to exert their cytotoxicity to cancer cells. After entering tumor cells, they need to be further delivered to the nucleus for actions. Herein, we discuss the biological barriers and summarize recent progress of nuclear drug delivery for cancer chemotherapy, emphasizing strategies that appear useful for design of vehicles capable of delivering drugs to the nucleus, particularly for in vivo applications. The existing obstacles or problems that need to be overcome before successful applications of nuclear drug delivery for cancer chemotherapy are also discussed.

  3. Molecular imprinted polymers as drug delivery vehicles.

    PubMed

    Zaidi, Shabi Abbas

    2016-09-01

    This review is aimed to discuss the molecular imprinted polymer (MIP)-based drug delivery systems (DDS). Molecular imprinted polymers have proved to possess the potential and also as a suitable material in several areas over a long period of time. However, only recently it has been employed for pharmaceuticals and biomedical applications, particularly as drug delivery vehicles due to properties including selective recognition generated from imprinting the desired analyte, favorable in harsh experimental conditions, and feedback-controlled recognitive drug release. Hence, this review will discuss their synthesis, the reason they are selected as drug delivery vehicles and for their applications in several drug administration routes (i.e. transdermal, ocular and gastrointestinal or stimuli-reactive routes).

  4. Calcium phosphate ceramics in drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Susmita; Tarafder, Solaiman; Edgington, Joe; Bandyopadhyay, Amit

    2011-04-01

    Calcium phosphate (CaP) particulates, cements and scaffolds have attracted significant interest as drug delivery vehicles. CaP systems, including both hydroxyapaptite and tricalcium phosphates, possess variable stoichiometry, functionality and dissolution properties which make them suitable for cellular delivery. Their chemical similarity to bone and thus biocompatibility, as well as variable surface charge density contribute to their controlled release properties. Among specific research areas, nanoparticle size, morphology, surface area due to porosity, and chemistry controlled release kinetics are the most active. This article discusses CaP systems in their particulate, cements, and scaffold forms for drug, protein, and growth factor delivery toward orthopedic and dental applications.

  5. Microneedles for drug and vaccine delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeu-Chun; Park, Jung-Hwan; Prausnitz, Mark R.

    2012-01-01

    Microneedles were first conceptualized for drug delivery many decades ago, but only became the subject of significant research starting in the mid-1990’s when microfabrication technology enabled their manufacture as (i) solid microneedles for skin pretreatment to increase skin permeability, (ii) microneedles coated with drug that dissolves off in the skin, (iii) polymer microneedles that encapsulate drug and fully dissolve in the skin and (iv) hollow microneedles for drug infusion into the skin. As shown in more than 350 papers now published in the field, microneedles have been used to deliver a broad range of different low molecular weight drugs, biotherapeutics and vaccines, including published human studies with a number of small-molecule and protein drugs and vaccines. Influenza vaccination using a hollow microneedle is in widespread clinical use and a number of solid microneedle products are sold for cosmetic purposes. In addition to applications in the skin, microneedles have also been adapted for delivery of bioactives into the eye and into cells. Successful application of microneedles depends on device function that facilitates microneedle insertion and possible infusion into skin, skin recovery after microneedle removal, and drug stability during manufacturing, storage and delivery, and on patient outcomes, including lack of pain, skin irritation and skin infection, in addition to drug efficacy and safety. Building off a strong technology base and multiple demonstrations of successful drug delivery, microneedles are poised to advance further into clinical practice to enable better pharmaceutical therapies, vaccination and other applications. PMID:22575858

  6. Designing hydrogels for controlled drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianyu; Mooney, David J.

    2016-12-01

    Hydrogel delivery systems can leverage therapeutically beneficial outcomes of drug delivery and have found clinical use. Hydrogels can provide spatial and temporal control over the release of various therapeutic agents, including small-molecule drugs, macromolecular drugs and cells. Owing to their tunable physical properties, controllable degradability and capability to protect labile drugs from degradation, hydrogels serve as a platform on which various physiochemical interactions with the encapsulated drugs occur to control drug release. In this Review, we cover multiscale mechanisms underlying the design of hydrogel drug delivery systems, focusing on physical and chemical properties of the hydrogel network and the hydrogel-drug interactions across the network, mesh and molecular (or atomistic) scales. We discuss how different mechanisms interact and can be integrated to exert fine control in time and space over drug presentation. We also collect experimental release data from the literature, review clinical translation to date of these systems and present quantitative comparisons between different systems to provide guidelines for the rational design of hydrogel delivery systems.

  7. Polymethacrylate microparticles gel for topical drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Labouta, Hagar Ibrahim; El-Khordagui, Labiba K

    2010-10-01

    Evaluating the potentials of particulate delivery systems in topical drug delivery. Polymethacrylate microparticles (MPs) incorporating verapamil hydrochloride (VRP) as a model hydrophilic drug with potential topical clinical uses, using Eudragit RS100 and Eudragit L100 were prepared for the formulation of a composite topical gel. The effect of initial drug loading, polymer composition, particularly the proportion of Eudragit L100 as an interacting polymer component and the HLB of the dispersing agent on MPs characteristics was investigated. A test MPs formulation was incorporated in gel and evaluated for drug release and human skin permeation. MPs showed high % incorporation efficiency and % yield. Composition of the hybrid polymer matrix was a main determinant of MPs characteristics, particularly drug release. Factors known to influence drug release such as MPs size and high drug solubility were outweighed by strong VRP-Eudragit L100 interaction. The developed MPs gel showed controlled VRP release and reduced skin retention compared to a free drug gel. Topical drug delivery and skin retention could be modulated using particulate delivery systems. From a practical standpoint, the VRP gel developed may offer advantage in a range of dermatological conditions, in response to the growing off-label topical use of VRP.

  8. Progress in antiretroviral drug delivery using nanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Mallipeddi, Rama; Rohan, Lisa Cencia

    2010-01-01

    There are currently a number of antiretroviral drugs that have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration for use in the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). More recently, antiretrovirals are being evaluated in the clinic for prevention of HIV infection. Due to the challenging nature of treatment and prevention of this disease, the use of nanocarriers to achieve more efficient delivery of antiretroviral drugs has been studied. Various forms of nanocarriers, such as nanoparticles (polymeric, inorganic, and solid lipid), liposomes, polymeric micelles, dendrimers, cyclodextrins, and cell-based nanoformulations have been studied for delivery of drugs intended for HIV prevention or therapy. The aim of this review is to provide a summary of the application of nanocarrier systems to the delivery of anti-HIV drugs, specifically antiretrovirals. For anti-HIV drugs to be effective, adequate distribution to specific sites in the body must be achieved, and effective drug concentrations must be maintained at those sites for the required period of time. Nanocarriers provide a means to overcome cellular and anatomical barriers to drug delivery. Their application in the area of HIV prevention and therapy may lead to the development of more effective drug products for combating this pandemic disease. PMID:20957115

  9. Current approaches for drug delivery to central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Sharif; Akaike, Toshihiro; Chowdhury, Ezharul Hoque

    2010-12-01

    Brain, the center of the nervous system in all vertebrate, plays the most vital role in every function of human body. However, many neurodegenerative diseases, cancer and infections of the brain become more prevalent as populations become older. In spite of the major advances in neuroscience, many potential therapeutics are still unable to reach the central nervous system (CNS) due to the blood-brain barrier (BBB) which is formed by the tight junctions within the capillary endothelium of the vertebrate brain. This results in the capillary wall behaving as a continuous lipid bilayer and preventing the passage of polar and lipid insoluble substances. Several approaches for delivering drugs to the CNS have been developed to enhance the capacity of therapeutic molecules to cross the BBB by modifying the drug itself, or by coupling it to a vector for receptor-mediated, carrier mediated or adsorption-mediated transcytosis. The current challenge is to develop drug delivery systems that ensure the safe and effective passage of drugs across the BBB. This review focuses on the strategies and approaches developed to enhance drug delivery to the CNS.

  10. Hydrogen peroxide mediated transvaginal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Fatakdawala, Hussain; Uhland, Scott A

    2011-05-16

    Simple, safe and effective permeability enhancers are crucial for successful non-invasive drug delivery methods. We seek local permeability augmentation mechanisms for integration into passive or active architectures in order to enable novel therapeutic delivery routes of the target drug while minimizing drug formulation challenges. This study explores the efficacy of hydrogen peroxide (HP) as a permeability enhancer for transmucosal delivery of macromolecules. HP at low concentrations (2–8 mM) is an effective permeability enhancer that is locally metabolized and safe. HP improves drug permeation through mucosa by altering tight junctions (TJ) between cells and oxidizing enzymes that function to degrade the foreign species. Results from trans-epithelial electrical resistance measurements and cell viability assay show reversible disassembly of TJ with minimal cell damage demonstrating the feasibility of HP as a safe permeability enhancer for drug delivery. Permeation studies show that HP treatment of cell cultured vaginal mucosa significantly enhances the permeability to insulin by more than an order of magnitude. This work lays foundation for the development of a drug delivery platform that administers drug doses by enhancing the permeability of local epithelial tissue via a separate HP treatment step.

  11. Transpapillary Drug Delivery to the Breast

    PubMed Central

    Dave, Kaushalkumar; Averineni, Ranjith; Sahdev, Preety; Perumal, Omathanu

    2014-01-01

    The study was aimed at investigating localized topical drug delivery to the breast via mammary papilla (nipple). 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and estradiol (EST) were used as model hydrophilic and hydrophobic compounds respectively. Porcine and human nipple were used for in-vitro penetration studies. The removal of keratin plug enhanced the drug transport through the nipple. The drug penetration was significantly higher through the nipple compared to breast skin. The drug’s lipophilicity had a significant influence on drug penetration through nipple. The ducts in the nipple served as a major transport pathway to the underlying breast tissue. Results showed that porcine nipple could be a potential model for human nipple. The topical application of 5-FU on the rat nipple resulted in high drug concentration in the breast and minimal drug levels in plasma and other organs. Overall, the findings from this study demonstrate the feasibility of localized drug delivery to the breast through nipple. PMID:25545150

  12. Microfluidic device for drug delivery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beebe, David J. (Inventor); MacDonald, Michael J. (Inventor); Eddington, David T. (Inventor); Mensing, Glennys A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A microfluidic device is provided for delivering a drug to an individual. The microfluidic device includes a body that defines a reservoir for receiving the drug therein. A valve interconnects the reservoir to an output needle that is insertable into the skin of an individual. A pressure source urges the drug from the reservoir toward the needle. The valve is movable between a closed position preventing the flow of the drug from the reservoir to the output needle and an open position allowing for the flow of the drug from the reservoir to the output needle in response to a predetermined condition in the physiological fluids of the individual.

  13. Improving brain drug targeting through exploitation of the nose-to-brain route: a physiological and pharmacokinetic perspective.

    PubMed

    Badhan, R K S; Kaur, M; Lungare, S; Obuobi, S

    2014-01-01

    With an ageing population and increasing prevalence of central-nervous system (CNS) disorders new approaches are required to sustain the development and successful delivery of therapeutics into the brain and CNS. CNS drug delivery is challenging due to the impermeable nature of the brain microvascular endothelial cells that form the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and which prevent the entry of a wide range of therapeutics into the brain. This review examines the role intranasal delivery may play in achieving direct brain delivery, for small molecular weight drugs, macromolecular therapeutics and cell-based therapeutics, by exploitation of the olfactory and trigeminal nerve pathways. This approach is thought to deliver drugs into the brain and CNS through bypassing the BBB. Details of the mechanism of transfer of administrated therapeutics, the pathways that lead to brain deposition, with a specific focus on therapeutic pharmacokinetics, and examples of successful CNS delivery will be explored.

  14. Chapter 3 - Colloidal systems for CNS drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Costantino, Luca; Tosi, Giovanni; Ruozi, Barbara; Bondioli, Lucia; Vandelli, Maria Angela; Forni, Flavio

    2009-01-01

    The pharmaceutical treatment of central nervous system (CNS) disorders is the second largest area of therapy, following cardiovascular diseases. Nowadays, noninvasive drug delivery systems for CNS are actively studied. The development of these new delivery systems started with the discovery that properly surface-engineered colloidal vectors, and in particular liposomes and polymeric nanoparticles, with a diameter approximately 200nm, were shown to be able to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) without apparent damage, and to deliver drugs or genetic materials into the brain. However, even if this ability was confirmed by confocal microscopy and measured by biodistribution experiments or by means of the pharmacological effect exerted by the embedded drugs, a clear understanding of the main characteristics of the colloidal systems that are important for BBB crossing is still lacking. It is also shown that the presence of the drug is able to modify the surface of these systems, with unpredictable results on the colloidal systems biodistribution; thus, the results obtained in the absence of the loaded drug have to be taken cautiously. Moreover, since the loaded drug is only a fraction of the colloidal system that is administered, the presence of the carrier in the body and into CNS, especially in the case of long-term therapies, might cause adverse effects not yet fully understood. Thus, even if promising results have been obtained, and some colloidal systems loaded with a drug are the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved for human use (but not for brain targeting), a long way of research has to be done in order to use these drug delivery systems for the treatment of CNS pathologies. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Intelligent, self-powered, drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Patra, Debabrata; Sengupta, Samudra; Duan, Wentao; Zhang, Hua; Pavlick, Ryan; Sen, Ayusman

    2013-02-21

    Self-propelled nano/micromotors and pumps are considered to be next generation drug delivery systems since the carriers can either propel themselves ("motor"-based drug delivery) or be delivered ("pump"-based drug delivery) to the target in response to specific biomarkers. Recently, there has been significant advancement towards developing nano/microtransporters into proof-of-concept tools for biomedical applications. This review encompasses the progress made to date on the design of synthetic nano/micromotors and pumps with respect to transportation and delivery of cargo at specific locations. Looking ahead, it is possible to imagine a day when intelligent machines navigate through the human body and perform challenging tasks.

  16. Novel drug delivery systems for glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Lavik, E; Kuehn, M H; Kwon, Y H

    2011-01-01

    Reduction of intraocular pressure (IOP) by pharmaceutical or surgical means has long been the standard treatment for glaucoma. A number of excellent drugs are available that are effective in reducing IOP. These drugs are typically applied as eye drops. However, patient adherence can be poor, thus reducing the clinical efficacy of the drugs. Several novel delivery systems designed to address the issue of adherence and to ensure consistent reduction of IOP are currently under development. These delivery systems include contact lenses-releasing glaucoma medications, injectables such as biodegradable micro- and nanoparticles, and surgically implanted systems. These new technologies are aimed at increasing clinical efficacy by offering multiple delivery options and are capable of managing IOP for several months. There is also a desire to have complementary neuroprotective approaches for those who continue to show progression, despite IOP reduction. Many potential neuroprotective agents are not suitable for traditional oral or drop formulations. Their potential is dependent on developing suitable delivery systems that can provide the drugs in a sustained, local manner to the retina and optic nerve. Drug delivery systems have the potential to improve patient adherence, reduce side effects, increase efficacy, and ultimately, preserve sight for glaucoma patients. In this review, we discuss benefits and limitations of the current systems of delivery and application, as well as those on the horizon. PMID:21475311

  17. Lipid-Based Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Hina; Bala, Rajni; Arora, Sandeep

    2014-01-01

    The principle objective of formulation of lipid-based drugs is to enhance their bioavailability. The use of lipids in drug delivery is no more a new trend now but is still the promising concept. Lipid-based drug delivery systems (LBDDS) are one of the emerging technologies designed to address challenges like the solubility and bioavailability of poorly water-soluble drugs. Lipid-based formulations can be tailored to meet a wide range of product requirements dictated by disease indication, route of administration, cost consideration, product stability, toxicity, and efficacy. These formulations are also a commercially viable strategy to formulate pharmaceuticals, for topical, oral, pulmonary, or parenteral delivery. In addition, lipid-based formulations have been shown to reduce the toxicity of various drugs by changing the biodistribution of the drug away from sensitive organs. However, the number of applications for lipid-based formulations has expanded as the nature and type of active drugs under investigation have become more varied. This paper mainly focuses on novel lipid-based formulations, namely, emulsions, vesicular systems, and lipid particulate systems and their subcategories as well as on their prominent applications in pharmaceutical drug delivery. PMID:26556202

  18. Electroresponsive nanoparticles for drug delivery on demand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Devleena; Hosseini-Nassab, Niloufar; Zare, Richard N.

    2016-04-01

    The potential of electroresponsive conducting polymer nanoparticles to be used as general drug delivery systems that allow electrically pulsed, linearly scalable, and on demand release of incorporated drugs is demonstrated. As examples, facile release from polypyrrole nanoparticles is shown for fluorescein, a highly water-soluble model compound, piroxicam, a lipophilic small molecule drug, and insulin, a large hydrophilic peptide hormone. The drug loading is about 13 wt% and release is accomplished in a few seconds by applying a weak constant current or voltage. To identify the parameters that should be finely tuned to tailor the carrier system for the release of the therapeutic molecule of interest, a systematic study of the factors that affect drug delivery is performed, using fluorescein as a model compound. The parameters studied include current, time, voltage, pH, temperature, particle concentration, and ionic strength. Results indicate that there are several degrees of freedom that can be optimized for efficient drug delivery. The ability to modulate linearly drug release from conducting polymers with the applied stimulus can be utilized to design programmable and minimally invasive drug delivery devices.

  19. Cellulose based polymeric systems in drug delivery

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The pharmaceutical industry requires the development of biodegradable, biocompatible, non toxic, site specific drug delivery polymers, which can be easily coupled with drugs to be delivered orally, topically, locally, or parenterally. The use of the most abundant biopolymer, cellulose along with its...

  20. Microfabrication Technologies for Oral Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Sant, Shilpa; Tao, Sarah L.; Fisher, Omar; Xu, Qiaobing; Peppas, Nicholas A.; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Micro-/nanoscale technologies such as lithographic techniques and microfluidics offer promising avenues to revolutionalize the fields of tissue engineering, drug discovery, diagnostics and personalized medicine. Microfabrication techniques are being explored for drug delivery applications due to their ability to combine several features such as precise shape and size into a single drug delivery vehicle. They also offer to create unique asymmetrical features incorporated into single or multiple reservoir systems maximizing contact area with the intestinal lining. Combined with intelligent materials, such microfabricated platforms can be designed to be bioadhesive and stimuli-responsive. Apart from drug delivery devices, microfabrication technologies offer exciting opportunities to create biomimetic gastrointestinal tract models incorporating physiological cell types, flow patterns and brush-border like structures. Here we review the recent developments in this field with a focus on the applications of microfabrication in the development of oral drug delivery devices and biomimetic gastrointestinal tract models that can be used to evaluate the drug delivery efficacy. PMID:22166590

  1. A pulsed mode electrolytic drug delivery device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Ying; Buttner, Ulrich; Carreno, Armando A. A.; Conchouso, David; Foulds, Ian G.

    2015-10-01

    This paper reports the design of a proof-of-concept drug delivery device that is actuated using the bubbles formed during electrolysis. The device uses a platinum (Pt) coated nickel (Ni) metal foam and a solid drug in reservoir (SDR) approach to improve the device’s performance. This electrochemically-driven pump has many features that are unlike conventional drug delivery devices: it is capable of pumping periodically and being refilled automatically; it features drug release control; and it enables targeted delivery. Pt-coated metal foam is used as a catalytic reforming element, which reduces the period of each delivery cycle. Two methods were used for fabricating the Pt-coated metal: sputtering and electroplating. Of these two methods, the sputtered Pt-coated metal foam has a higher pumping rate; it also has a comparable recombination rate when compared to the electroplated Pt-coated metal foam. The only drawback of this catalytic reformer is that it consumes nickel scaffold. Considering long-term applications, the electroplated Pt metal foam was selected for drug delivery, where a controlled drug release rate of 2.2 μg  ±  0.3 μg per actuation pulse was achieved using 4 mW of power.

  2. Potential and problems in ultrasound-responsive drug delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ying-Zheng; Du, Li-Na; Lu, Cui-Tao; Jin, Yi-Guang; Ge, Shu-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound is an important local stimulus for triggering drug release at the target tissue. Ultrasound-responsive drug delivery systems (URDDS) have become an important research focus in targeted therapy. URDDS include many different formulations, such as microbubbles, nanobubbles, nanodroplets, liposomes, emulsions, and micelles. Drugs that can be loaded into URDDS include small molecules, biomacromolecules, and inorganic substances. Fields of clinical application include anticancer therapy, treatment of ischemic myocardium, induction of an immune response, cartilage tissue engineering, transdermal drug delivery, treatment of Huntington’s disease, thrombolysis, and disruption of the blood–brain barrier. This review focuses on recent advances in URDDS, and discusses their formulations, clinical application, and problems, as well as a perspective on their potential use in the future. PMID:23637531

  3. Receptor-Mediated Drug Delivery Systems Targeting to Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shanshan; Meng, Ying; Li, Chengyi; Qian, Min; Huang, Rongqin

    2015-01-01

    Glioma has been considered to be the most frequent primary tumor within the central nervous system (CNS). The complexity of glioma, especially the existence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), makes the survival and prognosis of glioma remain poor even after a standard treatment based on surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. This provides a rationale for the development of some novel therapeutic strategies. Among them, receptor-mediated drug delivery is a specific pattern taking advantage of differential expression of receptors between tumors and normal tissues. The strategy can actively transport drugs, such as small molecular drugs, gene medicines, and therapeutic proteins to glioma while minimizing adverse reactions. This review will summarize recent progress on receptor-mediated drug delivery systems targeting to glioma, and conclude the challenges and prospects of receptor-mediated glioma-targeted therapy for future applications.

  4. Nanotech approaches to drug delivery and imaging.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Sanjeeb K; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2003-12-15

    Nanotechnology, a multidisciplinary scientific undertaking, involves creation and utilization of materials, devices or systems on the nanometer scale. The field of nanotechnology is currently undergoing explosive development on many fronts. The technology is expected to create innovations and play a critical role in various biomedical applications, not only in drug delivery, but also in molecular imaging, biomarkers and biosensors. Target-specific drug therapy and methods for early diagnosis of pathologies are the priority research areas where nanotechnology would play a vital role. This review considers different nanotechnology-based drug delivery and imaging approaches, and their economic impact on pharmaceutical and biomedical industries.

  5. Liposome-like Nanostructures for Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Weiwei; Hu, Che-Ming J.; Fang, Ronnie H.; Zhang, Liangfang

    2013-01-01

    Liposomes are a class of well-established drug carriers that have found numerous therapeutic applications. The success of liposomes, together with recent advancements in nanotechnology, has motivated the development of various novel liposome-like nanostructures with improved drug delivery performance. These nanostructures can be categorized into five major varieties, namely: (1) polymer-stabilized liposomes, (2) nanoparticle-stabilized liposomes, (3) core-shell lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticles, (4) natural membrane-derived vesicles, and (5) natural membrane coated nanoparticles. They have received significant attention and have become popular drug delivery platforms. Herein, we discuss the unique strengths of these liposome-like platforms in drug delivery, with a particular emphasis on how liposome-inspired novel designs have led to improved therapeutic efficacy, and review recent progress made by each platform in advancing healthcare. PMID:24392221

  6. Drug delivery approaches for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Singh, Santosh Kumar; Singh, Shriti; Lillard, James W; Singh, Rajesh

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers affecting women worldwide. The controlled release of drugs to the precise site of the disease using a nanocarrier vehicle increases the therapeutic efficiency of the drugs. Nanotechnology-based approaches used to endorse clinical improvement from a disease also help to understand the interaction of malignant cells with their microenvironment. Receptor-based targeting is another approach for drug delivery which is undergoing clinical trials. Nanoparticles (NPs) delivery has been proven to promise high loading capacity, less toxicity, and stability of the drugs or biomolecules compared to traditional chemotherapeutic drugs. The goal of this review is to present the current problems of breast cancer therapy and discuss the NP-based targeting to overcome the hurdles of conventional drug therapy approach.

  7. Brain-specific delivery of naproxen using different carrier systems.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Sheha; Mohammad, Alhawi

    2010-11-01

    Naproxen is one of the most potent NSAIDs and plays an important role in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. Poor brain delivery of naproxen at therapeutic doses, in addition to its serious gastrointestinal side effects, has prompted research into the development of a specific carrier system that is capable of delivering naproxen to the brain at smaller doses. The purpose of this study was to evaluate two brain-specific carrier systems of naproxen. The first was the dihydropyridine/pyridinium redox system that utilized a lipophilic chemical delivery system coupled to the carboxylic acid group of naproxen through an ethanolamine linker. Secondly, an ascorbic acid system, which has reducing properties and acts as a biological carrier through sodium-dependent vitamin-C transporter, was used for brain-specific delivery of naproxen. The prepared prodrugs were stable in aqueous buffers (pH 1.2 and 7.4) and rapidly hydrolyzed in biological fluids. Bioavailability studies revealed that both prodrugs 10 and 17 were rapidly cleared from blood with half lives of about 1 h, which will likely decrease systemic adverse effects. The rapid clearance from the blood was accompanied by an increase in the prodrug concentration in the brain, which occurred as a result of the prodrug being more locked in compared to the parent drug naproxen.

  8. Emulsion forming drug delivery system for lipophilic drugs.

    PubMed

    Wadhwa, Jyoti; Nair, Anroop; Kumria, Rachna

    2012-01-01

    In the recent years, there is a growing interest in the lipid-based formulations for delivery of lipophilic drugs. Due to their potential as therapeutic agents, preferably these lipid soluble drugs are incorporated into inert lipid carriers such as oils, surfactant dispersions, emulsions, liposomes etc. Among them, emulsion forming drug delivery systems appear to be a unique and industrially feasible approach to overcome the problem of low oral bioavailability associated with the BCS class II drugs. Self-emulsifying formulations are ideally isotropic mixtures of oils, surfactants and co-solvents that emulsify to form fine oil in water emulsions when introduced in aqueous media. Fine oil droplets would pass rapidly from stomach and promote wide distribution of drug throughout the GI tract, thereby overcome the slow dissolution step typically observed with solid dosage forms. Recent advances in drug carrier technologies have promulgated the development of novel drug carriers such as control release self-emulsifying pellets, microspheres, tablets, capsules etc. that have boosted the use of "self-emulsification" in drug delivery. This article reviews the different types of formulations and excipients used in emulsion forming drug delivery system to enhance the bioavailability of lipophilic drugs.

  9. Drug Delivery Research: The Invention Cycle.

    PubMed

    Park, Kinam

    2016-07-05

    Controlled drug delivery systems have been successful in introducing improved formulations for better use of existing drugs and novel delivery of biologicals. The initial success of producing many oral products and some injectable depot formulations, however, reached a plateau, and the progress over the past three decades has been slow. This is likely due to the difficulties of formulating hydrophilic, high molecular weight drugs, such as proteins and nucleic acids, for targeting specific cells, month-long sustained delivery, and pulsatile release. Since the approaches that have served well for delivery of small molecules are not applicable to large molecules, it is time to develop new methods for biologicals. The process of developing future drug delivery systems, termed as the invention cycle, is proposed, and it starts with clearly defining the problems for developing certain formulations. Once the problems are well-defined, creative imagination examines all potential options and selects the best answer and alternatives. Then, innovation takes over to generate unique solutions for developing new formulations that resolve the previously identified problems. Ultimately, the new delivery systems will have to go through a translational process to produce the final formulations for clinical use. The invention cycle also emphasizes examining the reasons for success of certain formulations, not just the reasons for failure of many systems. Implementation of the new invention cycle requires new mechanisms of funding the younger generation of scientists and a new way of identifying their achievements, thereby releasing them from the burden of short-termism.

  10. Ultrasonic Drug Delivery – A General Review

    PubMed Central

    Pitt, William G.; Husseini, Ghaleb A.; Staples, Bryant J.

    2006-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) has an ever-increasing role in the delivery of therapeutic agents including genetic material, proteins, and chemotherapeutic agents. Cavitating gas bodies such as microbubbles are the mediators through which the energy of relatively non-interactive pressure waves is concentrated to produce forces that permeabilize cell membranes and disrupt the vesicles that carry drugs. Thus the presence of microbubbles enormously enhances delivery of genetic material, proteins and smaller chemical agents. Delivery of genetic material is greatly enhanced by ultrasound in the presence of microbubbles. Attaching the DNA directly to the microbubbles or to gas-containing liposomes enhances gene uptake even further. US-enhanced gene delivery has been studied in various tissues including cardiac, vascular, skeletal muscle, tumor and even fetal tissue. US-enhanced delivery of proteins has found most application in transdermal delivery of insulin. Cavitation events reversibly disrupt the structure of the stratus corneum to allow transport of these large molecules. Other hormones and small proteins could also be delivered transdermally. Small chemotherapeutic molecules are delivered in research settings from micelles and liposomes exposed to ultrasound. Cavitation appears to play two roles: it disrupts the structure of the carrier vesicle and releases the drug; it also makes the cell membranes and capillaries more permeable to drugs. There remains a need to better understand the physics of cavitation of microbubbles and the impact that such cavitation has upon cells and drug-carrying vesicles. PMID:16296719

  11. Characterization of particulate drug delivery systems for oral delivery of Peptide and protein drugs.

    PubMed

    Christophersen, Philip Carsten; Fano, Mathias; Saaby, Lasse; Yang, Mingshi; Nielsen, Hanne Mørck; Mu, Huiling

    2015-01-01

    Oral drug delivery is a preferred route because of good patient compliance. However, most peptide/ protein drugs are delivered via parenteral routes because of the absorption barriers in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract such as enzymatic degradation by proteases and low permeability acrossthe biological membranes. To overcome these barriers, different formulation strategies for oral delivery of biomacromolecules have been proposed, including lipid based formulations and polymer-based particulate drug delivery systems (DDS). The aim of this review is to summarize the existing knowledge about oral delivery of peptide/protein drugs and to provide an overview of formulationand characterization strategies. For a better understanding of the challenges in oral delivery of peptide/protein drugs, the composition of GI fluids and the digestion processes of different kinds of excipients in the GI tract are summarized. Additionally, the paper provides an overview of recent studies on characterization of solid drug carriers for peptide/protein drugs, drug distribution in particles, drug release and stability in simulated GI fluids, as well as the absorption of peptide/protein drugs in cell-based models. The use of biorelevant media when applicable can increase the knowledge about the quality of DDS for oral protein delivery. Hopefully, the knowledge provided in this review will aid the establishment of improved biorelevant models capable of forecasting the performance of particulate DDS for oral peptide/protein delivery.

  12. Applications of chitosan nanoparticles in drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Tajmir-Riahi, H A; Nafisi, Sh; Sanyakamdhorn, S; Agudelo, D; Chanphai, P

    2014-01-01

    We have reviewed the binding affinities of several antitumor drugs doxorubicin (Dox), N-(trifluoroacetyl) doxorubicin (FDox), tamoxifen (Tam), 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4-Hydroxytam), and endoxifen (Endox) with chitosan nanoparticles of different sizes (chitosan-15, chitosan-100, and chitosan-200 KD) in order to evaluate the efficacy of chitosan nanocarriers in drug delivery systems. Spectroscopic and molecular modeling studies showed the binding sites and the stability of drug-polymer complexes. Drug-chitosan complexation occurred via hydrophobic and hydrophilic contacts as well as H-bonding network. Chitosan-100 KD was the more effective drug carrier than the chitosan-15 and chitosan-200 KD.

  13. Nanoparticles and microparticles for skin drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Prow, Tarl W; Grice, Jeffrey E; Lin, Lynlee L; Faye, Rokhaya; Butler, Margaret; Becker, Wolfgang; Wurm, Elisabeth M T; Yoong, Corinne; Robertson, Thomas A; Soyer, H Peter; Roberts, Michael S

    2011-05-30

    Skin is a widely used route of delivery for local and systemic drugs and is potentially a route for their delivery as nanoparticles. The skin provides a natural physical barrier against particle penetration, but there are opportunities to deliver therapeutic nanoparticles, especially in diseased skin and to the openings of hair follicles. Whilst nanoparticle drug delivery has been touted as an enabling technology, its potential in treating local skin and systemic diseases has yet to be realised. Most drug delivery particle technologies are based on lipid carriers, i.e. solid lipid nanoparticles and nanoemulsions of around 300 nm in diameter, which are now considered microparticles. Metal nanoparticles are now recognized for seemingly small drug-like characteristics, i.e. antimicrobial activity and skin cancer prevention. We present our unpublished clinical data on nanoparticle penetration and previously published reports that support the hypothesis that nanoparticles >10nm in diameter are unlikely to penetrate through the stratum corneum into viable human skin but will accumulate in the hair follicle openings, especially after massage. However, significant uptake does occur after damage and in certain diseased skin. Current chemistry limits both atom by atom construction of complex particulates and delineating their molecular interactions within biological systems. In this review we discuss the skin as a nanoparticle barrier, recent work in the field of nanoparticle drug delivery to the skin, and future directions currently being explored. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Lung surfactant as a drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Vermehren, C; Frokjaer, S; Aurstad, T; Hansen, J

    2006-01-03

    Lung surfactant is a complex mixture of mainly phospholipids and proteins. The composition leads to a unique spreading effect of the surfactant as well as spontaneous vesicle formation, which may be favourable characteristics of a drug delivery system for pulmonary delivery. The aim of study was to investigate the potential use of the surfactant extract, HL10 (LeoPharma, DK) as a drug delivery system. Studies involved incorporation of hydrophilic- and amphipathic model drugs (sucrose and acylated peptides) into HL10 and elucidation of the influence of surfactant proteins on the HL10 behaviour. Results showed that HL10 vesicles did not retain sucrose indicating formation of leaky vesicles. Studying the influence of surfactant proteins on release from DPPC-liposomes showed tendencies toward a protein-induced release. Hence, the surfactant proteins may influence the membrane lipid packing and characteristics resulting in leakiness of the membranes. Incorporation of acylated peptides into HL10 depended on the chain length rendering a successful incorporation of the peptide acylated with C14-acyl chains. This study suggests that HL10 may be a promising drug delivery system for the pulmonary delivery of amphipathic drug substances, e.g. therapeutically active acylated peptides (e.g. acylated insulin).

  15. Delivery of siRNA to the brain using a combination of nose-to-brain delivery and cell-penetrating peptide-modified nano-micelles.

    PubMed

    Kanazawa, T; Akiyama, F; Kakizaki, S; Takashima, Y; Seta, Y

    2013-12-01

    The potential for RNA-based agents to serve as effective therapeutics for central nerve systems (CNS) disorders has been successfully demonstrated in vitro. However, the blood-brain barrier limits the distribution of systemically administered therapeutics to the CNS, posing a major challenge for drug development aimed at combatting CNS disorders. Therefore, the development of effective strategies to enhance siRNA delivery to the brain is of great interest in clinical and pharmaceutical fields. To improve the efficiency of small interfering RNA (siRNA) delivery to the brain, we developed a nose-to-brain delivery system combined with cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) modified nano-micelles comprising polyethylene glycol-polycaprolactone (PEG-PCL) copolymers conjugated with the CPP, Tat (MPEG-PCL-Tat). In this study, we describe intranasal brain delivery of siRNA or dextran (Mw: 10,000 Da) as a model siRNA, by using MPEG-PCL-Tat. Intranasal delivery of dextran with MPEG-PCL-Tat improved brain delivery compared to intravenous delivery of dextran either with or without MPEG-PCL-Tat. We also studied the intranasal transfer of MPEG-PCL-Tat to the brain via the olfactory and trigeminal nerves, the putative pathways to the brain from the nasal cavity. We found that MPEG-PCL-Tat accelerated transport along the olfactory and trigeminal nerve pathway because of its high permeation across the nasal mucosa.

  16. Trojan Microparticles for Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Anton, Nicolas; Jakhmola, Anshuman; Vandamme, Thierry F.

    2012-01-01

    During the last decade, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) have regulated a wide range of products, (foods, cosmetics, drugs, devices, veterinary, and tobacco) which may utilize micro and nanotechnology or contain nanomaterials. Nanotechnology allows scientists to create, explore, and manipulate materials in nano-regime. Such materials have chemical, physical, and biological properties that are quite different from their bulk counterparts. For pharmaceutical applications and in order to improve their administration (oral, pulmonary and dermal), the nanocarriers can be spread into microparticles. These supramolecular associations can also modulate the kinetic releases of drugs entrapped in the nanoparticles. Different strategies to produce these hybrid particles and to optimize the release kinetics of encapsulated drugs are discussed in this review. PMID:24300177

  17. Lipid Nanoparticles for Nasal/Intranasal Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Cunha, S; Amaral, M H; Lobo, J M Sousa; Silva, Ana C

    2017-01-01

    Studies on the development of drug delivery systems have increased because these systems have particular characteristics that allow them to improve therapeutics. Among these, lipid nanoparticles (solid lipid nanoparticles, SLNs; and nanostructured lipid carriers, NLCs) have demonstrated suitability for drug targeting. The nasal administration of drug-loaded lipid nanoparticles showed effectiveness in treating central nervous system (CNS) disorders, particularly neurodegenerative diseases, because the nasal route (also called intranasal route) allows direct nose-to-brain drug delivery by means of lipid nanoparticles. Nonetheless, the feasibility of this application remains an open field for researchers. Drawbacks must be overcome before reaching the clinic (e.g., drug absorption at subtherapeutic levels, rapid mucociliary clearance). The intranasal administration of drugs for systemic absorption is effective for treating other conditions, such as cardiovascular diseases, infections, severe pain, and menopausal syndrome. In the near future, it is expected that patients will benefit from the advantages of lipid nanoparticle-based formulations, via the nasal/intranasal route, which bypasses the blood-brain barrier (BBB), avoiding first-pass metabolism and gastrointestinal degradation. This review discusses the use of SLNs and NLCs for nasal drug administration. A brief description of the nasal route and the features of SLNs and NLCs is initially provided.

  18. Functional Cyclodextrin Polyrotaxanes for Drug Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yui, Nobuhiko; Katoono, Ryo; Yamashita, Atsushi

    The mobility of cyclodextrins (CDs) threaded onto a linear polymeric chain and the dethreading of the CDs from the chain are the most fascinating features seen in polyrotaxanes. These structural characteristics are very promising for their possible applications in drug delivery. Enhanced multivalent interaction between ligand-receptor systems by using ligand-conjugated polyrotaxanes would be just one of the excellent properties related to the CD mobility. Gene delivery using cytocleavable polyrotaxanes is a more practical but highly crucial issue in drug delivery. Complexation of the polyrotaxanes with DNA and its intracellular DNA release ingeniously utilizes both CD mobility and polyrotaxane dissociation to achieve effective gene delivery. Such a supramolecular approach using CD-containing polyrotaxanes is expected to exploit a new paradigm of biomaterials.

  19. Nose-To-Brain Delivery of PLGA-Diazepam Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Deepak; Sharma, Rakesh Kumar; Sharma, Navneet; Gabrani, Reema; Sharma, Sanjeev K; Ali, Javed; Dang, Shweta

    2015-10-01

    The objective of the present investigation was to optimize diazepam (Dzp)-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles (NP) to achieve delivery in the brain through intranasal administration. Dzp nanoparticles (DNP) were formulated by nanoprecipitation and optimized using Box-Behnken design. The influence of various independent process variables (polymer, surfactant, aqueous to organic (w/o) phase ratio, and drug) on resulting properties of DNP (z-average and drug entrapment) was investigated. Developed DNP showed z-average 148-337 d.nm, polydispersity index 0.04-0.45, drug entrapment 69-92%, and zeta potential in the range of -15 to -29.24 mV. Optimized DNP were further analyzed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), ex-vivo drug release, and in-vitro cytotoxicity. Ex-vivo drug release study via sheep nasal mucosa from DNP showed a controlled release of 64.4% for 24 h. 3-[4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay performed on Vero cell line showed less toxicity for DNP as compared to Dzp suspension (DS). Gamma scintigraphy and biodistribution study of DNP and DS was performed on Sprague-Dawley rats using technetium-99m-labeled ((99m)Tc) Dzp formulations to investigate the nose-to-brain drug delivery pathway. Brain/blood uptake ratios, drug targeting efficiency, and direct nose-to-brain transport were found to be 1.23-1.45, 258, and 61% for (99m)Tc-DNP (i.n) compared to (99m)Tc-DS (i.n) (0.38-1.06, 125, and 1%). Scintigraphy images showed uptake of Dzp from nose-to-brain, and this observation was in agreement with the biodistribution results. These results suggest that the developed poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) NP could serve as a potential carrier of Dzp for nose-to-brain delivery in outpatient management of status epilepticus.

  20. Oral Delivery of Protein Drugs Bioencapsulated in Plant Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Kwang-Chul; Daniell, Henry

    2016-01-01

    Plants cells are now approved by the FDA for cost-effective production of protein drugs (PDs) in large-scale current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP) hydroponic growth facilities. In lyophilized plant cells, PDs are stable at ambient temperature for several years, maintaining their folding and efficacy. Upon oral delivery, PDs bioencapsulated in plant cells are protected in the stomach from acids and enzymes but are subsequently released into the gut lumen by microbes that digest the plant cell wall. The large mucosal area of the human intestine offers an ideal system for oral drug delivery. When tags (receptor-binding proteins or cell-penetrating peptides) are fused to PDs, they efficiently cross the intestinal epithelium and are delivered to the circulatory or immune system. Unique tags to deliver PDs to human immune or nonimmune cells have been developed recently. After crossing the epithelium, ubiquitous proteases cleave off tags at engineered sites. PDs are also delivered to the brain or retina by crossing the blood–brain or retinal barriers. This review highlights recent advances in PD delivery to treat Alzheimer's disease, diabetes, hypertension, Gaucher's or ocular diseases, as well as the development of affordable drugs by eliminating prohibitively expensive purification, cold chain and sterile delivery. PMID:27378236

  1. Engineered Polymers for Advanced Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sungwon; Kim, Jong-Ho; Jeon, Oju; Kwon, Ick Chan; Park, Kinam

    2009-01-01

    Engineered polymers have been utilized for developing advanced drug delivery systems. The development of such polymers has caused advances in polymer chemistry, which, in turn, has resulted in smart polymers that can respond to changes in environmental condition, such as temperature, pH, and biomolecules. The responses vary widely from swelling/deswelling to degradation. Drug-polymer conjugates and drug-containing nano/micro-particles have been used for drug targeting. Engineered polymers and polymeric systems have also been used in new areas, such as molecular imaging as well as in nanotechnology. This review examines the engineered polymers that have been used as traditional drug delivery and as more recent applications in nanotechnology. PMID:18977434

  2. Nanoparticles and nanofibers for topical drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Ritu; Macri, Lauren K.; Kaplan, Hilton M.; Kohn, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    This review provides the first comprehensive overview of the use of both nanoparticles and nanofibers for topical drug delivery. Researchers have explored the use of nanotechnology, specifically nanoparticles and nanofibers, as drug delivery systems for topical and transdermal applications. This approach employs increased drug concentration in the carrier, in order to increase drug flux into and through the skin. Both nanoparticles and nanofibers can be used to deliver hydrophobic and hydrophilic drugs and are capable of controlled release for a prolonged period of time. The examples presented provide significant evidence that this area of research has—and will continue to have — a profound impact on both clinical outcomes and the development of new products. PMID:26518723

  3. Genetically engineered nanocarriers for drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Pu; Gustafson, Joshua A; MacKay, J Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Cytotoxicity, low water solubility, rapid clearance from circulation, and off-target side-effects are common drawbacks of conventional small-molecule drugs. To overcome these shortcomings, many multifunctional nanocarriers have been proposed to enhance drug delivery. In concept, multifunctional nanoparticles might carry multiple agents, control release rate, biodegrade, and utilize target-mediated drug delivery; however, the design of these particles presents many challenges at the stage of pharmaceutical development. An emerging solution to improve control over these particles is to turn to genetic engineering. Genetically engineered nanocarriers are precisely controlled in size and structure and can provide specific control over sites for chemical attachment of drugs. Genetically engineered drug carriers that assemble nanostructures including nanoparticles and nanofibers can be polymeric or non-polymeric. This review summarizes the recent development of applications in drug and gene delivery utilizing nanostructures of polymeric genetically engineered drug carriers such as elastin-like polypeptides, silk-like polypeptides, and silk-elastin-like protein polymers, and non-polymeric genetically engineered drug carriers such as vault proteins and viral proteins. PMID:24741309

  4. Nanoparticles in the ocular drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hong-Yan; Hao, Ji-Long; Wang, Shuang; Zheng, Yu; Zhang, Wen-Song

    2013-01-01

    Ocular drug transport barriers pose a challenge for drug delivery comprising the ocular surface epithelium, the tear film and internal barriers of the blood-aqueous and blood-retina barriers. Ocular drug delivery efficiency depends on the barriers and the clearance from the choroidal, conjunctival vessels and lymphatic. Traditional drug administration reduces the clinical efficacy especially for poor water soluble molecules and for the posterior segment of the eye. Nanoparticles (NPs) have been designed to overcome the barriers, increase the drug penetration at the target site and prolong the drug levels by few internals of drug administrations in lower doses without any toxicity compared to the conventional eye drops. With the aid of high specificity and multifunctionality, DNA NPs can be resulted in higher transfection efficiency for gene therapy. NPs could target at cornea, retina and choroid by surficial applications and intravitreal injection. This review is concerned with recent findings and applications of NPs drug delivery systems for the treatment of different eye diseases. PMID:23826539

  5. Liposomes as delivery systems for antineoplastic drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, Luis Alberto

    2014-11-01

    Liposome drug formulations are defined as pharmaceutical products containing active drug substances encapsulated within the lipid bilayer or in the interior aqueous space of the liposomes. The main importance of this drug delivery system is based on its drastic reduction in systemic dose and concomitant systemic toxicity that in comparison with the free drug, results in an improvement of patient compliance and in a more effective treatment. There are several therapeutic drugs that are potential candidates to be encapsulated into liposomes; particular interest has been focused in therapeutic and antineoplastic drugs, which are characterized for its low therapeutic index and high systemic toxicity. The use of liposomes as drug carriers has been extensively justified and the importance of the development of different formulations or techniques to encapsulate therapeutic drugs has an enormous value in benefit of patients affected by neoplastic diseases.

  6. Nanogels for Oligonucleotide Delivery to the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Vinogradov, Serguei V.; Batrakova, Elena V.; Kabanov, Alexander V.

    2009-01-01

    Systemic delivery of oligonucleotides (ODN) to the central nervous system is needed for development of therapeutic and diagnostic modalities for treatment of neurodegenerative disorders. Macromolecules injected in blood are poorly transported across the blood–brain barrier (BBB) and rapidly cleared from circulation. In this work we propose a novel system for ODN delivery to the brain based on nanoscale network of cross-linked poly(ethylene glycol) and polyethylenimine (“nanogel”). The methods of synthesis of nanogel and its modification with specific targeting molecules are described. Nanogels can bind and encapsulate spontaneously negatively charged ODN, resulting in formation of stable aqueous dispersion of polyelectrolyte complex with particle sizes less than 100 nm. Using polarized monolayers of bovine brain microvessel endothelial cells as an in vitro model this study demonstrates that ODN incorporated in nanogel formulations can be effectively transported across the BBB. The transport efficacy is further increased when the surface of the nanogel is modified with transferrin or insulin. Importantly the ODN is transported across the brain microvessel cells through the transcellular pathway; after transport, ODN remains mostly incorporated in the nanogel and ODN displays little degradation compared to the free ODN. Using mouse model for biodistribution studies in vivo, this work demonstrated that as a result of incorporation into nanogel 1 h after intravenous injection the accumulation of a phosphorothioate ODN in the brain increases by over 15 fold while in liver and spleen decreases by 2-fold compared to the free ODN. Overall, this study suggests that nanogel is a promising system for delivery of ODN to the brain. PMID:14733583

  7. Barriers to drug delivery in solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sriraman, Shravan Kumar; Aryasomayajula, Bhawani; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade, significant progress has been made in the field of drug delivery. The advent of engineered nanoparticles has allowed us to circumvent the initial limitations to drug delivery such as pharmacokinetics and solubility. However, in spite of significant advances to tumor targeting, an effective treatment strategy for malignant tumors still remains elusive. Tumors possess distinct physiological features which allow them to resist traditional treatment approaches. This combined with the complexity of the biological system presents significant hurdles to the site-specific delivery of therapeutic drugs. One of the key features of engineered nanoparticles is that these can be tailored to execute specific functions. With this review, we hope to provide the reader with a clear understanding and knowledge of biological barriers and the methods to exploit these characteristics to design multifunctional nanocarriers, effect useful dosing regimens and subsequently improve therapeutic outcomes in the clinic. PMID:25068098

  8. Collagen-coated microparticles in drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Praveen Kumar; Srinivasan, Aishwarya

    2009-07-01

    Advantages of drug-incorporated collagen particles have been described for the controlled delivery system for therapeutic actions. The attractiveness of collagen lies in its low immunogenicity and high biocompatibility. It is also recognized by the body as a natural constituent rather than a foreign body. Our research and development efforts are focused towards addressing some of the limitations of collagen, like the high viscosity of an aqueous phase, nondissolution in neutral pH buffers, thermal instability (denaturation) and biodegradability, to make it an ideal material for drug delivery with particular reference to microparticles. These limitations could be overcome by making collagen conjugates with other biomaterials or chemically modifying collagen monomer without affecting its triple helical conformation and maintaining its native properties. This article highlights collagen microparticles' present status as a carrier in drug delivery.

  9. Ultrasound-mediated gastrointestinal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Schoellhammer, Carl M; Schroeder, Avi; Maa, Ruby; Lauwers, Gregory Yves; Swiston, Albert; Zervas, Michael; Barman, Ross; DiCiccio, Angela M; Brugge, William R; Anderson, Daniel G; Blankschtein, Daniel; Langer, Robert; Traverso, Giovanni

    2015-10-21

    There is a significant clinical need for rapid and efficient delivery of drugs directly to the site of diseased tissues for the treatment of gastrointestinal (GI) pathologies, in particular, Crohn's and ulcerative colitis. However, complex therapeutic molecules cannot easily be delivered through the GI tract because of physiologic and structural barriers. We report the use of ultrasound as a modality for enhanced drug delivery to the GI tract, with an emphasis on rectal delivery. Ultrasound increased the absorption of model therapeutics inulin, hydrocortisone, and mesalamine two- to tenfold in ex vivo tissue, depending on location in the GI tract. In pigs, ultrasound induced transient cavitation with negligible heating, leading to an order of magnitude enhancement in the delivery of mesalamine, as well as successful systemic delivery of a macromolecule, insulin, with the expected hypoglycemic response. In a rodent model of chemically induced acute colitis, the addition of ultrasound to a daily mesalamine enema (compared to enema alone) resulted in superior clinical and histological scores of disease activity. In both animal models, ultrasound treatment was well tolerated and resulted in minimal tissue disruption, and in mice, there was no significant effect on histology, fecal score, or tissue inflammatory cytokine levels. The use of ultrasound to enhance GI drug delivery is safe in animals and could augment the efficacy of GI therapies and broaden the scope of agents that could be delivered locally and systemically through the GI tract for chronic conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease.

  10. Ultrasound-mediated gastrointestinal drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Schoellhammer, Carl M.; Schroeder, Avi; Maa, Ruby; Lauwers, Gregory Yves; Swiston, Albert; Zervas, Michael; Barman, Ross; DiCiccio, Angela M.; Brugge, William R.; Anderson, Daniel G.; Blankschtein, Daniel; Langer, Robert; Traverso, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    There is a significant clinical need for rapid and efficient delivery of drugs directly to the site of diseased tissues for the treatment of gastrointestinal (GI) pathologies, in particular, Crohn’s and ulcerative colitis. However, complex therapeutic molecules cannot easily be delivered through the GI tract because of physiologic and structural barriers. We report the use of ultrasound as a modality for enhanced drug delivery to the GI tract, with an emphasis on rectal delivery. Ultrasound increased the absorption of model therapeutics inulin, hydrocortisone, and mesalamine two- to tenfold in ex vivo tissue, depending on location in the GI tract. In pigs, ultrasound induced transient cavitation with negligible heating, leading to an order of magnitude enhancement in the delivery of mesalamine, as well as successful systemic delivery of a macromolecule, insulin, with the expected hypoglycemic response. In a rodent model of chemically induced acute colitis, the addition of ultrasound to a daily mesalamine enema (compared to enema alone) resulted in superior clinical and histological scores of disease activity. In both animal models, ultrasound treatment was well tolerated and resulted in minimal tissue disruption, and in mice, there was no significant effect on histology, fecal score, or tissue inflammatory cytokine levels. The use of ultrasound to enhance GI drug delivery is safe in animals and could augment the efficacy of GI therapies and broaden the scope of agents that could be delivered locally and systemically through the GI tract for chronic conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:26491078

  11. Local Drug Delivery to Prevent Restenosis

    PubMed Central

    Seedial, Stephen M.; Ghosh, Soumojit; Saunders, R. Scott; Suwanabol, Pasithorn A.; Shi, Xudong; Liu, Bo; Kent, K. Craig

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Despite significant advances in vascular biology, bioengineering and pharmacology, restenosis remains a limitation to the overall efficacy of vascular reconstructions, both percutaneous and open. Although the pathophysiology of intimal hyperplasia is complex, a number of drugs and/or molecular tools have been identified that can prevent restenosis. Moreover, the focal nature of this process lends itself to treatment with local drug administration. In this article we provide a broad overview of current and future techniques for local drug delivery that have been developed to prevent restenosis following vascular intervention. Methods A systematic electronic literature search using PubMed was performed for all accessible published articles through September 2012. In an effort to remain current, additional searches were performed for abstracts presented at relevant societal meetings, filed patents, clinical trials and funded NIH awards. Results The efficacy of local drug delivery has been demonstrated in the coronary circulation with the current clinical use of drug-eluting stents (DES). Until recently, however, DES were not found to be efficacious in the peripheral circulation. Further pursuit of intraluminal devices has led to the development of balloon-based technologies with a recent surge in trials involving drug-eluting balloons. Early data appears encouraging, particularly for treatment of lesions in the superficial femoral artery, with several devices having recently received the CE mark in Europe. Investigators have also explored periadventitial application of biomaterials containing anti-restenotic drugs, an approach that could be particularly useful for surgical bypass or endarterectomy. In the past systemic drug delivery has been unsuccessful, however, there has been recent exploration of intravenous delivery of drugs designed specifically to target injured or reconstructed arteries. Our review revealed a multitude of additional interesting

  12. Drug Delivery and Nanoformulations for the Cardiovascular System.

    PubMed

    Geldenhuys, W J; Khayat, M T; Yun, J; Nayeem, M A

    2017-02-01

    Therapeutic delivery to the cardiovascular system may play an important role in the successful treatment of a variety of disease state, including atherosclerosis, ischemic-reperfusion injury and other types of microvascular diseases including hypertension. In this review we evaluate the different options available for the development of suitable delivery systems that include the delivery of small organic compounds [adenosin A2A receptor agonist (CGS 21680), CYP-epoxygenases inhibitor (N-(methylsulfonyl)-2-(2-propynyloxy)-benzenehexanamide, trans-4-[4-(3-adamantan-1-ylureido)cyclohexyloxy] benzoic acid), soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitor (N-methylsulfonyl-12,12-dibromododec-11-enamide), PPARγ agonist (rosiglitazone) and PPARγ antagonist (T0070907)], nanoparticles, peptides, and siRNA to the cardiovascular system. Effective formulations of nanoproducts have significant potential to overcome physiological barriers and improve therapeutic outcomes in patients. As per the literature covering targeted delivery to the cardiovascular system, we found that this area is still at infancy stage, as compare to the more mature fields of tumor cancer or brain delivery (e.g. blood-brain barrier permeability) with fewer publications focused on the targeted drug delivery technologies. Additionally, we show how pharmacology needs to be well understood when considering the cardiovascular system. Therefore, we discussed in this review various receptors agonists, antagonists, activators and inhibitors which will have effects on cardiovascular system.

  13. Ultrasonic drug delivery--a general review.

    PubMed

    Pitt, William G; Husseini, Ghaleb A; Staples, Bryant J

    2004-11-01

    Ultrasound has an ever-increasing role in the delivery of therapeutic agents, including genetic material, protein and chemotherapeutic agents. Cavitating gas bodies, such as microbubbles, are the mediators through which the energy of relatively non-interactive pressure waves is concentrated to produce forces that permeabilise cell membranes and disrupt the vesicles that carry drugs. Thus, the presence of microbubbles enormously enhances ultrasonic delivery of genetic material, proteins and smaller chemical agents. Numerous reports show that the most efficient delivery of genetic material occurs in the presence of cavitating microbubbles. Attaching the DNA directly to the microbubbles, or to gas-containing liposomes, enhances gene uptake even further. Ultrasonic-enhanced gene delivery has been studied in various tissues, including cardiac, vascular, skeletal muscle, tumour and even fetal tissue. Ultrasonic-assisted delivery of proteins has found most application in transdermal transport of insulin. Cavitation events reversibly disrupt the structure of the stratus corneum to allow transport of these large molecules. Other hormones and small proteins could also be delivered transdermally. Small chemotherapeutic molecules are delivered in research settings from micelles and liposomes exposed to ultrasound. Cavitation appears to play two roles: it disrupts the structure of the carrier vesicle and releases the drug; and makes cell membranes and capillaries more permeable to drugs. There remains a need to better understand the physics of cavitation of microbubbles and the impact that such cavitation has on cells and drug-carrying vesicles.

  14. Light induced drug delivery into cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shamay, Yosi; Adar, Lily; Ashkenasy, Gonen; David, Ayelet

    2011-02-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) can be used for intracellular delivery of a broad variety of cargoes, including various nanoparticulate pharmaceutical carriers. However, the cationic nature of all CPP sequences, and thus lack of cell specificity, limits their in vivo use for drug delivery applications. Here, we have devised and tested a strategy for site-specific delivery of dyes and drugs into cancer cells by using polymers bearing a light activated caged CPP (cCPP). The positive charge of Lys residues on the minimum sequence of the CPP penetratin ((52)RRMKWKK(58)) was masked with photo-cleavable groups to minimize non-specific adsorption and cellular uptake. Once illuminated by UV light, these protecting groups were cleaved, the positively charged CPP regained its activity and facilitated rapid intracellular delivery of the polymer-dye or polymer-drug conjugates into cancer cells. We have found that a 10-min light illumination time was sufficient to enhance the penetration of the polymer-CPP conjugates bearing the proapoptotic peptide, (D)(KLAKLAK)(2), into 80% of the target cells, and to promote a 'switch' like cytotoxic activity resulting a shift from 100% to 10% in cell viability after 2 h. This report provides an example for tumor targeting by means of light activation of cell-penetrating peptides for intracellular drug delivery.

  15. Transungual drug delivery: current status.

    PubMed

    Elkeeb, Rania; AliKhan, Ali; Elkeeb, Laila; Hui, Xiaoying; Maibach, Howard I

    2010-01-15

    Topical therapy is highly desirable in treating nail disorders due to its localized effects, which results in minimal adverse systemic events and possibly improved adherence. However, the effectiveness of topical therapies is limited by minimal drug permeability through the nail plate. Current research on nail permeation that focuses on altering the nail plate barrier by means of chemical treatments, penetration enhancers as well as physical and mechanical methods is reviewed. A new method of nail sampling is examined. Finally limitations of current ungual drug permeability studies are briefly discussed.

  16. Zwitterionic drug nanocarriers: a biomimetic strategy for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Jin, Qiao; Chen, Yangjun; Wang, Yin; Ji, Jian

    2014-12-01

    Nanomaterials self-assembled from amphiphilic functional copolymers have emerged as safe and efficient nanocarriers for delivery of therapeutics. Surface engineering of the nanocarriers is extremely important for the design of drug delivery systems. Bioinspired zwitterions are considered as novel nonfouling materials to construct biocompatible and bioinert nanocarriers. As an alternative to poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), zwitterions exhibit some unique properties that PEG do not have. In this review, we highlight recent progress of the design of drug nanocarriers using a zwitterionic strategy. The possible mechanism of stealth properties of zwitterions was proposed. The advantages of zwitterionic drug nanocarriers deriving from phosphorylcholine (PC), carboxybetaine (CB), and sulfobetaine (SB) are also discussed.

  17. MRI-Guided Focused Ultrasound as a New Method of Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Thanou, M.; Gedroyc, W.

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound-mediated drug delivery under the guidance of an imaging modality can improve drug disposition and achieve site-specific drug delivery. The term focal drug delivery has been introduced to describe the focal targeting of drugs in tissues with the help of imaging and focused ultrasound. Focal drug delivery aims to improve the therapeutic profile of drugs by improving their specificity and their permeation in defined areas. Focused-ultrasound- (FUS-) mediated drug delivery has been applied with various molecules to improve their local distribution in tissues. FUS is applied with the aid of microbubbles to enhance the permeability of bioactive molecules across BBB and improve drug distribution in the brain. Recently, FUS has been utilised in combination with MRI-labelled liposomes that respond to temperature increase. This strategy aims to “activate” nanoparticles to release their cargo locally when triggered by hyperthermia induced by FUS. MRI-guided FUS drug delivery provides the opportunity to improve drug bioavailability locally and therefore improve the therapeutic profiles of drugs. This drug delivery strategy can be directly translated to clinic as MRg FUS is a promising clinically therapeutic approach. However, more basic research is required to understand the physiological mechanism of FUS-enhanced drug delivery. PMID:23738076

  18. Plasmon resonant liposomes for controlled drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knights-Mitchell, Shellie S.; Romanowski, Marek

    2015-03-01

    Nanotechnology use in drug delivery promotes a reduction in systemic toxicity, improved pharmacokinetics, and better drug bioavailability. Liposomes continue to be extensively researched as drug delivery systems (DDS) with formulations such as Doxil® and Ambisome® approved by FDA and successfully marketed in the United States. However, the limited ability to precisely control release of active ingredients from these vesicles continues to challenge the broad implementation of this technology. Moreover, the full potential of the carrier to sequester drugs until it can reach its intended target has yet to be realized. Here, we describe a liposomal DDS that releases therapeutic doses of an anticancer drug in response to external stimulus. Earlier, we introduced degradable plasmon resonant liposomes. These constructs, obtained by reducing gold on the liposome surface, facilitate spatial and temporal release of drugs upon laser light illumination that ultimately induces an increase in temperature. In this work, plasmon resonant liposomes have been developed to stably encapsulate and retain doxorubicin at physiological conditions represented by isotonic saline at 37o C and pH 7.4. Subsequently, they are stimulated to release contents either by a 5o C increase in temperature or by laser illumination (760 nm and 88 mW/cm2 power density). Successful development of degradable plasmon resonant liposomes responsive to near-infrared light or moderate hyperthermia can provide a new delivery method for multiple lipophilic and hydrophilic drugs with pharmacokinetic profiles that limit clinical utility.

  19. Drug delivery system and breast cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colone, Marisa; Kaliappan, Subramanian; Calcabrini, Annarica; Tortora, Mariarosaria; Cavalieri, Francesca; Stringaro, Annarita

    2016-06-01

    Recently, nanomedicine has received increasing attention for its ability to improve the efficacy of cancer therapeutics. Nanosized polymer therapeutic agents offer the advantage of prolonged circulation in the blood stream, targeting to specific sites, improved efficacy and reduced side effects. In this way, local, controlled delivery of the drug will be achieved with the advantage of a high concentration of drug release at the target site while keeping the systemic concentration of the drug low, thus reducing side effects due to bioaccumulation. Various drug delivery systems such as nanoparticles, liposomes, microparticles and implants have been demonstrated to significantly enhance the preventive/therapeutic efficacy of many drugs by increasing their bioavailability and targetability. As these carriers significantly increase the therapeutic effect of drugs, their administration would become less cost effective in the near future. The purpose of our research work is to develop a delivery system for breast cancer cells using a microvector of drugs. These results highlight the potential uses of these responsive platforms suited for biomedical and pharmaceutical applications. At the request of all authors of the paper an updated version was published on 12 July 2016. The manuscript was prepared and submitted without Dr. Francesca Cavalieri's contribution and her name was added without her consent. Her name has been removed in the updated and re-published article.

  20. Tuberculosis chemotherapy: current drug delivery approaches

    PubMed Central

    du Toit, Lisa Claire; Pillay, Viness; Danckwerts, Michael Paul

    2006-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a leading killer of young adults worldwide and the global scourge of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis is reaching epidemic proportions. It is endemic in most developing countries and resurgent in developed and developing countries with high rates of human immunodeficiency virus infection. This article reviews the current situation in terms of drug delivery approaches for tuberculosis chemotherapy. A number of novel implant-, microparticulate-, and various other carrier-based drug delivery systems incorporating the principal anti-tuberculosis agents have been fabricated that either target the site of tuberculosis infection or reduce the dosing frequency with the aim of improving patient outcomes. These developments in drug delivery represent attractive options with significant merit, however, there is a requisite to manufacture an oral system, which directly addresses issues of unacceptable rifampicin bioavailability in fixed-dose combinations. This is fostered by the need to deliver medications to patients more efficiently and with fewer side effects, especially in developing countries. The fabrication of a polymeric once-daily oral multiparticulate fixed-dose combination of the principal anti-tuberculosis drugs, which attains segregated delivery of rifampicin and isoniazid for improved rifampicin bioavailability, could be a step in the right direction in addressing issues of treatment failure due to patient non-compliance. PMID:16984627

  1. Intranasal microemulsion for targeted nose to brain delivery in neurocysticercosis: Role of docosahexaenoic acid.

    PubMed

    Shinde, Rajshree L; Bharkad, Gopal P; Devarajan, Padma V

    2015-10-01

    Intranasal Microemulsions (MEs) for nose to brain delivery of a novel combination of Albendazole sulfoxide (ABZ-SO) and Curcumin (CUR) for Neurocysticercosis (NCC), a brain infection are reported. MEs prepared by simple solution exhibited a globule size <20nm, negative zeta potential and good stability. The docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) ME revealed high and rapid ex vivo permeation of drugs through sheep nasal mucosa. Intranasal DHA ME resulted in high brain concentrations and 10.76 (ABZ-SO) and 3.24 (CUR) fold enhancement in brain area-under-the-curve (AUC) compared to intravenous DHA MEs at the same dose. Direct nose to brain transport (DTP) of >95% was seen for both drugs. High drug targeting efficiency (DTE) to the brain compared to Capmul ME and drug solution (P<0.05) suggested the role of DHA in aiding nose to brain delivery. Histopathology study confirmed no significant changes. High efficacy of ABZ-SO: CUR (100:10ng/mL) DHA ME in vitro on Taenia solium cysts was confirmed by complete ALP inhibition and disintegration of cysts at 96h. Considering that the brain concentration at 24h was 1400±160.1ng/g (ABZ-SO) and 120±35.2ng/g (CUR), the in vitro efficacy seen at a 10 fold lower concentration of the drugs strongly supports the assumption of clinical efficacy. The intranasal DHA ME is a promising delivery system for targeted nose to brain delivery.

  2. Ingestion of drugs by "parachuting": a unique drug delivery technique.

    PubMed

    Kenerson, Katherine L; Lear-Kaul, Kelly C

    2012-06-01

    "Parachuting" is a technique of drug delivery where medications or illicit drugs are ingested by wrapping the drug of choice in a covering, which then will dissolve or unravel in the gastrointestinal tract, thereby releasing the drug for absorption. Parachuting of drugs can entail crushing of a pill prior to packaging to theoretically increase the surface area for absorption or may involve the packaging of a higher than usual dose of a drug in attempts to attain a sustained-release effect as the "parachute" dissolves or unravels. A case is presented in which a prescription drug abuser known to parachute his medications dies from obstruction of his airway by the inhaled packet. Risks of parachuting any drug would include overdose and fatal toxic effect from the drug itself and adverse effects from the packaging including bowel obstruction or perforation, or airway obstruction.

  3. Drug delivery applications with ethosomes.

    PubMed

    Ainbinder, D; Paolino, D; Fresta, M; Touitou, E

    2010-10-01

    Ethosomes are specially tailored vesicular carriers able to efficiently deliver various molecules with different physicochemical properties into deep skin layers and across the skin. This paper reviews the unique characteristics of the ethosomal carriers, focusing on work carried out with drug containing ethosomal systems in animal models and in clinical studies. The paper concludes with a discussion on the safety of the ethosomal system applications.

  4. Biodegradable Hybrid Stomatocyte Nanomotors for Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Tu, Yingfeng; Peng, Fei; André, Alain A M; Men, Yongjun; Srinivas, Mangala; Wilson, Daniela A

    2017-02-28

    We report the self-assembly of a biodegradable platinum nanoparticle-loaded stomatocyte nanomotor containing both PEG-b-PCL and PEG-b-PS as a potential candidate for anticancer drug delivery. Well-defined stomatocyte structures could be formed even after incorporation of 50% PEG-b-PCL polymer. Demixing of the two polymers was expected at high percentage of semicrystalline poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL), resulting in PCL domain formation onto the membrane due to different properties of two polymers. The biodegradable motor system was further shown to move directionally with speeds up to 39 μm/s by converting chemical fuel, hydrogen peroxide, into mechanical motion as well as rapidly delivering the drug to the targeted cancer cell. Uptake by cancer cells and fast doxorubicin drug release was demonstrated during the degradation of the motor system. Such biodegradable nanomotors provide a convenient and efficient platform for the delivery and controlled release of therapeutic drugs.

  5. Biodegradable Hybrid Stomatocyte Nanomotors for Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    We report the self-assembly of a biodegradable platinum nanoparticle-loaded stomatocyte nanomotor containing both PEG-b-PCL and PEG-b-PS as a potential candidate for anticancer drug delivery. Well-defined stomatocyte structures could be formed even after incorporation of 50% PEG-b-PCL polymer. Demixing of the two polymers was expected at high percentage of semicrystalline poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL), resulting in PCL domain formation onto the membrane due to different properties of two polymers. The biodegradable motor system was further shown to move directionally with speeds up to 39 μm/s by converting chemical fuel, hydrogen peroxide, into mechanical motion as well as rapidly delivering the drug to the targeted cancer cell. Uptake by cancer cells and fast doxorubicin drug release was demonstrated during the degradation of the motor system. Such biodegradable nanomotors provide a convenient and efficient platform for the delivery and controlled release of therapeutic drugs. PMID:28187254

  6. Nanotechnology: a focus on nanoparticles as a drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Kingsley, Jeffrey D; Dou, Huanyu; Morehead, Justin; Rabinow, Barrett; Gendelman, Howard E; Destache, Christopher J

    2006-09-01

    This review will provide an in-depth discussion on the previous development of nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems (DDS) and discuss original research data that includes the therapeutic enhancement of antiretroviral therapy. The use of nanoparticle DDS will allow practitioners to use drugs to target specific areas of the body. In the treatment of malignancies, the use of nanoparticles as a DDS is making measurable treatment impact. Medical imaging will also utilize DDS to illuminate tumors, the brain, or other cellular functions in the body. The utility of nanoparticle DDS to improve human health is potentially enormous.

  7. Role of nanomedicines in delivery of anti-acetylcholinesterase compounds to the brain in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Mohammad Z; Ahmad, Javed; Amin, Saima; Rahman, Mahfoozur; Anwar, Mohammad; Mallick, Neha; Ahmad, Farhan J; Rahman, Ziyaur; Kamal, Mohammad A; Akhter, Sohail

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a multifarious progressive neuro-degenerative state among elders. Potentiation of central cholinergic activity by using acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEI) is considered as one of the major pharmacological means for the management of AD. Investigation in the past and the rest decades revealed that many drugs with anti-AD activity, including the AChEI have been discovered from natural and synthetic origin but getting success in their brain delivery is still limited. However, barriers like blood-brain barrier, blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier and p-glycoproteins restrict the effective and safe drug delivery to the brain in patients with AD. Advancement in nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems over the last decade exemplifies the effective drug delivery and targeting to the brain with controlled rate in various diseases including AD. Till recently, diverse kinds of nanomedicines for targeting of the anti-AD drugs in brain are being studied. In this review, we have highlighted the recent progress in AChEI, challenges in their effective brain delivery (physicochemical properties and biological barriers) and possible nanotechnology-based strategies that can deliver drugs across the CNS barriers during AD.

  8. Vaginal drug delivery systems for HIV prevention.

    PubMed

    Rohan, Lisa Cencia; Sassi, Alexandra B

    2009-03-01

    Microbicides have become a principal focus for HIV prevention strategies. The successful design of drug delivery systems for vaginal microbicide drug candidates brings with it a multitude of challenges. It is imperative that the chemical and physical characteristics of the drug candidate and its mechanism of action be clearly understood and considered to successfully deliver and target drug candidates efficiently. In addition, an understanding of the dynamic nature of the vaginal environment, the tissue and innate barriers present, as well as patient preferences are critical considerations in the design of effective microbicide products. Although the majority of drug candidates clinically evaluated to date have been delivered using conventional semisolid aqueous-based gel dosage forms, drug delivery system design has recently been extended to include advanced delivery systems such as vaginal rings, quick-dissolve films, and tablets. Ultimately, it may be necessary to develop multiple dosage platforms for a single active agent to provide users with options that can be used within the constraints of their social environment, personal choice, and environmental conditions.

  9. Optically generated ultrasound for enhanced drug delivery

    DOEpatents

    Visuri, Steven R.; Campbell, Heather L.; Da Silva, Luiz

    2002-01-01

    High frequency acoustic waves, analogous to ultrasound, can enhance the delivery of therapeutic compounds into cells. The compounds delivered may be chemotherapeutic drugs, antibiotics, photodynamic drugs or gene therapies. The therapeutic compounds are administered systemically, or preferably locally to the targeted site. Local delivery can be accomplished through a needle, cannula, or through a variety of vascular catheters, depending on the location of routes of access. To enhance the systemic or local delivery of the therapeutic compounds, high frequency acoustic waves are generated locally near the target site, and preferably near the site of compound administration. The acoustic waves are produced via laser radiation interaction with an absorbing media and can be produced via thermoelastic expansion, thermodynamic vaporization, material ablation, or plasma formation. Acoustic waves have the effect of temporarily permeabilizing the membranes of local cells, increasing the diffusion of the therapeutic compound into the cells, allowing for decreased total body dosages, decreased side effects, and enabling new therapies.

  10. Recent Perspectives in Ocular Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Gaudana, Ripal; Jwala, J.; Boddu, Sai H. S.; Mitra, Ashim K.

    2015-01-01

    Anatomy and physiology of the eye makes it a highly protected organ. Designing an effective therapy for ocular diseases, especially for the posterior segment, has been considered as a formidable task. Limitations of topical and intravitreal route of administration have challenged scientists to find alternative mode of administration like periocular routes. Transporter targeted drug delivery has generated a great deal of interest in the field because of its potential to overcome many barriers associated with current therapy. Application of nanotechnology has been very promising in the treatment of a gamut of diseases. In this review, we have briefly discussed several ocular drug delivery systems such as microemulsions, nanosuspensions, nanoparticles, liposomes, niosomes, dendrimers, implants, and hydrogels. Potential for ocular gene therapy has also been described in this article. In near future, a great deal of attention will be paid to develop non-invasive sustained drug release for both anterior and posterior segment eye disorders. A better understanding of nature of ocular diseases, barriers and factors affecting in vivo performance, would greatly drive the development of new delivery systems. Current momentum in the invention of new drug delivery systems hold a promise towards much improved therapies for the treatment of vision threatening disorders. PMID:18758924

  11. Drug Delivery for Peripheral Nerve Regeneration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-01

    Gale)(months 0-1) b. Optimize nanoporous membrane dimensions ......................(Gale...kinetics of NGF in vitro using our novel drug delivery conduit Material Fabrication The proposed device consists of two concentric tubes, a reservoir...suctioning of material into the conduits, any excess PLGA was allowed to drip out of the molds. The conduits were then placed vertically into a water

  12. Drug delivery strategies for poorly water-soluble drugs.

    PubMed

    Fahr, Alfred; Liu, Xiangli

    2007-07-01

    The drug candidates coming from combinatorial chemistry research and/or the drugs selected from biologically based high-throughput screening are quite often very lipophilic, as these drug candidates exert their pharmacological action at or in biological membranes or membrane-associated proteins. This challenges drug delivery institutions in industry or academia to develop carrier systems for the optimal oral and parenteral administration of these drugs. To mention only a few of the challenges for this class of drugs: their oral bioavailability is poor and highly variable, and carrier development for parenteral administration is faced with problems, including the massive use of surface-active excipients for solubilisation. Formulation specialists are confronted with an even higher level of difficulties when these drugs have to be delivered site specifically. This article addresses the emerging formulation designs for delivering of poorly water-soluble drugs.

  13. Mucoadhesive drug delivery system: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Boddupalli, Bindu M.; Mohammed, Zulkar N. K.; Nath, Ravinder A.; Banji, David

    2010-01-01

    Mucoadhesive drug delivery systems interact with the mucus layer covering the mucosal epithelial surface, and mucin molecules and increase the residence time of the dosage form at the site of absorption. The drugs which have local action or those which have maximum absorption in gastrointestinal tract (GIT) require increased duration of stay in GIT. Thus, mucoadhesive dosage forms are advantageous in increasing the drug plasma concentrations and also therapeutic activity. In this regard, this review covers the areas of mechanisms and theories of mucoadhesion, factors influencing the mucoadhesive devices and also various mucoadhesive dosage forms. PMID:22247877

  14. Advanced materials and nanotechnology for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Yan, Li; Yang, Yang; Zhang, Wenjun; Chen, Xianfeng

    2014-08-20

    Many biological barriers are of great importance. For example, stratum corneum, the outmost layer of skin, effectively protects people from being invaded by external microorganisms such as bacteria and viruses. Cell membranes help organisms maintain homeostasis by controlling substances to enter and leave cells. However, on the other hand, these biological barriers seriously restrict drug delivery. For instance, stratum corneum has a very dense structure and only allows very small molecules with a molecular weight of below 500 Da to permeate whereas most drug molecules are much larger than that. A wide variety of drugs including genes needs to enter cells for proper functioning but cell membranes are not permeable to them. To overcome these biological barriers, many drug-delivery routes are being actively researched and developed. In this research news, we will focus on two advanced materials and nanotechnology approaches for delivering vaccines through the skin for painless and efficient immunization and transporting drug molecules to cross cell membranes for high-throughput intracellular delivery. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Structural DNA nanotechnology for intelligent drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Chao, Jie; Liu, Huajie; Su, Shao; Wang, Lianhui; Huang, Wei; Fan, Chunhai

    2014-11-01

    Drug delivery carriers have been popularly employed to improve solubility, stability, and efficacy of chemical and biomolecular drugs. Despite the rapid progress in this field, it remains a great challenge to develop an ideal carrier with minimal cytotoxicity, high biocompatibility and intelligence for targeted controlled release. The emergence of DNA nanotechnology offers unprecedented opportunities in this regard. Due to the unparalleled self-recognition properties of DNA molecules, it is possible to create numerous artificial DNA nanostructures with well-defined structures and DNA nanodevices with precisely controlled motions. More importantly, recent studies have proven that DNA nanostructures possess greater permeability to the membrane barrier of cells, which pave the way to developing new drug delivery carriers with nucleic acids, are summarized. In this Concept, recent advances on the design and fabrication of both static and dynamic DNA nanostructures, and the use of these nanostructures for the delivery of various types of drugs, are highlighted. It is also demonstrated that dynamic DNA nanostructures provide the required intelligence to realize logically controlled drug release. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Oral transmucosal drug delivery for pediatric use.

    PubMed

    Lam, Jenny K W; Xu, Yingying; Worsley, Alan; Wong, Ian C K

    2014-06-01

    The formulation of medicines for children remains a challenge. An ideal pediatric formulation must allow accurate dose administration and be in a dosage form that can be handled by the target age group. It is also important to consider the choices and the amount of excipients used in the formulation for this vulnerable age group. Although oral formulations are generally acceptable to most pediatric patients, they are not suitable for drugs with poor oral bioavailability or when a rapid clinical effect is required. In recent years, oral transmucosal delivery has emerged as an attractive route of administration for pediatric patients. With this route of administration, a drug is absorbed through the oral mucosa, therefore bypassing hepatic first pass metabolism and thus avoiding drug degradation or metabolism in the gastrointestinal tract. The high blood flow and relatively high permeability of the oral mucosa allow a quick onset of action to be achieved. It is a simple and non-invasive route of drug administration. However, there are several barriers that need to be overcome in the development of oral transmucosal products. This article aims to provide a comprehensive review of the current development of oral transmucosal delivery specifically for the pediatric population in order to achieve systemic drug delivery. The anatomical and physiological properties of the oral mucosa of infants and young children are carefully examined. The different dosage forms and formulation strategies that are suitable for young patients are discussed.

  17. Chitosan magnetic nanoparticles for drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Assa, Farnaz; Jafarizadeh-Malmiri, Hoda; Ajamein, Hossein; Vaghari, Hamideh; Anarjan, Navideh; Ahmadi, Omid; Berenjian, Aydin

    2017-06-01

    The potential of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in drug delivery systems (DDSs) is mainly related to its magnetic core and surface coating. These coatings can eliminate or minimize their aggregation under physiological conditions. Also, they can provide functional groups for bioconjugation to anticancer drugs and/or targeted ligands. Chitosan, as a derivative of chitin, is an attractive natural biopolymer from renewable resources with the presence of reactive amino and hydroxyl functional groups in its structure. Chitosan nanoparticles (NPs), due to their huge surface to volume ratio as compared to the chitosan in its bulk form, have outstanding physico-chemical, antimicrobial and biological properties. These unique properties make chitosan NPs a promising biopolymer for the application of DDSs. In this review, the current state and challenges for the application magnetic chitosan NPs in drug delivery systems were investigated. The present review also revisits the limitations and commercial impediments to provide insight for future works.

  18. Mucoadhesive polymeric platforms for controlled drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Gavin P; Laverty, Thomas P; Jones, David S

    2009-03-01

    The process of mucoadhesion involving a polymeric drug delivery platform is a complex one that includes wetting, adsorption and interpenetration of polymer chains amongst various other processes. The success and degree of mucoadhesion bonding is influenced by various polymer-based properties such as the degree of cross-linking, chain length and the presence of various functional groupings. The attractiveness of mucosal-targeted controlled drug delivery of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), has led formulation scientists to engineer numerous polymeric systems for such tasks. Formulation scientists have at their disposal a range of in vitro and in vivo mucoadhesion testing setups in order to select candidate adhesive drug delivery platforms. As such, mucoadhesive systems have found wide use throughout many mucosal covered organelles for API delivery for local or systemic effect. Evolution of such mucoadhesive formulations has transgressed from first-generation charged hydrophilic polymer networks to more specific second-generation systems based on lectin, thiol and various other adhesive functional groups.

  19. A survey on the applications of implantable micropump systems in drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Mahnama, Ali; Nourbakhsh, Ahmad; Ghorbaniasl, Ghader

    2014-01-01

    Systemic drug delivery is the most prevalent form of the drug administration; but it is not possible to extend this approach to all of diseases. In the traditional approaches of drug delivery, the drug spreads through whole of body and this could cause severe side effects in the healthy parts. In addition, in some parts of our body like the eye, ear and brain, there are biological barriers against drug penetration which made drug delivery to these organs as a challenging work. Micropumps are one of the MEMS based devices with great capabilities in controlled drug administration. The most prevalent application of micropumps in drug delivery is known as continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) for diabetic patients; but our study showed that there are some other ongoing investigations to extend application of micropumps in new treatment methods for some incurred diseases.

  20. Drug delivery optimization through Bayesian networks.

    PubMed Central

    Bellazzi, R.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes how Bayesian Networks can be used in combination with compartmental models to plan Recombinant Human Erythropoietin (r-HuEPO) delivery in the treatment of anemia of chronic uremic patients. Past measurements of hematocrit or hemoglobin concentration in a patient during the therapy can be exploited to adjust the parameters of a compartmental model of the erythropoiesis. This adaptive process allows more accurate patient-specific predictions, and hence a more rational dosage planning. We describe a drug delivery optimization protocol, based on our approach. Some results obtained on real data are presented. PMID:1482938

  1. Mucoadhesive in situ nasal gelling drug delivery systems for modulated drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Singh, Reena M P; Kumar, Anil; Pathak, Kamla

    2013-01-01

    The nasal route is an attractive target for administration of the drug of choice, particularly in overcoming disadvantages such as high first-pass metabolism and drug degradation in the gastrointestinal environment that are associated with the oral and other modes of administration. The major limitation associated is of rapid mucociliary clearance in the nasal delivery that results in low absorption and hence poor bioavailability. In order to overcome this, mucoadhesive in situ nasal gelling drug delivery systems have been explored to develop sustained/controlled delivery via nasal route. The present review critically evaluates the importance of in situ gel for the nasal delivery of drugs, and the polymers used in the formulation of in situ gel along with their mechanism of gelation. It also encompasses the research reports made in this arena of delivery system. The challenges of drug delivery through nose has led to development of in situ nasal gelling systems using a myriad of polymers to deliver the drugs, proteins, amino acids, hormones, vaccines and plasmid DNA for the local, systemic and central nervous system effects. Though a range of preclinical reports are available, clinical intricacies need to be critically worked out.

  2. Multifunctional High Drug Loading Nanocarriers for Cancer Drug Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Erlei

    2011-12-01

    Most anticancer drugs have poor water-solubility, rapid blood clearance, low tumor-selectivity and severe systemic toxicity to healthy tissues. Thus, polymeric nanocarriers have been widely explored for anticancer drugs to solve these problems. However, polymer nanocarriers developed to date still suffer drawbacks including low drug loading contents, premature drug release, slow cellular internalization, slow intracellular drug release and thereby low therapeutic efficiency in cancer thermotherapy. Accordingly, in this dissertation, functional nanocapsules and nanoparticles including high drug loading liposome-like nanocapsules, high drug loading phospholipid-mimic nanocapsules with fast intracellular drug release, high drug loading charge-reversal nanocapsules, TAT based long blood circulation nanoparticles and charge-reversal nuclear targeted nanoparticles are designed and synthesized. These functional carriers have advantages such as high drug loading contents without premature drug release, fast cellular internalization and intracellular drug release, nuclear targeted delivery and long blood circulation. As a result, all these drug carriers show much higher in vitro and in vivo anti-cancer activities.

  3. Insights into direct nose to brain delivery: current status and future perspective.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Deepti; Ali, Asgar; Md, Shadab; Baboota, Sanjula; Sahni, Jasjeet K; Ali, Javed

    2014-03-01

    Now a day's intranasal (i.n) drug delivery is emerging as a reliable method to bypass the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and deliver a wide range of therapeutic agents including both small and large molecules, growth factors, viral vectors and even stem cells to the brain and has shown therapeutic effects in both animals and humans. This route involves the olfactory or trigeminal nerve systems which initiate in the brain and terminate in the nasal cavity at the olfactory neuroepithelium or respiratory epithelium. They are the only externally exposed portions of the central nervous system (CNS) and therefore represent the most direct method of noninvasive entry into the brain. This approach has been primarily used to explore therapeutic avenues for neurological diseases. The potential for treatment possibilities with olfactory transfer of drugs will increase as more effective formulations and delivery devices are developed. Recently, the apomorphine hydrochloride dry powders have been developed for i.n. delivery (Apomorphine nasal, Lyonase technology, Britannia Pharmaceuticals, Surrey, UK). The results of clinical trial Phase III suggested that the prepared formulation had clinical effect equivalent to subcutaneously administered apomorphine. In coming years, intranasal delivery of drugs will demand more complex and automated delivery devices to ensure accurate and repeatable dosing. Thus, new efforts are needed to make this noninvasive route of delivery more efficient and popular, and it is also predicted that in future a range of intranasal products will be used in diagnosis as well as treatment of CNS diseases. This review will embark the existing evidence of nose-to-brain transport. It also provides insights into the most relevant pre-clinical studies of direct nose-brain delivery and delivery devices which will provide relative success of intranasal delivery system. We have, herein, outlined the relevant aspects of CNS drugs given intranasally to direct the brain in

  4. Ultrasound-Mediated Polymeric Micelle Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Xia, Hesheng; Zhao, Yue; Tong, Rui

    2016-01-01

    The synthesis of multi-functional nanocarriers and the design of new stimuli-responsive means are equally important for drug delivery. Ultrasound can be used as a remote, non-invasive and controllable trigger for the stimuli-responsive release of nanocarriers. Polymeric micelles are one kind of potential drug nanocarrier. By combining ultrasound and polymeric micelles, a new modality (i.e., ultrasound-mediated polymeric micelle drug delivery) has been developed and has recently received increasing attention. A major challenge remaining in developing ultrasound-responsive polymeric micelles is the improvement of the sensitivity or responsiveness of polymeric micelles to ultrasound. This chapter reviews the recent advance in this field. In order to understand the interaction mechanism between ultrasound stimulus and polymeric micelles, ultrasound effects, such as thermal effect, cavitation effect, ultrasound sonochemistry (including ultrasonic degradation, ultrasound-initiated polymerization, ultrasonic in-situ polymerization and ultrasound site-specific degradation), as well as basic micellar knowledge are introduced. Ultrasound-mediated polymeric micelle drug delivery has been classified into two main streams based on the different interaction mechanism between ultrasound and polymeric micelles; one is based on the ultrasound-induced physical disruption of the micelle and reversible release of payload. The other is based on micellar ultrasound mechanochemical disruption and irreversible release of payload.

  5. ATP-triggered anticancer drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Ran; Jiang, Tianyue; Disanto, Rocco; Tai, Wanyi; Gu, Zhen

    2014-03-01

    Stimuli-triggered drug delivery systems have been increasingly used to promote physiological specificity and on-demand therapeutic efficacy of anticancer drugs. Here we utilize adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) as a trigger for the controlled release of anticancer drugs. We demonstrate that polymeric nanocarriers functionalized with an ATP-binding aptamer-incorporated DNA motif can selectively release the intercalating doxorubicin via a conformational switch when in an ATP-rich environment. The half-maximal inhibitory concentration of ATP-responsive nanovehicles is 0.24 μM in MDA-MB-231 cells, a 3.6-fold increase in the cytotoxicity compared with that of non-ATP-responsive nanovehicles. Equipped with an outer shell crosslinked by hyaluronic acid, a specific tumour-targeting ligand, the ATP-responsive nanocarriers present an improvement in the chemotherapeutic inhibition of tumour growth using xenograft MDA-MB-231 tumour-bearing mice. This ATP-triggered drug release system provides a more sophisticated drug delivery system, which can differentiate ATP levels to facilitate the selective release of drugs.

  6. Drug Delivery Nanoparticles in Skin Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Dianzani, Chiara; Zara, Gian Paolo; Maina, Giovanni; Pettazzoni, Piergiorgio; Pizzimenti, Stefania; Rossi, Federica; Gigliotti, Casimiro Luca; Ciamporcero, Eric Stefano; Daga, Martina; Barrera, Giuseppina

    2014-01-01

    Nanotechnology involves the engineering of functional systems at nanoscale, thus being attractive for disciplines ranging from materials science to biomedicine. One of the most active research areas of the nanotechnology is nanomedicine, which applies nanotechnology to highly specific medical interventions for prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases, including cancer disease. Over the past two decades, the rapid developments in nanotechnology have allowed the incorporation of multiple therapeutic, sensing, and targeting agents into nanoparticles, for detection, prevention, and treatment of cancer diseases. Nanoparticles offer many advantages as drug carrier systems since they can improve the solubility of poorly water-soluble drugs, modify pharmacokinetics, increase drug half-life by reducing immunogenicity, improve bioavailability, and diminish drug metabolism. They can also enable a tunable release of therapeutic compounds and the simultaneous delivery of two or more drugs for combination therapy. In this review, we discuss the recent advances in the use of different types of nanoparticles for systemic and topical drug delivery in the treatment of skin cancer. In particular, the progress in the treatment with nanocarriers of basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and melanoma has been reported. PMID:25101298

  7. Limited Efficiency of Drug Delivery to Specific Intracellular Organelles Using Subcellularly "Targeted" Drug Delivery Systems.

    PubMed

    Maity, Amit Ranjan; Stepensky, David

    2016-01-04

    Many drugs have been designed to act on intracellular targets and to affect intracellular processes inside target cells. For the desired effects to be exerted, these drugs should permeate target cells and reach specific intracellular organelles. This subcellular drug targeting approach has been proposed for enhancement of accumulation of these drugs in target organelles and improved efficiency. This approach is based on drug encapsulation in drug delivery systems (DDSs) and/or their decoration with specific targeting moieties that are intended to enhance the drug/DDS accumulation in the intracellular organelle of interest. During recent years, there has been a constant increase in interest in DDSs targeted to specific intracellular organelles, and many different approaches have been proposed for attaining efficient drug delivery to specific organelles of interest. However, it appears that in many studies insufficient efforts have been devoted to quantitative analysis of the major formulation parameters of the DDSs disposition (efficiency of DDS endocytosis and endosomal escape, intracellular trafficking, and efficiency of DDS delivery to the target organelle) and of the resulting pharmacological effects. Thus, in many cases, claims regarding efficient delivery of drug/DDS to a specific organelle and efficient subcellular targeting appear to be exaggerated. On the basis of the available experimental data, it appears that drugs/DDS decoration with specific targeting residues can affect their intracellular fate and result in preferential drug accumulation within an organelle of interest. However, it is not clear whether these approaches will be efficient in in vivo settings and be translated into preclinical and clinical applications. Studies that quantitatively assess the mechanisms, barriers, and efficiencies of subcellular drug delivery and of the associated toxic effects are required to determine the therapeutic potential of subcellular DDS targeting.

  8. Transdermal drug delivery: from micro to nano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pegoraro, Carla; MacNeil, Sheila; Battaglia, Giuseppe

    2012-03-01

    Delivery across skin offers many advantages compared to oral or intravenous routes of drug administration. Skin however is highly impermeable to most molecules on the basis of size, hydrophilicity, lipophilicity and charge. For this reason it is often necessary to temporarily alter the barrier properties of skin for effective administration. This can be done by applying chemical enhancers, which alter the lipid structure of the top layer of skin (the stratum corneum, SC), by applying external forces such as electric currents and ultrasounds, by bypassing the stratum corneum via minimally invasive microneedles or by using nano-delivery vehicles that can cross and deliver their payload to the deeper layers of skin. Here we present a critical summary of the latest technologies used to increase transdermal delivery.

  9. Drug development in Parkinson's disease: from emerging molecules to innovative drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Garbayo, E; Ansorena, E; Blanco-Prieto, M J

    2013-11-01

    Current treatments for Parkinson's disease (PD) are aimed at addressing motor symptoms but there is no therapy focused on modifying the course of the disease. Successful treatment strategies have been so far limited and brain drug delivery remains a major challenge that restricts its treatment. This review provides an overview of the most promising emerging agents in the field of PD drug discovery, discussing improvements that have been made in brain drug delivery for PD. It will be shown that new approaches able to extend the length of the treatment, to release the drug in a continuous manner or to cross the blood-brain barrier and target a specific region are still needed. Overall, the results reviewed here show that there is an urgent need to develop both symptomatic and disease-modifying treatments, giving priority to neuroprotective treatments. Promising perspectives are being provided in this field by rasagiline and by neurotrophic factors like glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor. The identification of disease-relevant genes has also encouraged the search for disease-modifying therapies that function by identifying molecularly targeted drugs. The advent of new molecular and cellular targets like α-synuclein, leucine-rich repeat serine/threonine protein kinase 2 or parkin, among others, will require innovative delivery therapies. In this regard, drug delivery systems (DDS) have shown great potential for improving the efficacy of conventional and new PD therapy and reducing its side effects. The new DDS discussed here, which include microparticles, nanoparticles and hydrogels among others, will probably open up possibilities that extend beyond symptomatic relief. However, further work needs to be done before DDS become a therapeutic option for PD patients.

  10. Biomimetics in drug delivery systems: A critical review.

    PubMed

    Sheikhpour, Mojgan; Barani, Leila; Kasaeian, Alibakhsh

    2017-03-18

    Today, the advanced drug delivery systems have been focused on targeted drug delivery fields. The novel drug delivery is involved with the improvement of the capacity of drug loading in drug carriers, cellular uptake of drug carriers, and the sustained release of drugs within target cells. In this review, six groups of therapeutic drug carriers including biomimetic hydrogels, biomimetic micelles, biomimetic liposomes, biomimetic dendrimers, biomimetic polymeric carriers and biomimetic nanostructures, are studied. The subject takes advantage of the biomimetic methods of productions or the biomimetic techniques for the surface modifications, similar to what accrues in natural cells. Moreover, the effects of these biomimetic approaches for promoting the drug efficiency in targeted drug delivery are visible. The study demonstrates that the fabrication of biomimetic nanocomposite drug carriers could noticeably promote the efficiency of drugs in targeted drug delivery systems.

  11. Intranasal agomelatine solid lipid nanoparticles to enhance brain delivery: formulation, optimization and in vivo pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Fatouh, Ahmed M; Elshafeey, Ahmed H; Abdelbary, Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    Agomelatine is a novel antidepressant drug suffering from an extensive first-pass metabolism leading to a diminished absolute bioavailability. The aim of the study is: first to enhance its absolute bioavailability, and second to increase its brain delivery. To achieve these aims, the nasal route was adopted to exploit first its avoidance of the hepatic first-pass metabolism to increase the absolute bioavailability, and second the direct nose-to-brain pathway to enhance the brain drug delivery. Solid lipid nanoparticles were selected as a drug delivery system to enhance agomelatine permeability across the blood-brain barrier and therefore its brain delivery. The optimum solid lipid nanoparticles have a particle size of 167.70 nm ±0.42, zeta potential of -17.90 mV ±2.70, polydispersity index of 0.12±0.10, entrapment efficiency % of 91.25%±1.70%, the percentage released after 1 h of 35.40%±1.13% and the percentage released after 8 h of 80.87%±5.16%. The pharmacokinetic study of the optimized solid lipid nanoparticles revealed a significant increase in each of the plasma peak concentration, the AUC(0-360 min) and the absolute bioavailability compared to that of the oral suspension of Valdoxan(®) with the values of 759.00 ng/mL, 7,805.69 ng⋅min/mL and 44.44%, respectively. The optimized solid lipid nanoparticles gave a drug-targeting efficiency of 190.02, which revealed more successful brain targeting by the intranasal route compared with the intravenous route. The optimized solid lipid nanoparticles had a direct transport percentage of 47.37, which indicates a significant contribution of the direct nose-to-brain pathway in the brain drug delivery. The intranasal administration of agomelatine solid lipid nanoparticles has effectively enhanced both the absolute bioavailability and the brain delivery of agomelatine.

  12. Viruses as nanomaterials for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Lockney, Dustin; Franzen, Stefan; Lommel, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Virus delivery vectors are one among the many nanomaterials that are being developed as drug delivery materials. This chapter focuses on methods utilizing plant virus nanoparticles (PVNs) synthesized from the Red clover necrotic mosaic virus (RCNMV). A successful vector must be able to effectively carry and subsequently deliver a drug cargo to a specific target. In the case of the PVNs, we describe two types of ways cargo can be loaded within these structures: encapsidation and infusion. Several targeting approaches have been used for PVNs based on bioconjugate chemistry. Herein, examples of such approaches will be given that have been used for RCNMV as well as for other PVNs in the literature. Further, we describe characterization of PVNs, in vitro cell studies that can be used to test the efficacy of a targeting vector, and potential routes for animal administration.

  13. Nanotechnology Approaches for Ocular Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qingguo; Kambhampati, Siva P.; Kannan, Rangaramanujam M.

    2013-01-01

    Blindness is a major health concern worldwide that has a powerful impact on afflicted individuals and their families, and is associated with enormous socio-economical consequences. The Middle East is heavily impacted by blindness, and the problem there is augmented by an increasing incidence of diabetes in the population. An appropriate drug/gene delivery system that can sustain and deliver therapeutics to the target tissues and cells is a key need for ocular therapies. The application of nanotechnology in medicine is undergoing rapid progress, and the recent developments in nanomedicine-based therapeutic approaches may bring significant benefits to address the leading causes of blindness associated with cataract, glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy and retinal degeneration. In this brief review, we highlight some promising nanomedicine-based therapeutic approaches for drug and gene delivery to the anterior and posterior segments. PMID:23580849

  14. Diatomite silica nanoparticles for drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggiero, Immacolata; Terracciano, Monica; Martucci, Nicola M.; De Stefano, Luca; Migliaccio, Nunzia; Tatè, Rosarita; Rendina, Ivo; Arcari, Paolo; Lamberti, Annalisa; Rea, Ilaria

    2014-07-01

    Diatomite is a natural fossil material of sedimentary origin, constituted by fragments of diatom siliceous skeletons. In this preliminary work, the properties of diatomite nanoparticles as potential system for the delivery of drugs in cancer cells were exploited. A purification procedure, based on thermal treatments in strong acid solutions, was used to remove inorganic and organic impurities from diatomite and to make them a safe material for medical applications. The micrometric diatomite powder was reduced in nanoparticles by mechanical crushing, sonication, and filtering. Morphological analysis performed by dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy reveals a particles size included between 100 and 300 nm. Diatomite nanoparticles were functionalized by 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane and labeled by tetramethylrhodamine isothiocyanate. Different concentrations of chemically modified nanoparticles were incubated with cancer cells and confocal microscopy was performed. Imaging analysis showed an efficient cellular uptake and homogeneous distribution of nanoparticles in cytoplasm and nucleus, thus suggesting their potentiality as nanocarriers for drug delivery.

  15. Inhalation drug delivery devices: technology update

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Mariam; Verma, Rahul; Garcia-Contreras, Lucila

    2015-01-01

    The pulmonary route of administration has proven to be effective in local and systemic delivery of miscellaneous drugs and biopharmaceuticals to treat pulmonary and non-pulmonary diseases. A successful pulmonary administration requires a harmonic interaction between the drug formulation, the inhaler device, and the patient. However, the biggest single problem that accounts for the lack of desired effect or adverse outcomes is the incorrect use of the device due to lack of training in how to use the device or how to coordinate actuation and aerosol inhalation. This review summarizes the structural and mechanical features of aerosol delivery devices with respect to mechanisms of aerosol generation, their use with different formulations, and their advantages and limitations. A technological update of the current state-of-the-art designs proposed to overcome current challenges of existing devices is also provided. PMID:25709510

  16. Advanced drug delivery approaches against periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Deeksha; Garg, Tarun; Goyal, Amit K; Rath, Goutam

    2016-01-01

    Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease of gums involving the degeneration of periodontal ligaments, creation of periodontal pocket and resorption of alveolar bone, resulting in the disruption of the support structure of teeth. According to WHO, 10-15% of the global population suffers from severe periodontitis. The disease results from the growth of a diverse microflora (especially anaerobes) in the pockets and release of toxins, enzymes and stimulation of body's immune response. Various local or systemic approaches were used for an effective treatment of periodontitis. Currently, controlled local drug delivery approach is more favorable as compared to systemic approach because it mainly focuses on improving the therapeutic outcomes by achieving factors like site-specific delivery, low dose requirement, bypass of first-pass metabolism, reduction in gastrointestinal side effects and decrease in dosing frequency. Overall it provides a safe and effective mode of treatment, which enhances patient compliance. Complete eradication of the organisms from the sites was not achieved by using various surgical and mechanical treatments. So a number of polymer-based delivery systems like fibers, films, chips, strips, microparticles, nanoparticles and nanofibers made from a variety of natural and synthetic materials have been successfully tested to deliver a variety of drugs. These systems are biocompatible and biodegradable, completely fill the pockets, and have strong retention on the target site due to excellent mucoadhesion properties. The review summarizes various available and recently developing targeted delivery devices for the treatment of periodontitis.

  17. Microneedle Coating Techniques for Transdermal Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Haj-Ahmad, Rita; Khan, Hashim; Arshad, Muhammad Sohail; Rasekh, Manoochehr; Hussain, Amjad; Walsh, Susannah; Li, Xiang; Chang, Ming-Wei; Ahmad, Zeeshan

    2015-01-01

    Drug administration via the transdermal route is an evolving field that provides an alternative to oral and parenteral routes of therapy. Several microneedle (MN) based approaches have been developed. Among these, coated MNs (typically where drug is deposited on MN tips) are a minimally invasive method to deliver drugs and vaccines through the skin. In this review, we describe several processes to coat MNs. These include dip coating, gas jet drying, spray coating, electrohydrodynamic atomisation (EHDA) based processes and piezoelectric inkjet printing. Examples of process mechanisms, conditions and tested formulations are provided. As these processes are independent techniques, modifications to facilitate MN coatings are elucidated. In summary, the outcomes and potential value for each technique provides opportunities to overcome formulation or dosage form limitations. While there are significant developments in solid degradable MNs, coated MNs (through the various techniques described) have potential to be utilized in personalized drug delivery via controlled deposition onto MN templates. PMID:26556364

  18. Nanogel Carrier Design for Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Eckmann, D. M.; Composto, R. J.; Tsourkas, A.; Muzykantov, V. R.

    2014-01-01

    Polymer-based nanogel formulations offer features attractive for drug delivery, including ease of synthesis, controllable swelling and viscoelasticity as well as drug loading and release characteristics, passive and active targeting, and the ability to formulate nanogel carriers that can respond to biological stimuli. These unique features and low toxicity make the nanogels a favorable option for vascular drug targeting. In this review, we address key chemical and biological aspects of nanogel drug carrier design. In particular, we highlight published studies of nanogel design, descriptions of nanogel functional characteristics and their behavior in biological models. These studies form a compendium of information that supports the scientific and clinical rationale for development of this carrier for targeted therapeutic interventions. PMID:25485112

  19. Microneedle Coating Techniques for Transdermal Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Haj-Ahmad, Rita; Khan, Hashim; Arshad, Muhammad Sohail; Rasekh, Manoochehr; Hussain, Amjad; Walsh, Susannah; Li, Xiang; Chang, Ming-Wei; Ahmad, Zeeshan

    2015-11-05

    Drug administration via the transdermal route is an evolving field that provides an alternative to oral and parenteral routes of therapy. Several microneedle (MN) based approaches have been developed. Among these, coated MNs (typically where drug is deposited on MN tips) are a minimally invasive method to deliver drugs and vaccines through the skin. In this review, we describe several processes to coat MNs. These include dip coating, gas jet drying, spray coating, electrohydrodynamic atomisation (EHDA) based processes and piezoelectric inkjet printing. Examples of process mechanisms, conditions and tested formulations are provided. As these processes are independent techniques, modifications to facilitate MN coatings are elucidated. In summary, the outcomes and potential value for each technique provides opportunities to overcome formulation or dosage form limitations. While there are significant developments in solid degradable MNs, coated MNs (through the various techniques described) have potential to be utilized in personalized drug delivery via controlled deposition onto MN templates.

  20. Injected nanocrystals for targeted drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yi; Li, Ye; Wu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Nanocrystals are pure drug crystals with sizes in the nanometer range. Due to the advantages of high drug loading, platform stability, and ease of scaling-up, nanocrystals have been widely used to deliver poorly water-soluble drugs. Nanocrystals in the blood stream can be recognized and sequestered as exogenous materials by mononuclear phagocytic system (MPS) cells, leading to passive accumulation in MPS-rich organs, such as liver, spleen and lung. Particle size, morphology and surface modification affect the biodistribution of nanocrystals. Ligand conjugation and stimuli-responsive polymers can also be used to target nanocrystals to specific pathogenic sites. In this review, the progress on injected nanocrystals for targeted drug delivery is discussed following a brief introduction to nanocrystal preparation methods, i.e., top-down and bottom-up technologies. PMID:27006893

  1. Targeted Delivery of Protein Drugs by Nanocarriers

    PubMed Central

    Solaro, Roberto; Chiellini, Federica; Battisti, Antonella

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in biotechnology demonstrate that peptides and proteins are the basis of a new generation of drugs. However, the transportation of protein drugs in the body is limited by their high molecular weight, which prevents the crossing of tissue barriers, and by their short lifetime due to immuno response and enzymatic degradation. Moreover, the ability to selectively deliver drugs to target organs, tissues or cells is a major challenge in the treatment of several human diseases, including cancer. Indeed, targeted delivery can be much more efficient than systemic application, while improving bioavailability and limiting undesirable side effects. This review describes how the use of targeted nanocarriers such as nanoparticles and liposomes can improve the pharmacokinetic properties of protein drugs, thus increasing their safety and maximizing the therapeutic effect.

  2. Potential Pathways for CNS Drug Delivery Across the Blood-Cerebrospinal Fluid Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Strazielle, Nathalie; Ghersi-Egea, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    The blood-brain interfaces restrict the cerebral bioavailability of pharmacological compounds. Various drug delivery strategies have been developed to improve drug penetration into the brain. Most strategies target the microvascular endothelium forming the blood-brain barrier proper. Targeting the blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier formed by the epithelium of the choroid plexuses in addition to the blood-brain barrier may offer added-value for the treatment of central nervous system diseases. For instance, targeting the CSF spaces, adjacent tissue, or the choroid plexuses themselves is of interest for the treatment of neuroinflammatory and infectious diseases, cerebral amyloid angiopathy, selected brain tumors, hydrocephalus or neurohumoral dysregulation. Selected CSF-borne materials seem to reach deep cerebral structures by mechanisms that need to be understood in the context of chronic CSF delivery. Drug delivery through both barriers can reduce CSF sink action towards parenchymal drugs. Finally, targeting the choroid plexus-CSF system can be especially relevant in the context of neonatal and pediatric diseases of the central nervous system. Transcytosis appears the most promising mechanism to target in order to improve drug delivery through brain barriers. The choroid plexus epithelium displays strong vesicular trafficking and secretory activities that deserve to be explored in the context of cerebral drug delivery. Folate transport and exosome release into the CSF, plasma protein transport, and various receptor-mediated endocytosis pathways may prove useful mechanisms to exploit for efficient drug delivery into the CSF. This calls for a clear evaluation of transcytosis mechanisms at the blood-CSF barrier, and a thorough evaluation of CSF drug delivery rates. PMID:27464721

  3. Controlled Ocular Drug Delivery with Nanomicelles

    PubMed Central

    Vaishya, Ravi D.; Khurana, Varun; Patel, Sulabh; Mitra, Ashim K.

    2014-01-01

    Many vision threatening ocular diseases such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD), diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, and proliferative vitreoretinopathy may result in blindness. Ocular drug delivery specifically to the intraocular tissues remains a challenging task due to the presence of various physiological barriers. Nonetheless, recent advancements in the field of nanomicelle based novel drug delivery system could fulfil these unmet needs. Nanomicelles consists of amphiphilic molecules that self-assemble in aqueous media to form organized supramolecular structures. Micelles can be prepared in various sizes (10 to 1000nm) and shapes depending on the molecular weights of the core and corona forming blocks. Nanomicelles have been an attractive carriers for their potential to solubilize hydrophobic molecules in aqueous solution. In addition, small size in nanometer range and highly modifiable surface properties have been reported to be advantageous in ocular drug delivery. In the present review various factors influencing rationale design of nanomicelles formulation and disposition are discussed along with case studies. Despite the progress in the field, influence of various properties of nanomicelles such as size, shape, surface charge, rigidity of structure on ocular disposition need to be studied in further details to develop an efficient nanocarrier system. PMID:24888969

  4. Protein and Peptide Drug Delivery: Oral Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Shaji, Jessy; Patole, V.

    2008-01-01

    Till recent, injections remained the most common means for administering therapeutic proteins and peptides because of their poor oral bioavailability. However, oral route would be preferred to any other route because of its high levels of patient acceptance and long term compliance, which increases the therapeutic value of the drug. Designing and formulating a polypeptide drug delivery through the gastro intestinal tract has been a persistent challenge because of their unfavorable physicochemical properties, which includes enzymatic degradation, poor membrane permeability and large molecular size. The main challenge is to improve the oral bioavailability from less than 1% to at least 30-50%. Consequently, efforts have intensified over the past few decades, where every oral dosage form used for the conventional small molecule drugs has been used to explore oral protein and peptide delivery. Various strategies currently under investigation include chemical modification, formulation vehicles and use of enzyme inhibitors, absorption enhancers and mucoadhesive polymers. This review summarizes different pharmaceutical approaches which overcome various physiological barriers that help to improve oral bioavailability that ultimately achieve formulation goals for oral delivery. PMID:20046732

  5. Iontophoretic drug delivery across the nail.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Charro, Maria Begoña

    2012-01-01

    Topical drug delivery to treat nail diseases such as onychomycosis and psoriasis is receiving increasing attention. Topical nail delivery is challenged by the complicated structure of the nail and the low permeability of most drugs across the nail plate. Considerable effort has been directed at developing methods to promote drug permeation across the nail plate. Iontophoresis efficiently enhances molecular transport across the skin and the eye and is now being tested for its potential in ungual delivery. This review covers the basic mechanisms of transport (electro-osmosis and -migration) and their relative contribution to nail iontophoresis as well as the key factors governing nail permselectivity and ionic transport numbers. Methodological issues concerning research in this area are summarized. The data available in vivo on nail iontophoresis of terbinafine specifically are reviewed in separate sections. Our understanding of nail iontophoresis has improved considerably since 2007; most decisively, the feasibility of nail iontophoresis in vivo has been clearly demonstrated. Future work is required to establish the adequate implementation of the technique so that its clinical efficacy to treat onychomycosis and nail psoriasis can be unequivocally determined.

  6. Ultrasound-mediated nail drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Abadi, Danielle; Zderic, Vesna

    2011-12-01

    A novel ultrasound-mediated drug delivery system has been developed for treatment of a nail fungal disorder (onychomycosis) by improving delivery to the nail bed using ultrasound to increase the permeability of the nail. The slip-in device consists of ultrasound transducers and drug delivery compartments above each toenail. The device is connected to a computer, where a software interface allows users to select their preferred course of treatment. In in vitro testing, canine nails were exposed to 3 energy levels (acoustic power of 1.2 W and exposure durations of 30, 60, and 120 seconds). A stereo -microscope was used to determine how much of a drug-mimicking compound was delivered through the nail layers by measuring brightness on the cross section of each nail tested at each condition, where brightness level decreases coincide with increases in permeability. Each of the 3 energy levels tested showed statistical significance when compared to the control (P < .05) with a permeability factor of 1.3 after 30 seconds of exposure, 1.3 after 60 seconds, and 1.5 after 120 seconds, where a permeability factor of 1 shows no increase in permeability. Current treatments for onychomycosis include systemic, topical, and surgical. Even when used all together, these treatments typically take a long time to result in nail healing, thus making this ultrasound-mediated device a promising alternative.

  7. A model of axonal transport drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, Andrey V.

    2012-04-01

    In this paper a model of targeted drug delivery by means of active (motor-driven) axonal transport is developed. The model is motivated by recent experimental research by Filler et al. (A.G. Filler, G.T. Whiteside, M. Bacon, M. Frederickson, F.A. Howe, M.D. Rabinowitz, A.J. Sokoloff, T.W. Deacon, C. Abell, R. Munglani, J.R. Griffiths, B.A. Bell, A.M.L. Lever, Tri-partite complex for axonal transport drug delivery achieves pharmacological effect, Bmc Neuroscience 11 (2010) 8) that reported synthesis and pharmacological efficiency tests of a tri-partite complex designed for axonal transport drug delivery. The developed model accounts for two populations of pharmaceutical agent complexes (PACs): PACs that are transported retrogradely by dynein motors and PACs that are accumulated in the axon at the Nodes of Ranvier. The transitions between these two populations of PACs are described by first-order reactions. An analytical solution of the coupled system of transient equations describing conservations of these two populations of PACs is obtained by using Laplace transform. Numerical results for various combinations of parameter values are presented and their physical significance is discussed.

  8. Chitosan in nasal delivery systems for therapeutic drugs.

    PubMed

    Casettari, Luca; Illum, Lisbeth

    2014-09-28

    There is an obvious need for efficient and safe nasal absorption enhancers for the development of therapeutically efficacious nasal products for small hydrophilic drugs, peptides, proteins, nucleic acids and polysaccharides, which do not easily cross mucosal membranes, including the nasal. Recent years have seen the development of a range of nasal absorption enhancer systems such as CriticalSorb (based on Solutol HS15) (Critical Pharmaceuticals Ltd), Chisys based on chitosan (Archimedes Pharma Ltd) and Intravail based on alkylsaccharides (Aegis Therapeutics Inc.), that is presently being tested in clinical trials for a range of drugs. So far, none of these absorption enhancers have been used in a marketed nasal product. The present review discusses the evaluation of chitosan and chitosan derivatives as nasal absorption enhancers, for a range of drugs and in a range of formulations such as solutions, gels and nanoparticles and finds that chitosan and its derivatives are able to efficiently improve the nasal bioavailability. The revirtew also questions whether chitosan nanoparticles for systemic drug delivery provide any real improvement over simpler chitosan formulations. Furthermore, the review also evaluates the use of chitosan formulations for the improvement of transport of drugs directly from the nasal cavity to the brain, based on its mucoadhesive characteristics and its ability to open tight junctions in the olfactory and respiratory epithelia. It is found that the use of chitosan nanoparticles greatly increases the transport of drugs from nose to brain over and above the effect of simpler chitosan formulations.

  9. Drug transport across the blood–brain barrier

    PubMed Central

    Pardridge, William M

    2012-01-01

    The blood–brain barrier (BBB) prevents the brain uptake of most pharmaceuticals. This property arises from the epithelial-like tight junctions within the brain capillary endothelium. The BBB is anatomically and functionally distinct from the blood–cerebrospinal fluid barrier at the choroid plexus. Certain small molecule drugs may cross the BBB via lipid-mediated free diffusion, providing the drug has a molecular weight <400 Da and forms <8 hydrogen bonds. These chemical properties are lacking in the majority of small molecule drugs, and all large molecule drugs. Nevertheless, drugs can be reengineered for BBB transport, based on the knowledge of the endogenous transport systems within the BBB. Small molecule drugs can be synthesized that access carrier-mediated transport (CMT) systems within the BBB. Large molecule drugs can be reengineered with molecular Trojan horse delivery systems to access receptor-mediated transport (RMT) systems within the BBB. Peptide and antisense radiopharmaceuticals are made brain-penetrating with the combined use of RMT-based delivery systems and avidin–biotin technology. Knowledge on the endogenous CMT and RMT systems expressed at the BBB enable new solutions to the problem of BBB drug transport. PMID:22929442

  10. Exosome Delivered Anticancer Drugs Across the Blood-Brain Barrier for Brain Cancer Therapy in Danio Rerio

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tianzhi; Martin, Paige; Fogarty, Brittany; Brown, Alison; Schurman, Kayla; Phipps, Roger; Yin, Viravuth P.; Lockman, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The blood–brain barrier (BBB) essentially restricts therapeutic drugs from entering into the brain. This study tests the hypothesis that brain endothelial cell derived exosomes can deliver anticancer drug across the BBB for the treatment of brain cancer in a zebrafish (Danio rerio) model. Materials and Methods Four types of exosomes were isolated from brain cell culture media and characterized by particle size, morphology, total protein, and transmembrane protein markers. Transport mechanism, cell uptake, and cytotoxicity of optimized exosome delivery system were tested. Brain distribution of exosome delivered anticancer drugs was evaluated using transgenic zebrafish TG (fli1: GFP) embryos and efficacies of optimized formations were examined in a xenotransplanted zebrafish model of brain cancer model. Results Four exosomes in 30–100 diameters showed different morphologies and exosomes derived from brain endothelial cells expressed more CD63 tetraspanins transmembrane proteins. Optimized exosomes increased the uptake of fluorescent marker via receptor mediated endocytosis and cytotoxicity of anticancer drugs in cancer cells. Images of the zebrafish showed exosome delivered anticancer drugs crossed the BBB and entered into the brain. In the brain cancer model, exosome delivered anticancer drugs significantly decreased fluorescent intensity of xenotransplanted cancer cells and tumor growth marker. Conclusions Brain endothelial cell derived exosomes could be potentially used as a carrier for brain delivery of anticancer drug for the treatment of brain cancer. PMID:25609010

  11. Exosome delivered anticancer drugs across the blood-brain barrier for brain cancer therapy in Danio rerio.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tianzhi; Martin, Paige; Fogarty, Brittany; Brown, Alison; Schurman, Kayla; Phipps, Roger; Yin, Viravuth P; Lockman, Paul; Bai, Shuhua

    2015-06-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) essentially restricts therapeutic drugs from entering into the brain. This study tests the hypothesis that brain endothelial cell derived exosomes can deliver anticancer drug across the BBB for the treatment of brain cancer in a zebrafish (Danio rerio) model. Four types of exosomes were isolated from brain cell culture media and characterized by particle size, morphology, total protein, and transmembrane protein markers. Transport mechanism, cell uptake, and cytotoxicity of optimized exosome delivery system were tested. Brain distribution of exosome delivered anticancer drugs was evaluated using transgenic zebrafish TG (fli1: GFP) embryos and efficacies of optimized formations were examined in a xenotransplanted zebrafish model of brain cancer model. Four exosomes in 30-100 diameters showed different morphologies and exosomes derived from brain endothelial cells expressed more CD63 tetraspanins transmembrane proteins. Optimized exosomes increased the uptake of fluorescent marker via receptor mediated endocytosis and cytotoxicity of anticancer drugs in cancer cells. Images of the zebrafish showed exosome delivered anticancer drugs crossed the BBB and entered into the brain. In the brain cancer model, exosome delivered anticancer drugs significantly decreased fluorescent intensity of xenotransplanted cancer cells and tumor growth marker. Brain endothelial cell derived exosomes could be potentially used as a carrier for brain delivery of anticancer drug for the treatment of brain cancer.

  12. Nasal-to-CNS drug delivery: where are we now and where are we heading? An industrial perspective.

    PubMed

    Landis, Margaret S; Boyden, Tracey; Pegg, Simon

    2012-02-01

    Delivery of drug therapeutics across the blood-brain barrier is a challenging task for pharmaceutical scientists. Nasal-to-CNS drug delivery has shown promising results in preclinical efficacy models and investigatory human clinical trials. The further development of this technology with respect to the establishment of valid, predictable preclinical species models, translatable pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic relationships and definition of toxicology impact will help attract additional pharmaceutical investment in this drug-delivery approach. Further discoveries in nasal nanotechnology, targeted delivery devices and diagnostic olfactory imaging will serve to fuel the advancements in this area of drug delivery.

  13. Circumventing the blood-brain barrier: Local delivery of cyclosporin A stimulates stem cells in stroke-injured rat brain.

    PubMed

    Tuladhar, Anup; Morshead, Cindi M; Shoichet, Molly S

    2015-10-10

    Drug delivery to the central nervous system is limited by the blood-brain barrier, which can be circumvented by local delivery. In applications of stroke therapy, for example, stimulation of endogenous neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) by cyclosporin A (CsA) is promising. However, current strategies rely on high systemic drug doses to achieve small amounts of CsA in the brain tissue, resulting in systemic toxicity and undesirable global immunosuppression. Herein we describe the efficacy of local CsA delivery to the stroke-injured rat brain using an epi-cortically injected hydrogel composed of hyaluronan and methylcellulose (HAMC). CsA was encapsulated in poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) microparticles dispersed in HAMC, allowing for its sustained release over 14days in vivo. Tissue penetration was sufficient to provide sustained CsA delivery to the sub-cortical NSPC niche. In comparison to systemic delivery using an osmotic minipump, HAMC achieved higher CsA concentrations in the brain while significantly reducing drug exposure in other organs. HAMC alone was beneficial in the stroke-injured rat brain, significantly reducing the stroke infarct volume relative to untreated stroke-injured controls. The combination of HAMC and local CsA release increased the number of proliferating cells in the lateral ventricles - the NSPC niche in the adult brain. Thus, we demonstrate a superior method of drug delivery to the rat brain that provides dual benefits of tissue protection and endogenous NSPC stimulation after stroke. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Microemulsions based transdermal drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Vadlamudi, Harini C; Narendran, Hyndavi; Nagaswaram, Tejeswari; Yaga, Gowri; Thanniru, Jyotsna; Yalavarthi, Prasanna R

    2014-01-01

    Since the discovery of microemulsions by Jack H Schulman, there has been huge progress made in applying microemulsion systems in plethora of research and industrial process. Microemulsions are optically isotropic systems consisting of water, oil and amphiphile. These systems are beneficial due to their thermodynamic stability, optical clarity, ease of preparation, higher diffusion and absorption rates. Moreover, it has been reported that the ingredients of microemulsion can effectively overcome the diffusion barrier and penetrate through the stratum corneum of the skin. Hence it becomes promising for both transdermal and dermal drug delivery. However, low viscosity of microemulsion restrains its applicability in pharmaceutical industry. To overcome the above drawback, the low viscous microemulsions were added to viscous gel bases to potentiate its applications as topical drug delivery systems so that various drug related toxic effects and erratic drug absorption can be avoided. The present review deals with the microemulsions, various techniques involved in the development of organic nanoparticles. The review emphasized on microemulsion based systems such as hydrogels and organogels. The physicochemical characteristics, mechanical properties, rheological and stability principles involved in microemulsion based viscous gels were also explored.

  15. Phospholipid nanodisc engineering for drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Tatsuya

    2012-06-01

    Biocompatible mesoscale nanoparticles (5-100 nm in diameter) are attractive tools for drug delivery. Among them are several types of liposomes and polymer micelles already in clinical trial or use. Generally, biocompatibility of such particles is achieved by coating them with polyethylene glycol (PEG). Without PEG coating, particles are quickly trapped in the reticuloendothelial system when intravenously administered. However, recent studies have revealed several potential problems with PEG coating, including antigenicity and restriction of cellular uptake. This has motivated the development of alternative drug and gene delivery vehicles, including chemically and genetically engineered high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-like nanodiscs or "bicelles". HDL is a naturally occurring mesoscale nanoparticle that normally ferries cholesterol around in the body. Its initial "nascent" form is thought to be a simple 10 nm disc of phospholipids in a bilayer, and can be easily synthesized in vitro by mixing recombinant apoA-I proteins with various phospholipids. In this review, the use of synthetic HDL-like phospholipid nanodiscs as biocompatible drug carriers is summarized, focussing on manufacturing, size-control, drug loading and cell targeting. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Silk Electrogel Based Gastroretentive Drug Delivery System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qianrui

    Gastric cancer has become a global pandemic and there is imperative to develop efficient therapies. Oral dosing strategy is the preferred route to deliver drugs for treating the disease. Recent studies suggested silk electro hydrogel, which is pH sensitive and reversible, has potential as a vehicle to deliver the drug in the stomach environment. The aim of this study is to establish in vitro electrogelation e-gel based silk gel as a gastroretentive drug delivery system. We successfully extended the duration of silk e-gel in artificial gastric juice by mixing silk solution with glycerol at different ratios before the electrogelation. Structural analysis indicated the extended duration was due to the change of beta sheet content. The glycerol mixed silk e-gel had good doxorubicin loading capability and could release doxorubicin in a sustained-release profile. Doxorubicin loaded silk e-gels were applied to human gastric cancer cells. Significant cell viability decrease was observed. We believe that with further characterization as well as functional analysis, the silk e-gel system has the potential to become an effective vehicle for gastric drug delivery applications.

  17. Radionuclide imaging of liposomal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    van der Geest, Tessa; Laverman, Peter; Metselaar, Josbert M; Storm, Gert; Boerman, Otto C

    2016-09-01

    Ever since their discovery, liposomes have been radiolabeled to monitor their fate in vivo. Despite extensive preclinical studies, only a limited number of radiolabeled liposomal formulations have been examined in patients. Since they can play a crucial role in patient management, it is of importance to enable translation of radiolabeled liposomes into the clinic. Liposomes have demonstrated substantial advantages as drug delivery systems and can be efficiently radiolabeled. Potentially, radiolabeled drug-loaded liposomes form an elegant theranostic system, which can be tracked in vivo using single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) or positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. In this review, we discuss important aspects of liposomal research with a focus on the use of radiolabeled liposomes and their potential role in drug delivery and monitoring therapeutic effects. Radiolabeled drug-loaded liposomes have been poorly investigated in patients and no radiolabeled liposomes have been approved for use in clinical practice. Evaluation of the risks, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and toxicity is necessary to meet pharmaceutical and commercial requirements. It remains to be demonstrated whether the results found in animal studies translate to humans before radiolabeled liposomes can be implemented into clinical practice.

  18. Computational and Pharmacological Target of Neurovascular Unit for Drug Design and Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Md. Mirazul; Mohamed, Zahurin

    2015-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a dynamic and highly selective permeable interface between central nervous system (CNS) and periphery that regulates the brain homeostasis. Increasing evidences of neurological disorders and restricted drug delivery process in brain make BBB as special target for further study. At present, neurovascular unit (NVU) is a great interest and highlighted topic of pharmaceutical companies for CNS drug design and delivery approaches. Some recent advancement of pharmacology and computational biology makes it convenient to develop drugs within limited time and affordable cost. In this review, we briefly introduce current understanding of the NVU, including molecular and cellular composition, physiology, and regulatory function. We also discuss the recent technology and interaction of pharmacogenomics and bioinformatics for drug design and step towards personalized medicine. Additionally, we develop gene network due to understand NVU associated transporter proteins interactions that might be effective for understanding aetiology of neurological disorders and new target base protective therapies development and delivery. PMID:26579539

  19. Computational and Pharmacological Target of Neurovascular Unit for Drug Design and Delivery.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Mirazul; Mohamed, Zahurin

    2015-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a dynamic and highly selective permeable interface between central nervous system (CNS) and periphery that regulates the brain homeostasis. Increasing evidences of neurological disorders and restricted drug delivery process in brain make BBB as special target for further study. At present, neurovascular unit (NVU) is a great interest and highlighted topic of pharmaceutical companies for CNS drug design and delivery approaches. Some recent advancement of pharmacology and computational biology makes it convenient to develop drugs within limited time and affordable cost. In this review, we briefly introduce current understanding of the NVU, including molecular and cellular composition, physiology, and regulatory function. We also discuss the recent technology and interaction of pharmacogenomics and bioinformatics for drug design and step towards personalized medicine. Additionally, we develop gene network due to understand NVU associated transporter proteins interactions that might be effective for understanding aetiology of neurological disorders and new target base protective therapies development and delivery.

  20. Exosomes as drug delivery vehicles for Parkinson's disease therapy.

    PubMed

    Haney, Matthew J; Klyachko, Natalia L; Zhao, Yuling; Gupta, Richa; Plotnikova, Evgeniya G; He, Zhijian; Patel, Tejash; Piroyan, Aleksandr; Sokolsky, Marina; Kabanov, Alexander V; Batrakova, Elena V

    2015-06-10

    Exosomes are naturally occurring nanosized vesicles that have attracted considerable attention as drug delivery vehicles in the past few years. Exosomes are comprised of natural lipid bilayers with the abundance of adhesive proteins that readily interact with cellular membranes. We posit that exosomes secreted by monocytes and macrophages can provide an unprecedented opportunity to avoid entrapment in mononuclear phagocytes (as a part of the host immune system), and at the same time enhance delivery of incorporated drugs to target cells ultimately increasing drug therapeutic efficacy. In light of this, we developed a new exosomal-based delivery system for a potent antioxidant, catalase, to treat Parkinson's disease (PD). Catalase was loaded into exosomes ex vivo using different methods: the incubation at room temperature, permeabilization with saponin, freeze-thaw cycles, sonication, or extrusion. The size of the obtained catalase-loaded exosomes (exoCAT) was in the range of 100-200nm. A reformation of exosomes upon sonication and extrusion, or permeabilization with saponin resulted in high loading efficiency, sustained release, and catalase preservation against proteases degradation. Exosomes were readily taken up by neuronal cells in vitro. A considerable amount of exosomes was detected in PD mouse brain following intranasal administration. ExoCAT provided significant neuroprotective effects in in vitro and in vivo models of PD. Overall, exosome-based catalase formulations have a potential to be a versatile strategy to treat inflammatory and neurodegenerative disorders.

  1. Protein-Based Nanomedicine Platforms for Drug Delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Ham, Aihui; Tang, Zhiwen; Wu, Hong; Wang, Jun; Lin, Yuehe

    2009-08-03

    Drug delivery systems have been developed for many years, however some limitations still hurdle the pace of going to clinical phase, for example, poor biodistribution, drug molecule cytotoxicity, tissue damage, quick clearance from the circulation system, solubility and stability of drug molecules. To overcome the limitations of drug delivery, biomaterials have to be developed and applied to drug delivery to protect the drug molecules and to enhance the drug’s efficacy. Protein-based nanomedicine platforms for drug delivery are platforms comprised of naturally self-assembled protein subunits of the same protein or a combination of proteins making up a complete system. They are ideal for drug delivery platforms due to their biocompatibility and biodegradability coupled with low toxicity. A variety of proteins have been used and characterized for drug delivery systems including the ferritin/apoferritin protein cage, plant derived viral capsids, the small Heat shock protein (sHsp) cage, albumin, soy and whey protein, collagen, and gelatin. There are many different types and shapes that have been prepared to deliver drug molecules using protein-based platforms including the various protein cages, microspheres, nanoparticles, hydrogels, films, minirods and minipellets. There are over 30 therapeutic compounds that have been investigated with protein-based drug delivery platforms for the potential treatment of various cancers, infectious diseases, chronic diseases, autoimmune diseases. In protein-based drug delivery platforms, protein cage is the most newly developed biomaterials for drug delivery and therapeutic applications. Their uniform sizes, multifunctions, and biodegradability push them to the frontier for drug delivery. In this review, the recent strategic development of drug delivery has been discussed with a special emphasis upon the polymer based, especially protein-based nanomedicine platforms for drug delivery. The advantages and disadvantages are also

  2. Intracranial microcapsule chemotherapy delivery for the localized treatment of rodent metastatic breast adenocarcinoma in the brain.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Urvashi M; Tyler, Betty; Patta, Yoda; Wicks, Robert; Spencer, Kevin; Scott, Alexander; Masi, Byron; Hwang, Lee; Grossman, Rachel; Cima, Michael; Brem, Henry; Langer, Robert

    2014-11-11

    Metastases represent the most common brain tumors in adults. Surgical resection alone results in 45% recurrence and is usually accompanied by radiation and chemotherapy. Adequate chemotherapy delivery to the CNS is hindered by the blood-brain barrier. Efforts at delivering chemotherapy locally to gliomas have shown modest increases in survival, likely limited by the infiltrative nature of the tumor. Temozolomide (TMZ) is first-line treatment for gliomas and recurrent brain metastases. Doxorubicin (DOX) is used in treating many types of breast cancer, although its use is limited by severe cardiac toxicity. Intracranially implanted DOX and TMZ microcapsules are compared with systemic administration of the same treatments in a rodent model of breast adenocarcinoma brain metastases. Outcomes were animal survival, quantified drug exposure, and distribution of cleaved caspase 3. Intracranial delivery of TMZ and systemic DOX administration prolong survival more than intracranial DOX or systemic TMZ. Intracranial TMZ generates the more robust induction of apoptotic pathways. We postulate that these differences may be explained by distribution profiles of each drug when administered intracranially: TMZ displays a broader distribution profile than DOX. These microcapsule devices provide a safe, reliable vehicle for intracranial chemotherapy delivery and have the capacity to be efficacious and superior to systemic delivery of chemotherapy. Future work should include strategies to improve the distribution profile. These findings also have broader implications in localized drug delivery to all tissue, because the efficacy of a drug will always be limited by its ability to diffuse into surrounding tissue past its delivery source.

  3. Intracranial microcapsule chemotherapy delivery for the localized treatment of rodent metastatic breast adenocarcinoma in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Urvashi M.; Tyler, Betty; Patta, Yoda; Wicks, Robert; Spencer, Kevin; Scott, Alexander; Masi, Byron; Hwang, Lee; Grossman, Rachel; Cima, Michael; Brem, Henry; Langer, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Metastases represent the most common brain tumors in adults. Surgical resection alone results in 45% recurrence and is usually accompanied by radiation and chemotherapy. Adequate chemotherapy delivery to the CNS is hindered by the blood–brain barrier. Efforts at delivering chemotherapy locally to gliomas have shown modest increases in survival, likely limited by the infiltrative nature of the tumor. Temozolomide (TMZ) is first-line treatment for gliomas and recurrent brain metastases. Doxorubicin (DOX) is used in treating many types of breast cancer, although its use is limited by severe cardiac toxicity. Intracranially implanted DOX and TMZ microcapsules are compared with systemic administration of the same treatments in a rodent model of breast adenocarcinoma brain metastases. Outcomes were animal survival, quantified drug exposure, and distribution of cleaved caspase 3. Intracranial delivery of TMZ and systemic DOX administration prolong survival more than intracranial DOX or systemic TMZ. Intracranial TMZ generates the more robust induction of apoptotic pathways. We postulate that these differences may be explained by distribution profiles of each drug when administered intracranially: TMZ displays a broader distribution profile than DOX. These microcapsule devices provide a safe, reliable vehicle for intracranial chemotherapy delivery and have the capacity to be efficacious and superior to systemic delivery of chemotherapy. Future work should include strategies to improve the distribution profile. These findings also have broader implications in localized drug delivery to all tissue, because the efficacy of a drug will always be limited by its ability to diffuse into surrounding tissue past its delivery source. PMID:25349381

  4. Strategies for drug delivery to the central nervous system by systemic route.

    PubMed

    Kasinathan, Narayanan; Jagani, Hitesh V; Alex, Angel Treasa; Volety, Subrahmanyam M; Rao, J Venkata

    2015-05-01

    Delivery of a drug into the central nervous system (CNS) is considered difficult. Most of the drugs discovered over the past decade are biological, which are high in molecular weight and polar in nature. The delivery of such drugs across the blood-brain barrier presents problems. This review discusses some of the options available to reach the CNS by systemic route. The focus is mainly on the recent developments in systemic delivery of a drug to the CNS. Databases such as Scopus, Google scholar, Science Direct, SciFinder and online journals were referred for preparing this article including 89 references. There are at least nine strategies that could be adopted to achieve the required drug concentration in the CNS. The recent developments in drug delivery are very promising to deliver biologicals into the CNS.

  5. Recent advances in chitosan-based nanoparticulate pulmonary drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Nazrul; Ferro, Vito

    2016-07-01

    The advent of biodegradable polymer-encapsulated drug nanoparticles has made the pulmonary route of administration an exciting area of drug delivery research. Chitosan, a natural biodegradable and biocompatible polysaccharide has received enormous attention as a carrier for drug delivery. Recently, nanoparticles of chitosan (CS) and its synthetic derivatives have been investigated for the encapsulation and delivery of many drugs with improved targeting and controlled release. Herein, recent advances in the preparation and use of micro-/nanoparticles of chitosan and its derivatives for pulmonary delivery of various therapeutic agents (drugs, genes, vaccines) are reviewed. Although chitosan has wide applications in terms of formulations and routes of drug delivery, this review is focused on pulmonary delivery of drug-encapsulated nanoparticles of chitosan and its derivatives. In addition, the controversial toxicological effects of chitosan nanoparticles for lung delivery will also be discussed.

  6. Topical Drug Delivery for Chronic Rhinosinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Jonathan; Lane, Andrew P.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis is a multifactorial disorder that may be heterogeneous in presentation and clinical course. While the introduction of endoscopic sinus surgery revolutionized surgical management and has led to significantly improved patient outcomes, medical therapy remains the foundation of long-term care of chronic rhinosinusitis, particularly in surgically recalcitrant cases. A variety of devices and pharmaceutical agents have been developed to apply topical medical therapy to the sinuses, taking advantage of the access provided by endoscopic surgery. The goal of topical therapy is to address the inflammation, infection, and mucociliary dysfunction that underlies the disease. Major factors that impact success include the patient’s sinus anatomy and the dynamics of the delivery device. Despite a growing number of topical treatment options, the evidence-based literature to support their use is limited. In this article, we comprehensively review current delivery methods and the available topical agents. We also discuss biotechnological advances that promise enhanced delivery in the future, and evolving pharmacotherapeutical compounds that may be added to rhinologist’s armamentarium. A complete understand of topical drug delivery is increasingly essential to the management of chronic rhinosinusitis when traditional forms of medical therapy and surgery have failed. PMID:23525506

  7. Multiscale benchmarking of drug delivery vectors.

    PubMed

    Summers, Huw D; Ware, Matthew J; Majithia, Ravish; Meissner, Kenith E; Godin, Biana; Rees, Paul

    2016-10-01

    Cross-system comparisons of drug delivery vectors are essential to ensure optimal design. An in-vitro experimental protocol is presented that separates the role of the delivery vector from that of its cargo in determining the cell response, thus allowing quantitative comparison of different systems. The technique is validated through benchmarking of the dose-response of human fibroblast cells exposed to the cationic molecule, polyethylene imine (PEI); delivered as a free molecule and as a cargo on the surface of CdSe nanoparticles and Silica microparticles. The exposure metrics are converted to a delivered dose with the transport properties of the different scale systems characterized by a delivery time, τ. The benchmarking highlights an agglomeration of the free PEI molecules into micron sized clusters and identifies the metric determining cell death as the total number of PEI molecules presented to cells, determined by the delivery vector dose and the surface density of the cargo. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Tools for studying drug transport and metabolism in the brain.

    PubMed

    Pitcher, Meagan R; Quevedo, João

    2016-01-01

    Development of xenobiotics that cross the blood-brain barrier in therapeutically-relevant quantities is an expensive and time-consuming undertaking. However, central nervous system diseases are an under-addressed cause of high mortality and morbidity, and drug development in this field is a worthwhile venture. We aim to familiarize the reader with available methodologies for studying drug transport into the brain. Current understanding of the blood-brain barrier structure has been well-described in other manuscripts, and first we briefly review the path that xenobiotics take through the brain - from bloodstream, to endothelial cells of the blood-brain barrier, to interstitial space, to brain parenchymal cells, and then to an exit point from the central nervous system. The second half of the review discusses research tools available to determine if xenobiotics are making the journey through the brain successfully and offers commentary on the translational utility of each methodology. Theoretically, non-human mammalian and human blood-brain barriers are similar in composition; however, some findings demonstrate important differences across species. Translational methodologies may provide more reliable information about how a drug may act across species. The recent finding of lymphatic vessels within the central nervous system may provide new tools and strategies for drug delivery to the brain.

  9. Multi-component modelling of human brain tissue: a contribution to the constitutive and computational description of deformation, flow and diffusion processes with application to the invasive drug-delivery problem.

    PubMed

    Ehlers, Wolfgang; Wagner, Arndt

    2015-01-01

    Human brain tissue is complex and multi-component in nature. It consists of an anisotropic hyperelastic solid material composed of tissue cells and blood vessel walls. Brain tissue is permeated by two viscous pore liquids, the interstitial fluid and the blood. Both liquids are mobile within the tissue and exhibit a significant anisotropic perfusion behaviour. To model this complex aggregate, the well-founded Theory of Porous Media, a continuum-mechanical approach for the description of multi-component aggregates, is used. To include microscopic information, the model is enhanced by tissue characteristics obtained from medical imaging techniques. Moreover, the model is applied to invasive drug-delivery strategies, i.e. the direct extra-vascular infusion of therapeutic agents. For this purpose, the overall interstitial fluid is treated as a real two-component mixture of a liquid solvent and a dissolved therapeutic solute. Finally, the continuum-mechanical model results in a set of strongly coupled partial differential equations which are spatially discretised using mixed finite elements and solved in a monolithic manner with an implicit Euler time-integration scheme. Numerical examples demonstrate the applicability of the presented model.

  10. Oral Drug Delivery Systems Comprising Altered Geometric Configurations for Controlled Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Moodley, Kovanya; Pillay, Viness; Choonara, Yahya E.; du Toit, Lisa C.; Ndesendo, Valence M. K.; Kumar, Pradeep; Cooppan, Shivaan; Bawa, Priya

    2012-01-01

    Recent pharmaceutical research has focused on controlled drug delivery having an advantage over conventional methods. Adequate controlled plasma drug levels, reduced side effects as well as improved patient compliance are some of the benefits that these systems may offer. Controlled delivery systems that can provide zero-order drug delivery have the potential for maximizing efficacy while minimizing dose frequency and toxicity. Thus, zero-order drug release is ideal in a large area of drug delivery which has therefore led to the development of various technologies with such drug release patterns. Systems such as multilayered tablets and other geometrically altered devices have been created to perform this function. One of the principles of multilayered tablets involves creating a constant surface area for release. Polymeric materials play an important role in the functioning of these systems. Technologies developed to date include among others: Geomatrix® multilayered tablets, which utilizes specific polymers that may act as barriers to control drug release; Procise®, which has a core with an aperture that can be modified to achieve various types of drug release; core-in-cup tablets, where the core matrix is coated on one surface while the circumference forms a cup around it; donut-shaped devices, which possess a centrally-placed aperture hole and Dome Matrix® as well as “release modules assemblage”, which can offer alternating drug release patterns. This review discusses the novel altered geometric system technologies that have been developed to provide controlled drug release, also focusing on polymers that have been employed in such developments. PMID:22312236

  11. Oral drug delivery systems comprising altered geometric configurations for controlled drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Moodley, Kovanya; Pillay, Viness; Choonara, Yahya E; du Toit, Lisa C; Ndesendo, Valence M K; Kumar, Pradeep; Cooppan, Shivaan; Bawa, Priya

    2012-01-01

    Recent pharmaceutical research has focused on controlled drug delivery having an advantage over conventional methods. Adequate controlled plasma drug levels, reduced side effects as well as improved patient compliance are some of the benefits that these systems may offer. Controlled delivery systems that can provide zero-order drug delivery have the potential for maximizing efficacy while minimizing dose frequency and toxicity. Thus, zero-order drug release is ideal in a large area of drug delivery which has therefore led to the development of various technologies with such drug release patterns. Systems such as multilayered tablets and other geometrically altered devices have been created to perform this function. One of the principles of multilayered tablets involves creating a constant surface area for release. Polymeric materials play an important role in the functioning of these systems. Technologies developed to date include among others: Geomatrix(®) multilayered tablets, which utilizes specific polymers that may act as barriers to control drug release; Procise(®), which has a core with an aperture that can be modified to achieve various types of drug release; core-in-cup tablets, where the core matrix is coated on one surface while the circumference forms a cup around it; donut-shaped devices, which possess a centrally-placed aperture hole and Dome Matrix(®) as well as "release modules assemblage", which can offer alternating drug release patterns. This review discusses the novel altered geometric system technologies that have been developed to provide controlled drug release, also focusing on polymers that have been employed in such developments.

  12. Overview on gastroretentive drug delivery systems for improving drug bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Carla M; Bettencourt, Catarina; Rossi, Alessandra; Buttini, Francesca; Barata, Pedro

    2016-08-20

    In recent decades, many efforts have been made in order to improve drug bioavailability after oral administration. Gastroretentive drug delivery systems are a good example; they emerged to enhance the bioavailability and effectiveness of drugs with a narrow absorption window in the upper gastrointestinal tract and/or to promote local activity in the stomach and duodenum. Several strategies are used to increase the gastric residence time, namely bioadhesive or mucoadhesive systems, expandable systems, high-density systems, floating systems, superporous hydrogels and magnetic systems. The present review highlights some of the drugs that can benefit from gastroretentive strategies, such as the factors that influence gastric retention time and the mechanism of action of gastroretentive systems, as well as their classification into single and multiple unit systems.

  13. Drug transport and drug delivery--the Midnight Sun meeting.

    PubMed

    Uchegbu, Ijeoma F

    2004-08-01

    The Midnight Sun Meeting on Drug Transport and Drug Delivery was held on the island of Tromso in northern Norway, where the sun does not set for 2 months during the summer. The meeting was hosted by the University of Tromso's newly established Institute of Pharmacy and the Controlled Release Society (Nordic Chapter). The meeting, attended by approximately 80 delegates from across Europe, showcased recent advances in drug transport through biological barriers, solid-state pharmaceuticals and particulate drug delivery systems. This report will focus on the particulate and solid-state pharmaceuticals sessions, in which lectures were given to demonstrate the benefits in cognitive function associated with omega-3 fish oils, the increase in drug release rates observed on the processing-induced deformation of tablet granules, and the size of polymeric particulates being directly and linearly related to the molecular weight of a polymer. The meeting was held as a single-session event, giving delegates the opportunity to attend all presentations. There was a small poster and exhibitor display, and the meeting attracted sponsorship from a number of companies, namely Polypure AS, Weifa AS, ProBioNeutraceuticals AS, Lipoid GmbH, Clavis Pharma AS and Thermometric AB.

  14. Convection and retro-convection enhanced delivery: some theoretical considerations related to drug targeting.

    PubMed

    Motion, J P Michael; Huynh, Grace H; Szoka, Francis C; Siegel, Ronald A

    2011-03-01

    Delivery of drugs and macromolecules into the brain is a challenging problem, due in part to the blood-brain barrier. In this article, we focus on the possibilities and limitations of two infusion techniques devised to bypass the blood-brain barrier: convection enhanced delivery (CED) and retro-convection enhanced delivery (R-CED). CED infuses fluid directly into the interstitial space of brain or tumor, whereas R-CED removes fluid from the interstitial space, which results in the transfer of drugs from the vascular compartment into the brain or tumor. Both techniques have shown promising results for the delivery of drugs into large volumes of tissue. Theoretical approaches of varying complexity have been developed to better understand and predict brain interstitial pressures and drug distribution for these techniques. These theoretical models of flow and diffusion can only be solved explicitly in simple geometries, and spherical symmetry is usually assumed for CED, while axial symmetry has been assumed for R-CED. This perspective summarizes features of these models and provides physical arguments and numerical simulations to support the notion that spherical symmetry is a reasonable approximation for modeling CED and R-CED. We also explore the potential of multi-catheter arrays for delivering and compartmentalizing drugs using CED and R-CED.

  15. Brain delivery of insulin boosted by intranasal coadministration with cell-penetrating peptides.

    PubMed

    Kamei, Noriyasu; Takeda-Morishita, Mariko

    2015-01-10

    Intranasal administration is considered as an alternative route to enable effective drug delivery to the central nervous system (CNS) by bypassing the blood-brain barrier. Several reports have proved that macromolecules can be transferred directly from the nasal cavity to the brain. However, strategies to enhance the delivery of macromolecules from the nasal cavity to CNS are needed because of their low delivery efficiencies via this route in general. We hypothesized that the delivery of biopharmaceuticals to the brain parenchyma can be facilitated by increasing the uptake of drugs by the nasal epithelium including supporting and neuronal cells to maximize the potentiality of the intranasal pathway. To test this hypothesis, the CNS-related model peptide insulin was intranasally coadministered with the cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) penetratin to mice. As a result, insulin coadministered with l- or d-penetratin reached the distal regions of the brain from the nasal cavity, including the cerebral cortex, cerebellum, and brain stem. In particular, d-penetratin could intranasally deliver insulin to the brain with a reduced risk of systemic insulin exposure. Thus, the results obtained in this study suggested that CPPs are potential tools for the brain delivery of peptide- and protein-based pharmaceuticals via intranasal administration.

  16. In Situ Forming Polymeric Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Madan, M.; Bajaj, A.; Lewis, S.; Udupa, N.; Baig, J. A.

    2009-01-01

    In situ forming polymeric formulations are drug delivery systems that are in sol form before administration in the body, but once administered, undergo gelation in situ, to form a gel. The formation of gels depends on factors like temperature modulation, pH change, presence of ions and ultra violet irradiation, from which the drug gets released in a sustained and controlled manner. Various polymers that are used for the formulation of in situ gels include gellan gum, alginic acid, xyloglucan, pectin, chitosan, poly(DL-lactic acid), poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) and poly-caprolactone. The choice of solvents like water, dimethylsulphoxide, N-methyl pyrrolidone, triacetin and 2-pyrrolidone for these formulations depends on the solubility of polymer used. Mainly in situ gels are administered by oral, ocular, rectal, vaginal, injectable and intraperitoneal routes. The in situ gel forming polymeric formulations offer several advantages like sustained and prolonged action in comparison to conventional drug delivery systems. The article presents a detailed review of these types of polymeric systems, their evaluation, advancements and their commercial formulations. From a manufacturing point of view, the production of such devices is less complex and thus lowers the investment and manufacturing cost. PMID:20490289

  17. Transdermal patch drug delivery interactions with exercise.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Thomas L; Gillespie, Nicole

    2011-03-01

    Transdermal drug delivery systems, such as the transdermal patch, continue to be a popular and convenient way to administer medications. There are currently several medications that use a transdermal patch drug delivery system. This article describes the potential untoward side effects of increased drug absorption through the use of a transdermal patch in individuals who exercise or participate in sporting events. Four studies have been reported that demonstrate a significant increase in the plasma concentration of nitroglycerin when individuals exercise compared with rest. Likewise, several case reports and two studies have been conducted that demonstrate nicotine toxicity and increased plasma nicotine while wearing a nicotine patch in individuals who exercise or participate in sporting events compared with rest. Healthcare providers, trainers and coaches should be aware of proper transdermal patch use, especially while exercising, in order to provide needed information to their respective patients and athletes to avoid potential untoward side effects. Particular caution should be given to individuals who participate in an extreme sporting event of long duration. Further research that includes more medications is needed in this area.

  18. [Studies on market of drug delivery system product and drug delivery system of compound Chinese medicine].

    PubMed

    Feng, Yi; Xu, De-Sheng; Hong, Yan-Long; Zhang, Ning; Ma, Yue-Ming

    2006-10-01

    Based on the progress in the world market of drug delivery system (DDS) product and the research profile of DDS of compound Chinese Medicine, The article puts forward a new method of studies on DDS of compound Chinese Medicine. It is expected that the theory of compatibility of compound Chinese Medicine can be shown and its role can be exerted to the largest extent with the application of pharmaceutics technology to change the mode of drug delivery of activated components of compound Chinese Medicine.

  19. Recent advances of controlled drug delivery using microfluidic platforms.

    PubMed

    Sanjay, Sharma T; Zhou, Wan; Dou, Maowei; Tavakoli, Hamed; Ma, Lei; Xu, Feng; Li, XiuJun

    2017-09-15

    Conventional systematically-administered drugs distribute evenly throughout the body, get degraded and excreted rapidly while crossing many biological barriers, leaving minimum amounts of the drugs at pathological sites. Controlled drug delivery aims to deliver drugs to the target sites at desired rates and time, thus enhancing the drug efficacy, pharmacokinetics, and bioavailability while maintaining minimal side effects. Due to a number of unique advantages of the recent microfluidic lab-on-a-chip technology, microfluidic lab-on-a-chip has provided unprecedented opportunities for controlled drug delivery. Drugs can be efficiently delivered to the target sites at desired rates in a well-controlled manner by microfluidic platforms via integration, implantation, localization, automation, and precise control of various microdevice parameters. These features accordingly make reproducible, on-demand, and tunable drug delivery become feasible. On-demand self-tuning dynamic drug delivery systems have shown great potential for personalized drug delivery. This review presents an overview of recent advances in controlled drug delivery using microfluidic platforms. The review first briefly introduces microfabrication techniques of microfluidic platforms, followed by detailed descriptions of numerous microfluidic drug delivery systems that have significantly advanced the field of controlled drug delivery. Those microfluidic systems can be separated into four major categories, namely drug carrier-free micro-reservoir-based drug delivery systems, highly integrated carrier-free microfluidic lab-on-a-chip systems, drug carrier-integrated microfluidic systems, and microneedles. Microneedles can be further categorized into five different types, i.e. solid, porous, hollow, coated, and biodegradable microneedles, for controlled transdermal drug delivery. At the end, we discuss current limitations and future prospects of microfluidic platforms for controlled drug delivery. Copyright

  20. Dendrimer based nanotherapeutics for ocular drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kambhampati, Siva Pramodh

    PAMAM dendrimers are a class of well-defined, hyperbranched polymeric nanocarriers that are being investigated for ocular drug and gene delivery. Their favorable properties such as small size, multivalency and water solubility can provide significant opportunities for many biologically unstable drugs and allows potentially favorable ocular biodistribution. This work exploits hydroxyl terminated dendrimers (G4-OH) as drug/gene delivery vehicles that can target retinal microglia and pigment epithelium via systemic delivery with improved efficacy at much lower concentrations without any side effects. Two different drugs Triamcinolone acetonide (TA) and N-Acetyl Cysteine (NAC) conjugated to G4-OH dendrimers showed tailorable sustained release in physiological relevant solutions and were evaluated in-vitro and in-vivo. Dendrimer-TA conjugates enhanced the solubility of TA and were 100 fold more effective at lower concentrations than free TA in its anti-inflammatory activity in activated microglia and in suppressing VEGF production in hypoxic RPE cells. Dendrimers targeted activated microglia/macrophages and RPE and retained for a period of 21 days in I/R mice model. The relative retention of intravitreal and intravenous dendrimers was comparable, if a 30-fold intravenous dose is used; suggesting intravenous route targeting retinal diseases are possible with dendrimers. D-NAC when injected intravenously attenuated retinal and choroidal inflammation, significantly reduced (˜73%) CNV growth at early stage of AMD in rat model of CNV. A combination therapy of D-NAC + D-TA significantly suppressed microglial activation and promoted CNV regression in late stages of AMD without causing side-effects. G4-OH was modified with linker having minimal amine groups and incorporation of TA as a nuclear localization enhancer resulted in compact gene vectors with favorable safety profile and achieved high levels of transgene expression in hard to transfect human retinal pigment

  1. Biomedical Imaging in Implantable Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Haoyan; Hernandez, Christopher; Goss, Monika; Gawlik, Anna; Exner, Agata A.

    2015-01-01

    Implantable drug delivery systems (DDS) provide a platform for sustained release of therapeutic agents over a period of weeks to months and sometimes years. Such strategies are typically used clinically to increase patient compliance by replacing frequent administration of drugs such as contraceptives and hormones to maintain plasma concentration within the therapeutic window. Implantable or injectable systems have also been investigated as a means of local drug administration which favors high drug concentration at a site of interest, such as a tumor, while reducing systemic drug exposure to minimize unwanted side effects. Significant advances in the field of local DDS have led to increasingly sophisticated technology with new challenges including quantification of local and systemic pharmacokinetics and implant-body interactions. Because many of these sought-after parameters are highly dependent on the tissue properties at the implantation site, and rarely represented adequately with in vitro models, new nondestructive techniques that can be used to study implants in situ are highly desirable. Versatile imaging tools can meet this need and provide quantitative data on morphological and functional aspects of implantable systems. The focus of this review article is an overview of current biomedical imaging techniques, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound imaging, optical imaging, X-ray and computed tomography (CT), and their application in evaluation of implantable DDS. PMID:25418857

  2. Micro- and nano-fabricated implantable drug-delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Ellis; Hoang, Tuan

    2013-01-01

    Implantable drug-delivery systems provide new means for achieving therapeutic drug concentrations over entire treatment durations in order to optimize drug action. This article focuses on new drug administration modalities achieved using implantable drug-delivery systems that are enabled by micro- and nano-fabrication technologies, and microfluidics. Recent advances in drug administration technologies are discussed and remaining challenges are highlighted. PMID:23323562

  3. Pathways for Small Molecule Delivery to the Central Nervous System Across the Blood-Brain Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Mikitsh, John L; Chacko, Ann-Marie

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of central nervous system (CNS) disease has long been difficult due to the ineffectiveness of drug delivery across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). This review summarizes important concepts of the BBB in normal versus pathophysiology and how this physical, enzymatic, and efflux barrier provides necessary protection to the CNS during drug delivery, and consequently treatment challenging. Small molecules account for the vast majority of available CNS drugs primarily due to their ability to penetrate the phospholipid membrane of the BBB by passive or carrier-mediated mechanisms. Physiochemical and biological factors relevant for designing small molecules with optimal capabilities for BBB permeability are discussed, as well as the most promising classes of transporters suitable for small-molecule drug delivery. Clinically translatable imaging methodologies for detecting and quantifying drug uptake and targeting in the brain are discussed as a means of further understanding and refining delivery parameters for both drugs and imaging probes in preclinical and clinical domains. This information can be used as a guide to design drugs with preserved drug action and better delivery profiles for improved treatment outcomes over existing therapeutic approaches. PMID:24963272

  4. Role of mucoadhesive polymers in enhancing delivery of nimodipine microemulsion to brain via intranasal route.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Rudree; Prasad Dash, Ranjeet; Misra, Manju; Nivsarkar, Manish

    2014-04-01

    Intranasal drug administratio