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Sample records for brain imaging correlates

  1. Brain imaging correlates of peripheral nerve stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Bari, Ausaf A.; Pouratian, Nader

    2012-01-01

    Direct peripheral nerve stimulation is an effective treatment for a number of disorders including epilepsy, depression, neuropathic pain, cluster headache, and urological dysfunction. The efficacy of this stimulation is ultimately due to modulation of activity in the central nervous system. However, the exact brain regions involved in each disorder and how they are modulated by peripheral nerve stimulation is not fully understood. The use of functional neuroimaging such as SPECT, PET and fMRI in patients undergoing peripheral nerve stimulation can help us to understand these mechanisms. We review the literature for functional neuroimaging performed in patients implanted with peripheral nerve stimulators for the above-mentioned disorders. These studies suggest that brain activity in response to peripheral nerve stimulation is a complex interaction between the stimulation parameters, disease type and severity, chronicity of stimulation, as well as nonspecific effects. From this information we may be able to understand which brain structures are involved in the mechanism of peripheral nerve stimulation as well as define the neural substrates underlying these disorders. PMID:23230531

  2. Metabolic brain imaging correlated with clinical features of brain tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Alavi, J.; Alavi, A.; Dann, R.; Kushner, M.; Chawluk, J.; Powlis, W.; Reivich, M.

    1985-05-01

    Nineteen adults with brain tumors have been studied with positron emission tomography utilizing FDG. Fourteen had biopsy proven cerebral malignant glioma, one each had meningioma, hemangiopericytoma, primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET), two had unbiopsied lesions, and one patient had an area of biopsy proven radiation necrosis. Three different patterns of glucose metabolism are observed: marked increase in metabolism at the site of the known tumor in (10 high grade gliomas and the PNET), lower than normal metabolism at the tumor (in 1 grade II glioma, 3 grade III gliomas, 2 unbiopsied low density nonenhancing lesions, and the meningioma), no abnormality (1 enhancing glioma, the hemangiopericytoma and the radiation necrosis.) The metabolic rate of the tumor or the surrounding brain did not appear to be correlated with the history of previous irradiation or chemotherapy. Decreased metabolism was frequently observed in the rest of the affected hemisphere and in the contralateral cerebellum. Tumors of high grade or with enhancing CT characteristics were more likely to show increased metabolism. Among the patients with proven gliomas, survival after PETT scan tended to be longer for those with low metabolic activity tumors than for those with highly active tumors. The authors conclude that PETT may help to predict the malignant potential of tumors, and may add useful clinical information to the CT scan.

  3. A New Measure of Imagination Ability: Anatomical Brain Imaging Correlates

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Rex E.; Flores, Ranee A.; Hunter, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Imagination involves episodic memory retrieval, visualization, mental simulation, spatial navigation, and future thinking, making it a complex cognitive construct. Prior studies of imagination have attempted to study various elements of imagination (e.g., visualization), but none have attempted to capture the entirety of imagination ability in a single instrument. Here we describe the Hunter Imagination Questionnaire (HIQ), an instrument designed to assess imagination over an extended period of time, in a naturalistic manner. We hypothesized that the HIQ would be related to measures of creative achievement and to a network of brain regions previously identified to be important to imagination/creative abilities. Eighty subjects were administered the HIQ in an online format; all subjects were administered a broad battery of tests including measures of intelligence, personality, and aptitude, as well as structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging (sMRI). Responses of the HIQ were found to be normally distributed, and exploratory factor analysis yielded four factors. Internal consistency of the HIQ ranged from 0.76 to 0.79, and two factors (“Implementation” and “Learning”) were significantly related to measures of Creative Achievement (Scientific—r = 0.26 and Writing—r = 0.31, respectively), suggesting concurrent validity. We found that the HIQ and its factors were related to a broad network of brain volumes including increased bilateral hippocampi, lingual gyrus, and caudal/rostral middle frontal lobe, and decreased volumes within the nucleus accumbens and regions within the default mode network (e.g., precuneus, posterior cingulate, transverse temporal lobe). The HIQ was found to be a reliable and valid measure of imagination in a cohort of normal human subjects, and was related to brain volumes previously identified as central to imagination including episodic memory retrieval (e.g., hippocampus). We also identified compelling evidence suggesting imagination

  4. In Vivo Assessment of Age-related Brain Iron Differences by Magnetic Field Correlation Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Adisetiyo, Vitria; Jensen, Jens H.; Ramani, Anita; Tabesh, Ali; Di Martino, Adriana; Fieremans, Els; Castellanos, Francisco X.; Helpern, Joseph A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To assess a recently developed Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) technique called Magnetic Field Correlation (MFC) imaging along with a conventional imaging method, the transverse relaxation rate (R2), for estimating age-related brain iron concentration in adolescents and adults. Brain region measures were compared to non-heme iron concentrations (CPM) based on a prior postmortem study. Materials and Methods Asymmetric spin echo (ASE) images were acquired at 3T from 26 healthy individuals (16 adolescents, 10 adults). Regions of interest (ROIs) were placed in areas in which age-related iron content has been estimated post-mortem: globus pallidus (GP), putamen (PUT), caudate nucleus (CN), thalamus (THL) and frontal white matter (FWM). Regression and group analyses were conducted on ROI means. Results MFC and R2 displayed significant linear relationships to CPM when all regions were combined. Whereas MFC was significantly correlated with CPM for every individual region except FWM and detected significantly lower means in adolescents than adults for each region, R2 detected significant correlation and lower means for only PUT and CN. Conclusion Our results support the hypothesis that MFC is sensitive to brain iron in GM regions and detects age-related iron increases known to occur from adolescence to adulthood. MFC may be more sensitive than R2 to iron-related changes occurring within specific brain regions. PMID:22392846

  5. A Review of Functional Brain Imaging Correlates of Successful Cognitive Aging

    PubMed Central

    Eyler, Lisa T.; Sherzai, Abdullah; Jeste, Dilip V.

    2013-01-01

    Preserved cognitive performance is a key feature of successful aging. Several theoretical models (compensation, hemispheric asymmetry reduction, and posterior-anterior shift) have been proposed to explain the putative underlying relationship between brain function and performance. We aimed to review imaging studies of the association between brain functional response and cognitive performance among healthy younger and older adults in order to understand the neural correlates of successful cognitive aging. MEDLINE-indexed articles published between January 1989 and May 2008, and bibliographies of these articles and related reviews were searched. Studies that measured brain function using fMRI or PET, evaluated cognitive performance, analyzed how cognitive performance related to brain response, and studied healthy older individuals were included. Forty-seven of 276 articles met these criteria. Eighty-one percent of the studies reported some brain regions in which greater activation related to better cognitive performance among older participants. This association was not universal, however, and was seen mainly in frontal cortex brain response and seemed to be more common among older compared to younger individuals. This review supports the notion of compensatory increases in brain activity in old age resulting in better cognitive performance, as suggested by hemispheric asymmetry reduction and posterior-anterior shift models of functional brain aging. However, a simple model of bigger structure → greater brain response → better cognitive performance may not be accurate. Suggestions for future research are discussed. PMID:21316037

  6. Non-invasive Imaging based Detection and Mapping of Brain Oxidative Stress and its Correlation with Cognitive Functions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-05-14

    AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2017-0052 Non-invasive Imaging based Detection and Mapping of Brain Oxidative Stress and its Correlation with Cognative Functions...Pravat Mandal National Brain Research Centre Final Report 05/14/2017 DISTRIBUTION A: Distribution approved for public release. AF Office Of Scientific...invasive Imaging based Detection and Mapping of Brain Oxidative Stress and its Correlation with Cognative Functions 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b.  GRANT

  7. Visualizing functional pathways in the human brain using correlation tensors and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Ding, Zhaohua; Xu, Ran; Bailey, Stephen K; Wu, Tung-Lin; Morgan, Victoria L; Cutting, Laurie E; Anderson, Adam W; Gore, John C

    2016-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging usually detects changes in blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signals from T2*-sensitive acquisitions, and is most effective in detecting activity in brain cortex which is irrigated by rich vasculature to meet high metabolic demands. We recently demonstrated that MRI signals from T2*-sensitive acquisitions in a resting state exhibit structure-specific temporal correlations along white matter tracts. In this report we validate our preliminary findings and introduce spatio-temporal functional correlation tensors to characterize the directional preferences of temporal correlations in MRI signals acquired at rest. The results bear a remarkable similarity to data obtained by diffusion tensor imaging but without any diffusion-encoding gradients. Just as in gray matter, temporal correlations in resting state signals may reflect intrinsic synchronizations of neural activity in white matter. Here we demonstrate that functional correlation tensors are able to visualize long range white matter tracts as well as short range sub-cortical fibers imaged at rest, and that evoked functional activities alter these structures and enhance the visualization of relevant neural circuitry. Furthermore, we explore the biophysical mechanisms underlying these phenomena by comparing pulse sequences, which suggest that white matter signal variations are consistent with hemodynamic (BOLD) changes associated with neural activity. These results suggest new ways to evaluate MRI signal changes within white matter. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Whole-Brain Proton MR Spectroscopic Imaging of Mild-to-Moderate Traumatic Brain Injury and Correlation with Neuropsychological Deficits

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Stuart; Kaliannan, Krithica; Saigal, Gaurav; Falcone, Steven; Arheart, Kristopher L.; Harris, Leo; Jagid, Jonathan; Maudsley, Andrew A.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Changes in the distribution of the magnetic resonance (MR)-observable brain metabolites N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), total choline (Cho), and total creatine (Cre), following mild-to-moderate closed-head traumatic brain injury (mTBI) were evaluated using volumetric proton MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI). Studies were carried out during the subacute time period following injury, and associations of metabolite indices with neuropsychological test (NPT) results were evaluated. Twenty-nine subjects with mTBI and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores of 10–15 were included. Differences in individual metabolite and metabolite ratio distributions relative to those of age-matched control subjects were evaluated, as well as analyses by hemispheric lobes and tissue types. Primary findings included a widespread decrease of NAA and NAA/Cre, and increases of Cho and Cho/NAA, within all lobes of the TBI subject group, and with the largest differences seen in white matter. Examination of the association between all of the metabolite measures and the NPT scores found the strongest negative correlations to occur in the frontal lobe and for Cho/NAA. No significant correlations were found between any of the MRSI or NPT measures and the GCS. These results demonstrate that significant and widespread alterations of brain metabolites occur as a result of mild-to-moderate TBI, and that these measures correlate with measures of cognitive performance. PMID:20201668

  9. Whole-brain proton MR spectroscopic imaging of mild-to-moderate traumatic brain injury and correlation with neuropsychological deficits.

    PubMed

    Govind, Varan; Gold, Stuart; Kaliannan, Krithica; Saigal, Gaurav; Falcone, Steven; Arheart, Kristopher L; Harris, Leo; Jagid, Jonathan; Maudsley, Andrew A

    2010-03-01

    Changes in the distribution of the magnetic resonance (MR)-observable brain metabolites N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), total choline (Cho), and total creatine (Cre), following mild-to-moderate closed-head traumatic brain injury (mTBI) were evaluated using volumetric proton MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI). Studies were carried out during the subacute time period following injury, and associations of metabolite indices with neuropsychological test (NPT) results were evaluated. Twenty-nine subjects with mTBI and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores of 10-15 were included. Differences in individual metabolite and metabolite ratio distributions relative to those of age-matched control subjects were evaluated, as well as analyses by hemispheric lobes and tissue types. Primary findings included a widespread decrease of NAA and NAA/Cre, and increases of Cho and Cho/NAA, within all lobes of the TBI subject group, and with the largest differences seen in white matter. Examination of the association between all of the metabolite measures and the NPT scores found the strongest negative correlations to occur in the frontal lobe and for Cho/NAA. No significant correlations were found between any of the MRSI or NPT measures and the GCS. These results demonstrate that significant and widespread alterations of brain metabolites occur as a result of mild-to-moderate TBI, and that these measures correlate with measures of cognitive performance.

  10. Brain Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Racine, Eric; Bar-Ilan, Ofek; Illes, Judy

    2007-01-01

    Advances in neuroscience are increasingly intersecting with issues of ethical, legal, and social interest. This study is an analysis of press coverage of an advanced technology for brain imaging, functional magnetic resonance imaging, that has gained significant public visibility over the past ten years. Discussion of issues of scientific validity and interpretation dominated over ethical content in both the popular and specialized press. Coverage of research on higher order cognitive phenomena specifically attributed broad personal and societal meaning to neuroimages. The authors conclude that neuroscience provides an ideal model for exploring science communication and ethics in a multicultural context. PMID:17330151

  11. Brain imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bradshaw, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    This book presents a survey of the various imaging tools with examples of the different diseases shown best with each modality. It includes 100 case presentations covering the gamut of brain diseases. These examples are grouped according to the clinical presentation of the patient: headache, acute headache, sudden unilateral weakness, unilateral weakness of gradual onset, speech disorders, seizures, pituitary and parasellar lesions, sensory disorders, posterior fossa and cranial nerve disorders, dementia, and congenital lesions.

  12. Correlation of automated volumetric analysis of brain MR imaging with cognitive impairment in a natural history study of mucopolysaccharidosis II.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zheng; Styner, M; Muenzer, J; Poe, M; Escolar, M

    2010-08-01

    Reliable markers for predicting neurologic outcome in patients with MPS II are lacking. The purpose of this study is to explore whether quantitative volumetric measurements of brain MR imaging can be used to differentiate between MPS II patients with and without cognitive impairment. This MR imaging study is the first in MPS II patients to use automated/semi-automated methods to quantify brain volumes in a longitudinal design. Sixteen male patients with MPS II in a natural history study had annual brain MR imaging and detailed neurodevelopmental assessment over 2 years. Automated and semi-automated methods were used to determine brain volumes. Linear mixed regression models adjusting for age were used to assess the correlation between the volumetric parameters and cognition. Among the 16 MPS II patients, 10 (22 MR imaging studies) had cognitive impairment whereas the other 6 (11 MR imaging studies) had normal cognition. A decreased brain tissue/ICV ratio (-5%; P < .001) and an increased lateral ventricle/ICV ratio (+4%; P = .029) were found in patients with cognitive impairment compared with patients with normal cognition. These changes were apparent in patients as young as 7 years of age in addition to older patients. Quantitative volumetric measurements of brain MR imaging in MPS II patients can be obtained by using automated and semi-automated segmentation methods. MPS II patients with cognitive impairment have decreased brain tissue volumes, but longer studies with more subjects are required to confirm these results.

  13. Longitudinal diffusion tensor imaging and neuropsychological correlates in traumatic brain injury patients

    PubMed Central

    Farbota, Kimberly D.; Bendlin, Barbara B.; Alexander, Andrew L.; Rowley, Howard A.; Dempsey, Robert J.; Johnson, Sterling C.

    2012-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) often involves focal cortical injury and white matter (WM) damage that can be measured shortly after injury. Additionally, slowly evolving WM change can be observed but there is a paucity of research on the duration and spatial pattern of long-term changes several years post-injury. The current study utilized diffusion tensor imaging to identify regional WM changes in 12 TBI patients and nine healthy controls at three time points over a four year period. Neuropsychological testing was also administered to each participant at each time point. Results indicate that TBI patients exhibit longitudinal changes to WM indexed by reductions in fractional anisotropy (FA) in the corpus callosum, as well as FA increases in bilateral regions of the superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF) and portions of the optic radiation (OR). FA changes appear to be driven by changes in radial (not axial) diffusivity, suggesting that observed longitudinal FA changes may be related to changes in myelin rather than to axons. Neuropsychological correlations indicate that regional FA values in the corpus callosum and sagittal stratum (SS) correlate with performance on finger tapping and visuomotor speed tasks (respectively) in TBI patients, and that longitudinal increases in FA in the SS, SLF, and OR correlate with improved performance on the visuomotor speed (SS) task as well as a derived measure of cognitive control (SLF, OR). The results of this study showing progressive WM deterioration for several years post-injury contribute to a growing literature supporting the hypothesis that TBI should be viewed not as an isolated incident but as a prolonged disease state. The observations of long-term neurological and functional improvement provide evidence that some ameliorative change may be occurring concurrently with progressive degeneration. PMID:22723773

  14. [A correlation between diffusion kurtosis imaging and the proliferative activity of brain glioma].

    PubMed

    Tonoyan, A S; Pronin, I N; Pitshelauri, D I; Shishkina, L V; Fadeeva, L M; Pogosbekyan, E L; Zakharova, N E; Shults, E I; Khachanova, N V; Kornienko, V N; Potapov, A A

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the capabilities of diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI) in diagnosis of the glioma proliferative activity and to evaluate a relationship between the glioma proliferative activity index and diffusion parameters of the contralateral normal appearing white matter (CNAWM). The study included 47 patients with newly diagnosed brain gliomas (23 low grade, 13 grade III, and 11 grade IV gliomas). We determined a relationship between absolute and normalized parameters of the diffusion tensor (mean (MD), axial (AD), and radial (RD) diffusivities; fractional (FA) and relative (RA) anisotropies) and diffusion kurtosis (mean (MK), axial (AK), and radial (RK) kurtosis; kurtosis anisotropy (KA)) and the proliferative activity index in the most malignant glioma parts (p<0.05). We also established a relationship between the tensor and kurtosis parameters of CNAWM and the glioma proliferative activity index (p<0.05). The correlation between all the absolute and normalized diffusion parameters and the glioma proliferative activity index, except absolute and normalized FA and RA values, was found to be statistically significant (p<0.05). Kurtosis (MK, AK, and RK) and anisotropy (KA, FA, RA) values increased, and diffusivity (MD, AD, RD) values decreased as the glioma proliferative activity index increased. A strong correlation between the proliferative activity index and absolute RK (r=0,71; p=0.000001) and normalized values of MK (r=0.8; p=0.000001), AK (r=0.71; p=0.000001), RK (r=0.81; p=0.000001), and RD (r=-0.71; p=0.000001) was found. A weak, but statistically significant correlation between the glioma proliferative activity index and diffusion values RK (r=-0.36; p=0.014), KA (r=-0.39; p=0.007), RD (r=0.35; p=0.017), FA (r=-0.42; p=0.003), and RA (r=-0.41; p=0.004) of CNAWM was found. DKI has good capabilities to detect immunohistochemical changes in gliomas. DKI demonstrated a high sensitivity in detection of microstructural changes in the

  15. [Using functional brain imaging technique to study central mechanism of acupuncture therapy for chronic stable angina pectoris in view of heart-brain correlation].

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng-Jie; Zeng, Fang; Lan, Lei; Yang, Jie; Zhang, Di; Liang, Fan-Rong

    2014-08-01

    Heart-brain correlation is an important component of Chinese medicine about the theory of zang-fu organs, which is still valuable for acupuncture clinical practice. Nowadays, increasing evidence supports the close association between the heart-brain axis, central autonomic nerve network and cardiovascular diseases, as well as the extensive regulative effects of acupuncture intervention on the heart-brain axis, functional connectivity of the brain, automatic nerve activities and cardiac functions. Therefore, the authors of the present paper hold that from the viewpoint of the heart-brain relationship, and by combining non-invasive functional brain imaging techniques with the patients' subjective and objective clinical indexes, our researchers will possibly and systematically reveal the underlying central mechanisms of acupuncture therapy in the treatment of chronic stable angina pectoris. However, the concrete biochemical mechanism should be proved via other advanced biological techniques.

  16. Hoffmann sign: clinical correlation of neurological imaging findings in the cervical spine and brain.

    PubMed

    Grijalva, Ray A; Hsu, Frank P K; Wycliffe, Nathaniel D; Tsao, Bryan E; Williams, Paul; Akpolat, Yusuf T; Cheng, Wayne K

    2015-04-01

    Retrospective validity study. To investigate the relationship between Hoffmann sign and radiographical evidence of cervical spinal cord compression and brain lesions. Clinical significance of Hoffmann sign remains controversial with conflicting reports regarding its sensitivity and specificity and its usefulness. Patients were divided into 2 groups according to the presence of Hoffmann sign on physical examination. Imaging studies were blindly examined by 2 observers for possible cervical and brain lesions. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, as well as accuracy for Hoffmann sign as it relates to cervical spinal cord compression and brain pathology, were calculated. Of the 91 patients with a positive Hoffmann sign, 32 (35%) showed severe cervical cord compression and/or myelomalacia. Forty-seven of these patients had brain imaging studies, and 5 (10%) had positive findings. There were 80 patients in the negative Hoffmann sign or control group. Twenty-one (27%) of them had severe cervical cord compression and/or myelomalacia. Twenty-three of these control patients underwent neurological imaging of the brain, and 2 (8%) had positive findings. Hoffmann sign was found to have 59% sensitivity, 49% specificity, 35% positive predictive value, and 72% negative predictive value for cervical cord compression. For brain pathology, sensitivity was 71%, specificity 33%, positive predictive value 10%, and negative predictive value 95%. Hoffmann sign has too low a positive predictive value to be relied upon as a stand-alone physical examination finding and is not a reliable screening tool for solely predicting the presence of cervical spinal cord compression or brain pathology. 2.

  17. Functional brain imaging and the induction of traumatic recall: a cross-correlational review between neuroimaging and hypnosis.

    PubMed

    Vermetten, Eric; Douglas Bremner, J

    2004-07-01

    The behavioral and psychophysiological alterations during recall in patients with trauma disorders often resemble phenomena that are seen in hypnosis. In studies of emotional recall as well as in neuroimaging studies of hypnotic processes similar brain structures are involved: thalamus, hippocampus, amygdala, medial prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex. This paper focuses on cross-correlations in traumatic recall and hypnotic responses and reviews correlations between the involvement of brain structures in traumatic recall and processes that are involved in hypnotic responsiveness. To further improve uniformity of results of brain imaging specifically for traumatic recall studies, attention is needed for standardization of hypnotic variables, isolation of the emotional process of interest (state),and assessment of trait-related differences.

  18. Anatomical-Functional Correlative Analysis Of The Human Brain Using Three Dimensional Imaging Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Alan C.; Marrett, Sean; Collins, D. L.; Peters, Terence M.

    1989-05-01

    Quantitative interpretation of functional images (PET or SPECT) is hampered by poor spatial resolution, low counting statistics and, for many tracers, low contrast between different brain structures of interest. Further, normal tracer distributions can be severely distorted by such gross pathologies as stroke, tumor and dementia. Hence, the complementary anatomical information provided by CT or MRI is essential for accurate and reproducible regional analysis of functional data. We have developed methods for the three-dimensional integration and simultaneous display of image volumes from MRI and PET. PET data was collected from an older Therascan 3-slice scanner with 12 mm resolution and a 15-slice Scanditronix PC-2048 system having 5-6 mm resolution in each dimension. MRI data was obtained from a Philips 1.5 Tesla Gyroscan scanner. The image volumes were loaded into a PIXAR 3-D image computer for simultaneous display. A general algorithm for finding the optimal transformation between two ensembles of equivalent points was implemented and investigated through simulation studies. Using a locally-developed 3-D image/graphics analysis package, equivalent points in the two image volumes were identified, either manually or via an adjustable computerized volume-of-interest (VOI) atlas. The MRI data were then re-sampled along planes parallel to the PET planes and the two volumes overlaid using opacity-weighted composition. Arbitrary oblique planes through the two volumes were obtained in interactive sessions.

  19. Brain imaging and brain function

    SciTech Connect

    Sokoloff, L.

    1985-01-01

    This book is a survey of the applications of imaging studies of regional cerebral blood flow and metabolism to the investigation of neurological and psychiatric disorders. Contributors review imaging techniques and strategies for measuring regional cerebral blood flow and metabolism, for mapping functional neural systems, and for imaging normal brain functions. They then examine the applications of brain imaging techniques to the study of such neurological and psychiatric disorders as: cerebral ischemia; convulsive disorders; cerebral tumors; Huntington's disease; Alzheimer's disease; depression and other mood disorders. A state-of-the-art report on magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and central nervous system rounds out the book's coverage.

  20. Mining Outcome-relevant Brain Imaging Genetic Associations via Three-way Sparse Canonical Correlation Analysis in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Hao, Xiaoke; Li, Chanxiu; Du, Lei; Yao, Xiaohui; Yan, Jingwen; Risacher, Shannon L; Saykin, Andrew J; Shen, Li; Zhang, Daoqiang

    2017-03-14

    Neuroimaging genetics is an emerging field that aims to identify the associations between genetic variants (e.g., single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)) and quantitative traits (QTs) such as brain imaging phenotypes. In recent studies, in order to detect complex multi-SNP-multi-QT associations, bi-multivariate techniques such as various structured sparse canonical correlation analysis (SCCA) algorithms have been proposed and used in imaging genetics studies. However, associations between genetic markers and imaging QTs identified by existing bi-multivariate methods may not be all disease specific. To bridge this gap, we propose an analytical framework, based on three-way sparse canonical correlation analysis (T-SCCA), to explore the intrinsic associations among genetic markers, imaging QTs, and clinical scores of interest. We perform an empirical study using the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) cohort to discover the relationships among SNPs from AD risk gene APOE, imaging QTs extracted from structural magnetic resonance imaging scans, and cognitive and diagnostic outcomes. The proposed T-SCCA model not only outperforms the traditional SCCA method in terms of identifying strong associations, but also discovers robust outcome-relevant imaging genetic patterns, demonstrating its promise for improving disease-related mechanistic understanding.

  1. Automatic Contrast Enhancement of Brain MR Images Using Hierarchical Correlation Histogram Analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chiao-Min; Chen, Chih-Cheng; Wu, Ming-Chi; Horng, Gwoboa; Wu, Hsien-Chu; Hsueh, Shih-Hua; Ho, His-Yun

    Parkinson's disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that has a higher probability of occurrence in middle-aged and older adults than in the young. With the use of a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system, abnormal cell regions can be identified, and this identification can help medical personnel to evaluate the chance of disease. This study proposes a hierarchical correlation histogram analysis based on the grayscale distribution degree of pixel intensity by constructing a correlation histogram, that can improves the adaptive contrast enhancement for specific objects. The proposed method produces significant results during contrast enhancement preprocessing and facilitates subsequent CAD processes, thereby reducing recognition time and improving accuracy. The experimental results show that the proposed method is superior to existing methods by using two estimation image quantitative methods of PSNR and average gradient values. Furthermore, the edge information pertaining to specific cells can effectively increase the accuracy of the results.

  2. Neural correlates of emotion–cognition interactions: A review of evidence from brain imaging investigations

    PubMed Central

    Dolcos, Florin; Iordan, Alexandru D.; Dolcos, Sanda

    2011-01-01

    Complex dynamic behaviour involves reciprocal influences between emotion and cognition. On the one hand, emotion is a “double-edged sword” that may affect various aspects of our cognition and behaviour, by enhancing or hindering them and exerting both transient and long-term influences. On the other hand, emotion processing is also susceptible to cognitive influences, typically exerted in the form of emotion regulation. Noteworthy, both of these reciprocal influences are subjective to individual differences that may affect the way we perceive, experience, and eventually remember emotional experiences, or respond to emotionally challenging situations. Understanding these relationships is critical, as unbalanced emotion–cognition interactions may lead to devastating effects, such as those observed in mood and anxiety disorders. The present review analyses the reciprocal relationships between emotion and cognition, based on evidence derived from brain imaging investigations focusing on three main topics: (1) the impact of emotion on cognition, (2) the impact of cognition on emotion, and (3) the role of individual differences in emotion–cognition interactions. This evidence will be discussed in the context of identifying aspects that are fundamental to understanding the mechanisms underlying emotion–cognition interactions in healthy functioning, and to understanding changes associated with affective disorders. PMID:22059115

  3. Correlation among Magnetic Resonance Imaging Parameters of Brain in Preterm Neonates at Term Equivalent Age.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, Umamaheswari; Amboiram, Prakash; Ninan, Binu; Chandrasekar, Anupama; Rangasami, Rajeswaran

    2017-01-01

    To assess the spectrum of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) abnormalities among preterm babies at term equivalent age using objective scoring and to study the association among MRI variables. Ninety-four preterm babies born at ≤32 wk of gestation and / or birth weight ≤ 1500 g at term equivalent age who underwent cranial MRI between April 2011 and August 2012 and the MRI interpreted by experienced radiologists were studied. In 2014, the MRI was retrospectively re-interpreted by the same radiologists using an objective scoring system described by Kidokoro. Spectrum of MRI abnormalities, their association with perinatal variables and correlation among white matter (WM), grey matter and cerebellar scores were analyzed. MRI abnormalities observed were WM signal abnormality (24 %), lateral ventricular dilatation (16 %), WM cystic abnormality (13 %), deep grey matter signal abnormality (9 %), cerebellar volume reduction (9 %) and deep grey matter volume reduction (8 %). Sepsis was significantly associated with occurrence of WM and cerebellar abnormalities (p < 0.05). WM scores did not show significant correlation with cortical grey matter and deep grey matter scores while cerebellar scores showed a weak positive correlation with WM (r = 0.33), cortical grey matter (r = 0.27) and deep grey matter scores (r = 0.22). MRI abnormalities are common in preterm infants, with 60 % showing some abnormality at term equivalent age. Among perinatal characteristics, sepsis was identified as risk factor for WM and cerebellar injury. Grey matter abnormality occurs independent of WM abnormality. Cerebellar abnormalities appear to coexist with either WM or grey matter changes.

  4. Simultaneous EEG/functional magnetic resonance imaging at 4 Tesla: correlates of brain activity to spontaneous alpha rhythm during relaxation.

    PubMed

    Difrancesco, Mark W; Holland, Scott K; Szaflarski, Jerzy P

    2008-10-01

    : Simultaneous EEG and functional magnetic resonance imaging have been applied to the study of brain states associated with alpha waves using a magnetic field strength of 1.5 Tesla and has been shown in recent years to be feasible up to 3 Tesla for other applications. This study demonstrates this technique's continued viability at a field strength of 4 Tesla, affording a proportionally greater sensitivity to changes in Blood Oxygen Level Dependent (BOLD) signal. In addition, for the study of alpha correlations, the authors used a larger number of subjects and scanning sessions than in the previous work. Random effects group regression analysis of 35 EEG/functional magnetic resonance imaging sessions against occipital alpha magnitude in a relaxed state detected bilateral widespread activation of dorsal thalamus and portions of the anterior cingulate and cerebellum. In the same group analysis, deactivations arose predominantly in the fusiform and adjacent visual association areas with a small activation cluster also detected in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. This pattern is consistent with a correspondence between alpha magnitude variations and resting state network dynamics ascertained by recent studies of low frequency spontaneous BOLD fluctuations. The central role of the thalamus in resting state networks correlated with alpha activity is highlighted. Demonstrating the applicability of simultaneous EEG/functional magnetic resonance imaging up to 4 Tesla is particularly important for clinically relevant research involving challenging spontaneous EEG abnormalities, such as those of epilepsy.

  5. In vivo detection of microstructural correlates of brain pathology in preclinical and early Alzheimer Disease with magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yue; Raichle, Marcus E; Wen, Jie; Benzinger, Tammie L; Fagan, Anne M; Hassenstab, Jason; Vlassenko, Andrei G; Luo, Jie; Cairns, Nigel J; Christensen, Jon J; Morris, John C; Yablonskiy, Dmitriy A

    2017-03-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) affects at least 5 million individuals in the USA alone stimulating an intense search for disease prevention and treatment therapies as well as for diagnostic techniques allowing early identification of AD during a long pre-symptomatic period that can be used for the initiation of prevention trials of disease-modifying therapies in asymptomatic individuals. Our approach to developing such techniques is based on the Gradient Echo Plural Contrast Imaging (GEPCI) technique that provides quantitative in vivo measurements of several brain-tissue-specific characteristics of the gradient echo MRI signal (GEPCI metrics) that depend on the integrity of brain tissue cellular structure. Preliminary data were obtained from 34 participants selected from the studies of aging and dementia at the Knight Alzheimer's Disease Research Center at Washington University in St. Louis. Cognitive status was operationalized with the Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) scale. The participants, assessed as cognitively normal (CDR=0; n=23) or with mild AD dementia (CDR=0.5 or 1; n=11) underwent GEPCI MRI, a collection of cognitive performance tests and CSF amyloid (Aβ) biomarker Aβ42. A subset of 19 participants also underwent PET PiB studies to assess their brain Aβ burden. According to the Aβ status, cognitively normal participants were divided into normal (Aβ negative; n=13) and preclinical (Aβ positive; n=10) groups. GEPCI quantitative measurements demonstrated significant differences between all the groups: normal and preclinical, normal and mild AD, and preclinical and mild AD. GEPCI quantitative metrics characterizing tissue cellular integrity in the hippocampus demonstrated much stronger correlations with psychometric tests than the hippocampal atrophy. Importantly, GEPCI-determined changes in the hippocampal tissue cellular integrity were detected even in the hippocampal areas not affected by the atrophy. Our studies also uncovered strong correlations between

  6. Brain imaging investigation of the neural correlates of observing virtual social interactions.

    PubMed

    Sung, Keen; Dolcos, Sanda; Flor-Henry, Sophie; Zhou, Crystal; Gasior, Claudia; Argo, Jennifer; Dolcos, Florin

    2011-07-06

    The ability to gauge social interactions is crucial in the assessment of others' intentions. Factors such as facial expressions and body language affect our decisions in personal and professional life alike (1). These "friend or foe" judgements are often based on first impressions, which in turn may affect our decisions to "approach or avoid". Previous studies investigating the neural correlates of social cognition tended to use static facial stimuli (2). Here, we illustrate an experimental design in which whole-body animated characters were used in conjunction with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) recordings. Fifteen participants were presented with short movie-clips of guest-host interactions in a business setting, while fMRI data were recorded; at the end of each movie, participants also provided ratings of the host behaviour. This design mimics more closely real-life situations, and hence may contribute to better understanding of the neural mechanisms of social interactions in healthy behaviour, and to gaining insight into possible causes of deficits in social behaviour in such clinical conditions as social anxiety and autism (3).

  7. Correlation of brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging of spontaneously lead poisoned bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) with histological lesions: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    de Francisco, Olga Nicolas; Feeney, Daniel; Armién, Anibal G; Wuenschmann, Arno; Redig, Patrick T

    2016-04-01

    Six bald eagles with severe, acute lead poisoning based on blood lead values were analyzed by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of the brain and histopathology. The aims of the study were to use MRI to locate brain lesions and correlate the changes in MRI signal with the histological character of the lesions at necropsy. All of the bald eagles presented with neurologic and non-neurologic signs suggestive of severe lead poisoning and had blood lead levels in excess of 1.0 ppm. Areas of change in image intensity in the brainstem, midbrain and cerebellum were detected in the MRI scans. Histopathology confirmed the presence of all suspected lesions. The character of the lesions suggested vascular damage as the primary insult. MRI was useful for detecting lesions and defining their three-dimensional distribution and extent. Future studies are needed to evaluate the utility of MRI for detection of lesions in less severely lead poisoned eagles and determining prognosis for treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Evidence for correlations between distant intentionality and brain function in recipients: a functional magnetic resonance imaging analysis.

    PubMed

    Achterberg, Jeanne; Cooke, Karin; Richards, Todd; Standish, Leanna J; Kozak, Leila; Lake, James

    2005-12-01

    This study, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) technology, demonstrated that distant intentionality (DI), defined as sending thoughts at a distance, is correlated with an activation of certain brain functions in the recipients. Eleven healers who espoused some form for connecting or healing at a distance were recruited from the island of Hawaii. Each healer selected a person with whom they felt a special connection as a recipient for DI. The recipient was placed in the MRI scanner and isolated from all forms of sensory contact from the healer. The healers sent forms of DI that related to their own healing practices at random 2-minute intervals that were unknown to the recipient. Significant differences between experimental (send) and control (no send) procedures were found (p = 0.000127). Areas activated during the experimental procedures included the anterior and middle cingulate area, precuneus, and frontal area. It was concluded that instructions to a healer to make an intentional connection with a sensory isolated person can be correlated to changes in brain function of that individual.

  9. Ivy Sign on Fluid-Attenuated Inversion Recovery Images in Moyamoya Disease: Correlation with Clinical Severity and Old Brain Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Kwon-Duk; Suh, Sang Hyun; Kim, Yong Bae; Kim, Ji Hwa; Ahn, Sung Jun; Kim, Dong-Seok

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Leptomeningeal collateral, in moyamoya disease (MMD), appears as an ivy sign on fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) images. There has been little investigation into the relationship between presentation of ivy signs and old brain lesions. We aimed to evaluate clinical significance of ivy signs and whether they correlate with old brain lesions and the severity of clinical symptoms in patients with MMD. Materials and Methods FLAIR images of 83 patients were reviewed. Each cerebral hemisphere was divided into 4 regions and each region was scored based on the prominence of the ivy sign. Total ivy score (TIS) was defined as the sum of the scores from the eight regions and dominant hemispheric ivy sign (DHI) was determined by comparing the ivy scores from each hemisphere. According to the degree of ischemic symptoms, patients were classified into four subgroups: 1) nonspecific symptoms without motor weakness, 2) single transient ischemic attack (TIA), 3) recurrent TIA, or 4) complete stroke. Results TIS was significantly different as follows: 4.86±2.55 in patients with nonspecific symptoms, 5.89±3.10 in patients with single TIA, 9.60±3.98 in patients with recurrent TIA and 8.37±3.39 in patients with complete stroke (p=0.003). TIS associated with old lesions was significantly higher than those not associated with old lesions (9.35±4.22 vs. 7.49±3.37, p=0.032). We found a significant correlation between DHI and motor symptoms (p=0.001). Conclusion Because TIS has a strong tendency with severity of ischemic motor symptom and the presence of old lesions, the ivy sign may be useful in predicting severity of disease progression. PMID:26256975

  10. Ivy Sign on Fluid-Attenuated Inversion Recovery Images in Moyamoya Disease: Correlation with Clinical Severity and Old Brain Lesions.

    PubMed

    Seo, Kwon-Duk; Suh, Sang Hyun; Kim, Yong Bae; Kim, Ji Hwa; Ahn, Sung Jun; Kim, Dong-Seok; Lee, Kyung-Yul

    2015-09-01

    Leptomeningeal collateral, in moyamoya disease (MMD), appears as an ivy sign on fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR) images. There has been little investigation into the relationship between presentation of ivy signs and old brain lesions. We aimed to evaluate clinical significance of ivy signs and whether they correlate with old brain lesions and the severity of clinical symptoms in patients with MMD. FLAIR images of 83 patients were reviewed. Each cerebral hemisphere was divided into 4 regions and each region was scored based on the prominence of the ivy sign. Total ivy score (TIS) was defined as the sum of the scores from the eight regions and dominant hemispheric ivy sign (DHI) was determined by comparing the ivy scores from each hemisphere. According to the degree of ischemic symptoms, patients were classified into four subgroups: 1) nonspecific symptoms without motor weakness, 2) single transient ischemic attack (TIA), 3) recurrent TIA, or 4) complete stroke. TIS was significantly different as follows: 4.86±2.55 in patients with nonspecific symptoms, 5.89±3.10 in patients with single TIA, 9.60±3.98 in patients with recurrent TIA and 8.37±3.39 in patients with complete stroke (p=0.003). TIS associated with old lesions was significantly higher than those not associated with old lesions (9.35±4.22 vs. 7.49±3.37, p=0.032). We found a significant correlation between DHI and motor symptoms (p=0.001). Because TIS has a strong tendency with severity of ischemic motor symptom and the presence of old lesions, the ivy sign may be useful in predicting severity of disease progression.

  11. Radiological-Pathological Correlations Following Blast-Related Traumatic Brain Injury in the Whole Human Brain Using ex Vivo Diffusion Tensor Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    2-0072 TITLE: Radiological -Pathological Correlations Following Blast-Related Traumatic Brain Injury in the Whole Human Brain Using ex Vivo...January 2014 2. REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 1 January 2012-31 December 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Radiological -Pathological... radiological -pathological correlations using whole human brains from civilian TBI fatalities and US military fatalities caused by blast-related

  12. General and specialized brain correlates for analogical reasoning: A meta-analysis of functional imaging studies.

    PubMed

    Hobeika, Lucie; Diard-Detoeuf, Capucine; Garcin, Béatrice; Levy, Richard; Volle, Emmanuelle

    2016-05-01

    Reasoning by analogy allows us to link distinct domains of knowledge and to transfer solutions from one domain to another. Analogical reasoning has been studied using various tasks that have generally required the consideration of the relationships between objects and their integration to infer an analogy schema. However, these tasks varied in terms of the level and the nature of the relationships to consider (e.g., semantic, visuospatial). The aim of this study was to identify the cerebral network involved in analogical reasoning and its specialization based on the domains of information and task specificity. We conducted a coordinate-based meta-analysis of 27 experiments that used analogical reasoning tasks. The left rostrolateral prefrontal cortex was one of the regions most consistently activated across the studies. A comparison between semantic and visuospatial analogy tasks showed both domain-oriented regions in the inferior and middle frontal gyri and a domain-general region, the left rostrolateral prefrontal cortex, which was specialized for analogy tasks. A comparison of visuospatial analogy to matrix problem tasks revealed that these two relational reasoning tasks engage, at least in part, distinct right and left cerebral networks, particularly separate areas within the left rostrolateral prefrontal cortex. These findings highlight several cognitive and cerebral differences between relational reasoning tasks that can allow us to make predictions about the respective roles of distinct brain regions or networks. These results also provide new, testable anatomical hypotheses about reasoning disorders that are induced by brain damage. Hum Brain Mapp 37:1953-1969, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Radionuclide brain imaging correlates of cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease (PD).

    PubMed

    Nobili, Flavio; Morbelli, Silvia; Arnaldi, Dario; Ferrara, Michela; Campus, Claudio; Brugnolo, Andrea; Mazzei, Debora; Mehrdad, Naseri; Sambuceti, Gianmario; Rodriguez, Guido

    2011-11-15

    A subtle cognitive impairment can be detected early in the course of Parkinson's disease (PD). Executive, memory and visuospatial functions are specifically affected, but the underlying pathophysiological basis is not well elucidated yet and may be heterogeneous. The recent identification of a PD-related cognitive metabolic pattern (PDCP), including hypometabolism in associative frontal, parietal and posterior limbic structures, has integrated the classical notion of a striato-frontal syndrome at the basis of cognitive dys-function. Recent evidence suggests that whilst executive dys-function is seen in virtually all PD patients, visuospatial and memory impairment may share a higher risk for the subsequent development of dementia. By means of perfusion SPECT and [18F]FDG-PET, cortical dys-function may be highlighted since the early stages, it is more evident in PD patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), and reaches the maximum in PD dementia (PDD). Posterior temporo-parieto-occipital dys-function in associative and limbic cortex, closely resembling that found in Alzheimer's disease patients, is found in PDD, with a more severe occipital hypometabolism and a relatively milder hypometabolism in medial temporal lobe structures. Furthermore, deficit of acetylcholinesterase (AchE) can be found by means of [11C]MP4A-PET already in early stage of PD, especially in posterior regions, then becoming more severe in PDD and in dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). Administration of AchE inhibitors to PDD patients increased brain metabolism in bilateral frontal and left parietal regions, and left posterior cingulate. Finally, the recent availability of radiopharmaceuticals able to disclose amyloid brain deposition has allowed to demonstrate amyloid load in a part of patients with PDD, possibly due to diffuse rather than neuritic plaques. Brain PET and SPECT have strongly contributed to the understanding of the pathophysiology of cognitive impairment in PD and may serve as

  14. Imaging of brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Chourmouzi, Danai; Papadopoulou, Elissabet; Marias, Kostantinos; Drevelegas, Antonios

    2014-10-01

    Neuroimaging plays a crucial role in diagnosis of brain tumors and in the decision-making process for therapy. Functional imaging techniques can reflect cellular density (diffusion imaging), capillary density (perfusion techniques), and tissue biochemistry (magnetic resonance [MR] spectroscopy). In addition, cortical activation imaging (functional MR imaging) can identify various loci of eloquent cerebral cortical function. Combining these new tools can increase diagnostic specificity and confidence. Familiarity with conventional and advanced imaging findings facilitates accurate diagnosis, differentiation from other processes, and optimal patient treatment. This article is a practical synopsis of pathologic, clinical, and imaging spectra of most common brain tumors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The neuronal correlates of intranasal trigeminal function – An ALE meta-analysis of human functional brain imaging data

    PubMed Central

    Albrecht, Jessica; Kopietz, Rainer; Frasnelli, Johannes; Wiesmann, Martin; Hummel, Thomas; Lundström, Johan N.

    2009-01-01

    Almost every odor we encounter in daily life has the capacity to produce a trigeminal sensation. Surprisingly, few functional imaging studies exploring human neuronal correlates of intranasal trigeminal function exist, and results are to some degree inconsistent. We utilized activation likelihood estimation (ALE), a quantitative voxel-based meta-analysis tool, to analyze functional imaging data (fMRI/PET) following intranasal trigeminal stimulation with carbon dioxide (CO2), a stimulus known to exclusively activate the trigeminal system. Meta-analysis tools are able to identify activations common across studies, thereby enabling activation mapping with higher certainty. Activation foci of nine studies utilizing trigeminal stimulation were included in the meta-analysis. We found significant ALE scores, thus indicating consistent activation across studies, in the brainstem, ventrolateral posterior thalamic nucleus, anterior cingulate cortex, insula, precentral gyrus, as well as in primary and secondary somatosensory cortices – a network known for the processing of intranasal nociceptive stimuli. Significant ALE values were also observed in the piriform cortex, insula, and the orbitofrontal cortex, areas known to process chemosensory stimuli, and in association cortices. Additionally, the trigeminal ALE statistics were directly compared with ALE statistics originating from olfactory stimulation, demonstrating considerable overlap in activation. In conclusion, the results of this meta-analysis map the human neuronal correlates of intranasal trigeminal stimulation with high statistical certainty and demonstrate that the cortical areas recruited during the processing of intranasal CO2 stimuli include those outside traditional trigeminal areas. Moreover, through illustrations of the considerable overlap between brain areas that process trigeminal and olfactory information; these results demonstrate the interconnectivity of flavor processing. PMID:19913573

  16. Significant correlation between openness personality in normal subjects and brain myelin mapping with T1/T2-weighted MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Yasuno, Fumihiko; Kudo, Takashi; Yamamoto, Akihide; Matsuoka, Kiwamu; Takahashi, Masato; Iida, Hidehiro; Ihara, Masafumi; Nagatsuka, Kazuyuki; Kishimoto, Toshifumi

    2017-09-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between the myelination and the psychological trait of openness to experience in young cognitively normal volunteers using regional T1-weighted (T1w)/T2w ratios on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). It was hypothesized that axonal myelination would be related to openness, thus linking trait creativity and mental illness. We recruited 37 healthy subjects and administered the NEO Five-Factor Inventory to assess personality factors. Regional T1w/T2w MRI values were computed as surrogate indicators of myelination status and correlations between T1w/T2w values and various personality factors (e.g., trait of openness) were calculated with a voxel-based analysis using statistical parametric mapping. Significant negative correlations were identified between the trait of openness and T1w/T2w values in the medial frontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, posterior cingulate cortex, and posterior insula/adjacent putamen. These relationships remained significant even after adjusting for age, sex, and education as covariates. There were no significant correlations between other personality factors and regional volumes. Individual differences in openness may be associated with variations in intra-cortical myelination, specifically in the imaginative network of the brain including the midline core 'hubs' of the default mode network (anterior cingulate/medial frontal cortex and posterior cingulate cortex) and regions related to motivational state (posterior insula and adjacent putamen). Signal interference related to decreased myelination may facilitate flexible imagination and the trait of openness. Our findings assist in understanding the relationship between myelination and openness, as a link between creativity and mental illness.

  17. Correlation Plenoptic Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Angelo, Milena; Pepe, Francesco V.; Garuccio, Augusto; Scarcelli, Giuliano

    2016-06-01

    Plenoptic imaging is a promising optical modality that simultaneously captures the location and the propagation direction of light in order to enable three-dimensional imaging in a single shot. However, in standard plenoptic imaging systems, the maximum spatial and angular resolutions are fundamentally linked; thereby, the maximum achievable depth of field is inversely proportional to the spatial resolution. We propose to take advantage of the second-order correlation properties of light to overcome this fundamental limitation. In this Letter, we demonstrate that the correlation in both momentum and position of chaotic light leads to the enhanced refocusing power of correlation plenoptic imaging with respect to standard plenoptic imaging.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging, magnetisation transfer imaging, and diffusion weighted imaging correlates of optic nerve, brain, and cervical cord damage in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Inglese, M; Rovaris, M; Bianchi, S; Mantia, L; Mancardi, G; Ghezzi, A; Montagna, P; Salvi, F; Filippi, M

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a mitochondrial disease leading to bilateral loss of central vision and severe optic nerve atrophy. A subtype of LHON presents additional clinical and MRI aspects indistinguishable from those of multiple sclerosis (MS) (LHON-MS). In patients with LHON or LHON-MS, an assessment was made of (a) the severity of optic nerve damage, using MRI and magnetisation transfer imaging (MTI), and (b) the presence and extent of macroscopic and microscopic pathology in the brain and cervical cord, using MRI and MT ratio (MTR) and mean diffusivity (&Dmacr;) histogram analysis.
METHODS—Ten patients with LHON, four with LHON-MS, and 20 age and sex matched healthy controls were studied. For the optic nerve and the brain, dual-echo turbo spin echo (TSE), T1 weighted spin echo, and MT images were obtained. For the brain, fast fluid attenuated inversion recovery (fast FLAIR) and diffusion weighted images were also obtained. For the cervical cord, fast short tau inversion recovery (STIR) and MT images were obtained. The volume and the average MTR value of both the optic nerves were measured. MTR and &Dmacr; histograms of the normal appearing brain tissue (NABT) and MTR histograms of the whole cervical cord tissue were created.
RESULTS—The mean values of optic nerve volumes and MTR were significantly lower in patients with LHON than in healthy controls. Mean NABT-MTR histogram peak height was significantly lower in patients with LHON than in controls, whereas no significant difference was found for any of the cervical cord MTR histogram derived measures. Average diffusivity (&Dmacr;) was higher in patients with LHON than in controls. Optic nerve volume and MTR value and mean NABT-MTR were lower in patients with LHON-MS than in those with LHON.
CONCLUSIONS—The severity of optic nerve pathology in LHON is measurable in vivo using MRI and MTI. MTR and &Dmacr; histogram analysis suggests that microscopic brain damage occurs

  19. Imaging the Working Brain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swithenby, S. J.

    1996-01-01

    Very sensitive SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device) detectors are used in the technique known as magnetoencephalography to provide dynamic images of the brain. This can help our fundamental understanding of the way the brain works and may be of particular use in treating disorders such as epilepsy. (Author/MKR)

  20. Imaging the Working Brain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swithenby, S. J.

    1996-01-01

    Very sensitive SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device) detectors are used in the technique known as magnetoencephalography to provide dynamic images of the brain. This can help our fundamental understanding of the way the brain works and may be of particular use in treating disorders such as epilepsy. (Author/MKR)

  1. Brain Vascular Imaging Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Laviña, Bàrbara

    2016-01-01

    Recent major improvements in a number of imaging techniques now allow for the study of the brain in ways that could not be considered previously. Researchers today have well-developed tools to specifically examine the dynamic nature of the blood vessels in the brain during development and adulthood; as well as to observe the vascular responses in disease situations in vivo. This review offers a concise summary and brief historical reference of different imaging techniques and how these tools can be applied to study the brain vasculature and the blood-brain barrier integrity in both healthy and disease states. Moreover, it offers an overview on available transgenic animal models to study vascular biology and a description of useful online brain atlases. PMID:28042833

  2. Improving standards in brain-behavior correlation analyses.

    PubMed

    Rousselet, Guillaume A; Pernet, Cyril R

    2012-01-01

    Associations between two variables, for instance between brain and behavioral measurements, are often studied using correlations, and in particular Pearson correlation. However, Pearson correlation is not robust: outliers can introduce false correlations or mask existing ones. These problems are exacerbated in brain imaging by a widespread lack of control for multiple comparisons, and several issues with data interpretations. We illustrate these important problems associated with brain-behavior correlations, drawing examples from published articles. We make several propositions to alleviate these problems.

  3. Correlated diffusion imaging

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Prostate cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer death in the male population. Fortunately, the prognosis is excellent if detected at an early stage. Hence, the detection and localization of prostate cancer is crucial for diagnosis, as well as treatment via targeted focal therapy. New imaging techniques can potentially be invaluable tools for improving prostate cancer detection and localization. Methods In this study, we introduce a new form of diffusion magnetic resonance imaging called correlated diffusion imaging, where the tissue being imaged is characterized by the joint correlation of diffusion signal attenuation across multiple gradient pulse strengths and timings. By taking into account signal attenuation at different water diffusion motion sensitivities, correlated diffusion imaging can provide improved delineation between cancerous tissue and healthy tissue when compared to existing diffusion imaging modalities. Results Quantitative evaluation using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, tissue class separability analysis, and visual assessment by an expert radiologist were performed to study correlated diffusion imaging for the task of prostate cancer diagnosis. These results are compared with that obtained using T2-weighted imaging and standard diffusion imaging (via the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC)). Experimental results suggest that correlated diffusion imaging provide improved delineation between healthy and cancerous tissue and may have potential as a diagnostic tool for cancer detection and localization in the prostate gland. Conclusions A new form of diffusion magnetic resonance imaging called correlated diffusion imaging (CDI) was developed for the purpose of aiding radiologists in cancer detection and localization in the prostate gland. Preliminary results show CDI shows considerable promise as a diagnostic aid for radiologists in the detection and localization of prostate cancer. PMID:23924150

  4. Whole-brain diffusion tensor imaging in correlation to visual-evoked potentials in multiple sclerosis: a tract-based spatial statistics analysis.

    PubMed

    Lobsien, D; Ettrich, B; Sotiriou, K; Classen, J; Then Bergh, F; Hoffmann, K-T

    2014-01-01

    Functional correlates of microstructural damage of the brain affected by MS are incompletely understood. The purpose of this study was to evaluate correlations of visual-evoked potentials with microstructural brain changes as determined by DTI in patients with demyelinating central nervous disease. Sixty-one patients with clinically isolated syndrome or MS were prospectively recruited. The mean P100 visual-evoked potential latencies of the right and left eyes of each patient were calculated and used for the analysis. For DTI acquisition, a single-shot echo-planar imaging pulse sequence with 80 diffusion directions was performed at 3T. Fractional anisotropy, radial diffusivity, and axial diffusivity were calculated and correlated with mean P100 visual-evoked potentials by tract-based spatial statistics. Significant negative correlations between mean P100 visual-evoked potentials and fractional anisotropy and significant positive correlations between mean P100 visual-evoked potentials and radial diffusivity were found widespread over the whole brain. The highest significance was found in the optic radiation, frontoparietal white matter, and corpus callosum. Significant positive correlations between mean P100 visual-evoked potentials and axial diffusivity were less widespread, notably sparing the optic radiation. Microstructural changes of the whole brain correlated significantly with mean P100 visual-evoked potentials. The distribution of the correlations showed clear differences among axial diffusivity, fractional anisotropy, and radial diffusivity, notably in the optic radiation. This finding suggests a stronger correlation of mean P100 visual-evoked potentials to demyelination than to axonal damage. © 2014 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  5. Correlations between diffusion tensor imaging and levels of consciousness in patients with traumatic brain injury: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Wei, Rui-Li; Peng, Guo-Ping; Zhou, Jia-Jia; Wu, Min; He, Fang-Ping; Pan, Gang; Gao, Jian; Luo, Ben-Yan

    2017-06-05

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) often leads to impaired consciousness. Recent diffusion tensor imaging studies associated consciousness with imaging metrics including fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC). We evaluated their correlations and determined the best index in candidate regions. Six databases were searched, including PubMed and Embase, and 16 studies with 701 participants were included. Data from region-of-interest and whole-brain analysis methods were meta-analysed separately. The FA-consciousness correlation was marginal in the whole-brain white matter (r = 0.63, 95% CI [0.47, 0.79], p = 0.000) and the corpus callosum (CC) (r = 0.60, 95% CI [0.48, 0.71], p = 0.000), and moderate in the internal capsule (r = 0.48, 95% CI [0.24, 0.72], p = 0.000). Correlations with ADC trended negative and lacked significance. Further subgroup analysis revealed that consciousness levels correlated strongly with FA in the CC body (r = 0.66, 95% CI [0.43, 0.89]), moderately in the splenium (r = 0.58, 95% CI [0.38, 0.78]), but insignificantly in the genu. In conclusion, FA correlates better with consciousness levels than ADC in TBI. The degree of correlation varies among brain regions. The CC (especially its splenium and body) is a reliable candidate region to quantitatively reflect consciousness levels.

  6. MRI brain imaging.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Sarah

    2013-11-01

    General practitioners (GPs) are expected to be allowed to request MRI scans for adults for selected clinically appropriate indications from November 2013 as part of the expansion of Medicare-funded MRI services announced by the Federal Government in 2011. This article aims to give a brief overview of MRI brain imaging relevant to GPs, which will facilitate explanation of scan findings and management planning with their patients. Basic imaging techniques, common findings and terminology are presented using some illustrative case examples.

  7. Brain Imaging Analysis

    PubMed Central

    BOWMAN, F. DUBOIS

    2014-01-01

    The increasing availability of brain imaging technologies has led to intense neuroscientific inquiry into the human brain. Studies often investigate brain function related to emotion, cognition, language, memory, and numerous other externally induced stimuli as well as resting-state brain function. Studies also use brain imaging in an attempt to determine the functional or structural basis for psychiatric or neurological disorders and, with respect to brain function, to further examine the responses of these disorders to treatment. Neuroimaging is a highly interdisciplinary field, and statistics plays a critical role in establishing rigorous methods to extract information and to quantify evidence for formal inferences. Neuroimaging data present numerous challenges for statistical analysis, including the vast amounts of data collected from each individual and the complex temporal and spatial dependence present. We briefly provide background on various types of neuroimaging data and analysis objectives that are commonly targeted in the field. We present a survey of existing methods targeting these objectives and identify particular areas offering opportunities for future statistical contribution. PMID:25309940

  8. BrainImageJ

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Yi-Ren; Shiffman, Smadar; Brosnan, Thomas J.; Links, Jonathan M.; Beach, Leu S.; Judge, Nicholas S.; Xu, Yirong; Kelkar, Uma V.; Reiss, Allan L.

    2001-01-01

    The Human Brain Project consortium continues to struggle with effective sharing of tools. To facilitate reuse of its tools, the Stanford Psychiatry Neuroimaging Laboratory (SPNL) has developed BrainImageJ, a new software framework in Java. The framework consists of two components—a set of four programming interfaces and an application front end. The four interfaces define extension pathways for new data models, file loaders and savers, algorithms, and visualization tools. Any Java class that implements one of these interfaces qualifies as a BrainImageJ plug-in—a self-contained tool. After automatically detecting and incorporating new plug-ins, the application front end transparently generates graphical user interfaces that provide access to plug-in functionality. New plug-ins interoperate with existing ones immediately through the front end. BrainImageJ is used at the Stanford Psychiatry Neuroimaging Laboratory to develop image-analysis algorithms and three-dimensional visualization tools. It is the goal of our development group that, once the framework is placed in the public domain, it will serve as an interlaboratory platform for designing, distributing, and using interoperable tools. PMID:11522764

  9. Correlation between plasma brain natriuretic peptide concentration and lung thallium-201 uptake on exercise thallium perfusion images.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Noriko; Takahashi, Nobukazu; Kimura, Kazuo; Ishikawa, Toshiyuki; Toyama, Shinichi; Yoshii, Yuzuru; Uchino, Kazuaki; Yamakawa, Yohei; Matsumoto, Katsumi; Inoue, Tomio; Umemura, Satoshi

    2006-03-01

    The plasma brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) concentration at rest correlates with left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP), left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP). High lung thallium-201 uptake has been reported to be associated with hemodynamic variables such as LVEDP, LVEF, and PCWP. However, there is no study that has investigated the correlation of plasma BNP concentration with lung thallium-201 uptake. We examined whether the plasma BNP concentration was related to lung thallium-201 uptake. Before exercise, venous blood samples were obtained from 39 patients with old myocardial infarction. We investigated the correlations between plasma BNP concentration and lung thallium-201 uptake, and whether they were related to LVEF, extent of nonviable myocardium, and ischemic myocardium, respectively, with thallium-201 exercise stress testing. The plasma BNP concentration significantly correlated with lung thallium-201 uptake (P < 0.05), nonviable segments (P < 0.01), and LVEF (P < 0.01). Lung thallium-201 uptake correlated with nonviable segments (P < 0.01). Our results suggest that increased secretion of BNP is related to increased lung thallium-201 uptake, and they are related to the extent of nonviable myocardium and decreased left ventricular function. Plasma BNP concentration and lung thalium-201 uptake may reflect the extent of myocardial fibrosis causing myocyte stretch.

  10. Correlation-Peak Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, A.; Metzler, A.; Köckenberger, W.; Izquierdo, M.; Komor, E.; Haase, A.; Décorps, M.; von Kienlin, M.

    1996-08-01

    Identification and quantitation in conventional1H spectroscopic imagingin vivois often hampered by the small chemical-shift range. To improve the spectral resolution of spectroscopic imaging, homonuclear two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy has been combined with phase encoding of the spatial dimensions. From the theoretical description of the coherence-transfer signal in the Fourier-transform domain, a comprehensive acquisition and processing strategy is presented that includes optimization of the width and the position of the acquisition windows, matched filtering of the signal envelope, and graphical presentation of the cross peak of interest. The procedure has been applied to image the spatial distribution of the correlation peaks from specific spin systems in the hypocotyl of castor bean (Ricinus communis) seedlings. Despite the overlap of many resonances, correlation-peak imaging made it possible to observe a number of proton resonances, such as those of sucrose, β-glucose, glutamine/glutamate, lysine, and arginine.

  11. Brain Imaging: Applications in Psychiatry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andreasen, Nancy C.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses various brain imaging techniques, including computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, measurement of regional cerebral blood flow, single photo emission tomography, and position emission tomography. Describes the uses of these techniques in helping to understand brain functioning. (TW)

  12. Brain Imaging: Applications in Psychiatry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andreasen, Nancy C.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses various brain imaging techniques, including computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, measurement of regional cerebral blood flow, single photo emission tomography, and position emission tomography. Describes the uses of these techniques in helping to understand brain functioning. (TW)

  13. Perimetric visual field and functional MRI correlation: implications for image-guided surgery in occipital brain tumours

    PubMed Central

    Roux, F; Ibarrola, D; Lotterie, J; Chollet, F; Berry, I

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To compare the results of visual functional MRI with those of perimetric evaluation in patients with visual field defects and retrochiasmastic tumours and in normal subjects without visual field defect. The potential clinical usefulness of visual functional MRI data during resective surgery was evaluated in patients with occipital lobe tumours.
METHODS—Eleven patients with various tumours and visual field defects and 12 normal subjects were studied by fMRI using bimonocular or monocular repetitive photic stimulation (8 Hz). The data obtained were analyzed with the statistical parametric maps software (p<10-8) and were compared with the results of Goldmann visual field perimetric evaluation. In patients with occipital brain tumours undergoing surgery, the functional data were registered in a frameless stereotactic device and the images fused into anatomical three standard planes and three dimensional reconstructions of the brain surface.
RESULTS—Two studies of patients were discarded, one because of head motion and the other because of badly followed instructions. On the remaining patients the functional activations found in the visual cortex were consistent with the results of perimetric evaluation in all but one of the patients and all the normal subjects although the results of fMRI were highly dependent on the choices of the analysis thresholds. Visual functional MRI image guided data were used in five patients with occipital brain tumours. No added postoperative functional field defect was detected.
CONCLUSIONS—There was a good correspondence between fMRI data and the results of perimetric evaluation although dependent on the analysis thresholds. Visual fMRI data registered into a frameless stereotactic device may be useful in surgical planning and tumour removal.

 PMID:11561035

  14. Structures Showing Negative Correlations of Signal Intensity with Postnatal Age on T1-weighted Imaging of the Brain of Newborns and Infants.

    PubMed

    Hori, Saeka; Taoka, Toshiaki; Ochi, Tomoko; Miyasaka, Toshiteru; Sakamoto, Masahiko; Takayama, Katsutoshi; Wada, Takeshi; Myochin, Kaoru; Takahashi, Yukihiro; Kichikawa, Kimihiko

    2017-02-16

    Although the neonatal and infantile brain typically shows sequential T1 shortening according to gestational age as a result of myelination, several structures do not follow this rule. We evaluated the relationship between the signal intensity of various structures in the neonatal and infantile brain on T1-weighted imaging (T1WI) and either postnatal or gestational age. We examined magnetic resonance images from 120 newborns and infants without any abnormalities in the central nervous system. Written informed consent was obtained from all parents and the institutional review board approved the study. Gestational age at examination ranged from 35 weeks, 3 days to 46 weeks, 6 days, and postnatal age ranged from 7 days to 127 days. Signal intensity on T1WI was evaluated on a scale from Grade 1 (indistinguishable from surrounding structures) to Grade 4 (higher than cortex and close to fat). We evaluated relationships between the T1 signal grades of various structures in the neonatal brain and postnatal or gestational age using Spearman's correlation analysis. Significant positive correlations were identified between T1 signal grade and gestational age in the pyramidal tract (P < 0.001). Conversely, significant negative correlations were evident between T1 signal grade and postnatal age (P < 0.001), in structures including the stria medullaris thalami, fornix cerebellar vermis, dentate nucleus and anterior pituitary gland. Significant negative correlations exist between signal intensity on T1WI and postnatal age in some structures of the neonatal and infantile brain. Some mechanisms other than myelination might play roles in the course of signal appearance.

  15. Mining Outcome-relevant Brain Imaging Genetic Associations via Three-way Sparse Canonical Correlation Analysis in Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Xiaoke; Li, Chanxiu; Du, Lei; Yao, Xiaohui; Yan, Jingwen; Risacher, Shannon L.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Shen, Li; Zhang, Daoqiang; Weiner, Michael W.; Aisen, Paul; Petersen, Ronald; Jack, Clifford R.; Mason, Sara S.; Albers, Colleen S.; Knopman, David; Johnson, Kris; Jagust, William; Trojanowki, John Q.; Toga, Arthur W.; Beckett, Laurel; Green, Robert C.; Farlow, Martin R.; Marie Hake, Ann; Matthews, Brandy R.; Brosch, Jared R.; Herring, Scott; Hunt, Cynthia; Shaw, Leslie M.; Ances, Beau; Morris, John C.; Carroll, Maria; Creech, Mary L.; Franklin, Erin; Mintun, Mark A.; Schneider, Stacy; Oliver, Angela; Kaye, Jeffrey; Quinn, Joseph; Silbert, Lisa; Lind, Betty; Carter, Raina; Dolen, Sara; Schneider, Lon S.; Pawluczyk, Sonia; Beccera, Mauricio; Teodoro, Liberty; Spann, Bryan M.; Brewer, James; Vanderswag, Helen; Fleisher, Adam; Tariot, Pierre; Burke, Anna; Trncic, Nadira; Reeder, Stephanie; Heidebrink, Judith L.; Lord, Joanne L.; Doody, Rachelle S.; Villanueva-Meyer, Javier; Chowdhury, Munir; Rountree, Susan; Dang, Mimi; Stern, Yaakov; Honig, Lawrence S.; Bell, Karen L.; Marson, Daniel; Griffith, Randall; Clark, David; Geldmacher, David; Brockington, John; Roberson, Erik; Love, Marissa Natelson; Grossman, Hillel; Mitsis, Effie; Shah, Raj C.; deToledo-Morrell, Leyla; Duara, Ranjan; Varon, Daniel; Greig, Maria T.; Roberts, Peggy; Albert, Marilyn; Onyike, Chiadi; D’Agostino, Daniel; Kielb, Stephanie; Galvin, James E.; Cerbone, Brittany; Michel, Christina A.; Pogorelec, Dana M.; Rusinek, Henry; de Leon, Mony J.; Glodzik, Lidia; De Santi, Susan; Doraiswamy, P. Murali; Petrella, Jeffrey R.; Borges-Neto, Salvador; Wong, Terence Z.; Coleman, Edward; Smith, Charles D.; Jicha, Greg; Hardy, Peter; Sinha, Partha; Oates, Elizabeth; Conrad, Gary; Porsteinsson, Anton P.; Goldstein, Bonnie S.; Martin, Kim; Makino, Kelly M.; Ismail, M. Saleem; Brand, Connie; Mulnard, Ruth A.; Thai, Gaby; Mc-Adams-Ortiz, Catherine; Womack, Kyle; Mathews, Dana; Quiceno, Mary; Levey, Allan I.; Lah, James J.; Cellar, Janet S.; Burns, Jeffrey M.; Swerdlow, Russell H.; Brooks, William M.; Apostolova, Liana; Tingus, Kathleen; Woo, Ellen; Silverman, Daniel H. S.; Lu, Po H.; Bartzokis, George; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Parfitt, Francine; Kendall, Tracy; Johnson, Heather; van Dyck, Christopher H.; Carson, Richard E.; MacAvoy, Martha G.; Varma, Pradeep; Chertkow, Howard; Bergman, Howard; Hosein, Chris; Black, Sandra; Stefanovic, Bojana; Caldwell, Curtis; Hsiung, Ging-Yuek Robin; Feldman, Howard; Mudge, Benita; Assaly, Michele; Finger, Elizabeth; Pasternack, Stephen; Rachisky, Irina; Trost, Dick; Kertesz, Andrew; Bernick, Charles; Munic, Donna; Mesulam, Marek-Marsel; Lipowski, Kristine; Weintraub, Sandra; Bonakdarpour, Borna; Kerwin, Diana; Wu, Chuang-Kuo; Johnson, Nancy; Sadowsky, Carl; Villena, Teresa; Turner, Raymond Scott; Johnson, Kathleen; Reynolds, Brigid; Sperling, Reisa A.; Johnson, Keith A.; Marshall, Gad; Yesavage, Jerome; Taylor, Joy L.; Lane, Barton; Rosen, Allyson; Tinklenberg, Jared; Sabbagh, Marwan N.; Belden, Christine M.; Jacobson, Sandra A.; Sirrel, Sherye A.; Kowall, Neil; Killiany, Ronald; Budson, Andrew E.; Norbash, Alexander; Johnson, Patricia Lynn; Obisesan, Thomas O.; Wolday, Saba; Allard, Joanne; Lerner, Alan; Ogrocki, Paula; Tatsuoka, Curtis; Fatica, Parianne; Fletcher, Evan; Maillard, Pauline; Olichney, John; DeCarli, Charles; Carmichael, Owen; Kittur, Smita; Borrie, Michael; Lee, T.-Y.; Bartha, Rob; Johnson, Sterling; Asthana, Sanjay; Carlsson, Cynthia M.; Potkin, Steven G.; Preda, Adrian; Nguyen, Dana; Bates, Vernice; Capote, Horacio; Rainka, Michelle; Scharre, Douglas W.; Kataki, Maria; Adeli, Anahita; Zimmerman, Earl A.; Celmins, Dzintra; Brown, Alice D.; Pearlson, Godfrey D.; Blank, Karen; Anderson, Karen; Flashman, Laura A.; Seltzer, Marc; Hynes, Mary L.; Santulli, Robert B.; Sink, Kaycee M.; Gordineer, Leslie; Williamson, Jeff D.; Garg, Pradeep; Watkins, Franklin; Ott, Brian R.; Querfurth, Henry; Tremont, Geoffrey; Salloway, Stephen; Malloy, Paul; Correia, Stephen; Rosen, Howard J.; Miller, Bruce L.; Perry, David; Mintzer, Jacobo; Spicer, Kenneth; Bachman, David; Pomara, Nunzio; Hernando, Raymundo; Sarrael, Antero; Relkin, Norman; Chaing, Gloria; Lin, Michael; Ravdin, Lisa; Smith, Amanda; Raj, Balebail Ashok; Fargher, Kristin

    2017-01-01

    Neuroimaging genetics is an emerging field that aims to identify the associations between genetic variants (e.g., single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)) and quantitative traits (QTs) such as brain imaging phenotypes. In recent studies, in order to detect complex multi-SNP-multi-QT associations, bi-multivariate techniques such as various structured sparse canonical correlation analysis (SCCA) algorithms have been proposed and used in imaging genetics studies. However, associations between genetic markers and imaging QTs identified by existing bi-multivariate methods may not be all disease specific. To bridge this gap, we propose an analytical framework, based on three-way sparse canonical correlation analysis (T-SCCA), to explore the intrinsic associations among genetic markers, imaging QTs, and clinical scores of interest. We perform an empirical study using the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) cohort to discover the relationships among SNPs from AD risk gene APOE, imaging QTs extracted from structural magnetic resonance imaging scans, and cognitive and diagnostic outcomes. The proposed T-SCCA model not only outperforms the traditional SCCA method in terms of identifying strong associations, but also discovers robust outcome-relevant imaging genetic patterns, demonstrating its promise for improving disease-related mechanistic understanding. PMID:28291242

  16. Imaging the Alzheimer Brain

    PubMed Central

    Ashford, J. Wesson; Salehi, Ahmad; Furst, Ansgar; Bayley, Peter; Frisoni, Giovanni B.; Jack, Clifford R.; Sabri, Osama; Adamson, Maheen M.; Coburn, Kerry L.; Olichney, John; Schuff, Norbert; Spielman, Daniel; Edland, Steven D.; Black, Sandra; Rosen, Allyson; Kennedy, David; Weiner, Michael; Perry, George

    2013-01-01

    This supplement to the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease contains more than half of the chapters from The Handbook of Imaging the Alzheimer Brain, which was first presented at the International Conference on Alzheimer's Disease in Paris, in July, 2011. While the Handbook contains 27 chapters that are modified articles from 2009, 2010, and 2011 issues of the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, this supplement contains the 31 new chapters of that book and an introductory article drawn from the introductions to each section of the book. The Handbook was designed to provide a multilevel overview of the full field of brain imaging related to Alzheimer's disease (AD). The Handbook, as well as this supplement, contains both reviews of the basic concepts of imaging, the latest developments in imaging, and various discussions and perspectives of the problems of the field and promising directions. The Handbook was designed to be useful for students and clinicians interested in AD as well as scientists studying the brain and pathology related to AD. PMID:21971448

  17. Digital Image Correlation Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, Dan; Crozier, Paul; Reu, Phil

    2015-10-06

    DICe is an open source digital image correlation (DIC) tool intended for use as a module in an external application or as a standalone analysis code. It's primary capability is computing full –field displacements and strains from sequences of digital These images are typically of a material sample undergoing a materials characterization experiment, but DICe is also useful for other applications (for example, trajectory tracking). DICe is machine portable (Windows, Linux and Mac) and can be effectively deployed on a high performance computing platform. Capabilities from DICe can be invoked through a library interface, via source code integration of DICe classes or through a graphical user interface.

  18. Image correlation and sampling study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popp, D. J.; Mccormack, D. S.; Sedwick, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    The development of analytical approaches for solving image correlation and image sampling of multispectral data is discussed. Relevant multispectral image statistics which are applicable to image correlation and sampling are identified. The general image statistics include intensity mean, variance, amplitude histogram, power spectral density function, and autocorrelation function. The translation problem associated with digital image registration and the analytical means for comparing commonly used correlation techniques are considered. General expressions for determining the reconstruction error for specific image sampling strategies are developed.

  19. Structural brain correlates of human sleep oscillations.

    PubMed

    Saletin, Jared M; van der Helm, Els; Walker, Matthew P

    2013-12-01

    Sleep is strongly conserved within species, yet marked and perplexing inter-individual differences in sleep physiology are observed. Combining EEG sleep recordings and high-resolution structural brain imaging, here we demonstrate that the morphology of the human brain offers one explanatory factor of such inter-individual variability. Gray matter volume in interoceptive and exteroceptive cortices correlated with the expression of slower NREM sleep spindle frequencies, supporting their proposed role in sleep protection against conscious perception. Conversely, and consistent with an involvement in declarative memory processing, gray matter volume in bilateral hippocampus was associated with faster NREM sleep spindle frequencies. In contrast to spindles, gray matter volume in the homeostatic sleep-regulating center of the basal forebrain/hypothalamus, together with the medial prefrontal cortex, accounted for individual differences in NREM slow wave oscillations. Together, such findings indicate that the qualitative and quantitative expression of human sleep physiology is significantly related to anatomically specific differences in macroscopic brain structure.

  20. Diffusion tensor imaging reveals adolescent binge ethanol-induced brain structural integrity alterations in adult rats that correlate with behavioral dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Vetreno, Ryan P; Yaxley, Richard; Paniagua, Beatriz; Crews, Fulton T

    2016-07-01

    Adolescence is characterized by considerable brain maturation that coincides with the development of adult behavior. Binge drinking is common during adolescence and can have deleterious effects on brain maturation because of the heightened neuroplasticity of the adolescent brain. Using an animal model of adolescent intermittent ethanol [AIE; 5.0 g/kg, intragastric, 20 percent EtOH w/v; 2 days on/2 days off from postnatal day (P)25 to P55], we assessed the adult brain structural volumes and integrity on P80 and P220 using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). While we did not observe a long-term effect of AIE on structural volumes, AIE did reduce axial diffusivity (AD) in the cerebellum, hippocampus and neocortex. Radial diffusivity (RD) was reduced in the hippocampus and neocortex of AIE-treated animals. Prior AIE treatment did not affect fractional anisotropy (FA), but did lead to long-term reductions of mean diffusivity (MD) in both the cerebellum and corpus callosum. AIE resulted in increased anxiety-like behavior and diminished object recognition memory, the latter of which was positively correlated with DTI measures. Across aging, whole brain volumes increased, as did volumes of the corpus callosum and neocortex. This was accompanied by age-associated AD reductions in the cerebellum and neocortex as well as RD and MD reductions in the cerebellum. Further, we found that FA increased in both the cerebellum and corpus callosum as rats aged from P80 to P220. Thus, both age and AIE treatment caused long-term changes to brain structural integrity that could contribute to cognitive dysfunction.

  1. Brain receptor imaging.

    PubMed

    Heiss, Wolf-Dieter; Herholz, Karl

    2006-02-01

    Receptors have a prominent role in brain function, as they are the effector sites of neurotransmission at the postsynaptic membrane, have a regulatory role on presynaptic sites for transmitter reuptake and feedback, and are modulating various functions on the cell membrane. Distribution, density, and activity of receptors in the brain can be visualized by radioligands labeled for SPECT and PET, and the receptor binding can be quantified by appropriate tracer kinetic models, which can be modified and simplified for particular application. Selective radioligands are available for the various transmitter systems, by which the distribution of these receptors in the normal brain and changes in receptor binding during various physiologic activities or resulting from pathologic conditions can be visualized. The quantitative imaging for several receptors has gained clinical importance-for example, dopamine (D2)) receptors for differential diagnosis of movement disorders and for assessment of receptor occupancy by neuroleptics drugs; serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) receptors and the 5-HT transporter in affective disorders and for assessment of activity of antidepressants; nicotinic receptors and acetylcholinesterase as markers of cognitive and memory impairment; central benzodiazepine-binding sites at the gamma-aminobutyric acid A (GABAA) receptor complex as markers of neuronal integrity in neurodegenerative disorders, epilepsy, and stroke and as the site of action of benzodiazepines; peripheral benzodiazepine receptors as indicators of inflammatory changes; opioid receptors detecting increased cortical excitability in focal epilepsy but also affected in perception of and emotional response to pain; and several receptor systems affected in drug abuse and craving. Further studies of the various transmitter/receptor systems and their balance and infraction will improve our understanding of complex brain functions and will provide more insight into the pathophysiology of

  2. Brain Morphometry Using Anatomical Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bansal, Ravi; Gerber, Andrew J.; Peterson, Bradley S.

    2008-01-01

    The efficacy of anatomical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in studying the morphological features of various regions of the brain is described, also providing the steps used in the processing and studying of the images. The ability to correlate these features with several clinical and psychological measures can help in using anatomical MRI to…

  3. Brain Morphometry Using Anatomical Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bansal, Ravi; Gerber, Andrew J.; Peterson, Bradley S.

    2008-01-01

    The efficacy of anatomical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in studying the morphological features of various regions of the brain is described, also providing the steps used in the processing and studying of the images. The ability to correlate these features with several clinical and psychological measures can help in using anatomical MRI to…

  4. Extent of microstructural white matter injury in postconcussive syndrome correlates with impaired cognitive reaction time: a 3T diffusion tensor imaging study of mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Niogi, S N; Mukherjee, P; Ghajar, J; Johnson, C; Kolster, R A; Sarkar, R; Lee, H; Meeker, M; Zimmerman, R D; Manley, G T; McCandliss, B D

    2008-05-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) may be a useful index of microstructural changes implicated in diffuse axonal injury (DAI) linked to persistent postconcussive symptoms, especially in mild traumatic brain injury (TBI), for which conventional MR imaging techniques may lack sensitivity. We hypothesized that for mild TBI, DTI measures of DAI would correlate with impairments in reaction time, whereas the number of focal lesions on conventional 3T MR imaging would not. Thirty-four adult patients with mild TBI with persistent symptoms were assessed for DAI by quantifying traumatic microhemorrhages detected on a conventional set of T2*-weighted gradient-echo images and by DTI measures of fractional anisotropy (FA) within a set of a priori regions of interest. FA values 2.5 SDs below the region average, based on a group of 26 healthy control adults, were coded as exhibiting DAI. DTI measures revealed several predominant regions of damage including the anterior corona radiata (41% of the patients), uncinate fasciculus (29%), genu of the corpus callosum (21%), inferior longitudinal fasciculus (21%), and cingulum bundle (18%). The number of damaged white matter structures as quantified by DTI was significantly correlated with mean reaction time on a simple cognitive task (r = 0.49, P = .012). In contradistinction, the number of traumatic microhemorrhages was uncorrelated with reaction time (r = -0.08, P = .71). Microstructural white matter lesions detected by DTI correlate with persistent cognitive deficits in mild TBI, even in populations in which conventional measures do not. DTI measures may thus contribute additional diagnostic information related to DAI.

  5. Correlation between qualitative balance indices, dynamic posturography and structural brain imaging in patients with progressive supranuclear palsy and its subtypes.

    PubMed

    Pasha, Shaik Afsar; Yadav, Ravi; Ganeshan, Mohan; Saini, Jitender; Gupta, Anupam; Sandhya, M; Pal, Pramod Kumar

    2016-01-01

    To compare the clinical, balance, and radiological profile of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) of Richardson type (PSP-R) and Parkinsonian type (PSP-P). Twenty-nine patients with PSP (PSP-R: 17, PSP-P: 12) satisfying the probable/possible National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke-PSP criteria were recruited and assessed with Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale-III, PSP rating scale (PSPRS), Berg balance scale (BBS), Tinetti performance-oriented mobility assessment gait and total (TPG and TPT) score, dynamic posturography (DP), and magnetic resonance imaging. Data were compared with 30 age- and gender-matched healthy controls. The mean ages of PSP-R, PSP-P, and controls were comparable (62.5 ± 6.6, 59 ± 8.9, and 59.8 ± 7.6 years). The PSP group had significantly poor DP scores and more radiological abnormalities than controls. The PSPRS, TPG, and TPT scores were significantly more impaired in PSP-R compared to PSP-P (P = 0.045, P = 0.031, and P = 0.037, respectively). In DP, the limits of overall stability were most significant (P < 0.001) and PSP-R had lower scores. PSP-R compared to PSP-P had more often "Humming Bird" sign (P < 0.001), "Morning Glory" sign (P < 0.008), and generalized cortical atrophy (P < 0.001). The area of midbrain (P < 0.002) and midbrain/pons ratio (P < 0.013) was significantly lower in PSP-R. In PSP-P, the overall balance index significantly correlated with BBS, TPG, and TPT (r = -0.79, P = 0.002; r = -0.772, P = 0.003; and r = -0.688, P = 0.013) and the midbrain axial anterior-posterior diameter significantly correlated with the TPG and TPT (r = 0.74, P = 0.01; r = 0.66, P = 0.018). While balance and radiological abnormalities were more severe in PSP-R, the qualitative and quantitative measurements of severity of balance in PSP-P rather than PSP-R was a better reflection of the pathology of the midbrain.

  6. Correlation between clinical severity of central nervous system (CNS) lupus and findings on single photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT) images of the brain; preliminary results

    SciTech Connect

    Silverman, I.E.; Zeit, R.M.; Von Feldt, J.M.

    1994-05-01

    Systemic Lupus Erythematosis (SLE) commonly causes significant neuropsychiatric disorders. The purpose of this study was to review the brain SPECT studies of SLE patients with clinical evidence of CNS involvement and determine whether there is a correlation between the findings on SPECT images and the clinical manifestations of this serious phase of the disease. We enrolled 19 SLE patients and 12 normal controls in this study. The level of each patient`s disease activity was determined by the SLE Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI), an established method of scoring disease severity which is heavily weighted toward neuropsychiatric symptomatology, for 15 of the 19 SLE patients. The SLEDAI was calculated within a 10 day window of the date when the SPECT scan was obtained. SPECT scans were performed 30 minutes following the intravenous administration of 99mTc-HMPAO. Results are discussed.

  7. Two-Dimensional Correlation Spectroscopy for Multimodal Analysis of FT-IR, Raman, and MALDI-TOF MS Hyperspectral Images with Hamster Brain Tissue.

    PubMed

    Lasch, Peter; Noda, Isao

    2017-04-11

    Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) techniques are useful for obtaining very detailed structural and compositional information from biomedical, pharmaceutical, or clinical samples, among others. The informative value of these methods can be further increased through the application of different HSI techniques and joint analysis of the data. However, interpretation and understanding of multimodal HSI have been impeded by difficulties in registration of the different HSI data sets and by the lack of integrative analysis concepts. Here, we introduce two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2DCOS) as a novel technique for jointly analyzing HSI data which allows one to obtain deeper insights into the chemistry of complex samples by decrypting auto- and heterospectral correlations that may exist between features of the different HSI data. The general workflow of 2DCOS analysis is demonstrated by HSI examples acquired from cryo-sections of hamster brain tissue using Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) microspectroscopy, confocal Raman microspectroscopy (CRM), and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry. Multimodal hyperspectral image analysis by 2DCOS opens up new opportunities for spectral band assignments and thus the interpretation of structure-spectra and composition-spectra relationships. We foresee wide application potential for describing complex samples in various fields ranging from biomedicine to industrial applications.

  8. Late enhancement of brain-behavior correlations during response inhibition.

    PubMed

    Jimura, K; Hirose, S; Kunimatsu, A; Ohtomo, K; Koike, Y; Konishi, S

    2014-08-22

    Previous neuroimaging studies of response inhibition have examined correlations between behavioral efficiency and brain activity, but the temporal stability of the correlations has largely been ignored. The present functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study demonstrates the temporal changes of the brain activity associated with performance efficiency that led to more robust brain-behavior correlations in a later part of the experimental sessions. Participants performed a stop-signal task requiring inhibition of inappropriate responses, where more efficient behavioral performance is reflected in a shorter stop-signal reaction time (SSRT). Among across-subject negative correlations between the brain activity and the SSRT, the majority of the negative correlations were observed in the second half of experimental sessions. In the cerebellar region that showed the greatest difference in correlations between the second and the first halves, the brain activity increased in efficient performers, whereas the brain activity decreased in poor performers. These results suggest the existence of multiple brain mechanisms that increase and decrease the brain activity depending on the behavioral efficiency of the performers. More practically, these results indicate that robust brain-behavior correlations can more effectively be detected in a later part of the experimental sessions. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Isointense Infant Brain Segmentation by Stacked Kernel Canonical Correlation Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li; Shi, Feng; Gao, Yaozong; Li, Gang; Lin, Weili; Shen, Dinggang

    2016-01-01

    Segmentation of isointense infant brain (at ~6-months-old) MR images is challenging due to the ongoing maturation and myelination process in the first year of life. In particular, signal contrast between white and gray matters inverses around 6 months of age, where brain tissues appear isointense and hence exhibit extremely low tissue contrast, thus posing significant challenges for automated segmentation. In this paper, we propose a novel segmentation method to address the above-mentioned challenges based on stacked kernel canonical correlation analysis (KCCA). Our main idea is to utilize the 12-month-old brain image with high tissue contrast to guide the segmentation of 6-month-old brain images with extremely low contrast. Specifically, we use KCCA to learn the common feature representations for both 6-month-old and the subsequent 12-month-old brain images of same subjects to make their features comparable in the common space. Note that the longitudinal 12-month-old brain images are not required in the testing stage, and they are required only in the KCCA based training stage to provide a set of longitudinal 6- and 12-month-old image pairs for training. Moreover, for optimizing the common feature representations, we propose a stacked KCCA mapping, instead of using only the conventional one-step of KCCA mapping. In this way, we can better use the 12-month-old brain images as multiple atlases to guide the segmentation of isointense brain images. Specifically, sparse patch-based multi-atlas labeling is used to propagate tissue labels in the (12-month-old) atlases and segment isointense brain images by measuring patch similarity between testing and atlas images with their learned common features. The proposed method was evaluated on 20 isointense brain images via leave-one-out cross-validation, showing much better performance than the state-of-the-art methods.

  10. Structural Brain Correlates of Human Sleep Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Saletin, Jared M.; van der Helm, Els; Walker, Matthew P.

    2014-01-01

    Sleep is strongly conserved within species, yet marked and perplexing inter-individual differences in sleep physiology are observed. Combining EEG sleep recordings and high-resolution structural brain imaging, here we demonstrate that the morphology of the human brain offers one explanatory factor of such inter-individual variability. Grey matter volume in interoceptive and exteroceptive cortices correlated with the expression of slower NREM sleep spindle frequencies, supporting their proposed role in sleep protection against conscious perception. Conversely, and consistent with an involvement in declarative memory processing, grey matter volume in bilateral hippocampus was associated with faster NREM sleep spindle frequencies. In contrast to spindles, grey matter volume in the homeostatic sleep-regulating center of the basal forebrain/hypothalamus, together with the medial prefrontal cortex, accounted for individual differences in NREM slow wave oscillations. Together, such findings indicate that the qualitative and quantitative expression of human sleep physiology is significantly related to anatomically specific differences in macroscopic brain structure. PMID:23770411

  11. Brain imaging in psychiatry

    SciTech Connect

    Morihisa, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    This book contains the following five chapters: Positron Emission Tomography (PET) in Psychiatry; Regional Cerebral Blood Flow (CBF) in Psychiatry: Methodological Issues; Regional Cerebral Blood Flow in Psychiatry: Application to Clinical Research; Regional Cerebral Blood Flow in Psychiatry: The Resting and Activated Brains of Schizophrenic Patients; and Brain Electrical Activity Mapping (BEAM) in Psychiatry.

  12. Brain Imaging and Behavioral Outcome in Traumatic Brain Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigler, Erin D.

    1996-01-01

    This review explores the cellular pathology associated with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and its relation to neurobehavioral outcomes, the relationship of brain imaging findings to underlying pathology, brain imaging techniques, various image analysis procedures and how they relate to neuropsychological testing, and the importance of brain imaging…

  13. Brain Imaging and Behavioral Outcome in Traumatic Brain Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigler, Erin D.

    1996-01-01

    This review explores the cellular pathology associated with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and its relation to neurobehavioral outcomes, the relationship of brain imaging findings to underlying pathology, brain imaging techniques, various image analysis procedures and how they relate to neuropsychological testing, and the importance of brain imaging…

  14. Psychosis in Machado-Joseph Disease: Clinical Correlates, Pathophysiological Discussion, and Functional Brain Imaging. Expanding the Cerebellar Cognitive Affective Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Braga-Neto, Pedro; Pedroso, José Luiz; Gadelha, Ary; Laureano, Maura Regina; de Souza Noto, Cristiano; Garrido, Griselda Jara; Barsottini, Orlando Graziani Povoas

    2016-08-01

    Machado-Joseph disease (MJD) is the most common spinocerebellar ataxia worldwide with a broad range of clinical manifestations, but psychotic symptoms were not previously characterized. We investigated the psychiatric manifestations of a large cohort of Brazilian patients with MJD in an attempt to characterize the presence of psychotic symptoms. We evaluated 112 patients with clinical and molecular diagnosis of MJD from February 2008 to November 2013. Patients with psychotic symptoms were referred to psychiatric evaluation and brain perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) analysis. A specific scale-Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS)-was used to characterize psychotic symptoms in MJD patients. We also performed an autopsy from one of the patients with MJD and psychotic symptoms. Five patients presented psychotic symptoms. Patients with psychotic symptoms were older and had a late onset of the disease (p < 0.05). SPECT results showed that MJD patients had significant regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) decrease in the cerebellum bilaterally and vermis compared with healthy subjects. No significant rCBF differences were found in patients without psychotic symptoms compared to patients with psychotic symptoms. The pathological description of a patient with MJD and psychotic symptoms revealed severe loss of neuron bodies in the dentate nucleus and substantia nigra. MJD patients with a late onset of the disease and older ones are at risk to develop psychotic symptoms during the disease progression. These clinical findings may be markers for an underlying cortical-cerebellar disconnection or degeneration of specific cortical and subcortical regions that may characterize the cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome.

  15. Brain structures (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The structures of the brain include: the brainstem, consisting of the spinal cord, the medulla oblongata, the pons and the midbrain; the cerebellum; the cerebrum (one half, or hemisphere shown), and the diencephalon .

  16. Improved Digital Image Correlation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudassar, Asloob Ahmad; Butt, Saira

    2016-12-01

    Digital Image Correlation (DIC) is a powerful technique which is used to correlate two image segments to determine the similarity between them. A correlation image is formed which gives a peak known as correlation peak. If the two image segments are identical the peak is known as auto-correlation peak otherwise it is known as cross correlation peak. The location of the peak in a correlation image gives the relative displacement between the two image segments. Use of DIC for in-plane displacement and deformation measurements in Electronic Speckle Photography (ESP) is well known. In ESP two speckle images are correlated using DIC and relative displacement is measured. We are presenting background review of ESP and disclosing a technique based on DIC for improved relative measurements which we regard as the improved DIC method. Simulation and experimental results reveal that the proposed improved-DIC method is superior to the conventional DIC method in two aspects, in resolution and in the availability of reference position in displacement measurements.

  17. Journey into the brain: from single synapse to whole brain anatomy by correlative microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavone, Francesco

    2014-03-01

    The study of the brain's plasticity, or its ability to change, helps to reveal how it works. The secrets of brain activity and its control of motion are hidden in the structures, the functionality and the morphology of the physical brain, notes Francesco Pavone of the European Laboratory for Non-Linear Spectroscopy (LENS) in his presentation,"Journey into the Brain: from Single Synapse to Whole Brain Anatomy by Correlative Microscopy." We know synapses are formed through chemical interactions and electrical connections are made, Pavone says. But in order to understand the process we must examine the brain at several different scales. A cadre of optical methods such as correlative microscopy, optical manipulation, 3D tomography, confocal light sheet microscopy, and multimodal camera imaging are used to examine the brain at highly localized regions but at the multiple scales to reveal these inner workings.

  18. Self-calibrated correlation imaging with k-space variant correlation functions.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu; Edalati, Masoud; Du, Xingfu; Wang, Hui; Cao, Jie J

    2017-07-07

    Correlation imaging is a previously developed high-speed MRI framework that converts parallel imaging reconstruction into the estimate of correlation functions. The presented work aims to demonstrate this framework can provide a speed gain over parallel imaging by estimating k-space variant correlation functions. Because of Fourier encoding with gradients, outer k-space data contain higher spatial-frequency image components arising primarily from tissue boundaries. As a result of tissue-boundary sparsity in the human anatomy, neighboring k-space data correlation varies from the central to the outer k-space. By estimating k-space variant correlation functions with an iterative self-calibration method, correlation imaging can benefit from neighboring k-space data correlation associated with both coil sensitivity encoding and tissue-boundary sparsity, thereby providing a speed gain over parallel imaging that relies only on coil sensitivity encoding. This new approach is investigated in brain imaging and free-breathing neonatal cardiac imaging. Correlation imaging performs better than existing parallel imaging techniques in simulated brain imaging acceleration experiments. The higher speed enables real-time data acquisition for neonatal cardiac imaging in which physiological motion is fast and non-periodic. With k-space variant correlation functions, correlation imaging gives a higher speed than parallel imaging and offers the potential to image physiological motion in real-time. Magn Reson Med, 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  19. Temporal Lobe Cortical Thickness Correlations Differentiate the Migraine Brain from the Healthy Brain

    PubMed Central

    Schwedt, Todd J.; Berisha, Visar; Chong, Catherine D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Interregional cortical thickness correlations reflect underlying brain structural connectivity and functional connectivity. A few prior studies have shown that migraine is associated with atypical cortical brain structure and atypical functional connectivity amongst cortical regions that participate in sensory processing. However, the specific brain regions that most accurately differentiate the migraine brain from the healthy brain have yet to be determined. The aim of this study was to identify the brain regions that comprised interregional cortical thickness correlations that most differed between migraineurs and healthy controls. Methods This was a cross-sectional brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) investigation of 64 adults with migraine and 39 healthy control subjects recruited from tertiary-care medical centers and their surrounding communities. All subjects underwent structural brain MRI imaging on a 3T scanner. Cortical thickness was determined for 70 brain regions that cover the cerebral cortex and cortical thickness correlations amongst these regions were calculated. Cortical thickness correlations that best differentiated groups of six migraineurs from controls and vice versa were identified. Results A model containing 15 interregional cortical thickness correlations differentiated groups of migraineurs from healthy controls with high accuracy. The right temporal pole was involved in 13 of the 15 interregional correlations while the right middle temporal cortex was involved in the other two. Conclusions A model consisting of 15 interregional cortical thickness correlations accurately differentiates the brains of small groups of migraineurs from those of healthy controls. Correlations with the right temporal pole were highly represented in this classifier, suggesting that this region plays an important role in migraine pathophysiology. PMID:25679805

  20. Brain Tumor Imaging.

    PubMed

    Brindle, Kevin M; Izquierdo-García, José L; Lewis, David Y; Mair, Richard J; Wright, Alan J

    2017-07-20

    Modern imaging techniques, particularly functional imaging techniques that interrogate some specific aspect of underlying tumor biology, have enormous potential in neuro-oncology for disease detection, grading, and tumor delineation to guide biopsy and resection; monitoring treatment response; and targeting radiotherapy. This brief review considers the role of magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy, and positron emission tomography in these areas and discusses the factors that limit translation of new techniques to the clinic, in particular, the cost and difficulties associated with validation in multicenter clinical trials.

  1. Functional brain imaging across development.

    PubMed

    Rubia, Katya

    2013-12-01

    The developmental cognitive neuroscience literature has grown exponentially over the last decade. This paper reviews the functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) literature on brain function development of typically late developing functions of cognitive and motivation control, timing and attention as well as of resting state neural networks. Evidence shows that between childhood and adulthood, concomitant with cognitive maturation, there is progressively increased functional activation in task-relevant lateral and medial frontal, striatal and parieto-temporal brain regions that mediate these higher level control functions. This is accompanied by progressively stronger functional inter-regional connectivity within task-relevant fronto-striatal and fronto-parieto-temporal networks. Negative age associations are observed in earlier developing posterior and limbic regions, suggesting a shift with age from the recruitment of "bottom-up" processing regions towards "top-down" fronto-cortical and fronto-subcortical connections, leading to a more mature, supervised cognition. The resting state fMRI literature further complements this evidence by showing progressively stronger deactivation with age in anti-correlated task-negative resting state networks, which is associated with better task performance. Furthermore, connectivity analyses during the resting state show that with development increasingly stronger long-range connections are being formed, for example, between fronto-parietal and fronto-cerebellar connections, in both task-positive networks and in task-negative default mode networks, together with progressively lesser short-range connections, suggesting progressive functional integration and segregation with age. Overall, evidence suggests that throughout development between childhood and adulthood, there is progressive refinement and integration of both task-positive fronto-cortical and fronto-subcortical activation and task-negative deactivation, leading to

  2. Correlation between the Effects of Acupuncture at Taichong (LR3) and Functional Brain Areas: A Resting-State Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study Using True versus Sham Acupuncture

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Shanshan; Zhang, Jiping; Chen, Junqi; Zhang, Shaoqun; Li, Zhipeng; Chen, Jiarong; Ouyang, Huailiang; Huang, Yong; Tang, Chunzhi

    2014-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has been shown to detect the specificity of acupuncture points, as proved by numerous studies. In this study, resting-state fMRI was used to observe brain areas activated by acupuncture at the Taichong (LR3) acupoint. A total of 15 healthy subjects received brain resting-state fMRI before acupuncture and after sham and true acupuncture, respectively, at LR3. Image data processing was performed using Data Processing Assistant for Resting-State fMRI and REST software. The combination of amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF) and regional homogeneity (ReHo) was used to analyze the changes in brain function during sham and true acupuncture. Acupuncture at LR3 can specifically activate or deactivate brain areas related to vision, movement, sensation, emotion, and analgesia. The specific alterations in the anterior cingulate gyrus, thalamus, and cerebellar posterior lobe have a crucial effect and provide a valuable reference. Sham acupuncture has a certain effect on psychological processes and does not affect brain areas related to function. PMID:24963329

  3. Fiducial marker for correlating images

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Lisa Marie [Rocky Point, NY; Smith, Randy J [Wading River, NY; Warren, John B [Port Jefferson, NY; Elliott, Donald [Hampton Bays, NY

    2011-06-21

    The invention relates to a fiducial marker having a marking grid that is used to correlate and view images produced by different imaging modalities or different imaging and viewing modalities. More specifically, the invention relates to the fiducial marking grid that has a grid pattern for producing either a viewing image and/or a first analytical image that can be overlaid with at least one other second analytical image in order to view a light path or to image different imaging modalities. Depending on the analysis, the grid pattern has a single layer of a certain thickness or at least two layers of certain thicknesses. In either case, the grid pattern is imageable by each imaging or viewing modality used in the analysis. Further, when viewing a light path, the light path of the analytical modality cannot be visualized by viewing modality (e.g., a light microscope objective). By correlating these images, the ability to analyze a thin sample that is, for example, biological in nature but yet contains trace metal ions is enhanced. Specifically, it is desired to analyze both the organic matter of the biological sample and the trace metal ions contained within the biological sample without adding or using extrinsic labels or stains.

  4. Structural brain imaging correlates of ASD and ADHD across the lifespan: a hypothesis-generating review on developmental ASD-ADHD subtypes.

    PubMed

    Rommelse, Nanda; Buitelaar, Jan K; Hartman, Catharina A

    2017-02-01

    We hypothesize that it is plausible that biologically distinct developmental ASD-ADHD subtypes are present, each characterized by a distinct time of onset of symptoms, progression and combination of symptoms. The aim of the present narrative review was to explore if structural brain imaging studies may shed light on key brain areas that are linked to both ASD and ADHD symptoms and undergo significant changes during development. These findings may possibly pinpoint to brain mechanisms underlying differential developmental ASD-ADHD subtypes. To this end we brought together the literature on ASD and ADHD structural brain imaging symptoms and particularly highlight the adolescent years and beyond. Findings indicate that the vast majority of existing MRI studies has been cross-sectional and conducted in children, and sometimes did include adolescents as well, but without explicitly documenting on this age group. MRI studies documenting on age effects in adults with ASD and/or ADHD are rare, and if age is taken into account, only linear effects are examined. Data from various studies suggest that a crucial distinctive feature underlying different developmental ASD-ADHD subtypes may be the differential developmental thinning patterns of the anterior cingulate cortex and related connections towards other prefrontal regions. These regions are crucial for the development of cognitive/effortful control and socio-emotional functioning, with impairments in these features as key to both ASD and ADHD.

  5. Towards a comprehensive understanding of brain machinery by correlative microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allegra Mascaro, Anna Letizia; Silvestri, Ludovico; Sacconi, Leonardo; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2015-06-01

    Unraveling the complexity of brain structure and function is the biggest challenge of contemporary science. Due to their flexibility, optical techniques are the key to exploring this intricate network. However, a single imaging technique can reveal only a small part of this machinery due to its inherent multilevel organization. To obtain a more comprehensive view of brain functionality, complementary approaches have been combined. For instance, brain activity was monitored simultaneously on different spatiotemporal scales with functional magnetic resonance imaging and calcium imaging. On the other hand, dynamic information on the structural plasticity of neuronal networks has been contextualized in a wider framework combining two-photon and light-sheet microscopy. Finally, synaptic features have been revealed on previously in vivo imaged samples by correlative light-electron microscopy. Although these approaches have revealed important features of brain machinery, they provided small bridges between specific spatiotemporal scales, lacking an omni-comprehensive view. In this perspective, we briefly review the state of the art of correlative techniques and propose a wider methodological framework fusing multiple levels of brain investigation.

  6. Correlated gene expression supports synchronous activity in brain networks

    PubMed Central

    Richiardi, Jonas; Altmann, Andre; Milazzo, Anna-Clare; Chang, Catie; Chakravarty, M. Mallar; Banaschewski, Tobias; Barker, Gareth J.; Bokde, Arun L.W.; Bromberg, Uli; Büchel, Christian; Conrod, Patricia; Fauth-Bühler, Mira; Flor, Herta; Frouin, Vincent; Gallinat, Jürgen; Garavan, Hugh; Gowland, Penny; Heinz, Andreas; Lemaître, Hervé; Mann, Karl F.; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Nees, Frauke; Paus, Tomáš; Pausova, Zdenka; Rietschel, Marcella; Robbins, Trevor W.; Smolka, Michael N.; Spanagel, Rainer; Ströhle, Andreas; Schumann, Gunter; Hawrylycz, Mike; Poline, Jean-Baptiste; Greicius, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    During rest, brain activity is synchronized between different regions widely distributed throughout the brain, forming functional networks. However, the molecular mechanisms supporting functional connectivity remain undefined. We show that functional brain networks defined with resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging can be recapitulated by using measures of correlated gene expression in a post mortem brain tissue data set. The set of 136 genes we identify is significantly enriched for ion channels. Polymorphisms in this set of genes significantly affect resting-state functional connectivity in a large sample of healthy adolescents. Expression levels of these genes are also significantly associated with axonal connectivity in the mouse. The results provide convergent, multimodal evidence that resting-state functional networks correlate with the orchestrated activity of dozens of genes linked to ion channel activity and synaptic function. PMID:26068849

  7. Brain correlates of subjective freedom of choice.

    PubMed

    Filevich, Elisa; Vanneste, Patricia; Brass, Marcel; Fias, Wim; Haggard, Patrick; Kühn, Simone

    2013-12-01

    The subjective feeling of free choice is an important feature of human experience. Experimental tasks have typically studied free choice by contrasting free and instructed selection of response alternatives. These tasks have been criticised, and it remains unclear how they relate to the subjective feeling of freely choosing. We replicated previous findings of the fMRI correlates of free choice, defined objectively. We introduced a novel task in which participants could experience and report a graded sense of free choice. BOLD responses for conditions subjectively experienced as free identified a postcentral area distinct from the areas typically considered to be involved in free action. Thus, the brain correlates of subjective feeling of free action were not directly related to any established brain correlates of objectively-defined free action. Our results call into question traditional assumptions about the relation between subjective experience of choosing and activity in the brain's so-called voluntary motor areas. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Brain (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... to 2-Year-Old Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Brain KidsHealth > For Parents > Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Brain ... child may be given headphones to listen to music or earplugs to block the noise, and will ...

  9. Using brain stimulation to disentangle neural correlates of conscious vision

    PubMed Central

    de Graaf, Tom A.; Sack, Alexander T.

    2014-01-01

    Research into the neural correlates of consciousness (NCCs) has blossomed, due to the advent of new and increasingly sophisticated brain research tools. Neuroimaging has uncovered a variety of brain processes that relate to conscious perception, obtained in a range of experimental paradigms. But methods such as functional magnetic resonance imaging or electroencephalography do not always afford inference on the functional role these brain processes play in conscious vision. Such empirical NCCs could reflect neural prerequisites, neural consequences, or neural substrates of a conscious experience. Here, we take a closer look at the use of non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS) techniques in this context. We discuss and review how NIBS methodology can enlighten our understanding of brain mechanisms underlying conscious vision by disentangling the empirical NCCs. PMID:25295015

  10. Evolution of brain imaging instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Tony; Feng, Janine

    2011-05-01

    Computed tomography (CT) and static magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are now the most common imaging modalities used for anatomic evaluation of pathologic processes affecting the brain. By contrast, radionuclide-based methods, including planar imaging, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and positron emission tomography (PET), are the most widely used methods for evaluating brain function. SPECT and PET have been evolving for a longer time than CT and MRI and have made significant contributions to understanding brain function. The pioneering work on cerebral flow early in the last century laid the foundation of measurement with radioactive gases. This was initially performed with scintillation counters, which gave way to single, then multiple scintillation and multiprobe detectors. The invention of rectilinear scanners, MARK series, Anger cameras, and SPECT imaging further advanced nuclear medicine's role in brain imaging. Measurement of regional cerebral blood flow by SPECT provides pathophysiologic information that directs patient management in a variety of central nervous disorders (CNS), with the greatest clinical impact found in cerebrovascular disease and seizure disorder. In the former, SPECT not only provides means of early detection and localization of acute strokes but can also direct thrombolysis and determine prognosis in the postcerebrovascular accident period. With respect to the latter, ictal SPECT can localize seizure foci so that patients with refractory disease can potentially undergo surgical resection of the affected area. In contrast to brain SPECT, brain PET images reflect regional cerebral metabolism. Because of neurovascular coupling, findings on SPECT and PET images are often comparable. PET, however, still has improved spatial resolution and is therefore more sensitive than SPECT, particularly in the evaluation of dementias. Brain PET instrumentation has greatly evolved from its infancy, when it was used in regional

  11. Brain Imaging in Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Keith A.; Fox, Nick C.; Sperling, Reisa A.; Klunk, William E.

    2012-01-01

    Imaging has played a variety of roles in the study of Alzheimer disease (AD) over the past four decades. Initially, computed tomography (CT) and then magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were used diagnostically to rule out other causes of dementia. More recently, a variety of imaging modalities including structural and functional MRI and positron emission tomography (PET) studies of cerebral metabolism with fluoro-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG) and amyloid tracers such as Pittsburgh Compound-B (PiB) have shown characteristic changes in the brains of patients with AD, and in prodromal and even presymptomatic states that can help rule-in the AD pathophysiological process. No one imaging modality can serve all purposes as each have unique strengths and weaknesses. These modalities and their particular utilities are discussed in this article. The challenge for the future will be to combine imaging biomarkers to most efficiently facilitate diagnosis, disease staging, and, most importantly, development of effective disease-modifying therapies. PMID:22474610

  12. Brain imaging in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Keith A; Fox, Nick C; Sperling, Reisa A; Klunk, William E

    2012-04-01

    Imaging has played a variety of roles in the study of Alzheimer disease (AD) over the past four decades. Initially, computed tomography (CT) and then magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were used diagnostically to rule out other causes of dementia. More recently, a variety of imaging modalities including structural and functional MRI and positron emission tomography (PET) studies of cerebral metabolism with fluoro-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG) and amyloid tracers such as Pittsburgh Compound-B (PiB) have shown characteristic changes in the brains of patients with AD, and in prodromal and even presymptomatic states that can help rule-in the AD pathophysiological process. No one imaging modality can serve all purposes as each have unique strengths and weaknesses. These modalities and their particular utilities are discussed in this article. The challenge for the future will be to combine imaging biomarkers to most efficiently facilitate diagnosis, disease staging, and, most importantly, development of effective disease-modifying therapies.

  13. Image Alignment and Correlation System.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-07-01

    RESOLUTION TEST CHART NATIONAL BUREAU Of STANDARDS-1963-A 07- 0r MA4 ETL 237 IMAGE ALIGNMENT AND CORRELATION SYSTEM (J[ Y Samuel E./Craig Alan L./Moyer...respect to the reference image. The images are transparencies mounted on light boxes. iii/ . . . . .. , , I Ii / An x- y plotter and a graphics terminal were...terminal which has a storage cathode- ray tube (CRT) or an x- y recorder for "hard copy." The sensor output is scanned in the spatial frequency domain under

  14. Phase imaging in brain using SWIFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehto, Lauri Juhani; Garwood, Michael; Gröhn, Olli; Corum, Curtis Andrew

    2015-03-01

    The majority of MRI phase imaging is based on gradient recalled echo (GRE) sequences. This work studies phase contrast behavior due to small off-resonance frequency offsets in brain using SWIFT, a FID-based sequence with nearly zero acquisition delay. 1D simulations and a phantom study were conducted to describe the behavior of phase accumulation in SWIFT. Imaging experiments of known brain phase contrast properties were conducted in a perfused rat brain comparing GRE and SWIFT. Additionally, a human brain sample was imaged. It is demonstrated how SWIFT phase is orientation dependent and correlates well with GRE, linking SWIFT phase to similar off-resonance sources as GRE. The acquisition time is shown to be analogous to TE for phase accumulation time. Using experiments with and without a magnetization transfer preparation, the likely effect of myelin water pool contribution is seen as a phase increase for all acquisition times. Due to the phase accumulation during acquisition, SWIFT phase contrast can be sensitized to small frequency differences between white and gray matter using low acquisition bandwidths.

  15. Phase imaging in brain using SWIFT.

    PubMed

    Lehto, Lauri Juhani; Garwood, Michael; Gröhn, Olli; Corum, Curtis Andrew

    2015-03-01

    The majority of MRI phase imaging is based on gradient recalled echo (GRE) sequences. This work studies phase contrast behavior due to small off-resonance frequency offsets in brain using SWIFT, a FID-based sequence with nearly zero acquisition delay. 1D simulations and a phantom study were conducted to describe the behavior of phase accumulation in SWIFT. Imaging experiments of known brain phase contrast properties were conducted in a perfused rat brain comparing GRE and SWIFT. Additionally, a human brain sample was imaged. It is demonstrated how SWIFT phase is orientation dependent and correlates well with GRE, linking SWIFT phase to similar off-resonance sources as GRE. The acquisition time is shown to be analogous to TE for phase accumulation time. Using experiments with and without a magnetization transfer preparation, the likely effect of myelin water pool contribution is seen as a phase increase for all acquisition times. Due to the phase accumulation during acquisition, SWIFT phase contrast can be sensitized to small frequency differences between white and gray matter using low acquisition bandwidths.

  16. Rodent brain imaging with SPECT/CT

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Youngho; Gao, D.-W.; Hasegawa, Bruce H.; Dae, Michael W.; Franc, Benjamin L.

    2007-04-15

    We evaluated methods of imaging rat models of stroke in vivo using a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system dedicated to small animal imaging (X-SPECT{sup TM}, Gamma Medica-Ideas, Northridge, CA). An animal model of ischemic stroke was developed for in vivo SPECT/CT imaging using the middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) technique. The presence of cerebral ischemia was verified in ex vivo studies using triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining. In vivo radionuclide imaging of cerebral blood flow was performed in rats following MCAO using dynamic planar imaging of {sup 99m}Tc-exametazime with parallel hole collimation. This was followed immediately by in vivo radionuclide imaging of cerebral blood flow with {sup 99m}Tc-exametazime in the same animals using 1-mm pinhole SPECT. Correlated computed tomography imaging was performed to localize radiopharmaceutical uptake. The animals were allowed to recover and ex vivo autoradiography was performed with separate administration of {sup 99m}Tc-exametazime. Time activity curve of {sup 99m}Tc-exametazime showed that the radiopharmaceutical uptake could be maintained for over 9 min. The activity would be expected to be relatively stable for a much longer period, although the data were only obtained for 9 min. TTC staining revealed sizable infarcts by visual observation of inexistence of TTC stain in infracted tissues of MCAO rat brains. In vivo SPECT imaging showed cerebral blood flow deficit in the MCAO model, and the in vivo imaging result was confirmed with ex vivo autoradiography. We have demonstrated a capability of imaging regions of cerebral blood flow deficit in MCAO rat brains in vivo using a pinhole SPECT dedicated to small animal imaging.

  17. Fueling and imaging brain activation

    PubMed Central

    Dienel, Gerald A

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic signals are used for imaging and spectroscopic studies of brain function and disease and to elucidate the cellular basis of neuroenergetics. The major fuel for activated neurons and the models for neuron–astrocyte interactions have been controversial because discordant results are obtained in different experimental systems, some of which do not correspond to adult brain. In rats, the infrastructure to support the high energetic demands of adult brain is acquired during postnatal development and matures after weaning. The brain's capacity to supply and metabolize glucose and oxygen exceeds demand over a wide range of rates, and the hyperaemic response to functional activation is rapid. Oxidative metabolism provides most ATP, but glycolysis is frequently preferentially up-regulated during activation. Underestimation of glucose utilization rates with labelled glucose arises from increased lactate production, lactate diffusion via transporters and astrocytic gap junctions, and lactate release to blood and perivascular drainage. Increased pentose shunt pathway flux also causes label loss from C1 of glucose. Glucose analogues are used to assay cellular activities, but interpretation of results is uncertain due to insufficient characterization of transport and phosphorylation kinetics. Brain activation in subjects with low blood-lactate levels causes a brain-to-blood lactate gradient, with rapid lactate release. In contrast, lactate flooding of brain during physical activity or infusion provides an opportunistic, supplemental fuel. Available evidence indicates that lactate shuttling coupled to its local oxidation during activation is a small fraction of glucose oxidation. Developmental, experimental, and physiological context is critical for interpretation of metabolic studies in terms of theoretical models. PMID:22612861

  18. Clinical Correlation between Perverted Nystagmus and Brain MRI Abnormal Findings

    PubMed Central

    Han, Won-Gue; Yoon, Hee-Chul; Kim, Tae-Min; Rah, Yoon Chan

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives To analyze the clinical correlation between perverted nystagmus and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) abnormal findings and to evaluate whether perverted nystagmus is clinically significant results of brain abnormal lesions or not. Subjects and Methods We performed medical charts review from January 2008 to July 2014, retrospectively. Patients who were suspected central originated vertigo at Frenzel goggles test were included among patients who visited our hospital. To investigate the correlation with nystagmus suspected central originated vertigo and brain MRI abnormal findings, we confirmed whether performing brain MRI or not. Then we exclude that patients not performed brain MRI. Results The number of patients with perverted nystagmus was 15, upbeating was 1 and down-beating was 14. Among these patients, 5 patients have brain MRI abnormal findings. However, 2 patients with MRI abnormal findings were not associated correctly with perverted nystagmus and only 3 patients with perverted nystagmus were considered central originated vertigo and further evaluation and treatment was performed by the department of neurology. Conclusions Perverted nystagmus was considered to the abnormalities at brain lesions, especially cerebellum, but neurologic symptoms and further evaluation were needed for exact diagnosis of central originated vertigo. PMID:27626081

  19. Edge-based correlation image registration for multispectral imaging

    DOEpatents

    Nandy, Prabal

    2009-11-17

    Registration information for images of a common target obtained from a plurality of different spectral bands can be obtained by combining edge detection and phase correlation. The images are edge-filtered, and pairs of the edge-filtered images are then phase correlated to produce phase correlation images. The registration information can be determined based on these phase correlation images.

  20. Brain correlates of subjective freedom of choice

    PubMed Central

    Filevich, Elisa; Vanneste, Patricia; Brass, Marcel; Fias, Wim; Haggard, Patrick; Kühn, Simone

    2013-01-01

    The subjective feeling of free choice is an important feature of human experience. Experimental tasks have typically studied free choice by contrasting free and instructed selection of response alternatives. These tasks have been criticised, and it remains unclear how they relate to the subjective feeling of freely choosing. We replicated previous findings of the fMRI correlates of free choice, defined objectively. We introduced a novel task in which participants could experience and report a graded sense of free choice. BOLD responses for conditions subjectively experienced as free identified a postcentral area distinct from the areas typically considered to be involved in free action. Thus, the brain correlates of subjective feeling of free action were not directly related to any established brain correlates of objectively-defined free action. Our results call into question traditional assumptions about the relation between subjective experience of choosing and activity in the brain’s so-called voluntary motor areas. PMID:24021855

  1. Imaging brain development: the adolescent brain.

    PubMed

    Blakemore, Sarah-Jayne

    2012-06-01

    The past 15 years have seen a rapid expansion in the number of studies using neuroimaging techniques to investigate maturational changes in the human brain. In this paper, I review MRI studies on structural changes in the developing brain, and fMRI studies on functional changes in the social brain during adolescence. Both MRI and fMRI studies point to adolescence as a period of continued neural development. In the final section, I discuss a number of areas of research that are just beginning and may be the subject of developmental neuroimaging in the next twenty years. Future studies might focus on complex questions including the development of functional connectivity; how gender and puberty influence adolescent brain development; the effects of genes, environment and culture on the adolescent brain; development of the atypical adolescent brain; and implications for policy of the study of the adolescent brain. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Minimum Bayes risk image correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minter, T. C., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    In this paper, the problem of designing a matched filter for image correlation will be treated as a statistical pattern recognition problem. It is shown that, by minimizing a suitable criterion, a matched filter can be estimated which approximates the optimum Bayes discriminant function in a least-squares sense. It is well known that the use of the Bayes discriminant function in target classification minimizes the Bayes risk, which in turn directly minimizes the probability of a false fix. A fast Fourier implementation of the minimum Bayes risk correlation procedure is described.

  3. Minimum Bayes risk image correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minter, T. C., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    In this paper, the problem of designing a matched filter for image correlation will be treated as a statistical pattern recognition problem. It is shown that, by minimizing a suitable criterion, a matched filter can be estimated which approximates the optimum Bayes discriminant function in a least-squares sense. It is well known that the use of the Bayes discriminant function in target classification minimizes the Bayes risk, which in turn directly minimizes the probability of a false fix. A fast Fourier implementation of the minimum Bayes risk correlation procedure is described.

  4. BRAIN NETWORKS. Correlated gene expression supports synchronous activity in brain networks.

    PubMed

    Richiardi, Jonas; Altmann, Andre; Milazzo, Anna-Clare; Chang, Catie; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Banaschewski, Tobias; Barker, Gareth J; Bokde, Arun L W; Bromberg, Uli; Büchel, Christian; Conrod, Patricia; Fauth-Bühler, Mira; Flor, Herta; Frouin, Vincent; Gallinat, Jürgen; Garavan, Hugh; Gowland, Penny; Heinz, Andreas; Lemaître, Hervé; Mann, Karl F; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Nees, Frauke; Paus, Tomáš; Pausova, Zdenka; Rietschel, Marcella; Robbins, Trevor W; Smolka, Michael N; Spanagel, Rainer; Ströhle, Andreas; Schumann, Gunter; Hawrylycz, Mike; Poline, Jean-Baptiste; Greicius, Michael D

    2015-06-12

    During rest, brain activity is synchronized between different regions widely distributed throughout the brain, forming functional networks. However, the molecular mechanisms supporting functional connectivity remain undefined. We show that functional brain networks defined with resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging can be recapitulated by using measures of correlated gene expression in a post mortem brain tissue data set. The set of 136 genes we identify is significantly enriched for ion channels. Polymorphisms in this set of genes significantly affect resting-state functional connectivity in a large sample of healthy adolescents. Expression levels of these genes are also significantly associated with axonal connectivity in the mouse. The results provide convergent, multimodal evidence that resting-state functional networks correlate with the orchestrated activity of dozens of genes linked to ion channel activity and synaptic function.

  5. ELSI Priorities for Brain Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Illes, Judy; De Vries, Raymond; Cho, Mildred K.; Schraedley-Desmond, Pam

    2006-01-01

    As one of the most compelling technologies for imaging the brain, functional MRI (fMRI) produces measurements and persuasive pictures of research subjects making cognitive judgments and even reasoning through difficult moral decisions. Even after centuries of studying the link between brain and behavior, this capability presents a number of novel significant questions. For example, what are the implications of biologizing human experience? How might neuroimaging disrupt the mysteries of human nature, spirituality, and personal identity? Rather than waiting for an ethical agenda to emerge from some unpredictable combination of the concerns of ethicists and researchers, the attention of journalists, or after controversy is sparked by research that cannot be retracted, we queried key figures in bioethics and the humanities, neuroscience, media, industry, and patient advocacy in focus groups and interviews. We identified specific ethical, legal and social issues (ELSI) that highlight researcher obligations and the nonclinical impact of the technology at this new frontier. PMID:16500831

  6. Astrocytosis precedes amyloid plaque deposition in Alzheimer APPswe transgenic mouse brain: a correlative positron emission tomography and in vitro imaging study.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Vieitez, Elena; Ni, Ruiqing; Gulyás, Balázs; Tóth, Miklós; Häggkvist, Jenny; Halldin, Christer; Voytenko, Larysa; Marutle, Amelia; Nordberg, Agneta

    2015-06-01

    Pathological studies suggest that neuroinflammation is exacerbated by increased beta-amyloid (Aβ) levels in the brain early in Alzheimer's disease (AD). The time course and relationships between astrocytosis and Aβ deposition were examined using multitracer in vivo positron emission tomography (PET) imaging in an AD transgenic mouse model, followed by postmortem autoradiography and immunohistochemistry analysis. PET imaging with the amyloid plaque tracer (11)C-AZD2184 and the astroglial tracer (11)C-deuterium-L-deprenyl ((11)C-DED) was carried out in APPswe mice aged 6, 8-15 and 18-24 months (4-6 animals/group) and in wild-type (wt) mice aged 8-15 and 18-24 months (3-6 animals/group). Tracer uptake was quantified by region of interest analysis using PMOD software and a 3-D digital mouse brain atlas. Postmortem brain tissues from the same APPswe and wt mice in all age groups were analysed for Aβ deposition and astrocytosis by in vitro autoradiography using (3)H-AZD2184, (3)H-Pittsburgh compound B (PIB) and (3)H-L-deprenyl and immunostaining performed with antibodies for Aβ42 and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in sagittal brain sections. (11)C-AZD2184 PET retention in the cerebral cortices of APPswe mice was significantly higher at 18-24 months than in age-matched wt mice. Cortical and hippocampal (11)C-DED PET binding was significantly higher at 6 months than at 8-15 months or 18-24 months in APPswe mice, and it was also higher than at 8-15 months in wt mice. In vitro autoradiography (3)H-AZD2184 and (3)H-PIB binding confirmed the in vivo findings with (11)C-AZD2184 and demonstrated age-dependent increases in Aβ deposition in APPswe cortex and hippocampus. There were no significant differences between APPswe and wt mice in (3)H-L-deprenyl autoradiography binding across age groups. Immunohistochemical quantification demonstrated more Aβ42 deposits in the cortex and hippocampus and more GFAP(+) reactive astrocytes in the hippocampus at 18-24 months than

  7. [Brain imaging in early onset anorexia].

    PubMed

    Bargiacchi, A

    2014-05-01

    Structural and functional brain alterations in the structures involved in taste processing, emotions regulation and the reward system have been described in anorexia nervosa. The neurodevelopmental origin of this disorder has been recently discussed. In this article, brain-imaging data in early onset anorexia nervosa will be recalled and the relationship between clinical symptoms, normal brain maturation and brain imaging data in adolescents and adults will be discussed.

  8. Brain tumor imaging: imaging brain metastasis using a brain-metastasizing breast adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Madden, Kelley S; Zettel, Martha L; Majewska, Ania K; Brown, Edward B

    2013-03-01

    Brain metastases from primary or secondary breast tumors are difficult to model in the mouse. When metastatic breast cancer cell lines are injected directly into the arterial circulation, only a small fraction of cells enter the brain to form metastatic foci. To study the molecular and cellular mechanisms of brain metastasis, we have transfected MB-231BR, a brain-homing derivative of a human breast adenocarcinoma line MDA-MB-231, with the yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) variant Venus. MB-231BR selectively enters the brain after intracardiac injection into the arterial circulation, resulting in accumulation of fluorescent foci of cells in the brain that can be viewed by standard fluorescence imaging procedures. We describe how to perform the intracardiac injection and the parameters used to quantify brain metastasis in brain sections by standard one-photon fluorescence imaging. The disadvantage of this model is that the kinetics of growth over time cannot be determined in the same animal. In addition, the injection technique does not permit precise placement of tumor cells within the brain. This model is useful for determining the molecular determinants of brain tumor metastasis.

  9. Tutorial on use of intraclass correlation coefficients for assessing intertest reliability and its application in functional near-infrared spectroscopy-based brain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lin; Zeng, Li; Lin, Zi-Jing; Cazzell, Mary; Liu, Hanli

    2015-05-01

    Test-retest reliability of neuroimaging measurements is an important concern in the investigation of cognitive functions in the human brain. To date, intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs), originally used in inter-rater reliability studies in behavioral sciences, have become commonly used metrics in reliability studies on neuroimaging and functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). However, as there are six popular forms of ICC, the adequateness of the comprehensive understanding of ICCs will affect how one may appropriately select, use, and interpret ICCs toward a reliability study. We first offer a brief review and tutorial on the statistical rationale of ICCs, including their underlying analysis of variance models and technical definitions, in the context of assessment on intertest reliability. Second, we provide general guidelines on the selection and interpretation of ICCs. Third, we illustrate the proposed approach by using an actual research study to assess intertest reliability of fNIRS-based, volumetric diffuse optical tomography of brain activities stimulated by a risk decision-making protocol. Last, special issues that may arise in reliability assessment using ICCs are discussed and solutions are suggested.

  10. Monkey brain cortex imaging by photoacoustic tomography.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinmai; Wang, Lihong V

    2008-01-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is applied to image the brain cortex of a monkey through the intact scalp and skull ex vivo. The reconstructed PAT image shows the major blood vessels on the monkey brain cortex. For comparison, the brain cortex is imaged without the scalp, and then imaged again without the scalp and skull. Ultrasound attenuation through the skull is also measured at various incidence angles. This study demonstrates that PAT of the brain cortex is capable of surviving the ultrasound signal attenuation and distortion caused by a relatively thick skull.

  11. Structural brain correlates of adolescent resilience.

    PubMed

    Burt, Keith B; Whelan, Robert; Conrod, Patricia J; Banaschewski, Tobias; Barker, Gareth J; Bokde, Arun L W; Bromberg, Uli; Büchel, Christian; Fauth-Bühler, Mira; Flor, Herta; Galinowski, André; Gallinat, Juergen; Gowland, Penny; Heinz, Andreas; Ittermann, Bernd; Mann, Karl; Nees, Frauke; Papadopoulos-Orfanos, Dimitri; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Poustka, Luise; Rietschel, Marcella; Robbins, Trevor W; Smolka, Michael N; Ströhle, Andreas; Schumann, Gunter; Garavan, Hugh

    2016-11-01

    Despite calls for integration of neurobiological methods into research on youth resilience (high competence despite high adversity), we know little about structural brain correlates of resilient functioning. The aim of the current study was to test for brain regions uniquely associated with positive functioning in the context of adversity, using detailed phenotypic classification. 1,870 European adolescents (Mage  = 14.56 years, SDage  = 0.44 years, 51.5% female) underwent MRI scanning and completed behavioral and psychological measures of stressful life events, academic competence, social competence, rule-abiding conduct, personality, and alcohol use. The interaction of competence and adversity identified two regions centered on the right middle and superior frontal gyri; grey matter volumes in these regions were larger in adolescents experiencing adversity who showed positive adaptation. Differences in these regions among competence/adversity subgroups were maintained after controlling for several covariates and were robust to alternative operationalization decisions for key constructs. We demonstrate structural brain correlates of adolescent resilience, and suggest that right prefrontal structures are implicated in adaptive functioning for youth who have experienced adversity. © 2016 Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health.

  12. Topographic distribution of brain iron deposition and small cerebrovascular lesions in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and in frontotemporal lobar degeneration: a post-mortem 7.0-tesla magnetic resonance imaging study with neuropathological correlates.

    PubMed

    De Reuck, Jacques; Devos, David; Moreau, Caroline; Auger, Florent; Durieux, Nicolas; Deramecourt, Vincent; Pasquier, Florence; Maurage, Claude-Alain; Cordonnier, Charlotte; Leys, Didier; Bordet, Regis

    2017-10-07

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is associated with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) in 15% of the cases. A neuropathological continuity between ALS and FTLD-TDP is suspected. The present post-mortem 7.0-tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study compares the topographic distribution of iron (Fe) deposition and the incidence of small cerebrovascular lesions in ALS and in FTLD brains. Seventy-eight post-mortem brains underwent 7.0-tesla MRI. The patients consisted of 12 with ALS, 38 with FTLD, and 28 controls. Three ALS brains had minor FTLD features. Three coronal sections of a cerebral hemisphere were submitted to T2 and T2* MRI sequences. The amount of Fe deposition in the deep brain structures and the number of small cerebrovascular lesions was determined in ALS and the subtypes of FTLD compared to control brains, with neuropathological correlates. A significant increase of Fe deposition was observed in the claustrum, caudate nucleus, globus pallidus, thalamus, and subthalamic nucleus of the FTLD-FUS and FTLD-TDP groups, while in the ALS one, the Fe increase was only observed in the caudate and the subthalamic nuclei. White matter changes were only significantly more severe in the FTLD compared to those in ALS and in controls brains. Cortical micro-bleeds were increased in the frontal and temporal lobes of FTLD as well as of ALS brains compared to controls. Cortical micro-infarcts were, on the other hand, more frequent in the control compared to the ALS and FTLD groups. The present study supports the assumption of a neuropathological continuity between ALS and FTLD and illustrates the favourable vascular risk profile in these diseases.

  13. Automated in situ brain imaging for mapping the Drosophila connectome.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chi-Wen; Lin, Hsuan-Wen; Chiu, Mei-Tzu; Shih, Yung-Hsin; Wang, Ting-Yuan; Chang, Hsiu-Ming; Chiang, Ann-Shyn

    2015-01-01

    Mapping the connectome, a wiring diagram of the entire brain, requires large-scale imaging of numerous single neurons with diverse morphology. It is a formidable challenge to reassemble these neurons into a virtual brain and correlate their structural networks with neuronal activities, which are measured in different experiments to analyze the informational flow in the brain. Here, we report an in situ brain imaging technique called Fly Head Array Slice Tomography (FHAST), which permits the reconstruction of structural and functional data to generate an integrative connectome in Drosophila. Using FHAST, the head capsules of an array of flies can be opened with a single vibratome sectioning to expose the brains, replacing the painstaking and inconsistent brain dissection process. FHAST can reveal in situ brain neuroanatomy with minimal distortion to neuronal morphology and maintain intact neuronal connections to peripheral sensory organs. Most importantly, it enables the automated 3D imaging of 100 intact fly brains in each experiment. The established head model with in situ brain neuroanatomy allows functional data to be accurately registered and associated with 3D images of single neurons. These integrative data can then be shared, searched, visualized, and analyzed for understanding how brain-wide activities in different neurons within the same circuit function together to control complex behaviors.

  14. Imaging brain mechanisms in chronic visceral pain.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Emeran A; Gupta, Arpana; Kilpatrick, Lisa A; Hong, Jui-Yang

    2015-04-01

    Chronic visceral pain syndromes are important clinical problems with largely unmet medical needs. Based on the common overlap with other chronic disorders of visceral or somatic pain, mood and affect, and their responsiveness to centrally targeted treatments, an important role of central nervous system in their pathophysiology is likely. A growing number of brain imaging studies in irritable bowel syndrome, functional dyspepsia, and bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis has identified abnormalities in evoked brain responses, resting state activity, and connectivity, as well as in gray and white matter properties. Structural and functional alterations in brain regions of the salience, emotional arousal, and sensorimotor networks, as well as in prefrontal regions, are the most consistently reported findings. Some of these changes show moderate correlations with behavioral and clinical measures. Most recently, data-driven machine-learning approaches to larger data sets have been able to classify visceral pain syndromes from healthy control subjects. Future studies need to identify the mechanisms underlying the altered brain signatures of chronic visceral pain and identify targets for therapeutic interventions.

  15. Imaging Brain Mechanisms in Chronic Visceral Pain

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Emeran A.; Gupta, Arpana; Kilpatrick, Lisa A.; Hong, Jui-Yang

    2015-01-01

    Chronic visceral pain syndromes are important clinical problems with largely unmet medical needs. Based on the common overlap with other chronic disorders of visceral or somatic pain, mood and affect, and their responsiveness to centrally targeted treatments, an important role of central nervous system in their pathophysiology is likely. A growing number of brain imaging studies in irritable bowel syndrome, functional dyspepsia and bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis has identified abnormalities in evoked brain responses, resting state activity and connectivity, as well as in grey and white matter properties. Structural and functional alterations in brain regions of the salience, emotional arousal, and sensorimotor networks, as well as in prefrontal regions, are the most consistently reported findings. Some of these changes show moderate correlations with behavioral and clinical measures. Most recently, data driven machine-learning approaches to larger data sets have been able to classify visceral pain syndromes from healthy control subjects. Future studies need to identify the mechanisms underlying the altered brain signatures of chronic visceral pain and identify targets for therapeutic interventions. PMID:25789437

  16. Mouse brain imaging using photoacoustic computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Yang; Xia, Jun; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-03-01

    Photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) provides structural and functional information when used in small animal brain imaging. Acoustic distortion caused by bone structures largely limits the deep brain image quality. In our work, we present ex vivo PACT images of freshly excised mouse brain, intending that can serve as a gold standard for future PACT in vivo studies on small animal brain imaging. Our results show that structures such as the striatum, hippocampus, ventricles, and cerebellum can be clearly di erentiated. An artery feature called the Circle of Willis, located at the bottom of the brain, can also be seen. These results indicate that if acoustic distortion can be accurately accounted for, PACT should be able to image the entire mouse brain with rich structural information.

  17. An architecture for a brain-image database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herskovits, E. H.

    2000-01-01

    The widespread availability of methods for noninvasive assessment of brain structure has enabled researchers to investigate neuroimaging correlates of normal aging, cerebrovascular disease, and other processes; we designate such studies as image-based clinical trials (IBCTs). We propose an architecture for a brain-image database, which integrates image processing and statistical operators, and thus supports the implementation and analysis of IBCTs. The implementation of this architecture is described and results from the analysis of image and clinical data from two IBCTs are presented. We expect that systems such as this will play a central role in the management and analysis of complex research data sets.

  18. An architecture for a brain-image database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herskovits, E. H.

    2000-01-01

    The widespread availability of methods for noninvasive assessment of brain structure has enabled researchers to investigate neuroimaging correlates of normal aging, cerebrovascular disease, and other processes; we designate such studies as image-based clinical trials (IBCTs). We propose an architecture for a brain-image database, which integrates image processing and statistical operators, and thus supports the implementation and analysis of IBCTs. The implementation of this architecture is described and results from the analysis of image and clinical data from two IBCTs are presented. We expect that systems such as this will play a central role in the management and analysis of complex research data sets.

  19. FROM SELECTIVE VULNERABILITY TO CONNECTIVITY: INSIGHTS FROM NEWBORN BRAIN IMAGING

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Steven P.; Ferriero, Donna M

    2009-01-01

    The ability to image the newborn brain during development has provided new information regarding the effects of injury on brain development at different vulnerable time periods. Studies in animal models of brain injury correlate beautifully with what is now observed in the human newborn. We now know that injury at term results in a predilection for gray matter injury while injury in the premature brain results in a white matter predominant pattern although recent evidence suggests a blurring of this distinction. These injuries affect how the brain matures subsequently and again, imaging has led to new insights that allow us to match function and structure. This review will focus on these patterns of injury that are so critically determined by age at insult. In addition, this review will highlight how the brain responds to these insults with changes in connectivity that have profound functional consequences. PMID:19712981

  20. Brain correlates of music-evoked emotions.

    PubMed

    Koelsch, Stefan

    2014-03-01

    Music is a universal feature of human societies, partly owing to its power to evoke strong emotions and influence moods. During the past decade, the investigation of the neural correlates of music-evoked emotions has been invaluable for the understanding of human emotion. Functional neuroimaging studies on music and emotion show that music can modulate activity in brain structures that are known to be crucially involved in emotion, such as the amygdala, nucleus accumbens, hypothalamus, hippocampus, insula, cingulate cortex and orbitofrontal cortex. The potential of music to modulate activity in these structures has important implications for the use of music in the treatment of psychiatric and neurological disorders.

  1. Imaging of Brain Dopamine Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gene-Jack; Volkow, Nora D.; Thanos, Panayotis K.; Fowler, Joanna S.

    2011-01-01

    Obesity is typically associated with abnormal eating behaviors. Brain imaging studies in humans implicate the involvement of dopamine (DA)-modulated circuits in pathologic eating behavior(s). Food cues increase striatal extracellular DA, providing evidence for the involvement of DA in the nonhedonic motivational properties of food. Food cues also increase metabolism in the orbitofrontal cortex indicating the association of this region with the motivation for food consumption. Similar to drug-addicted subjects, striatal DA D2 receptor availability is reduced in obese subjects, which may predispose obese subjects to seek food as a means to temporarily compensate for understimulated reward circuits. Decreased DA D2 receptors in the obese subjects are also associated with decreased metabolism in prefrontal regions involved in inhibitory control, which may underlie their inability to control food intake. Gastric stimulation in obese subjects activates cortical and limbic regions involved with self-control, motivation, and memory. These brain regions are also activated during drug craving in drug-addicted subjects. Obese subjects have increased metabolism in the somatosensory cortex, which suggests an enhanced sensitivity to the sensory properties of food. The reduction in DA D2 receptors in obese subjects coupled with the enhanced sensitivity to food palatability could make food their most salient reinforcer putting them at risk for compulsive eating and obesity. The results from these studies suggest that multiple but similar brain circuits are disrupted in obesity and drug addiction and suggest that strategies aimed at improving DA function might be beneficial in the treatment and prevention of obesity. PMID:21603099

  2. Traumatic brain injury imaging research roadmap.

    PubMed

    Wintermark, M; Coombs, L; Druzgal, T J; Field, A S; Filippi, C G; Hicks, R; Horton, R; Lui, Y W; Law, M; Mukherjee, P; Norbash, A; Riedy, G; Sanelli, P C; Stone, J R; Sze, G; Tilkin, M; Whitlow, C T; Wilde, E A; York, G; Provenzale, J M

    2015-03-01

    The past decade has seen impressive advances in the types of neuroimaging information that can be acquired in patients with traumatic brain injury. However, despite this increase in information, understanding of the contribution of this information to prognostic accuracy and treatment pathways for patients is limited. Available techniques often allow us to infer the presence of microscopic changes indicative of alterations in physiology and function in brain tissue. However, because histologic confirmation is typically lacking, conclusions reached by using these techniques remain solely inferential in almost all cases. Hence, a need exists for validation of these techniques by using data from large population samples that are obtained in a uniform manner, analyzed according to well-accepted procedures, and correlated with closely monitored clinical outcomes. At present, many of these approaches remain confined to population-based research rather than diagnosis at an individual level, particularly with regard to traumatic brain injury that is mild or moderate in degree. A need and a priority exist for patient-centered tools that will allow advanced neuroimaging tools to be brought into clinical settings. One barrier to developing these tools is a lack of an age-, sex-, and comorbidities-stratified, sequence-specific, reference imaging data base that could provide a clear understanding of normal variations across populations. Such a data base would provide researchers and clinicians with the information necessary to develop computational tools for the patient-based interpretation of advanced neuroimaging studies in the clinical setting. The recent "Joint ASNR-ACR HII-ASFNR TBI Workshop: Bringing Advanced Neuroimaging for Traumatic Brain Injury into the Clinic" on May 23, 2014, in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, brought together neuroradiologists, neurologists, psychiatrists, neuropsychologists, neuroimaging scientists, members of the National Institute of Neurologic

  3. Male body image following acquired brain injury.

    PubMed

    Howes, Hannah; Edwards, Stephen; Benton, David

    2005-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate body image concerns and psycho-emotional health in males with acquired brain injury (ABI). Using a between subjects study of 25 males with ABI and 25 matched controls, variables were analysed using correlations and 2 x 2 analyses of variance (ANOVAs) with head injury and injury type as independent variables. Body image and psycho-emotional health were evaluated using self-report questionnaires. Disability and cognitive impairment were measured using a mixture of self-report, cognitive testing and clinical notes. Results indicated that males with ABI had significantly lower self-esteem and body dissatisfaction on a number of items relating to physical and sexual functioning. There were significant differences in body image between stroke and TBI, but there was no corresponding relationship with psycho-emotional health. These body image differences might be explained by age. The finding that ABI has a negative effect on body image and that this relates to psycho-emotional health should be investigated further, perhaps being included in future rehabilitation strategies.

  4. Spatial correlation coefficient images for ultrasonic detection.

    PubMed

    Cepel, Raina; Ho, K C; Rinker, Brett A; Palmer, Donald D; Lerch, Terrence P; Neal, Steven P

    2007-09-01

    In ultrasonics, image formation and detection are generally based on signal amplitude. In this paper, we introduce correlation coefficient images as a signal-amplitude independent approach for image formation. The correlation coefficients are calculated between A-scans digitized at adjacent measurement positions. In these images, defects are revealed as regions of high or low correlation relative to the background correlations associated with noise. Correlation coefficient and C-scan images are shown to demonstrate flat-bottom-hole detection in a stainless steel annular ring and crack detection in an aluminum aircraft structure.

  5. Animal imaging studies of potential brain damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatley, S. J.; Vazquez, M. E.; Rice, O.

    To date, animal studies have not been able to predict the likelihood of problems in human neurological health due to HZE particle exposure during space missions outside the Earth's magnetosphere. In ongoing studies in mice, we have demonstrated that cocaine stimulated locomotor activity is reduced by a moderate dose (120 cGy) of 1 GeV 56Fe particles. We postulate that imaging experiments in animals may provide more sensitive and earlier indicators of damage due to HZE particles than behavioral tests. Since the small size of the mouse brain is not well suited to the spatial resolution offered by microPET, we are now repeating some of our studies in a rat model. We anticipate that this will enable us to identify imaging correlates of behavioral endpoints. A specific hypothesis of our studies is that changes in the metabolic rate for glucose in striatum of animals will be correlated with alterations in locomotor activity. We will also evaluate whether the neuroprotective drug L-deprenyl reduces the effect of radiation on locomotor activity. In addition, we will conduct microPET studies of brain monoamine oxidase A and monoamine oxidase B in rats before and at various times after irradiation with HZE particles. The hypothesis is that monoamine oxidase A, which is located in nerve terminals, will be unchanged or decreased after irradiation, while monoamine oxidase B, which is located in glial cells, will be increased after irradiation. Neurochemical effects that could be measured using PET could in principle be applied in astronauts, in terms of detecting and monitoring subtle neurological damage that might have occurred during long space missions. More speculative uses of PET are in screening candidates for prolonged space missions (for example, for adequate reserve in critical brain circuits) and in optimizing medications to treat impairments after missions.

  6. Testing Group Differences in Brain Functional Connectivity: Using Correlations or Partial Correlations?

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Junghi; Wozniak, Jeffrey R.; Mueller, Bryon A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging allows one to study brain functional connectivity, partly motivated by evidence that patients with complex disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease, may have altered functional brain connectivity patterns as compared with healthy subjects. A functional connectivity network describes statistical associations of the neural activities among distinct and distant brain regions. Recently, there is a major interest in group-level functional network analysis; however, there is a relative lack of studies on statistical inference, such as significance testing for group comparisons. In particular, it is still debatable which statistic should be used to measure pairwise associations as the connectivity weights. Many functional connectivity studies have used either (full or marginal) correlations or partial correlations for pairwise associations. This article investigates the performance of using either correlations or partial correlations for testing group differences in brain connectivity, and how sparsity levels and topological structures of the connectivity would influence statistical power to detect group differences. Our results suggest that, in general, testing group differences in networks deviates from estimating networks. For example, high regularization in both covariance matrices and precision matrices may lead to higher statistical power; in particular, optimally selected regularization (e.g., by cross-validation or even at the true sparsity level) on the precision matrices with small estimation errors may have low power. Most importantly, and perhaps surprisingly, using either correlations or partial correlations may give very different testing results, depending on which of the covariance matrices and the precision matrices are sparse. Specifically, if the precision matrices are sparse, presumably and arguably a reasonable assumption, then using correlations often yields much higher powered and more

  7. Brain structural correlates of complex sentence comprehension in children.

    PubMed

    Fengler, Anja; Meyer, Lars; Friederici, Angela D

    2015-10-01

    Prior structural imaging studies found initial evidence for the link between structural gray matter changes and the development of language performance in children. However, previous studies generally only focused on sentence comprehension. Therefore, little is known about the relationship between structural properties of brain regions relevant to sentence processing and more specific cognitive abilities underlying complex sentence comprehension. In this study, whole-brain magnetic resonance images from 59 children between 5 and 8 years were assessed. Scores on a standardized sentence comprehension test determined grammatical proficiency of our participants. A confirmatory factory analysis corroborated a grammar-relevant and a verbal working memory-relevant factor underlying the measured performance. Voxel-based morphometry of gray matter revealed that while children's ability to assign thematic roles is positively correlated with gray matter probability (GMP) in the left inferior temporal gyrus and the left inferior frontal gyrus, verbal working memory-related performance is positively correlated with GMP in the left parietal operculum extending into the posterior superior temporal gyrus. Since these areas are known to be differentially engaged in adults' complex sentence processing, our data suggest a specific correspondence between children's GMP in language-relevant brain regions and differential cognitive abilities that guide their sentence comprehension. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Brain structural correlates of complex sentence comprehension in children

    PubMed Central

    Fengler, Anja; Meyer, Lars; Friederici, Angela D.

    2015-01-01

    Prior structural imaging studies found initial evidence for the link between structural gray matter changes and the development of language performance in children. However, previous studies generally only focused on sentence comprehension. Therefore, little is known about the relationship between structural properties of brain regions relevant to sentence processing and more specific cognitive abilities underlying complex sentence comprehension. In this study, whole-brain magnetic resonance images from 59 children between 5 and 8 years were assessed. Scores on a standardized sentence comprehension test determined grammatical proficiency of our participants. A confirmatory factory analysis corroborated a grammar-relevant and a verbal working memory-relevant factor underlying the measured performance. Voxel-based morphometry of gray matter revealed that while children's ability to assign thematic roles is positively correlated with gray matter probability (GMP) in the left inferior temporal gyrus and the left inferior frontal gyrus, verbal working memory-related performance is positively correlated with GMP in the left parietal operculum extending into the posterior superior temporal gyrus. Since these areas are known to be differentially engaged in adults’ complex sentence processing, our data suggest a specific correspondence between children's GMP in language-relevant brain regions and differential cognitive abilities that guide their sentence comprehension. PMID:26468613

  9. Brain structure and function correlates of cognitive subtypes in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Geisler, Daniel; Walton, Esther; Naylor, Melissa; Roessner, Veit; Lim, Kelvin O; Charles Schulz, S; Gollub, Randy L; Calhoun, Vince D; Sponheim, Scott R; Ehrlich, Stefan

    2015-10-30

    Stable neuropsychological deficits may provide a reliable basis for identifying etiological subtypes of schizophrenia. The aim of this study was to identify clusters of individuals with schizophrenia based on dimensions of neuropsychological performance, and to characterize their neural correlates. We acquired neuropsychological data as well as structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging from 129 patients with schizophrenia and 165 healthy controls. We derived eight cognitive dimensions and subsequently applied a cluster analysis to identify possible schizophrenia subtypes. Analyses suggested the following four cognitive clusters of schizophrenia: (1) Diminished Verbal Fluency, (2) Diminished Verbal Memory and Poor Motor Control, (3) Diminished Face Memory and Slowed Processing, and (4) Diminished Intellectual Function. The clusters were characterized by a specific pattern of structural brain changes in areas such as Wernicke's area, lingual gyrus and occipital face area, and hippocampus as well as differences in working memory-elicited neural activity in several fronto-parietal brain regions. Separable measures of cognitive function appear to provide a method for deriving cognitive subtypes meaningfully related to brain structure and function. Because the present study identified brain-based neural correlates of the cognitive clusters, the proposed groups of individuals with schizophrenia have some external validity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Linking brain imaging signals to visual perception.

    PubMed

    Welchman, Andrew E; Kourtzi, Zoe

    2013-11-01

    The rapid advances in brain imaging technology over the past 20 years are affording new insights into cortical processing hierarchies in the human brain. These new data provide a complementary front in seeking to understand the links between perceptual and physiological states. Here we review some of the challenges associated with incorporating brain imaging data into such "linking hypotheses," highlighting some of the considerations needed in brain imaging data acquisition and analysis. We discuss work that has sought to link human brain imaging signals to existing electrophysiological data and opened up new opportunities in studying the neural basis of complex perceptual judgments. We consider a range of approaches when using human functional magnetic resonance imaging to identify brain circuits whose activity changes in a similar manner to perceptual judgments and illustrate these approaches by discussing work that has studied the neural basis of 3D perception and perceptual learning. Finally, we describe approaches that have sought to understand the information content of brain imaging data using machine learning and work that has integrated multimodal data to overcome the limitations associated with individual brain imaging approaches. Together these approaches provide an important route in seeking to understand the links between physiological and psychological states.

  11. Magnetron surface coil for brain MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Alfredo O

    2006-08-01

    A resonator surface coil was developed for magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and tested on a clinical imager. This resonator design was based on the cavity magnetron with an 8 slot-and-hole configuration. High-resolution brain images were obtained from a water-filled phantom and from a healthy volunteer brain. To compare coil performance, SNR-vs.-depth plots were computed for a single-loop coil and the magnetron prototype from phantom images. These experimentally acquired profiles show an important improvement in SNR. Thus, the magnetron surface coil can generate brain images with a high resolution and penetration capacity. The high sensitivity of this coil makes it a good candidate to be used in multicoil imaging sequences.

  12. Whole-brain apparent diffusion coefficient in traumatic brain injury: correlation with Glasgow Coma Scale score.

    PubMed

    Shanmuganathan, Kathirkamanathan; Gullapalli, Rao P; Mirvis, Stuart E; Roys, Steven; Murthy, Prasad

    2004-04-01

    Patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and low Glasgow coma scale (GCS) scores may have severe injury associated with cellular disruption that can be studied with whole-brain apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) histograms. We retrospectively studied this hypothesis and correlated ADC with GCS. Twenty-one patients (37.81 +/- 41.3 years) with TBI were enrolled: Group A had normal MR imaging findings but low GCS scores (n = 6). Group B had brain stem injury with low GCS scores (n = 6). Group C had cortical lesions with normal GCS scores (n = 5), and group D had cortical lesions with low GCS scores (n = 4). Eleven control subjects were enrolled (32.7 +/- 19.2 years). Whole-brain ADC maps and histograms were generated and normalized for each subject. Mean and peak ADCs were determined. A one-sided t test was performed for each parameter. Average GCS scores and corresponding peak and mean ADCs were correlated. Peak histogram values significantly differed between controls and groups A, B, and D (P <.0019, P <.00129, and P <.0148, respectively). In groups A and D, values were significantly skewed compared with control values. Mean ADC was significantly different between the control ADC and group A (P <.013) but not group C. In each group, peak ADC and GCS score were strongly correlated (R(2) = 0.67). Whole-brain peak ADCs and GCS scores are significantly correlated in patients with TBI. Although conventional MR images were normal, ADC independently indicated TBI and better represents the degree of neurologic dysfunction.

  13. [Brain development of infant and MRI by diffusion tensor imaging].

    PubMed

    Dubois, J; Dehaene-Lambertz, G; Mangin, J-F; Le Bihan, D; Hüppi, P S; Hertz-Pannier, L

    2012-01-01

    Studying how the brain develops and becomes functional is important to understand how the man has been able to develop specific cognitive abilities, and to comprehend the complexity of some developmental pathologies. Thanks to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), it is now possible to image the baby's immature brain and to consider subtle correlations between the brain anatomical development and the early acquisition of cognitive functions. Dedicated methodologies for image acquisition and post-treatment must then be used because the size of cerebral structures and the image contrast are very different in comparison with the adult brain, and because the examination length is a major constraint. Two recent studies have evaluated the developing brain under an original perspective. The first one has focused on cortical folding in preterm newborns, from 6 to 8 months of gestational age, assessed with T2-weighted conventional MRI. The second study has mapped the organization and maturation of white matter fiber bundles in 1- to 4-month-old healthy infants with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Both studies have enabled to highlight spatio-temporal differences in the brain regions' maturation, as well as early anatomical asymmetries between cerebral hemispheres. These studies emphasize the potential of MRI to evaluate brain development compared with the infant's psychomotor acquisitions after birth.

  14. Ultrasonic Detection Using Correlation Images (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    for imaging and detection based on the similarity of adjacent signals, quantified by the correlation coefficient calculated between A-scans... Correlation coefficient images are introduced and shown with C-scan images to demonstrate flat-bottom-hole and crack detection in experimental data and planar

  15. Functional brain correlates of heterosexual paedophilia.

    PubMed

    Schiffer, Boris; Paul, Thomas; Gizewski, Elke; Forsting, Michael; Leygraf, Norbert; Schedlowski, Manfred; Kruger, Tillmann H C

    2008-05-15

    Although the neuronal mechanisms underlying normal sexual motivation and function have recently been examined, the alterations in brain function in deviant sexual behaviours such as paedophilia are largely unknown. The objective of this study was to identify paedophilia-specific functional networks implicated in sexual arousal. Therefore a consecutive sample of eight paedophile forensic inpatients, exclusively attracted to females, and 12 healthy age-matched heterosexual control participants from a comparable socioeconomic stratum participated in a visual sexual stimulation procedure during functional magnetic resonance imaging. The visual stimuli were sexually stimulating photographs and emotionally neutral photographs. Immediately after the imaging session subjective responses pertaining to sexual desire were recorded. Principally, the brain response of heterosexual paedophiles to heteropaedophilic stimuli was comparable to that of heterosexual males to heterosexual stimuli, including different limbic structures (amygdala, cingulate gyrus, and hippocampus), the substantia nigra, caudate nucleus, as well as the anterior cingulate cortex, different thalamic nuclei, and associative cortices. However, responses to visual sexual stimulation were found in the orbitofrontal cortex in healthy heterosexual males, but not in paedophiles, in whom abnormal activity in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex was observed. Thus, in line with clinical observations and neuropsychological studies, it seems that central processing of sexual stimuli in heterosexual paedophiles may be altered by a disturbance in the prefrontal networks, which, as has already been hypothesized, may be associated with stimulus-controlled behaviours, such as sexual compulsive behaviours. Moreover, these findings may suggest a dysfunction (in the functional and effective connectivity) at the cognitive stage of sexual arousal processing.

  16. Phase synchronization in brain networks derived from correlation between probabilities of recurrences in functional MRI data.

    PubMed

    Rangaprakash, D; Hu, Xiaoping; Deshpande, Gopikrishna

    2013-04-01

    It is increasingly being recognized that resting state brain connectivity derived from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data is an important marker of brain function both in healthy and clinical populations. Though linear correlation has been extensively used to characterize brain connectivity, it is limited to detecting first order dependencies. In this study, we propose a framework where in phase synchronization (PS) between brain regions is characterized using a new metric "correlation between probabilities of recurrence" (CPR) and subsequent graph-theoretic analysis of the ensuing networks. We applied this method to resting state fMRI data obtained from human subjects with and without administration of propofol anesthetic. Our results showed decreased PS during anesthesia and a biologically more plausible community structure using CPR rather than linear correlation. We conclude that CPR provides an attractive nonparametric method for modeling interactions in brain networks as compared to standard correlation for obtaining physiologically meaningful insights about brain function.

  17. Beyond a bigger brain: Multivariable structural brain imaging and intelligence

    PubMed Central

    Ritchie, Stuart J.; Booth, Tom; Valdés Hernández, Maria del C.; Corley, Janie; Maniega, Susana Muñoz; Gow, Alan J.; Royle, Natalie A.; Pattie, Alison; Karama, Sherif; Starr, John M.; Bastin, Mark E.; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; Deary, Ian J.

    2015-01-01

    People with larger brains tend to score higher on tests of general intelligence (g). It is unclear, however, how much variance in intelligence other brain measurements would account for if included together with brain volume in a multivariable model. We examined a large sample of individuals in their seventies (n = 672) who were administered a comprehensive cognitive test battery. Using structural equation modelling, we related six common magnetic resonance imaging-derived brain variables that represent normal and abnormal features—brain volume, cortical thickness, white matter structure, white matter hyperintensity load, iron deposits, and microbleeds—to g and to fluid intelligence. As expected, brain volume accounted for the largest portion of variance (~ 12%, depending on modelling choices). Adding the additional variables, especially cortical thickness (+~ 5%) and white matter hyperintensity load (+~ 2%), increased the predictive value of the model. Depending on modelling choices, all neuroimaging variables together accounted for 18–21% of the variance in intelligence. These results reveal which structural brain imaging measures relate to g over and above the largest contributor, total brain volume. They raise questions regarding which other neuroimaging measures might account for even more of the variance in intelligence. PMID:26240470

  18. Beyond a bigger brain: Multivariable structural brain imaging and intelligence.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, Stuart J; Booth, Tom; Valdés Hernández, Maria Del C; Corley, Janie; Maniega, Susana Muñoz; Gow, Alan J; Royle, Natalie A; Pattie, Alison; Karama, Sherif; Starr, John M; Bastin, Mark E; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Deary, Ian J

    2015-01-01

    People with larger brains tend to score higher on tests of general intelligence (g). It is unclear, however, how much variance in intelligence other brain measurements would account for if included together with brain volume in a multivariable model. We examined a large sample of individuals in their seventies (n = 672) who were administered a comprehensive cognitive test battery. Using structural equation modelling, we related six common magnetic resonance imaging-derived brain variables that represent normal and abnormal features-brain volume, cortical thickness, white matter structure, white matter hyperintensity load, iron deposits, and microbleeds-to g and to fluid intelligence. As expected, brain volume accounted for the largest portion of variance (~ 12%, depending on modelling choices). Adding the additional variables, especially cortical thickness (+~ 5%) and white matter hyperintensity load (+~ 2%), increased the predictive value of the model. Depending on modelling choices, all neuroimaging variables together accounted for 18-21% of the variance in intelligence. These results reveal which structural brain imaging measures relate to g over and above the largest contributor, total brain volume. They raise questions regarding which other neuroimaging measures might account for even more of the variance in intelligence.

  19. Does Variability in Cognitive Performance Correlate with Frontal Brain Volume?

    PubMed Central

    Lövdén, Martin; Schmiedek, Florian; Kennedy, Kristen M.; Rodrigue, Karen M.; Lindenberger, Ulman; Raz, Naftali

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the neural correlates of within-person variability in cognitive performance. We investigated associations between regional brain volumes and trial-to-trial, block-to-block, and day-to-day variability in choice-reaction time, and episodic and working memory accuracy. Healthy younger (n = 25) and older (n = 18) adults underwent 101 daily assessments of cognitive performance, and their regional brain volumes were measured manually on magnetic resonance images. Results showed that smaller prefrontal white matter volumes were associated with higher block-to-block variability in choice-reaction time performance, with a stronger association observed among older adults. Smaller volumes of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex covaried with higher block-to-block variability in episodic memory (number-word pair) performance. This association was stronger for younger adults. The observed associations between variability and brain volume were not due to individual differences in mean performance. Trial-to-trial and day-to-day variability in cognitive performance were unrelated to regional brain volume. We thus report novel findings demonstrating that block-by-block variability in cognitive performance is associated with integrity of the prefrontal regions and that between-person differences in different measures of variability of cognitive performance reflect different age-related constellations of behavioral and neural antecedents. PMID:23000256

  20. Neuroanatomical correlates of brain-computer interface performance.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Kazumi; DaSalla, Charles Sayo; Honda, Manabu; Hanakawa, Takashi

    2015-04-15

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) offer a potential means to replace or restore lost motor function. However, BCI performance varies considerably between users, the reasons for which are poorly understood. Here we investigated the relationship between sensorimotor rhythm (SMR)-based BCI performance and brain structure. Participants were instructed to control a computer cursor using right- and left-hand motor imagery, which primarily modulated their left- and right-hemispheric SMR powers, respectively. Although most participants were able to control the BCI with success rates significantly above chance level even at the first encounter, they also showed substantial inter-individual variability in BCI success rate. Participants also underwent T1-weighted three-dimensional structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The MRI data were subjected to voxel-based morphometry using BCI success rate as an independent variable. We found that BCI performance correlated with gray matter volume of the supplementary motor area, supplementary somatosensory area, and dorsal premotor cortex. We suggest that SMR-based BCI performance is associated with development of non-primary somatosensory and motor areas. Advancing our understanding of BCI performance in relation to its neuroanatomical correlates may lead to better customization of BCIs based on individual brain structure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Functional data analysis in brain imaging studies.

    PubMed

    Tian, Tian Siva

    2010-01-01

    Functional data analysis (FDA) considers the continuity of the curves or functions, and is a topic of increasing interest in the statistics community. FDA is commonly applied to time-series and spatial-series studies. The development of functional brain imaging techniques in recent years made it possible to study the relationship between brain and mind over time. Consequently, an enormous amount of functional data is collected and needs to be analyzed. Functional techniques designed for these data are in strong demand. This paper discusses three statistically challenging problems utilizing FDA techniques in functional brain imaging analysis. These problems are dimension reduction (or feature extraction), spatial classification in functional magnetic resonance imaging studies, and the inverse problem in magneto-encephalography studies. The application of FDA to these issues is relatively new but has been shown to be considerably effective. Future efforts can further explore the potential of FDA in functional brain imaging studies.

  2. Imaging Brain Development: Benefiting from Individual Variability

    PubMed Central

    Sharda, Megha; Foster, Nicholas E.V.; Hyde, Krista L.

    2015-01-01

    Human brain development is a complex process that evolves from early childhood to young adulthood. Major advances in brain imaging are increasingly being used to characterize the developing brain. These advances have further helped to elucidate the dynamic maturational processes that lead to the emergence of complex cognitive abilities in both typical and atypical development. However, conventional approaches involve categorical group comparison models and tend to disregard the role of widespread interindividual variability in brain development. This review highlights how this variability can inform our understanding of developmental processes. The latest studies in the field of brain development are reviewed, with a particular focus on the role of individual variability and the consequent heterogeneity in brain structural and functional development. This review also highlights how such heterogeneity might be utilized to inform our understanding of complex neuropsychiatric disorders and recommends the use of more dimensional approaches to study brain development. PMID:26648753

  3. Image correlation spectroscopy to define membrane dynamics.

    PubMed

    Bonor, Jeremy; Nohe, Anja

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescent imaging techniques are powerful tools that aid in studying protein dynamics and membrane domains and allow for the visualization and data collection of such structures as caveolae and clathrin-coated pits, key players in the regulation of cell communication and signaling. The family of image correlation spectroscopy (FICS) provides a unique way to determine details about aggregation, clustering, and dynamics of proteins on the plasma membrane. FICS consists of many imaging techniques which we will focus on including image correlation spectroscopy, image cross-correlation spectroscopy and dynamic image correlation spectroscopy. Image correlation spectroscopy is a tool used to calculate the cluster density, which is the average number of clusters per unit area along with data to determine the degree of aggregation of plasma membrane proteins. Image cross-correlation spectroscopy measures the colocalization of proteins of interest. Dynamic image correlation spectroscopy can be used to analyze protein aggregate dynamics on the cell surface during live-cell imaging in the millisecond to second range.

  4. Spatial organization and correlations of cell nuclei in brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yang; Berman, Hal; Kiehl, Tim-Rasmus; Torquato, Salvatore

    2011-01-01

    Accepting the hypothesis that cancers are self-organizing, opportunistic systems, it is crucial to understand the collective behavior of cancer cells in their tumorous heterogeneous environment. In the present paper, we ask the following basic question: Is this self-organization of tumor evolution reflected in the manner in which malignant cells are spatially distributed in their heterogeneous environment? We employ a variety of nontrivial statistical microstructural descriptors that arise in the theory of heterogeneous media to characterize the spatial distributions of the nuclei of both benign brain white matter cells and brain glioma cells as obtained from histological images. These descriptors, which include the pair correlation function, structure factor and various nearest neighbor functions, quantify how pairs of cell nuclei are correlated in space in various ways. We map the centroids of the cell nuclei into point distributions to show that while commonly used local spatial statistics (e.g., cell areas and number of neighboring cells) cannot clearly distinguish spatial correlations in distributions of normal and abnormal cell nuclei, their salient structural features are captured very well by the aforementioned microstructural descriptors. We show that the tumorous cells pack more densely than normal cells and exhibit stronger effective repulsions between any pair of cells. Moreover, we demonstrate that brain gliomas are organized in a collective way rather than randomly on intermediate and large length scales. The existence of nontrivial spatial correlations between the abnormal cells strongly supports the view that cancer is not an unorganized collection of malignant cells but rather a complex emergent integrated system.

  5. Spatial Organization and Correlations of Cell Nuclei in Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Yang; Berman, Hal; Kiehl, Tim-Rasmus; Torquato, Salvatore

    2011-01-01

    Accepting the hypothesis that cancers are self-organizing, opportunistic systems, it is crucial to understand the collective behavior of cancer cells in their tumorous heterogeneous environment. In the present paper, we ask the following basic question: Is this self-organization of tumor evolution reflected in the manner in which malignant cells are spatially distributed in their heterogeneous environment? We employ a variety of nontrivial statistical microstructural descriptors that arise in the theory of heterogeneous media to characterize the spatial distributions of the nuclei of both benign brain white matter cells and brain glioma cells as obtained from histological images. These descriptors, which include the pair correlation function, structure factor and various nearest neighbor functions, quantify how pairs of cell nuclei are correlated in space in various ways. We map the centroids of the cell nuclei into point distributions to show that while commonly used local spatial statistics (e.g., cell areas and number of neighboring cells) cannot clearly distinguish spatial correlations in distributions of normal and abnormal cell nuclei, their salient structural features are captured very well by the aforementioned microstructural descriptors. We show that the tumorous cells pack more densely than normal cells and exhibit stronger effective repulsions between any pair of cells. Moreover, we demonstrate that brain gliomas are organized in a collective way rather than randomly on intermediate and large length scales. The existence of nontrivial spatial correlations between the abnormal cells strongly supports the view that cancer is not an unorganized collection of malignant cells but rather a complex emergent integrated system. PMID:22110626

  6. Correlation Imaging with Arbitrary Sampling Trajectories

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yu

    2014-01-01

    The presented work aims to develop a generalized linear approach to image reconstruction with arbitrary sampling trajectories for high-speed MRI. This approach is based on a previously developed image reconstruction framework, "correlation imaging" (1). In the presented work, correlation imaging with arbitrary sampling trajectories is implemented in a multi-dimensional hybrid space that is formed from the physical sampling space and a virtually defined space. By introducing an undersampling trajectory with both uniformity and randomness in the hybrid space, correlation imaging may take advantage of multiple image reconstruction mechanisms including coil sensitivity encoding, data sparsity and information sharing. This hybrid-space implementation is demonstrated in multi-slice 2D imaging, multi-scan imaging, and radial dynamic imaging. Since more information is used in image reconstruction, it is found that hybrid-space correlation imaging outperforms several conventional techniques. The presented approach will benefit clinical MRI by enabling correlation imaging to be used to accelerate multi-scan clinical protocols that need different sampling trajectories in different scans. PMID:24629517

  7. Brain correlates of risky decision-making.

    PubMed

    Polezzi, David; Sartori, Giuseppe; Rumiati, Rino; Vidotto, Giulio; Daum, Irene

    2010-01-15

    Understanding the neurocognitive basis of risk-taking behavior is an important issue, especially in economic decision-making. Classical behavioral studies have shown that risk-attitude changes across different contexts, but little is so far known about the brain correlates of processing of outcomes across such context shifts. In this study, EEG was recorded while subjects performed a gambling task. Participants could choose between a risky and a safer option, within two different contexts: one in which options yielded gains and losses of the same magnitude (Zero Expected Value context) and another in which gains were larger than losses (Positive Expected Value context). Based on their risk-attitude, two groups were compared: subjects who are risk-seekers in the zero Expected Value context (Zero-Oriented group) and subjects who are risk-seekers in the positive Expected Value condition (Positive-Oriented group). The Feedback Related Negativity (FRN) reflects this distinction, with each group being insensitive to magnitude of outcomes in the condition in which they were risk-prone. P300 amplitude mirrored the behavioral results, with larger amplitudes in the condition in which each group showed a higher risk-tendency. Source analyses highlighted the involvement of posterior cingulate cortex in risky decision-making. Taken together, the findings make a contribution to the clarification of the neurocognitive substrates of risky decision-making.

  8. Imaging patterns of brain development and their relationship to cognition.

    PubMed

    Erus, Guray; Battapady, Harsha; Satterthwaite, Theodore D; Hakonarson, Hakon; Gur, Raquel E; Davatzikos, Christos; Gur, Ruben C

    2015-06-01

    We present a brain development index (BDI) that concisely summarizes complex imaging patterns of structural brain maturation along a single dimension using a machine learning methodology. The brain was found to follow a remarkably consistent developmental trajectory in a sample of 621 subjects of ages 8-22 participating in the Philadelphia Neurodevelopmental Cohort, reflected by a cross-validated correlation coefficient between chronologic age and the BDI of r = 0.89. Critically, deviations from this trajectory related to cognitive performance. Specifically, subjects whose BDI was higher than their chronological age displayed significantly superior cognitive processing speed compared with subjects whose BDI was lower than their actual age. These results indicate that the multiparametric imaging patterns summarized by the BDI can accurately delineate trajectories of brain development and identify individuals with cognitive precocity or delay. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. [Functional imaging of deep brain stimulation in idiopathic Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Hilker, R

    2010-10-01

    Functional brain imaging allows the effects of deep brain stimulation (DBS) on the living human brain to be investigated. In patients with advanced Parkinson's disease (PD), positron emission tomography (PET) studies were undertaken at rest as well as under motor, cognitive or behavioral activation. DBS leads to a reduction of abnormal PD-related network activity in the motor system, which partly correlates with the improvement of motor symptoms. The local increase of energy consumption within the direct target area suggests a predominant excitatory influence of the stimulation current on neuronal tissue. Remote effects of DBS of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) on frontal association cortices indicate an interference of stimulation energy with associative and limbic basal ganglia loops. Taken together, functional brain imaging provides very valuable data for advancement of the DBS technique in PD therapy.

  10. Lesion detection in magnetic resonance brain images by hyperspectral imaging algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Bai; Wang, Lin; Li, Hsiao-Chi; Chen, Hsian Min; Chang, Chein-I.

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic Resonance (MR) images can be considered as multispectral images so that MR imaging can be processed by multispectral imaging techniques such as maximum likelihood classification. Unfortunately, most multispectral imaging techniques are not particularly designed for target detection. On the other hand, hyperspectral imaging is primarily developed to address subpixel detection, mixed pixel classification for which multispectral imaging is generally not effective. This paper takes advantages of hyperspectral imaging techniques to develop target detection algorithms to find lesions in MR brain images. Since MR images are collected by only three image sequences, T1, T2 and PD, if a hyperspectral imaging technique is used to process MR images it suffers from the issue of insufficient dimensionality. To address this issue, two approaches to nonlinear dimensionality expansion are proposed, nonlinear correlation expansion and nonlinear band ratio expansion. Once dimensionality is expanded hyperspectral imaging algorithms are readily applied. The hyperspectral detection algorithm to be investigated for lesion detection in MR brain is the well-known subpixel target detection algorithm, called Constrained Energy Minimization (CEM). In order to demonstrate the effectiveness of proposed CEM in lesion detection, synthetic images provided by BrainWeb are used for experiments.

  11. Multichannel correlation recognition method of optical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongxia; He, Junfa; Sun, Honghui

    2000-10-01

    In this paper a multi-channel real-time hybrid joint transform correlator is proposed. In this correlator, the computer control is used to divide the screen into several equal size windows, reference images of the windows are all the same one and object images are adopted from different frames of image sequences by CCD, twice Fourier transforms of every channel images are realized by using hololens array. Areas of LCLV and the output light energy can be used effectively. The correlation performance can be improved.

  12. Brain and nervous system (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The nervous system controls the many complicated and interconnected functions of the body and mind. Motor, sensory cognitive and autonomic function are all coordinated and driven by the brain and nerves. As people age, ...

  13. Hemorrhage detection in MRI brain images using images features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moraru, Luminita; Moldovanu, Simona; Bibicu, Dorin; Stratulat (Visan), Mirela

    2013-11-01

    The abnormalities appear frequently on Magnetic Resonance Images (MRI) of brain in elderly patients presenting either stroke or cognitive impairment. Detection of brain hemorrhage lesions in MRI is an important but very time-consuming task. This research aims to develop a method to extract brain tissue features from T2-weighted MR images of the brain using a selection of the most valuable texture features in order to discriminate between normal and affected areas of the brain. Due to textural similarity between normal and affected areas in brain MR images these operation are very challenging. A trauma may cause microstructural changes, which are not necessarily perceptible by visual inspection, but they could be detected by using a texture analysis. The proposed analysis is developed in five steps: i) in the pre-processing step: the de-noising operation is performed using the Daubechies wavelets; ii) the original images were transformed in image features using the first order descriptors; iii) the regions of interest (ROIs) were cropped from images feature following up the axial symmetry properties with respect to the mid - sagittal plan; iv) the variation in the measurement of features was quantified using the two descriptors of the co-occurrence matrix, namely energy and homogeneity; v) finally, the meaningful of the image features is analyzed by using the t-test method. P-value has been applied to the pair of features in order to measure they efficacy.

  14. DATA SYNTHESIS AND METHOD EVALUATION FOR BRAIN IMAGING GENETICS.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Jinhua; Kim, Sungeun; Yan, Jingwen; Moore, Jason; Saykin, Andrew; Shen, Li

    2014-05-01

    Brain imaging genetics is an emergent research field where the association between genetic variations such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and neuroimaging quantitative traits (QTs) is evaluated. Sparse canonical correlation analysis (SCCA) is a bi-multivariate analysis method that has the potential to reveal complex multi-SNP-multi-QT associations. We present initial efforts on evaluating a few SCCA methods for brain imaging genetics. This includes a data synthesis method to create realistic imaging genetics data with known SNP-QT associations, application of three SCCA algorithms to the synthetic data, and comparative study of their performances. Our empirical results suggest, approximating covariance structure using an identity or diagonal matrix, an approach used in these SCCA algorithms, could limit the SCCA capability in identifying the underlying imaging genetics associations. An interesting future direction is to develop enhanced SCCA methods that effectively take into account the covariance structures in the imaging genetics data.

  15. Monotonic correlation analysis of image quality measures for image fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Lance M.; Burks, Stephen D.; Moore, Richard K.; Nguyen, Quang

    2008-04-01

    The next generation of night vision goggles will fuse image intensified and long wave infra-red to create a hybrid image that will enable soldiers to better interpret their surroundings during nighttime missions. Paramount to the development of such goggles is the exploitation of image quality (IQ) measures to automatically determine the best image fusion algorithm for a particular task. This work introduces a novel monotonic correlation coefficient to investigate how well possible IQ features correlate to actual human performance, which is measured by a perception study. The paper will demonstrate how monotonic correlation can identify worthy features that could be overlooked by traditional correlation values.

  16. Quantifying the reliability of image replication studies: the image intraclass correlation coefficient (I2C2).

    PubMed

    Shou, H; Eloyan, A; Lee, S; Zipunnikov, V; Crainiceanu, A N; Nebel, N B; Caffo, B; Lindquist, M A; Crainiceanu, C M

    2013-12-01

    This article proposes the image intraclass correlation (I2C2) coefficient as a global measure of reliability for imaging studies. The I2C2 generalizes the classic intraclass correlation (ICC) coefficient to the case when the data of interest are images, thereby providing a measure that is both intuitive and convenient. Drawing a connection with classical measurement error models for replication experiments, the I2C2 can be computed quickly, even in high-dimensional imaging studies. A nonparametric bootstrap procedure is introduced to quantify the variability of the I2C2 estimator. Furthermore, a Monte Carlo permutation is utilized to test reproducibility versus a zero I2C2, representing complete lack of reproducibility. Methodologies are applied to three replication studies arising from different brain imaging modalities and settings: regional analysis of volumes in normalized space imaging for characterizing brain morphology, seed-voxel brain activation maps based on resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), and fractional anisotropy in an area surrounding the corpus callosum via diffusion tensor imaging. Notably, resting-state fMRI brain activation maps are found to have low reliability, ranging from .2 to .4. Software and data are available to provide easy access to the proposed methods.

  17. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Cerebral Aspergillosis: Imaging and Pathological Correlations

    PubMed Central

    Sabou, Marcela; Lannes, Béatrice; Cotton, François; Meyronet, David; Galanaud, Damien; Cottier, Jean-Philippe; Grand, Sylvie; Desal, Hubert; Kreutz, Julie; Schenck, Maleka; Meyer, Nicolas; Schneider, Francis; Dietemann, Jean-Louis; Koob, Meriam

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral aspergillosis is associated with a significant morbidity and mortality rate. The imaging data present different patterns and no full consensus exists on typical imaging characteristics of the cerebral lesions. We reviewed MRI findings in 21 patients with cerebral aspergillosis and correlated them to the immune status of the patients and to neuropathological findings when tissue was available. The lesions were characterized by their number, topography, and MRI signal. Dissemination to the brain resulted from direct spread from paranasal sinuses in 8 patients, 6 of them being immunocompetent. Hematogenous dissemination was observed in 13 patients, all were immunosuppressed. In this later group we identified a total of 329 parenchymal abscesses involving the whole brain with a predilection for the corticomedullary junction. More than half the patients had a corpus callosum lesion. Hemorrhagic lesions accounted for 13% and contrast enhancement was observed in 61% of the lesions. Patients with hematogenous dissemination were younger (p = 0.003), had more intracranial lesions (p = 0.0004) and had a higher 12-week mortality rate (p = 0.046) than patients with direct spread from paranasal sinuses. Analysis of 12 aneurysms allowed us to highlight two distinct situations. In case of direct spread from the paranasal sinuses, aneurysms are saccular and located on the proximal artery portions, while the hematogenous dissemination in immunocompromised patients is more frequently associated with distal and fusiform aneurysms. MRI is the exam of choice for cerebral aspergillosis. Number and type of lesions are different according to the mode of dissemination of the infection. PMID:27097323

  18. Trigeminal nerve: Anatomic correlation with MR imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, D.L.; Pech, P.; Pojunas, K.W.; Kilgore, D.P.; Williams, A.L.; Haughton, V.M.

    1986-06-01

    Through correlation with cryomicrotic sections, the appearance of the trigeminal nerve and its branches on magnetic resonance images is described in healthy individuals and in patients with tumors involving this nerve. Coronal images are best for defining the different parts of the nerve and for making a side-to-side comparison. Sagittal images are useful to demonstrate tumors involving the Gasserian ganglion.

  19. CT scan of the brain (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... CAT scan (computed tomography) is a much more sensitive imaging technique than x-ray, allowing high definition not only of the bony structures, but of the soft tissues. Clear images of organs such as the brain, muscles, joint structures, veins ...

  20. NIH Conference. Brain imaging: aging and dementia

    SciTech Connect

    Cutler, N.R.; Duara, R.; Creasey, H.; Grady, C.L.; Haxby, J.V.; Schapiro, M.B.; Rapoport, S.I.

    1984-09-01

    The brain imaging techniques of positron emission tomography using (18F)-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose, and computed tomography, together with neuropsychological tests, were used to examine overall brain function and anatomy in three study populations: healthy men at different ages, patients with presumptive Alzheimer's disease, and adults with Down's syndrome. Brain glucose use did not differ with age, whereas an age-related decrement in gray matter volume was found on computed tomographic assessment in healthy subjects. Memory deficits were found to precede significant reductions in brain glucose utilization in mild to moderate Alzheimer's dementia. Furthermore, differences between language and visuoconstructive impairments in patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease were related to hemispheric asymmetry of brain metabolism. Brain glucose utilization was found to be significantly elevated in young adults with Down's syndrome, compared with controls. The importance of establishing strict criteria for selecting control subjects and patients is explained in relation to the findings.

  1. Advantages in functional imaging of the brain

    PubMed Central

    Mier, Walter; Mier, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    As neuronal pathologies cause only minor morphological alterations, molecular imaging techniques are a prerequisite for the study of diseases of the brain. The development of molecular probes that specifically bind biochemical markers and the advances of instrumentation have revolutionized the possibilities to gain insight into the human brain organization and beyond this—visualize structure-function and brain-behavior relationships. The review describes the development and current applications of functional brain imaging techniques with a focus on applications in psychiatry. A historical overview of the development of functional imaging is followed by the portrayal of the principles and applications of positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), two key molecular imaging techniques that have revolutionized the ability to image molecular processes in the brain. We conclude that the juxtaposition of PET and fMRI in hybrid PET/MRI scanners enhances the significance of both modalities for research in neurology and psychiatry and might pave the way for a new area of personalized medicine. PMID:26042013

  2. Wavelet-space correlation imaging for high-speed MRI without motion monitoring or data segmentation.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu; Wang, Hui; Tkach, Jean; Roach, David; Woods, Jason; Dumoulin, Charles

    2015-12-01

    This study aims to (i) develop a new high-speed MRI approach by implementing correlation imaging in wavelet-space, and (ii) demonstrate the ability of wavelet-space correlation imaging to image human anatomy with involuntary or physiological motion. Correlation imaging is a high-speed MRI framework in which image reconstruction relies on quantification of data correlation. The presented work integrates correlation imaging with a wavelet transform technique developed originally in the field of signal and image processing. This provides a new high-speed MRI approach to motion-free data collection without motion monitoring or data segmentation. The new approach, called "wavelet-space correlation imaging", is investigated in brain imaging with involuntary motion and chest imaging with free-breathing. Wavelet-space correlation imaging can exceed the speed limit of conventional parallel imaging methods. Using this approach with high acceleration factors (6 for brain MRI, 16 for cardiac MRI, and 8 for lung MRI), motion-free images can be generated in static brain MRI with involuntary motion and nonsegmented dynamic cardiac/lung MRI with free-breathing. Wavelet-space correlation imaging enables high-speed MRI in the presence of involuntary motion or physiological dynamics without motion monitoring or data segmentation. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. [Psychopathology of schizophrenia and brain imaging].

    PubMed

    Gross, G; Huber, G

    2008-05-01

    separated from idiopathic schizophrenias as symptomatic by neurohistopathological findings of post mortem examinations and e.g. diagnosed as sporadic, atypical encephalitis. The cenesthetic type had a pilot function for the development of the BSC, because in its course the basic symptomatology determined as well the prodromes before the first psychotic episode, as after that the reversible postpsychotic basic stages respectively the irreversible pure defect syndromes, into which two thirds of cenesthetic schizophrenias terminate; then, because with this type the first time has been observed, that from initially quite uncharacteristic basic symptoms (BS) (level 1 BS), qualitatively peculiar basic symptoms (level 2 BS) and then distinct psychotic symptoms, i.e. bodily hallucinations arise; and because in patients with persisting pure deficiency syndromes neuromorphological changes in the sense of a basal ganglia syndrome could be proved. The clinical neuroradiological correlation study in 195 schizophrenic patients with slight residues or full remissions and 212 chronic schizophrenias as well as in 535 patients with organic psychosyndromes of different diagnostic groups reveal that brain imaging and biological-psychiatric research are only promising in close connection with clinical psychopathology and observation of the course, if they aim to assign certain structural or functional cerebral disturbances with certain clinical symptoms and syndromes. In this respect schizophrenic, schizoaffective and affective idiopathic psychosyndromes do not differ from somatically based psychoses in definable brain diseases. With functional-dynamic parameters the differentiation in process active and inactive stages has to be made guided by the actual clinical psychopathological syndrome at the moment of the collecting of the electroencephalographic, neurochemical, fMRI or PET findings. The reasons of inconsistencies of the EEG, PEG, CT, MRI, PET findings are analysed and it is shown that

  4. Image correlation method for DNA sequence alignment.

    PubMed

    Curilem Saldías, Millaray; Villarroel Sassarini, Felipe; Muñoz Poblete, Carlos; Vargas Vásquez, Asticio; Maureira Butler, Iván

    2012-01-01

    The complexity of searches and the volume of genomic data make sequence alignment one of bioinformatics most active research areas. New alignment approaches have incorporated digital signal processing techniques. Among these, correlation methods are highly sensitive. This paper proposes a novel sequence alignment method based on 2-dimensional images, where each nucleic acid base is represented as a fixed gray intensity pixel. Query and known database sequences are coded to their pixel representation and sequence alignment is handled as object recognition in a scene problem. Query and database become object and scene, respectively. An image correlation process is carried out in order to search for the best match between them. Given that this procedure can be implemented in an optical correlator, the correlation could eventually be accomplished at light speed. This paper shows an initial research stage where results were "digitally" obtained by simulating an optical correlation of DNA sequences represented as images. A total of 303 queries (variable lengths from 50 to 4500 base pairs) and 100 scenes represented by 100 x 100 images each (in total, one million base pair database) were considered for the image correlation analysis. The results showed that correlations reached very high sensitivity (99.01%), specificity (98.99%) and outperformed BLAST when mutation numbers increased. However, digital correlation processes were hundred times slower than BLAST. We are currently starting an initiative to evaluate the correlation speed process of a real experimental optical correlator. By doing this, we expect to fully exploit optical correlation light properties. As the optical correlator works jointly with the computer, digital algorithms should also be optimized. The results presented in this paper are encouraging and support the study of image correlation methods on sequence alignment.

  5. Image Correlation Method for DNA Sequence Alignment

    PubMed Central

    Curilem Saldías, Millaray; Villarroel Sassarini, Felipe; Muñoz Poblete, Carlos; Vargas Vásquez, Asticio; Maureira Butler, Iván

    2012-01-01

    The complexity of searches and the volume of genomic data make sequence alignment one of bioinformatics most active research areas. New alignment approaches have incorporated digital signal processing techniques. Among these, correlation methods are highly sensitive. This paper proposes a novel sequence alignment method based on 2-dimensional images, where each nucleic acid base is represented as a fixed gray intensity pixel. Query and known database sequences are coded to their pixel representation and sequence alignment is handled as object recognition in a scene problem. Query and database become object and scene, respectively. An image correlation process is carried out in order to search for the best match between them. Given that this procedure can be implemented in an optical correlator, the correlation could eventually be accomplished at light speed. This paper shows an initial research stage where results were “digitally” obtained by simulating an optical correlation of DNA sequences represented as images. A total of 303 queries (variable lengths from 50 to 4500 base pairs) and 100 scenes represented by 100 x 100 images each (in total, one million base pair database) were considered for the image correlation analysis. The results showed that correlations reached very high sensitivity (99.01%), specificity (98.99%) and outperformed BLAST when mutation numbers increased. However, digital correlation processes were hundred times slower than BLAST. We are currently starting an initiative to evaluate the correlation speed process of a real experimental optical correlator. By doing this, we expect to fully exploit optical correlation light properties. As the optical correlator works jointly with the computer, digital algorithms should also be optimized. The results presented in this paper are encouraging and support the study of image correlation methods on sequence alignment. PMID:22761742

  6. Brain Structural Correlates of Emotion Recognition in Psychopaths

    PubMed Central

    Batalla, Iolanda; Kosson, David; Menchón, José M; Pifarré, Josep; Bosque, Javier; Cardoner, Narcís; Soriano-Mas, Carles

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with psychopathy present deficits in the recognition of facial emotional expressions. However, the nature and extent of these alterations are not fully understood. Furthermore, available data on the functional neural correlates of emotional face recognition deficits in adult psychopaths have provided mixed results. In this context, emotional face morphing tasks may be suitable for clarifying mild and emotion-specific impairments in psychopaths. Likewise, studies exploring corresponding anatomical correlates may be useful for disentangling available neurofunctional evidence based on the alleged neurodevelopmental roots of psychopathic traits. We used Voxel-Based Morphometry and a morphed emotional face expression recognition task to evaluate the relationship between regional gray matter (GM) volumes and facial emotion recognition deficits in male psychopaths. In comparison to male healthy controls, psychopaths showed deficits in the recognition of sad, happy and fear emotional expressions. In subsequent brain imaging analyses psychopaths with better recognition of facial emotional expressions showed higher volume in the prefrontal cortex (orbitofrontal, inferior frontal and dorsomedial prefrontal cortices), somatosensory cortex, anterior insula, cingulate cortex and the posterior lobe of the cerebellum. Amygdala and temporal lobe volumes contributed to better emotional face recognition in controls only. These findings provide evidence suggesting that variability in brain morphometry plays a role in accounting for psychopaths’ impaired ability to recognize emotional face expressions, and may have implications for comprehensively characterizing the empathy and social cognition dysfunctions typically observed in this population of subjects. PMID:27175777

  7. The significance of negative correlations in brain connectivity.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Liang; Jenkins, Lisanne M; Wolfson, Ouri E; GadElkarim, Johnson Jonaris; Nocito, Kevin; Thompson, Paul M; Ajilore, Olusola A; Chung, Moo K; Leow, Alex D

    2017-10-15

    Understanding the modularity of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)-derived brain networks or "connectomes" can inform the study of brain function organization. However, fMRI connectomes additionally involve negative edges, which may not be optimally accounted for by existing approaches to modularity that variably threshold, binarize, or arbitrarily weight these connections. Consequently, many existing Q maximization-based modularity algorithms yield variable modular structures. Here, we present an alternative complementary approach that exploits how frequent the blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal correlation between two nodes is negative. We validated this novel probability-based modularity approach on two independent publicly-available resting-state connectome data sets (the Human Connectome Project [HCP] and the 1,000 functional connectomes) and demonstrated that negative correlations alone are sufficient in understanding resting-state modularity. In fact, this approach (a) permits a dual formulation, leading to equivalent solutions regardless of whether one considers positive or negative edges; (b) is theoretically linked to the Ising model defined on the connectome, thus yielding modularity result that maximizes data likelihood. Additionally, we were able to detect novel and consistent sex differences in modularity in both data sets. As data sets like HCP become widely available for analysis by the neuroscience community at large, alternative and perhaps more advantageous computational tools to understand the neurobiological information of negative edges in fMRI connectomes are increasingly important. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Brain Structural Correlates of Emotion Recognition in Psychopaths.

    PubMed

    Pera-Guardiola, Vanessa; Contreras-Rodríguez, Oren; Batalla, Iolanda; Kosson, David; Menchón, José M; Pifarré, Josep; Bosque, Javier; Cardoner, Narcís; Soriano-Mas, Carles

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with psychopathy present deficits in the recognition of facial emotional expressions. However, the nature and extent of these alterations are not fully understood. Furthermore, available data on the functional neural correlates of emotional face recognition deficits in adult psychopaths have provided mixed results. In this context, emotional face morphing tasks may be suitable for clarifying mild and emotion-specific impairments in psychopaths. Likewise, studies exploring corresponding anatomical correlates may be useful for disentangling available neurofunctional evidence based on the alleged neurodevelopmental roots of psychopathic traits. We used Voxel-Based Morphometry and a morphed emotional face expression recognition task to evaluate the relationship between regional gray matter (GM) volumes and facial emotion recognition deficits in male psychopaths. In comparison to male healthy controls, psychopaths showed deficits in the recognition of sad, happy and fear emotional expressions. In subsequent brain imaging analyses psychopaths with better recognition of facial emotional expressions showed higher volume in the prefrontal cortex (orbitofrontal, inferior frontal and dorsomedial prefrontal cortices), somatosensory cortex, anterior insula, cingulate cortex and the posterior lobe of the cerebellum. Amygdala and temporal lobe volumes contributed to better emotional face recognition in controls only. These findings provide evidence suggesting that variability in brain morphometry plays a role in accounting for psychopaths' impaired ability to recognize emotional face expressions, and may have implications for comprehensively characterizing the empathy and social cognition dysfunctions typically observed in this population of subjects.

  9. Dynamic joint transform correlator of images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angervaks, A. E.; Malyi, A. F.; Fedorov, I. U.; Shcheulin, A. S.

    2008-03-01

    In this article principles of operation of a coherent optical image correlator based on a well know optical joint transform correlator are examined. Theoretical predictions and experimental data for of the optical image correlator with a holographic filter recorded on a thin holographic photographic plates PFG - 01 are analyzed. Results of the operation of the dynamic joint transform correlator on the basis of cadmium fluoride crystal, CdF2, with bistable impurity centers are demonstrated. Calculated and experimental correlation peak intensity dependencies with the scale and angular mismatch between an observed and reference objects for static and dynamic joint transform correlators are compared. Tangram figures were used as a test images. In the paper all computations were performed by use of MATLAB 7.0.1 mathematical program.

  10. Rainbow correlation imaging with macroscopic twin beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allevi, Alessia; Bondani, Maria

    2017-06-01

    We present the implementation of a correlation-imaging protocol that exploits both the spatial and spectral correlations of macroscopic twin-beam states generated by parametric downconversion. In particular, the spectral resolution of an imaging spectrometer coupled to an EMCCD camera is used in a proof-of-principle experiment to encrypt and decrypt a simple code to be transmitted between two parties. In order to optimize the trade-off between visibility and resolution, we provide the characterization of the correlation images as a function of the spatio-spectral properties of twin beams generated at different pump power values.

  11. Wavelet-space Correlation Imaging for High-speed MRI without Motion Monitoring or Data Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yu; Wang, Hui; Tkach, Jean; Roach, David; Woods, Jason; Dumoulin, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study aims to 1) develop a new high-speed MRI approach by implementing correlation imaging in wavelet-space, and 2) demonstrate the ability of wavelet-space correlation imaging to image human anatomy with involuntary or physiological motion. Methods Correlation imaging is a high-speed MRI framework in which image reconstruction relies on quantification of data correlation. The presented work integrates correlation imaging with a wavelet transform technique developed originally in the field of signal and image processing. This provides a new high-speed MRI approach to motion-free data collection without motion monitoring or data segmentation. The new approach, called “wavelet-space correlation imaging”, is investigated in brain imaging with involuntary motion and chest imaging with free-breathing. Results Wavelet-space correlation imaging can exceed the speed limit of conventional parallel imaging methods. Using this approach with high acceleration factors (6 for brain MRI, 16 for cardiac MRI and 8 for lung MRI), motion-free images can be generated in static brain MRI with involuntary motion and nonsegmented dynamic cardiac/lung MRI with free-breathing. Conclusion Wavelet-space correlation imaging enables high-speed MRI in the presence of involuntary motion or physiological dynamics without motion monitoring or data segmentation. PMID:25470230

  12. Connectome imaging for mapping human brain pathways.

    PubMed

    Shi, Y; Toga, A W

    2017-09-01

    With the fast advance of connectome imaging techniques, we have the opportunity of mapping the human brain pathways in vivo at unprecedented resolution. In this article we review the current developments of diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the reconstruction of anatomical pathways in connectome studies. We first introduce the background of diffusion MRI with an emphasis on the technical advances and challenges in state-of-the-art multi-shell acquisition schemes used in the Human Connectome Project. Characterization of the microstructural environment in the human brain is discussed from the tensor model to the general fiber orientation distribution (FOD) models that can resolve crossing fibers in each voxel of the image. Using FOD-based tractography, we describe novel methods for fiber bundle reconstruction and graph-based connectivity analysis. Building upon these novel developments, there have already been successful applications of connectome imaging techniques in reconstructing challenging brain pathways. Examples including retinofugal and brainstem pathways will be reviewed. Finally, we discuss future directions in connectome imaging and its interaction with other aspects of brain imaging research.

  13. Generating Text from Functional Brain Images

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Francisco; Detre, Greg; Botvinick, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    Recent work has shown that it is possible to take brain images acquired during viewing of a scene and reconstruct an approximation of the scene from those images. Here we show that it is also possible to generate text about the mental content reflected in brain images. We began with images collected as participants read names of concrete items (e.g., “Apartment’’) while also seeing line drawings of the item named. We built a model of the mental semantic representation of concrete concepts from text data and learned to map aspects of such representation to patterns of activation in the corresponding brain image. In order to validate this mapping, without accessing information about the items viewed for left-out individual brain images, we were able to generate from each one a collection of semantically pertinent words (e.g., “door,” “window” for “Apartment’’). Furthermore, we show that the ability to generate such words allows us to perform a classification task and thus validate our method quantitatively. PMID:21927602

  14. Connectome imaging for mapping human brain pathways

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Y; Toga, A W

    2017-01-01

    With the fast advance of connectome imaging techniques, we have the opportunity of mapping the human brain pathways in vivo at unprecedented resolution. In this article we review the current developments of diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the reconstruction of anatomical pathways in connectome studies. We first introduce the background of diffusion MRI with an emphasis on the technical advances and challenges in state-of-the-art multi-shell acquisition schemes used in the Human Connectome Project. Characterization of the microstructural environment in the human brain is discussed from the tensor model to the general fiber orientation distribution (FOD) models that can resolve crossing fibers in each voxel of the image. Using FOD-based tractography, we describe novel methods for fiber bundle reconstruction and graph-based connectivity analysis. Building upon these novel developments, there have already been successful applications of connectome imaging techniques in reconstructing challenging brain pathways. Examples including retinofugal and brainstem pathways will be reviewed. Finally, we discuss future directions in connectome imaging and its interaction with other aspects of brain imaging research. PMID:28461700

  15. Diffuse optical correlation tomography of cerebral blood flow during cortical spreading depression in rat brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chao; Yu, Guoqiang; Furuya, Daisuke; Greenberg, Joel; Yodh, Arjun; Durduran, Turgut

    2006-02-01

    Diffuse optical correlation methods were adapted for three-dimensional (3D) tomography of cerebral blood flow (CBF) in small animal models. The image reconstruction was optimized using a noise model for diffuse correlation tomography which enabled better data selection and regularization. The tomographic approach was demonstrated with simulated data and during in-vivo cortical spreading depression (CSD) in rat brain. Three-dimensional images of CBF were obtained through intact skull in tissues(~4mm) deep below the cortex.

  16. Electromagnetic inverse applications for functional brain imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, C.C.

    1997-10-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This project addresses an important mathematical and computational problem in functional brain imaging, namely the electromagnetic {open_quotes}inverse problem.{close_quotes} Electromagnetic brain imaging techniques, magnetoencephalography (MEG) and electroencephalography (EEG), are based on measurements of electrical potentials and magnetic fields at hundreds of locations outside the human head. The inverse problem is the estimation of the locations, magnitudes, and time-sources of electrical currents in the brain from surface measurements. This project extends recent progress on the inverse problem by combining the use of anatomical constraints derived from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with Bayesian and other novel algorithmic approaches. The results suggest that we can achieve significant improvements in the accuracy and robustness of inverse solutions by these two approaches.

  17. Brain correlates of response inhibition in Internet gaming disorder.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chiao-Yun; Huang, Mei-Feng; Yen, Ju-Yu; Chen, Cheng-Sheng; Liu, Gin-Chung; Yen, Cheng-Fang; Ko, Chih-Hung

    2015-04-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the brain correlates of response inhibition among subjects with Internet gaming disorder (IGD). For this purpose, 15 men with IGD for at least 1 year, and 15 controls with no history of IGD were recruited to perform the Go/Nogo task under functional magnetic resonance imaging investigation. Prior to scanning, the subjects were assessed using the Chen Internet Addiction Scale and the Barrett Impulsivity Scale. The control group exhibited activation of the right supplement motor area (SMA), dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and caudate for response inhibition. However, the IGD group had a higher impulsivity and lower activity of the right SMA/pre-SMA in comparison to the control group. The results obtained suggest that dysfunctional activation of the SMA for response inhibition is one of the candidate mechanisms of IGD. © 2014 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2014 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  18. Brain 'imaging' in the Renaissance.

    PubMed

    Paluzzi, Alessandro; Belli, Antonio; Bain, Peter; Viva, Laura

    2007-12-01

    During the Renaissance, a period of 'rebirth' for humanities and science, new knowledge and speculation began to emerge about the function of the human body, replacing ancient religious and philosophical dogma. The brain must have been a fascinating mystery to a Renaissance artist, but some speculation existed at that time on the function of its parts. Here we show how revived interest in anatomy and life sciences may have influenced the figurative work of Italian and Flemish masters, such as Rafael, Michelangelo and David. We present a historical perspective on the artists and the period in which they lived, their fascination for human anatomy and its symbolic use in their art. Prior to the 16th century, knowledge of the brain was limited and influenced in a dogmatic way by the teachings of Galen(1) who, as we now know, conducted his anatomical studies not on humans but on animals.(2) Nemesus, Bishop of Emesa, in around the year 400 was one of the first to attribute mental faculties to the brain, specifically to the ventricles. He identified two anterior (lateral) ventricles, to which he assigned perception, a middle ventricle responsible for cognition and a posterior ventricle for memory.(2,3) After a long period of stasis in the Middle Ages, Renaissance scholars realized the importance of making direct observations on dissected cadavers. Between 1504 and 1507, Leonardo da Vinci conducted experiments to reveal the anatomy of the ventricular system in the brain. He injected hot wax through a tube thrust into the ventricular cavities of an ox and then scraped the overlying brain off, thus obtaining, in a simple but ingenious way, an accurate cast of the ventricles.(2,4) Leonardo shared the belief promoted by scholarly Christians that the ventricles were the abode of rational soul. We have several examples of hidden symbolism in Renaissance paintings, but the influence of phrenology and this rudimentary knowledge of neuroanatomy on artists of that period is under

  19. Correlation of clinical findings and brain volume data in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Fragoso, Yara Dadalti; Wille, Paulo Roberto; Abreu, Marcelo; Brooks, Joseph Bruno B; Dias, Ronaldo Maciel; Duarte, Juliana Avila; Farage, Luciano; Finkelsztejn, Alessandro; Frohlich, Alan Christmann; Goncalves, Marcus Vinicius Magno; Guedes, Bruno V Sobreira; Medeiros, Leonardo; Oliveira, Rodrigo Andre; Ribas, Flavio Diniz; da Rocha, Fernando Coronetti Gomes; Santos, Gutemberg Augusto C; Scorcine, Claudio; da Silveira, Guilherme Lopes; Spedo, Carina Tellaroli; Tauil, Carlos Bernardo; Varela, Juliana Santos; Vieira, Vera Lucia Ferreira

    2017-10-01

    Brain volume measurements are becoming an important tool for assessing success in controlling multiple sclerosis (MS) activity. MSmetrix (icometrix) is an easy-to-use platform, specific for MS magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain. It provides data on total brain volume, grey matter volume and lesion load volume. The objective of the present study was to assess whether disability and the number of relapses during the previous year correlated with brain volume measurements from MSmetrix. Data on 185 icometrix reports from patients with MS were used to evaluate the potential correlation between brain volume measurements and clinical parameters. There was a significant correlation between higher disability and decreased brain volume (total and grey matter). Increased lesion load in the brain and higher number of relapses in the previous year were also independently correlated with decreased brain tissue volume and with increased disability. This is the first study with real-world data to show that icometrix is a relevant tool for the study of brain volume loss in MS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Large-scale imaging in small brains

    PubMed Central

    Ahrens, Misha B.; Engert, Florian

    2016-01-01

    The dense connectivity in the brain and arrangements of cells into circuits means that one neuron’s activity can influence many others. To observe this interconnected system comprehensively, an aspiration within neuroscience is to record from as many neurons as possible at the same time. There are two useful routes toward this goal: one is to expand the spatial extent of functional imaging techniques, and the second is to use animals with small brains. Here we review recent progress toward imaging many neurons and complete populations of identified neurons in small vertebrates and invertebrates. PMID:25636154

  1. Quantum Image Encryption Algorithm Based on Image Correlation Decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Tianxiang; Chen, Jiamin; Pei, Dongju; Zhang, Wenquan; Zhou, Nanrun

    2015-02-01

    A novel quantum gray-level image encryption and decryption algorithm based on image correlation decomposition is proposed. The correlation among image pixels is established by utilizing the superposition and measurement principle of quantum states. And a whole quantum image is divided into a series of sub-images. These sub-images are stored into a complete binary tree array constructed previously and then randomly performed by one of the operations of quantum random-phase gate, quantum revolving gate and Hadamard transform. The encrypted image can be obtained by superimposing the resulting sub-images with the superposition principle of quantum states. For the encryption algorithm, the keys are the parameters of random phase gate, rotation angle, binary sequence and orthonormal basis states. The security and the computational complexity of the proposed algorithm are analyzed. The proposed encryption algorithm can resist brute force attack due to its very large key space and has lower computational complexity than its classical counterparts.

  2. Semantic image retrieval in magnetic resonance brain volumes.

    PubMed

    Quddus, Azhar; Basir, Otman

    2012-05-01

    Practitioners in the area of neurology often need to retrieve multimodal magnetic resonance (MR) images of the brain to study disease progression and to correlate observations across multiple subjects. In this paper, a novel technique for retrieving 2-D MR images (slices) in 3-D brain volumes is proposed. Given a 2-D MR query slice, the technique identifies the 3-D volume among multiple subjects in the database, associates the query slice with a specific region of the brain, and retrieves the matching slice within this region in the identified volumes. The proposed technique is capable of retrieving an image in multimodal and noisy scenarios. In this study, support vector machines (SVM) are used for identifying 3-D MR volume and for performing semantic classification of the human brain into various semantic regions. In order to achieve reliable image retrieval performance in the presence of misalignments, an image registration-based retrieval framework is developed. The proposed retrieval technique is tested on various modalities. The test results reveal superior robustness performance with respect to accuracy, speed, and multimodality.

  3. Digital image registration by correlation techniques.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popp, D. J.; Mccormack, D. S.; Lee, G. M.

    1972-01-01

    This study considers the translation problem associated with digital image registration and develops a means for comparing commonly used correlation techniques. Using suitably defined constraints, an optimum and four suboptimum registration techniques are defined and evaluated. A computational comparison is made and Gaussian image statistics are used to compare the selected techniques in terms of radial position location error.

  4. An algorithm to stabilize a sequence of thermal brain images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalerchuk, Boris; Lemley, Joseph; Gorbach, Alexander M.

    2007-03-01

    Complex challenges of optical imaging in diagnostics and surgical treatment require accurate image registration/stabilization methods that remove only unwanted motions. An SIAROI algorithm is proposed for real-time subpixel registration sequences of intraoperatively acquired infrared (thermal) brain images. SIAROI algorithm is based upon automatic, localized Subpixel Image Autocorrelation and a user-selected Region of Interest (ROI). Human expertise about unwanted motions is added through a user-outlined ROI, using a low-accuracy free-hand paintbrush. SIAROI includes: (a) propagating the user-outlined ROI by selecting pixels in the second image of the sequence, using the same ROI; (b) producing SROI (sub-pixel ROI) by converting each pixel to k=NxN subpixels; (c) producing new SROI in the second image by shifting SROI within plus or minus 6k subpixels; (d) finding an optimal autocorrelation shift (x,y) within 12N that minimizes the Standard Deviation of Differences of Pixel Intensities (SDDPI) between corresponding ROI pixels in both images, (e) shifting the second image by (x,y), repeating (a)-(e) for successive images (t,t1). In experiments, a user quickly outlined non-deformable ROI (such as bone) in the first image of a sequence. Alignment of 100 brain images (25600x25600 pixel search, after every pixel was converted to 100 sub-pixels), took ~3 minutes, which is 200 times faster (with a 0.1=ROI/image ratio) than global auto-correlation. SIAROI improved frame alignment by a factor of two, relative to a Global Auto-correlation and Tie-points-based registration methods, as measured by reductions in the SDDPI.

  5. Rotationally invariant correlation filtering for multiple images

    SciTech Connect

    Schils, G.F.; Sweeney, D.W.

    1986-07-01

    A method is presented for designing translation-invariant optical correlation filters that have a specified rotational response for each of several input images. The correlation filter is postulated to have the form of an infinite linear combination of the angular Fourier harmonics of the input images. The corresponding response of the optical system too rotations of the multiple input images is described by a vector-matrix convolution equation. The solution of this equation for the unknown correlation filter is presented in terms of Fourier series. Use of one term in the Fourier series gives the multiple circular-harmonic filter that provides a specified rotationally invariant response for each of the multiple input images. Applications to rotationally invariant discrimination are described, and examples are given.

  6. Coherent photoacoustic-ultrasound correlation and imaging.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fei; Feng, Xiaohua; Zheng, Yuanjin

    2014-09-01

    Both photoacoustics and ultrasound have been researched extensively but separately. In this letter, we report an initial study on the coherent correlation between pulsed photoacoustic wave and pulse-echo ultrasound wave. By illuminating an object with a pulsed laser and external ultrasound sequentially, both the endogenous photoacoustic wave and pulse-echo ultrasound wave are received and coherently correlated, demonstrating enhanced signal-to-noise ratio. Image contrast of the proposed coherent photoacoustic-ultrasound imaging is also demonstrated to be improved significantly on vessel-mimicking phantom, due to fusion of the optical absorption and ultrasound reflection contrasts by coherent correlation of either conventional laser-induced photoacoustic imaging or pulse-echo ultrasound imaging separately.

  7. Fast and accurate registration techniques for affine and nonrigid alignment of MR brain images.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia-Xiu; Chen, Yong-Sheng; Chen, Li-Fen

    2010-01-01

    Registration of magnetic resonance brain images is a geometric operation that determines point-wise correspondences between two brains. It remains a difficult task due to the highly convoluted structure of the brain. This paper presents novel methods, Brain Image Registration Tools (BIRT), that can rapidly and accurately register brain images by utilizing the brain structure information estimated from image derivatives. Source and target image spaces are related by affine transformation and non-rigid deformation. The deformation field is modeled by a set of Wendland's radial basis functions hierarchically deployed near the salient brain structures. In general, nonlinear optimization is heavily engaged in the parameter estimation for affine/non-rigid transformation and good initial estimates are thus essential to registration performance. In this work, the affine registration is initialized by a rigid transformation, which can robustly estimate the orientation and position differences of brain images. The parameters of the affine/non-rigid transformation are then hierarchically estimated in a coarse-to-fine manner by maximizing an image similarity measure, the correlation ratio, between the involved images. T1-weighted brain magnetic resonance images were utilized for performance evaluation. Our experimental results using four 3-D image sets demonstrated that BIRT can efficiently align images with high accuracy compared to several other algorithms, and thus is adequate to the applications which apply registration process intensively. Moreover, a voxel-based morphometric study quantitatively indicated that accurate registration can improve both the sensitivity and specificity of the statistical inference results.

  8. Cross contrast multi-channel image registration using image synthesis for MR brain images.

    PubMed

    Chen, Min; Carass, Aaron; Jog, Amod; Lee, Junghoon; Roy, Snehashis; Prince, Jerry L

    2017-02-01

    Multi-modal deformable registration is important for many medical image analysis tasks such as atlas alignment, image fusion, and distortion correction. Whereas a conventional method would register images with different modalities using modality independent features or information theoretic metrics such as mutual information, this paper presents a new framework that addresses the problem using a two-channel registration algorithm capable of using mono-modal similarity measures such as sum of squared differences or cross-correlation. To make it possible to use these same-modality measures, image synthesis is used to create proxy images for the opposite modality as well as intensity-normalized images from each of the two available images. The new deformable registration framework was evaluated by performing intra-subject deformation recovery, intra-subject boundary alignment, and inter-subject label transfer experiments using multi-contrast magnetic resonance brain imaging data. Three different multi-channel registration algorithms were evaluated, revealing that the framework is robust to the multi-channel deformable registration algorithm that is used. With a single exception, all results demonstrated improvements when compared against single channel registrations using the same algorithm with mutual information. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Recent advances in imaging preterm brain injury.

    PubMed

    Boardman, J P; Dyet, L E

    2007-08-01

    Survivors of preterm birth are at high risk of neurocognitive impairment in childhood, but the disturbances to brain growth and function that underlie impairment are not completely understood. Improvements in perinatal care have led to a reduction in the major destructive parenchymal brain lesions that are associated with motor impairment, such as cystic periventricular leucomalacia and haemorrhagic parenchymal infarction. However, with the application of advanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and processing techniques in the neonatal period, subtle alterations in brain development have become apparent. These changes occur with similar frequency to long-term neurocognitive impairment, and may therefore represent candidate neural substrates for this group of disorders. Here we review the range of lesions and associated outcomes that are seen in the current era of perinatal care, and discuss how state of the art MR imaging techniques have helped to define the neural systems affected by preterm birth, and have provided insights into understanding mechanisms of injury.

  10. Imaging assessment of traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Currie, Stuart; Saleem, Nayyar; Straiton, John A; Macmullen-Price, Jeremy; Warren, Daniel J; Craven, Ian J

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) constitutes injury that occurs to the brain as a result of trauma. It should be appreciated as a heterogeneous, dynamic pathophysiological process that starts from the moment of impact and continues over time with sequelae potentially seen many years after the initial event. Primary traumatic brain lesions that may occur at the moment of impact include contusions, haematomas, parenchymal fractures and diffuse axonal injury. The presence of extra-axial intracranial lesions such as epidural and subdural haematomas and subarachnoid haemorrhage must be anticipated as they may contribute greatly to secondary brain insult by provoking brain herniation syndromes, cranial nerve deficits, oedema and ischaemia and infarction. Imaging is fundamental to the management of patients with TBI. CT remains the imaging modality of choice for initial assessment due to its ease of access, rapid acquisition and for its sensitivity for detection of acute haemorrhagic lesions for surgical intervention. MRI is typically reserved for the detection of lesions that may explain clinical symptoms that remain unresolved despite initial CT. This is especially apparent in the setting of diffuse axonal injury, which is poorly discerned on CT. Use of particular MRI sequences may increase the sensitivity of detecting such lesions: diffusion-weighted imaging defining acute infarction, susceptibility-weighted imaging affording exquisite data on microhaemorrhage. Additional advanced MRI techniques such as diffusion tensor imaging and functional MRI may provide important information regarding coexistent structural and functional brain damage. Gaining robust prognostic information for patients following TBI remains a challenge. Advanced MRI sequences are showing potential for biomarkers of disease, but this largely remains at the research level. Various global collaborative research groups have been established in an effort to combine imaging data with clinical and

  11. Image Correlation Microscopy for Uniform Illumination

    PubMed Central

    Gaborski, Thomas R.; Sealander, Michael N.; Ehrenberg, Morton; Waugh, Richard E.; McGrath, James L.

    2011-01-01

    Image cross-correlation microscopy (ICM) is a technique that quantifies the motion of fluorescent features in an image by measuring the temporal autocorrelation function decay in a time-lapse image sequence. ICM has traditionally employed laser-scanning microscopes because the technique emerged as an extension of laser-based fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). In this work, we show that image correlation can also be used to measure fluorescence dynamics in uniform illumination or wide-field imaging systems and we call our new approach uniform illumination image correlation microscopy (UI-ICM). Wide-field microscopy is not only a simpler, less expensive imaging modality, but it offers the capability of greater temporal resolution over laser-scanning systems. In traditional laser-scanning ICM, lateral mobility is calculated from the temporal de-correlation of an image, where the characteristic length is the illuminating laser beam width. In wide-field microscopy, the diffusion length is defined by the feature size using the spatial autocorrelation function (SACF). Correlation function decay in time occurs as an object diffuses from its original position. We show that theoretical and simulated comparisons between Gaussian and uniform features indicate the temporal autocorrelation function (TACF) depends strongly on particle size and not particle shape. In this report, we establish the relationships between the SACF feature size, TACF characteristic time and the diffusion coefficient for UI-ICM using analytical, Monte-Carlo and experimental validation with particle tracking algorithms. Additionally, we demonstrate UI-ICM analysis of adhesion molecule domain aggregation and diffusion on the surface of human neutrophils. PMID:20055917

  12. Magnetoencephalography for brain electrophysiology and imaging.

    PubMed

    Baillet, Sylvain

    2017-02-23

    We review the aspects that uniquely characterize magnetoencephalography (MEG) among the techniques available to explore and resolve brain function and dysfunction. While emphasizing its specific strengths in terms of millisecond source imaging, we also identify and discuss current practical challenges, in particular in signal extraction and interpretation. We also take issue with some perceived disadvantages of MEG, including the misconception that the technique is redundant with electroencephalography. Overall, MEG contributes uniquely to our deeper comprehension of both regional and large-scale brain dynamics: from the functions of neural oscillations and the nature of event-related brain activation, to the mechanisms of functional connectivity between regions and the emergence of modes of network communication in brain systems. We expect MEG to play an increasing and pivotal role in the elucidation of these grand mechanistic principles of cognitive, systems and clinical neuroscience.

  13. Brain imaging of affective disorders and schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, H; Yamada, K; Iseki, E; Kosaka, K; Okoshi, T

    1998-12-01

    We review recent findings in human brain imaging, for example, which brain areas are used during perception of colors, moving objects, human faces, facial expressions, sadness and happiness etc. One study used fluorine-18-labeled deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) in patients with unipolar depression and bipolar depression, and found hypometabolism in the left anterolateral prefrontal cortex. Another study reported increased regional cerebral blood flow in the amygdala in familial pure depressive disease. Using 11C-glucose PET, we reported that the glutamic acid pool was reduced in cortical areas of the brain in patients with major depression. We also found that the thalamic and cingulate areas were hyperactive in drug-naive (never medicated) acute schizophrenics, while the associative frontal, parietal, temporal gyri were hypoactive in drug-naive chronic schizophrenics. Brain biochemical disturbances of schizophrenic patients involved glutamic acid, N-acetyl aspartic acid, phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin which are important chemical substances in the working brain. The areas of the thalamus and the cingulate which become hyperactive in acute schizophrenic patients are important brain areas for perception and communication. The association areas of the cortex which become disturbed in chronic schizophrenia are essential brain areas in human creativity (language, concepts, formation of cultures and societies) and exist only in human beings.

  14. Genetic correlates of the evolving primate brain

    PubMed Central

    Vallender, Eric J.

    2012-01-01

    The tremendous shifts in the size, structure, and function of the brain during primate evolution are ultimately caused by changes at the genetic level. Understanding what these changes are and how they effect the phenotypic changes observed lies at the heart of understanding evolutionary change. This chapter focuses on understanding the genetic basis of primate brain evolution, considering the substrates and mechanisms through which genetic change occurs. It also discusses the implications that our current understandings and tools have for what we have already discovered and where our studies will head in the future. While genetic and genomic studies have identified many regions undergoing positive selection during primate evolution, the findings are certainly not exhaustive and functional relevance remains to be confirmed. Nevertheless, a strong foundation has been built upon which future studies will emerge. PMID:22230621

  15. Assessment of factors that confound MRI and neuropathological correlation of human postmortem brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Grinberg, Lea T; Amaro, Edson; Teipel, Stefan; dos Santos, Denis Dionizio; Pasqualucci, Carlos Augusto; Leite, Renata E P; Camargo, Celia Regina; Gonçalves, Jaqueline Alba; Sanches, Ariadne Gonçalves; Santana, Miriam; Ferretti, Renata E L; Jacob-Filho, Wilson; Nitrini, Ricardo; Heinsen, Helmut

    2008-09-01

    In spite of considerable technical advance in MRI techniques, the optical resolution of these methods are still limited. Consequently, the delineation of cytoarchitectonic fields based on probabilistic maps and brain volume changes, as well as small-scale changes seen in MRI scans need to be verified by neuronanatomical/neuropathological diagnostic tools. To attend the current interdisciplinary needs of the scientific community, brain banks have to broaden their scope in order to provide high quality tissue suitable for neuroimaging- neuropathology/anatomy correlation studies. The Brain Bank of the Brazilian Aging Brain Research Group (BBBABSG) of the University of Sao Paulo Medical School (USPMS) collaborates with researchers interested in neuroimaging-neuropathological correlation studies providing brains submitted to postmortem MRI in-situ. In this paper we describe and discuss the parameters established by the BBBABSG to select and to handle brains for fine-scale neuroimaging-neuropathological correlation studies, and to exclude inappropriate/unsuitable autopsy brains. We tried to assess the impact of the postmortem time and storage of the corpse on the quality of the MRI scans and to establish fixation protocols that are the most appropriate to these correlation studies. After investigation of a total of 36 brains, postmortem interval and low body temperature proved to be the main factors determining the quality of routine MRI protocols. Perfusion fixation of the brains after autopsy by mannitol 20% followed by formalin 20% was the best method for preserving the original brain shape and volume, and for allowing further routine and immunohistochemical staining. Taken to together, these parameters offer a methodological progress in screening and processing of human postmortem tissue in order to guarantee high quality material for unbiased correlation studies and to avoid expenditures by post-imaging analyses and histological processing of brain tissue.

  16. Brain correlates of automatic visual change detection.

    PubMed

    Cléry, H; Andersson, F; Fonlupt, P; Gomot, M

    2013-07-15

    A number of studies support the presence of visual automatic detection of change, but little is known about the brain generators involved in such processing and about the modulation of brain activity according to the salience of the stimulus. The study presented here was designed to locate the brain activity elicited by unattended visual deviant and novel stimuli using fMRI. Seventeen adult participants were presented with a passive visual oddball sequence while performing a concurrent visual task. Variations in BOLD signal were observed in the modality-specific sensory cortex, but also in non-specific areas involved in preattentional processing of changing events. A degree-of-deviance effect was observed, since novel stimuli elicited more activity in the sensory occipital regions and at the medial frontal site than small changes. These findings could be compared to those obtained in the auditory modality and might suggest a "general" change detection process operating in several sensory modalities. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Fast Optical Imaging of Human Brain Function

    PubMed Central

    Gratton, Gabriele; Fabiani, Monica

    2010-01-01

    Great advancements in brain imaging during the last few decades have opened a large number of new possibilities for neuroscientists. The most dominant methodologies (electrophysiological and magnetic resonance-based methods) emphasize temporal and spatial information, respectively. However, theorizing about brain function has recently emphasized the importance of rapid (within 100 ms or so) interactions between different elements of complex neuronal networks. Fast optical imaging, and in particular the event-related optical signal (EROS, a technology that has emerged over the last 15 years) may provide descriptions of localized (to sub-cm level) brain activity with a temporal resolution of less than 100 ms. The main limitations of EROS are its limited penetration, which allows us to image cortical structures not deeper than 3 cm from the surface of the head, and its low signal-to-noise ratio. Advantages include the fact that EROS is compatible with most other imaging methods, including electrophysiological, magnetic resonance, and trans-cranial magnetic stimulation techniques, with which can be recorded concurrently. In this paper we present a summary of the research that has been conducted so far on fast optical imaging, including evidence for the possibility of recording neuronal signals with this method, the properties of the signals, and various examples of applications to the study of human cognitive neuroscience. Extant issues, controversies, and possible future developments are also discussed. PMID:20631845

  18. Magnetic resonance microscopy at 14 Tesla and correlative histopathology of human brain tumor tissue.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Segura, Ana; Morales, Jose Manuel; Gonzalez-Darder, Jose Manuel; Cardona-Marsal, Ramon; Lopez-Gines, Concepcion; Cerda-Nicolas, Miguel; Monleon, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Microscopy (MRM) can provide high microstructural detail in excised human lesions. Previous MRM images on some experimental models and a few human samples suggest the large potential of the technique. The aim of this study was the characterization of specific morphological features of human brain tumor samples by MRM and correlative histopathology. We performed MRM imaging and correlative histopathology in 19 meningioma and 11 glioma human brain tumor samples obtained at surgery. To our knowledge, this is the first MRM direct structural characterization of human brain tumor samples. MRM of brain tumor tissue provided images with 35 to 40 µm spatial resolution. The use of MRM to study human brain tumor samples provides new microstructural information on brain tumors for better classification and characterization. The correlation between MRM and histopathology images allowed the determination of image parameters for critical microstructures of the tumor, like collagen patterns, necrotic foci, calcifications and/or psammoma bodies, vascular distribution and hemorrhage among others. Therefore, MRM may help in interpreting the Clinical Magnetic Resonance images in terms of cell biology processes and tissue patterns. Finally, and most importantly for clinical diagnosis purposes, it provides three-dimensional information in intact samples which may help in selecting a preferential orientation for the histopathology slicing which contains most of the informative elements of the biopsy. Overall, the findings reported here provide a new and unique microstructural view of intact human brain tumor tissue. At this point, our approach and results allow the identification of specific tissue types and pathological features in unprocessed tumor samples.

  19. Magnetic Resonance Microscopy at 14 Tesla and Correlative Histopathology of Human Brain Tumor Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Segura, Ana; Morales, Jose Manuel; Gonzalez-Darder, Jose Manuel; Cardona-Marsal, Ramon; Lopez-Gines, Concepcion; Cerda-Nicolas, Miguel; Monleon, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Microscopy (MRM) can provide high microstructural detail in excised human lesions. Previous MRM images on some experimental models and a few human samples suggest the large potential of the technique. The aim of this study was the characterization of specific morphological features of human brain tumor samples by MRM and correlative histopathology. We performed MRM imaging and correlative histopathology in 19 meningioma and 11 glioma human brain tumor samples obtained at surgery. To our knowledge, this is the first MRM direct structural characterization of human brain tumor samples. MRM of brain tumor tissue provided images with 35 to 40 µm spatial resolution. The use of MRM to study human brain tumor samples provides new microstructural information on brain tumors for better classification and characterization. The correlation between MRM and histopathology images allowed the determination of image parameters for critical microstructures of the tumor, like collagen patterns, necrotic foci, calcifications and/or psammoma bodies, vascular distribution and hemorrhage among others. Therefore, MRM may help in interpreting the Clinical Magnetic Resonance images in terms of cell biology processes and tissue patterns. Finally, and most importantly for clinical diagnosis purposes, it provides three-dimensional information in intact samples which may help in selecting a preferential orientation for the histopathology slicing which contains most of the informative elements of the biopsy. Overall, the findings reported here provide a new and unique microstructural view of intact human brain tumor tissue. At this point, our approach and results allow the identification of specific tissue types and pathological features in unprocessed tumor samples. PMID:22110653

  20. Structural correlates of preterm birth in the adolescent brain.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Zoltan; Ashburner, John; Andersson, Jesper; Jbabdi, Saad; Draganski, Bogdan; Skare, Stefan; Böhm, Birgitta; Smedler, Ann-Charlotte; Forssberg, Hans; Lagercrantz, Hugo

    2009-11-01

    The Stockholm Neonatal Project involves a prospective, cross-sectional, population-based, cohort monitored for 12 to 17 years after birth; it was started with the aim of investigating the long-term structural correlates of preterm birth and comparing findings with reports on similar cohorts. High-resolution anatomic and diffusion tensor imaging data measuring diffusion in 30 directions were collected by using a 1.5-T MRI scanner. A total of 143 adolescents (12.18-17.7 years of age) participated in the study, including 74 formerly preterm infants with birth weights of brain volumes and voxelwise comparison of gray matter (GM) volumes. The diffusion tensor imaging data were used for voxelwise comparison of white matter (WM) microstructural integrity. The formerly preterm individuals possessed 8.8% smaller GM volume and 9.4% smaller WM volume. The GM and WM volumes of individuals depended on gestational age and birth weight. The reduction in GM could be attributed bilaterally to the temporal lobes, central, prefrontal, orbitofrontal, and parietal cortices, caudate nuclei, hippocampi, and thalami. Lower fractional anisotropy was observed in the posterior corpus callosum, fornix, and external capsules. Although preterm birth was found to be a risk factor regarding long-term structural brain development, the outcome was milder than in previous reports. This may be attributable to differences in social structure and neonatal care practices.

  1. BrainCAT - a tool for automated and combined functional magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging brain connectivity analysis

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Paulo; Soares, José M.; Alves, Victor; Sousa, Nuno

    2013-01-01

    Multimodal neuroimaging studies have recently become a trend in the neuroimaging field and are certainly a standard for the future. Brain connectivity studies combining functional activation patterns using resting-state or task-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tractography have growing popularity. However, there is a scarcity of solutions to perform optimized, intuitive, and consistent multimodal fMRI/DTI studies. Here we propose a new tool, brain connectivity analysis tool (BrainCAT), for an automated and standard multimodal analysis of combined fMRI/DTI data, using freely available tools. With a friendly graphical user interface, BrainCAT aims to make data processing easier and faster, implementing a fully automated data processing pipeline and minimizing the need for user intervention, which hopefully will expand the use of combined fMRI/DTI studies. Its validity was tested in an aging study of the default mode network (DMN) white matter connectivity. The results evidenced the cingulum bundle as the structural connector of the precuneus/posterior cingulate cortex and the medial frontal cortex, regions of the DMN. Moreover, mean fractional anisotropy (FA) values along the cingulum extracted with BrainCAT showed a strong correlation with FA values from the manual selection of the same bundle. Taken together, these results provide evidence that BrainCAT is suitable for these analyses. PMID:24319419

  2. Optical Coherence Tomography for Brain Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Gangjun; Chen, Zhongping

    Recently, there has been growing interest in using OCT for brain imaging. A feasibility study of OCT for guiding deep brain probes has found that OCT can differentiate the white matter and gray matter because the white matter tends to have a higher peak reflectivity and steeper attenuation rate compared to gray matter. In vivo 3D visualization of the layered organization of a rat olfactory bulb with OCT has been demonstrated. OCT has been used for single myelin fiber imaging in living rodents without labeling. The refractive index in the rat somatosensory cortex has also been measured with OCT. In addition, functional extension of OCT, such as Doppler-OCT (D-OCT), polarization sensitive-OCT (PS-OCT), and phase-resolved-OCT (PR-OCT), can image and quantify physiological parameters in addition to the morphological structure image. Based on the scattering changes during neural activity, OCT has been used to measure the functional activation in neuronal tissues. PS-OCT, which combines polarization sensitive detection with OCT to determine tissue birefringence, has been used for the localization of nerve fiber bundles and the mapping of micrometer-scale fiber pathways in the brain. D-OCT, also named optical Doppler tomography (ODT), combines the Doppler principle with OCT to obtain high resolution tomographic images of moving constituents in highly scattering biological tissues. D-OCT has been successfully used to image cortical blood flow and map the blood vessel network for brain research. In this chapter, the principle and technology of OCT and D-OCT are reviewed and examples of potential applications are described.

  3. Imaging visual function of the human brain

    SciTech Connect

    Marg, E.

    1988-10-01

    Imaging of human brain structure and activity with particular reference to visual function is reviewed along with methods of obtaining the data including computed tomographic (CT) scan, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), and positron emission tomography (PET). The literature is reviewed and the potential for a new understanding of brain visual function is discussed. PET is reviewed from basic physical principles to the most recent visual brain findings with oxygen-15. It is shown that there is a potential for submillimeter localization of visual functions with sequentially different visual stimuli designed for the temporal separation of the responses. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), a less expensive substitute for PET, is also discussed. MRS is covered from basic physical principles to the current state of the art of in vivo biochemical analysis. Future possible clinical applications are discussed. Improved understanding of the functional neural organization of vision and brain will open a window to maps and circuits of human brain function.119 references.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of the fetal brain.

    PubMed

    Tee, L Mf; Kan, E Yl; Cheung, J Cy; Leung, W C

    2016-06-01

    This review covers the recent literature on fetal brain magnetic resonance imaging, with emphasis on techniques, advances, common indications, and safety. We conducted a search of MEDLINE for articles published after 2010. The search terms used were "(fetal OR foetal OR fetus OR foetus) AND (MR OR MRI OR [magnetic resonance]) AND (brain OR cerebral)". Consensus statements from major authorities were also included. As a result, 44 relevant articles were included and formed the basis of this review. One major challenge is fetal motion that is largely overcome by ultra-fast sequences. Currently, single-shot fast spin-echo T2-weighted imaging remains the mainstay for motion resistance and anatomical delineation. Recently, a snap-shot inversion recovery sequence has enabled robust T1-weighted images to be obtained, which is previously a challenge for standard gradient-echo acquisitions. Fetal diffusion-weighted imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy are also being developed. With multiplanar capabilities, superior contrast resolution and field of view, magnetic resonance imaging does not have the limitations of sonography, and can provide additional important information. Common indications include ventriculomegaly, callosum and posterior fossa abnormalities, and twin complications. There are safety concerns about magnetic resonance-induced heating and acoustic damage but current literature showed no conclusive evidence of deleterious fetal effects. The American College of Radiology guideline states that pregnant patients can be accepted to undergo magnetic resonance imaging at any stage of pregnancy if risk-benefit ratio to patients warrants that the study be performed. Magnetic resonance imaging of the fetal brain is a safe and powerful adjunct to sonography in prenatal diagnosis. It can provide additional information that aids clinical management, prognostication, and counselling.

  5. Neuroimaging of the bilingual brain: Structural brain correlates of listening and speaking in a second language.

    PubMed

    Kuhl, Patricia K; Stevenson, Jeff; Corrigan, Neva M; van den Bosch, Jasper J F; Can, Dilara Deniz; Richards, Todd

    2016-11-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging was used to compare white matter structure between American monolingual and Spanish-English bilingual adults living in the United States. In the bilingual group, relationships between white matter structure and naturalistic immersive experience in listening to and speaking English were additionally explored. White matter structural differences between groups were found to be bilateral and widespread. In the bilingual group, experience in listening to English was more robustly correlated with decreases in radial and mean diffusivity in anterior white matter regions of the left hemisphere, whereas experience in speaking English was more robustly correlated with increases in fractional anisotropy in more posterior left hemisphere white matter regions. The findings suggest that (a) foreign language immersion induces neuroplasticity in the adult brain, (b) the degree of alteration is proportional to language experience, and (c) the modes of immersive language experience have more robust effects on different brain regions and on different structural features. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Semiautomatic brain morphometry from CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid; Windham, Joe P.; Peck, Donald J.

    1994-05-01

    Fast, accurate, and reproducible volume estimation is vital to the diagnosis, treatment, and evaluation of many medical situations. We present the development and application of a semi-automatic method for estimating volumes of normal and abnormal brain tissues from computed tomography images. This method does not require manual drawing of the tissue boundaries. It is therefore expected to be faster and more reproducible than conventional methods. The steps of the new method are as follows. (1) The intracranial brain volume is segmented from the skull and background using thresholding and morphological operations. (2) The additive noise is suppressed (the image is restored) using a non-linear edge-preserving filter which preserves partial volume information on average. (3) The histogram of the resulting low-noise image is generated and the dominant peak is removed from it using a Gaussian model. (4) Minima and maxima of the resulting histogram are identified and using a minimum error criterion, the brain is segmented into the normal tissues (white matter and gray matter), cerebrospinal fluid, and lesions, if present. (5) Previous steps are repeated for each slice through the brain and the volume of each tissue type is estimated from the results. Details and significance of each step are explained. Experimental results using a simulation, a phantom, and selected clinical cases are presented.

  7. Structural and functional brain imaging in schizophrenia.

    PubMed Central

    Cleghorn, J M; Zipursky, R B; List, S J

    1991-01-01

    We present an evaluation of the contribution of structural and functional brain imaging to our understanding of schizophrenia. Methodological influences on the validity of the data generated by these new technologies include problems with measurement and clinical and anatomic heterogeneity. These considerations greatly affect the interpretation of the data generated by these technologies. Work in these fields to date, however, has produced strong evidence which suggests that schizophrenia is a disease which involves abnormalities in the structure and function of many brain areas. Structural brain imaging studies of schizophrenia using computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are reviewed and their contribution to current theories of the pathogenesis of schizophrenia are discussed. Positron emission tomography (PET) studies of brain metabolic activity and dopamine receptor binding in schizophrenia are summarized and the critical questions raised by these studies are outlined. Future studies in these fields have the potential to yield critical insights into the pathophysiology of schizophrenia; new directions for studies of schizophrenia using these technologies are identified. PMID:1911736

  8. Lesion area detection using source image correlation coefficient for CT perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Fan Zhu; Rodriguez Gonzalez, David; Carpenter, Trevor; Atkinson, Malcolm; Wardlaw, Joanna

    2013-09-01

    Computer tomography (CT) perfusion imaging is widely used to calculate brain hemodynamic quantities such as cerebral blood flow, cerebral blood volume, and mean transit time that aid the diagnosis of acute stroke. Since perfusion source images contain more information than hemodynamic maps, good utilization of the source images can lead to better understanding than the hemodynamic maps alone. Correlation-coefficient tests are used in our approach to measure the similarity between healthy tissue time-concentration curves and unknown curves. This information is then used to differentiate penumbra and dead tissues from healthy tissues. The goal of the segmentation is to fully utilize information in the perfusion source images. Our method directly identifies suspected abnormal areas from perfusion source images and then delivers a suggested segmentation of healthy, penumbra, and dead tissue. This approach is designed to handle CT perfusion images, but it can also be used to detect lesion areas in magnetic resonance perfusion images.

  9. Electromagnetic imaging of dynamic brain activity

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, J.; Leahy, R. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering); Lewis, P.; Lewine, J.; George, J. ); Singh, M. . Dept. of Radiology)

    1991-01-01

    Neural activity in the brain produces weak dynamic electromagnetic fields that can be measured by an array of sensors. Using a spatio-temporal modeling framework, we have developed a new approach to localization of multiple neural sources. This approach is based on the MUSIC algorithm originally developed for estimating the direction of arrival of signals impinging on a sensor array. We present applications of this technique to magnetic field measurements of a phantom and of a human evoked somatosensory response. The results of the somatosensory localization are mapped onto the brain anatomy obtained from magnetic resonance images.

  10. Electromagnetic imaging of dynamic brain activity

    SciTech Connect

    Mosher, J.; Leahy, R.; Lewis, P.; Lewine, J.; George, J.; Singh, M.

    1991-12-31

    Neural activity in the brain produces weak dynamic electromagnetic fields that can be measured by an array of sensors. Using a spatio-temporal modeling framework, we have developed a new approach to localization of multiple neural sources. This approach is based on the MUSIC algorithm originally developed for estimating the direction of arrival of signals impinging on a sensor array. We present applications of this technique to magnetic field measurements of a phantom and of a human evoked somatosensory response. The results of the somatosensory localization are mapped onto the brain anatomy obtained from magnetic resonance images.

  11. Simulated driving and brain imaging: combining behavior, brain activity, and virtual reality.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Kara N; Pearlson, Godfrey D; Astur, Robert S; Calhoun, Vince D

    2006-01-01

    Virtual reality in the form of simulated driving is a useful tool for studying the brain. Various clinical questions can be addressed, including both the role of alcohol as a modulator of brain function and regional brain activation related to elements of driving. We reviewed a study of the neural correlates of alcohol intoxication through the use of a simulated-driving paradigm and wished to demonstrate the utility of recording continuous-driving behavior through a new study using a programmable driving simulator developed at our center. Functional magnetic resonance imaging data was collected from subjects while operating a driving simulator. Independent component analysis (ICA) was used to analyze the data. Specific brain regions modulated by alcohol, and relationships between behavior, brain function, and alcohol blood levels were examined with aggregate behavioral measures. Fifteen driving epochs taken from two subjects while also recording continuously recorded driving variables were analyzed with ICA. Preliminary findings reveal that four independent components correlate with various aspects of behavior. An increase in braking while driving was found to increase activation in motor areas, while cerebellar areas showed signal increases during steering maintenance, yet signal decreases during steering changes. Additional components and significant findings are further outlined. In summary, continuous behavioral variables conjoined with ICA may offer new insight into the neural correlates of complex human behavior.

  12. Neural correlates of establishing, maintaining, and switching brain states.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yi-Yuan; Rothbart, Mary K; Posner, Michael I

    2012-06-01

    Although the study of brain states is an old one in neuroscience, there has been growing interest in brain state specification owing to MRI studies tracing brain connectivity at rest. In this review, we summarize recent research on three relatively well-described brain states: the resting, alert, and meditation states. We explore the neural correlates of maintaining a state or switching between states, and argue that the anterior cingulate cortex and striatum play a critical role in state maintenance, whereas the insula has a major role in switching between states. Brain state may serve as a predictor of performance in a variety of perceptual, memory, and problem solving tasks. Thus, understanding brain states is critical for understanding human performance. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Neuroimaging Correlates of Novel Psychiatric Disorders after Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Max, Jeffrey E.; Wilde, Elisabeth A.; Bigler, Erin D.; Thompson, Wesley K.; MacLeod, Marianne; Vasquez, Ana C.; Merkley, Tricia L.; Hunter, Jill V.; Chu, Zili D.; Yallampalli, Ragini; Hotz, Gillian; Chapman, Sandra B.; Yang, Tony T.; Levin, Harvey S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To study magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) correlates of novel (new-onset) psychiatric disorders (NPD) after traumatic brain injury (TBI) and orthopedic injury (OI). Method: Participants were 7 to 17 years of age at the time of hospitalization for either TBI or OI. The study used a prospective, longitudinal, controlled design with…

  14. Neuroimaging Correlates of Novel Psychiatric Disorders after Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Max, Jeffrey E.; Wilde, Elisabeth A.; Bigler, Erin D.; Thompson, Wesley K.; MacLeod, Marianne; Vasquez, Ana C.; Merkley, Tricia L.; Hunter, Jill V.; Chu, Zili D.; Yallampalli, Ragini; Hotz, Gillian; Chapman, Sandra B.; Yang, Tony T.; Levin, Harvey S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To study magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) correlates of novel (new-onset) psychiatric disorders (NPD) after traumatic brain injury (TBI) and orthopedic injury (OI). Method: Participants were 7 to 17 years of age at the time of hospitalization for either TBI or OI. The study used a prospective, longitudinal, controlled design with…

  15. A dedicated neonatal brain imaging system

    PubMed Central

    Winchman, Tobias; Padormo, Francesco; Teixeira, Rui; Wurie, Julia; Sharma, Maryanne; Fox, Matthew; Hutter, Jana; Cordero‐Grande, Lucilio; Price, Anthony N.; Allsop, Joanna; Bueno‐Conde, Jose; Tusor, Nora; Arichi, Tomoki; Edwards, A. D.; Rutherford, Mary A.; Counsell, Serena J.; Hajnal, Joseph V.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The goal of the Developing Human Connectome Project is to acquire MRI in 1000 neonates to create a dynamic map of human brain connectivity during early development. High‐quality imaging in this cohort without sedation presents a number of technical and practical challenges. Methods We designed a neonatal brain imaging system (NBIS) consisting of a dedicated 32‐channel receive array coil and a positioning device that allows placement of the infant's head deep into the coil for maximum signal‐to‐noise ratio (SNR). Disturbance to the infant was minimized by using an MRI‐compatible trolley to prepare and transport the infant and by employing a slow ramp‐up and continuation of gradient noise during scanning. Scan repeats were minimized by using a restart capability for diffusion MRI and retrospective motion correction. We measured the 1) SNR gain, 2) number of infants with a completed scan protocol, and 3) number of anatomical images with no motion artifact using NBIS compared with using an adult 32‐channel head coil. Results The NBIS has 2.4 times the SNR of the adult coil and 90% protocol completion rate. Conclusion The NBIS allows advanced neonatal brain imaging techniques to be employed in neonatal brain imaging with high protocol completion rates. Magn Reson Med 78:794–804, 2017. © 2016 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution‐NonCommercial‐NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non‐commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made. PMID:27643791

  16. A dedicated neonatal brain imaging system.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Emer J; Winchman, Tobias; Padormo, Francesco; Teixeira, Rui; Wurie, Julia; Sharma, Maryanne; Fox, Matthew; Hutter, Jana; Cordero-Grande, Lucilio; Price, Anthony N; Allsop, Joanna; Bueno-Conde, Jose; Tusor, Nora; Arichi, Tomoki; Edwards, A D; Rutherford, Mary A; Counsell, Serena J; Hajnal, Joseph V

    2017-08-01

    The goal of the Developing Human Connectome Project is to acquire MRI in 1000 neonates to create a dynamic map of human brain connectivity during early development. High-quality imaging in this cohort without sedation presents a number of technical and practical challenges. We designed a neonatal brain imaging system (NBIS) consisting of a dedicated 32-channel receive array coil and a positioning device that allows placement of the infant's head deep into the coil for maximum signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Disturbance to the infant was minimized by using an MRI-compatible trolley to prepare and transport the infant and by employing a slow ramp-up and continuation of gradient noise during scanning. Scan repeats were minimized by using a restart capability for diffusion MRI and retrospective motion correction. We measured the 1) SNR gain, 2) number of infants with a completed scan protocol, and 3) number of anatomical images with no motion artifact using NBIS compared with using an adult 32-channel head coil. The NBIS has 2.4 times the SNR of the adult coil and 90% protocol completion rate. The NBIS allows advanced neonatal brain imaging techniques to be employed in neonatal brain imaging with high protocol completion rates. Magn Reson Med 78:794-804, 2017. © 2016 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non-commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made. © 2016 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  17. Brain imaging in myotonic dystrophy type 1: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Okkersen, Kees; Monckton, Darren G; Le, Nhu; Tuladhar, Anil M; Raaphorst, Joost; van Engelen, Baziel G M

    2017-08-29

    To systematically review brain imaging studies in myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1). We searched Embase (index period 1974-2016) and MEDLINE (index period 1946-2016) for studies in patients with DM1 using MRI, magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), functional MRI (fMRI), CT, ultrasound, PET, or SPECT. From 81 studies, we extracted clinical characteristics, primary outcomes, clinical-genetic correlations, and information on potential risk of bias. Results were summarized and pooled prevalence of imaging abnormalities was calculated, where possible. In DM1, various imaging changes are widely dispersed throughout the brain, with apparently little anatomical specificity. We found general atrophy and widespread gray matter volume reductions in all 4 cortical lobes, the basal ganglia, and cerebellum. The pooled prevalence of white matter hyperintensities is 70% (95% CI 64-77), compared with 6% (95% CI 3-12) in unaffected controls. DTI shows increased mean diffusivity in all 4 lobes and reduced fractional anisotropy in virtually all major association, projection, and commissural white matter tracts. Functional studies demonstrate reduced glucose uptake and cerebral perfusion in frontal, parietal, and temporal lobes, and abnormal fMRI connectivity patterns that correlate with personality traits. There is significant between-study heterogeneity in terms of imaging methods, which together with the established clinical variability of DM1 may explain divergent results. Longitudinal studies are remarkably scarce. DM1 brains show widespread white and gray matter involvement throughout the brain, which is supported by abnormal resting-state network, PET/SPECT, and MRS parameters. Longitudinal studies evaluating spatiotemporal imaging changes are essential. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  18. Reliability-guided digital image correlation for image deformation measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Pan Bing

    2009-03-10

    A universally applicable reliability-guided digital image correlation (DIC) method is proposed for reliable image deformation measurement. The zero-mean normalized cross correlation (ZNCC) coefficient is used to identify the reliability of the point computed. The correlation calculation begins with a seed point and is then guided by the ZNCC coefficient. That means the neighbors of the point with the highest ZNCC coefficient in a queue for computed points will be processed first. Thus the calculation path is always along the most reliable direction, and possible error propagation of the conventional DIC method can be avoided. The proposed novel DIC method is universally applicable to the images with shadows, discontinuous areas, and deformation discontinuity. Two image pairs were used to evaluate the performance of the proposed technique, and the successful results clearly demonstrate its robustness and effectiveness.

  19. Brain Event - Related Correlates of Concept Learning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-05-01

    significant discrimination between below- and above-average concept learners. Molfese, Papanicolau , Hess, and Molfese (1979), however, identified...1970, �’ 59-72. Molfese, D., Papanicolau , A., Hess, T, & Molfese, V. Neuroelectrical correlates of semantic processes. In H. Begleiter (Ed

  20. Digital image correlation through a rigid borescope.

    SciTech Connect

    Reu, Phillip L.

    2010-10-01

    There occasionally occur situations in field measurements where direct optical access to the area of interest is not possible. In these cases the borescope is the standard method of imaging. Furthermore, if shape, displacement, or strain are desired in these hidden locations, it would be advantageous to be able to do digital image correlation (DIC) through the borescope. This paper will present the added complexities and errors associated with imaging through a borescope for DIC. Discussion of non-radial distortions and their effects on the measurements, along with a possible correction scheme will be discussed.

  1. Introduction to machine learning for brain imaging.

    PubMed

    Lemm, Steven; Blankertz, Benjamin; Dickhaus, Thorsten; Müller, Klaus-Robert

    2011-05-15

    Machine learning and pattern recognition algorithms have in the past years developed to become a working horse in brain imaging and the computational neurosciences, as they are instrumental for mining vast amounts of neural data of ever increasing measurement precision and detecting minuscule signals from an overwhelming noise floor. They provide the means to decode and characterize task relevant brain states and to distinguish them from non-informative brain signals. While undoubtedly this machinery has helped to gain novel biological insights, it also holds the danger of potential unintentional abuse. Ideally machine learning techniques should be usable for any non-expert, however, unfortunately they are typically not. Overfitting and other pitfalls may occur and lead to spurious and nonsensical interpretation. The goal of this review is therefore to provide an accessible and clear introduction to the strengths and also the inherent dangers of machine learning usage in the neurosciences.

  2. Targeted polymeric magnetic nanoparticles for brain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirthivasan, Bharat; Singh, Dhirender; Raut, Sangram; Bommana, Murali Mohan; Squillante, Emilio, III; Sadoqi, Mostafa

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop targeted polymeric magnetic nanoparticle system for brain imaging. Near infrared dye indocyanine green (ICG) or p-gycoprotein substrate rhodamine 123 (Rh123) were encapsulated along with oleic acid coated magnetic nanoparticles (OAMNP) in a matrix of poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and methoxy poly(ethyleneglycol)-poly(lactide) (Met-PEG-PLA). The nanoparticles were evaluated for morphology, particle size, dye content and magnetite content. The in vivo biodistribution study was carried out using three groups of six male Sprague Dawley rats each. Group I received a saline solution containing the dye, group II received dye-loaded polymeric magnetic nanoparticles without the aid of a magnetic field, and group III received dye-loaded polymeric magnetic nanoparticles with a magnet (8000 G) placed on the head of the rat. After a preset exposure period, the animals were sacrificed and dye concentration was measured in the brain, liver, kidney, lungs and spleen homogenates. Brain sections were fixed, cryotomed and visualized using fluorescence microscopy. The particles were observed to be spherical and had a mean size of 220 nm. The encapsulation efficiency for OAMNP was 57%, while that for ICG was 56% and for Rh123 was 45%. In the biodistribution study, while the majority of the dose for all animals was found in the liver, kidneys and spleen, group III showed a significantly higher brain concentration than the other two groups (p < 0.001). This result was corroborated by the fluorescence microscopy studies, which showed enhanced dye penetration into the brain tissue for group III. Further studies need to be done to elucidate the exact mechanism responsible for the increased brain uptake of dye to help us understand if the magnetic nanoparticles actually penetrate the blood brain barrier or merely deliver a massive load of dye just outside it, thereby triggering passive diffusion into the brain parenchyma. These results reinforce

  3. Susceptibility tensor imaging (STI) of the brain.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Liu, Chunlei; Duong, Timothy Q; van Zijl, Peter C M; Li, Xu

    2017-04-01

    Susceptibility tensor imaging (STI) is a recently developed MRI technique that allows quantitative determination of orientation-independent magnetic susceptibility parameters from the dependence of gradient echo signal phase on the orientation of biological tissues with respect to the main magnetic field. By modeling the magnetic susceptibility of each voxel as a symmetric rank-2 tensor, individual magnetic susceptibility tensor elements as well as the mean magnetic susceptibility and magnetic susceptibility anisotropy can be determined for brain tissues that would still show orientation dependence after conventional scalar-based quantitative susceptibility mapping to remove such dependence. Similar to diffusion tensor imaging, STI allows mapping of brain white matter fiber orientations and reconstruction of 3D white matter pathways using the principal eigenvectors of the susceptibility tensor. In contrast to diffusion anisotropy, the main determinant factor of the susceptibility anisotropy in brain white matter is myelin. Another unique feature of the susceptibility anisotropy of white matter is its sensitivity to gadolinium-based contrast agents. Mechanistically, MRI-observed susceptibility anisotropy is mainly attributed to the highly ordered lipid molecules in the myelin sheath. STI provides a consistent interpretation of the dependence of phase and susceptibility on orientation at multiple scales. This article reviews the key experimental findings and physical theories that led to the development of STI, its practical implementations, and its applications for brain research. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. MDCT imaging of traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Pezzullo, Martina; Delpierre, Isabelle; Sadeghi, Niloufar

    2016-01-01

    The aim of emergency imaging is to detect treatable lesions before secondary neurological damage occurs. CT plays a primary role in the acute setting of head trauma, allowing accurate detection of lesions requiring immediate neurosurgical treatment. CT is also accurate in detecting secondary injuries and is therefore essential in follow-up. This review discusses the main characteristics of primary and secondary brain injuries. PMID:26607650

  5. A Correlative Optical Microscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy Approach to Locating Nanoparticles in Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kempen, Paul J.; Kircher, Moritz F.; de la Zerda, Adam; Zavaleta, Cristina L; Jokerst, Jesse V.; Mellinghoff, Ingo K.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S; Sinclair, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The growing use of nanoparticles in biomedical applications, including cancer diagnosis and treatment, demands the capability to exactly locate them within complex biological systems. In this work a correlative optical and scanning electron microscopy technique was developed to locate and observe multi-modal gold core nanoparticle accumulation in brain tumor models. Entire brain sections from mice containing orthotopic brain tumors injected intravenously with nanoparticles were imaged using both optical microscopy to identify the brain tumor, and scanning electron microscopy to identify the individual nanoparticles. Gold-based nanoparticles were readily identified in the scanning electron microscope using backscattered electron imaging as bright spots against a darker background. This information was then correlated to determine the exact location of the nanoparticles within the brain tissue. The nanoparticles were located only in areas that contained tumor cells, and not in the surrounding healthy brain tissue. This correlative technique provides a powerful method to relate the macro- and micro-scale features visible in light microscopy with the nanoscale features resolvable in scanning electron microscopy. PMID:25464144

  6. A correlative optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy approach to locating nanoparticles in brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Kempen, Paul J; Kircher, Moritz F; de la Zerda, Adam; Zavaleta, Cristina L; Jokerst, Jesse V; Mellinghoff, Ingo K; Gambhir, Sanjiv S; Sinclair, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The growing use of nanoparticles in biomedical applications, including cancer diagnosis and treatment, demands the capability to exactly locate them within complex biological systems. In this work a correlative optical and scanning electron microscopy technique was developed to locate and observe multi-modal gold core nanoparticle accumulation in brain tumor models. Entire brain sections from mice containing orthotopic brain tumors injected intravenously with nanoparticles were imaged using both optical microscopy to identify the brain tumor, and scanning electron microscopy to identify the individual nanoparticles. Gold-based nanoparticles were readily identified in the scanning electron microscope using backscattered electron imaging as bright spots against a darker background. This information was then correlated to determine the exact location of the nanoparticles within the brain tissue. The nanoparticles were located only in areas that contained tumor cells, and not in the surrounding healthy brain tissue. This correlative technique provides a powerful method to relate the macro- and micro-scale features visible in light microscopy with the nanoscale features resolvable in scanning electron microscopy.

  7. [Brain imaging of first-episode psychosis].

    PubMed

    Jardri, R

    2013-09-01

    In the last decades, schizophrenia has intensively been studied using various brain imaging techniques. However, several potential confounding factors limited their interpretation power (e.g. chronicity, the impact of antipsychotic medication). By considering psychosis as a continuum of changes starting from mild cognitive impairments to serious psychotic symptoms, it became possible to provide deeper insight in the neurobiological mechanisms underlying the onset of psychosis by focusing on at-risk individuals and first-episodes. Recent brain imaging meta-analyses of the first episode psychosis (FEP), noteworthy reported conjoint bilateral structural and functional differences at the level of the insula, the superior temporal gyrus and the medial frontal gyrus, encompassing the anterior cingulate cortex. In the present review, we thus provide an update of brain imaging studies of FEP with a particular emphasis on more recent anatomical, functional and molecular explorations. Specifically, we provide 1) a review of the common features observed in individuals with high risk for psychosis and changes characterizing the transition to psychosis, 2) a description of the environmental and drug factors influencing these abnormalities, 3) how these findings in FEP may differ from those observed in chronic individuals with schizophrenia, and 4) a short overview of new classification algorithms able to use MRI findings as valuable biomarkers to guide early detection in the prodromal phase of psychosis. Copyright © 2013 L’Encéphale. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.. All rights reserved.

  8. Middle cerebellar peduncles: Magnetic resonance imaging and pathophysiologic correlate

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Humberto; Tomsick, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    We describe common and less common diseases that can cause magnetic resonance signal abnormalities of middle cerebellar peduncles (MCP), offering a systematic approach correlating imaging findings with clinical clues and pathologic mechanisms. Myelin abnormalities, different types of edema or neurodegenerative processes, can cause areas of abnormal T2 signal, variable enhancement, and patterns of diffusivity of MCP. Pathologies such as demyelinating disorders or certain neurodegenerative entities (e.g., multiple system atrophy or fragile X-associated tremor-ataxia syndrome) appear to have predilection for MCP. Careful evaluation of concomitant imaging findings in the brain or brainstem; and focused correlation with key clinical findings such as immunosuppression for progressive multifocal leukoencephalopahty; hypertension, post-transplant status or high dose chemotherapy for posterior reversible encephalopathy; electrolyte disorders for myelinolysis or suspected toxic-drug related encephalopathy; would yield an appropriate and accurate differential diagnosis in the majority of cases. PMID:26751508

  9. Mental tasks classification for BCI using image correlation.

    PubMed

    Úbeda, Andrés; Iáñez, Eduardo; Azorin, José M

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a classifier based on image correlation of EEG maps to distinguish between three mental tasks in a Brain-Computer Interface (BCI). The data set V of BCI Competition 2003 has been used to test the classifier. To that end, the EEG maps obtained from this data set have been studied to find the ideal parameters of processing time and frequency. The classifier designed is based on a normalized cross-correlation of images which makes possible to obtain a proper similarity index to perform the classification. The success percentage of the classifier has been shown for different combinations of data. The results obtained are very successful, showing that this kind of techniques may be able to classify between three mental tasks with good results in a future online testing.

  10. Spectroscopic Imaging of Strongly Correlated Electronic States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdani, Ali; da Silva Neto, Eduardo H.; Aynajian, Pegor

    2016-03-01

    The study of correlated electronic systems from high-Tc cuprates to heavy-fermion systems continues to motivate the development of experimental tools to probe electronic phenomena in new ways and with increasing precision. In the past two decades, spectroscopic imaging with scanning tunneling microscopy has emerged as a powerful experimental technique. The combination of high energy and spatial resolutions provided by this technique reveals unprecedented detail of the electronic properties of strongly correlated metals and superconductors. This review examines specific experiments, theoretical concepts, and measurement methods that have established the application of these techniques to correlated materials. A wide range of applications, such as the study of collective responses to single atomic impurities, the characterization of quasiparticle-like excitations through their interference, and the identification of competing electronic phases using spectroscopic imaging, are discussed.

  11. [F-18]FDDNP microPET imaging correlates with brain Aβ burden in a transgenic rat model of Alzheimer disease: effects of aging, in vivo blockade, and anti-Aβ antibody treatment.

    PubMed

    Teng, Edmond; Kepe, Vladimir; Frautschy, Sally A; Liu, Jie; Satyamurthy, Nagichettiar; Yang, Fusheng; Chen, Ping-Ping; Cole, Graham B; Jones, Mychica R; Huang, Sung-Cheng; Flood, Dorothy G; Trusko, Stephen P; Small, Gary W; Cole, Gregory M; Barrio, Jorge R

    2011-09-01

    In vivo detection of Alzheimer's disease (AD) neuropathology in living patients using positron emission tomography (PET) in conjunction with high affinity molecular imaging probes for β-amyloid (Aβ) and tau has the potential to assist with early diagnosis, evaluation of disease progression, and assessment of therapeutic interventions. Animal models of AD are valuable for exploring the in vivo binding of these probes, particularly their selectivity for specific neuropathologies, but prior PET experiments in transgenic mice have yielded conflicting results. In this work, we utilized microPET imaging in a transgenic rat model of brain Aβ deposition to assess [F-18]FDDNP binding profiles in relation to age-associated accumulation of neuropathology. Cross-sectional and longitudinal imaging demonstrated that [F-18]FDDNP binding in the hippocampus and frontal cortex progressively increases from 9 to 18months of age and parallels age-associated Aβ accumulation. Specificity of in vivo [F-18]FDDNP binding was assessed by naproxen pretreatment, which reversibly blocked [F-18]FDDNP binding to Aβ aggregrates. Both [F-18]FDDNP microPET imaging and neuropathological analyses revealed decreased Aβ burden after intracranial anti-Aβ antibody administration. The combination of this non-invasive imaging method and robust animal model of brain Aβ accumulation allows for future longitudinal in vivo assessments of potential therapeutics for AD that target Aβ production, aggregation, and/or clearance. These results corroborate previous analyses of [F-18]FDDNP PET imaging in clinical populations.

  12. Photoacoustic brain imaging: from microscopic to macroscopic scales

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Junjie; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Human brain mapping has become one of the most exciting contemporary research areas, with major breakthroughs expected in the coming decades. Modern brain imaging techniques have allowed neuroscientists to gather a wealth of anatomic and functional information about the brain. Among these techniques, by virtue of its rich optical absorption contrast, high spatial and temporal resolutions, and deep penetration, photoacoustic tomography (PAT) has attracted more and more attention, and is playing an increasingly important role in brain studies. In particular, PAT complements other brain imaging modalities by providing high-resolution functional and metabolic imaging. More importantly, PAT’s unique scalability enables scrutinizing the brain at both microscopic and macroscopic scales, using the same imaging contrast. In this review, we present the state-of-the-art PAT techniques for brain imaging, summarize representative neuroscience applications, outline the technical challenges in translating PAT to human brain imaging, and envision potential technological deliverables. PMID:25401121

  13. Correlation among body height, intelligence, and brain gray matter volume in healthy children.

    PubMed

    Taki, Yasuyuki; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Sassa, Yuko; Takeuchi, Hikaru; Asano, Michiko; Asano, Kohei; Kotozaki, Yuka; Nouchi, Rui; Wu, Kai; Fukuda, Hiroshi; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2012-01-16

    A significant positive correlation between height and intelligence has been demonstrated in children. Additionally, intelligence has been associated with the volume of gray matter in the brains of children. Based on these correlations, we analyzed the correlation among height, full-scale intelligence quotient (IQ) and gray matter volume applying voxel-based morphometry using data from the brain magnetic resonance images of 160 healthy children aged 5-18 years of age. As a result, body height was significantly positively correlated with brain gray matter volume. Additionally, the regional gray matter volume of several regions such as the bilateral prefrontal cortices, temporoparietal region, and cerebellum was significantly positively correlated with body height and that the gray matter volume of several of these regions was also significantly positively correlated with full-scale intelligence quotient (IQ) scores after adjusting for age, sex, and socioeconomic status. Our results demonstrate that gray and white matter volume may mediate the correlation between body height and intelligence in healthy children. Additionally, the correlations among gray and white matter volume, height, and intelligence may be at least partially explained by the effect of insulin-like growth factor-1 and growth hormones. Given the importance of the effect of environmental factors, especially nutrition, on height, IQ, and gray matter volume, the present results stress the importance of nutrition during childhood for the healthy maturation of body and brain. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Digital Image Correlation with Dynamic Subset Selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Ghulam Mubashar; MacNish, Cara; Dyskin, Arcady; Shufrin, Igor

    2016-09-01

    The quality of the surface pattern and selection of subset size play a critical role in achieving high accuracy in Digital Image Correlation (DIC). The subset size in DIC is normally selected by testing different subset sizes across the entire image, which is a laborious procedure. This also leads to the problem that the worst region of the surface pattern influences the performance of DIC across the entire image. In order to avoid these limitations, a Dynamic Subset Selection (DSS) algorithm is proposed in this paper to optimize the subset size for each point in an image before optimizing the correlation parameters. The proposed DSS algorithm uses the local pattern around the point of interest to calculate a parameter called the Intensity Variation Ratio (Λ), which is used to optimize the subset size. The performance of the DSS algorithm is analyzed using numerically generated images and is compared with the results of traditional DIC. Images obtained from laboratory experiments are also used to demonstrate the utility of the DSS algorithm. Results illustrate that the DSS algorithm provides a better alternative to subset size "guessing" and finds an appropriate subset size for each point of interest according to the local pattern.

  15. An improved image reconstruction method for optical intensity correlation Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xin; Feng, Lingjie; Li, Xiyu

    2016-12-01

    The intensity correlation imaging method is a novel kind of interference imaging and it has favorable prospects in deep space recognition. However, restricted by the low detecting signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), it's usually very difficult to obtain high-quality image of deep space object like high-Earth-orbit (HEO) satellite with existing phase retrieval methods. In this paper, based on the priori intensity statistical distribution model of the object and characteristics of measurement noise distribution, an improved method of Prior Information Optimization (PIO) is proposed to reduce the ambiguous images and accelerate the phase retrieval procedure thus realizing fine image reconstruction. As the simulations and experiments show, compared to previous methods, our method could acquire higher-resolution images with less error in low SNR condition.

  16. Brain size and cognitive ability: Correlations with age, sex, social class, and race.

    PubMed

    Rushton, J P; Ankney, C D

    1996-03-01

    Using data from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), autopsy, endocranial measurements, and other techniques, we show that (1) brain size is correlated with cognitive ability about .44 using MRI; (2) brain size varies by age, sex, social class, and race; and (3) cognitive ability varies by age, sex, social class, and race. Brain size and cognitive ability show a curvilinear relation with age, increasing to young adulthood and then decreasing; increasing from women to men; increasing with socioeconomic status; and increasing from Africans to Europeans to Asians. Although only further research can determine if such correlations represent cause and effect, it is clear that the direction of the brain-size/cognitive-ability relationships described by Paul Broca (1824-1880), Francis Galton (1822-1911), and other nineteenth-century visionaries is true, and that the null hypothesis of no relation, strongly advocated over the last half century, is false.

  17. Brain correlates of hypnosis: A systematic review and meta-analytic exploration.

    PubMed

    Landry, Mathieu; Lifshitz, Michael; Raz, Amir

    2017-02-23

    Imaging of the living human brain elucidates the neural dynamics of hypnosis; however, few reliable brain patterns emerge across studies. Here, we methodically assess neuroimaging assays of hypnosis to uncover common neural configurations using a twofold approach. First, we systematically review research on the neural correlates of hypnotic phenomena; then, we meta-analyze these collective data seeking specific activation and deactivation patterns that typify hypnosis. Anchored around the role of top-down control processes, our comprehensive examination focuses on the involvement of intrinsic brain networks known to operationalize cognitive control and self-referential cognition, including the executive, salience, and default networks. We discuss how these neural dynamics may relate to contemporary theories of hypnosis and show that hypnosis correlates with activation of the lingual gyrus-a brain region involved in higher-order visual processing and mental imagery. Our findings help to better understand the neurobiological substrates comprising the appellation hypnosis.

  18. MR to CT Registration of Brains using Image Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Roy, Snehashis; Carass, Aaron; Jog, Amod; Prince, Jerry L; Lee, Junghoon

    2014-03-21

    Computed tomography (CT) is the standard imaging modality for patient dose calculation for radiation therapy. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (MRI) is used along with CT to identify brain structures due to its superior soft tissue contrast. Registration of MR and CT is necessary for accurate delineation of the tumor and other structures, and is critical in radiotherapy planning. Mutual information (MI) or its variants are typically used as a similarity metric to register MRI to CT. However, unlike CT, MRI intensity does not have an accepted calibrated intensity scale. Therefore, MI-based MR-CT registration may vary from scan to scan as MI depends on the joint histogram of the images. In this paper, we propose a fully automatic framework for MR-CT registration by synthesizing a synthetic CT image from MRI using a co-registered pair of MR and CT images as an atlas. Patches of the subject MRI are matched to the atlas and the synthetic CT patches are estimated in a probabilistic framework. The synthetic CT is registered to the original CT using a deformable registration and the computed deformation is applied to the MRI. In contrast to most existing methods, we do not need any manual intervention such as picking landmarks or regions of interests. The proposed method was validated on ten brain cancer patient cases, showing 25% improvement in MI and correlation between MR and CT images after registration compared to state-of-the-art registration methods.

  19. MR to CT registration of brains using image synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Snehashis; Carass, Aaron; Jog, Amod; Prince, Jerry L.; Lee, Junghoon

    2014-03-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is the preferred imaging modality for patient dose calculation for radiation therapy. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (MRI) is used along with CT to identify brain structures due to its superior soft tissue contrast. Registration of MR and CT is necessary for accurate delineation of the tumor and other structures, and is critical in radiotherapy planning. Mutual information (MI) or its variants are typically used as a similarity metric to register MRI to CT. However, unlike CT, MRI intensity does not have an accepted calibrated intensity scale. Therefore, MI-based MR-CT registration may vary from scan to scan as MI depends on the joint histogram of the images. In this paper, we propose a fully automatic framework for MR-CT registration by synthesizing a synthetic CT image from MRI using a co-registered pair of MR and CT images as an atlas. Patches of the subject MRI are matched to the atlas and the synthetic CT patches are estimated in a probabilistic framework. The synthetic CT is registered to the original CT using a deformable registration and the computed deformation is applied to the MRI. In contrast to most existing methods, we do not need any manual intervention such as picking landmarks or regions of interests. The proposed method was validated on ten brain cancer patient cases, showing 25% improvement in MI and correlation between MR and CT images after registration compared to state-of-the-art registration methods.

  20. Normative biometry of the fetal brain using magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Kyriakopoulou, Vanessa; Vatansever, Deniz; Davidson, Alice; Patkee, Prachi; Elkommos, Samia; Chew, Andrew; Martinez-Biarge, Miriam; Hagberg, Bibbi; Damodaram, Mellisa; Allsop, Joanna; Fox, Matt; Hajnal, Joseph V; Rutherford, Mary A

    2016-11-24

    The fetal brain shows accelerated growth in the latter half of gestation, and these changes can be captured by 2D and 3D biometry measurements. The aim of this study was to quantify brain growth in normal fetuses using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and to produce reference biometry data and a freely available centile calculator ( https://www.developingbrain.co.uk/fetalcentiles/ ). A total of 127 MRI examinations (1.5 T) of fetuses with a normal brain appearance (21-38 gestational weeks) were included in this study. 2D and 3D biometric parameters were measured from slice-to-volume reconstructed images, including 3D measurements of supratentorial brain tissue, lateral ventricles, cortex, cerebellum and extra-cerebral CSF and 2D measurements of brain biparietal diameter and fronto-occipital length, skull biparietal diameter and occipitofrontal diameter, head circumference, transverse cerebellar diameter, extra-cerebral CSF, ventricular atrial diameter, and vermis height, width, and area. Centiles were constructed for each measurement. All participants were invited for developmental follow-up. All 2D and 3D measurements, except for atrial diameter, showed a significant positive correlation with gestational age. There was a sex effect on left and total lateral ventricular volumes and the degree of ventricular asymmetry. The 5th, 50th, and 95th centiles and a centile calculator were produced. Developmental follow-up was available for 73.1% of cases [mean chronological age 27.4 (±10.2) months]. We present normative reference charts for fetal brain MRI biometry at 21-38 gestational weeks. Developing growth trajectories will aid in the better understanding of normal fetal brain growth and subsequently of deviations from typical development in high-risk pregnancies or following premature delivery.

  1. Brain magnetic resonance imaging findings in patients with mitochondrial cytopathies.

    PubMed

    Barragán-Campos, Héctor Manuel; Vallée, Jean-Noël; Lô, Daouda; Barrera-Ramírez, Carlos Felipe; Argote-Greene, Marcelo; Sánchez-Guerrero, Jorge; Estañol, Bruno; Guillevin, Rémy; Chiras, Jacques

    2005-05-01

    Mitochondrial cytopathies (MCs) are a heterogeneous group of clinical entities, some of which have classic phenotypes. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been reported to be helpful in the diagnosis of MC. To correlate the most common brain MRI findings reported in patients with MC with the clinical findings in patients in different MC subgroups. Case series. Patients with MCs seen at the Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubiran, Mexico City, Mexico. Twenty-one patients with MC with the following phenotypes: chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (n = 7), Kearns-Sayre syndrome (n = 7), mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalopathy (n = 6), and myoclonic epilepsy with ragged red fiber myopathy (n = 1). Brain MRI abnormalities were found in 20 (95%) of 21 patients. The most frequent abnormalities were widespread white matter hyperintensity in 19 patients (90%), supratentorial cortical atrophy in 18 patients (86%), and cerebellar atrophy in 13 patients (62%). Widespread white matter hyperintensity (P<.001) and supratentorial cortical atrophy (P = .001) were each correlated significantly with MC. Subsequent subgroup analyses showed that the absence of basal ganglia hyperintensity was correlated with Kearns-Sayre syndrome (P < .001) and the presence of supratentorial cortical atrophy was correlated with mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalopathy (P = .005). The presence of widespread white matter hyperintensity and/or supratentorial cortical atrophy in brain MRI may help to establish the diagnosis of MC. The radiologist has a role to play in the workup of MC by confirming the diagnosis and possibly distinguishing different subgroups of MC.

  2. Analysis of dynamic brain imaging data.

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, P P; Pesaran, B

    1999-01-01

    Modern imaging techniques for probing brain function, including functional magnetic resonance imaging, intrinsic and extrinsic contrast optical imaging, and magnetoencephalography, generate large data sets with complex content. In this paper we develop appropriate techniques for analysis and visualization of such imaging data to separate the signal from the noise and characterize the signal. The techniques developed fall into the general category of multivariate time series analysis, and in particular we extensively use the multitaper framework of spectral analysis. We develop specific protocols for the analysis of fMRI, optical imaging, and MEG data, and illustrate the techniques by applications to real data sets generated by these imaging modalities. In general, the analysis protocols involve two distinct stages: "noise" characterization and suppression, and "signal" characterization and visualization. An important general conclusion of our study is the utility of a frequency-based representation, with short, moving analysis windows to account for nonstationarity in the data. Of particular note are 1) the development of a decomposition technique (space-frequency singular value decomposition) that is shown to be a useful means of characterizing the image data, and 2) the development of an algorithm, based on multitaper methods, for the removal of approximately periodic physiological artifacts arising from cardiac and respiratory sources. PMID:9929474

  3. Hemispheric asymmetry: contributions from brain imaging.

    PubMed

    Hugdahl, Kenneth

    2011-09-01

    A series of studies using functional and structural magnetic resonance imaging, including diffusion tensor imaging measures also, to elucidate the aspects of hemispheric asymmetry are reviewed. It is suggested that laterality evolved as a response to the demands of language and the need for air-based communication which may have necessitated a division of labor between the hemispheres in order to avoid having duplicate copies in both the hemispheres that would increase processing redundancy. This would have put pressure on brain structures related to the evolution of language and speech, such as the left peri-Sylvian region. MRI data are provided showing structural and functional asymmetry in this region of the brain and how fibers connecting the right and left peri-Sylvian regions pass through the corpus callosum. It is further suggested that the so-called Yakelovian-torque, i.e., the twisting of the brain along the longitudinal axis, with the right frontal and left occipital poles protruding beyond the corresponding left and right sides, was necessary for the expansion of the left peri-Sylvian region and the right occipito-parietal regions subserving the processing of spatial relations. Functional magnetic resonance imaging data related to sex differences for visuo-spatial processing are presented showing enhanced right-sided activation in posterior parts of the brain in both sexes, and frontal activation including Broca's area in the female group only, suggesting that males and females use different strategies when solving a cognitive task. The paper ends with a discussion of the role of the corpus callosum in laterality and the role played by structural asymmetry in understanding corresponding functional asymmetry. WIREs Cogni Sci 2011 2 461-478 DOI: 10.1002/wcs.122 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  4. Three-Dimensional Medical Image Registration Using a Patient Space Correlation Technique

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    to which a tumor has invaded a particular portion of the brain , or when assessing stroke induced cerebral damage (6). A variation of this method...Pelizzari, C . A. et al. "Accurate Three-Dimensional Registration of CT, PET and/or MR Images of the Brain ," J. Computer Assisted Tomography, 13(1):20-26...Lothar R. et al. "Three Dimensional inage Correlation of CT, MR, and PET Studies in Radiotherapy Treatment Planning of Brain Tumors ," J. Computer

  5. Structural Imaging Measures of Brain Aging

    PubMed Central

    Lockhart, Samuel N.

    2014-01-01

    During the course of normal aging, biological changes occur in the brain that are associated with changes in cognitive ability. This review presents data from neuroimaging studies of primarily “normal” or healthy brain aging. As such, we focus on research in unimpaired or nondemented older adults, but also include findings from lifespan studies that include younger and middle aged individuals as well as from populations with prodromal or clinically symptomatic disease such as cerebrovascular or Alzheimer’s disease. This review predominantly addresses structural MRI biomarkers, such as volumetric or thickness measures from anatomical images, and measures of white matter injury and integrity respectively from FLAIR or DTI, and includes complementary data from PET and cognitive or clinical testing as appropriate. The findings reveal highly consistent age-related differences in brain structure, particularly frontal lobe and medial temporal regions that are also accompanied by age-related differences in frontal and medial temporal lobe mediated cognitive abilities. Newer findings also suggest that degeneration of specific white matter tracts such as those passing through the genu and splenium of the corpus callosum may also be related to age-related differences in cognitive performance. Interpretation of these findings, however, must be tempered by the fact that comorbid diseases such as cerebrovascular and Alzheimer’s disease also increase in prevalence with advancing age. As such, this review discusses challenges related to interpretation of current theories of cognitive aging in light of the common occurrence of these later-life diseases. Understanding the differences between “Normal” and “Healthy” brain aging and identifying potential modifiable risk factors for brain aging is critical to inform potential treatments to stall or reverse the effects of brain aging and possibly extend cognitive health for our aging society. PMID:25146995

  6. Brain activity associated with illusory correlations in animal phobia

    PubMed Central

    Wiemer, Julian; Schulz, Stefan M.; Reicherts, Philipp; Glotzbach-Schoon, Evelyn; Andreatta, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Anxiety disorder patients were repeatedly found to overestimate the association between disorder-relevant stimuli and aversive outcomes despite random contingencies. Such an illusory correlation (IC) might play an important role in the return of fear after extinction learning; yet, little is known about how this cognitive bias emerges in the brain. In a functional magnetic resonance imaging study, 18 female patients with spider phobia and 18 healthy controls were exposed to pictures of spiders, mushrooms and puppies followed randomly by either a painful electrical shock or nothing. In advance, both patients and healthy controls expected more shocks after spider pictures. Importantly, only patients with spider phobia continued to overestimate this association after the experiment. The strength of this IC was predicted by increased outcome aversiveness ratings and primary sensory motor cortex activity in response to the shock after spider pictures. Moreover, increased activation of the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) to spider pictures predicted the IC. These results support the theory that phobia-relevant stimuli amplify unpleasantness and sensory motor representations of aversive stimuli, which in turn may promote their overestimation. Hyper-activity in dlPFC possibly reflects a pre-occupation of executive resources with phobia-relevant stimuli, thus complicating the accurate monitoring of objective contingencies and the unlearning of fear. PMID:25411452

  7. Brain activity associated with illusory correlations in animal phobia.

    PubMed

    Wiemer, Julian; Schulz, Stefan M; Reicherts, Philipp; Glotzbach-Schoon, Evelyn; Andreatta, Marta; Pauli, Paul

    2015-07-01

    Anxiety disorder patients were repeatedly found to overestimate the association between disorder-relevant stimuli and aversive outcomes despite random contingencies. Such an illusory correlation (IC) might play an important role in the return of fear after extinction learning; yet, little is known about how this cognitive bias emerges in the brain. In a functional magnetic resonance imaging study, 18 female patients with spider phobia and 18 healthy controls were exposed to pictures of spiders, mushrooms and puppies followed randomly by either a painful electrical shock or nothing. In advance, both patients and healthy controls expected more shocks after spider pictures. Importantly, only patients with spider phobia continued to overestimate this association after the experiment. The strength of this IC was predicted by increased outcome aversiveness ratings and primary sensory motor cortex activity in response to the shock after spider pictures. Moreover, increased activation of the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) to spider pictures predicted the IC. These results support the theory that phobia-relevant stimuli amplify unpleasantness and sensory motor representations of aversive stimuli, which in turn may promote their overestimation. Hyper-activity in dlPFC possibly reflects a pre-occupation of executive resources with phobia-relevant stimuli, thus complicating the accurate monitoring of objective contingencies and the unlearning of fear.

  8. Pathological correlations between traumatic brain injury and chronic neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Haces, Marcela; Tang, Jonathan; Acosta, Glen; Fernandez, Joseph; Shi, Riyi

    2017-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury is among the most common causes of death and disability in youth and young adults. In addition to the acute risk of morbidity with moderate to severe injuries, traumatic brain injury is associated with a number of chronic neurological and neuropsychiatric sequelae including neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. However, despite the high incidence of traumatic brain injuries and the established clinical correlation with neurodegeneration, the causative factors linking these processes have not yet been fully elucidated. Apart from removal from activity, few, if any prophylactic treatments against post-traumatic brain injury neurodegeneration exist. Therefore, it is imperative to understand the pathophysiological mechanisms of traumatic brain injury and neurodegeneration in order to identify potential factors that initiate neurodegenerative processes. Oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, and glutamatergic excitotoxicity have previously been implicated in both secondary brain injury and neurodegeneration. In particular, reactive oxygen species appear to be key in mediating molecular insult in neuroinflammation and excitotoxicity. As such, it is likely that post injury oxidative stress is a key mechanism which links traumatic brain injury to increased risk of neurodegeneration. Consequently, reactive oxygen species and their subsequent byproducts may serve as novel fluid markers for identification and monitoring of cellular damage. Furthermore, these reactive species may further serve as a suitable therapeutic target to reduce the risk of post-injury neurodegeneration and provide long term quality of life improvements for those suffering from traumatic brain injury.

  9. Imaging biomarker correlates with oxidative stress in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Naduthota, Rajini M; Bharath, Rose D; Jhunjhunwala, Ketan; Yadav, Ravi; Saini, Jitender; Christopher, Rita; Pal, Pramod Kumar

    2017-01-01

    While oxidative stress (OS) may be one of the crucial factors determining the initiation and progression of Parkinson's disease (PD), its correlation with gray matter (GM) atrophy is not known. To determine the GM volume (GMV) changes using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and correlation with OS marker serum malondialdehyde (MDA) in PD. Seventy-two patients with PD were clinically evaluated and underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on a 3T MRI scanner using a 32-channel head coil. Lipid peroxidation product MDA levels were measured by spectrophotometry. MDA levels and regional GM differences using VBM were compared with 72 healthy controls. The mean age of the patients was 51.3 ± 10.6 years and that of controls was 50.8 ± 10.4 years. The mean age of onset of symptoms in PD was 45.2 ± 11.3 years. In PD, serum MDA level was significantly higher than that in controls (0.592 ± 0.89 μmol/l vs. 0.427 ± 0.055 μmol/l; P < 0.0001). Compared to controls, patients had greater regional GM atrophy in all the brain lobes (P < 0.001, uncorrected). A significant positive correlation was found between GMV and MDA in the caudate nucleus (CN) and posterior cingulate gyrus (PC) in the patient group (P < 0.001, uncorrected). We observed GM atrophy in all major brain lobes of patients when compared to controls. Only in the patient group, a significant positive correlation was observed in CN and PC with MDA. These findings suggest that, even though the whole brain is affected in PD, some of the non-substantia nigra regions of the brain, such as CN, may have some differential compensatory mechanism, which are preserved from oxidative damage.

  10. Brain tumor resection guided by fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leblond, Frederic; Fontaine, Kathryn M.; Valdes, Pablo; Ji, Songbai; Pogue, Brian W.; Hartov, Alex; Roberts, David W.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2009-02-01

    We present the methods that are being used in the scope of an on-going clinical trial designed to assess the usefulness of ALA-PpIX fluorescence imaging when used in conjunction with pre-operative MRI. The overall objective is to develop imaging-based neuronavigation approaches to aid in maximizing the completeness of brain tumor resection, thereby improving patient survival rate. In this paper we present the imaging methods that are used, emphasizing technical aspects relating to the fluorescence optical microscope, including initial validation approaches based on phantom and small-animal experiments. The surgical workflow is then described in detail based on a high-grade glioma resection we performed.

  11. Neuroradiology back to the future: brain imaging.

    PubMed

    Hoeffner, E G; Mukherji, S K; Srinivasan, A; Quint, D J

    2012-01-01

    The beginning of neuroradiology can be traced to the early 1900s with the use of skull radiographs. Ventriculography and pneumoencephalography were introduced in 1918 and 1919, respectively, and carotid angiography, in 1927. Technical advances were made in these procedures during the next 40 years that lead to improved diagnosis of intracranial pathology. Yet, they remained invasive procedures that were often uncomfortable and associated with significant morbidity. The introduction of CT in 1971 revolutionized neuroradiology. Ventriculography and pneumoencephalography were rendered obsolete. The imaging revolution continued with the advent of MR imaging in the early 1980s. Noninvasive angiographic techniques have curtailed the use of conventional angiography, and physiologic imaging gives us a window into the function of the brain. In this historical review, we will trace the origin and evolution of the advances that have led to the quicker, less invasive diagnosis and resulted in more rapid therapy and improved outcomes.

  12. Computing dynamic classification images from correlation maps.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hongjing; Liu, Zili

    2006-05-22

    We used Pearson's correlation to compute dynamic classification images of biological motion in a point-light display. Observers discriminated whether a human figure that was embedded in dynamic white Gaussian noise was walking forward or backward. Their responses were correlated with the Gaussian noise fields frame by frame, across trials. The resultant correlation map gave rise to a sequence of dynamic classification images that were clearer than either the standard method of A. J. Ahumada and J. Lovell (1971) or the optimal weighting method of R. F. Murray, P. J. Bennett, and A. B. Sekuler (2002). Further, the correlation coefficients of all the point lights were similar to each other when overlapping pixels between forward and backward walkers were excluded. This pattern is consistent with the hypothesis that the point-light walker is represented in a global manner, as opposed to a fixed subset of point lights being more important than others. We conjecture that the superior performance of the correlation map may reflect inherent nonlinearities in processing biological motion, which are incompatible with the assumptions underlying the previous methods.

  13. Electroencephalographic imaging of higher brain function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gevins, A.; Smith, M. E.; McEvoy, L. K.; Leong, H.; Le, J.

    1999-01-01

    High temporal resolution is necessary to resolve the rapidly changing patterns of brain activity that underlie mental function. Electroencephalography (EEG) provides temporal resolution in the millisecond range. However, traditional EEG technology and practice provide insufficient spatial detail to identify relationships between brain electrical events and structures and functions visualized by magnetic resonance imaging or positron emission tomography. Recent advances help to overcome this problem by recording EEGs from more electrodes, by registering EEG data with anatomical images, and by correcting the distortion caused by volume conduction of EEG signals through the skull and scalp. In addition, statistical measurements of sub-second interdependences between EEG time-series recorded from different locations can help to generate hypotheses about the instantaneous functional networks that form between different cortical regions during perception, thought and action. Example applications are presented from studies of language, attention and working memory. Along with its unique ability to monitor brain function as people perform everyday activities in the real world, these advances make modern EEG an invaluable complement to other functional neuroimaging modalities.

  14. Electroencephalographic imaging of higher brain function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gevins, A.; Smith, M. E.; McEvoy, L. K.; Leong, H.; Le, J.

    1999-01-01

    High temporal resolution is necessary to resolve the rapidly changing patterns of brain activity that underlie mental function. Electroencephalography (EEG) provides temporal resolution in the millisecond range. However, traditional EEG technology and practice provide insufficient spatial detail to identify relationships between brain electrical events and structures and functions visualized by magnetic resonance imaging or positron emission tomography. Recent advances help to overcome this problem by recording EEGs from more electrodes, by registering EEG data with anatomical images, and by correcting the distortion caused by volume conduction of EEG signals through the skull and scalp. In addition, statistical measurements of sub-second interdependences between EEG time-series recorded from different locations can help to generate hypotheses about the instantaneous functional networks that form between different cortical regions during perception, thought and action. Example applications are presented from studies of language, attention and working memory. Along with its unique ability to monitor brain function as people perform everyday activities in the real world, these advances make modern EEG an invaluable complement to other functional neuroimaging modalities.

  15. Pixel-level robust digital image correlation.

    PubMed

    Cofaru, Corneliu; Philips, Wilfried; Van Paepegem, Wim

    2013-12-02

    Digital Image Correlation (DIC) is a well-established non-contact optical metrology method. It employs digital image analysis to extract the full-field displacements and strains that occur in objects subjected to external stresses. Despite recent DIC progress, many problematic areas which greatly affect accuracy and that can seldomly be avoided, received very little attention. Problems posed by the presence of sharp displacement discontinuities, reflections, object borders or edges can be linked to the analysed object's properties and deformation. Other problematic areas, such as image noise, localized reflections or shadows are related more to the image acquisition process. This paper proposes a new subset-based pixel-level robust DIC method for in-plane displacement measurement which addresses all of these problems in a straightforward and unified approach, significantly improving DIC measurement accuracy compared to classic approaches. The proposed approach minimizes a robust energy functional which adaptively weighs pixel differences in the motion estimation process. The aim is to limit the negative influence of pixels that present erroneous or inconsistent motions by enforcing local motion consistency. The proposed method is compared to the classic Newton-Raphson DIC method in terms of displacement accuracy in three experiments. The first experiment is numerical and presents three combined problems: sharp displacement discontinuities, missing image information and image noise. The second experiment is a real experiment in which a plastic specimen is developing a lateral crack due to the application of uniaxial stress. The region around the crack presents both reflections that saturate the image intensity levels leading to missing image information, as well as sharp motion discontinuities due to the plastic film rupturing. The third experiment compares the proposed and classic DIC approaches with generic computer vision optical flow methods using images from

  16. Fatigue Crack Detection Using Digital Image Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cawley, P.; Hutt, T. D.

    2009-03-01

    At present, detecting structural defects such as cracking and corrosion before they become critical is largely achieved by time consuming techniques such as eddy current and ultrasonic testing. These techniques require point-by-point scanning over the area to be tested. Digital Image Correlation could provide a cheaper and quicker testing technique. It works by correlating images of the structure surface in unloaded and loaded states taken with a standard digital camera, giving the displacement and strain fields. The specific case of a crack at a hole in an aluminium plate was investigated. It was found that the strain concentration around the crack tip is too localised to detect; however the displacement jump across the crack could be seen. This technique allows the cracks to be detected and would allow rapid testing of a structure if it can easily be loaded.

  17. Imaging extrasynaptic glutamate dynamics in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Hirokazu; Iinuma, Sho; Yamasaki, Miwako; Watanabe, Masahiko; Hirose, Kenzo; Iino, Masamitsu

    2010-01-01

    Glutamate is the major neurotransmitter in the brain, mediating point-to-point transmission across the synaptic cleft in excitatory synapses. Using a glutamate imaging method with fluorescent indicators, we show that synaptic activity generates extrasynaptic glutamate dynamics in the vicinity of active synapses. These glutamate dynamics had magnitudes and durations sufficient to activate extrasynaptic glutamate receptors in brain slices. We also observed crosstalk between synapses—i.e., summation of glutamate released from neighboring synapses. Furthermore, we successfully observed that sensory input from the extremities induced extrasynaptic glutamate dynamics within the appropriate sensory area of the cerebral cortex in vivo. Thus, the present study clarifies the spatiotemporal features of extrasynaptic glutamate dynamics, and opens up an avenue to directly visualizing synaptic activity in live animals. PMID:20308566

  18. Simultaneous MRI and PET imaging of a rat brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raylman, Raymond R.; Majewski, Stan; Lemieux, Susan K.; Sendhil Velan, S.; Kross, Brian; Popov, Vladimir; Smith, Mark F.; Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Zorn, Carl; Marano, Gary D.

    2006-12-01

    Multi-modality imaging is rapidly becoming a valuable tool in the diagnosis of disease and in the development of new drugs. Functional images produced with PET fused with anatomical structure images created by MRI will allow the correlation of form with function. Our group is developing a system to acquire MRI and PET images contemporaneously. The prototype device consists of two opposed detector heads, operating in coincidence mode. Each MRI-PET detector module consists of an array of LSO detector elements coupled through a long fibre optic light guide to a single Hamamatsu flat panel position-sensitive photomultiplier tube (PSPMT). The use of light guides allows the PSPMTs to be positioned outside the bore of a 3T MRI scanner where the magnetic field is relatively small. To test the device, simultaneous MRI and PET images of the brain of a male Sprague Dawley rat injected with FDG were successfully obtained. The images revealed no noticeable artefacts in either image set. Future work includes the construction of a full ring PET scanner, improved light guides and construction of a specialized MRI coil to permit higher quality MRI imaging.

  19. Demosaicing images from colour cameras for digital image correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forsey, A.; Gungor, S.

    2016-11-01

    Digital image correlation is not the intended use for consumer colour cameras, but with care they can be successfully employed in such a role. The main obstacle is the sparsely sampled colour data caused by the use of a colour filter array (CFA) to separate the colour channels. It is shown that the method used to convert consumer camera raw files into a monochrome image suitable for digital image correlation (DIC) can have a significant effect on the DIC output. A number of widely available software packages and two in-house methods are evaluated in terms of their performance when used with DIC. Using an in-plane rotating disc to produce a highly constrained displacement field, it was found that the bicubic spline based in-house demosaicing method outperformed the other methods in terms of accuracy and aliasing suppression.

  20. Sex, ecology and the brain: evolutionary correlates of brain structure volumes in Tanganyikan cichlids.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Voyer, Alejandro; Kolm, Niclas

    2010-12-17

    Analyses of the macroevolutionary correlates of brain structure volumes allow pinpointing of selective pressures influencing specific structures. Here we use a multiple regression framework, including phylogenetic information, to analyze brain structure evolution in 43 Tanganyikan cichlid species. We analyzed the effect of ecological and sexually selected traits for species averages, the effect of ecological traits for each sex separately and the influence of sexual selection on structure dimorphism. Our results indicate that both ecological and sexually selected traits have influenced brain structure evolution. The patterns observed in males and females generally followed those observed at the species level. Interestingly, our results suggest that strong sexual selection is associated with reduced structure volumes, since all correlations between sexually selected traits and structure volumes were negative and the only statistically significant association between sexual selection and structure dimorphism was also negative. Finally, we previously found that monoparental female care was associated with increased brain size. However, here cerebellum and hypothalamus volumes, after controlling for brain size, associated negatively with female-only care. Thus, in accord with the mosaic model of brain evolution, brain structure volumes may not respond proportionately to changes in brain size. Indeed selection favoring larger brains can simultaneously lead to a reduction in relative structure volumes.

  1. Functional brain imaging in respiratory medicine.

    PubMed

    Pattinson, Kyle

    2015-06-01

    Discordance of clinical symptoms with markers of disease severity remains a conundrum in a variety of respiratory conditions. The breathlessness of chronic lung disease correlates poorly with spirometry, yet is a better predictor of mortality. In chronic cough, symptoms are often evident without clear physical cause. In asthma, the terms 'over perceivers' and 'under perceivers' are common parlance. In all these examples, aberrant brain mechanisms may explain the mismatch between symptoms and pathology. Functional MRI is a non-invasive method of measuring brain function. It has recently become significantly advanced enough to be useful in clinical research and to address these potential mechanisms. This article explains how FMRI works, current understanding from FMRI in breathlessness, cough and asthma and suggests possibilities for future research.

  2. Cognitive Abilities Independent of IQ Correlate with Regional Brain Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Wendy; Jung, Rex E.; Colom, Roberto; Haier, Richard J.

    2008-01-01

    There is increasing evidence relating psychometric measures of general intelligence and reasoning to regional brain structure and function assessed with a variety of neuroimaging techniques. Cognitive dimensions independent of general intelligence can also be identified psychometrically and studied for any neuroanatomical correlates. Here we…

  3. Cognitive Abilities Independent of IQ Correlate with Regional Brain Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Wendy; Jung, Rex E.; Colom, Roberto; Haier, Richard J.

    2008-01-01

    There is increasing evidence relating psychometric measures of general intelligence and reasoning to regional brain structure and function assessed with a variety of neuroimaging techniques. Cognitive dimensions independent of general intelligence can also be identified psychometrically and studied for any neuroanatomical correlates. Here we…

  4. Role of Hybrid Brain Imaging in Neuropsychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Burhan, Amer M.; Marlatt, Nicole M.; Palaniyappan, Lena; Anazodo, Udunna C.; Prato, Frank S.

    2015-01-01

    This is a focused review of imaging literature to scope the utility of hybrid brain imaging in neuropsychiatric disorders. The review focuses on brain imaging modalities that utilize hybrid (fusion) techniques to characterize abnormal brain molecular signals in combination with structural and functional changes that have been observed in neuropsychiatric disorders. An overview of clinical hybrid brain imaging technologies for human use is followed by a selective review of the literature that conceptualizes the use of these technologies in understanding basic mechanisms of major neuropsychiatric disorders and their therapeutics. Neuronal network abnormalities are highlighted throughout this review to scope the utility of hybrid imaging as a potential biomarker for each disorder. PMID:26854172

  5. Magnetic source imaging of the human brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zhong L.; Williamson, Samuel J.; Kaufman, Lloyd

    1993-08-01

    The importance of neuromagnetic studies in basic research on sensory and cognitive functions is well recognized. Researchers are now exploiting more sophisticated paradigms as well as more sophisticated data analysis techniques to achieve new knowledge about the human brain. Our recent identification of characteristic time constants in human auditory cortex that well predict the behavioral lifetime of human auditory sensory memory, and developments and application of various procedures for the magnetic inverse problem have opened new areas of investigation and advanced the technical capability of MSI. With multi-disciplinary efforts from physicists, neural scientists, psychologists and physiologists, MSI is being established as an important modality for functional images.

  6. MR brain image analysis in dementia: From quantitative imaging biomarkers to ageing brain models and imaging genetics.

    PubMed

    Niessen, Wiro J

    2016-10-01

    MR brain image analysis has constantly been a hot topic research area in medical image analysis over the past two decades. In this article, it is discussed how the field developed from the construction of tools for automatic quantification of brain morphology, function, connectivity and pathology, to creating models of the ageing brain in normal ageing and disease, and tools for integrated analysis of imaging and genetic data. The current and future role of the field in improved understanding of the development of neurodegenerative disease is discussed, and its potential for aiding in early and differential diagnosis and prognosis of different types of dementia. For the latter, the use of reference imaging data and reference models derived from large clinical and population imaging studies, and the application of machine learning techniques on these reference data, are expected to play a key role. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Imaging Study Confirms Brain Differences in People with ADHD

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_163599.html Imaging Study Confirms Brain Differences in People With ADHD Attention-deficit/hyperactivity should be considered a brain disorder, researchers say To use the sharing features ...

  8. MRI relaxation in the presence of fictitious fields correlates with myelin content in normal rat brain.

    PubMed

    Hakkarainen, Hanne; Sierra, Alejandra; Mangia, Silvia; Garwood, Michael; Michaeli, Shalom; Gröhn, Olli; Liimatainen, Timo

    2016-01-01

    Brain myelin plays an important role in normal brain function. Demyelination is involved in many degenerative brain diseases, thus quantitative imaging of myelin has been under active investigation. In previous work, we demonstrated the capability of the method known as Relaxation Along a Fictitious Field (RAFF) in the rotating frame of rank n (RAFFn) to provide image contrast between white and gray matter in human and rat brains. Here, we provide evidence pointing to myelin being the major source of this contrast. RAFFn relaxation time constant (TRAFFn) was mapped in rat brain ex vivo. TRAFFn was quantified in 12 different brain areas. TRAFFn values were compared with multiple other MRI metrics (T1, T2 , continuous wave T1ρ, adiabatic T1ρ and T2ρ, magnetization transfer ratio), and with histologic measurements of cell density, myelin and iron content. Highest contrast between white and grey matter was obtained with TRAFFn in the rotating frames of ranks n = 4 and 5. TRAFFn values correlated strongly with myelin content, whereas no associations between TRAFFn and iron content or cell density were found. TRAFFn with n = 4 or 5 provides a high sensitivity for selective myelin mapping in the rat brain. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Love songs, bird brains and diffusion tensor imaging.

    PubMed

    De Groof, Geert; Van der Linden, Annemie

    2010-08-01

    The song control system of songbirds displays a remarkable seasonal neuroplasticity in species in which song output also changes seasonally. Thus far, this song control system has been extensively analyzed by histological and electrophysiological methods. However, these approaches do not provide a global view of the brain and/or do not allow repeated measurements, which are necessary to establish causal correlations between alterations in neural substrate and behavior. Research has primarily been focused on the song nuclei themselves, largely neglecting their interconnections and other brain regions involved in seasonally changing behavior. In this review, we introduce and explore the song control system of songbirds as a natural model for brain plasticity. At the same time, we point out the added value of the songbird brain model for in vivo diffusion tensor techniques and its derivatives. A compilation of the diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data obtained thus far in this system demonstrates the usefulness of this in vivo method for studying brain plasticity. In particular, it is shown to be a perfect tool for long-term studies of morphological and cellular changes of specific brain circuits in different endocrine/photoperiod conditions. The method has been successfully applied to obtain quantitative measurements of seasonal changes of fiber tracts and nuclei from the song control system. In addition, outside the song control system, changes have been discerned in the optic chiasm and in an interhemispheric connection. DTI allows the detection of seasonal changes in a region analogous to the mammalian secondary auditory cortex and in regions of the 'social behavior network', an interconnected group of structures that controls multiple social behaviors, including aggression and courtship. DTI allows the demonstration, for the first time, that the songbird brain in its entirety exhibits an extreme seasonal plasticity which is not merely limited to the song control

  10. The psychopath magnetized: insights from brain imaging

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Nathaniel E.; Kiehl, Kent A.

    2014-01-01

    Psychopaths commit a disproportionate amount of violent crime, and this places a substantial economic and emotional burden on society. Elucidation of the neural correlates of psychopathy may lead to improved management and treatment of the condition. Although some methodological issues remain, the neuroimaging literature is generally converging on a set of brain regions and circuits that are consistently implicated in the condition: the orbitofrontal cortex, amygdala, and the anterior and posterior cingulate and adjacent (para)limbic structures. We discuss these findings in the context of extant theories of psychopathy and highlight the potential legal and policy implications of this body of work. PMID:22177031

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Newborn Brain: Automatic Segmentation of Brain Images into 50 Anatomical Regions

    PubMed Central

    Gousias, Ioannis S.; Hammers, Alexander; Counsell, Serena J.; Srinivasan, Latha; Rutherford, Mary A.; Heckemann, Rolf A.; Hajnal, Jo V.; Rueckert, Daniel; Edwards, A. David

    2013-01-01

    We studied methods for the automatic segmentation of neonatal and developing brain images into 50 anatomical regions, utilizing a new set of manually segmented magnetic resonance (MR) images from 5 term-born and 15 preterm infants imaged at term corrected age called ALBERTs. Two methods were compared: individual registrations with label propagation and fusion; and template based registration with propagation of a maximum probability neonatal ALBERT (MPNA). In both cases we evaluated the performance of different neonatal atlases and MPNA, and the approaches were compared with the manual segmentations by means of the Dice overlap coefficient. Dice values, averaged across regions, were 0.81±0.02 using label propagation and fusion for the preterm population, and 0.81±0.02 using the single registration of a MPNA for the term population. Segmentations of 36 further unsegmented target images of developing brains yielded visibly high-quality results. This registration approach allows the rapid construction of automatically labeled age-specific brain atlases for neonates and the developing brain. PMID:23565180

  12. Ultrafast magnetic resonance imaging of the brain.

    PubMed

    Ba-Ssalamaha, A; Schick, S; Heimberger, K; Linnau, K F; Schibany, N; Prokesch, R; Trattnig, S

    2000-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the diagnostic efficacy of single shot fast spin echo sequence (SSh-FSE), and single shot GRASE-sequence (SSh-GRASE) to the conventional T(2)-weighted fast spin echo-sequence (T(2)-FSE) in the imaging of brain disorders. Thirty three patients with high signal intensity lesions on T(2)-weighted images (n = 28), or intracerebral hemorrhage (n = 5), were examined on a 1.0 T MR scanner, with 23 mT/m gradient strength. The scan time for the conventional T(2)-FSE-sequence was 2 min 57 s, the scan time for the single shot-FSE-, and single shot-GRASE-sequences was 11 sec, and 17 sec, respectively. Twenty-one patients remained still during the examination, whereas 12 could not stay still with consecutive marked motion artifacts. Images were reviewed by three radiologists. Lesion conspicuity, image quality, and artifacts were scored on a subjective scale. Signal-to-noise ratios of lesions and normal tissue and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) were measured by region of interest (ROI). In the patient group without motion artifacts conspicuity for lesions > or =5 mm did not show a significant difference on conventional T(2)-FSE, single shot-FSE and single shot-GRASE. Detectability of the smaller lesions was significantly inferior on single shot-FSE-, and single shot-GRASE-sequences in artifact free images. For the patient group with motion artifacts SSh-FSE and SSh-GRASE were markedly superior to the conventional T(2)-FSE. Grey-white differentiation was better on conventional T(2)-FSE. Physiologic ferritin as well as pathologic hemosiderin depositions were slightly darker and therefore better visible on SSh-GRASE than on SSh-FSE. Conventional T(2)-FSE showed significantly more artifacts. In conclusion, SSh-FSE and SSh-GRASE imaging can be used for rapid imaging of the brain in those patients who are claustrophobic or in patients with involuntary movements due to extrapyramidal disorders, as well as in children in whom anesthesia is

  13. Vascular Risk Factors: Imaging and Neuropathologic Correlates

    PubMed Central

    Knopman, David S.; Roberts, Rosebud

    2010-01-01

    Cerebrovascular disease plays an important role in cognitive disorders in the elderly. Cerebrovascular disease and Alzheimer’s disease interact on several levels, one important level being the overlap in risk factors. The major vascular risk factors such as diabetes and impaired glycemic control, hypertension, obesity and hyper- or dyslipidemia have been associated both with Alzheimer’s disease and vascular dementia. The purpose of this review is to consider the context in which vascular dementia is diagnosed, place the pathophysiological consequences of cerebrovascular disease on cognition in the context of clinical and pathological Alzheimer’s disease, and then to consider the evidence for the role of major vascular risk factors in late-life cognitive impairment, changes in brain imaging and neuropathological changes. Midlife diabetes mellitus, hypertension and obesity are established risk factors for clinically defined Alzheimer’s disease as well as vascular dementia. The basis for these relationships could either be that the risk factors lead to microvascular brain disease, promote Alzheimer pathology or both. The associations of late-life onset diabetes mellitus, hypertension and obesity with cognitive impairment are either attenuated or reversed. The role of vascular risk factors in midlife should be the focus of public health efforts to reduce the burden of late-life cognitive impairment. PMID:20182020

  14. Decreased Serum Hepcidin Concentration Correlates with Brain Iron Deposition in Patients with HBV-Related Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jian-Ying; He, Yi-Feng; Dai, Zhi; Chen, Cai-Zhong; Cheng, Wei-Zhong; Zhou, Jian; Wang, Xin

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Excessive brain iron accumulation contributes to cognitive impairments in hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related cirrhotic patients. The underlying mechanism remains unclear. Hepcidin, a liver-produced, 25-aminoacid peptide, is the major regulator of systemic iron metabolism. Abnormal hepcidin level is a key factor in some body iron accumulation or deficiency disorders, especially in those associated with liver diseases. Our study was aimed to explore the relationship between brain iron content in patients with HBV-related cirrhosis and serum hepcidin level. Methods Seventy HBV-related cirrhotic patients and forty age- sex-matched healthy controls were enrolled. Brain iron content was quantified by susceptibility weighted phase imaging technique. Serum hepcidin as well as serum iron, serum transferrin, ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor, total iron binding capacity, and transferrin saturation were tested in thirty cirrhotic patients and nineteen healthy controls. Pearson correlation analysis was performed to investigate correlation between brain iron concentrations and serum hepcidin, or other iron parameters. Results Cirrhotic patients had increased brain iron accumulation compared to controls in the left red nuclear, the bilateral substantia nigra, the bilateral thalamus, the right caudate, and the right putamen. Cirrhotic patients had significantly decreased serum hepcidin concentration, as well as lower serum transferring level, lower total iron binding capacity and higher transferrin saturation, compared to controls. Serum hepcidin level negatively correlated with the iron content in the right caudate, while serum ferritin level positively correlated with the iron content in the bilateral putamen in cirrhotic patients. Conclusions Decreased serum hepcidin level correlated with excessive iron accumulation in the basal ganglia in HBV-related cirrhotic patients. Our results indicated that systemic iron overload underlined regional brain iron repletion. Serum

  15. Decreased serum hepcidin concentration correlates with brain iron deposition in patients with HBV-related cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Dong; Ding, Jing; Liu, Jian-Ying; He, Yi-Feng; Dai, Zhi; Chen, Cai-Zhong; Cheng, Wei-Zhong; Zhou, Jian; Wang, Xin

    2013-01-01

    Excessive brain iron accumulation contributes to cognitive impairments in hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related cirrhotic patients. The underlying mechanism remains unclear. Hepcidin, a liver-produced, 25-aminoacid peptide, is the major regulator of systemic iron metabolism. Abnormal hepcidin level is a key factor in some body iron accumulation or deficiency disorders, especially in those associated with liver diseases. Our study was aimed to explore the relationship between brain iron content in patients with HBV-related cirrhosis and serum hepcidin level. Seventy HBV-related cirrhotic patients and forty age- sex-matched healthy controls were enrolled. Brain iron content was quantified by susceptibility weighted phase imaging technique. Serum hepcidin as well as serum iron, serum transferrin, ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor, total iron binding capacity, and transferrin saturation were tested in thirty cirrhotic patients and nineteen healthy controls. Pearson correlation analysis was performed to investigate correlation between brain iron concentrations and serum hepcidin, or other iron parameters. Cirrhotic patients had increased brain iron accumulation compared to controls in the left red nuclear, the bilateral substantia nigra, the bilateral thalamus, the right caudate, and the right putamen. Cirrhotic patients had significantly decreased serum hepcidin concentration, as well as lower serum transferring level, lower total iron binding capacity and higher transferrin saturation, compared to controls. Serum hepcidin level negatively correlated with the iron content in the right caudate, while serum ferritin level positively correlated with the iron content in the bilateral putamen in cirrhotic patients. Decreased serum hepcidin level correlated with excessive iron accumulation in the basal ganglia in HBV-related cirrhotic patients. Our results indicated that systemic iron overload underlined regional brain iron repletion. Serum hepcidin may be a clinical

  16. Spatial normalization of brain images and beyond.

    PubMed

    Mangin, J-F; Lebenberg, J; Lefranc, S; Labra, N; Auzias, G; Labit, M; Guevara, M; Mohlberg, H; Roca, P; Guevara, P; Dubois, J; Leroy, F; Dehaene-Lambertz, G; Cachia, A; Dickscheid, T; Coulon, O; Poupon, C; Rivière, D; Amunts, K; Sun, Z Y

    2016-10-01

    The deformable atlas paradigm has been at the core of computational anatomy during the last two decades. Spatial normalization is the variant endowing the atlas with a coordinate system used for voxel-based aggregation of images across subjects and studies. This framework has largely contributed to the success of brain mapping. Brain spatial normalization, however, is still ill-posed because of the complexity of the human brain architecture and the lack of architectural landmarks in standard morphological MRI. Multi-atlas strategies have been developed during the last decade to overcome some difficulties in the context of segmentation. A new generation of registration algorithms embedding architectural features inferred for instance from diffusion or functional MRI is on the verge to improve the architectural value of spatial normalization. A better understanding of the architectural meaning of the cortical folding pattern will lead to use some sulci as complementary constraints. Improving the architectural compliance of spatial normalization may impose to relax the diffeomorphic constraint usually underlying atlas warping. A two-level strategy could be designed: in each region, a dictionary of templates of incompatible folding patterns would be collected and matched in a way or another using rare architectural information, while individual subjects would be aligned using diffeomorphisms to the closest template. Manifold learning could help to aggregate subjects according to their morphology. Connectivity-based strategies could emerge as an alternative to deformation-based alignment leading to match the connectomes of the subjects rather than images. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The correlation between mid-brain serotonin transporter availability and intelligence quotient in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Tseng, P Y; Lee, I H; Chen, K C; Chen, P S; Chiu, N T; Yao, W J; Chu, C L; Yeh, T L; Yang, Y K

    2015-02-01

    This study was performed to investigate the association between the mid-brain serotonin transporter (SERT) availability and intelligence quotient (IQ). One hundred and thirteen healthy participants, including 52 male and 61 female subjects, were recruited. We used SPECT with [(123)I]ADAM images to determine the SERT availability in the mid-brain, and measured the subjects' IQ using the WAIS-R. We found a significant positive correlation between the mid-brain SERT availability and the IQ of the participants. Even when controlling for age and sex, the significant association still existed. This result implied that the higher the SERT binding in the mid-brain, the better the IQ in healthy participants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Compact and mobile high resolution PET brain imager

    DOEpatents

    Majewski, Stanislaw [Yorktown, VA; Proffitt, James [Newport News, VA

    2011-02-08

    A brain imager includes a compact ring-like static PET imager mounted in a helmet-like structure. When attached to a patient's head, the helmet-like brain imager maintains the relative head-to-imager geometry fixed through the whole imaging procedure. The brain imaging helmet contains radiation sensors and minimal front-end electronics. A flexible mechanical suspension/harness system supports the weight of the helmet thereby allowing for patient to have limited movements of the head during imaging scans. The compact ring-like PET imager enables very high resolution imaging of neurological brain functions, cancer, and effects of trauma using a rather simple mobile scanner with limited space needs for use and storage.

  19. Infrared Imaging System for Studying Brain Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mintz, Frederick; Mintz, Frederick; Gunapala, Sarath

    2007-01-01

    A proposed special-purpose infrared imaging system would be a compact, portable, less-expensive alternative to functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) systems heretofore used to study brain function. Whereas a typical fMRI system fills a large room, and must be magnetically isolated, this system would fit into a bicycle helmet. The system would include an assembly that would be mounted inside the padding in a modified bicycle helmet or other suitable headgear. The assembly would include newly designed infrared photodetectors and data-acquisition circuits on integrated-circuit chips on low-thermal-conductivity supports in evacuated housings (see figure) arranged in multiple rows and columns that would define image coordinates. Each housing would be spring-loaded against the wearer s head. The chips would be cooled by a small Stirling Engine mounted contiguous to, but thermally isolated from, the portions of the assembly in thermal contact with the wearer s head. Flexible wires or cables for transmitting data from the aforementioned chips would be routed to an integrated, multichannel transmitter and thence through the top of the assembly to a patch antenna on the outside of the helmet. The multiple streams of data from the infrared-detector chips would be sent to a remote site, where they would be processed, by software, into a three-dimensional display of evoked potentials that would represent firing neuronal bundles and thereby indicate locations of neuronal activity associated with mental or physical activity. The 3D images will be analogous to current fMRI images. The data would also be made available, in real-time, for comparison with data in local or internationally accessible relational databases that already exist in universities and research centers. Hence, this system could be used in research on, and for the diagnosis of response from the wearer s brain to physiological, psychological, and environmental changes in real time. The images would also be

  20. Neural correlates of induced motion perception in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Takemura, Hiromasa; Ashida, Hiroshi; Amano, Kaoru; Kitaoka, Akiyoshi; Murakami, Ikuya

    2012-10-10

    A physically stationary stimulus surrounded by a moving stimulus appears to move in the opposite direction. There are similarities between the characteristics of this phenomenon of induced motion and surround suppression of directionally selective neurons in the brain. Here, functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to investigate the link between the subjective perception of induced motion and cortical activity. The visual stimuli consisted of a central drifting sinusoid surrounded by a moving random-dot pattern. The change in cortical activity in response to changes in speed and direction of the central stimulus was measured. The human cortical area hMT+ showed the greatest activation when the central stimulus moved at a fast speed in the direction opposite to that of the surround. More importantly, the activity in this area was the lowest when the central stimulus moved in the same direction as the surround and at a speed such that the central stimulus appeared to be stationary. The results indicate that the activity in hMT+ is related to perceived speed modulated by induced motion rather than to physical speed or a kinetic boundary. Early visual areas (V1, V2, V3, and V3A) showed a similar pattern; however, the relationship to perceived speed was not as clear as that in hMT+. These results suggest that hMT+ may be a neural correlate of induced motion perception and play an important role in contrasting motion signals in relation to their surrounding context and adaptively modulating our motion perception depending on the spatial context.

  1. Image Correlation: Part 1. Simulation and Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-11-01

    prepared for UNITED STATES AIR FORCE PROJECT RAND D D Or,• Illnel lSANT Dr-- CA. 90 ft M A R . . . . . -- a .02 .0. The research described In this...Analysis, Deputy Chief of Staff, Research and Development, Hq USAF. Reports of The Rand Corporation do not necessarily reflect the opinions or policies of...the sponsors of Rand research , 4. . . , * R-2057/1-PR Novem-ber 1976 Image Correlation: Part I Simulation and Analysis H. H. Bailey, F. W. Blackwell

  2. FTIR, Raman, and CARS microscopic imaging for histopathologic assessment of brain tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krafft, Christoph; Bergner, Norbert; Matthäus, Christian; Romeike, Bernd; Reichart, Rupert; Kalff, Rolf; Dietzek, B.,; Popp, Jürgen

    2010-02-01

    The contribution demonstrates how the molecular contrast of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), Raman and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopic imaging can be applied for the histopathological assessment of brain tumors. Human brain tissue specimens were obtained from patients undergoing neurosurgery. Thin sections of control brain tissue from an epilepsy patient and tumor tissue from a meningioma patient were prepared on calciumfluoride slides which were appropriate substrates for data acquisition in transmission and reflection mode. All CARS images correlate well with the FTIR and Raman images. Whereas CARS images were collected within seconds, exposure times were minutes for FTIR imaging and hours for Raman imaging. CARS images in the interval 2750-3000 cm-1 mainly probed spectral contributions of lipids which are important diagnostic markers of brain tumors. It was demonstrated that the CARS profile in the interval 2750-3000 cm-1 differed between the control sample and meningioma. Full spectral information could be extracted from Raman and FTIR images that enabled to distinguish different tissue types in brain tumors. Based on the current results we suggest a complementary application of FTIR, Raman and CARS imaging. FTIR and Raman imaging defines spectral regions and spectral markers that are essential for tissue classification. CARS images at different Stokes shifts or in the multiplex mode probe these spectral descriptors at video-time frame rates.

  3. Groupwise registration of MR brain images with tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Zhenyu; Wu, Yihong; Fan, Yong

    2017-09-01

    A novel groupwise image registration framework is developed for registering MR brain images with tumors. Our method iteratively estimates a normal-appearance counterpart for each tumor image to be registered and constructs a directed graph (digraph) of normal-appearance images to guide the groupwise image registration. Particularly, our method maps each tumor image to its normal appearance counterpart by identifying and inpainting brain tumor regions with intensity information estimated using a low-rank plus sparse matrix decomposition based image representation technique. The estimated normal-appearance images are groupwisely registered to a group center image guided by a digraph of images so that the total length of ‘image registration paths’ to be the minimum, and then the original tumor images are warped to the group center image using the resulting deformation fields. We have evaluated our method based on both simulated and real MR brain tumor images. The registration results were evaluated with overlap measures of corresponding brain regions and average entropy of image intensity information, and Wilcoxon signed rank tests were adopted to compare different methods with respect to their regional overlap measures. Compared with a groupwise image registration method that is applied to normal-appearance images estimated using the traditional low-rank plus sparse matrix decomposition based image inpainting, our method achieved higher image registration accuracy with statistical significance (p  =  7.02  ×  10-9).

  4. Groupwise registration of MR brain images with tumors.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhenyu; Wu, Yihong; Fan, Yong

    2017-08-04

    A novel groupwise image registration framework is developed for registering MR brain images with tumors. Our method iteratively estimates a normal-appearance counterpart for each tumor image to be registered and constructs a directed graph (digraph) of normal-appearance images to guide the groupwise image registration. Particularly, our method maps each tumor image to its normal appearance counterpart by identifying and inpainting brain tumor regions with intensity information estimated using a low-rank plus sparse matrix decomposition based image representation technique. The estimated normal-appearance images are groupwisely registered to a group center image guided by a digraph of images so that the total length of 'image registration paths' to be the minimum, and then the original tumor images are warped to the group center image using the resulting deformation fields. We have evaluated our method based on both simulated and real MR brain tumor images. The registration results were evaluated with overlap measures of corresponding brain regions and average entropy of image intensity information, and Wilcoxon signed rank tests were adopted to compare different methods with respect to their regional overlap measures. Compared with a groupwise image registration method that is applied to normal-appearance images estimated using the traditional low-rank plus sparse matrix decomposition based image inpainting, our method achieved higher image registration accuracy with statistical significance (p  =  7.02  ×  10(-9)).

  5. Functional connectivity of the rodent brain using optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevara Codina, Edgar

    The aim of this thesis is to apply functional connectivity in a variety of animal models, using several optical imaging modalities. Even at rest, the brain shows high metabolic activity: the correlation in slow spontaneous fluctuations identifies remotely connected areas of the brain; hence the term "functional connectivity". Ongoing changes in spontaneous activity may provide insight into the neural processing that takes most of the brain metabolic activity, and so may provide a vast source of disease related changes. Brain hemodynamics may be modified during disease and affect resting-state activity. The thesis aims to better understand these changes in functional connectivity due to disease, using functional optical imaging. The optical imaging techniques explored in the first two contributions of this thesis are Optical Imaging of Intrinsic Signals and Laser Speckle Contrast Imaging, together they can estimate the metabolic rate of oxygen consumption, that closely parallels neural activity. They both have adequate spatial and temporal resolution and are well adapted to image the convexity of the mouse cortex. In the last article, a depth-sensitive modality called photoacoustic tomography was used in the newborn rat. Optical coherence tomography and laminar optical tomography were also part of the array of imaging techniques developed and applied in other collaborations. The first article of this work shows the changes in functional connectivity in an acute murine model of epileptiform activity. Homologous correlations are both increased and decreased with a small dependence on seizure duration. These changes suggest a potential decoupling between the hemodynamic parameters in resting-state networks, underlining the importance to investigate epileptic networks with several independent hemodynamic measures. The second study examines a novel murine model of arterial stiffness: the unilateral calcification of the right carotid. Seed-based connectivity analysis

  6. Validated Automatic Brain Extraction of Head CT Images

    PubMed Central

    Muschelli, John; Ullman, Natalie L.; Mould, W. Andrew; Vespa, Paul; Hanley, Daniel F.; Crainiceanu, Ciprian M.

    2015-01-01

    volume (ICV) of each scan was estimated by multiplying the number of voxels in the brain mask by the dimensions of each voxel for that scan. From this, we calculated the ICV ratio comparing manual and automated segmentation: ICVautomatedICVmanual. To estimate the performance in a large number of scans, brain masks were generated from the 6 BET pipelines for 1095 longitudinal scans from 129 patients. Failure rates were estimated from visual inspection. ICV of each scan was estimated and and an intraclass correlation (ICC) was estimated using a one-way ANOVA. Results Smoothing images improves brain extraction results using BET for all measures except specificity (all p < 0.01, uncorrected), irrespective of the FI threshold. Using an FI of 0.01 or 0.1 performed better than 0.35. Thus, all reported results refer only to smoothed data using an FI of 0.01 or 0.1. Using an FI of 0.01 had a higher median sensitivity (0.9901) than an FI of 0.1 (0.9884, median difference: 0.0014, p < 0.001), accuracy (0.9971 vs. 0.9971; median difference: 0.0001, p < 0.001), and DSI (0.9895 vs. 0.9894; median difference: 0.0004, p < 0.001) and lower specificity (0.9981 vs. 0.9982; median difference: −0.0001, p < 0.001). These measures are all very high indicating that a range of FI values may produce visually indistinguishable brain extractions. Using smoothed data and an FI of 0.01, the mean (SD) ICV ratio was 1.002 (0.008); the mean being close to 1 indicates the ICV estimates are similar for automated and manual segmentation. In the 1095 longitudinal scans, this pipeline had a low failure rate (5.2%) and the ICC estimate was high (0.929, 95% CI: 0.91, 0.945) for successfully extracted brains. Conclusion BET performs well at brain extraction on thresholded, 1mm3 smoothed CT images with an FI of 0.01 or 0.1. Smoothing before applying BET is an important step not previously discussed in the literature. Analysis code is provided. PMID:25862260

  7. Cluster-Based Statistics for Brain Connectivity in Correlation with Behavioral Measures

    PubMed Central

    Han, Cheol E.; Yoo, Sang Wook; Seo, Sang Won; Na, Duk L.; Seong, Joon-Kyung

    2013-01-01

    Graph theoretical approaches have successfully revealed abnormality in brain connectivity, in particular, for contrasting patients from healthy controls. Besides the group comparison analysis, a correlational study is also challenging. In studies with patients, for example, finding brain connections that indeed deepen specific symptoms is interesting. The correlational study is also beneficial since it does not require controls, which are often difficult to find, especially for old-age patients with cognitive impairment where controls could also have cognitive deficits due to normal ageing. However, one of the major difficulties in such correlational studies is too conservative multiple comparison correction. In this paper, we propose a novel method for identifying brain connections that are correlated with a specific cognitive behavior by employing cluster-based statistics, which is less conservative than other methods, such as Bonferroni correction, false discovery rate procedure, and extreme statistics. Our method is based on the insight that multiple brain connections, rather than a single connection, are responsible for abnormal behaviors. Given brain connectivity data, we first compute a partial correlation coefficient between every edge and the behavioral measure. Then we group together neighboring connections with strong correlation into clusters and calculate their maximum sizes. This procedure is repeated for randomly permuted assignments of behavioral measures. Significance levels of the identified sub-networks are estimated from the null distribution of the cluster sizes. This method is independent of network construction methods: either structural or functional network can be used in association with any behavioral measures. We further demonstrated the efficacy of our method using patients with subcortical vascular cognitive impairment. We identified sub-networks that are correlated with the disease severity by exploiting diffusion tensor imaging

  8. Laboratory and clinical correlates for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) abnormalities in pediatric sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Lebensburger, Jeffrey D; Hilliard, Lee M; McGrath, Tony M; Fineberg, Naomi S; Howard, Thomas H

    2011-10-01

    Children with sickle cell anemia are at risk for brain injury. Physicians obtain brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for clinical indications to determine if a patient has developed a brain injury. Controversy exists whether all children with sickle cell anemia should undergo MRI screening. This retrospective study evaluates the clinical and laboratory correlates for brain injury in 124 MRIs obtained for a variety of clinical indications. Seizure, sensory, or motor events were statistically associated with the highest risk for brain injury while less specific neurologic complaints of headache or poor school performance were not associated. Children with high systolic blood pressure, leukocytosis, and severe anemia demonstrate a higher probability for brain injury. These results indicate that brain MRI should be obtained on all children with seizure, sensory, or motor events. These data suggest that less specific neurologic symptoms should be screened if physical findings or abnormal lab or vital signs exist.

  9. Phase correlation imaging of unlabeled cell dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lihong; Rajshekhar, Gannavarpu; Wang, Ru; Bhaduri, Basanta; Sridharan, Shamira; Mir, Mustafa; Chakraborty, Arindam; Iyer, Rajashekar; Prasanth, Supriya; Millet, Larry; Gillette, Martha U.; Popescu, Gabriel

    2016-09-01

    We present phase correlation imaging (PCI) as a novel approach to study cell dynamics in a spatially-resolved manner. PCI relies on quantitative phase imaging time-lapse data and, as such, functions in label-free mode, without the limitations associated with exogenous markers. The correlation time map outputted in PCI informs on the dynamics of the intracellular mass transport. Specifically, we show that PCI can extract quantitatively the diffusion coefficient map associated with live cells, as well as standard Brownian particles. Due to its high sensitivity to mass transport, PCI can be applied to studying the integrity of actin polymerization dynamics. Our results indicate that the cyto-D treatment blocking the actin polymerization has a dominant effect at the large spatial scales, in the region surrounding the cell. We found that PCI can distinguish between senescent and quiescent cells, which is extremely difficult without using specific markers currently. We anticipate that PCI will be used alongside established, fluorescence-based techniques to enable valuable new studies of cell function.

  10. Phase correlation imaging of unlabeled cell dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Lihong; Rajshekhar, Gannavarpu; Wang, Ru; Bhaduri, Basanta; Sridharan, Shamira; Mir, Mustafa; Chakraborty, Arindam; Iyer, Rajashekar; Prasanth, Supriya; Millet, Larry; Gillette, Martha U.; Popescu, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    We present phase correlation imaging (PCI) as a novel approach to study cell dynamics in a spatially-resolved manner. PCI relies on quantitative phase imaging time-lapse data and, as such, functions in label-free mode, without the limitations associated with exogenous markers. The correlation time map outputted in PCI informs on the dynamics of the intracellular mass transport. Specifically, we show that PCI can extract quantitatively the diffusion coefficient map associated with live cells, as well as standard Brownian particles. Due to its high sensitivity to mass transport, PCI can be applied to studying the integrity of actin polymerization dynamics. Our results indicate that the cyto-D treatment blocking the actin polymerization has a dominant effect at the large spatial scales, in the region surrounding the cell. We found that PCI can distinguish between senescent and quiescent cells, which is extremely difficult without using specific markers currently. We anticipate that PCI will be used alongside established, fluorescence-based techniques to enable valuable new studies of cell function. PMID:27615512

  11. Multimodal image analysis of clinical influences on preterm brain development

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Gareth; Aljabar, Paul; Nongena, Phumza; Kennea, Nigel; Gonzalez‐Cinca, Nuria; Falconer, Shona; Chew, Andrew T.M.; Harper, Nicholas; Wurie, Julia; Rutherford, Mary A.; Edwards, A. David

    2017-01-01

    Objective Premature birth is associated with numerous complex abnormalities of white and gray matter and a high incidence of long‐term neurocognitive impairment. An integrated understanding of these abnormalities and their association with clinical events is lacking. The aim of this study was to identify specific patterns of abnormal cerebral development and their antenatal and postnatal antecedents. Methods In a prospective cohort of 449 infants (226 male), we performed a multivariate and data‐driven analysis combining multiple imaging modalities. Using canonical correlation analysis, we sought separable multimodal imaging markers associated with specific clinical and environmental factors and correlated to neurodevelopmental outcome at 2 years. Results We found five independent patterns of neuroanatomical variation that related to clinical factors including age, prematurity, sex, intrauterine complications, and postnatal adversity. We also confirmed the association between imaging markers of neuroanatomical abnormality and poor cognitive and motor outcomes at 2 years. Interpretation This data‐driven approach defined novel and clinically relevant imaging markers of cerebral maldevelopment, which offer new insights into the nature of preterm brain injury. Ann Neurol 2017;82:233–246 PMID:28719076

  12. Multimodal image analysis of clinical influences on preterm brain development.

    PubMed

    Ball, Gareth; Aljabar, Paul; Nongena, Phumza; Kennea, Nigel; Gonzalez-Cinca, Nuria; Falconer, Shona; Chew, Andrew T M; Harper, Nicholas; Wurie, Julia; Rutherford, Mary A; Counsell, Serena J; Edwards, A David

    2017-08-01

    Premature birth is associated with numerous complex abnormalities of white and gray matter and a high incidence of long-term neurocognitive impairment. An integrated understanding of these abnormalities and their association with clinical events is lacking. The aim of this study was to identify specific patterns of abnormal cerebral development and their antenatal and postnatal antecedents. In a prospective cohort of 449 infants (226 male), we performed a multivariate and data-driven analysis combining multiple imaging modalities. Using canonical correlation analysis, we sought separable multimodal imaging markers associated with specific clinical and environmental factors and correlated to neurodevelopmental outcome at 2 years. We found five independent patterns of neuroanatomical variation that related to clinical factors including age, prematurity, sex, intrauterine complications, and postnatal adversity. We also confirmed the association between imaging markers of neuroanatomical abnormality and poor cognitive and motor outcomes at 2 years. This data-driven approach defined novel and clinically relevant imaging markers of cerebral maldevelopment, which offer new insights into the nature of preterm brain injury. Ann Neurol 2017;82:233-246. © 2017 The Authors Annals of Neurology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Neurological Association.

  13. [Correlation of brain electrical activity and motivation in healthy people].

    PubMed

    Bogovin, L V; Nakhamchen, D L; Kolosov, V P; Perel'man, Iu M

    2014-01-01

    Motivation dominates in the structure of the personality and is one of the basic notions which explains the dynamics of the behavior. The literature has little data about neurophysiology of motivation. The aim of the research was to study the correlation between the motivational sphere and electrical activity of the brain at the influence of different provocations. 24 healthy people at the age of 26-36 years were examined. The results of motivation tests turned out to be uniform (the motivation to success was of a moderate or high level, there were mean values of readiness to risk and low motivation to achievement and approval). Multiple correlations between different types of motivation and electrical activity of the brain at rest, at hyperventilation with room temperature air and at isocapnic cold air hyperventilation were revealed.

  14. Optical Brain Imaging: A Powerful Tool for Neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xinpei; Xia, Yanfang; Wang, Xuecen; Si, Ke; Gong, Wei

    2017-02-01

    As the control center of organisms, the brain remains little understood due to its complexity. Taking advantage of imaging methods, scientists have found an accessible approach to unraveling the mystery of neuroscience. Among these methods, optical imaging techniques are widely used due to their high molecular specificity and single-molecule sensitivity. Here, we overview several optical imaging techniques in neuroscience of recent years, including brain clearing, the micro-optical sectioning tomography system, and deep tissue imaging.

  15. Brain imaging and brain privacy: a realistic concern?

    PubMed

    Farah, Martha J; Smith, M Elizabeth; Gawuga, Cyrena; Lindsell, Dennis; Foster, Dean

    2009-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging has been used to study a wide array of psychological traits, including aspects of personality and intelligence. Progress in identifying the neural correlates of individual differences in such traits, for the sake of basic science, has moved us closer to the applied science goal of measuring them and thereby raised ethical concerns about privacy. How realistic are such concerns given the current state of the art? In this article, we describe the statistical basis of the measurement of psychological traits using functional neuroimaging and examine the degree to which current functional neuroimaging protocols could be used for this purpose. By analyzing the published data from 16 studies, we demonstrate that the use of imaging to gather information about an individual's psychological traits is already possible, but to an extremely limited extent.

  16. Imaging retinotopic maps in the human brain

    PubMed Central

    Wandell, Brian A.; Winawer, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    A quarter-century ago visual neuroscientists had little information about the number and organization of retinotopic maps in human visual cortex. The advent of functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), a non-invasive, spatially-resolved technique for measuring brain activity, provided a wealth of data about human retinotopic maps. Just as there are differences amongst nonhuman primate maps, the human maps have their own unique properties. Many human maps can be measured reliably in individual subjects during experimental sessions lasting less than an hour. The efficiency of the measurements and the relatively large amplitude of functional MRI signals in visual cortex make it possible to develop quantitative models of functional responses within specific maps in individual subjects. During this last quarter century, there has also been significant progress in measuring properties of the human brain at a range of length and time scales, including white matter pathways, macroscopic properties of gray and white matter, and cellular and molecular tissue properties. We hope the next twenty-five years will see a great deal of work that aims to integrate these data by modeling the network of visual signals. We don’t know what such theories will look like, but the characterization of human retinotopic maps from the last twenty-five years is likely to be an important part of future ideas about visual computations. PMID:20692278

  17. Comparison of heterogeneity quantification algorithms for brain SPECT perfusion images

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    (slope = 58.5), the fractal dimension (35.9), and the RW method (31.6) can differentiate the different levels of diffuse heterogeneity. The GLCM contrast parameter method is not influenced by a focal defect contrary to the FD and RW methods. A significant correlation was found between the RW method and the physicians' classification (r = 0.86; F = 137; p < 0.0001). Conclusions The GLCM method can quantify the different levels of diffuse heterogeneity in brain-simulated SPECT images without an influence from the focal cortical defects. However, GLCM classification was not correlated with the physicians' classification (Rho = −0.099). The RW method was significantly correlated with the physicians' heterogeneity perception but is influenced by the existence of a focal defect. PMID:22818866

  18. Comparison of heterogeneity quantification algorithms for brain SPECT perfusion images.

    PubMed

    Modzelewski, Romain; Janvresse, Elise; de la Rue, Thierry; Vera, Pierre

    2012-07-20

    dimension (35.9), and the RW method (31.6) can differentiate the different levels of diffuse heterogeneity. The GLCM contrast parameter method is not influenced by a focal defect contrary to the FD and RW methods. A significant correlation was found between the RW method and the physicians' classification (r = 0.86; F = 137; p < 0.0001). The GLCM method can quantify the different levels of diffuse heterogeneity in brain-simulated SPECT images without an influence from the focal cortical defects. However, GLCM classification was not correlated with the physicians' classification (Rho = -0.099). The RW method was significantly correlated with the physicians' heterogeneity perception but is influenced by the existence of a focal defect.

  19. Cluster imaging of multi-brain networks (CIMBN): a general framework for hyperscanning and modeling a group of interacting brains

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Lian; Dai, Rui-Na; Xiao, Xiang; Sun, Pei-Pei; Li, Zheng; Zhu, Chao-Zhe

    2015-01-01

    Studying the neural basis of human social interactions is a key topic in the field of social neuroscience. Brain imaging studies in this field usually focus on the neural correlates of the social interactions between two participants. However, as the participant number further increases, even by a small amount, great difficulties raise. One challenge is how to concurrently scan all the interacting brains with high ecological validity, especially for a large number of participants. The other challenge is how to effectively model the complex group interaction behaviors emerging from the intricate neural information exchange among a group of socially organized people. Confronting these challenges, we propose a new approach called “Cluster Imaging of Multi-brain Networks” (CIMBN). CIMBN consists of two parts. The first part is a cluster imaging technique with high ecological validity based on multiple functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) systems. Using this technique, we can easily extend the simultaneous imaging capacity of social neuroscience studies up to dozens of participants. The second part of CIMBN is a multi-brain network (MBN) modeling method based on graph theory. By taking each brain as a network node and the relationship between any two brains as a network edge, one can construct a network model for a group of interacting brains. The emergent group social behaviors can then be studied using the network's properties, such as its topological structure and information exchange efficiency. Although there is still much work to do, as a general framework for hyperscanning and modeling a group of interacting brains, CIMBN can provide new insights into the neural correlates of group social interactions, and advance social neuroscience and social psychology. PMID:26283906

  20. Whole Mouse Brain Image Reconstruction from Serial Coronal Sections Using FIJI (ImageJ).

    PubMed

    Paletzki, Ronald; Gerfen, Charles R

    2015-10-01

    Whole-brain reconstruction of the mouse enables comprehensive analysis of the distribution of neurochemical markers, the distribution of anterogradely labeled axonal projections or retrogradely labeled neurons projecting to a specific brain site, or the distribution of neurons displaying activity-related markers in behavioral paradigms. This unit describes a method to produce whole-brain reconstruction image sets from coronal brain sections with up to four fluorescent markers using the freely available image-processing program FIJI (ImageJ).

  1. Brain activity correlates with emotional perception induced by dynamic avatars.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Hagar; Christensen, Andrea; Flash, Tamar; Giese, Martin A; Malach, Rafael

    2015-11-15

    An accurate judgment of the emotional state of others is a prerequisite for successful social interaction and hence survival. Thus, it is not surprising that we are highly skilled at recognizing the emotions of others. Here we aimed to examine the neuronal correlates of emotion recognition from gait. To this end we created highly controlled dynamic body-movement stimuli based on real human motion-capture data (Roether et al., 2009). These animated avatars displayed gait in four emotional (happy, angry, fearful, and sad) and speed-matched neutral styles. For each emotional gait and its equivalent neutral gait, avatars were displayed at five morphing levels between the two. Subjects underwent fMRI scanning while classifying the emotions and the emotional intensity levels expressed by the avatars. Our results revealed robust brain selectivity to emotional compared to neutral gait stimuli in brain regions which are involved in emotion and biological motion processing, such as the extrastriate body area (EBA), fusiform body area (FBA), superior temporal sulcus (STS), and the amygdala (AMG). Brain activity in the amygdala reflected emotional awareness: for visually identical stimuli it showed amplified stronger response when the stimulus was perceived as emotional. Notably, in avatars gradually morphed along an emotional expression axis there was a parametric correlation between amygdala activity and emotional intensity. This study extends the mapping of emotional decoding in the human brain to the domain of highly controlled dynamic biological motion. Our results highlight an extensive level of brain processing of emotional information related to body language, which relies mostly on body kinematics.

  2. PET imaging reveals brain functional changes in internet gaming disorder.

    PubMed

    Tian, Mei; Chen, Qiaozhen; Zhang, Ying; Du, Fenglei; Hou, Haifeng; Chao, Fangfang; Zhang, Hong

    2014-07-01

    Internet gaming disorder is an increasing problem worldwide, resulting in critical academic, social, and occupational impairment. However, the neurobiological mechanism of internet gaming disorder remains unknown. The aim of this study is to assess brain dopamine D2 (D2)/Serotonin 2A (5-HT2A) receptor function and glucose metabolism in the same subjects by positron emission tomography (PET) imaging approach, and investigate whether the correlation exists between D2 receptor and glucose metabolism. Twelve drug-naive adult males who met criteria for internet gaming disorder and 14 matched controls were studied with PET and (11)C-N-methylspiperone ((11)C-NMSP) to assess the availability of D2/5-HT2A receptors and with (18)F-fluoro-D-glucose ((18)F-FDG) to assess regional brain glucose metabolism, a marker of brain function. (11)C-NMSP and (18)F-FDG PET imaging data were acquired in the same individuals under both resting and internet gaming task states. In internet gaming disorder subjects, a significant decrease in glucose metabolism was observed in the prefrontal, temporal, and limbic systems. Dysregulation of D2 receptors was observed in the striatum, and was correlated to years of overuse. A low level of D2 receptors in the striatum was significantly associated with decreased glucose metabolism in the orbitofrontal cortex. For the first time, we report the evidence that D2 receptor level is significantly associated with glucose metabolism in the same individuals with internet gaming disorder, which indicates that D2/5-HT2A receptor-mediated dysregulation of the orbitofrontal cortex could underlie a mechanism for loss of control and compulsive behavior in internet gaming disorder subjects.

  3. Image Findings in Brain Developmental Venous Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mong

    2012-01-01

    Objective Developmental venous anomalies (DVAs) are benign anatomic variations; therefore, they are usually discovered incidentally. The aim of this article was to describe radiological findings of DVAs. Methods A retrospective search for DVAs of the brain was performed in 1899 patients who had undergone magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with contrast enhancement between January 1, 2005 and April 25, 2011. We also reviewed the results of computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), CT angiography, and transfemoral cerebral angiography (TFCA) studies performed in patients with DVAs. Results Thirty-two DVAs were identified in 31 of the 1899 patients (1.63%). These 31 patients underwent five enhanced CTs, three MRAs, two CT angiographies, and two TFCAs. Thirty of the 32 DVAs were supratentorial (ST) and two were infratentorial (IT). All enhanced MRI studies exhibited excellent resolution of DVAs. All DVAs had only one draining vein. The venous drainage system was an IT vein in three DVAs and an ST vein in 29 DVAs. Two out of five enhanced CTs presented good visualization of the draining vein. None of the MRAs, including the source image, revealed the presence of DVAs. The two CT angiographies exhibited good resolution of DVAs. One of the two TFCAs yielded an excellent illustration of the DVA. Conclusion CT angiography and MRI with contrast enhancement yielded detailed findings of DVAs. In contrast, MRA did not identify the DVAs. Enhanced CT presented only the draining vein of DVAs. PMID:23210028

  4. Advancing multiscale structural mapping of the brain through fluorescence imaging and analysis across length scales

    PubMed Central

    Hogstrom, L. J.; Guo, S. M.; Murugadoss, K.; Bathe, M.

    2016-01-01

    Brain function emerges from hierarchical neuronal structure that spans orders of magnitude in length scale, from the nanometre-scale organization of synaptic proteins to the macroscopic wiring of neuronal circuits. Because the synaptic electrochemical signal transmission that drives brain function ultimately relies on the organization of neuronal circuits, understanding brain function requires an understanding of the principles that determine hierarchical neuronal structure in living or intact organisms. Recent advances in fluorescence imaging now enable quantitative characterization of neuronal structure across length scales, ranging from single-molecule localization using super-resolution imaging to whole-brain imaging using light-sheet microscopy on cleared samples. These tools, together with correlative electron microscopy and magnetic resonance imaging at the nanoscopic and macroscopic scales, respectively, now facilitate our ability to probe brain structure across its full range of length scales with cellular and molecular specificity. As these imaging datasets become increasingly accessible to researchers, novel statistical and computational frameworks will play an increasing role in efforts to relate hierarchical brain structure to its function. In this perspective, we discuss several prominent experimental advances that are ushering in a new era of quantitative fluorescence-based imaging in neuroscience along with novel computational and statistical strategies that are helping to distil our understanding of complex brain structure. PMID:26855758

  5. Tl-201 brain scans: A comparative study with pathologic correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, W.D.; Takvorian, R.W.; Morris, J.H.; Rumbaugh, C.L.; Atkins, H.L.

    1985-05-01

    Since the clinical expression of brain tumors is dependent on anatomic location, following the response to therapy can be difficult. In patients (pts.) with gliomas who were stable or improving, the authors noted a disparity between an improving clinical status and stable CT scans. To elucidate this finding, 29 pts. were sequentially scanned with 2.0 mCi Tl-201 (at 5-30 min), 20 mCi Tc-99m glucoheptonate (GH) (at 3-4 h) and 7-10 mCi Ga-67 (at 48-72 h). A total of 198 images (300K each) were obtained. A set of 3 scans at a midpoint in follow-up was selected for analysis. Seven pts. who died had neuropathologic data available; brain sections were reconstructed to match radionuclide (RN) views without knowledge of image results. The authors conclude that Tl-201 scans; more accurately reflect viable tumor burden than other RN studies of brain tumors; are not effected by concommitant steroid administration; can be performed immediately following tracer administration; and compliment the anatomic data obtained from CT scans.

  6. Brain imaging and psychotherapy: methodological considerations and practical implications.

    PubMed

    Linden, David E J

    2008-11-01

    The development of psychotherapy has been based on psychological theories and clinical effects. However, an investigation of the neurobiological mechanisms of psychological interventions is also needed in order to improve indication and prognosis, inform the choice of parallel pharmacotherapy, provide outcome measures and potentially even aid the development of new treatment protocols. This neurobiological investigation can be informed by animal models, for example of learning and conditioning, but will essentially need the non-invasive techniques of functional neuroimaging in order to assess psychotherapy effects on patients' brains, which will be reviewed here. Most research so far has been conducted in obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), anxiety disorders and depression. Effects in OCD were particularly exciting in that both cognitive behavioural therapy and medication with a selective serotonin inhibitor led to a reduction in blood flow in the caudate nucleus. In phobia, brief courses of behavioural therapy produced marked reductions of paralimbic responses to offensive stimuli in line with the clinical improvement. Findings in depression are less consistent, with both increases and decreases in prefrontal metabolism being reported. However, they are important in pointing to different mechanisms for the clinical effects of pharmacotherapy (more "bottom up") and psychotherapy (more "top down"). For the future it would be desirable if the findings of psychotherapy changes to brain activation patterns were confirmed in larger groups with homogenous imaging protocols. Functional imaging has already made great contributions to the understanding of the neural correlates of psychopathology. For example, evidence converges to suggest that the subgenual cingulate is crucial for mood regulation. One current clinical application of these findings is deep brain stimulation in areas highlighted by such imaging studies. I will discuss their initial application in depression

  7. Human monoamine oxidase. Lack of brain and platelet correlation.

    PubMed

    Young, W F; Laws, E R; Sharbrough, F W; Weinshilboum, R M

    1986-06-01

    Monoamine oxidase (MAO) exists in two forms, MAO A and MAO B. Both are present in human brain, but the human platelet contains only MAO B. We studied whether individual variations in the activity of human platelet MAO B reflect individual variations in cerebral cortical MAO activities. Optimal conditions were determined for the measurement of MAO activities in both the platelet and cerebral cortex, obtained from 14 patients with epilepsy during clinically indicated neurosurgery. There was no significant correlation between the activities of MAO B in the cerebral cortex and platelets of these patients. Platelet MAO B activities also failed to correlate significantly with cerebral cortical MAO A activities. However, there was a significant positive correlation between cerebral cortical MAO A and MAO B activities. Individual variations in platelet MAO B activities do not reflect individual variations in either cerebral cortical MAO B or MAO A activities in patients with epilepsy who undergo neurosurgery.

  8. Structural Brain Correlates Associated with Professional Handball Playing

    PubMed Central

    Hänggi, Jürgen; Langer, Nicolas; Lutz, Kai; Birrer, Karin; Mérillat, Susan; Jäncke, Lutz

    2015-01-01

    Background There is no doubt that good bimanual performance is very important for skilled handball playing. The control of the non-dominant hand is especially demanding since efficient catching and throwing needs both hands. Methodology/Hypotheses We investigated training-induced structural neuroplasticity in professional handball players using several structural neuroimaging techniques and analytic approaches and also provide a review of the literature about sport-induced structural neuroplastic alterations. Structural brain adaptations were expected in regions relevant for motor and somatosensory processing such as the grey matter (GM) of the primary/secondary motor (MI/supplementary motor area, SMA) and somatosensory cortex (SI/SII), basal ganglia, thalamus, and cerebellum and in the white matter (WM) of the corticospinal tract (CST) and corpus callosum, stronger in brain regions controlling the non-dominant left hand. Results Increased GM volume in handball players compared with control subjects were found in the right MI/SI, bilateral SMA/cingulate motor area, and left intraparietal sulcus. Fractional anisotropy (FA) and axial diffusivity were increased within the right CST in handball players compared with control women. Age of handball training commencement correlated inversely with GM volume in the right and left MI/SI and years of handball training experience correlated inversely with radial diffusivity in the right CST. Subcortical structures tended to be larger in handball players. The anatomical measures of the brain regions associated with handball playing were positively correlated in handball players, but not interrelated in control women. Discussion/Conclusion Training-induced structural alterations were found in the somatosensory-motor network of handball players, more pronounced in the right hemisphere controlling the non-dominant left hand. Correlations between handball training-related measures and anatomical differences suggest neuroplastic

  9. Whole-Brain Calcium Imaging Reveals an Intrinsic Functional Network in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Mann, Kevin; Gallen, Courtney L; Clandinin, Thomas R

    2017-08-07

    A long-standing goal of neuroscience has been to understand how computations are implemented across large-scale brain networks. By correlating spontaneous activity during "resting states" [1], studies of intrinsic brain networks in humans have demonstrated a correspondence with task-related activation patterns [2], relationships to behavior [3], and alterations in processes such as aging [4] and brain disorders [5], highlighting the importance of resting-state measurements for understanding brain function. Here, we develop methods to measure intrinsic functional connectivity in Drosophila, a powerful model for the study of neural computation. Recent studies using calcium imaging have measured neural activity at high spatial and temporal resolution in zebrafish, Drosophila larvae, and worms [6-10]. For example, calcium imaging in the zebrafish brain recently revealed correlations between the midbrain and hindbrain, demonstrating the utility of measuring intrinsic functional connections in model organisms [8]. An important component of human connectivity research is the use of brain atlases to compare findings across individuals and studies [11]. An anatomical atlas of the central adult fly brain was recently described [12]; however, combining an atlas with whole-brain calcium imaging has yet to be performed in vivo in adult Drosophila. Here, we measure intrinsic functional connectivity in Drosophila by acquiring calcium signals from the central brain. We develop an alignment procedure to assign functional data to atlas regions and correlate activity between regions to generate brain networks. This work reveals a large-scale architecture for neural communication and provides a framework for using Drosophila to study functional brain networks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. MR image denoising method for brain surface 3D modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, De-xin; Liu, Peng-jie; Zhang, De-gan

    2014-11-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) modeling of medical images is a critical part of surgical simulation. In this paper, we focus on the magnetic resonance (MR) images denoising for brain modeling reconstruction, and exploit a practical solution. We attempt to remove the noise existing in the MR imaging signal and preserve the image characteristics. A wavelet-based adaptive curve shrinkage function is presented in spherical coordinates system. The comparative experiments show that the denoising method can preserve better image details and enhance the coefficients of contours. Using these denoised images, the brain 3D visualization is given through surface triangle mesh model, which demonstrates the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  11. [Modern methods of functional tomographic brain imaging for brain function reseaching in norm and pathology].

    PubMed

    Kireev, M V; Zakhs, D V; Korotkov, A D; Medvedev, S V

    2013-01-01

    For many years the modern methods of functional tomographic brain imaging (fMRI and PET) were actively used not only for the research of basic brain functions, but also in clinical practice. In present paper we described the basic characteristics of the signal registered with fMRI and PET, the principles of image reconstruction, as well as the methodological requirements, which are necessary to obtain reliable results. The advantages and limitations of modem tomographic methods of the brain functions investigation are discussed. The need of the complex approach use in brain study is emphasized and methods for the study of functional integration of the brain are suggested.

  12. Brain structure correlates of component reading processes: implications for reading disability.

    PubMed

    Phinney, Erin; Pennington, Bruce F; Olson, Richard; Filley, Christopher M; Filipek, Pauline A

    2007-08-01

    Brain structures implicated in developmental dyslexia (reading disability - RD) vary greatly across structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies due to methodological differences regarding the definition of RD and the exact measurements of a specific brain structure. The current study attempts to resolve some of those methodological concerns by examining brain volume as it relates to components of proposed RD subtypes. We performed individual regression analyses on total cerebral volume, neocortical volume, subcortical volume, 9 neo-cortical structures and 2 sub-cortical structures. These analyses used three dimensions of reading, phonemic ability (PA), orthographic ability, and rapid naming (RN) ability, while accounting for total cerebral volume, age, and performance IQ (PIQ). Primary analyses included membership to a group (poor reader vs. good reader) in the analysis. The result was a significant interaction between PA and reading ability as it predicts total cerebral volume. Analyses revealed that poor readers lacked a relationship between PA and brain size, but that good readers had a significant positive relationship. This pattern of interaction was not present for the other two reading component factors. These findings bring into question the general belief that individuals with RD are at the low end of a reading ability distribution and do not have a unique disorder. Additional analyses revealed only a few significant relationships between brain size and task performance, most notably a positive correlation between orthographic ability and the angular gyrus (AG), as well as a negative correlation between RN ability and the parietal operculum (PO).

  13. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Andrew R; Bellgowan, Patrick S F; Hanlon, Faith M

    2015-02-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) offers great promise for elucidating the neuropathology associated with a single or repetitive mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). The current review discusses the physiological underpinnings of the blood-oxygen level dependent response and how trauma affects the signal. Methodological challenges associated with fMRI data analyses are considered next, followed by a review of current mTBI findings. The majority of evoked studies have examined working memory and attentional functioning, with results suggesting a complex relationship between cognitive load/attentional demand and neuronal activation. Researchers have more recently investigated how brain trauma affects functional connectivity, and the benefits/drawbacks of evoked and functional connectivity studies are also discussed. The review concludes by discussing the major clinical challenges associated with fMRI studies of brain-injured patients, including patient heterogeneity and variations in scan-time post-injury. We conclude that the fMRI signal represents a complex filter through which researchers can measure the physiological correlates of concussive symptoms, an important goal for the burgeoning field of mTBI research.

  14. Imaging emotional brain functions: conceptual and methodological issues.

    PubMed

    Peper, Martin

    2006-06-01

    This article reviews the psychophysiological and brain imaging literature on emotional brain function from a methodological point of view. The difficulties in defining, operationalising and measuring emotional activation and, in particular, aversive learning will be considered. Emotion is a response of the organism during an episode of major significance and involves physiological activation, motivational, perceptual, evaluative and learning processes, motor expression, action tendencies and monitoring/subjective feelings. Despite the advances in assessing the physiological correlates of emotional perception and learning processes, a critical appraisal shows that functional neuroimaging approaches encounter methodological difficulties regarding measurement precision (e.g., response scaling and reproducibility) and validity (e.g., response specificity, generalisation to other paradigms, subjects or settings). Since emotional processes are not only the result of localised but also of widely distributed activation, a more representative model of assessment is needed that systematically relates the hierarchy of high- and low-level emotion constructs with the corresponding patterns of activity and functional connectivity of the brain.

  15. Correlations among brain gray matter volumes, age, gender, and hemisphere in healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Taki, Yasuyuki; Thyreau, Benjamin; Kinomura, Shigeo; Sato, Kazunori; Goto, Ryoi; Kawashima, Ryuta; Fukuda, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    To determine the relationship between age and gray matter structure and how interactions between gender and hemisphere impact this relationship, we examined correlations between global or regional gray matter volume and age, including interactions of gender and hemisphere, using a general linear model with voxel-based and region-of-interest analyses. Brain magnetic resonance images were collected from 1460 healthy individuals aged 20-69 years; the images were linearly normalized and segmented and restored to native space for analysis of global gray matter volume. Linearly normalized images were then non-linearly normalized and smoothed for analysis of regional gray matter volume. Analysis of global gray matter volume revealed a significant negative correlation between gray matter ratio (gray matter volume divided by intracranial volume) and age in both genders, and a significant interaction effect of age × gender on the gray matter ratio. In analyzing regional gray matter volume, the gray matter volume of all regions showed significant main effects of age, and most regions, with the exception of several including the inferior parietal lobule, showed a significant age × gender interaction. Additionally, the inferior temporal gyrus showed a significant age × gender × hemisphere interaction. No regional volumes showed significant age × hemisphere interactions. Our study may contribute to clarifying the mechanism(s) of normal brain aging in each brain region.

  16. Correlations among Brain Gray Matter Volumes, Age, Gender, and Hemisphere in Healthy Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Taki, Yasuyuki; Thyreau, Benjamin; Kinomura, Shigeo; Sato, Kazunori; Goto, Ryoi; Kawashima, Ryuta; Fukuda, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    To determine the relationship between age and gray matter structure and how interactions between gender and hemisphere impact this relationship, we examined correlations between global or regional gray matter volume and age, including interactions of gender and hemisphere, using a general linear model with voxel-based and region-of-interest analyses. Brain magnetic resonance images were collected from 1460 healthy individuals aged 20–69 years; the images were linearly normalized and segmented and restored to native space for analysis of global gray matter volume. Linearly normalized images were then non-linearly normalized and smoothed for analysis of regional gray matter volume. Analysis of global gray matter volume revealed a significant negative correlation between gray matter ratio (gray matter volume divided by intracranial volume) and age in both genders, and a significant interaction effect of age × gender on the gray matter ratio. In analyzing regional gray matter volume, the gray matter volume of all regions showed significant main effects of age, and most regions, with the exception of several including the inferior parietal lobule, showed a significant age × gender interaction. Additionally, the inferior temporal gyrus showed a significant age × gender × hemisphere interaction. No regional volumes showed significant age × hemisphere interactions. Our study may contribute to clarifying the mechanism(s) of normal brain aging in each brain region. PMID:21818377

  17. Exploring the brain on multiple scales with correlative two-photon and light sheet microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvestri, Ludovico; Allegra Mascaro, Anna Letizia; Costantini, Irene; Sacconi, Leonardo; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2014-02-01

    One of the unique features of the brain is that its activity cannot be framed in a single spatio-temporal scale, but rather spans many orders of magnitude both in space and time. A single imaging technique can reveal only a small part of this complex machinery. To obtain a more comprehensive view of brain functionality, complementary approaches should be combined into a correlative framework. Here, we describe a method to integrate data from in vivo two-photon fluorescence imaging and ex vivo light sheet microscopy, taking advantage of blood vessels as reference chart. We show how the apical dendritic arbor of a single cortical pyramidal neuron imaged in living thy1-GFP-M mice can be found in the large-scale brain reconstruction obtained with light sheet microscopy. Starting from the apical portion, the whole pyramidal neuron can then be segmented. The correlative approach presented here allows contextualizing within a three-dimensional anatomic framework the neurons whose dynamics have been observed with high detail in vivo.

  18. Regional cerebral brain metabolism correlates of neuroticism and extraversion.

    PubMed

    Deckersbach, Thilo; Miller, Karen K; Klibanski, Anne; Fischman, Alan; Dougherty, Darin D; Blais, Mark A; Herzog, David B; Rauch, Scott L

    2006-01-01

    Factor-analytic approaches to human personality have consistently identified several core personality traits, such as Extraversion/Introversion, Neuroticism, Agreeableness, Consciousness, and Openness. There is an increasing recognition that certain personality traits may render individuals vulnerable to psychiatric disorders, including anxiety disorders and depression. Our purpose in this study was to explore correlates between the personality dimensions neuroticism and extraversion as assessed by the NEO Five-Factor Inventory (NEO-FFI) and resting regional cerebral glucose metabolism (rCMRglu) in healthy control subjects. Based on the anxiety and depression literatures, we predicted correlations with a network of brain structures, including ventral and medial prefrontal cortex (encompassing anterior cingulate cortex and orbitofrontal cortex), insular cortex, anterior temporal pole, ventral striatum, and the amygdala. Twenty healthy women completed an (18F)FDG (18F-fluorodeoxyglucose) positron emission tomography (PET) scan at rest and the NEO-FFI inventory. We investigated correlations between scores on NEO-FFI Neuroticism and Extraversion and rCMRglu using statistical parametric mapping (SPM99). Within a priori search territories, we found significant negative correlations between Neuroticism and rCMRglu in the insular cortex and positive correlations between Extraversion and rCMRglu in the orbitofrontal cortex. No significant correlations were found involving anterior cingulate, amygdala, or ventral striatum. Neuroticism and Extraversion are associated with activity in insular cortex and orbitofrontal cortex, respectively.

  19. Value of obtaining renal images following brain scintigraphy with technetium-99m glucoheptonate

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, A.J.; Rodriguez, A.A.; Spicer, M.J.; Jackson, R.E.; Byrd, B.F.; Turnbull, G.L.

    1986-08-01

    The value of adding an extra view of the kidneys immediately following brain imaging with Tc-99m glucoheptonate was investigated in a two-year retrospective study at our institution. Between October 1982 and October 1984, 561 individuals underwent Tc-99m glucoheptonate brain imaging with the added renal view. Twenty-nine of these individuals (5.2%) demonstrated renal abnormalities. The abnormal renal findings were clinically correlated in 24 of these persons. Sixteen (67%) of these 24 individuals were unaware of any renal abnormality. Useful information can be obtained from renal images incidental to brain imaging at no added expense or radiation exposure to the patient, and at a minimal cost in time to the imaging clinic.

  20. Rhesus monkey brain imaging through intact skull with thermoacoustic tomography.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yuan; Wang, Lihong V

    2006-03-01

    Two-dimensional microwave-induced thermoacoustic tomography (TAT) is applied to imaging the Rhesus monkey brain through the intact skull. To reduce the wavefront distortion caused by the skull, only the low-frequency components of the thermoacoustic signals (< 1 MHz) are used to reconstruct the TAT images. The methods of signal processing and image reconstruction are validated by imaging a lamb kidney. The resolution of the system is found to be 4 mm when we image a 1-month-old monkey head containing inserted needles. We also image the coronal and axial sections of a 7-month-old monkey head. Brain features that are 3 cm deep in the head are imaged clearly. Our results demonstrate that TAT has potential for use in portable, cost-effective imagers for pediatric brains.

  1. Correlating Function and Imaging Measures of the Medial Longitudinal Fasciculus

    PubMed Central

    Sakaie, Ken; Takahashi, Masaya; Remington, Gina; Wang, Xiaofeng; Conger, Amy; Conger, Darrel; Dimitrov, Ivan; Jones, Stephen; Frohman, Ashley; Frohman, Teresa; Sagiyama, Koji; Togao, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Objective To test the validity of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) measures of tissue injury by examining such measures in a white matter structure with well-defined function, the medial longitudinal fasciculus (MLF). Injury to the MLF underlies internuclear ophthalmoparesis (INO). Methods 40 MS patients with chronic INO and 15 healthy controls were examined under an IRB-approved protocol. Tissue integrity of the MLF was characterized by DTI parameters: longitudinal diffusivity (LD), transverse diffusivity (TD), mean diffusivity (MD) and fractional anisotropy (FA). Severity of INO was quantified by infrared oculography to measure versional disconjugacy index (VDI). Results LD was significantly lower in patients than in controls in the medulla-pons region of the MLF (p < 0.03). FA was also lower in patients in the same region (p < 0.0004). LD of the medulla-pons region correlated with VDI (R = -0.28, p < 0.05) as did FA in the midbrain section (R = 0.31, p < 0.02). Conclusions This study demonstrates that DTI measures of brain tissue injury can detect injury to a functionally relevant white matter pathway, and that such measures correlate with clinically accepted evaluation indices for INO. The results validate DTI as a useful imaging measure of tissue integrity. PMID:26800522

  2. Neurovascular manifestations in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia: imaging features and genotype-phenotype correlations.

    PubMed

    Krings, T; Kim, H; Power, S; Nelson, J; Faughnan, M E; Young, W L; terBrugge, K G

    2015-05-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia is an autosomal dominant disease that presents in 10%-20% of patients with various brain vascular malformations. We aimed to report the radiologic features (phenotype) and the genotype-phenotype correlations of brain vascular malformations in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. Demographic, clinical, genotypic, and imaging information of 75 patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia with brain arteriovenous malformations enrolled in the Brain Vascular Malformation Consortium from 2010 to 2012 were reviewed. Nonshunting, small, superficially located conglomerates of enhancing vessels without enlarged feeding arteries or draining veins called "capillary vascular malformations" were the most commonly observed lesion (46 of 75 patients; 61%), followed by shunting "nidus-type" brain AVMs that were typically located superficially with a low Spetzler-Martin Grade and a small size (32 of 75 patients; 43%). Direct high-flow fistulous arteriovenous shunts were present in 9 patients (12%). Other types of vascular malformations (dural AVF and developmental venous anomalies) were present in 1 patient each. Multiplicity of vascular malformations was seen in 33 cases (44%). No statistically significant correlation was observed between hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia gene mutation and lesion type or lesion multiplicity. Depending on their imaging features, brain vascular malformations in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia can be subdivided into brain AVF, nidus-type AVM, and capillary vascular malformations, with the latter being the most common phenotype in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. No genotype-phenotype correlation was observed among patients with this condition. © 2015 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  3. Neurovascular Manifestations in Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia: Imaging Features and Genotype-Phenotype Correlations

    PubMed Central

    Krings, Timo; Kim, Helen; Power, Sarah; Nelson, Jeffrey; Faughnan, Marie; Young, William L.; Terbrugge, Karel G.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia is an autosomal dominant disease that presents in 10%–20% of patients with various brain vascular malformations. We aimed to report the radiologic features (phenotype) and the genotype-phenotype correlations of brain vascular malformations in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. MATERIALS AND METHODS Demographic, clinical, genotypic and imaging information of 75 HHT patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia with brain arteriovenous malformations enrolled in the Brain Vascular Malformation Consortium from 2010 to 2012 were reviewed. RESULTS Non-shunting, small, superficially located conglomerates of enhancing vessels without enlarged feeding arteries or draining veins called “capillary vascular malformations” were the most commonly observed lesion (46 of 75 patients; 61%), followed by shunting “nidus-type” brain AVMs that were typically located superficially with a low Spetzler-Martin Grade and a small size (32 of 75 patients; 43%). Direct high-flow fistulous arteriovenous shunts were present in 9 patients (12%). Other types of vascular malformations (dural AVF and developmental venous anomalies) were present in 1 patient each. Multiplicity of vascular malformations was seen in 33 cases (44%). No statistically significant correlation was observed between hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia gene mutation and lesion type or lesion multiplicity. CONCLUSIONS Depending on their imaging features, brain vascular malformations in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia can be subdivided into brain AVF, nidus-type AVM, and capillary vascular malformations, with the latter being the most common phenotype in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. No genotype-phenotype correlation was observed among patients with this condition. PMID:25572952

  4. Brain structural and functional correlates of resilience to Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Frangou, Sophia

    2011-01-01

    Background: Resilient adaptation can be construed in different ways, but as used here it refers to adaptive brain responses associated with avoidance of psychopathology despite expressed genetic predisposition to Bipolar Disorder (BD). Although family history of BD is associated with elevated risk of affective morbidity a significant proportion of first-degree relatives remain free of psychopathology. Examination of brain structure and function in these individuals may inform on adaptive responses that pre-empt disease expression. Methods: Data presented here are derived from the Vulnerability to Bipolar Disorders Study (VIBES) which includes BD patients, asymptomatic relatives and controls. Participants underwent extensive investigations including brain structural (sMRI) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We present results from sMRI voxel-based-morphometry and from conventional and connectivity analyses of fMRI data obtained during the Stroop Colour Word Test (SCWT), a task of cognitive control during conflict resolution. All analyses were implemented using Statistical Parametric Mapping software version 5 (SPM5). Resilience in relatives was operationalized as the lifetime absence of clinical-range symptoms. Results: Resilient relatives of BD patients expressed structural, functional, and connectivity changes reflecting the effect of genetic risk on the brain. These included increased insular volume, decreased activation within the posterior and inferior parietal regions involved in selective attention during the SCWT, and reduced fronto-insular and fronto-cingulate connectivity. Resilience was associated with increased cerebellar vermal volume and enhanced functional coupling between the dorsal and the ventral prefrontal cortex during the SCWT. Conclusions: Our findings suggests the presence of biological mechanisms associated with resilient adaptation of brain networks and pave the way for the identification of outcome-specific trajectories given

  5. Novel Nanotechnologies for Brain Cancer Therapeutics and Imaging.

    PubMed

    Ferroni, Letizia; Gardin, Chiara; Della Puppa, Alessandro; Sivolella, Stefano; Brunello, Giulia; Scienza, Renato; Bressan, Eriberto; D'Avella, Domenico; Zavan, Barbara

    2015-11-01

    Despite progress in surgery, radiotherapy, and in chemotherapy, an effective curative treatment of brain cancer, specifically malignant gliomas, does not yet exist. The efficacy of current anti-cancer strategies in brain tumors is limited by the lack of specific therapies against malignant cells. Besides, the delivery of the drugs to brain tumors is limited by the presence of the blood-brain barrier. Nanotechnology today offers a unique opportunity to develop more effective brain cancer imaging and therapeutics. In particular, the development of nanocarriers that can be conjugated with several functional molecules including tumor-specific ligands, anticancer drugs, and imaging probes, can provide new devices which are able to overcome the difficulties of the classical strategies. Nanotechnology-based approaches hold great promise for revolutionizing brain cancer medical treatments, imaging, and diagnosis.

  6. Cerebral blood flow velocity positively correlates with brain volumes in long-term remitted depression.

    PubMed

    Desmidt, Thomas; Andersson, Frédéric; Brizard, Bruno; Cottier, Jean-Philippe; Patat, Frédéric; Gissot, Valérie; Belzung, Catherine; El-Hage, Wissam; Camus, Vincent

    2017-09-20

    Mechanisms involved in brain changes observed in major depression have been poorly investigated in clinical populations. Changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) have been found in depressed patients and constitute a potential mechanism by which brain volume varies in depression. We have tested the association of cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV) as assessed with Transcranial Doppler (TCD) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) as assessed with Arterial Spin Labeling Magnetic Resonance Imaging (ASL-MRI) with Total Brain Volume (TBV) and the volume of seven subcortical regions, in currently depressed and long-term remitted patients. In addition, we have evaluated other potential confounders for the association depression/brain volume, including dimensional symptoms of depression, cardiovascular risk factors (CVRF) and antidepressants. Seventy-five individuals were recruited, divided in 3 equal groups (currently depressed, remitted individuals and healthy controls) and were submitted to clinical assessment, MRI and Transcranial Doppler. CBFV was positively correlated with TBV, Hippocampus and Thalamus volume, but only in remitted patients, who tend to have larger brains compared to both currently depressed and controls. CVRF were negatively associated with brain volumes in the 3 groups and antidepressant use was associated with larger Thalamus. We found no association between brain volumes and CBF as assessed with ASL-MRI, anhedonia, anxiety or psychomotor retardation. Greater CBFV may be a physiological mechanism by which brain is enlarged in remitted patients. Future studies should consider CBFV, CVRF and antidepressants as possible confounders for the association depression/brain volumes, especially in remitted patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Noise correlations in the human brain and their impact on pattern classification

    PubMed Central

    da Silveira, Rava Azeredo; Cohen, Jonathan D.; Turk-Browne, Nicholas B.

    2017-01-01

    Multivariate decoding methods, such as multivoxel pattern analysis (MVPA), are highly effective at extracting information from brain imaging data. Yet, the precise nature of the information that MVPA draws upon remains controversial. Most current theories emphasize the enhanced sensitivity imparted by aggregating across voxels that have mixed and weak selectivity. However, beyond the selectivity of individual voxels, neural variability is correlated across voxels, and such noise correlations may contribute importantly to accurate decoding. Indeed, a recent computational theory proposed that noise correlations enhance multivariate decoding from heterogeneous neural populations. Here we extend this theory from the scale of neurons to functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and show that noise correlations between heterogeneous populations of voxels (i.e., voxels selective for different stimulus variables) contribute to the success of MVPA. Specifically, decoding performance is enhanced when voxels with high vs. low noise correlations (measured during rest or in the background of the task) are selected during classifier training. Conversely, voxels that are strongly selective for one class in a GLM or that receive high classification weights in MVPA tend to exhibit high noise correlations with voxels selective for the other class being discriminated against. Furthermore, we use simulations to show that this is a general property of fMRI data and that selectivity and noise correlations can have distinguishable influences on decoding. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that if there is signal in the data, the resulting above-chance classification accuracy is modulated by the magnitude of noise correlations. PMID:28841641

  8. Noise correlations in the human brain and their impact on pattern classification.

    PubMed

    Bejjanki, Vikranth R; da Silveira, Rava Azeredo; Cohen, Jonathan D; Turk-Browne, Nicholas B

    2017-08-01

    Multivariate decoding methods, such as multivoxel pattern analysis (MVPA), are highly effective at extracting information from brain imaging data. Yet, the precise nature of the information that MVPA draws upon remains controversial. Most current theories emphasize the enhanced sensitivity imparted by aggregating across voxels that have mixed and weak selectivity. However, beyond the selectivity of individual voxels, neural variability is correlated across voxels, and such noise correlations may contribute importantly to accurate decoding. Indeed, a recent computational theory proposed that noise correlations enhance multivariate decoding from heterogeneous neural populations. Here we extend this theory from the scale of neurons to functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and show that noise correlations between heterogeneous populations of voxels (i.e., voxels selective for different stimulus variables) contribute to the success of MVPA. Specifically, decoding performance is enhanced when voxels with high vs. low noise correlations (measured during rest or in the background of the task) are selected during classifier training. Conversely, voxels that are strongly selective for one class in a GLM or that receive high classification weights in MVPA tend to exhibit high noise correlations with voxels selective for the other class being discriminated against. Furthermore, we use simulations to show that this is a general property of fMRI data and that selectivity and noise correlations can have distinguishable influences on decoding. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that if there is signal in the data, the resulting above-chance classification accuracy is modulated by the magnitude of noise correlations.

  9. Topological correlations of structural and functional networks in patients with traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Caeyenberghs, Karen; Leemans, Alexander; Leunissen, Inge; Michiels, Karla; Swinnen, Stephan P.

    2013-01-01

    Despite an increasing amount of specific correlation studies between structural and functional connectivity, there is still a need for combined studies, especially in pathological conditions. Impairments of brain white matter (WM) and diffuse axonal injuries are commonly suspected to be responsible for the disconnection hypothesis in traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients. Moreover, our previous research on TBI patients shows a strong relationship between abnormalities in topological organization of brain networks and behavioral deficits. In this study, we combined task-related functional connectivity (using event-related fMRI) with structural connectivity (derived from fiber tractography using diffusion MRI data) estimates in the same participants (17 adults with TBI and 16 controls), allowing for direct comparison between graph metrics of the different imaging modalities. Connectivity matrices were computed covering the switching motor network, which includes the basal ganglia, anterior cingulate cortex/supplementary motor area, and anterior insula/inferior frontal gyrus. The edges constituting this network consisted of the partial correlations between the fMRI time series from each node of the switching motor network. The interregional anatomical connections between the switching-related areas were determined using the fiber tractography results. We found that graph metrics and hubs obtained showed no agreement in both groups. The topological properties of brain functional networks could not be solely accounted for by the properties of the underlying structural networks. However, combining complementary information from both imaging modalities could improve accuracy in prediction of switching performance. Direct comparison between functional task-related and anatomical structural connectivity, presented here for the first time in TBI patients, links two powerful approaches to map the patterns of brain connectivity that may underlie behavioral deficits in brain

  10. Flow distributions and spatial correlations in human brain capillary networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorthois, Sylvie; Peyrounette, Myriam; Larue, Anne; Le Borgne, Tanguy

    2015-11-01

    The vascular system of the human brain cortex is composed of a space filling mesh-like capillary network connected upstream and downstream to branched quasi-fractal arterioles and venules. The distribution of blood flow rates in these networks may affect the efficiency of oxygen transfer processes. Here, we investigate the distribution and correlation properties of blood flow velocities from numerical simulations in large 3D human intra-cortical vascular network (10000 segments) obtained from an anatomical database. In each segment, flow is solved from a 1D non-linear model taking account of the complex rheological properties of blood flow in microcirculation to deduce blood pressure, blood flow and red blood cell volume fraction distributions throughout the network. The network structural complexity is found to impart broad and spatially correlated Lagrangian velocity distributions, leading to power law transit time distributions. The origins of this behavior (existence of velocity correlations in capillary networks, influence of the coupling with the feeding arterioles and draining veins, topological disorder, complex blood rheology) are studied by comparison with results obtained in various model capillary networks of controlled disorder. ERC BrainMicroFlow GA615102, ERC ReactiveFronts GA648377.

  11. Sexual behavior and its correlates after traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Turner, Daniel; Schöttle, Daniel; Krueger, Richard; Briken, Peer

    2015-03-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the leading causes of permanent disability in young adults and is frequently accompanied by changes in sexual behaviors. Satisfying sexuality is an important factor for overall quality of life in people with disabilities. The purpose of this article is to review the studies evaluating the assessment, correlates and management of sexuality following TBI. The Brain Injury Questionnaire of Sexuality is the first validated questionnaire specifically developed for adults with TBI. A considerable amount of individuals with TBI show inappropriate sexual behaviors and sexual dysfunctions. Whereas inappropriate sexual behaviors are related to younger age, less social participation and more severe injuries, sexual dysfunctions show an association with higher fatigue, higher depression scores, less self-esteem and female sex. Healthcare professionals have suggested that because of discomfort at the individual or institutional level, sexual problems are often not sufficiently addressed and have suggested that a specialist should treat sexual problems. Although some important correlates of sexual problems could be identified, methodological differences across studies limit their comparability. Furthermore, there is an absence of evidence-based treatment strategies for addressing sexual problems. Therapeutic efforts should take into account the identified correlates of sexual problems following TBI.

  12. Brain correlates of sentence translation in Finnish-Norwegian bilinguals.

    PubMed

    Lehtonen, Minna H; Laine, Matti; Niemi, Jussi; Thomsen, Tormod; Vorobyev, Victor A; Hugdahl, Kenneth

    2005-04-25

    We measured brain activation with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while Finnish-Norwegian bilinguals silently translated sentences from Finnish into Norwegian and decided whether a later presented probe sentence was a correct translation of the original sentence. The control task included silent sentence reading and probe sentence decision within a single language, Finnish. The translation minus control task contrast activated the left inferior frontal gyrus (Brodmann's area 47) and the left basal ganglia. The left inferior frontal activation appears to be related to active semantic retrieval and the basal ganglia activation to a general action control function that works by suppressing competing responses.

  13. Hypnosis and imaging of the living human brain.

    PubMed

    Landry, Mathieu; Raz, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Over more than two decades, studies using imaging techniques of the living human brain have begun to explore the neural correlates of hypnosis. The collective findings provide a gripping, albeit preliminary, account of the underlying neurobiological mechanisms involved in hypnotic phenomena. While substantial advances lend support to different hypotheses pertaining to hypnotic modulation of attention, control, and monitoring processes, the complex interactions among the many mediating variables largely hinder our ability to isolate robust commonalities across studies. The present account presents a critical integrative synthesis of neuroimaging studies targeting hypnosis as a function of suggestion. Specifically, hypnotic induction without task-specific suggestion is examined, as well as suggestions concerning sensation and perception, memory, and ideomotor response. The importance of carefully designed experiments is highlighted to better tease apart the neural correlates that subserve hypnotic phenomena. Moreover, converging findings intimate that hypnotic suggestions seem to induce specific neural patterns. These observations propose that suggestions may have the ability to target focal brain networks. Drawing on evidence spanning several technological modalities, neuroimaging studies of hypnosis pave the road to a more scientific understanding of a dramatic, yet largely evasive, domain of human behavior.

  14. Towards the routine use of brain imaging to aid the clinical diagnosis of disorders of consciousness.

    PubMed

    Coleman, M R; Davis, M H; Rodd, J M; Robson, T; Ali, A; Owen, A M; Pickard, J D

    2009-09-01

    Clinical audits have highlighted the many challenges and dilemmas faced by clinicians assessing persons with disorders of consciousness (vegetative state and minimally conscious state). The diagnostic decision-making process is highly subjective, dependent upon the skills of the examiner and invariably dictated by the patients' ability to move or speak. Whilst a considerable amount has been learnt since Jennett and Plum coined the term 'vegetative state', the assessment process remains largely unchanged; conducted at the bedside, using behavioural assessment tools, which are susceptible to environmental and physiological factors. This has created a situation where the rate of misdiagnosis is unacceptably high (up to 43%). In order to address these problems, various functional brain imaging paradigms, which do not rely upon the patient's ability to move or speak, have been proposed as a source of additional information to inform the diagnostic decision making process. Although accumulated evidence from brain imaging, particularly functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), has been encouraging, the empirical evidence is still based on relatively small numbers of patients. It remains unclear whether brain imaging is capable of informing the diagnosis beyond the behavioural assessment and whether brain imaging has any prognostic utility. In this study, we describe the functional brain imaging findings from a group of 41 patients with disorders of consciousness, who undertook a hierarchical speech processing task. We found, contrary to the clinical impression of a specialist team using behavioural assessment tools, that two patients referred to the study with a diagnosis of vegetative state did in fact demonstrate neural correlates of speech comprehension when assessed using functional brain imaging. These fMRI findings were found to have no association with the patient's behavioural presentation at the time of investigation and thus provided additional diagnostic

  15. The role of image registration in brain mapping

    PubMed Central

    Toga, A.W.; Thompson, P.M.

    2008-01-01

    Image registration is a key step in a great variety of biomedical imaging applications. It provides the ability to geometrically align one dataset with another, and is a prerequisite for all imaging applications that compare datasets across subjects, imaging modalities, or across time. Registration algorithms also enable the pooling and comparison of experimental findings across laboratories, the construction of population-based brain atlases, and the creation of systems to detect group patterns in structural and functional imaging data. We review the major types of registration approaches used in brain imaging today. We focus on their conceptual basis, the underlying mathematics, and their strengths and weaknesses in different contexts. We describe the major goals of registration, including data fusion, quantification of change, automated image segmentation and labeling, shape measurement, and pathology detection. We indicate that registration algorithms have great potential when used in conjunction with a digital brain atlas, which acts as a reference system in which brain images can be compared for statistical analysis. The resulting armory of registration approaches is fundamental to medical image analysis, and in a brain mapping context provides a means to elucidate clinical, demographic, or functional trends in the anatomy or physiology of the brain. PMID:19890483

  16. The role of image registration in brain mapping.

    PubMed

    Toga, A W; Thompson, P M

    2001-01-01

    Image registration is a key step in a great variety of biomedical imaging applications. It provides the ability to geometrically align one dataset with another, and is a prerequisite for all imaging applications that compare datasets across subjects, imaging modalities, or across time. Registration algorithms also enable the pooling and comparison of experimental findings across laboratories, the construction of population-based brain atlases, and the creation of systems to detect group patterns in structural and functional imaging data. We review the major types of registration approaches used in brain imaging today. We focus on their conceptual basis, the underlying mathematics, and their strengths and weaknesses in different contexts. We describe the major goals of registration, including data fusion, quantification of change, automated image segmentation and labeling, shape measurement, and pathology detection. We indicate that registration algorithms have great potential when used in conjunction with a digital brain atlas, which acts as a reference system in which brain images can be compared for statistical analysis. The resulting armory of registration approaches is fundamental to medical image analysis, and in a brain mapping context provides a means to elucidate clinical, demographic, or functional trends in the anatomy or physiology of the brain.

  17. Healthy children show gender differences in correlations between nonverbal cognitive ability and brain activation during visual perception.

    PubMed

    Asano, Kohei; Taki, Yasuyuki; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Sassa, Yuko; Thyreau, Benjamin; Asano, Michiko; Takeuchi, Hikaru; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2014-08-08

    Humans perceive textual and nontextual information in visual perception, and both depend on language. In childhood education, students exhibit diverse perceptual abilities, such that some students process textual information better and some process nontextual information better. These predispositions involve many factors, including cognitive ability and learning preference. However, the relationship between verbal and nonverbal cognitive abilities and brain activation during visual perception has not yet been examined in children. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine the relationship between nonverbal and verbal cognitive abilities and brain activation during nontextual visual perception in large numbers of children. A significant positive correlation was found between nonverbal cognitive abilities and brain activation in the right temporoparietal junction, which is thought to be related to attention reorienting. This significant positive correlation existed only in boys. These findings suggested that male brain activation differed from female brain activation, and that this depended on individual cognitive processes, even if there was no gender difference in behavioral performance.

  18. Brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging After High-Dose Chemotherapy and Radiotherapy for Childhood Brain Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Spreafico, Filippo Gandola, Lorenza; Marchiano, Alfonso; Simonetti, Fabio; Poggi, Geraldina; Adduci, Anna; Clerici, Carlo Alfredo; Luksch, Roberto; Biassoni, Veronica; Meazza, Cristina; Catania, Serena; Terenziani, Monica; Musumeci, Renato; Fossati-Bellani, Franca; Massimino, Maura

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: Brain necrosis or other subacute iatrogenic reactions has been recognized as a potential complication of radiotherapy (RT), although the possible synergistic effects of high-dose chemotherapy and RT might have been underestimated. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the clinical and radiologic data of 49 consecutive children with malignant brain tumors treated with high-dose thiotepa and autologous hematopoietic stem cell rescue, preceded or followed by RT. The patients were assessed for neurocognitive tests to identify any correlation with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) anomalies. Results: Of the 49 children, 18 (6 of 25 with high-grade gliomas and 12 of 24 with primitive neuroectodermal tumors) had abnormal brain MRI findings occurring a median of 8 months (range, 2-39 months) after RT and beginning to regress a median of 13 months (range, 2-26 months) after onset. The most common lesion pattern involved multiple pseudonodular, millimeter-size, T{sub 1}-weighted unevenly enhancing, and T{sub 2}-weighted hyperintense foci. Four patients with primitive neuroectodermal tumors also had subdural fluid leaks, with meningeal enhancement over the effusion. One-half of the patients had symptoms relating to the new radiographic findings. The MRI lesion-free survival rate was 74% {+-} 6% at 1 year and 57% {+-} 8% at 2 years. The number of marrow ablative courses correlated significantly to the incidence of radiographic anomalies. No significant difference was found in intelligent quotient scores between children with and without radiographic changes. Conclusion: Multiple enhancing cerebral lesions were frequently seen on MRI scans soon after high-dose chemotherapy and RT. Such findings pose a major diagnostic challenge in terms of their differential diagnosis vis-a-vis recurrent tumor. Their correlation with neurocognitive results deserves further investigation.

  19. Imaging microstructure in the living human brain: A viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Paus, Tomáš

    2017-10-09

    This special issue summarizes an impressive body of work concerned with in vivo imaging of brain microstructure. Collectively, papers included here demonstrate the power of multi-modal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for mapping various structural properties of brain tissue. In this introduction, I provide a user's perspective vis-à-vis motivations for these efforts, review briefly the cellular composition of grey and white matter in the human brain, and provide a few examples of how we can bridge the gap between ex vivo and in vivo datasets to facilitate interpretation of studies measuring brain macro- and microstructure. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Correlations between brain structures and study time at home in healthy children: a longitudinal analysis

    PubMed Central

    Asano, Michiko; Taki, Yasuyuki; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Takeuchi, Hikaru; Thyreau, Benjamin; Sassa, Yuko; Asano, Kohei; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Like sleeping and eating habits, the study habits adopted by children when they are at home are important contributors to lifestyle and they affect cognitive ability. It has recently been reported that sleeping and eating habits change the brain structure of children. However, no research on the effect of study habits at home on the brain structure of children has been conducted thus far. We investigated the effects of study habits at home on the brain structures of healthy children by examining correlations between study time at home and changes in brain structure over the course of 3 years. Methods We used the brain magnetic resonance images of 229 healthy children aged 5.6–18.4 years and computed the changes (time 2–time 1) in regional gray matter and white matter volume (rWMV) using voxel-based morphometry. Whole-brain multiple regression analysis revealed a significant positive correlation between study time at home and changes in rWMV in the right superior frontal gyrus (SFG). Behaviorally, we found a significant positive correlation between study time at home and change in the verbal comprehension index (VCI), one of the subscales of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children–third edition (WISC–III). Results and Conclusions Given that the SFG is involved in memory control and that the VCI measures abilities related to vocabulary, our results indicate that greater SFG involvement in the memorization component of longer study times may result in greater increases in the number of axons and more axon branching and myelination, causing plastic changes in the neural network involved in memory processes. PMID:25365804

  1. Parkinson's disease biomarkers program brain imaging repository.

    PubMed

    Ofori, Edward; Du, Guangwei; Babcock, Debra; Huang, Xuemei; Vaillancourt, David E

    2016-01-01

    The Parkinson's Disease Biomarkers Program (PDBP) is a multi-site study designed to identify Parkinson's disease (PD) biomarkers that can be used to improve the understanding of PD pathophysiology and to develop tools that provide novel measures to evaluate PD clinical trials. The PDBP consortium comprises numerous individual projects of which two are specifically geared to the development of brain imaging markers for diagnosis, progression, and prognosis of PD or related disorders. All study data from PD patients, atypical Parkinsonian patients, patients with essential tremor, and healthy controls collected from the sites are integrated in the PDBP database and will be publically available. All subjects are asked to submit blood samples, and undergo a battery of clinical evaluations that cover motor, cognitive, and other background information. In addition, a subset of subjects contributed cerebrospinal fluid samples. A restricted access, web-based Data Management Resource facilitates rapid sharing of data and biosamples across the entire PD research community. The PDBP consortium is a useful resource for research and collaboration aimed at the discovery of biomarkers and their use in understanding the pathophysiology of PD.

  2. Geometrical Correlation and Matching of 2d Image Shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vizilter, Y. V.; Zheltov, S. Y.

    2012-07-01

    The problem of image correspondence measure selection for image comparison and matching is addressed. Many practical applications require image matching "just by shape" with no dependence on the concrete intensity or color values. Most popular technique for image shape comparison utilizes the mutual information measure based on probabilistic reasoning and information theory background. Another approach was proposed by Pytiev (so called "Pytiev morphology") based on geometrical and algebraic reasoning. In this framework images are considered as piecewise-constant 2D functions, tessellation of image frame by the set of non-intersected connected regions determines the "shape" of image and the projection of image onto the shape of other image is determined. Morphological image comparison is performed using the normalized morphological correlation coefficients. These coefficients estimate the closeness of one image to the shape of other image. Such image analysis technique can be characterized as an ""ntensity-to-geometry" matching. This paper generalizes the Pytiev morphological approach for obtaining the pure "geometry-to-geometry" matching techniques. The generalized intensity-geometrical correlation coefficient is proposed including the linear correlation coefficient and the square of Pytiev correlation coefficient as its partial cases. The morphological shape correlation coefficient is proposed based on the statistical averaging of images with the same shape. Centered morphological correlation coefficient is obtained under the condition of intensity centering of averaged images. Two types of symmetric geometrical normalized correlation coefficients are proposed for comparison of shape-tessellations. The technique for correlation and matching of shapes with ordered intensities is proposed with correlation measures invariant to monotonous intensity transformations. The quality of proposed geometrical correlation measures is experimentally estimated in the task of

  3. Image Data Mining for Pattern Classification and Visualization of Morphological Changes in Brain MR Images.

    PubMed

    Murakawa, Saki; Ikuta, Rie; Uchiyama, Yoshikazu; Shiraishi, Junji

    2016-02-01

    Hospital information systems (HISs) and picture archiving and communication systems (PACSs) are archiving large amounts of data (i.e., "big data") that are not being used. Therefore, many research projects in progress are trying to use "big data" for the development of early diagnosis, prediction of disease onset, and personalized therapies. In this study, we propose a new method for image data mining to identify regularities and abnormalities in the large image data sets. We used 70 archived magnetic resonance (MR) images that were acquired using three-dimensional magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition with gradient echo (3D MP-RAGE). These images were obtained from the Alzheimer's disease neuroimaging initiative (ADNI) database. For anatomical standardization of the data, we used the statistical parametric mapping (SPM) software. Using a similarity matrix based on cross-correlation coefficients (CCs) calculated from an anatomical region and a hierarchical clustering technique, we classified all the abnormal cases into five groups. The Z score map identified the difference between a standard normal brain and each of those from the Alzheimer's groups. In addition, the scatter plot obtained from two similarity matrixes visualized the regularities and abnormalities in the image data sets. Image features identified using our method could be useful for understanding of image findings associated with Alzheimer's disease.

  4. Diffusion imaging and tractography of congenital brain malformations.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Michael; Barkovich, A James; Mukherjee, Pratik

    2010-01-01

    Diffusion imaging is an MRI modality that measures the microscopic molecular motion of water in order to investigate white matter microstructure. The modality has been used extensively in recent years to investigate the neuroanatomical basis of congenital brain malformations. We review the basic principles of diffusion imaging and of specific techniques, including diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI). We show how DTI and HARDI, and their application to fiber tractography, has elucidated the aberrant connectivity underlying a number of congenital brain malformations. Finally, we discuss potential uses for diffusion imaging of developmental disorders in the clinical and research realms.

  5. Advanced MR Imaging in Pediatric Brain Tumors, Clinical Applications.

    PubMed

    Lequin, Maarten; Hendrikse, Jeroen

    2017-02-01

    Advanced MR imaging techniques, such as spectroscopy, perfusion, diffusion, and functional imaging, have improved the diagnosis of brain tumors in children and also play an important role in defining surgical as well as therapeutic responses in these patients. In addition to the anatomic or structural information gained with conventional MR imaging sequences, advanced MR imaging techniques also provide physiologic information about tumor morphology, metabolism, and hemodynamics. This article reviews the physiology, techniques, and clinical applications of diffusion-weighted and diffusion tensor imaging, MR spectroscopy, perfusion MR imaging, susceptibility-weighted imaging, and functional MR imaging in the setting of neuro-oncology.

  6. Troponin T: Correlation with location and volume of acute brain infarction.

    PubMed

    Král, Michal; Šaňák, Daniel; Veverka, Tomáš; Hutyra, Martin; Vindiš, David; Bártková, Andrea; Kunčarová, Anna; Dorňák, Tomáš; Čecháková, Eva; Herzig, Roman; Langová, Kateřina; Kaňovský, Petr; Školoudík, David

    2015-02-15

    The troponin T (cTnT) is frequently elevated in acute ischemic stroke (AIS) patients. However, the relationship, if any, between the cTnT level and brain infarction remains to be established. The aim was to investigate the possible correlation between the location and volume of brain infarction and the cardiac cTnT serum level in AIS patients. The study consisted of consecutive AIS patients admitted within 12h of stroke onset. The location and volume of the acute ischemic lesion was assessed with magnetic resonance imaging. Standard laboratory tests, including cTnT and repeated electrocardiograms, were performed at admission and after 4h. Correlations between the cTnT level and the location and volume of brain infarction and baseline parameters were tested with a Spearman correlation coefficient. Univariate and multiple logistic regression analysis (LRA) were used to determine the possible predictors of cTnT elevation. Out of the 200 enrolled patients, elevated cTnT was present in 71 (36%). No correlation was found between the cTnT serum levels and the location (P>0.05) nor volume of brain infarction (r=0.05, P=0.48). LRA identified creatinine (OR: 1.26 per 10μmol/L increase; 95% CI: 1.043-1.524), NT-proBNP (OR: 1.05 per 100μg/L increase; 95% CI: 1.018-1.093) and male gender (OR: 3.674; 95% CI: 1.025-13.164) as significant independent predictors of pathological elevation of cTnT. Although elevated cTnT serum level is relatively frequent in AIS patients within the first 12h of stroke onset, it is not related to the location or volume of brain infarction. http://www.clinicaltrials.gov (No. NCT01541163). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Child and adolescent traumatic brain injury: correlates of injury severity.

    PubMed

    Max, J E; Lindgren, S D; Knutson, C; Pearson, C S; Ihrig, D; Welborn, A

    1998-01-01

    A record review focused on children and adolescents, with a history of traumatic brain injury, who were consecutively admitted to a brain injury clinic in which all new patients are psychiatrically evaluated. Significant correlates of severity of injury in the cognitive, education and communication domains of functioning included Performance IQ but not Verbal IQ nor standardized ratings of language or learning disability. Current organic personality syndrome (OPS) but not attention deficit hyperactivity disorder or oppositional defiant disorder/conduct disorder diagnostic status was significantly related to severity. In conclusion, the findings in this referred sample are similar to prospective studies indicating that Performance IQ appears sensitive in reflecting brain damage. The finding linking OPS to severity of injury is not surprising. This is because OPS is a diagnosis which is dependent on the clinician's judgment of the likelihood that the organic factor is etiologically related to a defined behavioural syndrome. The diagnosis therefore requires a clinical judgment that the threshold of severity of a presumed organic etiological factor has been reached.

  8. Digital Image Correlation for Performance Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaviccini, Miguel; Turner, Dan; Herzberg, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Evaluating the health of a mechanism requires more than just a binary evaluation of whether an operation was completed. It requires analyzing more comprehensive, full-field data. Health monitoring is a process of non-destructively identifying characteristics that indicate the fitness of an engineered component. In order to monitor unit health in a production setting, an automated test system must be created to capture the motion of mechanism parts in a real-time and non-intrusive manner. One way to accomplish this is by using high-speed video and Digital Image Correlation (DIC). In this approach, individual frames of the video are analyzed to track the motion of mechanism components. The derived performance metrics allow for state-of-health monitoring and improved fidelity of mechanism modeling. The results are in-situ state-of-health identification and performance prediction. This paper introduces basic concepts of this test method, and discusses two main themes: the use of laser marking to add fiducial patterns to mechanism components, and new software developed to track objects with complex shapes, even as they move behind obstructions. Finally, the implementation of these tests into an automated tester is discussed.

  9. Digital Image Correlation for Performance Monitoring.

    SciTech Connect

    Palaviccini, Miguel; Turner, Daniel Z.; Herzberg, Michael

    2016-02-01

    Evaluating the health of a mechanism requires more than just a binary evaluation of whether an operation was completed. It requires analyzing more comprehensive, full-field data. Health monitoring is a process of nondestructively identifying characteristics that indicate the fitness of an engineered component. In order to monitor unit health in a production setting, an automated test system must be created to capture the motion of mechanism parts in a real-time and non-intrusive manner. One way to accomplish this is by using high-speed video (HSV) and Digital Image Correlation (DIC). In this approach, individual frames of the video are analyzed to track the motion of mechanism components. The derived performance metrics allow for state-of-health monitoring and improved fidelity of mechanism modeling. The results are in-situ state-of-health identification and performance prediction. This paper introduces basic concepts of this test method, and discusses two main themes: the use of laser marking to add fiducial patterns to mechanism components, and new software developed to track objects with complex shapes, even as they move behind obstructions. Finally, the implementation of these tests into an automated tester is discussed.

  10. High speed image correlation for vibration analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebert, T.; Wood, R.; Splitthof, K.

    2009-08-01

    Digital speckle correlation techniques have already been successfully proven to be an accurate displacement analysis tool for a wide range of applications. With the use of two cameras, three dimensional measurements of contours and displacements can be carried out. With a simple setup it opens a wide range of applications. Rapid new developments in the field of digital imaging and computer technology opens further applications for these measurement methods to high speed deformation and strain analysis, e.g. in the fields of material testing, fracture mechanics, advanced materials and component testing. The high resolution of the deformation measurements in space and time opens a wide range of applications for vibration analysis of objects. Since the system determines the absolute position and displacements of the object in space, it is capable of measuring high amplitudes and even objects with rigid body movements. The absolute resolution depends on the field of view and is scalable. Calibration of the optical setup is a crucial point which will be discussed in detail. Examples of the analysis of harmonic vibration and transient events from material research and industrial applications are presented. The results show typical features of the system.

  11. Dynamic correlations between heart and brain rhythm during Autogenic meditation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae-Keun; Lee, Kyung-Mi; Kim, Jongwha; Whang, Min-Cheol; Kang, Seung Wan

    2013-01-01

    This study is aimed to determine significant physiological parameters of brain and heart under meditative state, both in each activities and their dynamic correlations. Electrophysiological changes in response to meditation were explored in 12 healthy volunteers who completed 8 weeks of a basic training course in autogenic meditation. Heart coherence, representing the degree of ordering in oscillation of heart rhythm intervals, increased significantly during meditation. Relative EEG alpha power and alpha lagged coherence also increased. A significant slowing of parietal peak alpha frequency was observed. Parietal peak alpha power increased with increasing heart coherence during meditation, but no such relationship was observed during baseline. Average alpha lagged coherence also increased with increasing heart coherence during meditation, but weak opposite relationship was observed at baseline. Relative alpha power increased with increasing heart coherence during both meditation and baseline periods. Heart coherence can be a cardiac marker for the meditative state and also may be a general marker for the meditative state since heart coherence is strongly correlated with EEG alpha activities. It is expected that increasing heart coherence and the accompanying EEG alpha activations, heart brain synchronicity, would help recover physiological synchrony following a period of homeostatic depletion.

  12. Dynamic correlations between heart and brain rhythm during Autogenic meditation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae-Keun; Lee, Kyung-Mi; Kim, Jongwha; Whang, Min-Cheol; Kang, Seung Wan

    2013-01-01

    This study is aimed to determine significant physiological parameters of brain and heart under meditative state, both in each activities and their dynamic correlations. Electrophysiological changes in response to meditation were explored in 12 healthy volunteers who completed 8 weeks of a basic training course in autogenic meditation. Heart coherence, representing the degree of ordering in oscillation of heart rhythm intervals, increased significantly during meditation. Relative EEG alpha power and alpha lagged coherence also increased. A significant slowing of parietal peak alpha frequency was observed. Parietal peak alpha power increased with increasing heart coherence during meditation, but no such relationship was observed during baseline. Average alpha lagged coherence also increased with increasing heart coherence during meditation, but weak opposite relationship was observed at baseline. Relative alpha power increased with increasing heart coherence during both meditation and baseline periods. Heart coherence can be a cardiac marker for the meditative state and also may be a general marker for the meditative state since heart coherence is strongly correlated with EEG alpha activities. It is expected that increasing heart coherence and the accompanying EEG alpha activations, heart brain synchronicity, would help recover physiological synchrony following a period of homeostatic depletion. PMID:23914165

  13. Mechanism of Chronic Pain in Rodent Brain Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Pei-Ching

    Chronic pain is a significant health problem that greatly impacts the quality of life of individuals and imparts high costs to society. Despite intense research effort in understanding of the mechanism of pain, chronic pain remains a clinical problem that has few effective therapies. The advent of human brain imaging research in recent years has changed the way that chronic pain is viewed. To further extend the use of human brain imaging techniques for better therapies, the adoption of imaging technique onto the animal pain models is essential, in which underlying brain mechanisms can be systematically studied using various combination of imaging and invasive techniques. The general goal of this thesis is to addresses how brain develops and maintains chronic pain in an animal model using fMRI. We demonstrate that nucleus accumbens, the central component of mesolimbic circuitry, is essential in development of chronic pain. To advance our imaging technique, we develop an innovative methodology to carry out fMRI in awake, conscious rat. Using this cutting-edge technique, we show that allodynia is assoicated with shift brain response toward neural circuits associated nucleus accumbens and prefrontal cortex that regulate affective and cognitive component of pain. Taken together, this thesis provides a deeper understanding of how brain mediates pain. It builds on the existing body of knowledge through maximizing the depth of insight into brain imaging of chronic pain.

  14. Stereotactic PET atlas of the human brain: Aid for visual interpretation of functional brain images

    SciTech Connect

    Minoshima, S.; Koeppe, R.A.; Frey, A.; Ishihara, M.; Kuhl, D.E.

    1994-06-01

    In the routine analysis of functional brain images obtained by PET, subjective visual interpretation is often used for anatomic localization. To enhance the accuracy and consistency of the anatomic interpretation, a PET stereotactic atlas and localization approach was designed for functional brain images. The PET atlas was constructed from a high-resolution [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) image set of a normal volunteer (a 41-yr-ld woman). The image set was reoriented stereotactically, according to the intercommissural (anterior and posterior commissures) line and transformed to the standard stereotactic atlas coordinates. Cerebral structures were annotated on the transaxial planes using a proportional grid system and surface-rendered images. The stereotactic localization technique was applied to image sets from patients with Alzheimer`s disease, and areas of functional alteration were localized visually by referring to the PET atlas. Major brain structures were identified on both transaxial planes and surface-rendered images. In the stereotactic system, anatomic correspondence between the PET atlas and stereotactically reoriented individual image sets of patients with Alzheimer`s disease facilitated both indirect and direct localization of the cerebral structures. Because rapid stereotactic alignment methods for PET images are now available for routine use, the PET atlas will serve as an aid for visual interpretation of functional brain images in the stereotactic system. Widespread application of stereotactic localization may be used in functional brain images, not only in the research setting, but also in routine clinical situations. 41 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Structural Imaging Changes and Behavioral Correlates in Patients with Crohn’s Disease in Remission

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Veena A.; Beniwal-Patel, Poonam; Mbah, Ifeanyi; Young, Brittany M.; Prabhakaran, Vivek; Saha, Sumona

    2016-01-01

    Background: Crohn’s disease (CD) is a subtype of inflammatory bowel disease caused by immune-mediated inflammation in the gastrointestinal tract. The extent of morphologic brain alterations and their associated cognitive and affective impairments remain poorly characterized. Aims: We used magnetic resonance imaging to identify structural brain differences between patients with Crohn’s disease in remission compared to age-matched healthy controls and evaluated for structural-behavioral correlates. Methods: Nineteen patients and 20 healthy, age-matched controls were recruited in the study. Group differences in brain morphometric measures and correlations between brain measures and performance on a cognitive task, the verbal fluency (VF) task, were examined. Correlations between brain measures and cognitive measures as well as self-reported measures of depression, personality, and affective scales were examined. Results: Patients showed significant cortical thickening in the left superior frontal region compared to controls. Significant group differences were observed in sub-cortical volume measures in both hemispheres. Investigation of brain-behavior correlations revealed significant group differences in the correlation between cortical surface area and VF performance, although behavioral performance was equivalent between the two groups. The left middle temporal surface area was a significant predictor of VF performance with controls showing a significant positive correlation between these measures, and patients showing the opposite effect. Conclusion: Our results indicate key differences in structural brain measures in patients with CD compared to controls. Additionally, correlation between brain measures and behavioral responses suggest there may be a neural basis to the alterations in patients’ cognitive and affective responses. PMID:27695405

  16. Spatial Correlation Coefficient Images for Ultrasonic Detection (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    for image formation and detection based on the similarity of adjacent signals. Signal similarity is quantified in terms of the correlation coefficient calculated...between A-scans digitized at adjacent measurement positions. Correlation coefficient images are introduced for visualizing the similarity...beam field with the defect. Correlation coefficient and C-scan images are shown to demonstrate flat-bottom-hole detection in a stainless steel annular

  17. Evaluation of sliding window correlation performance for characterizing dynamic functional connectivity and brain states

    PubMed Central

    Shakil, Sadia; Lee, Chin-Hui; Keilholz, Shella Dawn

    2016-01-01

    A promising recent development in the study of brain function is the dynamic analysis of resting-state functional MRI scans, which can enhance understanding of normal cognition and alterations that result from brain disorders. One widely used method of capturing the dynamics of functional connectivity is sliding window correlation (SWC). However, in the absence of a “gold standard” for comparison, evaluating the performance of the SWC in typical resting-state data is challenging. This study uses simulated networks (SNs) with known transitions to examine the effects of parameters such as window length, window offset, window type, noise, filtering, and sampling rate on the SWC performance. The SWC time course was calculated for all node pairs of each SN and then clustered using the k-means algorithm to determine how resulting brain states match known configurations and transitions in the SNs. The outcomes show that the detection of state transitions and durations in the SWC is most strongly influenced by the window length and offset, followed by noise and filtering parameters. The effect of the image sampling rate was relatively insignificant. Tapered windows provide less sensitivity to state transitions than rectangular windows, which could be the result of the sharp transitions in the SNs. Overall, the SWC gave poor estimates of correlation for each brain state. Clustering based on the SWC time course did not reliably reflect the underlying state transitions unless the window length was comparable to the state duration, highlighting the need for new adaptive window analysis techniques. PMID:26952197

  18. Advanced Pediatric Brain Imaging Research and Training Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    injury in children. Dr. Dobson’s project was an investigation of the mechanisms of brain injury in premature infants , and potential neuroprotective...study hypoxic ischemic brain injury in newborns treated with therapeutic hypothermia. Dr. Massaro has a long standing interest in identifying early...TE.Understanding brain injury and neurodevelopmental disabilities in the preterm infant : the evolving role of advanced magnetic resonance imaging.Semin

  19. [Usefulness of SPECT images in helping radiologists understand brain diseases].

    PubMed

    Hayashida, K

    2001-04-01

    Nuclear brain imaging is able to show functional abnormalities of lesions that are not detectable by CT and MR images. The diagnostic keys of nuclear-imaging in terms of clinical usefulness are its early detection of lesions and determination of the efficacy of drug and surgical therapies. In dementic patients, F-18 FDG brain images can be diagnosed as Alzheimer's disease 12 months earlier than is possible on CT and MRI images, and can provide information for effective drug therapy. O-15 water CBF images can predict the effect of Nicholin by assessing transient increases in cerebral blood flow (CBF), thereby facilitating improvement in higher brain functions such as orientation. In stroke patients, brain SPECT images with Tc-99m HMPAO can predict fatal cerebral hemorrhage caused by anti-thrombic therapy by showing the decrease in count ratio (count ratio of infarcted to contralateral area of < 0.34) in the acute phase and identifying disruption of the blood brain barrier by showing hyperfixation in the subacute phase. Brain SPECT with I-123 IMP can also identify "misery" perfused areas resulting from reduced CBF and decreased vasoreactivity in the chronic phase. This criterion is utilized for patient selection for extracranial/intracranial bypass surgery, because patients with areas of poor perfusion might be indicated for such surgery. Since nuclear medicine images can accurately select candidates for drug or surgical therapies, they will be beneficial in reducing Medicare costs as well as in enhancing patients' quality of life as a result of the successful treatment. With the advancement of technology, nuclear medicine units that can simultaneously obtain CT images and can combine functional with anatomical images will provide more useful information for the diagnosis of brain disease.

  20. Brain MR diffusion tensor imaging in Kennedy’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Garaci, Francesco; Lanzafame, Simona; Marfia, Girolama A; Marziali, Simone; Meschini, Alessandro; Di Giuliano, Francesca; Simonetti, Giovanni; Guerrisi, Maria; Massa, Roberto; Floris, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Kennedy’s disease (KD) is a progressive degenerative disorder affecting lower motor neurons. We investigated the correlation between disease severity and whole brain white matter microstructure, including upper motor neuron tracts, by using diffusion-tensor imaging (DTI) in eight patients with KD in whom disease severity was evaluated using the Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Functional Rating Scale (ALSFRS). Methods From DTI acquisitions we obtained maps of fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), axial diffusivity (L1) and radial diffusivities (L2, L3). We then employed tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) to investigate within-patient correlations of DTI invariants with ALSFRS and disease duration (DD). Results We found a significant correlation between low ALSFRS and 1) low FA values in association commissural and projection fibers, and 2) high L3 values in commissural tracts and fronto-parietal white matter. Additionally, we found a significant association between longer DD and 1) low FA in the genu and body of corpus callosum, association fibers and midbrain and 2) high L1 in projection and association tracts. Conclusions The associations between clinical variables and white matter microstructural changes in areas thought to be spared by the disease process support the hypothesis of a multisystem involvement in the complex pathogenic mechanisms responsible for the clinical disability of these patients. PMID:25963157

  1. Brain MR diffusion tensor imaging in Kennedy's disease.

    PubMed

    Garaci, Francesco; Toschi, Nicola; Lanzafame, Simona; Marfia, Girolama A; Marziali, Simone; Meschini, Alessandro; Di Giuliano, Francesca; Simonetti, Giovanni; Guerrisi, Maria; Massa, Roberto; Floris, Roberto

    2015-04-01

    Kennedy's disease (KD) is a progressive degenerative disorder affecting lower motor neurons. We investigated the correlation between disease severity and whole brain white matter microstructure, including upper motor neuron tracts, by using diffusion-tensor imaging (DTI) in eight patients with KD in whom disease severity was evaluated using the Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Functional Rating Scale (ALSFRS). From DTI acquisitions we obtained maps of fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), axial diffusivity (L1) and radial diffusivities (L2, L3). We then employed tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) to investigate within-patient correlations of DTI invariants with ALSFRS and disease duration (DD). We found a significant correlation between low ALSFRS and 1) low FA values in association commissural and projection fibers, and 2) high L3 values in commissural tracts and fronto-parietal white matter. Additionally, we found a significant association between longer DD and 1) low FA in the genu and body of corpus callosum, association fibers and midbrain and 2) high L1 in projection and association tracts. The associations between clinical variables and white matter microstructural changes in areas thought to be spared by the disease process support the hypothesis of a multisystem involvement in the complex pathogenic mechanisms responsible for the clinical disability of these patients. © The Author(s) 2015 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  2. CT imaging correlates of genomic expression for oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Pickering, C R; Shah, K; Ahmed, S; Rao, A; Frederick, M J; Zhang, J; Unruh, A K; Wang, J; Ginsberg, L E; Kumar, A J; Myers, J N; Hamilton, J D

    2013-09-01

    Imaging correlates of genetic expression have been found for prognostic and predictive biomarkers of some malignant diseases, including breast and brain tumors. This study tests the hypothesis that imaging findings correlate with relevant genomic biomarkers in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma. Surplus frozen tissue from 27 untreated patients with oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma who underwent preoperative CT imaging was analyzed for gene expression. A team of neuroradiologists blinded to the genomic analysis results reviewed an extensive list of CT findings. The imaging correlated with genomic expression for cyclin D1, angiogenesis-related genes (vascular endothelial growth factor receptors and ligands), which relate to enhancement on the basis of other tumor types; and epidermal growth factor receptor, which may relate to proliferation and mass effect. Expression of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors 1 and 2 correlated with the enhancement of the primary tumor (P = .018 and P = .025, respectively), whereas the epidermal growth factor receptor correlated with mass effect (P = .03). Other exploratory correlations included epidermal growth factor receptor to perineural invasion (P = .05), and certain vascular endothelial growth factor receptors and ligands to mass effect (P = .03) and increased (P = .01) or decreased (P = .02) primary tumor size. We report that CT imaging correlates with gene expression in untreated oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma. Enhancement of the primary tumor and degree of mass effect correlate with relevant genomic biomarkers, which are also potential drug targets. Eventually, treatment decisions may be aided by combining imaging findings into meaningful phenotypes that relate directly to genomic biomarkers.

  3. Quantitative Imaging of Energy Expenditure in Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiao-Hong; Qiao, Hongyan; Du, Fei; Xiong, Qiang; Liu, Xiao; Zhang, Xiaoliang; Ugurbil, Kamil; Chen, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Despite the essential role of the brain energy generated from ATP hydrolysis in supporting cortical neuronal activity and brain function, it is challenging to noninvasively image and directly quantify the energy expenditure in the human brain. In this study, we applied an advanced in vivo 31P MRS imaging approach to obtain regional cerebral metabolic rates of high-energy phosphate reactions catalyzed by ATPase (CMRATPase) and creatine kinase (CMRCK), and to determine CMRATPase and CMRCK in pure grey mater (GM) and white mater (WM), respectively. It was found that both ATPase and CK rates are three times higher in GM than WM; and CMRCK is seven times higher than CMRATPase in GM and WM. Among the total brain ATP consumption in the human cortical GM and WM, 77% of them are used by GM in which approximately 96% is by neurons. A single cortical neuron utilizes approximately 4.7 billion ATPs per second in a resting human brain. This study demonstrates the unique utility of in vivo 31P MRS imaging modality for direct imaging of brain energy generated from ATP hydrolysis, and provides new insights into the human brain energetics and its role in supporting neuronal activity and brain function. PMID:22487547

  4. Quantitative imaging of energy expenditure in human brain.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiao-Hong; Qiao, Hongyan; Du, Fei; Xiong, Qiang; Liu, Xiao; Zhang, Xiaoliang; Ugurbil, Kamil; Chen, Wei

    2012-05-01

    Despite the essential role of the brain energy generated from ATP hydrolysis in supporting cortical neuronal activity and brain function, it is challenging to noninvasively image and directly quantify the energy expenditure in the human brain. In this study, we applied an advanced in vivo(31)P MRS imaging approach to obtain regional cerebral metabolic rates of high-energy phosphate reactions catalyzed by ATPase (CMR(ATPase)) and creatine kinase (CMR(CK)), and to determine CMR(ATPase) and CMR(CK) in pure gray mater (GM) and white mater (WM), respectively. It was found that both ATPase and CK rates are three times higher in GM than WM; and CMR(CK) is seven times higher than CMR(ATPase) in GM and WM. Among the total brain ATP consumption in the human cortical GM and WM, 77% of them are used by GM in which approximately 96% is by neurons. A single cortical neuron utilizes approximately 4.7 billion ATPs per second in a resting human brain. This study demonstrates the unique utility of in vivo(31)P MRS imaging modality for direct imaging of brain energy generated from ATP hydrolysis, and provides new insights into the human brain energetics and its role in supporting neuronal activity and brain function. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A Unified Framework for Brain Segmentation in MR Images

    PubMed Central

    Yazdani, S.; Yusof, R.; Karimian, A.; Riazi, A. H.; Bennamoun, M.

    2015-01-01

    Brain MRI segmentation is an important issue for discovering the brain structure and diagnosis of subtle anatomical changes in different brain diseases. However, due to several artifacts brain tissue segmentation remains a challenging task. The aim of this paper is to improve the automatic segmentation of brain into gray matter, white matter, and cerebrospinal fluid in magnetic resonance images (MRI). We proposed an automatic hybrid image segmentation method that integrates the modified statistical expectation-maximization (EM) method and the spatial information combined with support vector machine (SVM). The combined method has more accurate results than what can be achieved with its individual techniques that is demonstrated through experiments on both real data and simulated images. Experiments are carried out on both synthetic and real MRI. The results of proposed technique are evaluated against manual segmentation results and other methods based on real T1-weighted scans from Internet Brain Segmentation Repository (IBSR) and simulated images from BrainWeb. The Kappa index is calculated to assess the performance of the proposed framework relative to the ground truth and expert segmentations. The results demonstrate that the proposed combined method has satisfactory results on both simulated MRI and real brain datasets. PMID:26089978

  6. Brain imaging in the context of food perception and eating.

    PubMed

    Hollmann, Maurice; Pleger, Burkhard; Villringer, Arno; Horstmann, Annette

    2013-02-01

    Eating behavior depends heavily on brain function. In recent years, brain imaging has proved to be a powerful tool to elucidate brain function and brain structure in the context of eating. In this review, we summarize recent findings in the fast growing body of literature in the field and provide an overview of technical aspects as well as the basic brain mechanisms identified with imaging. Furthermore, we highlight findings linking neural processing of eating-related stimuli with obesity. The consumption of food is based on a complex interplay between homeostatic and hedonic mechanisms. Several hormones influence brain activity to regulate food intake and interact with the brain's reward circuitry, which is partly mediated by dopamine signaling. Additionally, it was shown that food stimuli trigger cognitive control mechanisms that incorporate internal goals into food choice. The brain mechanisms observed in this context are strongly influenced by genetic factors, sex and personality traits. Overall, a complex picture arises from brain-imaging findings, because a multitude of factors influence human food choice. Although several key mechanisms have been identified, there is no comprehensive model that is able to explain the behavioral observations to date. Especially a careful characterization of patients according to genotypes and phenotypes could help to better understand the current and future findings in neuroimaging studies.

  7. Thermal imaging of brain tumors in a rat glioma model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papaioannou, Thanassis; Thompson, Reid C.; Kateb, Babak; Sorokoumov, Oleg; Grundfest, Warren S.; Black, Keith L.

    2002-05-01

    We have explored the capability of thermal imaging for the detection of brain tumors in a rat glioma mode. Fourteen Wistar rats were injected stereotactically with 100,000 C6 glioma cells. Approximately one and two weeks post implantation, the rats underwent bilateral craniotomy and the exposed brain surface was imaged with a short wave thermal camera. Thermal images were obtained at both low (approximately 28.7 degree(s)C) and high (approximately 38 degree(s)C) core temperatures. Temperature gradients between the tumor site and the contralateral normal brain were calculated. Overall, the tumors appeared cooler than normal brain, for both high and low core temperatures. Average temperature difference between tumor and normal brain were maximal in more advanced tumors (two weeks) and at higher core temperatures. At one week (N equals 6), the average temperature gradient between tumor and normal sites was 0.1 degree(s)C and 0.2 degree(s)C at low and high core temperatures respectively (P(greater than)0.05). At two weeks (N equals 8), the average temperature gradient was 0.3 degree(s)C and 0.7 degree(s)C at low and high core temperatures respectively (P<0.05). We conclude that thermal imaging can detect temperature differences between tumor and normal brain tissue in this model, particularly in more advanced tumors. Thermal imaging may provide a novel means to identify brain tumors intraoperatively.

  8. Incidental findings on brain and spine imaging in children.

    PubMed

    Maher, Cormac O; Piatt, Joseph H

    2015-04-01

    In recent years, the utilization of diagnostic imaging of the brain and spine in children has increased dramatically, leading to a corresponding increase in the detection of incidental findings of the central nervous system. Patients with unexpected findings on imaging are often referred for subspecialty evaluation. Even with rational use of diagnostic imaging and subspecialty consultation, the diagnostic process will always generate unexpected findings that must be explained and managed. Familiarity with the most common findings that are discovered incidentally on diagnostic imaging of the brain and spine will assist the pediatrician in providing counseling to families and in making recommendations in conjunction with a neurosurgeon, when needed, regarding additional treatments and prognosis.

  9. Basal ganglia infarction demonstrated by radionuclide brain imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, E.E.; Schacht, R.A.; Domstad, P.A.; DeLand, F.H.

    1982-11-01

    Four cases of basal ganglia infarction demonstrated by radionuclide brain imaging are presented. Bilateral basal ganglia infarctions in two patients were probably related to methanol intoxication and meningoencephalitis, and unilateral basal ganglia infarctions in two other patients were presumably due to cerebral atherosclerosis and/or hypertension. Various causes and mechanisms of basal ganglia infarction as well as positive findings of radionuclide brain imaging are briefly reviewed.

  10. Transcranial Optical Imaging of Cold-Injured Brain in Rat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, Yoshinori; Sato, Shunichi; Ooigawa, Hidetoshi; Nawashiro, Hiroshi; Saitoh, Daizoh; Shima, Katsuji; Ashida, Hiroshi; Obara, Minoru

    2005-06-01

    We performed a transcranial optical imaging of a cold-injured brain in a rat. The rat skull was illuminated with a 633 nm HeNe laser, and the distribution of reflected light intensity was imaged with a cooled charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. An increase in reflected light intensity was observed in the injured area. The analysis of brain tissues perfused with India ink suggested that a reduced blood flow rate in the area of injury enhances reflection.

  11. Advanced Pediatric Brain Imaging Research Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    confirm that online multimedia learning provides a highly engaging educational method to teaching complex subject matter on brain development, brain injury...for instructional 4 technologists and multimedia developers to begin producing interactive learning objects and assessments. - Held internal...Society Meeting). San Diego, CA.: Children’s National Medical Center. Sestokas, J.M., (2015) Course 3816 – Multimedia Learning : Selecting the Right

  12. Correlation of neurocognitive function and brain parenchyma volumes in children surviving cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddick, Wilburn E.; White, Holly A.; Glass, John O.; Mulhern, Raymond K.

    2002-04-01

    This research builds on our hypothesis that white matter damage and associated neurocognitive symptoms, in children treated for cancer with cranial spinal irradiation, spans a continuum of severity that can be reliably probed using non-invasive MR technology. Quantitative volumetric assessments of MR imaging and psychological assessments were obtained in 40 long-term survivors of malignant brain tumors treated with cranial irradiation. Neurocognitive assessments included a test of intellect (Wechsler Intelligence Test for Children, Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale), attention (Conner's Continuous Performance Test), and memory (California Verbal Learning Test). One-sample t-tests were conducted to evaluate test performance of survivors against age-adjusted scores from the test norms; these analyses revealed significant impairments in all apriori selected measures of intelligence, attention, and memory. Partial correlation analyses were performed to assess the relationships between brain tissues volumes (normal appearing white matter (NAWM), gray matter, and CSF) and neurocognitive function. Global intelligence (r = 0.32, p = 0.05) and global attentional (r = 0.49, p < 0.01) were significantly positively correlated with NAWM volumes, whereas global memory was significantly positively correlated with overall brain parenchyma (r = 0.38, p = 0.04). We conclude that quantitative assessment of MR examinations in survivors of childhood cancer treated with cranial irradiation reveal that loss of NAWM is associated with decreased intellectual and attentional deficits, whereas overall parenchyma loss, as reflected by increased CSF and decreased white matter, is associated with memory-related deficits.

  13. Natural image classification driven by human brain activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dai; Peng, Hanyang; Wang, Jinqiao; Tang, Ming; Xue, Rong; Zuo, Zhentao

    2016-03-01

    Natural image classification has been a hot topic in computer vision and pattern recognition research field. Since the performance of an image classification system can be improved by feature selection, many image feature selection methods have been developed. However, the existing supervised feature selection methods are typically driven by the class label information that are identical for different samples from the same class, ignoring with-in class image variability and therefore degrading the feature selection performance. In this study, we propose a novel feature selection method, driven by human brain activity signals collected using fMRI technique when human subjects were viewing natural images of different categories. The fMRI signals associated with subjects viewing different images encode the human perception of natural images, and therefore may capture image variability within- and cross- categories. We then select image features with the guidance of fMRI signals from brain regions with active response to image viewing. Particularly, bag of words features based on GIST descriptor are extracted from natural images for classification, and a sparse regression base feature selection method is adapted to select image features that can best predict fMRI signals. Finally, a classification model is built on the select image features to classify images without fMRI signals. The validation experiments for classifying images from 4 categories of two subjects have demonstrated that our method could achieve much better classification performance than the classifiers built on image feature selected by traditional feature selection methods.

  14. Gravity correlation imaging with a moving data window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Feng

    2015-01-01

    As a kind of imaging technique, correlation imaging of potential data can be used to determine the shape and position of sources approximately. In order to improve the resolution of correlation imaging results, I adopted a strategy similar to Euler deconvolution method. This method includes three steps. First, calculate the vertical gradient of gravity anomaly. Then add a moving data window to the correlation imaging procedure. At last, search the local maximum or minimum of the results and output the extreme points that meet the acceptance criterion. In the synthetic model tests, the resolution of correlation imaging is improved. Compared with the Euler deconvolution, the results are closer to the centers of the models. In a case study of a sylvite mine gravity survey in Yunnan Province, China, the positions of extreme points of correlation imaging are in the range of the ore zone defined by drills.

  15. The Potential of Using Brain Images for Authentication

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zongtan; Shen, Hui; Hu, Dewen

    2014-01-01

    Biometric recognition (also known as biometrics) refers to the automated recognition of individuals based on their biological or behavioral traits. Examples of biometric traits include fingerprint, palmprint, iris, and face. The brain is the most important and complex organ in the human body. Can it be used as a biometric trait? In this study, we analyze the uniqueness of the brain and try to use the brain for identity authentication. The proposed brain-based verification system operates in two stages: gray matter extraction and gray matter matching. A modified brain segmentation algorithm is implemented for extracting gray matter from an input brain image. Then, an alignment-based matching algorithm is developed for brain matching. Experimental results on two data sets show that the proposed brain recognition system meets the high accuracy requirement of identity authentication. Though currently the acquisition of the brain is still time consuming and expensive, brain images are highly unique and have the potential possibility for authentication in view of pattern recognition. PMID:25126604

  16. The potential of using brain images for authentication.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fanglin; Zhou, Zongtan; Shen, Hui; Hu, Dewen

    2014-01-01

    Biometric recognition (also known as biometrics) refers to the automated recognition of individuals based on their biological or behavioral traits. Examples of biometric traits include fingerprint, palmprint, iris, and face. The brain is the most important and complex organ in the human body. Can it be used as a biometric trait? In this study, we analyze the uniqueness of the brain and try to use the brain for identity authentication. The proposed brain-based verification system operates in two stages: gray matter extraction and gray matter matching. A modified brain segmentation algorithm is implemented for extracting gray matter from an input brain image. Then, an alignment-based matching algorithm is developed for brain matching. Experimental results on two data sets show that the proposed brain recognition system meets the high accuracy requirement of identity authentication. Though currently the acquisition of the brain is still time consuming and expensive, brain images are highly unique and have the potential possibility for authentication in view of pattern recognition.

  17. Atypical pyogenic brain abscess evaluation by diffusion-weighted imaging: diagnosis with multimodality MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Ozbayrak, Mustafa; Ulus, Ozden Sila; Berkman, Mehmet Zafer; Kocagoz, Sesin; Karaarslan, Ercan

    2015-10-01

    Whether a brain abscess is apparent by imaging depends on the stage of the abscess at the time of imaging, as well as the etiology of the infection. Because conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is limited in its ability to distinguish brain abscesses from necrotic tumors, advanced techniques are required. The management of these two disease entities differs and can potentially affect the clinical outcome. We report a case having atypical imaging features of a pyogenic brain abscess on advanced MRI, in particular, on diffusion-weighted and perfusion imaging, in a patient with osteosarcoma undergoing chemotherapy.

  18. Toward brain correlates of natural behavior: fMRI during violent video games.

    PubMed

    Mathiak, Klaus; Weber, René

    2006-12-01

    Modern video games represent highly advanced virtual reality simulations and often contain virtual violence. In a significant amount of young males, playing video games is a quotidian activity, making it an almost natural behavior. Recordings of brain activation with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during gameplay may reflect neuronal correlates of real-life behavior. We recorded 13 experienced gamers (18-26 years; average 14 hrs/week playing) while playing a violent first-person shooter game (a violent computer game played in self-perspective) by means of distortion and dephasing reduced fMRI (3 T; single-shot triple-echo echo-planar imaging [EPI]). Content analysis of the video and sound with 100 ms time resolution achieved relevant behavioral variables. These variables explained significant signal variance across large distributed networks. Occurrence of violent scenes revealed significant neuronal correlates in an event-related design. Activation of dorsal and deactivation of rostral anterior cingulate and amygdala characterized the mid-frontal pattern related to virtual violence. Statistics and effect sizes can be considered large at these areas. Optimized imaging strategies allowed for single-subject and for single-trial analysis with good image quality at basal brain structures. We propose that virtual environments can be used to study neuronal processes involved in semi-naturalistic behavior as determined by content analysis. Importantly, the activation pattern reflects brain-environment interactions rather than stimulus responses as observed in classical experimental designs. We relate our findings to the general discussion on social effects of playing first-person shooter games.

  19. Brain and behavioral correlates of action semantic deficits in autism

    PubMed Central

    Moseley, Rachel L.; Mohr, Bettina; Lombardo, Michael V.; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Hauk, Olaf; Pulvermüller, Friedemann

    2013-01-01

    Action-perception circuits containing neurons in the motor system have been proposed as the building blocks of higher cognition; accordingly, motor dysfunction should entail cognitive deficits. Autism spectrum conditions (ASC) are marked by motor impairments but the implications of such motor dysfunction for higher cognition remain unclear. We here used word reading and semantic judgment tasks to investigate action-related motor cognition and its corresponding fMRI brain activation in high-functioning adults with ASC. These participants exhibited hypoactivity of motor cortex in language processing relative to typically developing controls. Crucially, we also found a deficit in semantic processing of action-related words, which, intriguingly, significantly correlated with this underactivation of motor cortex to these items. Furthermore, the word-induced hypoactivity in the motor system also predicted the severity of ASC as expressed by the number of autistic symptoms measured by the Autism-Spectrum Quotient (Baron-Cohen etal., 2001). These significant correlations between word-induced activation of the motor system and a newly discovered semantic deficit in a condition known to be characterized by motor impairments, along with the correlation of such activation with general autistic traits, confirm critical predictions of causal theories linking cognitive and semantic deficits in ASC, in part, to dysfunctional action-perception circuits and resultant reduction of motor system activation. PMID:24265609

  20. Correlated Imaging – A Grand Challenge in Chemical Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Masyuko, Rachel; Lanni, Eric; Sweedler, Jonathan V.; Bohn, Paul W.

    2013-01-01

    Correlated chemical imaging is an emerging strategy for acquisition of images by combining information from multiplexed measurement platforms to track, visualize, and interpret in situ changes in the structure, organization, and activities of interesting chemical systems, frequently spanning multiple decades in space and time. Acquiring and correlating information from complementary imaging experiments has the potential to expose complex chemical behavior in ways that are simply not available from single methods applied in isolation, thereby greatly amplifying the information gathering power of imaging experiments. However, in order to correlate image information across platforms, a number of issues must be addressed. First, signals are obtained from disparate experiments with fundamentally different figures of merit, including pixel size, spatial resolution, dynamic range, and acquisition rates. In addition, images are often acquired on different instruments in different locations, so the sample must be registered spatially so that the same area of the sample landscape is addressed. The signals acquired must be correlated in both spatial and temporal domains, and the resulting information has to be presented in a way that is readily understood. These requirements pose special challenges for image cross-correlation that go well beyond those posed in single technique imaging approaches. The special opportunities and challenges that attend correlated imaging are explored by specific reference to correlated mass spectrometric and Raman imaging, a topic of substantial and growing interest. PMID:23431559

  1. Imaging Phenotypes of Major Depressive Disorder: Genetic Correlates

    PubMed Central

    Savitz, Jonathan B; Drevets, Wayne C

    2009-01-01

    Imaging techniques are a potentially powerful method of identifying phenotypes that are associated with, or are indicative of a vulnerability to developing major depressive disorder (MDD). Here we identify seven promising MDD-associated traits identified by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or positron emission tomography (PET). We evaluate whether these traits are state-independent, heritable endophenotypes, or state-dependent phenotypes that may be useful markers of treatment efficacy. In MDD, increased activity of the amygdala in response to negative stimuli appears to be a mood-congruent phenomenon, and is likely moderated by the serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4) promoter polymorphism (5-HTTLPR). Hippocampal volume loss is characteristic of elderly or chronically-ill samples and may be impacted by the val66met brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene variant and the 5-HTTLPR SLC6A4 polymorphism. White matter pathology is salient in elderly MDD cohorts but is associated with cerebrovascular disease, and is unlikely to be a useful marker of a latent MDD diathesis. Increased blood flow or metabolism of the subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (sgACC), together with gray matter volume loss in this region, is a well-replicated finding in MDD. An attenuation of the usual pattern of fronto-limbic connectivity, particularly a decreased temporal correlation in amygdala-anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) activity, is another MDD-associated trait. Concerning neuroreceptor PET imaging, decreased 5-HT1A binding potential in the raphe, medial temporal lobe, and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) has been strongly associated with MDD, and may be impacted by a functional single nucleotide polymorphism in the promoter region of the 5-HT1A gene (HTR1A: –1019C/G; rs6295). Potentially indicative of inter-study variation in MDD etiology or mood state, both increased and decreased binding potential of the serotonin transporter has been reported. Challenges facing the field include

  2. Structural brain correlates of heart rate variability in a healthy young adult population.

    PubMed

    Winkelmann, Tobias; Thayer, Julian F; Pohlack, Sebastian; Nees, Frauke; Grimm, Oliver; Flor, Herta

    2017-03-01

    The high frequency component of heart rate variability (HRV) has reliably been shown to serve as an index of autonomic inhibitory control and is increasingly considered as a biomarker of adaptability and health. While several functional neuroimaging studies identified associations between regional cerebral blood flow and HRV, studies on structural brain correlates of HRV are scarce. We investigated whether interindividual differences in HRV are related to brain morphology in healthy humans. Thirty participants underwent HRV recording at rest subsequent to structural magnetic resonance imaging. Cortical reconstruction and subcortical volumetry were performed with the Freesurfer image analysis suite. The amount of resting HRV was positively correlated with the cortical thickness of an area within the right anterior midcingulate cortex (aMCC). Consistent with existing studies implicating forebrain regions in cardiac regulation, our findings show that the thickness of the right aMCC is associated with the degree of parasympathetic regulation of heart rate. Evidence for the neural correlates of interindividual differences in HRV may complement our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the association between HRV and self-regulatory capacity.

  3. Understanding microstructure of the brain by comparison of neurite orientation dispersion and density imaging (NODDI) with transparent mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Sato, Kanako; Kerever, Aurelien; Kamagata, Koji; Tsuruta, Kohei; Irie, Ryusuke; Tagawa, Kazuhiko; Okazawa, Hitoshi; Arikawa-Hirasawa, Eri; Nitta, Nobuhiro; Aoki, Ichio; Aoki, Shigeki

    2017-04-01

    Neurite orientation dispersion and density imaging (NODDI) is a diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique with the potential to visualize the microstructure of the brain. Revolutionary histological methods to render the mouse brain transparent have recently been developed, but verification of NODDI by these methods has not been reported. To confirm the concordance of NODDI with histology in terms of density and orientation dispersion of neurites of the brain. Whole brain diffusion MRI of a thy-1 yellow fluorescent protein mouse was acquired with a 7-T MRI scanner, after which transparent brain sections were created from the same mouse. NODDI parameters calculated from the MR images, including the intracellular volume fraction (Vic) and the orientation dispersion index (ODI), were compared with histological findings. Neurite density, Vic, and ODI were compared between areas of the anterior commissure and the hippocampus containing crossing fibers (crossing areas) and parallel fibers (parallel areas), and the correlation between fiber density and Vic was assessed. The ODI was significantly higher in the crossing area compared to the parallel area in both the anterior commissure and the hippocampus (P = 0.0247, P = 0.00022, respectively). Neurite density showed a similar tendency, but was significantly different only in the hippocampus (P = 7.91E-07). There was no significant correlation between neurite density and Vic. NODDI was verified by histology for quantification of the orientation dispersion of neurites. These results indicate that the ODI is a suitable index for understanding the microstructure of the brain in vivo.

  4. In vivo rat deep brain imaging using photoacoustic computed tomography (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Li; Li, Lei; Zhu, Liren; Hu, Peng; Wang, Lihong V.

    2017-03-01

    The brain has been likened to a great stretch of unknown territory consisting of a number of unexplored continents. Small animal brain imaging plays an important role charting that territory. By using 1064 nm illumination from the side, we imaged the full coronal depth of rat brains in vivo. The experiment was performed using a real-time full-ring-array photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) imaging system, which achieved an imaging depth of 11 mm and a 100 μm radial resolution. Because of the fast imaging speed of the full-ring-array PACT system, no animal motion artifact was induced. The frame rate of the system was limited by the laser repetition rate (50 Hz). In addition to anatomical imaging of the blood vessels in the brain, we continuously monitored correlations between the two brain hemispheres in one of the coronal planes. The resting states in the coronal plane were measured before and after stroke ligation surgery at a neck artery.

  5. Play it again, Sam: brain correlates of emotional music recognition.

    PubMed

    Altenmüller, Eckart; Siggel, Susann; Mohammadi, Bahram; Samii, Amir; Münte, Thomas F

    2014-01-01

    Music can elicit strong emotions and can be remembered in connection with these emotions even decades later. Yet, the brain correlates of episodic memory for highly emotional music compared with less emotional music have not been examined. We therefore used fMRI to investigate brain structures activated by emotional processing of short excerpts of film music successfully retrieved from episodic long-term memory. Eighteen non-musicians volunteers were exposed to 60 structurally similar pieces of film music of 10 s length with high arousal ratings and either less positive or very positive valence ratings. Two similar sets of 30 pieces were created. Each of these was presented to half of the participants during the encoding session outside of the scanner, while all stimuli were used during the second recognition session inside the MRI-scanner. During fMRI each stimulation period (10 s) was followed by a 20 s resting period during which participants pressed either the "old" or the "new" button to indicate whether they had heard the piece before. Musical stimuli vs. silence activated the bilateral superior temporal gyrus, right insula, right middle frontal gyrus, bilateral medial frontal gyrus and the left anterior cerebellum. Old pieces led to activation in the left medial dorsal thalamus and left midbrain compared to new pieces. For recognized vs. not recognized old pieces a focused activation in the right inferior frontal gyrus and the left cerebellum was found. Positive pieces activated the left medial frontal gyrus, the left precuneus, the right superior frontal gyrus, the left posterior cingulate, the bilateral middle temporal gyrus, and the left thalamus compared to less positive pieces. Specific brain networks related to memory retrieval and emotional processing of symphonic film music were identified. The results imply that the valence of a music piece is important for memory performance and is recognized very fast.

  6. Play it again, Sam: brain correlates of emotional music recognition

    PubMed Central

    Altenmüller, Eckart; Siggel, Susann; Mohammadi, Bahram; Samii, Amir; Münte, Thomas F.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Music can elicit strong emotions and can be remembered in connection with these emotions even decades later. Yet, the brain correlates of episodic memory for highly emotional music compared with less emotional music have not been examined. We therefore used fMRI to investigate brain structures activated by emotional processing of short excerpts of film music successfully retrieved from episodic long-term memory. Methods: Eighteen non-musicians volunteers were exposed to 60 structurally similar pieces of film music of 10 s length with high arousal ratings and either less positive or very positive valence ratings. Two similar sets of 30 pieces were created. Each of these was presented to half of the participants during the encoding session outside of the scanner, while all stimuli were used during the second recognition session inside the MRI-scanner. During fMRI each stimulation period (10 s) was followed by a 20 s resting period during which participants pressed either the “old” or the “new” button to indicate whether they had heard the piece before. Results: Musical stimuli vs. silence activated the bilateral superior temporal gyrus, right insula, right middle frontal gyrus, bilateral medial frontal gyrus and the left anterior cerebellum. Old pieces led to activation in the left medial dorsal thalamus and left midbrain compared to new pieces. For recognized vs. not recognized old pieces a focused activation in the right inferior frontal gyrus and the left cerebellum was found. Positive pieces activated the left medial frontal gyrus, the left precuneus, the right superior frontal gyrus, the left posterior cingulate, the bilateral middle temporal gyrus, and the left thalamus compared to less positive pieces. Conclusion: Specific brain networks related to memory retrieval and emotional processing of symphonic film music were identified. The results imply that the valence of a music piece is important for memory performance and is recognized very

  7. Brain activation during visual working memory correlates with behavioral mobility performance in older adults.

    PubMed

    Kawagoe, Toshikazu; Suzuki, Maki; Nishiguchi, Shu; Abe, Nobuhito; Otsuka, Yuki; Nakai, Ryusuke; Yamada, Minoru; Yoshikawa, Sakiko; Sekiyama, Kaoru

    2015-01-01

    Functional mobility and cognitive function often decline with age. We previously found that functional mobility as measured by the Timed Up and Go Test (TUG) was associated with cognitive performance for visually-encoded (i.e., for location and face) working memory (WM) in older adults. This suggests a common neural basis between TUG and visual WM. To elucidate this relationship further, the present study aimed to examine the neural basis for the WM-mobility association. In accordance with the well-known neural compensation model in aging, we hypothesized that "attentional" brain activation for easy WM would increase in participants with lower mobility. The data from 32 healthy older adults were analyzed, including brain activation during easy WM tasks via functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) and mobility performance via both TUG and a simple walking test. WM performance was significantly correlated with TUG but not with simple walking. Some prefrontal brain activations during WM were negatively correlated with TUG performance, while positive correlations were found in subcortical structures including the thalamus, putamen and cerebellum. Moreover, activation of the subcortical regions was significantly correlated with WM performance, with less activation for lower WM performers. These results indicate that older adults with lower mobility used more cortical (frontal) and fewer subcortical resources for easy WM tasks. To date, the frontal compensation has been proposed separately in the motor and cognitive domains, which have been assumed to compensate for dysfunction of the other brain areas; however, such dysfunction was less clear in previous studies. The present study observed such dysfunction as degraded activation associated with lower performance, which was found in the subcortical regions. We conclude that a common dysfunction-compensation activation pattern is likely the neural basis for the association between visual WM and functional mobility.

  8. Brain activation during visual working memory correlates with behavioral mobility performance in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Kawagoe, Toshikazu; Suzuki, Maki; Nishiguchi, Shu; Abe, Nobuhito; Otsuka, Yuki; Nakai, Ryusuke; Yamada, Minoru; Yoshikawa, Sakiko; Sekiyama, Kaoru

    2015-01-01

    Functional mobility and cognitive function often decline with age. We previously found that functional mobility as measured by the Timed Up and Go Test (TUG) was associated with cognitive performance for visually-encoded (i.e., for location and face) working memory (WM) in older adults. This suggests a common neural basis between TUG and visual WM. To elucidate this relationship further, the present study aimed to examine the neural basis for the WM-mobility association. In accordance with the well-known neural compensation model in aging, we hypothesized that “attentional” brain activation for easy WM would increase in participants with lower mobility. The data from 32 healthy older adults were analyzed, including brain activation during easy WM tasks via functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) and mobility performance via both TUG and a simple walking test. WM performance was significantly correlated with TUG but not with simple walking. Some prefrontal brain activations during WM were negatively correlated with TUG performance, while positive correlations were found in subcortical structures including the thalamus, putamen and cerebellum. Moreover, activation of the subcortical regions was significantly correlated with WM performance, with less activation for lower WM performers. These results indicate that older adults with lower mobility used more cortical (frontal) and fewer subcortical resources for easy WM tasks. To date, the frontal compensation has been proposed separately in the motor and cognitive domains, which have been assumed to compensate for dysfunction of the other brain areas; however, such dysfunction was less clear in previous studies. The present study observed such dysfunction as degraded activation associated with lower performance, which was found in the subcortical regions. We conclude that a common dysfunction—compensation activation pattern is likely the neural basis for the association between visual WM and functional

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Experimental Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qiang; Watts, Lora Tally; Li, Wei; Duong, Timothy Q

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of death and disability in the USA. Common causes of TBI include falls, violence, injuries from wars, and vehicular and sporting accidents. The initial direct mechanical damage in TBI is followed by progressive secondary injuries such as brain swelling, perturbed cerebral blood flow (CBF), abnormal cerebrovascular reactivity (CR), metabolic dysfunction, blood-brain-barrier disruption, inflammation, oxidative stress, and excitotoxicity, among others. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers the means to noninvasively probe many of these secondary injuries. MRI has been used to image anatomical, physiological, and functional changes associated with TBI in a longitudinal manner. This chapter describes controlled cortical impact (CCI) TBI surgical procedures, a few common MRI protocols used in TBI imaging, and, finally, image analysis pertaining to experimental TBI imaging in rats.

  10. Correlation between subjective and objective assessment of magnetic resonance (MR) images.

    PubMed

    Chow, Li Sze; Rajagopal, Heshalini; Paramesran, Raveendran

    2016-07-01

    Medical Image Quality Assessment (IQA) plays an important role in assisting and evaluating the development of any new hardware, imaging sequences, pre-processing or post-processing algorithms. We have performed a quantitative analysis of the correlation between subjective and objective Full Reference - IQA (FR-IQA) on Magnetic Resonance (MR) images of the human brain, spine, knee and abdomen. We have created a MR image database that consists of 25 original reference images and 750 distorted images. The reference images were distorted with six types of distortions: Rician Noise, Gaussian White Noise, Gaussian Blur, DCT compression, JPEG compression and JPEG2000 compression, at various levels of distortion. Twenty eight subjects were chosen to evaluate the images resulting in a total of 21,700 human evaluations. The raw scores were then converted to Difference Mean Opinion Score (DMOS). Thirteen objective FR-IQA metrics were used to determine the validity of the subjective DMOS. The results indicate a high correlation between the subjective and objective assessment of the MR images. The Noise Quality Measurement (NQM) has the highest correlation with DMOS, where the mean Pearson Linear Correlation Coefficient (PLCC) and Spearman Rank Order Correlation Coefficient (SROCC) are 0.936 and 0.938 respectively. The Universal Quality Index (UQI) has the lowest correlation with DMOS, where the mean PLCC and SROCC are 0.807 and 0.815 respectively. Student's T-test was used to find the difference in performance of FR-IQA across different types of distortion. The superior IQAs tested statistically are UQI for Rician noise images, Visual Information Fidelity (VIF) for Gaussian blur images, NQM for both DCT and JPEG compressed images, Peak Signal-to-Noise Ratio (PSNR) for JPEG2000 compressed images.

  11. Imaging hemodynamic changes in preterm infant brains with two-dimensional diffuse optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Feng; Ma, Yiwen; Yang, Fang; Zhao, Huijuan; Jiang, Jingying; Kusaka, Takashi; Ueno, Masanori; Yamada, Yukio

    2008-02-01

    We present our preliminary results on two-dimensional (2-D) optical tomographic imaging of hemodynamic changes of two preterm infant brains in different ventilation settings conditions. The investigations use the established two-wavelength, 16-channel time-correlated single photon counting system for the detection, and the generalized pulse spectrum technique based algorithm for the image reconstruction. The experiments demonstrate that two-dimensional diffuse optical tomography may be a potent and relatively simple way of investigating the functions and neural development of infant brains in the perinatal period.

  12. Metastatic adenocarcinoma to the brain: MR with pathologic correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Carrier, D.A. ); Mawad, M.E.; Kirkpatrick, J.B.; Schmid, M.F. )

    1994-01-01

    To describe the appearance on T2-weighted scans of metastatic adenocarcinoma to the brain and to show that the hypointensity frequently associated with these lesions is not related to the presence of mucin, blood products, iron, or calcium. The MR scans of 14 patients with metastatic adenocarcinoma to the brain were reviewed retrospectively. The signal intensity on T2-weighted scans of the solid enhancing portion of the tumors was compared with white matter. Histologic examination of the surgical specimens included special stains to search for calcium, mucin, and iron. Eight of nine surgical and all six nonsurgical lesions were either iso- or hypointense to white matter on T2-weighted scans. There was no correlation with tumor histology or the presence of mucin, blood products, iron, or calcium. The presence of a hypointense intraaxial mass on T2-weighted scans strongly suggests the possibility of metastatic adenocarcinoma. The MR appearance is not explained by the presence of mucin, blood products, iron, or calcium. This phenomenon most likely reflects the relaxation parameters of the tissue from which the metastasis arose. 21 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Brain size is correlated with endangerment status in mammals.

    PubMed

    Abelson, Eric S

    2016-02-24

    Increases in relative encephalization (RE), brain size after controlling for body size, comes at a great metabolic cost and is correlated with a host of cognitive traits, from the ability to count objects to higher rates of innovation. Despite many studies examining the implications and trade-offs accompanying increased RE, the relationship between mammalian extinction risk and RE is unknown. I examine whether mammals with larger levels of RE are more or less likely to be at risk of endangerment than less-encephalized species. I find that extant species with large levels of encephalization are at greater risk of endangerment, with this effect being strongest in species with small body sizes. These results suggest that RE could be a valuable asset in estimating extinction vulnerability. Additionally, these findings suggest that the cost-benefit trade-off of RE is different in large-bodied species when compared with small-bodied species.

  14. Brain size is correlated with endangerment status in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Abelson, Eric S.

    2016-01-01

    Increases in relative encephalization (RE), brain size after controlling for body size, comes at a great metabolic cost and is correlated with a host of cognitive traits, from the ability to count objects to higher rates of innovation. Despite many studies examining the implications and trade-offs accompanying increased RE, the relationship between mammalian extinction risk and RE is unknown. I examine whether mammals with larger levels of RE are more or less likely to be at risk of endangerment than less-encephalized species. I find that extant species with large levels of encephalization are at greater risk of endangerment, with this effect being strongest in species with small body sizes. These results suggest that RE could be a valuable asset in estimating extinction vulnerability. Additionally, these findings suggest that the cost–benefit trade-off of RE is different in large-bodied species when compared with small-bodied species. PMID:26888034

  15. Hierarchical approach for automated segmentation of the brain volume from MR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Li-Yueh; Loew, Murray H.; Momenan, Reza

    1999-05-01

    Image segmentation is considered one of the essential steps in medical image analysis. Cases such as classification of tissue structures for quantitative analysis, reconstruction of anatomical volumes for visualization, and registration of multi-modality images for complementary study often require the segmentation of the brain to accomplish the task. In many clinical applications, parts of this task are performed either manually or interactively. Not only is this proces often tedious and time-consuming, it introduces additional external factors of inter- and intra-rater variability. In this paper, we present a 3D automated algorithm for segmenting the brain from various MR images. This algorithm consists of a sequence of pre-determined steps: First, an intensity window for initial separation of the brain volume from the background and non-brain structures is selected by using probability curves fitting on the intensity histogram. Next, a 3D isotropic volume is interpolated and an optimal threshold value is determined to construct a binary brain mask. The morphological and connectivity processes are then applied on this 3D mask for eliminating the non-brain structures. Finally, a surface extraction kernel is applied to extract the 3D brain surface. Preliminary results from the same subjects with different pulse sequences are compared with the manual segmentation. The automatically segmented brain volumes are compared with the manual results using the correlation coefficient and percentage overlay. Then the automatically detected surfaces are measured with the manual contouring in terms of RMS distance. The introduced automatic segmentation algorithm is effective on different sequences of MR data sets without any parameter tuning. It requires no user interaction so variability introduced by manual tracing or interactive thresholding can be eliminated. Currently, the introduced segmentation algorithm is applied in the automated inter- and intra-modality image

  16. Numerical simulations of MREIT conductivity imaging for brain tumor detection.

    PubMed

    Meng, Zi Jun; Sajib, Saurav Z K; Chauhan, Munish; Sadleir, Rosalind J; Kim, Hyung Joong; Kwon, Oh In; Woo, Eung Je

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) is a new modality capable of imaging the electrical properties of human body using MRI phase information in conjunction with external current injection. Recent in vivo animal and human MREIT studies have revealed unique conductivity contrasts related to different physiological and pathological conditions of tissues or organs. When performing in vivo brain imaging, small imaging currents must be injected so as not to stimulate peripheral nerves in the skin, while delivery of imaging currents to the brain is relatively small due to the skull's low conductivity. As a result, injected imaging currents may induce small phase signals and the overall low phase SNR in brain tissues. In this study, we present numerical simulation results of the use of head MREIT for brain tumor detection. We used a realistic three-dimensional head model to compute signal levels produced as a consequence of a predicted doubling of conductivity occurring within simulated tumorous brain tissues. We determined the feasibility of measuring these changes in a time acceptable to human subjects by adding realistic noise levels measured from a candidate 3 T system. We also reconstructed conductivity contrast images, showing that such conductivity differences can be both detected and imaged.

  17. Measuring iron in the brain using quantitative susceptibility mapping and X-ray fluorescence imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Weili; Nichol, Helen; Liu, Saifeng; Cheng, Yu-Chung N.; Haacke, E. Mark

    2013-01-01

    Measuring iron content in the brain has important implications for a number of neurodegenerative diseases. Quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM), derived from magnetic resonance images, has been used to measure total iron content in vivo and in post mortem brain. In this paper, we show how magnetic susceptibility from QSM correlates with total iron content measured by X-ray fluorescence (XRF) imaging and by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). The relationship between susceptibility and ferritin iron was estimated at 1.10 ± 0.08 ppb susceptibility per μg iron/g wet tissue, similar to that of iron in fixed (frozen/thawed) cadaveric brain and previously published data from unfixed brains. We conclude that magnetic susceptibility can provide a direct and reliable quantitative measurement of iron content and that it can be used clinically at least in regions with high iron content. PMID:23591072

  18. Brain tumor classification of microscopy images using deep residual learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Yota; Washiya, Kiyotada; Aoki, Kota; Nagahashi, Hiroshi

    2016-12-01

    The crisis rate of brain tumor is about one point four in ten thousands. In general, cytotechnologists take charge of cytologic diagnosis. However, the number of cytotechnologists who can diagnose brain tumors is not sufficient, because of the necessity of highly specialized skill. Computer-Aided Diagnosis by computational image analysis may dissolve the shortage of experts and support objective pathological examinations. Our purpose is to support a diagnosis from a microscopy image of brain cortex and to identify brain tumor by medical image processing. In this study, we analyze Astrocytes that is a type of glia cell of central nerve system. It is not easy for an expert to discriminate brain tumor correctly since the difference between astrocytes and low grade astrocytoma (tumors formed from Astrocyte) is very slight. In this study, we present a novel method to segment cell regions robustly using BING objectness estimation and to classify brain tumors using deep convolutional neural networks (CNNs) constructed by deep residual learning. BING is a fast object detection method and we use pretrained BING model to detect brain cells. After that, we apply a sequence of post-processing like Voronoi diagram, binarization, watershed transform to obtain fine segmentation. For classification using CNNs, a usual way of data argumentation is applied to brain cells database. Experimental results showed 98.5% accuracy of classification and 98.2% accuracy of segmentation.

  19. Leveraging Clinical Imaging Archives for Radiomics: Reliability of Automated Methods for Brain Volume Measurement.

    PubMed

    Adduru, Viraj R; Michael, Andrew M; Helguera, Maria; Baum, Stefi A; Moore, Gregory J

    2017-09-01

    Purpose To validate the use of thick-section clinically acquired magnetic resonance (MR) imaging data for estimating total brain volume (TBV), gray matter (GM) volume (GMV), and white matter (WM) volume (WMV) by using three widely used automated toolboxes: SPM ( www.fil.ion.ucl.ac.uk/spm/ ), FreeSurfer ( surfer.nmr.mgh.harvard.edu ), and FSL (FMRIB software library; Oxford Centre for Functional MR Imaging of the Brain, Oxford, England, https://fsl.fmrib.ox.ac.uk/fsl ). Materials and Methods MR images from a clinical archive were used and data were deidentified. The three methods were applied to estimate brain volumes from thin-section research-quality brain MR images and routine thick-section clinical MR images acquired from the same 38 patients (age range, 1-71 years; mean age, 22 years; 11 women). By using these automated methods, TBV, GMV, and WMV were estimated. Thin- versus thick-section volume comparisons were made for each method by using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). Results SPM exhibited excellent ICCs (0.97, 0.85, and 0.83 for TBV, GMV, and WMV, respectively). FSL exhibited ICCs of 0.69, 0.51, and 0.60 for TBV, GMV, and WMV, respectively, but they were lower than with SPM. FreeSurfer exhibited excellent ICC of 0.63 only for TBV. Application of SPM's voxel-based morphometry on the modulated images of thin-section images and interpolated thick-section images showed fair to excellent ICCs (0.37-0.98) for the majority of brain regions (88.47% [306924 of 346916 voxels] of WM and 80.35% [377 282 of 469 502 voxels] of GM). Conclusion Thick-section clinical-quality MR images can be reliably used for computing quantitative brain metrics such as TBV, GMV, and WMV by using SPM. (©) RSNA, 2017 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  20. Optical imaging to map blood-brain barrier leakage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffer, Hayder; Adjei, Isaac M.; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2013-11-01

    Vascular leakage in the brain is a major complication associated with brain injuries and certain pathological conditions due to disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). We have developed an optical imaging method, based on excitation and emission spectra of Evans Blue dye, that is >1000-fold more sensitive than conventional ultraviolet spectrophotometry. We used a rat thromboembolic stroke model to validate the usefulness of our method for vascular leakage. Optical imaging data show that vascular leakage varies in different areas of the post-stroke brain and that administering tissue plasminogen activator causes further leakage. The new method is quantitative, simple to use, requires no tissue processing, and can map the degree of vascular leakage in different brain locations. The high sensitivity of our method could potentially provide new opportunities to study BBB leakage in different pathological conditions and to test the efficacy of various therapeutic strategies to protect the BBB.

  1. Brain imaging of pain: state of the art

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Debbie L; Sandhu, Javin S; Jones, Anthony KP

    2016-01-01

    Pain is a complex sensory and emotional experience that is heavily influenced by prior experience and expectations of pain. Before the development of noninvasive human brain imaging, our grasp of the brain’s role in pain processing was limited to data from postmortem studies, direct recording of brain activity, patient experience and stimulation during neurosurgical procedures, and animal models of pain. Advances made in neuroimaging have bridged the gap between brain activity and the subjective experience of pain and allowed us to better understand the changes in the brain that are associated with both acute and chronic pain. Additionally, cognitive influences on pain such as attention, anticipation, and fear can now be directly observed, allowing for the interpretation of the neural basis of the psychological modulation of pain. The use of functional brain imaging to measure changes in endogenous neurochemistry has increased our understanding of how states of increased resilience and vulnerability to pain are maintained. PMID:27660488

  2. Blood-brain barrier permeability imaging using perfusion computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Avsenik, Jernej; Bisdas, Sotirios; Popovic, Katarina Surlan

    2015-01-01

    Background. The blood-brain barrier represents the selective diffusion barrier at the level of the cerebral microvascular endothelium. Other functions of blood-brain barrier include transport, signaling and osmoregulation. Endothelial cells interact with surrounding astrocytes, pericytes and neurons. These interactions are crucial to the development, structural integrity and function of the cerebral microvascular endothelium. Dysfunctional blood-brain barrier has been associated with pathologies such as acute stroke, tumors, inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases. Conclusions. Blood-brain barrier permeability can be evaluated in vivo by perfusion computed tomography - an efficient diagnostic method that involves the sequential acquisition of tomographic images during the intravenous administration of iodinated contrast material. The major clinical applications of perfusion computed tomography are in acute stroke and in brain tumor imaging. PMID:26029020

  3. Inter-species activity correlations reveal functional correspondences between monkey and human brain areas

    PubMed Central

    Mantini, Dante; Hasson, Uri; Betti, Viviana; Perrucci, Mauro G.; Romani, Gian Luca; Corbetta, Maurizio; Orban, Guy A.; Vanduffel, Wim

    2012-01-01

    Evolution-driven functional changes in the primate brain are typically assessed by aligning monkey and human activation maps using cortical surface expansion models. These models use putative homologous areas as registration landmarks, assuming they are functionally correspondent. In cases where functional changes have occurred in an area, this assumption prohibits to reveal whether other areas may have assumed lost functions. Here we describe a method to examine functional correspondences across species. Without making spatial assumptions, we assess similarities in sensory-driven functional magnetic resonance imaging responses between monkey (Macaca mulatta) and human brain areas by means of temporal correlation. Using natural vision data, we reveal regions for which functional processing has shifted to topologically divergent locations during evolution. We conclude that substantial evolution-driven functional reorganizations have occurred, not always consistent with cortical expansion processes. This novel framework for evaluating changes in functional architecture is crucial to building more accurate evolutionary models. PMID:22306809

  4. Interspecies activity correlations reveal functional correspondence between monkey and human brain areas.

    PubMed

    Mantini, Dante; Hasson, Uri; Betti, Viviana; Perrucci, Mauro G; Romani, Gian Luca; Corbetta, Maurizio; Orban, Guy A; Vanduffel, Wim

    2012-02-05

    Evolution-driven functional changes in the primate brain are typically assessed by aligning monkey and human activation maps using cortical surface expansion models. These models use putative homologous areas as registration landmarks, assuming they are functionally correspondent. For cases in which functional changes have occurred in an area, this assumption prohibits to reveal whether other areas may have assumed lost functions. Here we describe a method to examine functional correspondences across species. Without making spatial assumptions, we assessed similarities in sensory-driven functional magnetic resonance imaging responses between monkey (Macaca mulatta) and human brain areas by temporal correlation. Using natural vision data, we revealed regions for which functional processing has shifted to topologically divergent locations during evolution. We conclude that substantial evolution-driven functional reorganizations have occurred, not always consistent with cortical expansion processes. This framework for evaluating changes in functional architecture is crucial to building more accurate evolutionary models.

  5. Nanoparticles for imaging and treating brain cancer

    PubMed Central

    Meyers, Joseph D; Doane, Tennyson; Burda, Clemens; Basilion, James P

    2013-01-01

    Brain cancer tumors cause disruption of the selective properties of vascular endothelia, even causing disruptions in the very selective blood–brain barrier, which are collectively referred to as the blood–brain–tumor barrier. Nanoparticles (NPs) have previously shown great promise in taking advantage of this increased vascular permeability in other cancers, which results in increased accumulation in these cancers over time due to the accompanying loss of an effective lymph system. NPs have therefore attracted increased attention for treating brain cancer. While this research is just beginning, there have been many successes demonstrated thus far in both the laboratory and clinical setting. This review serves to present the reader with an overview of NPs for treating brain cancer and to provide an outlook on what may come in the future. For NPs, just like the blood–brain–tumor barrier, the future is wide open. PMID:23256496

  6. Diffusion tensor imaging for understanding brain development in early life.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Anqi; Mori, Susumu; Miller, Michael I

    2015-01-03

    The human brain rapidly develops during the final weeks of gestation and in the first two years following birth. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is a unique in vivo imaging technique that allows three-dimensional visualization of the white matter anatomy in the brain. It has been considered to be a valuable tool for studying brain development in early life. In this review, we first introduce the DTI technique. We then review DTI findings on white matter development at the fetal stage and in infancy as well as DTI applications for understanding neurocognitive development and brain abnormalities in preterm infants. Finally, we discuss limitations of DTI and potential valuable imaging techniques for studying white matter myelination.

  7. Photoacoustic imaging for transvascular drug delivery to the rat brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Ryota; Sato, Shunichi; Tsunoi, Yasuyuki; Kawauchi, Satoko; Takemura, Toshiya; Terakawa, Mitsuhiro

    2015-03-01

    Transvascular drug delivery to the brain is difficult due to the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Thus, various methods for safely opening the BBB have been investigated, for which real-time imaging methods are desired both for the blood vessels and distribution of a drug. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging, which enables depth-resolved visualization of chromophores in tissue, would be useful for this purpose. In this study, we performed in vivo PA imaging of the blood vessels and distribution of a drug in the rat brain by using an originally developed compact PA imaging system with fiber-based illumination. As a test drug, Evans blue (EB) was injected to the tail vein, and a photomechanical wave was applied to the targeted brain tissue to increase the permeability of the blood vessel walls. For PA imaging of blood vessels and EB distribution, nanosecond pulses at 532 nm and 670 nm were used, respectively. We clearly visualized blood vessels with diameters larger than 50 μm and the distribution of EB in the brain, showing spatiotemporal characteristics of EB that was transvascularly delivered to the target tissue in the brain.

  8. Imaging Imageability: Behavioral Effects and Neural Correlates of Its Interaction with Affect and Context

    PubMed Central

    Westbury, Chris F.; Cribben, Ivor; Cummine, Jacqueline

    2016-01-01

    The construct of imageability refers to the extent to which a word evokes a tangible sensation. Previous research (Westbury et al., 2013) suggests that the behavioral effects attributed to a word's imageability can be largely or wholly explained by two objective constructs, contextual density and estimated affect. Here, we extend these previous findings in two ways. First, we show that closely matched stimuli on the three measures of contextual density, estimated affect, and human-judged imageability show a three-way interaction in explaining variance in LD RTs, but that imagebility accounts for no additional variance after contextual density and estimated affect are entered first. Secondly, we demonstrate that the loci and functional connectivity (via graphical models) of the brain regions implicated in processing the three variables during that task are largely over-lapping and similar. These two lines of evidence support the conclusion that the effect usually attributed to human-judged imageability is largely or entirely due to the effects of other correlated measures that are directly computable. PMID:27471455

  9. An evaluation of the left-brain vs. right-brain hypothesis with resting state functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Jared A; Zielinski, Brandon A; Ferguson, Michael A; Lainhart, Janet E; Anderson, Jeffrey S

    2013-01-01

    Lateralized brain regions subserve functions such as language and visuospatial processing. It has been conjectured that individuals may be left-brain dominant or right-brain dominant based on personality and cognitive style, but neuroimaging data has not provided clear evidence whether such phenotypic differences in the strength of left-dominant or right-dominant networks exist. We evaluated whether strongly lateralized connections covaried within the same individuals. Data were analyzed from publicly available resting state scans for 1011 individuals between the ages of 7 and 29. For each subject, functional lateralization was measured for each pair of 7266 regions covering the gray matter at 5-mm resolution as a difference in correlation before and after inverting images across the midsagittal plane. The difference in gray matter density between homotopic coordinates was used as a regressor to reduce the effect of structural asymmetries on functional lateralization. Nine left- and 11 right-lateralized hubs were identified as peaks in the degree map from the graph of significantly lateralized connections. The left-lateralized hubs included regions from the default mode network (medial prefrontal cortex, posterior cingulate cortex, and temporoparietal junction) and language regions (e.g., Broca Area and Wernicke Area), whereas the right-lateralized hubs included regions from the attention control network (e.g., lateral intraparietal sulcus, anterior insula, area MT, and frontal eye fields). Left- and right-lateralized hubs formed two separable networks of mutually lateralized regions. Connections involving only left- or only right-lateralized hubs showed positive correlation across subjects, but only for connections sharing a node. Lateralization of brain connections appears to be a local rather than global property of brain networks, and our data are not consistent with a whole-brain phenotype of greater "left-brained" or greater "right-brained" network strength

  10. Automated regional behavioral analysis for human brain images

    PubMed Central

    Lancaster, Jack L.; Laird, Angela R.; Eickhoff, Simon B.; Martinez, Michael J.; Fox, P. Mickle; Fox, Peter T.

    2012-01-01

    Behavioral categories of functional imaging experiments along with standardized brain coordinates of associated activations were used to develop a method to automate regional behavioral analysis of human brain images. Behavioral and coordinate data were taken from the BrainMap database (http://www.brainmap.org/), which documents over 20 years of published functional brain imaging studies. A brain region of interest (ROI) for behavioral analysis can be defined in functional images, anatomical images or brain atlases, if images are spatially normalized to MNI or Talairach standards. Results of behavioral analysis are presented for each of BrainMap's 51 behavioral sub-domains spanning five behavioral domains (Action, Cognition, Emotion, Interoception, and Perception). For each behavioral sub-domain the fraction of coordinates falling within the ROI was computed and compared with the fraction expected if coordinates for the behavior were not clustered, i.e., uniformly distributed. When the difference between these fractions is large behavioral association is indicated. A z-score ≥ 3.0 was used to designate statistically significant behavioral association. The left-right symmetry of ~100K activation foci was evaluated by hemisphere, lobe, and by behavioral sub-domain. Results highlighted the classic left-side dominance for language while asymmetry for most sub-domains (~75%) was not statistically significant. Use scenarios were presented for anatomical ROIs from the Harvard-Oxford cortical (HOC) brain atlas, functional ROIs from statistical parametric maps in a TMS-PET study, a task-based fMRI study, and ROIs from the ten “major representative” functional networks in a previously published resting state fMRI study. Statistically significant behavioral findings for these use scenarios were consistent with published behaviors for associated anatomical and functional regions. PMID:22973224

  11. Automated regional behavioral analysis for human brain images.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, Jack L; Laird, Angela R; Eickhoff, Simon B; Martinez, Michael J; Fox, P Mickle; Fox, Peter T

    2012-01-01

    Behavioral categories of functional imaging experiments along with standardized brain coordinates of associated activations were used to develop a method to automate regional behavioral analysis of human brain images. Behavioral and coordinate data were taken from the BrainMap database (http://www.brainmap.org/), which documents over 20 years of published functional brain imaging studies. A brain region of interest (ROI) for behavioral analysis can be defined in functional images, anatomical images or brain atlases, if images are spatially normalized to MNI or Talairach standards. Results of behavioral analysis are presented for each of BrainMap's 51 behavioral sub-domains spanning five behavioral domains (Action, Cognition, Emotion, Interoception, and Perception). For each behavioral sub-domain the fraction of coordinates falling within the ROI was computed and compared with the fraction expected if coordinates for the behavior were not clustered, i.e., uniformly distributed. When the difference between these fractions is large behavioral association is indicated. A z-score ≥ 3.0 was used to designate statistically significant behavioral association. The left-right symmetry of ~100K activation foci was evaluated by hemisphere, lobe, and by behavioral sub-domain. Results highlighted the classic left-side dominance for language while asymmetry for most sub-domains (~75%) was not statistically significant. Use scenarios were presented for anatomical ROIs from the Harvard-Oxford cortical (HOC) brain atlas, functional ROIs from statistical parametric maps in a TMS-PET study, a task-based fMRI study, and ROIs from the ten "major representative" functional networks in a previously published resting state fMRI study. Statistically significant behavioral findings for these use scenarios were consistent with published behaviors for associated anatomical and functional regions.

  12. A review of multivariate methods in brain imaging data fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui, Jing; Adali, Tülay; Li, Yi-Ou; Yang, Honghui; Calhoun, Vince D.

    2010-03-01

    On joint analysis of multi-task brain imaging data sets, a variety of multivariate methods have shown their strengths and been applied to achieve different purposes based on their respective assumptions. In this paper, we provide a comprehensive review on optimization assumptions of six data fusion models, including 1) four blind methods: joint independent component analysis (jICA), multimodal canonical correlation analysis (mCCA), CCA on blind source separation (sCCA) and partial least squares (PLS); 2) two semi-blind methods: parallel ICA and coefficient-constrained ICA (CC-ICA). We also propose a novel model for joint blind source separation (BSS) of two datasets using a combination of sCCA and jICA, i.e., 'CCA+ICA', which, compared with other joint BSS methods, can achieve higher decomposition accuracy as well as the correct automatic source link. Applications of the proposed model to real multitask fMRI data are compared to joint ICA and mCCA; CCA+ICA further shows its advantages in capturing both shared and distinct information, differentiating groups, and interpreting duration of illness in schizophrenia patients, hence promising applicability to a wide variety of medical imaging problems.

  13. Dissociations between behavioural and functional magnetic resonance imaging-based evaluations of cognitive function after brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Bardin, Jonathan C.; Fins, Joseph J.; Katz, Douglas I.; Hersh, Jennifer; Heier, Linda A.; Tabelow, Karsten; Dyke, Jonathan P.; Ballon, Douglas J.; Schiff, Nicholas D.

    2011-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging methods hold promise for the identification of cognitive function and communication capacity in some severely brain-injured patients who may not retain sufficient motor function to demonstrate their abilities. We studied seven severely brain-injured patients and a control group of 14 subjects using a novel hierarchical functional magnetic resonance imaging assessment utilizing mental imagery responses. Whereas the control group showed consistent and accurate (for communication) blood-oxygen-level-dependent responses without exception, the brain-injured subjects showed a wide variation in the correlation of blood-oxygen-level-dependent responses and overt behavioural responses. Specifically, the brain-injured subjects dissociated bedside and functional magnetic resonance imaging-based command following and communication capabilities. These observations reveal significant challenges in developing validated functional magnetic resonance imaging-based methods for clinical use and raise interesting questions about underlying brain function assayed using these methods in brain-injured subjects. PMID:21354974

  14. Dissociations between behavioural and functional magnetic resonance imaging-based evaluations of cognitive function after brain injury.

    PubMed

    Bardin, Jonathan C; Fins, Joseph J; Katz, Douglas I; Hersh, Jennifer; Heier, Linda A; Tabelow, Karsten; Dyke, Jonathan P; Ballon, Douglas J; Schiff, Nicholas D; Voss, Henning U

    2011-03-01

    Functional neuroimaging methods hold promise for the identification of cognitive function and communication capacity in some severely brain-injured patients who may not retain sufficient motor function to demonstrate their abilities. We studied seven severely brain-injured patients and a control group of 14 subjects using a novel hierarchical functional magnetic resonance imaging assessment utilizing mental imagery responses. Whereas the control group showed consistent and accurate (for communication) blood-oxygen-level-dependent responses without exception, the brain-injured subjects showed a wide variation in the correlation of blood-oxygen-level-dependent responses and overt behavioural responses. Specifically, the brain-injured subjects dissociated bedside and functional magnetic resonance imaging-based command following and communication capabilities. These observations reveal significant challenges in developing validated functional magnetic resonance imaging-based methods for clinical use and raise interesting questions about underlying brain function assayed using these methods in brain-injured subjects.

  15. Brain structure correlates of emotion-based rash impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Muhlert, N.; Lawrence, A.D.

    2015-01-01

    Negative urgency (the tendency to engage in rash, ill-considered action in response to intense negative emotions), is a personality trait that has been linked to problematic involvement in several risky and impulsive behaviours, and to various forms of disinhibitory psychopathology, but its neurobiological correlates are poorly understood. Here, we explored whether inter-individual variation in levels of trait negative urgency was associated with inter-individual variation in regional grey matter volumes. Using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) in a sample (n = 152) of healthy participants, we found that smaller volumes of the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex and right temporal pole, regions previously linked to emotion appraisal, emotion regulation and emotion-based decision-making, were associated with higher levels of trait negative urgency. When controlling for other impulsivity linked personality traits (sensation seeking, lack of planning/perseverance) and negative emotionality per se (neuroticism), these associations remained, and an additional relationship was found between higher levels of trait negative urgency and smaller volumes of the left ventral striatum. This latter finding mirrors recent VBM findings in an animal model of impulsivity. Our findings offer novel insight into the brain structure correlates of one key source of inter-individual differences in impulsivity. PMID:25957991

  16. Potential for photoacoustic imaging of the neonatal brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavakolian, Pantea; Kosik, Ivan; Chamson-Reig, Astrid; St. Lawrence, Keith; Carson, Jeffrey J. L.

    2013-03-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) has been proposed as a non-invasive technique for imaging neonatal brain injury. Since PAI combines many of the merits of both optical and ultrasound imaging, images with high contrast, high resolution, and a greater penetration depth can be obtained when compared to more traditional optical methods. However, due to the strong attenuation and reflection of photoacoustic pressure waves at the skull bone, PAI of the brain is much more challenging than traditional methods (e.g. near infrared spectroscopy) for optical interrogation of the neonatal brain. To evaluate the potential limits the skull places on 3D PAI of the neonatal brain, we constructed a neonatal skull phantom (1.4-mm thick) with a mixture of epoxy and titanium dioxide powder that provided acoustic insertion loss (1-5MHz) similar to human infant skull bone. The phantom was molded into a realistic infant skull shape by means of a CNCmachined mold that was based upon a 3D CAD model. To evaluate the effect of the skull bone on PAI, a photoacoustic point source was raster scanned within the phantom brain cavity to capture the imaging operator of the 3D PAI system (128 ultrasound transducers in a hemispherical arrangement) with and without the intervening skull phantom. The resultant imaging operators were compared to determine the effect of the skull layer on the PA signals in terms of amplitude loss and time delay.

  17. [Drainage of otogenic brain abscess under imaging guidance].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiwen; Sun, Yan; Zhang, Qingquan

    2015-10-01

    To investigate the methods and results of imaging guided puncture and drainage in the treatment of otogenic brain abscess. Reviewed and analyzed four cases of otogenic brain abscess treated by the technique of imaging guided puncture and drainage from May 2010 to October 2013, all of the four cases were male with age ranged from 21 years old to 59 years old, among whom three cases were under 25 years old. All patients had history of middle ear cholesteatoma and were found single brain abscess. Three cases were cerebrum abscess and one case was cerebellum abscess. The three cases with temporal lobe abscess received skull puncture drainage drilling, and one case with cerebellar abscess used the mastoid cavity puncture drainage. Four cases were punctured successfully in one time with the assistance of image navigation, 6-15 ml of pus was drainged out. After imaging showed pus cavity closure, middle ear surgery was performed to thoroughly remove cholesteatoma. The pus bacteria was cultured, which found three cases infected with staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus mitis and proteusbacillus vulgaris respectively. The imaging showed brain abscess closed after once puncture drainage, four cases were cured without complications. Postoperative follow-up of one year with good mastoid cavity epithelialization. Image guidance assisted puncture can drainage brain abscess with accurate positioning, less trauma, short operation time, and high safety, which could be choosen for otogenic abscess patient.

  18. Neurobiological basis of head motion in brain imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Ling-Li; Wang, Danhong; Fox, Michael D.; Sabuncu, Mert; Hu, Dewen; Ge, Manling; Buckner, Randy L.; Liu, Hesheng

    2014-01-01

    Individual differences in brain metrics, especially connectivity measured with functional MRI, can correlate with differences in motion during data collection. The assumption has been that motion causes artifactual differences in brain connectivity that must and can be corrected. Here we propose that differences in brain connectivity can also represent a neurobiological trait that predisposes to differences in motion. We support this possibility with an analysis of intra- versus intersubject differences in connectivity comparing high- to low-motion subgroups. Intersubject analysis identified a correlate of head motion consisting of reduced distant functional connectivity primarily in the default network in individuals with high head motion. Similar connectivity differences were not found in analysis of intrasubject data. Instead, this correlate of head motion was a stable property in individuals across time. These findings suggest that motion-associated differences in brain connectivity cannot fully be attributed to motion artifacts but rather also reflect individual variability in functional organization. PMID:24711399

  19. Can we evaluate cranial aneurysms on conventional brain magnetic resonance imaging?

    PubMed

    Caliskan, Emine; Pekcevik, Yeliz; Kaya, Adnan

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the contribution of conventional brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the determination of intracranial aneurysms. Brain MRI and computed tomography angiography (CTA) of 45 patients (29 women and 16 men; age range, 32-80 years) with aneurysm were analyzed. A comparison was made between brain MRI and CTA based on size and presence of aneurysm. The comparisons between MRI and CTA were investigated through Bland-Altman graphics, receiver operating characteristic curve, and Kappa statistics. Fifty-seven aneurysms were evaluated. Forty-five percent of 57 aneurysms on CTA were detected on conventional brain MRI. A significant correlation was found between CTA and brain MRI in the diagnosis of aneurysm (P < 0.05). In an analysis of the size measurement, a significant correlation was observed between CTA and brain MRI. Seventy-seven percent of aneurysms <4 mm was not detected and the efficiency of MRI in the detection of aneurysms <4 mm was found to be low. Aneurysms can also be appreciated on conventional brain MRI, and vascular structures should be reviewed carefully while analyzing brain MRI.

  20. Apoptotic markers in cultured fibroblasts correlate with brain metabolites and regional brain volume in antipsychotic-naive first-episode schizophrenia and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Batalla, A; Bargalló, N; Gassó, P; Molina, O; Pareto, D; Mas, S; Roca, J M; Bernardo, M; Lafuente, A; Parellada, E

    2015-08-25

    Cultured fibroblasts from first-episode schizophrenia patients (FES) have shown increased susceptibility to apoptosis, which may be related to glutamate dysfunction and progressive neuroanatomical changes. Here we determine whether apoptotic markers obtained from cultured fibroblasts in FES and controls correlate with changes in brain glutamate and N-acetylaspartate (NAA) and regional brain volumes. Eleven antipsychotic-naive FES and seven age- and gender-matched controls underwent 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging scanning. Glutamate plus glutamine (Glx) and NAA levels were measured in the anterior cingulate (AC) and the left thalamus (LT). Hallmarks of apoptotic susceptibility (caspase-3-baseline activity, phosphatidylserine externalization and chromatin condensation) were measured in fibroblast cultures obtained from skin biopsies after inducing apoptosis with staurosporine (STS) at doses of 0.25 and 0.5 μM. Apoptotic biomarkers were correlated to brain metabolites and regional brain volume. FES and controls showed a negative correlation in the AC between Glx levels and percentages of cells with condensed chromatin (CC) after both apoptosis inductions (STS 0.5 μM: r = -0.90; P = 0.001; STS 0.25 μM: r = -0.73; P = 0.003), and between NAA and cells with CC (STS 0.5 μM induction r = -0.76; P = 0.002; STS 0.25 μM r = -0.62; P = 0.01). In addition, we found a negative correlation between percentages of cells with CC and regional brain volume in the right supratemporal cortex and post-central region (STS 0.25 and 0.5 μM; P < 0.05 family-wise error corrected (FWEc)). We reveal for the first time that peripheral markers of apoptotic susceptibility may correlate with brain metabolites, Glx and NAA, and regional brain volume in FES and controls, which is consistent with the neuroprogressive theories around the onset of the schizophrenia illness.

  1. Algorithm for image fusion via gradient correlation and difference statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jing; Wang, Li-juan; Zhang, Yi; Bai, Lian-fa; Mao, Ningjie

    2016-10-01

    In order to overcome the shortcoming of traditional image fusion based on discrete wavelet transform (DWT), a novel image fusion algorithm based on gradient correlation and difference statistics is proposed in this paper. The source images are decomposed into low-frequency coefficients and high-frequency coefficients by DWT: the former are fused by a local gradient correlation based scheme to extract the local feature information in source images; the latter are fused by a neighbor difference statistics based scheme to reserve the conspicuous edge information. Finally, the fused image is reconstructed by inverse DWT. Experimental results show that the proposed method performs better than other methods in reserving details.

  2. Applications of nanotechnology to imaging and therapy of brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Mohs, Aaron M; Provenzale, James M

    2010-08-01

    In the past decade, numerous advances in the understanding of brain tumor physiology, tumor imaging, and tumor therapy have been attained. In some cases, these advances have resulted from refinements of pre-existing technologies (eg, improvements of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging). In other instances, advances have resulted from development of novel technologies. The development of nanomedicine (ie, applications of nanotechnology to the field of medicine) is an example of the latter. In this review, the authors explain the principles that underlay nanoparticle design and function as well as the means by which nanoparticles can be used for imaging and therapy of brain tumors.

  3. Cornelia de Lange syndrome: Correlation of brain MRI findings with behavioral assessment.

    PubMed

    Roshan Lal, Tamanna R; Kliewer, Mark A; Lopes, Thelma; Rebsamen, Susan L; O'Connor, Julia; Grados, Marco A; Kimball, Amy; Clemens, Julia; Kline, Antonie D

    2016-06-01

    Neurobehavioral and developmental issues with a broad range of deficits are prominent features of Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS), a disorder due to disruption of the cohesin protein complex. The etiologic relationship of these clinical findings to anatomic abnormalities on neuro-imaging studies has not, however, been established. Anatomic abnormalities in the brain and central nervous system specific to CdLS have been observed, including changes in the white matter, brainstem, and cerebellum. We hypothesize that location and severity of brain abnormalities correlate with clinical phenotype in CdLS, as seen in other developmental disorders. In this study, we retrospectively evaluated brain MRI studies of 15 individuals with CdLS and compared these findings to behavior at the time of the scan. Behavior was assessed using the Aberrant Behavior Checklist (ABC), a validated behavioral assessment tool with several clinical features. Ten of fifteen (67%) of CdLS patients had abnormal findings on brain MRI, including cerebral atrophy, white matter changes, cerebellar hypoplasia, and enlarged ventricles. Other findings included pituitary tumors or cysts, Chiari I malformation and gliosis. Abnormal behavioral scores in more than one behavioral area were seen in all but one patient. All 5 of the 15 (33%) patients with normal structural MRI studies had abnormal ABC scores. All normal ABC scores were noted in only one patient and this was correlated with moderately abnormal MRI changes. Although our cohort is small, our results suggest that abnormal behaviors can exist in individuals with CdLS in the setting of relatively normal structural brain findings. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Cornelia de Lange Syndrome: Correlation of Brain MRI Findings With Behavioral Assessment

    PubMed Central

    ROSHAN LAL, TAMANNA R.; KLIEWER, MARK A.; LOPES, THELMA; REBSAMEN, SUSAN L.; O’CONNOR, JULIA; GRADOS, MARCO A.; KIMBALL, AMY; CLEMENS, JULIA; KLINE, ANTONIE D.

    2017-01-01

    Neurobehavioral and developmental issues with a broad range of deficits are prominent features of Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS), a disorder due to disruption of the cohesin protein complex. The etiologic relationship of these clinical findings to anatomic abnormalities on neuro-imaging studies has not, however, been established. Anatomic abnormalities in the brain and central nervous system specific to CdLS have been observed, including changes in the white matter, brainstem, and cerebellum. We hypothesize that location and severity of brain abnormalities correlate with clinical phenotype in CdLS, as seen in other developmental disorders. In this study, we retrospectively evaluated brain MRI studies of 15 individuals with CdLS and compared these findings to behavior at the time of the scan. Behavior was assessed using the Aberrant Behavior Checklist (ABC), a validated behavioral assessment tool with several clinical features. Ten of fifteen (67%) of CdLS patients had abnormal findings on brain MRI, including cerebral atrophy, white matter changes, cerebellar hypoplasia, and enlarged ventricles. Other findings included pituitary tumors or cysts, Chiari I malformation and gliosis. Abnormal behavioral scores in more than one behavioral area were seen in all but one patient. All 5 of the 15 (33%) patients with normal structural MRI studies had abnormal ABC scores. All normal ABC scores were noted in only one patient and this was correlated with moderately abnormal MRI changes. Although our cohort is small, our results suggest that abnormal behaviors can exist in individuals with CdLS in the setting of relatively normal structural brain findings. PMID:27164360

  5. Super-resolution Imaging of Chemical Synapses in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Dani, Adish; Huang, Bo; Bergan, Joseph; Dulac, Catherine; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2010-01-01

    Determination of the molecular architecture of synapses requires nanoscopic image resolution and specific molecular recognition, a task that has so far defied many conventional imaging approaches. Here we present a super-resolution fluorescence imaging method to visualize the molecular architecture of synapses in the brain. Using multicolor, three-dimensional stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy, the distributions of synaptic proteins can be measured with nanometer precision. Furthermore, the wide-field, volumetric imaging method enables high-throughput, quantitative analysis of a large number of synapses from different brain regions. To demonstrate the capabilities of this approach, we have determined the organization of ten protein components of the presynaptic active zone and the postsynaptic density. Variations in synapse morphology, neurotransmitter receptor composition, and receptor distribution were observed both among synapses and across different brain regions. Combination with optogenetics further allowed molecular events associated with synaptic plasticity to be resolved at the single-synapse level. PMID:21144999

  6. Imaging modalities in mild traumatic brain injury and sports concussion.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Peter G; Walker, Matthew T

    2011-10-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury is a significant public health issue that has been gaining considerable attention over the past few years. After injury, a large percentage of patients experience postconcussive symptoms that affect work and school performance and that carry significant medicolegal implications. Conventional imaging modalities (computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging) are insensitive to microstructural changes and underestimate the degree of diffuse axonal injury and metabolic changes. Newer imaging techniques have attempted to better diagnose and characterize diffuse axonal injury and the metabolic and functional aspects of traumatic brain injury. The following review article summarizes the currently available imaging studies and describes the novel and more investigational techniques available for mild traumatic brain injury. A suggested algorithm is offered.

  7. Resting-state functional connectivity imaging of the mouse brain using photoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasiriavanaki, Mohammadreza; Xia, Jun; Wan, Hanlin; Bauer, Adam Q.; Culver, Joseph P.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-03-01

    Resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC) imaging is an emerging neuroimaging approach that aims to identify spontaneous cerebral hemodynamic fluctuations and their associated functional connections. Clinical studies have demonstrated that RSFC is altered in brain disorders such as stroke, Alzheimer's, autism, and epilepsy. However, conventional neuroimaging modalities cannot easily be applied to mice, the most widely used model species for human brain disease studies. For instance, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of mice requires a very high magnetic field to obtain a sufficient signal-to-noise ratio and spatial resolution. Functional connectivity mapping with optical intrinsic signal imaging (fcOIS) is an alternative method. Due to the diffusion of light in tissue, the spatial resolution of fcOIS is limited, and experiments have been performed using an exposed skull preparation. In this study, we show for the first time, the use of photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) to noninvasively image resting-state functional connectivity in the mouse brain, with a large field of view and a high spatial resolution. Bilateral correlations were observed in eight regions, as well as several subregions. These findings agreed well with the Paxinos mouse brain atlas. This study showed that PACT is a promising, non-invasive modality for small-animal functional brain imaging.

  8. Brain connectivity study of joint attention using frequency-domain optical imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhary, Ujwal; Zhu, Banghe; Godavarty, Anuradha

    2010-02-01

    Autism is a socio-communication brain development disorder. It is marked by degeneration in the ability to respond to joint attention skill task, from as early as 12 to 18 months of age. This trait is used to distinguish autistic from nonautistic populations. In this study, diffuse optical imaging is being used to study brain connectivity for the first time in response to joint attention experience in normal adults. The prefrontal region of the brain was non-invasively imaged using a frequency-domain based optical imager. The imaging studies were performed on 11 normal right-handed adults and optical measurements were acquired in response to joint-attention based video clips. While the intensity-based optical data provides information about the hemodynamic response of the underlying neural process, the time-dependent phase-based optical data has the potential to explicate the directional information on the activation of the brain. Thus brain connectivity studies are performed by computing covariance/correlations between spatial units using this frequency-domain based optical measurements. The preliminary results indicate that the extent of synchrony and directional variation in the pattern of activation varies in the left and right frontal cortex. The results have significant implication for research in neural pathways associated with autism that can be mapped using diffuse optical imaging tools in the future.

  9. Functional connectivity in the mouse brain imaged by B-mode photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasiriavanaki, Mohammadreza; Xing, Wenxin; Xia, Jun; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-03-01

    The increasing use of mouse models for human brain disease studies, coupled with the fact that existing functional imaging modalities cannot be easily applied to mice, presents an emerging need for a new functional imaging modality. Utilizing acoustic-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (AR-PAM), we imaged spontaneous cerebral hemodynamic fluctuations and their associated functional connections in the mouse brain. The images were acquired noninvasively in B-scan mode with a fast frame rate, a large field of view, and a high spatial resolution. At a location relative to the bregma 0, correlations were investigated inter-hemispherically between bilaterally homologous regions, as well as intra-hemispherically within the same functional regions. The functional connectivity in different functional regions was studied. The locations of these regions agreed well with the Paxinos mouse brain atlas. The functional connectivity map obtained in this study can then be used in the investigation of brain disorders such as stroke, Alzheimer's, schizophrenia, multiple sclerosis, autism, and epilepsy. Our experiments show that photoacoustic microscopy is capable to detect connectivities between different functional regions in B-scan mode, promising a powerful functional imaging modality for future brain research.

  10. Characterization of SEM speckle pattern marking and imaging distortion by digital image correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guery, Adrien; Latourte, Félix; Hild, François; Roux, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    Surface patterning by e-beam lithography and scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging distortions are studied via digital image correlation. The global distortions from the reference pattern, which has been numerically generated, are first quantified from a digital image correlation procedure between the (virtual) reference pattern and the actual SEM image both in secondary and backscattered electron imaging modes. These distortions result from both patterning and imaging techniques. These two contributions can be separated (without resorting to an external caliper) based on the images of the same patterned surface acquired at different orientations. Patterning distortions are much smaller than those due to imaging on wide field images.

  11. Impact of metal artefacts due to EEG electrodes in brain PET/CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Lemmens, Catherine; Montandon, Marie-Louise; Nuyts, Johan; Ratib, Osman; Dupont, Patrick; Zaidi, Habib

    2008-08-21

    The goal of this study is to investigate the impact of electroencephalogram (EEG) electrodes on the visual quality and quantification of (18)F-FDG PET images in neurological PET/CT examinations. For this purpose, the scans of 20 epilepsy patients with EEG monitoring were used. The CT data were reconstructed with filtered backprojection (FBP) and with a metal artefact reduction (MAR) algorithm. Both data sets were used for CT-based attenuation correction (AC) of the PET data. Also, a calculated AC (CALC) technique was considered. A volume of interest (VOI)-based analysis and a voxel-based quantitative analysis were performed to compare the different AC methods. Images were also evaluated visually by two observers. It was shown with simulations and phantom measurements that from the considered AC methods, the MAR-AC can be used as the reference in this setting. The visual assessment of PET images showed local hot spots outside the brain corresponding to the locations of the electrodes when using FBP-AC. In the brain, no abnormalities were observed. The quantitative analysis showed a very good correlation between PET-FBP-AC and PET-MAR-AC, with a statistically significant positive bias in the PET-FBP-AC images of about 5-7% in most brain voxels. There was also good correlation between PET-CALC-AC and PET-MAR-AC, but in the PET-CALC-AC images, regions with both a significant positive and negative bias were observed. EEG electrodes give rise to local hot spots outside the brain and a positive quantification bias in the brain. However, when diagnosis is made by mere visual assessment, the presence of EEG electrodes does not seem to alter the diagnosis. When quantification is performed, the bias becomes an issue especially when comparing brain images with and without EEG monitoring.

  12. Impact of metal artefacts due to EEG electrodes in brain PET/CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemmens, Catherine; Montandon, Marie-Louise; Nuyts, Johan; Ratib, Osman; Dupont, Patrick; Zaidi, Habib

    2008-08-01

    The goal of this study is to investigate the impact of electroencephalogram (EEG) electrodes on the visual quality and quantification of 18F-FDG PET images in neurological PET/CT examinations. For this purpose, the scans of 20 epilepsy patients with EEG monitoring were used. The CT data were reconstructed with filtered backprojection (FBP) and with a metal artefact reduction (MAR) algorithm. Both data sets were used for CT-based attenuation correction (AC) of the PET data. Also, a calculated AC (CALC) technique was considered. A volume of interest (VOI)-based analysis and a voxel-based quantitative analysis were performed to compare the different AC methods. Images were also evaluated visually by two observers. It was shown with simulations and phantom measurements that from the considered AC methods, the MAR-AC can be used as the reference in this setting. The visual assessment of PET images showed local hot spots outside the brain corresponding to the locations of the electrodes when using FBP-AC. In the brain, no abnormalities were observed. The quantitative analysis showed a very good correlation between PET-FBP-AC and PET-MAR-AC, with a statistically significant positive bias in the PET-FBP-AC images of about 5-7% in most brain voxels. There was also good correlation between PET-CALC-AC and PET-MAR-AC, but in the PET-CALC-AC images, regions with both a significant positive and negative bias were observed. EEG electrodes give rise to local hot spots outside the brain and a positive quantification bias in the brain. However, when diagnosis is made by mere visual assessment, the presence of EEG electrodes does not seem to alter the diagnosis. When quantification is performed, the bias becomes an issue especially when comparing brain images with and without EEG monitoring.

  13. BrainMap: A Database of Functional Neuroanatomy Derived from Human Brain Images

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-08-26

    medical imaging techniques such as PET and MRI. We have developed highly quantitative image analysis tools for PET which provide spatial localization of brain function in a standardized spatial frame (AC-PC reference frame). Database strategies have been developed to specifically address the needs of brain mapping. Most of our efforts during this quarter were devoted to the Macintosh version of BrainMap. Software development is proceeding in a timely fashion, and at present we see no major problems with completing this portion of the project on

  14. Serotonergic, brain volume and attentional correlates of trait anxiety in primates.

    PubMed

    Mikheenko, Yevheniia; Shiba, Yoshiro; Sawiak, Stephen; Braesicke, Katrin; Cockcroft, Gemma; Clarke, Hannah; Roberts, Angela C

    2015-05-01

    Trait anxiety is a risk factor for the development and maintenance of affective disorders, and insights into the underlying brain mechanisms are vital for improving treatment and prevention strategies. Translational studies in non-human primates, where targeted neurochemical and genetic manipulations can be made, are critical in view of their close neuroanatomical similarity to humans in brain regions implicated in trait anxiety. Thus, we characterised the serotonergic and regional brain volume correlates of trait-like anxiety in the marmoset monkey. Low- and high-anxious animals were identified by behavioral responses to a human intruder (HI) that are known to be sensitive to anxiolytic drug treatment. Extracellular serotonin levels within the amygdala were measured with in vivo microdialysis, at baseline and in response to challenge with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, citalopram. Regional brain volume was assessed by structural magnetic resonance imaging. Anxious individuals showed persistent, long-term fearful responses to both a HI and a model snake, alongside sustained attention (vigilance) to novel cues in a context associated with unpredictable threat. Neurally, high-anxious marmosets showed reduced amygdala serotonin levels, and smaller volumes in a closely connected prefrontal region, the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex. These findings highlight behavioral and neural similarities between trait-like anxiety in marmosets and humans, and set the stage for further investigation of the processes contributing to vulnerability and resilience to affective disorders.

  15. Serotonergic, Brain Volume and Attentional Correlates of Trait Anxiety in Primates

    PubMed Central

    Mikheenko, Yevheniia; Shiba, Yoshiro; Sawiak, Stephen; Braesicke, Katrin; Cockcroft, Gemma; Clarke, Hannah; Roberts, Angela C

    2015-01-01

    Trait anxiety is a risk factor for the development and maintenance of affective disorders, and insights into the underlying brain mechanisms are vital for improving treatment and prevention strategies. Translational studies in non-human primates, where targeted neurochemical and genetic manipulations can be made, are critical in view of their close neuroanatomical similarity to humans in brain regions implicated in trait anxiety. Thus, we characterised the serotonergic and regional brain volume correlates of trait-like anxiety in the marmoset monkey. Low- and high-anxious animals were identified by behavioral responses to a human intruder (HI) that are known to be sensitive to anxiolytic drug treatment. Extracellular serotonin levels within the amygdala were measured with in vivo microdialysis, at baseline and in response to challenge with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, citalopram. Regional brain volume was assessed by structural magnetic resonance imaging. Anxious individuals showed persistent, long-term fearful responses to both a HI and a model snake, alongside sustained attention (vigilance) to novel cues in a context associated with unpredictable threat. Neurally, high-anxious marmosets showed reduced amygdala serotonin levels, and smaller volumes in a closely connected prefrontal region, the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex. These findings highlight behavioral and neural similarities between trait-like anxiety in marmosets and humans, and set the stage for further investigation of the processes contributing to vulnerability and resilience to affective disorders. PMID:25586542

  16. Positive effects of neurofeedback on autism symptoms correlate with brain activation during imitation and observation.

    PubMed

    Datko, Michael; Pineda, Jaime A; Müller, Ralph-Axel

    2017-02-28

    Autism has been characterized by atypical task-related brain activation and functional connections, coinciding with deficits in sociocommunicative abilities. However, evidence of the brain's experience-dependent plasticity suggests that abnormal activity patterns may be reversed with treatment. In particular, neurofeedback training (NFT), an intervention based on operant conditioning resulting in self-regulation of brain electrical oscillations, has shown increasing promise in addressing abnormalities in brain function and behavior. We examined the effects of ≥ 20 h of sensorimotor mu-rhythm-based NFT in children with high-functioning autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and a matched control group of typically developing children (ages 8-17). During an functional magnetic resonance imaging imitation and observation task, the ASD group showed increased activation in regions of the human mirror neuron system following the NFT, as part of a significant interaction between group (ASD vs. controls) and training (pre- vs. post-training). These changes were positively correlated with behavioral improvements in the ASD participants, indicating that mu-rhythm NFT may be beneficial to individuals with ASD.

  17. Brain metabolic correlates of fatigue in Parkinson's disease: A PET study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Li, Tiannv; Yuan, Yongsheng; Tong, Qing; Jiang, Siming; Wang, Min; Wang, Jianwei; Ding, Jian; Xu, Qinrong; Zhang, Kezhong

    2017-09-18

    The neural bases of fatigue in Parkinson's disease (PD) remain uncertain. We aimed to assess the brain metabolic correlates of fatigue in patients with PD. Twenty-seven PD patients without clinically relevant depression (17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale [HAMD] score ≥ 14), apathy (Apathy Scale [AS] score ≥ 14) and excessive daytime somnolence (Epworth Sleepiness Scale [ESS] score ≥ 10) were evaluated with Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS). Each patient had an F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose PET (FDG-PET) scan. Motor symptoms were measured with the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) motor part. Levodopa equivalent daily dose (LEDD) for each patient was also calculated. The PET images were analyzed using statistical parametric mapping software. We introduced the age, educational level, HAMD scores, AS scores and ESS scores as covariates. High FSS scores were associated with brain hypermetabolism in areas including the right middle temporal gyrus (Brodmann area [BA] 37) and left middle occipital gyrus (BA 19). Increased FSS scores correlated with hypometabolism in regions such as the right precuneus (BA 23), left inferior frontal gyrus (BA 45) and left superior frontal gyrus (orbital part, BA 11). This study demonstrates that brain areas including frontal, temporal and parietal regions indicative of emotion, motivation and cognitive functions are involved in fatigue in PD patients.

  18. Brain Imaging and Brain Privacy: A Realistic Concern?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farah, Martha J.; Smith, M. Elizabeth; Gawuga, Cyrena; Lindsell, Dennis; Foster, Dean

    2009-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging has been used to study a wide array of psychological traits, including aspects of personality and intelligence. Progress in identifying the neural correlates of individual differences in such traits, for the sake of basic science, has moved us closer to the applied science goal of measuring them and thereby raised ethical…

  19. Brain Imaging and Brain Privacy: A Realistic Concern?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farah, Martha J.; Smith, M. Elizabeth; Gawuga, Cyrena; Lindsell, Dennis; Foster, Dean

    2009-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging has been used to study a wide array of psychological traits, including aspects of personality and intelligence. Progress in identifying the neural correlates of individual differences in such traits, for the sake of basic science, has moved us closer to the applied science goal of measuring them and thereby raised ethical…

  20. Look again: effects of brain images and mind-brain dualism on lay evaluations of research.

    PubMed

    Hook, Cayce J; Farah, Martha J

    2013-09-01

    Brain scans have frequently been credited with uniquely seductive and persuasive qualities, leading to claims that fMRI research receives a disproportionate share of public attention and funding. It has been suggested that functional brain images are fascinating because they contradict dualist beliefs regarding the relationship between the body and the mind. Although previous research has indicated that brain images can increase judgments of an article's scientific reasoning, the hypotheses that brain scans make research appear more interesting, surprising, or worthy of funding have not been tested. Neither has the relation between the allure of brain imaging and dualism. In the following three studies, laypersons rated both fictional research descriptions and real science news articles accompanied by brain scans, bar charts, or photographs. Across 988 participants, we found little evidence of neuroimaging's seductive allure or of its relation to self-professed dualistic beliefs. These results, taken together with other recent null findings, suggest that brain images are less powerful than has been argued.

  1. Imaging Live Bee Brains using Minimally-Invasive Diagnostic Radioentomology

    PubMed Central

    Greco, Mark K; Tong, Jenna; Soleimani, Manucher; Bell, Duncan; Schäfer, Marc O

    2012-01-01

    The sensitivity of the honey bee, Apis mellifera L. (Hymeonoptera: Apidae), brain volume and density to behavior (plasticity) makes it a great model for exploring the interactions between experience, behavior, and brain structure. Plasticity in the adult bee brain has been demonstrated in previous experiments. This experiment was conducted to identify the potentials and limitations of MicroCT (micro computed tomograpy) scanning “live” bees as a more comprehensive, non-invasive method for brain morphology and physiology. Bench-top and synchrotron MicroCT were used to scan live bees. For improved tissue differentiation, bees were fed and injected with radiographic contrast. Images of optic lobes, ocelli, antennal lobes, and mushroom bodies were visualized in 2D and 3D rendering modes. Scanning of live bees (for the first time) enabled minimally-invasive imaging of physiological processes such as passage of contrast from gut to haemolymph, and preliminary brain perfusion studies. The use of microCT scanning for studying insects (collectively termed ‘diagnostic radioentomology’, or DR) is increasing. Our results indicate that it is feasible to observe plasticity of the honey bee brain in vivo using diagnostic radioentomology, and that progressive, real-time observations of these changes can be followed in individual live bees. Limitations of live bee scanning, such as movement errors and poor tissue differentiation, were identified; however, there is great potential for in-vivo, non-invasive diagnostic radioentomology imaging of the honey bee for brain morphology and physiology. PMID:23421752

  2. Images of the brain: past as prologue

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1986-12-01

    The invention of the Anger scintillation camera and the development of /sup 99m/Tc tracers brought about a tenfold increase in nuclear brain scanning between 1963 and 1973, an increase that plateaued with the introduction of x-ray computed tomography. A second growth curve began in 1976 at which time there were four PET centers in the United States, a number that grew to 60 worldwide over the next decade. PET, SPECT, MRI, and MRS are leading us into a new era of in vivo brain chemistry, based on regional bioenergetics and neurotransmission. The immediate impact is in epilepsy, stroke, brain tumors and the dementias, with psychiatric diseases becoming a major focus of research. Receptivity has become a biochemical as well as a psychological approach to mental functions. The finding of elevated D2 dopamine receptors in schizophrenia in living patients may be the forerunner of a new biochemical approach to psychiatry.

  3. Compensation for non-uniform attenuation in SPECT brain imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Glick, S.J.; King, M.A.; Pan, T.S.

    1994-05-01

    Photon attenuation is a major limitation in performing quantitative SPECT brain imaging. A number of methods have been proposed for compensation of attenuation in regions of the body that can be modelled as a uniform attenuator. The magnitude of the errors introduced into reconstructed brain images by assuming the head to be a uniform attenuator are uncertain (the skull, sinus cavities and head holder all have different attenuation properties than brain tissue). Brain imaging is unique in that the radioisotope, for the most part, is taken up within a uniform attenuation medium (i.e., brain tissue) which is surrounded by bone (i.e., the skull) of a different density. Using this observation, Bellini`s method for attenuation compensation (which is an exact solution to the exponential Radon transform) has been modified to account for the different attenuation properties of the skull. To test this modified Bellini method, a simple mathematical phantom was designed to model the brain and a skull of varying thickness less than 7.5 mm. To model brain imaging with Tc-99m HMPAO, the attenuation coefficient of the brain tissue and skull were set to 0.15 cm{sup -1} and 0.22 cm{sup -1} respectively. A ray-driven projector which accounted for non-uniform attenuation was used to simulate projection data from 128 views. The detector response and scatter were not simulated. It was observed that reconstructions processed with uniform attenuation compensation (i.e., where it was assumed that the brain tissue and the skull had the same attenuation coefficient) provided errors of 6-20%, whereas those processed with the non-uniform Bellini algorithm were biased by only 0-5%.

  4. Recent Developments in Diffusion Tensor Imaging of Brain

    PubMed Central

    Parekh, Mansi Bharat; Gurjarpadhye, Abhijit Achyut; Manoukian, Martin A.C.; Dubnika, Arita; Rajadas, Jayakumar; Inayathullah, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has come to be known as a unique radiological imaging modality because of its ability to perform tomographic imaging of body without the use of any harmful ionizing radiation. The radiologists use MRI to gain insight into the anatomy of organs, including the brain, while biomedical researchers explore the modality to gain better understanding of the brain structure and function. However, due to limited resolution and contrast, the conventional MRI fails to show the brain microstructure. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) harnesses the power of conventional MRI to deduce the diffusion dynamics of water molecules within the tissue and indirectly create a three-dimensional sketch of the brain anatomy. DTI enables visualization of brain tissue microstructure, which is extremely helpful in understanding various neuropathologies and neurodegenerative disorders. In this review, we briefly discuss the background and operating principles of DTI, followed by current trends in DTI applications for biomedical and clinical investigation of various brain diseases and disorders. PMID:27077135

  5. IMAGING BRAIN ACTIVATION: SIMPLE PICTURES OF COMPLEX BIOLOGY

    PubMed Central

    Dienel, Gerald A.; Cruz, Nancy F.

    2009-01-01

    Elucidation of biochemical, physiological, and cellular contributions to metabolic images of brain is important for interpretation of images of brain activation and disease. Discordant brain images obtained with [14C]deoxyglucose (DG) and [1- or 6-14C]glucose were previously ascribed to increased glycolysis and rapid [14C]lactate release from tissue, but direct proof of [14C]lactate release from activated brain structures is lacking. Analysis of factors contributing to images of focal metabolic activity evoked by monotonic acoustic stimulation of conscious rats reveals that labeled metabolites of [1- or 6-14C]glucose are quickly released from activated cells due to decarboxylation reactions, spreading via gap junctions, and efflux via lactate transporters. Label release from activated tissue accounts for most of the additional [14C]glucose consumed during activation compared to rest. Metabolism of [3,4-14C]glucose generates about four times more [14C]lactate compared to 14CO2 in extracellular fluid suggesting that most lactate is not locally oxidized. In brain slices, direct assays of lactate uptake from extracellular fluid demonstrate that astrocytes have faster influx and higher transport capacity than neurons. Also, lactate transfer from a single astrocyte to other gap junction-coupled astrocytes exceeds astrocyte-to-neuron lactate shuttling. Astrocytes and neurons have excess capacities for glycolysis, and oxidative metabolism in both cell types rises during sensory stimulation. The energetics of brain activation is quite complex and the proportion of glucose consumed by astrocytes and neurons, lactate generation by either cell type, and the contributions of both cell types to brain images during brain activation are likely to vary with the stimulus paradigm and activated pathways. PMID:19076439

  6. Image guided constitutive modeling of the silicone brain phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puzrin, Alexander; Skrinjar, Oskar; Ozan, Cem; Kim, Sihyun; Mukundan, Srinivasan

    2005-04-01

    The goal of this work is to develop reliable constitutive models of the mechanical behavior of the in-vivo human brain tissue for applications in neurosurgery. We propose to define the mechanical properties of the brain tissue in-vivo, by taking the global MR or CT images of a brain response to ventriculostomy - the relief of the elevated intracranial pressure. 3D image analysis translates these images into displacement fields, which by using inverse analysis allow for the constitutive models of the brain tissue to be developed. We term this approach Image Guided Constitutive Modeling (IGCM). The presented paper demonstrates performance of the IGCM in the controlled environment: on the silicone brain phantoms closely simulating the in-vivo brain geometry, mechanical properties and boundary conditions. The phantom of the left hemisphere of human brain was cast using silicon gel. An inflatable rubber membrane was placed inside the phantom to model the lateral ventricle. The experiments were carried out in a specially designed setup in a CT scanner with submillimeter isotropic voxels. The non-communicative hydrocephalus and ventriculostomy were simulated by consequently inflating and deflating the internal rubber membrane. The obtained images were analyzed to derive displacement fields, meshed, and incorporated into ABAQUS. The subsequent Inverse Finite Element Analysis (based on Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm) allowed for optimization of the parameters of the Mooney-Rivlin non-linear elastic model for the phantom material. The calculated mechanical properties were consistent with those obtained from the element tests, providing justification for the future application of the IGCM to in-vivo brain tissue.

  7. Anatomical Brain Images Alone Can Accurately Diagnose Chronic Neuropsychiatric Illnesses

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Ravi; Staib, Lawrence H.; Laine, Andrew F.; Hao, Xuejun; Xu, Dongrong; Liu, Jun; Weissman, Myrna; Peterson, Bradley S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Diagnoses using imaging-based measures alone offer the hope of improving the accuracy of clinical diagnosis, thereby reducing the costs associated with incorrect treatments. Previous attempts to use brain imaging for diagnosis, however, have had only limited success in diagnosing patients who are independent of the samples used to derive the diagnostic algorithms. We aimed to develop a classification algorithm that can accurately diagnose chronic, well-characterized neuropsychiatric illness in single individuals, given the availability of sufficiently precise delineations of brain regions across several neural systems in anatomical MR images of the brain. Methods We have developed an automated method to diagnose individuals as having one of various neuropsychiatric illnesses using only anatomical MRI scans. The method employs a semi-supervised learning algorithm that discovers natural groupings of brains based on the spatial patterns of variation in the morphology of the cerebral cortex and other brain regions. We used split-half and leave-one-out cross-validation analyses in large MRI datasets to assess the reproducibility and diagnostic accuracy of those groupings. Results In MRI datasets from persons with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, Schizophrenia, Tourette Syndrome, Bipolar Disorder, or persons at high or low familial risk for Major Depressive Disorder, our method discriminated with high specificity and nearly perfect sensitivity the brains of persons who had one specific neuropsychiatric disorder from the brains of healthy participants and the brains of persons who had a different neuropsychiatric disorder. Conclusions Although the classification algorithm presupposes the availability of precisely delineated brain regions, our findings suggest that patterns of morphological variation across brain surfaces, extracted from MRI scans alone, can successfully diagnose the presence of chronic neuropsychiatric disorders. Extensions of these

  8. Molecular imaging of brain tumors with radiolabeled choline PET.

    PubMed

    Calabria, Ferdinando Franco; Barbarisi, Manlio; Gangemi, Vincenzo; Grillea, Giovanni; Cascini, Giuseppe Lucio

    2016-05-26

    Several positron emission tomography (PET) radiopharmaceuticals have been emerged in the last decade as feasible in the management of brain lesions, due to the low performance in this field of the 18F-fluoro-deoxyglucose (18F-FDG), for its high physiological gradient of distribution in the brain. Beyond its usefulness in prostate cancer imaging, the radiolabeled choline is becoming a promising tool in diagnosing benign and malignant lesions of the brain, due to a very low rate of distribution in normal white and grey matters. The aim of our review was to assess the real impact of the radiolabeled choline PET/CT in the management of brain benign lesions, brain tumors, and metastases. Furthermore, emphasis was given to the comparison between the radiolabeled choline and the other radiopharmaceuticals in this field. A literature review was performed. The radiolabeled choline is useful in the management of patients with suspected brain tumor relapse, especially in association with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), with caution regarding its intrinsic characteristic of non-tumor-specific tracer. For the same reason, it is not useful in the early evaluation of brain lesions. Similar results are reported for other radiopharmaceuticals. The inclusion of the head in the whole-body scans for somatic tumors is necessary to ensure metastases in the brain or choline-avid benign lesions.

  9. Quantitative MR Imaging of Brain Tissue and Brain Pathologies.

    PubMed

    Hattingen, E; Jurcoane, A; Nelles, M; Müller, A; Nöth, U; Mädler, B; Mürtz, P; Deichmann, R; Schild, H H

    2015-10-01

    Measurement of basic quantitative magnetic resonance (MR) parameters (e.g., relaxation times T1, T2*, T2 or respective rates R (1/T)) corrected for radiofrequency (RF) coil bias yields different conventional and new tissue contrasts as well as volumes for tissue segmentation. This approach also provides quantitative measures of microstructural and functional tissue changes. We herein demonstrate some prospects of quantitative MR imaging in neurological diagnostics and science.

  10. Compressive optical image watermarking using joint Fresnel transform correlator architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jun; Zhong, Ting; Dai, Xiaofang; Yang, Chanxia; Li, Rong; Tang, Zhilie

    2017-02-01

    A new optical image watermarking technique based on compressive sensing using joint Fresnel transform correlator architecture has been presented. A secret scene or image is first embedded into a host image to perform optical image watermarking by use of joint Fresnel transform correlator architecture. Then, the watermarked image is compressed to much smaller signal data using single-pixel compressive holographic imaging in optical domain. At the received terminal, the watermarked image is reconstructed well via compressive sensing theory and a specified holographic reconstruction algorithm. The preliminary numerical simulations show that it is effective and suitable for optical image security transmission in the coming absolutely optical network for the reason of the completely optical implementation and largely decreased holograms data volume.

  11. Adaptive Intuitionistic Fuzzy Enhancement of Brain Tumor MR Images

    PubMed Central

    Deng, He; Deng, Wankai; Sun, Xianping; Ye, Chaohui; Zhou, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Image enhancement techniques are able to improve the contrast and visual quality of magnetic resonance (MR) images. However, conventional methods cannot make up some deficiencies encountered by respective brain tumor MR imaging modes. In this paper, we propose an adaptive intuitionistic fuzzy sets-based scheme, called as AIFE, which takes information provided from different MR acquisitions and tries to enhance the normal and abnormal structural regions of the brain while displaying the enhanced results as a single image. The AIFE scheme firstly separates an input image into several sub images, then divides each sub image into object and background areas. After that, different novel fuzzification, hyperbolization and defuzzification operations are implemented on each object/background area, and finally an enhanced result is achieved via nonlinear fusion operators. The fuzzy implementations can be processed in parallel. Real data experiments demonstrate that the AIFE scheme is not only effectively useful to have information from images acquired with different MR sequences fused in a single image, but also has better enhancement performance when compared to conventional baseline algorithms. This indicates that the proposed AIFE scheme has potential for improving the detection and diagnosis of brain tumors. PMID:27786240

  12. Adaptive Intuitionistic Fuzzy Enhancement of Brain Tumor MR Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, He; Deng, Wankai; Sun, Xianping; Ye, Chaohui; Zhou, Xin

    2016-10-01

    Image enhancement techniques are able to improve the contrast and visual quality of magnetic resonance (MR) images. However, conventional methods cannot make up some deficiencies encountered by respective brain tumor MR imaging modes. In this paper, we propose an adaptive intuitionistic fuzzy sets-based scheme, called as AIFE, which takes information provided from different MR acquisitions and tries to enhance the normal and abnormal structural regions of the brain while displaying the enhanced results as a single image. The AIFE scheme firstly separates an input image into several sub images, then divides each sub image into object and background areas. After that, different novel fuzzification, hyperbolization and defuzzification operations are implemented on each object/background area, and finally an enhanced result is achieved via nonlinear fusion operators. The fuzzy implementations can be processed in parallel. Real data experiments demonstrate that the AIFE scheme is not only effectively useful to have information from images acquired with different MR sequences fused in a single image, but also has better enhancement performance when compared to conventional baseline algorithms. This indicates that the proposed AIFE scheme has potential for improving the detection and diagnosis of brain tumors.

  13. Adaptive Intuitionistic Fuzzy Enhancement of Brain Tumor MR Images.

    PubMed

    Deng, He; Deng, Wankai; Sun, Xianping; Ye, Chaohui; Zhou, Xin

    2016-10-27

    Image enhancement techniques are able to improve the contrast and visual quality of magnetic resonance (MR) images. However, conventional methods cannot make up some deficiencies encountered by respective brain tumor MR imaging modes. In this paper, we propose an adaptive intuitionistic fuzzy sets-based scheme, called as AIFE, which takes information provided from different MR acquisitions and tries to enhance the normal and abnormal structural regions of the brain while displaying the enhanced results as a single image. The AIFE scheme firstly separates an input image into several sub images, then divides each sub image into object and background areas. After that, different novel fuzzification, hyperbolization and defuzzification operations are implemented on each object/background area, and finally an enhanced result is achieved via nonlinear fusion operators. The fuzzy implementations can be processed in parallel. Real data experiments demonstrate that the AIFE scheme is not only effectively useful to have information from images acquired with different MR sequences fused in a single image, but also has better enhancement performance when compared to conventional baseline algorithms. This indicates that the proposed AIFE scheme has potential for improving the detection and diagnosis of brain tumors.

  14. Brain imaging research: does the science serve clinical practice?

    PubMed

    Wong, Dean F; Gründer, Gerhard; Brasic, James Robert

    2007-10-01

    Brain imaging represents a potent tool to characterize biomarkers, biological traits that are pathognomonic for specific neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders. Positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) are imaging techniques used to identify alterations in the density and distribution of neurotransmitters, neuroreceptors, and transporters in specific regions of the brains of people with these disorders. Brain imaging research currently facilitates the elucidation of dysfunction of dopamine, serotonin, acetylcholine, and other substances in people with Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, schizophrenia, alcoholism and other substance abuse disorders, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and the syndromes of restless legs, Lesch-Nyhan, Rett, and Tourette. Thus, brain imaging research offers great potential for the diagnosis, treatment, prevention, and cure of neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders. Brain imaging research also facilitates new drug development and helps establish therapeutic doses of novel drugs. In particular, studies of specific receptors, such as the dopamine D2 receptor, before and after the administration of doses of drugs that occupy these D2 receptors, provide the means to determine receptor occupancy. For example, an optimal dose of D2 antagonist antipsychotics produces occupancy of 65% to 80% of D2 receptors, while a greater dose carries a risk of extrapyramidal side effects.

  15. Optimal magnetic resonance imaging of the brain.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Ian

    2011-01-01

    Quality magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is complex and requires optimization of many technical factors. The most important factors are: magnet field and gradient strengths, coil selection, receiver bandwidth, field of view and image matrix size, number of excitations, slice thickness, image weighting and contrast, imaging planes and the direction of the phase, and frequency gradients. The ability to augment a standard MR study with additional sequences, and the need to ensure the completed study is comprehensive and robust must be balanced against the time the patient spends under anesthesia in the magnet.

  16. Biomarkers for Musculoskeletal Pain Conditions: Use of Brain Imaging and Machine Learning.

    PubMed

    Boissoneault, Jeff; Sevel, Landrew; Letzen, Janelle; Robinson, Michael; Staud, Roland

    2017-01-01

    Chronic musculoskeletal pain condition often shows poor correlations between tissue abnormalities and clinical pain. Therefore, classification of pain conditions like chronic low back pain, osteoarthritis, and fibromyalgia depends mostly on self report and less on objective findings like X-ray or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) changes. However, recent advances in structural and functional brain imaging have identified brain abnormalities in chronic pain conditions that can be used for illness classification. Because the analysis of complex and multivariate brain imaging data is challenging, machine learning techniques have been increasingly utilized for this purpose. The goal of machine learning is to train specific classifiers to best identify variables of interest on brain MRIs (i.e., biomarkers). This report describes classification techniques capable of separating MRI-based brain biomarkers of chronic pain patients from healthy controls with high accuracy (70-92%) using machine learning, as well as critical scientific, practical, and ethical considerations related to their potential clinical application. Although self-report remains the gold standard for pain assessment, machine learning may aid in the classification of chronic pain disorders like chronic back pain and fibromyalgia as well as provide mechanistic information regarding their neural correlates.

  17. The Visual Image in Mind and Brain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeki, Semir

    1992-01-01

    Describes the synchronized activities of specialized areas in the visual cortex responsible for the simultaneous process of seeing and understanding. Presents the anatomic and functional organization of the visual cortex in the human brain, implications drawn from the study of pathologies afflicting the visual cortex, identification of blindsight,…

  18. The Visual Image in Mind and Brain.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeki, Semir

    1992-01-01

    Describes the synchronized activities of specialized areas in the visual cortex responsible for the simultaneous process of seeing and understanding. Presents the anatomic and functional organization of the visual cortex in the human brain, implications drawn from the study of pathologies afflicting the visual cortex, identification of blindsight,…

  19. Intrinsic signal imaging of brain function using a small implantable CMOS imaging device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haruta, Makito; Sunaga, Yoshinori; Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Takehara, Hironari; Noda, Toshihiko; Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Tokuda, Takashi; Ohta, Jun

    2015-04-01

    A brain functional imaging technique over a long period is important to understand brain functions related to animal behavior. We have developed a small implantable CMOS imaging device for measuring brain activity in freely moving animals. This device is composed of a CMOS image sensor chip and LEDs for illumination. In this study, we demonstrated intrinsic signal imaging of blood flow using the device with a green LED light source at a peak wavelength of 535 nm, which corresponds to one of the absorption spectral peaks of blood cells. Brain activity increases regional blood flow. The device light weight of about 0.02 g makes it possible to stably measure brain activity through blood flow over a long period. The device has successfully measured the intrinsic signal related to sensory stimulation on the primary somatosensory cortex.